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Sample records for acidic tumor microenvironment

  1. Acidic tumor microenvironment and pH-sensing G protein-coupled receptors.

    PubMed

    Justus, Calvin R; Dong, Lixue; Yang, Li V

    2013-12-05

    The tumor microenvironment is acidic due to glycolytic cancer cell metabolism, hypoxia, and deficient blood perfusion. It is proposed that acidosis in the tumor microenvironment is an important stress factor and selection force for cancer cell somatic evolution. Acidic pH has pleiotropic effects on the proliferation, migration, invasion, metastasis, and therapeutic response of cancer cells and the function of immune cells, vascular cells, and other stromal cells. However, the molecular mechanisms by which cancer cells and stromal cells sense and respond to acidic pH in the tumor microenvironment are poorly understood. In this article the role of a family of pH-sensing G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) in tumor biology is reviewed. Recent studies show that the pH-sensing GPCRs, including GPR4, GPR65 (TDAG8), GPR68 (OGR1), and GPR132 (G2A), regulate cancer cell metastasis and proliferation, immune cell function, inflammation, and blood vessel formation. Activation of the proton-sensing GPCRs by acidosis transduces multiple downstream G protein signaling pathways. Since GPCRs are major drug targets, small molecule modulators of the pH-sensing GPCRs are being actively developed and evaluated. Research on the pH-sensing GPCRs will continue to provide important insights into the molecular interaction between tumor and its acidic microenvironment and may identify new targets for cancer therapy and chemoprevention.

  2. The altered glucose metabolism in tumor and a tumor acidic microenvironment associated with extracellular matrix metalloproteinase inducer and monocarboxylate transporters

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xiaofeng; Yu, Xiaozhou; Dai, Dong; Song, Xiuyu; Xu, Wengui

    2016-01-01

    Extracellular matrix metalloproteinase inducer, also knowns as cluster of differentiation 147 (CD147) or basigin, is a widely distributed cell surface glycoprotein that is involved in numerous physiological and pathological functions, especially in tumor invasion and metastasis. Monocarboxylate transporters (MCTs) catalyze the proton-linked transport of monocarboxylates such as L-lactate across the plasma membrane to preserve the intracellular pH and maintain cell homeostasis. As a chaperone to some MCT isoforms, CD147 overexpression significantly contributes to the metabolic transformation of tumor. This overexpression is characterized by accelerated aerobic glycolysis and lactate efflux, and it eventually provides the tumor cells with a metabolic advantage and an invasive phenotype in the acidic tumor microenvironment. This review highlights the roles of CD147 and MCTs in tumor cell metabolism and the associated molecular mechanisms. The regulation of CD147 and MCTs may prove to be with a therapeutic potential for tumors through the metabolic modification of the tumor microenvironment. PMID:27009812

  3. Targeting the tumor microenvironment

    PubMed Central

    Bournazou, Eirini; Bromberg, Jacqueline

    2013-01-01

    Persistent JAK-STAT3 signaling is implicated in many aspects of tumorigenesis. Apart from its tumor-intrinsic effects, STAT3 also exerts tumor-extrinsic effects, supporting tumor survival and metastasis. These involve the regulation of paracrine cytokine signaling, alterations in metastatic sites rendering these permissive for the growth of cancer cells and subversion of host immune responses to create an immunosuppressive environment. Targeting this signaling pathway is considered a novel promising therapeutic approach, especially in the context of tumor immunity. In this article, we will review to what extent JAK-STAT3-targeted therapies affect the tumor microenvironment and whether the observed effects underlie responsiveness to therapy. PMID:24058812

  4. Phenotypic changes of acid adapted cancer cells push them toward aggressiveness in their evolution in the tumor microenvironment.

    PubMed

    Damaghi, Mehdi; Gillies, Robert

    2016-09-16

    The inter- and intra-tumoral metabolic phenotypes of tumors are heterogeneous, and this is related to microenvironments that select for increased glycolysis. Increased glycolysis leads to decreased pH, and these local microenvironment effects lead to further selection. Hence, heterogeneity of phenotypes is an indirect consequence of altering microenvironments during carcinogenesis. In early stages of growth, tumors are stratified, with the most aggressive cells developing within the acidic interior of the tumor. However, these cells eventually find themselves at the tumor edge, where they invade into the normal tissue via acid-mediated invasion. We believe acid adaptation during the evolution of cancer cells in their niche is a Rubicon that, once crossed, allows cells to invade into and outcompete normal stromal tissue. In this study, we illustrate some acid-induced phenotypic changes due to acidosis resulting in more aggressiveness and invasiveness of cancer cells.

  5. Targeting the tumor microenvironment

    SciTech Connect

    Kenny, P.A.; Lee, G.Y.; Bissell, M.J.

    2006-11-07

    Despite some notable successes cancer remains, for the most part, a seemingly intractable problem. There is, however, a growing appreciation that targeting the tumor epithelium in isolation is not sufficient as there is an intricate mutually sustaining synergy between the tumor epithelial cells and their surrounding stroma. As the details of this dialogue emerge, new therapeutic targets have been proposed. The FDA has already approved drugs targeting microenvironmental components such as VEGF and aromatase and many more agents are in the pipeline. In this article, we describe some of the 'druggable' targets and processes within the tumor microenvironment and review the approaches being taken to disrupt these interactions.

  6. Caged [(18)F]FDG Glycosylamines for Imaging Acidic Tumor Microenvironments Using Positron Emission Tomography.

    PubMed

    Flavell, Robert R; Truillet, Charles; Regan, Melanie K; Ganguly, Tanushree; Blecha, Joseph E; Kurhanewicz, John; VanBrocklin, Henry F; Keshari, Kayvan R; Chang, Christopher J; Evans, Michael J; Wilson, David M

    2016-01-20

    Solid tumors are hypoxic with altered metabolism, resulting in secretion of acids into the extracellular matrix and lower relative pH, a feature associated with local invasion and metastasis. Therapeutic and diagnostic agents responsive to this microenvironment may improve tumor-specific delivery. Therefore, we pursued a general strategy whereby caged small-molecule drugs or imaging agents liberate their parent compounds in regions of low interstitial pH. In this manuscript, we present a new acid-labile prodrug method based on the glycosylamine linkage, and its application to a class of positron emission tomography (PET) imaging tracers, termed [(18)F]FDG amines. [(18)F]FDG amines operate via a proposed two-step mechanism, in which an acid-labile precursor decomposes to form the common radiotracer 2-deoxy-2-[(18)F]fluoro-d-glucose, which is subsequently accumulated by glucose avid cells. The rate of decomposition of [(18)F]FDG amines is tunable in a systematic fashion, tracking the pKa of the parent amine. In vivo, a 4-phenylbenzylamine [(18)F]FDG amine congener showed greater relative accumulation in tumors over benign tissue, which could be attenuated upon tumor alkalinization using previously validated models, including sodium bicarbonate treatment, or overexpression of carbonic anhydrase. This new class of PET tracer represents a viable approach for imaging acidic interstitial pH with potential for clinical translation.

  7. pH Titratable Superparamagnetic Iron Oxide for Improved Nanoparticle Accumulation in Acidic Tumor Microenvironments

    PubMed Central

    Crayton, Samuel H.; Tsourkas, Andrew

    2011-01-01

    A wide variety of nanoparticle platforms are being developed for the diagnosis and treatment of malignancy. While many of these are passively targeted or rely on receptor-ligand interactions, metabolically directed nanoparticles provide a complementary approach. It is known that both primary and secondary events in tumorigensis alter the metabolic profile of developing and metastatic cancers. One highly conserved metabolic phenotype is a state of up-regulated glycolysis and reduced use of oxidative phosphorylation, even when oxygen tension is not limiting. This metabolic shift, termed the Warburg effect, creates a “hostile” tumor microenvironment with increased levels of lactic acid and low extracellular pH. In order to exploit this phenomenon and improve the delivery of nanoparticle platforms to a wide variety of tumors, a pH-responsive iron oxide nanoparticle was designed. Specifically, glycol chitosan (GC), a water-soluble polymer with pH titratable charge, was conjugated to the surface of superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIO) to generate a T2*-weighted MR contrast agent that responds to alterations in its surrounding pH. Compared to control nanoparticles that lack pH sensitivity, these GC-SPIO nanoparticles demonstrated potent pH-dependent cellular association and MR contrast in vitro. In murine tumor models GC-SPIO also generated robust T2*-weighted contrast, which correlated with increased delivery of the agent to the tumor site, measured quantitatively by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. Importantly, the increased delivery of GC-SPIO nanoparticles cannot be solely attributed to the commonly observed enhanced permeability and retention effect, since these nanoparticles have similar physical properties and blood circulation times as control agents. PMID:22035454

  8. pH-sensitive oncolytic adenovirus hybrid targeting acidic tumor microenvironment and angiogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Joung-Woo; Jung, Soo-Jung; Kasala, Dayananda; Hwang, June Kyu; Hu, Jun; Bae, You Han; Yun, Chae-Ok

    2015-01-01

    Although oncolytic adenoviruses (Ads) are an attractive option for cancer gene therapy, the intravenous administration of naked Ad still encounters unfavorable host responses, non-specific interactions, and heterogeneity in targeted cancer cells. To overcome these obstacles and achieve specific targeting of the tumor microenvironment, Ad was coated with the pH-sensitive block copolymer, methoxy poly(ethylene glycol)-b-poly(l-histidine-co-l-phenylalanine) (PEGbPHF). The physicochemical properties of the generated nanocomplex, Ad/PEGbPHF, were assessed. At pH 6.4, GFP-expressing Ad/PEGbPHF induced significantly higher GFP expression than naked Ad in both coxsackie and adenovirus receptor (CAR)-positive and -negative cells. To assess the therapeutic efficacy of the Ad/PEGbPHF complex platform, an oncolytic Ad expressing VEGF promoter-targeting transcriptional repressor (KOX) was used to form complexes. At pH 6.4, KOX/PEGbPHF significantly suppressed VEGF gene expression, cancer cell migration, vessel sprouting, and cancer cell killing effect compared to naked KOX or KOX/PEGbPHF at pH 7.4, demonstrating that KOX/PEGbPHF can overcome the lack of CAR that is frequently observed in tumor tissues. The antitumor activity of KOX/PEGbPHF systemically administered to a tumor xenograft model was significantly higher than that of naked KOX. Furthermore, KOX/PEGbPHF showed lower hepatic toxicity and did not induce an innate immune response against Ad. Altogether, these results demonstrate that pH-sensitive polymer-coated Ad complex significantly increases net positive charge upon exposure to hypoxic tumor microenvironment, allowing passive targeting to the tumor tissue. It may offer superior potential for systemic therapy, due to its improved tumor selectivity, increased therapeutic efficacy, and lower toxicity compared to naked KOX. PMID:25575865

  9. pH-sensitive oncolytic adenovirus hybrid targeting acidic tumor microenvironment and angiogenesis.

    PubMed

    Choi, Joung-Woo; Jung, Soo-Jung; Kasala, Dayananda; Hwang, June Kyu; Hu, Jun; Bae, You Han; Yun, Chae-Ok

    2015-05-10

    Although oncolytic adenoviruses (Ads) are an attractive option for cancer gene therapy, the intravenous administration of naked Ad still encounters unfavorable host responses, non-specific interactions, and heterogeneity in targeted cancer cells. To overcome these obstacles and achieve specific targeting of the tumor microenvironment, Ad was coated with the pH-sensitive block copolymer, methoxy poly(ethylene glycol)-b-poly(l-histidine-co-l-phenylalanine) (PEGbPHF). The physicochemical properties of the generated nanocomplex, Ad/PEGbPHF, were assessed. At pH6.4, GFP-expressing Ad/PEGbPHF induced significantly higher GFP expression than naked Ad in both coxsackie and adenovirus receptor (CAR)-positive and -negative cells. To assess the therapeutic efficacy of the Ad/PEGbPHF complex platform, an oncolytic Ad expressing VEGF promoter-targeting transcriptional repressor (KOX) was used to form complexes. At pH6.4, KOX/PEGbPHF significantly suppressed VEGF gene expression, cancer cell migration, vessel sprouting, and cancer cell killing effect compared to naked KOX or KOX/PEGbPHF at pH7.4, demonstrating that KOX/PEGbPHF can overcome the lack of CAR that is frequently observed in tumor tissues. The antitumor activity of KOX/PEGbPHF systemically administered to a tumor xenograft model was significantly higher than that of naked KOX. Furthermore, KOX/PEGbPHF showed lower hepatic toxicity and did not induce an innate immune response against Ad. Altogether, these results demonstrate that pH-sensitive polymer-coated Ad complex significantly increases net positive charge upon exposure to hypoxic tumor microenvironment, allowing passive targeting to the tumor tissue. It may offer superior potential for systemic therapy, due to its improved tumor selectivity, increased therapeutic efficacy, and lower toxicity compared to naked KOX.

  10. A pH and thermosensitive choline phosphate-based delivery platform targeted to the acidic tumor microenvironment.

    PubMed

    Yu, Xifei; Yang, Xiaoqiang; Horte, Sonja; Kizhakkedathu, Jayachandran N; Brooks, Donald E

    2014-01-01

    Solid tumors generally exhibit an acidic microenvironment which has been recognized as a potential route to distinguishing tumor from normal tissue for purposes of drug delivery or imaging. To this end we describe a pH and temperature sensitive polymeric adhesive that can be derivatized to carry drugs or other agents and can be tuned synthetically to bind to tumor cells at pH 6.8 but not at pH 7.4 at 37 °C. The adhesive is based on the universal reaction between membrane phosphatidyl choline (PC) molecules and polymers derivatized with multiple copies of the inverse motif, choline phosphate (CP). The polymer family we use is a linear copolymer of a CP terminated tetraethoxymethacrylate and dimethylaminoethyl (DMAE) methacrylate, the latter providing pH sensitivity. The copolymer exhibits a lower critical solution temperature (LCST) just below 37 °C when the DMAE is uncharged at pH 7.4 but the LCST does not occur when the group is charged at pH 6.8 due to the ionization hydrophilicity. At 37 °C the polymer binds strongly to mammalian cells at pH 6.8 but does not bind at pH 7.4, potentially targeting tumor cells existing in an acidic microenvironment. We show the binding is strong, reversible if the pH is raised and is followed rapidly by cellular uptake of the fluorescently labeled material. Drug delivery utilizing this dually responsive family of polymers should provide a basis for targeting tumor cells with minimal side reactions against untransformed counterparts.

  11. Biological stoichiometry in tumor micro-environments.

    PubMed

    Kareva, Irina

    2013-01-01

    Tumors can be viewed as evolving ecological systems, in which heterogeneous populations of cancer cells compete with each other and somatic cells for space and nutrients within the ecosystem of the human body. According to the growth rate hypothesis (GRH), increased phosphorus availability in an ecosystem, such as the tumor micro-environment, may promote selection within the tumor for a more proliferative and thus potentially more malignant phenotype. The applicability of the GRH to tumor growth is evaluated using a mathematical model, which suggests that limiting phosphorus availability might promote intercellular competition within a tumor, and thereby delay disease progression. It is also shown that a tumor can respond differently to changes in its micro-environment depending on the initial distribution of clones within the tumor, regardless of its initial size. This suggests that composition of the tumor as a whole needs to be evaluated in order to maximize the efficacy of therapy.

  12. Tumor-Associated Macrophages and Neutrophils in Tumor Microenvironment

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jaehong; Bae, Jong-Sup

    2016-01-01

    Distinct tumor microenvironment forms in each progression step of cancer and has diverse capacities to induce both adverse and beneficial consequences for tumorigenesis. It is now known that immune cells can be activated to favor tumor growth and progression, most probably influenced by the tumor microenvironment. Tumor-associated macrophages and tumor-associated neutrophils can exert protumoral functions, enhancing tumor cell invasion and metastasis, angiogenesis, and extracellular matrix remodeling, while inhibiting the antitumoral immune surveillance. Considering that neutrophils in inflammatory environments recruit macrophages and that recruited macrophages affect neutrophil functions, there may be various degrees of interaction between tumor-associated macrophages and tumor-associated neutrophils. Platelets also play an important role in the recruitment and regulation of monocytic and granulocytic cells in the tumor tissues, suggesting that platelet function may be essential for generation of tumor-associated macrophages and tumor-associated neutrophils. In this review, we will explore the biology of tumor-associated macrophages and tumor-associated neutrophils and their possible interactions in the tumor microenvironment. Special attention will be given to the recruitment and activation of these tumor-associated cells and to the roles they play in maintenance of the tumor microenvironment and progression of tumors. PMID:26966341

  13. Analyzing the Tumor Microenvironment by Flow Cytometry.

    PubMed

    Young, Yoon Kow; Bolt, Alicia M; Ahn, Ryuhjin; Mann, Koren K

    2016-01-01

    Flow cytometry is an essential tool for studying the tumor microenvironment. It allows us to quickly quantify and identify multiple cell types in a heterogeneous sample. A brief overview of flow cytometry instrumentation and the appropriate considerations and steps in building a good flow cytometry staining panel are discussed. In addition, a lymphoid tissue and solid tumor leukocyte infiltrate flow cytometry staining protocol and an example of flow cytometry data analysis are presented.

  14. Lysyl Oxidase and the Tumor Microenvironment

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Tong-Hong; Hsia, Shih-Min; Shieh, Tzong-Ming

    2016-01-01

    The lysyl oxidase (LOX) family of oxidases contains a group of extracellular copper-dependent enzymes that catalyze the cross-linking of collagen and elastin by oxidation, thus maintaining the rigidity and structural stability of the extracellular matrix (ECM). Aberrant expression or activation of LOX alters the cellular microenvironment, leading to many diseases, including atherosclerosis, tissue fibrosis, and cancer. Recently, a number of studies have shown that LOX is overexpressed in most cancers and that it is involved in the regulation of tumor progression and metastasis. In contrast, a few reports have also indicated the tumor-suppressing role of LOX. In this short review, we discuss recent research on the correlations between LOX and cancer. Further, the role of LOX in tumor microenvironment remodeling, tumorigenesis, and metastasis and the underlying mechanisms have also been elucidated. PMID:28036074

  15. Probing the tumor microenvironment: collection and induction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, James K.; Padgen, Michael R.; Wang, Yarong; Entenberg, David; Gertler, Frank; Condeelis, John S.; Castracane, James

    2012-03-01

    The Nano Intravital Device, or NANIVID, is under development as an optically transparent, implantable tool to study the tumor microenvironment. Two etched glass substrates are sealed using a thin polymer membrane to create a reservoir with a single outlet. This reservoir is loaded with a hydrogel blend that contains growth factors or other chemicals to be delivered to the tumor microenvironment. When the device is implanted in the tumor, the hydrogel will swell and release these entrapped molecules, forming a gradient. Validation of the device has been performed in vitro using epidermal growth factor (EGF) and MenaINV, a highly invasive, rat mammary adenocarcinoma cell line. In both 2-D and 3-D environments, cells migrated toward the gradient of EGF released from the device. The chorioallantoic membrane (CAM) of White Leghorn chicken eggs is being utilized to grow xenograft tumors that will be used for ex vivo cell collection. Device optimization is being performed for in vivo use as a tool to collect the invasive cell population. Preliminary cell collection experiments in vivo were performed using a mouse model of breast cancer. As a second application, the device is being explored as a delivery vehicle for chemicals that induce controlled changes in the tumor microenvironment. H2O2 was loaded in the device and generated intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) in cells near the device outlet. In the future, other induction targets will be explored, including hypoglycemia and the manipulation of extracellular matrix stiffness.

  16. Effects of laser immunotherapy on tumor microenvironment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Acquaviva, Joseph T.; Wood, Ethan W.; Hasanjee, Aamr; Chen, Wei R.; Vaughan, Melville B.

    2014-02-01

    The microenvironments of tumors are involved in a complex and reciprocal dialog with surrounding cancer cells. Any novel treatment must consider the impact of the therapy on the microenvironment. Recently, clinical trials with laser immunotherapy (LIT) have proven to effectively treat patients with late-stage, metastatic breast cancer and melanoma. LIT is the synergistic combination of phototherapy (laser irradiation) and immunological stimulation. One prominent cell type found in the tumor stroma is the fibroblast. Fibroblast cells can secrete different growth factors and extracellular matrix modifying molecules. Furthermore, fibroblast cells found in the tumor stroma often express alpha smooth muscle actin. These particular fibroblasts are coined cancer-associated fibroblast cells (CAFs). CAFs are known to facilitate the malignant progression of tumors. A collagen lattice assay with human fibroblast cells is used to elucidate the effects LIT has on the microenvironment of tumors. Changes in the contraction of the lattice, the differentiation of the fibroblast cells, as well as the proliferation of the fibroblast cells will be determined.

  17. Immune suppressive mechanisms in the tumor microenvironment.

    PubMed

    Munn, David H; Bronte, Vincenzo

    2016-04-01

    Effective immunotherapy, whether by checkpoint blockade or adoptive cell therapy, is limited in most patients by a key barrier: the immunosuppressive tumor microenvironment. Suppression of tumor-specific T cells is orchestrated by the activity of a variety of stromal myeloid and lymphoid cells. These often display inducible suppressive mechanisms that are triggered by the same anti-tumor inflammatory response that the immunotherapy intends to create. Therefore, a more comprehensive understanding of how the immunosuppressive milieu develops and persists is critical in order to harness the full power of immunotherapy of cancer.

  18. Role of PTEN in the Tumor Microenvironment

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-06-01

    3Department of Molecular and Cellular Biochemistry , College of Medicine; 4Department of Veterinary Biosciences, College of Veterinary Medicine; 5Center...7Department of Biochemistry , Rosalind and Morris Goodman Cancer Center, 8McGill Center for Bioinformatics, 11Department of Oncology, McGill... Biochemistry Tumor Microenvironment Program The Ohio State University 810 Biomedical Research Tower 460 W. 12th Ave. Columbus, OH 43210 Telephone: 614

  19. Exploring the Tumor Microenvironment with Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Miao, Lei

    2016-01-01

    Recent developments in nanotechnology have brought new approaches to cancer diagnosis and therapy. While enhanced permeability and retention effect (EPR) promotes nanoparticle (NP) extravasation, the abnormal tumor vasculature, high interstitial pressure and dense stroma structure limit homogeneous intratumoral distribution of NP and compromise their imaging and therapeutic effect. Moreover, heterogeneous distribution of NP in nontumor-stroma cells damages the nontumor cells, and interferes with tumor-stroma crosstalk. This can lead to inhibition of tumor progression, but can also paradoxically induce acquired resistance and facilitate tumor cell proliferation and metastasis. Overall, the tumor microenvironment plays a crucial, yet controversial role in regulating NP distribution and their biological effects. In this review, we summarize recent studies on the stroma barriers for NP extravasation, and discuss the consequential effects of NP distribution in stroma cells. We also highlight design considerations to improve NP delivery and propose potential combinatory strategies to overcome acquired resistance induced by damaged stroma cells. PMID:25895870

  20. Diverse macrophages polarization in tumor microenvironment.

    PubMed

    Rhee, Inmoo

    2016-11-01

    Macrophages are traditional innate immune cells that play critical roles in the clearance of pathogens and the maintenance of tissue homeostasis. Accumulating evidence proves that macrophages affect cancer initiation and malignancy. Macrophages can be categorized into two extreme subsets, classically activated (M1) and alternatively activated (M2) macrophages based on their distinct functional abilities in response to microenvironmental stimuli. In a tumor microenvironment, tumor associated macrophages (TAMs) are considered to be of the polarized M2 phenotype that enhances tumor progression and represent a poor prognosis. Furthermore, TAMs enhance tumor angiogenesis, growth, metastasis, and immunosuppression by secreting a series of cytokines, chemokines, and proteases. The regulation of macrophage polarization is considered to be a potential future therapy for cancer management.

  1. The Tumor Microenvironment in Esophageal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Eric W.; Karakasheva, Tatiana A.; Hicks, Philip D.; Bass, Adam J.; Rustgi, Anil K.

    2016-01-01

    Esophageal cancer is a deadly disease, ranking sixth among all cancers in mortality. Despite incremental advances in diagnostics and therapeutics, esophageal cancer still carries a poor prognosis, and thus there remains a need to elucidate the molecular mechanisms underlying this disease. There is accumulating evidence that a comprehensive understanding of the molecular composition of esophageal cancer requires attention to not only tumor cells but also the tumor microenvironment, which contains diverse cell populations, signaling factors, and structural molecules that interact with tumor cells and support all stages of tumorigenesis. In esophageal cancer, environmental exposures can trigger chronic inflammation, which leads to constitutive activation of pro-inflammatory signaling pathways that promote survival and proliferation. Anti-tumor immunity is attenuated by cell populations such as myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) and regulatory T cells (Tregs), as well as immune checkpoints like programmed death-1 (PD-1). Other immune cells such as tumor-associated macrophages can have other pro-tumorigenic functions, including the induction of angiogenesis and tumor cell invasion. Cancer-associated fibroblasts secrete growth factors and alter the extracellular matrix (ECM) to create a tumor niche and enhance tumor cell migration and metastasis. Further study of how these TME components relate to the different stages of tumor progression in each esophageal cancer subtype will lead to development of novel and specific TME-targeting therapeutic strategies, which offer considerable potential especially in the setting of combination therapy. PMID:26923327

  2. Role of tumor microenvironment in tumorigenesis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Maonan; Zhao, Jingzhou; Zhang, Lishen; Wei, Fang; Lian, Yu; Wu, Yingfeng; Gong, Zhaojian; Zhang, Shanshan; Zhou, Jianda; Cao, Ke; Li, Xiayu; Xiong, Wei; Li, Guiyuan; Zeng, Zhaoyang; Guo, Can

    2017-01-01

    Tumorigenesis is a complex and dynamic process, consisting of three stages: initiation, progression, and metastasis. Tumors are encircled by extracellular matrix (ECM) and stromal cells, and the physiological state of the tumor microenvironment (TME) is closely connected to every step of tumorigenesis. Evidence suggests that the vital components of the TME are fibroblasts and myofibroblasts, neuroendocrine cells, adipose cells, immune and inflammatory cells, the blood and lymphatic vascular networks, and ECM. This manuscript, based on the current studies of the TME, offers a more comprehensive overview of the primary functions of each component of the TME in cancer initiation, progression, and invasion. The manuscript also includes primary therapeutic targeting markers for each player, which may be helpful in treating tumors. PMID:28382138

  3. Targeting the Metabolic Microenvironment of Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Bailey, Kate M.; Wojtkowiak, Jonathan W.; Hashim, Arig Ibrahim; Gillies, Robert J.

    2013-01-01

    The observation of aerobic glycolysis by tumor cells in 1924 by Otto Warburg, and subsequent innovation of imaging glucose uptake by tumors in patients with PET-CT has incited a renewed interest in the altered metabolism of tumors. As tumors grow in situ, a fraction of it is further away from their blood supply, leading to decreased oxygen concentrations (hypoxia), which induces the hypoxia response pathways of HIF1α, mTOR and UPR. In normal tissues, these responses mitigate hypoxic stress and induce neo-angiogenesis. In tumors, these pathways are dysregulated and lead to decreased perfusion and exacerbation of hypoxia as a result of immature and chaotic blood vessels. Hypoxia selects for a glycolytic phenotype and resultant acidification of the tumor microenvironment, facilitated by upregulation of proton transporters. Acidification selects for enhanced metastatic potential and reduced drug efficacy through ion trapping. In this review, we provide a comprehensive summary of pre-clinical and clinical drugs under development for targeting aerobic glycolysis, acidosis, hypoxia and hypoxia-response pathways. Hypoxia and acidosis can be manipulated, providing further therapeutic benefit for cancers that feature these common phenotypes. PMID:22959024

  4. Modeling the Spatiotemporal Evolution of the Melanoma Tumor Microenvironment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Signoriello, Alexandra; Bosenberg, Marcus; Shattuck, Mark; O'Hern, Corey

    The tumor microenvironment, which includes tumor cells, tumor-associated macrophages (TAM), cancer-associated fibroblasts, and endothelial cells, drives the formation and progression of melanoma tumors. Using quantitative analysis of in vivo confocal images of melanoma tumors in three spatial dimensions, we examine the physical properties of the melanoma tumor microenvironment, including the numbers of different cells types, cell size, and morphology. We also compute the nearest neighbor statistics and measure intermediate range spatial correlations between different cell types. We also calculate the step size distribution, mean-square displacement, and non-Gaussian parameter from the spatial trajectories of different cell types in the tumor microenvironment.

  5. Targeting Pancreatic Ductal Adenocarcinoma Acidic Microenvironment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cruz-Monserrate, Zobeida; Roland, Christina L.; Deng, Defeng; Arumugam, Thiruvengadam; Moshnikova, Anna; Andreev, Oleg A.; Reshetnyak, Yana K.; Logsdon, Craig D.

    2014-03-01

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) is the fourth leading cause of cancer death in the USA, accounting for ~40,000 deaths annually. The dismal prognosis for PDAC is largely due to its late diagnosis. Currently, the most sensitive diagnosis of PDAC requires invasive procedures, such as endoscopic ultrasonography, which has inherent risks and accuracy that is highly operator dependent. Here we took advantage of a general characteristic of solid tumors, the acidic microenvironment that is generated as a by-product of metabolism, to develop a novel approach of using pH (Low) Insertion Peptides (pHLIPs) for imaging of PDAC. We show that fluorescently labeled pHLIPs can localize and specifically detect PDAC in human xenografts as well as PDAC and PanIN lesions in genetically engineered mouse models. This novel approach may improve detection, differential diagnosis and staging of PDAC.

  6. Accelerated aging in the tumor microenvironment

    PubMed Central

    Martinez-Outschoorn, Ubaldo E; Pavlides, Stephanos; Whitaker-Menezes, Diana; Pestell, Richard G; Howell, Anthony

    2011-01-01

    Cancer is thought to be a disease associated with aging. Interestingly, normal aging is driven by the production of ROS and mitochondrial oxidative stress, resulting in the cumulative accumulation of DNA damage. Here, we discuss how ROS signaling, NFκB- and HIF1-activation in the tumor micro-environment induces a form of “accelerated aging,” which leads to stromal inflammation and changes in cancer cell metabolism. Thus, we present a unified model where aging (ROS), inflammation (NFκB) and cancer metabolism (HIF1), act as co-conspirators to drive autophagy (“self-eating”) in the tumor stroma. Then, autophagy in the tumor stroma provides high-energy “fuel” and the necessary chemical building blocks, for accelerated tumor growth and metastasis. Stromal ROS production acts as a “mutagenic motor” and allows cancer cells to buffer—at a distance—exactly how much of a mutagenic stimulus they receive, further driving tumor cell selection and evolution. Surviving cancer cells would be selected for the ability to induce ROS more effectively in stromal fibroblasts, so they could extract more nutrients from the stroma via autophagy. If lethal cancer is a disease of “accelerated host aging” in the tumor stroma, then cancer patients may benefit from therapy with powerful antioxidants. Antioxidant therapy should block the resulting DNA damage, and halt autophagy in the tumor stroma, effectively “cutting off the fuel supply” for cancer cells. These findings have important new implications for personalized cancer medicine, as they link aging, inflammation and cancer metabolism with novel strategies for more effective cancer diagnostics and therapeutics. PMID:21654190

  7. The Tumor Microenvironment Modulates Choline and Lipid Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Mori, Noriko; Wildes, Flonné; Takagi, Tomoyo; Glunde, Kristine; Bhujwalla, Zaver M.

    2016-01-01

    An increase of cellular phosphocholine (PC) and total choline (tCho)-containing compounds as well as alterations in lipids have been consistently observed in cancer cells and tissue. These metabolic changes are closely related to malignant transformation, invasion, and metastasis. The study of cancer cells in culture plays an important role in understanding mechanisms leading to altered choline (Cho) and lipid metabolism in cancer, as it provides a carefully controlled environment. However, a solid tumor is a complex system with a unique tumor microenvironment frequently containing hypoxic and acidic regions and areas of nutrient deprivation and necrosis. Cancer cell–stromal cell interactions and the extracellular matrix may also alter Cho and lipid metabolism. Human tumor xenograft models in mice are useful to mimic the growth of human cancers and provide insights into the influence of in vivo conditions on metabolism. Here, we have compared metabolites, obtained with high resolution 1H MRS of extracts from human breast and prostate cancer cells in a 2-dimensional (2D) monolayer culture and from solid tumor xenografts derived from these cells, as well as the protein expression of enzymes that regulate Cho and lipid metabolism. Our data demonstrate significant differences in Cho and lipid metabolism and protein expression patterns between human breast and prostate cancer cells in culture and in tumors derived from these cells. These data highlight the influence of the tumor microenvironment on Cho and lipid metabolism. PMID:28066718

  8. The effect of environmental chemicals on the tumor microenvironment

    PubMed Central

    Casey, Stephanie C.; Vaccari, Monica; Al-Mulla, Fahd; Al-Temaimi, Rabeah; Amedei, Amedeo; Barcellos-Hoff, Mary Helen; Brown, Dustin G.; Chapellier, Marion; Christopher, Joseph; Curran, Colleen S.; Forte, Stefano; Hamid, Roslida A.; Heneberg, Petr; Koch, Daniel C.; Krishnakumar, P.K.; Laconi, Ezio; Maguer-Satta, Veronique; Marongiu, Fabio; Memeo, Lorenzo; Mondello, Chiara; Raju, Jayadev; Roman, Jesse; Roy, Rabindra; Ryan, Elizabeth P.; Ryeom, Sandra; Salem, Hosni K.; Scovassi, A.Ivana; Singh, Neetu; Soucek, Laura; Vermeulen, Louis; Whitfield, Jonathan R.; Woodrick, Jordan; Colacci, Anna Maria; Bisson, William H.; Felsher, Dean W.

    2015-01-01

    Potentially carcinogenic compounds may cause cancer through direct DNA damage or through indirect cellular or physiological effects. To study possible carcinogens, the fields of endocrinology, genetics, epigenetics, medicine, environmental health, toxicology, pharmacology and oncology must be considered. Disruptive chemicals may also contribute to multiple stages of tumor development through effects on the tumor microenvironment. In turn, the tumor microenvironment consists of a complex interaction among blood vessels that feed the tumor, the extracellular matrix that provides structural and biochemical support, signaling molecules that send messages and soluble factors such as cytokines. The tumor microenvironment also consists of many host cellular effectors including multipotent stromal cells/mesenchymal stem cells, fibroblasts, endothelial cell precursors, antigen-presenting cells, lymphocytes and innate immune cells. Carcinogens can influence the tumor microenvironment through effects on epithelial cells, the most common origin of cancer, as well as on stromal cells, extracellular matrix components and immune cells. Here, we review how environmental exposures can perturb the tumor microenvironment. We suggest a role for disrupting chemicals such as nickel chloride, Bisphenol A, butyltins, methylmercury and paraquat as well as more traditional carcinogens, such as radiation, and pharmaceuticals, such as diabetes medications, in the disruption of the tumor microenvironment. Further studies interrogating the role of chemicals and their mixtures in dose-dependent effects on the tumor microenvironment could have important general mechanistic implications for the etiology and prevention of tumorigenesis. PMID:26106136

  9. The First Tianjin, China Forum on Tumor Microenvironment

    PubMed Central

    Keller, Evan T.; Li, Lu-Yuan

    2010-01-01

    Although it is well recognized that the tumor microenvironment plays a key role in regulating tumor progression the mechanisms through which this occurs need to be defined. Current international research activities towards defining the role of the tumor microenvironment in cancer progression were the subject of the 1st Tianjin Forum on Tumor Microenvironment held at Nankai University in Tianjin, China, July 2 to 4, 2010. The importance of variety of processes, such as inflammation and angiogenesis, in the role of tumor progression were described for multiple tumor types including breast, prostate, and hepatic cancers as well as the process of bone metastasis. Identification of novel signaling pathways that impact both angiogenesis and bone remodeling were presented. Several themes emerged from this meeting including that (1) tumor cells modify the microenvironment to enhance their own survival and progression; (2) targeting host factors, in addition to targeting tumor cells, will have important therapeutic effects; and (3) host cells distribution within the tumor has both prognostic and therapeutic significance. Several priorities for future research were defined including use of a systems biology approach to define the role of host factors in tumor progression; defining the importance of targeting both arms of the bone remodeling process for therapy of bone metastasis and determining how different cell subsets contribute to microenvironment-mediated regulation of tumor progression. PMID:21224351

  10. Cellular microenvironment modulates the galvanotaxis of brain tumor initiating cells.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yu-Ja; Hoffmann, Gwendolyn; Wheeler, Benjamin; Schiapparelli, Paula; Quinones-Hinojosa, Alfredo; Searson, Peter

    2016-02-22

    Galvanotaxis is a complex process that represents the collective outcome of various contributing mechanisms, including asymmetric ion influxes, preferential activation of voltage-gated channels, and electrophoretic redistribution of membrane components. While a large number of studies have focused on various up- and downstream signaling pathways, little is known about how the surrounding microenvironment may interact and contribute to the directional response. Using a customized galvanotaxis chip capable of carrying out experiments in both two- and three-dimensional microenvironments, we show that cell-extracellular matrix (ECM) interactions modulate the galvanotaxis of brain tumor initiating cells (BTICs). Five different BTICs across three different glioblastoma subtypes were examined and shown to all migrate toward the anode in the presence of a direct-current electric field (dcEF) when cultured on a poly-L-ornithine/laminin coated surface, while the fetal-derived neural progenitor cells (fNPCs) migrated toward the cathode. Interestingly, when embedded in a 3D ECM composed of hyaluronic acid and collagen, BTICs exhibited opposite directional response and migrated toward the cathode. Pharmacological inhibition against a panel of key molecules involved in galvanotaxis further revealed the mechanistic differences between 2- and 3D galvanotaxis in BTICs. Both myosin II and phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K) were found to hold strikingly different roles in different microenvironments.

  11. Targeting tumor microenvironment: crossing tumor interstitial fluid by multifunctional nanomedicines

    PubMed Central

    Omidi, Yadollah; Barar, Jaleh

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: The genesis of cancer appears to be a complex matter, which is not simply based upon few genetic abnormalities/alteration. In fact, irregular microvasculature and aberrant interstitium of solid tumors impose significant pathophysiologic barrier functions against cancer treatment modalities, hence novel strategies should holistically target bioelements of tumor microenvironment (TME). In this study, we provide some overview and insights on TME and important strategies used to control the impacts of such pathophysiologic barriers. Methods: We reviewed all relevant literature for the impacts of tumor interstitium and microvasculature within the TME as well as the significance of the implemented strategies. Results: While tumorigenesis initiation seems to be in close relation with an emergence of hypoxia and alterations in epigenetic/genetic materials, large panoplies of molecular events emerge as intricate networks during oncogenesis to form unique lenient TME in favor of tumor progression. Within such irregular interstitium, immune system displays defective surveillance functionalities against malignant cells. Solid tumors show multifacial traits with coadaptation and self-regulation potentials, which bestow profound resistance against the currently used conventional chemotherapy and immunotherapy agents that target solely one face of the disease. Conclusion: The cancerous cells attain unique abilities to form its permissive microenvironment, wherein (a) extracellular pH is dysregulated towards acidification, (b) extracellular matrix (ECM) is deformed, (c) stromal cells are cooperative with cancer cells, (d) immune system mechanisms are defective, (e) non-integrated irregular microvasculature with pores (120-1200 nm) are formed, and (h) interstitial fluid pressure is high. All these phenomena are against cancer treatment modalities. As a result, to control such abnormal pathophysiologic traits, novel cancer therapy strategies need to be devised using

  12. Macrophages in Tumor Microenvironments and the Progression of Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Hao, Ning-Bo; Lü, Mu-Han; Fan, Ya-Han; Cao, Ya-Ling; Zhang, Zhi-Ren; Yang, Shi-Ming

    2012-01-01

    Macrophages are widely distributed innate immune cells that play indispensable roles in the innate and adaptive immune response to pathogens and in-tissue homeostasis. Macrophages can be activated by a variety of stimuli and polarized to functionally different phenotypes. Two distinct subsets of macrophages have been proposed, including classically activated (M1) and alternatively activated (M2) macrophages. M1 macrophages express a series of proinflammatory cytokines, chemokines, and effector molecules, such as IL-12, IL-23, TNF-α, iNOS and MHCI/II. In contrast, M2 macrophages express a wide array of anti-inflammatory molecules, such as IL-10, TGF-β, and arginase1. In most tumors, the infiltrated macrophages are considered to be of the M2 phenotype, which provides an immunosuppressive microenvironment for tumor growth. Furthermore, tumor-associated macrophages secrete many cytokines, chemokines, and proteases, which promote tumor angiogenesis, growth, metastasis, and immunosuppression. Recently, it was also found that tumor-associated macrophages interact with cancer stem cells. This interaction leads to tumorigenesis, metastasis, and drug resistance. So mediating macrophage to resist tumors is considered to be potential therapy. PMID:22778768

  13. Tumor microenvironment-associated modifications of alternative splicing.

    PubMed

    Brosseau, Jean-Philippe; Lucier, Jean-François; Nwilati, Hanad; Thibault, Philippe; Garneau, Daniel; Gendron, Daniel; Durand, Mathieu; Couture, Sonia; Lapointe, Elvy; Prinos, Panagiotis; Klinck, Roscoe; Perreault, Jean-Pierre; Chabot, Benoit; Abou-Elela, Sherif

    2014-02-01

    Pre-mRNA alternative splicing is modified in cancer, but the origin and specificity of these changes remain unclear. Here, we probed ovarian tumors to identify cancer-associated splicing isoforms and define the mechanism by which splicing is modified in cancer cells. Using high-throughput quantitative PCR, we monitored the expression of splice variants in laser-dissected tissues from ovarian tumors. Surprisingly, changes in alternative splicing were not limited to the tumor tissues but were also found in the tumor microenvironment. Changes in the tumor-associated splicing events were found to be regulated by splicing factors that are differentially expressed in cancer tissues. Overall, ∼20% of the alternative splicing events affected by the down-regulation of the splicing factors QKI and RBFOX2 were altered in the microenvironment of ovarian tumors. Together, our results indicate that the tumor microenvironment undergoes specific changes in alternative splicing orchestrated by a limited number of splicing factors.

  14. Metabolic Hallmarks of Tumor and Immune Cells in the Tumor Microenvironment

    PubMed Central

    Renner, Kathrin; Singer, Katrin; Koehl, Gudrun E.; Geissler, Edward K.; Peter, Katrin; Siska, Peter J.; Kreutz, Marina

    2017-01-01

    Cytotoxic T lymphocytes and NK cells play an important role in eliminating malignant tumor cells and the number and activity of tumor-infiltrating T cells represent a good marker for tumor prognosis. Based on these findings, immunotherapy, e.g., checkpoint blockade, has received considerable attention during the last couple of years. However, for the majority of patients, immune control of their tumors is gray theory as malignant cells use effective mechanisms to outsmart the immune system. Increasing evidence suggests that changes in tumor metabolism not only ensure an effective energy supply and generation of building blocks for tumor growth but also contribute to inhibition of the antitumor response. Immunosuppression in the tumor microenvironment is often based on the mutual metabolic requirements of immune cells and tumor cells. Cytotoxic T and NK cell activation leads to an increased demand for glucose and amino acids, a well-known feature shown by tumor cells. These close metabolic interdependencies result in metabolic competition, limiting the proliferation, and effector functions of tumor-specific immune cells. Moreover, not only nutrient restriction but also tumor-driven shifts in metabolite abundance and accumulation of metabolic waste products (e.g., lactate) lead to local immunosuppression, thereby facilitating tumor progression and metastasis. In this review, we describe the metabolic interplay between immune cells and tumor cells and discuss tumor cell metabolism as a target structure for cancer therapy. Metabolic (re)education of tumor cells is not only an approach to kill tumor cells directly but could overcome metabolic immunosuppression in the tumor microenvironment and thereby facilitate immunotherapy. PMID:28337200

  15. Metabolic Hallmarks of Tumor and Immune Cells in the Tumor Microenvironment.

    PubMed

    Renner, Kathrin; Singer, Katrin; Koehl, Gudrun E; Geissler, Edward K; Peter, Katrin; Siska, Peter J; Kreutz, Marina

    2017-01-01

    Cytotoxic T lymphocytes and NK cells play an important role in eliminating malignant tumor cells and the number and activity of tumor-infiltrating T cells represent a good marker for tumor prognosis. Based on these findings, immunotherapy, e.g., checkpoint blockade, has received considerable attention during the last couple of years. However, for the majority of patients, immune control of their tumors is gray theory as malignant cells use effective mechanisms to outsmart the immune system. Increasing evidence suggests that changes in tumor metabolism not only ensure an effective energy supply and generation of building blocks for tumor growth but also contribute to inhibition of the antitumor response. Immunosuppression in the tumor microenvironment is often based on the mutual metabolic requirements of immune cells and tumor cells. Cytotoxic T and NK cell activation leads to an increased demand for glucose and amino acids, a well-known feature shown by tumor cells. These close metabolic interdependencies result in metabolic competition, limiting the proliferation, and effector functions of tumor-specific immune cells. Moreover, not only nutrient restriction but also tumor-driven shifts in metabolite abundance and accumulation of metabolic waste products (e.g., lactate) lead to local immunosuppression, thereby facilitating tumor progression and metastasis. In this review, we describe the metabolic interplay between immune cells and tumor cells and discuss tumor cell metabolism as a target structure for cancer therapy. Metabolic (re)education of tumor cells is not only an approach to kill tumor cells directly but could overcome metabolic immunosuppression in the tumor microenvironment and thereby facilitate immunotherapy.

  16. Studies of the Tumor Microenvironment in Pathogenesis of Neuroblastoma

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-07-01

    of Neuroblastoma PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Shahab Asgharzadeh, M D CONTRACTING ORGANIZATION: Children’s Hospital Los Angeles Los Angeles...2012 - 30 June 2013 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Studies of the Tumor Microenvironment in Pathogenesis of Neuroblastoma 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b...NOTES 14. ABSTRACT The NBL-Tag neuroblastoma tumors were assessed for presence of macrophages and their role in promoting tumor growth

  17. Nanomedicine as a potent strategy in melanoma tumor microenvironment.

    PubMed

    Pautu, Vincent; Leonetti, Daniela; Lepeltier, Elise; Clere, Nicolas; Passirani, Catherine

    2017-02-20

    Melanoma originated from melanocytes is the most aggressive type of skin cancer. Despite considerable progresses in clinical treatment with the discovery of BRAF or MEK inhibitors and monoclonal antibodies, the durability of response to treatment is often limited to the development of acquired resistance and systemic toxicity. The limited success of conventional treatment highlights the importance of understanding the role of melanoma tumor microenvironment in tumor developement and drug resistance. Nanoparticles represent a promising strategy for the development of new cancer treatments able to improve the bioavailability of drugs and increase their penetration by targeting specifically tumors cells and/or tumor environment. In this review, we will discuss the main influence of tumor microenvironment in melanoma growth and treatment outcome. Furthermore, third generation loaded nanotechnologies represent an exciting tool for detection, treatment, and escape from possible mechanism of resistance mediated by tumor microenvironment, and will be highlighted in this review.

  18. microRNA-mediated regulation of the tumor microenvironment

    PubMed Central

    Chou, Jonathan; Shahi, Payam; Werb, Zena

    2013-01-01

    The tumor microenvironment includes cells such as fibroblasts, immune cells, endothelial cells, as well as extracellular matrix (ECM), proteases, and cytokines. Together, these components participate in a complex crosstalk with neoplastic tumor cells that affects growth, angiogenesis, and metastasis. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small, non-coding RNAs involved in post-transcriptional regulation of gene expression and have recently emerged as important players involved in regulating multiple aspects of cancer biology and the tumor microenvironment. Differential miRNA expression in both the epithelial and stromal compartments of tumors compared with normal tissue suggests that miRNAs are important drivers of tumorigenesis and metastasis. This review article summarizes our current understanding of the diverse roles of miRNAs involved in tumor microenvironment regulation and underscores the importance of miRNAs within multiple cell types that contribute to the hallmarks of cancer. PMID:24036551

  19. The Two Faces of IL-6 in the Tumor Microenvironment

    PubMed Central

    Fisher, Daniel T.; Appenheimer, Michelle M.; Evans, Sharon S.

    2014-01-01

    Within the tumor microenvironment, IL-6 signaling is generally considered a malevolent player, assuming a dark visage that promotes tumor progression. Chronic IL-6 signaling is linked to tumorigenesis in numerous mouse models as well as in human disease. IL-6 acts intrinsically on tumor cells through numerous downstream mediators to support cancer cell proliferation, survival, and metastatic dissemination. Moreover, IL-6 can act extrinsically on other cells within the complex tumor microenvironment to sustain a pro-tumor milieu by supporting angiogenesis and tumor evasion of immune surveillance. A lesser known role for IL-6 signaling has recently emerged in which it plays a beneficial role, presenting a fairer face that opposes tumor growth by mobilizing anti-tumor T cell immune responses to attain tumor control. Accumulating evidence establishes IL-6 as a key player in the activation, proliferation and survival of lymphocytes during active immune responses. IL-6 signaling can also resculpt the T cell immune response, shifting it from a suppressive to a responsive state that can effectively act against tumors. Finally, IL-6 plays an indispensable role in boosting T cell trafficking to lymph nodes and to tumor sites, where they have the opportunity to become activated and execute their cytotoxic effector functions, respectively. Here, we discuss the dual faces of IL-6 signaling in the tumor microenvironment; the dark face that drives malignancy, and the fairer aspect that promotes anti-tumor adaptive immunity. PMID:24602448

  20. Targeting SDF-1 in multiple myeloma tumor microenvironment.

    PubMed

    Bouyssou, Juliette M C; Ghobrial, Irene M; Roccaro, Aldo M

    2016-09-28

    Multiple myeloma (MM) is a type of B-cell malignancy that remains incurable to date. The bone marrow (BM) microenvironment plays a crucial role in MM progression. The chemokine SDF-1 (CXCL12) is an important actor of the BM microenvironment that has the ability to regulate numerous processes related to its malignant transformation during MM development. The activity of SDF-1 is mainly mediated by its specific receptor CXCR4, which is expressed at the surface of MM cells and various other BM cell types. Current treatments available for MM patients mainly target tumor cells but have limited effects on the BM microenvironment. In this context, SDF-1 and CXCR4 represent ideal targets for the normalization of the MM-supportive BM microenvironment. The present review focuses on the activity of SDF-1 in the MM BM microenvironment and the current efforts carried out to target the SDF-1/CXCR4 axis for treatment of MM.

  1. Immunotherapeutic modulation of the suppressive liver and tumor microenvironments

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Tim; Wiltrout, Robert H.; Weiss, Jonathan M.

    2011-01-01

    The liver is an immunologically unique organ, consisting of resident hematopoietic and parenchymal cells which often contribute to a relatively tolerant microenvironment. It is also becoming increasingly clear that tumor-induced immunosuppression occurs via many of the same cellular mechanisms which contribute to the tolerogenic liver microenvironment. Myeloid cells, consisting of dendritic cells (DC), macrophages and myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSC), have been implicated in providing a tolerogenic liver environment and immune dysfunction within the tumor microenvironment which can favor tumor progression. As we increase our understanding of the biological mechanisms involved for each phenotypic and/or functionally distinct leukocyte subset, immunotherapeutic strategies can be developed to overcome the inherent barriers to the development of improved strategies for the treatment of liver disease and tumors. In this review, we discuss the principal myeloid cell-based contributions to immunosuppression that are shared between the liver and tumor microenvironments. We further highlight immune-based strategies shown to modulate immunoregulatory cells within each microenvironment and enhance anti-tumor responses. PMID:21241810

  2. Myeloid Cells in the Tumor Microenvironment: Modulation of Tumor Angiogenesis and Tumor Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Schmid, Michael C.; Varner, Judith A.

    2010-01-01

    Myeloid cells are a heterogeneous population of bone marrow-derived cells that play a critical role during growth and metastasis of malignant tumors. Tumors exhibit significant myeloid cell infiltrates, which are actively recruited to the tumor microenvironment. Myeloid cells promote tumor growth by stimulating tumor angiogenesis, suppressing tumor immunity, and promoting metastasis to distinct sites. In this review, we discuss the role of myeloid cells in promoting tumor angiogenesis. Furthermore, we describe a subset of myeloid cells with immunosuppressive activity (known as myeloid-derived suppressor cells). Finally, we will comment on the mechanisms regulating myeloid cell recruitment to the tumor microenvironment and on the potential of myeloid cells as new targets for cancer therapy. PMID:20490273

  3. Optimization of the tumor microenvironment and nanomedicine properties simultaneously to improve tumor therapy

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Ting; Wang, Lanting; Mei, Heng; Lu, Heng; Hu, Yu; Pang, Zhiqing

    2016-01-01

    Effective delivery of nanomedicines to tumor tissues depends on both the tumor microenvironment and nanomedicine properties. Accordingly, tumor microenvironment modification or advanced design of nanomedicine was emerging to improve nanomedicine delivery to tumors. However, few studies have emphasized the necessity to optimize the tumor microenvironment and nanomedicine properties simultaneously to improve tumor treatment. In the present study, imatinib mesylate (IMA) was used to normalize the tumor microenvironment including platelet-derived growth factor receptor-β expression inhibition, tumor vessel normalization, and tumor perfusion improvement as demonstrated by immunofluorescence staining. In addition, the effect of tumor microenvironment normalization on tumor delivery of nanomedicines with different sizes was carefully investigated. It was shown that IMA treatment significantly reduced the accumulation of nanoparticles (NPs) around 110 nm but enhanced the accumulation of micelles around 23 nm by in vivo fluorescence imaging experiment. Furthermore, IMA treatment limited the distribution of NPs inside tumors but increased that of micelles with a more homogeneous pattern. Finally, the anti-tumor efficacy study displayed that IMA pretreatment could significantly increase the therapeutic effects of paclitaxel-loaded micelles. All-together, a new strategy to improve nanomedicine delivery to tumor was provided by optimizing both nanomedicine size and the tumor microenvironment simultaneously, and it will have great potential in clinics for tumor treatment. PMID:27566585

  4. Impact of tumor microenvironment on oncolytic viral therapy

    PubMed Central

    Wojton, Jeffrey; Kaur, Balveen

    2010-01-01

    Interactions between tumor cells and their microenvironment have been shown to play a very significant role in the initiation, progression, and invasiveness of cancer. These tumor-stromal interactions are capable of altering the delivery and effectiveness of therapeutics into the tumor and are also known to influence future resistance and re-growth after treatment. Here we review recent advances in the understanding of the tumor microenvironment and its response to oncolytic viral therapy. The multifaceted environmental response to viral therapy can influence viral infection, replication, and propagation within the tumor. Recent studies have unveiled the complicated temporal changes in the tumor vasculature post OV treatment, and their impact on tumor biology. Similarly, the secreted extracellular matrix in solid tumors can affect both infection and spread of the therapeutic virus. Together, these complex changes in the tumor microenvironment also modulate the activation of the innate antiviral host immune response, leading to quick and efficient viral clearance. In order to combat these detrimental responses, viruses have been combined with pharmacological adjuvants and “armed” with therapeutic genes in order to suppress the pernicious environmental conditions following therapy. In this review we will discuss the impact of the tumor environment on viral therapy and examine some of the recent literature investigating methods of modulating this environment to enhance oncolysis. PMID:20399700

  5. Innate and adaptive immune cells in the tumor microenvironment

    PubMed Central

    Gajewski, Thomas F; Schreiber, Hans; Fu, Yang-Xin

    2014-01-01

    Most tumor cells express antigens that can mediate recognition by host CD8+ T cells. Cancers that are detected clinically must have evaded antitumor immune responses to grow progressively. Recent work has suggested two broad categories of tumor escape based on cellular and molecular characteristics of the tumor microenvironment. One major subset shows a T cell–inflamed phenotype consisting of infiltrating T cells, a broad chemokine profile and a type I interferon signature indicative of innate immune activation. These tumors appear to resist immune attack through the dominant inhibitory effects of immune system–suppressive pathways. The other major phenotype lacks this T cell–inflamed phenotype and appears to resist immune attack through immune system exclusion or ignorance. These two major phenotypes of tumor microenvironment may require distinct immunotherapeutic interventions for maximal therapeutic effect. PMID:24048123

  6. Current Multistage Drug Delivery Systems Based on the Tumor Microenvironment

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Binlong; Dai, Wenbing; He, Bing; Zhang, Hua; Wang, Xueqing; Wang, Yiguang; Zhang, Qiang

    2017-01-01

    The development of traditional tumor-targeted drug delivery systems based on EPR effect and receptor-mediated endocytosis is very challenging probably because of the biological complexity of tumors as well as the limitations in the design of the functional nano-sized delivery systems. Recently, multistage drug delivery systems (Ms-DDS) triggered by various specific tumor microenvironment stimuli have emerged for tumor therapy and imaging. In response to the differences in the physiological blood circulation, tumor microenvironment, and intracellular environment, Ms-DDS can change their physicochemical properties (such as size, hydrophobicity, or zeta potential) to achieve deeper tumor penetration, enhanced cellular uptake, timely drug release, as well as effective endosomal escape. Based on these mechanisms, Ms-DDS could deliver maximum quantity of drugs to the therapeutic targets including tumor tissues, cells, and subcellular organelles and eventually exhibit the highest therapeutic efficacy. In this review, we expatiate on various responsive modes triggered by the tumor microenvironment stimuli, introduce recent advances in multistage nanoparticle systems, especially the multi-stimuli responsive delivery systems, and discuss their functions, effects, and prospects. PMID:28255348

  7. The effects of CA IX catalysis products within tumor microenvironment.

    PubMed

    Santi, Alice; Caselli, Anna; Paoli, Paolo; Corti, Denise; Camici, Guido; Pieraccini, Giuseppe; Taddei, Maria Letizia; Serni, Sergio; Chiarugi, Paola; Cirri, Paolo

    2013-10-29

    Solid tumors are composed of both cancer cells and various types of accessory cells, mainly fibroblasts, that collectively compose the so called tumor-microenvironment. Cancer-associated fibroblasts have been described to actively participate in cancer progression by establishing a cytokine-mediated as well as metabolic crosstalk with cancer cells. In the present paper we show that activated human fibroblasts are able to boost tumor cells proliferation and that this effect is greatly dependent on stromal carbonic anhydrase IX (CA IX) activity. In fact fibroblasts show a strong upregulation of CA IX expression upon activation by cancer cells, while CA IX products, protons and bicarbonate, exert differential effects on cancer cells proliferation. While acidification of extracellular pH, a typical condition of rapidly growing solid tumors, is detrimental for tumor cells proliferation, bicarbonate, through its organication, supplies cancer cells with intermediates useful to sustain their high proliferation rate. Here we propose a new kind of fibroblasts/tumor cells crosstalk within tumor microenvironment, mediated by stromal CA IX products, aimed to favor cancer cells growth, opening new perspectives on CA IX role in tumor microenvironment.

  8. Metabolic origins of spatial organization in the tumor microenvironment

    PubMed Central

    Carmona-Fontaine, Carlos; Akkari, Leila; Thompson, Craig B.; Joyce, Johanna A.; Xavier, Joao B.

    2017-01-01

    The genetic and phenotypic diversity of cells within tumors is a major obstacle for cancer treatment. Because of the stochastic nature of genetic alterations, this intratumoral heterogeneity is often viewed as chaotic. Here we show that the altered metabolism of cancer cells creates predictable gradients of extracellular metabolites that orchestrate the phenotypic diversity of cells in the tumor microenvironment. Combining experiments and mathematical modeling, we show that metabolites consumed and secreted within the tumor microenvironment induce tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs) to differentiate into distinct subpopulations according to local levels of ischemia and their position relative to the vasculature. TAMs integrate levels of hypoxia and lactate into progressive activation of MAPK signaling that induce predictable spatial patterns of gene expression, such as stripes of macrophages expressing arginase 1 (ARG1) and mannose receptor, C type 1 (MRC1). These phenotypic changes are functionally relevant as ischemic macrophages triggered tube-like morphogenesis in neighboring endothelial cells that could restore blood perfusion in nutrient-deprived regions where angiogenic resources are most needed. We propose that gradients of extracellular metabolites act as tumor morphogens that impose order within the microenvironment, much like signaling molecules convey positional information to organize embryonic tissues. Unearthing embryology-like processes in tumors may allow us to control organ-like tumor features such as tissue repair and revascularization and treat intratumoral heterogeneity. PMID:28246332

  9. Interstitial Inorganic Phosphate as a Tumor Microenvironment Marker for Tumor Progression

    PubMed Central

    Bobko, Andrey A.; Eubank, Timothy D.; Driesschaert, Benoit; Dhimitruka, Ilirian; Evans, Jason; Mohammad, Rahman; Tchekneva, Elena E.; Dikov, Mikhail M.; Khramtsov, Valery V.

    2017-01-01

    Noninvasive in vivo assessment of chemical tumor microenvironment (TME) parameters such as oxygen (pO2), extracellular acidosis (pHe), and concentration of interstitial inorganic phosphate (Pi) may provide unique insights into biological processes in solid tumors. In this work, we employ a recently developed multifunctional trityl paramagnetic probe and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) technique for in vivo concurrent assessment of these TME parameters in various mouse models of cancer. While the data support the existence of hypoxic and acidic regions in TME, the most dramatic differences, about 2-fold higher concentrations in tumors vs. normal tissues, were observed for interstitial Pi - the only parameter that also allowed for discrimination between non-metastatic and highly metastatic tumors. Correlation analysis between [Pi], pO2, pHe and tumor volumes reveal an association of high [Pi] with changes in tumor metabolism and supports different mechanisms of protons and Pi accumulation in TME. Our data identifies interstitial inorganic phosphate as a new TME marker for tumor progression. Pi association with tumor metabolism, buffer-mediated proton transport, and a requirement of high phosphorus content for the rapid growth in the “growth rate hypothesis” may underline its potential role in tumorigenesis and tumor progression. PMID:28117423

  10. Tumor microenvironment derived exosomes pleiotropically modulate cancer cell metabolism

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cancer-associated fibroblasts (CAFs) are a major cellular component of tumor microenvironment in most solid cancers. Altered cellular metabolism is a hallmark of cancer, and much of the published literature has focused on neoplastic cell-autonomous processes for these adaptations. We demonstrate tha...

  11. Molecular Connections between Cancer Cell Metabolism and the Tumor Microenvironment

    PubMed Central

    Justus, Calvin R.; Sanderlin, Edward J.; Yang, Li V.

    2015-01-01

    Cancer cells preferentially utilize glycolysis, instead of oxidative phosphorylation, for metabolism even in the presence of oxygen. This phenomenon of aerobic glycolysis, referred to as the “Warburg effect”, commonly exists in a variety of tumors. Recent studies further demonstrate that both genetic factors such as oncogenes and tumor suppressors and microenvironmental factors such as spatial hypoxia and acidosis can regulate the glycolytic metabolism of cancer cells. Reciprocally, altered cancer cell metabolism can modulate the tumor microenvironment which plays important roles in cancer cell somatic evolution, metastasis, and therapeutic response. In this article, we review the progression of current understandings on the molecular interaction between cancer cell metabolism and the tumor microenvironment. In addition, we discuss the implications of these interactions in cancer therapy and chemoprevention. PMID:25988385

  12. Chemokine modulation of the tumor microenvironment.

    PubMed

    Richmond, Ann

    2010-06-01

    Coverage on: Shields, J.D., Kourtis, I.C., Tomei, A.A., Roberts, J.M. & Swartz,M.A. (2010). Induction of lymphoidlike stroma and immune escape by tumors that express the chemokine CCL21. Science. E Pub, March 25, 2010; and Kim, M.Y., Oskarsson, T., Acharyya, S.,Nguyen, D.X., Zhang, X.H., Norton, L. & Massague, J. (2009). Tumor self-seeding by circulating cancer cells. Cell, 139,1315-1326.

  13. Probing Tumor Microenvironment with In Vivo Phage Display

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-07-01

    peptides may result in an efficient probe for breast tumor imaging and therapy . 15. SUBJECT TERMS Carcinoma-associated fibroblast; phage display...In Vivo Phage Display PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Dr. Erkki Ruoslahti CONTRACTING ORGANIZATION: Sanford Burnham Medical Research Institute...COVERED 01 July 2012 – 30 June 2013 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Probing Tumor Microenvironment with In Vivo Phage Display 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER W81XWH

  14. Immunosuppression associated with chronic inflammation in the tumor microenvironment

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Dingzhi; DuBois, Raymond N.

    2015-01-01

    Chronic inflammation contributes to cancer development via multiple mechanisms. One potential mechanism is that chronic inflammation can generate an immunosuppressive microenvironment that allows advantages for tumor formation and progression. The immunosuppressive environment in certain chronic inflammatory diseases and solid cancers is characterized by accumulation of proinflammatory mediators, infiltration of immune suppressor cells and activation of immune checkpoint pathways in effector T cells. In this review, we highlight recent advances in our understanding of how immunosuppression contributes to cancer and how proinflammatory mediators induce the immunosuppressive microenvironment via induction of immunosuppressive cells and activation of immune checkpoint pathways. PMID:26354776

  15. Tumor suppressor ARF regulates tissue microenvironment and tumor growth through modulation of macrophage polarization

    PubMed Central

    Jiménez-García, Lidia; Herranz, Sandra; Higueras, María Angeles

    2016-01-01

    Tumor microenvironment has been described to play a key role in tumor growth, progression, and metastasis. Macrophages are a major cellular constituent of the tumor stroma, and particularly tumor associated macrophages (TAMs or M2-like macrophages) exert important immunosuppressive activity and a pro-tumoral role within the tumor microenvironment. Alternative-reading frame (ARF) gene is widely inactivated in human cancer. We have previously demonstrated that ARF deficiency severely impairs inflammatory response establishing a new role for ARF in the regulation of innate immunity. On the basis of these observations, we hypothesized that ARF may also regulates tumor growth through recruitment and modulation of the macrophage phenotype in the tumor microenvironment. Xenograft assays of B16F10 melanoma cells into ARF-deficient mice resulted in increased tumor growth compared to those implanted in WT control mice. Tumors from ARF-deficient mice exhibited significantly increased number of TAMs as well as microvascular density. Transwell assays showed crosstalk between tumor cells and macrophages. On the one hand, ARF-deficient macrophages modulate migratory ability of the tumor cells. And on the other, tumor cells promote the skewing of ARF−/− macrophages toward a M2-type polarization. In conclusion, these results demonstrate that ARF deficiency facilitates the infiltration of macrophages into the tumor mass and favors their polarization towards a M2 phenotype, thus promoting tumor angiogenesis and tumor growth. This work provides novel information about the critical role of ARF in the modulation of tumor microenvironment. PMID:27572316

  16. Metastasis genetics, epigenetics, and the tumor microenvironment

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    KISS1 is a member of a family of genes known as metastasis suppressors, defined by their ability to block metastasis without blocking primary tumor development and growth. KISS1 re-expression in multiple metastatic cell lines of diverse cellular origin suppresses metastasis; yet, still allows comple...

  17. Hollow mesoporous silica nanoparticles facilitated drug delivery via cascade pH stimuli in tumor microenvironment for tumor therapy.

    PubMed

    Liu, Junjie; Luo, Zhong; Zhang, Jixi; Luo, Tiantian; Zhou, Jun; Zhao, Xiaojing; Cai, Kaiyong

    2016-03-01

    To efficiently deliver anti-cancer drug to tumor site and reduce its toxic side effects on normal tissues, a polyethylene glycol (PEG) shielding and tumor microenvironment triggering cascade pH-responsive hollow mesoporous silica nanoparticles (HMSNs) drug delivery system was fabricated. 3-(3, 4-dihydroxyphenyl) propionic acid (DHPA) functionalized beta-cyclodextrin (β-CD) was grafted onto the surfaces of HMSNs via boronic acid-catechol ester bonds. Then, PEG conjugated adamantane (Ada) was anchored on HMSNs-β-CD nanocarrier via host-gust interaction. Various techniques proved the successful fabrication of the system. The in vitro tests confirmed that the system was biocompatible. After the system permeating into tumor via enhanced permeability and retention (EPR) effect, the benzoic-imine bonds between the PEG and Ada were cleaved under weak acid condition in tumor microenvironment (pH 6.8), while the dissociated PEG protective layer facilitating cellular uptake of HMSNs system. Subsequently, the boronic acid-catechol ester bonds linkers further hydrolyzed under even low endosomal pH (4.5-6.5) condition for intracellular drug delivery, leading to efficient cell apoptosis. The in vivo results demonstrated that drug loaded HMSNs significantly inhibited tumor growth while only with minimal toxic side effects. The strategy provides new insight into the development of new generation of drug delivery carriers triggering by tumor microenvironment.

  18. Neurodegeneration in the Brain Tumor Microenvironment: Glutamate in the Limelight

    PubMed Central

    Savaskan, Nicolai E.; Fan, Zheng; Broggini, Thomas; Buchfelder, Michael; Eyüpoglu, Ilker Y.

    2015-01-01

    Malignant brain tumors are characterized by destructive growth and neuronal cell death making them one of the most devastating diseases. Neurodegenerative actions of malignant gliomas resemble mechanisms also found in many neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's and Parkinson's diseases and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. Recent data demonstrate that gliomas seize neuronal glutamate signaling for their own growth advantage. Excessive glutamate release via the glutamate/cystine antiporter xCT (system xc-, SLC7a11) renders cancer cells resistant to chemotherapeutics and create the tumor microenvironment toxic for neurons. In particular the glutamate/cystine antiporter xCT takes center stage in neurodegenerative processes and sets this transporter a potential prime target for cancer therapy. Noteworthy is the finding, that reactive oxygen species (ROS) activate transient receptor potential (TRP) channels and thereby TRP channels can potentiate glutamate release. Yet another important biological feature of the xCT/glutamate system is its modulatory effect on the tumor microenvironment with impact on host cells and the cancer stem cell niche. The EMA and FDA-approved drug sulfasalazine (SAS) presents a lead compound for xCT inhibition, although so far clinical trials on glioblastomas with SAS were ambiguous. Here, we critically analyze the mechanisms of action of xCT antiporter on malignant gliomas and in the tumor microenvironment. Deciphering the impact of xCT and glutamate and its relation to TRP channels in brain tumors pave the way for developing important cancer microenvironmental modulators and drugable lead targets. PMID:26411769

  19. Embelin suppresses pancreatic cancer growth by modulating tumor immune microenvironment.

    PubMed

    Marsh, Justine L; Jackman, Chris P; Tang, Su-Ni; Shankar, Sharmila; Srivastava, Rakesh K

    2014-01-01

    Since pancreatic carcinoma is largely refractory to conventional therapies, development of novel agents is required for the effective treatment of pancreatic cancer. The objective of this paper was to examine the molecular mechanisms by which embelin inhibited human pancreatic cancer growth in mice by modulating tumor immune microenvironment. Embelin inhibited PANC-1 tumor growth, angiogenesis, and metastasis which were associated with suppression of Akt and Sonic Hedgehog (Shh) pathways. Embelin inhibited the expression of Bcl-2, cyclin D1, CDK2 and CDK6, IL-6 and IL-8, and induced the expression of Bax in tumor tissues. Embelin also reversed epithelial-mesenchymal transition by up-regulating E-cadherin and inhibiting the expression of Snail, Slug and Zeb1. Embelin inhibited pancreatic cancer growth in Kras(G12D) mice by modulating tumor immune microenvironment where CTL, NKT, γδT, NK, and IFNγ (Th1 type) cells were up-regulated, and Th17, PMN-MDSC, IL-6 and IL-8 (Th2 type) immune cells were inhibited. These data suggest that embelin can inhibit pancreatic cancer growth by modulating tumor immune microenvironment and Akt and Shh pathways, and inhibiting inflammation. Embelin may offer therapeutic benefits for the treatment and/or prevention of pancreatic cancer.

  20. Regulation of the Prostate Cancer Tumor Microenvironment

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-04-01

    produce danger signals that elicit the activation of immune responses. These signals in the form of conserved molecules termed pathogen-associated...molecular patterns (PAMPs) or danger -associated molecular patterns (DAMPs) can be discriminated from self-antigens by a family of pattern-recognition...to our initial aims using TRAMP Tg+/- animals , namely the length of time for development of tumors from 24 to 30 weeks of age, the ubiquitous

  1. Regulation of the Prostate Cancer Tumor Microenvironment

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-04-01

    epithelium , stroma, as well as immune system, and the fixed nature of the prostate model with expression of the large T antigen, which may have limited...cancer glandular architecture formed (Figure 8). Figure 8. Subcutanous TRAMP Model to Recapitulate Prostate Cancer. TRAMP C2 cells with and...model to be able to alter the aggressiveness of the tumor and specifically modulate the TLR signaling pathway in prostate epithelium , stroma, and immune

  2. Exosome mediated communication within the tumor microenvironment.

    PubMed

    Milane, Lara; Singh, Amit; Mattheolabakis, George; Suresh, Megha; Amiji, Mansoor M

    2015-12-10

    It is clear that exosomes (endosome derived vesicles) serve important roles in cellular communication both locally and distally and that the exosomal process is abnormal in cancer. Cancer cells are not malicious cells; they are cells that represent 'survival of the fittest' at its finest. All of the mutations, abnormalities, and phenomenal adaptations to a hostile microenvironment, such as hypoxia and nutrient depletion, represent the astute ability of cancer cells to adapt to their environment and to intracellular changes to achieve a single goal - survival. The aberrant exosomal process in cancer represents yet another adaptation that promotes survival of cancer. Cancer cells can secrete more exosomes than healthy cells, but more importantly, the content of cancer cells is distinct. An illustrative distinction is that exosomes derived from cancer cells contain more microRNA than healthy cells and unlike exosomes released from healthy cells, this microRNA can be associated with the RNA-induced silencing complex (RISC) which is required for processing mature and biologically active microRNA. Cancer derived exosomes have the ability to transfer metastatic potential to a recipient cell and cancer exosomes function in the physical process of invasion. In this review we conceptualize the aberrant exosomal process (formation, content selection, loading, trafficking, and release) in cancer as being partially attributed to cancer specific differences in the endocytotic process of receptor recycling/degradation and plasma membrane remodeling and the function of the endosome as a signaling entity. We discuss this concept and, to advance comprehension of exosomal function in cancer as mediators of communication, we detail and discuss exosome biology, formation, and communication in health and cancer; exosomal content in cancer; exosomal biomarkers in cancer; exosome mediated communication in cancer metastasis, drug resistance, and interfacing with the immune system; and

  3. Combined Effects of Pericytes in the Tumor Microenvironment

    PubMed Central

    Ribeiro, Aline Lopes; Okamoto, Oswaldo Keith

    2015-01-01

    Pericytes are multipotent perivascular cells whose involvement in vasculature development is well established. Evidences in the literature also suggest that pericytes display immune properties and that these cells may serve as an in vivo reservoir of stem cells, contributing to the regeneration of diverse tissues. Pericytes are also capable of tumor homing and are important cellular components of the tumor microenvironment (TME). In this review, we highlight the contribution of pericytes to some classical hallmarks of cancer, namely, tumor angiogenesis, growth, metastasis, and evasion of immune destruction, and discuss how collectively these hallmarks could be tackled by therapies targeting pericytes, providing a rationale for cancer drugs aiming at the TME. PMID:26000022

  4. Combined effects of pericytes in the tumor microenvironment.

    PubMed

    Ribeiro, Aline Lopes; Okamoto, Oswaldo Keith

    2015-01-01

    Pericytes are multipotent perivascular cells whose involvement in vasculature development is well established. Evidences in the literature also suggest that pericytes display immune properties and that these cells may serve as an in vivo reservoir of stem cells, contributing to the regeneration of diverse tissues. Pericytes are also capable of tumor homing and are important cellular components of the tumor microenvironment (TME). In this review, we highlight the contribution of pericytes to some classical hallmarks of cancer, namely, tumor angiogenesis, growth, metastasis, and evasion of immune destruction, and discuss how collectively these hallmarks could be tackled by therapies targeting pericytes, providing a rationale for cancer drugs aiming at the TME.

  5. Modeling tumor microenvironments using custom-designed biomaterial scaffolds

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Zen; Vunjak-Novakovic, Gordana

    2016-01-01

    The dominant roles of the tumor microenvironment in regulating tumor formation, progression, and metastasis have driven the application of tissue engineering strategies in cancer biology. Highly dynamic and reciprocal communication of tumor cells with their surroundings suggests that studying cancer in custom-designed biomaterial scaffolds may lead to novel therapeutic targets and therapeutic regimens more reliably than traditional monolayer tissue culture models. As tissue engineering becomes progressively more successful in recapitulating the native tumor environment, critical insights into mechanisms of tumor resistance may be elucidated, to impact clinical practice, drug development, and biological research. We review here the recent developments in the use of custom-designed biomaterial scaffolds for modeling human tumors. PMID:27152253

  6. Intravital imaging of multicolor-labeled tumor immune microenvironment through skin-fold window chamber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qi, Shuhong; Zhang, Zhihong

    2015-03-01

    Tumor immune microenvironment became very important for the tumor immunotherapy. There were several kinds of immune cells in tumor stromal, and they played very different roles in tumor growth. In order to observe the behaviors of multiple immune cells in tumor microenvironment and the interaction between immune cells and tumor cells at the same time, we generated a multicolor-labeled tumor immune microenvironment model. The tumor cells and immune cells were labeled by different fluorescent proteins. By using of skin-fold window chamber implanted into mice and intravital imaging technology, we could dynamically observe the different immune cells in tumor microenvironment. After data analysis from the video, we could know the behavior of TILs, DCs and Tregs in tumor immune microenvironment; furthermore, we could know these immune cells play different roles in the tumor microenvironment.

  7. One cell, multiple roles: contribution of mesenchymal stem cells to tumor development in tumor microenvironment.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xue; Hou, Jing; Han, Zhipeng; Wang, Ying; Hao, Chong; Wei, Lixin; Shi, Yufang

    2013-01-21

    The discovery of tissue reparative and immunosuppressive abilities of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) has drawn more attention to tumor microenvironment and its role in providing the soil for the tumor cell growth. MSCs are recruited to tumor which is referred as the never healing wound and altered by the inflammation environment, thereby helping to construct the tumor microenvironment. The environment orchestrated by MSCs and other factors can be associated with angiogenesis, immunosuppression, inhibition of apoptosis, epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT), survival of cancer stem cells, which all contribute to tumor growth and progression. In this review, we will discuss how MSCs are recruited to the tumor microenvironment and what effects they have on tumor progression.

  8. Probing Tumor Microenvironment with in Vivo Phage Display

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-07-01

    Vivo Phage Display PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Kazuki N. Sugahara, M.D., Ph.D...TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Probing Tumor Microenvironment with In Vivo Phage Display 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-12-1-0174 5c...cells and the matrix. The goal of our group is to make technical improvements in our phage display system, and find peptides that target carcinoma

  9. Tungsten targets the tumor microenvironment to enhance breast cancer metastasis.

    PubMed

    Bolt, Alicia M; Sabourin, Valérie; Molina, Manuel Flores; Police, Alice M; Negro Silva, Luis Fernando; Plourde, Dany; Lemaire, Maryse; Ursini-Siegel, Josie; Mann, Koren K

    2015-01-01

    The number of individuals exposed to high levels of tungsten is increasing, yet there is limited knowledge of the potential human health risks. Recently, a cohort of breast cancer patients was left with tungsten in their breasts following testing of a tungsten-based shield during intraoperative radiotherapy. While monitoring tungsten levels in the blood and urine of these patients, we utilized the 66Cl4 cell model, in vitro and in mice to study the effects of tungsten exposure on mammary tumor growth and metastasis. We still detect tungsten in the urine of patients' years after surgery (mean urinary tungsten concentration at least 20 months post-surgery = 1.76 ng/ml), even in those who have opted for mastectomy, indicating that tungsten does not remain in the breast. In addition, standard chelation therapy was ineffective at mobilizing tungsten. In the mouse model, tungsten slightly delayed primary tumor growth, but significantly enhanced lung metastasis. In vitro, tungsten did not enhance 66Cl4 proliferation or invasion, suggesting that tungsten was not directly acting on 66Cl4 primary tumor cells to enhance invasion. In contrast, tungsten changed the tumor microenvironment, enhancing parameters known to be important for cell invasion and metastasis including activated fibroblasts, matrix metalloproteinases, and myeloid-derived suppressor cells. We show, for the first time, that tungsten enhances metastasis in an animal model of breast cancer by targeting the microenvironment. Importantly, all these tumor microenvironmental changes are associated with a poor prognosis in humans.

  10. Tungsten Targets the Tumor Microenvironment to Enhance Breast Cancer Metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Bolt, Alicia M.; Sabourin, Valérie; Molina, Manuel Flores; Police, Alice M.; Negro Silva, Luis Fernando; Plourde, Dany; Lemaire, Maryse; Ursini-Siegel, Josie; Mann, Koren K.

    2015-01-01

    The number of individuals exposed to high levels of tungsten is increasing, yet there is limited knowledge of the potential human health risks. Recently, a cohort of breast cancer patients was left with tungsten in their breasts following testing of a tungsten-based shield during intraoperative radiotherapy. While monitoring tungsten levels in the blood and urine of these patients, we utilized the 66Cl4 cell model, in vitro and in mice to study the effects of tungsten exposure on mammary tumor growth and metastasis. We still detect tungsten in the urine of patients’ years after surgery (mean urinary tungsten concentration at least 20 months post-surgery = 1.76 ng/ml), even in those who have opted for mastectomy, indicating that tungsten does not remain in the breast. In addition, standard chelation therapy was ineffective at mobilizing tungsten. In the mouse model, tungsten slightly delayed primary tumor growth, but significantly enhanced lung metastasis. In vitro, tungsten did not enhance 66Cl4 proliferation or invasion, suggesting that tungsten was not directly acting on 66Cl4 primary tumor cells to enhance invasion. In contrast, tungsten changed the tumor microenvironment, enhancing parameters known to be important for cell invasion and metastasis including activated fibroblasts, matrix metalloproteinases, and myeloid-derived suppressor cells. We show, for the first time, that tungsten enhances metastasis in an animal model of breast cancer by targeting the microenvironment. Importantly, all these tumor microenvironmental changes are associated with a poor prognosis in humans. PMID:25324207

  11. Tumor Microenvironment Metabolism: A New Checkpoint for Anti-Tumor Immunity

    PubMed Central

    Scharping, Nicole E.; Delgoffe, Greg M.

    2016-01-01

    When a T cell infiltrates a tumor, it is subjected to a variety of immunosuppressive and regulatory signals in the microenvironment. However, it is becoming increasingly clear that due to the proliferative and energetically-deregulated nature of tumor cells, T cells also operate at a metabolic disadvantage. The nutrient dearth of the tumor microenvironment (TME) creates “metabolic checkpoints” upon infiltrating T cells, impacting their ability to survive, proliferate and function effectively. In this review, we summarize the basics of tumor cell and T cell metabolism and discuss recent advances elucidating the individual metabolic checkpoints exerted on T cells that drive their dysfunction in the TME. PMID:27929420

  12. Galectin 3 as a guardian of the tumor microenvironment.

    PubMed

    Ruvolo, Peter P

    2016-03-01

    Galectin 3 is a member of a family of β-galactoside binding proteins and has emerged as an important regulator of diverse functions critical in cancer biology including apoptosis, metastasis, immune surveillance, molecular trafficking, mRNA splicing, gene expression, and inflammation. Galectin 3's ability to support cancer cell survival by intra-cellular and extra-cellular mechanisms suggests this molecule is an important component of the tumor microenvironment that potentially could be targeted for therapy. Data is emerging that Galectin 3 is elevated in many cancers including solid tumors and the cancers of the blood. Galectin 3 also appears to be a key molecule produced by tumor microenvironment support cells including mesenchymal stromal cells (MSC) to suppress immune surveillance by killing T cells and interfering with NK cell function and by supporting metastasis. Levels of Galectin 3 increase in the MSC of aging mice and perhaps this contributes to the development of cancer in the elderly. Galectin 3 modulates surface protein expression of a diverse set of glycoproteins including CD44 by regulating endocytosis of these proteins. In addition, Galectin 3 binding to receptor kinases such as CD45 and the T cell receptor is critical in the regulation of their function. In this review I will examine the various mechanisms how Galectin 3 supports chemoresistance and metastasis in solid tumors and in leukemia and lymphoma. I will also discuss possible therapeutic strategies to target this Galectin for cancer therapy. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Tumor Microenvironment Regulation of Cancer Cell Survival, Metastasis, Inflammation, and Immune Surveillance edited by Peter Ruvolo and Gregg L. Semenza.

  13. The Role of Chemoattractant Receptors in Shaping the Tumor Microenvironment

    PubMed Central

    Xiang, Yi; Yoshimura, Teizo; Chen, Keqiang; Gong, Wanghua; Huang, Jian; Zhou, Ye; Yao, Xiaohong; Bian, Xiuwu; Wang, Ji Ming

    2014-01-01

    Chemoattractant receptors are a family of seven transmembrane G protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) initially found to mediate the chemotaxis and activation of immune cells. During the past decades, the functions of these GPCRs have been discovered to not only regulate leukocyte trafficking and promote immune responses, but also play important roles in homeostasis, development, angiogenesis, and tumor progression. Accumulating evidence indicates that chemoattractant GPCRs and their ligands promote the progression of malignant tumors based on their capacity to orchestrate the infiltration of the tumor microenvironment by immune cells, endothelial cells, fibroblasts, and mesenchymal cells. This facilitates the interaction of tumor cells with host cells, tumor cells with tumor cells, and host cells with host cells to provide a basis for the expansion of established tumors and development of distant metastasis. In addition, many malignant tumors of the nonhematopoietic origin express multiple chemoattractant GPCRs that increase the invasiveness and metastasis of tumor cells. Therefore, GPCRs and their ligands constitute targets for the development of novel antitumor therapeutics. PMID:25110692

  14. The role of the microenvironment in tumor growth and invasion

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Yangjin; Stolarska, Magdalena A.; Othmer, Hans G.

    2011-01-01

    Mathematical modeling and computational analysis are essential for understanding the dynamics of the complex gene networks that control normal development and homeostasis, and can help to understand how circumvention of that control leads to abnormal outcomes such as cancer. Our objectives here are to discuss the different mechanisms by which the local biochemical and mechanical microenvironment, which is comprised of various signaling molecules, cell types and the extracellular matrix (ECM), affects the progression of potentially-cancerous cells, and to present new results on two aspects of these effects. We first deal with the major processes involved in the progression from a normal cell to a cancerous cell at a level accessible to a general scientific readership, and we then outline a number of mathematical and computational issues that arise in cancer modeling. In Section 2 we present results from a model that deals with the effects of the mechanical properties of the environment on tumor growth, and in Section 3 we report results from a model of the signaling pathways and the tumor microenvironment (TME), and how their interactions affect the development of breast cancer. The results emphasize anew the complexities of the interactions within the TME and their effect on tumor growth, and show that tumor progression is not solely determined by the presence of a clone of mutated immortal cells, but rather that it can be ‘community-controlled’. It Takes a Village – Hilary Clinton PMID:21736894

  15. Simulation of Complex Transport of Nanoparticles around a Tumor Using Tumor-Microenvironment-on-Chip

    PubMed Central

    Kwak, Bongseop; Ozcelikkale, Altug; Shin, Crystal S.; Park, Kinam; Han, Bumsoo

    2014-01-01

    Delivery of therapeutic agents selectively to tumor tissue, which is referred as “targeted delivery,” is one of the most ardently pursued goals of cancer therapy. Recent advances in nanotechnology enable numerous types of nanoparticles (NPs) whose properties can be designed for targeted delivery to tumors. In spite of promising early results, the delivery and therapeutic efficacy of the majority of NPs are still quite limited. This is mainly attributed to the limitation of currently available tumor models to test these NPs and systematically study the effects of complex transport and pathophysiological barriers around the tumors. In this study, thus, we developed a new in vitro tumor model to recapitulate the tumor microenvironment determining the transport around tumors. This model, named tumor-microenvironment-on-chip (T-MOC), consists of 3-dimensional microfluidic channels where tumor cells and endothelial cells are cultured within extracellular matrix under perfusion of interstitial fluid. Using this T-MOC platform, the transport of NPs and its variation due to tumor microenvironmental parameters have been studied including cut-off pore size, interstitial fluid pressure, and tumor tissue microstructure. The results suggest that T-MOC is capable of simulating the complex transport around the tumor, and providing detailed information about NP transport behavior. This finding confirms that NPs should be designed considering their dynamic interactions with tumor microenvironment. PMID:25194778

  16. Effect of tumor cells and tumor microenvironment on NK-cell function.

    PubMed

    Vitale, Massimo; Cantoni, Claudia; Pietra, Gabriella; Mingari, Maria Cristina; Moretta, Lorenzo

    2014-06-01

    The ability of tumors to manage an immune-mediated attack has been recently included in the "next generation" of cancer hallmarks. In solid tumors, the microenvironment that is generated during the first steps of tumor development has a pivotal role in immune regulation. An intricate net of cross-interactions occurring between tumor components, stromal cells, and resident or recruited immune cells skews the possible acute inflammatory response toward an aberrant ineffective chronic inflammatory status that favors the evasion from the host's defenses. Natural killer (NK) cells have powerful cytotoxic activity, but their activity may be eluded by the tumor microenvironment. Immunosubversion, immunoediting or immunoselection of poorly immunogenic tumor cells and interference with tumor infiltration play a major role in evading NK-cell responses to tumors. Tumor cells, tumor-associated fibroblasts and tumor-induced aberrant immune cells (i.e. tolerogenic or suppressive macrophages, dendritic cells (DCs) and T cells) can interfere with NK-cell activation pathways or the complex receptor array that regulate NK-cell activation and antitumor activity. Thus, the definition of tumor microenvironment-related immunosuppressive factors, along with the identification of new classes of tissue-residing NK-like innate lymphoid cells, represent key issues to design effective NK-cell-based therapies of solid tumors.

  17. Reprogramming the tumor microenvironment: tumor-induced immunosuppressive factors paralyze T cells

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Annie A; Drake, Virginia; Huang, Huai-Shiuan; Chiu, ShihChi; Zheng, Lei

    2015-01-01

    It has become evident that tumor-induced immuno-suppressive factors in the tumor microenvironment play a major role in suppressing normal functions of effector T cells. These factors serve as hurdles that limit the therapeutic potential of cancer immunotherapies. This review focuses on illustrating the molecular mechanisms of immunosuppression in the tumor microenvironment, including evasion of T-cell recognition, interference with T-cell trafficking, metabolism, and functions, induction of resistance to T-cell killing, and apoptosis of T cells. A better understanding of these mechanisms may help in the development of strategies to enhance the effectiveness of cancer immunotherapies. PMID:26140242

  18. Reprogramming the tumor microenvironment: tumor-induced immunosuppressive factors paralyze T cells.

    PubMed

    Wu, Annie A; Drake, Virginia; Huang, Huai-Shiuan; Chiu, ShihChi; Zheng, Lei

    2015-07-01

    It has become evident that tumor-induced immuno-suppressive factors in the tumor microenvironment play a major role in suppressing normal functions of effector T cells. These factors serve as hurdles that limit the therapeutic potential of cancer immunotherapies. This review focuses on illustrating the molecular mechanisms of immunosuppression in the tumor microenvironment, including evasion of T-cell recognition, interference with T-cell trafficking, metabolism, and functions, induction of resistance to T-cell killing, and apoptosis of T cells. A better understanding of these mechanisms may help in the development of strategies to enhance the effectiveness of cancer immunotherapies.

  19. Ablative Tumor Radiation Can Change the Tumor Immune Cell Microenvironment to Induce Durable Complete Remissions

    PubMed Central

    Filatenkov, Alexander; Baker, Jeanette; Mueller, Antonia M.S.; Kenkel, Justin; Ahn, G-One; Dutt, Suparna; Zhang, Nigel; Kohrt, Holbrook; Jensen, Kent; Dejbakhsh-Jones, Sussan; Shizuru, Judith A.; Negrin, Robert N.; Engleman, Edgar G.; Strober, Samuel

    2015-01-01

    Purpose The goals of the study were to elucidate the immune mechanisms that contribute to desirable complete remissions of murine colon tumors treated with single radiation dose of 30 Gy. This dose is at the upper end of the ablative range used clinically to treat advanced or metastatic colorectal, liver, and non-small cell lung tumors. Experimental design Changes in the tumor immune microenvironment of single tumor nodules exposed to radiation were studied using 21 day (>1 cm in diameter) CT26 and MC38 colon tumors. These are well-characterized weakly immunogenic tumors. Results We found that the high dose radiation transformed the immunosuppressive tumor microenvironment resulting in an intense CD8+ T cell tumor infiltrate, and a loss of myeloid derived suppressor cells (MDSCs). The change was dependent on antigen cross-presenting CD8+ dendritic cells, secretion of IFN-γ, and CD4+ T cells expressing CD40L. Anti-tumor CD8+ T cells entered tumors shortly after radiotherapy, reversed MDSC infiltration, and mediated durable remissions in an IFN-γ dependent manner. Interestingly, extended fractionated radiation regimen did not result in robust CD8+ T cell infiltration. Conclusion For immunologically sensitive tumors, these results indicate that remissions induced by a short course of high dose radiation therapy depend on the development of anti-tumor immunity that is reflected by the nature and kinetics of changes induced in the tumor cell microenvironment. These results suggest that systematic examination of the tumor immune microenvironment may help in optimizing the radiation regimen used to treat tumors by adding a robust immune response. PMID:25869387

  20. Use of laser scanning cytometry to study tumor microenvironment.

    PubMed

    Mocellin, S; Wang, E; Panelli, M; Rossi, C R; Marincola, F M

    2003-04-01

    The study of phenomena occurring in the tumor microenvironment is a challenging task because of technical difficulties, particularly when dealing with hypocellular specimens. Laser scanning cytometry (LSC) is a new laboratory technology that has been recently introduced to overcome the limitations of other traditional technologies. By combining the properties and the advantages of flow cytometry (FC) and immunohistochemistry (IHC), LSC allows the investigator to obtain objective information on DNA content, protein expression and cellular localization is combination with morphological features. It has been already shown that LSC results are reliable compared to more traditional technologies, and its implementation in the clinical routine is under way. Its use in oncology, which is rapidly expanding, spans from apoptosis analysis to DNA content quantitation and tumor cell phenotyping. Here we describe the technology underlying this novel fluorescence-based device, review its use in oncology by dissecting the phenomena occurring in the tumor microenvironment and propose its application for the immunological follow-up of malignant lesions undergoing immunotherapeutic manipulation.

  1. Methods to study the tumor microenvironment under controlled oxygen conditions

    PubMed Central

    Byrne, Matthew B.; Leslie, Matthew T.; Gaskins, H. Rex; Kenis, Paul J.A.

    2014-01-01

    The tumor microenvironment is a complex heterogeneous assembly composed of a variety of cell types and physical features. One such feature, hypoxia, is associated with metabolic reprogramming, the epithelial-mesenchymal transition, and therapeutic resistance. Many questions remain regarding the effects of hypoxia on these outcomes, yet only few experimental methods enable both precise control over oxygen concentration and real-time imaging of cell behavior. Recent efforts with microfluidic platforms offer a promising solution to these limitations. We discuss conventional methods and tools used to control oxygen concentration for cell studies then highlight recent advances in microfluidic-based approaches for controlling oxygen in engineered platforms. PMID:25282035

  2. Orchestrating the Tumor Microenvironment to Improve Survival for Patients With Pancreatic Cancer Normalization, Not Destruction

    PubMed Central

    Whatcott, Clifford J.; Hanl, Haiyong; Von Hoff, Daniel D.

    2016-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is the fourth leading cause of cancer death in the United States. The microenvironment of pancreatic cancer could be one of the “perfect storms” that support the growth of a cancer. Indeed, pancreatic cancer may be the poster child of a problem with the microenvironment. In this article, we review the rationale and attempts to date on modifying or targeting structural proteins in the microenvironment including hyaluronan (HA) (in primary and metastases), collagen, and SPARC (secreted protein, acidic, and rich in cysteine). Indeed, working in this area has produced a regimen that improves survival for patients with advanced pancreatic cancer (nab-paclitaxel + gemcitabine). In addition, in initial clinical trials, PEGylated hyaluronidase appears promising. We also review a new approach that is different than targeting/destroying the microenvironment and that is orchestrating, reengineering, reprogramming, or normalizing the microenvironment (including normalizing structural proteins, normalizing an immunologically tumor-friendly environment to a less friendly environment, reversing epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition, and so on). We believe this will be most effectively done by agents that have global effects on transcription. There is initial evidence that this can be done by agents such as vitamin D derivatives and other new agents. There is no doubt these opportunities can now be tried in the clinic with hopefully beneficial effects. PMID:26222082

  3. Tumor-Associated Macrophages as Major Players in the Tumor Microenvironment

    PubMed Central

    Chanmee, Theerawut; Ontong, Pawared; Konno, Kenjiro; Itano, Naoki

    2014-01-01

    During tumor progression, circulating monocytes and macrophages are actively recruited into tumors where they alter the tumor microenvironment to accelerate tumor progression. Macrophages shift their functional phenotypes in response to various microenvironmental signals generated from tumor and stromal cells. Based on their function, macrophages are divided broadly into two categories: classical M1 and alternative M2 macrophages. The M1 macrophage is involved in the inflammatory response, pathogen clearance, and antitumor immunity. In contrast, the M2 macrophage influences an anti-inflammatory response, wound healing, and pro-tumorigenic properties. Tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs) closely resemble the M2-polarized macrophages and are critical modulators of the tumor microenvironment. Clinicopathological studies have suggested that TAM accumulation in tumors correlates with a poor clinical outcome. Consistent with that evidence, experimental and animal studies have supported the notion that TAMs can provide a favorable microenvironment to promote tumor development and progression. In this review article, we present an overview of mechanisms responsible for TAM recruitment and highlight the roles of TAMs in the regulation of tumor angiogenesis, invasion, metastasis, immunosuppression, and chemotherapeutic resistance. Finally, we discuss TAM-targeting therapy as a promising novel strategy for an indirect cancer therapy. PMID:25125485

  4. Rapid 3D extrusion of synthetic tumor microenvironments

    PubMed Central

    Grolman, Joshua M.; Zhang, Douglas; Smith, Andrew M.; Moore, Jeffrey S.

    2016-01-01

    Solid tumors house an assortment of complex and dynamically changing microenvironments in which signaling events between multiple cell types are known to play a critical role in tumor progression, invasion, and metastasis. To deepen our understanding of this biology, it is desirable to accurately model these structures in vitro for basic studies and for drug screening; however, current systems fall short of mimicking the complex organization of cells and matrix in vivo. Here we demonstrate the generation of spatially-organized 3D hydrogels of cells and matrix produced from a simple concentric flow device in a single step. Multiple cell types are pre-seeded in different spatial domains such as concentric regions of vessel-like tubular structures to reproducibly establish heterotypic cellular environments in 3D. Using macrophages and breast adenocarcinoma cells as an example of a paracrine loop that regulates metastasis, we explored the effects of clinical drug treatments and observed a dose-dependent modulation of cellular migration. This versatile and tunable approach for tissue fabrication will enable a means to study a wide range of microenvironments and may provide a clinically-viable solution for personalized assessment of patient response to therapeutics. PMID:26283579

  5. A Novel Organotypic Model Mimics the Tumor Microenvironment

    PubMed Central

    Nurmenniemi, Sini; Sinikumpu, Teemu; Alahuhta, Ilkka; Salo, Sirpa; Sutinen, Meeri; Santala, Markku; Risteli, Juha; Nyberg, Pia; Salo, Tuula

    2009-01-01

    Carcinoma cell invasion is traditionally studied in three-dimensional organotypic models composed of type I collagen and fibroblasts. However, carcinoma cell behavior is affected by the various cell types and the extracellular matrix (ECM) in the tumor microenvironment. In this study, a novel organotypic model based on human uterine leiomyoma tissue was established and characterized to create a more authentic environment for carcinoma cells. Human tongue squamous cell carcinoma cells (HSC-3) were cultured on top of either collagen or myoma. Organotypic sections were examined by immunohistochemistry and in situ hybridization. The maximal invasion depth of HSC-3 cells was markedly increased in myomas compared with collagen. In myomas, various cell types and ECM components were present, and the HSC-3 cells only expressed ECM molecules in the myoma model. Organotypic media were analyzed by radioimmunoassay, zymography, or Western blotting. During carcinoma cell invasion, matrix metalloprotease-9 production and collagen degradation were enhanced particularly in the myoma model. To evaluate the general applicability of the myoma model, several oral carcinoma, breast carcinoma, and melanoma cell lines were cultured on myomas and found to invade in highly distinct patterns. We conclude that myoma tissue mimics the native tumor microenvironment better than previous organotypic models and possibly enhances epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition. Thus, the myoma model provides a promising tool for analyzing the behavior of carcinoma cells. PMID:19679876

  6. Targeting CD73 in the tumor microenvironment with MEDI9447

    PubMed Central

    Hay, Carl M.; Sult, Erin; Huang, Qihui; Mulgrew, Kathy; Fuhrmann, Stacy R.; McGlinchey, Kelly A.; Hammond, Scott A.; Rothstein, Raymond; Rios-Doria, Jonathan; Poon, Edmund; Holoweckyj, Nick; Durham, Nicholas M.; Leow, Ching Ching; Diedrich, Gundo; Damschroder, Melissa; Herbst, Ronald; Hollingsworth, Robert E.; Sachsenmeier, Kris F.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT MEDI9447 is a human monoclonal antibody that is specific for the ectoenzyme CD73 and currently undergoing Phase I clinical trials. Here we show that MEDI9447 is a potent inhibitor of CD73 ectonucleotidase activity, with wide ranging immune regulatory consequences. MEDI9447 results in relief from adenosine monophosphate (AMP)-mediated lymphocyte suppression in vitro and inhibition of mouse syngeneic tumor growth in vivo. In contrast with other cancer immunotherapy agents such as checkpoint inhibitors or T-cell agonists, MEDI9447 drives changes in both myeloid and lymphoid infiltrating leukocyte populations within the tumor microenvironment of mouse models. Changes include significant alterations in a number of tumor micro-environmental subpopulations including increases in CD8+ effector cells and activated macrophages. Furthermore, these changes correlate directly with responder and non-responder subpopulations within animal studies using syngeneic tumors. Combination data showing additive activity between MEDI9447 and anti-PD-1 antibodies using human cells in vitro and mouse tumor models further demonstrate the potential value of relieving adenosine-mediated immunosuppression. Based on these data, a Phase I study to test the safety, tolerability, and clinical activity of MEDI9447 in cancer patients was initiated (NCT02503774). PMID:27622077

  7. Natural Compounds Regulate Glycolysis in Hypoxic Tumor Microenvironment

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Jian-Li; Chen, Ying-Ge

    2015-01-01

    In the early twentieth century, Otto Heinrich Warburg described an elevated rate of glycolysis occurring in cancer cells, even in the presence of atmospheric oxygen (the Warburg effect). Recently it became a therapeutically interesting strategy and is considered as an emerging hallmark of cancer. Hypoxia inducible factor-1 (HIF-1) is one of the key transcription factors that play major roles in tumor glycolysis and could directly trigger Warburg effect. Thus, how to inhibit HIF-1-depended Warburg effect to assist the cancer therapy is becoming a hot issue in cancer research. In fact, HIF-1 upregulates the glucose transporters (GLUT) and induces the expression of glycolytic enzymes, such as hexokinase, pyruvate kinase, and lactate dehydrogenase. So small molecules of natural origin used as GLUT, hexokinase, or pyruvate kinase isoform M2 inhibitors could represent a major challenge in the field of cancer treatment. These compounds aim to suppress tumor hypoxia induced glycolysis process to suppress the cell energy metabolism or enhance the susceptibility of tumor cells to radio- and chemotherapy. In this review, we highlight the role of natural compounds in regulating tumor glycolysis, with a main focus on the glycolysis under hypoxic tumor microenvironment. PMID:25685782

  8. Aberrant PGE₂ metabolism in bladder tumor microenvironment promotes immunosuppressive phenotype of tumor-infiltrating myeloid cells.

    PubMed

    Eruslanov, Evgeniy; Daurkin, Irina; Vieweg, Johannes; Daaka, Yehia; Kusmartsev, Sergei

    2011-07-01

    Bladder cancer is associated with enhanced inflammation and characterized by deregulated prostanoid metabolism. Here we examined prostaglandin E₂ (PGE₂) metabolism and myeloid cell subsets that infiltrate tumor tissue using two xenograft models of human bladder cancer. Human bladder tumor xenografts implanted into athymic nude mice become highly infiltrated with host CD11b myeloid cells of bone marrow origin. Fast growing SW780 bladder tumor xenografts were infiltrated with heterogeneous CD11b myeloid cell subsets including tumor-associated macrophages and myeloid-derived suppressor cells. In contrast, majority of myeloid cells in tumor tissue from slow growing bladder cancer Urothel 11 displayed more immature, homogenous phenotype and comprised mostly MHC II class-negative myeloid-derived suppressor cells. We demonstrate that human bladder tumors secrete substantial amounts of PGE₂. Normal bone marrow myeloid cell progenitors cultured in the presence of a bladder tumor-conditioned medium, which is enriched for PGE₂, failed to differentiate into mature APCs and acquired phenotype of the myeloid-derived suppressor cells or inflammatory macrophages with up-regulated chemokine receptor CXCR4. Collectively our data demonstrate that enhanced cancer-related inflammation and deregulated PGE₂ metabolism in tumor microenvironment promote immunosuppressive pro-tumoral phenotype of myeloid cells in bladder cancer. These data also suggest that not only local tumor microenvironment but other factors such as stage of cancer disease and pace of tumor growth could markedly influence the phenotype, differentiation and immune function of myeloid cells in tumor tissue.

  9. Neuropilin-1 stimulates tumor growth by increasing fibronectin fibril assembly in the tumor microenvironment

    PubMed Central

    Yaqoob, Usman; Cao, Sheng; Shergill, Uday; Jagavelu, Kumaravelu; Geng, Zhimin; Yin, Meng; de Assuncao, Thiago M; Cao, Ying; Szabolcs, Anna; Thorgeirsson, Snorri; Schwartz, Martin; Yang, Ju Dong; Ehman, Richard; Roberts, Lewis; Mukhopadhyay, Debabrata; Shah, Vijay H.

    2012-01-01

    The tumor microenvironment, including stromal myofibroblasts and associated matrix proteins, regulates cancer cell invasion and proliferation. Here we report that neuropilin-1 (NRP-1) orchestrates communications between myofibroblasts and soluble fibronectin (FN) that promote α5β1 integrin-dependent FN fibril assembly, matrix stiffness, and tumor growth. Tumor growth and FN fibril assembly was reduced by genetic depletion or antibody neutralization of NRP-1 from stromal myofibroblasts in vivo. Mechanistically, the increase in FN fibril assembly required glycosylation of serine 612 of the extracellular domain of NRP-1, an intact intracellular NRP-1 SEA domain, and intracellular associations between NRP-1, the scaffold protein GIPC, and the nonreceptor tyrosine kinase c-Abl, that augmented α5β1 FN fibril assembly activity. Analysis of human cancer specimens established an association between tumoral NRP-1 levels and clinical outcome. Our findings indicate that NRP-1 activates the tumor microenvironment, thereby promoting tumor growth. These results not only identify new molecular mechanisms of FN fibril assembly but also have important implications for therapeutic targeting of the myofibroblast in the tumor microenvironment. PMID:22738912

  10. Synergistic Effect and Molecular Mechanisms of Traditional Chinese Medicine on Regulating Tumor Microenvironment and Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Song, Zhuo; Li, Jie

    2016-01-01

    The interaction of tumor cells with the microenvironment is like a relationship between the “seeds” and “soil,” which is a hotspot in recent cancer research. Targeting at tumor microenvironment as well as tumor cells has become a new strategy for cancer treatment. Conventional cancer treatments mostly focused on single targets or single mechanism (the seeds or part of the soil); few researches intervened in the whole tumor microenvironment and achieved ideal therapeutic effect as expected. Traditional Chinese medicine displays a broad range of biological effects, and increasing evidence has shown that it may relate with synergistic effect on regulating tumor microenvironment and cancer cells. Based on literature review and our previous studies, we summarize the synergistic effect and the molecular mechanisms of traditional Chinese medicine on regulating tumor microenvironment and cancer cells. PMID:27042656

  11. Class (I) Phosphoinositide 3-Kinases in the Tumor Microenvironment

    PubMed Central

    Gyori, David; Chessa, Tamara; Hawkins, Phillip T.; Stephens, Len R.

    2017-01-01

    Phosphoinositide 3-kinases (PI3Ks) are a diverse family of enzymes which regulate various critical biological processes, such as cell proliferation and survival. Class (I) PI3Ks (PI3Kα, PI3Kβ, PI3Kγ and PI3Kδ) mediate the phosphorylation of the inositol ring at position D3 leading to the generation of PtdIns(3,4,5)P3. PtdIns(3,4,5)P3 can be dephosphorylated by several phosphatases, of which the best known is the 3-phosphatase PTEN (phosphatase and tensin homolog). The Class (I) PI3K pathway is frequently disrupted in human cancers where mutations are associated with increased PI3K-activity or loss of PTEN functionality within the tumor cells. However, the role of PI3Ks in the tumor stroma is less well understood. Recent evidence suggests that the white blood cell-selective PI3Kγ and PI3Kδ isoforms have an important role in regulating the immune-suppressive, tumor-associated myeloid cell and regulatory T cell subsets, respectively, and as a consequence are also critical for solid tumor growth. Moreover, PI3Kα is implicated in the direct regulation of tumor angiogenesis, and dysregulation of the PI3K pathway in stromal fibroblasts can also contribute to cancer progression. Therefore, pharmacological inhibition of the Class (I) PI3K family in the tumor microenvironment can be a highly attractive anti-cancer strategy and isoform-selective PI3K inhibitors may act as potent cancer immunotherapeutic and anti-angiogenic agents. PMID:28273837

  12. Water permeation drives tumor cell migration in confined microenvironments.

    PubMed

    Stroka, Kimberly M; Jiang, Hongyuan; Chen, Shih-Hsun; Tong, Ziqiu; Wirtz, Denis; Sun, Sean X; Konstantopoulos, Konstantinos

    2014-04-24

    Cell migration is a critical process for diverse (patho)physiological phenomena. Intriguingly, cell migration through physically confined spaces can persist even when typical hallmarks of 2D planar migration, such as actin polymerization and myosin II-mediated contractility, are inhibited. Here, we present an integrated experimental and theoretical approach ("Osmotic Engine Model") and demonstrate that directed water permeation is a major mechanism of cell migration in confined microenvironments. Using microfluidic and imaging techniques along with mathematical modeling, we show that tumor cells confined in a narrow channel establish a polarized distribution of Na+/H+ pumps and aquaporins in the cell membrane, which creates a net inflow of water and ions at the cell leading edge and a net outflow of water and ions at the trailing edge, leading to net cell displacement. Collectively, this study presents an alternate mechanism of cell migration in confinement that depends on cell-volume regulation via water permeation.

  13. Plumbagin inhibits breast tumor bone metastasis and osteolysis by modulating the tumor-bone microenvironment.

    PubMed

    Li, Z; Xiao, J; Wu, X; Li, W; Yang, Z; Xie, J; Xu, L; Cai, X; Lin, Z; Guo, W; Luo, J; Liu, M

    2012-09-01

    Bone metastasis is a common and serious consequence of breast cancer. Bidirectional interaction between tumor cells and the bone marrow microenvironment drives a so-called 'vicious cycle' that promotes tumor cell malignancy and stimulates osteolysis. Targeting these interactions and pathways in the tumor-bone microenvironment has been an encouraging strategy for bone metastasis therapy. In the present study, we examined the effects of plumbagin on breast cancer bone metastasis. Our data indicated that plumbagin inhibited cancer cell migration and invasion, suppressed the expression of osteoclast-activating factors, altered the cancer cell induced RANKL/OPG ratio in osteoblasts, and blocked both cancer cell- and RANKL-stimulated osteoclastogenesis. In mouse model of bone metastasis, we further demonstrated that plumbagin significantly repressed breast cancer cell metastasis and osteolysis, inhibited cancer cell induced-osteoclastogenesis and the secretion of osteoclast-activating factors in vivo. At the molecular level, we found that plumbagin abrogated RANKL-induced NF-κB and MAPK pathways by blocking RANK association with TRAF6 in osteoclastogenesis, and by inhibiting the expression of osteoclast-activating factors through the suppression of NF-κB activity in breast cancer cells. Taken together, our data demonstrate that plumbagin inhibits breast tumor bone metastasis and osteolysis by modulating the tumor-bone microenvironment and that plumbagin may serve as a novel agent in the treatment of tumor bone metastasis.

  14. Regulation of Transport Pathways in Tumor Vessels: Role of Tumor Type and Microenvironment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hobbs, Susan K.; Monsky, Wayne L.; Yuan, Fan; Roberts, W. Gregory; Griffith, Linda; Torchilin, Vladimir P.; Jain, Rakesh K.

    1998-04-01

    Novel anti-neoplastic agents such as gene targeting vectors and encapsulated carriers are quite large (approximately 100-300 nm in diameter). An understanding of the functional size and physiological regulation of transvascular pathways is necessary to optimize delivery of these agents. Here we analyze the functional limits of transvascular transport and its modulation by the microenvironment. One human and five murine tumors including mammary and colorectal carcinomas, hepatoma, glioma, and sarcoma were implanted in the dorsal skin-fold chamber or cranial window, and the pore cutoff size, a functional measure of transvascular gap size, was determined. The microenvironment was modulated: (i) spatially, by growing tumors in subcutaneous or cranial locations and (ii) temporally, by inducing vascular regression in hormone-dependent tumors. Tumors grown subcutaneously exhibited a characteristic pore cutoff size ranging from 200 nm to 1.2 μ m. This pore cutoff size was reduced in tumors grown in the cranium or in regressing tumors after hormone withdrawal. Vessels induced in basic fibroblast growth factor-containing gels had a pore cutoff size of 200 nm. Albumin permeability was independent of pore cutoff size. These results have three major implications for the delivery of therapeutic agents: (i) delivery may be less efficient in cranial tumors than in subcutaneous tumors, (ii) delivery may be reduced during tumor regression induced by hormonal ablation, and (iii) permeability to a molecule is independent of pore cutoff size as long as the diameter of the molecule is much less than the pore diameter.

  15. Caveolin-1 and Accelerated Host Aging in the Breast Tumor Microenvironment

    PubMed Central

    Mercier, Isabelle; Camacho, Jeanette; Titchen, Kanani; Gonzales, Donna M.; Quann, Kevin; Bryant, Kelly G.; Molchansky, Alexander; Milliman, Janet N.; Whitaker-Menezes, Diana; Sotgia, Federica; Jasmin, Jean-François; Schwarting, Roland; Pestell, Richard G.; Blagosklonny, Mikhail V.; Lisanti, Michael P.

    2013-01-01

    Increasing chronological age is the most significant risk factor for human cancer development. To examine the effects of host aging on mammary tumor growth, we used caveolin (Cav)-1 knockout mice as a bona fide model of accelerated host aging. Mammary tumor cells were orthotopically implanted into these distinct microenvironments (Cav-1+/+ versus Cav-1−/− age-matched young female mice). Mammary tumors grown in a Cav-1–deficient tumor microenvironment have an increased stromal content, with vimentin-positive myofibroblasts (a marker associated with oxidative stress) that are also positive for S6-kinase activation (a marker associated with aging). Mammary tumors grown in a Cav-1–deficient tumor microenvironment were more than fivefold larger than tumors grown in a wild-type microenvironment. Thus, a Cav-1–deficient tumor microenvironment provides a fertile soil for breast cancer tumor growth. Interestingly, the mammary tumor-promoting effects of a Cav-1–deficient microenvironment were estrogen and progesterone independent. In this context, chemoprevention was achieved by using the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) inhibitor and anti-aging drug, rapamycin. Systemic rapamycin treatment of mammary tumors grown in a Cav-1–deficient microenvironment significantly inhibited their tumor growth, decreased their stromal content, and reduced the levels of both vimentin and phospho-S6 in Cav-1–deficient cancer-associated fibroblasts. Since stromal loss of Cav-1 is a marker of a lethal tumor microenvironment in breast tumors, these high-risk patients might benefit from treatment with mTOR inhibitors, such as rapamycin or other rapamycin-related compounds (rapalogues). PMID:22698676

  16. MicroRNA deregulation in cancer cells and the tumor microenvironment

    PubMed Central

    Rupaimoole, Rajesha; Calin, George A.; Lopez-Berestein, Gabriel; Sood, Anil K.

    2015-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are a key component of the noncoding RNA family. The underlying mechanisms involved in the interplay between the tumor microenvironment and cancer cells involve highly dynamic factors such as hypoxia and cell types such as cancer-associated fibroblasts and macrophages. Although miRNA levels are known to be altered in cancer cells, recent evidence suggests a critical role for the tumor microenvironment in regulating miRNA biogenesis, methylation, and transcriptional changes. Here, we discuss the complex pro-tumorigenic symbiotic role between tumor cells, the tumor microenvironment, and miRNA deregulation. PMID:26865249

  17. Reactive Oxygen Species Regulate T Cell Immune Response in the Tumor Microenvironment

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xinfeng; Song, Mengjia

    2016-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) produced by cellular metabolism play an important role as signaling messengers in immune system. ROS elevated in the tumor microenvironment are associated with tumor-induced immunosuppression. T cell-based therapy has been recently approved to be effective for cancer treatment. However, T cells often become dysfunctional after reaching the tumor site. It has been reported that ROS participate extensively in T cells activation, apoptosis, and hyporesponsiveness. The sensitivity of T cells to ROS varies among different subsets. ROS can be regulated by cytokines, amino acid metabolism, and enzymatic activity. Immunosuppressive cells accumulate in the tumor microenvironment and induce apoptosis and functional suppression of T cells by producing ROS. Thus, modulating the level of ROS may be important to prolong survival of T cells and enhance their antitumor function. Combining T cell-based therapy with antioxidant treatment such as administration of ROS scavenger should be considered as a promising strategy in cancer treatment, aiming to improve antitumor T cells immunity. PMID:27547291

  18. Clinical impact of chemotherapy to improve tumor microenvironment of pancreatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Tsuchikawa, Takahiro; Takeuchi, Shintaro; Nakamura, Toru; Shichinohe, Toshiaki; Hirano, Satoshi

    2016-01-01

    A perioperative multimodal strategy including combination chemotherapy and radiotherapy, in addition to surgical resection, has been acknowledged to improve patient prognosis. However chemotherapy has not been actively applied as an immunomodulating modality because of concerns about various immunosuppressive effects. It has recently been shown that certain chemotherapeutic agents could modify tumor microenvironment and host immune responses through several underlying mechanisms such as immunogenic cell death, local T-cell infiltration and also the eradication of immune-suppressing regulatory cells such as regulatory T cells (Tregs) and myeloid-derived suppressor cells. With the better understanding of the cell components in the tumor microenvironment and the effect of chemotherapy to improve tumor microenvironment, it has been gradually clear that the chemotherapeutic agents is two-edged sword to have both immune promoting and suppressing effects. The cellular components of the tumor microenvironment include infiltrating T lymphocytes, dendritic cells, regulatory T cells, tumor associated macrophages, myeloid derived suppressor cells and cancer associated fibroblasts. Based on the better understanding of tumor microenvironment following chemotherapy, the treatment protocol could be modified as personalized medicine and the prognosis of pancreas cancer would be more improved utilizing multimodal chemotherapy. Here we review the recent advances of chemotherapy to improve tumor microenvironment of pancreatic cancer, introducing the unique feature of tumor microenvironment of pancreatic cancer, interaction between anti-cancer reagents and these constituting cells and future prospects. PMID:27895816

  19. WE-E-BRE-12: Tumor Microenvironment Dynamics Following Radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Campos, D; Niles, D; Adamson, E; Torres, A; Kissick, M; Eliceiri, K; Kimple, R

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: This work aims to understand the radiation-induced interplay between tumor oxygenation and metabolic activity. These dynamics can potentially serve as biomarkers in assessing treatment response allowing for patient-specific adaptive radiotherapy. Methods: Using patient-derived xenografts of head and neck cancer we assessed tumor oxygenation via fiber-optic probe monitored hemoglobin saturation and Blood Oxygen Level Dependent (BOLD) MRI. Measurements were taken before and after a 10 Gy dose of radiation. Changes in metabolic activity were measured via Fluorescence Lifetime IMaging (FLIM) with the appropriate controls following a 10 Gy dose of radiation. FLIM can non-invasively monitor changes in fluorescence in response to the microenvironment including being able to detect free and bound states of the intrinsically fluorescent metabolite NADH (Nicotinamide Adenine Dinucleotide). With this information FLIM can accurately quantify the metabolic state of cells that have been radiated. To model the observed changes, a two-compartment, source-sink simulation relating hemoglobin saturation and metabolic activity was performed using MATLAB. Results: Hemoglobin saturation as measured by interstitial probe and BOLD-MRI decreased by 30% within 15 minutes following radiation. FLIM demonstrated a decrease in the mean fluorescence lifetime of NADH by 100 ps following 10 Gy indicating a shift towards glycolytic pathways. Simulation of radiation-induced alterations in tumor oxygenation demonstrated that these changes can be the result of changes in either vasculature or metabolic activity. Conclusion: Radiation induces significant changes in hemoglobin saturation and metabolic activity. These alterations occur on time scales approximately the duration of common radiation treatments. Further understanding these dynamics has important implications with regard to improvement of therapy and biomarkers of treatment response.

  20. Dendritic Cells The Tumor Microenvironment and the Challenges for an Effective Antitumor Vaccination

    PubMed Central

    Benencia, Fabian; Sprague, Leslee; McGinty, John; Pate, Michelle; Muccioli, Maria

    2012-01-01

    Many clinical trials have been carried out or are in progress to assess the therapeutic potential of dendritic-cell- (DC-) based vaccines on cancer patients, and recently the first DC-based vaccine for human cancer was approved by the FDA. Herewith, we describe the general characteristics of DCs and different strategies to generate effective antitumor DC vaccines. In recent years, the relevance of the tumor microenvironment in the progression of cancer has been highlighted. It has been shown that the tumor microenvironment is capable of inactivating various components of the immune system responsible for tumor clearance. In particular, the effect of the tumor microenvironment on antigen-presenting cells, such as DCs, does not only render these immune cells unable to induce specific immune responses, but also turns them into promoters of tumor growth. We also describe strategies likely to increase the efficacy of DC vaccines by reprogramming the immunosuppressive nature of the tumor microenvironment. PMID:22505809

  1. Rapid dissolution of ZnO nanocrystals in acidic cancer microenvironment leading to preferential apoptosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sasidharan, Abhilash; Chandran, Parwathy; Menon, Deepthy; Raman, Sreerekha; Nair, Shantikumar; Koyakutty, Manzoor

    2011-09-01

    The microenvironment of cancer plays a very critical role in the survival, proliferation and drug resistance of solid tumors. Here, we report an interesting, acidic cancer microenvironment-mediated dissolution-induced preferential toxicity of ZnO nanocrystals (NCs) against cancer cells while leaving primary cells unaffected. Irrespective of the size-scale (5 and 200 nm) and surface chemistry differences (silica, starch or polyethylene glycol coating), ZnO NCs exhibited multiple stress mechanisms against cancer cell lines (IC50 ~150 μM) while normal human primary cells (human dermal fibroblast, lymphocytes, human umbilical vein endothelial cells) remain less affected. Flow cytometry and confocal microscopy studies revealed that ZnO NCs undergo rapid preferential dissolution in acidic (pH ~5-6) cancer microenvironment causing elevated ROS stress, mitochondrial superoxide formation, depolarization of mitochondrial membrane, and cell cycle arrest at S/G2 phase leading to apoptosis. In effect, by elucidating the unique toxicity mechanism of ZnO NCs, we show that ZnO NCs can destabilize cancer cells by utilizing its own hostile acidic microenvironment, which is otherwise critical for its survival.The microenvironment of cancer plays a very critical role in the survival, proliferation and drug resistance of solid tumors. Here, we report an interesting, acidic cancer microenvironment-mediated dissolution-induced preferential toxicity of ZnO nanocrystals (NCs) against cancer cells while leaving primary cells unaffected. Irrespective of the size-scale (5 and 200 nm) and surface chemistry differences (silica, starch or polyethylene glycol coating), ZnO NCs exhibited multiple stress mechanisms against cancer cell lines (IC50 ~150 μM) while normal human primary cells (human dermal fibroblast, lymphocytes, human umbilical vein endothelial cells) remain less affected. Flow cytometry and confocal microscopy studies revealed that ZnO NCs undergo rapid preferential dissolution in

  2. The irradiated tumor microenvironment: role of tumor-associated macrophages in vascular recovery

    PubMed Central

    Russell, Jeffery S.; Brown, J. Martin

    2013-01-01

    Radiotherapy is an important modality used in the treatment of more than 50% of cancer patients in the US. However, despite sophisticated techniques for radiation delivery as well as the combination of radiation with chemotherapy, tumors can recur. Thus, any method of improving the local control of the primary tumor by radiotherapy would produce a major improvement in the curability of cancer patients. One of the challenges in the field is to understand how the tumor vasculature can regrow after radiation in order to support tumor recurrence, as it is unlikely that any of the endothelial cells within the tumor could survive the doses given in a typical radiotherapy regimen. There is now considerable evidence from both preclinical and clinical studies that the tumor vasculature can be restored following radiotherapy from an influx of circulating cells consisting primarily of bone marrow derived monocytes and macrophages. The radiation-induced influx of bone marrow derived cells (BMDCs) into tumors can be prevented through the blockade of various cytokine pathways and such strategies can inhibit tumor recurrence. However, the post-radiation interactions between surviving tumor cells, recruited immune cells, and the remaining stroma remain poorly defined. While prior studies have described the monocyte/macrophage inflammatory response within normal tissues and in the tumor microenvironment, less is known about this response with respect to a tumor after radiation therapy. The goal of this review is to summarize existing research studies to provide an understanding of how the myelomonocytic lineage may influence vascular recovery within the irradiated tumor microenvironment. PMID:23882218

  3. The nature of myeloid-derived suppressor cells in the tumor microenvironment

    PubMed Central

    Gabrilovich, Dmitry I.

    2016-01-01

    Myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSC) are one of the major components of the tumor microenvironment. The main feature of these cells is their potent immune suppressive activity. MDSC are generated in the bone marrow, and in tumor-bearing hosts, migrate to peripheral lymphoid organs and the tumor to contribute to the formation of the tumor microenvironment. Recent findings have revealed differences in the function and fate of MDSC in the tumor and peripheral lymphoid organs. We review these findings here, and in this context we discuss the current understanding as to the nature of these differences, the underlying mechanisms, and their potential impact on the regulation of tumor progression. PMID:26858199

  4. Can cancer be reversed by engineering the tumor microenvironment?

    PubMed Central

    Ingber, Donald E.

    2008-01-01

    To advance cancer research in a transformative way, we must redefine the problem. Although epithelial cancers, such as breast cancer, may be caused by random somatic gene mutations, the reality is that this is only one of many ways to induce tumor formation. Cancers also can be produced in experimental systems in vitro and in vivo, for example, by inducing sustained alterations of extracellular matrix (ECM) structure. Moreover, certain epithelial cancers can be induced to ‘reboot’ and regenerate normal tissue morphology when combined with embryonic mesenchyme or exogenous ECM scaffolds that are produced through epithelial-stromal interactions. At the same time, work in the field of Mechanical Biology has revealed that many cell behaviors critical for cancer formation (e.g., growth, differentiation, motility, apoptosis) can be controlled by physical interactions between cells and their ECM adhesions that alter the mechanical force balance in the ECM, cell and cytoskeleton. Epithelial tumor progression also can be induced in vitro by changing ECM mechanics or altering cytoskeletal tension generation through manipulation of the Rho GTPase signaling pathway. Mechanical interactions between capillary cells and ECM that are mediated by Rho signaling similarly mediate control of capillary cell growth and angiogenesis, which are equally critical for cancer progression and metastasis. These findings question basic assumptions in the cancer field, and raise the intriguing possibility that cancer may be a reversible disease that results from progressive deregulation of tissue architecture, which leads to physical changes in cells and altered mechanical signaling. This perspective raises the possibility of developing a tissue engineering approach to cancer therapy in which biologically-inspired materials that mimic the embryonic microenvironment are used to induce cancers to revert into normal tissues. PMID:18472275

  5. [The tumoral microenvironment: feeding resources, battle field and therapeutic target in cancer].

    PubMed

    Fridman, Wolf H; Sautès-Fridman, Catherine

    2014-04-01

    Tumors grow surrounded by a complex cellular and tissular microenvironment. Its components influence disease outcome, some accelarating growth and invasion and others blocking it. From the very first steps leading a normal tissue to dysplasia, followed by a benign tumor which may become locally invasive and metastatic, interactions between the transformed cells and their microenvironment direct the evolution of this process. Chronic inflammation in a tissue favors tumor first appearance which then accentuate the nutritional and energetic properties of their microenvironment by producing neoangiogenic, immunosuppressive and inflammatory molecules. In contrast a strong memory Th1/cytotoxic reaction can prevent the transition from benign to malignant tumors and control cancer invasivness and metastasis. Knowledge of these multiple phenomena, discussed in the different articles of the present issue has a major clinical impact, since new prognostic tests and efficient novel therapeutic approaches which target the tumor microenvironment are actively developed.

  6. Tumor Irradiation Increases the Recruitment of Circulating Mesenchymal Stem Cells into the Tumor Microenvironment

    PubMed Central

    Klopp, Ann H.; Spaeth, Erika L.; Dembinski, Jennifer L.; Woodward, Wendy A.; Munshi, Anupama; Meyn, Raymond E.; Cox, James D.; Andreeff, Michael; Marini, Frank C.

    2011-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) migrate to and proliferate within sites of inflammation and tumors as part of the tissue remodeling process. Radiation increases the expression of inflammatory mediators that could enhance the recruitment of MSC into the tumor microenvironment. To investigate this, bilateral murine 4T1 breast carcinomas (expressing renilla luciferase) were irradiated unilaterally (1 or 2 Gy). Twenty-four hours later, 2 × 105 MSC-expressing firefly luciferase were injected i.v. Mice were then monitored with bioluminescent imaging for expression of both renilla (tumor) and firefly (MSC) luciferase. Forty-eight hours postirradiation, levels of MSC engraftment were 34% higher in tumors receiving 2 Gy (P = 0.004) than in the contralateral unirradiated limb. Immunohistochemical staining of tumor sections from mice treated unilaterally with 2 Gy revealed higher levels of MSC in the parenchyma of radiated tumors, whereas a higher proportion of MSC remained vasculature-associated in unirradiated tumors. To discern the potential mediators involved in MSC attraction, in vitro migration assays showed a 50% to 80% increase in MSC migration towards conditioned media from 1 to 5 Gy-irradiated 4T1 cells compared with unirradiated 4T1 cells. Irradiated 4T1 cells had increased expression of the cytokines, transforming growth factor-β1, vascular endothelial growth factor, and platelet-derived growth factor-BB, and this up-regulation was confirmed by immunohistochemistry in tumors irradiated in vivo. Interestingly, the chemokine receptor CCR2 was found to be up-regulated in MSC exposed to irradiated tumor cells and inhibition of CCR2 led to a marked decrease of MSC migration in vitro. In conclusion, clinically relevant low doses of irradiation increase the tropism for and engraftment of MSC in the tumor microenvironment. PMID:18089798

  7. Extended Time-lapse Intravital Imaging of Real-time Multicellular Dynamics in the Tumor Microenvironment

    PubMed Central

    Harney, Allison S.; Wang, Yarong; Condeelis, John S.; Entenberg, David

    2016-01-01

    In the tumor microenvironment, host stromal cells interact with tumor cells to promote tumor progression, angiogenesis, tumor cell dissemination and metastasis. Multicellular interactions in the tumor microenvironment can lead to transient events including directional tumor cell motility and vascular permeability. Quantification of tumor vascular permeability has frequently used end-point experiments to measure extravasation of vascular dyes. However, due to the transient nature of multicellular interactions and vascular permeability, the kinetics of these dynamic events cannot be discerned. By labeling cells and vasculature with injectable dyes or fluorescent proteins, high-resolution time-lapse intravital microscopy has allowed the direct, real-time visualization of transient events in the tumor microenvironment. Here we describe a method for using multiphoton microscopy to perform extended intravital imaging in live mice to directly visualize multicellular dynamics in the tumor microenvironment. This method details cellular labeling strategies, the surgical preparation of a mammary skin flap, the administration of injectable dyes or proteins by tail vein catheter and the acquisition of time-lapse images. The time-lapse sequences obtained from this method facilitate the visualization and quantitation of the kinetics of cellular events of motility and vascular permeability in the tumor microenvironment. PMID:27341448

  8. Regulatory T Cells in the Tumor Microenvironment and Cancer Progression: Role and Therapeutic Targeting

    PubMed Central

    Chaudhary, Belal; Elkord, Eyad

    2016-01-01

    Recent years have seen significant efforts in understanding and modulating the immune response in cancer. In this context, immunosuppressive cells, including regulatory T cells (Tregs) and myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs), have come under intense investigation for their proposed roles in suppressing tumor-specific immune responses and establishing an immunosuppressive tumor microenvironment, thus enabling tumor immune evasion. Additionally, recent evidence indicates that Tregs comprise diverse and heterogeneous subsets; phenotypically and functionally distinct subsets of tumor-infiltrating Tregs could contribute differently to cancer prognosis and clinical outcomes. Understanding Treg biology in the setting of cancer, and specifically the tumor microenvironment, is important for designing effective cancer therapies. In this review, we critically examine the role of Tregs in the tumor microenvironment and in cancer progression focusing on human studies. We also discuss the impact of current therapeutic modalities on Treg biology and the therapeutic opportunities for targeting Tregs to enhance anti-tumor immune responses and clinical benefits. PMID:27509527

  9. Mapping spatial heterogeneity in the tumor microenvironment: a new era for digital pathology.

    PubMed

    Heindl, Andreas; Nawaz, Sidra; Yuan, Yinyin

    2015-04-01

    The emergent field of digital pathology employing automated image analysis techniques is to revolutionize traditional pathology at the center of clinical diagnostics. Histological images provide important tumor features unavailable in molecular profiling or omics data- the spatial context of tumor and stromal cells at single-cell resolution. Methods to map the spatial and morphological patterns of cancer and normal cells can contribute to a more comprehensive understanding of the highly heterogeneous tumor microenvironment. This review focuses on methods that help expand our knowledge of intra-tumoral spatial heterogeneity of the tumor microenvironment and their potential synergies with molecular profiling technologies.

  10. Acidic microenvironment and bone pain in cancer-colonized bone

    PubMed Central

    Yoneda, Toshiyuki; Hiasa, Masahiro; Nagata, Yuki; Okui, Tatsuo; White, Fletcher A

    2015-01-01

    Solid cancers and hematologic cancers frequently colonize bone and induce skeletal-related complications. Bone pain is one of the most common complications associated with cancer colonization in bone and a major cause of increased morbidity and diminished quality of life, leading to poor survival in cancer patients. Although the mechanisms responsible for cancer-associated bone pain (CABP) are poorly understood, it is likely that complex interactions among cancer cells, bone cells and peripheral nerve cells contribute to the pathophysiology of CABP. Clinical observations that specific inhibitors of osteoclasts reduce CABP indicate a critical role of osteoclasts. Osteoclasts are proton-secreting cells and acidify extracellular bone microenvironment. Cancer cell-colonized bone also releases proton/lactate to avoid intracellular acidification resulting from increased aerobic glycolysis known as the Warburg effect. Thus, extracellular microenvironment of cancer-colonized bone is acidic. Acidosis is algogenic for nociceptive sensory neurons. The bone is densely innervated by the sensory neurons that express acid-sensing nociceptors. Collectively, CABP is evoked by the activation of these nociceptors on the sensory neurons innervating bone by the acidic extracellular microenvironment created by bone-resorbing osteoclasts and bone-colonizing cancer cells. As current treatments do not satisfactorily control CABP and can elicit serious side effects, new therapeutic interventions are needed to manage CABP. Understanding of the cellular and molecular mechanism by which the acidic extracellular microenvironment is created in cancer-colonized bone and by which the expression and function of the acid-sensing nociceptors on the sensory neurons are regulated would facilitate to develop novel therapeutic approaches for the management of CABP. PMID:25987988

  11. Novel Therapeutic Targets to Inhibit Tumor Microenvironment Induced Castration-resistant Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-10-01

    AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-13-1-0163 TITLE: Novel Therapeutic Targets to Inhibit Tumor Microenvironment Induced Castration-resistant Prostate Cancer ...Castration-resistant Prostate Cancer 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) Feng Yang, Ph.D. 5d. PROJECT NUMBER 5e. TASK...Annual Progress Report W81XWH-13-1-0163 Novel Therapeutic Targets to Inhibit Tumor Microenvironment Induced Castration-resistant Prostate Cancer

  12. Defining the Recruitment of Reactive Stroma Progenitor Cells to the Tumor Microenvironment of Human Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-02-01

    AD Award Number: W81XWH-08-1-0059 TITLE: Defining the Recruitment of Reactive Stroma Progenitor Cells to the Tumor Microenvironment of Human...2008 - 6 Jan 2009 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Defining the Recruitment of Reactive Stroma Progenitor Cells to the Tumor Microenvironment of Human...Symposium on Stem Cells , Cancer, and Aging in Singapore RESEARCH EXPERIENCE 2001 Baylor College of Medicine, Department of Pulmonary and Critical

  13. Evolution and morphology of microenvironment-enhanced malignancy of three-dimensional invasive solid tumors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiao, Yang; Torquato, Salvatore

    2013-05-01

    The emergence of invasive and metastatic behavior in malignant tumors can often lead to fatal outcomes for patients. The collective malignant tumor behavior resulting from the complex tumor-host interactions and the interactions between the tumor cells is currently poorly understood. In this paper, we employ a cellular automaton (CA) model to investigate microenvironment-enhanced malignant behaviors and morphologies of in vitro avascular invasive solid tumors in three dimensions. Our CA model incorporates a variety of microscopic-scale tumor-host interactions, including the degradation of the extracellular matrix by the malignant cells, nutrient-driven cell migration, pressure buildup due to the deformation of the microenvironment by the growing tumor, and its effect on the local tumor-host interface stability. Moreover, the effects of cell-cell adhesion on tumor growth are explicitly taken into account. Specifically, we find that while strong cell-cell adhesion can suppress the invasive behavior of the tumors growing in soft microenvironments, cancer malignancy can be significantly enhanced by harsh microenvironmental conditions, such as exposure to high pressure levels. We infer from the simulation results a qualitative phase diagram that characterizes the expected malignant behavior of invasive solid tumors in terms of two competing malignancy effects: the rigidity of the microenvironment and cell-cell adhesion. This diagram exhibits phase transitions between noninvasive and invasive behaviors. We also discuss the implications of our results for the diagnosis, prognosis, and treatment of malignant tumors.

  14. Fibroblast activation protein α in tumor microenvironment: Recent progression and implications (Review)

    PubMed Central

    ZI, FUMING; HE, JINGSONG; HE, DONGHUA; LI, YI; YANG, LI; CAI, ZHEN

    2015-01-01

    Accumulated evidence has demonstrated that the microenvironment of a given tumor is important in determining its drug resistance, tumorigenesis, progression and metastasis. These microenvironments, like tumor cells, are vital targets for cancer therapy. The cross-talk between tumor cells and cancer-associated fibroblasts (CAFs, alternatively termed activated fibroblasts) is crucial in regulating the drug resistance, tumorigenesis, neoplastic progression, angiogenesis, invasion and metastasis of a tumor. Fibroblast activation protein α (FAPα) is a transmembrane serine protease and is highly expressed on CAFs present in >90% of human epithelial neoplasms. FAPα activity, alongside that of gelatinase and type I collagenase, has become increasingly important in cancer therapy due to its effectiveness in modulating tumor behavior. In this review, recent progression in the knowledge of the role of FAPα in tumor microenvironments is discussed. PMID:25593080

  15. Implication of Tumor Microenvironment in Chemoresistance: Tumor-Associated Stromal Cells Protect Tumor Cells from Cell Death

    PubMed Central

    Castells, Magali; Thibault, Benoît; Delord, Jean-Pierre; Couderc, Bettina

    2012-01-01

    Tumor development principally occurs following the accumulation of genetic and epigenetic alterations in tumor cells. These changes pave the way for the transformation of chemosensitive cells to chemoresistant ones by influencing the uptake, metabolism, or export of drugs at the cellular level. Numerous reports have revealed the complexity of tumors and their microenvironment with tumor cells located within a heterogeneous population of stromal cells. These stromal cells (fibroblasts, endothelial or mesothelial cells, adipocytes or adipose tissue-derived stromal cells, immune cells and bone marrow-derived stem cells) could be involved in the chemoresistance that is acquired by tumor cells via several mechanisms: (i) cell–cell and cell–matrix interactions influencing the cancer cell sensitivity to apoptosis; (ii) local release of soluble factors promoting survival and tumor growth (crosstalk between stromal and tumor cells); (iii) direct cell-cell interactions with tumor cells (crosstalk or oncologic trogocytosis); (iv) generation of specific niches within the tumor microenvironment that facilitate the acquisition of drug resistance; or (v) conversion of the cancer cells to cancer-initiating cells or cancer stem cells. This review will focus on the implication of each member of the heterogeneous population of stromal cells in conferring resistance to cytotoxins and physiological mediators of cell death. PMID:22949815

  16. Microfluidic Biopsy Trapping Device for the Real-Time Monitoring of Tumor Microenvironment

    PubMed Central

    Holton, Angela Babetski; Sinatra, Francy L.; Altiok, Soner

    2017-01-01

    The tumor microenvironment is composed of cellular and stromal components such as tumor cells, mesenchymal cells, immune cells, cancer associated fibroblasts and the supporting extracellular matrix. The tumor microenvironment provides crucial support for growth and progression of tumor cells and affects tumor response to therapeutic interventions. To better understand tumor biology and to develop effective cancer therapeutic agents it is important to develop preclinical platforms that can faithfully recapitulate the tumor microenvironment and the complex interaction between the tumor and its surrounding stromal elements. Drug studies performed in vitro with conventional two-dimensional cancer cell line models do not optimally represent clinical drug response as they lack true tumor heterogeneity and are often performed in static culture conditions lacking stromal tumor components that significantly influence the metabolic activity and proliferation of cells. Recent microfluidic approaches aim to overcome such obstacles with the use of cell lines derived in artificial three-dimensional supportive gels or micro-chambers. However, absence of a true tumor microenvironment and full interstitial flow, leads to less than optimal evaluation of tumor response to drug treatment. Here we report a continuous perfusion microfluidic device coupled with microscopy and image analysis for the assessment of drug effects on intact fresh tumor tissue. We have demonstrated that fine needle aspirate biopsies obtained from patient-derived xenograft models of adenocarcinoma of the lung can successfully be analyzed for their response to ex vivo drug treatment within this biopsy trapping microfluidic device, wherein a protein kinase C inhibitor, staurosporine, was used to assess tumor cell death as a proof of principle. This approach has the potential to study tumor tissue within its intact microenvironment to better understand tumor response to drug treatments and eventually to choose the

  17. The tumor microenvironment: An irreplaceable element of tumor budding and epithelial-mesenchymal transition-mediated cancer metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Li, Hui; Xu, Fangying; Li, Si; Zhong, Anjing; Meng, Xianwen; Lai, Maode

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Tumor budding occurs at the invasive front of cancer; the tumor cells involved have metastatic and stemness features, indicating a poor prognosis. Tumor budding is partly responsible for cancer metastasis, and its initiation is based on the epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) process. The EMT process involves the conversion of epithelial cells into migratory and invasive cells, and is a profound event in tumorigenesis. The EMT, associated with the formation of cancer stem cells (CSCs) and resistance to therapy, results from a combination of gene mutation, epigenetic regulation, and microenvironmental control. Tumor budding can be taken to represent the EMT in vivo. The EMT process is under the influence of the tumor microenvironment as well as tumor cells themselves. Here, we demonstrate that the tumor microenvironment dominates EMT development and impacts cancer metastasis, as well as promotes CSC formation and mediates drug resistance. In this review, we mainly discuss components of the microenvironment, such as the extracellular matrix (ECM), inflammatory cytokines, metabolic products, and hypoxia, that are involved in and impact on the acquisition of tumor-cell motility and dissemination, the EMT, metastatic tumor-cell formation, tumor budding and CSCs, and cancer metastasis, including subsequent chemo-resistance. From our point of view, the tumor microenvironment now constitutes a promising target for cancer therapy. PMID:26743180

  18. Expanding Applications of the Nano Intravital Device as a Platform for Exploring Tumor Microenvironments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Padgen, Michael R.

    The tumor microenvironment has been demonstrated to be a key determinant in the progression of cancer. Unfortunately, the mechanisms behind the different microenvironments (cytokine gradients, hypoxia, hypoglycemia, etc) have not been fully elucidated. Identifying these mechanisms can lead to targeted, individualized therapy to prevent metastasis. The Nano Intravital Device (NANIVID) is a microfabricated, implantable device designed to initiate specific microenvironments in vivo so that the time course of the effects can be observed. With both spatial and temporal control over the induced environments, the affected regions of the tumor can be compared to the rest of the tumor. The NANIVID was first used to establish cytokine gradients to monitor the migration of invasive cancer cells. The three projects that comprise this work expand the applications of the NANIVID to establish the device as a robust platform for investigating tumor microenvironment interactions. The first project released chemical mimics from the device to induce the cellular hypoxic response in tumors to determine how hypoxia affects the fate of disseminated tumor cells. The second project used the NANIVID in combination with an atomic force microscope to investigate the altered mechanics of migrating invasive cancer cells. The final project was to develop a cell counter to monitor the isolation of the invasive subpopulation of cells that were drawn into the device using a chemoattractant. These three projects demonstrate the potential of the NANIVID as a platform for investigating the tumor microenvironment.

  19. Metastasis Suppressors Regulate the Tumor Microenvironment by Blocking Recruitment of Prometastatic Tumor-Associated Macrophages.

    PubMed

    Frankenberger, Casey; Rabe, Daniel; Bainer, Russell; Sankarasharma, Devipriya; Chada, Kiran; Krausz, Thomas; Gilad, Yoav; Becker, Lev; Rosner, Marsha Rich

    2015-10-01

    Triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) patients have the highest risk of recurrence and metastasis. Because they cannot be treated with targeted therapies, and many do not respond to chemotherapy, they represent a clinically underserved group. TNBC is characterized by reduced expression of metastasis suppressors such as Raf kinase inhibitory protein (RKIP), which inhibits tumor invasiveness. Mechanisms by which metastasis suppressors alter tumor cells are well characterized; however, their ability to regulate the tumor microenvironment and the importance of such regulation to metastasis suppression are incompletely understood. Here, we use species-specific RNA sequencing to show that RKIP expression in tumors markedly reduces the number and metastatic potential of infiltrating tumor-associated macrophages (TAM). TAMs isolated from nonmetastatic RKIP(+) tumors, relative to metastatic RKIP(-) tumors, exhibit a reduced ability to drive tumor cell invasion and decreased secretion of prometastatic factors, including PRGN, and shed TNFR2. RKIP regulates TAM recruitment by blocking HMGA2, resulting in reduced expression of numerous macrophage chemotactic factors, including CCL5. CCL5 overexpression in RKIP(+) tumors restores recruitment of prometastatic TAMs and intravasation, whereas treatment with the CCL5 receptor antagonist Maraviroc reduces TAM infiltration. These results highlight the importance of RKIP as a regulator of TAM recruitment through chemokines such as CCL5. The clinical significance of these interactions is underscored by our demonstration that a signature comprised of RKIP signaling and prometastatic TAM factors strikingly separates TNBC patients based on survival outcome. Collectively, our findings identify TAMs as a previously unsuspected mechanism by which the metastasis-suppressor RKIP regulates tumor invasiveness, and further suggest that TNBC patients with decreased RKIP activity and increased TAM infiltration may respond to macrophage

  20. A High-Throughput Screening Model of the Tumor Microenvironment for Ovarian Cancer Cell Growth.

    PubMed

    Lal-Nag, Madhu; McGee, Lauren; Guha, Rajarshi; Lengyel, Ernst; Kenny, Hilary A; Ferrer, Marc

    2017-01-01

    The tumor microenvironment plays an important role in the processes of tumor growth, metastasis, and drug resistance. We have used a multilayered 3D primary cell culture model that reproduces the human ovarian cancer metastatic microenvironment to study the effect of the microenvironment on the pharmacological responses of different classes of drugs on cancer cell proliferation. A collection of oncology drugs was screened to identify compounds that inhibited the proliferation of ovarian cancer cells growing as monolayers or forming spheroids, on plastic and on a 3D microenvironment culture model of the omentum metastatic site, and also cells already in preformed spheroids. Target-based analysis of the pharmacological responses revealed that several classes of targets were more efficacious in cancer cells growing in the absence of the metastatic microenvironment, and other target classes were less efficacious in cancer cells in preformed spheres compared to forming spheroid cultures. These findings show that both the cellular context of the tumor microenvironment and cell adhesion mode have an essential role in cancer cell drug resistance. Therefore, it is important to perform screens for new drugs using model systems that more faithfully recapitulate the tissue composition at the site of tumor growth and metastasis.

  1. Role of the tumor microenvironment in mature B-cell lymphoid malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Fowler, Nathan H.; Cheah, Chan Yoon; Gascoyne, Randy D.; Gribben, John; Neelapu, Sattva S.; Ghia, Paolo; Bollard, Catherine; Ansell, Stephen; Curran, Michael; Wilson, Wyndham H.; O’Brien, Susan; Grant, Cliona; Little, Richard; Zenz, Thorsten; Nastoupil, Loretta J.; Dunleavy, Kieron

    2016-01-01

    The tumor microenvironment is the cellular and molecular environment in which the tumor exists and with which it continuously interacts. In B-cell lymphomas, this microenvironment is intriguing in that it plays critical roles in the regulation of tumor cell survival and proliferation, fostering immune escape as well as the development of treatment resistance. The purpose of this review is to summarize the proceedings of the Second Annual Summit on the Immune Microenvironment in Hematologic Malignancies that took place on September 11–12, 2014 in Dublin, Ireland. We provide a timely overview of the composition and biological relevance of the cellular and molecular microenvironment interface and discuss the role of interactions between the microenvironment and neoplastic cells in a variety of B-cell lymphomas. In addition, we focus on various novel therapeutic strategies that target the tumor microenvironment, including agents that modulate B-cell receptor pathways and immune-checkpoints, chimeric antigen receptor T cells and immunomodulatory agents. PMID:27132279

  2. Immunomodulation of the tumor microenvironment by neutralization of Semaphorin 4D

    PubMed Central

    Evans, Elizabeth E; Paris, Mark; Smith, Ernest S; Zauderer, Maurice

    2015-01-01

    Semaphorin 4D is highly expressed at the invasive tumor margin and acts as a guidance molecule, restricting movement of tumoricidal immune cells into the tumor microenvironment. We recently showed that antibody neutralization of SEMA4D augmented activated monocyte and anticancer T-cell tumor penetration and that anti-SEMA4D antibody potentiated other immunomodulatory therapies in murine tumor models. PMID:26587332

  3. MUC1 modulates the tumor immune microenvironment through the engagement of Siglec-9

    PubMed Central

    Beatson, Richard; Tajadura-Ortega, Virginia; Achkova, Daniela; Picco, Gianfranco; Tsourouktsoglou, Theodora-Dorita; Klausing, Sandra; Hillier, Matthew; Maher, John; Noll, Thomas; Crocker, Paul R.; Taylor-Papadimitriou, Joyce; Burchell, Joy M.

    2016-01-01

    Siglec-9 is a sialic acid binding lectin predominantly expressed on myeloid cells. Aberrant glycosylation occurs in essentially all types of cancers resulting in increased sialylation. Thus when MUC1 is expressed on cancer cells it is decorated by multiple short, sialylated O-linked glycans (MUC1-ST). Here we show that this cancer-specific MUC1 glycoform could, through the engagement of Siglec-9, educate myeloid cells to release factors associated with tumor microenvironment determination and disease progression. Moreover MUC1-ST induced macrophages to display a TAM-like phenotype with increased expression of PD-L1. MUC1-ST binding to Siglec-9 did not activate SHP-1/2 but surprisingly induced calcium flux leading to MEK-ERK activation. This work defines a critical role for aberrantly glycosylated MUC1 and identifies an activating pathway following Siglec-9 engagement. PMID:27595232

  4. B7x and myeloid-derived suppressor cells in the tumor microenvironment

    PubMed Central

    Jeon, Hyungjun; Ohaegbulam, Kim C; Abadi, Yael M; Zang, Xingxing

    2013-01-01

    A new study demonstrates the tumorigenic functions of B7x and reveals a link between B7x and myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) within the tumor microenvironment. We propose that the binding of B7x to a hitherto unidentified receptor on MDSCs may stimulate their proliferation and/or immunosuppressive functions, hence promoting tumor growth. PMID:24073367

  5. The PTEN pathway in Tregs is a critical driver of the suppressive tumor microenvironment

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Madhav D.; Shinde, Rahul; McGaha, Tracy L.; Huang, Lei; Holmgaard, Rikke B.; Wolchok, Jedd D.; Mautino, Mario R.; Celis, Esteban; Sharpe, Arlene H.; Francisco, Loise M.; Powell, Jonathan D.; Yagita, Hideo; Mellor, Andrew L.; Blazar, Bruce R.; Munn, David H.

    2015-01-01

    The tumor microenvironment is profoundly immunosuppressive. We show that multiple tumor types create intratumoral immune suppression driven by a specialized form of regulatory T cell (Treg) activation dependent on the PTEN (phosphatase and tensin homolog) lipid phosphatase. PTEN acted to stabilize Tregs in tumors, preventing them from reprogramming into inflammatory effector cells. In mice with a Treg-specific deletion of PTEN, tumors grew slowly, were inflamed, and could not create an immunosuppressive tumor microenvironment. In normal mice, exposure to apoptotic tumor cells rapidly elicited PTEN-expressing Tregs, and PTEN-deficient mice were unable to maintain tolerance to apoptotic cells. In wild-type mice with large established tumors, pharmacologic inhibition of PTEN after chemotherapy or immunotherapy profoundly reconfigured the tumor microenvironment, changing it from a suppressive to an inflammatory milieu, and tumors underwent rapid regression. Thus, the immunosuppressive milieu in tumors must be actively maintained, and tumors become susceptible to immune attack if the PTEN pathway in Tregs is disrupted. PMID:26601142

  6. A Brain Tumor/Organotypic Slice Co-culture System for Studying Tumor Microenvironment and Targeted Drug Therapies.

    PubMed

    Chadwick, Emily J; Yang, David P; Filbin, Mariella G; Mazzola, Emanuele; Sun, Yu; Behar, Oded; Pazyra-Murphy, Maria F; Goumnerova, Liliana; Ligon, Keith L; Stiles, Charles D; Segal, Rosalind A

    2015-11-07

    Brain tumors are a major cause of cancer-related morbidity and mortality. Developing new therapeutics for these cancers is difficult, as many of these tumors are not easily grown in standard culture conditions. Neurosphere cultures under serum-free conditions and orthotopic xenografts have expanded the range of tumors that can be maintained. However, many types of brain tumors remain difficult to propagate or study. This is particularly true for pediatric brain tumors such as pilocytic astrocytomas and medulloblastomas. This protocol describes a system that allows primary human brain tumors to be grown in culture. This quantitative assay can be used to investigate the effect of microenvironment on tumor growth, and to test new drug therapies. This protocol describes a system where fluorescently labeled brain tumor cells are grown on an organotypic brain slice from a juvenile mouse. The response of tumor cells to drug treatments can be studied in this assay, by analyzing changes in the number of cells on the slice over time. In addition, this system can address the nature of the microenvironment that normally fosters growth of brain tumors. This brain tumor organotypic slice co-culture assay provides a propitious system for testing new drugs on human tumor cells within a brain microenvironment.

  7. A Brain Tumor/Organotypic Slice Co-culture System for Studying Tumor Microenvironment and Targeted Drug Therapies

    PubMed Central

    Chadwick, Emily J.; Yang, David P.; Filbin, Mariella G.; Mazzola, Emanuele; Sun, Yu; Behar, Oded; Pazyra-Murphy, Maria F.; Goumnerova, Liliana; Ligon, Keith L.; Stiles, Charles D.; Segal, Rosalind A.

    2015-01-01

    Brain tumors are a major cause of cancer-related morbidity and mortality. Developing new therapeutics for these cancers is difficult, as many of these tumors are not easily grown in standard culture conditions. Neurosphere cultures under serum-free conditions and orthotopic xenografts have expanded the range of tumors that can be maintained. However, many types of brain tumors remain difficult to propagate or study. This is particularly true for pediatric brain tumors such as pilocytic astrocytomas and medulloblastomas. This protocol describes a system that allows primary human brain tumors to be grown in culture. This quantitative assay can be used to investigate the effect of microenvironment on tumor growth, and to test new drug therapies. This protocol describes a system where fluorescently labeled brain tumor cells are grown on an organotypic brain slice from a juvenile mouse. The response of tumor cells to drug treatments can be studied in this assay, by analyzing changes in the number of cells on the slice over time. In addition, this system can address the nature of the microenvironment that normally fosters growth of brain tumors. This brain tumor organotypic slice co-culture assay provides a propitious system for testing new drugs on human tumor cells within a brain microenvironment. PMID:26575352

  8. The Bed and the Bugs: Interactions between the Tumor Microenvironment and Cancer Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Castaño, Zafira; Fillmore, Christine M.; Kim, Carla F.; McAllister, Sandra S.

    2012-01-01

    Tumors have been increasingly recognized as organs with a complexity that approaches, and may even exceed, that of healthy tissues. When viewed from this perspective, the biology of a tumor can be understood only by studying tumor cell heterogeneity and the microenvironment that is constructed during the course of tumorigenesis and malignant progression. Recent work has revealed the existence of cancer stem cells, the “bugs”, with the capacity for self-renewal and tumor propagation. In addition, it is now recognized that the tumor microenvironment, the “bed”, plays a critical role in supporting cancer stem cells and also may promote neoplasia and malignant progression. The interdependence of the cell-intrinsic features of cancer, including the cancer stem cell “bugs” and the tumor microenvironment “bed”, is only beginning to be understood. In this review, we highlight the rapidly evolving concepts about the interactions between tumor stem cells and their microenvironment, the insights gained from studying their normal tissue counterparts, and the questions and controversies surrounding this area of research, with an emphasis on breast and lung cancer. Finally, we address evidence supporting the notion that eliminating the bed as well as the bugs should lead to more effective and personalized cancer treatments that improve patient outcome. PMID:22548722

  9. The bed and the bugs: interactions between the tumor microenvironment and cancer stem cells.

    PubMed

    Castaño, Zafira; Fillmore, Christine M; Kim, Carla F; McAllister, Sandra S

    2012-10-01

    Tumors have been increasingly recognized as organs with a complexity that approaches, and may even exceed, that of healthy tissues. When viewed from this perspective, the biology of a tumor can be understood only by studying tumor cell heterogeneity and the microenvironment that is constructed during the course of tumorigenesis and malignant progression. Recent work has revealed the existence of cancer stem cells, the "bugs", with the capacity for self-renewal and tumor propagation. In addition, it is now recognized that the tumor microenvironment, the "bed", plays a critical role in supporting cancer stem cells and also may promote neoplasia and malignant progression. The interdependence of the cell-intrinsic features of cancer, including the cancer stem cell "bugs" and the tumor microenvironment "bed", is only beginning to be understood. In this review, we highlight the rapidly evolving concepts about the interactions between tumor stem cells and their microenvironment, the insights gained from studying their normal tissue counterparts, and the questions and controversies surrounding this area of research, with an emphasis on breast and lung cancer. Finally, we address evidence supporting the notion that eliminating the bed as well as the bugs should lead to more effective and personalized cancer treatments that improve patient outcome.

  10. ME-10TUMOR MICROENVIRONMENT INFILTRATING MYELOID DERIVED SUPPRESSOR CELLS INHIBIT ANTI-TUMOR T CELL RESPONSES

    PubMed Central

    Kamran, Neha; Ayala, Mariela; Li, Youping; Assi, Hikmat; Candolfi, Marianela; Dzaman, Marta; Lowenstein, Pedro; Castro, Maria

    2014-01-01

    MDSCs represent a population of immature myeloid cells at various stages of differentiation that inhibit anti-tumor T cell-mediated responses. We demonstrate the accumulation of MDSCs in GL26 induced glioma and B16 melanoma bearing mice. Absolute numbers of Ly-6G+ (Gr-1high) MDSCs showed a 200 fold increase within the tumor microenvironment (TME) 28 days post-tumor implantation. The numbers of Ly-6C+ (Gr-1low) MDSCs also showed a similar trend within the TME. While this massive influx of MDSCs was noted within intracranial tumors, MDSC levels did not increase in the dLNs, spleen or bone marrow (BM) of intracranial tumor bearing mice. MDSCs numbers were significantly elevated in the blood of GL26 intracranial tumor bearing mice at 28 days. Mice bearing B16 tumors in the flank showed a ∼5 fold increased influx of Ly-6G+ MDSCs while the Ly6C+ MDSCs increased marginally by 1.1 fold within the tumor mass. Levels of circulating MDSCs also increased by ∼10 fold, while the levels of splenic MDSCs did not change. While both Ly-6G+ and Ly6C+ MDSCs isolated from the brain TME of GL26 intracranial tumor bearing mice inhibited antigen-specific T cell proliferation, Ly6C+ MDSC were found to be more efficient. Ly6G+ or Ly6C+ MDSCs from the bone marrow of intracranial tumor bearing mice failed to suppress antigen-specific T cell proliferation. Splenic and bone marrow MDSCs from naïve mice also did not inhibit antigen-specific T cell proliferation suggesting that TME derived factors may activate MDSCs to exert their immune-suppressive properties. Microarray analysis of glioma cell lines showed elevated levels of CXCL1 mRNA and splenic MDSCs from GL26 tumor mice showed upregulation of the CXCR2 mRNA. Preliminary experiments indicate that CXCR2 signaling mediates MDSC chemotaxis. Overall, our data suggests that strategies that inhibit MDSC recruitment to the TME and/or block their activity could enhance the T cell mediated tumor clearance.

  11. Immunomodulatory Function of the Tumor Suppressor p53 in Host Immune Response and the Tumor Microenvironment

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Yan; Guo, Gang

    2016-01-01

    The tumor suppressor p53 is the most frequently mutated gene in human cancers. Most of the mutations are missense leading to loss of p53 function in inducing apoptosis and senescence. In addition to these autonomous effects of p53 inactivation/dysfunction on tumorigenesis, compelling evidence suggests that p53 mutation/inactivation also leads to gain-of-function or activation of non-autonomous pathways, which either directly or indirectly promote tumorigenesis. Experimental and clinical results suggest that p53 dysfunction fuels pro-tumor inflammation and serves as an immunological gain-of-function driver of tumorigenesis via skewing immune landscape of the tumor microenvironment (TME). It is now increasingly appreciated that p53 dysfunction in various cellular compartments of the TME leads to immunosuppression and immune evasion. Although our understanding of the cellular and molecular processes that link p53 activity to host immune regulation is still incomplete, it is clear that activating/reactivating the p53 pathway in the TME also represents a compelling immunological strategy to reverse immunosuppression and enhance antitumor immunity. Here, we review our current understanding of the potential cellular and molecular mechanisms by which p53 participates in immune regulation and discuss how targeting the p53 pathway can be exploited to alter the immunological landscape of tumors for maximizing therapeutic outcome. PMID:27869779

  12. Reconstitution of a metastatic-resistant tumor microenvironment with cancer-associated fibroblasts enables metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Murata, Takuya; Hoffman, Robert M.

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT The tumor microenvironment is critical for metastasis to occur. Subcutaneous xenografts of tumors in immunodeficient mice are usually encapsulated and rarely metastasize as opposed to orthotopic tumors which metastasize if the original tumor was metastatic. In the present report, we were able to reconstitute a metastatic tumor microenvironment by subcutaneously co-transplanting a human cervical cancer cell line and human cervical cancer-associated fibroblasts (CAFs), in athymic mice, which resulted in lymph node metastasis in 40% of the animals. In contrast, no metastasis occurred from the cervical cancer without CAFs. These results suggest that CAFs can overcome an anti-metastatic tumor environment and are a potential target to prevent metastasis. PMID:28103135

  13. Microenvironment-Driven Bioelimination of Magnetoplasmonic Nanoassemblies and Their Multimodal Imaging-Guided Tumor Photothermal Therapy.

    PubMed

    Li, Linlin; Fu, Shiyan; Chen, Chuanfang; Wang, Xuandong; Fu, Changhui; Wang, Shu; Guo, Weibo; Yu, Xin; Zhang, Xiaodi; Liu, Zhirong; Qiu, Jichuan; Liu, Hong

    2016-07-26

    Biocompatibility and bioelimination are basic requirements for systematically administered nanomaterials for biomedical purposes. Gold-based plasmonic nanomaterials have shown potential applications in photothermal cancer therapy. However, their inability to biodegrade has impeded practical biomedical application. In this study, a kind of bioeliminable magnetoplasmonic nanoassembly (MPNA), assembled from an Fe3O4 nanocluster and gold nanoshell, was elaborately designed for computed tomography, photoacoustic tomography, and magnetic resonance trimodal imaging-guided tumor photothermal therapy. A single dose of photothermal therapy under near-infrared light induced a complete tumor regression in mice. Importantly, MPNAs could respond to the local microenvironment with acidic pH and enzymes where they accumulated including tumors, liver, spleen, etc., collapse into small molecules and discrete nanoparticles, and finally be cleared from the body. With the bioelimination ability from the body, a high dose of 400 mg kg(-1) MPNAs had good biocompatibility. The MPNAs for cancer theranostics pave a way toward biodegradable bio-nanomaterials for biomedical applications.

  14. Tumor Microvasculature and Microenvironment: Novel Insights Through Intravital Imaging in Pre-Clinical Models

    PubMed Central

    Fukumura, Dai; Duda, Dan G.; Munn, Lance L.; Jain, Rakesh K.

    2010-01-01

    Intravital imaging techniques have provided unprecedented insight into tumor microcirculation and microenvironment. For example, these techniques allowed quantitative evaluations of tumor blood vasculature to uncover its abnormal organization, structure and function (e.g., hyper-permeability, heterogeneous and compromised blood flow). Similarly, imaging of functional lymphatics has documented their absence inside tumors. These abnormalities result in elevated interstitial fluid pressure and hinder the delivery of therapeutic agents to tumors. In addition, they induce a hostile microenvironment characterized by hypoxia and acidosis, as documented by intravital imaging. The abnormal microenvironment further lowers the effectiveness of anti-tumor treatments such as radiation therapy and chemotherapy. In addition to these mechanistic insights, intravital imaging may also offer new opportunities to improve therapy. For example, tumor angiogenesis results in immature, dysfunctional vessels—primarily caused by an imbalance in production of pro- and anti-angiogenic factors by the tumors. Restoring the balance of pro- and anti-angiogenic signaling in tumors can “normalize” tumor vasculature and thus, improve its function, as demonstrated by intravital imaging studies in preclinical models and in cancer patients. Administration of cytotoxic therapy during periods of vascular normalization has the potential to enhance treatment efficacy. PMID:20374484

  15. Oxygen microenvironment affects the uptake of nanoparticles in head and neck tumor cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Eunice Y.; Hodge, Sasson; Tai, Katherine; Hou, Huagang; Khan, Nadeem; Hoopes, P. Jack; Samkoe, Kimberley S.

    2013-02-01

    Survival of head and neck cancer patients has not improved in several decades despite advances in diagnostic and therapeutic techniques. Tumor hypoxia in head and neck cancers is a critical factor that leads to poor prognosis, resistance to radiation and chemotherapies, and increased metastatic potential. Magnetic nanoparticle hyperthermia (mNPHT) is a promising therapy for hypoxic tumors because nanoparticles (NP) can be directly injected into, or targeted to, hypoxic tumor cells and exposed to alternating magnetic fields (AMF) to induce hyperthermia. Magnetic NPHT can improve therapeutic effectiveness by two modes of action: 1) direct killing of hypoxic tumor cells; and 2) increase in tumor oxygenation, which has the potential to make the tumor more susceptible to adjuvant therapies such as radiation and chemotherapy. Prior studies in breast cancer cells demonstrated that a hypoxic microenvironment diminished NP uptake in vitro; however, mNPHT with intratumoral NP injection in hypoxic tumors increased tumor oxygenation and delayed tumor growth. In this study, head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) cell lines were incubated in normoxic, hypoxic, and hyperoxic conditions with iron oxide NP for 4-72 hours. After incubation, the cells were analyzed for iron uptake by mass spectrometry, Prussian blue staining, and electron microscopy. In contrast to breast cancer cells, uptake of NPs was increased in hypoxic microenvironments as compared to normoxic conditions in HNSCC cells. In future studies, we will confirm the effect of the oxygen microenvironment on NP uptake and efficacy of mNPHT both in vitro and in vivo.

  16. Androgen Regulated SPARCL1 in the Tumor Microenvironment Inhibits Metastatic Progression

    PubMed Central

    Hurley, Paula J.; Hughes, Robert M.; Simons, Brian W.; Huang, Jessie; Miller, Rebecca M.; Shinder, Brian; Haffner, Michael C.; Esopi, David; Kimura, Yasunori; Jabbari, Javaneh; Ross, Ashley E.; Erho, Nicholas; Vergara, Ismael A.; Faraj, Sheila F.; Davicioni, Elai; Netto, George J.; Yegnasubramanian, Srinivasan; An, Steven S.; Schaeffer, Edward M.

    2015-01-01

    Prostate cancer is a leading cause of cancer death in men due to the subset of cancers that progress to metastasis. Prostate cancers are thought to be hardwired to androgen receptor (AR) signaling, but AR-regulated changes in the prostate that facilitate metastasis remain poorly understood. We previously noted a marked reduction in Secreted protein, acidic and rich in cysteine-like 1 (SPARCL1) expression during invasive phases of androgen-induced prostate growth, suggesting that this may be a novel invasive program governed by AR. Herein, we show that SPARCL1 loss occurs concurrently with AR amplification or overexpression in patient based data. Mechanistically, we demonstrate that SPARCL1 expression is directly suppressed by androgen-induced AR activation and binding at the SPARCL1 locus via an epigenetic mechanism, and these events can be pharmacologically attenuated with either AR antagonists or HDAC inhibitors. We establish using the Hi-Myc model of prostate cancer that in Hi-Myc/Sparcl1−/− mice, SPARCL1 functions to suppress cancer formation. Moreover, metastatic progression of Myc-CaP orthotopic allografts is restricted by SPARCL1 in the tumor microenvironment. Specifically, we show that SPARCL1 both tethers to collagen in the extracellular matrix (ECM) and binds to the cell's cytoskeleton. SPARCL1 directly inhibits the assembly of focal adhesions thereby constraining the transmission of cell traction forces. Our findings establish a new insight into AR-regulated prostate epithelial movement and provide a novel framework whereby, SPARCL1 in the ECM microenvironment restricts tumor progression by regulating the initiation of the network of physical forces that may be required for metastatic-invasion of prostate cancer. PMID:26294211

  17. The Role of the Tumor Microenvironment in Regulating Angiogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Watnick, Randolph S.

    2012-01-01

    The tumor-associated stroma has been shown to play a significant role in cancer formation. Paracrine signaling interactions between epithelial tumor cells and stromal cells are a key component in the transformation and proliferation of tumors in several organs. Whereas the intracellular signaling pathways regulating the expression of several pro- and antiangiogenic proteins have been well characterized in human cancer cells, the intercellular signaling that takes place between tumor cells and the surrounding tumor-associated stroma has not been as extensively studied with regard to the regulation of angiogenesis. In this chapter we define the key players in the regulation of angiogenesis and examine how their expression is regulated in the tumor-associated stroma. The resulting analysis is often seemingly paradoxical, underscoring the complexity of intercellular signaling within tumors and the need to better understand the environmental context underlying these signaling mechanisms. PMID:23209177

  18. In vivo imaging of the tumor and its associated microenvironment using combined CARS / 2-photon microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Martin; Downes, Andy; Chau, You-Ying; Serrels, Bryan; Hastie, Nick; Elfick, Alistair; Brunton, Valerie; Frame, Margaret; Serrels, Alan

    2015-01-01

    The use of confocal and multi-photon microscopy for intra-vital cancer imaging has impacted on our understanding of cancer cell behavior and interaction with the surrounding tumor microenvironment in vivo. However, many studies to-date rely on the use fluorescent dyes or genetically encoded probes that enable visualization of a structure or cell population of interest, but do not illuminate the complexity of the surrounding tumor microenvironment. Here, we show that multi-modal microscopy combining 2-photon fluorescence with CARS can begin to address this deficit, enabling detailed imaging of the tumor niche without the need for additional labeling. This can be performed on live tumor-bearing animals through optical observation windows, permitting real-time and longitudinal imaging of dynamic processes within the tumor niche. PMID:28243514

  19. The Role of the Tumor Vasculature in the Host Immune Response: Implications for Therapeutic Strategies Targeting the Tumor Microenvironment.

    PubMed

    Hendry, Shona A; Farnsworth, Rae H; Solomon, Benjamin; Achen, Marc G; Stacker, Steven A; Fox, Stephen B

    2016-01-01

    Recently developed cancer immunotherapy approaches including immune checkpoint inhibitors and chimeric antigen receptor T cell transfer are showing promising results both in trials and in clinical practice. These approaches reflect increasing recognition of the crucial role of the tumor microenvironment in cancer development and progression. Cancer cells do not act alone, but develop a complex relationship with the environment in which they reside. The host immune response to tumors is critical to the success of immunotherapy; however, the determinants of this response are incompletely understood. The immune cell infiltrate in tumors varies widely in density, composition, and clinical significance. The tumor vasculature is a key component of the microenvironment that can influence tumor behavior and treatment response and can be targeted through the use of antiangiogenic drugs. Blood vascular and lymphatic endothelial cells have important roles in the trafficking of immune cells, controlling the microenvironment, and modulating the immune response. Improving access to the tumor through vascular alteration with antiangiogenic drugs may prove an effective combinatorial strategy with immunotherapy approaches and might be applicable to many tumor types. In this review, we briefly discuss the host's immune response to cancer and the treatment strategies utilizing this response, before focusing on the pathological features of tumor blood and lymphatic vessels and the contribution these might make to tumor immune evasion.

  20. The Role of the Tumor Vasculature in the Host Immune Response: Implications for Therapeutic Strategies Targeting the Tumor Microenvironment

    PubMed Central

    Hendry, Shona A.; Farnsworth, Rae H.; Solomon, Benjamin; Achen, Marc G.; Stacker, Steven A.; Fox, Stephen B.

    2016-01-01

    Recently developed cancer immunotherapy approaches including immune checkpoint inhibitors and chimeric antigen receptor T cell transfer are showing promising results both in trials and in clinical practice. These approaches reflect increasing recognition of the crucial role of the tumor microenvironment in cancer development and progression. Cancer cells do not act alone, but develop a complex relationship with the environment in which they reside. The host immune response to tumors is critical to the success of immunotherapy; however, the determinants of this response are incompletely understood. The immune cell infiltrate in tumors varies widely in density, composition, and clinical significance. The tumor vasculature is a key component of the microenvironment that can influence tumor behavior and treatment response and can be targeted through the use of antiangiogenic drugs. Blood vascular and lymphatic endothelial cells have important roles in the trafficking of immune cells, controlling the microenvironment, and modulating the immune response. Improving access to the tumor through vascular alteration with antiangiogenic drugs may prove an effective combinatorial strategy with immunotherapy approaches and might be applicable to many tumor types. In this review, we briefly discuss the host’s immune response to cancer and the treatment strategies utilizing this response, before focusing on the pathological features of tumor blood and lymphatic vessels and the contribution these might make to tumor immune evasion. PMID:28066431

  1. A Dialogue between the Hypoxia-Inducible Factor and the Tumor Microenvironment

    PubMed Central

    Dayan, Frédéric; Mazure, Nathalie M.; Brahimi-Horn, M. Christiane

    2008-01-01

    The hypoxia-inducible factor is the key protein responsible for the cellular adaptation to low oxygen tension. This transcription factor becomes activated as a result of a drop in the partial pressure of oxygen, to hypoxic levels below 5% oxygen, and targets a panel of genes involved in maintenance of oxygen homeostasis. Hypoxia is a common characteristic of the microenvironment of solid tumors and, through activation of the hypoxia-inducible factor, is at the center of the growth dynamics of tumor cells. Not only does the microenvironment impact on the hypoxia-inducible factor but this factor impacts on microenvironmental features, such as pH, nutrient availability, metabolism and the extracellular matrix. In this review we discuss the influence the tumor environment has on the hypoxia-inducible factor and outline the role of this factor as a modulator of the microenvironment and as a powerful actor in tumor remodeling. From a fundamental research point of view the hypoxia-inducible factor is at the center of a signaling pathway that must be deciphered to fully understand the dynamics of the tumor microenvironment. From a translational and pharmacological research point of view the hypoxia-inducible factor and its induced downstream gene products may provide information on patient prognosis and offer promising targets that open perspectives for novel “anti-microenvironment” directed therapies. PMID:19308685

  2. Concurrence of extracellular vesicle enrichment and metabolic switch visualized label-free in the tumor microenvironment

    PubMed Central

    Tu, Haohua; Liu, Yuan; Marjanovic, Marina; Chaney, Eric J.; You, Sixian; Zhao, Youbo; Boppart, Stephen A.

    2017-01-01

    Understanding the role of the tumor microenvironment in carcinogenesis has reshaped cancer research. Events at both microscopic (molecular) and macroscopic (tissue) scales have been identified in engineered tumor microenvironments involving in vitro cultures, live tissue xenografts, and transgenic animals. However, these events have not been comprehensively observed under unperturbed (authentic) conditions free of exogenous labeling or genetic modification. The lack of a suitable imaging methodology has largely limited our understanding of the complex interrelations and possible causal links involved in carcinogenesis and metastasis within the tumor microenvironment. Using multicontrast nonlinear imaging, we visualize endogenous substances in rat and human mammary tumors through their intrinsic nonlinear optical properties, and simultaneously observe angiogenesis, extracellular matrix reorganization, and non-native cell recruitment. We find that all these macroscopic events in the tumor microenvironment require concurrent enrichment of specific extracellular vesicles and a metabolic switch toward biosynthesis. This concurrence at the microscopic scale provides not only new insights into carcinogenesis and metastasis but also a potentially new strategy for cancer diagnosis, surgery, and therapeutics. PMID:28138543

  3. Inhibition of indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase 1 expression alters immune response in colon tumor microenvironment in mice

    PubMed Central

    Takamatsu, Manabu; Hirata, Akihiro; Ohtaki, Hirofumi; Hoshi, Masato; Ando, Tatsuya; Ito, Hiroyasu; Hatano, Yuichiro; Tomita, Hiroyuki; Kuno, Toshiya; Saito, Kuniaki; Seishima, Mitsuru; Hara, Akira

    2015-01-01

    Indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO), an enzyme that degrades the essential amino acid l-tryptophan along the kynurenine pathway, exerts immunomodulatory effects in a number of diseases. IDO expression is increased in tumor tissue and in draining lymph nodes; this increase is thought to play a role in tumor evasion by suppressing the immune response. A competitive inhibitor of IDO is currently being tested in clinical trials for the treatment of relapsed or refractory solid tumors, but the efficacy of IDO inhibition in colorectal tumors remains to be fully elucidated. In this study, we investigated the effect of IDO deficiency on colon tumorigenesis in mice by genetic deletion and pharmacological inhibition. Ido1-deficient(−/−) mice were crossed with ApcMin/+ mice or were administered azoxymethane with or without dextran sodium sulfate. Ido1 deficiency did not lead to significant differences in the size and number of colon tumors. Similarly, the pharmacological inhibition of IDO using 1-methyltryptophan (1-mT) also resulted in no significant differences in tumor size and number in ApcMin/+ mice. However, Ido1 deficiency altered the immune response in the tumor microenvironment, showing a significant increase in mRNA expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines and a significant decrease in the number of Foxp3-positive regulatory T cells in the colon tumors of Ido1(−/−) mice. Importantly, 1-mT treatment also significantly altered cytokine expression in the colon tumor tissues. These results suggest that IDO inhibition alone cannot sufficiently suppress colon cancer development in mice despite its immunomodulatory activity in the tumor microenvironment. PMID:26033215

  4. Characterization of the Tumor Microenvironment and Tumor–Stroma Interaction by Non-invasive Preclinical Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Ramamonjisoa, Nirilanto; Ackerstaff, Ellen

    2017-01-01

    Tumors are often characterized by hypoxia, vascular abnormalities, low extracellular pH, increased interstitial fluid pressure, altered choline-phospholipid metabolism, and aerobic glycolysis (Warburg effect). The impact of these tumor characteristics has been investigated extensively in the context of tumor development, progression, and treatment response, resulting in a number of non-invasive imaging biomarkers. More recent evidence suggests that cancer cells undergo metabolic reprograming, beyond aerobic glycolysis, in the course of tumor development and progression. The resulting altered metabolic content in tumors has the ability to affect cell signaling and block cellular differentiation. Additional emerging evidence reveals that the interaction between tumor and stroma cells can alter tumor metabolism (leading to metabolic reprograming) as well as tumor growth and vascular features. This review will summarize previous and current preclinical, non-invasive, multimodal imaging efforts to characterize the tumor microenvironment, including its stromal components and understand tumor–stroma interaction in cancer development, progression, and treatment response. PMID:28197395

  5. Tumor Microenvironment, a Paradigm in Hepatocellular Carcinoma Progression and Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Tahmasebi Birgani, Maryam; Carloni, Vinicio

    2017-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is among the most lethal and prevalent cancers in the human population. Different etiological factors such as hepatitis B and C virus, alcohol and diabetes cause liver injury followed by inflammation, necrosis and hepatocytes proliferation. Continuous cycles of this destructive–regenerative process culminates in liver cirrhosis which is characterized by regenerating nodules that progress to dysplastic nodules and ultimately HCC. Despite its significance, there is only an elemental understanding of the pathogenetic mechanisms, and there are only limited therapeutic options. Therefore, the study of the involved molecular mechanisms can open a new insight to define more effective treatment strategies. A variety of alterations have been reported in HCC patients, particularly the cancer-associated microenvironment components including immune cells, fibroblast cells, endothelial cells and extracellular matrix can support the neoplastic cells to proliferate, growth and invade. This review summarizes the current state of knowledge and highlights the principal challenges that are relevant to controlling this milieu. PMID:28216578

  6. Impact of the non-cellular tumor microenvironment on metastasis: potential therapeutic and imaging opportunities.

    PubMed

    Cretu, Alexandra; Brooks, Peter C

    2007-11-01

    Evidence is accumulating that the malignant phenotype of a given tumor is dependent not only on the intrinsic characteristics of tumor cells, but also on the cooperative interactions of non-neoplastic cells, soluble secreted factors and the non-cellular solid-state ECM network that comprise the tumor microenvironment. Given the ability of the tumor microenvironment to regulate the cellular phenotype, recent efforts have focused on understanding the molecular mechanisms by which cells sense, assimilate, interpret, and ultimately respond to their immediate surroundings. Exciting new studies are beginning to unravel the complex interactions between the numerous cell types and regulatory factors within the tumor microenvironment that function cooperatively to control tumor cell invasion and metastasis. Here, we will focus on studies concerning a common theme, which is the central importance of the non-cellular solid-state compartment as a master regulator of the malignant phenotype. We will highlight the non-cellular solid-state compartment as a relatively untapped source of therapeutic and imaging targets and how cellular interactions with these targets may regulate tumor metastasis.

  7. In vitro microfluidic models of tumor microenvironment to screen transport of drugs and nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Ozcelikkale, Altug; Moon, Hye-Ran; Linnes, Michael; Han, Bumsoo

    2017-02-14

    Advances in nanotechnology have enabled numerous types of nanoparticles (NPs) to improve drug delivery to tumors. While many NP systems have been proposed, their clinical translation has been less than anticipated primarily due to failure of current preclinical evaluation techniques to adequately model the complex interactions between the NP and physiological barriers of tumor microenvironment. This review focuses on microfluidic tumor models for characterization of delivery efficacy and toxicity of cancer nanomedicine. Microfluidics offer significant advantages over traditional macroscale cell cultures by enabling recapitulation of tumor microenvironment through precise control of physiological cues such as hydrostatic pressure, shear stress, oxygen, and nutrient gradients. Microfluidic systems have recently started to be adapted for screening of drugs and NPs under physiologically relevant settings. So far the two primary application areas of microfluidics in this area have been high-throughput screening using traditional culture settings such as single cells or multicellular tumor spheroids, and mimicry of tumor microenvironment for study of cancer-related cell-cell and cell-matrix interactions. These microfluidic technologies are also useful in modeling specific steps in NP delivery to tumor and characterize NP transport properties and outcomes by systematic variation of physiological conditions. Ultimately, it will be possible to design drug-screening platforms uniquely tailored for individual patient physiology using microfluidics. These in vitro models can contribute to development of precision medicine by enabling rapid and patient-specific evaluation of cancer nanomedicine. For further resources related to this article, please visit the WIREs website.

  8. Aberrant PGE2 metabolism in bladder tumor microenvironment promotes immunosuppressive phenotype of tumor-infiltrating myeloid cells

    PubMed Central

    Eruslanov, Evgeniy; Daurkin, Irina; Vieweg, Johannes; Daaka, Yehia; Kusmartsev, Sergei

    2011-01-01

    Bladder cancer is associated with enhanced inflammation and characterized by deregulated prostanoid metabolism. Here we examined prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) metabolism and myeloid cell subsets that infiltrate tumor tissue using two xenograft models of human bladder cancer. Human bladder tumor xenografts implanted into athymic nude mice become highly infiltrated with host CD11b myeloid cells of bone marrow origin. Fast growing SW780 bladder tumor xenografts were infiltrated with heterogeneous CD11b myeloid cell subsets including tumor-associated macrophages and myeloid-derived suppressor cells. In contrast, majority of myeloid cells in tumor tissue from slow growing bladder cancer Urothel 11 displayed more immature, homogenous phenotype and comprised mostly MHC II class-negative myeloid-derived suppressor cells. We demonstrate that human bladder tumors secrete substantial amounts of PGE2. Normal bone marrow myeloid cell progenitors cultured in the presence of a bladder tumor-conditioned medium, which is enriched for PGE2, failed to differentiate into mature APCs and acquired phenotype of the myeloid-derived suppressor cells or inflammatory macrophages with up-regulated chemokine receptor CXCR4. Collectively our data demonstrate that enhanced cancer-related inflammation and deregulated PGE2 metabolism in tumor microenvironment promote immunosuppressive pro-tumoral phenotype of myeloid cells in bladder cancer. These data also suggest that not only local tumor microenvironment but other factors such as stage of cancer disease and pace of tumor growth could markedly influence the phenotype, differentiation and immune function of myeloid cells in tumor tissue. PMID:21315786

  9. The mucin MUC1 modulates the tumor immunological microenvironment through engagement of the lectin Siglec-9.

    PubMed

    Beatson, Richard; Tajadura-Ortega, Virginia; Achkova, Daniela; Picco, Gianfranco; Tsourouktsoglou, Theodora-Dorita; Klausing, Sandra; Hillier, Matthew; Maher, John; Noll, Thomas; Crocker, Paul R; Taylor-Papadimitriou, Joyce; Burchell, Joy M

    2016-11-01

    Siglec-9 is a sialic-acid-binding lectin expressed predominantly on myeloid cells. Aberrant glycosylation occurs in essentially all types of cancers and results in increased sialylation. Thus, when the mucin MUC1 is expressed on cancer cells, it is decorated by multiple short, sialylated O-linked glycans (MUC1-ST). Here we found that this cancer-specific MUC1 glycoform, through engagement of Siglec-9, 'educated' myeloid cells to release factors associated with determination of the tumor microenvironment and disease progression. Moreover, MUC1-ST induced macrophages to display a tumor-associated macrophage (TAM)-like phenotype, with increased expression of the checkpoint ligand PD-L1. Binding of MUC1-ST to Siglec-9 did not activate the phosphatases SHP-1 or SHP-2 but, unexpectedly, induced calcium flux that led to activation of the kinases MEK-ERK. This work defines a critical role for aberrantly glycosylated MUC1 and identifies an activating pathway that follows engagement of Siglec-9.

  10. Pathophysiological response to hypoxia - from the molecular mechanisms of malady to drug discovery: drug discovery for targeting the tumor microenvironment.

    PubMed

    Nagasawa, Hideko

    2011-01-01

    The tumor microenvironment, characterized by regions of hypoxia, low nutrition, and acidosis due to incomplete blood vessel networks, has been recognized as a major factor that influences not only the response to conventional anti-cancer therapies but also malignant progression and metastasis. However, exploiting such a cumbersome tumor microenvironment for cancer treatment could provide tumor-specific therapeutic approaches. In particular, hypoxia is now considered a fundamentally important characteristic of the tumor microenvironment in which hypoxia inducible factor (HIF)-1-mediated gene regulation is considered essential for angiogenesis and tumor development. Additional oxygen sensitive signaling pathways including mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) signaling and signaling through activation of the unfolded protein response (UPR) also contribute to the adaptation in the tumor microenvironment. This in turn has led to the current extensive interest in the signal molecules related to adaptive responses in the tumor microenvironment as potential molecular targets for cancer therapy against refractory cancer and recurrence in preparation for the aging society. Therefore, we should focus on the drug discovery for targeting the tumor microenvironment to develop tumor-specific cytostatic agents including angiogenesis inhibitors. In this paper, the development of hypoxia-selective prodrugs, HIF-1 inhibitors, and modulators of the tumor microenvironment will be discussed.

  11. Cancer prevention and therapy through the modulation of the tumor microenvironment

    PubMed Central

    Casey, Stephanie C.; Amedei, Amedeo; Aquilano, Katia; Benencia, Fabian; Bhakta, Dipita; Boosani, Chandra S.; Chen, Sophie; Ciriolo, Maria Rosa; Crawford, Sarah; Fujii, Hiromasa; Georgakilas, Alexandros G.; Guha, Gunjan; Halicka, Dorota; Helferich, William G.; Heneberg, Petr; Honoki, Kanya; Kerkar, Sid P.; Mohammed, Sulma I.; Niccolai, Elena; Nowsheen, Somaira; Rupasinghe, H. P. Vasantha; Samadi, Abbas; Singh, Neetu; Talib, Wamidh H.; Venkateswaran, Vasundara; Whelan, Richard; Yang, Xujuan; Felsher, Dean W.

    2015-01-01

    Cancer arises in the context of an in vivo tumor microenvironment. This microenvironment is both a cause and consequence of tumorigenesis. Tumor and host cells co-evolve dynamically through indirect and direct cellular interactions, eliciting multiscale effects on many biological programs, including cellular proliferation, growth, and metabolism, as well as angiogenesis and hypoxia and innate and adapative immunity. Here we highlight specific biological processes that could be exploited as targets for the prevention and therapy of cancer. Specifically, we describe how inhibition of targets such as cholesterol synthesis and metabolites, reactive oxygen species and hypoxia, macrophage activation and conversion, indoleamine 2, 3-dioxygenase regulation of dendritic cells, vascular endothelial growth factor regulation of angiogenesis, fibrosis inhibition, endoglin, and Janus kinase signaling emerge as examples of important potential nexuses in the regulation of tumorigenesis and the tumor microenvironment that can be targeted. We have also identified therapeutic agents as approaches, in particular natural products such as berberine, resveratrol, onionin A, epigallocatechin gallate, genistein, curcumin, naringenin, desoxyrhapontigenin, piperine, and zerumbone, that may warrant further investigation to target the tumor microenvironment for the treatment and/or prevention of cancer. PMID:25865775

  12. Identification and Therapeutic Targeting of Paracrine Senescence Factors in the Prostate Tumor Microenvironment

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-03-01

    the effects of androgen deprivation and chemotherapies would significantly improve the morbid- ity and mortality of prostate cancer. We hypothesize...that the induction of cellular senescence in the tumor microenvironment by androgen deprivation and cytotoxic chemotherapy promotes the resistance and...tissue induced by androgen deprivation and chemotherapy, specifically focusing on identify- ing factors with the potential to influence the survival

  13. Roles of NGAL and MMP-9 in the tumor microenvironment and sensitivity to targeted therapy.

    PubMed

    Candido, Saverio; Abrams, Stephen L; Steelman, Linda S; Lertpiriyapong, Kvin; Fitzgerald, Timothy L; Martelli, Alberto M; Cocco, Lucio; Montalto, Giuseppe; Cervello, Melchiorre; Polesel, Jerry; Libra, Massimo; McCubrey, James A

    2016-03-01

    Various, diverse molecules contribute to the tumor microenvironment and influence invasion and metastasis. In this review, the roles of neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin (NGAL) and matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) in the tumor microenvironment and sensitivity to therapy will be discussed. The lipocalin family of proteins has many important functions. For example when NGAL forms a complex with MMP-9 it increases its stability which is important in cancer metastasis. Small hydrophobic molecules are bound by NGAL which can alter their entry into and efflux from cells. Iron transport and storage are also influenced by NGAL activity. Regulation of iron levels is important for survival in the tumor microenvironment as well as metastasis. Innate immunity is also regulated by NGAL as it can have bacteriostatic properties. NGAL and MMP-9 expression may also affect the sensitivity of cancer cells to chemotherapy as well as targeted therapy. Thus NGAL and MMP-9 play important roles in key processes involved in metastasis as well as response to therapy. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Tumor Microenvironment Regulation of Cancer Cell Survival, Metastasis, Inflammation, and Immune Surveillance edited by Peter Ruvolo and Gregg L. Semenza.

  14. 3D bioprinting: improving in vitro models of metastasis with heterogeneous tumor microenvironments

    PubMed Central

    Albritton, Jacob L.

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Even with many advances in treatment over the past decades, cancer still remains a leading cause of death worldwide. Despite the recognized relationship between metastasis and increased mortality rate, surprisingly little is known about the exact mechanism of metastatic progression. Currently available in vitro models cannot replicate the three-dimensionality and heterogeneity of the tumor microenvironment sufficiently to recapitulate many of the known characteristics of tumors in vivo. Our understanding of metastatic progression would thus be boosted by the development of in vitro models that could more completely capture the salient features of cancer biology. Bioengineering groups have been working for over two decades to create in vitro microenvironments for application in regenerative medicine and tissue engineering. Over this time, advances in 3D printing technology and biomaterials research have jointly led to the creation of 3D bioprinting, which has improved our ability to develop in vitro models with complexity approaching that of the in vivo tumor microenvironment. In this Review, we give an overview of 3D bioprinting methods developed for tissue engineering, which can be directly applied to constructing in vitro models of heterogeneous tumor microenvironments. We discuss considerations and limitations associated with 3D printing and highlight how these advances could be harnessed to better model metastasis and potentially guide the development of anti-cancer strategies. PMID:28067628

  15. microRNAs as mediators and communicators between cancer cells and the tumor micro-environment

    PubMed Central

    Kohlhapp, Frederick J.; Mitra, Anirban K.; Lengyel, Ernst; Peter, Marcus E.

    2015-01-01

    Cancer cells grow in an environment comprised of multiple components that support tumor growth and contribute to therapy resistance. Major cell types in the tumor micro-environment are fibroblasts, endothelial cells and infiltrating immune cells all of which communicate with cancer cells. One way that these cell types promote cancer progression is by altering expression of miRNAs, small noncoding RNAs that negatively regulate protein expression, either in the cancer cells or in associated normal cells. Changes in miRNA expression can be brought about by direct interaction between the stromal cells and cancer cells, by paracrine factors secreted by any of the cell types, or even through direct communication between cells through secreted miRNAs. Understanding the role of miRNAs in the complex interactions between the tumor and cells in its micro-environment is necessary if we are to understand tumor progression and devise new treatments. PMID:25867073

  16. Enhancing T cell therapy by overcoming the immunosuppressive tumor microenvironment.

    PubMed

    Arina, Ainhoa; Corrales, Leticia; Bronte, Vincenzo

    2016-02-01

    Immune response to tumors can be successfully oriented for therapeutic purposes, as shown by the clinical efficacy of checkpoint blockade in extending the survival of patients with certain solid and hematologic neoplasms. Nonetheless, numerous patients do not benefit from these new treatments. Tumor-specific CD8(+) T lymphocytes, either endogenously revived by checkpoint interference or adoptively transferred after in vitro expansion and retargeting, can be extremely efficient in controlling metastatic disease but have to overcome a number of restraints imposed by growing tumors. This immune escape relies on a profound modification of the tumor environment, which is rendered less permissive to lymphocyte arrival, persistence, and functional activity. We review here emerging findings on the main negative circuits limiting the efficacy of cancer immunotherapy, as well as novel and conventional approaches that can translate into rational combination therapies.

  17. A Metabolic Immune Checkpoint: Adenosine in Tumor Microenvironment

    PubMed Central

    Ohta, Akio

    2016-01-01

    Within tumors, some areas are less oxygenated than others. Since their home ground is under chronic hypoxia, tumor cells adapt to this condition by activating aerobic glycolysis; however, this hypoxic environment is very harsh for incoming immune cells. Deprivation of oxygen limits availability of energy sources and induces accumulation of extracellular adenosine in tumors. Extracellular adenosine, upon binding with adenosine receptors on the surface of various immune cells, suppresses pro-inflammatory activities. In addition, signaling through adenosine receptors upregulates a number of anti-inflammatory molecules and immunoregulatory cells, leading to the establishment of a long-lasting immunosuppressive environment. Thus, due to hypoxia and adenosine, tumors can discourage antitumor immune responses no matter how the response was induced, whether it was spontaneous or artificially introduced with a therapeutic intention. Preclinical studies have shown the significance of adenosine in tumor survival strategy by demonstrating tumor regression after inactivation of adenosine receptors, inhibition of adenosine-producing enzymes, or reversal of tissue hypoxia. These promising results indicate a potential use of the inhibitors of the hypoxia–adenosine pathway for cancer immunotherapy. PMID:27066002

  18. Influence of the Tumor Microenvironment on Genomic Changes Conferring Chemoresistance in Breast Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-04-01

    tumor microenvironment on clonal selection using intravital microscopy Jae-Hyun Park 1 , Miriam R. Fein 1 , Mikala Egeblad 1 1 Cold Spring Harbor...used surgically implanted mammary imaging windows in immunocompetent mice and injected “brainbow” expressing, syngeneic 4T1 breast carcinoma cells...under the windows. This allowed us to acquire multiple time- lapse imaging series by spinning disk confocal microscopy of the same tumor, done about 3

  19. Spread of tumor microenvironment contributes to colonic obstruction through subperitoneal fibroblast activation in colon cancer

    PubMed Central

    Yokota, Mitsuru; Kojima, Motohiro; Higuchi, Youichi; Nishizawa, Yuji; Kobayashi, Akihiro; Ito, Masaaki; Saito, Norio; Ochiai, Atsushi

    2015-01-01

    We evaluated the influence of the cancer microenvironment formed by peritoneal invasion (CMPI) on clinical findings in colon cancer patients. In addition to the association with poor prognosis, we discovered a relationship with bowel obstruction. Detailed analysis revealed that clinical findings related to bowel obstruction occurred more frequently in patients with an elevated type tumor, which had peritoneal elastic laminal elevation to the tumor surface, compared to those with non-elevated type tumors among those with elastic laminal invasion (ELI). Lateral tumor spread and increase of tumor annularity rate in ELI-positive elevated type cases suggested the morphological progression from ELI-positive non-elevated type to elevated type. In addition, α-smooth muscle actin expression was the highest in ELI-positive elevated type, and prominent expressions were found not only in the deep tumor area but also in the shallow tumor area. Furthermore, contraction assays revealed the robust contractile ability of subperitoneal fibroblasts stimulated by cancer cell-conditioned medium. Our findings suggest that CMPI spread into the luminal side of the colonic wall along with tumor progression, which caused bowel obstruction through the activation of subperitoneal fibroblasts. However, although the clinical outcome was not different between the two types, the clinical findings were affected by the spread of CMPI. We are the first to explore how the alteration of the tumor-promoting microenvironment, along with tumor progression, contributes to the development of clinical findings. PMID:25613547

  20. Pathophysiological Basis for the Formation of the Tumor Microenvironment

    PubMed Central

    Horsman, Michael R.; Vaupel, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Poor microenvironmental conditions are a characteristic feature of solid tumors. Such conditions occur because the tumor vascular supply, which develops from the normal host vasculature by the process of angiogenesis, is generally inadequate in meeting the oxygen and nutrient demands of the growing tumor mass. Regions of low oxygenation (hypoxia) is believed to be the most critical deficiency, since it has been well documented to play a significant role in influencing the response to conventional radiation and chemotherapy treatments, as well as influencing malignant progression in terms of aggressive growth and recurrence of the primary tumor and its metastatic spread. As a result, significant emphasis has been placed on finding clinically applicable approaches to identify those tumors that contain hypoxia and realistic methods to target this hypoxia. However, most studies consider hypoxia as a single entity, yet we now know that it is multifactorial. Furthermore, hypoxia is often associated with other microenvironmental parameters, such as elevated interstitial fluid pressure, glycolysis, low pH, and reduced bioenergetic status, and these can also influence the effects of hypoxia. Here, we review the various aspects of hypoxia, but also discuss the role of the other microenvironmental parameters associated with hypoxia. PMID:27148472

  1. Rat Prostate Tumor Cells Progress in the Bone Microenvironment to a Highly Aggressive Phenotype1

    PubMed Central

    Bergström, Sofia Halin; Rudolfsson, Stina H; Bergh, Anders

    2016-01-01

    Prostate cancer generally metastasizes to bone, and most patients have tumor cells in their bone marrow already at diagnosis. Tumor cells at the metastatic site may therefore progress in parallel with those in the primary tumor. Androgen deprivation therapy is often the first-line treatment for clinically detectable prostate cancer bone metastases. Although the treatment is effective, most metastases progress to a castration-resistant and lethal state. To examine metastatic progression in the bone microenvironment, we implanted androgen-sensitive, androgen receptor–positive, and relatively slow-growing Dunning G (G) rat prostate tumor cells into the tibial bone marrow of fully immune-competent Copenhagen rats. We show that tumor establishment in the bone marrow was reduced compared with the prostate, and whereas androgen deprivation did not affect tumor establishment or growth in the bone, this was markedly reduced in the prostate. Moreover, we found that, with time, G tumor cells in the bone microenvironment progress to a more aggressive phenotype with increased growth rate, reduced androgen sensitivity, and increased metastatic capacity. Tumor cells in the bone marrow encounter lower androgen levels and a higher degree of hypoxia than at the primary site, which may cause high selective pressures and eventually contribute to the development of a new and highly aggressive tumor cell phenotype. It is therefore important to specifically study progression in bone metastases. This tumor model could be used to increase our understanding of how tumor cells adapt in the bone microenvironment and may subsequently improve therapy strategies for prostate metastases in bone. PMID:26992916

  2. Microenvironment alters epigenetic and gene expression profiles in Swarm rat chondrosarcoma tumors

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Chondrosarcomas are malignant cartilage tumors that do not respond to traditional chemotherapy or radiation. The 5-year survival rate of histologic grade III chondrosarcoma is less than 30%. An animal model of chondrosarcoma has been established - namely, the Swarm Rat Chondrosarcoma (SRC) - and shown to resemble the human disease. Previous studies with this model revealed that tumor microenvironment could significantly influence chondrosarcoma malignancy. Methods To examine the effect of the microenvironment, SRC tumors were initiated at different transplantation sites. Pyrosequencing assays were utilized to assess the DNA methylation of the tumors, and SAGE libraries were constructed and sequenced to determine the gene expression profiles of the tumors. Based on the gene expression analysis, subsequent functional assays were designed to determine the relevancy of the specific genes in the development and progression of the SRC. Results The site of transplantation had a significant impact on the epigenetic and gene expression profiles of SRC tumors. Our analyses revealed that SRC tumors were hypomethylated compared to control tissue, and that tumors at each transplantation site had a unique expression profile. Subsequent functional analysis of differentially expressed genes, albeit preliminary, provided some insight into the role that thymosin-β4, c-fos, and CTGF may play in chondrosarcoma development and progression. Conclusion This report describes the first global molecular characterization of the SRC model, and it demonstrates that the tumor microenvironment can induce epigenetic alterations and changes in gene expression in the SRC tumors. We documented changes in gene expression that accompany changes in tumor phenotype, and these gene expression changes provide insight into the pathways that may play a role in the development and progression of chondrosarcoma. Furthermore, specific functional analysis indicates that thymosin-β4 may have a role

  3. Human Subperitoneal Fibroblast and Cancer Cell Interaction Creates Microenvironment That Enhances Tumor Progression and Metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Yokota, Mitsuru; Ishii, Genichiro; Saito, Norio; Aoyagi, Kazuhiko; Sasaki, Hiroki; Ochiai, Atsushi

    2014-01-01

    Backgrounds Peritoneal invasion in colon cancer is an important prognostic factor. Peritoneal invasion can be objectively identified as periotoneal elastic laminal invasion (ELI) by using elastica stain, and the cancer microenvironment formed by the peritoneal invasion (CMPI) can also be observed. Cases with ELI more frequently show distant metastasis and recurrence. Therefore, CMPI may represent a particular milieu that facilitates tumor progression. Pathological and biological investigations into CMPI may shed light on this possibly distinctive cancer microenvironment. Methods We analyzed area-specific tissue microarrays to determine the pathological features of CMPI, and propagated subperitoneal fibroblasts (SPFs) and submucosal fibroblasts (SMFs) from human colonic tissue. Biological characteristics and results of gene expression profile analyses were compared to better understand the peritoneal invasion of colon cancer and how this may form a special microenvironment through the interaction with SPFs. Mouse xenograft tumors, derived by co-injection of cancer cells with either SPFs or SMFs, were established to evaluate their active role on tumor progression and metastasis. Results We found that fibrosis with alpha smooth muscle actin (α-SMA) expression was a significant pathological feature of CMPI. The differences in proliferation and gene expression profile analyses suggested SPFs and SMFs were distinct populations, and that SPFs were characterized by a higher expressions of extracellular matrix (ECM)-associated genes. Furthermore, compared with SMFs, SPFs showed more variable alteration in gene expressions after cancer-cell-conditioned medium stimulation. Gene ontology analysis revealed that SPFs-specific upregulated genes were enriched by actin-binding or contractile-associated genes including α-SMA encoding ACTA2. Mouse xenograft tumors derived by co-injection of cancer cells with SPFs showed enhancement of tumor growth, metastasis, and capacity for

  4. It takes a tissue to make a tumor: epigenetics, cancer and the microenvironment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barcellos-Hoff, M. H.; Chatterjee, A. (Principal Investigator)

    2001-01-01

    How do normal tissues limit the development of cancer? This review discusses the evidence that normal cells effectively restrict malignant behavior, and that such tissue forces must be subjugated to establish a tumor. The action of ionizing radiation will be specifically discussed regarding the disruption of the microenvironment that promotes the transition from preneoplastic to neoplastic growth. Unlike the highly unpredictable nature of genetic mutations, the response of normal cells to radiation damage follows an epigenetic program similar to wound healing and other damage responses. Our hypothesis is that the persistent disruption of the microenvironment in irradiated tissue compromises its ability to suppress carcinogenesis.

  5. It takes a tissue to make a tumor: Epigenetics, cancer and the microenvironment

    SciTech Connect

    Barcellos-Hoff, Mary Helen

    2001-01-19

    How do normal tissues limit the development of cancer? This review discusses the evidence that normal cells effectively restrict malignant behavior, and that such tissue forces must be subjugated to establish a tumor. The action of ionizing radiation will be specifically discussed regarding the disruption of the microenvironment that promotes the transition from preneoplastic to neoplastic growth. Unlike the highly unpredictable nature of genetic mutations, the response of normal cells to radiation damage follows an epigenetic program similar to wound healing and other damage responses. Our hypothesis is that the persistent disruption of the microenvironment in irradiated tissue compromises its ability to suppress carcinogenesis.

  6. Growth factors from tumor microenvironment possibly promote the proliferation of glioblastoma-derived stem-like cells in vitro.

    PubMed

    Guo, JingJing; Niu, Rui; Huang, Wenhui; Zhou, Mengliang; Shi, Jixing; Zhang, Luyong; Liao, Hong

    2012-10-01

    Glioblastoma multiform is a lethal brain glial tumor characterized by low survival and high recurrence, partially attributed to the glioblastoma stem cells according to recent researches. Microenvironment or niche in tumor tissue is believed to provide essential support for the aberrant growth of tumor stem cells. In order to explore the effect of growth factors in tumor microenvironment on glioblastoma stem cells behavior, glioblastoma-derived stem-like cells (GDSCs) were isolated from adult human glioblastoma specimen with antibody against surface marker CD133 and were co-cultured with various tumor cells including U87MG cells, unsorted glioblastoma tumor cells, CD133(-) cells and normal rat primary astrocytes. Results suggested that tumor cells could promote GDSCs proliferation while non-tumor cells could not, and several growth factors were exclusively detected in the co-culture system with tumor cells. It was concluded that growth factors derived from tumor microenvironment possibly contributed to the uncontrolled proliferation of GDSCs.

  7. Delineating the "galectin signature" of the tumor microenvironment

    PubMed Central

    Compagno, Daniel; Laderach, Diego J.; Gentilini, Lucas; Jaworski, Felipe M.; Rabinovich, Gabriel A.

    2013-01-01

    Galectins, a family of glycan-binding proteins, can control tumor progression by promoting transformation, angiogenesis and immune escape. We identified a dynamically regulated ‘galectin signature’, which delineates the progression of prostate cancer, highlighting galectin-1 as an attractive target for anti-angiogenic therapy in advanced stages of the disease. PMID:23734312

  8. Translational Horizons in the Tumor Microenvironment: Harnessing Breakthroughs and Targeting Cures

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Yu

    2015-01-01

    Chemotherapy and targeted therapy have opened new avenues in clinical oncology. However, there is a lack of response in a substantial percentage of cancer patients and diseases frequently relapse in those who even initially respond. Resistance is, at present, the major barrier to conquering cancer, the most lethal age-related pathology. Identification of mechanisms underlying resistance and development of effective strategies to circumvent treatment pitfalls thereby improving clinical outcomes remain overarching tasks for scientists and clinicians. Growing bodies of data indicate that stromal cells within the genetically stable but metabolically dynamic tumor microenvironment confer acquired resistance against anticancer therapies. Further, treatment itself activates the microenvironment by damaging a large population of benign cells, which can drastically exacerbate disease conditions in a cell nonautonomous manner, and such off-target effects should be well taken into account when establishing future therapeutic rationale. In this review, we highlight relevant biological mechanisms through which the tumor microenvironment drives development of resistance. We discuss some unsolved issues related to the preclinical and clinical trial paradigms that need to be carefully devised, and provide implications for personalized medicine. In the long run, an insightful and accurate understanding of the intricate signaling networks of the tumor microenvironment in pathological settings will guide the design of new clinical interventions particularly combinatorial therapies, and it might help overcome, or at least prevent, the onset of acquired resistance. PMID:25588753

  9. Tumor microenvironment-derived proteins dominate the plasma proteome response during breast cancer induction and progression.

    PubMed

    Pitteri, Sharon J; Kelly-Spratt, Karen S; Gurley, Kay E; Kennedy, Jacob; Buson, Tina Busald; Chin, Alice; Wang, Hong; Zhang, Qing; Wong, Chee-Hong; Chodosh, Lewis A; Nelson, Peter S; Hanash, Samir M; Kemp, Christopher J

    2011-08-01

    Tumor development relies upon essential contributions from the tumor microenvironment and host immune alterations. These contributions may inform the plasma proteome in a manner that could be exploited for cancer diagnosis and prognosis. In this study, we employed a systems biology approach to characterize the plasma proteome response in the inducible HER2/neu mouse model of breast cancer during tumor induction, progression, and regression. Mass spectrometry data derived from approximately 1.6 million spectra identified protein networks involved in wound healing, microenvironment, and metabolism that coordinately changed during tumor development. The observed alterations developed prior to cancer detection, increased progressively with tumor growth and reverted toward baseline with tumor regression. Gene expression and immunohistochemical analyses suggested that the cancer-associated plasma proteome was derived from transcriptional responses in the noncancerous host tissues as well as the developing tumor. The proteomic signature was distinct from a nonspecific response to inflammation. Overall, the developing tumor simultaneously engaged a number of innate physiologic processes, including wound repair, immune response, coagulation and complement cascades, tissue remodeling, and metabolic homeostasis that were all detectable in plasma. Our findings offer an integrated view of tumor development relevant to plasma-based strategies to detect and diagnose cancer.

  10. The Role of IL-33-Dependent Inflammation in the Tumor Microenvironment

    PubMed Central

    Wasmer, Marie-Hélène; Krebs, Philippe

    2017-01-01

    There is compelling evidence that inflammation contributes to tumorigenesis. Inflammatory mediators within the tumor microenvironment can either promote an antitumor immune response or support tumor pathogenesis. Therefore, it is critical to determine the relative contribution of tumor-associated inflammatory pathways to cancer development. Interleukin-33 (IL-33) is a member of the IL-1 family of cytokines that is released upon tissue stress or damage to operate as an alarmin. IL-33 has been primarily implicated in the induction of type-2 immune responses. However, recent findings have shown a role of IL-33 in several cancers where it may exert multiple functions. In this review, we will present the current knowledge on the role of IL-33 in the microenvironment of different tumors. We will highlight which cells produce and which cells are activated by IL-33 in cancer. Furthermore, we will explain how IL-33 modulates the tumor-associated inflammatory microenvironment to restrain or promote tumorigenesis. Finally, we will discuss the issues to be addressed first before potentially targeting the IL-33 pathway for cancer therapy. PMID:28119694

  11. Probing Tumor Microenvironment with In Vivo Phage Display

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-09-01

    Torrey Pines Rd La Jolla, Ca 92037-1005 9. SPONSORING / MONITORING AGENCY NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) 10. SPONSOR/MONITOR’S ACRONYM(S) U.S. Army...perfused through the heart with PBS, and tumors and tissues were collected for macroscopic imaging under a fluorescent light table. The dotted lines outline...green fluorophor (FAM). The peptide was allowed to circulate for 1 hour, and the mice were perfused through the left ventricle of the heart to

  12. Contribution of resident and recruited macrophages to the photodynamic intervention of colorectal tumor microenvironment.

    PubMed

    Pansa, María Florencia; Lamberti, María Julia; Cogno, Ingrid Sol; Correa, Silvia Graciela; Rumie Vittar, Natalia Belén; Rivarola, Viviana Alicia

    2016-01-01

    The study of cellular interactions in the tumor microenvironment has become one of the main areas of research in the fight against cancer. Tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs) influence tumor progression and therapy response due to its functional plasticity. Regarding cancer treatment, photodynamic therapy (PDT) is a minimally invasive and clinically approved procedure that involves the administration of a photosensitizer (PS), a nontoxic photosensitizing drug which is selectively retained in neoplastic tissue. Here, we investigated the role of resident and nonresident macrophages in the context of a PDT-treated colorectal tumor by developing a combination of 2-D and three-dimensional (3-D) experimental platform, recreating tumor-stroma interactions in vitro. Enhancement of cytotoxicity of PDT was achieved in the presence of nonresident macrophages which had a strong anti-tumor phenotype mediated by the production of nitric oxide, IL-6, and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α). On the contrary, tumor resident macrophages induced a pro-tumor phenotype promoting tumor cell migration and endothelial stimulation. Due to their plasticity, tumor-resident or tumor-recruited macrophages can differentially influence the response of tumors to PDT, so their multifactorial roles should be considered in the overall design of anti-tumor therapeutic.

  13. Endostar enhances the antitumor effects of radiation by affecting energy metabolism and alleviating the tumor microenvironment in a Lewis lung carcinoma mouse model

    PubMed Central

    ZHENG, YONG-FA; GE, WEI; XU, HUI-LIN; CAO, DE-DONG; LIU, LIANG; MING, PING-PO; LI, CHANG-HU; XU, XI-MING; TAO, WEI-PING; TAO, ZE-ZHANG

    2015-01-01

    Lung cancer is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality. Previous studies have identified that an improvement in treatment efficacy was achieved using Endostar; however, the role of Endostar in lung cancer remains poorly understood. The present study investigated whether the enhanced antitumor effects of Endostar in combination with radiation involved changes in the metabolism and microenvironment in non-small cell lung cancer. A Lewis lung carcinoma mouse model was used, including the control, Endostar (ES), radiotherapy (RT) and Endostar plus radiotherapy (ES + RT) groups. The tumor inhibition rates and growth were described based on changes in tumor volume. In addition, ultraviolet enzymatic analysis was performed to determine the lactate level and reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction was used to measure the mRNA expression of lactate dehydrogenase (LDH). A Meph-3 pH meter was used to detect the ranges of tumor interstitial tissue pH, and immunohistochemical analysis was adopted to examine hypoxia within the tumor microenvironment. The tumor inhibition rate of the ES + RT group was significantly higher compared with the other three groups (P<0.05). Following treatment, the lactate levels decreased in all three treatment groups compared with the control, particularly in the ES + RT group (P<0.05). Reduced LDH expression and hypoxic fraction in the tumor microenvironment were also observed in the ES + RT group (P<0.05). Furthermore, changes from acidic to alkaline pH in the tumor microenvironment were detected in the ES + RT group. The present study suggested that Endostar is involved in the regulation of metabolism and tumor microenvironment hypoxia, which may be responsible for the enhanced antitumor effect of Endostar in combination with radiotherapy. PMID:26722291

  14. A top-down view of the tumor microenvironment: structure, cells and signaling

    PubMed Central

    Bhome, Rahul; Bullock, Marc D.; Al Saihati, Hajir A.; Goh, Rebecca W.; Primrose, John N.; Sayan, A. Emre; Mirnezami, Alex H.

    2015-01-01

    It is well established that the tumor microenvironment (TME) contributes to cancer progression. Stromal cells can be divided into mesenchymal, vascular, and immune. Signaling molecules secreted by the tumor corrupts these cells to create “activated” stroma. Equally, the extracellular matrix (ECM) contributes to tumor development and invasion by forming a biologically active scaffold. In this review we describe the key structural, cellular and signaling components of the TME with a perspective on stromal soluble factors and microRNAs (miRNAs). PMID:26075202

  15. Targeting the Tumor Microenvironment: From Understanding Pathways to Effective Clinical Trials

    PubMed Central

    Fang, Hua; DeClerck, Yves A.

    2013-01-01

    It is clear that tumor cells do not act alone but in close interaction with the extracellular matrix and with stromal cells in the tumor microenvironment (TME). As our understanding of tumor cell-stroma interactions increased over the last two decades, significant efforts have been made to develop agents that interfere with these interactions. Here, we discuss four different therapeutic strategies that target the TME, focusing on agents that are at the most advanced stage of preclinical or clinical development. We end this review by outlining some of the lessons we have learned so far from the development of TME-targeting agents. PMID:23913938

  16. Probing Tumor Microenvironment With In Vivo Phage Display

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-10-01

    Institute 10901 N Torrey Pines Rd La Jolla Ca 92037-1005 9. SPONSORING / MONITORING AGENCY NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) 10. SPONSOR/MONITOR’S ACRONYM(S...synthetic iRGD peptide was co-injected with FAM-CIS. After 1 hr of peptide circulation, the mice were perfused through the heart with PBS, and...was allowed to circulate for 30 min. The mice were perfused through the heart with PBS, and the tumors were subjected to immunofluorescence. Red

  17. Heterogeneity of tumor cells in the bone microenvironment: Mechanisms and therapeutic targets for bone metastasis of prostate or breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Futakuchi, Mitsuru; Fukamachi, Katsumi; Suzui, Masumi

    2016-04-01

    Bone is the most common target organ of metastasis of prostate and breast cancers. This produces considerable morbidity due to skeletal-related events, SREs, including bone pain, hypercalcemia, pathologic fracture, and compression of the spinal cord. The mechanism of bone metastasis is complex and involves cooperative reciprocal interaction among tumor cells, osteoblasts, osteoclasts, and the mineralized bone matrix. The interaction between the metastatic tumor and bone stromal cells has been commonly referred to as the "vicious cycle". Tumor cells stimulate osteoblasts, which in turn stimulate osteoclasts through the secretion of cytokines such as the TNF family member receptor activator of nuclear κB ligand (RANKL). Activated osteoclasts degrade the bone matrix by producing strong acid and proteinases. Bone degradation by osteoclasts releases TGFβ and other growth factors stored in the bone matrix, that further stimulate tumor cells. Bone modifying agents, targeting osteoclast activity, such as bisphosphonate and RANKL antibodies are considered as the standard of care for reducing SREs of patients with bone metastatic diseases. These agents decrease osteoclast activity and delay worsening of skeletal pain and aggravation of bone metastatic diseases. While the management of SREs by these agents may improve patients' lives, this treatment does not address the specific issues of the patients with bone metastasis such as tumor dormancy, drug resistance, or improvement of survival. Here, we review the mechanisms of bone metastasis formation, tumor heterogeneity in the bone microenvironment, and conventional therapy for bone metastatic diseases and discuss the potential development of new therapies targeting tumor heterogeneity in the bone microenvironment.

  18. Modulation of the Tumor Microenvironment for Cancer Treatment: A Biomaterials Approach

    PubMed Central

    Adjei, Isaac M.; Blanka, Sharma

    2015-01-01

    Tumors are complex tissues that consist of stromal cells, such as fibroblasts, immune cells and mesenchymal stem cells, as well as non-cellular components, in addition to neoplastic cells. Increasingly, there is evidence to suggest that these non-neoplastic cell components support cancer initiation, progression and metastasis and that their ablation or reprogramming can inhibit tumor growth. Our understanding of the activities of different parts of the tumor stroma in advancing cancer has been improved by the use of scaffold and matrix-based 3D systems originally developed for regenerative medicine. Additionally, drug delivery systems made from synthetic and natural biomaterials deliver drugs to kill stromal cells or reprogram the microenvironment for tumor inhibition. In this article, we review the impact of 3D tumor models in increasing our understanding of tumorigenesis. We also discuss how different drug delivery systems aid in the reprogramming of tumor stroma for cancer treatment. PMID:25695337

  19. Investigating the Radioresistant Properties of Lung Cancer Stem Cells in the Context of the Tumor Microenvironment

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Ryan; Sethi, Pallavi; Jyoti, Amar; McGarry, Ronald; Upreti, Meenakshi

    2016-01-01

    Lung cancer is the most common cause of cancer-related deaths worldwide and non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) accounts for ~85% of all lung cancer. While recent research has shown that cancer stem cells (CSC) exhibit radioresistant and chemoresistant properties, current cancer therapy targets the bulk of the tumor burden without accounting for the CSC and the contribution of the tumor microenvironment. CSC interaction with the stroma enhances NSCLC survival, thus limiting the efficacy of treatment. The aim of this study was to elucidate the role of CSC and the microenvironment in conferring radio- or chemoresistance in an in vitro tumor model for NSCLC. The novel in vitro three-dimensional (3D) NSCLC model of color-coded tumor tissue analogs (TTA) that we have developed is comprised of human lung adenocarcinoma cells, fibroblasts, endothelial cells and NSCLC cancer stem cells maintained in low oxygen conditions (5% O2) to recapitulate the physiologic conditions in tumors. Using this model, we demonstrate that a single 5 Gy radiation dose does not inhibit growth of TTA containing CSC and results in elevated expression of cytokines (TGF-α, RANTES, ENA-78) and factors (vimentin, MMP and TIMP), indicative of an invasive and aggressive phenotype. However, combined treatment of single dose or fractionated doses with cisplatin was found to either attenuate or decrease the proliferative effect that radiation exposure alone had on TTA containing CSC maintained in hypoxic conditions. In summary, we utilized a 3D NSCLC model, which had characteristics of the tumor microenvironment and tumor cell heterogeneity, to elucidate the multifactorial nature of radioresistance in tumors. PMID:26836231

  20. Metabolic remodeling of the tumor microenvironment: migration stimulating factor (MSF) reprograms myofibroblasts toward lactate production, fueling anabolic tumor growth.

    PubMed

    Carito, Valentina; Bonuccelli, Gloria; Martinez-Outschoorn, Ubaldo E; Whitaker-Menezes, Diana; Caroleo, Maria Cristina; Cione, Erika; Howell, Anthony; Pestell, Richard G; Lisanti, Michael P; Sotgia, Federica

    2012-09-15

    Migration stimulating factor (MSF) is a genetically truncated N-terminal isoform of fibronectin that is highly expressed during mammalian development in fetal fibroblasts, and during tumor formation in human cancer-associated myofibroblasts. However, its potential functional role in regulating tumor metabolism remains unexplored. Here, we generated an immortalized fibroblast cell line that recombinantly overexpresses MSF and studied their properties relative to vector-alone control fibroblasts. Our results indicate that overexpression of MSF is sufficient to confer myofibroblastic differentiation, likely via increased TGF-b signaling. In addition, MSF activates the inflammation-associated transcription factor NFκB, resulting in the onset of autophagy/mitophagy, thereby driving glycolytic metabolism (L-lactate production) in the tumor microenvironment. Consistent with the idea that glycolytic fibroblasts fuel tumor growth (via L-lactate, a high-energy mitochondrial fuel), MSF fibroblasts significantly increased tumor growth, by up to 4-fold. Mechanistic dissection of the MSF signaling pathway indicated that Cdc42 lies downstream of MSF and fibroblast activation. In accordance with this notion, Cdc42 overexpression in immortalized fibroblasts was sufficient to drive myofibroblast differentiation, to provoke a shift towards glycolytic metabolism and to promote tumor growth by up to 2-fold. In conclusion, the MSF/Cdc42/NFκB signaling cascade may be a critical druggable target in preventing "Warburg-like" cancer metabolism in tumor-associated fibroblasts. Thus, MSF functions in the metabolic remodeling of the tumor microenvironment by metabolically reprogramming cancer-associated fibroblasts toward glycolytic metabolism.

  1. Lactate Contribution to the Tumor Microenvironment: Mechanisms, Effects on Immune Cells and Therapeutic Relevance

    PubMed Central

    Romero-Garcia, Susana; Moreno-Altamirano, María Maximina B.; Prado-Garcia, Heriberto; Sánchez-García, Francisco Javier

    2016-01-01

    Malignant transformation of cells leads to enhanced glucose uptake and the conversion of a larger fraction of pyruvate into lactate, even under normoxic conditions; this phenomenon of aerobic glycolysis is largely known as the Warburg effect. This metabolic reprograming serves to generate biosynthetic precursors, thus facilitating the survival of rapidly proliferating malignant cells. Extracellular lactate directs the metabolic reprograming of tumor cells, thereby serving as an additional selective pressure. Besides tumor cells, stromal cells are another source of lactate production in the tumor microenvironment, whose role in both tumor growth and the antitumor immune response is the subject of intense research. In this review, we provide an integral perspective of the relationship between lactate and the overall tumor microenvironment, from lactate structure to metabolic pathways for its synthesis, receptors, signaling pathways, lactate-producing cells, lactate-responding cells, and how all contribute to the tumor outcome. We discuss the role of lactate as an immunosuppressor molecule that contributes to tumor evasion and we explore the possibility of targeting lactate metabolism for cancer treatment, as well as of using lactate as a prognostic biomarker. PMID:26909082

  2. Alterations of tumor microenvironment by carbon monoxide impedes lung cancer growth

    PubMed Central

    Nemeth, Zsuzsanna; Csizmadia, Eva; Vikstrom, Lisa; Li, Mailin; Bisht, Kavita; Feizi, Alborz; Otterbein, Sherrie; Zuckerbraun, Brian; Costa, Daniel B.; Pandolfi, Pier Paolo; Fillinger, Janos; Döme, Balazs; Otterbein, Leo E.; Wegiel, Barbara

    2016-01-01

    We hypothesized that tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs) are controlled by the diffusible gas carbon monoxide (CO). We demonstrate that induction of apoptosis in lung tumors treated with low doses of CO is associated with increased CD86 expression and activation of mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK)/extracellular signal-regulated kinases (Erk) 1/2 pathway in tumor microenvironment. Presence of CD86-positive cells was required for the anti-tumoral effects of CO in established A549 xenografts. We show that the effects of CO on tumor stroma and reprogramming of macrophages towards the anti-tumoral phenotype is mediated by reactive oxygen species (ROS)-dependent activation of MAPK/Erk1/2-c-myc pathway as well as Notch 1-dependent negative feedback on the metabolic enzyme heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1). We find a similar negative correlation between HO-1 and active MAPK-Erk1/2 levels in human lung cancer specimens. In summary, we describe novel non-cell autonomous mechanisms by which the diffusible gas CO dictates changes in the tumor microenvironment through the modulation of macrophages. PMID:26993595

  3. Hypoxia-Induced Reactive Oxygen Species Cause Chromosomal Abnormalities in Endothelial Cells in the Tumor Microenvironment

    PubMed Central

    Hida, Yasuhiro; Maishi, Nako; Towfik, Alam Mohammad; Inoue, Nobuo; Shindoh, Masanobu; Hida, Kyoko

    2013-01-01

    There is much evidence that hypoxia in the tumor microenvironment enhances tumor progression. In an earlier study, we reported abnormal phenotypes of tumor-associated endothelial cells such as those resistant to chemotherapy and chromosomal instability. Here we investigated the role of hypoxia in the acquisition of chromosomal abnormalities in endothelial cells. Tumor-associated endothelial cells isolated from human tumor xenografts showed chromosomal abnormalities, >30% of which were aneuploidy. Aneuploidy of the tumor-associated endothelial cells was also shown by simultaneous in-situ hybridization for chromosome 17 and by immunohistochemistry with anti-CD31 antibody for endothelial staining. The aneuploid cells were surrounded by a pimonidazole-positive area, indicating hypoxia. Human microvascular endothelial cells expressed hypoxia-inducible factor 1 and vascular endothelial growth factor A in response to either hypoxia or hypoxia-reoxygenation, and in these conditions, they acquired aneuploidy in 7 days. Induction of aneuploidy was inhibited by either inhibition of vascular endothelial growth factor signaling with vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2 inhibitor or by inhibition of reactive oxygen species by N-acetyl-L-cysteine. These results indicate that hypoxia induces chromosomal abnormalities in endothelial cells through the induction of reactive oxygen species and excess signaling of vascular endothelial growth factor in the tumor microenvironment. PMID:24260373

  4. CD47 in the tumor microenvironment limits cooperation between antitumor T-cell immunity and radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Soto-Pantoja, David R; Terabe, Masaki; Ghosh, Arunima; Ridnour, Lisa A; DeGraff, William G; Wink, David A; Berzofsky, Jay A; Roberts, David D

    2014-12-01

    Although significant advances in radiotherapy have increased its effectiveness in many cancer settings, general strategies to widen the therapeutic window between normal tissue toxicity and malignant tumor destruction would still offer great value. CD47 blockade has been found to confer radioprotection to normal tissues while enhancing tumor radiosensitivity. Here, we report that CD47 blockade directly enhances tumor immunosurveillance by CD8(+) T cells. Combining CD47 blockade with irradiation did not affect fibrosarcoma growth in T cell-deficient mice, whereas adoptive transfer of tumor-specific CD8(+) T cells restored combinatorial efficacy. Furthermore, ablation of CD8(+) T cells abolished radiotherapeutic response in immunocompetent syngeneic hosts. CD47 blockade in either target cells or effector cells was sufficient to enhance antigen-dependent CD8(+) CTL-mediated tumor cell killing in vitro. In CD47-deficient syngeneic hosts, engrafted B16 melanomas were 50% more sensitive to irradiation, establishing that CD47 expression in the microenvironment was sufficient to limit tumor radiosensitivity. Mechanistic investigations revealed increased tumor infiltration by cytotoxic CD8(+) T cells in a CD47-deficient microenvironment, with an associated increase in T cell-dependent intratumoral expression of granzyme B. Correspondingly, an inverse correlation between CD8(+) T-cell infiltration and CD47 expression was observed in human melanomas. Our findings establish that blocking CD47 in the context of radiotherapy enhances antitumor immunity by directly stimulating CD8(+) cytotoxic T cells, with the potential to increase curative responses.

  5. Modulatory role of 17β-estradiol in the tumor microenvironment of thyroid cancer.

    PubMed

    Hima, Sithul; Sreeja, Sreeharshan

    2016-02-01

    Thyroid cancer (TC) is an endocrine related cancer and is well coupled with the female reproductive hormone, 17β-estradiol (estrogen). Plenty of articles have discussed the role of tumor microenvironment (TME) with different types of tumors in a broad-spectrum but the role of female reproductive hormone, that is, involvement of estrogen in TME of TC have not been reviewed elsewhere. The aim of this review is to analyze how 17β-estradiol affects the TME of TC and also that subsequently leads to progression of cancer. This review is given a new insight on: 1) the estrogen's involvement in TME of TC; 2) how it interferes with the complex cross talk of signaling pathways established between cancer cells, host cells, and their surrounding extracellular matrix; and 3) the important factors of microenvironment comprising inflammation, hypoxia, angiogenesis, metastasis, various growth factors and fibroblasts in stromal cells.

  6. CD47 in the tumor microenvironment limits cooperation between anti-tumor T cell immunity and radiation therapy

    PubMed Central

    Soto-Pantoja, David R.; Terabe, Masaki; Ghosh, Arunima; Ridnour, Lisa A.; DeGraff, William G.; Wink, David A.; Berzofsky, Jay A.; Roberts, David D.

    2014-01-01

    While significant advances in radiotherapy have increased its effectiveness in many cancer settings, general strategies to widen the therapeutic window between normal tissue toxicity and malignant tumor destruction would still offer great value. CD47 blockade has been found to confer radioprotection to normal tissues while enhancing tumor radiosensitivity. Here we report that CD47 blockade directly enhances tumor immunosurveillance by CD8+ T cells. Combining CD47 blockade with irradiation did not affect fibrosarcoma growth in T cell-deficient mice, whereas adoptive transfer of tumor-specific CD8+ T cells restored combinatorial efficacy. Further, ablation of CD8+ T cells abolished radiotherapeutic response in immunocompetent syngeneic hosts. CD47 blockade in either target cells or effector cells was sufficient to enhance antigen-dependent CD8+ CTL-mediated tumor cell killing in vitro. In CD47-deficient syngeneic hosts, engrafted B16 melanomas were 50% more sensitive to irradiation, establishing that CD47 expression in the microenvironment was sufficient to limit tumor radiosensitivity. Mechanistic investigations revealed increased tumor infiltration by cytotoxic CD8+ T cells in a CD47-deficient microenvironment, with an associated increase in T cell-dependent intratumoral expression of granzyme B. Correspondingly, an inverse correlation between CD8+ T cell infiltration and CD47 expression was observed in human melanomas. Our findings establish that blocking CD47 in the context of radiotherapy enhances antitumor immunity by directly stimulating CD8+ cytotoxic T cells, with the potential to increase curative responses. PMID:25297630

  7. Tumor Microenvironment Gene Signature as a Prognostic Classifier and Therapeutic Target

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-06-01

    Approved for Public Release; Distribution Unlimited 13. SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES 14. ABSTRACT Outcome predictors based on gene signatures have been...successfully applied in breast cancer but similar predictors have not been developed for ovarian cancer. We identified a tumor microenvironment- based gene...of patients who are unlikely to benefit from standard surgery and/or chemotherapy and should be considered for clinical trials targeting specific

  8. Mesenchymal Stromal Cells Can Regulate the Immune Response in the Tumor Microenvironment

    PubMed Central

    Poggi, Alessandro; Giuliani, Massimo

    2016-01-01

    The tumor microenvironment is a good target for therapy in solid tumors and hematological malignancies. Indeed, solid tumor cells’ growth and expansion can influence neighboring cells’ behavior, leading to a modulation of mesenchymal stromal cell (MSC) activities and remodeling of extracellular matrix components. This leads to an altered microenvironment, where reparative mechanisms, in the presence of sub-acute inflammation, are not able to reconstitute healthy tissue. Carcinoma cells can undergo epithelial mesenchymal transition (EMT), a key step to generate metastasis; these mesenchymal-like cells display the functional behavior of MSC. Furthermore, MSC can support the survival and growth of leukemic cells within bone marrow participating in the leukemic cell niche. Notably, MSC can inhibit the anti-tumor immune response through either carcinoma-associated fibroblasts or bone marrow stromal cells. Experimental data have indicated their relevance in regulating cytolytic effector lymphocytes of the innate and adaptive arms of the immune system. Herein, we will discuss some of the evidence in hematological malignancies and solid tumors. In particular, we will focus our attention on the means by which it is conceivable to inhibit MSC-mediated immune suppression and trigger anti-tumor innate immunity. PMID:27834810

  9. Identification of genetic loci that control mammary tumor susceptibility through the host microenvironment

    DOE PAGES

    Zhang, Pengju; Lo, Alvin; Huang, Yurong; ...

    2015-03-09

    The interplay between host genetics, tumor microenvironment and environmental exposure in cancer susceptibility remains poorly understood. Here we assessed the genetic control of stromal mediation of mammary tumor susceptibility to low dose ionizing radiation (LDIR) using backcrossed F1 into BALB/c (F1Bx) between cancer susceptible (BALB/c) and resistant (SPRET/EiJ) mouse strains. Tumor formation was evaluated after transplantation of non-irradiated Trp53-/- BALB/c mammary gland fragments into cleared fat pads of F1Bx hosts. Genome-wide linkage analysis revealed 2 genetic loci that constitute the baseline susceptibility via host microenvironment. However, once challenged with LDIR, we discovered 13 additional loci that were enriched for genesmore » involved in cytokines, including TGFβ1 signaling. Surprisingly, LDIR-treated F1Bx cohort significantly reduced incidence of mammary tumors from Trp53-/- fragments as well as prolonged tumor latency, compared to sham-treated controls. We demonstrated further that plasma levels of specific cytokines were significantly correlated with tumor latency. Using an ex vivo 3-D assay, we confirmed TGFβ1 as a strong candidate for reduced mammary invasion in SPRET/EiJ, which could explain resistance of this strain to mammary cancer risk following LDIR. Our results open possible new avenues to understand mechanisms of genes operating via the stroma that affect cancer risk from external environmental exposures.« less

  10. Identification of genetic loci that control mammary tumor susceptibility through the host microenvironment

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Pengju; Lo, Alvin; Huang, Yurong; Huang, Ge; Liang, Guozhou; Mott, Joni; Karpen, Gary H.; Blakely, Eleanor A.; Bissell, Mina J.; Barcellos-Hoff, Mary Helen; Snijders, Antoine M.; Mao, Jian-Hua

    2015-03-09

    The interplay between host genetics, tumor microenvironment and environmental exposure in cancer susceptibility remains poorly understood. Here we assessed the genetic control of stromal mediation of mammary tumor susceptibility to low dose ionizing radiation (LDIR) using backcrossed F1 into BALB/c (F1Bx) between cancer susceptible (BALB/c) and resistant (SPRET/EiJ) mouse strains. Tumor formation was evaluated after transplantation of non-irradiated Trp53-/- BALB/c mammary gland fragments into cleared fat pads of F1Bx hosts. Genome-wide linkage analysis revealed 2 genetic loci that constitute the baseline susceptibility via host microenvironment. However, once challenged with LDIR, we discovered 13 additional loci that were enriched for genes involved in cytokines, including TGFβ1 signaling. Surprisingly, LDIR-treated F1Bx cohort significantly reduced incidence of mammary tumors from Trp53-/- fragments as well as prolonged tumor latency, compared to sham-treated controls. We demonstrated further that plasma levels of specific cytokines were significantly correlated with tumor latency. Using an ex vivo 3-D assay, we confirmed TGFβ1 as a strong candidate for reduced mammary invasion in SPRET/EiJ, which could explain resistance of this strain to mammary cancer risk following LDIR. Our results open possible new avenues to understand mechanisms of genes operating via the stroma that affect cancer risk from external environmental exposures.

  11. Galectin-3 in bone tumor microenvironment: a beacon for individual skeletal metastasis management.

    PubMed

    Nakajima, Kosei; Kho, Dong Hyo; Yanagawa, Takashi; Zimel, Melissa; Heath, Elisabeth; Hogan, Victor; Raz, Avraham

    2016-06-01

    The skeleton is frequently a secondary growth site of disseminated cancers, often leading to painful and devastating clinical outcomes. Metastatic cancer distorts bone marrow homeostasis through tumor-derived factors, which shapes different bone tumor microenvironments depending on the tumor cells' origin. Here, we propose a novel insight on tumor-secreted Galectin-3 (Gal-3) that controls the induction of an inflammatory cascade, differentiation of osteoblasts, osteoclasts, and bone marrow cells, resulting in bone destruction and therapeutic failure. In the approaching era of personalized medicine, the current treatment modalities targeting bone metastatic environments are provided to the patient with limited consideration of the cancer cells' origin. Our new outlook suggests delivering individual tumor microenvironment treatments based on the expression level/activity/functionality of tumor-derived factors, rather than utilizing a commonly shared therapeutic umbrella. The notion of "Gal-3-associated bone remodeling" could be the first step toward a specific personalized therapy for each cancer type generating a different bone niche in patients afflicted with non-curable bone metastasis.

  12. Mesenchymal Stromal Cells Can Regulate the Immune Response in the Tumor Microenvironment.

    PubMed

    Poggi, Alessandro; Giuliani, Massimo

    2016-11-08

    The tumor microenvironment is a good target for therapy in solid tumors and hematological malignancies. Indeed, solid tumor cells' growth and expansion can influence neighboring cells' behavior, leading to a modulation of mesenchymal stromal cell (MSC) activities and remodeling of extracellular matrix components. This leads to an altered microenvironment, where reparative mechanisms, in the presence of sub-acute inflammation, are not able to reconstitute healthy tissue. Carcinoma cells can undergo epithelial mesenchymal transition (EMT), a key step to generate metastasis; these mesenchymal-like cells display the functional behavior of MSC. Furthermore, MSC can support the survival and growth of leukemic cells within bone marrow participating in the leukemic cell niche. Notably, MSC can inhibit the anti-tumor immune response through either carcinoma-associated fibroblasts or bone marrow stromal cells. Experimental data have indicated their relevance in regulating cytolytic effector lymphocytes of the innate and adaptive arms of the immune system. Herein, we will discuss some of the evidence in hematological malignancies and solid tumors. In particular, we will focus our attention on the means by which it is conceivable to inhibit MSC-mediated immune suppression and trigger anti-tumor innate immunity.

  13. Interleukin-8 promotes canine hemangiosarcoma growth by regulating the tumor microenvironment

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Jong-Hyuk; Frantz, Aric M.; Anderson, Katie L.; Graef, Ashley J.; Scott, Milcah C.; Robinson, Sally; Sharkey, Leslie C.; O'Brien, Timothy D.; Dickerson, Erin B.; Modiano, Jaime F.

    2014-04-15

    Interleukin-8 (IL-8) gene expression is highly up-regulated in canine hemangiosarcoma (HSA); however, its role in the pathogenesis of this disease is unknown. We investigated the expression of IL-8 in canine HSA tissues and cell lines, as well and the effects of IL-8 on canine HSA in vitro, and in vivo using a mouse xenograft model for the latter. Constitutive expression of IL-8 mRNA, IL-8 protein, and IL-8 receptor were variable among different tumor samples and cell lines, but they showed stable steady states in each cell line. Upon the addition of IL-8, HSA cells showed transient intracellular calcium fluxes, suggesting that their IL-8 receptors are functional and that IL-8 binding activates relevant signaling pathways. Yet, neither addition of exogenous IL-8 nor blockade of endogenous IL-8 by neutralizing anti-IL-8 antibody (α-IL-8 Ab) affected HSA cell proliferation or survival in vitro. To assess potential effects of IL-8 in other tumor constituents, we stratified HSA cell lines and whole tumor samples into “IL-8 high” and “IL-8 low” groups. Genome-wide gene expression profiling showed that samples in the “IL-8 high” tumor group were enriched for genes associated with a “reactive microenvironment,” including activation of coagulation, inflammation, and fibrosis networks. Based on these findings, we hypothesized that the effects of IL-8 on these tumors were mostly indirect, regulating interactions with the microenvironment. This hypothesis was supported by in vivo xenograft experiments where survival and engraftment of tumor cells was inhibited by administration of neutralizing α-IL-8 Ab. Together, our results suggest that IL-8 contributes to establishing a permissive microenvironment during the early stages of tumorigenesis in HSA. - Highlights: • IL-8 is expressed in canine hemangiosarcoma tumor samples and cell lines. • IL-8 transduces a relevant biological signal in canine hemangiosarcoma cells. • IL-8 gene signature is associated

  14. The STING pathway and the T cell-inflamed tumor microenvironment

    PubMed Central

    Woo, Seng-Ryong; Corrales, Leticia; Gajewski, Thomas F.

    2015-01-01

    A major subset of patients with advanced solid tumors shows a spontaneous T cell-inflamed tumor microenvironment, which has prognostic import and is associated with clinical response to immunotherapies. As such, understanding the mechanisms governing the generation of spontaneous T cell responses in only a subset of patients is critical for advancing immunotherapeutic approaches further. Here, we discuss characteristics of T cell-inflamed versus non-inflamed tumors, including a type I IFN signature associated with T cell priming against tumor antigens. We review recent findings that have pointed towards the STING pathway of cytosolic DNA sensing as an important innate immune sensing mechanism driving type I IFN production in the tumor context. Knowledge of this pathway is guiding the further development of novel immunotherapeutic strategies. PMID:25758021

  15. The tumor microenvironment shapes lineage, transcriptional, and functional diversity of infiltrating myeloid cells.

    PubMed

    Elpek, Kutlu G; Cremasco, Viviana; Shen, Hua; Harvey, Christopher J; Wucherpfennig, Kai W; Goldstein, Daniel R; Monach, Paul A; Turley, Shannon J

    2014-07-01

    Myeloid cells play important regulatory roles within the tumor environment by directly promoting tumor progression and modulating the function of tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes, and as such, they represent a potential therapeutic target for the treatment of cancer. Although distinct subsets of tumor-associated myeloid cells have been identified, a broader analysis of the complete myeloid cell landscape within individual tumors and also across different tumor types has been lacking. By establishing the developmental and transcriptomic signatures of infiltrating myeloid cells from multiple primary tumors, we found that tumor-associated macrophages (TAM) and tumor-associated neutrophils (TAN), while present within all tumors analyzed, exhibited strikingly different frequencies, gene expression profiles, and functions across cancer types. We also evaluated the impact of anatomic location and circulating factors on the myeloid cell composition of tumors. The makeup of the myeloid compartment was determined by the tumor microenvironment rather than the anatomic location of tumor development or tumor-derived circulating factors. Protumorigenic and hypoxia-associated genes were enriched in TAMs and TANs compared with splenic myeloid-derived suppressor cells. Although all TANs had an altered expression pattern of secretory effector molecules, in each tumor type they exhibited a unique cytokine, chemokine, and associated receptor expression profile. One such molecule, haptoglobin, was uniquely expressed by 4T1 TANs and identified as a possible diagnostic biomarker for tumors characterized by the accumulation of myeloid cells. Thus, we have identified considerable cancer-specific diversity in the lineage, gene expression, and function of tumor-infiltrating myeloid cells.

  16. Curcumin Micelles Remodel Tumor Microenvironment and Enhance Vaccine Activity in an Advanced Melanoma Model

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Yao; Miao, Lei; Wang, Yuhua; Xu, Zhenghong; Zhao, Yi; Shen, Youqing; Xiang, Guangya; Huang, Leaf

    2016-01-01

    Previously, we have reported a lipid-based Trp2 peptide vaccine for immunotherapy against melanoma. The suppressive immune microenvironment in the tumor is a major hurdle for an effective vaccine therapy. We hypothesized that curcumin (CUR) would remodel the tumor microenvironment to improve the vaccine activity. Curcumin–polyethylene glycol conjugate (CUR–PEG), an amphiphilic CUR-based micelle, was delivered intravenously (i.v.) to the tumor. Indeed, in the B16F10 tumor–bearing mice, the combination of CUR–PEG and vaccine treatment resulted in a synergistic antitumor effect (P < 0.001) compared to individual treatments. In the immune organs, the combination therapy significantly boosted in vivo cytotoxic T-lymphocyte response (41.0 ± 5.0% specific killing) and interferon-γ (IFN-γ) production (sevenfold increase). In the tumor microenvironment, the combination therapy led to significantly downregulated levels of immunosuppressive factors, such as decreased numbers of myeloid-derived suppressor cells and regulatory T cells (Treg) cells and declined levels of interleukin-6 and chemokine ligand 2—in correlation with increased levels of proinflammatory cytokines, including tumor necrosis factor-α and IFN-γ as well as an elevation in the CD8+ T-cell population. The results indicated a distinct M2 to M1 phenotype switch in the treated tumors. Combining CUR–PEG and vaccine also dramatically downregulated the signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 pathway (76% reduction). Thus, we conclude that CUR–PEG is an effective agent to improve immunotherapy for advanced melanoma. PMID:26334519

  17. Modification of the tumor microenvironment as a novel target of renal cell carcinoma therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Finke, James H; Rayman, Pat A; Ko, Jennifer S; Bradley, Judy M; Gendler, Sandra J; Cohen, Peter A

    2013-01-01

    To move forward with immunotherapy, it is important to understand how the tumor microenvironment generates systemic immunosuppression in patients with renal cell carcinoma (RCC) as well as in patients with other types of solid tumors. Even though antigen discovery in RCC has lagged behind melanoma, recent clinical trials have finally authenticated that RCC is susceptible to vaccine-based therapy. Furthermore, judicious coadministration of cytokines and chemotherapy can potentiate therapeutic responses to vaccine in RCC and prolong survival, as has already proved possible for melanoma. Although high-dose interleukin 2 immunotherapy has been superseded as first-line therapy for RCC by promiscuous receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitors (rTKIs) such as sunitinib, sunitinib itself is a potent immunoadjunct in animal tumor models. A reasonable therapeutic goal is to unite antiangiogenic strategies with immunotherapy as first-line therapy for RCC. This strategy is equally appropriate for testing in all solid tumors in which the microenvironment generates immunosuppression. A common element of RCC and pancreatic, colon, breast, and other solid tumors is large numbers of circulating myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs), and because MDSCs elicit regulatory T cells rather than vice versa, gaining control over MDSCs is an important initial step in any immunotherapy. Although rTKIs like sunitinib have a remarkable capacity to deplete MDSCs and restore normal T-cell function in peripheral body compartments such as the bloodstream and the spleen, such rTKIs are effective only against MDSCs, which are engaged in phospho-STAT3-dependent programming (pSTAT3+). Unfortunately, rTKI-resistant pSTAT3- MDSCs are especially apt to arise within the tumor microenvironment itself, necessitating strategies that do not rely exclusively on STAT3 disruption. The most utilitarian strategy to gain control of both pSTAT3+ and pSTAT3- MDSCs may be to exploit the natural differentiation pathway

  18. Bone mesenchymal stem cells differentiate into myofibroblasts in the tumor microenvironment.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jing; Sun, Dingqi; Fu, Qiang; Cao, Qingwei; Zhang, Hui; Zhang, Keqin

    2016-07-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the tropism of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) to the tumor microenvironment, and to evaluate the feasibility of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells differentiating into myofibroblasts in vitro. A total of 1 ml bone marrow was extracted from the greater trochanter of one male New Zealand rabbit, and MSCs were obtained by density gradient centrifugation and cultured routinely. The surface markers were analyzed by flow cytometry. A VX2 tumor was aseptically excised from another male New Zealand rabbit and primary cultured. The tropism of MSCs for 30% and 50% VX2 conditioned medium was determined by using Transwell migration assays. MSCs were incubated in 30% VX2 conditioned medium for 7 or 14 days. The messenger (m)RNA levels and protein expression of α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA) and vimentin were measured by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction and western blotting. MSCs were observed to have a spindle shape. The cultured MSCs were cluster of differentiation (CD)44(+), CD105(+), CD106(+) and CD34(-). VX2 cells demonstrated a spindle or polygon shape. In the Transwell assay, it was observed that the migrated cells appeared more frequently in the 30% VX2 conditioned medium group compared with the other groups when microscopically examined, which was additionally confirmed by the results of a colorimetric assay. The mRNA levels and protein expression of α-SMA and vimentin significantly increased in the test group compared with the control group at 7 days (P<0.01), and further increased in the test group at 14 days (P<0.01). The results of the present study demonstrated that MSCs have tropism for the tumor microenvironment and furthermore, may differentiate into myofibroblasts in the tumor microenvironment in vitro. The present study suggested that MSCs may migrate to the tumor and subsequently differentiate into myofibroblasts due to the tumor microenvironment, which may lead to promotion of the growth of the

  19. Interrogating Tumor Metabolism and Tumor Microenvironments Using Molecular Positron Emission Tomography Imaging. Theranostic Approaches to Improve Therapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Jacobson, Orit

    2013-01-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) is a noninvasive molecular imaging technology that is becoming increasingly important for the measurement of physiologic, biochemical, and pharmacological functions at cellular and molecular levels in patients with cancer. Formation, development, and aggressiveness of tumor involve a number of molecular pathways, including intrinsic tumor cell mutations and extrinsic interaction between tumor cells and the microenvironment. Currently, evaluation of these processes is mainly through biopsy, which is invasive and limited to the site of biopsy. Ongoing research on specific target molecules of the tumor and its microenvironment for PET imaging is showing great potential. To date, the use of PET for diagnosing local recurrence and metastatic sites of various cancers and evaluation of treatment response is mainly based on [18F]fluorodeoxyglucose ([18F]FDG), which measures glucose metabolism. However, [18F]FDG is not a target-specific PET tracer and does not give enough insight into tumor biology and/or its vulnerability to potential treatments. Hence, there is an increasing need for the development of selective biologic radiotracers that will yield specific biochemical information and allow for noninvasive molecular imaging. The possibility of cancer-associated targets for imaging will provide the opportunity to use PET for diagnosis and therapy response monitoring (theranostics) and thus personalized medicine. This article will focus on the review of non-[18F]FDG PET tracers for specific tumor biology processes and their preclinical and clinical applications. PMID:24064460

  20. P-selectin is a nanotherapeutic delivery target in the tumor microenvironment.

    PubMed

    Shamay, Yosi; Elkabets, Moshe; Li, Hongyan; Shah, Janki; Brook, Samuel; Wang, Feng; Adler, Keren; Baut, Emily; Scaltriti, Maurizio; Jena, Prakrit V; Gardner, Eric E; Poirier, John T; Rudin, Charles M; Baselga, José; Haimovitz-Friedman, Adriana; Heller, Daniel A

    2016-06-29

    Disseminated tumors are poorly accessible to nanoscale drug delivery systems because of the vascular barrier, which attenuates extravasation at the tumor site. We investigated P-selectin, a molecule expressed on activated vasculature that facilitates metastasis by arresting tumor cells at the endothelium, for its potential to target metastases by arresting nanomedicines at the tumor endothelium. We found that P-selectin is expressed on cancer cells in many human tumors. To develop a targeted drug delivery platform, we used a fucosylated polysaccharide with nanomolar affinity to P-selectin. The nanoparticles targeted the tumor microenvironment to localize chemotherapeutics and a targeted MEK (mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase) inhibitor at tumor sites in both primary and metastatic models, resulting in superior antitumor efficacy. In tumors devoid of P-selectin, we found that ionizing radiation guided the nanoparticles to the disease site by inducing P-selectin expression. Radiation concomitantly produced an abscopal-like phenomenon wherein P-selectin appeared in unirradiated tumor vasculature, suggesting a potential strategy to target disparate drug classes to almost any tumor.

  1. The Roles of Mesenchymal Stromal/Stem Cells in Tumor Microenvironment Associated with Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Krstić, Jelena; Djordjević, Ivana Okić; Jauković, Aleksandra

    2016-01-01

    State of tumor microenvironment (TME) is closely linked to regulation of tumor growth and progression affecting the final outcome, refractoriness, and relapse of disease. Interactions of tumor, immune, and mesenchymal stromal/stem cells (MSCs) have been recognized as crucial for understanding tumorigenesis. Due to their outstanding features, stem cell-like properties, capacity to regulate immune response, and dynamic functional phenotype dependent on microenvironmental stimuli, MSCs have been perceived as important players in TME. Signals provided by tumor-associated chronic inflammation educate MSCs to alter their phenotype and immunomodulatory potential in favor of tumor-biased state of MSCs. Adjustment of phenotype to TME and acquisition of tumor-promoting ability by MSCs help tumor cells in maintenance of permissive TME and suppression of antitumor immune response. Potential utilization of MSCs in treatment of tumor is based on their inherent ability to home tumor tissue that makes them suitable delivery vehicles for immune-stimulating factors and vectors for targeted antitumor therapy. Here, we review data regarding intrusive effects of inflammatory TME on MSCs capacity to affect tumor development through modification of their phenotype and interactions with immune system. PMID:27630452

  2. P-selectin is a nanotherapeutic delivery target in the tumor microenvironment

    PubMed Central

    Shamay, Yosi; Elkabets, Moshe; Li, Hongyan; Shah, Janki; Brook, Samuel; Wang, Feng; Adler, Keren; Baut, Emily; Scaltriti, Maurizio; Jena, Prakrit V.; Gardner, Eric E.; Poirier, John T.; Rudin, Charles M.; Baselga, José; Haimovitz-Friedman, Adriana; Heller, Daniel A.

    2016-01-01

    Disseminated tumors are poorly accessible to nanoscale drug delivery systems because of the vascular barrier, which attenuates extravasation at the tumor site. We investigated P-selectin, a molecule expressed on activated vasculature that facilitates metastasis by arresting tumor cells at the endothelium, for its potential to target metastases by arresting nanomedicines at the tumor endothelium. We found that P-selectin is expressed on cancer cells in many human tumors. To develop a targeted drug delivery platform, we used a fucosylated polysaccharide with nanomolar affinity to P-selectin. The nanoparticles targeted the tumor microenvironment to localize chemotherapeutics and a targeted MEK (mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase) inhibitor at tumor sites in both primary and metastatic models, resulting in superior antitumor efficacy. In tumors devoid of P-selectin, we found that ionizing radiation guided the nanoparticles to the disease site by inducing P-selectin expression. Radiation concomitantly produced an abscopal-like phenomenon wherein P-selectin appeared in unirradiated tumor vasculature, suggesting a potential strategy to target disparate drug classes to almost any tumor. PMID:27358497

  3. Tumor-targeting and microenvironment-responsive smart nanoparticles for combination therapy of antiangiogenesis and apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Huang, Shixian; Shao, Kun; Liu, Yang; Kuang, Yuyang; Li, Jianfeng; An, Sai; Guo, Yubo; Ma, Haojun; Jiang, Chen

    2013-03-26

    Tumor microenvironment, such as the lowered tumor extracellular pH (pHe) and matrix metalloproteinase 2 (MMP2), has been extensively explored, which promotes the development of the microenvironment-responsive drug delivery system. Utilizing these unique features, an activatable cell-penetrating peptide (designated as dtACPP) that is dual-triggered by the lowered pHe and MMP2 has been constructed, and a smart nanoparticle system decorating with dtACPP has been successfully developed, which could dual-load gene drug and chemotherapeutics simultaneously. After systemic administration, dtACPP-modified nanoparticles possess passive tumor targetability via the enhanced permeability and retention effect. Then dtACPP would be activated to expose cell-penetrating peptide to drive the nanoparticles' internalization into the intratumoral cells. As angiogenesis and tumor cells might be mutually improved in tumor growth, so combining antiangiogenesis and apoptosis is meaningful for oncotherapy. Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) is significant in angiogenesis, and anti-VEGF therapy could decrease blood vessel density and delay tumor growth obviously. Chemotherapy using doxorubicin (DOX) could kill off tumor cells efficiently. Here, utilizing dtACPP-modified nanoparticles to co-deliver plasmid expressing interfering RNA targeting VEGF (shVEGF) and DOX (designated as dtACPPD/shVEGF-DOX) results in effective shutdown of blood vessels and cell apoptosis within the tumor. On the premise of effective drug delivery, dtACPPD/shVEGF-DOX has demonstrated good tumor targetability, little side effects after systemic administration, and ideal antitumor efficacy.

  4. Until Death Do Us Part: Necrosis and Oxidation Promote the Tumor Microenvironment

    PubMed Central

    Lotfi, Ramin; Kaltenmeier, Christof; Lotze, Michael T.; Bergmann, Christoph

    2016-01-01

    Summary Tumor proliferation is concomitant with autophagy, limited apoptosis, and resultant necrosis. Necrosis is associated with the release of damage-associated molecular pattern molecules (DAMPs), which act as ‘danger signals’, recruiting inflammatory cells, inducing immune responses, and promoting wound healing. Most of the current treatment strategies for cancer (chemotherapy, radiation therapy, hormonal therapy) promote DAMP release following therapy-induced tumor death by necroptosis and necrosis. Myeloid cells (monocytes, dendritic cells (DCs), and granulocytes), as well as mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) belong to the early immigrants in response to unscheduled cell death, initiating and modulating the subsequent inflammatory response. Responding to DAMPs, MSCs, and DCs promote an immunosuppressive milieu, while eosinophils induce oxidative conditions limiting the biologic activity of DAMPs over time and distance. Regulatory T cells are strongly affected by pattern recognition receptor signaling in the tumor microenvironment and limit immune reactivity coordinately with myeloid-derived suppressor cells. Means to ‘aerobically’ oxidize DAMPs provide a novel strategy for limiting tumor progression. The present article summarizes our current understanding of the impact of necrosis on the tumor microenvironment and the influence of oxidative conditions found within this setting. PMID:27226794

  5. Caveolin-1 and cancer metabolism in the tumor microenvironment: markers, models, and mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Sotgia, Federica; Martinez-Outschoorn, Ubaldo E; Howell, Anthony; Pestell, Richard G; Pavlides, Stephanos; Lisanti, Michael P

    2012-01-01

    Caveolins are a family of membrane-bound scaffolding proteins that compartmentalize and negatively regulate signal transduction. Recent studies have implicated a loss of caveolin-1 (Cav-1) expression in the pathogenesis of human cancers. Loss of Cav-1 expression in cancer-associated fibroblasts results in an activated tumor microenvironment, thereby driving early tumor recurrence, metastasis, and poor clinical outcome in breast and prostate cancers. We describe various paracrine signaling mechanism(s) by which the loss of stromal Cav-1 promotes tumor progression, including fibrosis, extracellular matrix remodeling, and the metabolic/catabolic reprogramming of cancer-associated fibroblast, to fuel the growth of adjacent tumor cells. It appears that oxidative stress is the root cause of initiation of the loss of stromal Cav-1 via autophagy, which provides further impetus for the use of antioxidants in anticancer therapy. Finally, we discuss the functional role of Cav-1 in epithelial cancer cells.

  6. Evaluating pH in the Extracellular Tumor Microenvironment Using CEST MRI and Other Imaging Methods

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Liu Qi; Pagel, Mark D.

    2016-01-01

    Tumor acidosis is a consequence of altered metabolism, which can lead to chemoresistance and can be a target of alkalinizing therapies. Noninvasive measurements of the extracellular pH (pHe) of the tumor microenvironment can improve diagnoses and treatment decisions. A variety of noninvasive imaging methods have been developed for measuring tumor pHe. This review provides a detailed description of the advantages and limitations of each method, providing many examples from previous research reports. A substantial emphasis is placed on methods that use MR spectroscopy and MR imaging, including recently developed methods that use chemical exchange saturation transfer MRI that combines some advantages of MR spectroscopy and imaging. Together, this review provides a comprehensive overview of methods for measuring tumor pHe, which may facilitate additional creative approaches in this research field. PMID:27761517

  7. Recombinant Poxvirus and the Tumor Microenvironment: Oncolysis, Immune Regulation and Immunization

    PubMed Central

    Sharp, Daniel W.; Lattime, Edmund C.

    2016-01-01

    Oncolytic viruses (OVs) are being extensively studied for their potential roles in the development of cancer therapy regimens. In addition to their direct lytic effects, OVs can initiate and drive systemic antitumor immunity indirectly via release of tumor antigen, as well as by encoding and delivering immunostimulatory molecules. This combination makes them an effective platform for the development of immunotherapeutic strategies beyond their primary lytic function. Engineering the viruses to also express tumor-associated antigens (TAAs) allows them to simultaneously serve as therapeutic vaccines, targeting and amplifying an immune response to TAAs. Our group and others have shown that vaccinating intratumorally with a poxvirus that encodes TAAs, in addition to immune stimulatory molecules, can modulate the tumor microenvironment, overcome immune inhibitory pathways, and drive both local and systemic tumor specific immune responses. PMID:28191451

  8. Glucose regulated protein 78: a critical link between tumor microenvironment and cancer hallmarks.

    PubMed

    Li, Zongwei; Li, Zhuoyu

    2012-08-01

    Glucose regulated protein 78 (GRP78) has long been recognized as a molecular chaperone in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and can be induced by the ER stress response. Besides its location in the ER, GRP78 has been found to be present in cell plasma membrane, cytoplasm, mitochondria, nucleus as well as cellular secretions. GRP78 is implicated in tumor cell proliferation, apoptosis resistance, immune escape, metastasis and angiogenesis, and its elevated expression usually correlates with a variety of tumor microenvironmental stresses, including hypoxia, glucose deprivation, lactic acidosis and inflammatory response. GRP78 protein acts as a centrally located sensor of stress, which feels and adapts to the alteration in the tumor microenvironment. This article reviews the potential contributions of GRP78 to the acquisition of cancer hallmarks based on intervening in stress responses caused by tumor niche alterations. The paper also introduces several potential GRP78 relevant targeted therapies.

  9. Effect and Molecular Mechanisms of Traditional Chinese Medicine on Regulating Tumor Immunosuppressive Microenvironment

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Qiujun; Li, Jie; Lin, Hongsheng

    2015-01-01

    Traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) is an important complementary strategy for treating cancer in China. The mechanism is related to regulating the internal environment and remodeling the tumor immunosuppressive microenvironment (TIM). Herein we illustrate how TIM is reformed and its protumor activity on promoting tumor cell proliferation, angiogenesis and lymphangiogenesis, tumor invasion, and the oncogenicity of cancer stem cells. Furthermore we summarize the effects and mechanism of TCM on regulating TIM via enhancing antitumor immune responses (e.g., regulating the expression of MHC molecules and Fas/FasL, attenuating cancerigenic ability of cancer stem cells) and remolding immunosuppressive cells (e.g., reversing immune phenotypes of T lymphocytes and tumor associated macrophages, promoting dendritic cells mature, restraining myeloid derived suppressor cells function, and regulating Th1/Th2 factors). We also reveal the bidirectional and multitargeting functions of TCM on regulating TIM. Hopefully, it provides new theoretical basis for TCM clinical practice in cancer treatment and prevention. PMID:26161392

  10. The dynamics of Rho GTPase signaling and implications for targeting cancer and the tumor microenvironment

    PubMed Central

    Pajic, Marina; Herrmann, David; Vennin, Claire; Conway, James RW; Chin, Venessa T; Johnsson, Anna-Karin E; Welch, Heidi CE; Timpson, Paul

    2015-01-01

    Numerous large scale genomics studies have demonstrated that cancer is a molecularly heterogeneous disease, characterized by acquired changes in the structure and DNA sequence of tumor genomes. More recently, the role of the equally complex tumor microenvironment in driving the aggressiveness of this disease is increasingly being realized. Tumor cells are surrounded by activated stroma, creating a dynamic environment that promotes cancer development, metastasis and chemoresistance. The Rho family of small GTPases plays an essential role in the regulation of cell shape, cytokinesis, cell adhesion, and cell motility. Importantly, these processes need to be considered in the context of a complex 3-dimensional (3D) environment, with reciprocal feedback and cross-talk taking place between the tumor cells and host environment. Here we discuss the role of molecular networks involving Rho GTPases in cancer, and the therapeutic implications of inhibiting Rho signaling in both cancer cells and the emerging concept of targeting the surrounding stroma. PMID:26103062

  11. Osteoclast derived matrix metalloproteinase-9 directly impacts angiogenesis in the prostate tumor-bone microenvironment

    PubMed Central

    Bruni-Cardoso, Alexandre; Johnson, Lindsay C.; Vessella, Robert L.; Peterson, Todd E.; Lynch, Conor C.

    2010-01-01

    In human prostate to bone metastases and in a novel rodent model that recapitulates prostate tumor induced-osteolytic and osteogenic responses, we found that osteoclasts are a major source of the proteinase, MMP-9. Since MMPs are important mediators of tumor-host communication, we tested the impact of host derived MMP-9 on prostate tumor progression in bone. To this end, immunocompromised mice that were wild type or null for MMP-9 received transplants of osteolytic/osteogenic inducing prostate adenocarcinoma tumor tissue to the calvaria. Surprisingly, we found that that host MMP-9 significantly contributed to prostate tumor growth without impacting prostate tumor induced osteolytic or osteogenic change as determined by μCT, μSPECT and histomorphometry. Subsequent studies aimed at delineating the mechanism of MMP-9 action on tumor growth focused on angiogenesis since MMP-9 and osteoclasts have been implicated in this process. We observed; 1) significantly fewer and smaller blood vessels in the MMP-9 null group by CD-31 immunohistochemistry; 2) MMP-9 null osteoclasts had significantly lower levels of bioavailable VEGF-A164 and; 3) using an aorta sprouting assay, conditioned media derived from wild type osteoclasts was significantly more angiogenic than conditioned media derived from MMP-9 null osteoclasts. In conclusion, these studies demonstrate that osteoclast derived MMP-9 impacts prostate tumor growth in the bone microenvironment by contributing to angiogenesis without altering prostate tumor induced osteolytic or osteogenic changes. PMID:20332212

  12. Current trends in mathematical modeling of tumor-microenvironment interactions: a survey of tools and applications.

    PubMed

    Rejniak, Katarzyna A; McCawley, Lisa J

    2010-04-01

    In its simplest description, a tumor is comprised of an expanding population of transformed cells supported by a surrounding microenvironment termed the tumor stroma. The tumor microenvironment has a very complex composition, including multiple types of stromal cells, a dense network of various extracellular matrix (ECM) fibers interpenetrated by the interstitial fluid and gradients of several chemical species that either are dissolved in the fluid or are bound to the ECM structure. In order to study experimentally such complex interactions between multiple players, cancer is dissected and considered at different scales of complexity, such as protein interactions, biochemical pathways, cellular functions or whole organism studies. However, the integration of information acquired from these studies into a common description is as difficult as the disease itself. Computational models of cancer can provide cancer researchers with invaluable tools that are capable of integrating the complexity into organizing principles as well as suggesting testable hypotheses. We will focus in this Minireview on mathematical models in which the whole cell is a main modeling unit. We will present a current stage of such cell-focused mathematical modeling incorporating different stromal components and their interactions with growing tumors, and discuss what modeling approaches can be undertaken to complement the in vivo and in vitro experimentation.

  13. Lipocalin-2 Promotes Pancreatic Ductal Adenocarcinoma by Regulating Inflammation in the Tumor Microenvironment.

    PubMed

    Gomez-Chou, Sobeyda; Swidnicka-Siergiejko, Agnieszka; Badi, Niharika; Chavez-Tomar, Myrriah; Lesinski, Gregory B; Bekaii-Saab, Tanios; Farren, Matthew R; Mace, Thomas A; Schmidt, Carl; Liu, Yan; Deng, Defeng; Hwang, Rosa F; Zhou, Liran; Moore, Todd T; Chatterjee, Deyali; Wang, Huamin; Leng, Xiaohong; Arlinghaus, Ralph B; Logsdon, Craig D; Cruz-Monserrate, Zobeida

    2017-03-01

    Lipocalin-2 (LCN2) promotes malignant development in many cancer types. LCN2 is upregulated in patients with pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) and in obese individuals, but whether it contributes to PDAC development is unclear. In this study, we investigated the effects of Lcn2 depletion on diet-induced obesity, inflammation and PDAC development. Mice with acinar cell-specific expression of KrasG12D were crossed with Lcn2-depleted animals and fed isocaloric diets with varying amounts of fat content. Pancreas were collected and analyzed for inflammation, pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasia (PanIN) and PDAC. We also used a syngeneic orthotopic PDAC mouse model to study tumor growth in the presence or absence of Lcn2 expression. In addition, to understand the mechanistic role of how LCN2 could be mediating PDAC, we studied LCN2 and its specific receptor solute carrier family 22 member 17 (SLC22A17) in human pancreatic cancer stellate cells (PSC), key mediators of the PDAC stroma. Depletion of Lcn2 diminished extracellular matrix deposition, immune cell infiltration, PanIN formation and tumor growth. Notably, it also increased survival in both obesity-driven and syngeneic orthotopic PDAC mouse models. LCN2 modulated the secretion of pro-inflammatory cytokines in PSC of the PDAC tumor microenvironment, while downregulation of LCN2-specific receptor SLC22A17 blocked these effects. Our results reveal how LCN2 acts in the tumor microenvironment links obesity, inflammation and PDAC development.

  14. The Fate of the Tumor in the Hands of Microenvironment: Role of TAMs and mTOR Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Soave, Danilo Figueiredo; Miguel, Marina Pacheco

    2016-01-01

    Since 2000, written with elegance and accuracy, Hanahan and Weinberg have proposed six major hallmarks of cancer and, together, they provide great advances to the understanding of tumoral biology. Our knowledge about tumor behavior has improved and the investigators have now recognized that inflammatory microenvironment may be a new feature for the tumor entities. Macrophages are considered as an important component of tumoral microenvironment. Biologically, two forms of activated macrophages can be observed: classically activated macrophages (M1) and alternative activated macrophages (M2). Despite the canonical pathways that control this puzzle of macrophages polarization, recently, mTOR signaling pathway has been implicated as an important piece in determining the metabolic and functional differentiation of M1 and M2 profiles. Currently, it is believed that macrophages related to tumoral microenvironment present an “M2-like” feature promoting an immunosuppressive microenvironment enhancing tumoral angiogenesis, growth, and metastasis. In the present review we discuss the role of macrophages in the tumor microenvironment and the role of mTOR pathway in M1 and M2 differentiation. We also discuss the recent findings in M1 and M2 polarization as a possible target in the cancer therapy. PMID:28074082

  15. Sphingosine-1 Phosphate: A New Modulator of Immune Plasticity in the Tumor Microenvironment

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez, Yamila I.; Campos, Ludmila E.; Castro, Melina G.; Aladhami, Ahmed; Oskeritzian, Carole A.; Alvarez, Sergio E.

    2016-01-01

    In the last 15 years, increasing evidences demonstrate a strong link between sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) and both normal physiology and progression of different diseases, including cancer and inflammation. Indeed, numerous studies show that tissue levels of this sphingolipid metabolite are augmented in many cancers, affecting survival, proliferation, angiogenesis, and metastatic spread. Recent insights into the possible role of S1P as a therapeutic target has attracted enormous attention and opened new opportunities in this evolving field. In this review, we will focus on the role of S1P in cancer, with particular emphasis in new developments that highlight the many functions of this sphingolipid in the tumor microenvironment. We will discuss how S1P modulates phenotypic plasticity of macrophages and mast cells, tumor-induced immune evasion, differentiation and survival of immune cells in the tumor milieu, interaction between cancer and stromal cells, and hypoxic response. PMID:27800303

  16. Crosstalk between Innate Lymphoid Cells and Other Immune Cells in the Tumor Microenvironment

    PubMed Central

    Irshad, Sheeba; Gordon, Peter; Wong, Felix; Sheriff, Ibrahim; Tutt, Andrew; Ng, Tony

    2016-01-01

    Our knowledge and understanding of the tumor microenvironment (TME) have been recently expanded with the recognition of the important role of innate lymphoid cells (ILC). Three different groups of ILC have been described based on their ability to produce cytokines that mediate the interactions between innate and adaptive immune cells in a variety of immune responses in infection, allergy, and autoimmunity. However, recent evidence from experimental models and clinical studies has demonstrated that ILC contribute to the mechanisms that generate suppressive or tolerant environments that allow tumor regression or progression. Defining the complex network of interactions and crosstalk of ILC with other immune cells and understanding the specific contributions of each type of ILC leading to tumor development will allow the manipulation of their function and will be important to develop new interventions and therapeutic strategies. PMID:27882334

  17. Trial Watch—Small molecules targeting the immunological tumor microenvironment for cancer therapy

    PubMed Central

    Buqué, Aitziber; Bloy, Norma; Aranda, Fernando; Cremer, Isabelle; Eggermont, Alexander; Fridman, Wolf Hervé; Fucikova, Jitka; Galon, Jérôme; Spisek, Radek; Tartour, Eric; Zitvogel, Laurence; Kroemer, Guido; Galluzzi, Lorenzo

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Progressing malignancies establish robust immunosuppressive networks that operate both systemically and locally. In particular, as tumors escape immunosurveillance, they recruit increasing amounts of myeloid and lymphoid cells that exert pronounced immunosuppressive effects. These cells not only prevent the natural recognition of growing neoplasms by the immune system, but also inhibit anticancer immune responses elicited by chemo-, radio- and immuno therapeutic interventions. Throughout the past decade, multiple strategies have been devised to counteract the accumulation or activation of tumor-infiltrating immunosuppressive cells for therapeutic purposes. Here, we review recent preclinical and clinical advances on the use of small molecules that target the immunological tumor microenvironment for cancer therapy. These agents include inhibitors of indoleamine 2,3-dioxigenase 1 (IDO1), prostaglandin E2, and specific cytokine receptors, as well as modulators of intratumoral purinergic signaling and arginine metabolism. PMID:27471617

  18. Improving cancer therapies by targeting the physical and chemical hallmarks of the tumor microenvironment.

    PubMed

    Ivey, Jill W; Bonakdar, Mohammad; Kanitkar, Akanksha; Davalos, Rafael V; Verbridge, Scott S

    2016-09-28

    Tumors are highly heterogeneous at the patient, tissue, cellular, and molecular levels. This multi-scale heterogeneity poses significant challenges for effective therapies, which ideally must not only distinguish between tumorous and healthy tissue, but also fully address the wide variety of tumorous sub-clones. Commonly used therapies either leverage a biological phenotype of cancer cells (e.g. high rate of proliferation) or indiscriminately kill all the cells present in a targeted volume. Tumor microenvironment (TME) targeting represents a promising therapeutic direction, because a number of TME hallmarks are conserved across different tumor types, despite the underlying genetic heterogeneity. Historically, TME targeting has largely focused on the cells that support tumor growth (e.g. vascular endothelial cells). However, by viewing the intrinsic physical and chemical alterations in the TME as additional therapeutic opportunities rather than barriers, a new class of TME-inspired treatments has great promise to complement or replace existing therapeutic strategies. In this review we summarize the physical and chemical hallmarks of the TME, and discuss how these tumor characteristics either currently are, or may ultimately be targeted to improve cancer therapies.

  19. Tissue-resident versus monocyte-derived macrophages in the tumor microenvironment.

    PubMed

    Lahmar, Qods; Keirsse, Jiri; Laoui, Damya; Movahedi, Kiavash; Van Overmeire, Eva; Van Ginderachter, Jo A

    2016-01-01

    The tumor-promoting role of macrophages has been firmly established in most cancer types. However, macrophage identity has been a matter of debate, since several levels of complexity result in considerable macrophage heterogeneity. Ontogenically, tissue-resident macrophages derive from yolk sac progenitors which either directly or via a fetal liver monocyte intermediate differentiate into distinct macrophage types during embryogenesis and are maintained throughout life, while a disruption of the steady state mobilizes monocytes and instructs the formation of monocyte-derived macrophages. Histologically, the macrophage phenotype is heavily influenced by the tissue microenvironment resulting in molecularly and functionally distinct macrophages in distinct organs. Finally, a change in the tissue microenvironment as a result of infectious or sterile inflammation instructs different modes of macrophage activation. These considerations are relevant in the context of tumors, which can be considered as sites of chronic sterile inflammation encompassing subregions with distinct environmental conditions (for example, hypoxic versus normoxic). Here, we discuss existing evidence on the role of macrophage subpopulations in steady state tissue and primary tumors of the breast, lung, pancreas, brain and liver.

  20. Tumor and the Microenvironment: A Chance to Reframe the Paradigm of Carcinogenesis?

    PubMed Central

    Cucina, Alessandra

    2014-01-01

    The somatic mutation theory of carcinogenesis has eventually accumulated an impressive body of shortfalls and paradoxes, as admittedly claimed by its own supporters given that the cell-based approach can hardly explain the emergence of tissue-based processes, like cancer. However, experimental data and alternatives theories developed during the last decades may actually provide a new framework on which cancer research should be reframed. Such issue may be fulfilled embracing new theoretical perspectives, taking the cells-microenvironment interplay as the privileged level of observation and assuming radically different premises as well as new methodological frameworks. Within that perspective, the tumor microenvironment cannot be merely considered akin to new “factor” to be added to an already long list of “signaling factors”; microenvironment represents the physical-biochemical support of the morphogenetic field which drives epithelial cells towards differentiation and phenotype transformation, according to rules understandable only by means of a systems biology approach. That endeavour entails three fundamental aspects: general biological premises, the level of observation (i.e., the systems to which we are looking for), and the principles of biological organization that would help in integrating and understanding experimental data. PMID:25013812

  1. Role of curcumin-dependent modulation of tumor microenvironment of a murine T cell lymphoma in altered regulation of tumor cell survival

    SciTech Connect

    Vishvakarma, Naveen Kumar; Kumar, Anjani; Singh, Sukh Mahendra

    2011-05-01

    Using a murine model of a T cell lymphoma, in the present study, we report that tumor growth retarding action of curcumin involves modulation of some crucial parameters of tumor microenvironment regulating tumor progression. Curcumin-administration to tumor-bearing host caused an altered pH regulation in tumor cells associated with alteration in expression of cell survival and apoptosis regulatory proteins and genes. Nevertheless, an alteration was also observed in biophysical parameters of tumor microenvironment responsible for modulation of tumor growth pertaining to hypoxia, tumor acidosis, and glucose metabolism. The study thus sheds new light with respect to the antineoplastic action of curcumin against a tumor-bearing host with progressively growing tumor of hematological origin. This will help in optimizing application of the drug and anticancer research and therapy. - Graphical Abstract: Display Omitted

  2. Tumor-associated macrophages mediate immunosuppression in the renal cancer microenvironment by activating the 15-lipoxygenase-2 pathway.

    PubMed

    Daurkin, Irina; Eruslanov, Evgeniy; Stoffs, Taryn; Perrin, George Q; Algood, Chester; Gilbert, Scott M; Rosser, Charles J; Su, Li-Ming; Vieweg, Johannes; Kusmartsev, Sergei

    2011-10-15

    Renal cell carcinoma (RCC), the most common human kidney cancer, is frequently infiltrated with tumor-associated macrophages (TAM) that can promote malignant progression. Here, we show that TAMs isolated from human RCC produce substantial amounts of the proinflammatory chemokine CCL2 and immunosuppressive cytokine IL-10, in addition to enhanced eicosanoid production via an activated 15-lipoxygenase-2 (15-LOX2) pathway. TAMs isolated from RCC tumors had a high 15-LOX2 expression and secreted substantial amounts of 15(S)-hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid, its major bioactive lipid product. Inhibition of lipoxygenase activity significantly reduced production of CCL2 and IL-10 by RCC TAMs. In addition, TAMs isolated from RCC were capable of inducing in T lymphocytes, the pivotal T regulatory cell transcription factor forkhead box P3 (FOXP3), and the inhibitory cytotoxic T-lymphocyte antigen 4 (CTLA-4) coreceptor. However, this TAM-mediated induction of FOXP3 and CTLA-4 in T cells was independent of lipoxygenase and could not be reversed by inhibiting lipoxygenase activity. Collectively, our results show that TAMs, often present in RCCs, display enhanced 15-LOX2 activity that contributes to RCC-related inflammation, immunosuppression, and malignant progression. Furthermore, we show that TAMs mediate the development of immune tolerance through both 15-LOX2-dependent and 15-LOX2-independent pathways. We propose that manipulating LOX-dependent arachidonic acid metabolism in the tumor microenvironment could offer new strategies to block cancer-related inflammation and immune escape in patients with RCC.

  3. CAPS1 Negatively Regulates Hepatocellular Carcinoma Development through Alteration of Exocytosis-Associated Tumor Microenvironment

    PubMed Central

    Xue, Ruyi; Tang, Wenqing; Dong, Pingping; Weng, Shuqiang; Ma, Lijie; Chen, She; Liu, Taotao; Shen, Xizhong; Huang, Xiaowu; Zhang, Si; Dong, Ling

    2016-01-01

    The calcium-dependent activator protein for secretion 1 (CAPS1) regulates exocytosis of dense-core vesicles (DCVs) in neurons and neuroendocrine cells. The role of CAPS1 in cancer biology remains unknown. The purpose of this study was to investigate the role of CAPS1 in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). We determined the levels of CAPS1 in eight hepatoma cell lines and 141 HCC specimens. We evaluated the prognostic value of CAPS1 expression and its association with clinical parameters. We investigated the biological consequences of CAPS1 overexpression in two hepatoma cell lines in vitro and in vivo. The results showed that loss of CAPS1 expression in HCC tissues was markedly correlated with aggressive tumor phenotypes, such as high-grade tumor node metastasis (TNM) stage (p = 0.003) and absence of tumor encapsulation (p = 0.016), and was associated with poor overall survival (p = 0.008) and high recurrence (p = 0.015). CAPS1 overexpression inhibited cell proliferation and migration by changing the exocytosis-associated tumor microenvironment in hepatoma cells in vitro. The in vivo study showed that CAPS1 overexpression inhibited xenograft tumor growth. Together, these results identified a previously unrecognized tumor suppressor role for CAPS1 in HCC development. PMID:27689999

  4. Well Plate-Based Perfusion Culture Device for Tissue and Tumor Microenvironment Replication

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, W.; Gu, Y.; Hao, Y.; Sun, Q.; Konior, K.; Wang, H.

    2015-01-01

    There are significant challenges in developing in vitro human tissue and tumor models that can be used to support new drug development and evaluate personalized therapeutics. The challenges include: (1) working with primary cells which are often difficult to maintain ex vivo, (2) mimicking native microenvironments from which primary cells are harvested, and (3) lack of culture devices that can support these microenvironments to evaluate drug responses in a high-throughput manner. Here we report a versatile well plate-based perfusion culture device that was designed, fabricated and used to: (1) ascertain the role of perfusion in facilitating the expansion of human multiple myeloma cells and evaluate drug response of the cells, (2) preserve the physiological phenotype of primary murine osteocytes by reconstructing the 3D cellular network of osteocytes, and (3) circulate primary murine T cells through a layer of primary murine intestine epithelial cells to recapitulate the interaction of the immune cells with the epithelial cells. Through these diverse case studies, we demonstrate the device’s design features to support: (1) the convenient and spatiotemporal placement of cells and biomaterials into the culture wells of the device; (2) the replication of tissues and tumor microenvironments using perfusion, stromal cells, and/or biomaterials; (3) the circulation of non-adherent cells through the culture chambers; and (4) conventional tissue and cell characterization by plate reading, histology, and flow cytometry. Future challenges are identified and discussed from the perspective of manufacturing the device and making its operation for routine and wide use. PMID:26021852

  5. Establishment of a Novel Model for Anticancer Drug Resistance in Three-Dimensional Primary Culture of Tumor Microenvironment

    PubMed Central

    Sakurai, Masashi; Enjoji, Shuhei; Umata, Koji; Fujiwara, Nobuyuki; Tsuji, Shunya; Hazama, Shoichi

    2016-01-01

    Tumor microenvironment has been implicated in tumor development and progression. As a three-dimensional tumor microenvironment model, air liquid interface (ALI) organoid culture from oncogene transgenic mouse gastrointestinal tissues was recently produced. However, ALI organoid culture system from tissues of colorectal cancer patients has not been established. Here, we developed an ALI organoid model from normal and tumor colorectal tissues of human patients. Both organoids were successfully generated and showed cystic structures containing an epithelial layer and surrounding mesenchymal stromal cells. Structures of tumor organoids closely resembled primary tumor epithelium. Expression of an epithelial cell marker, E-cadherin, a goblet cell marker, MUC2, and a fibroblast marker, vimentin, but not a myofibroblast marker, α-smooth muscle actin (SMA), was observed in normal organoids. Expression of E-cadherin, MUC2, vimentin, and α-SMA was observed in tumor organoids. Expression of a cancer stem cell marker, LGR5 in tumor organoids, was higher than that in primary tumor tissues. Tumor organoids were more resistant to toxicity of 5-fluorouracil and Irinotecan than colorectal cancer cell lines, SW480, SW620, and HCT116. These findings indicate that ALI organoid culture from colorectal cancer patients may become a novel model that is useful for examining resistance to chemotherapy in tumor microenvironment. PMID:28119740

  6. SCCOHT tumors acquire chemoresistance and protection by interacting mesenchymal stroma/stem cells within the tumor microenvironment.

    PubMed

    Otte, Anna; Yang, Yuanyuan; von der Ohe, Juliane; Melzer, Catharina; Hillemanns, Peter; Feuerhake, Friedrich; Hass, Ralf

    2016-12-01

    Chemotherapeutic drug testing of SCCOHT-1 and BIN-67 tumor cells revealed synergistic growth-inhibition of >95% in vitro with a combination of foretinib and FK228. Application of this drug combination in vivo in NODscid mice-induced SCCOHT-1GFP tumors was associated with ~6-fold reduction in tumor mass within 10 days, whereby synergistic effects of the two compounds remained undetectable compared to previous results with foretinib treatment alone. Histopathologic evaluation revealed a reduced vascularization and a lower amount of proliferating cells in the treated tumors. Surprisingly, a simultaneous significant accumulation of extracellular matrix structures with positive elastin-van Gieson staining was observed following foretinib/FK228 exposure. Expression analysis of treated animal tumors exhibited various changes including increased mouse transcript levels of elastin, laminin, and fibronectin. In parallel, markers for mesenchymal stroma/stem cells (MSC) including CD73 and CD90 were detectable in all mouse tumors suggesting a possible involvement of these cells in extracellular matrix restructure. Indeed, incubation of MSC with FK228 or foretinib/FK228 demonstrated morphologic alterations and enhanced expression of laminin and fibronectin. Moreover, a co-culture of MSC with lentiviral-labeled SCCOHT-1GFP cells contributed to protection of the tumor cells against FK228-mediated cytotoxicity. Furthermore, explant cultures of SCCOHT-1GFP-induced tumors acquired an increased resistance to FK228 and a combination of foretinib/FK228 in contrast to foretinib alone. Together, these data suggested that FK228-mediated extracellular matrix protein expression by MSC contributes to increased protection and enhanced resistance of SCCOHT tumors which could represent a more general mechanism of MSC during drug-induced alterations of a tumor microenvironment.

  7. Virus-stimulated neutrophils in the tumor microenvironment enhance T cell-mediated anti-tumor immunity

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Chin Yang; Tai, Jiayu A.; Li, Sumin; Nishikawa, Tomoyuki; Kaneda, Yasufumi

    2016-01-01

    The tumor microenvironment (TME) fosters tumors by attenuating anti-tumor immunity, reinforcing tumor cell survival and increasing angiogenesis. Among the constituents of the TME, here, we focused on tumor-associated neutrophils (TANs). First, we found that the combination of poly I:C and inactivated Sendai virus particles (hemagglutinating virus of Japan envelope; HVJ-E) synergistically suppressed tumor growth in the B16-F10 melanoma mouse model. In this model, poly I:C contributed to the recruitment of CD11b+Ly6G+ neutrophils to the TME, and co-injection of poly I:C and HVJ-E increased CD11b+Ly6G+FAS+ TAN in the TME. Depletion of neutrophils abolished the synergistic anti-tumor effect of HVJ-E and poly I:C in B16-F10 tumors. We revealed that C-X-C motif chemokine ligand 2 (CXCL2) is produced in the TME by poly I:C, but HVJ-E enhanced neutrophil infiltration of the TME does not occur. An anti-CXCL2 antibody inhibited the tumor suppression by HVJ-E+poly I:C. HVJ-E in combination with recombinant CXCL2 protein or CXCL2 pDNA suppressed mouse melanoma by increasing cytotoxic T lymphocyte activity against B16-F10 melanoma, which was abolished by an anti-Ly6G antibody. HVJ-E directly and indirectly increased FAS and ICAM-1 expression in cultured bone marrow-derived naïve neutrophils. Thus, HVJ-E activates anti-tumor immunity via anti-tumorigenic neutrophils in the TME. An HVJ-E vector containing the CXCL2 gene may be applicable as a novel cancer gene therapy strategy. PMID:27259252

  8. A Nervous Tumor Microenvironment: The Impact of Adrenergic Stress on Cancer Cells, Immunosuppression, and Immunotherapeutic Response

    PubMed Central

    Eng, Jason W.-L.; Kokolus, Kathleen M.; Reed, Chelsey B.; Hylander, Bonnie L.; Ma, Wen W.; Repasky, Elizabeth A.

    2014-01-01

    Long conserved mechanisms maintain homeostasis in living creatures in response to a variety of stresses. However, continuous exposure to stress can result in unabated production of stress hormones, especially catecholamines, which can have detrimental health effects. While the long-term effects of chronic stress have well known physiological consequences, recent discoveries have revealed that stress may affect therapeutic efficacy in cancer. Growing epidemiological evidence reveals strong correlations between long term survival and cancer progression and β-blocker usage in patients. In this review, we summarize the current understanding of how the catecholamines, epinephrine and norepinephrine, affect cancer cell survival and tumor progression. We also highlight new data exploring the potential contributions of stress on immunosuppression in the tumor microenvironment and the implications of these findings for the efficacy of immunotherapies. PMID:25307152

  9. A nervous tumor microenvironment: the impact of adrenergic stress on cancer cells, immunosuppression, and immunotherapeutic response.

    PubMed

    Eng, Jason W-L; Kokolus, Kathleen M; Reed, Chelsey B; Hylander, Bonnie L; Ma, Wen W; Repasky, Elizabeth A

    2014-11-01

    Long conserved mechanisms maintain homeostasis in living creatures in response to a variety of stresses. However, continuous exposure to stress can result in unabated production of stress hormones, especially catecholamines, which can have detrimental health effects. While the long-term effects of chronic stress have well-known physiological consequences, recent discoveries have revealed that stress may affect therapeutic efficacy in cancer. Growing epidemiological evidence reveals strong correlations between progression-free and long-term survival and β-blocker usage in cancer patients. In this review, we summarize the current understanding of how the catecholamines, epinephrine and norepinephrine, affect cancer cell survival and tumor progression. We also highlight new data exploring the potential contributions of stress to immunosuppression in the tumor microenvironment and the implications of these findings for the efficacy of immunotherapies.

  10. Lactate is a mediator of metabolic cooperation between stromal carcinoma associated fibroblasts and glycolytic tumor cells in the tumor microenvironment

    SciTech Connect

    Rattigan, Yanique I.; Patel, Brijesh B.; Ackerstaff, Ellen; Sukenick, George; Koutcher, Jason A.; Glod, John W.; and others

    2012-02-15

    Human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) are bone marrow-derived stromal cells, which play a role in tumor progression. We have shown earlier that breast cancer cells secrete higher levels of interleukin-6 (IL-6) under hypoxia, leading to the recruitment of hMSCs towards hypoxic tumor cells. We found that (i) MDA-MB-231 cells secrete significantly higher levels of lactate (3-fold more) under hypoxia (1% O{sub 2}) than under 20% O{sub 2} and (ii) lactate recruits hMSCs towards tumor cells by activating signaling pathways to enhance migration. The mRNA and protein expression of functional MCT1 in hMSCs is increased in response to lactate exposure. Thus, we hypothesized that hMSCs and stromal carcinoma associated fibroblasts (CAFs) in the tumor microenvironment have the capacity to take up lactate expelled from tumor cells and use it as a source of energy. Our {sup 13}C NMR spectroscopic measurements indicate that {sup 13}C-lactate is converted to {sup 13}C-alpha ketoglutarate in hMSCs and CAFs supporting this hypothesis. To our knowledge this is the first in vitro model system demonstrating that hMSCs and CAFs can utilize lactate produced by tumor cells.

  11. Cytokines from the tumor microenvironment modulate sirtinol cytotoxicity in A549 lung carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Pal, Shyama; Shankar, Bhavani S; Sainis, Krishna B

    2013-10-01

    Cytokines in tumor microenvironment play an important role in the success or failure of molecular targeted therapies. We have chosen tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α), TNF related apoptosis inducing ligand (TRAIL), insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1) and transforming growth factor β (TGF-β) as representative pro-inflammatory, pro-apoptotic, anti-apoptotic and anti-inflammatory tumor derived cytokines. Analysis of Oncomine database revealed the differential expression of these cytokines in a subset of cancer patients. The effects of these cytokines on cytotoxicity of FDA approved drugs - cisplatin and taxol and inhibitors of epidermal growth factor receptor - AG658, Janus kinase - AG490 and SIRT1 - sirtinol were assessed in A549 lung cancer cells. TRAIL augmented cytotoxicity of sirtinol and IGF-1 had a sparing effect. Since TRAIL and IGF-1 differentially modulated sirtinol cytotoxicity, further studies were carried out to identify the mechanisms. Sirtinol or knockdown of SIRT1 increased the expression of death receptors DR4 and DR5 and sensitized A549 cells to TRAIL. Increased cell death in presence of TRAIL and sirtinol was caspase independent and demonstrated classical features of necroptosis. Inhibition of iNOS increased caspase activity and switched the mode of cell death to caspase mediated apoptosis. Interestingly, sirtinol or SIRT1 knockdown did not increase IGF-1R expression. Instead, it abrogated ligand induced downregulation of IGF-1R and increased cell survival through PI3K-AKT pathway. In conclusion, these findings reveal that the tumor microenvironment contributes to modulation of cytotoxicity of drugs and that combination therapy, with agents that increase TRAIL signaling and suppress IGF-1 pathway may potentiate anticancer effect.

  12. Long-term intravital imaging of the multicolor-coded tumor microenvironment during combination immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Qi, Shuhong; Li, Hui; Lu, Lisen; Qi, Zhongyang; Liu, Lei; Chen, Lu; Shen, Guanxin; Fu, Ling; Luo, Qingming; Zhang, Zhihong

    2016-01-01

    The combined-immunotherapy of adoptive cell therapy (ACT) and cyclophosphamide (CTX) is one of the most efficient treatments for melanoma patients. However, no synergistic effects of CTX and ACT on the spatio-temporal dynamics of immunocytes in vivo have been described. Here, we visualized key cell events in immunotherapy-elicited immunoreactions in a multicolor-coded tumor microenvironment, and then established an optimal strategy of metronomic combined-immunotherapy to enhance anti-tumor efficacy. Intravital imaging data indicated that regulatory T cells formed an 'immunosuppressive ring' around a solid tumor. The CTX-ACT combined-treatment elicited synergistic immunoreactions in tumor areas, which included relieving the immune suppression, triggering the transient activation of endogenous tumor-infiltrating immunocytes, increasing the accumulation of adoptive cytotoxic T lymphocytes, and accelerating the infiltration of dendritic cells. These insights into the spatio-temporal dynamics of immunocytes are beneficial for optimizing immunotherapy and provide new approaches for elucidating the mechanisms underlying the involvement of immunocytes in cancer immunotherapy. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.14756.001 PMID:27855783

  13. Video-rate resonant scanning multiphoton microscopy: An emerging technique for intravital imaging of the tumor microenvironment.

    PubMed

    Kirkpatrick, Nathaniel D; Chung, Euiheon; Cook, Daniel C; Han, Xiaoxing; Gruionu, Gabriel; Liao, Shan; Munn, Lance L; Padera, Timothy P; Fukumura, Dai; Jain, Rakesh K

    2012-01-01

    The abnormal tumor microenvironment fuels tumor progression, metastasis, immune suppression, and treatment resistance. Over last several decades, developments in and applications of intravital microscopy have provided unprecedented insights into the dynamics of the tumor microenvironment. In particular, intravital multiphoton microscopy has revealed the abnormal structure and function of tumor-associated blood and lymphatic vessels, the role of aberrant tumor matrix in drug delivery, invasion and metastasis of tumor cells, the dynamics of immune cell trafficking to and within tumors, and gene expression in tumors. However, traditional multiphoton microscopy suffers from inherently slow imaging rates-only a few frames per second, thus unable to capture more rapid events such as blood flow, lymphatic flow, and cell movement within vessels. Here, we report the development and implementation of a video-rate multiphoton microscope (VR-MPLSM) based on resonant galvanometer mirror scanning that is capable of recording at 30 frames per second and acquiring intravital multispectral images. We show that the design of the system can be readily implemented and is adaptable to various experimental models. As examples, we demonstrate the utility of the system to directly measure flow within tumors, capture metastatic cancer cells moving within the brain vasculature and cells in lymphatic vessels, and image acute responses to changes in a vascular network. VR-MPLSM thus has the potential to further advance intravital imaging and provide new insight into the biology of the tumor microenvironment.

  14. Amino acid function relates to its embedded protein microenvironment: A study on disulfide-bridged cystine.

    PubMed

    Bhatnagar, Akshay; Apostol, Marcin I; Bandyopadhyay, Debashree

    2016-11-01

    In our previous study, we have shown that the microenvironments around conserved amino acids are also conserved in protein families (Bandyopadhyay and Mehler, Proteins 2008; 72:646-659). In this study, we have hypothesized that amino acids perform similar functions when embedded in a certain type of protein microenvironment. We have tested this hypothesis on the microenvironments around disulfide-bridged cysteines from high-resolution protein crystal structures. Although such cystines mainly play structural role in proteins, in certain enzymes they participate in catalysis and redox reactions. We have performed and report a functional annotation of enzymatically active cystines to their respective microenvironments. Three protein microenvironment clusters were identified: (i) buried-hydrophobic, (ii) exposed-hydrophilic, and (iii) buried-hydrophilic. The buried-hydrophobic cluster encompasses a small group of 22 redox-active cystines, mostly in alpha-helical conformations in a -C-x-x-C- motif from the Oxido-reductase enzyme class. All these cystines have high strain energy and near identical microenvironments. Most of the active cystines in hydrolase enzyme class belong to buried hydrophilic microenvironment cluster. In total there are 34 half-cystines detected in buried hydrophilic cluster from hydrolases, as a part of enzyme active site. Even within the buried hydrophilic cluster, there is clear separation of active half-cystines between surface exposed part of the protein and protein interior. Half-cystines toward the surface exposed region are higher in number compared to those in protein interior. Apart from cystines at the active sites of the enzymes, many more half-cystines were detected in buried hydrophilic cluster those are part of the microenvironment of enzyme active sites. However, no active half-cystines were detected in extremely hydrophilic microenvironment cluster, that is, exposed hydrophilic cluster, indicating that total exposure of cystine

  15. Chemokine axes in breast cancer: factors of the tumor microenvironment reshape the CCR7-driven metastatic spread of luminal-A breast tumors.

    PubMed

    Weitzenfeld, Polina; Kossover, Olga; Körner, Cindy; Meshel, Tsipi; Wiemann, Stefan; Seliktar, Dror; Legler, Daniel F; Ben-Baruch, Adit

    2016-06-01

    Chemokine axes have been shown to mediate site-specific metastasis in breast cancer, but their relevance to different subtypes has been hardly addressed. Here, with the focus on the CCR7-CCL21 axis, patient datasets demonstrated that luminal-A tumors express relatively low CCR7 levels compared with more aggressive disease subtypes. Furthermore, lymph node metastasis was not associated with high CCR7 levels in luminal-A patients. The metastatic pattern of luminal-A breast tumors may be influenced by the way luminal-A tumor cells interpret signals provided by factors of the primary tumor microenvironment. Thus, CCR7-expressing human luminal-A cells were stimulated simultaneously by factors representing 3 tumor microenvironment arms typical of luminal-A tumors, hormonal, inflammatory, and growth stimulating: estrogen + TNF-α + epidermal growth factor. Such tumor microenvironment stimulation down-regulated the migration of CCR7-expressing tumor cells toward CCL21 and inhibited the formation of directional protrusions toward CCL21 in a novel 3-dimensional hydrogel system. CCL21-induced migration of CCR7-expressing tumor cells depended on PI3K and MAPK activation; however, when CCR7-expressing cancer cells were prestimulated by tumor microenvironment factors, CCL21 could not effectively activate these signaling pathways. In vivo, pre-exposure of the tumor cells to tumor microenvironment factors has put restraints on CCL21-mediated lymph node-homing cues and shifted the metastatic pattern of CCR7-expressing cells to the aggressive phenotype of dissemination to bones. Several of the aspects were also studied in the CXCR4-CXCL12 system, demonstrating similar patient and in vitro findings. Thus, we provide novel evidence to subtype-specific regulation of the CCR7-CCL21 axis, with more general implications to chemokine-dependent patterns of metastatic spread, revealing differential regulation in the luminal-A subtype.

  16. Modulating mammary tumor growth, metastasis and immunosuppression by siRNA-induced MIF reduction in tumor microenvironment.

    PubMed

    Zhang, M; Yan, L; Kim, J A

    2015-10-01

    Macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF) has been identified as a major gene product upregulated in breast cancer cells-tissues upon the accumulation of macrophages. However, regulatory role of MIF in tumor microenvironment is not well understood. Previously, we have developed small interfering RNA (siRNA)-loaded nanoparticle system to effectively reduce MIF expression in both breast cancer cells and macrophages. Using this nanoparticle system, in this study we demonstrated that the siRNA-induced MIF reduction in murine mammary cancer line 4T1 and human breast cancer line MDA-MB-231 resulted in significant reduction of cell proliferation and increase of apoptosis; the siRNA-induced MIF reduction in tumor-associated macrophages resulted in a significant reduction of surface expression of CD74 and CD206 and a significant increase of surface expression of major histocompatibility complex II, as well as intracellular expression of tumor necrosis factor-α and interleukin-2. A direct injection of the MIF-siRNA-loaded nanoparticles into 4T1 tumor in mice resulted in effective reduction of intratumoral MIF. This led to a reduction of tumor growth and metastasis. This also resulted in a reduction of circulating myeloid-derived suppressive cells both in number and in suppressive function. CD4 T-cell infiltration to tumor was increased. More importantly, this not only slowed the growth of treated 4T1 tumor, but also delayed the growth and metastasis of a contralateral untreated 4T1-luc tumor, suggesting the development of systemic antitumor responses. This study demonstrates for the first time that the siRNA-mediated intratumoral MIF reduction can induce antitumoral immune response via reducing systemic immune suppression.

  17. Tumor Microenvironment Regulates Metastasis and Metastasis Genes of Mouse MMTV-PymT Mammary Cancer Cells In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Werbeck, J. L.; Thudi, N. K.; Martin, C. K.; Premanandan, C.; Yu, L.; Ostrowksi, M. C.; Rosol, T. J.

    2014-01-01

    Metastasis is the primary cause of death in breast cancer patients, yet there are challenges to modeling this process in vivo. The goal of this study was to analyze the effects of injection site on tumor growth and metastasis and gene expression of breast cancer cells in vivo using the MMTV-PymT breast cancer model (Met-1 cells). Met-1 cells were injected into 5 sites (subcutaneous, mammary fat pad, tail vein, intracardiac, and intratibial), and tumors and metastases were monitored using bioluminescent imaging and confirmed with gross necropsy and histopathology. Met-1 tumors were analyzed based on morphology and changes in gene expression in each tissue microenvironment. There were 6 permissible sites of Met-1 tumor growth (mammary gland, subcutis, lung, adrenal gland, ovary, bone). Met-1 cells grew faster in the subcutis compared to mammary fat pad tumors (highest Ki-67 index). Morphologic differences were evident in each tumor microenvironment. Finally, 7 genes were differentially expressed in the Met-1 tumors in the 6 sites of growth or metastasis. This investigation demonstrates that breast cancer progression and metastasis are regulated by not only the tumor cells but also the experimental model and unique molecular signals from the tumor microenvironment. PMID:24091811

  18. Tumor microenvironment regulates metastasis and metastasis genes of mouse MMTV-PymT mammary cancer cells in vivo.

    PubMed

    Werbeck, J L; Thudi, N K; Martin, C K; Premanandan, C; Yu, L; Ostrowksi, M C; Rosol, T J

    2014-07-01

    Metastasis is the primary cause of death in breast cancer patients, yet there are challenges to modeling this process in vivo. The goal of this study was to analyze the effects of injection site on tumor growth and metastasis and gene expression of breast cancer cells in vivo using the MMTV-PymT breast cancer model (Met-1 cells). Met-1 cells were injected into 5 sites (subcutaneous, mammary fat pad, tail vein, intracardiac, and intratibial), and tumors and metastases were monitored using bioluminescent imaging and confirmed with gross necropsy and histopathology. Met-1 tumors were analyzed based on morphology and changes in gene expression in each tissue microenvironment. There were 6 permissible sites of Met-1 tumor growth (mammary gland, subcutis, lung, adrenal gland, ovary, bone). Met-1 cells grew faster in the subcutis compared to mammary fat pad tumors (highest Ki-67 index). Morphologic differences were evident in each tumor microenvironment. Finally, 7 genes were differentially expressed in the Met-1 tumors in the 6 sites of growth or metastasis. This investigation demonstrates that breast cancer progression and metastasis are regulated by not only the tumor cells but also the experimental model and unique molecular signals from the tumor microenvironment.

  19. Accelerated aging in the tumor microenvironment: connecting aging, inflammation and cancer metabolism with personalized medicine.

    PubMed

    Lisanti, Michael P; Martinez-Outschoorn, Ubaldo E; Pavlides, Stephanos; Whitaker-Menezes, Diana; Pestell, Richard G; Howell, Anthony; Sotgia, Federica

    2011-07-01

    Cancer is thought to be a disease associated with aging. Interestingly, normal aging is driven by the production of ROS and mitochondrial oxidative stress, resulting in the cumulative accumulation of DNA damage. Here, we discuss how ROS signaling, NFκB- and HIF1-activation in the tumor microenvironment induces a form of "accelerated aging," which leads to stromal inflammation and changes in cancer cell metabolism. Thus, we present a unified model where aging (ROS), inflammation (NFκB) and cancer metabolism (HIF1), act as co-conspirators to drive autophagy ("self-eating") in the tumor stroma. Then, autophagy in the tumor stroma provides high-energy "fuel" and the necessary chemical building blocks, for accelerated tumor growth and metastasis. Stromal ROS production acts as a "mutagenic motor" and allows cancer cells to buffer-at a distance-exactly how much of a mutagenic stimulus they receive, further driving tumor cell selection and evolution. Surviving cancer cells would be selected for the ability to induce ROS more effectively in stromal fibroblasts, so they could extract more nutrients from the stroma via autophagy. If lethal cancer is a disease of "accelerated host aging" in the tumor stroma, then cancer patients may benefit from therapy with powerful antioxidants. Antioxidant therapy should block the resulting DNA damage, and halt autophagy in the tumor stroma, effectively "cutting off the fuel supply" for cancer cells. These findings have important new implications for personalized cancer medicine, as they link aging, inflammation and cancer metabolism with novel strategies for more effective cancer diagnostics and therapeutics.

  20. Visualizing the antivascular effect of bortezomib on the hypoxic tumor microenvironment.

    PubMed

    Sun, Xiaorong; Ackerstaff, Ellen; He, Fuqiu; Xing, Ligang; Hsiao, Hung Tsung; Koutcher, Jason A; Ling, C Clifton; Li, Gloria C

    2015-10-27

    Bortezomib, a novel proteasome inhibitor, has been approved for treating multiple myeloma and mantle cell lymphoma and studied pre-clinically and clinically for solid tumors. Preferential cytotoxicity of bortezomib was found toward hypoxic tumor cells and endothelial cells in vitro. The purpose of this study is to investigate the role of a pretreatment hypoxic tumor microenvironment on the effects of bortezomib in vitro and ex vivo, and explore the feasibility of dynamic contrast enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE MRI) to noninvasively evaluate the biological effects of bortezomib. It was shown in vitro by Western blot, flow cytometry, and ELISA that bortezomib accumulated HIF-1α in non-functional forms and blocks its hypoxia response in human colorectal cancer cell lines. Ex vivo experiments were performed with fluorescent immunohistochemical staining techniques using multiple endogenous and exogenous markers to identify hypoxia (pimonidazole, HRE-TKeGFP), blood flow/permeability (Hoechst 33342), micro-vessels (CD31 and SMA), apoptosis (cleaved caspase 3) and hypoxia response (CA9). After bortezomib administration, overall apoptosis index was significantly increased and blood perfusion was dramatically decreased in tumor xenografts. More importantly, apoptosis signals were found preferentially located in moderate and severe pretreatment hypoxic regions in both tumor and endothelial cells. Meanwhile, DCE MRI examinations showed that the tumor blood flow and permeability decreased significantly after bortezomib administration. The present study revealed that bortezomib reduces tumor hypoxia response and blood perfusion, thus, presenting antivascular properties. It will be important to determine the hypoxic/perfusion status pre- and during treatment at further translational studies.

  1. Oxystressed tumor microenvironment potentiates epithelial to mesenchymal transition and alters cellular bioenergetics towards cancer progression.

    PubMed

    Sridaran, Dhivya; Ramamoorthi, Ganesan; MahaboobKhan, Rasool; Kumpati, Premkumar

    2016-10-01

    During tumorigenesis, cancer cells generate complex, unresolved interactions with the surrounding oxystressed cellular milieu called tumor microenvironment (TM) that favors spread of cancer to other body parts. This dissemination of cancer cells from the primary tumor site is the main clinical challenge in cancer treatment. In addition, the significance of enhanced oxidative stress in TM during cancer progression still remains elusive. Thus, the present study was performed to investigate the molecular and cytoskeletal alterations in breast cancer cells associated with oxystressed TM that potentiates metastasis. Our results showed that depending on the extent of oxidative stress in TM, cancer cells exhibited enhanced migration and survival with reduction of chemosensitivity. Corresponding ultrastructural analysis showed radical cytoskeletal modifications that reorganize cell-cell interactions fostering transition of epithelial cells to mesenchymal morphology (EMT) marking metastasis, which was reversed upon antioxidant treatment. Decreased E-cadherin and increased vimentin, Twist1/2 expression corroborated the initiation of EMT in oxystressed TM-influenced cells. Further evaluation of cellular energetics demonstrated significant metabolic reprogramming with inclination towards glucose or external glutamine from TM as energy source depending on the breast cancer cell type. These observations prove the elemental role of oxystressed TM in cancer progression, initiating EMT and metabolic reprogramming. Further cell-type specific metabolomic analysis would unravel the alternate mechanisms in cancer progression for effective therapeutic intervention. Graphical abstract Schematic representation of the study and proposed mechanism of oxystressed TM influenced cancer progression. Cancer cells exhibit a close association with tumor microenvironment (TM), and oxystressed TM enhances cancer cell migration and survival and reduces chemosensitivity. Oxystressed TM induces dynamic

  2. Epithelial Tumors Originate in Tumor Hotspots, a Tissue-Intrinsic Microenvironment

    PubMed Central

    Tamori, Yoichiro; Suzuki, Emiko; Deng, Wu-Min

    2016-01-01

    Malignant tumors are caused by uncontrolled proliferation of transformed mutant cells that have lost the ability to maintain tissue integrity. Although a number of causative genetic backgrounds for tumor development have been discovered, the initial steps mutant cells take to escape tissue integrity and trigger tumorigenesis remain elusive. Here, we show through analysis of conserved neoplastic tumor-suppressor genes (nTSGs) in Drosophila wing imaginal disc epithelia that tumor initiation depends on tissue-intrinsic local cytoarchitectures, causing tumors to consistently originate in a specific region of the tissue. In this “tumor hotspot” where cells constitute a network of robust structures on their basal side, nTSG-deficient cells delaminate from the apical side of the epithelium and begin tumorigenic overgrowth by exploiting endogenous Janus kinase/signal transducer and activator of transcription (JAK/STAT) signaling activity. Conversely, in other regions, the “tumor coldspot” nTSG-deficient cells are extruded toward the basal side and undergo apoptosis. When the direction of delamination is reversed through suppression of RhoGEF2, an activator of the Rho family small GTPases, and JAK/STAT is activated ectopically in these coldspot nTSG-deficient cells, tumorigenesis is induced. These data indicate that two independent processes, apical delamination and JAK/STAT activation, are concurrently required for the initiation of nTSG-deficient-induced tumorigenesis. Given the conservation of the epithelial cytoarchitecture, tumorigenesis may be generally initiated from tumor hotspots by a similar mechanism. PMID:27584724

  3. Complementary approaches to investigating cancer cell dynamics in the tumor microenvironment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Padgen, Michael R.; Raja, Waseem Khan; Gligorijevic, Bojana; Williams, James K.; Condeelis, John S.; Castracane, James

    2011-02-01

    Metastatic cancer cells respond to chemical and mechanical stimuli in their microenvironment that guide invasion into the surrounding tissue and eventually the circulatory/lymph systems. The NANIVID is designed to be an in vivo device used to collect metastatic cancer cells by providing a gradient of epidermal growth factor through the controlled release from a customized hydrogel. The model cells, MTLn3 and MenaInv, both derived from a rat mammary adenocarcinoma, will migrate toward the device and be collected in the chamber. A set of electrodes inside the chamber will provide real-time data on the density of cells collected in the device. The characterization and optimization of the electrodes in vitro will be reported, as will the development of an equivalent circuit model used to describe electrode behavior. The ultimate goal of this work is for the NANIVID to be used for in vivo investigations of a rat model of mammary cancer. Furthermore, since the morphology, mechanical properties, and movement of cells are influenced by the microenvironment, a combined scanning confocal laser microscope and atomic force microscope will be used to study these relationships. This work will further the understanding of the dynamics and mechanics of metastatic cancer cells as they leave the primary tumor and metastasize.

  4. Cytokines secreted by macrophages isolated from tumor microenvironment of inflammatory breast cancer patients possess chemotactic properties

    PubMed Central

    Mohamed, Mona M.; El-Ghonaimy, Eslam A.; Nouh, Mohamed A.; Schneider, Robert J.; Sloane, Bonnie F.; El-Shinawi, Mohamed

    2014-01-01

    Although there is a growing literature describing the role of macrophages in breast cancer, the role of macrophages in inflammatory breast cancer (IBC) is unclear. The aim of present study was to isolate and characterize tumor associated macrophages of IBC and non-IBC patients and define their role in IBC. Tumor infiltrating monocytes/macrophages (CD14+ and CD68+) were measured by immunohistochem-istry using specific monoclonal antibodies. Blood drained from axillary vein tributaries was collected during breast cancer surgery and the percentage of CD14+ in the total isolated leukocytes was assessed by flow cytometric analysis. CD14+ cells were separated from total leukocytes by immuno-magnetic beads technique and were cultured overnight. Media conditioned by CD14+ were collected and subjected to cytokine profiling using cytokine antibody array. Wound healing and invasion assays were used to test whether cytokines highly secreted by tumor drained macrophages induce motility and invasion of breast cancer cells. We found that macrophages highly infiltrate into carcinoma tissues of IBC patients. In addition blood collected from axillary tributaries of IBC patients is highly enriched with CD14+ cells as compared to blood collected from non-IBC patients. Cytokine profiling of CD14+ cells isolated from IBC patients revealed a significant increase in secretion of tumor necrosis factor-α; monocyte chemoat-tractant protein-1/CC-chemokine ligand 2; interleukin-8 and interleukin-10 as compared to CD14+ cells isolated from non-IBC patients. Tumor necrosis factor-a, interleukin-8 and interleukin-10 significantly increased motility and invasion of IBC cells in vitro. In conclusion, macrophages isolated from the tumor microenvironment of IBC patients secrete chemotactic cytokines that may augment dissemination and metastasis of IBC carcinoma cells. PMID:24291763

  5. Mechanistic patient-specific predictive correlation of tumor drug response with microenvironment and perfusion measurements

    PubMed Central

    Pascal, Jennifer; Bearer, Elaine L.; Wang, Zhihui; Koay, Eugene J.; Curley, Steven A.; Cristini, Vittorio

    2013-01-01

    Physical properties of the microenvironment influence penetration of drugs into tumors. Here, we develop a mathematical model to predict the outcome of chemotherapy based on the physical laws of diffusion. The most important parameters in the model are the volume fraction occupied by tumor blood vessels and their average diameter. Drug delivery to cells, and kill thereof, are mediated by these microenvironmental properties and affected by the diffusion penetration distance after extravasation. To calculate parameter values we fit the model to histopathology measurements of the fraction of tumor killed after chemotherapy in human patients with colorectal cancer metastatic to liver (coefficient of determination R2 = 0.94). To validate the model in a different tumor type, we input patient-specific model parameter values from glioblastoma; the model successfully predicts extent of tumor kill after chemotherapy (R2 = 0.7–0.91). Toward prospective clinical translation, we calculate blood volume fraction parameter values from in vivo contrast-enhanced computed tomography imaging from a separate cohort of patients with colorectal cancer metastatic to liver, and demonstrate accurate model predictions of individual patient responses (average relative error = 15%). Here, patient-specific data from either in vivo imaging or histopathology drives output of the model’s formulas. Values obtained from standard clinical diagnostic measurements for each individual are entered into the model, producing accurate predictions of tumor kill after chemotherapy. Clinical translation will enable the rational design of individualized treatment strategies such as amount, frequency, and delivery platform of drug and the need for ancillary non–drug-based treatment. PMID:23940372

  6. The tumor immune microenvironment in octogenarians with stage I non-small cell lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Ming-Ching; Buitrago, Daniel H.; Kadota, Kyuichi; Ujiie, Hideki; Woo, Kaitlin; Sima, Camelia S.; Travis, William D.; Jones, David R.; Adusumilli, Prasad S.

    2014-01-01

    Non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is the leading cause of cancer-related mortality and has increasingly become a disease of elderly patients. Elderly patients are underrepresented in clinical trials that evaluate treatments for NSCLC. It has been suggested that patients >65 years of age have less robust immune responses to infections, immunizations, and tumors compared with younger patients. With increasing focus and number of immunotherapy clinical trials for NSCLC, we investigated the relationship between patient age and the tumor immune microenvironment in NSCLC. Using tissue microarrays from 1,278 patients with surgically resected Stage I NSCLC (≤65 years [33%], 66–79 years [55%], and ≥80 years [12%]), we determined whether quantitative and qualitative immune cell infiltration in the tumor differed between younger and older patients. Furthermore, we investigated the prognostic value of immune cell infiltration with respect to recurrence in octogenarians. We found that there were no statistically significant differences between older and younger patients in tumoral immune infiltration or effector regulatory immune response ratios (FoxP3/CD3, FoxP3/CD4, and FoxP3/CD8 ratios). In octogenarians, presence of low tumoral CD68+ immune cells was an independent predictor of recurrence. In the uniform cohort of surgically selected and resected Stage I NSCLC patients, tumor immune cell infiltration among the older age group resembled other age groups. Our study provides information that supports inclusion of older age patients selected for surgical resection in neoadjuvant or adjuvant immunotherapy clinical trials for lung cancer. PMID:25941595

  7. Cytokines secreted by macrophages isolated from tumor microenvironment of inflammatory breast cancer patients possess chemotactic properties.

    PubMed

    Mohamed, Mona M; El-Ghonaimy, Eslam A; Nouh, Mohamed A; Schneider, Robert J; Sloane, Bonnie F; El-Shinawi, Mohamed

    2014-01-01

    Although there is a growing literature describing the role of macrophages in breast cancer, the role of macrophages in inflammatory breast cancer (IBC) is unclear. The aim of present study was to isolate and characterize tumor associated macrophages of IBC and non-IBC patients and define their role in IBC. Tumor infiltrating monocytes/macrophages (CD14+ and CD68+) were measured by immunohistochemistry using specific monoclonal antibodies. Blood drained from axillary vein tributaries was collected during breast cancer surgery and the percentage of CD14+ in the total isolated leukocytes was assessed by flow cytometric analysis. CD14+ cells were separated from total leukocytes by immuno-magnetic beads technique and were cultured overnight. Media conditioned by CD14+ were collected and subjected to cytokine profiling using cytokine antibody array. Wound healing and invasion assays were used to test whether cytokines highly secreted by tumor drained macrophages induce motility and invasion of breast cancer cells. We found that macrophages highly infiltrate into carcinoma tissues of IBC patients. In addition blood collected from axillary tributaries of IBC patients is highly enriched with CD14+ cells as compared to blood collected from non-IBC patients. Cytokine profiling of CD14+ cells isolated from IBC patients revealed a significant increase in secretion of tumor necrosis factor-α; monocyte chemoattractant protein-1/CC-chemokine ligand 2; interleukin-8 and interleukin-10 as compared to CD14+ cells isolated from non-IBC patients. Tumor necrosis factor-α, interleukin-8 and interleukin-10 significantly increased motility and invasion of IBC cells in vitro. In conclusion, macrophages isolated from the tumor microenvironment of IBC patients secrete chemotactic cytokines that may augment dissemination and metastasis of IBC carcinoma cells.

  8. The tumor immune microenvironment in octogenarians with stage I non-small cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Lee, Ming-Ching; Buitrago, Daniel H; Kadota, Kyuichi; Ujiie, Hideki; Woo, Kaitlin; Sima, Camelia S; Travis, William D; Jones, David R; Adusumilli, Prasad S

    2014-11-01

    Non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is the leading cause of cancer-related mortality and has increasingly become a disease of elderly patients. Elderly patients are underrepresented in clinical trials that evaluate treatments for NSCLC. It has been suggested that patients >65 years of age have less robust immune responses to infections, immunizations, and tumors compared with younger patients. With increasing focus and number of immunotherapy clinical trials for NSCLC, we investigated the relationship between patient age and the tumor immune microenvironment in NSCLC. Using tissue microarrays from 1,278 patients with surgically resected Stage I NSCLC (≤65 years [33%], 66-79 years [55%], and ≥80 years [12%]), we determined whether quantitative and qualitative immune cell infiltration in the tumor differed between younger and older patients. Furthermore, we investigated the prognostic value of immune cell infiltration with respect to recurrence in octogenarians. We found that there were no statistically significant differences between older and younger patients in tumoral immune infiltration or effector regulatory immune response ratios (FoxP3/CD3, FoxP3/CD4, and FoxP3/CD8 ratios). In octogenarians, presence of low tumoral CD68(+) immune cells was an independent predictor of recurrence. In the uniform cohort of surgically selected and resected Stage I NSCLC patients, tumor immune cell infiltration among the older age group resembled other age groups. Our study provides information that supports inclusion of older age patients selected for surgical resection in neoadjuvant or adjuvant immunotherapy clinical trials for lung cancer.

  9. Pi (Spleen)-deficiency syndrome in tumor microenvironment is the pivotal pathogenesis of colorectal cancer immune escape.

    PubMed

    Sun, Xue-Gang; Lin, Xiao-Chang; Diao, Jian-Xin; Yu, Zhi-Ling; Li, Kun

    2016-10-01

    Cancer immunoediting consists of three sequential phases: elimination, equilibrium, and escape. For colorectal adenoma-carcinoma sequence, the adenoma dysplastic progression may represent an equilibrium phase and the cancer stage as escape phase. Immune system eliminates transformed enterocytes by destroying them at first, sculpts them at the same time and selects the variants subsequently that are no longer recognized and insensitive to immune effectors, and finally induces immunosuppressive state within the tumor microenvironment that facilitates immune escape and tumor outgrowth. Immunosuppression and inflammation are the two crucial features of Pi (Spleen)-deficiency. Classic quotations, immune evidence and clinical observations suggest that Spleen (but not other organs) deficiency is the key pathogenesis of colorectal cancer (CRC) microenvironment. Weakness of old age, immunosuppressive cytokines from chronic inflammation, tumor-derived immunosuppressive factors and surrendered immune cells-regulatory T cells, myeloid-derived suppressor cells and tumor associated macrophages (TAMs) constitutes CRC microenvironment of Pi-deficiency. Furthermore, excess in superficiality, such as phlegm stagnation, blood stasis and toxin accumulation are induced by chronic inflammation on the basis of asthenia in origin, an immunosuppressive state. Great masters of Chinese medicine emphasize that strengthen Pi is the chief therapeutic principle for CRC which receives good therapeutic effects. So, Pi-deficiency based syndrome is the pivotal pathogenesis of tumor microenvironment. The immunosuppressive microenvironment facilitates immune escape which play an important role in the transition from adenoma to adenocarcinoma. There are some signs that strengthen Pi based treatment has potential capacity to ameliorate tumor environment. It might be a novel starting point to explore the mechanism of strengthen Pi based therapy in the prevention and treatment of CRC through regulation of

  10. Modification of loco-regional microenvironment in brain tumors by spinal cord stimulation. Implications for radio-chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Clavo, B; Robaina, F; Valcarcel, B; Catala, L; Perez, J L; Cabezon, A; Jorge, I J; Fiuza, D; Hernandez, M A; Jover, R; Carreras, J L

    2012-01-01

    The effectiveness of radiotherapy and chemotherapy in high grade gliomas (HGG) depends on tumor micro-environment. We summarize our experience of the influence of spinal cord stimulation (SCS) on this micro-environment. Patients with HGG (n = 26) were assessed pre- and post-SCS, using: (1) Doppler in middle cerebral arteries (MCA) and (2) in common carotid arteries (CCA); (3) tumor blood-flow using single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT); (4) tumor-pO(2) (mmHg) using polarographic probes (eight tumor areas from five patients); and (5) tumor glucose metabolism using (18)F-fluoro-2-deoxyglucose ((18)FDG) positron emission tomography ((18)FDG-PET). Pre-SCS: tumor blood-flow was lower (P < 0.001) than peri-tumor areas and healthy contra-lateral areas. Tumor-pO(2) was lower (P < 0.042) than healthy tissue. Tumor glucose metabolism was higher than peri-tumor areas (P = 0.017) and healthy contra-lateral areas (P = 0.048). Post-SCS: there were increases in: MCA blood-flow (P ≤ 0.002), CCA blood-flow (P ≤ 0.013), tumor blood-flow (P = 0.033), tumor glucose metabolism (P = 0.027) and tumor-pO(2) (P = 0.022). The percentage of hypoxic values decreased (P = 0.007). SCS can modify tumor micro-environment. The potential usefulness of SCS in improving the effectiveness of radio-chemotherapy in HGG needs to be evaluated.

  11. Impacts of Ionizing Radiation on the Different Compartments of the Tumor Microenvironment

    PubMed Central

    Leroi, Natacha; Lallemand, François; Coucke, Philippe; Noel, Agnès; Martinive, Philippe

    2016-01-01

    Radiotherapy (RT) is one of the most important modalities for cancer treatment. For many years, the impact of RT on cancer cells has been extensively studied. Recently, the tumor microenvironment (TME) emerged as one of the key factors in therapy resistance. RT is known to influence and modify diverse components of the TME. Hence, we intent to review data from the literature on the impact of low and high single dose, as well as fractionated RT on host cells (endothelial cells, fibroblasts, immune and inflammatory cells) and the extracellular matrix. Optimizing the schedule of RT (i.e., dose per fraction) and other treatment modalities is a current challenge. A better understanding of the cascade of events and TME remodeling following RT would be helpful to design optimal treatment combination. PMID:27064581

  12. IDO in the Tumor Microenvironment: Inflammation, Counter-regulation and Tolerance

    PubMed Central

    Munn, David H.; Mellor, Andrew L.

    2016-01-01

    Indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO) has immunoregulatory roles associated tryptophan metabolism. These include counter-regulation (controlling inflammation) and acquired tolerance in T cells. Recent findings reveal that IDO can be triggered by innate responses during tumorigenesis, and also by attempted T cell activation, either spontaneous or due to immunotherapy. Here we review the current understanding of mechanisms by which IDO participates in the control of inflammation and in peripheral tolerance. Focusing on the tumor microenvironment, we examine the role of IDO in response to apoptotic cells and the impact of IDO on Treg cell function. We discuss how the counter-regulatory and tolerogenic functions of IDO can be targeted for cancer immunotherapy and present an overview of the current clinical progress in this area. PMID:26839260

  13. Preferential action of arsenic trioxide in solid-tumor microenvironment enhances radiation therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Griffin, Robert J. . E-mail: griff007@umn.edu; Williams, Brent W.; Park, Heon Joo; Song, Chang W.

    2005-04-01

    Purpose: To investigate the effect of arsenic trioxide, Trisenox (TNX), on primary cultures of endothelial cells and tumor tissue under varying pH and pO{sub 2} environments and the effects of combined TNX and radiation therapy on experimental tumors. Methods and Materials: Human dermal microvascular endothelial cells were cultured in vitro and exposed to TNX under various combinations of aerobic, hypoxic, neutral, or acidic conditions, and levels of activated JNK MAP kinase were assessed by Western blotting. FSaII fibrosarcoma cells grown in the hind limb of female C3H mice were used to study the effect of TNX on tumor blood perfusion and oxygenation. The tumor-growth delay after a single or fractionated irradiation with or without TNX treatment was assessed. Results: A single intraperitoneal injection of 8 mg/kg TNX reduced the blood perfusion in FSaII tumors by 53% at 2 hours after injection. To increase the oxygenation of the tumor vasculature during TNX treatment, some animals were allowed to breathe carbogen (95% O{sub 2}/5% CO{sub 2}). Carbogen breathing alone for 2 hours reduced tumor perfusion by 33%. When carbogen breathing was begun immediately after TNX injection, no further reduction occurred in tumor blood perfusion at 2 hours after injection. In vitro, TNX exposure increased activity JNK MAP kinase preferentially in endothelial cells cultured in an acidic or hypoxic environment. In vivo, the median oxygenation in FSaII tumors measured at 3 or 5 days after TNX injection was found to be significantly elevated compared with control tumors. Subsequently, radiation-induced tumor-growth delay was synergistically increased when radiation and TNX injection were fractionated at 3-day or 5-day intervals. Conclusions: Trisenox has novel vascular-damaging properties, preferentially against endothelium in regions of low pH or pO{sub 2}, which leads to tumor cell death and enhancement of the response of tumors to radiotherapy.

  14. Neem Leaf Glycoprotein Prophylaxis Transduces Immune Dependent Stop Signal for Tumor Angiogenic Switch within Tumor Microenvironment

    PubMed Central

    Banerjee, Saptak; Ghosh, Tithi; Barik, Subhasis; Das, Arnab; Ghosh, Sarbari; Bhuniya, Avishek

    2014-01-01

    We have reported that prophylactic as well as therapeutic administration of neem leaf glycoprotein (NLGP) induces significant restriction of solid tumor growth in mice. Here, we investigate whether the effect of such pretreatment (25µg/mice; weekly, 4 times) benefits regulation of tumor angiogenesis, an obligate factor for tumor progression. We show that NLGP pretreatment results in vascular normalization in melanoma and carcinoma bearing mice along with downregulation of CD31, VEGF and VEGFR2. NLGP pretreatment facilitates profound infiltration of CD8+ T cells within tumor parenchyma, which subsequently regulates VEGF-VEGFR2 signaling in CD31+ vascular endothelial cells to prevent aberrant neovascularization. Pericyte stabilization, VEGF dependent inhibition of VEC proliferation and subsequent vascular normalization are also experienced. Studies in immune compromised mice confirmed that these vascular and intratumoral changes in angiogenic profile are dependent upon active adoptive immunity particularly those mediated by CD8+ T cells. Accumulated evidences suggest that NLGP regulated immunomodulation is active in tumor growth restriction and normalization of tumor angiogenesis as well, thereby, signifying its clinical translation. PMID:25391149

  15. Contribution of acidic extracellular microenvironment of cancer-colonized bone to bone pain.

    PubMed

    Yoneda, Toshiyuki; Hiasa, Masahiro; Nagata, Yuki; Okui, Tatsuo; White, Fletcher

    2015-10-01

    Solid and hematologic cancer colonized bone produces a number of pathologies. One of the most common complications is bone pain. Cancer-associated bone pain (CABP) is a major cause of increased morbidity and diminishes the quality of life and affects survival. Current treatments do not satisfactorily control CABP and can elicit adverse effects. Thus, new therapeutic interventions are needed to manage CABP. However, the mechanisms responsible for CABP are poorly understood. The observation that specific osteoclast inhibitors can reduce CABP in patients indicates a critical role of osteoclasts in the pathophysiology of CABP. Osteoclasts create an acidic extracellular microenvironment by secretion of protons via vacuolar proton pumps during bone resorption. In addition, bone-colonized cancer cells also release protons and lactate via plasma membrane pH regulators to avoid intracellular acidification resulting from increased aerobic glycolysis known as the Warburg effect. Since acidosis is algogenic for sensory neurons and bone is densely innervated by sensory neurons that express acid-sensing nociceptors, the acidic bone microenvironments can evoke CABP. Understanding of the mechanism by which the acidic extracellular microenvironment is created in cancer-colonized bone and the expression and function of the acid-sensing nociceptors are regulated should facilitate the development of novel approaches for management of CABP. Here, the contribution of the acidic microenvironment created in cancer-colonized bone to elicitation of CABP and potential therapeutic implications of blocking the development and recognition of acidic microenvironment will be described. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Membrane channels and transporters in cancers.

  16. Tumor Microenvironment Modulation via Gold Nanoparticles Targeting Malicious Exosomes: Implications for Cancer Diagnostics and Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Roma-Rodrigues, Catarina; Raposo, Luís R.; Cabral, Rita; Paradinha, Fabiana; Baptista, Pedro V.; Fernandes, Alexandra R.

    2017-01-01

    Exosomes are nanovesicles formed in the endosomal pathway with an important role in paracrine and autocrine cell communication. Exosomes secreted by cancer cells, malicious exosomes, have important roles in tumor microenvironment maturation and cancer progression. The knowledge of the role of exosomes in tumorigenesis prompted a new era in cancer diagnostics and therapy, taking advantage of the use of circulating exosomes as tumor biomarkers due to their stability in body fluids and targeting malignant exosomes’ release and/or uptake to inhibit or delay tumor development. In recent years, nanotechnology has paved the way for the development of a plethora of new diagnostic and therapeutic platforms, fostering theranostics. The unique physical and chemical properties of gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) make them suitable vehicles to pursuit this goal. AuNPs’ properties such as ease of synthesis with the desired shape and size, high surface:volume ratio, and the possibility of engineering their surface as desired, potentiate AuNPs’ role in nanotheranostics, allowing the use of the same formulation for exosome detection and restraining the effect of malicious exosomes in cancer progression. PMID:28098821

  17. Inter-cellular signaling network reveals a mechanistic transition in tumor microenvironment

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Yu; Garmire, Lana X.; Fan, Rong

    2012-01-01

    We conducted inter-cellular cytokine correlation and network analysis based upon a stochastic population dynamics model that comprises five cell types and fifteen signaling molecules inter-connected through a large number of cell-cell communication pathways. We observed that the signaling molecules are tightly correlated even at very early stages (e.g. the first month) of human glioma, but such correlation rapidly diminishes when tumor grows to a size that can be clinically detected. Further analysis suggests that paracrine is shown to be the dominant force during tumor initiation and priming, while autocrine supersedes it and supports a robust tumor expansion. In correspondence, the cytokine correlation network evolves through an increasing to decreasing complexity. This study indicates a possible mechanistic transition from the microenvironment-controlled, paracrine-based regulatory mechanism to self-sustained rapid progression to fetal malignancy. It also reveals key nodes that are responsible for such transition and can be potentially harnessed for the design of new anti-cancer therapies. PMID:23080410

  18. Targeting the Tumor Microenvironment: The Protumor Effects of IL-17 Related to Cancer Type

    PubMed Central

    Fabre, Joseph; Giustiniani, Jerome; Garbar, Christian; Antonicelli, Frank; Merrouche, Yacine; Bensussan, Armand; Bagot, Martine; al-Dacak, Reem

    2016-01-01

    The inflammatory process contributes to immune tolerance as well as to tumor progression and metastasis. By releasing extracellular signals, cancerous cells constantly shape their surrounding microenvironment through their interactions with infiltrating immune cells, stromal cells and components of extracellular matrix. Recently, the pro-inflammatory interleukin 17 (IL-17)-producing T helper lymphocytes, the Th17 cells, and the IL-17/IL-17 receptor (IL-17R) axis gained special attention. The IL-17 family comprises at least six members, IL-17A, IL-17B, IL-17C, IL-17D, IL-17E (also called IL-25), and IL-17F. Secreted as disulfide-linked homo- or heterodimers, the IL-17 bind to the IL-17R, a type I cell surface receptor, of which there are five variants, IL-17RA to IL-17RE. This review focuses on the current advances identifying the promoting role of IL-17 in carcinogenesis, tumor metastasis and resistance to chemotherapy of diverse solid cancers. While underscoring the IL-17/IL-17R axis as promising immunotherapeutic target in the context of cancer managing, this knowledge calls upon further in vitro and in vivo studies that would allow the development and implementation of novel strategies to combat tumors. PMID:27589729

  19. Prognostic and predictive aspects of the tumor immune microenvironment and immune checkpoints in malignant pleural mesothelioma.

    PubMed

    Marcq, Elly; Siozopoulou, Vasiliki; De Waele, Jorrit; van Audenaerde, Jonas; Zwaenepoel, Karen; Santermans, Eva; Hens, Niel; Pauwels, Patrick; van Meerbeeck, Jan P; Smits, Evelien L J

    2017-01-01

    Malignant pleural mesothelioma (MPM) is an aggressive cancer with a poor prognosis and an increasing incidence, for which novel therapeutic strategies are urgently required. Since the immune system has been described to play a presumed role in the protection against MPM, characterization of its tumor immune microenvironment (TME) and immune checkpoints can identify new immunotherapeutic targets and their predictive and/or prognostic value. To characterize the TME and the immune checkpoint expression profile, we performed immunohistochemistry (IHC) on formalin-fixed paraffin embedded (FFPE) tissue sections from 54 MPM patients (40 at time of diagnosis; 14 treated with chemotherapy). We stained for PD-1, PD-L1, TIM-3, LAG-3, CD4, CD8, CD45RO, granzyme B, FoxP3 and CD68. Furthermore, we analyzed the relationship between the immunological parameters and survival, as well as response to chemotherapy. We found that TIM-3, PD-1 and PD-L1 were expressed on both immune and tumor cells. Strikingly, PD-1 and PD-L1 expression on tumor cells was only seen in unpretreated samples. No LAG-3 expression was observed. CD45RO expression in the stroma was an independent negative predictive factor for response on chemotherapy, while CD4 and TIM-3 expression in lymphoid aggregates were independent prognostic factors for better outcome. Our data propose TIM-3 as a promising new target in mesothelioma. Chemotherapy influences the expression of immune checkpoints and therefore further research on the best combination treatment schedule is required.

  20. Paracrine sonic hedgehog signaling contributes significantly to acquired steroidogenesis in the prostate tumor microenvironment.

    PubMed

    Lubik, Amy A; Nouri, Mannan; Truong, Sarah; Ghaffari, Mazyar; Adomat, Hans H; Corey, Eva; Cox, Michael E; Li, Na; Guns, Emma S; Yenki, Parvin; Pham, Steven; Buttyan, Ralph

    2017-01-15

    Despite the substantial benefit of androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) for metastatic prostate cancer, patients often progress to castration-resistant disease (CRPC) that is more difficult to treat. CRPC is associated with renewed androgen receptor activity in tumor cells and restoration of tumor androgen levels through acquired intratumoral steroidogenesis (AIS). Although prostate cancer (PCa) cells have been shown to have steroidogenic capability in vitro, we previously found that benign prostate stromal cells (PrSCs) can also synthesize testosterone (T) from an adrenal precursor, DHEA, when stimulated with a hedgehog (Hh) pathway agonist, SAG. Here, we show exposure of PrSCs to a different Smoothened (Smo) agonist, Ag1.5, or to conditioned medium from sonic hedgehog overexpressing LNCaP cells induces steroidogenic enzyme expression in PrSCs and significantly increases production of T and its precursor steroids in a Smo-dependent manner from 22-OH-cholesterol substrate. Hh agonist-/ligand-treated PrSCs produced androgens at a rate similar to or greater than that of PCa cell lines. Likewise, primary bone marrow stromal cells became more steroidogenic and produced T under the influence of Smo agonist. Treatment of mice bearing LNCaP xenografts with a Smo antagonist, TAK-441, delayed the onset of CRPC after castration and substantially reduced androgen levels in residual tumors. These outcomes support the idea that stromal cells in ADT-treated primary or metastatic prostate tumors can contribute to AIS as a consequence of a paracrine Hh signaling microenvironment. As such, Smo antagonists may be useful for targeting prostate tumor stromal cell-derived AIS and delaying the onset of CRPC after ADT.

  1. Immune infiltration and PD-L1 expression in the tumor microenvironment are prognostic in osteosarcoma

    PubMed Central

    Koirala, Pratistha; Roth, Michael E.; Gill, Jonathan; Piperdi, Sajida; Chinai, Jordan M.; Geller, David S.; Hoang, Bang H.; Park, Amy; Fremed, Michael A.; Zang, Xingxing; Gorlick, Richard

    2016-01-01

    Osteosarcoma patient survival has remained stagnant for 30 years. Novel therapeutic approaches are needed to improve outcomes. We examined the expression of Programmed Death Ligand 1 (PD-L1) and defined the tumor immune microenvironment to assess the prognostic utility in osteosarcoma. PD-L1 expression in osteosarcoma was examined in two patient cohorts using immunohistochemistry (IHC) (n = 48, n = 59) and expression was validated using quantitative real time PCR (n = 21) and western blotting (n = 9). IHC was used to determine the presence of tumor infiltrating lymphocytes and antigen-presenting cells (APCs) in the tumor. Expression of PD-L1 was correlated with immune cell infiltration and event-free-survival (EFS). The 25% of primary osteosarcoma tumors that express PD-L1 were more likely to contain cells that express PD-1 than PD-L1 negative tumors (91.7% vs 47.2%, p = 0.002). Expression of PD-L1 was significantly associated with the presence of T cells, dendritic cells, and natural killer cells. Although all immune cell types examined were present in osteosarcoma samples, only infiltration by dendritic cells (28.3% vs. 83.9%, p = 0.001) and macrophages (45.5% vs. 84.4%, p = 0.031) were associated with worse five-year-EFS. PD-L1 expression was significantly associated with poorer five-year-EFS (25.0%. vs. 69.4%, p = 0.014). Further studies in osteosarcoma are needed to determine if targeting the PD-L1:PD-1 axis improves survival. PMID:27456063

  2. FGFR inhibitors: Effects on cancer cells, tumor microenvironment and whole-body homeostasis (Review)

    PubMed Central

    KATOH, MASARU

    2016-01-01

    Fibroblast growth factor (FGF)2, FGF4, FGF7 and FGF20 are representative paracrine FGFs binding to heparan-sulfate proteoglycan and fibroblast growth factor receptors (FGFRs), whereas FGF19, FGF21 and FGF23 are endocrine FGFs binding to Klotho and FGFRs. FGFR1 is relatively frequently amplified and overexpressed in breast and lung cancer, and FGFR2 in gastric cancer. BCR-FGFR1, CNTRL-FGFR1, CUX1-FGFR1, FGFR1OP-FGFR1, MYO18A-FGFR1 and ZMYM2-FGFR1 fusions in myeloproliferative neoplasms are non-receptor-type FGFR kinases, whereas FGFR1-TACC1, FGFR2-AFF3, FGFR2-BICC1, FGFR2-PPHLN1, FGFR3-BAIAP2L1 and FGFR3-TACC3 fusions in solid tumors are transmembrane-type FGFRs with C-terminal alterations. AZD4547, BGJ398 (infigratinib), Debio-1347 and dovitinib are FGFR1/2/3 inhibitors; BLU9931 is a selective FGFR4 inhibitor; FIIN-2, JNJ-42756493, LY2874455 and ponatinib are pan-FGFR inhibitors. AZD4547, dovitinib and ponatinib are multi-kinase inhibitors targeting FGFRs, colony stimulating factor 1 receptor (CSF1R), vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)R2, and others. The tumor microenvironment consists of cancer cells and stromal/immune cells, such as cancer-associated fibroblasts (CAFs), endothelial cells, M2-type tumor-associating macrophages (M2-TAMs), myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) and regulatory T cells. FGFR inhibitors elicit antitumor effects directly on cancer cells, as well as indirectly through the blockade of paracrine signaling. The dual inhibition of FGF and CSF1 or VEGF signaling is expected to enhance the antitumor effects through the targeting of immune evasion and angiogenesis in the tumor microenvironment. Combination therapy using tyrosine kinase inhibitors (FGFR or CSF1R inhibitors) and immune checkpoint blockers (anti-PD-1 or anti-CTLA-4 monoclonal antibodies) may be a promising choice for cancer patients. The inhibition of FGF19-FGFR4 signaling is associated with a risk of liver toxicity, whereas the activation of FGF23-FGFR4 signaling is

  3. Microenvironment of Breast Tissue: Lithocholic Acid and Other Intestinal Steroids.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1997-09-01

    decompose under the acidic conditions needed for solvolysis. Attempts to utilize sulfatase enzymes were not successful. c. Acetate derivatives were...methods continue to utilize preparative tech- niques that were introduced for the analysis of bile acid by GLC (5). Thus, extensive multiple column...premature and neonatal urine. ’Major component of urine in 3ß-hydroxy-C27-steroid dehydrog- enase/isomerase deficiency . ’Major component of urine in A4-3

  4. Tissue Microenvironment Modulates CXCR4 Expression and Tumor Metastasis in Neuroblastoma1

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Libo; Yeger, Herman; Das, Bikul; Irwin, Meredith S; Baruchel, Sylvain

    2007-01-01

    Abstract Neuroblastoma (NB) is derived from intrinsic migratory neural crest cells and has a high potential for distant metastasis. Growing evidence has implicated chemokine receptors, especially CXCR4, which normally control immune and inflammatory cell migration, as having important roles in tumor progression. In this study, we investigated the expression of CXCR4 in eight different NB cell lines and found that CXCR4 expression is dynamically regulated in NB and can be modulated by different tissue stromata. In addition, we demonstrate that IL-5 and IFN-γ are released from stromal cells and act as differential mediators for CXCR4 expression. We also overexpressed CXCR4 in two NB cell lines, NUB-7 and SK-N-BE(2), and studied the role of CXCR4 in NB metastasis both in vitro and in vivo. In vitro transwell invasion assay showed that CXCR4 overexpression promoted NB cell migration preferentially toward a bone marrow stromal cell-conditioned medium. Using an in vivo xenograft model, CXCR4-overexpressing cells showed an increased incidence of metastasis, most notably bone marrow metastasis. Our studies reveal critical roles for CXCR4 in NB metastasis and provide insights into the regulatory mechanism of chemokine receptors in NB and the importance of the tissue microenvironment in modulating tumor cell behavior. PMID:17325742

  5. Polarization of macrophages in the tumor microenvironment is influenced by EGFR signaling within colon cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Weina; Chen, Lechuang; Ma, Kai; Zhao, Yahui; Liu, Xianghe; Wang, Yu; Liu, Mei; Liang, Shufang; Zhu, Hongxia; Xu, Ningzhi

    2016-01-01

    Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) is a target of colon cancer therapy, but the effects of this therapy on the tumor microenvironment remain poorly understood. Our in vivo studies showed that cetuximab, an anti-EGFR monoclonal antibody, effectively inhibited AOM/DSS-induced, colitis-associated tumorigenesis, downregulated M2-related markers, and decreased F4/80+/CD206+ macrophage populations. Treatment with conditioned medium of colon cancer cells increased macrophage expression of the M2-related markers arginase-1 (Arg1), CCL17, CCL22, IL-10 and IL-4. By contrast, conditioned medium of EGFR knockout colon cancer cells inhibited expression of these M2-related markers and induced macrophage expression of the M1-related markers inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), IL-12, TNF-α and CCR7. EGFR knockout in colon cancer cells inhibited macrophage-induced promotion of xenograft tumor growth. Moreover, colon cancer-derived insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) increased Arg1 expression, and treatment with the IGF1R inhibitor AG1024 inhibited that increase. These results suggest that inhibition of EGFR signaling in colon cancer cells modulates cytokine secretion (e.g. IGF-1) and prevents M1-to-M2 macrophage polarization, thereby inhibiting cancer cell growth. PMID:27683110

  6. Polarization of macrophages in the tumor microenvironment is influenced by EGFR signaling within colon cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Weina; Chen, Lechuang; Ma, Kai; Zhao, Yahui; Liu, Xianghe; Wang, Yu; Liu, Mei; Liang, Shufang; Zhu, Hongxia; Xu, Ningzhi

    2016-11-15

    Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) is a target of colon cancer therapy, but the effects of this therapy on the tumor microenvironment remain poorly understood. Our in vivo studies showed that cetuximab, an anti-EGFR monoclonal antibody, effectively inhibited AOM/DSS-induced, colitis-associated tumorigenesis, downregulated M2-related markers, and decreased F4/80+/CD206+ macrophage populations. Treatment with conditioned medium of colon cancer cells increased macrophage expression of the M2-related markers arginase-1 (Arg1), CCL17, CCL22, IL-10 and IL-4. By contrast, conditioned medium of EGFR knockout colon cancer cells inhibited expression of these M2-related markers and induced macrophage expression of the M1-related markers inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), IL-12, TNF-α and CCR7. EGFR knockout in colon cancer cells inhibited macrophage-induced promotion of xenograft tumor growth. Moreover, colon cancer-derived insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) increased Arg1 expression, and treatment with the IGF1R inhibitor AG1024 inhibited that increase. These results suggest that inhibition of EGFR signaling in colon cancer cells modulates cytokine secretion (e.g. IGF-1) and prevents M1-to-M2 macrophage polarization, thereby inhibiting cancer cell growth.

  7. Role of the tumor microenvironment in the pathogenesis of gastric carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Hye Won; Lim, Jong-Baeck

    2014-01-01

    Gastric carcinoma (GC) is the 4th most prevalent cancer and has the 2nd highest cancer-related mortality rate worldwide. Despite the incidence of GC has decreased over the past few decades, it is still a serious health problem. Chronic inflammatory status of the stomach, caused by the infection of Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) and through the production of inflammatory mediators within the parenchyma is suspected to play an important role in the initiation and progression of GC. In this review, the correlation between chronic inflammation and H. pylori infection as an important factor for the development of GC will be discussed. Major components, including tumor-associated macrophages, lymphocytes, cancer-associated fibroblasts, angiogenic factors, cytokines, and chemokines of GC microenvironment and their mechanism of action on signaling pathways will also be discussed. Increasing our understanding of how the components of the tumor microenviroment interact with GC cells and the signaling pathways involved could help identify new therapeutic and chemopreventive targets. PMID:24587646

  8. Caveolin-1 and accelerated host aging in the breast tumor microenvironment: chemoprevention with rapamycin, an mTOR inhibitor and anti-aging drug.

    PubMed

    Mercier, Isabelle; Camacho, Jeanette; Titchen, Kanani; Gonzales, Donna M; Quann, Kevin; Bryant, Kelly G; Molchansky, Alexander; Milliman, Janet N; Whitaker-Menezes, Diana; Sotgia, Federica; Jasmin, Jean-François; Schwarting, Roland; Pestell, Richard G; Blagosklonny, Mikhail V; Lisanti, Michael P

    2012-07-01

    Increasing chronological age is the most significant risk factor for human cancer development. To examine the effects of host aging on mammary tumor growth, we used caveolin (Cav)-1 knockout mice as a bona fide model of accelerated host aging. Mammary tumor cells were orthotopically implanted into these distinct microenvironments (Cav-1(+/+) versus Cav-1(-/-) age-matched young female mice). Mammary tumors grown in a Cav-1-deficient tumor microenvironment have an increased stromal content, with vimentin-positive myofibroblasts (a marker associated with oxidative stress) that are also positive for S6-kinase activation (a marker associated with aging). Mammary tumors grown in a Cav-1-deficient tumor microenvironment were more than fivefold larger than tumors grown in a wild-type microenvironment. Thus, a Cav-1-deficient tumor microenvironment provides a fertile soil for breast cancer tumor growth. Interestingly, the mammary tumor-promoting effects of a Cav-1-deficient microenvironment were estrogen and progesterone independent. In this context, chemoprevention was achieved by using the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) inhibitor and anti-aging drug, rapamycin. Systemic rapamycin treatment of mammary tumors grown in a Cav-1-deficient microenvironment significantly inhibited their tumor growth, decreased their stromal content, and reduced the levels of both vimentin and phospho-S6 in Cav-1-deficient cancer-associated fibroblasts. Since stromal loss of Cav-1 is a marker of a lethal tumor microenvironment in breast tumors, these high-risk patients might benefit from treatment with mTOR inhibitors, such as rapamycin or other rapamycin-related compounds (rapalogues).

  9. Functional block copolymer assemblies responsive to tumor and intracellular microenvironments for site-specific drug delivery and enhanced imaging performance.

    PubMed

    Ge, Zhishen; Liu, Shiyong

    2013-09-07

    imaging sensitivity via disease site-specific delivery and controlled release. A variety of extracellular or intracellular stimuli innate to disease sites, such as mildly acidic pH, temperature, enzymes (matrix metalloproteinase, β-glucuronidase, and phosphatase), oxidative/reductive microenvironments, and abnormal levels of bioactive molecules or metabolites, have been utilized for this purpose. In this review, we summarize recent advances in stimuli-responsive block copolymer assemblies which are responsive to tumor and intracellular microenvironments and their applications in anticancer drug delivery and enhanced imaging sensitivity.

  10. An Implantable Device for Manipulation of the in vivo Tumor Microenvironment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, James K.

    In the past decade, it has become increasingly recognized that interactions between cancer cells and the tumor microenvironment (TME) regulate metastasis. One such interaction is the paracrine loop between macrophages and cancer cells which drives metastatic invasion in mammary tumors. Tumor associated macrophages release epidermal growth factor (EGF), a chemoattractant which induces the migration of cancer cells toward the blood vessels. The cancer cells reciprocate by releasing a macrophage chemoattractant, colony-stimulating factor 1 (CSF-1), resulting in the co-migration of both cell types and subsequent intravasation. In this work, a new technology has been developed for studying the mechanisms by which invasive tumor cells migrate in vivo toward gradients of EGF. Conventional in vitro methods used for studying tumor cell migration lack the complexity found in the TME and are therefore of limited relevance to in vivo metastasis. The Nano Intravital Device (NANIVID) has been designed as an implantable tool to manipulate the TME through the generation of soluble factor gradients. The NANIVID consists of two etched glass substrates, loaded with a hydrogel containing EGF, and sealed together using a polymer membrane. When implanted in vivo, the hydrogel will swell and release the entrapped EGF, forming a diffusion gradient in the tumor over many hours. The NANIVID design has been optimized for use with multiphoton-based intravital imaging, to monitor migration toward the device at single-cell resolution. Stabilization techniques have been developed to minimize imaging artifacts caused by breathing and specimen movement over the course of the experiment. The NANIVID has been validated in vivo using a mouse model of metastasis. When implanted in MDA-MB-231 xenograft tumors grown in SCID mice, chemotaxis of tumor cells was induced by the EGF gradient generated by the device. Cell motility parameters including velocity, directionality, and chemotactic index were

  11. The microenvironment in primary cutaneous melanoma with associated spontaneous tumor regression: evaluation for T-regulatory cells and the presence of an immunosuppressive microenvironment.

    PubMed

    Gray, Arielle; Grushchak, Solomiya; Mudaliar, Kumaran; Kliethermes, Stephanie; Carey, Kyle; Hutchens, Kelli A

    2017-04-01

    Spontaneous tumor regression, regression in the absence of therapeutic intervention, can be identified histologically in over 25% of primary cutaneous melanomas at initial diagnosis. A unique subset of T lymphocytes found in areas of regression can be histologically distinguished from tumor-infiltrating T lymphocytes (TIL) found in areas of tumor progression. We call this unique subset of T lymphocytes regression-associated T lymphocytes (RATs). The aim of this study is to determine the phenotype of lymphocytes and the density of specific cell types linked to immunosuppression in areas of tumor progression compared with areas of tumor regression. These specific cell types include T-regulatory cells (Tregs) and S100A9 cells. A total of 14 primary cutaneous melanomas with areas of progression and regression were used. Immunohistochemistry staining was used to identify CD4 cells, CD8 cells, Tregs, and S100A9 cells. Two independent observers manually counted three high-powered ×40 fields. There was no predominance of CD4 or CD8 T lymphocytes in either RATs or TIL. We identified a lower density of Tregs in RATs compared with TIL when using the FOXP3/CD4 Treg marker (P=0.04) and a marginal difference when using our second, confirmatory Treg marker, FOXP3/CD25 (P=0.11). We observed a lower density of S100A9 cells in RATs compared with TIL (P=0.002). There was an observable difference in the tumor microenvironments of RATs and TIL, with RATs having a significantly lower density of Tregs and S100A9 cells. We deduce that the absence of immunosuppression in areas of regression allows for a more robust immune response and thus effective eradication of tumor cells.

  12. Concepts of Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia Pathogenesis: DNA Damage Response and Tumor Microenvironment.

    PubMed

    Frenzel, Lukas P; Reinhardt, H Christian; Pallasch, Christian P

    2016-01-01

    Pathogenesis of chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) is characterized by specific genetic aberrations and alterations of cellular signaling pathways. In particular, a disturbed DNA damage response (DDR) and an activated B-cell receptor signaling pathway play a major role in promoting CLL cell survival. External stimuli are similarly essential for CLL cell survival and lead to activation of the PI3K/AKT and MAPK pathways. Activation of nuclear factor-kappa B (NFkB) influences the disturbed anti-apoptotic balance of CLL cells. Losses or disabling mutations in TP53 and ATM are frequent events in chemotherapy-naïve patients and are further enriched in chemotherapy-resistant patients. As these lesions define key regulatory elements of the DDR pathway, they also determine treatment response to genotoxic therapy. Novel therapeutic strategies therefore try to circumvent defective DDR signaling and to suppress the pro-survival stimuli received from the tumor microenvironment. With increasing knowledge on specific genetic alterations of CLL, we may be able to target CLL cells more efficiently even in the situation of mutated DDR pathways or protection by microenvironmental stimuli.

  13. Molecular Pathways: Targeting the CXCR4-CXCL12 Axis--Untapped Potential in the Tumor Microenvironment.

    PubMed

    Scala, Stefania

    2015-10-01

    Evidence suggests that the CXC-chemokine receptor-4 pathway plays a role in cancer cell homing and metastasis, and thus represents a potential target for cancer therapy. The homeostatic microenvironment chemokine CXCL12 binds the CXCR4 and CXCR7 receptors, activating divergent signals on multiple pathways, such as ERK1/2, p38, SAPK/JNK, AKT, mTOR, and the Bruton tyrosine kinase (BTK). An activating mutation in CXCR4 is responsible for a rare disease, WHIM syndrome (warts, hypogammaglobulinemia, infections, and myelokathexis), and dominant CXCR4 mutations have also been reported in Waldenstrom macroglobulinemia. The CXCR4-CXCL12 axis regulates the hematopoietic stem cell niche--a property that has led to the approval of the CXCR4 antagonist plerixafor (AMD3100) for mobilization of hematopoietic precursors. In preclinical models, plerixafor has shown antimetastatic potential in vivo, offering proof of concept. Other antagonists are in preclinical and clinical development. Recent evidence demonstrates that inhibiting CXCR4 signaling restores sensitivity to CTLA-4 and PD-1 checkpoint inhibitors, creating a new line for investigation. Targeting the CXCR4-CXCL12 axis thus offers the possibility of affecting CXCR4-expressing primary tumor cells, modulating the immune response, or synergizing with other targeted anticancer therapies.

  14. Impact of Metabolism on T-Cell Differentiation and Function and Cross Talk with Tumor Microenvironment

    PubMed Central

    Kouidhi, Soumaya; Elgaaied, Amel Benammar; Chouaib, Salem

    2017-01-01

    The immune system and metabolism are highly integrated and multilevel interactions between metabolic system and T lymphocyte signaling and fate exist. Accumulating evidence indicates that the regulation of nutrient uptake and utilization in T cells is critically important for the control of their differentiation and manipulating metabolic pathways in these cells can shape their function and survival. This review will discuss some potential cell metabolism pathways involved in shaping T lymphocyte function and differentiation. It will also describe show subsets of T cells have specific metabolic requirements and signaling pathways that contribute to their respective function. Examples showing the apparent similarity between cancer cell metabolism and T cells during activation are illustrated and finally some mechanisms being used by tumor microenvironment to orchestrate T-cell metabolic dysregulation and the subsequent emergence of immune suppression are discussed. We believe that targeting T-cell metabolism may provide an additional opportunity to manipulate T-cell function in the development of novel therapeutics. PMID:28348562

  15. Modulation of IL-1β reprogrammes the tumor microenvironment to interrupt oral carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Wu, Tong; Hong, Yun; Jia, Lihua; Wu, Jie; Xia, Juan; Wang, Juan; Hu, Qinchao; Cheng, Bin

    2016-02-01

    Head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) development is a multistage process includes the normal, dysplasia and squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) stages. Recently, increasing evidence has suggested that the tumor microenvironment (TME) is an integral part of malignant transformation. Exploring certain key node genes in TME for future intervention in dysplasia to interrupt oral carcinogenesis was the primary goal of this research. To achieve this goal, systems biology approaches were first applied to the epithelia and fibroblasts collected at sequential stages in a 4-nitroquinoline-1-oxide (4NQO) -induced rat oral carcinogenesis model. Through bioinformatics network construction, IL-1β was identified as one of the key node genes in TME during carcinogenesis. Immunohistochemical staining of human and rat samples demonstrated that IL-1β expression patterns were parallel to the stages of malignant transformation. Silencing IL-1β with lentivirus-delivered shRNA significantly inhibited oral squamous cell carcinoma cell growth both in vivo and in vitro. Based on these findings, we hypothesized that IL-1β may be a chemoprevention target in TME during oral carcinogenesis. Therefore, we targeted IL-1 in the TME by oral mucosal injection of an IL-1 receptor antagonist in 4NQO rats. The results demonstrated that targeting IL-1 could interrupt oral carcinogenesis by reprogramming the TME.

  16. Co-Culture of Tumor Spheroids and Fibroblasts in a Collagen Matrix-Incorporated Microfluidic Chip Mimics Reciprocal Activation in Solid Tumor Microenvironment

    PubMed Central

    Jeong, Su-Yeong; Lee, Ji-Hyun; Shin, Yoojin; Chung, Seok; Kuh, Hyo-Jeong

    2016-01-01

    Multicellular 3D culture and interaction with stromal components are considered essential elements in establishing a ‘more clinically relevant’ tumor model. Matrix-embedded 3D cultures using a microfluidic chip platform can recapitulate the microscale interaction within tumor microenvironments. As a major component of tumor microenvironment, cancer-associated fibroblasts (CAFs) play a role in cancer progression and drug resistance. Here, we present a microfluidic chip-based tumor tissue culture model that integrates 3D tumor spheroids (TSs) with CAF in proximity within a hydrogel scaffold. HT-29 human colorectal carcinoma cells grew into 3D TSs and the growth was stimulated when co-cultured with fibroblasts as shown by 1.5-folds increase of % changes in diameter over 5 days. TS cultured for 6 days showed a reduced expression of Ki-67 along with increased expression of fibronectin when co-cultured with fibroblasts compared to mono-cultured TSs. Fibroblasts were activated under co-culture conditions, as demonstrated by increases in α-SMA expression and migratory activity. When exposed to paclitaxel, a survival advantage was observed in TSs co-cultured with activated fibroblasts. Overall, we demonstrated the reciprocal interaction between TSs and fibroblasts in our 7-channel microfluidic chip. The co-culture of 3D TS-CAF in a collagen matrix-incorporated microfluidic chip may be useful to study the tumor microenvironment and for evaluation of drug screening and evaluation. PMID:27391808

  17. FGFR inhibitors: Effects on cancer cells, tumor microenvironment and whole-body homeostasis (Review).

    PubMed

    Katoh, Masaru

    2016-07-01

    Fibroblast growth factor (FGF)2, FGF4, FGF7 and FGF20 are representative paracrine FGFs binding to heparan-sulfate proteoglycan and fibroblast growth factor receptors (FGFRs), whereas FGF19, FGF21 and FGF23 are endocrine FGFs binding to Klotho and FGFRs. FGFR1 is relatively frequently amplified and overexpressed in breast and lung cancer, and FGFR2 in gastric cancer. BCR-FGFR1, CNTRL-FGFR1, CUX1-FGFR1, FGFR1OP-FGFR1, MYO18A-FGFR1 and ZMYM2-FGFR1 fusions in myeloproliferative neoplasms are non-receptor-type FGFR kinases, whereas FGFR1-TACC1, FGFR2-AFF3, FGFR2-BICC1, FGFR2-PPHLN1, FGFR3-BAIAP2L1 and FGFR3-TACC3 fusions in solid tumors are transmembrane-type FGFRs with C-terminal alterations. AZD4547, BGJ398 (infigratinib), Debio-1347 and dovitinib are FGFR1/2/3 inhibitors; BLU9931 is a selective FGFR4 inhibitor; FIIN-2, JNJ-42756493, LY2874455 and ponatinib are pan-FGFR inhibitors. AZD4547, dovitinib and ponatinib are multi-kinase inhibitors targeting FGFRs, colony stimulating factor 1 receptor (CSF1R), vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)R2, and others. The tumor microenvironment consists of cancer cells and stromal/immune cells, such as cancer-associated fibroblasts (CAFs), endothelial cells, M2-type tumor-associating macrophages (M2-TAMs), myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) and regulatory T cells. FGFR inhibitors elicit antitumor effects directly on cancer cells, as well as indirectly through the blockade of paracrine signaling. The dual inhibition of FGF and CSF1 or VEGF signaling is expected to enhance the antitumor effects through the targeting of immune evasion and angiogenesis in the tumor microenvironment. Combination therapy using tyrosine kinase inhibitors (FGFR or CSF1R inhibitors) and immune checkpoint blockers (anti-PD-1 or anti-CTLA-4 monoclonal antibodies) may be a promising choice for cancer patients. The inhibition of FGF19-FGFR4 signaling is associated with a risk of liver toxicity, whereas the activation of FGF23-FGFR4 signaling

  18. Intratumoral oncolytic adenoviral treatment modulates the glioma microenvironment and facilitates systemic tumor-antigen-specific T cell therapy

    PubMed Central

    Qiao, Jian; Dey, Mahua; Chang, Alan L; Kim, Julius W; Miska, Jason; Ling, Alex; M Nettlebeck, Dirk; Han, Yu; Zhang, Lingjiao; Lesniak, Maciej S

    2015-01-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is the most aggressive form of primary brain tumor and is associated with poor survival. Virotherapy is a promising candidate for the development of effective, novel treatments for GBM. Recent studies have underscored the potential of virotherapy in enhancing antitumor immunity despite the fact that its mechanisms remain largely unknown. Here, using a syngeneic GBM mouse model, we report that intratumoral virotherapy significantly modulates the tumor microenvironment. We found that intratumoral administration of an oncolytic adenovirus, AdCMVdelta24, decreased tumor-infiltrating CD4+ Foxp3+ regulatory T cells (Tregs) and increased IFNγ-producing CD8+ T cells in treated tumors, even in late stage disease in which a highly immunosuppressive tumor microenvironment is considered to be a significant barrier to immunotherapy. Importantly, intratumoral AdCMVdelta24 treatment augmented systemically transferred tumor-antigen-specific T cell therapy. Furthermore, mechanistic studies showed (1) downregulation of Foxp3 in Tregs that were incubated with media conditioned by virus-infected tumor cells, (2) downregulation of indoleamine 2,3 dioxygenase 1 (IDO) in glioma cells upon infection by AdCMVdelta24, and (3) reprograming of Tregs from an immunosuppressive to a stimulatory state. Taken together, our findings demonstrate the potency of intratumoral oncolytic adenoviral treatment in enhancing antitumor immunity through the regulation of multiple aspects of immune suppression in the context of glioma, supporting further clinical development of oncolytic adenovirus-based immune therapies for malignant brain cancer. PMID:26405578

  19. NF-κB functions as a molecular link between tumor cells and Th1/Tc1 T cells in the tumor microenvironment to exert radiation-mediated tumor suppression.

    PubMed

    Simon, Priscilla S; Bardhan, Kankana; Chen, May R; Paschall, Amy V; Lu, Chunwan; Bollag, Roni J; Kong, Feng-Chong; Jin, JianYue; Kong, Feng-Ming; Waller, Jennifer L; Pollock, Raphael E; Liu, Kebin

    2016-04-26

    Radiation modulates both tumor cells and immune cells in the tumor microenvironment to exert its anti-tumor activity; however, the molecular connection between tumor cells and immune cells that mediates radiation-exerted tumor suppression activity in the tumor microenvironment is largely unknown. We report here that radiation induces rapid activation of the p65/p50 and p50/p50 NF-κB complexes in human soft tissue sarcoma (STS) cells. Radiation-activated p65/p50 and p50/p50 bind to the TNFα promoter to activate its transcription in STS cells. Radiation-induced TNFα induces tumor cell death in an autocrine manner. A sublethal dose of Smac mimetic BV6 induces cIAP1 and cIAP2 degradation to increase tumor cell sensitivity to radiation-induced cell death in vitro and to enhance radiation-mediated suppression of STS xenografts in vivo. Inhibition of caspases, RIP1, or RIP3 blocks radiation/TNFα-induced cell death, whereas inhibition of RIP1 blocks TNFα-induced caspase activation, suggesting that caspases and RIP1 act sequentially to mediate the non-compensatory cell death pathways. Furthermore, we determined in a syngeneic sarcoma mouse model that radiation up-regulates IRF3, IFNβ, and the T cell chemokines CCL2 and CCL5 in the tumor microenvironment, which are associated with activation and increased infiltration of Th1/Tc1 T cells in the tumor microenvironment. Moreover, tumor-infiltrating T cells are in their active form since both the perforin and FasL pathways are activated in irradiated tumor tissues. Consequently, combined BV6 and radiation completely suppressed tumor growth in vivo. Therefore, radiation-induced NF-κB functions as a molecular link between tumor cells and immune cells in the tumor microenvironment for radiation-mediated tumor suppression.

  20. Plasmacytoid dendritic cells in the tumor microenvironment: immune targets for glioma therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Candolfi, Marianela; King, Gwendalyn D; Yagiz, Kader; Curtin, James F; Mineharu, Yohei; Muhammad, A K M Ghulam; Foulad, David; Kroeger, Kurt M; Barnett, Nick; Josien, Regis; Lowenstein, Pedro R; Castro, Maria G

    2012-08-01

    Adenovirus-mediated delivery of the immune-stimulatory cytokine Flt3L and the conditionally cytotoxic thymidine kinase (TK) induces tumor regression and long-term survival in preclinical glioma (glioblastoma multiforme [GBM]) models. Flt3L induces expansion and recruitment of plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDCs) into the brain. Although pDCs can present antigen and produce powerful inflammatory cytokines, that is, interferon α (IFN-α), their role in tumor immunology remains debated. Thus, we studied the role of pDCs and IFN-α in Ad.TK/GCV+ Ad.Flt3L-mediated anti-GBM therapeutic efficacy. Our data indicate that the combined gene therapy induced recruitment of plasmacytoid DCs (pDCs) into the tumor mass; which were capable of in vivo phagocytosis, IFN-α release, and T-cell priming. Thus, we next used either pDCs or an Ad vector encoding IFN-α delivered within the tumor microenvironment. When rats were treated with Ad.TK/GCV in combination with pDCs or Ad-IFN-α, they exhibited 35% and 50% survival, respectively. However, whereas intracranial administration of Ad.TK/GCV + Ad.Flt3L exhibited a high safety profile, Ad-IFN-α led to severe local inflammation, with neurologic and systemic adverse effects. To elucidate whether the efficacy of the immunotherapy was dependent on IFN-α-secreting pDCs, we administered an Ad vector encoding B18R, an IFN-α antagonist, which abrogated the antitumoral effect of Ad.TK/GCV + Ad.Flt3L. Our data suggest that IFN-α release by activated pDCs plays a critical role in the antitumor effect mediated by Ad.TK/GCV + Ad.Flt3L. In summary, taken together, our results demonstrate that pDCs mediate anti-GBM therapeutic efficacy through the production of IFN-α, thus manipulation of pDCs constitutes an attractive new therapeutic target for the treatment of GBM.

  1. Plasmacytoid Dendritic Cells in the Tumor Microenvironment: Immune Targets for Glioma Therapeutics12

    PubMed Central

    Candolfi, Marianela; King, Gwendalyn D; Yagiz, Kader; Curtin, James F; Mineharu, Yohei; Muhammad, AKM Ghulam; Foulad, David; Kroeger, Kurt M; Barnett, Nick; Josien, Regis; Lowenstein, Pedro R; Castro, Maria G

    2012-01-01

    Adenovirus-mediated delivery of the immune-stimulatory cytokine Flt3L and the conditionally cytotoxic thymidine kinase (TK) induces tumor regression and long-term survival in preclinical glioma (glioblastoma multiforme [GBM]) models. Flt3L induces expansion and recruitment of plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDCs) into the brain. Although pDCs can present antigen and produce powerful inflammatory cytokines, that is, interferon α (IFN-α), their role in tumor immunology remains debated. Thus, we studied the role of pDCs and IFN-α in Ad.TK/GCV+ Ad.Flt3L-mediated anti-GBM therapeutic efficacy. Our data indicate that the combined gene therapy induced recruitment of plasmacytoid DCs (pDCs) into the tumor mass; which were capable of in vivo phagocytosis, IFN-α release, and T-cell priming. Thus, we next used either pDCs or an Ad vector encoding IFN-α delivered within the tumor microenvironment. When rats were treated with Ad.TK/GCV in combination with pDCs or Ad-IFN-α, they exhibited 35% and 50% survival, respectively. However, whereas intracranial administration of Ad.TK/GCV + Ad.Flt3L exhibited a high safety profile, Ad-IFN-α led to severe local inflammation, with neurologic and systemic adverse effects. To elucidate whether the efficacy of the immunotherapy was dependent on IFN-α-secreting pDCs, we administered an Ad vector encoding B18R, an IFN-α antagonist, which abrogated the antitumoral effect of Ad.TK/GCV + Ad.Flt3L. Our data suggest that IFN-α release by activated pDCs plays a critical role in the antitumor effect mediated by Ad.TK/GCV + Ad.Flt3L. In summary, taken together, our results demonstrate that pDCs mediate anti-GBM therapeutic efficacy through the production of IFN-α, thus manipulation of pDCs constitutes an attractive new therapeutic target for the treatment of GBM. PMID:22952428

  2. An Osteoblast-Derived Proteinase Controls Tumor Cell Survival via TGF-beta Activation in the Bone Microenvironment

    PubMed Central

    Thiolloy, Sophie; Edwards, James R.; Fingleton, Barbara; Rifkin, Daniel B.; Matrisian, Lynn M.; Lynch, Conor C.

    2012-01-01

    Background Breast to bone metastases frequently induce a “vicious cycle” in which osteoclast mediated bone resorption and proteolysis results in the release of bone matrix sequestered factors that drive tumor growth. While osteoclasts express numerous proteinases, analysis of human breast to bone metastases unexpectedly revealed that bone forming osteoblasts were consistently positive for the proteinase, MMP-2. Given the role of MMP-2 in extracellular matrix degradation and growth factor/cytokine processing, we tested whether osteoblast derived MMP-2 contributed to the vicious cycle of tumor progression in the bone microenvironment. Methodology/Principal Findings To test our hypothesis, we utilized murine models of the osteolytic tumor-bone microenvironment in immunocompetent wild type and MMP-2 null mice. In longitudinal studies, we found that host MMP-2 significantly contributed to tumor progression in bone by protecting against apoptosis and promoting cancer cell survival (caspase-3; immunohistochemistry). Our data also indicate that host MMP-2 contributes to tumor induced osteolysis (μCT, histomorphometry). Further ex vivo/in vitro experiments with wild type and MMP-2 null osteoclast and osteoblast cultures identified that 1) the absence of MMP-2 did not have a deleterious effect on osteoclast function (cd11B isolation, osteoclast differentiation, transwell migration and dentin resorption assay); and 2) that osteoblast derived MMP-2 promoted tumor survival by regulating the bioavailability of TGFβ, a factor critical for cell-cell communication in the bone (ELISA, immunoblot assay, clonal and soft agar assays). Conclusion/Significance Collectively, these studies identify a novel “mini-vicious cycle” between the osteoblast and metastatic cancer cells that is key for initial tumor survival in the bone microenvironment. In conclusion, the findings of our study suggest that the targeted inhibition of MMP-2 and/or TGFβ would be beneficial for the treatment

  3. Knockout of MDA-9/Syntenin (SDCBP) expression in the microenvironment dampens tumor-supporting inflammation and inhibits melanoma metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Das, Swadesh K.; Guo, Chunqing; Pradhan, Anjan K.; Bhoopathi, Praveen; Talukdar, Sarmistha; Shen, Xue-Ning; Emdad, Luni; Subler, Mark A.; Windle, Jolene J.; Sarkar, Devanand; Wang, Xiang-Yang; Fisher, Paul B.

    2016-01-01

    Cancer development and progression to metastasis is a complex process, which largely depends on bidirectional communication between tumor cells and their microenvironment. Melanoma differentiation associated gene-9 (mda-9, also known as Syntenin-1, SDCBP), a gene first cloned by our group, is robustly expressed in multiple cancers including melanoma and contributes to invasion and metastasis in a tumor cell-intrinsic manner. However, the role of MDA-9/Syntenin in the tumor cell-extrinsic microenvironment remains unclear even though MDA-9/Syntenin is ubiquitously expressed in most organs that are active metastatic sites for melanoma, e.g., lung, lymph node, brain, and liver. In this study, we explored the effect of environmental mda-9/syntenin expression on melanoma growth and metastasis using multiple immunocompetent animal models, syngeneic B16 xenograft and intravenous B16 mouse model and a genetically engineered mouse (GEM) model of melanoma. Host-deficient expression of mda-9/syntenin in mice negatively impacted on subcutaneously implanted B16 tumor growth and lung metastasis. Absence of MDA-9/Syntenin in the lung microenvironment suppressed tumor growth by modulating in situ Interleukin 17A (IL17A) expression and impaired the recruitment of myeloid derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) and Th17 cells as compared to genetically wild type animals. Additionally, loss of mda-9/syntenin expression in a spontaneous melanoma model (melanocyte-specific pten loss and BrafV600E mutation) significantly delayed tumor initiation and suppressed metastasis to the lymph nodes and lungs. The present study highlights a novel role of mda-9/syntenin in tumor-promoting inflammation and immune suppression. These observations along with other documented roles of MDA-9/Syntenin in cancer and metastasis support the potential relevance of MDA-9/Syntenin in the carcinogenic process and as a target for developing improved therapies by using either genetic or pharmacologic approaches to treat

  4. Improved Methods to Generate Spheroid Cultures from Tumor Cells, Tumor Cells & Fibroblasts or Tumor-Fragments: Microenvironment, Microvesicles and MiRNA

    PubMed Central

    Lao, Zheng; Kelly, Catherine J.; Yang, Xiang-Yang; Jenkins, W. Timothy; Toorens, Erik; Ganguly, Tapan; Evans, Sydney M.; Koch, Cameron J.

    2015-01-01

    Diagnostic and prognostic indicators are key components to achieve the goal of personalized cancer therapy. Two distinct approaches to this goal include predicting response by genetic analysis and direct testing of possible therapies using cultures derived from biopsy specimens. Optimally, the latter method requires a rapid assessment, but growing xenograft tumors or developing patient-derived cell lines can involve a great deal of time and expense. Furthermore, tumor cells have much different responses when grown in 2D versus 3D tissue environments. Using a modification of existing methods, we show that it is possible to make tumor-fragment (TF) spheroids in only 2–3 days. TF spheroids appear to closely model characteristics of the original tumor and may be used to assess critical therapy-modulating features of the microenvironment such as hypoxia. A similar method allows the reproducible development of spheroids from mixed tumor cells and fibroblasts (mixed-cell spheroids). Prior literature reports have shown highly variable development and properties of mixed-cell spheroids and this has hampered the detailed study of how individual tumor-cell components interact. In this study, we illustrate this approach and describe similarities and differences using two tumor models (U87 glioma and SQ20B squamous-cell carcinoma) with supporting data from additional cell lines. We show that U87 and SQ20B spheroids predict a key microenvironmental factor in tumors (hypoxia) and that SQ20B cells and spheroids generate similar numbers of microvesicles. We also present pilot data for miRNA expression under conditions of cells, tumors, and TF spheroids. PMID:26208323

  5. The anti-oncogenic influence of ellagic acid on colon cancer cells in leptin-enriched microenvironment.

    PubMed

    Yousef, Amany I; El-Masry, Omar S; Yassin, Eman H

    2016-10-01

    Ellagic acid (EA) has been proposed as a promising candidate for therapeutic use in colon cancer. Investigation of the effectiveness of EA in a leptin-enriched model might have been given a little interest. Here in, we investigated the anti-tumor effect of EA in the presence of leptin to reflect on therapeutic use of EA in obesity-linked colon cancer. Proven effective in leptin-enriched microenvironment, EA inhibited cell proliferation of HCT-116 and CaCo-2 cell lines, modulated cell cycle, translocated Bax to the mitochondrial fraction of cells, activated caspase-8, and reduced PCNA expression. The current study findings cast a beam of light on the potential therapeutic use of EA in obesity-related colon carcinogenesis.

  6. Identification of Cell Nonautonomous DNA Damage Responses in the Tumor Microenvironment that Contribute to Cancer Therapy Resistance

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-05-01

    include susceptibilities to toxic insults. Using a genome-wide analysis of transcriptional responses to genotoxic stress induced by cancer therapeutics...enhance resistance to DNA-damaging cancer therapeutics. These results suggest a mechanism by which genotoxic therapies given in a cyclical fashion...responses to genotoxic stress induced by cancer therapeutics, we have identified a spectrum of secreted proteins derived from the tumor microenvironment

  7. BRCA1 mutations drive oxidative stress and glycolysis in the tumor microenvironment

    PubMed Central

    Martinez-Outschoorn, Ubaldo E.; Balliet, Renee; Lin, Zhao; Whitaker-Menezes, Diana; Birbe, Ruth C.; Bombonati, Alessandro; Pavlides, Stephanos; Lamb, Rebecca; Sneddon, Sharon; Howell, Anthony; Sotgia, Federica; Lisanti, Michael P.

    2012-01-01

    Mutations in the BRCA1 tumor suppressor gene are commonly found in hereditary breast cancer. Similarly, downregulation of BRCA1 protein expression is observed in the majority of basal-like breast cancers. Here, we set out to study the effects of BRCA1 mutations on oxidative stress in the tumor microenvironment. To mimic the breast tumor microenvironment, we utilized an in vitro co-culture model of human BRCA1-mutated HCC1937 breast cancer cells and hTERT-immortalized human fibroblasts. Notably, HCC1937 cells induce the generation of hydrogen peroxide in the fibroblast compartment during co-culture, which can be inhibited by genetic complementation with the wild-type BRCA1 gene. Importantly, treatment with powerful antioxidants, such as NAC and Tempol, induces apoptosis in HCC1937 cells, suggesting that microenvironmental oxidative stress supports cancer cell survival. In addition, Tempol treatment increases the apoptotic rates of MDA-MB-231 cells, which have wild-type BRCA1, but share a basal-like breast cancer phenotype with HCC1937 cells. MCT4 is the main exporter of L-lactate out of cells and is a marker for oxidative stress and glycolytic metabolism. Co-culture with HCC1937 cells dramatically induces MCT4 protein expression in fibroblasts, and this can be prevented by either BRCA1 overexpression or by pharmacological treatment with NAC. We next evaluated caveolin-1 (Cav-1) expression in stromal fibroblasts. Loss of Cav-1 is a marker of the cancer-associated fibroblast (CAF) phenotype, which is linked to high stromal glycolysis, and is associated with a poor prognosis in numerous types of human cancers, including breast cancers. Remarkably, HCC1937 cells induce a loss of Cav-1 in adjacent stromal cells during co-culture. Conversely, Cav-1 expression in fibroblasts can be rescued by administration of NAC or by overexpression of BRCA1 in HCC1937 cells. Notably, BRCA1-deficient human breast cancer samples (9 out of 10) also showed a glycolytic stromal phenotype

  8. Involvement of acidic microenvironment in the pathophysiology of cancer-associated bone pain.

    PubMed

    Yoneda, Toshiyuki; Hata, Kenji; Nakanishi, Masako; Nagae, Maho; Nagayama, Tomotaka; Wakabayashi, Hiroki; Nishisho, Toshihiko; Sakurai, Teruhisa; Hiraga, Toru

    2011-01-01

    Bone pain is one of the most common complications in cancer patients with bone metastases. Although the mechanism of cancer-associated bone pain is poorly understood, clinical observations that inhibitors of osteoclasts such as bisphosphonates (BPs) efficiently reduce bone pain suggest a potential role of osteoclasts, which play a central role in the development and progression of bone metastasis. Osteoclasts dissolve bone minerals by releasing protons through the a3 isoform of the vacuolar-H(+)-ATPase, creating acidic microenvironments. In addition, cancer cells, inflammatory cells and immune cells that reside in bone metastases also produce acidic conditions by releasing protons. It has been well-known that acidic conditions due to proton release cause pain. Our study showed that the sensory nociceptive neurons innervate bone and these neurons express acid-sensing nociceptors such as the acid-sensing ion channels and transient receptor potential channel-vanilloid subfamily members. Acid signals received by these nociceptors subsequently activate intracellular signaling pathways and transcription factors in sensory neurons. The understanding of the nociceptive events following proton release and subsequent creation of acidic microenvironments leads us to design novel molecular-based approaches for reducing bone pain associated with cancer and inflammation.

  9. IL-36γ transforms the tumor microenvironment and promotes type 1 lymphocyte-mediated antitumor immune responses

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xuefeng; Zhao, Xin; Feng, Chao; Weinstein, Aliyah; Xia, Rui; Wen, Wen; Lv, Quansheng; Zuo, Shuting; Tang, Peijun; Yang, Xi; Chen, Xiaojuan; Wang, Hongrui; Zang, Shayang; Stollings, Lindsay; Denning, Timothy L.; Jiang, Jingting; Fan, Jie; Zhang, Guangbo; Zhang, Xueguang; Zhu, Yibei; Storkus, Walter; Lu, Binfeng

    2015-01-01

    Summary Cytokines play a pivotal role in regulating tumor immunogenicity and antitumor immunity. IL-36γ is important for the IL-23/IL-17-dominated inflammation and anti-BCG Th1 immune responses. However, the impact of IL-36γ on tumor immunity is unknown. Here, we found IL-36γ stimulated CD8+ T cells, NK cells, and γδ T cells synergistically with TCR signaling and/or IL-12. Importantly, IL-36γ exerted profound antitumor effects in vivo and transformed the tumor microenvironment in favor of tumor eradication. Furthermore, IL-36γ strongly increased the efficacy of tumor vaccination. Moreover, IL-36γ expression inversely correlated with progression of human melanoma and lung cancer. Our study establishes a role of IL-36γ in promoting antitumor immune responses and suggests its potential clinical translation in cancer immunotherapy. PMID:26321222

  10. Oncogenes and inflammation rewire host energy metabolism in the tumor microenvironment

    PubMed Central

    Martinez-Outschoorn, Ubaldo E; Curry, Joseph M; Ko, Ying-Hui; Lin, Zhao; Tuluc, Madalina; Cognetti, David; Birbe, Ruth C; Pribitkin, Edmund; Bombonati, Alessandro; Pestell, Richard G; Howell, Anthony; Sotgia, Federica; Lisanti, Michael P

    2013-01-01

    Here, we developed a model system to evaluate the metabolic effects of oncogene(s) on the host microenvironment. A matched set of “normal” and oncogenically transformed epithelial cell lines were co-cultured with human fibroblasts, to determine the “bystander” effects of oncogenes on stromal cells. ROS production and glucose uptake were measured by FACS analysis. In addition, expression of a panel of metabolic protein biomarkers (Caveolin-1, MCT1, and MCT4) was analyzed in parallel. Interestingly, oncogene activation in cancer cells was sufficient to induce the metabolic reprogramming of cancer-associated fibroblasts toward glycolysis, via oxidative stress. Evidence for “metabolic symbiosis” between oxidative cancer cells and glycolytic fibroblasts was provided by MCT1/4 immunostaining. As such, oncogenes drive the establishment of a stromal-epithelial “lactate-shuttle”, to fuel the anabolic growth of cancer cells. Similar results were obtained with two divergent oncogenes (RAS and NFκB), indicating that ROS production and inflammation metabolically converge on the tumor stroma, driving glycolysis and upregulation of MCT4. These findings make stromal MCT4 an attractive target for new drug discovery, as MCT4 is a shared endpoint for the metabolic effects of many oncogenic stimuli. Thus, diverse oncogenes stimulate a common metabolic response in the tumor stroma. Conversely, we also show that fibroblasts protect cancer cells against oncogenic stress and senescence by reducing ROS production in tumor cells. Ras-transformed cells were also able to metabolically reprogram normal adjacent epithelia, indicating that cancer cells can use either fibroblasts or epithelial cells as “partners” for metabolic symbiosis. The antioxidant N-acetyl-cysteine (NAC) selectively halted mitochondrial biogenesis in Ras-transformed cells, but not in normal epithelia. NAC also blocked stromal induction of MCT4, indicating that NAC effectively functions as an “MCT4

  11. Role of LAP+CD4+ T cells in the tumor microenvironment of colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zhong, Wu; Jiang, Zhi-Yuan; Zhang, Lei; Huang, Jia-Hao; Wang, Shi-Jun; Liao, Cun; Cai, Bin; Chen, Li-Sheng; Zhang, Sen; Guo, Yun; Cao, Yun-Fei; Gao, Feng

    2017-01-01

    AIM To investigate the abundance and potential functions of LAP+CD4+ T cells in colorectal cancer (CRC). METHODS Proportions of LAP+CD4+ T cells were examined in peripheral blood and tumor/paratumor tissues of CRC patients and healthy controls using flow cytometry. Expression of phenotypic markers such as forkhead box (Fox)p3, cytotoxic T-lymphocyte-associated protein (CTLA)-4, chemokine CC receptor (CCR)4 and CCR5 was measured using flow cytometry. LAP-CD4+ and LAP+CD4+ T cells were isolated using a magnetic cell-sorting system and cell purity was analyzed by flow cytometry. Real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction was used to measure expression of cytokines interleukin (IL)-10 and transforming growth factor (TGF)-β. RESULTS The proportion of LAP+CD4+ T cells was significantly higher in peripheral blood from patients (9.44% ± 3.18%) than healthy controls (1.49% ± 1.00%, P < 0.001). Among patients, the proportion of LAP+CD4+ T cells was significantly higher in tumor tissues (11.76% ± 3.74%) compared with paratumor tissues (3.87% ± 1.64%, P < 0.001). We also observed positive correlations between the proportion of LAP+CD4+ T cells and TNM stage (P < 0.001), distant metastasis (P < 0.001) and serum level of carcinoembryonic antigen (P < 0.05). Magnetic-activated cell sorting gave an overall enrichment of LAP+CD4+ T cells (95.02% ± 2.87%), which was similar for LAP-CD4+ T cells (94.75% ± 2.76%). In contrast to LAP-CD4+ T cells, LAP+CD4+ T cells showed lower Foxp3 expression but significantly higher levels of CTLA-4, CCR4 and CCR5 (P < 0.01). LAP+CD4+ T cells expressed significantly larger amounts of IL-10 and TGF-β but lower levels of IL-2, IL-4, IL-17 and interferon-γ, compared with LAP-CD4+ T cells. CONCLUSION LAP+CD4+ T cells accumulated in the tumor microenvironment of CRC patients and were involved in immune evasion mediated by IL-10 and TGF-β. PMID:28210081

  12. Optimization of biguanide derivatives as selective antitumor agents blocking adaptive stress responses in the tumor microenvironment

    PubMed Central

    Narise, Kosuke; Okuda, Kensuke; Enomoto, Yukihiro; Hirayama, Tasuku; Nagasawa, Hideko

    2014-01-01

    Adaptive cellular responses resulting from multiple microenvironmental stresses, such as hypoxia and nutrient deprivation, are potential novel drug targets for cancer treatment. Accordingly, we focused on developing anticancer agents targeting the tumor microenvironment (TME). In this study, to search for selective antitumor agents blocking adaptive responses in the TME, thirteen new compounds, designed and synthesized on the basis of the arylmethylbiguanide scaffold of phenformin, were used in structure activity relationship studies of inhibition of hypoxia inducible factor (HIF)-1 and unfolded protein response (UPR) activation and of selective cytotoxicity under glucose-deprived stress conditions, using HT29 cells. We conducted luciferase reporter assays using stable cell lines expressing either an HIF-1-responsive reporter gene or a glucose-regulated protein 78 promoter-reporter gene, which were induced by hypoxia and glucose deprivation stress, respectively, to screen for TME-targeting antitumor drugs. The guanidine analog (compound 2), obtained by bioisosteric replacement of the biguanide group, had activities comparable with those of phenformin (compound 1). Introduction of various substituents on the phenyl ring significantly affected the activities. In particular, the o-methylphenyl analog compound 7 and the o-chlorophenyl analog compound 12 showed considerably more potent inhibitory effects on HIF-1 and UPR activation than did phenformin, and excellent selective cytotoxicity under glucose deprivation. These compounds, therefore, represent an improvement over phenformin. They also suppressed HIF-1- and UPR-related protein expression and secretion of vascular endothelial growth factor-A. Moreover, these compounds exhibited significant antiangiogenic effects in the chick chorioallantoic membrane assay. Our structural development studies of biguanide derivatives provided promising candidates for a novel anticancer agent targeting the TME for selective cancer

  13. Genistein regulates tumor microenvironment and exhibits anticancer effect in dimethyl hydrazine-induced experimental colon carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Sekar, Vasudevan; Anandasadagopan, Suresh Kumar; Ganapasam, Sudhandiran

    2016-11-12

    Colon cancer is one of the leading causes of cancer mortality, worldwide. Cancer stem cells are attractive targets for therapeutic interventions since their abnormal growth may trigger tumor initiation, progression, and recurrence. Colon cancer in rats were induced with 1, 2-dimethyl hydrazine (DMH) and treated with genistein, an isoflavone rich in the soy food products, which also possesses various biological activities. Genistein treatment regulates enzymatic and non-enzymatic anti-oxidants in the DMH-induced colonic tissue microenvironment. Alcian blue staining in colonic tissue reveals that mucin secretion was found to be depleted in DMH-induced group of animals. The alterations were normalized in the genistein-treated groups. Also, the mast cell population and collagen deposition were reduced as compared to induced group. Genistein treatment reduces the prognostic marker Argyrophilic nuclear organizer region (AgNOR) and proliferating cell nucleolar antigen (PCNA) in DMH-induced group of rats. DMH administration induces oxidative stress, whereas genistein activates nuclear factor-erythroid 2 related factor 2 (Nrf-2) and its downstream target hemoxygenase-1 (HO-1). Colonic stem cell marker protein CD133, CD44, and β-catenin expressions were found to be increased in DMH-induced group of animals as compared to control group of rats. Genistein treatment suppressed the expression of these stem cell markers suggesting rapid dysfunctional activation and proliferation of colonic stem cell-induced by DMH. The results of this study indicate that genistein administration in rats restored the colonic niche that was damaged by DMH and inhibits colon cancer progression. © 2016 BioFactors, 42(6):623-637, 2016.

  14. Transgenic nude mice ubiquitously expressing fluorescent proteins for color-coded imaging of the tumor microenvironment.

    PubMed

    Hoffman, Robert M

    2014-01-01

    We have developed a transgenic green fluorescent protein (GFP) nude mouse with ubiquitous GFP expression. The GFP nude mouse was obtained by crossing nontransgenic nude mice with the transgenic C57/B6 mouse in which the β-actin promoter drives GFP expression in essentially all tissues. In the adult mice, many organs brightly expressed GFP, including the spleen, heart, lungs, spleen, pancreas, esophagus, stomach, and duodenum as well as the circulatory system. The liver expressed GFP at a lesser level. The red fluorescent protein (RFP) transgenic nude mouse was obtained by crossing non-transgenic nude mice with the transgenic C57/B6 mouse in which the beta-actin promoter drives RFP (DsRed2) expression in essentially all tissues. In the RFP nude mouse, the organs all brightly expressed RFP, including the heart, lungs, spleen, pancreas, esophagus, stomach, liver, duodenum, the male and female reproductive systems; brain and spinal cord; and the circulatory system, including the heart, and major arteries and veins. The skinned skeleton highly expressed RFP. The bone marrow and spleen cells were also RFP positive. The cyan fluorescent protein (CFP) nude mouse was developed by crossing nontransgenic nude mice with the transgenic CK/ECFP mouse in which the β-actin promoter drives expression of CFP in almost all tissues. In the CFP nude mice, the pancreas and reproductive organs displayed the strongest fluorescence signals of all internal organs, which vary in intensity. The GFP, RFP, and CFP nude mice when transplanted with cancer cells of another color are powerful models for color-coded imaging of the tumor microenvironment (TME) at the cellular level.

  15. HIF-1α inhibition blocks the cross talk between multiple myeloma plasma cells and tumor microenvironment

    SciTech Connect

    Borsi, Enrica; Perrone, Giulia; Terragna, Carolina; Martello, Marina; Zamagni, Elena; Tacchetti, Paola; Pantani, Lucia; Brioli, Annamaria; Dico, Angela Flores; Zannetti, Beatrice Anna; Rocchi, Serena; Cavo, Michele

    2014-11-01

    Multiple myeloma (MM) is a malignant disorder of post-germinal center B cells, characterized by the clonal proliferation of malignant plasma cells (PCs) within the bone marrow (BM). The reciprocal and complex interactions that take place between the different compartments of BM and the MM cells result in tumor growth, angiogenesis, bone disease, and drug resistance. Given the importance of the BM microenvironment in MM pathogenesis, we investigated the possible involvement of Hypoxia-Inducible transcription Factor-1 alpha (HIF-1α) in the PCs-bone marrow stromal cells interplay. To test this hypothesis, we used EZN-2968, a 3rd generation antisense oligonucleotide against HIF-1α, to inhibit HIF-1α functions. Herein, we provide evidence that the interaction between MM cells and BM stromal cells is drastically reduced upon HIF-1α down-modulation. Notably, we showed that upon exposure to HIF-1α inhibitor, neither the incubation with IL-6 nor the co-culture with BM stromal cells were able to revert the anti-proliferative effect induced by EZN-2968. Moreover, we observed a down-modulation of cytokine-induced signaling cascades and a reduction of MM cells adhesion capability to the extracellular matrix proteins in EZN-2968-treated samples. Taken together, these results strongly support the concept that HIF-1α plays a critical role in the interactions between bone BM cells and PCs in Multiple Myeloma. - Highlights: • HIF-1α inhibition induces a mild apoptotic cell death. • Down-modulation of cytokine-induced signaling cascades upon HIF-1α inhibition. • Reduced interaction between MM cells and BMSCs upon HIF-1α down-modulation. • Reduced PCs adhesion to the extracellular matrix protein induced by EZN-2968. • HIF-1α inhibition may be an attractive therapeutic strategy for Multiple Myeloma.

  16. Pomalidomide shows significant therapeutic activity against CNS lymphoma with a major impact on the tumor microenvironment in murine models.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhimin; Qiu, Yushi; Personett, David; Huang, Peng; Edenfield, Brandy; Katz, Jason; Babusis, Darius; Tang, Yang; Shirely, Michael A; Moghaddam, Mehran F; Copland, John A; Tun, Han W

    2013-01-01

    Primary CNS lymphoma carries a poor prognosis. Novel therapeutic agents are urgently needed. Pomalidomide (POM) is a novel immunomodulatory drug with anti-lymphoma activity. CNS pharmacokinetic analysis was performed in rats to assess the CNS penetration of POM. Preclinical evaluation of POM was performed in two murine models to assess its therapeutic activity against CNS lymphoma. The impact of POM on the CNS lymphoma immune microenvironment was evaluated by immunohistochemistry and immunofluorescence. In vitro cell culture experiments were carried out to further investigate the impact of POM on the biology of macrophages. POM crosses the blood brain barrier with CNS penetration of ~ 39%. Preclinical evaluations showed that it had significant therapeutic activity against CNS lymphoma with significant reduction in tumor growth rate and prolongation of survival, that it had a major impact on the tumor microenvironment with an increase in macrophages and natural killer cells, and that it decreased M2-polarized tumor-associated macrophages and increased M1-polarized macrophages when macrophages were evaluated based on polarization status. In vitro studies using various macrophage models showed that POM converted the polarization status of IL4-stimulated macrophages from M2 to M1, that M2 to M1 conversion by POM in the polarization status of lymphoma-associated macrophages is dependent on the presence of NK cells, that POM induced M2 to M1 conversion in the polarization of macrophages by inactivating STAT6 signaling and activating STAT1 signaling, and that POM functionally increased the phagocytic activity of macrophages. Based on our findings, POM is a promising therapeutic agent for CNS lymphoma with excellent CNS penetration, significant preclinical therapeutic activity, and a major impact on the tumor microenvironment. It can induce significant biological changes in tumor-associated macrophages, which likely play a major role in its therapeutic activity against CNS

  17. Deletion of 5-Lipoxygenase in the Tumor Microenvironment Promotes Lung Cancer Progression and Metastasis through Regulating T Cell Recruitment

    PubMed Central

    Poczobutt, Joanna M.; Nguyen, Teresa T.; Hanson, Dwight; Li, Howard; Sippel, Trisha R.; Weiser-Evans, Mary C. M.; Gijon, Miguel; Murphy, Robert C.

    2016-01-01

    Eicosanoids, including PGs, produced by cyclooxygenases (COX), and leukotrienes, produced by 5-lipoxygenase (5-LO) have been implicated in cancer progression. These molecules are produced by both cancer cells and the tumor microenvironment (TME). We previously reported that both COX and 5-LO metabolites increase during progression in an orthotopic immunocompetent model of lung cancer. Although PGs in the TME have been well studied, less is known regarding 5-LO products produced by the TME. We examined the role of 5-LO in the TME using a model in which Lewis lung carcinoma cells are directly implanted into the lungs of syngeneic WT mice or mice globally deficient in 5-LO (5-LO-KO). Unexpectedly, primary tumor volume and liver metastases were increased in 5-LO-KO mice. This was associated with an ablation of leukotriene (LT) production, consistent with production mainly mediated by the microenvironment. Increased tumor progression was partially reproduced in global LTC4 synthase KO or mice transplanted with LTA4 hydrolase-deficient bone marrow. Tumor-bearing lungs of 5-LO-KO had decreased numbers of CD4 and CD8 T cells compared with WT controls, as well as fewer dendritic cells. This was associated with lower levels of CCL20 and CXL9, which have been implicated in dendritic and T cell recruitment. Depletion of CD8 cells increased tumor growth and eliminated the differences between WT and 5-LO mice. These data reveal an antitumorigenic role for 5-LO products in the microenvironment during lung cancer progression through regulation of T cells and suggest that caution should be used in targeting this pathway in lung cancer. PMID:26663781

  18. Reprogramming the lung microenvironment by inhaled immunotherapy fosters immune destruction of tumor.

    PubMed

    Le Noci, Valentino; Sommariva, Michele; Tortoreto, Monica; Zaffaroni, Nadia; Campiglio, Manuela; Tagliabue, Elda; Balsari, Andrea; Sfondrini, Lucia

    2016-01-01

    Due to their constant exposure to inhaled antigens, lungs represent a particularly immunosuppressive environment that limits excessive immune responses; however, cancer cells can exploit this unique environment for their growth. We previously described the ability of aerosolized CpG-ODN combined with Poly(I:C) (TLR9 and TLR3 agonists, respectively) to promote antitumor immunity in a B16 melanoma lung metastasis model. Here, we explored the possibility of improving the therapeutic efficacy of TLR9/TLR3 agonist combinations by including in the inhalant either an antibody directed to both Ly6G and Ly6C markers to locally deplete myeloid-derived suppressive cells (MDSCs) or IFNα to directly activate the natural killer (NK) and macrophage innate immune cells in the lung. Addition of nebulized anti-MDSC antibody RB6-8C5 to aerosolized CpG-ODN/Poly(I:C) resulted in reduced mRNA levels of immunsuppressive molecules (IL10, Arg-1, and Nos2), increased activation of resident NK cells and improved treatment outcome, with a significant reduction in established B16 melanoma lung metastases compared to treatment with CpG-ODN/Poly(I:C) alone. Likewise, addition of aerosolized IFNα led to increased mRNA levels of proinflammatory cytokines (IL15 and IFNγ) in the lung and recruitment of highly activated NK cells, with no evident signs of toxicity and with a significantly improved antitumor effect as compared with aerosolized CpG-ODN/Poly(I:C). Combining both IFNα and RB6-8C5 with CpG-ODN/Poly(I:C) did not produce an additive effect compared to IFNα + CpG-ODN/Poly(I:C) or RB6-8C5 + CpG-ODN/Poly(I:C). Our results indicate that the inhalation therapy is a feasible and non-invasive strategy to deliver immunodulatory molecules, including antibodies and cytokines that reprogram the lung tumor microenvironment to foster immune destruction of tumors.

  19. Stromal progenitor cells from endogenous adipose tissue contribute to pericytes and adipocytes that populate the tumor microenvironment.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yan; Daquinag, Alexes C; Amaya-Manzanares, Felipe; Sirin, Olga; Tseng, Chieh; Kolonin, Mikhail G

    2012-10-15

    Epidemiologic studies associate cancer with obesity, but the pathophysiologic connections remain obscure. In this study, we show that obesity facilitates tumor growth in mice irrespective of concurrent diet, suggesting a direct effect of excess white adipose tissue (WAT). When transplanted into mice, adipose stromal cells (ASC) can serve as perivascular adipocyte progenitors that promote tumor growth, perhaps helping explain the obesity-cancer link. In developing this hypothesis, we showed that ASCs are expanded in obesity and that they traffic from endogenous WAT to tumors in several mouse models of cancer. Strikingly, a comparison of circulating and tumor-infiltrating cell populations in lean, and obese mice revealed that cancer induces a six-fold increase of ASC frequency in the systemic circulation. We obtained evidence that ASCs mobilized in this way can be recruited into tumors, where they can be incorporated into blood vessels as pericytes and they can differentiate into adipocytes in an obesity-dependent manner. Extending this evidence, we found that increased tumor vascularization (reflected by changes in tumor vascular morphology and a two-fold increase in vascular density) was associated with intratumoral adipocytes and elevated proliferation of neighboring malignant cells. Taken together, our results suggest that ASCs recruited from endogenous adipose tissue can be recruited by tumors to potentiate the supportive properties of the tumor microenvironment.

  20. Fumaric acid microenvironment tablet formulation and process development for crystalline cenicriviroc mesylate, a BCS IV compound.

    PubMed

    Menning, Mark M; Dalziel, Sean M

    2013-11-04

    Cenicriviroc mesylate (CVC) is a potent dual antagonist of C-C chemokine receptor type 5 (CCR5) and C-C chemokine receptor type 2 (CCR2) in phase 2b development as an entry inhibitor for HIV-1 infection treatment.1,2 CVC is a weak base exhibiting BCS IV characteristics with a highly pH dependent solubility profile (>100 mg/mL for pH < 2 and <0.2 μg/mL for pH > 4) and low Caco-2 cell line permeability. Previous tablet formulations of CVC, including spray-dried dispersion and a wet granulation with citric acid, had been found unacceptable for commercial use due to chemical and physical instability or unacceptably high excipient loading precluding fixed-dose combinability. A high drug loading, 26% (w/w), acidic microenvironment tablet formulation with fumaric acid solubilizer (1:1 CVC/fumaric acid) and a dry granulation process was developed iteratively through a sequence of prototypes characterized by beagle dog absorption studies, focused beam reflectance measurement (FBRM), dynamic vapor sorption (DVS), and accelerated stability testing. The fumaric acid based dry granulated product demonstrated a mean bioavailability comparable to an oral solution dose in a dog model. Stability and moisture sensitivity of the formulation were improved via the dry granulation process technique and the use of fumaric acid. It is hypothesized that the observed slow dissolution kinetics of fumaric acid prolongs an acidic microenvironment around the agglomerated CVC crystals and excipients leading to increased CVC dissolution and thereby absorption. The fumaric acid formulation also demonstrated absorption resilience to gastric pH extremes in a dog model. This optimized formulation and process enables CVC to be a viable candidate for current HIV treatment paradigms of single once daily fixed-dose combination products.

  1. Hypoxic Tumor Cell Modulates Its Microenvironment to Enhance Angiogenic and Metastatic Potential by Secretion of Proteins and Exosomes*

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jung Eun; Tan, Hon Sen; Datta, Arnab; Lai, Ruenn Chai; Zhang, Huoming; Meng, Wei; Lim, Sai Kiang; Sze, Siu Kwan

    2010-01-01

    Under hypoxia, tumor cells produce a secretion that modulates their microenvironment to facilitate tumor angiogenesis and metastasis. Here, we observed that hypoxic or reoxygenated A431 carcinoma cells exhibited enhanced angiogenic and metastatic potential such as reduced cell-cell and cell-extracellular matrix adhesion, increased invasiveness, and production of a secretion with increased chorioallantoic membrane angiogenic activity. Consistent with these observations, quantitative proteomics revealed that under hypoxia the tumor cells secreted proteins involved in angiogenesis, focal adhesion, extracellular matrix-receptor interaction, and immune cell recruitment. Unexpectedly, the secreted proteins were predominantly cytoplasmic and membrane proteins. Ultracentrifugation at 100,000 × g precipitated 54% of the secreted proteins and enriched for many exosome-associated proteins such as the tetraspanins and Alix and also proteins with the potential to facilitate angiogenesis and metastasis. Two tetraspanins, CD9 and CD81, co-immunoprecipitated. Together, these data suggested that tumor cells secrete proteins and exosomes with the potential to modulate their microenvironment and facilitate angiogenesis and metastasis. PMID:20124223

  2. Epigenetic changes in localized gastric cancer: the role of RUNX3 in tumor progression and the immune microenvironment.

    PubMed

    Llorca-Cardeñosa, Marta Jessica; Fleitas, Tania; Ibarrola-Villava, Maider; Peña-Chilet, María; Mongort, Cristina; Martinez-Ciarpaglini, Carolina; Navarro, Lara; Gambardella, Valentina; Castillo, Josefa; Roselló, Susana; Navarro, Samuel; Ribas, Gloria; Cervantes, Andrés

    2016-09-27

    Gastric cancer (GC) pathogenesis involves genetic, epigenetic and environmental factors. Epigenetic alterations, such as DNA methylation are considered pivotal in the inactivation of tumor-related genes. We assessed a methylation panel of 5 genes to study their association to GC progression and microsatellite instability (MSI), and studied the role of RUNX3 in GC pathogenesis and the tumor immune microenvironment.The methylation status of 47 promoter-CpG islands was studied through MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry analysis in 35 Microsatellite stable (MSS) GC, 26 MSI, and 18 cancer-free samples (CFS), and 6 MSS GC and 4 MSI GC cell lines. We also studied RUNX3 expression by immunohistochemistry (IHC) in 40 samples, and validated differences in methylation levels between tumor, normal, and immune tissue in 14 additional samples.Unsupervised hierarchical clustering of methylation levels revealed no distinct subgroups between MSI and MSS samples or cell lines. CFSs clustered together showing higher levels of RUNX3 methylation compared to GC samples. RUNX3 showed protein silencing in cancer and normal mucosa, compared to inflammatory peritumoural infiltrate in almost all cases, showing a non-lymphocytic predominant pattern and being correlated with epigenetic silencing.Our results show aberrant promoter's methylation in APC, CDH1, CDKN2A, MLH1 and RUNX3 associated with GC, as well as a non-lymphocytic predominant infiltrate with high expression of RUNX3. Deep study of RUNX3 inflammation signaling could help in understanding inflammation and immune activation in the tumor microenvironment.

  3. Epigenetic changes in localized gastric cancer: the role of RUNX3 in tumor progression and the immune microenvironment

    PubMed Central

    Ibarrola-Villava, Maider; Peña-Chilet, María; Mongort, Cristina; Martinez-Ciarpaglini, Carolina; Navarro, Lara; Gambardella, Valentina; Castillo, Josefa; Roselló, Susana; Navarro, Samuel; Ribas, Gloria; Cervantes, Andrés

    2016-01-01

    Gastric cancer (GC) pathogenesis involves genetic, epigenetic and environmental factors. Epigenetic alterations, such as DNA methylation are considered pivotal in the inactivation of tumor-related genes. We assessed a methylation panel of 5 genes to study their association to GC progression and microsatellite instability (MSI), and studied the role of RUNX3 in GC pathogenesis and the tumor immune microenvironment. The methylation status of 47 promoter-CpG islands was studied through MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry analysis in 35 Microsatellite stable (MSS) GC, 26 MSI, and 18 cancer-free samples (CFS), and 6 MSS GC and 4 MSI GC cell lines. We also studied RUNX3 expression by immunohistochemistry (IHC) in 40 samples, and validated differences in methylation levels between tumor, normal, and immune tissue in 14 additional samples. Unsupervised hierarchical clustering of methylation levels revealed no distinct subgroups between MSI and MSS samples or cell lines. CFSs clustered together showing higher levels of RUNX3 methylation compared to GC samples. RUNX3 showed protein silencing in cancer and normal mucosa, compared to inflammatory peritumoural infiltrate in almost all cases, showing a non-lymphocytic predominant pattern and being correlated with epigenetic silencing. Our results show aberrant promoter's methylation in APC, CDH1, CDKN2A, MLH1 and RUNX3 associated with GC, as well as a non-lymphocytic predominant infiltrate with high expression of RUNX3. Deep study of RUNX3 inflammation signaling could help in understanding inflammation and immune activation in the tumor microenvironment. PMID:27566570

  4. Neutralization of Tumor Acidity Improves Antitumor Responses to Immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Pilon-Thomas, Shari; Kodumudi, Krithika N; El-Kenawi, Asmaa E; Russell, Shonagh; Weber, Amy M; Luddy, Kimberly; Damaghi, Mehdi; Wojtkowiak, Jonathan W; Mulé, James J; Ibrahim-Hashim, Arig; Gillies, Robert J

    2016-03-15

    Cancer immunotherapies, such as immune checkpoint blockade or adoptive T-cell transfer, can lead to durable responses in the clinic, but response rates remain low due to undefined suppression mechanisms. Solid tumors are characterized by a highly acidic microenvironment that might blunt the effectiveness of antitumor immunity. In this study, we directly investigated the effects of tumor acidity on the efficacy of immunotherapy. An acidic pH environment blocked T-cell activation and limited glycolysis in vitro. IFNγ release blocked by acidic pH did not occur at the level of steady-state mRNA, implying that the effect of acidity was posttranslational. Acidification did not affect cytoplasmic pH, suggesting that signals transduced by external acidity were likely mediated by specific acid-sensing receptors, four of which are expressed by T cells. Notably, neutralizing tumor acidity with bicarbonate monotherapy impaired the growth of some cancer types in mice where it was associated with increased T-cell infiltration. Furthermore, combining bicarbonate therapy with anti-CTLA-4, anti-PD1, or adoptive T-cell transfer improved antitumor responses in multiple models, including cures in some subjects. Overall, our findings show how raising intratumoral pH through oral buffers therapy can improve responses to immunotherapy, with the potential for immediate clinical translation.

  5. Proteasomal inhibition sensitizes cervical cancer cells to mitomycin C-induced bystander effect: the role of tumor microenvironment.

    PubMed

    Singh, S V; Ajay, A K; Mohammad, N; Malvi, P; Chaube, B; Meena, A S; Bhat, M K

    2015-10-22

    Inaccessibility of drugs to poorly vascularized strata of tumor is one of the limiting factors in cancer therapy. With the advent of bystander effect (BE), it is possible to perpetuate the cellular damage from drug-exposed cells to the unexposed ones. However, the role of infiltrating tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs), an integral part of the tumor microenvironment, in further intensifying BE remains obscure. In the present study, we evaluated the effect of mitomycin C (MMC), a chemotherapeutic drug, to induce BE in cervical carcinoma. By using cervical cancer cells and differentiated macrophages, we demonstrate that MMC induces the expression of FasL via upregulation of PPARγ in both cell types (effector cells) in vitro, but it failed to induce bystander killing in cervical cancer cells. This effect was primarily owing to the proteasomal degradation of death receptors in the cervical cancer cells. Pre-treatment of cervical cancer cells with MG132, a proteasomal inhibitor, facilitates MMC-mediated bystander killing in co-culture and condition medium transfer experiments. In NOD/SCID mice bearing xenografted HeLa tumors administered with the combination of MMC and MG132, tumor progression was significantly reduced in comparison with those treated with either agent alone. FasL expression was increased in TAMs, and the enhanced level of Fas was observed in these tumor sections, thereby causing increased apoptosis. These findings suggest that restoration of death receptor-mediated apoptotic pathway in tumor cells with concomitant activation of TAMs could effectively restrict tumor growth.

  6. Tumor Microenvironment Remodeling by 4-Methylumbelliferone Boosts the Antitumor Effect of Combined Immunotherapy in Murine Colorectal Carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Malvicini, Mariana; Fiore, Esteban; Ghiaccio, Valentina; Piccioni, Flavia; Rizzo, Miguel; Olmedo Bonadeo, Lucila; García, Mariana; Rodríguez, Marcelo; Bayo, Juan; Peixoto, Estanislao; Atorrasagasti, Catalina; Alaniz, Laura; Aquino, Jorge; Matar, Pablo; Mazzolini, Guillermo

    2015-09-01

    We have previously demonstrated that a low dose of cyclophosphamide (Cy) combined with gene therapy of interleukin-12 (AdIL-12) has a synergistic, although limited, antitumoral effect in mice with colorectal carcinoma. The main mechanism involved in the efficacy of Cy+AdIL-12 was the induction of a specific immune response mediated by cytotoxic T lymphocytes. Our current aims were to evaluate the effects of 4-methylumbelliferone (4Mu), a selective inhibitor of hyaluronan (HA) synthesis, on tumor microenvironment (TME) and to investigate how 4Mu affects the therapeutic efficacy of Cy+AdIL-12. The results showed that 4Mu significantly reduced the amount of tumoral HA leading to a significant decrease in tumor interstitial pressure (TIP). As a consequence, tumor perfusion was improved allowing an increased adenoviral transgene expression. In addition, treatment with 4Mu boosted the number of cytotoxic T lymphocytes that reach the tumor after adoptive transfer resulting in a potent inhibition of tumor growth. Importantly, we observed complete tumor regression in 75% of mice when 4Mu was administrated in combination with Cy+AdIL-12. The triple combination 4Mu+Cy+AdIL-12 also induced a shift toward antiangiogenic factors production in tumor milieu. Our results showed that TME remodeling is an interesting strategy to increase the efficacy of anticancer immunotherapies based on gene and/or cell therapy.

  7. Tumor Microenvironment Remodeling by 4-Methylumbelliferone Boosts the Antitumor Effect of Combined Immunotherapy in Murine Colorectal Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Malvicini, Mariana; Fiore, Esteban; Ghiaccio, Valentina; Piccioni, Flavia; Rizzo, Miguel; Olmedo Bonadeo, Lucila; García, Mariana; Rodríguez, Marcelo; Bayo, Juan; Peixoto, Estanislao; Atorrasagasti, Catalina; Alaniz, Laura; Aquino, Jorge; Matar, Pablo; Mazzolini, Guillermo

    2015-01-01

    We have previously demonstrated that a low dose of cyclophosphamide (Cy) combined with gene therapy of interleukin-12 (AdIL-12) has a synergistic, although limited, antitumoral effect in mice with colorectal carcinoma. The main mechanism involved in the efficacy of Cy+AdIL-12 was the induction of a specific immune response mediated by cytotoxic T lymphocytes. Our current aims were to evaluate the effects of 4-methylumbelliferone (4Mu), a selective inhibitor of hyaluronan (HA) synthesis, on tumor microenvironment (TME) and to investigate how 4Mu affects the therapeutic efficacy of Cy+AdIL-12. The results showed that 4Mu significantly reduced the amount of tumoral HA leading to a significant decrease in tumor interstitial pressure (TIP). As a consequence, tumor perfusion was improved allowing an increased adenoviral transgene expression. In addition, treatment with 4Mu boosted the number of cytotoxic T lymphocytes that reach the tumor after adoptive transfer resulting in a potent inhibition of tumor growth. Importantly, we observed complete tumor regression in 75% of mice when 4Mu was administrated in combination with Cy+AdIL-12. The triple combination 4Mu+Cy+AdIL-12 also induced a shift toward antiangiogenic factors production in tumor milieu. Our results showed that TME remodeling is an interesting strategy to increase the efficacy of anticancer immunotherapies based on gene and/or cell therapy. PMID:26105158

  8. Inorganic Arsenic–Related Changes in the Stromal Tumor Microenvironment in a Prostate Cancer Cell–Conditioned Media Model

    PubMed Central

    Shearer, Joseph J.; Wold, Eric A.; Umbaugh, Charles S.; Lichti, Cheryl F.; Nilsson, Carol L.; Figueiredo, Marxa L.

    2015-01-01

    Background: The tumor microenvironment plays an important role in the progression of cancer by mediating stromal–epithelial paracrine signaling, which can aberrantly modulate cellular proliferation and tumorigenesis. Exposure to environmental toxicants, such as inorganic arsenic (iAs), has also been implicated in the progression of prostate cancer. Objective: The role of iAs exposure in stromal signaling in the tumor microenvironment has been largely unexplored. Our objective was to elucidate molecular mechanisms of iAs-induced changes to stromal signaling by an enriched prostate tumor microenvironment cell population, adipose-derived mesenchymal stem/stromal cells (ASCs). Results: ASC-conditioned media (CM) collected after 1 week of iAs exposure increased prostate cancer cell viability, whereas CM from ASCs that received no iAs exposure decreased cell viability. Cytokine array analysis suggested changes to cytokine signaling associated with iAs exposure. Subsequent proteomic analysis suggested a concentration-dependent alteration to the HMOX1/THBS1/TGFβ signaling pathway by iAs. These results were validated by quantitative reverse transcriptase–polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and Western blotting, confirming a concentration-dependent increase in HMOX1 and a decrease in THBS1 expression in ASC following iAs exposure. Subsequently, we used a TGFβ pathway reporter construct to confirm a decrease in stromal TGFβ signaling in ASC following iAs exposure. Conclusions: Our results suggest a concentration-dependent alteration of stromal signaling: specifically, attenuation of stromal-mediated TGFβ signaling following exposure to iAs. Our results indicate iAs may enhance prostate cancer cell viability through a previously unreported stromal-based mechanism. These findings indicate that the stroma may mediate the effects of iAs in tumor progression, which may have future therapeutic implications. Citation: Shearer JJ, Wold EA, Umbaugh CS, Lichti CF, Nilsson CL

  9. The role of the tumor-microenvironment in lung cancer-metastasis and its relationship to potential therapeutic targets.

    PubMed

    Wood, Steven L; Pernemalm, Maria; Crosbie, Philip A; Whetton, Anthony D

    2014-05-01

    Non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) accounts for >80% of lung cancer cases and currently has an overall five-year survival rate of only 15%. Patients presenting with advanced stage NSCLC die within 18-months of diagnosis. Metastatic spread accounts for >70% of these deaths. Thus elucidation of the mechanistic basis of NSCLC-metastasis has potential to impact on patient quality of life and survival. Research on NSCLC metastasis has recently expanded to include non-cancer cell components of tumors-the stromal cellular compartment and extra-cellular matrix components comprising the tumor-microenvironment. Metastasis (from initial primary tumor growth through angiogenesis, intravasation, survival in the bloodstream, extravasation and metastatic growth) is an inefficient process and few released cancer cells complete the entire process. Micro-environmental interactions assist each of these steps and discovery of the mechanisms by which tumor cells co-operate with the micro-environment are uncovering key molecules providing either biomarkers or potential drug targets. The major sites of NSCLC metastasis are brain, bone, adrenal gland and the liver. The mechanistic basis of this tissue-tropism is beginning to be elucidated offering the potential to target stromal components of these tissues thus targeting therapy to the tissues affected. This review covers the principal steps involved in tumor metastasis. The role of cell-cell interactions, ECM remodeling and autocrine/paracrine signaling interactions between tumor cells and the surrounding stroma is discussed. The mechanistic basis of lung cancer metastasis to specific organs is also described. The signaling mechanisms outlined have potential to act as future drug targets minimizing lung cancer metastatic spread and morbidity.

  10. Adrenergic receptor β2 activation by stress promotes breast cancer progression through macrophages M2 polarization in tumor microenvironment

    PubMed Central

    Qin, Jun-fang; Jin, Feng-jiao; Li, Ning; Guan, Hai-tao; Lan, Lan; Ni, Hong; Wang, Yue

    2015-01-01

    Stress and its related hormones epinephrine (E) and norepinephrine (NE) play a crucial role in tumor progression. Macrophages in the tumor microenvironment (TME) polarized to M2 is also a vital pathway for tumor deterioration. Here, we explore the underlying role of macrophages in the effect of stress and E promoting breast cancer growth. It was found that the weight and volume of tumor in tumor bearing mice were increased, and dramatically accompanied with the rising E level after chronic stress using social isolation. What is most noteworthy, the number of M2 macrophages inside tumor was up-regulated with it. The effects of E treatment appear to be directly related to the change of M2 phenotype is reproduced in vitro. Moreover, E receptor ADRβ2 involved in E promoting M2 polarization was comprehended simultaneously. Our results imply psychological stress is influential on specific immune system, more essential for the comprehensive treatment against tumors. [BMB Reports 2015; 48(5): 295-300] PMID:25748171

  11. Probing the Bi-directional Interaction Between Microglia and Gliomas in a Tumor Microenvironment on a Microdevice.

    PubMed

    Gu, Rui; Zhang, Xu; Zhang, Ge; Tao, Tingting; Yu, Haibo; Liu, Lianqing; Dou, Ying; Li, Aiping; Qin, Jianhua

    2017-02-24

    It has been proven that microglia are involved in both early and late stages of glioma progression and contribute substantially to the tumor mass of gliomas. Because no appropriate in vitro or in vivo investigative approach is available, the dynamic interaction between microglia and gliomas during tumor formation remains unclear. In this study, three types of microfluidic assay were developed to examine the outcomes of the dynamic interaction between microglia and gliomas. Co-migration assay and two-dimensional cell co-culture assay have been used to show that microglial BV-2 cells migrate toward C6 glioma cells and inhibit tumor growth during the early stage of tumorigenesis. However, in three-dimensional cell spheres (three-dimensional cell co-culture assay) that contain a large amount of glioma cells, mimicking the late stage of glioma growth, the phagocytosis of microglia was suppressed, which suggests that glioma cells could reeducate classically activated microglia into a tumor-promoting state at some point during tumor progression. Notably, we found that microglia could contribute to tumor invasion and acquisition of the epithelial-mesenchymal transition phenotype in the glioma microenvironment during the early stage and the late stage of tumor progression. In conclusion, we have developed a potential quantitative method for in vitro study of glioma immunity and provided evidence for the duality of glioma-associated microglia.

  12. Anti-cancer potency of tasquinimod is enhanced via albumin-binding facilitating increased uptake in the tumor microenvironment

    PubMed Central

    Isaacs, John T.; Dalrymple, Susan L.; Rosen, D. Marc; Hammers, Hans; Olsson, Anders; Leanderson, Tomas

    2014-01-01

    Tasquinimod, an orally active quinoline-3-carboxamide, binds with high affinity to HDAC4 and S100A9 in cancer and infiltrating host cells within compromised tumor microenvironment inhibiting adaptive survival pathways needed for an angiogenic response. Clinical trials document that as low as 0.5-1mg tasquinimod/day is therapeutic against castrate resistant metastatic prostate cancer. Tasquinimod is metabolized via cytochrome P4503A4, but ketoconazole at a dose which completely inhibits CYP3A metabolism does not affect tasquinimod's ability to inhibit endothelial “sprouting” in vitro or anti-cancer efficacy against human prostate cancer xenografts in vivo. Tasquinimod's potency is facilitated by its reversible binding (Kd < 35 μM) to the IIA subdomain of albumin (Sudlow's site I). As blood vessels within the compromised cancer microenvironment are characterized by a higher degree of leakiness than those in normal tissues, this results in an enhanced uptake of tasquinimod bound to albumin in cancer tissue via a tumor specific process known as the “enhanced permeability and retention” (i.e., EPR) effect. Thus, despite plasma levels of < 1 μM, the EPR effect results in intracellular drug concentrations of 2-3 μM, levels several-fold higher than needed for inhibition of endothelial sprouting (IC50 ~ 0.5 μM) or for inhibition of HDAC4 and S100A9 mediated tumor growth. PMID:25193858

  13. MiR-652 inhibits acidic microenvironment-induced epithelial-mesenchymal transition of pancreatic cancer cells by targeting ZEB1

    PubMed Central

    Niu, Yi; Zhu, Shuai; Jin, Yan; Deng, Shijiang; Chen, Jingyuan; Liu, Yang; He, Chi; Yin, Tao; Yang, Zhiyong; Tao, Jing; Xiong, Jiongxin; Wu, Heshui; Wang, Chunyou; Zhao, Gang

    2015-01-01

    Recent evidences suggest that the acidic microenvironment might facilitate epithelial mesenchymal transition (EMT) of tumor cells, while the effects of acidity on EMT of pancreatic cancer (PC) remain undefined. The present study demonstrated that acidity suppressed miR-652 expression, which further promoted EMT process by absenting inhibition on the transcriptional factor ZEB1 expression. At first, we found that acidity remarkably enhanced invasion ability of PC cells accompanying with increased mesenchymal and decreased epithelial markers. Meanwhile, miRNAs-microarray showed that miR-652, the potential regulator of ZEB1, was distinctly decreased in acidity-treated PC cells. Furthermore, restoration of miR-652 reversed acidity-induced EMT by inhibiting ZEB1 expression, while miR-652 inhibitor induced EMT in normal PC cells through promoting ZEB1 expression. Nevertheless, knockdown of ZEB1 significantly suppressed acidity-induced EMT in PC cells, but ZEB1 overexpression rescued the EMT which was inhibited by miR-652 overexpression. The in vivo results showed that the tumor growth and liver metastasis were remarkably retarded by both miR-652 overexpression and ZEB1 knockdown. The clinical samples further revealed that miR-652 was decreased in PC tissues and antagonistically correlated with ZEB1 expression, associating with late tumor stage, lymphatic invasion and metastasis. In conclusion, our study indicated a novel acidity/miR-652/ZEB1/EMT axis in the tumorigenesis of PC. PMID:26498682

  14. CCL2/CCR2 Regulates the Tumor Microenvironment in HER-2/neu-Driven Mammary Carcinomas in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xuguang; Wang, Yunyue; Nelson, David; Tian, Sara; Mulvey, Erin; Patel, Bhumi; Conti, Ilaria; Jaen, Juan; Rollins, Barrett J.

    2016-01-01

    Chronic inflammation is a hallmark of cancer. Inflammatory chemokines, such as C-C chemokine ligand 2 (CCL2), are often present in tumors but their roles in cancer initiation and maintenance are not clear. Here we report that CCL2 promotes mammary carcinoma development in a clinically relevant murine model of breast cancer. Targeted disruption of Ccl2 slowed the growth of activated Her2/neu-driven mammary tumors and prolonged host survival. Disruption of Ccl2 was associated with a decrease in the development and mobilization of endothelial precursor cells (EPCs) which can contribute to tumor neovascularization. In contrast, disruption of Ccr2, which encodes CCL2’s sole signaling receptor, accelerated tumor development, shortened host survival, and mobilized EPCs. However, pharmacological inhibition of CCR2 phenocopied Ccl2 disruption rather than Ccr2 disruption, suggesting that the Ccr2-/- phenotype is a consequence of unanticipated alterations not linked to intact CCL2/CCR2 signaling. Consistent with this explanation, Ccr2-/- monocytes are more divergent from wild type monocytes than Ccl2-/- monocytes in their expression of genes involved in key developmental and functional pathways. Taken together, our data suggest a tumor-promoting role for CCL2 acting through CCR2 on the tumor microenvironment and support the targeting of this chemokine/receptor pair in breast cancer. PMID:27820834

  15. Targeting of cancer-associated fibroblasts enhances the efficacy of cancer chemotherapy by regulating the tumor microenvironment

    PubMed Central

    LI, MINMIN; LI, MEI; YIN, TAO; SHI, HUASHAN; WEN, YUAN; ZHANG, BINGLAN; CHEN, MEIHUA; XU, GUANGCHAO; REN, KEXIN; WEI, YUQUAN

    2016-01-01

    Cancer-associated fibroblasts (CAFs), key components of the tumor stroma, can regulate tumorigenesis by altering the tumor microenvironment in variety of ways to promote angiogenesis, recruit inflammatory immune cells and remodel the extracellular matrix. Using a murine xenograft model of colon carcinoma, the present study observed that oxaliplatin increased the accumulation of CAFs and stimulated the production of cytokines associated with CAFs. When oxaliplatin was combined with the small-molecule dipeptidyl peptidase inhibitor PT-100, which inhibits CAFs by targeting fibroblast activation protein (FAP), the accumulation of CAFs was markedly reduced, xenograft tumor growth was significantly suppressed and the survival of the mice increased, compared to those of mice treated with oxaliplatin or PT-100 alone. Furthermore, the xenograft tumor tissues of mice treated with oxaliplatin and PT-100 contained lower numbers of tumor-associated macrophages and dendritic cells, expressed lower levels of cytokines associated with CAFs and had a lower density of CD31+ endothelial cells. The present study demonstrated that pharmacological inhibition of CAFs improved the response to chemotherapy, reduced the recruitment of immune tumor-promoting cells and inhibited angiogenesis. Combining chemotherapy with agents which target CAFs may represent a novel strategy for improving the efficacy of chemotherapy and reducing chemoresistance. PMID:26846566

  16. Indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase regulates anti-tumor immunity in lung cancer by metabolic reprogramming of immune cells in the tumor microenvironment

    PubMed Central

    Schafer, Cara C.; Wang, Yong; Hough, Kenneth P.; Sawant, Anandi; Grant, Stefan C.; Thannickal, Victor J.; Zmijewski, Jaroslaw; Ponnazhagan, Selvarangan; Deshane, Jessy S.

    2016-01-01

    Indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO) has been implicated in immune evasion by tumors. Upregulation of this tryptophan (Trp)-catabolizing enzyme, in tumor cells and myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) within the tumor microenvironment (TME), leads to Trp depletion that impairs cytotoxic T cell responses and survival; however, exact mechanisms remain incompletely understood. We previously reported that a combination therapy of gemcitabine and a superoxide dismutase mimetic promotes anti-tumor immunity in a mouse model of lung cancer by inhibiting MDSCs, enhancing polyfunctional response of CD8+ memory T cells, and extending survival. Here, we show that combination therapy targets IDO signaling, specifically in MDSCs, tumor cells, and CD8+ T cells infiltrating the TME. Deficiency of IDO caused significant reduction in tumor burden, tumor-infiltrating MDSCs, GM-CSF, MDSC survival and infiltration of programmed death receptor-1 (PD-1)-expressing CD8+ T cells compared to controls. IDO−/− MDSCs downregulated nutrient-sensing AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) activity, but IDO−/− CD8+ T cells showed AMPK activation associated with enhanced effector function. Our studies provide proof-of-concept for the efficacy of this combination therapy in inhibiting IDO and T cell exhaustion in a syngeneic model of lung cancer and provide mechanistic insights for IDO-dependent metabolic reprogramming of MDSCs that reduces T cell exhaustion and regulates anti-tumor immunity. PMID:27705910

  17. Indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase regulates anti-tumor immunity in lung cancer by metabolic reprogramming of immune cells in the tumor microenvironment.

    PubMed

    Schafer, Cara C; Wang, Yong; Hough, Kenneth P; Sawant, Anandi; Grant, Stefan C; Thannickal, Victor J; Zmijewski, Jaroslaw; Ponnazhagan, Selvarangan; Deshane, Jessy S

    2016-11-15

    Indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO) has been implicated in immune evasion by tumors. Upregulation of this tryptophan (Trp)-catabolizing enzyme, in tumor cells and myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) within the tumor microenvironment (TME), leads to Trp depletion that impairs cytotoxic T cell responses and survival; however, exact mechanisms remain incompletely understood. We previously reported that a combination therapy of gemcitabine and a superoxide dismutase mimetic promotes anti-tumor immunity in a mouse model of lung cancer by inhibiting MDSCs, enhancing polyfunctional response of CD8+ memory T cells, and extending survival. Here, we show that combination therapy targets IDO signaling, specifically in MDSCs, tumor cells, and CD8+ T cells infiltrating the TME. Deficiency of IDO caused significant reduction in tumor burden, tumor-infiltrating MDSCs, GM-CSF, MDSC survival and infiltration of programmed death receptor-1 (PD-1)-expressing CD8+ T cells compared to controls. IDO-/- MDSCs downregulated nutrient-sensing AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) activity, but IDO-/- CD8+ T cells showed AMPK activation associated with enhanced effector function. Our studies provide proof-of-concept for the efficacy of this combination therapy in inhibiting IDO and T cell exhaustion in a syngeneic model of lung cancer and provide mechanistic insights for IDO-dependent metabolic reprogramming of MDSCs that reduces T cell exhaustion and regulates anti-tumor immunity.

  18. Tumor microenvironment B cells increase bladder cancer metastasis via modulation of the IL-8/androgen receptor (AR)/MMPs signals.

    PubMed

    Ou, Zhenyu; Wang, Yongjie; Liu, Longfei; Li, Lei; Yeh, Shuyuan; Qi, Lin; Chang, Chawnshang

    2015-09-22

    While B cells in the tumor microenvironment may play important roles in cancer progression, their impacts on the bladder cancer (BCa) metastasis remain unclear. Here we found from human clinical BCa samples that BCa tissues could recruit more B cells than the surrounding normal bladder tissues and the in vitro co-culture assay also demonstrated that B cells could be recruited more easily towards BCa cells compared to normal bladder cells. Chamber invasion and 3D invasion assays showed the recruited B cells could then significantly increase the BCa cell invasion. Mechanism dissection found that recruited B cells could increase IL-8/androgen receptor (AR) signals in BCa cells that could then promote the expression of metastasis genes including MMP1 and MMP13. Blocking the IL-8/AR/MMPs signals either by anti-IL-8 neutralizing antibody, AR-siRNA, or MMPs inhibitors all partially reversed the infiltrating B cells capacity to increase the BCa cell invasion. The in vivo data from orthotopically xenografted BCa mouse model also confirmed that infiltrating B cells could increase BCa cell invasion via increasing AR signals. Together, these results demonstrate the key roles of B cells within the bladder tumor microenvironment that increase the BCa metastasis and may help us to develop the potential therapies via targeting these newly identified IL-8/AR/MMPs signals to better battle the BCa progression.

  19. High risk of development of renal cell tumor in end-stage kidney disease: the role of microenvironment.

    PubMed

    Nagy, Anetta; Walter, Eva; Zubakov, Dmitry; Kovacs, Gyula

    2016-07-01

    End-stage renal disease (ESRD) and acquired cystic renal disease (ACRD) are associated with high risk of development of renal cell tumors (RCT) displaying unusual phenotype and genotype. The underlying molecular mechanism is not yet known. To explore the molecular microenvironment, we have established the expression profile of ESRD/ACRD kidneys. RNA extracted from normal and ESRD/ACRD kidneys and distinct types of RCT was subjected to Affymetrix HG U133 micro array analysis. A gene expression signature indicated cancer-related biological processes in the remodeling of ESRD/ACRD kidneys. Quantitative RT-PCR studies confirmed a specific gene signature including a functional group of inflammatory cytokines and also cytokeratins associated with stem cell characteristics of epithelial cells. Several of the signature genes including the SCEL were expressed in ESRD/ACRD-associated papillary RCT as well. Immunohistological analysis confirmed the expression of CXCL8 and its receptor CXCR2 as well as the expression of SCEL in hyperplastic tubular, cystic, and papillary structures and RCTs in ESRD/ACRD kidney. Our data indicates that ESRD/ACRD is a novel disease and the inflammatory microenvironment altered plasticity, and stem cell characteristics of epithelial cells may be associated with the high risk of tumor development.

  20. Endostatin induces proliferation of oral carcinoma cells but its effect on invasion is modified by the tumor microenvironment

    SciTech Connect

    Alahuhta, Ilkka; Aikio, Mari; Väyrynen, Otto; Nurmenniemi, Sini; Suojanen, Juho; Teppo, Susanna; Pihlajaniemi, Taina; Heljasvaara, Ritva; Salo, Tuula; Nyberg, Pia

    2015-08-01

    The turnover of extracellular matrix liberates various cryptic molecules with novel biological activities. Endostatin is an endogenous angiogenesis inhibitor that is derived from the non-collagenous domain of collagen XVIII. Although there are a large number of studies on its anti-tumor effects, the molecular mechanisms are not yet completely understood, and the reasons why endostatin has not been successful in clinical trials are unclear. Research has mostly focused on its anti-angiogenic effect in tumors. Here, we aimed to elucidate how endostatin affects the behavior of aggressive tongue HSC-3 carcinoma cells that were transfected to overproduce endostatin. Endostatin inhibited the invasion of HSC-3 cells in a 3D collagen–fibroblast model. However, it had no effect on invasion in a human myoma organotypic model, which lacks vital fibroblasts. Recombinant endostatin was able to reduce the Transwell migration of normal fibroblasts, but had no effect on carcinoma associated fibroblasts. Surprisingly, endostatin increased the proliferation and decreased the apoptosis of cancer cells in organotypic models. Also subcutaneous tumors overproducing endostatin grew bigger, but showed less local invasion in nude mice xenografts. We conclude that endostatin affects directly to HSC-3 cells increasing their proliferation, but its net effect on cancer invasion seem to depend on the cellular composition and interactions of tumor microenvironment. - Highlights: • Endostatin affects not only angiogenesis, but also carcinoma cells and fibroblasts. • Endostatin increased carcinoma cell proliferation, but decreased 3D invasion. • The invasion inhibitory effect was sensitive to the microenvironment composition. • Fibroblasts may be a factor regulating the fluctuating roles of endostatin.

  1. Sulfasalazine impacts on ferroptotic cell death and alleviates the tumor microenvironment and glioma-induced brain edema

    PubMed Central

    Sehm, Tina; Fan, Zheng; Ghoochani, Ali; Rauh, Manfred; Engelhorn, Tobias; Minakaki, Georgia; Dörfler, Arnd; Klucken, Jochen; Buchfelder, Michael

    2016-01-01

    The glutamate transporter xCT (SCL7a11, system Xc-, SXC) is an emerging key player in glutamate/cysteine/glutathione homeostasis in the brain and in cancer. xCT expression correlates with the grade of malignancy. Here, we report on the use of the U.S. Food and Drug Administration and EMA-approved xCT inhibitor, sulfasalazine (SAS) in gliomas. SAS does not affect cell viability in gliomas at concentrations below 200 μM. At higher concentrations SAS becomes gliomatoxic. Mechanistically SAS inhibits xCT and induces ferroptotic cell death in glioma cells. There is no evidence for impact on autophagic flux following SAS application. However, SAS can potentiate the efficacy of the standard chemotherapeutic and autophagy-inducing agent temozolomide (Temcat, Temodal or Temodar®). We also investigated SAS in non-transformed cellular constituents of the brain. Neurons and brain tissue are almost non-responding to SAS whereas isolated astrocytes are less sensitive towards SAS toxicity compared to gliomas. In vivo SAS treatment does not affect experimental tumor growth and treated animals revealed comparable tumor volume as untreated controls. However, SAS treatment resulted in reduced glioma-derived edema and, hence, total tumor volume burden as revealed by T2-weighted magnetic resonance imaging. Altogether, we show that SAS can be utilized for targeting the glutamate antiporter xCT activity as a tumor microenvironment-normalizing drug, while crucial cytotoxic effects in brain tumors are minor. PMID:27074570

  2. P01.07IMPACT OF EXTRACELLULAR VESICLES RELEASED BY GLIOBLASTOMA CELLS AFTER IRRADIATION ON TUMOR MICROENVIRONMENT

    PubMed Central

    Ding, H.; Pinel, S.; Jouan-Hureaux, V.; Chateau, A.; Boura, C.; Faivre, B.

    2014-01-01

    AIMS: Glioblastoma (GBM) is the most lethal of all human tumors. Ionizing radiation (IR), as a major therapeutic modality, induces multiple types of DNA lesions in cells, therefore causes cell death. However, IR could also affect neighboring unirradiated cells, inducing Bystander Effects as chromosomal aberrations, increased proliferation, etc. Intercellular communication through the release of different components is involved in the mechanism. GBM cells release different soluble factors as well as tumor microvesicles (TMVs) to modify the phenotype of neighboring cells, thus participating in the tumor progression. The present study was designed to investigate in vitro the impact of IR on the communication between tumor cells and endothelial cells in the tumor microenvironment via soluble factors and TMVs. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Two GBM cell lines (T98G, U87) were grown and sham-irradiated (0Gy) or irradiated (2 or 10Gy) using a Clinac iX linear accelerator. Cell culture media (CM) were collected. Filtrate (containing only soluble factors) and TMVs were separated with successive centrifugations and Pierce concentrator. Cell viability was assessed by cell counting using trypan blue. TMVs quantifications were performed by flow cytometry. The effect of CM/Filtrate/TMVs on the global behavior (proliferation, adhesion) of bystander tumor cells or HUVEC was investigated using the xCELLigence system (ACEA). RESULTS: As expected, irradiation caused a loss of cell number in U87 and T98G: 20% at 2Gy and 60% at 10Gy 48h post-IR as compared to untreated cells. Both CM and Filtrate collected from sham-irradiated tumor cells induced a 50% reduction of bystander tumor cells proliferation, while CM and Filtrate recovered from 10Gy-irradiated cells had different influence on the proliferation: herein, the inhibitory properties of CM were less marked than those of Filtrate. The discordant effects between CM and Filtrate led us to investigate the role of TMVs. When quantified using

  3. Caveolin-1 and mitochondrial SOD2 (MnSOD) function as tumor suppressors in the stromal microenvironment

    PubMed Central

    Trimmer, Casey; Sotgia, Federica; Whitaker-Menezes, Diana; Balliet, Renee M; Eaton, Gregory; Martinez-Outschoorn, Ubaldo E; Pavlides, Stephanos; Howell, Anthony; Iozzo, Renato V; Pestell, Richard G; Scherer, Philipp E

    2011-01-01

    Cancer”. The human Cav-1 deficient fibroblasts that we have generated are a new genetically tractable model system for identifying other suppressors of the cancer-associated fibroblast phenotype, via a genetic “complementation” approach. This has important implications for understanding the pathogenesis of triple negative and basal breasts cancers, as well as tamoxifen-resistance in ER-positive breast cancers, which are all associated with a Cav-1 deficient “lethal” tumor microenvironment, driving poor clinical outcome. PMID:21150282

  4. Biomarkers in Tumor Microenvironment? Upregulation of Fibroblast Activation Protein-α Correlates with Gastric Cancer Progression and Poor Prognosis.

    PubMed

    Hu, Mengmou; Qian, Chengjia; Hu, Ziwei; Fei, Bojian; Zhou, Haibo

    2017-01-01

    Gastric cancer is the third leading cause of cancer-related mortality worldwide. Recent evidence points to importance of cross talk between cancer cells and the surrounding stroma on gastric cancer progression. Tumor microenvironment biomarkers thus represent a new opportunity for diagnostics innovation. Reactive stromal fibroblasts selectively express the fibroblast activation protein alpha (FAP-α), a homodimeric integral membrane gelatinase that belongs to the serine protease family. We report here that FAP-α expression is significantly elevated in gastric cancer samples by more than fivefold (p < 0.05), using transcriptome data from The Cancer Genome Atlas. Notably, the greatest FAP-α upregulation was observed in the poorly differentiated group (p < 0.001). Moreover, elevated FAP-α expression levels correlated with adverse clinical-pathological characteristics, such as diffuse histological subtype (p < 0.001), advanced pathological stage (p < 0.01) and poor survival. Functional annotation analysis demonstrated that FAP-α upregulation was associated with activation of biological processes implicated in tumor progression, including cell migration and angiogenesis pathways. These observations underscore the possible prognostic significance of FAP-α in gastric cancer and its potential as a novel biomarker for personalized medicine. We caution, however, that further multiomics, biochemical, and animal studies are necessary to ascertain the role of FAP-α as a causative and mechanistic biomarker. Based on pathway analyses, we hypothesize that gastric cancer patients exhibiting FAP-α upregulation might presumably benefit from antiangiogenic drugs in addition to standard therapeutic regimens. We call for future research focusing on the tumor microenvironment biomarkers in clinical oncology.

  5. Vav1 promotes lung cancer growth by instigating tumor-microenvironment cross-talk via growth factor secretion.

    PubMed

    Sebban, Shulamit; Farago, Marganit; Rabinovich, Shiran; Lazer, Galit; Idelchuck, Yulia; Ilan, Lena; Pikarsky, Eli; Katzav, Shulamit

    2014-10-15

    Vav1 is a signal transducer that functions as a scaffold protein and a regulator of cytoskeleton organization in the hematopoietic system, where it is exclusively expressed. Recently, Vav1 was shown to be involved in diverse human cancers, including lung cancer. We demonstrate that lung cancer cells that abnormally express Vav1 secrete growth factors in a Vav1-dependent manner. Transcriptome analysis demonstrated that Vav1 depletion results in a marked reduction in the expression of colony-stimulating-factor-1 (CSF1), a hematopoietic growth factor. The association between Vav1 expression and CSF1 was further supported by signal transduction experiments, supporting involvement of Vav1 in regulating lung cancer secretome. Blocking of ERK phosphorylation, led to a decrease in CSF1 transcription, thus suggesting a role for ERK, a downstream effector of Vav1, in CSF1 expression. CSF1-silenced cells exhibited reduced focus formation, proliferation abilities, and growth in NOD/SCID mice. CSF1-silenced H358 cells resulted in significantly smaller tumors, showing increased fibrosis and a decrease in tumor infiltrating macrophages. Finally, immunohistochemical analysis of primary human lung tumors revealed a positive correlation between Vav1 and CSF1 expression, which was associated with tumor grade. Additional results presented herein suggest a potential cross-talk between cancer cells and the microenvironment controlled by CSF1/Vav1 signaling pathways.

  6. Vav1 promotes lung cancer growth by instigating tumor-microenvironment cross-talk via growth factor secretion

    PubMed Central

    Rabinovich, Shiran; Lazer, Galit; Idelchuck, Yulia; Ilan, Lena; Pikarsky, Eli; Katzav, Shulamit

    2014-01-01

    Vav1 is a signal transducer that functions as a scaffold protein and a regulator of cytoskeleton organization in the hematopoietic system, where it is exclusively expressed. Recently, Vav1 was shown to be involved in diverse human cancers, including lung cancer. We demonstrate that lung cancer cells that abnormally express Vav1 secrete growth factors in a Vav1-dependent manner. Transcriptome analysis demonstrated that Vav1 depletion results in a marked reduction in the expression of colony-stimulating-factor-1 (CSF1), a hematopoietic growth factor. The association between Vav1 expression and CSF1 was further supported by signal transduction experiments, supporting involvement of Vav1 in regulating lung cancer secretome. Blocking of ERK phosphorylation, led to a decrease in CSF1 transcription, thus suggesting a role for ERK, a downstream effector of Vav1, in CSF1 expression. CSF1-silenced cells exhibited reduced focus formation, proliferation abilities, and growth in NOD/SCID mice. CSF1-silenced H358 cells resulted in significantly smaller tumors, showing increased fibrosis and a decrease in tumor infiltrating macrophages. Finally, immunohistochemical analysis of primary human lung tumors revealed a positive correlation between Vav1 and CSF1 expression, which was associated with tumor grade. Additional results presented herein suggest a potential cross-talk between cancer cells and the microenvironment controlled by CSF1/Vav1 signaling pathways. PMID:25313137

  7. Targeting of cancer‑associated fibroblasts enhances the efficacy of cancer chemotherapy by regulating the tumor microenvironment.

    PubMed

    Li, Minmin; Li, Mei; Yin, Tao; Shi, Huashan; Wen, Yuan; Zhang, Binglan; Chen, Meihua; Xu, Guangchao; Ren, Kexin; Wei, Yuquan

    2016-03-01

    Cancer‑associated fibroblasts (CAFs), key components of the tumor stroma, can regulate tumorigenesis by altering the tumor microenvironment in variety of ways to promote angiogenesis, recruit inflammatory immune cells and remodel the extracellular matrix. Using a murine xenograft model of colon carcinoma, the present study observed that oxaliplatin increased the accumulation of CAFs and stimulated the production of cytokines associated with CAFs. When oxaliplatin was combined with the small‑molecule dipeptidyl peptidase inhibitor PT‑100, which inhibits CAFs by targeting fibroblast activation protein (FAP), the accumulation of CAFs was markedly reduced, xenograft tumor growth was significantly suppressed and the survival of the mice increased, compared to those of mice treated with oxaliplatin or PT‑100 alone. Furthermore, the xenograft tumor tissues of mice treated with oxaliplatin and PT‑100 contained lower numbers of tumor‑associated macrophages and dendritic cells, expressed lower levels of cytokines associated with CAFs and had a lower density of CD31+ endothelial cells. The present study demonstrated that pharmacological inhibition of CAFs improved the response to chemotherapy, reduced the recruitment of immune tumor‑promoting cells and inhibited angiogenesis. Combining chemotherapy with agents which target CAFs may represent a novel strategy for improving the efficacy of chemotherapy and reducing chemoresistance.

  8. Nitrification in a Biofilm at Low pH Values: Role of In Situ Microenvironments and Acid Tolerance

    PubMed Central

    Gieseke, Armin; Tarre, Sheldon; Green, Michal; de Beer, Dirk

    2006-01-01

    The sensitivity of nitrifying bacteria to acidic conditions is a well-known phenomenon and generally attributed to the lack and/or toxicity of substrates (NH3 and HNO2) with decreasing pHs. In contrast, we observed strong nitrification at a pH around 4 in biofilms grown on chalk particles and investigated the following hypotheses: the presence of less acidic microenvironments and/or the existence of acid-tolerant nitrifiers. Microelectrode measurements (in situ and under various experimental conditions) showed no evidence of a neutral microenvironment, either within the highly active biofilm colonizing the chalk surface or within a control biofilm grown on a nonbuffering (i.e., sintered glass) surface under acidic pH. A 16S rRNA approach (clone libraries and fluorescence in situ hybridizations) did not reveal uncommon nitrifying (potentially acid-tolerant) strains. Instead, we found a strongly acidic microenvironment, evidence for a clear adaptation to the low pH in situ, and the presence of nitrifying populations related to subgroups with low Kms for ammonia (Nitrosopira spp., Nitrosomonas oligotropha, and Nitrospira spp.). Acid-consuming (chalk dissolution) and acid-producing (ammonia oxidation) processes are equilibrated on a low-pH steady state that is controlled by mass transfer limitation through the biofilm. Strong affinity to ammonia and possibly the expression of additional functions, e.g., ammonium transporters, are adaptations that allow nitrifiers to cope with acidic conditions in biofilms and other habitats. PMID:16751543

  9. Loss of Cdh1 and Trp53 in the uterus induces chronic inflammation with modification of tumor microenvironment.

    PubMed

    Stodden, G R; Lindberg, M E; King, M L; Paquet, M; MacLean, J A; Mann, J L; DeMayo, F J; Lydon, J P; Hayashi, K

    2015-05-07

    Type II endometrial carcinomas (ECs) are estrogen independent, poorly differentiated tumors that behave in an aggressive manner. As TP53 mutation and CDH1 inactivation occur in 80% of human endometrial type II carcinomas, we hypothesized that mouse uteri lacking both Trp53 and Cdh1 would exhibit a phenotype indicative of neoplastic transformation. Mice with conditional ablation of Cdh1 and Trp53 (Cdh1(d/d)Trp53(d/d)) clearly demonstrate architectural features characteristic of type II ECs, including focal areas of papillary differentiation, protruding cytoplasm into the lumen (hobnailing) and severe nuclear atypia at 6 months of age. Further, Cdh1(d/d)Trp53(d/d) tumors in 12-month-old mice were highly aggressive, and metastasized to nearby and distant organs within the peritoneal cavity, such as abdominal lymph nodes, mesentery and peri-intestinal adipose tissues, demonstrating that tumorigenesis in this model proceeds through the universally recognized morphological intermediates associated with type II endometrial neoplasia. We also observed abundant cell proliferation and complex angiogenesis in the uteri of Cdh1(d/d)Trp53(d/d) mice. Our microarray analysis found that most of the genes differentially regulated in the uteri of Cdh1(d/d)Trp53(d/d) mice were involved in inflammatory responses. CD163 and Arg1, markers for tumor-associated macrophages, were also detected and increased in the uteri of Cdh1(d/d)Trp53(d/d) mice, suggesting that an inflammatory tumor microenvironment with immune cell recruitment is augmenting tumor development in Cdh1(d/d)Trp53(d/d) uteri. Further, inflammatory mediators secreted from CDH1-negative, TP53 mutant endometrial cancer cells induced normal macrophages to express inflammatory-related genes through activation of nuclear factor-κB signaling. These results indicate that absence of CDH1 and TP53 in endometrial cells initiates chronic inflammation, promotes tumor microenvironment development following the recruitment of macrophages

  10. Modeling the Pro-inflammatory Tumor Microenvironment in Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia Predicts a Breakdown of Hematopoietic-Mesenchymal Communication Networks

    PubMed Central

    Enciso, Jennifer; Mayani, Hector; Mendoza, Luis; Pelayo, Rosana

    2016-01-01

    Lineage fate decisions of hematopoietic cells depend on intrinsic factors and extrinsic signals provided by the bone marrow microenvironment, where they reside. Abnormalities in composition and function of hematopoietic niches have been proposed as key contributors of acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) progression. Our previous experimental findings strongly suggest that pro-inflammatory cues contribute to mesenchymal niche abnormalities that result in maintenance of ALL precursor cells at the expense of normal hematopoiesis. Here, we propose a molecular regulatory network interconnecting the major communication pathways between hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPCs) and mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) within the BM. Dynamical analysis of the network as a Boolean model reveals two stationary states that can be interpreted as the intercellular contact status. Furthermore, simulations describe the molecular patterns observed during experimental proliferation and activation. Importantly, our model predicts instability in the CXCR4/CXCL12 and VLA4/VCAM1 interactions following microenvironmental perturbation due by temporal signaling from Toll like receptors (TLRs) ligation. Therefore, aberrant expression of NF-κB induced by intrinsic or extrinsic factors may contribute to create a tumor microenvironment where a negative feedback loop inhibiting CXCR4/CXCL12 and VLA4/VCAM1 cellular communication axes allows for the maintenance of malignant cells. PMID:27594840

  11. Immune modulation by ER stress and inflammation in the tumor microenvironment.

    PubMed

    Rodvold, Jeffrey J; Mahadevan, Navin R; Zanetti, Maurizio

    2016-09-28

    It is now increasingly evident that the immune system represents a barrier to tumor emergence, growth, and recurrence. Although this idea was originally proposed almost 50 years ago as the "immune surveillance hypothesis", it is commonly recognized that, with few rare exceptions, tumor cells always prevail. Thus, one of the central unsolved paradoxes of tumor immunology is how a tumor escapes immune control, which is reflected in the lack of effective autochthonous or vaccine-induced anti-tumor T cell responses. In this review, we discuss the role of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress response/unfolded protein response (UPR) in the immunomodulation of myeloid cells and T cells. Specifically, we will discuss how the tumor cell UPR polarizes myeloid cells in a cell-extrinsic manner, and how in turn, thus polarized myeloid cells negatively affect T cell activation and clonal expansion.

  12. Nuclear Factor-Kappa B Activity in the Host-Tumor Microenvironment of Ovarian Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-10-01

    of NF-κB such as thymoquinone (TQ) potentiate the effects of cytotoxic agents, including cisplatin , in ovarian cancer cells. Equally relevant are the...Combined TQ and cisplatin treatment lead to synergistic anti-tumor effects in vitro, reduced tumor burden and apoptotic marks in tumors to a greater...extent than treatment with cisplatin alone, reduced M2 and induced M1 macrophage markers, and decreased levels of known pro-tumorigenic cytokines in

  13. Clinical Implications of Co-Inhibitory Molecule Expression in the Tumor Microenvironment for DC Vaccination: A Game of Stop and Go

    PubMed Central

    Vasaturo, Angela; Di Blasio, Stefania; Peeters, Deborah G. A.; de Koning, Coco C. H.; de Vries, Jolanda M.; Figdor, Carl G.; Hato, Stanleyson V.

    2013-01-01

    The aim of therapeutic dendritic cell (DC) vaccines in cancer immunotherapy is to activate cytotoxic T cells to recognize and attack the tumor. T cell activation requires the interaction of the T cell receptor with a cognate major-histocompatibility complex-peptide complex. Although initiated by antigen engagement, it is the complex balance between co-stimulatory and co-inhibitory signals on DCs that results in T cell activation or tolerance. Even when already activated, tumor-specific T cells can be neutralized by the expression of co-inhibitory molecules on tumor cells. These and other immunosuppressive cues in the tumor microenvironment are major factors currently hampering the application of DC vaccination. In this review, we discuss recent data regarding the essential and complex role of co-inhibitory molecules in regulating the immune response within the tumor microenvironment. In particular, possible therapeutic intervention strategies aimed at reversing or neutralizing suppressive networks within the tumor microenvironment will be emphasized. Importantly, blocking co-inhibitory molecule signaling, often referred to as immune checkpoint blockade, does not necessarily lead to an effective activation of tumor-specific T cells. Therefore, combination of checkpoint blockade with other immune potentiating therapeutic strategies, such as DC vaccination, might serve as a synergistic combination, capable of reversing effector T cells immunosuppression while at the same time increasing the efficacy of T cell-mediated immunotherapies. This will ultimately result in long-term anti-tumor immunity. PMID:24348481

  14. An orthotopic xenograft model with survival hindlimb amputation allows investigation of the effect of tumor microenvironment on sarcoma metastasis.

    PubMed

    Goldstein, Seth D; Hayashi, Masanori; Albert, Catherine M; Jackson, Kyle W; Loeb, David M

    2015-10-01

    Overall survival rates for pediatric high-grade sarcoma have improved greatly in the past few decades, but prevention and treatment of distant metastasis remain the most compelling problems facing these patients. Traditional preclinical mouse models have not proven adequate to study the biology and treatment of spontaneous distant sarcoma metastasis. To address this deficit, we developed an orthotopic implantation/amputation model in which patient-derived sarcoma xenografts are surgically implanted into mouse hindlimbs, allowed to grow, then subsequently amputated and the animals observed for development of metastases. NOD/SCID/IL-2Rγ-null mice were implanted with either histologically intact high grade sarcoma patient-derived xenografts or cell lines in the pretibial space and affected limbs were amputated after tumor growth. In contrast to subcutaneous flank tumors, we were able to consistently detect spontaneous distant spread of the tumors using our model. Metastases were seen in 27-90 % of animals, depending on the xenograft, and were repeatable and predictable. We also demonstrate the utility of this model for studying the biology of metastasis and present preliminary new insights suggesting the role of arginine metabolism and macrophage phenotype polarization in creating a tumor microenvironment that facilitates metastasis. Subcutaneous tumors express more arginase than inducible nitric oxide synthase and demonstrate significant macrophage infiltration, whereas orthotopic tumors express similar amounts of inducible nitric oxide synthase and arginase and have only a scant macrophage infiltrate. Thus, we present a model of spontaneous distant sarcoma metastasis that mimics the clinical situation and is amenable to studying the biology of the entire metastatic cascade.

  15. A THERAPEUTIC OX40 AGONIST DYNAMICALLY ALTERS DENDRITIC, ENDOTHELIAL AND T CELL SUBSETS WITHIN THE ESTABLISHED TUMOR MICROENVIRONMENT

    PubMed Central

    Pardee, Angela D.; McCurry, Dustin; Alber, Sean; Hu, Peisheng; Epstein, Alan L.; Storkus, Walter J.

    2010-01-01

    Little preclinical modeling currently exists to support the use of OX40 agonists as therapeutic agents in the setting of advanced cancers, as well as, the mechanisms through which therapeutic efficacy is achieved. We demonstrate that treatment of mice bearing well-established day 17 sarcomas with a novel OX40 ligand-Fc fusion protein (OX40L-Fc) resulted in tumor regression or dormancy in the majority of treated animals. Unexpectedly, dendritic cells (DC) in the progressive tumor microenvironment (TME) acquire OX40 expression and bind fluorescently-labeled OX40L-Fc. Furthermore, longitudinal analyses revealed that DC become enriched in the tumor-draining lymph node (TDLN) of both wild-type and Rag-/- mice within three days after OX40L-Fc treatment. By day 7 after treatment, a significant expansion of CXCR3+ T effector cells was noted in the TDLN, and by day 10 post-treatment, Type-1 polarized T cells exhibiting a re-activated memory phenotype had accumulated in the tumors. High levels of CXCL9 (a CXCR3 ligand) and enhanced expression of VCAM-1 by vascular endothelial cells (VEC) were observed in the TME early after treatment with OX40L-Fc. Notably, these vascular alterations were maintained in Rag-/- mice, indicating that the OX40L-Fc-mediated activation of both DC and VEC occur in a T cell-independent manner. Collectively, these findings support a paradigm in which the stimulation of DC, T cells and the tumor vasculature by an OX40 agonist dynamically orchestrates the activation, expansion and recruitment of therapeutic T cells into established tumors. PMID:21045144

  16. A therapeutic OX40 agonist dynamically alters dendritic, endothelial, and T cell subsets within the established tumor microenvironment.

    PubMed

    Pardee, Angela D; McCurry, Dustin; Alber, Sean; Hu, Peisheng; Epstein, Alan L; Storkus, Walter J

    2010-11-15

    Little preclinical modeling currently exists to support the use of OX40 agonists as therapeutic agents in the setting of advanced cancers, as well as the mechanisms through which therapeutic efficacy is achieved. We show that treatment of mice bearing well-established day 17 sarcomas with a novel OX40 ligand-Fc fusion protein (OX40L-Fc) resulted in tumor regression or dormancy in the majority of treated animals. Unexpectedly, dendritic cells (DC) in the progressive tumor microenvironment (TME) acquire OX40 expression and bind fluorescently labeled OX40L-Fc. Furthermore, longitudinal analyses revealed that DCs become enriched in the tumor-draining lymph node (TDLN) of both wild-type and Rag-/- mice within 3 days after OX40L-Fc treatment. By day 7 after treatment, a significant expansion of CXCR3+ T effector cells was noted in the TDLN, and by day 10 after treatment, type 1 polarized T cells exhibiting a reactivated memory phenotype had accumulated in the tumors. High levels of CXCL9 (a CXCR3 ligand) and enhanced expression of VCAM-1 by vascular endothelial cells (VEC) were observed in the TME early after treatment with OX40L-Fc. Notably, these vascular alterations were maintained in Rag-/- mice, indicating that the OX40L-Fc-mediated activation of both DC and VEC occurs in a T-cell-independent manner. Collectively, these findings support a paradigm in which the stimulation of DC, T cells, and the tumor vasculature by an OX40 agonist dynamically orchestrates the activation, expansion, and recruitment of therapeutic T cells into established tumors.

  17. Autophagy is involved in TGF-β1-induced protective mechanisms and formation of cancer-associated fibroblasts phenotype in tumor microenvironment

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Fang-Lan; Mo, En-Pan; Yang, Liu; Du, Jun; Wang, Hong-Sheng; Zhang, Huan; Kurihara, Hiroshi; Xu, Jun; Cai, Shao-Hui

    2016-01-01

    Transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1) present in tumor microenvironment acts in a coordinated fashion to either suppress or promote tumor development. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying the effects of TGF-β1 on tumor microenvironment are not well understood. Our clinical data showed a positive association between TGF-β1 expression and cancer-associated fibroblasts (CAFs) in tumor microenvironment of breast cancer patients. Thus we employed starved NIH3T3 fibroblasts in vitro and 4T1 cells mixed with NIH3T3 fibroblasts xenograft model in vivo to simulate nutritional deprivation of tumor microenvironment to explore the effects of TGF-β1. We demonstrated that TGF-β1 protected NIH3T3 fibroblasts from Star-induced growth inhibition, mitochondrial damage and cell apoptosis. Interestingly, TGF-β1 induced the formation of CAFs phenotype in starvation (Star)-treated NIH3T3 fibroblasts and xenografted Balb/c mice, which promoted breast cancer tumor growth. In both models, autophagy agonist rapamycin increased TGF-β1-induced protective effects and formation of CAFs phenotypes, while autophagy inhibitor 3-methyladenine, Atg5 knockdown or TGF-β type I receptor kinase inhibitor LY-2157299 blocked TGF-β1 induced these effects. Taken together, our results indicated that TGF-β/Smad autophagy was involved in TGF-β1-induced protective effects and formation of CAFs phenotype in tumor microenvironment, which may be used as therapy targets in breast cancer. PMID:26716641

  18. STK11/LKB1 deficiency promotes neutrophil recruitment and proinflammatory cytokine production to suppress T cell activity in the lung tumor microenvironment

    PubMed Central

    Koyama, Shohei; Akbay, Esra A.; Li, Yvonne Y.; Aref, Amir R.; Skoulidis, Ferdinandos; Herter-Sprie, Grit S.; Buczkowski, Kevin A.; Liu, Yan; Awad, Mark M.; Denning, Warren L.; Diao, Lixia; Wang, Jing; Parra-Cuentas, Edwin R.; Wistuba, Ignacio I.; Soucheray, Margaret; Thai, Tran C.; Asahina, Hajime; Kitajima, Shunsuke; Altabef, Abigail; Cavanaugh, Jillian D.; Rhee, Kevin; Gao, Peng; Zhang, Haikuo; Fecci, Peter E.; Shimamura, Takeshi; Hellmann, Matthew D.; Heymach, John V.; Hodi, F. Stephen; Freeman, Gordon J.; Barbie, David A.; Dranoff, Glenn; Hammerman, Peter S.; Wong, Kwok-Kin

    2016-01-01

    STK11/LKB1 is among the most commonly inactivated tumor suppressors in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), especially in tumors harboring KRAS mutations. Many oncogenes promote immune escape, undermining the effectiveness of immunotherapies, but it is unclear whether inactivation of tumor suppressor genes such as STK11/LKB1 exert similar effects. In this study, we investigated the consequences of STK11/LKB1 loss on the immune microenvironment in a mouse model of KRAS-driven NSCLC. Genetic ablation of STK11/LKB1 resulted in accumulation of neutrophils with T cell suppressive effects, along with a corresponding increase in the expression of T cell exhaustion markers and tumor-promoting cytokines. The number of tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes was also reduced in LKB1-deficient mouse and human tumors. Furthermore, STK11/LKB1 inactivating mutations were associated with reduced expression of PD-1 ligand PD-L1 in mouse and patient tumors as well as in tumor-derived cell lines. Consistent with these results, PD-1 targeting antibodies were ineffective against Lkb1-deficient tumors. In contrast, treating Lkb1-deficient mice with an IL-6 neutralizing antibody or a neutrophil-depleting antibody yielded therapeutic benefits associated with reduced neutrophil accumulation and proinflammatory cytokine expression. Our findings illustrate how tumor suppressor mutations can modulate the immune milieu of the tumor microenvironment, and they offer specific implications for addressing STK11/LKB1 mutated tumors with PD-1 targeting antibody therapies. PMID:26833127

  19. STK11/LKB1 Deficiency Promotes Neutrophil Recruitment and Proinflammatory Cytokine Production to Suppress T-cell Activity in the Lung Tumor Microenvironment.

    PubMed

    Koyama, Shohei; Akbay, Esra A; Li, Yvonne Y; Aref, Amir R; Skoulidis, Ferdinandos; Herter-Sprie, Grit S; Buczkowski, Kevin A; Liu, Yan; Awad, Mark M; Denning, Warren L; Diao, Lixia; Wang, Jing; Parra-Cuentas, Edwin R; Wistuba, Ignacio I; Soucheray, Margaret; Thai, Tran; Asahina, Hajime; Kitajima, Shunsuke; Altabef, Abigail; Cavanaugh, Jillian D; Rhee, Kevin; Gao, Peng; Zhang, Haikuo; Fecci, Peter E; Shimamura, Takeshi; Hellmann, Matthew D; Heymach, John V; Hodi, F Stephen; Freeman, Gordon J; Barbie, David A; Dranoff, Glenn; Hammerman, Peter S; Wong, Kwok-Kin

    2016-03-01

    STK11/LKB1 is among the most commonly inactivated tumor suppressors in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), especially in tumors harboring KRAS mutations. Many oncogenes promote immune escape, undermining the effectiveness of immunotherapies, but it is unclear whether the inactivation of tumor suppressor genes, such as STK11/LKB1, exerts similar effects. In this study, we investigated the consequences of STK11/LKB1 loss on the immune microenvironment in a mouse model of KRAS-driven NSCLC. Genetic ablation of STK11/LKB1 resulted in accumulation of neutrophils with T-cell-suppressive effects, along with a corresponding increase in the expression of T-cell exhaustion markers and tumor-promoting cytokines. The number of tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes was also reduced in LKB1-deficient mouse and human tumors. Furthermore, STK11/LKB1-inactivating mutations were associated with reduced expression of PD-1 ligand PD-L1 in mouse and patient tumors as well as in tumor-derived cell lines. Consistent with these results, PD-1-targeting antibodies were ineffective against Lkb1-deficient tumors. In contrast, treating Lkb1-deficient mice with an IL6-neutralizing antibody or a neutrophil-depleting antibody yielded therapeutic benefits associated with reduced neutrophil accumulation and proinflammatory cytokine expression. Our findings illustrate how tumor suppressor mutations can modulate the immune milieu of the tumor microenvironment, and they offer specific implications for addressing STK11/LKB1-mutated tumors with PD-1-targeting antibody therapies.

  20. Intracellular Signal Transduction and Modification of the Tumor Microenvironment Induced by RET/PTCs in Papillary Thyroid Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Menicali, Elisa; Moretti, Sonia; Voce, Pasquale; Romagnoli, Serena; Avenia, Nicola; Puxeddu, Efisio

    2012-01-01

    RET gene rearrangements (RET/PTCs) represent together with BRAF point mutations the two major groups of mutations involved in papillary thyroid carcinoma (PTC) initiation and progression. In this review, we will examine the mechanisms involved in RET/PTC-induced thyroid cell transformation. In detail, we will summarize the data on the molecular mechanisms involved in RET/PTC formation and in its function as a dominant oncogene, on the activated signal transduction pathways and on the induced gene expression modifications. Moreover, we will report on the effects of RET/PTCs on the tumor microenvironment. Finally, a short review of the literature on RET/PTC prognostic significance will be presented. PMID:22661970

  1. SHMT2 drives glioma cell survival in the tumor microenvironment but imposes a dependence on glycine clearance

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Dohoon; Fiske, Brian P.; Birsoy, Kivanc; Freinkman, Elizaveta; Kami, Kenjiro; Possemato, Richard; Chudnovsky, Yakov; Pacold, Michael E.; Chen, Walter W.; Cantor, Jason R.; Shelton, Laura M.; Gui, Dan Y.; Kwon, Manjae; Ramkissoon, Shakti H.; Ligon, Keith L.; Kang, Seong Woo; Snuderl, Matija; Heiden, Matthew G. Vander; Sabatini, David M.

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Cancer cells adapt their metabolic processes to support rapid proliferation, but less is known about how cancer cells alter metabolism to promote cell survival in a poorly vascularized tumor microenvironment1–3. Here, we identify a key role for serine and glycine metabolism in the survival of brain cancer cells within the ischemic zones of gliomas. In human glioblastoma multiforme (GBM), mitochondrial serine hydroxymethyltransferase (SHMT2) and glycine decarboxylase (GLDC) are highly expressed in the pseudopalisading cells that surround necrotic foci. We find that SHMT2 activity limits that of pyruvate kinase (PKM2) and reduces oxygen consumption, eliciting a metabolic state that confers a profound survival advantage to cells in poorly vascularized tumor regions. GLDC inhibition impairs cells with high SHMT2 levels as the excess glycine not metabolized by GLDC can be converted to the toxic molecules aminoacetone and methylglyoxal. Thus, SHMT2 is required for cancer cells to adapt to the tumor environment, but also renders these cells sensitive to glycine cleavage system inhibition. PMID:25855294

  2. Targeting Hypoxia-inducible Factor 1α in a New Orthotopic Model of Glioblastoma Recapitulating the Hypoxic Tumor Microenvironment

    PubMed Central

    Nigim, Fares; Cavanaugh, Jill; Patel, Anoop P.; Curry, William T.; Esaki, Shin-ichi; Kasper, Ekkehard M.; Chi, Andrew S.; Louis, David N.; Martuza, Robert L.; Rabkin, Samuel D.; Wakimoto, Hiroaki

    2015-01-01

    Tissue hypoxia and necrosis represent pathophysiological and histological hallmarks of glioblastoma (GBM). Although hypoxia inducible factor 1α (HIF-1α) plays crucial roles in the malignant phenotypes of GBM, developing HIF-1α-targeted agents has been hampered by the lack of a suitable preclinical model that recapitulates the complex biology of clinical GBM. We present a new GBM model, MGG123, which was established from a recurrent human GBM. Orthotopic xenografting of stem-like MGG123 cells reproducibly generated lethal tumors that were characterized by foci of palisading necrosis, hypervascularity, and robust stem cell marker expression. Perinecrotic neoplastic cells distinctively express HIF-1α and are proliferative in both xenografts and the patient tissue. The xenografts contain scattered hypoxic foci that were consistently >50 μm distant from blood vessels, indicating intratumoral heterogeneity of oxygenation. Hypoxia enhanced HIF-1α expression in cultured MGG123 cells, which was abrogated by the HIF-1α inhibitors digoxin or ouabain. In vivo, treatment of orthotopic MGG123 xenografts with digoxin decreased HIF-1α expression, vascular endothelial growth factor mRNA levels and CD34-positive vasculature within the tumors, and extended survival of mice bearing the aggressive MGG123 GBM. This preclinical tumor model faithfully recapitulates the GBM-relevant hypoxic microenvironment and stemness, and is a suitable platform for studying disease biology and developing hypoxia-targeted agents. PMID:26083570

  3. Ovarian low and high grade serous carcinomas: hidden divergent features in the tumor microenvironment

    PubMed Central

    Buttarelli, Marianna; Martinelli, Enrica; Mascilini, Floriana; Petrillo, Marco; Ferrandina, Gabriella; Scambia, Giovanni; Gallo, Daniela

    2016-01-01

    Only recently low-grade serous carcinoma (LGSOC) of the ovary has been recognized as a disease entity distinct from the more common high-grade serous carcinoma (HGSOC), with significant differences in pathogenesis and clinical and pathologic features. The present study aimed at evaluating whether the different natural histories and patterns of response to therapy demonstrated for LGSOC and HGSOC, along with a diverse genomic landscape, may also reside in the supporting tumor stroma, specifically in the state of differentiation and activation of tumor associated macrophages (TAMs). TAMs play complex roles in tumorigenesis since they are believed to possess both tumor rejecting (M1 macrophages) and tumor promoting (M2 macrophages) activities. Here we showed that, when compared to HGSOC (n = 55), LGSOC patients (n = 25) exhibited lower density of tumor-infiltrating CD68+ macrophage, along with an attenuated M2-skewed (CD163+) phenotype. Accordingly, assessment of intratumoral vascularization and of matrix metalloproteinase 9 expression (a key protein involved in tumor invasion and metastasis) revealed lower expression in LGSOC compared to HGSOC patients, in line with emerging evidence supporting a role for TAMs in all aspects of tumor initiation, growth, and development. In conclusion, results from the present study demonstrate that microenvironmental factors contribute greatly to determine clinical and pathological features that differentiate low and high grade serous ovarian carcinomas. This understanding may increase possibilities and opportunities to improve disease control and design new therapeutic strategies. PMID:27462782

  4. Insights into the role of components of the tumor microenvironment in oral carcinoma call for new therapeutic approaches

    SciTech Connect

    Salo, Tuula; Vered, Marilena; Bello, Ibrahim O.; Nyberg, Pia; Bitu, Carolina Cavalcante; Zlotogorski Hurvitz, Ayelet; Dayan, Dan

    2014-07-15

    The research on oral cancer has focused mainly on the cancer cells, their genetic changes and consequent phenotypic modifications. However, it is increasingly clear that the tumor microenvironment (TME) has been shown to be in a dynamic state of inter-relations with the cancer cells. The TME contains a variety of components including the non-cancerous cells (i.e., immune cells, resident fibroblasts and angiogenic vascular cells) and the ECM milieu [including fibers (mainly collagen and fibronectin) and soluble factors (i.e., enzymes, growth factors, cytokines and chemokines)]. Thus, it is currently assumed that TME is considered a part of the cancerous tissue and the functionality of its key components constitutes the setting on which the hallmarks of the cancer cells can evolve. Therefore, in terms of controlling a malignancy, one should control the growth, invasion and spread of the cancer cells through modifications in the TME components. This mini review focuses on the TME as a diagnostic approach and reports the recent insights into the role of different TME key components [such as carcinoma-associated fibroblasts (CAFs) and inflammation (CAI) cells, angiogenesis, stromal matrix molecules and proteases] in the molecular biology of oral carcinoma. Furthermore, the impact of TME components on clinical outcomes and the concomitant need for development of new therapeutic approaches will be discussed. - Highlights: • Tumor depth and budding, hypoxia and TME cells associate with worse prognosis. • Pro-tumoral CAFs and CAI cells aid proliferation, invasion and spread hypoxia. • Some ECM-bound factors exert pro-angiogenic or pro-tumor activities. • Tumor spread is greatly dependent on ECM proteolysis, mediated by TME cells. • Direct targeting of TME components for treatment is still experimental.

  5. Melanoma cell-derived exosomes promote epithelial-mesenchymal transition in primary melanocytes through paracrine/autocrine signaling in the tumor microenvironment.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Deyi; Barry, Samantha; Kmetz, Daniel; Egger, Michael; Pan, Jianmin; Rai, Shesh N; Qu, Jifu; McMasters, Kelly M; Hao, Hongying

    2016-07-01

    The tumor microenvironment is abundant with exosomes that are secreted by the cancer cells themselves. Exosomes are nanosized, organelle-like membranous structures that are increasingly being recognized as major contributors in the progression of malignant neoplasms. A critical element in melanoma progression is its propensity to metastasize, but little is known about how melanoma cell-derived exosomes modulate the microenvironment to optimize conditions for tumor progression and metastasis. Here, we provide evidence that melanoma cell-derived exosomes promote phenotype switching in primary melanocytes through paracrine/autocrine signaling. We found that the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling pathway was activated during the exosome-mediated epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT)-resembling process, which promotes metastasis. Let-7i, an miRNA modulator of EMT, was also involved in this process. We further defined two other miRNA modulators of EMT (miR-191 and let-7a) in serum exosomes for differentiating stage I melanoma patients from non-melanoma subjects. These results provide the first strong molecular evidence that melanoma cell-derived exosomes promote the EMT-resembling process in the tumor microenvironment. Thus, novel strategies targeting EMT and modulating the tumor microenvironment may emerge as important approaches for the treatment of metastatic melanoma.

  6. Chimeric antigen receptor T cells shape myeloid cell function within the tumor microenvironment through IFN-γ and GM-CSF.

    PubMed

    Spear, Paul; Barber, Amorette; Rynda-Apple, Agnieszka; Sentman, Charles L

    2012-06-15

    The infiltration of suppressive myeloid cells into the tumor microenvironment restrains anti-tumor immunity. However, cytokines may alter the function of myeloid lineage cells to support tumor rejection, regulating the balance between pro- and anti-tumor immunity. In this study, it is shown that effector cytokines secreted by adoptively transferred T cells expressing a chimeric Ag receptor (CAR) shape the function of myeloid cells to promote endogenous immunity and tumor destruction. Mice bearing the ovarian ID8 tumor were treated with T cells transduced with a chimeric NKG2D receptor. GM-CSF secreted by the adoptively transferred T cells recruited peripheral F4/80(lo)Ly-6C(+) myeloid cells to the tumor microenvironment in a CCR2-dependent fashion. T cell IFN-γ and GM-CSF activated local, tumor-associated macrophages, decreased expression of regulatory factors, increased IL-12p40 production, and augmented Ag processing and presentation by host macrophages to Ag-specific T cells. In addition, T cell-derived IFN-γ, but not GM-CSF, induced the production of NO by F4/80(hi) macrophages and enhanced their lysis of tumor cells. The ability of CAR T cell therapy to eliminate tumor was moderately impaired when inducible NO synthase was inhibited and greatly impaired in the absence of peritoneal macrophages after depletion with clodronate encapsulated liposomes. This study demonstrates that the activation of host macrophages by CAR T cell-derived cytokines transformed the tumor microenvironment from immunosuppressive to immunostimulatory and contributed to inhibition of ovarian tumor growth.

  7. Reduced inflammation in the tumor microenvironment delays the accumulation of myeloid-derived suppressor cells and limits tumor progression.

    PubMed

    Bunt, Stephanie K; Yang, Linglin; Sinha, Pratima; Clements, Virginia K; Leips, Jeff; Ostrand-Rosenberg, Suzanne

    2007-10-15

    Chronic inflammation is frequently associated with malignant growth and is thought to promote and enhance tumor progression, although the mechanisms which regulate this relationship remain elusive. We reported previously that interleukin (IL)-1beta promoted tumor progression by enhancing the accumulation of myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSC), and hypothesized that inflammation leads to cancer through the production of MDSC which inhibit tumor immunity. If inflammation-induced MDSC promote tumor progression by blocking antitumor immunity, then a reduction in inflammation should reduce MDSC levels and delay tumor progression, whereas an increase in inflammation should increase MDSC levels and hasten tumor progression. We have tested this hypothesis using the 4T1 mammary carcinoma and IL-1 receptor (IL-1R)-deficient mice which have a reduced potential for inflammation, and IL-1R antagonist-deficient mice, which have an increased potential for inflammation. Consistent with our hypothesis, IL-1R-deficient mice have a delayed accumulation of MDSC and reduced primary and metastatic tumor progression. Accumulation of MDSC and tumor progression are partially restored by IL-6, indicating that IL-6 is a downstream mediator of the IL-1beta-induced expansion of MDSC. In contrast, excessive inflammation in IL-1R antagonist-deficient mice promotes the accumulation of MDSC and produces MDSC with enhanced suppressive activity. These results show that immune suppression by MDSC and tumor growth are regulated by the inflammatory milieu and support the hypothesis that the induction of suppressor cells which down-regulate tumor immunity is one of the mechanisms linking inflammation and cancer.

  8. Boosting the MHC Class II-Restricted Tumor Antigen Presentation to CD4+ T Helper Cells: A Critical Issue for Triggering Protective Immunity and Re-Orienting the Tumor Microenvironment Toward an Anti-Tumor State

    PubMed Central

    Accolla, Roberto S.; Lombardo, Letizia; Abdallah, Rawan; Raval, Goutham; Forlani, Greta; Tosi, Giovanna

    2014-01-01

    Although the existence of an immune response against tumor cells is well documented, the fact that tumors take off in cancer patients indicates that neoplastic cells can circumvent this response. Over the years many investigators have described strategies to rescue the anti-tumor immune response with the aim of creating specific and long-lasting protection against the disease. When exported to human clinical settings, these strategies have revealed in most cases a very limited, if any, positive outcome. We believe that the failure is mostly due to the inadequate triggering of the CD4+ T helper (TH) cell arm of the adaptive immunity, as TH cells are necessary to trigger all the immune effector mechanisms required to eliminate tumor cells. In this review, we focus on novel strategies that by stimulating MHC class II-restricted activation of TH cells generate a specific and persistent adaptive immunity against the tumor. This point is of critical importance for both preventive and therapeutic anti-tumor vaccination protocols, because adaptive immunity with its capacity to produce specific, long-lasting protection and memory responses is indeed the final goal of vaccination. We will discuss data from our as well as other laboratories which strongly suggest that triggering a specific and persistent anti-tumor CD4+ TH cell response stably modify not only the tumor microenvironment but also tumor-dependent extratumor microenvironments by eliminating and/or reducing the blood-derived tumor infiltrating cells that may have a pro-tumor growth function such as regulatory CD4+/CD25+ T cells and myeloid-derived-suppressor cells. Within this frame, therefore, we believe that the establishment of a pro-tumor environment is not the cause but simply the consequence of the tumor strategy to primarily counteract components of the adaptive cellular immunity, particularly TH lymphocytes. PMID:24600588

  9. The tumor suppressor semaphorin 3B triggers a prometastatic program mediated by interleukin 8 and the tumor microenvironment

    PubMed Central

    Rolny, Charlotte; Capparuccia, Lorena; Casazza, Andrea; Mazzone, Massimiliano; Vallario, Antonella; Cignetti, Alessandro; Medico, Enzo; Carmeliet, Peter; Comoglio, Paolo M.; Tamagnone, Luca

    2008-01-01

    Semaphorins are a large family of evolutionarily conserved morphogenetic molecules originally identified for their repelling role in axonal guidance. Intriguingly, semaphorins have recently been implicated in cancer progression (Neufeld, G., T. Lange, A. Varshavsky, and O. Kessler. 2007. Adv. Exp. Med. Biol. 600:118–131). In particular, semaphorin 3B (SEMA3B) is considered a putative tumor suppressor, and yet we found that it is expressed at high levels in many invasive and metastatic human cancers. By investigating experimental tumor models, we confirmed that SEMA3B expression inhibited tumor growth, whereas metastatic dissemination was surprisingly increased. We found that SEMA3B induced the production of interleukin (IL) 8 by tumor cells by activating the p38–mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway in a neuropilin 1–dependent manner. Silencing the expression of endogenous SEMA3B in tumor cells impaired IL-8 transcription. The release of IL-8, in turn, induced the recruitment of tumor-associated macrophages and metastatic dissemination to the lung, which could be rescued by blocking IL-8 with neutralizing antibodies. In conclusion, we report that SEMA3B exerts unexpected functions in cancer progression by fostering a prometastatic environment through elevated IL-8 secretion and recruitment of macrophages coupled to the suppression of tumor growth. PMID:18458115

  10. The tumor suppressor semaphorin 3B triggers a prometastatic program mediated by interleukin 8 and the tumor microenvironment.

    PubMed

    Rolny, Charlotte; Capparuccia, Lorena; Casazza, Andrea; Mazzone, Massimiliano; Vallario, Antonella; Cignetti, Alessandro; Medico, Enzo; Carmeliet, Peter; Comoglio, Paolo M; Tamagnone, Luca

    2008-05-12

    Semaphorins are a large family of evolutionarily conserved morphogenetic molecules originally identified for their repelling role in axonal guidance. Intriguingly, semaphorins have recently been implicated in cancer progression (Neufeld, G., T. Lange, A. Varshavsky, and O. Kessler. 2007. Adv. Exp. Med. Biol. 600:118-131). In particular, semaphorin 3B (SEMA3B) is considered a putative tumor suppressor, and yet we found that it is expressed at high levels in many invasive and metastatic human cancers. By investigating experimental tumor models, we confirmed that SEMA3B expression inhibited tumor growth, whereas metastatic dissemination was surprisingly increased. We found that SEMA3B induced the production of interleukin (IL) 8 by tumor cells by activating the p38-mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway in a neuropilin 1-dependent manner. Silencing the expression of endogenous SEMA3B in tumor cells impaired IL-8 transcription. The release of IL-8, in turn, induced the recruitment of tumor-associated macrophages and metastatic dissemination to the lung, which could be rescued by blocking IL-8 with neutralizing antibodies. In conclusion, we report that SEMA3B exerts unexpected functions in cancer progression by fostering a prometastatic environment through elevated IL-8 secretion and recruitment of macrophages coupled to the suppression of tumor growth.

  11. Favorable alteration of tumor microenvironment by immunomodulatory cytokines for efficient T-cell therapy in solid tumors.

    PubMed

    Tähtinen, Siri; Kaikkonen, Saija; Merisalo-Soikkeli, Maiju; Grönberg-Vähä-Koskela, Susanna; Kanerva, Anna; Parviainen, Suvi; Vähä-Koskela, Markus; Hemminki, Akseli

    2015-01-01

    Unfavorable ratios between the number and activation status of effector and suppressor immune cells infiltrating the tumor contribute to resistance of solid tumors to T-cell based therapies. Here, we studied the capacity of FDA and EMA approved recombinant cytokines to manipulate this balance in favor of efficient anti-tumor responses in B16.OVA melanoma bearing C57BL/6 mice. Intratumoral administration of IFN-α2, IFN-γ, TNF-α, and IL-2 significantly enhanced the anti-tumor effect of ovalbumin-specific CD8+ T-cell (OT-I) therapy, whereas GM-CSF increased tumor growth in association with an increase in immunosuppressive cell populations. None of the cytokines augmented tumor trafficking of OT-I cells significantly, but injections of IFN-α2, IFN-γ and IL-2 increased intratumoral cytokine secretion and recruitment of endogenous immune cells capable of stimulating T-cells, such as natural killer and maturated CD11c+ antigen-presenting cells. Moreover, IFN-α2 and IL-2 increased the levels of activated tumor-infiltrating CD8+ T-cells concomitant with reduction in the CD8+ T-cell expression of anergy markers CTLA-4 and PD-1. In conclusion, intratumoral administration of IFN-α2, IFN-γ and IL-2 can lead to immune sensitization of the established tumor, whereas GM-CSF may contribute to tumor-associated immunosuppression. The results described here provide rationale for including local administration of immunostimulatory cytokines into T-cell therapy regimens. One appealing embodiment of this would be vectored delivery which could be advantageous over direct injection of recombinant molecules with regard to efficacy, cost, persistence and convenience.

  12. Favorable Alteration of Tumor Microenvironment by Immunomodulatory Cytokines for Efficient T-Cell Therapy in Solid Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Tähtinen, Siri; Kaikkonen, Saija; Merisalo-Soikkeli, Maiju; Grönberg-Vähä-Koskela, Susanna; Kanerva, Anna; Parviainen, Suvi; Vähä-Koskela, Markus; Hemminki, Akseli

    2015-01-01

    Unfavorable ratios between the number and activation status of effector and suppressor immune cells infiltrating the tumor contribute to resistance of solid tumors to T-cell based therapies. Here, we studied the capacity of FDA and EMA approved recombinant cytokines to manipulate this balance in favor of efficient anti-tumor responses in B16.OVA melanoma bearing C57BL/6 mice. Intratumoral administration of IFN-α2, IFN-γ, TNF-α, and IL-2 significantly enhanced the anti-tumor effect of ovalbumin-specific CD8+ T-cell (OT-I) therapy, whereas GM-CSF increased tumor growth in association with an increase in immunosuppressive cell populations. None of the cytokines augmented tumor trafficking of OT-I cells significantly, but injections of IFN-α2, IFN-γ and IL-2 increased intratumoral cytokine secretion and recruitment of endogenous immune cells capable of stimulating T-cells, such as natural killer and maturated CD11c+ antigen-presenting cells. Moreover, IFN-α2 and IL-2 increased the levels of activated tumor-infiltrating CD8+ T-cells concomitant with reduction in the CD8+ T-cell expression of anergy markers CTLA-4 and PD-1. In conclusion, intratumoral administration of IFN-α2, IFN-γ and IL-2 can lead to immune sensitization of the established tumor, whereas GM-CSF may contribute to tumor-associated immunosuppression. The results described here provide rationale for including local administration of immunostimulatory cytokines into T-cell therapy regimens. One appealing embodiment of this would be vectored delivery which could be advantageous over direct injection of recombinant molecules with regard to efficacy, cost, persistence and convenience. PMID:26107883

  13. Distribution and clinical significance of Th17 cells in the tumor microenvironment and peripheral blood of pancreatic cancer patients.

    PubMed

    He, Songbing; Fei, Min; Wu, Yugang; Zheng, Dingcheng; Wan, Daiwei; Wang, Liang; Li, Dechun

    2011-01-01

    This study was designed to investigate the distribution of Th17 cells in the tumor microenvironment and peripheral blood of pancreatic cancer patients, its clinical significance, and the expression profile of Th17 cell-associated cytokines. The percentage of Th17 cells detected by flow cytometry analysis (FACS) was significantly higher in 46 pancreatic tumor tissues (5.28 ± 1.65%) compared with corresponding adjacent normal tissues (2.57 ± 0.83%) (P = 0.031). In addition, the percentage of Th17 cells was significantly higher in stage III-IV tumors than stage I-II tumors (P = 0.039). The percentage of Th17 cells in peripheral blood of 20 pancreatic cancer patients (3.99 ± 1.15%) was significantly higher than 15 healthy volunteers (1.98 ± 0.57%) (P = 0.027). Immunohistochemistry (IHC) was performed to detect IL-17(+) cells in 46 pancreatic tumor tissues, as well as expression of CD34 in 24 tumor tissues. IL-17 was shown to mainly locate in cytoplasm, and the frequency of IL-17(+) cells in tumor tissues (39/46) was higher than control (29/46). The presence of IL-17(+) cells in tumor tissues was associated with tumor, node, and metastasis (TNM) stage, and lymph node metastasis (P = 0.012 and P = 0.009) but not with patient sex, age, tumor size, and histological grade (P > 0.05). Interestingly, distribution of Th17 cells in tumor tissues was positively correlated with microvessel density (MVD) (r = 0.86, P = 0.018). Furthermore, the median survival time of patients with high and low level of IL-17(+) cells frequency was 14.5 and 18.5 months respectively (P = 0.023). The serum levels of Th17 cell-associated cytokines, IL-17 and IL-23 in 20 pancreatic patients detected by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) were 69.2 ± 28.5 pg/mL and 266.5 ± 98.1 pg/mL, respectively, which were significantly higher than 15 healthy volunteers (P = 0.015 and P = 0.02). Moreover, levels of IL-17 and IL-23 were significantly higher in stage III-IV tumors than stage I-II tumors (P

  14. Exo-MFA - A 13C metabolic flux analysis framework to dissect tumor microenvironment-secreted exosome contributions towards cancer cell metabolism.

    PubMed

    Achreja, Abhinav; Zhao, Hongyun; Yang, Lifeng; Yun, Tae Hyun; Marini, Juan; Nagrath, Deepak

    2017-01-11

    Dissecting the pleiotropic roles of tumor micro-environment (TME) on cancer progression has been brought to the foreground of research on cancer pathology. Extracellular vesicles such as exosomes, transport proteins, lipids, and nucleic acids, to mediate intercellular communication between TME components and have emerged as candidates for anti-cancer therapy. We previously reported that cancer-associated fibroblast (CAF) derived exosomes (CDEs) contain metabolites in their cargo that are utilized by cancer cells for central carbon metabolism and promote cancer growth. However, the metabolic fluxes involved in donor cells towards packaging of metabolites in extracellular vesicles and exosome-mediated metabolite flux upregulation in recipient cells are still not known. Here, we have developed a novel empirical and computational technique, exosome-mediated metabolic flux analysis (Exo-MFA) to quantify flow of cargo from source cells to recipient cells via vesicular transport. Our algorithm, which is based on (13)C metabolic flux analysis, successfully predicts packaging fluxes to metabolite cargo in CAFs, dynamic changes in rate of exosome internalization by cancer cells, and flux of cargo release over time. We find that cancer cells internalize exosomes rapidly leading to depletion of extracellular exosomes within 24h. However, metabolite cargo significantly alters intracellular metabolism over the course of 24h by regulating glycolysis pathway fluxes via lactate supply. Furthermore, it can supply up to 35% of the TCA cycle fluxes by providing TCA intermediates and glutamine. Our algorithm will help gain insight into (i) metabolic interactions in multicellular systems (ii) biogenesis of extracellular vesicles and their differential packaging of cargo under changing environments, and (iii) regulation of cancer cell metabolism by its microenvironment.

  15. Antitumor and chemosensitizing action of dichloroacetate implicates modulation of tumor microenvironment: A role of reorganized glucose metabolism, cell survival regulation and macrophage differentiation

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, Ajay; Kant, Shiva; Singh, Sukh Mahendra

    2013-11-15

    Targeting of tumor metabolism is emerging as a novel therapeutic strategy against cancer. Dichloroacetate (DCA), an inhibitor of pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase (PDK), has been shown to exert a potent tumoricidal action against a variety of tumor cells. The main mode of its antineoplastic action implicates a shift of glycolysis to oxidative metabolism of glucose, leading to generation of cytotoxic reactive oxygen intermediates. However, the effect of DCA on tumor microenvironment, which in turn regulates tumor cell survival; remains speculative to a large extent. It is also unclear if DCA can exert any modulatory effect on the process of hematopoiesis, which is in a compromised state in tumor-bearing hosts undergoing chemotherapy. In view of these lacunas, the present study was undertaken to investigate the so far unexplored aspects with respect to the molecular mechanisms of DCA-dependent tumor growth retardation and chemosensitization. BALB/c mice were transplanted with Dalton's lymphoma (DL) cells, a T cell lymphoma of spontaneous origin, followed by administration of DCA with or without cisplatin. DCA-dependent tumor regression and chemosensitization to cisplatin was found to be associated with altered repertoire of key cell survival regulatory molecules, modulated glucose metabolism, accompanying reconstituted tumor microenvironment with respect to pH homeostasis, cytokine balance and alternatively activated TAM. Moreover, DCA administration also led to an alteration in the MDR phenotype of tumor cells and myelopoietic differentiation of macrophages. The findings of this study shed a new light with respect to some of the novel mechanisms underlying the antitumor action of DCA and thus may have immense clinical applications. - Highlights: • DCA modulates tumor progression and chemoresistance. • DCA alters molecules regulating cell survival, glucose metabolism and MDR. • DCA reconstitutes biophysical and cellular composition of tumor microenvironment.

  16. Water Dynamics in Living Cells and Tumor Cell Migration in Confined Microenvironments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Sean

    More than 70% of the total mass in living cells is water. In most biological scenarios water serves as a passive medium responsible for solvation and proper functioning of proteins. However, it has been long recognized that there are situations where dynamic transport of water in cells is important. First, cells actively transport water in order to maintain its volume, and because cell volume directly influences cell shape and internal hydrostatic pressure, it is a critical aspect of cell mechanics. Furthermore, cell volume is coupled to protein synthesis which ultimately determines the cell size. Therefore water transport and cell volume dynamics ultimately impact cell growth and division. Second, epithelial cells in organs such as the eye and kidney actively transport water across the cell membrane and the epithelial layer. Indeed, water channels such as aquaporins increase water permeability of the membrane and facilitate this transport. Recent, we have shown that in confined microenvironments, active transport of water is responsible for actin-independent cell movement in confined spaces, especially for cancer cells. These results suggest that cells actively control its water content. The active regulation of water content is a crucial aspect of cell dynamics. We will discuss a theoretical model of cell pressure/volume control. Implications of this model for active cell dynamics in multi-cellular epithelial sheets will be discussed.

  17. Hydrogels to Model 3D in vitro Microenvironment of Tumor Vascularization

    PubMed Central

    Song, Hyun-Ho Greco; Park, Kyung Min; Gerecht, Sharon

    2014-01-01

    A growing number of failing clinical trials for cancer therapy is substantiating the need to upgrade the current practice in culturing tumor cells and modeling tumor angiogenesis in vitro. Many attempts have been made to engineer vasculature in vitro by utilizing hydrogels, but the application of these tools in simulating in vivo tumor angiogenesis is still very new. In this review, we explore current use of hydrogels and their design parameters to engineer vasculogenesis and angiogenesis and to evaluate the angiogenic capability of cancerous cells and tissues. When coupled with other technologies such as lithography and three-dimensional printing, one can even create an advanced microvessel model as microfluidic channels to more accurately capture the native angiogenesis process. PMID:24969477

  18. Extranodal induction of therapeutic immunity in the tumor microenvironment after intratumoral delivery of Tbet gene-modified dendritic cells.

    PubMed

    Chen, L; Taylor, J L; Sabins, N C; Lowe, D B; Qu, Y; You, Z; Storkus, W J

    2013-08-01

    Murine dendritic cells (DC) transduced to express the Type-1 transactivator T-bet (i.e. mDC.Tbet) and delivered intratumorally as a therapy are superior to control wild-type DC in slowing the growth of established subcutaneous MCA205 sarcomas in vivo. Optimal antitumor efficacy of mDC.Tbet-based gene therapy was dependent on host natural killer (NK) cells and CD8(+) T cells, and required mDC.Tbet expression of major histocompatibility complex class I molecules, but was independent of the capacity of the injected mDC.Tbet to produce proinflammatory cytokines (interleukin-12 family members or interferon-γ) or to migrate to tumor-draining lymph nodes based on CCR7 ligand chemokine recruitment. Conditional (CD11c-DTR) or genetic (BATF3(-/-)) deficiency in host antigen-crosspresenting DC did not diminish the therapeutic action of intratumorally delivered wild-type mDC.Tbet. Interestingly, we observed that intratumoral delivery of mDC.Tbet (versus control mDC.Null) promoted the acute infiltration of NK cells and naive CD45RB(+) T cells into the tumor microenvironment (TME) in association with elevated expression of NK- and T-cell-recruiting chemokines by mDC.Tbet. When taken together, our data support a paradigm for extranodal (cross)priming of therapeutic Type-1 immunity in the TME after intratumoral delivery of mDC.Tbet-based gene therapy.

  19. Serial Low Doses of Sorafenib Enhance Therapeutic Efficacy of Adoptive T Cell Therapy in a Murine Model by Improving Tumor Microenvironment

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Ren-Shyan; Hwang, Jeng-Jong

    2014-01-01

    Requirements of large numbers of transferred T cells and various immunosuppressive factors and cells in the tumor microenvironment limit the applications of adoptive T cells therapy (ACT) in clinic. Accumulating evidences show that chemotherapeutic drugs could act as immune supportive instead of immunosuppressive agents when proper dosage is used, and combined with immunotherapy often results in better treatment outcomes than monotherapy. Controversial immunomodulation effects of sorafenib, a multi-kinases inhibitor, at high and low doses have been reported in several types of cancer. However, what is the range of the low-dose sorafenib will influence the host immunity and responses of ACT is still ambiguous. Here we used a well-established E.G7/OT-1 murine model to understand the effects of serial low doses of sorafenib on both tumor microenvironment and transferred CD8+ T cells and the underlying mechanisms. Sorafenib lowered the expressions of immunosuppressive factors, and enhanced functions and migrations of transferred CD8+ T cells through inhibition of STAT3 and other immunosuppressive factors. CD8+ T cells were transduced with granzyme B promoter for driving imaging reporters to visualize the activation and distribution of transferred CD8+ T cells prior to adoptive transfer. Better activations of CD8+ T cells and tumor inhibitions were found in the combinational group compared with CD8+ T cells or sorafenib alone groups. Not only immunosuppressive factors but myeloid derived suppressive cells (MDSCs) and regulatory T cells (Tregs) were decreased in sorafenib-treated group, indicating that augmentation of tumor inhibition and function of CD8+ T cells by serial low doses of sorafenib were via reversing the immunosuppressive microenvironment. These results revealed that the tumor inhibitions of sorafenib not only through eradicating tumor cells but modifying tumor microenvironment, which helps outcomes of ACT significantly. PMID:25333973

  20. Tumor necrosis factor links chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and K-ras mutant lung cancer through induction of an immunosuppressive pro-tumor microenvironment.

    PubMed

    Gong, Lei; da Silva Caetano, Mauricio; Cumpian, Amber M; Daliri, Soudabeh; Garza Flores, Alejandra; Chang, Seon Hee; Ochoa, Cesar E; Evans, Christopher M; Yu, Zhentao; Moghaddam, Seyed Javad

    2016-01-01

    Tumor necrosis factor (TNF) is known as an important regulator of tumor microenvironment and inflammation. TNF levels are markedly elevated in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) of patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), which is an independent risk factor for lung cancer. We have previously shown that COPD-like airway inflammation promotes lung cancer in a K-ras mutant mouse model (CC-LR mouse). This was associated with a significant increase of neutrophils in BALF, accompanied by a marked increase in TNF level, suggesting a link between COPD, TNF, and lung cancer promotion. Therefore, we first overexpressed TNF in the airway epithelium of CC-LR mice, which promoted lung cancer by ∼2-fold. This was associated with increased numbers of Ki67 and CD31 positive cells in lung tumors of CC-LR/TNF-Tg mice. We also found a robust increase in NF-κB activation, and numbers of neutrophils and myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) in lung. Accordingly, we depleted MDSCs in CC-LR/TNF-Tg mice, which lead to significant tumor suppression emphasizing on the role of TNF-induced MDSCs in K-ras induced lung tumorigenesis. Finally, we targeted TNF expression by crossing CC-LR mice with TNF knock-out mice (CC-LR/TNF-KO), which resulted in a significant decrease in lung tumor burden in the absence or presence of COPD-like airway inflammation. Interestingly, there were less MDSCs and lower Ki67 and CD31 expression in the lung of the CC-LR/TNF-KO mice. We conclude that TNF links COPD to lung cancer promotion by induction of an immunosuppressive MDSC response, and subsequent amplification of proliferation and angiogenesis in tumors.

  1. WE-E-BRE-06: High-Dose Microbeam Radiation Induces Different Responses in Tumor Microenvironment Compared to Conventional Seamless Radiation in Window Chamber Tumor Models

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, S; Zhang, J; Hadsell, M; Fontanella, A; Schroeder, T; Palmer, G; Dewhirst, M; Boss, M; Berman, K

    2014-06-15

    portion of the tumor. Conclusion: Our preliminary study indicated that microbeam radiation modified tumor microenvironment in ways significantly different than of the conventional seamless radiation.

  2. Breast Cancer Cell Invasion into a Three Dimensional Tumor-Stroma Microenvironment

    PubMed Central

    Truong, Danh; Puleo, Julieann; Llave, Alison; Mouneimne, Ghassan; Kamm, Roger D.; Nikkhah, Mehdi

    2016-01-01

    In this study, to model 3D chemotactic tumor-stroma invasion in vitro, we developed an innovative microfluidic chip allowing side-by-side positioning of 3D hydrogel-based matrices. We were able to (1) create a dual matrix architecture that extended in a continuous manner, thus allowing invasion from one 3D matrix to another, and (2) establish distinct regions of tumor and stroma cell/ECM compositions, with a clearly demarcated tumor invasion front, thus allowing us to quantitatively analyze progression of cancer cells into the stroma at a tissue or single-cell level. We showed significantly enhanced cancer cell invasion in response to a transient gradient of epidermal growth factor (EGF). 3D tracking at the single-cell level displayed increased migration speed and persistence. Subsequently, we analyzed changes in expression of EGF receptors, cell aspect ratio, and protrusive activity. These findings show the unique ability of our model to quantitatively analyze 3D chemotactic invasion, both globally by tracking the progression of the invasion front, and at the single-cell level by examining changes in cellular behavior and morphology using high-resolution imaging. Taken together, we have shown a novel model recapitulating 3D tumor-stroma interactions for studies of real-time cell invasion and morphological changes within a single platform. PMID:27678304

  3. Tumor Microenvironment and Progression to Invasion after a Diagnosis of Ductal Carcinoma In Situ

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-03-01

    detected symptomatically were more likely to have a recurrence than cases detected by screening mammography (HR=1.6; 95% CI 0.9- 3.0). Tumor size, grade...of breast cancers were detected via mammography (85.4%). Use of tamoxifen was reported by 38.0% of women, most frequently among women undergoing

  4. Tumour microenvironment-responsive lipoic acid nanoparticles for targeted delivery of docetaxel to lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Fenfen; Hu, Chuling; Tai, Zhongguang; Yao, Chong; Tian, Jing; Zhang, Lijuan; Xia, Qingming; Gong, Chunai; Gao, Yuan; Gao, Shen

    2016-01-01

    In the present study, we developed a novel type of reduction-sensitive nanoparticles (NPs) for docetaxel (DTX) delivery based on cross-linked lipoic acid NPs (LANPs). The physicochemical properties, cellular uptake and in vitro cytotoxicity of DTX loaded LANPs (DTX-LANPs) on A549 cells were investigated. Furthermore, the in vivo distribution and in vivo efficacy of DTX-LANPs was evaluated. The results showed that DTX-LANPs had a particle size of 110 nm and a negative zeta potential of −35 mv with excellent colloidal stability. LANPs efficiently encapsulated DTX with a high drug loading of 4.51% ± 0.49% and showed remarkable reduction-sensitive drug release in vitro. Cellular uptake experiments demonstrated that LANPs significantly increased intracellular DTX uptake by about 10 fold as compared with free DTX. The cytotoxicity of DTX-LANPs showed significantly higher potency in inhibiting A549 cell growth than free DTX, while blank LANPs had a good biocompatibility. In addition, in vivo experiments demonstrated that DTX-LANPs could enhance tumour targeting and anti-tumour efficacy with low systemic toxicity. In conclusion, LANPs may prove to be a potential tumour microenvironment-responsive delivery system for cancer treatment, with the potential for commercialization due to the simple component, controllable synthesis, stability and economy. PMID:27805051

  5. The Prostate Tumor Microenvironment Exhibits differentially expressed Genes Useful for Diagnosis — EDRN Public Portal

    Cancer.gov

    To develop a multi-site prospective clinical validation trial of the multigene diagnostic signature for the diagnosis of prostate cancer from non tumor containing biopsy tissue. Prostate cancer now affects one in five men in the U.S. It is diagnosed by examination of a biopsy sample of the prostate gland by a pathologist and treatment decisions such as the choice of surgery are usually not made without direct visualization of the presence of cancer by a pathologist. There are about one million such biopsy procedures in the U.S. every year. However about 1-200,000 are ambiguous owing to the absence of tumor but the presence of small changes such as atypical small acinar proliferations (ASAP) or proliferations within otherwise normal glands (PIN, prostate intraepithelial neoplasia) that are highly suspicious for cancer. Studies by the UCI/NCI SPECS project on prostate cancer have led to a new way to diagnosis the presence of prostate cancer in these ambiguous changes. Researchers of the UCI/NCI SPECS project observed that the tissue around a tumor called stroma has many altered gene activities that are caused by molecules secreted by the tumor cells. Indeed these studies revealed that 114 genes exhibited altered activity in stroma near tumor compared to normal stroma. These changes can be used as a “signature” to examine new samples to determine the “presence of-tumor”. Such a test has many applications. Currently ambiguous cases are asked to return for a repeat biopsy in 3 to 12 months – an agonizing period for patients during which they receive no guidance and during which any tumor may continue to grow and spread. Thus, the new test would detect tumor 3 to 12 months prior to conventional practice. This will avoid repeated biopsy procedures. Patients who are positive by the new test may consider whether immediate medical treatment or neo adjuvant treatment is appropriate. In addition the ability to detect presence-of-tumor early will avoid the necessity

  6. The Tumor Microenvironment at a Turning Point Knowledge Gained Over the Last Decade, and Challenges and Opportunities Ahead: A White Paper from the NCI TME Network.

    PubMed

    DeClerck, Yves A; Pienta, Kenneth J; Woodhouse, Elisa C; Singer, Dinah S; Mohla, Suresh

    2017-03-01

    Over the past 10 years, the Tumor Microenvironment Network (TMEN), supported by the NCI (Bethesda, MD), has promoted collaborative research with the explicit goal of fostering multi-institutional and transdisciplinary groups that are capable of addressing complex issues involving the tumor microenvironment. The main goal of the TMEN was to generate novel information about the dynamic complexity of tumor-host interactions in different organ systems with emphasis on using human tissues and supplemented by experimental models. As this initiative comes to a close, members of the TMEN took time to examine what has been accomplished by the Network and importantly to identify the challenges and opportunities ahead. This consensus document summarizes for the broader scientific community discussions that occurred at the two final meetings of the TMEN in 2015 and 2016. Cancer Res; 77(5); 1051-9. ©2017 AACR.

  7. The Role of Heparanase and Sulfatases in the Modification of Heparan Sulfate Proteoglycans within the Tumor Microenvironment and Opportunities for Novel Cancer Therapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Hammond, Edward; Khurana, Ashwani; Shridhar, Viji; Dredge, Keith

    2014-01-01

    Heparan sulfate proteoglycans (HSPGs) are an integral and dynamic part of normal tissue architecture at the cell surface and within the extracellular matrix. The modification of HSPGs in the tumor microenvironment is known to result not just in structural but also functional consequences, which significantly impact cancer progression. As substrates for the key enzymes sulfatases and heparanase, the modification of HSPGs is typically characterized by the degradation of heparan sulfate (HS) chains/sulfation patterns via the endo-6-O-sulfatases (Sulf1 and Sulf2) or by heparanase, an endo-glycosidase that cleaves the HS polymers releasing smaller fragments from HSPG complexes. Numerous studies have demonstrated how these enzymes actively influence cancer cell proliferation, signaling, invasion, and metastasis. The activity or expression of these enzymes has been reported to be modified in a variety of cancers. Such observations are consistent with the degradation of normal architecture and basement membranes, which are typically compromised in metastatic disease. Moreover, recent studies elucidating the requirements for these proteins in tumor initiation and progression exemplify their importance in the development and progression of cancer. Thus, as the influence of the tumor microenvironment in cancer progression becomes more apparent, the focus on targeting enzymes that degrade HSPGs highlights one approach to maintain normal tissue architecture, inhibit tumor progression, and block metastasis. This review discusses the role of these enzymes in the context of the tumor microenvironment and their promise as therapeutic targets for the treatment of cancer. PMID:25105093

  8. Modeling alveolar soft part sarcomagenesis in the mouse: a role for lactate in the tumor microenvironment

    PubMed Central

    Goodwin, Matthew L.; Jin, Huifeng; Straessler, Krystal; Smith-Fry, Kyllie; Zhu, Ju-Fen; Monument, Michael J.; Grossmann, Allie; Randall, R. Lor; Capecchi, Mario R.; Jones, Kevin B.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Alveolar soft part sarcoma (ASPS), a deadly soft tissue malignancy with a predilection for adolescents and young adults, associates consistently with t(X;17) translocations that generate the fusion gene ASPSCR1-TFE3. We proved the oncogenic capacity of this fusion gene by driving sarcomagenesis in mice from conditional ASPSCR1-TFE3 expression. The completely penetrant tumors were indistinguishable from human ASPS by histology and gene expression. They formed preferentially in the anatomic environment highest in lactate--the cranial vault--, expressed high levels of lactate importers, harbored abundant mitochondria, metabolized lactate as a metabolic substrate and responded to the administration of exogenous lactate with tumor cell proliferation and angiogenesis. These data demonstrate lactate’s role as a driver of alveolar soft part sarcomagenesis. PMID:25453902

  9. Tumor Microenvironment and Progression to Invasion after a Diagnosis of Ductal Carcinoma In Situ

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-03-01

    received, ranging from 86.5% among cases receiving no further treatment after biopsy to 100% among women receiving a bilateral mastectomy . Women... mastectomy (94.7%). Tamoxifen use reduced the risk of a second event by about 20% among all treatment groups, with the exception of those undergoing...bilateral mastectomy . We have also examined tumor and patient characteristics in relation to DCIS disease-free survival in the WISC Cohort. DCIS cases

  10. Tumor Microenvironment and Progression to Invasion after a Diagnosis of Ductal Carcinoma In situ

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-03-01

    bilateral mastectomy . Women receiving breast conservation surgery followed by radiation had similar disease-free survival (95.4%) compared to women...undergoing ipsilateral mastectomy (94.7%). Tamoxifen use reduced the risk of a second event by about 20% among all treatment groups, with the...exception of those undergoing bilateral mastectomy . We have also examined tumor and patient characteristics in relation to DCIS disease-free survival in

  11. Nuclear Factor-Kappa B Activity in the Host-Tumor Microenvironment of Ovarian Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-08-01

    Thymoquinone, macrophages 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 17. LIMITATION OF ABSTRACT 18. NUMBER OF PAGES 19a. NAME OF RESPONSIBLE PERSON USAMRMC...from ascites fluid or peritoneal lavages. Quantification of raw NF-B reporter activity indicated that there was a time-dependent increase (Fig 5D...relative proportion of M2 to M1 macrophages changes in response to tumor cells. We would anticipate such an increase, but are currently limited by

  12. Priming the Tumor Immune Microenvironment Improves Immune Surveillance of Cancer Stem Cells and Prevents Cancer Recurrence

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-10-01

    specifically inhibited with Caþþ-channel blockers [18]. The dye-effluxing population was given the designation side population (SP) based on their low dye...antibody (Santa Cruz Biotechnology, Santa Cruz, CA, http://www.scbt.com). We also used polyclonal rabbit anti-mouse N-cadherin and beta catenin...increased release of proangiogenic factors, including matrix metallopeptidase 9 (MMP-9), VEGF and transforming growth factor beta (TGF-b), from tumor

  13. Comprehensive immunohistochemical analysis of tumor microenvironment immune status in esophageal squamous cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Hatogai, Ken; Kitano, Shigehisa; Fujii, Satoshi; Kojima, Takashi; Daiko, Hiroyuki; Nomura, Shogo; Yoshino, Takayuki; Ohtsu, Atsushi; Takiguchi, Yuichi; Doi, Toshihiko; Ochiai, Atsushi

    2016-01-01

    Immunotherapy with anti-PD-1 antibody preliminarily showed promising efficacy for treating esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC). Herein, we used tissue microarrays and immunohistochemically analyzed PD-L1 and various tumor infiltrating immune cells (TIICs) in specimens from 196 ESCC patients who had undergone curative resection without preoperative therapy. PD-L1 expressions in tumor cells (TCs) and TIICs, as well as infiltration of lymphocytes (CD4+, CD8+, FOXP3+, and PD- 1+) and macrophages (CD68+ and CD204+), were evaluated. PD-L1 was expressed in TCs of 18.4% and in TIICs of 83.3% of these patients. PD-L1 expressions in TCs and TIICs were associated with significant infiltration of various TIIC types, especially CD8+ cells. PD-L1 expressions in both TCs and TIICs were significantly associated with favorable overall survival, and combining their levels enhanced prognostic accuracy. Prognostic impacts of PD-L1 expressions in TCs and TIICs, abundant PD-1+ cell infiltration, a high CD8+/FOXP3+ ratio, and the CD8+/CD204+ ratio remained significant after adjusting for clinicopathological factors. In conclusion, PD-L1 expression reflects anti-tumor immunity, and PD-1/PD-L1 expression and the ratio of infiltrating effector to immune suppressor cells have prognostic value. Therapeutic strategies inhibiting the PD-1/PD-L1 signal and immune suppressor cells are anticipated in ESCC patients. PMID:27322149

  14. Functional TRAIL receptors in monocytes and tumor-associated macrophages: A possible targeting pathway in the tumor microenvironment

    PubMed Central

    Liguori, Manuela; Buracchi, Chiara; Pasqualini, Fabio; Bergomas, Francesca; Pesce, Samantha; Sironi, Marina; Grizzi, Fabio; Mantovani, Alberto

    2016-01-01

    Despite the accepted dogma that TRAIL kills only tumor cells and spares normal ones, we show in this study that mononuclear phagocytes are susceptible to recombinant TRAIL via caspase-dependent apoptosis. Human resting monocytes and in vitro-differentiated macrophages expressed substantial levels of the functional TRAIL receptors (TRAIL-R1 and TRAIL-R2), while neutrophils and lymphocytes mostly expressed the non-signaling decoy receptor (TRAIL-R3). Accordingly, exclusively monocytes and macrophages activated caspase-8 and underwent apoptosis upon recombinant TRAIL treatment. TRAIL-Rs were up-regulated by anti-inflammatory agents (IL-10, glucocorticoids) and by natural compounds (Apigenin, Quercetin, Palmitate) and their treatment resulted in increased TRAIL-induced apoptosis. In mice, the only signaling TRAIL-R (DR5) was preferentially expressed by blood monocytes rather than neutrophils or lymphocytes. In both mice and humans, Tumor-Associated Macrophages (TAM) expressed functional TRAIL-R, while resident macrophages in normal tissues did not. As a proof of principle, we treated mice bearing a murine TRAIL-resistant fibrosarcoma with recombinant TRAIL. We observed significant decrease of circulating monocytes and infiltrating TAM, as well as reduced tumor growth and lower metastasis formation. Overall, these findings demonstrate that human and murine monocytes/macrophages are, among leukocytes, uniquely susceptible to TRAIL-mediated killing. This differential susceptibility to TRAIL could be exploited to selectively target macrophages in tumors. PMID:27191500

  15. Differential expression of mitotic regulators and tumor microenvironment influences the regional growth pattern of solid sarcoma along the cranio-caudal axis.

    PubMed

    Chattopadhyay, Sukalpa; Chaklader, Malay; Chatterjee, Ritam; Law, Aditya; Law, Sujata

    2016-01-01

    Soft tissue sarcomas are relatively rare, unusual, anatomically diverse group of malignancies. According to the recent literature and medical bulletins, tumor growth and aggressiveness immensely relies on its anatomical locations. However, it is unclear whether the cranio-caudal anatomical axis of the mammalian body can influence sarcoma development and the underlying molecular mechanisms are not yet deciphered. Here, we investigated the growth pattern of solid sarcoma implanted into the murine cranial and caudal anatomical locations and tried to explore the location specific expression pattern of crucial mammalian mitotic regulators such as Aurora kinase A, Histone H3 and c-Myc in the cranio-caudally originated solid tumors. In addition, the influence of local tumor microenvironment on regional sarcoma growth was also taken into consideration. We found that solid sarcoma developed differentially when implanted into two different anatomical locations and most notably, enhanced tumor growth was observed in case of cranially implanted sarcoma than the caudal sarcoma. Interestingly, Aurora kinase A and c-Myc expression and histone H3 phosphorylation level were comparatively higher in the cranial tumor than the caudal. In addition, variation of tumor stroma in a location specific manner also facilitated tumor growth. Cranial sarcoma microenvironment was well vascularized than the caudal one and consequently, a significantly higher microvessel density count was observed which was parallel with low hypoxic response with sign of local tumor inflammation in this region. Taken together, our findings suggest that differential gradient of mitotic regulators together with varied angiogenic response and local tumor microenvironment largely controls solid sarcoma growth along the cranio-caudal anatomical axis.

  16. Hypoxia and TGF-β Drive Breast Cancer Bone Metastases through Parallel Signaling Pathways in Tumor Cells and the Bone Microenvironment

    PubMed Central

    Dunn, Lauren K.; Mohammad, Khalid S.; Fournier, Pierrick G. J.; McKenna, C. Ryan; Davis, Holly W.; Niewolna, Maria; Peng, Xiang Hong; Chirgwin, John M.; Guise, Theresa A.

    2009-01-01

    Background Most patients with advanced breast cancer develop bone metastases, which cause pain, hypercalcemia, fractures, nerve compression and paralysis. Chemotherapy causes further bone loss, and bone-specific treatments are only palliative. Multiple tumor-secreted factors act on the bone microenvironment to drive a feed-forward cycle of tumor growth. Effective treatment requires inhibiting upstream regulators of groups of prometastatic factors. Two central regulators are hypoxia and transforming growth factor (TGF)- β. We asked whether hypoxia (via HIF-1α) and TGF-β signaling promote bone metastases independently or synergistically, and we tested molecular versus pharmacological inhibition strategies in an animal model. Methodology/Principal Findings We analyzed interactions between HIF-1α and TGF-β pathways in MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells. Only vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and the CXC chemokine receptor 4 (CXCR4), of 16 genes tested, were additively increased by both TGF-β and hypoxia, with effects on the proximal promoters. We inhibited HIF-1α and TGF-β pathways in tumor cells by shRNA and dominant negative receptor approaches. Inhibition of either pathway decreased bone metastasis, with no further effect of double blockade. We tested pharmacologic inhibitors of the pathways, which target both the tumor and the bone microenvironment. Unlike molecular blockade, combined drug treatment decreased bone metastases more than either alone, with effects on bone to decrease osteoclastic bone resorption and increase osteoblast activity, in addition to actions on tumor cells. Conclusions/Significance Hypoxia and TGF-β signaling in parallel drive tumor bone metastases and regulate a common set of tumor genes. In contrast, small molecule inhibitors, by acting on both tumor cells and the bone microenvironment, additively decrease tumor burden, while improving skeletal quality. Our studies suggest that inhibitors of HIF-1α and TGF-β may improve

  17. Modulation of the tumor microenvironment and inhibition of EGF/EGFR pathway: novel anti-tumor mechanisms of Cannabidiol in breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Elbaz, Mohamad; Nasser, Mohd W; Ravi, Janani; Wani, Nissar A; Ahirwar, Dinesh K; Zhao, Helong; Oghumu, Steve; Satoskar, Abhay R; Shilo, Konstantin; Carson, William E; Ganju, Ramesh K

    2015-04-01

    The anti-tumor role and mechanisms of Cannabidiol (CBD), a non-psychotropic cannabinoid compound, are not well studied especially in triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC). In the present study, we analyzed CBD's anti-tumorigenic activity against highly aggressive breast cancer cell lines including TNBC subtype. We show here -for the first time-that CBD significantly inhibits epidermal growth factor (EGF)-induced proliferation and chemotaxis of breast cancer cells. Further studies revealed that CBD inhibits EGF-induced activation of EGFR, ERK, AKT and NF-kB signaling pathways as well as MMP2 and MMP9 secretion. In addition, we demonstrated that CBD inhibits tumor growth and metastasis in different mouse model systems. Analysis of molecular mechanisms revealed that CBD significantly inhibits the recruitment of tumor-associated macrophages in primary tumor stroma and secondary lung metastases. Similarly, our in vitro studies showed a significant reduction in the number of migrated RAW 264.7 cells towards the conditioned medium of CBD-treated cancer cells. The conditioned medium of CBD-treated cancer cells also showed lower levels of GM-CSF and CCL3 cytokines which are important for macrophage recruitment and activation. In summary, our study shows -for the first time-that CBD inhibits breast cancer growth and metastasis through novel mechanisms by inhibiting EGF/EGFR signaling and modulating the tumor microenvironment. These results also indicate that CBD can be used as a novel therapeutic option to inhibit growth and metastasis of highly aggressive breast cancer subtypes including TNBC, which currently have limited therapeutic options and are associated with poor prognosis and low survival rates.

  18. mTOR and MEK1/2 inhibition differentially modulate tumor growth and the immune microenvironment in syngeneic models of oral cavity cancer

    PubMed Central

    Cash, Harrison; Shah, Sujay; Moore, Ellen; Caruso, Andria; Uppaluri, Ravindra; Van Waes, Carter; Allen, Clint

    2015-01-01

    We investigated the effects of mTOR and MEK1/2 inhibition on tumor growth and the tumor microenvironment in immunogenic and poorly immunogenic models of murine oral cancer. In vitro, rapamycin and PD901 inhibited signaling through expected downstream targets, but only PD901 reduced viability and altered function of MOC cells. Following transplantation of MOC cells into immune-competent mice, effects on both cancer and infiltrating immune cells were characterized following rapamycin and/or PD901 treatment for 21 days. In vivo, both rapamycin and PD901 inhibition reduced primary growth of established MOC tumors on treatment. Following withdrawal of PD901, rapid rebound of tumor growth limited survival, whereas durable tumor control was observed following rapamycin treatment in immunogenic MOC1 tumors despite more robust inhibition of oncogenic signaling by PD901. Characterization of the immune microenvironment revealed diminished infiltration and activation of antigen-specific CD8+ T-cells and other immune cells following PD901 but not rapamycin in immunogenic tumors. Subsequent in vitro T-cell assays validated robust inhibition of T-cell expansion and activation following MEK inhibition compared to mTOR inhibition. CD8 cell depletion abrogated rapamycin-induced primary tumor growth inhibition in MOC1 mice. These data have critical implications in the design of combination targeted and immune therapies in oral cancer. PMID:26506415

  19. Overexpression of CD90 (Thy-1) in pancreatic adenocarcinoma present in the tumor microenvironment.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Jianhui; Thakolwiboon, Smathorn; Liu, Xinhua; Zhang, Min; Lubman, David M

    2014-01-01

    CD90 (Thy-1) plays important roles in oncogenesis and shows potential as a candidate marker for cancer stem cells (CSCs) in various malignancies. Herein, we investigated the expression of CD90 in pancreatic adenocarcinoma (PDAC), with a comparison to normal pancreas and non-malignant pancreatic disease, by immunohistochemical (IHC) analysis of tissue microarrays containing 183 clinical tissue specimens. Statistical analysis was performed to evaluate the correlation between CD90 expression and the major clinicopathological factors after adjustment of age and gender. The IHC data showed that CD90 was significantly overexpressed in PDAC and its metastatic cancers as compared to chronic pancreatitis and benign islet tumors, while it was negative in normal pancreas and 82.7% of adjacent normal pancreas tissues. The abundant CD90 expression was predominantly present in PDAC stroma, such as fibroblasts and vascular endothelial cells, which could serve as a promising marker to distinguish pancreatic adenocarcinoma from normal pancreas and non-malignant pancreatic diseases. Double immunostaining of CD90 with CD24, a CSC marker for PDAC, showed that there was little overlap between these two markers. However, CD90+ fibroblast cells were clustered around CD24+ malignant ducts, suggesting that CD90 may be involved in the tumor-stroma interactions and promote pancreatic cancer development. Furthermore, CD90 mostly overlapped with α-smooth muscle actin (αSMA, a marker of activated pancreatic stellate cells (PSCs)) in PDAC stroma, which demonstrated that CD90+ stromal cells consist largely of activated PSCs. Double immunostaining of CD90 and a vascular endothelial cell marker CD31 demonstrated that CD90 expression on vascular endothelial cells was significantly increased in PDACs as compared to normal pancreas and non-malignant pancreatic diseases. Our findings suggest that CD90 could serve as a promising marker for pancreatic adenocarcinoma where desmoplastic stroma plays an

  20. Synergistic COX2 Induction by IFNγ and TNFα Self-Limits Type-1 Immunity in the Human Tumor Microenvironment.

    PubMed

    Wong, Jeffrey L; Obermajer, Nataša; Odunsi, Kunle; Edwards, Robert P; Kalinski, Pawel

    2016-04-01

    Maintenance of CTL-, Th1-, and NK cell-mediated type-1 immunity is essential for effective antitumor responses. Unexpectedly, we observed that the critical soluble mediators of type-1 immune effector cells, IFNγ and TNFα, synergize in the induction of cyclooxygenase 2 (COX2), the key enzyme in prostaglandin (PG)E2 synthesis, and the subsequent hyperactivation of myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSC) within the tumor microenvironment (TME) of ovarian cancer patients. MDSC hyperactivation by type-1 immunity and the resultant overexpression of indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO), inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS/NOS2), IL10, and additional COX2 result in strong feedback suppression of type-1 immune responses. This paradoxical immune suppression driven by type-1 immune cell activation was found to depend on the synergistic action of IFNγ and TNFα, and could not be reproduced by either of these factors alone. Importantly, from a therapeutic standpoint, these negative feedback limiting type-1 responses could be eliminated by COX2 blockade, allowing amplification of type-1 immunity in the ovarian cancer TME. Our data demonstrate a new mechanism underlying the self-limiting nature of type-1 immunity in the human TME, driven by the synergistic induction of COX2 by IFNγ and TNFα, and provide a rationale for targeting the COX2-PGE2 axis to enhance the effectiveness of cancer immunotherapies.

  1. Matrix metalloproteinase triggered size-shrinkable gelatin-gold fabricated nanoparticles for tumor microenvironment sensitive penetration and diagnosis of glioma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruan, Shaobo; He, Qin; Gao, Huile

    2015-05-01

    To improve glioma targeting delivery efficiency and to monitor drug delivery and treatment outcome, a novel tumor microenvironment sensitive size-shrinkable theranostic system was constructed and evaluated. The G-AuNPs-DC-RRGD system was constructed by fabricating small sized gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) onto matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2) degradable gelatin nanoparticles (GNPs), doxorubicin (DOX) and Cy5.5 were decorated onto AuNPs through a hydrazone bond to enable the system with pH triggered cargoes release, and RRGD, a tandem peptide of RGD and octarginine was surface-modified onto the system to enable it with glioma active targeting ability. In vitro, the size of G-AuNPs-DC-RRGD could effectively shrink from 188.2 nm to 55.9 nm after incubation with MMP-2, while DOX and Cy5.5 were released in a pH dependent manner. Cellular uptake demonstrated that G-AuNPs-DC-RRGD could be effectively taken up by cells with higher intensity than G-AuNPs-DC-PEG. A study of tumor spheroids further demonstrated that the particles with smaller size showed better penetration ability, while RRGD modification could further improve permeability. In vivo, G-AuNPs-DC-RRGD displayed the best glioma targeting and accumulation efficiency, with good colocalization with neovessels. Cy5.5 also was colocalized well with DOX, indicating that Cy5.5 could be used for imaging of DOX delivery.To improve glioma targeting delivery efficiency and to monitor drug delivery and treatment outcome, a novel tumor microenvironment sensitive size-shrinkable theranostic system was constructed and evaluated. The G-AuNPs-DC-RRGD system was constructed by fabricating small sized gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) onto matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2) degradable gelatin nanoparticles (GNPs), doxorubicin (DOX) and Cy5.5 were decorated onto AuNPs through a hydrazone bond to enable the system with pH triggered cargoes release, and RRGD, a tandem peptide of RGD and octarginine was surface-modified onto the system to

  2. Biomaterials approaches to modeling macrophage-extracellular matrix interactions in the tumor microenvironment.

    PubMed

    Springer, Nora L; Fischbach, Claudia

    2016-08-01

    Tumors are characterized by aberrant extracellular matrix (ECM) remodeling and chronic inflammation. While advances in biomaterials and tissue engineering strategies have led to important new insights regarding the role of ECM composition, structure, and mechanical properties in cancer in general, the functional link between these parameters and macrophage phenotype is poorly understood. Nevertheless, increasing experimental evidence suggests that macrophage behavior is similarly controlled by physicochemical properties of the ECM and consequential changes in mechanosignaling. Here, we will summarize the current knowledge of macrophage biology and ECM-mediated differences in mechanotransduction and discuss future opportunities of biomaterials and tissue engineering platforms to interrogate the functional relationship between these parameters and their relevance to cancer.

  3. Didymin reverses phthalate ester-associated breast cancer aggravation in the breast cancer tumor microenvironment

    PubMed Central

    HSU, YA-LING; HSIEH, CHIA-JUNG; TSAI, EING-MEI; HUNG, JEN-YU; CHANG, WEI-AN; HOU, MING-FENG; KUO, PO-LIN

    2016-01-01

    The present study demonstrated two novel findings. To the best of our knowledge, it is the first study to demonstrate that regulated upon activation, normal T-cell expressed and secreted (RANTES), produced by breast tumor-associated monocyte-derived dendritic cells (TADCs) following breast cancer cell exposure to phthalate esters, may contribute to the progression of cancer via enhancement of cancer cell proliferation, migration and invasion. Furthermore, the present study revealed that didymin, a dietary flavonoid glycoside present in citrus fruits, was able to reverse phthalate ester-mediated breast cancer aggravation. MDA-MB-231 cells were treated with butyl benzyl phthalate (BBP), di-n-butyl phthalate (DBP) or di-2-ethylhexyl phthalate (DEHP). Subsequently, the conditioned medium (CM) was harvested and cultured with monocyte-derived dendritic cells (mdDCs). Cultures of MDA-MB-231 cells with the conditioned medium of BBP-, DBP- or DEHP-MDA-MB-231 tumor-associated mdDCs (BBP-, DBP- or DEHP-MDA-TADC-CM) demonstrated enhanced proliferation, migration and invasion. Exposure of the MDA-MB-231 cells to DBP induced the MDA-TADCs to produce the inflammatory cytokine RANTES, which subsequently induced MDA-MB-231 cell proliferation, migration and invasion. Depleting RANTES reversed the effects of DBP-MDA-TADC-mediated MDA-MB-231 cell proliferation, migration and invasion. In addition, didymin was observed to suppress phthalate-mediated breast cancer cell proliferation, migration and invasion. The present study suggested that didymin was capable of preventing phthalate ester-associated cancer aggravation. PMID:26893687

  4. Characterizing the immune microenvironment of malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor by PD-L1 expression and presence of CD8+ tumor infiltrating lymphocytes

    PubMed Central

    Shurell, Elizabeth; Singh, Arun S.; Crompton, Joseph G.; Jensen, Sarah; Li, Yunfeng; Dry, Sarah; Nelson, Scott; Chmielowski, Bartosz; Bernthal, Nicholas; Federman, Noah; Tumeh, Paul; Eilber, Fritz C.

    2016-01-01

    Background Malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor (MPNST) is an aggressive sarcoma with few treatment options. Tumor immune state has not been characterized in MPNST, and is important in determining response to immune checkpoint blockade. Our aim was to evaluate the expression of programmed death-ligand 1 (PD-L1), programmed cell death protein 1 (PD-1), and presence of CD8+ tumor infiltrating lymphocytes (TILs) in MPNST, and correlate these findings with clinical behavior and outcome. Results PD-L1 staining of at least 1% was seen in 0/20 nerves, 2/68 benign lesions and 9/53 MPNST. Two of 68 benign lesions and 7/53 (13%) MPNST had at least 5% PD-L1 staining. CD8 staining of at least 5% was seen in 1/20 (5%) nerves, 45/68 (66%) benign lesions and 30/53 (57%) MPNST. PD-L1 was statistically more prevalent in MPNST than both nerves and benign lesions (p=0.049 and p=0.008, respectively). Expression of PD-1 was absent in all tissue specimens. There was no correlation of PD-L1 or CD8 expression with disease state (primary versus metastatic) or patient survival. Methods A comprehensive PNST tissue microarray was created from 141 surgical specimens including primary, recurrent, and metastatic MPNST (n=53), neurofibromas (n=57), schwannoma (n=11), and normal nerve (n=20). Cores were stained in triplicate for PD-L1, PD-1, and CD8, and expression compared between tumor types. These data were then examined for survival correlates in 35 patients with primary MPNST. Conclusions MPNST is characterized by low PD-L1 and absent PD-1 expression with significant CD8+ TIL presence. MPNST immune microenvironment does not correlate with patient outcome. PMID:27588404

  5. Contribution of Fibroblast and Mast Cell (Afferent) and Tumor (Efferent) IL-6 Effects within the Tumor Microenvironment.

    PubMed

    Hugo, Honor J; Lebret, Stephanie; Tomaskovic-Crook, Eva; Ahmed, Nuzhat; Blick, Tony; Newgreen, Donald F; Thompson, Erik W; Ackland, M Leigh

    2012-04-01

    Hyperactive inflammatory responses following cancer initiation have led to cancer being described as a 'wound that never heals'. These inflammatory responses elicit signals via NFκB leading to IL-6 production, and IL-6 in turn has been shown to induce epithelial to mesenchymal transition in breast cancer cells in vitro, implicating a role for this cytokine in cancer cell invasion. We previously have shown that conditioned medium derived from cancer-associated fibroblasts induced an Epithelial to Mesenchymal transition (EMT) in PMC42-LA breast cancer cells and we have now identify IL-6 as present in this medium. We further show that IL-6 is expressed approximately 100 fold higher in a cancer-associated fibroblast line compared to normal fibroblasts. Comparison of mouse-specific (stroma) and human-specific (tumor) IL-6 mRNA expression from MCF-7, MDA MB 468 and MDA MB 231 xenografts also indicated the stroma rather than tumor as a significantly higher source of IL-6 expression. Mast cells (MCs) feature in inflammatory cancer-associated stroma, and activated MCs secrete IL-6. We observed a higher MC index (average number of mast cells per xenograft section/average tumor size) in MDA MB 468 compared to MDA MB 231 xenografts, where all MC were observed to be active (degranulating). This higher MC index correlated with greater mouse-specific IL-6 expression in the MDA MB 468 xenografts, implicating MC as an important source of stromal IL-6. Furthermore, immunohistochemistry on these xenografts for pSTAT3, which lies downstream of the IL-6 receptor indicated frequent correlations between pSTAT3 and mast cell positive cells. Analysis of publically available databases for IL-6 expression in patient tissue revealed higher IL-6 in laser capture microdissected stroma compared to adjacent tissue epithelium from patients with inflammatory breast cancer (IBC) and invasive non-inflammatory breast cancer (non-IBC) and we show that IL-6 expression was significantly higher in Basal

  6. Transcriptional Activation by NFκB Increases Perlecan/HSPG2 Expression in the Desmoplastic Prostate Tumor Microenvironment

    PubMed Central

    Warren, Curtis R.; Grindel, Brian J.; Francis, Lewis; Carson, Daniel D.; Farach-Carson, Mary C.

    2014-01-01

    Perlecan/HSPG2, a heparan sulfate proteoglycan typically found at tissue borders including those separating epithelia and connective tissue, increases near sites of invasion of primary prostatic tumors as previously shown for other proteins involved in desmoplastic tissue reaction. Studies of prostate cancer cells and stromal cells from both prostate and bone, the major site for prostate cancer metastasis, showed that cancer cells and a subset of stromal cells increased production of perlecan in response to cytokines present in the tumor microenvironment. In silico analysis of the HSPG2 promoter revealed two conserved NFκB binding sites, in addition to the previously reported SMAD3 binding sites. By systematically transfecting cells with a variety of reporter constructs including sequences up to 2.6 kb from the start site of transcription, we identified an active cis element in the distal region of the HSPG2 promoter, and showed that it functions in regulating transcription of HSPG2. Treatment with TNF-α and/or TGFβ1 identified TNF-α as a major cytokine regulator of perlecan production. TNF-α treatment also triggered p65 nuclear translocation and binding to the HSPG2 regulatory region in stromal cells and cancer cells. In addition to stromal induction of perlecan production in the prostate, we identified a matrix-secreting bone marrow stromal cell type that may represent the source for increases in perlecan in the metastatic bone marrow environment. These studies implicate perlecan in cytokine-mediated, innate tissue responses to cancer cell invasion, a process we suggest reflects a modified wound healing tissue response co-opted by prostate cancer cells. PMID:24700612

  7. Molecular crosstalk between cancer cells and tumor microenvironment components suggests potential targets for new therapeutic approaches in mobile tongue cancer

    PubMed Central

    Dayan, Dan; Salo, Tuula; Salo, Sirpa; Nyberg, Pia; Nurmenniemi, Sini; Costea, Daniela Elena; Vered, Marilena

    2012-01-01

    We characterized tumor microenvironment (TME) components of mobile tongue (MT) cancer patients in terms of overall inflammatory infiltrate, focusing on the protumorigenic/anti-inflammatory phenotypes and on cancer-associated fibroblasts (CAFs) in order to determine their interrelations and associations with clinical outcomes. In addition, by culturing tongue carcinoma cells (HSC-3) on a three-dimensional myoma organotypic model that mimics TME, we attempted to investigate the possible existence of a molecular crosstalk between cancer cells and TME components. Analysis of 64 cases of MT cancer patients revealed that the overall density of the inflammatory infiltrate was inversely correlated to the density of CAFs (P = 0.01), but that the cumulative density of the protumorigenic/anti-inflammatory phenotypes, including regulatory T cells (Tregs, Foxp3+), tumor-associated macrophages (TAM2, CD163+), and potentially Tregs-inducing immune cells (CD80+), was directly correlated with the density of CAFs (P = 0.01). The hazard ratio (HR) for recurrence in a TME rich in CD163+ Foxp3+ CD80+ was 2.9 (95% CI 1.03–8.6, P = 0.043 compared with low in CD163+ Foxp3+ CD80+). The HR for recurrence in a TME rich in CAFs was 4.1 (95% confidence interval [CI] 1.3–12.8, P = 0.012 compared with low in CAFs). In vitro studies showed cancer-derived exosomes, epithelial–mesenchymal transition process, fibroblast-to-CAF-like cell transdifferentiation, and reciprocal interrelations between different cytokines suggesting the presence of molecular crosstalk between cancer cells and TME components. Collectively, these results highlighted the emerging need of new therapies targeting this crosstalk between the cancer cells and TME components in MT cancer. PMID:23342263

  8. Three-Dimensional Lung Tumor Microenvironment Modulates Therapeutic Compound Responsiveness In Vitro – Implication for Drug Development

    PubMed Central

    Ekert, Jason E.; Johnson, Kjell; Strake, Brandy; Pardinas, Jose; Jarantow, Stephen; Perkinson, Robert; Colter, David C.

    2014-01-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) cell culture is gaining acceptance in response to the need for cellular models that better mimic physiologic tissues. Spheroids are one such 3D model where clusters of cells will undergo self-assembly to form viable, 3D tumor-like structures. However, to date little is known about how spheroid biology compares to that of the more traditional and widely utilized 2D monolayer cultures. Therefore, the goal of this study was to characterize the phenotypic and functional differences between lung tumor cells grown as 2D monolayer cultures, versus cells grown as 3D spheroids. Eight lung tumor cell lines, displaying varying levels of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and cMET protein expression, were used to develop a 3D spheroid cell culture model using low attachment U-bottom plates. The 3D spheroids were compared with cells grown in monolayer for 1) EGFR and cMET receptor expression, as determined by flow cytometry, 2) EGFR and cMET phosphorylation by MSD assay, and 3) cell proliferation in response to epidermal growth factor (EGF) and hepatocyte growth factor (HGF). In addition, drug responsiveness to EGFR and cMET inhibitors (Erlotinib, Crizotinib, Cetuximab [Erbitux] and Onartuzumab [MetMab]) was evaluated by measuring the extent of cell proliferation and migration. Data showed that EGFR and cMET expression is reduced at day four of untreated spheroid culture compared to monolayer. Basal phosphorylation of EGFR and cMET was higher in spheroids compared to monolayer cultures. Spheroids showed reduced EGFR and cMET phosphorylation when stimulated with ligand compared to 2D cultures. Spheroids showed an altered cell proliferation response to HGF, as well as to EGFR and cMET inhibitors, compared to monolayer cultures. Finally, spheroid cultures showed exceptional utility in a cell migration assay. Overall, the 3D spheroid culture changed the cellular response to drugs and growth factors and may more accurately mimic the natural tumor

  9. Three-dimensional lung tumor microenvironment modulates therapeutic compound responsiveness in vitro--implication for drug development.

    PubMed

    Ekert, Jason E; Johnson, Kjell; Strake, Brandy; Pardinas, Jose; Jarantow, Stephen; Perkinson, Robert; Colter, David C

    2014-01-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) cell culture is gaining acceptance in response to the need for cellular models that better mimic physiologic tissues. Spheroids are one such 3D model where clusters of cells will undergo self-assembly to form viable, 3D tumor-like structures. However, to date little is known about how spheroid biology compares to that of the more traditional and widely utilized 2D monolayer cultures. Therefore, the goal of this study was to characterize the phenotypic and functional differences between lung tumor cells grown as 2D monolayer cultures, versus cells grown as 3D spheroids. Eight lung tumor cell lines, displaying varying levels of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and cMET protein expression, were used to develop a 3D spheroid cell culture model using low attachment U-bottom plates. The 3D spheroids were compared with cells grown in monolayer for 1) EGFR and cMET receptor expression, as determined by flow cytometry, 2) EGFR and cMET phosphorylation by MSD assay, and 3) cell proliferation in response to epidermal growth factor (EGF) and hepatocyte growth factor (HGF). In addition, drug responsiveness to EGFR and cMET inhibitors (Erlotinib, Crizotinib, Cetuximab [Erbitux] and Onartuzumab [MetMab]) was evaluated by measuring the extent of cell proliferation and migration. Data showed that EGFR and cMET expression is reduced at day four of untreated spheroid culture compared to monolayer. Basal phosphorylation of EGFR and cMET was higher in spheroids compared to monolayer cultures. Spheroids showed reduced EGFR and cMET phosphorylation when stimulated with ligand compared to 2D cultures. Spheroids showed an altered cell proliferation response to HGF, as well as to EGFR and cMET inhibitors, compared to monolayer cultures. Finally, spheroid cultures showed exceptional utility in a cell migration assay. Overall, the 3D spheroid culture changed the cellular response to drugs and growth factors and may more accurately mimic the natural tumor

  10. Interface between breast cancer cells and the tumor microenvironment using platelet-rich plasma to promote tumor angiogenesis - influence of platelets and fibrin bundles on the behavior of breast tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Andrade, Sheila Siqueira; Sumikawa, Joana Tomomi; Castro, Eloísa Dognani; Batista, Fabricio Pereira; Paredes-Gamero, Edgar; Oliveira, Lilian Carolina; Guerra, Izabel Monastério; Peres, Giovani Bravin; Cavalheiro, Renan Pelluzzi; Juliano, Luiz; Nazário, Afonso Pinto; Facina, Gil; Tsai, Siu Mui; Oliva, Maria Luiza Vilela; Girão, Manoel João Batista Castello

    2017-02-07

    Cancer progression is associated with an evolving tissue interface of direct epithelial-tumor microenvironment interactions. In biopsies of human breast tumors, extensive alterations in molecular pathways are correlated with cancer staging on both sides of the tumor-stroma interface. These interactions provide a pivotal paracrine signaling to induce malignant phenotype transition, the epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT). We explored how the direct contact between platelets-fibrin bundles primes metastasis using platelet-rich plasma (PRP) as a source of growth factors and mimics the provisional fibrin matrix between actively growing breast cancer cells and the tumor stroma. We have demonstrated PRP functions, modulating cell proliferation that is tumor-subtype and cancer cell-type-specific. Epithelial and stromal primary cells were prepared from breast cancer biopsies from 21 women with different cancer subtypes. Cells supplemented with PRP were immunoblotted with anti-phospho and total Src-Tyr-416, FAK-Try-925, E-cadherin, N-cadherin, TGF-β, Smad2, and Snail monoclonal antibodies. Breast tumor cells from luminal B and HER2 subtypes showed the most malignant profiles and the expression of thrombin and other classes of proteases at levels that were detectable through FRET peptide libraries. The angiogenesis process was investigated in the interface obtained between platelet-fibrin-breast tumor cells co-cultured with HUVEC cells. Luminal B and HER2 cells showed robust endothelial cell capillary-like tubes ex vivo. The studied interface contributes to the attachment of endothelial cells, provides a source of growth factors, and is a solid substrate. Thus, replacement of FBS supplementation with PRP supplementation represents an efficient and simple approach for mimicking the real multifactorial tumor microenvironment.

  11. The impact of age on oncogenic potential: tumor-initiating cells and the brain microenvironment.

    PubMed

    Stoll, Elizabeth A; Horner, Philip J; Rostomily, Robert C

    2013-10-01

    Paradoxically, aging leads to both decreased regenerative capacity in the brain and an increased risk of tumorigenesis, particularly the most common adult-onset brain tumor, glioma. A shared factor contributing to both phenomena is thought to be age-related alterations in neural progenitor cells (NPCs), which function normally to produce new neurons and glia, but are also considered likely cells of origin for malignant glioma. Upon oncogenic transformation, cells acquire characteristics known as the hallmarks of cancer, including unlimited replication, altered responses to growth and anti-growth factors, increased capacity for angiogenesis, potential for invasion, genetic instability, apoptotic evasion, escape from immune surveillance, and an adaptive metabolic phenotype. The precise molecular pathogenesis and temporal acquisition of these malignant characteristics is largely a mystery. Recent studies characterizing NPCs during normal aging, however, have begun to elucidate mechanisms underlying the age-associated increase in their malignant potential. Aging cells are dependent upon multiple compensatory pathways to maintain cell cycle control, normal niche interactions, genetic stability, programmed cell death, and oxidative metabolism. A few multi-functional proteins act as 'critical nodes' in the coordination of these various cellular activities, although both intracellular signaling and elements within the brain environment are critical to maintaining a balance between senescence and tumorigenesis. Here, we provide an overview of recent progress in our understanding of how mechanisms underlying cellular aging inform on glioma pathogenesis and malignancy.

  12. Dichloroacetate improves immune dysfunction caused by tumor-secreted lactic acid and increases antitumor immunoreactivity.

    PubMed

    Ohashi, Toshimitsu; Akazawa, Takashi; Aoki, Mitsuhiro; Kuze, Bunya; Mizuta, Keisuke; Ito, Yatsuji; Inoue, Norimitsu

    2013-09-01

    The activation of oncogenic signaling pathways induces the reprogramming of glucose metabolism in tumor cells and increases lactic acid secretion into the tumor microenvironment. This is a well-known characteristic of tumor cells, termed the Warburg effect, and is a candidate target for antitumor therapy. Previous reports show that lactic acid secreted by tumor cells is a proinflammatory mediator that activates the IL-23/IL-17 pathway, thereby inducing inflammation, angiogenesis and tissue remodeling. Here, we show that lactic acid, or more specifically the acidification it causes, increases arginase I (ARG1) expression in macrophages to inhibit T-cell proliferation and activation. Accordingly, we hypothesized that counteraction of the immune effects by lactic acid might suppress tumor development. We show that dichloroacetate (DCA), an inhibitor of pyruvate dehydrogenase kinases, targets macrophages to suppress activation of the IL-23/IL-17 pathway and the expression of ARG1 by lactic acid. Furthermore, lactic acid-pretreated macrophages inhibited CD8+ T-cell proliferation, but CD8+ T-cell proliferation was restored when macrophages were pretreated with lactic acid and DCA. DCA treatment decreased ARG1 expression in tumor-infiltrating immune cells and increased the number of IFN-γ-producing CD8+ T cells and NK cells in tumor-bearing mouse spleen. Although DCA treatment alone did not suppress tumor growth, it increased antitumor immunotherapeutic activity of Poly(IC) in both CD8+ T cell- and NK cell-sensitive tumor models. Therefore, DCA acts not only on tumor cells to suppress glycolysis but also on immune cells to improve the immune status modulated by lactic acid and to increase the effectiveness of antitumor immunotherapy.

  13. Oncogenes and inflammation rewire host energy metabolism in the tumor microenvironment: RAS and NFκB target stromal MCT4.

    PubMed

    Martinez-Outschoorn, Ubaldo E; Curry, Joseph M; Ko, Ying-Hui; Lin, Zhao; Tuluc, Madalina; Cognetti, David; Birbe, Ruth C; Pribitkin, Edmund; Bombonati, Alessandro; Pestell, Richard G; Howell, Anthony; Sotgia, Federica; Lisanti, Michael P

    2013-08-15

    Here, we developed a model system to evaluate the metabolic effects of oncogene(s) on the host microenvironment. A matched set of "normal" and oncogenically transformed epithelial cell lines were co-cultured with human fibroblasts, to determine the "bystander" effects of oncogenes on stromal cells. ROS production and glucose uptake were measured by FACS analysis. In addition, expression of a panel of metabolic protein biomarkers (Caveolin-1, MCT1, and MCT4) was analyzed in parallel. Interestingly, oncogene activation in cancer cells was sufficient to induce the metabolic reprogramming of cancer-associated fibroblasts toward glycolysis, via oxidative stress. Evidence for "metabolic symbiosis" between oxidative cancer cells and glycolytic fibroblasts was provided by MCT1/4 immunostaining. As such, oncogenes drive the establishment of a stromal-epithelial "lactate-shuttle", to fuel the anabolic growth of cancer cells. Similar results were obtained with two divergent oncogenes (RAS and NFκB), indicating that ROS production and inflammation metabolically converge on the tumor stroma, driving glycolysis and upregulation of MCT4. These findings make stromal MCT4 an attractive target for new drug discovery, as MCT4 is a shared endpoint for the metabolic effects of many oncogenic stimuli. Thus, diverse oncogenes stimulate a common metabolic response in the tumor stroma. Conversely, we also show that fibroblasts protect cancer cells against oncogenic stress and senescence by reducing ROS production in tumor cells. Ras-transformed cells were also able to metabolically reprogram normal adjacent epithelia, indicating that cancer cells can use either fibroblasts or epithelial cells as "partners" for metabolic symbiosis. The antioxidant N-acetyl-cysteine (NAC) selectively halted mitochondrial biogenesis in Ras-transformed cells, but not in normal epithelia. NAC also blocked stromal induction of MCT4, indicating that NAC effectively functions as an "MCT4 inhibitor". Taken

  14. T cells from the tumor microenvironment of patients with progressive myeloma can generate strong, tumor-specific cytolytic responses to autologous, tumor-loaded dendritic cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dhodapkar, Madhav V.; Krasovsky, Joseph; Olson, Kara

    2002-10-01

    Most untreated cancer patients develop progressive tumors. We tested the capacity of T lymphocytes from patients with clinically progressive, multiple myeloma to develop killer function against fresh autologous tumor. In this malignancy, it is feasible to reproducibly evaluate freshly isolated tumor cells and T cells from the marrow tumor environment. When we did this with seven consecutive patients, with all clinical stages of disease, we did not detect reactivity to autologous cancer cells. However, both cytolytic and IFN--producing responses to autologous myeloma were generated in six of seven patients after stimulation ex vivo with dendritic cells that had processed autologous tumor cells. The antitumor effectors recognized fresh autologous tumor but not nontumor cells in the bone marrow, myeloma cell lines, dendritic cells loaded with tumor-derived Ig, or allogeneic tumor. Importantly, these CD8+ effectors developed with similar efficiency by using T cells from both the blood and the bone marrow tumor environment. Therefore, even in the setting of clinical tumor progression, the tumor bed of myeloma patients contains T cells that can be activated readily by dendritic cells to kill primary autologous tumor.

  15. Extracellular Vesicles Present in Human Ovarian Tumor Microenvironments Induce a Phosphatidylserine-Dependent Arrest in the T-cell Signaling Cascade.

    PubMed

    Kelleher, Raymond J; Balu-Iyer, Sathy; Loyall, Jenni; Sacca, Anthony J; Shenoy, Gautam N; Peng, Peng; Iyer, Vandana; Fathallah, Anas M; Berenson, Charles S; Wallace, Paul K; Tario, Joseph; Odunsi, Kunle; Bankert, Richard B

    2015-11-01

    The identification of immunosuppressive factors within human tumor microenvironments, and the ability to block these factors, would be expected to enhance patients' antitumor immune responses. We previously established that an unidentified factor, or factors, present in ovarian tumor ascites fluids reversibly inhibited the activation of T cells by arresting the T-cell signaling cascade. Ultracentrifugation of the tumor ascites fluid has now revealed a pellet that contains small extracellular vesicles (EV) with an average diameter of 80 nm. The T-cell arrest was determined to be causally linked to phosphatidylserine (PS) that is present on the outer leaflet of the vesicle bilayer, as a depletion of PS-expressing EV or a blockade of PS with anti-PS antibody significantly inhibits the vesicle-induced signaling arrest. The inhibitory EV were also isolated from solid tumor tissues. The presence of immunosuppressive vesicles in the microenvironments of ovarian tumors and our ability to block their inhibition of T-cell function represent a potential therapeutic target for patients with ovarian cancer.

  16. The expressions of MIF and CXCR4 protein in tumor microenvironment are adverse prognostic factors in patients with esophageal squamous cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Tumor-derived cytokines and their receptors usually take important roles in the disease progression and prognosis of cancer patients. In this survey, we aimed to detect the expression levels of MIF and CXCR4 in different cell populations of tumor microenvironments and their association with survivals of patients with esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC). Methods MIF and CXCR4 levels were measured by immunochemistry in tumor specimens from 136 resected ESCC. Correlation analyses and independent prognostic outcomes were determined using Pearson’s chi-square test and Cox regression analysis. Results The expression of CXCR4 in tumor cells was positively associated with tumor status (P = 0.045) and clinical stage (P = 0.044); whereas the expression of CXCR4 in tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes (TILs) and the expression of MIF in tumor cells and in TILs were not associated with clinical parameters of ESCC patients. High MIF expression in tumor cells or in TILs or high CXCR4 expression in tumor cells was significantly related to poor survival of ESCC patients (P < 0.05). Multivariate analysis showed that the expression of MIF or CXCR4 in tumor cells and the expression of MIF in TILs were adverse independent factors for disease-free survival (DFS) and overall survival (OS) in the whole cohort of patients (P < 0.05). Furthermore, the expression of MIF and CXCR4 in tumor cells were independent factors for reduced DFS and OS in metastatic/recurrent ESCC patients (P < 0.05). Interestingly, the expressions of MIF and CXCR4 in tumor cells and in TILs were significantly positively correlated (P < 0.05), and the combined MIF and CXCR4 expression in tumor cells was an independent adverse predictive factor for DFS and OS (P < 0.05). Conclusion The expressions of MIF and CXCR4 proteins in tumor cells and TILs have different clinically predictive values in ESCC. PMID:23497377

  17. Activation of the FGFR-STAT3 pathway in breast cancer cells induces a hyaluronan-rich microenvironment that licenses tumor formation.

    PubMed

    Bohrer, Laura R; Chuntova, Pavlina; Bade, Lindsey K; Beadnell, Thomas C; Leon, Ronald P; Brady, Nicholas J; Ryu, Yungil; Goldberg, Jodi E; Schmechel, Stephen C; Koopmeiners, Joseph S; McCarthy, James B; Schwertfeger, Kathryn L

    2014-01-01

    Aberrant activation of fibroblast growth factor receptors (FGFR) contributes to breast cancer growth, progression, and therapeutic resistance. Because of the complex nature of the FGF/FGFR axis, and the numerous effects of FGFR activation on tumor cells and the surrounding microenvironment, the specific mechanisms through which aberrant FGFR activity contributes to breast cancer are not completely understood. We show here that FGFR activation induces accumulation of hyaluronan within the extracellular matrix and that blocking hyaluronan synthesis decreases proliferation, migration, and therapeutic resistance. Furthermore, FGFR-mediated hyaluronan accumulation requires activation of the STAT3 pathway, which regulates expression of hyaluronan synthase 2 (HAS2) and subsequent hyaluronan synthesis. Using a novel in vivo model of FGFR-dependent tumor growth, we demonstrate that STAT3 inhibition decreases both FGFR-driven tumor growth and hyaluronan levels within the tumor. Finally, our results suggest that combinatorial therapies inhibiting both FGFR activity and hyaluronan synthesis is more effective than targeting either pathway alone and may be a relevant therapeutic approach for breast cancers associated with high levels of FGFR activity. In conclusion, these studies indicate a novel targetable mechanism through which FGFR activation in breast cancer cells induces a protumorigenic microenvironment.

  18. Lead Structures for Applications in Photodynamic Therapy. 6. Temoporfin Anti-Inflammatory Conjugates to Target the Tumor Microenvironment for In Vitro PDT.

    PubMed

    Rogers, Luke; Sergeeva, Natalia N; Paszko, Edyta; Vaz, Gisela M F; Senge, Mathias O

    2015-01-01

    Due to the ongoing development of clinical photodynamic therapy (PDT), the search continues for optimized photosensitizers that can overcome some of the side effects associated with this type of treatment modality. The main protagonists being: post-treatment photosensitivity, due to only limited cellular selectivity and post-treatment tumor regrowth, due to the up-regulation of pro-inflammatory agents within the tumor microenvironment. A photosensitizer that could overcome one or both of these drawbacks would be highly attractive to those engaged in clinical PDT. Certain non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) when used in combination with PDT have shown to increase the cytotoxicity of the treatment modality by targeting the tumor microenvironment. Temoporfin (m-THPC), the gold standard chlorin-based photosensitizer (PS) since its discovery in the 1980's, has successfully been conjugated to non-steroidal anti-inflammatory compounds, in an attempt to address the issue of post-treatment tumor regrowth. Using a modified Steglich esterification reaction, a library of "iPorphyrins" was successfully synthesized and evaluated for their PDT efficacy.

  19. Lead Structures for Applications in Photodynamic Therapy. 6. Temoporfin Anti-Inflammatory Conjugates to Target the Tumor Microenvironment for In Vitro PDT

    PubMed Central

    Rogers, Luke; Sergeeva, Natalia N.; Paszko, Edyta; Vaz, Gisela M. F.; Senge, Mathias O.

    2015-01-01

    Due to the ongoing development of clinical photodynamic therapy (PDT), the search continues for optimized photosensitizers that can overcome some of the side effects associated with this type of treatment modality. The main protagonists being: post-treatment photosensitivity, due to only limited cellular selectivity and post-treatment tumor regrowth, due to the up-regulation of pro-inflammatory agents within the tumor microenvironment. A photosensitizer that could overcome one or both of these drawbacks would be highly attractive to those engaged in clinical PDT. Certain non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) when used in combination with PDT have shown to increase the cytotoxicity of the treatment modality by targeting the tumor microenvironment. Temoporfin (m-THPC), the gold standard chlorin-based photosensitizer (PS) since its discovery in the 1980’s, has successfully been conjugated to non-steroidal anti-inflammatory compounds, in an attempt to address the issue of post-treatment tumor regrowth. Using a modified Steglich esterification reaction, a library of “iPorphyrins” was successfully synthesized and evaluated for their PDT efficacy. PMID:25992651

  20. Amino acid analogs for tumor imaging

    DOEpatents

    Goodman, Mark M.; Shoup, Timothy

    1998-10-06

    The invention provides novel amino acid compounds of use in detecting and evaluating brain and body tumors. These compounds combine the advantageous properties of 1-amino-cycloalkyl-1-carboxylic acids, namely, their rapid uptake and prolonged retention in tumors with the properties of halogen substituents, including certain useful halogen isotopes including fluorine-18, iodine-123, iodine-125, iodine-131, bromine-75, bromine-76, bromine-77 and bromine-82. In one aspect, the invention features amino acid compounds that have a high specificity for target sites when administered to a subject in vivo. Preferred amino acid compounds show a target to non-target ratio of at least 5:1, are stable in vivo and substantially localized to target within 1 hour after administration. An especially preferred amino acid compound is ›.sup.18 F!-1-amino-3-fluorocyclobutane-1-carboxylic acid (FACBC). In another aspect, the invention features pharmaceutical compositions comprised of an .alpha.-amino acid moiety attached to either a four, five, or a six member carbon-chain ring. In addition, the invention features analogs of .alpha.-aminoisobutyric acid.

  1. Amino acid analogs for tumor imaging

    DOEpatents

    Goodman, Mark M.; Shoup, Timothy

    1998-09-15

    The invention provides novel amino acid compounds of use in detecting and evaluating brain and body tumors. These compounds combine the advantageous properties of 1-amino-cycloalkyl-1-carboxylic acids, namely, their rapid uptake and prolonged retention in tumors with the properties of halogen substituents, including certain useful halogen isotopes including fluorine-18, iodine-123, iodine-125, iodine-131, bromine-75, bromine-76, bromine-77 and bromine-82. In one aspect, the invention features amino acid compounds that have a high specificity for target sites when administered to a subject in vivo. Preferred amino acid compounds show a target to non-target ratio of at least 5:1, are stable in vivo and substantially localized to target within 1 hour after administration. An especially preferred amino acid compound is ›.sup.18 F!-1-amino-3-fluorocyclobutane-1-carboxylic acid (FACBC). In another aspect, the invention features pharmaceutical compositions comprised of an .alpha.-amino acid moiety attached to either a four, five, or a six member carbon-chain ring. In addition, the invention features analogs of .alpha.-aminoisobutyric acid.

  2. Amino acid analogs for tumor imaging

    DOEpatents

    Goodman, M.M.; Shoup, T.

    1998-09-15

    The invention provides novel amino acid compounds of use in detecting and evaluating brain and body tumors. These compounds combine the advantageous properties of 1-amino-cycloalkyl-1-carboxylic acids, namely, their rapid uptake and prolonged retention in tumors with the properties of halogen substituents, including certain useful halogen isotopes including fluorine-18, iodine-123, iodine-125, iodine-131, bromine-75, bromine-76, bromine-77 and bromine-82. In one aspect, the invention features amino acid compounds that have a high specificity for target sites when administered to a subject in vivo. Preferred amino acid compounds show a target to non-target ratio of at least 5:1, are stable in vivo and substantially localized to target within 1 hour after administration. An especially preferred amino acid compound is [{sup 18}F]-1-amino-3-fluorocyclobutane-1-carboxylic acid (FACBC). In another aspect, the invention features pharmaceutical compositions comprised of an {alpha}-amino acid moiety attached to either a four, five, or a six member carbon-chain ring. In addition, the invention features analogs of {alpha}-aminoisobutyric acid.

  3. Amino acid analogs for tumor imaging

    DOEpatents

    Goodman, M.M.; Shoup, T.

    1998-10-06

    The invention provides novel amino acid compounds of use in detecting and evaluating brain and body tumors. These compounds combine the advantageous properties of 1-amino-cycloalkyl-1-carboxylic acids, namely, their rapid uptake and prolonged retention in tumors with the properties of halogen substituents, including certain useful halogen isotopes including fluorine-18, iodine-123, iodine-125, iodine-131, bromine-75, bromine-76, bromine-77 and bromine-82. In one aspect, the invention features amino acid compounds that have a high specificity for target sites when administered to a subject in vivo. Preferred amino acid compounds show a target to non-target ratio of at least 5:1, are stable in vivo and substantially localized to target within 1 hour after administration. An especially preferred amino acid compound is [{sup 18}F]-1-amino-3-fluorocyclobutane-1-carboxylic acid (FACBC). In another aspect, the invention features pharmaceutical compositions comprised of an {alpha}-amino acid moiety attached to either a four, five, or a six member carbon-chain ring. In addition, the invention features analogs of {alpha}-aminoisobutyric acid.

  4. Autophagy contributes to the survival of CD133+ liver cancer stem cells in the hypoxic and nutrient-deprived tumor microenvironment.

    PubMed

    Song, Yu-Jiao; Zhang, Shan-Shan; Guo, Xian-Ling; Sun, Kai; Han, Zhi-Peng; Li, Rong; Zhao, Qiu-Dong; Deng, Wei-Jie; Xie, Xu-Qin; Zhang, Jian-Wei; Wu, Meng-Chao; Wei, Li-Xin

    2013-10-01

    Liver cancer stem cells (LCSCs) can drive and maintain hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) growth, metastasis, and recurrence. Therefore, they are potentially responsible for the poor prognosis of HCC. Oxygen and nutrient deficiencies are common characteristics of the tumor microenvironment. However, how LCSCs adapt to oxygen- and nutrient-deprived conditions is unclear. Here, we used immunofluorescent staining and flow cytometry analysis to show that CD133+ cells were significantly enriched after hypoxia and nutrient starvation (H/S) in the human HCC cell line Huh7. Sorted CD133+ cells showed higher survival, less apoptosis, and possess higher clonogenic ability under H/S compared to the CD133- population. Under H/S, electron microscopy revealed more advanced autophagic vesicles in CD133+ cells. Additionally, CD133+ cells had higher autophagy levels as measured by both RT-qPCR and Western blotting. CD133+ cells had more accumulated GFP-LC3 puncta, which can be detected by fluorescence microscopy. The autophagic inhibitor chloroquine (CQ) significantly increased apoptosis and decreased the clonogenic capacity of CD133+ cells under H/S. Pre-culturing in H/S enhanced the sphere-forming capacity of CD133+ cells. However, CQ significantly impaired this process. Therefore, autophagy is essential for LCSCs maintenance. CD133+ cells were also found to have a higher tumor-forming ability in vivo, which could be inhibited by CQ administration. Collectively, our results indicate that the involvement of autophagy in maintenance of CD133+ LCSCs under the oxygen- and nutrient-deprived conditions that are typical of the tumor microenvironment in HCC. Therefore, autophagy inhibitors may make LCSCs more sensitive to the tumor microenvironment and be useful in improving anti-cancer treatments.

  5. An in vitro model of the tumor-lymphatic microenvironment with simultaneous transendothelial and luminal flows reveals mechanisms of flow enhanced invasion.

    PubMed

    Pisano, M; Triacca, V; Barbee, K A; Swartz, M A

    2015-05-01

    The most common cancers, including breast and skin, disseminate initially through the lymphatic system, yet the mechanisms by which tumor cells home towards, enter and interact with the lymphatic endothelium remain poorly understood. Transmural and luminal flows are important biophysical cues of the lymphatic microenvironment that can affect adhesion molecules, growth factors and chemokine expression as well as matrix remodeling, among others. Although microfluidic models are suitable for in vitro reconstruction of highly complex biological systems, the difficult assembly and operation of these systems often only allows a limited throughput. Here we present and characterize a novel flow chamber which recapitulates the lymphatic capillary microenvironment by coupling a standard Boyden chamber setup with a micro-channel and a controlled fluidic environment. The inclusion of luminal and transmural flow renders the model more biologically relevant, combining standard 3D culture techniques with advanced control of mechanical forces that are naturally present within the lymphatic microenvironment. The system can be monitored in real-time, allowing continuous quantification of different parameters of interest, such as cell intravasation and detachment from the endothelium, under varied biomechanical conditions. Moreover, the easy setup permits a medium-high throughput, thereby enabling downstream quantitative analyses. Using this model, we examined the kinetics of tumor cell (MDA-MB-231) invasion and transmigration dynamics across lymphatic endothelium under varying flow conditions. We found that luminal flow indirectly upregulates tumor cell transmigration rate via its effect on lymphatic endothelial cells. Moreover, we showed that the addition of transmural flow further increases intravasation, suggesting that distinct flow-mediated mechanisms regulate tumor cell invasion.

  6. Microenvironment-Modulated Metastatic CD133+/CXCR4+/EpCAM- Lung Cancer-Initiating Cells Sustain Tumor Dissemination and Correlate with Poor Prognosis.

    PubMed

    Bertolini, Giulia; D'Amico, Lucia; Moro, Massimo; Landoni, Elena; Perego, Paola; Miceli, Rosalba; Gatti, Laura; Andriani, Francesca; Wong, Donald; Caserini, Roberto; Tortoreto, Monica; Milione, Massimo; Ferracini, Riccardo; Mariani, Luigi; Pastorino, Ugo; Roato, Ilaria; Sozzi, Gabriella; Roz, Luca

    2015-09-01

    Metastasis is the main reason for lung cancer-related mortality, but little is known about specific determinants of successful dissemination from primary tumors and metastasis initiation. Here, we show that CD133(+)/CXCR4(+) cancer-initiating cells (CIC) directly isolated from patient-derived xenografts (PDX) of non-small cell lung cancer are endowed with superior ability to seed and initiate metastasis at distant organs. We additionally report that CXCR4 inhibition successfully prevents the increase of cisplatin-resistant CD133(+)/CXCR4(+) cells in residual tumors and their metastatization. Immunophenotypic analysis of lung tumor cells intravenously injected or spontaneously disseminated to murine lungs demonstrated the survival advantage and increased colonization ability of a specific subset of CD133(+)/CXCR4(+) with reduced expression of epithelial cell adhesion molecule (EpCAM(-)), which also shows the greatest in vitro invasive potential. We next prove that recovered disseminated cells from lungs of PDX-bearing mice enriched for CD133(+)/CXCR4(+)/EpCAM(-) CICs are highly tumorigenic and metastatic. Importantly, microenvironment stimuli eliciting epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition, including signals from cancer-associated fibroblasts, are able to increase the dissemination potential of lung cancer cells through the generation of the CD133(+)/CXCR4(+)/EpCAM(-) subset. These findings also have correlates in patient samples where disseminating CICs are enriched in metastatic lymph nodes (20-fold, P = 0.006) and their detection in primary tumors is correlated with poor clinical outcome (disease-free survival: P = 0.03; overall survival: P = 0.05). Overall, these results highlight the importance of specific cellular subsets in the metastatic process, the need for in-depth characterization of disseminating tumor cells, and the potential of therapeutic strategies targeting both primary tumor and tumor-microenvironment interactions.

  7. Regulatory T Cells and Myeloid-Derived Suppressor Cells in the Tumor Microenvironment Undergo Fas-Dependent Cell Death during IL-2/αCD40 Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Weiss, Jonathan M.; Subleski, Jeff J.; Back, Tim; Chen, Xin; Watkins, Stephanie K.; Yagita, Hideo; Sayers, Thomas J.; Murphy, William J.

    2014-01-01

    Fas ligand expression in certain tumors has been proposed to contribute to immunosuppression and poor prognosis. However, immunotherapeutic approaches may elicit the Fas-mediated elimination of immunosuppressive regulatory T cells (Tregs) and myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) within tumors that represent major obstacles for cancer immunotherapy. Previously, we showed that IL-2 and agonistic CD40 Ab (αCD40) elicited synergistic antitumor responses coincident with the efficient removal of Tregs and MDSCs. We demonstrate in this study in two murine tumor models that Treg and MDSC loss within the tumor microenvironment after IL-2/αCD40 occurs through a Fas-dependent cell death pathway. Among tumor-infiltrating leukocytes, CD8+ T cells, neutrophils, and immature myeloid cells expressed Fas ligand after treatment. Fas was expressed by tumor-associated Tregs and immature myeloid cells, including MDSCs. Tregs and MDSCs in the tumor microenvironment expressed active caspases after IL-2/αCD40 therapy and, in contrast with effector T cells, Tregs significantly downregulated Bcl-2 expression. In contrast, Tregs and MDSCs proliferated and expanded in the spleen after treatment. Adoptive transfer of Fas-deficient Tregs or MDSCs into wild-type, Treg-, or MDSC-depleted hosts resulted in the persistence of Tregs or MDSCs and the loss of antitumor efficacy in response to IL-2/αCD40. These results demonstrate the importance of Fas-mediated Treg/MDSC removal for successful antitumor immunotherapy. Our results suggest that immunotherapeutic strategies that include exploiting Treg and MDSC susceptibility to Fas-mediated apoptosis hold promise for treatment of cancer. PMID:24808361

  8. Gastrin promotes intestinal polyposis through cholecystokinin-B receptor-mediated proliferative signaling and fostering tumor microenvironment.

    PubMed

    Han, Y-M; Park, J-M; Park, S-H; Hahm, K B; Hong, S P; Kim, E-H

    2013-08-01

    -mediated proliferative signaling or fostering tumor microenvironment such as macrophage activation.

  9. Liquid biopsies for liquid tumors: emerging potential of circulating free nucleic acid evaluation for the management of hematologic malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Hocking, Jay; Mithraprabhu, Sridurga; Kalff, Anna; Spencer, Andrew

    2016-01-01

    Circulating free nucleic acids; cell free DNA and circulating micro-RNA, are found in the plasma of patients with hematologic and solid malignancies at levels higher than that of healthy individuals. In patients with hematologic malignancy cell free DNA reflects the underlying tumor mutational profile, whilst micro-RNAs reflect genetic interference mechanisms within a tumor and potentially the surrounding microenvironment and immune effector cells. These circulating nucleic acids offer a potentially simple, non-invasive, repeatable analysis that can aid in diagnosis, prognosis and therapeutic decisions in cancer treatment. PMID:27458529

  10. CXCL12 modulation of CXCR4 and CXCR7 activity in human glioblastoma stem-like cells and regulation of the tumor microenvironment.

    PubMed

    Würth, Roberto; Bajetto, Adriana; Harrison, Jeffrey K; Barbieri, Federica; Florio, Tullio

    2014-01-01

    Chemokines are crucial autocrine and paracrine players in tumor development. In particular, CXCL12, through its receptors CXCR4 and CXCR7, affects tumor progression by controlling cancer cell survival, proliferation and migration, and, indirectly, via angiogenesis or recruiting immune cells. Glioblastoma (GBM) is the most prevalent primary malignant brain tumor in adults and despite current multimodal therapies it remains almost incurable. The aggressive and recurrent phenotype of GBM is ascribed to high growth rate, invasiveness to normal brain, marked angiogenesis, ability to escape the immune system and resistance to standard of care therapies. Tumor molecular and cellular heterogeneity severely hinders GBM therapeutic improvement. In particular, a subpopulation of chemo- and radio-therapy resistant tumorigenic cancer stem-like cells (CSCs) is believed to be the main responsible for tumor cell dissemination to the brain. GBM cells display heterogeneous expression levels of CXCR4 and CXCR7 that are overexpressed in CSCs, representing a molecular correlate for the invasive potential of GBM. The microenvironment contribution in GBM development is increasingly emphasized. An interplay exists between CSCs, differentiated GBM cells, and the microenvironment, mainly through secreted chemokines (e.g., CXCL12) causing recruitment of fibroblasts, endothelial, mesenchymal and inflammatory cells to the tumor, via specific receptors such as CXCR4. This review covers recent developments on the role of CXCL12/CXCR4-CXCR7 networks in GBM progression and the potential translational impact of their targeting. The biological and molecular understanding of the heterogeneous GBM cell behavior, phenotype and signaling is still limited. Progress in the identification of chemokine-dependent mechanisms that affect GBM cell survival, trafficking and chemo-attractive functions, opens new perspectives for development of more specific therapeutic approaches that include chemokine

  11. CXCL12 modulation of CXCR4 and CXCR7 activity in human glioblastoma stem-like cells and regulation of the tumor microenvironment

    PubMed Central

    Würth, Roberto; Bajetto, Adriana; Harrison, Jeffrey K.; Barbieri, Federica; Florio, Tullio

    2014-01-01

    Chemokines are crucial autocrine and paracrine players in tumor development. In particular, CXCL12, through its receptors CXCR4 and CXCR7, affects tumor progression by controlling cancer cell survival, proliferation and migration, and, indirectly, via angiogenesis or recruiting immune cells. Glioblastoma (GBM) is the most prevalent primary malignant brain tumor in adults and despite current multimodal therapies it remains almost incurable. The aggressive and recurrent phenotype of GBM is ascribed to high growth rate, invasiveness to normal brain, marked angiogenesis, ability to escape the immune system and resistance to standard of care therapies. Tumor molecular and cellular heterogeneity severely hinders GBM therapeutic improvement. In particular, a subpopulation of chemo- and radio-therapy resistant tumorigenic cancer stem–like cells (CSCs) is believed to be the main responsible for tumor cell dissemination to the brain. GBM cells display heterogeneous expression levels of CXCR4 and CXCR7 that are overexpressed in CSCs, representing a molecular correlate for the invasive potential of GBM. The microenvironment contribution in GBM development is increasingly emphasized. An interplay exists between CSCs, differentiated GBM cells, and the microenvironment, mainly through secreted chemokines (e.g., CXCL12) causing recruitment of fibroblasts, endothelial, mesenchymal and inflammatory cells to the tumor, via specific receptors such as CXCR4. This review covers recent developments on the role of CXCL12/CXCR4–CXCR7 networks in GBM progression and the potential translational impact of their targeting. The biological and molecular understanding of the heterogeneous GBM cell behavior, phenotype and signaling is still limited. Progress in the identification of chemokine-dependent mechanisms that affect GBM cell survival, trafficking and chemo-attractive functions, opens new perspectives for development of more specific therapeutic approaches that include chemokine

  12. Dichotomous role of protein kinase A type I (PKAI) in the tumor microenvironment: a potential target for 'two-in-one' cancer chemoimmunotherapeutics.

    PubMed

    Hussain, Muzammal; Tang, Fei; Liu, Jinsong; Zhang, Jiancun; Javeed, Aqeel

    2015-12-01

    An emerging trend in cancer chemoimmunotherapeutics is to develop 'two-in-one' therapies, which directly inhibit tumor growth and progression, as well as enhance anti-tumor immune surveillance. Protein kinase A (PKA) is a cAMP-dependent protein kinase that mediates signal transduction of G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs). The regulatory subunit of PKA exists in two isoforms, RI and RII, which distinguish the PKA isozymes, PKA type I (PKAI) and PKA type II (PKAII). The differential expression of both PKA isozymes has long been linked to growth regulation and differentiation. RI/PKAI is particularly implicated in cellular proliferation and neoplastic transformation. Emerging experimental and pre-clinical data also indicate that RI/PKAI plays a key role in tumor-induced immune suppression. More briefly, RI/PKAI possesses a dichotomous role in the tumor microenvironment: not only contributes to tumor growth and progression, but also takes part in tumor-induced suppression of the innate and adaptive arms of anti-tumor immunosurveillance. This review specifically discusses this dichotomous role of RI/PKAI with respect to 'two-in-one' chemoimmunotherapeutic manipulation. The reviewed experimental and pre-clinical data provide the proof of concept validation that RI/PKAI may be regarded as an attractive target for a new, single-targeted, 'two hit' chemoimmunotherapeutic approach against cancer.

  13. Human Pancreatic Cancer Cells Induce a MyD88-Dependent Stromal Response to Promote a Tumor-Tolerant Immune Microenvironment.

    PubMed

    Delitto, Daniel; Delitto, Andrea E; DiVita, Bayli B; Pham, Kien; Han, Song; Hartlage, Emily R; Newby, Brittney N; Gerber, Michael H; Behrns, Kevin E; Moldawer, Lyle L; Thomas, Ryan M; George, Thomas J; Brusko, Todd M; Mathews, Clayton E; Liu, Chen; Trevino, Jose G; Hughes, Steven J; Wallet, Shannon M

    2017-02-01

    Cancer cells exert mastery over the local tumor-associated stroma (TAS) to configure protective immunity within the tumor microenvironment. The immunomodulatory character of pancreatic lysates of patients with cancer differs from those with pancreatitis. In this study, we evaluated the cross-talk between pancreatic cancer and its TAS in primary human cell culture models. Upon exposure of TAS to pancreatic cancer cell-conditioned media, we documented robust secretion of IL6 and IL8. This TAS response was MyD88-dependent and sufficient to directly suppress both CD4(+) and CD8(+) T-cell proliferation, inducing Th17 polarization at the expense of Th1. We found that patients possessed a similar shift in circulating effector memory Th17:Th1 ratios compared with healthy controls. The TAS response also directly suppressed CD8(+) T-cell-mediated cytotoxicity. Overall, our results demonstrate how TAS contributes to the production of an immunosuppressive tumor microenvironment in pancreatic cancer. Cancer Res; 77(3); 672-83. ©2016 AACR.

  14. Induction of a Tumor-Metastasis-Receptive Microenvironment as an Unwanted Side Effect After Radio/Chemotherapy and In Vitro and In Vivo Assays to Study this Phenomenon.

    PubMed

    Schneider, Gabriela; Sellers, Zachariah Payne; Ratajczak, Mariusz Z

    2016-01-01

    Besides surgical removal of tumor tissue, chemotherapy and radiotherapy are the most important and efficient treatment modalities employed to treat therapy-susceptible malignancies. The main aim of this treatment-to destroy tumor cells-is unfortunately usually associated with toxicity to nontumor cells and different degrees of tissue and organ damage. In damaged tissues several chemoattractants are upregulated and released that may attract tumor cells. Moreover, highly migratory radio/chemotherapy treatment may endow cells with several properties of cancer stem cells which survive and respond to these chemoattractants upregulated in collateral tissues. Based on this, one of the unwanted and underappreciated side effects of chemotherapy or radiotherapy is the creation of a metastasis-receptive microenvironment in bones as well as in other organs of the body. Herein we describe methods and assays that can be employed to study migratory properties of cancer cells in in vitro (chemotaxis) and in vivo (seeding efficiency assay) conditions in response to the induction of pro-metastatic microenvironments in various organs and tissues.

  15. LYSOPHOSPHATIDIC ACID INHIBITS CD8 T CELL ACTIVATION AND CONTROL OF TUMOR PROGRESSION

    PubMed Central

    Oda, Shannon K.; Strauch, Pamela; Fujiwara, Yuko; Al-Shami, Amin; Oravecz, Tamas; Tigyi, Gabor; Pelanda, Roberta; Torres, Raul M.

    2013-01-01

    CD8 T lymphocytes are able to eliminate nascent tumor cells through a process referred to as immune surveillance. However, multiple inhibitory mechanisms within the tumor microenvironment have been described that impede tumor rejection by CD8 T cells, including increased signaling by inhibitory receptors. Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) is a bioactive lysophospholipid that has been shown repeatedly to promote diverse cellular processes benefiting tumorigenesis. Accordingly, the increased expression of LPA and LPA receptors is a common feature of diverse tumor cell lineages and can result in elevated systemic LPA levels. LPA is recognized by at least 6 distinct G-protein-coupled receptors and several of which are expressed by T cells, although the precise role of LPA signaling in CD8 T cell activation and function has not been defined. Here, we demonstrate that LPA signaling via the LPA5 receptor expressed by CD8 T cells suppresses antigen receptor signaling, cell activation and proliferation in vitro and in vivo. Importantly, in a mouse melanoma model tumor-specific CD8 T cells that are LPA5-deficient are able to control tumor growth significantly better than wild-type tumor-specific CD8 T cells. Together, these data suggest that the production of LPA by tumors serves not only in an autocrine manner to promote tumorigenesis but also as a mechanism to suppress adaptive immunity and highlights a potential novel target for cancer treatment. PMID:24455753

  16. Interleukin-6 Induced “Acute” Phenotypic Microenvironment Promotes Th1 Anti-Tumor Immunity in Cryo-Thermal Therapy Revealed By Shotgun and Parallel Reaction Monitoring Proteomics

    PubMed Central

    Xue, Ting; Liu, Ping; Zhou, Yong; Liu, Kun; Yang, Li; Moritz, Robert L.; Yan, Wei; Xu, Lisa X.

    2016-01-01

    Cryo-thermal therapy has been emerged as a promising novel therapeutic strategy for advanced breast cancer, triggering higher incidence of tumor regression and enhanced remission of metastasis than routine treatments. To better understand its anti-tumor mechanism, we utilized a spontaneous metastatic mouse model and quantitative proteomics to compare N-glycoproteome changes in 94 serum samples with and without treatment. We quantified 231 highly confident N-glycosylated proteins using iTRAQ shotgun proteomics. Among them, 53 showed significantly discriminated regulatory patterns over the time course, in which the acute phase response emerged as the most enhanced pathway. The anti-tumor feature of the acute response was further investigated using parallel reaction monitoring target proteomics and flow cytometry on 23 of the 53 significant proteins. We found that cryo-thermal therapy reset the tumor chronic inflammation to an “acute” phenotype, with up-regulation of acute phase proteins including IL-6 as a key regulator. The IL-6 mediated “acute” phenotype transformed IL-4 and Treg-promoting ICOSL expression to Th1-promoting IFN-γ and IL-12 production, augmented complement system activation and CD86+MHCII+ dendritic cells maturation and enhanced the proliferation of Th1 memory cells. In addition, we found an increased production of tumor progression and metastatic inhibitory proteins under such “acute” environment, favoring the anti-metastatic effect. Moreover, cryo-thermal on tumors induced the strongest “acute” response compared to cryo/hyperthermia alone or cryo-thermal on healthy tissues, accompanying by the most pronounced anti-tumor immunological effect. In summary, we demonstrated that cryo-thermal therapy induced, IL-6 mediated “acute” microenvironment shifted the tumor chronic microenvironment from Th2 immunosuppressive and pro-tumorigenic to Th1 immunostimulatory and tumoricidal state. Moreover, the magnitude of “acute” and

  17. Therapeutic targets in malignant glioblastoma microenvironment.

    PubMed

    Barcellos-Hoff, Mary Helen; Newcomb, Elizabeth W; Zagzag, David; Narayana, Ashwatha

    2009-07-01

    There is considerable evidence that the tissue microenvironment can suppress cancer and that microenvironment disruption is required for cancer growth and progression. Distortion of the microenvironment by tumor cells can promote growth, recruit nonmalignant cells that provide physiological resources, and facilitate invasion. Compared with the variable routes taken by cells to become cancers, the response of normal tissue to cancer is relatively consistent such that controlling cancer may be more readily achieved indirectly via the microenvironment. Here, we discuss 3 ideas about how the microenvironment, consisting of a vasculature, inflammatory cells, immune cells, growth factors, and extracellular matrix, might provide therapeutic targets in glioblastoma (GBM) in the context of radiotherapy (RT): (1) viable therapeutic targets exist in the GBM microenvironment, (2) RT alters the microenvironment of tissues and tumors; and (3) a potential benefit may be achieved by targeting the microenvironments induced by RT.

  18. Normalization of Tumor Microenvironment by Neem Leaf Glycoprotein Potentiates Effector T Cell Functions and Therapeutically Intervenes in the Growth of Mouse Sarcoma

    PubMed Central

    Barik, Subhasis; Banerjee, Saptak; Mallick, Atanu; Goswami, Kuntal Kanti; Roy, Soumyabrata; Bose, Anamika; Baral, Rathindranath

    2013-01-01

    We have observed restriction of the murine sarcoma growth by therapeutic intervention of neem leaf glycoprotein (NLGP). In order to evaluate the mechanism of tumor growth restriction, here, we have analyzed tumor microenvironment (TME) from sarcoma bearing mice with NLGP therapy (NLGP-TME, in comparison to PBS-TME). Analysis of cytokine milieu within TME revealed IL-10, TGFβ, IL-6 rich type 2 characters was switched to type 1 microenvironment with dominance of IFNγ secretion within NLGP-TME. Proportion of CD8+ T cells was increased within NLGP-TME and these T cells were protected from TME-induced anergy by NLGP, as indicated by higher expression of pNFAT and inhibit related downstream signaling. Moreover, low expression of FasR+ cells within CD8+ T cell population denotes prevention from activation induced cell death. Using CFSE as a probe, better migration of T cells was noted within TME from NLGP treated mice than PBS cohort. CD8+ T cells isolated from NLGP-TME exhibited greater cytotoxicity to sarcoma cells in vitro and these cells show higher expression of cytotoxicity related molecules, perforin and granzyme B. Adoptive transfer of NLGP-TME exposed T cells, but not PBS-TME exposed cells in mice, is able to significantly inhibit the growth of sarcoma in vivo. Such tumor growth inhibition by NLGP-TME exposed T cells was not observed when mice were depleted for CD8+ T cells. Accumulated evidences strongly suggest NLGP mediated normalization of TME allows T cells to perform optimally to inhibit the tumor growth. PMID:23785504

  19. Evaluation of Tumor Micro-Environment in an Animal Model using a Nanoparticle Contrast Agent in Computed Tomography Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Ghaghada, Ketan B.; Badea, Cristian T.; Karumbaiah, Lohitash; Fettig, Nicole; Bellamkonda, Ravi V.; Johnson, G A; Annapragada, Ananth

    2010-01-01

    RATIONALE AND OBJECTIVES Non-invasive longitudinal imaging of tumor vasculature could provide new insights into the development of solid tumors, facilitating efficient delivery of therapeutics. In this study, we report three-dimensional imaging and characterization of tumor vascular architecture using a nanoparticle contrast agent and high-resolution computed tomography (CT) imaging. MATERIALS AND METHODS Five Balb/c mice implanted with 4T1/Luc syngeneic breast tumors cells were used for the study. The nanoparticle contrast agent was systemically administered and longitudinal CT imaging was performed pre-contrast and at serial time-points post-contrast, for up to 7 days for studying the characteristics of tumor-associated blood vessels. Gene-expression of tumor angiogenic biomarkers was measured using quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR). RESULTS Early-phase imaging demonstrated the presence of co-opted and newly developed tumor vessels. The co-opted vessels demonstrated wall-permeability and ‘leakiness’ characteristics evident by an increase in extra-vascular nanoparticle-based signal enhancement visible well beyond the margins of tumor. Diameters of tumor-associated vessels were larger than the contra-lateral normal vessels. Delayed-phase imaging also demonstrated significant accumulation of nanoparticle contrast agent both within and in areas surrounding the tumor. A heterogeneous pattern of signal enhancement was observed both within and among individual tumors. Gene-expression profiling demonstrated significant variability in several angiogenic biomarkers both within and among individual tumors. CONCLUSIONS The nanoparticle contrast agent and high-resolution CT imaging facilitated visualization of co-opted and newly developed tumors vessels as well as imaging of nanoparticle accumulation within tumors. The use of this agent could provide novel insights into tumor vascular biology and could have implications on the monitoring of tumor

  20. The novel role of tyrosine kinase inhibitor in the reversal of immune suppression and modulation of tumor microenvironment for immune-based cancer therapies.

    PubMed

    Ozao-Choy, Junko; Ma, Ge; Kao, Johnny; Wang, George X; Meseck, Marcia; Sung, Max; Schwartz, Myron; Divino, Celia M; Pan, Ping-Ying; Chen, Shu-Hsia

    2009-03-15

    In tumor-bearing hosts, myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSC) and T regulatory cells (Treg) play important roles in immune suppression, the reversal of which is vitally important for the success of immune therapy. We have shown that ckit ligand is required for MDSC accumulation and Treg development. We hypothesized that sunitinib malate, a receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitor, could reverse MDSC-mediated immune suppression and modulate the tumor microenvironment, thereby improving the efficacy of immune-based therapies. Treatment with sunitinib decreased the number of MDSC and Treg in advanced tumor-bearing animals. Furthermore, it not only reduced the suppressive function of MDSCs but also prevented tumor-specific T-cell anergy and Treg development. Interestingly, sunitinib treatment resulted in reduced expression of interleukin (IL)-10, transforming growth factor-beta, and Foxp3 but enhanced expression of Th1 cytokine IFN-gamma and increased CTL responses in isolated tumor-infiltrating leukocytes. A significantly higher percentage and infiltration of CD8 and CD4 cells was detected in tumors of sunitinib-treated mice when compared with control-treated mice. More importantly, the expression of negative costimulatory molecules CTLA4 and PD-1 in both CD4 and CD8 T cells, and PDL-1 expression on MDSC and plasmacytoid dendritic cells, was also significantly decreased by sunitinib treatment. Finally, sunitinib in combination with our immune therapy protocol (IL-12 and 4-1BB activation) significantly improves the long-term survival rate of large tumor-bearing mice. These data suggest that sunitinib can be used to reverse immune suppression and as a potentially useful adjunct for enhancing the efficacy of immune-based cancer therapy for advanced malignancies.

  1. Single cell dual adherent-suspension co-culture micro-environment for studying tumor-stromal interactions with functionally selected cancer stem-like cells.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yu-Chih; Zhang, Zhixiong; Fouladdel, Shamileh; Deol, Yadwinder; Ingram, Patrick N; McDermott, Sean P; Azizi, Ebrahim; Wicha, Max S; Yoon, Euisik

    2016-08-07

    Considerable evidence suggests that cancer stem-like cells (CSCs) are critical in tumor pathogenesis, but their rarity and transience has led to much controversy about their exact nature. Although CSCs can be functionally identified using dish-based tumorsphere assays, it is difficult to handle and monitor single cells in dish-based approaches; single cell-based microfluidic approaches offer better control and reliable single cell derived sphere formation. However, like normal stem cells, CSCs are heavily regulated by their microenvironment, requiring tumor-stromal interactions for tumorigenic and proliferative behaviors. To enable single cell derived tumorsphere formation within a stromal microenvironment, we present a dual adherent/suspension co-culture device, which combines a suspension environment for single-cell tumorsphere assays and an adherent environment for co-culturing stromal cells in close proximity by selectively patterning polyHEMA in indented microwells. By minimizing dead volume and improving cell capture efficiency, the presented platform allows for the use of small numbers of cells (<100 cells). As a proof of concept, we co-cultured single T47D (breast cancer) cells and primary cancer associated fibroblasts (CAF) on-chip for 14 days to monitor sphere formation and growth. Compared to mono-culture, co-cultured T47D have higher tumorigenic potential (sphere formation rate) and proliferation rates (larger sphere size). Furthermore, 96-multiplexed single-cell transcriptome analyses were performed to compare the gene expression of co-cultured and mono-cultured T47D cells. Phenotypic changes observed in co-culture correlated with expression changes in genes associated with proliferation, apoptotic suppression, tumorigenicity and even epithelial-to-mesechymal transition. Combining the presented platform with single cell transcriptome analysis, we successfully identified functional CSCs and investigated the phenotypic and transcriptome effects induced

  2. BRAF V600E mutation correlates with suppressive tumor immune microenvironment and reduced disease-free survival in Langerhans cell histiocytosis

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, Kaixuan; Wang, Zhe; Ohshima, Koichi; Liu, Yixiong; Zhang, Weichen; Wang, Lu; Fan, Linni; Li, Mingyang; Li, Xia; Wang, Yingmei; Yu, Zhou; Yan, Qingguo; Guo, Shuangping; Wei, Jie; Guo, Ying

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Langerhans cell histiocytosis (LCH) is a neoplasm of myeloid origin characterized by a clonal proliferation of CD1a+/CD207+ dendritic cells. Recurrent BRAF V600E mutation has been reported in LCH. In the present report, we confirm the feasibility of the high-specificity monoclonal antibody VE1 for detecting BRAF V600E mutation in 36/97 (37.1%) retrospectively enrolled patients with LCH; concordant immunohistochemistry and Sanger sequencing results were seen in 94.8% of cases. We then assessed the tumor immune microenvironment status in LCH, and found that the GATA binding protein 3 (GATA3)+/T-bet+ ratio could distinguish between clinical multi-system/single-system (SS) multifocal and SS unifocal LCH. Notably, we found that BRAF V600E mutation is significantly correlated with increased programmed cell death 1 ligand 1 (PDL1) expression and forkhead box protein 3 (FOXP3)+ regulatory T cells (p < 0.001, 0.009, respectively). Moreover, Cox multivariate survival analysis showed that BRAF V600E mutation and PDL1 were independent prognostic factors of poor disease-free survival (DFS) in LCH (hazard ratio [HR] = 2.38, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.02–5.56, p = 0.044; HR = 3.06, 95%CI 1.14–7.14, p = 0.025, respectively), and the superiority of PDL1 in sensitivity and specificity as biomarker for DFS in LCH was demonstrated by receiver operator characteristic (ROC) curves when compared with BRAF V600E and risk category. Collectively, this study identifies for the first time relationship between BRAF V600E mutation and a suppressive tumor immune microenvironment in LCH, resulting in disruption of host–tumor immune surveillance, which is DFS. Our findings may provide a rationale for combining immunotherapy and BRAF-targeted therapy for treating patients with BRAF V600E mutant LCH. PMID:27622040

  3. BRAF V600E mutation correlates with suppressive tumor immune microenvironment and reduced disease-free survival in Langerhans cell histiocytosis.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Kaixuan; Wang, Zhe; Ohshima, Koichi; Liu, Yixiong; Zhang, Weichen; Wang, Lu; Fan, Linni; Li, Mingyang; Li, Xia; Wang, Yingmei; Yu, Zhou; Yan, Qingguo; Guo, Shuangping; Wei, Jie; Guo, Ying

    2016-07-01

    Langerhans cell histiocytosis (LCH) is a neoplasm of myeloid origin characterized by a clonal proliferation of CD1a(+)/CD207(+) dendritic cells. Recurrent BRAF V600E mutation has been reported in LCH. In the present report, we confirm the feasibility of the high-specificity monoclonal antibody VE1 for detecting BRAF V600E mutation in 36/97 (37.1%) retrospectively enrolled patients with LCH; concordant immunohistochemistry and Sanger sequencing results were seen in 94.8% of cases. We then assessed the tumor immune microenvironment status in LCH, and found that the GATA binding protein 3 (GATA3)(+)/T-bet(+) ratio could distinguish between clinical multi-system/single-system (SS) multifocal and SS unifocal LCH. Notably, we found that BRAF V600E mutation is significantly correlated with increased programmed cell death 1 ligand 1 (PDL1) expression and forkhead box protein 3 (FOXP3)(+) regulatory T cells (p < 0.001, 0.009, respectively). Moreover, Cox multivariate survival analysis showed that BRAF V600E mutation and PDL1 were independent prognostic factors of poor disease-free survival (DFS) in LCH (hazard ratio [HR] = 2.38, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.02-5.56, p = 0.044; HR = 3.06, 95%CI 1.14-7.14, p = 0.025, respectively), and the superiority of PDL1 in sensitivity and specificity as biomarker for DFS in LCH was demonstrated by receiver operator characteristic (ROC) curves when compared with BRAF V600E and risk category. Collectively, this study identifies for the first time relationship between BRAF V600E mutation and a suppressive tumor immune microenvironment in LCH, resulting in disruption of host-tumor immune surveillance, which is DFS. Our findings may provide a rationale for combining immunotherapy and BRAF-targeted therapy for treating patients with BRAF V600E mutant LCH.

  4. Listeria monocytogenes (Lm)-LLO immunotherapies reduce the immunosuppressive activity of myeloid-derived suppressor cells and regulatory T cells in the tumor microenvironment.

    PubMed

    Wallecha, Anu; Singh, Reshma; Malinina, Inga

    2013-01-01

    Myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSC) and regulatory T cells (Treg) are major components of the immune suppressive cells that potentially limit the effectiveness of an immunotherapy-based treatment. Both of these suppressive cell types have been shown to expand in tumor models and promote T-cell dysfunction that in turn favors tumor progression. This study demonstrates that Listeria monocytogenes (Lm)-LLO immunotherapies effect on the suppressive ability of MDSC and Treg in the tumor microenvironment (TME), resulting in a loss in the ability of these cells to suppress T cells. This alteration of immunosuppression in the TME was an inherent property of all Lm-LLO immunotherapies tested and was independent of the tumor model. The virtually total loss in the suppressive ability of these cells in the TME was linked to the reduction in the expression of arginase I in MDSC and IL-10 in Treg. The results presented here provide insight into a novel mechanism of Lm-LLO immunotherapies that potentially contributes to therapeutic antitumor responses.

  5. Photosensitizer-Conjugated Hyaluronic Acid-Shielded Polydopamine Nanoparticles for Targeted Photomediated Tumor Therapy.

    PubMed

    Han, Jieun; Park, Wooram; Park, Sin-Jung; Na, Kun

    2016-03-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is a widely used clinical option for tumor therapy. However, the clinical utilization of conventional small-molecule photosensitizers (PSs) for PDT has been limited by their low selectivity for disease sites, and undesirable photoactivation. To overcome these limitations, we demonstrated a tumor-specific and photoactivity-controllable nanoparticle photomedicine based on a combination of PS-biomacromolecule conjugates and polydopamine nanoparticles (PD-NP) for an effective tumor therapy. This novel photomedicine consisted of a PD-NP core and a PS-conjugated hyaluronic acid (PS-HA) shell. The PD-NP and the PS-HA play roles as a quencher for PSs and a cancer targeting moiety, respectively. The synthesized PS-HA-shielded PD-NPs (PHPD-NPs) had a relatively narrow size distribution (approximately 130 nm) with uniform spherical shapes. In response to cancer-specific intracellular enzymes (e.g., hyaluronidase), the PHPD-NPs exhibited an excellent singlet oxygen generation capacity for PDT. Furthermore, an efficient photothermal conversion ability for photothermal therapy (PTT) was also shown in the PHPD-NPs system. These properties provide superior therapeutic efficacy against cancer cells. In mice tumor model, the photoactive restorative effects of the PHPD-NPs were much higher in cancer microenvironments compared to that in the normal tissue. As a result, the PHPD-NPs showed a significant antitumor activity in in vivo mice tumor model. The nanoparticle photomedicine design is a novel strat