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Sample records for acidic vesicular organelle

  1. The hydrophobic amino acids involved in the interdomain association of phospholipase D1 regulate the shuttling of phospholipase D1 from vesicular organelles into the nucleus.

    PubMed

    Jang, Young Hoon; Min, Do Sik

    2012-10-31

    Phospholipase D (PLD) catalyzes the hydrolysis of phosphatidylcholine to generate the lipid second messenger, phosphatidic acid. PLD is localized in most cellular organelles, where it is likely to play different roles in signal transduction. PLD1 is primarily localized in vesicular structures such as endosomes, lysosomes and autophagosomes. However, the factors defining its localization are less clear. In this study, we found that four hydrophobic residues present in the N-terminal HKD catalytic motif of PLD1, which is involved in intramolecular association, are responsible for vesicular localization. Site-directed mutagenesis of the residues dramatically disrupted vesicular localization of PLD1. Interestingly, the hydrophobic residues of PLD1 are also involved in the interruption of its nuclear localization. Mutation of the residues increased the association of PLD1 with importin-β, which is known to mediate nuclear importation, and induced the localization of PLD1 from vesicles into the nucleus. Taken together, these data suggest that the hydrophobic amino acids involved in the interdomain association of PLD1 are required for vesicular localization and disturbance of its nuclear localization.

  2. Mapping organelle motion reveals a vesicular conveyor belt spatially replenishing secretory vesicles in stimulated chromaffin cells.

    PubMed

    Maucort, Guillaume; Kasula, Ravikiran; Papadopulos, Andreas; Nieminen, Timo A; Rubinsztein-Dunlop, Halina; Meunier, Frederic A

    2014-01-01

    How neurosecretory cells spatially adjust their secretory vesicle pools to replenish those that have fused and released their hormonal content is currently unknown. Here we designed a novel set of image analyses to map the probability of tracked organelles undergoing a specific type of movement (free, caged or directed). We then applied our analysis to time-lapse z-stack confocal imaging of secretory vesicles from bovine Chromaffin cells to map the global changes in vesicle motion and directionality occurring upon secretagogue stimulation. We report a defined region abutting the cortical actin network that actively transports secretory vesicles and is dissipated by actin and microtubule depolymerizing drugs. The directionality of this "conveyor belt" towards the cell surface is activated by stimulation. Actin and microtubule networks therefore cooperatively probe the microenvironment to transport secretory vesicles to the periphery, providing a mechanism whereby cells globally adjust their vesicle pools in response to secretagogue stimulation.

  3. Skin delivery of ferulic acid from different vesicular systems.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ming; Liu, Xiangli; Fahr, Alfred

    2010-10-01

    The aim of the present research is to evaluate the skin delivery capabilities of different vesicular systems, including conventional liposomes (CL), Tween 80-based deformable liposomes (DL), invasomes (INS) and ethosomes bearing ferulic acid (FA) being an antioxidant exhibiting a wide range of therapeutic effects against various diseases. All of the test formulations were characterized for particle size distribution, zeta-potential, vesicular shape and surface morphology, in vitro human skin permeation and skin deposition. Dynamic Light Scattering (DLS) and Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) defined that all of liposomal vesicles were almost spherical, displaying unilamellar structures with low polydispersity (PDI < 0.2) and nanometric size range (z-average no more than 150 nm). In addition, all the vesicular systems except conventional liposomes were negatively charged to a certain extent. In vitro skin permeation and skin deposition experiments demonstrated that the permeation profile of ferulic acid through human stratum corneum epidermis membrane (SCE) and the drug deposition in skin were both improved significantly using these vesicular liposomal systems. Permeation and skin deposition enhancing effect was highlighted by the ethosomal system containing 18.0 mg/ml of ferulic acid with an significantly (P < 0.01) enhanced skin flux (267.8 +/- 16.77 microg/cm2/h) and skin drug deposition (51.67 +/- 1.94 microg/cm2), which was 75 times and 7.3 times higher than those of ferulic acid from saturated PBS (pH 7.4) solution, respectively. This study demonstrated that ethosomes are promising vesicular carriers for delivering ferulic acid into or across the skin.

  4. Eukaryotic behaviour of a prokaryotic energy-transducing membrane: fully detached vesicular organelles arise by budding from the Rhodobacter sphaeroides intracytoplasmic photosynthetic membrane.

    PubMed

    Niederman, Robert A

    2010-05-01

    A major feature that distinguishes prokaryotic organisms from eukaryotes is their less complex internal structure, in which all membrane-associated functions are thought to be present within a continuous lipid-protein bilayer, rather than with distinct organelles. Contrary to this notion, as described by Tucker and co-workers in this issue of Molecular Microbiology, the application of cryo-electron tomography to the purple bacterium Rhodobacter sphaeroides has demonstrated a heretofore unrecognized ultrastructural complexity within the intracytoplasmic membrane (ICM) housing the photosynthetic apparatus. In addition to distinguishing invaginations of the cytoplasmic membrane (CM) and interconnected vesicular structures still attached to the CM, a eukaryote-like ICM budding process was revealed, which results in the formation of fully detached vesicular structures. These bacterial organelles are able to carry out both the light-harvesting and light-driven energy transduction activities necessary for the cells to assume a photosynthetic lifestyle. Their formation is shown to represent the final stage in a membrane invagination and growth process, originating with small CM indentations, which after cell disruption give rise to a membrane fraction that can be separated from mature ICM vesicles by rate-zone sedimentation.

  5. A review of reagents for fluorescence microscopy of cellular compartments and structures, Part II: reagents for non-vesicular organelles.

    PubMed

    Kilgore, Jason A; Dolman, Nick J; Davidson, Michael W

    2013-10-09

    A wide range of fluorescent dyes and reagents exist for labeling organelles in live and fixed cells. Choosing between them can sometimes be confusing, and optimization for many of them can be challenging. Presented here is a discussion on the commercially-available reagents that have shown the most promise for each organelle of interest, including endoplasmic reticulum/nuclear membrane, Golgi apparatus, mitochondria, nucleoli, and nuclei, with an emphasis on localization of these structures for microscopy. Included is a featured reagent for each structure with a recommended protocol, troubleshooting guide, and example image.

  6. Fluorogenic Substrates for Visualizing Acidic Organelle Enzyme Activities

    PubMed Central

    Harlan, Fiona Karen; Lusk, Jason Scott; Mohr, Breanna Michelle; Guzikowski, Anthony Peter; Batchelor, Robert Hardy; Jiang, Ying

    2016-01-01

    Lysosomes are acidic cytoplasmic organelles that are present in all nucleated mammalian cells and are involved in a variety of cellular processes including repair of the plasma membrane, defense against pathogens, cholesterol homeostasis, bone remodeling, metabolism, apoptosis and cell signaling. Defects in lysosomal enzyme activity have been associated with a variety of neurological diseases including Parkinson’s Disease, Lysosomal Storage Diseases, Alzheimer's disease and Huntington's disease. Fluorogenic lysosomal staining probes were synthesized for labeling lysosomes and other acidic organelles in a live-cell format and were shown to be capable of monitoring lysosomal metabolic activity. The new targeted substrates were prepared from fluorescent dyes having a low pKa value for optimum fluorescence at the lower physiological pH found in lysosomes. They were modified to contain targeting groups to direct their accumulation in lysosomes as well as enzyme-cleavable functions for monitoring specific enzyme activities using a live-cell staining format. Application to the staining of cells derived from blood and skin samples of patients with Metachromatic Leukodystrophy, Krabbe and Gaucher Diseases as well as healthy human fibroblast and leukocyte control cells exhibited localization to the lysosome when compared with known lysosomal stain LysoTracker® Red DND-99 as well as with anti-LAMP1 Antibody staining. When cell metabolism was inhibited with chloroquine, staining with an esterase substrate was reduced, demonstrating that the substrates can be used to measure cell metabolism. When applied to diseased cells, the intensity of staining was reflective of lysosomal enzyme levels found in diseased cells. Substrates specific to the enzyme deficiencies in Gaucher or Krabbe disease patient cell lines exhibited reduced staining compared to that in non-diseased cells. The new lysosome-targeted fluorogenic substrates should be useful for research, diagnostics and

  7. Bidirectional Ca2+ signaling occurs between the endoplasmic reticulum and acidic organelles

    PubMed Central

    Davis, Lianne C.; Wagner, Siegfried K.T.Y.; Lewis, Alexander M.; Parrington, John; Churchill, Grant C.

    2013-01-01

    The endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and acidic organelles (endo-lysosomes) act as separate Ca2+ stores that release Ca2+ in response to the second messengers IP3 and cADPR (ER) or NAADP (acidic organelles). Typically, trigger Ca2+ released from acidic organelles by NAADP subsequently recruits IP3 or ryanodine receptors on the ER, an anterograde signal important for amplification and Ca2+ oscillations/waves. We therefore investigated whether the ER can signal back to acidic organelles, using organelle pH as a reporter of NAADP action. We show that Ca2+ released from the ER can activate the NAADP pathway in two ways: first, by stimulating Ca2+-dependent NAADP synthesis; second, by activating NAADP-regulated channels. Moreover, the differential effects of EGTA and BAPTA (slow and fast Ca2+ chelators, respectively) suggest that the acidic organelles are preferentially activated by local microdomains of high Ca2+ at junctions between the ER and acidic organelles. Bidirectional organelle communication may have wider implications for endo-lysosomal function as well as the generation of Ca2+ oscillations and waves. PMID:23479744

  8. Characteristics of weak base-induced vacuoles formed around individual acidic organelles.

    PubMed

    Hiruma, Hiromi; Kawakami, Tadashi

    2011-01-01

    We have previously found that the weak base 4-aminopyridine induces Brownian motion of acidic organelles around which vacuoles are formed, causing organelle traffic disorder in neurons. Our present study investigated the characteristics of vacuoles induced by weak bases (NH(4)Cl, aminopyridines, and chloroquine) using mouse cells. Individual vacuoles included acidic organelles identified by fluorescent protein expression. Mitochondria and actin filaments were extruded outside the vacuoles, composing the vacuole rim. Staining with amine-reactive fluorescence showed no protein/amino acid content in vacuoles. Thus, serous vacuolar contents are probably partitioned by viscous cytosol, other organelles, and cytoskeletons, but not membrane. The weak base (chloroquine) was immunochemically detected in intravacuolar organelles, but not in vacuoles. Early vacuolization was reversible, but long-term vacuolization caused cell death. The vacuolization and cell death were blocked by the vacuolar H(+)-ATPase inhibitor and Cl--free medium. Staining with LysoTracker or LysoSensor indicated that intravacuolar organelles were strongly acidic and vacuoles were slightly acidic. This suggests that vacuolization is caused by accumulation of weak base and H(+) in acidic organelles, driven by vacuolar H(+)-ATPase associated with Cl(-) entering, and probably by subsequent extrusion of H(+) and water from organelles to the surrounding cytoplasm.

  9. Ca2+/H+ exchange by acidic organelles regulates cell migration in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Melchionda, Manuela; Pittman, Jon K.

    2016-01-01

    Increasing evidence implicates Ca2+ in the control of cell migration. However, the underlying mechanisms are incompletely understood. Acidic Ca2+ stores are fast emerging as signaling centers. But how Ca2+ is taken up by these organelles in metazoans and the physiological relevance for migration is unclear. Here, we identify a vertebrate Ca2+/H+ exchanger (CAX) as part of a widespread family of homologues in animals. CAX is expressed in neural crest cells and required for their migration in vivo. It localizes to acidic organelles, tempers evoked Ca2+ signals, and regulates cell-matrix adhesion during migration. Our data provide new molecular insight into how Ca2+ is handled by acidic organelles and link this to migration, thereby underscoring the role of noncanonical Ca2+ stores in the control of Ca2+-dependent function. PMID:27002171

  10. The Influence of Reserpine and Ethylenediaminetetraacetic Acid (EDTA) on Serotonin Storage Organelles of Blood Platelets

    PubMed Central

    Gerrard, Jonathan M.; Rao, Gundu H. R.; White, James G.

    1977-01-01

    The present investigation has evaluated the influence of reserpine on the serotonin-rich organelles bodies) in platelets from dogs, rabbits, and humans. Reserpine markedly depresses the levels of stored serotonin in human and animal platelets, accompanied by a small decrease in platelet ATP but no change in platelet ADP content. Thin sections of human platelets showed no change in the number or morphology of serotonin storage organelles during reserpine therapy, whereas a profound decrease in the size and number of dense bodies occurred in platelets from rabbits treated with reserpine. Dog platelets also showed a decrease in the number and density of serotonin storage organelles after reserpine therapy. The basis for the difference between rabbit and human platelets was explored by fixing platelets in glutaraldehyde and osmium in the presence or absence of the chelating agent ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA). Most of the dense bodies in fixed human platelets were removed by EDTA while rabbit platelet dense bodies remained essentially intact. The results suggested that the opacity of rabbit platelet dense bodies following fixation with glutaraldehyde and osmium relate primarily to their serotonin content, while the electron density of human serotonin storage organelles in fixed cells is due primarily to their calcium content. Further confirmation of this concept came from studies of platelets using the whole mount technique. Rabbit platelet serotonin storage organelles were found to lack the inherent opacity of the human dense bodies, a finding consistent with the lower concentration of calcium in the rabbit organelles. ImagesFigures 1A-DFigure 2Figure 3Figure 4Figures 5 and 6Figure 7Figure 8 PMID:405872

  11. Fluorescent macrocyclic probes with pendant functional groups as markers of acidic organelles within live cells.

    PubMed

    Wadhavane, Prashant D; Izquierdo, M Ángeles; Lutters, Dennis; Burguete, M Isabel; Marín, María J; Russell, David A; Galindo, Francisco; Luis, Santiago V

    2014-02-07

    A new family of acidity sensitive fluorescent macrocycles has been synthesized and fully characterized. Their photophysical properties including emission quantum yield and fluorescence lifetime have been determined. The acid-base properties of the new molecules can be tuned by the incorporation of pendant functional groups. The nature of such functional groups (carboxylic acid or ester) influences dramatically the pKa of the probes, two compounds of which exhibit low values. Preliminary intracellular studies using confocal microscopy together with emission spectra of the probes from the cellular environment have shown that the synthesized fluorescent macrocycles mark the acidic organelles of RAW 264.7 macrophage cells.

  12. Vesicular γ-Aminobutyric Acid Transporter Expression in Amacrine and Horizontal Cells

    PubMed Central

    Cueva, Juan G.; Haverkamp, Silke; Reimer, Richard J.; Edwards, Robert; Wässle, Heinz; Brecha, Nicholas C.

    2010-01-01

    The vesicular γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) transporter (VGAT), which transports the inhibitory amino acid transmitters GABA and glycine, is localized to synaptic vesicles in axon terminals. The localization of VGAT immunoreactivity to mouse and rat retina was evaluated with light and electron microscopy by using well-characterized VGAT antibodies. Specific VGAT immunoreactivity was localized to numerous varicose processes in all laminae of the inner plexiform layer (IPL) and to the outer plexiform layer (OPL). Amacrine cell somata characterized by weak VGAT immunoreactivity in the cytoplasm were located in the ganglion cell layer and proximal inner nuclear layer (INL) adjacent to the IPL. In rat retina, VGAT-immunoreactive cell bodies also contained GABA, glycine, or parvalbumin (PV) immunoreactivity, suggesting vesicular uptake of GABA or glycine by these cells. A few varicose VGAT-immunoreactive processes entered the OPL from the IPL. VGAT immunoreactivity in the OPL was predominantly localized to horizontal cell processes. VGAT and calcium binding protein-28K immunoreactivities (CaBP; a marker for horizontal cells) were colocalized in processes and terminals distributed to the OPL. Furthermore, VGAT immunoreactivity overlapped or was immediately adjacent to postsynaptic density-95 (PSD-95) immunoreactivity, which is prominent in photoreceptor terminals. Preem-bedding immunoelectron microscopy of mouse and rat retinae showed that VGAT immunoreactivity was localized to horizontal cell processes and their terminals. Immunoreactivity was distributed throughout the cytoplasm of the horizontal cell processes. Taken together, these findings demonstrate VGAT immunoreactivity in both amacrine and horizontal cell processes, suggesting these cells contain vesicles that accumulate GABA and glycine, possibly for vesicular release. PMID:11920703

  13. Membraneless organelles can melt nucleic acid duplexes and act as biomolecular filters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nott, Timothy J.; Craggs, Timothy D.; Baldwin, Andrew J.

    2016-06-01

    Membraneless organelles are cellular compartments made from drops of liquid protein inside a cell. These compartments assemble via the phase separation of disordered regions of proteins in response to changes in the cellular environment and the cell cycle. Here we demonstrate that the solvent environment within the interior of these cellular bodies behaves more like an organic solvent than like water. One of the most-stable biological structures known, the DNA double helix, can be melted once inside the liquid droplet, and simultaneously structures formed from regulatory single-stranded nucleic acids are stabilized. Moreover, proteins are shown to have a wide range of absorption or exclusion from these bodies, and can act as importers for otherwise-excluded nucleic acids, which suggests the existence of a protein-mediated trafficking system. A common strategy in organic chemistry is to utilize different solvents to influence the behaviour of molecules and reactions. These results reveal that cells have also evolved this capability by exploiting the interiors of membraneless organelles.

  14. Lipid Body Organelles within the Parasite Trypanosoma cruzi: A Role for Intracellular Arachidonic Acid Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Toledo, Daniel A. M.; Roque, Natália R.; Teixeira, Lívia; Milán-Garcés, Erix A.; Carneiro, Alan B.; Almeida, Mariana R.; Andrade, Gustavo F. S.; Martins, Jefferson S.; Pinho, Roberto R.; Freire-de-Lima, Célio G.; Bozza, Patrícia T.; D’Avila, Heloisa

    2016-01-01

    Most eukaryotic cells contain varying amounts of cytosolic lipidic inclusions termed lipid bodies (LBs) or lipid droplets (LDs). In mammalian cells, such as macrophages, these lipid-rich organelles are formed in response to host-pathogen interaction during infectious diseases and are sites for biosynthesis of arachidonic acid (AA)-derived inflammatory mediators (eicosanoids). Less clear are the functions of LBs in pathogenic lower eukaryotes. In this study, we demonstrated that LBs, visualized by light microscopy with different probes and transmission electron microscopy (TEM), are produced in trypomastigote forms of the parasite Trypanosoma cruzi, the causal agent of Chagas’ disease, after both host interaction and exogenous AA stimulation. Quantitative TEM revealed that LBs from amastigotes, the intracellular forms of the parasite, growing in vivo have increased size and electron-density compared to LBs from amastigotes living in vitro. AA-stimulated trypomastigotes released high amounts of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) and showed PGE2 synthase expression. Raman spectroscopy demonstrated increased unsaturated lipid content and AA incorporation in stimulated parasites. Moreover, both Raman and MALDI mass spectroscopy revealed increased AA content in LBs purified from AA-stimulated parasites compared to LBs from unstimulated group. By using a specific technique for eicosanoid detection, we immunolocalized PGE2 within LBs from AA-stimulated trypomastigotes. Altogether, our findings demonstrate that LBs from the parasite Trypanosoma cruzi are not just lipid storage inclusions but dynamic organelles, able to respond to host interaction and inflammatory events and involved in the AA metabolism. Acting as sources of PGE2, a potent immunomodulatory lipid mediator that inhibits many aspects of innate and adaptive immunity, newly-formed parasite LBs may be implicated with the pathogen survival in its host. PMID:27490663

  15. Plasmalemmal and Vesicular γ-Aminobutyric Acid Transporter Expression in the Developing Mouse Retina

    PubMed Central

    GUO, CHENYING; STELLA, SALVATORE L.; HIRANO, ARLENE A.; BRECHA, NICHOLAS C.

    2009-01-01

    Plasmalemmal and vesicular γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) transporters influence neurotransmission by regulating high-affinity GABA uptake and GABA release into the synaptic cleft and extracellular space. Postnatal expression of the plasmalemmal GABA transporter-1 (GAT-1), GAT-3, and the vesicular GABA/glycine transporter (VGAT) were evaluated in the developing mouse retina by using immunohistochemistry with affinity-purified antibodies. Weak transporter immunoreactivity was observed in the inner retina at postnatal day 0 (P0). GAT-1 immunostaining at P0 and at older ages was in amacrine and displaced amacrine cells in the inner nuclear layer (INL) and ganglion cell layer (GCL), respectively, and in their processes in the inner plexiform layer (IPL). At P10, weak GAT-1 immunostaining was in Müller cell processes. GAT-3 immunostaining at P0 and older ages was in amacrine cells and their processes, as well as in Müller cells and their processes that extended radially across the retina. At P10, Müller cell somata were observed in the middle of the INL. VGAT immunostaining was present at P0 and older ages in amacrine cells in the INL as well as processes in the IPL. At P5, weak VGAT immunostaining was also observed in horizontal cell somata and processes. By P15, the GAT and VGAT immunostaining patterns appear similar to the adult immunostaining patterns; they reached adult levels by about P20. These findings demonstrate that GABA uptake and release are initially established in the inner retina during the first postnatal week and that these systems subsequently mature in the outer retina during the second postnatal week. PMID:18975268

  16. Nitric oxide releases Cl− from acidic organelles in retinal amacrine cells

    PubMed Central

    Krishnan, Vijai; Gleason, Evanna

    2015-01-01

    Determining the factors regulating cytosolic Cl− in neurons is fundamental to our understanding of the function of GABA- and glycinergic synapses. This is because the Cl− distribution across the postsynaptic plasma membrane determines the sign and strength of postsynaptic voltage responses. We have previously demonstrated that nitric oxide (NO) releases Cl− into the cytosol from an internal compartment in both retinal amacrine cells and hippocampal neurons. Furthermore, we have shown that the increase in cytosolic Cl− is dependent upon a decrease in cytosolic pH. Here, our goals were to confirm the compartmental nature of the internal Cl− store and to test the hypothesis that Cl− is being released from acidic organelles (AO) such as the Golgi, endosomes or lysosomes. To achieve this, we made whole cell voltage clamp recordings from cultured chick retinal amacrine cells and used GABA-gated currents to track changes in cytosolic Cl−. Our results demonstrate that intact internal proton gradients are required for the NO-dependent release of internal Cl−. Furthermore, we demonstrate that increasing the pH of AO leads to release of Cl− into the cytosol. Intriguingly, the elevation of organellar pH results in a reversal in the effects of NO. These results demonstrate that cytosolic Cl− is closely linked to the regulation and maintenance of organellar pH and provide evidence that acidic compartments are the target of NO. PMID:26106295

  17. Mitochondria are the main target organelle for trivalent monomethylarsonous acid (MMA(III))-induced cytotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Naranmandura, Hua; Xu, Shi; Sawata, Takashi; Hao, Wen Hui; Liu, Huan; Bu, Na; Ogra, Yasumitsu; Lou, Yi Jia; Suzuki, Noriyuki

    2011-07-18

    Excessive generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) is considered to play an important role in arsenic-induced carcinogenicity in the liver, lungs, and urinary bladder. However, little is known about the mechanism of ROS-based carcinogenicity, including where the ROS are generated, and which arsenic species are the most effective ROS inducers. In order to better understand the mechanism of arsenic toxicity, rat liver RLC-16 cells were exposed to arsenite (iAs(III)) and its intermediate metabolites [i.e., monomethylarsonous acid (MMA(III)) and dimethylarsinous acid (DMA(III))]. MMA(III) (IC(50) = 1 μM) was found to be the most toxic form, followed by DMA(III) (IC(50) = 2 μM) and iAs(III) (IC(50) = 18 μM). Following exposure to MMA(III), ROS were found to be generated primarily in the mitochondria. DMA(III) exposure resulted in ROS generation in other organelles, while no ROS generation was seen following exposures to low levels of iAs(III). This suggests the mechanisms of induction of ROS are different among the three arsenicals. The effects of iAs(III), MMA(III), and DMA(III) on activities of complexes I-IV in the electron transport chain (ETC) of rat liver submitochondrial particles and on the stimulation of ROS production in intact mitochondria were also studied. Activities of complexes II and IV were significantly inhibited by MMA(III), but only the activity of complexes II was inhibited by DMA(III). Incubation with iAs(III) had no inhibitory effects on any of the four complexes. Generation of ROS in intact mitochondria was significantly increased following incubation with MMA(III), while low levels of ROS generation were observed following incubation with DMA(III). ROS was not produced in mitochondria following exposure to iAs(III). The mechanism underlying cell death is different among As(III), MMA(III), and DMA(III), with mitochondria being one of the primary target organelles for MMA(III)-induced cytotoxicity.

  18. Cell organelles from crassulacean acid metabolism (CAM) plants : II. Compartmentation of enzymes of the crassulacean acid metabolism.

    PubMed

    Schnarrenberger, C; Groß, D; Burkhard, C; Herbert, M

    1980-02-01

    The intracellular distribution of enzymes involved in the Crassulacean acid metabolism (CAM) has been studied in Bryophyllum calycinum Salisb. and Crassula lycopodioides Lam. After separation of cell organelles by isopycnic centrifugation, enzymes of the Crassulacean acid metabolism were found in the following cell fractions: Phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase in the chloroplasts; NAD-dependent malate dehydrogenase in the mitochondria and in the supernatant; NADP-dependent malate dehydrogenase and phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase in the chloroplasts; NADP-dependent malic enzyme in the supernatant and to a minor extent in the chloroplasts; NAD-dependent malic enzyme in the supernatant and to some degree in the mitochondria; and pyruvate; orthophosphate dikinase in the chloroplasts. The activity of the NAD-dependent malate dehydrogenase was due to three isoenzymes separated by (NH4)2SO4 gradient solubilization. These isoenzymes represented 17, 78, and 5% of the activity recovered, respectively, in the order of elution. The isoenzyme eluting first was associated with the mitochondria and the second isoenzyme was of cytosolic origin, while the intracellular location of the third isoenzyme was probably the peroxisome. Based on these findings, the metabolic path of Crassulacean acid metabolism within cells of CAM plants is discussed.

  19. Cell organelles from crassulacean-acid-metabolism (CAM) plants : I. Enzymes in isolated peroxisomes.

    PubMed

    Herbert, M; Burkhard, C; Schnarrenberger, C

    1978-01-01

    Cell organelles were isolated from the CAM plants Crassula lycopodioides Lam., Bryophyllum calycinum Salisb. and Sedum rubrotinctum R.T. Clausen by isopycnic centrifugation in sucrose gradients. The inclusion of 2.5% Ficoll in the grinding medium proved to be essential for a satisfactory separation of cell organelles during the subsequent centrifugation. Peroxisomes, mitochondria, and whole and broken chloroplasts were at least partially resolved as judged by marker-enzyme-activity profiles. The isolated peroxisomes contained activities of glycollate oxidase, catalase, hydroxypyruvate reductase, glycine aminotransferase, serine-glyoxylate aminotransferase, and aspartate aminotransferase, comparable to activities found in spinach (Spinacia oleracea L.) leaf peroxisomes. In contrast to spinach, however, only little, if any, particulate malate dehydrogenase activity could be attributed to isolated peroxisomes of the three CAM plants.

  20. Ca2+ accumulation into acidic organelles mediated by Ca2+- and vacuolar H+-ATPases in human platelets

    PubMed Central

    2005-01-01

    Most physiological agonists increase cytosolic free [Ca2+]c (cytosolic free Ca2+ concentration) to regulate a variety of cellular processes. How different stimuli evoke distinct spatiotemporal Ca2+ responses remains unclear, and the presence of separate intracellular Ca2+ stores might be of great functional relevance. Ca2+ accumulation into intracellular compartments mainly depends on the activity of Ca2+- and H+-ATPases. Platelets present two separate Ca2+ stores differentiated by the distinct sensitivity to thapsigargin and TBHQ [2,5-di-(t-butyl)-1,4-hydroquinone]. Although one store has long been identified as the dense tubular system, the nature of the TBHQ-sensitive store remains uncertain. Treatment of platelets with GPN (glycylphenylalanine-2-naphthylamide) impaired Ca2+ release by TBHQ and reduced that evoked by thrombin. In contrast, GPN did not modify Ca2+ mobilization stimulated by ADP or AVP ([arginine]vasopressin). Treatment with nigericin, a proton carrier, and bafilomycin A1, an inhibitor of the vacuolar H+-ATPase, to dissipate the proton gradient into acidic organelles induces a transient increase in [Ca2+]c that was abolished by previous treatment with the SERCA (sarcoplasmic/endoplasmic-reticulum Ca2+-ATPase) 3 inhibitor TBHQ. Depleted acidic stores after nigericin or bafilomycin A1 were refilled by SERCA 3. Thrombin, but not ADP or AVP, reduces the rise in [Ca2+]c evoked by nigericin and bafilomycin A1. Our results indicate that the TBHQ-sensitive store in human platelets is an acidic organelle whose Ca2+ accumulation is regulated by both Ca2+- and vacuolar H+-ATPases. PMID:15847604

  1. Neuronal transport of acid hydrolases and peroxidase within the lysosomal system or organelles: involvement of agranular reticulum-like cisterns.

    PubMed

    Broadwell, R D; Oliver, C; Brightman, M W

    1980-04-01

    Neurosecretory neurons of the hyperosmotically stressed hypothalamo-neurohypophysial system have been a useful model with which to demonstrate interrelationships among perikaryal lysosomes, agranular reticulum-like cisterns, endocytotic vacuoles, and the axoplasmic transport of acid hydrolases and horseradish peroxidase. Supraoptic neurons from normal mice and mice given 2% salt water to drink for 5--8 days have been studied using enzyme cytochemical techniques for peroxidase and lysosomal acid hydrolases. Peroxidase-labeling of these neurons was accomplished by intravenous injection or cerebral ventriculocisternal perfusion of the protein as previously reported (Broadwell and Brightman, '79). Compared to normal controls, supraoptic cell bodies from hyperosmotically stimulated mice contained elevated concentrations of peroxidase-labeled dense bodies demonstrated to be secondary lysosomes and acid hydrolase-positive and peroxidase-positive cisterns either attached or unattached to secondary lysosomes. These cisterns were smooth-surfaced and 400--1,000 A wide. Their morphology was similar to that of the agranular reticulum. Some of the cisterns contained both peroxidase and acid hydrolase activities. The cisterns probably represent an elongated form of lysosome and, therefore, are not elements of the agranular reticulum per se. By virtue of their direct connections with perikaryal secondary lysosomes, these cisterns may provide the route by which acid hydrolases and exogenous macromolecules can leave perikaryal secondary lysosomes for anterograde flow down the axon. Very few smooth-surfaced cisterns were involved in the retrograde transport of peroxidase within pituitary stalk axons from normal and salt-treated mice injected intravenously with peroxidase. Peroxidase undergoing retrograde transport was predominantly in endocytotic structures such as vacuoles and cup-shaped organelles, which deliver this exogenous macromolecule directly to secondary lysosomes for

  2. Vesicular stomatitis.

    PubMed

    Letchworth, G J; Rodriguez, L L; Del cbarrera, J

    1999-05-01

    Vesicular stomatitis is a disease of livestock caused by some members of the Vesiculovirus genus (Family Rhabdoviridae), two of which are called 'vesicular stomatitis virus'. Clinical disease presents as severe vesiculation and/or ulceration of the tongue, oral tissues, feet, and teats, and results in substantial loss of productivity. Except for its appearance in horses, it is clinically indistinguishable from foot-and-mouth disease. Unlike foot-and-mouth disease, it is very infectious for man and can cause a temporarily debilitating disease. Vesicular stomatitis occurs seasonally every year in the southeastern USA, southern Mexico, throughout Central America and in northern South America, and emerges from tropical areas to cause sporadic epidemics in cooler climates during the summer months. Other Vesiculoviruses are endemic in India and Africa. Vesiculoviruses are arthropod-borne and it is possible they are actually well adapted insect viruses that incidentally infect mammals. Vesiculoviruses are relatively simple, having a linear, single stranded, negative sense RNA genome encased in a bullet-shaped virion made from only five proteins. Upon infection of cultured cells, viral products turn off cellular gene expression and seize the entire metabolic potential of the cell. They also depolymerize the cytoskeleton to cause rapid tissue destruction. Virus infection in animals provokes interferon and nitric oxide responses, which quickly control viral replication, and an antibody response that prevents further viral replication. Vesiculovirus genome replication is error-prone, resulting in viral progeny containing many variants. This allows rapid adaptation. Nevertheless, vesicular stomatitis virus genomic sequences appear relatively stable within single endemic areas, and vary progressively on a North-South axis in the Western Hemisphere. Numerous important fundamental discoveries in immunology and virology have come from recent studies of vesicular stomatitis virus

  3. The endoplasmic reticulum is a target organelle for trivalent dimethylarsinic acid (DMA{sup III})-induced cytotoxicity

    SciTech Connect

    Naranmandura, Hua; Xu, Shi; Koike, Shota; Pan, Li Qiang; Chen, Bin; Wang, Yan Wei; Rehman, Kanwal; Wu, Bin; Chen, Zhe; Suzuki, Noriyuki

    2012-05-01

    The purpose of present study was to characterize the endoplasmic reticulum stress and generation of ROS in rat liver RLC-16 cells by exposing to trivalent dimethylarsinous acid (DMA{sup III}) and compared with that of trivalent arsenite (iAs{sup III}) and monomethylarsonous acid (MMA{sup III}). Protein kinase-like endoplasmic reticulum kinase (PERK) phosphorylation was significantly induced in cells exposed to DMA{sup III}, while there was no change in phosphorylated PERK (P-PERK) detected in cells after exposure to iAs{sup III} or MMA{sup III}. The generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) after DMA{sup III} exposure was found to take place specifically in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), while previous reports showed that ROS was generated in mitochondria following exposure to MMA{sup III}. Meanwhile, cycloheximide (CHX) which is an inhibitor of protein biosynthesis strongly inhibited the DMA{sup III}-induced intracellular ROS generation in the ER and the phosphorylation of PERK, suggesting the induction of ER stress probably occurs through the inhibition of the protein folding process. Activating transcription factor 4 (ATF4) and C/EBP homologous protein (CHOP) mRNA were induced by all three arsenic species, however, evidence suggested that they might be induced by different pathways in the case of iAs{sup III} and MMA{sup III}. In addition, ER resident molecular chaperone glucose-regulated protein78 (GRP78) was not affected by trivalent arsenicals, while it was induced in positive control only at high concentration (Thapsigargin;Tg), suggesting the GRP78 is less sensitive to low levels of ER stress. In summary, our findings demonstrate that the endoplasmic reticulum is a target organelle for DMA{sup III}-induced cytotoxicity. Highlights: ►ER is a target organelle for trivalent DMA{sup III}-induced cytotoxicity. ►Generation of ROS in ER can be induced specially by trivalent DMA{sup III}. ►ER-stress and generation of ROS are caused by the increase in

  4. Mitochondria-organelle contact sites: the plot thickens.

    PubMed

    Elbaz-Alon, Yael

    2017-04-15

    Membrane contact sites (MCSs) are areas of close apposition between the membranes of two different organelles that enable non-vesicular transfer of ions and lipids. Recent studies reveal that mitochondria maintain contact sites with organelles other than the endoplasmic reticulum such as the vacuole, plasma membrane and peroxisomes. This review focuses on novel findings achieved mainly in yeast regarding tethers, function and regulation of mitochondria-organelle contact sites. The emerging network of MCSs linking virtually all cellular organelles is highly dynamic and integrated with cellular metabolism.

  5. Increased long chain acyl-Coa synthetase activity and fatty acid import is linked to membrane synthesis for development of picornavirus replication organelles.

    PubMed

    Nchoutmboube, Jules A; Viktorova, Ekaterina G; Scott, Alison J; Ford, Lauren A; Pei, Zhengtong; Watkins, Paul A; Ernst, Robert K; Belov, George A

    2013-01-01

    All positive strand (+RNA) viruses of eukaryotes replicate their genomes in association with membranes. The mechanisms of membrane remodeling in infected cells represent attractive targets for designing future therapeutics, but our understanding of this process is very limited. Elements of autophagy and/or the secretory pathway were proposed to be hijacked for building of picornavirus replication organelles. However, even closely related viruses differ significantly in their requirements for components of these pathways. We demonstrate here that infection with diverse picornaviruses rapidly activates import of long chain fatty acids. While in non-infected cells the imported fatty acids are channeled to lipid droplets, in infected cells the synthesis of neutral lipids is shut down and the fatty acids are utilized in highly up-regulated phosphatidylcholine synthesis. Thus the replication organelles are likely built from de novo synthesized membrane material, rather than from the remodeled pre-existing membranes. We show that activation of fatty acid import is linked to the up-regulation of cellular long chain acyl-CoA synthetase activity and identify the long chain acyl-CoA syntheatse3 (Acsl3) as a novel host factor required for polio replication. Poliovirus protein 2A is required to trigger the activation of import of fatty acids independent of its protease activity. Shift in fatty acid import preferences by infected cells results in synthesis of phosphatidylcholines different from those in uninfected cells, arguing that the viral replication organelles possess unique properties compared to the pre-existing membranes. Our data show how poliovirus can change the overall cellular membrane homeostasis by targeting one critical process. They explain earlier observations of increased phospholipid synthesis in infected cells and suggest a simple model of the structural development of the membranous scaffold of replication complexes of picorna-like viruses, that may be

  6. New application of a subcellular fractionation method to kidney and testis for the determination of conjugated linoleic acid in selected cell organelles of healthy and cancerous human tissues.

    PubMed

    Hoffmann, Kristina; Blaudszun, Jörg; Brunken, Claus; Höpker, Wilhelm-Wolfgang; Tauber, Roland; Steinhart, Hans

    2005-03-01

    To clarify the mechanism of the anticarcinogenic effect of conjugated linoleic acid (CLA), its intracellular distribution needs to be determined. Subcellular fractionation using centrifugation techniques is a method that is frequently used for isolation of cell organelles from different tissues. But as the size and density of the organelles differ, the method needs to be optimised for every type of tissue. The novelty of this study is the application of a subcellular fractionation method to human healthy and cancerous renal and testicular tissue. Separation of total tissue homogenate into nuclei, cytosol, and a mixture of mitochondria and plasma membranes was achieved by differential centrifugation. As mitochondria and plasma membranes seemed to be too similar in size and weight to be separated by differential centrifugation, discontinuous density-gradient centrifugation was carried out successfully. The purity of the subcellular fractions was checked by measuring the activity of marker enzymes. All fractions were highly enriched in their corresponding marker enzyme. However, the nuclear fractions of kidney and renal cell carcinoma were slightly contaminated with mitochondria and plasma membrane fractions of all tissues with lysosomes. The fraction designated the cytosolic fraction contained not only cytosol, but also microsomes and lysosomes. The CLA contents of the subcellular fractions were in the range 0.13-0.37% of total fatty acids and were lowest in the plasma membrane fractions of all types of tissue studied. C16:0, C18:0, C18:1 c9, C18:2 n-6, and C20:4 n-6 were found to be the major fatty acids in all the subcellular fractions studied. However, marked variations in fatty acid content between subcellular fractions and between types of tissue were detectable. Because of these differences between tissues, no general statement on characteristic fatty acid profiles of single subcellular fractions is possible.

  7. Membraneless organelles: Phasing in and out

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shorter, James

    2016-06-01

    The low-complexity-protein, liquid phases of membraneless organelles have now been established to selectively partition biomolecules. The specialized microenvironment that they provide differs chemically from the surrounding medium and enables specific nucleic-acid remodelling reactions.

  8. Characterization of two malaria parasite organelle translation elongation factor G proteins: the likely targets of the anti-malarial fusidic acid.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Russell A; McFadden, Geoffrey I; Goodman, Christopher D

    2011-01-01

    Malaria parasites harbour two organelles with bacteria-like metabolic processes that are the targets of many anti-bacterial drugs. One such drug is fusidic acid, which inhibits the translation component elongation factor G. The response of P. falciparum to fusidic acid was characterised using extended SYBR-Green based drug trials. This revealed that fusidic acid kills in vitro cultured P. falciparum parasites by immediately blocking parasite development. Two bacterial-type protein translation elongation factor G genes are identified as likely targets of fusidic acid. Sequence analysis suggests that these proteins function in the mitochondria and apicoplast and both should be sensitive to fusidic acid. Microscopic examination of protein-reporter fusions confirm the prediction that one elongation factor G is a component of parasite mitochondria whereas the second is a component of the relict plastid or apicoplast. The presence of two putative targets for a single inhibitory compound emphasizes the potential of elongation factor G as a drug target in malaria.

  9. First year sugar maple (Acer saccharum, Marsh. ) seedling nutrition, vesicular-arbuscular mycorrhizal colonization, physiology, and growth along an acidic deposition gradient in Michigan

    SciTech Connect

    McLaughlin, J.W.

    1992-01-01

    A field study was conducted to evaluate the use of foliar amino acid and root reducing sugar accumulations to separate acidic deposition from natural (i.e., soil phosphorus, mycorrhizae, and temperature) ecosystem stressors on first-year sugar maple seedling growth in three Michigan forests. Seedling growth was greatest at the sites exposed to highest levels of acidic deposition. However, sites receiving greatest acidic deposition rates also had high available soil phosphorus contents. No significant differences occurred, suggesting increased nitrogen loadings were not reflected in seedling tissue nitrogen. Seedling root or foliar calcium, magnesium, or potassium also were not significantly different, suggesting those elements were not growth limiting. Significant differences, however, occurred for seedling arginine and glutamine concentrations in foliage and reducing sugar concentrations in roots and were negatively correlated with seedling tissue phosphorus concentrations, suggesting phosphorus was limiting seedling growth at the low acidic deposition site. Vesicular-arbuscular mycorrhizal colonization of seedling roots was greater at the low acidic deposition site and positively correlated with seedling amino acid and reducing sugar accumulation but negatively correlated with sucrose concentrations in seedling roots, indicating that the fungal partner may have stimulated sucrose degradation to reducing sugars. Both air and soil temperatures were positively correlated with total sugar and sucrose concentrations in seedling roots. High levels of arginine, glutamine, and reducing sugars were negatively correlated with seedling growth indicating that seedlings at the low acidic deposition site were more stressed than seedlings at the sites receiving higher levels of pollutant loads. The results suggest differences in foliar arginine and glutamine and root reducing sugars in the forests in this study are likely due to natural rather than acidic deposition stress.

  10. cAMP increases mitochondrial cholesterol transport through the induction of arachidonic acid release inside this organelle in Leydig cells.

    PubMed

    Castillo, Ana Fernanda; Cornejo Maciel, Fabiana; Castilla, Rocío; Duarte, Alejandra; Maloberti, Paula; Paz, Cristina; Podestá, Ernesto J

    2006-11-01

    We have investigated the direct effect of arachidonic acid on cholesterol transport in intact cells or isolated mitochondria from steroidogenic cells and the effect of cyclic-AMP on the specific release of this fatty acid inside the mitochondria. We show for the first time that cyclic-AMP can regulate the release of arachidonic acid in a specialized compartment of MA-10 Leydig cells, e.g. the mitochondria, and that the fatty acid induces cholesterol transport through a mechanism different from the classical pathway. Arachidonic acid and arachidonoyl-CoA can stimulate cholesterol transport in isolated mitochondria from nonstimulated cells. The effect of arachidonoyl-CoA is inhibited by the reduction in the expression or in the activity of a mitochondrial thioesterase that uses arachidonoyl-CoA as a substrate to release arachidonic acid. cAMP-induced arachidonic acid accumulation into the mitochondria is also reduced when the mitochondrial thioesterase activity or expression is blocked. This new feature in the regulation of cholesterol transport by arachidonic acid and the release of arachidonic acid in specialized compartment of the cells could offer novel means for understanding the regulation of steroid synthesis but also would be important in other situations such as neuropathological disorders or oncology disorders, where cholesterol transport plays an important role.

  11. The role of acidic organelles in the development of schistosomula of Schistosoma mansoni and their response to signalling molecules.

    PubMed

    Al-Adhami, B H; Noble, C; Sharaf, O; Thornhill, J; Doenhoff, M J; Kusel, R

    2005-03-01

    The cercariae of Schistosoma mansoni become transformed into schistosomula during host skin penetration. We have found that large acidophilic compartments are detected in schistosomula but not in cercariae or in any other stages of the parasite by use of the fluorescent dye LysoTracker, a dye specific for mammalian lysosomes. Some of these large acidic compartments incorporated monodansylcadaverine, a specific dye for autophagosomes. We have used potent inhibitors (wortmannin and 3-methyladenine) and a potent inducer (starvation) of autophagy to show that the pathway to the formation of the acidic compartments requires specific molecular signals from the environment and from the genome. Certain doses of ultraviolet light inhibited significantly the formation of the acidic compartments, which may indicate disruption of the lysosome/autophagosome pathway. We have also defined two proteins that are commonly associated with lysosomes and autophagosomes in mammalian cells, the microtubule-associated membrane protein (MAP-LC3) and lysosome-associated membrane protein (LAMP-1), in extracts of schistosomula. We suggest that the autophagy pathway could be developed in transformed schistosomula.

  12. The Amino Acid Substitution Q65H in the 2C Protein of Swine Vesicular Disease Virus Confers Resistance to Golgi Disrupting Drugs

    PubMed Central

    Vázquez-Calvo, Ángela; Caridi, Flavia; González-Magaldi, Mónica; Saiz, Juan-Carlos; Sobrino, Francisco; Martín-Acebes, Miguel A.

    2016-01-01

    Swine vesicular disease virus (SVDV) is a porcine pathogen and a member of the species Enterovirus B within the Picornaviridae family. Brefeldin A (BFA) is an inhibitor of guanine nucleotide exchange factors of Arf proteins that induces Golgi complex disassembly and alters the cellular secretory pathway. Since BFA has been shown to inhibit the RNA replication of different enteroviruses, including SVDV, we have analyzed the effect of BFA and of golgicide A (GCA), another Golgi disrupting drug, on SVDV multiplication. BFA and GCA similarly inhibited SVDV production. To investigate the molecular basis of the antiviral effect of BFA, SVDV mutants with increased resistance to BFA were isolated. A single amino acid substitution, Q65H, in the non-structural protein 2C was found to be responsible for increased resistance to BFA. These results provide new insight into the relationship of enteroviruses with the components of the secretory pathway and on the role of SVDV 2C protein in this process. PMID:27199941

  13. Insights into the mechanisms of sterol transport between organelles.

    PubMed

    Mesmin, Bruno; Antonny, Bruno; Drin, Guillaume

    2013-09-01

    In cells, the levels of sterol vary greatly among organelles. This uneven distribution depends largely on non-vesicular routes of transfer, which are mediated by soluble carriers called lipid-transfer proteins (LTPs). These proteins have a domain with a hydrophobic cavity that accommodates one sterol molecule. However, a demonstration of their role in sterol transport in cells remains difficult. Numerous LTPs also contain membrane-binding elements, but it is not clear how these LTPs couple their ability to target organelles with lipid transport activity. This issue appears critical, since many sterol transporters are thought to act at contact sites between two membrane-bound compartments. Here, we emphasize that biochemical and structural studies provide precious insights into the mode of action of sterol-binding proteins. Recent studies on START, Osh/ORP and NPC proteins suggest models on how these proteins could transport sterol between organelles and, thereby, influence cellular functions.

  14. Evolving a photosynthetic organelle.

    PubMed

    Nakayama, Takuro; Archibald, John M

    2012-04-24

    The evolution of plastids from cyanobacteria is believed to represent a singularity in the history of life. The enigmatic amoeba Paulinella and its 'recently' acquired photosynthetic inclusions provide a fascinating system through which to gain fresh insight into how endosymbionts become organelles.The plastids, or chloroplasts, of algae and plants evolved from cyanobacteria by endosymbiosis. This landmark event conferred on eukaryotes the benefits of photosynthesis--the conversion of solar energy into chemical energy--and in so doing had a huge impact on the course of evolution and the climate of Earth 1. From the present state of plastids, however, it is difficult to trace the evolutionary steps involved in this momentous development, because all modern-day plastids have fully integrated into their hosts. Paulinella chromatophora is a unicellular eukaryote that bears photosynthetic entities called chromatophores that are derived from cyanobacteria and has thus received much attention as a possible example of an organism in the early stages of organellogenesis. Recent studies have unlocked the genomic secrets of its chromatophore 23 and provided concrete evidence that the Paulinella chromatophore is a bona fide photosynthetic organelle 4. The question is how Paulinella can help us to understand the process by which an endosymbiont is converted into an organelle.

  15. Mechanisms of organelle transport and capture along proplatelets during platelet production

    PubMed Central

    Richardson, Jennifer L.; Shivdasani, Ramesh A.; Boers, Chad; Hartwig, John H.; Italiano, Joseph E.

    2005-01-01

    Megakaryocytes generate platelets by remodeling their cytoplasm into long proplatelet extensions, which serve as assembly lines for platelet production. Platelet packaging and release concludes at the tips of each proplatelet. Essential in this process is the distribution of organelles and platelet-specific granules into the nascent platelets. To investigate the mechanism of delivery of organelles into putative platelets, the distribution and dynamics of organelles/granules was monitored. Individual organelles are sent from the cell body to the proplatelets where they move bidirectionally until they are captured at proplatelet ends. Movement occurs at approximately 0.2 μm/min, but pauses and changes in direction are frequent. At any given time, approximately 30% of organelles/granules are in motion. Actin poisons do not diminish organelle motion, and vesicular structures are intimately associated with the microtubules. Therefore, movement appears to involve microtubule-based forces. Bidirectional organelle movement is conveyed by the bipolar organization of microtubules within the proplatelet, as kinesin-coated beads move bidirectionally on the microtubule arrays of permeabilized proplatelets. Movement of organelles along proplatelets involves 2 mechanisms: organelles travel along microtubules, and the linked microtubules move relative to each other. These studies demonstrate that the components that form platelets are delivered to and assembled de novo along proplatelets. PMID:16118320

  16. Compartmentalized vesicular traffic around the hair cell cuticular plate.

    PubMed

    Kachar, B; Battaglia, A; Fex, J

    1997-05-01

    Through thin-section and freeze-fracture electron microscopy, we identify structural correlates of an intense vesicular traffic in a narrow band of cytoplasm around the cuticular plate of the bullfrog vestibular hair cells. Myriads of coated and uncoated vesicles associated with longitudinally oriented microtubules populate the narrow cytoplasmic region between the cuticular plate and the actin network of the apical junctional belt. If microtubules in the sensory hair cells, like those in axons, are pathways for organelle transport, then the characteristic distribution of microtubules around the cuticular plate represents transport pathways across the apical region of the hair cells. This compartmentalized membrane traffic system appears to support an intense vesicular release and uptake along a band of apical plasma membrane near the cell border. Functions of this transport system may include membrane recycling as well as exocytotic and endocytotic exchange between the hair cell cytoplasm and the endolymphatic compartment.

  17. Cell biology of prokaryotic organelles.

    PubMed

    Murat, Dorothee; Byrne, Meghan; Komeili, Arash

    2010-10-01

    Mounting evidence in recent years has challenged the dogma that prokaryotes are simple and undefined cells devoid of an organized subcellular architecture. In fact, proteins once thought to be the purely eukaryotic inventions, including relatives of actin and tubulin control prokaryotic cell shape, DNA segregation, and cytokinesis. Similarly, compartmentalization, commonly noted as a distinguishing feature of eukaryotic cells, is also prevalent in the prokaryotic world in the form of protein-bounded and lipid-bounded organelles. In this article we highlight some of these prokaryotic organelles and discuss the current knowledge on their ultrastructure and the molecular mechanisms of their biogenesis and maintenance.

  18. Identification of regions within the Legionella pneumophila VipA effector protein involved in actin binding and polymerization and in interference with eukaryotic organelle trafficking.

    PubMed

    Bugalhão, Joana N; Mota, Luís Jaime; Franco, Irina S

    2016-02-01

    The Legionella pneumophila effector protein VipA is an actin nucleator that co-localizes with actin filaments and early endosomes in infected macrophages and which interferes with organelle trafficking when expressed in yeast. To identify the regions of VipA involved in its subcellular localization and functions, we ectopically expressed specific VipA mutant proteins in eukaryotic cells. This indicated that the characteristic punctate distribution of VipA depends on its NH2 -terminal (amino acid residues 1-133) and central coiled-coil (amino acid residues 133-206) regions, and suggested a role for the COOH-terminal (amino acid residues 206-339) region in association with actin filaments and for the NH2 -terminal in co-localization with early endosomes. Co-immunoprecipitation and in vitro assays showed that the COOH-terminal region of VipA is necessary and sufficient to mediate actin binding, and is essential but insufficient to induce microfilament formation. Assays in yeast revealed that the NH2 and the COOH-terminal regions, and possibly an NPY motif within the NH2 region of VipA, are necessary for interference with organelle trafficking. Overall, this suggests that subversion of eukaryotic vesicular trafficking by VipA involves both its ability to associate with early endosomes via its NH2 -terminal region and its capacity to bind and polymerize actin through its COOH-terminal region.

  19. Identification of a vesicular aspartate transporter

    PubMed Central

    Miyaji, Takaaki; Echigo, Noriko; Hiasa, Miki; Senoh, Shigenori; Omote, Hiroshi; Moriyama, Yoshinori

    2008-01-01

    Aspartate is an excitatory amino acid that is costored with glutamate in synaptic vesicles of hippocampal neurons and synaptic-like microvesicles (SLMVs) of pinealocytes and is exocytosed and stimulates neighboring cells by binding to specific cell receptors. Although evidence increasingly supports the occurrence of aspartergic neurotransmission, this process is still debated because the mechanism for the vesicular storage of aspartate is unknown. Here, we show that sialin, a lysosomal H+/sialic acid cotransporter, is present in hippocampal synaptic vesicles and pineal SLMVs. RNA interference of sialin expression decreased exocytosis of aspartate and glutamate in pinealocytes. Proteoliposomes containing purified sialin actively accumulated aspartate and glutamate to a similar extent when inside positive membrane potential is imposed as the driving force. Sialin carrying a mutation found in people suffering from Salla disease (R39C) was completely devoid of aspartate and glutamate transport activity, although it retained appreciable H+/sialic acid cotransport activity. These results strongly suggest that sialin possesses dual physiological functions and acts as a vesicular aspartate/glutamate transporter. It is possible that people with Salla disease lose aspartergic (and also the associated glutamatergic) neurotransmission, and this could provide an explanation for why Salla disease causes severe neurological defects. PMID:18695252

  20. Evolution of organelle-associated protein profiling.

    PubMed

    Yan, Wei; Aebersold, Ruedi; Raines, Elaine W

    2009-02-15

    Identification of the protein constituents of cell organelles forms the basis for studies to define the roles of specific proteins in organelle structure and functions. Over the past decade, the use of mass spectrometry-based proteomics has dissected various organelles and allowed the association of many novel proteins with particular organelles. This review chronicles the evolution of organelle proteomics technology, and discusses how many limitations, such as organelle heterogeneity and purity, can be avoided with recently developed quantitative profiling approaches. Although many challenges remain, quantitative profiling of organelles holds the promise to begin to address the complex and dynamic shuttling of proteins among organelles that will be critical for application of this advanced technology to disease-based changes in organelle function.

  1. Co-existence of Functionally Different Vesicular Neurotransmitter Transporters

    PubMed Central

    Münster-Wandowski, Agnieszka; Zander, Johannes-Friedrich; Richter, Karin; Ahnert-Hilger, Gudrun

    2016-01-01

    The vesicular transmitter transporters VGLUT, VGAT, VMAT2 and VAChT, define phenotype and physiological properties of neuronal subtypes. VGLUTs concentrate the excitatory amino acid glutamate, VGAT the inhibitory amino acid GABA, VMAT2 monoamines, and VAChT acetylcholine (ACh) into synaptic vesicle (SV). Following membrane depolarization SV release their content into the synaptic cleft. A strict segregation of vesicular transporters is mandatory for the precise functioning of synaptic communication and of neuronal circuits. In the last years, evidence accumulates that subsets of neurons express more than one of these transporters leading to synaptic co-release of different and functionally opposing transmitters and modulation of synaptic plasticity. Synaptic co-existence of transporters may change during pathological scenarios in order to ameliorate misbalances in neuronal activity. In addition, evidence increases that transporters also co-exist on the same vesicle providing another layer of regulation. Generally, vesicular transmitter loading relies on an electrochemical gradient ΔμH+ driven by the proton ATPase rendering the lumen of the vesicle with respect to the cytosol positive (Δψ) and acidic (ΔpH). While the activity of VGLUT mainly depends on the Δψ component, VMAT, VGAT and VAChT work best at a high ΔpH. Thus, a vesicular synergy of transporters depending on the combination may increase or decrease the filling of SV with the principal transmitter. We provide an overview on synaptic co-existence of vesicular transmitter transporters including changes in the excitatory/inhibitory balance under pathological conditions. Additionally, we discuss functional aspects of vesicular synergy of transmitter transporters. PMID:26909036

  2. Co-existence of Functionally Different Vesicular Neurotransmitter Transporters.

    PubMed

    Münster-Wandowski, Agnieszka; Zander, Johannes-Friedrich; Richter, Karin; Ahnert-Hilger, Gudrun

    2016-01-01

    The vesicular transmitter transporters VGLUT, VGAT, VMAT2 and VAChT, define phenotype and physiological properties of neuronal subtypes. VGLUTs concentrate the excitatory amino acid glutamate, VGAT the inhibitory amino acid GABA, VMAT2 monoamines, and VAChT acetylcholine (ACh) into synaptic vesicle (SV). Following membrane depolarization SV release their content into the synaptic cleft. A strict segregation of vesicular transporters is mandatory for the precise functioning of synaptic communication and of neuronal circuits. In the last years, evidence accumulates that subsets of neurons express more than one of these transporters leading to synaptic co-release of different and functionally opposing transmitters and modulation of synaptic plasticity. Synaptic co-existence of transporters may change during pathological scenarios in order to ameliorate misbalances in neuronal activity. In addition, evidence increases that transporters also co-exist on the same vesicle providing another layer of regulation. Generally, vesicular transmitter loading relies on an electrochemical gradient ΔμH(+) driven by the proton ATPase rendering the lumen of the vesicle with respect to the cytosol positive (Δψ) and acidic (ΔpH). While the activity of VGLUT mainly depends on the Δψ component, VMAT, VGAT and VAChT work best at a high ΔpH. Thus, a vesicular synergy of transporters depending on the combination may increase or decrease the filling of SV with the principal transmitter. We provide an overview on synaptic co-existence of vesicular transmitter transporters including changes in the excitatory/inhibitory balance under pathological conditions. Additionally, we discuss functional aspects of vesicular synergy of transmitter transporters.

  3. 9 CFR 311.32 - Vesicular diseases.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Vesicular diseases. 311.32 Section 311... CERTIFICATION DISPOSAL OF DISEASED OR OTHERWISE ADULTERATED CARCASSES AND PARTS § 311.32 Vesicular diseases. (a) Any carcass affected with vesicular disease shall be condemned if the condition is acute and if...

  4. 9 CFR 309.15 - Vesicular diseases.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Vesicular diseases. 309.15 Section 309... CERTIFICATION ANTE-MORTEM INSPECTION § 309.15 Vesicular diseases. (a) Immediate notification shall be given by... any livestock is found to be affected with a vesicular disease. (b) No livestock under quarantine...

  5. 9 CFR 311.32 - Vesicular diseases.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Vesicular diseases. 311.32 Section 311... CERTIFICATION DISPOSAL OF DISEASED OR OTHERWISE ADULTERATED CARCASSES AND PARTS § 311.32 Vesicular diseases. (a) Any carcass affected with vesicular disease shall be condemned if the condition is acute and if...

  6. 9 CFR 311.32 - Vesicular diseases.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Vesicular diseases. 311.32 Section 311... CERTIFICATION DISPOSAL OF DISEASED OR OTHERWISE ADULTERATED CARCASSES AND PARTS § 311.32 Vesicular diseases. (a) Any carcass affected with vesicular disease shall be condemned if the condition is acute and if...

  7. 9 CFR 309.15 - Vesicular diseases.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Vesicular diseases. 309.15 Section 309... CERTIFICATION ANTE-MORTEM INSPECTION § 309.15 Vesicular diseases. (a) Immediate notification shall be given by... any livestock is found to be affected with a vesicular disease. (b) No livestock under quarantine...

  8. 9 CFR 309.15 - Vesicular diseases.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Vesicular diseases. 309.15 Section 309... CERTIFICATION ANTE-MORTEM INSPECTION § 309.15 Vesicular diseases. (a) Immediate notification shall be given by... any livestock is found to be affected with a vesicular disease. (b) No livestock under quarantine...

  9. 9 CFR 311.32 - Vesicular diseases.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Vesicular diseases. 311.32 Section 311... CERTIFICATION DISPOSAL OF DISEASED OR OTHERWISE ADULTERATED CARCASSES AND PARTS § 311.32 Vesicular diseases. (a) Any carcass affected with vesicular disease shall be condemned if the condition is acute and if...

  10. 9 CFR 309.15 - Vesicular diseases.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Vesicular diseases. 309.15 Section 309... CERTIFICATION ANTE-MORTEM INSPECTION § 309.15 Vesicular diseases. (a) Immediate notification shall be given by... any livestock is found to be affected with a vesicular disease. (b) No livestock under quarantine...

  11. 9 CFR 311.32 - Vesicular diseases.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Vesicular diseases. 311.32 Section 311... CERTIFICATION DISPOSAL OF DISEASED OR OTHERWISE ADULTERATED CARCASSES AND PARTS § 311.32 Vesicular diseases. (a) Any carcass affected with vesicular disease shall be condemned if the condition is acute and if...

  12. 9 CFR 309.15 - Vesicular diseases.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Vesicular diseases. 309.15 Section 309... CERTIFICATION ANTE-MORTEM INSPECTION § 309.15 Vesicular diseases. (a) Immediate notification shall be given by... any livestock is found to be affected with a vesicular disease. (b) No livestock under quarantine...

  13. A single amino acid change resulting in loss of fluorescence of eGFP in a viral fusion protein confers fitness and growth advantage to the recombinant vesicular stomatitis virus

    SciTech Connect

    Dinh, Phat X.; Panda, Debasis; Das, Phani B.; Das, Subash C.; Das, Anshuman; Pattnaik, Asit K.

    2012-10-25

    Using a recombinant vesicular stomatitis virus encoding eGFP fused in-frame with an essential viral replication protein, the phosphoprotein P, we show that during passage in culture, the virus mutates the nucleotide C289 within eGFP of the fusion protein PeGFP to A or T, resulting in R97S/C amino acid substitution and loss of fluorescence. The resultant non-fluorescent virus exhibits increased fitness and growth advantage over its fluorescent counterpart. The growth advantage of the non-fluorescent virus appears to be due to increased transcription and replication activities of the PeGFP protein carrying the R97S/C substitution. Further, our results show that the R97S/C mutation occurs prior to accumulation of mutations that can result in loss of expression of the gene inserted at the G-L gene junction. These results suggest that fitness gain is more important for the recombinant virus than elimination of expression of the heterologous gene.

  14. A single amino acid change resulting in loss of fluorescence of eGFP in a viral fusion protein confers fitness and growth advantage to the recombinant vesicular stomatitis virus.

    PubMed

    Dinh, Phat X; Panda, Debasis; Das, Phani B; Das, Subash C; Das, Anshuman; Pattnaik, Asit K

    2012-10-25

    Using a recombinant vesicular stomatitis virus encoding eGFP fused in-frame with an essential viral replication protein, the phosphoprotein P, we show that during passage in culture, the virus mutates the nucleotide C289 within eGFP of the fusion protein PeGFP to A or T, resulting in R97S/C amino acid substitution and loss of fluorescence. The resultant non-fluorescent virus exhibits increased fitness and growth advantage over its fluorescent counterpart. The growth advantage of the non-fluorescent virus appears to be due to increased transcription and replication activities of the PeGFP protein carrying the R97S/C substitution. Further, our results show that the R97S/C mutation occurs prior to accumulation of mutations that can result in loss of expression of the gene inserted at the G-L gene junction. These results suggest that fitness gain is more important for the recombinant virus than elimination of expression of the heterologous gene.

  15. Evolution of apicomplexan secretory organelles

    PubMed Central

    Gubbels, Marc-Jan; Duraisingh, Manoj T.

    2013-01-01

    The alveolate superphylum includes many free-living and parasitic organisms, which are united by the presence of alveolar sacs lying proximal to the plasma membrane, providing cell structure. All species comprising the apicomplexan group of alveolates are parasites and have adapted to the unique requirements of the parasitic lifestyle. Here the evolution of apicomplexan secretory organelles that are involved in the critical process of egress from one cell and invasion of another is explored. The variations within the Apicomplexa and how these relate to species-specific biology will be discussed. In addition, recent studies have identified specific calcium-sensitive molecules that coordinate the various events and regulate the release of these secretory organelles within apicomplexan parasites. Some aspects of this machinery are conserved outside the Apicomplexa, and are beginning to elucidate the conserved nature of the machinery. Briefly, the relationship of this secretion machinery within the Apicomplexa will be discussed, compared with free-living and predatory alveolates, and how these might have evolved from a common ancestor. PMID:23068912

  16. Are vesicular neurotransmitter transporters potential treatment targets for temporal lobe epilepsy?

    PubMed Central

    Van Liefferinge, Joeri; Massie, Ann; Portelli, Jeanelle; Di Giovanni, Giuseppe; Smolders, Ilse

    2013-01-01

    The vesicular neurotransmitter transporters (VNTs) are small proteins responsible for packing synaptic vesicles with neurotransmitters thereby determining the amount of neurotransmitter released per vesicle through fusion in both neurons and glial cells. Each transporter subtype was classically seen as a specific neuronal marker of the respective nerve cells containing that particular neurotransmitter or structurally related neurotransmitters. More recently, however, it has become apparent that common neurotransmitters can also act as co-transmitters, adding complexity to neurotransmitter release and suggesting intriguing roles for VNTs therein. We will first describe the current knowledge on vesicular glutamate transporters (VGLUT1/2/3), the vesicular excitatory amino acid transporter (VEAT), the vesicular nucleotide transporter (VNUT), vesicular monoamine transporters (VMAT1/2), the vesicular acetylcholine transporter (VAChT) and the vesicular γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) transporter (VGAT) in the brain. We will focus on evidence regarding transgenic mice with disruptions in VNTs in different models of seizures and epilepsy. We will also describe the known alterations and reorganizations in the expression levels of these VNTs in rodent models for temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) and in human tissue resected for epilepsy surgery. Finally, we will discuss perspectives on opportunities and challenges for VNTs as targets for possible future epilepsy therapies. PMID:24009559

  17. Mechanisms of Polarized Organelle Distribution in Neurons.

    PubMed

    Britt, Dylan J; Farías, Ginny G; Guardia, Carlos M; Bonifacino, Juan S

    2016-01-01

    Neurons are highly polarized cells exhibiting axonal and somatodendritic domains with distinct complements of cytoplasmic organelles. Although some organelles are widely distributed throughout the neuronal cytoplasm, others are segregated to either the axonal or somatodendritic domains. Recent findings show that organelle segregation is largely established at a pre-axonal exclusion zone (PAEZ) within the axon hillock. Polarized sorting of cytoplasmic organelles at the PAEZ is proposed to depend mainly on their selective association with different microtubule motors and, in turn, with distinct microtubule arrays. Somatodendritic organelles that escape sorting at the PAEZ can be subsequently retrieved at the axon initial segment (AIS) by a microtubule- and/or actin-based mechanism. Dynamic sorting along the PAEZ-AIS continuum can thus explain the polarized distribution of cytoplasmic organelles between the axonal and somatodendritic domains.

  18. Mechanisms of Polarized Organelle Distribution in Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Britt, Dylan J.; Farías, Ginny G.; Guardia, Carlos M.; Bonifacino, Juan S.

    2016-01-01

    Neurons are highly polarized cells exhibiting axonal and somatodendritic domains with distinct complements of cytoplasmic organelles. Although some organelles are widely distributed throughout the neuronal cytoplasm, others are segregated to either the axonal or somatodendritic domains. Recent findings show that organelle segregation is largely established at a pre-axonal exclusion zone (PAEZ) within the axon hillock. Polarized sorting of cytoplasmic organelles at the PAEZ is proposed to depend mainly on their selective association with different microtubule motors and, in turn, with distinct microtubule arrays. Somatodendritic organelles that escape sorting at the PAEZ can be subsequently retrieved at the axon initial segment (AIS) by a microtubule- and/or actin-based mechanism. Dynamic sorting along the PAEZ-AIS continuum can thus explain the polarized distribution of cytoplasmic organelles between the axonal and somatodendritic domains. PMID:27065809

  19. The Amyloid Precursor Protein of Alzheimer’s Disease Clusters at the Organelle/Microtubule Interface on Organelles that Bind Microtubules in an ATP Dependent Manner

    PubMed Central

    Stevenson, James W.; Conaty, Eliza A.; Walsh, Rylie B.; Poidomani, Paul J.; Samoriski, Colin M.; Scollins, Brianne J.; DeGiorgis, Joseph A.

    2016-01-01

    The amyloid precursor protein (APP) is a causal agent in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer’s disease and is a transmembrane protein that associates with membrane-limited organelles. APP has been shown to co-purify through immunoprecipitation with a kinesin light chain suggesting that APP may act as a trailer hitch linking kinesin to its intercellular cargo, however this hypothesis has been challenged. Previously, we identified an mRNA transcript that encodes a squid homolog of human APP770. The human and squid isoforms share 60% sequence identity and 76% sequence similarity within the cytoplasmic domain and share 15 of the final 19 amino acids at the C-terminus establishing this highly conserved domain as a functionally import segment of the APP molecule. Here, we study the distribution of squid APP in extruded axoplasm as well as in a well-characterized reconstituted organelle/microtubule preparation from the squid giant axon in which organelles bind microtubules and move towards the microtubule plus-ends. We find that APP associates with microtubules by confocal microscopy and co-purifies with KI-washed axoplasmic organelles by sucrose density gradient fractionation. By electron microscopy, APP clusters at a single focal point on the surfaces of organelles and localizes to the organelle/microtubule interface. In addition, the association of APP-organelles with microtubules is an ATP dependent process suggesting that the APP-organelles contain a microtubule-based motor protein. Although a direct kinesin/APP association remains controversial, the distribution of APP at the organelle/microtubule interface strongly suggests that APP-organelles have an orientation and that APP like the Alzheimer’s protein tau has a microtubule-based function. PMID:26814888

  20. Organelles in Blastocystis that blur the distinction between mitochondria and hydrogenosomes.

    PubMed

    Stechmann, Alexandra; Hamblin, Karleigh; Pérez-Brocal, Vicente; Gaston, Daniel; Richmond, Gregory S; van der Giezen, Mark; Clark, C Graham; Roger, Andrew J

    2008-04-22

    Blastocystis is a unicellular stramenopile of controversial pathogenicity in humans. Although it is a strict anaerobe, Blastocystis has mitochondrion-like organelles with cristae, a transmembrane potential and DNA. An apparent lack of several typical mitochondrial pathways has led some to suggest that these organelles might be hydrogenosomes, anaerobic organelles related to mitochondria. We generated 12,767 expressed sequence tags (ESTs) from Blastocystis and identified 115 clusters that encode putative mitochondrial and hydrogenosomal proteins. Among these is the canonical hydrogenosomal protein iron-only [FeFe] hydrogenase that we show localizes to the organelles. The organelles also have mitochondrial characteristics, including pathways for amino acid metabolism, iron-sulfur cluster biogenesis, and an incomplete tricarboxylic acid cycle as well as a mitochondrial genome. Although complexes I and II of the electron transport chain (ETC) are present, we found no evidence for complexes III and IV or F1Fo ATPases. The Blastocystis organelles have metabolic properties of aerobic and anaerobic mitochondria and of hydrogenosomes. They are convergently similar to organelles recently described in the unrelated ciliate Nyctotherus ovalis. These findings blur the boundaries between mitochondria, hydrogenosomes, and mitosomes, as currently defined, underscoring the disparate selective forces that shape these organelles in eukaryotes.

  1. Initiation of RNA synthesis in vitro by vesicular stomatitis virus: single internal initiation in the presence of aurintricarboxylic acid and vanadyl ribonucleoside complexes.

    PubMed Central

    Talib, S; Hearst, J E

    1983-01-01

    In the presence of aurintricarboxylic acid (ATA) and vanadyl ribonucleoside complexes (VRC), we have isolated and characterized a small RNA, product of VSV in vitro transcription. This RNA is capped and lacks poly(A) at its 3'-end. Nucleotide sequence analysis revealed that this RNA corresponds to the 5'-terminal transcription product of the N-gene. The termination of the transcription occurs precisely at the 118th base from the 3'-end of the VSV genome. Analysis of the nucleotide sequence around this region reveals a potential secondary structure. Photoreaction of the VSV with 4'-substituted psoralen fails to inhibit the synthesis of the 68-mer RNA under conditions where full length mRNA synthesis is blocked, indicating that the psoralen binding site is located further into the N-gene. Since this RNA is the only in vitro transcription product synthesized under these conditions, the existence of two types of polymerase activities, one for the synthesis of leader RNA and one for mRNA, is suggested. Images PMID:6314272

  2. [Porosome: a new organelle and the universal secretion machine in cells].

    PubMed

    Lazrishvili, I L; Zhvaniia, M G

    2010-01-01

    A new cell organelle, porosome, discovered in the mid 1990's and its demonstration as the universal secretory machinery in cells is described. In contrast to the generally accepted belief that the secretory vesicle membrane is totally incorporated into the plasma membrane during cell secretion, it has been shown that secretory vesicles transiently dock and fuse with the porosome base via SNARE proteins to expel vesicular contents under intravesicular pressure which is generated by active transport of water through water channels located at the secretory vesicle membrane.

  3. Transmission and pathogenesis of vesicular stomatitis viruses

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Vesicular Stomatitis (VS) is caused by the Vesicular Stomatitis Virus (VSV), a negative single stranded RNA arthropod-borne virus member of the Family Rhabdoviridae. The virion is composed of the host derived plasma membrane, the envelope, and an internal ribonucleoprotein core. The envelope contain...

  4. Mitochondrion-related organelles in eukaryotic protists.

    PubMed

    Shiflett, April M; Johnson, Patricia J

    2010-01-01

    The discovery of mitochondrion-type genes in organisms thought to lack mitochondria led to the demonstration that hydrogenosomes share a common ancestry with mitochondria, as well as the discovery of mitosomes in multiple eukaryotic lineages. No examples of examined eukaryotes lacking a mitochondrion-related organelle exist, implying that the endosymbiont that gave rise to the mitochondrion was present in the first eukaryote. These organelles, known as hydrogenosomes, mitosomes, or mitochondrion-like organelles, are typically reduced, both structurally and biochemically, relative to classical mitochondria. However, despite their diversification and adaptation to different niches, all appear to play a role in Fe-S cluster assembly, as observed for mitochondria. Although evidence supports the use of common protein targeting mechanisms in the biogenesis of these diverse organelles, divergent features are also apparent. This review examines the metabolism and biogenesis of these organelles in divergent unicellular microbes, with a focus on parasitic protists.

  5. Comparing Vesicularity in Pyroclastic Deposits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richard, D.; Mueller, S.; Spieler, O.; Kueppers, U.; Scheu, B.; Kramers, S.; Dingwell, D. B.

    2005-12-01

    The investigation of processes associated with explosive volcanism requires the knowledge of the physico-chemical properties of the rock material involved. Parameters such as the rock's density and vesicularity highly influence the rheological properties as well as the fragmentation behavior of magma. Because observations inside the volcanic conduit are not possible, information on the spatial and temporal variability of the ascending magma's vesicularity is more easily obtained by measuring a statistically reliable amount of representative erupted material. In order to correlate density/porosity distributions of eruptive products with specific volcanic settings and eruption characteristics, data from six field campaigns in the circum-Pacific area were analyzed and compared. Densities from ~3000 pyroclastic- deposit samples collected on St. Augustine (Alaska), Bezymianny (Kamchatka), Unzen (Japan), Colima (Mexico), and Merapi, Krakatau and Kelut (Indonesia) were mostly measured directly in the field. This field-based density measurement method is based on the Archimedean principle whereby a sample's mass is measured in air and under water (Kueppers et al., 2005). Previous results indicated that the density peaks of St. Augustine and Bezymianny were at 1.5 and 1.6 g/cm3, respectively, whereas the most abundant densities at Mt. Unzen and Merapi were significantly higher at 2.2 and 2.3 g/cm3. However, samples collected from the 1883 Krakatau pyroclastic deposits during our most recent campaign follow a lower density distribution with a density peak of ~0.6 g/cm3. This suggests that the erupted material had a higher gas content. Results will be supported by detailed laboratory-based density and porosity measurements, and investigations of their influence on rock fragmentation and viscosity. This comprehensive work is part of the BMBF project SUNDAARC, which aims to quantify the potential risk of selected highly-explosive volcanoes by combining field and laboratory

  6. Endosymbiotic theory for organelle origins.

    PubMed

    Zimorski, Verena; Ku, Chuan; Martin, William F; Gould, Sven B

    2014-12-01

    Endosymbiotic theory goes back over 100 years. It explains the similarity of chloroplasts and mitochondria to free-living prokaryotes by suggesting that the organelles arose from prokaryotes through (endo)symbiosis. Gene trees provide important evidence in favour of symbiotic theory at a coarse-grained level, but the finer we get into the details of branches in trees containing dozens or hundreds of taxa, the more equivocal evidence for endosymbiotic events sometimes becomes. It seems that either the interpretation of some endosymbiotic events are wrong, or something is wrong with the interpretations of some gene trees having many leaves. There is a need for evidence that is independent of gene trees and that can help outline the course of symbiosis in eukaryote evolution. Protein import is the strongest evidence we have for the single origin of chloroplasts and mitochondria. It is probably also the strongest evidence we have to sort out the number and nature of secondary endosymbiotic events that have occurred in evolution involving the red plastid lineage. If we relax our interpretation of individual gene trees, endosymbiotic theory can tell us a lot.

  7. Cytonuclear interactions and relaxed selection accelerate sequence evolution in organelle ribosomes.

    PubMed

    Sloan, Daniel B; Triant, Deborah A; Wu, Martin; Taylor, Douglas R

    2014-03-01

    Many mitochondrial and plastid protein complexes contain subunits that are encoded in different genomes. In animals, nuclear-encoded mitochondrial proteins often exhibit rapid sequence evolution, which has been hypothesized to result from selection for mutations that compensate for changes in interacting subunits encoded in mutation-prone animal mitochondrial DNA. To test this hypothesis, we analyzed nuclear genes encoding cytosolic and organelle ribosomal proteins in flowering plants. The model angiosperm genus Arabidopsis exhibits low organelle mutation rates, typical of most plants. Nevertheless, we found that (nuclear-encoded) subunits of organelle ribosomes in Arabidopsis have higher amino acid sequence polymorphism and divergence than their counterparts in cytosolic ribosomes, suggesting that organelle ribosomes experience relaxed functional constraint. However, the observed difference between organelle and cytosolic ribosomes was smaller than in animals and could be partially attributed to rapid evolution in N-terminal organelle-targeting peptides that are not involved in ribosome function. To test the role of organelle mutation more directly, we used transcriptomic data from an angiosperm genus (Silene) with highly variable rates of organelle genome evolution. We found that Silene species with unusually fast-evolving mitochondrial and plastid DNA exhibited increased amino acid sequence divergence in ribosomal proteins targeted to the organelles but not in those that function in cytosolic ribosomes. Overall, these findings support the hypothesis that rapid organelle genome evolution has selected for compensatory mutations in nuclear-encoded proteins. We conclude that coevolution between interacting subunits encoded in different genomic compartments within the eukaryotic cell is an important determinant of variation in rates of protein sequence evolution.

  8. Mitochondrial swelling impairs the transport of organelles in cerebellar granule neurons.

    PubMed

    Kaasik, Allen; Safiulina, Dzhamilja; Choubey, Vinay; Kuum, Malle; Zharkovsky, Alexander; Veksler, Vladimir

    2007-11-09

    Organelle transport in neuronal processes is central to the organization, developmental fate, and functions of neurons. Organelles must be transported through the slender, highly branched neuronal processes, making the axonal transport vulnerable to any perturbation. However, some intracellular structures like mitochondria are able to considerably modify their volume. We therefore hypothesized that swollen mitochondria could impair the traffic of other organelles in neurite shafts. To test this hypothesis, we have investigated the effects of mitochondrial swellers on the organelle traffic. Our data demonstrate that treatment of neurons with potassium ionophore valinomycin led to the fast time-dependent inhibition of organelle movement in cerebellar granule neurons. Similar inhibition was observed in neurons treated with the inhibitors of the mitochondrial respiratory chain, sodium azide and antimycin, which also induced swelling. No decrease in the motility of organelles was observed in cultures treated with inhibitors of ATP production or transport, oligomycin or bongkrekic acid, suggesting that inhibition of the ATP-generating activity itself without swelling does not affect the motility of organelles. The effect of swellers on the traffic was more important in thin processes, thus indicating the role of steric hindrance of swollen mitochondria. We propose that the size and morphology of the transported cargo is also relevant for seamless axonal transport and speculate that mitochondrial swelling could be one of the reasons for impaired organelle transport in neuronal processes.

  9. Vesicular and Extra-Vesicular RNAs of Human Blood Plasma.

    PubMed

    Savelyeva, Anna V; Baryakin, Dmitriy N; Chikova, Elena D; Kuligina, Elena V; Richter, Vladimir A; Semenov, Dmitriy V

    2016-01-01

    Human blood contains a great variety of membrane-covered RNA carrying vesicles which are spherical or tubular particles enclosed by a phospholipid bilayer. Circulating vesicles are thought to mediate cell-to-cell communication and their RNA cargo can act as regulatory molecules. In this work, we separated blood plasma of healthy donors by centrifugation and determined that vesicles precipitated at 16,000 g were enriched with CD41a, marker of platelets. At 160,000 g, the pellets were enriched with CD3 marker of T cells. To characterize the RNA-content of the blood plasma sub fractions, we performed high throughput sequencing of the RNA pelleted within vesicles at 16,000 g and 160,000 g as well as RNA remaining in the vesicle-free supernatant. We found that blood plasma sub fractions contain not only extensive set of microRNAs but also fragments of other cellular RNAs: rRNAs, tRNAs, mRNAs, lncRNAs, small RNAs including RNAs encoded by mtDNAs. Our data indicate that a variety of blood plasma RNAs circulating within vesicles as well as of extra-vesicular RNAs are comparable to the variety of cellular RNA species.

  10. A putative vesicular transporter expressed in Drosophila mushroom bodies that mediates sexual behavior may define a neurotransmitter system.

    PubMed

    Brooks, Elizabeth S; Greer, Christina L; Romero-Calderón, Rafael; Serway, Christine N; Grygoruk, Anna; Haimovitz, Jasmine M; Nguyen, Bac T; Najibi, Rod; Tabone, Christopher J; de Belle, J Steven; Krantz, David E

    2011-10-20

    Vesicular transporters are required for the storage of all classical and amino acid neurotransmitters in synaptic vesicles. Some neurons lack known vesicular transporters, suggesting additional neurotransmitter systems remain unidentified. Insect mushroom bodies (MBs) are critical for several behaviors, including learning, but the neurotransmitters released by the intrinsic Kenyon cells (KCs) remain unknown. Likewise, KCs do not express a known vesicular transporter. We report the identification of a novel Drosophila gene portabella (prt) that is structurally similar to known vesicular transporters. Both larval and adult brains express PRT in the KCs of the MBs. Additional PRT cells project to the central complex and optic ganglia. prt mutation causes an olfactory learning deficit and an unusual defect in the male's position during copulation that is rescued by expression in KCs. Because prt is expressed in neurons that lack other known vesicular transporters or neurotransmitters, it may define a previously unknown neurotransmitter system responsible for sexual behavior and a component of olfactory learning.

  11. A putative vesicular transporter expressed in Drosophila mushroom bodies that mediates sexual behavior may define a novel neurotransmitter system

    PubMed Central

    Brooks, Elizabeth S.; Greer, Christina L.; Romero-Calderón, Rafael; Serway, Christine N.; Grygoruk, Anna; Haimovitz, Jasmine M.; Nguyen, Bac T.; Najibi, Rod; Tabone, Christopher J.; de Belle, J. Steven; Krantz, David E.

    2011-01-01

    Summary Storage and release of classical and amino acid neurotransmitters requires vesicular transporters. Some neurons lack known vesicular transporters, suggesting additional neurotransmitter systems remain unidentified. Insect mushroom bodies (MBs) are critical for several behaviors, including learning, but the neurotransmitters released by the intrinsic Kenyon cells (KCs) remain unknown. Likewise, KCs do not express a known vesicular transporter. We report the identification of a novel Drosophila gene portabella (prt) that is structurally similar to known vesicular transporters. Both larval and adult brains express PRT in the KCs of the MBs. Additional PRT cells project to the central complex and optic ganglia. prt mutation causes an olfactory learning deficit and an unusual defect in the male’s position during copulation that is rescued by expression in KCs. Since prt is expressed in neurons that lack other known vesicular transporters or neurotransmitters, it may define a previously unknown neurotransmitter system responsible for sexual behavior and a component of olfactory learning. PMID:22017990

  12. Optogenetic control of organelle transport and positioning

    PubMed Central

    Hoogenraad, Casper C.; Kapitein, Lukas C.

    2016-01-01

    Proper positioning of organelles by cytoskeleton-based motor proteins underlies cellular events such as signaling, polarization, and growth1–8. For many organelles, however, the precise connection between position and function has remained unclear, because strategies to control intracellular organelle positioning with spatiotemporal precision are lacking. Here, we establish optical control of intracellular transport by using light-sensitive heterodimerization to recruit specific cytoskeletal motor proteins (kinesin, dynein or myosin) to selected cargoes. We demonstrate that the motility of peroxisomes, recycling endosomes and mitochondria can be locally and repeatedly induced or stopped, allowing rapid organelle repositioning. We applied this approach in primary neurons to test how local positioning of recycling endosomes contributes to axon outgrowth and found that dynein-driven removal of endosomes from axonal growth cones reversibly suppressed axon growth, whereas kinesin-driven endosome enrichment enhances growth. Our strategy for optogenetic control of organelle positioning will be widely applicable to directly explore site-specific organelle functions in different model systems. PMID:25561173

  13. The different facets of organelle interplay—an overview of organelle interactions

    PubMed Central

    Schrader, Michael; Godinho, Luis F.; Costello, Joseph L.; Islinger, Markus

    2015-01-01

    Membrane-bound organelles such as mitochondria, peroxisomes, or the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) create distinct environments to promote specific cellular tasks such as ATP production, lipid breakdown, or protein export. During recent years, it has become evident that organelles are integrated into cellular networks regulating metabolism, intracellular signaling, cellular maintenance, cell fate decision, and pathogen defence. In order to facilitate such signaling events, specialized membrane regions between apposing organelles bear distinct sets of proteins to enable tethering and exchange of metabolites and signaling molecules. Such membrane associations between the mitochondria and a specialized site of the ER, the mitochondria associated-membrane (MAM), as well as between the ER and the plasma membrane (PAM) have been partially characterized at the molecular level. However, historical and recent observations imply that other organelles like peroxisomes, lysosomes, and lipid droplets might also be involved in the formation of such apposing membrane contact sites. Alternatively, reports on so-called mitochondria derived-vesicles (MDV) suggest alternative mechanisms of organelle interaction. Moreover, maintenance of cellular homeostasis requires the precise removal of aged organelles by autophagy—a process which involves the detection of ubiquitinated organelle proteins by the autophagosome membrane, representing another site of membrane associated-signaling. This review will summarize the available data on the existence and composition of organelle contact sites and the molecular specializations each site uses in order to provide a timely overview on the potential functions of organelle interaction. PMID:26442263

  14. Calcium regulation in endosymbiotic organelles of plants.

    PubMed

    Bussemer, Johanna; Vothknecht, Ute C; Chigri, Fatima

    2009-09-01

    In plant cells calcium-dependent signaling pathways are involved in a large array of biological processes in response to hormones, biotic/abiotic stress signals and a variety of developmental cues. This is generally achieved through binding of calcium to diverse calcium-sensing proteins, which subsequently control downstream events by activating or inhibiting biochemical reactions. Regulation by calcium is considered as a eukaryotic trait and has not been described for prokaryotes. Nevertheless, there is increasing evidence indicating that organelles of prokaryotic origin, such as chloroplasts and mitochondria, are integrated into the calcium-signaling network of the cell. An important transducer of calcium in these organelles appears to be calmodulin. In this review we want to give an overview over present data showing that endosymbiotic organelles harbour calcium-dependent biological processes with a focus on calmodulin-regulation.

  15. Designer amphiphilic proteins as building blocks for the intracellular formation of organelle-like compartments.

    PubMed

    Huber, Matthias C; Schreiber, Andreas; von Olshausen, Philipp; Varga, Balázs R; Kretz, Oliver; Joch, Barbara; Barnert, Sabine; Schubert, Rolf; Eimer, Stefan; Kele, Péter; Schiller, Stefan M

    2015-01-01

    Nanoscale biological materials formed by the assembly of defined block-domain proteins control the formation of cellular compartments such as organelles. Here, we introduce an approach to intentionally 'program' the de novo synthesis and self-assembly of genetically encoded amphiphilic proteins to form cellular compartments, or organelles, in Escherichia coli. These proteins serve as building blocks for the formation of artificial compartments in vivo in a similar way to lipid-based organelles. We investigated the formation of these organelles using epifluorescence microscopy, total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy and transmission electron microscopy. The in vivo modification of these protein-based de novo organelles, by means of site-specific incorporation of unnatural amino acids, allows the introduction of artificial chemical functionalities. Co-localization of membrane proteins results in the formation of functionalized artificial organelles combining artificial and natural cellular function. Adding these protein structures to the cellular machinery may have consequences in nanobiotechnology, synthetic biology and materials science, including the constitution of artificial cells and bio-based metamaterials.

  16. Novel mitochondrion-related organelles in the anaerobic amoeba Mastigamoeba balamuthi.

    PubMed

    Gill, Erin E; Diaz-Triviño, Sara; Barberà, Maria José; Silberman, Jeffrey D; Stechmann, Alexandra; Gaston, Daniel; Tamas, Ivica; Roger, Andrew J

    2007-12-01

    Unicellular eukaryotes that lack mitochondria typically contain related organelles such as hydrogenosomes or mitosomes. To characterize the evolutionary diversity of these organelles, we conducted an expressed sequence tag (EST) survey on the free-living amoeba Mastigamoeba balamuthi, a relative of the human parasite Entamoeba histolytica. From 19 182 ESTs, we identified 21 putative mitochondrial proteins implicated in protein import, amino acid interconversion and carbohydrate metabolism, two components of the iron-sulphur cluster (Fe-S) assembly apparatus as well as two enzymes characteristic of hydrogenosomes. By immunofluorescence microscopy and subcellular fractionation, we show that mitochondrial chaperonin 60 is targeted to small abundant organelles within Mastigamoeba. In transmission electron micrographs, we identified double-membraned compartments that likely correspond to these mitochondrion-derived organelles, The predicted organellar proteome of the Mastigamoeba organelle indicates a unique spectrum of functions that collectively have never been observed in mitochondrion-related organelles. However, like Entamoeba, the Fe-S cluster assembly proteins in Mastigamoeba were acquired by lateral gene transfer from epsilon-proteobacteria and do not possess obvious organellar targeting peptides. These data indicate that the loss of classical aerobic mitochondrial functions and acquisition of anaerobic enzymes and Fe-S cluster assembly proteins occurred in a free-living member of the eukaryote super-kingdom Amoebozoa.

  17. Designer amphiphilic proteins as building blocks for the intracellular formation of organelle-like compartments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huber, Matthias C.; Schreiber, Andreas; von Olshausen, Philipp; Varga, Balázs R.; Kretz, Oliver; Joch, Barbara; Barnert, Sabine; Schubert, Rolf; Eimer, Stefan; Kele, Péter; Schiller, Stefan M.

    2015-01-01

    Nanoscale biological materials formed by the assembly of defined block-domain proteins control the formation of cellular compartments such as organelles. Here, we introduce an approach to intentionally ‘program’ the de novo synthesis and self-assembly of genetically encoded amphiphilic proteins to form cellular compartments, or organelles, in Escherichia coli. These proteins serve as building blocks for the formation of artificial compartments in vivo in a similar way to lipid-based organelles. We investigated the formation of these organelles using epifluorescence microscopy, total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy and transmission electron microscopy. The in vivo modification of these protein-based de novo organelles, by means of site-specific incorporation of unnatural amino acids, allows the introduction of artificial chemical functionalities. Co-localization of membrane proteins results in the formation of functionalized artificial organelles combining artificial and natural cellular function. Adding these protein structures to the cellular machinery may have consequences in nanobiotechnology, synthetic biology and materials science, including the constitution of artificial cells and bio-based metamaterials.

  18. Essential role of vesicular nucleotide transporter in vesicular storage and release of nucleotides in platelets

    PubMed Central

    Hiasa, Miki; Togawa, Natsuko; Miyaji, Takaaki; Omote, Hiroshi; Yamamoto, Akitsugu; Moriyama, Yoshinori

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Nucleotides are stored in the dense granules of platelets. The release of nucleotides triggers one of the first steps in a series of cascades responsible for blood coagulation. However, the mechanism of how the nucleotides are accumulated in the granules is still far less understood. The transporter protein responsible for storage of nucleotides in the neuroendocrine cells has been identified and characterized. We hypothesized that the vesicular nucleotide transporter (VNUT) is also involved in the vesicular storage of nucleotides in platelets. In this article, we present three lines of evidence that VNUT is responsible for the vesicular storage of nucleotides in platelets and that vesicular ATP transport is crucial for platelet function, detection and characterization of VNUT activity in platelets isolated from healthy humans and MEG‐01 cells, RNA interference experiments on MEG‐01 cells, and studies on nucleotide transport and release with a selective inhibitor. PMID:24907298

  19. Different transporter systems regulate extracellular GABA from vesicular and non-vesicular sources

    PubMed Central

    Song, Inseon; Volynski, Kirill; Brenner, Tanja; Ushkaryov, Yuri; Walker, Matthew; Semyanov, Alexey

    2013-01-01

    Tonic GABA type A (GABAA) conductance is a key factor regulating neuronal excitability and computation in neuronal networks. The magnitude of the tonic GABAA conductance depends on the concentration of ambient GABA originating from vesicular and non-vesicular sources and is tightly regulated by GABA uptake. Here we show that the transport system regulating ambient GABA responsible for tonic GABAA conductances in hippocampal CA1 interneurons depends on its source. In mice, GABA from vesicular sources is regulated by mouse GABA transporter 1 (mGAT1), while that from non-vesicular sources by mouse GABA transporters 3/4 (mGAT3/4). This finding suggests that the two transporter systems do not just provide backup for each other, but regulate distinct signaling pathways. This allows individual tuning of the two signaling systems and indicates that drugs designed to act at specific transporters will have distinct therapeutic actions. PMID:23494150

  20. Toxoplasma gondii Vps11, a subunit of HOPS and CORVET tethering complexes, is essential for the biogenesis of secretory organelles.

    PubMed

    Morlon-Guyot, Juliette; Pastore, Sandra; Berry, Laurence; Lebrun, Maryse; Daher, Wassim

    2015-08-01

    Apicomplexan parasites harbour unique secretory organelles (dense granules, rhoptries and micronemes) that play essential functions in host infection. Toxoplasma gondii parasites seem to possess an atypical endosome-like compartment, which contains an assortment of proteins that appear to be involved in vesicular sorting and trafficking towards secretory organelles. Recent studies highlighted the essential roles of many regulators such as Rab5A, Rab5C, sortilin-like receptor and syntaxin-6 in secretory organelle biogenesis. However, little is known about the protein complexes that recruit Rab-GTPases and SNAREs for membrane tethering in Apicomplexa. In mammals and yeast, transport, tethering and fusion of vesicles from early endosomes to lysosomes and the vacuole, respectively, are mediated by CORVET and HOPS complexes, both built on the same Vps-C core that includes Vps11 protein. Here, we show that a T. gondii Vps11 orthologue is essential for the biogenesis or proper subcellular localization of secretory organelle proteins. TgVps11 is a dynamic protein that associates with Golgi endosomal-related compartments, the vacuole and immature apical secretory organelles. Conditional knock-down of TgVps11 disrupts biogenesis of dense granules, rhoptries and micronemes. As a consequence, parasite motility, invasion, egress and intracellular growth are affected. This phenotype was confirmed with additional knock-down mutants of the HOPS complex. In conclusion, we show that apicomplexan parasites use canonical regulators of the endolysosome system to accomplish essential parasite-specific functions in the biogenesis of their unique secretory organelles.

  1. Plant organelle proteomics: collaborating for optimal cell function.

    PubMed

    Agrawal, Ganesh Kumar; Bourguignon, Jacques; Rolland, Norbert; Ephritikhine, Geneviève; Ferro, Myriam; Jaquinod, Michel; Alexiou, Konstantinos G; Chardot, Thierry; Chakraborty, Niranjan; Jolivet, Pascale; Doonan, John H; Rakwal, Randeep

    2011-01-01

    Organelle proteomics describes the study of proteins present in organelle at a particular instance during the whole period of their life cycle in a cell. Organelles are specialized membrane bound structures within a cell that function by interacting with cytosolic and luminal soluble proteins making the protein composition of each organelle dynamic. Depending on organism, the total number of organelles within a cell varies, indicating their evolution with respect to protein number and function. For example, one of the striking differences between plant and animal cells is the plastids in plants. Organelles have their own proteins, and few organelles like mitochondria and chloroplast have their own genome to synthesize proteins for specific function and also require nuclear-encoded proteins. Enormous work has been performed on animal organelle proteomics. However, plant organelle proteomics has seen limited work mainly due to: (i) inter-plant and inter-tissue complexity, (ii) difficulties in isolation of subcellular compartments, and (iii) their enrichment and purity. Despite these concerns, the field of organelle proteomics is growing in plants, such as Arabidopsis, rice and maize. The available data are beginning to help better understand organelles and their distinct and/or overlapping functions in different plant tissues, organs or cell types, and more importantly, how protein components of organelles behave during development and with surrounding environments. Studies on organelles have provided a few good reviews, but none of them are comprehensive. Here, we present a comprehensive review on plant organelle proteomics starting from the significance of organelle in cells, to organelle isolation, to protein identification and to biology and beyond. To put together such a systematic, in-depth review and to translate acquired knowledge in a proper and adequate form, we join minds to provide discussion and viewpoints on the collaborative nature of organelles in

  2. Is replenishment of the readily releasable pool associated with vesicular movement?

    PubMed

    Bui, Loc; Glavinović, Mladen I

    2014-04-01

    At the excitatory synapse of rat hippocampus the short-term synaptic depression observed during long high-frequency stimulation is associated with slower replenishment of the readily-releasable pool. Given that the replenishment rate is also not [Ca(++)]o sensitive this puts into question a widely held notion that the vesicles-constrained by the cytoskeleton and rendered free from such constraints by Ca(++) entry that renders them more mobile-are important in the replenishment of the readily-releasable pool. This raises a question-Is vesicular replenishment of the readily releasable pool associated with significant movement? To answer this question we evaluated how okadaic acid and staurosporine (compounds known to affect vesicular mobility) influence the replenishment rate. We used patterned stimulation on the Schaffer collateral fiber pathway and recorded the excitatory post-synaptic currents (EPSCs) from rat CA1 neurons, in the absence and presence of these drugs. The parameters of a circuit model with two vesicular pools were estimated by minimizing the squared difference between the ESPC amplitudes and simulated model output. [Ca(2+)]o did not influence the progressive decrease of the replenishment rate during long, high frequency stimulation. Okadaic acid did not significantly affect any parameters of the vesicular storage and release system, including the replenishment rate. Staurosporine reduced the replenishment coupling, but not the replenishment rate, and this is owing to the fact that it also reduces the ability of the readily releasable pool to contain quanta. Moreover, these compounds were ineffective in influencing how the replenishment rate decreases during long, high frequency stimulation. In conclusion at the excitatory synapses of rat hippocampus the replenishment of the readily releasable pool does not appear to be associated with a significant vesicular movement, and during long high frequency stimulation [Ca(++)]o does not influence the

  3. Proteomics of a fuzzy organelle: interphase chromatin

    PubMed Central

    Kustatscher, Georg; Hégarat, Nadia; Wills, Karen L H; Furlan, Cristina; Bukowski-Wills, Jimi-Carlo; Hochegger, Helfrid; Rappsilber, Juri

    2014-01-01

    Chromatin proteins mediate replication, regulate expression, and ensure integrity of the genome. So far, a comprehensive inventory of interphase chromatin has not been determined. This is largely due to its heterogeneous and dynamic composition, which makes conclusive biochemical purification difficult, if not impossible. As a fuzzy organelle, it defies classical organellar proteomics and cannot be described by a single and ultimate list of protein components. Instead, we propose a new approach that provides a quantitative assessment of a protein's probability to function in chromatin. We integrate chromatin composition over a range of different biochemical and biological conditions. This resulted in interphase chromatin probabilities for 7635 human proteins, including 1840 previously uncharacterized proteins. We demonstrate the power of our large-scale data-driven annotation during the analysis of cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) regulation in chromatin. Quantitative protein ontologies may provide a general alternative to list-based investigations of organelles and complement Gene Ontology. PMID:24534090

  4. Ciliary Extracellular Vesicles: Txt Msg Organelles.

    PubMed

    Wang, Juan; Barr, Maureen M

    2016-04-01

    Cilia are sensory organelles that protrude from cell surfaces to monitor the surrounding environment. In addition to its role as sensory receiver, the cilium also releases extracellular vesicles (EVs). The release of sub-micron sized EVs is a conserved form of intercellular communication used by all three kingdoms of life. These extracellular organelles play important roles in both short and long range signaling between donor and target cells and may coordinate systemic responses within an organism in normal and diseased states. EV shedding from ciliated cells and EV-cilia interactions are evolutionarily conserved phenomena, yet remarkably little is known about the relationship between the cilia and EVs and the fundamental biology of EVs. Studies in the model organisms Chlamydomonas and Caenorhabditis elegans have begun to shed light on ciliary EVs. Chlamydomonas EVs are shed from tips of flagella and are bioactive. Caenorhabditis elegans EVs are shed and released by ciliated sensory neurons in an intraflagellar transport-dependent manner. Caenorhabditis elegans EVs play a role in modulating animal-to-animal communication, and this EV bioactivity is dependent on EV cargo content. Some ciliary pathologies, or ciliopathies, are associated with abnormal EV shedding or with abnormal cilia-EV interactions. Until the 21st century, both cilia and EVs were ignored as vestigial or cellular junk. As research interest in these two organelles continues to gain momentum, we envision a new field of cell biology emerging. Here, we propose that the cilium is a dedicated organelle for EV biogenesis and EV reception. We will also discuss possible mechanisms by which EVs exert bioactivity and explain how what is learned in model organisms regarding EV biogenesis and function may provide insight to human ciliopathies.

  5. Photoacoustic "nanobombs" fight against undesirable vesicular compartmentalization of anticancer drugs.

    PubMed

    Chen, Aiping; Xu, Chun; Li, Min; Zhang, Hailin; Wang, Diancheng; Xia, Mao; Meng, Gang; Kang, Bin; Chen, Hongyuan; Wei, Jiwu

    2015-10-20

    Undesirable intracellular vesicular compartmentalization of anticancer drugs in cancer cells is a common cause of chemoresistance. Strategies aimed at circumventing this problem may improve chemotherapeutic efficacy. We report a novel photophysical strategy for controlled-disruption of vesicular sequestration of the anticancer drug doxorubicin (DOX). Single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs), modified with folate, were trapped in acidic vesicles after entering lung cancer cells. Upon irradiation by near-infrared pulsed laser, these vesicles were massively broken by the resulting photoacoustic shockwave, and the vesicle-sequestered contents were released, leading to redistribution of DOX from cytoplasm to the target-containing nucleus. Redistribution resulted in 12-fold decrease of the EC50 of DOX in lung cancer cells, and enhanced antitumor efficacy of low-dose DOX in tumor-bearing mice. Side effects were not observed. These findings provide insights of using nanotechnology to improve cancer chemotherapy, i.e. not only for drug delivery, but also for overcoming intracellular drug-transport hurdles.

  6. Organelle size equalization by a constitutive process.

    PubMed

    Ludington, William B; Shi, Linda Z; Zhu, Qingyuan; Berns, Michael W; Marshall, Wallace F

    2012-11-20

    How cells control organelle size is an elusive problem. Two predominant models for size control can be distinguished: (1) induced control, where organelle genesis, maintenance, and disassembly are three separate programs that are activated in response to size change, and (2) constitutive control, where stable size results from the balance between continuous organelle assembly and disassembly. The problem has been studied in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii because the flagella are easy to measure, their size changes only in the length dimension, and the genetics are comparable to yeast. Length dynamics in Chlamydomonas flagella are quite robust: they maintain a length of about 12 μm and recover from amputation in about 90 min with a growth rate that decreases smoothly to zero as the length approaches 12 μm. Despite a wealth of experimental studies, existing data are consistent with both induced and constitutive control models for flagella. Here we developed novel microfluidic trapping and laser microsurgery techniques in Chlamydomonas to distinguish between length control models by measuring the two flagella on a single cell as they equilibrate after amputation of a single flagellum. The results suggest that cells equalize flagellar length by constitutive control.

  7. Scaling properties of cell and organelle size

    PubMed Central

    Marshall, Wallace F

    2010-01-01

    How size is controlled is a fundamental question in biology. In this review, we discuss the use of scaling relationships—for example, power-laws of the form y∝xα—to provide a framework for comparison and interpretation of size measurements. Such analysis can illustrate the biological and physical principles underlying observed trends, as has been proposed for the allometric dependence of metabolic rate or limb structure on organism mass. Techniques for measuring size at smaller length-scales continue to improve, leading to more data on the control of size in cells and organelles. Size scaling of these structures is expected to influence growth patterns, functional capacity and intracellular transport. Furthermore, organelles such as the nucleus, mitochondria and endoplasmic reticulum show widely varying morphologies that affect their scaling properties. We provide brief summaries of these issues for individual organelles, and conclude with a discussion on how to apply this concept to better understand the mechanisms of size control in the cellular environment. PMID:20885855

  8. The giant organelles in beige and Chediak-Higashi fibroblasts are derived from late endosomes and mature lysosomes

    PubMed Central

    1993-01-01

    Chediak-Higashi Syndrome (CHS) is an autosomal recessive disease affecting secretory granules and lysosomes-like organelles. In CHS fibroblasts, acidic organelles are abnormally large and clustered in the perinuclear area. We have analyzed fibroblast cell lines from a CHS patient and from the murine model for CHS, the beige mouse, to determine which lysosome-like compartments are affected. Uptake of neutral red showed that in both beige and CHS cell lines, the acidic organelles were markedly clustered in the perinuclear region of the cells. Giant organelles (> 4 microns) were observed in a fraction of the cells, and these were more dramatic in the beige fibroblasts than in the CHS fibroblasts. The total dye uptake of both mutant cell lines was similar to their respective wild type fibroblasts, suggesting that the overall volume of acidic compartments is unaffected by the disorder. Histochemistry and immunofluorescence showed that the giant organelles in both beige and CHS fibroblasts were positive for cathepsin D, lysosome-associated membrane protein (LAMP) 1, LAMP 2, and a 120-kD lysosomal glycoprotein, all marker proteins for late endosomes and lysosomes. The giant organelles were also negative for transferrin receptor and mannose-6-phosphate receptor, and most of them were also negative for rab 7. This distribution of marker proteins shows that the giant organelles in both beige and CHS are derived from late compartments of the endocytic pathway. This conclusion was confirmed using endocytic tracers. BSA was transported to the giant organelles, but only after long incubation times, and only at 37 degrees C. alpha 2- Macroglobulin was taken up and degraded at similar rates by CHS or beige cells and their respective wild type control cells. Taken together, our results indicate that the mutation in CHS specifically affects late endosomes and lysosomes, with little or no effect on early endosomes. Although the mutation clearly causes mislocalization of these

  9. Plants grow with a little help from their organelle friends.

    PubMed

    Van Dingenen, Judith; Blomme, Jonas; Gonzalez, Nathalie; Inzé, Dirk

    2016-12-01

    Chloroplasts and mitochondria are indispensable for plant development. They not only provide energy and carbon sources to cells, but also have evolved to become major players in a variety of processes such as amino acid metabolism, hormone biosynthesis and cellular signalling. As semi-autonomous organelles, they contain a small genome that relies largely on nuclear factors for its maintenance and expression. An intensive crosstalk between the nucleus and the organelles is therefore essential to ensure proper functioning, and the nuclear genes encoding organellar proteins involved in photosynthesis and oxidative phosphorylation are obviously crucial for plant growth. Organ growth is determined by two main cellular processes: cell proliferation and cell expansion. Here, we review how plant growth is affected in mutants of organellar proteins that are differentially expressed during leaf and root development. Our findings indicate a clear role for organellar proteins in plant organ growth, primarily during cell proliferation. However, to date, the role of the nuclear-encoded organellar proteins in the cellular processes driving organ growth has not been investigated in much detail. We therefore encourage researchers to extend their phenotypic characterization beyond macroscopic features in order to get a better view on how chloroplasts and mitochondria regulate the basic processes of cell proliferation and cell expansion, essential to driving growth.

  10. Model of reversible vesicular transport with exclusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bressloff, Paul C.; Karamched, Bhargav R.

    2016-08-01

    A major question in neurobiology concerns the mechanics behind the motor-driven transport and delivery of vesicles to synaptic targets along the axon of a neuron. Experimental evidence suggests that the distribution of vesicles along the axon is relatively uniform and that vesicular delivery to synapses is reversible. A recent modeling study has made explicit the crucial role that reversibility in vesicular delivery to synapses plays in achieving uniformity in vesicle distribution, so called synaptic democracy (Bressloff et al 2015 Phys. Rev. Lett. 114 168101). In this paper we generalize the previous model by accounting for exclusion effects (hard-core repulsion) that may occur between molecular motor-cargo complexes (particles) moving along the same microtubule track. The resulting model takes the form of an exclusion process with four internal states, which distinguish between motile and stationary particles, and whether or not a particle is carrying vesicles. By applying a mean field approximation and an adiabatic approximation we reduce the system of ODEs describing the evolution of occupation numbers of the sites on a 1D lattice to a system of hydrodynamic equations in the continuum limit. We find that reversibility in vesicular delivery allows for synaptic democracy even in the presence of exclusion effects, although exclusion does exacerbate nonuniform distributions of vesicles in an axon when compared with a model without exclusion. We also uncover the relationship between our model and other models of exclusion processes with internal states.

  11. The mitochondrion-like organelle of Trimastix pyriformis contains the complete glycine cleavage system.

    PubMed

    Zubáčová, Zuzana; Novák, Lukáš; Bublíková, Jitka; Vacek, Vojtěch; Fousek, Jan; Rídl, Jakub; Tachezy, Jan; Doležal, Pavel; Vlček, Cestmír; Hampl, Vladimír

    2013-01-01

    All eukaryotic organisms contain mitochondria or organelles that evolved from the same endosymbiotic event like classical mitochondria. Organisms inhabiting low oxygen environments often contain mitochondrial derivates known as hydrogenosomes, mitosomes or neutrally as mitochondrion-like organelles. The detailed investigation has shown unexpected evolutionary plasticity in the biochemistry and protein composition of these organelles in various protists. We investigated the mitochondrion-like organelle in Trimastix pyriformis, a free-living member of one of the three lineages of anaerobic group Metamonada. Using 454 sequencing we have obtained 7 037 contigs from its transcriptome and on the basis of sequence homology and presence of N-terminal extensions we have selected contigs coding for proteins that putatively function in the organelle. Together with the results of a previous transcriptome survey, the list now consists of 23 proteins - mostly enzymes involved in amino acid metabolism, transporters and maturases of proteins and transporters of metabolites. We have no evidence of the production of ATP in the mitochondrion-like organelle of Trimastix but we have obtained experimental evidence for the presence of enzymes of the glycine cleavage system (GCS), which is part of amino acid metabolism. Using homologous antibody we have shown that H-protein of GCS localizes into vesicles in the cell of Trimastix. When overexpressed in yeast, H- and P-protein of GCS and cpn60 were transported into mitochondrion. In case of H-protein we have demonstrated that the first 16 amino acids are necessary for this transport. Glycine cleavage system is at the moment the only experimentally localized pathway in the mitochondrial derivate of Trimastix pyriformis.

  12. Organelle communication: signaling crossroads between homeostasis and disease.

    PubMed

    Bravo-Sagua, Roberto; Torrealba, Natalia; Paredes, Felipe; Morales, Pablo E; Pennanen, Christian; López-Crisosto, Camila; Troncoso, Rodrigo; Criollo, Alfredo; Chiong, Mario; Hill, Joseph A; Simmen, Thomas; Quest, Andrew F; Lavandero, Sergio

    2014-05-01

    Cellular organelles do not function as isolated or static units, but rather form dynamic contacts between one another that can be modulated according to cellular needs. The physical interfaces between organelles are important for Ca2+ and lipid homeostasis, and serve as platforms for the control of many essential functions including metabolism, signaling, organelle integrity and execution of the apoptotic program. Emerging evidence also highlights the importance of organelle communication in disorders such as Alzheimer's disease, pulmonary arterial hypertension, cancer, skeletal and cardiac muscle dysfunction. Here, we provide an overview of the current literature on organelle communication and the link to human pathologies.

  13. Resynthesis of phosphatidylinositol in permeabilized neutrophils following phospholipase Cbeta activation: transport of the intermediate, phosphatidic acid, from the plasma membrane to the endoplasmic reticulum for phosphatidylinositol resynthesis is not dependent on soluble lipid carriers or vesicular transport.

    PubMed Central

    Whatmore, J; Wiedemann, C; Somerharju, P; Swigart, P; Cockcroft, S

    1999-01-01

    Receptor-mediated phospholipase C (PLC) hydrolysis of phosphoinositides is accompanied by the resynthesis of phosphatidylinositol (PI). Hydrolysis of phosphoinositides occurs at the plasma membrane, and the resulting diacylglycerol (DG) is converted into phosphatidate (PA). Two enzymes located at the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) function sequentially to convert PA back into PI. We have established an assay whereby the resynthesis of PI could be followed in permeabilized cells. In the presence of [gamma-32P]ATP, DG generated by PLC activation accumulates label when converted into PA. The 32P-labelled PA is subsequently converted into labelled PI. The formation of labelled PI reports the arrival of labelled PA from the plasma membrane to the ER. Cytosol-depleted, permeabilized human neutrophils are capable of PI resynthesis following stimulation of PLCbeta (in the presence of phosphatidylinositol-transfer protein), provided that CTP and inositol are also present. We also found that wortmannin, an inhibitor of endocytosis, or cooling the cells to 15 degrees C did not stop PI resynthesis. We conclude that PI resynthesis is dependent neither on vesicular transport mechanisms nor on freely diffusible, soluble transport proteins. Phosphatidylcholine-derived PA generated by the ADP-ribosylation-factor-stimulated phospholipase D pathway was found to accumulate label, reflecting the rapid cycling of PA to DG, and back. This labelled PA was not converted into PI. We conclude that PA derived from the PLC pathway is selected for PI resynthesis, and its transfer to the ER could be membrane-protein-mediated at sites of close membrane contact. PMID:10393103

  14. The function of genomes in bioenergetic organelles.

    PubMed Central

    Allen, John F

    2003-01-01

    Mitochondria and chloroplasts are energy-transducing organelles of the cytoplasm of eukaryotic cells. They originated as bacterial symbionts whose host cells acquired respiration from the precursor of the mitochondrion, and oxygenic photosynthesis from the precursor of the chloroplast. The host cells also acquired genetic information from their symbionts, eventually incorporating much of it into their own genomes. Genes of the eukaryotic cell nucleus now encode most mitochondrial and chloroplast proteins. Genes are copied and moved between cellular compartments with relative ease, and there is no obvious obstacle to successful import of any protein precursor from the cytosol. So why are any genes at all retained in cytoplasmic organelles? One proposal is that these small but functional genomes provide a location for genes that is close to, and in the same compartment as, their gene products. This co-location facilitates rapid and direct regulatory coupling. Redox control of synthesis de novo is put forward as the common property of those proteins that must be encoded and synthesized within mitochondria and chloroplasts. This testable hypothesis is termed CORR, for co-location for redox regulation. Principles, predictions and consequences of CORR are examined in the context of competing hypotheses and current evidence. PMID:12594916

  15. Fluorescence spectral imaging of organelle interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohen, Elli; Hirschberg, Joseph G.; Kohen, Cahide; Schachtschabel, Dietrich O.; Monti, Marco; Stanikunaite, Rita

    2000-04-01

    In cell biology, one of the great mysteries, which has bene only superficially 8investigate,d is the integration of cytoplasmic and nuclear organelles as part of the intracellular regulatory mechanism. The methodology used for the exploration of such intracellular processes is the pixel-by-pixel scanning by means of fluorescence spectral imaging and excitation emission fluorescence spectroscopy. While several of the steps required by this method are still in the process of implementation, the Michelson interferometer, the Sagnac interferometer and the related 'pentaferometer' are possible components of the instrumental design. One of the illustrative experimental models to begin the study of intracellular integrative processes is based on the hypothesis of a 'nuclear pump' in conjunction with cell treatment by chemotherapeutic agents such as adriamycin. Preliminary observations initiated in cultured fibroblasts, and to be pursued in Cloudman's melanoma cells, suggest that this cytotoxic agent first moves into the nucleus, form which it is subsequently ejected to be incorporated into the lysosomes and Golgi apparatus, possibly prior to exclusion via the multiple drug resistance pathway. The timetable of such a process is under investigation. This subject has obvious implications for diagnostic, prognostic and therapeutic studies of organelles integration.

  16. Vesicular nucleotide transporter regulates the nucleotide content in airway epithelial mucin granules

    PubMed Central

    Sesma, Juliana I.; Kreda, Silvia M.; Okada, Seiko F.; van Heusden, Catharina; Moussa, Lama; Jones, Lisa C.; O'Neal, Wanda K.; Togawa, Natsuko; Hiasa, Miki; Moriyama, Yoshinori

    2013-01-01

    Nucleotides within the airway surface liquid promote fluid secretion via activation of airway epithelial purinergic receptors. ATP is stored within and released from mucin granules as co-cargo with mucins, but the mechanism by which ATP, and potentially other nucleotides, enter the lumen of mucin granules is not known. We assessed the contribution of the recently identified SLC17A9 vesicle nucleotide transporter (VNUT) to the nucleotide availability within isolated mucin granules and further examined the involvement of VNUT in mucin granule secretion-associated nucleotide release. RT-PCR and Western blot analyses indicated that VNUT is abundantly expressed in airway epithelial goblet-like Calu-3 cells, migrating as a duplex with apparent mobility of 55 and 60 kDa. Subcellular fractionation studies indicated that VNUT55 was associated with high-density mucin granules, whereas VNUT60 was associated with low-density organelles. Immunofluorescence studies showed that recombinant VNUT localized to mucin granules and other organelles. Mucin granules isolated from VNUT short hairpin RNA-expressing cells exhibited a marked reduction of ATP, ADP, AMP, and UTP levels within granules. Ca2+-regulated vesicular ATP release was markedly reduced in these cells, but mucin secretion was not affected. These results suggest that VNUT is the relevant nucleotide transporter responsible for the uptake of cytosolic nucleotides into mucin granules. By controlling the entry of nucleotides into mucin granules, VNUT contributes to the release of purinergic signaling molecules necessary for the proper hydration of co-released mucins. PMID:23467297

  17. Vesicular nucleotide transporter regulates the nucleotide content in airway epithelial mucin granules.

    PubMed

    Sesma, Juliana I; Kreda, Silvia M; Okada, Seiko F; van Heusden, Catharina; Moussa, Lama; Jones, Lisa C; O'Neal, Wanda K; Togawa, Natsuko; Hiasa, Miki; Moriyama, Yoshinori; Lazarowski, Eduardo R

    2013-05-15

    Nucleotides within the airway surface liquid promote fluid secretion via activation of airway epithelial purinergic receptors. ATP is stored within and released from mucin granules as co-cargo with mucins, but the mechanism by which ATP, and potentially other nucleotides, enter the lumen of mucin granules is not known. We assessed the contribution of the recently identified SLC17A9 vesicle nucleotide transporter (VNUT) to the nucleotide availability within isolated mucin granules and further examined the involvement of VNUT in mucin granule secretion-associated nucleotide release. RT-PCR and Western blot analyses indicated that VNUT is abundantly expressed in airway epithelial goblet-like Calu-3 cells, migrating as a duplex with apparent mobility of 55 and 60 kDa. Subcellular fractionation studies indicated that VNUT55 was associated with high-density mucin granules, whereas VNUT60 was associated with low-density organelles. Immunofluorescence studies showed that recombinant VNUT localized to mucin granules and other organelles. Mucin granules isolated from VNUT short hairpin RNA-expressing cells exhibited a marked reduction of ATP, ADP, AMP, and UTP levels within granules. Ca(2+)-regulated vesicular ATP release was markedly reduced in these cells, but mucin secretion was not affected. These results suggest that VNUT is the relevant nucleotide transporter responsible for the uptake of cytosolic nucleotides into mucin granules. By controlling the entry of nucleotides into mucin granules, VNUT contributes to the release of purinergic signaling molecules necessary for the proper hydration of co-released mucins.

  18. Lipid Composition of Organelles from Germinating Castor Bean Endosperm 1

    PubMed Central

    Donaldson, Robert P.; Beevers, Harry

    1977-01-01

    Glyoxysome, endoplasmic reticulum, mitochondria, and proplastid fractions were isolated from endosperm of castor beans (Ricinus communis) germinated for 5 days at 30 C. Samples from sucrose density gradients were diluted with 0.15 m KCI and the membranes pelleted. Lipid extracts of these membranes were analyzed for phosphoglyceride, acyl lipid, and sterol content. The endoplasmic reticulum contains 1.24 μmol of phosphoglyceride per mg of protein; the mitochondria, 0.65 μmol/mg; and the glyoxysome membranes, 0.55 μmol/mg. Phosphatidyl choline and phosphatidyl ethanolamine are the most abundant lipids in all membranes studied, accounting for 70% or more of the lipid phosphorus and 50% or more of the fatty acid. Glyoxysome membranes and endoplasmic reticulum also contain phosphatidyl inositol (respectively, 9 and 17% of the lipid phosphorus) and free fatty acids (13% of the total fatty acid in each). Compared with other organelles, mitochondrial membranes have more phosphatidyl ethanolamine relative to phosphatidyl choline and are characterized by the presence of cardiolipin, in which 80% of the fatty acid is linoleate. The relative amounts of linoleate, palmitate, oleate, stearate, and linolenate in each of the phosphotoglycerides are constant regardless of the membrane source. Stimasgasterol and β-sitosterol are present in the membranes (1-9 nmol each/mg protein). The data provide further evidence that glyoxysome membranes are derived from the endoplasmic reticulum but at the same time indicate some differentiation. PMID:16659829

  19. Requirements and standards for organelle genome databases

    SciTech Connect

    Boore, Jeffrey L.

    2006-01-09

    Mitochondria and plastids (collectively called organelles)descended from prokaryotes that adopted an intracellular, endosymbioticlifestyle within early eukaryotes. Comparisons of their remnant genomesaddress a wide variety of biological questions, especially when includingthe genomes of their prokaryotic relatives and the many genes transferredto the eukaryotic nucleus during the transitions from endosymbiont toorganelle. The pace of producing complete organellar genome sequences nowmakes it unfeasible to do broad comparisons using the primary literatureand, even if it were feasible, it is now becoming uncommon for journalsto accept detailed descriptions of genome-level features. Unfortunatelyno database is currently useful for this task, since they have littlestandardization and are riddled with error. Here I outline what iscurrently wrong and what must be done to make this data useful to thescientific community.

  20. The mitochondrial UPR - protecting organelle protein homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Haynes, Cole M; Ron, David

    2010-11-15

    Mitochondria are required for numerous essential metabolic processes including the regulation of apoptosis; therefore, proper maintenance of the mitochondrial proteome is crucial. The protein-folding environment in mitochondria is challenged by organelle architecture, the presence of reactive oxygen species and the difficulties associated with assembly of the electron transport chain, which consists of components encoded by both the mitochondrial and the nuclear genomes. Mitochondria have dedicated molecular chaperones and proteases that promote proper protein folding, complex assembly and quality control. Work in cultured mammalian cells and Caenorhabditis elegans has yielded clues to the mechanisms linking perturbations in the protein-folding environment in the mitochondrial matrix to the expression of nuclear genes encoding mitochondrial proteins. Here, we review the current knowledge of this mitochondrial unfolded protein response (UPR(mt)), compare it with the better understood UPR of the endoplasmic reticulum and highlight its potential impact on development and disease.

  1. Apoptotic death sensor: an organelle's alter ego?

    PubMed

    Bratton, S B; Cohen, G M

    2001-06-01

    Caspases are intracellular cysteine proteases that are primarily responsible for the stereotypic morphological and biochemical changes that are associated with apoptosis. Caspases are often activated by the apoptotic protease-activating factor 1 (APAF-1) apoptosome, a complex that is formed following mitochondrial release of cytochrome c in response to many death-inducing stimuli. Both pro- and anti-apoptotic BCL-2 family members regulate apoptosis, primarily by their effects on mitochondria, whereas many inhibitor of apoptosis proteins (IAPs) regulate apoptosis by directly inhibiting distinct caspases. Exposure of cells to chemicals and radiation, as well as loss of trophic stimuli, perturb cellular homeostasis and, depending on the type of cellular stress, particular or multiple organelles appear to 'sense' the damage and signal the cell to undergo apoptosis by stimulating the formation of unique and/or common caspase-activating complexes.

  2. The inheritance of organelle genes and genomes: patterns and mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jianping

    2005-12-01

    Unlike nuclear genes and genomes, the inheritance of organelle genes and genomes does not follow Mendel's laws. In this mini-review, I summarize recent research progress on the patterns and mechanisms of the inheritance of organelle genes and genomes. While most sexual eukaryotes show uniparental inheritance of organelle genes and genomes in some progeny at least part of the time, increasing evidence indicates that strictly uniparental inheritance is rare and that organelle inheritance patterns are very diverse and complex. In contrast with the predominance of uniparental inheritance in multicellular organisms, organelle genes in eukaryotic microorganisms, such as protists, algae, and fungi, typically show a greater diversity of inheritance patterns, with sex-determining loci playing significant roles. The diverse patterns of inheritance are matched by the rich variety of potential mechanisms. Indeed, many factors, both deterministic and stochastic, can influence observed patterns of organelle inheritance. Interestingly, in multicellular organisms, progeny from interspecific crosses seem to exhibit more frequent paternal leakage and biparental organelle genome inheritance than those from intraspecific crosses. The recent observation of a sex-determining gene in the basidiomycete yeast Cryptococcus neoformans, which controls mitochondrial DNA inheritance, has opened up potentially exciting research opportunities for identifying specific molecular genetic pathways that control organelle inheritance, as well as for testing evolutionary hypotheses regarding the prevalence of uniparental inheritance of organelle genes and genomes.

  3. Human p80-coilin is targeted to sphere organelles in the amphibian germinal vesicle.

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Z; Murphy, C; Gall, J G

    1994-01-01

    Cultured vertebrate cells often display one or more coiled bodies in their nuclei. These are spherical structures approximately 0.5-1.0 micron in diameter that contain high concentrations of small nuclear ribonucleoproteins (snRNPs); they are distinct from nuclear speckles and nucleoli, the other major sites of snRNP concentration. Coiled bodies in human cells contain a unique protein, p80-coilin, that has an M(r) = 80 kDa. Cloned p80-coilin cDNA encodes 576 amino acids with a calculated molecular weight of 62.6 kDa. To determine which of several snRNP-containing structures in the amphibian germinal vesicle (GV) might be the homologue of coiled bodies, we injected myc-tagged transcripts of full-length human p80-coilin into the cytoplasm of Xenopus oocytes and followed the fate of the translated proteins with an antibody specific for the tag. Western blots of GV proteins showed rapid appearance of both full-length and truncated p80-coilin in the nucleus. Immunofluorescent staining of spread GV contents demonstrated specific uptake of p80-coilin by the sphere organelle within 1 h after injection. Similar experiments were performed with a series of deletion constructs that lacked progressively longer segments from the carboxy terminus. A construct that contained only the first 102 amino acids (18% of the molecule) was specifically targeted to the sphere organelle. Conversely, a construct lacking the first 92 amino acids failed to localize, although it was imported into the GV. Thus, a relatively short region at the amino terminus of human p80-coilin is both necessary and sufficient for localization in the sphere organelle. Sphere organelles in the GV and coiled bodies in somatic nuclei are clearly related in composition. We suggest that they are homologous organelles with similar functions in preassembly and sorting of RNA processing components. Differences in their composition suggest functional specialization in the two cell types. Images PMID:7532471

  4. A vesicular sequestration to oxidative deamination shift in myocardial sympathetic nerves in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Goldstein, David S; Sullivan, Patricia; Holmes, Courtney; Miller, Gary W; Sharabi, Yehonatan; Kopin, Irwin J

    2014-10-01

    In Parkinson's disease (PD), profound putamen dopamine (DA) depletion reflects denervation and a shift from vesicular sequestration to oxidative deamination of cytoplasmic DA in residual terminals. PD also involves cardiac sympathetic denervation. Whether PD entails myocardial norepinephrine (NE) depletion and a sequestration-deamination shift have been unknown. We measured apical myocardial tissue concentrations of NE, DA, and their neuronal metabolites 3,4-dihydroxyphenylglycol (DHPG), and 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid (DOPAC) from 23 PD patients and 23 controls and ascertained the extent of myocardial NE depletion in PD. We devised, validated in VMAT2-Lo mice, and applied 5 neurochemical indices of the sequestration-deamination shift-concentration ratios of DOPAC:DA, DA:NE, DHPG:NE, DOPAC:NE, and DHPG:DOPAC-and used a kinetic model to estimate the extent of the vesicular storage defect. The PD group had decreased myocardial NE content (p < 0.0001). The majority of patients (70%) had severe NE depletion (mean 2% of control), and in this subgroup all five indices of a sequestration-deamination shift were increased compared to controls (p < 0.001 for each). Vesicular storage in residual nerves was estimated to be decreased by 84-91% in this subgroup. We conclude that most PD patients have severe myocardial NE depletion, because of both sympathetic denervation and decreased vesicular storage in residual nerves. We found that the majority (70%) of Parkinson's disease (PD) patients have profound (98%) myocardial norepinephrine depletion, because of both cardiac sympathetic denervation and a shift from vesicular sequestration to oxidative deamination of cytoplasmic catecholamines in the residual nerves. This shift may be part of a final common pathogenetic pathway in the loss of catecholaminergic neurons that characterizes PD.

  5. Intra-neuronal vesicular uptake of catecholamines is decreased in patients with Lewy body diseases.

    PubMed

    Goldstein, David S; Holmes, Courtney; Kopin, Irwin J; Sharabi, Yehonatan

    2011-08-01

    Several neurodegenerative disorders, including Parkinson disease (PD), are characterized by the presence of Lewy bodies - cytoplasmic inclusions containing α-synuclein protein aggregates - in the affected neurons. A poorly understood feature of Lewy body diseases is loss of sympathetic nerves in the heart and other organs, manifesting as orthostatic hypotension (OH; also known as postural hypotension). We asked whether sympathetic denervation is associated with decreased uptake of catecholamines, such as dopamine and norepinephrine, into storage vesicles within sympathetic neurons. We used 6-[18F]-dopamine (18F-DA) to track myocardial uptake and retention of catecholamines. Concurrently, the fate of intra-neuronal 18F-DA was followed by assessment of arterial plasma levels of the 18F-DA metabolite 18F-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid (18F-DOPAC). The ratio of myocardial 18F-DA to arterial 18F-DOPAC provided an index of vesicular uptake. Tracer concentrations were measured in patients with PD with or without orthostatic hypotension (PD+OH, PD-No-OH); in patients with pure autonomic failure (PAF, a Lewy body disease without parkinsonism); in patients with multiple system atrophy (MSA, a non-Lewy body synucleinopathy); and in normal controls. Patients with PD+OH or PAF had decreased vesicular 18F-DA uptake and accelerated 18F-DA loss, compared with MSA and control subjects. PD-No-OH patients could be subtyped into one of these categories based on their initial 18F-DA uptake. We conclude that sympathetic denervation in Lewy body diseases is associated with decreased vesicular uptake of neuronal catecholamines, suggesting that vesicular monoamine transport is impaired. Vesicular uptake may constitute a novel target for diagnosis, treatment, and prevention.

  6. Role of Intermediate Filaments in Vesicular Traffic

    PubMed Central

    Margiotta, Azzurra; Bucci, Cecilia

    2016-01-01

    Intermediate filaments are an important component of the cellular cytoskeleton. The first established role attributed to intermediate filaments was the mechanical support to cells. However, it is now clear that intermediate filaments have many different roles affecting a variety of other biological functions, such as the organization of microtubules and microfilaments, the regulation of nuclear structure and activity, the control of cell cycle and the regulation of signal transduction pathways. Furthermore, a number of intermediate filament proteins have been involved in the acquisition of tumorigenic properties. Over the last years, a strong involvement of intermediate filament proteins in the regulation of several aspects of intracellular trafficking has strongly emerged. Here, we review the functions of intermediate filaments proteins focusing mainly on the recent knowledge gained from the discovery that intermediate filaments associate with key proteins of the vesicular membrane transport machinery. In particular, we analyze the current understanding of the contribution of intermediate filaments to the endocytic pathway. PMID:27120621

  7. Multicompartment Artificial Organelles Conducting Enzymatic Cascade Reactions inside Cells.

    PubMed

    Godoy-Gallardo, Maria; Labay, Cédric; Trikalitis, Vasileios D; Kempen, Paul J; Larsen, Jannik B; Andresen, Thomas L; Hosta-Rigau, Leticia

    2017-02-13

    Cell organelles are subcellular structures entrapping a set of enzymes to achieve a specific functionality. The incorporation of artificial organelles into cells is a novel medical paradigm which might contribute to the treatment of various cell disorders by replacing malfunctioning organelles. In particular, artificial organelles are expected to be a powerful solution in the context of enzyme replacement therapy since enzymatic malfunction is the primary cause of organelle dysfunction. Although several attempts have been made to encapsulate enzymes within a carrier vehicle, only few intracellularly active artificial organelles have been reported to date and they all consist of single-compartment carriers. However, it is noted that biological organelles consist of multicompartment architectures where enzymatic reactions are executed within distinct subcompartments. Compartmentalization allows for multiple processes to take place in close vicinity and in a parallel manner without the risk of interference or degradation. Here, we report on a subcompartmentalized and intracellularly active carrier, a crucial step for advancing artificial organelles. In particular, we develop and characterize a novel capsosome system, which consists of multiple liposomes and fluorescent gold nanoclusters embedded within a polymer carrier capsule. We subsequently demonstrate that encapsulated enzymes preserve their activity intracellularly, allowing for controlled enzymatic cascade reaction within a host cell.

  8. Intracellular control of axial shape in non-uniform neurites: a serial electron microscopic analysis of organelles and microtubules in AI and AII retinal amacrine neurites

    PubMed Central

    1984-01-01

    AI and AII cat retinal amacrine cells have highly varicose non-uniform, neuritic processes. Processes of both types were reconstructed via a computer system using serial electron micrographs. These reconstructions were analyzed for (a) varicosity volume, surface area, and length, (b) "neck" volume, surface area, and length, (c) number of microtubules within the varicosity, (d) number of microtubules within the "neck," and (e) volume and surface area of mitochondria and smooth endoplasmic reticulum and large smooth vesicular bodies within the processes. Correlation of these parameters revealed a linear relationship between the number of microtubules in the necks and mean neck cross-sectional area (rs = 0.780, P less than 0.001), while microtubule number within the varicosities showed no correlation with varicosity volume (rs = 0.239, P greater than 0.2). Varicosity volume did, however, correlate strongly with the summed volume of mitochondria and smooth vesicular bodies contained within the varicosity for both cell types examined. The ratio between membranous organelle volume and varicosity volume for AI amacrine processes of 1:6.97 (rs = 0.927), differed from the ratio of 1:1.80 for the AII amacrine processes (rs = 0.987). Similar relationships were observed in other nonvaricose neurites such as optic tract axons. Membranous organelles appear to contribute an additional obligatory volume to the cytosol that can be as much as seven times the organelles' direct volume. These observations suggest that both the cytoskeletal components, and the membrane organelles play a direct role in determining neurite shape. PMID:6538879

  9. The Evolution of Per-cell Organelle Number

    PubMed Central

    Cole, Logan W.

    2016-01-01

    Organelles with their own distinct genomes, such as plastids and mitochondria, are found in most eukaryotic cells. As these organelles and their host cells have evolved, the partitioning of metabolic processes and the encoding of interacting gene products have created an obligate codependence. This relationship has played a role in shaping the number of organelles in cells through evolution. Factors such as stochastic evolutionary forces acting on genes involved in organelle biogenesis, organelle–nuclear gene interactions, and physical limitations may, to varying degrees, dictate the selective constraint that per-cell organelle number is under. In particular, coordination between nuclear and organellar gene expression may be important in maintaining gene product stoichiometry, which may have a significant role in constraining the evolution of this trait. PMID:27588285

  10. Organelle membranes from germinating castro bean endosperm

    SciTech Connect

    Donaldson, R.P.; Tully, R.E.; Young, O.A.; Beevers, H.

    1981-01-01

    Glyoxysome ghosts were isolated from germinating castor bean endosperms using established methods. Electron microscopic examination showed that some matrix material was retained within the glyoxysomal membrane. Two cytochrome reductases and phosphorylcholine glyceride transferase co-sedimented with the alkaline lipase, a known component of the glyoxysome membrane, in sucrose gradient centrifugation of osmotically shocked glyoxysomes. The activities of these enzymes in the glyoxysome membranes were compared to those in the endoplasmic reticulum relative to phospholipid content. On this basis, the phosphorylcholine glyceride transferase was 10-fold more active in the endoplasmic reticulum, whereas the lipase was 50-fold more active in the glyoxysome membrane. The cytochrome reductases were only 2-fold more active in the endoplasmic reticulum, indicating that they are components of the two membranes. Difference spectroscopy of the glyoxysome membrane suspension revealed the presence of a b5-type cytochrome similar to that found in the endoplasmic reticulum. Since the glyoxysome membrane is apparently derived from the endoplasmic reticulum, components of the endoplasmic reticulum such as these are likely to be incorporated into the glyoxysome membrane during biogenesis. Enzyme activites involving the cofactors NADH or CoA were measurable in broken, but not in intact, glyoxysomes. Thus, it appears that cofactors for enzymes within the organelle cannot pass through the membrane.

  11. Application of vesicular coacervate phase for microextraction based on solidification of floating drop.

    PubMed

    Moradi, Morteza; Yamini, Yadollah

    2012-03-16

    A new, efficient and environmentally friendly method for the analysis of parabens as model compounds was developed using solidified floating vesicular coacervative drop microextraction (SFVCDME). A supramolecular solvent consisting of vesicles of decanoic acid in the nano- and microscale regimes was firstly used as the solvent in solidification of floating drop microextraction. The solvent was produced from the coacervation of decanoic acid aqueous vesicles in the presence of tetrabutylammonium (Bu(4)N(+)). Methylparaben (MP), ethylparaben (EP), and propylparaben (PP) were extracted on the basis of hydrophobic and π-cation interactions and the formation of hydrogen bonds. Microliter volume of vesicular coacervative droplet was delivered to the surface of the aqueous sample, and the sample was stirred for a desired time. The sample vial was cooled by immersing it into an ice bath for 3 min. The solidified solvent was transferred into a suitable vial and melted immediately. Twenty microliter of the vesicular coacervative solvent was directly injected to high-performance liquid chromatography-ultraviolet detection, with no need to dilution or solvent evaporation. Several parameters affecting the microextraction efficiency including sample temperature, stirring rate, pH, salt effect, volume of the solvent and extraction time were investigated and optimized. Under optimum conditions, preconcentration factors and relative recoveries of the studied compounds were obtained in the range of 81-174 and 91-108%, respectively; and the performance of the method was comparable with that of solid-phase extraction as the reference method.

  12. Organelles are transported on sliding microtubules in Reticulomyxa.

    PubMed

    Orokos, D D; Cole, R W; Travis, J L

    2000-12-01

    Organelles and plasma membrane domains appear to be transported along Reticulomyxa's microtubule cytoskeleton. Previously we demonstrated that organelle and cell surface transport share the same enzymatic properties and suggested that both are powered by the same cytoplasmic dynein. Motility analysis in Reticulomyxa is complicated by the fact that the microtubules also are motile and appear to "slide" bidirectionally throughout the network. We have utilized laser ablation to address this frame-of-reference problem as to how each transport component (microtubule sliding vs. organelle translocations) contributes to reactivated bidirectional translocation of organelles along the microtubule cytoskeleton. Laser ablation was used to cut microtubule bundles from lysed networks into 4-15-microm segments. After examining these reactivated cut fragments, it appears that the majority of organelles did not move relative to microtubule fragments, but remained attached to microtubules and moved as the microtubules slid. Microtubule sliding stops after 1-2 min and cannot be reactivated even when perfused with fresh ATP. Furthermore, once sliding stops, organelle transport also stops. Our findings indicate that the majority of Reticulomyxa pseudopodial organelles do not move along the surface of the microtubules, rather it is the sliding of the microtubules to which they are attached that moves them.

  13. Programmed death phenomena: from organelle to organism.

    PubMed

    Skulachev, Vladimir P

    2002-04-01

    Programmed death phenomena appear to be inherent not only in living cells (apoptosis), but also in subcellular organelles (e.g., self-elimination of mitochondria, called mitoptosis), organs (organoptosis), and even whole organisms (phenoptosis). In all these cases, the "Samurai law of biology"--it is better to die than to be wrong--seems to be operative. The operation of this law helps complicated living systems avoid the risk of ruin when a system of lower hierarchic position makes a significant mistake. Thus, mitoptosis purifies a cell from damaged and hence unwanted mitochondria; apoptosis purifies a tissue from unwanted cells; and phenoptosis purifies a community from unwanted individuals. Defense against reactive oxygen species (ROS) is probably one of the primary evolutionary functions of programmed death mechanisms. So far, it seems that ROS play a key role in the mito-, apo-, organo-, and phenoptoses, which is consistent with Harman's theory of aging. Here a concept is described that tries to unite Weismann's hypothesis of aging as an adaptive programmed death mechanism and the generally accepted alternative point of view that considers aging as an inevitable result of accumulation in an organism of occasional injuries. It is suggested that injury accumulation is monitored by a system(s) actuating a phenoptotic death program when the number of injuries reaches some critical level. The system(s) in question are organized in such a way that the lethal case appears to be a result of phenoptosis long before the occasional injuries make impossible the functioning of the organism. It is stressed that for humans these cruel regulations look like an atavism that, if overcome, might dramatically prolong the human life span.

  14. Isolation and characterization of vesicular and non-vesicular microRNAs circulating in sera of partially hepatectomized rats

    PubMed Central

    Castoldi, Mirco; Kordes, Claus; Sawitza, Iris; Häussinger, Dieter

    2016-01-01

    Circulating microRNAs are protected from degradation by their association with either vesicles or components of the RNAi machinery. Although increasing evidence indicates that cell-free microRNAs are transported in body fluids by different types of vesicles, current research mainly focuses on the characterization of exosome-associated microRNAs. However, as isolation and characterization of exosomes is challenging, it is yet unclear whether exosomes or other vesicular elements circulating in serum are the most reliable source for discovering disease-associated biomarkers. In this study, circulating microRNAs associated to the vesicular and non-vesicular fraction of sera isolated from partially hepatectomized rats were measured. Here we show that independently from their origin, levels of miR-122, miR-192, miR-194 and Let-7a are up-regulated two days after partial hepatectomy. The inflammation-associated miR-150 and miR-155 are up-regulated in the vesicular-fraction only, while the regeneration-associated miR-21 and miR-33 are up-regulated in the vesicular- and down-regulated in the non-vesicular fraction. Our study shows for the first time the modulation of non-vesicular microRNAs in animals recovering from partial hepatectomy, suggesting that, in the search for novel disease-associated biomarkers, the profiling of either vesicular or non-vesicular microRNAs may be more relevant than the analysis of microRNAs isolated from unfractionated serum. PMID:27535708

  15. pARIS-htt: an optimised expression platform to study huntingtin reveals functional domains required for vesicular trafficking

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Huntingtin (htt) is a multi-domain protein of 350 kDa that is mutated in Huntington's disease (HD) but whose function is yet to be fully understood. This absence of information is due in part to the difficulty of manipulating large DNA fragments by using conventional molecular cloning techniques. Consequently, few studies have addressed the cellular function(s) of full-length htt and its dysfunction(s) associated with the disease. Results We describe a flexible synthetic vector encoding full-length htt called pARIS-htt (Adaptable, RNAi Insensitive &Synthetic). It includes synthetic cDNA coding for full-length human htt modified so that: 1) it is improved for codon usage, 2) it is insensitive to four different siRNAs allowing gene replacement studies, 3) it contains unique restriction sites (URSs) dispersed throughout the entire sequence without modifying the translated amino acid sequence, 4) it contains multiple cloning sites at the N and C-ter ends and 5) it is Gateway compatible. These modifications facilitate mutagenesis, tagging and cloning into diverse expression plasmids. Htt regulates dynein/dynactin-dependent trafficking of vesicles, such as brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF)-containing vesicles, and of organelles, including reforming and maintenance of the Golgi near the cell centre. We used tests of these trafficking functions to validate various pARIS-htt constructs. We demonstrated, after silencing of endogenous htt, that full-length htt expressed from pARIS-htt rescues Golgi apparatus reformation following reversible microtubule disruption. A mutant form of htt that contains a 100Q expansion and a htt form devoid of either HAP1 or dynein interaction domains are both unable to rescue loss of endogenous htt. These mutants have also an impaired capacity to promote BDNF vesicular trafficking in neuronal cells. Conclusion We report the validation of a synthetic gene encoding full-length htt protein that will facilitate analyses of its

  16. Morphological Features of Organelles during Apoptosis: An Overview

    PubMed Central

    Bottone, Maria Grazia; Santin, Giada; Aredia, Francesca; Bernocchi, Graziella; Pellicciari, Carlo; Scovassi, Anna Ivana

    2013-01-01

    An apoptotic program leading to controlled cell dismantling implies perturbations of nuclear dynamics, as well as changes affecting the organelle structure and distribution. In human cancer cells driven to apoptosis by different stimuli, we have recently investigated the morphological properties of several organelles, including mitochondria, lysosomes, endoplasmic reticulum and Golgi apparatus. In this review, we will discuss the body of evidence in the literature suggesting that organelles are generally relocated and/or degraded during apoptosis, irrespectively of the apoptogenic stimulus and cell type. PMID:24709702

  17. Vesicular stomatitis outbreak in the southwestern United States, 2012.

    PubMed

    McCluskey, Brian J; Pelzel-McCluskey, Angela M; Creekmore, Lynn; Schiltz, John

    2013-09-01

    Vesicular stomatitis is a viral disease primarily affecting horses and cattle when it occurs in the United States. Outbreaks in the southwestern United States occur sporadically, with initial cases typically occurring in Texas, New Mexico, or Arizona and subsequent cases occurring in a northward progression. The viruses causing vesicular stomatitis can be transmitted by direct contact of lesioned animals with other susceptible animals, but transmission is primarily through arthropod vectors. In 2012, an outbreak of vesicular stomatitis in the United States occurred that was caused by Vesicular stomatitis New Jersey virus serotype. Overall, 51 horses on 36 premises in 2 states were confirmed positive. Phylogenetic analysis of the virus indicated that it was most closely related to viruses detected in the state of Veracruz, Mexico, in 2000.

  18. Nanopreparations for Organelle-Specific Delivery in Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Biswas, Swati; Torchilin, Vladimir P.

    2014-01-01

    To efficiently deliver therapeutics into cancer cells, a number of strategies have been recently investigated. The toxicity associated with the administration of chemotherapeutic drugs due to their random interactions throughout the body necessitates the development of drug-encapsulating nanopreparations that significantly mask, or reduce, the toxic side effects of the drugs. In addition to reduced side effects associated with drug encapsulation, nanocarriers preferentially accumulate in tumors as a result of its abnormally leaky vasculature via the Enhanced Permeability and Retention (EPR) effect. However, simple passive nanocarrier delivery to the tumor site is unlikely to be enough to elicit a maximum therapeutic response as the drug-loaded carriers must reach the intracellular target sites. Therefore, efficient translocation of the nanocarrier through the cell membrane is necessary for cytosolic delivery of the cargo. However, Crossing the cell membrane barrier and reaching cytosol might still not be enough for achieving maximum therapeutic benefit, which necessitates the delivery of drugs directly to intracellular targets, such as bringing pro-apoptotic drugs to mitochondria, nucleic acid therapeutics to nuclei, and lysosomal enzymes to defective lysosomes. In this review, we discuss the strategies developed for tumor targeting, cytosolic delivery via cell membrane translocation, and finally organelle-specific targeting, which may be applied for developing highly efficacious, truly multifunctional, cancer-targeted nanopreparations. PMID:24270008

  19. Vesicular carriers for dermal drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Sinico, Chiara; Fadda, Anna Maria

    2009-08-01

    The skin can offer several advantages as a route of drug administration although its barrier nature makes it difficult for most drugs to penetrate into and permeate through it. During the past decades there has been a lot of interest in lipid vesicles as a tool to improve drug topical delivery. Vesicular systems such as liposomes, niosomes, ethosomes and elastic, deformable vesicles provide an alternative for improved skin drug delivery. The function of vesicles as topical delivery systems is controversial with variable effects being reported in relation to the type of vesicles and their composition. In fact, vesicles can act as drug carriers controlling active release; they can provide a localized depot in the skin for dermally active compounds and enhance transdermal drug delivery. A wide variety of lipids and surfactants can be used to prepare vesicles, which are commonly composed of phospholipids (liposomes) or non-ionic surfactants (niosomes). Vesicle composition and preparation method influence their physicochemical properties (size, charge, lamellarity, thermodynamic state, deformability) and therefore their efficacy as drug delivery systems. A review of vesicle value in localizing drugs within the skin at the site of action will be provided with emphasis on their potential mechanism of action.

  20. Lipid vesicular nanocarrier: Quick encapsulation efficiency determination and transcutaneous application.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yibang; Ng, Weibeng; Feng, Xue; Cao, Fangying; Xu, Huaxi

    2017-01-10

    Nanoscale delivery systems have been widely investigated to overcome the penetration barrier of stratum corneum for effective transcutaneous application. The aim of this study is the development of effective vesicular formulations of ovalbumin and saponin which are able to promote penetration through the skin layers. Three kinds of vesicular formulations have been investigated as carriers, including liposomes, transfersomes and ethosomes, in which cholesterol and/or cationic lipid stearylamine are incorporated. The impact of membrane composition variations on the protein entrapment has been evaluated for each vesicle type. Formulations were characterized for particle size, polydispersity and encapsulation efficiency. The best formulations for each type of vesicle were subjected to in vivo transdermal immunization in mice. Among the three kinds of vesicular carrier, ethosomal nano carrier not only showed the best stability over a two months' storage, but also enabled the highest increase in the titer of serum antibody. In this regard, cationic nano-ethosomes can be considered as a promising vesicular carrier for transdermal vaccines. Meanwhile, we have developed a simple method to determine encapsulation efficiency of vesicular systems, which has potential application as a high throughput screening for vesicular formulations.

  1. Metabolic Capacity of Mitochondrion-related Organelles in the Free-living Anaerobic Stramenopile Cantina marsupialis.

    PubMed

    Noguchi, Fumiya; Shimamura, Shigeru; Nakayama, Takuro; Yazaki, Euki; Yabuki, Akinori; Hashimoto, Tetsuo; Inagaki, Yuji; Fujikura, Katsunori; Takishita, Kiyotaka

    2015-11-01

    Functionally and morphologically degenerate mitochondria, so-called mitochondrion-related organelles (MROs), are frequently found in eukaryotes inhabiting hypoxic or anoxic environments. In the last decade, MROs have been discovered from a phylogenetically broad range of eukaryotic lineages and these organelles have been revealed to possess diverse metabolic capacities. In this study, the biochemical characteristics of an MRO in the free-living anaerobic protist Cantina marsupialis, which represents an independent lineage in stramenopiles, were inferred based on RNA-seq data. We found transcripts for proteins known to function in one form of MROs, the hydrogenosome, such as pyruvate:ferredoxin oxidoreductase, iron-hydrogenase, acetate:succinate CoA-transferase, and succinyl-CoA synthase, along with transcripts for acetyl-CoA synthetase (ADP-forming). These proteins possess putative mitochondrial targeting signals at their N-termini, suggesting dual ATP generation systems through anaerobic pyruvate metabolism in Cantina MROs. In addition, MROs in Cantina were also shown to share several features with canonical mitochondria, including amino acid metabolism and an "incomplete" tricarboxylic acid cycle. Transcripts for all four subunits of complex II (CII) of the electron transport chain were detected, while there was no evidence for the presence of complexes I, III, IV, or F1Fo ATPase. Cantina MRO biochemistry challenges the categories of mitochondrial organelles recently proposed.

  2. Proteomics of secretory and endocytic organelles in Giardia lamblia.

    PubMed

    Wampfler, Petra B; Tosevski, Vinko; Nanni, Paolo; Spycher, Cornelia; Hehl, Adrian B

    2014-01-01

    Giardia lamblia is a flagellated protozoan enteroparasite transmitted as an environmentally resistant cyst. Trophozoites attach to the small intestine of vertebrate hosts and proliferate by binary fission. They access nutrients directly via uptake of bulk fluid phase material into specialized endocytic organelles termed peripheral vesicles (PVs), mainly on the exposed dorsal side. When trophozoites reach the G2/M restriction point in the cell cycle they can begin another round of cell division or encyst if they encounter specific environmental cues. They induce neogenesis of Golgi-like organelles, encystation-specific vesicles (ESVs), for regulated secretion of cyst wall material. PVs and ESVs are highly simplified and thus evolutionary diverged endocytic and exocytic organelle systems with key roles in proliferation and transmission to a new host, respectively. Both organelle systems physically and functionally intersect at the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) which has catabolic as well as anabolic functions. However, the unusually high degree of sequence divergence in Giardia rapidly exhausts phylogenomic strategies to identify and characterize the molecular underpinnings of these streamlined organelles. To define the first proteome of ESVs and PVs we used a novel strategy combining flow cytometry-based organelle sorting with in silico filtration of mass spectrometry data. From the limited size datasets we retrieved many hypothetical but also known organelle-specific factors. In contrast to PVs, ESVs appear to maintain a strong physical and functional link to the ER including recruitment of ribosomes to organelle membranes. Overall the data provide further evidence for the formation of a cyst extracellular matrix with minimal complexity. The mass spectrometry proteomics data have been deposited to the ProteomeXchange Consortium with the dataset identifier PXD000694.

  3. Organelle-Specific Activity-Based Protein Profiling in Living Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Wiedner, Susan D.; Anderson, Lindsey N.; Sadler, Natalie C.; Chrisler, William B.; Kodali, Vamsi K.; Smith, Richard D.; Wright, Aaron T.

    2014-02-06

    A multimodal acidic organelle targeting activity-based probe was developed for analysis of subcellular native enzymatic activity of cells by fluorescent microscopy and mass spectrometry. A cathepsin reactive warhead was conjugated to an acidotropic amine, and a clickable alkyne for appendage of AlexaFluor 488 or biotin reporter tags. This probe accumulated in punctate vesicles surrounded by LAMP1, a lysosome marker, as observed by Structured Illumination Microscopy (SIM) in J774 mouse macrophage cells. Biotin conjugation, affinity purification, and analysis of in vivo labeled J774 by mass spectrometry showed that the probe was very selective for Cathepsins B and Z, two lysosomal cysteine proteases. Analysis of starvation induced autophagy, which is an increase in cell component catabolism involving lysosomes, showed a large increase in tagged protein number and an increase in cathepsin activity. Organelle targeting activity-based probes and subsequent analysis of resident proteins by mass spectrometry is enabled by tuning the physicochemical properties of the probe.

  4. Recombination and the maintenance of plant organelle genome stability.

    PubMed

    Maréchal, Alexandre; Brisson, Normand

    2010-04-01

    Like their nuclear counterpart, the plastid and mitochondrial genomes of plants have to be faithfully replicated and repaired to ensure the normal functioning of the plant. Inability to maintain organelle genome stability results in plastid and/or mitochondrial defects, which can lead to potentially detrimental phenotypes. Fortunately, plant organelles have developed multiple strategies to maintain the integrity of their genetic material. Of particular importance among these processes is the extensive use of DNA recombination. In fact, recombination has been implicated in both the replication and the repair of organelle genomes. Revealingly, deregulation of recombination in organelles results in genomic instability, often accompanied by adverse consequences for plant fitness. The recent identification of four families of proteins that prevent aberrant recombination of organelle DNA sheds much needed mechanistic light on this important process. What comes out of these investigations is a partial portrait of the recombination surveillance machinery in which plants have co-opted some proteins of prokaryotic origin but have also evolved whole new factors to keep their organelle genomes intact. These new features presumably optimized the protection of plastid and mitochondrial genomes against the particular genotoxic stresses they face.

  5. Osh proteins regulate COPII-mediated vesicular transport of ceramide from the endoplasmic reticulum in budding yeast.

    PubMed

    Kajiwara, Kentaro; Ikeda, Atsuko; Aguilera-Romero, Auxiliadora; Castillon, Guillaume A; Kagiwada, Satoshi; Hanada, Kentaro; Riezman, Howard; Muñiz, Manuel; Funato, Kouichi

    2014-01-15

    Lipids synthesized at the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) are delivered to the Golgi by vesicular and non-vesicular pathways. ER-to-Golgi transport is crucial for maintaining the different membrane lipid composition and identities of organelles. Despite their importance, mechanisms regulating transport remain elusive. Here we report that in yeast coat protein complex II (COPII) vesicle-mediated transport of ceramide from the ER to the Golgi requires oxysterol-binding protein homologs, Osh proteins, which have been implicated in lipid homeostasis. Because Osh proteins are not required to transport proteins to the Golgi, these results indicate a specific requirement for the Osh proteins in the transport of ceramide. In addition, we provide evidence that Osh proteins play a negative role in COPII vesicle biogenesis. Together, our data suggest that ceramide transport and sphingolipid levels between the ER and Golgi are maintained by two distinct functions of Osh proteins, which negatively regulate COPII vesicle formation and positively control a later stage, presumably fusion of ceramide-enriched vesicles with Golgi compartments.

  6. Identification and Complete Genome of Seneca Valley Virus in Vesicular Fluid and Sera of Pigs Affected with Idiopathic Vesicular Disease, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Vannucci, F A; Linhares, D C L; Barcellos, D E S N; Lam, H C; Collins, J; Marthaler, D

    2015-12-01

    Numerous, ongoing outbreaks in Brazilian swine herds have been characterized by vesicular lesions in sows and acute losses of neonatal piglets. The complete genome of Seneca Valley virus (SVV) was identified in vesicular fluid and sera of sows, providing evidence of association between SVV and vesicular disease and viraemia in affected animals.

  7. Monodisperse Vesicular Structures produced Spontaneously from a Structureless Aqueous Amphiphilic System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murthy, Kamalakara; Easwar, Nalini; Singer, Emily

    1998-03-01

    The ternary system of water/di(ethylene glycol)mono-hexyl ether(C_6E_2)/sodium cholate (bile acid) is found to produce highly monodisperse vesicular structures. Individually, neither C_6E2 nor bile acid produces aggregate structures in aqueous solution. However, large microstructures are produced when bile acid is added to the C_6E_2/water system, while the miscibility gap of the binary system is pushed to higher temperatures. Dynamic light scattering reveals monodisperse structures of sizes ranging from 15-60nm. The radius shows a strong dependence on concentration of the ternary system as well as the distance from the cloud point. The vesicular nature of these structures has been confirmed with electron microscopy and conductivity measurements. The sizes of the vesicles are very reproducible for a given set of conditions. Results from dynamic light scattering, electron microscopy and conductivity measurements will be presented along with possible models for the association of bile acid with C_6E2 which result in the geometrical parameters necessary for the formation of the structures.

  8. The importance of synapsin I and II for neurotransmitter levels and vesicular storage in cholinergic, glutamatergic and GABAergic nerve terminals.

    PubMed

    Bogen, Inger Lise; Haug, Kristin Huse; Roberg, Bjørg; Fonnum, Frode; Walaas, S Ivar

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the importance of the vesicle-associated synapsin I and II phosphoproteins for the accumulation of neurotransmitters in central cholinergic as compared to central glutamatergic and GABAergic nerve terminals. In brain homogenate samples from mice devoid of synapsin I and II, the levels of vesicular transporters for glutamate (VGLUT1-2) and GABA (VGAT) were decreased by 35-40% in striatum and cortex, while no change was apparent for the vesicular acetylcholine transporter (VAChT). The severe decrease in the levels of amino acid vesicular transporters caused only minor changes in the concentrations of the respective neurotransmitters in homogenates of the three selected brain areas from synapsin I- and II-deficient mice. However, when measured in a crude vesicular fraction, the concentrations of glutamate and GABA were decreased by 48-60% in synapsin-deficient mice, with a similar decrease in the levels of VGLUT1, VGLUT2 and VGAT. In comparison, the concentration of acetylcholine and the level of VAChT were not significantly different from wild-type in the vesicular fraction. No changes were seen in the activity of specific enzymes involved in the synthesis of acetylcholine, glutamate or GABA, however, immunoblotting indicated a decrease in the protein level of glutamic acid decarboxylase, isoform 65 (GAD(65)). In conclusion, the results indicate that neurotransmitter regulation in central cholinergic synapses may be less dependent on synapsin I and II compared to the marked alterations seen in the glutamatergic and GABAergic synapses.

  9. Cellular Distribution and Subcellular Localization of Molecular Components of Vesicular Transmitter Release in Horizontal Cells of Rabbit Retina

    PubMed Central

    HIRANO, ARLENE A.; BRANDSTÄTTER, JOHANN H.; BRECHA, NICHOLAS C.

    2010-01-01

    The mechanism underlying transmitter release from retinal horizontal cells is poorly understood. We investigated the possibility of vesicular transmitter release from mammalian horizontal cells by examining the expression of synaptic proteins that participate in vesicular transmitter release at chemical synapses. Using immunocytochemistry, we evaluated the cellular and subcellular distribution of complexin I/II, syntaxin-1, and synapsin I in rabbit retina. Strong labeling for complexin I/II, proteins that regulate a late step in vesicular transmitter release, was found in both synaptic layers of the retina, and in somata of A- and B-type horizontal cells, of γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA)- and glycinergic amacrine cells, and of ganglion cells. Immunoelectron microscopy demonstrated the presence of complexin I/II in horizontal cell processes postsynaptic to rod and cone ribbon synapses. Syntaxin-1, a core protein of the soluble N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive-factor attachment protein receptor (SNARE) complex known to bind to complexin, and synapsin I, a synaptic vesicle-associated protein involved in the Ca2+-dependent recruitment of synaptic vesicles for transmitter release, were also present in the horizontal cells and their processes at photoreceptor synapses. Photoreceptors and bipolar cells did not express any of these proteins at their axon terminals. The presence of complexin I/II, syntaxin-1, and synapsin I in rabbit horizontal cell processes and tips suggests that a vesicular mechanism may underlie transmitter release from mammalian horizontal cells. PMID:15912504

  10. Integrated femtosecond stimulated Raman scattering and two-photon fluorescence imaging of subcellular lipid and vesicular structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xuesong; Lam, Wen Jiun; Cao, Zhe; Hao, Yan; Sun, Qiqi; He, Sicong; Mak, Ho Yi; Qu, Jianan Y.

    2015-11-01

    The primary goal of this study is to demonstrate that stimulated Raman scattering (SRS) as a new imaging modality can be integrated into a femtosecond (fs) nonlinear optical (NLO) microscope system. The fs sources of high pulse peak power are routinely used in multimodal nonlinear microscopy to enable efficient excitation of multiple NLO signals. However, with fs excitations, the SRS imaging of subcellular lipid and vesicular structures encounters significant interference from proteins due to poor spectral resolution and a lack of chemical specificity, respectively. We developed a unique NLO microscope of fs excitation that enables rapid acquisition of SRS and multiple two-photon excited fluorescence (TPEF) signals. In the in vivo imaging of transgenic C. elegans animals, we discovered that by cross-filtering false positive lipid signals based on the TPEF signals from tryptophan-bearing endogenous proteins and lysosome-related organelles, the imaging system produced highly accurate assignment of SRS signals to lipid. Furthermore, we demonstrated that the multimodal NLO microscope system could sequentially image lipid structure/content and organelles, such as mitochondria, lysosomes, and the endoplasmic reticulum, which are intricately linked to lipid metabolism.

  11. Integrated femtosecond stimulated Raman scattering and two-photon fluorescence imaging of subcellular lipid and vesicular structures.

    PubMed

    Li, Xuesong; Lam, Wen Jiun; Cao, Zhe; Hao, Yan; Sun, Qiqi; He, Sicong; Mak, Ho Yi; Qu, Jianan Y

    2015-11-01

    The primary goal of this study is to demonstrate that stimulated Raman scattering (SRS) as a new imaging modality can be integrated into a femtosecond (fs) nonlinear optical (NLO) microscope system. The fs sources of high pulse peak power are routinely used in multimodal nonlinear microscopy to enable efficient excitation of multiple NLO signals. However, with fs excitations, the SRS imaging of subcellular lipid and vesicular structures encounters significant interference from proteins due to poor spectral resolution and a lack of chemical specificity, respectively. We developed a unique NLO microscope of fs excitation that enables rapid acquisition of SRS and multiple two-photon excited fluorescence (TPEF) signals. In the in vivo imaging of transgenic C. elegans animals, we discovered that by cross-filtering false positive lipid signals based on the TPEF signals from tryptophan-bearing endogenous proteins and lysosome-related organelles, the imaging system produced highly accurate assignment of SRS signals to lipid. Furthermore, we demonstrated that the multimodal NLO microscope system could sequentially image lipid structure/content and organelles, such as mitochondria, lysosomes, and the endoplasmic reticulum, which are intricately linked to lipid metabolism.

  12. A pH-independent DNA nanodevice for quantifying chloride transport in organelles of living cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saha, Sonali; Prakash, Ved; Halder, Saheli; Chakraborty, Kasturi; Krishnan, Yamuna

    2015-07-01

    The concentration of chloride ions in the cytoplasm and subcellular organelles of living cells spans a wide range (5-130 mM), and is tightly regulated by intracellular chloride channels or transporters. Chloride-sensitive protein reporters have been used to study the role of these chloride regulators, but they are limited to a small range of chloride concentrations and are pH-sensitive. Here, we show that a DNA nanodevice can precisely measure the activity and location of subcellular chloride channels and transporters in living cells in a pH-independent manner. The DNA nanodevice, called Clensor, is composed of sensing, normalizing and targeting modules, and is designed to localize within organelles along the endolysosomal pathway. It allows fluorescent, ratiometric sensing of chloride ions across the entire physiological regime. We used Clensor to quantitate the resting chloride concentration in the lumen of acidic organelles in Drosophila melanogaster. We showed that lumenal lysosomal chloride, which is implicated in various lysosomal storage diseases, is regulated by the intracellular chloride transporter DmClC-b.

  13. A nanobuffer reporter library for fine-scale imaging and perturbation of endocytic organelles

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Chensu; Wang, Yiguang; Li, Yang; Bodemann, Brian; Zhao, Tian; Ma, Xinpeng; Huang, Gang; Hu, Zeping; DeBerardinis, Ralph J.; White, Michael A.; Gao, Jinming

    2015-01-01

    Endosomes, lysosomes and related catabolic organelles are a dynamic continuum of vacuolar structures that impact a number of cell physiological processes such as protein/lipid metabolism, nutrient sensing and cell survival. Here we develop a library of ultra-pH-sensitive fluorescent nanoparticles with chemical properties that allow fine-scale, multiplexed, spatio-temporal perturbation and quantification of catabolic organelle maturation at single organelle resolution to support quantitative investigation of these processes in living cells. Deployment in cells allows quantification of the proton accumulation rate in endosomes; illumination of previously unrecognized regulatory mechanisms coupling pH transitions to endosomal coat protein exchange; discovery of distinct pH thresholds required for mTORC1 activation by free amino acids versus proteins; broad-scale characterization of the consequence of endosomal pH transitions on cellular metabolomic profiles; and functionalization of a context-specific metabolic vulnerability in lung cancer cells. Together, these biological applications indicate the robustness and adaptability of this nanotechnology-enabled ‘detection and perturbation' strategy. PMID:26437053

  14. A Recombinant Vesicular Stomatitis Virus Ebola Vaccine.

    PubMed

    Regules, Jason A; Beigel, John H; Paolino, Kristopher M; Voell, Jocelyn; Castellano, Amy R; Hu, Zonghui; Muñoz, Paula; Moon, James E; Ruck, Richard C; Bennett, Jason W; Twomey, Patrick S; Gutiérrez, Ramiro L; Remich, Shon A; Hack, Holly R; Wisniewski, Meagan L; Josleyn, Matthew D; Kwilas, Steven A; Van Deusen, Nicole; Mbaya, Olivier Tshiani; Zhou, Yan; Stanley, Daphne A; Jing, Wang; Smith, Kirsten S; Shi, Meng; Ledgerwood, Julie E; Graham, Barney S; Sullivan, Nancy J; Jagodzinski, Linda L; Peel, Sheila A; Alimonti, Judie B; Hooper, Jay W; Silvera, Peter M; Martin, Brian K; Monath, Thomas P; Ramsey, W Jay; Link, Charles J; Lane, H Clifford; Michael, Nelson L; Davey, Richard T; Thomas, Stephen J

    2017-01-26

    Background The worst Ebola virus disease (EVD) outbreak in history has resulted in more than 28,000 cases and 11,000 deaths. We present the final results of two phase 1 trials of an attenuated, replication-competent, recombinant vesicular stomatitis virus (rVSV)-based vaccine candidate designed to prevent EVD. Methods We conducted two phase 1, placebo-controlled, double-blind, dose-escalation trials of an rVSV-based vaccine candidate expressing the glycoprotein of a Zaire strain of Ebola virus (ZEBOV). A total of 39 adults at each site (78 participants in all) were consecutively enrolled into groups of 13. At each site, volunteers received one of three doses of the rVSV-ZEBOV vaccine (3 million plaque-forming units [PFU], 20 million PFU, or 100 million PFU) or placebo. Volunteers at one of the sites received a second dose at day 28. Safety and immunogenicity were assessed. Results The most common adverse events were injection-site pain, fatigue, myalgia, and headache. Transient rVSV viremia was noted in all the vaccine recipients after dose 1. The rates of adverse events and viremia were lower after the second dose than after the first dose. By day 28, all the vaccine recipients had seroconversion as assessed by an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) against the glycoprotein of the ZEBOV-Kikwit strain. At day 28, geometric mean titers of antibodies against ZEBOV glycoprotein were higher in the groups that received 20 million PFU or 100 million PFU than in the group that received 3 million PFU, as assessed by ELISA and by pseudovirion neutralization assay. A second dose at 28 days after dose 1 significantly increased antibody titers at day 56, but the effect was diminished at 6 months. Conclusions This Ebola vaccine candidate elicited anti-Ebola antibody responses. After vaccination, rVSV viremia occurred frequently but was transient. These results support further evaluation of the vaccine dose of 20 million PFU for preexposure prophylaxis and suggest that a

  15. Vesicular trafficking through cortical actin during exocytosis is regulated by the Rab27a effector JFC1/Slp1 and the RhoA-GTPase-activating protein Gem-interacting protein.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Jennifer L; Monfregola, Jlenia; Napolitano, Gennaro; Kiosses, William B; Catz, Sergio D

    2012-05-01

    Cytoskeleton remodeling is important for the regulation of vesicular transport associated with exocytosis, but a direct association between granular secretory proteins and actin-remodeling molecules has not been shown, and this mechanism remains obscure. Using a proteomic approach, we identified the RhoA-GTPase-activating protein Gem-interacting protein (GMIP) as a factor that associates with the Rab27a effector JFC1 and modulates vesicular transport and exocytosis. GMIP down-regulation induced RhoA activation and actin polymerization. Importantly, GMIP-down-regulated cells showed impaired vesicular transport and exocytosis, while inhibition of the RhoA-signaling pathway induced actin depolymerization and facilitated exocytosis. We show that RhoA activity polarizes around JFC1-containing secretory granules, suggesting that it may control directionality of granule movement. Using quantitative live-cell microscopy, we show that JFC1-containing secretory organelles move in areas near the plasma membrane deprived of polymerized actin and that dynamic vesicles maintain an actin-free environment in their surroundings. Supporting a role for JFC1 in RhoA inactivation and actin remodeling during exocytosis, JFC1 knockout neutrophils showed increased RhoA activity, and azurophilic granules were unable to traverse cortical actin in cells lacking JFC1. We propose that during exocytosis, actin depolymerization commences near the secretory organelle, not the plasma membrane, and that secretory granules use a JFC1- and GMIP-dependent molecular mechanism to traverse cortical actin.

  16. Systematic Structural Analyses of Attachment Organelle in Mycoplasma pneumoniae.

    PubMed

    Nakane, Daisuke; Kenri, Tsuyoshi; Matsuo, Lisa; Miyata, Makoto

    2015-12-01

    Mycoplasma pneumoniae, a human pathogenic bacterium, glides on host cell surfaces by a unique and unknown mechanism. It forms an attachment organelle at a cell pole as a membrane protrusion composed of surface and internal structures, with a highly organized architecture. In the present study, we succeeded in isolating the internal structure of the organelle by sucrose-gradient centrifugation. The negative-staining electron microscopy clarified the details and dimensions of the internal structure, which is composed of terminal button, paired plates, and bowl complex from the end of cell front. Peptide mass fingerprinting of the structure suggested 25 novel components for the organelle, and 3 of them were suggested for their involvement in the structure through their subcellular localization determined by enhanced yellow fluorescent protein (EYFP) tagging. Thirteen component proteins including the previously reported ones were mapped on the organelle systematically for the first time, in nanometer order by EYFP tagging and immunoelectron microscopy. Two, three, and six specific proteins localized specifically to the terminal button, the paired plates, and the bowl, respectively and interestingly, HMW2 molecules were aligned parallel to form the plate. The integration of these results gave the whole image of the organelle and allowed us to discuss possible gliding mechanisms.

  17. Systematic Structural Analyses of Attachment Organelle in Mycoplasma pneumoniae

    PubMed Central

    Matsuo, Lisa; Miyata, Makoto

    2015-01-01

    Mycoplasma pneumoniae, a human pathogenic bacterium, glides on host cell surfaces by a unique and unknown mechanism. It forms an attachment organelle at a cell pole as a membrane protrusion composed of surface and internal structures, with a highly organized architecture. In the present study, we succeeded in isolating the internal structure of the organelle by sucrose-gradient centrifugation. The negative-staining electron microscopy clarified the details and dimensions of the internal structure, which is composed of terminal button, paired plates, and bowl complex from the end of cell front. Peptide mass fingerprinting of the structure suggested 25 novel components for the organelle, and 3 of them were suggested for their involvement in the structure through their subcellular localization determined by enhanced yellow fluorescent protein (EYFP) tagging. Thirteen component proteins including the previously reported ones were mapped on the organelle systematically for the first time, in nanometer order by EYFP tagging and immunoelectron microscopy. Two, three, and six specific proteins localized specifically to the terminal button, the paired plates, and the bowl, respectively and interestingly, HMW2 molecules were aligned parallel to form the plate. The integration of these results gave the whole image of the organelle and allowed us to discuss possible gliding mechanisms. PMID:26633540

  18. Multidimensional fluorescence microscopy of multiple organelles in Arabidopsis seedlings

    PubMed Central

    Kato, Naohiro; Reynolds, Dexter; Brown, Matthew L; Boisdore, Marietta; Fujikawa, Yukichi; Morales, Andrea; Meisel, Lee A

    2008-01-01

    Background The isolation of green fluorescent protein (GFP) and the development of spectral variants over the past decade have begun to reveal the dynamic nature of protein trafficking and organelle motility. In planta analyses of this dynamic process have typically been limited to only two organelles or proteins at a time in only a few cell types. Results We generated a transgenic Arabidopsis plant that contains four spectrally different fluorescent proteins. Nuclei, plastids, mitochondria and plasma membranes were genetically tagged with cyan, red, yellow and green fluorescent proteins, respectively. In addition, methods to track nuclei, mitochondria and chloroplasts and quantify the interaction between these organelles at a submicron resolution were developed. These analyzes revealed that N-ethylmaleimide disrupts nuclear-mitochondrial but not nuclear-plastids interactions in root epidermal cells of live Arabidopsis seedlings. Conclusion We developed a tool and associated methods for analyzing the complex dynamic of organelle-organelle interactions in real time in planta. Homozygous transgenic Arabidopsis (Kaleidocell) is available through Arabidopsis Biological Resource Center. PMID:18489765

  19. Brain dopamine-serotonin vesicular transport disease presenting as a severe infantile hypotonic parkinsonian disorder.

    PubMed

    Jacobsen, Jessie C; Wilson, Callum; Cunningham, Vicki; Glamuzina, Emma; Prosser, Debra O; Love, Donald R; Burgess, Trent; Taylor, Juliet; Swan, Brendan; Hill, Rosamund; Robertson, Stephen P; Snell, Russell G; Lehnert, Klaus

    2016-03-01

    Two male siblings from a consanguineous union presented in early infancy with marked truncal hypotonia, a general paucity of movement, extrapyramidal signs and cognitive delay. By mid-childhood they had made little developmental progress and remained severely hypotonic and bradykinetic. They developed epilepsy and had problems with autonomic dysfunction and oculogyric crises. They had a number of orthopaedic problems secondary to their hypotonia. Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) neurotransmitters were initially normal, apart from mildly elevated 5-hydroxyindolacetic acid, and the children did not respond favourably to a trial of levodopa-carbidopa. The youngest died from respiratory complications at 10 years of age. Repeat CSF neurotransmitters in the older sibling at eight years of age showed slightly low homovanillic acid and 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid levels. Whole-exome sequencing revealed a novel mutation homozygous in both children in the monoamine transporter gene SLC18A2 (p.Pro237His), resulting in brain dopamine-serotonin vesicular transport disease. This is the second family to be described with a mutation in this gene. Treatment with the dopamine agonist pramipexole in the surviving child resulted in mild improvements in alertness, communication, and eye movements. This case supports the identification of the causal mutation in the original case, expands the clinical phenotype of brain dopamine-serotonin vesicular transport disease and confirms that pramipexole treatment may lead to symptomatic improvement in affected individuals.

  20. Imaging trace element distributions in single organelles and subcellular features

    SciTech Connect

    Kashiv, Yoav; Austin, Jotham R.; Lai, Barry; Rose, Volker; Vogt, Stefan; El-Muayed, Malek

    2016-02-25

    The distributions of chemical elements within cells are of prime importance in a wide range of basic and applied biochemical research. An example is the role of the subcellular Zn distribution in Zn homeostasis in insulin producing pancreatic beta cells and the development of type 2 diabetes mellitus. We combined transmission electron microscopy with micro- and nano-synchrotron X-ray fluorescence to image unequivocally for the first time, to the best of our knowledge, the natural elemental distributions, including those of trace elements, in single organelles and other subcellular features. Detected elements include Cl, K, Ca, Co, Ni, Cu, Zn and Cd (which some cells were supplemented with). Cell samples were prepared by a technique that minimally affects the natural elemental concentrations and distributions, and without using fluorescent indicators.We find it could likely be applied to all cell types and provide new biochemical insights at the single organelle level not available from organelle population level studies.

  1. Imaging trace element distributions in single organelles and subcellular features

    PubMed Central

    Kashiv, Yoav; Austin, Jotham R.; Lai, Barry; Rose, Volker; Vogt, Stefan; El-Muayed, Malek

    2016-01-01

    The distributions of chemical elements within cells are of prime importance in a wide range of basic and applied biochemical research. An example is the role of the subcellular Zn distribution in Zn homeostasis in insulin producing pancreatic beta cells and the development of type 2 diabetes mellitus. We combined transmission electron microscopy with micro- and nano-synchrotron X-ray fluorescence to image unequivocally for the first time, to the best of our knowledge, the natural elemental distributions, including those of trace elements, in single organelles and other subcellular features. Detected elements include Cl, K, Ca, Co, Ni, Cu, Zn and Cd (which some cells were supplemented with). Cell samples were prepared by a technique that minimally affects the natural elemental concentrations and distributions, and without using fluorescent indicators. It could likely be applied to all cell types and provide new biochemical insights at the single organelle level not available from organelle population level studies. PMID:26911251

  2. Poles apart: prokaryotic polar organelles and their spatial regulation.

    PubMed

    Kirkpatrick, Clare L; Viollier, Patrick H

    2011-03-01

    While polar organelles hold the key to understanding the fundamentals of cell polarity and cell biological principles in general, they have served in the past merely for taxonomical purposes. Here, we highlight recent efforts in unraveling the molecular basis of polar organelle positioning in bacterial cells. Specifically, we detail the role of members of the Ras-like GTPase superfamily and coiled-coil-rich scaffolding proteins in modulating bacterial cell polarity and in recruiting effector proteins to polar sites. Such roles are well established for eukaryotic cells, but not for bacterial cells that are generally considered diffusion-limited. Studies on spatial regulation of protein positioning in bacterial cells, though still in their infancy, will undoubtedly experience a surge of interest, as comprehensive localization screens have yielded an extensive list of (polarly) localized proteins, potentially reflecting subcellular sites of functional specialization predicted for organelles.

  3. Spatiotemporal analysis of organelle and macromolecular complex inheritance

    PubMed Central

    Menendez-Benito, Victoria; van Deventer, Sjoerd J.; Jimenez-Garcia, Victor; Roy-Luzarraga, Marina; van Leeuwen, Fred; Neefjes, Jacques

    2013-01-01

    Following mitosis, daughter cells must inherit a functional set of essential proteins and organelles. We applied a genetic tool to simultaneously monitor the kinetics and distribution of old and new proteins marking all intracellular compartments in budding yeasts. Most organelles followed a general pattern whereby preexisting proteins are symmetrically partitioned followed by template-based incorporation of new proteins. Peroxisomes belong to this group, supporting a model of biogenesis by growth and division from preexisting peroxisomes. We detected two exceptions: the nuclear pore complex (NPC) and the spindle pole body (SPB). Old NPCs are stably inherited during successive generations but remained separated from new NPCs, which are incorporated de novo in mother and daughter cells. Only the SPB displayed asymmetrical distribution, with old components primarily inherited by daughter cells and new proteins equally incorporated in both cells. Our analysis resolves conflicting models (peroxisomes, NPC) and reveals unique patterns (NPC, SPB) of organelle inheritance. PMID:23248297

  4. Lam6 Regulates the Extent of Contacts between Organelles

    PubMed Central

    Elbaz-Alon, Yael; Eisenberg-Bord, Michal; Shinder, Vera; Stiller, Sebastian Berthold; Shimoni, Eyal; Wiedemann, Nils; Geiger, Tamar; Schuldiner, Maya

    2015-01-01

    Summary Communication between organelles is crucial for eukaryotic cells to function as one coherent unit. An important means of communication is through membrane contact sites, where two organelles come into close proximity allowing the transport of lipids and small solutes between them. Contact sites are dynamic in size and can change in response to environmental or cellular stimuli; however, how this is regulated has been unclear. Here, we show that Saccharomyces cerevisiae Lam6 resides in several central contact sites: ERMES (ER/mitochondria encounter structure), vCLAMP (vacuole and mitochondria patch), and NVJ (nuclear vacuolar junction). We show that Lam6 is sufficient for expansion of contact sites under physiological conditions and necessary for coordination of contact site size. Given that Lam6 is part of a large protein family and is conserved in vertebrates, our work opens avenues for investigating the underlying principles of organelle communication. PMID:26119743

  5. Transient domain formation in membrane-bound organelles undergoing maturation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dmitrieff, Serge; Sens, Pierre

    2013-12-01

    The membrane components of cellular organelles have been shown to segregate into domains as the result of biochemical maturation. We propose that the dynamical competition between maturation and lateral segregation of membrane components regulates domain formation. We study a two-component fluid membrane in which enzymatic reaction irreversibly converts one component into another and phase separation triggers the formation of transient membrane domains. The maximum domain size is shown to depend on the maturation rate as a power law similar to the one observed for domain growth with time in the absence of maturation, despite this time dependence not being verified in the case of irreversible maturation. This control of domain size by enzymatic activity could play a critical role in regulating exchange between organelles or within compartmentalized organelles such as the Golgi apparatus.

  6. Imaging trace element distributions in single organelles and subcellular features

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kashiv, Yoav; Austin, Jotham R.; Lai, Barry; Rose, Volker; Vogt, Stefan; El-Muayed, Malek

    2016-02-01

    The distributions of chemical elements within cells are of prime importance in a wide range of basic and applied biochemical research. An example is the role of the subcellular Zn distribution in Zn homeostasis in insulin producing pancreatic beta cells and the development of type 2 diabetes mellitus. We combined transmission electron microscopy with micro- and nano-synchrotron X-ray fluorescence to image unequivocally for the first time, to the best of our knowledge, the natural elemental distributions, including those of trace elements, in single organelles and other subcellular features. Detected elements include Cl, K, Ca, Co, Ni, Cu, Zn and Cd (which some cells were supplemented with). Cell samples were prepared by a technique that minimally affects the natural elemental concentrations and distributions, and without using fluorescent indicators. It could likely be applied to all cell types and provide new biochemical insights at the single organelle level not available from organelle population level studies.

  7. Biogenesis of a bacterial organelle: the carboxysome assembly pathway.

    PubMed

    Cameron, Jeffrey C; Wilson, Steven C; Bernstein, Susan L; Kerfeld, Cheryl A

    2013-11-21

    The carboxysome is a protein-based organelle for carbon fixation in cyanobacteria, keystone organisms in the global carbon cycle. It is composed of thousands of subunits including hexameric and pentameric proteins that form a shell to encapsulate the enzymes ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase and carbonic anhydrase. Here, we describe the stages of carboxysome assembly and the requisite gene products necessary for progression through each. Our results demonstrate that, unlike membrane-bound organelles of eukaryotes, in carboxysomes the interior of the compartment forms first, at a distinct site within the cell. Subsequently, shell proteins encapsulate this procarboxysome, inducing budding and distribution of functional organelles within the cell. We propose that the principles of carboxysome assembly that we have uncovered extend to diverse bacterial microcompartments.

  8. Some Ideas to Improve Pyroclast Density and Vesicularity Data Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernard, B.; Kueppers, U.; Ortiz, H. D.

    2014-12-01

    Pyroclast density and vesicularity are critical parameters in physical volcanology used to reconstruct eruptive dynamics and feed numerical models. Pyroclastic deposits typically present a wide range of density and vesicularity values, so measurements must be repeated tens of times. These data are generally treated using classical statistical analysis including averages and frequency histograms. One issue in this approach is that density and vesicularity are intensive properties and therefore they cannot be added or averaged directly. We encourage the use of weighted density and vesicularity averages and histograms, which is, until now, done only in few studies. In order to insure an adequate and efficient use of the weighting equations, we introduce an open-source R code to calculate the most common statistical parameters such as range and weighted averages, and produce abundance histograms. An important question when working with statistics is whether or not the sample size is large enough. To address this matter we also included a stability analysis based on a Monte Carlo approach which enables to quantify the reliability of the results. To illustrate this methodology we chose two large datasets from Chachimbiro (Ecuador) and Unzen (Japan) volcanoes. Our first results indicate that the use of weighted analysis instead of frequency analysis can change the density and vesicularity averages up to 4% and the shape of the abundance histogram leading to different interpretations. The stability analysis reveals that the number of measurements required for reliable results depends greatly on the distribution of density and vesicularity values. Therefore the number of measurements must be fixed on an ipso facto basis using a large sample size at the beginning and reducing it to achieve time efficiency.

  9. A novel microtubule-based motor protein (KIF4) for organelle transports, whose expression is regulated developmentally

    PubMed Central

    1994-01-01

    To understand the mechanisms of transport for organelles in the axon, we isolated and sequenced the cDNA encoding KIF4 from murine brain, and characterized the molecule biochemically and immunocytochemically. Complete amino acid sequence analysis of KIF4 and ultrastructural studies of KIF4 molecules expressed in Sf9 cells revealed that the protein contains 1,231 amino acid residues (M(r) 139,550) and that the molecule (116-nm rod with globular heads and tail) consists of three domains: an NH2-terminal globular motor domain, a central alpha-helical stalk domain and a COOH-terminal tail domain. KIF4 protein has the property of nucleotide-dependent binding to microtubules, microtubule- activated ATPase activity, and microtubule plus-end-directed motility. Northern blot analysis and in situ hybridization demonstrated that KIF4 is strongly expressed in juvenile tissues including differentiated young neurons, while its expression is decreased considerably in adult mice except in spleen. Immunocytochemical studies revealed that KIF4 colocalized with membranous organelles both in growth cones of differentiated neurons and in the cytoplasm of cultured fibroblasts. During mitotic phase of cell cycle, KIF4 appears to colocalize with membranous organelles in the mitotic spindle. Hence we conclude that KIF4 is a novel microtubule-associated anterograde motor protein for membranous organelles, the expression of which is regulated developmentally. PMID:7929562

  10. Organelle-localized potassium transport systems in plants.

    PubMed

    Hamamoto, Shin; Uozumi, Nobuyuki

    2014-05-15

    Some intracellular organelles found in eukaryotes such as plants have arisen through the endocytotic engulfment of prokaryotic cells. This accounts for the presence of plant membrane intrinsic proteins that have homologs in prokaryotic cells. Other organelles, such as those of the endomembrane system, are thought to have evolved through infolding of the plasma membrane. Acquisition of intracellular components (organelles) in the cells supplied additional functions for survival in various natural environments. The organelles are surrounded by biological membranes, which contain membrane-embedded K(+) transport systems allowing K(+) to move across the membrane. K(+) transport systems in plant organelles act coordinately with the plasma membrane intrinsic K(+) transport systems to maintain cytosolic K(+) concentrations. Since it is sometimes difficult to perform direct studies of organellar membrane proteins in plant cells, heterologous expression in yeast and Escherichia coli has been used to elucidate the function of plant vacuole K(+) channels and other membrane transporters. The vacuole is the largest organelle in plant cells; it has an important task in the K(+) homeostasis of the cytoplasm. The initial electrophysiological measurements of K(+) transport have categorized three classes of plant vacuolar cation channels, and since then molecular cloning approaches have led to the isolation of genes for a number of K(+) transport systems. Plants contain chloroplasts, derived from photoautotrophic cyanobacteria. A novel K(+) transport system has been isolated from cyanobacteria, which may add to our understanding of K(+) flux across the thylakoid membrane and the inner membrane of the chloroplast. This chapter will provide an overview of recent findings regarding plant organellar K(+) transport proteins.

  11. Vesicular system: Versatile carrier for transdermal delivery of bioactives.

    PubMed

    Singh, Deependra; Pradhan, Madhulika; Nag, Mukesh; Singh, Manju Rawat

    2015-01-01

    The transdermal route of drug delivery has gained immense interest for pharmaceutical researchers. The major hurdle for diffusion of drugs and bioactives through transdermal route is the stratum corneum, the outermost layer of the skin. Currently, various approaches such as physical approach, chemical approach, and delivery carriers have been used to augment the transdermal delivery of bioactives. This review provides a brief overview of mechanism of drug transport across skin, different lipid vesicular systems, with special emphasis on lipid vesicular systems including transfersomes, liposomes, niosomes, ethosomes, virosomes, and pharmacosomes and their application for the delivery of different bioactives.

  12. Eicosapentaenoic acid prevents TCDD-induced oxidative stress and inflammatory response by modulating MAP kinases and redox-sensitive transcription factors

    PubMed Central

    Palanisamy, Kalaiselvi; Krishnaswamy, Rajashree; Paramasivan, Poornima; Chih-Yang, Huang; Vishwanadha, Vijaya Padma

    2015-01-01

    Background and Purpose Oxidative stress and subsequent activation of inflammatory responses is a widely accepted consequence of exposure to environmental toxins. TCDD (2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin), a well-known environmental toxin, exerts its toxicity through many signalling mechanisms, with liver being the principal organ affected. However, an effective antidote to TCDD-induced toxicity is unknown. The present study evaluated the effect of eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA), an n3 fatty acid, on TCDD-induced toxicity. Experimental Approach In cultures of HepG2 cells, the EPA/AA ratio was determined using gas chromatography, oxidative stress and inflammatory responses through reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels, antioxidant status, [Ca2+]i, nuclear migration of two redox-sensitive transcription factors, NF-κB p65 and Nrf-2, expression of MAP kinase (p-Erk, p-p38), NF-κB p65, COX-2 and Nrf-2. Cellular changes in ΔΨm, acidic vesicular organelle formation, cell cycle analysis and scanning electron microscopy analysis were performed. Key Results EPA offered significant cytoprotection by increasing EPA/AA ratios in cell membranes, inhibiting ROS generation, enhancing antioxidant status and modulating nuclear translocation of redox-sensitive transcription factors (NF-κB p65 and Nrf-2) and expression of NF-κB p65, COX-2 and Nrf-2. Furthermore, TCDD-induced upstream events of MAPK phosphorylation, the increase in [Ca2+]i levels and cell surface changes in microvilli were significantly inhibited by EPA. EPA treatment maintained ΔΨm and prevented formation of acidic vesicular organelles. Conclusion and Implications The present study demonstrates for the first time some underlying molecular mechanisms of cytoprotection exerted by EPA against TCDD-induced oxidative stress and inflammatory responses. PMID:26177858

  13. METABOLIC REGULATION OF ORGANELLE HOMEOSTASIS IN LUPUS T CELLS

    PubMed Central

    Caza, Tiffany N; Talaber, Gergely; Perl, Andras

    2012-01-01

    Abnormal T-cell signaling and activation is a characteristic feature in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Lupus T cells are shifted towards an over-activated state, important signaling pathways are rewired, and signaling molecules are replaced. Disturbances in metabolic and organelle homeostasis, importantly within the mitochondrial, endosomal, and autophagosomal compartments, underlie the changes in signal transduction. Mitochondrial hyperpolarization, enhanced endosomal recycling, and dysregulated autophagy are hallmarks of pathologic organelle homeostasis in SLE. This review is focused on the metabolic checkpoints of endosomal traffic that control immunological synapse formation and mitophagy and may thus serve as targets for treatment in SLE. PMID:22836085

  14. The contribution of specific organelles to side scatter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mourant, Judith R.; Marina, Oana C.; Sanders, Claire K.

    2013-02-01

    Knowledge of which cellular structures scatter light is needed to fully utilize the information available from light scattering measurements of cells and tissues. To determine how specific organelles contribute to light scattering, wide angle side scattering was imaged simultaneously with fluorescence from specific organelles for thousands of cells using flow cytometry. Images were obtained with different depth of field conditions and analyzed with different assumptions. Both sets of data demonstrated that mitochondria and lysosomes, contribute similarly to side scatter. The nucleus contributes as much or more light scatter than either the mitochondria or the lysosomes.

  15. Melanosomes – dark organelles enlighten endosomal membrane transport

    PubMed Central

    Raposo, Graça; Marks, Michael S.

    2009-01-01

    Melanosomes are tissue-specific “lysosome-related” organelles of pigment cells in which melanins are synthesized and stored. Analyses of the trafficking and fate of melanosomal components are beginning to reveal how melanosomes are formed through novel pathways from early endosomal intermediates. These studies unveil generalized structural and functional modifications of the endosomal system in specialized cells, and provide unexpected insights into the biogenesis of multivesicular bodies and how compartmentalization regulates protein refolding. Moreover, genetic disorders that affect the biogenesis of melanosomes and other lysosome-related organelles have shed light into the molecular machinery that controls specialized endosomal sorting events. PMID:17878918

  16. Subaqueous non-vesicular to poorly-vesicular shards: hydroclastic fragmentation on seamounts and summit calderas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mueller, W. U.; Dingwell, D. B.; Downey, W. S.; Mastin, L. G.

    2008-12-01

    Recognizing pyroclastic deposits that originate directly from magmatic and phreatomagmatic explosions in a subaqueous setting is based upon sedimentary structures, such as massive, stratified, and graded beds as well as (pyro)clast size. Ideally such deposits form ordered fining-and thinning-upward sequences. Pumice, scoria, glass shards, euhedral and broken crystals, and lithic fragments are constituents that support an explosive heritage. Recent deep-sea ROV and submersible dives have retrieved non-vesicular to vesicle- poor, mm-scale, mafic shards in 5-15 cm-thick massive and/or graded (stratified) deposits, for which a subaqueous explosive origin has been inferred. These sheet hyaloclastites with variable shard shapes were first documented on Seamount 6 as deep-sea Limu O Pele at water depths > 1000 m. We identified in Seamount 6 samples equant to blocky shards with angular to subrounded terminations, but also subordinate hair-like and contorted glassy filaments, warped shards and irregular shards. Shards display internal laminations (flow-banding?) and have local perlitic fractures. Bubble wall shards derived from scoria burst were rare. In combination with all the above and a poor shard vesicularity (< 2%), a magmatic explosive origin seems improbable. Such small-volume deposits have been reported from seamounts and summit calderas associated with subaqueous drainage tubes and ponded magma in depths > 1000 m. We envision that hydrostatic pressure commensurate with water depth played a significant role. The deposits can be readily explained by a hydroclastic process whereby fragmentation occurred at the milli-second (Limu) to second scale (hyaloclastite). Hence, hyperquenched glass shards or thread-like glass filaments need not require magmatic explosivity. Constant surface interaction between aphyric, low-viscosity, high temperature, magma-lava at depth with seawater causes fragmentation (granulation) that can generate such delicate shards. The transfer of

  17. Metabolic Interplay between Peroxisomes and Other Subcellular Organelles Including Mitochondria and the Endoplasmic Reticulum

    PubMed Central

    Wanders, Ronald J. A.; Waterham, Hans R.; Ferdinandusse, Sacha

    2016-01-01

    Peroxisomes are unique subcellular organelles which play an indispensable role in several key metabolic pathways which include: (1.) etherphospholipid biosynthesis; (2.) fatty acid beta-oxidation; (3.) bile acid synthesis; (4.) docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) synthesis; (5.) fatty acid alpha-oxidation; (6.) glyoxylate metabolism; (7.) amino acid degradation, and (8.) ROS/RNS metabolism. The importance of peroxisomes for human health and development is exemplified by the existence of a large number of inborn errors of peroxisome metabolism in which there is an impairment in one or more of the metabolic functions of peroxisomes. Although the clinical signs and symptoms of affected patients differ depending upon the enzyme which is deficient and the extent of the deficiency, the disorders involved are usually (very) severe diseases with neurological dysfunction and early death in many of them. With respect to the role of peroxisomes in metabolism it is clear that peroxisomes are dependent on the functional interplay with other subcellular organelles to sustain their role in metabolism. Indeed, whereas mitochondria can oxidize fatty acids all the way to CO2 and H2O, peroxisomes are only able to chain-shorten fatty acids and the end products of peroxisomal beta-oxidation need to be shuttled to mitochondria for full oxidation to CO2 and H2O. Furthermore, NADH is generated during beta-oxidation in peroxisomes and beta-oxidation can only continue if peroxisomes are equipped with a mechanism to reoxidize NADH back to NAD+, which is now known to be mediated by specific NAD(H)-redox shuttles. In this paper we describe the current state of knowledge about the functional interplay between peroxisomes and other subcellular compartments notably the mitochondria and endoplasmic reticulum for each of the metabolic pathways in which peroxisomes are involved. PMID:26858947

  18. More than a locomotive organelle: flagella in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Mingxu; Yang, Yang; Chen, Panlin; Hu, Huijie; Hardwidge, Philip R; Zhu, Guoqiang

    2015-11-01

    The flagellum is a locomotive organelle that allows bacteria to respond to chemical gradients. This review summarizes the current knowledge regarding Escherichia coli flagellin variants and the role of flagella in bacterial functions other than motility, including the relationship between flagella and bacterial virulence.

  19. Plant cell organelle proteomics in response to abiotic stress.

    PubMed

    Hossain, Zahed; Nouri, Mohammad-Zaman; Komatsu, Setsuko

    2012-01-01

    Proteomics is one of the finest molecular techniques extensively being used for the study of protein profiling of a given plant species experiencing stressed conditions. Plants respond to a stress by alteration in the pattern of protein expression, either by up-regulating of the existing protein pool or by the synthesizing novel proteins primarily associated with plants antioxidative defense mechanism. Improved protein extraction protocols and advance techniques for identification of novel proteins have been standardized in different plant species at both cellular and whole plant level for better understanding of abiotic stress sensing and intracellular stress signal transduction mechanisms. In contrast, an in-depth proteome study of subcellular organelles could generate much detail information about the intrinsic mechanism of stress response as it correlates the possible relationship between the protein abundance and plant stress tolerance. Although a wealth of reviews devoted to plant proteomics are available, review articles dedicated to plant cell organelle proteins response under abiotic stress are very scanty. In the present review, an attempt has been made to summarize all significant contributions related to abiotic stresses and their impacts on organelle proteomes for better understanding of plants abiotic stress tolerance mechanism at protein level. This review will not only provide new insights into the plants stress response mechanisms, which are necessary for future development of genetically engineered stress tolerant crop plants for the benefit of humankind, but will also highlight the importance of studying changes in protein abundance within the cell organelles in response to abiotic stress.

  20. Proteins involved in vesicular transport and membrane fusion.

    PubMed

    Waters, M G; Griff, I C; Rothman, J E

    1991-08-01

    In the past year, new information about proteins involved in vesicular transport has been plentiful. Particularly noteworthy are the complementary findings that Sec17p is required for vesicle consumption in endoplasmic reticulum-to-Golgi transport in yeast and that an analogous activity in mammalian cells, termed SNAP, is required for transport from the cis to the medial cisternae of the Golgi apparatus.

  1. Development of a novel real-time RT-PCR assay to detect Seneca Valley virus associated with emerging cases of vesicular disease in pigs.

    PubMed

    Fowler, Veronica L; Ransburgh, Russell H; Poulsen, Elizabeth G; Wadsworth, Jemma; King, Donald P; Mioulet, Valerie; Knowles, Nick J; Williamson, Susanna; Liu, Xuming; Anderson, Gary A; Fang, Ying; Bai, Jianfa

    2016-10-29

    Seneca Valley virus (SVV) can cause vesicular disease that is clinically indistinguishable from foot-and-mouth disease, vesicular stomatitis and swine vesicular disease. SVV-associated disease has been identified in pigs in several countries, namely USA, Canada, Brazil and China. Diagnostic tests are required to reliably detect this emerging virus, and this report describes the development and evaluation of a novel real-time reverse-transcription (RT) PCR assay (rRT-PCR), targeting the viral polymerase gene (3D) of SVV. This new assay detected all historical and contemporary SVV-1 isolates examined (n=8), while no cross-reactivity was observed with nucleic acid template prepared from other vesicular disease viruses or common swine pathogens. The analytical sensitivity of the rRT-PCR was 0.79 TCID50/ml and the limit of detect was equivalent using two different RT-PCR master-mixes. The performance of the test was further evaluated using pig nasal (n=25) and rectal swab samples (n=25), where concordant results compared to virus sequencing were generated for 43/50 samples. The availability of this assay, will enable laboratories to rapidly detect SVV in cases of vesicular disease in pigs, negated for notifiable diseases, and could enable existing knowledge gaps to be investigated surrounding the natural epidemiology of SVV.

  2. Development of a novel real-time RT-PCR assay to detect Seneca Valley virus-1 associated with emerging cases of vesicular disease in pigs.

    PubMed

    Fowler, Veronica L; Ransburgh, Russell H; Poulsen, Elizabeth G; Wadsworth, Jemma; King, Donald P; Mioulet, Valerie; Knowles, Nick J; Williamson, Susanna; Liu, Xuming; Anderson, Gary A; Fang, Ying; Bai, Jianfa

    2017-01-01

    Seneca Valley virus 1 (SVV-1) can cause vesicular disease that is clinically indistinguishable from foot-and-mouth disease, vesicular stomatitis and swine vesicular disease. SVV-1-associated disease has been identified in pigs in several countries, namely USA, Canada, Brazil and China. Diagnostic tests are required to reliably detect this emerging virus, and this report describes the development and evaluation of a novel real-time (r) reverse-transcription (RT) PCR assay (rRT-PCR), targeting the viral polymerase gene (3D) of SVV-1. This new assay detected all historical and contemporary SVV-1 isolates examined (n=8), while no cross-reactivity was observed with nucleic acid templates prepared from other vesicular disease viruses or common swine pathogens. The analytical sensitivity of the rRT-PCR was 0.79 TCID50/ml and the limit of detection was equivalent using two different rRT-PCR master-mixes. The performance of the test was further evaluated using pig nasal (n=25) and rectal swab samples (n=25), where concordant results compared to virus sequencing were generated for 43/50 samples. The availability of this assay, will enable laboratories to rapidly detect SVV-1 in cases of vesicular disease in pigs, negated for notifiable diseases, and could enable existing knowledge gaps to be investigated surrounding the natural epidemiology of SVV-1.

  3. C. elegans Major Fats Are Stored in Vesicles Distinct from Lysosome-Related Organelles

    PubMed Central

    O’Rourke, Eyleen J.; Soukas, Alexander A.; Carr, Christopher E.; Ruvkun, Gary

    2010-01-01

    SUMMARY Genetic conservation allows ancient features of fat storage endocrine pathways to be explored in C. elegans. Multiple studies have used Nile red or BODIPY-labeled fatty acids to identify regulators of fat mass. When mixed with their food, E. coli bacteria, Nile red, and BODIPY-labeled fatty acids stain multiple spherical cellular structures in the C. elegans major fat storage organ, the intestine. However, here we demonstrate that, in the conditions previously reported, the lysosome-related organelles stained by Nile red and BODIPY-labeled fatty acids are not the C. elegans major fat storage compartment. We show that the major fat stores are contained in a distinct cellular compartment that is not stained by Nile red. Using biochemical assays, we validate oil red O staining as a method to assess major fat stores in C. elegans, allowing for efficient and accurate genetic and functional genomic screens for genes that control fat accumulation at the organismal level. PMID:19883620

  4. Genome-wide transcriptome analysis revealed organelle specific responses to temperature variations in algae

    PubMed Central

    Shin, HyeonSeok; Hong, Seong-Joo; Yoo, Chan; Han, Mi-Ae; Lee, Hookeun; Choi, Hyung-Kyoon; Cho, Suhyung; Lee, Choul-Gyun; Cho, Byung-Kwan

    2016-01-01

    Temperature is a critical environmental factor that affects microalgal growth. However, microalgal coping mechanisms for temperature variations are unclear. Here, we determined changes in transcriptome, total carbohydrate, total fatty acid methyl ester, and fatty acid composition of Tetraselmis sp. KCTC12432BP, a strain with a broad temperature tolerance range, to elucidate the tolerance mechanisms in response to large temperature variations. Owing to unavailability of genome sequence information, de novo transcriptome assembly coupled with BLAST analysis was performed using strand specific RNA-seq data. This resulted in 26,245 protein-coding transcripts, of which 83.7% could be annotated to putative functions. We identified more than 681 genes differentially expressed, suggesting an organelle-specific response to temperature variation. Among these, the genes related to the photosynthetic electron transfer chain, which are localized in the plastid thylakoid membrane, were upregulated at low temperature. However, the transcripts related to the electron transport chain and biosynthesis of phosphatidylethanolamine localized in mitochondria were upregulated at high temperature. These results show that the low energy uptake by repressed photosynthesis under low and high temperature conditions is compensated by different mechanisms, including photosystem I and mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation, respectively. This study illustrates that microalgae tolerate different temperature conditions through organelle specific mechanisms. PMID:27883062

  5. Cadmium stress disrupts the endomembrane organelles and endocytosis during Picea wilsonii pollen germination and tube growth.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaoxia; Gao, Yuan; Feng, Yu; Li, Xue; Wei, Qian; Sheng, Xianyong

    2014-01-01

    As one of the most severe pollutants, cadmium has been reported to be harmful to plant cells, but the effects of cadmium on gymnosperm pollen germination and tube growth and the mechanism of this involvement are still unclear. Here, we report that cadmium not only strongly inhibited P. wilsonii pollen germination and tube growth, but also significantly altered tube morphology in a dose-dependent manner. Time-lapse images obtained with a laser scanning confocal microscope revealed that endocytosis was dramatically inhibited by cadmium stress. Further investigation with ER-Tracker dye indicated that cadmium stress reduced the number of the Golgi apparatus, and induced dilation of ER. Additionally, Lyso-Tracker staining showed that cadmium distinctly promoted the formation of acidic organelles in pollen tubes, likely derived from the dilated ER. Taken together, our studies indicated that P. wilsonii pollens were highly susceptible to cadmium stress, and that cadmium stress strongly inhibited pollen germination and tube growth by disrupting the endomembrane organelles, inhibiting endo/exocytosis, and forming acidic vacuoles, resulting in swollen tube tips and irregularly broadened tube diameters. These findings provide a new insight into the effects of cadmium toxicity on the tip growth of pollen tubes.

  6. Cadmium Stress Disrupts the Endomembrane Organelles and Endocytosis during Picea wilsonii Pollen Germination and Tube Growth

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Yu; Li, Xue; Wei, Qian; Sheng, Xianyong

    2014-01-01

    As one of the most severe pollutants, cadmium has been reported to be harmful to plant cells, but the effects of cadmium on gymnosperm pollen germination and tube growth and the mechanism of this involvement are still unclear. Here, we report that cadmium not only strongly inhibited P. wilsonii pollen germination and tube growth, but also significantly altered tube morphology in a dose-dependent manner. Time-lapse images obtained with a laser scanning confocal microscope revealed that endocytosis was dramatically inhibited by cadmium stress. Further investigation with ER-Tracker dye indicated that cadmium stress reduced the number of the Golgi apparatus, and induced dilation of ER. Additionally, Lyso-Tracker staining showed that cadmium distinctly promoted the formation of acidic organelles in pollen tubes, likely derived from the dilated ER. Taken together, our studies indicated that P. wilsonii pollens were highly susceptible to cadmium stress, and that cadmium stress strongly inhibited pollen germination and tube growth by disrupting the endomembrane organelles, inhibiting endo/exocytosis, and forming acidic vacuoles, resulting in swollen tube tips and irregularly broadened tube diameters. These findings provide a new insight into the effects of cadmium toxicity on the tip growth of pollen tubes. PMID:24722362

  7. Environmental significance of vesicular sediment structure in arid regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dietze, M.; Kleber, A.

    2012-04-01

    Vesicular structure is a frequent and widely spread phenomenon in surficial fine-grained sediments in arid environments. It typically affects the upper few millimetres to decimetres of sediment and consists of isolated, spherical to ovoid pores, some 100 to 1000 micrometres in diameter, which give the sediment a foamy appearance. The vesicular layer has, together with an often genetically associated stone pavement cover, major control functions for dust trapping as well as dust mobilisation, water infiltration, soil moisture and surface runoff, as well as ecological site characteristics. Accordingly, there are numerous but often contradictory hypotheses about vesicular structure formation. Most of them are based on individual experiments with settings that were never consistent and overarching but rather focused on one sediment or environmental variable and its relative influence on vesicle formation. We present highlights of extensive laboratory experiments where physical and chemical sediment properties as well as environmental variables such as wetting technique, wetting amount, surface cover type or drying temperature were changed systematically over the entire range of published characteristics of vesicular layers. A series of measures of vesicle features, derived from digitised sediment sections, forms the base for quantitative sample comparison. Furthermore, the experimental results are related to natural analogues from severe regions throughout a climatic gradient from the hyper-arid part of Baja California, Mexico, to the sub-humid southern Sevier Basin, USA. Based on the results, the plausibility of published vesicle formation hypotheses is discussed and a genetic model is formulated. Vesicles are no transient feature but rather evolve exponentially and become stabilised. They form due to surface puddling and a wetting front which advances downward, thereby elevating the gas pressure within the sediment matrix. Translocation of clay and calcium carbonate

  8. Subpopulations of rat dorsal root ganglion neurons express active vesicular acetylcholine transporter.

    PubMed

    Tata, Ada Maria; De Stefano, M Egle; Tomassy, Giulio Srubek; Vilaró, M Teresa; Levey, Allan I; Biagioni, Stefano

    2004-01-15

    The vesicular acetylcholine transporter (VAChT) is a transmembrane protein required, in cholinergic neurons, for selective storage of acetylcholine into synaptic vesicles. Although dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons utilize neuropeptides and amino acids for neurotransmission, we have previously demonstrated the presence of a cholinergic system. To investigate whether, in sensory neurons, the vesicular accumulation of acetylcholine relies on the same mechanisms active in classical cholinergic neurons, we investigated VAChT presence, subcellular distribution, and activity. RT-PCR and Western blot analysis demonstrated the presence of VAChT mRNA and protein product in DRG neurons and in the striatum and cortex, used as positive controls. Moreover, in situ hybridization and immunocytochemistry showed VAChT staining located mainly in the medium/large-sized subpopulation of the sensory neurons. A few small neurons were also faintly labeled by immunocytochemistry. In the electron microscope, immunolabeling was associated with vesicle-like elements distributed in the neuronal cytoplasm and in both myelinated and unmyelinated intraganglionic nerve fibers. Finally, [(3)H]acetylcholine active transport, evaluated either in the presence or in the absence of ATP, also demonstrated that, as previously reported, the uptake of acetylcholine by VAChT is ATP dependent. This study suggests that DRG neurons not only are able to synthesize and degrade ACh and to convey cholinergic stimuli but also are capable of accumulating and, possibly, releasing acetylcholine by the same mechanism used by the better known cholinergic neurons.

  9. Disrupting vesicular trafficking at the endosome attenuates transcriptional activation by Gcn4.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Fan; Gaur, Naseem A; Hasek, Jiri; Kim, Soon-ja; Qiu, Hongfang; Swanson, Mark J; Hinnebusch, Alan G

    2008-11-01

    The late endosome (MVB) plays a key role in coordinating vesicular transport of proteins between the Golgi complex, vacuole/lysosome, and plasma membrane. We found that deleting multiple genes involved in vesicle fusion at the MVB (class C/D vps mutations) impairs transcriptional activation by Gcn4, a global regulator of amino acid biosynthetic genes, by decreasing the ability of chromatin-bound Gcn4 to stimulate preinitiation complex assembly at the promoter. The functions of hybrid activators with Gal4 or VP16 activation domains are diminished in class D mutants as well, suggesting a broader defect in activation. Class E vps mutations, which impair protein sorting at the MVB, also decrease activation by Gcn4, provided they elicit rapid proteolysis of MVB cargo proteins in the aberrant late endosome. By contrast, specifically impairing endocytic trafficking from the plasma membrane, or vesicular transport to the vacuole, has a smaller effect on Gcn4 function. Thus, it appears that decreasing cargo proteins in the MVB through impaired delivery or enhanced degradation, and not merely the failure to transport cargo properly to the vacuole or downregulate plasma membrane proteins by endocytosis, is required to attenuate substantially transcriptional activation by Gcn4.

  10. Amyloplast sedimentation and organelle saltation in living corn columella cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sack, F. D.; Suyemoto, M. M.; Leopold, A. C.

    1986-01-01

    Amyloplast sedimentation during gravistimulation and organelle movements was studied in living central rootcap cells of Zea mays L. cv. Merit. Cells from sectioned roots were viewed with a horizontally-mounted videomicroscope. The kinetics of gravity-induced amyloplast sedimentation were comparable to those calculated from experiments using fixed material. Individual amyloplasts fell at an average velocity of 5.5 micrometers min-1; the maximal velocity of fall measured was 18.0 micrometers min-1. Amyloplasts often rotated, sometimes rose in the cytoplasm, and occasionally underwent sudden rapid movements as fast as 58 micrometers min-1. Saltations of other organelles were frequently observed. This appears to be the first report of cytoplasmic streaming in the presumptive statocytes of roots.

  11. Updating Our View of Organelle Genome Nucleotide Landscape

    PubMed Central

    Smith, David Roy

    2012-01-01

    Organelle genomes show remarkable variation in architecture and coding content, yet their nucleotide composition is relatively unvarying across the eukaryotic domain, with most having a high adenine and thymine (AT) content. Recent studies, however, have uncovered guanine and cytosine (GC)-rich mitochondrial and plastid genomes. These sequences come from a small but eclectic list of species, including certain green plants and animals. Here, I review GC-rich organelle DNAs and the insights they have provided into the evolution of nucleotide landscape. I emphasize that GC-biased mitochondrial and plastid DNAs are more widespread than once thought, sometimes occurring together in the same species, and suggest that the forces biasing their nucleotide content can differ both among and within lineages, and may be associated with specific genome architectural features and life history traits. PMID:22973299

  12. Nuclear regulators with a second home in organelles.

    PubMed

    Krause, Kirsten; Krupinska, Karin

    2009-04-01

    In plants, increasing evidence points towards the existence of nuclear proteins that are also targeted to either mitochondria - a well-known phenomenon from yeast and mammalians - or to plastids. One such protein is Whirly1, which was the first protein to be identified in the nucleus and plastids of the same plant cell. Like Whirly1, most of the dual targeted (nucleus and organelle) proteins have functions in the maintenance of DNA, telomere structuring or gene expression. In some instances, proteins were even shown to be relocated from one compartment to another upon environmental or developmental clues. We hypothesize that one rationale of dual targeting is storage or sequestration of these proteins inside the organelles until specific conditions require their activity in the nucleus.

  13. Acetylation of prostaglandin synthetase by aspirin. Purification and properties of the acetylated protein from sheep vesicular gland.

    PubMed

    Roth, G J; Stanford, N; Jacobs, J W; Majerus, P W

    1977-09-20

    We previously presented evidence that aspirin (acetylsalicylic acid) inhibits prostaglandin synthetase by acetylating and active site of the enzyme. In the current work, we have labeled the enzyme from an aceton-pentane powder of sheep vesicular gland using [acetyl-3H]aspirin and purified the [3H]acetyl-protein to near homogeneity. The final preparation contains protein of a single molecular weight (85 000) and an amino-terminal sequence of Asp-Ala-Gly-Arg-Ala. The [3H]acetyl-protein contained 0.5 mol of acetyl residues per mol of protein based on amino acid composition but only a single sequence was found.

  14. Genomes at the interface between bacteria and organelles.

    PubMed Central

    Douglas, Angela E; Raven, John A

    2003-01-01

    The topic of the transition of the genome of a free-living bacterial organism to that of an organelle is addressed by considering three cases. Two of these are relatively clear-cut as involving respectively organisms (cyanobacteria) and organelles (plastids). Cyanobacteria are usually free-living but some are involved in symbioses with a range of eukaryotes in which the cyanobacterial partner contributes photosynthesis, nitrogen fixation, or both of these. In several of these symbioses the cyanobacterium is vertically transmitted, and in a few instances, sufficient unsuccessful attempts have been made to culture the cyanobiont independently for the association to be considered obligate for the cyanobacterium. Plastids clearly had a cyanobacterial ancestor but cannot grow independently of the host eukaryote. Plastid genomes have at most 15% of the number of genes encoded by the cyanobacterium with the smallest number of genes; more genes than are retained in the plastid genome have been transferred to the eukaryote nuclear genome, while the rest of the cyanobacterial genes have been lost. Even the most cyanobacteria-like plastids, for example the "cyanelles" of glaucocystophyte algae, are functionally and genetically very similar to other plastids and give little help in indicating intermediates in the evolution of plastids. The third case considered is the vertically transmitted intracellular bacterial symbionts of insects where the symbiosis is usually obligate for both partners. The number of genes encoded by the genomes of these obligate symbionts is intermediate between that of organelles and that of free-living bacteria, and the genomes of the insect symbionts also show rapid rates of sequence evolution and AT (adenine, thymine) bias. Genetically and functionally, these insect symbionts show considerable similarity to organelles. PMID:12594915

  15. Gregarina niphandrodes may lack both a plastid genome and organelle.

    PubMed

    Toso, Marc A; Omoto, Charlotte K

    2007-01-01

    Gregarines are early diverging apicomplexans that appear to be closely related to Cryptosporidium. Most apicomplexans, including Plasmodium, Toxoplasma, and Eimeria, possess both plastids and corresponding plastid genomes. Cryptosporidium lacks both the organelle and the genome. To investigate the evolutionary history of plastids in the Apicomplexa, we tried to determine whether gregarines possess a plastid and/or its genome. We used PCR and dot-blot hybridization to determine whether the gregarine Gregarina niphandrodes possesses a plastid genome. We used an inhibitor of plastid function for any reduction in gregarine infection, and transmission electron microscopy to search for plastid ultrastructure. Despite an extensive search, an organelle of the appropriate ultrastructure in transmission electron microscopy, was not observed. Triclosan, an inhibitor of the plastid-specific enoyl-acyl carrier reductase enzyme, did not reduce host infection by G. niphandrodes. Plastid-specific primers produced amplicons with the DNA of Babesia equi, Plasmodium falciparum, and Toxoplasma gondii as templates, but not with G. niphandrodes DNA. Plastid-specific DNA probes, which hybridized to Babesia equi, failed to hybridize to G. niphandrodes DNA. This evidence indicates that G. niphandrodes is not likely to possess either a plastid organelle or its genome. This raises the possibility that the plastid was lost in the Apicomplexan following the divergence of gregarines and Cryptosporidium.

  16. Whole-Genome Hitchhiking on an Organelle Mutation.

    PubMed

    Flood, Pádraic J; van Heerwaarden, Joost; Becker, Frank; de Snoo, C Bastiaan; Harbinson, Jeremy; Aarts, Mark G M

    2016-05-23

    Strong selection on a beneficial mutation can cause a selective sweep, which fixes the mutation in the population and reduces the genetic variation in the region flanking the mutation [1-3]. These flanking regions have increased in frequency due to their physical association with the selected loci, a phenomenon called "genetic hitchhiking" [4]. Theoretically, selection could extend the hitchhiking to unlinked parts of the genome, to the point that selection on organelles affects nuclear genome diversity. Such indirect selective sweeps have never been observed in nature. Here we show that strong selection on a chloroplast gene in the wild plant species Arabidopsis thaliana has caused widespread and lasting hitchhiking of the whole nuclear genome. The selected allele spread more than 400 km along the British railway network, reshaping the genetic composition of local populations. This demonstrates that selection on organelle genomes can significantly reduce nuclear genetic diversity in natural populations. We expect that organelle-mediated genetic draft is a more common occurrence than previously realized and needs to be considered when studying genome evolution.

  17. Protein localization and dynamics within a bacterial organelle

    PubMed Central

    Hughes, H. Velocity; Huitema, Edgar; Pritchard, Sean; Keiler, Kenneth C.; Brun, Yves V.; Viollier, Patrick H.

    2010-01-01

    Protein localization mechanisms dictate the functional and structural specialization of cells. Of the four polar surface organelles featured by the dimorphic bacterium Caulobacter crescentus, the stalk, a cylindrical extension of all cell envelope layers, is the least well characterized at the molecular level. Here we apply a powerful experimental scheme that integrates genetics with high-throughput localization to discover StpX, an uncharacterized bitopic membrane protein that modulates stalk elongation and is sequestered to the stalk. In stalkless mutants StpX is dispersed. Two populations of StpX were discernible within the stalk with different mobilities: an immobile one near the stalk base and a mobile one near the stalk tip. Molecular anatomy provides evidence that (i) the StpX transmembrane domain enables access to the stalk organelle, (ii) the N-terminal periplasmic domain mediates retention in the stalk, and (iii) the C-terminal cytoplasmic domain enhances diffusion within the stalk. Moreover, the accumulation of StpX and an N-terminally truncated isoform is differentially coordinated with the cell cycle. Thus, at the submicron scale the localization and the mobility of a protein are precisely regulated in space and time and are important for the correct organization of a subcellular compartment or organelle such as the stalk. PMID:20212131

  18. Organelle DNA accumulation in the recently evolved papaya sex chromosomes.

    PubMed

    VanBuren, Robert; Ming, Ray

    2013-06-01

    Sex chromosomes are a pair of specialized chromosomes containing a sex determination region that is suppressed for recombination. Without recombination, Y chromosomes are thought to accumulate repetitive DNA sequences which contribute to their degeneration. A pair of primitive sex chromosomes controls sex type in papaya with male and hermaphrodite determined by the slightly different male-specific region of the Y (MSY) and hermaphrodite-specific region of Y(h) (HSY) chromosomes, respectively. Here, we show that the papaya HSY and MSY in the absence of recombination have accumulated nearly 12 times the amount of chloroplast-derived DNA than the corresponding region of the X chromosome and 4 times the papaya genome-wide average. Furthermore, a chloroplast genome fragment containing the rsp15 gene has been amplified 23 times in the HSY, evidence of retrotransposon-mediated duplication. Surprisingly, mitochondria-derived sequences are less abundant in the X and HSY compared to the whole genome. Shared organelle integrations are sparse between X and HSY, with only 11 % of chloroplast and 12 % of mitochondria fragments conserved, respectively, suggesting that the accelerated accumulation of organelle DNA occurred after the HSY was suppressed for recombination. Most of the organelle-derived sequences have divergence times of <7 MYA, reinforcing this notion. The accumulated chloroplast DNA is evidence of the slow degeneration of the HSY.

  19. Imaging trace element distributions in single organelles and subcellular features

    DOE PAGES

    Kashiv, Yoav; Austin, Jotham R.; Lai, Barry; ...

    2016-02-25

    The distributions of chemical elements within cells are of prime importance in a wide range of basic and applied biochemical research. An example is the role of the subcellular Zn distribution in Zn homeostasis in insulin producing pancreatic beta cells and the development of type 2 diabetes mellitus. We combined transmission electron microscopy with micro- and nano-synchrotron X-ray fluorescence to image unequivocally for the first time, to the best of our knowledge, the natural elemental distributions, including those of trace elements, in single organelles and other subcellular features. Detected elements include Cl, K, Ca, Co, Ni, Cu, Zn and Cdmore » (which some cells were supplemented with). Cell samples were prepared by a technique that minimally affects the natural elemental concentrations and distributions, and without using fluorescent indicators.We find it could likely be applied to all cell types and provide new biochemical insights at the single organelle level not available from organelle population level studies.« less

  20. Solubilization and reconstitution of vesicular stomatitis virus envelope using octylglucoside.

    PubMed Central

    Paternostre, M; Viard, M; Meyer, O; Ghanam, M; Ollivon, M; Blumenthal, R

    1997-01-01

    Reconstituted vesicular stomatitis virus envelopes or virosomes are formed by detergent removal from solubilized intact virus. We have monitored the solubilization process of the intact vesicular stomatitis virus by the nonionic surfactant octylglucoside at various initial virus concentrations by employing turbidity measurements. This allowed us to determine the phase boundaries between the membrane and the mixed micelles domains. We have also characterized the lipid and protein content of the solubilized material and of the reconstituted envelope. Both G and M proteins and all of the lipids of the envelope were extracted by octylglucoside and recovered in the reconstituted envelope. Fusion activity of the virosomes tested either on Vero cells or on liposomes showed kinetics and pH dependence similar to those of the intact virus. Images FIGURE 4 PMID:9083672

  1. Keeping Wnt Signalosome in Check by Vesicular Traffic

    PubMed Central

    FENG, QIANG; GAO, NAN

    2015-01-01

    Wg/Wnts are paracrine and autocrine ligands that activate distinct signaling pathways while being internalized through surface receptors. Converging and contrasting views are shaping our understanding of whether, where, and how endocytosis may modulate Wnt signaling. We gather considerable amount of evidences to elaborate the point that signal-receiving cells utilize distinct, flexible, and sophisticated vesicular trafficking mechanisms to keep Wnt signaling activity in check. Same molecules in a highly context-dependent fashion serve as regulatory hub for various signaling purposes: amplification, maintenance, inhibition, and termination. Updates are provided for the regulatory mechanisms related to the three critical cell surface complexes, Wnt-Fzd-LRP6, Dkk1-Kremen-LRP6, and R-spondin-LGR5-RNF43, which potently influence Wnt signaling. We pay particular attentions to how cells achieve sustained and delicate control of Wnt signaling strength by employing comprehensive aspects of vesicular trafficking. PMID:25336320

  2. Lycopene from tomatoes: vesicular nanocarrier formulations for dermal delivery.

    PubMed

    Ascenso, Andreia; Pinho, Sónia; Eleutério, Carla; Praça, Fabíola Garcia; Bentley, Maria Vitória Lopes Badra; Oliveira, Helena; Santos, Conceição; Silva, Olga; Simões, Sandra

    2013-07-31

    This experimental work aimed to develop a simple, fast, economic, and environmentally friendly process for the extraction of lycopene from tomato and incorporate this lycopene-rich extract into ultradeformable vesicular nanocarriers suitable for topical application. Lycopene extraction was conducted without a cosolvent for 30 min. The extracts were analyzed and incorporated in transfersomes and ethosomes. These formulations were characterized, and the cellular uptake was observed by confocal microscopy. Dermal delivery of lycopene formulations was tested under in vitro and in vivo conditions. Lycopene extraction proved to be quite safe and selective. The vesicular formulation was taken up by the cells, being more concentrated around the nucleus. Epicutaneous application of lycopene formulations decreased the level of anthralin-induced ear swelling by 97 and 87%, in a manner nonstatistically different from the positive control. These results support the idea that the lycopene-rich extract may be a good alternative to the expensive commercial lycopene for incorporation into advanced topical delivery systems.

  3. Effects of cell geometry on reversible vesicular transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karamched, Bhargav R.; Bressloff, Paul C.

    2017-02-01

    A major question in cell biology concerns the biophysical mechanism underlying delivery of newly synthesized macromolecules to specific targets within a cell. A recent modeling paper investigated this phenomenon in the context of vesicular delivery to en passant synapses in neurons (Bressloff and Levien 2015 Phys. Rev. Lett.). It was shown how reversibility in vesicular delivery to synapses could play a crucial role in achieving uniformity in the distribution of resources throughout an axon, which is consistent with experimental observations in C. elegans and Drosophila. In this work we generalize the previous model by investigating steady-state vesicular distributions on a Cayley tree, a disk, and a sphere. We show that for irreversible transport on a tree, branching increases the rate of decay of the steady-state distribution of vesicles. On the other hand, the steady-state profiles for reversible transport are similar to the 1D case. In the case of higher-dimensional geometries, we consider two distinct types of radially-symmetric microtubular network: (i) a continuum and (ii) a discrete set. In the continuum case, we model the motor-cargo dynamics using a phenomenologically-based advection-diffusion equation in polar (2D) and spherical (3D) coordinates. On the other-hand, in the discrete case, we derive the population model from a stochastic model of a single motor switching between ballistic motion and diffusion. For all of the geometries we find that reversibility in vesicular delivery to target sites allows for a more uniform distribution of vesicles, provided that cargo-carrying motors are not significantly slowed by their cargo. In each case we characterize the loss of uniformity as a function of the dispersion in velocities.

  4. A parafusin-related Toxoplasma protein in Ca2+-regulated secretory organelles.

    PubMed

    Matthiesen, S H; Shenoy, S M; Kim, K; Singer, R H; Satir, B H

    2001-12-01

    We cloned a gene, PRPI, of Toxoplasma gondii encoding a 637-amino-acids protein having a calculated mass of 70 kDa. The sequence showed high homology to parafusin, a protein that in Paramecium tetraurelia participates in Ca2+-regulated exocytosis and is a paralog of phosphoglucomutase. We show that Toxoplasma gondii homogenate and an expressed recombinant PRP1 fusion protein cross-react with a specific peptide-derived antibody to parafusin in Western blots. Antibodies to the recombinant PRP1 showed cross-reaction with parafusin and recognized PRP1, as bands at M, 63 x 10(3) and 68 x 10(3), respectively. PRP1 is labeled when Toxoplasma gondii cells are incubated with inorganic 32P and appears as the major band on autoradiograms of SDS-PAGE gels. The localization of PRP1 was examined in secretory organelles of Toxoplasma gondii by deconvolution light microscopy followed by three dimensional reconstruction using pairwise combinations of specific antibodies. PRP1 localized to the apical third of the cell. It co-localized with micronemes, the only secretory organelle the secretion of which is Ca2+ dependent. Quantification of the co-localized stain suggests that only mature micronemes ready for exocytosis have PRP1. These findings suggest that PRP1, parafusin and other members of the phosphoglucomutase superfamily have a conserved role in Ca2+-regulated exocytic processes.

  5. Highly divergent mitochondrion-related organelles in anaerobic parasitic protozoa.

    PubMed

    Makiuchi, Takashi; Nozaki, Tomoyoshi

    2014-05-01

    The mitochondria have arisen as a consequence of endosymbiosis of an ancestral α-proteobacterium with a methane-producing archae. The main function of the canonical aerobic mitochondria include ATP generation via oxidative phosphorylation, heme and phospholipid synthesis, calcium homeostasis, programmed cell death, and the formation of iron-sulfur clusters. Under oxygen-restricted conditions, the mitochondrion has often undergone remarkable reductive alterations of its content and function, leading to the generation of mitochondrion-related organelles (MROs), such as mitosomes, hydrogenosomes, and mithochondrion-like organelles, which are found in a wide range of anaerobic/microaerophilic eukaryotes that include several medically important parasitic protists such as Entamoeba histolytica, Giardia intestinalis, Trichomonas vaginalis, Cryptosporidium parvum, Blastocystis hominis, and Encephalitozoon cuniculi, as well as free-living protists such as Sawyeria marylandensis, Neocallimastix patriciarum, and Mastigamoeba balamuthi. The transformation from canonical aerobic mitochondria to MROs apparently have occurred in independent lineages, and resulted in the diversity of their components and functions. Due to medical and veterinary importance of the MRO-possessing human- and animal-pathogenic protozoa, their genomic, transcriptomic, proteomic, and biochemical evidence has been accumulated. Detailed analyses of the constituents and functions of the MROs in such anaerobic pathogenic protozoa, which reside oxygen-deprived or oxygen-poor environments such as the mammalian intestine and the genital organs, should illuminate the current evolutionary status of the MROs in these organisms, and give insight to environmental constraints that drive the evolution of eukaryotes and their organelles. In this review, we summarize and discuss the diverse metabolic functions and protein transport systems of the MROs from anaerobic parasitic protozoa.

  6. Organelle biogenesis and intracellular lipid transport in eukaryotes.

    PubMed Central

    Voelker, D R

    1991-01-01

    The inter- and intramembrane transport of phospholipids, sphingolipids, and sterols involves the most fundamental processes of membrane biogenesis. Identification of the mechanisms involved in these lipid transport reactions has lagged significantly behind that for intermembrane protein traffic until recently. Application of methods that include fluorescently labeled and spin-labeled lipid analogs, new cellular fractionation techniques, topographically specific chemical modification techniques, the identification of organelle-specific metabolism, permeabilized cell methodology, and yeast molecular genetics has contributed to revealing a diverse biochemical array of transport processes for lipids. Compelling evidence now exists for ATP-dependent, ATP-independent, vesicle-dependent, and vesicle-independent transport processes that are lipid and membrane specific. ATP-dependent transport processes include the transbilayer movement of phosphatidylserine and phosphatidylethanolamine at the plasma membrane and the transport of phosphatidylserine from its site of synthesis to the mitochondria. ATP-independent processes include the transbilayer movement of virtually all lipids at the endoplasmic reticulum, the movement of phosphatidylserine between the inner and outer mitochondrial membranes, and the transfer of nascent phosphatidylcholine and phosphatidylethanolamine to the plasma membrane. The ATP-independent movement of lipids between organelles is believed to be due to the action of lipid transfer proteins, but this still remains to be proved. Vesicle-based transport mechanisms (which are also inherently ATP dependent) include the transport of nascent cholesterol, sphingomyelin, and glycosphingolipids from the Golgi apparatus to the plasma membrane and the recycling of sphingolipids and selected pools of phosphatidylcholine from the plasma membrane to the cell interior. The vesicles involved in cholesterol transport to the plasma membrane are different from those

  7. Ligand-directed profiling of organelles with internalizing phage libraries

    PubMed Central

    Dobroff, Andrey S.; Rangel, Roberto; Guzman-Roja, Liliana; Salmeron, Carolina C.; Gelovani, Juri G.; Sidman, Richard L.; Bologa, Cristian G.; Oprea, Tudor I.; Brinker, C. Jeffrey; Pasqualini, Renata; Arap, Wadih

    2015-01-01

    Phage display is a resourceful tool to, in an unbiased manner, discover and characterize functional protein-protein interactions, to create vaccines, and to engineer peptides, antibodies, and other proteins as targeted diagnostic and/or therapeutic agents. Recently, our group has developed a new class of internalizing phage (iPhage) for ligand-directed targeting of organelles and/or to identify molecular pathways within live cells. This unique technology is suitable for applications ranging from fundamental cell biology to drug development. Here we describe the method for generating and screening the iPhage display system, and explain how to select and validate candidate internalizing homing peptide. PMID:25640897

  8. Organelle evolution, fragmented rRNAs, and Carl

    PubMed Central

    Gray, Michael W

    2014-01-01

    I am honored to have been asked to contribute to this memorial issue, although I cannot claim to have known Carl Woese well. Carl’s insights and the discoveries that his research group made over the years certainly stimulated my own research program, and at several points early on, interactions with him were pivotal in my career. Here I comment on these personal dealings with Carl and emphasize his influence in two areas of long-standing interest in my lab: organelle evolution and rRNA evolution. PMID:24572720

  9. The lipid droplet—a well-connected organelle

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Qiang; Goodman, Joel M.

    2015-01-01

    Our knowledge of inter-organellar communication has grown exponentially in recent years. This review focuses on the interactions that cytoplasmic lipid droplets have with other organelles. Twenty-five years ago droplets were considered simply particles of coalesced fat. Ten years ago there were hints from proteomics studies that droplets might interact with other structures to share lipids and proteins. Now it is clear that the droplets interact with many if not most cellular structures to maintain cellular homeostasis and to buffer against insults such as starvation. The evidence for this statement, as well as probes to understand the nature and results of droplet interactions, are presented. PMID:26322308

  10. Ligand-directed profiling of organelles with internalizing phage libraries.

    PubMed

    Dobroff, Andrey S; Rangel, Roberto; Guzman-Roja, Liliana; Salmeron, Carolina C; Gelovani, Juri G; Sidman, Richard L; Bologa, Cristian G; Oprea, Tudor I; Brinker, C Jeffrey; Pasqualini, Renata; Arap, Wadih

    2015-02-02

    Phage display is a resourceful tool to, in an unbiased manner, discover and characterize functional protein-protein interactions, create vaccines, and engineer peptides, antibodies, and other proteins as targeted diagnostic and/or therapeutic agents. Recently, our group has developed a new class of internalizing phage (iPhage) for ligand-directed targeting of organelles and to identify molecular pathways within live cells. This unique technology is suitable for applications ranging from fundamental cell biology to drug development. This unit describes the methods for generating and screening the iPhage display system, and explains how to select and validate candidate internalizing homing peptide.

  11. Sequence-Specific Polyampholyte Phase Separation in Membraneless Organelles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Yi-Hsuan; Forman-Kay, Julie D.; Chan, Hue Sun

    2016-10-01

    Liquid-liquid phase separation of charge- and/or aromatic-enriched intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs) is critical in the biological function of membraneless organelles. Much of the physics of this recent discovery remains to be elucidated. Here, we present a theory in the random phase approximation to account for electrostatic effects in polyampholyte phase separations, yielding predictions consistent with recent experiments on the IDP Ddx4. The theory is applicable to any charge pattern and thus provides a general analytical framework for studying sequence dependence of IDP phase separation.

  12. 9 CFR 94.14 - Swine from regions where swine vesicular disease exists; importations prohibited.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... PATHOGENIC AVIAN INFLUENZA, AFRICAN SWINE FEVER, CLASSICAL SWINE FEVER, SWINE VESICULAR DISEASE, AND BOVINE SPONGIFORM ENCEPHALOPATHY: PROHIBITED AND RESTRICTED IMPORTATIONS § 94.14 Swine from regions where...

  13. Short- and long-term effects of MDMA ("ecstasy") on synaptosomal and vesicular uptake of neurotransmitters in vitro and ex vivo.

    PubMed

    Bogen, Inger Lise; Haug, Kristin Huse; Myhre, Oddvar; Fonnum, Frode

    2003-01-01

    3,4-Methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA, "ecstasy") is a commonly abused drug which has been shown to be neurotoxic to serotonergic neurons in many species. The exact mechanism responsible for the neurotoxicity of MDMA is, however, poorly understood. In this study, the effects of MDMA on the synaptosomal and vesicular uptake of neurotransmitters were investigated. Our results show that MDMA (0.5-20 microM) reduces both synaptosomal and vesicular uptake of serotonin and dopamine in a dose dependent manner in vitro, while the uptake of glutamate and gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) remains unaffected. Ex vivo experiments support the importance of the monoamines, with predominant dopaminergic inhibition at short-term exposure (3 x 15 mg/kg; 2-h intervals), and exclusively serotonergic inhibition at long-term exposure (2 x 10 mg/kg per day; 4 days). This study also compares MDMA and the structurally related antidepressant paroxetine, in an attempt to reveal possible cellular mechanisms for the serotonergic toxicity of MDMA. One important difference between paroxetine and MDMA is that only MDMA has the capability of inhibiting vesicular uptake of monoamines at doses used. We suggest that inhibition of the vesicular monoamine transporter-2, and a following increase in cytoplasmatic monoamine concentrations, might be crucial for the neurotoxic effect of MDMA.

  14. The organelle of differentiation in embryos: the cell state splitter.

    PubMed

    Gordon, Natalie K; Gordon, Richard

    2016-03-10

    The cell state splitter is a membraneless organelle at the apical end of each epithelial cell in a developing embryo. It consists of a microfilament ring and an intermediate filament ring subtending a microtubule mat. The microtubules and microfilament ring are in mechanical opposition as in a tensegrity structure. The cell state splitter is bistable, perturbations causing it to contract or expand radially. The intermediate filament ring provides metastability against small perturbations. Once this snap-through organelle is triggered, it initiates signal transduction to the nucleus, which changes gene expression in one of two readied manners, causing its cell to undergo a step of determination and subsequent differentiation. The cell state splitter also triggers the cell state splitters of adjacent cells to respond, resulting in a differentiation wave. Embryogenesis may be represented then as a bifurcating differentiation tree, each edge representing one cell type. In combination with the differentiation waves they propagate, cell state splitters explain the spatiotemporal course of differentiation in the developing embryo. This review is excerpted from and elaborates on "Embryogenesis Explained" (World Scientific Publishing, Singapore, 2016).

  15. Targeting mammalian organelles with internalizing phage (iPhage) libraries

    PubMed Central

    Rangel, Roberto; Dobroff, Andrey S.; Guzman-Rojas, Liliana; Salmeron, Carolina C.; Gelovani, Juri G.; Sidman, Richard L.; Pasqualini, Renata; Arap, Wadih

    2015-01-01

    Techniques largely used for protein interaction studies and discovery of intracellular receptors, such as affinity capture complex purification and yeast two-hybrid, may produce inaccurate datasets due to protein insolubility, transient or weak protein interactions, or irrelevant intracellular context. A versatile tool to overcome these limitations as well as to potentially create vaccines and engineer peptides and antibodies as targeted diagnostic and therapeutic agents, is the phage display technique. We have recently developed a new technology for screening internalizing phage (iPhage) vectors and libraries utilizing a ligand/receptor-independent mechanism to penetrate eukaryotic cells. iPhage particles provide a unique discovery platform for combinatorial intracellular targeting of organelle ligands along with their corresponding receptors and to fingerprint functional protein domains in living cells. Here we explain the design, cloning, construction, and production of iPhage-based vectors and libraries, along with basic ligand-receptor identification and validation methodologies for organelle receptors. An iPhage library screening can be performed in ~8 weeks. PMID:24030441

  16. Prokaryotic cells: structural organisation of the cytoskeleton and organelles.

    PubMed

    Souza, Wanderley de

    2012-05-01

    For many years, prokaryotic cells were distinguished from eukaryotic cells based on the simplicity of their cytoplasm, in which the presence of organelles and cytoskeletal structures had not been discovered. Based on current knowledge, this review describes the complex components of the prokaryotic cell cytoskeleton, including (i) tubulin homologues composed of FtsZ, BtuA, BtuB and several associated proteins, which play a fundamental role in cell division, (ii) actin-like homologues, such as MreB and Mb1, which are involved in controlling cell width and cell length, and (iii) intermediate filament homologues, including crescentin and CfpA, which localise on the concave side of a bacterium and along its inner curvature and associate with its membrane. Some prokaryotes exhibit specialised membrane-bound organelles in the cytoplasm, such as magnetosomes and acidocalcisomes, as well as protein complexes, such as carboxysomes. This review also examines recent data on the presence of nanotubes, which are structures that are well characterised in mammalian cells that allow direct contact and communication between cells.

  17. Geometric modeling of subcellular structures, organelles, and multiprotein complexes.

    PubMed

    Feng, Xin; Xia, Kelin; Tong, Yiying; Wei, Guo-Wei

    2012-12-01

    Recently, the structure, function, stability, and dynamics of subcellular structures, organelles, and multiprotein complexes have emerged as a leading interest in structural biology. Geometric modeling not only provides visualizations of shapes for large biomolecular complexes but also fills the gap between structural information and theoretical modeling, and enables the understanding of function, stability, and dynamics. This paper introduces a suite of computational tools for volumetric data processing, information extraction, surface mesh rendering, geometric measurement, and curvature estimation of biomolecular complexes. Particular emphasis is given to the modeling of cryo-electron microscopy data. Lagrangian-triangle meshes are employed for the surface presentation. On the basis of this representation, algorithms are developed for surface area and surface-enclosed volume calculation, and curvature estimation. Methods for volumetric meshing have also been presented. Because the technological development in computer science and mathematics has led to multiple choices at each stage of the geometric modeling, we discuss the rationales in the design and selection of various algorithms. Analytical models are designed to test the computational accuracy and convergence of proposed algorithms. Finally, we select a set of six cryo-electron microscopy data representing typical subcellular complexes to demonstrate the efficacy of the proposed algorithms in handling biomolecular surfaces and explore their capability of geometric characterization of binding targets. This paper offers a comprehensive protocol for the geometric modeling of subcellular structures, organelles, and multiprotein complexes.

  18. Visualization of lipid droplet composition by direct organelle mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Horn, Patrick J; Ledbetter, Nicole R; James, Christopher N; Hoffman, William D; Case, Charlene R; Verbeck, Guido F; Chapman, Kent D

    2011-02-04

    An expanding appreciation for the varied functions of neutral lipids in cellular organisms relies on a more detailed understanding of the mechanisms of lipid production and packaging into cytosolic lipid droplets (LDs). Conventional lipid profiling procedures involve the analysis of tissue extracts and consequently lack cellular or subcellular resolution. Here, we report an approach that combines the visualization of individual LDs, microphase extraction of lipid components from droplets, and the direct identification of lipid composition by nanospray mass spectrometry, even to the level of a single LD. The triacylglycerol (TAG) composition of LDs from several plant sources (mature cotton (Gossypium hirsutum) embryos, roots of cotton seedlings, and Arabidopsis thaliana seeds and leaves) were examined by direct organelle mass spectrometry and revealed the heterogeneity of LDs derived from different plant tissue sources. The analysis of individual LDs makes possible organellar resolution of molecular compositions and will facilitate new studies of LD biogenesis and functions, especially in combination with analysis of morphological and metabolic mutants. Furthermore, direct organelle mass spectrometry could be applied to the molecular analysis of other subcellular compartments and macromolecules.

  19. Vesicularity variation to pyroclasts from silicic eruptions at Laguna del Maule volcanic complex, Chile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wright, H. M. N.; Fierstein, J.; Amigo, A.; Miranda, J.

    2014-12-01

    Crystal-poor rhyodacitic to rhyolitic volcanic eruptions at Laguna del Maule volcanic complex, Chile have produced an astonishing range of textural variation to pyroclasts. Here, we focus on eruptive deposits from two Quaternary eruptions from vents on the northwestern side of the Laguna del Maule basin: the rhyolite of Loma de Los Espejos and the rhyodacite of Laguna Sin Puerto. Clasts in the pyroclastic fall and pyroclastic flow deposits from the rhyolite of Loma de Los Espejos range from dense, non-vesicular (obsidian) to highly vesicular, frothy (coarsely vesicular reticulite); where vesicularity varies from <1% to >90%. Bulk compositions range from 75.6-76.7 wt.% SiO2. The highest vesicularity clasts are found in early fall deposits and widely dispersed pyroclastic flow deposits; the frothy carapace to lava flows is similarly highly vesicular. Pyroclastic deposits also contain tube pumice, and macroscopically folded, finely vesicular, breadcrusted, and heterogeneously vesiculated textures. We speculate that preservation of the highest vesicularities requires relatively low decompression rates or open system degassing such that relaxation times were sufficient to allow extensive vesiculation. Such an inference is in apparent contradiction to documentation of Plinian dispersal to the eruption. Clasts in the pyroclastic fall deposit of the rhyodacite (68-72 wt.% SiO2) of Laguna Sin Puerto are finely vesicular, with vesicularity modes at ~50% and ~68% corresponding to gray and white pumice colors, respectively. Some clasts are banded in color (and vesicularity). All clasts were fragmented into highly angular particles, with subplanar to slightly concave exterior surfaces (average Wadell Roundness of clast margins between 0.32 and 0.39), indicating brittle fragmentation. In contrast to Loma de Los Espejos, high bubble number densities to Laguna Sin Puerto rhyodacite imply high decompression rates.

  20. Chromosomal localization of the human vesicular amine transporter genes

    SciTech Connect

    Peter, D.; Finn, P.; Liu, Y.; Roghani, A.; Edwards, R.H.; Klisak, I.; Kojis, T.; Heinzmann, C.; Sparkes, R.S. )

    1993-12-01

    The physiologic and behavioral effects of pharmacologic agents that interfere with the transport of monoamine neurotransmitters into vesicles suggest that vesicular amine transport may contribute to human neuropsychiatric disease. To determine whether an alteration in the genes that encode vesicular amine transport contributes to the inherited component of these disorders, the authors have isolated a human cDNA for the brain transporter and localized the human vesciular amine transporter genes. The human brain synaptic vesicle amine transporter (SVAT) shows unexpected conservation with rat SVAT in the regions that diverge extensively between rat SVAT and the rat adrenal chromaffin granule amine transporter (CGAT). Using the cloned sequences with a panel of mouse-human hybrids and in situ hybridization for regional localization, the adrenal CGAT gene (or VAT1) maps to human chromosome 8p21.3 and the brain SVAT gene (or VAT2) maps to chromosome 10q25. Both of these sites occur very close to if not within previously described deletions that produce severe but viable phenotypes. 26 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  1. Distribution of vesicular glutamate transporters in the human brain

    PubMed Central

    Vigneault, Érika; Poirel, Odile; Riad, Mustapha; Prud'homme, Josée; Dumas, Sylvie; Turecki, Gustavo; Fasano, Caroline; Mechawar, Naguib; El Mestikawy, Salah

    2015-01-01

    Glutamate is the major excitatory transmitter in the brain. Vesicular glutamate transporters (VGLUT1-3) are responsible for uploading glutamate into synaptic vesicles. VGLUT1 and VGLUT2 are considered as specific markers of canonical glutamatergic neurons, while VGLUT3 is found in neurons previously shown to use other neurotransmitters than glutamate. Although there exists a rich literature on the localization of these glutamatergic markers in the rodent brain, little is currently known about the distribution of VGLUT1-3 in the human brain. In the present study, using subtype specific probes and antisera, we examined the localization of the three vesicular glutamate transporters in the human brain by in situ hybridization, immunoautoradiography and immunohistochemistry. We found that the VGLUT1 transcript was highly expressed in the cerebral cortex, hippocampus and cerebellum, whereas VGLUT2 mRNA was mainly found in the thalamus and brainstem. VGLUT3 mRNA was localized in scarce neurons within the cerebral cortex, hippocampus, striatum and raphe nuclei. Following immunoautoradiographic labeling, intense VGLUT1- and VGLUT2-immunoreactivities were observed in all regions investigated (cerebral cortex, hippocampus, caudate-putamen, cerebellum, thalamus, amygdala, substantia nigra, raphe) while VGLUT3 was absent from the thalamus and cerebellum. This extensive mapping of VGLUT1-3 in human brain reveals distributions that correspond for the most part to those previously described in rodent brains. PMID:25798091

  2. Decreased Vesicular Storage and Aldehyde Dehydrogenase Activity in Multiple System Atrophy

    PubMed Central

    Goldstein, David S.; Sullivan, Patricia; Holmes, Courtney; Kopin, Irwin J.; Sharabi, Yehonatan; Mash, Deborah C.

    2015-01-01

    Background Parkinson disease (PD) and multiple system atrophy (MSA) share some neuropathologic findings (nigrostriatal dopaminergic lesion, alpha-synuclein deposition) but not others (Lewy bodies in PD, glial cytoplasmic inclusions in MSA). In PD evidence has accrued for a vesicular storage defect and aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) inhibition in residual dopaminergic terminals, resulting in accumulation of the toxic dopamine (DA) metabolite 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetaldehyde (DOPAL). In this study we asked whether MSA entails a similar abnormal neurochemical pattern. Methods DA and its main neuronal metabolite 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid (DOPAC), norepinephrine (NE) and its main neuronal metabolite 3,4-dihydroxyphenylglycol (DHPG), the catecholamine precursor DOPA, and DOPAL were measured in striatal and frontal cortical tissue from patients with pathologically proven end-stage MSA (N=15), sporadic PD (N=17), and control subjects (N=18). Results Compared to the control group, the MSA and PD groups had similarly decreased putamen DA (by 96% and 93%, p<0.0001), DOPAC (97% and 95%, p<0.0001), NE (91% and 74%, p<0.0001), and DHPG (81% and 74%, p<0.0001). In the MSA and PD groups, ratios of DOPAL:DA were 2.3 and 3.5 times control and DHPG:NE 3.1 and 2.6 times control, while DOPAC:DOPAL ratios were decreased by 61% and 74%. In both diseases cortical NE and DHPG were decreased, while DA and DOPAC were not. Conclusions MSA and PD entail a catecholamine metabolic profile indicating impaired vesicular storage, decreased ALDH activity, and DOPAL buildup, which may be part of a common pathway in catecholamine neuronal death. Targeting this pathway by interfering with catecholaldehyde production or effects constitutes a novel treatment approach. PMID:25829070

  3. Topography of the Human Papillomavirus Minor Capsid Protein L2 during Vesicular Trafficking of Infectious Entry

    PubMed Central

    DiGiuseppe, Stephen; Keiffer, Timothy R.; Bienkowska-Haba, Malgorzata; Luszczek, Wioleta; Guion, Lucile G. M.; Müller, Martin

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT The human papillomavirus (HPV) capsid is composed of the major capsid protein L1 and the minor capsid protein L2. During entry, the HPV capsid undergoes numerous conformational changes that result in endosomal uptake and subsequent trafficking of the L2 protein in complex with the viral DNA to the trans-Golgi network. To facilitate this transport, the L2 protein harbors a number of putative motifs that, if capable of direct interaction, would interact with cytosolic host cell factors. These data imply that a portion of L2 becomes cytosolic during infection. Using a low concentration of digitonin to selectively permeabilize the plasma membrane of infected cells, we mapped the topography of the L2 protein during infection. We observed that epitopes within amino acid residues 64 to 81 and 163 to 170 and a C-terminal tag of HPV16 L2 are exposed on the cytosolic side of intracellular membranes, whereas an epitope within residues 20 to 38, which are upstream of a putative transmembrane region, is luminal. Corroborating these findings, we also found that L2 protein is sensitive to trypsin digestion during infection. These data demonstrate that the majority of the L2 protein becomes accessible on the cytosolic side of intracellular membranes in order to interact with cytosolic factors to facilitate vesicular trafficking. IMPORTANCE In order to complete infectious entry, nonenveloped viruses have to pass cellular membranes. This is often achieved through the viral capsid protein associating with or integrating into intracellular membrane. Here, we determine the topography of HPV L2 protein in the endocytic vesicular compartment, suggesting that L2 becomes a transmembrane protein with a short luminal portion and with the majority facing the cytosolic side for interaction with host cell transport factors. PMID:26246568

  4. Following mitochondria dynamism: confocal analysis of the organelle morphology.

    PubMed

    Mariotti, Francesca R; Corrado, Mauro; Campello, Silvia

    2015-01-01

    Mitochondria are highly dynamic organelles, whose morphology can vary from an elongated and interconnected network to fragmented units. In recent years, outstanding discoveries have linked mitochondrial morphology to the regulation of an increasing number of biological processes, such as biosynthetic pathways, oxidative phosphorylation and ATP production, calcium buffering, and cell death. Here we describe two of the main methods used to analyze the mitochondrial length in fixed cells and the mitochondrial fusion rate in live cells. Moreover, we focus one of the protocols on T cells, as an example of non-adherent cells, which present some particularities and difficulties in the analysis of mitochondrial shape. We also discuss the main mouse models carrying a mitochondrial targeted fluorescent protein, an invaluable tool to deeply investigate in vivo mitochondrial morphology.

  5. Cilia in the CNS: the Quiet Organelle Claims Center Stage

    PubMed Central

    Louvi, Angeliki; Grove, Elizabeth A.

    2011-01-01

    Summary The primary cilium is a cellular organelle that is almost ubiquitous in eukaryotes, yet its functions in vertebrates have been slow to emerge. The last fifteen years have been marked by accelerating insight into the biology of primary cilia, arising from the synergy of three major lines of research. These research programs describe a specialized mode of protein trafficking in cilia, reveal that genetic disruptions of primary cilia cause complex human disease syndromes, and establish that Sonic hedgehog (Shh) signal transduction requires the primary cilium. New lines of research have branched off to investigate the role of primary cilia in neuronal signaling, adult neurogenesis, and brain tumor formation. We review a fast expanding literature to determine what we now know about the primary cilium in the developing and adult CNS, and what new directions should lead to further clarity. PMID:21435552

  6. Sizing Subcellular Organelles and Nanoparticles Confined within Aqueous Droplets

    PubMed Central

    Gadd, Jennifer C.; Kuyper, Christopher L.; Fujimoto, Bryant S.; Allen, Richard W.; Chiu, Daniel T.

    2009-01-01

    This paper describes two complementary techniques, single-particle tracking and correlation spectroscopy, for accurately sizing nanoparticles confined within picoliter-volume aqueous droplets. Single-particle tracking works well with bright particles that can be continuously illuminated and imaged, and we demonstrated this approach for sizing single fluorescent beads. Fluorescence correlation spectroscopy detects small intensity bursts from particles or molecules diffusing through the confocal probe volume, which works well with dim and rapidly diffusing particles or molecules; we demonstrated FCS for sizing synaptic vesicles confined in aqueous droplets. In combination with recent advances in droplet manipulations and analysis, we anticipate this capability to size single nanoparticles and molecules in free solution will complement existing tools for probing cellular systems, subcellular organelles, and nanoparticles. PMID:18363409

  7. Organelle targeting during bacterial infection: insights from Listeria.

    PubMed

    Lebreton, Alice; Stavru, Fabrizia; Cossart, Pascale

    2015-06-01

    Listeria monocytogenes, a facultative intracellular bacterium responsible for severe foodborne infections, is now recognized as a multifaceted model in infection biology. Comprehensive studies of the molecular and cellular basis of the infection have unraveled how the bacterium crosses the intestinal and feto-placental barriers, invades several cell types in which it multiplies and moves, and spreads from cell to cell. Interestingly, although Listeria does not actively invade host cell organelles, it can interfere with their function. We discuss the effect of Listeria on the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and the mechanisms leading to the fragmentation of the mitochondrial network and its consequences, and review the strategies used by Listeria to subvert nuclear functions, more precisely to control host gene expression at the chromatin level.

  8. Quantum dots targeted to the assigned organelle in living cells.

    PubMed

    Hoshino, Akiyoshi; Fujioka, Kouki; Oku, Taisuke; Nakamura, Shun; Suga, Masakazu; Yamaguchi, Yukio; Suzuki, Kazuo; Yasuhara, Masato; Yamamoto, Kenji

    2004-01-01

    Fluorescent nanocrystal quantum dots (QDs) have the potential to be applied to bioimaging since QDs emit higher and far longer fluorescence than conventional organic probes. Here we show that QDs conjugated with signal peptide obey the order to transport the assigned organelle in living cells. We designed the supermolecule of luminescent QDs conjugated with nuclear- and mitochondria-targeting ligands. When QDs with nuclear-localizing signal peptides were added to the culture media, we can visualize the movements of the QDs being delivered into the nuclear compartment of the cells with 15 min incubation. In addition, mitochondrial signal peptide can also transport QDs to the mitochondria in living cells. In conclusion, these techniques have the possibility that QDs can reveal the transduction of proteins and peptides into specific subcellular compartments as a powerful tool for studying intracellular analysis in vitro and even in vivo.

  9. Structure and function of ER membrane contact sites with other organelles.

    PubMed

    Phillips, Melissa J; Voeltz, Gia K

    2016-02-01

    The endoplasmic reticulum (ER) is the largest organelle in the cell, and its functions have been studied for decades. The past several years have provided novel insights into the existence of distinct domains between the ER and other organelles, known as membrane contact sites (MCSs). At these contact sites, organelle membranes are closely apposed and tethered, but do not fuse. Here, various protein complexes can work in concert to perform specialized functions such as binding, sensing and transferring molecules, as well as engaging in organelle biogenesis and dynamics. This Review describes the structure and functions of MCSs, primarily focusing on contacts of the ER with mitochondria and endosomes.

  10. Characteristics in Sliding Motions of Small Organelles in a Nitella Internodal Cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uchida, Go; Nemoto, Tomomi; Tsuchiya, Yoshimi

    1995-12-01

    Steady velocities of small organelles smoothly moving on chloroplasts in a Nitella internodal cell have been investigated at various temperatures. It has been found that variance in the velocities of the organelles changes in proportion to their average velocity, which has been first elucidated from the temperature dependence of the organelle's velocity. This result suggests that the generation process of the force due to the actin-myosin is a Poisson like stochastic one. Thus, we have discussed a stochastic model for the motion of the organelle with many myosin-like molecules and estimated the force to be 4.2×10-12 N.

  11. Organelle DB: a cross-species database of protein localization and function.

    PubMed

    Wiwatwattana, Nuwee; Kumar, Anuj

    2005-01-01

    To efficiently utilize the growing body of available protein localization data, we have developed Organelle DB, a web-accessible database cataloging more than 25,000 proteins from nearly 60 organelles, subcellular structures and protein complexes in 154 organisms spanning the eukaryotic kingdom. Organelle DB is the first on-line resource devoted to the identification and presentation of eukaryotic proteins localized to organelles and subcellular structures. As such, Organelle DB is a strong resource of data from the human proteome as well as from the major model organisms Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Arabidopsis thaliana, Drosophila melanogaster, Caenorhabditis elegans and Mus musculus. In particular, Organelle DB is a central repository of yeast data, incorporating results--and actual fluorescent imagesfrom ongoing large-scale studies of protein localization in S.cerevisiae. Each protein in Organelle DB is presented with its sequence and, as available, a detailed description of its function; functions were extracted from relevant model organism databases, and links to these databases are provided within Organelle DB. To facilitate data interoperability, we have annotated all protein localizations using vocabulary from the Gene Ontology consortium. We also welcome new data for inclusion in Organelle DB, which may be freely accessed at http://organelledb.lsi.umich.edu.

  12. Seeing is believing: on the use of image databases for visually exploring plant organelle dynamics.

    PubMed

    Mano, Shoji; Miwa, Tomoki; Nishikawa, Shuh-ichi; Mimura, Tetsuro; Nishimura, Mikio

    2009-12-01

    Organelle dynamics vary dramatically depending on cell type, developmental stage and environmental stimuli, so that various parameters, such as size, number and behavior, are required for the description of the dynamics of each organelle. Imaging techniques are superior to other techniques for describing organelle dynamics because these parameters are visually exhibited. Therefore, as the results can be seen immediately, investigators can more easily grasp organelle dynamics. At present, imaging techniques are emerging as fundamental tools in plant organelle research, and the development of new methodologies to visualize organelles and the improvement of analytical tools and equipment have allowed the large-scale generation of image and movie data. Accordingly, image databases that accumulate information on organelle dynamics are an increasingly indispensable part of modern plant organelle research. In addition, image databases are potentially rich data sources for computational analyses, as image and movie data reposited in the databases contain valuable and significant information, such as size, number, length and velocity. Computational analytical tools support image-based data mining, such as segmentation, quantification and statistical analyses, to extract biologically meaningful information from each database and combine them to construct models. In this review, we outline the image databases that are dedicated to plant organelle research and present their potential as resources for image-based computational analyses.

  13. Structure and function of ER membrane contact sites with other organelles

    PubMed Central

    Phillips, Melissa J.; Voeltz, Gia K.

    2016-01-01

    The endoplasmic reticulum (ER) is the largest organelle in the cell, and its functions have been studied for decades. The past several years have provided novel insights into the existence of distinct domains between the ER and other organelles, known as membrane contact sites (MCSs). At these contact sites, organelle membranes are closely apposed and tethered, but do not fuse. Here, various protein complexes can work in concert to perform specialized functions such as binding, sensing and transferring molecules, as well as engaging in organelle biogenesis and dynamics. This Review describes the structure and functions of MCSs, primarily focusing on contacts of the ER with mitochondria and endosomes. PMID:26627931

  14. 9 CFR 94.14 - Swine from regions where swine vesicular disease exists; importations prohibited.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... vesicular disease exists; importations prohibited. 94.14 Section 94.14 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL... (INCLUDING POULTRY) AND ANIMAL PRODUCTS RINDERPEST, FOOT-AND-MOUTH DISEASE, EXOTIC NEWCASTLE DISEASE, AFRICAN SWINE FEVER, CLASSICAL SWINE FEVER, SWINE VESICULAR DISEASE, AND BOVINE SPONGIFORM...

  15. 9 CFR 94.14 - Swine from regions where swine vesicular disease exists; importations prohibited.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... vesicular disease exists; importations prohibited. 94.14 Section 94.14 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL... (INCLUDING POULTRY) AND ANIMAL PRODUCTS RINDERPEST, FOOT-AND-MOUTH DISEASE, EXOTIC NEWCASTLE DISEASE, AFRICAN SWINE FEVER, CLASSICAL SWINE FEVER, SWINE VESICULAR DISEASE, AND BOVINE SPONGIFORM...

  16. 9 CFR 94.14 - Swine from regions where swine vesicular disease exists; importations prohibited.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... vesicular disease exists; importations prohibited. 94.14 Section 94.14 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL... (INCLUDING POULTRY) AND ANIMAL PRODUCTS RINDERPEST, FOOT-AND-MOUTH DISEASE, EXOTIC NEWCASTLE DISEASE, AFRICAN SWINE FEVER, CLASSICAL SWINE FEVER, SWINE VESICULAR DISEASE, AND BOVINE SPONGIFORM...

  17. 9 CFR 94.14 - Swine from regions where swine vesicular disease exists; importations prohibited.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... vesicular disease exists; importations prohibited. 94.14 Section 94.14 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL... (INCLUDING POULTRY) AND ANIMAL PRODUCTS RINDERPEST, FOOT-AND-MOUTH DISEASE, EXOTIC NEWCASTLE DISEASE, AFRICAN SWINE FEVER, CLASSICAL SWINE FEVER, SWINE VESICULAR DISEASE, AND BOVINE SPONGIFORM...

  18. Vesicular disease in 9-week-old pigs experimentally infected with Senecavirus A

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Introduction: Senecavirus A (SVA), a picornavirus, has been infrequently associated with cases of idiopathic vesicular disease (IVD) in pigs in the US and Canada since 1988. In 2014 and 2015 there was surge of IVD cases in Brazil and US, respectively. SVA was identified in serum, vesicular fluid, an...

  19. Time to seroconversion to vesicular stomatitis virus in sentinel cows in Southern Mexico

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Vesicular stomatitis (VS) is a disease of livestock and some wildlife species caused by vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV). VS epidemics are frequent in certain regions of the United States and such epidemics inflict severe economic losses to affected regions of the country. In this study, a prospecti...

  20. Vesicular Disease in 9-Week-Old Pigs Experimentally Infected with Senecavirus A

    PubMed Central

    Montiel, Nestor; Buckley, Alexandra; Guo, Baoqing; Kulshreshtha, Vikas; VanGeelen, Albert; Hoang, Hai; Rademacher, Christopher; Yoon, Kyoung-Jin

    2016-01-01

    Senecavirus A has been infrequently associated with vesicular disease in swine since 1988. However, clinical disease has not been reproduced after experimental infection with this virus. We report vesicular disease in 9-week-old pigs after Sencavirus A infection by the intranasal route under experimental conditions. PMID:27315363

  1. Viral Surveillance during the 2006 Vesicular Stomatitis Outbreak in Natrona County, Wyoming

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In 2006, we collected 12203 biting flies from a vesicular stomatitis outbreak in Natrona County, Wyoming. Flies were identified to the species level and viruses were isolated and identified by RT-PCR. We detected vesicular stomatitis virus-New Jersey serotype in two pools of Simulium bivittatum, W...

  2. Experimental infection of Didelphis marsupialis with Vesicular Stomatitis New Jersey Virus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Although vesicular stomatitis has been present for many years in the Americas, many aspects of its natural history remain undefined. In this study we challenged five adult Virginia opossums (Didelphis marsupialis) with vesicular stomatitis New Jersey serotype virus (VSNJV). Opossums had no detecta...

  3. Spatial and phylogenetic analysis of vesicular stomatitus virus overwintering in the United States

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    From 2004 through 2006, 751 vesicular stomatitis (VS) outbreaks caused by vesicular stomatitis virus serotype New Jersey (VSNJV) were reported in nine states of the southwestern United States. The normal model of the space scan statistic and phylogenetic techniques were used to test the hypothesis t...

  4. Vesicular Disease in 9-Week-Old Pigs Experimentally Infected with Senecavirus A

    SciTech Connect

    Montiel, Nestor; Buckley, Alexandra; Guo, Baoqing; Kulshreshtha, Vikas; VanGeelen, Albert; Hoang, Hai; Rademacher, Christopher; Yoon, Kyoung-Jin; Lager, Kelly

    2016-07-01

    Senecavirus A has been infrequently associated with vesicular disease in swine since 1988. However, clinical disease has not been reproduced after experimental infection with this virus. Here we report vesicular disease in 9-week-old pigs after Sencavirus A infection by the intranasal route under experimental conditions.

  5. Organelle-mimicking liposome dissociates G-quadruplexes and facilitates transcription

    PubMed Central

    Pramanik, Smritimoy; Tateishi-Karimata, Hisae; Sugimoto, Naoki

    2014-01-01

    Important biological reactions involving nucleic acids occur near the surface of membranes such as the nuclear membrane (NM) and rough endoplasmic reticulum (ER); however, the interactions between biomembranes and nucleic acids are poorly understood. We report here that transcription was facilitated in solution with liposomes, which mimic a biomembrane surface, relative to the reaction in a homogeneous aqueous solution when the template was able to form a G-quadruplex. The G-quadruplex is known to be an inhibitor of transcription, but the stability of the G-quadruplex was decreased at the liposome surface because of unfavourable enthalpy. The destabilization of the G-quadruplex was greater at the surface of NM- and ER-mimicking liposomes than at the surfaces of liposomes designed to mimic other organelles. Thermodynamic analyses revealed that the G-rich oligonucleotides adopted an extended structure at the liposome surface, whereas in solution the compact G-quadruplex was formed. Our data suggest that changes in structure and stability of nucleic acids regulate biological reactions at membrane surfaces. PMID:25336617

  6. Direct Imaging of Protein Organization in an Intact Bacterial Organelle Using High-Resolution Atomic Force Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The function of bioenergetic membranes is strongly influenced by the spatial arrangement of their constituent membrane proteins. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) can be used to probe protein organization at high resolution, allowing individual proteins to be identified. However, previous AFM studies of biological membranes have typically required that curved membranes are ruptured and flattened during sample preparation, with the possibility of disruption of the native protein arrangement or loss of proteins. Imaging native, curved membranes requires minimal tip–sample interaction in both lateral and vertical directions. Here, long-range tip–sample interactions are reduced by optimizing the imaging buffer. Tapping mode AFM with high-resonance-frequency small and soft cantilevers, in combination with a high-speed AFM, reduces the forces due to feedback error and enables application of an average imaging force of tens of piconewtons. Using this approach, we have imaged the membrane organization of intact vesicular bacterial photosynthetic “organelles”, chromatophores. Despite the highly curved nature of the chromatophore membrane and lack of direct support, the resolution was sufficient to identify the photosystem complexes and quantify their arrangement in the native state. Successive imaging showed the proteins remain surprisingly static, with minimal rotation or translation over several-minute time scales. High-order assemblies of RC-LH1-PufX complexes are observed, and intact ATPases are successfully imaged. The methods developed here are likely to be applicable to a broad range of protein-rich vesicles or curved membrane systems, which are an almost ubiquitous feature of native organelles. PMID:28114766

  7. A single nucleotide polymorphism of porcine MX2 gene provides antiviral activity against vesicular stomatitis virus.

    PubMed

    Sasaki, Keisuke; Tungtrakoolsub, Pullop; Morozumi, Takeya; Uenishi, Hirohide; Kawahara, Manabu; Watanabe, Tomomasa

    2014-01-01

    The objective was to determine if single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in porcine MX2 gene affect its antiviral potential. MX proteins are known to suppress the multiplication of several viruses, including influenza virus and vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV). In domestic animals possessing highly polymorphic genome, our previous research indicated that a specific SNP in chicken Mx gene was responsible for its antiviral function. However, there still has been no information about SNPs in porcine MX2 gene. In this study, we first conducted polymorphism analysis in 17 pigs of MX2 gene derived from seven breeds. Consequently, a total of 30 SNPs, of which 11 were deduced to cause amino acid variations, were detected, suggesting that the porcine MX2 is very polymorphic. Next, we classified MX2 into eight alleles (A1-A8) and subsequently carried out infectious experiments with recombinant VSVΔG*-G to each allele. In A1-A5 and A8, position 514 amino acid (514 aa) of MX2 was glycine (Gly), which did not inhibit VSV multiplication, whereas in A6 and A7, 514 aa was arginine (Arg), which exhibited the antiviral ability against VSV. These results demonstrate that a SNP at 514 aa (Gly-Arg) of porcine MX2 plays a pivotal role in the antiviral activity as well as that at 631 aa of chicken Mx.

  8. Myosin IIA is critical for organelle distribution and F-actin organization in megakaryocytes and platelets.

    PubMed

    Pertuy, Fabien; Eckly, Anita; Weber, Josiane; Proamer, Fabienne; Rinckel, Jean-Yves; Lanza, François; Gachet, Christian; Léon, Catherine

    2014-02-20

    During proplatelet formation, a relatively homogeneous content of organelles is transported from the megakaryocyte (MK) to the nascent platelets along microtubule tracks. We found that platelets from Myh9(-/-) mice and a MYH9-RD patient were heterogeneous in their organelle content (granules and mitochondria). In addition, Myh9(-/-) MKs have an abnormal cytoplasmic clustering of organelles, suggesting that the platelet defect originates in the MKs. Myosin is not involved in the latest stage of organelle traffic along microtubular tracks in the proplatelet shafts as shown by confocal observations of proplatelet buds. By contrast, it is required for the earlier distribution of organelles within the large MK preplatelet fragments shed into the sinusoid circulation before terminal proplatelet remodeling. We show here that F-actin is abnormally clustered in the cytoplasm of Myh9(-/-) MKs and actin polymerization is impaired in platelets. Myosin IIA is required for normal granule motility and positioning within MKs, mechanisms that may be dependent on organelle traveling and tethering onto F-actin cytoskeleton tracks. Altogether, our results indicate that the distribution of organelles within platelets critically depends on a homogeneous organelle distribution within MKs and preplatelet fragments, which requires myosin IIA.

  9. Protein import into the photosynthetic organelles of Paulinella chromatophora and its implications for primary plastid endosymbiosis.

    PubMed

    Mackiewicz, Paweł; Bodył, Andrzej; Gagat, Przemysław

    2012-12-01

    The rhizarian amoeba Paulinella chromatophora harbors two photosynthetically active organelles of cyanobacterial origin that have been acquired independently of classic primary plastids. Because their acquisition did take place relatively recently, they are expected to provide new insight into the ancient cyanobacterial primary endosymbiosis. During the process of Paulinella endosymbiont-to-organelle transformation, more than 30 genes have been transferred from the organelle to the host nuclear genome via endosymbiotic gene transfer (EGT). The article discusses step-by-step protein import of EGT-derived proteins into Paulinella photosynthetic organelles with the emphasis on the nature of their targeting signals and the final passage of proteins through the inner organelle membrane. The latter most probably involves a simplified Tic translocon composed of Tic21- and Tic32-like proteins as well as a Hsp70-based motor responsible for pulling of imported proteins into the organelle matrix. Our results indicate that although protein translocation across the inner membrane of Paulinella photosynthetic organelles seems to resemble the one in classic primary plastids, the transport through the outer membrane does not. The differences could result from distinct integration pathways of Paulinella photosynthetic organelles and primary plastids with their respective host cells.

  10. The role of intraorganellar Ca(2+) in late endosome-lysosome heterotypic fusion and in the reformation of lysosomes from hybrid organelles.

    PubMed

    Pryor, P R; Mullock, B M; Bright, N A; Gray, S R; Luzio, J P

    2000-05-29

    We have investigated the requirement for Ca(2+) in the fusion and content mixing of rat hepatocyte late endosomes and lysosomes in a cell-free system. Fusion to form hybrid organelles was inhibited by 1,2-bis(2-aminophenoxy) ethane-N,N,N',N'-tetraacetic acid (BAPTA), but not by EGTA, and this inhibition was reversed by adding additional Ca(2+). Fusion was also inhibited by methyl ester of EGTA (EGTA-AM), a membrane permeable, hydrolyzable ester of EGTA, and pretreatment of organelles with EGTA-AM showed that the chelation of lumenal Ca(2+) reduced the amount of fusion. The requirement for Ca(2+) for fusion was a later event than the requirement for a rab protein since the system became resistant to inhibition by GDP dissociation inhibitor at earlier times than it became resistant to BAPTA. We have developed a cell-free assay to study the reformation of lysosomes from late endosome-lysosome hybrid organelles that were isolated from the rat liver. The recovery of electron dense lysosomes was shown to require ATP and was inhibited by bafilomycin and EGTA-AM. The data support a model in which endocytosed Ca(2+) plays a role in the fusion of late endosomes and lysosomes, the reformation of lysosomes, and the dynamic equilibrium of organelles in the late endocytic pathway.

  11. Proteomic Analysis of the Acidocalcisome, an Organelle Conserved from Bacteria to Human Cells

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Guozhong; Ulrich, Paul N.; Storey, Melissa; Johnson, Darryl; Tischer, Julie; Tovar, Javier A.; Moreno, Silvia N. J.; Orlando, Ron; Docampo, Roberto

    2014-01-01

    Acidocalcisomes are acidic organelles present in a diverse range of organisms from bacteria to human cells. In this study acidocalcisomes were purified from the model organism Trypanosoma brucei, and their protein composition was determined by mass spectrometry. The results, along with those that we previously reported, show that acidocalcisomes are rich in pumps and transporters, involved in phosphate and cation homeostasis, and calcium signaling. We validated the acidocalcisome localization of seven new, putative, acidocalcisome proteins (phosphate transporter, vacuolar H+-ATPase subunits a and d, vacuolar iron transporter, zinc transporter, polyamine transporter, and acid phosphatase), confirmed the presence of six previously characterized acidocalcisome proteins, and validated the localization of five novel proteins to different subcellular compartments by expressing them fused to epitope tags in their endogenous loci or by immunofluorescence microscopy with specific antibodies. Knockdown of several newly identified acidocalcisome proteins by RNA interference (RNAi) revealed that they are essential for the survival of the parasites. These results provide a comprehensive insight into the unique composition of acidocalcisomes of T. brucei, an important eukaryotic pathogen, and direct evidence that acidocalcisomes are especially adapted for the accumulation of polyphosphate. PMID:25503798

  12. Quantitative and Qualitative Effects of Phosphorus on Extracts and Exudates of Sudangrass Roots in Relation to Vesicular-Arbuscular Mycorrhiza Formation

    PubMed Central

    Schwab, Suzanne M.; Menge, John A.; Leonard, Robert T.

    1983-01-01

    A comparison was made of water-soluble root exudates and extracts of Sorghum vulgare Pers. grown under two levels of P nutrition. An increase in P nutrition significantly decreased the concentration of carbohydrates, carboxylic acids, and amino acids in exudates, and decreased the concentration of carboxylic acids in extracts. Higher P did not affect the relative proportions of specific carboxylic acids and had little effect on proportions of specific amino acids in both extracts and exudates. Phosphorus amendment resulted in an increase in the relative proportion of arabinose and a decrease in the proportion of fructose in exudates, but did not have a large effect on the proportion of individual sugars in extracts. The proportions of specific carbohydrates, carboxylic acids, and amino acids varied between exudates and extracts. Therefore, the quantity and composition of root extracts may not be a reliable predictor of the availability of substrate for symbiotic vesicular-arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi. Comparisons of the rate of leakage of compounds from roots with the growth rate of vesicular-arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi suggest that the fungus must either be capable of using a variety of organic substrates for growth, or be capable of inducing a much higher rate of movement of specific organic compounds across root cell membranes than occurs through passive exudation as measured in this study. PMID:16663297

  13. The perennial organelle: assembly and disassembly of the primary cilium

    PubMed Central

    Seeley, E. Scott; Nachury, Maxence V.

    2010-01-01

    Primary cilia contain signaling receptors of diverse classes, and ciliary dysfunction results in a variety of developmental defects. Thus, primary cilia are thought to have an important role in sensing and transducing cellular signals. Although there is clear evidence demonstrating that these organelles are assembled and disassembled dynamically as cells progress through the cell cycle, the mechanisms by which the cell cycle controls the assembly and disassembly of the primary cilium remain poorly understood. In this Commentary, we review the basic cellular mechanisms that underlie the early stages of cilium assembly and discuss how the cell cycle communicates with the ciliation program. A commonly held view is that ciliation occurs exclusively in cells that have exited the cell cycle and entered quiescence or differentiation. However, this concept is at odds with the finding that, during development, many actively proliferating cells require cilia-mediated signaling pathways to instruct their developmental fate. Here, we reassess the quiescence-centric view of ciliation by reviewing historic and current literature. We discuss ample evidence that cilia are in fact present on many proliferating cells, and that a transient peak of ciliation before the G1-S transition might be tightly coupled to entry into the DNA replication phase. Finally, we touch on the relationship between the ciliation and cell-division cycles and the tissue distribution of primary cilia in order to highlight potential roles for the primary cilium in restraining cells from the hyperproliferative state that contributes to cancer. PMID:20144999

  14. Modularity of a carbon-fixing protein organelle.

    PubMed

    Bonacci, Walter; Teng, Poh K; Afonso, Bruno; Niederholtmeyer, Henrike; Grob, Patricia; Silver, Pamela A; Savage, David F

    2012-01-10

    Bacterial microcompartments are proteinaceous complexes that catalyze metabolic pathways in a manner reminiscent of organelles. Although microcompartment structure is well understood, much less is known about their assembly and function in vivo. We show here that carboxysomes, CO(2)-fixing microcompartments encoded by 10 genes, can be heterologously produced in Escherichia coli. Expression of carboxysomes in E. coli resulted in the production of icosahedral complexes similar to those from the native host. In vivo, the complexes were capable of both assembling with carboxysomal proteins and fixing CO(2). Characterization of purified synthetic carboxysomes indicated that they were well formed in structure, contained the expected molecular components, and were capable of fixing CO(2) in vitro. In addition, we verify association of the postulated pore-forming protein CsoS1D with the carboxysome and show how it may modulate function. We have developed a genetic system capable of producing modular carbon-fixing microcompartments in a heterologous host. In doing so, we lay the groundwork for understanding these elaborate protein complexes and for the synthetic biological engineering of self-assembling molecular structures.

  15. The Gas Vacuole - an Early Organelle of Prokaryote Motility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Staley, James T.

    1980-06-01

    Several lines of evidence suggest that the gas vesicle may have been an early organelle of prokaryote motility. First, it is found in bacteria that are thought to be representatives of primitive groups. Second, it is a simple structure, and the structure alone imparts the function of motility. Thirdly, it is widely distributed amongst prokaryotes, having been found in the purple and green sulfur photosynthetic bacteria, cyanobacteria, methanogenic bacteria, obligate and facultative anaerobic heterotrophic bacteria, as well as aerobic heterotrophic bacteria that divide by budding and binary transverse fission. Recent evidence suggests that in some bacteria the genes for gas vesicle synthesis occur on plasmids. Thus, the wide distribution of this characteristic could be due to recent evolution and rapid dispersal, though early evolution is not precluded. Though the gas vesicle structure itself appears to be highly conserved among the various groups of bacteria, it seems doubtful that the regulatory mechanism to control its synthesis could be the same for the diverse gas vacuolate bacterial groups.

  16. Organelle Redox of CF and CFTR-Corrected Airway Epithelia

    PubMed Central

    Schwarzer, Christian; Illek, Beate; Suh, Jung H.; Remington, S. James; Fischer, Horst; Machen, Terry E.

    2014-01-01

    In cystic fibrosis reduced CFTR function may alter redox properties of airway epithelial cells. Redox-sensitive GFP (roGFP1) and imaging microscopy were used to measure redox potentials of cytosol, ER, mitochondria and cell surface of cystic fibrosis nasal epithelial cells and CFTR-corrected cells. We also measured glutathione and cysteine thiol redox states in cell lysates and apical fluids to provide coverage over a range of redox potentials and environments that might be affected by CFTR. As measured with roGFP1, redox potentials at the cell surface (~ -207 ±8 mV) and in the ER (~ -217 ±1 mV) and rates of regulation of the apical fluid and ER lumen following DTT treatment were similar for CF and CFTR-corrected cells. CF and CFTR-corrected cells had similar redox potentials in mitochondria (-344 ±9 mV) and cytosol (-322 ±7 mV). Oxidation of carboxy-dichlorodihydrofluoresceindiacetate and of apical Amplex Red occurred at equal rates in CF and CFTR-corrected cells. Glutathione and cysteine redox couples in cell lysates and apical fluid were equal in CF and CFTR-corrected cells. These quantitative estimates of organelle redox potentials combined with apical and cell measurements using small molecule couples confirmed there were no differences in redox properties of CF and CFTR-corrected cells. PMID:17603939

  17. Structure, Function, and Assembly of Adhesive Organelles by Uropathogenic Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Chahales, Peter; Thanassi, David G.

    2015-01-01

    Bacteria assemble a wide range of adhesive proteins, termed adhesins, to mediate binding to receptors and colonization of surfaces. For pathogenic bacteria, adhesins are critical for early stages of infection, allowing the bacteria to initiate contact with host cells, colonize different tissues, and establish a foothold within the host. The adhesins expressed by a pathogen are also critical for bacterial-bacterial interactions and the formation of bacterial communities such as biofilms. The ability to adhere to host tissues is particularly important for bacteria that colonize sites such as the urinary tract, where the flow of urine functions to maintain sterility by washing away non-adherent pathogens. Adhesins vary from monomeric proteins that are directly anchored to the bacterial surface to polymeric, hairlike fibers that extend out from the cell surface. These latter fibers are termed pili or fimbriae, and were among the first identified virulence factors of uropathogenic Escherichia coli. Studies since then have identified a range of both pilus and non-pilus adhesins that contribute to bacterial colonization of the urinary tract, and have revealed molecular details of the structures, assembly pathways, and functions of these adhesive organelles. In this review, we describe the different types of adhesins expressed by both Gram-negative and Gram-positive uropathogens, what is known about their structures, how they are assembled on the bacterial surface, and the functions of specific adhesins in the pathogenesis of urinary tract infections. PMID:26542038

  18. Lassa-Vesicular Stomatitis Chimeric Virus Safely Destroys Brain Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Wollmann, Guido; Drokhlyansky, Eugene; Davis, John N.; Cepko, Connie

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT High-grade tumors in the brain are among the deadliest of cancers. Here, we took a promising oncolytic virus, vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV), and tested the hypothesis that the neurotoxicity associated with the virus could be eliminated without blocking its oncolytic potential in the brain by replacing the neurotropic VSV glycoprotein with the glycoprotein from one of five different viruses, including Ebola virus, Marburg virus, lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV), rabies virus, and Lassa virus. Based on in vitro infections of normal and tumor cells, we selected two viruses to test in vivo. Wild-type VSV was lethal when injected directly into the brain. In contrast, a novel chimeric virus (VSV-LASV-GPC) containing genes from both the Lassa virus glycoprotein precursor (GPC) and VSV showed no adverse actions within or outside the brain and targeted and completely destroyed brain cancer, including high-grade glioblastoma and melanoma, even in metastatic cancer models. When mice had two brain tumors, intratumoral VSV-LASV-GPC injection in one tumor (glioma or melanoma) led to complete tumor destruction; importantly, the virus moved contralaterally within the brain to selectively infect the second noninjected tumor. A chimeric virus combining VSV genes with the gene coding for the Ebola virus glycoprotein was safe in the brain and also selectively targeted brain tumors but was substantially less effective in destroying brain tumors and prolonging survival of tumor-bearing mice. A tropism for multiple cancer types combined with an exquisite tumor specificity opens a new door to widespread application of VSV-LASV-GPC as a safe and efficacious oncolytic chimeric virus within the brain. IMPORTANCE Many viruses have been tested for their ability to target and kill cancer cells. Vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) has shown substantial promise, but a key problem is that if it enters the brain, it can generate adverse neurologic consequences, including death. We

  19. Ion Channels in Plant Bioenergetic Organelles, Chloroplasts and Mitochondria: From Molecular Identification to Function.

    PubMed

    Carraretto, Luca; Teardo, Enrico; Checchetto, Vanessa; Finazzi, Giovanni; Uozumi, Nobuyuki; Szabo, Ildiko

    2016-03-07

    Recent technical advances in electrophysiological measurements, organelle-targeted fluorescence imaging, and organelle proteomics have pushed the research of ion transport a step forward in the case of the plant bioenergetic organelles, chloroplasts and mitochondria, leading to the molecular identification and functional characterization of several ion transport systems in recent years. Here we focus on channels that mediate relatively high-rate ion and water flux and summarize the current knowledge in this field, focusing on targeting mechanisms, proteomics, electrophysiology, and physiological function. In addition, since chloroplasts evolved from a cyanobacterial ancestor, we give an overview of the information available about cyanobacterial ion channels and discuss the evolutionary origin of chloroplast channels. The recent molecular identification of some of these ion channels allowed their physiological functions to be studied using genetically modified Arabidopsis plants and cyanobacteria. The view is emerging that alteration of chloroplast and mitochondrial ion homeostasis leads to organelle dysfunction, which in turn significantly affects the energy metabolism of the whole organism. Clear-cut identification of genes encoding for channels in these organelles, however, remains a major challenge in this rapidly developing field. Multiple strategies including bioinformatics, cell biology, electrophysiology, use of organelle-targeted ion-sensitive probes, genetics, and identification of signals eliciting specific ion fluxes across organelle membranes should provide a better understanding of the physiological role of organellar channels and their contribution to signaling pathways in plants in the future.

  20. Trans-Membrane Area Asymmetry Controls the Shape of Cellular Organelles

    PubMed Central

    Beznoussenko, Galina V.; Pilyugin, Sergei S.; Geerts, Willie J. C.; Kozlov, Michael M.; Burger, Koert N. J.; Luini, Alberto; Derganc, Jure; Mironov, Alexander A.

    2015-01-01

    Membrane organelles often have complicated shapes and differ in their volume, surface area and membrane curvature. The ratio between the surface area of the cytosolic and luminal leaflets (trans-membrane area asymmetry (TAA)) determines the membrane curvature within different sites of the organelle. Thus, the shape of the organelle could be critically dependent on TAA. Here, using mathematical modeling and stereological measurements of TAA during fast transformation of organelle shapes, we present evidence that suggests that when organelle volume and surface area are constant, TAA can regulate transformation of the shape of the Golgi apparatus, endosomal multivesicular bodies, and microvilli of brush borders of kidney epithelial cells. Extraction of membrane curvature by small spheres, such as COPI-dependent vesicles within the Golgi (extraction of positive curvature), or by intraluminal vesicles within endosomes (extraction of negative curvature) controls the shape of these organelles. For instance, Golgi tubulation is critically dependent on the fusion of COPI vesicles with Golgi cisternae, and vice versa, for the extraction of membrane curvature into 50–60 nm vesicles, to induce transformation of Golgi tubules into cisternae. Also, formation of intraluminal ultra-small vesicles after fusion of endosomes allows equilibration of their TAA, volume and surface area. Finally, when microvilli of the brush border are broken into vesicles and microvilli fragments, TAA of these membranes remains the same as TAA of the microvilli. Thus, TAA has a significant role in transformation of organelle shape when other factors remain constant. PMID:25761238

  1. Nuclearly encoded splicing factors implicated in RNA splicing in higher plant organelles.

    PubMed

    de Longevialle, Andéol Falcon; Small, Ian D; Lurin, Claire

    2010-07-01

    Plant organelles arose from two independent endosymbiosis events. Throughout evolutionary history, tight control of chloroplasts and mitochondria has been gained by the nucleus, which regulates most steps of organelle genome expression and metabolism. In particular, RNA maturation, including RNA splicing, is highly dependent on nuclearly encoded splicing factors. Most introns in organelles are group II introns, whose catalytic mechanism closely resembles that of the nuclear spliceosome. Plant group II introns have lost the ability to self-splice in vivo and require nuclearly encoded proteins as cofactors. Since the first splicing factor was identified in chloroplasts more than 10 years ago, many other proteins have been shown to be involved in splicing of one or more introns in chloroplasts or mitochondria. These new proteins belong to a variety of different families of RNA binding proteins and provide new insights into ribonucleo-protein complexes and RNA splicing machineries in organelles. In this review, we describe how splicing factors, encoded by the nucleus and targeted to the organelles, take part in post-transcriptional steps in higher plant organelle gene expression. We go on to discuss the potential for these factors to regulate organelle gene expression.

  2. Visualization of the vesicular acetylcholine transporter in cholinergic nerve terminals and its targeting to a specific population of small synaptic vesicles.

    PubMed Central

    Weihe, E; Tao-Cheng, J H; Schäfer, M K; Erickson, J D; Eiden, L E

    1996-01-01

    Immunohistochemical visualization of the rat vesicular acetylcholine transporter (VAChT) in cholinergic neurons and nerve terminals has been compared to that for choline acetyltransferase (ChAT), heretofore the most specific marker for cholinergic neurons. VAChT-positive cell bodies were visualized in cerebral cortex, basal forebrain, medial habenula, striatum, brain stem, and spinal cord by using a polyclonal anti-VAChT antiserum. VAChT-immuno-reactive fibers and terminals were also visualized in these regions and in hippocampus, at neuromuscular junctions within skeletal muscle, and in sympathetic and parasympathetic autonomic ganglia and target tissues. Cholinergic nerve terminals contain more VAChT than ChAT immunoreactivity after routine fixation, consistent with a concentration of VAChT within terminal neuronal arborizations in which secretory vesicles are clustered. These include VAChT-positive terminals of the median eminence or the hypothalamus, not observed with ChAT antiserum after routine fixation. Subcellular localization of VAChT in specific organelles in neuronal cells was examined by immunoelectron microscopy in a rat neuronal cell line (PC 12-c4) expressing VAChT as well as the endocrine and neuronal forms of the vesicular monoamine transporters (VMAT1 and VMAT2). VAChT is targeted to small synaptic vesicles, while VMAT1 is found mainly but not exclusively on large dense-core vesicles. VMAT2 is found on large dense-core vesicles but not on the small synaptic vesicles that contain VAChT in PC12-c4 cells, despite the presence of VMAT2 immunoreactivity in central and peripheral nerve terminals known to contain monoamines in small synaptic vesicles. Thus, VAChT and VMAT2 may be specific markers for "cholinergic" and "adrenergic" small synaptic vesicles, with the latter not expressed in nonstimulated neuronally differentiated PC12-c4 cells. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 Fig. 6 PMID:8622973

  3. Effects of organelle shape on fluorescence recovery after photobleaching.

    PubMed

    Sbalzarini, Ivo F; Mezzacasa, Anna; Helenius, Ari; Koumoutsakos, Petros

    2005-09-01

    The determination of diffusion coefficients from fluorescence recovery data is often complicated by geometric constraints imposed by the complex shapes of intracellular compartments. To address this issue, diffusion of proteins in the lumen of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) is studied using cell biological and computational methods. Fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP) experiments are performed in tissue culture cells expressing GFP-KDEL, a soluble, fluorescent protein, in the ER lumen. The three-dimensional (3D) shape of the ER is determined by confocal microscopy and computationally reconstructed. Within these ER geometries diffusion of solutes is simulated using the method of particle strength exchange. The simulations are compared to experimental FRAP curves of GFP-KDEL in the same ER region. Comparisons of simulations in the 3D ER shapes to simulations in open 3D space show that the constraints imposed by the spatial confinement result in two- to fourfold underestimation of the molecular diffusion constant in the ER if the geometry is not taken into account. Using the same molecular diffusion constant in different simulations, the observed speed of fluorescence recovery varies by a factor of 2.5, depending on the particular ER geometry and the location of the bleached area. Organelle shape considerably influences diffusive transport and must be taken into account when relating experimental photobleaching data to molecular diffusion coefficients. This novel methodology combines experimental FRAP curves with high accuracy computer simulations of diffusion in the same ER geometry to determine the molecular diffusion constant of the solute in the particular ER lumen.

  4. Effects of Organelle Shape on Fluorescence Recovery after Photobleaching

    PubMed Central

    Sbalzarini, Ivo F.; Mezzacasa, Anna; Helenius, Ari; Koumoutsakos, Petros

    2005-01-01

    The determination of diffusion coefficients from fluorescence recovery data is often complicated by geometric constraints imposed by the complex shapes of intracellular compartments. To address this issue, diffusion of proteins in the lumen of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) is studied using cell biological and computational methods. Fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP) experiments are performed in tissue culture cells expressing GFP–KDEL, a soluble, fluorescent protein, in the ER lumen. The three-dimensional (3D) shape of the ER is determined by confocal microscopy and computationally reconstructed. Within these ER geometries diffusion of solutes is simulated using the method of particle strength exchange. The simulations are compared to experimental FRAP curves of GFP–KDEL in the same ER region. Comparisons of simulations in the 3D ER shapes to simulations in open 3D space show that the constraints imposed by the spatial confinement result in two- to fourfold underestimation of the molecular diffusion constant in the ER if the geometry is not taken into account. Using the same molecular diffusion constant in different simulations, the observed speed of fluorescence recovery varies by a factor of 2.5, depending on the particular ER geometry and the location of the bleached area. Organelle shape considerably influences diffusive transport and must be taken into account when relating experimental photobleaching data to molecular diffusion coefficients. This novel methodology combines experimental FRAP curves with high accuracy computer simulations of diffusion in the same ER geometry to determine the molecular diffusion constant of the solute in the particular ER lumen. PMID:15951382

  5. Hypoxia signaling pathways: modulators of oxygen-related organelles

    PubMed Central

    Schönenberger, Miriam J.; Kovacs, Werner J.

    2015-01-01

    Oxygen (O2) is an essential substrate in cellular metabolism, bioenergetics, and signaling and as such linked to the survival and normal function of all metazoans. Low O2 tension (hypoxia) is a fundamental feature of physiological processes as well as pathophysiological conditions such as cancer and ischemic diseases. Central to the molecular mechanisms underlying O2 homeostasis are the hypoxia-inducible factors-1 and -2 alpha (HIF-1α and EPAS1/HIF-2α) that function as master regulators of the adaptive response to hypoxia. HIF-induced genes promote characteristic tumor behaviors, including angiogenesis and metabolic reprogramming. The aim of this review is to critically explore current knowledge of how HIF-α signaling regulates the abundance and function of major O2-consuming organelles. Abundant evidence suggests key roles for HIF-1α in the regulation of mitochondrial homeostasis. An essential adaptation to sustained hypoxia is repression of mitochondrial respiration and induction of glycolysis. HIF-1α activates several genes that trigger mitophagy and represses regulators of mitochondrial biogenesis. Several lines of evidence point to a strong relationship between hypoxia, the accumulation of misfolded proteins in the endoplasmic reticulum, and activation of the unfolded protein response. Surprisingly, although peroxisomes depend highly on molecular O2 for their function, there has been no evidence linking HIF signaling to peroxisomes. We discuss our recent findings that establish HIF-2α as a negative regulator of peroxisome abundance and suggest a mechanism by which cells attune peroxisomal function with O2 availability. HIF-2α activation augments peroxisome turnover by pexophagy and thereby changes lipid composition reminiscent of peroxisomal disorders. We discuss potential mechanisms by which HIF-2α might trigger pexophagy and place special emphasis on the potential pathological implications of HIF-2α-mediated pexophagy for human health. PMID:26258123

  6. Rapidly transported organelles containing membrane and cytoskeletal components: their relation to axonal growth

    PubMed Central

    1987-01-01

    We have examined the movements, composition, and cellular origin of phase-dense varicosities in cultures of chick sympathetic and sensory neurons. These organelles are variable in diameter (typically between 0.2 and 2 microns) and undergo saltatory movements both towards and away from the neuronal cell body. Their mean velocities vary inversely with the size of the organelle and are greater in the retrograde than the anterograde direction. Organelles stain with the lipophilic dye 1, 1'-dioctadecyl-3,3,3',3'-tetramethyl-indocarbocyanine and with antibodies to cytoskeletal components. In cultures double-stained with antibodies to alpha-tubulin and 70-kD neurofilament protein (NF-L), approximately 40% of the organelles stain for tubulin, 30% stain for NF- L, 10% stain for both tubulin and NF-L, and 40% show no staining with either antibody. The association of cytoskeletal proteins with the organelles shows that these proteins are able to move by a form of rapid axonal transport. Under most culture conditions the predominant direction of movement is towards the cell body, suggesting that the organelles are produced at or near the growth cone. Retrograde movements continue in culture medium lacking protein or high molecular mass components and increase under conditions in which the advance of the growth cone is arrested. There is a fourfold increase in the number of organelles moving retrogradely in neurites that encounter a substratum-associated barrier to elongation; retrograde movements increase similarly in cultures exposed to cytochalasin at levels known to block growth cone advance. No previously described organelle shows behavior coordinated with axonal growth in this way. We propose that the organelles contain membrane and cytoskeletal components that have been delivered to the growth cone, by slow or fast anterograde transport, in excess of the amounts required to synthesize more axon. In view of their rapid mobility and variable contents, we suggest that they

  7. 9 CFR 94.12 - Pork and pork products from regions where swine vesicular disease exists.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... vesicular disease is maintained on the APHIS Web site at http://www.aphis.usda.gov/import_export/animals... 260 °C for approximately 210 minutes after which they must be cooked in hot oil (deep-fried) at...

  8. Understanding and altering cell tropism of vesicular stomatitis virus

    PubMed Central

    Hastie, Eric; Cataldi, Marcela; Marriott, Ian; Grdzelishvili, Valery Z.

    2013-01-01

    Vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) is a prototypic nonsegmented negative-strand RNA virus. VSV’s broad cell tropism makes it a popular model virus for many basic research applications. In addition, a lack of preexisting human immunity against VSV, inherent oncotropism and other features make VSV a widely used platform for vaccine and oncolytic vectors. However, VSV’s neurotropism that can result in viral encephalitis in experimental animals needs to be addressed for the use of the virus as a safe vector. Therefore, it is very important to understand the determinants of VSV tropism and develop strategies to alter it. VSV glycoprotein (G) and matrix (M) protein play major roles in its cell tropism. VSV G protein is responsible for VSV broad cell tropism and is often used for pseudotyping other viruses. VSV M affects cell tropism via evasion of antiviral responses, and M mutants can be used to limit cell tropism to cell types defective in interferon signaling. In addition, other VSV proteins and host proteins may function as determinants of VSV cell tropism. Various approaches have been successfully used to alter VSV tropism to benefit basic research and clinically relevant applications. PMID:23796410

  9. Asymmetric packaging of polymerases within vesicular stomatitis virus

    SciTech Connect

    Hodges, Jeffery; Tang, Xiaolin; Landesman, Michael B.; Ruedas, John B.; Ghimire, Anil; Gudheti, Manasa V.; Perrault, Jacques; Jorgensen, Erik M.; Gerton, Jordan M.; Saffarian, Saveez

    2013-10-18

    Highlights: •The VSV polymerases (L proteins) are localized to the blunt end of the virus. •The VSV phosphoproteins (P proteins) are localized to the blunt end of the virus. •Each VSV virion packages a variable number of P and L proteins. -- Abstract: Vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) is a prototypic negative sense single-stranded RNA virus. The bullet-shape appearance of the virion results from tightly wound helical turns of the nucleoprotein encapsidated RNA template (N-RNA) around a central cavity. Transcription and replication require polymerase complexes, which include a catalytic subunit L and a template-binding subunit P. L and P are inferred to be in the cavity, however lacking direct observation, their exact position has remained unclear. Using super-resolution fluorescence imaging and atomic force microscopy (AFM) on single VSV virions, we show that L and P are packaged asymmetrically towards the blunt end of the virus. The number of L and P proteins varies between individual virions and they occupy 57 ± 12 nm of the 150 nm central cavity of the virus. Our finding positions the polymerases at the opposite end of the genome with respect to the only transcriptional promoter.

  10. Kernel energy method applied to vesicular stomatitis virus nucleoprotein

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Lulu; Massa, Lou; Karle, Jerome

    2009-01-01

    The kernel energy method (KEM) is applied to the vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) nucleoprotein (PDB ID code 2QVJ). The calculations employ atomic coordinates from the crystal structure at 2.8-Å resolution, except for the hydrogen atoms, whose positions were modeled by using the computer program HYPERCHEM. The calculated KEM ab initio limited basis Hartree-Fock energy for the full 33,175 atom molecule (including hydrogen atoms) is obtained. In the KEM, a full biological molecule is represented by smaller “kernels” of atoms, greatly simplifying the calculations. Collections of kernels are well suited for parallel computation. VSV consists of five similar chains, and we obtain the energy of each chain. Interchain hydrogen bonds contribute to the interaction energy between the chains. These hydrogen bond energies are calculated in Hartree-Fock (HF) and Møller-Plesset perturbation theory to second order (MP2) approximations by using 6–31G** basis orbitals. The correlation energy, included in MP2, is a significant factor in the interchain hydrogen bond energies. PMID:19188588

  11. Transferosomes - A vesicular transdermal delivery system for enhanced drug permeation

    PubMed Central

    Rajan, Reshmy; Jose, Shoma; Mukund, V. P. Biju; Vasudevan, Deepa T.

    2011-01-01

    Transdermal administration of drugs is generally limited by the barrier function of the skin. Vesicular systems are one of the most controversial methods for transdermal delivery of active substances. The interest in designing transdermal delivery systems was relaunched after the discovery of elastic vesicles like transferosomes, ethosomes, cubosomes, phytosomes, etc. This paper presents the composition, mechanisms of penetration, manufacturing and characterization methods of transferosomes as transdermal delivery systems of active substances. For a drug to be absorbed and distributed into organs and tissues and eliminated from the body, it must pass through one or more biological membranes/barriers at various locations. Such a movement of drug across the membrane is called as drug transport. For the drugs to be delivered to the body, they should cross the membranous barrier. The concept of these delivery systems was designed in an attempt to concentrate the drug in the tissues of interest, while reducing the amount of drug in the remaining tissues. Hence, surrounding tissues are not affected by the drug. In addition, loss of drug does not happen due to localization of drug, leading to get maximum efficacy of the medication. Therefore, the phospholipid based carrier systems are of considerable interest in this era. PMID:22171309

  12. Use of influenza C virus glycoprotein HEF for generation of vesicular stomatitis virus pseudotypes.

    PubMed

    Hanika, Andrea; Larisch, Birthe; Steinmann, Eike; Schwegmann-Wessels, Christel; Herrler, Georg; Zimmer, Gert

    2005-05-01

    Influenza C virus contains two envelope glycoproteins: CM2, a putative ion channel protein; and HEF, a unique multifunctional protein that performs receptor-binding, receptor-destroying and fusion activities. Here, it is demonstrated that expression of HEF is sufficient to pseudotype replication-incompetent vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) that lacks the VSV glycoprotein (G) gene. The pseudotyped virus showed characteristic features of influenza C virus with respect to proteolytic activation, receptor usage and cell tropism. Chimeric glycoproteins composed of HEF ectodomain and VSV-G C-terminal domains were efficiently incorporated into VSV particles and showed receptor-binding and receptor-destroying activities but, unlike authentic HEF, did not mediate efficient infection, probably because of impaired fusion activity. HEF-pseudotyped VSV efficiently infected polarized Madin-Darby canine kidney cells via the apical plasma membrane, whereas entry of VSV-G-complemented virus was restricted to the basolateral membrane. These findings suggest that pseudotyping of viral vectors with HEF might be useful for efficient apical gene transfer into polarized epithelial cells and for targeting cells that express 9-O-acetylated sialic acids.

  13. A plausible mechanism of biosorption in dual symbioses by vesicular-arbuscular mycorrhizal in plants.

    PubMed

    Azmat, Rafia; Hamid, Neelofer

    2015-03-01

    Dual symbioses of vesicular-arbuscular mycorrhizal (VAM) fungi with growth of Momordica charantia were elucidated in terms of plausible mechanism of biosorption in this article. The experiment was conducted in green house and mixed inoculum of the VAM fungi was used in the three replicates. Results demonstrated that the starch contents were the main source of C for the VAM to builds their hyphae. The increased plant height and leaves surface area were explained in relation with an increase in the photosynthetic rates to produce rapid sugar contents for the survival of plants. A decreased in protein, and amino acid contents and increased proline and protease activity in VAM plants suggested that these contents were the main bio-indicators of the plants under biotic stress. The decline in protein may be due to the degradation of these contents, which later on converted into dextrose where it can easily be absorbed by for the period of symbioses. A mechanism of C chemisorption in relation with physiology and morphology of plant was discussed.

  14. Structure and Function of the N-Terminal Domain of the Vesicular Stomatitis Virus RNA Polymerase

    PubMed Central

    Qiu, Shihong; Ogino, Minako; Luo, Ming

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Viruses have various mechanisms to duplicate their genomes and produce virus-specific mRNAs. Negative-strand RNA viruses encode their own polymerases to perform each of these processes. For the nonsegmented negative-strand RNA viruses, the polymerase is comprised of the large polymerase subunit (L) and the phosphoprotein (P). L proteins from members of the Rhabdoviridae, Paramyxoviridae, and Filoviridae share sequence and predicted secondary structure homology. Here, we present the structure of the N-terminal domain (conserved region I) of the L protein from a rhabdovirus, vesicular stomatitis virus, at 1.8-Å resolution. The strictly and strongly conserved residues in this domain cluster in a single area of the protein. Serial mutation of these residues shows that many of the amino acids are essential for viral transcription but not for mRNA capping. Three-dimensional alignments show that this domain shares structural homology with polymerases from other viral families, including segmented negative-strand RNA and double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) viruses. IMPORTANCE Negative-strand RNA viruses include a diverse set of viral families that infect animals and plants, causing serious illness and economic impact. The members of this group of viruses share a set of functionally conserved proteins that are essential to their replication cycle. Among this set of proteins is the viral polymerase, which performs a unique set of reactions to produce genome- and subgenome-length RNA transcripts. In this article, we study the polymerase of vesicular stomatitis virus, a member of the rhabdoviruses, which has served in the past as a model to study negative-strand RNA virus replication. We have identified a site in the N-terminal domain of the polymerase that is essential to viral transcription and that shares sequence homology with members of the paramyxoviruses and the filoviruses. Newly identified sites such as that described here could prove to be useful targets in the

  15. Bidirectional organelle transport can occur in cell processes that contain single microtubules.

    PubMed

    Koonce, M P; Schliwa, M

    1985-01-01

    Intracellular organelle transport was studied in a new model system, the giant freshwater ameba Reticulomyxa. The ameba extends a large reticulate network of cytoplasmic strands in which various phase-dense organelles can be seen to move at a rate of up to 25 microns/s. This combined light and high voltage electron microscopic study shows that organelles move bidirectionally in even the finest network strands that contain only a single microtubule. In terms of microtubule-associated intracellular transport, this observation defines a minimum set of conditions necessary for such movement. The implications of this finding for possible models of force generation are discussed.

  16. Saturated fatty acids alter the late secretory pathway by modulating membrane properties.

    PubMed

    Payet, Laurie-Anne; Pineau, Ludovic; Snyder, Ellen C R; Colas, Jenny; Moussa, Ahmed; Vannier, Brigitte; Bigay, Joelle; Clarhaut, Jonathan; Becq, Frédéric; Berjeaud, Jean-Marc; Vandebrouck, Clarisse; Ferreira, Thierry

    2013-12-01

    Saturated fatty acids (SFA) have been reported to alter organelle integrity and function in many cell types, including muscle and pancreatic β-cells, adipocytes, hepatocytes and cardiomyocytes. SFA accumulation results in increased amounts of ceramides/sphingolipids and saturated phospholipids (PL). In this study, using a yeast-based model that recapitulates most of the trademarks of SFA-induced lipotoxicity in mammalian cells, we demonstrate that these lipid species act at different levels of the secretory pathway. Ceramides mostly appear to modulate the induction of the unfolded protein response and the transcription of nutrient transporters destined to the cell surface. On the other hand, saturated PL, by altering membrane properties, directly impact vesicular budding at later steps in the secretory pathway, i.e. at the trans-Golgi Network level. They appear to do so by increasing lipid order within intracellular membranes which, in turn, alters the recruitment of loose lipid packing-sensing proteins, required for optimal budding, to nascent vesicles. We propose that this latter general mechanism could account for the well-documented deleterious impacts of fatty acids on the last steps of the secretory pathway in several cell types.

  17. Expression of androgen receptor and cyclooxygenase-2 in the vesicular glands of castrated and intact goat.

    PubMed

    Emam, Mahmoud Abdelghaffar

    2016-03-01

    This study was conducted to demonstrate the effect of castration on the structure of vesicular glands of the Egyptian Nubian (Zaraibi) goat. Vesicular glands of castrated (n=4) and intact (n=6) goat were used for histological and immunohistochemical evaluations. In this study, we report the difference in cell specific expression of androgen receptor (AR) and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) in the vesicular glands of castrated and intact goats. In both castrated and intact goats, the present study revealed no immunopositive cells for AR or COX-2 in the fibromuscular stroma meanwhile, AR and COX-2 containing immunoreactive cells were restricted only to the epithelium of the secretory acini of the vesicular gland. Such finding suggests androgen and COX-2 as important regulators for the growth and secretory activity of epithelial cells in the vesicular gland of goats. Overall, the vesicular gland of castrated goats showed significantly (P<0.05) lower AR and COX-2 immuno-expression than intact goats indicating that both AR and COX-2 are androgen dependent.

  18. Increased vesicular monoamine transporter enhances dopamine release and opposes Parkinson disease-related neurodegeneration in vivo.

    PubMed

    Lohr, Kelly M; Bernstein, Alison I; Stout, Kristen A; Dunn, Amy R; Lazo, Carlos R; Alter, Shawn P; Wang, Minzheng; Li, Yingjie; Fan, Xueliang; Hess, Ellen J; Yi, Hong; Vecchio, Laura M; Goldstein, David S; Guillot, Thomas S; Salahpour, Ali; Miller, Gary W

    2014-07-08

    Disruption of neurotransmitter vesicle dynamics (transport, capacity, release) has been implicated in a variety of neurodegenerative and neuropsychiatric conditions. Here, we report a novel mouse model of enhanced vesicular function via bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC)-mediated overexpression of the vesicular monoamine transporter 2 (VMAT2; Slc18a2). A twofold increase in vesicular transport enhances the vesicular capacity for dopamine (56%), dopamine vesicle volume (33%), and basal tissue dopamine levels (21%) in the mouse striatum. The elevated vesicular capacity leads to an increase in stimulated dopamine release (84%) and extracellular dopamine levels (44%). VMAT2-overexpressing mice show improved outcomes on anxiety and depressive-like behaviors and increased basal locomotor activity (41%). Finally, these mice exhibit significant protection from neurotoxic insult by the dopaminergic toxicant 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP), as measured by reduced dopamine terminal damage and substantia nigra pars compacta cell loss. The increased release of dopamine and neuroprotection from MPTP toxicity in the VMAT2-overexpressing mice suggest that interventions aimed at enhancing vesicular capacity may be of therapeutic benefit in Parkinson disease.

  19. Increased vesicular monoamine transporter enhances dopamine release and opposes Parkinson disease-related neurodegeneration in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Lohr, Kelly M.; Bernstein, Alison I.; Stout, Kristen A.; Dunn, Amy R.; Lazo, Carlos R.; Alter, Shawn P.; Wang, Minzheng; Li, Yingjie; Fan, Xueliang; Hess, Ellen J.; Yi, Hong; Vecchio, Laura M.; Goldstein, David S.; Guillot, Thomas S.; Salahpour, Ali; Miller, Gary W.

    2014-01-01

    Disruption of neurotransmitter vesicle dynamics (transport, capacity, release) has been implicated in a variety of neurodegenerative and neuropsychiatric conditions. Here, we report a novel mouse model of enhanced vesicular function via bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC)-mediated overexpression of the vesicular monoamine transporter 2 (VMAT2; Slc18a2). A twofold increase in vesicular transport enhances the vesicular capacity for dopamine (56%), dopamine vesicle volume (33%), and basal tissue dopamine levels (21%) in the mouse striatum. The elevated vesicular capacity leads to an increase in stimulated dopamine release (84%) and extracellular dopamine levels (44%). VMAT2-overexpressing mice show improved outcomes on anxiety and depressive-like behaviors and increased basal locomotor activity (41%). Finally, these mice exhibit significant protection from neurotoxic insult by the dopaminergic toxicant 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP), as measured by reduced dopamine terminal damage and substantia nigra pars compacta cell loss. The increased release of dopamine and neuroprotection from MPTP toxicity in the VMAT2-overexpressing mice suggest that interventions aimed at enhancing vesicular capacity may be of therapeutic benefit in Parkinson disease. PMID:24979780

  20. Structure and Mechanisms of a Protein-Based Organelle in Escherichia coli

    SciTech Connect

    Tanaka, Shiho; Sawaya, Michael R.; Yeates, Todd O.

    2010-08-18

    Many bacterial cells contain proteinaceous microcompartments that act as simple organelles by sequestering specific metabolic processes involving volatile or toxic metabolites. Here we report the three-dimensional (3D) crystal structures, with resolutions between 1.65 and 2.5 angstroms, of the four homologous proteins (EutS, EutL, EutK, and EutM) that are thought to be the major shell constituents of a functionally complex ethanolamine utilization (Eut) microcompartment. The Eut microcompartment is used to sequester the metabolism of ethanolamine in bacteria such as Escherichia coli and Salmonella enterica. The four Eut shell proteins share an overall similar 3D fold, but they have distinguishing structural features that help explain the specific roles they play in the microcompartment. For example, EutL undergoes a conformational change that is probably involved in gating molecular transport through shell protein pores, whereas structural evidence suggests that EutK might bind a nucleic acid component. Together these structures give mechanistic insight into bacterial microcompartments.

  1. Integrated regulation of motor-driven organelle transport by scaffolding proteins.

    PubMed

    Fu, Meng-meng; Holzbaur, Erika L F

    2014-10-01

    Intracellular trafficking pathways, including endocytosis, autophagy, and secretion, rely on directed organelle transport driven by the opposing microtubule motor proteins kinesin and dynein. Precise spatial and temporal targeting of vesicles and organelles requires the integrated regulation of these opposing motors, which are often bound simultaneously to the same cargo. Recent progress demonstrates that organelle-associated scaffolding proteins, including Milton/TRAKs (trafficking kinesin-binding protein), JIP1, JIP3 (JNK-interacting proteins), huntingtin, and Hook1, interact with molecular motors to coordinate activity and sustain unidirectional transport. Scaffolding proteins also bind to upstream regulatory proteins, including kinases and GTPases, to modulate transport in the cell. This integration of regulatory control with motor activity allows for cargo-specific changes in the transport or targeting of organelles in response to cues from the complex cellular environment.

  2. Organelle genome complexity scales positively with organism size in volvocine green algae.

    PubMed

    Smith, David Roy; Hamaji, Takashi; Olson, Bradley J S C; Durand, Pierre M; Ferris, Patrick; Michod, Richard E; Featherston, Jonathan; Nozaki, Hisayoshi; Keeling, Patrick J

    2013-04-01

    It has been argued that for certain lineages, noncoding DNA expansion is a consequence of the increased random genetic drift associated with long-term escalations in organism size. But a lack of data has prevented the investigation of this hypothesis in most plastid-bearing protists. Here, using newly sequenced mitochondrial and plastid genomes, we explore the relationship between organelle DNA noncoding content and organism size within volvocine green algae. By looking at unicellular, colonial, and differentiated multicellular algae, we show that organelle DNA complexity scales positively with species size and cell number across the volvocine lineage. Moreover, silent-site genetic diversity data suggest that the volvocine species with the largest cell numbers and most bloated organelle genomes have the smallest effective population sizes. Together, these findings support the view that nonadaptive processes, like random genetic drift, promote the expansion of noncoding regions in organelle genomes.

  3. Bioinformatics and functional analyses of coronavirus nonstructural proteins involved in the formation of replicative organelles.

    PubMed

    Neuman, Benjamin W

    2016-11-01

    Replication of eukaryotic positive-stranded RNA viruses is usually linked to the presence of membrane-associated replicative organelles. The purpose of this review is to discuss the function of proteins responsible for formation of the coronavirus replicative organelle. This will be done by identifying domains that are conserved across the order Nidovirales, and by summarizing what is known about function and structure at the level of protein domains.

  4. FtsZ and the division of prokaryotic cells and organelles.

    PubMed

    Margolin, William

    2005-11-01

    Binary fission of many prokaryotes as well as some eukaryotic organelles depends on the FtsZ protein, which self-assembles into a membrane-associated ring structure early in the division process. FtsZ is homologous to tubulin, the building block of the microtubule cytoskeleton in eukaryotes. Recent advances in genomics and cell-imaging techniques have paved the way for the remarkable progress in our understanding of fission in bacteria and organelles.

  5. Vesicular Contact Reaction May Progress into Erythema Multiforme.

    PubMed

    Czarnecka-Operacz, Magdalena; Jenerowicz, Dorota; Szulczyńska-Gabor, Joanna; Teresiak-Mikołajczak, Ewa; Szyfter-Harris, Joanna; Bowszyc-Dmochowska, Monika

    2016-12-01

    Dear Editor, Erythema multiforme is considered an acute skin condition, characterized by a self-limiting and sometimes recurrent course. It is regarded as a type IV hypersensitivity reaction associated with certain infections, medications, and other various triggers. Allergic contact dermatitis is in turn a delayed type of induced allergy as a result of cutaneous contact with a specific allergen to which the patient develops specific sensitivity. This type of cutaneous reaction is associated with inflammation manifesting with erythema, edema, and vesicles. A 27-year old female patient presented with a 3-day history of erythematous and vesicular lesions which developed 24 hours after cesarean section. Initially the lesions were localized in the area of surgery (mainly the abdomen and upper thighs) and on the next day progressed to the buttocks and lumbar area. The patient was referred to the Outpatient Clinic and was treated with antihistamines, but her dermatological state deteriorated rapidly. At the day of admission to the Department of Dermatology, numerous erythematous and vesicular lesions were present on the skin of the abdomen, thighs, and back (Figure 1, a), but the skin of the neck, chest, and extremities was also covered with erythematous and edematous patches. On the second day of hospitalization, we observed the evolution of lesions localized within the chest and extremities into an erythema multiforme-like targetoid eruption (Figure 1, b). Initially the patient was treated with intravenous injections of dexamethasone and ceftriaxone and orally with second-generation antihistamines (in four-fold doses), followed by intravenous metyloprednisolone pulse-therapy (total dose of 3 g). As the new vesicobullous lesions started to appear on the face and arms, we introduced cyclosporine A orally 400 mg daily. We could then observe gradual remission, but on the seventh day of hospitalization the patient developed a massive labial herpes simplex infection and had

  6. Mitochondrial fission factor Drp1 maintains oocyte quality via dynamic rearrangement of multiple organelles.

    PubMed

    Udagawa, Osamu; Ishihara, Takaya; Maeda, Maki; Matsunaga, Yui; Tsukamoto, Satoshi; Kawano, Natsuko; Miyado, Kenji; Shitara, Hiroshi; Yokota, Sadaki; Nomura, Masatoshi; Mihara, Katsuyoshi; Mizushima, Noboru; Ishihara, Naotada

    2014-10-20

    Mitochondria are dynamic organelles that change their morphology by active fusion and fission in response to cellular signaling and differentiation. The in vivo role of mitochondrial fission in mammals has been examined by using tissue-specific knockout (KO) mice of the mitochondria fission-regulating GTPase Drp1, as well as analyzing a human patient harboring a point mutation in Drp1, showing that Drp1 is essential for embryonic and neonatal development and neuronal function. During oocyte maturation and aging, structures of various membrane organelles including mitochondria and the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) are changed dynamically, and their organelle aggregation is related to germ cell formation and epigenetic regulation. However, the underlying molecular mechanisms of organelle dynamics during the development and aging of oocytes have not been well understood. Here, we analyzed oocyte-specific mitochondrial fission factor Drp1-deficient mice and found that mitochondrial fission is essential for follicular maturation and ovulation in an age-dependent manner. Mitochondria were highly aggregated with other organelles, such as the ER and secretory vesicles, in KO oocyte, which resulted in impaired Ca(2+) signaling, intercellular communication via secretion, and meiotic resumption. We further found that oocytes from aged mice displayed reduced Drp1-dependent mitochondrial fission and defective organelle morphogenesis, similar to Drp1 KO oocytes. On the basis of these findings, it appears that mitochondrial fission maintains the competency of oocytes via multiorganelle rearrangement.

  7. Counting molecules in single organelles with superresolution microscopy allows tracking of the endosome maturation trajectory.

    PubMed

    Puchner, Elias M; Walter, Jessica M; Kasper, Robert; Huang, Bo; Lim, Wendell A

    2013-10-01

    Cells tightly regulate trafficking of intracellular organelles, but a deeper understanding of this process is technically limited by our inability to track the molecular composition of individual organelles below the diffraction limit in size. Here we develop a technique for intracellularly calibrated superresolution microscopy that can measure the size of individual organelles as well as accurately count absolute numbers of molecules, by correcting for undercounting owing to immature fluorescent proteins and overcounting owing to fluorophore blinking. Using this technique, we characterized the size of individual vesicles in the yeast endocytic pathway and the number of accessible phosphatidylinositol 3-phosphate binding sites they contain. This analysis reveals a characteristic vesicle maturation trajectory of composition and size with both stochastic and regulated components. The trajectory displays some cell-to-cell variability, with smaller variation between organelles within the same cell. This approach also reveals mechanistic information on the order of events in this trajectory: Colocalization analysis with known markers of different vesicle maturation stages shows that phosphatidylinositol 3-phosphate production precedes fusion into larger endosomes. This single-organelle analysis can potentially be applied to a range of small organelles to shed light on their precise composition/structure relationships, the dynamics of their regulation, and the noise in these processes.

  8. Granulation in amine-storage organelles of mouse megakaryocytes: X-ray microprobe analysis and radioautography.

    PubMed

    Daimon, T; Kawai, K; Uchida, K

    1995-02-01

    The mechanisms and the processes of the storage of bivalent cations, ATP and 5-hydroxytryptamine (5HT) in the precursors of the amine-storage organelles of megakaryocytes were studied at the electron microscopic level. Although the precursors of the amine-storage organelles in the megakaryocytes fixed with glutaraldehyde and osmium tetroxide were empty, the electron opaque granules were observed in these organelles of the freeze-substituted megakaryocytes cut onto ethylene glycol. X-ray microprobe analysis demonstrated that they contained P, Mg and Ca. Quantitative differences in bivalent cations in the granules were not observed between megakaryocytes and blood platelets. Electron opaque uranaffin-reaction products were observed in the precursors of the amine-storage organelles of the megakaryocytes after treatment with the uranaffin reaction for ATP. However, few chromaffin positive granules were observed in the precursors of the amine-storage organelles after the chromaffin reaction for monoamines. Radioautographic analysis demonstrated that blood platelets avidly took up 3H-5HT but megakaryocytes were not able to accumulate 3H-5HT in vivo. These results indicate that megakaryocytes do not yet acquire the well developed uptake system of 5HT in vivo, while they readily accumulate cations and ATP in the precursors of the amine-storage organelles.

  9. Guinea Pig Horizontal Cells Express GABA, the GABA-Synthesizing Enzyme GAD65, and the GABA Vesicular Transporter

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Chenying; Hirano, Arlene A.; Stella, Salvatore L.; Bitzer, Michaela; Brecha, Nicholas C.

    2013-01-01

    γ-Aminobutyric acid (GABA) is likely expressed in horizontal cells of all species, although conflicting physiological findings have led to considerable controversy regarding its role as a transmitter in the outer retina. This study has evaluated key components of the GABA system in the outer retina of guinea pig, an emerging retinal model system. The presence of GABA, its rate-limiting synthetic enzyme glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD65 and GAD67 isoforms), the plasma membrane GABA transporters (GAT-1 and GAT-3), and the vesicular GABA transporter (VGAT) was evaluated by using immunohistochemistry with well-characterized antibodies. The presence of GAD65 mRNA was also evaluated by using laser capture microdissection and reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction. Specific GABA, GAD65, and VGAT immunostaining was localized to horizontal cell bodies, as well as to their processes and tips in the outer plexiform layer. Furthermore, immunostaining of retinal whole mounts and acutely dissociated retinas showed GAD65 and VGAT immunoreactivity in both A-type and B-type horizontal cells. However, these cells did not contain GAD67, GAT-1, or GAT-3 immunoreactivity. GAD65 mRNA was detected in horizontal cells, and sequencing of the amplified GAD65 fragment showed approximately 85% identity with other mammalian GAD65 mRNAs. These studies demonstrate the presence of GABA, GAD65, and VGAT in horizontal cells of the guinea pig retina, and support the idea that GABA is synthesized from GAD65, taken up into synaptic vesicles by VGAT, and likely released by a vesicular mechanism from horizontal cells. PMID:20235161

  10. Nanomanipulation-Coupled Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption/ Ionization-Direct Organelle Mass Spectrometry: A Technique for the Detailed Analysis of Single Organelles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phelps, Mandy S.; Sturtevant, Drew; Chapman, Kent D.; Verbeck, Guido F.

    2016-02-01

    We describe a novel technique combining precise organelle microextraction with deposition and matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) for a rapid, minimally invasive mass spectrometry (MS) analysis of single organelles from living cells. A dual-positioner nanomanipulator workstation was utilized for both extraction of organelle content and precise co-deposition of analyte and matrix solution for MALDI-direct organelle mass spectrometry (DOMS) analysis. Here, the triacylglycerol (TAG) profiles of single lipid droplets from 3T3-L1 adipocytes were acquired and results validated with nanoelectrospray ionization (NSI) MS. The results demonstrate the utility of the MALDI-DOMS technique as it enabled longer mass analysis time, higher ionization efficiency, MS imaging of the co-deposited spot, and subsequent MS/MS capabilities of localized lipid content in comparison to NSI-DOMS. This method provides selective organellar resolution, which complements current biochemical analyses and prompts for subsequent subcellular studies to be performed where limited samples and analyte volume are of concern.

  11. Nanomanipulation-Coupled Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption/ Ionization-Direct Organelle Mass Spectrometry: A Technique for the Detailed Analysis of Single Organelles.

    PubMed

    Phelps, Mandy S; Sturtevant, Drew; Chapman, Kent D; Verbeck, Guido F

    2016-02-01

    We describe a novel technique combining precise organelle microextraction with deposition and matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) for a rapid, minimally invasive mass spectrometry (MS) analysis of single organelles from living cells. A dual-positioner nanomanipulator workstation was utilized for both extraction of organelle content and precise co-deposition of analyte and matrix solution for MALDI-direct organelle mass spectrometry (DOMS) analysis. Here, the triacylglycerol (TAG) profiles of single lipid droplets from 3T3-L1 adipocytes were acquired and results validated with nanoelectrospray ionization (NSI) MS. The results demonstrate the utility of the MALDI-DOMS technique as it enabled longer mass analysis time, higher ionization efficiency, MS imaging of the co-deposited spot, and subsequent MS/MS capabilities of localized lipid content in comparison to NSI-DOMS. This method provides selective organellar resolution, which complements current biochemical analyses and prompts for subsequent subcellular studies to be performed where limited samples and analyte volume are of concern. Graphical Abstract ᅟ.

  12. Target Biological Structures: The Cell, Organelles, DNA and RNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Holst, Marcelis; Grant, Maxine P.; Aldrich-Wright, Janice

    Living organisms are self replicating molecular factories of staggering complexity [1]. As a result, we are often overwhelmed when trying to identify potential targets for therapeutics. Water, inorganic ions and a large array of relatively small organic molecules (e.g., sugars, vitamins and fatty acids) account for approximately 80% of living matter, with water being the most abundant. Macromolecules such as proteins, polysaccharides, ribonucleic acid (RNA) and deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) constitute the rest. The majority of potential therapeutic targets are found within the cell. Small molecules which are vital for cellular function are imported into the cell by a variety of mechanisms but unlike smaller molecules, macromolecules are assembled within the cell itself. Drugs are usually designed to target cellular macromolecules, as they perform very specific roles in the metabolic processes.

  13. [The subcellular organelles of peroxisome, realization of biologic functions of trophology, homeostasis, endoecology and functional bond with mitochondrion: the lecture].

    PubMed

    Titov, V N; Shiriaeva, Iu K; Kaba, S I

    2012-06-01

    The biologic role of peroxisomes in cells is that the organelles in respect to fatty acids, lipids and substrates synthesized from acetate implement the same fimnctions as the lysosomes exercise to proteins and polypeptides. The biologic role of peroxisomes is to optimize in vivo the exogenous fatty acids in hepatocytes under the realization of biologic functions of trophology, homeostasis, endoecology. About 800 individual fatty acids can penetrate into organism with food. At that, no more than thirty of them undergo the metabolic transformation in vivo. The rest hundreds of fatty acids are aphysiologic and have to be oxidized into peroxisomes under isochronic activation of alpha-, beta- and omega-oxydases without ATP formation. If in peroxisomes are formed fatty acids that can oxidize mitochondrions by beta-oxidation then the proteins of cytosol transfer fatty acids from peroxisomes to mitochondrions. The mitochondrions oxidize fatty acids in the Krebs cycle to form ATP. The oxidation in peroxisomes concerns the fatty acids with odd numbers of carbon atoms, the transforms of unsaturated fatty acids, the very long chain fatty acids, the fatty acids with carbon atoms side-chains, the dicarboxylic fatty acids, the fatty acids with benzene or indole rings in carbon atoms chains. The peroxisomes oxidize the surplus amount of exogenous palmitic saturated fatty acid too. The peroxisomes implement the biologic.function of endoecology on autocrine level supporting the "purity" of cells cytosol and interact functionally with mitochondrions. In the intercellular medium of paracrine cells coens the fimctions of endoecology are realized by the Toll-similar receptors by the "our-not our" principle concerning phospholipids, positional aphysiologic triglycerides and proteolipids. In the peroxisomes, under the simultaneous oxidation of very long chain fatty acids, the synthesis by primate cells is possible of some amount of essential unsaturated and polyene fatty acids. The

  14. Foot & Mouth Disease & Ulcerative/Vesicular Rule-outs: Challenges Encountered in Recent Outbreaks

    SciTech Connect

    Hullinger, P

    2008-01-28

    . It has been shown that the African Cape buffalo are the major maintenance host of SAT serotypes. FMDV transmission can occur by either direct or indirect contact. Indirect transmission can occur via contaminated animate vectors (humans, etc.), inanimate vectors (vehicles, implements) or airborne transmission. Indirect disease transmission via animate or inanimate vectors can play a major role in disease transmission. Good biosecurity can significantly reduce this type of transmission. Airborne transmission is often debated and is known to be serotype and species specific as well as require specific environmental conditions to occur. Airborne transmission is favored in temperate zones and has been postulated to occur over distances of up to 60 km overland and 300 km by sea. Foot and mouth disease virus is an unenveloped virus which is preserved by refrigeration and freezing and progressively inactivated by temperatures above 50 C. FMDV is highly sensitive to pH change and is inactivated by pH < 6.0 or > 9.0. There are many disinfectants which are effective against FMDV including sodium hydroxide (2%), sodium carbonate (4%), and citric acid (0.2%). FMDV is resistant to iodophores, quaternary ammonium compounds, hypochlorite and phenol, especially in the presence of organic matter. The virus can survive in lymph nodes and bone marrow at neutral pH, but is destroyed in muscle when is pH < 6.0 i.e. after rigor mortis. FMDV can persist in contaminated feed/commodities and the environment for over to 1 month, depending on the temperature and pH conditions. The incubation period for FMD is 2-14 days. Animals transition through latent (infected but not infectious), subclinically infected (infectious but lacking clinical signs) clinically infected and recovered disease states. In cattle clinical signs include pyrexia, reluctance to eat, bruxism, drooling, lameness, treading or stamping of the feet and decreased milk production. Most clinical signs are related to the

  15. Ursodeoxycholic and deoxycholic acids: Differential effects on intestinal Ca(2+) uptake, apoptosis and autophagy of rat intestine.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez, Valeria A; Rivoira, María A; Pérez, Adriana del V; Marchionatti, Ana M; Tolosa de Talamoni, Nori G

    2016-02-01

    The aim of this work was to study the effect of sodium deoxycholate (NaDOC) and ursodeoxycholic acid (UDCA) on Ca(2+) uptake by enterocytes and the underlying mechanisms. Rats were divided into four groups: a) controls, b) treated with NaDOC, c) treated with UDCA d) treated with NaDOC and UDCA. Ca(2+) uptake was studied in enterocytes with different degrees of maturation. Apoptosis, autophagy and NO content and iNOS protein expression were evaluated. NaDOC decreased and UDCA increased Ca(2+) uptake only in mature enterocytes. The enhancement of protein expression of Fas, FasL, caspase-8 and caspase-3 activity by NaDOC indicates triggering of the apoptotic extrinsic pathway, which was blocked by UDCA. NO content and iNOS protein expression were enhanced by NaDOC, and avoided by UDCA. The increment of acidic vesicular organelles and LC3 II produced by NaDOC was also prevented by UDCA. In conclusion, the inhibitory effects of NaDOC on intestinal Ca(2+) absorption occur by decreasing the Ca(2+) uptake by mature enterocytes. NaDOC triggers apoptosis and autophagy, in part as a result of nitrosative stress. In contrast, UDCA increases the Ca(2+) uptake by mature enterocytes, and in combination with NaDOC acts as an antiapoptotic and antiautophagic agent normalizing the transcellular Ca(2+) pathway.

  16. Identification and quantification of host proteins in the vesicular fluid of porcine Taenia solium cysticerci.

    PubMed

    Navarrete-Perea, José; Moguel, Bárbara; Mendoza-Hernández, Guillermo; Fragoso, Gladis; Sciutto, Edda; Bobes, Raúl J; Laclette, Juan P

    2014-08-01

    The host-parasite relationship in cestode infections is complex. One feature of this bidirectional molecular communication is the uptake of host proteins by the parasite. Here we describe the presence of several host proteins in the vesicular fluid of Taenia solium cysticerci dissected from the central nervous system and the skeletal muscle of naturally infected pigs. Using two-dimensional electrophoresis we compared the protein patterns of vesicular fluids of cysticerci vs. the sera of cysticercotic pigs. We found that the vesicular fluids of both groups of cysts showed 17 protein spots matching with the pig's sera spots. After mass spectrometry sequencing of these spots, five host proteins were identified: hemoglobin, albumin, serpin A3-8, haptoglobin, rho GTPase-activating protein 36-like. Three of the 17 spots corresponded to host protein fragments: hemoglobin, albumin and serpin A3-8. IgG heavy and light chains were also identified by Western blot using a specific antibody. Quantitative estimations indicated that the host proteins represented 11-13% of the protein content in the vesicular fluids. We also calculated the relative abundance of these host proteins in the vesicular fluids; all were represented in similar relative abundances as in host sera. This suggests that uptake of host proteins by cysticerci proceeds through an unspecific mechanism such as non-specific fluid pinocytosis.

  17. Mapping the distribution of vesicular textures on silicic lavas using the Thermal Infrared Multispectral Scanner

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ondrusek, Jaime; Christensen, Philip R.; Fink, Jonathan H.

    1993-01-01

    To investigate the effect of vesicularity on TIMS (Thermal Infrared Multispectral Scanner) imagery independent of chemical variations, we studied a large rhyolitic flow of uniform composition but textural heterogeneity. The imagery was recalibrated so that the digital number values for a lake in the scene matched a calculated ideal spectrum for water. TIMS spectra for the lava show useful differences in coarsely and finely vesicular pumice data, particularly in TIMS bands 3 and 4. Images generated by ratioing these bands accurately map out those areas known from field studies to be coarsely vesicular pumice. These texture-related emissivity variations are probably due to the larger vesicles being relatively deeper and separated by smaller septa leaving less smooth glass available to give the characteristic emission of the lava. In studies of inaccessible lava flows (as on Mars) areas of coarsely vesicular pumice must be identified and avoided before chemical variations can be interpreted. Remotely determined distributions of vesicular and glassy textures can also be related to the volatile contents and potential hazards associated with the emplacement of silicic lava flows on Earth.

  18. Intracellular organelles mediate cytoplasmic pulling force for centrosome centration in the Caenorhabditis elegans early embryo

    PubMed Central

    Kimura, Akatsuki

    2010-01-01

    The centrosome is generally maintained at the center of the cell. In animal cells, centrosome centration is powered by the pulling force of microtubules, which is dependent on cytoplasmic dynein. However, it is unclear how dynein brings the centrosome to the cell center, i.e., which structure inside the cell functions as a substrate to anchor dynein. Here, we provide evidence that a population of dynein, which is located on intracellular organelles and is responsible for organelle transport toward the centrosome, generates the force required for centrosome centration in Caenorhabditis elegans embryos. By using the database of full-genome RNAi in C. elegans, we identified dyrb-1, a dynein light chain subunit, as a potential subunit involved in dynein anchoring for centrosome centration. DYRB-1 is required for organelle movement toward the minus end of the microtubules. The temporal correlation between centrosome centration and the net movement of organelle transport was found to be significant. Centrosome centration was impaired when Rab7 and RILP, which mediate the association between organelles and dynein in mammalian cells, were knocked down. These results indicate that minus end-directed transport of intracellular organelles along the microtubules is required for centrosome centration in C. elegans embryos. On the basis of this finding, we propose a model in which the reaction forces of organelle transport generated along microtubules act as a driving force that pulls the centrosomes toward the cell center. This is the first model, to our knowledge, providing a mechanical basis for cytoplasmic pulling force for centrosome centration. PMID:21173218

  19. Sensitive imaging of organelles in label-free cells by surface plasmon resonance in deep-ultraviolet region (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawata, Yoshimasa; Kikawada, Masakazu; Ono, Atsushi; Inami, Wataru

    2016-09-01

    In this research, we demonstrate the enhanced autofluorescence and high-sensitivity bioimaging of intracellular organelles using DUV-SPR. The Kretschmann configuration is used for excitation of DUV-SPR. We used an aluminum thickness of 24 nm. The alumina surface was estimated to be 6 nm by comparison between the experimental and calculated results. Reflectance after culturing of cells was measured. DUV-SPR is excited at an incident angle of 52° after the biological samples are cultured. MC3T3-E1 cells as Label-free cells are directly cultured on an aluminum and glass surfaces, and they were cultured on the both substrates in an incubator. Autofluorescence spectra excited of the label-free MC3T3-E1 cells was measured by 266-nm exictation. The autofluorescence intensity for the aluminum is higher than that for the glass. In the autofluorescence spectra, MC3T3-E1 cells exhibited two fluorescence peaks, which were located around 330 and 500 nm. These 330 and 500 nm emissions indicate aromatic amino acid and mitochondria, respectively. Both of the ehnahcement factors were 8 times. We also observed autofluorescence of aromatic amino acid and mitochondrial NADH in the label-free MC3T3-E1 cells cultured on the aluminum and glass surfaces. In the autofluorescence image with DUV-SPR, organelles can be clearly observed in the MC3T3-E1 cells. On the other hand, the autofluorescence intensity is very weak in the image without DUV-SPR. Accordingly, DUV-SPR can facilitate the observation of proteins, DNA in nucleus, and other structures that cannot be excited by visible light. DUV-SPR is shown to be a powerful technique for acquiring high-sensitivity label-free observation of biological samples.

  20. Vesicular Trafficking Systems Impact TORC1-Controlled Transcriptional Programs in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Kingsbury, Joanne M; Cardenas, Maria E

    2016-01-06

    The Target of Rapamycin Complex I (TORC1) orchestrates global reprogramming of transcriptional programs in response to myriad environmental conditions, yet, despite the commonality of the TORC1 complex components, different TORC1-inhibitory conditions do not elicit a uniform transcriptional response. In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, TORC1 regulates the expression of nitrogen catabolite repressed (NCR) genes by controlling the nuclear translocation of the NCR transactivator Gln3. Moreover, Golgi-to-endosome trafficking was shown to be required for nuclear translocation of Gln3 upon a shift from rich medium to the poor nitrogen source proline, but not upon rapamycin treatment. Here, we employed microarray profiling to survey the full impact of the vesicular trafficking system on yeast TORC1-orchestrated transcriptional programs. In addition to the NCR genes, we found that ribosomal protein, ribosome biogenesis, phosphate-responsive, and sulfur-containing amino acid metabolism genes are perturbed by disruption of Golgi-to-endosome trafficking following a nutritional shift from rich to poor nitrogen source medium, but not upon rapamycin treatment. Similar to Gln3, defects in Golgi-to-endosome trafficking significantly delayed cytoplasmic-nuclear translocation of Sfp1, but did not detectably affect the cytoplasmic-nuclear or nuclear-cytoplasmic translocation of Met4, which are the transactivators of these genes. Thus, Golgi-to-endosome trafficking defects perturb TORC1 transcriptional programs via multiple mechanisms. Our findings further delineate the downstream transcriptional responses of TORC1 inhibition by rapamycin compared with a nitrogen quality downshift. Given the conservation of both TORC1 and endomembrane networks throughout eukaryotes, our findings may also have implications for TORC1-mediated responses to nutritional cues in mammals and other eukaryotes.

  1. Stimulation of Vesicular Stomatitis Virus in vitro RNA Synthesis by Microtubule-Associated Proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hill, Virginia M.; Harmon, Shirley A.; Summers, Donald F.

    1986-08-01

    Microtubule-associated proteins purified from bovine brains stimulated the in vitro transcription and replication reactions of vesicular stomatitis virus. The products of these reactions were intact messenger or genome-sized RNA species. A preparation from HeLa cells containing tubulin and microtubule-associated proteins also stimulated vesicular stomatitis virus transcription in vitro. This observation is in accord with previous studies, which suggested that a host cell factor was involved with the function of the vesicular stomatitis virus RNA polymerase, and others that indicated that several animal viruses displayed an association with host cell cytoskeletal elements during their replication cycles. We show evidence in this report of a host cell protein that seems to have a functional role in interacting with the virion polymerase.

  2. Evidence that release of adenosine triphosphate from endothelial cells during increased shear stress is vesicular.

    PubMed

    Bodin, P; Burnstock, G

    2001-12-01

    In response to increased shear stress, vascular endothelial cells release adenosine triphosphate (ATP) by an unknown mechanism. We have investigated this mechanism using different approaches. First, we discovered that quinacrine, used to locate intracellular stores of ATP bound to peptides, displayed a granular fluorescence, typical of vesicular storage. Second, we found that two inhibitors of vesicular transport (monensin and N-ethylmaleimide) produced a highly significant reduction in the release of ATP from vascular endothelial cells in response to increased shear stress. Preliminary experiments using inhibitors of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane regulator, the sulfonylurea receptor, and the multidrug resistance protein showed no involvement of these ATP-binding cassette transporter proteins (previously characterized in endothelial cells) in the mechanism of release of ATP. We suggest, therefore, that the release of ATP from vascular endothelial cells, like that of nerve cells, is probably by vesicular exocytosis.

  3. Cryogenic transmission electron microscopy study: preparation of vesicular dispersions by quenching microemulsions.

    PubMed

    Lee, H S; Morrison, E D; Zhang, Q; McCormick, A V

    2016-09-01

    We previously showed that long-lived nanoemulsions, seeming initially vesicular, might be prepared simply by diluting and cooling (quenching) warm microemulsions with n-hexadecane with precooled water. In this paper, we confirm that these systems are vesicular dispersions when fresh, and they can be made with similar structures and compositional dependence using alkanes with chain lengths ranging from octane to hexadecane. The nanostructures of fresh nanoemulsions are imaged with cryogenic transmission electron microscopy (cryo-TEM). We confirm that water-continuous microemulsions give simple dispersions of vesicles (sometimes unilamellar), typically less than 100 nm in diameter; these systems can avoid separation for over 2 months. Selected samples were also prepared using halogenated alkanes to create additional contrast in the cryo-TEM, allowing us to confirm that the oil is located in the observed vesicular structures.

  4. Functional diversity of Arabidopsis organelle-localized RNA-recognition motif-containing proteins.

    PubMed

    Shi, Xiaowen; Hanson, Maureen R; Bentolila, Stephane

    2017-03-29

    RNA-Binding Proteins (RBPs) play key roles in plant gene expression and regulation. RBPs contain a variety of RNA-binding motifs, the most abundant and most widespread one in eukaryotes is the RNA recognition motif (RRM). Many nucleus-encoded RRM-containing proteins are transported into chloroplasts and/or mitochondria, and participate in various RNA-related processes in plant organelles. Loss of these proteins can have a detrimental effect on some critical processes such as photosynthesis and respiration, sometimes leading to lethality. Progress has been made in the last few years in understanding the function of particular organelle-localized RRM-containing proteins. Members of the Organelle RRM protein (ORRM, some also characterized as Glycine-Rich RNA-Binding Proteins) family and the Chloroplast RiboNucleoProtein (cpRNP) family, are involved in various types of RNA metabolism, including RNA editing, RNA stability and RNA processing. Organelle-localized RRM proteins also function in plant development and stress responses, in some conditions acting as protein or RNA chaperones. There has been recent progress in characterizing the function of organelle-localized RRM proteins in RNA-related processes and how RRM proteins contribute to the normal growth and development of plants. For further resources related to this article, please visit the WIREs website.

  5. Nucleotide specificity for the bidirectional transport of membrane-bounded organelles in isolated axoplasm.

    PubMed

    Leopold, P L; Snyder, R; Bloom, G S; Brady, S T

    1990-01-01

    Video microscopy of isolated axoplasm from the squid giant axon permits correlated quantitative analyses of membrane-bounded organelle transport both in the intact axoplasm and along individual microtubules. As a result, the effects of experimental manipulations on both anterograde and retrograde movements of membrane-bounded organelles can be evaluated under nearly physiological conditions. Since anterograde and retrograde fast axonal transport are similar but distinct cellular processes, a systematic biochemical analysis is important for a further understanding of the molecular mechanisms for each. In this series of experiments, we employed isolated axoplasm of the squid to define the nucleoside triphosphate specificity for bidirectional organelle motility in the axon. Perfusion of axoplasm with 2-20 mM ATP preserved optimal vesicle velocities in both the anterograde and retrograde directions. Organelle velocities decreased to less than 50% of optimal values when the axoplasm was perfused with 10-20 mM UTP, GTP, ITP, or CTP with simultaneous depletion of endogenous ATP with hexokinase. Under the same conditions, TTP and ATP-gamma-S were unable to support significant levels of transport. None of the NTPs tested had a differential effect on anterograde vs. retrograde movement of vesicles. Surprisingly, several inconsistencies were revealed when a comparison was made between these results and nucleoside triphosphate specificities that have been reported for putative organelle motors by using in vitro assays. These data may be used in conjunction with data from well-defined in vitro assays to develop models for the molecular mechanisms of axonal transport.

  6. Mitochondria and hydrogenosomes are two forms of the same fundamental organelle.

    PubMed Central

    Embley, T Martin; van der Giezen, Mark; Horner, David S; Dyal, Patricia L; Foster, Peter

    2003-01-01

    Published data suggest that hydrogenosomes, organelles found in diverse anaerobic eukaryotes that make energy and hydrogen, were once mitochondria. As hydrogenosomes generally lack a genome, the conversion is probably one way. The sources of the key hydrogenosomal enzymes, pyruvate : ferredoxin oxidoreductase (PFO) and hydrogenase, are not resolved by current phylogenetic analyses, but it is likely that both were present at an early stage of eukaryotic evolution. Once thought to be restricted to a few unusual anaerobic eukaryotes, the proteins are intimately integrated into the fabric of diverse eukaryotic cells, where they are targeted to different cell compartments, and not just hydrogenosomes. There is no evidence supporting the view that PFO and hydrogenase originated from the mitochondrial endosymbiont, as posited by the hydrogen hypothesis for eukaryogenesis. Other organelles derived from mitochondria have now been described in anaerobic and parasitic microbial eukaryotes, including species that were once thought to have diverged before the mitochondrial symbiosis. It thus seems possible that all eukaryotes may eventually be shown to contain an organelle of mitochondrial ancestry, to which different types of biochemistry can be targeted. It remains to be seen if, despite their obvious differences, this family of organelles shares a common function of importance for the eukaryotic cell, other than energy production, that might provide the underlying selection pressure for organelle retention. PMID:12594927

  7. Regulation of Mouse Oocyte Microtubule and Organelle Dynamics by PADI6 and the Cytoplasmic Lattices

    PubMed Central

    Kan, Rui; Yurttas, Piraye; Kim, Boram; Jin, Mei; Wo, Luccie; Lee, Bora; Gosden, Roger; Coonrod, Scott A.

    2010-01-01

    Organelle positioning and movement in oocytes is largely mediated by microtubules (MTs) and their associated motor proteins. While yet to be studied in germ cells, cargo trafficking in somatic cells is also facilitated by specific recognition of acetylated MTs by motor proteins. We have previously shown that oocyte-restricted PADI6 is essential for formation of a novel oocyte-restricted fibrous structure, the cytoplasmic lattices (CPLs). Here, we show that α-tubulin appears to be associated with the PADI6/CPL complex. Next, we demonstrate that organelle positioning and redistribution is defective in PADI6-null oocytes and that alteration of MT polymerization or MT motor activity does not induce organelle redistribution in these oocytes. Finally, we report that levels of acetylated microtubules are dramatically suppressed in the cytoplasm of PADI6-null oocytes, suggesting that the observed organelle redistribution failure is due to defects in stable cytoplasmic MTs. These results demonstrate that the PADI6/CPL superstructure plays a key role in regulating MT-mediated organelle positioning and movement. PMID:21147087

  8. The exception proves the rule? Dual targeting of nuclear-encoded proteins into endosymbiotic organelles.

    PubMed

    Baudisch, Bianca; Langner, Uwe; Garz, Ingo; Klösgen, Ralf Bernd

    2014-01-01

    Plant cells harbor two types of endosymbiotic organelle: mitochondria and chloroplasts. As a consequence of endosymbiotic gene transfer, the majority of their proteins are encoded in the nucleus and post-translationally 're'-imported into the respective target organelle. The corresponding transport signals are usually selective for a single organelle, but several proteins are transported into both the mitochondria and chloroplasts. To estimate the number of proteins with such dual targeting properties in Arabidopsis, we classified the proteins encoded by nuclear genes of endosymbiotic origin according to the respective targeting specificity of their N-terminal transport signals as predicted by the TargetP software package. Selected examples of the resulting protein classes were subsequently analyzed by transient transformation assays as well as by in organello protein transport experiments. It was found that most proteins with high prediction values for both organelles show dual targeting with both experimental approaches. Unexpectedly, however, dual targeting was even found among those proteins that are predicted to be localized solely in one of the two endosymbiotic organelles. In total, among the 16 candidate proteins analyzed, we identified 10 proteins with dual targeting properties. This unexpectedly high proportion suggests that such transport properties are much more abundant than anticipated.

  9. New organelles by gene duplication in a biophysical model of eukaryote endomembrane evolution.

    PubMed

    Ramadas, Rohini; Thattai, Mukund

    2013-06-04

    Extant eukaryotic cells have a dynamic traffic network that consists of diverse membrane-bound organelles exchanging matter via vesicles. This endomembrane system arose and diversified during a period characterized by massive expansions of gene families involved in trafficking after the acquisition of a mitochondrial endosymbiont by a prokaryotic host cell >1.8 billion years ago. Here we investigate the mechanistic link between gene duplication and the emergence of new nonendosymbiotic organelles, using a minimal biophysical model of traffic. Our model incorporates membrane-bound compartments, coat proteins and adaptors that drive vesicles to bud and segregate cargo from source compartments, and SNARE proteins and associated factors that cause vesicles to fuse into specific destination compartments. In simulations, arbitrary numbers of compartments with heterogeneous initial compositions segregate into a few compositionally distinct subsets that we term organelles. The global structure of the traffic system (i.e., the number, composition, and connectivity of organelles) is determined completely by local molecular interactions. On evolutionary timescales, duplication of the budding and fusion machinery followed by loss of cross-interactions leads to the emergence of new organelles, with increased molecular specificity being necessary to maintain larger organellar repertoires. These results clarify potential modes of early eukaryotic evolution as well as more recent eukaryotic diversification.

  10. Organelle Transport in Cultured Drosophila Cells: S2 Cell Line and Primary Neurons.

    PubMed Central

    Gelfand, Vladimir I.

    2013-01-01

    Drosophila S2 cells plated on a coverslip in the presence of any actin-depolymerizing drug form long unbranched processes filled with uniformly polarized microtubules. Organelles move along these processes by microtubule motors. Easy maintenance, high sensitivity to RNAi-mediated protein knock-down and efficient procedure for creating stable cell lines make Drosophila S2 cells an ideal model system to study cargo transport by live imaging. The results obtained with S2 cells can be further applied to a more physiologically relevant system: axonal transport in primary neurons cultured from dissociated Drosophila embryos. Cultured neurons grow long neurites filled with bundled microtubules, very similar to S2 processes. Like in S2 cells, organelles in cultured neurons can be visualized by either organelle-specific fluorescent dyes or by using fluorescent organelle markers encoded by DNA injected into early embryos or expressed in transgenic flies. Therefore, organelle transport can be easily recorded in neurons cultured on glass coverslips using living imaging. Here we describe procedures for culturing and visualizing cargo transport in Drosophila S2 cells and primary neurons. We believe that these protocols make both systems accessible for labs studying cargo transport. PMID:24300413

  11. Systematic study of subcellular localization of Arabidopsis PPR proteins confirms a massive targeting to organelles

    PubMed Central

    Colcombet, Jean; Lopez-Obando, Mauricio; Heurtevin, Laure; Bernard, Clément; Martin, Karine; Berthomé, Richard; Lurin, Claire

    2013-01-01

    Four hundred and fifty-eight genes coding for PentatricoPeptide Repeat (PPR) proteins are annotated in the Arabidopsis thaliana genome. Over the past 10 years, numerous reports have shown that many of these proteins function in organelles to target specific transcripts and are involved in post-transcriptional regulation. Therefore, they are thought to be important players in the coordination between nuclear and organelle genome expression. Only four of these proteins have been described to be addressed outside organelles, indicating that some PPRs could function in post-transcriptional regulations of nuclear genes. In this work, we updated and improved our current knowledge on the localization of PPR proteins of Arabidopsis within the plant cell. We particularly investigated the subcellular localization of 166 PPR proteins whose targeting predictions were ambiguous, using a combination of high-throughput cloning and microscopy. Through systematic localization experiments and data integration, we confirmed that PPR proteins are largely targeted to organelles and showed that dual targeting to both the mitochondria and plastid occurs more frequently than expected. These results allow us to speculate that dual-targeted PPR proteins could be important for the fine coordination of gene expressions in both organelles. PMID:24037373

  12. The cytoskeleton maintains organelle partitioning required for single-cell C4 photosynthesis in Chenopodiaceae species.

    PubMed

    Chuong, Simon D X; Franceschi, Vincent R; Edwards, Gerald E

    2006-09-01

    Recently, three Chenopodiaceae species, Bienertia cycloptera, Bienertia sinuspersici, and Suaeda aralocaspica, were shown to possess novel C(4) photosynthesis mechanisms through the compartmentalization of organelles and photosynthetic enzymes into two distinct regions within a single chlorenchyma cell. Bienertia has peripheral and central compartments, whereas S. aralocaspica has distal and proximal compartments. This compartmentalization achieves the equivalent of spatial separation of Kranz anatomy, including dimorphic chloroplasts, but within a single cell. To characterize the mechanisms of organelle compartmentalization, the distribution of the major organelles relative to the cytoskeleton was examined. Examination of the distribution of the cytoskeleton using immunofluorescence studies and transient expression of green fluorescent protein-tagged cytoskeleton markers revealed a highly organized network of actin filaments and microtubules associating with the chloroplasts and showed that the two compartments in each cell had different cytoskeletal arrangements. Experiments using cytoskeleton-disrupting drugs showed in Bienertia and S. aralocaspica that microtubules are critical for the polarized positioning of chloroplasts and other organelles. Compartmentalization of the organelles in these species represents a unique system in higher plants and illustrates the degree of control the plant cell has over the organization and integration of multiorganellar processes within its cytoplasm.

  13. Widespread occurrence of organelle genome-encoded 5S rRNAs including permuted molecules

    PubMed Central

    Valach, Matus; Burger, Gertraud; Gray, Michael W.; Lang, B. Franz

    2014-01-01

    5S Ribosomal RNA (5S rRNA) is a universal component of ribosomes, and the corresponding gene is easily identified in archaeal, bacterial and nuclear genome sequences. However, organelle gene homologs (rrn5) appear to be absent from most mitochondrial and several chloroplast genomes. Here, we re-examine the distribution of organelle rrn5 by building mitochondrion- and plastid-specific covariance models (CMs) with which we screened organelle genome sequences. We not only recover all organelle rrn5 genes annotated in GenBank records, but also identify more than 50 previously unrecognized homologs in mitochondrial genomes of various stramenopiles, red algae, cryptomonads, malawimonads and apusozoans, and surprisingly, in the apicoplast (highly derived plastid) genomes of the coccidian pathogens Toxoplasma gondii and Eimeria tenella. Comparative modeling of RNA secondary structure reveals that mitochondrial 5S rRNAs from brown algae adopt a permuted triskelion shape that has not been seen elsewhere. Expression of the newly predicted rrn5 genes is confirmed experimentally in 10 instances, based on our own and published RNA-Seq data. This study establishes that particularly mitochondrial 5S rRNA has a much broader taxonomic distribution and a much larger structural variability than previously thought. The newly developed CMs will be made available via the Rfam database and the MFannot organelle genome annotator. PMID:25429974

  14. Intracellular Microreactors as Artificial Organelles to Conduct Multiple Enzymatic Reactions Simultaneously.

    PubMed

    Godoy-Gallardo, María; Labay, Cédric; Jansman, Michelle M T; Ek, Pramod K; Hosta-Rigau, Leticia

    2017-02-01

    The creation of artificial organelles is a new paradigm in medical therapy that aims to substitute for missing cellular function by replenishing a specific cellular task. Artificial organelles tackle the challenge of mimicking metabolism, which is the set of chemical reactions that occur within a cell, mainly catalyzed by enzymes. So far, the few reported carriers able to conduct enzymatic reactions intracellularly are based on single-compartment carriers. However, cell organelles outperform by conducting multiple reactions simultaneously within confined sub-compartments. Here, the field of artificial organelles is advanced by reporting the assembly of a microreactor consisting of polymer capsules entrapping gold nanoclusters (AuNCs) and liposomes as sub-compartments. The fluorescence properties of AuNCs are employed to monitor the microreactors uptake by macrophages. Encapsulation is demonstrated and functionality of microreactors with trypsin (TRP) and horseradish peroxidase (HRP)-loaded liposomes is preserved. Multiple enzymatic reactions taking place simultaneously is demonstrated by exposing macrophages with the internalized microreactors to bis-(benzyloxycarbonyl-Ile-Pro-Arg)-Rho-110 and Amplex Red substrates, which are specific for TRP and HRP, respectively. Conversion of the substrates into the respective fluorescent products is observed. This report on the first microreactor conducting multiple enzymatic reactions simultaneously inside a cell is a considerable step in the field of artificial organelles.

  15. Real-Time Reverse Transcription PCR Assay for Detection of Senecavirus A in Swine Vesicular Diagnostic Specimens

    PubMed Central

    Fabian, Andrew W.; Barrette, Roger W.; Sayed, Abu

    2016-01-01

    Senecavirus A (SV-A), formerly, Seneca Valley virus (SVV), has been detected in swine with vesicular lesions and is thought to be associated with swine idiopathic vesicular disease (SIVD), a vesicular disease syndrome that lacks a defined causative agent. The clinical presentation of SIVD resembles that of other more contagious and economically devastating vesicular diseases, such as foot-and-mouth disease (FMD), swine vesicular disease (SVD), and vesicular stomatitis (VS), that typically require immediate rule out diagnostics to lift restrictions on animal quarantine, movement, and trade. This study presents the development of a sensitive, SYBR Green RT-qPCR assay suitable for detection of SV-A in diagnostic swine specimens. After testing 50 pigs with clinical signs consistent with vesicular disease, 44 (88%) were found to be positive for SV-A by RT-qPCR as compared to none from a negative cohort of 35 animals without vesicular disease, indicating that the assay is able to successfully detect the virus in an endemic population. SV-A RNA was also detectable at a low level in sera from a subset of pigs that presented with (18%) or without (6%) vesicular signs. In 2015, there has been an increase in the occurrence of SV-A in the US, and over 200 specimens submitted to our laboratory for vesicular investigation have tested positive for the virus using this method. SV-A RNA was detectable in all common types of vesicular specimens including swabs and tissue from hoof lesions, oral and snout epithelium, oral swabs, scabs, and internal organ tissues such as liver and lymph node. Genome sequencing analysis from recent virus isolates was performed to confirm target amplicon specificity and was aligned to previous isolates. PMID:26757142

  16. Influence of Vesicular-Arbuscular Mycorrhizal Fungi on the Response of Potato to Phosphorus Deficiency.

    PubMed Central

    McArthur, DAJ.; Knowles, N. R.

    1993-01-01

    Morphological and biochemical interactions between a vesicular-arbuscular mycorrhizal (VAM) fungus (Glomus fasciculatum [Thaxt. sensu Gerdemann] Gerdemann and Trappe) and potato (Solanum tuberosum L.) plants during the development of P deficiency were characterized. Nonmycorrhizal (NM) plants grown for 63 d with low abiotic P supply (0.5 mM) produced 34, 52, and 73% less root, shoot, and tuber dry matter, respectively, than plants grown with high P (2.5 mM). The total leaf area and the leaf area:plant dry weight ratio of low-P plants were substantially lower than those of high-P plants. Moreover, a lower shoot:root dry weight ratio and tuber:plant dry weight ratio in low-P plants than in high-P plants characterized a major effect of P deficiency stress on dry matter partitioning. In addition to a slower rate of growth, low-P plants accumulated nonreducing sugars and nitrate. Furthermore, root respiration and leaf nitrate reductase activity were lower in low-P plants than in high-P plants. Low abiotic P supply also induced physiological changes that contributed to the greater efficiency of P acquisition by low-P plants than by high-P plants. For example, allocation of dry matter and P to root growth was less restricted by P deficiency stress than to shoot and tuber growth. Also, the specific activities of root acid phosphatases and vanadate-sensitive microsomal ATPases were enhanced in P-deficient plants. The establishment of a VAM symbiosis by low-P plants was essential for efficient P acquisition, and a greater root infection level for P-stressed plants indicated increased compatibility to the VAM fungus. By 63 d after planting, low-P VAM plants had recovered 42% more of the available soil P than low-P NM plants. However, the VAM fungus only partially alleviated P deficiency stress and did not completely compensate for inadequate abiotic P supply. Although the specific activities of acid phosphatases and microsomal ATPases were only marginally influenced by VAM

  17. Phosphorylation-mediated RNA/peptide complex coacervation as a model for intracellular liquid organelles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aumiller, William M.; Keating, Christine D.

    2016-02-01

    Biological cells are highly organized, with numerous subcellular compartments. Phosphorylation has been hypothesized as a means to control the assembly/disassembly of liquid-like RNA- and protein-rich intracellular bodies, or liquid organelles, that lack delimiting membranes. Here, we demonstrate that charge-mediated phase separation, or complex coacervation, of RNAs with cationic peptides can generate simple model liquid organelles capable of reversibly compartmentalizing biomolecules. Formation and dissolution of these liquid bodies was controlled by changes in peptide phosphorylation state using a kinase/phosphatase enzyme pair. The droplet-generating phase transition responded to modification of even a single serine residue. Electrostatic interactions between the short cationic peptides and the much longer polyanionic RNAs drove phase separation. Coacervates were also formed on silica beads, a primitive model for localization at specific intracellular sites. This work supports phosphoregulation of complex coacervation as a viable mechanism for dynamic intracellular compartmentalization in membraneless organelles.

  18. Artificially-induced organelles are optimal targets for optical trapping experiments in living cells

    PubMed Central

    López-Quesada, C.; Fontaine, A.-S.; Farré, A.; Joseph, M.; Selva, J.; Egea, G.; Ludevid, M. D.; Martín-Badosa, E.; Montes-Usategui, M.

    2014-01-01

    Optical trapping supplies information on the structural, kinetic or rheological properties of inner constituents of the cell. However, the application of significant forces to intracellular objects is notoriously difficult due to a combination of factors, such as the small difference between the refractive indices of the target structures and the cytoplasm. Here we discuss the possibility of artificially inducing the formation of spherical organelles in the endoplasmic reticulum, which would contain densely packed engineered proteins, to be used as optimized targets for optical trapping experiments. The high index of refraction and large size of our organelles provide a firm grip for optical trapping and thereby allow us to exert large forces easily within safe irradiation limits. This has clear advantages over alternative probes, such as subcellular organelles or internalized synthetic beads. PMID:25071944

  19. Artificially-induced organelles are optimal targets for optical trapping experiments in living cells.

    PubMed

    López-Quesada, C; Fontaine, A-S; Farré, A; Joseph, M; Selva, J; Egea, G; Ludevid, M D; Martín-Badosa, E; Montes-Usategui, M

    2014-07-01

    Optical trapping supplies information on the structural, kinetic or rheological properties of inner constituents of the cell. However, the application of significant forces to intracellular objects is notoriously difficult due to a combination of factors, such as the small difference between the refractive indices of the target structures and the cytoplasm. Here we discuss the possibility of artificially inducing the formation of spherical organelles in the endoplasmic reticulum, which would contain densely packed engineered proteins, to be used as optimized targets for optical trapping experiments. The high index of refraction and large size of our organelles provide a firm grip for optical trapping and thereby allow us to exert large forces easily within safe irradiation limits. This has clear advantages over alternative probes, such as subcellular organelles or internalized synthetic beads.

  20. Protein kinase Darkener of apricot and its substrate EF1γ regulate organelle transport along microtubules.

    PubMed

    Serpinskaya, Anna S; Tuphile, Karine; Rabinow, Leonard; Gelfand, Vladimir I

    2014-01-01

    Regulation of organelle transport along microtubules is important for proper distribution of membrane organelles and protein complexes in the cytoplasm. RNAi-mediated knockdown in cultured Drosophila S2 cells demonstrates that two microtubule-binding proteins, a unique isoform of Darkener of apricot (DOA) protein kinase, and its substrate, translational elongation factor EF1γ, negatively regulate transport of several classes of membrane organelles along microtubules. Inhibition of transport by EF1γ requires its phosphorylation by DOA on serine 294. Together, our results indicate a new role for two proteins that have not previously been implicated in regulation of the cytoskeleton. These results further suggest that the biological role of some of the proteins binding to the microtubule track is to regulate cargo transport along these tracks.

  1. GAP, an aequorin-based fluorescent indicator for imaging Ca2+ in organelles.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez-Garcia, Arancha; Rojo-Ruiz, Jonathan; Navas-Navarro, Paloma; Aulestia, Francisco Javier; Gallego-Sandin, Sonia; Garcia-Sancho, Javier; Alonso, Maria Teresa

    2014-02-18

    Genetically encoded calcium indicators allow monitoring subcellular Ca(2+) signals inside organelles. Most genetically encoded calcium indicators are fusions of endogenous calcium-binding proteins whose functionality in vivo may be perturbed by competition with cellular partners. We describe here a novel family of fluorescent Ca(2+) sensors based on the fusion of two Aequorea victoria proteins, GFP and apo-aequorin (GAP). GAP exhibited a unique combination of features: dual-excitation ratiometric imaging, high dynamic range, good signal-to-noise ratio, insensitivity to pH and Mg(2+), tunable Ca(2+) affinity, uncomplicated calibration, and targetability to five distinct organelles. Moreover, transgenic mice for endoplasmic reticulum-targeted GAP exhibited a robust long-term expression that correlated well with its reproducible performance in various neural tissues. This biosensor fills a gap in the actual repertoire of Ca(2+) indicators for organelles and becomes a valuable tool for in vivo Ca(2+) imaging applications.

  2. The Presence of Cysteine in the Cytoplasmic Domain of the Vesicular Stomatitis Virus Glycoprotein is Required for Palmitate Addition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rose, John K.; Adams, Gregg A.; Gallione, Carol J.

    1984-04-01

    The transmembrane glycoprotein (G protein) of vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) is known to contain 1-2 mol of covalently linked fatty acid (palmitate) per mol of protein. G protein is oriented in cellular membranes such that the carboxyl-terminal 29 amino acids protrude into the cytoplasm. We have obtained expression in eukaryotic cells of mutagenized cDNA clones that encode VSV G proteins lacking portions of this cytoplasmic domain. Labeling of these truncated proteins with [3H]palmitate indicated that the palmitate might be linked to an amino acid residue within the first 14 residues on the carboxyl-terminal side of the transmembrane domain. Using oligonucleotide directed mutagenesis, we changed the single codon specifying cysteine in this domain to a codon specifying serine. Expression of this mutant gene results in synthesis of a G protein lacking palmitate. We suggest that linkage of palmitate to G protein is through the cysteine in the cytoplasmic domain and that such a linkage may occur in many viral and cellular glycoproteins. The G protein lacking palmitate is glycosylated and is transported normally to the cell surface.

  3. Inhibition of biliary cholesterol and phospholipid secretion by cefmetazole. The role of vesicular transport and of canalicular events.

    PubMed Central

    Cava, F; Gonzalez, J; Gonzalez-Buitrago, J M; Muriel, C; Jimenez, R

    1991-01-01

    A number of organic anions selectively inhibit the biliary secretion of cholesterol and phospholipids without affecting bile acid secretion. We studied the effect of cefmetazole, a third-generation cephalosporin, on biliary lipid secretion in the rat. Injection of cefmetazole at a dose of 200 mumol/kg body wt. induced a choleretic effect and a significant decrease in the biliary output of cholesterol and phospholipid, without changes in bile acid secretion. The decrease was more marked for cholesterol than for phospholipid secretion, with a significant decrease in their molar ratio in bile. The effects were apparently unrelated to an inhibition of intracellular vesicular transport because, after injection of horseradish peroxidase, both the time course and total amount secreted of the protein did not significantly differ between control animals and those receiving cefmetazole. The secretory rate of the lysosomal marker acid phosphatase was not affected by cefmetazole administration. Biliary outputs of the plasma-membrane enzymes alkaline phosphatase and gamma-glutamyltransferase were significantly decreased by the antibiotic. These results point to an effect of cefmetazole at the level of the canalicular membrane. PMID:1674860

  4. Subcellular distribution of swine vesicular disease virus proteins and alterations induced in infected cells: A comparative study with foot-and-mouth disease virus and vesicular stomatitis virus

    SciTech Connect

    Martin-Acebes, Miguel A.; Gonzalez-Magaldi, Monica; Rosas, Maria F.; Borrego, Belen; Brocchi, Emiliana; Armas-Portela, Rosario; Sobrino, Francisco

    2008-05-10

    The intracellular distribution of swine vesicular disease virus (SVDV) proteins and the induced reorganization of endomembranes in IBRS-2 cells were analyzed. Fluorescence to new SVDV capsids appeared first upon infection, concentrated in perinuclear circular structures and colocalized to dsRNA. As in foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV)-infected cells, a vesicular pattern was predominantly found in later stages of SVDV capsid morphogenesis that colocalized with those of non-structural proteins 2C, 2BC and 3A. These results suggest that assembly of capsid proteins is associated to the replication complex. Confocal microscopy showed a decreased fluorescence to ER markers (calreticulin and protein disulfide isomerase), and disorganization of cis-Golgi gp74 and trans-Golgi caveolin-1 markers in SVDV- and FMDV-, but not in vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV)-infected cells. Electron microscopy of SVDV-infected cells at an early stage of infection revealed fragmented ER cisternae with expanded lumen and accumulation of large Golgi vesicles, suggesting alterations of vesicle traffic through Golgi compartments. At this early stage, FMDV induced different patterns of ER fragmentation and Golgi alterations. At later stages of SVDV cytopathology, cells showed a completely vacuolated cytoplasm containing vesicles of different sizes. Cell treatment with brefeldin A, which disrupts the Golgi complex, reduced SVDV ({approx} 5 log) and VSV ({approx} 4 log) titers, but did not affect FMDV growth. Thus, three viruses, which share target tissues and clinical signs in natural hosts, induce different intracellular effects in cultured cells.

  5. A nanobuffer reporter library for fine-scale imaging and perturbation of endocytic organelles | Office of Cancer Genomics

    Cancer.gov

    Endosomes, lysosomes and related catabolic organelles are a dynamic continuum of vacuolar structures that impact a number of cell physiological processes such as protein/lipid metabolism, nutrient sensing and cell survival. Here we develop a library of ultra-pH-sensitive fluorescent nanoparticles with chemical properties that allow fine-scale, multiplexed, spatio-temporal perturbation and quantification of catabolic organelle maturation at single organelle resolution to support quantitative investigation of these processes in living cells.

  6. Cytopathogenesis of Vesicular Stomatitis virus is regulated by the PSAP motif of M protein in a species-dependent manner

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) is an important vector-borne pathogen of bovine and equine species, causing a reportable vesicular disease. The matrix (M) protein of VSV is multifunctional and plays a key role in cytopathogenesis, apoptosis, host protein shut-off, and virion assembly/budding. Our ...

  7. A workflow for the automatic segmentation of organelles in electron microscopy image stacks

    PubMed Central

    Perez, Alex J.; Seyedhosseini, Mojtaba; Deerinck, Thomas J.; Bushong, Eric A.; Panda, Satchidananda; Tasdizen, Tolga; Ellisman, Mark H.

    2014-01-01

    Electron microscopy (EM) facilitates analysis of the form, distribution, and functional status of key organelle systems in various pathological processes, including those associated with neurodegenerative disease. Such EM data often provide important new insights into the underlying disease mechanisms. The development of more accurate and efficient methods to quantify changes in subcellular microanatomy has already proven key to understanding the pathogenesis of Parkinson's and Alzheimer's diseases, as well as glaucoma. While our ability to acquire large volumes of 3D EM data is progressing rapidly, more advanced analysis tools are needed to assist in measuring precise three-dimensional morphologies of organelles within data sets that can include hundreds to thousands of whole cells. Although new imaging instrument throughputs can exceed teravoxels of data per day, image segmentation and analysis remain significant bottlenecks to achieving quantitative descriptions of whole cell structural organellomes. Here, we present a novel method for the automatic segmentation of organelles in 3D EM image stacks. Segmentations are generated using only 2D image information, making the method suitable for anisotropic imaging techniques such as serial block-face scanning electron microscopy (SBEM). Additionally, no assumptions about 3D organelle morphology are made, ensuring the method can be easily expanded to any number of structurally and functionally diverse organelles. Following the presentation of our algorithm, we validate its performance by assessing the segmentation accuracy of different organelle targets in an example SBEM dataset and demonstrate that it can be efficiently parallelized on supercomputing resources, resulting in a dramatic reduction in runtime. PMID:25426032

  8. The acquisition of phototrophy: adaptive strategies of hosting endosymbionts and organelles.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Matthew D

    2011-01-01

    Many non-photosynthetic species of protists and metazoans are capable of hosting viable algal endosymbionts or their organelles through adaptations of phagocytic pathways. A form of mixotrophy combining phototrophy and heterotrophy, acquired phototrophy (AcPh) encompasses a suite of endosymbiotic and organelle retention interactions, that range from facultative to obligate. AcPh is a common phenomenon in aquatic ecosystems, with endosymbiotic associations generally more prevalent in nutrient poor environments, and organelle retention typically associated with more productive ones. All AcPhs benefit from enhanced growth due to access to photosynthetic products; however, the degree of metabolic integration and dependency in the host varies widely. AcPh is found in at least four of the major eukaryotic supergroups, and is the driving force in the evolution of secondary and tertiary plastid acquisitions. Mutualistic resource partitioning characterizes most algal endosymbiotic interactions, while organelle retention is a form of predation, characterized by nutrient flow (i.e., growth) in one direction. AcPh involves adaptations to recognize specific prey or endosymbionts and to house organelles or endosymbionts within the endomembrane system but free from digestion. In many cases, hosts depend upon AcPh for the production of essential nutrients, many of which remain obscure. The practice of AcPh has led to multiple independent secondary and tertiary plastid acquisition events among several eukaryote lineages, giving rise to the diverse array of algae found in modern aquatic ecosystems. This article highlights those AcPhs that are model research organisms for both metazoans and protists. Much of the basic biology of AcPhs remains enigmatic, particularly (1) which essential nutrients or factors make certain forms of AcPh obligatory, (2) how hosts regulate and manipulate endosymbionts or sequestered organelles, and (3) what genomic imprint, if any, AcPh leaves on non

  9. The effect of elevated intraocular oxygen on organelle degradation in the embryonic chicken lens.

    PubMed

    Bassnett, Steven; McNulty, Richard

    2003-12-01

    In the vertebrate lens, nuclei and other cytoplasmic organelles are degraded in fiber cells situated in the center of the tissue. This is believed to ensure the transparency of the tissue. The mechanism that triggers this process is unknown. We hypothesized that standing gradients of oxygen generated within the tissue may serve as a spatial cue for organelle degradation. To examine this possibility, we incubated fertilized chicken eggs under hyperoxic (50% O(2)) or normoxic (21% O(2)) conditions. Hyperoxic treatment was initiated on the seventh day of embryonic development (E7), five days before organelle degradation normally commences in the lens core. Hyperoxia was maintained until E17. Under normoxic conditions, the partial pressure of oxygen (P(O)) within the vitreous compartment was low. Direct measurement of P(O) using an optode oxygen sensor indicated values of 1.3 kPa and 0.4 kPa for the mid- and anterior vitreous, respectively. Similarly, treatment with pimonidazole, a bio-reductive hypoxia marker, led to the formation of immuno-positive protein adducts within the lens, suggesting that the embryonic lens is chronically hypoxic in situ. Following hyperoxic treatment, vitreous P(O) significantly increased, although pimonidazole staining in the lens was not markedly affected. Confocal microscopy of slices prepared from hyperoxic lenses revealed a significant increase in the size of the lens relative to age-matched normoxic controls. By E13, an organelle-free zone (OFZ) was present in the center of normoxic and hyperoxic lenses. However, in hyperoxic lenses, the OFZ was consistently smaller, and the distance from the lens surface to the border of the OFZ significantly larger, than in normoxic controls. These observations suggest that hyperoxia delays organelle breakdown and are consistent with a model in which hypoxia in the deep cortical layers of the normal lens serves as a trigger for the organelle loss process.

  10. RNase P branches out from RNP to protein: organelle-triggered diversification?

    PubMed Central

    Goldfarb, Katherine C.; Borah, Sumit; Cech, Thomas R.

    2012-01-01

    RNase P is the enzyme that removes 5′ leader sequences from precursor tRNAs. Remarkably, in most organisms, RNase P is a ribonucleoprotein particle where the RNA component is responsible for catalysis. In this issue of Genes & Development, Gutmann and colleagues (pp. 1022–1027) report the first organism, Arabidopsis thaliana, to employ protein-only RNase P in both its nucleus and organelles. An intriguing possibility is that replacement of RNase P ribonucleoprotein particles (RNPs) by proteins may have been triggered by the acquisition of organelles. PMID:22588715

  11. Colocalization of serotonin and vesicular glutamate transporter 3-like immunoreactivity in the midbrain raphe of Syrian hamsters (Mesocricetus auratus).

    PubMed

    Mintz, Eric M; Scott, Tamara J

    2006-02-13

    Vesicular glutamate transporter 3 (VGLUT3) expression has been specifically localized to brain regions rich in serotonergic cells. It has been suggested that this transporter may contribute to the regulation of extracellular glutamate concentrations via a nonsynaptic mechanism. In this study, we examine the colocalization of vesicular glutamate transporter 3 immunoreactivity with serotonin immunoreactivity in the dorsal and median raphe nuclei of Syrian hamsters. Brain sections from adult hamsters were fluorescently labeled for serotonin-ir and VGLUT3-ir and examined using confocal microscopy. The results indicate that most serotonergic cells of the midbrain raphe also expressed vesicular glutamate transporter 3. In addition, nonserotonergic cells in these brain regions also show immunoreactivity for the transporter. These data confirm previous findings of vesicular glutamate transporter 3 expression in serotonergic and nonserotonergic neurons in rats. These findings suggest that the location of vesicular glutamate transporter 3 may be as much a function of neuroanatomical location as of the neurochemical identity of the expressing neurons.

  12. Vesicular stomatitis virus-based vaccines against Lassa and Ebola viruses.

    PubMed

    Marzi, Andrea; Feldmann, Friederike; Geisbert, Thomas W; Feldmann, Heinz; Safronetz, David

    2015-02-01

    We demonstrated that previous vaccination with a vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV)-based Lassa virus vaccine does not alter protective efficacy of subsequent vaccination with a VSV-based Ebola virus vaccine. These findings demonstrate the utility of VSV-based vaccines against divergent viral pathogens, even when preexisting immunity to the vaccine vector is present.

  13. Bovine neuronal vesicular glutamate transporter activity is inhibited by ergovaline and other ergopeptines

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    L-Glutamate (Glu) is the major excitatory neurotransmitter responsible for neurotransmission in the vertebrate central nervous system, including the gastrointestinal tract (GIT) of cattle. Vesicular Glu transporters VGLUT1 and VGLUT2 concentrate (50 mM) Glu (Km = 1 to 4 mM) into synaptic vesicles (S...

  14. Blood Feeding Behavior of Vesicular Stomatitis Virus Infected Culicoides Sonorensis (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    To determine whether vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) infection of Culicoides sonorensis affects subsequent blood feeding behavior, midges injected with either virus-infected or virus-free cell lysates were allowed to blood feed for short (10 min) or long (60 min) periods of time on days 2, 3, and 4...

  15. Characterization of the Full-Length Genomic Sequence of Vesicular Stomatitis Cocal and Alagoas Viruses

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Vesicular stomatitis (VS) is an important viral disease of livestock throughout the Americas caused by members of the vesiculovirus genus of the family Rhabdoviridae. VS outbreaks between northern South America and North America are caused principally by the New Jersey serotype (VSNJV) and to a les...

  16. Potential for Transovarial Transmission of Vesicular Stomatitis Virus in the biting midge, Culicoides sonorensis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) is an insect transmitted rhabdovirus which causes economically devastating disease in cattle and horses in the western U.S. Important insect vectors identified thus far include Lutzomyia shannoni sand flies, Simulium vittatum black flies, and Culicoides sonorensis bi...

  17. Domestic cattle as a non-conventional amplifying host of vesicular stomatitis New Jersey virus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The role of vertebrates as amplifying and maintenance hosts for vesicular stomatitis New Jersey virus (VSNJV) remains unclear. Livestock have been considered dead-end hosts because detectable viremia is absent in VSNJV-infected animals. We demonstrated two situations where cattle can serve as a so...

  18. Blood Feeding Behavior of Vesicular Stomatitis Virus Infected Culicoides Sonorensis (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Culicoides sonorensis (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae) is the primary vector of Bluetongue virus in North America and a competent vector of Vesicular Stomatitis virus (VSV). Little is known about how viral infection of this midge affects blood feeding behavior and how this might affect virus transmission....

  19. 9 CFR 94.12 - Pork and pork products from regions where swine vesicular disease exists.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... has declared free of swine vesicular disease is maintained on the APHIS Web site at http://www.aphis... which they must be cooked in hot oil (deep-fried) at a minimum of 104 °C for an additional 150...

  20. Genome sequences of nine vesicular stomatitis virus isolates from South America

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We report nine full-genome sequences of vesicular stomatitis virus obtrained by Illumina next-generation sequencing of RNA, isolated from either cattle epithelial suspensions or cell culture supernatants. Seven of these viral genomes belonged to the New Jersey serotype/species, clade III, while two...

  1. Trajectory analysis of winds and vesicular stomatitis in North America, 1982-5.

    PubMed

    Sellers, R F; Maarouf, A R

    1990-04-01

    Outbreaks of vesicular stomatitis, serotype New Jersey, during epidemics in the United States and northern Mexico, 1982-5, were examined by backward trajectories of winds to investigate spread and possible sources. The outbreaks selected for analysis did not involve introduction of disease by infected animals. The findings indicate that wind could have been responsible for carrying infection from northern Mexico to Arizona and New Mexico and thence to Colorado and Utah and on to Wyoming, Idaho and Montana. The results of these analyses are consistent with the findings from T1 RNAse fingerprinting of virus isolates from outbreaks during the epidemics. The arrival of the trajectories was associated with the passage of a front and rain or passage of a front alone or rain alone. At the time of the trajectories temperatures of 10 degrees C and higher were recorded at heights up to 2500-3500 m. Introduction by airborne particles would appear unlikely as it would have required a source of at least 10(5) infectious units per minute per animal. Vesicular stomatitis virus had been isolated from Simulium and Culicoides during the epidemic with amounts of virus from Simulium sufficient to suggest biological transmission. The possibility of Simulium infected with vesicular stomatitis virus being carried downwind to introduce disease is discussed in relation to the behaviour of Simulium and the pathogenesis of vesicular stomatitis in large animals.

  2. 9 CFR 94.12 - Pork and pork products from regions where swine vesicular disease exists.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Pork and pork products from regions where swine vesicular disease exists. 94.12 Section 94.12 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE EXPORTATION AND IMPORTATION OF ANIMALS...

  3. 9 CFR 94.12 - Pork and pork products from regions where swine vesicular disease exists.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Pork and pork products from regions where swine vesicular disease exists. 94.12 Section 94.12 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE EXPORTATION AND IMPORTATION OF ANIMALS...

  4. 9 CFR 94.12 - Pork and pork products from regions where swine vesicular disease exists.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Pork and pork products from regions where swine vesicular disease exists. 94.12 Section 94.12 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE EXPORTATION AND IMPORTATION OF ANIMALS...

  5. Increased vesicular and vacuolar transendothelial transport in traumatic human brain oedema. A review.

    PubMed

    Castejón, Orlando J

    2013-01-01

    The endothelial vacuolar and vesicular transports in traumatic human brain oedema have been reviewed and compared with experimental brain oedema in order to establish their role in both oedema formation and oedema resolution. Normal or "non-activated" and "activated" capillaries are found. The activated capillaries showed predominantly an enhanced abluminally orientated vesicular transport by means of small, medium and large uncoated and clathrin coated vesicles, as well as the presence of endothelial tubular structures. Activation of the endothelial nuclear zone is featured by the increased amount of micropinocytotic vesicles. Vesicles internalizing to the hypertrophic Golgi complex, lysosomes and multivesicular bodies are observed. The protein vacuolar transport is predominant in most cortical capillaries. A wide spectrum of endothelial cell mechanisms is observed increasing the vesicular and vacuolar transport, such as deep invaginations of the luminal surface, large coated vesicles, tubular structures, and transient and incomplete transendothelial channels formed either by chained plasmalemmal vesicles or elongated protein-containing vacuoles. Uncoated vesicles are seen surrounding lysosomes. Vesicular transport might be discriminated between abluminally orientated or transendothelial transport (oedema formation) and intraendothelial transport (oedema resolution) directed towards cell lysosomes to be degraded by lysosomal enzymes. The transendothelial passage via large vacuoles is mainly caused by macromolecular protein transport.

  6. Vesicular trafficking of immune mediators in human eosinophils revealed by immunoelectron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Melo, Rossana C N; Weller, Peter F

    2016-10-01

    Electron microscopy (EM)-based techniques are mostly responsible for our current view of cell morphology at the subcellular level and continue to play an essential role in biological research. In cells from the immune system, such as eosinophils, EM has helped to understand how cells package and release mediators involved in immune responses. Ultrastructural investigations of human eosinophils enabled visualization of secretory processes in detail and identification of a robust, vesicular trafficking essential for the secretion of immune mediators via a non-classical secretory pathway associated with secretory (specific) granules. This vesicular system is mainly organized as large tubular-vesicular carriers (Eosinophil Sombrero Vesicles - EoSVs) actively formed in response to cell activation and provides a sophisticated structural mechanism for delivery of granule-stored mediators. In this review, we highlight the application of EM techniques to recognize pools of immune mediators at vesicular compartments and to understand the complex secretory pathway within human eosinophils involved in inflammatory and allergic responses.

  7. Effect of amyloids on the vesicular machinery: implications for somatic neurotransmission

    PubMed Central

    Das, Anand Kant; Pandit, Rucha; Maiti, Sudipta

    2015-01-01

    Certain neurodegenerative diseases are thought to be initiated by the aggregation of amyloidogenic proteins. However, the mechanism underlying toxicity remains obscure. Most of the suggested mechanisms are generic in nature and do not directly explain the neuron-type specific lesions observed in many of these diseases. Some recent reports suggest that the toxic aggregates impair the synaptic vesicular machinery. This may lead to an understanding of the neuron-type specificity observed in these diseases. A disruption of the vesicular machinery can also be deleterious for extra-synaptic, especially somatic, neurotransmission (common in serotonergic and dopaminergic systems which are specifically affected in Alzheimer's disease (AD) and Parkinson's disease (PD), respectively), though this relationship has remained unexplored. In this review, we discuss amyloid-induced damage to the neurotransmitter vesicular machinery, with an eye on the possible implications for somatic exocytosis. We argue that the larger size of the system, and the availability of multi-photon microscopy techniques for directly visualizing monoamines, make the somatic exocytosis machinery a more tractable model for understanding the effect of amyloids on all types of vesicular neurotransmission. Indeed, exploring this neglected connection may not just be important, it may be a more fruitful route for understanding AD and PD. PMID:26009766

  8. Isolation of bovine herpesvirus-1 from vesicular lesions of the bovine udder.

    PubMed

    Guy, J S; Potgieter, L N; McCracken, M; Martin, W

    1984-04-01

    Bovine herpesvirus-1 was isolated from vesicular lesions on the udder and mammary papillae (teats) of a Charolais cow. Lesions on the animal consisted of papules and vesicles up to 10 mm in diameter. The virus was identified by fluorescent antibody and serum-neutralization tests.

  9. Infection of Melanoplus Sanguinipes Grasshoppers Following Ingestion of Rangeland Plant Species Harboring Vesicular Stomatitis Virus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Knowledge of the many mechanisms of vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) transmission is critical to understanding the epidemiology of sporadic disease outbreaks in the western U.S. Migratory grasshoppers (Melanoplus sanguinipes, Fabricius) have been implicated as reservoirs and mechanical vectors of VS...

  10. Infection of grasshoppers following ingestion of grassland plant species harboring vesicular stomatitis virus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) causes sporadic, re-emerging disease outbreaks in horses and cattle in the western United States. Lesions in the oral cavity result in excessive salivation and significant virus shedding. This results in efficient direct contact transmission within the herd, and vira...

  11. Vesicular Trafficking and Signaling for Cytokine and Chemokine Secretion in Mast Cells

    PubMed Central

    Blank, Ulrich; Madera-Salcedo, Iris Karina; Danelli, Luca; Claver, Julien; Tiwari, Neeraj; Sánchez-Miranda, Elizabeth; Vázquez-Victorio, Genaro; Ramírez-Valadez, Karla Alina; Macias-Silva, Marina; González-Espinosa, Claudia

    2014-01-01

    Upon activation mast cells (MCs) secrete numerous inflammatory compounds stored in their cytoplasmic secretory granules by a process called anaphylactic degranulation, which is responsible for type I hypersensitivity responses. Prestored mediators include histamine and MC proteases but also some cytokines and growth factors making them available within minutes for a maximal biological effect. Degranulation is followed by the de novo synthesis of lipid mediators such as prostaglandins and leukotrienes as well as a vast array of cytokines, chemokines, and growth factors, which are responsible for late phase inflammatory responses. While lipid mediators diffuse freely out of the cell through lipid bilayers, both anaphylactic degranulation and secretion of cytokines, chemokines, and growth factors depends on highly regulated vesicular trafficking steps that occur along the secretory pathway starting with the translocation of proteins to the endoplasmic reticulum. Vesicular trafficking in MCs also intersects with endocytic routes, notably to form specialized cytoplasmic granules called secretory lysosomes. Some of the mediators like histamine reach granules via specific vesicular monoamine transporters directly from the cytoplasm. In this review, we try to summarize the available data on granule biogenesis and signaling events that coordinate the complex steps that lead to the release of the inflammatory mediators from the various vesicular carriers in MCs. PMID:25295038

  12. Castor bean organelle genome sequencing and worldwide genetic diversity analysis.

    PubMed

    Rivarola, Maximo; Foster, Jeffrey T; Chan, Agnes P; Williams, Amber L; Rice, Danny W; Liu, Xinyue; Melake-Berhan, Admasu; Huot Creasy, Heather; Puiu, Daniela; Rosovitz, M J; Khouri, Hoda M; Beckstrom-Sternberg, Stephen M; Allan, Gerard J; Keim, Paul; Ravel, Jacques; Rabinowicz, Pablo D

    2011-01-01

    Castor bean is an important oil-producing plant in the Euphorbiaceae family. Its high-quality oil contains up to 90% of the unusual fatty acid ricinoleate, which has many industrial and medical applications. Castor bean seeds also contain ricin, a highly toxic Type 2 ribosome-inactivating protein, which has gained relevance in recent years due to biosafety concerns. In order to gain knowledge on global genetic diversity in castor bean and to ultimately help the development of breeding and forensic tools, we carried out an extensive chloroplast sequence diversity analysis. Taking advantage of the recently published genome sequence of castor bean, we assembled the chloroplast and mitochondrion genomes extracting selected reads from the available whole genome shotgun reads. Using the chloroplast reference genome we used the methylation filtration technique to readily obtain draft genome sequences of 7 geographically and genetically diverse castor bean accessions. These sequence data were used to identify single nucleotide polymorphism markers and phylogenetic analysis resulted in the identification of two major clades that were not apparent in previous population genetic studies using genetic markers derived from nuclear DNA. Two distinct sub-clades could be defined within each major clade and large-scale genotyping of castor bean populations worldwide confirmed previously observed low levels of genetic diversity and showed a broad geographic distribution of each sub-clade.

  13. Castor Bean Organelle Genome Sequencing and Worldwide Genetic Diversity Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Agnes P.; Williams, Amber L.; Rice, Danny W.; Liu, Xinyue; Melake-Berhan, Admasu; Huot Creasy, Heather; Puiu, Daniela; Rosovitz, M. J.; Khouri, Hoda M.; Beckstrom-Sternberg, Stephen M.; Allan, Gerard J.; Keim, Paul; Ravel, Jacques; Rabinowicz, Pablo D.

    2011-01-01

    Castor bean is an important oil-producing plant in the Euphorbiaceae family. Its high-quality oil contains up to 90% of the unusual fatty acid ricinoleate, which has many industrial and medical applications. Castor bean seeds also contain ricin, a highly toxic Type 2 ribosome-inactivating protein, which has gained relevance in recent years due to biosafety concerns. In order to gain knowledge on global genetic diversity in castor bean and to ultimately help the development of breeding and forensic tools, we carried out an extensive chloroplast sequence diversity analysis. Taking advantage of the recently published genome sequence of castor bean, we assembled the chloroplast and mitochondrion genomes extracting selected reads from the available whole genome shotgun reads. Using the chloroplast reference genome we used the methylation filtration technique to readily obtain draft genome sequences of 7 geographically and genetically diverse castor bean accessions. These sequence data were used to identify single nucleotide polymorphism markers and phylogenetic analysis resulted in the identification of two major clades that were not apparent in previous population genetic studies using genetic markers derived from nuclear DNA. Two distinct sub-clades could be defined within each major clade and large-scale genotyping of castor bean populations worldwide confirmed previously observed low levels of genetic diversity and showed a broad geographic distribution of each sub-clade. PMID:21750729

  14. Organelle acidification negatively regulates vacuole membrane fusion in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Desfougères, Yann; Vavassori, Stefano; Rompf, Maria; Gerasimaite, Ruta; Mayer, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    The V-ATPase is a proton pump consisting of a membrane-integral V0 sector and a peripheral V1 sector, which carries the ATPase activity. In vitro studies of yeast vacuole fusion and evidence from worms, flies, zebrafish and mice suggested that V0 interacts with the SNARE machinery for membrane fusion, that it promotes the induction of hemifusion and that this activity requires physical presence of V0 rather than its proton pump activity. A recent in vivo study in yeast has challenged these interpretations, concluding that fusion required solely lumenal acidification but not the V0 sector itself. Here, we identify the reasons for this discrepancy and reconcile it. We find that acute pharmacological or physiological inhibition of V-ATPase pump activity de-acidifies the vacuole lumen in living yeast cells within minutes. Time-lapse microscopy revealed that de-acidification induces vacuole fusion rather than inhibiting it. Cells expressing mutated V0 subunits that maintain vacuolar acidity were blocked in this fusion. Thus, proton pump activity of the V-ATPase negatively regulates vacuole fusion in vivo. Vacuole fusion in vivo does, however, require physical presence of a fusion-competent V0 sector. PMID:27363625

  15. RNA Editing and Its Molecular Mechanism in Plant Organelles.

    PubMed

    Ichinose, Mizuho; Sugita, Mamoru

    2016-12-23

    RNA editing by cytidine (C) to uridine (U) conversions is widespread in plant mitochondria and chloroplasts. In some plant taxa, "reverse" U-to-C editing also occurs. However, to date, no instance of RNA editing has yet been reported in green algae and the complex thalloid liverworts. RNA editing may have evolved in early land plants 450 million years ago. However, in some plant species, including the liverwort, Marchantia polymorpha, editing may have been lost during evolution. Most RNA editing events can restore the evolutionarily conserved amino acid residues in mRNAs or create translation start and stop codons. Therefore, RNA editing is an essential process to maintain genetic information at the RNA level. Individual RNA editing sites are recognized by plant-specific pentatricopeptide repeat (PPR) proteins that are encoded in the nuclear genome. These PPR proteins are characterized by repeat elements that bind specifically to RNA sequences upstream of target editing sites. In flowering plants, non-PPR proteins also participate in multiple RNA editing events as auxiliary factors. C-to-U editing can be explained by cytidine deamination. The proteins discovered to date are important factors for RNA editing but a bona fide RNA editing enzyme has yet to be identified.

  16. RNA Editing and Its Molecular Mechanism in Plant Organelles

    PubMed Central

    Ichinose, Mizuho; Sugita, Mamoru

    2016-01-01

    RNA editing by cytidine (C) to uridine (U) conversions is widespread in plant mitochondria and chloroplasts. In some plant taxa, “reverse” U-to-C editing also occurs. However, to date, no instance of RNA editing has yet been reported in green algae and the complex thalloid liverworts. RNA editing may have evolved in early land plants 450 million years ago. However, in some plant species, including the liverwort, Marchantia polymorpha, editing may have been lost during evolution. Most RNA editing events can restore the evolutionarily conserved amino acid residues in mRNAs or create translation start and stop codons. Therefore, RNA editing is an essential process to maintain genetic information at the RNA level. Individual RNA editing sites are recognized by plant-specific pentatricopeptide repeat (PPR) proteins that are encoded in the nuclear genome. These PPR proteins are characterized by repeat elements that bind specifically to RNA sequences upstream of target editing sites. In flowering plants, non-PPR proteins also participate in multiple RNA editing events as auxiliary factors. C-to-U editing can be explained by cytidine deamination. The proteins discovered to date are important factors for RNA editing but a bona fide RNA editing enzyme has yet to be identified. PMID:28025543

  17. In Vitro Assays Demonstrate That Pollen Tube Organelles Use Kinesin-Related Motor Proteins to Move along MicrotubulesW⃞

    PubMed Central

    Romagnoli, Silvia; Cai, Giampiero; Cresti, Mauro

    2003-01-01

    The movement of pollen tube organelles relies on cytoskeletal elements. Although the movement of organelles along actin filaments in the pollen tube has been studied widely and is becoming progressively clear, it remains unclear what role microtubules play. Many uncertainties about the role of microtubules in the active transport of pollen tube organelles and/or in the control of this process remain to be resolved. In an effort to determine if organelles are capable of moving along microtubules in the absence of actin, we extracted organelles from tobacco pollen tubes and analyzed their ability to move along in vitro–polymerized microtubules under different experimental conditions. Regardless of their size, the organelles moved at different rates along microtubules in the presence of ATP. Cytochalasin D did not inhibit organelle movement, indicating that actin filaments are not required for organelle transport in our assay. The movement of organelles was cytosol independent, which suggests that soluble factors are not necessary for the organelle movement to occur and that microtubule-based motor proteins are present on the organelle surface. By washing organelles with KI, it was possible to release proteins capable of gliding carboxylated beads along microtubules. Several membrane fractions, which were separated by Suc density gradient centrifugation, showed microtubule-based movement. Proteins were extracted by KI treatment from the most active organelle fraction and then analyzed with an ATP-sensitive microtubule binding assay. Proteins isolated by the selective binding to microtubules were tested for the ability to glide microtubules in the in vitro motility assay, for the presence of microtubule-stimulated ATPase activity, and for cross-reactivity with anti-kinesin antibodies. We identified and characterized a 105-kD organelle-associated motor protein that is functionally, biochemically, and immunologically related to kinesin. This work provides clear

  18. Nucleotide specificities of anterograde and retrograde organelle transport in Reticulomyxa are indistinguishable.

    PubMed

    Schliwa, M; Shimizu, T; Vale, R D; Euteneuer, U

    1991-03-01

    Membrane-bound organelles move bidirectionally along microtubules in the freshwater ameba, Reticulomyxa. We have examined the nucleotide requirements for transport in a lysed cell model and compared them with kinesin and dynein-driven motility in other systems. Both anterograde and retrograde transport in Reticulomyxa show features characteristic of dynein but not of kinesin-powered movements: organelle transport is reactivated only by ATP and no other nucleoside triphosphates; the Km and Vmax of the ATP-driven movements are similar to values obtained for dynein rather than kinesin-driven movement; and of 15 ATP analogues tested for their ability to promote organelle transport, only 4 of them did. This narrow specificity resembles that of dynein-mediated in vitro transport and is dissimilar to the broad specificity of the kinesin motor (Shimizu, T., K. Furusawa, S. Ohashi, Y. Y. Toyoshima, M. Okuno, F. Malik, and R. D. Vale. 1991. J. Cell Biol. 112: 1189-1197). Remarkably, anterograde and retrograde organelle transport cannot be distinguished at all with respect to nucleotide specificity, kinetics of movement, and the ability to use the ATP analogues. Since the "kinetic fingerprints" of the motors driving transport in opposite directions are indistinguishable, the same type of motor(s) may be involved in the two directions of movement.

  19. Changes in architecture of the Golgi complex and other subcellular organelles during myogenesis

    PubMed Central

    1993-01-01

    Myogenesis involves changes in both gene expression and cellular architecture. Little is known of the organization, in muscle in vivo, of the subcellular organelles involved in protein synthesis despite the potential importance of targeted protein synthesis for formation and maintenance of functional domains such as the neuromuscular junction. A panel of antibodies to markers of the ER, the Golgi complex, and the centrosome were used to localize these organelles by immunofluorescence in myoblasts and myotubes of the mouse muscle cell line C2 in vitro, and in intact single muscle fibers from the rat flexor digitorum brevis. Antibodies to the ER stained structures throughout the cytoplasm of both C2 myoblasts and myotubes. In contrast, the spatial relationship between nucleus, centrosome, and Golgi complex was dramatically altered. These changes could also be observed in a low- calcium medium that allowed differentiation while preventing myoblast fusion. Muscle fibers in vivo resembled myotubes except that the ER occupied a smaller volume of cytoplasm and no staining was found for one of the Golgi complex markers, the enzyme alpha-mannosidase II. Electron microscopy, however, clearly showed the presence of stacks of Golgi cisternae in both junctional and extrajunctional regions of muscle fibers. The perinuclear distribution of the Golgi complex was also observed in live muscle fibers stained with a fluorescent lipid. Thus, the distribution of subcellular organelles of the secretory pathway was found to be similar in myotubes and muscle fibers, and all organelles were found in both junctional and extrajunctional areas of muscle. PMID:7678420

  20. Biogenesis of the crystalloid organelle in Plasmodium involves microtubule-dependent vesicle transport and assembly

    PubMed Central

    Saeed, Sadia; Tremp, Annie Z.; Dessens, Johannes T.

    2015-01-01

    Malaria parasites possess unique subcellular structures and organelles. One of these is the crystalloid, a multivesicular organelle that forms during the parasite’s development in vector mosquitoes. The formation and function of these organelles remain poorly understood. A family of six conserved and modular proteins named LCCL-lectin adhesive-like proteins (LAPs), which have essential roles in sporozoite transmission, localise to the crystalloids. In this study we analyse crystalloid formation using transgenic Plasmodium berghei parasites expressing GFP-tagged LAP3. We show that deletion of the LCCL domain from LAP3 causes retarded crystalloid development, while knockout of LAP3 prevents formation of the organelle. Our data reveal that the process of crystalloid formation involves active relocation of endoplasmic reticulum-derived vesicles to common assembly points via microtubule-dependent transport. Inhibition of microtubule-dependent cargo transport disrupts this process and replicates the LCCL domain deletion mutant phenotype in wildtype parasites. These findings provide the first clear insight into crystalloid biogenesis, demonstrating a fundamental role for the LAP family in this process, and identifying the crystalloid and its formation as potential targets for malaria transmission control. PMID:25900212

  1. An organelle-specific protein landscape identifies novel diseases and molecular mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Boldt, Karsten; van Reeuwijk, Jeroen; Lu, Qianhao; Koutroumpas, Konstantinos; Nguyen, Thanh-Minh T.; Texier, Yves; van Beersum, Sylvia E. C.; Horn, Nicola; Willer, Jason R.; Mans, Dorus A.; Dougherty, Gerard; Lamers, Ideke J. C.; Coene, Karlien L. M.; Arts, Heleen H.; Betts, Matthew J.; Beyer, Tina; Bolat, Emine; Gloeckner, Christian Johannes; Haidari, Khatera; Hetterschijt, Lisette; Iaconis, Daniela; Jenkins, Dagan; Klose, Franziska; Knapp, Barbara; Latour, Brooke; Letteboer, Stef J. F.; Marcelis, Carlo L.; Mitic, Dragana; Morleo, Manuela; Oud, Machteld M.; Riemersma, Moniek; Rix, Susan; Terhal, Paulien A.; Toedt, Grischa; van Dam, Teunis J. P.; de Vrieze, Erik; Wissinger, Yasmin; Wu, Ka Man; Apic, Gordana; Beales, Philip L.; Blacque, Oliver E.; Gibson, Toby J.; Huynen, Martijn A.; Katsanis, Nicholas; Kremer, Hannie; Omran, Heymut; van Wijk, Erwin; Wolfrum, Uwe; Kepes, François; Davis, Erica E.; Franco, Brunella; Giles, Rachel H.; Ueffing, Marius; Russell, Robert B.; Roepman, Ronald; Al-Turki, Saeed; Anderson, Carl; Antony, Dinu; Barroso, Inês; Bentham, Jamie; Bhattacharya, Shoumo; Carss, Keren; Chatterjee, Krishna; Cirak, Sebahattin; Cosgrove, Catherine; Danecek, Petr; Durbin, Richard; Fitzpatrick, David; Floyd, Jamie; Reghan Foley, A.; Franklin, Chris; Futema, Marta; Humphries, Steve E.; Hurles, Matt; Joyce, Chris; McCarthy, Shane; Mitchison, Hannah M.; Muddyman, Dawn; Muntoni, Francesco; O'Rahilly, Stephen; Onoufriadis, Alexandros; Payne, Felicity; Plagnol, Vincent; Raymond, Lucy; Savage, David B.; Scambler, Peter; Schmidts, Miriam; Schoenmakers, Nadia; Semple, Robert; Serra, Eva; Stalker, Jim; van Kogelenberg, Margriet; Vijayarangakannan, Parthiban; Walter, Klaudia; Whittall, Ros; Williamson, Kathy

    2016-01-01

    Cellular organelles provide opportunities to relate biological mechanisms to disease. Here we use affinity proteomics, genetics and cell biology to interrogate cilia: poorly understood organelles, where defects cause genetic diseases. Two hundred and seventeen tagged human ciliary proteins create a final landscape of 1,319 proteins, 4,905 interactions and 52 complexes. Reverse tagging, repetition of purifications and statistical analyses, produce a high-resolution network that reveals organelle-specific interactions and complexes not apparent in larger studies, and links vesicle transport, the cytoskeleton, signalling and ubiquitination to ciliary signalling and proteostasis. We observe sub-complexes in exocyst and intraflagellar transport complexes, which we validate biochemically, and by probing structurally predicted, disruptive, genetic variants from ciliary disease patients. The landscape suggests other genetic diseases could be ciliary including 3M syndrome. We show that 3M genes are involved in ciliogenesis, and that patient fibroblasts lack cilia. Overall, this organelle-specific targeting strategy shows considerable promise for Systems Medicine. PMID:27173435

  2. Calcium signaling in plant cell organelles delimited by a double membrane.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Tou-Cheu; Bourque, Stéphane; Lecourieux, David; Amelot, Nicolas; Grat, Sabine; Brière, Christian; Mazars, Christian; Pugin, Alain; Ranjeva, Raoul

    2006-11-01

    Increases in the concentration of free calcium in the cytosol are one of the general events that relay an external stimulus to the internal cellular machinery and allow eukaryotic organisms, including plants, to mount a specific biological response. Different lines of evidence have shown that other intracellular organelles contribute to the regulation of free calcium homeostasis in the cytosol. The vacuoles, the endoplasmic reticulum and the cell wall constitute storage compartments for mobilizable calcium. In contrast, the role of organelles surrounded by a double membrane (e.g. mitochondria, chloroplasts and nuclei) is more complex. Here, we review experimental data showing that these organelles harbor calcium-dependent biological processes. Mitochondria, chloroplasts as well as nuclei are equipped to generate calcium signal on their own. Changes in free calcium in a given organelle may also favor the relocalization of proteins and regulatory components and therefore have a profound influence on the integrated functioning of the cell. Studying, in time and space, the dynamics of different components of calcium signaling pathway will certainly give clues to understand the extraordinary flexibility of plants to respond to stimuli and mount adaptive responses. The availability of technical and biological resources should allow breaking new grounds by unveiling the contribution of signaling networks in integrative plant biology.

  3. Phase Transition of a Disordered Nuage Protein Generates Environmentally Responsive Membraneless Organelles

    PubMed Central

    Nott, Timothy J.; Petsalaki, Evangelia; Farber, Patrick; Jervis, Dylan; Fussner, Eden; Plochowietz, Anne; Craggs, Timothy D.; Bazett-Jones, David P.; Pawson, Tony; Forman-Kay, Julie D.; Baldwin, Andrew J.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Cells chemically isolate molecules in compartments to both facilitate and regulate their interactions. In addition to membrane-encapsulated compartments, cells can form proteinaceous and membraneless organelles, including nucleoli, Cajal and PML bodies, and stress granules. The principles that determine when and why these structures form have remained elusive. Here, we demonstrate that the disordered tails of Ddx4, a primary constituent of nuage or germ granules, form phase-separated organelles both in live cells and in vitro. These bodies are stabilized by patterned electrostatic interactions that are highly sensitive to temperature, ionic strength, arginine methylation, and splicing. Sequence determinants are used to identify proteins found in both membraneless organelles and cell adhesion. Moreover, the bodies provide an alternative solvent environment that can concentrate single-stranded DNA but largely exclude double-stranded DNA. We propose that phase separation of disordered proteins containing weakly interacting blocks is a general mechanism for forming regulated, membraneless organelles. PMID:25747659

  4. Mitochondrial remnant organelles of Giardia function in iron-sulphur protein maturation.

    PubMed

    Tovar, Jorge; León-Avila, Gloria; Sánchez, Lidya B; Sutak, Robert; Tachezy, Jan; van der Giezen, Mark; Hernández, Manuel; Müller, Miklós; Lucocq, John M

    2003-11-13

    Giardia intestinalis (syn. lamblia) is one of the most widespread intestinal protozoan pathogens worldwide, causing hundreds of thousands of cases of diarrhoea each year. Giardia is a member of the diplomonads, often described as an ancient protist group whose primitive nature is suggested by the lack of typical eukaryotic organelles (for example, mitochondria, peroxisomes), the presence of a poorly developed endomembrane system and by their early branching in a number of gene phylogenies. The discovery of nuclear genes of putative mitochondrial ancestry in Giardia and the recent identification of mitochondrial remnant organelles in amitochondrial protists such as Entamoeba histolytica and Trachipleistophora hominis suggest that the eukaryotic amitochondrial state is not a primitive condition but is rather the result of reductive evolution. Using an in vitro protein reconstitution assay and specific antibodies against IscS and IscU--two mitochondrial marker proteins involved in iron-sulphur cluster biosynthesis--here we demonstrate that Giardia contains mitochondrial remnant organelles (mitosomes) bounded by double membranes that function in iron-sulphur protein maturation. Our results indicate that Giardia is not primitively amitochondrial and that it has retained a functional organelle derived from the original mitochondrial endosymbiont.

  5. Phosphorylation of αSNAP is Required for Secretory Organelle Biogenesis in Toxoplasma gondii.

    PubMed

    Stewart, Rebecca J; Ferguson, David J P; Whitehead, Lachlan; Bradin, Clare H; Wu, Hong J; Tonkin, Christopher J

    2016-02-01

    Upon infection, apicomplexan parasites quickly invade host cells and begin a replicative cycle rapidly increasing in number over a short period of time, leading to tissue lysis and disease. The secretory pathway of these highly polarized protozoan parasites tightly controls, in time and space, the biogenesis of specialized structures and organelles required for invasion and intracellular survival. In other systems, regulation of protein trafficking can occur by phosphorylation of vesicle fusion machinery. Previously, we have shown that Toxoplasma gondii αSNAP - a protein that controls the disassembly of cis-SNARE complexes--is phosphorylated. Here, we show that this post-translational modification is required for the correct function of αSNAP in controlling secretory traffic. We demonstrate that during intracellular development conditional expression of a non-phosphorylatable form of αSNAP results in Golgi fragmentation and vesiculation of all downstream secretory organelles. In addition, we show that the vestigial plastid (termed apicoplast), although reported not to be reliant on Golgi trafficking for biogenesis, is also affected upon overexpression of αSNAP and is much more sensitive to the levels of this protein than targeting to other organelles. This work highlights the importance of αSNAP and its phosphorylation in Toxoplasma organelle biogenesis and exposes a hereto fore-unexplored mechanism of regulation of vesicle fusion during secretory pathway trafficking in apicomplexan parasites.

  6. Biochemical characterization of a mitochondrial-like organelle from Blastocystis sp. subtype 7.

    PubMed

    Lantsman, Yelena; Tan, Kevin S W; Morada, Mary; Yarlett, Nigel

    2008-09-01

    A mitochondrion-like organelle (MLO) was isolated from isotonic homogenates of Blastocystis. The organelle sedimented at 5000 g for 10 min, and had an isopycnic density in sucrose of 1.2 g ml(-1). Biochemical characterization enabled the demonstration of several key enzymes that allowed the construction of a metabolic pathway consisting of an incomplete Krebs cycle linked to the oxygen-sensitive enzymes pyruvate : NADP(+) oxidoreductase (PNO), acetate : succinate CoA transferase (ASCT) and succinate thiokinase (STK), which cumulatively are responsible for recycling CoA and generating ATP. The organelle differs from typical aerobic mitochondria in possessing an oxygen-sensitive PNO that can use FAD(+) or FMN(+) as electron acceptor but is inactive with NAD(+), Spinacia oleracea ferredoxin or Clostridium pasteurianum ferredoxin. A gene with 77 % sequence similarity to the PNO mitochondrion precursor cluster from Euglena gracilis sp[Q941N5] was identified in the Blastocystis genome database. A second cluster with 56 % sequence similarity to the pyruvate : ferredoxin oxidoreductase (PFOR) from Trichomonas vaginalis was also identified, which is in agreement with the concept that the PNO gene arose through the fusion of a eubacterial gene for PFOR with the gene for NADPH : cytochrome p450 reductase. Hydrogenase activity was not detected under the conditions used in this study. The Blastocystis oranelle therefore demonstrates significant biochemical differences from traditional mitochondria and hydrogenosomes, but possesses features of both. Based upon the results of this study, the Blastocystis organelle falls into the category of a MLO.

  7. Divide and Conquer: the Application of Organelle Proteomics to Heart Failure

    PubMed Central

    Agnetti, Giulio; Husberg, Cathrine; Van Eyk, Jennifer E.

    2013-01-01

    Chronic heart failure is a worldwide cause of mortality and morbidity and is the final outcome of a number of different etiologies. This reflects both the complexity of the disease and our incomplete understanding of its underlying molecular mechanisms. One experimental approach to address this is to study subcellular organelles and how their functions are activated and synchronized under physiological and pathological conditions. In this review, we discuss the application of proteomic technologies to organelles and how this has deepened our perception of the cellular proteome and its alterations with heart failure. The use of proteomics to monitor protein quantity and post-translational modifications (PTMs) has revealed a highly intricate and sophisticated level of protein regulation. PTMs have the potential to regulate organelle function and interplay most likely by targeting both structural and signaling proteins throughout the cell, ultimately coordinating their responses. The potentials and limitations of current proteomic technologies are also discussed emphasizing that the development of novel methods will enhance our ability to further investigate organelles and decode intracellular communication. PMID:21335433

  8. Organelle-Specific Sensors for Monitoring Ca2+ Dynamics in Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, Seok-Kyu; Hirabayashi, Yusuke; Polleux, Franck

    2016-01-01

    Calcium (Ca2+) plays innumerable critical functions in neurons ranging from regulation of neurotransmitter release and synaptic plasticity to activity-dependent transcription. Therefore, more than any other cell types, neurons are critically dependent on spatially and temporally controlled Ca2+ dynamics. This is achieved through an exquisite level of compartmentalization of Ca2+ storage and release from various organelles. The function of these organelles in the regulation of Ca2+ dynamics has been studied for decades using electrophysiological and optical methods combined with pharmacological and genetic alterations. Mitochondria and the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) are among the organelles playing the most critical roles in Ca2+ dynamics in neurons. At presynaptic boutons, Ca2+ triggers neurotransmitter release and synaptic plasticity, and postsynaptically, Ca2+ mobilization mediates long-term synaptic plasticity. To explore Ca2+ dynamics in live cells and intact animals, various synthetic and genetically encoded fluorescent Ca2+ sensors were developed, and recently, many groups actively increased the sensitivity and diversity of genetically encoded Ca2+ indicators (GECIs). Following conjugation with various signal peptides, these improved GECIs can be targeted to specific subcellular compartments, allowing monitoring of organelle-specific Ca2+ dynamics. Here, we review recent findings unraveling novel roles for mitochondria- and ER-dependent Ca2+ dynamics in neurons and at synapses. PMID:27695411

  9. Nucleotide specificities of anterograde and retrograde organelle transport in Reticulomyxa are indistinguishable

    PubMed Central

    1991-01-01

    Membrane-bound organelles move bidirectionally along microtubules in the freshwater ameba, Reticulomyxa. We have examined the nucleotide requirements for transport in a lysed cell model and compared them with kinesin and dynein-driven motility in other systems. Both anterograde and retrograde transport in Reticulomyxa show features characteristic of dynein but not of kinesin-powered movements: organelle transport is reactivated only by ATP and no other nucleoside triphosphates; the Km and Vmax of the ATP-driven movements are similar to values obtained for dynein rather than kinesin-driven movement; and of 15 ATP analogues tested for their ability to promote organelle transport, only 4 of them did. This narrow specificity resembles that of dynein-mediated in vitro transport and is dissimilar to the broad specificity of the kinesin motor (Shimizu, T., K. Furusawa, S. Ohashi, Y. Y. Toyoshima, M. Okuno, F. Malik, and R. D. Vale. 1991. J. Cell Biol. 112: 1189-1197). Remarkably, anterograde and retrograde organelle transport cannot be distinguished at all with respect to nucleotide specificity, kinetics of movement, and the ability to use the ATP analogues. Since the "kinetic fingerprints" of the motors driving transport in opposite directions are indistinguishable, the same type of motor(s) may be involved in the two directions of movement. PMID:1825662

  10. Overexpressing OsPIN2 enhances aluminium internalization by elevating vesicular trafficking in rice root apex.

    PubMed

    Wu, Daoming; Shen, Hong; Yokawa, Ken; Baluška, František

    2015-11-01

    Aluminium (Al) sequestration is required for internal detoxification of Al in plant cells. In this study, it was found that the rice OsPIN2 overexpression line (OX1) had significantly reduced Al content in its cell wall and increased Al concentration in cell sap only in rice root tips relative to the wild-type (WT). In comparison with WT, OX1 reduced morin staining of cytosolic Al, enhanced FM 4-64 staining of membrane vesicular trafficking in root tip sections (0-1mm), and showed morin-FM 4-64 fluorescence overlap. Recovery treatment showed that cell-wall-bound Al was internalized into vacuoles via endocytic vesicular trafficking after removal of external Al. In this process, OX1 showed a higher rate of Al internalization than WT. Brefeldin A (BFA) interfered with vesicular trafficking and resulted in inhibition of Al internalization. This inhibitory effect could be alleviated when BFA was washed out, and the process of alleviation was slower in the cells of WT than in those of OX1. Microscopic observations revealed that, upon Al exposure, numerous multilamellar endosomes were detected between the cell wall and plasma membrane in the cells of OX1. Moreover, more vesicles enriched with Al complexes accumulated in the cells of OX1 than in those of WT, and these vesicles transformed into larger structures in the cells of OX1. Taken together, the data indicate that endocytic vesicular trafficking might contribute to Al internalization, and that overexpressing OsPIN2 enhances rice Al tolerance via elevated endocytic vesicular trafficking and Al internalization.

  11. Mitochondria-derived organelles in the diplomonad fish parasite Spironucleus vortens.

    PubMed

    Millet, Coralie O M; Williams, Catrin F; Hayes, Anthony J; Hann, Anthony C; Cable, Joanne; Lloyd, David

    2013-10-01

    In some eukaryotes, mitochondria have become modified during evolution to yield derived organelles (MDOs) of a similar size (hydrogenosomes), or extremely reduced to produce tiny cellular vesicles (mitosomes). The current study provides evidence for the presence of MDOs in the highly infectious fish pathogen Spironucleus vortens, an organism that produces H₂ and is shown here to have no detectable cytochromes. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) reveals that S. vortens trophozoites contain electron-dense, membranous structures sometimes with an electron-dense core (200 nm-1 μm), resembling the hydrogenosomes previously described in other protists from habitats deficient in O₂. Confocal microscopy establishes that these organelles exhibit autofluorescence emission spectra similar to flavoprotein constituents previously described for mitochondria and also present in hydrogenosomes. These organelles possess a membrane potential and are labelled by a fluorescently labeled antibody against Fe-hydrogenase from Blastocystis hominis. Heterologous antibodies raised to mitochondrial proteins frataxin and Isu1, also exhibit a discrete punctate pattern of localization in S. vortens; however these labelled structures are distinctly smaller (90-150 nm) than hydrogenosomes as observed previously in other organisms. TEM confirms the presence of double-membrane bounded organelles of this smaller size. In addition, strong background immunostaining occurs in the cytosol for frataxin and Isu1, and labelling by anti-ferredoxin antibody is generally distributed and not specifically localized except for at the anterior polar region. This suggests that some of the functions traditionally attributed to such MDOs may also occur elsewhere. The specialized parasitic life-style of S. vortens may necessitate more complex intracellular compartmentation of redox reactions than previously recognized. Control of infection requires biochemical characterization of redox-related organelles.

  12. Phylogeny of endocytic components yields insight into the process of nonendosymbiotic organelle evolution

    PubMed Central

    Dacks, Joel B.; Poon, Pak P.; Field, Mark C.

    2008-01-01

    The process by which some eukaryotic organelles, for example the endomembrane system, evolved without endosymbiotic input remains poorly understood. This problem largely arises because many major cellular systems predate the last common eukaryotic ancestor (LCEA) and thus do not provide examples of organellogenesis in progress. A model is emerging whereby gene duplication and divergence of multiple “specificity-” or “identity-” encoding proteins for the various endomembranous organelles produced the diversity of nonendosymbiotically derived cellular compartments present in modern eukaryotes. To address this possibility, we analyzed three molecular components of the endocytic membrane-trafficking machinery. Phylogenetic analyses of the endocytic syntaxins, Rab 5, and the β-adaptins each reveal a pattern of ancestral, undifferentiated endocytic homologues in the LCEA. Subsequently, these undifferentiated progenitors independently duplicated in widely divergent lineages, convergently producing components with similar endocytic roles, e.g., β1 and β2-adaptin. In contrast, β3, β4, and all other adaptin complex subunits, as well as paralogues of the syntaxins and Rabs specific for the other membrane-trafficking organelles, all evolved before the LCEA. Thus, the process giving rise to the differentiated organelles of the endocytic system appears to have been interrupted by the major speciation event that produced the extant eukaryotic lineages. These results suggest that although many endocytic components evolved before the LCEA, other major features evolved independently and convergently after diversification into the primary eukaryotic supergroups. This finding provides an example of a basic cellular system that was simpler in the LCEA than in many extant eukaryotes and yields insight into nonendosymbiotic organelle evolution. PMID:18182495

  13. Organelle Size Scaling of the Budding Yeast Vacuole by Relative Growth and Inheritance.

    PubMed

    Chan, Yee-Hung M; Reyes, Lorena; Sohail, Saba M; Tran, Nancy K; Marshall, Wallace F

    2016-05-09

    It has long been noted that larger animals have larger organs compared to smaller animals of the same species, a phenomenon termed scaling [1]. Julian Huxley proposed an appealingly simple model of "relative growth"-in which an organ and the whole body grow with their own intrinsic rates [2]-that was invoked to explain scaling in organs from fiddler crab claws to human brains. Because organ size is regulated by complex, unpredictable pathways [3], it remains unclear whether scaling requires feedback mechanisms to regulate organ growth in response to organ or body size. The molecular pathways governing organelle biogenesis are simpler than organogenesis, and therefore organelle size scaling in the cell provides a more tractable case for testing Huxley's model. We ask the question: is it possible for organelle size scaling to arise if organelle growth is independent of organelle or cell size? Using the yeast vacuole as a model, we tested whether mutants defective in vacuole inheritance, vac8Δ and vac17Δ, tune vacuole biogenesis in response to perturbations in vacuole size. In vac8Δ/vac17Δ, vacuole scaling increases with the replicative age of the cell. Furthermore, vac8Δ/vac17Δ cells continued generating vacuole at roughly constant rates even when they had significantly larger vacuoles compared to wild-type. With support from computational modeling, these results suggest there is no feedback between vacuole biogenesis rates and vacuole or cell size. Rather, size scaling is determined by the relative growth rates of the vacuole and the cell, thus representing a cellular version of Huxley's model.

  14. Astrocytes as secretory cells of the central nervous system: idiosyncrasies of vesicular secretion.

    PubMed

    Verkhratsky, Alexei; Matteoli, Michela; Parpura, Vladimir; Mothet, Jean-Pierre; Zorec, Robert

    2016-02-01

    Astrocytes are housekeepers of the central nervous system (CNS) and are important for CNS development, homeostasis and defence. They communicate with neurones and other glial cells through the release of signalling molecules. Astrocytes secrete a wide array of classic neurotransmitters, neuromodulators and hormones, as well as metabolic, trophic and plastic factors, all of which contribute to the gliocrine system. The release of neuroactive substances from astrocytes occurs through several distinct pathways that include diffusion through plasmalemmal channels, translocation by multiple transporters and regulated exocytosis. As in other eukaryotic cells, exocytotic secretion from astrocytes involves divergent secretory organelles (synaptic-like microvesicles, dense-core vesicles, lysosomes, exosomes and ectosomes), which differ in size, origin, cargo, membrane composition, dynamics and functions. In this review, we summarize the features and functions of secretory organelles in astrocytes. We focus on the biogenesis and trafficking of secretory organelles and on the regulation of the exocytotic secretory system in the context of healthy and diseased astrocytes.

  15. Construction and expression of a recombinant DNA gene encoding a polyomavirus middle-size tumor antigen with the carboxyl terminus of the vesicular stomatitis virus glycoprotein G

    SciTech Connect

    Templeton, D.; Voronova, A.; Eckhart, W.

    1984-02-01

    The authors constructed a molecular clone encoding the N-terminal 379 amino acids of the polyomavirus middle-size tumor antigen, followed by the C-terminal 60 amino acids of the vesicular stomatitis virus glycoprotein G. This hybrid gene contained the coding region for the C-terminal hydrophobic membrane-spanning domain of the G protein in place of the C-terminal hydrophobic domain of the middle-size tumor antigen. The hybrid gene was expressed in COS-1 cells under the control of the simian virus 40 late promoter. The hybrid protein was located in cell membranes and was associated with a tyrosine-specific protein kinase activity, as was the middle-size tumor antigen. Plasmids encoding the hybrid protein failed to transform mouse NIH 3T3 or rat F2408 cells.

  16. Resistance Responses of Potato to Vesicular-Arbuscular Mycorrhizal Fungi under Varying Abiotic Phosphorus Levels.

    PubMed

    McArthur, D A; Knowles, N R

    1992-09-01

    In mycorrhizal symbioses, susceptibility of a host plant to infection by fungi is influenced by environmental factors, especially the availability of soil phosphorus. This study describes morphological and biochemical details of interactions between a vesicular-arbuscular mycorrhizal (VAM) fungus and potato (Solanum tuberosum L. cv Russet Burbank) plants, with a particular focus on the physiological basis for P-induced resistance of roots to infection. Root infection by the VAM fungus Glomus fasciculatum ([Thaxt. sensu Gerdemann] Gerdemann and Trappe) was extensive for plants grown with low abiotic P supply, and plant biomass accumulation was enhanced by the symbiosis. The capacity of excised roots from P-deficient plants to produce ethylene in the presence or absence of exogenous 1-amino cyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid (ACC) was markedly reduced by VAM infection. This apparent inhibition of ACC oxidase (ACC(ox)) activity was localized to areas containing infected roots, as demonstrated in split-root studies. Furthermore, leachate from VAM roots contained a potent water-soluble inhibitor of ethylene generation from exogenous ACC by nonmycorrhizal (NM) roots. The leachate from VAM-infected roots had a higher concentration of phenolics, relative to that from NM roots. Moreover, the rates of ethylene formation and phenolic concentration in leachates from VAM roots were inversely correlated, suggesting that this inhibitor may be of a phenolic nature. The specific activity of extracellular peroxidase recovered in root leachates was not stimulated by VAM infection, although activity on a fresh weight basis was significantly enhanced, reflecting the fact that VAM roots had higher protein content than NM roots. Polyphenol oxidase activity of roots did not differ between NM and VAM roots. These results characterize the low resistance response of P-deficient plants to VAM infection. When plants were grown with higher abiotic P supply, the relative benefit of the VAM symbiosis

  17. The Dunaliella salina organelle genomes: large sequences, inflated with intronic and intergenic DNA

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, David R.; Lee, Robert W.; Cushman, John C.; Magnuson, Jon K.; Tran, Duc; Polle, Juergen E.

    2010-05-07

    Abstract Background: Dunaliella salina Teodoresco, a unicellular, halophilic green alga belonging to the Chlorophyceae, is among the most industrially important microalgae. This is because D. salina can produce massive amounts of β-carotene, which can be collected for commercial purposes, and because of its potential as a feedstock for biofuels production. Although the biochemistry and physiology of D. salina have been studied in great detail, virtually nothing is known about the genomes it carries, especially those within its mitochondrion and plastid. This study presents the complete mitochondrial and plastid genome sequences of D. salina and compares them with those of the model green algae Chlamydomonas reinhardtii and Volvox carteri. Results: The D. salina organelle genomes are large, circular-mapping molecules with ~60% noncoding DNA, placing them among the most inflated organelle DNAs sampled from the Chlorophyta. In fact, the D. salina plastid genome, at 269 kb, is the largest complete plastid DNA (ptDNA) sequence currently deposited in GenBank, and both the mitochondrial and plastid genomes have unprecedentedly high intron densities for organelle DNA: ~1.5 and ~0.4 introns per gene, respectively. Moreover, what appear to be the relics of genes, introns, and intronic open reading frames are found scattered throughout the intergenic ptDNA regions -- a trait without parallel in other characterized organelle genomes and one that gives insight into the mechanisms and modes of expansion of the D. salina ptDNA. Conclusions: These findings confirm the notion that chlamydomonadalean algae have some of the most extreme organelle genomes of all eukaryotes. They also suggest that the events giving rise to the expanded ptDNA architecture of D. salina and other Chlamydomonadales may have occurred early in the evolution of this lineage. Although interesting from a genome evolution standpoint, the D. salina organelle DNA sequences will aid in the development of a viable

  18. SED5 encodes a 39-kD integral membrane protein required for vesicular transport between the ER and the Golgi complex

    PubMed Central

    1992-01-01

    The ERD2 gene, which encodes the yeast HDEL (His-Asp-Glu-Leu) receptor, is essential for growth (Semenza, J. C., K. G. Hardwick, N. Dean, and H. R. B. Pelham. 1990. Cell. 61:1349-1357; Lewis, M. J., D. J. Sweet, and H. R. B. Pelham. 1990. Cell. 61:1359-1363). SED5, when present in multiple copies, enables cells to grow in the absence of Erd2p. Sequence analysis of SED5 reveals no significant homology with ERD2 or other known genes. We have raised antibodies to Sed5p which specifically recognize a 39-kD integral membrane protein. A stretch of hydrophobic residues at the COOH terminus is predicted to hold Sed5p on the cytoplasmic face of intracellular membranes. Cells that are depleted of Sed5p are unable to transport carboxypeptidase Y to the Golgi complex, and stop growing after a dramatic accumulation of ER membranes and vesicles. We conclude that the SED5 gene is essential for growth and that Sed5p is required for ER to Golgi transport. When Sed5p is overexpressed the efficiency of ER to Golgi transport is reduced, vesicles accumulate, and cellular morphology is perturbed. Immunofluorescence studies reveal that the bulk of Sed5p is not found on ER membranes but on punctate structures throughout the cytoplasm, the number of which increases upon SED5 overexpression. We suggest that Sed5p has an essential role in vesicular transport between ER and Golgi compartments and that it may itself cycle between these organelles. PMID:1400588

  19. Immunogenicity of an aphthovirus chimera of the glycoprotein of vesicular stomatitis virus.

    PubMed Central

    Grigera, P R; Garcia-Briones, M; Periolo, O; la Torre, J L; Wagner, R R

    1996-01-01

    An oligodeoxynucleotide coding for amino acids 139 through 149 of antigenic site A (ASA) of the VP1 capsid protein of the foot-and-mouth disease virus C3 serotype (FMDV C3) was inserted into three different in-frame sites of the vesicular stomatitis virus New Jersey serotype (VSV-NJ) glycoprotein (G) gene cDNA present in plasmid pKG97 under control of the bacteriophage T7 polymerase promoter. Transfection of these plasmids into CV1 cells coinfected with the T7 polymerase-expressing vaccinia virus recombinant vTF1-6,2 resulted in expression of chimeric proteins efficiently reactive with both anti-FMDV and anti-VSV G antibodies. However, in vitro translation of transcripts of these VSV-G/FMDV-ASA chimeric plasmids resulted in proteins that were recognized by anti-G serum but not by anti-FMDV serum, indicating a requirement for in vivo conformation to expose the ASA antigenic determinant. Insertion of DNA coding for a dimer of the ASA unidecapeptide between the VSV-NJ G gene region coding for amino acids 160 and 161 gave rise to a chimeric ASA-dimer protein designated GF2d, which reacted twice as strongly with anti-FMDV antibody as did chimeric proteins in which the ASA monomer was inserted in the same position or two other G-gene positions. For even greater expression of chimeric VSV-G/FMDV-ASA proteins, plasmid pGF2d and a deletion mutant p(delta)GF2d (G protein deleted of 324 C-terminal amino acids) were inserted into baculovirus vectors expressing chimeric proteins GF2d-bac and deltaGF2d-bac produced in Sf9 insect cells. Mice vaccinated with three booster injections of 30 microg each of partially purified GF2d-bac protein responded by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay with FMDV antibody titers of 1,000 units, and those injected with equivalent amounts of deltaGF2d-bac protein showed serum titers of up to 10,000 units. Particularly impressive were FMDV neutralizing antibody titers in serum of mice vaccinated with deltaGF2d-bac protein, which approached those in the

  20. Shear-induced bubble coalescence in rhyolitic melts with low vesicularity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okumura, Satoshi; Nakamura, Michihiko; Tsuchiyama, Akira

    2006-10-01

    We have experimentally demonstrated for the first time, shear-induced development of bubble size and shape in a rhyolitic melt. The deformation experiments have been performed by using an externally heated, piston-cylinder type apparatus with a rotational piston. At 975°C, the vesiculated rhyolitic melts having cylindrical shape were twisted at rotational speeds of 0.3, 0.5 and 1.0 rpm. The number, size and shape of bubbles were then measured by using the X-ray computed tomography. The experimental results show that coalescence of bubbles occur even at low vesicularity (20 vol.%) and the degree of coalescence is enhanced with the shear rate. Because the shear-induced deformation seems to be produced for magmas ascending in a volcanic conduit, we propose the possibility of the vesiculated magma undergoing bubble coalescence at a significant depth (low vesicularity), resulting in the formation of permeable magmas, at least near the conduit wall.

  1. Exclusion of close linkage between the synaptic vesicular monoamine transporter locus and schizophrenia spectrum disorders

    SciTech Connect

    Persico, A.M.; Uhl, G.R.; Wang, Zhe Wu

    1995-12-18

    The principal brain synaptic vesicular monoamine transporter (VMAT2) is responsible for the reuptake of serotonin, dopamine, norepinephrine, epinephrine, and histamine from the cytoplasm into synaptic vesicles, thus contributing to determination of the size of releasable neurotransmitter vesicular pools. Potential involvement of VMAT2 gene variants in the etiology of schizophrenia and related disorders was tested using polymorphic VMAT2 gene markers in 156 subjects from 16 multiplex pedigrees with schizophrenia, schizophreniform, schizoaffective, and schizotypal disorders and mood incongruent psychotic depression. Assuming genetic homogeneity, complete ({theta} = 0.0) linkage to the schizophrenia spectrum was excluded under both dominant and recessive models. Allelic variants at the VMAT2 locus do not appear to provide major genetic contributions to the etiology of schizophrenia spectrum disorders in these pedigrees. 16 refs.

  2. The neuroprotective role of vesicular monoamine transporter 2 in neurodegenerative diseases.

    PubMed

    Yulug, Burak; Hanoglu, Lutfu; Kilic, Ertugrul

    2015-01-01

    Neuropharmacological relation of religious belief supports the role of dopaminergic activation as the leading neurochemical feature. However, vesicular monoamine transporter-2 (VMAT-2) has been shown to be responsible for removing of neurotransmitters such as dopamine that may secondarily lead to a neuroprotective activity by different neurodegeneration models. Moreover, there are interesting data showing that VMAT-2 may play an important role during religious belief and experience. In the light of these findings, we aimed to review the preclinical and clinical neuroprotective data of Vesicular monoamine transporter (VMAT-2) in different neurodegenerative and neuropsychiatric diseases. In respect of rapidly increasing evidences about the neurobiological and neuroimaging correlates of religious belief, we hypothesized that there is a link between belief and neuroprotection.

  3. Vesicular Glutamate Transport Promotes Dopamine Storage and Glutamate Corelease In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Hnasko, Thomas S.; Chuhma, Nao; Zhang, Hui; Goh, Germaine Y.; Sulzer, David; Palmiter, Richard D.; Rayport, Stephen; Edwards, Robert H.

    2010-01-01

    SUMMARY Dopamine neurons in the ventral tegmental area (VTA) play an important role in the motivational systems underlying drug addiction, and recent work has suggested that they also release the excitatory neurotransmitter glutamate. To assess a physiological role for glutamate corelease, we disrupted the expression of vesicular glutamate transporter 2 selectively in dopamine neurons. The conditional knockout abolishes glutamate release from midbrain dopamine neurons in culture and severely reduces their excitatory synaptic output in mesoaccumbens slices. Baseline motor behavior is not affected, but stimulation of locomotor activity by cocaine is impaired, apparently through a selective reduction of dopamine stores in the projection of VTA neurons to ventral striatum. Glutamate co-entry promotes monoamine storage by increasing the pH gradient that drives vesicular monoamine transport. Remarkably, low concentrations of glutamate acidify synaptic vesicles more slowly but to a greater extent than equimolar Cl−, indicating a distinct, presynaptic mechanism to regulate quantal size. PMID:20223200

  4. Effects of Cisplatin in Neuroblastoma Rat Cells: Damage to Cellular Organelles

    PubMed Central

    Santin, Giada; Scietti, Luigi; Veneroni, Paola; Barni, Sergio; Bernocchi, Graziella; Bottone, Maria Grazia

    2012-01-01

    Cisplatin (cisPt) is a chemotherapy agent used as a treatment for several types of cancer. The main cytotoxic effect of cisplatin is generally accepted to be DNA damage. Recently, the mechanism by which cisPt generates the cascade of events involved in the apoptotic process has been demonstrated. In particular it has been shown that some organelles are cisPt target and are involved in cell death. This paper aims to describe the morphological and functional changes of the Golgi apparatus and lysosomes during apoptosis induced in neuronal rat cells (B50) by cisplatin. The results obtained show that the cellular organelles are the target of cisPt, so their damage can induce cell death. PMID:22505928

  5. Organelle DNA haplotypes reflect crop-use characteristics and geographic origins of Cannabis sativa.

    PubMed

    Gilmore, Simon; Peakall, Rod; Robertson, James

    2007-10-25

    Comparative sequencing of cannabis individuals across 12 chloroplast and mitochondrial DNA loci revealed 7 polymorphic sites, including 5 length variable regions and 2 single nucleotide polymorphisms. Simple PCR assays were developed to assay these polymorphisms, and organelle DNA haplotypes were obtained for 188 cannabis individuals from 76 separate populations, including drug-type, fibre-type and wild populations. The haplotype data were analysed using parsimony, UPGMA and neighbour joining methods. Three haplotype groups were recovered by each analysis method, and these groups are suggestive of the crop-use characteristics and geographical origin of the populations, although not strictly diagnostic. We discuss the relationship between our haplotype data and taxonomic opinions of cannabis, and the implications of organelle DNA haplotyping to forensic investigations of cannabis.

  6. Quantitatively Mapping Cellular Viscosity with Detailed Organelle Information via a Designed PET Fluorescent Probe

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Tianyu; Liu, Xiaogang; Spring, David R.; Qian, Xuhong; Cui, Jingnan; Xu, Zhaochao

    2014-01-01

    Viscosity is a fundamental physical parameter that influences diffusion in biological processes. The distribution of intracellular viscosity is highly heterogeneous, and it is challenging to obtain a full map of cellular viscosity with detailed organelle information. In this work, we report 1 as the first fluorescent viscosity probe which is able to quantitatively map cellular viscosity with detailed organelle information based on the PET mechanism. This probe exhibited a significant ratiometric fluorescence intensity enhancement as solvent viscosity increases. The emission intensity increase was attributed to combined effects of the inhibition of PET due to restricted conformational access (favorable for FRET, but not for PET), and the decreased PET efficiency caused by viscosity-dependent twisted intramolecular charge transfer (TICT). A full map of subcellular viscosity was successfully constructed via fluorescent ratiometric detection and fluorescence lifetime imaging; it was found that lysosomal regions in a cell possess the highest viscosity, followed by mitochondrial regions. PMID:24957323

  7. Active diffusion and microtubule-based transport oppose myosin forces to position organelles in cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Congping; Schuster, Martin; Guimaraes, Sofia Cunha; Ashwin, Peter; Schrader, Michael; Metz, Jeremy; Hacker, Christian; Gurr, Sarah Jane; Steinberg, Gero

    2016-06-01

    Even distribution of peroxisomes (POs) and lipid droplets (LDs) is critical to their role in lipid and reactive oxygen species homeostasis. How even distribution is achieved remains elusive, but diffusive motion and directed motility may play a role. Here we show that in the fungus Ustilago maydis ~95% of POs and LDs undergo diffusive motions. These movements require ATP and involve bidirectional early endosome motility, indicating that microtubule-associated membrane trafficking enhances diffusion of organelles. When early endosome transport is abolished, POs and LDs drift slowly towards the growing cell end. This pole-ward drift is facilitated by anterograde delivery of secretory cargo to the cell tip by myosin-5. Modelling reveals that microtubule-based directed transport and active diffusion support distribution, mobility and mixing of POs. In mammalian COS-7 cells, microtubules and F-actin also counteract each other to distribute POs. This highlights the importance of opposing cytoskeletal forces in organelle positioning in eukaryotes.

  8. Notochord vacuoles are lysosome-related organelles that function in axis and spine morphogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Ellis, Kathryn; Bagwell, Jennifer

    2013-01-01

    The notochord plays critical structural and signaling roles during vertebrate development. At the center of the vertebrate notochord is a large fluid-filled organelle, the notochord vacuole. Although these highly conserved intracellular structures have been described for decades, little is known about the molecular mechanisms involved in their biogenesis and maintenance. Here we show that zebrafish notochord vacuoles are specialized lysosome-related organelles whose formation and maintenance requires late endosomal trafficking regulated by the vacuole-specific Rab32a and H+-ATPase–dependent acidification. We establish that notochord vacuoles are required for body axis elongation during embryonic development and identify a novel role in spine morphogenesis. Thus, the vertebrate notochord plays important structural roles beyond early development. PMID:23460678

  9. Multiple vacuoles in impaired tonoplast trafficking3 mutants are independent organelles.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Jiameng; Han, Sang Won; Munnik, Teun; Rojas-Pierce, Marcela

    2014-01-01

    Plant vacuoles are essential and dynamic organelles, and mechanisms of vacuole biogenesis and fusion are not well characterized. We recently demonstrated that Wortmannin, an inhibitor of Phosphatidylinositol 3-Kinase (PI3K), induces the fusion of plant vacuoles both in roots of itt3/vti11 mutant alleles and in guard cells of wild type Arabidopsis and Fava bean. Here we used Fluorescence Recovery After Photobleaching (FRAP) to demonstrate that the vacuoles in itt3/vti11 are independent organelles. Furthermore, we used fluorescent protein reporters that bind specifically to Phosphatidylinositol 3-Phosphate (PtdIns(3)P) or PtdIns(4)P to show that Wortmannin treatments that induce the fusion of vti11 vacuoles result in the loss of PtdIns(3)P from cellular membranes. These results provided supporting evidence for a critical role of PtdIns(3)P in vacuole fusion in roots and guard cells.

  10. Multiple vacuoles in impaired tonoplast trafficking3 mutants are independent organelles.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Jiameng; Won Han, Sang; Munnik, Teun; Rojas-Pierce, Marcela

    2014-08-13

    Plant vacuoles are essential and dynamic organelles, and mechanisms of vacuole biogenesis and fusion are not well characterized. We recently demonstrated that Wortmannin, an inhibitor of Phosphatidylinositol-3-Kinase (PI3K), induces the fusion of plant vacuoles both in roots of itt3/vti11 mutant alleles and in guard cells of wild type Arabidopsis and Fava bean. Here we used Fluorescence Recovery After Photobleaching (FRAP) to demonstrate that the vacuoles in itt3/vti11 are independent organelles. Furthermore, we used fluorescent protein reporters that bind specifically to Phosphatidylinositol-3-Phosphate (PtdIns(3)P) or PtdIns(4)P to show that Wortmannin treatments that induce the fusion of vti11 vacuoles result in the loss of PtdIns(3)P from cellular membranes. These results provided supporting evidence for a critical role of PtdIns(3)P in vacuole fusion in roots and guard cells.

  11. Multiple vacuoles in impaired tonoplast trafficking3 mutants are independent organelles

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Jiameng; Han, Sang Won; Munnik, Teun; Rojas-Pierce, Marcela

    2014-01-01

    Plant vacuoles are essential and dynamic organelles, and mechanisms of vacuole biogenesis and fusion are not well characterized. We recently demonstrated that Wortmannin, an inhibitor of Phosphatidylinositol 3-Kinase (PI3K), induces the fusion of plant vacuoles both in roots of itt3/vti11 mutant alleles and in guard cells of wild type Arabidopsis and Fava bean. Here we used Fluorescence Recovery After Photobleaching (FRAP) to demonstrate that the vacuoles in itt3/vti11 are independent organelles. Furthermore, we used fluorescent protein reporters that bind specifically to Phosphatidylinositol 3-Phosphate (PtdIns(3)P) or PtdIns(4)P to show that Wortmannin treatments that induce the fusion of vti11 vacuoles result in the loss of PtdIns(3)P from cellular membranes. These results provided supporting evidence for a critical role of PtdIns(3)P in vacuole fusion in roots and guard cells. PMID:25482812

  12. Resonance Raman Probes for Organelle-Specific Labeling in Live Cells

    PubMed Central

    Kuzmin, Andrey N.; Pliss, Artem; Lim, Chang-Keun; Heo, Jeongyun; Kim, Sehoon; Rzhevskii, Alexander; Gu, Bobo; Yong, Ken-Tye; Wen, Shangchun; Prasad, Paras N.

    2016-01-01

    Raman microspectroscopy provides for high-resolution non-invasive molecular analysis of biological samples and has a breakthrough potential for dissection of cellular molecular composition at a single organelle level. However, the potential of Raman microspectroscopy can be fully realized only when novel types of molecular probes distinguishable in the Raman spectroscopy modality are developed for labeling of specific cellular domains to guide spectrochemical spatial imaging. Here we report on the design of a next generation Raman probe, based on BlackBerry Quencher 650 compound, which provides unprecedentedly high signal intensity through the Resonance Raman (RR) enhancement mechanism. Remarkably, RR enhancement occurs with low-toxic red light, which is close to maximum transparency in the biological optical window. The utility of proposed RR probes was validated for targeting lysosomes in live cultured cells, which enabled identification and subsequent monitoring of dynamic changes in this organelle by Raman imaging. PMID:27339882

  13. Resonance Raman Probes for Organelle-Specific Labeling in Live Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuzmin, Andrey N.; Pliss, Artem; Lim, Chang-Keun; Heo, Jeongyun; Kim, Sehoon; Rzhevskii, Alexander; Gu, Bobo; Yong, Ken-Tye; Wen, Shangchun; Prasad, Paras N.

    2016-06-01

    Raman microspectroscopy provides for high-resolution non-invasive molecular analysis of biological samples and has a breakthrough potential for dissection of cellular molecular composition at a single organelle level. However, the potential of Raman microspectroscopy can be fully realized only when novel types of molecular probes distinguishable in the Raman spectroscopy modality are developed for labeling of specific cellular domains to guide spectrochemical spatial imaging. Here we report on the design of a next generation Raman probe, based on BlackBerry Quencher 650 compound, which provides unprecedentedly high signal intensity through the Resonance Raman (RR) enhancement mechanism. Remarkably, RR enhancement occurs with low-toxic red light, which is close to maximum transparency in the biological optical window. The utility of proposed RR probes was validated for targeting lysosomes in live cultured cells, which enabled identification and subsequent monitoring of dynamic changes in this organelle by Raman imaging.

  14. Notochord vacuoles are lysosome-related organelles that function in axis and spine morphogenesis.

    PubMed

    Ellis, Kathryn; Bagwell, Jennifer; Bagnat, Michel

    2013-03-04

    The notochord plays critical structural and signaling roles during vertebrate development. At the center of the vertebrate notochord is a large fluid-filled organelle, the notochord vacuole. Although these highly conserved intracellular structures have been described for decades, little is known about the molecular mechanisms involved in their biogenesis and maintenance. Here we show that zebrafish notochord vacuoles are specialized lysosome-related organelles whose formation and maintenance requires late endosomal trafficking regulated by the vacuole-specific Rab32a and H(+)-ATPase-dependent acidification. We establish that notochord vacuoles are required for body axis elongation during embryonic development and identify a novel role in spine morphogenesis. Thus, the vertebrate notochord plays important structural roles beyond early development.

  15. Active diffusion and microtubule-based transport oppose myosin forces to position organelles in cells

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Congping; Schuster, Martin; Guimaraes, Sofia Cunha; Ashwin, Peter; Schrader, Michael; Metz, Jeremy; Hacker, Christian; Gurr, Sarah Jane; Steinberg, Gero

    2016-01-01

    Even distribution of peroxisomes (POs) and lipid droplets (LDs) is critical to their role in lipid and reactive oxygen species homeostasis. How even distribution is achieved remains elusive, but diffusive motion and directed motility may play a role. Here we show that in the fungus Ustilago maydis ∼95% of POs and LDs undergo diffusive motions. These movements require ATP and involve bidirectional early endosome motility, indicating that microtubule-associated membrane trafficking enhances diffusion of organelles. When early endosome transport is abolished, POs and LDs drift slowly towards the growing cell end. This pole-ward drift is facilitated by anterograde delivery of secretory cargo to the cell tip by myosin-5. Modelling reveals that microtubule-based directed transport and active diffusion support distribution, mobility and mixing of POs. In mammalian COS-7 cells, microtubules and F-actin also counteract each other to distribute POs. This highlights the importance of opposing cytoskeletal forces in organelle positioning in eukaryotes. PMID:27251117

  16. Quantitatively Mapping Cellular Viscosity with Detailed Organelle Information via a Designed PET Fluorescent Probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Tianyu; Liu, Xiaogang; Spring, David R.; Qian, Xuhong; Cui, Jingnan; Xu, Zhaochao

    2014-06-01

    Viscosity is a fundamental physical parameter that influences diffusion in biological processes. The distribution of intracellular viscosity is highly heterogeneous, and it is challenging to obtain a full map of cellular viscosity with detailed organelle information. In this work, we report 1 as the first fluorescent viscosity probe which is able to quantitatively map cellular viscosity with detailed organelle information based on the PET mechanism. This probe exhibited a significant ratiometric fluorescence intensity enhancement as solvent viscosity increases. The emission intensity increase was attributed to combined effects of the inhibition of PET due to restricted conformational access (favorable for FRET, but not for PET), and the decreased PET efficiency caused by viscosity-dependent twisted intramolecular charge transfer (TICT). A full map of subcellular viscosity was successfully constructed via fluorescent ratiometric detection and fluorescence lifetime imaging; it was found that lysosomal regions in a cell possess the highest viscosity, followed by mitochondrial regions.

  17. Maternal inheritance of mitochondrial DNA: degradation of paternal mitochondria by allogeneic organelle autophagy, allophagy.

    PubMed

    Sato, Miyuki; Sato, Ken

    2012-03-01

    Maternal inheritance of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) is generally observed in many eukaryotes. Sperm-derived paternal mitochondria and their mtDNA enter the oocyte cytoplasm upon fertilization and then normally disappear during early embryogenesis. However, the mechanism underlying this clearance of paternal mitochondria has remained largely unknown. Recently, we showed that autophagy is required for the elimination of paternal mitochondria in Caenorhabditis elegans embryos. Shortly after fertilization, autophagosomes are induced locally around the penetrated sperm components. These autophagosomes engulf paternal mitochondria, resulting in their lysosomal degradation during early embryogenesis. In autophagy-defective zygotes, paternal mitochondria and their genomes remain even in the larval stage. Therefore, maternal inheritance of mtDNA is accomplished by autophagic degradation of paternal mitochondria. We also found that another kind of sperm-derived structure, called the membranous organelle, is degraded by zygotic autophagy as well. We thus propose to term this allogeneic (nonself) organelle autophagy as allophagy.

  18. Effects of the uncoupling agents FCCP and CCCP on the saltatory movements of cytoplasmic organelles.

    PubMed

    Hollenbeck, P J; Bray, D; Adams, R J

    1985-02-01

    Two potent uncoupling agents, carbonylcyanide-4-trifluoromethoxyphenylhydrazone (FCCP) and carbonylcyanide-3-chlorophenylhydrazone (CCCP) inhibit the movement of organelles in neurites of chick sensory neurones in culture. FCCP applied for 30 minutes at 10 microM reduces the number of moving organelles by 78% and a similar treatment with CCCP causes a reduction of 47%. At 100 microM either compound abolishes all directed movements both in neurites and in cultured 3T3 cells. These effects are probably not due to the discharge of proton gradients since 2,4-dinitrophenol (DNP), at concentrations shown to uncouple mitochondria by the discharge of the permeant cationic fluorescent probe rhodamine 123, fails to inhibit cytoplasmic movements. The inhibition of cytoplasmic movements by FCCP and CCCP is likely to be a consequence of their inhibitory action on a variety of enzymes, including dynein and myosin ATPases, through a reaction with sulfhydryl groups.

  19. Quantitatively mapping cellular viscosity with detailed organelle information via a designed PET fluorescent probe.

    PubMed

    Liu, Tianyu; Liu, Xiaogang; Spring, David R; Qian, Xuhong; Cui, Jingnan; Xu, Zhaochao

    2014-06-24

    Viscosity is a fundamental physical parameter that influences diffusion in biological processes. The distribution of intracellular viscosity is highly heterogeneous, and it is challenging to obtain a full map of cellular viscosity with detailed organelle information. In this work, we report 1 as the first fluorescent viscosity probe which is able to quantitatively map cellular viscosity with detailed organelle information based on the PET mechanism. This probe exhibited a significant ratiometric fluorescence intensity enhancement as solvent viscosity increases. The emission intensity increase was attributed to combined effects of the inhibition of PET due to restricted conformational access (favorable for FRET, but not for PET), and the decreased PET efficiency caused by viscosity-dependent twisted intramolecular charge transfer (TICT). A full map of subcellular viscosity was successfully constructed via fluorescent ratiometric detection and fluorescence lifetime imaging; it was found that lysosomal regions in a cell possess the highest viscosity, followed by mitochondrial regions.

  20. Axonal Segregation and Role of the Vesicular Glutamate Transporter VGLUT3 in Serotonin Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Voisin, Aurore N.; Mnie-Filali, Ouissame; Giguère, Nicolas; Fortin, Guillaume M.; Vigneault, Erika; El Mestikawy, Salah; Descarries, Laurent; Trudeau, Louis-Éric

    2016-01-01

    A subset of monoamine neurons releases glutamate as a cotransmitter due to presence of the vesicular glutamate transporters VGLUT2 or VGLUT3. In addition to mediating vesicular loading of glutamate, it has been proposed that VGLUT3 enhances serotonin (5-HT) vesicular loading by the vesicular monoamine transporter (VMAT2) in 5-HT neurons. In dopamine (DA) neurons, glutamate appears to be released from specialized subsets of terminals and it may play a developmental role, promoting neuronal growth and survival. The hypothesis of a similar developmental role and axonal localization of glutamate co-release in 5-HT neurons has not been directly examined. Using postnatal mouse raphe neurons in culture, we first observed that in contrast to 5-HT itself, other phenotypic markers of 5-HT axon terminals such as the 5-HT reuptake transporter (SERT) show a more restricted localization in the axonal arborization. Interestingly, only a subset of SERT- and 5-HT-positive axonal varicosities expressed VGLUT3, with SERT and VGLUT3 being mostly segregated. Using VGLUT3 knockout mice, we found that deletion of this transporter leads to reduced survival of 5-HT neurons in vitro and also decreased the density of 5-HT-immunoreactivity in terminals in the dorsal striatum and dorsal part of the hippocampus in the intact brain. Our results demonstrate that raphe 5-HT neurons express SERT and VGLUT3 mainly in segregated axon terminals and that VGLUT3 regulates the vulnerability of these neurons and the neurochemical identity of their axonal domain, offering new perspectives on the functional connectivity of a cell population involved in anxiety disorders and depression. PMID:27147980

  1. Purification of Regucalcin from the Seminal Vesicular Fluid: A Calcium Binding Multi-Functional Protein.

    PubMed

    Harikrishna, P; Shende, A M; Reena, K K; Thomas, Jobin; Bhure, S K

    2016-08-01

    Regucalcin is a multi-functional protein having roles in calcium homeostasis as well as in anti-apoptotic, anti-prolific and anti-oxidative functions. Recently, it has been reported from the male reproductive tract, but its role in male reproduction needs further investigation; for which the native regucalcin of reproductive origin will be more appropriate. The gel exclusion chromatography followed by diethyl aminoethane cellulose chromatography and two-dimentional cellulose acetate membrane electrophoresis used for its purification are time consuming and less specific. Here, the regucalcin gene from buffalo testis has been cloned, expressed and purified in recombinant form, and subsequently used for raising hyper-immune serum. The Western blot of seminal vesicular fluid probed with anti-regucalcin polyclonal and monoclonal antibodies showed the presence of 28 and 34 kDa bands specific to regucalcin. Further, an affinity matrix has been prepared using anti-regucalcin polyclonal antibodies. An immuno-affinity chromatography method has been standardized to isolate regucalcin from seminal vesicular fluid. The initial complexity of the protein mixture in the seminal vesicular fluid has been reduced by a heat coagulation step. The purified protein on sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis showed a single band at 68 kDa that has been further confirmed as regucalcin by Liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry/mass spectrometry. The RGN purified from seminal vesicular fluid will be more appropriate for studying its possible role in male reproduction, especially sperm cell capacitation, hyperactivation, acrosome reaction and cryopreservation. The study can be applied in purifying regucalcin from different tissues or species with minor modifications in the methodology.

  2. Outbreaks of Vesicular stomatitis Alagoas virus in horses and cattle in northeastern Brazil.

    PubMed

    Cargnelutti, Juliana F; Olinda, Roberio G; Maia, Lisanka A; de Aguiar, Gildeni M N; Neto, Eldinê G M; Simões, Sara V D; de Lima, Tatiane G; Dantas, Antônio F M; Weiblen, Rudi; Flores, Eduardo F; Riet-Correa, Franklin

    2014-11-01

    The current article describes outbreaks of vesicular stomatitis (VS) in horses and cattle in Paraiba and Rio Grande do Norte states, northeastern Brazil, between June and August 2013. The reported cases affected 15-20 horses and 6 cattle distributed over 6 small farms in 4 municipalities, but additional data indicated the involvement of a large number of animals on several farms. The disease was characterized by blisters; eruptive lesions in coronary bands, lips, mouth, and muzzle; salivation; claudication and loss of condition. Swollen lower limbs and lips, and ulcerated and erosive areas in the lips and muzzle were observed in some horses. A necrotizing vesiculopustular dermatitis and stomatitis was observed histologically. Vesicular stomatitis virus was isolated from the vesicular fluid of a horse lesion and shown to be serologically related to the VS Indiana serogroup (VSIV) by virus neutralization. Convalescent sera of affected horses and cattle, and from healthy contacts, harbored high levels of neutralizing antibodies against the isolated virus (named VSIV-3 2013SaoBento/ParaibaE). Genomic sequences of VSIV subtype 3 (Vesicular stomatitis Alagoas virus) were amplified by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction out of clinical specimens from a cow and a horse from different farms. Nucleotide sequencing and phylogenetic analysis of the phosphoprotein gene indicated that the 2 isolates were derived from the same virus and clustered them in VSIV-3, along with VS viruses identified in southeastern and northeastern Brazil in the last decades. Thus, the present report demonstrates the circulation of VSIV-3 in northeastern Brazil and urges for more effective diagnosis and surveillance.

  3. Arabidopsis myosin XI sub-domains homologous to the yeast myo2p organelle inheritance sub-domain target subcellular structures in plant cells

    PubMed Central

    Sattarzadeh, Amirali; Schmelzer, Elmon; Hanson, Maureen R.

    2013-01-01

    Myosin XI motor proteins transport plant organelles on the actin cytoskeleton. The Arabidopsis gene family that encodes myosin XI has 13 members, 12 of which have sub-domains within the tail region that are homologous to well-characterized cargo-binding domains in the yeast myosin V myo2p. Little is presently known about the cargo-binding domains of plant myosin XIs. Prior experiments in which most or all of the tail regions of myosin XIs have been fused to yellow fluorescent protein (YFP) and transiently expressed have often not resulted in fluorescent labeling of plant organelles. We identified 42 amino-acid regions within 12 Arabidopsis myosin XIs that are homologous to the yeast myo2p tail region known to be essential for vacuole and mitochondrial inheritance. A YFP fusion of the yeast region expressed in plants did not label tonoplasts or mitochondria. We investigated whether the homologous Arabidopsis regions, termed by us the “PAL” sub-domain, could associate with subcellular structures following transient expression of fusions with YFP in Nicotiana benthamiana. Seven YFP::PAL sub-domain fusions decorated Golgi and six were localized to mitochondria. In general, the myosin XI PAL sub-domains labeled organelles whose motility had previously been observed to be affected by mutagenesis or dominant negative assays with the respective myosins. Simultaneous transient expression of the PAL sub-domains of myosin XI-H, XI-I, and XI-K resulted in inhibition of movement of mitochondria and Golgi. PMID:24187546

  4. A Dual Functional Electroactive and Fluorescent Probe for Coupled Measurements of Vesicular Exocytosis with High Spatial and Temporal Resolution.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiaoqing; Savy, Alexandra; Maurin, Sylvie; Grimaud, Laurence; Darchen, François; Quinton, Damien; Labbé, Eric; Buriez, Olivier; Delacotte, Jérôme; Lemaître, Frédéric; Guille-Collignon, Manon

    2017-02-20

    In this work, Fluorescent False Neurotransmitter 102 (FFN102), a synthesized analogue of biogenic neurotransmitters, was demonstrated to show both pH-dependent fluorescence and electroactivity. To study secretory behaviors at the single-vesicle level, FFN102 was employed as a new fluorescent/electroactive dual probe in a coupled technique (amperometry and total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy (TIRFM)). We used N13 cells, a stable clone of BON cells, to specifically accumulate FFN102 into their secretory vesicles, and then optical and electrochemical measurements of vesicular exocytosis were experimentally achieved by using indium tin oxide (ITO) transparent electrodes. Upon stimulation, FFN102 started to diffuse out from the acidic intravesicular microenvironment to the neutral extracellular space, leading to fluorescent emissions and to the electrochemical oxidation signals that were simultaneously collected from the ITO electrode surface. The correlation of fluorescence and amperometric signals resulting from the FFN102 probe allows real-time monitoring of single exocytotic events with both high spatial and temporal resolution. This work opens new possibilities in the investigation of exocytotic mechanisms.

  5. Retargeting vesicular stomatitis virus glycoprotein pseudotyped lentiviral vectors with enhanced stability by in situ synthesized polymer shell.

    PubMed

    Liang, Min; Yan, Ming; Lu, Yunfeng; Chen, Irvin S Y

    2013-02-01

    The ability to introduce transgenes with precise specificity to the desired target cells or tissues is key to a more facile application of genetic therapy. Here, we describe a novel method using nanotechnology to generate lentiviral vectors with altered recognition of host cell receptor specificity. Briefly, the infectivity of the vesicular stomatitis virus glycoprotein (VSV-G) pseudotyped lentiviral vectors was shielded by a thin polymer shell synthesized in situ onto the viral envelope, and new binding ability was conferred to the shielded virus by introducing acrylamide-tailored cyclic arginine-glycine-aspartic acid (cRGD) peptide to the polymer shell. We termed the resulting virus "targeting nanovirus." The targeting nanovirus had similar titer with VSV-G pseudotypes and specifically transduced Hela cells with high transduction efficiency. In addition, the encapsulation of the VSV-G pseudotyped lentivirus by the polymer shell did not change the pathway that VSV-G pseudotypes enter and fuse with cells, as well as later events such as reverse transcription and gene expression. Furthermore, the targeting nanovirus possessed enhanced stability in the presence of human serum, indicating protection of the virus by the polymer shell from human serum complement inactivation. This novel use of nanotechnology demonstrates proof of concept for an approach that could be more generally applied for redirecting viral vectors for laboratory and clinical purposes.

  6. Use of Oral Fluids for Detection of Virus and Antibodies in Pigs Infected with Swine Vesicular Disease Virus.

    PubMed

    Senthilkumaran, C; Bittner, H; Ambagala, A; Lung, O; Babiuk, S; Yang, M; Zimmerman, J; Giménez-Lirola, L G; Nfon, C

    2016-09-15

    The use of swine oral fluid (OF) for the detection of nucleic acids and antibodies is gaining significant popularity. Assays have been developed for this purpose for endemic and foreign animal diseases of swine. Here, we report the use of OF for the detection of virus and antibodies in pigs experimentally infected with swine vesicular disease virus (SVDV), a virus that causes a disease clinically indistinguishable from the economically devastating foot-and-mouth disease. Viral genome was detected in OF by real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RRT-PCR) from 1 day post-infection (DPI) to 21 DPI. Virus isolation from OF was also successful at 1-5 DPI. An adapted competitive ELISA based on the monoclonal antibodies 5B7 detected antibodies to SVDV in OF starting at DPI 6. Additionally, using isotype-specific indirect ELISAs, SVDV-specific IgM and IgA were evaluated in OF. IgM response started at DPI 6, peaking at DPI 7 or 14 and declining sharply at DPI 21, while IgA response started at DPI 7, peaked at DPI 14 and remained high until the end of the experiment. These results confirm the potential use of OF for SVD surveillance using both established and partially validated assays in this study.

  7. A validated RP-HPLC method to investigate finasteride in human skin after in vitro topically applying vesicular nanocarrier.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Feiyue; Rao, Yuefeng; Lou, Yan; Lu, Xiaoyang

    2014-05-01

    The pharmacotherapeutic efficiency of topical drug delivery systems is mainly dominated by the skin distribution of therapeutic agents. In this work, a sensitive, rapid and fully-validated reversed-phase high performance liquid chromatography (RP-HPLC) method was developed to determine finasteride in human cadaver skin after different vesicular formulations were applied. Drug in different depth of skin layers were measured with an EclipseXDB-C18 column. The mobile phase consisted of 75% (v/v) methanol containing 0.2% phosphoric acid buffered to pH 3.0 with triethylamine under isocratic conditions. The system was operated at 40°C and the mobile phase flow rate was set at 1 mL/min. The standard-calibration curve was linear within range of 5 to 200 ng/ml with correlation coefficient 0.9996. The intra-assay precision was less than 3.9% while the inter-assay precision was less than 7.1% with the bias range of -8.6 to 4.1%. This method was found to be specific, accurate, and sensitive and was successfully used to determine the accumulation of finasteride after in-vitro percutaneous delivery by liposomal or ethosomal drug delivery nanocarriers.

  8. Retargeting Vesicular Stomatitis Virus Glycoprotein Pseudotyped Lentiviral Vectors with Enhanced Stability by In Situ Synthesized Polymer Shell

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Min; Yan, Ming; Lu, Yunfeng

    2013-01-01

    Abstract The ability to introduce transgenes with precise specificity to the desired target cells or tissues is key to a more facile application of genetic therapy. Here, we describe a novel method using nanotechnology to generate lentiviral vectors with altered recognition of host cell receptor specificity. Briefly, the infectivity of the vesicular stomatitis virus glycoprotein (VSV-G) pseudotyped lentiviral vectors was shielded by a thin polymer shell synthesized in situ onto the viral envelope, and new binding ability was conferred to the shielded virus by introducing acrylamide-tailored cyclic arginine-glycine-aspartic acid (cRGD) peptide to the polymer shell. We termed the resulting virus “targeting nanovirus.” The targeting nanovirus had similar titer with VSV-G pseudotypes and specifically transduced Hela cells with high transduction efficiency. In addition, the encapsulation of the VSV-G pseudotyped lentivirus by the polymer shell did not change the pathway that VSV-G pseudotypes enter and fuse with cells, as well as later events such as reverse transcription and gene expression. Furthermore, the targeting nanovirus possessed enhanced stability in the presence of human serum, indicating protection of the virus by the polymer shell from human serum complement inactivation. This novel use of nanotechnology demonstrates proof of concept for an approach that could be more generally applied for redirecting viral vectors for laboratory and clinical purposes. PMID:23327104

  9. The Membrane Marker mCLING Reveals the Molecular Composition of Trafficking Organelles.

    PubMed

    Revelo, Natalia H; Rizzoli, Silvio O

    2016-01-04

    mCLING is a fixable endocytosis marker that can be combined with immunolabeling techniques to study the molecular composition of trafficking organelles. mCLING can be used both in cultured cells and in tissue if critical sample preparation steps, such as fixation, are correctly performed. This unit describes protocols for the application of mCLING and for the subsequent sample processing. We include immunostaining protocols and embedding procedures for confocal and high-resolution microscopy.

  10. An NMR probe for the study of aerobic suspensions of cells and organelles

    SciTech Connect

    Balaban, R.S.; Gadian, D.G.; Radda, G.K.; Wong, G.G.

    1981-09-15

    The construction of an NMR probe and cell chamber with good mixing, pH buffering, and oxygenation characteristics, which can be used for relatively dilute cell and organelle suspension is described. The /sup 31/P NMR spectra of acceptable signal-to-noise ratios are obtained from approximately 200 mg (protein) of tissues, and kinetic studies of mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation are demonstrated. Representative spectra from rabbit kidney cortical tubules and rabbit kidney cortical mitochondria are presented.

  11. Dextran vesicular carriers for dual encapsulation of hydrophilic and hydrophobic molecules and delivery into cells.

    PubMed

    Pramod, P S; Takamura, Kathryn; Chaphekar, Sonali; Balasubramanian, Nagaraj; Jayakannan, M

    2012-11-12

    Dextran vesicular nanoscaffolds were developed based on polysaccharide and renewable resource alkyl tail for dual encapsulation of hydrophilic and hydrophobic molecules (or drugs) and delivery into cells. The roles of the hydrophobic segments on the molecular self-organization of dextran backbone into vesicles or nanoparticles were investigated in detail. Dextran vesicles were found to be a unique dual carrier in which water-soluble molecules (like Rhodamine-B, Rh-B) and polyaromatic anticancer drug (camptothecin, CPT) were selectively encapsulated in the hydrophilic core and hydrophobic layer, respectively. The dextran vesicles were capable of protecting the plasma-sensitive CPT lactone pharmacophore against the hydrolysis by 10× better than the CPT alone in PBS. The aliphatic ester linkage connecting the hydrophobic tail with dextran was found to be cleaved by esterase under physiological conditions for fast releasing of CPT or Rh-B. Cytotoxicity of the dextran vesicle and its drug conjugate were tested on mouse embryonic fibroblast cells (MEFs) using MTT assay. The dextran vesicular scaffold was found to be nontoxic to living cells. CPT loaded vesicles were found to be 2.5-fold more effective in killing fibroblasts compared to that of CPT alone in PBS. Confocal microscopic images confirmed that both Rh-B and CPT loaded vesicles to be taken up by fibroblasts compared to CPT alone, showing a distinctly perinuclear localization in cells. The custom designed dextran vesicular provides new research opportunities for dual loading and delivering of hydrophilic and hydrophobic drug molecules.

  12. Inhibition of skin inflammation in mice by diclofenac in vesicular carriers: liposomes, ethosomes and PEVs.

    PubMed

    Caddeo, Carla; Sales, Octavio Diez; Valenti, Donatella; Saurí, Amparo Ruiz; Fadda, Anna Maria; Manconi, Maria

    2013-02-25

    Diclofenac-loaded phospholipid vesicles, namely conventional liposomes, ethosomes and PEVs (penetration enhancer-containing vesicles) were developed and their efficacy in TPA (phorbol ester) induced skin inflammation was examined. Vesicles were made from a cheap and unpurified mixture of phospholipids and diclofenac sodium; Transcutol P and propylene glycol were added to obtain PEVs, and ethanol to produce ethosomes. The structure and lamellar organization of the vesicle bilayer were investigated by transmission electron microscopy and small and wide angle X-ray scattering, as well as the main physico-chemical features. The formulations, along with a diclofenac solution and commercial Voltaren Emulgel, were tested in a comparative trial for anti-inflammatory efficacy on TPA-treated mice dorsal skin. Vesicles were around 100 nm, negatively charged, able to encapsulate diclofenac in good yields, and disclosed different lamellarity, as a function of the formulation composition. Vesicular formulations promoted drug accumulation and reduced the permeation. Administration of vesicular diclofenac on TPA-inflamed skin resulted in marked attenuation of oedema and leucocyte infiltration, especially using PEVs. Histology confirmed the effectiveness of vesicles, since they provided an amelioration of the tissual damage induced by TPA. The proposed approach based on vesicular nanocarriers may hold promising therapeutic value for treating a variety of inflammatory skin disorders.

  13. In vitro percutaneous permeation and skin accumulation of finasteride using vesicular ethosomal carriers.

    PubMed

    Rao, Yuefeng; Zheng, Feiyue; Zhang, Xingguo; Gao, Jianqing; Liang, Wenquan

    2008-01-01

    In order to develop a novel transdermal drug delivery system that facilitates the skin permeation of finasteride encapsulated in novel lipid-based vesicular carriers (ethosomes)finasteride ethosomes were constructed and the morphological characteristics were studied by transmission electron microscopy. The particle size, zeta potential and the entrapment capacity of ethosome were also determined. In contrast to liposomes ethosomes were of more condensed vesicular structure and they were found to be oppositely charged. Ethosomes were found to be more efficient delivery carriers with high encapsulation capacities. In vitro percutaneous permeation experiments demonstrated that the permeation of finasteride through human cadaver skin was significantly increased when ethosomes were used. The finasteride transdermal fluxes from ethosomes containing formulation (1.34 +/- 0.11 microg/cm(2)/h) were 7.4, 3.2 and 2.6 times higher than that of finasteride from aqueous solution, conventional liposomes and hydroethanolic solution respectively (P < 0.01).Furthermore, ethosomes produced a significant (P < 0.01) finasteride accumulation in the skin, especially in deeper layers, for instance in dermis it reached to 18.2 +/- 1.8 microg/cm(2). In contrast, the accumulation of finasteride in the dermis was only 2.8 +/- 1.3 microg/cm(2) with liposome formulation. The study demonstrated that ethosomes are promising vesicular carriers for enhancing percutaneous absorption of finasteride.

  14. The vesicular SNARE Synaptobrevin is required for Semaphorin 3A axonal repulsion

    PubMed Central

    Zylbersztejn, Kathleen; Petkovic, Maja; Burgo, Andrea; Deck, Marie; Garel, Sonia; Marcos, Séverine; Bloch-Gallego, Evelyne; Nothias, Fatiha; Serini, Guido; Bagnard, Dominique; Binz, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    Attractive and repulsive molecules such as Semaphorins (Sema) trigger rapid responses that control the navigation of axonal growth cones. The role of vesicular traffic in axonal guidance is still largely unknown. The exocytic vesicular soluble N-ethylmaleimide sensitive fusion protein attachment protein receptor (SNARE) Synaptobrevin 2 (Syb2) is known for mediating neurotransmitter release in mature neurons, but its potential role in axonal guidance remains elusive. Here we show that Syb2 is required for Sema3A-dependent repulsion but not Sema3C-dependent attraction in cultured neurons and in the mouse brain. Syb2 associated with Neuropilin 1 and Plexin A1, two essential components of the Sema3A receptor, via its juxtatransmembrane domain. Sema3A receptor and Syb2 colocalize in endosomal membranes. Moreover, upon Sema3A treatment, Syb2-deficient neurons failed to collapse and transport Plexin A1 to cell bodies. Reconstitution of Sema3A receptor in nonneuronal cells revealed that Sema3A further inhibited the exocytosis of Syb2. Therefore, Sema3A-mediated signaling and axonal repulsion require Syb2-dependent vesicular traffic. PMID:22213797

  15. Detection of multiple viral infections in cattle and buffalo with suspected vesicular disease in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Laguardia-Nascimento, Mateus; Sales, Érica Bravo; Gasparini, Marcela Ribeiro; de Souza, Natália Mendes; da Silva, Josiane Aparecida Gonçalina; Souza, Giovana Gonçalves; Carani, Fernanda Rezek; Dos Santos, Alyane Figueiredo; Rivetti Júnior, Anselmo Vasconcelos; Camargos, Marcelo Fernandes; Fonseca Júnior, Antônio Augusto

    2016-07-01

    Vesicular diseases are of high importance for livestock, primarily because of foot-and-mouth disease (FMD), which is a high-morbidity disease that generates direct losses caused by low milk production, weight loss, and indirect losses because of the need for sanitary barriers. Other vesicular diseases are also of importance for livestock because of direct impacts or because their clinical signs may be confused with those of FMD. We report herein the detection of multiple infections in cattle with suspected vesicular disease in the Brazilian states of Amazonas (AM), Mato Grosso (MT), and Roraima. Thirty-seven epithelial samples from cattle and 1 sample from a buffalo were sent to the laboratory for testing for FMDV and similar disease agents. All samples from MT were positive for parapoxvirus (Pseudocowpox virus and Bovine papular stomatitis virus). In addition, 3 samples were positive for Bluetongue virus, and 5 samples were positive for Bovine herpesvirus 1 Among these samples, 1 was positive for all of these 3 agents. Only 2 samples from AM were negative for parapoxvirus. The molecular tests conducted in this study detected multiple infections, with a high prevalence of parapoxvirus.

  16. Vesicular transport and apotransferrin in intestinal iron absorption, as shown in the Caco-2 cell model.

    PubMed

    Moriya, Mizue; Linder, Maria C

    2006-02-01

    The potential roles of vesicular transport and apotransferrin (entering from the blood) in intestinal Fe absorption were investigated using Caco-2 cell monolayers with tight junctions in bicameral chambers as a model. As shown previously, addition of 39 microM apotransferrin (apoTf) to the basolateral fluid during absorption studies markedly stimulated overall transport of 1 microM (59)Fe from the apical to the basal chamber and stimulated its basolateral release from prelabeled cells, implicating endo- and exocytosis. Rates of transport more than doubled. Uptake was also stimulated, but only 20%. Specific inhibitors of aspects of vesicular trafficking were applied to determine their potential effects on uptake, retention, and basolateral (overall) transport of (59)Fe. Nocodazole and 5'-(4-fluorosulfonylbenzoyl)-adenosine each reduced uptake and basolateral transport up to 50%. Brefeldin A inhibited about 10%. Tyrphostin A8 (AG10) reduced uptake 35% but markedly stimulated basolateral efflux, particularly that dependent on apoTf. Cooling of cells to 4 degrees C (which causes depolymerization of microtubules and lowers energy availability) profoundly inhibited uptake and basolateral transfer of Fe (7- to 12-fold). Apical efflux (which was substantial) was not temperature affected. Our results support the involvement of apoTf cycling in intestinal Fe absorption and indicate that as much as half of the iron uses apoTf and non-apoTf-dependent vesicular pathways to cross the basolateral membrane and brush border of enterocytes.

  17. Diagnostic value of Tzanck smear in various erosive, vesicular, and bullous skin lesions

    PubMed Central

    Yaeen, Atiya; Ahmad, Qazi Masood; Farhana, Anjum; Shah, Parveen; Hassan, Iffat

    2015-01-01

    Background: Cutaneous cytology has long been shown to be useful in the diagnosis of several erosive, vesicular, and bullous skin lesions. The Tzanck smear although an old tool, still remains a simple, rapid, easily applied, and inexpensive test for these skin lesions. Aims and Objectives: The aim of this study was to evaluate the diagnostic value of Tzanck smear by determining its sensitivity and specificity in various erosive, vesicular, and bullous skin lesions. Materials and Methods: One hundred and forty-two patients with erosive, vesicular, and/or bullous skin lesions were included in the study. Four groups of disorders were identified: infections, immunologic disorders, genodermatosis, and spongiotic dermatitis. All the study cases were evaluated by Tzanck smear. Definitive diagnosis was established by standard diagnostic techniques (including when appropriate, viral serology, bacterial culture, histopathology, direct immunoflourescence). Results: The sensitivity and specificity of cytologic findings was respectively 86.36% and 91.30% for viral infections; for bacterial infections, it was 85.7% and 66.6%. The sensitivity and specificity of Tzanck smear was respectively 85.0% and 83.33% for pemphigus; for bullous pemhigoid it was 11.11% and 100.0%. Tzanck smear sensitivity in genodermatoses was 100%. The sensitivity and specificity of the test in spongiotic dermatitis could not be calculated due to an insufficient number of patients. Conclusion: The Tzanck smear is a quick and reliable tool for the evaluation of various erosive and vesiculobullous skin lesions. PMID:26751561

  18. Methamphetamine-induced nitric oxide promotes vesicular transport in blood-brain barrier endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Martins, Tânia; Burgoyne, Thomas; Kenny, Bridget-Ann; Hudson, Natalie; Futter, Clare E; Ambrósio, António F; Silva, Ana P; Greenwood, John; Turowski, Patric

    2013-02-01

    Methamphetamine's (METH) neurotoxicity is thought to be in part due to its ability to induce blood-brain barrier (BBB) dysfunction. Here, we investigated the effect of METH on barrier properties of cultured rat primary brain microvascular endothelial cells (BMVECs). Transendothelial flux doubled in response to METH, irrespective of the size of tracer used. At the same time, transendothelial electrical resistance was unchanged as was the ultrastructural appearance of inter-endothelial junctions and the distribution of key junction proteins, suggesting that METH promoted vesicular but not junctional transport. Indeed, METH significantly increased uptake of horseradish peroxidase into vesicular structures. METH also enhanced transendothelial migration of lymphocytes indicating that the endothelial barrier against both molecules and cells was compromised. Barrier breakdown was only observed in response to METH at low micromolar concentrations, with enhanced vesicular uptake peaking at 1 μM METH. The BMVEC response to METH also involved rapid activation of endothelial nitric oxide synthase and its inhibition abrogated METH-induced permeability and lymphocyte migration, indicating that nitric oxide was a key mediator of BBB disruption in response to METH. This study underlines the key role of nitric oxide in BBB function and describes a novel mechanism of drug-induced fluid-phase transcytosis at the BBB.

  19. Experimental infection of Didelphis marsupialis with vesicular stomatitis New Jersey virus.

    PubMed

    Trujillo, Carlos M; Rodriguez, Luis; Rodas, Juan D; Arboleda, John Jairo

    2010-01-01

    Although vesicular stomatitis has been present for many years in the Americas, many aspects of its natural history remain undefined. In this study, we challenged five adult Virginia opossums (Didelphis marsupialis) with vesicular stomatitis New Jersey serotype virus (VSNJV). Opossums had no detectable antibodies against VSNJV prior to being inoculated with 10(6.5) median tissue culture infective doses (TCID(50)) of VSNJV by two routes; intraepithelial/subepithelial (IE/SE) inoculation and scarification in the muzzle (SM). Clinical response was monitored daily and animals were tested for viral shedding. All infected animals developed vesicles and ulcers on the tongue and inflammation of the nasal alar folds. Virus was isolated from esophagus-pharynx, nasal, and from ocular swabs and lesions samples. The failure to detect viremia in these animals indicates that a source other than blood may be required for transmission to insect vectors. Our results suggest that D. marsupialis could play a role in the maintenance of VSNJV outside of domestic animal populations and could provide a model to study vesicular stomatitis virus pathogenesis.

  20. Relationship between eruptive style and vesicularity of juvenile clasts during eruptive episode A of Towada Volcano, Northeast Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hiroi, Yoshimi; Miyamoto, Tsuyoshi

    2016-10-01

    It has been reported that juvenile pumice lapilli found in plinian eruptions have high vesicularity, while those found in phreatoplinian eruptions have low vesicularity. However, juvenile glass shards from phreatoplinian eruptions consist of large, expanded bubbles such as bubble wall-type glass. These glass shards seem to possess high vesicularity, unlike the pumice lapilli. This study examines the factors causing this difference, especially focusing on the temporal variations in the vesicularity of the juvenile pyroclasts from eruptive episode A of Towada Volcano, Northeast Japan. This examination was conducted through four analyses: density measurements of pumice lapilli, thin section texture classification of pumice lapilli, classification of glass shards, and surface texture classification of pumice lapilli. Further, pumice lapilli from plinian eruptions have a low density, and those from phreatoplinian eruptions are characterized by high density. The density of the pumice lapilli depends on the eruption style and is hence determined after the eruption. A progressive increase in the amount of large bubbles is observed in glass shards ejected during an eruptive magmatic to phreatomagmatic sequence. Because it does not hinge on the eruptive style, it is assumed that the vesicularity of the glass shards is kept from the conduit before contact with water, especially on fragmentation by magma vesiculation in the conduit. The surfaces of the pumice lapilli show a similar increase in vesicularity with time as glass shards. However, this increase is not successive throughout, but decreases temporarily at the phreatomagmatic stage of the eruption, as in the case of density. This indicates that the successive bubble growth continues within the pumice, and additional vesiculation is superposed when the magmatic eruption comes into contact with water. Because of this, different juvenile clasts exhibit different vesicularities upon cooling. Interestingly, magma

  1. Correlation of the vesicular acetylcholine transporter densities in the striata to the clinical abilities of women with Rett syndrome.

    PubMed

    Brašić, James Robert; Bibat, Genila; Kumar, Anil; Zhou, Yun; Hilton, John; Yablonski, Marybeth E; Dogan, Ahmet Semih; Guevara, Maria Rita; Stephane, Massoud; Johnston, Michael; Wong, Dean Foster; Naidu, Sakkubai

    2012-06-01

    Rett syndrome (RTT) is a neurodevelopmental disability characterized by mutations in the X-linked methyl-CpG-binding protein 2 located at the Xq28 region. The severity is modified in part by X chromosomal inactivation resulting in wide clinical variability. We hypothesized that the ability to perform the activities of daily living (ADL) is correlated with the density of vesicular acetylcholine transporters in the striata of women with RTT. The density of the vesicular acetylcholine transporters in the living human brain can be estimated by single-photon emission-computed tomography (SPECT) after the administration of (-)-5-[¹²³I]iodobenzovesamicol ([¹²³I]IBVM). Twenty-four hours following the intravenous injection of ∼333 MBq (9 mCi) [¹²³ I]IBVM, four women with RTT and nine healthy adult volunteer control participants underwent SPECT brain scans for 60 min. The Vesicular Acetylcholine Transporter Binding Site Index (Kuhl et al., 1994), a measurement of the density of vesicular acetylcholine transporters, was estimated in the striatum and the reference structure, the cerebellum. The women with RTT were assessed for certain ADL. Although the striatal Vesicular Acetylcholine Transporter Binding Site Index was not significantly lower in RTT (5.2 ± 0.9) than in healthy adults (5.7 ± 1.6), RTT striatal Vesicular Acetylcholine Transporter Binding Site Indices and ADL scores were linearly associated (ADL = 0.89*(Vesicular Acetylcholine Transporter Binding Site Index) + 4.5; R² = 0.93; P < 0.01), suggesting a correlation between the ability to perform ADL and the density of vesicular acetylcholine transporters in the striata of women with RTT. [¹²³I]IBVM is a promising tool to characterize the pathophysiological mechanisms of RTT and other neurodevelopmental disabilities.

  2. Postexposure Protection Against Marburg Haemorrhagic Fever with Recombinant Vesicular Stomatitis Virus Vectors in Non-Human Primates: An Efficacy Assessment

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-04-29

    virus (MARV). We aimed to test the effi cacy of a replication -competent vaccine based on attenuated recombinant vesicular stomatitis virus (rVSV...including vaccines based on recombinant adenoviruses12,13 and recombinant alphaviruses .8 We previously described the generation and assessment of a live...such as Marburg virus (MARV). We aimed to test the efficacy of a replication -competent vaccine based on attenuated recombinant vesicular stomatitis

  3. The sigma-1 receptor chaperone as an inter-organelle signaling modulator

    PubMed Central

    Su, Tsung-Ping; Hayashi, Teruo; Maurice, Tangui; Buch, Shilpa; Ruoho, Arnold E.

    2010-01-01

    Inter-organelle signaling plays important roles in many physiological functions. Endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-mitochondrion signaling affects intra-mitochondrial calcium (Ca2+) homeostasis and cellular bioenergetics. ER-nucleus signaling attenuates ER stress. ER-plasma membrane signaling regulates cytosolic Ca2+ homeostasis, and ER-mitochondrion-plasma membrane signaling regulates hippocampal dendritic spine formation. Here we propose that the sigma-1 receptor (Sig-1R), an ER chaperone protein, acts as an inter-organelle signaling modulator. Sig-1Rs normally reside at the ER-mitochondrion contact called the MAM (mitochondrion-associated ER membrane), where Sig-1Rs regulate ER-mitochondrion signaling and the ER-nucleus cross-talk. When cells are stimulated by ligands or undergo prolonged stress, Sig-1Rs translocate from the MAM to the ER reticular network and plasmalemma/plasma membrane to regulate a variety of functional proteins, including ion channels, receptors, and kinases. Thus, the Sig-1R serves as an inter-organelle signaling modulator locally at the MAM and remotely at the plasmalemma/plasma membrane. Many pharmacological/physiological effects of Sig-1Rs may relate to this unique action of Sig-1Rs. PMID:20869780

  4. DNA transfer from organelles to the nucleus: the idiosyncratic genetics of endosymbiosis.

    PubMed

    Kleine, Tatjana; Maier, Uwe G; Leister, Dario

    2009-01-01

    In eukaryotes, DNA is exchanged between endosymbiosis-derived compartments (mitochondria and chloroplasts) and the nucleus. Organelle-to-nucleus DNA transfer involves repair of double-stranded breaks by nonhomologous end-joining, and resulted during early organelle evolution in massive relocation of organelle genes to the nucleus. A large fraction of the products of the nuclear genes so acquired are retargeted to their ancestral compartment; many others now function in new subcellular locations. Almost all present-day nuclear transfers of mitochondrial or plastid DNA give rise to noncoding sequences, dubbed nuclear mitochondrial DNAs (NUMTs) and nuclear plastid DNAs (NUPTs). Some of these sequences were recruited as exons, thus introducing new coding sequences into preexisting nuclear genes by a novel mechanism. In organisms derived from secondary or tertiary endosymbiosis, serial gene transfers involving nucleus-to-nucleus migration of DNA have also occurred. Intercompartmental DNA transfer therefore represents a significant driving force for gene and genome evolution, relocating and refashioning genes and contributing to genetic diversity.

  5. AQUATIC PLANT SPECIATION AFFECTED BY DIVERSIFYING SELECTION OF ORGANELLE DNA REGIONS(1).

    PubMed

    Kato, Syou; Misawa, Kazuharu; Takahashi, Fumio; Sakayama, Hidetoshi; Sano, Satomi; Kosuge, Keiko; Kasai, Fumie; Watanabe, Makoto M; Tanaka, Jiro; Nozaki, Hisayoshi

    2011-10-01

    Many of the genes that control photosynthesis are carried in the chloroplast. These genes differ among species. However, evidence has yet to be reported revealing the involvement of organelle genes in the initial stages of plant speciation. To elucidate the molecular basis of aquatic plant speciation, we focused on the unique plant species Chara braunii C. C. Gmel. that inhabits both shallow and deep freshwater habitats and exhibits habitat-based dimorphism of chloroplast DNA (cpDNA). Here, we examined the "shallow" and "deep" subpopulations of C. braunii using two nuclear DNA (nDNA) markers and cpDNA. Genetic differentiation between the two subpopulations was measured in both nDNA and cpDNA regions, although phylogenetic analyses suggested nuclear gene flow between subpopulations. Neutrality tests based on Tajima's D demonstrated diversifying selection acting on organelle DNA regions. Furthermore, both "shallow" and "deep" haplotypes of cpDNA detected in cultures originating from bottom soils of three deep environments suggested that migration of oospores (dormant zygotes) between the two habitats occurs irrespective of the complete habitat-based dimorphism of cpDNA from field-collected vegetative thalli. Therefore, the two subpopulations are highly selected by their different aquatic habitats and show prezygotic isolation, which represents an initial process of speciation affected by ecologically based divergent selection of organelle genes.

  6. Molecular characterization of a trafficking organelle: dissecting the axonal paths of calsyntenin-1 transport vesicles.

    PubMed

    Steuble, Martin; Gerrits, Bertran; Ludwig, Alexander; Mateos, José María; Diep, Tu-My; Tagaya, Mitsuo; Stephan, Alexander; Schätzle, Philipp; Kunz, Beat; Streit, Peter; Sonderegger, Peter

    2010-11-01

    Kinesin motors play crucial roles in the delivery of membranous cargo to its destination and thus for the establishment and maintenance of cellular polarization. Recently, calsyntenin-1 was identified as a cargo-docking protein for Kinesin-1-mediated axonal transport of tubulovesicular organelles along axons of central nervous system neurons. To further define the function of calsyntenin-1, we immunoisolated calsyntenin-1 organelles from murine brain homogenates and determined their proteome by MS. We found that calsyntenin-1 organelles are endowed with components of the endosomal trafficking machinery and contained the β-amyloid precursor protein (APP). Detailed biochemical analyses of calsyntenin-1 immunoisolates in conjunction with immunocytochemical colocalization studies with cultured hippocampal neurons, using endosomal marker proteins for distinct subcompartments of the endosomal pathways, indicated that neuronal axons contain at least two distinct, nonoverlapping calsyntenin-1-containing transport packages: one characterized as early-endosomal, APP positive, the other as recycling-endosomal, APP negative. We postulate that calsyntenin-1 acts as a general mediator of anterograde axonal transportation of endosomal vesicles. In this role, calsyntenin-1 may actively contribute to axonal growth and pathfinding in the developing as well as to the maintenance of neuronal polarity in the adult nervous system; further, it may actively contribute to the stabilization of APP during its anterograde axonal trajectory.

  7. Organelle sedimentation in gravitropic roots of Limnobium is restricted to the elongation zone

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sack, F. D.; Kim, D.; Stein, B.

    1994-01-01

    Roots of the aquatic angiosperm Limnobium spongia (Bosc) Steud. were evaluated by light and electron microscopy to determine the distribution of organelle sedimentation towards gravity. Roots of Limnobium are strongly gravitropic. The rootcap consists of only two layers of cells. Although small amyloplasts are present in the central cap cells, no sedimentation of any organelle, including amyloplasts, was found. In contrast, both amyloplasts and nuclei sediment consistently and completely in cells of the elongation zone. Sedimentation occurs in one cell layer of the cortex just outside the endodermis. Sedimentation of both amyloplasts and nuclei begins in cells that are in their initial stages of elongation and persists at least to the level of the root where root hairs emerge. This is the first modern report of the presence of sedimentation away from, but not in, the rootcap. It shows that sedimentation in the rootcap is not necessary for gravitropic sensing in at least one angiosperm. If amyloplast sedimentation is responsible for gravitropic sensing, then the site of sensing in Limnobium roots is the elongation zone and not the rootcap. These data do not necessarily conflict with the hypothesis that sensing occurs in the cap in other roots, since Limnobium roots are exceptional in rootcap origin and structure, as well as in the distribution of organelle sedimentation. Similarly, if nuclear sedimentation is involved in gravitropic sensing, then nuclear mass would function in addition to, not instead of, that of amyloplasts.

  8. Crystal Structures of DNA-Whirly Complexes and Their Role in Arabidopsis Organelle Genome Repair

    SciTech Connect

    Cappadocia, Laurent; Maréchal, Alexandre; Parent, Jean-Sébastien; Lepage, Étienne; Sygusch, Jurgen; Brisson, Normand

    2010-09-07

    DNA double-strand breaks are highly detrimental to all organisms and need to be quickly and accurately repaired. Although several proteins are known to maintain plastid and mitochondrial genome stability in plants, little is known about the mechanisms of DNA repair in these organelles and the roles of specific proteins. Here, using ciprofloxacin as a DNA damaging agent specific to the organelles, we show that plastids and mitochondria can repair DNA double-strand breaks through an error-prone pathway similar to the microhomology-mediated break-induced replication observed in humans, yeast, and bacteria. This pathway is negatively regulated by the single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) binding proteins from the Whirly family, thus indicating that these proteins could contribute to the accurate repair of plant organelle genomes. To understand the role of Whirly proteins in this process, we solved the crystal structures of several Whirly-DNA complexes. These reveal a nonsequence-specific ssDNA binding mechanism in which DNA is stabilized between domains of adjacent subunits and rendered unavailable for duplex formation and/or protein interactions. Our results suggest a model in which the binding of Whirly proteins to ssDNA would favor accurate repair of DNA double-strand breaks over an error-prone microhomology-mediated break-induced replication repair pathway.

  9. A simple, straightforward correlative live-cell-imaging-structured-illumination-microscopy approach for studying organelle dynamics.

    PubMed

    Sherman, Shachar; Nachmias, Dikla; Elia, Natalie

    2015-09-01

    Most cellular organelles are highly dynamic and continuously undergo membrane fission and fusion to mediate their function. Documenting organelle dynamics under physiological conditions, therefore, requires high temporal resolution of the recording system. Concurrently, these structures are relatively small and determining their substructural organization is often impossible using conventional microscopy. Structured Illumination Microscopy (SIM) is a super resolution technique providing a two-fold increase in resolution. Importantly, SIM is versatile because it allows the use of any fluorescent dye or protein and, hence, is highly applicable for cell biology. However, similar to other SR techniques, the applicability of SIM to high-speed live cell imaging is limited. Here we present an easy, straightforward methodology for coupling of high-speed live cell recordings, using spinning disk (SD) microscopy, with SIM. Using this simple methodology, we are able to track individual mitochondrial membrane fission and fusion events in real time and to determine the network connectivity and substructural organization of the membrane at high resolution. Applying this methodology to other cellular organelles such as, ER, golgi, and cilia will no doubt contribute to our understanding of membrane dynamics in cells.

  10. Bacterial microcompartments: widespread prokaryotic organelles for isolation and optimization of metabolic pathways

    PubMed Central

    Bobik, Thomas A.; Lehman, Brent P.; Yeates, Todd O.

    2016-01-01

    Summary Prokaryotes use subcellular compartments for a variety of purposes. An intriguing example is a family of complex subcellular organelles known as bacterial microcompartments (MCPs). MCPs are widely distributed among bacteria and impact processes ranging global carbon fixation and enteric pathogenesis. Overall, MCPs consist of metabolic enzymes encased within a protein shell, and their function is to optimize biochemical pathways by confining toxic or volatile metabolic intermediates. MCPs are fundamentally different from other organelles in having a complex protein shell rather than a lipid-based membrane as an outer barrier. This unusual feature raises basic questions about organelle assembly, protein targeting and metabolite transport. In this review, we discuss the three best-studied MCPs highlighting atomic-level models for shell assembly, targeting sequences that direct enzyme encapsulation, multivalent proteins that organize the lumen enzymes, the principles of metabolite movement across the shell, internal cofactor recycling, a potential system of allosteric regulation of metabolite transport and the mechanism and rationale behind the functional diversification of the proteins that form the shell. We also touch on some potential biotechnology applications an unusual compartment designed by nature to optimize metabolic processes within a cellular context. PMID:26148529

  11. Bacterial microcompartments: widespread prokaryotic organelles for isolation and optimization of metabolic pathways.

    PubMed

    Bobik, Thomas A; Lehman, Brent P; Yeates, Todd O

    2015-10-01

    Prokaryotes use subcellular compartments for a variety of purposes. An intriguing example is a family of complex subcellular organelles known as bacterial microcompartments (MCPs). MCPs are widely distributed among bacteria and impact processes ranging from global carbon fixation to enteric pathogenesis. Overall, MCPs consist of metabolic enzymes encased within a protein shell, and their function is to optimize biochemical pathways by confining toxic or volatile metabolic intermediates. MCPs are fundamentally different from other organelles in having a complex protein shell rather than a lipid-based membrane as an outer barrier. This unusual feature raises basic questions about organelle assembly, protein targeting and metabolite transport. In this review, we discuss the three best-studied MCPs highlighting atomic-level models for shell assembly, targeting sequences that direct enzyme encapsulation, multivalent proteins that organize the lumen enzymes, the principles of metabolite movement across the shell, internal cofactor recycling, a potential system of allosteric regulation of metabolite transport and the mechanism and rationale behind the functional diversification of the proteins that form the shell. We also touch on some potential biotechnology applications of an unusual compartment designed by nature to optimize metabolic processes within a cellular context.

  12. Characterization of the reflective materials and organelles in the bright irides of North American blackbirds (Icterinae).

    PubMed

    Hudon, J; Muir, A D

    1996-04-01

    The reflective materials in the iris stroma of bright-irised American blackbirds (Icterinae, Emberizidae) and the red-eyed vireo (vireo olivaceus) (Vireonidae) were characterized using high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) and diode-array detection. Two purines, guanine and hypoxanthine, and two pteridines, leucopterin and xanthopterin, were detected in large amounts in all bright irides. The brown iris of the red-winged blackbird (Agelaius phoeniceus) by comparison contained only small amounts of these and additional unidentified compounds. The absolute and relative amounts of light-absorbing compounds in the iris varied somewhat among species of blackbirds with bright irides, and markedly within one species (brewer's blackbird, Euphagus cyanocephalus) between sexes and age classes that very in eye color. Differences in the types, numbers, and sizes of pigment organelles in the irides appeared to underlie the differences in amounts of light-absorbing compounds. Guanine was the most abundant light-absorbing compound in all bright irides, accounting for about 90% of the total absorption at 250 nm. A wide range of concentrations of guanine, from 96 to 9 micrograms per iris, produced bright irides. The primary pigment organelles of pigment cells in bright irides were reflecting platelets, which typically appeared as open spaces on electron micrographs. In the red-eyed vireo there were in addition red pterinosome-like pigment organelles in the pigment cells on the anterior surface of the iris stroma. Guanine was present even in irides with no overt reflecting platelets.

  13. A close look at axonal transport: Cargos slow down when crossing stationary organelles.

    PubMed

    Che, Daphne L; Chowdary, Praveen D; Cui, Bianxiao

    2016-01-01

    The bidirectional transport of cargos along the thin axon is fundamental for the structure, function and survival of neurons. Defective axonal transport has been linked to the mechanism of neurodegenerative diseases. In this paper, we study the effect of the local axonal environment to cargo transport behavior in neurons. Using dual-color fluorescence imaging in microfluidic neuronal devices, we quantify the transport dynamics of cargos when crossing stationary organelles such as non-moving endosomes and stationary mitochondria in the axon. We show that the axonal cargos tend to slow down, or pause transiently within the vicinity of stationary organelles. The slow-down effect is observed in both retrograde and anterograde transport directions of three different cargos (TrkA, lysosomes and TrkB). Our results agree with the hypothesis that bulky axonal structures can pose as steric hindrance for axonal transport. However, the results do not rule out the possibility that cellular mechanisms causing stationary organelles are also responsible for the delay in moving cargos at the same locations.

  14. F-actin cytoskeleton and the fate of organelles in chromaffin cells.

    PubMed

    Villanueva, José; Gimenez-Molina, Yolanda; Viniegra, Salvador; Gutiérrez, Luis M

    2016-06-01

    In addition to playing a fundamental structural role, the F-actin cytoskeleton in neuroendocrine chromaffin cells has a prominent influence on governing the molecular mechanism and regulating the secretory process. Performing such roles, the F-actin network might be essential to first transport, and later locate the cellular organelles participating in the secretory cycle. Chromaffin granules are transported from the internal cytosolic regions to the cell periphery along microtubular and F-actin structures. Once in the cortical region, they are embedded in the F-actin network where these vesicles experience restrictions in motility. Similarly, mitochondria transport is affected by both microtubule and F-actin inhibitors and suffers increasing motion restrictions when they are located in the cortical region. Therefore, the F-actin cortex is a key factor in defining the existence of two populations of cortical and perinuclear granules and mitochondria which could be distinguished by their different location and mobility. Interestingly, other important organelles for controlling intracellular calcium levels, such as the endoplasmic reticulum network, present clear differences in distribution and much lower mobility than chromaffin vesicles and mitochondria. Nevertheless, both mitochondria and the endoplasmic reticulum appear to distribute in the proximity of secretory sites to fulfill a pivotal role, forming triads with calcium channels ensuring the fine tuning of the secretory response. This review presents the contributions that provide the basis for our current view regarding the influence that F-actin has on the distribution of organelles participating in the release of catecholamines in chromaffin cells, and summarizes this knowledge in simple models. In chromaffin cells, organelles such as granules and mitochondria distribute forming cortical and perinuclear populations whereas others like the ER present homogenous distributions. In the present review we discuss

  15. The pollen organelle membrane proteome reveals highly spatial-temporal dynamics during germination and tube growth of lily pollen.

    PubMed

    Pertl, Heidi; Schulze, Waltraud X; Obermeyer, Gerhard

    2009-11-01

    As a first step in understanding the membrane-related dynamics during pollen grain germination and subsequent tube growth, the changes in protein abundance of membrane and membrane-associated proteins of 5 different membrane/organelle fractions were studied at physiologically important stages (0, 10, 30, 60, and 240 min) of Lilium longiflorum pollen in vitro culture. Proteins of each fraction and time point were identified by 'shot-gun' proteomics (LC-MS/MS). Analysis of more than 270 identified proteins revealed an increase in the abundance of proteins involved in cytoskeleton, carbohydrate and energy metabolism, as well as ion transport before pollen grain germination (10-30 min), whereas proteins involved in membrane/protein trafficking, signal transduction, stress response and protein biosynthesis decreased in abundance during this time. Proteins of amino acids and lipids/steroids metabolism, proteolysis, transcription, cell wall biosynthesis as well as nutrient transport showed a time-independent abundance profile. These spatiotemporal patterns were confirmed by immunodetection of specific proteins of the cellular processes membrane/protein trafficking and ion transport. Our results reveal major protein rearrangements at endomembranes and the plasma membrane before and as the pollen grains start tube growth. The spatiotemporal protein abundance changes correlate with the underlying developmental and physiological processes of the germinating pollen grain.

  16. A Ribbon-like Structure in the Ejective Organelle of the Green Microalga Pyramimonas parkeae (Prasinophyceae) Consists of Core Histones and Polymers Containing N-acetyl-glucosamine.

    PubMed

    Yamagishi, Takahiro; Kurihara, Akira; Kawai, Hiroshi

    2015-11-01

    The green microalga, Pyramimonas parkeae (Prasinophyceae) has an ejective organelle containing a coiled ribbon structure resembling the ejectisome in Cryptophyta. This structure is discharged from the cell by a stimulus and extends to form a tube-like structure, but the molecular components of the structure have not been identified. Tricine-SDS-PAGE analysis indicated that the ribbon-like structure of P. parkeae contains some proteins and low molecular acidic polymers. Edman degradation, LC/MS/MS analyses and immunological studies demonstrated that their proteins are core histones (H3, H2A, H2B and H4). In addition, monosaccharide composition analysis of the ribbon-like structures and degradation by lysozyme strongly indicated that the ribbon-like structure consist of β (1-4) linked polymers containing N-acetyl-glucosamine. Purified polymers and recombinant histones formed glob-like or filamentous structures. Therefore we conclude that the ribbon-like structure of P. parkeae mainly consists of a complex of core histones (H3, H2A, H2B and H4) and polymers containing N-acetyl-glucosamine, and suggest to name the ejective organelle in P. parkeae the "histrosome" to distinguish it from the ejectisome in Cryptophyta.

  17. A Critical Role for Toxoplasma gondii Vacuolar Protein Sorting VPS9 in Secretory Organelle Biogenesis and Host Infection

    PubMed Central

    Sakura, Takaya; Sindikubwabo, Fabien; Oesterlin, Lena K.; Bousquet, Hugo; Slomianny, Christian; Hakimi, Mohamed-Ali; Langsley, Gordon; Tomavo, Stanislas

    2016-01-01

    Accurate sorting of proteins to the three types of parasite-specific secretory organelles namely rhoptry, microneme and dense granule in Toxoplasma gondii is crucial for successful host cell invasion by this obligate intracellular parasite. Despite its tiny body architecture and limited trafficking machinery, T. gondii relies heavily on transport of vesicles containing proteins, lipids and important virulence-like factors that are delivered to these secretory organelles. However, our understanding on how trafficking of vesicles operates in the parasite is still limited. Here, we show that the T. gondii vacuolar protein sorting 9 (TgVps9), has guanine nucleotide exchange factor (GEF) activity towards Rab5a and is crucial for sorting of proteins destined to secretory organelles. Our results illuminate features of TgVps9 protein as a key trafficking facilitator that regulates protein maturation, secretory organelle formation and secretion, thereby ensuring a primary role in host infection by T. gondii. PMID:27966671

  18. A multicolored set of in vivo organelle markers for co-localization studies in Arabidopsis and other plants.

    PubMed

    Nelson, Brook K; Cai, Xue; Nebenführ, Andreas

    2007-09-01

    Genome sequencing has resulted in the identification of a large number of uncharacterized genes with unknown functions. It is widely recognized that determination of the intracellular localization of the encoded proteins may aid in identifying their functions. To facilitate these localization experiments, we have generated a series of fluorescent organelle markers based on well-established targeting sequences that can be used for co-localization studies. In particular, this organelle marker set contains indicators for the endoplasmic reticulum, the Golgi apparatus, the tonoplast, peroxisomes, mitochondria, plastids and the plasma membrane. All markers were generated with four different fluorescent proteins (FP) (green, cyan, yellow or red FPs) in two different binary plasmids for kanamycin or glufosinate selection, respectively, to allow for flexible combinations. The labeled organelles displayed characteristic morphologies consistent with previous descriptions that could be used for their positive identification. Determination of the intracellular distribution of three previously uncharacterized proteins demonstrated the usefulness of the markers in testing predicted subcellular localizations. This organelle marker set should be a valuable resource for the plant community for such co-localization studies. In addition, the Arabidopsis organelle marker lines can also be employed in plant cell biology teaching labs to demonstrate the distribution and dynamics of these organelles.

  19. Myosin Ib modulates the morphology and the protein transport within multi-vesicular sorting endosomes.

    PubMed

    Salas-Cortes, Laura; Ye, Fei; Tenza, Danièle; Wilhelm, Claire; Theos, Alexander; Louvard, Daniel; Raposo, Graça; Coudrier, Evelyne

    2005-10-15

    Members of at least four classes of myosin (I, II, V and VI) have been implicated in the dynamics of a large variety of organelles. Despite their common motor domain structure, some of these myosins, however, are non processive and cannot move organelles along the actin tracks. Here, we demonstrate in the human pigmented MNT-1 cell line that, (1) the overexpression of one of these myosins, myosin 1b, or the addition of cytochalasin D affects the morphology of the sorting multivesicular endosomes; (2) the overexpression of myosin 1b delays the processing of Pmel17 (the product of murine silver locus also named GP100), which occurs in these multivesicular endosomes; (3) myosin 1b associated with endosomes coimmunoprecipitates with Pmel17. All together, these observations suggest that myosin 1b controls the traffic of protein cargo in multivesicular endosomes most probably through its ability to modulate with actin the morphology of these sorting endosomes.

  20. The internal architecture of leukocyte lipid body organelles captured by three-dimensional electron microscopy tomography.

    PubMed

    Melo, Rossana C N; Paganoti, Guillherme F; Dvorak, Ann M; Weller, Peter F

    2013-01-01

    Lipid bodies (LBs), also known as lipid droplets, are complex organelles of all eukaryotic cells linked to a variety of biological functions as well as to the development of human diseases. In cells from the immune system, such as eosinophils, neutrophils and macrophages, LBs are rapidly formed in the cytoplasm in response to inflammatory and infectious diseases and are sites of synthesis of eicosanoid lipid mediators. However, little is known about the structural organization of these organelles. It is unclear whether leukocyte LBs contain a hydrophobic core of neutral lipids as found in lipid droplets from adipocytes and how diverse proteins, including enzymes involved in eicosanoid formation, incorporate into LBs. Here, leukocyte LB ultrastructure was studied in detail by conventional transmission electron microscopy (TEM), immunogold EM and electron tomography. By careful analysis of the two-dimensional ultrastructure of LBs from human blood eosinophils under different conditions, we identified membranous structures within LBs in both resting and activated cells. Cyclooxygenase, a membrane inserted protein that catalyzes the first step in prostaglandin synthesis, was localized throughout the internum of LBs. We used fully automated dual-axis electron tomography to study the three-dimensional architecture of LBs in high resolution. By tracking 4 nm-thick serial digital sections we found that leukocyte LBs enclose an intricate system of membranes within their "cores". After computational reconstruction, we showed that these membranes are organized as a network of tubules which resemble the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). Our findings explain how membrane-bound proteins interact and are spatially arranged within LB "cores" and support a model for LB formation by incorporating cytoplasmic membranes of the ER, instead of the conventional view that LBs emerge from the ER leaflets. This is important to understand the functional capabilities of leukocyte LBs in health and

  1. Neospora caninum Recruits Host Cell Structures to Its Parasitophorous Vacuole and Salvages Lipids from Organelles.

    PubMed

    Nolan, Sabrina J; Romano, Julia D; Luechtefeld, Thomas; Coppens, Isabelle

    2015-05-01

    Toxoplasma gondii and Neospora caninum, which cause the diseases toxoplasmosis and neosporosis, respectively, are two closely related apicomplexan parasites. They have similar heteroxenous life cycles and conserved genomes and share many metabolic features. Despite these similarities, T. gondii and N. caninum differ in their transmission strategies and zoonotic potential. Comparative analyses of the two parasites are important to identify the unique biological features that underlie the basis of host preference and pathogenicity. T. gondii and N. caninum are obligate intravacuolar parasites; in contrast to T. gondii, events that occur during N. caninum infection remain largely uncharacterized. We examined the capability of N. caninum (Liverpool isolate) to interact with host organelles and scavenge nutrients in comparison to that of T. gondii (RH strain). N. caninum reorganizes the host microtubular cytoskeleton and attracts endoplasmic reticulum (ER), mitochondria, lysosomes, multivesicular bodies, and Golgi vesicles to its vacuole though with some notable differences from T. gondii. For example, the host ER gathers around the N. caninum parasitophorous vacuole (PV) but does not physically associate with the vacuolar membrane; the host Golgi apparatus surrounds the N. caninum PV but does not fragment into ministacks. N. caninum relies on plasma lipoproteins and scavenges cholesterol from NPC1-containing endocytic organelles. This parasite salvages sphingolipids from host Golgi Rab14 vesicles that it sequesters into its vacuole. Our data highlight a remarkable degree of conservation in the intracellular infection program of N. caninum and T. gondii. The minor differences between the two parasites related to the recruitment and rearrangement of host organelles around their vacuoles likely reflect divergent evolutionary paths.

  2. Evidence for Proteolytic Processing and Stimulated Organelle Redistribution of iPLA2β

    PubMed Central

    Song, Haowei; Bao, Shunzhong; Lei, Xiaoyong; Jin, Chun; Zhang, Sheng; Turk, John; Ramanadham, Sasanka

    2010-01-01

    Over the past decade, important roles for the 84–88 kDa Group VIA Ca2+-independent phospholipase A2 (iPLA2β) in various organs have been described. We demonstrated that iPLA2β participates in insulin secretion, insulinoma cells and native pancreatic islets express full-length and truncated isoforms of iPLA2β, and certain stimuli promote perinuclear localization of iPLA2β. To gain a better understanding of its mobilization, iPLA2β was expressed in INS-1 cells as a fusion protein with EGFP, enabling detection of subcellular localization of iPLA2β by monitoring EGFP fluorescence. Cells stably-transfected with fusion protein expressed nearly 5-fold higher catalytic iPLA2β activity than control cells transfected with EGFP cDNA alone, indicating that co-expression of EGFP does not interfere with manifestation of iPLA2β activity. Dual fluorescence monitoring of EGFP and organelle Trackers combined with immunoblotting analyses revealed expression of truncated iPLA2β isoforms in separate subcellular organelles. Exposure to secretagogues and induction of ER stress are known to activate iPLA2β in β-cells and we find here that these stimuli promote differential localization of iPLA2β in subcellular organelles. Further, mass spectrometric analyses identified iPLA2β variants from which N-terminal residues were removed. Collectively, these findings provide evidence for endogenous proteolytic processing of iPLA2β and redistribution of iPLA2β variants in subcellular compartments. It might be proposed that in vivo processing of iPLA2β facilitates its participation in multiple biological processes. PMID:20132906

  3. Optical tweezers for single molecule force spectroscopy on bacterial adhesion organelles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andersson, Magnus; Axner, Ove; Uhlin, Bernt Eric; Fällman, Erik

    2006-08-01

    Instrumentation and methodologies for single molecule force spectroscopy on bacterial adhesion organelles by the use of force measuring optical tweezers have been developed. A thorough study of the biomechanical properties of fimbrial adhesion organelles expressed by uropathogenic E. coli, so-called pili, is presented. Steady-state as well as dynamic force measurements on P pili, expressed by E. coli causing pyelonephritis, have revealed, among other things, various unfolding and refolding properties of the helical structure of P pili, the PapA rod. Based on these properties an energy landscape model has been constructed by which specific biophysical properties of the PapA rod have been extracted, e.g. the number of subunits, the length of a single pilus, bond lengths and activation energies for bond opening and closure. Moreover, long time repetitive measurements have shown that the rod can be unfolded and refolded repetitive times without losing its intrinsic properties. These properties are believed to be of importance for the bacteria's ability to maintain close contact with host cells during initial infections. The results presented are considered to be of importance for the field of biopolymers in general and the development of new pharmaceuticals towards urinary tract infections in particular. The results show furthermore that the methodology can be used to gain knowledge of the intrinsic biomechanical function of adhesion organelles. The instrumentation is currently used for characterization of type 1 pili, expressed by E. coli causing cystitis, i.e. infections in the bladder. The first force spectrometry investigations of these pili will be presented.

  4. Off to the Organelles - Killing Cancer Cells with Targeted Gold Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Kodiha, Mohamed; Wang, Yi Meng; Hutter, Eliza; Maysinger, Dusica; Stochaj, Ursula

    2015-01-01

    Gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) are excellent tools for cancer cell imaging and basic research. However, they have yet to reach their full potential in the clinic. At present, we are only beginning to understand the molecular mechanisms that underlie the biological effects of AuNPs, including the structural and functional changes of cancer cells. This knowledge is critical for two aspects of nanomedicine. First, it will define the AuNP-induced events at the subcellular and molecular level, thereby possibly identifying new targets for cancer treatment. Second, it could provide new strategies to improve AuNP-dependent cancer diagnosis and treatment. Our review summarizes the impact of AuNPs on selected subcellular organelles that are relevant to cancer therapy. We focus on the nucleus, its subcompartments, and mitochondria, because they are intimately linked to cancer cell survival, growth, proliferation and death. While non-targeted AuNPs can damage tumor cells, concentrating AuNPs in particular subcellular locations will likely improve tumor cell killing. Thus, it will increase cancer cell damage by photothermal ablation, mechanical injury or localized drug delivery. This concept is promising, but AuNPs have to overcome multiple hurdles to perform these tasks. AuNP size, morphology and surface modification are critical parameters for their delivery to organelles. Recent strategies explored all of these variables, and surface functionalization has become crucial to concentrate AuNPs in subcellular compartments. Here, we highlight the use of AuNPs to damage cancer cells and their organelles. We discuss current limitations of AuNP-based cancer research and conclude with future directions for AuNP-dependent cancer treatment. PMID:25699096

  5. Differential phosphorylation in vivo of cytoplasmic dynein associated with anterogradely moving organelles

    PubMed Central

    1994-01-01

    Two microtubule-stimulated ATPases, cytoplasmic dynein, and kinesin, are believed to be responsible for the intracellular movement of membrane-bound organelles in opposite directions along microtubules. An unresolved component of this model is the mechanism by which cells regulate these two motors to direct various membrane-bound organelles to their proper locations. To determine if phosphorylation may play a role in the regulation of cytoplasmic dynein, the in vivo phosphorylation state of cytoplasmic dynein from two cellular pools was examined. The entire cellular pool of brain cytoplasmic dynein was metabolically labeled by the infusion of [32P]orthophosphate into the cerebrospinal fluid of rat brain ventricles. To characterize the phosphorylation of dynein associated with anterograde membrane-bound organelles, the optic nerve fast axonal transport system was used. Using a monoclonal antibody to the 74-kD polypeptide of brain cytoplasmic dynein, the native dynein complex was immunoprecipitated from the radiolabled tissue extracts. Autoradiographs of one and two dimensional gels showed labeling of nearly all of the polypeptide isoforms of cytoplasmic dynein from rat brain. These polypeptides are phosphorylated on serine residues. Comparison of the amount of 32P incorporated into the dynein polypeptides revealed differences in the phosphorylation of dynein polypeptides from the anterograde and the cellular pools. Most interestingly, the 530-kD heavy chain of dynein appears to be phosphorylated to a lesser extent in the anterograde pool than in the cellular pool. Since the anterograde pool contains inactive dynein, while the entire cellular pool contains both inactive and active dynein, these results are consistent with the hypothesis that phosphorylation regulates the functional activity of cytoplasmic dynein. PMID:7528220

  6. Modular electron-transport chains from eukaryotic organelles function to support nitrogenase activity

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Jianguo; Xie, Xiaqing; Yang, Mingxuan; Dixon, Ray; Wang, Yi-Ping

    2017-01-01

    A large number of genes are necessary for the biosynthesis and activity of the enzyme nitrogenase to carry out the process of biological nitrogen fixation (BNF), which requires large amounts of ATP and reducing power. The multiplicity of the genes involved, the oxygen sensitivity of nitrogenase, plus the demand for energy and reducing power, are thought to be major obstacles to engineering BNF into cereal crops. Genes required for nitrogen fixation can be considered as three functional modules encoding electron-transport components (ETCs), proteins required for metal cluster biosynthesis, and the “core” nitrogenase apoenzyme, respectively. Among these modules, the ETC is important for the supply of reducing power. In this work, we have used Escherichia coli as a chassis to study the compatibility between molybdenum and the iron-only nitrogenases with ETC modules from target plant organelles, including chloroplasts, root plastids, and mitochondria. We have replaced an ETC module present in diazotrophic bacteria with genes encoding ferredoxin–NADPH oxidoreductases (FNRs) and their cognate ferredoxin counterparts from plant organelles. We observe that the FNR–ferredoxin module from chloroplasts and root plastids can support the activities of both types of nitrogenase. In contrast, an analogous ETC module from mitochondria could not function in electron transfer to nitrogenase. However, this incompatibility could be overcome with hybrid modules comprising mitochondrial NADPH-dependent adrenodoxin oxidoreductase and the Anabaena ferredoxins FdxH or FdxB. We pinpoint endogenous ETCs from plant organelles as power supplies to support nitrogenase for future engineering of diazotrophy in cereal crops. PMID:28193863

  7. Myosin-Va and dynamic actin oppose microtubules to drive long-range organelle transport.

    PubMed

    Evans, Richard D; Robinson, Christopher; Briggs, Deborah A; Tooth, David J; Ramalho, Jose S; Cantero, Marta; Montoliu, Lluis; Patel, Shyamal; Sviderskaya, Elena V; Hume, Alistair N

    2014-08-04

    In animal cells, microtubule and actin tracks and their associated motors (dynein, kinesin, and myosin) are thought to regulate long- and short-range transport, respectively. Consistent with this, microtubules extend from the perinuclear centrosome to the plasma membrane and allow bidirectional cargo transport over long distances (>1 μm). In contrast, actin often comprises a complex network of short randomly oriented filaments, suggesting that myosin motors move cargo short distances. These observations underpin the "highways and local roads" model for transport along microtubule and actin tracks. The "cooperative capture" model exemplifies this view and suggests that melanosome distribution in melanocyte dendrites is maintained by long-range transport on microtubules followed by actin/myosin-Va-dependent tethering. In this study, we used cell normalization technology to quantitatively examine the contribution of microtubules and actin/myosin-Va to organelle distribution in melanocytes. Surprisingly, our results indicate that microtubules are essential for centripetal, but not centrifugal, transport. Instead, we find that microtubules retard a centrifugal transport process that is dependent on myosin-Va and a population of dynamic F-actin. Functional analysis of mutant proteins indicates that myosin-Va works as a transporter dispersing melanosomes along actin tracks whose +/barbed ends are oriented toward the plasma membrane. Overall, our data highlight the role of myosin-Va and actin in transport, and not tethering, and suggest a new model in which organelle distribution is determined by the balance between microtubule-dependent centripetal and myosin-Va/actin-dependent centrifugal transport. These observations appear to be consistent with evidence coming from other systems showing that actin/myosin networks can drive long-distance organelle transport and positioning.

  8. Myosin-Va and Dynamic Actin Oppose Microtubules to Drive Long-Range Organelle Transport

    PubMed Central

    Evans, Richard D.; Robinson, Christopher; Briggs, Deborah A.; Tooth, David J.; Ramalho, Jose S.; Cantero, Marta; Montoliu, Lluis; Patel, Shyamal; Sviderskaya, Elena V.; Hume, Alistair N.

    2014-01-01

    Summary In animal cells, microtubule and actin tracks and their associated motors (dynein, kinesin, and myosin) are thought to regulate long- and short-range transport, respectively [1–8]. Consistent with this, microtubules extend from the perinuclear centrosome to the plasma membrane and allow bidirectional cargo transport over long distances (>1 μm). In contrast, actin often comprises a complex network of short randomly oriented filaments, suggesting that myosin motors move cargo short distances. These observations underpin the “highways and local roads” model for transport along microtubule and actin tracks [2]. The “cooperative capture” model exemplifies this view and suggests that melanosome distribution in melanocyte dendrites is maintained by long-range transport on microtubules followed by actin/myosin-Va-dependent tethering [5, 9]. In this study, we used cell normalization technology to quantitatively examine the contribution of microtubules and actin/myosin-Va to organelle distribution in melanocytes. Surprisingly, our results indicate that microtubules are essential for centripetal, but not centrifugal, transport. Instead, we find that microtubules retard a centrifugal transport process that is dependent on myosin-Va and a population of dynamic F-actin. Functional analysis of mutant proteins indicates that myosin-Va works as a transporter dispersing melanosomes along actin tracks whose +/barbed ends are oriented toward the plasma membrane. Overall, our data highlight the role of myosin-Va and actin in transport, and not tethering, and suggest a new model in which organelle distribution is determined by the balance between microtubule-dependent centripetal and myosin-Va/actin-dependent centrifugal transport. These observations appear to be consistent with evidence coming from other systems showing that actin/myosin networks can drive long-distance organelle transport and positioning [10, 11]. PMID:25065759

  9. Clonidine promotes the accumulation of /sup 45/Ca in pancreatic beta-cell organelles

    SciTech Connect

    Andersson, T.; Nygren, P.

    1983-12-01

    Glucose-stimulated insulin release from pancreatic islets of ob/ob-mice was inhibited by 10(-9) M of the alpha 2-adrenergic agonist clonidine. This inhibitory effect was abolished by 10(-7) M of the antagonist yohimbine. Loading the islets with /sup 45/Ca during the clonidine exposure followed by isolation of subcellular fractions under conditions known to minimize the /sup 45/Ca redistribution resulted in increased accumulation of the isotope in the mitochondrial and microsomal fractions. It is suggested that clonidine inhibits glucose-stimulated insulin release by increasing the organelle sequestration of Ca2+.

  10. Time-lapse recording of centrosomes and other organelles in Drosophila neuroblasts.

    PubMed

    Pampalona, Judit; Januschke, Jens; Sampaio, Paula; Gonzalez, Cayetano

    2015-01-01

    Drosophila larval neuroblasts (NBs) are an excellent model for asymmetric division and cell cycle studies in general. For decades, visualizing relevant structures like centrosomes, chromosomes, or the mitotic spindle relied exclusively on immunofluorescence on fix samples. More recently, improvements on sensitivity and acquisition speed of different confocal systems have made it possible to acquire time-resolved images of combined fluorescent reporters from single larval NBs. Here, we provide protocols to visualize centrosomes and other organelles from both primary cultures of isolated single NBs and ex vivo, whole-mounted larval brains.

  11. The endoplasmic reticulum exerts control over organelle streaming during cell expansion.

    PubMed

    Stefano, Giovanni; Renna, Luciana; Brandizzi, Federica

    2014-03-01

    Cytoplasmic streaming is crucial for cell homeostasis and expansion but the precise driving forces are largely unknown. In plants, partial loss of cytoplasmic streaming due to chemical and genetic ablation of myosins supports the existence of yet-unknown motors for organelle movement. Here we tested a role of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) as propelling force for cytoplasmic streaming during cell expansion. Through quantitative live-cell analyses in wild-type Arabidopsis thaliana cells and mutants with compromised ER structure and streaming, we demonstrate that cytoplasmic streaming undergoes profound changes during cell expansion and that it depends on motor forces co-exerted by the ER and the cytoskeleton.

  12. Using targeted variants of aequorin to measure Ca2+ levels in intracellular organelles.

    PubMed

    Granatiero, Veronica; Patron, Maria; Tosatto, Anna; Merli, Giulia; Rizzuto, Rosario

    2014-01-01

    Aequorin is a Ca(2+)-sensitive photoprotein isolated from the jellyfish Aequorea victoria. It is an ideal probe for measuring Ca(2+) concentration ([Ca(2+)]) in intracellular organelles because it can be modified to include specific targeting sequences. On the binding of Ca(2+) to three high-affinity sites in aequorin, an irreversible reaction occurs in which the prosthetic group coelenterazine is released and a photon is emitted. This protocol presents procedures for expressing, targeting, and reconstituting aequorin in intact and permeabilized mammalian cells and describes how to use this photoprotein to measure intracellular [Ca(2+)] in various subcellular compartments.

  13. Role of myosin Va in purinergic vesicular neurotransmission in the gut

    PubMed Central

    Chaudhury, Arun; He, Xue-Dao

    2012-01-01

    We examined the hypothesis that myosin Va, by transporting purinergic vesicles to the varicosity membrane for exocytosis, plays a key role in purinergic vesicular neurotransmission. Studies were performed in wild-type (WT) and myosin Va-deficient dilute, brown, nonagouti (DBA) mice. Intracellular microelectrode recordings were made in mouse antral muscle strips. Purinergic inhibitory junction potential (pIJP) was recorded under nonadrenergic noncholinergic conditions after masking the nitrergic junction potentials. DBA mice showed reduced pIJP but normal hyperpolarizing response to P2Y1 receptor agonist MRS-2365. To investigate the mechanism of reduced purinergic transmission in DBA mice, studies were performed in isolated varicosities obtained from homogenates of whole gut tissues by ultracentrifugation and sucrose cushion purification. Purinergic varicosities were identified in tissue sections and in isolated varicosities by immunostaining for the vesicular ATP transporter, the solute carrier protein SLC17A9. The varicosities were similar in WT and DBA mice. Myosin Va was markedly reduced in DBA varicosities compared with the WT varicosities. Proximity ligation assay showed that myosin Va was closely associated with SLC17A9. Vesicular exoendocytosis was examined by FM1–43 staining of varicosities, which showed that exoendocytosis after KCl stimulation was impaired in DBA varicosities compared with WT varicosities. These studies show that SLC17A9 identifies ATP-containing purinergic varicosities. Myosin Va associates with SLC17A9-stained vesicles and possibly transports them to varicosity membrane for exocytosis. In myosin Va-deficient mice, purinergic inhibitory neurotransmission is impaired. PMID:22207579

  14. Prion Aggregates Are Recruited to the Insoluble Protein Deposit (IPOD) via Myosin 2-Based Vesicular Transport

    PubMed Central

    Nawroth, Peter P.; Tyedmers, Jens

    2016-01-01

    Aggregation of amyloidogenic proteins is associated with several neurodegenerative diseases. Sequestration of misfolded and aggregated proteins into specialized deposition sites may reduce their potentially detrimental properties. Yeast exhibits a distinct deposition site for amyloid aggregates termed “Insoluble PrOtein Deposit (IPOD)”, but nothing is known about the mechanism of substrate recruitment to this site. The IPOD is located directly adjacent to the Phagophore Assembly Site (PAS) where the cell initiates autophagy and the Cytoplasm-to-Vacuole Targeting (CVT) pathway destined for delivery of precursor peptidases to the vacuole. Recruitment of CVT substrates to the PAS was proposed to occur via vesicular transport on Atg9 vesicles and requires an intact actin cytoskeleton and “SNAP (Soluble NSF Attachment Protein) Receptor Proteins (SNARE)” protein function. It is, however, unknown how this vesicular transport machinery is linked to the actin cytoskeleton. We demonstrate that recruitment of model amyloid PrD-GFP and the CVT substrate precursor-aminopeptidase 1 (preApe1) to the IPOD or PAS, respectively, is disturbed after genetic impairment of Myo2-based actin cable transport and SNARE protein function. Rather than accumulating at the respective deposition sites, both substrates reversibly accumulated often together in the same punctate structures. Components of the CVT vesicular transport machinery including Atg8 and Atg9 as well as Myo2 partially co-localized with the joint accumulations. Thus we propose a model where vesicles, loaded with preApe1 or PrD-GFP, are recruited to tropomyosin coated actin cables via the Myo2 motor protein for delivery to the PAS and IPOD, respectively. We discuss that deposition at the IPOD is not an integrated mandatory part of the degradation pathway for amyloid aggregates, but more likely stores excess aggregates until downstream degradation pathways have the capacity to turn them over after liberation by the Hsp104

  15. Prion Aggregates Are Recruited to the Insoluble Protein Deposit (IPOD) via Myosin 2-Based Vesicular Transport.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Rajesh; Nawroth, Peter P; Tyedmers, Jens

    2016-09-01

    Aggregation of amyloidogenic proteins is associated with several neurodegenerative diseases. Sequestration of misfolded and aggregated proteins into specialized deposition sites may reduce their potentially detrimental properties. Yeast exhibits a distinct deposition site for amyloid aggregates termed "Insoluble PrOtein Deposit (IPOD)", but nothing is known about the mechanism of substrate recruitment to this site. The IPOD is located directly adjacent to the Phagophore Assembly Site (PAS) where the cell initiates autophagy and the Cytoplasm-to-Vacuole Targeting (CVT) pathway destined for delivery of precursor peptidases to the vacuole. Recruitment of CVT substrates to the PAS was proposed to occur via vesicular transport on Atg9 vesicles and requires an intact actin cytoskeleton and "SNAP (Soluble NSF Attachment Protein) Receptor Proteins (SNARE)" protein function. It is, however, unknown how this vesicular transport machinery is linked to the actin cytoskeleton. We demonstrate that recruitment of model amyloid PrD-GFP and the CVT substrate precursor-aminopeptidase 1 (preApe1) to the IPOD or PAS, respectively, is disturbed after genetic impairment of Myo2-based actin cable transport and SNARE protein function. Rather than accumulating at the respective deposition sites, both substrates reversibly accumulated often together in the same punctate structures. Components of the CVT vesicular transport machinery including Atg8 and Atg9 as well as Myo2 partially co-localized with the joint accumulations. Thus we propose a model where vesicles, loaded with preApe1 or PrD-GFP, are recruited to tropomyosin coated actin cables via the Myo2 motor protein for delivery to the PAS and IPOD, respectively. We discuss that deposition at the IPOD is not an integrated mandatory part of the degradation pathway for amyloid aggregates, but more likely stores excess aggregates until downstream degradation pathways have the capacity to turn them over after liberation by the Hsp104

  16. Reduced vesicular monoamine transport disrupts serotonin signaling but does not cause serotonergic degeneration.

    PubMed

    Alter, Shawn P; Stout, Kristen A; Lohr, Kelly M; Taylor, Tonya N; Shepherd, Kennie R; Wang, Minzheng; Guillot, Thomas S; Miller, Gary W

    2016-01-01

    We previously demonstrated that mice with reduced expression of the vesicular monoamine transporter 2 (VMAT2 LO) undergo age-related degeneration of the catecholamine-producing neurons of the substantia nigra pars compacta and locus ceruleus and exhibit motor disturbances and depressive-like behavior. In this work, we investigated the effects of reduced vesicular transport on the function and viability of serotonin neurons in these mice. Adult (4-6 months of age), VMAT2 LO mice exhibit dramatically reduced (90%) serotonin release capacity, as measured by fast scan cyclic voltammetry. We observed changes in serotonin receptor responsivity in in vivo pharmacological assays. Aged (months) VMAT2 LO mice exhibited abolished 5-HT1A autoreceptor sensitivity, as determined by 8-OH-DPAT (0.1 mg/kg) induction of hypothermia. When challenged with the 5HT2 agonist, 2,5-dimethoxy-4-iodoamphetamine (1 mg/kg), VMAT2 LO mice exhibited a marked increase (50%) in head twitch responses. We observed sparing of serotonergic terminals in aged mice (18-24 months) throughout the forebrain by SERT immunohistochemistry and [(3)H]-paroxetine binding in striatal homogenates of aged VMAT2 LO mice. In contrast to their loss of catecholamine neurons of the substantia nigra and locus ceruleus, aged VMAT2 LO mice do not exhibit a change in the number of serotonergic (TPH2+) neurons within the dorsal raphe, as measured by unbiased stereology at 26-30 months. Collectively, these data indicate that reduced vesicular monoamine transport significantly disrupts serotonergic signaling, but does not drive degeneration of serotonin neurons.

  17. Regulated vesicular trafficking of specific PCDH15 and VLGR1 variants in auditory hair cells.

    PubMed

    Zallocchi, Marisa; Delimont, Duane; Meehan, Daniel T; Cosgrove, Dominic

    2012-10-03

    Usher syndrome is a genetically heterogeneous disorder characterized by hearing and balance dysfunction and progressive retinitis pigmentosa. Mouse models carrying mutations for the nine Usher-associated genes have splayed stereocilia, and some show delayed maturation of ribbon synapses suggesting these proteins may play different roles in terminal differentiation of auditory hair cells. The presence of the Usher proteins at the basal and apical aspects of the neurosensory epithelia suggests the existence of regulated trafficking through specific transport proteins and routes. Immature mouse cochleae and UB/OC-1 cells were used in this work to address whether specific variants of PCDH15 and VLGR1 are being selectively transported to opposite poles of the hair cells. Confocal colocalization studies between apical and basal vesicular markers and the different PCDH15 and VLGR1 variants along with sucrose density gradients and the use of vesicle trafficking inhibitors show the existence of Usher protein complexes in at least two vesicular subpools. The apically trafficked pool colocalized with the early endosomal vesicle marker, rab5, while the basally trafficked pool associated with membrane microdomains and SNAP25. Moreover, coimmunoprecipitation experiments between SNAP25 and VLGR1 show a physical interaction of these two proteins in organ of Corti and brain. Collectively, these findings establish the existence of a differential vesicular trafficking mechanism for specific Usher protein variants in mouse cochlear hair cells, with the apical variants playing a potential role in endosomal recycling and stereocilia development/maintenance, and the basolateral variants involved in vesicle docking and/or fusion through SNAP25-mediated interactions.

  18. Self-organization of bent rod molecules into hexagonally ordered vesicular columns.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ho-Joong; Liu, Feng; Ryu, Ja-Hyoung; Kang, Seong-Kyun; Zeng, Xiangbing; Ungar, Goran; Lee, Jeong-Kyu; Zin, Wang-Cheol; Lee, Myongsoo

    2012-08-22

    Bent-shaped rigid-core molecules with flexible chiral dendrons grafted to the outer side of the bend were synthesized and characterized by circular dichroism, differential scanning calorimetry, X-ray scatterings, and transmission electron microscopy in solution and the solid state. The bent aromatic rods based on hepta- and nonaphenylene with nitrile groups at both ends self-assemble into well-ordered hollow tubular structures in aqueous solution, while the bent rod based on heptaphenylene without nitrile groups showed no apparent aggregations in aqueous solution. In the solid state, the rigid-flexible molecules based on heptaphenylene rod without the nitrile group self-assemble into a 2D oblique columnar structure with the columnar cross-section containing two interlocked molecules. Remarkably, the rigid flexible molecules based on hepta-, nona-, and undecaphenylene with nitrile groups self-assemble into a hexagonal columnar structure with weak 3D order. A model of vesicular channel structure is proposed based on small- and wide-angle X-ray diffraction on oriented fibers, density measurement, reconstruction and simulation of electron density maps, and molecular dynamics simulation. In contrast to the hollow tubular structure found in solution, in the solid both the outside and the interior of the columns are filled by the pendant aliphatic coils. Filling of the interior of these vesicular channels is made possible by some bent rod molecules turning their obtuse apex inward. One in 7, 2 in 8, and 4 in 10 molecules are thus inverted in a column slice in compounds with hepta-, nona-, and undecaphenylene cores, respectively. These are new examples of vesicular double-segregated columnar structures recently discovered in some dendrons.

  19. Evolution of the vesicular stomatitis viruses: divergence and codon usage bias.

    PubMed

    Liang, Yang; He, Mei; Teng, Chun-Bo

    2014-11-04

    Four Vesiculovirus species causing vesicular stomatitis in the Americas, together with two closely related insect isolates, can be phyletically classified into two major groups: New Jersey (NJ) and Indiana (IN). Here, Bayesian coalescent analyses were conducted to the time-stamped entire coding sequences of the G gene of these vesiculoviruses, with emphasis on their divergence scenario. The primary bifurcation was a much ancient event that might have taken place around 1.8 million years ago between NJ and IN, which shared a similar high mean rate. Interestingly, the overall codon usage bias pattern of these viruses resembled that of the insect vectors rather than the livestock hosts.

  20. Radiation inactivation analysis of fusion and hemolysis by vesicular stomatitis virus

    SciTech Connect

    Bundo-Morita, K.; Gibson, S.; Lenard, J.

    1988-04-01

    Radiation inactivation analysis was used to determine the size of the functional unit responsible for fusion of vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) with cardiolipin or phosphatidylcholine-phosphatidylethanolamine (1:1) liposomes, and for VSV-induced hemolysis. When radiation-insensitive background values were subtracted, the calculated functional units for all three activities were similar, ranging from 866 to 957 kDa, equivalent to about 15 G protein molecules. This is in striking contrast to results of similar studies with influenza and Sendai viruses, in which the functional unit corresponded in size to a single fusion protein monomer, and suggests that VSV fusion may occur by a different mechanism.

  1. The management of VA (vesicular-arbuscular) mycorrhizae in semi-arid environments

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, R.M.

    1987-01-01

    The need for management of vesicular-arbuscular mycorrhizae in semi-arid ecosystems represent an important challenge to belowground researchers especially as we increase our utilization of these stressed habitats. Within the laser couple of years several reviews have been prepared on the effects of disturbance to shrub and grasslands and their mycorrhizae. The purpose of this presentation is to discuss some research findings and management needs using examples from a high elevation cold desert, and from research in mid-grass and tallgrass prairies.

  2. Recombinant vesicular stomatitis virus vector mediates postexposure protection against Sudan Ebola hemorrhagic fever in nonhuman primates.

    PubMed

    Geisbert, Thomas W; Daddario-DiCaprio, Kathleen M; Williams, Kinola J N; Geisbert, Joan B; Leung, Anders; Feldmann, Friederike; Hensley, Lisa E; Feldmann, Heinz; Jones, Steven M

    2008-06-01

    Recombinant vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) vectors expressing homologous filoviral glycoproteins can completely protect rhesus monkeys against Marburg virus when administered after exposure and can partially protect macaques after challenge with Zaire ebolavirus. Here, we administered a VSV vector expressing the Sudan ebolavirus (SEBOV) glycoprotein to four rhesus macaques shortly after exposure to SEBOV. All four animals survived SEBOV challenge, while a control animal that received a nonspecific vector developed fulminant SEBOV hemorrhagic fever and succumbed. This is the first demonstration of complete postexposure protection against an Ebola virus in nonhuman primates and provides further evidence that postexposure vaccination may have utility in treating exposures to filoviruses.

  3. Blastomycosis-like pyoderma in association with recurrent vesicular hand eczema: good response to acitretin.

    PubMed

    Cecchi, Roberto; Bartoli, Laura; Brunetti, Luigi; Pavesi, Mario

    2011-03-15

    Blastomycosis-like pyoderma, also known as pyoderma vegetans, is an uncommon disease characterized by vegetating skin lesions mimicking blastomycosis or warty tuberculosis, often associated with staphylococcal and streptococcal infections. It is more commonly observed in elderly patients with impaired immunological capacity, and is often unresponsive to various therapeutic modalities. We describe a case of BLP that occurred on the palmar aspect of the left hand in an elderly female, affected with recurrent vesicular hand eczema. The disease resolved completely following the administration of oral acitretin 25 mg/day for 10 weeks.

  4. Oxidative Stress in the Healthy and Wounded Hepatocyte: A Cellular Organelles Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Mello, Tommaso; Zanieri, Francesca; Ceni, Elisabetta; Galli, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    Accurate control of the cell redox state is mandatory for maintaining the structural integrity and physiological functions. This control is achieved both by a fine-tuned balance between prooxidant and anti-oxidant molecules and by spatial and temporal confinement of the oxidative species. The diverse cellular compartments each, although structurally and functionally related, actively maintain their own redox balance, which is necessary to fulfill specialized tasks. Many fundamental cellular processes such as insulin signaling, cell proliferation and differentiation and cell migration and adhesion, rely on localized changes in the redox state of signal transducers, which is mainly mediated by hydrogen peroxide (H2O2). Therefore, oxidative stress can also occur long before direct structural damage to cellular components, by disruption of the redox circuits that regulate the cellular organelles homeostasis. The hepatocyte is a systemic hub integrating the whole body metabolic demand, iron homeostasis and detoxification processes, all of which are redox-regulated processes. Imbalance of the hepatocyte's organelles redox homeostasis underlies virtually any liver disease and is a field of intense research activity. This review recapitulates the evolving concept of oxidative stress in the diverse cellular compartments, highlighting the principle mechanisms of oxidative stress occurring in the healthy and wounded hepatocyte. PMID:26788252

  5. An organelle-exclusion envelope assists mitosis and underlies distinct molecular crowding in the spindle region.

    PubMed

    Schweizer, Nina; Pawar, Nisha; Weiss, Matthias; Maiato, Helder

    2015-08-31

    The mitotic spindle is a microtubular assembly required for chromosome segregation during mitosis. Additionally, a spindle matrix has long been proposed to assist this process, but its nature has remained elusive. By combining live-cell imaging with laser microsurgery, fluorescence recovery after photobleaching, and fluorescence correlation spectroscopy in Drosophila melanogaster S2 cells, we uncovered a microtubule-independent mechanism that underlies the accumulation of molecules in the spindle region. This mechanism relies on a membranous system surrounding the mitotic spindle that defines an organelle-exclusion zone that is conserved in human cells. Supported by mathematical modeling, we demonstrate that organelle exclusion by a membrane system causes spatio-temporal differences in molecular crowding states that are sufficient to drive accumulation of mitotic regulators, such as Mad2 and Megator/Tpr, as well as soluble tubulin, in the spindle region. This membranous "spindle envelope" confined spindle assembly, and its mechanical disruption compromised faithful chromosome segregation. Thus, cytoplasmic compartmentalization persists during early mitosis to promote spindle assembly and function.

  6. The Neurospora organelle motor: a distant relative of conventional kinesin with unconventional properties.

    PubMed Central

    Steinberg, G; Schliwa, M

    1995-01-01

    The "conventional" kinesins comprise a conserved family of molecular motors for organelle transport that have been identified in various animal species. Organelle motors from other phyla have not yet been analyzed at the molecular level. Here we report the identification, biochemical and immunological characterization, and molecular cloning of a cytoplasmic motor in a "lower" eukaryote, the Ascomycete fungus Neurospora crassa. This motor, termed Nkin (for Neurospora kinesin), exhibits several unique structural and functional features, including a high rate of microtubule transport, a lack of copurifying light chains, a second P-loop motif, and an overall sequence organization reminiscent of a kinesin-like protein. However, a greater than average sequence homology in the motor domain and the presence of a highly conserved region in the C-terminus identify Nkin as a distant relative of the family of conventional kinesins. A molecular phylogenetic analysis suggests Nkin to have diverged early in the evolution of this family of motors. The discovery of Nkin may help identify domains important for specific biological functions in conventional kinesins. Images PMID:8589459

  7. Propeptides of eukaryotic proteases encode histidines to exploit organelle pH for regulation.

    PubMed

    Elferich, Johannes; Williamson, Danielle M; Krishnamoorthy, Bala; Shinde, Ujwal

    2013-08-01

    Eukaryotic cells maintain strict control over protein secretion, in part by using the pH gradient maintained within their secretory pathway. How eukaryotic proteins evolved from prokaryotic orthologs to exploit the pH gradient for biological functions remains a fundamental question in cell biology. Our laboratory previously demonstrated that protein domains located within precursor proteins, propeptides, encode histidine-driven pH sensors to regulate organelle-specific activation of the eukaryotic proteases furin and proprotein convertase-1/3. Similar findings have been reported in other unrelated protease families. By analyzing >10,000 unique proteases within evolutionarily unrelated families, we show that eukaryotic propeptides are enriched in histidines compared with prokaryotic orthologs. On this basis, we hypothesize that eukaryotic proteins evolved to enrich histidines within their propeptides to exploit the tightly controlled pH gradient of the secretory pathway, thereby regulating activation within specific organelles. Enrichment of histidines in propeptides may therefore be used to predict the presence of pH sensors in other proteases or even protease substrates.

  8. Identification of the Moving Junction Complex of Toxoplasma gondii: A Collaboration between Distinct Secretory Organelles

    PubMed Central

    2005-01-01

    Apicomplexan parasites, including Toxoplasma gondii and Plasmodium sp., are obligate intracellular protozoa. They enter into a host cell by attaching to and then creating an invagination in the host cell plasma membrane. Contact between parasite and host plasma membranes occurs in the form of a ring-shaped moving junction that begins at the anterior end of the parasite and then migrates posteriorly. The resulting invagination of host plasma membrane creates a parasitophorous vacuole that completely envelops the now intracellular parasite. At the start of this process, apical membrane antigen 1 (AMA1) is released onto the parasite surface from specialized secretory organelles called micronemes. The T. gondii version of this protein, TgAMA1, has been shown to be essential for invasion but its exact role has not previously been determined. We identify here a trio of proteins that associate with TgAMA1, at least one of which associates with TgAMA1 at the moving junction. Surprisingly, these new proteins derive not from micronemes, but from the anterior secretory organelles known as rhoptries and specifically, for at least two, from the neck portion of these club-shaped structures. Homologues for these AMA1-associated proteins are found throughout the Apicomplexa strongly suggesting that this moving junction apparatus is a conserved feature of this important class of parasites. Differences between the contributing proteins in different species may, in part, be the result of selective pressure from the different niches occupied by these parasites. PMID:16244709

  9. Massive and Widespread Organelle Genomic Expansion in the Green Algal Genus Dunaliella

    PubMed Central

    Del Vasto, Michael; Figueroa-Martinez, Francisco; Featherston, Jonathan; González, Mariela A.; Reyes-Prieto, Adrian; Durand, Pierre M.; Smith, David Roy

    2015-01-01

    The mitochondrial genomes of chlamydomonadalean green algae are renowned for their highly reduced and conserved gene repertoires, which are almost fixed at 12 genes across the entire lineage. The sizes of these genomes, however, are much more variable, with some species having small, compact mitochondrial DNAs (mtDNAs) and others having expanded ones. Earlier work demonstrated that the halophilic genus Dunaliella contains extremely inflated organelle genomes, but to date the mtDNA of only one isolate has been explored. Here, by surveying mtDNA architecture across the Chlamydomonadales, we show that various Dunaliella species have undergone massive levels of mitochondrial genomic expansion, harboring the most inflated, intron-dense mtDNAs available from chlorophyte green algae. The same also appears to be true for their plastid genomes, which are potentially among the largest of all plastid-containing eukaryotes. Genetic divergence data are used to investigate the underlying causes of such extreme organelle genomic architectures, and ultimately reveal order-of-magnitude differences in mitochondrial versus plastid mutation rates within Dunaliella. PMID:25663488

  10. From endosymbiont to host-controlled organelle: the hijacking of mitochondrial protein synthesis and metabolism.

    PubMed

    Gabaldón, Toni; Huynen, Martijn A

    2007-11-01

    Mitochondria are eukaryotic organelles that originated from the endosymbiosis of an alpha-proteobacterium. To gain insight into the evolution of the mitochondrial proteome as it proceeded through the transition from a free-living cell to a specialized organelle, we compared a reconstructed ancestral proteome of the mitochondrion with the proteomes of alpha-proteobacteria as well as with the mitochondrial proteomes in yeast and man. Overall, there has been a large turnover of the mitochondrial proteome during the evolution of mitochondria. Early in the evolution of the mitochondrion, proteins involved in cell envelope synthesis have virtually disappeared, whereas proteins involved in replication, transcription, cell division, transport, regulation, and signal transduction have been replaced by eukaryotic proteins. More than half of what remains from the mitochondrial ancestor in modern mitochondria corresponds to translation, including post-translational modifications, and to metabolic pathways that are directly, or indirectly, involved in energy conversion. Altogether, the results indicate that the eukaryotic host has hijacked the proto-mitochondrion, taking control of its protein synthesis and metabolism.

  11. Isolation of Intact Chloroplasts and Other Cell Organelles from Spinach Leaf Protoplasts 1

    PubMed Central

    Nishimura, Mikio; Graham, Douglas; Akazawa, Takashi

    1976-01-01

    Freshly prepared spinach leaf protoplasts were gently ruptured by mechanical shearing followed by sucrose density gradient centrifugation to separate constituent cell organelles. The isolation of intact Class I chloroplasts (d = 1.21) in high yield, well separated from peroxisomes and mitochondria, was evidenced by the specific localization of ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase (EC 4.1.1.39), NADP triose-P dehydrogenase (EC 1.2.1.9), and carbonic anhydrase (EC 4.2.1.1) in the fractions. A clear separation of chloroplastic ribosomes from the soluble cytoplasmic ribosomes was also demonstrated by the band patterns of constituent RNA species in the polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Localization of several enzyme activities specific to leaf peroxisomes, e.g. catalase (EC 1.11.1.6), glycolate oxidase (EC 1.1.3.1), glyoxylate reductase (EC 1.1.1.26), glutamate glyoxylate aminotransferase (EC 2.6.1.4), serine glyoxylate aminotransferase, and alanine glyoxylate aminotransferase (EC 2.6.1.12) in the peroxisomal fractions (d = 1.25), was demonstrated. Overall results show the feasibility of the method for the isolation of pure organelle components in leaf tissues. Images PMID:16659669

  12. Extension of the concept of an anomalous water component to images of T-cell organelles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tychinsky, Vladimir P.

    2014-12-01

    Microscopic images of a living cell are the main source of information on its functional state. Modern interference microscopy techniques allow the numerical parameters of cell images to be obtained with an accuracy not available with other methods. Quantitative analysis of phase images of T lymphocytes (TCs) in different functional states demonstrated that variations of the properties of intracellular water should be taken into account. This conclusion agrees with the current view that the physical parameters of water, including the refractive index (RI) of a water layer, depend on the hydrophilicity and other characteristics of the adjacent surface. Application of this concept to phase images of TCs showed that the contribution of the fourth phase of water (4-water) or the structured water component, which has an increased RI, should be considered. The proportion of 4-water depends on the functional state of the cell determined by the culture medium composition. Normally, the proportion of 4-water in organelles is as high as 30% it is considerably lower in organelles of cells with inhibited metabolism.

  13. Multiclassifier combinatorial proteomics of organelle shadows at the example of mitochondria in chromatin data.

    PubMed

    Kustatscher, Georg; Grabowski, Piotr; Rappsilber, Juri

    2016-02-01

    Subcellular localization is an important aspect of protein function, but the protein composition of many intracellular compartments is poorly characterized. For example, many nuclear bodies are challenging to isolate biochemically and thus remain inaccessible to proteomics. Here, we explore covariation in proteomics data as an alternative route to subcellular proteomes. Rather than targeting a structure of interest biochemically, we target it by machine learning. This becomes possible by taking data obtained for one organelle and searching it for traces of another organelle. As an extreme example and proof-of-concept we predict mitochondrial proteins based on their covariation in published interphase chromatin data. We detect about ⅓ of the known mitochondrial proteins in our chromatin data, presumably most as contaminants. However, these proteins are not present at random. We show covariation of mitochondrial proteins in chromatin proteomics data. We then exploit this covariation by multiclassifier combinatorial proteomics to define a list of mitochondrial proteins. This list agrees well with different databases on mitochondrial composition. This benchmark test raises the possibility that, in principle, covariation proteomics may also be applicable to structures for which no biochemical isolation procedures are available.

  14. Isolation and characterization of a prokaryotic cell organelle from the anammox bacterium Kuenenia stuttgartiensis.

    PubMed

    Neumann, Sarah; Wessels, Hans J C T; Rijpstra, W Irene C; Sinninghe Damsté, Jaap S; Kartal, Boran; Jetten, Mike S M; van Niftrik, Laura

    2014-11-01

    Anaerobic ammonium oxidizing (anammox) bacteria oxidize ammonium with nitrite to nitrogen gas in the absence of oxygen. These microorganisms form a significant sink for fixed nitrogen in the oceans and the anammox process is applied as a cost-effective and environment-friendly nitrogen removal system from wastewater. Anammox bacteria have a compartmentalized cell plan that consists of three separate compartments. Here we report the fractionation of the anammox bacterium Kuenenia stuttgartiensis in order to isolate and analyze the innermost cell compartment called the anammoxosome. The subcellular fractions were microscopically characterized and all membranes in the anammox cell were shown to contain ladderane lipids which are unique for anammox bacteria. Proteome analyses and activity assays with the isolated anammoxosomes showed that these organelles harbor the energy metabolism in anammox cells. Together the experimental data provide the first thorough characterization of a respiratory cell organelle from a bacterium and demonstrate the essential role of the anammoxosome in the production of a major portion of the nitrogen gas in our atmosphere.

  15. Manipulation and Motion of Organelles and Single Molecules in Living Cells.

    PubMed

    Norregaard, Kamilla; Metzler, Ralf; Ritter, Christine M; Berg-Sørensen, Kirstine; Oddershede, Lene B

    2017-03-08

    The biomolecule is among the most important building blocks of biological systems, and a full understanding of its function forms the scaffold for describing the mechanisms of higher order structures as organelles and cells. Force is a fundamental regulatory mechanism of biomolecular interactions driving many cellular processes. The forces on a molecular scale are exactly in the range that can be manipulated and probed with single molecule force spectroscopy. The natural environment of a biomolecule is inside a living cell, hence, this is the most relevant environment for probing their function. In vivo studies are, however, challenged by the complexity of the cell. In this review, we start with presenting relevant theoretical tools for analyzing single molecule data obtained in intracellular environments followed by a description of state-of-the art visualization techniques. The most commonly used force spectroscopy techniques, namely optical tweezers, magnetic tweezers, and atomic force microscopy, are described in detail, and their strength and limitations related to in vivo experiments are discussed. Finally, recent exciting discoveries within the field of in vivo manipulation and dynamics of single molecule and organelles are reviewed.

  16. Inheritance of organelle DNA sequences in a citrus-poncirus intergeneric cross.

    PubMed

    Moreira, C D; Gmitter, F G; Grosser, J W; Huang, S; Ortega, V M; Chase, C D

    2002-01-01

    Many land plants deviate from the maternal pattern of organelle inheritance. In this study, heterologous mitochondrial and chloroplast probes were used to investigate the inheritance of organelle genomes in the progeny of an intergeneric cross. The seed parent was LB 1-18 (a hybrid of Citrus reticulata Blanco cv. Clementine x C. paradisi Macf. cv. Duncan) and the pollen parent was the cross-compatible species Poncirus trifoliata (L.) Raf. All 26 progeny examined exhibited maternal inheritance of plastid petA and petD loci. However, 17 of the 26 progeny exhibited an apparent biparental inheritance of mitochondrial atpA, cob, coxII, and coxIII restriction fragment length polymorphisms (RFLPs) and maternal inheritance of mitochondrial rrn26 and coxI RFLPs. The remaining nine progeny inherited only maternal mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) configurations. Investigations of plant mitochondrial genome inheritance are complicated by the multipartite structure of this genome, nuclear gene control over mitochondrial genome organization, and transfer of mitochondrial sequences to the nucleus. In this study, paternal mtDNA configurations were not detected in purified mtDNA of progeny plants, but were present in progeny DNA preparations enriched for nuclear genome sequences. MtDNA sequences in the nuclear genome therefore produced an inheritance pattern that mimics biparental inheritance of mtDNA.

  17. Interrelations between the Parasitophorous Vacuole of Toxoplasma gondii and Host Cell Organelles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cardoso Magno, Rodrigo; Cobra Straker, Lorian; de Souza, Wanderley; Attias, Marcia

    2005-04-01

    Toxoplasma gondii, the causative agent of toxoplasmosis, is capable of actively penetrating and multiplying in any nucleated cell of warm-blooded animals. Its survival strategies include escape from fusion of the parasitophorous vacuole with host cell lysosomes and rearrangement of host cell organelles in relation to the parasitophorous vacuole. In this article we report the rearrangement of host cell organelles and elements of the cytoskeleton of LLCMK2 cells, a lineage derived from green monkey kidney epithelial cells, in response to infection by T. gondii tachyzoites. Transmission electron microscopy made on flat embedded monolayers cut horizontally to the apical side of the cells or field emission scanning electron microscopy of monolayers scraped with scotch tape before sputtering showed that association of mitochondria to the vacuole is much less frequent than previously described. On the other hand, all parasitophorous vacuoles were surrounded by elements of the endoplasmic reticulum. These data were complemented by observations by laser scanning microscopy using fluorescent probes from mitochondria and endoplasmic reticulum and reinforced by three-dimensional reconstruction from serial sections observed by transmission electron microscopy and labeling of mitochondria and endoplasmic reticulum by fluorescent probes.

  18. Multiclassifier combinatorial proteomics of organelle shadows at the example of mitochondria in chromatin data

    PubMed Central

    Kustatscher, Georg; Grabowski, Piotr

    2016-01-01

    Subcellular localization is an important aspect of protein function, but the protein composition of many intracellular compartments is poorly characterized. For example, many nuclear bodies are challenging to isolate biochemically and thus remain inaccessible to proteomics. Here, we explore covariation in proteomics data as an alternative route to subcellular proteomes. Rather than targeting a structure of interest biochemically, we target it by machine learning. This becomes possible by taking data obtained for one organelle and searching it for traces of another organelle. As an extreme example and proof‐of‐concept we predict mitochondrial proteins based on their covariation in published interphase chromatin data. We detect about ⅓ of the known mitochondrial proteins in our chromatin data, presumably most as contaminants. However, these proteins are not present at random. We show covariation of mitochondrial proteins in chromatin proteomics data. We then exploit this covariation by multiclassifier combinatorial proteomics to define a list of mitochondrial proteins. This list agrees well with different databases on mitochondrial composition. This benchmark test raises the possibility that, in principle, covariation proteomics may also be applicable to structures for which no biochemical isolation procedures are available. PMID:26510496

  19. Apical Organelle Secretion by Toxoplasma Controls Innate and Adaptive Immunity and Mediates Long-Term Protection.

    PubMed

    Sloves, Pierre-Julien; Mouveaux, Thomas; Ait-Yahia, Saliha; Vorng, Han; Everaere, Laetitia; Sangare, Lamba Omar; Tsicopoulos, Anne; Tomavo, Stanislas

    2015-11-01

    Apicomplexan parasites have unique apical rhoptry and microneme secretory organelles that are crucial for host infection, although their role in protection against Toxoplasma gondii infection is not thoroughly understood. Here, we report a novel function of the endolysosomal T. gondii sortilin-like receptor (TgSORTLR), which mediates trafficking to functional apical organelles and their subsequent secretion of virulence factors that are critical to the induction of sterile immunity against parasite reinfection. We further demonstrate that the T. gondii armadillo repeats-only protein (TgARO) mutant, which is deficient only in apical secretion of rhoptries, is also critical in mounting protective immunity. The lack of TgSORTLR and TgARO proteins completely inhibited T-helper 1-dependent adaptive immunity and compromised the function of natural killer T-cell-mediated innate immunity. Our findings reveal an essential role for apical secretion in promoting sterile protection against T. gondii and provide strong evidence for rhoptry-regulated discharge of antigens as a key effector for inducing protective immunity.

  20. Detection, imaging, and kinetics of sub-micron organelles of chondrocytes by multiple beam interference microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joshi, Narahari V.; Medina, Honorio; Barboza, J. M.; Colantuoni, Gladys; Quintero, Maritza

    2004-07-01

    Chondrocytes, obtained from testosterone treated human articular cartilage, were examined by a recently developed Multiple Beam Interference Microscopy (MBIM) attached to a confocal set up, Video-enhanced differential interference microphotography and also by cinematography. In the MBIM, the intensity of the transmitted pattern is given by the Airy function which increases the contrast dramatically as the coefficient of the reflectance of the parallel plates increases. Moreover, in this configuration, the beam passes several times through a specific organelle and increases its optical path difference both because of the increase in the trajectory and refractive index (high density) of the organelle. The improved contrast enhances the resolving power of the system and makes visible several structural details of sub micron dimensions like nucleolus, retraction fibers, podia, etc. which are not possible to reveal with such a clarity by conventional techniques such as bright field, phase contrast or DIC. This technique permits to detect the oscillatory and rotational motions of unstained cilia for the first time. The frequency of oscillations was found to be 0.8 Hz.

  1. The anammoxosome organelle is crucial for the energy metabolism of anaerobic ammonium oxidizing bacteria.

    PubMed

    van Teeseling, Muriel C F; Neumann, Sarah; van Niftrik, Laura

    2013-01-01

    Anammox bacteria convert ammonium and nitrite to dinitrogen gas under anaerobic conditions to obtain their energy for growth. The anammox reaction was deemed impossible until its discovery in the early 1990s. Now, anammox bacteria are recognized as major players in the global nitrogen cycle and estimated to be responsible for up to 50% of the nitrogen in the air that we breathe. In addition, anammox bacteria are extremely valuable for wastewater treatment where they are applied for the removal of ammonium. Besides their importance in industry and the environment, anammox bacteria defy some basic biological concepts. Whereas most other bacteria have only one cell compartment, the cytoplasm, anammox bacteria have three independent cell compartments bounded by bilayer membranes, from out- to inside; the paryphoplasm, riboplasm and anammoxosome. The anammoxosome is the largest compartment of the anammox cell and is proposed to be dedicated to energy conservation. As such it would be analogous to the mitochondria of eukaryotes. This review will discuss the anammox cell plan in detail, with the main focus on the anammoxosome. The identity of the anammoxosome as a prokaryotic organelle and the importance of this organelle for anammox bacteria are discussed as well as challenges these bacteria face by having three independent cell compartments.

  2. Presynaptic Mechanisms of Lead Neurotoxicity: Effects on Vesicular Release, Vesicle Clustering and Mitochondria Number

    PubMed Central

    McGlothan, Jennifer L.; Stansfield, Kirstie H.; Stanton, Patric K.; Guilarte, Tomás R.

    2015-01-01

    Childhood lead (Pb2+) intoxication is a global public health problem and accounts for 0.6% of the global burden of disease associated with intellectual disabilities. Despite the recognition that childhood Pb2+ intoxication contributes significantly to intellectual disabilities, there is a fundamental lack of knowledge on presynaptic mechanisms by which Pb2+ disrupts synaptic function. In this study, using a well-characterized rodent model of developmental Pb2+ neurotoxicity, we show that Pb2+ exposure markedly inhibits presynaptic vesicular release in hippocampal Schaffer collateral-CA1 synapses in young adult rats. This effect was associated with ultrastructural changes which revealed a reduction in vesicle number in the readily releasable/docked vesicle pool, disperse vesicle clusters in the resting pool, and a reduced number of presynaptic terminals with multiple mitochondria with no change in presynaptic calcium influx. These studies provide fundamental knowledge on mechanisms by which Pb2+ produces profound inhibition of presynaptic vesicular release that contribute to deficits in synaptic plasticity and intellectual development. PMID:26011056

  3. Ethosomes: versatile vesicular carriers for efficient transdermal delivery of therapeutic agents.

    PubMed

    Pandey, Vikas; Golhani, Dilip; Shukla, Rajesh

    2015-12-01

    Delivery across skin is attractive due to its easy accessibility. However, drug delivery across skin is still a challenge in biomedical sciences. Over the past few decades, various successful novel devices and techniques have emerged to optimize drug delivery across skin whose obstructing behavior constricts entry of most of the therapeutic agents. Inability of various conventional vesicular formulations, e.g. liposomes to pass through the tapered (>30 nm) intercellular channels of stratum corneum, rendered invention of some lipid based vesicular carrier systems such as ethosomes which consist of phospholipid, ethanol and water. Ethosomes are non-invasive delivery carriers that enable drugs to reach the deep skin layers and/or the systemic circulation. In spite of their sophistication in conceptuality, they are exemplified by easiness in their preparation, safety and efficacy - a combination that can highly inflate their application. This review attempts to describe all aspects of ethosomes including roles and upshots of different excipients, various methods of preparation and characterizations, research reports on various drug deliveries, patent reports and future prospects.

  4. Interaction of Rhizosphere Bacteria, Fertilizer, and Vesicular-Arbuscular Mycorrhizal Fungi with Sea Oats †

    PubMed Central

    Will, M. E.; Sylvia, D. M.

    1990-01-01

    Plants must be established quickly on replenished beaches in order to stabilize the sand and begin the dune-building process. The objective of this research was to determine whether inoculation of sea oats (Uniola paniculata L.) with bacteria (indigenous rhizosphere bacteria and N2 fixers) alone or in combination with vesicular-arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi would enhance plant growth in beach sand. At two fertilizer-N levels, Klebsiella pneumoniae and two Azospirillum spp. did not provide the plants with fixed atmospheric N; however, K. pneumoniae increased root and shoot growth. When a sparingly soluble P source (CaHPO4) was added to two sands, K. pneumoniae increased plant growth in sand with a high P content. The phosphorus content of shoots was not affected by bacterial inoculation, indicating that a mechanism other than bacterially enhanced P availability to plants was responsible for the growth increases. When sea oats were inoculated with either K. pneumoniae or Acaligenes denitrificans and a mixed Glomus inoculum, there was no consistent evidence of a synergistic effect on plant growth. Nonetheless, bacterial inoculation increased root colonization by vesicular-arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi when the fungal inoculum consisted of colonized roots but had no effect on colonization when the inoculum consisted of spores alone. K. pneumoniae was found to increase spore germination and hyphal growth of Glomus deserticola compared with the control. The use of bacterial inoculants to enhance establishment of pioneer dune plants warrants further study. PMID:16348236

  5. The pathogenesis of vesicular exanthema of swine virus and San Miguel sea lion virus in swine.

    PubMed

    Gelberg, H B; Lewis, R M

    1982-07-01

    Vesicular exanthema of swine virus type A48 or San Miguel sea lion virus type 2, when inoculated intradermally into swine, resulted in fluid-filled vesicles at the sites of inoculation in the snout, coronary band, and tongue. Pigs that developed vesicles also had fevers. Secondary vesicle formation varied, depending on virus serotype. Viremia was found in one pig infected with San Miguel sea lion virus five days after infection. Virus was recovered from nasal-oral passages for up to five days after infection in both groups of pigs and from the gastrointestinal and urinary tracts of pigs infected with San Miguel sea lion virus. Neutralizing antibodies began to increase three days after inoculation and reached peak titers in seven to ten days. In the absence of secondary bacterial infection, healing was well advanced by ten days after inoculation. Lesions usually were limited to nonhaired portions of the integument and tongue. Individual epithelial cells became infected when a break in the skin allowed virus access to susceptible epithelial cells from either exogenous or endogenous sources. Individual infected cells ruptured and adjacent cells were infected, resulting in the formation of multiple microvesicles. Centrifugal coalescence of microvesicles led to formation of grossly visible macrovesicles. Lesions rarely developed from viral contamination of intact hair follicles. A mild virus-induced encephalitis was seen in pigs infected with vesicular exanthema of swine virus, and virus was recovered from brain tissue of pigs infected with San Miguel sea lion virus.

  6. Genetic and antigenic relationships of vesicular stomatitis viruses from South America.

    PubMed

    Pauszek, Steven J; Barrera, Jose Del C; Goldberg, Tony; Allende, Rossana; Rodriguez, Luis L

    2011-11-01

    Vesicular stomatitis (VS) viruses have been classified into two serotypes: New Jersey (VSNJV) and Indiana (VSIV). Here, we have characterized field isolates causing vesicular stomatitis in Brazil and Argentina over a 35-year span. Cluster analysis based on either serological relatedness, as inferred from virus neutralization and complement fixation assays, or nucleotide sequences of two separate genes (phosphoprotein or glycoprotein) grouped the field isolates into two distinct monophyletic groups within the Indiana serogroup. One group included seven viruses from Brazil and Argentina that were serologically classified as Indiana-2 and Cocal virus (COCV). The other group contained three viruses from Brazil that were serologically classified as Indiana-3 and the prototype of this group, Alagoas virus (VSAV). Interestingly, two vesiculoviruses that were isolated from insects but do not cause disease in animals, one from Brazil (Maraba virus; MARAV) and the other from Colombia (CoAr 171638), grouped into two separate genetic lineages within the Indiana serotype. Our data provide support for the classification of viruses causing clinical VS in livestock in Brazil and Argentina into two distinct groups: Indiana-2 (VSIV-2) and Indiana-3 (VSIV-3). We suggest using nomenclature for these viruses that includes the serotype, year and place of occurrence, and affected host. This nomenclature is consistent with that currently utilized to describe field isolates of VSNJV or VSIV in scientific literature.

  7. Rapid, activity-independent turnover of vesicular transmitter content at a mixed glycine/GABA synapse

    PubMed Central

    Apostolides, Pierre F.; Trussell, Laurence O.

    2013-01-01

    The release of neurotransmitter via the fusion of transmitter-filled, presynaptic vesicles is the primary means by which neurons relay information. However, little is known regarding the molecular mechanisms that supply neurotransmitter destined for vesicle filling, the endogenous transmitter concentrations inside presynaptic nerve terminals or the dynamics of vesicle refilling after exocytosis. We addressed these issues by recording from synaptically-coupled pairs of glycine/GABA co-releasing interneurons (cartwheel cells) of the mouse dorsal cochlear nucleus. We find that the plasma membrane transporter GlyT2 and the intracellular enzyme glutamate decarboxylase supply the majority of glycine and GABA, respectively. Pharmacological block of GlyT2 or glutamate decarboxylase led to rapid and complete rundown of transmission, whereas increasing GABA synthesis via intracellular glutamate uncaging dramatically potentiated GABA release within one minute. These effects were surprisingly independent of exocytosis, indicating that pre-filled vesicles re-equilibrated upon acute changes in cytosolic transmitter. Titration of cytosolic transmitter with postsynaptic responses indicated that endogenous, non-vesicular glycine/GABA levels in nerve terminals are 5 to 7 mM, and that vesicular transport mechanisms are not saturated under basal conditions. Thus, cytosolic transmitter levels dynamically set the strength of inhibitory synapses in a release-independent manner. PMID:23486948

  8. Heterogeneous transport of digitalis-like compounds by P-glycoprotein in vesicular and cellular assays.

    PubMed

    Gozalpour, Elnaz; Wilmer, Martijn J; Bilos, Albert; Masereeuw, Rosalinde; Russel, Frans G M; Koenderink, Jan B

    2016-04-01

    Digitalis-like compounds (DLCs), the ancient medication of heart failure and Na,K-ATPase inhibitors, are characterized by their toxicity. Drug-drug interactions (DDIs) at absorption and excretion levels play a key role in their toxicity, hence, knowledge about the transporters involved might prevent these unwanted interactions. In the present study, the transport of fourteen DLCs with human P-glycoprotein (P-gp; ABCB1) was studied using a liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS) quantification method. DLC transport by P-gp overexpressing Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK) and immortalized human renal cells (ciPTEC) was compared to vesicular DLC transport. Previously, we identified convallatoxin as a substrate using membrane vesicles overexpressing P-gp; however, we could not measure transport of other DLCs in this assay (Gozalpour et al., 2014a). Here, we showed that lipophilic digitoxin, digoxigenin, strophanthidin and proscillaridin A are P-gp substrates in cellular accumulation assays, whereas the less lipophilic convallatoxin was not. P-gp function in the cellular accumulation assays depends on the entrance of lipophilic compounds by passive diffusion, whereas the vesicular transport assay is more appropriate for hydrophilic substrates. In conclusion, we identified digitoxin, digoxigenin, strophanthidin and proscillaridin A as P-gp substrates using cellular accumulation assays and recognized lipophilicity as an important factor in selecting a suitable transport assay.

  9. Hitchhiking vesicular transport routes to the vacuole: Amyloid recruitment to the Insoluble Protein Deposit (IPOD).

    PubMed

    Kumar, Rajesh; Neuser, Nicole; Tyedmers, Jens

    2017-03-09

    Sequestration of aggregates into specialized deposition sites occurs in many species across all kingdoms of life ranging from bacteria to mammals and is commonly believed to have a cytoprotective function. Yeast cells possess at least 3 different spatially separated deposition sites, one of which is termed "Insoluble Protein Deposit (IPOD)" and harbors amyloid aggregates. We have recently discovered that recruitment of amyloid aggregates to the IPOD uses an actin cable based recruitment machinery that also involves vesicular transport. (1) Here we discuss how different proteins known to be involved in vesicular transport processes to the vacuole might act to guide amyloid aggregates to the IPOD. These factors include the Myosin V motor protein Myo2 involved in transporting vacuolar vesicles along actin cables, the transmembrane protein Atg9 involved in the recruitment of large precursor hydrolase complexes to the vacuole, the phosphatidylinositol/ phosphatidylcholine (PI/PC) transfer protein Sec 14 and the SNARE chaperone Sec 18. Furthermore, we present new data suggesting that the yeast dynamin homolog Vps1 is also crucial for faithful delivery of the amyloid model protein PrD-GFP to the IPOD. This is in agreement with a previously identified role for Vps1 in recruitment of heat-denatured aggregates to a perivacuolar deposition site. (2).

  10. Co-expression studies of the orphan carrier protein Slc10a4 and the vesicular carriers VAChT and VMAT2 in the rat central and peripheral nervous system.

    PubMed

    Burger, S; Döring, B; Hardt, M; Beuerlein, K; Gerstberger, R; Geyer, J

    2011-10-13

    The orphan carrier protein Slc10a4 represents a novel member of the so-called "sodium-bile acid co-transporter family," SLC10. Slc10a4 has a close phylogenetic relationship with the liver bile acid carrier Ntcp (Slc10a1), but has no transport activity for bile acids. In a previous study Slc10a4 proved to be predominantly expressed in the rat brain, where it was localized within cholinergic neurons. However, whether this cholinergic expression pattern was exclusive for Slc10a4 and whether this protein might also be expressed in the peripheral nervous system or other peripheral organs, remained unclear. Therefore, in the present study we analyzed the expression of Slc10a4 in neuronal and non-neuronal rat tissues more systematically, employing immunofluorescence co-localization studies of the vesicular acetylcholine transporter VAChT and the vesicular monoamine transporter VMAT2. The Slc10a4 protein was found to be widely expressed throughout structures of the CNS and peripheral nervous system. In addition to cholinergic neurons in the CNS, the retina, the neuromuscular junction and parasympathetic innervations, Slc10a4 was also localized in certain monoaminergic neurons and nerve fibers in the substantia nigra, the spinal cord and sympathetic innervations. Slc10a4 expression was also detected in granules of rat peritoneal and tissue mast cells using immunofluorescence and electron microscopy. Western blot and immunoprecipitation experiments with rat brain vesicle preparations revealed that the Slc10a4 protein was expressed in synaptic vesicles where it co-localized with synaptophysin, VAChT and VMAT2. This vesicular expression pattern was also shown in the rat adrenal pheochromocytoma cell line PC12 by immunofluorescence. Based on the findings of the present study we can speculate about the function of Slc10a4 as follows: (I) Slc10a4 could be a novel vesicular transporter for cholinergic and/or various monoaminergic neurotransmitters in the central and peripheral

  11. The Cytoskeleton Maintains Organelle Partitioning Required for Single-Cell C4 Photosynthesis in Chenopodiaceae Species[W

    PubMed Central

    Chuong, Simon D.X.; Franceschi, Vincent R.; Edwards, Gerald E.

    2006-01-01

    Recently, three Chenopodiaceae species, Bienertia cycloptera, Bienertia sinuspersici, and Suaeda aralocaspica, were shown to possess novel C4 photosynthesis mechanisms through the compartmentalization of organelles and photosynthetic enzymes into two distinct regions within a single chlorenchyma cell. Bienertia has peripheral and central compartments, whereas S. aralocaspica has distal and proximal compartments. This compartmentalization achieves the equivalent of spatial separation of Kranz anatomy, including dimorphic chloroplasts, but within a single cell. To characterize the mechanisms of organelle compartmentalization, the distribution of the major organelles relative to the cytoskeleton was examined. Examination of the distribution of the cytoskeleton using immunofluorescence studies and transient expression of green fluorescent protein–tagged cytoskeleton markers revealed a highly organized network of actin filaments and microtubules associating with the chloroplasts and showed that the two compartments in each cell had different cytoskeletal arrangements. Experiments using cytoskeleton-disrupting drugs showed in Bienertia and S. aralocaspica that microtubules are critical for the polarized positioning of chloroplasts and other organelles. Compartmentalization of the organelles in these species represents a unique system in higher plants and illustrates the degree of control the plant cell has over the organization and integration of multiorganellar processes within its cytoplasm. PMID:16905659

  12. [Vesicular intracellular transport in the digestive organs. Membrane vesicle--the universal mechanism of the functional transport].

    PubMed

    Morozov, I A

    2014-01-01

    On the basis of long-term research of the morpho-functional characteristics of the cells of the stomach, small intestine and gallbladder the mechanism and function of membrane vesicles in the implementation of the main functions of these organs sets out in this article: the secretion of hydrochloric acid by parietal cells, the absorption of nutrients in the small intestine and the fluid at a concentration of bile epitheliocytes of gallbladder. Proofs of the intracellular formation of hydrochloric acid in tubulovesicles of the parietal cells and turnover of its secretory membranes in the process of secretory cycle, that has ensured the re-use and explained the extraordinary life of these unique cells are presented. The credible mechanism of HCl output oppression by H(+)-K(+)-ATPase activity blockers has set out on this basis. The article provides detailed endocytosis mechanism of the ions and nutrients absorption by enterocytes. The mechanism of participation of the apical contractile complex of brush border of epithelial cells in the initiation of endocytosis and cytoplasmic microtubules in transport of membrane vesicles in the cytoplasm was analyzed. Based on our research and numerous of the world scientific proceedings the conclusion was done about the existence of two energy dependent types of transport in the absorptive epithelium of the digestive--transmembrane (ionic and nutritive) homeostatic type which is realized by the ATP-system of the basal plasmalemma, and vesicular (endocytosis) type which is impltmented by apical contractile complex of brush border and cytoplasmic microtubules. Both types of transport are interrelated and are under constant cellular control. This observation is relevant to the majority of cells, including those involved in the secretion of various substances: hydrochloric acid by parietal cells, enzymes by main cells of the gastric glands and exocrinocytes of the pancreas, hormone by endocrine cells of the APUD system and, finally

  13. Mechanical transmission of vesicular stomatitis New Jersey virus by Simulium vittatum (Diptera: Simuliidae) to domestic swine (Sus scrofa).

    PubMed

    Smith, Paul F; Howerth, Elizabeth W; Carter, Deborah; Gray, Elmer W; Noblet, Raymond; Mead, Daniel G

    2009-11-01

    Biting flies have been suggested as mechanical vectors of vesicular stomatitis New Jersey Virus (family Rhabdoviridae, genus Vesiculovirus, VSNJV) in livestock populations during epidemic outbreaks in the western United States. We conducted a proof-of-concept study to determine whether biting flies could mechanically transmit VSNJV to livestock by using a black fly, Simulium vittatum Zetterstedt (Diptera: Simuliidae), domestic swine, Sus scrofa L., model. Black flies mechanically transmitted VSNJV to a naive host after interrupted feeding on a vesicular lesion on a previously infected host. Transmission resulted in clinical disease in the naïve host. This is the first demonstration of mechanical transmission of VSNJV to livestock by insects.

  14. Chloroplast DNA Copy Number Changes during Plant Development in Organelle DNA Polymerase Mutants

    PubMed Central

    Morley, Stewart A.; Nielsen, Brent L.

    2016-01-01

    Chloroplast genome copy number is very high in leaf tissue, with upwards of 10,000 or more copies of the chloroplast DNA (ctDNA) per leaf cell. This is often promoted as a major advantage for engineering the plastid genome, as it provides high gene copy number and thus is expected to result in high expression of foreign proteins from integrated genes. However, it is also known that ctDNA copy number and ctDNA integrity decrease as cells age. Quantitative PCR (qPCR) allows measurement of organelle DNA levels relative to a nuclear gene target. We have used this approach to determine changes in copy number of ctDNA relative to the nuclear genome at different ages of Arabidopsis plant growth and in organellar DNA polymerase mutants. The mutant plant lines have T-DNA insertions in genes encoding the two organelle localized DNA polymerases (PolIA and PolIB). Each of these mutant lines exhibits some delay in plant growth and development as compared to wild-type plants, with the PolIB plants having a more pronounced delay. Both mutant lines develop to maturity and produce viable seeds. Mutants for both proteins were observed to have a reduction in ctDNA and mtDNA copy number relative to wild type plants at all time points as measured by qPCR. Both DNA polymerase mutants had a fairly similar decrease in ctDNA copy number, while the PolIB mutant had a greater effect of reduction in mtDNA levels. However, despite similar decreases in genome copy number, RT-PCR analysis of PolIA mutants show that PolIB expression remains unchanged, suggesting that PolIA may not be essential to plant survival. Furthermore, genotypic analysis of plants from heterozygous parents display a strong pressure to maintain two functioning copies of PolIB. These results indicate that the two DNA polymerases are both important in ctDNA replication, and they are not fully redundant to each other, suggesting each has a specific function in plant organelles. PMID:26870072

  15. Experimental Transmission of Vesicular Stomatitis New Jersey Virus From Black Flies (Simulium vittatum) To Cattle: Clinical Outcome Is Determined By Site of Insect Feeding

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Vesicular stomatitis New Jersey virus (VSNJV) is an insect-transmitted Rhabdovirus causing vesicular disease in domestic livestock including cattle, horses and pigs. The natural transmission of VSV during epidemics remains poorly understood. Transmission of VSNJV from experimentally infected black f...

  16. Lesion development and replication kinetics during early infection in cattle inoculated with vesicular stomatitis New Jersey virus via scarification and black fly (Simulium vittatum) bite

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Vesicular stomatitis viruses are the causative agents of vesicular stomatitis, an economically important contagious disease of livestock that occurs in North, Central, and South America. Little is known regarding the early stages of infection in natural hosts. Twelve adult Holstein steers were inocu...

  17. Development of a reverse transcription loop-mediated isothermal amplification assay for the detection of vesicular stomatitis New Jersey virus: use of rapid molecular assay to differentiate between vesicular disease viruses

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Vesicular stomatitis (VS) is endemic in Central America and northern regions of South America. Sporadic outbreaks of VS can occur in cattle and pigs where the clinical presentation can be similar to foot-and-mouth disease (FMD). There is therefore a pressing need for rapid, sensitive and specific d...

  18. The dynamic subcellular localization of ERK: mechanisms of translocation and role in various organelles.

    PubMed

    Wainstein, Ehud; Seger, Rony

    2016-04-01

    The dynamic subcellular localization of ERK in resting and stimulated cells plays an important role in its regulation. In resting cells, ERK localizes in the cytoplasm, and upon stimulation, it translocates to its target substrates and organelles. ERK signaling initiated from different places in resting cells has distinct outcomes. In this review, we summarize the mechanisms of ERK1/2 translocation to the nucleus and mitochondria, and of ERK1c to the Golgi. We also show that ERK1/2 translocation to the nucleus is a useful anti cancer target. Unraveling the complex subcellular localization of ERK and its dynamic changes upon stimulation provides a better understanding of the regulation of ERK signaling and may result in the development of new strategies to combat ERK-related diseases.

  19. The Role of the Transmembrane RING Finger Proteins in Cellular and Organelle Function

    PubMed Central

    Nakamura, Nobuhiro

    2011-01-01

    A large number of RING finger (RNF) proteins are present in eukaryotic cells and the majority of them are believed to act as E3 ubiquitin ligases. In humans, 49 RNF proteins are predicted to contain transmembrane domains, several of which are specifically localized to membrane compartments in the secretory and endocytic pathways, as well as to mitochondria and peroxisomes. They are thought to be molecular regulators of the organization and integrity of the functions and dynamic architecture of cellular membrane and membranous organelles. Emerging evidence has suggested that transmembrane RNF proteins control the stability, trafficking and activity of proteins that are involved in many aspects of cellular and physiological processes. This review summarizes the current knowledge of mammalian transmembrane RNF proteins, focusing on their roles and significance. PMID:24957874

  20. Behavior of DNA-lacking mitochondria in Entamoeba histolytica revealed by organelle transplant

    PubMed Central

    Kazama, Makoto; Ogiwara, Sanae; Makiuchi, Takashi; Yoshida, Kazuhiro; Nakada-Tsukui, Kumiko; Nozaki, Tomoyoshi; Tachibana, Hiroshi

    2017-01-01

    The anaerobic protozoan parasite Entamoeba histolytica has mitosomes that are mitochondria lacking some canonical functions and organelle DNA. Mitosomes play an important role in the life cycle of the parasite. The distribution of proteins in mitosomes is not uniform, and how mitosomes are maintained and retained is unknown. To answer these questions, we developed a transplant method for mitosomes with hemagglutinin-tagged protein into recipient cells containing mitosomes with Myc-tagged protein. Immunofluorescence staining showed that the two protein tags colocalized in single mitosomes in some recipient cells. These results suggest that our transplant method can be used in anaerobic protozoa and that donor mitosomes may obtain recipient proteins through fusion with other mitosomes or through de novo synthesis of proteins in recipient cells. PMID:28287148

  1. Organelle-specific injury to melanin-containing cells in human skin by pulsed laser irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Murphy, G.F.; Shepard, R.S.; Paul, B.S.; Menkes, A.; Anderson, R.R.; Parrish, J.A.

    1983-12-01

    Physical models predict that ultraviolet laser radiation of appropriately brief pulses can selectively alter melanin-containing cellular targets in human skin. Skin of normal human volunteers was exposed to brief (20 nanosecond) 351-nm wave length pulses from a XeF excimer laser, predicting that those cells containing the greatest quantities of melanized melanosomes (lower half of the epidermis) would be selectively damaged. Transmission electron microscopy revealed the earliest cellular alteration to be immediate disruption of melanosomes, both within melanocytes and basal keratinocytes. This disruption was dose dependent and culminated in striking degenerative changes in these cells. Superficial keratinocytes and Langerhans cells were not affected. It was concluded that the XeF excimer laser is capable of organelle-specific injury to melanosomes. These findings may have important clinical implications in the treatment of both benign and malignant pigmented lesions by laser radiations of defined wave lengths and pulse durations.

  2. From organelle to protein gel: a 6-wk laboratory project on flagellar proteins.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, Beth Ferro; Graziano, Mary R

    2006-01-01

    Research suggests that undergraduate students learn more from lab experiences that involve longer-term projects. We have developed a one-semester laboratory sequence aimed at sophomore-level undergraduates. In designing this curriculum, we focused on several educational objectives: 1) giving students a feel for the scientific research process, 2) introducing them to commonly used lab techniques, and 3) building skills in both data analysis and scientific writing. Over the course of the semester, students carry out two project-based lab experiences and write two substantial lab reports modeled on primary literature. Student assessment data indicate that this lab curriculum achieved these objectives. This article describes the first of these projects, which uses the biflagellate alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii to introduce students to the study of flagellar motility, protein synthesis, microtubule polymerization, organelle assembly, and protein isolation and characterization.

  3. Biochemical properties of platelet microparticle membranes formed during exocytosis resemble organelles more than plasma membrane.

    PubMed

    Olas, Beata; Lundell, Kerstin; Holmsen, Holm; Fukami, Miriam H

    2002-08-14

    Studies of [3H]glycerol turnover in phosphatidylcholine (PC) in platelets revealed two metabolic pools, a 'low turnover PC' in collagen-induced microparticles with specific radioactivity only 10% of that found in the 'high turnover PC' of bulk platelet PC. Isolated organelle fractions of [3H]glycerol-labelled platelets contained [3H]PC with specific radioactivities about 20% of that in membrane fractions. These results together with studies on distribution of concanavalin A-FITC and GPlb, a plasma membrane receptor, indicate that microparticles formed during exocytosis are not simple vesiculations of plasma membrane, but they seem rather to originate from a relatively metabolically static membrane pool not accessible to extracellular reagents.

  4. Muscle intermediate filaments and their links to membranes and membranous organelles.

    PubMed

    Capetanaki, Yassemi; Bloch, Robert J; Kouloumenta, Asimina; Mavroidis, Manolis; Psarras, Stelios

    2007-06-10

    Intermediate filaments (IFs) play a key role in the integration of structure and function of striated muscle, primarily by mediating mechanochemical links between the contractile apparatus and mitochondria, myonuclei, the sarcolemma and potentially the vesicle trafficking apparatus. Linkage of all these membranous structures to the contractile apparatus, mainly through the Z-disks, supports the integration and coordination of growth and energy demands of the working myocyte, not only with force transmission, but also with de novo gene expression, energy production and efficient protein and lipid trafficking and targeting. Desmin, the most abundant and intensively studied muscle intermediate filament protein, is linked to proper costamere organization, myoblast and stem cell fusion and differentiation, nuclear shape and positioning, as well as mitochondrial shape, structure, positioning and function. Similar links have been established for lysosomes and lysosome-related organelles, consistent with the presence of widespread links between IFs and membranous structures and the regulation of their fusion, morphology and stabilization necessary for cell survival.

  5. New insights into an old organelle: meeting report on biology of cilia and flagella.

    PubMed

    Sengupta, Piali; Barr, Maureen M

    2014-06-01

    The rising interest of the scientific community in cilia biology was evident from the fact that registration for the third FASEB conference on 'The Biology of Cilia and Flagella' closed out before the early bird deadline. Cilia and flagella are organelles of profound medical importance; defects in their structure or function result in a plethora of human diseases called ciliopathies. 240 clinicians and basic scientists from around the world gathered from 23 June 2013 to 28 June 2013 at Sheraton at the Falls, Niagara Falls, NY to present and discuss their research on this intensely studied subcellular structure. The meeting was organized by Gregory Pazour (University of Massachusetts Medical School), Bradley Yoder (University of Alabama-Birmingham), and Maureen Barr (Rutgers University) and was sponsored by the Federation of American Societies for Experimental Biology (FASEB). Here, we report highlights, points of discussion, and emerging themes from this exciting meeting.

  6. The Role of Organelle Stresses in Diabetes Mellitus and Obesity: Implication for Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Yi-Cheng; Hee, Siow-Wey; Hsieh, Meng-Lun; Jeng, Yung-Ming; Chuang, Lee-Ming

    2015-01-01

    The type 2 diabetes pandemic in recent decades is a huge global health threat. This pandemic is primarily attributed to the surplus of nutrients and the increased prevalence of obesity worldwide. In contrast, calorie restriction and weight reduction can drastically prevent type 2 diabetes, indicating a central role of nutrient excess in the development of diabetes. Recently, the molecular links between excessive nutrients, organelle stress, and development of metabolic disease have been extensively studied. Specifically, excessive nutrients trigger endoplasmic reticulum stress and increase the production of mitochondrial reactive oxygen species, leading to activation of stress signaling pathway, inflammatory response, lipogenesis, and pancreatic beta-cell death. Autophagy is required for clearance of hepatic lipid clearance, alleviation of pancreatic beta-cell stress, and white adipocyte differentiation. ROS scavengers, chemical chaperones, and autophagy activators have demonstrated promising effects for the treatment of insulin resistance and diabetes in preclinical models. Further results from clinical trials are eagerly awaited. PMID:26613076

  7. Behavior of DNA-lacking mitochondria in Entamoeba histolytica revealed by organelle transplant.

    PubMed

    Kazama, Makoto; Ogiwara, Sanae; Makiuchi, Takashi; Yoshida, Kazuhiro; Nakada-Tsukui, Kumiko; Nozaki, Tomoyoshi; Tachibana, Hiroshi

    2017-03-13

    The anaerobic protozoan parasite Entamoeba histolytica has mitosomes that are mitochondria lacking some canonical functions and organelle DNA. Mitosomes play an important role in the life cycle of the parasite. The distribution of proteins in mitosomes is not uniform, and how mitosomes are maintained and retained is unknown. To answer these questions, we developed a transplant method for mitosomes with hemagglutinin-tagged protein into recipient cells containing mitosomes with Myc-tagged protein. Immunofluorescence staining showed that the two protein tags colocalized in single mitosomes in some recipient cells. These results suggest that our transplant method can be used in anaerobic protozoa and that donor mitosomes may obtain recipient proteins through fusion with other mitosomes or through de novo synthesis of proteins in recipient cells.

  8. Influence of organelle geometry on the apparent binding kinetics of peripheral membrane proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoffmann, Julia; Fickentscher, Rolf; Weiss, Matthias

    2015-02-01

    Information processing in living cells frequently involves an exchange of peripheral membrane proteins between the cytosol and organelle membranes. The typical time scale τ of these association-dissociation cycles is commonly quantified in vivo via fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP). Contrary to common assumptions, we show here that τ values determined by FRAP depend on the size and number of target structures. Hence, FRAP times alone are insufficient to draw conclusions about the proteins' binding kinetics. In contrast, extracting primary molecular association and dissociation rates from FRAP approaches provides a size-independent and therefore robust measure for the proteins' binding kinetics. We support our theoretical considerations with experiments on the small GTPase Arf-1 that transiently associates with Golgi membranes: While Arf-1 recovery times in untreated cells and in cells with disrupted microtubules are significantly different, the molecular kinetic rates are shown to be the same in both cases.

  9. Muscle intermediate filaments and their links to membranes and membranous organelles

    SciTech Connect

    Capetanaki, Yassemi . E-mail: ycapetanaki@bioacademy.gr; Bloch, Robert J.; Kouloumenta, Asimina; Mavroidis, Manolis; Psarras, Stelios

    2007-06-10

    Intermediate filaments (IFs) play a key role in the integration of structure and function of striated muscle, primarily by mediating mechanochemical links between the contractile apparatus and mitochondria, myonuclei, the sarcolemma and potentially the vesicle trafficking apparatus. Linkage of all these membranous structures to the contractile apparatus, mainly through the Z-disks, supports the integration and coordination of growth and energy demands of the working myocyte, not only with force transmission, but also with de novo gene expression, energy production and efficient protein and lipid trafficking and targeting. Desmin, the most abundant and intensively studied muscle intermediate filament protein, is linked to proper costamere organization, myoblast and stem cell fusion and differentiation, nuclear shape and positioning, as well as mitochondrial shape, structure, positioning and function. Similar links have been established for lysosomes and lysosome-related organelles, consistent with the presence of widespread links between IFs and membranous structures and the regulation of their fusion, morphology and stabilization necessary for cell survival.

  10. Calcium homeostasis and organelle function in the pathogenesis of obesity and diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Arruda, Ana Paula; Hotamisligil, Gökhan S.

    2015-01-01

    Summary A number of chronic metabolic pathologies, including obesity, diabetes, cardiovascular disease, asthma, and cancer cluster together to present the greatest threat to human health. As research in this field has advanced, it has become clear that unresolved metabolic inflammation, organelle dysfunction, and other cellular and metabolic stresses underlie the development of these chronic metabolic diseases. However, the relationship between these systems and pathological mechanisms is poorly understood. Here, we will discuss the role of cellular Ca2+ homeostasis as a critical mechanism integrating the myriad of cellular and subcellular dysfunctional networks found in metabolic tissues such as liver and adipose tissue in the context of metabolic disease particularly in obesity and diabetes. PMID:26190652

  11. Maternally supplied S-acyl-transferase is required for crystalloid organelle formation and transmission of the malaria parasite

    PubMed Central

    Duarte, Neuza; Ramesar, Jai; Avramut, M. Cristina; Koster, Abraham J.; Dessens, Johannes T.; Frischknecht, Friedrich; Chevalley-Maurel, Séverine; Janse, Chris J.; Franke-Fayard, Blandine; Mair, Gunnar R.

    2016-01-01

    Transmission of the malaria parasite from the mammalian host to the mosquito vector requires the formation of adequately adapted parasite forms and stage-specific organelles. Here we show that formation of the crystalloid—a unique and short-lived organelle of the Plasmodium ookinete and oocyst stage required for sporogony—is dependent on the precisely timed expression of the S-acyl-transferase DHHC10. DHHC10, translationally repressed in female Plasmodium berghei gametocytes, is activated translationally during ookinete formation, where the protein is essential for the formation of the crystalloid, the correct targeting of crystalloid-resident protein LAP2, and malaria parasite transmission. PMID:27303037

  12. Characterization of a Planctomycetal Organelle: a Novel Bacterial Microcompartment for the Aerobic Degradation of Plant Saccharides

    PubMed Central

    Erbilgin, Onur; McDonald, Kent L.

    2014-01-01

    Bacterial microcompartments (BMCs) are organelles that encapsulate functionally linked enzymes within a proteinaceous shell. The prototypical example is the carboxysome, which functions in carbon fixation in cyanobacteria and some chemoautotrophs. It is increasingly apparent that diverse heterotrophic bacteria contain BMCs that are involved in catabolic reactions, and many of the BMCs are predicted to have novel functions. However, most of these putative organelles have not been experimentally characterized. In this study, we sought to discover the function of a conserved BMC gene cluster encoded in the majority of the sequenced planctomycete genomes. This BMC is especially notable for its relatively simple genetic composition, its remote phylogeneti