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Sample records for acidic whey protein

  1. Interaction of milk whey protein with common phenolic acids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Hao; Yu, Dandan; Sun, Jing; Guo, Huiyuan; Ding, Qingbo; Liu, Ruihai; Ren, Fazheng

    2014-01-01

    Phenolics-rich foods such as fruit juices and coffee are often consumed with milk. In this study, the interactions of α-lactalbumin and β-lactoglobulin with the phenolic acids (chlorogenic acid, caffeic acid, ferulic acid, and coumalic acid) were examined. Fluorescence, CD, and FTIR spectroscopies were used to analyze the binding modes, binding constants, and the effects of complexation on the conformation of whey protein. The results showed that binding constants of each whey protein-phenolic acid interaction ranged from 4 × 105 to 7 × 106 M-n and the number of binding sites n ranged from 1.28 ± 0.13 to 1.54 ± 0.34. Because of these interactions, the conformation of whey protein was altered, with a significant reduction in the amount of α-helix and an increase in the amounts of β-sheet and turn structures.

  2. Influence of Bleaching on Flavor of 34% Whey Protein Concentrate and Residual Benzoic Acid Concentration in Dried Whey Proteins

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Previous studies have shown that bleaching negatively affects the flavor of 70% whey protein concentrate (WPC70), but bleaching effects on lower-protein products have not been established. Benzoyl peroxide (BP), a whey bleaching agent, degrades to benzoic acid (BA) and may elevate BA concentrations...

  3. Influence of bleaching on flavor of 34% whey protein concentrate and residual benzoic acid concentration in dried whey products

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Previous studies have shown that bleaching negatively affects the flavor of 70% whey protein concentrate (WPC70), but bleaching effects on lower-protein products have not been established. Benzoyl peroxide (BP), a whey bleaching agent, degrades to benzoic acid (BA) and may elevate BA concentrations...

  4. Protein and Amino Acid Profiles of Different Whey Protein Supplements.

    PubMed

    Almeida, Cristine C; Alvares, Thiago S; Costa, Marion P; Conte-Junior, Carlos A

    2016-01-01

    Whey protein (WP) supplements have received increasing attention by consumers due to the high nutritional value of the proteins and amino acids they provide. However, some WP supplements may not contain the disclosed amounts of the ingredients listed on the label, compromising the nutritional quality and the effectiveness of these supplements. The aim of this study was to evaluate and compare the contents of total protein (TP), α-lactalbumin (α-LA), β-lactoglobulin (β-LG), free essential amino acids (free EAA), and free branched-chain amino acids (free BCAA), amongst different WP supplements produced by U.S. and Brazilian companies. Twenty commercial brands of WP supplements were selected, ten manufactured in U.S. (WP-USA) and ten in Brazil (WP-BRA). The TP was analyzed using the Kjeldahl method, while α-LA, β-LG, free EAA, and free BCAA were analyzed using HPLC system. There were higher (p < 0.05) concentrations of TP, α-LA, β-LG, and free BCAA in WP-USA supplements, as compared to the WP-BRA supplements; however, there was no difference (p > 0.05) in the content of free EAA between WP-USA and WP-BRA. Amongst the 20 brands evaluated, four WP-USA and seven WP-BRA had lower (p < 0.05) values of TP than those specified on the label. In conclusion, the WP-USA supplements exhibited better nutritional quality, evaluated by TP, α-LA, β-LG, and free BCAA when compared to WP-BRA.

  5. Influence of bleaching on flavor of 34% whey protein concentrate and residual benzoic acid concentration in dried whey proteins.

    PubMed

    Listiyani, M A D; Campbell, R E; Miracle, R E; Dean, L O; Drake, M A

    2011-09-01

    Previous studies have shown that bleaching negatively affects the flavor of 70% whey protein concentrate (WPC70), but bleaching effects on lower-protein products have not been established. Benzoyl peroxide (BP), a whey bleaching agent, degrades to benzoic acid (BA) and may elevate BA concentrations in dried whey products. No legal limit exists in the United States for BP use in whey, but international concerns exist. The objectives of this study were to determine the effect of hydrogen peroxide (HP) or BP bleaching on the flavor of 34% WPC (WPC34) and to evaluate residual BA in commercial and experimental WPC bleached with and without BP. Cheddar whey was manufactured in duplicate. Pasteurized fat-separated whey was subjected to hot bleaching with either HP at 500 mg/kg, BP at 50 or 100 mg/kg, or no bleach. Whey was ultrafiltered and spray dried into WPC34. Color [L*(lightness), a* (red-green), and b* (yellow-blue)] measurements and norbixin extractions were conducted to compare bleaching efficacy. Descriptive sensory and instrumental volatile analyses were used to evaluate bleaching effects on flavor. Benzoic acid was extracted from experimental and commercial WPC34 and 80% WPC (WPC80) and quantified by HPLC. The b* value and norbixin concentration of BP-bleached WPC34 were lower than HP-bleached and control WPC34. Hydrogen peroxide-bleached WPC34 displayed higher cardboard flavor and had higher volatile lipid oxidation products than BP-bleached or control WPC34. Benzoyl peroxide-bleached WPC34 had higher BA concentrations than unbleached and HP-bleached WPC34 and BA concentrations were also higher in BP-bleached WPC80 compared with unbleached and HP-bleached WPC80, with smaller differences than those observed in WPC34. Benzoic acid extraction from permeate showed that WPC80 permeate contained more BA than did WPC34 permeate. Benzoyl peroxide is more effective in color removal of whey and results in fewer flavor side effects compared with HP and residual BA is

  6. Expression of the whey acidic protein in transgenic pigs impairs mammary development.

    PubMed

    Shamay, A; Pursel, V G; Wilkinson, E; Wall, R J; Hennighausen, L

    1992-05-01

    The whey acidic protein has been found in milk of mice, rats, rabbits and camels, and its gene is expressed specifically in mammary tissue at late pregnancy and throughout lactation. A characteristic of whey acidic protein is the 'four-disulfide-core' signature which is also present in proteins involved in organ development. We have generated six lines of transgenic pigs which carry a mouse whey acidic protein transgene and express it at high levels in their mammary glands. Transgenic sows from three lines could not produce sufficient quantities of milk to support normal development of healthy offspring. This phenotype appears to be similar, if not identical, to the milchlos phenotype exhibited by mice expressing whey acidic protein transgenes. Mammary tissue from post-partum milchlos sows had an immature histological appearance, which was distinct from that observed during normal development or involution. Expression of the whey acidic protein transgene was found in mammary tissue from sexually immature pigs from milchlos lines, but not in sows from lines that appeared to lactate normally. We suggest that precocious synthesis of whey acidic protein impairs mammary development and function. Impaired mammary development due to inappropriate timing of whey acidic protein expression is consistent with the notion that proteins with the 'four-disulfide-core' signature participate in tissue formation. PMID:1284481

  7. Molecular evolution of monotreme and marsupial whey acidic protein genes.

    PubMed

    Sharp, Julie A; Lefèvre, Christophe; Nicholas, Kevin R

    2007-01-01

    Whey acidic protein (WAP), a major whey protein present in milk of a number of mammalian species has characteristic cysteine-rich domains known as four-disulfide cores (4-DSC). Eutherian WAP, expressed in the mammary gland throughout lactation, has two 4-DSC domains, (DI-DII) whereas marsupial WAP, expressed only during mid-late lactation, contains an additional 4-DSC (DIII), and has a DIII-D1-DII configuration. We report the expression and evolution of echidna (Tachyglossus aculeatus) and platypus (Onithorhynchus anatinus) WAP cDNAs. Predicted translation of monotreme cDNAs showed echidna WAP contains two 4-DSC domains corresponding to DIII-DII, whereas platypus WAP contains an additional domain at the C-terminus with homology to DII and has the configuration DIII-DII-DII. Both monotreme WAPs represent new WAP protein configurations. We propose models for evolution of the WAP gene in the mammalian lineage either through exon loss from an ancient ancestor or by rapid evolution via the process of exon shuffling. This evolutionary outcome may reflect differences in lactation strategy between marsupials, monotremes, and eutherians, and give insight to biological function of the gene products. WAP four-disulfide core domain 2 (WFDC2) proteins were also identified in echidna, platypus and tammar wallaby (Macropus eugenii) lactating mammary cells. WFDC2 proteins are secreted proteins not previously associated with lactation. Mammary gland expression of tammar WFDC2 during the course of lactation showed WFDC2 was elevated during pregnancy, reduced in early lactation and absent in mid-late lactation.

  8. Effect of temperature and concentration on benzoyl peroxide bleaching efficacy and benzoic acid levels in whey protein concentrate.

    PubMed

    Smith, T J; Gerard, P D; Drake, M A

    2015-11-01

    Much of the fluid whey produced in the United States is a by-product of Cheddar cheese manufacture and must be bleached. Benzoyl peroxide (BP) is currently 1 of only 2 legal chemical bleaching agents for fluid whey in the United States, but benzoic acid is an unavoidable by-product of BP bleaching. Benzoyl peroxide is typically a powder, but new liquid BP dispersions are available. A greater understanding of the bleaching characteristics of BP is necessary. The objective of the study was to compare norbixin destruction, residual benzoic acid, and flavor differences between liquid whey and 80% whey protein concentrates (WPC80) bleached at different temperatures with 2 different benzoyl peroxides (soluble and insoluble). Two experiments were conducted in this study. For experiment 1, 3 factors (temperature, bleach type, bleach concentration) were evaluated for norbixin destruction using a response surface model-central composite design in liquid whey. For experiment 2, norbixin concentration, residual benzoic acid, and flavor differences were explored in WPC80 from whey bleached by the 2 commercially available BP (soluble and insoluble) at 5 mg/kg. In liquid whey, soluble BP bleached more norbixin than insoluble BP, especially at lower concentrations (5 and 10 mg/kg) at both cold (4°C) and hot (50°C) temperatures. The WPC80 from liquid whey bleached with BP at 50°C had lower norbixin concentration, benzoic acid levels, cardboard flavor, and aldehyde levels than WPC80 from liquid whey bleached with BP at 4°C. Regardless of temperature, soluble BP destroyed more norbixin at lower concentrations than insoluble BP. The WPC80 from soluble-BP-bleached wheys had lower cardboard flavor and lower aldehyde levels than WPC80 from insoluble-BP-bleached whey. This study suggests that new, soluble (liquid) BP can be used at lower concentrations than insoluble BP to achieve equivalent bleaching and that less residual benzoic acid remains in WPC80 powder from liquid whey

  9. Effect of temperature and concentration on benzoyl peroxide bleaching efficacy and benzoic acid levels in whey protein concentrate.

    PubMed

    Smith, T J; Gerard, P D; Drake, M A

    2015-11-01

    Much of the fluid whey produced in the United States is a by-product of Cheddar cheese manufacture and must be bleached. Benzoyl peroxide (BP) is currently 1 of only 2 legal chemical bleaching agents for fluid whey in the United States, but benzoic acid is an unavoidable by-product of BP bleaching. Benzoyl peroxide is typically a powder, but new liquid BP dispersions are available. A greater understanding of the bleaching characteristics of BP is necessary. The objective of the study was to compare norbixin destruction, residual benzoic acid, and flavor differences between liquid whey and 80% whey protein concentrates (WPC80) bleached at different temperatures with 2 different benzoyl peroxides (soluble and insoluble). Two experiments were conducted in this study. For experiment 1, 3 factors (temperature, bleach type, bleach concentration) were evaluated for norbixin destruction using a response surface model-central composite design in liquid whey. For experiment 2, norbixin concentration, residual benzoic acid, and flavor differences were explored in WPC80 from whey bleached by the 2 commercially available BP (soluble and insoluble) at 5 mg/kg. In liquid whey, soluble BP bleached more norbixin than insoluble BP, especially at lower concentrations (5 and 10 mg/kg) at both cold (4°C) and hot (50°C) temperatures. The WPC80 from liquid whey bleached with BP at 50°C had lower norbixin concentration, benzoic acid levels, cardboard flavor, and aldehyde levels than WPC80 from liquid whey bleached with BP at 4°C. Regardless of temperature, soluble BP destroyed more norbixin at lower concentrations than insoluble BP. The WPC80 from soluble-BP-bleached wheys had lower cardboard flavor and lower aldehyde levels than WPC80 from insoluble-BP-bleached whey. This study suggests that new, soluble (liquid) BP can be used at lower concentrations than insoluble BP to achieve equivalent bleaching and that less residual benzoic acid remains in WPC80 powder from liquid whey

  10. Effect of protein concentration, pH, lactose content and pasteurization on thermal gelation of acid caprine whey protein concentrates.

    PubMed

    Bordenave-Juchereau, Stéphanie; Almeida, Bruno; Piot, Jean-Marie; Sannier, Frédéric

    2005-02-01

    The influence of pH (4.5-6.5), sodium chloride content (125-375 mM), calcium chloride content (10-30 mM), protein concentration (70-90 g/l) and lactose content on the gel hardness of goat whey protein concentrate (GWPC) in relation to the origin of the acid whey (raw or pasteurized milk) was studied using a factorial design. Gels were obtained after heat treatment (90 degrees C, 30 min). Gel hardness was measured using texture analyser. Only protein concentration and pH were found to have a statistically significant effect on the gel hardness. An increase in the protein concentration resulted in an increase in the gel hardness. GWPC containing 800g/kg protein formed gels with a hardness maximum at the pHi, whereas GWPC containing 300 g/kg protein did not form true gels. Whey from pasteurized milk formed softer gels than whey from raw milk. A high lactose content (approximately 360 g/kg) also reduced the gelation performance of GWPC. PMID:15747729

  11. Optimization of folic acid nano-emulsification and encapsulation by maltodextrin-whey protein double emulsions.

    PubMed

    Assadpour, Elham; Maghsoudlou, Yahya; Jafari, Seid-Mahdi; Ghorbani, Mohammad; Aalami, Mehran

    2016-05-01

    Due to susceptibility of folic acid like many other vitamins to environmental and processing conditions, it is necessary to protect it by highly efficient methods such as micro/nano-encapsulation. Our aim was to prepare and optimize real water in oil nano-emulsions containing folic acid by a low energy (spontaneous) emulsification technique so that the final product could be encapsulated within maltodextrin-whey protein double emulsions. A non ionic surfactant (Span 80) was used for making nano-emulsions at three dispersed phase/surfactant ratios of 0.2, 0.6, and 1.0. Folic acid content was 1.0, 2.0, and 3.0mg/mL of dispersed phase by a volume fraction of 5.0, 8.5, and 12%. The final optimum nano-emulsion formulation with 12% dispersed phase, a water to surfactant ratio of 0.9 and folic acid content of 3mg/mL in dispersed phase was encapsulated within maltodextrin-whey protein double emulsions. It was found that the emulsification time for preparing nano-emulsions was between 4 to 16 h based on formulation variables. Droplet size decreased at higher surfactant contents and final nano-emulsions had a droplet size<100 nm. Shear viscosity was higher for those formulations containing more surfactant. Our results revealed that spontaneous method could be used successfully for preparing stable W/O nano-emulsions containing folic acid. PMID:26806649

  12. Optimization of folic acid nano-emulsification and encapsulation by maltodextrin-whey protein double emulsions.

    PubMed

    Assadpour, Elham; Maghsoudlou, Yahya; Jafari, Seid-Mahdi; Ghorbani, Mohammad; Aalami, Mehran

    2016-05-01

    Due to susceptibility of folic acid like many other vitamins to environmental and processing conditions, it is necessary to protect it by highly efficient methods such as micro/nano-encapsulation. Our aim was to prepare and optimize real water in oil nano-emulsions containing folic acid by a low energy (spontaneous) emulsification technique so that the final product could be encapsulated within maltodextrin-whey protein double emulsions. A non ionic surfactant (Span 80) was used for making nano-emulsions at three dispersed phase/surfactant ratios of 0.2, 0.6, and 1.0. Folic acid content was 1.0, 2.0, and 3.0mg/mL of dispersed phase by a volume fraction of 5.0, 8.5, and 12%. The final optimum nano-emulsion formulation with 12% dispersed phase, a water to surfactant ratio of 0.9 and folic acid content of 3mg/mL in dispersed phase was encapsulated within maltodextrin-whey protein double emulsions. It was found that the emulsification time for preparing nano-emulsions was between 4 to 16 h based on formulation variables. Droplet size decreased at higher surfactant contents and final nano-emulsions had a droplet size<100 nm. Shear viscosity was higher for those formulations containing more surfactant. Our results revealed that spontaneous method could be used successfully for preparing stable W/O nano-emulsions containing folic acid.

  13. Glycation inhibits trichloroacetic acid (TCA)-induced whey protein precipitation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Four different WPI saccharide conjugates were successfully prepared to test whether glycation could inhibit WPI precipitation induced by trichloroacetic acid (TCA). Conjugates molecular weights after glycation were analyzed with SDS-PAGE. No significant secondary structure change due to glycation wa...

  14. Whey proteins in the regulation of food intake and satiety.

    PubMed

    Luhovyy, Bohdan L; Akhavan, Tina; Anderson, G Harvey

    2007-12-01

    Whey protein has potential as a functional food component to contribute to the regulation of body weight by providing satiety signals that affect both short-term and long-term food intake regulation. Because whey is an inexpensive source of high nutritional quality protein, the utilization of whey as a physiologically functional food ingredient for weight management is of current interest. At present, the role of individual whey proteins and peptides in contributing to food intake regulation has not been fully defined. However, Whey protein reduces short-term food intake relative to placebo, carbohydrate and other proteins. Whey protein affects satiation and satiety by the actions of: (1) whey protein fractions per se; (2) bioactive peptides; (3) amino-acids released after digestion; (4) combined action of whey protein and/or peptides and/or amino acids with other milk constituents. Whey ingestion activates many components of the food intake regulatory system. Whey protein is insulinotropic, and whey-born peptides affect the renin-angiotensin system. Therefore whey protein has potential as physiologically functional food component for persons with obesity and its co-morbidities (hypertension, type II diabetes, hyper- and dislipidemia). It remains unclear, however, if the favourable effects of whey on food intake, subjective satiety and intake regulatory mechanisms in humans are obtained from usual serving sizes of dairy products. The effects described have been observed in short-term experiments and when whey is consumed in much higher amounts.

  15. Ascorbic acid-containing whey protein film coatings for control of oxidation.

    PubMed

    Min, Seacheol; Krochta, John M

    2007-04-18

    A formulation for the whey protein isolate film or coating incorporating ascorbic acid (AA-WPI film or coating) was developed. Tensile and oxygen-barrier properties of the AA-WPI film were measured. Antioxidant effects of the AA-WPI coating on roasted peanuts were studied by comparing the values of peroxide (PO), thiobarbituric acid reactive substance (TBARS), and free-radical-scavenging activity, determined with noncoated peanuts and peanuts coated with WPI with and without ascorbic acid during storage at 21% relative humidity (RH) and 23, 35, and 50 degrees C. The incorporation of AA reduced elongation of WPI films. The oxygen-barrier property of the WPI film was significantly improved by incorporation of AA. The AA-WPI coating retarded lipid oxidation in peanuts significantly at 23, 35, and 50 degrees C. The AA-WPI coated peanuts were more red than noncoated peanuts at all storage temperatures.

  16. Effect of degree of hydrolysis of whey protein on in vivo plasma amino acid appearance in humans.

    PubMed

    Farup, Jean; Rahbek, Stine Klejs; Storm, Adam C; Klitgaard, Søren; Jørgensen, Henry; Bibby, Bo M; Serena, Anja; Vissing, Kristian

    2016-01-01

    Whey protein is generally found to be faster digested and to promote faster and higher increases in plasma amino acid concentrations during the immediate ~60 min following protein ingestion compared to casein. The aim of the present study was to compare three different whey protein hydrolysates with varying degrees of hydrolysis (DH, % cleaved peptide bonds) to evaluate if the degree of whey protein hydrolysis influences the rate of amino acid plasma appearance in humans. A casein protein was included as reference. The three differentially hydrolysed whey proteins investigated were: High degree of hydrolysis (DH, DH = 48 %), Medium DH (DH = 27 %), and Low DH (DH = 23 %). The casein protein was intact. Additionally, since manufacturing of protein products may render some amino acids unavailable for utilisation in the body the digestibility and the biological value of all four protein fractions were evaluated in a rat study. A two-compartment model for the description of the postprandial plasma amino acid kinetics was applied to investigate the rate of postprandial total amino acid plasma appearance of the four protein products. The plasma amino acid appearance rates of the three whey protein hydrolysates (WPH) were all significantly higher than for the casein protein, however, the degree of hydrolysis of the WPH products did not influence plasma total amino acid appearance rate (estimates of DH and 95 % confidence intervals [CI] (mol L(-1) min(-1)): High DH 0.0585 [0.0454, 0.0754], Medium DH 0.0594 [0.0495, 0.0768], Low DH 0.0560 [0.0429, 0.0732], Casein 0.0194 [0.0129, 0.0291]). The four protein products were all highly digestible, while the biological value decreased with increasing degree of hydrolysis. In conclusion, the current study does not provide evidence that the degree of whey protein hydrolysis is a strong determinant for plasma amino acid appearance rate within the studied range of hydrolysis and protein dose. PMID:27065230

  17. Emerging therapeutic potential of whey proteins and peptides.

    PubMed

    Yalçin, A Süha

    2006-01-01

    Whey is a natural by-product of cheese making process. Bovine milk has about 3.5% protein, 80% of which are caseins and the remaining 20% are whey proteins. Whey proteins contain all the essential amino acids and have the highest protein quality rating among other proteins. Advances in processing technologies have led to the industrial production of different products with varying protein contents from liquid whey. These products have different biological activities and functional properties. Also recent advances in processing technologies have expanded the commercial use of whey proteins and their products. As a result, whey proteins are used as common ingredients in various products including infant formulas, specialized enteral and clinical protein supplements, sports nutrition products, products specific to weight management and mood control. This brief review intends to focus on scientific evidence and recent findings related to the therapeutic potential of whey proteins and peptides.

  18. Secretion of whey acidic protein and cystatin is down regulated at mid-lactation in the red kangaroo (Macropus rufus).

    PubMed

    Nicholas, K R; Fisher, J A; Muths, E; Trott, J; Janssens, P A; Reich, C; Shaw, D C

    2001-07-01

    Milk collected from the red kangaroo (Macropus rufus) between day 100 and 260 of lactation showed major changes in milk composition at around day 200 of lactation, the time at which the pouch young begins to temporarily exit the pouch and eat herbage. The carbohydrate content of milk declined abruptly at this time and although there was only a small increase in total protein content, SDS PAGE analysis of milk revealed asynchrony in the secretory pattern of individual proteins. The levels of alpha-lactalbumin, beta-lactoglobulin, serum albumin and transferrin remain unchanged during lactation. In contrast, the protease inhibitor cystatin, and the putative protease inhibitor whey acidic protein (WAP) first appeared in milk at elevated concentrations after approximately 150 days of lactation and then ceased to be secreted at approximately 200 days. In addition, a major whey protein, late lactation protein, was first detected in milk around the time whey acidic protein and cystatin cease to be secreted and was present at least until day 260 of lactation. The co-ordinated, but asynchronous secretion of putative protease inhibitors in milk may have several roles during lactation including tissue remodelling in the mammary gland and protecting specific proteins in milk required for physiological development of the dependent young.

  19. Secretion of whey acidic protein and cystatin is down regulated at mid-lactation in the red kangaroo (Macropus rufus)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nicholas, K.R.; Fisher, J.A.; Muths, E.; Trott, J.; Janssens, P.A.; Reich, C.; Shaw, D.C.

    2001-01-01

    Milk collected from the red kangaroo (Macropus rufus) between day 100 and 260 of lactation showed major changes in milk composition at around day 200 of lactation, the time at which the pouch young begins to temporarily exit the pouch and eat herbage. The carbohydrate content of milk declined abruptly at this time and although there was only a small increase in total protein content, SDS PAGE analysis of milk revealed asynchrony in the secretory pattern of individual proteins. The levels of ??-lactalbumin, ??-lactoglobulin, serum albumin and transferrin remain unchanged during lactation. In contrast, the protease inhibitor cystatin, and the putative protease inhibitor whey acidic protein (WAP) first appeared in milk at elevated concentrations after approximately 150 days of lactation and then ceased to be secreted at approximately 200 days. In addition, a major whey protein, late lactation protein, was first detected in milk around the time whey acidic protein and cystatin cease to be secreted and was present at least until day 260 of lactation. The co-ordinated, but asynchronous secretion of putative protease inhibitors in milk may have several roles during lactation including tissue remodelling in the mammary gland and protecting specific proteins in milk required for physiological development of the dependent young. ?? 2001 Elsevier Science Inc.

  20. Synthesis and secretion of the mouse whey acidic protein in transgenic sheep.

    PubMed

    Wall, R J; Rexroad, C E; Powell, A; Shamay, A; McKnight, R; Hennighausen, L

    1996-01-01

    The synthesis of foreign proteins can be targeted to the mammary gland of transgenic animals, thus permitting commercial purification of otherwise unavailable proteins from milk. Genetic regulatory elements from the mouse whey acidic protein (WAP) gene have been used successfully to direct expression of transgenes to the mammary gland of mice, goats and pigs. To extend the practical usefulness of WAP promoter-driven fusion genes and further characterize WAP expression in heterologous species, we introduced a 6.8 kb DNA fragment containing the genomic form of the mouse WAP gene into sheep zygotes. Two lines of transgenic sheep were produced. The transgene was expressed in mammary tissue of both lines and intact WAP was secreted into milk at concentrations estimated to range from 100 to 500 mg/litre. Ectopic WAP gene expression was found in salivary gland, spleen, liver, lung, heart muscle, kidney and bone marrow of one founder ewe. WAP RNA was not detected in skeletal muscle and intestine. These data suggest that unlike pigs, sheep may possess nuclear factors in a variety of tissues that interact with WAP regulatory sequences. Though the data presented are based on only two lines, these findings suggest WAP regulatory sequences may not be suitable as control elements for transgenes in sheep bioreactors. PMID:8589741

  1. Production of the mouse whey acidic protein in transgenic pigs during lactation.

    PubMed

    Shamay, A; Solinas, S; Pursel, V G; McKnight, R A; Alexander, L; Beattie, C; Hennighausen, L; Wall, R J

    1991-11-01

    The mouse whey acidic protein (WAP) gene was introduced into the genome of pigs and its expression was analyzed in the mammary gland. Mouse WAP was detected in milk of lactating females from five lines at levels between .5 and 1.5 g/liter, thereby representing as much as 2% of the total milk proteins. The corresponding mRNA was expressed in mammary tissue at levels similar to those of pig beta-lactoglobulin and beta-casein. The pattern of WAP secretion in three pigs over a period of 6 wk was quantitatively similar to that of pig beta-lactoglobulin. From the eight transgenic pigs analyzed, three successfully completed one lactational period, but five pigs stopped lactating a few days after parturition. Our results show that it is possible to produce large quantities of a foreign protein in milk of pigs over a full lactational period. However, expression of WAP can compromise the mammary gland and render it nonfunctional. PMID:1721617

  2. Ruminants genome no longer contains Whey Acidic Protein gene but only a pseudogene.

    PubMed

    Hajjoubi, Siham; Rival-Gervier, Sylvie; Hayes, Hélène; Floriot, Sandrine; Eggen, André; Piumi, François; Chardon, Patrick; Houdebine, Louis-Marie; Thépot, Dominique

    2006-03-29

    Whey Acidic Protein (WAP) has been identified in the milk of only a few species, including mouse, rat, rabbit, camel, pig, tammar wallaby, brushtail possum, echidna and platypus. Despite intensive studies, it has not yet been found in the milk of Ruminants. We have isolated and characterized genomic WAP clones from ewe, goat and cow, identified their chromosomal localization and examined the expression of the endogenous WAP sequence in the mammary glands of all three species. The WAP sequences were localized on chromosome 4 (4q26) as expected from comparative mapping data. The three ruminant WAP sequences reveal the same deletion of a nucleotide at the end of the first exon when compared with the pig sequence. Due to this frameshift mutation, the putative proteins encoded by these sequences do not harbor the features of a usual WAP protein with two four-disulfide core domains. Moreover, RT-PCR experiments have shown that these sequences are not transcribed and are, thus, pseudogenes. This loss of functionality of the gene in Ruminants raises the question of the biological role of the WAP. Some putative roles previously suggested for WAP are discussed. PMID:16483732

  3. Acid-responsive properties of fibrils from heat-induced whey protein concentrate.

    PubMed

    Xu, Hong-Hua; Wang, Jing; Dong, Shi-Rong; Cheng, Wen; Kong, Bao-Hua; Tan, Jun-Yan

    2016-08-01

    The heat-induced fibrils of whey protein concentrate (WPC) have demonstrated an acid-responsive property; that is, the fibrils went through formation-depolymerization-reformation as pH was adjusted to 1.8, 6.5, and back to 1.8. We investigated the microstructure, driving force, and thermal stability of 3.0% (wt) WPC nanofibrils adjusted between pH 6.5 and 1.8 twice. The results showed that the nanofibrils had acid-responsive properties and good thermal stability after reheating for 10h at 90°C and adjusting pH from 1.8 to 6.5 to 1.8. The content of WPC fibril aggregates was not much different with the prolongation of heating times during pH variation. Although the nanofibrils' structure could be destroyed only by changing the pH, the essence of this destruction might only form fiber fragments, polymers that would restore a fibrous structure upon returning to pH 1.8. A described model for the acid-responsive assembly of fibrils of WPC was proposed. The fibrils went through formation-depolymerization-reformation by weaker noncovalent interactions (surface hydrophobicity) as pH changed from 1.8 to 6.5 back to 1.8. However, the fibrils lost the acid-responsive properties because much more S-S (disulfide) formation occurred when the solution was adjusted to pH 6.5 and reheated. Meanwhile, fibrils still possessed acid-responsive properties when reheated at pH 1.8, and the content of fibrils slightly increased with a further reduction of α-helix structure. PMID:27265171

  4. Urinary loss of tricarboxylic acid cycle intermediates as revealed by metabolomics studies: an underlying mechanism to reduce lipid accretion by whey protein ingestion?

    PubMed

    Lillefosse, Haldis H; Clausen, Morten R; Yde, Christian C; Ditlev, Ditte B; Zhang, Xumin; Du, Zhen-Yu; Bertram, Hanne C; Madsen, Lise; Kristiansen, Karsten; Liaset, Bjørn

    2014-05-01

    Whey protein intake is associated with the modulation of energy metabolism and altered body composition both in human subjects and in animals, but the underlying mechanisms are not yet elucidated. We fed obesity-prone C57BL/6J mice high-fat diets with either casein (HF casein) or whey (HF whey) for 6 weeks. At equal energy intake and apparent fat and nitrogen digestibility, mice fed HF whey stored less energy as lipids, evident both as lower white adipose tissue mass and as reduced liver lipids, compared with HF-casein-fed mice. Explorative analyses of 48 h urine, both by (1)H NMR and LC-MS metabolomic platforms, demonstrated higher urinary excretion of tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle intermediates citric acid and succinic acid (identified by both platforms), and cis-aconitic acid and isocitric acid (identified by LC-MS platform) in the HF whey, relative to in the HF-casein-fed mice. Targeted LC-MS analyses revealed higher citric acid and cis-aconitic acid concentrations in fed state plasma, but not in liver of HF-whey-fed mice. We propose that enhanced urinary loss of TCA cycle metabolites drain available substrates for anabolic processes, such as lipogenesis, thereby leading to reduced lipid accretion in HF-whey-fed compared to HF-casein-fed mice.

  5. Storage stability of ascorbic acid incorporated in edible whey protein films.

    PubMed

    Janjarasskul, Theeranun; Min, Sea C; Krochta, John M

    2011-12-14

    The stability of ascorbic acid (AA) incorporated in whey protein isolate (WPI) film and the related color changes during storage were studied. No significant loss of AA content was found in any films prepared from pH 2.0 casting solution stored at 30% relative humidity (RH) and 22 °C over 84 days. Total visible color difference (ΔE*(ab)) of all films slowly increased over storage time. The ΔE*(ab) values of pH 3.5 films were significantly higher than those of pH 2.0 films. The stability of AA-WPI films was found to be mainly affected by the pH of the film-forming solution and storage temperature. Oxidative degradation of AA-WPI films followed Arrhenius behavior. Reduction of the casting solution pH to below the pK(a1) (4.04 at 25 °C) of AA effectively maintained AA-WPI storage stability by greatly reducing oxidative degradation, whereas anaerobic and nonenzymatic browning were insignificant. The half-life of pH 2.0 AA-WPI film at 30% RH and 22 °C was 520 days.

  6. Nutrition and Inflammation in Older Individuals: Focus on Vitamin D, n-3 Polyunsaturated Fatty Acids and Whey Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Ticinesi, Andrea; Meschi, Tiziana; Lauretani, Fulvio; Felis, Giovanna; Franchi, Fabrizio; Pedrolli, Carlo; Barichella, Michela; Benati, Giuseppe; Di Nuzzo, Sergio; Ceda, Gian Paolo; Maggio, Marcello

    2016-01-01

    Chronic activation of the inflammatory response, defined as inflammaging, is the key physio-pathological substrate for anabolic resistance, sarcopenia and frailty in older individuals. Nutrients can theoretically modulate this phenomenon. The underlying molecular mechanisms reducing the synthesis of pro-inflammatory mediators have been elucidated, particularly for vitamin D, n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) and whey proteins. In this paper, we review the current evidence emerging from observational and intervention studies, performed in older individuals, either community-dwelling or hospitalized with acute disease, and evaluating the effects of intake of vitamin D, n-3 PUFA and whey proteins on inflammatory markers, such as C-Reactive Protein (CRP), interleukin-1 (IL-1), interleukin-6 (IL-6) and tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α). After the analysis, we conclude that there is sufficient evidence for an anti-inflammatory effect in aging only for n-3 PUFA intake, while the few existing intervention studies do not support a similar activity for vitamin D and whey supplements. There is need in the future of large, high-quality studies testing the effects of combined dietary interventions including the above mentioned nutrients on inflammation and health-related outcomes. PMID:27043616

  7. Nutrition and Inflammation in Older Individuals: Focus on Vitamin D, n-3 Polyunsaturated Fatty Acids and Whey Proteins.

    PubMed

    Ticinesi, Andrea; Meschi, Tiziana; Lauretani, Fulvio; Felis, Giovanna; Franchi, Fabrizio; Pedrolli, Carlo; Barichella, Michela; Benati, Giuseppe; Di Nuzzo, Sergio; Ceda, Gian Paolo; Maggio, Marcello

    2016-01-01

    Chronic activation of the inflammatory response, defined as inflammaging, is the key physio-pathological substrate for anabolic resistance, sarcopenia and frailty in older individuals. Nutrients can theoretically modulate this phenomenon. The underlying molecular mechanisms reducing the synthesis of pro-inflammatory mediators have been elucidated, particularly for vitamin D, n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) and whey proteins. In this paper, we review the current evidence emerging from observational and intervention studies, performed in older individuals, either community-dwelling or hospitalized with acute disease, and evaluating the effects of intake of vitamin D, n-3 PUFA and whey proteins on inflammatory markers, such as C-Reactive Protein (CRP), interleukin-1 (IL-1), interleukin-6 (IL-6) and tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α). After the analysis, we conclude that there is sufficient evidence for an anti-inflammatory effect in aging only for n-3 PUFA intake, while the few existing intervention studies do not support a similar activity for vitamin D and whey supplements. There is need in the future of large, high-quality studies testing the effects of combined dietary interventions including the above mentioned nutrients on inflammation and health-related outcomes. PMID:27043616

  8. Production and characterization of poly(3-hydroxybutyrate) generated by Alcaligenes latus using lactose and whey after acid protein precipitation process.

    PubMed

    Berwig, Karina Hammel; Baldasso, Camila; Dettmer, Aline

    2016-10-01

    Whey after acid protein precipitation was used as substrate for PHB production in orbital shaker using Alcaligenes latus. Statistical analysis determined the most appropriate hydroxide for pH neutralization of whey after protein precipitation among NH4OH, KOH and NaOH 10%w/v. The results were compared to those of commercial lactose. A scale-up test in a 4L bioreactor was done at 35°C, 750rpm, 7L/min air flow, and 6.5 pH. The PHB was characterized through Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy, thermogravimetry and differential scanning calorimetry. NH4OH provided the best results for productivity (p), 0.11g/L.h, and for polymer yield, (YP/S), 1.08g/g. The bioreactor experiment resulted in lower p and YP/S. PHB showed maximum degradation temperature (291°C), melting temperature (169°C), and chemical properties similar to those of standard PHB. The use of whey as a substrate for PHB production did not affect significantly the final product quality. PMID:27347795

  9. Submerged yeast fermentation of acid cheese whey for protein production and pollution potential reduction.

    PubMed

    Ghaly, A E; Kamal, M A

    2004-02-01

    Bench-scale batch bioreactors were used to study the effectiveness of cheese whey fermentation for single-cell protein production using the yeast Kluyveromyces fragilis in reducing the pollution potential of whey as measured by solids, chemical oxygen demand (COD) and nitrogenous compounds concentrations. The four principal phases (lag, exponential, stationary and death) encountered in the history of a microbial culture grown under batch conditions were clearly recognized in the growth, temperature and dissolved oxygen curves. The lactose concentration and soluble COD displayed three distinct phases corresponding to the lag, exponential and stationary phases of the yeast growth. The minimum dissolved oxygen and maximum temperature observed in this study (at an air flow of 3 VVM, a mixing speed of 400 rpm and an ambient temperature) were 2.49 mg/L and 31.6 degrees C, respectively. About 99% of lactose (90.6% of soluble COD) was utilized after 28 h. The total COD continued to decline due to cell death resulting in a reduction of 42.98%. The total nitrogen concentration remained unchanged while the organic nitrogen increased during the exponential phase and then declined during the death phase. The ash content remained unchanged while a substantial reduction (56%) of the volatile solids was observed. These results indicated that sufficient oxygen for yeast growth was present in the medium and no cooling system was needed for this type of fermenter under similar experimental conditions. Recovering the yeast biomass with ultrafiltration reduced the total COD by 98% of its initial value in the raw whey. PMID:14723932

  10. Whey protein fractionation using supercritical carbon dioxide

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Sweet whey, a coproduct of the cheesemaking process, can be concentrated using ultrafiltration and ion-exchange to produce whey protein isolates (WPI). WPI contains approximately 32% alpha-lactalbumin (alpha-LA) and 61% beta-lactoglobulin (beta-LG), plus a small amount of minor whey proteins. Whil...

  11. Whey protein fractionation using supercritical carbon dioxide

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Sweet whey, the watery product of the cheesemaking process, is usually concentrated using ultrafiltration or ion-exchange to produce whey protein concentrates (WPC) and whey protein isolates (WPI), respectively. WPC are comprised mainly of beta-lactoglobulin (LG), alpha-lactalbumin (LA), proteose - ...

  12. Post-exercise whey protein hydrolysate supplementation induces a greater increase in muscle protein synthesis than its constituent amino acid content.

    PubMed

    Kanda, Atsushi; Nakayama, Kyosuke; Fukasawa, Tomoyuki; Koga, Jinichiro; Kanegae, Minoru; Kawanaka, Kentaro; Higuchi, Mitsuru

    2013-09-28

    It is well known that ingestion of a protein source is effective in stimulating muscle protein synthesis after exercise. In addition, there are numerous reports on the impact of leucine and leucine-rich whey protein on muscle protein synthesis and mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) signalling. However, there is only limited information on the effects of whey protein hydrolysates (WPH) on muscle protein synthesis and mTOR signalling. The aim of the present study was to compare the effects of WPH and amino acids on muscle protein synthesis and the initiation of translation in skeletal muscle during the post-exercise phase. Male Sprague–Dawley rats swam for 2 h to depress muscle protein synthesis. Immediately after exercise, the animals were administered either carbohydrate (CHO), CHO plus an amino acid mixture (AA) or CHO plus WPH. At 1 h after exercise, the supplements containing whey-based protein (AA and WPH) caused a significant increase in the fractional rate of protein synthesis (FSR) compared with CHO. WPH also caused a significant increase in FSR compared with AA. Post-exercise ingestion of WPH caused a significant increase in the phosphorylation of mTOR levels compared with AA or CHO. In addition, WPH caused greater phosphorylation of ribosomal protein S6 kinase and eukaryotic initiation factor 4E-binding protein 1 than AA and CHO. In contrast, there was no difference in plasma amino acid levels following supplementation with either AA or WPH. These results indicate that WPH may include active components that are superior to amino acids for stimulating muscle protein synthesis and initiating translation.

  13. Purification and characterisation of a glutamic acid-containing peptide with calcium-binding capacity from whey protein hydrolysate.

    PubMed

    Huang, Shun-Li; Zhao, Li-Na; Cai, Xixi; Wang, Shao-Yun; Huang, Yi-Fan; Hong, Jing; Rao, Ping-Fan

    2015-02-01

    The bioavailability of dietary ionised calcium is affected by intestinal basic environment. Calcium-binding peptides can form complexes with calcium to improve its absorption and bioavailability. The aim of this study was focused on isolation and characterisation of a calcium-binding peptide from whey protein hydrolysates. Whey protein was hydrolysed using Flavourzyme and Protamex with substrate to enzyme ratio of 25:1 (w/w) at 49 °C for 7 h. The calcium-binding peptide was isolated by DEAE anion-exchange chromatography, Sephadex G-25 gel filtration and reversed phase high-performance liquid chromatography (RP-HPLC). A purified peptide of molecular mass 204 Da with strong calcium binding ability was identified on chromatography/electrospray ionisation (LC/ESI) tandem mass spectrum to be Glu-Gly (EG) after analysis and alignment in database. The calcium binding capacity of EG reached 67·81 μg/mg, and the amount increased by 95% compared with whey protein hydrolysate complex. The UV and infrared spectrometer analysis demonstrated that the principal sites of calcium-binding corresponded to the carboxyl groups and carbonyl groups of glutamic acid. In addition, the amino group and peptide amino are also the related groups in the interaction between EG and calcium ion. Meanwhile, the sequestered calcium percentage experiment has proved that EG-Ca is significantly more stable than CaCl2 in human gastrointestinal tract in vitro. The findings suggest that the purified dipeptide has the potential to be used as ion-binding ingredient in dietary supplements.

  14. Short communication: Flavor and flavor stability of cheese, rennet, and acid wheys.

    PubMed

    Smith, S; Smith, T J; Drake, M A

    2016-05-01

    Dried whey ingredients are valuable food ingredients but potential whey sources are underutilized. Previous work has established flavor and flavor stability differences in Cheddar and Mozzarella wheys, but little work has compared these whey sources to acid or rennet wheys. The objective of this study was to characterize and compare flavor and flavor stability among cheese, rennet, and acid wheys. Full-fat and fat-free Cheddar, rennet and acid casein, cottage cheese, and Greek yogurt fluid wheys were manufactured in triplicate. Wheys were fat separated and pasteurized followed by compositional analyses and storage at 4°C for 48 h. Volatile compound analysis and descriptive sensory analysis were evaluated on all liquid wheys initially and after 24 and 48 h. Greek yogurt whey contained almost no true protein nitrogen (0.02% wt/vol) whereas other wheys contained 0.58%±0.4% (wt/vol) true protein nitrogen. Solids and fat content were not different between wheys, with the exception of Greek yogurt whey, which was also lower in solids content than the other wheys (5.6 vs. 6.5% wt/vol, respectively). Fresh wheys displayed sweet aromatic and cooked milk flavors. Cheddar wheys were distinguished by diacetyl/buttery flavors, and acid wheys (acid casein, cottage cheese, and Greek yogurt) by sour aromatic flavor. Acid casein whey had a distinct soapy flavor, and acid and Greek yogurt wheys had distinct potato flavor. Both cultured acid wheys contained acetaldehyde flavor. Cardboard flavor increased and sweet aromatic and buttery flavors decreased with storage in all wheys. Volatile compound profiles were also distinct among wheys and changed with storage, consistent with sensory results. Lipid oxidation aldehydes increased in all wheys with storage time. Fat-free Cheddar was more stable than full-fat Cheddar over 48h of storage. Uncultured rennet casein whey was the most stable whey, as exhibited by the lowest increase in lipid oxidation products over time. These results

  15. Chemical characterisation and application of acid whey in fermented milk.

    PubMed

    Lievore, Paolla; Simões, Deise R S; Silva, Karolline M; Drunkler, Northon L; Barana, Ana C; Nogueira, Alessandro; Demiate, Ivo M

    2015-04-01

    Acid whey is a by-product from cheese processing that can be employed in beverage formulations due to its high nutritional quality. The objective of the present work was to study the physicochemical characterisation of acid whey from Petit Suisse-type cheese production and use this by-product in the formulation of fermented milk, substituting water. In addition, a reduction in the fermentation period was tested. Both the final product and the acid whey were analysed considering physicochemical determinations, and the fermented milk was evaluated by means of sensory analysis, including multiple comparison and acceptance tests, as well as purchase intention. The results of the physicochemical analyses showed that whey which was produced during both winter and summer presented higher values of protein (1.22 and 0.97 %, w/v, respectively), but there were no differences in lactose content. During the autumn, the highest solid extract was found in whey (6.00 %, w/v), with larger amounts of lactose (4.73 %, w/v) and ash (0.83 %, w/v). When analysing the fermented milk produced with added acid whey, the acceptance test resulted in 90 % of acceptance; the purchase intention showed that 54 % of the consumers would 'certainly buy' and 38 % would 'probably buy' the product. Using acid whey in a fermented milk formulation was technically viable, allowing by-product value aggregation, avoiding discharge, lowering water consumption and shortening the fermentation period. PMID:25829588

  16. Growth and plasma amino acid concentrations in very low birthweight infants fed either human milk protein fortified human milk or a whey-predominant formula.

    PubMed

    Moro, G; Fulconis, F; Minoli, I; Pohlandt, F; Räihä, N

    1989-01-01

    In a prospective, study involving 20 VLBW-infants (AGA), divided into two study groups of 10 infants, we have evaluated the effects on growth and metabolism of human milk fortified with ultrafiltrated human milk protein and a whey-predominant (whey/casein = 60/40) formula containing 2 g/dl of protein. The study was initiated at a mean age of 30 days when an oral intake of 180 ml/kg/d was tolerated and continued until a weight of 2 kg was reached. The protein intake in both groups was about 3.7 g/kg/d. All infants in both groups reached intrauterine rates of growth for the age, weight gain 18.0 g/kg/d, and length 1.2 cm/week. BUN, acid-base status, total protein and albumin were normal and similar in the two groups. Plasma levels of threonine, glycine, citrulline and methionine were significantly greater in the formula-fed infants. Taurine and proline had higher concentrations in the protein fortified human milk group. There was good tolerance of protein from both sources but the differences in plasma amino acid profiles suggest that the dietary protein quality in formulas for preterm infants must be further modified, if the goal of formula feeding is to achieve metabolic indices of protein metabolism similar to those found when human milk protein is used.

  17. Paraoxonase-1 (PON1) inhibition by tienilic acid produces hepatic injury: Antioxidant protection by fennel extract and whey protein concentrate.

    PubMed

    Abdel-Wahhab, Khaled G; Fawzi, Heba; Mannaa, Fathia A

    2016-03-01

    This study evaluated the effect of whey protein concentrate (WPC) or fennel seed extract (FSE) on paraoxonase-1 activity (PON1) and oxidative stress in liver of tienilic acid (TA) treated rats. Six groups of rats were treated for six weeks as follows: control; WPC (0.5g/kg/day); FSE (200mg/ kg/day); TA (1g/kg/twice a week); TA (1g/kg/twice a week) plus WPC (0.5g/kg/day); TA (1g/kg/twice a week) plus FSE (200mg/kg/day). TA administration significantly increased ALT and AST besides to total- and direct bilirubin levels. Also, serum tumor necrosis factor-α and nitric oxide levels were significantly increased. Furthermore, serum PON1, and hepatic reduced glutathione, glutathione-S-transferase and Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase values were diminished matched with a significant rise in the level of hepatic lipid peroxidation. Also, triglycerides, total- and LDL-cholesterol levels were significantly elevated while HDL-cholesterol was unchanged. The administration of either WPC or FSE to TA-treated animals significantly protected the liver against the injurious effects of tienilic acid. This appeared from the improvement of hepatic functions, atherogenic markers, Na(+)/K(+) ATPase activity, endogenous antioxidants and hepatic lipid peroxidation level; where WPC showed the strongest protection effect. In conclusion, the present study indicated that WPC and FSE improve PON1 activity and attenuate liver dysfunction induced by TA. This may be attributed to the high content of antioxidant compounds in WPC and fennel extract.

  18. Paraoxonase-1 (PON1) inhibition by tienilic acid produces hepatic injury: Antioxidant protection by fennel extract and whey protein concentrate.

    PubMed

    Abdel-Wahhab, Khaled G; Fawzi, Heba; Mannaa, Fathia A

    2016-03-01

    This study evaluated the effect of whey protein concentrate (WPC) or fennel seed extract (FSE) on paraoxonase-1 activity (PON1) and oxidative stress in liver of tienilic acid (TA) treated rats. Six groups of rats were treated for six weeks as follows: control; WPC (0.5g/kg/day); FSE (200mg/ kg/day); TA (1g/kg/twice a week); TA (1g/kg/twice a week) plus WPC (0.5g/kg/day); TA (1g/kg/twice a week) plus FSE (200mg/kg/day). TA administration significantly increased ALT and AST besides to total- and direct bilirubin levels. Also, serum tumor necrosis factor-α and nitric oxide levels were significantly increased. Furthermore, serum PON1, and hepatic reduced glutathione, glutathione-S-transferase and Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase values were diminished matched with a significant rise in the level of hepatic lipid peroxidation. Also, triglycerides, total- and LDL-cholesterol levels were significantly elevated while HDL-cholesterol was unchanged. The administration of either WPC or FSE to TA-treated animals significantly protected the liver against the injurious effects of tienilic acid. This appeared from the improvement of hepatic functions, atherogenic markers, Na(+)/K(+) ATPase activity, endogenous antioxidants and hepatic lipid peroxidation level; where WPC showed the strongest protection effect. In conclusion, the present study indicated that WPC and FSE improve PON1 activity and attenuate liver dysfunction induced by TA. This may be attributed to the high content of antioxidant compounds in WPC and fennel extract. PMID:26884099

  19. Citric acid fermentation in whey permeate

    SciTech Connect

    Somkuti, G.A.; Bencivengo, M.M.

    1981-01-01

    Acid-whey permeate was used for the production of citric acid by Aspergillus niger. The fermentation proceeded in 2 phases: a growth phase when citric acid was not accumulated, followed by an acidogenic phase when citric acid accumulated and mold growth was greatly reduced. Optimal production of citric acid occurred after 8-12 days at 30 degrees. Maximum citric acid yields were influenced by the initial lactose concentration and reached 10 g/l when the lactose concentration in the acid-whey permeate was adjusted to 15%. MeOH at 2-4% markedly increased the production of citric acid. Fermentation of acid-whey permeate by a mutant strain (A. niger 599-3) was more reproducible, and yields of citric acid were substantially improved. The amount of citric acid produced by A. niger 599-3 was 18-23 g/l after 12-14 days, depending on the lactose content of the whey permeate. Throughout the fermentation, galactose was apparently co-metabolized with glucose.

  20. Food products made with glycomacropeptide, a low-phenylalanine whey protein, provide a new alternative to amino Acid-based medical foods for nutrition management of phenylketonuria.

    PubMed

    van Calcar, Sandra C; Ney, Denise M

    2012-08-01

    Phenylketonuria (PKU), an inborn error in phenylalanine metabolism, requires lifelong nutrition management with a low-phenylalanine diet, which includes a phenylalanine-free amino acid-based medical formula to provide the majority of an individual's protein needs. Compliance with this diet is often difficult for older children, adolescents, and adults with PKU. The whey protein glycomacropeptide (GMP) is ideally suited for the PKU diet because it is naturally low in phenylalanine. Nutritionally complete, acceptable medical foods and beverages can be made with GMP to increase the variety of protein sources for the PKU diet. As an intact protein, GMP improves protein use and increases satiety compared with amino acids. Thus, GMP provides a new, more physiologic source of low-phenylalanine dietary protein for people with PKU.

  1. Astringency reduction in red wine by whey proteins.

    PubMed

    Jauregi, Paula; Olatujoye, Jumoke B; Cabezudo, Ignacio; Frazier, Richard A; Gordon, Michael H

    2016-05-15

    Whey is a by-product of cheese manufacturing and therefore investigating new applications of whey proteins will contribute towards the valorisation of whey and hence waste reduction. This study shows for the first time a detailed comparison of the effectiveness of gelatin and β-lactoglobulin (β-LG) as fining agents. Gelatin was more reactive than whey proteins to tannic acid as shown by both the astringency method (with ovalbumin as a precipitant) and the tannins determination method (with methylcellulose as a precipitant). The two proteins showed similar selectivity for polyphenols but β-LG did not remove as much catechin. The fining agent was removed completely or to a trace level after centrifugation followed by filtration which minimises its potential allergenicity. In addition, improved understanding of protein-tannin interactions was obtained by fluorescence, size measurement and isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC). Overall this study demonstrates that whey proteins have the potential of reducing astringency in red wine and can find a place in enology.

  2. Astringency reduction in red wine by whey proteins.

    PubMed

    Jauregi, Paula; Olatujoye, Jumoke B; Cabezudo, Ignacio; Frazier, Richard A; Gordon, Michael H

    2016-05-15

    Whey is a by-product of cheese manufacturing and therefore investigating new applications of whey proteins will contribute towards the valorisation of whey and hence waste reduction. This study shows for the first time a detailed comparison of the effectiveness of gelatin and β-lactoglobulin (β-LG) as fining agents. Gelatin was more reactive than whey proteins to tannic acid as shown by both the astringency method (with ovalbumin as a precipitant) and the tannins determination method (with methylcellulose as a precipitant). The two proteins showed similar selectivity for polyphenols but β-LG did not remove as much catechin. The fining agent was removed completely or to a trace level after centrifugation followed by filtration which minimises its potential allergenicity. In addition, improved understanding of protein-tannin interactions was obtained by fluorescence, size measurement and isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC). Overall this study demonstrates that whey proteins have the potential of reducing astringency in red wine and can find a place in enology. PMID:26776007

  3. Acid whey powder modification of gari from cassava

    SciTech Connect

    Okezie, B.O.; Kosikowski, F.V.

    1981-01-01

    Gari, a staple food consumed in Nigeria, is made from peeled and ground cassava tubers. The ground material is pressed with a stone slab for 2-4 days to remove moisture, and the partially fermented product is then baked over an open fire. Since gari mainly contributes energy to the diet, attempts were made to develop a more nutritious product without altering organoleptic and textural properties. In laboratory tests, ground cassava was fermented in stainless steel cheese vats for 4 days (to produce gari flavour) and then partially dehydrated by pressing in cheese cloth. A reduction in HCN content from 6.2 to 3.4 mg/100 g resulted. Various combinations of spray-dried acid whey, soya protein and freeze-dried Candida tropicalis were added to the fermented cassava, which was then pressure-cooked for 10 minutes at 121 degrees Celcius, dried and ground in a hammer mill. Product (i), made with gari fortified with 15% soya concentrate and 5% dried acid whey, was as acceptable as traditional gari and had a protein score of 75.8 vs. 9.91 for traditional gari. Product (ii), gari fortified with 20% yeast and 10% dried acid whey, had significantly lower scores for flavour and texture than traditional gari and the protein score was only 29.45. Supplementing gari with relatively inexpensive whey concentrates appears to be a means of overcoming protein energy malnutrition in children.

  4. Clinical Potential of Hyperbaric Pressure-Treated Whey Protein

    PubMed Central

    Piccolomini, André F.; Kubow, Stan; Lands, Larry C.

    2015-01-01

    Whey protein (WP) from cow’s milk is a rich source of essential and branched chain amino acids. Whey protein isolates (WPI) has been demonstrated to support muscle accretion, antioxidant activity, and immune modulation. However, whey is not readily digestible due to its tight conformational structure. Treatment of WPI with hyperbaric pressure results in protein unfolding. This enhances protein digestion, and results in an altered spectrum of released peptides, and greater release of essential and branched chain amino acids. Pressurized whey protein isolates (pWPI), through a series of cell culture, animal models and clinical studies, have been demonstrated to enhance muscle accretion, reduce inflammation, improve immunity, and decrease fatigue. It is also conceivable that pWPI would be more accessible to digestive enzymes, which would allow for a more rapid proteolysis of the proteins and an increased or altered release of small bioactive peptides. The altered profile of peptides released from WP digestion could thus play a role in the modulation of the immune response and tissue glutathione (GSH) concentrations. The research to date presents potentially interesting applications for the development of new functional foods based on hyperbaric treatment of WPI to produce products with more potent nutritional and nutraceutical properties. PMID:27417773

  5. Cheese whey protein recovery by ultrafiltration through transglutaminase (TG) catalysis whey protein cross-linking.

    PubMed

    Wen-Qiong, Wang; Lan-Wei, Zhang; Xue, Han; Yi, Lu

    2017-01-15

    In whey ultrafiltration (UF) production, two main problems are whey protein recovery and membrane fouling. In this study, membrane coupling protein transglutaminase (TG) catalysis protein cross-linking was investigated under different conditions to find out the best treatment. We found that the optimal conditions for protein recovery involved catalyzing whey protein cross-linking with TG (40U/g whey proteins) at 40°C for 60min at pH 5.0. Under these conditions, the recovery rate was increased 15-20%, lactose rejection rate was decreased by 10%, and relative permeate flux was increase 30-40% compared to the sample without enzyme treatment (control). It was noticeable that the total resistance and cake resistance were decreased after enzyme catalysis. This was mainly due to the increased particle size and decreased zeta potential. Therefore, membrane coupling enzyme catalysis protein cross-linking is a potential means for further use.

  6. Cheese whey protein recovery by ultrafiltration through transglutaminase (TG) catalysis whey protein cross-linking.

    PubMed

    Wen-Qiong, Wang; Lan-Wei, Zhang; Xue, Han; Yi, Lu

    2017-01-15

    In whey ultrafiltration (UF) production, two main problems are whey protein recovery and membrane fouling. In this study, membrane coupling protein transglutaminase (TG) catalysis protein cross-linking was investigated under different conditions to find out the best treatment. We found that the optimal conditions for protein recovery involved catalyzing whey protein cross-linking with TG (40U/g whey proteins) at 40°C for 60min at pH 5.0. Under these conditions, the recovery rate was increased 15-20%, lactose rejection rate was decreased by 10%, and relative permeate flux was increase 30-40% compared to the sample without enzyme treatment (control). It was noticeable that the total resistance and cake resistance were decreased after enzyme catalysis. This was mainly due to the increased particle size and decreased zeta potential. Therefore, membrane coupling enzyme catalysis protein cross-linking is a potential means for further use. PMID:27542447

  7. Fractionation of whey protein isolate with supercritical carbon dioxide – process modeling and cost estimation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    An economical and environmentally friendly whey protein fractionation process was developed using supercritical carbon dioxide (sCO2) as an acid to produce enriched fractions of alpha-lactalbumin (alpha-La) and beta-lactoglobulin (beta-Lg) from a commercial whey protein isolate (WPI) containing 55% ...

  8. Kinetics, aggregation behavior and optimization of the fractionation of whey protein isolate with hydrochloric acid

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Concentrated WPI solutions (10% (w/w)) containing approximately 30% alpha-lactalbumin (alpha-LA) and 60% beta-lactoglobulin (beta-LG) were fractionated with HCl at acidic pH and moderate temperatures to denature alpha-LA and recover the alpha-LA aggregates via centrifugation. Aggregation behavior an...

  9. 21 CFR 184.1979c - Whey protein concentrate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...) FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION (CONTINUED) DIRECT FOOD SUBSTANCES AFFIRMED AS GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Listing of Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1979c Whey protein concentrate. (a) Whey protein concentrate is the substance obtained by the removal of sufficient nonprotein constituents from whey so...

  10. Lactic acid bacteria production from whey.

    PubMed

    Mondragón-Parada, María Elena; Nájera-Martínez, Minerva; Juárez-Ramírez, Cleotilde; Galíndez-Mayer, Juvencio; Ruiz-Ordaz, Nora; Cristiani-Urbina, Eliseo

    2006-09-01

    The main purpose of this work was to isolate and characterize lactic acid bacteria (LAB) strains to be used for biomass production using a whey-based medium supplemented with an ammonium salt and with very low levels of yeast extract (0.25 g/L). Five strains of LAB were isolated from naturally soured milk after enrichment in whey-based medium. One bacterial isolate, designated MNM2, exhibited a remarkable capability to utilize whey lactose and give a high biomass yield on lactose. This strain was identified as Lactobacillus casei by its 16S rDNA sequence. A kinetic study of cell growth, lactose consumption, and titratable acidity production of this bacterial strain was performed in a bioreactor. The biomass yield on lactose, the percentage of lactose consumption, and the maximum increase in cell mass obtained in the bioreactor were 0.165 g of biomass/g of lactose, 100%, and 2.0 g/L, respectively, which were 1.44, 1.11, and 2.35 times higher than those found in flask cultures. The results suggest that it is possible to produce LAB biomass from a whey-based medium supplemented with minimal amounts of yeast extract.

  11. The behaviour of whey protein isolate in protecting Lactobacillus plantarum.

    PubMed

    Khem, Sarim; Small, Darryl M; May, Bee K

    2016-01-01

    There is increasing evidence that whey protein isolates (WPI), can be utilised to encapsulate and protect bioactive substances, including lactic acid bacteria, due to their physicochemical properties. However, little is known about what happens in the immediate vicinity of the cells. This study examined the protective behaviour of WPI for two strains of Lactobacillus plantarum, A17 and B21, during spray drying. B21 was found to be more hydrophobic than A17 and required 50% of the amount of WPI to provide comparably high survival (∼ 90%). We hypothesise that WPI protects the hydrophobic bacteria by initial attachment to the unfolded whey protein due to hydrophobic interactions followed by adhesion to the proteins, resulting in cells being embedded within the walls of the capsules. The encapsulated strains had a moisture content of approximately 5.5% and during storage trials at 20 °C retained viability for at least eight weeks. PMID:26213030

  12. The behaviour of whey protein isolate in protecting Lactobacillus plantarum.

    PubMed

    Khem, Sarim; Small, Darryl M; May, Bee K

    2016-01-01

    There is increasing evidence that whey protein isolates (WPI), can be utilised to encapsulate and protect bioactive substances, including lactic acid bacteria, due to their physicochemical properties. However, little is known about what happens in the immediate vicinity of the cells. This study examined the protective behaviour of WPI for two strains of Lactobacillus plantarum, A17 and B21, during spray drying. B21 was found to be more hydrophobic than A17 and required 50% of the amount of WPI to provide comparably high survival (∼ 90%). We hypothesise that WPI protects the hydrophobic bacteria by initial attachment to the unfolded whey protein due to hydrophobic interactions followed by adhesion to the proteins, resulting in cells being embedded within the walls of the capsules. The encapsulated strains had a moisture content of approximately 5.5% and during storage trials at 20 °C retained viability for at least eight weeks.

  13. Biochemical and metabolic mechanisms by which dietary whey protein may combat obesity and Type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Jakubowicz, Daniela; Froy, Oren

    2013-01-01

    Consumption of milk and dairy products has been associated with reduced risk of metabolic disorders and cardiovascular disease. Milk contains two primary sources of protein, casein (80%) and whey (20%). Recently, the beneficial physiological effects of whey protein on the control of food intake and glucose metabolism have been reported. Studies have shown an insulinotropic and glucose-lowering properties of whey protein in healthy and Type 2 diabetes subjects. Whey protein seems to induce these effects via bioactive peptides and amino acids generated during its gastrointestinal digestion. These amino acids and peptides stimulate the release of several gut hormones, such as cholecystokinin, peptide YY and the incretins gastric inhibitory peptide and glucagon-like peptide 1 that potentiate insulin secretion from β-cells and are associated with regulation of food intake. The bioactive peptides generated from whey protein may also serve as endogenous inhibitors of dipeptidyl peptidase-4 (DPP-4) in the proximal gut, preventing incretin degradation. Indeed, recently, DPP-4 inhibitors were identified in whey protein hydrolysates. This review will focus on the emerging properties of whey protein and its potential clinical application for obesity and Type 2 diabetes.

  14. Plasma Free Amino Acid Responses to Intraduodenal Whey Protein, and Relationships with Insulin, Glucagon-Like Peptide-1 and Energy Intake in Lean Healthy Men.

    PubMed

    Luscombe-Marsh, Natalie D; Hutchison, Amy T; Soenen, Stijn; Steinert, Robert E; Clifton, Peter M; Horowitz, Michael; Feinle-Bisset, Christine

    2016-01-04

    This study determined the effects of increasing loads of intraduodenal (ID) dairy protein on plasma amino acid (AA) concentrations, and their relationships with serum insulin, plasma glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) and energy intake. Sixteen healthy men had concentrations of AAs, GLP-1 and insulin measured in response to 60-min ID infusions of hydrolysed whey protein administered, in double-blinded and randomised order, at 2.1 (P2.1), 6.3 (P6.3) or 12.5 (P12.5) kJ/min (encompassing the range of nutrient emptying from the stomach), or saline control (C). Energy intake was quantified immediately afterwards. Compared with C, the concentrations of 19/20 AAs, the exception being cysteine, were increased, and this was dependent on the protein load. The relationship between AA concentrations in the infusions and the area under the curve from 0 to 60 min (AUC0-60 min) of each AA profile was strong for essential AAs (R² range, 0.61-0.67), but more variable for non-essential (0.02-0.54) and conditional (0.006-0.64) AAs. The AUC0-60 min for each AA was correlated directly with the AUC0-60 min of insulin (R² range 0.3-0.6), GLP-1 (0.2-0.6) and energy intake (0.09-0.3) (p < 0.05, for all), with the strongest correlations being for branched-chain AAs, lysine, methionine and tyrosine. These findings indicate that ID whey protein infused at loads encompassing the normal range of gastric emptying increases plasma concentrations of 19/20 AAs in a load-dependent manner, and provide novel information on the close relationships between the essential AAs, leucine, valine, isoleucine, lysine, methionine, and the conditionally-essential AA, tyrosine, with energy intake, insulin and GLP-1.

  15. Human insulinotropic response to oral ingestion of native and hydrolysed whey protein.

    PubMed

    Power, O; Hallihan, A; Jakeman, P

    2009-07-01

    The insulinotropic response to the ingestion of whey protein and whey protein hydrolysate, independent of carbohydrate, is not known. This study examined the effect of protein hydrolysis on the insulinotropic response to the ingestion of whey protein. Sixteen healthy males ingested a 500 mL solution containing either 45 g of whey protein (WPI) or whey protein hydrolysate (WPH). The estimated rate of gastric emptying was not altered by hydrolysis of the protein [18 (3) vs. 23 (3) min, n = 16; P = 0.15]. Maximum plasma insulin concentration (Cmax) occurred later (40 vs. 60 min) and was 28% [234 (26) vs. 299 (31) mM, P = 0.018] greater following ingestion of the WPH compared to the WPI leading to a 43% increase [7.6 (0.9) vs. 10.8 (2.6) nM, P = 0.21] in the AUC of insulin for the WPH. Of the amino acids with known insulinotropic properties only Phe demonstrated a significantly greater maximal concentration [C (max); 65 (2) vs. 72 (3) microM, n = 16; P = 0.01] and increase (+22%) in AUC following ingestion of the WPH. In conclusion, ingestion of whey protein is an effective insulin secretagogue. Hydrolysis of whey protein prior to ingestion augments the maximal insulin concentration by a mechanism that is unrelated to gastric emptying of the peptide solution.

  16. Whey protein concentrate market enhancement. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Hudson, L.

    1982-09-01

    Whey protein concentrate (WPC) was studied to see whether or not there was sufficient depth in the marketplace to accommodate increased WPC production in the event more whey was converted into alcohol. It was concluded that the current market for WPC is still immature and ample room exists in the marketplace to produce and dispose of WPC. In addition, WPC literature was reviewed so as to evaluate the current state of the art producing WPC. Considerable evidence suggests that more product formulation work is needed to move WPC into the general marketplace. Concurrent to the market and ltierature study WPC was incorporated into select categories of foods where finished goods were enhanced by having WPC incorporated in their formulations. Formulations were produced to demonstrate the fact that products such as ice cream, breedings and batters for fish sticks, and orange juice can be enhanced by using WPC.

  17. Comparison of capillary electrophoresis with traditional methods to analyse bovine whey proteins.

    PubMed

    Kinghorn, N M; Norris, C S; Paterson, G R; Otter, D E

    1995-05-12

    The separation of the four major whey proteins by sodium dodecyl sulphate (SDS)-capillary gel electrophoresis (CGE) is described. Whilst commercially purified whey proteins could be analysed using the recommended protocol, the more complex nature of an acid whey and a reconstituted whey protein concentrate (WPC) powder necessitated considerable refinement of the CGE sample buffer. Individual whey proteins in the acid whey and WPC samples were then also separated and quantitated using capillary zone electrophoresis, polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (PAGE) and HPLC methods and the results were compared. The values obtained for alpha-lactalbumin (alpha-Lac) and beta-lactoglobulin (beta-Lg) were consistent throughout the various methods, although size-exclusion HPLC, SDS-PAGE and SDS-CGE could not separate the two beta-Lg variants or the glycosylated form of alpha-Lac from the beta-Lg. There was considerable variation in the values for the bovine serum albumin and immunoglobulin determined by the different methods and it was concluded that none of the methods could satisfactorily quantitate all four whey proteins.

  18. Preparation of protein concentrates from whey and seed products

    SciTech Connect

    Saunders, R.M.; Kohler, G.O.

    1980-01-01

    Whey is mixed with a seed product (e.g., cereal, legumes, oil seeds, flour, etc.) and the pH of the mixture adjusted to 9-10. The resultant mixture is treated to separate a juice from the fibrous residue; in a preferred embodiment of the subsequent process, a protein concentrate is recovered from the juice by adding an acid to it to adjust the pH to 3-4 and subsequently adding sodium hexametaphosphate in an amount sufficient to precipitate the protein product. After adjustment of the pH to 7, a protein concentrate may be obtained by drying the alkaline extract.

  19. Cheese whey: A cost-effective alternative for hyaluronic acid production by Streptococcus zooepidemicus.

    PubMed

    Amado, Isabel R; Vázquez, José A; Pastrana, Lorenzo; Teixeira, José A

    2016-05-01

    This study focuses on the optimisation of cheese whey formulated media for the production of hyaluronic acid (HA) by Streptococcus zooepidemicus. Culture media containing whey (W; 2.1g/L) or whey hydrolysate (WH; 2.4 g/L) gave the highest HA productions. Both W and WH produced high yields on protein consumed, suggesting cheese whey is a good nitrogen source for S. zooepidemicus production of HA. Polysaccharide concentrations of 4.0 g/L and 3.2g/L were produced in W and WH in a further scale-up to 5L bioreactors, confirming the suitability of the low-cost nitrogen source. Cheese whey culture media provided high molecular weight (>3000 kDa) HA products. This study revealed replacing the commercial peptone by the low-cost alternative could reduce HA production costs by up to a 70% compared to synthetic media.

  20. Cheese whey: A cost-effective alternative for hyaluronic acid production by Streptococcus zooepidemicus.

    PubMed

    Amado, Isabel R; Vázquez, José A; Pastrana, Lorenzo; Teixeira, José A

    2016-05-01

    This study focuses on the optimisation of cheese whey formulated media for the production of hyaluronic acid (HA) by Streptococcus zooepidemicus. Culture media containing whey (W; 2.1g/L) or whey hydrolysate (WH; 2.4 g/L) gave the highest HA productions. Both W and WH produced high yields on protein consumed, suggesting cheese whey is a good nitrogen source for S. zooepidemicus production of HA. Polysaccharide concentrations of 4.0 g/L and 3.2g/L were produced in W and WH in a further scale-up to 5L bioreactors, confirming the suitability of the low-cost nitrogen source. Cheese whey culture media provided high molecular weight (>3000 kDa) HA products. This study revealed replacing the commercial peptone by the low-cost alternative could reduce HA production costs by up to a 70% compared to synthetic media. PMID:26769504

  1. Cheese whey: A potential resource to transform into bioprotein, functional/nutritional proteins and bioactive peptides.

    PubMed

    Yadav, Jay Shankar Singh; Yan, Song; Pilli, Sridhar; Kumar, Lalit; Tyagi, R D; Surampalli, R Y

    2015-11-01

    The byproduct of cheese-producing industries, cheese whey, is considered as an environmental pollutant due to its high BOD and COD concentrations. The high organic load of whey arises from the presence of residual milk nutrients. As demand for milk-derived products is increasing, it leads to increased production of whey, which poses a serious management problem. To overcome this problem, various technological approaches have been employed to convert whey into value-added products. These technological advancements have enhanced whey utilization and about 50% of the total produced whey is now transformed into value-added products such as whey powder, whey protein, whey permeate, bioethanol, biopolymers, hydrogen, methane, electricity bioprotein (single cell protein) and probiotics. Among various value-added products, the transformation of whey into proteinaceous products is attractive and demanding. The main important factor which is attractive for transformation of whey into proteinaceous products is the generally recognized as safe (GRAS) regulatory status of whey. Whey and whey permeate are biotransformed into proteinaceous feed and food-grade bioprotein/single cell protein through fermentation. On the other hand, whey can be directly processed to obtain whey protein concentrate, whey protein isolate, and individual whey proteins. Further, whey proteins are also transformed into bioactive peptides via enzymatic or fermentation processes. The proteinaceous products have applications as functional, nutritional and therapeutic commodities. Whey characteristics, and its transformation processes for proteinaceous products such as bioproteins, functional/nutritional protein and bioactive peptides are covered in this review.

  2. Cheese whey: A potential resource to transform into bioprotein, functional/nutritional proteins and bioactive peptides.

    PubMed

    Yadav, Jay Shankar Singh; Yan, Song; Pilli, Sridhar; Kumar, Lalit; Tyagi, R D; Surampalli, R Y

    2015-11-01

    The byproduct of cheese-producing industries, cheese whey, is considered as an environmental pollutant due to its high BOD and COD concentrations. The high organic load of whey arises from the presence of residual milk nutrients. As demand for milk-derived products is increasing, it leads to increased production of whey, which poses a serious management problem. To overcome this problem, various technological approaches have been employed to convert whey into value-added products. These technological advancements have enhanced whey utilization and about 50% of the total produced whey is now transformed into value-added products such as whey powder, whey protein, whey permeate, bioethanol, biopolymers, hydrogen, methane, electricity bioprotein (single cell protein) and probiotics. Among various value-added products, the transformation of whey into proteinaceous products is attractive and demanding. The main important factor which is attractive for transformation of whey into proteinaceous products is the generally recognized as safe (GRAS) regulatory status of whey. Whey and whey permeate are biotransformed into proteinaceous feed and food-grade bioprotein/single cell protein through fermentation. On the other hand, whey can be directly processed to obtain whey protein concentrate, whey protein isolate, and individual whey proteins. Further, whey proteins are also transformed into bioactive peptides via enzymatic or fermentation processes. The proteinaceous products have applications as functional, nutritional and therapeutic commodities. Whey characteristics, and its transformation processes for proteinaceous products such as bioproteins, functional/nutritional protein and bioactive peptides are covered in this review. PMID:26165970

  3. Whey protein/polysaccharide-stabilized oil powders for topical application-release and transdermal delivery of salicylic acid from oil powders compared to redispersed powders.

    PubMed

    Kotzé, Magdalena; Otto, Anja; Jordaan, Anine; du Plessis, Jeanetta

    2015-08-01

    Oil-in-water (o/w) emulsions are commonly converted into solid-like powders in order to improve their physical and chemical stabilities. The aim of this study was to investigate whether whey protein/polysaccharide-stabilized o/w emulsions could be converted into stable oil powders by means of freeze-drying. Moreover, during this study, the effects of pH and polymer type on release and trans(dermal) delivery of salicylic acid, a model drug, from these oil powders were investigated and compared to those of the respective template emulsions and redispersed oil powders. Physical characterization of the various formulations was performed, such as droplet size analysis and oil leakage, and relationships drawn with regards to release and trans(dermal) delivery. The experimental outcomes revealed that the oil powders could be redispersed in water without changing the release characteristics of salicylic acid. pH and polymer type affected the release of salicylic acid from the oil powders, template emulsions, and redispersed powders similarly. Contrary, the transdermal delivery from the oil powders and from their respective redispersed oil powders was differently affected by pH and polymer type. It was hypothesized that the release had been influenced by the electrostatic interactions between salicylic acid and emulsifiers, whereas the transdermal performance could have been determined by the particle or aggregate sizes of the formulations.

  4. Whey protein: The “whey” forward for treatment of type 2 diabetes?

    PubMed Central

    Mignone, Linda E; Wu, Tongzhi; Horowitz, Michael; Rayner, Christopher K

    2015-01-01

    A cost-effective nutritional approach to improve postprandial glycaemia is attractive considering the rising burden of diabetes throughout the world. Whey protein, a by-product of the cheese-making process, can be used to manipulate gut function in order to slow gastric emptying and stimulate incretin hormone secretion, thereby attenuating postprandial glycaemic excursions. The function of the gastrointestinal tract plays a pivotal role in glucose homeostasis, particularly during the postprandial period, and this review will discuss the mechanisms by which whey protein slows gastric emptying and stimulates release of gut peptides, including the incretins. Whey protein is also a rich source of amino acids, and these can directly stimulate beta cells to secrete insulin, which contributes to the reduction in postprandial glycaemia. Appetite is suppressed with consumption of whey, due to its effects on the gut-brain axis and the hypothalamus. These properties of whey protein suggest its potential in the management of type 2 diabetes. However, the optimal dose and timing of whey protein ingestion are yet to be defined, and studies are required to examine the long-term benefits of whey consumption for overall glycaemic control. PMID:26516411

  5. Behavior of whey protein concentrates under extreme storage conditions

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The overseas demand for whey protein concentrates (WPC) has increased steadily in recent years. Emergency aid foods often include WPC, but shelf-life studies of whey proteins under different shipment and storage conditions have not been conducted in the last 50 yr. Microbial quality, compound form...

  6. Acne and whey protein supplementation among bodybuilders.

    PubMed

    Simonart, Thierry

    2012-01-01

    Accumulative evidence supports the role of nutritional factors in acne. I report here 5 healthy male adult patients developing acne after the consumption of whey protein, a favorite supplement of those engaged in bodybuilding. These observations are in line with biochemical and epidemiological data supporting the effects of milk and dairy products as enhancers of insulin/insulin-like growth factor 1 signaling and acne aggravation. Further prospective studies are required to determine the possible role of dietary supplements in the fitness and bodybuilding environment.

  7. Whey protein mucoadhesive properties for oral drug delivery: Mucin-whey protein interaction and mucoadhesive bond strength.

    PubMed

    Hsein, Hassana; Garrait, Ghislain; Beyssac, Eric; Hoffart, Valérie

    2015-12-01

    Whey protein is a natural polymer recently used as an excipient in buccoadhesive tablets but its mucoadhesive properties were barely studied. In this work, we characterize mucoadhesion of whey protein in order to determine the mechanisms and optimal conditions for use as excipient in oral drug delivery. Thus, native and denatured whey protein (NWP and DWP) were investigated and the effect of concentration and pH were also studied. Many methods of characterization were selected to allow the study of chemical and physical interactions with mucin and then the results were bound with an ex vivo experiments. Turbidity of WP-mucin mixture increased at acidic pH 1.2 till 4.5 indicating interaction with mucin but not at pH 6.8. No interaction with mucin was also found by ITC method at pH 6.8 for native and denatured whey protein used at 1% (w/w). Forces of bioadhesion evaluated by viscosity measurements were the best for high concentrated (10.8%) DWP solutions at pH 6.8 and were low at pH 1.2 for NWP and DWP solutions. Addition of chemical blockers indicated that hydrogen bondings and disulfide bridges were the main mechanisms of interactions with mucin. Reticulation of DWP with calcium ions to obtain microparticles (MP) did not influence the ability of interaction with mucin as shown by FTIR analysis. These results correlated with ex vivo study on rat tissue demonstrating important adhesion (75%) of WP MP on the intestine and null on the stomach after 2h of deposit.

  8. Effect of inclusion of hydroxycinnamic and chlorogenic acids from green coffee bean in β-cyclodextrin on their interactions with whey, egg white and soy protein isolates.

    PubMed

    Budryn, Grażyna; Pałecz, Bartłomiej; Rachwał-Rosiak, Danuta; Oracz, Joanna; Zaczyńska, Donata; Belica, Sylwia; Navarro-González, Inmaculada; Meseguer, Josefina María Vegara; Pérez-Sánchez, Horacio

    2015-02-01

    The aim of the study was to characterise the interactions of hydroxycinnamic and chlorogenic acids (CHAs) from green coffee, with isolates of proteins from egg white (EWP), whey (WPC) and soy (SPI), depending on pH and temperature. The binding degree was determined by liquid chromatography coupled to a diode array detector and an ultrahigh resolution hybrid quadruple-time-of-flight mass spectrometer with ESI source (LC-QTOF-MS/MS). As a result of binding, the concentration of CHAs in proteins ranged from 9.44-12.2, 11.8-13.1 and 12.1-14.4g/100g for SPI, WPC and EWP, respectively. Thermodynamic parameters of protein-ligand interactions were determined by isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) and energetics of interactions at the atomic level by molecular modelling. The amount of CHAs released during proteolytic digestion was in the range 0.33-2.67g/100g. Inclusion of CHAs with β-cyclodextrin strongly limited these interactions to a level of 0.03-0.06g/100g.

  9. Plasma Free Amino Acid Responses to Intraduodenal Whey Protein, and Relationships with Insulin, Glucagon-Like Peptide-1 and Energy Intake in Lean Healthy Men

    PubMed Central

    Luscombe-Marsh, Natalie D.; Hutchison, Amy T.; Soenen, Stijn; Steinert, Robert E.; Clifton, Peter M.; Horowitz, Michael; Feinle-Bisset, Christine

    2016-01-01

    This study determined the effects of increasing loads of intraduodenal (ID) dairy protein on plasma amino acid (AA) concentrations, and their relationships with serum insulin, plasma glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) and energy intake. Sixteen healthy men had concentrations of AAs, GLP-1 and insulin measured in response to 60-min ID infusions of hydrolysed whey protein administered, in double-blinded and randomised order, at 2.1 (P2.1), 6.3 (P6.3) or 12.5 (P12.5) kJ/min (encompassing the range of nutrient emptying from the stomach), or saline control (C). Energy intake was quantified immediately afterwards. Compared with C, the concentrations of 19/20 AAs, the exception being cysteine, were increased, and this was dependent on the protein load. The relationship between AA concentrations in the infusions and the area under the curve from 0 to 60 min (AUC0–60 min) of each AA profile was strong for essential AAs (R2 range, 0.61–0.67), but more variable for non-essential (0.02–0.54) and conditional (0.006–0.64) AAs. The AUC0–60 min for each AA was correlated directly with the AUC0–60 min of insulin (R2 range 0.3–0.6), GLP-1 (0.2–0.6) and energy intake (0.09–0.3) (p < 0.05, for all), with the strongest correlations being for branched-chain AAs, lysine, methionine and tyrosine. These findings indicate that ID whey protein infused at loads encompassing the normal range of gastric emptying increases plasma concentrations of 19/20 AAs in a load-dependent manner, and provide novel information on the close relationships between the essential AAs, leucine, valine, isoleucine, lysine, methionine, and the conditionally-essential AA, tyrosine, with energy intake, insulin and GLP-1. PMID:26742062

  10. Whey protein/polysaccharide-stabilized emulsions: Effect of polymer type and pH on release and topical delivery of salicylic acid.

    PubMed

    Combrinck, Johann; Otto, Anja; du Plessis, Jeanetta

    2014-06-01

    Emulsions are widely used as topical formulations in the pharmaceutical and cosmetic industries. They are thermodynamically unstable and require emulsifiers for stabilization. Studies have indicated that emulsifiers could affect topical delivery of actives, and this study was therefore designed to investigate the effects of different polymers, applied as emulsifiers, as well as the effects of pH on the release and topical delivery of the active. O/w emulsions were prepared by the layer-by-layer technique, with whey protein forming the first layer around the oil droplets, while either chitosan or carrageenan was subsequently adsorbed to the protein at the interface. Additionally, the emulsions were prepared at three different pH values to introduce different charges to the polymers. The active ingredient, salicylic acid, was incorporated into the oil phase of the emulsions. Physical characterization of the resulting formulations, i.e., droplet size, zeta potential, stability, and turbidity in the water phase, was performed. Release studies were conducted, after which skin absorption studies were performed on the five most stable emulsions, by using Franz type diffusion cells and utilizing human, abdominal skin membranes. It was found that an increase in emulsion droplet charge could negatively affect the release of salicylic acid from these formulations. Contrary, positively charged emulsion droplets were found to enhance dermal and transdermal delivery of salicylic acid from emulsions. It was hypothesized that electrostatic complex formation between the emulsifier and salicylic acid could affect its release, whereas electrostatic interaction between the emulsion droplets and skin could influence dermal/transdermal delivery of the active.

  11. A model of proteolysis and amino acid biosynthesis for Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus in whey.

    PubMed

    Liu, Enuo; Zheng, Huajun; Hao, Pei; Konno, Tomonobu; Yu, Yao; Kume, Hisae; Oda, Munehiro; Ji, Zai-Si

    2012-12-01

    Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus 2038 (L. bulgaricus 2038) is a bacterium that is used as a starter for dairy products by Meiji Co., Ltd of Japan. Culturing L. bulgaricus 2038 with whey as the sole nitrogen source results in a shorter lag phase than other milk proteins under the same conditions (carbon source, minerals, and vitamins). Microarray results of gene expression revealed characteristics of amino acid anabolism with whey as the nitrogen source and established a model of proteolysis and amino acid biosynthesis for L. bulgaricus. Whey peptides and free amino acids are readily metabolized, enabling rapid entry into the logarithmic growth phase. The oligopeptide transport system is the primary pathway for obtaining amino acids. Amino acid biosynthesis maintains the balance between amino acids required for cell growth and the amount obtained from environment. The interconversion of amino acids is also important for L. bulgaricus 2038 growth.

  12. Whey Protein Concentrate Hydrolysate Prevents Bone Loss in Ovariectomized Rats.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jonggun; Kim, Hyung Kwan; Kim, Saehun; Imm, Ji-Young; Whang, Kwang-Youn

    2015-12-01

    Milk is known as a safe food and contains easily absorbable minerals and proteins, including whey protein, which has demonstrated antiosteoporotic effects on ovariectomized rats. This study evaluated the antiosteoporotic effect of whey protein concentrate hydrolysate (WPCH) digested with fungal protease and whey protein concentrate (WPC). Two experiments were conducted to determine (1) efficacy of WPCH and WPC and (2) dose-dependent impact of WPCH in ovariectomized rats (10 weeks old). In Experiment I, ovariectomized rats (n=45) were allotted into three dietary treatments of 10 g/kg diet of WPC, 10 g/kg diet of WPCH, and a control diet. In Experiment II, ovariectomized rats (n=60) were fed four different diets (0, 10, 20, and 40 g/kg of WPCH). In both experiments, sham-operated rats (n=15) were also fed a control diet containing the same amount of amino acids and minerals as dietary treatments. After 6 weeks, dietary WPCH prevented loss of bone, physical properties, mineral density, and mineral content, and improved breaking strength of femurs, with similar effect to WPC. The bone resorption enzyme activity (tartrate resistance acid phosphatase) in tibia epiphysis decreased in response to WPCH supplementation, while bone formation enzyme activity (alkaline phosphatase) was unaffected by ovariectomy and dietary treatment. Bone properties and strength increased as the dietary WPCH level increased (10 and 20 g/kg), but there was no difference between the 20 and 40 g/kg treatment. WPCH and WPC supplementation ameliorated bone loss induced by ovariectomy in rats. PMID:26367331

  13. Whey Protein Concentrate Hydrolysate Prevents Bone Loss in Ovariectomized Rats.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jonggun; Kim, Hyung Kwan; Kim, Saehun; Imm, Ji-Young; Whang, Kwang-Youn

    2015-12-01

    Milk is known as a safe food and contains easily absorbable minerals and proteins, including whey protein, which has demonstrated antiosteoporotic effects on ovariectomized rats. This study evaluated the antiosteoporotic effect of whey protein concentrate hydrolysate (WPCH) digested with fungal protease and whey protein concentrate (WPC). Two experiments were conducted to determine (1) efficacy of WPCH and WPC and (2) dose-dependent impact of WPCH in ovariectomized rats (10 weeks old). In Experiment I, ovariectomized rats (n=45) were allotted into three dietary treatments of 10 g/kg diet of WPC, 10 g/kg diet of WPCH, and a control diet. In Experiment II, ovariectomized rats (n=60) were fed four different diets (0, 10, 20, and 40 g/kg of WPCH). In both experiments, sham-operated rats (n=15) were also fed a control diet containing the same amount of amino acids and minerals as dietary treatments. After 6 weeks, dietary WPCH prevented loss of bone, physical properties, mineral density, and mineral content, and improved breaking strength of femurs, with similar effect to WPC. The bone resorption enzyme activity (tartrate resistance acid phosphatase) in tibia epiphysis decreased in response to WPCH supplementation, while bone formation enzyme activity (alkaline phosphatase) was unaffected by ovariectomy and dietary treatment. Bone properties and strength increased as the dietary WPCH level increased (10 and 20 g/kg), but there was no difference between the 20 and 40 g/kg treatment. WPCH and WPC supplementation ameliorated bone loss induced by ovariectomy in rats.

  14. Supplemental protein in support of muscle mass and health: advantage whey.

    PubMed

    Devries, Michaela C; Phillips, Stuart M

    2015-03-01

    Skeletal muscle is an integral body tissue playing key roles in strength, performance, physical function, and metabolic regulation. It is essential for athletes to ensure that they have optimal amounts of muscle mass to ensure peak performance in their given sport. However, the role of maintaining muscle mass during weight loss and as we age is an emerging concept, having implications in chronic disease prevention, functional capacity, and quality of life. Higher-protein diets have been shown to: (1) promote gains in muscle mass, especially when paired with resistance training; (2) spare muscle mass loss during caloric restriction; and (3) attenuate the natural loss of muscle mass that accompanies aging. Protein quality is important to the gain and maintenance of muscle mass. Protein quality is a function of protein digestibility, amino acid content, and the resulting amino acid availability to support metabolic function. Whey protein is one of the highest-quality proteins given its amino acid content (high essential, branched-chain, and leucine amino acid content) and rapid digestibility. Consumption of whey protein has a robust ability to stimulate muscle protein synthesis. In fact, whey protein has been found to stimulate muscle protein synthesis to a greater degree than other proteins such as casein and soy. This review examines the existing data supporting the role for protein consumption, with an emphasis on whey protein, in the regulation of muscle mass and body composition in response to resistance training, caloric restriction, and aging.

  15. Functional fermented whey-based beverage using lactic acid bacteria.

    PubMed

    Pescuma, Micaela; Hébert, Elvira María; Mozzi, Fernanda; de Valdez, Graciela Font

    2010-06-30

    Whey protein concentrate (WPC) is employed as functional food ingredient because of its nutritional value and emulsifying properties. However, the major whey protein beta-lactoglobulin (BLG) is the main cause of milk allergy. The aim of this study was to formulate a fermented whey beverage using selected lactic acid bacteria and WPC35 (WPC containing 35% of proteins) to obtain a fermented product with low lactose and BLG contents and high essential amino acid concentration. Cell viability, lactose consumption, lactic acid production, proteolytic activity, amino acid release and BLG degradation by the selected strains Lactobacillus acidophilus CRL 636, Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus CRL 656 and Streptococcus thermophilus CRL 804, as single or mixed (SLaB) cultures were evaluated in WPC35 (10%, w/v) incubated at 37 degrees C for 24h. Then, the fermented WPC35 was mixed with peach juice and calcium lactate (2%, w/v) and stored at 10 degrees C for 28 days. During fermentation, single cultures grew 1.7-3.1 log CFU/ml and produced 25.1-95.0 mmol/l of lactic acid as consequence of lactose consumption (14.0-41.8 mmol/l) after 12h fermentation. L. delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus CRL 656 was the most proteolytic strain (626 microg/ml Leu) and released the branched-chain essential amino acids Leu (16 microg/ml), Ile (27 microg/ml) and Val (43 microg/ml). All strains were able to degrade BLG in a range of 41-85% after 12h incubation. The starter culture SLaB grew 3.0 log CFU/ml, showed marked pH reduction, produced 122.0 mmol/l of lactic acid, displayed high proteolytic activity (484 microg/ml Leu) releasing Leu (13 microg/ml), Ile (18 microg/ml) and Val (35 microg/ml), and hydrolyzed 92% of BLG. The addition of calcium lactate to WPC35 maintained the drink pH stable during shelf life; no contamination was detected during this period. After 28 days, a decrease in cell viability of all strains was observed being more pronounced for L. delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus

  16. Biochemical studies on proteins from cheese whey and blood plasma by-products.

    PubMed

    el-Sayed, M M; Abdel Hamid, F F; Ahmed, Y M; Ali, S H; Mansour, O Y; Abdallah, N M

    1998-02-01

    Efforts have been done to recover proteins from waste liquors rich in protein in a soluble form. Cheese whey and animal bloods are by-products from the manufacture of cheese and meat. It contains a variety of proteins which can be reclaimed. The efficiency of protein precipitation from the sweet-cheese whey by the use of hydroxyethyl cellulose (HEC) was similar to that precipitated by the use of carboxymethyl cellulose (CMC). Both are greater than that precipitated by trichloro acetic acid. The same results of the efficiency of precipitation were attained when the plasma was precipitated. It was found that cheese-whey protein-HEC-complex and plasma protein-HEC-complex contain a large amount of essential amino acids. Electrophoretic separation of whey protein complex showed that beta-Lactoglobulin forms the major fraction while in case of plasma protein complex albumin forms the major fraction. The fractionation patterns of different complexes with HEC, CMC or TCA gave the same components and about the same ratio. It appears from these results that HEC-protein complexes are preferable than CMC-protein complexes or proteins precipitated by TCA. Chemical analysis of whey protein complexes revealed that lactose content of whey protein-HEC-complex was higher than that of CMC-complex or protein precipitated by TCA. Elemental analysis of protein complexes showed that the level of sodium, phosphorus, and potassium was increased while that of copper or zinc decreased. Cellulose derivative protein complexes showed no significant effects on the liver or kidney function of albino rat and these results indicted that no toxic effect was observed from the uses of these protein complexes in feeding.

  17. Chitosan-whey protein isolate composite films for encapsulation and stabilization of fish oil containing ultra pure omega-3 fatty acids.

    PubMed

    Duan, Jingyun; Jiang, Yan; Zhao, Yanyun

    2011-01-01

    Chitosan (1.5%, w/v)-whey protein isolate (WPI, 5% w/v) composite films were developed for encapsulating and stabilizing fish oil (FO) containing 93.7% eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA). Chitosan-WPI film-forming solutions (FFS) were incorporated with 1.5% or 2% FO (w/v), 2% (w/v) glycerol, Tween 80 (3 times weight of FO), and 0.5% (w/v) oregano or rosemary essential oil (EO), and cast for films at room conditions. Dried films were stored at 2 °C for 30 d for evaluating encapsulation efficiency (EE), lipid stability, and film functionality. Total oil contents in films from FFS incorporating 1.5% or 2% FO were 28.1% to 32.5% and 33.4% to 37.3%, respectively, and free oil contents were 13.5% to 14.7% and 15.5% to 16.3%, respectively. EE, moisture content, and water activity of the films were 47.8% to 66%, 18.7% to 24.9%, and 0.42% to 0.50%, respectively, without significant difference among differently formulated films. Increasing FO concentration from 1.5% to 2% in FFS decreased tensile strength of the films from 0.57-0.73 to 0.34-0.44 MPa, but not the film elongation. Addition of oregano EO in FFS retarded lipid oxidation of the fish oil encapsulated in the films, in which a 43% to 53% reduction in thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances value and 39% to 51% reduction in peroxide value were achieved. Chitosan-WPI composite films with incorporation of oregano essential oil could be applied as a simple and economic means for encapsulating and stabilizing fish oil for fortifying omega-3 fatty acids in various applications.

  18. The composition and functional properties of whey protein concentrates produced from buttermilk are comparable with those of whey protein concentrates produced from skimmed milk.

    PubMed

    Svanborg, Sigrid; Johansen, Anne-Grethe; Abrahamsen, Roger K; Skeie, Siv B

    2015-09-01

    The demand for whey protein is increasing in the food industry. Traditionally, whey protein concentrates (WPC) and isolates are produced from cheese whey. At present, microfiltration (MF) enables the utilization of whey from skim milk (SM) through milk protein fractionation. This study demonstrates that buttermilk (BM) can be a potential source for the production of a WPC with a comparable composition and functional properties to a WPC obtained by MF of SM. Through the production of WPC powder and a casein- and phospholipid (PL)-rich fraction by the MF of BM, sweet BM may be used in a more optimal and economical way. Sweet cream BM from industrial churning was skimmed before MF with 0.2-µm ceramic membranes at 55 to 58°C. The fractionations of BM and SM were performed under the same conditions using the same process, and the whey protein fractions from BM and SM were concentrated by ultrafiltration and diafiltration. The ultrafiltration and diafiltration was performed at 50°C using pasteurized tap water and a membrane with a 20-kDa cut-off to retain as little lactose as possible in the final WPC powders. The ultrafiltrates were subsequently spray dried, and their functional properties and chemical compositions were compared. The amounts of whey protein and PL in the WPC powder from BM (BMWPC) were comparable to the amounts found in the WPC from SM (SMWPC); however, the composition of the PL classes differed. The BMWPC contained less total protein, casein, and lactose compared with SMWPC, as well as higher contents of fat and citric acid. No difference in protein solubility was observed at pH values of 4.6 and 7.0, and the overrun was the same for BMWPC and SMWPC; however, the BMWPC made less stable foam than SMWPC.

  19. Intake of low-dose leucine-rich essential amino acids stimulates muscle anabolism equivalently to bolus whey protein in older women at rest and after exercise.

    PubMed

    Bukhari, Syed S I; Phillips, Bethan E; Wilkinson, Daniel J; Limb, Marie C; Rankin, Debbie; Mitchell, William K; Kobayashi, Hisamine; Greenhaff, Paul L; Smith, Kenneth; Atherton, Philip J

    2015-06-15

    Dysregulated anabolic responses to nutrition/exercise may contribute to sarcopenia; however, these characteristics are poorly defined in female populations. We determined the effects of two feeding regimes in older women (66 ± 2.5 yr; n = 8/group): bolus whey protein (WP-20 g) or novel low-dose leucine-enriched essential amino acids (EAA) [LEAA; 3 g (40% leucine)]. Using [(13)C6]phenylalanine infusions, we quantified muscle (MPS) and albumin (APS) protein synthesis at baseline and in response to both feeding (FED) and feeding plus exercise (FED-EX; 6 × 8 knee extensions at 75% 1-repetition maximum). We also quantified plasma insulin/AA concentrations, whole leg (LBF)/muscle microvascular blood flow (MBF), and muscle anabolic signaling by phosphoimmunoblotting. Plasma insulinemia and EAA/aemia were markedly greater after WP than LEAA (P < 0.001). Neither LEAA nor WP modified LBF in response to FED or FED-EX, whereas MBF increased to a similar extent in both groups only after FED-EX (P < 0.05). In response to FED, both WP and LEAA equally stimulated MPS 0-2 h (P < 0.05), abating thereafter (0-4 h, P > 0.05). In contrast, after FED-EX, MPS increased at 0-2 h and remained elevated at 0-4 h (P < 0.05) with both WP and LEAA. No anabolic signals quantifiably increased after FED, but p70 S6K1 Thr(389) increased after FED-EX (2 h, P < 0.05). APS increased similarly after WP and LEAA. Older women remain subtly responsive to nutrition ± exercise. Intriguingly though, bolus WP offers no trophic advantage over LEAA. PMID:25827594

  20. Intake of low-dose leucine-rich essential amino acids stimulates muscle anabolism equivalently to bolus whey protein in older women at rest and after exercise.

    PubMed

    Bukhari, Syed S I; Phillips, Bethan E; Wilkinson, Daniel J; Limb, Marie C; Rankin, Debbie; Mitchell, William K; Kobayashi, Hisamine; Greenhaff, Paul L; Smith, Kenneth; Atherton, Philip J

    2015-06-15

    Dysregulated anabolic responses to nutrition/exercise may contribute to sarcopenia; however, these characteristics are poorly defined in female populations. We determined the effects of two feeding regimes in older women (66 ± 2.5 yr; n = 8/group): bolus whey protein (WP-20 g) or novel low-dose leucine-enriched essential amino acids (EAA) [LEAA; 3 g (40% leucine)]. Using [(13)C6]phenylalanine infusions, we quantified muscle (MPS) and albumin (APS) protein synthesis at baseline and in response to both feeding (FED) and feeding plus exercise (FED-EX; 6 × 8 knee extensions at 75% 1-repetition maximum). We also quantified plasma insulin/AA concentrations, whole leg (LBF)/muscle microvascular blood flow (MBF), and muscle anabolic signaling by phosphoimmunoblotting. Plasma insulinemia and EAA/aemia were markedly greater after WP than LEAA (P < 0.001). Neither LEAA nor WP modified LBF in response to FED or FED-EX, whereas MBF increased to a similar extent in both groups only after FED-EX (P < 0.05). In response to FED, both WP and LEAA equally stimulated MPS 0-2 h (P < 0.05), abating thereafter (0-4 h, P > 0.05). In contrast, after FED-EX, MPS increased at 0-2 h and remained elevated at 0-4 h (P < 0.05) with both WP and LEAA. No anabolic signals quantifiably increased after FED, but p70 S6K1 Thr(389) increased after FED-EX (2 h, P < 0.05). APS increased similarly after WP and LEAA. Older women remain subtly responsive to nutrition ± exercise. Intriguingly though, bolus WP offers no trophic advantage over LEAA.

  1. Flavor and Functional Characteristics of Whey Protein Isolates from Different Whey Sources.

    PubMed

    Smith, T J; Foegeding, E A; Drake, M A

    2016-04-01

    This study evaluated flavor and functional characteristics of whey protein isolates (WPIs) from Cheddar, Mozzarella, Cottage cheese, and rennet casein whey. WPIs were manufactured in triplicate. Powders were rehydrated and evaluated in duplicate by descriptive sensory analysis. Volatile compounds were extracted by solid-phase microextraction followed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Functional properties were evaluated by measurement of foam stability, heat stability, and protein solubility. WPI from Cheddar and Cottage cheese whey had the highest cardboard flavor, whereas sweet aromatic flavor was highest in Mozzarella WPI, and rennet casein WPI had the lowest overall flavor and aroma. Distinct sour taste and brothy/potato flavor were also noted in WPI from Cottage cheese whey. Consistent with sensory results, aldehyde concentrations were also highest in Cheddar and Cottage cheese WPI. Overrun, yield stress, and foam stability were not different (P > 0.05) among Cheddar, Mozzarella, and rennet casein WPI, but WPI foams from Cottage cheese whey had a lower overrun and air-phase fraction (P < 0.05). Cottage cheese WPI was more heat stable at pH 7 (P < 0.05) than other WPI in 4% protein solutions, and was the only WPI to not gel at 10% protein. Cottage cheese WPI was less soluble at pH 4.6 compared to other WPI (P < 0.05) and also exhibited higher turbidity loss at pH 3 to 7 compared to other WPI (P < 0.05). This study suggests that WPI produced from nontraditional whey sources could be used in new applications due to distinct functional and flavor characteristics. PMID:26910294

  2. Emerging trends in nutraceutical applications of whey protein and its derivatives.

    PubMed

    Patel, Seema

    2015-11-01

    The looming food insecurity demands the utilization of nutrient-rich residues from food industries as value-added products. Whey, a dairy industry waste has been characterized to be excellent nourishment with an array of bioactive components. Whey protein comprises 20 % of total milk protein and it is rich in branched and essential amino acids, functional peptides, antioxidants and immunoglobulins. It confers benefits against a wide range of metabolic diseases such as cardiovascular complications, hypertension, obesity, diabetes, cancer and phenylketonuria. The protein has been validated to boost recovery from resistance exercise-injuries, stimulate gut physiology and protect skin against detrimental radiations. Apart from health invigoration, whey protein has proved its suitability as fat replacer and emulsifier. Further, its edible and antimicrobial packaging potential renders its highly desirable in food as well as pharmaceutical sectors. Considering the enormous nutraceutical worth of whey protein, this review emphasizes on its established and emerging biological roles. Present and future scopes in food processing and dietary supplement formulation are discussed. Associated hurdles are identified and how technical advancement might augment its applications are explored. This review is expected to provide valuable insight on whey protein-fortified functional foods, associated technical hurdles and scopes of improvement. PMID:26884639

  3. Hormone-induced modifications of the chromatin structure surrounding upstream regulatory regions conserved between the mouse and rabbit whey acidic protein genes.

    PubMed Central

    Millot, Benjamin; Montoliu, Lluís; Fontaine, Marie-Louise; Mata, Teresa; Devinoy, Eve

    2003-01-01

    The upstream regulatory regions of the mouse and rabbit whey acidic protein (WAP) genes have been used extensively to target the efficient expression of foreign genes into the mammary gland of transgenic animals. Therefore both regions have been studied to elucidate fully the mechanisms controlling WAP gene expression. Three DNase I-hypersensitive sites (HSS0, HSS1 and HSS2) have been described upstream of the rabbit WAP gene in the lactating mammary gland and correspond to important regulatory regions. These sites are surrounded by variable chromatin structures during mammary-gland development. In the present study, we describe the upstream sequence of the mouse WAP gene. Analysis of genomic sequences shows that the mouse WAP gene is situated between two widely expressed genes (Cpr2 and Ramp3). We show that the hypersensitive sites found upstream of the rabbit WAP gene are also detected in the mouse WAP gene. Further, they encompass functional signal transducer and activator of transcription 5-binding sites, as has been observed in the rabbit. A new hypersensitive site (HSS3), not specific to the mammary gland, was mapped 8 kb upstream of the rabbit WAP gene. Unlike the three HSSs described above, HSS3 is also detected in the liver, but similar to HSS1, it does not depend on lactogenic hormone treatments during cell culture. The region surrounding HSS3 encompasses a potential matrix attachment region, which is also conserved upstream of the mouse WAP gene and contains a functional transcription factor Ets-1 (E26 transformation-specific-1)-binding site. Finally, we demonstrate for the first time that variations in the chromatin structure are dependent on prolactin alone. PMID:12580766

  4. Effect of bleaching whey on sensory and functional properties of 80% whey protein concentrate.

    PubMed

    Jervis, S; Campbell, R; Wojciechowski, K L; Foegeding, E A; Drake, M A; Barbano, D M

    2012-06-01

    Whey is a highly functional food that has found widespread use in a variety of food and beverage applications. A large amount of the whey proteins produced in the United States is derived from annatto-colored Cheddar cheese. Color from annatto is undesirable in whey and must be bleached. The objective of this study was to compare 2 commercially approved bleaching agents, benzoyl peroxide (BP) and hydrogen peroxide (HP), and their effects on the flavor and functionality of 80% whey protein concentrate (WPC80). Colored and uncolored liquid wheys were bleached with BP or HP, and then ultrafiltered, diafiltered, and spray-dried; WPC80 from unbleached colored and uncolored Cheddar whey were manufactured as controls. All treatments were manufactured in triplicate. The WPC80 were then assessed by sensory, instrumental, functionality, color, and proximate analysis techniques. The HP-bleached WPC80 were higher in lipid oxidation compounds (specifically hexanal, heptanal, octanal, nonanal, decanal, dimethyl disulfide, and 1-octen-3-one) and had higher fatty and cardboard flavors compared with the other unbleached and BP-bleached WPC80. The WPC80 bleached with BP had lower norbixin concentrations compared with WPC80 bleached with HP. The WPC powders differed in Hunter color values (L, a, b), with bleached powders being more white, less red, and less yellow than unbleached powders. Bleaching with BP under the conditions used in this study resulted in larger reductions in yellowness of the powders made from whey with annatto color than did bleaching with HP. Functionality testing demonstrated that whey bleached with HP treatments had more soluble protein after 10 min of heating at 90°C at pH 4.6 and pH 7 than the no-bleach and BP treatments, regardless of additional color. Overall, HP bleaching caused more lipid oxidation products and subsequent off-flavors compared with BP bleaching. However, heat stability of WPC80 was enhanced by HP bleaching compared with control or BP

  5. Molecular modelling and experimental studies of mutation and cell-adhesion sites in the fibronectin type III and whey acidic protein domains of human anosmin-1.

    PubMed Central

    Robertson, A; MacColl, G S; Nash, J A; Boehm, M K; Perkins, S J; Bouloux, P M

    2001-01-01

    Anosmin-1, the gene product of the KAL gene, is implicated in the pathogenesis of X-linked Kallmann's syndrome. Anosmin-1 protein expression is restricted to the basement membrane and interstitial matrix of tissues affected in this syndrome during development. The anosmin-1 sequence indicates an N-terminal cysteine-rich domain, a whey acidic protein (WAP) domain, four fibronectin type III (FnIII) domains and a C-terminal histidine-rich region, and shows similarity with cell-adhesion molecules, such as neural cell-adhesion molecule, TAG-1 and L1. We investigated the structural and functional significance of three loss-of-function missense mutations of anosmin-1 using comparative modelling of the four FnIII and the WAP domains based on known NMR and crystal structures. Three missense mutation-encoded amino acid substitutions, N267K, E514K and F517L, were mapped to structurally defined positions on the GFCC' beta-sheet face of the first and third FnIII domains. Electrostatic maps demonstrated large basic surfaces containing clusters of conserved predicted heparan sulphate-binding residues adjacent to these mutation sites. To examine these modelling results anosmin-1 was expressed in insect cells. The incorporation of the three mutations into recombinant anosmin-1 had no effect on its secretion. The removal of two dibasic motifs that may constitute potential physiological cleavage sites for anosmin-1 had no effect on cleavage. Peptides based on the anosmin-1 sequences R254--K285 and P504--K527 were then synthesized in order to assess the effect of the three mutations on cellular adhesion, using cell lines that represented potential functional targets of anosmin-1. Peptides (10 microg/ml) incorporating the N267K and E514K substitutions promoted enhanced adhesion to 13.S.1.24 rat olfactory epithelial cells and canine MDCK1 kidney epithelial cells (P<0.01) compared with the wild-type peptides. This result was attributed to the introduction of a lysine residue adjacent to

  6. Casein and whey exert different effects on plasma amino acid profiles, gastrointestinal hormone secretion and appetite.

    PubMed

    Hall, W L; Millward, D J; Long, S J; Morgan, L M

    2003-02-01

    Protein, generally agreed to be the most satiating macronutrient, may differ in its effects on appetite depending on the protein source and variation in digestion and absorption. We investigated the effects of two milk protein types, casein and whey, on food intake and subjective ratings of hunger and fullness, and on postprandial metabolite and gastrointestinal hormone responses. Two studies were undertaken. The first study showed that energy intake from a buffet meal ad libitum was significantly less 90 min after a 1700 kJ liquid preload containing 48 g whey, compared with an equivalent casein preload (P<0.05). In the second study, the same whey preload led to a 28 % increase in postprandial plasma amino acid concentrations over 3 h compared with casein (incremental area under the curve (iAUC), P<0.05). Plasma cholecystokinin (CCK) was increased by 60 % (iAUC, P<0.005), glucagon-like peptide (GLP)-1 by 65 % (iAUC, P<0.05) and glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide by 36 % (iAUC, P<0.01) following the whey preload compared with the casein. Gastric emptying was influenced by protein type as evidenced by differing plasma paracetamol profiles with the two preloads. Greater subjective satiety followed the whey test meal (P<0.05). These results implicate post-absorptive increases in plasma amino acids together with both CCK and GLP-1 as potential mediators of the increased satiety response to whey and emphasise the importance of considering the impact of protein type on the appetite response to a mixed meal.

  7. Effect of whey protein coating on quality attributes of low-fat, aerobically packaged sausage during refrigerated storage.

    PubMed

    Shon, J; Chin, K B

    2008-08-01

    Whey protein-based edible coating was used to reduce oxidative degradation and microbial growth of low-fat sausages (LFSs) stored at 4 degrees C for 8 wk, under aerobic package. Whey protein coating reduced (P<0.05) thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances (TBARS) and peroxide value (PV) formation compared to control sausages. The percent inhibition of TBARS and PV for whey protein-coated sausages, compared to the control, was 31.3% and 27.1%, respectively. The ability of the whey protein coating to provide a moisture barrier for the sausages was reduced (P<0.05). In addition, a reduction of moisture loss by 36.7% compared to the control was achieved by whey coating. However, whey protein coating of LFSs did not inhibit the growth of either the total number of aerobic bacteria or of Listeria monocytogenes. These results indicated that whey protein coating had an antioxidative activity in LFSs under aerobic package during refrigerated storage.

  8. The cysteine-rich region and the whey acidic protein domain are essential for anosmin-1 biological functions.

    PubMed

    Esteban, Pedro F; Murcia-Belmonte, Verónica; García-González, Diego; de Castro, Fernando

    2013-03-01

    The protein anosmin-1, coded by the KAL1 gene responsible for the X-linked form of Kallmann syndrome (KS), exerts its biological effects mainly through the interaction with and signal modulation of fibroblast growth factor receptor 1 (FGFR1). We have previously shown the interaction of the third fibronectin-like type 3 (FnIII) domain and the N-terminal region of anosmin-1 with FGFR1. Here, we demonstrate that missense mutations reported in patients with KS, C172R and N267K did not alter or substantially reduce, respectively, the binding to FGFR1. These substitutions annulled the chemoattraction of the full-length protein over subventricular zone (SVZ) neuronal precursors (NPs), but they did not annul it in the N-terminal-truncated protein (A1Nt). We also show that although not essential for binding to FGFR1, the cysteine-rich (CR) region is necessary for anosmin-1 function and that FnIII.3 cannot substitute for FnIII.1 function. Truncated proteins recapitulating nonsense mutations found in KS patients did not show the chemotropic effect on SVZ NPs, suggesting that the presence behind FnIII.1 of any part of anosmin-1 produces an unstable protein incapable of action. We also identify the extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2) pathway as necessary for the chemotropic effect exerted by FGF2 and anosmin-1 on rat SVZ NPs.

  9. Treatability of cheese whey for single-cell protein production in nonsterile systems: Part I. Optimal condition for lactic acid fermentation using a microaerobic sequencing batch reactor (microaerobic SBR) with immobilized Lactobacillus plantarum TISTR 2265 and microbial communities.

    PubMed

    Monkoondee, Sarawut; Kuntiya, Ampin; Chaiyaso, Thanongsak; Leksawasdi, Noppol; Techapun, Charin; Kawee-Ai, Arthitaya; Seesuriyachan, Phisit

    2016-05-18

    Cheese whey contains a high organic content and causes serious problems if it is released into the environment when untreated. This study aimed to investigate the optimum condition of lactic acid production using the microaerobic sequencing batch reactor (microaerobic SBR) in a nonsterile system. The high production of lactic acid was achieved by immobilized Lactobacillus plantarum TISTR 2265 to generate an acidic pH condition below 4.5 and then to support single-cell protein (SCP) production in the second aerobic sequencing batch reactor (aerobic SBR). A hydraulic retention time (HRT) of 4 days and a whey concentration of 80% feeding gave a high lactic acid yield of 12.58 g/L, chemical oxygen demand (COD) removal of 62.38%, and lactose utilization of 61.54%. The microbial communities in the nonsterile system were dominated by members of lactic acid bacteria, and it was shown that the inoculum remained in the system up to 330 days. PMID:26178366

  10. Fractionation of whey protein isolate with supercritical carbon dioxide to produce enriched alpha-lactalbumin and beta-lactoglobulin food ingredients

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A potentially economical and environmentally friendly whey protein fractionation process was developed using supercritical carbon dioxide (SCO2) as an acid to produce enriched fractions of alpha-lactalbumin (a-LA) and beta-lactoglobulin (b-LG) from whey protein isolate. To prepare the fractions, so...

  11. Improving surface functional properties of tofu whey-derived peptides by chemical modification with fatty acids.

    PubMed

    Matemu, Athanasia Oswald; Katayama, Shigeru; Kayahara, Hisataka; Murasawa, Hisashi; Nakamura, Soichiro

    2012-04-01

    Effect of acylation with saturated fatty acids on surface functional properties of tofu whey-derived peptides was investigated. Tofu whey (TW) and soy proteins (7S, 11S, and acid-precipitated soy protein [APP]) were hydrolyzed by Protease M 'Amano' G, and resulting peptide mixtures were acylated with esterified fatty acids of different chain length (6C to 18C) to form a covalent linkage between the carboxyl group of fatty acid and the free amino groups of peptide. Acylation significantly (P < 0.05) increased emulsifying properties of 7S, 11S, and APP peptides independent of fatty acid chain length. Acylation decreased water binding capacity although oil binding capacity of acylated tofu whey ultra filtered fraction (UFTW < 3 kDa), 7S- and 11S-peptides were improved compared to native peptides. 7S peptides acylated with long chain fatty acids had shown significant higher surface hydrophobicity as in contrast with acylated UFTW < 3 kDa and APP peptides. Fluorescence spectra studies revealed structural conformation of acylated soy peptides as compared to native peptides. This study shows that chemical modification with fatty acids can further affect functional properties of soy proteins.

  12. Designing Whey Protein-Polysaccharide Particles for Colloidal Stability.

    PubMed

    Wagoner, Ty; Vardhanabhuti, Bongkosh; Foegeding, E Allen

    2016-01-01

    Interactions between whey proteins and polysaccharides, in particular the formation of food-grade soluble complexes, are of interest because of potential functional and health benefits. A specific application that has not received much attention is the use of complexes for enhanced colloidal stability of protein sols, such as protein-containing beverages. In beverages, the primary goal is the formation of complexes that remain dispersed after thermal processing and extended storage. This review highlights recent progress in the area of forming whey protein-polysaccharide soluble complexes that would be appropriate for beverage applications. Research in this area indicates that soluble complexes can be formed and stabilized that are reasonably small in size and possess a large surface charge that would predict colloidal stability. Selection of specific proteins and polysaccharides can be tailored to desired conditions. The principal challenges involve overcoming restrictions on protein concentration and ensuring that protein remains bioavailable.

  13. Whey protein concentrate storage at elevated temperature and humidity

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Dairy processors are finding new export markets for whey protein concentrate (WPC), a byproduct of cheesemaking, but they need to know if full-sized bags of this powder will withstand high temperature and relative humidity (RH) levels during unrefrigerated storage under tropical conditions. To answ...

  14. Improved Functional Characteristics of Whey Protein Hydrolysates in Food Industry.

    PubMed

    Jeewanthi, Renda Kankanamge Chaturika; Lee, Na-Kyoung; Paik, Hyun-Dong

    2015-01-01

    This review focuses on the enhanced functional characteristics of enzymatic hydrolysates of whey proteins (WPHs) in food applications compared to intact whey proteins (WPs). WPs are applied in foods as whey protein concentrates (WPCs), whey protein isolates (WPIs), and WPHs. WPs are byproducts of cheese production, used in a wide range of food applications due to their nutritional validity, functional activities, and cost effectiveness. Enzymatic hydrolysis yields improved functional and nutritional benefits in contrast to heat denaturation or native applications. WPHs improve solubility over a wide range of pH, create viscosity through water binding, and promote cohesion, adhesion, and elasticity. WPHs form stronger but more flexible edible films than WPC or WPI. WPHs enhance emulsification, bind fat, and facilitate whipping, compared to intact WPs. Extensive hydrolyzed WPHs with proper heat applications are the best emulsifiers and addition of polysaccharides improves the emulsification ability of WPHs. Also, WPHs improve the sensorial properties like color, flavor, and texture but impart a bitter taste in case where extensive hydrolysis (degree of hydrolysis greater than 8%). It is important to consider the type of enzyme, hydrolysis conditions, and WPHs production method based on the nature of food application. PMID:26761849

  15. 21 CFR 184.1979c - Whey protein concentrate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... incorporated by reference in accordance with 5 U.S.C. 552(a) and 1 CFR part 51, is given in paragraphs (b)(1)(i... 1 CFR part 51. Copies are available from the National Academy Press, Box 285, 2101 Constitution Ave... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Whey protein concentrate. 184.1979c Section...

  16. Improved Functional Characteristics of Whey Protein Hydrolysates in Food Industry.

    PubMed

    Jeewanthi, Renda Kankanamge Chaturika; Lee, Na-Kyoung; Paik, Hyun-Dong

    2015-01-01

    This review focuses on the enhanced functional characteristics of enzymatic hydrolysates of whey proteins (WPHs) in food applications compared to intact whey proteins (WPs). WPs are applied in foods as whey protein concentrates (WPCs), whey protein isolates (WPIs), and WPHs. WPs are byproducts of cheese production, used in a wide range of food applications due to their nutritional validity, functional activities, and cost effectiveness. Enzymatic hydrolysis yields improved functional and nutritional benefits in contrast to heat denaturation or native applications. WPHs improve solubility over a wide range of pH, create viscosity through water binding, and promote cohesion, adhesion, and elasticity. WPHs form stronger but more flexible edible films than WPC or WPI. WPHs enhance emulsification, bind fat, and facilitate whipping, compared to intact WPs. Extensive hydrolyzed WPHs with proper heat applications are the best emulsifiers and addition of polysaccharides improves the emulsification ability of WPHs. Also, WPHs improve the sensorial properties like color, flavor, and texture but impart a bitter taste in case where extensive hydrolysis (degree of hydrolysis greater than 8%). It is important to consider the type of enzyme, hydrolysis conditions, and WPHs production method based on the nature of food application.

  17. Improved Functional Characteristics of Whey Protein Hydrolysates in Food Industry

    PubMed Central

    Jeewanthi, Renda Kankanamge Chaturika; Lee, Na-Kyoung; Paik, Hyun-Dong

    2015-01-01

    This review focuses on the enhanced functional characteristics of enzymatic hydrolysates of whey proteins (WPHs) in food applications compared to intact whey proteins (WPs). WPs are applied in foods as whey protein concentrates (WPCs), whey protein isolates (WPIs), and WPHs. WPs are byproducts of cheese production, used in a wide range of food applications due to their nutritional validity, functional activities, and cost effectiveness. Enzymatic hydrolysis yields improved functional and nutritional benefits in contrast to heat denaturation or native applications. WPHs improve solubility over a wide range of pH, create viscosity through water binding, and promote cohesion, adhesion, and elasticity. WPHs form stronger but more flexible edible films than WPC or WPI. WPHs enhance emulsification, bind fat, and facilitate whipping, compared to intact WPs. Extensive hydrolyzed WPHs with proper heat applications are the best emulsifiers and addition of polysaccharides improves the emulsification ability of WPHs. Also, WPHs improve the sensorial properties like color, flavor, and texture but impart a bitter taste in case where extensive hydrolysis (degree of hydrolysis greater than 8%). It is important to consider the type of enzyme, hydrolysis conditions, and WPHs production method based on the nature of food application. PMID:26761849

  18. Antioxidant Effects of Sheep Whey Protein on Endothelial Cells.

    PubMed

    Kerasioti, Efthalia; Stagos, Dimitrios; Georgatzi, Vasiliki; Bregou, Erinda; Priftis, Alexandros; Kafantaris, Ioannis; Kouretas, Dimitrios

    2016-01-01

    Excessive production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) may cause endothelial dysfunction and consequently vascular disease. In the present study, the possible protective effects of sheep whey protein (SWP) from tert-butyl hydroperoxide- (tBHP-) induced oxidative stress in endothelial cells (EA.hy926) were assessed using oxidative stress biomarkers. These oxidative stress biomarkers were glutathione (GSH) and ROS levels determined by flow cytometry. Moreover, thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances (TBARS), protein carbonyls (CARB), and oxidized glutathione (GSSG) were determined spectrophotometrically. The results showed that SWP at 0.78, 1.56, 3.12, and 6.24 mg of protein mL(-1) increased GSH up to 141%, while it decreased GSSG to 46.7%, ROS to 58.5%, TBARS to 52.5%, and CARB to 49.0%. In conclusion, the present study demonstrated for the first time that SWP protected endothelial cells from oxidative stress. Thus, SWP may be used for developing food supplements or biofunctional foods to attenuate vascular disturbances associated with oxidative stress. PMID:27127549

  19. Antioxidant Effects of Sheep Whey Protein on Endothelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Kerasioti, Efthalia; Stagos, Dimitrios; Georgatzi, Vasiliki; Bregou, Erinda; Priftis, Alexandros; Kafantaris, Ioannis; Kouretas, Dimitrios

    2016-01-01

    Excessive production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) may cause endothelial dysfunction and consequently vascular disease. In the present study, the possible protective effects of sheep whey protein (SWP) from tert-butyl hydroperoxide- (tBHP-) induced oxidative stress in endothelial cells (EA.hy926) were assessed using oxidative stress biomarkers. These oxidative stress biomarkers were glutathione (GSH) and ROS levels determined by flow cytometry. Moreover, thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances (TBARS), protein carbonyls (CARB), and oxidized glutathione (GSSG) were determined spectrophotometrically. The results showed that SWP at 0.78, 1.56, 3.12, and 6.24 mg of protein mL−1 increased GSH up to 141%, while it decreased GSSG to 46.7%, ROS to 58.5%, TBARS to 52.5%, and CARB to 49.0%. In conclusion, the present study demonstrated for the first time that SWP protected endothelial cells from oxidative stress. Thus, SWP may be used for developing food supplements or biofunctional foods to attenuate vascular disturbances associated with oxidative stress. PMID:27127549

  20. Kinetics of sucrose crystallization in whey protein films.

    PubMed

    Dangaran, Kirsten L; Krochta, John M

    2006-09-20

    The kinetics of sucrose crystallization in whey protein isolate (WPI) films was studied at 25 degrees C in four different relative humidity environments: 23, 33, 44, and 53%. The effects of protein matrix, crystallization inhibitors, and storage environment on the rate constants of sucrose crystallization were determined using the Avrami model of crystallization. It was found that a cross-linked, denatured whey protein (WP) matrix more effectively hindered sucrose crystallization than a protein matrix of native WP. The crystallization inhibitors tested were lactose, raffinose, modified starch (Purity 69), and polyvinylpyrrolidone (Plasdone C15). Raffinose and modified starch were determined to be the more effective inhibitors of sucrose crystallization. At lower relative humidities (23, 33, and 44%), the cross-linked protein matrix played a more important role in sucrose crystallization than the inhibitors. As relative humidity increased (53%), the crystallization inhibitors were more central to controlling sucrose crystallization in WPI films.

  1. Investigation of the protective effect of whey proteins on lactococcal phages during heat treatment at various pH.

    PubMed

    Geagea, Hany; Gomaa, Ahmed I; Remondetto, Gabriel; Moineau, Sylvain; Subirade, Muriel

    2015-10-01

    The incorporation of whey protein concentrates (WPC) into cheese is a risky process due to the potential contamination with thermo-resistant phages of lactic acid bacteria (LAB). Furthermore, whey proteins can protect phages during heat treatment, thereby increasing the above risk. The main objective of this work was to understand this protective effect in order to better control LAB phages and maximize whey recycling in the cheese industry. First, the inactivation of a previously characterized thermo-resistant lactococcal virulent phage (P1532) was investigated at 95 °C in WPC, in individual whey components β-lactoglobulin, α-lactalbumin, and bovine serum albumin as well as under different heat and pH conditions. The structural changes of the tested proteins were also monitored by transmission FTIR spectroscopy. Phage inactivation results indicated that the protective effect of whey proteins was pH and time dependent at 95 °C and was not restricted to one component. FTIR spectra suggest that the protection is related to protein molecular structures and to the level of protein aggregates, which was more pronounced in acidic conditions. Moreover, the molecular structure of the three proteins tested was differently influenced by pH and the duration of the heat treatment. This work confirms the protective effect of WPC on phages during heat treatment and offers the first hint to explain such phenomenon. Finding the appropriate treatment of WPC to reduce the phage risk is one of the keys to improving the cheese manufacturing process.

  2. Recovery of Whey Proteins and Enzymatic Hydrolysis of Lactose Derived from Casein Whey Using a Tangential Flow Ultrafiltration Module

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, Bipasha; Bhattacharjee, Sangita; Bhattacharjee, Chiranjib

    2013-09-01

    In this study, ultrafiltration (UF) of pretreated casein whey was carried out in a cross-flow module fitted with 5 kDa molecular weight cut-off polyethersulfone membrane to recover whey proteins in the retentate and lactose in the permeate. Effects of processing conditions, like transmembrane pressure and pH on permeate flux and rejection were investigated and reported. The polarised layer resistance was found to increase with time during UF even in this high shear device. The lactose concentration in the permeate was measured using dinitro salicylic acid method. Enzymatic kinetic study for lactose hydrolysis was carried out at three different temperatures ranging from 30 to 50 °C using β-galactosidase enzyme. The glucose formed during lactose hydrolysis was analyzed using glucose oxidase-peroxidase method. Kinetics of enzymatic hydrolysis of lactose solution was found to follow Michaelis-Menten model and the model parameters were estimated by Lineweaver-Burk plot. The hydrolysis rate was found to be maximum (with Vmax = 5.5091 mmol/L/min) at 30 °C.

  3. Improvement of the antimicrobial and antioxidant activities of camel and bovine whey proteins by limited proteolysis.

    PubMed

    Salami, Maryam; Moosavi-Movahedi, Ali Akbar; Ehsani, Mohammad Reza; Yousefi, Reza; Haertlé, Thomas; Chobert, Jean-Marc; Razavi, Seyed Hadi; Henrich, Robert; Balalaie, Saeed; Ebadi, Seyed Ahmad; Pourtakdoost, Samineh; Niasari-Naslaji, Amir

    2010-03-24

    The compositions and structures of bovine and camel milk proteins are different, which define their functional and biological properties. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of enzymatic hydrolysis of camel and bovine whey proteins (WPs) on their antioxidant and antimicrobial properties. After enzymatic treatment, both the antioxidant and the antimicrobial activities of bovine and camel WPs were improved. The significantly higher antioxidant activity of camel WPs and their hydrolysates as compared with that of bovine WPs and their hydrolysates may result from the differences in amounts and/or in accessibilities of antioxidant amino acid residues present in their primary structures and from the prevalence of alpha-lactalbumin and beta-lactoglobulin as proteolytic substrates in camel and bovine whey, respectively. The results of this study reveal differences in antimicrobial and antioxidant activities between WP hydrolysates of bovine and camel milk and the effects of limited proteolysis on these activities.

  4. Effect of resveratrol or ascorbic acid on the stability of α-tocopherol in O/W emulsions stabilized by whey protein isolate: Simultaneous encapsulation of the vitamin and the protective antioxidant.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lei; Gao, Yahui; Li, Juan; Subirade, Muriel; Song, Yuanda; Liang, Li

    2016-04-01

    Food proteins have been widely used as carrier materials due to their multiple functional properties. Hydrophobic bioactives are generally dissolved in the oil phase of O/W emulsions. Ligand-binding properties provide the possibility of binding bioactives to the protein membrane of oil droplets. In this study, the influence of whey protein isolate (WPI) concentration and amphiphilic resveratrol or hydrophilic ascorbic acid on the decomposition of α-tocopherol in the oil phase of WPI emulsions is considered. Impact of ascorbic acid, in the continuous phase, on the decomposition depended on the vitamin concentration. Resveratrol partitioned into the oil-water interface and the cis-isomer contributed most of the protective effect of this polyphenol. About 94% of α-tocopherol and 50% of resveratrol were found in the oil droplets stabilized by 0.01% WPI. These results suggest the feasibility of using the emulsifying and ligand-binding properties of WPI to produce carriers for simultaneous encapsulation of bioactives with different physicochemical properties.

  5. Effect of resveratrol or ascorbic acid on the stability of α-tocopherol in O/W emulsions stabilized by whey protein isolate: Simultaneous encapsulation of the vitamin and the protective antioxidant.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lei; Gao, Yahui; Li, Juan; Subirade, Muriel; Song, Yuanda; Liang, Li

    2016-04-01

    Food proteins have been widely used as carrier materials due to their multiple functional properties. Hydrophobic bioactives are generally dissolved in the oil phase of O/W emulsions. Ligand-binding properties provide the possibility of binding bioactives to the protein membrane of oil droplets. In this study, the influence of whey protein isolate (WPI) concentration and amphiphilic resveratrol or hydrophilic ascorbic acid on the decomposition of α-tocopherol in the oil phase of WPI emulsions is considered. Impact of ascorbic acid, in the continuous phase, on the decomposition depended on the vitamin concentration. Resveratrol partitioned into the oil-water interface and the cis-isomer contributed most of the protective effect of this polyphenol. About 94% of α-tocopherol and 50% of resveratrol were found in the oil droplets stabilized by 0.01% WPI. These results suggest the feasibility of using the emulsifying and ligand-binding properties of WPI to produce carriers for simultaneous encapsulation of bioactives with different physicochemical properties. PMID:26593516

  6. Partial Molecular Characterization of Arctium minus Aspartylendopeptidase and Preparation of Bioactive Peptides by Whey Protein Hydrolysis.

    PubMed

    Cimino, Cecilia V; Colombo, María Laura; Liggieri, Constanza; Bruno, Mariela; Vairo-Cavalli, Sandra

    2015-08-01

    In this article, we report the cloning of an aspartic protease (AP) from flowers of Arctium minus (Hill) Bernh. (Asteraceae) along with the use of depigmented aqueous flower extracts, as a source of APs, for the hydrolysis of whey proteins. The isolated cDNA encoded a protein product with 509 amino acids called arctiumisin, with the characteristic primary structure organization of typical plant APs. Bovine whey protein hydrolysates, obtained employing the enzyme extracts of A. minus flowers, displayed inhibitory angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) and antioxidant activities. Hydrolysates after 3 and 5 h of reaction (degree of hydrolysis 2.4 and 5.6, respectively) and the associated peptide fraction with molecular weight below 3 kDa were analyzed by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization/time of flight mass spectrometry, and reverse phase-high-performance liquid chromatography. The results obtained in this study demonstrate the viability of using proteases from A. minus to increase the antioxidant and inhibitory ACE capacity of whey proteins.

  7. Partial Molecular Characterization of Arctium minus Aspartylendopeptidase and Preparation of Bioactive Peptides by Whey Protein Hydrolysis.

    PubMed

    Cimino, Cecilia V; Colombo, María Laura; Liggieri, Constanza; Bruno, Mariela; Vairo-Cavalli, Sandra

    2015-08-01

    In this article, we report the cloning of an aspartic protease (AP) from flowers of Arctium minus (Hill) Bernh. (Asteraceae) along with the use of depigmented aqueous flower extracts, as a source of APs, for the hydrolysis of whey proteins. The isolated cDNA encoded a protein product with 509 amino acids called arctiumisin, with the characteristic primary structure organization of typical plant APs. Bovine whey protein hydrolysates, obtained employing the enzyme extracts of A. minus flowers, displayed inhibitory angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) and antioxidant activities. Hydrolysates after 3 and 5 h of reaction (degree of hydrolysis 2.4 and 5.6, respectively) and the associated peptide fraction with molecular weight below 3 kDa were analyzed by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization/time of flight mass spectrometry, and reverse phase-high-performance liquid chromatography. The results obtained in this study demonstrate the viability of using proteases from A. minus to increase the antioxidant and inhibitory ACE capacity of whey proteins. PMID:25575270

  8. Fermented ammoniated condensed whey as a crude protein source for feedlot cattle

    SciTech Connect

    Crickenberger, R.G.; Henderson, H.E.; Reddy, C.A.

    1981-04-01

    Four feeding trials were conducted to evaluate fermented ammoniated condensed whey as a crude protein supplement for finishing cattle fed corn silage or corn - corn silage diets. Feed efficiencies and daily gains with protein treatments were noted. The trials indicate that fermented ammoniated condensed whey is comparable to soybean meal as a crude protein source for feedlot cattle. (Refs. 18).

  9. Inhibitory activity against plasmin, trypsin, and elastase in rennet whey and in cheese fortified with whey protein.

    PubMed

    Benfeldt, C; Sørensen, J; Petersen, T E

    1998-03-01

    The inhibitory activity against trypsin, elastase, and plasmin was determined in samples of Danbo 45+ that were manufactured from milk pasteurized at 72, 80, and 90 degrees C for 15, 30 and 60 s; the corresponding rennet wheys; and Havarti 45+ manufactured from milk concentrated 1.8-fold, 2.7-fold, and 4.6-fold by ultrafiltration. A sensitive colorimetric assay demonstrated that the incorporation of thermally denatured whey proteins into the cheese curd by pasteurization resulted in a decreased proteinase inhibitory activity against trypsin and elastase in Danbo 45+ and against trypsin, elastase, and plasmin in the corresponding rennet wheys. However, incorporation of native whey proteins into Havarti 45+ by ultrafiltration of the cheese milk resulted in an increased inhibitory activity against trypsin and elastase in the cheeses. Cheese manufactured from milk concentrated 1.8-fold, 2.7-fold, or 4.6-fold displayed trypsin inhibitory activity that was 1.8, 2.9, and 5.1 times, respectively, that of the reference cheese. Similarly, the elastase inhibitory activity in the cheeses increased 2.2, 3.2 and 7.8 times. The increased inhibitory activity in cheese fortified with native whey protein likely contributes to the decreased proteolysis and altered ripening characteristics of the resulting cheeses, and further, the method can be adapted to detection of other inhibitors if sufficiently sensitive substrates are available.

  10. Consumption of Milk Protein or Whey Protein Results in a Similar Increase in Muscle Protein Synthesis in Middle Aged Men.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, Cameron J; McGregor, Robin A; D'Souza, Randall F; Thorstensen, Eric B; Markworth, James F; Fanning, Aaron C; Poppitt, Sally D; Cameron-Smith, David

    2015-10-21

    The differential ability of various milk protein fractions to stimulate muscle protein synthesis (MPS) has been previously described, with whey protein generally considered to be superior to other fractions. However, the relative ability of a whole milk protein to stimulate MPS has not been compared to whey. Sixteen healthy middle-aged males ingested either 20 g of milk protein (n = 8) or whey protein (n = 8) while undergoing a primed constant infusion of ring (13)C₆ phenylalanine. Muscle biopsies were obtained 120 min prior to consumption of the protein and 90 and 210 min afterwards. Resting myofibrillar fractional synthetic rates (FSR) were 0.019% ± 0.009% and 0.021% ± 0.018% h(-1) in the milk and whey groups respectively. For the first 90 min after protein ingestion the FSR increased (p < 0.001) to 0.057% ± 0.018% and 0.052% ± 0.024% h(-1) in the milk and whey groups respectively with no difference between groups (p = 0.810). FSR returned to baseline in both groups between 90 and 210 min after protein ingestion. Despite evidence of increased rate of digestion and leucine availability following the ingestion of whey protein, there was similar activation of MPS in middle-aged men with either 20 g of milk protein or whey protein.

  11. Consumption of Milk Protein or Whey Protein Results in a Similar Increase in Muscle Protein Synthesis in Middle Aged Men

    PubMed Central

    Mitchell, Cameron J.; McGregor, Robin A.; D’Souza, Randall F.; Thorstensen, Eric B.; Markworth, James F.; Fanning, Aaron C.; Poppitt, Sally D.; Cameron-Smith, David

    2015-01-01

    The differential ability of various milk protein fractions to stimulate muscle protein synthesis (MPS) has been previously described, with whey protein generally considered to be superior to other fractions. However, the relative ability of a whole milk protein to stimulate MPS has not been compared to whey. Sixteen healthy middle-aged males ingested either 20 g of milk protein (n = 8) or whey protein (n = 8) while undergoing a primed constant infusion of ring 13C6 phenylalanine. Muscle biopsies were obtained 120 min prior to consumption of the protein and 90 and 210 min afterwards. Resting myofibrillar fractional synthetic rates (FSR) were 0.019% ± 0.009% and 0.021% ± 0.018% h−1 in the milk and whey groups respectively. For the first 90 min after protein ingestion the FSR increased (p < 0.001) to 0.057% ± 0.018% and 0.052% ± 0.024% h−1 in the milk and whey groups respectively with no difference between groups (p = 0.810). FSR returned to baseline in both groups between 90 and 210 min after protein ingestion. Despite evidence of increased rate of digestion and leucine availability following the ingestion of whey protein, there was similar activation of MPS in middle-aged men with either 20 g of milk protein or whey protein. PMID:26506377

  12. Production of Fungal Mycelial Protein in Submerged Culture of Soybean Whey

    PubMed Central

    Falanghe, Helcio; Smith, A. K.; Rackis, J. J.

    1964-01-01

    Various soybean whey media were tested as substrate for seven species of fungi in submerged culture. Very little mycelial growth was obtained with Morchella hybrida, Collybia velutipes, Cantharellus cibarius, and Xylaria polymorpha. Agaricus campestris failed to grow. Tricholoma nudum and Boletus indecisus showed the greatest rate of growth and production of mycelial protein and the best utilization of soybean whey solids, with much shorter incubation times compared with those of the other species. T. nudum developed as spheres having diameters of about 5 to 8 mm, instead of the usual slurry or yeastlike form, in the presence of added ammonium acetate. B. indecisus always developed as spheres. Mycelial yields and production of protein by T. nudum greatly decreased with the addition of more than 1% glucose to soybean whey, whereas with B. indecisus the yield of protein almost doubled when up to 3% glucose was added. The effect of minerals on mycelial growth was determined. With soybean whey concentrated to 50%, the rate of mycelial growth of T. nudum was nearly doubled, but protein content of mycelia was greatly reduced. Mycelial growth and yield of protein of B. indecisus grown in concentrated whey were increased greatly. About 4 to 6 g of mycelial protein per liter can be obtained from fermentation in soybean whey, depending upon the medium used. Utilization of soybean whey by fungal fermentation may have economic value in whey disposal and in the production of products of high protein content. PMID:14199023

  13. Buffalo Cheese Whey Proteins, Identification of a 24 kDa Protein and Characterization of Their Hydrolysates: In Vitro Gastrointestinal Digestion.

    PubMed

    Bassan, Juliana C; Goulart, Antonio J; Nasser, Ana L M; Bezerra, Thaís M S; Garrido, Saulo S; Rustiguel, Cynthia B; Guimarães, Luis H S; Monti, Rubens

    2015-01-01

    Milk whey proteins are well known for their high biological value and versatile functional properties, characteristics that allow its wide use in the food and pharmaceutical industries. In this work, a 24 kDa protein from buffalo cheese whey was analyzed by mass spectrometry and presented homology with Bos taurus beta-lactoglobulin. In addition, the proteins present in buffalo cheese whey were hydrolyzed with pepsin and with different combinations of trypsin, chymotrypsin and carboxypeptidase-A. When the TNBS method was used the obtained hydrolysates presented DH of 55 and 62% for H1 and H2, respectively. Otherwise for the OPA method the DH was 27 and 43% for H1 and H2, respectively. The total antioxidant activities of the H1 and H2 samples with and without previous enzymatic hydrolysis, determined by DPPH using diphenyl-p-picrylhydrazyl radical, was 4.9 and 12 mM of Trolox equivalents (TE) for H2 and H2Dint, respectively. The increased concentrations for H1 and H2 samples were approximately 99% and 75%, respectively. The in vitro gastrointestinal digestion efficiency for the samples that were first hydrolyzed was higher compared with samples not submitted to previous hydrolysis. After in vitro gastrointestinal digestion, several amino acids were released in higher concentrations, and most of which were essential amino acids. These results suggest that buffalo cheese whey is a better source of bioavailable amino acids than bovine cheese whey.

  14. Buffalo Cheese Whey Proteins, Identification of a 24 kDa Protein and Characterization of Their Hydrolysates: In Vitro Gastrointestinal Digestion

    PubMed Central

    Bassan, Juliana C.; Goulart, Antonio J.; Nasser, Ana L. M.; Bezerra, Thaís M. S.; Garrido, Saulo S.; Rustiguel, Cynthia B.; Guimarães, Luis H. S.; Monti, Rubens

    2015-01-01

    Milk whey proteins are well known for their high biological value and versatile functional properties, characteristics that allow its wide use in the food and pharmaceutical industries. In this work, a 24 kDa protein from buffalo cheese whey was analyzed by mass spectrometry and presented homology with Bos taurus beta-lactoglobulin. In addition, the proteins present in buffalo cheese whey were hydrolyzed with pepsin and with different combinations of trypsin, chymotrypsin and carboxypeptidase-A. When the TNBS method was used the obtained hydrolysates presented DH of 55 and 62% for H1 and H2, respectively. Otherwise for the OPA method the DH was 27 and 43% for H1 and H2, respectively. The total antioxidant activities of the H1 and H2 samples with and without previous enzymatic hydrolysis, determined by DPPH using diphenyl-p-picrylhydrazyl radical, was 4.9 and 12 mM of Trolox equivalents (TE) for H2 and H2Dint, respectively. The increased concentrations for H1 and H2 samples were approximately 99% and 75%, respectively. The in vitro gastrointestinal digestion efficiency for the samples that were first hydrolyzed was higher compared with samples not submitted to previous hydrolysis. After in vitro gastrointestinal digestion, several amino acids were released in higher concentrations, and most of which were essential amino acids. These results suggest that buffalo cheese whey is a better source of bioavailable amino acids than bovine cheese whey. PMID:26465145

  15. Buffalo Cheese Whey Proteins, Identification of a 24 kDa Protein and Characterization of Their Hydrolysates: In Vitro Gastrointestinal Digestion.

    PubMed

    Bassan, Juliana C; Goulart, Antonio J; Nasser, Ana L M; Bezerra, Thaís M S; Garrido, Saulo S; Rustiguel, Cynthia B; Guimarães, Luis H S; Monti, Rubens

    2015-01-01

    Milk whey proteins are well known for their high biological value and versatile functional properties, characteristics that allow its wide use in the food and pharmaceutical industries. In this work, a 24 kDa protein from buffalo cheese whey was analyzed by mass spectrometry and presented homology with Bos taurus beta-lactoglobulin. In addition, the proteins present in buffalo cheese whey were hydrolyzed with pepsin and with different combinations of trypsin, chymotrypsin and carboxypeptidase-A. When the TNBS method was used the obtained hydrolysates presented DH of 55 and 62% for H1 and H2, respectively. Otherwise for the OPA method the DH was 27 and 43% for H1 and H2, respectively. The total antioxidant activities of the H1 and H2 samples with and without previous enzymatic hydrolysis, determined by DPPH using diphenyl-p-picrylhydrazyl radical, was 4.9 and 12 mM of Trolox equivalents (TE) for H2 and H2Dint, respectively. The increased concentrations for H1 and H2 samples were approximately 99% and 75%, respectively. The in vitro gastrointestinal digestion efficiency for the samples that were first hydrolyzed was higher compared with samples not submitted to previous hydrolysis. After in vitro gastrointestinal digestion, several amino acids were released in higher concentrations, and most of which were essential amino acids. These results suggest that buffalo cheese whey is a better source of bioavailable amino acids than bovine cheese whey. PMID:26465145

  16. Comparing serum responses to acute feedings of an extensively hydrolyzed whey protein concentrate versus a native whey protein concentrate in rats: a metabolomics approach.

    PubMed

    Roberts, Michael D; Cruthirds, Clayton L; Lockwood, Christopher M; Pappan, Kirk; Childs, Thomas E; Company, Joseph M; Brown, Jacob D; Toedebusch, Ryan G; Booth, Frank W

    2014-02-01

    We examined how gavage feeding extensively hydrolyzed whey protein (WPH) versus a native whey protein concentrate (WPC) transiently affected serum biochemical profiles in rodents. Male Wistar rats (250-300 g) were 8 h fasted and subsequently fed isonitrogenous amounts of WPH or WPC, or remained unfed (control). Animals were sacrificed 15 min, 30 min, and 60 min post-gavage for serum extraction, and serum was analyzed using untargeted global metabolic profiling via gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (MS) and liquid chromatography/MS/MS platforms. We detected 333 serum metabolites amongst the experimental and control groups. Both WPH and WPC generally increased amino acids (1.2-2.8-fold), branched-chain amino acids (1.2-1.7-fold), and serum di- and oligo-peptides (1.1-2.7-fold) over the 60 min time course compared with control (q < 0.05). However, WPH increased lysine (false discovery rate using a q-value <0.05) and tended to increase isoleucine and valine 15 min post-feeding (q < 0.10) as well as aspartylleucine 30 min post-feeding compared with WPC (q < 0.05). While both protein sources led to a dramatic increase in free fatty acids compared with control (up to 6-fold increases, q < 0.05), WPH also uniquely resulted in a 30 min post-feeding elevation in free fatty acids compared with WPC (q < 0.05), an effect which may be due to the robust 30 min postprandial increase in epinephrine in the WPH cohort. These data provide a unique postprandial time-course perspective on how WPH versus WPC feedings affect circulating biochemicals and will guide future research comparing these 2 protein sources.

  17. Whey protein supplementation increases methionine intake but not homocysteine plasma concentration in rats.

    PubMed

    Deminice, Rafael; Comparotto, Hugo; Jordao, Alceu Afonso

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of whey protein supplementation on homocysteine (Hcy) metabolism and liver oxidative stress in rats. Twenty-four rats were divided into 3 groups (n = 8) to receive one of the following diets for 4 weeks: control diet (C), whey protein-composed diet (WP), and whey protein-supplemented diet (WPS). The C and WP diets consisted of AIN-93 with 20% casein and 20% whey protein as protein source, respectively. WPS was AIN-93 (20% casein) supplemented by the addition of 20% (w/w) whey protein. Four weeks of ingesting a WPS diet resulted in a significantly higher (P < 0.05) total protein and methionine intakes. Although a significant increase (P < 0.05) in the hepatic S-adenosylmethionine and S-adenosylhomocysteine levels occurred in WPS group compared with C and WP, no significant change was observed in plasma Hcy concentration between groups. Furthermore, the levels of lipid hydroperoxides and advanced oxidation protein products, known liver oxidative stress markers, were increased in the WPS group compared with the C group. In addition, no change in glutathione liver concentration was observed in any of the groups studied. In conclusion, whey protein supplementation increases methionine intake substantially; however, it does not change plasma Hcy concentrations. On the other hand, increased hepatic oxidative stress markers were observed in whey protein supplemented rats were probably due to high protein intake.

  18. Functional Biomaterials: Solution Electrospinning and Gelation of Whey Protein and Pullulan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sullivan, Stephanie Tolstedt

    Utilizing biomaterials that are biodegradable, biocompatible and edible serve well for food products as well as biomedical applications. Biomaterials whey protein and pullulan both have these characteristics. Whey proteins (WP) have been used in food products for many years and more recently in pharmaceutical products. They have the ability to form both gels and stable foams. Pullulan (PULL) has also been used in both food and pharmaceutical products, and is a highly water soluble, non-gelling polysaccharide and has been used primarily as a film former. Herein, we investigate the ability of whey protein and pullulan to form nanofibers and gels. Combining their distinct properties allows the ability to uniquely manipulate nanofiber and gel characteristics and behavior for a variety of applications, from food to even tissue scaffolding. First, we determined the electrospinnability of aqueous whey protein solutions. Both whey protein isolate (WPI) and one of its major components beta--lactoglobulin (BLG), either in native or denatured form, yielded interesting micro and nanostructures when electrosprayed; while nanofiber production required blending with a spinnable polymer, poly(ethylene oxide) (PEO). WP:PEO solutions were also successfully electrospun at acidic pH (2≤pH≤3), which could improve shelf life. Fourier Transform Infrared Reflectance (FTIR) analysis of WP:PEO fiber mat indicated some variation in WP secondary structure with varying WPI concentration (as WPI increased, % alpha-helix increased and beta-turn decreased) and pH (as pH decreased from neutral (7.5) to acidic (2), % beta-sheet decreased and alpha-helix increased). X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS) also confirmed the presence of WP on the surface of the blend fibers, augmenting the FTIR analysis. Interestingly, WP:PEO composite nanofibers maintained its fibrous morphology at temperatures as high as 100 °C, above the 60 °C PEO melting point. Further, we show that the blend mats retained a

  19. Phenylalanine flux and gastric emptying are not affected by replacement of casein with whey protein in the diet of adult cats consuming frequent small meals

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Decreasing the rate of protein emptying from the stomach may improve efficiency of utilization of dietary amino acids for protein deposition. Some studies in rats and humans have shown casein to be more slowly released from the stomach than whey protein. To test if casein induces a slower rate of gastric emptying in cats than whey protein, L-[1-13C]phenylalanine (Phe) was dosed orally into 9 adult cats to estimate gastric emptying and whole-body Phe flux. Results Concentrations of indispensable amino acids in plasma were not significantly affected by dietary protein source. First-pass splanchnic extraction of Phe was not different between diets and averaged 50% (SEM = 3.8%). The half-time for gastric emptying averaged 9.9 min with casein and 10.3 min with whey protein, and was not significantly different between diets (SEM = 1.7 min). Phenylalanine fluxes were 45.3 and 46.5 μmol/(min · kg) for casein- and whey-based diets, respectively (SEM = 4.7 μmol/(min · kg)). Conclusions In adult cats fed frequent small meals, the replacement of casein with whey protein in the diet does not affect supply or utilization of amino acids. These two milk proteins appear to be equally capable of meeting the dietary amino acid needs of cats. PMID:25266643

  20. Sensory properties of meal replacement bars and beverages made from whey and soy proteins.

    PubMed

    Childs, J L; Yates, M D; Drake, M A

    2007-08-01

    Whey and soy proteins have a variety of applications. Previous work has documented flavors of rehydrated whey and soy proteins. It is necessary to understand what flavors whey and soy proteins contribute to product applications to optimize protein performance in desired applications. This research was conducted to characterize sensory properties of meal replacement products containing whey and soy proteins. Flavor and texture lexicons were developed for meal replacement bars and beverages. Commercial peanut butter-flavored meal replacement bars and vanilla meal replacement shakes were evaluated by an experienced, trained descriptive panel (n= 9). Prototypes of bars and beverages were developed with 3 levels of whey and soy protein and subsequently evaluated. Consumer acceptance testing (n= 85) was conducted on the prototype bars and beverages. Protein type as well as product-specific formulation contributed differences in flavor and texture of commercial bars and beverages (P < 0.05). Sensory properties of prototype bars and beverages fell within the spectrum of commercial products. Prototype bars made with whey protein were characterized by sweet aromatic and vanillin flavor notes while the texture was characterized by adhesiveness and cohesiveness. Prototype bars made with soy protein were characterized by nutty flavor while the texture was characterized by tooth-pack and denseness. Whey protein contributed to sweet aromatic and vanillin flavors in prototype beverages while soy protein contributed cereal/grainy flavors. Consumer acceptance scores were higher for prototype bars and beverages containing whey protein or a mixture of whey/soy protein than for products made with soy protein alone (P < 0.05). These results will aid researchers and product developers in optimizing sensory quality in meal replacement products. PMID:17995701

  1. Sensory properties of meal replacement bars and beverages made from whey and soy proteins.

    PubMed

    Childs, J L; Yates, M D; Drake, M A

    2007-08-01

    Whey and soy proteins have a variety of applications. Previous work has documented flavors of rehydrated whey and soy proteins. It is necessary to understand what flavors whey and soy proteins contribute to product applications to optimize protein performance in desired applications. This research was conducted to characterize sensory properties of meal replacement products containing whey and soy proteins. Flavor and texture lexicons were developed for meal replacement bars and beverages. Commercial peanut butter-flavored meal replacement bars and vanilla meal replacement shakes were evaluated by an experienced, trained descriptive panel (n= 9). Prototypes of bars and beverages were developed with 3 levels of whey and soy protein and subsequently evaluated. Consumer acceptance testing (n= 85) was conducted on the prototype bars and beverages. Protein type as well as product-specific formulation contributed differences in flavor and texture of commercial bars and beverages (P < 0.05). Sensory properties of prototype bars and beverages fell within the spectrum of commercial products. Prototype bars made with whey protein were characterized by sweet aromatic and vanillin flavor notes while the texture was characterized by adhesiveness and cohesiveness. Prototype bars made with soy protein were characterized by nutty flavor while the texture was characterized by tooth-pack and denseness. Whey protein contributed to sweet aromatic and vanillin flavors in prototype beverages while soy protein contributed cereal/grainy flavors. Consumer acceptance scores were higher for prototype bars and beverages containing whey protein or a mixture of whey/soy protein than for products made with soy protein alone (P < 0.05). These results will aid researchers and product developers in optimizing sensory quality in meal replacement products.

  2. Oral supplementation with whey proteins increases plasma glutathione levels of HIV-infected patients.

    PubMed

    Micke, P; Beeh, K M; Schlaak, J F; Buhl, R

    2001-02-01

    HIV infection is characterized by an enhanced oxidant burden and a systemic deficiency of the tripeptide glutathione (GSH), a major antioxidant. The semi-essential amino acid cysteine is the main source of the free sulfhydryl group of GSH and limits its synthesis. Therefore, different strategies to supplement cysteine supply have been suggested to increase glutathione levels in HIV-infected individuals. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of oral supplementation with two different cysteine-rich whey protein formulas on plasma GSH levels and parameters of oxidative stress and immune status in HIV-infected patients. In a prospective double blind clinical trial, 30 patients (25 male, 5 female; mean age (+/- SD) 42 +/- 9.8 years) with stable HIV infection (221 +/- 102 CD4 + lymphocytes L-1) were randomized to a supplemental diet with a daily dose of 45 g whey proteins of either Protectamin (Fresenius Kabi, Bad Hamburg, Germany) or Immunocal (Immunotec, Vandreuil, Canada) for two weeks. Plasma concentrations of total, reduced and oxidized GSH, superoxide anion (O2-) release by blood mononuclear cells, plasma levels of TNF-alpha and interleukins 2 and 12 were quantified with standard methods at baseline and after therapy. Pre-therapy, plasma GSH levels (Protectamin: 1.92 +/- 0.6 microM; Immunocal: 1.98 +/- 0.9 microM) were less than normal (2.64 +/- 0.7 microM, P = 0.03). Following two weeks of oral supplementation with whey proteins, plasma GSH levels increased in the Protectamin group by 44 +/- 56% (2.79 +/- 1.2 microM, P = 0.004) while the difference in the Immunocal group did not reach significance (+ 24.5 +/- 59%, 2.51 +/- 1.48 microM, P = 0.43). Spontaneous O2- release by blood mononuclear cells was stable (20.1 +/- 14.2 vs. 22.6 +/- 16.1 nmol h-1 10-6 cells, P = 0.52) whereas PMA-induced O2- release decreased in the Protectamin group (53.7 +/- 19 vs. 39.8 +/- 18 nmol h-1 10-6 cells, P = 0.04). Plasma concentrations of TNF-alpha and interleukins 2 and

  3. Investigation of the protective effect of whey proteins on lactococcal phages during heat treatment at various pH.

    PubMed

    Geagea, Hany; Gomaa, Ahmed I; Remondetto, Gabriel; Moineau, Sylvain; Subirade, Muriel

    2015-10-01

    The incorporation of whey protein concentrates (WPC) into cheese is a risky process due to the potential contamination with thermo-resistant phages of lactic acid bacteria (LAB). Furthermore, whey proteins can protect phages during heat treatment, thereby increasing the above risk. The main objective of this work was to understand this protective effect in order to better control LAB phages and maximize whey recycling in the cheese industry. First, the inactivation of a previously characterized thermo-resistant lactococcal virulent phage (P1532) was investigated at 95 °C in WPC, in individual whey components β-lactoglobulin, α-lactalbumin, and bovine serum albumin as well as under different heat and pH conditions. The structural changes of the tested proteins were also monitored by transmission FTIR spectroscopy. Phage inactivation results indicated that the protective effect of whey proteins was pH and time dependent at 95 °C and was not restricted to one component. FTIR spectra suggest that the protection is related to protein molecular structures and to the level of protein aggregates, which was more pronounced in acidic conditions. Moreover, the molecular structure of the three proteins tested was differently influenced by pH and the duration of the heat treatment. This work confirms the protective effect of WPC on phages during heat treatment and offers the first hint to explain such phenomenon. Finding the appropriate treatment of WPC to reduce the phage risk is one of the keys to improving the cheese manufacturing process. PMID:26093988

  4. Composition and structure of whey protein/gum arabic coacervates.

    PubMed

    Weinbreck, F; Tromp, R H; de Kruif, C G

    2004-01-01

    Complex coacervation in whey protein/gum arabic (WP/GA) mixtures was studied as a function of three main key parameters: pH, initial protein to polysaccharide mixing ratio (Pr:Ps)(ini), and ionic strength. Previous studies had already revealed under which conditions a coacervate phase was obtained. This study is aimed at understanding how these parameters influence the phase separation kinetics, the coacervate composition, and the internal coacervate structure. At a defined (Pr:Ps)(ini), an optimum pH of complex coacervation was found (pH(opt)), at which the strength of electrostatic interaction was maximum. For (Pr:Ps)(ini) = 2:1, the phase separation occurred the fastest and the final coacervate volume was the largest at pH(opt) = 4.0. The composition of the coacervate phase was determined after 48 h of phase separation and revealed that, at pH(opt), the coacervate phase was the most concentrated. Varying the (Pr:Ps)(ini) shifted the pH(opt) to higher values when (Pr:Ps)(ini) was increased and to lower values when (Pr:Ps)(ini) was decreased. This phenomenon was due to the level of charge compensation of the WP/GA complexes. Finally, the structure of the coacervate phase was studied with small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS). SAXS data confirmed that at pH(opt) the coacervate phase was dense and structured. Model calculations revealed that the structure factor of WP induced a peak at Q = 0.7 nm(-1), illustrating that the coacervate phase was more structured, inducing the stronger correlation length of WP molecules. When the pH was changed to more acidic values, the correlation peak faded away, due to a more open structure of the coacervate. A shoulder in the scattering pattern of the coacervates was visible at small Q. This peak was attributed to the presence of residual charges on the GA. The peak intensity was reduced when the strength of interaction was increased, highlighting a greater charge compensation of the polyelectrolyte. Finally, increasing the ionic

  5. Pasting and extrusion properties of mixed carbohydrates and whey protein isolate matrices

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Mixed systems of whey protein isolate (WPI) or texturized WPI (tWPI) and different starches may form weak or strong gel pastes or rigid matrices depending on interactions. The paste viscoelasticity of starches from amioca, barley, corn starch, Hylon VII, plantain, and pea starch, mixed with whey pro...

  6. Effect of whey protein isolate on rehydration after exercise.

    PubMed

    James, Lewis J; Mattin, Lewis; Aldiss, Peter; Adebishi, Rukayat; Hobson, Ruth M

    2014-05-01

    Studies have examined adding protein to carbohydrate-electrolyte rehydration drinks, but the effects of protein in isolation remain unknown. Ten subjects completed two trials in which they were dehydrated (~2 % of pre-exercise body mass) by intermittent cycling in the heat. Subjects then rehydrated (150 % total mass loss) over 1 h with mineral water (W) or mineral water plus 20 g L(-1) whey protein isolate (WP) and remained in the laboratory for a further 4 h. Blood and urine samples were provided pre-exercise, post-exercise, post-rehydration and every hour thereafter. From blood samples, serum osmolality, change in plasma volume and plasma albumin content was determined, whilst the volume and osmolality of urine samples were determined. There was no difference between trials for total urine volume [W: 1,234 (358) mL; WP: 1,306 (268) mL; P = 0.409], drink retention [W: 40 (14) %; WP: 37 (14) %; P = 0.322] or net fluid balance [W: -605 (318) mL; WP: -660 (274) mL; P = 0.792] 4-h post-rehydration. Plasma volume was greater 3 and 4 h post-drinking during WP, and plasma albumin content relative to pre-exercise was increased 1-4 h post-drinking in WP only. These results suggest that addition of 20 g L(-1) whey protein isolate neither enhances nor inhibits post-exercise rehydration, when a volume equivalent to 150 % of sweat losses is ingested in 1 h. As post-exercise nutritional requirements are multifactorial (rehydration, glycogen resynthesis, myofibrillar/mitochondrial protein synthesis), these data demonstrate that when post-exercise protein intake might benefit recovery or adaptation, this can be achieved without compromising rehydration.

  7. Effect of whey protein and glycomacropeptide on measures of satiety in normal-weight adult women.

    PubMed

    Chungchunlam, Sylvia M S; Henare, Sharon J; Ganesh, Siva; Moughan, Paul J

    2014-07-01

    Protein is the most satiating macronutrient and dairy whey protein is thought to be more satiating than other protein sources. The purported satiating effect of whey protein may be attributable to the presence of glycomacropeptide (GMP). The objective of this study was to investigate the role of GMP in the satiating effect of whey protein. Isoenergetic (~1600 kJ) preload drinks contained GMP isolate (86% GMP, "GMP"), whey protein isolate (WPI) with 21% naturally occurring GMP, WPI with 2% naturally present GMP, or maltodextrin carbohydrate ("carbohydrate"). Satiety was assessed in 22 normal-weight adult women by determining the consumption of a test meal provided ad libitum 120 min following ingestion of a preload drink, and also by using visual analogue scales (VAS) for rating feelings of hunger, desire to eat, prospective consumption and fullness (appetite). The ad libitum test meal intake was significantly different between the preload drinks (p = 0.0003), with food intake following ingestion of both WPI preload drinks (regardless of the amount of GMP) being ~18% lower compared with the beverages enriched with carbohydrate or GMP alone. There were no significant differences (p > 0.05) in the VAS-rated feelings of appetite among the four preload drinks. GMP alone did not reduce subsequent food intake compared with a drink enriched with carbohydrate, but whey protein had a greater satiating effect than carbohydrate. The presence of GMP in whey does not appear to be the cause of the observed effect of whey protein on satiety.

  8. Effect of whey protein and glycomacropeptide on measures of satiety in normal-weight adult women.

    PubMed

    Chungchunlam, Sylvia M S; Henare, Sharon J; Ganesh, Siva; Moughan, Paul J

    2014-07-01

    Protein is the most satiating macronutrient and dairy whey protein is thought to be more satiating than other protein sources. The purported satiating effect of whey protein may be attributable to the presence of glycomacropeptide (GMP). The objective of this study was to investigate the role of GMP in the satiating effect of whey protein. Isoenergetic (~1600 kJ) preload drinks contained GMP isolate (86% GMP, "GMP"), whey protein isolate (WPI) with 21% naturally occurring GMP, WPI with 2% naturally present GMP, or maltodextrin carbohydrate ("carbohydrate"). Satiety was assessed in 22 normal-weight adult women by determining the consumption of a test meal provided ad libitum 120 min following ingestion of a preload drink, and also by using visual analogue scales (VAS) for rating feelings of hunger, desire to eat, prospective consumption and fullness (appetite). The ad libitum test meal intake was significantly different between the preload drinks (p = 0.0003), with food intake following ingestion of both WPI preload drinks (regardless of the amount of GMP) being ~18% lower compared with the beverages enriched with carbohydrate or GMP alone. There were no significant differences (p > 0.05) in the VAS-rated feelings of appetite among the four preload drinks. GMP alone did not reduce subsequent food intake compared with a drink enriched with carbohydrate, but whey protein had a greater satiating effect than carbohydrate. The presence of GMP in whey does not appear to be the cause of the observed effect of whey protein on satiety. PMID:24698990

  9. Succinic Acid Production from Cheese Whey using Actinobacillus succinogenes 130 Z

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wan, Caixia; Li, Yebo; Shahbazi, Abolghasem; Xiu, Shuangning

    Actinobacillus succinogenes 130 Z was used to produce succinic acid from cheese whey in this study. At the presence of external CO2 supply, the effects of initial cheese whey concentration, pH, and inoculum size on the succinic acid production were studied. The by-product formation during the fermentation process was also analyzed. The highest succinic acid yield of 0.57 was obtained at initial cheese whey concentration of 50 g/L, while the highest succinic acid productivity of 0.58 g h-1 L-1 was obtained at initial cheese whey concentration of 100 g/L. Increase in pH and inoculum size caused higher succinic acid yield and productivity. At the preferred fermentation condition of pH 6.8, inoculum size of 5% and initial cheese whey concentration of 50 g/L, succinic acid yield of 0.57, and productivity of 0.44 g h-1 L-1 were obtained. Acetic acid and formic acid were the main by-products throughout the fermentation run of 48 h. It is feasible to produce succinic acid using lactose from cheese whey as carbon resource by A. succinogenes 130 Z.

  10. Fermentation of lactose in direct-acid-set cottage cheese whey

    SciTech Connect

    Demott, B.J.; Draughon, F.A.; Herald, P.J.

    1981-01-01

    Kluyveromyces fragilis was more suitable than Candida pseudotropicalis or K. lactis for production of EtOH from whey. Direct-acid-set cottage cheese whey and the supernatant fluid resulting from heat treatment of the whey at 95 degrees for 20 min showed similar rates of fermentation when inoculated with K. fragilis. Inoculation rates of 10, 12 and 14 mL of active K. fragilis culture/100 mL of media were not different in rate of EtOH production. Samples incubated with K. fragilis at 35, 37, 40 and 42 degrees showed more rapid reduction in specific gravity than samples incubated at room temperature or 30 degrees. Lactose conversion in whey was 83% complete and in whey supernatant fluid, 77%.

  11. Casein protein results in higher prandial and exercise induced whole body protein anabolism than whey protein in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Engelen, Mariëlle P K J; Rutten, Erica P A; De Castro, Carmen L N; Wouters, Emiel F M; Schols, Annemie M W J; Deutz, Nicolaas E P

    2012-09-01

    Exercise is known to improve physical functioning and health status in Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD). Recently, disturbances in protein turnover and amino acid kinetics have been observed after exercise in COPD. The objective was to investigate which dairy protein is able to positively influence the protein metabolic response to exercise in COPD. 8 COPD patients and 8 healthy subjects performed a cycle test on two days while ingesting casein or whey protein. Whole body protein breakdown (WbPB), synthesis (WbPS), splanchnic amino acid extraction (SPE), and NetWbPS (=WbPS-WbPB) were measured using stable isotope methodology during 20 min of exercise (at 50% peak work load of COPD group). The controls performed a second exercise test at the same relative workload. Exercise was followed by 1 h of recovery. In the healthy group, WbPS, SPE, and NetPS were higher during casein than during whey feeding (P<.01). WbPS and NetPS were higher during exercise, independent of exercise intensity (P<.01). NetPS was higher during casein feeding in COPD due to lower WbPB (P<.05). Higher SPE was found during exercise during casein and whey feeding in COPD (P<.05). Lactate levels during exercise were higher in COPD (P<.05) independent of the protein. Post-exercise, lower NetPS values were found independent of protein type in both groups. Casein resulted in more protein anabolism than whey protein which was maintained during and following exercise in COPD. Optimizing protein intake might be of importance for muscle maintenance during daily physical activities in COPD.

  12. Bioconversion of Cheese Waste (Whey)

    SciTech Connect

    Bohnert, G.W.

    1998-03-11

    The US dairy industry produces 67 billion pounds of cheese whey annually. A waste by-product of cheese production, whey consists of water, milk sugar (lactose), casein (protein), and salts amounting to about 7% total solids. Ultrafiltration is used to concentrate cheese whey into a protein-rich foodstuff; however, it too produces a waste stream, known as ''whey permeate,'' (rejected water, lactose, and salts from the membrane). Whey permeate contains about 4.5% lactose and requires treatment to reduce the high BOD (biological oxygen demand) before disposal. Ab Initio, a small business with strong chemistry and dairy processing background, desired help in developing methods for bioconversion of whey permeate lactose into lactic acid. Lactic acid is an organic acid primarily used as an acidulant in the food industry. More recently it has been used to produce polylactic acid, a biodegradable polymer and as a new method to treat meat carcasses to combat E. coli bacteria. Conversion of whey permeate to lactic acid is environmentally sound because it produces a valued product from an otherwise waste stream. FM&T has expertise in bioconversion processes and analytical techniques necessary to characterize biomass functions. The necessary engineering and analytical services for pilot biomass monitoring, process development, and purification of crude lactic acid were available at this facility.

  13. [The Interaction of Oil Microcapsule Wall Materials between Whey Protein and Acacia].

    PubMed

    Shi, Yan; Li, Ru-yi; Wang, Hui; Li, Qian; Li, De-jun; Tu, Zong-cai

    2015-03-01

    The interaction between whey protein and acacia which were used as wall material was studied on the formation of the oils microcapsules by the FTIR Spectroscopy and Computer Aided Analysis. The results indicated that whey protein changed obviously in amide A and amide I by high pressured homogenization and spray-drying. The amide A moved from 3 406.5 cm(-1) to 3 425.4 cm(-1) which was possibly due to covalent cross-linking between whey protein and acacia. Furthermore the amide I moved from 1 648.6 cm(-1) to 1 654.7 cm(-1) for intramolecular hydrogen bonding of protein had been weaken. After Gaussian fitting on amide I , it was found that the content of secondary structure of α-helix content and β-folding in whey protein reduced from 19.55% to 17.50% and from 30.59% to 25.63%, respectively. This suggests that protein intramolecular hydrogen bonding force was abated, resulting in abating the rigid structure of the protein molecules and enhancing of the toughness structure. The protein molecules showed some flexibility. The result of SDS-PAGE electrophoresis showed that whey protein--gum Arabic complexes produced covalent products in larger molecular weight. During the spray-drying process, covalent cross-linking produced between whey protein and gum Arabic which improved emulsifying activity of the complex whey protein and gum Arabic produced covalent cross-linking and improved the complex emulsifying activity. Observing the surface structure of the fish oil microcapsule by SEM, the compound of whey protein and acacia as wall material was proved better toughness, less micropore, and more compact structure.

  14. [The Interaction of Oil Microcapsule Wall Materials between Whey Protein and Acacia].

    PubMed

    Shi, Yan; Li, Ru-yi; Wang, Hui; Li, Qian; Li, De-jun; Tu, Zong-cai

    2015-03-01

    The interaction between whey protein and acacia which were used as wall material was studied on the formation of the oils microcapsules by the FTIR Spectroscopy and Computer Aided Analysis. The results indicated that whey protein changed obviously in amide A and amide I by high pressured homogenization and spray-drying. The amide A moved from 3 406.5 cm(-1) to 3 425.4 cm(-1) which was possibly due to covalent cross-linking between whey protein and acacia. Furthermore the amide I moved from 1 648.6 cm(-1) to 1 654.7 cm(-1) for intramolecular hydrogen bonding of protein had been weaken. After Gaussian fitting on amide I , it was found that the content of secondary structure of α-helix content and β-folding in whey protein reduced from 19.55% to 17.50% and from 30.59% to 25.63%, respectively. This suggests that protein intramolecular hydrogen bonding force was abated, resulting in abating the rigid structure of the protein molecules and enhancing of the toughness structure. The protein molecules showed some flexibility. The result of SDS-PAGE electrophoresis showed that whey protein--gum Arabic complexes produced covalent products in larger molecular weight. During the spray-drying process, covalent cross-linking produced between whey protein and gum Arabic which improved emulsifying activity of the complex whey protein and gum Arabic produced covalent cross-linking and improved the complex emulsifying activity. Observing the surface structure of the fish oil microcapsule by SEM, the compound of whey protein and acacia as wall material was proved better toughness, less micropore, and more compact structure. PMID:26117866

  15. Using state diagrams for predicting colloidal stability of whey protein beverages.

    PubMed

    Wagoner, Ty B; Ward, Loren; Foegeding, E Allen

    2015-05-01

    A method for evaluating aspects of colloidal stability of whey protein beverages after thermal treatment was established. Three state diagrams for beverages (pH 3-7) were developed representing protein solubility, turbidity, and macroscopic state after two ultrahigh-temperature (UHT) treatments. Key transitions of stability in the state diagrams were explored using electrophoresis and chromatography to determine aggregation propensities of β-lactoglobulin, α-lactalbumin, bovine serum albumin, and glycomacropeptide. The state diagrams present an overlapping view of high colloidal stability at pH 3 accompanied by high solubility of individual whey proteins. At pH 5, beverages were characterized by poor solubility, high turbidity, and aggregation/gelation of whey proteins with the exception of glycomacropeptide. Stability increased at pH 6, due to increased solubility of α-lactalbumin. The results indicate that combinations of state diagrams can be used to identify key regions of stability for whey protein containing beverages.

  16. Yeasts that utilize lactose in sweet whey

    SciTech Connect

    Gholson, J.H.; Gough, R.H.

    1980-01-01

    Since processing costs are usually higher for whey than for other available food or feed nutrients, only about one-third of whey produced in the US is used by food and feed industries. As a result whey disposal costs are a problem. Further; when whey is disposed of through municipal sewerage systems, the lactose present is changed by bacteria to lactic acid which tends to act as a preservative and retards further oxidation of whey constituents. This article describes a method of utilizing lactose-fermenting yeasts to produce large quantities of yeast cells, single-cell protein. Kluveromyces fragilis was found to be the most effective yeast species and the yeast cells produced could be used as a natural food or feed additive. Results of this study determined that certain methods and yeast strains could reduce whey-related pollution and thus help reduce costs of whey disposal.

  17. Niosome-loaded cold-set whey protein hydrogels.

    PubMed

    Abaee, Arash; Madadlou, Ashkan

    2016-04-01

    The α-tocopherol-carrying niosomes with mean diameter of 5.7 μm were fabricated and charged into a transglutaminase-cross-linked whey protein solution that was subsequently gelled with glucono delta-lactone. Encapsulation efficiency of α-tocopherol within niosomes was ≈80% and encapsulation did not influence the radical scavenging activity of α-tocopherol. Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy suggested formation of ε-(γ-glutamyl) lysine cross-linkages by transglutaminase and that enzymatic cross-linking increased proteins hydrophobicity. FTIR also proposed hydrogen bonding between niosomes and proteins. Dynamic rheometry indicated that transglutaminase cross-linking and niosomes charging of the protein solution enhanced the gelation process. However, charging the cross-linked protein solution with niosomal suspension resulted in lower elastic modulus (G') of the subsequently formed gel compared with both non-cross-linked niosome-loaded and cross-linked niosome-free counterparts. Electron microscopy indicated a discontinuous network for the niosome-loaded cross-linked sample. Niosome loading into the protein gel matrix increased its swelling extent in the enzyme-free simulated gastric fluid.

  18. The Reasearch on the Anti-Fatigue Effect of Whey Protein Powder in Basketball Training

    PubMed Central

    Ronghui, Sun

    2015-01-01

    In order to observe the effects of whey protein powder on hematological indexes of players majoring in physical education in the basketball training, the authors divided the players randomly into a control group and a nutrition group. Athletes complete the 30 minutes quantitative exercise using cycle ergometer respectively before the trial and after one month trial. Then we exsanguinated immediately after exercise, extracted heparin and measured hemoglobin, red blood cell count, hematocrit and mean corpuscular volume and other hematological indices. The results showed that after taking whey protein powder, the HB, RBC, HCT of nutrition group was significantly higher that the control group. This suggests that in high-intensity training, taking whey protein powder can cause changes of HB, RBC and HCT in human body, meanwhile MCV essentially the same. So whey protein powder can improve exercise capacity, and has anti-fatigue effect. PMID:26998184

  19. The Reasearch on the Anti-Fatigue Effect of Whey Protein Powder in Basketball Training.

    PubMed

    Ronghui, Sun

    2015-01-01

    In order to observe the effects of whey protein powder on hematological indexes of players majoring in physical education in the basketball training, the authors divided the players randomly into a control group and a nutrition group. Athletes complete the 30 minutes quantitative exercise using cycle ergometer respectively before the trial and after one month trial. Then we exsanguinated immediately after exercise, extracted heparin and measured hemoglobin, red blood cell count, hematocrit and mean corpuscular volume and other hematological indices. The results showed that after taking whey protein powder, the HB, RBC, HCT of nutrition group was significantly higher that the control group. This suggests that in high-intensity training, taking whey protein powder can cause changes of HB, RBC and HCT in human body, meanwhile MCV essentially the same. So whey protein powder can improve exercise capacity, and has anti-fatigue effect.

  20. Impacts of pH-mediated EPS structure on probiotic bacterial pili-whey proteins interactions.

    PubMed

    Burgain, Jennifer; Scher, Joel; Lebeer, Sarah; Vanderleyden, Jos; Corgneau, Magda; Guerin, Justine; Caillet, Céline; Duval, Jérôme F L; Francius, Gregory; Gaiani, Claire

    2015-10-01

    Probiotic bacteria are routinely incorporated into dairy foods because of the health benefits they can provide when consumed. In this work, the marked pH-dependence of the pili/EPS organization at the outer surface of Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG is characterized in detail by Single Cell Force Microscopy and cell electrophoretic mobility measurements analyzed according to formalisms for nanomechanical contact and soft particle electrokinetics, respectively. At pH 6.8, LGG pili are easily accessible by AFM tips functionalized with whey proteins for specific binding, while at pH 4.8 the collapsed EPS surface layer significantly immobilized the LGG pili. This resulted in their reduced accessibility to the specific whey-coated AFM tip, and to stronger whey protein-pili rupture forces. Thus, pili interactions with whey proteins are screened to an extent that depends on the pH-mediated embedment of the pili within the EPS layer. PMID:26209966

  1. Impacts of pH-mediated EPS structure on probiotic bacterial pili-whey proteins interactions.

    PubMed

    Burgain, Jennifer; Scher, Joel; Lebeer, Sarah; Vanderleyden, Jos; Corgneau, Magda; Guerin, Justine; Caillet, Céline; Duval, Jérôme F L; Francius, Gregory; Gaiani, Claire

    2015-10-01

    Probiotic bacteria are routinely incorporated into dairy foods because of the health benefits they can provide when consumed. In this work, the marked pH-dependence of the pili/EPS organization at the outer surface of Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG is characterized in detail by Single Cell Force Microscopy and cell electrophoretic mobility measurements analyzed according to formalisms for nanomechanical contact and soft particle electrokinetics, respectively. At pH 6.8, LGG pili are easily accessible by AFM tips functionalized with whey proteins for specific binding, while at pH 4.8 the collapsed EPS surface layer significantly immobilized the LGG pili. This resulted in their reduced accessibility to the specific whey-coated AFM tip, and to stronger whey protein-pili rupture forces. Thus, pili interactions with whey proteins are screened to an extent that depends on the pH-mediated embedment of the pili within the EPS layer.

  2. In vitro bioactive properties of intact and enzymatically hydrolysed whey protein: targeting the enteroinsular axis.

    PubMed

    Power-Grant, O; Bruen, C; Brennan, L; Giblin, L; Jakeman, P; FitzGerald, R J

    2015-03-01

    Enzymatically hydrolysed milk proteins have a variety of biofunctional effects some of which may be beneficial in the management of type 2 diabetes mellitus. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of commercially available intact and hydrolysed whey protein ingredients (DH 32, DH 45) on markers of the enteroinsular axis (glucagon like peptide-1 secretion, dipeptidyl peptidase IV inhibition, insulin secretion and antioxidant activity) before and after simulated gastrointestinal digestion (SGID). A whey protein hydrolysate, DH32, significantly enhanced (P < 0.05) insulin secretion from BRIN BD11 β-cells compared to the positive control (16.7 mM glucose and 10 mM Ala). The whey protein hydrolysates inhibited dipeptidyl peptidase IV activity, yielding half maximal inhibitory concentration values (IC50) of 1.5 ± 0.1 and 1.1 ± 0.1 mg mL(-1) for the DH 32 and DH 45, samples respectively, and were significantly more potent than the intact whey (P < 0.05). Enzymatic hydrolysis of whey protein significantly enhanced (P < 0.05) its antioxidant activity compared to intact whey, as measured by the oxygen radical absorbance capacity assay (ORAC). This antioxidant activity was maintained (DH 32, P > 0.05) or enhanced (DH 45, P < 0.05) following SGID. Intact whey stimulated GLP-1 secretion from enteroendocrine cells compared to vehicle control (P < 0.05). This data confirm that whey proteins and peptides can act through multiple targets within the enteroinsular axis and as such may have glucoregulatory potential.

  3. Quantification of whey proteins by reversed phase-HPLC and effectiveness of mid-infrared spectroscopy for their rapid prediction in sweet whey.

    PubMed

    Sturaro, Alba; De Marchi, Massimo; Masi, Antonio; Cassandro, Martino

    2016-01-01

    In the dairy industry, membrane filtration is used to reduce the amount of whey waste and, simultaneously, to recover whey proteins (WP). The composition of WP can strongly affect the filtration treatment of whey, and rapid determination of WP fractions would be of interest for dairy producers to monitor WP recovery. This study aimed to develop mid-infrared spectroscopy (MIRS) prediction models for the rapid quantification of protein in sweet whey, using a validated rapid reversed phase (RP)-HPLC as a reference method. Quantified WP included α-lactalbumin (α-LA), β-lactoglobulin (β-LG) A and B, bovine serum albumin, caseinomacropeptides, and proteose peptone. Validation of RP-HPLC was performed by calculating the relative standard deviation (RSD) in repeatability and reproducibility tests for WP retention time and peak areas. Samples of liquid whey (n=187) were analyzed by RP-HPLC and scanned through MIRS to collect spectral information (900 to 4,000 cm(-1)); statistical analysis was carried out through partial least squares regression and random cross-validation procedure. Retention times in RP-HPLC method were stable (RSD between 0.03 and 0.80%), whereas the RSD of peak area (from 0.25 to 8.48%) was affected by WP relative abundance. Higher coefficients of determination in validation for MIRS model were obtained for protein fractions present in whey in large amounts, such as β-LG (0.58), total identified WP (0.58), and α-LA (0.56). Results of this study suggest that MIRS is an easy method for rapid quantification of detail protein in sweet whey, even if better resolution was achieved with the method based on RP-HPLC. The prediction of WP in sweet whey by MIRS might be used for screening and for classifying sweet whey according to its total and individual WP contents.

  4. Comparison of the aggregation behavior of soy and bovine whey protein hydrolysates.

    PubMed

    Kuipers, Bas J H; Alting, Arno C; Gruppen, Harry

    2007-01-01

    Soy-derived proteins (soy protein isolate, glycinin, and beta-conglycinin) and bovine whey-derived proteins (whey protein isolate, alpha-lactalbumin, beta-lactoglobulin) were hydrolyzed using subtilisin Carlsberg, chymotrypsin, trypsin, bromelain, and papain. The (in)solubility of the hydrolysates obtained was studied as a function of pH. At neutral pH, all soy-derived protein hydrolysates, particularly those from glycinin, obtained by hydrolysis with subtilisin Carlsberg, chymotrypsin, bromelain, and papain showed a stronger aggregation compared to the non-hydrolyzed ones. This increase in aggregation was not observed upon hydrolysis by trypsin. None of the whey-derived protein hydrolysates exhibited an increase in aggregation at neutral pH. The high abundance of theoretical cleavage sites in the hydrophobic regions of glycinin probably explains the stronger exposure of hydrophobic groups than for the other proteins, which is suggested to be the driving force in the aggregate formation.

  5. Fractionation of Whey Protein Isolate with Supercritical Carbon Dioxide—Process Modeling and Cost Estimation

    PubMed Central

    Yver, Alexandra L.; Bonnaillie, Laetitia M.; Yee, Winnie; McAloon, Andrew; Tomasula, Peggy M.

    2012-01-01

    An economical and environmentally friendly whey protein fractionation process was developed using supercritical carbon dioxide (sCO2) as an acid to produce enriched fractions of α-lactalbumin (α-LA) and β-lactoglobulin (β-LG) from a commercial whey protein isolate (WPI) containing 20% α-LA and 55% β-LG, through selective precipitation of α-LA. Pilot-scale experiments were performed around the optimal parameter range (T = 60 to 65 °C, P = 8 to 31 MPa, C = 5 to 15% (w/w) WPI) to quantify the recovery rates of the individual proteins and the compositions of both fractions as a function of processing conditions. Mass balances were calculated in a process flow-sheet to design a large-scale, semi-continuous process model using SuperproDesigner® software. Total startup and production costs were estimated as a function of processing parameters, product yield and purity. Temperature, T, pressure, P, and concentration, C, showed conflicting effects on equipment costs and the individual precipitation rates of the two proteins, affecting the quantity, quality, and production cost of the fractions considerably. The highest α-LA purity, 61%, with 80% α-LA recovery in the solid fraction, was obtained at T = 60 °C, C = 5% WPI, P = 8.3 MPa, with a production cost of $8.65 per kilogram of WPI treated. The most profitable conditions resulted in 57%-pure α-LA, with 71% α-LA recovery in the solid fraction and 89% β-LG recovery in the soluble fraction, and production cost of $5.43 per kilogram of WPI treated at T = 62 °C, C = 10% WPI and P = 5.5 MPa. The two fractions are ready-to-use, new food ingredients with a pH of 6.7 and contain no residual acid or chemical contaminants. PMID:22312250

  6. Physical properties of whey protein--hydroxypropylmethylcellulose blend edible films.

    PubMed

    Brindle, L P; Krochta, J M

    2008-11-01

    The formations of glycerol (Gly)-plasticized whey protein isolate (WPI)-hydroxypropylmethylcellulose (HPMC) films, blended using different combinations and at different conditions, were investigated. The resulting WPI: Gly-HPMC films were analyzed for mechanical properties, oxygen permeability (OP), and water solubility. Differences due to HPMC quantity and blend method were determined via SAS software. While WPI: Gly and HPMC films were transparent, blend films were translucent, indicating some degree of immiscibility and/or WPI-HPMC aggregated domains in the blend films. WPI: Gly-HPMC films were stronger than WPI: Gly films and more flexible and stretchable than HPMC films, with films becoming stiffer, stronger, and less stretchable as the concentration of HPMC increased. However, WPI: Gly-HPMC blended films maintained the same low OP of WPI: Gly films, significantly lower than the OP of HPMC films. Comparison of mechanical properties and OP of films made by heat-denaturing WPI before and after blending with HPMC did not indicate any difference in degree of cross-linking between the methods, while solubility data indicated otherwise. Overall, while adding HPMC to WPI: Gly films had a large effect on the flexibility, strength, stretchability, and water solubility of the film polymeric network, results indicated that HPMC had no effect on OP through the polymer network. WPI-HPMC blend films had a desirable combination of mechanical and oxygen barrier properties, reflecting the combination of hydrogen-bonding, hydrophobic interactions, and disulfide bond cross-linking in the blended polymer network.

  7. Seasonal changes in protein composition of whey from commercial manufacture of caprine and ovine specialty cheeses.

    PubMed

    Casper, J L; Wendorff, W L; Thomas, D L

    1998-12-01

    Pooled whey from the production of one variety of ovine cheese and two varieties of caprine cheeses was studied for gross composition and individual whey protein composition over one production season. Individual proteins were quantified by sodium dodecyl sulfate-PAGE and digital imaging technology. The mean proportion of alpha-lactalbumin (LA) from caprine wheys from the manufacture of Chevre and Cheddar-type cheeses was higher than values previously reported for bovine whey from Cheddar cheese; proportions of serum albumin, immunoglobulin (Ig)G, and beta-lactoglobulin (LG) were lower. Ovine whey from Manchego-type cheese showed a higher proportion of beta-LG, about the same proportion of alpha-LA, and lower proportions of serum albumin and IgG than did the bovine whey. Relative amounts of alpha-LA decreased throughout the season, but beta-LG rose in midlactation and then gradually decreased toward the end of lactation. Relative proportions of serum albumin remained fairly stable throughout the year, and IgG decreased. PMID:9891259

  8. Effects of Glucides on Thermal Denaturation and Coagulation of Whey Proteins Studied by Ultraviolet Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mongo Antoine, Etou; Abena, A. A.; Gbeassor, M.; Chaveron, H.

    The thermal coagulation of whey proteins concentrates was inhibited by various glucides. The disaccharides, saccharose and lactose, were most effective and the amino sugar, glucosamine, least effective in this respect. Ultraviolet absorption and light-scattering measurements on thermal denaturation and coagulation of both unfractionated and individual whey proteins (α-lactalbumin, ß-lactoglobulin and bovine serum albumin) showed that saccharose promotes the denaturation of these proteins but inhibits their subsequent coagulation. These results are interpreted in terms of the effect of saccharose on the hydrophobic interactions between solvent and protein.

  9. Use of acid whey and mustard seed to replace nitrites during cooked sausage production.

    PubMed

    Wójciak, Karolina M; Karwowska, Małgorzata; Dolatowski, Zbigniew J

    2014-02-01

    The aim was to determine the effects of sea salt, acid whey, native and autoclaved mustard seed on the physico-chemical properties, especially colour formation, microbial stability and sensory evaluation of non-nitrite cooked sausage during chilling storage. The cooked pork sausages were divided into 4 groups (group I--control sausages with curing salt (2.8%) and water (5%) added; group II--sausages with sea salt (2.8%) and acid whey (5%) added; group III--sausages with sea salt (2.8%), acid whey (5%) and mustard seed (1%) added; group IV--sausages with sea salt (2.8%), acid whey (5%) and autoclaved mustard seed (1%) added). Instrumental colour (L*, a*, b*), oxygenation index (ΔR), 650/570 nm ratio, heme iron, pH value and water activity (aw) were determined 1 day after production and after 10, 20 and 30 days of refrigerated storage (4 °C). Sensory analysis was conducted immediately after production (day 1). Microbial analysis (lactic acid bacteria, total viable count, Clostridium spp.) was determinated at the end of storage (30 days). The autoclaved mustard with acid whey can be used at 1.0% (w/w) of model cooked sausages with beneficial effect on physico-chemical and sensory qualities of no-nitrite sausage. This product can be stored at refrigeration temperature for up to 30 days, in vacuum, with good acceptability. The colour, visual appearance and overall quality of samples with autoclaved mustard seed and acid whey were similar to the control with curing agent. PMID:24200566

  10. Use of acid whey and mustard seed to replace nitrites during cooked sausage production.

    PubMed

    Wójciak, Karolina M; Karwowska, Małgorzata; Dolatowski, Zbigniew J

    2014-02-01

    The aim was to determine the effects of sea salt, acid whey, native and autoclaved mustard seed on the physico-chemical properties, especially colour formation, microbial stability and sensory evaluation of non-nitrite cooked sausage during chilling storage. The cooked pork sausages were divided into 4 groups (group I--control sausages with curing salt (2.8%) and water (5%) added; group II--sausages with sea salt (2.8%) and acid whey (5%) added; group III--sausages with sea salt (2.8%), acid whey (5%) and mustard seed (1%) added; group IV--sausages with sea salt (2.8%), acid whey (5%) and autoclaved mustard seed (1%) added). Instrumental colour (L*, a*, b*), oxygenation index (ΔR), 650/570 nm ratio, heme iron, pH value and water activity (aw) were determined 1 day after production and after 10, 20 and 30 days of refrigerated storage (4 °C). Sensory analysis was conducted immediately after production (day 1). Microbial analysis (lactic acid bacteria, total viable count, Clostridium spp.) was determinated at the end of storage (30 days). The autoclaved mustard with acid whey can be used at 1.0% (w/w) of model cooked sausages with beneficial effect on physico-chemical and sensory qualities of no-nitrite sausage. This product can be stored at refrigeration temperature for up to 30 days, in vacuum, with good acceptability. The colour, visual appearance and overall quality of samples with autoclaved mustard seed and acid whey were similar to the control with curing agent.

  11. Physical and chemical changes in whey protein concentrate stored at elevated temperature and humidity

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The chemistry of whey protein concentrate (WPC) under adverse storage conditions was monitored to provide information on shelf life in hot, humid areas. WPC34 (34.9 g protein/100 g) and WPC80 (76.8 g protein/100 g) were stored for up to 18 mo under ambient conditions and at elevated temperature and...

  12. Functional Biomaterials: Solution Electrospinning and Gelation of Whey Protein and Pullulan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sullivan, Stephanie Tolstedt

    Utilizing biomaterials that are biodegradable, biocompatible and edible serve well for food products as well as biomedical applications. Biomaterials whey protein and pullulan both have these characteristics. Whey proteins (WP) have been used in food products for many years and more recently in pharmaceutical products. They have the ability to form both gels and stable foams. Pullulan (PULL) has also been used in both food and pharmaceutical products, and is a highly water soluble, non-gelling polysaccharide and has been used primarily as a film former. Herein, we investigate the ability of whey protein and pullulan to form nanofibers and gels. Combining their distinct properties allows the ability to uniquely manipulate nanofiber and gel characteristics and behavior for a variety of applications, from food to even tissue scaffolding. First, we determined the electrospinnability of aqueous whey protein solutions. Both whey protein isolate (WPI) and one of its major components beta--lactoglobulin (BLG), either in native or denatured form, yielded interesting micro and nanostructures when electrosprayed; while nanofiber production required blending with a spinnable polymer, poly(ethylene oxide) (PEO). WP:PEO solutions were also successfully electrospun at acidic pH (2≤pH≤3), which could improve shelf life. Fourier Transform Infrared Reflectance (FTIR) analysis of WP:PEO fiber mat indicated some variation in WP secondary structure with varying WPI concentration (as WPI increased, % alpha-helix increased and beta-turn decreased) and pH (as pH decreased from neutral (7.5) to acidic (2), % beta-sheet decreased and alpha-helix increased). X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS) also confirmed the presence of WP on the surface of the blend fibers, augmenting the FTIR analysis. Interestingly, WP:PEO composite nanofibers maintained its fibrous morphology at temperatures as high as 100 °C, above the 60 °C PEO melting point. Further, we show that the blend mats retained a

  13. Interactions between whey protein isolate and gum Arabic.

    PubMed

    Klein, Miri; Aserin, Abraham; Ben Ishai, Paul; Garti, Nissim

    2010-09-01

    In this study we have attempted to understand the nature of "charge interactions" between two negatively charged biopolymers (whey protein isolate, WPI and gum Arabic, GA) and, consequently, why their mixture exhibits better interfacial activity. Surface tension (gamma(0)) measurements indicated that at ca. 1 wt.% of the biopolymer mixture (3:1 wt. ratio) the air/water surface is saturated. At 5 wt.% the gamma(0) of the mixture is lower than the calculated co-operative value. The zeta-potential measurements revealed that the isoelectric point of the WPI:GA 3:1 wt. ratio mixture is 3.8. The zeta-potential values up to pH 6 are below those calculated. Similarly, the electrical conductivities of the mixture are lower than those calculated. All these measurements indicate: (1) partial charge neutralization in spite of the fact that both biopolymers are negative or (2) partial charge-charge interactions between the two biopolymers. The thermal heating behavior of the frozen water in the aqueous mixture studied by DSC (heating cycle of the frozen sample) clearly indicates that the two biopolymers are interacting. We calculated the enthalpy, the free energy and the chemical potential of the interactions. We found that the interactions of the biopolymers are rather weak. They are likely derived from some local positively charged domains (pH 7) on the protein that neutralize some of the negatively charged GA. These interactions form weak charge adducts. These charge adducts are sufficient to improve its adsorption into the oil-water interface and enhance the emulsion stability.

  14. Processing of whey modulates proliferative and immune functions in intestinal epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Duc Ninh; Sangild, Per T; Li, Yanqi; Bering, Stine B; Chatterton, Dereck E W

    2016-02-01

    Whey protein concentrate (WPC) is often subjected to heat treatment during industrial processing, resulting in protein denaturation and loss of protein bioactivity. We hypothesized that WPC samples subjected to different degrees of thermal processing are associated with different levels of bioactive proteins and effects on proliferation and immune response in intestinal epithelial cells (IEC). The results showed that low-heat-treated WPC had elevated levels of lactoferrin and transforming growth factor-β2 compared with that of standard WPC. The level of aggregates depended on the source of whey, with the lowest level being found in WPC derived from acid whey. Following acid activation, WPC from acid whey enhanced IEC proliferation compared with WPC from sweet whey or nonactivated WPC. Low-heat-treated WPC from acid whey induced greater secretion of IL-8 in IEC than either standard WPC from acid whey or low-heat-treated WPC from sweet whey. Following acid activation (to activate growth factors), low-heat-treated WPC from sweet whey induced higher IL-8 levels in IEC compared with standard WPC from sweet whey. In conclusion, higher levels of bioactive proteins in low-heat-treated WPC, especially from acid whey, may enhance proliferation and cytokine responses of IEC. These considerations could be important to maintain optimal bioactivity of infant formulas, including their maturational and immunological effects on the developing intestine.

  15. The effect of microfiltration on color, flavor, and functionality of 80% whey protein concentrate.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Y; Smith, T J; Foegeding, E A; Drake, M A

    2015-09-01

    The residual annatto colorant in fluid Cheddar cheese whey is bleached to provide a neutral-colored final product. Currently, hydrogen peroxide (HP) and benzoyl peroxide are used for bleaching liquid whey. However, previous studies have shown that chemical bleaching causes off-flavor formation, mainly due to lipid oxidation and protein degradation. The objective of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of microfiltration (MF) on norbixin removal and to compare flavor and functionality of 80% whey protein concentrate (WPC80) from MF whey to WPC80 from whey bleached with HP or lactoperoxidase (LP). Cheddar cheese whey was manufactured from colored, pasteurized milk. The fluid whey was pasteurized and fat separated. Liquid whey was subjected to 4 different treatments: control (no bleaching; 50°C, 1 h), HP (250 mg of HP/kg; 50°C, 1 h), and LP (20 mg of HP/kg; 50°C, 1 h), or MF (microfiltration; 50°C, 1 h). The treated whey was then ultrafiltered, diafiltered, and spray-dried to 80% concentrate. The entire experiment was replicated 3 times. Proximate analyses, color, functionality, descriptive sensory and instrumental volatile analysis were conducted on WPC80. The MF and HP- and LP-bleached WPC80 displayed a 39.5, 40.9, and 92.8% norbixin decrease, respectively. The HP and LP WPC80 had higher cardboard flavors and distinct cabbage flavor compared with the unbleached and MF WPC80. Volatile compound results were consistent with sensory results. The HP and LP WPC80 were higher in lipid oxidation compounds (especially heptanal, hexanal, pentanal, 1-hexen-3-one, 2-pentylfuran, and octanal) compared with unbleached and MF WPC80. All WPC80 had >85% solubility across the pH range of 3 to 7. The microstructure of MF gels determined by confocal laser scanning showed an increased protein particle size in the gel network. MF WPC80 also had larger storage modulus values, indicating higher gel firmness. Based on bleaching efficacy comparable to chemical bleaching with HP

  16. The effect of microfiltration on color, flavor, and functionality of 80% whey protein concentrate.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Y; Smith, T J; Foegeding, E A; Drake, M A

    2015-09-01

    The residual annatto colorant in fluid Cheddar cheese whey is bleached to provide a neutral-colored final product. Currently, hydrogen peroxide (HP) and benzoyl peroxide are used for bleaching liquid whey. However, previous studies have shown that chemical bleaching causes off-flavor formation, mainly due to lipid oxidation and protein degradation. The objective of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of microfiltration (MF) on norbixin removal and to compare flavor and functionality of 80% whey protein concentrate (WPC80) from MF whey to WPC80 from whey bleached with HP or lactoperoxidase (LP). Cheddar cheese whey was manufactured from colored, pasteurized milk. The fluid whey was pasteurized and fat separated. Liquid whey was subjected to 4 different treatments: control (no bleaching; 50°C, 1 h), HP (250 mg of HP/kg; 50°C, 1 h), and LP (20 mg of HP/kg; 50°C, 1 h), or MF (microfiltration; 50°C, 1 h). The treated whey was then ultrafiltered, diafiltered, and spray-dried to 80% concentrate. The entire experiment was replicated 3 times. Proximate analyses, color, functionality, descriptive sensory and instrumental volatile analysis were conducted on WPC80. The MF and HP- and LP-bleached WPC80 displayed a 39.5, 40.9, and 92.8% norbixin decrease, respectively. The HP and LP WPC80 had higher cardboard flavors and distinct cabbage flavor compared with the unbleached and MF WPC80. Volatile compound results were consistent with sensory results. The HP and LP WPC80 were higher in lipid oxidation compounds (especially heptanal, hexanal, pentanal, 1-hexen-3-one, 2-pentylfuran, and octanal) compared with unbleached and MF WPC80. All WPC80 had >85% solubility across the pH range of 3 to 7. The microstructure of MF gels determined by confocal laser scanning showed an increased protein particle size in the gel network. MF WPC80 also had larger storage modulus values, indicating higher gel firmness. Based on bleaching efficacy comparable to chemical bleaching with HP

  17. Breakfast high in whey protein or carbohydrates improves coping with workload in healthy subjects.

    PubMed

    Sihvola, Nora; Korpela, Riitta; Henelius, Andreas; Holm, Anu; Huotilainen, Minna; Müller, Kiti; Poussa, Tuija; Pettersson, Kati; Turpeinen, Anu; Peuhkuri, Katri

    2013-11-14

    Dietary components may affect brain function and influence behaviour by inducing the synthesis of neurotransmitters. The aim of the present study was to examine the influence of consumption of a whey protein-containing breakfast drink v. a carbohydrate drink v. control on subjective and physiological responses to mental workload in simulated work. In a randomised cross-over design, ten healthy subjects (seven women, median age 26 years, median BMI 23 kg/m(2)) participated in a single-blinded, placebo-controlled study. The subjects performed demanding work-like tasks after having a breakfast drink high in protein (HP) or high in carbohydrate (HC) or a control drink on separate sessions. Subjective states were assessed using the NASA Task Load Index (NASA-TLX), the Karolinska sleepiness scale (KSS) and the modified Profile of Mood States. Heart rate was recorded during task performance. The ratio of plasma tryptophan (Trp) to the sum of the other large neutral amino acids (LNAA) and salivary cortisol were also analysed. The plasma Trp:LNAA ratio was 30 % higher after the test drinks HP (median 0·13 (μmol/l)/(μmol/l)) and HC (median 0·13 (μmol/l)/(μmol/l)) than after the control drink (median 0·10 (μmol/l)/(μmol/l)). The increase in heart rate was smaller after the HP (median 2·7 beats/min) and HC (median 1·9 beats/min) drinks when compared with the control drink (median 7·2 beats/min) during task performance. Subjective sleepiness was reduced more after the HC drink (median KSS - 1·5) than after the control drink (median KSS - 0·5). There were no significant differences between the breakfast types in the NASA-TLX index, cortisol levels or task performance. We conclude that a breakfast drink high in whey protein or carbohydrates may improve coping with mental tasks in healthy subjects.

  18. PROCESSING WHEY PROTEIN ISOLATE AND CORN STARCH USING A TORQUE RHEOMETER

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Processing a combination of starch and protein mixtures for food or nonfood applications involves shearing and heating to produce desired texture, appearance and thermo-mechanical properties. In this study, corn starch and whey protein isolate (WPI) were processed in a torque rheometer at varying ro...

  19. Production of extruded barley, cassava, corn and quinoa enriched with whey proteins and cashew pulp

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Well-formulated snacks can play a positive role in enhancing health by providing essential nutrients, such as increased protein and fiber, that mitigate metabolic syndrome associated with obesity. Adding whey protein concentrate (WPC80) and cashew pulp (CP) to corn meal, a major ingredient in extru...

  20. Short communication: The effect of liquid storage on the flavor of whey protein concentrate.

    PubMed

    Park, Curtis W; Parker, Megan; Drake, MaryAnne

    2016-06-01

    Unit operations in dried dairy ingredient manufacture significantly influence sensory properties and, consequently, their use and consumer acceptance in a variety of ingredient applications. In whey protein concentrate (WPC) manufacture, liquid can be stored as whey or WPC before spray drying. The objective of this study was to determine the effect of storage, composition, and bleaching on the flavor of spray-dried WPC80. Liquid whey was manufactured and subjected to the following treatments: bleached or unbleached and liquid whey or liquid WPC storage. The experiment was replicated 3 times and included a no-storage control. All liquid storage was performed at 4°C for 24h. Flavor of the final spray-dried WPC80 was evaluated by a trained panel and volatile compound analyses. Storage of liquids increased cardboard flavor, decreased sweet aromatic flavor, and resulted in increased volatile lipid oxidation products. Bleaching altered the effect of liquid storage. Storage of unbleached liquid whey decreased sweet aromatic flavor and increased cardboard flavor and volatile lipid oxidation products compared with liquid WPC80 and no storage. In contrast, storage of bleached liquid WPC decreased sweet aromatic flavor and increased cardboard flavor and associated volatile lipid oxidation products compared with bleached liquid whey or no storage. These results confirm that liquid storage increases off-flavors in spray-dried protein but to a variable degree, depending on whether bleaching has been applied. If liquid storage is necessary, bleached WPC80 should be stored as liquid whey and unbleached WPC80 should be stored as liquid WPC to mitigate off-flavors.

  1. Whey proteins as source of dipeptidyl dipeptidase IV (dipeptidyl peptidase-4) inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Tulipano, Giovanni; Sibilia, Valeria; Caroli, Anna Maria; Cocchi, Daniela

    2011-04-01

    Preclinical and clinical studies suggest that whey proteins can reduce postprandial glucose levels and stimulate insulin release in healthy subjects and in subjects with type 2 diabetes by reducing dipeptidyl peptidase-4 (DPP-4) activity in the proximal bowel and hence increasing intact incretin levels. Our aim was to identify DPP-4 inhibitors among short peptides occurring in hydrolysates of β-lactoglobulin, the major whey protein found in the milk of ruminants. We proved that the bioactive peptide Ile-Pro-Ala can be regarded as a moderate DPP-4 inhibitor.

  2. The Relationship Between Creatine and Whey Protein Supplements Consumption and Anesthesia in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Saberi, Kianoush; Gorji Mahlabani, Mohammad Amin; Tashayoie, Mohammad; Nasiri Nejad, Farinaz

    2016-01-01

    Background: Because the trend of pharmacotherapy is toward controlling diet rather than administration of drugs, in our study we examined the probable relationship between Creatine (Cr) or Whey (Wh) consumption and anesthesia (analgesia effect of ketamine). Creatine and Wh are among the most favorable supplements in the market. Whey is a protein, which is extracted from milk and is a rich source of amino acids. Creatine is an amino acid derivative that can change to ATP in the body. Both of these supplements result in Nitric Oxide (NO) retention, which is believed to be effective in N-Methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor analgesia. Objectives: The main question of this study was whether Wh and Cr are effective on analgesic and anesthetic characteristics of ketamine and whether this is related to NO retention or amino acids’ features Materials and Methods: We divided 30 male Wistar rats to three (n = 10) groups; including Cr, Wh and sham (water only) groups. Each group was administered (by gavage) the supplements for an intermediate dosage during 25 days. After this period, they became anesthetized using a Ketamine-Xylazine (KX) and their time to anesthesia and analgesia, and total sleep time were recorded. Results: Data were analyzed twice using the SPSS 18 software with Analysis of Variance (ANOVA) and post hoc test; first time we expunged the rats that didn’t become anesthetized and the second time we included all of the samples. There was a significant P-value (P < 0.05) for total anesthesia time in the second analysis. Bonferroni multiple comparison indicated that the difference was between Cr and Sham groups (P < 0.021). Conclusions: The data only indicated that there might be a significant relationship between Cr consumption and total sleep time. Further studies, with rats of different gender and different dosage of supplement and anesthetics are suggested. PMID:27110533

  3. Structural analysis of new antihypertensive peptides derived from cheese whey protein by proteinase K digestion.

    PubMed

    Abubakar, A; Saito, T; Kitazawa, H; Kawai, Y; Itoh, T

    1998-12-01

    Whey protein was digested with one of seven kinds of proteases at 37 degrees C (trypsin, proteinase K, actinase E, thermolysin, or papain) or at 25 degrees C (pepsin or chymotrypsin) for 24 h. The digested samples were assayed for the inhibitory activity of angiotensin-converting enzyme and for changes in the systolic blood pressure caused in spontaneously hypertensive rats after gastric intubation. The strongest depressive effect on the systolic blood pressure (-55 mm Hg) was observed at 6 h after gastric intubation of the whey protein that was digested by proteinase K. Finally, six peptides were chromatographically isolated from the proteinase K digest by a combination of hydrophobic reversed-phase HPLC and gel filtration. The amino acid sequences and their origins were clarified as follows: Val-Tyr-Pro-Phe-Pro-Gly [beta-casein (CN); f 59-64], Gly-Lys-Pro (beta 2-microglobulin; f 18-20), Ile-Pro-Ala (beta-lactoglobulin; f 78-80), Phe-Pro (serum albumin; f 221-222; beta-CN, f 62-63, f 157-158, and f 205-206), Val-Tyr-Pro (beta-CN; f 59-61), and Thr-Pro-Val-Val-Val-Pro-Pro-Phe-Leu-Gln-Pro (beta-CN; f 80-90). Chemical synthesis of these six peptides confirmed that all peptides, except an undecapeptide, have antihypertensive activity in spontaneously hypertensive rats. The synthetic tripeptide Ile-Pro-Ala, originating from beta-lactoglobulin, showed the strongest antihypertensive activity (-31 mm Hg).

  4. Whey protein hydrolysates enhance water absorption in the perfused small intestine of anesthetized rats.

    PubMed

    Ito, Kentaro; Yamaguchi, Makoto; Noma, Teruyuki; Yamaji, Taketo; Itoh, Hiroyuki; Oda, Munehiro

    2016-08-01

    We evaluated the effect of whey protein hydrolysates (WPH) on the water absorption rate in the small intestine using a rat small intestine perfusion model. The rate was significantly higher with 5 g/L WPH than with 5 g/L soy protein hydrolysates or physiological saline (p < 0.05). WPH dose-dependently increased the water absorption rate in the range of 1.25-10.0 g/L. WPH showed a significantly higher rate than an amino acid mixture whose composition was equal to that of WPH (p < 0.05). The addition of 4-aminomethylbenzoic acid, an inhibitor of PepT1, significantly suppressed WPH's enhancement of water absorption (p < 0.05). The rate of water absorption was significantly correlated with that of peptides/amino acids absorption in WPH (r = 0.82, p < 0.01). These data suggest that WPH have a high water absorption-promoting effect, to which PepT1 contributes.

  5. Predictive response surface model for heat-induced rheological changes and aggregation of whey protein concentrate.

    PubMed

    Alvarez, Pedro A; Emond, Charles; Gomaa, Ahmed; Remondetto, Gabriel E; Subirade, Muriel

    2015-02-01

    Whey proteins are now far more than a by-product of cheese processing. In the last 2 decades, food manufacturers have developed them as ingredients, with the dairy industry remaining as a major user. For many applications, whey proteins are modified (denatured) to alter their structure and functional properties. The objective of this research was to study the influence of 85 to 100 °C, with protein concentration of 8% to 12%, and treatment times of 5 to 30 min, while measuring rheological properties (storage modulus, loss modulus, and complex viscosity) and aggregation (intermolecular beta-sheet formation) in dispersions of whey protein concentrate (WPC). A Box-Behnken Response Surface Methodology modeled the heat denaturation of liquid sweet WPC at 3 variables and 3 levels. The model revealed a very significant fit for viscoelastic properties, and a lesser fit for protein aggregation, at temperatures not previously studied. An exponential increase of rheological parameters was governed by protein concentration and temperature, while a modest linear relationship of aggregation was governed by temperature. Models such as these can serve as valuable guides to the ingredient and dairy industries to develop target products, as whey is a major ingredient in many functional foods.

  6. Investigation of the lactosylation of whey proteins by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Czerwenka, Christoph; Maier, Irene; Pittner, Fritz; Lindner, Wolfgang

    2006-11-15

    Heat treatment of milk induces a reaction between the milk proteins and lactose, resulting in lactosylated protein species. The lactosylation of the two major whey proteins alpha-lactalbumin and beta-lactoglobulin was investigated by reversed phase liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS). Three sample series, consisting of aqueous model solutions of each whey protein separately and in mixture and whole milk, were heated for different time periods, and the progression of the lactosylation reaction was monitored. The observed degrees of lactosylation and the reaction kinetics showed that the lactosylation of beta-lactoglobulin was not influenced by the presence of other components, whereas the lactosylation of alpha-lactalbumin was enhanced in whole milk compared to the aqueous model systems. An in-depth evaluation of the LC-MS data yielded information regarding changes of physicochemical properties of the whey proteins upon lactosylation. Whereas retention time shifts indicated changes in hydrophobicity for both alpha-lactalbumin and beta-lactoglobulin, changes in the charge state distribution denoting conformational alterations were observed only for beta-lactoglobulin. The analysis of different liquid and solid milk products showed that the lactosylation patterns of the whey proteins can be used as indicators for the extent of heat treatment. PMID:17090137

  7. Diffusivity of whey protein and gum arabic in their coacervates.

    PubMed

    Weinbreck, Fanny; Rollema, Harry S; Tromp, R Hans; de Kruif, Cornelis G

    2004-07-20

    Structural properties of whey protein (WP)/gum arabic (GA) coacervates were investigated by measuring the diffusivity of WP and GA in their coacervate phase as a function of pH by means of three different complementary techniques. The combination of these measurements revealed new insights into the structure of coacervates. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) measured the self-diffusion coefficient of the GA in the coacervate phase prepared at various pH values. Fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP) was measured using a confocal scanning laser microscope. The WP and GA were covalently labeled with two different dyes. The time of fluorescence recovery, related to the inverse of the diffusion coefficient, was evaluated from the measurements, and the diffusivity of the WP and GA on a long time scale could be individually estimated at each pH value. Diffusing wave spectroscopy (DWS) combined with transmission measurement was carried out in the coacervate phase, and the diffusion coefficient, corresponding to the averaged diffusion of all particles that scattered in the system, was calculated as a function of pH. Independently of the technique used, the results showed that the diffusion of the WP and GA within the coacervate phase was reduced as compared to a diluted biopolymer mixture. NMR, DWS, and FRAP measurements gave similar results, indicating that the biopolymers moved the slowest in the coacervate matrix at pH 4.0-4.2. It is assumed that the diffusion of the WP and GA is reduced because of a higher electrostatic interaction between the biopolymers. Furthermore, FRAP results showed that in the coacervate phase WP molecules diffused 10 times faster than GA molecules. This result is very relevant because it shows that WP and GA move independently in the liquid coacervate phase. Finally, DWS measurements revealed that the coacervate phase rearranged with time, as evidenced by a decrease of the diffusion coefficient and a loss of the turbidity of the sample

  8. Semicontinuous Production of Lactic Acid From Cheese Whey Using Integrated Membrane Reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yebo; Shahbazi, Abolghasem; Coulibaly, Sekou; Mims, Michele M.

    Semicontinuous production of lactic acid from cheese whey using free cells of Bifidobacterium longum with and without nanofiltration was studied. For the semicontinuous fermentation without membrane separation, the lactic acid productivity of the second and third runs is much lower than the first run. The semicontinuous fermentation with nanoseparation was run semicontinuously for 72 h with lactic acid to be harvested every 24 h using a nanofiltration membrane unit. The cells and unutilized lactose were kept in the reactor and mixed with newly added cheese whey in the subsequent runs. Slight increase in the lactic acid productivity was observed in the second and third runs during the semicontinuous fermentation with nanofiltration. It can be concluded that nanoseparation could improve the lactic acid productivity of the semicontinuous fermentation process.

  9. Enrichment and purification of casein glycomacropeptide from whey protein isolate using supercritical carbon dioxide processing and membrane filtration

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Whey protein concentrates (WPC) and isolates (WPI), which are dried, concentrated forms of cheese whey, are comprised mainly of beta–lactoglobulin (beta-LG), a–lactalbumin (a-LA), and glycomacropeptide (GLY), and are added to foods to boost their nutritional and functional properties. In previous st...

  10. Minimizing variations in functionality of whey protein concentrates from different sources.

    PubMed

    Onwulata, C I; Konstance, R P; Tomasula, P M

    2004-03-01

    Enhancement in processing technology has improved the nutritional and functional properties of whey protein concentrates by increasing the content and quality of the protein, leading to their increased use in different food products. The extent of heat treatment affects the quality of the whey protein concentrate, and wide variation in product quality exists due to the various means of manufacture and from the whey product history from farm to factory. The study was carried out with 6 commercial whey protein concentrates with 80% protein (WPC80) to determine variations in physical properties, particle size and density, and functional properties--solubility, gel strength, foam volume, and stability. Significant differences were observed among all the products for every property compared. Particulate size was the most important determinant of functional characteristics. Larger particulate WPC80 had significantly higher fat content and were less soluble with poor foam stability; but narrowing the particle size distribution through sieving, minimized variations. We determined that sieving all products within the particle size distribution range of 100 to 150 microns minimized variation in physical composition, making functionality uniform. WPC80 from different manufacturers can be made to perform uniformly within a narrow functionality range by reducing the particle size distribution through sieving. PMID:15202660

  11. Minimizing variations in functionality of whey protein concentrates from different sources.

    PubMed

    Onwulata, C I; Konstance, R P; Tomasula, P M

    2004-03-01

    Enhancement in processing technology has improved the nutritional and functional properties of whey protein concentrates by increasing the content and quality of the protein, leading to their increased use in different food products. The extent of heat treatment affects the quality of the whey protein concentrate, and wide variation in product quality exists due to the various means of manufacture and from the whey product history from farm to factory. The study was carried out with 6 commercial whey protein concentrates with 80% protein (WPC80) to determine variations in physical properties, particle size and density, and functional properties--solubility, gel strength, foam volume, and stability. Significant differences were observed among all the products for every property compared. Particulate size was the most important determinant of functional characteristics. Larger particulate WPC80 had significantly higher fat content and were less soluble with poor foam stability; but narrowing the particle size distribution through sieving, minimized variations. We determined that sieving all products within the particle size distribution range of 100 to 150 microns minimized variation in physical composition, making functionality uniform. WPC80 from different manufacturers can be made to perform uniformly within a narrow functionality range by reducing the particle size distribution through sieving.

  12. Fractionation of sheep cheese whey by a scalable method to sequentially isolate bioactive proteins.

    PubMed

    Pilbrow, Jodi; Bekhit, Alaa El-din A; Carne, Alan

    2016-07-15

    This study reports a procedure for the simultaneous purification of glyco(caseino)macropeptide, immunoglobulin, lactoperoxidase, lactoferrin, α-lactalbumin and β-lactoglobulin from sheep cheese sweet whey, an under-utilized by-product of cheese manufacture generated by an emerging sheep dairy industry in New Zealand. These proteins have recognized value in the nutrition, biomedical and health-promoting supplements industries. A sequential fractionation procedure using economical anion and cation exchange chromatography on HiTrap resins was evaluated. The whey protein fractionation is performed under mild conditions, requires only the adjustment of pH between ion exchange chromatography steps, does not require buffer exchange and uses minimal amounts of chemicals. The purity of the whey protein fractions generated were analyzed by reversed phase-high performance liquid chromatography and the identity of the proteins was confirmed by mass spectrometry. This scalable procedure demonstrates that several proteins of recognized value can be fractionated in reasonable yield and purity from sheep cheese whey in one streamlined process.

  13. Fractionation of sheep cheese whey by a scalable method to sequentially isolate bioactive proteins.

    PubMed

    Pilbrow, Jodi; Bekhit, Alaa El-din A; Carne, Alan

    2016-07-15

    This study reports a procedure for the simultaneous purification of glyco(caseino)macropeptide, immunoglobulin, lactoperoxidase, lactoferrin, α-lactalbumin and β-lactoglobulin from sheep cheese sweet whey, an under-utilized by-product of cheese manufacture generated by an emerging sheep dairy industry in New Zealand. These proteins have recognized value in the nutrition, biomedical and health-promoting supplements industries. A sequential fractionation procedure using economical anion and cation exchange chromatography on HiTrap resins was evaluated. The whey protein fractionation is performed under mild conditions, requires only the adjustment of pH between ion exchange chromatography steps, does not require buffer exchange and uses minimal amounts of chemicals. The purity of the whey protein fractions generated were analyzed by reversed phase-high performance liquid chromatography and the identity of the proteins was confirmed by mass spectrometry. This scalable procedure demonstrates that several proteins of recognized value can be fractionated in reasonable yield and purity from sheep cheese whey in one streamlined process. PMID:26948602

  14. Dataset of milk whey proteins of two indigenous greek goat breeds.

    PubMed

    Anagnostopoulos, Athanasios K; Katsafadou, Angeliki I; Pierros, Vasileios; Kontopodis, Evangelos; Fthenakis, George C; Arsenos, George; Karkabounas, Spyridon Ch; Tzora, Athina; Skoufos, Ioannis; Tsangaris, George Th

    2016-09-01

    Due to its rarity and unique biological traits, as well as its growing financial value, milk of dairy Greek small ruminants is continuously attracting interest from both the scientific community and industry. For the construction of the present dataset, cutting-edge proteomics methodologies were employed, in order to investigate and characterize, for the first time, the milk whey proteome from the two indigenous Greek goat breeds, Capra prisca and Skopelos. In total 822 protein groups were identified in milk whey of the two breeds, The present data are further discussed in the research article "Milk of Greek sheep and goat breeds; characterization by means of proteomics" [1].

  15. Dataset of milk whey proteins of two indigenous greek goat breeds.

    PubMed

    Anagnostopoulos, Athanasios K; Katsafadou, Angeliki I; Pierros, Vasileios; Kontopodis, Evangelos; Fthenakis, George C; Arsenos, George; Karkabounas, Spyridon Ch; Tzora, Athina; Skoufos, Ioannis; Tsangaris, George Th

    2016-09-01

    Due to its rarity and unique biological traits, as well as its growing financial value, milk of dairy Greek small ruminants is continuously attracting interest from both the scientific community and industry. For the construction of the present dataset, cutting-edge proteomics methodologies were employed, in order to investigate and characterize, for the first time, the milk whey proteome from the two indigenous Greek goat breeds, Capra prisca and Skopelos. In total 822 protein groups were identified in milk whey of the two breeds, The present data are further discussed in the research article "Milk of Greek sheep and goat breeds; characterization by means of proteomics" [1]. PMID:27508219

  16. Characterization and evaluation of whey protein-based biofilms as substrates for in vitro cell cultures.

    PubMed

    Gilbert, Vanessa; Rouabhia, Mahmoud; Wang, Hongxum; Arnould, Anne-Lise; Remondetto, Gabriel; Subirade, Muriel

    2005-12-01

    Whey proteins-based biofilms were prepared using different plasticizers in order to obtain a biomaterial for the human keratinocytes and fibroblasts in vitro culture. The film properties were evaluated by Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR) technique and mechanical tests. A relationship was found between the decrease of intermolecular hydrogen bond strength and film mechanical behavior changes, expressed by a breaking stress and Young modulus values diminishing. These results allow stating that the film molecular configuration could induce dissimilarities in its mechanical properties. The films toxicity was assessed by evaluating the cutaneous cells adherence, growth, proliferation and structural stratification. Microscopic observation demonstrated that both keratinocytes and fibroblasts adhered to the biofilms. The trypan blue exclusion test showed that keratinocytes grew at a significantly high rate on all the biofilms. Structural analysis demonstrated that keratinocytes stratified when cultured on the whey protein-based biofilms and gave rise to multi-layered epidermal structures. The most organized epidermis was obtained with whey protein isolate/DEG biofilm. This structure had a well-organized basal layer under supra-basal and corneous layers. This study demonstrated that whey proteins, an inexpensive renewable resource which can be obtained readily, were non-toxic to cutaneous cells and thus they could be useful substrates for a variety of biomedical applications, including tissue engineering.

  17. Utilization of concentrated cheese whey for the production of protein concentrate fuel alcohol and alcoholic beverages

    SciTech Connect

    Krishnamurti, R.

    1983-01-01

    The objective of this investigation was to recover the major components of whey and to develop food applications for their incorporation/conversion into acceptable products of commercial value. Reconstituted dried sweet whey with 36% solids was ultrafiltered to yield a protein concentrate (WPC) and a permeate containing 24% lactose and 3.7% ash. Orange juice fortified up to 2.07% and chocolate milks fortified up to 5.88% total protein levels with WPC containing 45% total protein were acceptable to about 90% of a panel of 24 individuals. Fermentation of demineralized permeate at 30/sup 0/C with Kluyveromyces fragilis NRRL Y 2415 adapted to 24% lactose levels, led to 13.7% (v/v) ethanol in the medium at the end of 34 hours. Batch productivity was 3.2 gms. ethanol per liter per hour and conversion efficiency was 84.26% of the theoretical maximum. Alcoholic fermentation of permeate and subsequent distillation produced compounds with desirable aroma characters in such products. This study suggests that there is potential for the production of protein fortified non-alcoholic products and alcoholic beverages of commercial value from whey, thus providing a cost effective solution to the whey utilization problem.

  18. Changes in volatile compounds in whey protein concentrate stored at elevated temperature and humidity

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Whey protein concentrate (WPC) has been recommended for use in emergency aid programs, but it is often stored overseas without temperature and relative humidity (RH) control, which may cause it to be rejected because of yellowing, off-flavors, or clumping. Therefore, the volatile compounds present ...

  19. Changes in microbial populations of WPC34 and WPC80 whey protein during long term storage

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The use of whey protein (WPC34 and WPC80) as a food ingredient and as a base for making biodegradable products is increasing. The need to alleviate world hunger in arid and semi-arid regions demands that we investigate the behavior of native bacteria in these products, especially during long term st...

  20. Phase behaviour and in vitro hydrolysis of wheat starch in mixture with whey protein.

    PubMed

    Yang, Natasha; Liu, Yingting; Ashton, John; Gorczyca, Elisabeth; Kasapis, Stefan

    2013-04-15

    Network formation of whey protein isolate (WPI) with increasing concentrations of native wheat starch (WS) has been examined. Small deformation dynamic oscillation in shear and modulated temperature differential scanning calorimetry enabled analysis of binary mixtures at the macro- and micromolecular level. Following heat induced gelation, textural hardness was measured by undertaking compression tests. Environmental scanning electron microscopy provided tangible information on network morphology of polymeric constituents. Experiments involving in vitro starch digestion also allowed for indirect assessment of phase topology in the binary mixture. The biochemical component of this work constitutes an attempt to utilise whey protein as a retardant to the enzymatic hydrolysis of starch in a model system with α-amylase enzyme. During heating, rheological profiles of binary mixtures exhibited dramatic increases in G' at temperatures more closely related to those observed for single whey protein rather than pure starch. Results from this multidisciplinary approach of analysis, utilising rheology, calorimetry and microscopy, argue for the occurrence of phase separation phenomena in the gelled systems. There is also evidence of whey protein forming the continuous phase with wheat starch being the discontinuous filler, an outcome that is explored in the in vitro study of the enzymatic hydrolysis of starch.

  1. Protein denaturation of whey protein isolates (WPIs) induced by high intensity ultrasound during heat gelation.

    PubMed

    Frydenberg, Rikke P; Hammershøj, Marianne; Andersen, Ulf; Greve, Marie T; Wiking, Lars

    2016-02-01

    In this study, the impact of high intensity ultrasound (HIU) on proteins in whey protein isolates was examined. Effects on thermal behavior, secondary structure and nature of intra- and intermolecular bonds during heat-induced gelling were investigated. Ultrasonication (24 kHz, 300 W/cm(2), 2078 J/mL) significantly reduced denaturation enthalpies, whereas no change in secondary structure was detected by circular dichroism. The thiol-blocking agent N-ethylmaleimide was applied in order to inhibit formation of disulfide bonds during gel formation. Results showed that increased contents of α-lactalbumin (α-La) were associated with increased sensitivity to ultrasonication. The α-La:β-lactoglobulin (β-Lg) ratio greatly affected the nature of the interactions formed during gelation, where higher amounts of α-La lead to a gel more dependent on disulfide bonds. These results contribute to clarifying the mechanisms mediating the effects of HIU on whey proteins on the molecular level, thus moving further toward implementing HIU in the processing chain in the food industry.

  2. A combination of whey protein and potassium bicarbonate supplements during head-down-tilt bed rest: Presentation of a multidisciplinary randomized controlled trial (MEP study)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buehlmeier, Judith; Mulder, Edwin; Noppe, Alexandra; Frings-Meuthen, Petra; Angerer, Oliver; Rudwill, Floriane; Biolo, Gianni; Smith, Scott M.; Blanc, Stéphane; Heer, Martina

    2014-02-01

    Inactivity, as it appears during space flight and in bed rest, induces reduction of lean body and bone mass, glucose intolerance, and weakening of the cardiovascular system. Increased protein intake, whey protein in particular, has been proposed to counteract some of these effects, but has also been associated with negative effects on bone, likely caused by a correspondingly high ratio of acid to alkali precursors in the diet.

  3. The chronic effects of whey proteins on blood pressure, vascular function, and inflammatory markers in overweight individuals.

    PubMed

    Pal, Sebely; Ellis, Vanessa

    2010-07-01

    Limited evidence suggests that dairy whey protein may be the major dairy component that is responsible for health benefits currently associated with increased dairy consumption. Whey proteins may reduce blood pressure and improve cardiovascular health. This study evaluated the effects of whey protein supplementation on blood pressure, vascular function and inflammatory markers compared to casein and glucose (control) supplementation in overweight/obese individuals. The subjects were randomized to either whey protein, casein or glucose supplementation for 12 weeks according to a parallel design. In all, 70 men and women with a mean (+/-s.e.m.) BMI (kg/m(2)) of 31.3 +/- 0.8 completed the study. Systolic blood pressure (SBP) decreased significantly at week 6 compared to baseline in the whey and casein groups, (P = 0.028 and P = 0.020, respectively) and at week 12 (P = 0.020, and P = 0.017, respectively). Diastolic blood pressure (DBP) decreased significantly compared to baseline in the whey and casein groups (P = 0.038 and P = 0.042, respectively) at week 12. DBP decreased significantly in the whey and casein groups (P = 0.025, P = 0.038, respectively) at week 12 compared to the control group. Augmentation index (AI) was significantly lower from baseline at 12 weeks (P = 0.021) in the whey group. AI decreased significantly in the whey group at 12 weeks compared to control (P = 0.006) and casein (P = 0.006). There were no significant changes in inflammatory markers within or between groups. This study demonstrated that supplementation with whey protein improves blood pressure and vascular function in overweight and obese individuals.

  4. The effect of acidification of liquid whey protein concentrate on the flavor of spray-dried powder.

    PubMed

    Park, Curtis W; Bastian, Eric; Farkas, Brian; Drake, MaryAnne

    2014-07-01

    Off-flavors in whey protein negatively influence consumer acceptance of whey protein ingredient applications. Clear acidic beverages are a common application of whey protein, and recent studies have demonstrated that beverage processing steps, including acidification, enhance off-flavor production from whey protein. The objective of this study was to determine the effect of preacidification of liquid ultrafiltered whey protein concentrate (WPC) before spray drying on flavor of dried WPC. Two experiments were performed to achieve the objective. In both experiments, Cheddar cheese whey was manufactured, fat-separated, pasteurized, bleached (250 mg/kg of hydrogen peroxide), and ultrafiltered (UF) to obtain liquid WPC that was 13% solids (wt/wt) and 80% protein on a solids basis. In experiment 1, the liquid retentate was then acidified using a blend of phosphoric and citric acids to the following pH values: no acidification (control; pH 6.5), pH 5.5, or pH 3.5. The UF permeate was used to normalize the protein concentration of each treatment. The retentates were then spray dried. In experiment 2, 150 μg/kg of deuterated hexanal (D₁₂-hexanal) was added to each treatment, followed by acidification and spray drying. Both experiments were replicated 3 times. Flavor properties of the spray-dried WPC were evaluated by sensory and instrumental analyses in experiment 1 and by instrumental analysis in experiment 2. Preacidification to pH 3.5 resulted in decreased cardboard flavor and aroma intensities and an increase in soapy flavor, with decreased concentrations of hexanal, heptanal, nonanal, decanal, dimethyl disulfide, and dimethyl trisulfide compared with spray drying at pH 6.5 or 5.5. Adjustment to pH 5.5 before spray drying increased cabbage flavor and increased concentrations of nonanal at evaluation pH values of 3.5 and 5.5 and dimethyl trisulfide at all evaluation pH values. In general, the flavor effects of preacidification were consistent regardless of the pH to

  5. Physical Stability of Octenyl Succinate-Modified Polysaccharides and Whey Proteins for Potential Use as Bioactive Carriers in Food Systems.

    PubMed

    Puerta-Gomez, Alex F; Castell-Perez, M Elena

    2015-06-01

    The high cost and potential toxicity of biodegradable polymers like poly(lactic-co-glycolic)acid (PLGA) has increased the interest in natural and modified biopolymers as bioactive carriers. This study characterized the physical stability (water sorption and state transition behavior) of selected starch and proteins: octenyl succinate-modified depolymerized waxy corn starch (DWxCn), waxy rice starch (DWxRc), phytoglycogen, whey protein concentrate (80%, WPC), whey protein isolate (WPI), and α-lactalbumin (α-L) to determine their potential as carriers of bioactive compounds under different environmental conditions. After enzyme modification and particle size characterization, glass transition temperature and moisture isotherms were used to characterize the systems. DWxCn and DWxRc had increased water sorption compared to native starch. The level of octenyl succinate anhydrate (OSA) modification (3% and 7%) did not reduce the water sorption of the DWxCn and phytoglycogen samples. The Guggenheim-Andersen-de Boer model indicated that native waxy corn had significantly (P < 0.05) higher water monolayer capacity followed by 3%-OSA-modified DWxCn, WPI, 3%-OSA-modified DWxRc, α-L, and native phytoglycogen. WPC had significantly lower water monolayer capacity. All Tg values matched with the solid-like appearance of the biopolymers. Native polysaccharides and whey proteins had higher glass transition temperature (Tg) values. On the other hand, depolymerized waxy starches at 7%-OSA modification had a "melted" appearance when exposed to environments with high relative humidity (above 70%) after 10 days at 23 °C. The use of depolymerized and OSA-modified polysaccharides blended with proteins created more stable blends of biopolymers. Hence, this biopolymer would be suitable for materials exposed to high humidity environments in food applications.

  6. Effect of whey and soy protein supplementation combined with resistance training in young adults.

    PubMed

    Candow, Darren G; Burke, Natalie C; Smith-Palmer, T; Burke, Darren G

    2006-06-01

    The purpose was to compare changes in lean tissue mass, strength, and myofibrillar protein catabolism resulting from combining whey protein or soy protein with resistance training. Twenty-seven untrained healthy subjects (18 female, 9 male) age 18 to 35 y were randomly assigned (double blind) to supplement with whey protein (W; 1.2 g/kg body mass whey protein + 0.3 g/kg body mass sucrose power, N = 9: 6 female, 3 male), soy protein (S; 1.2 g/kg body mass soy protein + 0.3 g/kg body mass sucrose powder, N= 9: 6 female, 3 male) or placebo (P; 1.2 g/kg body mass maltodextrine + 0.3 g/kg body mass sucrose powder, N = 9: 6 female, 3 male) for 6 wk. Before and after training, measurements were taken for lean tissue mass (dual energy X-ray absorptiometry), strength (1-RM for bench press and hack squat), and an indicator of myofibrillar protein catabolism (urinary 3-methylhistidine). Results showed that protein supplementation during resistance training, independent of source, increased lean tissue mass and strength over isocaloric placebo and resistance training (P < 0.05). We conclude that young adults who supplement with protein during a structured resistance training program experience minimal beneficial effects in lean tissue mass and strength.

  7. Supplementation of a suboptimal protein dose with leucine or essential amino acids: effects on myofibrillar protein synthesis at rest and following resistance exercise in men.

    PubMed

    Churchward-Venne, Tyler A; Burd, Nicholas A; Mitchell, Cameron J; West, Daniel W D; Philp, Andrew; Marcotte, George R; Baker, Steven K; Baar, Keith; Phillips, Stuart M

    2012-06-01

    Leucine is a nutrient regulator of muscle protein synthesis by activating mTOR and possibly other proteins in this pathway. The purpose of this study was to examine the role of leucine in the regulation of human myofibrillar protein synthesis (MPS). Twenty-four males completed an acute bout of unilateral resistance exercise prior to consuming either: a dose (25 g) of whey protein (WHEY); 6.25 g whey protein with total leucine equivalent to WHEY (LEU); or 6.25 g whey protein with total essential amino acids (EAAs) equivalent to WHEY for all EAAs except leucine (EAA-LEU). Measures of MPS, signalling through mTOR, and amino acid transporter (AAT) mRNA abundance were made while fasted (FAST), and following feeding under rested (FED) and post-exercise (EX-FED) conditions. Leucinaemia was equivalent between WHEY and LEU and elevated compared to EAA-LEU (P=0.001). MPS was increased above FAST at 1–3 h post-exercise in both FED (P <0.001) and EX-FED (P <0.001) conditions with no treatment effect.At 3–5 h, only WHEY remained significantly elevated above FAST in EX-FED(WHEY 184% vs. LEU 55% and EAA-LEU 35%; P =0.036). AAT mRNA abundance was increased above FAST after feeding and exercise with no effect of leucinaemia. In summary, a low dose of whey protein supplemented with leucine or all other essential amino acids was as effective as a complete protein (WHEY) in stimulating postprandial MPS; however only WHEY was able to sustain increased rates of MPS post-exercise and may therefore be most suited to increase exercise-induced muscle protein accretion.

  8. Hydrolyzed whey protein prevents the development of food allergy to β-lactoglobulin in sensitized mice.

    PubMed

    Gomes-Santos, Ana Cristina; Fonseca, Roberta Cristelli; Lemos, Luisa; Reis, Daniela Silva; Moreira, Thaís Garcias; Souza, Adna Luciana; Silva, Mauro Ramalho; Silvestre, Marialice Pinto Coelho; Cara, Denise Carmona; Faria, Ana Maria Caetano

    2015-01-01

    Food allergy is an adverse immune response to dietary proteins. Hydrolysates are frequently used for children with milk allergy. However, hydrolysates effects afterwards are poorly studied. The aim of this study was to investigate the immunological consequences of hydrolyzed whey protein in allergic mice. For that, we developed a novel model of food allergy in BALB/c mice sensitized with alum-adsorbed β-lactoglobulin. These mice were orally challenged with either whey protein or whey hydrolysate. Whey-challenged mice had elevated levels of specific IgE and lost weight. They also presented gut inflammation, enhanced levels of SIgA and IL-5 as well as decreased production of IL-4 and IL-10 in the intestinal mucosa. Conversely, mice challenged with hydrolyzate maintained normal levels of IgE, IL-4 and IL-5 and showed no sign of gut inflammation probably due to increased IL-12 production in the gut. Thus, consumption of hydrolysate prevented the development of clinical signs of food allergy in mice.

  9. Different digestion of caprine whey proteins by human and porcine gastrointestinal enzymes.

    PubMed

    Eriksen, Ellen K; Holm, Halvor; Jensen, Einar; Aaboe, Ragnhild; Devold, Tove G; Jacobsen, Morten; Vegarud, Gerd E

    2010-08-01

    The objective of the present study was twofold: first to compare the degradation patterns of caprine whey proteins digested with either human digestive juices (gastric or duodenal) or commercial porcine enzymes (pepsin or pancreatic enzymes) and second to observe the effect of gastric pH on digestion. An in vitro two-step assay was performed at 37 degrees C to simulate digestion in the stomach (pH 2, 4 or 6) and the duodenum (pH 8). The whey proteins were degraded more efficiently by porcine pepsin than by human gastric juice at all pH values. Irrespective of the enzyme source, gastric digestion at pH 2 followed by duodenal digestion resulted in the most efficient degradation. Lactoferrin, serum albumin and the Ig heavy chains were highly degraded with less than 6 % remaining after digestion. About 15, 56 and 50 % Ig light chains, beta-lactoglobulin (beta-LG) and alpha-lactalbumin remained intact, respectively, when digested with porcine enzymes compared with 25, 74 and 81 % with human digestive juices. For comparison, purified bovine beta-LG was digested and the peptide profiles obtained were compared with those of the caprine beta-LG in the digested whey. The bovine beta-LG seemed to be more extensively cleaved than the caprine beta-LG in the whey. Commercial enzymes appear to digest whey proteins more efficiently compared with human digestive juices when used at similar enzyme activities. This could lead to conflicting results when comparing human in vivo protein digestion with digestion using purified enzymes of non-human species. Consequently the use of human digestive juices might be preferred.

  10. Different digestion of caprine whey proteins by human and porcine gastrointestinal enzymes.

    PubMed

    Eriksen, Ellen K; Holm, Halvor; Jensen, Einar; Aaboe, Ragnhild; Devold, Tove G; Jacobsen, Morten; Vegarud, Gerd E

    2010-08-01

    The objective of the present study was twofold: first to compare the degradation patterns of caprine whey proteins digested with either human digestive juices (gastric or duodenal) or commercial porcine enzymes (pepsin or pancreatic enzymes) and second to observe the effect of gastric pH on digestion. An in vitro two-step assay was performed at 37 degrees C to simulate digestion in the stomach (pH 2, 4 or 6) and the duodenum (pH 8). The whey proteins were degraded more efficiently by porcine pepsin than by human gastric juice at all pH values. Irrespective of the enzyme source, gastric digestion at pH 2 followed by duodenal digestion resulted in the most efficient degradation. Lactoferrin, serum albumin and the Ig heavy chains were highly degraded with less than 6 % remaining after digestion. About 15, 56 and 50 % Ig light chains, beta-lactoglobulin (beta-LG) and alpha-lactalbumin remained intact, respectively, when digested with porcine enzymes compared with 25, 74 and 81 % with human digestive juices. For comparison, purified bovine beta-LG was digested and the peptide profiles obtained were compared with those of the caprine beta-LG in the digested whey. The bovine beta-LG seemed to be more extensively cleaved than the caprine beta-LG in the whey. Commercial enzymes appear to digest whey proteins more efficiently compared with human digestive juices when used at similar enzyme activities. This could lead to conflicting results when comparing human in vivo protein digestion with digestion using purified enzymes of non-human species. Consequently the use of human digestive juices might be preferred. PMID:20307348

  11. Properties of whey protein isolate nanocomposite films reinforced with nanocellulose isolated from oat husk.

    PubMed

    Qazanfarzadeh, Zeinab; Kadivar, Mahdi

    2016-10-01

    Whey protein isolate (WPI)-based composite films with varying proportions of oat husk nanocellulose (ONC) obtained from acid sulfuric hydrolysis were prepared using a solution casting method. The obtained material after each step of the isolating cellulose, morphological and crystallinity of the ONC were studied by Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy, Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD), respectively. The effect of ONC content (0, 2.5, 5 and 7.5wt% of WPI) on physical, mechanical and barrier properties of the nanocomposite were then evaluated. FTIR spectroscopy indicated the progressive removal of non-cellulosic components from the oat husk. SEM images showed the mean width of ONC was about 76nm and XRD analysis revealed the crystallinity increased after acid hydrolysis. The films prepared with up to 5wt% ONC showed the highest tensile strength, Young's modulus, solubility and the lowest elongation at break and moisture content. At high level (7.5wt%), tensile strength, Young's modulus and solubility of the films decreased and elongation at break and moisture content increased due to agglomeration of the fillers. Nevertheless, film transparency and water vapor permeability decreased with ONC incorporation. PMID:27349890

  12. Properties of whey protein isolate nanocomposite films reinforced with nanocellulose isolated from oat husk.

    PubMed

    Qazanfarzadeh, Zeinab; Kadivar, Mahdi

    2016-10-01

    Whey protein isolate (WPI)-based composite films with varying proportions of oat husk nanocellulose (ONC) obtained from acid sulfuric hydrolysis were prepared using a solution casting method. The obtained material after each step of the isolating cellulose, morphological and crystallinity of the ONC were studied by Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy, Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD), respectively. The effect of ONC content (0, 2.5, 5 and 7.5wt% of WPI) on physical, mechanical and barrier properties of the nanocomposite were then evaluated. FTIR spectroscopy indicated the progressive removal of non-cellulosic components from the oat husk. SEM images showed the mean width of ONC was about 76nm and XRD analysis revealed the crystallinity increased after acid hydrolysis. The films prepared with up to 5wt% ONC showed the highest tensile strength, Young's modulus, solubility and the lowest elongation at break and moisture content. At high level (7.5wt%), tensile strength, Young's modulus and solubility of the films decreased and elongation at break and moisture content increased due to agglomeration of the fillers. Nevertheless, film transparency and water vapor permeability decreased with ONC incorporation.

  13. 40 CFR 405.110 - Applicability; description of the condensed whey subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... condensed whey subcategory. 405.110 Section 405.110 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION... Condensed Whey Subcategory § 405.110 Applicability; description of the condensed whey subcategory. The... whey and condensed acid whey....

  14. 40 CFR 405.110 - Applicability; description of the condensed whey subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... condensed whey subcategory. 405.110 Section 405.110 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION... Condensed Whey Subcategory § 405.110 Applicability; description of the condensed whey subcategory. The... whey and condensed acid whey....

  15. Method for chromatographic analysis of whey protein-dextran glycation products.

    PubMed

    Allelein, Susann; Arunkumar, Abhiram; Etzel, Mark R

    2012-12-28

    A chromatographic method for the analysis of whey protein isolate (WPI)-dextran glycates was developed in this work that is useful for quantification of sample purity and concentration, and as a sample-preparation method for subsequent analysis by gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) and laser-light scattering. Glycation was by the Maillard reaction between WPI and dextran of 3 different sizes. Glycate fractions from each dextran were collected and analyzed by fluorescent and glycoprotein staining of gels, bicinchoinic acid protein assay, and static and dynamic laser light scattering. The weight-average molecular mass of the glycates was 27-34 kDa (from 3.5 kDa dextran), 32-39 kDa (from 10 kDa dextran), and 250-270 kDa (from 150 kDa dextran). The new method was used to characterize the kinetics of the glycation reaction, which followed a reversible pseudo first-order model. The kinetics of decomposition of the purified glycate by hydrolysis was also examined. The new method is rapid (25 min) and quantitative, and is the first chromatographic method for direct analysis of WPI-dextran glycation products. PMID:23182287

  16. Studies on the application of temperature-responsive ion exchange polymers with whey proteins.

    PubMed

    Maharjan, Pankaj; Campi, Eva M; De Silva, Kirthi; Woonton, Brad W; Jackson, W Roy; Hearn, Milton T W

    2016-03-18

    Several new types of temperature-responsive ion exchange resins of different polymer composition have been prepared by grafting the products from the co-polymerisation of N-phenylacrylamide, N-iso-propylacrylamide and acrylic acid derivatives onto cross-linked agarose. Analysis of the binding isotherms for these different resins obtained under batch adsorption conditions indicated that the resin based on N-iso-propylacrylamide containing 5% (w/w) N-phenylacrylamide and 5% (w/w) acrylic acid resulted in the highest adsorption capacity, Bmax, for the whey protein, bovine lactoferrin, e.g. 14 mg bovine lactoferrin/mL resin at 4 °C and 62 mg bovine lactoferrin/mL resin at 40 °C, respectively. Under dynamic loading conditions at 40 °C, 94% of the loaded bovine lactoferrin on a normalised mg protein per mL resin basis was adsorbed by this new temperature-responsive ion-exchanger, and 76% was eluted by a single cycle temperature shift to 4 °C without varying the composition of the 10mM sodium dihydrogen phosphate buffer, pH 6.5, or the flow rate. The binding characteristics of these different ion exchange resins with bovine lactoferrin were also compared to results obtained using other resins based on N-isopropylacrylamide but contained N-tert-butylacrylamide rather than N-phenylacrylamide, where the corresponding dynamic capture and release properties for bovine lactoferrin required different temperature conditions of 20 °C and 50 °C, respectively for optimal desorption/adsorption. The cationic protein, bovine lactoperoxidase, was also adsorbed and desorbed with these temperature-responsive resins under similar conditions of changing temperature, whereas the anionic protein, bovine β-lactoglobulin, was not adsorbed under this regime of temperature conditions but instead eluted in the flow-through.

  17. Effectiveness of esterified whey proteins fractions against Egyptian Lethal Avian Influenza A (H5N1)

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Avian influenza A (H5N1) virus is one of the most important public health concerns worldwide. The antiviral activity of native and esterified whey proteins fractions (α- lactalbumin, β- lactoglobulin, and lactoferrin) was evaluated against A/chicken/Egypt/086Q-NLQP/2008 HPAI (H5N1) strain of clade 2.2.1 (for multiplicity of infection (1 MOI) after 72 h of incubation at 37°C in the presence of 5% CO2) using MDCK cell lines. Result Both the native and esterified lactoferrin seem to be the most active antiviral protein among the tested samples, followed by β- lactoglobulin. α-Lactalbumin had less antiviral activity even after esterification. Conclusion Esterification of whey proteins fractions especially lactoferrin and β-lactoglobulin enhanced their antiviral activity against H5N1 in a concentration dependent manner. PMID:21092081

  18. Effect of whey concentration on protein recovery in fresh ovine ricotta cheese.

    PubMed

    Salvatore, E; Pes, M; Falchi, G; Pagnozzi, D; Furesi, S; Fiori, M; Roggio, T; Addis, M F; Pirisi, A

    2014-01-01

    Ricotta cheese, particularly the ovine type, is a typical Italian dairy product obtained by heat-coagulation of the proteins in whey. The aim of this work was to investigate the influence of whey protein concentration, obtained by ultrafiltration, on yield of fresh ovine ricotta cheese. Ricotta cheeses were obtained by thermocoagulation of mixtures with protein content of 1.56, 3.10, 4.16, and 7.09g/100g from the mixing of skim whey and ultrafiltered skim whey. A fat-to-protein ratio of 1.1 (wt/wt) was obtained for all mixtures by adding fresh cream. The initial mixtures, as well as the final ricotta cheeses, were analyzed for their composition and by SDS-PAGE. Protein bands were quantified by QuantityOne software (Bio-Rad, Hercules, CA) and identified by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. Significant differences in the composition of the ricotta cheese were observed depending on protein concentration. Particularly, ricotta cheese resulting from the mixture containing 7.09g/100g of protein presented higher moisture (72.88±1.50g/100g) and protein (10.18±0.45g/100g) contents than that prepared from the mixture with 1.56g/100g of protein (69.52±1.75 and 6.70±0.85g/100g, respectively), and fat content was lower in this sample (12.20±1.60g/100g) compared with the other treatments, with mean values between 15.72 and 20.50g/100g. Each protein fraction presented a different behavior during thermocoagulation. In particular, the recovery of β-lactoglobulin and α-lactalbumin in the cheese increased as their content increased in the mixtures. It was concluded that concentrating ovine rennet whey improved the extent of heat-induced protein aggregation during the thermal coagulation process. This resulted in a better recovery of each protein fraction in the product, and in a consequent increase of ricotta cheese yield.

  19. Effect of whey concentration on protein recovery in fresh ovine ricotta cheese.

    PubMed

    Salvatore, E; Pes, M; Falchi, G; Pagnozzi, D; Furesi, S; Fiori, M; Roggio, T; Addis, M F; Pirisi, A

    2014-01-01

    Ricotta cheese, particularly the ovine type, is a typical Italian dairy product obtained by heat-coagulation of the proteins in whey. The aim of this work was to investigate the influence of whey protein concentration, obtained by ultrafiltration, on yield of fresh ovine ricotta cheese. Ricotta cheeses were obtained by thermocoagulation of mixtures with protein content of 1.56, 3.10, 4.16, and 7.09g/100g from the mixing of skim whey and ultrafiltered skim whey. A fat-to-protein ratio of 1.1 (wt/wt) was obtained for all mixtures by adding fresh cream. The initial mixtures, as well as the final ricotta cheeses, were analyzed for their composition and by SDS-PAGE. Protein bands were quantified by QuantityOne software (Bio-Rad, Hercules, CA) and identified by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. Significant differences in the composition of the ricotta cheese were observed depending on protein concentration. Particularly, ricotta cheese resulting from the mixture containing 7.09g/100g of protein presented higher moisture (72.88±1.50g/100g) and protein (10.18±0.45g/100g) contents than that prepared from the mixture with 1.56g/100g of protein (69.52±1.75 and 6.70±0.85g/100g, respectively), and fat content was lower in this sample (12.20±1.60g/100g) compared with the other treatments, with mean values between 15.72 and 20.50g/100g. Each protein fraction presented a different behavior during thermocoagulation. In particular, the recovery of β-lactoglobulin and α-lactalbumin in the cheese increased as their content increased in the mixtures. It was concluded that concentrating ovine rennet whey improved the extent of heat-induced protein aggregation during the thermal coagulation process. This resulted in a better recovery of each protein fraction in the product, and in a consequent increase of ricotta cheese yield. PMID:24856986

  20. Dietary whey protein decreases food intake and body fat in rats.

    PubMed

    Zhou, June; Keenan, Michael J; Losso, Jack N; Raggio, Anne M; Shen, Li; McCutcheon, Kathleen L; Tulley, Richard T; Blackman, Marc R; Martin, Roy J

    2011-08-01

    We investigated the effects of dietary whey protein on food intake, body fat, and body weight gain in rats. Adult (11-12 week) male Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into three dietary treatment groups for a 10-week study: control. Whey protein (HP-W), or high-protein content control (HP-S). Albumin was used as the basic protein source for all three diets. HP-W and HP-S diets contained an additional 24% (wt/wt) whey or isoflavone-free soy protein, respectively. Food intake, body weight, body fat, respiratory quotient (RQ), plasma cholecystokinin (CCK), glucagon like peptide-1 (GLP-1), peptide YY (PYY), and leptin were measured during and/or at the end of the study. The results showed that body fat and body weight gain were lower (P < 0.05) at the end of study in rats fed HP-W or HP-S vs. control diet. The cumulative food intake measured over the 10-week study period was lower in the HP-W vs. control and HP-S groups (P < 0.01). Further, HP-W fed rats exhibited lower N(2) free RQ values than did control and HP-S groups (P < 0.01). Plasma concentrations of total GLP-1 were higher in HP-W and HP-S vs. control group (P < 0.05), whereas plasma CCK, PYY, and leptin did not differ among the three groups. In conclusion, although dietary HP-W and HP-S each decrease body fat accumulation and body weight gain, the mechanism(s) involved appear to be different. HP-S fed rats exhibit increased fat oxidation, whereas HP-W fed rats show decreased food intake and increased fat oxidation, which may contribute to the effects of whey protein on body fat.

  1. Effects of Whey, Caseinate, or Milk Protein Ingestion on Muscle Protein Synthesis after Exercise

    PubMed Central

    Kanda, Atsushi; Nakayama, Kyosuke; Sanbongi, Chiaki; Nagata, Masashi; Ikegami, Shuji; Itoh, Hiroyuki

    2016-01-01

    Whey protein (WP) is characterized as a “fast” protein and caseinate (CA) as a “slow” protein according to their digestion and absorption rates. We hypothesized that co-ingestion of milk proteins (WP and CA) may be effective for prolonging the muscle protein synthesis response compared to either protein alone. We therefore compared the effect of ingesting milk protein (MP) to either WP or CA alone on muscle protein synthesis after exercise in rats. We also compared the effects of these milk-derived proteins to a control, soy protein (SP). Male Sprague-Dawley rats swam for two hours. Immediately after exercise, one of the following four solutions was administered: WP, CA, MP, or SP. Individual rats were euthanized at designated postprandial time points and triceps muscle samples collected for measurement of the protein fractional synthesis rate (FSR). FSR tended to increase in all groups post-ingestion, although the initial peaks of FSR occurred at different times (WP, peak time = 60 min, FSR = 7.76%/day; MP, peak time = 90 min, FSR = 8.34%/day; CA, peak time = 120 min, FSR = 7.85%/day). Milk-derived proteins caused significantly greater increases (p < 0.05) in FSR compared with SP at different times (WP, 60 min; MP, 90 and 120 min; CA, 120 min). Although statistical analysis could not be performed, the calculated the area under the curve (AUC) values for FSR following this trend were: MP, 534.61; CA, 498.22; WP, 473.46; and SP, 406.18. We conclude that ingestion of MP, CA or WP causes the initial peak time in muscle protein synthesis to occur at different times (WP, fast; MP, intermediate; CA, slow) and the dairy proteins have a superior effect on muscle protein synthesis after exercise compared with SP. PMID:27271661

  2. Effects of Whey, Caseinate, or Milk Protein Ingestion on Muscle Protein Synthesis after Exercise.

    PubMed

    Kanda, Atsushi; Nakayama, Kyosuke; Sanbongi, Chiaki; Nagata, Masashi; Ikegami, Shuji; Itoh, Hiroyuki

    2016-06-03

    Whey protein (WP) is characterized as a "fast" protein and caseinate (CA) as a "slow" protein according to their digestion and absorption rates. We hypothesized that co-ingestion of milk proteins (WP and CA) may be effective for prolonging the muscle protein synthesis response compared to either protein alone. We therefore compared the effect of ingesting milk protein (MP) to either WP or CA alone on muscle protein synthesis after exercise in rats. We also compared the effects of these milk-derived proteins to a control, soy protein (SP). Male Sprague-Dawley rats swam for two hours. Immediately after exercise, one of the following four solutions was administered: WP, CA, MP, or SP. Individual rats were euthanized at designated postprandial time points and triceps muscle samples collected for measurement of the protein fractional synthesis rate (FSR). FSR tended to increase in all groups post-ingestion, although the initial peaks of FSR occurred at different times (WP, peak time = 60 min, FSR = 7.76%/day; MP, peak time = 90 min, FSR = 8.34%/day; CA, peak time = 120 min, FSR = 7.85%/day). Milk-derived proteins caused significantly greater increases (p < 0.05) in FSR compared with SP at different times (WP, 60 min; MP, 90 and 120 min; CA, 120 min). Although statistical analysis could not be performed, the calculated the area under the curve (AUC) values for FSR following this trend were: MP, 534.61; CA, 498.22; WP, 473.46; and SP, 406.18. We conclude that ingestion of MP, CA or WP causes the initial peak time in muscle protein synthesis to occur at different times (WP, fast; MP, intermediate; CA, slow) and the dairy proteins have a superior effect on muscle protein synthesis after exercise compared with SP.

  3. Acute effects of whey protein isolate on blood pressure, vascular function and inflammatory markers in overweight postmenopausal women.

    PubMed

    Pal, Sebely; Ellis, Vanessa

    2011-05-01

    Previous evidence indicates that chronic consumption of dairy whey proteins has beneficial effects on CVD risk factors. The present study investigated the postprandial effects of whey protein isolate on blood pressure, vascular function and inflammatory markers in overweight and obese postmenopausal women. This was a randomised, three-way cross-over design study where twenty overweight and obese postmenopausal women consumed a breakfast meal in conjunction with one of three supplements: 45 g whey protein isolate, 45 g sodium caseinate or 45 g of a glucose control. Fasting and postprandial blood samples, blood pressure and pulse wave analysis readings were taken for up to 6 h. After consumption of the meal, both systolic and diastolic blood pressure, and augmentation index (AI) decreased initially for all interventions and gradually returned to baseline levels by 6 h. However, there were no significant differences in AI, systolic or diastolic blood pressure within or between the glucose control, casein or whey groups. There were also no significant group effects on plasma inflammatory markers (IL-6, TNF-α and C-reactive protein). The health effects previously seen with chronic whey protein ingestion were not seen in the acute 6 h postprandial period in relation to blood pressure, vascular function or inflammatory markers when compared with casein and a glucose control. This suggests that such effects are better observed from the long-term consumption of whey proteins.

  4. Anaerobic fermentative production of lactic acid using cheese whey and corn steep liquor.

    PubMed

    Agarwal, Lata; Dutt, Kakoli; Meghwanshi, Gautam K; Saxena, R K

    2008-04-01

    Cheese whey was the most suitable substrate for production of lactic acid under anaerobic conditions by Entercoccus flavescens which, on supplementating with corn steep liquor (5% v/v) and 10 mM CaCO(3) at pH 5.5, 37 degrees C, yielded 12.6 g lactic acid/l in 36 h. Production was scaled up to a 10 l bioreactor under controlled pH and continuous CO(2) supply and gave 28 g lactic acid/l in 30 h resulting in a net 8.7-fold increase in production as compared to unoptimized conditions.

  5. Whey protein supplementation accelerates satellite cell proliferation during recovery from eccentric exercise.

    PubMed

    Farup, Jean; Rahbek, Stine Klejs; Knudsen, Inge Skovgaard; de Paoli, Frank; Mackey, Abigail L; Vissing, Kristian

    2014-11-01

    Human skeletal muscle satellite cells (SCs) are essential for muscle regeneration and remodeling processes in healthy and clinical conditions involving muscle breakdown. However, the potential influence of protein supplementation on post-exercise SC regulation in human skeletal muscle has not been well investigated. In a comparative human study, we investigated the effect of hydrolyzed whey protein supplementation following eccentric exercise on fiber type-specific SC accumulation. Twenty-four young healthy subjects received either hydrolyzed whey protein + carbohydrate (whey, n = 12) or iso-caloric carbohydrate (placebo, n = 12) during post-exercise recovery from 150 maximal unilateral eccentric contractions. Prior to and 24, 48 and 168 h post-exercise, muscle biopsies were obtained from the exercise leg and analyzed for fiber type-specific SC content. Maximal voluntary contraction (MVC) and serum creatine kinase (CK) were evaluated as indices of recovery from muscle damage. In type II fiber-associated SCs, the whey group increased SCs/fiber from 0.05 [0.02; 0.07] to 0.09 [0.06; 0.12] (p < 0.05) and 0.11 [0.06; 0.16] (p < 0.001) at 24 and 48 h, respectively, and exhibited a difference from the placebo group (p < 0.05) at 48 h. The whey group increased SCs/myonuclei from 4 % [2; 5] to 10 % [4; 16] (p < 0.05) at 48 h, whereas the placebo group increased from 5 % [2; 7] to 9 % [3; 16] (p < 0.01) at 168 h. MVC decreased (p < 0.001) and muscle soreness and CK increased (p < 0.001), irrespective of supplementation. In conclusion, whey protein supplementation may accelerate SC proliferation as part of the regeneration or remodeling process after high-intensity eccentric exercise.

  6. Whey protein coating increases bilayer rigidity and stability of liposomes in food-like matrices.

    PubMed

    Frenzel, Monika; Steffen-Heins, Anja

    2015-04-15

    Liposomes are suitable for encapsulating lipophilic bioactive compounds, enhancing compound solubility, stability and bioavailability. To enhance physical stability of liposomes in food-like matrices they were coated with positively charged whey protein isolate (WPI). WPI concentration, for a successful coating, was optimised by dynamic light scattering (DLS) and zeta potential measurements. Membrane properties of coated and uncoated vesicles were investigated by electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) with site-directed and non-site-directed spin probes. Coexistence of two or three simulated spin probe populations indicated a less fluid membrane and higher concentration of water molecules in the phosphate/glycerol moiety with WPI coating. This relies on the insertion of WPI into the membrane, which is favoured by the molten globule state under investigated acidic conditions. Physical stability of liposomes benefits from WPI coating, as indicated by prolonged shelf-life, cancellation of osmotic effects in the presence of salts or sugars and a lower sensitivity towards low pH values during in vitro gastric digestion.

  7. Fabrication and characterization of the nano-composite of whey protein hydrolysate chelated with calcium.

    PubMed

    Xixi, Cai; Lina, Zhao; Shaoyun, Wang; Pingfan, Rao

    2015-03-01

    The nano-composites of whey protein hydrolysate (WPH) chelated with calcium were fabricated in aqueous solution at 30 °C for 20 min, with the ratio of hydrolysate to calcium 15 : 1 (w/w). UV scanning spectroscopy, fluorescent spectroscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, dynamic light scattering and atomic force microscopy were applied to characterize the structure of the WPH-calcium chelate. The nano-composites showed the successful incorporation of calcium into the WPH, indicating the interaction between calcium and WPH. The chelation of calcium ions to WPH caused molecular folding and aggregation which led to the formation of a WPH-calcium chelate of nanoparticle size, and the principal sites of calcium-binding corresponded to the carboxyl groups and carbonyl groups of WPH. The WPH-calcium chelate demonstrated excellent stability and absorbability under both acidic and basic conditions, which was beneficial for calcium absorption in the gastrointestinal tract of the human body. Moreover, the calcium absorption of the WPH-calcium chelate on Caco-2 cells was significantly higher than those of calcium gluconate and CaCl₂ in vitro, suggesting the possible increase in calcium bioavailability. The findings suggest that the WPH-calcium chelate has the potential in making dietary supplements for improving bone health of the human body.

  8. Oxygen permeability and mechanical properties of films from hydrolyzed whey protein.

    PubMed

    Sothornvit, R; Krochta, J M

    2000-09-01

    The effects of whey protein hydrolysis on film oxygen permeability (OP) and mechanical properties at several glycerol-plasticizer levels were studied. Both 5.5% and 10% degree of hydrolysis (DH) whey protein isolate (WPI) had significant effect (p 0.05) occurred for film OP between unhydrolyzed WPI, 5.5% DH WPI, and 10% DH WPI films at the same glycerol content. Hydrolyzed WPI films of mechanical properties similar to those of WPI films had better oxygen barrier. Therefore, use of hydrolyzed WPI allowed achievement of desired film flexibility with less glycerol and with smaller increase in OP.

  9. Dietary whey protein lessens several risk factors for metabolic diseases: a review

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Obesity and type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM) have grown in prevalence around the world, and recently, related diseases have been considered epidemic. Given the high cost of treatment of obesity/DM-associated diseases, strategies such as dietary manipulation have been widely studied; among them, the whey protein diet has reached popularity because it has been suggested as a strategy for the prevention and treatment of obesity and DM in both humans and animals. Among its main actions, the following activities stand out: reduction of serum glucose in healthy individuals, impaired glucose tolerance in DM and obese patients; reduction in body weight; maintenance of muscle mass; increases in the release of anorectic hormones such as cholecystokinin, leptin, and glucagon like-peptide 1 (GLP-1); and a decrease in the orexigenic hormone ghrelin. Furthermore, studies have shown that whey protein can also lead to reductions in blood pressure, inflammation, and oxidative stress. PMID:22676328

  10. Usage of whey protein may cause liver damage via inflammatory and apoptotic responses.

    PubMed

    Gürgen, S G; Yücel, A T; Karakuş, A Ç; Çeçen, D; Özen, G; Koçtürk, S

    2015-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the long- and short-term inflammatory and apoptotic effects of whey protein on the livers of non-exercising rats. Thirty rats were divided into three groups namely (1) control group, (2) short-term whey (WS) protein diet (252 g/kg for 5 days), and (3) long-term whey (WL) protein diet (252 g/kg for 4 weeks). Interleukin 1β (IL-1β), IL-6, tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α), and cytokeratin 18 (CK-18-M30) were assessed using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and immunohistochemical methods. Apoptosis was evaluated using the terminal transferase-mediated deoxyuridine triphosphate nick-end labeling (TUNEL) method. Hepatotoxicity was evaluated by quantitation of serum aspartate aminotransferase (AST) and alanine aminotransferase (ALT). Based on the biochemical levels and immunohistochemical results, the highest level of IL-1β was identified in the WL group (p < 0.01). The IL-6 and TNF-α results were slightly lower in the WS group than in the control group and were highest in the WL group (p < 0.01). The CK-18-M30 and TUNEL results were highest in the WS group and exhibited medium intensity in the WL group (p < 0.01). AST results were statistically significant for all groups, while our ALT groups were particularly significant between the WL and control groups (p < 0.01). The results showed that when whey protein is used in an uninformed manner and without exercising, adverse effects on the liver may occur by increasing the apoptotic signal in the short term and increasing inflammatory markers and hepatotoxicity in the long term.

  11. Effects of whey protein isolate on body composition, lipids, insulin and glucose in overweight and obese individuals.

    PubMed

    Pal, Sebely; Ellis, Vanessa; Dhaliwal, Satvinder

    2010-09-01

    The health benefits currently associated with increased dairy intake may be attributable to the whey component of dairy proteins. The present study evaluated the effects of whey protein supplementation on body composition, lipids, insulin and glucose in comparison to casein and glucose (control) supplementation in overweight/obese individuals for 12 weeks. The subjects were randomised to whey protein, casein or glucose supplementation for 12 weeks according to a parallel design. Fasting blood samples and dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry measurements were taken. Seventy men and women with a mean age of 48.4 (SEM 0.86) years and a mean BMI of 31.3 (SEM 0.8) kg/m2 completed the study. Subjects supplemented with whey protein had no significant change in body composition or serum glucose at 12 weeks compared with the control or casein group. Fasting TAG levels were significantly lowered in the whey group compared with the control group at 6 weeks (P = 0.025) and 12 weeks (P = 0.035). There was a significant decrease in total cholesterol and LDL cholesterol at week 12 in the whey group compared with the casein (P = 0.026 and 0.045, respectively) and control groups (P < 0.001 and 0.003, respectively). Fasting insulin levels and homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance scores were also significantly decreased in the whey group compared with the control group (P = 0.049 and P = 0.034, respectively). The present study demonstrated that supplementation with whey proteins improves fasting lipids and insulin levels in overweight and obese individuals.

  12. Inhibition of Tomato Yellow Leaf Curl Virus (TYLCV) using whey proteins

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    The antiviral activity of native and esterified whey proteins fractions (α-lactalbumin, β-lactoglobulin, and lactoferrin) was studied to inhibit tomato yellow leaf curl virus (TYLCV) on infected tomato plants. Whey proteins fractions and their esterified derivatives were sprayed into TYLCV-infected plants. Samples were collected from infected leaves before treatment, 7 and 15 days after treatment for DNA and molecular hybridization analysis. The most evident inhibition of virus replication was observed after 7 and 15 days using α-lactoferrin and α-lactalbumin, respectively. Native and esterified lactoferrin showed complete inhibition after 7 days. On the other hand, native β-lactoglobulin showed inhibition after 7 and 15 days whereas esterified β-lactoglobulin was comparatively more effective after 7 days. The relative amount of viral DNA was less affected by the esterified α-lactalbumin whereas native α-lactalbumin inhibited virus replication completely after 15 days. These results indicate that native or modified whey proteins fractions can be used for controlling the TYLCV-infected plants. PMID:20128897

  13. The safety of whey protein concentrate derived from the milk of cows immunized against Clostridium difficile.

    PubMed

    Young, Karen W H; Munro, Ian C; Taylor, Steve L; Veldkamp, Peter; van Dissel, Jaap T

    2007-04-01

    A whey protein concentrate prepared from the milk of cows that have been immunized against Clostridium difficile (C. difficile) and its toxins, toxin A and toxin B, is produced for use as a medical food for the dietary management of patients with C. difficile-associated diarrhea (CDAD) to prevent a relapse of the infection. The safety of anti-C. difficile whey protein concentrate (anti-CD WPC) is supported by analytical data comparing the composition of raw milk from immunized cows versus that from non-immunized cows, and the composition of anti-CD WPC versus that of regular whey protein concentrate. Additionally, a prospective clinical study was conducted in 77 patients with CDAD to demonstrate the safety of consuming anti-CD WPC to prevent relapse of the infection. This study, which included adverse event monitoring, physical examinations, and extensive hematological and biochemical assessments, showed that anti-CD WPC is safe to consume by patients with CDAD. The available analytical and clinical evidence demonstrate that anti-CD WPC is safe for use by individuals with CDAD, under the described conditions of use.

  14. High-Pressure-High-Temperature Processing Reduces Maillard Reaction and Viscosity in Whey Protein-Sugar Solutions.

    PubMed

    Avila Ruiz, Geraldine; Xi, Bingyan; Minor, Marcel; Sala, Guido; van Boekel, Martinus; Fogliano, Vincenzo; Stieger, Markus

    2016-09-28

    The aim of the study was to determine the influence of pressure in high-pressure-high-temperature (HPHT) processing on Maillard reactions and protein aggregation of whey protein-sugar solutions. Solutions of whey protein isolate containing either glucose or trehalose at pH 6, 7, and 9 were treated by HPHT processing or conventional high-temperature (HT) treatments. Browning was reduced, and early and advanced Maillard reactions were retarded under HPHT processing at all pH values compared to HT treatment. HPHT induced a larger pH drop than HT treatments, especially at pH 9, which was not associated with Maillard reactions. After HPHT processing at pH 7, protein aggregation and viscosity of whey protein isolate-glucose/trehalose solutions remained unchanged. It was concluded that HPHT processing can potentially improve the quality of protein-sugar-containing foods, for which browning and high viscosities are undesired, such as high-protein beverages.

  15. Protection of Lactobacillus acidophilus NRRL-B 4495 under in vitro gastrointestinal conditions with whey protein/pullulan microcapsules.

    PubMed

    Çabuk, Burcu; Tellioğlu Harsa, Şebnem

    2015-12-01

    In this research, whey protein/pullulan (WP/pullulan) microcapsules were developed in order to assess its protective effect on the viability of Lactobacillus acidophilus NRRL-B 4495 under in vitro gastrointestinal conditions. Results demonstrated that WP/pullulan microencapsulated cells exhibited significantly (p ≤ 0.05) higher resistance to simulated gastric acid and bile salt. Pullulan incorporation into protein wall matrix resulted in improved survival as compared to free cells after 3 h incubation in simulated gastric solution. Moreover WP/pullulan microcapsules were found to release over 70% of encapsulated L. acidophilus NRRL-B 4495 cells within 1 h. The effect of encapsulation during refrigerated storage was also studied. Free bacteria exhibited 3.96 log reduction while, WP/pullulan encapsulated bacteria showed 1.64 log reduction after 4 weeks of storage. PMID:26100319

  16. Protection of Lactobacillus acidophilus NRRL-B 4495 under in vitro gastrointestinal conditions with whey protein/pullulan microcapsules.

    PubMed

    Çabuk, Burcu; Tellioğlu Harsa, Şebnem

    2015-12-01

    In this research, whey protein/pullulan (WP/pullulan) microcapsules were developed in order to assess its protective effect on the viability of Lactobacillus acidophilus NRRL-B 4495 under in vitro gastrointestinal conditions. Results demonstrated that WP/pullulan microencapsulated cells exhibited significantly (p ≤ 0.05) higher resistance to simulated gastric acid and bile salt. Pullulan incorporation into protein wall matrix resulted in improved survival as compared to free cells after 3 h incubation in simulated gastric solution. Moreover WP/pullulan microcapsules were found to release over 70% of encapsulated L. acidophilus NRRL-B 4495 cells within 1 h. The effect of encapsulation during refrigerated storage was also studied. Free bacteria exhibited 3.96 log reduction while, WP/pullulan encapsulated bacteria showed 1.64 log reduction after 4 weeks of storage.

  17. Kinetic modeling of lactic acid production from batch submerged fermentation of cheese whey

    SciTech Connect

    Tango, M.S.A.; Ghaly, A.E.

    1999-12-01

    A kinetic model for the production of lactic acid through batch submerged fermentation of cheese whey using Lactobacillus helveticus was developed. The model accounts for the effect of substrate limitation, substrate inhibition, lactic acid inhibition, maintenance energy and cell death on the cell growth, substrate utilization, and lactic acid production during the fermentation process. The model was evaluated using experimental data from Tango and Ghaly (1999). The predicted results obtained from the model compared well with experimental (R{sup 2} = 0.92--0.98). The model was also used to investigate the effect of the initial substrate concentration on the lag period, fermentation time, specific growth rate, and cell productivity during batch fermentation. The maximum specific growth rate ({micro}{sub m}), the saturation constant (K{sub S}), the substrate inhibition constant (K{sub IS}), and the lactic acid inhibition constant (K{sub IP}) were found to be 0.25h{sup {minus}1}, 0.9 g/L, 250.0 g/L, and 60.0 g/L, respectively. High initial lactose concentration in cheese whey reduced both the specific growth rate and substrate utilization rate due to the substrate inhibition phenomenon. The maximum lactic acid production occurred at about 100 g/L initial lactose concentration after 40 h of fermentation. The maximum lactic acid concentration above which Lactobacillus helveticus did not grow was found to be 80.0 g/L.

  18. Sensing Small Changes in Protein Abundance: Stimulation of Caco-2 Cells by Human Whey Proteins.

    PubMed

    Cundiff, Judy K; McConnell, Elizabeth J; Lohe, Kimberly J; Maria, Sarah D; McMahon, Robert J; Zhang, Qiang

    2016-01-01

    Mass spectrometry (MS)-based proteomic approaches have largely facilitated our systemic understanding of cellular processes and biological functions. Cutoffs in protein expression fold changes (FCs) are often arbitrarily determined in MS-based quantification with no demonstrable determination of small magnitude changes in protein expression. Therefore, many biological insights may remain veiled due to high FC cutoffs. Herein, we employ the intestinal epithelial cell (IEC) line Caco-2 as a model system to demonstrate the dynamicity of tandem-mass-tag (TMT) labeling over a range of 5-40% changes in protein abundance, with the variance controls of ± 5% FC for around 95% of TMT ratios when sampling 9-12 biological replicates. We further applied this procedure to examine the temporal proteome of Caco-2 cells upon exposure to human whey proteins (WP). Pathway assessments predict subtle effects due to WP in moderating xenobiotic metabolism, promoting proliferation and various other cellular functions in differentiating enterocyte-like Caco-2 cells. This demonstration of a sensitive MS approach may open up new perspectives in the system-wide exploration of elusive or transient biological effects by facilitating scrutiny of narrow windows of proteome abundance changes. Furthermore, we anticipate this study will encourage more investigations of WP on infant gastrointestinal tract development.

  19. Incorporation of radiolabeled whey proteins into casein micelles by heat processing

    SciTech Connect

    Noh, B.; Richardson, T. )

    1989-07-01

    Skim milk was heated at .70, 95, and 140{degree}C to simulate the processes of pasteurization, forewarming, and UHT sterilization, and the specific interactions between {alpha}-lactalbumin or {beta}-lactoglobulin and the caseins studied using tracer amounts of added {sup 14}C-labeled whey protein. Radioactivities of the whey and of the washed casein pellets from renneted skim milk were measured and the extent of the interaction estimated. Upon heating skim milk at 70{degree}C for 45 s, less than 2% {beta}-lactoglobulin and less than .3% {alpha}-lactalbumin were incorporated into the curd. Heating at 95{degree}C for .5 to 20 min resulted in 58 to 85% of the {beta}-lactoglobulin and 8 to 55% of the {alpha}-lactalbumin becoming associated with the curd. Heating at 140{degree}C for 2 and 4 s caused 43 and 54% of the {beta}-lactoglobulin and 9 and 12% of the {alpha}-lactalbumin, respectively, to be bound to the curd fraction. The radiolabeling technique is very sensitive and useful for tracing low levels of interaction between whey proteins and casein in heated milk systems.

  20. Effect of homogenization and pasteurization on the structure and stability of whey protein in milk.

    PubMed

    Qi, Phoebe X; Ren, Daxi; Xiao, Yingping; Tomasula, Peggy M

    2015-05-01

    The effect of homogenization alone or in combination with high-temperature, short-time (HTST) pasteurization or UHT processing on the whey fraction of milk was investigated using highly sensitive spectroscopic techniques. In pilot plant trials, 1-L quantities of whole milk were homogenized in a 2-stage homogenizer at 35°C (6.9 MPa/10.3 MPa) and, along with skim milk, were subjected to HTST pasteurization (72°C for 15 s) or UHT processing (135°C for 2 s). Other whole milk samples were processed using homogenization followed by either HTST pasteurization or UHT processing. The processed skim and whole milk samples were centrifuged further to remove fat and then acidified to pH 4.6 to isolate the corresponding whey fractions, and centrifuged again. The whey fractions were then purified using dialysis and investigated using the circular dichroism, Fourier transform infrared, and Trp intrinsic fluorescence spectroscopic techniques. Results demonstrated that homogenization combined with UHT processing of milk caused not only changes in protein composition but also significant secondary structural loss, particularly in the amounts of apparent antiparallel β-sheet and α-helix, as well as diminished tertiary structural contact. In both cases of homogenization alone and followed by HTST treatments, neither caused appreciable chemical changes, nor remarkable secondary structural reduction. But disruption was evident in the tertiary structural environment of the whey proteins due to homogenization of whole milk as shown by both the near-UV circular dichroism and Trp intrinsic fluorescence. In-depth structural stability analyses revealed that even though processing of milk imposed little impairment on the secondary structural stability, the tertiary structural stability of whey protein was altered significantly. The following order was derived based on these studies: raw whole>HTST, homogenized, homogenized and pasteurized>skimmed and pasteurized, and skimmed UHT

  1. Functional properties of whey protein and its application in nanocomposite materials and functional foods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walsh, Helen

    Whey is a byproduct of cheese making; whey proteins are globular proteins which can be modified and polymerized to add functional benefits, these benefits can be both nutritional and structural in foods. Modified proteins can be used in non-foods, being of particular interest in polymer films and coatings. Food packaging materials, including plastics, can linings, interior coatings of paper containers, and beverage cap sealing materials, are generally made of synthetic petroleum based compounds. These synthetic materials may pose a potential human health risk due to presence of certain chemicals such as Bisphenol A (BPA). They also add to environmental pollution, being difficult to degrade. Protein-based materials do not have the same issues as synthetics and so can be used as alternatives in many packaging types. As proteins are generally hydrophilic they must be modified structurally and their performance enhanced by the addition of waterproofing agents. Polymerization of whey proteins results in a network, adding both strength and flexibility. The most interesting of the food-safe waterproofing agents are the (large aspect ratio) nanoclays. Nanoclays are relatively inexpensive, widely available and have low environmental impact. The clay surface can be modified to make it organophilic and so compatible with organic polymers. The objective of this study is the use of polymerized whey protein (PWP), with reinforcing nanoclays, to produce flexible surface coatings which limit the transfer of contents while maintaining food safety. Four smectite and kaolin type clays, one treated and three natural were assessed for strengthening qualities and the potential waterproofing and plasticizing benefits of other additives were also analyzed. The nutritional benefits of whey proteins can also be used to enhance the protein content of various foodstuffs. Drinkable yogurt is a popular beverage in the US and other countries and is considered a functional food, especially when

  2. Effect of whey supplementation on circulating C-reactive protein: a meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Ling-Mei; Xu, Jia-Ying; Rao, Chun-Ping; Han, Shufen; Wan, Zhongxiao; Qin, Li-Qiang

    2015-02-09

    Whey supplementation is beneficial for human health, possibly by reducing the circulating C-reactive protein (CRP) level, a sensitive marker of inflammation. Thus, a meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials was conducted to evaluate their relationship. A systematic literature search was conducted in July, 2014, to identify eligible studies. Either a fixed-effects model or a random-effects model was used to calculate pooled effects. The meta-analysis results of nine trials showed a slight, but no significant, reduction of 0.42 mg/L (95% CI -0.96, 0.13) in CRP level with the supplementation of whey protein and its derivates. Relatively high heterogeneity across studies was observed. Subgroup analyses showed that whey significantly lowered CRP by 0.72 mg/L (95% CI -0.97, -0.47) among trials with a daily whey dose≥20 g/day and by 0.67 mg/L (95% CI -1.21, -0.14) among trials with baseline CRP≥3 mg/L. Meta-regression analysis revealed that the baseline CRP level was a potential effect modifier of whey supplementation in reducing CRP. In conclusion, our meta-analysis did not find sufficient evidence that whey and its derivates elicited a beneficial effect in reducing circulating CRP. However, they may significantly reduce CRP among participants with highly supplemental doses or increased baseline CRP levels.

  3. Influence of heat and shear induced protein aggregation on the in vitro digestion rate of whey proteins.

    PubMed

    Singh, Tanoj K; Øiseth, Sofia K; Lundin, Leif; Day, Li

    2014-11-01

    Protein intake is essential for growth and repair of body cells, the normal functioning of muscles, and health related immune functions. Most food proteins are consumed after undergoing various degrees of processing. Changes in protein structure and assembly as a result of processing impact the digestibility of proteins. Research in understanding to what extent the protein structure impacts the rate of proteolysis under human physiological conditions has gained considerable interest. In this work, four whey protein gels were prepared using heat processing at two different pH values, 6.8 and 4.6, with and without applied shear. The gels showed different protein network microstructures due to heat induced unfolding (at pH 6.8) or lack of unfolding, thus resulting in fine stranded protein networks. When shear was applied during heating, particulate protein networks were formed. The differences in the gel microstructures resulted in considerable differences in their rheological properties. An in vitro gastric and intestinal model was used to investigate the resulting effects of these different gel structures on whey protein digestion. In addition, the rate of digestion was monitored by taking samples at various time points throughout the in vitro digestion process. The peptides in the digesta were profiled using SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, reversed-phase-HPLC and LC-MS. Under simulated gastric conditions, whey proteins in structured gels were hydrolysed faster than native proteins in solution. The rate of peptides released during in vitro digestion differed depending on the structure of the gels and extent of protein aggregation. The outcomes of this work highlighted that changes in the network structure of the protein can influence the rate and pattern of its proteolysis under gastrointestinal conditions. Such knowledge could assist the food industry in designing novel food formulations to control the digestion kinetics and the release of biologically

  4. FTIR Examination Of Thermal Denaturation And Gel-Formation In Whey Proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Byler, D. M.; Purcell, James M.

    1989-12-01

    Second derivative Fourier-transform infrared [DR2-FTIR] spectra of β-lactoglobulin [RIG], serum albumin [BSA], and a-lactalbumin [aLA], three proteins found in bovine whey, are markedly different before and after thermal denaturation. In no case, however, do the heat-treated proteins unfold as completely as does alkaline-denatured RLG [1]. The spectra also suggest that, for RLG and BSA, formation of intermolecularly hydrogen-bonded (β-strands precedes the onset of heat-induced gelation.

  5. Whey protein supplementation does not alter plasma branched-chained amino acid profiles but results in unique metabolomics patterns in obese women enrolled in an 8-week weight loss trial

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Background: It has been suggested that perturbations in branched-chain amino acid (BCAA) catabolism are associated with insulin resistance and contribute to elevated systemic BCAAs. Evidence in rodents suggests dietary protein rich in BCAAs can increase BCAA catabolism, but there is limited evidence...

  6. Whey cheese: membrane technology to increase yields.

    PubMed

    Riera, Francisco; González, Pablo; Muro, Claudia

    2016-02-01

    Sweet cheese whey has been used to obtain whey cheese without the addition of milk. Pre-treated whey was concentrated by nanofiltration (NF) at different concentration ratios (2, 2.5 and 2.8) or by reverse osmosis (RO) (2-3 times). After the concentration, whey was acidified with lactic acid until a final pH of 4.6-4.8, and heated to temperatures between 85 and 90 °C. The coagulated fraction (supernatant) was collected and freely drained over 4 h. The cheese-whey yield and protein, fat, lactose and ash recoveries in the final product were calculated. The membrane pre-concentration step caused an increase in the whey-cheese yield. The final composition of products was compared with traditional cheese-whey manufacture products (without membrane concentration). Final cheese yields found were to be between 5 and 19.6%, which are higher than those achieved using the traditional 'Requesón' process. PMID:26869115

  7. Modulatory effect of whey proteins in some cytokines involved in wound healing in male diabetic albino rats.

    PubMed

    Abdel-Salam, Bahaa Kenawy Abuel-Hussien

    2014-10-01

    The anti-inflammatory cytokines (interleukin (IL)-4 and IL-10) and the pro-inflammatory cytokines (IL-1β, IL-6, and tumor necroses factor-alpha (TNF-α)) have important functions in wound healing. Thus, the aim of this study was to determine whether dietary supplementation with whey protein could enhance normal inflammatory responses during wound healing in diabetic rats. In this study, male albino rats were divided into a wounded control group, a wounded diabetic group, and a wounded diabetic group supplemented with whey protein orally at a dose of 100 mg/kg body weight. Tested rats showed increasing wound closure in rats treated with whey protein. In addition, after 4 days of wound, modulation in IL-4, IL-10, IL-1β, IL-6, and TNF-α levels were detected. Statistical analysis of data showed significant difference between the whey-protein-treated group and either control or diabetic groups (P < 0.05). Dietary supplementation with whey protein enhances the normal inflammatory responses during wound healing in diabetic rats by modulating the levels of some anti-inflammatory and inflammatory cytokines.

  8. Capillary zone electrophoresis for fatty acids with chemometrics for the determination of milk adulteration by whey addition.

    PubMed

    de Oliveira Mendes, Thiago; Porto, Brenda Lee Simas; Bell, Maria José Valenzuela; Perrone, Ítalo Tuler; de Oliveira, Marcone Augusto Leal

    2016-12-15

    Adulteration of milk with whey is difficult to detect because these two have similar physical and chemical characteristics. The traditional methodologies to monitor this fraud are based on the analysis of caseinomacropeptide. The present study proposes a new approach to detect and quantify this fraud using the fatty acid profiles of milk and whey. Fatty acids C14:0, C16:0, C18:0, C18:1, C18:2 and C18:3 were selected by gas chromatography associated with discriminant analysis to differentiate milk and whey, as they are present in quite different amounts. These six fatty acids were quantified within a short time by capillary zone electrophoresis in a set of adulterated milk samples. The correlation coefficient between the true values of whey addition and the experimental values obtained by this technique was 0.973. The technique is thus useful for the evaluation of milk adulteration with whey, contributing to the quality control of milk in the dairy industry. PMID:27451230

  9. Capillary zone electrophoresis for fatty acids with chemometrics for the determination of milk adulteration by whey addition.

    PubMed

    de Oliveira Mendes, Thiago; Porto, Brenda Lee Simas; Bell, Maria José Valenzuela; Perrone, Ítalo Tuler; de Oliveira, Marcone Augusto Leal

    2016-12-15

    Adulteration of milk with whey is difficult to detect because these two have similar physical and chemical characteristics. The traditional methodologies to monitor this fraud are based on the analysis of caseinomacropeptide. The present study proposes a new approach to detect and quantify this fraud using the fatty acid profiles of milk and whey. Fatty acids C14:0, C16:0, C18:0, C18:1, C18:2 and C18:3 were selected by gas chromatography associated with discriminant analysis to differentiate milk and whey, as they are present in quite different amounts. These six fatty acids were quantified within a short time by capillary zone electrophoresis in a set of adulterated milk samples. The correlation coefficient between the true values of whey addition and the experimental values obtained by this technique was 0.973. The technique is thus useful for the evaluation of milk adulteration with whey, contributing to the quality control of milk in the dairy industry.

  10. High whey protein intake delayed the loss of lean body mass in healthy old rats, whereas protein type and polyphenol/antioxidant supplementation had no effects.

    PubMed

    Mosoni, Laurent; Gatineau, Eva; Gatellier, Philippe; Migné, Carole; Savary-Auzeloux, Isabelle; Rémond, Didier; Rocher, Emilie; Dardevet, Dominique

    2014-01-01

    Our aim was to compare and combine 3 nutritional strategies to slow down the age-related loss of muscle mass in healthy old rats: 1) increase protein intake, which is likely to stimulate muscle protein anabolism; 2) use leucine rich, rapidly digested whey proteins as protein source (whey proteins are recognized as the most effective proteins to stimulate muscle protein anabolism). 3) Supplement animals with a mixture of chamomile extract, vitamin E, vitamin D (reducing inflammation and oxidative stress is also effective to improve muscle anabolism). Such comparisons and combinations were never tested before. Nutritional groups were: casein 12% protein, whey 12% protein, whey 18% protein and each of these groups were supplemented or not with polyphenols/antioxidants. During 6 months, we followed changes of weight, food intake, inflammation (plasma fibrinogen and alpha-2-macroglobulin) and body composition (DXA). After 6 months, we measured muscle mass, in vivo and ex-vivo fed and post-absorptive muscle protein synthesis, ex-vivo muscle proteolysis, and oxidative stress parameters (liver and muscle glutathione, SOD and total antioxidant activities, muscle carbonyls and TBARS). We showed that although micronutrient supplementation reduced inflammation and oxidative stress, the only factor that significantly reduced the loss of lean body mass was the increase in whey protein intake, with no detectable effect on muscle protein synthesis, and a tendency to reduce muscle proteolysis. We conclude that in healthy rats, increasing protein intake is an effective way to delay sarcopenia.

  11. A novel whey protein synthesized only in late lactation by the mammary gland from the tammar (Macropus eugenii).

    PubMed Central

    Nicholas, K R; Messer, M; Elliott, C; Maher, F; Shaw, D C

    1987-01-01

    A major whey protein which appears in milk from the tammar wallaby (Macropus eugenii) only during the second half of lactation (late lactation protein-A, LLP-A) was purified to apparent homogeneity by ion-exchange chromatography and gel filtration. An Mr of 21,600 +/- 2000 was calculated from its amino acid composition. A computer-based comparison of the sequence of the first 69 amino acid residues with the Atlas of Protein Sequence data base showed no significant homology with known proteins. Antiserum to LLP-A was prepared in rabbits, and single radial immunodiffusion was used to measure the amounts of LLP-A in milk during the first 40 weeks of lactation. LLP-A was first detected at 26 weeks; thereafter its concentration increased abruptly, to reach a maximum of 26 g/l at approx. 36 weeks of lactation. Explants prepared from mammary gland biopsies at 20 and 35 weeks of lactation were exposed to [3H]amino acids for 8 h; immunoprecipitation of tissue extracts showed that, whereas the rate of casein synthesis was the same at both stages of lactation, LLP-A was synthesized only by the 35-week mammary gland. Images Fig. 1. PMID:3109381

  12. Effect of fermentation conditions on the production of citric acid from cheese whey by Aspergillus niger.

    PubMed

    el-Samragy, Y A; Khorshid, M A; Foda, M I; Shehata, A E

    1996-04-01

    The effect of pH value, methanol, and salt concentration on the production of citric acid from cheese whey by two strains of Aspergillus niger, i.e. CAIM 111 and CAIM 167, was investigated. Lactose concentration, utilized lactose, citric acid concentration, conversion coefficient of lactose to citric acid, and mycelial dry weight were measured during the fermentation process. The maximum citric acid concentration (1.06 and 0.82 g/l), and conversion coefficient (5.58 and 7.45%) were obtained at pH 3.5 after 9 days of fermentation for A. niger CAIM 111 and A. niger CAIM 167, respectively. The presence of 4% (v/v) methanol in the fermentation medium increased the amount of citric acid produced by A. niger CAIM 111 and A. niger CAIM 167 by 23% and 18%, respectively. Both strains showed a high ability to utilize lactose for the production of citric acid when grown in the presence of 10% (w/v) salt. The conversion coefficient of lactose to citric acid was 28.24% for A. niger CAIM 111 and 25.60% for A. niger CAIM 167 when the fermentation medium had a 10% (w/v) level of salt. The cumulative effect of fermentation medium pH (3.5), methanol concentration (4%, v/v) and salt concentration (10%, w/v) during the fermentation process of whey did not enhance the production of citric acid by A. niger CAIM 111, while it did increase the production of citric acid by A. niger CAIM 167 by about 4-fold.

  13. Cocoa and Whey Protein Differentially Affect Markers of Lipid and Glucose Metabolism and Satiety.

    PubMed

    Campbell, Caroline L; Foegeding, E Allen; Harris, G Keith

    2016-03-01

    Food formulation with bioactive ingredients is a potential strategy to promote satiety and weight management. Whey proteins are high in leucine and are shown to decrease hunger ratings and increase satiety hormone levels; cocoa polyphenolics moderate glucose levels and slow digestion. This study examined the effects of cocoa and whey proteins on lipid and glucose metabolism and satiety in vitro and in a clinical trial. In vitro, 3T3-L1 preadipocytes were treated with 0.5-100 μg/mL cocoa polyphenolic extract (CPE) and/or 1-15 mM leucine (Leu) and assayed for lipid accumulation and leptin production. In vivo, a 6-week clinical trial consisted of nine panelists (age: 22.6 ± 1.7; BMI: 22.3 ± 2.1) consuming chocolate-protein beverages once per week, including placebo, whey protein isolate (WPI), low polyphenolic cocoa (LP), high polyphenolic cocoa (HP), LP-WPI, and HP-WPI. Measurements included blood glucose and adiponectin levels, and hunger ratings at baseline and 0.5-4.0 h following beverage consumption. At levels of 50 and 100 μg/mL, CPE significantly inhibited preadipocyte lipid accumulation by 35% and 50%, respectively, and by 22% and 36% when combined with 15 mM Leu. Leu treatment increased adipocyte leptin production by 26-37%. In the clinical trial, all beverages significantly moderated blood glucose levels 30 min postconsumption. WPI beverages elicited lowest peak glucose levels and HP levels were significantly lower than LP. The WPI and HP beverage treatments significantly increased adiponectin levels, but elicited no significant changes in hunger ratings. These trends suggest that combinations of WPI and cocoa polyphenols may improve markers of metabolic syndrome and satiety. PMID:26987021

  14. Effect of casein to whey protein ratios on the protein interactions and coagulation properties of low-fat yogurt.

    PubMed

    Zhao, L L; Wang, X L; Tian, Q; Mao, X Y

    2016-10-01

    In this study, we investigated the effect of casein (CN) to whey protein (WP) ratios (4:1, 3:1, 2:1, and 1:1) on gelation properties and microstructure of low-fat yogurt made with reconstituted skim milk with or without addition of whey protein concentrate. The rheological properties (storage modulus, G'; yield stress; and yield strain) of the obtained low-fat yogurt were greatly enhanced, the fermentation period was shortened, and the microstructure became more compact with smaller pores as the CN:WP ratio decreased. When CN:WP was 2:1 or 1:1, the obtained yogurt coagulum showed higher G' and greater yield stress, with more compact crosslinking and smaller pores. In addition, the more of skim milk powder was replaced by whey protein concentrate, the more disulfide bonds were formed and the greater the occurrence of hydrophobic interactions during heat treatment, which can improve the rheological properties and microstructure of low-fat yogurt. PMID:27522418

  15. Effect of casein to whey protein ratios on the protein interactions and coagulation properties of low-fat yogurt.

    PubMed

    Zhao, L L; Wang, X L; Tian, Q; Mao, X Y

    2016-10-01

    In this study, we investigated the effect of casein (CN) to whey protein (WP) ratios (4:1, 3:1, 2:1, and 1:1) on gelation properties and microstructure of low-fat yogurt made with reconstituted skim milk with or without addition of whey protein concentrate. The rheological properties (storage modulus, G'; yield stress; and yield strain) of the obtained low-fat yogurt were greatly enhanced, the fermentation period was shortened, and the microstructure became more compact with smaller pores as the CN:WP ratio decreased. When CN:WP was 2:1 or 1:1, the obtained yogurt coagulum showed higher G' and greater yield stress, with more compact crosslinking and smaller pores. In addition, the more of skim milk powder was replaced by whey protein concentrate, the more disulfide bonds were formed and the greater the occurrence of hydrophobic interactions during heat treatment, which can improve the rheological properties and microstructure of low-fat yogurt.

  16. Efficacy of whey protein supplementation on resistance exercise-induced changes in muscle strength, lean mass, and function in mobility-limited older adults

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Whey protein supplementation may augment resistance exercise-induced increases in muscle strength and mass. Further studies are required to determine whether this effect extends to functionally compromised older adults. The objectives of the study were to compare the effects of whey protein concent...

  17. Comprehensive peptidomic and glycomic evaluation reveals that sweet whey permeate from colostrum is a source of milk protein-derived peptides and oligosaccharides

    PubMed Central

    Dallas, David C.; Weinborn, Valerie; de Moura Bell, Juliana M.L.N.; Wang, Meng; Parker, Evan A.; Guerrero, Andres; Hettinga, Kasper A.; Lebrilla, Carlito B.; German, J. Bruce; Barile, Daniela

    2014-01-01

    Whey permeate is a co-product obtained when cheese whey is passed through an ultrafiltration membrane to concentrate whey proteins. Whey proteins are retained by the membrane, whereas the low-molecular weight compounds such as lactose, salts, oligosaccharides and peptides pass through the membrane yielding whey permeate. Research shows that bovine milk from healthy cows contains hundreds of naturally occurring peptides – many of which are homologous with known antimicrobial and immunomodulatory peptides – and nearly 50 oligosaccharide compositions (not including structural isomers). As these endogenous peptides and oligosaccharides have low-molecular weight and whey permeate is currently an under-utilized product stream of the dairy industry, we hypothesized that whey permeate may serve as an inexpensive source of naturally occurring functional peptides and oligosaccharides. Laboratory fractionation of endogenous peptides and oligosaccharides from bovine colostrum sweet whey was expanded to pilot-scale. The membrane fractionation methodology used was similar to the methods commonly used industrially to produce whey protein concentrate and whey permeate. Pilot-scale fractionation was compared to laboratory-scale fractionation with regard to the identified peptides and oligosaccharide compositions. Results were interpreted on the basis of whether industrial whey permeate could eventually serve as a source of functional peptides and oligosaccharides. The majority (96%) of peptide sequences and the majority (96%) of oligosaccharide compositions found in the laboratory-scale process were mirrored in the pilot-scale process. Moreover, the pilot-scale process recovered an additional 33 peptides and 1 oligosaccharide not identified from the laboratory-scale extraction. Both laboratory- and pilot-scale processes yielded peptides deriving primarily from the protein β-casein. The similarity of the laboratory-and pilot-scale's resulting peptide and oligosaccharide

  18. Physical and chemical changes in whey protein concentrate stored at elevated temperature and humidity.

    PubMed

    Tunick, Michael H; Thomas-Gahring, Audrey; Van Hekken, Diane L; Iandola, Susan K; Singh, Mukti; Qi, Phoebe X; Ukuku, Dike O; Mukhopadhyay, Sudarsan; Onwulata, Charles I; Tomasula, Peggy M

    2016-03-01

    In a case study, we monitored the physical properties of 2 batches of whey protein concentrate (WPC) under adverse storage conditions to provide information on shelf life in hot, humid areas. Whey protein concentrates with 34.9 g of protein/100g (WPC34) and 76.8 g of protein/100g (WPC80) were stored for up to 18 mo under ambient conditions and at elevated temperature and relative humidity. The samples became yellower with storage; those stored at 35 °C were removed from the study by 12 mo because of their unsatisfactory appearance. Decreases in lysine and increases in water activity, volatile compound formation, and powder caking values were observed in many specimens. Levels of aerobic mesophilic bacteria, coliforms, yeast, and mold were <3.85 log10 cfu/g in all samples. Relative humidity was not a factor in most samples. When stored in sealed bags, these samples of WPC34 and WPC80 had a shelf life of 9 mo at 35 °C but at least 18 mo at lower temperatures, which should extend the market for these products.

  19. Physical and chemical changes in whey protein concentrate stored at elevated temperature and humidity.

    PubMed

    Tunick, Michael H; Thomas-Gahring, Audrey; Van Hekken, Diane L; Iandola, Susan K; Singh, Mukti; Qi, Phoebe X; Ukuku, Dike O; Mukhopadhyay, Sudarsan; Onwulata, Charles I; Tomasula, Peggy M

    2016-03-01

    In a case study, we monitored the physical properties of 2 batches of whey protein concentrate (WPC) under adverse storage conditions to provide information on shelf life in hot, humid areas. Whey protein concentrates with 34.9 g of protein/100g (WPC34) and 76.8 g of protein/100g (WPC80) were stored for up to 18 mo under ambient conditions and at elevated temperature and relative humidity. The samples became yellower with storage; those stored at 35 °C were removed from the study by 12 mo because of their unsatisfactory appearance. Decreases in lysine and increases in water activity, volatile compound formation, and powder caking values were observed in many specimens. Levels of aerobic mesophilic bacteria, coliforms, yeast, and mold were <3.85 log10 cfu/g in all samples. Relative humidity was not a factor in most samples. When stored in sealed bags, these samples of WPC34 and WPC80 had a shelf life of 9 mo at 35 °C but at least 18 mo at lower temperatures, which should extend the market for these products. PMID:26778305

  20. Amaltheys: A fluorescence-based analyzer to assess cheese milk denatured whey proteins.

    PubMed

    Lacotte, Pierre; Gomez, Franck; Bardeau, Floriane; Muller, Sabine; Acharid, Abdelhaq; Quervel, Xavier; Trossat, Philippe; Birlouez-Aragon, Inès

    2015-10-01

    The cheese industry faces many challenges to optimize cheese yield and quality. A very precise standardization of the cheese milk is needed, which is achieved by a fine control of the process and milk composition. Thorough analysis of protein composition is important to determine the amount of protein that will be retained in the curd or lost in the whey. The fluorescence-based Amaltheys analyzer (Spectralys Innovation, Romainville, France) was developed to assess pH 4.6-soluble heat-sensitive whey proteins (sWP*) in 5 min. These proteins are those that can be denatured upon heat-treatment and further retained in the curd after coagulation. Monitoring of sWP* in milk and subsequent adaptation of the process is a reliable solution to achieve stable cheese yield and quality. Performance of the method was evaluated by an accredited laboratory on a 0 to 7 g/L range. Accuracy compared with the reference Kjeldahl method is also provided with a standard error of 0.25 g/L. Finally, a 4-mo industrial trial in a cheese plant is described, where Amaltheys was used as a process analytical technology to monitor sWP* content in ingredients and final cheese milk. Calibration models over quality parameters of final cheese were also built from near-infrared and fluorescence spectroscopic data. The Amaltheys analyzer was found to be a rapid, compact, and accurate device to help implementation of standardization procedures in the dairy industry.

  1. Macromolecular crowding conditions enhance glycation and oxidation of whey proteins in ultrasound-induced Maillard reaction.

    PubMed

    Perusko, Marija; Al-Hanish, Ayah; Cirkovic Velickovic, Tanja; Stanic-Vucinic, Dragana

    2015-06-15

    High intensity ultrasound (HIUS) can promote Maillard reaction (MR). Macromolecular crowding conditions accelerate reactions and stabilise protein structure. The aim of this study was to investigate if combined application of ultrasound and macromolecular crowding can improve efficiency of MR. The presence of crowding agent (polyethylene glycol) significantly increased ultrasound-induced whey protein (WP) glycation by arabinose. An increase in glycation efficiency results only in slight change of WP structure. Macromolecular crowding intensifies oxidative modifications of WP, as well as formation of amyloid-like structures by enhancement of MR. Solubility at different pH, thermal stability and antioxidative capacity of glycated WP were increased, especially in the presence of crowding agent, compared to sonicated nonglycated proteins. The application of HIUS under crowding conditions can be a new approach for enhancement of reactions in general, enabling short processing time and mild conditions, while preserving protein structure and minimising protein aggregation.

  2. Monte Carlo simulations of flexible polyanions complexing with whey proteins at their isoelectric point

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Vries, R.

    2004-02-01

    Electrostatic complexation of flexible polyanions with the whey proteins α-lactalbumin and β-lactoglobulin is studied using Monte Carlo simulations. The proteins are considered at their respective isoelectric points. Discrete charges on the model polyelectrolytes and proteins interact through Debye-Hückel potentials. Protein excluded volume is taken into account through a coarse-grained model of the protein shape. Consistent with experimental results, it is found that α-lactalbumin complexes much more strongly than β-lactoglobulin. For α-lactalbumin, strong complexation is due to localized binding to a single large positive "charge patch," whereas for β-lactoglobulin, weak complexation is due to diffuse binding to multiple smaller charge patches.

  3. Macromolecular crowding conditions enhance glycation and oxidation of whey proteins in ultrasound-induced Maillard reaction.

    PubMed

    Perusko, Marija; Al-Hanish, Ayah; Cirkovic Velickovic, Tanja; Stanic-Vucinic, Dragana

    2015-06-15

    High intensity ultrasound (HIUS) can promote Maillard reaction (MR). Macromolecular crowding conditions accelerate reactions and stabilise protein structure. The aim of this study was to investigate if combined application of ultrasound and macromolecular crowding can improve efficiency of MR. The presence of crowding agent (polyethylene glycol) significantly increased ultrasound-induced whey protein (WP) glycation by arabinose. An increase in glycation efficiency results only in slight change of WP structure. Macromolecular crowding intensifies oxidative modifications of WP, as well as formation of amyloid-like structures by enhancement of MR. Solubility at different pH, thermal stability and antioxidative capacity of glycated WP were increased, especially in the presence of crowding agent, compared to sonicated nonglycated proteins. The application of HIUS under crowding conditions can be a new approach for enhancement of reactions in general, enabling short processing time and mild conditions, while preserving protein structure and minimising protein aggregation. PMID:25660883

  4. Application of Kevin-Voigt Model in Quantifying Whey Protein Adsorption on Polyethersulfone Using QCM-D

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The study of protein adsorption on the membrane surface is of great importance to cheese-making processors that use polymeric membrane-based processes to recover whey protein from the process waste streams. Quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation (QCM-D) is a lab-scale, fast analytical techniq...

  5. Short communication: Potential of Fresco-style cheese whey as a source of protein fractions with antioxidant and angiotensin-I-converting enzyme inhibitory activities.

    PubMed

    Tarango-Hernández, S; Alarcón-Rojo, A D; Robles-Sánchez, M; Gutiérrez-Méndez, N; Rodríguez-Figueroa, J C

    2015-11-01

    Recently, traditional Mexican Fresco-style cheese production has been increasing, and the volume of cheese whey generated represents a problem. In this study, we investigated the chemical composition of Fresco-style cheese wheys and their potential as a source of protein fractions with antioxidant and angiotensin-I-converting enzyme (ACE)-inhibitory activities. Three samples from Fresco, Panela, and Ranchero cheeses whey were physicochemically characterized. Water-soluble extracts were fractionated to obtain whey fractions with different molecular weights: 10-5, 5-3, 3-1 and <1 kDa. The results indicated differences in the lactose, protein, ash, and dry matter contents (% wt/wt) in the different Fresco-style cheese wheys. All whey fractions had antioxidant and ACE-inhibitory activities. The 10-5 kDa whey fraction of Ranchero cheese had the highest Trolox equivalent antioxidant capacity (0.62 ± 0.00 mM), and the 3-1 kDa Panela and Fresco cheese whey fractions showed the highest ACE-inhibitory activity (0.57 ± 0.02 and 0.59 ± 0.04 μg/mL 50%-inhibitory concentration values, respectively). These results suggest that Fresco-style cheese wheys may be a source of protein fractions with bioactivity, and thus could be useful ingredients in the manufacture of functional foods with increased nutritional value.

  6. Short communication: Potential of Fresco-style cheese whey as a source of protein fractions with antioxidant and angiotensin-I-converting enzyme inhibitory activities.

    PubMed

    Tarango-Hernández, S; Alarcón-Rojo, A D; Robles-Sánchez, M; Gutiérrez-Méndez, N; Rodríguez-Figueroa, J C

    2015-11-01

    Recently, traditional Mexican Fresco-style cheese production has been increasing, and the volume of cheese whey generated represents a problem. In this study, we investigated the chemical composition of Fresco-style cheese wheys and their potential as a source of protein fractions with antioxidant and angiotensin-I-converting enzyme (ACE)-inhibitory activities. Three samples from Fresco, Panela, and Ranchero cheeses whey were physicochemically characterized. Water-soluble extracts were fractionated to obtain whey fractions with different molecular weights: 10-5, 5-3, 3-1 and <1 kDa. The results indicated differences in the lactose, protein, ash, and dry matter contents (% wt/wt) in the different Fresco-style cheese wheys. All whey fractions had antioxidant and ACE-inhibitory activities. The 10-5 kDa whey fraction of Ranchero cheese had the highest Trolox equivalent antioxidant capacity (0.62 ± 0.00 mM), and the 3-1 kDa Panela and Fresco cheese whey fractions showed the highest ACE-inhibitory activity (0.57 ± 0.02 and 0.59 ± 0.04 μg/mL 50%-inhibitory concentration values, respectively). These results suggest that Fresco-style cheese wheys may be a source of protein fractions with bioactivity, and thus could be useful ingredients in the manufacture of functional foods with increased nutritional value. PMID:26364114

  7. Whey drying on porous carriers

    SciTech Connect

    Mitura, E.; Kaminski, W.

    1996-05-01

    Whey is treated very often as a waste which pollutes the natural environment. Whey which is a valuable source of protein, lacrose, vitamins and mineral salts should be utilized completely. The present paper is a proposal of whey drying on porous carriers. It is proved experimentally that the proposed drying method guarantees good product quality.

  8. Coacervate whey protein improves inflammatory milieu in mice fed with high-fat diet

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Functional foods with bioactive properties may help in treat obesity, as they can lead to a decreased risks of inflammatory diseases. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of chitosan coacervate whey protein on the proinflammatory processes in mice fed with high-fat diet. Methods Mice were divided into two groups receiving either a normolipidic or high-fat diet; the animals in each of the two diet groups were given a diet supplement of either coacervate (gavage, 36 mg protein/kg of body weight) or tap water for four weeks [groups: normolipidic diet plus water (C); normolipidic diet and coacervate (CC); high-fat diet and water (H); and high-fat diet and coacervate (HC)]. Results The high-fat diet promoted inflammation, possibly by decreased adiponectin/sum of adipose tissues ratio and increased phosphorylation of NF-κB p50. In HC we observed a positive correlation between IL-10 and TNF-α in mesenteric adipose tissue, retroperitoneal adipose tissue and liver tissue. We also observed a positive correlation between lipopolisaccharide with IL-10 in the liver tissue. Conclusions High-fat diet treatment promoted metabolic alterations and inflammation, and chitosan coacervate whey protein modulated inflammatory milieu. PMID:24673809

  9. Determination of adsorption isotherm parameters for minor whey proteins by gradient elution preparative liquid chromatography.

    PubMed

    Faraji, Naeimeh; Zhang, Yan; Ray, Ajay K

    2015-09-18

    Ion-Exchange Chromatography (IEC) techniques have been extensively investigated in protein purification processes, due to the more selective and milder separation steps. To date, existing studies of minor whey proteins fractionation in IEC have primarily been conducted as batch uptake studies, which require more experimental search space, time and materials. In this work, the selected resin's (SP Sepharose FF) equilibrium and dynamic binding capacity were first investigated. Next, adsorption of the pure binary mixture of lactoperoxidase and lactoferrin was studied to calibrate steric mass action (SMA) model using a simplified approach with data from single column experiments. The calibrated model was then verified by performing factorial-design based experiments for various process operating conditions assessing process performance on a larger bed height column. The model predicted results demonstrated a realistic agreement with the experiments providing reproducible column elution profile and reduced experimental work. Finally, whey protein isolate was used to evaluate model parameters in real conditions. Results obtained herein are suitable for future large scale applications.

  10. Non-wheat pasta based on pearl millet flour containing barley and whey protein concentrate.

    PubMed

    Yadav, Deep N; Balasubramanian, S; Kaur, Jaspreet; Anand, Tanupriya; Singh, Ashish K

    2014-10-01

    Non-wheat pasta was prepared with pearl millet supplemented with 10-30 % barley flour, 5-15 % whey protein concentrate, 2.5-4 % carboxy methyl cellulose and 27-33 % water using response surface methodology (RSM) following central composite rotatable design (CCRD). Results showed that barley flour and whey protein concentrate (WPC) had significant (p ≤ 0.05) positive effect on lightness and negative effect on stickiness of pasta, thus improved the overall acceptability (OAA). Carboxymethyl cellulose (CMC) improved the textural attributes i.e. increased firmness and decreased stickiness significantly (P ≤ 0.05) and caused a significant (P ≤ 0.05) reduction in solids losses in gruel. Based upon the experiments, the optimized level of ingredients were barley flour 13.80 g 100 g(-1) pearl millet flour (PMF), WPC 12.27 g 100 g(-1) PMF, CMC 3.45 g 100 g(-1) PMF and water 27.6 mL 100 g(-1) ingredients premix with 88 % desirability. The developed pasta had protein 16.47 g, calcium 98.53 mg, iron 5.43 mg, phosphorus 315.5 mg and β-glucan 0.33 g 100 g(-1) pasta (db). PMID:25328200

  11. Composition and functionality of whey protein phospholipid concentrate and delactosed permeate.

    PubMed

    Levin, M A; Burrington, K J; Hartel, R W

    2016-09-01

    Whey protein phospholipid concentrate (WPPC) and delactosed permeate (DLP) are 2 coproducts of cheese whey processing that are currently underused. Past research has shown that WPPC and DLP can be used together as a functional dairy ingredient in foods such as ice cream, soup, and caramel. However, the scope of the research has been limited to 1 WPPC supplier. The objective of this research was to fully characterize a range of WPPC. Four WPPC samples and 1 DLP sample were analyzed for chemical composition and functionality. This analysis showed that WPPC composition was highly variable between suppliers and lots. In addition, the functionality of the WPPC varies depending on the supplier and testing pH, and cannot be correlated with fat or protein content because of differences in processing. The addition of DLP to WPPC affects functionality. In general, WPPC has a high water-holding capacity, is relatively heat stable, has low foamability, and does not aid in emulsion stability. The gel strength and texture are highly dependent on the amount of protein. To be able to use these 2 dairy products, the composition and functionality must be fully understood. PMID:27394941

  12. Potential sources of mouth drying in beverages fortified with dairy proteins: A comparison of casein- and whey-rich ingredients.

    PubMed

    Withers, C A; Lewis, M J; Gosney, M A; Methven, L

    2014-03-01

    Oral nutritional supplement drinks (ONS) are beverages high in dairy proteins that are prescribed to individuals at risk of malnutrition. Consumption of ONS is poor in elderly care facilities, with patients commenting that the sensory attributes of these drinks reduce their enjoyment and willingness to consume. Mouth drying is an attribute of ONS found to build with repeated consumption, which may further limit liking of these products. This study investigated the sources of drying sensations by sequential profiling, with a trained sensory panel rating a range of model milk systems and ONS over repeated sips and during after-effects. Sequential profiling found that fortification of milk with both caseinate and whey protein concentrate significantly increased the perception of mouth drying over repeated consumption, increasing by between 35 and 85% over consumption of 40mL. Enrichment of ONS with either whey protein concentrate or milk protein concentrate to a total protein content of 8.7% (wt/wt) resulted in whey and casein levels of 4.3:4.4% and 1.7:7.0% respectively. The product higher in whey protein was substantially more mouth drying, implying that whey proteins may be the most important contributor to mouth drying in ONS. However, efforts to mask mouth drying of protein-fortified milk by increasing sweetness or fat level were unsuccessful at the levels tested. Increasing the viscosity of protein-fortified milk led to a small but significant reduction in mouth drying. However, this approach was not successful when tested within complete ONS. Further analysis is required into the mechanism of protein-derived mouth drying to mask negative sensations and improve the enjoyment and consumption of protein-rich ONS.

  13. Physico-chemical characteristics of oil-in-water emulsions based on whey protein-phospholipid mixtures.

    PubMed

    Sünder, A; Scherze, I; Muschiolik, G

    2001-07-01

    Emulsions prepared with whey proteins, phospholipids and 10% of vegetable oil were used for a model typifying dressings, coffee whitener and balanced diets. For the present study, two whey proteins (partial heat-denatured whey protein concentrate (WPC) and undenatured whey protein isolate (WPI)) in combination with different phospholipids (hydrolysed and unmodified deoiled lecithin) were chosen to investigate the interactions between proteins, phospholipids and salt (sodium chloride) in such emulsion systems. Oil-in-water (o/w) emulsions (10 wt.% sunflower oil) containing various concentrations of commercial whey proteins (1-2%), phospholipids (0.39-0.78%) and salt (0.5-1.5%) were prepared using a laboratory high pressure homogeniser under various preparation conditions. Each emulsion was characterised by droplet size, creaming rate, flow behaviour and protein load. The dynamic surface activity of the whey proteins and lecithins at the oil-water interface was determined using the drop volume method. The properties of emulsions were significantly influenced by the content of whey protein. Higher protein levels improved the emulsion behaviour (smaller oil droplets and increased stability) independent of the protein or lecithin samples used. An increase of the protein content resulted in a lower tendency for oil droplet aggregation of emulsions with WPC to occur and emulsions tending towards a Newtonian flow behaviour. The emulsification temperature was especially important using the partial heat-denatured WPC in combination with the deoiled lecithin. A higher emulsification temperature (60 degrees C) promoted oil droplet aggregation, as well as an increased emulsion consistency. Emulsions with the WPC were significantly influenced by the NaCl content, as well as the protein-salt ratio. Increasing the NaCl content led to an increase of the droplet size, higher oil droplet aggregation, as well as to a higher creaming rate of the emulsions. An increase of the lecithin

  14. Skeletal effect of casein and whey protein intake during catch-up growth in young male Sprague-Dawley rats.

    PubMed

    Masarwi, Majdi; Gabet, Yankel; Dolkart, Oleg; Brosh, Tamar; Shamir, Raanan; Phillip, Moshe; Gat-Yablonski, Galia

    2016-07-01

    The aim of the present study was to determine whether the type of protein ingested influences the efficiency of catch-up (CU) growth and bone quality in fast-growing male rats. Young male Sprague-Dawley rats were either fed ad libitum (controls) or subjected to 36 d of 40 % food restriction followed by 24 or 40 d of re-feeding with either standard rat chow or iso-energetic, iso-protein diets containing milk proteins - casein or whey. In terms of body weight, CU growth was incomplete in all study groups. Despite their similar food consumption, casein-re-fed rats had a significantly higher body weight and longer humerus than whey-re-fed rats in the long term. The height of the epiphyseal growth plate (EGP) in both casein and whey groups was greater than that of rats re-fed normal chow. Microcomputed tomography yielded significant differences in bone microstructure between the casein and whey groups, with the casein-re-fed animals having greater cortical thickness in both the short and long term in addition to a higher trabecular bone fraction in the short term, although this difference disappeared in the long term. Mechanical testing confirmed the greater bone strength in rats re-fed casein. Bone quality during CU growth significantly depends on the type of protein ingested. The higher EGP in the casein- and whey-re-fed rats suggests a better growth potential with milk-based diets. These results suggest that whey may lead to slower bone growth with reduced weight gain and, as such, may serve to circumvent long-term complications of CU growth.

  15. Skeletal effect of casein and whey protein intake during catch-up growth in young male Sprague-Dawley rats.

    PubMed

    Masarwi, Majdi; Gabet, Yankel; Dolkart, Oleg; Brosh, Tamar; Shamir, Raanan; Phillip, Moshe; Gat-Yablonski, Galia

    2016-07-01

    The aim of the present study was to determine whether the type of protein ingested influences the efficiency of catch-up (CU) growth and bone quality in fast-growing male rats. Young male Sprague-Dawley rats were either fed ad libitum (controls) or subjected to 36 d of 40 % food restriction followed by 24 or 40 d of re-feeding with either standard rat chow or iso-energetic, iso-protein diets containing milk proteins - casein or whey. In terms of body weight, CU growth was incomplete in all study groups. Despite their similar food consumption, casein-re-fed rats had a significantly higher body weight and longer humerus than whey-re-fed rats in the long term. The height of the epiphyseal growth plate (EGP) in both casein and whey groups was greater than that of rats re-fed normal chow. Microcomputed tomography yielded significant differences in bone microstructure between the casein and whey groups, with the casein-re-fed animals having greater cortical thickness in both the short and long term in addition to a higher trabecular bone fraction in the short term, although this difference disappeared in the long term. Mechanical testing confirmed the greater bone strength in rats re-fed casein. Bone quality during CU growth significantly depends on the type of protein ingested. The higher EGP in the casein- and whey-re-fed rats suggests a better growth potential with milk-based diets. These results suggest that whey may lead to slower bone growth with reduced weight gain and, as such, may serve to circumvent long-term complications of CU growth. PMID:27189324

  16. Acceptability of an Alimentary Supplement of Whey-Protein Concentrate and TGF-β in Patients with Crohn's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Davanço, Taciana; Silva, Luciano Bruno de Carvalho; Sampaio, Karina de Lemos; Coy, Cláudio Saddy Rodrigues; Vilela, Maria Marluce dos Santos; Pinto, Elizete Aparecida Lomazi da Costa

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the acceptability of an alimentary supplement of bovine whey-protein concentrate (WPC) and TGF-β, unavailable commercially, by patients with Crohn's disease (CD) and determine the chemical composition, solubility, and total amino acids content. The supplement was diluted in water, and an acceptance test was done to evaluate the aroma, flavour, and viscosity of the product using facial hedonic scale (nine-point scale), applied on 54 CD patients. The supplement composition indicated 73.3% protein, 10.5% fat, 2.2% ash, 6.3% water, and 7.7% carbohydrate. The supplement is presented as a good protein source and high content of essential amino acids. The average acceptance for all the attributes was between 5.0 and 6.0, and the flavour was mainly associated with soybean/grain, sour milk, and sweet/vanilla flavour. The results indicated that the supplement provided important nutritional properties for CD patients; however, for a large number of individuals to be encouraged to perform supplementation, it is essential to improve the sensory quality of the product. In order to do so, additional research is necessary to prevent the formation of volatiles which cause off-flavours or to mask undesirable aromas/flavours found in it. PMID:24967262

  17. Glycemic Response of a Carbohydrate-Protein Bar with Ewe-Goat Whey

    PubMed Central

    Manthou, Eirini; Kanaki, Maria; Georgakouli, Kalliopi; Deli, Chariklia K.; Kouretas, Dimitrios; Koutedakis, Yiannis; Jamurtas, Athanasios Z.

    2014-01-01

    In this study we examined the glycaemic index (GI) and glycaemic load (GL) of a functional food product, which contains ewe-goat whey protein and carbohydrates in a 1:1 ratio. Nine healthy volunteers, (age, 23.3 ± 3.9 years; body mass index, 24.2 ± 4.1 kg·m2; body fat %, 18.6 ± 10.0) randomly consumed either a reference food or amount of the test food both with equal carbohydrate content in two visits. In each visit, seven blood samples were collected; the first sample after an overnight fast and the remaining six at 15, 30, 45, 60, 90 and 120 min after the beginning of food consumption. Plasma glucose concentration was measured and the GI was determined by calculation of the incremental area under the curve. The GL was calculated using the equation: test food GI/100 g available carbohydrates per test food serving. The GI of the test food was found to be 5.18 ± 3.27, while the GL of one test food serving was 1.09 ± 0.68. These results indicate that the tested product can be classified as a low GI (<55) and low GL (<10) food. Given the health benefits of low glycaemic response foods and whey protein consumption, the tested food could potentially promote health beyond basic nutrition. PMID:24926525

  18. Preventive Effects of Chitosan Coacervate Whey Protein on Body Composition and Immunometabolic Aspect in Obese Mice

    PubMed Central

    de Souza, Gabriel Inácio de Morais Honorato; Santamarina, Aline Boveto; de Santana, Aline Alves; Lira, Fábio Santos; de Laquila, Rachel; Moreno, Mayara Franzoi; do Nascimento, Claudia Maria da Penha Oller; Esposito, Elisa; Oyama, Lila Missae

    2014-01-01

    Functional foods containing bioactive compounds of whey may play an important role in prevention and treatment of obesity. The aim of this study was to investigate the prospects of the biotechnological process of coacervation of whey proteins (CWP) in chitosan and test its antiobesogenic potential. Methods. CWP (100 mg·kg·day) was administered in mice with diet-induced obesity for 8 weeks. The animals were divided into four groups: control normocaloric diet gavage with water (C) or coacervate (C-CWP), and high fat diet gavage with water (HF) or coacervate (HF-CWP). Results. HF-CWP reduced weight gain and serum lipid fractions and displayed reduced adiposity and insulin. Adiponectin was significantly higher in HF-CWP group when compared to the HF. The level of LPS in HF-W group was significantly higher when compared to HF-CWP. The IL-10 showed an inverse correlation between the levels of insulin and glucose in the mesenteric adipose tissue in the HF-CWP group. CWP promoted an increase in both phosphorylation AMPK and the amount of ATGL in the mesenteric adipose tissue in HF-CWP group. Conclusion. CWP was able to modulate effects, possibly due to its high biological value of proteins. We observed a protective effect against obesity and improved the inflammatory milieu of white adipose tissue. PMID:25309049

  19. Effects of exercise on leukocyte death: prevention by hydrolyzed whey protein enriched with glutamine dipeptide.

    PubMed

    Cury-Boaventura, Maria Fernanda; Levada-Pires, Adriana C; Folador, Alessandra; Gorjão, Renata; Alba-Loureiro, Tatiana C; Hirabara, Sandro M; Peres, Fabiano P; Silva, Paulo R S; Curi, Rui; Pithon-Curi, Tania C

    2008-06-01

    Lymphocyte and neutrophil death induced by exercise and the role of hydrolyzed whey protein enriched with glutamine dipeptide (Gln) supplementation was investigated. Nine triathletes performed two exhaustive exercise trials with a 1-week interval in a randomized, double blind, crossover protocol. Thirty minutes before treadmill exhaustive exercise at variable speeds in an inclination of 1% the subjects ingested 50 g of maltodextrin (placebo) or 50 g of maltodextrin plus 4 tablets of 700 mg of hydrolyzed whey protein enriched with 175 mg of glutamine dipeptide dissolved in 250 mL water. Cell viability, DNA fragmentation, mitochondrial transmembrane potential and production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) were determined in lymphocytes and neutrophils. Exhaustive exercise decreased viable lymphocytes but had no effect on neutrophils. A 2.2-fold increase in the proportion of lymphocytes and neutrophils with depolarized mitochondria was observed after exhaustive exercise. Supplementation of maltodextrin plus Gln (MGln) prevented the loss of lymphocyte membrane integrity and the mitochondrial membrane depolarization induced by exercise. Exercise caused an increase in ROS production by neutrophils, whereas supplementation of MGln had no additional effect. MGln supplementation partially prevented lymphocyte apoptosis induced by exhaustive exercise possibly by a protective effect on mitochondrial function. PMID:18320208

  20. Characterization of whey protein-carboxymethylated chitosan composite films with and without transglutaminase treatment.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Shu-Juan; Zhang, Xuan; Ma, Ying; Tuo, Yanfeng; Qian, Fang; Fu, Wenjia; Mu, Guangqing

    2016-11-20

    Edible composite packaging has the advantage of complementary functional properties over its each bio-components. However, reports on whey protein concentrates (WPC)-carboxymethylated chitosan (CMC) composite films have not yet been released. To investigate the preparation of WPC-CMC composite films and its functional properties, four types of WPC-CMC composite films were prepared with and without Transglutaminase (TGase) treatment by mixing WPC aqueous solutions (10%, w/v) with CMC aqueous solutions (3%, w/v) at WPC to CMC volume ratios of (100:0), (75:25), (50:50), and (25:75). SDS-PAGE confirmed that TGase catalyzed crosslinking of whey protein. Results revealed that CMC incorporation conferred a smooth and even surface microstructure on the films and markedly improved the transparency, water barrier properties, mechanical properties and solubility of the composite film. Furthermore, TGase resulted in an improvement in the water vapor barrier properties and mechanical properties of WPC-CMC (75:25 and 50:50, v/v) composite films, and there was no impairment of thermal stability of composite films. Therefore, TGase successfully facilitated the formation of WPC-CMC composite films with some improved functional properties. This offers potential applications as an alternative approach to the preparation of edible packaging films.

  1. Characterization of whey protein-carboxymethylated chitosan composite films with and without transglutaminase treatment.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Shu-Juan; Zhang, Xuan; Ma, Ying; Tuo, Yanfeng; Qian, Fang; Fu, Wenjia; Mu, Guangqing

    2016-11-20

    Edible composite packaging has the advantage of complementary functional properties over its each bio-components. However, reports on whey protein concentrates (WPC)-carboxymethylated chitosan (CMC) composite films have not yet been released. To investigate the preparation of WPC-CMC composite films and its functional properties, four types of WPC-CMC composite films were prepared with and without Transglutaminase (TGase) treatment by mixing WPC aqueous solutions (10%, w/v) with CMC aqueous solutions (3%, w/v) at WPC to CMC volume ratios of (100:0), (75:25), (50:50), and (25:75). SDS-PAGE confirmed that TGase catalyzed crosslinking of whey protein. Results revealed that CMC incorporation conferred a smooth and even surface microstructure on the films and markedly improved the transparency, water barrier properties, mechanical properties and solubility of the composite film. Furthermore, TGase resulted in an improvement in the water vapor barrier properties and mechanical properties of WPC-CMC (75:25 and 50:50, v/v) composite films, and there was no impairment of thermal stability of composite films. Therefore, TGase successfully facilitated the formation of WPC-CMC composite films with some improved functional properties. This offers potential applications as an alternative approach to the preparation of edible packaging films. PMID:27561482

  2. Microencapsulation of Lactobacillus plantarum spp in an alginate matrix coated with whey proteins.

    PubMed

    Gbassi, Gildas Komenan; Vandamme, Thierry; Ennahar, Saïd; Marchioni, Eric

    2009-01-31

    Whey proteins were used as a coating material to improve encapsulation of Lactobacillus plantarum strains in calcium alginate beads. L. plantarum 299v, L. plantarum 800 and L. plantarum CIP A159 were used in this study. Inactivation experiments were carried out in simulated gastric fluid (SGF) and simulated intestinal fluid (SIF). Cross-sections of freeze-dried beads revealed the random distribution of bacteria throughout the alginate network. From an initial count of 10.04+/-0.01 log(10) CFU g(-1) for L. plantarum 299v, 10.12+/-0.04 for L. plantarum CIP A159 and 10.03+/-0.01 for L. plantarum 800, bacteria in coated beads and incubated in SGF (37 degrees C, 60 min) showed a better survival for L. plantarum 299v, L. plantarum CIP A159 and L. plantarum 800 (respectively 7.76+/-0.12, 6.67+/-0.08 and 5.81+/-0.25 log(10) CFU g(-1)) when compared to uncoated beads (2.19+/-0.09, 1.89+/-0.09 and 1.65+/-0.10 log(10) CFU g(-1)) (p<0.05). Only bacteria in the coated beads survived in the SIF medium (37 degrees C, 180 min) after SGF treatment. This preliminary work showed that whey proteins are a convenient, cheap and efficient material for coating alginate beads loaded with bacteria.

  3. Susceptibility of whey protein isolate to oxidation and changes in physicochemical, structural, and digestibility characteristics.

    PubMed

    Feng, Xianchao; Li, Chenyi; Ullah, Niamat; Cao, Jiqianrui; Lan, Yongli; Ge, Wupeng; Hackman, Robert M; Li, Zhixi; Chen, Lin

    2015-11-01

    Oxidation is an important factor for denaturing of whey protein isolate (WPI) during food processing. We studied the effects of chemical oxidation on physicochemical and structural changes along with in vitro digestibility of WPI in this work. Evaluation of physicochemical changes showed that carbonyl level and dityrosine content increased, whereas total and free thiol group levels decreased for oxidized WPI samples. For the structural changes, protein aggregation was measured by surface hydrophobicity, turbidity, and particle diameter, which was increased for oxidized WPI samples. The increase of the secondary structure β-sheets and antiparallel β-sheet also supported the aggregation of oxidized WPI. A direct quantitative relationship between physicochemical and structural changes and protein digestibility indicated that oxidation-related damage restricts the susceptibility of WPI to proteases. In conclusion, WPI had high susceptibility to oxidative stress, and both physicochemical and structural changes caused by severe oxidative stress could decrease the rate of in vitro digestibility of WPI.

  4. Evaluation of antimicrobial edible coatings from a whey protein isolate base to improve the shelf life of cheese.

    PubMed

    Ramos, Ó L; Pereira, J O; Silva, S I; Fernandes, J C; Franco, M I; Lopes-da-Silva, J A; Pintado, M E; Malcata, F X

    2012-11-01

    The objective of this work was to evaluate the effectiveness of antimicrobial edible coatings to wrap cheeses, throughout 60 d of storage, as an alternative to commercial nonedible coatings. Coatings were prepared using whey protein isolate, glycerol, guar gum, sunflower oil, and Tween 20 as a base matrix, together with several combinations of antimicrobial compounds-natamycin and lactic acid, natamycin and chitooligosaccharides (COS), and natamycin, lactic acid, and COS. Application of coating on cheese decreased water loss (~10%, wt/wt), hardness, and color change; however, salt and fat contents were not significantly affected. Moreover, the antimicrobial edible coatings did not permit growth of pathogenic or contaminant microorganisms, while allowing regular growth of lactic acid bacteria throughout storage. Commercial nonedible coatings inhibited only yeasts and molds. The antimicrobial edible coating containing natamycin and lactic acid was the best in sensory terms. Because these antimicrobial coatings are manufactured from food-grade materials, they can be consumed as an integral part of cheese, which represents a competitive advantage over nonedible coatings.

  5. Effect of whey protein hydrolysate on performance and recovery of top-class orienteering runners.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Mette; Bangsbo, Jens; Jensen, Jørgen; Bibby, Bo Martin; Madsen, Klavs

    2015-04-01

    This trial aimed to examine the effect of whey protein hydrolysate intake before and after exercise sessions on endurance performance and recovery in elite orienteers during a training camp. Eighteen elite orienteers participated in a randomized controlled intervention trial during a 1-week training camp (13 exercise sessions). Half of the runners (PRO-CHO) ingested a protein drink before (0.3 g kg(-1)) and a protein-carbohydrate drink after (0.3 g protein kg(-1) and 1 g carbohydrate kg(-1)) each exercise session. The others ingested energy and time-matched carbohydrate drinks (CHO). A 4-km run-test with 20 control points was performed before and on the last day of the intervention. Blood and saliva were obtained in the mornings, before and after run-tests, and after the last training session. During the intervention, questionnaires were fulfilled regarding psychological sense of performance capacity and motivation. PRO-CHO and not CHO improved performance in the 4-km run-test (interaction p < .05). An increase in serum creatine kinase was observed during the week, which was greater in CHO than PRO-CHO (interaction p < .01). Lactate dehydrogenase (p < .001) and cortisol (p = .057) increased during the week, but the change did not differ between groups. Reduction in sense of performance capacity during the intervention was greater in CHO (p < .05) than PRO-CHO. In conclusion, ingestion of whey protein hydrolysate before and after each exercise session improves performance and reduces markers of muscle damage during a strenuous 1-week training camp. The results indicate that protein supplementation in conjunction with each exercise session facilitates the recovery from strenuous training in elite orienteers.

  6. Oil production by Mortierella isabellina from whey treated with lactase.

    PubMed

    Demir, Muammer; Turhan, Irfan; Kucukcetin, Ahmet; Alpkent, Zafer

    2013-01-01

    Whey, a by-product of cheese manufacturing is rich in nutrients such as lactose, proteins, and mineral salts. The fungus Mortierella isabellina was used for production of oil containing γ-linoleic acid (GLA) during fermentation on deproteinized whey permeate (DP-WP) with and without lactase addition. The maximum oil concentration was 3.65 g/L in DP-whey (16.0% lactose) without enzyme treatment. Treatment of DP-WP with lactase resulted in an increase in oil content to 17.13 g/L. Palmitic (22.50-25.80%) and oleic acids (37.60-48.56%) were the major fatty acids along with GLA (2.18-5.48%), linoleic (16.21-22.43%) and stearic acid (3.20-10.08%). This study suggests that whey can be utilized as a feedstock for production of microbial oil.

  7. Review: elimination of bacteriophages in whey and whey products.

    PubMed

    Atamer, Zeynep; Samtlebe, Meike; Neve, Horst; J Heller, Knut; Hinrichs, Joerg

    2013-01-01

    As the cheese market faces strong international competition, the optimization of production processes becomes more important for the economic success of dairy companies. In dairy productions, whey from former cheese batches is frequently re-used to increase the yield, to improve the texture and to increase the nutrient value of the final product. Recycling of whey cream and particulated whey proteins is also routinely performed. Most bacteriophages, however, survive pasteurization and may re-enter the cheese manufacturing process. There is a risk that phages multiply to high numbers during the production. Contamination of whey samples with bacteriophages may cause problems in cheese factories because whey separation often leads to aerosol-borne phages and thus contamination of the factory environment. Furthermore, whey cream or whey proteins used for recycling into cheese matrices may contain thermo-resistant phages. Drained cheese whey can be contaminated with phages as high as 10(9) phages mL(-1). When whey batches are concentrated, phage titers can increase significantly by a factor of 10 hindering a complete elimination of phages. To eliminate the risk of fermentation failure during recycling of whey, whey treatments assuring an efficient reduction of phages are indispensable. This review focuses on inactivation of phages in whey by thermal treatment, ultraviolet (UV) light irradiation, and membrane filtration. Inactivation by heat is the most common procedure. However, application of heat for inactivation of thermo-resistant phages in whey is restricted due to negative effects on the functional properties of native whey proteins. Therefore an alternative strategy applying combined treatments should be favored - rather than heating the dairy product at extreme temperature/time combinations. By using membrane filtration or UV treatment in combination with thermal treatment, phage numbers in whey can be reduced sufficiently to prevent subsequent phage

  8. Review: elimination of bacteriophages in whey and whey products.

    PubMed

    Atamer, Zeynep; Samtlebe, Meike; Neve, Horst; J Heller, Knut; Hinrichs, Joerg

    2013-01-01

    As the cheese market faces strong international competition, the optimization of production processes becomes more important for the economic success of dairy companies. In dairy productions, whey from former cheese batches is frequently re-used to increase the yield, to improve the texture and to increase the nutrient value of the final product. Recycling of whey cream and particulated whey proteins is also routinely performed. Most bacteriophages, however, survive pasteurization and may re-enter the cheese manufacturing process. There is a risk that phages multiply to high numbers during the production. Contamination of whey samples with bacteriophages may cause problems in cheese factories because whey separation often leads to aerosol-borne phages and thus contamination of the factory environment. Furthermore, whey cream or whey proteins used for recycling into cheese matrices may contain thermo-resistant phages. Drained cheese whey can be contaminated with phages as high as 10(9) phages mL(-1). When whey batches are concentrated, phage titers can increase significantly by a factor of 10 hindering a complete elimination of phages. To eliminate the risk of fermentation failure during recycling of whey, whey treatments assuring an efficient reduction of phages are indispensable. This review focuses on inactivation of phages in whey by thermal treatment, ultraviolet (UV) light irradiation, and membrane filtration. Inactivation by heat is the most common procedure. However, application of heat for inactivation of thermo-resistant phages in whey is restricted due to negative effects on the functional properties of native whey proteins. Therefore an alternative strategy applying combined treatments should be favored - rather than heating the dairy product at extreme temperature/time combinations. By using membrane filtration or UV treatment in combination with thermal treatment, phage numbers in whey can be reduced sufficiently to prevent subsequent phage

  9. Induction of immune tolerance to caseins and whey proteins by oral intubation in mouse allergy model.

    PubMed

    Shandilya, U K; Kapila, R; Singh, S; Dahiya, D; Kapila, S; Kansal, V K

    2014-06-01

    This study was designed to evaluate the effect of oral tolerance of caseins (CSN) and whey proteins (WP) in alleviating the allergic response to cow's milk proteins in Swiss albino mice raised on a milk protein-free diet. Oral tolerance was induced by feeding mice with 20 mg of CSN or WP once in a day for 4 days consecutively before immunization with respective protein by intraperitoneal (i.p.) injections (20 μg 200 per μl of PBS) using 2% of alum Al(OH)3 as adjuvant. Three weeks later, oral tolerance induction was analysed in humoral and cellular compartments of CSN- and WP-fed versus saline-fed control mice groups by measuring seric and intestinal antibody responses, mRNA abundance in splenic tissue and cytokine secretion patterns. The specific serum immunoglobulin-E (IgE) levels were significantly suppressed (p < 0.05), while sIgA was enhanced in these groups when compared with their respective saline-fed mice. Moreover, the mRNA levels of interferon-γ (IFN-γ) and interleukin-4 (IL-4) in both CSN- and WP-tolerized mice were found to be significantly decreased, while the abundance of interleukin-10 (IL-10) and transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) was increased significantly, as compared to respective control groups. Finally, cytokine profiles indicated a reciprocal decrease in IL-4 and IFN-γ versus an increase in IL-10 secretions in supernatants of cultured splenocytes of tolerized mice. Taken together, these results clearly showed that oral administration of cows' milk caseins and whey proteins can induce significant hyposensitization in mice, with the participation of suppressor cytokines.

  10. Fractionation of whey protein isolate with supercritical carbon dioxide to produce enriched α-lactalbumin and β-lactoglobulin food ingredients.

    PubMed

    Bonnaillie, Laetitia M; Tomasula, Peggy M

    2012-05-23

    An environmentally friendly protein fractionation process using supercritical carbon dioxide (SCO(2)) as an acid was developed to produce enriched α-lactalbumin (α-LA) and β-lactoglobulin (β-LG) fractions from whey protein isolate solutions containing from 2 to 10% WPI. This study investigated the effects of pH, temperature, WPI concentration, and residence time on the precipitation kinetics and recovery yields of individual whey proteins and the relative enrichment and composition of both protein fractions. At 5.5-34 MPa and 60-65 °C, solubilized SCO(2) decreased solution pH and induced the formation and precipitation of α-LA aggregates. Gel electrophoresis and HPLC of the enriched fractions demonstrated the production of ≥ 60% pure α-LA, and ≥ 70% pure β-LG, under various operating conditions, from WPI containing ∼57% β-LG and 21% α-LA. The enriched fractions are ready-to-use food ingredients with neutral pH, untainted by acids and contaminants.

  11. Physicochemical stability and in vitro bioaccessibility of ß-carotene nanoemulsions stabilized with whey protein-dextran conjugates

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In this study, ß-carotene (BC)-loaded nanoemulsions encapsulated with native whey protein isolate (WPI) and WPI-dextran (DT, 5 kDa, 20 kDa, and 70 kDa) conjugates were prepared and the effects of glycosylation with various molecular weight DTs on the physicochemical property, lipolysis, and BC bioac...

  12. Behavior of native microbial populations of WPC-34 and WPC-80 whey protein stored at different temperatures

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Whey protein (WPC34 and 80) has been used as food ingredients and as a base for making biodegradable product. However, there is limited information on the behavior of native microflora associated with these products. WPC 34 and WPC80 were obtained from the manufacturer, and were stored at 5, 10, 15,...

  13. Whey protein phospholipid concentrate and delactosed permeate: Applications in caramel, ice cream, and cake.

    PubMed

    Levin, M A; Burrington, K J; Hartel, R W

    2016-09-01

    Whey protein phospholipid concentrate (WPPC) and delactosed permeate (DLP) are 2 coproducts of cheese whey processing that are currently underutilized. Past research has shown that WPPC and DLP can be used together as a functional dairy ingredient in foods such as ice cream, soup, and caramel. However, the scope of the research has been limited to a single WPPC supplier. The variability of the composition and functionality of WPPC was previously studied. The objective of this research was to expand on the previous study and examine the potential applications of WPPC and DLP blends in foods. In ice cream, WPPC was added as a natural emulsifier to replace synthetic emulsifiers. The WPPC decreased the amount of partially coalesced fat and increased the drip-through rate. In caramel, DLP and WPPC replaced sweetened condensed skim milk and lecithin. Cold flow increased significantly, and hardness and stickiness decreased. In cake, DLP and WPPC were added as a total replacement of eggs, with no change in yield, color, or texture. Overall, WPPC and DLP can be utilized as functional dairy ingredients at a lower cost in ice cream and cake but not in chewy caramel.

  14. Mechanical and barrier properties of cross-linked soy and whey protein based films.

    PubMed

    Sabato, S F; Ouattara, B; Yu, H; D'Aprano, G; Le Tien, C; Mateescu, M A; Lacroix, M

    2001-03-01

    Sterilized biofilms based on soy protein isolate (SPI, S system) and a 1:1 mixture of SPI and whey protein isolate (WPI, SW system) were achieved through the formation of cross-links by means of gamma-irradiation combined with thermal treatments. The effect of the incorporation of carboxymethylcellulose (CMC) and poly(vinyl alcohol) was also examined. gamma-Irradiation combined with thermal treatment improved significantly the mechanical properties, namely, puncture strength and puncture deformation, for all types of films. Irradiated formulations that contain CMC behave more similarly as elastomers. CMC showed also significant improvements of the barrier properties, namely, water vapor permeability, for irradiated films of the S system and for non-irradiated films of the SW system.

  15. Effects of the conjugation of whey proteins with gellan polysaccharides on surfactant-induced competitive displacement from the air-water interface.

    PubMed

    Cai, B; Ikeda, S

    2016-08-01

    Whey proteins can be used to stabilize foams and emulsions against coalescence because of their ability to form viscoelastic films at the interface that resist film rupture on collision between colloidal particles. However, whey proteins are competitively displaced from the interface if small-molecule surfactants are added, leading to destabilization of the entire system. This is because surfactants are more effective in molecular packing at the interface, and they lower interfacial tension to a greater degree than whey proteins do, but their interfacial films are poor in viscoelasticity. We hypothesized that whey proteins would become more resistant to surfactant-induced competitive displacement if they were conjugated with network-forming polysaccharides. The protein moiety of the conjugate would be expected to enable its adsorption to the interface, and the polysaccharide moiety would be expected to form self-assembled networks, strengthening the interfacial film as a whole. In this study, whey proteins were conjugated with gellan polysaccharides using the Maillard reaction. Atomic force microscopy images of interfacial films formed by the whey protein-gellan conjugate at the air-water interface and transferred onto mica sheets using the Langmuir-Blodgett method revealed that gellan did form self-assembled networks at the interface and that interfacial films also contained a large number of unconjugated whey protein molecules. Following the addition of a small-molecule surfactant (Tween 20) to the sub-phase, surface pressure increased, indicating spontaneous adsorption of surfactants to the interface. Atomic force microscopy images showed decreases in interfacial area coverage by whey proteins as surface pressure increased. At a given surface pressure, the interfacial area coverage by whey protein-gellan conjugates was greater than coverage by unconjugated whey proteins, confirming that whey proteins became more resistant to surfactant-induced displacement after

  16. "Whey" proteins of milk of the red (Macropus rufus) and eastern grey (Macropus giganteus) kangaroo.

    PubMed

    McKenzie, H A; Muller, V J; Treacy, G B

    1983-01-01

    1. A comparison is made of gel electrophoretic patterns of the "whey" proteins of the milk of red (Macropus rufus) and eastern grey (Macropus giganteus) kangaroos at various stages of lactation. Qualitative and quantitative changes occur with time during the mature phase of lactation of both types. Their onset is related solely to the stage of lactation. "Whey" proteins are isolated and characterised and the nature of protein changes determined for the first time. 2. The anodic electrophoretic pattern is divided into 6 main zones (designated A F in order of decreasing mobility) and 2 cathodic zones (G and H) that are only detected in the milk of M. giganteus. 3. Zones A, B and C are milk specific. Zone B is present throughout lactation in both species and is an alpha-lactalbumin. Zones A and C are present only in late lactation, zone C, usually, but not always, appearing first. Zone A is an alpha-lactalbumin in M. giganteus, but is not an alpha-lactalbumin in M. rufus. Zone C appears to be the same protein in both species and is possibly a beta-lactoglobulin. 4. Zone D is kangaroo serum albumin and zone E is possibly a beta 2-microglobulin. Zone F contains three main iron (III) binding bands whose relative intensity varies with stage of lactation. Their intensity differs from the corresponding blood serum transferrin bands. 5. Zone H of Macropus giganteus is a lysozyme. 6. Lactose is present in the milk, but is not the principal sugar. 7. The significance of the results is discussed.

  17. Swelling of whey and egg white protein hydrogels with stranded and particulate microstructures.

    PubMed

    Li, Hui; Zhao, Lei; Chen, Xiao Dong; Mercadé-Prieto, Ruben

    2016-02-01

    Swelling of protein hydrogels in alkaline conditions strongly depends on the gel microstructure. Stranded transparent gels swell as predicted using a modified Flory-Rehner model with the net protein charge. Particulate opaque gels swell very differently, with a sudden increase at a narrow pH range. Its swelling is not controlled by the protein charge, but by the destruction of the non-covalent interactions. Comparable dissolution thresholds, one with pH and another with the degree of swelling, are observed in both types of microstructures. These conclusions are valid for both whey protein isolate (WPI) gels and egg white gels, suggesting that they are universal for all globular proteins that can form such microscructures. Differences are observed, however, from the prevalent chemical crosslinks in each protein system. Non-covalent interactions dominate WPI gels; when such interactions are destroyed at pH≥11.5 the gels swell extensively and eventually dissolve. In egg white gels, the higher degree of disulphide crosslinking allows extensive swelling when non-covalent interactions are destroyed, but dissolution only occurs at pH≥13 when covalent crosslinks are cleaved. The current study highlights that the microstructure of protein hydrogels, a unique particularity of protein systems compared to other synthetic hydrogels, defines swelling.

  18. Whey Protein

    MedlinePlus

    ... than carbohydrate supplements in untrained but not trained athletes. Asthma. Early research suggests that taking a specific ... selenium, glutamine, and metoclopramide. Inherited disorders that cause mental and developmental problems (mitochondrial myopathies). Early research suggests ...

  19. Whey Proteins Are More Efficient than Casein in the Recovery of Muscle Functional Properties following a Casting Induced Muscle Atrophy

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Vincent; Ratel, Sébastien; Siracusa, Julien; Le Ruyet, Pascale; Savary-Auzeloux, Isabelle; Combaret, Lydie; Guillet, Christelle; Dardevet, Dominique

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of whey supplementation, as compared to the standard casein diet, on the recovery of muscle functional properties after a casting-induced immobilization period. After an initial (I0) evaluation of the contractile properties of the plantarflexors (isometric torque-frequency relationship, concentric power-velocity relationship and a fatigability test), the ankle of 20 male adult rats was immobilized by casting for 8 days. During this period, rats were fed a standard diet with 13% of casein (CAS). After cast removal, rats received either the same diet or a diet with 13% of whey proteins (WHEY). A control group (n = 10), non-immobilized but pair-fed to the two other experimental groups, was also studied and fed with the CAS diet. During the recovery period, contractile properties were evaluated 7 (R7), 21 (R21) and 42 days (R42) after cast removal. The immobilization procedure induced a homogeneous depression of average isometric force at R7 (CAS: − 19.0±8.2%; WHEY: − 21.7±8.4%; P<0.001) and concentric power (CAS: − 26.8±16.4%, P<0.001; WHEY: − 13.5±21.8%, P<0.05) as compared to I0. Conversely, no significant alteration of fatigability was observed. At R21, isometric force had fully recovered in WHEY, especially for frequencies above 50 Hz, whereas it was still significantly depressed in CAS, where complete recovery occurred only at R42. Similarly, recovery of concentric power was faster at R21 in the 500−700°/s range in the WHEY group. These results suggest that recovery kinetics varied between diets, the diet with the whey proteins promoting a faster recovery of isometric force and concentric power output as compared to the casein diet. These effects were more specifically observed at force level and movement velocities that are relevant for functional abilities, and thus natural locomotion. PMID:24069411

  20. Whey proteins are more efficient than casein in the recovery of muscle functional properties following a casting induced muscle atrophy.

    PubMed

    Martin, Vincent; Ratel, Sébastien; Siracusa, Julien; Le Ruyet, Pascale; Savary-Auzeloux, Isabelle; Combaret, Lydie; Guillet, Christelle; Dardevet, Dominique

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of whey supplementation, as compared to the standard casein diet, on the recovery of muscle functional properties after a casting-induced immobilization period. After an initial (I0) evaluation of the contractile properties of the plantarflexors (isometric torque-frequency relationship, concentric power-velocity relationship and a fatigability test), the ankle of 20 male adult rats was immobilized by casting for 8 days. During this period, rats were fed a standard diet with 13% of casein (CAS). After cast removal, rats received either the same diet or a diet with 13% of whey proteins (WHEY). A control group (n = 10), non-immobilized but pair-fed to the two other experimental groups, was also studied and fed with the CAS diet. During the recovery period, contractile properties were evaluated 7 (R7), 21 (R21) and 42 days (R42) after cast removal. The immobilization procedure induced a homogeneous depression of average isometric force at R7 (CAS: - 19.0 ± 8.2%; WHEY: - 21.7 ± 8.4%; P<0.001) and concentric power (CAS: - 26.8 ± 16.4%, P<0.001; WHEY: - 13.5 ± 21.8%, P<0.05) as compared to I0. Conversely, no significant alteration of fatigability was observed. At R21, isometric force had fully recovered in WHEY, especially for frequencies above 50 Hz, whereas it was still significantly depressed in CAS, where complete recovery occurred only at R42. Similarly, recovery of concentric power was faster at R21 in the 500-700°/s range in the WHEY group. These results suggest that recovery kinetics varied between diets, the diet with the whey proteins promoting a faster recovery of isometric force and concentric power output as compared to the casein diet. These effects were more specifically observed at force level and movement velocities that are relevant for functional abilities, and thus natural locomotion. PMID:24069411

  1. Fate of Staphylococcus aureus in whey, whey cream, and whey cream butter.

    PubMed

    Halpin-Dohnalek, M I; Marth, E H

    1989-12-01

    Fresh Cheddar cheese whey was inoculated with ca. 10(6) Staphylococcus aureus/ml and held at 4, 25, and 37 degrees C for 48 h. Numbers of staphylococci decreased in whey at 25 and 37 degrees C and decreased or remained constant in whey at 4 degrees C. When Cheddar cheese whey was neutralized with sodium hydroxide before inoculation with ca. 10(2) or 10(6) S. aureus/ml, numbers of the bacterium increased at all incubation temperatures. Viability of S. aureus strains in whey butter made from inoculated whey cream (from Cheddar cheese whey) was determined. Whey cream was either neutralized to a titratable acidity of .15% or untreated before inoculation with ca. 10(4) S. aureus/ml. Butter churned from the whey cream was held at 4, 25, and 30 degrees C for up to 4 wk. Viability of S. aureus was enhanced in lightly salted (1%) whey cream butter and in butter made from neutralized whey cream. Strains of S. aureus did not survive in unsalted or in salted (1.5%) butter made from untreated whey cream.

  2. Influence of olive oil phenolic compounds on headspace aroma release by interaction with whey proteins.

    PubMed

    Genovese, Alessandro; Caporaso, Nicola; De Luca, Lucia; Paduano, Antonello; Sacchi, Raffaele

    2015-04-22

    The release of volatile compounds in an oil-in-water model system obtained from olive oil-whey protein (WP) pairing was investigated by considering the effect of phenolic compounds. Human saliva was used to simulate mouth conditions by retronasal aroma simulator (RAS) analysis. Twelve aroma compounds were quantified in the dynamic headspace by SPME-GC/MS. The results showed significant influences of saliva on the aroma release of virgin olive oil (VOO) volatiles also in the presence of WP. The interaction between WP and saliva leads to lower headspace release of ethyl esters and hexanal. Salivary components caused lower decrease of the release of acetates and alcohols. A lower release of volatile compounds was found in the RAS essay in comparison to that in orthonasal simulation of only refined olive oil (without addition of saliva or WP), with the exception of hexanal and 1-penten-3-one, where a significantly higher release was found. Our results suggest that the extent of retronasal odor (green, pungent) of these two volatile compounds is higher than orthonasal odor. An extra VOO was used to verify the release in model systems, indicating that WP affected aroma release more than model systems, while saliva seems to exert an opposite trend. A significant increase in aroma release was found when phenolic compounds were added to the system, probably due to the contrasting effects of binding of volatile compounds caused by WP, for the polyphenol-protein interaction phenomenon. Our study could be applied to the formulation of new functional foods to enhance flavor release and modulate the presence and concentrations of phenolics and whey proteins in food emulsions/dispersions. PMID:25832115

  3. Whey proteins have beneficial effects on intestinal enteroendocrine cells stimulating cell growth and increasing the production and secretion of incretin hormones.

    PubMed

    Gillespie, Anna L; Calderwood, Danielle; Hobson, Laura; Green, Brian D

    2015-12-15

    Whey protein has been indicated to curb diet-induced obesity, glucose intolerance and delay the onset of type 2 diabetes mellitus. Here the effects of intact crude whey, intact individual whey proteins and beta-lactoglobulin hydrolysates on an enteroendocrine (EE) cell model were examined. STC-1 pGIP/neo cells were incubated with several concentrations of yogurt whey (YW), cheese whey (CW), beta-lactoglobulin (BLG), alpha-lactalbumin (ALA) and bovine serum albumin (BSA). The findings demonstrate that BLG stimulates EE cell proliferation, and also GLP-1 secretion (an effect which is lost following hydrolysis with chymotrypsin or trypsin). ALA is a highly potent GLP-1 secretagogue which also increases the intracellular levels of GLP-1. Conversely, whey proteins and hydrolysates had little impact on GIP secretion. This appears to be the first investigation of the effects of the three major proteins of YW and CW on EE cells. The anti-diabetic potential of whey proteins should be further investigated.

  4. Growth and viability of Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus and Streptococcus thermophilus in traditional yoghurt enriched by honey and whey protein concentrate

    PubMed Central

    Glušac, J; Stijepić, M; Đurđević-Milošević, D; Milanović, S; Kanurić, K; Vukić, V

    2015-01-01

    The ability of whey protein concentrate (WPC) (1% w/v) and/or honey (2% and 4% w⁄v) to improve lactic acid bacteria (Streptococcus thermophilus and Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus) growth and viability in yoghurt during a 21 day period of storage was investigated. Another focus of this study was to examine fermentation kinetics and post-acidification rates through pH and lactic acid content measurements over the 21 day period. The addition of WPC and acacia honey accelerated fermentation and improved lactic acid bacteria (LAB) growth over the 21 days, but honey proportion did not significantly affect the viability of LAB. Moreover, adding honey and WPC did not support the overproduction of lactic acid, which positively influenced yoghurt stability during the 21 day storage period. PMID:27175184

  5. Growth and viability of Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus and Streptococcus thermophilus in traditional yoghurt enriched by honey and whey protein concentrate.

    PubMed

    Glušac, J; Stijepić, M; Đurđević-Milošević, D; Milanović, S; Kanurić, K; Vukić, V

    2015-01-01

    The ability of whey protein concentrate (WPC) (1% w/v) and/or honey (2% and 4% w⁄v) to improve lactic acid bacteria (Streptococcus thermophilus and Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus) growth and viability in yoghurt during a 21 day period of storage was investigated. Another focus of this study was to examine fermentation kinetics and post-acidification rates through pH and lactic acid content measurements over the 21 day period. The addition of WPC and acacia honey accelerated fermentation and improved lactic acid bacteria (LAB) growth over the 21 days, but honey proportion did not significantly affect the viability of LAB. Moreover, adding honey and WPC did not support the overproduction of lactic acid, which positively influenced yoghurt stability during the 21 day storage period. PMID:27175184

  6. Modification of functional properties of pullulan-whey protein bionanocomposite films with nanoclay.

    PubMed

    Hassannia-Kolaee, Mahbobeh; Khodaiyan, Faramarz; Shahabi-Ghahfarrokhi, Iman

    2016-02-01

    In this study, biodegradable nanocomposite film composed of pullulan - whey protein isolate (WPI) - montmorillonite (MMT) were developed and characterized as a function of incorporating various amounts of MMT nanoparticles (0, 1, 3 and 5 % wt). Results showed that the water-vapor permeability, moisture content, moisture absorption and water solubility decreased when the nano-MMT content was increased. Tensile strength improved and elongation at break simultaneously decreased with increasing MMT content. The glass transition temperature (Tg(and melting-point temperature (Tm) increased with increasing nano-MMT content. Scanning electron microscope (SEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis revealed uniform distribution of MMT into the polymer matrix. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) showed enhancement of films' roughness with increasing MMT content. PMID:27162410

  7. Kinetics of microstructure formation of high-pressure induced gel from a whey protein isolate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Jin-Song; Yang, Hongwei; Zhu, Wanpeng; Mu, Tai-Hua

    2010-03-01

    The kinetic process of pressure-induced gelation of whey protein isolate (WPI) solutions was studied using in situ light scattering. The relationship of the logarithm of scattered light intensity (I) versus time (t) was linear after the induced time and could be described by the Cahn-Hilliard linear theory. With increasing time, the scattered intensity deviated from the exponential relationship, and the time evolution of the scattered light intensity maximum Im and the corresponding wavenumber qm could be described in terms of the power-law relationship as Im~fβ and qm~f-α, respectively. These results indicated that phase separation occurred during the gelation of WPI solutions under high pressure.

  8. Preparation and Characterization of Nanocomposites from Whey Protein Concentrate Activated with Lycopene.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Rafaela Corrêa; de Deus Souza Carneiro, João; Borges, Soraia Vilela; Assis, Odílio Benedito Garrido; Alvarenga, Gabriela Lara

    2016-03-01

    The production and characterization of nanocomposites based on whey protein concentrate (WPC) and montmorilonite (MMT) incorporated with lycopene as a functional substance is presented and discussed as an alternative biomaterial for potential uses in foodstuff applications. A full factorial design with varying levels of MMT (0% and 2% in w/w) and lycopene (0%, 6%, and 12% in w/w) was used. Color, light transmission, film transparency, moisture, density, solubility, water vapor permeability, and antioxidant activity of the resulting materials were evaluated. Results indicated that lycopene and MMT nanoparticles were successfully included in WPC films using the casting/evaporation method. Inclusion of 2% w/w of MMT in the polymeric matrix significantly improved barrier property against water vapor. Lycopene, besides its good red coloring ability, provided to the films antioxidant activity and UV-vis light protection. These findings open a new perspective for the use of materials for bioactive packaging applications. PMID:26814439

  9. Modification of functional properties of pullulan-whey protein bionanocomposite films with nanoclay.

    PubMed

    Hassannia-Kolaee, Mahbobeh; Khodaiyan, Faramarz; Shahabi-Ghahfarrokhi, Iman

    2016-02-01

    In this study, biodegradable nanocomposite film composed of pullulan - whey protein isolate (WPI) - montmorillonite (MMT) were developed and characterized as a function of incorporating various amounts of MMT nanoparticles (0, 1, 3 and 5 % wt). Results showed that the water-vapor permeability, moisture content, moisture absorption and water solubility decreased when the nano-MMT content was increased. Tensile strength improved and elongation at break simultaneously decreased with increasing MMT content. The glass transition temperature (Tg(and melting-point temperature (Tm) increased with increasing nano-MMT content. Scanning electron microscope (SEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis revealed uniform distribution of MMT into the polymer matrix. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) showed enhancement of films' roughness with increasing MMT content.

  10. Dataset of milk whey proteins of three indigenous Greek sheep breeds.

    PubMed

    Anagnostopoulos, Athanasios K; Katsafadou, Angeliki I; Pierros, Vasileios; Kontopodis, Evangelos; Fthenakis, George C; Arsenos, George; Karkabounas, Spyridon Ch; Tzora, Athina; Skoufos, Ioannis; Tsangaris, George Th

    2016-09-01

    The importance and unique biological traits, as well as the growing financial value, of milk from small Greek ruminants is continuously attracting interest from both the scientific community and industry. In this regard the construction of a reference dataset of the milk of the Greek sheep breeds is of great interest. In order to obtain such a dataset we employed cutting-edge proteomics methodologies to investigate and characterize, the proteome of milk from the three indigenous Greek sheep breeds Mpoutsko, Karagouniko and Chios. In total, more than 1300 protein groups were identified in milk whey from these breeds, reporting for the first time the most detailed proteome dataset of this precious biological material. The present results are further discussed in the research paper "Milk of Greek sheep and goat breeds; characterization by means of proteomics" (Anagnostopoulos et al. 2016) [1]. PMID:27508236

  11. Dataset of milk whey proteins of three indigenous Greek sheep breeds.

    PubMed

    Anagnostopoulos, Athanasios K; Katsafadou, Angeliki I; Pierros, Vasileios; Kontopodis, Evangelos; Fthenakis, George C; Arsenos, George; Karkabounas, Spyridon Ch; Tzora, Athina; Skoufos, Ioannis; Tsangaris, George Th

    2016-09-01

    The importance and unique biological traits, as well as the growing financial value, of milk from small Greek ruminants is continuously attracting interest from both the scientific community and industry. In this regard the construction of a reference dataset of the milk of the Greek sheep breeds is of great interest. In order to obtain such a dataset we employed cutting-edge proteomics methodologies to investigate and characterize, the proteome of milk from the three indigenous Greek sheep breeds Mpoutsko, Karagouniko and Chios. In total, more than 1300 protein groups were identified in milk whey from these breeds, reporting for the first time the most detailed proteome dataset of this precious biological material. The present results are further discussed in the research paper "Milk of Greek sheep and goat breeds; characterization by means of proteomics" (Anagnostopoulos et al. 2016) [1].

  12. Preparation and Characterization of Nanocomposites from Whey Protein Concentrate Activated with Lycopene.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Rafaela Corrêa; de Deus Souza Carneiro, João; Borges, Soraia Vilela; Assis, Odílio Benedito Garrido; Alvarenga, Gabriela Lara

    2016-03-01

    The production and characterization of nanocomposites based on whey protein concentrate (WPC) and montmorilonite (MMT) incorporated with lycopene as a functional substance is presented and discussed as an alternative biomaterial for potential uses in foodstuff applications. A full factorial design with varying levels of MMT (0% and 2% in w/w) and lycopene (0%, 6%, and 12% in w/w) was used. Color, light transmission, film transparency, moisture, density, solubility, water vapor permeability, and antioxidant activity of the resulting materials were evaluated. Results indicated that lycopene and MMT nanoparticles were successfully included in WPC films using the casting/evaporation method. Inclusion of 2% w/w of MMT in the polymeric matrix significantly improved barrier property against water vapor. Lycopene, besides its good red coloring ability, provided to the films antioxidant activity and UV-vis light protection. These findings open a new perspective for the use of materials for bioactive packaging applications.

  13. Alcohol and single-cell protein production by Kluyveromyces in concentrated whey permeates with reduced ash

    SciTech Connect

    Mahmoud, M.M.; Kosikowski, F.V.

    1982-01-01

    Five Kluyveromyces yeasts were grown in concentrated whey permeates under aerobic and anaerobic conditions to produce single-cell protein and ethanol. K. fragilis NRRL Y2415 produced the highest yield of alcohol, 9.1%, and K. bulgaricus ATCC 1605 gave the highest yield of biomass, 13.5 mg/mL. High ash, apparently through Na and K effects, inhibited production of biomass and alcohol. A 0.77% ash was optimum. Lactose utilization was more rapid under aerobic than anaerobic conditions. (NH/sub 4/)/sub 2/SO/sub 4/ and urea supplementation were without effect on yeast growth or were slightly inhibitory. A 1% peptone inclusion gave the highest biomass yield with minimum alcohol production.

  14. Efficacy of fermented milk and whey proteins in Helicobacter pylori eradication: a review.

    PubMed

    Sachdeva, Aarti; Rawat, Swapnil; Nagpal, Jitender

    2014-01-21

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) eradication is considered a necessary step in the management of peptic ulcer disease, chronic gastritis, gastric adenocarcinoma and mucosa associated lymphoid tissue lymphoma. Standard triple therapy eradication regimens are inconvenient and achieve unpredictable and often poor results. Eradication rates are decreasing over time with increase in antibiotic resistance. Fermented milk and several of its component whey proteins have emerged as candidates for complementary therapy. In this context the current review seeks to summarize the current evidence available on their role in H. pylori eradication. Pertinent narrative/systematic reviews, clinical trials and laboratory studies on individual components including fermented milk, yogurt, whey proteins, lactoferrin, α-lactalbumin (α-LA), glycomacropeptide and immunoglobulin were comprehensively searched and retrieved from Medline, Embase, Scopus, Cochrane Controlled Trials Register and abstracts/proceedings of conferences up to May 2013. A preponderance of the evidence available on fermented milk-based probiotic preparations and bovine lactoferrin suggests a beneficial effect in Helicobacter eradication. Evidence for α-LA and immunoglobulins is promising while that for glycomacropeptide is preliminary and requires substantiation. The magnitude of the potential benefit documented so far is small and the precise clinical settings are ill defined. This restricts the potential use of this group as a complementary therapy in a nutraceutical setting hinging on better patient acceptability/compliance. Further work is necessary to identify the optimal substrate, fermentation process, dose and the ideal clinical setting (prevention/treatment, first line therapy/recurrence, symptomatic/asymptomatic, gastritis/ulcer diseases etc.). The potential of this group in high antibiotic resistance or treatment failure settings presents interesting possibilities and deserves further exploration.

  15. Enhanced colon cancer chemoprevention of curcumin by nanoencapsulation with whey protein.

    PubMed

    Jayaprakasha, Guddadarangavvanahally K; Chidambara Murthy, Kotamballi N; Patil, Bhimanagouda S

    2016-10-15

    To improve bioavailability and enhance colon cancer prevention ability of curcumin, whey protein was used to nanoencapsulate at three different ratios such as 70:30, 50:50 and 35:65 for the first time. The drug loading, entrapment efficiency and structural changes of curcumin was confirmed by quantitative NMR spectroscopy. The nanoparticles prepared using the three ratios had an average diameters of 236.5±8.8, 212±3.4, and 187±11.4nm, as well as zeta (ζ) potentials of -13.1,-9.26, and -4.63mV, respectively, at pH 7.0. The cytotoxicity assay was performed for human colon and prostate cancer (SW480 and LNCap) by MTT assay and results showed significantly higher cytotoxicity of nanoencapsulated curcumin (NEC) (equivalent to 30.91, 20.70 and 16.86µM of NEC-1, 2 and 3 respectively), as compared to plain curcumin at 50µM after 72h of treatment. Cytotoxicity was also confirmed by microscopy of treated cells stained with acridine orange and propidium iodide. The cells treated with 50µM of curcumin, 30.91µM (NEC-1), 20.70µM (NEC-2) and 16.86µM (NEC-3) showed enhanced activation of p53 and elevated bax/Bcl2 expression (NEC-3), increased cytochrome-c in cytosol (NEC-2) confirming the enhanced cytotoxicity. To confirm the increased bioavailability, the intracellular curcumin was measured using fluorescence intensity. The fluorescent signal for intracellular curcumin was increased by 12, 30, and 21% for NEC-1, NEC-2, and NEC-3 respectively as compared to plain curcumin at 4h. Based on these results, we conclude that nanoencapsulated curcumin with whey protein will have potential to be considered for clinical applications for future studies. PMID:27404761

  16. Enhanced colon cancer chemoprevention of curcumin by nanoencapsulation with whey protein.

    PubMed

    Jayaprakasha, Guddadarangavvanahally K; Chidambara Murthy, Kotamballi N; Patil, Bhimanagouda S

    2016-10-15

    To improve bioavailability and enhance colon cancer prevention ability of curcumin, whey protein was used to nanoencapsulate at three different ratios such as 70:30, 50:50 and 35:65 for the first time. The drug loading, entrapment efficiency and structural changes of curcumin was confirmed by quantitative NMR spectroscopy. The nanoparticles prepared using the three ratios had an average diameters of 236.5±8.8, 212±3.4, and 187±11.4nm, as well as zeta (ζ) potentials of -13.1,-9.26, and -4.63mV, respectively, at pH 7.0. The cytotoxicity assay was performed for human colon and prostate cancer (SW480 and LNCap) by MTT assay and results showed significantly higher cytotoxicity of nanoencapsulated curcumin (NEC) (equivalent to 30.91, 20.70 and 16.86µM of NEC-1, 2 and 3 respectively), as compared to plain curcumin at 50µM after 72h of treatment. Cytotoxicity was also confirmed by microscopy of treated cells stained with acridine orange and propidium iodide. The cells treated with 50µM of curcumin, 30.91µM (NEC-1), 20.70µM (NEC-2) and 16.86µM (NEC-3) showed enhanced activation of p53 and elevated bax/Bcl2 expression (NEC-3), increased cytochrome-c in cytosol (NEC-2) confirming the enhanced cytotoxicity. To confirm the increased bioavailability, the intracellular curcumin was measured using fluorescence intensity. The fluorescent signal for intracellular curcumin was increased by 12, 30, and 21% for NEC-1, NEC-2, and NEC-3 respectively as compared to plain curcumin at 4h. Based on these results, we conclude that nanoencapsulated curcumin with whey protein will have potential to be considered for clinical applications for future studies.

  17. Efficacy of fermented milk and whey proteins in Helicobacter pylori eradication: A review

    PubMed Central

    Sachdeva, Aarti; Rawat, Swapnil; Nagpal, Jitender

    2014-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) eradication is considered a necessary step in the management of peptic ulcer disease, chronic gastritis, gastric adenocarcinoma and mucosa associated lymphoid tissue lymphoma. Standard triple therapy eradication regimens are inconvenient and achieve unpredictable and often poor results. Eradication rates are decreasing over time with increase in antibiotic resistance. Fermented milk and several of its component whey proteins have emerged as candidates for complementary therapy. In this context the current review seeks to summarize the current evidence available on their role in H. pylori eradication. Pertinent narrative/systematic reviews, clinical trials and laboratory studies on individual components including fermented milk, yogurt, whey proteins, lactoferrin, α-lactalbumin (α-LA), glycomacropeptide and immunoglobulin were comprehensively searched and retrieved from Medline, Embase, Scopus, Cochrane Controlled Trials Register and abstracts/proceedings of conferences up to May 2013. A preponderance of the evidence available on fermented milk-based probiotic preparations and bovine lactoferrin suggests a beneficial effect in Helicobacter eradication. Evidence for α-LA and immunoglobulins is promising while that for glycomacropeptide is preliminary and requires substantiation. The magnitude of the potential benefit documented so far is small and the precise clinical settings are ill defined. This restricts the potential use of this group as a complementary therapy in a nutraceutical setting hinging on better patient acceptability/compliance. Further work is necessary to identify the optimal substrate, fermentation process, dose and the ideal clinical setting (prevention/treatment, first line therapy/recurrence, symptomatic/asymptomatic, gastritis/ulcer diseases etc.). The potential of this group in high antibiotic resistance or treatment failure settings presents interesting possibilities and deserves further exploration. PMID

  18. Use of /γ-irradiation to produce films from whey, casein and soya proteins: structure and functionals characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lacroix, M.; Le, T. C.; Ouattara, B.; Yu, H.; Letendre, M.; Sabato, S. F.; Mateescu, M. A.; Patterson, G.

    2002-03-01

    γ-irradiation and thermal treatments have been used to produce sterilized cross-linked films. Formulations containing variable concentrations of calcium caseinate and whey proteins (whey protein isolate (WPI) and commercial whey protein concentrate) or mixture of soya protein isolate (SPI) with WPI was investigated on the physico-chemical properties of these films. Results showed that the mechanical properties of cross-linked films improved significantly the puncture strength for all types of films. Size-exclusion chromatography showed for no cross-linked proteins, a molecular mass of around 40 kDa. The soluble fractions of the cross-linked proteins molecular distributions were between 600 and 3800 kDa. γ-irradiation seems to modify to a certain extent the conformation of proteins which will adopt structures more ordered and more stable, as suggested by X-ray diffraction analysis. Microstructure observations showed that the mechanical characteristics of these films are closely related to their microscopic structure. Water vapor permeability of films based on SPI was also significantly decreased when irradiated. Microbial resistance was also evaluated for cross-linked films. Results showed that the level of biodegradation of cross-linked films was 36% after 60 d of fermentation in the presence of Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

  19. High-Pressure-High-Temperature Processing Reduces Maillard Reaction and Viscosity in Whey Protein-Sugar Solutions.

    PubMed

    Avila Ruiz, Geraldine; Xi, Bingyan; Minor, Marcel; Sala, Guido; van Boekel, Martinus; Fogliano, Vincenzo; Stieger, Markus

    2016-09-28

    The aim of the study was to determine the influence of pressure in high-pressure-high-temperature (HPHT) processing on Maillard reactions and protein aggregation of whey protein-sugar solutions. Solutions of whey protein isolate containing either glucose or trehalose at pH 6, 7, and 9 were treated by HPHT processing or conventional high-temperature (HT) treatments. Browning was reduced, and early and advanced Maillard reactions were retarded under HPHT processing at all pH values compared to HT treatment. HPHT induced a larger pH drop than HT treatments, especially at pH 9, which was not associated with Maillard reactions. After HPHT processing at pH 7, protein aggregation and viscosity of whey protein isolate-glucose/trehalose solutions remained unchanged. It was concluded that HPHT processing can potentially improve the quality of protein-sugar-containing foods, for which browning and high viscosities are undesired, such as high-protein beverages. PMID:27588940

  20. Whey protein gel composites in the diet of goats increased the omega-3 and omega-6 content of milk fat.

    PubMed

    Weinstein, J A; Taylor, S J; Rosenberg, M; DePeters, E J

    2016-08-01

    Previously, feeding whey protein gels containing polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) reduced their rumen biohydrogenation and increased their concentration in milk fat of Holstein cows. Our objective was to test the efficacy of whey protein isolate (WPI) gels produced in a steam tunnel as a method to alter the fatty acid (FA) composition of the milk lipids. Four primiparous Lamancha goats in midlactation were fed three diets in a 3 × 4 Latin square design. The WPI gels were added to a basal concentrate mix that contained one of three lipid sources: (i) 100% soya bean oil (S) to create (WPI/S), (ii) a 1:1 (wt/wt) mixture of S and linseed (L) oil to create (WPI/SL), or (iii) 100% L to create (WPI/L). Periods were 22 days with the first 10 days used as an adjustment phase followed by a 12-day experimental phase. During the adjustment phase, all goats received a rumen available source of lipid, yellow grease, to provide a baseline for milk FA composition. During the experimental phase, each goat received its assigned WPI. Milk FA concentration of C18:2 n-6 and C18:3 n-3 reached 9.3 and 1.64 g/100 g FA, respectively, when goats were fed WPI/S. Feeding WPI/SL increased the C18:2 n-6 and C18:3 n-3 concentration to 6.22 and 4.36 g/100 g FA, and WPI/L increased C18:2 n-6 and C18:3 n-3 to 3.96 and 6.13 g/100 g FA respectively. The adjusted transfer efficiency (%) of C18:3 n-3 to milk FA decreased significantly as dietary C18:3 n-3 intake increased. Adjusted transfer efficiency for C18:2 n-6 did not change with increasing intake of C18:2 n-6. The WPI gels were effective at reducing rumen biohydrogenation of PUFA; however, we observed a change in the proportion increase of C18:3 n-3 in milk FA suggesting possible regulation of n-3 FA to the lactating caprine mammary gland. PMID:26249647

  1. Whey protein gel composites in the diet of goats increased the omega-3 and omega-6 content of milk fat.

    PubMed

    Weinstein, J A; Taylor, S J; Rosenberg, M; DePeters, E J

    2016-08-01

    Previously, feeding whey protein gels containing polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) reduced their rumen biohydrogenation and increased their concentration in milk fat of Holstein cows. Our objective was to test the efficacy of whey protein isolate (WPI) gels produced in a steam tunnel as a method to alter the fatty acid (FA) composition of the milk lipids. Four primiparous Lamancha goats in midlactation were fed three diets in a 3 × 4 Latin square design. The WPI gels were added to a basal concentrate mix that contained one of three lipid sources: (i) 100% soya bean oil (S) to create (WPI/S), (ii) a 1:1 (wt/wt) mixture of S and linseed (L) oil to create (WPI/SL), or (iii) 100% L to create (WPI/L). Periods were 22 days with the first 10 days used as an adjustment phase followed by a 12-day experimental phase. During the adjustment phase, all goats received a rumen available source of lipid, yellow grease, to provide a baseline for milk FA composition. During the experimental phase, each goat received its assigned WPI. Milk FA concentration of C18:2 n-6 and C18:3 n-3 reached 9.3 and 1.64 g/100 g FA, respectively, when goats were fed WPI/S. Feeding WPI/SL increased the C18:2 n-6 and C18:3 n-3 concentration to 6.22 and 4.36 g/100 g FA, and WPI/L increased C18:2 n-6 and C18:3 n-3 to 3.96 and 6.13 g/100 g FA respectively. The adjusted transfer efficiency (%) of C18:3 n-3 to milk FA decreased significantly as dietary C18:3 n-3 intake increased. Adjusted transfer efficiency for C18:2 n-6 did not change with increasing intake of C18:2 n-6. The WPI gels were effective at reducing rumen biohydrogenation of PUFA; however, we observed a change in the proportion increase of C18:3 n-3 in milk FA suggesting possible regulation of n-3 FA to the lactating caprine mammary gland.

  2. Whey protein concentrate and gum tragacanth as fat replacers in nonfat yogurt: chemical, physical, and microstructural properties.

    PubMed

    Aziznia, S; Khosrowshahi, A; Madadlou, A; Rahimi, J

    2008-07-01

    The effect of whey protein concentrate (WPC) and gum tragacanth (GT) as fat replacers on the chemical, physical, and microstructural properties of nonfat yogurt was investigated. The WPC (7.5, 15, and 20 g/L) and GT (0.25, 0.5, 0.75, and 1 g/L) were incorporated into the skim milk slowly at 40 to 45 degrees C with agitation. The yogurt mixes were pasteurized at 90 degrees C for 10 min, inoculated with 0.1% starter culture, and incubated at 42 degrees C to pH 4.6, then refrigerated overnight at 5 degrees C. A control nonfat yogurt and control full fat yogurt were prepared as described, but without addition of WPC and GT. Increasing amount of WPC led to the increase in total solids, total protein, acidity, and ash content, whereas GT did not affect chemical parameters. Increasing WPC caused a more compact structure consisting of robust casein particles and large aggregates. Firmness was increased and susceptibility to syneresis was decreased as WPC increased. No significant difference was observed for firmness and syneresis of yogurt fortified with GT up to 0.5 g/L compared with control nonfat yogurt. Increasing the amount of gum above 0.5 g/L produced softer gels with a greater tendency for syneresis than the ones prepared without it. Addition of GT led to the coarser and more open structure compared with control yogurt.

  3. Isolation of micro- and nano-crystalline cellulose particles and fabrication of crystalline particles-loaded whey protein cold-set gel.

    PubMed

    Ahmadi, Maede; Madadlou, Ashkan; Sabouri, Ali Akbar

    2015-05-01

    Micro- and nano-crystalline cellulose (MCC and NCC, respectively) particles isolated from cellulose filter papers via acid digestion were characterised and loaded into a heat-denatured whey protein isolate (WPI) solution which was subsequently cold-set-gelled. Both the MCC and NCC particles were rod-shaped and had higher crystallinity degrees than had the cellulose source they were isolated from. The hydrodynamic diameter of NCC particles was ≈ 15 nm. Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy suggested more surface hydroxyl groups on the NCC than the MCC particles and complete digestion of hemicellulose on the cellulosic substrate by acid. MCC- and NCC-loaded WPI gel matrices were topographically less uniform and contained many more undulations in comparison to the crystal-free counterpart. It was found, using dynamic rheometry and penetration tests, that the crystal loading into WPI gels weakened the texture. Non-covalent interactions between the cellulose crystals and whey protein strands were proposed in the gel structure according to FTIR results.

  4. Physico-chemical properties of whey protein isolate films containing oregano oil and their antimicrobial action against spoilage flora of fresh beef.

    PubMed

    Zinoviadou, Kyriaki G; Koutsoumanis, Konstantinos P; Biliaderis, Costas G

    2009-07-01

    Antimicrobial films were prepared by incorporating different levels of oregano oil (0.5%, 1.0%, and 1.5% w/w in the film forming solution) into sorbitol-plasticized whey protein isolate (WPI) films. The moisture uptake behavior and the water vapor permeability (WVP) were not affected by the addition of oregano oil at any of the concentrations used. A reduction of the glass transition temperature (∼10-20°C), as determined by dynamic mechanical thermal analysis (DMTA), was caused by addition of oil into the protein matrix. A decrease of Young modulus (E) and maximum tensile strength (σ(max)) accompanied with an increase in elongation at break (%EB) was observed with increasing oil concentration up to a level of 1.0% (w/w). Wrapping of beef cuts with the antimicrobial films resulted in smaller changes in total color difference (ΔΕ) and saturation difference (Δ(chroma)) during refrigeration (5°C, 12days). The maximum specific growth rate (μ(max)) of total flora (total viable count, TVC) and pseudomonads were significantly reduced (P<0.05) by a factor of two with the use of antimicrobial films (1.5% w/w oil in the film forming solution), while the growth of lactic acid bacteria was completely inhibited. These results pointed to the effectiveness of oregano oil containing whey protein films to increase the shelf life of fresh beef.

  5. Exploring the denaturation of whey proteins upon application of moderate electric fields: a kinetic and thermodynamic study.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Ricardo N; Teixeira, José A; Vicente, António A

    2011-11-01

    Thermal processing often results in disruption of the native conformation of whey proteins, thus affecting functional properties. The aim of this work was to evaluate the effects of moderate electric fields on denaturation kinetics and thermodynamic properties of whey protein dispersions at temperatures ranging from 75 to 90 °C. Application of electric fields led to a lower denaturation of whey proteins, kinetically traduced by lower values of reaction order (n) and rate constant (k) (p < 0.05), when compared to those from conventional heating under equivalent heating rates and holding times. Furthermore, the application of electric fields combined with short come-up times has reduced considerably the denaturation of proteins during early stages of heating (>30% of native soluble protein than conventional heating) and has determined also considerable changes in calculated thermodynamic properties (such as E(a), ΔH(‡), ΔS(‡)). In general, denaturation reactions during moderate electric fields processing were less dependent on temperature increase.

  6. Oral administration of bovine whey proteins to mice elicits opposing immunoregulatory responses and is adjuvant dependent

    PubMed Central

    AFUWAPE, A O; TURNER, M W; STROBEL, S

    2004-01-01

    Most studies investigating the induction of oral tolerance (OT) use purified proteins such as ovalbumin (OVA), bovine serum albumin (BSA) and beta-lactoglobulin (β-LG). Little information is available regarding the induction of OT to a protein mixture, e.g. cow's milk. In this study we compared the regulatory mechanisms induced after the oral administration of a whey protein concentrate (WP) derived from cow's milk following immunization with two different adjuvants, complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA) and alum. OVA was used as a control antigen. Animals were given a single feed of these proteins at an equivalent dose of 1 mg/g body weight before they were immunized seven days later with the antigen in Freund's adjuvant or alum. Delayed type hypersensitivity (DTH) responses were suppressed by both a feed of WP and OVA after immunization with CFA. However, only OVA feeding suppressed antigen specific IgG responses. In an attempt to investigate whether WP would tolerize the more susceptible IgE responses, alum immunization replaced CFA as the adjuvant used for systemic immunizations. WP, after a single feed, significantly primed for DTH and IgE responses indicating oral sensitization to WP. In contrast, OVA suppressed DTH, IgE and IgG responses. Antigen specific proliferation of mononuclear cells was suppressed in mice fed OVA, but primed in those fed with WP. In addition cells taken from sensitized mice fed WP up-regulated levels of specific interleukin (IL) -4, -10 and -12 in vitro whereas these cytokines were suppressed in cultures from tolerant WP fed mice. Global suppression was obtained in cultures from tolerant OVA fed mice. TGF-β was not detected in draining PLN cell cultures of either tolerant or sensitized mice. These data suggest that a whey protein mixture induces divergent responses following immunization with either CFA or alum despite being fed at an identical dose. We suggest that that the choice of the adjuvant may determine the immunoregulatory

  7. Lesser suppression of energy intake by orally ingested whey protein in healthy older men compared with young controls

    PubMed Central

    Giezenaar, Caroline; Trahair, Laurence G.; Rigda, Rachael; Hutchison, Amy T.; Luscombe-Marsh, Natalie D.; Hausken, Trygve; Jones, Karen L.; Horowitz, Michael; Chapman, Ian

    2015-01-01

    Protein-rich supplements are used widely for the management of malnutrition in young and older people. Protein is the most satiating of the macronutrients in young. It is not known how the effects of oral protein ingestion on energy intake, appetite, and gastric emptying are modified by age. The aim of the study was to determine the suppression of energy intake by protein compared with control and underlying gastric-emptying and appetite responses of oral whey protein drinks in eight healthy older men (69–80 yr) compared with eight young male controls (18–34 yr). Subjects were studied on three occasions to determine the effects of protein loads of 30 g/120 kcal and 70 g/280 kcal compared with a flavored water control-drink (0 g whey protein) on energy intake (ad libitum buffet-style meal), and gastric emptying (three-dimensional-ultrasonography) and appetite (0–180 min) in a randomized, double-blind, cross-over design. Energy intake was suppressed by the protein compared with control (P = 0.034). Suppression of energy intake by protein was less in older men (1 ± 5%) than in young controls (15 ± 2%; P = 0.008). Cumulative energy intake (meal+drink) on the protein drink days compared with the control day increased more in older (18 ± 6%) men than young (1 ± 3%) controls (P = 0.008). Gastric emptying of all three drinks was slower in older men (50% gastric-emptying time: 68 ± 5 min) than young controls (36 ± 5 min; P = 0.007). Appetite decreased in young, while it increased in older (P < 0.05). In summary, despite having slower gastric emptying, elderly men exhibited blunted protein-induced suppression of energy intake by whey protein compared with young controls, so that in the elderly men, protein ingestion increased overall energy intake more than in the young men. PMID:26290103

  8. Lesser suppression of energy intake by orally ingested whey protein in healthy older men compared with young controls.

    PubMed

    Giezenaar, Caroline; Trahair, Laurence G; Rigda, Rachael; Hutchison, Amy T; Feinle-Bisset, Christine; Luscombe-Marsh, Natalie D; Hausken, Trygve; Jones, Karen L; Horowitz, Michael; Chapman, Ian; Soenen, Stijn

    2015-10-15

    Protein-rich supplements are used widely for the management of malnutrition in young and older people. Protein is the most satiating of the macronutrients in young. It is not known how the effects of oral protein ingestion on energy intake, appetite, and gastric emptying are modified by age. The aim of the study was to determine the suppression of energy intake by protein compared with control and underlying gastric-emptying and appetite responses of oral whey protein drinks in eight healthy older men (69-80 yr) compared with eight young male controls (18-34 yr). Subjects were studied on three occasions to determine the effects of protein loads of 30 g/120 kcal and 70 g/280 kcal compared with a flavored water control-drink (0 g whey protein) on energy intake (ad libitum buffet-style meal), and gastric emptying (three-dimensional-ultrasonography) and appetite (0-180 min) in a randomized, double-blind, cross-over design. Energy intake was suppressed by the protein compared with control (P = 0.034). Suppression of energy intake by protein was less in older men (1 ± 5%) than in young controls (15 ± 2%; P = 0.008). Cumulative energy intake (meal+drink) on the protein drink days compared with the control day increased more in older (18 ± 6%) men than young (1 ± 3%) controls (P = 0.008). Gastric emptying of all three drinks was slower in older men (50% gastric-emptying time: 68 ± 5 min) than young controls (36 ± 5 min; P = 0.007). Appetite decreased in young, while it increased in older (P < 0.05). In summary, despite having slower gastric emptying, elderly men exhibited blunted protein-induced suppression of energy intake by whey protein compared with young controls, so that in the elderly men, protein ingestion increased overall energy intake more than in the young men.

  9. Postprandial muscle protein synthesis is higher after a high whey protein, leucine-enriched supplement than after a dairy-like product in healthy older people: a randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Decreased ability of muscles to respond to anabolic stimuli is part of the underlying mechanism for muscle loss with aging. Previous studies suggest that substantial amounts of essential amino acids (EAA), whey protein and leucine are beneficial for stimulation of acute muscle protein synthesis in older adults. However, these studies supplied only proteins, and no bolus studies have been done with dairy products or supplements that contained also fat and carbohydrates besides proteins. The aim of this study was to evaluate whether a specifically designed nutritional supplement in older adults stimulates muscle protein synthesis acutely to a greater extent than a conventional dairy product. Moreover, the combined effect with resistance exercise was studied by using a unilateral resistance exercise protocol. Methods Utilizing a randomized, controlled, double blind study design, healthy older adults received a single bolus of a high whey protein, leucine-enriched supplement (EXP: 20g whey protein, 3g total leucine, 150kcal; n = 9) or an iso-caloric milk protein control (Control: 6g milk protein; n = 10), immediately after unilateral resistance exercise. Postprandial mixed muscle protein fractional synthesis rate (FSR) was measured over 4h using a tracer infusion protocol with L-[ring-13C6]-phenylalanine and regular blood and muscle sampling. Results FSR was significantly higher overall after EXP (0.0780 ± 0.0070%/h) vs Control (0.0574 ± 0.0066%/h (EMM ± SE)) (p = 0.049). No interaction between treatment and exercise was observed (p = 0.519). Higher postprandial concentrations of EAA and leucine are possible mediating factors for the FSR response, while plasma insulin increase did not dictate the FSR response. Moreover, when the protein intake from the supplements was expressed per kg leg lean mass (LLM), a significant correlation was observed with resting postprandial FSR (r = 0.48, P = 0.038). Conclusions Ingestion of

  10. Toward Separating Alpha-lactalbumin and Beta-lactoglobulin Proteins from Whey through Cation-exchange Adsorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Sayed, Mayyada; Chase, Howard

    2009-05-01

    This paper describes the cation-exchange adsorption of the two major whey proteins, alpha-lactalbumin (ALA) and beta-lactoglobulin (BLG) with the purpose of establishing a process for isolating them from cow's milk whey. The single- and two-component adsorption of 1.5 mg/ml ALA and 3 mg/ml BLG to the cation-exchanger SP Sepharose FF at 20° C using 0.1 M acetate buffer of pH 3.7 was studied. Langmuir isotherm parameters were determined for the pure proteins. In two-component systems, BLG breakthrough curve exhibited an overshoot phenomenon that gave evidence for the presence of a competitive adsorption between the two proteins. Complete separation occurred and it was possible to obtain each of the two proteins in a pure form. The process was then applied to a whey concentrate mixture where incomplete separation took place. However, BLG was produced with 95% purity and a recovery of 80%, while ALA showed an 84% recovery with low purity.

  11. Modulating the textural characteristics of whey protein nanofibril gels with different concentrations of calcium chloride.

    PubMed

    Farjami, Toktam; Madadlou, Ashkan; Labbafi, Mohsen

    2016-02-01

    Protein nanofibrils with 10-20 nm diameters were formed by heating whey protein solution at pH 2.0. Nanofibrils solution was deacidified slowly through dialysis followed by adding different amounts of CaCl2 (0-80 mM) into the dialysis water resulting in formation of a soft viscoelastic gel over time. The gel fabricated from the nanofibrils solution dialyzed against distilled water with 0 mM CaCl2 had zero ash content. Fourier transform infra-red spectroscopy revealed a change in the pattern of hydrogen bond formation in gel network by calcium chloride. The higher the ash content of gels, the lower was the storage modulus and fracture stress of samples. Gels with higher ash contents had a more porous microstructure which was attributed to the diminished hydrophobic interactions and hydrogen bonding among nanofibrils by the action of chloride. Higher ash contents also led to higher water holding capacity of gels which was attributed to the influence of the strongly hydrated calcium ions that interacted with the non-charged regions of proteins via site-specific interactions.

  12. Relationship between the microstructure and the mechanical and barrier properties of whey protein films.

    PubMed

    Anker, M; Stading, M; Hermansson, A M

    2000-09-01

    This work was focused on the relationship between the microstructure and the mechanical and barrier properties of whey protein isolate (WPI) films. Sorbitol (S) and glycerol (G) were used as plasticizers and the pH was varied between 7 and 9. The films were cast from heated aqueous solutions and dried in a climate room at 23 degrees C and 50% relative humidity for 16 h. The microstructure of the films was found to be dependent on the concentration, the plasticizers, and the pH. When the concentration increased, a more aggregated structure was formed, with a denser protein network and larger pores. This resulted in increased water vapor permeability (WVP) and decreased oxygen permeability (OP). When G was used as a plasticizer instead of S, the microstructure was different, and the moisture content and WVP approximately doubled. When the pH increased from 7 to 9, a denser protein structure was formed, the strain at break increased, and the OP decreased.

  13. Isolation and characterization of anti-inflammatory peptides derived from whey protein.

    PubMed

    Ma, Ye; Liu, Jie; Shi, Haiming; Yu, Liangli Lucy

    2016-09-01

    The present study was conducted to isolate and characterize anti-inflammatory peptides from whey protein hydrolysates using alcalase. Nine subfractions were obtained after sequential purification by ultrafiltration, Sephadex G-25 gel (GE Healthcare, Uppsala, Sweden) filtration chromatography, and preparative HPLC. Among them, subfraction F4e showed the strongest inhibitory activity on interleukin-1β (IL-1β), cyclooxygenase-2, and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) mRNA expression in lipopolysaccharide-induced RAW 264.7 mouse macrophages. Eight peptides, including 2 new peptides-Asp-Tyr-Lys-Lys-Tyr (DYKKY) and Asp-Gln-Trp-Leu (DQWL)-were identified from subfractions F4c and F4e, respectively, using ultra-high performance liquid chromatography-quadrupole-time-of-flight mass spectrometry. Peptide DQWL showed the strongest inhibitory ability on IL-1β, cyclooxygenase-2, and TNF-α mRNA expression and production of IL-1β and TNF-α proteins at concentrations of 10 and 100μg/mL, respectively. Additionally, DQWL treatment significantly inhibited nuclear factor-κB activation by suppressing nuclear translocation of nuclear factor-κB p65 and blocking inhibitor κB kinase phosphorylation and inhibitor κB degradation together with p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase activation. Our study suggests that peptide DQWL has anti-inflammatory potential; further confirmation using an in vivo model is needed. PMID:27394940

  14. Whey protein isolate decreases murine stomach weight and intestinal length and alters the expression of Wnt signalling-associated genes.

    PubMed

    McAllan, Liam; Speakman, John R; Cryan, John F; Nilaweera, Kanishka N

    2015-01-28

    The present study examined the underlying mechanisms by which whey protein isolate (WPI) affects energy balance. C57BL/6J mice were fed a diet containing 10% energy from fat, 70% energy from carbohydrate (35% energy from sucrose) and 20% energy from casein or WPI for 15 weeks. Mice fed with WPI had reduced weight gain, cumulative energy intake and dark-phase VO2 compared with casein-fed mice (P< 0.05); however, WPI intake had no significant effects on body composition, meal size/number, water intake or RER. Plasma levels of insulin, TAG, leptin, glucose and glucagon-like peptide 1 remained unchanged. Notably, the intake of WPI reduced stomach weight and both length and weight of the small intestine (P< 0.05). WPI intake reduced the gastric expression of Wingless/int-1 5a (Wnt5a) (P< 0.01) and frizzled 4 (Fzd4) (P< 0.01), with no change in the expression of receptor tyrosine kinase-like orphan receptor 2 (Ror2) and LDL receptor-related protein 5 (Lrp5). In the ileum, WPI increased the mRNA expression of Wnt5a (P< 0.01) and caused a trend towards an increase in the expression of Fzd4 (P= 0.094), with no change in the expression of Ror2 and Lrp5. These genes were unresponsive in the duodenum. Among the nutrient-responsive genes, WPI specifically reduced ileal mRNA expression of peptide YY (P< 0.01) and fatty acid transporter protein 4 (P< 0.05), and decreased duodenal mRNA expression of the insulin receptor (P= 0.05), with a trend towards a decreased expression of Na-glucose co-transporter 1 (P= 0.07). The effects of WPI on gastrointestinal Wnt signalling may explain how this protein affects gastrointestinal structure and function and, in turn, energy intake and balance.

  15. Modification of the structural and rheological properties of whey protein/gelatin mixtures through high pressure processing.

    PubMed

    Devi, Anastasia Fitria; Buckow, Roman; Hemar, Yacine; Kasapis, Stefan

    2014-08-01

    High pressure processing (HPP) can induce structure development in macromolecules which are distinct from those of conventional thermal treatments. Gelation properties of whey protein (5-20% w/w) upon 15min HPP at 600MPa and 5 or 30°C (initial sample temperatures) were examined in the presence and absence of 5% w/w gelatin. The values of storage modulus (G') in pressure treated mixed gels were below those of their counterparts thermally treated at 80°C. Mixed systems subjected to HPP in the solution state possessed higher G' than the mixed systems subjected to HPP in the form of gels. The cooling profile of G' in pressurised mixed solutions was similar to that of the gelatin solution, which indicates that HPP resulted in a high degree of gelatin continuity. Confocal images confirmed that gelatin was the continuous phase whilst whey protein aggregated in discontinuous inclusions within the pressurised mixed systems.

  16. Whey protein supplementation does not alter plasma branched-chained amino acid profiles but results in unique metabolomics patterns in obese women enrolled in an 8-week weight loss trial

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Background. Elevations of plasma concentrations of branched-chain amino acids (BCAA) are correlated with insulin resistance. Reduction in the activity of branched-chain ketoacid dehydrogenase complex (BCKDC) activity and impaired complete mitochondrial BCAA catabolism may contribute to this phenoty...

  17. Effect of water content on thermal behavior of freeze-dried soy whey and their isolated proteins.

    PubMed

    Sobral, Pablo A; Palazolo, Gonzalo G; Wagner, Jorge R

    2011-04-27

    Thermal behavior of lyophilized soy whey (LSW) and whey soy proteins (WSP) at different water contents (WC) was studied by DSC. In anhydrous condition, Kunitz trypsin inhibitor (KTI) and lectin (L) were more heat stable for WSP with respect to LSW sample. The increase of WC destabilized both proteins but differently depending on the sample analyzed. Thermal stability inversion of KTI and L was observed for WSP and LSW at 50.0% and 17.0% WC, respectively, which correspond to the same water-protein content mass ratio (W/P ≈ 1.9). At W/P < 1.9, KTI was more heat stable than L. Before the inversion point, WC strongly modified the peak temperatures (T(p)) of KTI and L for WSP, whereas this behavior was not observed for LSW. The high sugar content was responsible for the thermal behavior of KTI and L in LSW under anhydrous condition and low WC. These results have important implications for the soy whey processing and inactivation of antinutritional factors. PMID:21413812

  18. Optical backscatter method for determining thermal denaturation of β-lactoglobulin and other whey proteins in milk.

    PubMed

    Lamb, Alisa; Payne, Fred; Xiong, Youling L; Castillo, Manuel

    2013-03-01

    The heat denaturation of whey proteins affects the functional properties of milk. Correlations of β-lactoglobulin (β-LG) denaturation to gelation time, gel firmness, and gel moisture content have been widely documented. Currently, no technique is available for quantifying β-LG denaturation in milk without altering its native composition or requiring a laborious procedure. The goal of this study was to establish if an optical backscatter response of whey protein denaturation during milk heat treatment could be determined that would be the basis for an inline optical measurement technology. The experimental design consisted of 1 factor (time at 80°C) and 6 levels (0, 3, 5, 7, 12, and 25 min). Physicochemical analysis performed indicated that β-LG denaturation followed a first-order response during thermal treatment. The light backscatter response, measured as a ratio of two 25-nm wave bands (832.5 nm/382.5 nm), significantly correlated to β-LG denaturation and had a 14% increase for milk with 75% β-LG denaturation. The strength of the optical response at the proposed wave bands and their correlation to denaturation suggests that light backscatter could potentially be used to measure β-LG and other whey protein denaturation inline.

  19. Heat-induced changes in the properties of modified skim milks with different casein to whey protein ratios.

    PubMed

    Singh, Mandeep Jeswan; Chandrapala, Jayani; Udabage, Punsandani; McKinnon, Ian; Augustin, Mary Ann

    2015-05-01

    The heat-induced changes in pH, Ca activity and viscosity after heating at 90 °C for 10 min of five modified skim milks were studied as a function of the initial pH of the milks at 25 °C. The milks had (i) different ratios of casein : whey protein (0.03, 1.74, 3.97, 5.27 and 7.25), (ii) the same total solids concentration (9% w/w) and (iii) prior to the adjustment of the pH, similar values of pH (6.67-6.74), concentration of serum calcium, and calcium activity, suggesting that the sera have similar mineral composition. The total protein concentrations of the milks differ (2.8-4.0%, w/w). The pH decrease in situ upon heating from 25-90 °C was similar for all the modified skim milks with the same starting pH, suggesting that the pH changes to milk on heating were primarily mediated by the initial mineral composition of the serum and were unaffected by the casein : whey protein ratio or the total protein content of the milk. The heat-induced changes in pH and calcium activity were largely reversible on cooling. The two milks with the lowest ratios of casein to whey protein gelled on heating to 90 °C for 10 min and cooling to 25 °C when the pH was adjusted to pH = 6.2 prior to heating. The viscosities of all other milks with casein to whey protein ratio of 3.97, 5.27 and 7.25 and/or pH ≥6.7 prior to heating did not change significantly. The effect of casein : whey protein ratio and the pH are the dominant factors in controlling the susceptibility to thickening of the milks on heating in this study.

  20. Whey protein concentrate doped electrospun poly(epsilon-caprolactone) fibers for antibiotic release improvement.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Said Mahmoud; Ahmed, Hanaa; Tian, Chang; Tu, Qin; Guo, Yadan; Wang, Jinyi

    2016-07-01

    Design and fabrication of scaffolds using appropriate biomaterials are a key step for the creation of functionally engineered tissues and their clinical applications. Poly(epsilon-caprolactone) (PCL), a biodegradable and biocompatible material with negligible cytotoxicity, is widely used to fabricate nanofiber scaffolds by electrospinning for the applications of pharmaceutical products and wound dressings. However, the use of PCL as such in tissue engineering is limited due to its poor bioregulatory activity, high hydrophobicity, lack of functional groups and neutral charge. With the attempt to found nanofiber scaffolds with antibacterial activity for skin tissue engineering, in this study, whey protein concentrate (WPC) was used to modify the PCL nanofibers by doping it in the PCL electrospun solution. By adding proteins into PCL nanofibers, the degradability of the fibers may be increased, and this further allows an antibiotic incorporated in the fibers to be efficiently released. The morphology, wettability and degradation of the as-prepared PCL/WPC nanofibers were carefully characterized. The results showed that the PCL/WPC nanofibers possessed good morphology and wettability, as well as high degradation ability to compare with the pristine PCL fibers. Afterwords, tetracycline hydrochloride as a model antibiotic drug was doped in the PCL/WPC nanofibers. In vitro drug release assays demonstrated that PCL/WPC nanofibers had higher antibiotic release capability than the PCL nanofibers. Also, antibacterial activity evaluation against various bacteria showed that the drug-doped PCL/WPC fibers possessed more efficient antibacterial activity than the PCL nanofibers. PMID:27022878

  1. Whey protein aerogel as blended with cellulose crystalline particles or loaded with fish oil.

    PubMed

    Ahmadi, Maede; Madadlou, Ashkan; Saboury, Ali Akbar

    2016-04-01

    Whey protein hydrogels blended with nanocrystalline and microcrystalline cellulose particles (NCC and MCC, respectively) were prepared, followed by freeze-drying, to produce aerogels. NCC blending increased the Young's modulus, and elastic character, of the protein aerogel. Aerogels were microporous and mesoporous materials, as characterized by the pores sizing 1.2 nm and 12.2 nm, respectively. Blending with NCC decreased the count of both microporous and mesoporous-classified pores at the sub-100 nm pore size range investigated. In contrast, MCC blending augmented the specific surface area and pores volume of the aerogel. It also increased moisture sorption affinity of aerogel. The feasibility of conveying hydrophobic nutraceuticals by aerogels was evaluated through loading fish oil into the non-blended aerogel. Oil loading altered its microstructure, corresponding to a peak displacement in Fourier-transform infra-red spectra, which was ascribed to increased hydrophobic interactions. Surface coating of aerogel with zein decreased the oxidation susceptibility of the loaded oil during subsequent storage.

  2. Whey protein aerogel as blended with cellulose crystalline particles or loaded with fish oil.

    PubMed

    Ahmadi, Maede; Madadlou, Ashkan; Saboury, Ali Akbar

    2016-04-01

    Whey protein hydrogels blended with nanocrystalline and microcrystalline cellulose particles (NCC and MCC, respectively) were prepared, followed by freeze-drying, to produce aerogels. NCC blending increased the Young's modulus, and elastic character, of the protein aerogel. Aerogels were microporous and mesoporous materials, as characterized by the pores sizing 1.2 nm and 12.2 nm, respectively. Blending with NCC decreased the count of both microporous and mesoporous-classified pores at the sub-100 nm pore size range investigated. In contrast, MCC blending augmented the specific surface area and pores volume of the aerogel. It also increased moisture sorption affinity of aerogel. The feasibility of conveying hydrophobic nutraceuticals by aerogels was evaluated through loading fish oil into the non-blended aerogel. Oil loading altered its microstructure, corresponding to a peak displacement in Fourier-transform infra-red spectra, which was ascribed to increased hydrophobic interactions. Surface coating of aerogel with zein decreased the oxidation susceptibility of the loaded oil during subsequent storage. PMID:26593584

  3. The effect of feed solids concentration and inlet temperature on the flavor of spray dried whey protein concentrate.

    PubMed

    Park, Curtis W; Bastian, Eric; Farkas, Brian; Drake, MaryAnne

    2014-01-01

    Previous research has demonstrated that unit operations in whey protein manufacture promote off-flavor production in whey protein. The objective of this study was to determine the effects of feed solids concentration in liquid retentate and spray drier inlet temperature on the flavor of dried whey protein concentrate (WPC). Cheddar cheese whey was manufactured, fat-separated, pasteurized, bleached (250 ppm hydrogen peroxide), and ultrafiltered (UF) to obtain WPC80 retentate (25% solids, wt/wt). The liquid retentate was then diluted with deionized water to the following solids concentrations: 25%, 18%, and 10%. Each of the treatments was then spray dried at the following temperatures: 180 °C, 200 °C, and 220 °C. The experiment was replicated 3 times. Flavor of the WPC80 was evaluated by sensory and instrumental analyses. Particle size and surface free fat were also analyzed. Both main effects (solids concentration and inlet temperature) and interactions were investigated. WPC80 spray dried at 10% feed solids concentration had increased surface free fat, increased intensities of overall aroma, cabbage and cardboard flavors and increased concentrations of pentanal, hexanal, heptanal, decanal, (E)2-decenal, DMTS, DMDS, and 2,4-decadienal (P < 0.05) compared to WPC80 spray dried at 25% feed solids. Product spray dried at lower inlet temperature also had increased surface free fat and increased intensity of cardboard flavor and increased concentrations of pentanal, (Z)4-heptenal, nonanal, decanal, 2,4-nonadienal, 2,4-decadienal, and 2- and 3-methyl butanal (P < 0.05) compared to product spray dried at higher inlet temperature. Particle size was higher for powders from increased feed solids concentration and increased inlet temperature (P < 0.05). An increase in feed solids concentration in the liquid retentate and inlet temperature within the parameters evaluated decreased off-flavor intensity in the resulting WPC80. PMID:24329978

  4. The effect of feed solids concentration and inlet temperature on the flavor of spray dried whey protein concentrate.

    PubMed

    Park, Curtis W; Bastian, Eric; Farkas, Brian; Drake, MaryAnne

    2014-01-01

    Previous research has demonstrated that unit operations in whey protein manufacture promote off-flavor production in whey protein. The objective of this study was to determine the effects of feed solids concentration in liquid retentate and spray drier inlet temperature on the flavor of dried whey protein concentrate (WPC). Cheddar cheese whey was manufactured, fat-separated, pasteurized, bleached (250 ppm hydrogen peroxide), and ultrafiltered (UF) to obtain WPC80 retentate (25% solids, wt/wt). The liquid retentate was then diluted with deionized water to the following solids concentrations: 25%, 18%, and 10%. Each of the treatments was then spray dried at the following temperatures: 180 °C, 200 °C, and 220 °C. The experiment was replicated 3 times. Flavor of the WPC80 was evaluated by sensory and instrumental analyses. Particle size and surface free fat were also analyzed. Both main effects (solids concentration and inlet temperature) and interactions were investigated. WPC80 spray dried at 10% feed solids concentration had increased surface free fat, increased intensities of overall aroma, cabbage and cardboard flavors and increased concentrations of pentanal, hexanal, heptanal, decanal, (E)2-decenal, DMTS, DMDS, and 2,4-decadienal (P < 0.05) compared to WPC80 spray dried at 25% feed solids. Product spray dried at lower inlet temperature also had increased surface free fat and increased intensity of cardboard flavor and increased concentrations of pentanal, (Z)4-heptenal, nonanal, decanal, 2,4-nonadienal, 2,4-decadienal, and 2- and 3-methyl butanal (P < 0.05) compared to product spray dried at higher inlet temperature. Particle size was higher for powders from increased feed solids concentration and increased inlet temperature (P < 0.05). An increase in feed solids concentration in the liquid retentate and inlet temperature within the parameters evaluated decreased off-flavor intensity in the resulting WPC80.

  5. Pickering emulsions stabilized by whey protein nanoparticles prepared by thermal cross-linking.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jiande; Shi, Mengxuan; Li, Wei; Zhao, Luhai; Wang, Ze; Yan, Xinzhong; Norde, Willem; Li, Yuan

    2015-03-01

    A Pickering (o/w) emulsion was formed and stabilized by whey protein isolate nanoparticles (WPI NPs). Those WPI NPs were prepared by thermal cross-linking of denatured WPI proteins within w/o emulsion droplets at 80°C for 15 min. During heating of w/o emulsions containing 10% (w/v) WPI proteins in the water phase, the emulsions displayed turbid-transparent-turbid phase transitions, which is ascribed to the change in the size of the protein-containing water droplets caused by thermal cross-linking between denatured protein molecules. The transparent stage indicated the formation of WPI NPs. WPI NPs of different sizes were obtained by varying the mixing speed. WPI NPs of 200-500 nm were selected to prepare o/w Pickering emulsions because of their good stability against coalescence. By Confocal Laser Scanning Microscopy, it was observed that WPI NPs were closely packed and distributed at the surface of the emulsion droplets. By measuring water contact angles of WPI NPs films, it was found that under most conditions WPI NPs present good partial wetting properties, but that at the isoelectric point (pI) and high ionic strength the particles become more hydrophobic, resulting in less stable Pickering emulsion. Thus, at pH above and below the pI of WPI NPs and low to moderate ionic strengths (1-10 mM), and with a WPI NPs concentration of 2% (w/v), a stable Pickering emulsion can be obtained. The results may provide useful information for applications of WPI NPs in environmentally friendly and food grade applications, notably in food, pharmaceutical and cosmetic products.

  6. Fuel alcohol from whey

    SciTech Connect

    Lyons, T.P.; Cunningham, J.D.

    1980-01-01

    According to the 'Report on alcohol fuels policy review', published in 1979 by the US Department of Energy, cheese whey had a very low net feedstock cost/gal of ethanol produced ($0.22) and the production potential in the USA is 90 million gal ethanol/yr. Three processes are described, i.e. the Milbrew whey fermentation process using Kluyveromyces fragilis with whey of 10-15% TS under sterile or non-sterile conditions and in batch, semi-continuous or continuous operation (primarily, designed for the production of single-cell protein), the continuous Carbery process in commercial operation in Ireland (DSA 42, 7856) and the Danish process (Dansk Gaerings-industri, Copenhagen) producing edible alcohol from whey permeate, and methane from distillation wastes for use as fuel for heating the distillation units.

  7. Citrulline does not enhance blood flow, microvascular circulation, or myofibrillar protein synthesis in elderly men at rest or following exercise.

    PubMed

    Churchward-Venne, Tyler A; Cotie, Lisa M; MacDonald, Maureen J; Mitchell, Cameron J; Prior, Todd; Baker, Steven K; Phillips, Stuart M

    2014-07-01

    Aging is associated with anabolic resistance, a reduced sensitivity of myofibrillar protein synthesis (MPS) to postprandial hyperaminoacidemia, particularly with low protein doses. Impairments in postprandial skeletal muscle blood flow and/or microvascular perfusion with hyperaminoacidemia and hyperinsulinemia may contribute to anabolic resistance. We examined whether providing citrulline, a precursor for arginine and nitric oxide synthesis, would increase arterial blood flow, skeletal muscle microvascular perfusion, MPS, and signaling through mTORC1. Twenty-one elderly males (65-80 yr) completed acute unilateral resistance exercise prior to being assigned to ingest a high dose (45 g) of whey protein (WHEY) or a low dose (15 g) of whey protein with 10 g of citrulline (WHEY + CIT) or with 10 g of nonessential amino acids (WHEY + NEAA). A primed, continuous infusion of L-[ring-(13)C6] phenylalanine with serial muscle biopsies was used to measure MPS and protein phosphorylation, whereas ultrasound was used to measure microvascular circulation under basal and postprandial conditions in both a rested (FED) and exercised (EX-FED) leg. Argininemia was greater in WHEY + CIT vs. WHEY and WHEY + NEAA from 30 to 300 min postexercise (P < 0.001), but there were no treatment differences in blood flow or microvascular perfusion (all P > 0.05). Phosphorylation of p70S6K-Thr(389) was greater in WHEY vs. WHEY + NEAA (P = 0.02). Postprandial MPS was greater in WHEY vs. WHEY + CIT and WHEY + NEAA under both FED (WHEY: ~128%; WHEY + CIT: ~56%; WHEY + NEAA: ~38%) and EX-FED (WHEY: ~251%; WHEY + CIT: ~124%; WHEY + NEAA: ~108%) conditions (P = 0.003). Citrulline coingestion with a low quantity of protein was ineffective in augmenting the anabolic properties of protein compared with nonessential amino acids.

  8. Sour cherry pomace extract encapsulated in whey and soy proteins: Incorporation in cookies.

    PubMed

    Tumbas Šaponjac, Vesna; Ćetković, Gordana; Čanadanović-Brunet, Jasna; Pajin, Biljana; Djilas, Sonja; Petrović, Jovana; Lončarević, Ivana; Stajčić, Slađana; Vulić, Jelena

    2016-09-15

    One of the potential sources of valuable bioactives is pomace, a by-product from fruit juice processing industry. In the presented study, bioactive compounds extracted from cherry pomace, encapsulated in whey and soy proteins, have been incorporated in cookies, replacing 10% (WE10 and SE10) and 15% (WE15 and SE15) of flour. Total polyphenols, anthocyanins, antioxidant activity and colour characteristics of enriched cookies were followed during 4 months of storage. Total polyphenols of WE10, SE10, WE15 and SE15 have shown a slight increase (23.47, 42.00, 4.12 and 1.16%, respectively), while total anthocyanins (67.92, 64.33, 58.75 and 35.91%, respectively) and antioxidant activity (9.31, 24.30, 11.41 and 12.98%, respectively) decreased. Colour parameters (L(∗), a(∗) and b(∗)) of cookies were influenced by the colour of encapsulates. Fortified cookies received satisfactory sensory acceptance as well. Encapsulated sour cherry pomace bioactives have positively influenced functional characteristics of fortified cookies and their preservation. PMID:27080876

  9. Microencapsulation of Lactobacillus acidophilus NCFM using polymerized whey proteins as wall material.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Yujun; Zheng, Zhe; Zhang, Tiehua; Hendricks, Gregory; Guo, Mingruo

    2016-09-01

    Survivability of probiotics in foods is essential for developing functional food containing probiotics. We investigated polymerized whey protein (PWP)-based microencapsulation process which is developed for protecting probiotics like Lactobacillus acidophilus NCFM and compared with the method using sodium alginate (SA). The entrapment rate was 89.3 ± 4.8% using PWP, while it was 73.2 ± 1.4% for SA. The microencapsulated NCFM by PWP and SA were separately subjected to digestion juices and post-fermentation storage of fermented cows' and goats' milk using the encapsulated culture. The log viable count of NCFM in PWP-based microencapsulation was 4.56, compared with that of 4.26 in SA-based ones and 3.13 for free culture. Compared with using SA as wall material, PWP was more effective in protecting probiotic. Microencapsulation of L. acidophilus NCFM using PWP as wall material can be exploited in the development of fermented dairy products with better survivability of probiotic organism. PMID:27309796

  10. Alginate-whey protein granular microspheres as oral delivery vehicles for bioactive compounds.

    PubMed

    Chen, Lingyun; Subirade, Muriel

    2006-09-01

    Alginate (AL)-whey protein isolate (WPI) microspheres of varied WPI/AL ratio, particle diameter and concentration of polymer bead forming solution (C(AL+WPI)) were prepared in order to develop a biocompatible vehicle for oral administration of bioactive compounds. Microscopy revealed a special matrix/granular structure for microspheres with a WPI/AL ratio of 8:2, 100 microm diameter and C(AL+WPI) of 5% (AL-WPI A2), featuring WPI granules 3-10 microm in diameter homogeneously distributed within an AL spherical matrix. The compound release properties of these microspheres were investigated in simulated gastric and intestinal fluids (SGF and SIF). They demonstrated the desirable property of retarding riboflavin release in SGF and underwent alginate matrix erosion together with liberation of WPI granules in SIF, followed by complete release of the riboflavin. Riboflavin release in SGF and in SIF without pancreatin followed the Higuchi diffusion model while release in SIF in the presence of pancreatin was attributed to WPI granule degradation.

  11. Whey protein isolate modified by transglutaminase aggregation and emulsion gel properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qi, Weiwei; Chen, Chong; Liu, Mujun; Yu, Guoping; Cai, Xinghang; Guo, Peipei; Yao, Yuxiu; Mei, Sijie

    2015-07-01

    Whey protein isolate and commercial soybean salad oil were used to produce the WPI emulsion dispersions. The properties of TG-catalyzed emulsion gelation produced from WPI emulsion dispersions were investigated by the amount of TG, temperature, pH and reaction time. Specifically, the texture properties (hardness and springiness), water-holding capacity and rheological properties (G' and G") were assessed. The result of Orthogonal tests showed WPI emulsion can form better hardness and springiness gel when the ratio of TG and WPI was 20U/g, pH 7.5, treatment temperature and time were 50°C and 3 h, respectively. The microstructure of TG emulsion gels was more compact, gel pore is smaller, distribution more uniform, the oil droplets size smaller compared with untreated emulsion gels. Compared to the control of rheological properties, G' and G" were significantly increased and G' > G", results showed that the gel was solid state, and TG speeded up the process of gelation.

  12. Study of the physical properties of whey protein isolate and gelatin composite films.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Yanfeng; Li, Yanxia; Chai, Zhi; Leng, Xiaojing

    2010-04-28

    The relationships between the microstructural and physical properties of the whey protein isolate and gelatin (WPI/gelatin) composite films were investigated in the present work. Through the electrostatic effects at pH 8, WPI and gelatin molecules could form compact aggregates in solution, where a remarkable shrinkage of the gelatin molecules was observed, when the WPI/gelatin mass ratio was close to 50W:50G. FT-IR analysis indicated that hydrogen bonding also involved the aggregation and film-forming process. The melting temperature of the 50W:50G composite film increased by 9 degrees C compared with the single component films. However, this aggregation process also made the film network microstructure discontinuous, and led to a decline of the puncture strength of the film near 50W:50G; in contrast, the deformation and water vapor permeability of the composite films increased with the gelatin content, while the moisture content and solubility did not show significant variations.

  13. Hydrophobicity, thermal and micro-structural properties of whey protein concentrate-pullulan-beeswax films.

    PubMed

    Jafari, Seid Mahdi; Khanzadi, Mehrdad; Mirzaei, Habibollah; Dehnad, Danial; Chegini, Faramarz Khodaian; Maghsoudlou, Yayha

    2015-09-01

    In this research, effects of beeswax (BW) on functional properties of whey protein concentrates (WPC):pullulan (PUL) films were investigated. For this purpose, 0, 10, 20 and 30w/w(glycerol)% BW rates and 30:70, 50:50 and 70:30w/w% WPC:PUL ratios were applied. Films containing 70% WPC:30% PUL (WPC70) and 30% BW (BW30) justified the highest contact angle (92.4°) among all films; SEM micrographs indicated that BW could come toward the surface of films during drying stage and resulted in a higher hydrophobic behavior of bilayer films compared with blend films. WPC70 supplied the lowest T(g) values (36-48 °C) among different proportions of WPC-PUL; the highest melting points were just assured in the absence of BW regardless of combination ratio for WPI:PUL. BW30 films deserved lower roughness rates than BW20 (and even BW10) films, indicating more advantageous microstructure and higher hydrogen connections in BW30 films and justifying similar melting points attained for BW30 films to BW20 or 10 ones. Overall, application of WPC70 and BW30 was recommended to obtain optimum combination of final properties for WPC-PUL-BW bilayer films as SEM exhibited flexible and elastic structures of such films.

  14. Development and characterization of the kefiran-whey protein isolate-TiO2 nanocomposite films.

    PubMed

    Zolfi, Mohsen; Khodaiyan, Faramarz; Mousavi, Mohammad; Hashemi, Maryam

    2014-04-01

    Biodegradable kefiran-whey protein isolate (WPI)-titanium dioxide (TiO2) blend films were developed and characterized as a function of incorporating amount of TiO2 nanoparticles (1, 3 and 5% wt.). Results showed that the water vapor permeability, moisture content, moisture absorption and water solubility decreased by increasing the nano-TiO2 content. Mechanical tests revealed the plasticizing effect of TiO2 nanoparticles on the kefiran-WPI-TiO2 film. Addition of TiO2 nanoparticles to kefiran-WPI films significantly decreased tensile strength and Young's modulus, while increased its elongation at break. Differential scanning calorimetry data indicated that the glass transition temperature significantly changed by adding nano-TiO2. X-ray diffraction analysis also demonstrated that crystal type in kefiran-WPI was not affected by incorporation of TiO2 nanoparticles. A uniform distribution at 1 and 3% wt. loading levels of TiO2 nanoparticles was observed using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) micrographs.

  15. Aging of whey protein films and the effect on mechanical and barrier properties.

    PubMed

    Anker, M; Stading, M; Hermansson, A M

    2001-02-01

    This work focuses on the aging of whey protein isolate (WPI) films plasticized with glycerol (G) and sorbitol (S). The films were cast from heated aqueous solutions at pH 7 and dried at 23 degrees C and 50% relative humidity (RH) for 16 h. They were stored in a climate room (23 degrees C, 50% RH) for 120 days, and the film properties were measured at regular intervals. The moisture content (MC) of the WPI/G films decreased from 22% (2 days) to 15% (45 days) and was thereafter constant at 15% (up to 120 days). This affected the mechanical properties and caused an increased stress at break (from 2.7 to 8.3 MPa), a decreased strain at break (from 33 to 4%), and an increased glass transition temperature (T(g)) (from -56 to -45 degrees C). The barrier properties were, however, unaffected, with constant water vapor permeability and a uniform film thickness. The MC of the WPI/S films was constant at approximately 9%, which gave no change in film properties.

  16. The improvement of characteristics of biodegradable films made from kefiran-whey protein by nanoparticle incorporation.

    PubMed

    Zolfi, Mohsen; Khodaiyan, Faramarz; Mousavi, Mohammad; Hashemi, Maryam

    2014-08-30

    Biodegradable kefiran-whey protein isolate (WPI) nanocomposites were produced using montmorillonite (MMT) and nano-TiO2 as nanoparticles in the percentage of 1, 3, and 5% (w/w) by a casting and solvent-evaporation method. Physical, mechanical, and water-vapor permeability (WVP) properties were determined as a function of nanoparticle concentration. The results revealed that the effect of these nanoparticles was different according to their nature and percentage. The films incorporated with 5% (w/w) MMT showed the highest tensile strength, Young's modulus, puncture strength, and the lowest WVP compared with the control and TiO2 added films. In contrast to MMT, addition of TiO2 nanoparticles due to the plasticizing effect led to a significant change in color and transparency of nanocomposite. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) observations demonstrated the films' properties in relation to their microstructures. The surface topography results also showed a considerable increase in roughness parameters by incorporating the nanoparticles in kefiran-WPI matrix.

  17. Physical properties of whey protein coating solutions and films containing antioxidants.

    PubMed

    Han, J H; Krochta, J M

    2007-06-01

    Antioxidants (ascorbyl palmitate and alpha-tocopherol) were incorporated into 10% (w/w) whey protein isolate (WPI) coating solution containing 6.67% (w/w) glycerol (WPI:glycerol = 6:4). Before incorporation, the antioxidants were mixed using either powder blending (Process 1) or ethanol solvent-mixing (Process 2). After the antioxidant mixtures were incorporated into heat-denatured WPI solution, viscosity and turbidity of the WPI solutions were determined. The WPI solutions were dried on a flat surface to produce WPI films. The WPI films were examined to determine transparency and oxygen-barrier properties (permeability, diffusivity, and solubility). WPI solution containing antioxidants produced by Process 1 and Process 2 did not show any difference in viscosity and turbidity, but viscosity was greater for the WPI solution with rather than without antioxidants. WPI films produced by Process 2 were more transparent than the films produced by Process 1. Oxygen permeability of Process 1 film was lower than Process 2 film. However, both the diffusivity and solubility of oxygen were statistically the same in Process 1 and Process 2 films. Both control WPI films and antioxidant-containing WPI films had very low oxygen solubility, comparable to polyethylene terephthalate films. Permeability of antioxidant-incorporated films was not enhanced compared to control WPI films.

  18. Preparation and characterization of whey protein film incorporated with TiO2 nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Zhou, J J; Wang, S Y; Gunasekaran, S

    2009-09-01

    Biodegradable titanium dioxide (TiO(2))/whey protein isolate (WPI) blend films were made by casting denatured WPI film solutions incorporated with TiO(2) nanoparticles. X-ray diffraction, UV-vis spectra, and fluorescence spectra of the films showed the successful incorporation of TiO(2) nanoparticles into the WPI matrix and indicated the interactions between TiO(2) and WPI. Mechanical tests revealed the antiplasticizing effect of TiO(2) nanoparticles on the WPI/TiO(2) film. Small amounts (<1 wt%) of added TiO(2) nanoparticles significantly increase the tensile properties of WPI film, but also decrease the moisture barrier properties. The addition of higher amounts (>1 wt%) of TiO(2) improves moisture barrier properties but lowers the tensile properties of the film. Microstructural evaluation confirmed the aggregation and distribution of TiO(2) nanoparticles within the WPI matrix and validated the results of functional properties of the WPI/TiO(2) film.

  19. Development of ecofriendly bionanocomposite: Whey protein isolate/pullulan films with nano-SiO2.

    PubMed

    Hassannia-Kolaee, Mahbobeh; Khodaiyan, Faramarz; Pourahmad, Rezvan; Shahabi-Ghahfarrokhi, Iman

    2016-05-01

    During the past decade, the limitation of petroleum based polymers, the high price of oil, and the environmental concern were attracted the attention of researchers to develop biobased polymers. The composition of different biopolymers and the reinforcement with nano filler are common methods to improve the drawbacks of biopolymers. In this study whey protein isolate/pullulan (WPI/PUL) films contain 1%, 3%, and 5% (w/w) nano-SiO2 (NS) were prepared by a casting method. Tensile strength of nanocomposite films increased after increasing NS content, but elongation at break decreased, simultaneously. Water absorption, moisture content, solubility in water improved in the wake of increasing NS content because NS increase the cohesiveness of the polymer matrix and improved the barrier and water resistance properties of the films. water vapor permeability of film specimens decreased by increasing NS content. Uniform distribution of NS into polymer matrix was confirmed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). XRD pattern and thermal analysis revealed increasing crystallinity and increasing Tg of film specimens with increasing NS content, respectively. According to our result WPI/PUL/NS films possess potential to be used as environment friendly packaging films to improve shelf life of food and can be used as promising alternative to petroleum based packaging films.

  20. Drying and denaturation characteristics of whey protein isolate in the presence of lactose and trehalose.

    PubMed

    Haque, M Amdadul; Chen, Jie; Aldred, Peter; Adhikari, Benu

    2015-06-15

    The denaturation kinetics of whey protein isolate (WPI), in the presence and absence of lactose and trehalose, was quantified in a convective air-drying environment. Single droplets of WPI, WPI-lactose and WPI-trehalose were dried in conditioned air (2.5% RH, 0.5m/s air velocity) at two temperatures (65°C and 80°C) for 500s. The initial solid concentration of these solutions was 10% (w/v) in all the samples. Approximately 68% of WPI was denatured when it was dried in the absence of sugars. Addition of 20% trehalose prevented the irreversible denaturation of WPI at both temperatures. Thirty percent lactose was required to prevent denaturation of WPI at 65°C and the same amount of lactose protected only 70% of WPI from denaturation at 80°C. The secondary structures of WPI were found to be altered by the drying-induced stresses, even in the presence of 20% trehalose and 30% lactose.

  1. Sour cherry pomace extract encapsulated in whey and soy proteins: Incorporation in cookies.

    PubMed

    Tumbas Šaponjac, Vesna; Ćetković, Gordana; Čanadanović-Brunet, Jasna; Pajin, Biljana; Djilas, Sonja; Petrović, Jovana; Lončarević, Ivana; Stajčić, Slađana; Vulić, Jelena

    2016-09-15

    One of the potential sources of valuable bioactives is pomace, a by-product from fruit juice processing industry. In the presented study, bioactive compounds extracted from cherry pomace, encapsulated in whey and soy proteins, have been incorporated in cookies, replacing 10% (WE10 and SE10) and 15% (WE15 and SE15) of flour. Total polyphenols, anthocyanins, antioxidant activity and colour characteristics of enriched cookies were followed during 4 months of storage. Total polyphenols of WE10, SE10, WE15 and SE15 have shown a slight increase (23.47, 42.00, 4.12 and 1.16%, respectively), while total anthocyanins (67.92, 64.33, 58.75 and 35.91%, respectively) and antioxidant activity (9.31, 24.30, 11.41 and 12.98%, respectively) decreased. Colour parameters (L(∗), a(∗) and b(∗)) of cookies were influenced by the colour of encapsulates. Fortified cookies received satisfactory sensory acceptance as well. Encapsulated sour cherry pomace bioactives have positively influenced functional characteristics of fortified cookies and their preservation.

  2. Development of ecofriendly bionanocomposite: Whey protein isolate/pullulan films with nano-SiO2.

    PubMed

    Hassannia-Kolaee, Mahbobeh; Khodaiyan, Faramarz; Pourahmad, Rezvan; Shahabi-Ghahfarrokhi, Iman

    2016-05-01

    During the past decade, the limitation of petroleum based polymers, the high price of oil, and the environmental concern were attracted the attention of researchers to develop biobased polymers. The composition of different biopolymers and the reinforcement with nano filler are common methods to improve the drawbacks of biopolymers. In this study whey protein isolate/pullulan (WPI/PUL) films contain 1%, 3%, and 5% (w/w) nano-SiO2 (NS) were prepared by a casting method. Tensile strength of nanocomposite films increased after increasing NS content, but elongation at break decreased, simultaneously. Water absorption, moisture content, solubility in water improved in the wake of increasing NS content because NS increase the cohesiveness of the polymer matrix and improved the barrier and water resistance properties of the films. water vapor permeability of film specimens decreased by increasing NS content. Uniform distribution of NS into polymer matrix was confirmed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). XRD pattern and thermal analysis revealed increasing crystallinity and increasing Tg of film specimens with increasing NS content, respectively. According to our result WPI/PUL/NS films possess potential to be used as environment friendly packaging films to improve shelf life of food and can be used as promising alternative to petroleum based packaging films. PMID:26774376

  3. Coating of peanuts with edible whey protein film containing alpha-tocopherol and ascorbyl palmitate.

    PubMed

    Han, J H; Hwang, H-M; Min, S; Krochta, J M

    2008-10-01

    Physical properties of whey protein isolate (WPI) coating solution incorporating ascorbic palmitate (AP) and alpha-tocopherol (tocopherol) were characterized, and the antioxidant activity of dried WPI coatings against lipid oxidation in roasted peanuts were investigated. The AP and tocopherol were mixed into a 10% (w/w) WPI solution containing 6.7% glycerol. Process 1 (P1) blended an AP and tocopherol mixture directly into the WPI solution using a high-speed homogenizer. Process 2 (P2) used ethanol as a solvent for dissolving AP and tocopherol into the WPI solution. The viscosity and turbidity of the WPI coating solution showed the Newtonian fluid behavior, and 0.25% of critical concentration of AP in WPI solution rheology. After peanuts were coated with WPI solutions, color changes of peanuts were measured during 16 wk of storage at 25 degrees C, and the oxidation of peanuts was determined by hexanal analysis using solid-phase micro-extraction samplers and GC-MS. Regardless of the presence of antioxidants in the coating layer, the formation of hexanal from the oxidation of peanut lipids was reduced by WPI coatings, which indicates WPI coatings protected the peanuts from oxygen permeation and oxidation. However, the incorporation of antioxidants in the WPI coating layer did not show a significant difference in hexanal production from that of WPI coating treatment without incorporation of antioxidants.

  4. Generation of Soluble Advanced Glycation End Products Receptor (sRAGE)-Binding Ligands during Extensive Heat Treatment of Whey Protein/Lactose Mixtures Is Dependent on Glycation and Aggregation.

    PubMed

    Liu, Fahui; Teodorowicz, Małgorzata; Wichers, Harry J; van Boekel, Martinus A J S; Hettinga, Kasper A

    2016-08-24

    Heating of protein- and sugar-containing materials is considered the primary factor affecting the formation of advanced glycation end products (AGEs). This study aimed to investigate the influence of heating conditions, digestion, and aggregation on the binding capacity of AGEs to the soluble AGE receptor (sRAGE). Samples consisting of mixtures of whey protein and lactose were heated at 130 °C. An in vitro infant digestion model was used to study the influence of heat treatment on the digestibility of whey proteins. The amount of sRAGE-binding ligands before and after digestion was measured by an ELISA-based sRAGE-binding assay. Water activity did not significantly affect the extent of digestibility of whey proteins dry heated at pH 5 (ranging from 3.3 ± 0.2 to 3.6 ± 0.1% for gastric digestion and from 53.5 ± 1.5 to 64.7 ± 1.1% for duodenal digestion), but there were differences in cleavage patterns of peptides among the samples heated at different pH values. Formation of sRAGE-binding ligands depended on the formation of aggregates and was limited in the samples heated at pH 5. Moreover, the sRAGE-binding activity of digested sample was changed by protease degradation and correlated with the digestibility of samples. In conclusion, generation of sRAGE-binding ligands during extensive heat treatment of whey protein/lactose mixtures is limited in acidic heating condition and dependent on glycation and aggregation. PMID:27460534

  5. Anti-Helicobacter pylori activity of crude N-acetylneuraminic acid isolated from glycomacropeptide of whey

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Dong-Jae; Kang, Min-Jung; Choi, Jin-A; Na, Dae-Seung; Kim, Jin-Beom; Na, Chun-Soo

    2016-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori colonizes the gastric mucosa of about half of the world's population, causing chronic gastritis and gastric cancer. An increasing emergence of antibiotic-resistant H. pylori arouses demand on alternative non-antibiotic-based therapies. In this study, we freshly prepared crude N-acetylneuraminic acid obtained from glycomacropeptide (G-NANA) of whey through a neuraminidase-mediated reaction and evaluated its antibacterial ability against H. pylori and H. felis. Overnight cultures of the H. pylori were diluted with fresh media and different concentrations (1-150 mg/mL) of crude G-NANA were added directly to the culture tube. Bacterial growth was evaluated by measuring the optical density of the culture medium and the number of viable bacteria was determined by a direct count of the colony forming units (CFU) on agar plates. For the in vivo study, mice were orally infected with 100 µL (5×108 cfu/mL) of H. felis four times at a day's interval, accompanied by a daily administration of crude G-NANA or vehicle. A day after the last infection, the mice were daily administered the crude G-NANA (0, 75, and 300 mg/mL) for 10 days and euthanized. Their stomachs were collected and bacterial colonization was determined by quantitative real-time PCR. Crude G-NANA inhibited H. pylori's growth and reduced the number of viable bacteria in a dose-dependent manner. Furthermore, crude G-NANA inhibited bacterial colonization in the mice. These results showed that crude G-NANA has antibacterial activity against Helicobacter and demonstrated its therapeutic potential for the prevention of chronic gastritis and gastric carcinogenesis induced by Helicobacter infection in humans. PMID:27382378

  6. Anti-Helicobacter pylori activity of crude N-acetylneuraminic acid isolated from glycomacropeptide of whey.

    PubMed

    Kim, Dong-Jae; Kang, Min-Jung; Choi, Jin-A; Na, Dae-Seung; Kim, Jin-Beom; Na, Chun-Soo; Park, Jong-Hwan

    2016-06-01

    Helicobacter pylori colonizes the gastric mucosa of about half of the world's population, causing chronic gastritis and gastric cancer. An increasing emergence of antibiotic-resistant H. pylori arouses demand on alternative non-antibiotic-based therapies. In this study, we freshly prepared crude N-acetylneuraminic acid obtained from glycomacropeptide (G-NANA) of whey through a neuraminidase-mediated reaction and evaluated its antibacterial ability against H. pylori and H. felis. Overnight cultures of the H. pylori were diluted with fresh media and different concentrations (1-150 mg/mL) of crude G-NANA were added directly to the culture tube. Bacterial growth was evaluated by measuring the optical density of the culture medium and the number of viable bacteria was determined by a direct count of the colony forming units (CFU) on agar plates. For the in vivo study, mice were orally infected with 100 µL (5×10(8) cfu/mL) of H. felis four times at a day's interval, accompanied by a daily administration of crude G-NANA or vehicle. A day after the last infection, the mice were daily administered the crude G-NANA (0, 75, and 300 mg/mL) for 10 days and euthanized. Their stomachs were collected and bacterial colonization was determined by quantitative real-time PCR. Crude G-NANA inhibited H. pylori's growth and reduced the number of viable bacteria in a dose-dependent manner. Furthermore, crude G-NANA inhibited bacterial colonization in the mice. These results showed that crude G-NANA has antibacterial activity against Helicobacter and demonstrated its therapeutic potential for the prevention of chronic gastritis and gastric carcinogenesis induced by Helicobacter infection in humans. PMID:27382378

  7. Simultaneous production of lactobionic and gluconic acid in cheese whey/glucose co-fermentation by Pseudomonas taetrolens.

    PubMed

    Alonso, Saúl; Rendueles, Manuel; Díaz, Mario

    2015-11-01

    Substrate versatility of Pseudomonas taetrolens was evaluated for the first time in a co-fermentation system combining cheese whey and glucose, glycerol or lactose as co-substrates. Results showed that P. taetrolens displayed different production patterns depending on the co-substrate supplied. Whereas the presence of glucose led to a simultaneous co-production of lactobionic (78g/L) and gluconic acid (8.8g/L), lactose feeding stimulated the overproduction of lactobionic acid from whey with a high specific productivity (1.4g/gh) and yield (100%). Co-substrate supply of glycerol conversely led to reduced lactobionic acid yield (82%) but higher cell densities (1.8g/L), channelling the carbon source towards cell growth and maintenance. Higher carbon availability impaired the metabolic activity as well as membrane integrity, whereas lactose feeding improved the cellular functionality of P. taetrolens. Insights into these mixed carbon source strategies open up the possibility of co-producing lactobionic and gluconic acid into an integrated single-cell biorefinery.

  8. Whey protein processing influences formula-induced gut maturation in preterm pigs.

    PubMed

    Li, Yanqi; Østergaard, Mette V; Jiang, Pingping; Chatterton, Dereck E W; Thymann, Thomas; Kvistgaard, Anne S; Sangild, Per T

    2013-12-01

    Immaturity of the gut predisposes preterm infants to nutritional challenges potentially leading to clinical complications such as necrotizing enterocolitis. Feeding milk formulas is associated with greater risk than fresh colostrum or milk, probably due to loss of bioactive proteins (e.g., immunoglobulins, lactoferrin, insulin-like growth factor, transforming growth factor-β) during industrial processing (e.g., pasteurization, filtration, spray-drying). We hypothesized that the processing method for whey protein concentrate (WPC) would affect gut maturation in formula-fed preterm pigs used as a model for preterm infants. Fifty-five caesarean-delivered preterm pigs were distributed into 4 groups given 1 of 4 isoenergetic diets: formula containing conventional WPC (filtration, multi-pasteurization, standard spray-drying) (CF); formula containing gently treated WPC (reduced filtration and pasteurization, gentle spray-drying) (GF); formula containing minimally treated WPC (rennet precipitation, reduced filtration, heat treatment <40°C, freeze-drying) (MF); and bovine colostrum (used as a positive reference group) (BC). Relative to CF, GF, and MF pigs, BC pigs had greater villus heights, lactose digestion, and absorption and lower gut permeability (P < 0.05). MF and BC pigs had greater plasma citrulline concentrations than CF and GF pigs and intestinal interleukin-8 was lower in BC pigs than in the other groups (P < 0.05). MF pigs had lower concentrations of intestinal claudin-4, cleaved caspase-3, and phosphorylated c-Jun than CF pigs (P < 0.05). The conventional and gently treated WPCs had similar efficacy in stimulating proliferation of porcine intestinal epithelial cells. We conclude that processing of WPC affects intestinal structure, function, and integrity when included in formulas for preterm pigs. Optimization of WPC processing technology may be important to preserve the bioactivity and nutritional value of formulas for sensitive newborns. PMID:24047702

  9. Foaming Properties of Whey Protein Isolate and λ-Carrageenan Mixed Systems.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhengshan; Zhang, Sha; Vardhanabhuti, Bongkosh

    2015-08-01

    Heating protein with polysaccharide under neutral or near neutral pH can induce the formation of soluble complex with improved functional properties. The objective of our research was to investigate the effects of λ-carrageenan (λC) concentrations and pH on foaming properties of heated whey protein isolate (WPI) and λC soluble complex (h-cpx) in comparison to heated WPI with added λC (pWPI-λC), and unheated WPI with λC (WPI-λC). In all 3 WPI-λC systems at pH 7, increasing λC concentration led to improved foamability until a certain concentration before it decreased. Despite their higher viscosity, both heated systems (pWPI-λC and h-cpx) showed significantly better foamability and foam stability compared to WPI-λC. Rheological results of foams with 0.25% λC suggested that higher elasticity and viscous films were produced in h-cpx and pWPI-λC systems corresponding to better foam stability. Foam microstructure images indicated that foams produced from h-cpx had thicker film and consisted of smaller initial bubble area and more uniform bubble size. Results from the effect of pH (6.2, 6.5, and 7.0) further confirmed that stronger interactions between WPI and λC during heating contributed to the improved foaming properties. Foam stability was higher in h-cpx system at all 3 pH levels, especially under pH 6.2 where there were strongest interactions between the biopolymers.

  10. Emulsions stabilised by whey protein microgel particles: towards food-grade Pickering emulsions.

    PubMed

    Destribats, Mathieu; Rouvet, Martine; Gehin-Delval, Cécile; Schmitt, Christophe; Binks, Bernard P

    2014-09-28

    We have investigated a new class of food-grade particles, whey protein microgels, as stabilisers of triglyceride-water emulsions. The sub-micron particles stabilized oil-in-water emulsions at all pH with and without salt. All emulsions creamed but exhibited exceptional resistance to coalescence. Clear correlations exist between the properties of the microgels in aqueous dispersion and the resulting emulsion characteristics. For conditions in which the particles were uncharged, fluid emulsions with relatively large drops were stabilised, whereas emulsions stabilized by charged particles contained smaller flocculated drops. A combination of optical microscopy of the drops and spectrophotometry of the resolved aqueous phase allowed us to estimate the interfacial adsorption densities of the particles using the phenomenon of limited coalescence. We deduce two classes of particle arrangement. Complete adsorption of the particles was obtained when they were neutral or when their charges were screened by salt resulting in at least one particle monolayer at the interface. By contrast, only around 50% of the particles adsorbed when they were charged with emulsion drops being covered by less than half a monolayer. These findings were supported by direct visualization of drop interfaces using cryo-scanning electron microscopy. Uncharged particles were highly aggregated and formed a continuous 2-D network at the interface. Otherwise particles organized as individual aggregates separated by particle-free regions. In this case, we suggest that some particles spread at the interface leading to the formation of a continuous protein membrane. Charged particles displayed the ability to bridge opposing interfaces of neighbouring drops to form dense particle disks protecting drops against coalescence; this is the main reason for the flocculation and stability of emulsions containing sparsely covered drops.

  11. Whey protein isolate gel for separation: A formation, characterization, and application study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teo, Jiunn Yeong

    Novel microporous membranes made of whey protein isolate (WPI) were developed. Aggregates of WPI comprised the bulk of the membrane, the size and packing density of which were varied by changing CaCl2 concentration (0.05--0.3M) and WPI concentration (30--40wt%), respectively. Aggregate sizes of the membranes made with 0.3M, 0.1M, 0.05M CaCl2 were roughly 1.5mum, 1mum, and 0.8mum, respectively. Skin layer of thickness about 0.5mum was found on either side of the membrane, but the thickness could reach 5mum at 0.3M CaCl2. Additionally, the porosity of the skin layer was shown to be modifiable with the addition of surfactant. Membranes were stable in hexane with flux values on the order of 1--1000gal/ft 2·d depending on the morphology of the membrane. The molecular weight cutoffs (MWCOs) of the WPI membranes with skins were evaluated using two different methods: (i) dextran marker method and (ii) protein/vitamin marker method. Membranes were found to have MWCOs of 1,000 or greater with variations when the concentration of salt used to control aggregate size, or surfactant used to modify skin properties were selected. The microporous WPI gel was also used as a cation exchanger and a hydrophobic adsorbent. The WPI cation exchanger has a maximum capacity of 68mg cupric chloride per gram dry WPI gel at neutral pH and can be regenerated effectively by reducing the pH of the solution. The WPI gel has also been found to be an excellent adsorbent for total phenolic compounds from grape extract with a partition coefficient higher than 1000 in aqueous system. The mechanism for total phenolic compounds adsorption is believed to be physical sorption, particularly sorption/condensation of total phenolic compounds in the pores and on all surfaces of WPI gel. The gel has a low extractables of 1ng/ml.g gel, and has an isoelectric point of 5.5. Although WPI gel was made into a monolith for continuous bed chromatography, channeling problems have made it very hard to evaluate the

  12. Effect of N-Ethylmaleimide as a Blocker of Disulfide Crosslinks Formation on the Alkali-Cold Gelation of Whey Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Lei, Zhao; Chen, Xiao Dong

    2016-01-01

    N-ethylmaleimide (NEM) was used to verify that no new disulfide crosslinks were formed during the fascinating rheology of the alkali cold-gelation of whey proteins, which show Sol-Gel-Sol transitions with time at pH > 11.5. These dynamic transitions involve the formation and subsequent destruction of non-covalent interactions between soluble whey aggregates. Therefore, incubation of aggregates with NEM was expected not to affect much the rheology. Experiments show that very little additions of NEM, such as 0.5 mol per mol of protein, delayed and significantly strengthened the metastable gels formed. Interactions between whey protein aggregates were surprisingly enhanced during incubation with NEM as inferred from oscillatory rheometry at different protein concentrations, dynamic swelling, Trp fluorescence and SDS-PAGE measurements. PMID:27732644

  13. Corning and Kroger turn whey to yeast

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-11-16

    It is reported that Corning and Kroger intend to build a 35,000 sq. ft. plant in Winchester, Ky., that will turn whey into bakers' yeast. The plant will convert whey from Kroger's dairies into bakers' yeast, supplying about 60% of the yeast needed for nine Kroger bakeries. It will also produce syrups and whey protein concentrate for use in other food processing activities. In addition to making useful products, the project will convert the whey to glucose and galactose. The protein component of the whey will be concentrated and used in various foods and feeds.

  14. Effect of heating strategies on whey protein denaturation--Revisited by liquid chromatography quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Akkerman, M; Rauh, V M; Christensen, M; Johansen, L B; Hammershøj, M; Larsen, L B

    2016-01-01

    Previous standards in the area of effect of heat treatment processes on milk protein denaturation were based primarily on laboratory-scale analysis and determination of denaturation degrees by, for example, electrophoresis. In this study, whey protein denaturation was revisited by pilot-scale heating strategies and liquid chromatography quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometer (LC/MC Q-TOF) analysis. Skim milk was heat treated by the use of 3 heating strategies, namely plate heat exchanger (PHE), tubular heat exchanger (THE), and direct steam injection (DSI), under various heating temperatures (T) and holding times. The effect of heating strategy on the degree of denaturation of β-lactoglobulin and α-lactalbumin was determined using LC/MC Q-TOF of pH 4.5-soluble whey proteins. Furthermore, effect of heating strategy on the rennet-induced coagulation properties was studied by oscillatory rheometry. In addition, rennet-induced coagulation of heat-treated micellar casein concentrate subjected to PHE was studied. For skim milk, the whey protein denaturation increased significantly as T and holding time increased, regardless of heating method. High denaturation degrees were obtained for T >100°C using PHE and THE, whereas DSI resulted in significantly lower denaturation degrees, compared with PHE and THE. Rennet coagulation properties were impaired by increased T and holding time regardless of heating method, although DSI resulted in less impairment compared with PHE and THE. No significant difference was found between THE and PHE for effect on rennet coagulation time, whereas the curd firming rate was significantly larger for THE compared with PHE. Micellar casein concentrate possessed improved rennet coagulation properties compared with skim milk receiving equal heat treatment.

  15. Amino acids and proteins.

    PubMed

    van Goudoever, Johannes B; Vlaardingerbroek, Hester; van den Akker, Chris H; de Groof, Femke; van der Schoor, Sophie R D

    2014-01-01

    Amino acids and protein are key factors for growth. The neonatal period requires the highest intake in life to meet the demands. Those demands include amino acids for growth, but proteins and amino acids also function as signalling molecules and function as neurotransmitters. Often the nutritional requirements are not met, resulting in a postnatal growth restriction. However, current knowledge on adequate levels of both amino acid as well as protein intake can avoid under nutrition in the direct postnatal phase, avoid the need for subsequent catch-up growth and improve later outcome.

  16. Thermal properties of milk fat, xanthine oxidase, caseins and whey proteins in pulsed electric field-treated bovine whole milk.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Pankaj; Oey, Indrawati; Everett, David W

    2016-09-15

    Thermodynamics of milk components (milk fat, xanthine oxidase, caseins and whey proteins) in pulsed electric field (PEF)-treated milk were compared with thermally treated milk (63 °C for 30 min and 73 °C for 15s). PEF treatments were applied at 20 or 26 kV cm(-1) for 34 μs with or without pre-heating of milk (55 °C for 24s), using bipolar square wave pulses in a continuous mode of operation. PEF treatments did not affect the final temperatures of fat melting (Tmelting) or xanthine oxidase denaturation (Tdenaturation), whereas thermal treatments increased both the Tmelting of milk fat and the Tdenaturation for xanthine oxidase by 2-3 °C. Xanthine oxidase denaturation was ∼13% less after PEF treatments compared with the thermal treatments. The enthalpy change (ΔH of denaturation) of whey proteins decreased in the treated-milk, and denaturation increased with the treatment intensity. New endothermic peaks in the calorimetric thermograms of treated milk revealed the formation of complexes due to interactions between MFGM (milk fat globule membrane) proteins and skim milk proteins. Evidence for the adsorption of complexes onto the MFGM surface was obtained from the increase in surface hydrophobicity of proteins, revealing the presence of unfolded hydrophobic regions. PMID:27080877

  17. Physicochemical Characterization and Potential Prebiotic Effect of Whey Protein Isolate/Inulin Nano Complex

    PubMed Central

    Han, Kyoung-Sik; Yun, Sung Seob; Lee, Mee-Ryung

    2016-01-01

    The purposes of this study were to investigate the impacts of concentration levels of whey protein isolate (WPI) and inulin on the formation and physicochemical properties of WPI/inulin nano complexes and to evaluate their potential prebiotic effects. WPI/inulin nano complexes were produced using the internal gelation method. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and particle size analyzer were used to assess the morphological and physicochemical characterizations of nano complexes, respectively. The encapsulation efficiency of resveratrol in nano complexes was studied using HPLC while the potential prebiotic effects were investigated by measuring the viability of probiotics. In TEM micrographs, the globular forms of nano complexes in the range of 10 and 100 nm were successfully manufactured. An increase in WPI concentration level from 1 to 3% (w/v) resulted in a significant (p<0.05) decrease in the size of nano complexs while inulin concentration level did not affect the size of nano complexes. The polydispersity index of nano complexes was below 0.3 in all cases while the zeta-potential values in the range of -2 and -12 mV were observed. The encapsulation efficiency of resveratrol was significantly (p<0.05) increased as WPI and inulin concentration levels were increased from 1 to 3% (w/v). During incubation at 37℃ for 24 h, WPI/inulin nano complexes exhibited similar viability of probiotics with free inulin and had significantly (p<0.05) higher viability than negative control. In conclusions, WPI and inulin concentration levels were key factors affecting the physicochemical properties of WPI/inulin nano complexes and had potential prebiotic effect. PMID:27194937

  18. Listeria monocytogenes inhibition by whey protein films and coatings incorporating lysozyme.

    PubMed

    Min, Seacheol; Harris, Linda J; Han, Jung H; Krochta, John M

    2005-11-01

    The effects of whey protein isolate (WPI) films and coatings incorporating lysozyme (LZ) on the inhibition of Listeria monocytogenes both in and on microbial media, as well as on cold-smoked salmon, were studied. The antimicrobial effects of LZ were examined using various growth media by turbidity and plate counting tests. Disc-covering and disc-surface-spreading tests were also used to evaluate the effects of WPI films incorporating LZ. Smoked salmon was used as a model food to test the antimicrobial effects of WPI coatings incorporating LZ, both initially and during storage at 4 and 10 degrees C for 35 days. Tensile properties (elastic modulus, tensile strength, and percentage of elongation), oxygen permeability, and color (Hunter L, a, and b) of WPI films with and without LZ were also compared. LZ inhibited L. monocytogenes in broth and on agar media. The number of cells surviving after LZ treatments depended on the type of media. WPI films incorporating 204 mg of LZ per g of film (dry basis) inhibited the growth of a preparation of 4.4 log CFU/cm2 L. monocytogenes. WPI coatings prepared with 25 mg of LZ per g of coating solution initially inactivated more than 2.4, 4.5, and 3.0 log CFU/g of L. monocytogenes, total aerobes, and yeasts and molds in smoked salmon samples, respectively. The WPI coatings incorporating LZ efficiently retarded the growth of L. monocytogenes at both 4 and 10 degrees C. The anti-L. monocytogenes effect of LZ-WPI coating was more noticeable when the coating was applied before inoculation than when the coating was applied after inoculation. Significantly higher elastic modulus values and lower percentage of elongation and oxygen permeability values were measured with the WPI films incorporating LZ than with the plain WPI films.

  19. Low-fat mozzarella as influenced by microbial exopolysaccharides, preacidification, and whey protein concentrate.

    PubMed

    Zisu, B; Shah, N P

    2005-06-01

    Low-fat Mozzarella cheeses containing 6% fat were made by preacidification of milk, preacidification combined with exopolysaccharide- (EPS-) producing starter, used independently or as a coculture with non-EPS starter, and preacidification combined with whey protein concentrate (WPC) and EPS. The impact of these treatments on moisture retention, changes in texture profile analysis, cheese melt, stretch, and on pizza bake performance were investigated over 45 d of storage at 4 degrees C. Preacidified cheeses without EPS (control) had the lowest moisture content (53.75%). These cheeses were hardest and exhibited greatest springiness and chewiness. The meltability and stretchability of these cheeses increased most during the first 28 d of storage. The moisture content in cheeses increased to 55.08, 54.79, and 55.82% with EPS starter (containing 41.18 mg/g of EPS), coculturing (containing 28.61 mg/g of EPS), and WPC (containing 44.23 mg/g of EPS), respectively. Exopolysaccharide reduced hardness, springiness, and chewiness of low-fat cheeses made with preacidified milk in general and such cheeses exhibited an increase in cohesiveness and meltability. Although stretch distance was similar in all cheeses, those containing EPS were softer than the control. Cocultured cheeses exhibited the greatest meltability. Cheeses containing WPC were softest in general; however, hardness remained unchanged over 45 d. Cheeses made with WPC had the least increase in meltability over time. Incorporation of WPC did not reduce surface scorching or increase shred fusion of cheese shreds during pizza baking; however, there was an improvement in these properties between d 7 and 45. Coating of the cheese shreds with oil was necessary for adequate browning, melt, and flow characteristics in all cheese types.

  20. Physicochemical Characterization and Potential Prebiotic Effect of Whey Protein Isolate/Inulin Nano Complex.

    PubMed

    Ha, Ho-Kyung; Jeon, Na-Eun; Kim, Jin Wook; Han, Kyoung-Sik; Yun, Sung Seob; Lee, Mee-Ryung; Lee, Won-Jae

    2016-01-01

    The purposes of this study were to investigate the impacts of concentration levels of whey protein isolate (WPI) and inulin on the formation and physicochemical properties of WPI/inulin nano complexes and to evaluate their potential prebiotic effects. WPI/inulin nano complexes were produced using the internal gelation method. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and particle size analyzer were used to assess the morphological and physicochemical characterizations of nano complexes, respectively. The encapsulation efficiency of resveratrol in nano complexes was studied using HPLC while the potential prebiotic effects were investigated by measuring the viability of probiotics. In TEM micrographs, the globular forms of nano complexes in the range of 10 and 100 nm were successfully manufactured. An increase in WPI concentration level from 1 to 3% (w/v) resulted in a significant (p<0.05) decrease in the size of nano complexs while inulin concentration level did not affect the size of nano complexes. The polydispersity index of nano complexes was below 0.3 in all cases while the zeta-potential values in the range of -2 and -12 mV were observed. The encapsulation efficiency of resveratrol was significantly (p<0.05) increased as WPI and inulin concentration levels were increased from 1 to 3% (w/v). During incubation at 37℃ for 24 h, WPI/inulin nano complexes exhibited similar viability of probiotics with free inulin and had significantly (p<0.05) higher viability than negative control. In conclusions, WPI and inulin concentration levels were key factors affecting the physicochemical properties of WPI/inulin nano complexes and had potential prebiotic effect.

  1. Kinetics of cold-set diffusion-limited aggregations of denatured whey protein isolate colloids.

    PubMed

    Wu, Hua; Xie, Jianjun; Morbidelli, Massimo

    2005-01-01

    The CaCl2-induced cold-set aggregation kinetics of the denatured whey protein isolate (WPI) colloids has been investigated under dilute diffusion-limited cluster aggregation (DLCA) conditions, using small-angle light scattering. In particular, the structure factor, the scattered intensity at zero angle and the average radius of gyration have been measured for the aggregating system as a function of time. It is found that the fractal dimension of the clusters is df= 1.85, in the range typical of clusters aggregated under DLCA conditions. The aggregation kinetics in this transition region can be described by a power law relation in the initial stage of the aggregation, but the exponent of the power law is equal to 0.7, i.e., significantly larger than 1/df= 0.54, which is the typical value of the DLCA kinetics. Since it is found that the average gyration radius of the clusters has reached a value of 80 microm, leading to a cumulative volume fraction of clusters equal to 0.25, it is legitimate to expect that the process is in the region of transition from aggregation to gelation. This confirmed by the fact that, at the later stage of the aggregation, the growth of the average cluster size further accelerates with time and eventually becomes explosive, leading to gelation. The observed aggregation kinetics has been compared with that reported in the literature from DLCA Monte Carlo simulations, and a good agreement has been found with the data corresponding to the transition region from aggregation to gelation. Numerical simulations using the Smoluchowski kinetic model have also been carried out in order to support the experimental findings.

  2. Anti-obesity Effect of Fermented Whey Beverage using Lactic Acid Bacteria in Diet-induced Obese Rats.

    PubMed

    Hong, Sung-Moon; Chung, Eui-Chun; Kim, Cheol-Hyun

    2015-01-01

    High-protein fermented whey beverage (FWB) was manufactured using whey protein concentrate (WPC) and Lactobacillus plantarum DK211 isolated from kimchi. This study was designed to evaluate the anti-obesity activity of FWB in male rats fed a high-fat diet. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly assigned to three groups (n=8 per group). The three groups differed in their diet; one group received a normal diet (ND), another, a high-fat diet (HD), and the third, a HD plus fermented whey beverage (HDFWB), for 4 wk. Supplementation with FWB (the HDFWB group) prevented weight gain and body fat accumulation. The food intake in the HDWFB group was significantly lower (p<0.05) than that of the HD group. The HDWFB group also showed a significant decrease in organ weights (p<0.05), except for the weight of the testis. There was a significant decrease in total cholesterol, LDL-cholesterol, and triglycerides in the HDFWB group compared with the HD group (p<0.05), but there was no significant difference in serum HDL-cholesterol levels among the experimental groups. Rats ingesting FWB (the HDFWB group) also showed a significant decrease in blood glucose levels, and plasma levels of insulin, leptin, and ghrelin compared to HD group (p<0.05). These results indicate that FWB has beneficial effects on dietary control, weight control, and reduction in fat composition and serum lipid level; consequently, it may provide antiobesity and hypolipidemic activity against high fat diet-induced obesity in rats. PMID:26761894

  3. Anti-obesity Effect of Fermented Whey Beverage using Lactic Acid Bacteria in Diet-induced Obese Rats

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    High-protein fermented whey beverage (FWB) was manufactured using whey protein concentrate (WPC) and Lactobacillus plantarum DK211 isolated from kimchi. This study was designed to evaluate the anti-obesity activity of FWB in male rats fed a high-fat diet. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly assigned to three groups (n=8 per group). The three groups differed in their diet; one group received a normal diet (ND), another, a high-fat diet (HD), and the third, a HD plus fermented whey beverage (HDFWB), for 4 wk. Supplementation with FWB (the HDFWB group) prevented weight gain and body fat accumulation. The food intake in the HDWFB group was significantly lower (p<0.05) than that of the HD group. The HDWFB group also showed a significant decrease in organ weights (p<0.05), except for the weight of the testis. There was a significant decrease in total cholesterol, LDL-cholesterol, and triglycerides in the HDFWB group compared with the HD group (p<0.05), but there was no significant difference in serum HDL-cholesterol levels among the experimental groups. Rats ingesting FWB (the HDFWB group) also showed a significant decrease in blood glucose levels, and plasma levels of insulin, leptin, and ghrelin compared to HD group (p<0.05). These results indicate that FWB has beneficial effects on dietary control, weight control, and reduction in fat composition and serum lipid level; consequently, it may provide antiobesity and hypolipidemic activity against high fat diet-induced obesity in rats. PMID:26761894

  4. Coingestion of whey protein and casein in a mixed meal: demonstration of a more sustained anabolic effect of casein

    PubMed Central

    Soop, Mattias; Nehra, Vandana; Henderson, Gregory C.; Boirie, Yves; Ford, G. Charles

    2012-01-01

    When consumed separately, whey protein (WP) is more rapidly absorbed into circulation than casein (Cas), which prompted the concept of rapid and slow dietary protein. It is unclear whether these proteins have similar metabolic fates when coingested as in milk. We determined the rate of appearance across the splanchnic bed and the rate of disappearance across the leg of phenylalanine (Phe) from coingested, intrinsically labeled WP and Cas. Either [15N]Phe or [13C-ring C6]Phe was infused in lactating cows, and the labeled WP and Cas from their milk were collected. To determine the fate of Phe derived from different protein sources, 18 healthy participants were studied after ingestion of one of the following: 1) [15N]WP, [13C]Cas, and lactose; 2) [13C]WP, [15N]Cas, and lactose; 3) lactose alone. At 80–120 min, the rates of appearance (Ra) across the splanchnic bed of Phe from WP and Cas were similar [0.068 ± 0.010 vs. 0.070 ± 0.009%/min; not significant (ns)]. At time 220–260 min, Phe appearance from WP had slowed (0.039 ± 0.008%/min, P < 0.05) whereas Phe appearance from Cas was sustained (0.068 ± 0.013%/min). Similarly, accretion rates across the leg of Phe absorbed from WP and Cas were not different at 80–120 min (0.011 ± 0.002 vs. 0.012 ± 0.003%/min; ns), but they were significantly lower for WP (0.007 ± 0.002%/min) at 220–260 min than for Cas (0.013 ± 0.002%/min) at 220–260 min. Early after meal ingestion, amino acid absorption and retention across the leg were similar for WP and Cas, but as rates for WP waned, absorption and assimilation into skeletal muscle were better retained for Cas. PMID:22569072

  5. Fundamental studies on the structural functionality of whey protein isolate in the presence of small polyhydroxyl compounds as co-solute.

    PubMed

    George, Paul; Lundin, Leif; Kasapis, Stefan

    2013-08-15

    The present work deals with the changing network morphology of whey protein isolate (15%, w/w) in the presence of glucose syrup (co-solute) with concentrations ranging from 0% to 65% (w/w) in 10 mM CaCl2 solution, thus producing formulations with a total level of solids of up to 80% (w/w). Denaturation behaviour and aggregation of whey protein systems were investigated using small deformation dynamic oscillation on shear, micro and modulated differential scanning calorimetry, and confocal laser scanning microscopy. A progression in the mechanical strength of protein aggregates was observed resulting from enhanced protein-protein interactions in the presence of glucose syrup. Addition of the co-solute resulted in better thermal stability of protein molecules by shifting the process of denaturation to higher temperature, as observed by calorimetry. Observations are supported by micrographs showing coherent networks with reduced size of whey protein aggregates in the presence of high levels of glucose syrup, as opposed to thick and random clusters for systems of whey protein by itself. Glass transition phenomenon was observed for condensed protein/co-solute systems, which were treated with theoretical concepts adapted from synthetic polymer research to pinpoint the mechanical glass transition temperature.

  6. TRIXcell+, a new long-term boar semen extender containing whey protein with higher preservation capacity and litter size

    PubMed Central

    van den Berg, B.M.; Reesink, J.; Reesink, W.

    2014-01-01

    It was the aim of the present study to test whey as protective protein for the sperm cell in the long-term boar semen preservation medium TRIXcell. Analyses of sperm cell motility using computer-assisted semen analysis (CASA) indicated that the whey protein Porex has a similar protective effect as bovine serum albumin (BSA) in maintaining viability of stored boar sperm. Boar sperm diluted in TRIXcell+ maintains commercially acceptable motility (>60%) for 10 days, while swine sperm diluted in the semen preservation medium Beltsville Thawing Solution (BTS) maintains commercially acceptable motility (>60%) for 3-5 days for most boars. To test the on-farm fertility performance of TRIXcell+ compared to BTS, inseminations were started on 35 commercial pig production farms in the summer of 2006. During the period of July 2006 until July 2012 for each farm and each calendar year the mean farrowing rate and litter size for semen diluted in TRIXcell+ and stored for 3-5 days was found higher than that of semen stored for 1-2 days in BTS. Based on data gained from a total of 583.749 sows inseminated through the years 2006-2012, the mean farrowing rate for semen diluted in TRIXcell+ and BTS was 90.4 ± 4.0 and 87.9 ± 3.6, respectively, which is not significantly different. Based on the same data, the mean total number of piglets born alive for semen diluted in TRIXcell+ and BTS was 14.2 ± 0.7 and 13.6 ± 0.6, respectively, which is significantly different. We conclude that whey protein can effectively be used in the long-term preservation medium TRIXcell resulting in a higher litter size. PMID:26623335

  7. Evaluation of bromine and iodine content of milk whey proteins combining digestion by microwave-induced combustion and ICP-MS determination.

    PubMed

    da Silva, Sabrina Vieira; Picoloto, Rochele Sogari; Flores, Erico Marlon Moraes; Wagner, Roger; dos Santos Richards, Neila Silvia Pereira; Barin, Juliano Smanioto

    2016-01-01

    The bromine and iodine content of whey protein concentrate (WPC), hydrolysate (WPH), and isolate (WPI) was evaluated combining microwave-induced combustion (MIC) digestion with inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) determination. MIC digestion allowed the decomposition of up to 500 mg of samples using diluted NH4OH solution (25 mmol L(-1)) for absorption of analytes, assuring the compatibility with ICP-MS determination. Accuracy was evaluated using milk powder certified reference material (NIST 8435) with good agreements for Br and I (102% and 105%, respectively). For Br and I, the limit of quantification obtained by ICP-MS was 7 and 281 times lower in comparison with ion chromatography determination, respectively. Iodine could be enriched in whey protein production and up to 70% of the tolerable upper intake level was found, thus revealing the need to monitor it in whey proteins. On the other hand, the concentration of Br was below its acceptable daily intake.

  8. Enhanced physicochemical properties of chitosan/whey protein isolate composite film by sodium laurate-modified TiO2 nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wei; Chen, Jiwang; Chen, Yue; Xia, Wenshui; Xiong, Youling L; Wang, Hongxun

    2016-03-15

    Chitosan/whey protein isolate film incorporated with sodium laurate-modified TiO2 nanoparticles was developed. The nanocomposite film was characterized by scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction and differential scanning calorimetry, and investigated in physicochemical properties as color, tensile strength, elongation at break, water vapor permeability and water adsorption isotherm. Our results showed that the nanoparticles improved the compatibility of whey protein isolate and chitosan. Addition of nanoparticles increased the whiteness of chitosan/whey protein isolate film, but decreased its transparency. Compared with binary film, the tensile strength and elongation at break of nanocomposite film were increased by 11.51% and 12.01%, respectively, and water vapor permeability was decreased by 7.60%. The equilibrium moisture of nanocomposite film was lower than binary film, and its water sorption isotherm of the nanocomposite film fitted well to Guggenheim-Anderson-deBoer model. The findings contributed to the development of novel food packaging materials.

  9. Fuzzy Clustering-Based Modeling of Surface Interactions and Emulsions of Selected Whey Protein Concentrate Combined to i-Carrageenan and Gum Arabic Solutions

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Gums and proteins are valuable ingredients with a wide spectrum of applications. Surface properties (surface tension, interfacial tension, emulsion activity index “EAI” and emulsion stability index “ESI”) of 4% whey protein concentrate (WPC) in a combination with '- carrageenan (0.05%, 0.1%, and 0.5...

  10. Effect of homogenization and pasteurization on the structure and thermal stability of whey protein in milk

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The effect of homogenization alone or in combination with high temperature, short time (HTST) pasteurization or UHT processing on the whey fraction of milk was investigated using highly sensitive spectroscopic techniques. In pilot plant trials, 1-L quantities of whole milk were homogenized in a two-...

  11. Effect of processing on the displacement of whey proteins: applying the orogenic model to a real system.

    PubMed

    Woodward, Nicola C; Wilde, Peter J; Mackie, Alan R; Gunning, A Patrick; Gunning, Paul A; Morris, Victor J

    2004-03-10

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) has been used to investigate the displacement of a commercial whey protein system and the behavior as compared to that of beta-lactoglobulin (Mackie, A. R.; Gunning, A. P.; Wilde, P. J.; Morris, V. J. Orogenic displacement of protein from the air-water interface by competitive adsorption. J. Colloid Interface Sci. 1999, 210, 157-166). The whey protein isolate (WPI) was displaced from an air-water interface by the surfactants Tween 20 and Tween 60. Displacement data obtained were compared with data obtained for pure beta-lactoglobulin and have shown that WPI was more resistant to displacement from the air-water interface than native beta-lactoglobulin. This was related to the greater surface elasticity of WPI at higher surface stresses. In the presence of Tween 20, WPI was observed to remain on the interface at surface pressures up to 8 mN/m greater than the surface pressure at which complete displacement of beta-lactoglobulin was observed. Displacement of WPI and beta-lactoglobulin films by the surfactant Tween 60 showed similar results. However, because of the lower surface activity of Tween 60, it was not possible to reach surface tension values similar to those obtained for Tween 20. Despite the lower surface activity of Tween 60, WPI was still observed to be present at the interface at surface pressure values greater than those by which beta-lactoglobulin had been completely displaced.

  12. Is it possible to screen for milk or whey protein adulteration with melamine, urea and ammonium sulphate, combining Kjeldahl and classical spectrophotometric methods?

    PubMed

    Finete, Virgínia de Lourdes Mendes; Gouvêa, Marcos Martins; Marques, Flávia Ferreira de Carvalho; Netto, Annibal Duarte Pereira

    2013-12-15

    The Kjeldahl method and four classic spectrophotometric methods (Biuret, Lowry, Bradford and Markwell) were applied to evaluate the protein content of samples of UHT whole milk deliberately adulterated with melamine, ammonium sulphate or urea, which can be used to defraud milk protein and whey contents. Compared with the Kjeldahl method, the response of the spectrophotometric methods was unaffected by the addition of the nitrogen compounds to milk or whey. The methods of Bradford and Markwell were most robust and did not exhibit interference subject to composition. However, the simultaneous interpretation of results obtained using these methods with those obtained using the Kjeldahl method indicated the addition of nitrogen-rich compounds to milk and/or whey. Therefore, this work suggests a combination of results of Kjeldahl and spectrophotometric methods should be used to screen for milk adulteration by these compounds.

  13. Effect of annatto addition and bleaching treatments on ultrafiltration flux during production of 80% whey protein concentrate and 80% serum protein concentrate.

    PubMed

    Adams, Michael C; Zulewska, Justyna; Barbano, David M

    2013-04-01

    The goals of this study were to determine if adding annatto color to milk or applying a bleaching process to whey or microfiltration (MF) permeate influenced ultrafiltration (UF) flux, diafiltration (DF) flux, or membrane fouling during production of 80% whey protein concentrate (WPC80) or 80% serum protein concentrate (SPC80). Separated Cheddar cheese whey (18 vats using 900 kg of whole milk each) and MF permeate of skim milk (18 processing runs using 800 kg of skim milk each) were produced to make WPC80 and SPC80, respectively. The 6 treatments, replicated 3 times each, that constituted the 18 processing runs within either whey or MF permeate UF were as follows: (1) no annatto; (2) no annatto+benzoyl peroxide (BPO); (3) no annatto+hydrogen peroxide (H2O2); (4) annatto; (5) annatto+BPO; and (6) annatto+H2O2. Approximately 700 kg of whey or 530 kg of MF permeate from each treatment were heated to 50°C and processed in 2 stages (UF and DF) with the UF system in batch recirculation mode using a polyethersulfone spiral-wound UF membrane with a molecular weight cutoff of 10,000 Da. Addition of annatto color had no effect on UF or DF flux. The processes of bleaching whey or MF permeate with or without added color improved flux during processing. Bleaching with H2O2 usually produced higher flux than bleaching with BPO. Bleaching with BPO increased WPC80 flux to a greater extent than it did SPC80 flux. Though no differences in mean flux were observed for a common bleaching treatment between the WPC80 and SPC80 production processes during the UF stage, mean flux during WPC80 DF was higher than mean flux during SPC80 DF for each bleaching treatment. Water flux values before and after processing were used to calculate a fouling coefficient that demonstrated differences in fouling which were consistent with flux differences among treatments. In both processes, bleaching with H2O2 led to the largest reduction in fouling. No effect of annatto on fouling was observed. The

  14. Purification by reflux electrophoresis of whey proteins and of a recombinant protein expressed in Dictyostelium discoideum.

    PubMed

    Corthals, G L; Collins, B M; Mabbutt, B C; Williams, K L; Gooley, A A

    1997-06-27

    Protein purification that combines the use of molecular mass exclusion membranes with electrophoresis is particularly powerful as it uses properties inherent to both techniques. The use of membranes allows efficient processing and is easily scaled up, while electrophoresis permits high resolution separation under mild conditions. The Gradiflow apparatus combines these two technologies as it uses polyacrylamide membranes to influence electrokinetic separations. The reflux electrophoresis process consists of a series of cycles incorporating a forward phase and a reverse phase. The forward phase involves collection of a target protein that passes through a separation membrane before trailing proteins in the same solution. The forward phase is repeated following clearance of the membrane in the reverse phase by reversing the current. We have devised a strategy to establish optimal reflux separation parameters, where membranes are chosen for a particular operating range and protein transfer is monitored at different pH values. In addition, forward and reverse phase times are determined during this process. Two examples of the reflux method are described. In the first case, we described the purification strategy for proteins from a complex mixture which contains proteins of higher electrophoretic mobility than the target protein. This is a two-step procedure, where first proteins of higher mobility than the target protein are removed from the solution by a series of reflux cycles, so that the target protein remains as the leading fraction. In the second step the target protein is collected, as it has become the leading fraction of the remaining proteins. In the second example we report the development of a reflux strategy which allowed a rapid one-step preparative purification of a recombinant protein, expressed in Dictyostelium discoideum. These strategies demonstrate that the Gradiflow is amenable to a wide range of applications, as the protein of interest is not

  15. Development of a multiplex real time PCR to detect thermophilic lactic acid bacteria in natural whey starters.

    PubMed

    Bottari, Benedetta; Agrimonti, Caterina; Gatti, Monica; Neviani, Erasmo; Marmiroli, Nelson

    2013-01-01

    A multiplex real time PCR (mRealT-PCR) useful to rapidly screen microbial composition of thermophilic starter cultures for hard cooked cheeses and to compare samples with potentially different technological properties was developed. Novel primers directed toward pheS gene were designed and optimized for multiple detection of Lactobacillus helveticus, Lactobacillus delbrueckii, Streptococcus thermophilus and Lactobacillus fermentum. The assay was based on SYBR Green chemistry followed by melting curves analysis. The method was then evaluated for applications in the specific detection of the 4 lactic acid bacteria (LAB) in 29 different natural whey starters for Parmigiano Reggiano cheese production. The results obtained by mRealT-PCR were also compared with those obtained on the same samples by Fluorescence in Situ Hybridization (FISH) and Length-Heterogeneity PCR (LH-PCR). The mRealT-PCR developed in this study, was found to be effective for analyzing species present in the samples with an average sensitivity down to less than 600 copies of DNA and therefore sensitive enough to detect even minor LAB community members of thermophilic starter cultures. The assay was able to describe the microbial population of all the different natural whey starter samples analyzed, despite their natural variability. A higher number of whey starter samples with S. thermophilus and L. fermentum present in their microbial community were revealed, suggesting that these species could be more frequent in Parmigiano Reggiano natural whey starter samples than previously shown. The method was more effective than LH-PCR and FISH and, considering that these two techniques have to be used in combination to detect the less abundant species, the mRealT-PCR was also faster. Providing a single step sensitive detection of L. helveticus, L. delbrueckii, S. thermophilus and L. fermentum, the developed mRealT-PCR could be used for screening thermophilic starter cultures and to follow the presence of

  16. Effects of thermally induced denaturation on technological-functional properties of whey protein isolate-based films.

    PubMed

    Schmid, M; Krimmel, B; Grupa, U; Noller, K

    2014-09-01

    This study examined how and to what extent the degree of denaturation affected the technological-functional properties of whey protein isolate (WPI)-based coatings. It was observed that denaturation affected the material properties of WPI-coated films significantly. Surface energy decreased by approximately 20% compared with native coatings. Because the surface energy of a coating should be lower than that of the substrate, this might result in enhanced wettability characteristics between WPI-based solution and substrate surface. Water vapor barrier properties increased by about 35% and oxygen barrier properties increased by approximately 33%. However, significant differences were mainly observed between coatings made of fully native WPI and ones with a degree of denaturation of 25%. Higher degrees of denaturation did not lead to further improvement of material properties. This observation offers cost-saving potential: a major share of denatured whey proteins may be replaced by fully native ones that are not exposed to energy-intensive heat treatment. Furthermore, native WPI solutions can be produced with higher dry matter content without gelatinizing. Hence, less moisture has to be removed through drying, resulting in reduced energy consumption.

  17. Effect of high pressure--low temperature treatments on structural characteristics of whey proteins and micellar caseins.

    PubMed

    Baier, Daniel; Purschke, Benedict; Schmitt, Christophe; Rawel, Harshadrai M; Knorr, Dietrich

    2015-11-15

    In this study, structural changes in micellar caseins and whey proteins due to high pressure--low temperature treatments (HPLT) were investigated and compared to changes caused by high pressure treatments at room temperature. Whey protein isolate (WPI) solutions as well as micellar casein (MC) dispersions and mixtures were treated at 500 MPa (pH 7.0 and 5.8) at room temperature, -15 °C and -35 °C. Surface hydrophobicity and accessible thiol groups remained nearly unchanged after HPLT treatments whereas HP treatments at room temperature caused an unfolding of the WPI, resulting in an increase in surface hydrophobicity and exposure of the thiol groups. For HPLT treatments, distinct changes in the secondary structure (increase in the amount of β-sheets) were observed while the tertiary structure remained unchanged. Large flocs, stabilized by hydrophobic interactions and hydrogen bonds, were formed in casein containing samples due to HPLT treatments. Depending on the pH and the applied HPLT treatment parameters, these interactions differed significantly from the interactions determined in native micelles.

  18. Cycling time trial performance may be impaired by whey protein and L-alanine intake during prolonged exercise.

    PubMed

    Schroer, Adam B; Saunders, Michael J; Baur, Daniel A; Womack, Christopher J; Luden, Nicholas D

    2014-10-01

    Previous studies reported that adding protein (PRO) to carbohydrate (CHO) solutions enhances endurance performance. The ergogenic effect may be a function of additional protein/amino acid calories, but this has not been examined. In addition, although supplemental L-alanine (ALA) is readily oxidized during exercise, the subsequent impact on metabolism and prolonged endurance performance is unknown. The purpose of this investigation was to independently gauge the impact of whey PRO hydrolysate and ALA supplementation on performance and various physiological parameters. Eight cyclists (age: 22.3 ± 5.6 yr, weight: 70.0 ± 8.0 kg, VO2max: 59.4 ± 4.9 ml · kg(-1) · min(-1)) performed 120 min of constant-load cycling (55% of peak power) followed by a 30-km time trial (TT) under placebo (PLA), PRO, and ALA conditions. Magnitude-based qualitative inferences were applied to evaluate treatment differences and data are presented as percent difference between treatments ± 90% confidence limit. Both ALA (2.1 ± 2.7%) and PRO intake (-2.1 ± 2.2%) possibly harmed performance compared with PLA. Of interest, heart rate was possibly lower with ALA than PLA at 20- (-2.7 ± 3.4%) and 120-min (-1.7 ± 2.9%) of constant-load cycling and the serum interleukin-6 (IL-6) response to 120 min of cycling was likely attenuated with PRO compared with PLA (PLA, 6.6 ± 3.7 fold vs. PRO, 2.9 ± 1.8 fold). In addition, blood glucose levels were lower with PRO than PLA at 20- (-8.8 ± 2.3%; very likely) and 120-min (-4.9 ± 4.6%; likely) of constant-load cycling. Although ALA intake appears to lower HR and PRO ingestion dampens the IL-6 response to exercise, the ingestion of PRO (without CHO) or ALA does not enhance, and may actually impair, performance following prolonged cycling.

  19. Oil as reaction medium for glycation, oxidation, denaturation, and aggregation of whey protein systems of low water activity.

    PubMed

    Potes, Naritchaya; Kerry, Joseph P; Roos, Yrjö H

    2013-04-17

    Whey protein isolate (WPI)-oil (75:25) and WPI-oil-(glucose-fructose) (45:15:40) as models of high-protein systems containing either olive (OO) or sunflower oil (SO) were stored at 20 or 40 °C to investigate component interactions. The indicators of protein oxidation (carbonyl content) and aggregation (total sulfhydryl content) and heats of protein denaturation and aggregation were investigated. Highest levels of disulfide bonding and carbonyls in WPI-OO formed during the first 2 weeks of storage concomitantly with enhanced protein aggregation. WPI-OO and WPI-SO systems (prestorage) showed increased protein denaturation temperature. The WPI proteins showed higher heat sensitivity with OO or SO at 40 °C, and the system with OO showed preaggregated protein as found from decreased heats of protein aggregation. OO or SO in WPI-oil-(glucose-fructose) systems reduced heats of protein aggregation. Lipid oxidation products and nonenzymatic browning reactions in glucose-fructose-containing systems decreased the solubility of solids and increased protein aggregation, hydrophobicity, and hardening of structure. PMID:23517062

  20. Controlling the pH of acid cheese whey in a two-stage anaerobic digester with sodium hydroxide

    SciTech Connect

    Ghaly, A.E.; Ramkumar, D.R.

    1999-07-01

    Anaerobic digestion of cheese whey offers a two-fold benefit: pollution potential reduction and biogas production. The biogas, as an energy source, could be used to reduce the consumption of traditional fuels in the cheese plant. However, as a result of little or no buffering capacity of whey, the pH of the anaerobic digester drops drastically and the process is inhibited. In this study, the effect of controlling the pH of the second chamber of a two-stage, 150 L anaerobic digester operating on cheese whey on the quality and quantity of biogas and the pollution potential reduction, was investigated using sodium hydroxide. The digester was operated at a temperature of 35 C and a hydraulic retention time of 15 days for three runs (no pH control, pH control with no reseeding, and ph control with reseeding) each lasting 50 days. The results indicated that operating the digester without pH control resulted in a low pH (3.3) which inhibited the methanogenic bacteria. The inhibition was irreversible and the digester did not recover (no methane production) when the pH was restored to 7.0 without reseeding, as the observed increased gas production was a false indication of recovery because the gas was mainly carbon dioxide. The addition of base resulted in a total alkalinity of 12,000 mg/L as CaCO{sub 3}. When the system was reseeded and the pH controlled, the total volatile acid concentration was 15,100 mg/L (as acetic acid), with acetic (28%), propionic (21%), butyric (25%), valeric (8%), and caproic (15%) acids as the major constituents. The biogas production was 62.6 L/d (0.84 m{sup 3}/m{sup 3}/d) and the methane content was 60.7%. Reductions of 27.3, 30.4 and 23.3% in the total solids, chemical oxygen demand and total kjeldahl nitrogen were obtained, respectively. The ammonium nitrogen content increased significantly (140%).

  1. A reagent for specific recognition of cysteine in aqueous buffer and in natural milk: imaging studies, enzymatic reaction and analysis of whey protein.

    PubMed

    A, Anila H; G, Upendar Reddy; Ali, Firoj; Taye, Nandaraj; Chattopadhyay, Samit; Das, Amitava

    2015-11-01

    We report a new chemodosimetric probe () for specific recognition of cysteine (Cys) in aqueous buffer and in whey protein isolated from fresh cow's milk. Using this reagent we could develop a luminescence-based methodology for estimation of Cys released from a commercially available Cys-supplement drug by aminoacylase-1 in live cells.

  2. Influence of whey protein-beet pectin conjugate on the properties and digestibility of β-carotene emulsion during in vitro digestion.

    PubMed

    Xu, Duoxia; Yuan, Fang; Gao, Yanxiang; Panya, Atikorn; McClements, David Julian; Decker, Eric Andrew

    2014-08-01

    The impact of a whey protein isolate (WPI)-beet pectin (BP) conjugate (formed by dry-heating) on the physical properties and digestibilities of β-carotene and carrier oil in oil-in-water emulsions was studied when they passed through a model gastrointestinal system. β-Carotene emulsions were stabilized by WPI, unconjugated and conjugated WPI-BP, separately. The emulsions were then passed through an in vitro digestion model and the mean droplet size, droplet distribution, zeta-potential, free fatty acids and β-carotene released were measured. The stability to droplet flocculation and coalescence during digestion was increased for the WPI-BP conjugate stabilized emulsion. Addition of BP onto the WPI stabilized emulsions could inhibit the releases of carrier oil (MCT) and β-carotene. The releases of free fatty acids and β-carotene did not differ greatly between the unconjugated and conjugated WPI-BP stabilized emulsions. These results have important implications for protein-polysaccharide stabilized emulsions and conjugates used for the protection and delivery of bioactive compounds.

  3. A study of different indicators of Maillard reaction with whey proteins and different carbohydrates under adverse storage conditions.

    PubMed

    Leiva, Graciela E; Naranjo, Gabriela B; Malec, Laura S

    2017-01-15

    This study examined different indicators of each stage of Maillard reaction under adverse storage conditions in a system with whey proteins and lactose or glucose. The analysis of lysine loss by the o-phthaldialdehyde method can be considered a good indicator of the early stage, showing considerable differences in reactivity when systems with mono and disaccharides were analyzed. Capillary electrophoresis proved to be a sensitive method for evaluating the extent of glycosylation of the native proteins, providing valuable information when the loss of lysine was not significant. The estimation of the Amadori compound from the determination of total 5-hydroxymethyl-2-furfuraldehyde would have correlate well with reactive lysine content if the advanced stages of the reaction had not been reached. For assessing the occurrence of the intermediate and final stages, the measurement of free 5-hydroxymethyl-2-furfuraldehyde and color, proved not to be suitable for storage conditions.

  4. A study of different indicators of Maillard reaction with whey proteins and different carbohydrates under adverse storage conditions.

    PubMed

    Leiva, Graciela E; Naranjo, Gabriela B; Malec, Laura S

    2017-01-15

    This study examined different indicators of each stage of Maillard reaction under adverse storage conditions in a system with whey proteins and lactose or glucose. The analysis of lysine loss by the o-phthaldialdehyde method can be considered a good indicator of the early stage, showing considerable differences in reactivity when systems with mono and disaccharides were analyzed. Capillary electrophoresis proved to be a sensitive method for evaluating the extent of glycosylation of the native proteins, providing valuable information when the loss of lysine was not significant. The estimation of the Amadori compound from the determination of total 5-hydroxymethyl-2-furfuraldehyde would have correlate well with reactive lysine content if the advanced stages of the reaction had not been reached. For assessing the occurrence of the intermediate and final stages, the measurement of free 5-hydroxymethyl-2-furfuraldehyde and color, proved not to be suitable for storage conditions. PMID:27542493

  5. Conversion of dried Aspergillus candidus mycelia grown on waste whey to biodiesel by in situ acid transesterification.

    PubMed

    Kakkad, Hardik; Khot, Mahesh; Zinjarde, Smita; RaviKumar, Ameeta; Ravi Kumar, V; Kulkarni, B D

    2015-12-01

    This study reports optimization of the transesterification reaction step on dried biomass of an oleaginous fungus Aspergillus candidus grown on agro-dairy waste, whey. Acid catalyzed transesterification was performed and variables affecting esterification, viz., catalyst methanol and chloroform concentrations, temperature, time, and biomass were investigated. Statistical optimization of the transesterification reaction using Plackett-Burman Design showed biomass to be the predominant factor with a 12.5-fold increase in total FAME from 25.6 to 320mg. Studies indicate that the transesterification efficiency in terms of conversion is favored by employing lower biomass loadings. A. candidus exhibited FAME profiles containing desirable saturated (30.2%), monounsaturated (31.5%) and polyunsaturated methyl esters (38.3%). The predicted and experimentally determined biodiesel properties (density, kinematic viscosity, iodine value, cetane number, TAN, water content, total and free glycerol) were in accordance with international (ASTM D6751, EN 14214) and national (IS 15607) standards.

  6. Conversion of dried Aspergillus candidus mycelia grown on waste whey to biodiesel by in situ acid transesterification.

    PubMed

    Kakkad, Hardik; Khot, Mahesh; Zinjarde, Smita; RaviKumar, Ameeta; Ravi Kumar, V; Kulkarni, B D

    2015-12-01

    This study reports optimization of the transesterification reaction step on dried biomass of an oleaginous fungus Aspergillus candidus grown on agro-dairy waste, whey. Acid catalyzed transesterification was performed and variables affecting esterification, viz., catalyst methanol and chloroform concentrations, temperature, time, and biomass were investigated. Statistical optimization of the transesterification reaction using Plackett-Burman Design showed biomass to be the predominant factor with a 12.5-fold increase in total FAME from 25.6 to 320mg. Studies indicate that the transesterification efficiency in terms of conversion is favored by employing lower biomass loadings. A. candidus exhibited FAME profiles containing desirable saturated (30.2%), monounsaturated (31.5%) and polyunsaturated methyl esters (38.3%). The predicted and experimentally determined biodiesel properties (density, kinematic viscosity, iodine value, cetane number, TAN, water content, total and free glycerol) were in accordance with international (ASTM D6751, EN 14214) and national (IS 15607) standards. PMID:26362462

  7. Influence of maltodextrin and environmental stresses on stability of whey protein concentrate/κ-carrageenan stabilized sesame oil-in-water emulsions.

    PubMed

    Onsaard, E; Putthanimon, J; Singthong, J; Thammarutwasik, P

    2014-12-01

    The influence of maltodextrin with different concentrations (0-30%) and dextrose equivalent (dextrose equivalent 10 and dextrose equivalent 15) under different environmental stresses (pH 3-8, NaCl 0-500 mM, and sucrose 0-20%) on the stability of whey protein concentrate/κ-carrageenan stabilized sesame oil-in-water emulsions was investigated by mean particle diameter, particle size distribution, ζ-potential, microstructure, and viscosity. Sesame oil-in-water emulsions containing anionic droplets stabilized by interfacial membranes comprising whey protein concentrate/κ-carrageenan/maltodextrin (15% sesame oil, 0.5% whey protein concentrate, 0.2% κ-carrageenan, 0.02% sodium azide and 0-30% maltodextrin with dextrose equivalent of 10 and 15, 5 mM phosphate buffer, pH 7) were produced using a homogenizer. The primary emulsion (1°) containing whey protein concentrate-coated droplets was prepared by homogenizing. The secondary emulsion (2°) containing whey protein concentrate-κ-carrageenan in the absence or presence of maltodextrin was produced by mixing the 1° emulsion with an aqueous κ-carrageenan in the absence or presence of maltodextrin solution. There were no significant changes in mean droplet diameter and ζ-potential of droplets at any maltodextrin concentration (0-30%) or dextrose equivalent (10 and 15) after 24 h storage. The apparent viscosity of emulsions increased when the maltodextrin concentration increased. The 2° emulsion containing 15% maltodextrin with dextrose equivalent of 10 had the stability to aggregation at pH 6-8, NaCl ≤ 300 mM, and sucrose 0-20%. The addition of maltodextrin to emulsion can be used to form emulsions with different physicochemical properties for various applications in food processing (for example, encapsulation).

  8. Effect of β-lactoglobulin A and B whey protein variants on cheese yield potential of a model milk system.

    PubMed

    Meza-Nieto, M A; González-Córdova, A F; Piloni-Martini, J; Vallejo-Cordoba, B

    2013-01-01

    Cheese yield mainly depends on the amount and proportion of milk constituents; however, genetic variants of the proteins present in milk may also have an important effect. The objective of this research was to study the effect of the variants A and B of β-lactoglobulin (LG) on cheese yield using a model system consisting of skim milk powder fortified with different levels of a mixture containing α-lactalbumin and β-LG genetic variants (A, B, or A-B) in a 1:2 ratio. Fortified milk samples were subjected to pasteurization at 65 °C for 30 min. Miniature cheeses were made by acidifying (pH=5.9) fortified milk and incubating with rennet for 1h at 32 °C. The clot formed was cut, centrifuged at 2,600 × g for 30 min at 20 °C and drained for determining cheese yield. Cheese-yielding capacity was expressed as actual yield (grams of cheese curd per 100g of milk) and dry weight yield (grams of dried cheese curd per 100g of milk). Free-zone capillary electrophoresis was used for determining β-LG A or B recovery in the curd during rennet-induced coagulation. The presence of β-LG variant B resulted in a significantly higher actual and dried weight cheese yield than when A or A-B were present at levels ≤ 0.675% of whey protein (WP) addition. Results of free-zone capillary electrophoresis allowed us to infer that β-LG B associates with the casein micelles during renneting, as shown by an increase in the recovery of this variant in the curd when β-LG B was added up to a maximum at 0.45% (equivalent to 0.675% WP). In general, actual or dried weight cheese yield increased as WP addition was increased from 0.225 to 0.675%. However, when WP addition ranged from 0.675 to 0.90%, a drastic drop in cheese yield was observed. This behavior may be because an increase in the aggregation of casein micelles with a concomitant inclusion of whey protein in the gel occurs at low levels of WP addition, whereas once the association of WP with the casein micelles reach a saturation point

  9. Protein and energy intake during weaning. III. Effects on plasma amino acids.

    PubMed

    Axelsson, I; Borulf, S; Abildskov, K; Heird, W; Räihä, N

    1988-01-01

    Preprandial plasma amino acid concentrations were measured at 5 and 6 months of age in 30 healthy term infants who were either breast-fed ad libitum or fed one of two different formulas (1.9 g of protein per 100 ml with a whey:casein ratio of 50:50; 2.9 g of protein per 100 ml with a whey:casein ratio of 20:80) ad libitum, plus the same supplementary food regimen. The mean plasma concentrations of total amino acids and especially total essential amino acids were higher in the formula-fed infants. Those fed formula also had plasma concentrations of methionine, isoleucine, phenylalanine, leucine, valine, threonine, aspartate, proline, lysine, tyrosine, histidine that exceeded plasma concentrations of breast-fed infants by 2 or more standard deviations. Concentrations of arginine, glutamic acid, glutamine, ornithine, serine, cystine did not differ and taurine was higher in the breast-fed infants. The data indicate that formulas in common use today during weaning (4-6 months) provide excessive protein intakes when compared to the breast-fed control infants. A lowering of protein concentration and a further manipulation of the whey:casein ratio is necessary if plasma amino acid patterns similar to those found in breast-fed infants is to be achieved with artificial feeding.

  10. Acute allergic skin response as a new tool to evaluate the allergenicity of whey hydrolysates in a mouse model of orally induced cow's milk allergy.

    PubMed

    van Esch, Betty C A M; Schouten, Bastiaan; Hofman, Gerard A; van Baalen, Ton; Nijkamp, Frans P; Knippels, Léon M J; Willemsen, Linette E M; Garssen, Johan

    2010-06-01

    Hypoallergenic milk formulae are used for cow's milk allergic infants and may be a good option for infants at risk. Clinical studies have shown that the protein source or the hydrolysis methodology used may influence the effectiveness in infants stressing the importance of adequate pre-clinical testing of hypoallergenic formulae in an in vivo model of orally induced cow's milk allergy. This study was undertaken to introduce a new read-out system to measure the residual allergenicity of whey hydrolysates on both the sensitization and challenge phase of orally induced cow's milk allergy in mice. Mice were sensitized orally to whey or a partial whey hydrolysate (pWH) to measure the residual sensitizing capacity. To predict the residual allergenicity of hydrolysates, whey allergic mice were challenged in the ear with pWH, extensive whey hydrolysate or an amino acid-based formula. An acute allergic skin response (ear swelling at 1 h), whey-specific serum antibodies, and local MCP-1 concentrations were measured. In contrast to whey, oral sensitization with pWH did not result in the induction of whey-specific antibodies, although a minor residual skin response to whey was observed after challenge. Skin exposure to whey hydrolysates showed a hydrolysation dependent reduction of the acute allergic skin response in whey allergic mice. In contrast to whey, skin exposure to pWH did not enhance tissue MCP-1 levels. The acute allergic skin response in mice orally sensitized to cow's milk proteins reveals a new pre-clinical tool which might provide information about the residual sensitizing capacity of hydrolysates supporting the discussion on the use of hypoallergenic formulae in high risk children. This mouse model might be a relevant model for the screening of new hypoallergenic formulae aimed to prevent or treat cow's milk allergy.

  11. Homo-fermentative production of D-lactic acid by Lactobacillus sp. employing casein whey permeate as a raw feed-stock.

    PubMed

    Prasad, Saurav; Srikanth, Katla; Limaye, Anil M; Sivaprakasam, Senthilkumar

    2014-06-01

    Casein whey permeate (CWP), a lactose-enriched dairy waste effluent, is a viable feed stock for the production of value-added products. Two lactic acid bacteria were cultivated in a synthetic casein whey permeate medium with or without pH control. Lactobacillus lactis ATCC 4797 produced D-lactic acid (DLA) at 12.5 g l(-1) in a bioreactor. The values of Leudking-Piret model parameters suggested that lactate was a growth-associated product. Batch fermentation was also performed employing CWP (35 g lactose l(-1)) with casein hydrolysate as a nitrogen supplement in a bioreactor. After 40 h, L. lactis produced 24.3 g lactic acid l(-1) with an optical purity >98 %. Thus CWP may be regarded as a potential feed-stock for DLA production. PMID:24563313

  12. Stability of whey-protein-stabilized oil-in-water emulsions during chilled storage and temperature cycling.

    PubMed

    Kiokias, Sotirios; Reiffers-Magnani, Christel K; Bot, Arjen

    2004-06-16

    The stability of heat-treated and/or acidified, partly-crystalline-fat-based, whey-protein-stabilized oil-in-water (o/w) emulsions against partial coalescence was investigated during chilled storage (at 5 degrees C) and repeated temperature cycling (three times between 5 and 25 degrees C). Experiments focused on the evolution of firmness and droplet size (using pulsed field gradient NMR and scanning electron microscopy). Besides the effects of denaturation and/or acidification, the influence of the droplet size of the dispersed phase on emulsion stability was investigated also. It was found that heat treatment or acidification before emulsification led to unstable emulsions during temperature cycling, whereas heat treatment after acidification resulted in stable emulsions. PMID:15186103

  13. Drying temperature effect on water vapor permeability and mechanical properties of whey protein-lipid emulsion films.

    PubMed

    Perez-Gago, M B; Krochta, J M

    2000-07-01

    The water vapor permeability (WVP) and mechanical properties of whey protein isolate (WPI) and WPI-lipid emulsion films dried at different conditions were investigated. As drying temperature increased, WVPs decreased significantly. Significantly lower WVP was observed for emulsion films compared to WPI films. WPI-Beeswax (BW) and WPI-anhydrous milkfat fraction emulsion films dried at 80 degrees C and 40% RH gave the lowest WVP compared to 25 degrees C, 40% RH and 40 degrees C, 40% RH. A large drop in WVP of WPI-BW emulsion films was observed at 20% BW content. The decrease in WVP for emulsion films as drying temperature increased could be due to change in the lipid crystalline morphology and/or lipid distribution within the matrix. Mechanical properties of WPI and WPI-lipid emulsion films, on the other hand, were not modified by drying conditions.

  14. Flavor release and perception of flavored whey protein gels: perception is determined by texture rather than by release.

    PubMed

    Weel, Koen G C; Boelrijk, Alexandra E M; Alting, Arno C; Van Mil, Peter J J M; Burger, Jack J; Gruppen, Harry; Voragen, Alphons G J; Smit, Gerrit

    2002-08-28

    Five whey protein gels, with different gel hardnesses and waterholding capacities, were flavored with ethylbutyrate or diacetyl and evaluated by a 10-person panel to study the relation between the gel structure and the sensory perception, as well as the nosespace flavor concentration during eating. The sensory perception of the flavor compounds was measured by the time-intensity method, while simultaneously the nosespace flavor concentration was monitored by the MS-Nose. The nosespace flavor concentration was found to be independent of the gel hardness or waterholding capacity. However, significant changes in flavor intensity between the gels were perceived by the majority of the panelists, despite the fact that the panelists were instructed to focus only on flavor perception and to not take texture into account. From these observations it is concluded that the texture of gels determines perception of flavor intensity rather than the in-nose flavor concentration.

  15. Lipid particle size effect on water vapor permeability and mechanical properties of whey protein/beeswax emulsion films.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Gago, M B; Krochta, J M

    2001-02-01

    Lipid particle size effects on water vapor permeability (WVP) and mechanical properties of whey protein isolate (WPI)/beeswax (BW) emulsion films were investigated. Emulsion films containing 20 and 60% BW (dry basis) and mean lipid particle sizes ranging from 0.5 to 2.0 microm were prepared. BW particle size effects on WVP and mechanical properties were observed only in films containing 60% BW. WVP of these films decreased as lipid particle size decreased. As drying temperature increased, film WVPs decreased significantly. Meanwhile, tensile strength and elongation increased as BW particle size decreased. However, for 20% BW emulsion films, properties were not affected by lipid particle size. Results suggest that increased protein-lipid interactions at the BW particle interfaces, as particle size decreased and resulting interfacial area increased, result in stronger films with lower WVPs. Observing this effect depends on a large lipid content within the protein matrix. At low lipid content, the effect of interactions at the protein-lipid interfaces is not observed, due to the presence of large protein-matrix regions of the film without lipid, which are not influenced by protein-lipid interactions.

  16. Cloning of a crustin-like, single whey-acidic-domain, antibacterial peptide from the haemocytes of the European lobster, Homarus gammarus, and its response to infection with bacteria.

    PubMed

    Hauton, C; Brockton, V; Smith, V J

    2006-03-01

    Degenerate PCR was used to isolate a 221-base pair nucleotide sequence of a new crustin-like antibacterial peptide from the haemocytes of the European lobster, Homarus gammarus. Rapid amplification of cDNA ends was used to extend the sequence to determine the complete open reading frame and un-translated regions. The inferred amino acid sequence of this peptide was found to be similar to crustin-like peptides isolated for several species of shrimp as well as the shore crab, Carcinus maenas. The sequence also contains a single-whey-acidic protein (WAP) domain, similar to novel antibacterial single-whey-acidic domain (SWD) peptides that have been recently described in the tiger shrimp, Penaeus monodon, and the Pacific white shrimp, Litopenaeus vannamei. Real-time PCR was used to analyse the expression of the gene coding for this peptide. The gene is up regulated after inoculation with the Gram-positive lobster pathogen Aerococcus viridans var. homari but down regulated after inoculation with the Gram-negative bacteria Listonella anguillarum. Phylogenetic analysis of this new peptide shows that it is most related to other antimicrobial crustin peptides and that the crustins are only distantly related to the antibacterial SWD peptides recently described. PMID:16144710

  17. Protein-Protein Multilayer Oil-in-Water Emulsions for the Microencapsulation of Flaxseed Oil: Effect of Whey and Fish Gelatin Concentration.

    PubMed

    Fustier, Patrick; Achouri, Allaoua; Taherian, Ali R; Britten, Michel; Pelletier, Marylène; Sabik, Hassan; Villeneuve, Sébastien; Mondor, Martin

    2015-10-28

    The impact of whey protein isolate (WPI) and fish gelatin (FG) deposited sequentially at concentrations of 0.1, 0.5, and 0.75% on the surface of primary oil-in-water emulsions containing 5% flaxseed oil stabilized with either 0.5% fish gelatin or whey protein, respectively, was investigated. The results revealed that the adsorption of WPI/FG or FG/WPI complexes to the emulsion interface led to the formation of oil-in-water (o/w) emulsions with different stabilities and different protection degrees of the flaxseed oil. Deposition of FG on the WPI primary emulsion increased the particle size (from 0.53 to 1.58 μm) and viscosity and decreased electronegativity (from -23.91 to -11.15 mV) of the complexes. Different trends were noted with the deposition of WPI on the FG primary emulsion, resulting in decreasing particle size and increasing electronegativity and viscosity to a lower extent. Due to the superior tension-active property of WPI, the amount of protein load in the WPI primary emulsion as well as in WPI/FG complex was significantly higher than the FG counterparts. A multilayer emulsion made with 0.5% WPI/0.75% FG exhibited the lowest oxidation among all of the multilayered emulsions tested (0.32 ppm of hexanal) after 21 days, likely due to the charge effect of FG that may prevent pro-oxidant metals to interact with the flaxseed oil.

  18. Conversion of cheese whey into a fucose- and glucuronic acid-rich extracellular polysaccharide by Enterobacter A47.

    PubMed

    Antunes, Sílvia; Freitas, Filomena; Alves, Vítor D; Grandfils, Christian; Reis, Maria A M

    2015-09-20

    Cheese whey was used as the sole substrate for the production of extracellular polysaccharides (EPS) by Enterobacter A47. An EPS concentration of 6.40 g L(-1) was reached within 3.2 days of cultivation, corresponding to a volumetric productivity of 2.00 g L(-1) d(-1). The produced EPS was mainly composed of glucuronic acid (29 mol%) and fucose (29 mol%), with lower contents of glucose and galactose (21 mol% each) and a total acyl groups content of 32 wt.%. The polymer had an average molecular weight of 1.8×10(6) Da, with a polydispersity index of 1.2, and an intrinsic viscosity of 8.0 dL g(-1). EPS aqueous solutions (1.0 wt.% in 0.01 M NaCl, at pH 8.0) presented a shear thinning behavior with a viscosity of the first Newtonian plateau approaching 0.1 Pas. This novel glucuronic acid-rich polymer possesses interesting rheological properties, which, together with its high content of glucuronic acid and fucose, two bioactive sugar monomers, confers it a great potential for use in high-value applications, such as cosmetics and pharmaceuticals. PMID:26119564

  19. Conversion of cheese whey into a fucose- and glucuronic acid-rich extracellular polysaccharide by Enterobacter A47.

    PubMed

    Antunes, Sílvia; Freitas, Filomena; Alves, Vítor D; Grandfils, Christian; Reis, Maria A M

    2015-09-20

    Cheese whey was used as the sole substrate for the production of extracellular polysaccharides (EPS) by Enterobacter A47. An EPS concentration of 6.40 g L(-1) was reached within 3.2 days of cultivation, corresponding to a volumetric productivity of 2.00 g L(-1) d(-1). The produced EPS was mainly composed of glucuronic acid (29 mol%) and fucose (29 mol%), with lower contents of glucose and galactose (21 mol% each) and a total acyl groups content of 32 wt.%. The polymer had an average molecular weight of 1.8×10(6) Da, with a polydispersity index of 1.2, and an intrinsic viscosity of 8.0 dL g(-1). EPS aqueous solutions (1.0 wt.% in 0.01 M NaCl, at pH 8.0) presented a shear thinning behavior with a viscosity of the first Newtonian plateau approaching 0.1 Pas. This novel glucuronic acid-rich polymer possesses interesting rheological properties, which, together with its high content of glucuronic acid and fucose, two bioactive sugar monomers, confers it a great potential for use in high-value applications, such as cosmetics and pharmaceuticals.

  20. Hydrolyzed casein and whey protein meals comparably stimulate net whole-body protein synthesis in COPD patients with nutritional depletion without an additional effect of leucine co-ingestion

    PubMed Central

    Jonker, Renate; Deutz, Nicolaas EP; Erbland, Marcia L; Anderson, Paula J; Engelen, Mariëlle PKJ

    2013-01-01

    Background & Aims Muscle wasting commonly occurs in COPD, negatively affecting outcome. The aim was to examine the net whole-body protein synthesis response to two milk protein meals with comparable absorption rates (hydrolyzed casein (hCAS) vs. hydrolyzed whey (hWHEY)) and the effects of co-ingesting leucine. Methods Twelve COPD patients (GOLD stage II-IV) with nutritional depletion, were studied following intake of a 15g hCAS or hWHEY protein meal with or without leucine-co-ingestion, according to a double-blind randomized cross-over design. The isotopic tracers L-[ring-2H5]-Phenylalanine, L-[ring-2H2]-Tyrosine, L-[2H3]-3-Methylhistidine (given via continuous intravenous infusion), and L-[15N]-Phenylalanine (added to the protein meals) were used to measure endogenous whole-body protein breakdown (WbPB), whole-body protein synthesis (WbPS), net protein synthesis (NetPS), splanchnic extraction and myofibrillar protein breakdown (MPB). Analyses were done in arterialized-venous plasma by LC/MS/MS. Results WbPS was greater after intake of the hCAS protein meal (P<0.05) whereas the hWHEY protein meal reduced WbPB more (P<0.01). NetPS was stimulated comparably, with a protein conversion rate greater than 70%. Addition of leucine did not modify the insulin, WbPB, WbPS or MPB response. Conclusions Hydrolyzed casein and whey protein meals comparably and efficiently stimulate whole-body protein anabolism in COPD patients with nutritional depletion without an additional effect of leucine co-ingestion. PMID:23886411

  1. Hydrolysis with Cucurbita ficifolia serine protease reduces antigenic response to bovine whey protein concentrate and αs-casein.

    PubMed

    Babij, Konrad; Bajzert, Joanna; Dąbrowska, Anna; Szołtysik, Marek; Zambrowicz, Aleksandra; Lubec, Gert; Stefaniak, Tadeusz; Willak-Janc, Ewa; Chrzanowska, Józefa

    2015-11-01

    In the present study the effect of hydrolysis with non-commercial Cucurbita ficifolia serine protease on a reduction of the IgE and IgG binding capacity of whey protein concentrate and αs-casein was investigated. The intensity of the protein degradation was analyzed by the degree of hydrolysis, the free amino groups content and RP-HPLC. The ability to bind the antibodies by native proteins and their hydrolysates was determined using a competitive ELISA test. Deep hydrolysis contributed to a significant reduction of immunoreactive epitopes present in WPC. In the case of IgE and IgG present in the serum pool of children with CMA, the lowest binding capacity was detected in the 24 h WPC hydrolysate, where the inhibition of the reaction with native WPC was ≤23 and ≤60 %, respectively. The analysis of the IgG reactivity in the antiserum of the immunized goat showed that the lowest antibody binding capacity was exhibited also by 24 h WPC hydrolysate at a concentration of 1000 μg/ml where the inhibition of the reaction with nWPC was ≤47 %. One-hour hydrolysis of α-casein was sufficient to significant reduction of the protein antigenicity, while the longer time (5 h) of hydrolysis probably lead to the appearance of new epitopes reactive with polyclonal.

  2. Stabilization of water in oil in water (W/O/W) emulsion using whey protein isolate-conjugated durian seed gum: enhancement of interfacial activity through conjugation process.

    PubMed

    Tabatabaee Amid, Bahareh; Mirhosseini, Hamed

    2014-01-01

    The present work was conducted to investigate the effect of purification and conjugation processes on functional properties of durian seed gum (DSG) used for stabilization of water in oil in water (W/O/W) emulsion. Whey protein isolate (WPI) was conjugated to durian seed gum through the covalent linkage. In order to prepare WPI-DSG conjugate, covalent linkage of whey protein isolate to durian seed gum was obtained by Maillard reaction induced by heating at 60 °C and 80% (±1%) relative humidity. SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis was used to test the formation of the covalent linkage between whey protein isolate and durian seed gum after conjugation process. In this study, W/O/W stabilized by WPI-conjugated DSG A showed the highest interface activity and lowest creaming layer among all prepared emulsions. This indicated that the partial conjugation of WPI to DSG significantly improved its functional characteristics in W/O/W emulsion. The addition of WPI-conjugated DSG to W/O/W emulsion increased the viscosity more than non-conjugated durian seed gum (or control). This might be due to possible increment of the molecular weight after linking the protein fraction to the structure of durian seed gum through the conjugation process.

  3. Effect of xanthan/enzyme-modified guar gum mixtures on the stability of whey protein isolate stabilized fish oil-in-water emulsions.

    PubMed

    Chityala, Pavan Kumar; Khouryieh, Hanna; Williams, Kevin; Conte, Eric

    2016-12-01

    The effect of xanthan gum (XG) and enzyme-modified guar (EMG) gum mixtures on the physicochemical properties and oxidative stability of 2wt% whey protein isolate (WPI) stabilized oil-in-water (O/W) emulsions containing 20%v/v fish oil was investigated. EMG was obtained by hydrolyzing native guar gum using α-galactosidase enzyme. At higher gum concentrations (0.2 and 0.3wt%), the viscosity of the emulsions containing XG/EMG gum mixtures was significantly higher (P<0.05) of all emulsions. Increasing concentrations (0-0.3wt%) of XG/EMG gum mixtures did not affect the droplet size of emulsions. Microstructure images revealed decreased flocculation at higher concentrations. Primary and secondary lipid oxidation measurements indicated a slower rate of oxidation in emulsions containing XG/EMG gum mixtures, compared to XG, guar (GG), and XG/GG gum mixtures. These results indicate that XG/EMG gum mixtures can be used in O/W emulsions to increase physical and oxidative stabilities of polyunsaturated fatty acids in foods.

  4. Physicochemical properties of whey protein, lactoferrin and Tween 20 stabilised nanoemulsions: Effect of temperature, pH and salt.

    PubMed

    Teo, Anges; Goh, Kelvin K T; Wen, Jingyuan; Oey, Indrawati; Ko, Sanghoon; Kwak, Hae-Soo; Lee, Sung Je

    2016-04-15

    Oil-in-water nanoemulsions were prepared by emulsification and solvent evaporation using whey protein isolate (WPI), lactoferrin and Tween 20 as emulsifiers. Protein-stabilised nanoemulsions showed a decrease in particle size with increasing protein concentration from 0.25% to 1% (w/w) level with Z-average diameter between 70 and 90 nm. However, larger droplets were produced by Tween 20 (120-450 nm) especially at concentration above 0.75% (w/w). The stability of nanoemulsions to temperature (30-90°C), pH (2-10) and ionic strength (0-500 mM NaCl or 0-90 mM CaCl2) was also tested. Tween 20 nanoemulsions were unstable to heat treatment at 90°C for 15 min. WPI-stabilised nanoemulsions exhibited droplet aggregation near the isoelectric point at pH 4.5 and 5 and they were also unstable at salt concentration above 30 mM CaCl2. These results indicated that stable nanoemulsions can be prepared by careful selection of emulsifiers. PMID:26616953

  5. Physicochemical properties of whey protein, lactoferrin and Tween 20 stabilised nanoemulsions: Effect of temperature, pH and salt.

    PubMed

    Teo, Anges; Goh, Kelvin K T; Wen, Jingyuan; Oey, Indrawati; Ko, Sanghoon; Kwak, Hae-Soo; Lee, Sung Je

    2016-04-15

    Oil-in-water nanoemulsions were prepared by emulsification and solvent evaporation using whey protein isolate (WPI), lactoferrin and Tween 20 as emulsifiers. Protein-stabilised nanoemulsions showed a decrease in particle size with increasing protein concentration from 0.25% to 1% (w/w) level with Z-average diameter between 70 and 90 nm. However, larger droplets were produced by Tween 20 (120-450 nm) especially at concentration above 0.75% (w/w). The stability of nanoemulsions to temperature (30-90°C), pH (2-10) and ionic strength (0-500 mM NaCl or 0-90 mM CaCl2) was also tested. Tween 20 nanoemulsions were unstable to heat treatment at 90°C for 15 min. WPI-stabilised nanoemulsions exhibited droplet aggregation near the isoelectric point at pH 4.5 and 5 and they were also unstable at salt concentration above 30 mM CaCl2. These results indicated that stable nanoemulsions can be prepared by careful selection of emulsifiers.

  6. Microstructural, textural, and sensory characteristics of probiotic yogurts fortified with sodium calcium caseinate or whey protein concentrate.

    PubMed

    Akalın, A S; Unal, G; Dinkci, N; Hayaloglu, A A

    2012-07-01

    The influence of milk protein-based ingredients on the textural characteristics, sensory properties, and microstructure of probiotic yogurt during a refrigerated storage period of 28 d was studied. Milk was fortified with 2% (wt/vol) skim milk powder as control, 2% (wt/vol) sodium calcium caseinate (SCaCN), 2% (wt/vol) whey protein concentrate (WPC) or a blend of 1% (wt/vol) SCaCN and 1% (wt/vol) WPC. A commercial yogurt starter culture and Bifidobacterium lactis Bb12 as probiotic bacteria were used for the production. The fortification with SCaCN improved the firmness and adhesiveness. Higher values of viscosity were also obtained in probiotic yogurts with SCaCN during storage. However, WPC enhanced water-holding capacity more than the caseinate. Addition of SCaCN resulted in a coarse, smooth, and more compact protein network; however, WPC gave finer and bunched structures in the scanning electron microscopy micrographs. The use of SCaCN decreased texture scores in probiotic yogurt; probably due to the lower water-holding capacity and higher syneresis values in the caseinate-added yogurt sample. Therefore, the textural characteristics of probiotic yogurts improved depending on the ingredient variety. PMID:22720919

  7. Effect of cysteine on lowering protein aggregation and subsequent hardening of whey protein isolate (WPI) protein bars in WPI/buffer model systems.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Dan; Labuza, Theodore P

    2010-07-14

    Whey protein isolate (WPI) bar hardening without and with cysteine (Cys) or N-ethylmaleimide (NEM) was investigated in model systems (WPI/buffer = 6:4, by weight, pH 6.8, a(w) approximately 0.97) in an accelerated shelf-life test (ASLT) at 45 degrees C over a period of up to 35 days. The formation of insoluble aggregates as determined by solubility and the structural rearrangement of WPI protein aggregates as observed by SEM were responsible for the WPI bars' hardening. As corroborated by electrophoresis analysis, both beta-lactoglobulin (beta-lg) and alpha-lactalbumin (alpha-la) were involved in the formation of aggregates via the thiol-disulfide interchange reaction and/or noncovalent interactions. The former force dominated the bar hardening at an earlier stage, whereas the latter force played a role for the long-term hardening. In comparison with the control bar without Cys, the thiol-disulfide interchange reaction was significantly reduced by Cys (WPI/Cys = 0.05), increased by Cys (WPI/Cys = 0.25), and inhibited by NEM (WPI/NEM = 2). Therefore, bar hardening was significantly delayed by Cys (WPI/Cys = 0.05) and NEM but accelerated by Cys (WPI/Cys = 0.25).

  8. Temperature resistance of Salmonella in low-water activity whey protein powder as influenced by salt content.

    PubMed

    Santillana Farakos, S M; Hicks, J W; Frank, J F

    2014-04-01

    Salmonella can survive in low-water activity (a(w)) foods for long periods of time. Water activity and the presence of solutes may affect its survival during heating. Low-a(w) products that contain sodium levels above 0.1 % (wt/wt) and that have been involved in major Salmonella outbreaks include peanut products and salty snacks. Reduced a(w) protects against thermal inactivation. There is conflicting information regarding the role of salt. The aim of this study was to determine whether NaCl influences the survival of Salmonella in low-a(w) whey protein powder independent of a(w) at 70 and 80 °C. Whey protein powders of differing NaCl concentrations (0, 8, and 17 % [wt/wt]) were equilibrated to target a(w) levels 0.23, 0.33, and 0.58. Powders were inoculated with Salmonella, vacuum sealed, and stored at 70 and 80 °C for 48 h. Cells were recovered on nonselective differential media. Survival data were fit with the Weibull model, and first decimal reduction times (δ) (measured in minutes) and shape factor values (β) were estimated. The influence of temperature, a(w), and salinity on Weibull model parameters (δ and β) was analyzed using multiple linear regression. Results showed that a(w) significantly influenced the survival of Salmonella at both temperatures, increasing resistance at decreasing a(w). Sodium chloride did not provide additional protection or inactivation of Salmonella at any temperature beyond that attributed to a(w). The Weibull model described the survival kinetics of Salmonella well, with R2 adj and root mean square error values ranging from 0.59 to 0.97 and 0.27 to 1.07, respectively. Temperature and a(w) influenced δ values (P < 0.05), whereas no significant differences were found between 70 and 80 °C among the different salt concentrations (P > 0.05). β values were not significantly influenced by temperature, a(w), or % NaCl (P > 0.05). This study indicates that information on salt content in food may not help improve predictions on the

  9. Temperature resistance of Salmonella in low-water activity whey protein powder as influenced by salt content.

    PubMed

    Santillana Farakos, S M; Hicks, J W; Frank, J F

    2014-04-01

    Salmonella can survive in low-water activity (a(w)) foods for long periods of time. Water activity and the presence of solutes may affect its survival during heating. Low-a(w) products that contain sodium levels above 0.1 % (wt/wt) and that have been involved in major Salmonella outbreaks include peanut products and salty snacks. Reduced a(w) protects against thermal inactivation. There is conflicting information regarding the role of salt. The aim of this study was to determine whether NaCl influences the survival of Salmonella in low-a(w) whey protein powder independent of a(w) at 70 and 80 °C. Whey protein powders of differing NaCl concentrations (0, 8, and 17 % [wt/wt]) were equilibrated to target a(w) levels 0.23, 0.33, and 0.58. Powders were inoculated with Salmonella, vacuum sealed, and stored at 70 and 80 °C for 48 h. Cells were recovered on nonselective differential media. Survival data were fit with the Weibull model, and first decimal reduction times (δ) (measured in minutes) and shape factor values (β) were estimated. The influence of temperature, a(w), and salinity on Weibull model parameters (δ and β) was analyzed using multiple linear regression. Results showed that a(w) significantly influenced the survival of Salmonella at both temperatures, increasing resistance at decreasing a(w). Sodium chloride did not provide additional protection or inactivation of Salmonella at any temperature beyond that attributed to a(w). The Weibull model described the survival kinetics of Salmonella well, with R2 adj and root mean square error values ranging from 0.59 to 0.97 and 0.27 to 1.07, respectively. Temperature and a(w) influenced δ values (P < 0.05), whereas no significant differences were found between 70 and 80 °C among the different salt concentrations (P > 0.05). β values were not significantly influenced by temperature, a(w), or % NaCl (P > 0.05). This study indicates that information on salt content in food may not help improve predictions on the

  10. Computer modelling integrated with micro-CT and material testing provides additional insight to evaluate bone treatments: Application to a beta-glycan derived whey protein mice model.

    PubMed

    Sreenivasan, D; Tu, P T; Dickinson, M; Watson, M; Blais, A; Das, R; Cornish, J; Fernandez, J

    2016-01-01

    The primary aim of this study was to evaluate the influence of a whey protein diet on computationally predicted mechanical strength of murine bones in both trabecular and cortical regions of the femur. There was no significant influence on mechanical strength in cortical bone observed with increasing whey protein treatment, consistent with cortical tissue mineral density (TMD) and bone volume changes observed. Trabecular bone showed a significant decline in strength with increasing whey protein treatment when nanoindentation derived Young׳s moduli were used in the model. When microindentation, micro-CT phantom density or normalised Young׳s moduli were included in the model a non-significant decline in strength was exhibited. These results for trabecular bone were consistent with both trabecular bone mineral density (BMD) and micro-CT indices obtained independently. The secondary aim of this study was to characterise the influence of different sources of Young׳s moduli on computational prediction. This study aimed to quantify the predicted mechanical strength in 3D from these sources and evaluate if trends and conclusions remained consistent. For cortical bone, predicted mechanical strength behaviour was consistent across all sources of Young׳s moduli. There was no difference in treatment trend observed when Young׳s moduli were normalised. In contrast, trabecular strength due to whey protein treatment significantly reduced when material properties from nanoindentation were introduced. Other material property sources were not significant but emphasised the strength trend over normalised material properties. This shows strength at the trabecular level was attributed to both changes in bone architecture and material properties.

  11. Enhanced physicochemical properties of chitosan/whey protein isolate composite film by sodium laurate-modified TiO2 nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wei; Chen, Jiwang; Chen, Yue; Xia, Wenshui; Xiong, Youling L; Wang, Hongxun

    2016-03-15

    Chitosan/whey protein isolate film incorporated with sodium laurate-modified TiO2 nanoparticles was developed. The nanocomposite film was characterized by scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction and differential scanning calorimetry, and investigated in physicochemical properties as color, tensile strength, elongation at break, water vapor permeability and water adsorption isotherm. Our results showed that the nanoparticles improved the compatibility of whey protein isolate and chitosan. Addition of nanoparticles increased the whiteness of chitosan/whey protein isolate film, but decreased its transparency. Compared with binary film, the tensile strength and elongation at break of nanocomposite film were increased by 11.51% and 12.01%, respectively, and water vapor permeability was decreased by 7.60%. The equilibrium moisture of nanocomposite film was lower than binary film, and its water sorption isotherm of the nanocomposite film fitted well to Guggenheim-Anderson-deBoer model. The findings contributed to the development of novel food packaging materials. PMID:26794738

  12. Fuel alcohol from whey

    SciTech Connect

    Lyons, T.P.; Cunningham, J.D.

    1980-11-01

    Whey disposal has become a serious environmental problem and loss of revenue to the cheese industry. The U.S. Dept. of Energy has indicated that cheese whey has one of the lowest net feedstock costs per gallon of ethanol. The manufacture of ethanol is accomplished by specially selected yeast fermentation of lactose via the glycolytic pathway. Three commercial processes are described, the Milbrew process which produces single cell protein and alcohol, and the Carbery and Denmark processes which produce potable alcohol. Selected strains of Kluveromyces fragilis are used in all processes and in the latter process, effluents are treated under anaerobic conditions to produce methane, which replaces 17-20% of the fuel oil required by the distillation plant.

  13. Timed-daily ingestion of whey protein and exercise training reduces visceral adipose tissue mass and improves insulin resistance: the PRISE study.

    PubMed

    Arciero, Paul J; Baur, Daniel; Connelly, Scott; Ormsbee, Michael J

    2014-07-01

    The present study examined the effects of timed ingestion of supplemental protein (20-g servings of whey protein, 3×/day), added to the habitual diet of free-living overweight/obese adults and subsequently randomized to either whey protein only (P; n = 24), whey protein and resistance exercise (P + RT; n = 27), or a whey protein and multimode exercise training program [protein and resistance exercise, intervals, stretching/yoga/Pilates, endurance exercise (PRISE); n = 28]. Total and regional body composition and visceral adipose tissue (VAT) mass (dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry), insulin sensitivity [homeostasis model assessment-estimated insulin resistance (HOMA-IR)], plasma lipids and adipokines, and feelings of hunger and satiety (visual analog scales) were measured before and after the 16-wk intervention. All groups lost body weight, fat mass (FM), and abdominal fat; however, PRISE lost significantly (P < 0.01) more body weight (3.3 ± 0.7 vs. 1.1 ± 0.7 kg, P + RT) and FM (2.8 ± 0.7 vs. 0.9 ± 0.5 kg, P + RT) and gained (P < 0.05) a greater percentage of lean body mass (2 ± 0.5 vs. 0.9 ± 0.3 and 0.6 ± 0.4%, P + RT and P, respectively). Only P + RT (0.1 ± 0.04 kg) and PRISE (0.21 ± 0.07 kg) lost VAT mass (P < 0.05). Fasting glucose decreased only in P + RT (5.1 ± 2.5 mg/dl) and PRISE (15.3 ± 2.1 mg/dl), with the greatest decline occurring in PRISE (P < 0.05). Similarly, HOMA-IR improved (0.6 ± 0.3, 0.6 ± 0.4 units), and leptin decreased (4.7 ± 2.2, 4.7 ± 3.1 ng/dl), and adiponectin increased (3.8 ± 1.1, 2.4 ± 1.1 μg/ml) only in P + RT and PRISE, respectively, with no change in P. In conclusion, we find evidence to support exercise training and timed ingestion of whey protein added to the habitual diet of free-living overweight/obese adults, independent of caloric restriction on total and regional body fat distribution, insulin resistance, and adipokines. PMID:24833780

  14. Timed-daily ingestion of whey protein and exercise training reduces visceral adipose tissue mass and improves insulin resistance: the PRISE study.

    PubMed

    Arciero, Paul J; Baur, Daniel; Connelly, Scott; Ormsbee, Michael J

    2014-07-01

    The present study examined the effects of timed ingestion of supplemental protein (20-g servings of whey protein, 3×/day), added to the habitual diet of free-living overweight/obese adults and subsequently randomized to either whey protein only (P; n = 24), whey protein and resistance exercise (P + RT; n = 27), or a whey protein and multimode exercise training program [protein and resistance exercise, intervals, stretching/yoga/Pilates, endurance exercise (PRISE); n = 28]. Total and regional body composition and visceral adipose tissue (VAT) mass (dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry), insulin sensitivity [homeostasis model assessment-estimated insulin resistance (HOMA-IR)], plasma lipids and adipokines, and feelings of hunger and satiety (visual analog scales) were measured before and after the 16-wk intervention. All groups lost body weight, fat mass (FM), and abdominal fat; however, PRISE lost significantly (P < 0.01) more body weight (3.3 ± 0.7 vs. 1.1 ± 0.7 kg, P + RT) and FM (2.8 ± 0.7 vs. 0.9 ± 0.5 kg, P + RT) and gained (P < 0.05) a greater percentage of lean body mass (2 ± 0.5 vs. 0.9 ± 0.3 and 0.6 ± 0.4%, P + RT and P, respectively). Only P + RT (0.1 ± 0.04 kg) and PRISE (0.21 ± 0.07 kg) lost VAT mass (P < 0.05). Fasting glucose decreased only in P + RT (5.1 ± 2.5 mg/dl) and PRISE (15.3 ± 2.1 mg/dl), with the greatest decline occurring in PRISE (P < 0.05). Similarly, HOMA-IR improved (0.6 ± 0.3, 0.6 ± 0.4 units), and leptin decreased (4.7 ± 2.2, 4.7 ± 3.1 ng/dl), and adiponectin increased (3.8 ± 1.1, 2.4 ± 1.1 μg/ml) only in P + RT and PRISE, respectively, with no change in P. In conclusion, we find evidence to support exercise training and timed ingestion of whey protein added to the habitual diet of free-living overweight/obese adults, independent of caloric restriction on total and regional body fat distribution, insulin resistance, and adipokines.

  15. Supplementation with a whey protein hydrolysate enhances recovery of muscle force-generating capacity following eccentric exercise.

    PubMed

    Buckley, Jonathan D; Thomson, Rebecca L; Coates, Alison M; Howe, Peter R C; DeNichilo, Mark O; Rowney, Michelle K

    2010-01-01

    There is evidence that protein hydrolysates can speed tissue repair following damage and may therefore be useful for accelerating recovery from exercise induced muscle damage. The potential for a hydrolysate (WPI(HD)) of whey protein isolate (WPI) to speed recovery following eccentric exercise was evaluated by assessing effects on recovery of peak isometric torque (PIT). In a double-blind randomised parallel trial, 28 sedentary males had muscle soreness (MS), serum creatine kinase (CK) activity, plasma TNFalpha, and PIT assessed at baseline and after 100 maximal eccentric contractions (ECC) of their knee extensors. Participants then consumed 250 ml of flavoured water (FW; n=11), or FW containing 25 g WPI (n=11) or 25 g WPI(HD) (n=6) and the assessments were repeated 1, 2, 6 and 24h later. PIT decreased approximately 23% following ECC, remained suppressed in FW and WPI, but recovered fully in WPI(HD) by 6h (P=0.006, treatment x time interaction). MS increased following ECC (P<0.001 for time), and remained elevated with no difference between groups (P=0.61). TNFalpha and CK did not change (P>0.45). WPI(HD) may be a useful supplement for assisting athletes to recover from fatiguing eccentric exercise.

  16. Anti-inflammatory effects of a special carbohydrate-whey protein cake after exhaustive cycling in humans.

    PubMed

    Kerasioti, Efthalia; Stagos, Dimitrios; Jamurtas, Athanasios; Kiskini, Alexandra; Koutedakis, Yiannis; Goutzourelas, Nikos; Pournaras, Spyros; Tsatsakis, Aristidis M; Kouretas, Dimitrios

    2013-11-01

    Intense exercise induces increased levels of pro-inflammatory and anti-inflammatory cytokines. Thus, the purpose of this study was to examine the effects of a special cake (consisting of carbohydrate to whey protein 3.5:1) vs. an isocaloric carbohydrate cake on inflammatory markers after exhaustive cycling in humans. Nine subjects received either the experimental or placebo cake in a counterbalanced fashion using a crossover, double-blind, repeated-measures design. They performed one trial involving a 2h exercise on a cycle ergometer at 60-65% VO2max followed by a 4h recovery and then a second trial involving an 1h exercise at 60-65% VO2max which was increased at 95% VO2max. Blood samples were collected pre-exercise, 30 min and 4h post-exercise, post-time Trial and 48 h post-time Trial. Cakes were consumed immediately post-exercise and every 1h for the next 3h. The results showed that consumption of the experimental cake reduced significantly (p<0.05), 4h post-exercise, the pro-inflammatory protein levels IL-6 and CRP compared to the control group by 50% and 46% respectively. Moreover, in the experimental cake group, the level of the anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10 was higher by 118%, 4h post-exercise, compared to the control group but not statistically significant.

  17. Formation and stabilization of nanoemulsion-based vitamin E delivery systems using natural biopolymers: Whey protein isolate and gum arabic.

    PubMed

    Ozturk, Bengu; Argin, Sanem; Ozilgen, Mustafa; McClements, David Julian

    2015-12-01

    Natural biopolymers, whey protein isolate (WPI) and gum arabic (GA), were used to fabricate emulsion-based delivery systems for vitamin E-acetate. Stable delivery systems could be formed when vitamin E-acetate was mixed with sufficient orange oil prior to high pressure homogenization. WPI (d32=0.11 μm, 1% emulsifier) was better than GA (d32=0.38 μm, 10% emulsifier) at producing small droplets at low emulsifier concentrations. However, WPI-stabilized nanoemulsions were unstable to flocculation near the protein isoelectric point (pH 5.0), at high ionic strength (>100mM), and at elevated temperatures (>60 °C), whereas GA-stabilized emulsions were stable. This difference was attributed to differences in emulsifier stabilization mechanisms: WPI by electrostatic repulsion; GA by steric repulsion. These results provide useful information about the emulsifying and stabilizing capacities of natural biopolymers for forming food-grade vitamin-enriched delivery systems. PMID:26041190

  18. Formation and stabilization of nanoemulsion-based vitamin E delivery systems using natural biopolymers: Whey protein isolate and gum arabic.

    PubMed

    Ozturk, Bengu; Argin, Sanem; Ozilgen, Mustafa; McClements, David Julian

    2015-12-01

    Natural biopolymers, whey protein isolate (WPI) and gum arabic (GA), were used to fabricate emulsion-based delivery systems for vitamin E-acetate. Stable delivery systems could be formed when vitamin E-acetate was mixed with sufficient orange oil prior to high pressure homogenization. WPI (d32=0.11 μm, 1% emulsifier) was better than GA (d32=0.38 μm, 10% emulsifier) at producing small droplets at low emulsifier concentrations. However, WPI-stabilized nanoemulsions were unstable to flocculation near the protein isoelectric point (pH 5.0), at high ionic strength (>100mM), and at elevated temperatures (>60 °C), whereas GA-stabilized emulsions were stable. This difference was attributed to differences in emulsifier stabilization mechanisms: WPI by electrostatic repulsion; GA by steric repulsion. These results provide useful information about the emulsifying and stabilizing capacities of natural biopolymers for forming food-grade vitamin-enriched delivery systems.

  19. Production of Functional High-protein Beverage Fermented with Lactic Acid Bacteria Isolated from Korean Traditional Fermented Food

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to manufacture functional high protein fermented beverage, using whey protein concentrate (WPC) and Lactobacillus plantarum DK211 isolated from kimchi, and to evaluate the physicochemical, functional, and sensory properties of the resulting product. The fermented whey beverage (FWB) was formulated with whey protein concentrate 80 (WPC 80), skim milk powder, and sucrose; and fermented with Lactobacillus plantarum DK211 as single, or mixed with Lactococcus lactis R704, a commercial starter culture. The pH, titratable acidity, and viable cell counts during fermentation and storage were evaluated. It was found that the mixed culture showed faster acid development than the single culture. The resulting FWB had high protein (9%) and low fat content (0.2%). Increased viscosity, and antioxidant and antimicrobial activity were observed after fermentation. A viable cell count of 109 CFU/mL in FWB was achieved within 10 h fermentation, and it remained throughout storage at 15℃ for 28 d. Sensory analysis was also conducted, and compared to that of a commercial protein drink. The sensory scores of FWB were similar to those of the commercial protein drink in most attributes, except sourness. The sourness was highly related with the high lactic acid content produced during fermentation. The results showed that WPC and vegetable origin lactic acid bacteria isolated from kimchi might be used for the development of a high protein fermented beverage, with improved functionality and organoleptic properties. PMID:26761827

  20. Production of Functional High-protein Beverage Fermented with Lactic Acid Bacteria Isolated from Korean Traditional Fermented Food.

    PubMed

    Cho, Young-Hee; Shin, Il-Seung; Hong, Sung-Moon; Kim, Cheol-Hyun

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to manufacture functional high protein fermented beverage, using whey protein concentrate (WPC) and Lactobacillus plantarum DK211 isolated from kimchi, and to evaluate the physicochemical, functional, and sensory properties of the resulting product. The fermented whey beverage (FWB) was formulated with whey protein concentrate 80 (WPC 80), skim milk powder, and sucrose; and fermented with Lactobacillus plantarum DK211 as single, or mixed with Lactococcus lactis R704, a commercial starter culture. The pH, titratable acidity, and viable cell counts during fermentation and storage were evaluated. It was found that the mixed culture showed faster acid development than the single culture. The resulting FWB had high protein (9%) and low fat content (0.2%). Increased viscosity, and antioxidant and antimicrobial activity were observed after fermentation. A viable cell count of 10(9) CFU/mL in FWB was achieved within 10 h fermentation, and it remained throughout storage at 15℃ for 28 d. Sensory analysis was also conducted, and compared to that of a commercial protein drink. The sensory scores of FWB were similar to those of the commercial protein drink in most attributes, except sourness. The sourness was highly related with the high lactic acid content produced during fermentation. The results showed that WPC and vegetable origin lactic acid bacteria isolated from kimchi might be used for the development of a high protein fermented beverage, with improved functionality and organoleptic properties. PMID:26761827

  1. Protein-Protein Multilayer Oil-in-Water Emulsions for the Microencapsulation of Flaxseed Oil: Effect of Whey and Fish Gelatin Concentration.

    PubMed

    Fustier, Patrick; Achouri, Allaoua; Taherian, Ali R; Britten, Michel; Pelletier, Marylène; Sabik, Hassan; Villeneuve, Sébastien; Mondor, Martin

    2015-10-28

    The impact of whey protein isolate (WPI) and fish gelatin (FG) deposited sequentially at concentrations of 0.1, 0.5, and 0.75% on the surface of primary oil-in-water emulsions containing 5% flaxseed oil stabilized with either 0.5% fish gelatin or whey protein, respectively, was investigated. The results revealed that the adsorption of WPI/FG or FG/WPI complexes to the emulsion interface led to the formation of oil-in-water (o/w) emulsions with different stabilities and different protection degrees of the flaxseed oil. Deposition of FG on the WPI primary emulsion increased the particle size (from 0.53 to 1.58 μm) and viscosity and decreased electronegativity (from -23.91 to -11.15 mV) of the complexes. Different trends were noted with the deposition of WPI on the FG primary emulsion, resulting in decreasing particle size and increasing electronegativity and viscosity to a lower extent. Due to the superior tension-active property of WPI, the amount of protein load in the WPI primary emulsion as well as in WPI/FG complex was significantly higher than the FG counterparts. A multilayer emulsion made with 0.5% WPI/0.75% FG exhibited the lowest oxidation among all of the multilayered emulsions tested (0.32 ppm of hexanal) after 21 days, likely due to the charge effect of FG that may prevent pro-oxidant metals to interact with the flaxseed oil. PMID:26457588

  2. Short communication: radio frequency dielectric heating of nonfat dry milk affects solubility and whey protein nitrogen index.

    PubMed

    Chen, C; Michael, M; Phebus, R K; Thippareddi, H; Subbiah, J; Birla, S L; Schmidt, K A

    2013-03-01

    The US infant formula market is estimated at over $3.5 billion, of which 75% are dairy-based formulas. Dried dairy powders pose a significant food safety risk, with Cronobacter sakazakii and Salmonella spp. being pathogens of particular concern. Radio frequency dielectric heating (RFDH) can provide rapid, uniform heat treatment of dry powders; thus, it potentially may be used as a postprocess lethality treatment for nonfat dry milk (NDM) or powdered infant formula. Because RFDH is a heat treatment, the functionality of the NDM may be altered and should be evaluated. High heat- and low heat-NDM were RFDH processed at temperatures ranging from 75 to 90°C for 5 to 125 min. Products were then assessed for whey protein nitrogen index (WPNI), solubility, and color. In low heat-NDM, RFDH decreased WPNI and solubility if the process was done at ≥ 80°C; however, in high heat-NDM, RFDH had a greater effect on solubility than WPNI and some color properties were altered. Further investigation of RFDH is merited to validate its application as a pathogen control process for NDM across processing parameters that result in acceptable functional properties for infant formula and other food products containing NDM.

  3. Microwave-assisted isomerisation of lactose to lactulose and Maillard conjugation of lactulose and lactose with whey proteins and peptides.

    PubMed

    Nooshkam, Majid; Madadlou, Ashkan

    2016-06-01

    Lactose was isomerised to lactulose by microwave heating and purified by a methanolic procedure to a product with approximately 72% lactulose content. Afterwards, lactose and the lactulose-rich product (PLu) were conjugated with either whey protein isolate (WPI) or its antioxidant hydrolysate (WPH) through microwaving. Lactose had a higher Maillard reactivity than PLu, and WPH was more reactive than WPI. The browning intensity of WPI-sugar systems was however higher than that of WPH-sugar pairs. Atomic force microscopy showed larger (up to ≈103 nm) particles for WPI-PLu conjugates compared to WPH-PLu counterparts (up to ≈39 nm). The Maillard conjugation progressively increased the radical-scavenging activity of WPI/WPH-sugar pairs with increasing conjugation time and improved the foaming properties of WPI and WPH. The WPI/WPH-sugar conjugates showed higher solubility and emulsification index than unreacted counterpart pairs. For native WPI, β-lactoglobulin was not degraded by in vitro gastric digestion, whereas for WPH-PLu conjugates degraded completely.

  4. pH-stat vs. free-fall pH techniques in the enzymatic hydrolysis of whey proteins.

    PubMed

    Fernández, Ayoa; Kelly, Phil

    2016-05-15

    Enzymatic hydrolysis of a commercial whey protein isolate (WPI) using either trypsin or Protamex® was compared using controlled (pH-stat) and uncontrolled (free-fall) pH conditions. pH-stat control at the enzyme's optimum value led to a more rapid rate of WPI hydrolysis by trypsin, while the opposite was the case when Protamex® was used. Furthermore, the choice of alkaline solution used to maintain constant pH during pH-stat experiments appeared to affect the reaction rate, being higher when KOH is added to the reaction mixture instead of NaOH. It would appear that potassium may play a role as co-factor or activator for the activity of this particular protease preparation. Although pH-stat techniques are usually considered to yield better hydrolysis kinetics, these findings suggest that the response of proteolytic enzyme preparations to static or free-fall pH control should be checked in advance, particularly when undertaking large scale production of WPI hydrolysates.

  5. Self-emulsification of alkaline-dissolved clove bud oil by whey protein, gum arabic, lecithin, and their combinations.

    PubMed

    Luo, Yangchao; Zhang, Yue; Pan, Kang; Critzer, Faith; Davidson, P Michael; Zhong, Qixin

    2014-05-14

    Low-cost emulsification technologies using food ingredients are critical to various applications. In the present study, a novel self-emulsification technique was studied to prepare clove bud oil (CBO) emulsions, without specialized equipment or organic solvents. CBO was first dissolved in hot alkaline solutions, added at 1% v/v into neutral solutions with 1% w/v emulsifier composed of whey protein concentrate (WPC), gum arabic, lecithin, or their equal mass mixtures, and adjusted to pH 7.0. The self-emulsification process did not affect UV-vis absorption spectrum, reversed-phase HPLC chromatogram, or antimicrobial activity of CBO against Escherichia coli O157:H7, Listeria monocytogenes Scott A, and Salmonella Enteritidis. The entrapment efficiency after extraction by petroleum ether was determined to be about 80%. Most emulsions were stable during 7 days of storage. Emulsions prepared with WPC had smaller particles, whereas emulsions prepared with emulsifier mixtures had more stable particle dimensions. The studied self-emulsification technique may find numerous applications in the preparation of low-cost food emulsions.

  6. Thymol nanoemulsified by whey protein-maltodextrin conjugates: the enhanced emulsifying capacity and antilisterial properties in milk by propylene glycol.

    PubMed

    Xue, Jia; Davidson, P Michael; Zhong, Qixin

    2013-12-26

    The objective of this research was to enhance the capability of whey protein isolate-maltodextrin conjugates in nanoemulsifying thymol using propylene glycol to improve antilisterial properties in milk. Thymol was predissolved in PG and emulsified in 7% conjugate solution. Transparent dispersions with mean diameters of <30 nm were observed up to 1.5%w/v thymol. In skim and 2% reduced fat milk, Listeria monocytogenes Scott A was reduced from ∼5 log CFU/mL to below the detection limit in 6 h by 0.1% w/v and 0.45% w/v nanoemulsified thymol, respectively, contrasting with gradual reductions to 1.15 and 2.26 log CFU/mL after 48 h by same levels of free thymol. In full fat milk, L. monocytogenes was gradually reduced to be undetectable after 48 h by 0.6% w/v nanoemulsified thymol, contrasting with the insignificant reduction by free thymol. The improved antilisterial activities of nanoemulsified thymol resulted from the increased solubility in milk and synergistic activity with propylene glycol.

  7. Self-emulsification of alkaline-dissolved clove bud oil by whey protein, gum arabic, lecithin, and their combinations.

    PubMed

    Luo, Yangchao; Zhang, Yue; Pan, Kang; Critzer, Faith; Davidson, P Michael; Zhong, Qixin

    2014-05-14

    Low-cost emulsification technologies using food ingredients are critical to various applications. In the present study, a novel self-emulsification technique was studied to prepare clove bud oil (CBO) emulsions, without specialized equipment or organic solvents. CBO was first dissolved in hot alkaline solutions, added at 1% v/v into neutral solutions with 1% w/v emulsifier composed of whey protein concentrate (WPC), gum arabic, lecithin, or their equal mass mixtures, and adjusted to pH 7.0. The self-emulsification process did not affect UV-vis absorption spectrum, reversed-phase HPLC chromatogram, or antimicrobial activity of CBO against Escherichia coli O157:H7, Listeria monocytogenes Scott A, and Salmonella Enteritidis. The entrapment efficiency after extraction by petroleum ether was determined to be about 80%. Most emulsions were stable during 7 days of storage. Emulsions prepared with WPC had smaller particles, whereas emulsions prepared with emulsifier mixtures had more stable particle dimensions. The studied self-emulsification technique may find numerous applications in the preparation of low-cost food emulsions. PMID:24758517

  8. Antimicrobial activity and hydrophobicity of edible whey protein isolate films formulated with nisin and/or glucose oxidase.

    PubMed

    Murillo-Martínez, María M; Tello-Solís, Salvador R; García-Sánchez, Miguel A; Ponce-Alquicira, Edith

    2013-04-01

    The use of edible antimicrobial films has been reported as a means to improve food shelf life through gradual releasing of antimicrobial compounds on the food surface. This work reports the study on the incorporation of 2 antimicrobial agents, nisin (N), and/or glucose oxidase (GO), into the matrix of Whey protein isolate (WPI) films at pH 5.5 and 8.5. The antimicrobial activity of the edible films was evaluated against Listeria innocua (ATCC 33090), Brochothrix thermosphacta (NCIB10018), Escherichia coli (JMP101), and Enterococcus faecalis (MXVK22). In addition, the antimicrobial activity was related to the hydrophobicity and water solubility of the WPI films. The greatest antibacterial activity was observed in WPI films containing only GO. The combined addition of N and GO resulted in films with lower antimicrobial activity than films with N or GO alone. In most cases, a pH effect was observed as greater antimicrobial response at pH 5.5 as well as higher film matrix hydrophobicity. WPI films supplemented with GO can be used in coating systems suitable for food preservation.

  9. Safety evaluation of a whey protein fraction containing a concentrated amount of naturally occurring TGF-β2.

    PubMed

    Forster, Roy; Bourtourault, Michel; Chung, Yong Joo; Silvano, Jérémy; Sire, Guillaume; Spezia, François; Puel, Caroline; Descotes, Jacques; Mikogami, Takashi

    2014-08-01

    TM0601p is a whey protein isolate derived from cow milk, containing a concentrated amount of transforming growth factor β2 (TGF-β2), and is intended for nutritional use in infants and adults. In vivo and in vitro studies have been performed to evaluate the safety of this product. In a 13-week toxicity study, treatment of adult Sprague-Dawley rats by gavage at up to 2000mg/kg/day did not result in any significant findings other than minor non-adverse changes in urinary parameters in females. The no-observed-adverse-effect level (NOAEL) was established as 2000mg/kg/day. In a juvenile toxicity study, rat pups received 600mg/kg/day by gavage from postnatal day (PND) 7 to PND 49. Transient lower bodyweight gain in the pre-weaning period was attributed to gastrointestinal effects of the viscous test material; following weaning, bodyweight gain was comparable to the vehicle controls. Reduced eosinophil counts and changes in urinary parameters (females) were recorded in treated pups at PND 49, and higher thymus weights were recorded in males only at the end of the recovery period (Day 77). None of the findings were considered adverse. There were no other significant findings and the NOAEL was established as 600mg/kg/day. No evidence of genotoxicity was seen in the bacterial reverse mutation test or the in vitro micronucleus test. Overall the results obtained present a reassuring safety profile for TM0601p. PMID:24842704

  10. Dipeptidyl peptidase-IV inhibitory peptides generated by tryptic hydrolysis of a whey protein concentrate rich in β-lactoglobulin.

    PubMed

    Silveira, Silvana T; Martínez-Maqueda, Daniel; Recio, Isidra; Hernández-Ledesma, Blanca

    2013-11-15

    Dipeptidyl peptidase-IV (DPP-IV) is a serine protease involved in the degradation and inactivation of incretin hormones that act by stimulating glucose-dependent insulin secretion after meal ingestion. DPP-IV inhibitors have emerged as new and promising oral agents for the treatment of type 2 diabetes. The purpose of this study was to investigate the potential of β-lactoglobulin as natural source of DPP-IV inhibitory peptides. A whey protein concentrate rich in β-lactoglobulin was hydrolysed with trypsin and fractionated using a chromatographic separation at semipreparative scale. Two of the six collected fractions showed notable DPP-IV inhibitory activity. These fractions were analysed by HPLC coupled to tandem mass spectrometry (HPLC-MS/MS) to identify peptides responsible for the observed activity. The most potent fragment (IPAVF) corresponded to β-lactoglobulin f(78-82) which IC50 value was 44.7μM. The results suggest that peptides derived from β-lactoglobulin would be beneficial ingredients of foods against type 2 diabetes.

  11. The response of muscle protein synthesis following whole-body resistance exercise is greater following 40 g than 20 g of ingested whey protein.

    PubMed

    Macnaughton, Lindsay S; Wardle, Sophie L; Witard, Oliver C; McGlory, Chris; Hamilton, D Lee; Jeromson, Stewart; Lawrence, Clare E; Wallis, Gareth A; Tipton, Kevin D

    2016-08-01

    The currently accepted amount of protein required to achieve maximal stimulation of myofibrillar protein synthesis (MPS) following resistance exercise is 20-25 g. However, the influence of lean body mass (LBM) on the response of MPS to protein ingestion is unclear. Our aim was to assess the influence of LBM, both total and the amount activated during exercise, on the maximal response of MPS to ingestion of 20 or 40 g of whey protein following a bout of whole-body resistance exercise. Resistance-trained males were assigned to a group with lower LBM (≤65 kg; LLBM n = 15) or higher LBM (≥70 kg; HLBM n = 15) and participated in two trials in random order. MPS was measured with the infusion of (13)C6-phenylalanine tracer and collection of muscle biopsies following ingestion of either 20 or 40 g protein during recovery from a single bout of whole-body resistance exercise. A similar response of MPS during exercise recovery was observed between LBM groups following protein ingestion (20 g - LLBM: 0.048 ± 0.018%·h(-1); HLBM: 0.051 ± 0.014%·h(-1); 40 g - LLBM: 0.059 ± 0.021%·h(-1); HLBM: 0.059 ± 0.012%·h(-1)). Overall (groups combined), MPS was stimulated to a greater extent following ingestion of 40 g (0.059 ± 0.020%·h(-1)) compared with 20 g (0.049 ± 0.020%·h(-1); P = 0.005) of protein. Our data indicate that ingestion of 40 g whey protein following whole-body resistance exercise stimulates a greater MPS response than 20 g in young resistance-trained men. However, with the current doses, the total amount of LBM does not seem to influence the response. PMID:27511985

  12. The response of muscle protein synthesis following whole-body resistance exercise is greater following 40 g than 20 g of ingested whey protein.

    PubMed

    Macnaughton, Lindsay S; Wardle, Sophie L; Witard, Oliver C; McGlory, Chris; Hamilton, D Lee; Jeromson, Stewart; Lawrence, Clare E; Wallis, Gareth A; Tipton, Kevin D

    2016-08-01

    The currently accepted amount of protein required to achieve maximal stimulation of myofibrillar protein synthesis (MPS) following resistance exercise is 20-25 g. However, the influence of lean body mass (LBM) on the response of MPS to protein ingestion is unclear. Our aim was to assess the influence of LBM, both total and the amount activated during exercise, on the maximal response of MPS to ingestion of 20 or 40 g of whey protein following a bout of whole-body resistance exercise. Resistance-trained males were assigned to a group with lower LBM (≤65 kg; LLBM n = 15) or higher LBM (≥70 kg; HLBM n = 15) and participated in two trials in random order. MPS was measured with the infusion of (13)C6-phenylalanine tracer and collection of muscle biopsies following ingestion of either 20 or 40 g protein during recovery from a single bout of whole-body resistance exercise. A similar response of MPS during exercise recovery was observed between LBM groups following protein ingestion (20 g - LLBM: 0.048 ± 0.018%·h(-1); HLBM: 0.051 ± 0.014%·h(-1); 40 g - LLBM: 0.059 ± 0.021%·h(-1); HLBM: 0.059 ± 0.012%·h(-1)). Overall (groups combined), MPS was stimulated to a greater extent following ingestion of 40 g (0.059 ± 0.020%·h(-1)) compared with 20 g (0.049 ± 0.020%·h(-1); P = 0.005) of protein. Our data indicate that ingestion of 40 g whey protein following whole-body resistance exercise stimulates a greater MPS response than 20 g in young resistance-trained men. However, with the current doses, the total amount of LBM does not seem to influence the response.

  13. A combination of probiotics and whey proteins enhances anti-obesity effects of calcium and dairy products during nutritional energy restriction in aP2-agouti transgenic mice.

    PubMed

    Yoda, Kazutoyo; Sun, Xiaocum; Kawase, Manabu; Kubota, Akira; Miyazawa, Kenji; Harata, Gaku; Hosoda, Masataka; Hiramatsu, Masaru; He, Fang; Zemel, Michael B

    2015-06-14

    Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG, Lactobacillus paracasei TMC0409, Streptococcus thermophilus TMC1543 and whey proteins were used to prepare fermented milk. For the experiment aP2- agouti transgenic mice were pre-treated with a high-sucrose/high-fat diet for 6 weeks to induce obesity. The obese mice were fed a diet containing 1·2% Ca and either non-fat dried milk (NFDM) or probiotic-fermented milk (PFM) with nutritional energy restriction for 6 weeks. The animals were examined after the treatment for changes in body weight, fat pad weight, fatty acid synthase (FAS) activity, lypolysis, the expression levels of genes related to lipid metabolism, insulin sensitivity in adipocytes and skeletal muscle and the presence of biomarkers for oxidative and inflammatory stress in plasma. It was found that the PFM diet significantly reduced body weight, fat accumulation, and adipocyte FAS activity, and increased adipocyte lipolysis as compared with the effects of the NFDM diet (P<0·05). The adipose tissue gene expression of 11β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase 1 (11β-HSD1) was significantly suppressed in mice that were fed PFM as compared with those that were fed NFDM (P<0·05). PFM caused a greater up-regulation of skeletal muscle PPARα, PPARδ, uncoupling protein 3 (UCP3) and GLUT4 expression and a significant decrease in the plasma concentration of insulin, malondialdehyde, TNF-α, monocyte chemotactic protein-1 and C-reactive protein as compared with the effects of NFDM (P<0·05). Fermentation of milk with selected probiotics and supplementation of milk with whey proteins may thus enhance anti-obesity effects of Ca and dairy products by the suppression of adipose tissue lipogenesis, activation of fat oxidation in skeletal muscle and reduction of oxidative and inflammatory stress.

  14. Whey as a brewing material. III. Fermentation of wort containing hydrolyzed whey permeate

    SciTech Connect

    Tenney, R.I.

    1981-01-01

    Ultrafiltration of whey removes most of the protein, leaving lactose and minerals in the permeate. Salinity may be controlled by demineralization, resulting in a product that ferments easily, yielding beers of normal and controllable composition and character. Up to 30% extracts may be derived from whey. Several strains of yeast isolated from breweries are capable of the fermentation.

  15. [Whey as a substrate for obtaining an edible yeast].

    PubMed

    Terra, N N

    1976-01-01

    Using a fermentative process of whey through Kluyveromyces fragilys, Jörgensen, the Author prepared two edible products: Biomass I (yeast) and Biomass II (yeast plus protein of whey). Biomass I offered 53% of protein, and the yield was 22,3 g/1 whey. Biomass II, 62% of protein and yield of 27,7 g/1 whey. The test of food efficiency for Biomass II was similar to that presented by casein; the protein eficiency ratio at the level of 5% was the same, both for Biomass I and II. More research is needed specially to determine the economical convenience of the process.

  16. Development of an SDS-gel electrophoresis method on SU-8 microchips for protein separation with LIF detection: Application to the analysis of whey proteins.

    PubMed

    Del Mar Barrios-Romero, Maria; Crevillén, Agustín G; Diez-Masa, José Carlos

    2013-08-01

    This work describes the development of an SDS-gel electrophoresis method for the analysis of major whey proteins (α-lactalbumin, β-lactoglobulin, and BSA) carried out in SU-8 microchips. The method uses a low-viscosity solution of dextran as a sieving polymer. A commercial coating agent (EOTrol LN) was added to the separation buffer to control the EOF of the chips. The potential of this coating agent to prevent protein adsorption on the walls of the SU-8 channels was also evaluated. Additionally, the fluorescence background of the SU-8 material was studied to improve the sensitivity of the method. By selecting an excitation wavelength of 532 nm at which the background fluorescence remains low and by replacing the mercury arc lamp by a laser in the detection system, an LOD in the nanomolar range was achieved for proteins derivatized with the fluorogenic reagent Chromeo P540. Finally, the method was applied to the analysis of milk samples, demonstrating the potential of SU-8 microchips for the analysis of proteins in complex food samples.

  17. Effects of preoperative feeding with a whey protein plus carbohydrate drink on the acute phase response and insulin resistance. A randomized trial

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Prolonged preoperative fasting increases insulin resistance and current evidence recommends carbohydrate (CHO) drinks 2 hours before surgery. Our hypothesis is that the addition of whey protein to a CHO-based drink not only reduces the inflammatory response but also diminish insulin resistance. Methods Seventeen patients scheduled to cholecystectomy or inguinal herniorraphy were randomized and given 474 ml and 237 ml of water (CO group) or a drink containing CHO and milk whey protein (CHO-P group) respectively, 6 and 3 hours before operation. Blood samples were collected before surgery and 24 hours afterwards for biochemical assays. The endpoints of the study were the insulin resistance (IR), the prognostic inflammatory and nutritional index (PINI) and the C-reactive protein (CRP)/albumin ratio. A 5% level for significance was established. Results There were no anesthetic or postoperative complications. The post-operative IR was lower in the CHO-P group when compared with the CO group (2.75 ± 0.72 vs 5.74 ± 1.16; p = 0.03). There was no difference between the two groups in relation to the PINI. The CHO-P group showed a decrease in the both CRP elevation and CRP/albumin ratio (p < 0.05). The proportion of patients who showed CRP/albumin ratio considered normal was significantly greater (p < 0.05) in the CHO-P group (87.5%) than in the CO group (33.3%). Conclusions Shortening the pre-operative fasting using CHO and whey protein is safe and reduces insulin resistance and postoperative acute phase response in elective moderate operations. Trial registration ClinicalTrail.gov NCT01354249 PMID:21668975

  18. Short communication: The influence of solids concentration and bleaching agent on bleaching efficacy and flavor of sweet whey powder.

    PubMed

    Jervis, M G; Smith, T J; Drake, M A

    2015-04-01

    Recent studies have demonstrated the effect of bleaching conditions and bleaching agent on flavor and functional properties of whey protein ingredients. Solids concentration at bleaching significantly affected bleaching efficacy and flavor effects of different bleaching agents. It is not known if these parameters influence quality of sweet whey powder (SWP). The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of solids concentration and bleaching agent on the flavor and bleaching efficacy of SWP. Colored cheddar whey was manufactured, fat separated, and pasteurized. Subsequently, the whey (6.7% solids) was bleached, concentrated using reverse osmosis (RO) to 14% solids, and then spray dried, or whey was concentrated before bleaching and then spray dried. Bleaching treatments included a control (no bleaching, 50 °C, 60 min), hydrogen peroxide (HP; 250 mg/kg, 50 °C, 60 min), benzoyl peroxide (50 mg/kg, 50 °C, 60 min), lactoperoxidase (20 mg/kg of HP, 50 °C, 30 min), and external peroxidase (MaxiBright, DSM Food Specialties, Delft, the Netherlands; 2 dairy bleaching units/mL, 50 °C, 30 min). The experiment was repeated in triplicate. Sensory properties and volatile compounds of SWP were evaluated by a trained panel and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry, respectively. Bleaching efficacy (norbixin destruction) and benzoic acid were measured by HPLC. Differences in bleaching efficacy, sensory and volatile compound profiles, and benzoic acid were observed with different bleaching agents, consistent with previous studies. Solids concentration affected bleaching efficacy of HP, but not other bleaching agents. The SWP from whey bleached with HP or lactoperoxidase following RO had increased cardboard and fatty flavors and higher concentrations of lipid oxidation compounds compared with SWP from whey bleached before RO. The SWP bleached with benzoyl peroxide after RO contained less benzoic acid than SWP from whey bleached before RO. These results indicate that

  19. Short communication: The influence of solids concentration and bleaching agent on bleaching efficacy and flavor of sweet whey powder.

    PubMed

    Jervis, M G; Smith, T J; Drake, M A

    2015-04-01

    Recent studies have demonstrated the effect of bleaching conditions and bleaching agent on flavor and functional properties of whey protein ingredients. Solids concentration at bleaching significantly affected bleaching efficacy and flavor effects of different bleaching agents. It is not known if these parameters influence quality of sweet whey powder (SWP). The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of solids concentration and bleaching agent on the flavor and bleaching efficacy of SWP. Colored cheddar whey was manufactured, fat separated, and pasteurized. Subsequently, the whey (6.7% solids) was bleached, concentrated using reverse osmosis (RO) to 14% solids, and then spray dried, or whey was concentrated before bleaching and then spray dried. Bleaching treatments included a control (no bleaching, 50 °C, 60 min), hydrogen peroxide (HP; 250 mg/kg, 50 °C, 60 min), benzoyl peroxide (50 mg/kg, 50 °C, 60 min), lactoperoxidase (20 mg/kg of HP, 50 °C, 30 min), and external peroxidase (MaxiBright, DSM Food Specialties, Delft, the Netherlands; 2 dairy bleaching units/mL, 50 °C, 30 min). The experiment was repeated in triplicate. Sensory properties and volatile compounds of SWP were evaluated by a trained panel and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry, respectively. Bleaching efficacy (norbixin destruction) and benzoic acid were measured by HPLC. Differences in bleaching efficacy, sensory and volatile compound profiles, and benzoic acid were observed with different bleaching agents, consistent with previous studies. Solids concentration affected bleaching efficacy of HP, but not other bleaching agents. The SWP from whey bleached with HP or lactoperoxidase following RO had increased cardboard and fatty flavors and higher concentrations of lipid oxidation compounds compared with SWP from whey bleached before RO. The SWP bleached with benzoyl peroxide after RO contained less benzoic acid than SWP from whey bleached before RO. These results indicate that

  20. One-Pot Procedure for Recovery of Gallic Acid from Wastewater and Encapsulation within Protein Particles.

    PubMed

    Nourbakhsh, Himan; Madadlou, Ashkan; Emam-Djomeh, Zahra; Wang, Yi-Cheng; Gunasekaran, Sundaram; Mousavi, Mohammad E

    2016-02-24

    A whey protein isolate solution was heat-denatured and treated with the enzyme transglutaminase, which cross-linked ≈26% of the amino groups and increased the magnitude of the ζ-potential value. The protein solution was microemulsified, and then the resulting water-in-oil microemulsion was dispersed within a gallic acid-rich model wastewater. Gallic acid extraction by the outlined microemulsion liquid membrane (MLM) from the exterior aqueous phase (wastewater) and accumulation within the internal aqueous nanodroplets induced protein cold-set gelation and resulted in the formation of gallic acid-enveloping nanoparticles. Measurements with a strain-controlled rheometer indicated a progressive increase in the MLM viscosity during gallic acid recovery corresponding to particle formation. The mean hydrodynamic size of the nanoparticles made from the heat-denatured and preheated enzymatically cross-linked proteins was 137 and 122 nm, respectively. The enzymatic cross-linking of whey proteins led to a higher gallic acid recovery yield and increased the glass transition enthalpy and temperature. A similar impact on glass transition indices was observed by the gallic acid-induced nanoparticulation of proteins. Scanning electron microscopy showed the existence of numerous jammed/fused nanoparticles. It was suggested on the basis of the results of Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy that the in situ nanoparticulation of proteins shifted the C-N stretching and C-H bending peaks to higher wavenumbers. X-ray diffraction results proposed a decreased β-sheet content for proteins because of the acid-induced particulation. The nanoparticles made from the enzymatically cross-linked protein were more stable against the in vitro gastrointestinal digestion and retained almost 19% of the entrapped gallic acid after 300 min sequential gastric and intestinal digestions. PMID:26862880

  1. One-Pot Procedure for Recovery of Gallic Acid from Wastewater and Encapsulation within Protein Particles.

    PubMed

    Nourbakhsh, Himan; Madadlou, Ashkan; Emam-Djomeh, Zahra; Wang, Yi-Cheng; Gunasekaran, Sundaram; Mousavi, Mohammad E

    2016-02-24

    A whey protein isolate solution was heat-denatured and treated with the enzyme transglutaminase, which cross-linked ≈26% of the amino groups and increased the magnitude of the ζ-potential value. The protein solution was microemulsified, and then the resulting water-in-oil microemulsion was dispersed within a gallic acid-rich model wastewater. Gallic acid extraction by the outlined microemulsion liquid membrane (MLM) from the exterior aqueous phase (wastewater) and accumulation within the internal aqueous nanodroplets induced protein cold-set gelation and resulted in the formation of gallic acid-enveloping nanoparticles. Measurements with a strain-controlled rheometer indicated a progressive increase in the MLM viscosity during gallic acid recovery corresponding to particle formation. The mean hydrodynamic size of the nanoparticles made from the heat-denatured and preheated enzymatically cross-linked proteins was 137 and 122 nm, respectively. The enzymatic cross-linking of whey proteins led to a higher gallic acid recovery yield and increased the glass transition enthalpy and temperature. A similar impact on glass transition indices was observed by the gallic acid-induced nanoparticulation of proteins. Scanning electron microscopy showed the existence of numerous jammed/fused nanoparticles. It was suggested on the basis of the results of Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy that the in situ nanoparticulation of proteins shifted the C-N stretching and C-H bending peaks to higher wavenumbers. X-ray diffraction results proposed a decreased β-sheet content for proteins because of the acid-induced particulation. The nanoparticles made from the enzymatically cross-linked protein were more stable against the in vitro gastrointestinal digestion and retained almost 19% of the entrapped gallic acid after 300 min sequential gastric and intestinal digestions.

  2. Fuel ethanol and high protein feed from corn and corn-whey mixtures in a farm-scale plant

    SciTech Connect

    Gibbons, W.R.; Westby, C.A.

    1983-09-01

    Distiller's wet grain (DWG) and 95% ethanol were produced from corn in a farm-scale process involving batch cooking-fermentation and continuous distillation-centrifugation. The energy balance was 2.26 and the cost was $1.86/gal (1981 cost). To improve the energy balance and reduce costs, various modifications were made in the plant. The first change, back-end (after liquefaction) serial recycling of stillage supernatant at 20 and 40% strengths, produced beers with 0.2 and 0.4% (v/v) more ethanol, respectively, than without recycling. This increased the energy balance by 0.22-0.43 units and reduced costs by $0.07-$0.10/gal. The DWGs from back-end recycling had increased fat. The second change, increasing the starch content from 17-19% to 27.5%, increased the ethanol in the beer from 10.5-14.9% at a cost savings of $0.41/gal. The energy balance increased by 1.08 units. No significant change was seen in DWG composition. The third change, using continuous cascade rather than batch fermentation, permitted batch-levels of ethanol (10%) in the beer but only at low dilution rates. Both the cost and energy balance were decreased slightly. The DWG composition remained constant. The last change, replacing part of the corn and all of the tap water in the mash with whole whey and using Kluyveromyces fragilis instead of Saccharomyces cerevisiae during fermentation, resulted in an energy balance increase of 0.16 units and a $0.27/gal cost reduction. Here, 10% ethanolic beers were produced and the DWGs showed increased protein and fat. Recommendations for farm-scale plants are provided.

  3. Fuel ethanol and high protein feed from corn and corn-whey mixtures in a farm-scale plant

    SciTech Connect

    Gibbons, W.R.; Westby, C.A.

    1983-09-01

    Distiller's wet grain (DWG) and 95% ethanol were produced from corn in a farm-scale process involving batch cooking-fermentation and continuous distillation-centrifugation. The energy balance was 2.26 and the cost was $1.86/gal (1981 cost). To improve the energy balance and reduce costs, various modifications were made in the plant. The first change, back-end (after liquefaction) serial recycling of stillage supernatant at 20 and 40% strengths, produced beers with 0.2 and 0.4% (v/v) more ethanol, respectively, than without recycling. This increased the energy balance by 0.22-0.43 units and reduced costs by $0.07-$0.10/gal. The DWGs from back-end recycling had increased fat. The second change, increasing the starch content from 17-19% to 27.5%, increased the ethanol in the beer from 10.5-14.9% at a cost savings of $0.41/gal. The energy balance increased by 1.08 units. No significant change was seen in DWG composition. The third change, using continuous cascade rather than batch fermentation, permitted batch-levels of ethanol (10%) in the beer but only at low dilution rates. Both the cost and energy balance were decreased slightly. The DWG composition remained constant. The last change, replacing part of the corn and all of the tap water in the mash with whole whey and using Kluyveromyces fragilis instead of Saccharomyces cerevisiae during fermentation, resulted in an energy balance increase of 0.16 units and a $0.27/gal cost reduction. Here, 10% ethanolic beers were produced and the DWGs showed increased protein and fat. Recommendations for farm-scale plants are provided. (Refs. 46).

  4. Tocotrienols and Whey Protein Isolates Substantially Increase Exercise Endurance Capacity in Diet -Induced Obese Male Sprague-Dawley Rats

    PubMed Central

    Aguila, Jay; McConell, Glenn K.; McAinch, Andrew J.; Mathai, Michael L.

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aims Obesity and impairments in metabolic health are associated with reductions in exercise capacity. Both whey protein isolates (WPIs) and vitamin E tocotrienols (TCTs) exert favorable effects on obesity-related metabolic parameters. This research sought to determine whether these supplements improved exercise capacity and increased glucose tolerance in diet-induced obese rats. Methods Six week old male rats (n = 35) weighing 187 ± 32g were allocated to either: Control (n = 9), TCT (n = 9), WPI (n = 8) or TCT + WPI (n = 9) and placed on a high-fat diet (40% of energy from fat) for 10 weeks. Animals received 50mg/kg body weight and 8% of total energy intake per day of TCTs and/or WPIs respectively. Food intake, body composition, glucose tolerance, insulin sensitivity, exercise capacity, skeletal muscle glycogen content and oxidative enzyme activity were determined. Results Both TCT and WPI groups ran >50% longer (2271 ± 185m and 2195 ± 265m respectively) than the Control group (1428 ± 139m) during the run to exhaustion test (P<0.05), TCT + WPI did not further improve exercise endurance (2068 ± 104m). WPIs increased the maximum in vitro activity of beta-hydroxyacyl-CoA in the soleus muscle (P<0.05 vs. Control) but not in the plantaris. Citrate synthase activity was not different between groups. Neither supplement had any effect on weight gain, adiposity, glucose tolerance or insulin sensitivity. Conclusion Ten weeks of both TCTs and WPIs increased exercise endurance by 50% in sedentary, diet-induced obese rats. These positive effects of TCTs and WPIs were independent of body weight, adiposity or glucose tolerance. PMID:27058737

  5. Comparative study of denaturation of whey protein isolate (WPI) in convective air drying and isothermal heat treatment processes.

    PubMed

    Haque, M Amdadul; Aldred, Peter; Chen, Jie; Barrow, Colin J; Adhikari, Benu

    2013-11-15

    The extent and nature of denaturation of whey protein isolate (WPI) in convective air drying environments was measured and analysed using single droplet drying. A custom-built, single droplet drying instrument was used for this purpose. Single droplets having 5±0.1μl volume (initial droplet diameter 1.5±0.1mm) containing 10% (w/v) WPI were dried at air temperatures of 45, 65 and 80°C for 600s at constant air velocity of 0.5m/s. The extent and nature of denaturation of WPI in isothermal heat treatment processes was measured at 65 and 80°C for 600s and compared with those obtained from convective air drying. The extent of denaturation of WPI in a high hydrostatic pressure environment (600MPa for 600s) was also determined. The results showed that at the end of 600s of convective drying at 65°C the denaturation of WPI was 68.3%, while it was only 10.8% during isothermal heat treatment at the same medium temperature. When the medium temperature was maintained at 80°C, the denaturation loss of WPI was 90.0% and 68.7% during isothermal heat treatment and convective drying, respectively. The bovine serum albumin (BSA) fraction of WPI was found to be more stable in the convective drying conditions than β-lactoglobulin and α-lactalbumin, especially at longer drying times. The extent of denaturation of WPI in convective air drying (65 and 80°C) and isotheral heat treatment (80°C) for 600s was found to be higher than its denaturation in a high hydrostatic pressure environment at ambient temperature (600MPa for 600s).

  6. Physical properties of emulsion-based hydroxypropyl methylcellulose/whey protein isolate (HPMC/WPI) edible films.

    PubMed

    Rubilar, Javiera F; Zúñiga, Rommy N; Osorio, Fernando; Pedreschi, Franco

    2015-06-01

    The objective of this research was to study the effect of the film microstructure of oil-in-water emulsions stabilized by hydroxypropyl methyl cellulose/whey protein isolate (HPMC/WPI) with or without sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) over physical properties of HPMC/WPI emulsion-based films. The films were prepared with different HPMC/WPI-oil-SDS combinations (%w/w for 100g of dispersion): HPMC; WPI; HPMC/1WPI-0.5-SDS; HPMC/1WPI-1; HPMC/2WPI-0.5; HPMC/2WPI-1-SDS. Physical properties of films were evaluated. The results showed no statistical differences (p>0.05) between the thicknesses of EFs (0.156 ± 0.004 mm). The effect of oil content and incorporation of SDS showed the inverse trend for WI and ΔE, the increasing order of change, for WI and ΔE, among the formulation evaluated was: HPMC/1WPI-1>HPMC/2WPI-0.5>HPMC/2WPI-1.0-SDS≈HPMC/1WPI-0.5-SDS≈WPI>HPMC for WI and HPMC/1WPI-0.5-SDS>HPMC/2WPI-1.0-SDS>HPMC/2WPI-0.5>HPMC/1WPI-1 for ΔE, respectively. The addition of oil and SDS decreased the TS and EB, because oil addition into EF induces the development of structural discontinuities, producing an EF with less chain mobility, and consequently, with less flexibility and resistance to fracture.

  7. The decrease in the IgG-binding capacity of intensively dry heated whey proteins is associated with intense Maillard reaction, structural changes of the proteins and formation of RAGE-ligands.

    PubMed

    Liu, Fahui; Teodorowicz, Małgorzata; van Boekel, Martinus A J S; Wichers, Harry J; Hettinga, Kasper A

    2016-01-01

    Heat treatment is the most common way of milk processing, inducing structural changes as well as chemical modifications in milk proteins. These modifications influence the immune-reactivity and allergenicity of milk proteins. This study shows the influence of dry heating on the solubility, particle size, loss of accessible thiol and amino groups, degree of Maillard reaction, IgG-binding capacity and binding to the receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE) of thermally treated and glycated whey proteins. A mixture of whey proteins and lactose was dry heated at 130 °C up to 20 min to mimic the baking process in two different water activities, 0.23 to mimic the heating in the dry state and 0.59 for the semi-dry state. The dry heating was accompanied by a loss of soluble proteins and an increase in the size of dissolved aggregates. Most of the Maillard reaction sites were found to be located in the reported conformational epitope area on whey proteins. Therefore the structural changes, including exposure of the SH group, SH-SS exchange, covalent cross-links and the loss of available lysine, subsequently resulted in a decreased IgG-binding capacity (up to 33%). The binding of glycation products to RAGE increased with the heating time, which was correlated with the stage of the Maillard reaction and the decrease in the IgG-binding capacity. The RAGE-binding capacity was higher in samples with a lower water activity (0.23). These results indicate that the intensive dry heating of whey proteins as it occurs during baking may be of importance to the immunological properties of allergens in cow's milk, both due to chemical modifications of the allergens and formation of AGEs.

  8. Co-Ingestion of Whey Protein with a Carbohydrate-Rich Breakfast Does Not Affect Glycemia, Insulinemia or Subjective Appetite Following a Subsequent Meal in Healthy Males

    PubMed Central

    Allerton, Dean M.; Campbell, Matthew D.; Gonzalez, Javier T.; Rumbold, Penny L. S.; West, Daniel J.; Stevenson, Emma J.

    2016-01-01

    We aimed to assess postprandial metabolic and appetite responses to a mixed-macronutrient lunch following prior addition of whey protein to a carbohydrate-rich breakfast. Ten healthy males (age: 24 ± 1 years; body mass index (BMI): 24.5 ± 0.7 kg/m2) completed three trials in a non-isocaloric, crossover design. A carbohydrate-rich breakfast (93 g carbohydrate; 1799 kJ) was consumed with (CHO + WP) or without (CHO) 20 g whey protein isolate (373 kJ), or breakfast was omitted (NB). At 180 min, participants consumed a mixed-macronutrient lunch meal. Venous blood was sampled at 15 min intervals following each meal and every 30 min thereafter, while subjective appetite sensations were collected every 30 min throughout. Post-breakfast insulinemia was greater after CHO + WP (time-averaged area under the curve (AUC0–180 min): 193.1 ± 26.3 pmol/L), compared to CHO (154.7 ± 18.5 pmol/L) and NB (46.1 ± 8.0 pmol/L; p < 0.05), with no difference in post-breakfast (0–180 min) glycemia (CHO + WP, 3.8 ± 0.2 mmol/L; CHO, 4.2 ± 0.2 mmol/L; NB, 4.2 ± 0.1 mmol/L; p = 0.247). There were no post-lunch (0–180 min) effects of condition on glycemia (p = 0.492), insulinemia (p = 0.338) or subjective appetite (p > 0.05). Adding whey protein to a carbohydrate-rich breakfast enhanced the acute postprandial insulin response, without influencing metabolic or appetite responses following a subsequent mixed-macronutrient meal. PMID:26927166

  9. Co-Ingestion of Whey Protein with a Carbohydrate-Rich Breakfast Does Not Affect Glycemia, Insulinemia or Subjective Appetite Following a Subsequent Meal in Healthy Males.

    PubMed

    Allerton, Dean M; Campbell, Matthew D; Gonzalez, Javier T; Rumbold, Penny L S; West, Daniel J; Stevenson, Emma J

    2016-03-01

    We aimed to assess postprandial metabolic and appetite responses to a mixed-macronutrient lunch following prior addition of whey protein to a carbohydrate-rich breakfast. Ten healthy males (age: 24 ± 1 years; body mass index (BMI): 24.5 ± 0.7 kg/m²) completed three trials in a non-isocaloric, crossover design. A carbohydrate-rich breakfast (93 g carbohydrate; 1799 kJ) was consumed with (CHO + WP) or without (CHO) 20 g whey protein isolate (373 kJ), or breakfast was omitted (NB). At 180 min, participants consumed a mixed-macronutrient lunch meal. Venous blood was sampled at 15 min intervals following each meal and every 30 min thereafter, while subjective appetite sensations were collected every 30 min throughout. Post-breakfast insulinemia was greater after CHO + WP (time-averaged area under the curve (AUC0--180 min): 193.1 ± 26.3 pmol/L), compared to CHO (154.7 ± 18.5 pmol/L) and NB (46.1 ± 8.0 pmol/L; p < 0.05), with no difference in post-breakfast (0-180 min) glycemia (CHO + WP, 3.8 ± 0.2 mmol/L; CHO, 4.2 ± 0.2 mmol/L; NB, 4.2 ± 0.1 mmol/L; p = 0.247). There were no post-lunch (0-180 min) effects of condition on glycemia (p = 0.492), insulinemia (p = 0.338) or subjective appetite (p > 0.05). Adding whey protein to a carbohydrate-rich breakfast enhanced the acute postprandial insulin response, without influencing metabolic or appetite responses following a subsequent mixed-macronutrient meal. PMID:26927166

  10. Effect of whey and casein protein hydrolysates on rheological, textural and sensory properties of cookies.

    PubMed

    Gani, Adil; Broadway, A A; Ahmad, Mudasir; Ashwar, Bilal Ahmad; Wani, Ali Abas; Wani, Sajad Mohd; Masoodi, F A; Khatkar, Bupinder Singh

    2015-09-01

    Milk proteins were hydrolyzed by papain and their effect on the rheological, textural and sensory properties of cookies were investigated. Water absorption (%) decreased significantly as the amount of milk protein concentrates and hydrolysates increased up to a level of 15 % in the wheat flour. Dough extensibility decreased with inrease in parental proteins and their hydrolysates in wheat flour, significantly. Similarly, the pasting properties also varied significantly in direct proportion to the quantity added in the wheat flour. The colour difference (ΔE) of cookies supplemented with milk protein concentrates and hydrolysates were significantly higher than cookies prepared from control. Physical and sensory characteristics of cookies at 5 % level of supplementation were found to be acceptable. Also the scores assigned by the judges for texture and colour were in good agreement with the measurements derived from the physical tests.

  11. Milk whey protein modification by coffee-specific phenolics: effect on structural and functional properties.

    PubMed

    Ali, Mostafa; Homann, Thomas; Khalil, Mahmoud; Kruse, Hans-Peter; Rawel, Harshadrai

    2013-07-17

    A suitable vehicle for integration of bioactive plant constituents is proposed. It involves modification of proteins using phenolics and applying these for protection of labile constituents. It dissects the noncovalent and covalent interactions of β-lactoglobulin with coffee-specific phenolics. Alkaline and polyphenol oxidase modulated covalent reactions were compared. Tryptic digestion combined with MALDI-TOF-MS provided tentative allocation of the modification type and site in the protein, and an in silico modeling of modified β-lactoglobulin is proposed. The modification delivers proteins with enhanced antioxidative properties. Changed structural properties and differences in solubility, surface hydrophobicity, and emulsification were observed. The polyphenol oxidase modulated reaction provides a modified β-lactoglobulin with a high antioxidative power, is thermally more stable, requires less energy to unfold, and, when emulsified with lutein esters, exhibits their higher stability against UV light. Thus, adaptation of this modification provides an innovative approach for functionalizing proteins and their uses in the food industry.

  12. Efficacy of sweet whey containing final dips in reducing protein oxidation in retail-cut cubed beefsteak

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Oxidative degradation results in extensive deterioration of shelf-life and quality of retail-cut muscle foods. Use of antioxidants, especially the ones of natural origin, can markedly reduce this process without adverse health consequences to the consumer. Sweet whey originating from Cheddar (CW) an...

  13. Evaluation of the thermal history of bovine milk from the lactosylation of whey proteins: an investigation by liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Losito, Ilario; Carbonara, Teresa; Monaci, Linda; Palmisano, Francesco

    2007-12-01

    Reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography coupled to electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (RP-HPLC-ESI-MS) has been used for analysis of the native and lactosylated forms of the main whey proteins, alpha-lactalbumin and beta-lactoglobulins A and B, in commercial bovine milk samples after different thermal treatment (pasteurisation and ultra high-temperature, UHT, treatment), of different lipid content, and of different brands, to find markers of the thermal history of the milk. A new quantification strategy was developed, based on peak-area integration after multiple ion current extraction and considering all the ions detectable in the multi-charge ESI mass spectrum for each type of protein. Validation of the procedure for native forms was first accomplished by calibration with model solutions. Linearity was always good. Sensitivity was different for alpha-lactalbumin and beta-lactoglobulins; the signal was stronger for the latter with only a slight difference between variants A and B of beta-lactoglobulins. Application of the quantification approach to pasteurised and UHT milk samples showed that the distributions of the three proteins and of their three main forms (native, and mono and bi-lactosylated) in whey extracts can be used as statistically robust discriminatory properties for recognition of commercial thermal treatment of milk. PMID:17673990

  14. Effects of Pre-Meal Drinks with Protein and Amino Acids on Glycemic and Metabolic Responses at a Subsequent Composite Meal

    PubMed Central

    Gunnerud, Ulrika J.; Heinzle, Cornelia; Holst, Jens J.; Östman, Elin M.; Björck, Inger M. E.

    2012-01-01

    Background Whey proteins have insulinogenic properties and the effect appears to originate from a specific postprandial plasma amino acid pattern. The insulinogenic effect can be mimicked by a specific mixture of the five amino acids iso, leu, lys, thr and val. Objective The objective was to evaluate the efficacy of pre-meal boluses of whey or soy protein with or without added amino acids on glycaemia, insulinemia as well as on plasma responses of incretins and amino acids at a subsequent composite meal. Additionally, plasma ghrelin and subjective appetite responses were studied. Design In randomized order, fourteen healthy volunteers were served a standardized composite ham sandwich meal with either water provided (250 ml) during the time course of the meal, or different pre-meal protein drinks (PMPD) (100 ml provided as a bolus) with additional water (150 ml) served to the meal. The PMPDs contained 9 g protein and were based on either whey or soy protein isolates, with or without addition of the five amino acids (iso, leu, lys, thr and val) or the five amino acids + arg. Results All PMPD meals significantly reduced incremental area for plasma glucose response (iAUC) during the first 60 min. All whey based PMPD meals displayed lower glycemic indices compared to the reference meal. There were no significant differences for the insulinemic indices. The early insulin response (iAUC 0–15 min) correlated positively to plasma amino acids, GIP and GLP-1 as well as to the glycemic profile. Additionally, inverse correlations were found between insulin iAUC 0–15 min and the glucose peak. Conclusion The data suggests that a pre-meal drink containing specific proteins/amino acids significantly reduces postprandial glycemia following a composite meal, in absence of elevated insulinemic excursions. An early phase insulinemic response induced by plasma amino acids and incretins appears to mediate the effect. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01586780 PMID

  15. Study of human allergic milk whey protein from different mammalian species using computational method

    PubMed Central

    Dixit, Shikha Jaiprakash; KK, Appu Kuttan; Singh, Kiran

    2012-01-01

    Nowadays, safety and quality assessment of food used for human consumption have to consider by its possible contribution to the maintenance or improvement of the consumer's health. Milk is an important food with many nutrients. Cow milk is an important source of energy, protein, vitamins and minerals for the growing child as well as adults. But, numerous cow milk proteins have been implicated in allergic responses and most of these have been shown to contain multiple allergic epitopes. The present study disclosed best alternatives to cow milk, which are not allergic and as good as cow milk in nutritional value. The in silico analysis of casein (alpha s1, alpha s2, beta and kappa) and beta-lactoglobulin, unveils that sheep milk is a more suitable alternate to cow milk for allergic infants and buffalo milk for allergic adult humans. PMID:23275703

  16. Use of microparticulated whey protein concentrate, exopolysaccharide-producing Streptococcus thermophilus, and adjunct cultures for making low-fat Italian Caciotta-type cheese.

    PubMed

    Di Cagno, R; De Pasquale, I; De Angelis, M; Buchin, S; Rizzello, C G; Gobbetti, M

    2014-01-01

    Low-fat Caciotta-type cheeses were manufactured with partially skim milk (fat content of ~0.3%) alone (LFC); with the supplementation of 0.5% (wt/vol) microparticulated whey protein concentrate (MWPC) (LFC-MWPC); with MWPC and exopolysaccharides (EPS)-producing Streptococcus thermophilus ST446 (LFC-MWPC-EPS); and with MWPC, EPS-producing strain ST446, and Lactobacillus plantarum LP and Lactobacillus rhamnosus LRA as adjunct cultures (LFC-MWPC-EPS-A). The non-EPS-producing isogenic variant Streptococcus thermophilus ST042 was used for making full-fat Caciotta-type cheese (FFC), LFC, and LFC-MWPC. Cheeses were characterized based on compositional, microbiological, biochemical, texture, volatile components (purge and trap, and solid-phase microextraction coupled with gas chromatography-mass spectrometry), and sensory analyses. Compared with FFC and LFC (51.6 ± 0.7 to 53.0 ± 0.9%), the other cheese variants retained higher levels of moisture (60.5 ± 1.1 to 67.5 ± 0.5%). The MWPC mainly contributed to moisture retention. Overall, all LFC had approximately one-fourth (22.6 ± 0.8%) of the fat of FFC. Hardness of cheeses slightly varied over 7d of ripening. Microbial EPS positively affected cheese texture, and the texture of LFC without MWPC or microbial EPS was excessively firm. Free amino acids were at the highest levels in LFC treatments (2,705.8 ± 122 to 3,070.4 ± 123 mg/kg) due to the addition of MWPC and the peptidase activity of adjunct cultures. Aldehydes, alcohols, ketones, sulfur compounds, and short- to medium-chain carboxylic acids differentiated LFC variants and FFC. The sensory attributes pleasant to taste, intensity of flavor, overall acceptability, and pleasant to chew variously described LFC-MWPC-EPS and LFC-MWPC-EPS-A. Based on the technology options used, low-fat Caciotta-type cheese (especially ripened for 14 d) has promising features to be further exploited as a suitable alternative to the full-fat variant.

  17. Chitosan/whey Protein (CWP) Edible Films Efficiency for Controlling Mould Growth and on Microbiological, Chemical and Sensory Properties During Storage of Göbek Kashar Cheese.

    PubMed

    Yangılar, Filiz

    2015-01-01

    The objective of present study was to evaluate the effects of the application of chitosan and chitosan/whey protein on the chemical, microbial and organoleptic properties of Göbek Kashar cheese during ripening time (on 3(rd), 30(th), 60(th) and 90(th) d). Difference in microbiological and chemical changes between samples was found to be significant (p<0.05) during ripening period. Cheese samples with edible coating had statistically lower mould counts compared to the uncoated samples. Furthermore the highest and lowest mould counts were determined in control (4.20 Log CFU/g) and other samples (<1 Log CFU/g) at 60(th) and 90(th) d of storage. All samples exhibited higher levels of water soluble nitrogen and ripening index at the end of storage process. At the end of 90 day storage period, no signicant dierences in salt and fat values were observed among the cheeses studied. The edible coatings had a beneficial effect on the sensory quality of cheese samples. In the result of sensory analysis, while cheese C and the chitosan coated cheese samples were more preferred by the panellists, the chitosan/whey protein film-coated cheese samples received the lowest scores. This study shows coating suggests could be used to improve the quality of cheese during ripening time. PMID:26761831

  18. Chitosan/whey Protein (CWP) Edible Films Efficiency for Controlling Mould Growth and on Microbiological, Chemical and Sensory Properties During Storage of Göbek Kashar Cheese

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The objective of present study was to evaluate the effects of the application of chitosan and chitosan/whey protein on the chemical, microbial and organoleptic properties of Göbek Kashar cheese during ripening time (on 3rd, 30th, 60th and 90th d). Difference in microbiological and chemical changes between samples was found to be significant (p<0.05) during ripening period. Cheese samples with edible coating had statistically lower mould counts compared to the uncoated samples. Furthermore the highest and lowest mould counts were determined in control (4.20 Log CFU/g) and other samples (<1 Log CFU/g) at 60th and 90th d of storage. All samples exhibited higher levels of water soluble nitrogen and ripening index at the end of storage process. At the end of 90 day storage period, no signicant dierences in salt and fat values were observed among the cheeses studied. The edible coatings had a beneficial effect on the sensory quality of cheese samples. In the result of sensory analysis, while cheese C and the chitosan coated cheese samples were more preferred by the panellists, the chitosan/whey protein film-coated cheese samples received the lowest scores. This study shows coating suggests could be used to improve the quality of cheese during ripening time. PMID:26761831

  19. Effect of the addition of conventional additives and whey proteins concentrates on technological parameters, physicochemical properties, microstructure and sensory attributes of sous vide cooked beef muscles.

    PubMed

    Szerman, N; Gonzalez, C B; Sancho, A M; Grigioni, G; Carduza, F; Vaudagna, S R

    2012-03-01

    Beef muscles submitted to four enhancement treatments (1.88% whey protein concentrate (WPC)+1.25% sodium chloride (NaCl); 1.88% modified whey protein concentrate (MWPC)+1.25%NaCl; 0.25% sodium tripolyphosphate (STPP)+1.25%NaCl; 1.25%NaCl) and a control treatment (non-injected muscles) were sous vide cooked. Muscles with STPP+NaCl presented a significantly higher total yield (106.5%) in comparison to those with WPC/MWPC+NaCl (94.7% and 92.9%, respectively), NaCl alone (84.8%) or controls (72.1%). Muscles with STPP+NaCl presented significantly lower shear force values than control ones; also, WPC/MWPC+NaCl added muscles presented similar values than those from the other treatments. After cooking, muscles with STPP+NaCl or WPC/MWPC+NaCl depicted compacted and uniform microstructures. Muscles with STPP+NaCl showed a pink colour, meanwhile other treatment muscles presented colours between pinkish-grey and grey-brown. STPP+NaCl added samples presented the highest values of global tenderness and juiciness. The addition of STPP+NaCl had a better performance than WPC/MWPC+NaCl. However, the addition of WPC/MWPC+NaCl improved total yield in comparison to NaCl added or control ones. PMID:22112522

  20. Effect of the addition of conventional additives and whey proteins concentrates on technological parameters, physicochemical properties, microstructure and sensory attributes of sous vide cooked beef muscles.

    PubMed

    Szerman, N; Gonzalez, C B; Sancho, A M; Grigioni, G; Carduza, F; Vaudagna, S R

    2012-03-01

    Beef muscles submitted to four enhancement treatments (1.88% whey protein concentrate (WPC)+1.25% sodium chloride (NaCl); 1.88% modified whey protein concentrate (MWPC)+1.25%NaCl; 0.25% sodium tripolyphosphate (STPP)+1.25%NaCl; 1.25%NaCl) and a control treatment (non-injected muscles) were sous vide cooked. Muscles with STPP+NaCl presented a significantly higher total yield (106.5%) in comparison to those with WPC/MWPC+NaCl (94.7% and 92.9%, respectively), NaCl alone (84.8%) or controls (72.1%). Muscles with STPP+NaCl presented significantly lower shear force values than control ones; also, WPC/MWPC+NaCl added muscles presented similar values than those from the other treatments. After cooking, muscles with STPP+NaCl or WPC/MWPC+NaCl depicted compacted and uniform microstructures. Muscles with STPP+NaCl showed a pink colour, meanwhile other treatment muscles presented colours between pinkish-grey and grey-brown. STPP+NaCl added samples presented the highest values of global tenderness and juiciness. The addition of STPP+NaCl had a better performance than WPC/MWPC+NaCl. However, the addition of WPC/MWPC+NaCl improved total yield in comparison to NaCl added or control ones.

  1. Implications of partial conjugation of whey protein isolate to durian seed gum through Maillard reactions: foaming properties, water holding capacity and interfacial activity.

    PubMed

    Amid, Bahareh Tabatabaee; Mirhosseini, Hamed; Poorazarang, Hashem; Mortazavi, Seyed Ali

    2013-01-01

    This paper deals with the conjugation of durian seed gum (DSG) with whey protein isolate (WPI) through Maillard reactions. Subsequently, the functional properties of durian seed gum in the non-conjugated (control sample) and conjugated forms were compared with several commercial gums (i.e., Arabic gum, sodium alginate, kappa carrageenan, guar gum, and pectin). The current study revealed that the conjugation of durian seed gum with whey protein isolate significantly (p < 0.05) improved its foaming properties. In this study, the conjugated durian seed gum produced the most stable foam among all samples. On the other hand, the emulsion stabilized with the conjugated durian seed gum also showed more uniform particles with a larger specific surface area than the emulsion containing the non-conjugated durian seed gum. The conjugated durian seed gum showed significant different foaming properties, specific surface area, particle uniformity and water holding capacity (WHC) as compared to the target polysaccharide gums. The conjugated durian seed gum showed more similar functional properties to Arabic gum rather than other studied gums.

  2. Chitosan/whey Protein (CWP) Edible Films Efficiency for Controlling Mould Growth and on Microbiological, Chemical and Sensory Properties During Storage of Göbek Kashar Cheese.

    PubMed

    Yangılar, Filiz

    2015-01-01

    The objective of present study was to evaluate the effects of the application of chitosan and chitosan/whey protein on the chemical, microbial and organoleptic properties of Göbek Kashar cheese during ripening time (on 3(rd), 30(th), 60(th) and 90(th) d). Difference in microbiological and chemical changes between samples was found to be significant (p<0.05) during ripening period. Cheese samples with edible coating had statistically lower mould counts compared to the uncoated samples. Furthermore the highest and lowest mould counts were determined in control (4.20 Log CFU/g) and other samples (<1 Log CFU/g) at 60(th) and 90(th) d of storage. All samples exhibited higher levels of water soluble nitrogen and ripening index at the end of storage process. At the end of 90 day storage period, no signicant dierences in salt and fat values were observed among the cheeses studied. The edible coatings had a beneficial effect on the sensory quality of cheese samples. In the result of sensory analysis, while cheese C and the chitosan coated cheese samples were more preferred by the panellists, the chitosan/whey protein film-coated cheese samples received the lowest scores. This study shows coating suggests could be used to improve the quality of cheese during ripening time.

  3. Identification of adulteration in water buffalo mozzarella and in ewe cheese by using whey proteins as biomarkers and matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Cozzolino, R; Passalacqua, S; Salemi, S; Garozzo, D

    2002-09-01

    A rapid and accurate method to identify bovine and ewe milk adulteration of fresh water buffalo mozzarella cheese by using matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOFMS) is described. The differentiation among mozzarella made from water buffalo milk and from mixtures of less expensive bovine and, more recently, ewe milk with water buffalo milk is achieved using whey proteins, alpha-lactalbumin and beta-lactoglobulins as molecular markers. It is worth noting that the method proposed here is, to our knowledge, the first strategy able to characterize possible fraudulent additions of ewe milk in samples of water buffalo milk devoted to the production of water buffalo mozzarella cheese. In addition, a linear relationship was found between the relative response of the molecular ion and the abundance of the analysed whey proteins. This demonstrates that this approach can be used to determine the amount of bovine or ovine milk added to water buffalo milk employed for mozzarella cheese production. Furthermore, this method also appears suitable for the analysis of ewe cheese. Hence these findings open the way to a new field for mass spectrometry in the evaluation of possible fraudulence in dairy industry production.

  4. Whey protein preloads are more beneficial than soy protein preloads in regulating appetite, calorie intake, anthropometry, and body composition of overweight and obese men.

    PubMed

    Tahavorgar, Atefeh; Vafa, Mohammadreza; Shidfar, Farzad; Gohari, Mahmoodreza; Heydari, Iraj

    2014-10-01

    High-protein diets exert beneficial effects on appetite, anthropometry, and body composition; however, the effects of protein preloads depend on the amount, type, and time of consumption. Therefore, we hypothesized that long-term supplemental preloads of whey protein concentrate (WPC) and soy protein isolate (SPI) consumed 30 minutes before the largest meal would decrease appetite, calorie intake (CI), and anthropometry and improve body composition in overweight and obese men in free-living conditions. The subjects included 45 men with a body mass index between 25 and 40 kg/m(2) and who were randomly allocated to either the WPC (n = 26) or SPI (n = 19) groups. For 12 weeks, the subjects consumed 65 g WPC or 60 g SPI that was dissolved in 500 mL water 30 minutes before their ad libitum lunch. Appetite, CI, anthropometry, and body composition were assessed before and after the study and biweekly throughout. After 12 weeks, mean changes between the groups were significant for appetite (P = .032), CI (P = .045), anthropometry (body weight [P = .008], body mass index [P = .006], and waist circumference), and body composition (body fat mass and lean muscle [P < .001]). Relative to baseline, within-group mean changes from WPC were significant for appetite, CI, anthropometry, and body composition (P < .001). In the SPI group, mean changes were significant, relative to baseline, for all variables except lean muscle (P = .37). According to this 12-week study, WPC preloads conducted 30 minutes prior to the ad libitum main meal exerted stronger beneficial effects than did SPI preloads on appetite, CI, anthropometry, and body composition of free-living overweight and obese men.

  5. The Effects of Pre- and Post-Exercise Whey vs. Casein Protein Consumption on Body Composition and Performance Measures in Collegiate Female Athletes.

    PubMed

    Wilborn, Colin D; Taylor, Lem W; Outlaw, Jordan; Williams, Laura; Campbell, Bill; Foster, Cliffa A; Smith-Ryan, Abbie; Urbina, Stacie; Hayward, Sara

    2013-01-01

    Two of the most popular forms of protein on the market are whey and casein. Both proteins are derived from milk but each protein differs in absorption rate and bioavailability, thus it is possible that each type of protein may contribute differently to the adaptations elicited through resistance training. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to investigate the potential effects of ingestion of two types of protein in conjunction with a controlled resistance training program in collegiate female basketball players. Sixteen NCAA Division III female basketball players were matched according to body mass and randomly assigned in a double-blind manner to consume 24 g whey protein (WP) (N = 8, 20.0 ± 1.9 years, 1.58 ± 0.27 m, 66. 0 ± 4.9 kg, 27.0 ± 4.9 %BF) or 24 g casein protein (CP) (N = 8, 21.0 ± 2.8 years, 1.53 ± 0.29 m, 68.0 ± 2.9 kg, 25.0 ± 5.7 %BF) immediately pre- and post-exercise for eight weeks. Subjects participated in a supervised 4-day per week undulating periodized training program. At 0 and 8 weeks, subjects underwent DXA body composition analysis, and at 0 and 8 weeks underwent one repetition maximum (1RM) strength, muscle endurance, vertical jump, 5-10-5 agility run, and broad jump testing sessions. Data were analyzed using repeated measures ANOVA, and presented as mean ± SD changes from baseline after 60 days. No significant group x time interaction effects were observed among groups in changes in any variable (p > 0.05). A significant time effect was observed for body fat (WP: -2.0 ± 1.1 %BF; CP: -1.0 ± 1.6 %BF, p < 0.001), lean mass (WP: 1.5 ± 1.0 kg; CP: 1. 4 ± 1.0 kg, p < 0.001), fat mass (WP: -1.3 ± 1.2 kg; CP: -0.6 ± 1.4 kg, p < 0.001), leg press 1RM (WP: 88.7 ± 43.9 kg; CP: 90.0 ± 48.5 kg, p < 0.001), bench press 1RM (WP: 7.5 ± 4.6 kg; CP: 4.3 ± 4.5 kg, p = 0.01), vertical jump (WP: 4.1 ± 1.8 cm; CP: 3.5 ± 7.6 cm, p < 0.001), 5-10-5 (WP: -0.3 ± 0.2 sec; CP: -0.09 ± 0.42 sec, p < 0.001), and broad jump (WP: 10.4 ± 6

  6. Cold enzymatic bleaching of fluid whey.

    PubMed

    Campbell, R E; Drake, M A

    2013-01-01

    Chemical bleaching of fluid whey and retentate with hydrogen peroxide (HP) alone requires high concentrations (100-500 mg of HP/kg) and recent studies have demonstrated that off-flavors are generated during chemical bleaching that carry through to spray-dried whey proteins. Bleaching of fluid whey and retentate with enzymes such as naturally present lactoperoxidase or an exogenous commercial peroxidase (EP) at cold temperatures (4°C) may be a viable alternative to traditional chemical bleaching of whey. The objective of this study was to determine the optimum level of HP for enzymatic bleaching (both lactoperoxidase and EP) at 4°C and to compare bleaching efficacy and sensory characteristics to HP chemical bleaching at 4°C. Selected treatments were subsequently applied for whey protein concentrate with 80% protein (WPC80) manufacture. Fluid Cheddar whey and retentate (80% protein) were manufactured in triplicate from pasteurized whole milk. The optimum concentration of HP (0 to 250 mg/kg) to activate enzymatic bleaching at 4°C was determined by quantifying the loss of norbixin. In subsequent experiments, bleaching efficacy, descriptive sensory analysis, and volatile compounds were monitored at selected time points. A control with no bleaching was also evaluated. Enzymatic bleaching of fluid whey and retentate at 4°C resulted in faster bleaching and higher bleaching efficacy (color loss) than bleaching with HP alone at 250 mg/kg. Due to concentrated levels of naturally present lactoperoxidase, retentate bleached to completion (>80% norbixin destruction in 30 min) faster than fluid whey at 4°C (>80% norbixin destruction in 12h). In fluid whey, the addition of EP decreased bleaching time. Spray-dried WPC80 from bleached wheys, regardless of bleaching treatment, were characterized by a lack of sweet aromatic and buttery flavors, and the presence of cardboard flavor concurrent with higher relative abundance of 1-octen-3-ol and 1-octen-3-one. Among enzymatically

  7. Cell-free supernatants obtained from fermentation of cheese whey hydrolyzates and phenylpyruvic acid by Lactobacillus plantarum as a source of antimicrobial compounds, bacteriocins, and natural aromas.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Pazo, Noelia; Vázquez-Araújo, Laura; Pérez-Rodríguez, Noelia; Cortés-Diéguez, Sandra; Domínguez, José Manuel

    2013-10-01

    Cheese whey hydrolyzates supplemented with phenylpyruvic acid (PPA) and commercial nutrients can be efficiently metabolized by Lactobacillus plantarum CECT-221 to biosynthesize some compounds with attractive applications in the food market. The main metabolites of cell-free extracts were antimicrobial compounds such as phenyllactic acid (PLA) and lactic acid (LA). The production of PLA by L. plantarum CECT-221 was evaluated in the Man-Rogosa-Sharpe broth supplemented with two biosynthetic precursors: phenylalanine or PPA. Using 30.5 mM PPA, the microorganism increased sevenfold the concentration of PLA producing 16.4 mM PLA in 46 h. A concentration of 40 mM PPA was a threshold to avoid substrate inhibition. The biosynthesis of whey hydrolyzates as a carbon source was enhanced by fed-batch fermentation of PPA; the average productivity of PLA increased up to 45.4 ± 3.02 mM after 120 h with a product yield of 0.244 mM mM(-1); meanwhile, LA reached 26.1 ± 1.3 g L(-1) with a product yield of 0.72 g g(-1). Cell-free fed-batch extracts charged in wells showed bacteriocin activity with halos of 7.49 ± 1.44 mm in plates inoculated with Carnobacterium piscicola and antimicrobial activity against Staphylococcus aureus (11.54 ± 1.14 mm), Pseudomonas aeruginosa (10.17 ± 2.46 mm), Listeria monocytogenes (7.75 ± 1.31 mm), and Salmonella enterica (3.60 ± 1.52 mm). Additionally, the analysis of the volatile composition of the headspace of this cell-free extract revealed that L. plantarum is a potential producer for natural aromas, such as acetophenone, with high price in the market. This is the first report of PLA production from cheese whey and PPA. The extracts showed bacteriocin activity and potential to be applied as an antimicrobial in the elaboration of safer foods. PMID:23934083

  8. The influence of bleaching agent and temperature on bleaching efficacy and volatile components of fluid whey and whey retentate.

    PubMed

    Fox, A J; Smith, T J; Gerard, P D; Drake, M A

    2013-10-01

    Fluid whey or retentate are often bleached to remove residual annatto Cheddar cheese colorant, and this process causes off-flavors in dried whey proteins. This study determined the impact of temperature and bleaching agent on bleaching efficacy and volatile components in fluid whey and fluid whey retentate. Freshly manufactured liquid whey (6.7% solids) or concentrated whey protein (retentate) (12% solids, 80% protein) were bleached using benzoyl peroxide (BP) at 100 mg/kg (w/w) or hydrogen peroxide (HP) at 250 mg/kg (w/w) at 5 °C for 16 h or 50 °CC for 1 h. Unbleached controls were subjected to a similar temperature profile. The experiment was replicated three times. Annatto destruction (bleaching efficacy) among treatments was compared, and volatile compounds were extracted and separated using solid phase microextraction gas chromatography mass spectrometry (SPME GC-MS). Bleaching efficacy of BP was higher than HP (P < 0.05) for fluid whey at both 5 and 50 °C. HP bleaching efficacy was increased in retentate compared to liquid whey (P < 0.05). In whey retentate, there was no difference between bleaching with HP or BP at 50 or 5 °C (P > 0.05). Retentate bleached with HP at either temperature had higher relative abundances of pentanal, hexanal, heptanal, and octanal than BP bleached retentate (P < 0.05). Liquid wheys generally had lower concentrations of selected volatiles compared to retentates. These results suggest that the highest bleaching efficacy (within the parameters evaluated) in liquid whey is achieved using BP at 5 or 50 °C and at 50 °C with HP or BP in whey protein retentate. PMID:24102418

  9. Effect of human and simulated gastric juices on the digestion of whey proteins and carboxymethylcellulose-stabilised O/W emulsions.

    PubMed

    Malinauskytė, Ernesta; Ramanauskaitė, Jovita; Leskauskaitė, Daiva; Devold, Tove G; Schüller, Reidar B; Vegarud, Gerd E

    2014-12-15

    In this study, we analysed the impact of carboxymethylcellulose (CMC) on lipid digestion and physicochemical properties of whey proteins (WP)-stabilised emulsions during in vitro digestion with either artificial or human gastrointestinal juices. The emulsions were made by adsorbing WP on the fat droplets and subsequently adding CMC, which does not interact with the adsorbed proteins. The limited hydrolysis of lipids and their higher physical stability was recorded for WP-stabilised emulsions in the presence of CMC under simulated gastrointestinal conditions. The possible mechanism by which CMC lowers the digestion of WP-stabilised emulsions is related to the limited interaction of fat droplets with gastrointestinal fluids due to the extended thickening network formed by CMC in the continuous phase. The digestion of WP- and CMC-stabilised emulsions in the in vitro model with human gastric fluids led to greater lipid hydrolysis, although the enzymatic activity in both in vitro models was observed at the same level. PMID:25038655

  10. Unilateral hindlimb casting induced a delayed generalized muscle atrophy during rehabilitation that is prevented by a whey or a high protein diet but not a free leucine-enriched diet.

    PubMed

    Magne, Hugues; Savary-Auzeloux, Isabelle; Migné, Carole; Peyron, Marie-Agnès; Combaret, Lydie; Rémond, Didier; Dardevet, Dominique

    2013-01-01

    Sarcopenia is the general muscle mass and strength loss associated with ageing. Muscle atrophy could be made worse by exposure to acute periods of immobilization, because muscle disuse by itself is a stimulus for atrophy. Using a model of unilateral hindlimb casting in old adult rats, we have already demonstrated th