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Sample records for acidified pig slurry

  1. Process performance of anaerobic co-digestion of raw and acidified pig slurry.

    PubMed

    Moset, V; Cerisuelo, A; Sutaryo, S; Møller, H B

    2012-10-15

    The effect of incorporating different ratios of acidified pig slurry on methane yield was evaluated in two scales of anaerobic digesters: Thermophilic (50 °C) pilot scale digester (120 l), operating with an average hydraulic retention time of 20 days and thermophilic (52 °C) full-scale digesters (10 and 30 m(3)), operating with an average hydraulic retention time of 30 days. In the lab-scale digester, different inclusion levels of acidified slurry (0-60%) were tested each 15 days, to determine the maximum ratio of acidified to non-acidified slurry causing inhibition and to find process state indicators helping to prevent process failure. In the full-scale digesters, the level of inclusion of the acidified slurry was chosen from the ratio causing methane inhibition in the pilot scale experiment and was carried on in a long-term process of 100 days. The optimal inclusion level of acidified pig slurry in anaerobic co-digestion with conventional slurry was 10%, which promoted anaerobic methane yield by nearly 20%. Higher inclusion levels caused methane inhibition and volatile fatty acids accumulations in both experiments. In order to prevent process failure, the most important traits to monitor in the anaerobic digestion of acidified pig slurry were found to be: sulfate content of the slurry, alkalinity parameters (especially partial alkalinity and the ratio of alkalinity) and total volatile fatty acids (especially acetic and butyric acids). Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. The fate of sulfate in acidified pig slurry during storage and following application to cropped soil.

    PubMed

    Eriksen, Jørgen; Sørensen, Peter; Elsgaard, Lars

    2008-01-01

    Acidification of slurry with sulfuric acid is a recent agricultural practice that may serve a double purpose: reducing ammonia emission and ensuring crop sulfur sufficiency. We investigated S transformations in untreated and acidified pig slurry stored for up to 11 mo at 2, 10, or 20 degrees C. Furthermore, the fertilizer efficiency of sulfuric acid in acidified slurry was investigated in a pot experiment with spring barley. The sulfate content from acidification with sulfuric acid was relatively stable and even after 11 mo of storage the majority was in the plant-available sulfate form. Microbial sulfate reduction during storage of acidified pig slurry was limited, presumably due to initial pH effects and a limitation in the availability of easily degradable organic matter. Sulfide accumulation was observed during storage but the sulfide levels in acidified slurry did not exceed those of the untreated slurry for several months after addition. The S fertilizer value of the acidified slurry was considerable as a result of the stable sulfate pool during storage. The high content of inorganic S in the acidified slurry may potentially lead to development of odorous volatile sulfur-containing compounds and investigations are needed into the relationship between odor development and the C and S composition of the slurry.

  3. Effects of Acidifying Pig Diets on Emissions of Ammonia, Methane, and Sulfur from Slurry during Storage.

    PubMed

    Eriksen, Jørgen; Nørgaard, Jan V; Poulsen, Hanne D; Poulsen, Henrik V; Jensen, Bent B; Petersen, Søren O

    2014-11-01

    Ammonia (NH) volatilization from intensive livestock production is a threat to natural ecosystems. This study investigated pig diet manipulation by 1% (w/w) benzoic acid (BA) amendment and lowering of dietary electrolyte balance through substituting 1.4% (w/w) CaCO with 2.0% (w/w) CaCl. Urine and feces were collected separately from 24 pigs fed one of four diets (Control, +BA, +CaCl, +BA+CaCl) in metabolic cages and mixed as slurry. During 103 d of storage, all acidifying diets consistently reduced pH in the slurry by 0.4 to 0.6 units. There was a strong relationship between slurry pH and NH emissions, which were considerably reduced by the three acidifying diets. The +BA diet decreased NH emission by 28%, the +CaCl diet by 37%, and the combined +BA and +CaCl diet by 40%. Acidifying diets had no effect on S cycling or emission of volatile S compounds under the prevailing conditions of restricted S feeding. Methane (CH) emissions were increased by 73% in diets with CaCl. An initial delay in CH emissions was investigated in a separate experiment with manipulation of pH (5.4, 6.7, or 8.8) and inoculation with adapted pig slurry (0, 4, 11, or 19%), which showed that methanogenic potential, rather than inhibitory effects of the chemical environment, caused the delay. In conclusion, NH emissions from slurry could be reduced by addition of BA to pig diets or by controlling the dietary electrolyte balance, but there was no additive effect of combining the two strategies. However, CH emissions from slurry may increase with acidifying diets. Copyright © by the American Society of Agronomy, Crop Science Society of America, and Soil Science Society of America, Inc.

  4. Methanogenic community changes, and emissions of methane and other gases, during storage of acidified and untreated pig slurry.

    PubMed

    Petersen, S O; Højberg, O; Poulsen, M; Schwab, C; Eriksen, J

    2014-07-01

    Acidification with concentrated H(2)SO(4) is a novel strategy to reduce NH(3) emissions from livestock slurry. It was recently found that also CH(4) emissions from acidified slurry are reduced. This study investigated the microbiological basis and temporal stability of these effects. Pig slurry from two farms, acidified by different techniques or untreated, was stored for 83 days in a pilot-scale facility. Methanogens were characterized before and after storage by T-RFLP and qPCR targeting mcrA. Emissions of NH(3) and CH(4) during storage were quantified. Acidified slurry pH was nearly constant at values of 5·5 and 6·5. Ammonia losses were reduced by 84 and 49%, respectively, while CH(4) emission with both acidification techniques was reduced by >90%. T-RFLP fingerprints showed little effect of acidification or storage time. A major T-RF of 105 bp could represent methanogens related to Thermoplasmata (Tp). No treatment effects on gene copy numbers were seen with universal methanogen primers, whereas effects were found with Tp-specific primers. Methane emissions were reduced >90% during storage. Thermoplasmata-related methanogens could be involved in CH(4) emissions from pig slurry. The effect of acidification on CH(4) emissions during storage of pig slurry was quantified for the first time. Acidification with sulphuric acid holds promise as a novel greenhouse gas mitigation strategy for confined livestock production. © 2014 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  5. Agronomic recycling of pig slurry and pig sewage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gómez Garrido, Melisa; Sánchez García, Pablo; Faz Cano, Ángel; Büyükkılıç Yanardag, Asuman; Yanardag, Ibrahim; Kabas, Sebla; Ángeles Múñoz García, María; María Rosales Aranda, Rosa; Segura Ruíz, Juan Carlos

    2013-04-01

    Recycling pig slurry as organic fertilizer is a convenient and suitable way of waste elimination due to its low cost and high agronomic benefits. The objectives of this two year study are focused on improving and recycling pig slurry appropriately, and monitoring the soil-plant system at the same time. The evaluation of the agronomic effectiveness of different types of pig slurry (raw, solid, treated and depurated) in different doses (170 kg N ha-1 (legislated dose), 340 and 510 kg N ha-1) is innovative because the fertilizer value of each amendment can be balanced. Furthermore environmental issues such us volatilisation, leaching and salinisation have been considered for each treatment in order to set the viability of the study and to justify the treatments applied. Electrical conductivity, Kjeldhal nitrogen, sodium and potassium are the physico-chemical parameters most influenced in soils treated with doses 340 and 510 kg N ha-1. Additionally plant samples, especially halophyte, have shown the highest major and minor nutrients contents. Finally, pig slurry application in legislated doses could be considered a useful environmental practice; however, the development of the crop will be very influenced by the type of dose and amendment selected.

  6. Toxicity Evaluation of Pig Slurry Using Luminescent Bacteria and Zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Wenyan; Cai, Qiang; Zhao, Yuan; Zheng, Guojuan; Liang, Yuting

    2014-01-01

    Biogas slurry has become a serious pollution problem and anaerobic digestion is widely applied to pig manure treatment for environmental protection and energy recovery. To evaluate environmental risk of the emission of biogas slurry, luminescent bacteria (Vibrio fischeri), larvae and embryos of zebrafish (Danio rerio) were used to detect the acute and development toxicity of digested and post-treated slurry. Then the ability of treatment process was evaluated. The results showed that digested slurry displayed strong toxicity to both zebrafish and luminescent bacteria, while the EC50 for luminescent bacteria and the LC50 for larvae were only 6.81% (v/v) and 1.95% (v/v) respectively, and embryonic development was inhibited at just 1% (v/v). Slurry still maintained a high level of toxicity although it had been treated by membrane bioreactor (MBR), while the LC50 of larvae was 75.23% (v/v) and there was a little effect on the development of embryos and V. fischeri; the results also revealed that the zebrafish larvae are more sensitive than embryos and luminescent bacteria to pig slurry. Finally, we also found the toxicity removal rate was higher than 90% after the treatment of MBR according to toxicity tests. In conclusion, further treatment should be used in pig slurry disposal or reused of final effluent. PMID:24995598

  7. Clinoptilolite as an ammonia binder in pig slurry.

    PubMed

    Janssens, G P; Debal, V; Hesta, M; Millet, S; De Wilde, R O

    2001-01-01

    Six gilts and six barrows are used in a 2 x 2 experiment with two phase feeding versus multiphase feeding and celite addition versus clinoptilolite addition. Nitrogen and ammonia concentration in the slurry on dry matter basis was reduced by 30% and 35% respectively by multiphase feeding, together with a decreased ratio of ammonia over nitrogen. Ammonia fixation in pig slurry by clinoptilolite increased from 21% after 14 days of supplementation upto 35% at 8 weeks after the supplementation period.

  8. Pig slurry acidification and separation techniques affect soil N and C turnover and N2O emissions from solid, liquid and biochar fractions.

    PubMed

    Gómez-Muñoz, B; Case, S D C; Jensen, L S

    2016-03-01

    The combined effects of pig slurry acidification, subsequent separation techniques and biochar production from the solid fraction on N mineralisation and N2O and CO2 emissions in soil were investigated in an incubation experiment. Acidification of pig slurry increased N availability from the separated solid fractions in soil, but did not affect N2O and CO2 emissions. However acidification reduced soil N and C turnover from the liquid fraction. The use of more advanced separation techniques (flocculation and drainage > decanting centrifuge > screw press) increased N mineralisation from acidified solid fractions, but also increased N2O and CO2 emissions in soil amended with the liquid fraction. Finally, the biochar production from the solid fraction of pig slurry resulted in a very recalcitrant material, which reduced N and C mineralisation in soil compared to the raw solid fractions.

  9. Low frequency aeration of pig slurry affects slurry characteristics and emissions of greenhouse gases and ammonia.

    PubMed

    Calvet, Salvador; Hunt, John; Misselbrook, Tom H

    2017-07-01

    Low frequency aeration of slurries may reduce ammonia (NH3) and methane (CH4) emissions without increasing nitrous oxide (N2O) emissions. The aim of this study was to quantify this potential reduction and to establish the underlying mechanisms. A batch experiment was designed with 6 tanks with 1 m(3) of pig slurry each. After an initial phase of 7 days when none of the tanks were aerated, a second phase of 4 weeks subjected three of the tanks to aeration (2 min every 6 h, airflow 10 m(3) h(-1)), whereas the other three tanks remained as a control. A final phase of 9 days was established with no aeration in any tank. Emissions of NH3, CH4, carbon dioxide (CO2) and N2O were measured. In the initial phase no differences in emissions were detected, but during the second phase aeration increased NH3 emissions by 20% with respect to the controls (8.48 vs. 7.07 g m(-3) [slurry] d(-1), P < 0.05). A higher pH was found in the aerated tanks at the end of this phase (7.7 vs. 7.0 in the aerated and control tanks, respectively, P < 0.05). CH4 emissions were 40% lower in the aerated tanks (2.04 vs. 3.39 g m(-3) [slurry] d(-1), P < 0.05). These differences in NH3 and CH4 emissions remained after the aeration phase had finished. No effect was detected for CO2, and no relevant N2O emissions were detected during the experiment. Our results demonstrate that low frequency aeration of stored pig slurry increases slurry pH and increases NH3 emissions.

  10. Acidification of pig slurry before separation to improve slurry management on farms.

    PubMed

    Regueiro, Iria; Coutinho, João; Balsari, Paolo; Popovic, Olga; Fangueiro, David

    2016-08-01

    Pig slurry, rich in plant nutrients such as nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P), is generally applied to soil as organic fertilizer. However, costs related to slurry transport may limit its utilization to fields close to the farm, leading to significant N losses, namely ammonia (NH3) emissions. Slurry acidification, to minimize NH3 emissions, is a potential solution to this problem, while solid-liquid separation leads to a solid fraction (SF) - rich in organic matter (OM) and phosphorus - and a liquid fraction (LF) rich in soluble nutrients. We hypothesized that a combination of acidification and separation could affect the quality of the resulting fractions depending on the separation technique used. After acidification, the two most common techniques for separation, centrifugation (CF) and screw-press (SP), were applied. The main characteristics of the slurry fractions in terms of nutrient concentrations and speciation as well as the potential N mineralization (PNM) were analysed. Our results show SFs with improved properties, mostly N and PNM when acidification is performed before separation with both techniques. The PNM was significantly increased in LFs from both techniques after acidification. The [Formula: see text] concentration increased in LFs from SP with acidification; therefore, slurry acidification is recommended to avoid any N losses during the separation process with SP, while CF may not require such pretreatment. Acidification could allow the use of a cheaper technique such as SP relative to CF since it prevents NH3 emissions during the separation process and leads to more equilibrated fractions in terms of nutrient composition.

  11. Anaerobic digestion of sulfate-acidified cattle slurry: One-stage vs. two-stage.

    PubMed

    Moset, Veronica; Ottosen, Lars Ditlev Mørck; Xavier, Cristiane de Almeida Neves; Møller, Henrik Bjarne

    2016-05-15

    Two strategies to include acidified cattle manure (AcCM) in co-digestion with normal cattle manure (CM) are presented in this work. The strategies are a single thermophilic (50 °C) continuous stirred tank reactor (CSTR) anaerobic digestion and a two-step (65 °C + 50 °C) CSTR process. In both strategies, two different inclusion levels of H2SO4-acidified CM (10% and 20%) in co-digestion with normal CM were tested and compared with a control CSTR fed only CM. Important enhancement of methane (CH4) yield and solid reductions were observed in the thermophilic one-step CSTR working with 10% AcCM. However, a higher inclusion level of AcCM (20%) caused volatile fatty acid accumulation in the reactor and a more than 30% reduction in CH4 production. In terms of CH4 production, when 10% of AcCM was co-digested with 90% of CM, the two-step anaerobic co-digestion yielded less than the single step. During the first step of the two-step CSTR process, acidogenesis and a partial sulfate reduction were achieved. However, sulfide stripping between the first and the second step must be promoted in order to advance this technology. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Effect of acidified feed on the prevalence of Salmonella in market-age pigs.

    PubMed

    Creus, E; Pérez, J F; Peralta, B; Baucells, F; Mateu, E

    2007-01-01

    Two trials were carried out to determine the effect of feed acidification upon Salmonella carriage in market-age pigs. In the first trial, the administration for the last 14 weeks of the fattening period of a commercial pelleted feed added with 0.6% lactic acid plus 0.6% formic acid (Lac-Formic-1.2) was compared to an unacidified standard diet (STD). A second experiment was carried out in two herds of growing pigs (Herd I, 3000 pigs; Herd II, 900 pigs) in which three different diets were assayed during the last 8-9 weeks of the fattening period: a diet containing 0.8% formic acid (Formic-0.8), a diet containing 0.4% lactic acid plus 0.4% formic acid (Lac-Formic-0.8) and a STD. In the first experiment, serological evolution of the infection was examined by ELISA and microbiological cultures (rectal samples and mesenteric lymph nodes) were also done. Feed intake by pen and the individual weight of the animals were also measured. In the second trial, blood, rectal samples and mesenteric lymph nodes were collected at slaughter in both herds (30 pigs per experimental group). In the first experiment, the acidified diet (Lac-Formic-1.2) reduced Salmonella carriers in mesenteric lymph nodes (Fisher's exact P < 0.01). In the second trial, Lac-Formic-0.8 diet significantly reduced Salmonella seroprevalence compared to the STD (P = 0.001) in both herds. Also Lac-Formic-0.8 and Formic-0.8 diets in Herd II showed a lower faecal excretion and Salmonella carriage in mesenteric lymph nodes than the STD (P < 0.05). Our results suggest that the administration of a combination of lactic and formic acids at the levels used in this study could be used to reduce Salmonella prevalence in finishing pigs.

  13. The role of heterotrophic microorganism Galactomyces sp. Z3 in improving pig slurry bioleaching.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Jun; Zheng, Guanyu; Zhou, Lixiang; Liu, Fenwu; Zheng, Chaocheng; Cui, Chunhong

    2013-01-01

    The feasibility of removing heavy metals and eliminating pathogens from pig slurry through bioleaching involving the fungus Galactomyces sp. Z3 and two acidophilic thiobacillus (A. ferrooxidans LX5 and A. thiooxidans TS6) was investigated. It was found that the isolated pig slurry dissolved organic matter (DOM) degrader Z3 was identified as Galactomyces sp. Z3, which could grow well at pH 2.5-7 and degrade pig slurry DOM from 1973 to 942 mg/l within 48 h. During the successive multi-batch bioleaching systems, the co-inoculation of pig slurry degrader Galactomyces sp. Z3 and the two Acidithiobacillus species could improve pig slurry bioleaching efficiency compared to the single system without Galactomyces sp. Z3. The removal efficiency of Zn and Cu exceeded 94% and 85%, respectively. In addition, the elimination efficiencies of pathogens, including both total coliform and faecal coliform counts, exceeded 99% after bioleaching treatment. However, the counts of Galactomyces sp. Z3 decreased with the fall of pH and did not restore to the initial level during successive multi-batch bioleaching systems, and it is necessary to re-inoculate Galactomyces sp. Z3 cells into the bioleaching system to maintain its role in degrading pig slurry DOM. Therefore, a bioleaching technique involving both Galactomyces sp. Z3 and Acidithiobacillus species is an efficient method for removing heavy metals and eliminating pathogens from pig slurry.

  14. Sorption of 17β-estradiol to pig slurry separates and soil in the soil-slurry environment.

    PubMed

    Amin, M G Mostofa; Petersen, Søren O; Lægdsmand, Mette

    2012-01-01

    Contamination of freshwater by estrogens from manure applied to agricultural land is of grave concern because of the potentially harmful effects on aquatic life and human health. Recent developments in liquid manure (slurry) management include partial removal of particulate slurry dry matter (PSDM) by separation technologies, which may also remove parts of the estrogens and enhance infiltration of the slurry on field application and hence the interaction between estrogens and the soil matrix. This study investigated how 17β-estradiol (E2), a natural estrogen commonly found in pig manure, sorbs to agricultural soils, to different size fractions of pig slurry separates, and to soils amended with each size fraction to simulate conditions in the soil-slurry environment. A crude fiber fraction (SS1) was prepared by sieving (<500 μm) the solids removed by an on-farm separation process. Three other size fractions (SS2 > SS3 > SS4) were prepared from the liquid fraction of the separated slurry by sedimentation and centrifugation. Sorption experiments were conducted in 0.01 mol L(-1) CaCl(2) and in natural pig urine matrix. Sorption in 0.01 mol L(-1) CaCl(2) was higher than that in pig urine for all solids used. Sorption of E2 to soil increased with its organic carbon content for both liquid phases. The solid-liquid partition coefficients of slurry separates were 10 to 30 times higher than those of soils, but the organoic carbon normalized partition coefficient values, reflecting sorption per unit organic carbon, were lower for slurry separates. Mixing slurry separates with soil increased the sorption of E2 to the solid phase significantly in the order: SS1 < SS3 < SS2 for both liquid phases. In contrast, SS4 reduced the sorption of E2 to the solid phase by increasing the sorption to suspended or dissolved organic matter. The study suggested that potentially 50 to 75% of E2 in slurry can be removed from the liquid fraction of slurry by physical separation.

  15. Effects of pig slurry application on soils and soil humic acids.

    PubMed

    Plaza, César; Senesi, Nicola; García-Gil, Juan C; Brunetti, Gennaro; D'Orazio, Valeria; Polo, Alfredo

    2002-08-14

    The effect of three annually consecutive additions of pig slurry at two rates (90 and 150 m3 x ha(-1) x year(-1) on soils and soil humic acids (HAs) was investigated in a field experiment under semiarid conditions. Soils and pig slurries were analyzed by standard methods. The HAs were isolated from soils and pig slurry by a conventional procedure based on alkaline extraction, acidic precipitation to pH 1, purification by repeated alkaline dissolutions and acidic precipitations, water washing, dialysis, and final freeze-drying. The HAs obtained were analyzed for elemental (C, H, N, S, and O) and acidic functional group (carboxylic and phenolic) composition, and by UV-vis, FT-IR, fluorescence, and ESR spectroscopies. With respect to the control soil, the pig slurry amended soils had greater pH and electrical conductivity, slightly larger total N content, and smaller values of C/N ratio. A decrease of total organic C was observed only in soils amended for 2 and 3 years at the higher slurry rate. With respect to control soil HA, pig slurry HA was characterized by larger contents of S- and N-containing groups, smaller acidic functional group and organic free radical contents, a prevalent aliphatic character, extended molecular heterogeneity, and smaller aromatic polycondensation and humification degrees. Amendment with pig slurry HA determines a number of modifications in soil HAs, including increase of C, S, and COOH contents, C/N ratios, and aliphaticity and decrease of extraction yields and N, O, phenolic OH, and organic free radical contents. These effects are generally more evident after the first year of slurry application and tend to disappear with increasing number of treatments. Most probably, over the years the slightly humified slurry HA is mineralized through extended microbial oxidation, whereas only the most recalcitrant components, such as S-containing, phenolic, and aliphatic structures, are partially accumulated by incorporation into soil HA.

  16. Carbon dynamics in different soil types amended with pig slurry, pig manure and its biochar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yanardag, Ibrahim H.; Zornoza, Raúl; Faz, Ángel; Büyükkiliç-Yanardaǧ, Asuman; Mermut, Ahmet R.

    2014-05-01

    Determining the structure and components of soil and soil organic matter is very important in terms of sustainable agriculture and forestry and greenhouse gases emissions. Organic management can increase labile C and N in the short-term, and total soil C and N in the long-term, but less is known about how management practices may affect soil organic C (SOC)quality and stability. Methods to improve the management of livestock slurries to reduce the environmental impact and carbon losses are gaining importance. There is a need to find the best wastes treatment which enhances soil fertility but also carbon sequestration, to mitigate the effects of global warming. The objective of this study was to assess the short-term changes in SOC pools, using raw pig slurry, the solid phase of pig slurry, and its biochar as amendment in different soil types (Regosol, Luvisol and Kastanozem). The three different amendments were applied at 5 g C kg-1 soil. An unamended soil for each type was used as control. Soils were incubated in triplicate for 60 days at 25ºC and at 55% of their water holding capacity. Samples were sampled to monitor the evolution of soil organic and inorganic carbon, recalcitrant carbon, soluble carbon, carbon mineralization, SOC thermal distribution (thermogravimetric analysis - differential scanning calorimetry - quadrupole mass spectrometry), and characterization of functional groups (Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR)). Results showed that soils amended with raw pig slurry and the solid phase of the slurry showed higher values of soluble carbon, and higher carbon mineralization rates compared to biochar application, which showed values similar to controls. SOC increased at the end of incubation with biochar and the solid phase of the slurry applications in Kastanozem and Regosol. Thermogravimetric results showed an increased weight loss of the Regosol compared to Luvisol and Kastanozem, owing to the higher content of soil carbonates. Luvisol and

  17. Nitrate leaching through the unsaturated zone following pig slurry applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mantovi, Paolo; Fumagalli, Letizia; Beretta, Giovanni Pietro; Guermandi, Marina

    2006-01-01

    As the increase of nitrate concentration in groundwater has often been ascribed to an inappropriate use of liquid manure, the main purpose of this study was to better understand the factors controlling nitrate dynamics in the unsaturated zone of soils subjected to characteristic agronomic practices, and to contribute to improving Action Programmes, with reference to EU Directive 91/676, for nitrate vulnerable zones (NVZ). Water infiltration and nitrate leaching have been studied in experimental fields located inside nitrate vulnerable zones of the Emilia-Romagna region (Northern Italy), characterized by different pedological and hydrogeological properties and equipped with meteorological station, tensiometers, ceramic-cup samplers and piezometers. This article describes the results obtained from one of these sites, monitored over a 6-year period, which was cereal cropped and treated with pig slurry. MACRO and SOILN field-scale models have been used in order to verify the reliability of simulated water flow and nitrogen transport. The results demonstrate how nitrogen inputs from slurry, substantially higher than crop uptake, cause nitrate accumulation in the surface layer of the soil especially in warm periods (concentrations of up to 300 mg NO 3-N l -1 were found in soil water). Even if the soil texture was fine, the shrinking-swelling properties of clay minerals determined fast drainage conditions (related to macroporosity), so that during the early rainy periods nitrates leached through the first meters of the unsaturated zone, at least down to 4 m. This shows that nitrate accumulation should be limited before these periods, i.e. by reducing manure application rates, especially if the soil is to be left uncultivated. The model results confirm the observed role of macroporosity in accelerating the breakthrough of surface applied soluble compounds and provide evidence that MACRO and SOILN may be suitable tools for predicting such phenomena, even though their

  18. Estimation of Methane Emissions from Slurry Pits below Pig and Cattle Confinements

    PubMed Central

    Petersen, Søren O.; Olsen, Anne B.; Elsgaard, Lars; Triolo, Jin Mi; Sommer, Sven G.

    2016-01-01

    Quantifying in-house emissions of methane (CH4) from liquid manure (slurry) is difficult due to high background emissions from enteric processes, yet of great importance for correct estimation of CH4 emissions from manure management and effects of treatment technologies such as anaerobic digestion. In this study CH4 production rates were determined in 20 pig slurry and 11 cattle slurry samples collected beneath slatted floors on six representative farms; rates were determined within 24 h at temperatures close to the temperature in slurry pits at the time of collection. Methane production rates in pig and cattle slurry differed significantly at 0.030 and 0.011 kg CH4 kg-1 VS (volatile solids). Current estimates of CH4 emissions from pig and cattle manure management correspond to 0.032 and 0.015 kg CH4 kg-1, respectively, indicating that slurry pits under animal confinements are a significant source. Fractions of degradable volatile solids (VSd, kg kg-1 VS) were estimated using an aerobic biodegradability assay and total organic C analyses. The VSd in pig and cattle slurry averaged 0.51 and 0.33 kg kg-1 VS, and it was estimated that on average 43 and 28% of VSd in fresh excreta from pigs and cattle, respectively, had been lost at the time of sampling. An empirical model of CH4 emissions from slurry was reparameterised based on experimental results. A sensitivity analysis indicated that predicted CH4 emissions were highly sensitive to uncertainties in the value of lnA of the Arrhenius equation, but much less sensitive to uncertainties in VSd or slurry temperature. A model application indicated that losses of carbon in VS as CO2 may be much greater than losses as CH4. Implications of these results for the correct estimation of CH4 emissions from manure management, and for the mitigation potential of treatments such as anaerobic digestion, are discussed. PMID:27529692

  19. Application of pig slurry to soils. Effect of air stripping treatment on nitrogen and TOC leaching.

    PubMed

    Bolado-Rodríguez, Silvia; García-Sinovas, David; Alvarez-Benedí, Javier

    2010-12-01

    The effect of physical-chemical slurry treatment on the mobility and transformation of nitrogen and organic matter from pig slurry after soil application is evaluated. Two different pig slurries (one treated by stripping with air at pH=9 and another non-treated) were applied at the top of a soil column, containing approximately 100 kg of soil. Effluents were monitored measuring concentration values of ammonia, nitrites, nitrates and total organic carbon (TOC). The breakthrough curves were modelled using STANMOD and HYDRUS 1D codes. Low concentrations of ammonia were detected in the effluent recovered at the bottom of the soil profile for both types of slurry. Nitrate concentration in effluent was lower and more homogenous over time when applying stripping treated pig slurry. In N modelling, adsorption of ammonia by soil proved an important process, nitrite and nitrate adsorption being less significant, although not negligible. Transformation from ammonia to nitrite controls the kinetics of the nitrification process. Total organic carbon in the column effluent was higher in the experiment using treated pig slurry, which can be attributed to organic matter solubilisation in the stripping treatment process. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Nutrient Status and Contamination Risks from Digested Pig Slurry Applied on a Vegetable Crops Field

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Shaohui; Hua, Yumei; Deng, Liangwei

    2016-01-01

    The effects of applied digested pig slurry on a vegetable crops field were studied. The study included a 3-year investigation on nutrient characteristics, heavy metals contamination and hygienic risks of a vegetable crops field in Wuhan, China. The results showed that, after anaerobic digestion, abundant N, P and K remained in the digested pig slurry while fecal coliforms, ascaris eggs, schistosoma eggs and hookworm eggs were highly reduced. High Cr, Zn and Cu contents in the digested pig slurry were found in spring. Digested pig slurry application to the vegetable crops field led to improved soil fertility. Plant-available P in the fertilized soils increased due to considerable increase in total P content and decrease in low-availability P fraction. The As content in the fertilized soils increased slightly but significantly (p = 0.003) compared with control. The Hg, Zn, Cr, Cd, Pb, and Cu contents in the fertilized soils did not exceed the maximum permissible contents for vegetable crops soils in China. However, high Zn accumulation should be of concern due to repeated applications of digested pig slurry. No fecal coliforms, ascaris eggs, schistosoma eggs or hookworm eggs were detected in the fertilized soils. PMID:27058548

  1. Greenhouse Gas and Ammonia Emissions from Slurry Storage: Impacts of Temperature and Potential Mitigation through Covering (Pig Slurry) or Acidification (Cattle Slurry).

    PubMed

    Misselbrook, Tom; Hunt, John; Perazzolo, Francesca; Provolo, Giorgio

    2016-09-01

    Storage of livestock slurries is a significant source of methane (CH) and ammonia (NH) emissions to the atmosphere, for which accurate quantification and potential mitigation methods are required. Methane and NH emissions were measured from pilot-scale cattle slurry (CS) and pig slurry (PS) stores under cool, temperate, and warm conditions (approximately 8, 11, and 17°C, respectively) and including two potential mitigation practices: (i) a clay granule floating cover (PS) and (ii) slurry acidification (CS). Cumulative emissions of both gases were influenced by mean temperature over the storage period. Methane emissions from the control treatments over the 2-mo storage periods for the cool, temperate, and warm periods were 0.3, 0.1, and 34.3 g CH kg slurry volatile solids for CS and 4.4, 20.1, and 27.7 g CH kg slurry volatile solids for PS. Respective NH emissions for each period were 4, 7, and 12% of initial slurry N content for CS and 12, 18, and 28% of initial slurry N content for PS. Covering PS with clay granules reduced NH emissions by 77% across the three storage periods but had no impact on CH emissions. Acidification of CS reduced CH and NH emissions by 61 and 75%, respectively, across the three storage periods. Nitrous oxide emissions were also monitored but were insignificant. The development of approaches that take into account the influence of storage timing (temperature) and duration on emission estimates for national emission inventory purposes is recommended. Copyright © by the American Society of Agronomy, Crop Science Society of America, and Soil Science Society of America, Inc.

  2. Dynamics of a Pig Slurry Microbial Community during Anaerobic Storage and Management

    PubMed Central

    Peu, Pascal; Brugère, Hubert; Pourcher, Anne-Marie; Kérourédan, Monique; Godon, Jean-Jacques; Delgenès, Jean-Philippe; Dabert, Patrick

    2006-01-01

    The microbial community of a pig slurry on a farm was monitored for 6 months using both molecular and cultural approaches. Sampling was carried out at all the different stages of effluent handling, from the rearing build-up to slurry spreading. Total DNA of each sample was extracted and analyzed by PCR-single-strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP) analysis using primers targeting the 16S rRNA genes from the archaeal and bacterial domains and also the Eubacterium-Clostridium, Bacillus-Streptococcus-Lactobacillus, and Bacteroides-Prevotella groups. A comparison of the SSCP profiles showed that there were rapid changes in the dominant bacterial community during the first 2 weeks of anaerobic storage and that the community was relatively stable thereafter. Several bacterial populations, identified as populations closely related to uncultured Clostridium and Porphyromonas and to Lactobacillus and Streptococcus cultured species commonly isolated from pig feces, remained present and dominant from the rearing build-up to the time of spreading. Enumeration of fecal indicators (enterococci and Escherichia coli) performed in parallel using cultural methods revealed the same trends. On the other hand, the archaeal community adapted slowly during pig slurry storage, and its diversity increased. A shift between two hydrogenotrophic methanogenic Methanobrevibacter populations from the storage pit to the pond was observed. Microorganisms present in pig slurry at the time of spreading could not be detected in soil after spreading by either molecular or cultural techniques, probably because of the detection limit inherent in the two techniques. PMID:16672505

  3. Assessment of Bacterial Community Assembly Patterns and Processes in Pig Manure Slurry

    PubMed Central

    Kumari, Priyanka; Choi, Hong L.; Sudiarto, Sartika I. A.

    2015-01-01

    The bacterial community assembly patterns and processes are poorly understood in pig manure slurry. We collected pig manure slurry samples during the winter and summer seasons from eight commercial pig farms in South Korea. The V3 region of 16S rRNA genes was PCR amplified and sequenced using paired-end Illumina technology for in-depth characterization of bacterial community. Firmicutes, Bacteroidetes, Proteobacteria, Spirochaetes, and Tenericutes were the predominant bacterial phyla present in slurry samples. Bacterial taxonomic community composition was not influenced by the season; however, phylogenetic community composition was affected by seasonal variations. The community composition and diversity patterns were strongly influenced by pH. The bacterial diversity indices showed a unimodal relationship with pH. Phylogenetic signals were detected over only short phylogenetic distances, revealing that closely related bacterial operational taxonomic units (OTUs) tend to co-occur in the same environment; hence, they are ecologically similar. Across all samples, a niche-based process, through strong environmental filtering imposed by pH, primarily governed bacterial community assembly; however, in samples close to the neutral pH range, the role of environmental filtering was decreased due to neutral community assembly. In summary, pH emerged as the major physico-chemical variable in pig manure slurry that regulates the relative importance of niche-based and neutral processes in shaping the community assembly of bacteria. PMID:26422375

  4. Effect of fibrous diets on chemical composition and odours from pig slurry.

    PubMed

    Mpendulo, Conference Thando; Chimonyo, Michael

    2016-09-09

    Incorporating high fibre ingredients into pig diets has the potential to reduce odour emissions from of pigs. The current study was carried out to determine effect of diets containing 0, 80 and 160 g/kg of each of lucerne hay, maize cobs and sunflower husks on the chemical characteristics and odours from pig slurries. Twenty eight pigs averaging 18 ± 2.0 kg were kept in individual cages, over four weeks. All pigs were fed ad libitum. Faeces and urine were collected, mixed in a 1: 2.3 ratio (w/w), stored and fermented for 16 days in a temperature controlled room at 22 ± 2.3 ºC. The slurry was sampled twice (on day 1 and on day 16) of the fermentation period and analysed for pH, chemical oxygen demand (COD), nitrogen and short chain fatty acids (SCFA) concentration, on wet basis. All samples were tested for odour offensiveness using 18 panelists. A scale of 1 to 5 was used to rank the odour severity, (1 = not offensive, 5 = extremely offensive). Slurry pH and COD varied with fibre source (P <0.05). On day 16, COD for lucerne hay, sunflower husk and maize cobs were 369, 512 and 425 (SEM= 34.2) mg of oxygen per litre. Total SCFA concentration was higher at day 16 than day 1 (P <0.05). Odour offensiveness varied with fibre source across both incubation periods (P <0.05). Sunflower husks and lucerne hay-based diets were rated as less offensive (mean rank = 2.2) than maize cob diets (mean rank of 4.3) (P <0.05). It was concluded that different fibre sources and incubation period influence chemical composition and odour of the slurry. There is, thereby, a need to incorporate locally available fibrous feeds in the diet of pigs because they have an economical and environmental relevance to pig management.

  5. Copper(II) complexation by humic and fulvic acids from pig slurry and amended and non-amended soils.

    PubMed

    Plaza, C; Senesi, N; García-Gil, J C; Polo, A

    2005-11-01

    The effect of the consecutive annual additions of pig slurry at rates of 0 (control), 90 and 150 m3 ha(-1) y(-1) over a 4-year period on the binding affinity for Cu(II) of soil humic acids (HAs) and fulvic acids (FAs) was investigated in a field plot experiment under semiarid conditions. A ligand potentiometric titration method and a single site model were used for determining the Cu(II) complexing capacities and the stability constants of Cu(II) complexes of HAs and FAs isolated from pig slurry and control and amended soils. The HAs complexing capacities and stability constants were larger than those of the corresponding FA fractions. With respect to the control soil HA, pig-slurry HA was characterized by a much smaller binding capacity and stability constant. Amendment with pig slurry decreased the binding affinity of soil HAs. Similar to the corresponding HAs, the binding affinity of pig-slurry FA was much smaller while that of amended-soil FAs were slightly smaller when compared to the control soil FA. The latter effect was, however, more evident with increasing the amount of pig slurry applied to soil per year and the number of years of pig slurry application.

  6. Proton binding by humic and fulvic acids from pig slurry and amended soils.

    PubMed

    Plaza, César; García-Gil, Juan C; Polo, Alfredo; Senesi, Nicola; Brunetti, Gennaro

    2005-01-01

    The knowledge of acid-base characteristics of humic acid (HA) and fulvic acid (FA) fractions of organic amendments and amended soils is of considerable importance for assessing their agronomic efficacy and environmental impact. In this work, the acid-base properties of HAs and FAs isolated from pig slurry, soils amended with either 90 or 150 m(3) ha(-1) yr(-1) of pig slurry for 3 yr, and the corresponding nonamended control soil were investigated by using a current potentiometric titration method. The nonideal competitive adsorption (NICA) model that describes proton binding by two classes of binding sites (carboxylic- and phenolic-type groups) was successfully fit to titration data. With respect to the control soil HA and FA, pig-slurry HA and FA were generally characterized by smaller carboxylic-type group contents, slightly smaller phenolic-type group contents, larger affinities for proton binding by the carboxylic-type groups, and much smaller, in the case of the HA fraction, or similar, in the case of the FA fraction, affinities for proton binding by the phenolic-type groups. Amendment with pig slurry determined a number of modifications in soil HAs and FAs, including decrease of acidic functional group contents, and slight increase of the proton affinity of the carboxylic-type groups. Further, a slight decrease of the affinities for proton binding by the phenolic-type groups of HAs was observed. These effects can have a large impact on the biological availability, mobilization, and transport of macro- and micronutrients, toxic metal ions, and xenobiotic organic cations in pig slurry-amended soils.

  7. Benefits and limitations of pig slurry to reclaim bare mine soils under Mediterranean semiarid conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zornoza, Raúl; Faz, Ángel; Acosta, Jose A.; Kabas, Sebla; Martínez-Martínez, Silvia; Ángeles Muñoz, M.

    2013-04-01

    In this study, the effects of pig slurry application on reclamation of mine soils from Cartagena-La Unión Mining District (SE Spain) were investigated in a field experiment. Exchangeable metals (Cd, Cu, Pb and Zn), total organic carbon, total nitrogen, soluble carbon, microbial biomass and three enzyme activities were periodically monitored during 67 days. In addition, one year after the application of the pig slurry, soil and developed vegetation was sampled. Results showed that only exchangeable Cd and Zn significantly decreased in the amended plots, mainly for Cd, with decreases of 98%. The rest of metals and chemical properties did not change with time after application of amendments, showing values not significantly different than those present before pig slurry application. Soluble carbon, microbial biomass carbon and the enzyme activities increased after the application of pig slurry. However, after various days these parameters started a decreasing trend until reaching values similar to the control from approximately day 25. Thus, mainly precipitation as phosphate from the waste was very effective for Cd immobilization. No increments were observed in soil organic carbon because the organic carbon applied with the slurry was too low to be significantly detected. Nonetheless, pig slurry is a good fertilizer owing to the high quantity of nutrients provided, needed to promote the development of vegetation. One year after application, a native vegetation cover (25-30%) was reached by spontaneous colonization. Triggered plant growth by the effect of amendment improved soil conditions, particularly by the help of the medium created by their rhizosphere systems. Increments in soil organic carbon and total nitrogen, and decreases in the exchangeable metals fraction concentration were observed in rhizospheric soils when compared to the bare soils. This improvement in soil quality mediated by vegetation was more efficient than the direct effect of the amendment. In

  8. Environmental evaluation of transfer and treatment of excess pig slurry by life cycle assessment.

    PubMed

    Lopez-Ridaura, Santiago; Werf, Hayo van der; Paillat, Jean Marie; Le Bris, Bertrand

    2009-02-01

    Slurry management is a central topic in the agronomic and environmental analysis of intensive livestock production systems. The objective of this study is to compare the environmental performance of two scenarios of collective slurry management for the disposal of excess nitrogen from animal manure. The scenarios are the transfer of slurry and its injection to crop land, and the treatment of slurry in a collective biological treatment station. The study is based on a real case in the West of France, where a group of farmers is developing a collective plan for the disposal of almost 7000 m(3) of excess pig slurry. The evaluation is carried out by Life Cycle Assessment, where emissions and resource consumption are quantified and aggregated into four environmental impact categories: eutrophication, acidification, climate change, and non-renewable energy use. Ammonia emitted is the most important contributor to acidification and eutrophication, while methane contributes most to climate change. Both ammonia and methane are mostly emitted during the storage of slurry and, in the case of the treatment scenario, also during composting the solid fraction of the slurry. The two management strategies are similar with respect to climate change, whereas eutrophication and acidification are twice as large for treatment relative to transfer. Electricity needed for the treatment process is the main contributor to non-renewable energy use for the treatment scenario, while the transfer scenario represents a net energy saving, as energy saved by the reduction of mineral fertiliser use more than compensates for the energy needed for transport and injection of slurry. The overall environmental performance of transfer is better than that of treatment, as it involves less acidification, eutrophication and non-renewable energy use. The method employed and the results obtained in this study can provide elements for a transparent discussion of the advantages and disadvantages of contrasting

  9. Slurry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Ting; Lei, Hong

    2014-11-01

    With magnetic heads operating closer to hard disks, the hard disks must be ultra-smooth. The abrasive-free polishing (AFP) performance of cumene hydroperoxide (CHP) as the initiator in H2O2-based slurry for hard disk substrate was investigated in our work, and the results showed that the slurry including CHP could improve the material removal rate (MRR) and also reduce surface roughness. Electron spin-resonance spectroscopy (EPR), electrochemical measurement and Auger electron spectroscopy (AES) were conducted to investigate the acting mechanism with CHP during the polishing process. Compared with the H2O2 slurry, the EPR analysis shows that the CHP-H2O2 slurry provides a higher concentration of the HOO free radical. In addition, the AES analysis shows the oxidization reaction occurs in the external layer of the substrate surface. Furthermore, electrochemical measurements reveal that CHP can promote the electrochemical effect in AFP and lead to the increase of MRR.

  10. Earthworm effects on gaseous emissions during vermifiltration of pig fresh slurry.

    PubMed

    Luth; Robin, Paul; Germain, Philippe; Lecomte, Marcel; Landrain, Brigitte; Li, Yinsheng; Cluzeau, Daniel

    2011-02-01

    Treatment of liquid manure can result in the production of ammonia, nitrous oxide and methane. Earthworms mix and transform nitrogen and carbon without consuming additional energy. The objective of this paper is to analyse whether earthworms modify the emissions of NH(3), N(2)O, CH(4) and CO(2) during vermifiltration of pig slurry. The experiment used mesocosms of around 50 L, made from a vermifilter treating the diluted manure of a swine house. Three levels of slurry were added to the mesocosms, with or without earthworms, during one month, in triplicate. Earthworm abundance and gas emissions were measured three and five times, respectively. There was a decrease in emissions of ammonia and nitrous oxide and a sink of methane in treatments with earthworms. We suggest that earthworm abundance can be used as a bioindicator of low energy input, and low greenhouse gas and ammonia output in systems using fresh slurry with water recycling.

  11. The effects of certain antibiotics on biogas production in the anaerobic digestion of pig waste slurry.

    PubMed

    Lallai, A; Mura, G; Onnis, N

    2002-04-01

    Antibiotics commonly used in the treatment of pigs - amoxicillin trihydrate, oxytetracycline hydrochloride and thiamphenicol were added at different concentrations to aliquots of pig waste slurry plus anaerobic sludge in serum bottles. The biogas production and methane concentration in the headspace were monitored to determine the effect of the antibiotics on the anaerobic process. With thiamphenicol significant differences in methane production were found for concentrations of 80 and 160 mg l(-1) slurry. Compared to the control, only minor differences in methane production were noted in the bottles to which amoxicillin (60 and 120 mg l(-1)) had been added. Methane production was about the same for the bottles with different oxytetracycline concentrations (125 and 250 mg l(-1)) and for the control.

  12. Microbial community dynamics in continuous microbial fuel cells fed with synthetic wastewater and pig slurry.

    PubMed

    Sotres, Ana; Tey, Laura; Bonmatí, August; Viñas, Marc

    2016-10-01

    Two-chambered microbial fuel cells (MFCs) operating with synthetic wastewater and pig slurry were assessed. Additionally, the use of 2-bromoethanesulfonate (BES-Inh) was studied. The synthetic wastewater-fed MFC (MFCSW) showed a maximum power density (PDmax) of 2138mWm(-3), and the addition of BES-Inh (10mM) did not show any improvement in its performance (PDmax=2078mWm(-3)). When pig slurry was used as feed (MFCPS), PDmax increased up to 5623mWm(-3). The microbial community composition was affected by the type of substrate used. While, Pseudomonadaceae and Clostridiaceae were the most representative families within the acetate-based medium, Flavobacteriaceae, Chitinophagaceae, Comamonadaceae and Nitrosomonadaceae were predominant when pig slurry was used as feed. Otherwise, only the Eubacterial microbial community composition was strongly modified when adding BES-Inh, thus leading to an enrichment of the Bacteroidetes phylum. Oppositely, the Archaeal community was less affected by the addition of BES-Inh, and Methanosarcina sp., arose as the predominant family in both situations. Despite all the differences in microbial communities, 6 operational taxonomic units (OTUs) belonging to Bacteroidetes (Porphyromonadaceae and Marinilabiaceae) and Firmicutes (Clostridiales) were found to be common to both MFCs, also for different contents of COD and N-NH4(+), and therefore could be considered as the bioanode core microbiome.

  13. Fate of phosphorus from biological aerobic treatment of pig slurry. By-products characterization and recovery.

    PubMed

    Daumer, M L; Beline, F; Guiziou, F

    2003-11-01

    The fate of phosphorus distribution in the products obtained from biological aerobic treatment of pig slurry, e.g. separated solids, liquid effluent and sludge, was monitored in three different farm-scale units. Samples of raw slurry, solid products, aerated slurry, liquid effluent and sludge were characterised and analysed for their concentration in total phosphorus, nitrogen content and heavy metals (Cu and Zn). At each treatment stage, nitrogen, phosphorus and heavy metals mass balance between input and output was established. Moreover, liquid products were characterised and analysed both for their total and dissolved ortho-phosphate content. Separated solids, sludge and liquid effluent represented 5%, 15-40% and 75-83% of the mass of the raw slurry, respectively. A mechanical separation step prior to aeration allowed the export of 25-30% of total phosphorus for further use as organic fertiliser. A large amount of total phosphorus (e.g. 60-70%) was located in sludge while phosphorus remaining in liquid effluent was about 15-25%. Raw slurry separation and sufficient aeration allowed phosphorus to concentrate in the sludge. Insufficient aeration resulted in the release of phosphorus as dissolved ortho-phosphate within the liquid effluent. Finally, relevance of the agronomic use of the products was discussed and improvements of biological aerobic treatment to enhance phosphorus removal and/or recovery were considered.

  14. Optimization of the anaerobic co-digestion of pasteurized slaughterhouse waste, pig slurry and glycerine.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Abalde, Ángela; Flotats, Xavier; Fernández, Belén

    2017-03-01

    The feasibility of co-digestion of blends of two different animal by-products (pig manure and pasteurized slaughterhouse waste) and recovered glycerine was studied in mesophilic conditions. Experiments were performed in a lab-scale CSTR along 490days, with a hydraulic retention time of 21-33days and with a step-wise increased organic loading rate, by adding and/or changing the wastes ratio, from 0.8 to 3.2kgCODm(-3)d(-1). The best methane production rate (0.64Nm(3)CH4m(-3)d(-1)) represented an increment of 2.9-fold the initial one (0.22Nm(3)CH4m(-3)d(-1) with pig manure solely). It was attained with a ternary mixture composed, in terms of inlet volatile solids, by 35% pig slurry, 47% pasteurized slaughterhouse waste and 18% glycerine. This blend was obtained through a stepwise C/N adjustment: this strategy led to a more balanced biodegradation due to unstressed bacterial populations through the performance, showed by the VFA-related indicators. Besides this, an improved methane yield (+153%) and an organic matter removal efficiency (+83%), regarding the digestion of solely pig slurry, were attained when the C/N ratio was adjusted to 10.3. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Survival of Salmonella spp. and fecal indicator bacteria in Vietnamese biogas digesters receiving pig slurry.

    PubMed

    Huong, Luu Quynh; Forslund, Anita; Madsen, Henry; Dalsgaard, Anders

    2014-09-01

    Small-scale biogas digesters are widely promoted worldwide as a sustainable technology to manage livestock manure. In Vietnam, pig slurry is commonly applied to biogas digesters for production of gas for electricity and cooking with the effluent being used to fertilize field crops, vegetables and fish ponds. Slurry may contain a variety of zoonotic pathogens, e.g. Salmonella spp., which are able to cause disease in humans either through direct contact with slurry or by fecal contamination of water and foods. The objective of this study was to evaluate the survival of Salmonella spp. and the fecal indicator bacteria, enterococci, E. coli, and spores of Clostridium perfringens in biogas digesters operated by small-scale Vietnamese pig farmers. The serovar and antimicrobial susceptibility of the Salmonella spp. isolated were also established. The study was conducted in 12 farms (6 farms with and 6 farms without toilet connected) located in Hanam province, Vietnam. Sampling of pig slurry and biogas effluent was done during two seasons. Results showed that the concentration of enterococci, E. coli, and Clostridium perfringens spores was overall reduced by only 1-2 log10-units in the biogas digesters when comparing raw slurry and biogas effluent. Salmonella spp. was found in both raw slurry and biogas effluent. A total of 19 Salmonella serovars were identified, with the main serovars being Salmonella Typhimurium (55/138), Salmonella enterica serovar 4,[5],12:i:- (19/138), Salmonella Weltevreden (9/138) and Salmonella Rissen (9/138). The Salmonella serovars showed similar antimicrobial resistance patterns to those previously reported from Vietnam. When promoting biogas, farmers should be made aware that effluent should only be used as fertilizer for crops not consumed raw and that indiscriminate discharge of effluent are likely to contaminate water recipients, e.g. drinking water sources, with pathogens. Relevant authorities should promote safe animal manure management

  16. Carbon dynamics in an almond orchard soil amended with raw and treated pig slurry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Domínguez, Sara G.; Zornoza, Raúl; Faz, Ángel

    2010-05-01

    In SE Spain, intensive farming is very common which supposes the generation of great amounts of pig slurries. These residues cause many storage problems due to their pollution capacity. A good management of them is necessary to avoid damages to the environment. The use of this effluent as fertilizer is a usual practice that in the correct dose is a good amend and important for sustainable development, but in excess can be a risk of polluting and damaging soil, water and crop conditions. Pig slurry is a source of many nutrients and specially rich in organic matter. The main objective of this study is to determine changes in soil organic carbon dynamics resulting from raw and treated slurry amendments applied in different doses. The experimental area is an almond orchard located in Cartagena (SE Spain). The climate of the area is semiarid Mediterranean with mean annual temperature of 18°C and mean annual rainfall of 275 mm. A total of 10 plots (12 m x 30 m) were designed, one of them being the control without fertilizer. Surface soil samples (0-25 cm) were collected in September 2009. Three different treatments were applied, raw slurry, the effluent obtained after solid-liquid separation and solid manure, all of them in three doses being the first one of 170 kg N/ha, (maximum permitted in nitrates directive 91/676/CEE), and the others two and three times the first one. Soil biochemical parameters are rapid indicators of changes in soil quality. According to this, total organic carbon, soil microbial biomass carbon, soluble carbon, and β-glucosidase, β-galactosidase and arylesterase activities were measured in order to assess some soil biochemical conditions and carbon dynamics in terms of the different treatments. As we expected, the use of these organic fertilizers rich in organic matter, had an effect on soil carbon and soil microbial activity resulting in an increase in most of the parameters; total organic carbon and β-galactosidase activity showed the

  17. Environmental assessment of nutrient recycling from biological pig slurry treatment--impact of fertilizer substitution and field emissions.

    PubMed

    Brockmann, Doris; Hanhoun, Mary; Négri, Ophélie; Hélias, Arnaud

    2014-07-01

    Pig slurry treatment is an important means in reducing nitrogen loads applied to farmland. Solid phase separation prior to biological treatment further allows for recovering phosphorus with the solid phase. The organic residues from the pig slurry treatment can be applied as organic fertilizers to farmland replacing mineral fertilizers. The environmental impacts of nutrient recycling from aerobic, biological pig slurry treatment were evaluated applying the life cycle assessment (LCA) methodology. LCA results revealed that direct field emissions from organic fertilizer application and the amount of avoided mineral fertilizers dominated the environmental impacts. A modified plant available nitrogen calculation (PAN) was introduced taking into account calculated nitrogen emissions from organic fertilizer application. Additionally, an equation for calculating the quantity of avoided mineral fertilizers based on the modified PAN calculation was proposed, which accounted for nitrogen emissions from mineral fertilizer application.

  18. Emissions of sulfur-containing odorants, ammonia, and methane from pig slurry: effects of dietary methionine and benzoic acid.

    PubMed

    Eriksen, Jørgen; Adamsen, Anders Peter S; Nørgaard, Jan V; Poulsen, Hanne D; Jensen, Bent Borg; Petersen, Søren O

    2010-01-01

    Supplementation of benzoic acid to pig diets reduces the pH of urine and may thereby affect emissions of ammonia and other gases from slurry, including sulfur-containing compounds that are expected to play a role in odor emission. Over a period of 112 d, we investigated hydrogen sulfide (H(2)S), methanethiol (MT), dimethyl sulfide (DMS), dimethyl disulfide (DMDS), and dimethyl trisulfide (DMTS), as well as ammonia and methane emissions from stored pig slurry. The slurry was derived from a feeding experiment with four pig diets in a factorial design with 2% (w/w) benzoic acid and 1% (w/w) methionine supplementation as treatments. Benzoic acid reduced slurry pH by 1 to 1.5 units and ammonia emissions by 60 to 70% for up to 2 mo of storage, and a considerable, but transitory reduction of methane emissions was also observed after 4 to 5 wk. All five volatile sulfur (S) compounds were identified in gas emitted from the slurry of the control treatment, which came from pigs fed according to Danish recommendations for amino acids and minerals. The emission patterns of volatile S compounds suggested an intense cycling between pools of organic S in the slurries, with urinary sulfate as the main source. Diet supplementation with methionine significantly increased all S emissions. Diet supplementation with benzoic acid reduced emissions of H(2)S and DMTS compared with the control slurry and moderately increased the concentrations of MT. Sulfur gas emissions were influenced by a strong interaction between methionine and benzoic acid treatments, which caused a significant increase in emissions of especially MT, but also of DMDS. In conclusion, addition of 2% benzoic acid to pig diets effectively reduced ammonia volatilization, but interactions with dietary S may increase odor problems.

  19. Degradation of ampicillin in pig manure slurry and an aqueous ampicillin solution using electron beam irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chung, Byung Yeoup; Kim, Jae-Sung; Lee, Min Hee; Lee, Kang Soo; Hwang, Seon Ah; Cho, Jae Young

    2009-07-01

    This study was carried out to evaluate the efficiency of degradation of antibiotic ampicillin in pig manure slurry and an aqueous ampicillin solution with the use of electron beam irradiation as a function of the absorbed dose. The degradation efficiency of ampicillin was close to 95% at an absorbed dose of 10 kGy. The degradation of ampicillin followed a "first-order" reaction rate with respect to absorbed dose. The results demonstrate that the electron beam irradiation technology is an effective means to remove antibiotics in manure and bodies of water.

  20. Chemical and spectroscopic characterization of organic matter during the anaerobic digestion and successive composting of pig slurry.

    PubMed

    Provenzano, Maria Rosaria; Malerba, Anna D; Pezzolla, Daniela; Gigliotti, Giovanni

    2014-03-01

    In this work, anaerobic digestion of pig slurry and successive composting of the digestate after centrifugation were studied by means of chemical analysis, FTIR and fluorescence spectroscopy as excitation-emission matrix (EEM). Chemical analysis highlighted the organic matter transformation occurring during the processes. A decrease of volatile solids and total organic carbon were observed in the digestate with respect to the fresh pig slurry as a consequence of the consumption of sugars, proteins, amino acids and fatty acids used by microorganisms as a C source. Water Extractable Organic Matter (WEOM) was obtained for all samples and fractionated into a hydrophilic and a hydrophobic fraction. The highest WEOM value was found in the pig slurry indicating a high content of labile organic C. The digestate centrifuged and the digestate composted showed lower hydrophilic and higher hydrophobic contents because of the decrease of labile C. Total phenolic content was lower in the digestate with respect to fresh pig slurry sample (36.7%) as a consequence of phenolic compounds degradation. The strong decrease of total reducing sugars in the digestate (76.6%) as compared to pig slurry confirmed that anaerobic process proceed mainly through consumption of sugars which represent a readily available energy source for microbial activity. FTIR spectra of pig slurry showed bands indicative of proteins and carbohydrates. A drop of aliphatic structures and a decrease of polysaccharides was observed after the anaerobic process along with the increase of the peak in the aromatic region. The composted substrate showed an increase of aromatic and a relative decrease of polysaccharides. EEM spectra provided tryptophan:fulvic-like fluorescence ratios which increased from fresh substrate to digestate because of the OM decompostion. Composted substrate presented the lowest ratio due to the humification process. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Phosphorus, copper and zinc in solid and liquid fractions from full-scale and laboratory-separated pig slurry.

    PubMed

    Popovic, Olga; Hjorth, Maibritt; Jensen, Lars Stoumann

    2012-09-01

    Pig slurry separation is a slurry treatment technique that can reduce excess loads of P, Cu and Zn to the arable land. This study investigated the effects of different commercial and laboratory separation treatments for pig slurry on P, Cu and Zn distribution into solid and liquid fractions. Solid and liquid separation fractions were collected from two commercial separators installed on the farm. Five different separation treatments were performed (polymer flocculation and drainage; coagulation with iron sulphate addition and polymer flocculation and drainage; ozonation and centrifugation; centrifugation only; and natural sedimentation) on sow and suckling piglet raw slurry. Particle size fractionation was performed on raw slurry and all separation fractions by sequential wet sieving and P, Cu and Zn concentrations were then measured in the particle size classes. Dry matter and total P, Cu and Zn were separated with higher efficiency when chemical pretreatments with flocculants and coagulants were introduced before mechanical separation at both commercial and laboratory scale. When solid fractions are utilized as crop fertilizer (primarily as P fertilizer), the loads of Cu and Zn to the soils are not markedly different than the loads applied with raw slurry. When liquid fractions are used as crop fertilizer (primarily as N fertilizer), the loads of Cu and Zn are markedly lower than those supplied with raw slurry. The loads of Cu and Zn introduced to the soil were lowest on application of the liquid fraction produced by optimized separation treatments that included flocculation and coagulation.

  2. Deodorization of pig slurry and characterization of bacterial diversity using 16S rDNA sequence analysis.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Ok-Hwa; Raveendar, Sebastian; Kim, Young-Ju; Kim, Ji-Hun; Choi, Jung-Woo; Kim, Tae-Hun; Choi, Dong-Yoon; Jeon, Che Ok; Cho, Sung-Back; Lee, Kyung-Tai

    2014-11-01

    The concentration of major odor-causing compounds including phenols, indoles, short-chain fatty acids (SCFAs) and branched chain fatty acids (BCFAs) in response to the addition of powdered horse radish (PHR) and spent mushroom compost (SMC) was compared with control non-treated slurry (CNS) samples. A total of 97,465 rDNAs sequence reads were generated from three different samples (CNS, n = 2; PHR, n = 3; SMC, n = 3) using bar-coded pyrosequencing. The number of operational taxonomic units (OTUs) was lower in the PHR slurry compared with the other samples. A total of 11 phyla were observed in the slurry samples, while the phylogenetic analysis revealed that the slurry microbiome predominantly comprised members of the Bacteroidetes, Firmicutes, and Proteobacteria phyla. The rarefaction analysis showed the bacterial species richness varied among the treated samples. Overall, at the OTU level, 2,558 individual genera were classified, 276 genera were found among the three samples, and 1,832 additional genera were identified in the individual samples. A principal component analysis revealed the differences in microbial communities among the CNS, PHR, and SMC pig slurries. Correlation of the bacterial community structure with the Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG) predicted pathways showed that the treatments altered the metabolic capabilities of the slurry microbiota. Overall, these results demonstrated that the PHR and S MC treatments significantly reduced the malodor compounds in pig slurry (P < 0.05).

  3. Nitrogen recovery from pig slurry in a two-chambered bioelectrochemical system.

    PubMed

    Sotres, A; Cerrillo, M; Viñas, M; Bonmatí, A

    2015-10-01

    Abiotic batch experiments showed that ammonia migration from anode to cathode was favored by an increase in voltage, from 39.9% to 44.6%, using synthetic media. A slight increase in ammonia migration was observed when using pig slurry, reaching a maximum of 49.9%. In a continuously MFC fed with pig slurry with a stripping/absorption unit coupled to the cathode chamber, the highest nitrogen flux (7.2 g N d(-1) m(-2)) was achieved using buffer as catholyte. Nitrogen flux increased to 10.3 g N d(-1) m(-2) when shifting to MEC mode. A clear improvement in nitrogen flux (25.5 g N d(-1) m(-2)) was observed when using NaCl as catholyte. Besides, ammonia stripping was favored, reaching a nitrogen recovery of 94.3% in the absorption column, due to the high pH reached in the cathode. The microbial community analysis revealed an enrichment of certain taxonomic Eubacterial and Archaeal groups when the system shifted from MFC to MEC mode.

  4. Pig slurry application and irrigation effects on nitrate leaching in Mediterranean soil lysimeters.

    PubMed

    Daudén, A; Quílez, D; Vera, M V

    2004-01-01

    Land application of animal manures, such as pig slurry (PS), is a common practice in intensive-farming agriculture. However, this practice has a pitfall consisting of the loss of nutrients, in particular nitrate, toward water courses. The objective of this study was to evaluate nitrate leaching for three application rates of pig slurry (50, 100, and 200 Mg ha(-1)) and a control treatment of mineral fertilizer (275 kg N ha(-1)) applied to corn grown in 10 drainage lysimeters. The effects of two irrigation regimes (low vs. high irrigation efficiency) were also analyzed. In the first two irrigation events, drainage NO(3)-N concentrations as high as 145 and 69 mg L(-1) were measured in the high and moderate PS rate treatments, respectively, in the low irrigation efficiency treatments. This indicates the fast transformation of the PS ammonium into nitrate and the subsequent leaching of the transformed nitrate. Drainage NO(3)-N concentration and load increased linearly by 0.69 mg NO(3)-N L(-1) and 4.6 kg NO(3)-N ha(-1), respectively, for each 10 kg N ha(-1) applied over the minimum of 275 kg N ha(-1). An increase in irrigation efficiency did not induce a significant increase of leachate concentration and the amount of nitrate leached decreased about 65%. Application of low PS doses before sowing complemented with sidedressing N application and a good irrigation management are the key factors to reduce nitrate contamination of water courses.

  5. Replacement of mineral fertilizers with anaerobically digested pig slurry in paddy fields: assessment of plant growth and grain quality.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jin; Wang, Minyan; Cao, Yucheng; Liang, Peng; Wu, Shengchun; Leung, Anna Oi Wah; Christie, Peter

    2015-08-07

    Rice cultivation requires large quantities of irrigation water and mineral fertilizers. This provides an opportunity for the recycling of the plant nutrients in anaerobically digested pig slurry, large amounts of which are generated in Chinese pig farms. Hence, to promote the sustainable development of livestock and poultry breeding and rice production, a micro-plot field experiment was carried out to assess whether or not slurry can replace mineral fertilizers in rice paddy production in terms of plant tillering, grain quality, and yields. The results indicate that the total N content of the slurry can serve as an alternative source of N when compared to the control (450 kg ha(-1) commercial compound fertilizer (N/P2O5/K2O = 15:15:15) as basal fertilizer, 300 kg ha(-1) urea (N% = 46), and 150 kg ha(-1) commercial compound fertilizer as top-dressed fertilizer). No negative effects on plant growth or grain yield were observed, although there may be a potential risk due to an increase in grain Cu concentration. The amylose content and gel consistency of the rice grains were enhanced significantly by the use of slurry as a basal fertilizer, but the grain protein and total amino acid contents decreased. The results suggest that anaerobically digested pig slurry can replace mineral fertilizers in rice production when applied as a basal dressing together with urea and commercial compound fertilizer as top-dressed fertilizers.

  6. Modelling the potential of slurry management technologies to reduce the constraints of environmental legislation on pig production.

    PubMed

    Hutchings, Nicholas J; ten Hoeve, Marieke; Jensen, Rikke; Bruun, Sander; Søtoft, Lene F

    2013-11-30

    Limits on land applications of slurry nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) are used to restrict losses of nutrients caused by livestock production. Here, we used a model to assess technologies that enable a more even geographic distribution of slurry nutrients to land. Technologies included were screw press slurry separation, with or without solid fraction composting, centrifuge separation with or without liquid fraction ammonia (NH3) stripping, and anaerobic digestion. Regulatory constraints were placed first on the application in slurry of N, then P, then N and P both on the producing (donor) and receiving (recipient) farms. Finally, a constraint preventing an increase in donor farm NH3 emissions was imposed. Separation had little effect on N losses per unit mass of slurry, but NH3 stripping led to a reduction. Centrifuge separation allowed a greater increase in pig production than a screw press, especially with P regulation. NH3 stripping was only advantageous with N regulation or when combined with NH3 scrubbing of pig housing ventilation air, when donor farm NH3 emissions were a constraint. There was a production penalty for using composting or anaerobic digestion. The choice of appropriate slurry management option therefore depends on the focus of the regulation. Nuanced and therefore complex regulations are necessary to take advantage of synergies and avoid cross-policy conflicts and incongruencies.

  7. Comparative nitrogen use efficiency of urea and pig slurry for regrowth yield and nutritive value in perennial ryegrass sward.

    PubMed

    Park, Sang Hyun; Lee, Bok Rye; Cho, Won Mo; Kim, Tae Hwan

    2017-04-01

    The study aimed to assess the N use efficiency (NUE) of pig slurry (in comparison with chemical fertilizer) for each regrowth yield and annual herbage production and their nutritive value. Consecutive field experiments were separately performed using a single application with a full dose of N (200 kg N/ha) in 2014 and by four split applications in 2015 in different sites. The experiment consisted of three treatments: i) control plots that received no additional N, ii) chemical fertilizer-N as urea, and iii) pig-slurry-N with five replicates. The effect of N fertilization on herbage yield, N recovery in herbage, residual inorganic N in soil, and crude protein were significantly positive. When comparing the NUE between the two N sources (urea and pig slurry), pig slurry was significantly less effective for the earlier two regrowth periods, as shown by lower regrowth dry matter (DM) yield, N amount recovered in herbage, and inorganic N availability in soil at the 1st and 2nd cut compared to those of urea-applied plots. However, the effect of split application of the two N sources was significantly positive at the last two regrowth periods (at the 3rd and 4th cut). The two N sources and/or split application had little or no influence on neutral detergent fiber (NDF) content, acid detergent fiber (ADF) content, and in vitro DM digestibility, whereas cutting date was a large source of variation for these variables, resulting in a significant increase in in vitro DM digestibility for the last two regrowth periods when an increase in NDF and ADF content occurred. Split application of N reduced the N loss via nitrate leaching by 36% on average for the two N sources compared to a single application. The pig slurry-N was utilized as efficiently as urea-N for annual herbage yield, with a significant increase in NUE especially for the latter regrowth periods.

  8. Comparative nitrogen use efficiency of urea and pig slurry for regrowth yield and nutritive value in perennial ryegrass sward

    PubMed Central

    Park, Sang Hyun; Lee, Bok Rye; Cho, Won Mo; Kim, Tae Hwan

    2017-01-01

    Objective The study aimed to assess the N use efficiency (NUE) of pig slurry (in comparison with chemical fertilizer) for each regrowth yield and annual herbage production and their nutritive value. Methods Consecutive field experiments were separately performed using a single application with a full dose of N (200 kg N/ha) in 2014 and by four split applications in 2015 in different sites. The experiment consisted of three treatments: i) control plots that received no additional N, ii) chemical fertilizer-N as urea, and iii) pig-slurry-N with five replicates. Results The effect of N fertilization on herbage yield, N recovery in herbage, residual inorganic N in soil, and crude protein were significantly positive. When comparing the NUE between the two N sources (urea and pig slurry), pig slurry was significantly less effective for the earlier two regrowth periods, as shown by lower regrowth dry matter (DM) yield, N amount recovered in herbage, and inorganic N availability in soil at the 1st and 2nd cut compared to those of urea-applied plots. However, the effect of split application of the two N sources was significantly positive at the last two regrowth periods (at the 3rd and 4th cut). The two N sources and/or split application had little or no influence on neutral detergent fiber (NDF) content, acid detergent fiber (ADF) content, and in vitro DM digestibility, whereas cutting date was a large source of variation for these variables, resulting in a significant increase in in vitro DM digestibility for the last two regrowth periods when an increase in NDF and ADF content occurred. Split application of N reduced the N loss via nitrate leaching by 36% on average for the two N sources compared to a single application. Conclusion The pig slurry-N was utilized as efficiently as urea-N for annual herbage yield, with a significant increase in NUE especially for the latter regrowth periods. PMID:27608633

  9. Radical change of Zn speciation in pig slurry amended soil: Key role of nano-sized sulfide particles.

    PubMed

    Formentini, Thiago Augusto; Legros, Samuel; Fernandes, Cristovão Vicente Scapulatempo; Pinheiro, Adilson; Le Bars, Maureen; Levard, Clément; Mallmann, Fábio Joel Kochem; da Veiga, Milton; Doelsch, Emmanuel

    2017-03-01

    Spreading livestock manure as fertilizer on farmlands is a widespread practice. It represents the major source of heavy metal(loid)s (HM) input in agricultural soils. Since zinc (Zn) is present at high concentrations in manure, it poses special environmental concerns related to phytotoxicity, groundwater contamination, and introduction in the food chain. Therefore, investigations on the fate and behavior of manure-borne Zn, when it enters the soil environment, are necessary to predict the environmental effects. Nevertheless, long-term field studies assessing Zn speciation in the organic waste matrix, as well as within the soil after manure application, are lacking. This study was designed to fill this gap. Using SEM-EDS and XAS analysis, we reported the following new results: (i) ZnS made up 100% of the Zn speciation in the pig slurry (the highest proportion of ZnS ever observed in organic waste); and (ii) ZnS aggregates were about 1-μm diameter (the smallest particle size ever reported in pig slurry). Moreover, the pig slurry containing ZnS was spread on the soil over an 11-year period, totaling 22 applications, and the resulting Zn speciation within the amended soil was analyzed. Surprisingly, ZnS, i.e. the only species responsible for a nearly 2-fold increase in the Zn concentration within the amended soil, was not detected in this soil. Based on SEM-EDS and XAS observations, we put forward the hypothesis that Zn in the pig slurry consisted of nano-sized ZnS crystallites that further aggregated. The low stability of ZnS nanoparticles within oxic and complex environments such as the studied soil was the key explanation for the radical change in pig slurry-borne Zn speciation after long-term amendments.

  10. Animal Slurry Acidification Affects Particle Size Distribution and Improves Separation Efficiency.

    PubMed

    Regueiro, I; Pociask, M; Coutinho, J; Fangueiro, D

    2016-05-01

    Solid-liquid separation is performed to improve slurry management, and acidification of the slurry is used to reduce ammonia emissions. Acidification is known to affect slurry characteristics, and we hypothesized that it may affect mechanical separation. Our objective in this study was to assess the effects of slurry acidification on particle size distribution and separation efficiency. Two types of slurry, aged pig and fresh dairy, and two different acidification additives, sulfuric acid and aluminum sulfate (alum), were studied. We found that acidification with sulfuric acid promoted phosphorus (P) solubilization for both slurries, but no change was observed with alum. More ammonium was found in the acidified dairy slurry compared with raw dairy slurry, but no difference was found in aged pig slurry. Acidification before separation increased the proportion of the solid fraction in the slurries, and the effect was significantly higher with alum. When alum was used to acidify the slurries, the proportion of particles larger than 100 μm increased significantly, as did the P concentration in this particle size range. The efficiency of P separation increased markedly in both slurries when alum was used, with the removal to the solid fraction of the dairy slurry being almost complete (90%). Because the priority in mechanical separation is to increase the P content in the solid fraction, the use of alum before centrifugation may be the most suitable option for enhancing its nutrient content. We conclude that separation efficiency and particle size distribution are significantly affected by acidification, but the extent of the effects depends on slurry type and on the type of additive used for acidification. Copyright © by the American Society of Agronomy, Crop Science Society of America, and Soil Science Society of America, Inc.

  11. Phosphorus leaching from loamy sand and clay loam topsoils after application of pig slurry.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jian; Aronsson, Helena; Bergström, Lars; Sharpley, Andrew

    2012-12-01

    Appropriate management of animal waste is essential for guaranteeing good water quality. A laboratory leaching study with intact soil columns was performed to investigate the risk of phosphorus (P) leaching from a clay loam and a loamy sand. The columns (0.2 m deep) were irrigated before and after application of pig slurry on the surface or after incorporation, or application of mineral P, each at a rate of 30 kg P ha(-1). The two soils had different initial P contents (i.e. the ammonium lactate-extractable P was 65 and 142 mg kg(-1) for the clay loam and loamy sand, respectively), but had similar P sorption characteristics (P sorption index 3.0) and degree of P saturation (17-21%). Concentrations of dissolved reactive P (DRP) and total P (TP) before P application were significantly higher in leachate from the loamy sand (TP 0.21 mg L(-1)) than from the clay loam (TP 0.13 mg L(-1)), but only increased significantly after P application to the clay loam. The highest concentrations were found when slurry was surface-applied (DRP 1.77 mg L(-1)), while incorporation decreased the DRP concentration by 64% in the clay loam. Thus moderate slurry application to a sandy soil with low P saturation did not pose a major risk of P leaching. However, application of P increased the risk of P leaching from the clay loam, irrespective of application method and despite low P saturation. The results show the importance of considering soil texture and structure in addition to soil chemical characteristics in risk assessments of P leaching. Structured soils such as the clay loam used in this study are high risk soils and application of P to bare soil during wet periods, e.g. in autumn or spring, should be followed by incorporation or avoided completely.

  12. Effect of natural zeolite (clinoptilolite) on microbial decomposition processes in stored pig-slurry solids.

    PubMed

    Vargová, M; Ondrasovicová, O; Sasáková, N; Ondrasovic, M; Novák, P; Krajnák, M

    1999-01-01

    The solid fraction (SF) of pig slurry obtained in the first stage of aerobic slurry treatment was amended with 1 and 2% zeolite (clinoptilolite) and stored for 12 weeks under anaerobic conditions or with turning after 3 and 6 weeks of storage. In addition to that SF was mixed with 2% zeolite, 50% (V/V) sawdust, and both sawdust and zeolite, and stored for 6 weeks with turning after 1 and 3 weeks. Plate counts of psychrophilic, mesophilic, coliform and fecal coliform bacteria, determined during the storage, corresponded to the development of temperature in the core of the substrates. An effect of amendment of SF with zeolite and sawdust on plate counts of selected bacteria was observed, dependent on the zeolite dose. The thermophilic phase was not reached in any of the investigated substrates. The populations of fecal coliforms in the substrate amended with 1% zeolite and turned after 3 and 6 weeks decreased after 11 weeks down to 500 CFU/g substrate.

  13. Response of maize yield, nitrate leaching, and soil nitrogen to pig slurry combined with mineral nitrogen.

    PubMed

    Yagüe, María R; Quílez, Dolores

    2010-01-01

    The application of pig (Sus scrofa) slurry (PS) is a common fertilization practice that may affect nitrate concentrations and loads in drainage and receiving water bodies. To protect water resources, many agricultural areas are being designated as vulnerable to nitrate contamination, and there is a need for scientific data aiming at reducing nitrate exports from these vulnerable zones by optimizing N fertilization strategies. The objective of this work, conducted in drainage lysimeters in a 4-yr monoculture maize (Zea mays L.) crop, is to assess the effects of four fertilization strategies combining PS (30, 60, 90, and 120 t ha(-1)) and mineral N on yield, changes in soil mineral N, and concentration and mass of nitrate in drainage waters. Grain yield was not affected by treatments in the four experimental years, nor was the soil mineral N at the end of the experiment. Effects of fertilization strategies on nitrate concentration and mass in drainage waters were detected only after 3 yr of repeated PS applications. The mass of nitrate leached over the 4 yr was positively related to the total amount of N applied, either organic or mineral. In year 2003, precipitation in spring reduced N availability for the crop in treatments with rates > or = 60 t PS ha(-1). The N-budget revealed that the transport pathways for 25% of N inputs to the system are unknown. The presowing application of pig slurry at 30 t ha(-1) complemented with mineral N at side-dressing, was the most efficient from an environmental standpoint (4-yr average of 145 kg grain yield kg(-1) N leached).

  14. Survival of free-living Acholeplasma in aerated pig manure slurry revealed by 13C-labeled bacterial biomass probing

    PubMed Central

    Hanajima, Dai; Aoyagi, Tomo; Hori, Tomoyuki

    2015-01-01

    Many studies have been performed on microbial community succession and/or predominant taxa during the composting process; however, the ecophysiological roles of microorganisms are not well understood because microbial community structures are highly diverse and dynamic. Bacteria are the most important contributors to the organic-waste decomposition process, while decayed bacterial cells can serve as readily digested substrates for other microbial populations. In this study, we investigated the active bacterial species responsible for the assimilation of dead bacterial cells and their components in aerated pig manure slurry by using 13C-labeled bacterial biomass probing. After 3 days of forced aeration, 13C-labeled and unlabeled dead Escherichia coli cell suspensions were added to the slurry. The suspensions contained 13C-labeled and unlabeled bacterial cell components, possibly including the cell wall and membrane, as well as intracellular materials. RNA extracted from each slurry sample 2 h after addition of E. coli suspension was density-resolved by isopycnic centrifugation and analyzed by terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism, followed by cloning and sequencing of bacterial 16S rRNA genes. In the heavy isotopically labeled RNA fraction, the predominant 13C-assimilating population was identified as belonging to the genus Acholeplasma, which was not detected in control heavy RNA. Acholeplasma spp. have limited biosynthetic capabilities and possess a wide variety of transporters, resulting in their metabolic dependence on external carbon and energy sources. The prevalence of Acholeplasma spp. was further confirmed in aerated pig manure slurry from four different pig farms by pyrosequencing of 16S rRNA genes; their relative abundance was ∼4.4%. Free-living Acholeplasma spp. had a competitive advantage for utilizing dead bacterial cells and their components more rapidly relative to other microbial populations, thus allowing the survival and prevalence

  15. Leaching and crop uptake of nitrogen and phosphorus from pig slurry as affected by different application rates.

    PubMed

    Bergström, Lars; Kirchmann, Holger

    2006-01-01

    The influence of increasing pig slurry applications on leaching and crop uptake of N and P by cereals was evaluated in a 3-yr study of lysimeters filled with a sandy soil. The slurry was applied at N rates of 50 (S50), 100 (S100), 150 (S150), and 200 (S200) kg ha(-1) during 2 of the 3 yr. The P rates applied with slurry were: 40 (S50), 80 (S100), 120 (S150), and 160 (S200) kg ha(-1) yr(-1). Simultaneously, NH4NO3 and Ca(H2PO4)2 were applied at rates of 100 kg N ha(-1) and 50 kg P ha(-1), respectively, to additional lysimeters (F100), while others were left unfertilized (F0). During the 3-yr period, the leaching load of total N tended to increase with increasing slurry application to, on average, 139 kg ha(-1) at the highest application rate (S200). The corresponding N leaching loads (kg ha(-1)) in the other treatments were: 75 (F0), 103 (F100), 93 (S50), 120 (S100), and 128 (S150). The loads of slurry-derived N in the S100, S150, and S200 treatments were significantly larger (P < 0.05) than those of fertilizer-derived N. In contrast, P leaching tended to decrease with increasing input of slurry, and it was lower in all treatments that received P at or above 50 kg P ha(-1) yr(-1) with slurry or fertilizer than in the unfertilized treatment. The crop use efficiency of added N and P was clearly higher when NH4NO3 and Ca(H2PO4)2 were used rather than slurry (60 vs. 35% for N, 38 vs. 6-9% for P), irrespective of slurry application rate. Therefore, from both a production and water quality point of view, inorganic fertilizers seem to have environmental benefits over pig slurry when used on sandy soils.

  16. Triggered antioxidant defense mechanism in maize grown in soil with accumulation of Cu and Zn due to intensive application of pig slurry.

    PubMed

    Girotto, Eduardo; Ceretta, Carlos A; Rossato, Liana V; Farias, Julia G; Tiecher, Tadeu L; De Conti, Lessandro; Schmatz, Roberta; Brunetto, Gustavo; Schetinger, Maria R C; Nicoloso, Fernando T

    2013-07-01

    The present study investigated changes in both the growth parameters and the enzymatic and non-enzymatic antioxidant systems of maize (Zea may L.) plants grown in Typic Hapludalf soil containing an accumulation of Cu and Zn. This accumulation developed because the soil received nineteen applications of pig slurry in no-tillage system over seven years. In this study, the maize plants were grown for fifteen and 25 days after emergence (DAE) in pots containing undisturbed and disturbed soil samples collected from a field experiment that received the rates 0, 20, 40 and 80m(3)ha(-1) of pig slurry, which totalized the amount of 0, 380, 760 and 1520m(3)ha(-1) of pig slurry in seven years, respectively, and phosphorus (P)+potassium (K) treatment (in disturbed soil samples). The maize plants grown in the undisturbed soil samples with an accumulation of Cu and Zn did not indicate an apparent decrease in growth. However, when compared to the treatment with PK fertilization, the maize plants grown in the disturbed soil with pig slurry treatments indicated higher lipid peroxidation and a number of senescent leaves, as well as a significant decrease in plant height. Additionally, when compared to the PK treatment, the leaf superoxide dismutase and ascorbate peroxidase activities decreased and increased, respectively, with the addition of pig slurry treatments in the disturbed soil at 25 DAE. In general, when compared to the treatments with 20m(3)ha(-1) of pig slurry and PK at fifteen and 25 DAE, the leaf ascorbic acid and non-protein thiol groups concentrations decreased with the addition of 40 and 80m(3)ha(-1) of pig slurry. This result suggests that the excess of Cu and Zn in the pig slurry significantly changed the antioxidant system of the maize plants. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Dissolution of particulate phosphorus in pig slurry through biological acidification: A critical step for maximum phosphorus recovery as struvite.

    PubMed

    Piveteau, Simon; Picard, Sylvie; Dabert, Patrick; Daumer, Marie-Line

    2017-08-08

    Recycling phosphorus as struvite from pig slurry requires an acidification step to dissolve the inorganic solids containing most of the phosphorus. This study focused on the biological acidification of several pig slurries using sucrose as a model organic co-substrate. Lactic acid fermentation occurred systematically, dissolving 60-90% of TP (total phosphorus) and T-Mg (total magnesium) at pH 6 or lower. Optimal pH range for maximum P dissolution aimed at struvite recovery was 5.5-6. A simple model was developed correlating pH, sucrose and buffer capacity to optimize P dissolution and future recovery using real organic waste. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. The effect of urea and ammonia treatments on the survival of Salmonella spp. and Yersinia enterocolitica in pig slurry.

    PubMed

    Bolton, D J; Ivory, C; McDowell, D A

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the survival of Salmonella and Yersinia enterocolitica strains in pig slurry and evaluate urea and ammonia as disinfection strategies. Salmonella Anatum, Salmonella Derby, Salmonella Typhimurium DT19 and Y. enterocolitica bioserotypes 4, O:3, 2, O:5,27 and 1A, O:6,30 were selectively marked by insertion of the plasmid, pGLO encoding for green fluorescent protein and for ampicillin resistance. Strain cocktails were inoculated into fresh pig slurry (control), slurry treated with urea [final concentration 2% w/w, (0.33 mol l(-1) )] and slurry treated with ammonia [final concentration 0.5% w/w, (0.3 mol l(-1) )] and stored at 4, 14 and 25°C. Bacterial counts were determined at regular intervals on xylose lysine deoxycholate agar (XLD), and XLD supplemented with ampicillin (0.1 mg ml(-1) ) and arabinose (0.6 mg ml(-1) ) for Salmonella and cefsulodin-irgasan-novobiocin agar (CIN) and CIN supplemented with ampicillin and arabinose for Y. enterocolitica. The pH of the control-, urea- and ammonia-treated samples ranged from 7.1 to 7.7, 8.8 to 8.9 and 8.0 to 8.3, respectively. Salmonella D(4) values ranged from 2.71 to 21.29 days, D(14) values from 2.72 to 11.62 days and D(25) values from 1.76 to 6.85 days. The equivalent D values ranges for the Y. enterocolitica strains were 3.7-19.23, 1.8-16.67 and 1.63-7.09 days, respectively. Treatment significantly (P < 0.01) affected D values with control > ammonia > urea, as did incubation temperature; 4 > 14 > 25°C. Urea and to a lesser extent ammonia may be used to disinfect Salmonella- and/or Y. enterocolitica-contaminated pig slurry, decreasing the storage time required while increasing its fertilizer value. This study presents data supporting the treatment of pig slurry to kill important zoonotic agents, thereby reducing environmental contamination, cross-infection of other animals and decreasing zoonotic disease in the food chain. © 2012 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  19. Effects of long term raw pig slurry inputs on nutrient and metal contamination of tropical volcanogenic soils, Uvéa Island (South Pacific).

    PubMed

    Gunkel-Grillon, P; Roth, E; Laporte-Magoni, C; Le Mestre, M

    2015-11-15

    In small Polynesian islands, family pig breeding is usually conducted without recovery of pig slurry. Raw pig slurry is spread onto the soil without any treatment. So far, most of the studies were carried out in temperate climate and for industrial digested pig slurry applications on agricultural lands. In the present case study, conducted in Uvéa Island, the aim is to determine if long term application of raw pig slurry on tropical soils, naturally rich in heavy metals has a significant influence on elements concentrations and mobility. Two types of tropical soils and two pig breeding systems, pig enclosure on small concrete pens or pig enclosure in large land pens, were investigated. Here we demonstrate that raw pig slurry inputs on soils can lead to an increase of total nitrogen and phosphorus content with high Contamination Factors. The Pollution Load Index values (1.3; 5.3; 2.5; 2.3) were indicative of multi-heavy metals pollution (Fe, Mn, Al, Cu, Zn, Cr and Ni) in mixed calcareous soils of the coastal area and they are exchangeable while they are immobilized or less mobile in inland pure ferralitic soils. For mixed calcareous soils of the coastal area, family pig breeding represents a drainage risk of soluble species (phosphorus, inorganic nitrogen, Fe, Mn, Al, Cu, Zn, Cr and Ni). For inland ferralitic soils, family pig breeding is more compatible with a sustainable management of the environment in Uvéa Island and by extension in volcanic tropical islands with respect to the investigated chemical elements. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  20. Composting of the solid fraction of digestate derived from pig slurry: Biological processes and compost properties.

    PubMed

    Tambone, Fulvia; Terruzzi, Laura; Scaglia, Barbara; Adani, Fabrizio

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this paper was to assess the characteristics of the solid fractions (SF) obtained by mechanical separation of digestate, their compostability and compost quality. To do so, the SF of digestates obtained from anaerobic digestion of pig slurry, energy crops and agro-industrial residues were sampled in five plants located in Northern Italy. Results obtained indicated that anaerobic digestion by itself promoted the high biological stability of biomasses with a Potential Dynamic Respiration Index (PDRI) close to 1000 mgO2 kg V S(-1)h(-1). Subsequent composting of digestates, with an added bulking agent, did not give remarkably different results, and led only to a slight modification of the characteristics of the initial non-composted mixtures; the composts obtained fully respected the legal limits for high quality compost. Chemical studies of organic matter composition of the biomasses by using CP MAS (13)C NMR, indicated that the compost was composed of a high relative content of O-alkyl-C (71.47% of total C) (cellulose and hemicelluloses) and a low alkyl-C (12.42%) (i.e. volatile fatty acids, steroid-like molecules, aliphatic biopolymers and proteins).

  1. Survival of model bacterial strains and helminth eggs in the course of mesophilic anaerobic digestion of pig slurry.

    PubMed

    Juris, P; Tóth, F; Lauková, A; Plachý, P; Dubinský, P; Sokol, J

    1996-05-01

    The effect of methanogenesis on the survival of model bacterial strains (Escherichia coli EC 5, Staphylococcus aureus SA 11, Enterococcus faecium CCM 4231) and non-embryonated helminth eggs (Ascaris suum) was investigated in pig slurry. Two pilot-plant experiments were carried out in two anaerobic digesters (800 and 1,000 litre) in a mesophilic thermal range (35-37 degrees C). The mean hydraulic retention time of the digesters was 20 days. The methanogenesis process was monitored by determining the following chemical parameters: pH, N-NH3, total dry matter (kg/day), organic matter (kg/day) production of methane by supplied and degraded organic matter (m3/kg). The results obtained allow us to state that the anaerobic stabilization of pig slurry in the mesophilic temperature range resulted in total devitalization of model bacterial strains E. coli EC 5 and Ent. faecium CCM 4231. St. aureus SA 11 cells, exposed to the above mentioned conditions, were also reduced in their number from 10.04 to 3.27 and from 8.69 to 2.77 log cfu/ml. It is assumed that the longer retention time of excrements in the digester could also result in total devitalization of St. aureus SA 11 cells. From the microbiological point of view, the above mentioned facts indicate a sufficient hygienization effect of the anaerobic fermentation on the contaminated pig excrements. The survival of A. suum eggs was little affected by the 20-day anaerobic mesophilic digestion of pig slurry. Only 17 or 18% (F1, F2) of the non-embryonated A. suum eggs were damaged after the 20-day exposure.

  2. A full-scale study of treatment of pig slurry by composting: kinetic changes in chemical and microbial properties.

    PubMed

    Ros, M; García, C; Hernández, T

    2006-01-01

    Since the indiscriminate disposal of pig slurry can cause not only air pollution and bad odours but also nutrient pollution of ground waters and superficial waters, composting is sometimes used as one environmentally acceptable method for recycling pig manure. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of composting pig slurry on its sanitation (evaluated by ecotoxicity assays and pathogen content determination), as well as to determine the effect of a carbon-rich bulking agent (wood shavings, WS) and the starting C/N ratio on the changes undergone by different chemical (volatile organic matter, C and N fractions) and microbiological (microbial biomass C, ATP, dehydrogenase activity, urease, protease, phosphatase, and beta-glucosidase activities) parameters during composting. Pig slurry mixed with bulking agent (P+WS) and the solid faction separated from it, both with (PSF+WS) and without bulking agent (PSF), were composted for 13 weeks. Samples for analysis were taken from composting piles at the start of the process and at 3, 6, 9, and 13 weeks after the beginning of composting. The total organic carbon, water soluble C and ammonium content decreased with composting, while Kjeldahl N and nitrate content increased. The nitrification process in the PSF+WS pile was more intense than in the PSF or P+WS composting piles. The pathogen content decreased with composting, as did phytotoxic compounds, while the germination index increased with compost age. Piles with bulking agent showed higher values of basal respiration, microbial biomass carbon, ATP and hydrolase activities during the composting process than piles without bulking agent.

  3. Detection of copper(II) and zinc(II) binding to humic acids from pig slurry and amended soils by fluorescence spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Hernández, Diana; Plaza, César; Senesi, Nicola; Polo, Alfredo

    2006-09-01

    The effect of the consecutive annual additions of pig slurry at rates of 0 (control), 90 and 150 m3 ha(-1) yr(-1) after a 7-year period on the Cu(II) and Zn(II) binding behavior of soil HAs was investigated in a field experiment. A fluorescence titration method and a single site model were used for determining metal ion complexing capacities and stability constants of metal ion complexes of HAs isolated from pig slurry and unamended and amended soils. With respect to control soil HA, pig-slurry HA featured much smaller Cu(II) and Zn(II) binding capacities and stability constants. Pig-slurry application to soil decreased Cu(II) and Zn(II) complexing capacities and binding affinities of soil HA. These effects increased with increasing the rate per year of PS application to soil, and are expected to have a large impact on bioavailability, mobilization, and transport of Cu(II) and Zn(II) ions in pig slurry-amended soils.

  4. Composting of the solid fraction of digestate derived from pig slurry: Biological processes and compost properties

    SciTech Connect

    Tambone, Fulvia Terruzzi, Laura; Scaglia, Barbara; Adani, Fabrizio

    2015-01-15

    Highlights: • Anaerobic digestion leads to the production of a biologically stable digestate. • Solid–liquid separation produces a solid fraction having high fertilizer value. • Composting process shows low biological activity due to high biological stability of digestate. • Solid digestate fraction can be composted in a short time or used directly as organic fertilizer. - Abstract: The aim of this paper was to assess the characteristics of the solid fractions (SF) obtained by mechanical separation of digestate, their compostability and compost quality. To do so, the SF of digestates obtained from anaerobic digestion of pig slurry, energy crops and agro-industrial residues were sampled in five plants located in Northern Italy. Results obtained indicated that anaerobic digestion by itself promoted the high biological stability of biomasses with a Potential Dynamic Respiration Index (PDRI) close to 1000 mgO{sub 2} kg V S{sup −1} h{sup −1}. Subsequent composting of digestates, with an added bulking agent, did not give remarkably different results, and led only to a slight modification of the characteristics of the initial non-composted mixtures; the composts obtained fully respected the legal limits for high quality compost. Chemical studies of organic matter composition of the biomasses by using CP MAS {sup 13}C NMR, indicated that the compost was composed of a high relative content of O-alkyl-C (71.47% of total C) (cellulose and hemicelluloses) and a low alkyl-C (12.42%) (i.e. volatile fatty acids, steroid-like molecules, aliphatic biopolymers and proteins)

  5. Marble wastes and pig slurry improve the environmental and plant-relevant properties of mine tailings.

    PubMed

    Kabas, S; Faz, A; Acosta, J A; Arocena, J M; Zornoza, R; Martínez-Martínez, S; Carmona, D M

    2014-02-01

    Poor soil fertility is often the biggest challenge to the establishment of vegetation in mine wastes deposits. We conducted field trials in the El Gorguel and El Lirio sites in SE Spain, two representative tailing ponds of similar properties except for pH, to understand the environmental and plant-relevant benefits of marble waste (MW) and pig slurry (PS) applications to mine tailings. Low pH (5.4) tailings (El Lirio) exhibit reduction of up to fourfold in bio-availability of metals as shown by the DTPA-Zn, Pb, water-soluble Zn, Pb and up to 3× for water-soluble Cd. Tailings in El Gorguel have high pH (7.4) and did not exhibit significant trends in the reductions of water-extractable Zn, Pb, Cd and Cu. Improvements to the edaphic (plant-relevant) properties of tailings after the amendments are not as sensitive to pH compared to the environmental characteristics. The two sites had increases in aggregate stability, organic matter (total N and organic C) although total N is higher in the El Gorguel (up to 212 μg N kg(-1)) than the El Lirio (up to 26 μg N kg(-1)). However, cation exchange capacities are similar in both sites at 15.2 cmol(+) kg(-1). We conclude that the characteristics, especially pH, of tailing materials significantly influence the fate of metals but not improvements to plant-relevant properties such as cation exchange capacity and aggregate stability 1 year after the application of MW and PS amendments.

  6. Effect of fertilising with pig slurry and chicken manure on GHG emissions from Mediterranean paddies.

    PubMed

    Maris, S C; Teira-Esmatges, M R; Bosch-Serra, A D; Moreno-García, B; Català, M M

    2016-11-01

    Soil fertilisation affects greenhouse gas emissions. The objective of this study was to compare the effect of different fertilisation strategies on N2O, CH4 emissions and on ecosystem respiration (CO2 emissions), during different periods of rice cultivation (rice crop, postharvest period, and seedling) under Mediterranean climate. Emissions were quantified weekly by the photoacoustic technique at two sites. At Site 1 (2011 and 2012), background treatments were 2 doses of chicken manure (CM): 90 and 170kgNH4(+)-Nha(-1) (CM-90, CM-170), urea (U, 150kgNha(-1)) and no-N (control). Fifty kilogram N ha(-1) ammonium sulphate (AS) were topdress applied to all of them. At Site 2 (2012), background treatments were 2 doses of pig slurry (PS): 91 and 152kgNH4(+)-Nha(-1) (PS-91, PS-152) and ammonium sulphate (AS) at 120kgNH4(+)-Nha(-1) and no-N (control). Sixty kilogram NH4(+)-Nha(-1) as AS were topdress applied to AS and PS-91. During seedling, global warming potential (GWP) was ~3.5-17% of that of the whole rice crop for the CM treatments. The postharvest period was a net sink for CH4, and CO2 emissions only increased for the CM-170 treatment (up to 2MgCO2ha(-1)). The GWP of the entire rice crop reached 17Mg CO2-eqha(-1) for U, and was 14 for CM-170, and 37 for CM-90. The application of PS at agronomic doses (~170kgNha(-1)) allowed high yields (~7.4Mgha(-1)), the control of GWP (~6.5MgCO2-eqha(-1)), and a 13% reduction in greenhouse gas intensity (GHGI) to 0.89kgCO2-eqkg(-1) when compared to AS (1.02kgCO2-eqkg(-1)). Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Effect of Storage Period on the Changes of Odorous Compound Concentrations and Bacterial Ecology for Identifying the Cause of Odor Production from Pig Slurry

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Ok Hwa; Cho, Sung Back; Han, Deug Woo; Lee, Sang Ryoung; Kwag, Jeong Hoon; Park, Sung Kwon

    2016-01-01

    Odor from buildings where pigs are housed is generated by anaerobic fermentation of undigested materials in pig slurry stored for several weeks in pit. The objective of this study was to investigate the effect of storage period on the level of odorous compounds in pig slurry and on its bacterial community. A slurry sample (15 L) was taken from the pit of a finisher pig building and incubated in acryl chambers for six- weeks. Slurry for analysis was sampled every two-week. Levels of odorous compounds in the slurry sample were drastically changed after two weeks of storage period; levels of phenols and short chain fatty acids (SCFAs) were decreased (P<0.05), whereas indoles and branched-chain fatty acids (BCFAs) were increased (P<0.05). Among dominant bacteria, Bacteroides and Porphyromonadacese_uc_g revealed a strong positive correlation with the levels of phenols and SCFAs. Populations of AC160630_g, Acholeplasmatales_uc_g, Mollicutes_uc_g and Cloacamonas_f_uc_g positively correlated with indole and BCFAs content. Taken together, levels of odorous compounds were increased after two weeks of storage, possibly because of changes in the predominant bacterial groups to those that use protein as a carbon source in the hypo-carbohydrate conditions. PMID:27642752

  8. Effect of Storage Period on the Changes of Odorous Compound Concentrations and Bacterial Ecology for Identifying the Cause of Odor Production from Pig Slurry.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Ok Hwa; Cho, Sung Back; Han, Deug Woo; Lee, Sang Ryoung; Kwag, Jeong Hoon; Park, Sung Kwon

    2016-01-01

    Odor from buildings where pigs are housed is generated by anaerobic fermentation of undigested materials in pig slurry stored for several weeks in pit. The objective of this study was to investigate the effect of storage period on the level of odorous compounds in pig slurry and on its bacterial community. A slurry sample (15 L) was taken from the pit of a finisher pig building and incubated in acryl chambers for six- weeks. Slurry for analysis was sampled every two-week. Levels of odorous compounds in the slurry sample were drastically changed after two weeks of storage period; levels of phenols and short chain fatty acids (SCFAs) were decreased (P<0.05), whereas indoles and branched-chain fatty acids (BCFAs) were increased (P<0.05). Among dominant bacteria, Bacteroides and Porphyromonadacese_uc_g revealed a strong positive correlation with the levels of phenols and SCFAs. Populations of AC160630_g, Acholeplasmatales_uc_g, Mollicutes_uc_g and Cloacamonas_f_uc_g positively correlated with indole and BCFAs content. Taken together, levels of odorous compounds were increased after two weeks of storage, possibly because of changes in the predominant bacterial groups to those that use protein as a carbon source in the hypo-carbohydrate conditions.

  9. On-farm measurement of electrical conductivity for the estimation of ammonium nitrogen concentration in pig slurry.

    PubMed

    Yagüe, M R; Quílez, D

    2012-01-01

    Pig (Sus scrofa domesticus) slurry (PS) is commonly applied as fertilizer to agricultural fields. Knowledge of PS nitrogen content is essential for good management, but PS nitrogen content is highly variable, not only between farms but also within a farm. Laboratory analysis of animal slurries is often expensive and impractical for routine farmer use. Therefore, when slurry is spread on land, its fertilizer value is generally unknown, resulting in the risk of pollution. In this work, two rapid and suitable for field use methods for determining PS ammonium N (NH(4)+-N) concentration (Quantofix and conductimetry) are evaluated. The electrical conductivity of a dilution 1 PS:9 distilled water had better results than Quantofix, did not need reagents, and gave a direct value of NH(4)+-N concentrations (range, 1.0-7.6 kg NH(4)+-N m(-3)). The conductimetry method allows the use of alternative waters with EC <1.9 dS m(-1) for dilution. This method is being introduced to farmers in northeast Spain to improve PS management and has been well received due to its low cost and ease of use. Copyright © by the American Society of Agronomy, Crop Science Society of America, and Soil Science Society of America, Inc.

  10. Treatment by acidification followed by solid-liquid separation affects slurry and slurry fractions composition and their potential of N mineralization.

    PubMed

    Fangueiro, David; Ribeiro, Henrique; Vasconcelos, Ernesto; Coutinho, João; Cabral, Fernanda

    2009-10-01

    The aim of the present work was to assess the effect of treatments by acidification, solid-liquid separation or acidification followed by solid-liquid separation on the physical and chemical composition of pig slurry (S) and pig slurry fractions (non acidified and acidified solid (SF and ASF) and liquid (LF and ALF) fractions), as well as on the potential of N mineralization of these pig slurry derived materials. Acidification strongly decrease the inorganic carbon content of S, SF and LF and it also affects the distribution of P, Ca and Mg between the solid and liquid fraction leading to an ALF more equilibrated than LF in terms of nutrients. Acidification increases the potential of organic N mineralization in SF and decreases the potential of N immobilization in S and LF. It can be concluded that the proposed treatment generates valuable slurry fractions with distinct characteristics and potential of N mineralization that may be incorporated to soil at different periods after sowing to comply with plant nutrient requirements.

  11. Increasing energy and lysine in diets for growing-finishing pigs in hot environmental conditions: consequences on performance, digestibility, slurry composition, and gas emission.

    PubMed

    Cerisuelo, A; Torres, A; Lainez, M; Moset, V

    2012-05-01

    The influence of dietary nutrient concentration on growth performance, manure composition, and gas emission was studied in pigs in hot environmental conditions. A total of 64 intact males and 64 females [(Landrace × Large White) × Pietrain] weighing 63.1 ± 9.7 kg were divided into 2 dietary treatments: high (HD: 14.39 MJ of DE/kg and 1.11% Lys) and low (LD: 13.97 MJ of DE/kg and 1.01% Lys) in energy and Lys contents. Pigs were allocated to 32 split-sex pens with 4 pigs/pen and 16 pens/treatment. Average productive performance was recorded for 41 d (phase 1). After phase 1, 12 females of 103.3 ± 3.15 kg (6 per treatment) were selected and housed individually, and feces and slurry were collected during 3 and 4 consecutive days, respectively, to calculate nutrient digestibility and measure gas emissions (phase 2). For gas emission measurements, slurry was pooled by treatment and stored for 76 d. Initial composition of slurry and pH were analyzed. Maximum and minimum temperatures registered in the barn throughout the growing period were 35.1 and 18.1°C, respectively. Animals fed the HD diet grew more efficiently than pigs fed the LD diet (G:F, 0.43 vs. 0.40; SEM = 0.01; P < 0.05). Fat digestibility was greater in HD compared with LD pigs (88.0 vs. 84.9%; SEM = 0.9; P < 0.05). Slurry from pigs fed the LD diet showed greater DM, OM, total N, and VFA contents than slurry from pigs fed the HD diet. Cumulative NH(3), CO(2), and especially CH(4) emissions were greater in the HD slurry compared with the LD slurry (192.4 vs. 210.g of NH(3)/m(3); 2,712 vs. 3,210 g of CO(2)/m(3); 1,502 vs. 2,647 mL of CH(4)/kg of OM). Increasing feed density in the present study led to a more efficient growth, a decreased nutrient concentration in the slurry, and a greater gas emission.

  12. Evolution of temperature and chemical parameters during composting of the pig slurry solid fraction amended with natural zeolite.

    PubMed

    Venglovsky, J; Sasakova, N; Vargova, M; Pacajova, Z; Placha, I; Petrovsky, M; Harichova, D

    2005-01-01

    A 3-month experiment was conducted at a 300 kg scale to observe decomposition processes in pig slurry solids amended with two different doses of natural Slovak zeolite-clinoptilolite (substrates S1 and S2, 1% and 2% of zeolite by weight, respectively) in comparison with the control (unamended solids). The experimental and control substrates were stored outdoors in sheltered static piles at ambient temperatures ranging from 8.0 to 34.7 degrees C. The solid fraction (SF) of pig slurry was obtained by separation on vibration sieves prior to slurry treatment with activated sludge. The initial water content of the SF was 77.1% and no water was added to the piles during the storage. The temperature in the core of the piles was recorded throughout the experiment. By day 3 and 5 of storage (1% and 2% zeolite, resp.), the temperature in the substrates S1 and S2 exceeded 55 degrees C and remained above this level for 15 days while the highest temperature recorded in the control during the experiment was 29.8 degrees C. Samples from the core of the piles were taken periodically to determine pH, dry matter at 105 degrees C (DM), ash (550 degrees C/4 h), ammonia nitrogen (N-NH(4)(+)), nitrate nitrogen (N-NO(3)(-)), total nitrogen (N(t)), total phosphorus (P(t)); total organic carbon (TOC) was computed. The results showed that pH levels in S1 and S2 remained below that in the control for most of the thermophilic stage. This may be related to water-soluble ammonia and the affinity of zeolites to ammonium ions. A significant decrease in the level of ammonia nitrogen in water extracts from S1 and S2 was observed between days 5 and 35 in comparison with the control. The values of ash also differed and corresponded to the intensity of the decomposition processes in the respective substrates.

  13. The use of agricultural substrates to improve methane yield in anaerobic co-digestion with pig slurry: effect of substrate type and inclusion level.

    PubMed

    Ferrer, Pablo; Cambra-López, María; Cerisuelo, Alba; Peñaranda, David S; Moset, Verónica

    2014-01-01

    Anaerobic co-digestion of pig slurry with four agricultural substrates (tomato, pepper, persimmon and peach) was investigated. Each agricultural substrate was tested in co-digestion with pig slurry at four inclusion levels: 0%, 15%, 30% and 50%. Inclusion levels consisted in the replacement of the volatile solids (VS) from the pig slurry with the VS from the agricultural substrate. The effect of substrate type and inclusion level on the biochemical methane potential (BMP) was evaluated in a batch assay performed at 35 °C for 100 days. Agricultural substrate's chemical composition was also analyzed and related with BMP. Additionally, Bacteria and Archaea domains together with the four main methanogenic archaeal orders were quantified using quantitative real-time TaqMan polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) at the end of the experiment to determine the influence of agricultural substrate on sludge's microbial composition. Results showed that vegetable substrates (pepper and tomato) had higher lipid and protein content and lower carbohydrates than fruit substrates (persimmon and peach). Among substrates, vegetable substrates showed higher BMP than fruit substrates. Higher BMP values were obtained with increasing addition of agricultural substrate. The replacement of 50% of VS from pig slurry by tomato and pepper increased BMP in 41% and 44%, respectively compared with pig slurry only. Lower increments in BMP were achieved with lower inclusion levels. Results from qPCR showed that total bacteria and total archaea gene concentrations were similar in all combinations tested. Methanomicrobiales gene concentrations dominated over the rest of individual archaeal orders. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. ISTA 14--impact of antibiotics from pig slurry on soil microbial communities, including the basidiomycete Trametes versicolor.

    PubMed

    Igel-Egalon, Angélique; Cheviron, Nathalie; Hedde, Mickael; Hernandez-Raquet, Guillermina; Mougin, Christian

    2012-03-01

    Livestock slurry containing antibiotics is a source of contamination of agricultural soils, with possible effects on soil function and micro-organisms. Extracellular oxido-reductases and hydrolases from the fungus T. versicolor and fungal growth were monitored in liquid cultures in the presence of tetracycline, lincomycine, sulfadiazine and ciprofloxacin for 10 days, in order to assess the suitability of these enzymes as biomarkers. Among the conditions of treatment, statistical analysis demonstrated an increase in manganese-dependent peroxidase after exposure to sulfadiazine at 1 mg/L when compared with the control. Acid phosphatase activity was decreased by lincomycine at 1 or 10 mg/L. Conversely, β-glucosidase activity increased in the presence of this antibiotic at 10 mg/L. In Terrestrial Model Ecosystems spiked with contaminated pig slurry, lincomycine at the concentration of 8 or 80 μg/kg dry soil, and ciprofloxacin at 250 ng/kg dry soil decreased the activity of soil dehydrogenase, when compared with a green slurry treatment, over 28-day incubations. Laccase activity was similarly decreased in the presence of the highest concentration of antibiotics. We determined bacterial and fungal biomasses using Q-PCR. Bacterial biomass was increased in the presence of lincomycine at 80 μg/kg whatever the time of exposure, and to a lesser extent in the presence of ciprofloxacin at 250 ng/kg, but only at day 28. In contrast, both antibiotics, whatever their concentrations, did not modify fungal biomass in soil. In conclusion, we were unable to demonstrate important effects of antibiotics at concentrations found in the agricultural environment. Copyright © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. The impact of fouling on the process performance of the thermal treatment of pig slurry using tubular heat exchangers.

    PubMed

    Cunault, C; Burton, C H; Pourcher, A M

    2013-03-15

    The aim of this study was to determine the kinetics of fouling and their influence on the performance of a thermal treatment process used for sanitisation of pig slurry. Two temperatures (55 °C and 80 °C) were investigated. One trial was carried out at 55 °C and 80 °C in which the slurry was not re-circulated and one trial at 80 °C in which 100% or 50% of the slurry was re-circulated. Fouling of the heat exchangers was assessed by on-line monitoring of the drop in pressure, changes in treatment temperature, heat transfer coefficients, heat recycling rate, and energy consumption. Similar energy consumption of around 38 kWh m(-3) of effluent was observed at the two temperatures. The operating periods prior to excessive fouling or blockage were 18 days at 55 °C and four days at 80 °C. Recycling treated manure to obtain 50% dilution of the raw feed increased the viable operating period to 14 days at 80 °C but doubled energy consumption. At 55 °C, the significant drop in the target temperature (>7 °C) with fouling severely jeopardised the process. The nature of the decline in performance suggests that the main fouling mechanisms were bio-fouling at 55 °C and organic/mineral deposits at 80 °C. Recycling treated manure enabled the operating period to be extended but increased the total cost of heating. One hundred percent recycling showed that the fouling potential of the manure was largely eliminated after one thermal treatment, suggesting a pretreatment may be advantageous.

  16. Long-term Effect of Pig Slurry Application on Soil Carbon Storage, Quality and Yield Sustainability in Murcia Region, Spain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Büyükkılıç Yanardaǧ, Asuman

    2013-04-01

    Sustainability of agriculture is now a major global concern, especially since the 1980s. Soil organic matter is very important in the proper functions of the soil, which is also a good indicator of soil quality. This is due to its influence on many of the chemical, physical, and biological processes that control the capacity of a soil to perform properly. Understanding of nutrient supply through organic matter mineralization in agricultural systems is essential for maintaining long-term quality and productivity. The composition of pig manure will have a profound impact on soil properties, quality and crop yield when used in agriculture. We studied the effects of pig slurry (PS) application as an organic fertilizer, trying to determine the optimum amount that can be added to the soil, and the effect on soil properties, quality, and productivity. We applied 3 different doses on silty loam soils: Single (D1), Double (D2), Triple (D3) and unfertilized plots (C) served as controls. Samples were collected at two different levels, surface (0-30 cm) and subsurface (30-60 cm). D1 application dose, which is the agronomic rate of N-requirement (170 kg N/ha/yr) (European Directive 91/676/CEE), is very appropriate in term of sustainable agriculture and also can improve physical, chemical and biological soil properties. Therefore that the long-term use of PS with low dose may necessarily enhance soil quality in the long term. There are many factors to be considered when attempting to assess the overall net impact of a management practice on productivity. Additions of pig manure to soils at agronomic rates (170 kg N ha-1 yr-1) to match crop nutrient requirements are expected to have a positive impact on soil productivity. Therefore, the benefits from the use of application depend on the management of PS, carbon and environmental quality. However, PS have high micronutrient contents, and for this reason the application of high doses can pollute soils and damage human, animal and

  17. Bacterial community dynamics in long-term operation of a pilot plant using aerobic granular sludge to treat pig slurry.

    PubMed

    Fra-Vázquez, A; Morales, N; Figueroa, M; Val Del Río, A; Regueiro, L; Campos, J L; Mosquera-Corral, A

    2016-09-01

    Aerobic granular sludge represents an interesting approach for simultaneous organic matter and nitrogen removal in wastewater treatment plants. However, the information about microbial communities in aerobic granular systems dealing with industrial wastewater like pig slurry is limited. Herein, bacterial diversity and dynamics were assessed in a pilot scale plant using aerobic granular sludge for organic matter and nitrogen elimination from swine slurry during more than 300 days. Results indicated that bacterial composition evolved throughout the operational period from flocculent activated sludge, used as inoculum, to mature aerobic granules. Bacterial diversity increased at the beginning of the granulation process and then declined due to the application of transient organic matter and nitrogen loads. The operational conditions of the pilot plant and the degree of granulation determined the microbial community of the aerobic granules. Brachymonas, Zoogloea and Thauera were attributed with structural function as they are able to produce extracellular polymeric substances to maintain the granular structure. Nitrogen removal was justified by partial nitrification (Nitrosomonas) and denitrification (Thauera and Zoogloea), while Comamonas was identified as the main organic matter oxidizing bacteria. Overall, clear links between bacterial dynamics and composition with process performance were found and will help to predict their biological functions in wastewater ecosystems improving the future control of the process. © 2016 American Institute of Chemical Engineers Biotechnol. Prog., 32:1212-1221, 2016. © 2016 American Institute of Chemical Engineers.

  18. Carbon mineralization, microbial activity and metal dynamics in tailing ponds amended with pig slurry and marble waste.

    PubMed

    Zornoza, Raúl; Faz, Ángel; Carmona, Dora M; Acosta, Jose A; Martínez-Martínez, Silvia; de Vreng, Arno

    2013-03-01

    A field experiment was set up in Cartagena-La Unión Mining District, SE Spain, aimed at evaluating the short-term effects of pig slurry (PS) amendment alone and together with marble waste (MW) on organic matter mineralization, microbial activity and stabilization of heavy metals in two tailing ponds. These structures pose environmental risk owing to high metals contents, low organic matter and nutrients, and null vegetation. Carbon mineralization, exchangeable metals and microbiological properties were monitored during 67 d. The application of amendments led to a rapid decrease of exchangeable metals concentrations, except for Cu, with decreases up to 98%, 75% and 97% for Cd, Pb and Zn, respectively. The combined addition of MW+PS was the treatment with greater reduction in metals concentrations. The addition of PS caused a significant increase in respiration rates, although in MW+PS plots respiration was lower than in PS plots. The mineralized C from the pig slurry was low, approximately 25-30% and 4-12% for PS and MW+PS treatments, respectively. Soluble carbon (Csol), microbial biomass carbon (MBC) and β-galactosidase and β-glucosidase activities increased after the application of the organic amendment. However, after 3d these parameters started a decreasing trend reaching similar values than control from approximately day 25 for Csol and MBC. The PS treatment promoted highest values in enzyme activities, which remained high upon time. Arylesterase activity increased in the MW+PS treatment. Thus, the remediation techniques used improved soil microbiological status and reduced metal availability. The combined application of PS+MW reduced the degradability of the organic compounds.

  19. Thermal and spectroscopic analysis of organic matter degradation and humification during composting of pig slurry in different scenarios.

    PubMed

    Martín-Mata, J; Lahoz-Ramos, C; Bustamante, M A; Marhuenda-Egea, F C; Moral, R; Santos, A; Sáez, J A; Bernal, M P

    2016-09-01

    In this work, different analytical techniques (thermal analysis, (13)C cross-polarization magic angle spinning (CPMAS) NMR and Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy) have been used to study the organic matter changes during the co-composting of pig slurry with cotton gin waste. To ensure the validity of the findings, the composting process was developed in different scenarios: under experimental pilot plant conditions, using the static pile system, and under real conditions on a pig farm, using the turning pile system. Also, the thermal stability index (R1) was determined before and after an extraction with water, to evaluate the effect of eliminating water-soluble inorganic salts on the thermal analysis. The results of the thermal methods showed the degradation of the most labile organic matter during composting; R1 increased during composting in all piles, without any influence of the presence of water-soluble inorganic ions in the sample. The NMR showed a decrease in the abundance of the carbohydrate molecules and an increase in the aliphatic materials during composting, due to a concentration effect. Also, FT-IR spectroscopy was a useful technique to study the trends of polysaccharides and nitrate, as indicators of organic matter transformations during composting.

  20. Leaching of viruses and other microorganisms naturally occurring in pig slurry to tile drains on a well-structured loamy field in Denmark

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krog, Jesper S.; Forslund, Anita; Larsen, Lars E.; Dalsgaard, Anders; Kjaer, Jeanne; Olsen, Preben; Schultz, Anna Charlotte

    2017-02-01

    The amount of animal manure used in modern agriculture is increasing due to the increase in global animal production. Pig slurry is known to contain zoonotic bacteria such as E. coli, Salmonella spp. and Campylobacter spp., and viruses such as hepatitis E virus and group A rotavirus. Coliform bacteria, present in manure, have previously been shown to leach into tile drains. This poses a potential threat to aquatic environments and may also influence the quality of drinking water. As knowledge is especially scarce about the fate of viruses when applied to fields in natural settings, this project sets out to investigate the leaching potential of six different microorganisms: E. coli and Enterococcus spp. (detected by colony assay), somatic coliphages (using plaque assays), and hepatitis E virus, porcine circovirus type 2, and group A rotavirus (by real-time polymerase chain reaction). All six microorganisms leached through the soil entering the tile drains situated at 1-m depth the first day following pig slurry application. The leaching pattern of group A rotavirus differed substantially from the pattern for somatic coliphages, which are otherwise used as indicators for virus contamination. Furthermore, group A rotavirus was detected in monitoring wells at 3.5-m depth up to 2 months after pig slurry application. The detection of viral genomic material in drainage water and shallow groundwater signifies a potential hazard to human health that needs to be investigated further, as water reservoirs used for recreational use and drinking water are potentially contaminated with zoonotic pathogens.

  1. Leaching of viruses and other microorganisms naturally occurring in pig slurry to tile drains on a well-structured loamy field in Denmark

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krog, Jesper S.; Forslund, Anita; Larsen, Lars E.; Dalsgaard, Anders; Kjaer, Jeanne; Olsen, Preben; Schultz, Anna Charlotte

    2017-06-01

    The amount of animal manure used in modern agriculture is increasing due to the increase in global animal production. Pig slurry is known to contain zoonotic bacteria such as E. coli, Salmonella spp. and Campylobacter spp., and viruses such as hepatitis E virus and group A rotavirus. Coliform bacteria, present in manure, have previously been shown to leach into tile drains. This poses a potential threat to aquatic environments and may also influence the quality of drinking water. As knowledge is especially scarce about the fate of viruses when applied to fields in natural settings, this project sets out to investigate the leaching potential of six different microorganisms: E. coli and Enterococcus spp. (detected by colony assay), somatic coliphages (using plaque assays), and hepatitis E virus, porcine circovirus type 2, and group A rotavirus (by real-time polymerase chain reaction). All six microorganisms leached through the soil entering the tile drains situated at 1-m depth the first day following pig slurry application. The leaching pattern of group A rotavirus differed substantially from the pattern for somatic coliphages, which are otherwise used as indicators for virus contamination. Furthermore, group A rotavirus was detected in monitoring wells at 3.5-m depth up to 2 months after pig slurry application. The detection of viral genomic material in drainage water and shallow groundwater signifies a potential hazard to human health that needs to be investigated further, as water reservoirs used for recreational use and drinking water are potentially contaminated with zoonotic pathogens.

  2. Effect of dietary crude protein levels in a commercial range, on the nitrogen balance, ammonia emission and pollutant characteristics of slurry in fattening pigs.

    PubMed

    Hernández, F; Martínez, S; López, C; Megías, M D; López, M; Madrid, J

    2011-06-01

    An experiment was conducted to investigate the effect of dietary levels of crude protein (CP), close to the range used commercially and to the European Commission recommended values, on the nitrogen (N) balance, ammonia (NH(3)) emission and pollutant characteristics of the slurry from growing and finishing pigs. Three feeding programmes with different CP levels were compared during the growing and the finishing periods of fattening. Diets were formulated to be isoenergetic and for the digestible lysine : metabolisable energy ratio to be similar in all the diets for each phase, but differed in CP concentration (160, 150 and 140 g CP/kg for the growing phase and 155, 145 and 135 g CP/kg for the finishing phase). Faeces and urine from barrows (eight replicates per diet) allocated in metabolism cages were collected separately for 5 days to calculate the N balance and for 2 days to measure NH(3) emission in a laboratory system for 240 h. Excreta were analysed for pH, volatile fatty acids (VFA), total N, electrical conductivity (EC), total solids (TS), volatile solids (VS), biochemical oxygen demand (BOD(5)), chemical oxygen demand (COD) and NH(4)-N reduction of dietary CP content led to a linear decrease of urinary (P < 0.05) and total (P < 0.05) N excretion, and N excretion/feed intake (P < 0.001). The emission of NH3 was similar in all diets (P > 0.05) during the 240 h of study. However, in the growing phase, the NH(3)-N level in slurry was lower (P < 0.05) for the low-CP diet. In addition, the CP level had no significant effect (P > 0.05) on total VFA, EC, TS, VS, COD or BOD(5) contents of excreta. These parameters were higher (P < 0.05) in slurry from the finishing phase than from the growing phase. However, NH(4)-N in the slurry decreased (P < 0.05) by 20.3% and 28.4% when the CP level was decreased by 9.30 or 21.40 g/kg, respectively. It is concluded that lowering dietary CP levels even by small amounts and using CP levels close to these used in commercial diets

  3. Greenhouse gas microbiology in wet and dry straw crust covering pig slurry.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Rikke R; Nielsen, Daniel Aa; Schramm, Andreas; Nielsen, Lars P; Revsbech, Niels P; Hansen, Martin N

    2009-01-01

    Liquid manure (slurry) storages are sources of gases such as ammonia (NH(3)) and methane (CH(4)). Danish slurry storages are required to be covered to reduce NH(3) emissions and often a floating crust of straw is applied. This study investigated whether physical properties of the crust or crust microbiology had an effect on the emission of the potent greenhouse gases CH(4) and nitrous oxide (N(2)O) when crust moisture was manipulated ("dry", "moderate", and "wet"). The dry crust had the deepest oxygen penetration (45 mm as compared to 20 mm in the wet treatment) as measured with microsensors, the highest amounts of nitrogen oxides (NO(2)(-) and NO(3)(-)) (up to 36 mumol g(-1) wet weight) and the highest emissions of N(2)O and CH(4). Fluorescent in situ hybridization and gene-specific polymerase chain reaction (PCR) were used to detect occurrence of bacterial groups. Ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) were abundant in all three crust types, whereas nitrite-oxidizing bacteria (NOB) were undetectable and methane-oxidizing bacteria (MOB) were only sparsely present in the wet treatment. A change to anoxia did not affect the CH(4) emission indicating the virtual absence of aerobic methane oxidation in the investigated 2-mo old crusts. However, an increase in N(2)O emission was observed in all crusted treatments exposed to anoxia, and this was probably a result of denitrification based on NO(x)(-) that had accumulated in the crust during oxic conditions. To reduce overall greenhouse gas emissions, floating crust should be managed to optimize conditions for methanotrophs.

  4. Evaluation of a compost obtained from forestry wastes and solid phase of pig slurry as a substrate for seedlings production.

    PubMed

    Ribeiro, H M; Romero, A M; Pereira, H; Borges, P; Cabral, F; Vasconcelos, E

    2007-12-01

    A composted material obtained from forestry wastes and solid phase of pig slurry was evaluated as a substrate component for the production of tomato and lettuce seedlings. Four different substrates were tested: compost (100C), a mixture of 75% compost and 25% peat substrate (75C), a mixture of 50% compost and 50% peat substrate (50C), and peat-based substrate (control). Compost increased the pH of the substrate from 6.3 (control) to 6.9 (100C) but did not affect the electrical conductivity (0.26 and 0.27 mScm(-1), respectively, for control and 100C). Germination and growth of lettuce seedlings were not affected by the substrate type, contrasting with tomato seedlings where the highest growth occurred at 100C substrate. Increasing compost percentage on substrate increased nitrogen, calcium and magnesium availability and, consequently, the concentration of these elements in plant tissues increased. On the contrary, potassium and manganese concentration decreased. Results from the study suggest that the compost studied is a good alternative to peat-based substrates for the production of vegetable seedlings.

  5. Characteristics and composition of fouling caused by pig slurry in a tubular heat exchanger--recommended cleaning systems.

    PubMed

    Cunault, C; Coquinot, Y; Burton, C H; Picard, S; Pourcher, A M

    2013-03-15

    The structure and composition of the fouling deposits caused by pig slurry heated in a tubular heat exchanger were characterized to understand their formation and thus be able to minimize fouling and define effective routine cleaning methods. Two temperatures (55 °C and 80 °C) were investigated. Two types of fouling were identified: organic/mineral and biofilm. The first only formed at temperatures above 50 °C, often during the heating phase, and was the main problem encountered in treatments at 80 °C. Organic/mineral deposits formed a thin compact sub-layer and a thick porous top layer composed of 67-76% minerals, 9-15% proteins, 8-20% carbohydrates and 0-5% fats. Biofilms formed at temperatures between 25 °C and 70 °C in both the cooling and heating sections of the exchanger. This type of fouling predominated at temperatures below 55 °C. The biofilm covered a thin mineral base layer. Strongly acidic or alkaline washing cycle are recommended to clean Type I deposits, while in-line gas-rumbling is recommended for Type II fouling.

  6. Modeling field-scale vertical movement of zinc and copper in a pig slurry-amended soil in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Mallmann, Fábio Joel Kochem; dos Santos, Danilo Rheinheimer; Ceretta, Carlos Alberto; Cella, Cesar; Simůnek, Jirka; van Oort, Folkert

    2012-12-01

    Organic amendments often represent a source of trace metals (TMs) in soils, which may partly leach into the groundwater. The objectives of this study were (1) to validate Hydrus-2D for modeling the transport of Zn and Cu in an Alfisol amended with pig slurry (PS) by comparing numerical simulations and experimental field data, and (2) to model the next 50 years of TM movements under scenarios of suspended or continued PS amendments. First, between 2000 and 2008, we collected detailed Zn and Cu data from a soil profile in Santa Maria, Brazil. Two hypotheses about Zn and Cu reactivity with the solid phase were tested, considering physical, hydraulic, and chemical characteristics of six soil layers. Using a two-site sorption model with a sorption kinetic rate adjusted based on laboratory EDTA extractions, Hydrus simulations of the vertical TM transport were found to satisfactorily describe the soil Zn and Cu concentration profiles. Second, the long-term fate of Zn and Cu in the soil was assessed using the validated parameterized model. Numerical simulations showed that Zn and Cu did not present risks for groundwater pollution. However, future Cu accumulation in the surface soil layer would exceed the Brazilian threshold for agricultural soils.

  7. Combination of batch experiments with continuous reactor data for ADM1 calibration: application to anaerobic digestion of pig slurry.

    PubMed

    Girault, R; Rousseau, P; Steyer, J P; Bernet, N; Béline, F

    2011-01-01

    Modelling anaerobic digestion processes is a key aspect of studying and optimizing digesters and related waste streams. However, for the satisfactory prediction of biogas production and effluent characteristics, some parameters have to be calibrated according to the characteristics of the substrates. This article describes a calibration procedure for the IWA 'Anaerobic Digestion Model no. 1' applied to the modelling of a digester for treatment of pig slurry. The most sensitive parameters were selected and calibrated combining results from a continuous digester and from batch trials run with the sludge sampled from the digester and the addition of specific substrates. According to the sensitivity analysis, acetoclastic methanogenesis, acetogenesis of propionate and acidogenesis of sugars were identified as the main sensitive steps in our case. The calibration procedure led us to modify slightly acetogenesis of propionate kinetic. However, acetoclastic methanogenesis and acidogenesis of sugars kinetics were significantly reduced by decreasing km and increasing Ks. Indeed, for instance, a decrease of km_ac from 8 to 7 day(-1) combined with an increase of Ks_ac from 0.15 to 1.5 kgCOD/m3 was necessary. After calibration, ADM1 provides an accurate simulation of the continuous reactor results.

  8. Isolation and Characterization of a New Methanobacterium formicicum KOR-1 from an Anaerobic Digester Using Pig Slurry

    PubMed Central

    Battumur, Urantulkhuur; Yoon, Young-Man; Kim, Chang-Hyun

    2016-01-01

    A new methanogen was isolated from an anaerobic digester using pig slurry in South Korea. Only one strain, designated KOR-1, was characterized in detail. Cells of KOR-1 were straight or crooked rods, non-motile, 5 to 15 μm long and 0.7 μm wide. They stained Gram-positive and produced methane from H2+CO2 and formate. Strain KOR-1 grew optimally at 38°C. The optimum pH for growth was 7.0. The strain grew at 0.5% to 3.0% NaCl, with optimum growth at 2.5% NaCl. The G+C content of genomic DNA of strain KOR-1 was 41 mol%. The strain tolerated ampicillin, penicillin G, kanamycin and streptomycin but tetracycline inhibited cell growth. A large fragment of the 16S rRNA gene (~1,350 bp) was obtained from the isolate and sequenced. Comparison of 16S rRNA genes revealed that strain KOR–1 is related to Methanobacterium formicicum (98%, sequence similarity), Methanobacterium bryantii (95%) and Methanobacterium ivanovii (93%). Phylogenetic analysis of the deduced mcrA gene sequences confirmed the closest relative as based on mcrA gene sequence analysis was Methanobacterium formicicum strain (97% nucleic acid sequence identity). On the basis of physiological and phylogenetic characteristics, strain KOR-1 is proposed as a new strain within the genus Methanobacterium, Methanobacterium formicicum KOR-1. PMID:26949961

  9. Comparative characterization of digestate versus pig slurry and cow manure - Chemical composition and effects on soil microbial activity.

    PubMed

    Risberg, Kajsa; Cederlund, Harald; Pell, Mikael; Arthurson, Veronica; Schnürer, Anna

    2017-03-01

    The growing number of biogas plants in Europe has resulted in increased production of nutrient-rich digestate with great potential as fertilizer for arable land. The nutrient composition of digestate varies with the substrate treated in the biogas plant and may contain compounds that stimulate or inhibit soil microbial activity. This study compared 20 digestates (D) with 10 pig slurries (PS) and 10 cow manures (CM) regarding their chemical content and their effect on soil microbial activities, i.e. potential ammonia oxidation rate (PAO) and soil respiration. The results showed no significant differences within the D group when divided based on substrate type. i.e. manure dominated vs. other organic waste materials in any of the tests. In general D contained significantly higher concentrations of ammonium while the concentrations of total carbon and volatile fatty acids were higher in PS and CM than in D. The D showed both stimulating and inhibiting effects on PAO, while all CM and all PS except one showed inhibiting effects on PAO. However, PAO activity was negatively correlated with the content of volatile fatty acids in the residues indicating that these compounds may be the cause of the inhibition. The maximum respiration activity (hpeakmax) was lower and the time point for the maximum respiration activity (tpeakmax) occurred earlier for D compared with CM and PS. This earlier peak time could be indicative of a high proportion of easily degradable carbon in D compared with PS and CM. However, the utilization rate of carbon, i.e. the proportion of added organic C converted to CO2-C during 12days, did not differ significantly between D, PS and CM, indicating that overall carbon quality in the different fertilizers was still roughly comparable. In short, our results suggest that digestates were different compared with PS and CM but without posing a higher risk with respect to their impact on soil microbial activity. Copyright © 2016 The Author(s). Published by

  10. Copper and zinc accumulation and fractionation in a clayey Hapludox soil subject to long-term pig slurry application.

    PubMed

    Formentini, Thiago Augusto; Mallmann, Fábio Joel Kochem; Pinheiro, Adilson; Fernandes, Cristovão Vicente Scapulatempo; Bender, Marcos Antonio; da Veiga, Milton; dos Santos, Danilo Rheinheimer; Doelsch, Emmanuel

    2015-12-01

    Pig slurry (PS) recycling as fertilizer is commonly practiced as an option for minimizing livestock waste. Successive PS applications on the soil can lead to crop toxicity and environmental risk. Despite extensive investigation of macronutrient behavior, the fate of trace metals remains uncertain and only a few long-term field studies have been reported to date. This study was designed to assess the impact of 11-year continuous PS spreading on Cu and Zn accumulation and fractionation in a Brazilian clayey Hapludox soil. Three different PS application rates--50, 100 and 200m3 ha(-1)year(-1)--were monitored at six soil depths in comparison to a non-amended control soil. The modified Geological Survey of Canada sequential extraction protocol was applied. A statistically significant increase in Cu and Zn total concentration (assessed by the sum of fractions) was noted only within the 0-5 cm soil layer for the 50 and 100 m3 ha(-1) year(-1) (PS50 and PS100) treatments, and up to 10-15 cm for the 200 m3 ha(-1)year(-1) (PS200) treatment. The mass balance, determined for the 22 PS amendments over the period, confirmed the overall exogenous Cu and Zn accumulation within the surface layers. More than 70% of the natural heavy metal content was originally in the residual fraction. However, this was the only fraction not influenced by the PS amendments. After PS input, the exogenous Cu was mainly detected in the fraction bound to organic matter (66.4%) within the PS200 0-5 cm soil layer. Exogenous Zn was mainly distributed between the adsorbed fraction (36.7%) and the organic matter fraction (32.0%) within the PS200 0-5 cm layer. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Evaluation of the slurry management strategy and the integration of the composting technology in a pig farm - Agronomical and environmental implications.

    PubMed

    Sáez, José A; Clemente, Rafael; Bustamante, M Ángeles; Yañez, David; Bernal, M Pilar

    2017-05-01

    The changes in livestock production systems towards intensification frequently lead to an excess of manure generation with respect to the agricultural land available for its soil application. However, treatment technologies can help in the management of manures, especially in N-surplus areas. An integrated slurry treatment system based on solid-liquid separation, aerobic treatment of the liquid and composting the solid fraction was evaluated in a pig farm (sows and piglets) in the South of Spain. Solid fraction separation using a filter band connected to a screw press had low efficiency (38%), which was greatly improved incorporating a rotatory sieve (61%). The depuration system was very efficient for the liquid, with total removal of 84% total solids, 87% volatile solids, and 98% phosphorus. Two composting systems were tested through mechanical turning of: 1- a mixture of solid fraction stored for 1 month after solid-liquid separation and cereal straw; 2- recently-separated solid fraction mixed with cotton gin waste. System 2 was recommended for the farm, as it exhibited a fast temperature rise and a long thermophilic phase to ensure compost sanitisation, and high recovery of nutrients (TN 77%, P and K > 85%) and organic matter (45%). The composts obtained were mature, stable and showed a high degree of humification of their organic matter, absence of phytotoxicity and concentrations of nutrients similar to other composts from pig manure or separated slurry solids. However, the introduction of slurry from piglets into the solid-liquid separation system should be avoided in order to reduce the content of Zn in the compost, which lowers its quality. The slurry separation followed by composting of the solid fraction using a passive windrow system, and aeration of the liquid phase, was the most recommendable procedure for the reduction of GHG emissions on the farm. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Plasmid with Colistin Resistance Gene mcr-1 in Extended-Spectrum-β-Lactamase-Producing Escherichia coli Strains Isolated from Pig Slurry in Estonia

    PubMed Central

    Brauer, Age; Telling, Kaidi; Laht, Mailis; Kalmus, Piret; Lutsar, Irja; Remm, Maido; Kisand, Veljo

    2016-01-01

    A plasmid carrying the colistin resistance gene mcr-1 was isolated from a pig slurry sample in Estonia. The gene was present on a 33,311-bp plasmid of the IncX4 group. mcr-1 is the only antibiotic resistance gene on the plasmid, with the other genes mainly coding for proteins involved in conjugative DNA transfer (taxA, taxB, taxC, trbM, and the pilX operon). The plasmid pESTMCR was present in three phylogenetically very different Escherichia coli strains, suggesting that it has high potential for horizontal transfer. PMID:27572412

  13. Utilization of wasted sardine oil as co-substrate with pig slurry for biogas production--a pilot experience of decentralized industrial organic waste management in a Portuguese pig farm.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, L; Duarte, E; Figueiredo, D

    2012-07-01

    This work aimed to demonstrate in a pig farm and in real conditions, the possibilities to co-digest wasted sardine oil (WSO) and pig slurry (PS) at farm scale. A biogas mobile pilot plant, was set up in the farm and operated in real conditions during 4 months. Dynamic mesophilic (35-37 °C) continuous pilot trials were performed during four different periods of time. In each period a different organic loading rate (OLR) based on the chemical oxygen demand (COD) was operated sequentially, with pig slurry (PS) (OLR = 1.6 kg COD/m(3) d(-1)) and with mixtures of WSO:PS with a volumetric composition (% v/v) of 2:98 (OLR = 3.0 kg COD/m(3) d(-1)), 3:97 (OLR = 3.7 kg COD/m(3) d(-1)) and 5:95 (OLR = 5.2 kg COD/m(3) d(-1)). Biomass adapted very fast in metabolise the WSO and biogas productivity was raised substantially for different compositions of WSO:PS. Process stability indicators pH and Total volatile fatty acids/bicarbonate alkalinity (T-VFA/BA) ratio, suggests that the co-digestion process was robust. It was concluded that WSO could be easily co-digested in farm scale biogas plants.

  14. Pig feeding strategy coupled with effluent management - fresh or stored slurry, solid phase separation - on methane potential and methane conversion factors during storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jarret, Guillaume; Martinez, José; Dourmad, Jean-Yves

    2011-11-01

    In the guideline for the determination of methane (CH 4) emission from animal manure (IPCC) the amount of CH 4 emitted is generally calculated according to an equation combining the amount of organic matter (OM) or volatile solids excreted, the ultimate CH 4 potential ( B0) of excreta and a system-specific methane conversion factor (MCF, %) that reflects the portion of B0 that is really converted into CH 4. The objective of the present study was to investigate the effect of the modification of dietary crude protein and fibre levels on B0 of pig slurry and on subsequent MCF according to different strategies of slurry management. Five experimental diets differing mainly in their crude protein and fibre content were compared. Two types of measurement of CH 4 emission were performed. The first was the measurement of B0 of slurry using biomethanogene potential (BMP) test. The second consisted in a storage simulation, which was performed on different kinds of effluents: fresh slurry (FSl), stored slurry (SSl), and faeces mixed with water (FaW). The type of diet and the type of effluent affected ( P < 0.001) CH 4 production after 30, 50 and 100 days. Moreover, the interaction between type of effluent and type of diet was significant for CH 4 emission and for MCF. CH 4 production was the highest for BMP, the average production of CH 4 during storage from FaW, FSl and SSl samples representing 77%, 58% and 64% of the B0 value. The dynamic of CH 4 production during BMP tests was rather similar for all dietary treatments whereas it differed for storage simulation studies with significant effects of dietary CP and fibre contents. The results from this study indicate that the type of diet has a significant but rather limited effect on B0 value of effluent. The effect of diet is much more marked on MCF, with lower values for high protein diets, and higher values for high fibre diets. MCF is also affected by manure management, the values measured on separated faeces from urine

  15. Characteristics of volatile compounds removal in biogas slurry of pig manure by ozone oxidation and organic solvents extraction.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yujun; Feng, Lianshuang; Zhao, Xiaosong; Ma, Xiulan; Yang, Jingmin; Liu, Huiqing; Dou, Sen; Zhou, Miping; Xie, Zhonglei

    2013-09-01

    Biogas slurry is not suitable for liquid fertilizer due to its high amounts of volatile materials being of complicated composition and peculiar smell. In order to remove volatiles from biogas slurry efficiently, the dynamic headspace and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry were used to clear the composition of volatiles. Nitrogen stripping and superfluous ozone were also used to remove volatiles from biogas slurry. The results showed that there were 21 kinds of volatile compounds in the biogas slurry, including sulfur compounds, organic amines, benzene, halogen generation of hydrocarbons and alkanes, some of which had strong peculiar smell. The volatile compounds in biogas slurry can be removed with the rate of 53.0% by nitrogen stripping and with rate of 81.7% by the oxidization and stripping of the superfluous ozone. On this basis, the removal rate of the volatile compounds reached 99.2% by chloroform and n-hexane extraction, and almost all of odor was eliminated. The contents of some dissolved organic compounds decreased obviously and however main plant nutrients had no significant change in the biogas slurry after being treated.

  16. Impact of raw pig slurry and pig farming practices on physicochemical parameters and on atmospheric N2O and CH 4 emissions of tropical soils, Uvéa Island (South Pacific).

    PubMed

    Roth, E; Gunkel-Grillon, P; Joly, L; Thomas, X; Decarpenterie, T; Mappe-Fogaing, I; Laporte-Magoni, C; Dumelié, N; Durry, G

    2014-09-01

    Emissions of CH4 and N2O related to private pig farming under a tropical climate in Uvéa Island were studied in this paper. Physicochemical soil parameters such as nitrate, nitrite, ammonium, Kjeldahl nitrogen, total organic carbon, pH and moisture were measured. Gaseous soil emissions as well as physicochemical parameters were compared in two private pig farming strategies encountered on this island on two different soils (calcareous and ferralitic) in order to determine the best pig farming management: in small concrete pens or in large land pens. Ammonium levels were higher in control areas while nitrate and nitrite levels were higher in soils with pig slurry inputs, indicating that nitrification was the predominant process related to N2O emissions. Nitrate contents in soils near concrete pens were important (≥ 55 μg N/g) and can thus be a threat for the groundwater. For both pig farming strategies, N2O and CH4 fluxes can reach high levels up to 1 mg N/m(2)/h and 1 mg C/m(2)/h, respectively. CH4 emissions near concrete pens were very high (≥ 10.4 mg C/m(2)/h). Former land pens converted into agricultural land recover low N2O emission rates (≤ 0.03 mg N/m(2)/h), and methane uptake dominates. N2O emissions were related to nitrate content whereas CH4 emissions were found to be moisture dependent. As a result relating to the physicochemical parameters as well as to the gaseous emissions, we demonstrate that pig farming in large land pens is the best strategy for sustainable family pig breeding in Uvéa Islands and therefore in similar small tropical islands.

  17. Nitrogen transformations under different conditions in open ponds by means of microalgae-bacteria consortium treating pig slurry.

    PubMed

    González-Fernández, Cristina; Molinuevo-Salces, Beatriz; García-González, Maria Cruz

    2011-01-01

    Four open ponds inoculated with microalgae-bacteria consortium treating different swine slurries (fresh and anaerobically digested) were evaluated in terms of nitrogen transformation under optimal and real conditions of temperature and illumination. Ammonium complete depletion was not achieved. Ponds operated under real conditions presented lower ammonium removal. Elimination capacities were around 26 mg N/Ld and were subsequently increased with increasing inlet ammonium loading rate. Different nitrogen transformation was observed depending on substrate source. When anaerobically digested slurry was fed to the ponds, nitrification followed by biomass uptake and denitrification were the main nitrogen transformation taking place depending on inlet ammonium loading rate and operational conditions. Ponds fed with fresh slurry exhibited denitrification as the main nitrogen removal mechanism for the pond operated under real conditions while under optimal conditions stripping, denitrification and biomass uptake contributed similarly. Therefore, this study confirmed that the so-claimed nitrogen recovery by microalgae biomass is frequently overestimated.

  18. Injection of Dicyandiamide-Treated Pig Slurry Reduced Ammonia Volatilization without Enhancing Soil Nitrous Oxide Emissions from No-Till Corn in Southern Brazil.

    PubMed

    Aita, Celso; Gonzatto, Rogério; Miola, Ezequiel C C; B, Daniela; Santos, Dos; Rochette, Philippe; Angers, Denis A; Chantigny, Martin H; Pujol, Stefen B; Giacomini, Diego A; Giacomini, Sandro J

    2014-05-01

    There is a lack of information on how placement in soil and nitrification inhibitors affects nitrous oxide (NO) and ammonia (NH) emissions from pig slurry (PS) applied under no-till (NT) conditions. Our objective was to determine the impact of injecting PS and treating it with the nitrification inhibitor dicyandiamide (DCD) on NH and NO emissions from soils under NT in subtropical southern Brazil. The emissions of these gases were compared for shallow (∼ 10 cm) injection and surface broadcasting of PS with and without DCD (8.1-10.0 kg ha; 6.5-8.4% of applied NH-N). Measurements were made at two sites during two summer growing seasons under NT corn crops. Injection reduced NH volatilization by 70% but increased NO emissions 2.4-fold (from 2628 to 6198 g NO N ha) compared with surface broadcast application. Adding DCD to PS inhibited nitrification and reduced NO emissions by an average of 28% (730 g NO-N ha) for surface broadcast and 66% (4105 g NO-N ha) for injection but did not increase NH volatilization. Consequently, NO emission factors were much higher for injection (3.6%) than for surface broadcast (1.3%) application and were reduced (0.9%) when DCD was added to injected PS. In conclusion, the injection of DCD-treated slurry is a recommendable practice for reducing NH and NO emissions when applying PS on NT corn in southern Brazil.

  19. Effects of compost, pig slurry and lime on trace element solubility and toxicity in two soils differently affected by mining activities.

    PubMed

    Pardo, Tania; Clemente, Rafael; Bernal, M Pilar

    2011-07-01

    The use of organic wastes as amendments in heavy metal-polluted soils is an ecological integrated option for their recycling. The potential use of alperujo (solid olive-mill waste) compost and pig slurry in phytoremediation strategies has been studied, evaluating their short-term effects on soil health. An aerobic incubation experiment was carried out using an acid mine spoil based soil and a low OM soil from the mining area of La Unión (Murcia, Spain). Arsenic and heavy metal solubility in amended and non-amended soils, and microbial parameters were evaluated and related to a phytotoxicity test. The organic amendments provoked an enlargement of the microbial community (compost increased biomass-C from non detected values to 35 μg g(-1) in the mine spoil soil, and doubled control values in the low OM soil) and an intensification of its activity (including a twofold increase in nitrification), and significantly enhanced seed germination (increased cress germination by 25% in the mine spoil soil). Organic amendments increased Zn and Pb EDTA-extractable concentrations, and raised As solubility due to the influence of factors such as pH changes, phosphate concentration, and the nature of the organic matter of the amendments. Compost, thanks to the greater persistence of its organic matter in soil, could be recommended for its use in (phyto)stabilisation strategies. However, pig slurry boosted inorganic N content and did not significantly enhance As extractability in soil, so its use could be specifically recommended in As polluted soils. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Simulation with models of increasing complexity of CO2 emissions and nitrogen mineralisation, after soil application of labelled pig slurry and maize stalks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bechini, Luca; Marino Gallina, Pietro; Geromel, Gabriele; Corti, Martina; Cavalli, Daniele

    2015-04-01

    High amounts of nitrogen are available per unit area in regions with intensive livestock operations. In swine farms, pig slurries are frequently incorporated in the soil together with maize stalks. Simulation models may help to understand nitrogen dynamics associated with animal manure and crop residue decomposition in the soil, and to support the definition of best management practices. The objective of this work was to test the ability of different models to simulate CO2 emissions and nitrogen mineralisation during a laboratory incubation (under optimal soil water content and constant temperature) of maize stalks (ST) and pig slurry (PS). A loam soil was amended with labelled (15N) or unlabelled maize stalks and pig slurries, in the presence of ammonium sulphate (AS). These treatments were established: unfertilised soil; ST15 + AS + PS; ST + AS15 + PS; and ST + AS + PS15. During 180 days, we measured CO2 emissions; microbial biomass C, N, and 15N; and soil mineral N (SMN and SM-15N). Three models of increasing complexity were calibrated using measured data. The models were two modifications of ICBM 2B/N (Kätterer and Andrén, 2001) and CN-SIM (Petersen et al., 2005). The three models simulated rather accurately the emissions of CO2 throughout the incubation period (Relative Root Mean Squared Error, RRMSE = 8-25). The simplest model (with one pool for ST and one for PS) strongly overestimated SMN immobilisation from day 3 to day 21, both in the treatments with AS15 and PS15 (RRMSE = 27-30%). The other two models represented rather well the dynamics of SMN in the soil (RRMSE = 21-25%), simulating a fast increase of nitrate concentration in the first days, and slower rates of nitrification thereafter. Worse performances were obtained with all models for the simulation of SM-15N in the treatment with ST15 (RRMSE = 64-104%): experimental data showed positive mineralization of stalk-derived N from the beginning of the incubation, while models strongly underestimated

  1. Degradation of sulfadiazine by Microbacterium lacus strain SDZm4, isolated from lysimeters previously manured with slurry from sulfadiazine-medicated pigs.

    PubMed

    Tappe, Wolfgang; Herbst, Michael; Hofmann, Diana; Koeppchen, Stephan; Kummer, Sirgit; Thiele, Björn; Groeneweg, Joost

    2013-04-01

    Sulfadiazine (SDZ)-degrading bacterial cultures were enriched from the topsoil layer of lysimeters that were formerly treated with manure from pigs medicated with (14)C-labeled SDZ. The loss of about 35% of the applied radioactivity after an incubation period of 3 years was attributed to CO2 release due to mineralization processes in the lysimeters. Microcosm experiments with moist soil and soil slurries originating from these lysimeters confirmed the presumed mineralization potential, and an SDZ-degrading bacterium was isolated. It was identified as Microbacterium lacus, denoted strain SDZm4. During degradation studies with M. lacus strain SDZm4 using pyrimidine-ring labeled SDZ, SDZ disappeared completely but no (14)CO2 was released during 10 days of incubation. The entire applied radioactivity (AR) remained in solution and could be assigned to 2-aminopyrimidine. In contrast, for parallel incubations but with phenyl ring-labeled SDZ, 56% of the AR was released as (14)CO2, 16% was linked to biomass, and 21% remained as dissolved, not yet identified (14)C. Thus, it was shown that M. lacus extensively mineralized and partly assimilated the phenyl moiety of the SDZ molecule while forming equimolar amounts of 2-aminopyrimidine. This partial degradation might be an important step in the complete mineralization of SDZ by soil microorganisms.

  2. Degradation of Sulfadiazine by Microbacterium lacus Strain SDZm4, Isolated from Lysimeters Previously Manured with Slurry from Sulfadiazine-Medicated Pigs

    PubMed Central

    Herbst, Michael; Hofmann, Diana; Koeppchen, Stephan; Kummer, Sirgit; Thiele, Björn; Groeneweg, Joost

    2013-01-01

    Sulfadiazine (SDZ)-degrading bacterial cultures were enriched from the topsoil layer of lysimeters that were formerly treated with manure from pigs medicated with 14C-labeled SDZ. The loss of about 35% of the applied radioactivity after an incubation period of 3 years was attributed to CO2 release due to mineralization processes in the lysimeters. Microcosm experiments with moist soil and soil slurries originating from these lysimeters confirmed the presumed mineralization potential, and an SDZ-degrading bacterium was isolated. It was identified as Microbacterium lacus, denoted strain SDZm4. During degradation studies with M. lacus strain SDZm4 using pyrimidine-ring labeled SDZ, SDZ disappeared completely but no 14CO2 was released during 10 days of incubation. The entire applied radioactivity (AR) remained in solution and could be assigned to 2-aminopyrimidine. In contrast, for parallel incubations but with phenyl ring-labeled SDZ, 56% of the AR was released as 14CO2, 16% was linked to biomass, and 21% remained as dissolved, not yet identified 14C. Thus, it was shown that M. lacus extensively mineralized and partly assimilated the phenyl moiety of the SDZ molecule while forming equimolar amounts of 2-aminopyrimidine. This partial degradation might be an important step in the complete mineralization of SDZ by soil microorganisms. PMID:23396336

  3. Pelleted organo-mineral fertilisers from composted pig slurry solids, animal wastes and spent mushroom compost for amenity grasslands.

    PubMed

    Rao, Juluri R; Watabe, Miyuki; Stewart, T Andrew; Millar, B Cherie; Moore, John E

    2007-01-01

    In Ireland, conversion of biodegradable farm wastes such as pig manure spent mushroom compost and poultry litter wastes to pelletised fertilisers is a desirable option for farmers. In this paper, results obtained from the composting of pig waste solids (20% w/w) blended with other locally available biodegradable wastes comprising poultry litter (26% w/w), spent mushroom compost (26% w/w), cocoa husks (18% w/w) and moistened shredded paper (10% w/w) are presented. The resulting 6-mo old 'mature' composts had a nutrient content of 2.3% total N, 1.6% P and 3.1% K, too 'low' for direct use as an agricultural fertiliser. Formulations incorporating dried blood or feather meal amendments enriched the organic N-content, reduced the moisture in mature compost mixtures and aided the granulation process. Inclusion of mineral supplements viz., sulphate of ammonia, rock phosphate and sulphate of potash, yielded slow release fertilisers with nutrient N:P:K ratios of 10:3:6 and 3:5:10 that were suited for amenity grasslands such as golf courses for spring or summer application and autumn dressing, respectively. Rigorous microbiological tests carried out throughout the composting, processing and pelletising phases indicated that the formulated organo-mineral fertilisers were free of vegetative bacterial pathogens.

  4. Lapping slurry

    SciTech Connect

    Simandl, R.F.; Upchurch, V.S.; Leitten, M.E.

    1999-01-05

    Improved lapping slurries provide for easier and more thorough cleaning of alumina work pieces, as well as inhibit corrosion of the lapping table and provide for easier cleaning of the lapping equipment. The unthickened lapping slurry comprises abrasive grains such as diamond abrasive dispersed in a carrier comprising water, glycerine, and triethanolamine. The thickened lapping slurry comprises abrasive grains such as diamond abrasive dispersed in a carrier comprising water, glycerine, triethanolamine, a water soluble silicate, and acid. 1 fig.

  5. Lapping slurry

    DOEpatents

    Simandl, Ronald F.; Upchurch, Victor S.; Leitten, Michael E.

    1999-01-01

    Improved lapping slurries provide for easier and more thorough cleaning of alumina workpieces, as well as inhibit corrosion of the lapping table and provide for easier cleaning of the lapping equipment. The unthickened lapping slurry comprises abrasive grains such as diamond abrasive dispersed in a carrier comprising water, glycerine, and triethanolamine. The thickened lapping slurry comprises abrasive grains such as diamond abrasive dispersed in a carrier comprising water, glycerine, triethanolamine, a water soluble silicate, and acid.

  6. Reduction of total coliform numbers during vermicomposting is caused by short-term direct effects of earthworms on microorganisms and depends on the dose of application of pig slurry.

    PubMed

    Monroy, Fernando; Aira, Manuel; Domínguez, Jorge

    2009-10-01

    During vermicomposting of organic waste, the interactions between epigeic earthworms and the detrital microbial community lead to decreases in the abundance of some potentially pathogenic microorganisms. Despite its importance, little is known about the mechanisms involved and the factors that affect the intensity of this effect. In the present study, we carried out three experiments to test the effect of the earthworm Eisenia fetida on total coliform numbers in pig slurry. We firstly applied low and high doses (1.5 and 3 kg, respectively) of pig slurry to small scale vermireactors with and without earthworms. We found that E. fetida significantly reduced total coliform numbers after 2 weeks, but only in the low dose vermireactors. In a subsequent feeding experiment in mesocosms, we observed that the coliform population was reduced by 98% after passage through the earthworms' guts, which suggests that digestive processes in the gut of E. fetida are the main factors involved in the decrease in total coliforms observed in the low dose vermireactors. Decreases in total coliform numbers were not related to decreases in bacterial biomass, which indicates a specific negative effect of earthworms on the coliforms. In the third experiment, we tested the indirect effect of earthworms on total coliforms by inoculating pig slurry with either 2 or 10% vermicompost. The addition of vermicompost did not affect the number of coliforms either after 15, 30 or 60 days, which supports the idea that this bacterial group is more affected by the passage through the gut of E. fetida than by interactions with the earthworm-shaped microbial community.

  7. Acidification of animal slurry--a review.

    PubMed

    Fangueiro, David; Hjorth, Maibritt; Gioelli, Fabrizio

    2015-02-01

    Ammonia emissions are a major problem associated with animal slurry management, and solutions to overcome this problem are required worldwide by farmers and stakeholders. An obvious way to minimize ammonia emissions from slurry is to decrease slurry pH by addition of acids or other substances. This solution has been used commonly since 2010 in countries such as Denmark, and its efficiency with regard to the minimization of NH3 emissions has been documented in many studies. Nevertheless, the impact of such treatment on other gaseous emissions during storage is not clear, since the studies performed so far have provided different scenarios. Similarly, the impact of the soil application of acidified slurry on plant production and diffuse pollution has been considered in several studies. Also, the impact of acidification upon combination with other slurry treatment technologies (e.g. mechanical separation, anaerobic digestion …) is important to consider. Here, a compilation and critical review of all these studies has been performed in order to fully understand the global impact of slurry acidification and assess the applicability of this treatment for slurry management. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. 7 CFR 58.720 - Acidifying agents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... Specifications for Dairy Plants Approved for USDA Inspection and Grading Service 1 Quality Specifications for Raw Material § 58.720 Acidifying agents. Acidifying agents if used shall be those permitted by the Food...

  9. 7 CFR 58.720 - Acidifying agents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... Specifications for Dairy Plants Approved for USDA Inspection and Grading Service 1 Quality Specifications for Raw Material § 58.720 Acidifying agents. Acidifying agents if used shall be those permitted by the Food...

  10. 7 CFR 58.720 - Acidifying agents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... Specifications for Dairy Plants Approved for USDA Inspection and Grading Service 1 Quality Specifications for Raw Material § 58.720 Acidifying agents. Acidifying agents if used shall be those permitted by the Food...

  11. 7 CFR 58.720 - Acidifying agents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... Specifications for Dairy Plants Approved for USDA Inspection and Grading Service 1 Quality Specifications for Raw Material § 58.720 Acidifying agents. Acidifying agents if used shall be those permitted by the Food...

  12. 7 CFR 58.720 - Acidifying agents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Acidifying agents. 58.720 Section 58.720 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards... Material § 58.720 Acidifying agents. Acidifying agents if used shall be those permitted by the Food and...

  13. In vivo investigation of acidified pepsin exposure to porcine vocal fold epithelia.

    PubMed

    Durkes, Abigail; Sivasankar, M Preeti

    2016-01-01

    The study objective was to investigate epithelial changes in response to direct, repeated, acidified pepsin exposures in an in vivo porcine model. We hypothesized that 12 acidified pepsin applications to simulate reflux would elicit a vocal fold response characterized by inflammation, epithelial proliferation, and increased intercellular space, as well as changes in the gene expression of epithelial junctional proteins, ion transporter proteins, and proinflammatory cytokines. Prospective, in vivo study. Pigs received acidified pepsin (pH = 4) or saline (sham) applied directly to vocal folds. Larynges were collected following three exposures per week for 4 weeks. Vocal fold tissue morphology, collagen, and elastin were evaluated histologically. Gene expression of E-cadherin, zona occludens-1, cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator, epithelial sodium channel, interleukin-1β, tumor necrosis factor-α, and interferon-γ were measured. Ultrastructural alterations, epithelial intercellular space diameter, and microridge height were measured using transmission electron microscopy. There were no significant differences in histology, gene transcripts, epithelial ultrastructure, intercellular space, and microridge height after acidified pepsin exposure. Twelve simulated reflux challenges were insufficient to elicit epithelial changes, demonstrating the resistance of healthy vocal folds to direct, repeated acidified pepsin exposures. These data increase our understanding of healthy vocal fold defenses and lay the groundwork for a prospective, uninjured, nonsurgical, laryngopharyngeal reflux model where pigs can be exposed directly to acidified pepsin. © 2015 The American Laryngological, Rhinological and Otological Society, Inc.

  14. Effect of Bacillus spp. direct-fed microbial on slurry characteristics and gaseous emissions in growing pigs fed with high fibre-based diets.

    PubMed

    Prenafeta-Boldú, F X; Fernández, B; Viñas, M; Lizardo, R; Brufau, J; Owusu-Asiedu, A; Walsh, M C; Awati, A

    2017-02-01

    A 26-day trial with 18 Pietrain×(Landrace×Duroc) pigs was conducted to investigate the effect of two dose levels of a specifically selected Bacillus spp. direct-fed microbial (DFM) product, on the emission of environmentally harmful gasses (methane, ammonia and hydrogen sulphide) from manure. Pigs were assigned to one of three treatments in a randomized complete block design according to their sex and initial BW. Each treatment contained three replications with two pigs per pen. The test treatments included a Bacillus spp. DFM containing 3×108 colony-forming unit/g, added at a low (250 mg/kg) and high (500 mg/kg) dose to an antibiotic free high fibre-based diet, and a non-supplemented control diet. Manure from pigs fed with the supplemented diets emitted lower amounts of atmospheric contaminants. The most significant reduction was observed with low DFM supplementation, in which methane and ammonia volatilization decreased (P40% and 50%, respectively, on fresh weight basis in relation to the control. Microbiome analysis of manure by high through put sequencing techniques on eubacterial and archaeal 16S rRNA genes highlighted the complex interactions between indigenous gut microflora and inoculated Bacillus spp. The tested Bacillus DFM could be considered as a best available technique in reducing the environmental impacts of growing pigs fed with high fibre-based diets.

  15. 21 CFR 108.25 - Acidified foods.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Acidified foods. 108.25 Section 108.25 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN... With an Emergency Permit § 108.25 Acidified foods. (a) Inadequate or improper manufacture, processing...

  16. 21 CFR 108.25 - Acidified foods.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Acidified foods. 108.25 Section 108.25 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN... With an Emergency Permit § 108.25 Acidified foods. (a) Inadequate or improper manufacture, processing...

  17. 21 CFR 108.25 - Acidified foods.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Acidified foods. 108.25 Section 108.25 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN... With an Emergency Permit § 108.25 Acidified foods. (a) Inadequate or improper manufacture,...

  18. 21 CFR 108.25 - Acidified foods.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Acidified foods. 108.25 Section 108.25 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN... With an Emergency Permit § 108.25 Acidified foods. (a) Inadequate or improper manufacture,...

  19. Filtering reprecipitated slurry

    SciTech Connect

    Morrissey, M.F.

    1992-01-01

    As part of the Late Washing Demonstration at Savannah River Technology Center, Interim Waste Technology has filtered reprecipitated and non reprecipitated slurry with the Experimental Laboratory Filter (ELF) at TNX. Reprecipitated slurry generates higher permeate fluxes than non reprecipitated slurry. Washing reprecipitated slurry may require a defoamer because reprecipitation encourages foaming.

  20. Filtering reprecipitated slurry

    SciTech Connect

    Morrissey, M.F.

    1992-12-31

    As part of the Late Washing Demonstration at Savannah River Technology Center, Interim Waste Technology has filtered reprecipitated and non reprecipitated slurry with the Experimental Laboratory Filter (ELF) at TNX. Reprecipitated slurry generates higher permeate fluxes than non reprecipitated slurry. Washing reprecipitated slurry may require a defoamer because reprecipitation encourages foaming.

  1. Effects of cattle slurry acidification on ammonia and methane evolution during storage.

    PubMed

    Petersen, Søren O; Andersen, Astrid J; Eriksen, Jørgen

    2012-01-01

    Slurry acidification before storage is known to reduce NH(3) emissions, but recent observations have indicated that CH(4) emissions are also reduced. We investigated the evolution of CH(4) from fresh and aged cattle slurry during 3 mo of storage as influenced by pH adjustment to 5.5 with sulfuric acid. In a third storage experiment, cattle slurry acidified with commercial equipment on two farms was incubated. In the manipulation experiments, effects of acid and sulfate were distinguished by adding hydrochloric acid and potassium sulfate separately or in combination, rather than sulfuric acid. In one experiment sulfur was also added to slurry as the amino acid methionine in separate treatments. In each treatment 20-kg portions of slurry (n = 4) were stored for 95 d. All samples were subsampled nine to 10 times for determination of NH(3) and CH(4) evolution rates using a 2-L flow-through system. In all experiments, the pH of acidified cattle slurry increased gradually to between 6.5 and 7. Acidification of slurry reduced the evolution of CH(4) by 67 to 87%. The greatest reduction was observed with aged cattle slurry, which had a much higher potential for CH(4) production than fresh slurry. Sulfate and methionine amendment to cattle slurry without pH adjustment also significantly inhibited methanogenesis, probably as a result of sulfide production. The study suggests that complex microbial interactions involving sulfur transformations and pH determine the potential for CH(4) emission during storage of cattle slurry, and that slurry acidification may be a cost-effective greenhouse gas mitigation option. Copyright © by the American Society of Agronomy, Crop Science Society of America, and Soil Science Society of America, Inc.

  2. Effects of cattle-slurry treatment by acidification and separation on nitrogen dynamics and global warming potential after surface application to an acidic soil.

    PubMed

    Fangueiro, David; Pereira, José; Bichana, André; Surgy, Sónia; Cabral, Fernanda; Coutinho, João

    2015-10-01

    Cattle-slurry (liquid manure) application to soil is a common practice to provide nutrients and organic matter for crop growth but it also strongly impacts the environment. The objective of the present study was to assess the efficiency of cattle-slurry treatment by solid-liquid separation and/or acidification on nitrogen dynamics and global warming potential (GWP) following application to an acidic soil. An aerobic laboratory incubation was performed over 92 days with a Dystric Cambisol amended with raw cattle-slurry or separated liquid fraction (LF) treated or not by acidification to pH 5.5 by addition of sulphuric acid. Soil mineral N contents and NH3, N2O, CH4 and CO2 emissions were measured. Results obtained suggest that the acidification of raw cattle-slurry reduced significantly NH3 emissions (-88%) but also the GWP (-28%) while increased the N availability relative to raw cattle-slurry (15% of organic N applied mineralised against negative mineralisation in raw slurry). However, similar NH3 emissions and GWP were observed in acidified LF and non-acidified LF treatments. On the other hand, soil application of acidified cattle-slurry rather than non-acidified LF should be preferred attending the lower costs associated to acidification compared to solid-liquid separation. It can then be concluded that cattle-slurry acidification is a solution to minimise NH3 emissions from amended soil and an efficient strategy to decrease the GWP associated with slurry application to soil. Furthermore, the more intense N mineralisation observed with acidified slurry should lead to a higher amount of plant available N and consequently to higher crop yields. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Sulfur turnover and emissions during storage of cattle slurry: effects of acidification and sulfur addition.

    PubMed

    Eriksen, Jørgen; Andersen, Astrid J; Poulsen, Henrik V; Adamsen, Anders Peter S; Petersen, Søren O

    2012-01-01

    Slurry acidification using sulfuric acid reduces ammonia emissions but also affects sulfur (S) cycling. Emission of sulfur is a source of malodor and reduces the sulfur fertilizer value of the slurry. We investigated the effect of sulfate and methionine amendments, alone or in combination with acidification, on sulfur transformations in slurry and emissions of volatile sulfur compounds (VSC) during storage of fresh and aged cattle slurry. When pH was lowered to 5.5 it resulted in an almost complete inhibition of sulfate reduction. There was a huge emission of hydrogen sulfide (HS) with addition of sulfate and methionine ( < 0.01). Methanethiol (MT) was emitted in treatments with addition of methionine, especially when simultaneously acidified ( < 0.01). The large HS production in the sulfate-amended slurries resulted in little accumulation of MT and dimethyl sulfide (DMS) under neutral conditions, in contrast to acidic conditions where the degradation was inhibited and both MT and DMS accumulated. Based on odor activity values, untreated slurry had little odor development from S compounds, especially the aged slurry. Acidification did not significantly increase odor contribution from any of the compounds in fresh or aged slurry. Generally, addition of a sulfate increased the contribution from HS dramatically, whereas acidification lowered the HS contribution but increased that of MT. Thus, acidification of slurry with sulfuric acid may potentially produce more odor from S compounds than untreated slurry. Copyright © by the American Society of Agronomy, Crop Science Society of America, and Soil Science Society of America, Inc.

  4. Sizing pumps for slurries

    SciTech Connect

    Akhtar, S.Z.

    1996-11-01

    Slurry characteristics have a significant impact on centrifugal pump performance. For instance, as particle size increases or the percent solids concentration increases, pump head and efficiency decrease. Therefore, before a slurry pump is selected, it is important to define the slurry characteristics as accurately as possible. The effect of the slurry characteristics on the head and efficiency of the centrifugal pump will be emphasized (the effect on flowrate is less significant). The effect of slurry characteristics is more predominant in smaller pumps (with smaller diameter impellers) than in larger pumps. The data and relationship between the various slurry parameters have been developed from correlations and nomographs published by pump vendors from their field data and test results. The information helps to avoid specifying an undersized pump/motor assembly for slurry service.

  5. Reagent use efficiency with removal of nitrogen from pig slurry via struvite: A study on magnesium oxide and related by-products.

    PubMed

    Romero-Güiza, M S; Tait, S; Astals, S; Del Valle-Zermeño, R; Martínez, M; Mata-Alvarez, J; Chimenos, J M

    2015-11-01

    Controlled struvite formation has been attracting increasing attention as a near mature technology to recover nutrients from wastewater. However, struvite feasibility is generally limited by the high cost of chemical reagents. With the aim to understand and control reagent use efficiency, experiments and equilibrium model simulations examined inorganic nitrogen (TAN) removal from pig manure via struvite with added magnesium and phosphate reagents. Four industrial magnesium oxide (MgO), a commercial product and three by-products from magnesite calcination, were tested with phosphate added as a highly soluble potassium salt. TAN removal extents with the MgOs ranged from 47 to 72%, with the highest grade MgO providing the greatest extent of TAN removal. However, model analysis showed that all the MgO reagents were poorly soluble (only about 40% of added magnesium actually dissolved). The model results suggested that this poor dissolution was due to kinetic limitations, not solubility constraints. A further set of additional reagents (termed stabilization agents) were prepared by pre-treating the MgO reagents with phosphoric acid, and were tested separately as a source of both magnesium and phosphate. Results showed that acid pre-treatment of moderate to highly reactive MgOs (soft to medium-burnt) primarily formed bobierrite as the stabilizing agent, whereas the pre-treatment of very low reactivity MgOs (dead-burnt) mostly formed newberyite. The newberyite stabilizing agents achieved very high TAN removal extents of about 80%, which is significant, considering that these were formed from dead-burnt/low-grade MgOs. However, the bobierrite stabilizing agents achieved a substantially lower TAN removal extent than their medium-to-high reactivity precursor MgOs. Again, model analysis showed that the bobierrite stabilizing agents were poorly soluble, due to kinetic limitations, not solubility constraints. In contrast, the model suggested that the newberyite stabilizing

  6. Microbiological Spoilage of Acidified Specialty Products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sperber, William H.

    Acidified specialty products or condiments are among the most microbiologically stable and safe food products. Often formulated, packaged, and distributed without heat treatments, they are microbiologically stable indefinitely at ambient temperatures in unopened containers. The packaged, acidified products are often intended for multiple uses, exposing them at the points of consumption to numerous opportunities for contamination with microorganisms. Nonetheless, they remain resistant to microbiological spoilage for many months, often under refrigerated conditions that are used to retard chemical reactions, flavor changes, and yeast growth.

  7. Ultrasound Analysis of Slurries

    DOEpatents

    Soong, Yee and Blackwell, Arthur G.

    2005-11-01

    An autoclave reactor allows for the ultrasonic analysis of slurry concentration and particle size distribution at elevated temperatures and pressures while maintaining the temperature- and pressure-sensitive ultrasonic transducers under ambient conditions. The reactor vessel is a hollow stainless steel cylinder containing the slurry which includes a stirrer and a N, gas source for directing gas bubbles through the slurry. Input and output transducers are connected to opposed lateral portions of the hollow cylinder for respectively directing sound waves through the slurry and receiving these sound waves after transmission through the slurry, where changes in sound wave velocity and amplitude can be used to measure slurry parameters. Ultrasonic adapters connect the transducers to the reactor vessel in a sealed manner and isolate the transducers from the hostile conditions within the vessel without ultrasonic signal distortion or losses.

  8. Ultrasound Analysis Of Slurries

    DOEpatents

    Soong, Yee; Blackwell, Arthur G.

    2005-11-01

    An autoclave reactor allows for the ultrasonic analysis of slurry concentration and particle size distribution at elevated temperatures and pressures while maintaining the temperature- and pressure-sensitive ultrasonic transducers under ambient conditions. The reactor vessel is a hollow stainless steel cylinder containing the slurry which includes a stirrer and a N.sub.2 gas source for directing gas bubbles through the slurry. Input and output transducers are connected to opposed lateral portions of the hollow cylinder for respectively directing sound waves through the slurry and receiving these sound waves after transmission through the slurry, where changes in sound wave velocity and amplitude can be used to measure slurry parameters. Ultrasonic adapters connect the transducers to the reactor vessel in a sealed manner and isolate the transducers from the hostile conditions within the vessel without ultrasonic signal distortion or losses.

  9. 21 CFR 173.325 - Acidified sodium chlorite solutions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... HUMAN CONSUMPTION Specific Usage Additives § 173.325 Acidified sodium chlorite solutions. Acidified...., College Park, MD 20740, or may be examined at the Center for Food Safety and Applied Nutrition's...

  10. Chemical behavior of acidified chromium (3) solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Terman, D.K.

    1981-05-01

    A unique energy-storage system has been developed at NASA's Lewis Research Center called REDOX. This NASA-REDOX system is an electrochemical storage device that utilized the oxidation and reduction of two fully soluble redox couples for charging and discharging. The redox couples now being investigated are acidified chloride solutions of chromium (Cr(+2)/Cr(+3)) and iron (Fe(+2)/Fe(+3)).

  11. 21 CFR 108.25 - Acidified foods.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN..., or packing of acidified foods may result in the distribution in interstate commerce of processed... after these foods have entered into interstate commerce. The Commissioner of Food and Drugs...

  12. 21 CFR 173.325 - Acidified sodium chlorite solutions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Acidified sodium chlorite solutions. 173.325... HUMAN CONSUMPTION Specific Usage Additives § 173.325 Acidified sodium chlorite solutions. Acidified sodium chlorite solutions may be safely used in accordance with the following prescribed conditions: (a...

  13. Mn2O3 Slurry Achieving Reduction of Slurry Waste

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kishii, Sadahiro; Nakamura, Ko; Hanawa, Kenzo; Watanabe, Satoru; Arimoto, Yoshihiro; Kurokawa, Syuhei; Doi, Toshiro K.

    2012-04-01

    Fumed silica is widely used for SiO2 chemical mechanical polishing (CMP). In semiconductor processes, only fresh slurry is used, the used slurry being disposed of. We have demonstrated that Mn2O3 abrasive slurry polishes dielectric SiO2 film, giving 4 times the removal rate of conventional fumed silica slurry. The higher removal rate reduces the total amount of slurry used, consequently reducing the amount of used slurry waste. The removal rate of Mn2O3 slurry remains constant for solid concentrations between l and 10 wt %, and stays constant without pad conditioning. These characteristics are very useful for slurry reuse. Remanufacture of Mn2O3 slurry from used slurry has been demonstrated, and the removal rates of the remanufactured and fresh slurries are the same. Reuse and remanufacturing drastically reduce the amount of waste.

  14. ICE SLURRY APPLICATIONS

    PubMed Central

    Kauffeld, M.; WANG, M. J.; Goldstein, V.; Kasza, K. E.

    2011-01-01

    The role of secondary refrigerants is expected to grow as the focus on the reduction of greenhouse gas emissions increases. The effectiveness of secondary refrigerants can be improved when phase changing media are introduced in place of single phase media. Operating at temperatures below the freezing point of water, ice slurry facilitates several efficiency improvements such as reductions in pumping energy consumption as well as lowering the required temperature difference in heat exchangers due to the beneficial thermo-physical properties of ice slurry. Research has shown that ice slurry can be engineered to have ideal ice particle characteristics so that it can be easily stored in tanks without agglomeration and then be extractable for pumping at very high ice fraction without plugging. In addition ice slurry can be used in many direct contact food and medical protective cooling applications. This paper provides an overview of the latest developments in ice slurry technology. PMID:21528014

  15. Pressurized Vessel Slurry Pumping

    SciTech Connect

    Pound, C.R.

    2001-09-17

    This report summarizes testing of an alternate ''pressurized vessel slurry pumping'' apparatus. The principle is similar to rural domestic water systems and ''acid eggs'' used in chemical laboratories in that material is extruded by displacement with compressed air.

  16. Seasonal variation in methane emission from stored slurry and solid manures

    SciTech Connect

    Husted, S.

    1994-05-01

    Methane (CH{sub 4}) is an important greenhouse gas and recent inventories have suggested that livestock manure makes a significant contribution to global CH{sub 4} emissions. The emission of CH{sub 4} from stored pig slurry, cattle slurry, pig solid manure, and cattle solid manure was followed during a 1-yr period. Methane emission was determined by dynamic chambers. Emission rates followed a ln-normal distribution for all four manures, Indicating large spatial and seasonal variation& Monthly geometric means for pig slurry, cattle slurry, pig solid manure, and cattle solid manure varied from 0.4 to 35.8, 0.0 to 34.5, 0.4 to 142.1, and 0.1 to 42.7 g CH{sub 4} m{sup -3} d{sup -1}, respectively. For slurries CH{sub 4} emission rates increased significantly with storage temperatures, the Q{sub 10} value ranging from 14 to 5.7 depending on slurry type. The presence of a natural surface crust reduced CH{sub 4} emission from slurry by a factor of 11 to 12. Surface crust effects declined with increasing slurry temperature. Solid manures stored in dungheaps showed significant heat production. Pig solid manure temperatures were maintained at 30 to 60{degrees}C throughout most of the year, while cattle solid manure temperatures were close to ambient levels until late spring, when heat production was initiated. Methanogenesis in solid manure also increased with increasing temperatures. For pig solid manure, CH{sub 4} emission rates peaked at 35 to 45{degrees}C. No distinct temperature optimum could be detected for cattle solid manure, however, temperatures rarely exceeded 45{degrees}C. The Q{sub 10} values for dungheaps ranged from 2.7 to 10.3 depending on-manure type and Q{sub 10} temperature interval. Annual CH{sub 4} emissions from pig slurry, cattle slurry, pig solid manure, and cattle solid manure were estimated at 8.9, 15.5, 27.3, and 5.3 kg animal{sup -1} yr{sup -1}, respectively. 27 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs.

  17. Zeolite Combined with Alum and Polyaluminum Chloride Mixed with Agricultural Slurries Reduces Carbon Losses in Runoff from Grassed Soil Boxes.

    PubMed

    Murnane, J G; Brennan, R B; Fenton, O; Healy, M G

    2016-11-01

    Carbon (C) losses from agricultural soils to surface waters can migrate through water treatment plants and result in the formation of disinfection by-products, which are potentially harmful to human health. This study aimed to quantify total organic carbon (TOC) and total inorganic C losses in runoff after application of dairy slurry, pig slurry, or milk house wash water (MWW) to land and to mitigate these losses through coamendment of the slurries with zeolite (2.36-3.35 mm clinoptilolite) and liquid polyaluminum chloride (PAC) (10% AlO) for dairy and pig slurries or liquid aluminum sulfate (alum) (8% AlO) for MWW. Four treatments under repeated 30-min simulated rainfall events (9.6 mm h) were examined in a laboratory study using grassed soil runoff boxes (0.225 m wide, 1 m long; 10% slope): control soil, unamended slurries, PAC-amended dairy and pig slurries (13.3 and 11.7 kg t, respectively), alum-amended MWW (3.2 kg t), combined zeolite and PAC-amended dairy (160 and 13.3 kg t zeolite and PAC, respectively) and pig slurries (158 and 11.7 kg t zeolite and PAC, respectively), and combined zeolite and alum-amended MWW (72 and 3.2 kg t zeolite and alum, respectively). The unamended and amended slurries were applied at net rates of 31, 34, and 50 t ha for pig and dairy slurries and MWW, respectively. Significant reductions of TOC in runoff compared with unamended slurries were measured for PAC-amended dairy and pig slurries (52 and 56%, respectively) but not for alum-amended MWW. Dual zeolite and alum-amended MWW significantly reduced TOC in runoff compared with alum amendment only. We conclude that use of PAC-amended dairy and pig slurries and dual zeolite and alum-amended MWW, although effective, may not be economically viable to reduce TOC losses from organic slurries given the relatively low amounts of TOC measured in runoff from unamended slurries compared with the amounts applied.

  18. Impact of slurry management strategies on potential leaching of nutrients and pathogens in a sandy soil amended with cattle slurry.

    PubMed

    Fangueiro, D; Surgy, S; Napier, V; Menaia, J; Vasconcelos, E; Coutinho, J

    2014-12-15

    For farmers, management of cattle slurry (CS) is now a priority, in order to improve the fertilizer value of the slurry and simultaneously minimize its environmental impact. Several slurry pre-treatments and soil application methods to minimize ammonia emissions are now available to farmers, but the impact of such management strategies on groundwater is still unclear. A laboratory experiment was performed over 24 days in controlled conditions, with undisturbed soil columns (sandy soil) in PVC pipes (30 cm high and 5.7 cm in diameter). The treatments considered (4 replicates) were: a control with no amendment (CTR), injection of whole CS (WSI), and surface application of: whole CS (WSS), acidified (pH 5.5) whole CS (AWSS), the liquid fraction obtained by centrifugation of CS (LFS), and acidified (pH 5.5) liquid fraction (ALFS). An amount of CS equivalent to 240 kg N ha(-1) was applied in all treatments. The first leaching event was performed 72 h after application of the treatments and then leaching events were performed weekly to give a total of four irrigation events (IEs). All the leachates obtained were analyzed for mineral and organic nitrogen, electrical conductivity (EC), pH, total carbon, and phosphorus. Total coliforms and Escherichia coli were also quantified in the leachates obtained in the first IE. The results show that both acidification and separation had significant effects on the composition of the leachates: higher NO3(-) concentrations were observed for the LFS and ALFS relative to all the other treatments, throughout the experiment, and lower NO3(-) concentrations were observed for acidified relative to non-acidified treatments at IE2. Acidification of both the LF and WS led to higher NH4(+) concentrations as well as an increase of EC for treatment ALFS relative to the control, in the first IE, and lower pH values in the AWSS. Furthermore, the E. coli and total coliform concentrations in AWSS, LFS, and ALFS were significantly higher than in

  19. Slurry bubble column hydrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rados, Novica

    Slurry bubble column reactors are presently used for a wide range of reactions in both chemical and biochemical industry. The successful design and scale up of slurry bubble column reactors require a complete understanding of multiphase fluid dynamics, i.e. phase mixing, heat and mass transport characteristics. The primary objective of this thesis is to improve presently limited understanding of the gas-liquid-solid slurry bubble column hydrodynamics. The effect of superficial gas velocity (8 to 45 cm/s), pressure (0.1 to 1.0 MPa) and solids loading (20 and 35 wt.%) on the time-averaged solids velocity and turbulent parameter profiles has been studied using Computer Automated Radioactive Particle Tracking (CARPT). To accomplish this, CARPT technique has been significantly improved for the measurements in highly attenuating systems, such as high pressure, high solids loading stainless steel slurry bubble column. At a similar set of operational conditions time-averaged gas and solids holdup profiles have been evaluated using the developed Computed Tomography (CT)/Overall gas holdup procedure. This procedure is based on the combination of the CT scans and the overall gas holdup measurements. The procedure assumes constant solids loading in the radial direction and axially invariant cross-sectionally averaged gas holdup. The obtained experimental holdup, velocity and turbulent parameters data are correlated and compared with the existing low superficial gas velocities and atmospheric pressure CARPT/CT gas-liquid and gas-liquid-solid slurry data. The obtained solids axial velocity radial profiles are compared with the predictions of the one dimensional (1-D) liquid/slurry recirculation phenomenological model. The obtained solids loading axial profiles are compared with the predictions of the Sedimentation and Dispersion Model (SDM). The overall gas holdup values, gas holdup radial profiles, solids loading axial profiles, solids axial velocity radial profiles and solids

  20. 75 FR 59268 - Draft Guidance for Industry: Acidified Foods; Availability

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-27

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Draft Guidance for Industry: Acidified Foods; Availability AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is announcing the availability of a draft guidance entitled ``Guidance for Industry: Acidified Foods...

  1. 21 CFR 131.162 - Acidified sour cream.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Acidified sour cream. 131.162 Section 131.162 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR.... Acidified sour cream contains not less than 18 percent milkfat; except that when the food is characterized...

  2. 21 CFR 131.162 - Acidified sour cream.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Acidified sour cream. 131.162 Section 131.162 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR.... Acidified sour cream contains not less than 18 percent milkfat; except that when the food is characterized...

  3. 21 CFR 131.162 - Acidified sour cream.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Acidified sour cream. 131.162 Section 131.162 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR.... Acidified sour cream contains not less than 18 percent milkfat; except that when the food is characterized...

  4. 21 CFR 131.162 - Acidified sour cream.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Acidified sour cream. 131.162 Section 131.162 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR.... Acidified sour cream contains not less than 18 percent milkfat; except that when the food is characterized...

  5. New slurry pumps in China

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Z.; Wang, W.; Shi, Z.

    1998-07-01

    Wet parts of centrifugal slurry pumps are naturally subjected to wear, but local wear in pumps could be avoided, at least partly. Through studying the wear phenomenon of slurry pumps in industrial applications, a series of much more advanced slurry pumps was developed in China. Laboratory tests and industrial applications show that the new pumps are high in efficiency when transporting slurries, and uniform wear can be expected from them.

  6. New slurry pumps in China

    SciTech Connect

    Zhengwang Li; Wenlie Wang; Zhongyin Shi

    1998-04-01

    Wet parts of centrifugal slurry pumps are naturally subjected to wear, but local wear in pumps could be avoided, at least partly. Through studying the wear phenomenon of slurry pumps in industrial applications, a series of much more advanced slurry pumps was developed in China. Laboratory tests and industrial applications show that the new pumps are high in efficiency when transporting slurries, and uniform wear can be expected from them.

  7. B-complex vitamins in cultured and acidified yogurt.

    PubMed

    Reddy, K P; Shahani, K M; Kulkarni, S M

    1976-02-01

    Studies were to determine the effect of various factors upon B-vitamin content of cultured yogurt and to compare the B-vitamin contents of cultured and direct acidified yogurt. Incubation of yogurt culture at 42 C for 3 h yielded maximum vitamin synthesis concurrent with optimal flavor and texture qualities. A method was standardized for the manufacture of direct acidified yogurt involving the use of Stabilac acidulant and nonfat dry milk, Carboxymethyl cellulose, gelatin, and Starite. Acidified yogurt showed a slightly higher content of certain B-vitamins than the cultured yogurt due to the contribution made by various food additives. Both cultured and acidified yogurt showed good keeping quality and freedom from microbial contaminants during storage at 5 C for 16 days. However, folic acid and vitamin B12 contents decreased 29 and 60% in cultured yogurt and 48 and 54% in acidified yogurt.

  8. Slurry reactor design studies

    SciTech Connect

    Fox, J.M.; Degen, B.D.; Cady, G.; Deslate, F.D.; Summers, R.L. ); Akgerman, A. ); Smith, J.M. )

    1990-06-01

    The objective of these studies was to perform a realistic evaluation of the relative costs of tublar-fixed-bed and slurry reactors for methanol, mixed alcohols and Fischer-Tropsch syntheses under conditions where they would realistically be expected to operate. The slurry Fischer-Tropsch reactor was, therefore, operated at low H{sub 2}/CO ratio on gas directly from a Shell gasifier. The fixed-bed reactor was operated on 2.0 H{sub 2}/CO ratio gas after adjustment by shift and CO{sub 2} removal. Every attempt was made to give each reactor the benefit of its optimum design condition and correlations were developed to extend the models beyond the range of the experimental pilot plant data. For the methanol design, comparisons were made for a recycle plant with high methanol yield, this being the standard design condition. It is recognized that this is not necessarily the optimum application for the slurry reactor, which is being proposed for a once-through operation, coproducing methanol and power. Consideration is also given to the applicability of the slurry reactor to mixed alcohols, based on conditions provided by Lurgi for an Octamix{trademark} plant using their standard tubular-fixed reactor technology. 7 figs., 26 tabs.

  9. Slurry transport medium

    SciTech Connect

    Rosenthal, W.; Schiffman, L.

    1980-06-03

    This invention provides for an improvement in slurry transport systems, especially coal slurry lines. Instead of the usual use of fresh water resources which, in some geographic areas, are scarce for slurry transport, concentrated brine is used which is prepared from abundant salt water resources. Because of the higher density of this concentrated brine, it is a superior carrier of pulverized material. It diminishes the separation and settling tendency of slurry components during transport and particularly during shutdown. Other advantages in the use of concentrated brine include: freezing point depression which permits ease of transport during winter and at lower temperatures; dust suppression of stored coal; avoidance of spontaneous combustion of stored coal; inhibit freeze packing of dewatered pipeline coal; and diminished extent of corrosion in ferrous metal pipelines as compared to that which might occur with lower concentration brines. Important in the economy of the process is that the concentrated brine can be recycled. An inexpensive method for producing the concentrated brine is given.

  10. Carbon Slurry Secondary Atomization.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-09-01

    ELEMENT NO. NO. N ACCESSION NO. 1 62203F 3048 I 05 I 34 11 TITLE (Include Securty Clasification ) Carbon Slurry Secondary Atomization 12. PERSONAL AUTHOR(S...density, size, and induction time. Any continuing program in this area should attempt to keep these criteria in mind . IV. VOLATILE ADDITIVE STUDIES 1

  11. Ammonia emission after slurry application to grassland in Switzerland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Häni, Christoph; Sintermann, Jörg; Kupper, Thomas; Jocher, Markus; Neftel, Albrecht

    2016-01-01

    Loss of ammonia (NH3) after field application of livestock slurry contributes between 30% and 50% of agricultural NH3 emissions from European countries. The objectives of this study were to re-evaluate NH3 emissions following application of cattle and pig slurry to grassland in Switzerland and to investigate the effectiveness of abatement techniques. In 17 field experiments, NH3 emissions were determined with a micrometeorological approach, relating the emission to the measured concentration by means of atmospheric dispersion modelling. The cattle slurry applied exhibited an average dry matter content of 3.3% (range between 1.0% and 6.7% dry matter). The emission after application of cattle slurry spread with a splash plate (referred to as reference technique) ranged from 10% to 47% of applied Total Ammoniacal Nitrogen (% of TAN) and averaged to 25% of TAN. This range of losses is lower by approx. a factor of two compared to measurements from earlier Swiss experiments. Applications with trailing hose and trailing shoe systems yielded an average reduction of 51% and 53%, respectively, relative to the reference technique. A regression analysis showed that the dry matter content of the slurry and the air temperature are important drivers for NH3 emission.

  12. Schwertmannite stability in acidified coastal environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collins, Richard N.; Jones, Adele M.; Waite, T. David

    2010-01-01

    A combination of analytical and field measurements has been used to probe the speciation and cycling of iron in coastal lowland acid sulfate soils. Iron K-edge EXAFS spectroscopy demonstrated that schwertmannite dominated (43-77%) secondary iron mineralization throughout the oxidized and acidified soil profile, while pyrite and illite were the major iron-bearing minerals in the reduced potential acid sulfate soil layers. Analyses of contemporary precipitates from shallow acid sulfate soil groundwaters indicated that 2-line ferrihydrite, in addition to schwertmannite, is presently controlling secondary Fe(III) mineralization. Although aqueous pH values and concentrations of Fe(II) were seasonally high, no evidence was obtained for the Fe(II)-catalyzed crystallization of either mineral to goethite. The results of this study indicate that: (a) schwertmannite is likely to persist in coastal lowland acid sulfate soils on a much longer time-scale than predicted by laboratory experiments; (b) this mineral is less reactive in these types of soils due to surface-site coverage by components such as silicate and possibly, to a lesser extent, natural organic matter and phosphate and; (c) active water table management to promote oxic/anoxic cycles around the Fe(II)-Fe(III) redox couple, or reflooding of these soils, will be ineffective in promoting the Fe(II)-catalyzed transformation of either schwertmannite or 2-line ferrihydrite to crystalline iron oxyhydroxides.

  13. System and method for slurry handling

    DOEpatents

    Steele, Raymond Douglas; Oppenheim, Judith Pauline

    2015-12-29

    A system includes a slurry depressurizing system that includes a liquid expansion system configured to continuously receive a slurry at a first pressure and continuously discharge the slurry at a second pressure. For example, the slurry depressurizing system may include an expansion turbine to expand the slurry from the first pressure to the second pressure.

  14. Suspended-slurry reactor

    SciTech Connect

    2016-03-22

    An apparatus for generating a large volume of gas from a liquid stream is disclosed. The apparatus includes a first channel through which the liquid stream passes. The apparatus also includes a layer of catalyst particles suspended in a solid slurry for generating gas from the liquid stream. The apparatus further includes a second channel through which a mixture of converted liquid and generated gas passes. A heat exchange channel heats the liquid stream. A wicking structure located in the second channel separates the gas generated from the converted liquid.

  15. INEZ, KENTUCKY COAL SLURRY SPILL

    EPA Science Inventory

    On October 11th, 2000, a breach of a coal slurry impoundment released approximately 210 million gallons of coal slurry ( a mixture of fine coal particles, silt, clay, sand and water) into the Big Andy Branch, Wolf Creek, and Coldwater Fork. Approximately 75 river miles were affec...

  16. DEHYDRATION OF DEUTERIUM OXIDE SLURRIES

    DOEpatents

    Hiskey, C.F.

    1959-03-10

    A method is presented for recovering heavy water from uranium oxide-- heavy water slurries. The method consists in saturating such slurries with a potassium nitrate-sodium nitrate salt mixture and then allowing the self-heat of the slurry to raise its temperature to a point slightly in excess of 100 deg C, thus effecting complete evaporation of the free heavy water from the slurry. The temperature of the slurry is then allowed to reach 300 to 900 deg C causing fusion of the salt mixture and expulsion of the water of hydration. The uranium may be recovered from the fused salt mixture by treatment with water to leach the soluble salts away from the uranium-containing residue.

  17. Rheometry of natural sediment slurries

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Major, Jon J.; ,

    1993-01-01

    Recent experimental analyses of natural sediment slurries yield diverse results yet exhibit broad commonality of rheological responses under a range of conditions and shear rates. Results show that the relation between shear stress and shear rate is primarily nonlinear, that the relation can display marked hysteresis, that minimum shear stress can occur following yield, that physical properties of slurries are extremely sensitive to sediment concentration, and the concept of slurry yield strength is still debated. New rheometric analyses have probed viscoelastic behavior of sediment slurries. Results show that slurries composed of particles ??? 125 ?? m exhibit viscoelastic responses, and that shear stresses are relaxed over a range of time scales rather than by a single response time.

  18. Characterization of odor released during handling of swine slurry: Part II. Effect of production type, storage and physicochemical characteristics of the slurry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blanes-Vidal, V.; Hansen, M. N.; Adamsen, A. P. S.; Feilberg, A.; Petersen, S. O.; Jensen, B. B.

    The quality of rural life can be affected by offensive odors released from animal buildings and storage units. The objectives of this study were to compare the concentrations of odor and odorants above different types of stirred swine slurry to analyze the relationships between concentrations of odor (and odorants) and physicochemical characteristics of the slurry (i.e. pH, temperature, dry matter, volatile solids, and concentration of 22 chemical compounds); and to propose predictive models for the odor concentration (OC) based on these physicochemical characteristics (solely and in combination with concentrations of specific odorants in the air above the slurries). The study comprised data on concentrations of odor and odorants in the air above slurry samples (fresh and/or stored) collected from production units with farrowing sows, finishing swines, or weaning pigs at eight swine operations ( N = 48). OC measured in the air above stirred swine slurry samples were not significantly different among production types or storage times. The physicochemical characteristics of the slurries were not useful for predicting OC or concentrations of hydrogen sulfide (or organic sulfides) above the slurry, but were related to concentrations of other emitted gases such as phenols and indoles ( r2 = 0.65-0.79, p <0.05), ammonia ( r2 = 0.86, p < 0.05) and carboxylic acids ( r2 = 0.23-0.59, p <0.05). There was good precision of predictive models of OC based on selected slurry characteristics (i.e. pH, dry matter, nitrogen content, sulfur content or concentrations of individual aromatic compounds and carboxylic acids) together with concentrations of specific odorants in the air (e.g. hydrogen sulfide) ( r2 between 0.70 and 0.92). This study suggests that predictive models could be useful for evaluating odor nuisance potentials of swine slurry during handling.

  19. Growth and blood chemistry of ducklings reared on acidified wetlands

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rattner, B.A.; Haramis, G.; Linder, G.; Chu, D.

    1985-01-01

    Acid deposition is one factor that may be responsible for the decline of some waterfowl populations. Growth and physiological condition were monitored in captive-reared black ducks (Anas rubripes) exposed for 10-day trials (day 11-20 of life) on control (pH 6.8) and acidified (pH 5.0) man-made emergent wetlands. Impaired growth (body weight, culmen and tarsus length) and increased mortality (50%) were apparent in broods (hen + 4 ducklings) reared on acidified wetIands. Ducklings exbibiting poor growth had reduced hematocrit, plasma protein and cholesterol levels. This subset of birds had elevated plasma uric acid concentration and creatine kinase activity (perhaps due to enhanced protein and nucleotide catabolism). and elevated pIasma K+ levels. Based upon overt appearance, growth and blood chemistry, ducklings exposed to acidified wetlands were concluded to be in poorer condittion than those exposed on circumneutral pH wetlands.

  20. Coal slurry pipelining

    SciTech Connect

    Chassagne, P.J.

    1980-02-05

    A method is disclosed for preparing industrial ores, e.g., coal, for pipelining and pipelining the ores to a site for subsequent processing or use. Ore from a mine is screened into two fractions, one having a large size particle distribution and one having a small size particle distribution, each fraction retaining both the ore and the refuse. The large size particle fraction is cleaned of refuse and the clean ore therefrom crushed to a size distribution of the smaller size or small size ore fraction. The separated refuse from the large size particle fraction is ground to provide superfines to the extent required for the proper particle size distribution for pipelining. The ore and superfine refuse are combined in a water slurry for pipelining. After pipelining the ore, the ore is cleaned and dewatered conveniently as known in the art for fine ore. The resulting ore may then be stockpiled or directly used.

  1. Manifold Coal-Slurry Transport System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liddle, S. G.; Estus, J. M.; Lavin, M. L.

    1986-01-01

    Feeding several slurry pipes into main pipeline reduces congestion in coal mines. System based on manifold concept: feeder pipelines from each working entry joined to main pipeline that carries coal slurry out of panel and onto surface. Manifold concept makes coal-slurry haulage much simpler than existing slurry systems.

  2. NACA Research on Slurry Fuels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pinns, M L; Olson, W T; Barnett, H C; Breitwieser, R

    1958-01-01

    An extensive program was conducted to investigate the use of concentrated slurries of boron and magnesium in liquid hydrocarbon as fuels for afterburners and ramjet engines. Analytical calculations indicated that magnesium fuel would give greater thrust and that boron fuel would give greater range than are obtainable from jet hydrocarbon fuel alone. It was hoped that the use of these solid elements in slurry form would permit the improvement to be obtained without requiring unconventional fuel systems or combustors. Small ramjet vehicles fueled with magnesium slurry were flown successfully, but the test flights indicated that further improvement of combustors and fuel systems was needed.

  3. Tribological Properties Of Coal Slurries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fusaro, Robert L.; Schrubens, Dale L.

    1988-01-01

    Report describes study of tribological properties of coal/methanol slurries with pin-on-disk tribometer. Coefficients of friction, rates of wear of steel pin, and morphological studies of worn surfaces conducted on pins and disks of AISI 440C HT stainless steel and M-50 tool steel, both used as bearing steels. Coal slurries considered as replacement fuels in terrestrial oil-burning facilities and possible fuels for future aircraft turbine engines. Rates of wear of metallic components through which slurries flow limit such practical applications.

  4. Streamline coal slurry letdown valve

    DOEpatents

    Platt, R.J.; Shadbolt, E.A.

    1983-11-08

    A streamlined coal slurry letdown valve is featured which has a two-piece throat comprised of a seat and seat retainer. The two-piece design allows for easy assembly and disassembly of the valve. A novel cage holds the two-piece throat together during the high pressure letdown. The coal slurry letdown valve has long operating life as a result of its streamlined and erosion-resistance surfaces. 5 figs.

  5. Streamline coal slurry letdown valve

    DOEpatents

    Platt, Robert J.; Shadbolt, Edward A.

    1983-01-01

    A streamlined coal slurry letdown valve is featured which has a two-piece throat comprised of a seat and seat retainer. The two-piece design allows for easy assembly and disassembly of the valve. A novel cage holds the two-piece throat together during the high pressure letdown. The coal slurry letdown valve has long operating life as a result of its streamlined and erosion-resistance surfaces.

  6. Use of Linear Models for Thermal Processing Acidified Foods

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Acidified vegetable products with a pH above 3.3 must be pasteurized to assure the destruction of acid resistant pathogenic bacteria. The times and temperatures needed to assure a five log reduction by pasteurization have previously been determined using a non-linear (Weibull) model. Recently, the F...

  7. Medical ice slurry production device

    DOEpatents

    Kasza, Kenneth E [Palos Park, IL; Oras, John [Des Plaines, IL; Son, HyunJin [Naperville, IL

    2008-06-24

    The present invention relates to an apparatus for producing sterile ice slurries for medical cooling applications. The apparatus is capable of producing highly loaded slurries suitable for delivery to targeted internal organs of a patient, such as the brain, heart, lungs, stomach, kidneys, pancreas, and others, through medical size diameter tubing. The ice slurry production apparatus includes a slurry production reservoir adapted to contain a volume of a saline solution. A flexible membrane crystallization surface is provided within the slurry production reservoir. The crystallization surface is chilled to a temperature below a freezing point of the saline solution within the reservoir such that ice particles form on the crystallization surface. A deflector in the form of a reciprocating member is provided for periodically distorting the crystallization surface and dislodging the ice particles which form on the crystallization surface. Using reservoir mixing the slurry is conditioned for easy pumping directly out of the production reservoir via medical tubing or delivery through other means such as squeeze bottles, squeeze bags, hypodermic syringes, manual hand delivery, and the like.

  8. Comparative testing of slurry monitors

    SciTech Connect

    Hylton, T.D.; Bayne, C.K.; Anderson, M.S.; Van Essen, D.C.

    1998-05-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) has millions of gallons of radioactive liquid and sludge wastes that must be retrieved from underground storage tanks, transferred to treatment facilities, and processed to a final waste form. The wastes will be removed from the current storage tanks by mobilizing the sludge wastes and mixing them with the liquid wastes to create slurries. Each slurry would then be transferred by pipeline to the desired destination. To reduce the risk of plugging a pipeline, the transport properties (e.g., density, suspended solids concentration, viscosity, particle size range) of the slurry should be determined to be within acceptable limits prior to transfer. These properties should also be monitored and controlled within specified limits while the slurry transfer is in progress. The DOE issued a call for proposals for developing on-line instrumentation to measure the transport properties of slurries. In response to the call for proposals, several researchers submitted proposals and were funded to develop slurry monitoring instruments. These newly developed DOE instruments are currently in the prototype stage. Before the instruments were installed in a radioactive application, the DOE wanted to evaluate them under nonradioactive conditions to determine if they were accurate, reliable, and dependable. The goal of this project was to test the performance of the newly developed DOE instruments along with several commercially available instruments. The baseline method for comparison utilized the results from grab-sample analyses.

  9. Coal slurry fuel supply and purge system

    DOEpatents

    McDowell, Robert E.; Basic, Steven L.; Smith, Russel M.

    1994-01-01

    A coal slurry fuel supply and purge system for a locomotive engines is disclosed which includes a slurry recirculation path, a stand-by path for circulating slurry during idle or states of the engine when slurry fuel in not required by the engine, and an engine header fluid path connected to the stand-by path, for supplying and purging slurry fuel to and from fuel injectors. A controller controls the actuation of valves to facilitate supply and purge of slurry to and from the fuel injectors. A method for supplying and purging coal slurry in a compression ignition engine is disclosed which includes controlling fluid flow devices and valves in a plurality of fluid paths to facilitate continuous slurry recirculation and supply and purge of or slurry based on the operating state of the engine.

  10. Thermophilic treatment of acidified and partially acidified wastewater using an anaerobic submerged MBR: Factors affecting long-term operational flux.

    PubMed

    Jeison, D; van Lier, J B

    2007-09-01

    The long-term operation of two thermophilic anaerobic submerged membrane bioreactors (AnSMBRs) was studied using acidified and partially acidified synthetic wastewaters. In both reactors, cake formation was identified as the key factor governing critical flux. Even though cake formation was observed to be mostly reversible, particle deposition proceeds fast once the critical flux is exceeded. Very little irreversible fouling was observed during long-term operation, irrespective of the substrate. Critical flux values at the end of the reactors operation were 7 and 3L/m(2)h for the AnSMBRs fed with acidified and partially acidified wastewaters, respectively, at a gas superficial velocity of 70m/h. Small particle size was identified as the responsible parameter for the low observed critical flux values. The degree of wastewater acidification significantly affected the physical properties of the sludge, determining the attainable flux. Based on the fluxes observed in this research, the membrane costs would be in the range of 0.5euro/m(3) of treated wastewater. Gas sparging was ineffective in increasing the critical flux values. However, preliminary tests showed that cross-flow operation may be a feasible alternative to reduce particle deposition.

  11. Use of acidifiers and herb-acidifier combinations with encapsulated and non-encapsulated intestinal microflora, intestinal histological and serum characteristics in broiler

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Natsir, Muhammad Halim; Hartutik, Sjofjan, Osfar; Widodo, Eko; Widyastuti, Eny Sri

    2017-05-01

    The objective of this experiment was to evaluate the use of acidifier and herb-acidifier combinations on intestinal microflora, intestinal histology and serum characteristics of broilers at 35 days of age when fed a diet supplemented with natural acidifier (lactic acid and citric acid), and herb-acidifier combinations (natural acidifier and herbs (garlic and Phyllanthus niruri L.) encapsulated and non-encapsulated. Here, 192 (Lohmann) broiler chicks were fed a negative control diet, positive control diet (tetracycline), 1.2% acidifier non-encapsulated (ANE), 1.2% acidifier encapsulated (AE), 1.2% herb-acidifier combination non-encapsulated (CNE), or 1.2% herb-acidifier combination encapsulated (CE). The variables measured were the total colony of lactic acid bacteria, Escherichia coli and Salmonella sp., intestinal histological characteristics (crypt depth, villi number, villi length, and viscosity) and serum (total protein, serum albumin, and serum globulin). Results showed that during the 35-d growth period, there were significant differences (P<0.01) in increases of the total number of colonies of lactic acid bacteria and a decrease in the total colony of Escherichia coli and Salmonella sp., along with increasing intestinal histological characteristics (crypt depth, villi number, villi length, and viscosity) and total proteins in the serum, as well as significant effects (P<0.05) on intestinal pH and serum albumin. It is concluded that the use acidifiers or herb-acidifier combinations in encapsulation performed better than without encapsulation. Therefore using 1.2% of encapsulated combinations of herb-acidifiers in broiler diet is recommended.

  12. Development of biodiesel slurry fuels

    SciTech Connect

    Suppes, G.J.; Ng, C.; Srinivasan, B.

    1994-12-31

    As an alternative to diesel, the DOE has recently supported research which developed coal-water-slurries to the extent that they have demonstrated in low-, medium-, and high-speed diesel engines. Coal-water-slurry (CWS) fuels would be an American-made alternative to diesel distilled from imported crude oil. Such alternatives to imported oil are particularly desirable as 1994 crude oil imports will most likely exceed those disastrously high levels of the early 1980`s which led to a major recession. This paper is on the testing and development of biodiesel slurry fuels (e.g. corn flour and water) as an alternative to diesel for use in a modified diesel engine. While the economics for CWS`s are not favorable until bulk, tax-free diesel prices exceed $0.80 per gallon, a preliminary analysis of biodiesel slurries shows economic viability at today`s diesel prices. This paper presents advantages of biodiesel slurries over CWS`s due to different ash compositions and economics specific to applications on farm tractors. Engine modifications, fuel costs, fuel processing, fuel performance, and on-going research are discussed.

  13. The occurrence of intestinal parasites in swine slurry and their removal in activated sludge plants.

    PubMed

    Reinoso, Roberto; Becares, Eloy

    2008-09-01

    Thirteen intensive pig farms and two activated sludge treatment plants for pig slurry in north-western Spain were studied from April 2005 to June 2006 in order to evaluate the presence of enteric pathogens (Cryptosporidium, Giardia and helminths) and the efficiency with which they were removed. These parasites were present on 53%, 7% and 38% of the farms studied, respectively, with concentrations of 10(4)-10(5) oocysts per litre (/L) for Cryptosporidium, 10(3)cysts/L for Giardia and 10(2)-10(3) eggs/L for helminths. The overall removal of parasites in the pig slurry treatment plants ranged from 86.7% to over 99.99%. The results revealed a constant reduction at each stage of the treatment system, with activated sludge processes being the most effective treatment in reducing pathogens in pig slurry, 78-81% for Cryptosporidium oocysts and over 99.9% for helminth eggs. A heat drying procedure for sludge removed 4.3 log units of Cryptosporidium oocysts, demonstrating the excellent effectiveness of this treatment for reducing pathogens in sludge intended to be applied to land.

  14. Coal-oil slurry preparation

    DOEpatents

    Tao, John C.

    1983-01-01

    A pumpable slurry of pulverized coal in a coal-derived hydrocarbon oil carrier which slurry is useful as a low-ash, low-sulfur clean fuel, is produced from a high sulfur-containing coal. The initial pulverized coal is separated by gravity differentiation into (1) a high density refuse fraction containing the major portion of non-coal mineral products and sulfur, (2) a lowest density fraction of low sulfur content and (3) a middlings fraction of intermediate sulfur and ash content. The refuse fraction (1) is gasified by partial combustion producing a crude gas product from which a hydrogen stream is separated for use in hydrogenative liquefaction of the middlings fraction (3). The lowest density fraction (2) is mixed with the liquefied coal product to provide the desired fuel slurry. Preferably there is also separately recovered from the coal liquefaction LPG and pipeline gas.

  15. YIELD STRESS REDUCTION OF DWPF MELTER FEED SLURRIES

    SciTech Connect

    Stone, M; Michael02 Smith, M

    2006-12-28

    The Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) at the Savannah River Site vitrifies High Level Waste for repository internment. The process consists of three major steps: waste pretreatment, vitrification, and canister decontamination/sealing. The HLW consists of insoluble metal hydroxides (primarily iron, aluminum, magnesium, manganese, and uranium) and soluble sodium salts (carbonate, hydroxide, nitrite, nitrate, sulfate). The pretreatment process acidifies the sludge with nitric and formic acids, adds the glass formers as glass frit, then concentrates the resulting slurry to approximately 50 weight percent (wt%) total solids. This slurry is fed to the joule-heated melter where the remaining water is evaporated followed by calcination of the solids and conversion to glass. The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) is currently assisting DWPF efforts to increase throughput of the melter. As part of this effort, SRNL has investigated methods to increase the solids content of the melter feed to reduce the heat load required to complete the evaporation of water and allow more of the energy available to calcine and vitrify the waste. The process equipment in the facility is fixed and cannot process materials with high yield stresses, therefore increasing the solids content will require that the yield stress of the melter feed slurries be reduced. Changing the glass former added during pretreatment from an irregularly shaped glass frit to nearly spherical beads was evaluated. The evaluation required a systems approach which included evaluations of the effectiveness of beads in reducing the melter feed yield stress as well as evaluations of the processing impacts of changing the frit morphology. Processing impacts of beads include changing the settling rate of the glass former (which effects mixing and sampling of the melter feed slurry and the frit addition equipment) as well as impacts on the melt behavior due to decreased surface area of the beads versus frit

  16. Loose abrasive slurries for optical glass lapping

    SciTech Connect

    Neauport, Jerome; Destribats, Julie; Maunier, Cedric; Ambard, Chrystel; Cormont, Philippe; Pintault, B.; Rondeau, Olivier

    2010-10-20

    Loose abrasive lapping is widely used to prepare optical glass before its final polishing. We carried out a comparison of 20 different slurries from four different vendors. Slurry particle sizes and morphologies were measured. Fused silica samples were lapped with these different slurries on a single side polishing machine and characterized in terms of surface roughness and depth of subsurface damage (SSD). Effects of load, rotation speed, and slurry concentration during lapping on roughness, material removal rate, and SSD were investigated.

  17. Turbulence in slurry pipe flow

    SciTech Connect

    Gore, R.A. ); Crowe, C.T. . Dept. of Mechanical and Materials Engineering)

    1990-01-01

    The present state of knowledge of liquid-solid flows (slurries) is far behind than that for single phase flows. Very few geometries have been examined with a slurry and only with a limited variation of system parameters i.e. fluid viscosity, particle diameter, etc. This paper presents the first part of a study which examines the effects of the addition of a solid to the flow through a confined coaxial jet. Presented here will be the initial conditions for the jet which correspond to fully developed pipe flow. 6 refs., 9 figs.

  18. Supersonic coal water slurry fuel atomizer

    DOEpatents

    Becker, Frederick E.; Smolensky, Leo A.; Balsavich, John

    1991-01-01

    A supersonic coal water slurry atomizer utilizing supersonic gas velocities to atomize coal water slurry is provided wherein atomization occurs externally of the atomizer. The atomizer has a central tube defining a coal water slurry passageway surrounded by an annular sleeve defining an annular passageway for gas. A converging/diverging section is provided for accelerating gas in the annular passageway to supersonic velocities.

  19. DEMONSTRATION BULLETIN: SLURRY BIODEGRADATION, International Technology Corporation

    EPA Science Inventory

    This technology uses a slurry-phase bioreactor in which the soil is mixed with water to form a slurry. Microorganisms and nutrients are added to the slurry to enhance the biodegradation process, which converts organic wastes into relatively harmless byproducts of microbial metabo...

  20. Tribological properties of coal slurries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fusaro, Robert L.; Schrubens, Dale L.

    1987-01-01

    A pin-on-disk tribometer was used to study the tribological properties of methyl alcohol-coal slurries. Friction coefficients, steel pin wear rates and wear surface morphological studies were conducted on AISI 440C HT and M-50 bearing steels which were slid dry and in solutions of methyl alcohol, methyl alcohol-fine coal particles, and methyl alcohol-fine coal particles-flocking additive. The latter was an oil derived from coal and originally intended to be added to the coal slurry to improve the sedimentation and rheology properties. The results of this study indicated that the addition of the flocking additive to the coal slurry markedly improved the tribological properties, especially wear. In addition, the type of steel was found to be very important in determining the type of wear that took place. Cracks and pits were found on the M-50 steel pin wear surfaces that slid in the coal slurries while 440C HT steel pins showed none.

  1. Slurry pumping: Pump performance prediction

    SciTech Connect

    Taccani, R.; Pediroda, V.; Reini, M.; Giadrossi, A.

    2000-07-01

    Centrifugal pumps are being used increasingly for transportation of slurries through pipelines. To design a slurry handling system it is essential to have a knowledge of the effects of suspended solids on the pump performance. A new test loop has been realized in the laboratory of the Energetics Department of the University of Trieste which allows pump performance to be determined at various pump speeds, with many different mixture concentrations and rheologies. The pump test rig consists of 150 mm diameter pipe with facilities for measuring suction and discharge pressure, flowrate, pump input power and speed, slurry density and temperature. In particular flowrate is measured by diverting flow into a weighing tank and timing a specified volume of slurry. An automatic PC based data acquisition system has been implemented. Preliminary tests with clear water show that performance can be measured with good repeatability and accuracy. The new test rig is used to verify the range of validity of the correlations to predict pump performance, available in literature and of that proposed by authors. This correlation, based on a Neural Network and not on a predefined analytical expression, can be easily improved with new experimental data.

  2. Yield Stress Reduction of DWPF Melter Feed Slurries

    SciTech Connect

    Stone, M.E.; Smith, M.E.

    2007-07-01

    The Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) at the Savannah River Site vitrifies High Level Waste for repository internment. The process consists of three major steps: waste pretreatment, vitrification, and canister decontamination/sealing. The HLW consists of insoluble metal hydroxides and soluble sodium salts. The pretreatment process acidifies the sludge with nitric and formic acids, adds the glass formers as glass frit, then concentrates the resulting slurry to approximately 50 weight percent (wt%) total solids. This slurry is fed to the joule-heated melter where the remaining water is evaporated followed by calcination of the solids and conversion to glass. The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) is currently assisting DWPF efforts to increase throughput of the melter. As part of this effort, SRNL has investigated methods to increase the solids content of the melter feed to reduce the heat load required to complete the evaporation of water and allow more of the energy available to calcine and vitrify the waste. The process equipment in the facility is fixed and cannot process materials with high yield stresses, therefore increasing the solids content will require that the yield stress of the melter feed slurries be reduced. Changing the glass former added during pretreatment from an irregularly shaped glass frit to nearly spherical beads was evaluated. The evaluation required a systems approach which included evaluations of the effectiveness of beads in reducing the melter feed yield stress as well as evaluations of the processing impacts of changing the frit morphology. Processing impacts of beads include changing the settling rate of the glass former (which effects mixing and sampling of the melter feed slurry and the frit addition equipment) as well as impacts on the melt behavior due to decreased surface area of the beads versus frit. Beads were produced from the DWPF process frit by fire polishing. The frit was allowed to free fall through a flame

  3. Odor characterization from barns and slurry treatment facilities at a commercial swine facility in South Korea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jo, Sang-Hee; Kim, Ki-Hyun; Jeon, Byong-Hun; Lee, Min-Hee; Kim, Yong-Hyun; Kim, Bo-Won; Cho, Sung-Back; Hwang, Ok-Hwa; Bhattacharya, Satya Sundar

    2015-10-01

    In this study, emission characteristics of major odorants in pig confinement facilities were investigated through comparative analysis between odorant composition and odor intensity. Odorant samples in ambient air were collected from five different paired sampling sites: (1) in- and outside of windowless pig barn, (2) in- and outside of open pig barn, (3) before/after slurry treatment (via liquid fertilization), (4) before/after composting, and (5) two reference background sites on a pig confinement facility. A total of 47 compounds consisting of key offensive odorants (such as reduced sulfur and volatile organic compounds) were measured from each selected site. When the results are compared in terms of odor intensity, a list of odorants (sulfur compounds, volatile fatty acids, phenols, and indoles) were generally seen at enhanced levels on most sites. In two types of pig barn facilities (windowless ('W') and open ('O')), butyric and valeric acid were the predominant species. The removal efficiency of odorants was quite different between the two slurry treatment approaches of composting and liquid fertilization. Although the efficiencies of odor removal in the former were not sufficient, that of the latter was fairly significant in terms of odor intensity. However, some odorants like hydrogen sulfide, methanethiol, p-cresol, and butyric acid were still retained above the odor threshold level. Accordingly, odorant emissions from animal housing facilities can be characterized most effectively by key odorants such as volatile fatty acids and reduced sulfur species.

  4. Application of PTR-MS for measuring odorant emissions from soil application of manure slurry.

    PubMed

    Feilberg, Anders; Bildsoe, Pernille; Nyord, Tavs

    2015-01-09

    Odorous volatile organic compounds (VOC) and hydrogen sulfide (H2S) are emitted together with ammonia (NH3) from manure slurry applied as a fertilizer, but little is known about the composition and temporal variation of the emissions. In this work, a laboratory method based on dynamic flux chambers packed with soil has been used to measure emissions from untreated pig slurry and slurry treated by solid-liquid separation and ozonation. Proton-transfer-reaction mass spectrometry (PTR-MS) was used to provide time resolved data for a range of VOC, NH3 and H2S. VOC included organic sulfur compounds, carboxylic acids, phenols, indoles, alcohols, ketones and aldehydes. H2S emission was remarkably observed to take place only in the initial minutes after slurry application, which is explained by its high partitioning into the air phase. Long-term odor effects are therefore assessed to be mainly due to other volatile compounds with low odor threshold values, such as 4-methylphenol. PTR-MS signal assignment was verified by comparison to a photo-acoustic analyzer (NH3) and to thermal desorption GC/MS (VOC). Due to initial rapid changes in odorant emissions and low concentrations of odorants, PTR-MS is assessed to be a very useful method for assessing odor following field application of slurry. The effects of treatments on odorant emissions are discussed.

  5. Application of PTR-MS for Measuring Odorant Emissions from Soil Application of Manure Slurry

    PubMed Central

    Feilberg, Anders; Bildsoe, Pernille; Nyord, Tavs

    2015-01-01

    Odorous volatile organic compounds (VOC) and hydrogen sulfide (H2S) are emitted together with ammonia (NH3) from manure slurry applied as a fertilizer, but little is known about the composition and temporal variation of the emissions. In this work, a laboratory method based on dynamic flux chambers packed with soil has been used to measure emissions from untreated pig slurry and slurry treated by solid-liquid separation and ozonation. Proton-transfer-reaction mass spectrometry (PTR-MS) was used to provide time resolved data for a range of VOC, NH3 and H2S. VOC included organic sulfur compounds, carboxylic acids, phenols, indoles, alcohols, ketones and aldehydes. H2S emission was remarkably observed to take place only in the initial minutes after slurry application, which is explained by its high partitioning into the air phase. Long-term odor effects are therefore assessed to be mainly due to other volatile compounds with low odor threshold values, such as 4-methylphenol. PTR-MS signal assignment was verified by comparison to a photo-acoustic analyzer (NH3) and to thermal desorption GC/MS (VOC). Due to initial rapid changes in odorant emissions and low concentrations of odorants, PTR-MS is assessed to be a very useful method for assessing odor following field application of slurry. The effects of treatments on odorant emissions are discussed. PMID:25585103

  6. CHARACTERIZING PULSATING MIXING OF SLURRIES

    SciTech Connect

    Bamberger, Judith A.; Meyer, Perry A.

    2007-12-01

    This paper describes the physical properties for defining the operation of a pulse jet mixing system. Pulse jet mixing operates with no moving parts located in the vessel to be mixed. Pulse tubes submerged in the vessel provide a pulsating flow due to a controlled combination of applied pressure to expel the fluid from the pulse tube nozzle followed by suction to refill the pulse tube through the same nozzle. For mixing slurries nondimensional parameters to define mixing operation include slurry properties, geometric properties and operational parameters. Primary parameters include jet Reynolds number and Froude number; alternate parameters may include particle Galileo number, particle Reynolds number, settling velocity ratio, and hindered settling velocity ratio. Rating metrics for system performance include just suspended velocity, concentration distribution as a function of elevation, and blend time.

  7. Fluidization mechanisms in slurry flow

    SciTech Connect

    Campbell, C. S.

    1989-01-01

    There are two mechanisms by which heavy settling particles may be suspended in a horizontal slurry flow: (1) by particle-particle interactions (e.g. Bagnold dispersive stresses) and (2) by particle-fluid interactions (e.g. entrainment of the particles by turbulent eddies.) The purpose of this investigation is to determine to what extent each fluidization mechanism is active and the effect of the fluidization mechanism on the global properties of the slurry. The technique employs the understanding that the particles entrained in the turbulence of the fluid will appear as an increased hydrostatic head across the channel. This may be directly measured and can be related to the fraction of the mass of particles that are supported by fluid-particle forces. (The rest must therefore be supported by particle-particle forces.) 17 refs., 26 figs.

  8. Co-digestion of animal slurry can increase short-term nitrogen recovery by crops.

    PubMed

    de Boer, H C

    2008-01-01

    Co-digestion changes slurry characteristics and is supposed to increase short-term nitrogen (N) uptake by crops after application. A higher N uptake from slurry reduces the need for additional mineral N fertilizer. If farmers apply co-digested slurry (CS), a higher N recovery has to be taken into account to prevent losses to the environment. Since data on the effects of co-digestion on N recovery by crops are scarce, a pot experiment was performed. The apparent N recovery (ANR) of five different co-digested pig slurries was compared with their raw source slurries (RS) during 105 d after a single fertilization of ryegrass (Lolium perenne L.), grown under controlled conditions. Slurry was mixed with sandy soil and grass was cut every 35 d. The results show that co-digestion increased (p < 0.05) the ANR at first cut on average from 39 to 50%, at second cut from 7 to 9% (p < 0.05), and had no effect on ANR at third cut (3%). The ANR increase at first cut was likely due to an increase of the NH(4)-N/total N ratio along with a decrease of the organic C/total N ratio of slurry during co-digestion. Field application may under certain circumstances decrease N fertilizer value of CS, due to a higher NH(3) emission compared to RS. A potential ANR increase may then be reduced, absent, or even become a decrease. Under comparable NH(3) emissions, however, CS can in the short term be more valuable as an N fertilizer than RS, and fertilizer savings can likely be realized.

  9. Effects of acidifying reagents on microwave treatment of dairy manure.

    PubMed

    Srinivasan, Asha; Nkansah-Boadu, Frank; Liao, Ping H; Lo, Kwang V

    2014-01-01

    Dairy manure, acidified using organic acids (acetic, oxalic, and citric acid) were treated with microwave enhanced advanced oxidation process (MW/H2O2-AOP). The effect of a mixture of oxalic acid and commonly used mineral acids (sulfuric and hydrochloric acid) on MW/H2O2-AOP was also examined. Substantial amounts of phosphorus were released under MW/H2O2-AOP, regardless of organic acid or mineral acid used. All three organic acids were good acidifying reagents; however, only oxalic acid could remove free calcium ion in the solution, and improve settleability of dairy manure. The MW/H2O2-AOP and calcium removal process could be combined into a single-stage process, which could release phosphate, solubilize solids and remove calcium from dairy manure at the same time. A mixture of oxalic acid and mineral acid produced the maximum volume of clear supernatant and had an ideal molar ratio of calcium to magnesium for effective struvite (magnesium ammonium phosphate) crystallization process. A single-stage MW/H2O2-AOP would simplify the process and reduce mineral acid consumption compared to a two-stage operation. The results of a pilot scale study demonstrate that MW/H2O2-AOP is effective in treating manure and recovering resource from dairy farms.

  10. Modelling hydrological management for the restoration of acidified floating fens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dekker, Stefan C.; Barendregt, Aat; Bootsma, Margien C.; Schot, Paul P.

    2005-12-01

    Wetlands show a large decline in biodiversity. To protect and restore this biodiversity, many restoration projects are carried out. Hydrology in wetlands controls the chemical and biological processes and may be the most important factor regulating wetland function and development. Hydrological models may be used to simulate these processes and to evaluate management scenarios for restoration. HYDRUS2D, a combined saturated-unsaturated groundwater flow and transport model, is presented. This simulates near-surface hydrological processes in an acidified floating fen, with the aim to evaluate the effect of hydrological restoration in terms of conditions for biodiversity. In the acidified floating fen in the nature reserve Ilperveld (The Netherlands), a trench system was dug for the purpose of creating a runoff channel for acid rainwater in wet periods and to enable circum-neutral surface water to enter the fen in dry periods. The model is calibrated against measured conductivity values for a 5 year period. From the model simulations, it was found that lateral flow in the floating raft is limited. Furthermore, the model shows that the best management option is a combination of trenches and inundation, which gave the best soil water quality in the root zone. It is concluded that hydrological models can be used for the calculation of management scenarios in restoration projects. The combined saturated-unsaturated model concept used in this paper is able to incorporate the governing hydrological processes in the wetland root zones. Copyright

  11. Preparation of coal slurry with organic solvents.

    PubMed

    Shin, Yu-Jen; Shen, Yun-Hwei

    2007-06-01

    In this study, various organic solvents were used to prepare coal slurries and the rheological and thermal properties of coal-organic solvent slurries were examined. Solvents with molecules containing unpaired electrons (high basicity) show high extraction power and cause swelling of coal. Therefore, coal-organic solvent slurries usually showed higher viscosities compared to coal-water slurry. In addition, coal slurries prepared by alcohols and cyclohexanone demonstrated lower settling rates but a high specific sedimentation volume presumably because these solvents swelled coal particles well and led to the formation of weak gel structures in the bulk. In addition, ethanol and cyclohexanone are capable of breaking a considerable amount of hydrogen bonds in coal and subsequently opening up the structures. Thus, more surface area is available for combustion and the combustion rate of coal slurries was increased.

  12. Managing ammonia emissions from dairy cows by amending slurry with alum or zeolite or by diet modification.

    PubMed

    Meisinger, J J; Lefcourt, A M; Van Kessel, J A; Wilkerson, V

    2001-10-27

    Animal agriculture is a significant source of atmospheric ammonia. Ammonia (NH3) volatilization represents a loss of plant available N to the farmer and a potential contributor to eutrophication in low-nitrogen input ecosystems. This research evaluated on-farm slurry treatments of alum or zeolite and compared three diets for lactating dairy cows in their effectiveness to reduce NH3 emissions. NH3 emissions were compared using a group of mobile wind tunnels. The addition of 2.5% alum or 6.25% zeolite to barn-stored dairy slurry reduced NH3 volatilization by 60% and 55%, respectively, compared to untreated slurry. The alum conserved NH3 by acidifying the slurry to below pH 5, while the zeolite conserved ammonia by lowering the solution-phase nitrogen through cation exchange. The use of alum or zeolite also reduced soluble phosphorus in the slurry. NH3 loss from fresh manure collected from lactating dairy cows was not affected by three diets containing the same level of crude protein but differing in forage source (orchardgrass silage vs. alfalfa silage) or neutral detergent fiber (NDF) content (30% vs. 35% NDF). NH3 losses from the freshly excreted manures occurred very rapidly and included the urea component plus some unidentified labile organic nitrogen sources. NH3 conservation strategies for fresh manures will have to be active within the first few hours after excretion in order to be most effective. The use of alum or zeolites as an on-farm amendment to dairy slurry offers the potential for significantly reducing NH3 emissions.

  13. Method and apparatus for transporting liquid slurries

    SciTech Connect

    Berry, G.F.; Lyczkowski, R.W.; Wang, Chi-Sheng.

    1991-01-01

    An improved method and device to prevent erosion of slurry transport devices is disclosed which uses liquid injection to prevent contact by the slurry composition with the inner surface of the walls of the transport system. A non-abrasive liquid is injected into the slurry transport system and maintains intimate contact with the entire inner surface of the transport system, thereby creating a fluid barrier between the nonabrasive liquid and the inner surface of the transport system which thereby prevents erosion.

  14. High temperature well bore cement slurry

    SciTech Connect

    Nahm, J.J.W.; Vinegar, H.J.; Karanikas, J.M.; Wyant, R.E.

    1993-07-13

    A low density well bore cement slurry composition is described suitable for cementing well bores with high reservoir temperatures comprising: (a) a high alumina cement in an amount of about 40 pounds per barrel of slurry or greater: (b) graphite in an amount greater than about one quarter, by volume, of the solids in the cement slurry; and (c) and a carrier fluid comprising drilling mud.

  15. Gaseous emissions from the storage of untreated slurries and the fractions obtained after mechanical separation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dinuccio, E.; Berg, W.; Balsari, P.

    A laboratory-scale study was set up to investigate ammonia (NH 3), nitrous oxide (N 2O), carbon dioxide (CO 2) and methane (CH 4) emissions during storage of untreated pig and cattle slurry and the fractions (solid and liquid) obtained by mechanical separation. The solid and liquid fractions were obtained from the same untreated slurry by means of a lab-scale mechanical separator. The manures were stored for a period of 30 days in open vessels (1500 cm 3 capacity) in two temperature-controlled rooms, which were kept at 5±0.5 and 25±0.2 °C. Gaseous emissions were determined using a dynamic chamber method and infrared photoacoustic detection (IPD). Over the storage period, gaseous emissions from pig manures were significantly ( P<0.05) higher than those from cattle manures. N 2O fluxes of up to 232 mg m -2 h -1 were measured, but from pig solid fraction only. Between 40.8% (from pig liquid fraction stored at 25 °C) and 3.60% (from untreated cattle slurry stored at 25 °C) of the initial nitrogen content of the manures was lost as NH 3. Over the 30-day-storage period, the predominant emission of carbon was in the CO 2 form. Total C-CH 4 losses, expressed as a percent of the carbon initially present in the volatile solids (C-VS), ranged from 0.60% to 12.8% for pig manures and from 0.23% to 1.56% for cattle manures. The mechanical separation of cattle slurry increased by up to 30% the emissions of CO 2 equivalents to the atmosphere, during the storage of the separated fractions, when compared with the slurries. Results indicated that NH 3, N 2O, CO 2 and CH 4 emissions were affected by the interaction between a number of variables, including storage temperature, chemical characteristics and type of manure. Results also indicated that mechanical separation does not reduce emissions, but has the potential to increase the emissions of CO 2 equivalents to the atmosphere during the storage of the separated fractions.

  16. BOILING SLURRY REACTOR AND METHOD FO CONTROL

    DOEpatents

    Petrick, M.; Marchaterre, J.F.

    1963-05-01

    The control of a boiling slurry nuclear reactor is described. The reactor consists of a vertical tube having an enlarged portion, a steam drum at the top of the vertical tube, and at least one downcomer connecting the steam drum and the bottom of the vertical tube, the reactor being filled with a slurry of fissionabie material in water of such concentration that the enlarged portion of the vertical tube contains a critical mass. The slurry boils in the vertical tube and circulates upwardly therein and downwardly in the downcomer. To control the reactor by controlling the circulation of the slurry, a gas is introduced into the downcomer. (AEC)

  17. The effect of long or chopped straw on pig behaviour.

    PubMed

    Lahrmann, H P; Oxholm, L C; Steinmetz, H; Nielsen, M B F; D'Eath, R B

    2015-05-01

    In the EU, pigs must have permanent access to manipulable materials such as straw, rope, wood, etc. Long straw can fulfil this function, but can increase labour requirements for cleaning pens, and result in problems with blocked slatted floors and slurry systems. Chopped straw might be more practical, but what is the effect on pigs' behaviour of using chopped straw instead of long straw? Commercial pigs in 1/3 slatted, 2/3 solid pens of 15 pigs were provided with either 100 g/pig per day of long straw (20 pens) or of chopped straw (19 pens). Behavioural observations were made of three focal pigs per pen (one from each of small, medium and large weight tertiles) for one full day between 0600 and 2300 h at each of ~40 and ~80 kg. The time spent rooting/investigating overall (709 s/pig per hour at 40 kg to 533 s/pig per hour at 80 kg), or directed to the straw/solid floor (497 s/pig per hour at 40 kg to 343 s/pig per hour at 80 kg), was not affected by straw length but reduced with age. Time spent investigating other pigs (83 s/pig per hour at 40 kg), the slatted floor (57 s/pig per hour) or pen fixtures (21 s/pig per hour) was not affected by age or straw length. Aggressive behaviour was infrequent, but lasted about twice as long in pens with chopped straw (2.3 s/pig per hour at 40 kg) compared with pens with long straw (1.0 s/pig per hour at 40 kg, P=0.060). There were no significant effects of straw length on tail or ear lesions, but shoulders were significantly more likely to have minor scratches with chopped straw (P=0.031), which may reflect the higher levels of aggression. Smaller pigs showed more rooting/investigatory behaviour, and in particular directed towards the straw/solid floor and the slatted floor than their larger pen-mates. Females exhibited more straw and pen fixture-directed behaviour than males. There were no effects of pig size or sex on behaviour directed towards other pigs. In summary, pigs spent similar amounts of time interacting with straw

  18. RPP-WTP Slurry Wear Evaluation: Slurry Abrasivity

    SciTech Connect

    Duignan, M.R.

    2002-06-03

    This report deals with the task of evaluating wear in the cross-flow ultrafiltration system and specifically the need to define a representative slurry in order to obtain prototypic wear rates. The filtration system will treat many different wastes, but it is not practical to run a test for each one. This is especially true when considering that the planned period for testing is 2000 hours long and procurement of appropriate simulants is costly. Considering time and cost, one waste stream needs to be chosen to perform the wear test.

  19. Removal of Suspended Solids in Anaerobically Digested Slurries of Livestock and Poultry Manure by Coagulation Using Different Dosages of Polyaluminum Chloride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, P.; Zhang, C. J.; Zhao, T. K.; Zhong, H.

    2017-01-01

    In this study, anaerobically digested slurries of livestock and poultry manure were pretreated by coagulation-sedimentation using an inorganic polymer coagulant, polyaluminum chloride (PAC). The effect of different PAC dosages on suspended solids (SS) removal and pH in the biogas slurries was assessed to provide reference values for reducing the organic load of biogas slurry in the coagulation-sedimentation process and explore the feasibility of reducing the difficulty in subsequent utilization or processing of biogas slurry. The results showed that for the pig slurry containing approximately 5000 mg/L SS, the removal rate of SS reached up to 81.6% with the coagulant dosage of 0.28 g/L PAC. For the chicken slurry containing approximately 2600 mg/L SS, the removal rate of SS was 30.2% with the coagulant dosage of 0.33 g/L PAC. The removal rate of SS in both slurries of livestock and poultry manure exhibited a downward trend with high PAC dosage. Therefore, there is a need to control the PAC dosage in practical use. The pH changed little in the two types of biogas slurries after treatment with different PAC dosages and both were in line with the standard values specified in the “Standards for Irrigation Water Quality”.

  20. Physiological ecology of Mougeotia (Zygnemataceae) from an experimentally acidified lake

    SciTech Connect

    Arancibia-Avila, P.E.

    1994-01-01

    Filamentous green algae were collected in July, 1989, from metaphytic blooms that occurred in the acidified (pH 5.2) basin, but not an unacidified reference basin (pH 6.1) of Little Rock Lake, Vilas Co., WI. Isolates of a Mougeotia species and Spirogyra reflexa were cultured at pH 5.5, with aeration. Measurements Of O[sub 2] production in a factorial experiment revealed optimal irradiance and temperature for photosynthesis in Mougeotia were 2500 [mu]E[center dot]m[sup [minus]2][center dot]s[sup [minus]l] and 25[degrees]C. Additional O[sub 2] evolution measurements showed that the optimal pH for Mougeotia photosynthesis was 8, but that net photosynthesis was positive from pH 8 to 3. Further studies indicated that Mougeotia was tolerant to concentrations of zinc and aluminum that were greater than levels observed in the acidified basin of the lake. Since inorganic carbon (C[sub i]) is known to limit Mougeotia photosynthesis and growth in acidified lakes, the occurrence of carbonic anhydrase (CA) as a mechanism for uptake and concentration of C[sub i] was investigated. No CA activity was detected in S. reflexa. In contrast, both external and internal CA were measured in Mougeotia at pH 3.7 and at pH 8. By comparison to pH 8, at pH 3.7 external CA activity increased by a factor of about 2. An antibody to Chlamydomonas external CA was used to localize CA in the plasma membrane and cell wall of both Chlamydomonas and Mougeotia. When unaerated (DIC-limited) Mougeotia was grown in SD11 medium supplemented with 1% glucose, chlorophyll a levels were significantly higher than for cultures grown without sugar. Chloroplast morphology was also judged superior for sugar-supplemented cultures. The data suggest that Mougeotia possesses a DIC-concentrating system, and may also be able to import DOC (glucose).

  1. Growth potential of Clostridium perfringens from spores in acidified beef, pork and poultry products during chilling

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The ability of C. perfringens to germinate and grow in acidified ground beef as well as in ten commercially prepared acidified beef, pork and poultry products was assessed. The pH of ground beef was adjusted using organic vinegar to achieve various pH values between 5.0 and 5.6; the pH of the commer...

  2. Improvement of heating uniformity in packaged acidified vegetables pasteurized with a 915 MHz continuous microwave system

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Continuous microwave processing to produce shelf-stable acidified vegetables with moderate to high salt contents poses challenges in pasteurization due to reduced microwave penetration depths and non-uniform heating. Cups of sweetpotato, red bell pepper, and broccoli acidified to pH 3.8 with citric...

  3. Effect of temperature and water on gaseous emissions from soils treated with animal slurry

    SciTech Connect

    Maag, M.; Vinther, F.P.

    1999-08-01

    Microbial respiration and denitrification are greatly affected by abiotic factors, but they are difficult to assess in natural environments. Under controlled conditions the interactions between temperature and soil water content on microbial respiration, N{sub 2}O production, and denitrification in soil amended with animal slurries were studied. The effects of the abiotic factors on the biological processes were monitored for 8 wk in repacked soil cores amended with pig or cattle slurry. The soil cores were incubated at 43, 57, and 72% water-filled pore space (WFPS) and at 10, 15, and 20 C with or without addition of 10% acetylene. The amount of N{sub 2}O lost at 72% WFPS corresponded to 8 to 22% of the slurry's NH{sub 4}{sup +} content, but for only 0.01 to 1.2% at 43 to 57% WFPS. The amount of available C accounted for by denitrification was 8 to 16% of total respiration at 72% WFPS, but only 0.03 to 0.4% at 43 to 57% WFPS. Both N{sub 2}O production and denitrification peaked earlier in the cattle-slurry treated soil than in the pig-slurry treated soil, whereas the total N loss was greatest from the latter. Neither amendments nor soil water contents seemed to affect the Q{sub 10}-values for the CO{sub 2} production, resulting in values between 1.6 and 2.6. At 72% WFPS, N{sub 2}O production and denitrification had Q{sub 10}-values ranging between 3.3 and 5.4. High temperatures enhanced both aerobic respiration and denitrification, and aerobic respiration further enhanced denitrification by consuming oxygen, resulting in strong sensitivity of denitrification to temperature.

  4. Effects of acidified seawater on coral calcification and symbiotic algae on the massive coral Porites australiensis.

    PubMed

    Iguchi, Akira; Ozaki, Saori; Nakamura, Takashi; Inoue, Mayuri; Tanaka, Yasuaki; Suzuki, Atsushi; Kawahata, Hodaka; Sakai, Kazuhiko

    2012-02-01

    We investigated the effect of acidified seawater on calcification and symbiotic algae (zooxanthellae density, chlorophyll content per single algal cell, fluorescence yield (Fv/Fm)) on a massive coral, Porites australiensis, a common species in the Ryukyu Archipelago of Japan. We found that acidified seawater significantly decreased the calcification and fluorescence yield, but did not affect zooxanthellae density and chlorophyll content per single algal cell. This indicates low levels of photoacclimation to acidified seawater in this species, and this is contrary to the findings of previous studies of Acropora species. A significant correlation between calcification and fluorescence yield was observed, indicating the presence of a strong relationship between calcification and algal photosynthesis. Our results indicate that endosymbiont photosynthetic dysfunction may enhance the decrease of coral calcification in future acidified ocean conditions. Calcification and fluorescence yield among colonies clearly differed, showing that the response to acidified seawater is highly variable among colonies in natural coral populations. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Coral host cells acidify symbiotic algal microenvironment to promote photosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Barott, Katie L.; Venn, Alexander A.; Perez, Sidney O.; Tambutté, Sylvie; Tresguerres, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Symbiotic dinoflagellate algae residing inside coral tissues supply the host with the majority of their energy requirements through the translocation of photosynthetically fixed carbon. The algae, in turn, rely on the host for the supply of inorganic carbon. Carbon must be concentrated as CO2 in order for photosynthesis to proceed, and here we show that the coral host plays an active role in this process. The host-derived symbiosome membrane surrounding the algae abundantly expresses vacuolar H+-ATPase (VHA), which acidifies the symbiosome space down to pH ∼4. Inhibition of VHA results in a significant decrease in average H+ activity in the symbiosome of up to 75% and a significant reduction in O2 production rate, a measure of photosynthetic activity. These results suggest that host VHA is part of a previously unidentified carbon concentrating mechanism for algal photosynthesis and provide mechanistic evidence that coral host cells can actively modulate the physiology of their symbionts. PMID:25548188

  6. Coral host cells acidify symbiotic algal microenvironment to promote photosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Barott, Katie L; Venn, Alexander A; Perez, Sidney O; Tambutté, Sylvie; Tresguerres, Martin

    2015-01-13

    Symbiotic dinoflagellate algae residing inside coral tissues supply the host with the majority of their energy requirements through the translocation of photosynthetically fixed carbon. The algae, in turn, rely on the host for the supply of inorganic carbon. Carbon must be concentrated as CO2 in order for photosynthesis to proceed, and here we show that the coral host plays an active role in this process. The host-derived symbiosome membrane surrounding the algae abundantly expresses vacuolar H(+)-ATPase (VHA), which acidifies the symbiosome space down to pH ∼ 4. Inhibition of VHA results in a significant decrease in average H(+) activity in the symbiosome of up to 75% and a significant reduction in O2 production rate, a measure of photosynthetic activity. These results suggest that host VHA is part of a previously unidentified carbon concentrating mechanism for algal photosynthesis and provide mechanistic evidence that coral host cells can actively modulate the physiology of their symbionts.

  7. Microbial examination of anaerobic sludge adaptation to animal slurry.

    PubMed

    Moset, V; Cerisuelo, A; Ferrer, P; Jimenez, A; Bertolini, E; Cambra-López, M

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate changes in the microbial population of anaerobic sludge digesters during the adaptation to pig slurry (PS) using quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) and qualitative scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Additionally, the relationship between microbial parameters and sludge physicochemical composition and methane yield was examined. Results showed that the addition of PS to an unadapted thermophilic anaerobic digester caused an increase in volatile fatty acids (VFA) concentration, a decrease in removal efficiency and CH4 yield. Additionally, increases in total bacteria and total archaea were observed using qPCR. Scanning electron micrographs provided a general overview of the sludge's cell morphology, morphological diversity and degree of organic matter degradation. A change in microbial morphotypes from homogeneous cell morphologies to a higher morphological diversity, similar to that observed in PS, was observed with the addition of PS by SEM. Therefore, the combination of qPCR and SEM allowed expanding the knowledge about the microbial adaptation to animal slurry in thermophilic anaerobic digesters.

  8. Impact of ionic aluminium on extracellular phosphatases in acidified lakes.

    PubMed

    Bittl, T; Vrba, J; Nedoma, J; Kopácek, J

    2001-09-01

    We studied direct inhibiting effects of aluminium (Al) on extracellular phosphatases produced by the plankton of acidified lakes in the Bohemian Forest. In laboratory experiments we tested the effect of different Al concentrations (0-1000 microg l(-1)) on kinetic parameters of acid phosphatases (pH optimum approximately 5.0) at pH between 4.5 and 5.2. We observed a significant reduction of an apparent substrate affinity at Al concentrations between 300 and 1000 microg l(-1) at pH 4.5 and 4.8 (but not at 5.2). In contrast, maximum acid phosphatase activity (AcPA) remained unchanged. Such behaviour of saturation kinetics is compatible with the assumption that ionic Al acts as a competitive inhibitor of acid phosphatases. To decide whether the observed Al effects could be explained alternatively by complexation of Al with substrate, we tested statistically the best fits of data with both possible models (competitive versus complexation). Experimental results supported the competitive hypothesis rather than the complexation model suggested originally by some authors. Furthermore, we tested the Al effect within a wide range of pH from 4.0 to 6.0. For pH values < 5.2, the results of an Al-pH matrix experiment gave a more detailed picture: the higher the Al concentration, the wider the pH range in which Al could negatively affect AcPA. The ecological ramifications of this effect were evaluated in the context of field AcPA data on three strongly acidified lakes.

  9. Emission of ESBL/AmpC-producing Escherichia coli from pig fattening farms to surrounding areas.

    PubMed

    von Salviati, Christina; Laube, Henriette; Guerra, Beatriz; Roesler, Uwe; Friese, Anika

    2015-01-30

    The presence of ESBL/AmpC-producing Escherichia coli in livestock such as pigs has been known for some time. However, to date there is little information about the transmission of these resistant bacteria between pig farms and their surroundings. Thus, the aim of this study was to explore this topic by investigating seven German pig fattening farms. Samples from outside (including ground surfaces, ambient air, slurry and digestate from biogas plants) and, in parallel, from inside the pig barns (including pig feces, dust, barn air, flies and mice feces) were examined for ESBL/AmpC-producing E. coli and selected isolates were compared by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) analysis. 14/17 (82.4%) slurry samples and three of four samples of digestate from biogas plants tested positive for ESBL/AmpC-producing E. coli. In the vicinity of the pig barns these resistant bacteria were detected in 14/87 (16.1%) boot swabs taken from various ground surfaces and in 2/36 (6%) ambient air samples. Inside the pig barns, 6/63 (9.5%) barn air samples and a small proportion of flies and mice feces samples were ESBL/AmpC-positive. PFGE analysis proved fecal emission as well as a possible spread via flies, as identical ESBL-E. coli isolates were detected in slurry and on fertilized fields, as well as in flies and pooled feces from inside the barn and slurry. Contaminated slurry presented the major emission source for ESBL/AmpC-producing E. coli in the pig fattening farms, but a spread via the airborne route or via different vectors also seems possible.

  10. Apparent Benzene Solubility in Tetraphenylborate Slurries

    SciTech Connect

    Swingle, R.F.; Peterson, R.A.; Crawford, C.L.

    1997-11-01

    Personnel conducted testing to determine the apparent solubility of benzene in potassium tetraphenylborate (KTPB) slurries. The lack of benzene vapor pressure suppression in these tests indicate that for a 6.5 wt percent solids KTPB slurry in 4.65 M Na+ salt solution at approximately 25 degrees Celsius, no significant difference exists between the solubility of benzene in the slurry and the solubility of benzene in salt solution without KTPB solids. The work showed similar results in slurry with 6,000 mg/L sludge and 2,000 mg/L monosodium titanate added. Slurries containing tetraphenylborate decomposition intermediates (i.e., 4,200 mg/L triphenylboron (3PB), 510 mg/L diphenylborinic acid (2PB) and 1,500 mg/L phenylboric acid (1PB) or 100 mg/L tri-n-butylphosphate (TBP)) also showed no significant difference in benzene solubility form filtrate containing no KTPB solids. Slurry containing 2,000 mg/L Surfynol 420 did exhibit significant additional benzene solubility, as did irradiated slurries. The vapor pressure depression in the irradiated slurries presumably results from dissolution of biphenyl and other tetraphenylborate irradiation products in the benzene.

  11. Single stage high pressure centrifugal slurry pump

    DOEpatents

    Meyer, John W.; Bonin, John H.; Daniel, Arnold D.

    1984-03-27

    Apparatus is shown for feeding a slurry to a pressurized housing. An impeller that includes radial passages is mounted in the loose fitting housing. The impeller hub is connected to a drive means and a slurry supply means which extends through the housing. Pressured gas is fed into the housing for substantially enveloping the impeller in a bubble of gas.

  12. Optimizing slurry separation in coal preparation

    SciTech Connect

    V.S. Shved; V.H. Fritsler; V.V. Bukhtiyarov

    2009-05-15

    In processing slurry with cationic polyelectrolytes, the final concentration of the suspended particulates in the water beyond the slurry tank in the coal-preparation shop is no more than 10 mg/l. Consequently, this water may be reused in industrial systems.

  13. Are ammonia emissions from field-applied slurry substantially over-estimated in European emission inventories?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sintermann, J.; Neftel, A.; Ammann, C.; Häni, C.; Hensen, A.; Loubet, B.; Flechard, C. R.

    2011-10-01

    The EMEP/EEA guidebook 2009 for agricultural emission inventories reports average ammonia (NH3) emission factors (EF) by volatilisation of 55% of the applied total ammoniacal nitrogen (TAN) content for cattle slurry, and 35% losses for pig slurry, irrespective of the type of surface or slurry characteristics such as dry matter content and pH. In this review article, we compiled over 350 measurements of EFs published between 1991 and 2011. The standard slurry application technique during the early years of this period, when a large number of measurements were made, was spreading by splash plate, and as a result reference EFs given in many European inventories are predominantly based on this technique. However, slurry application practices have evolved since then, while there has also been a shift in measurement techniques and investigated plot sizes. We therefore classified the available measurements according to the flux measurement technique, measurement plot size, the year of measurement, and the year of publication. Medium size plots (usually circles between 20 to 50 m radius) generally yielded the highest EFs. The most commonly used measurement setups at this scale were based on the Integrated Horizontal Flux method (IHF or the ZINST method (a simplified IHF method)). Several empirical models were published in the years 1993 to 2003 predicting NH3 EFs as a function of meteorology and slurry characteristics (Menzi et al., 1998; Søgaard et al., 2002). More recent measurements that appeared subsequently show substantially lower EFs, and appear to indicate a need for a revision of the EF in emission inventories.

  14. Are ammonia emissions from field-applied slurry substantially over-estimated in European emission inventories?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sintermann, J.; Neftel, A.; Ammann, C.; Häni, C.; Hensen, A.; Loubet, B.; Flechard, C. R.

    2012-05-01

    The EMEP/EEA guidebook 2009 for agricultural emission inventories reports an average ammonia (NH3) emission factor (EF) by volatilisation of 55% of the applied total ammoniacal nitrogen (TAN) content for cattle slurry, and 35% losses for pig slurry, irrespective of the type of surface or slurry characteristics such as dry matter content and pH. In this review article, we compiled over 350 measurements of EFs published between 1991 and 2011. The standard slurry application technique during the early years of this period, when a large number of measurements were made, was spreading by splash plate, and as a result reference EFs given in many European inventories are predominantly based on this technique. However, slurry application practices have evolved since then, while there has also been a shift in measurement techniques and investigated plot sizes. We therefore classified the available measurements according to the flux measurement technique or measurement plot size and year of measurement. Medium size plots (usually circles between 20 to 50 m radius) generally yielded the highest EFs. The most commonly used measurement setups at this scale were based on the Integrated Horizontal Flux method (IHF or the ZINST method (a simplified IHF method)). Several empirical models were published in the years 1993 to 2003 predicting NH3 EFs as a function of meteorology and slurry characteristics (Menzi et al., 1998; Søgaard et al., 2002). More recent measurements show substantially lower EFs which calls for new measurement series in order to validate the various measurement approaches against each other and to derive revised inputs for inclusion into emission inventories.

  15. Slurry-pressing consolidation of silicon nitride

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sanders, William A.; Kiser, James D.; Freedman, Marc R.

    1988-01-01

    A baseline slurry-pressing method for a silicon nitride material is developed. The Si3N4 composition contained 5.8 wt percent SiO2 and 6.4 wt percent Y2O3. Slurry-pressing variables included volume percent solids, application of ultrasonic energy, and pH. Twenty vol percent slurry-pressed material was approximately 11 percent stronger than both 30 vol percent slurry-pressed and dry-pressed materials. The Student's t-test showed the difference to be significant at the 99 percent confidence level. Twenty volume percent (300 h) slurry-pressed test bars exhibited strengths as high as 980 MPa. Large, columnar beta-Si3N4 grains caused failure in the highest strength specimens. The improved strength correlated with better structural uniformity as determined by radiography, optical microscopy, and image analysis.

  16. Comparison of a Powdered, Acidified Liquid, and Non-Acidified Liquid Human Milk Fortifier on Clinical Outcomes in Premature Infants

    PubMed Central

    Thoene, Melissa; Lyden, Elizabeth; Weishaar, Kara; Elliott, Elizabeth; Wu, Ruomei; White, Katelyn; Timm, Hayley; Anderson-Berry, Ann

    2016-01-01

    We previously compared infant outcomes between a powdered human milk fortifier (P-HMF) vs. acidified liquid HMF (AL-HMF). A non-acidified liquid HMF (NAL-HMF) is now commercially available. The purpose of this study is to compare growth and outcomes of premature infants receiving P-HMF, AL-HMF or NAL-HMF. An Institutional Review Board (IRB) approved retrospective chart review compared infant outcomes (born < 2000 g) who received one of three HMF. Growth, enteral nutrition, laboratory and demographic data were compared. 120 infants were included (P-HMF = 46, AL-HMF = 23, NAL-HMF = 51). AL-HMF infants grew slower in g/day (median 23.66 vs. P-HMF 31.27, NAL-HMF 31.74 (p < 0.05)) and in g/kg/day, median 10.59 vs. 15.37, 14.03 (p < 0.0001). AL-HMF vs. NAL-HMF infants were smaller at 36 weeks gestational age (median 2046 vs. 2404 g, p < 0.05). However AL-HMF infants received more daily calories (p = 0.21) and protein (p < 0.0001), mean 129 cal/kg, 4.2 g protein/kg vs. P-HMF 117 cal/kg, 3.7 g protein/kg , NAL-HMF 120 cal/kg, 4.0 g protein/kg. AL-HMF infants exhibited lower carbon dioxide levels after day of life 14 and 30 (p < 0.0001, p = 0.0038). Three AL-HMF infants (13%) developed necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC) vs. no infants in the remaining groups (p = 0.0056). A NAL-HMF is the most optimal choice for premature human milk-fed infants in a high acuity neonatal intensive care unit (NICU). PMID:27472359

  17. Comparison of a Powdered, Acidified Liquid, and Non-Acidified Liquid Human Milk Fortifier on Clinical Outcomes in Premature Infants.

    PubMed

    Thoene, Melissa; Lyden, Elizabeth; Weishaar, Kara; Elliott, Elizabeth; Wu, Ruomei; White, Katelyn; Timm, Hayley; Anderson-Berry, Ann

    2016-07-26

    We previously compared infant outcomes between a powdered human milk fortifier (P-HMF) vs. acidified liquid HMF (AL-HMF). A non-acidified liquid HMF (NAL-HMF) is now commercially available. The purpose of this study is to compare growth and outcomes of premature infants receiving P-HMF, AL-HMF or NAL-HMF. An Institutional Review Board (IRB) approved retrospective chart review compared infant outcomes (born < 2000 g) who received one of three HMF. Growth, enteral nutrition, laboratory and demographic data were compared. 120 infants were included (P-HMF = 46, AL-HMF = 23, NAL-HMF = 51). AL-HMF infants grew slower in g/day (median 23.66 vs. P-HMF 31.27, NAL-HMF 31.74 (p < 0.05)) and in g/kg/day, median 10.59 vs. 15.37, 14.03 (p < 0.0001). AL-HMF vs. NAL-HMF infants were smaller at 36 weeks gestational age (median 2046 vs. 2404 g, p < 0.05). However AL-HMF infants received more daily calories (p = 0.21) and protein (p < 0.0001), mean 129 cal/kg, 4.2 g protein/kg vs. P-HMF 117 cal/kg, 3.7 g protein/kg , NAL-HMF 120 cal/kg, 4.0 g protein/kg. AL-HMF infants exhibited lower carbon dioxide levels after day of life 14 and 30 (p < 0.0001, p = 0.0038). Three AL-HMF infants (13%) developed necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC) vs. no infants in the remaining groups (p = 0.0056). A NAL-HMF is the most optimal choice for premature human milk-fed infants in a high acuity neonatal intensive care unit (NICU).

  18. Coal slurry rheology and chemistry

    SciTech Connect

    Lynch, A.W.; Cook, D.W.

    1987-09-01

    Three well-characterized, generic surfactants (nonionic, anionic and cationic) were used to modify coal/water mixtures by changing the interaction between several coals of different rank and the slurry liquor. Each experiment involved one coal and one surfactant per experiment. The analytical and rheological results from these experiments have been previously reported. The thrust of the current program is to extend the work to shear rates expected during atomization. The program consists of the following elements: (1) design, fabricate and test a helical screw rheometer capable of developing shear rates to 10,000 sec/sup -1/; (2) establish a capability to atomize slurries and monitor the spray using high speed photography; and (3) initiate a collaborative program with the Combustion Research Facility at Sandia National Laboratories Livermore for the purpose of analyzing particulates in atomized and burned sprays. The helical screw rheometer was designed using technology developed for polymer processing. The rheometer acts as an extrusion pump when there is discharge of fluid, but when flow is interrupted a differential pressure develops across the length of the screw. Using the mathematical analysis developed for screw pumps, the rotation rate of the screw may be translated to shear rate and the differential pressure translated to shear stress. 9 refs., 11 figs.

  19. Prior exposure influences the behavioural avoidance by an intertidal gastropod, Bembicium auratum, of acidified waters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amaral, Valter; Cabral, Henrique N.; Bishop, Melanie J.

    2014-01-01

    Phenotypic plasticity may be critical to the maintenance of viable populations under future environmental change. Here we examined the role of behavioural avoidance of sub-optimal conditions in enabling the intertidal gastropod, Bembicium auratum, to persist in mangrove forests affected by the low pH runoff from acid sulphate soils (ASS). Behaviourally, the gastropod may be able to avoid periods of particularly high acidity by using pneumatophores and/or mangrove trunks to vertically migrate above the water line or by retreating into its shell. We hypothesised that (1) B. auratum would display greater and more rapid vertical migration out of acidified than reference estuarine waters, and (2) responses would be more pronounced in gastropods collected from acidified than reference sites. Gastropods from acidified sites showed significantly higher activity in and more rapid migration out of acidified waters of pH 6.2-7.0, than reference waters or waters of pH < 5.0. Gastropods from reference locations showed a significantly weaker response to acidified water than those from acidified waters, and which did not significantly differ from their response to reference water. At extremely low pHs, <5.0, a higher proportion of both acidified and reference gastropods retreated into their shell than at higher pHs. Both the migration of gastropods out of acidified waters and retraction into their shells serves to reduce exposure time to acidified waters and may reduce the impact of this stressor on their populations. The stronger response to acidification of gastropods from populations previously exposed to this stressor suggests that the response may be learned, inherited or induced over multiple exposures. Our study adds to growing evidence that estuarine organisms may exhibit considerable physiological and behaviour adaptive capacity to acidification. The potential for such adaptive capacity should be incorporated into studies seeking to forecast impacts to marine organisms

  20. Reduction of hexavalent chromium in water samples acidified for preservation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stollenwerk, K.G.; Grove, D.B.

    1985-01-01

    Reduction of hexavalent chromium, Cr(VI), in water samples, preserved by standard techniques, was investigated. The standard preservation technique for water samples that are to be analyzed for Cr(VI) consists of filtration through a 0.45-??m membrane, acidification to a pH < 2, and storage in plastic bottles. Batch experiments were conducted to evaluate the effect of H+ concentration, NO2, temperature, and dissolved organic carbon (DOC) on the reduction of Cr(VI) to Cr(III). The rate of reduction of Cr(VI) to Cr(III) increased with increasing NO2, DOC, H+, and temperature. Reduction of Cr(VI) by organic matter occurred in some samples even though the samples were unacidified. Reduction of Cr(VI) is inhibited to an extent by storing the sample at 4??C. Stability of Cr(VI) in water is variable and depends on the other constituents present in the sample. Water samples collected for the determination of Cr(VI) should be filtered (0.45-??m membrane), refrigerated, and analyzed as quickly as possible. Water samples should not be acidified. Measurement of total Cr in addition to Cr(VI) can serve as a check for Cr(VI) reduction. If total Cr is greater than Cr(VI), the possibility that Cr(VI) reduction has occurred needs to be considered.The rate of reduction of Cr(VI) to Cr(III) increased with increasing NO//2, DOC, H** plus , and temperature. Reduction of Cr(VI) by organic matter occurred in some samples even though the samples were unacidified. Reduction of Cr(VI) is inhibited to an extent by storing the sample at 4 degree C. Stability of Cr(VI) in water is variable and depends on the other constituents present in the sample. Water samples collected for the determination of Cr(VI) should be filtered (0. 45- mu m membrane), refrigerated, and analyzed as quickly as possible. Water samples should not be acidified. Measurement of total Cr in addition to Cr(VI) can serve as a check for Cr(VI) reduction. If total Cr is greater than Cr(VI), the possibility that Cr

  1. Process for heating coal-oil slurries

    DOEpatents

    Braunlin, W.A.; Gorski, A.; Jaehnig, L.J.; Moskal, C.J.; Naylor, J.D.; Parimi, K.; Ward, J.V.

    1984-01-03

    Controlling gas to slurry volume ratio to achieve a gas holdup of about 0.4 when heating a flowing coal-oil slurry and a hydrogen containing gas stream allows operation with virtually any coal to solvent ratio and permits operation with efficient heat transfer and satisfactory pressure drops. The critical minimum gas flow rate for any given coal-oil slurry will depend on numerous factors such as coal concentration, coal particle size distribution, composition of the solvent (including recycle slurries), and type of coal. Further system efficiency can be achieved by operating with multiple heating zones to provide a high heat flux when the apparent viscosity of the gas saturated slurry is highest. Operation with gas flow rates below the critical minimum results in system instability indicated by temperature excursions in the fluid and at the tube wall, by a rapid increase and then decrease in overall pressure drop with decreasing gas flow rate, and by increased temperature differences between the temperature of the bulk fluid and the tube wall. At the temperatures and pressures used in coal liquefaction preheaters the coal-oil slurry and hydrogen containing gas stream behaves essentially as a Newtonian fluid at shear rates in excess of 150 sec[sup [minus]1]. The gas to slurry volume ratio should also be controlled to assure that the flow regime does not shift from homogeneous flow to non-homogeneous flow. Stable operations have been observed with a maximum gas holdup as high as 0.72. 29 figs.

  2. Process for heating coal-oil slurries

    DOEpatents

    Braunlin, Walter A.; Gorski, Alan; Jaehnig, Leo J.; Moskal, Clifford J.; Naylor, Joseph D.; Parimi, Krishnia; Ward, John V.

    1984-01-03

    Controlling gas to slurry volume ratio to achieve a gas holdup of about 0.4 when heating a flowing coal-oil slurry and a hydrogen containing gas stream allows operation with virtually any coal to solvent ratio and permits operation with efficient heat transfer and satisfactory pressure drops. The critical minimum gas flow rate for any given coal-oil slurry will depend on numerous factors such as coal concentration, coal particle size distribution, composition of the solvent (including recycle slurries), and type of coal. Further system efficiency can be achieved by operating with multiple heating zones to provide a high heat flux when the apparent viscosity of the gas saturated slurry is highest. Operation with gas flow rates below the critical minimum results in system instability indicated by temperature excursions in the fluid and at the tube wall, by a rapid increase and then decrease in overall pressure drop with decreasing gas flow rate, and by increased temperature differences between the temperature of the bulk fluid and the tube wall. At the temperatures and pressures used in coal liquefaction preheaters the coal-oil slurry and hydrogen containing gas stream behaves essentially as a Newtonian fluid at shear rates in excess of 150 sec.sup. -1. The gas to slurry volume ratio should also be controlled to assure that the flow regime does not shift from homogeneous flow to non-homogeneous flow. Stable operations have been observed with a maximum gas holdup as high as 0.72.

  3. Method and apparatus for transporting liquid slurries

    DOEpatents

    Berry, G.F.; Lyczkowski, R.W.; Chisheng Wang.

    1993-03-16

    An improved method and device to prevent erosion of slurry transport devices is disclosed which uses liquid injection to prevent contact by the slurry composition with the inner surface of the walls of the transport system. A non-abrasive liquid is injected into the slurry transport system and maintains intimate contact with the entire inner surface of the transport system, thereby creating a fluid barrier between the non-abrasive liquid and the inner surface of the transport system which thereby prevents erosion.

  4. Method and apparatus for transporting liquid slurries

    DOEpatents

    Berry, Gregory F.; Lyczkowski, Robert W.; Wang, Chi-Sheng

    1993-01-01

    An improved method and device to prevent erosion of slurry transport devices is disclosed which uses liquid injection to prevent contact by the slurry composition with the inner surface of the walls of the transport system. A non-abrasive liquid is injected into the slurry transport system and maintains intimate contact with the entire inner surface of the transport system, thereby creating a fluid barrier between the non-abrasive liquid and the inner surface of the transport system which thereby prevents erosion.

  5. Acidifying and yeast extract in diets for adults cats.

    PubMed

    Ogoshi, Rosana C S; Zangeronimo, Márcio G; Dos Reis, Jéssica S; França, Janine; Santos, João P F; Pires, Carolina P; Chizzotti, Ana F; Costa, Adriano C; Ferreira, Lívia G; Saad, Flávia M O B

    2014-05-01

    This study evaluated the effects of adding an acidifying agent based on phosphoric acid (A), a yeast extract from a specific strain (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) (Y) and the combination of these two additives in food for adult cats. A test was conducted with 24 animals (mean 3.5 years old), mixed breed, weighing 3.72 ± 0.74 kg, kept in individual metabolic cages and distributed in a completely randomized design with a 2 × 2 factorial design (with or without A 0.6% of dry matter, with or without Y 1.5% of dry matter) totalling four treatments and six replicates of each condition. The experimental period was 15 days. The A or the Y reduced (P< 0.01) the dry matter intake, but the effect was not observed when they were associated. The association improved (P<0.05) the digestibility of dry matter and ashes. The A reduced urine pH (P=0.05) regardless of the presence of the Y. There was no effect (P>0.09) on other parameters evaluated. Results of this study show that the isolated use of 0.6% A or 1.5% Y in diets for cats is not recommended. However, the association of these two additives was beneficial in increasing nutrient digestibility. © 2014 Japanese Society of Animal Science.

  6. Ammonia and odour emissions from UK pig farms and nitrogen leaching from outdoor pig production. A review.

    PubMed

    Webb, J; Broomfield, Mark; Jones, Stephanie; Donovan, Brian

    2014-02-01

    We reviewed specific literature for emissions of ammonia (NH3) and odours from all stages of pig production together with nitrogen (N) leaching from raising pigs outdoors. Emissions of NH3 decrease with decreases in the crude protein (CP) content of pig diets, at all stages of manure management. The CPs of pig diets have been greatly reduced by matching the CP content to the protein required at each stage of the animals' growth and by using synthetic essential amino acids to minimise total CP intake. The CP contents of the dietary ingredients needed to provide energy for the animals impose further limits to reductions in dietary CP. Housing systems have been designed and evaluated which offer potential for reducing NH3 emissions. However such designs may not be applicable at all stages of the pigs' development and the careful management needed to ensure their effective working may be costly and difficult to implement on commercial farms. The factors behind odour emissions are less well characterised. Reducing diet CP to 160 g CP kg(-1) has been shown to reduce odour emissions but further CP reductions may increase them. Some reductions in odour emissions from buildings can be achieved by careful management of the ventilation rate but the most effective measures to reduce emissions of NH3 and odours are to cover slurry stores and to inject slurry into soil. Changes in the feeding and management of outdoor pigs mean that N leaching losses may be up to 50% less than previously reported. No studies have been undertaken that compare the N leached from pigs raised outdoors, versus that arising from the application of pig manure from an equal number of housed pigs. As a precursor to any field study, current models could be used to provide a first estimate of any systematic differences. © 2013.

  7. Release of Nitrogen and Phosphorus from Poultry Litter Amended with Acidified Biochar

    PubMed Central

    Doydora, Sarah A.; Cabrera, Miguel L.; Das, Keshav C.; Gaskin, Julia W.; Sonon, Leticia S.; Miller, William P.

    2011-01-01

    Application of poultry litter (PL) to soil may lead to nitrogen (N) losses through ammonia (NH3) volatilization and to potential contamination of surface runoff with PL-derived phosphorus (P). Amending litter with acidified biochar may minimize these problems by decreasing litter pH and by retaining litter-derived P, respectively. This study evaluated the effect of acidified biochars from pine chips (PC) and peanut hulls (PH) on NH3 losses and inorganic N and P released from surface-applied or incorporated PL. Poultry litter with or without acidified biochars was surface-applied or incorporated into the soil and incubated for 21 d. Volatilized NH3 was determined by trapping it in acid. Inorganic N and P were determined by leaching the soil with 0.01 M of CaCl2 during the study and by extracting it with 1 M KCl after incubation. Acidified biochars reduced NH3 losses by 58 to 63% with surface-applied PL, and by 56 to 60% with incorporated PL. Except for PH biochar, which caused a small increase in leached NH4 +-N with incorporated PL, acidified biochars had no effect on leached or KCl-extractable inorganic N and P from surface-applied or incorporated PL. These results suggest that acidified biochars may decrease NH3 losses from PL but may not reduce the potential for P loss in surface runoff from soils receiving PL. PMID:21655132

  8. Release of nitrogen and phosphorus from poultry litter amended with acidified biochar.

    PubMed

    Doydora, Sarah A; Cabrera, Miguel L; Das, Keshav C; Gaskin, Julia W; Sonon, Leticia S; Miller, William P

    2011-05-01

    Application of poultry litter (PL) to soil may lead to nitrogen (N) losses through ammonia (NH(3)) volatilization and to potential contamination of surface runoff with PL-derived phosphorus (P). Amending litter with acidified biochar may minimize these problems by decreasing litter pH and by retaining litter-derived P, respectively. This study evaluated the effect of acidified biochars from pine chips (PC) and peanut hulls (PH) on NH(3) losses and inorganic N and P released from surface-applied or incorporated PL. Poultry litter with or without acidified biochars was surface-applied or incorporated into the soil and incubated for 21 d. Volatilized NH(3) was determined by trapping it in acid. Inorganic N and P were determined by leaching the soil with 0.01 M of CaCl(2) during the study and by extracting it with 1 M KCl after incubation. Acidified biochars reduced NH(3) losses by 58 to 63% with surface-applied PL, and by 56 to 60% with incorporated PL. Except for PH biochar, which caused a small increase in leached NH(4) (+)-N with incorporated PL, acidified biochars had no effect on leached or KCl-extractable inorganic N and P from surface-applied or incorporated PL. These results suggest that acidified biochars may decrease NH(3) losses from PL but may not reduce the potential for P loss in surface runoff from soils receiving PL.

  9. Elevated Colonization of Microborers at a Volcanically Acidified Coral Reef

    PubMed Central

    Enochs, Ian C.; Manzello, Derek P.; Tribollet, Aline; Valentino, Lauren; Kolodziej, Graham; Donham, Emily M.; Fitchett, Mark D.; Carlton, Renee; Price, Nichole N.

    2016-01-01

    Experiments have demonstrated that ocean acidification (OA) conditions projected to occur by the end of the century will slow the calcification of numerous coral species and accelerate the biological erosion of reef habitats (bioerosion). Microborers, which bore holes less than 100 μm diameter, are one of the most pervasive agents of bioerosion and are present throughout all calcium carbonate substrates within the reef environment. The response of diverse reef functional groups to OA is known from real-world ecosystems, but to date our understanding of the relationship between ocean pH and carbonate dissolution by microborers is limited to controlled laboratory experiments. Here we examine the settlement of microborers to pure mineral calcium carbonate substrates (calcite) along a natural pH gradient at a volcanically acidified reef at Maug, Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands (CNMI). Colonization of pioneer microborers was higher in the lower pH waters near the vent field. Depth of microborer penetration was highly variable both among and within sites (4.2–195.5 μm) over the short duration of the study (3 mo.) and no clear relationship to increasing CO2 was observed. Calculated rates of biogenic dissolution, however, were highest at the two sites closer to the vent and were not significantly different from each other. These data represent the first evidence of OA-enhancement of microboring flora colonization in newly available substrates and provide further evidence that microborers, especially bioeroding chlorophytes, respond positively to low pH. The accelerated breakdown and dissolution of reef framework structures with OA will likely lead to declines in structural complexity and integrity, as well as possible loss of essential habitat. PMID:27467570

  10. Acidified sodium chlorite antimicrobial treatment of broiler carcasses.

    PubMed

    Kemp, G K; Aldrich, M L; Waldroup, A L

    2000-08-01

    An acidified sodium chlorite (ASC) solution was investigated for its antimicrobial effects on broiler carcasses processed under conditions similar to those used in U.S. commercial poultry facilities. Of particular interest was the ability of the ASC solution to reduce natural bioburden in a prechill procedure. A number of parameters such as pretreatment washing of carcasses with water (no wash versus water wash), ASC concentration (500, 850, and 1,200 ppm), method of application (spray versus dip), and method of acid activation (phosphoric acid versus citric acid) were explored to evaluate disinfection conditions. ASC dip solutions (18.9 liters) were freshly prepared for groups of five prechill eviscerated carcasses per treatment (n = 10 carcasses). ASC treatment was shown to be an effective method for significantly reducing naturally occurring microbial contamination on carcasses. Reductions following immersion dipping were demonstrated at all disinfectant concentrations for total aerobes (82.9 to 90.7%), Escherichia coli (99.4 to 99.6%), and total coliforms (86.1 to 98.5%). Additionally, testing showed that ASC solutions maintained stable pH and minimal chlorite ion concentration deviations throughout each treatment. The results of the parameter evaluations indicated that maximal antimicrobial activity was achieved in carcasses that were prewashed and then exposed to a 5-s dip in a solution containing phosphoric acid- or citric acid-activated ASC. At 1,200 ppm ASC, a mild but transitory whitening of the skin was noted on dipped carcasses. The results support the methods currently approved by the U.S. Department of Agriculture for the use of ASC solutions as a prechill antimicrobial intervention in U.S. poultry processing plants.

  11. Fluidization mechanisms in slurry flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campbell, Charles S.

    1988-08-01

    A transducer is developed to measure particle pressures independently from fluid pressure. Initially it was thought that particle pressure was the only path by which the fluidization mechanism could be determined. The particle pressure transducer has been described in previous reports. A secondary project was developed to test these transducers and use them to measure the particle pressures generated against the side walls of gas-fluidized beds. This was a way to gain experience with the particle pressure transducer while awaiting the delivery of the pump and other components for the slurry pipe loop. Earlier this year, there was great difficulty in gaining repeatable results from the experiments. The culprit turned out to be static charge buildup in the granular mass. Hence, steam was injected into the air stream to help dissipate the charge buildup. This produced a further source of error that was eventually traced to the fiberoptic displacement transducer inside the probe. It developed that the transducer was sensitive to humidity. It has been suggested that this reaction might be a byproduct of the absorption of water onto the sensing surface changes its optical properties and hence its output signal.

  12. Conductivity and electrochemical performance of LiFePO4 slurry in the lithium slurry battery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Caimei; Chen, Yongchong; Liu, Dandan; Zhang, Ping

    2017-06-01

    Lithium slurry battery is a new type of energy storage technique which uses the slurry of solid active materials, conductive additions and liquid electrolyte as the electrode. The proportion of conductive addition and the active material has significant influence on the conductivity and electrochemical performance of the slurry electrode. In the present work, slurries with different volume ratios of LiFePO4 (LFP) and Ketjenblack (KB) were investigated by the electrochemical workstation and charge-discharge testing system (vs. Li/Li+). Results show that the conductivity of the slurry increases linearly with the addition of KB, and the measured specific capacity of the slurry reaches its theoretical value when the volume ratio of KB to LFP is around 0.2. Based on this ratio, a slurry battery with higher loading of LFP (19.1 wt.% in the slurry) was tested, and a specific capacity of 165 mAh/g at 0.2 mA/cm2 and 102 mAh/g at 5 mA/cm2 was obtained for LFP.

  13. The rheology and stability of concentrated coal water slurries

    SciTech Connect

    Slaczka, A.; Piszczynski, Z.

    1995-12-31

    An experimental study was undertaken to investigate the rheological properties of coal-water slurries (CWS). Slurries were prepared from coal of different rank, different particle size distribution, additives and solid content. Viscosity at different shear rate were measured using a capillary viscometer specially constructed by the authors for this purpose. The stability of investigated CWS was performed too. The study has revealed a correlation between the rank of coal used for slurry preparation and its viscosity in all ranges of slurry concentration. The addition of some reagents causes a considerable decrease in the slurry viscosity. The stability of the slurry was improved too.

  14. The effect of slurry treatment including ozonation on odorant reduction measured by in-situ PTR-MS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Dezhao; Feilberg, Anders; Adamsen, Anders P. S.; Jonassen, Kristoffer E. N.

    2011-07-01

    The emission of odorous compounds from intensive pig production facilities is a nuisance for neighbors. Slurry ozonation for odor abatement has previously been demonstrated in laboratory scale. In this study, the effect of slurry ozonation (combined with solid-liquid pre-separation and acidification) on emissions of odorous compounds was tested in an experimental full-scale growing pig facility using Proton-Transfer-Reaction Mass Spectrometry (PTR-MS) for online analysis of odorants. The measurements were performed to gain a better understanding of the effects of ozone treatment on emissions odorous compounds and to identify potential options for optimization of ozone treatment. The compounds monitored included volatile sulfur compounds, amine, carboxylic acids, ketones, phenols and indoles. Measurements were performed during nearly a one-month period in summertime. The compounds with the highest concentrations observed in the ventilation exhaust duct were acetic acid, hydrogen sulfide, propanoic acid and butanoic acid. The compounds with the highest removal efficiencies were hydrogen sulfide, 3-methyl-indole, phenol and acetic acid. Based on odor threshold values, methanethiol, butanoic acid, 4-methylphenol, hydrogen sulfide and C 5 carboxylic acids are estimated to contribute significantly to the odor nuisance. Emissions of odorous compounds were observed to be strongly correlated with temperature with the exception of hydrogen sulfide. Emission peaks of sulfur compounds were seen during slurry handling activities. Discharging of the slurry pit led to reduced hydrogen sulfide emissions, but emissions of most other odorants were not affected. The results indicate that emissions of odorants other than hydrogen sulfide mainly originate from sources other than the treated slurry, which limits the potential for further optimization. The PTR-MS measurements are demonstrated to provide a quantitative, accurate and detailed evaluation of ozone treatment for emission

  15. Rheological properties of defense waste slurries

    SciTech Connect

    Ebadian, M.A.

    1998-01-01

    The major objective of this two-year project has been to obtain refined and reliable experimental data about the rheological properties of melter feeds. The research has involved both experimental studies and model development. Two experimental facilities have been set up to measure viscosity and pressure drop. Mathematical models have been developed as a result of experimental observation and fundamental rheological theory. The model has the capability to predict the viscosity of melter slurries in a range of experimental conditions. The final results of the investigation could be used to enhance the current design base for slurry transportation systems and improve the performance of the slurry mixing process. If successful, the cost of this waste treatment will be reduced, and disposal safety will be increased. The specific objectives for this project included: (1) the design, implementation, and validation of the experimental facility in both batch and continuous operating modes; (2) the identification and preparation of melter feed samples of both the SRS and Hanford waste slurries at multiple solids concentration levels; (3) the measurement and analysis of the melter feeds to determine the effects of the solids concentration, pH value, and other factors on the rheological properties of the slurries; (4) the correlation of the rheological properties as a function of the measured physical and chemical parameters; and (5) transmission of the experimental data and resulting correlation to the DOE site user to guide melter feed preparation and transport equipment design.

  16. Natural inactivation of phosphorus by aluminum in atmospherically acidified water bodies.

    PubMed

    Kopácek, J; Ulrich, K U; Hejzlar, J; Borovec, J; Stuchlik, E

    2001-11-01

    Atmospheric acidification of catchment-lake ecosystems may provide natural conditions for the in-lake control of P cycling. This process is based on the elevated transport of aluminum from acidified soils and its subsequent precipitation in the water body and is described for strongly acidified forest lakes, acidified and circumneutral reservoirs, and a moderately acidified alpine lake. In water bodies with episodically or permanently acidified inflows a pH gradient develops between lake water and tributaries due to: (i) neutralization of acidic inflows after mixing with waters with undepleted carbonate buffering system, and/or (ii) the in-lake alkalinity generation dominated by biochemical removal of NO3- and SO4(2-). With the pH increasing towards neutrality, ionic Al species hydrolyze and form colloidal Al hydroxides (Al(part)) with large specific surfaces and strong ability to bind orthophosphate from the liquid phase. Moreover, Alpart settles and increases the P sorption capacity of the sediment. The presence of Al(part) on the bottom reduces orthophosphate release from sediments after its liberation from ferric oxyhydroxides during anoxia because Al(part) is not sensitive to redox changes. Consequently, the natural in-lake P inactivation may be expected in any water body with elevated Al input and a pH gradient between its inlet and outlet.

  17. Trace metal biogeochemistry in mangrove ecosystems: a comparative assessment of acidified (by acid sulfate soils) and non-acidified sites.

    PubMed

    Nath, Bibhash; Birch, Gavin; Chaudhuri, Punarbasu

    2013-10-01

    The generation of acidity and subsequent mobilization of toxic metals induced by acid sulfate soils (ASSs) are known to cause severe environmental damage to many coastal wetlands and estuaries of Australia and worldwide. Mangrove ecosystems serve to protect coastal environments, but are increasingly threatened from such ASS-induced acidification due to variable hydrological conditions (i.e., inundation-desiccation cycles). However, the impact of such behaviors on trace metal distribution, bio-availability and accumulation in mangrove tissues, i.e., leaves and pneumatophores, are largely unknown. In this study, we examined how ASS-induced acidifications controlled trace metal distribution and bio-availability in gray mangrove (Avicennia marina) soils and in tissues in the Kooragang wetland, New South Wales, Australia. We collected mangrove soils, leaves and pneumatophores from a part of the wetland acidified from ASS (i.e., an affected site) for detailed biogeochemical studies. The results were compared with samples collected from a natural intertidal mangrove forest (i.e., a control site) located within the same wetland. Soil pH (mean: 5.90) indicated acidic conditions in the affected site, whereas pH was near-neutral (mean: 7.17) in the control site. The results did not show statistically significant differences in near-total and bio-available metal concentrations, except for Fe and Mn, between affected and control sites. Iron concentrations were significantly (p values≤0.001) greater in the affected site, whereas Mn concentrations were significantly (p values≤0.001) greater in the control site. However, large proportions of near-total metals were potentially bio-available in control sites. Concentrations of Fe and Ni were significantly (p values≤0.001) greater in leaves and pneumatophores of the affected sites, whereas Mn, Cu, Pb and Zn were greater in control sites. The degree of metal bio-accumulation in leaves and pneumatophores suggest contrasting

  18. Effect of Particle Size Distribution on Slurry Rheology: Nuclear Waste Simulant Slurries

    SciTech Connect

    Chun, Jaehun; Oh, Takkeun; Luna, Maria L.; Schweiger, Michael J.

    2011-07-05

    Controlling the rheological properties of slurries has been of great interest in various industries such as cosmetics, ceramic processing, and nuclear waste treatment. Many physicochemical parameters, such as particle size, pH, ionic strength, and mass/volume fraction of particles, can influence the rheological properties of slurry. Among such parameters, the particle size distribution of slurry would be especially important for nuclear waste treatment because most nuclear waste slurries show a broad particle size distribution. We studied the rheological properties of several different low activity waste nuclear simulant slurries having different particle size distributions under high salt and high pH conditions. Using rheological and particle size analysis, it was found that the percentage of colloid-sized particles in slurry appears to be a key factor for rheological characteristics and the efficiency of rheological modifiers. This behavior was shown to be coupled with an existing electrostatic interaction between particles under a low salt concentration. Our study suggests that one may need to implement the particle size distribution as a critical factor to understand and control rheological properties in nuclear waste treatment plants, such as the U.S. Department of Energy’s Hanford and Savannah River sites, because the particle size distributions significantly vary over different types of nuclear waste slurries.

  19. Lightweight Cement Slurries based on vermiculite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minaev, K.; Gorbenko, V.; Ulyanova, O.

    2014-08-01

    The main purpose of the research is to study the lightweight cement slurry based on vermiculite and its parameters in accordance with GOST 1581-96 requirements as well as improvement of its formulation by polymer additives. Analysis of vermiculite-containing mixture providing the lowest density while maintaining other required parameters was conducted. As a cement base, cement PTscT-I-G-CC-1, cement PTscT - 100 and vermiculite M200 and M150 were used. Vermiculite content varied from 10 to 15 %; and water-to-cement-ratio ranged from 0.65 to 0.8. To sum up, despite the fact that lightweight cement slurry based on vermiculite satisfies GOST 1581-96 requirements under laboratory conditions, field studies are necessary in order to make a conclusion about applicability of this slurry for well cementing.

  20. Rocketdyne's advanced coal slurry pumping program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, D. E.; Wong, G. S.; Gilman, H. H.

    1977-01-01

    The Rocketdyne Division of Rockwell International Corporation is conducting a program for the engineering, fabrication, and testing of an experimental/prototype high-capacity, high-pressure centrifugal slurry feed pump for coal liquefaction purposes. The abrasion problems in a centrifugal slurry pump are primarily due to the manner in which the hard, solid particles contained in the slurry are transported through the hydraulic flow passages within the pump. The abrasive particles can create scraping, grinding, cutting, and sandblasting effects on the various exposed parts of the pump. These critical areas involving abrasion and impact erosion wear problems in a centrifugal pump are being addressed by Rocketdyne. The mechanisms of abrasion and erosion are being studied through hydrodynamic analysis, materials evaluation, and advanced design concepts.

  1. Fifth international technical conference on slurry transportation. Proceedings

    SciTech Connect

    Linderman, C.W.

    1980-01-01

    The fifth international technical conference on slurry transportation was held March 26-28, 1980, at the Sahara Tahoe, Lake Tahoe, Nevada. The papers deal with the transport of slurries (mostly coal and iron ores) in slurry pipelines. Planned slurry pipelines in the USA are described and the legal problems in getting rights-of-way and water rights. The economics of slurry pipelines and railways are considered in some detail. Finally, technical aspects of such pipelines are considered: design, engineering, pumps, maintenance, etc. Other topics discussed are: marine transport (moorings, terminal facilities and tanker ship design, other slurry media than water (fuel oils, methanol, CO/sub 2/), coarse slurry transport, slurry preparation, water removal and pumps (pulsations and dampering). Thirty-two papers have been entered individually into EDB and ERA; one had been entered previously from other sources. (LTN)

  2. The effects of four acidifying sprays, vinegar, and water on canine cutaneous pH levels.

    PubMed

    Matousek, Jennifer L; Campbell, Karen L; Kakoma, Ibulaimu; Schaeffer, David J

    2003-01-01

    This study determined the extent and duration of cutaneous acidification caused by a single application of four acidifying sprays, vinegar, and water. Multivariate repeated measures analysis of variance revealed a significant difference between the six sprays (F = 15.3; P < or = 0.001). Linear contrast tests showed that the effects of the acidifying sprays were significantly different from vinegar and water (F = 6.0; P < or = 0.001), and vinegar was significantly different from water (F = 13.8; P < or = 0.001). The acidifying sprays decreased cutaneous pH to < 6.0 for a mean range of 50 to 65 hours, while vinegar did so for a mean of 12 hours.

  3. Nutrient cycling and the growth of benthic algae in experimentally acidified Little Rock Lake, WI

    SciTech Connect

    Detenbeck, N.E.

    1987-01-01

    Changes in nutrient-cycling and the growth of benthic algae resulting from decreased pH in low alkalinity lake systems were analyzed by laboratory, mesocosm, and whole-lake studies on Little Rock Lake, Wisconsin. Nutrients, transparency, an algal growth in the experimentally acidified basin were compared with conditions in an untreated reference basin. During the first summer following acidification (1985), accumulation rates of attached algae were significantly higher in the acidified basin than in the reference basin during June-August, but not in September. Color and winter silica values were significantly lower in the acidified basin relative to the reference basin following treatment. In addition, the lack of a fall decline in SiO/sub 2/ in the north basin in 1986 may signal pH-related changes in siliceous algal communities.

  4. Results of sludge slurry pipeline pluggage tests. [Simulation of Radioactive Slurry Flow

    SciTech Connect

    Fazio, J.M.

    1987-02-06

    Test results of sludge slurry transport through the Interarea Transfer Line (IAL) Mock-up Facility showed little risk of plugging the interarea pipelines with sludge slurry. Plug-free operation of the pipeline was successfully demonstrated by worst case IAL operating scenarios. Pipeline pressure gradients were measured vs. flow rate for comparison with a computer model over a range of sludge slurry rheological properties. A mathematical computer model developed by L. M. Lee is included in this report which will predict pressure drop for Bingham plastic fluid flow in a pipeline. IAL pluggage situations and pumping requirements may be realized from this model. 4 refs., 11 figs., 2 tabs.

  5. Prospects for coal slurry pipelines in California

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lynch, J. F.

    1978-01-01

    The coal slurry pipeline segment of the transport industry is emerging in the United States. If accepted it will play a vital role in meeting America's urgent energy requirements without public subsidy, tax relief, or federal grants. It is proven technology, ideally suited for transport of an abundant energy resource over thousands of miles to energy short industrial centers and at more than competitive costs. Briefly discussed are the following: (1) history of pipelines; (2) California market potential; (3) slurry technology; (4) environmental benefits; (5) market competition; and (6) a proposed pipeline.

  6. Air blast type coal slurry fuel injector

    DOEpatents

    Phatak, R.G.

    1984-08-31

    A device to atomize and inject a coal slurry in the combustion chamber of an internal combustion engine is disclosed which eliminates the use of a conventional fuel injection pump/nozzle. The injector involves the use of compressed air to atomize and inject the coal slurry and like fuels. In one embodiment, the breaking and atomization of the fuel is achieved with the help of perforated discs and compressed air. In another embodiment, a cone shaped aspirator is used to achieve the breaking and atomization of the fuel. The compressed air protects critical bearing areas of the injector.

  7. Air blast type coal slurry fuel injector

    DOEpatents

    Phatak, Ramkrishna G.

    1986-01-01

    A device to atomize and inject a coal slurry in the combustion chamber of an internal combustion engine, and which eliminates the use of a conventional fuel injection pump/nozzle. The injector involves the use of compressed air to atomize and inject the coal slurry and like fuels. In one embodiment, the breaking and atomization of the fuel is achieved with the help of perforated discs and compressed air. In another embodiment, a cone shaped aspirator is used to achieve the breaking and atomization of the fuel. The compressed air protects critical bearing areas of the injector.

  8. Study on the degradation of chitosan slurries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martini, Benjamin; Dimida, Simona; De Benedetto, Egidio; Madaghiele, Marta; Demitri, Christian

    In the present work, we measured the degradation rate of different chitosan slurries. Several parameters were monitored such as temperature (25 °C, 37 °C, 50 °C); chitosan concentration (1% and 2% (w/V)); and polymer molecular weight. The samples were tested in dynamic sweep test mode. This test is able to provide a reliable estimation of viscosity variations of the slurries; in turn, these variations could be related to degradation rate of the system in the considered conditions. The resulting information is particularly important especially in applications in which there is a close relationship between physical properties and molecular structure.

  9. SEPARATING LIQUID MODERATOR FROM A SLURRY TYPE REACTOR

    DOEpatents

    Vernon, H.C.

    1961-07-01

    A system for evaporating moderator such as D/sub 2/O from an irradiated slurry or sloution characterized by two successive evaproators is described. In the first of these the most troublesome radioactivity dissipates before the slurry becomes too thick to be pumped out; in the second the slurry, now easier to handle, can be safely reduced to a sludge.

  10. Process for producing high-concentration slurry of coal

    SciTech Connect

    Nakaoji, K.; Itoh, H.; Kamao, M.; Takao, Sh.; Tatsumi, Sh.

    1985-02-19

    High concentrated coal-water slurry is produced by coarsely crushing coal, thereafter pulverizing the coarsely crushed coal, together with water and a slurry dispersant, according to necessity, in a wet-type ball mill, and feeding back one portion of the finely pulverized coal slurry thus obtained into the inlet of the wet-type ball mill.

  11. Development of a phenomenological model for coal slurry atomization

    SciTech Connect

    Dooher, J.P.

    1995-11-01

    Highly concentrated suspensions of coal particles in water or alternate fluids appear to have a wide range of applications for energy production. For enhanced implementation of coal slurry fuel technology, an understanding of coal slurry atomization as a function coal and slurry properties for specific mechanical configurations of nozzle atomizers should be developed.

  12. CATALYTIC RECOMBINATION OF RADIOLYTIC GASES IN THORIUM OXIDE SLURRIES

    DOEpatents

    Morse, L.E.

    1962-08-01

    A method for the coinbination of hydrogen and oxygen in aqueous thorium oxide-uranium oxide slurries is described. A small amount of molybdenum oxide catalyst is provided in the slurry. This catalyst is applicable to the recombination of hydrogen and/or deuterium and oxygen produced by irradiation of the slurries in nuclear reactors. (AEC)

  13. Comparison of raw dairy manure slurry and anaerobically digested slurry as N sources for grass forage production

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Our study was conducted to determine how raw dairy slurry and anaerobically digested slurry (dairy slurry and food waste) applied via broadcast and subsurface deposition to reed canary grass (Phalaris arundinacea) affected forage biomass, N uptake, apparent nitrogen recovery (ANR), and soil nitrate...

  14. The coal slime slurry combustion technology

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Y.; Xu, Z.

    1997-12-31

    This paper presents the coal slime slurry combustion technology in circulating fluidized bed (CFB) boilers. The technique is that the slurry-based flow from the concentrator in the coal washery plant directly feeds into the fluidized bed by pump for combustion after a simple filtration and enrichment to an approximate concentration of 50% of coal. The coal slime slurry can burn in a CFB boiler alone or jointly with coal refuse. The technique has been used in a 35 t/h (6MWe) CFB for power generation. The result shows that the combustion efficiency is over 96% and boiler thermal efficiency is over 77%. As compared with burning coal refuse alone, the thermal efficiency was improved by 3--4 percent. This technology is simple, easy to operate and reliable. It is an effective way to utilize coal slime slurry. It has a practical significance for saving coal resources and reducing environmental pollution near coal mine areas. As a clean coal technology, it will result in great social, environmental and economic benefits.

  15. Coal slurry combustion and technology. Volume 2

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1983-01-01

    Volume II contains papers presented at the following sessions of the Coal Slurry Combustion and Technology Symposium: (1) bench-scale testing; (2) pilot testing; (3) combustion; and (4) rheology and characterization. Thirty-three papers have been processed for inclusion in the Energy Data Base. (ATT)

  16. Rheological characterization of hydraulic fracturing slurries

    SciTech Connect

    Shah, S.N. . Research and Engineering Dept.)

    1993-05-01

    Few studies have dealt with the flow behavior of concentrated suspensions or slurries prepared with non-Newtonian carrier fluids. Therefore, the purpose of this investigation is to present experimental results obtained by pumping various hydraulic fracturing slurries into a fracture model and gathering data on differential pressure vs. flow rate. Several concentrations of hydroxypropyl guard (HPG), a wide range of proppant concentrations, and three test temperatures were studies. The effects of such variables as polymer gelling-agent concentration, proppant concentration, test temperature, and fracture-flow shear rate on the rheological properties of slurries were investigated. The correlations for predicting the relative slurry viscosity for these HPG fluids are presented. Substantial increases in viscosity of fracturing gels were observed, and results are discussed in light of several affecting variables. Results also are compared with those available for Newtonian and non-Newtonian concentrated suspensions. Applications of these correlations to estimate the hindered particle-settling velocity in the fracture caused by the presence of surrounding particles also is discussed. The correlations presented can easily be included in any currently available 2D or 3D fracture-design simulators; thus, the information can be applied directly to predict fracture geometry and extension.

  17. Freeforming objects with low-binder slurry

    DOEpatents

    Cesarano, III, Joseph; Calvert, Paul D.

    2000-01-01

    In a rapid prototyping system, a part is formed by depositing a bead of slurry that has a sufficient high concentration of particles to be pseudoplastic and almost no organic binders. After deposition the bead is heated to drive off sufficient liquid to cause the bead to become dilatant.

  18. Aerated atomization of coal water slurry

    SciTech Connect

    Buckner, H.N.; Sojka, P.E.; Lefebvre, A.H.

    1989-01-05

    In order to better understand the process of slurry atomization, it is important to observe the influence of fluid non-Newtonian rheological behavior on the spray formation process. As a first step, glycerin-water solutions have been atomized. This report describes findings of photographs taken during atomization. 19 figs.

  19. Low Cost Dewatering of Waste Slurries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peterson, J. B.; Sharma, S. K.; Church, R. H.; Scheiner, B. J.

    1993-01-01

    The U.S. Bureau of Mines has developed a technique for dewatering mineral waste slurries which utilizes polymer and a static screen. A variety of waste slurries from placer gold mines and crushed stone operations have been successfully treated using the system. Depending on the waste, a number of polymers have been used successfully with polymer costs ranging from $0.05 to $0.15 per 1,000 gal treated. The dewatering is accomplished using screens made from either ordinary window screen or wedge wire. The screens used are 8 ft wide and 8 ft long. The capacity of the screens varies from 3 to 7 gpm/sq. ft. The water produced is acceptable for recycling to the plant or for discharge to the environment. For example, a fine grain dolomite waste slurry produced from a crushed stone operation was dewatered from a nominal 2.5 pct solids to greater than 50 pct solids using $0.10 to $0.15 worth of polymer per 1,000 gal of slurry. The resulting waste water had a turbidity of less than 50 NTU and could be discharged or recycled. The paper describes field tests conducted using the polymer-screen dewatering system.

  20. Dispersant for aqueous slurry of coal powder

    SciTech Connect

    Moriyama, N.; Watanabe, S.; Yamamura, M.

    1982-05-18

    A dispersant for forming an aqueous slurry of coal powder having a good flowability, which comprises as the active ingredient at least one member selected from sulfonation products of polycyclic aromatic compounds which may have a hydrocarbon group as a substituent, salts thereof and formaldehyde condensates thereof.

  1. Fluid loss control in well cement slurries

    SciTech Connect

    Roark, D.N.; Nugent, A.; Bandlish, B.K.

    1987-04-14

    This patent describes a fluid-loss-control additive adapted for use in cementing subterranean well formations with an aqueous well cement slurry. The additive comprises in combination, an anydrous mixture of (i) a lignosulfonate polymer or a condensed naphthalene sulfonate polymer or a sulfonated vinylaromatic polymer or any combination thereof and (ii) an unmodified or a chemically modified polymer of monoallylamine.

  2. Agronomic measures of P, Q/I parameters and lysimeter-collectable P in subsurface soil horizons of a long-term slurry experiment.

    PubMed

    Anderson, R; Xia, L

    2001-01-01

    Soils from a long-term slurry experiment established in 1970 at Hillsborough, Northern Ireland, were used in the experiment. The site has a clay loam soil overlying Silurian shale. Seven treatments were used with three replicate plots per treatment under the following manurial regimes: (1) mineral fertiliser supplying 200 kg N, 32 kg P and 160 kg K ha(-1) yr(-1); (2)-(4) pig slurry applied at 50, 100 or 200 m3 ha(-1) yr(-1); (5)-(7) cow slurry applied at 50, 100 or 200 m3 ha(-1) yr(-1). Agronomic measures of P determined on subsurface layers down to 90 cm were compared with sorption isotherm data and rates of desorption. Adsorption isotherms were fitted using a standard Langmuir model. Data were compared with soluble (molybdate-reactive) P levels in soil water collected at 35 and 90 cm using PTFE suction cup lysimeters. Agronomically available P was concentrated in the top 30 cm of soil in all treatments. The accumulation of P in surface layers of the plots was significantly greater in the pig slurry treatments compared to the cow slurry, reflecting the history of P amendments. Nevertheless, over a period of a year, molybdate-reactive phosphorus (MRP) concentrations in lysimeter collections was consistently higher at 35 cm depth in the highest cow slurry treatment (7) compared to the equivalent pig slurry treatment (4). Either the movement of soluble P down the profile is facilitated by the higher organic content of cow slurry or P movement is not directly related to P accumulation in the soils. In addition, it is hypothesised that P movement down the soil profile depends upon two separate mechanisms. First, a 'break' point above which the accumulated P in the surface horizons is less strongly held and therefore amenable to dissolution and movement down the profile. Second, a mechanism by which some solute P from the surface horizons can travel rapidly through horizons of low P status to greater depth in the soil, i.e., by preferential flow.

  3. [Study the restoration technology of concentrated application-natural diffusion about amendments of acidified soil of hilly woodland].

    PubMed

    Fang, Xiong; Liu, Ju-Xiu; Yin, Guang-Cai; Zhao, Liang; Liu, Shi-Zhong; Chu, Guo-Wei; Li, Yi-Yong

    2013-01-01

    Through concentrated application of lime, sewage sludge and lime + sewage sludge on the sloping top of the hilly woodlands, the restoration effects of the three soil amendments on the acidified soil of hilly woodland were studied. The results showed that: (1) Joint application of sewage sludge + lime can significantly (P < 0.05) decrease soil acidity, promote the rapid increase in soil organic matter and nitrogen content, increase soil cation exchange capacity, and effectively improve acidified soil. (2) Through natural diffusion mechanisms of surface and subsurface runoff, a large area of acidified soil of hilly woodlands can be restored by concentrated application of soil amendments on the sloping top of the hilly woodlands. (3) It is conducive to solve the pollution problems of the urban sewage sludge by using municipal sewage sludge to restore acidified soil, but only for the restoration of acidified soil of timber forest.

  4. Method and centrifugal apparatus for slurry testing

    SciTech Connect

    Tuzson, J.J.

    1984-04-17

    In accordance with the centrifugal erosion testing method of the invention, a material specimen is rotated with a flat surface facing the direction of rotation and a narrow stream of an abrasive particle slurry is concurrently flowed at a preselected rate in a radial direction across the flat surface, the rotating step being at sufficiently high angular velocity to urge the abrasive particles by Coriolis acceleration into a compacted mass against the flat surface and erode material therefrom by scouring type action as the particles flow radially outward. The rotating and flowing steps are continued for a sufficient preselected duration to erode material to a measurable depth, and the depth to which the flat surface is worn by the abrasive particles is measured as an indication of the erosion resistance of the specimen material. The centrifugal slurry erosion testing apparatus includes a rotatable cylindrical vessel into the interior of which the abrasive slurry is fed and a specimen holder extending radially from the vessel having a cavity for receiving the specimen and a radial slurry flow passage communicating with the interior of the vessel. One of the radial passage longitudinal walls is defined by the flat surface of the specimen. Preferably the specimen holder comprises mating semicylindrical halves one of which has a specimen-receiving cavity in its abutting surface and the other has a narrow rectangular-in-cross section groove in its abutting surface which communicates with the interior of the vessel and together with the flat surface of the specimen defines the radial slurry flow passage. The mating semicylindrical halves are enclosed by a sleeve having an annular rim disposed interiorly of the vessel to prevent radially outward movement of the specimen holder.

  5. EOS for critical slurry and solution systems

    SciTech Connect

    DiPeso, G; Peterson, P

    1998-10-27

    In a fire involving fissile material, the mixture of the fissile material ash with fire fighting water may lead to a criticality excursion if there are nearby sumps that permit a critical geometry. The severity of the resulting energy release and pressure pulse is dependent on the rate at which the mixing occurs. To calculate these excursions, a non-equilibrium equation of state for the water ash mixture or slurry is needed that accounts for the thermal non-equilibrium that occurs due to finite heat transfer rates. We are developing the slurry EOS as well as a lumped neutronic and hydrodynamic model to serve as a testing ground for the non-equilibrium EOS before its incorporation into more sophisticated neutronic-hydrodynamics codes. Though the model lacks spatial dependence, it provides estimates of energy release and pressure pulses for various mixture assembly rates. We are also developing a non-equilibrium EOS for critical solution systems in which the fissile material is dissolved in water, which accounts for chemical non-equilibrium due to finite mass transfer rates. In contrast to previously published solution EOS, our solution EOS specifically accounts for mass diffusion of dissolved radiolytic gas to bubble nucleation sites. This EOS was developed to check our overall modeling against published solution excursion experiments and to compare solution excursions with slurry excursions initiated under the same conditions. Preliminary results indicate a good match between solution EOS calculations and experiments involving premixed 60-80 g U/l solutions for both low rate and high rate reactivity insertions. Comparison between slurry and solution calculations for the same composition show comparable energy release and pressure peaks for both low and high rate reactivity insertions with the slurry releasing less energy but generating more pressure than the solution for the amount of energy released. Calculations more appropriate to actual fire fighting scenarios

  6. Evaluation of slurry characteristics for rechargeable lithium-ion batteries

    SciTech Connect

    Cho, Ki Yeon; Kwon, Young Il; Youn, Jae Ryoun; Song, Young Seok

    2013-08-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Lithium-ion battery slurries are prepared for rechargeable batteries. • The dispersion state of slurry constituents is identified. • Thermal, morphological, rheological, and electrical properties of slurries are analyzed. - Abstract: A multi-component slurry for rechargeable batteries is prepared by dispersing LiCoO{sub 2}, conductive additives, and polymeric binders in a solvent. The physical properties, including rheological, morphological, electrical, and spectroscopic features of battery slurries are investigated. The relationship between the measured physical properties and the internal structure of the slurry is analyzed. It is found that the rheological behavior of the slurry is determined by the interaction of active materials and binding materials (e.g., network structure) and that the dispersion state of conductive additives (e.g., agglomeration) also depends on the binder–carbon interaction.

  7. Elemental analysis of slurry samples with laser induced breakdown spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Eseller, Kemal E.; Tripathi, Markandey M.; Yueh, Fang-Yu; Singh, Jagdish P.

    2010-05-01

    Direct analysis of wet slurry samples with laser induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) is challenging due to problems of sedimentation, splashing, and surface turbulence. Also, water can quench the laser plasma and suppress the LIBS signal, resulting in poor sensitivity. The effect of water on LIBS spectra from slurries was investigated. As the water content decreased, the LIBS signal was enhanced and the standard deviation was reduced. To improve LIBS slurry analysis, dried slurry samples prepared by applying slurry on PVC coated slides were evaluated. Univariate and multivariate calibration was performed on the LIBS spectra of the dried slurry samples for elemental analysis of Mg, Si, and Fe. Calibration results show that the dried slurry samples give a good correlation between spectral intensity and elemental concentration.

  8. The chemical behavior of acidified chromium (3) solutions. B.S. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Terman, D. K.

    1981-01-01

    A unique energy-storage system has been developed at NASA's Lewis Research Center called REDOX. This NASA-REDOX system is an electrochemical storage device that utilized the oxidation and reduction of two fully soluble redox couples for charging and discharging. The redox couples now being investigated are acidified chloride solutions of chromium (Cr(+2)/Cr(+3)) and iron (Fe(+2)/Fe(+3)).

  9. Quality evaluation of packaged acidified vegetables subjected to continuous microwave pasteurization

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The study evaluated the use of 915 MHz continuous microwave processing with a rotation apparatus for pasteurization of acidified vegetable packages. Broccoli florets, and 1.2 cm cubes of broccoli stems, red bell pepper, and sweetpotato were pre-equilibrated to 1 g/100 g NaCl and 0.38 g/100 mL citric...

  10. Effects of acid, salt and soaking time on the dielectric properties of acidified vegetables

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    In order to design a continuous microwave process for pasteurization of acidified vegetables, equilibration phenomena in acid and salt solutions must be examined with regards to changes in dielectric properties. The objective of this study was to examine the effects of acid and salt concentration o...

  11. The Reaction between Iron(II) Iodide and Potassium Dichromate(VI) in Acidified Aqueous Solution

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Talbot, Christopher

    2013-01-01

    This "Science note" teaching lesson explores the possible reaction between the ions in a reaction mixture consisting of iron(II) iodide and potassium dichromate(VI) in acidified aqueous solution. The electrode potentials will be used to deduce any spontaneous reactions under standard thermodynamic conditions (298 K, 1 bar (approximately…

  12. Acidified sodium chlorite as an alternative to chlorine for elimination of Salmonella on alfalfa seeds

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The disadvantage associated with the use of chlorine for food processing and water treatment had been documented previously. This study was conducted to determine if acidified sodium chlorite (ASC) could be used to replace calcium hypochlorite [Ca(OCl)2] for disinfection of alfalfa seeds. Seeds co...

  13. The Reaction between Iron(II) Iodide and Potassium Dichromate(VI) in Acidified Aqueous Solution

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Talbot, Christopher

    2013-01-01

    This "Science note" teaching lesson explores the possible reaction between the ions in a reaction mixture consisting of iron(II) iodide and potassium dichromate(VI) in acidified aqueous solution. The electrode potentials will be used to deduce any spontaneous reactions under standard thermodynamic conditions (298 K, 1 bar (approximately…

  14. Effect of acidified enteral feedings on gastric colonization in the critically ill patient.

    PubMed

    Heyland, D; Bradley, C; Mandell, L A

    1992-10-01

    To evaluate the effect of acidified enteral nutritional formulas (feedings) on gastric colonization and pH in critically ill patients. Randomized, double-blind trial of three groups: a) regular feedings into the stomach; b) regular feedings into the duodenum; and c) acidified feedings into the stomach. Nasogastric aspirates for gastric pH and microbiological determinations were obtained daily for a mean of 5 days after feeding began. ICU at a tertiary care hospital. Thirty-one patients indicated to receive enteral feedings before day 4 in the ICU were randomized. Seven patients had their feedings discontinued because of intolerance, accidental extubation, or tolerance of oral supplementation. One patient received the wrong feedings and was dropped from the study. A total of 23 patients finished the study. They were mostly trauma (n = 15) or neurosurgical (n = 6) patients. The average age was 40 yrs (range 15 to 71). An enteral formula with a pH of 6.5 was used as the control feeding. Hydrochloric acid was added to the control feeding to titrate the pH to 3.5 and this acidified enteral formula was given to the experimental group. All patients received continuous enteral feedings via an 8-Fr feeding tube. Seven of eight patients receiving the acidified feedings were sterile (no microbial growth) on receiving feedings compared with five of 15 of those patients receiving regular feedings (p = .027). For those patients initially colonized, four of four patients receiving acidified feedings immediately became sterile and remained so. Only two of ten patients receiving regular feedings remained sterile (p = .021). The mean gastric pH of the acidified group was 3.2 compared with the group receiving regular feedings into the stomach (pH = 4.7) and the group receiving regular feedings into the duodenum (pH = 3.8) (p < .01). There was no evidence of gastrointestinal bleeding in any patient. Acidified enteral feedings are effective in eliminating and preventing gastric

  15. Slurry sampling graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry: a preliminary examination of results from an international collaborative study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller-Ihli, N. J.

    1995-06-01

    An international collaborative study was initiated to evaluate the current state-of-the-art for solid sampling. Samples were sent to 28 laboratories and data were received from 18 collaborators, 16 of which reported slurry results. A preliminary check of performance using NIST SRM 1643c acidified water, showed that at least 13 laboratories were able to provide accurate results within ±10% of the mean certified Pb and Cr concentrations. The focus of this work was slurry analytical data reported by collaborators. Average performance by collaborators for the determination of Pb in NIST SRM 2704 Buffalo River Sediment was 103% recovery based on the mean certified reference value and was 84% recovery based on the mean certified reference value for NRCC PACS-1, a marine estuarine sediment, which was identified to collaborators as an unknown sediment. Average performance by collaborators for Cr in SRM 2704 was 96% based on the mean certified reference value and was 78% recovery based on the mean certified reference value for PACS-1. The use of secondary wavelengths and the importance of analysis of a representative subsample are highlighted. Possible problems leading to inaccurate results being reported by collaborators are discussed including the use of mini-flows, matrix modifiers, low atomization temperatures, short atomization times, and expulsion losses.

  16. Perception of the environmental impacts of current and alternative modes of pig production by stakeholder groups.

    PubMed

    Petit, Jean; van der Werf, Hayo M G

    2003-08-01

    The current industrial pig production model is in crisis, due to its association with environmental pollution, doubtful product quality and lack of animal well-being. In Bretagne (France), a region of intensive pig production, a survey of seven stakeholder groups concerned with pig production was conducted, as part of a research programme dedicated to the assessment of the environmental impact of different modes of pig production. A very large majority of pig producers (93%) and their suppliers (100%) considers pig farms as an asset for the region, whereas a majority of scientists (58%), activists (78%) and consumers (54%) sees it as a handicap. Differences among stakeholder groups are minor with respect to the perceived importance of environmental and social issues. Stakeholders agree on the relative level of responsibility of pig farms with respect to specific problems. For all groups unpleasant odours and water quality come first with respect to responsibility, for most groups soil quality comes second, followed by product safety and air quality. For a future improved mode of pig production, 76% of pig producers and their suppliers prefer to adapt the current model, for all other groups the majority prefers an alternative model. While pig producers and their suppliers prefer a slurry-based housing system, all other groups prefer a straw-based system. Pig producers see the slurry-based system as technically superior and associate the straw-based system with poor working conditions, whereas consumers associate the slurry-based system in the first place with poor water quality and associate the straw-based system with less pollution. These results will be of use in the research programme on the environmental impact of modes of pig production, as they indicate the environmental impacts to be considered and their relative importance. The results will also help in deciding which options should be assessed. It is concluded that the poor image of the current pig

  17. Dust in an acidified ocean: iron bioavailability, phytoplankton growth and DMS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mélançon, J.; Levasseur, M.; Lizotte, M.; Scarratt, M. G.; Tremblay, J. E.; Tortell, P. D.; Yang, G.; Shi, G. Y.; Gao, H.; Semeniuk, D.; Robert, M.; Arychuk, M.; Johnson, K.; Sutherland, N.; Davelaar, M.; Nemcek, N.; Pena, A.; Richardson, W.

    2015-12-01

    Ocean acidification (OA) is likely to have an effect on the fertilizing potential of desert dust in high-nutrient, low-chlorophyll oceanic regions, either by modifying Fe speciation and bioavailability, or by altering phytoplankton Fe requirements and acquisition. To address this issue, short incubations (4 days) of northeast subarctic Pacific waters enriched with either FeSO4 or dust, and maintained at pH 8.0 (in situ) and 7.8 were conducted in August 2010. We assessed the impact of a decrease in pH on dissolved Fe concentration, phytoplankton biomass, taxonomy and productivity, and the production of dimethylsulfide (DMS) and its algal precursor dimethylsulfoniopropionate (DMSP). Chlorophyll a (chl a) remained unchanged in the controls and doubled in both the FeSO4-enriched and dust-enriched incubations, confirming the Fe-limited status of the plankton assemblage during the experiment. In the acidified treatments, a significant reduction (by 16-38%) of the final concentration of chl a was measured compared to their non-acidified counterparts, and a 15% reduction in particulate organic carbon (POC) concentration was measured in the dust-enriched acidified treatment compared to the dust-enriched non-acidified treatment. FeSO4 and dust additions had a fertilizing effect mainly on diatoms and cyanobacteria. Lowering the pH affected mostly the haptophytes, but pelagophyte concentrations were also reduced in some acidified treatments. Acidification did not significantly alter DMSP and DMS concentrations. These results show that dust deposition events in a low-pH iron-limited Northeast subarctic Pacific are likely to stimulate phytoplankton growth to a lesser extent than in today's ocean during the few days following fertilization and point to a low initial sensitivity of the DMSP and DMS dynamics to OA.

  18. Effect of Sweet Orange Fruit Waste Diets and Acidifier on Haematology and Serum Chemistry of Weanling Rabbits

    PubMed Central

    Daudu, Oluremi Martha; Sani, Rahamatu Usman; Adedibu, Iyetunde Ifeyori; Ademu, Lawrence Anebi; Bawa, Gideon Shaibu; Olugbemi, Taiye Sunday

    2014-01-01

    A total of thirty-five mixed breed (35) rabbits of average weight of 700 g aged 5-6 weeks were allocated to seven treatments in a completely randomised design to investigate the effect of sweet orange fruit waste (SOFW) and acidomix acidifier on haematology and serum chemistry. The diets were 0% SOFW, 10% SOFW with 0.5% acidomix, 10% SOFW with 0.7 acidomix, 15% SOFW with 0.5% acidifier, 15% SOFW with 0.7% acidifier, 20% SOFW with 0.5% acidifier, and 20% SOFW with 0.7% acidifier. Blood samples were analyzed for haemoglobin (hb) concentration, white blood cells (WBC), red blood cells (RBC), differential WBC count (lymphocyte, basophil, eosinophil, monocyte, and neutrophil), alanine amino transferase (ALT), alkaline phosphatase (ALP), aspartate amino transferase (AST), total protein, albumin, and globulin. There was no interaction between SOFW and acidifier for the haematological and most of the serum chemistry parameters but significant difference was observed in ALT; however the values were within the normal range. SOFW had no significant effect on all haematological and serum chemistry parameters. Acidomix had significant effect (P < 0.05) on haemoglobin concentration; rabbits fed 0.5% acidomix diets had higher values which were within the normal range. It is therefore concluded that SOFW with acidifier up to 20% had no detrimental effect on serum chemistry and haematology. PMID:26464931

  19. Stabilized water slurries of carbonaceous materials

    SciTech Connect

    Papalos, J.G.; Knitter, K.A.; Savoly, A.; Villa, J.L.

    1984-07-03

    Improved stabilized water slurries of carbonaceous materials are obtained by having present a condensation product or a salt thereof of a substituted phenol sulfonic acid which is an arylphenol sulfonic acid, an aralkylphenol sulfonic acid, an arylphenol sulfonic acid and arylsulfonic acid mixture, or an aralkylphenol sulfonic acid and arylsulfonic acid mixture, condensed with from about 0.5 to about 4.0 moles of formaldehyde per mole of sulfonic acid with the proviso that the weight ratio if substituted phenol sulfonic acid to arylsulfonic acid is from about 0.95:0.05 to about 0.05:0.95 in the mixtures, the condensation product being present in an amount sufficient to reduce viscosity of the water slurry of carbonaceous materials, to stabilize carbonaceous materials in the water network and to improve its pumpability. If desired, an acid form or a salt of the condensation product may be used.

  20. System for pressure letdown of abrasive slurries

    DOEpatents

    Kasper, Stanley

    1991-01-01

    A system and method for releasing erosive slurries from containment at high pressure without subjecting valves to highly erosive slurry flow. The system includes a pressure letdown tank disposed below the high-pressure tank, the two tanks being connected by a valved line communicating the gas phases and a line having a valve and choke for a transfer of liquid into the letdown tank. The letdown tank has a valved gas vent and a valved outlet line for release of liquid. In operation, the gas transfer line is opened to equalize pressure between tanks so that a low level of liquid flow occurs. The letdown tank is then vented, creating a high-pressure differential between the tanks. At this point, flow between tanks is controlled by the choke. High-velocity, erosive flow through a high-pressure outlet valve is prevented by equalizing the start up pressure and thereafter limiting flow with the choke.

  1. Metal Slurry Droplet and Spray Combustion

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-09-15

    Thermophoresis on the Oxide Condensation 156 ii Appendix E Numerical Modeling of a Slurry Droplet Containing a Spherical Particle...Williams [110]. Thermophoresis can cause the condensed particles to move outwards, from the radius of condensation. However, convection would drive the...Here, the thermophoresis effect may drive the condensed particles outwards. However, since the bulk flow in the outer zone is negative (towards the

  2. Carbon Slurry Fuels for Volume Limited Missiles

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1979-11-01

    carbon slurry fuel combustion is to be understood. Major aspects of hydrocarbon combustion chemistry involve hydrocarbon pyroly - sis and partial oxidation...effective convcr•ei)n ’)i thiv pyroly - sis product to carbon particulate. 207 cyclo Hxmne 0 5.1 0.1.0 2.0 271 ’I 20 / i 0 6 10 15 20 Ŕ cyclo Hexene n" \\C

  3. Fischer-Tropsch Slurry Reactor modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Soong, Y.; Gamwo, I.K.; Harke, F.W.

    1995-12-31

    This paper reports experimental and theoretical results on hydrodynamic studies. The experiments were conducted in a hot-pressurized Slurry-Bubble Column Reactor (SBCR). It includes experimental results of Drakeol-10 oil/nitrogen/glass beads hydrodynamic study and the development of an ultrasonic technique for measuring solids concentration. A model to describe the flow behavior in reactors was developed. The hydrodynamic properties in a 10.16 cm diameter bubble column with a perforated-plate gas distributor were studied at pressures ranging from 0.1 to 1.36 MPa, and at temperatures from 20 to 200{degrees}C, using a dual hot-wire probe with nitrogen, glass beads, and Drakeol-10 oil as the gas, solid, and liquid phase, respectively. It was found that the addition of 20 oil wt% glass beads in the system has a slight effect on the average gas holdup and bubble size. A well-posed three-dimensional model for bed dynamics was developed from an ill-posed model. The new model has computed solid holdup distributions consistent with experimental observations with no artificial {open_quotes}fountain{close_quotes} as predicted by the earlier model. The model can be applied to a variety of multiphase flows of practical interest. An ultrasonic technique is being developed to measure solids concentration in a three-phase slurry reactor. Preliminary measurements have been made on slurries consisting of molten paraffin wax, glass beads, and nitrogen bubbles at 180 {degrees}C and 0.1 MPa. The data show that both the sound speed and attenuation are well-defined functions of both the solid and gas concentrations in the slurries. The results suggest possibilities to directly measure solids concentration during the operation of an autoclave reactor containing molten wax.

  4. Abrasive slurry composition for machining boron carbide

    DOEpatents

    Duran, E.L.

    1984-11-29

    An abrasive slurry particularly suited for use in drilling or machining boron carbide consists essentially of a suspension of boron carbide and/or silicon carbide grit in a carrier solution consisting essentially of a dilute solution of alkylaryl polyether alcohol in octyl alcohol. The alkylaryl polyether alcohol functions as a wetting agent which improves the capacity of the octyl alcohol for carrying the grit in suspension, yet without substantially increasing the viscosity of the carrier solution.

  5. Abrasive slurry composition for machining boron carbide

    DOEpatents

    Duran, Edward L.

    1985-01-01

    An abrasive slurry particularly suited for use in drilling or machining boron carbide consists essentially of a suspension of boron carbide and/or silicon carbide grit in a carrier solution consisting essentially of a dilute solution of alkylaryl polyether alcohol in octyl alcohol. The alkylaryl polyether alcohol functions as a wetting agent which improves the capacity of the octyl alcohol for carrying the grit in suspension, yet without substantially increasing the viscosity of the carrier solution.

  6. Geotechnical properties of debris-flow sediments and slurries

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Major, J.J.; Iverson, R.M.; McTigue, D.F.; Macias, S.; Fiedorowicz, B.K.

    1997-01-01

    Measurements of geotechnical properties of various poorly sorted debris-flow sediments and slurries (??? 32 mm diameter) emphasize their granular nature, and reveal that properties of slurries can differ significantly from those of compacted sediments. Measurements show that: (1) cohesion probably offers little resistance to shear in most debris flows under low confining stresses normally found in nature; (2) intrinsic hydraulic permeabilities of compacted debris-flow sediments vary from about 10-14-10-9 m2; permeabilities of 'typical' debris-flow slurries fall toward the low end of the range; (3) debris-flow slurries are characterized by very large values of 'elastic' compressibility (C approx. 10-2 kPa-1); and (4) hydraulic diffusivities of quasistatically consolidating slurries are approx. 10-4-10-7 m2/s. Low hydraulic diffusivity of debris slurries permits excess fluid pressure and low effective strength to persist during sediment transport and deposition.

  7. Survey of state water laws affecting coal slurry pipeline development

    SciTech Connect

    Rogozen, M.B.

    1980-11-01

    This report summarizes state water laws likely to affect the development of coal slurry pipelines. It was prepared as part of a project to analyze environmental issues related to energy transportation systems. Coal slurry pipelines have been proposed as a means to expand the existing transportation system to handle the increasing coal shipments that will be required in the future. The availability of water for use in coal slurry systems in the coal-producing states is an issue of major concern.

  8. Methods to enhance the characteristics of hydrothermally prepared slurry fuels

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, Chris M.; Musich, Mark A.; Mann, Michael D.; DeWall, Raymond A.; Richter, John J.; Potas, Todd A.; Willson, Warrack G.

    2000-01-01

    Methods for enhancing the flow behavior and stability of hydrothermally treated slurry fuels. A mechanical high-shear dispersion and homogenization device is used to shear the slurry fuel. Other improvements include blending the carbonaceous material with a form of coal to reduce or eliminate the flocculation of the slurry, and maintaining the temperature of the hydrothermal treatment between approximately 300.degree. to 350.degree. C.

  9. Remediation of Cr(VI)-Contaminated Soil Using the Acidified Hydrazine Hydrate.

    PubMed

    Ma, Yameng; Li, Fangfang; Jiang, Yuling; Yang, Weihua; Lv, Lv; Xue, Haotian; Wang, Yangyang

    2016-09-01

    Acidified hydrazine hydrate was used to remediate Cr(VI)-contaminated soil. The content of water-soluble Cr(VI) in contaminated soil was 4977.53 mg/kg. The optimal initial pH of hydrazine hydrate solution, soil to solution ratio and molar ratio of Cr(VI) to hydrazine hydrate for remediation of Cr(VI)-contaminated soil were 5.0, 3:1 and 1:3, respectively. Over 99.50 % of water-soluble Cr(VI) in the contaminated soil was reduced at the optimal condition within 30 min. The remediated soil can keep stable within 4 months. Meanwhile the total phosphorus increased from 0.47 to 4.29 g/kg, indicating that using of acidified hydrazine hydrate is an effective method to remediate Cr(VI)-contaminated soil.

  10. Diverse coral communities in naturally acidified waters of a Western Pacific reef

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shamberger, Kathryn E. F.; Cohen, Anne L.; Golbuu, Yimnang; McCorkle, Daniel C.; Lentz, Steven J.; Barkley, Hannah C.

    2014-01-01

    Anthropogenic carbon dioxide emissions are acidifying the oceans, reducing the concentration of carbonate ions ([CO32-]) that calcifying organisms need to build and cement coral reefs. To date, studies of a handful of naturally acidified reef systems reveal depauperate communities, sometimes with reduced coral cover and calcification rates, consistent with results of laboratory-based studies. Here we report the existence of highly diverse, coral-dominated reef communities under chronically low pH and aragonite saturation state (Ωar). Biological and hydrographic processes change the chemistry of the seawater moving across the barrier reefs and into Palau's Rock Island bays, where levels of acidification approach those projected for the western tropical Pacific open ocean by 2100. Nevertheless, coral diversity, cover, and calcification rates are maintained across this natural acidification gradient. Identifying the combination of biological and environmental factors that enable these communities to persist could provide important insights into the future of coral reefs under anthropogenic acidification.

  11. System and method for continuous solids slurry depressurization

    DOEpatents

    Leininger, Thomas Frederick; Steele, Raymond Douglas; Cordes, Stephen Michael

    2017-07-11

    A system includes a first pump having a first outlet and a first inlet, and a controller. The first pump is configured to continuously receive a flow of a slurry into the first outlet at a first pressure and to continuously discharge the flow of the slurry from the first inlet at a second pressure less than the first pressure. The controller is configured to control a first speed of the first pump against the flow of the slurry based at least in part on the first pressure, wherein the first speed of the first pump is configured to resist a backflow of the slurry from the first outlet to the first inlet.

  12. Slurry Supplying Method for Large Quartz Glass Substrate Polishing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khajornrungruang, Panart; Kimura, Keiichi; Yui, Ryuji; Wada, Nagisa; Suzuki, Keisuke

    2011-05-01

    Chemical mechanical polishing (CMP) has been used in polishing a photomask substrate in flat-panel display (FPD) manufacture. Moreover, the quadrilateral geometry of quartz glass used as the photomask substrate has been enlarged. However, the slurry cannot flow throughout the glass surface evenly owing to the enlarged substrate covering the center of the platen in the polishing process. In this work, we verified the beneficial of spreading slurry into a non-inflow region by the reinforced suction of the slurry supplied to the polishing pad through a hole at center of the platen. A fluorescent agent was used instead of the slurry for flow visualization.

  13. Oxidation of coal-water slurry feed to hydrogasifier

    DOEpatents

    Lee, Bernard S.

    1976-01-01

    An aqueous coal slurry is preheated, subjected to partial oxidation and vaporization by injection of high pressure oxygen and is introduced into a top section of a hydrogasifier in direct contact with hot methane-containing effluent gases where vaporization of the slurry is completed. The resulting solids are reacted in the hydrogasifier and the combined gases and vapors are withdrawn and subjected to purification and methanation to provide pipeline gas. The amount of oxygen injected into the slurry is controlled to provide the proper thermal balance whereby all of the water in the slurry can be evaporated in contact with the hot effluent gases from the hydrogasifier.

  14. Ice slurry cooling research: Storage tank ice agglomeration and extraction

    SciTech Connect

    Kasza, K.; Hayashi, Kanetoshi

    1999-08-01

    A new facility has been built to conduct research and development on important issues related to implementing ice slurry cooling technology. Ongoing studies are generating important information on the factors that influence ice particle agglomeration in ice slurry storage tanks. The studies are also addressing the development of methods to minimize and monitor agglomeration and improve the efficiency and controllability of tank extraction of slurry for distribution to cooling loads. These engineering issues impede the utilization of the ice slurry cooling concept that has been under development by various groups.

  15. The influence of additives on rheological properties of limestone slurry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaworska, B.; Bartosik, A.

    2014-08-01

    Limestone slurry appears in the lime production process as the result of rinsing the processed material. It consists of particles with diameter smaller than 2 mm and the water that is a carrier of solid fraction. Slurry is directed to the settling tank, where the solid phase sediments and the excess water through the transfer system is recovered for re-circulation. Collected at the bottom of the tank sludge is deposited in a landfill located on the premises. Rheological properties of limestone slurry hinder its further free transport in the pipeline due to generated flow resistance. To improve this state of affairs, chemical treatment of drilling fluid, could be applied, of which the main task is to give the slurry properties suitable for the conditions encountered in hydrotransport. This treatment consists of applying chemical additives to slurry in sufficient quantity. Such additives are called as deflocculants or thinners or dispersants, and are chemical compounds which added to aqueous solution are intended to push away suspended particles from each other. The paper presents the results of research allowing reduction of shear stress in limestone slurry. Results demonstrate rheological properties of limestone slurry with and without the addition of modified substances which causes decrease of slurry viscosity, and as a consequence slurry shear stress for adopted shear rate. Achieving the desired effects increases the degree of dispersion of the solid phase suspended in the carrier liquid and improving its ability to smooth flow with decreased friction.

  16. Tribological Behavior of Aluminum Slurry Coating on 300M Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Xiaohu; Zhang, Pingze; Wei, Dongbo; Zhao, Hongyuan; Wei, Xiangfei; Ding, Feng

    2017-07-01

    Al slurry coatings, an alternative of Cd coating to protect against corrosion in the aerospace industry, are currently being explored to satisfy the stringent technology and safety requirements for aeronautical applications. The results of salt fog corrosion exposure, fluid corrosion exposure (immersion), humidity resistance, electrical conductivity, galvanic corrosion, embrittlement, and fatigue indicate that Al slurry coatings can be used as an alternative of Cd coatings. However, the tribological property of Al slurry coatings has still not been investigated. Two types of aluminum slurry coatings on 300M steel were produced using the innovative technological process and characterized by scanning electron microscope, nanoindentation tests, and adhesion tests. The H/E and H 3/E 2 ratios of the two-layer Al slurry-coated sample were almost four times higher than the Cd-Ti plating-coated sample. The dry wear test results show that the friction coefficient of the two-layer Al slurry coating independently from the load was lower than the Cd-Ti plating. The width of the wear track of the two-layer Al slurry coating was significantly narrower, only 62% of the Cd-Ti plating wear scar. Compared to the Cd-Ti plating, an excellent wear resistance of the two-layer Al slurry coating can be attributed to its high resistance to plastic deformation and good load-bearing capacity. The results indicate that the two-layer Al slurry coating is an excellent alternative to Cd coatings in the aerospace industry.

  17. Combinatorial study of ceramic tape-casting slurries.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhifu; Wang, Yiling; Li, Yongxiang

    2012-03-12

    Ceramic tape-casting slurries are complex systems composed of ceramic powder, solvent, and a number of organic components. Conventionally, the development of ceramic tape-casting slurries is time-consuming and of low efficiency. In this work, combinatorial approaches were applied to screen the ethanol and ethyl-acetate binary solvent based slurry for ceramic green tape-casting. The combinatorial libraries were designed considering the variation of the amount of PVB (Poly vinyl-butyral) binder, polyethylene-400, and butyl-benzyl-phthalate plasticizers, and glyceryl triacetate dispersant. A parallel magnetic stirring process was used to make the combinatorial slurry library. The properties mapping of the slurry library was obtained by investigating the sedimentation and rheological characteristics of the slurries. The slurry composition was refined by scaling up the experiments and comparing the microstructure, mechanical property, and sintering behavior of green tapes made from the selected slurries. Finally, a kind of ethanol-ethyl acetate binary solvent based slurry system suitable for making X7R dielectric ceramic green tapes was achieved.

  18. Tribological Behavior of Aluminum Slurry Coating on 300M Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Xiaohu; Zhang, Pingze; Wei, Dongbo; Zhao, Hongyuan; Wei, Xiangfei; Ding, Feng

    2017-08-01

    Al slurry coatings, an alternative of Cd coating to protect against corrosion in the aerospace industry, are currently being explored to satisfy the stringent technology and safety requirements for aeronautical applications. The results of salt fog corrosion exposure, fluid corrosion exposure (immersion), humidity resistance, electrical conductivity, galvanic corrosion, embrittlement, and fatigue indicate that Al slurry coatings can be used as an alternative of Cd coatings. However, the tribological property of Al slurry coatings has still not been investigated. Two types of aluminum slurry coatings on 300M steel were produced using the innovative technological process and characterized by scanning electron microscope, nanoindentation tests, and adhesion tests. The H/ E and H 3/ E 2 ratios of the two-layer Al slurry-coated sample were almost four times higher than the Cd-Ti plating-coated sample. The dry wear test results show that the friction coefficient of the two-layer Al slurry coating independently from the load was lower than the Cd-Ti plating. The width of the wear track of the two-layer Al slurry coating was significantly narrower, only 62% of the Cd-Ti plating wear scar. Compared to the Cd-Ti plating, an excellent wear resistance of the two-layer Al slurry coating can be attributed to its high resistance to plastic deformation and good load-bearing capacity. The results indicate that the two-layer Al slurry coating is an excellent alternative to Cd coatings in the aerospace industry.

  19. Ice slurry cooling research: Microscale study of ice particles characteristics, role of freezing point depressant, and influence on slurry fluidity

    SciTech Connect

    Hayashi, K.; Kasza, K.

    2000-05-03

    The influences of freezing-point-depressants on ice slurry characteristics in the form of ice slurry fluidity and on the microscale ice particle features are studied. The results identify microscale features of ice particles such as surface roughness that greatly influence slurry fluidity that are altered favorably by the use of a freezing point depressant. The engineering of a workable and efficient ice slurry cooling system depends very strongly on the characteristics of the individual ice particles in the slurry and, in turn, on the method of ice production. Findings from this study provide guidance on the fluidity and handleability of slurry produced by several methods currently under development and already many achieved.

  20. Effects of simulated rain acidified with sulfuric acid on host-parasite interactions

    Treesearch

    D. S. Shriner

    1976-01-01

    Wind-blown rain, rain splash, and films of free moisture play important roles in the epidemiology of many plant diseases. The effects of simulated rain acidified with sulfuric acid were studied on several host-parasite systems. Plants were exposed, in greenhouse or field, to simulated rain of pH 3.2 ? 0.1 or pH 6.0 ? 0.2. Simulated "rain" of pH 3.2 resulted...

  1. Optimizing acidified bleach solutions to improve sporicidal efficacy on building materials.

    PubMed

    Wood, J P; Calfee, M W; Clayton, M; Griffin-Gatchalian, N; Touati, A

    2011-12-01

    We evaluated whether lowering pH (with acetic acid) and raising free available chlorine (FAC) levels in bleach solutions would improve efficacy in inactivating Bacillus spores on different materials. We also determined how varying pH and FAC levels affected bleach stability. Acidified bleach solutions with pH levels of 4.5, 6 and 7.5 and FAC levels between 5000 and 10,000 ppm were evaluated for decontamination efficacy against Bacillus subtilis spores inoculated onto test coupons made from wood, ceramic and galvanized steel. Lowering the pH or increasing the FAC level improved efficacy in some of the tests, but depended on the material, which significantly affected decontamination efficacy. The acidified bleach at pH of 7.5 was significantly less effective than bleach at a pH of 4.5 or 6. The FAC levels in the bleach were the most stable at pH 4.5, and stability at pH 4.5 was not significantly affected by the initial FAC level. It may be advisable to use bleach solutions with lower pH (rather than high FAC levels) in light of both the decontamination efficacy and bleach stability results. For wood materials, use of sporicides other than acidified bleach may be warranted. These results may be useful in preparing acidified bleach solutions for decontamination of materials contaminated with spores such as Bacillus anthracis. © 2011 The Authors. Letters in Applied Microbiology © 2011 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  2. Efficacy of acidified sodium chlorite treatments in reducing Escherichia coli O157:H7 on Chinese cabbage.

    PubMed

    Inatsu, Yasuhiro; Bari, Md Latiful; Kawasaki, Susumu; Isshiki, Kenji; Kawamoto, Shinichi

    2005-02-01

    Efficacy of acidified sodium chlorite for reducing the population of Escherichia coli O157:H7 pathogens on Chinese cabbage leaves was evaluated. Washing leaves with distilled water could reduce the population of E. coli O157:H7 by approximately 1.0 log CFU/g, whereas treating with acidified chlorite solution could reduce the population by 3.0 log CFU/g without changing the leaf color. A similar level of reduction was achieved by washing with sodium chlorite solution containing various organic acids. However, acidified sodium chlorite in combination with a mild heat treatment reduced the population by approximately 4.0 log CFU/g without affecting the color, but it softened the leaves. Moreover, the efficacy of the washing treatment was similar at low (4 degrees C) and room (25 degrees C) temperatures, indicating that acidified sodium chloride solution could be useful as a sanitizer for surface washing of fresh produce.

  3. Determination of 5-log pathogen reduction times for heat-processed, acidified vegetable brines.

    PubMed

    Breidt, F; Hayes, J S; Osborne, J A; McFeeters, R F

    2005-02-01

    Recent outbreaks of acid-resistant food pathogens in acid foods, including apple cider and orange juice, have raised concerns about the safety of acidified vegetable products. We determined pasteurization times and temperatures needed to assure a 5-log reduction in the numbers of Escherichia coli O157:H7, Listeria monocytogenes, and Salmonella strains in acidified cucumber pickle brines. Cocktails of five strains of each pathogen were (separately) used for heat-inactivation studies between 50 and 60 degrees C in brines that had an equilibrated pH value of 4.1. Salmonella strains were found to be less heat resistant than E. coli O157:H7 or L. monocytogenes strains. The nonlinear killing curves generated during these studies were modeled using a Weibull function. We found no significant difference in the heat-killing data for E. coli O157:H7 and L. monocytogenes (P = 0.9709). The predicted 5-log reduction times for E. coli O157:H7 and L. monocytogenes were found to fit an exponential decay function. These data were used to estimate minimum pasteurization times and temperatures needed to ensure safe processing of acidified pickle products and show that current industry pasteurization practices offer a significant margin of safety.

  4. Relative acidifying activity of anionic salts commonly used to prevent milk fever.

    PubMed

    Goff, J P; Ruiz, R; Horst, R L

    2004-05-01

    High cation diets can cause milk fever in dairy cows as they induce a metabolic alkalosis reducing the ability of the cow to maintain calcium homeostasis at the onset of lactation. Adding anions to the diet can offset the effect of the high cation forages by inducing a mild metabolic acidosis, restoring the ability to maintain calcium homeostasis. The difference in mEq of dietary cations and anions (DCAD) is most often expressed as (Na(+) + K+) - (Cl- + S(--)). This equation implies that a mEq of chloride and a mEq of sulfate are equipotent in their ability to alter acid-base balance of the cow. Using blood and urine pH to monitor effects on acid-base balance, experiments were conducted to test the relative acidifying activity of various sulfate and chloride anion sources in nonpregnant, nonlactating Jersey cows. Across all experiments, chloride proved to have about 1.6 times the acidifying activity of sulfate. Calcium and magnesium, ignored by the common DCAD equation, had a small but significant alkalinizing effect when accompanying chloride or sulfate. The ranking of the anion sources tested at a dose of 2 Eq/d, from most to least potent urine acidifier, was hydrochloric acid, ammonium chloride, calcium chloride, calcium sulfate, magnesium sulfate, and sulfur. These data should allow more accurate prediction of the response of late gestation cows to dietary cation-anion manipulation.

  5. Mn2O3 Slurry Reuse by Circulation Achieving High Constant Removal Rate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kishii, Sadahiro; Nakamura, Ko; Hanawa, Kenzo; Watanabe, Satoru; Arimoto, Yoshihiro; Kurokawa, Syuhei; Doi, Toshiro K.

    2012-04-01

    Fumed silica is widely used in SiO2 chemical mechanical polishing (CMP). In semiconductor processes, only fresh slurry is used, and used slurry is disposed. Sustainable development demands a reduction in waste. Since reuse of slurry is effective for reducing the amount of used slurry generated, we investigated the reuse of Mn2O3 slurry and conventional fumed silica slurry. In both cases, abrasive concentration decreases as reuse time increases. The removal rate for Mn2O3 slurry maintains a value 4 times that of the conventional fumed silica slurry during slurry reuse, because the removal rate for Mn2O3 slurry is almost constant for solid concentrations between 1.0 and 10 wt %. Pad conditioning was not performed for Mn2O3 slurry. The removal rate for conventional slurry decreases as the number of times of reuse increases, even when pad conditioning is appropriately performed.

  6. Biodegradation of Pig Manure by the Housefly, Musca domestica: A Viable Ecological Strategy for Pig Manure Management

    PubMed Central

    Čičková, Helena; Pastor, Berta; Kozánek, Milan; Martínez-Sánchez, Anabel; Rojo, Santos; Takáč, Peter

    2012-01-01

    The technology for biodegradation of pig manure by using houseflies in a pilot plant capable of processing 500–700 kg of pig manure per week is described. A single adult cage loaded with 25,000 pupae produced 177.7±32.0 ml of eggs in a 15-day egg-collection period. With an inoculation ratio of 0.4–1.0 ml eggs/kg of manure, the amount of eggs produced by a single cage can suffice for the biodegradation of 178–444 kg of manure. Larval development varied among four different types of pig manure (centrifuged slurry, fresh manure, manure with sawdust, manure without sawdust). Larval survival ranged from 46.9±2.1%, in manure without sawdust, to 76.8±11.9% in centrifuged slurry. Larval development took 6–11 days, depending on the manure type. Processing of 1 kg of wet manure produced 43.9–74.3 g of housefly pupae and the weight of the residue after biodegradation decreased to 0.18–0.65 kg, with marked differences among manure types. Recommendations for the operation of industrial-scale biodegradation facilities are presented and discussed. PMID:22431982

  7. Hepatitis E Virus (Genotype 3) in Slurry Samples from Swine Farming Activities in Italy.

    PubMed

    La Rosa, G; Della Libera, S; Brambilla, M; Bisaglia, C; Pisani, G; Ciccaglione, A R; Bruni, R; Taffon, S; Equestre, M; Iaconelli, M

    2017-06-01

    Hepatitis E virus (HEV) is an emergent causative agent of acute hepatitis, transmitted by fecal-oral route. Infection with HEV is a global cause for morbidity and mortality throughout the world: it mainly causes large outbreaks in endemic areas and sporadic autochthonous cases in industrialized countries where HEV infections seem to be an emergent zoonotic disease. Infection of porcine livestock and its relationship with the human cases have been demonstrated. The present study describes an investigation on the prevalence and diversity of HEV in pig slurry in Italy. Slurry samples (24) were collected from ten farms located in North Italy during 2015 and analyzed for HEV, using four broad-range nested PCR assays targeting ORF1 (MTase), ORF2 (capsid) genes, and ORF2/3 regions. Overall, 18 samples (75%) were positive for HEV RNA, and characterized as genotype 3. Nine samples could be subtyped by ORF2 sequencing: Eight belonged to subtype 3f, while one sequence could not be characterized by blast analysis and phylogenetic analysis and may actually represent a new subtype. Furthermore, similarity of 99% was found between 3f Italian HEV sequences of human and swine origins. Real-Time PCR assay was also performed, in order to obtain quantitative data on positive samples. Two swine slurry samples were positive, containing 600 and 1000 UI per mL of sewage. The results of this study show that HEV strains belonging to zoonotic genotype 3 are widely present in swine excreta, and have high degree of identity with strains detected in autochthonous HEV cases. Improving swine farming operations safety and increasing operators' awareness of the zoonotic potential connected with the handling of swine effluents turn out to be key points in order to reduce the environmental and sanitary problem represented by the possible dissemination of HEV to water bodies.

  8. Effect of liquid feeding weaned pigs on growth performance to harvest.

    PubMed

    Lawlor, P G; Lynch, P B; Gardiner, G E; Caffrey, P J; O'Doherty, J V

    2002-07-01

    Four experiments were undertaken to examine the effect of feeding postweaning diets as dry pelleted feed, fresh liquid feed, acidified liquid feed, and fermented liquid feed on pig performance from weaning (26 d) to harvest. In Exp. 1 (n = 12 replicates) and 2 (n = 10 replicates), the treatments were 1) dry pelleted feed and 2) fresh liquid feed. In Exp. 1, 2 kg of starter diet (16.7 MJ of DE/kg and 1.6% lysine) per pig and 5 kg of transition diet (16.7 MJ of DE/kg and 1.5% lysine) per pig followed by a weaner diet (14.0 MJ of DE/kg and 1.36% lysine) were offered to 27 d after weaning. In Exp. 3 (n = 8 replicates), the treatments were 1) dry pelleted feed, 2) fresh liquid feed, and 3) acidified liquid feed. In Exp. 4 (n = 8 replicates), the treatments were 1) dry pelleted feed, 2) acidified liquid feed, and 3) fermented liquid feed. In Exp. 2, 3, and 4, 3 kg of starter diet (16.1 MJ of DE/kg and 1.74% lysine) per pig and 6 kg of transition diet (15.3 MJ of DE/kg and 1.5% lysine) per pig followed by a weaner diet (14.0 MJ of DE/kg and 1.36% lysine) was offered to 27 d after weaning. All treatments were balanced for boars and gilts and diets were offered for ad libitum consumption. Acidified liquid feed was produced by adding lactic acid to the liquid feed so that its pH was decreased to 4.0. Fermented liquid feed was produced by adding an inoculum of Lactococcus lactis subsp. cremoris 303 (1.3%, vol/wt) to the first mix. In Exp. 1, ADG from weaning to d 27 after weaning was 338 and 286 g/d (SEM = 10; P < 0.01) and DM gain/feed in the same period was 888 and 594 g/kg (SEM = 23.1; P < 0.001) for dry pelleted feed and fresh liquid feed, respectively. In Exp. 2, ADG was 391 and 352 g/d (SEM = 6.4; P < 0.01) and DM gain/feed was 856 and 642 g/kg (SEM = 9.9; P < 0.001) for dry pelleted feed and fresh liquid feed, respectively, during the period from weaning to d 27 after weaning. In Exp. 3, ADG was 408, 416, and 433 g/d (SEM = 12.7; P > 0.05) and DM gain/feed was 865, 755

  9. High pressure slurry pump. Sand slurry test loop design and results. Wear parts lifetime analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Fongaro, S.; Severini, P.; Vinciguerra, G.

    2000-07-01

    This paper shows the experimental phase, following previous work presented at the Sixth International Conference on ``Multiphase Flow in Industrial Plants'', Milan, September 98. A Sand Water Slurry Test Loop has been tested using different sand percentages for a total power of 680 HP with a flow-rate of 35,000 [gpm] and pressure of 2300 [psig]. Its design considered, carefully, the particles build-up effect respecting flow velocity and dead space along the loop and into the hydraulics. The test pump is a TRIPLEX SINGLE ACTING that is one third of the COAL SLURRY SEPTUPLEX PUMP designed for a CHINA PROJECT. Wear rate on the main parts of an high pressure slurry pump have been analyzed running at 145 rpm (piston mean speed of 3.3 [ft/s]) with a net flow of 33,290 [gpm] and pressures between 1216 and 1575 [psig]. Tests gave indications of a damaging process on valves, piston seals and the relative weight on the overall damages. Design changes of piston-seal and its material have been done, results being a longer parts lifetime. The authors compared the results with literature on coal slurry and other sand tests. The pump speed, i.e., valve cycle, isn't the main wear factor, while the fluid speed under the valve is. Their goals are to improve the wear parts lifetime and define functions to relate the wear to operating parameters, design choice, and materials used.

  10. Rheology of sludge-slurry grouts

    SciTech Connect

    McDaniel, E. W.

    1980-10-01

    A series of rheograms was developed that relates the critical velocity (velocity where flow changes from laminar to turbulent) of a cementitious grout that incorporates a suspended sludge-slurry to the critical velocity of a reference grout made with a simulated waste solution. The sludge that is now in the Gunite waste tanks at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) will be suspended and pumped to the new waste storage tanks in Melton Valley. The sludge will then be blended with a cement mix base to form a grout which will be injected underground by the shale fracturing process. This report describes the materials, equipment, and techniques used in the laboratory studies to suspend sludges and mix sludge-slurry grouts that have flow properties similar to those of current shale fracturing grouts. Bentonite clay is an effective suspender in dilute NaNO/sub 3/ solutions; 15 wt % solids can be suspended with 2.0 wt % bentonite in a 0.1 M NaNO/sub 3/ solution. Other suspending materials were evaluated, but bentonite gave the best results. If a slurry grout becomes too viscous to pump, methods must be available to thin the mixture. A number of thinners, friction reducers, and plasticizers were examined. Q-Broxin, a thinner supplied by Baroid, reduced the velocity of a grout required for turbulent flow in a 5.0-cm (2-in.)-diam tube from 1.76 to 1.20 m/s (5.79 to 3.95 ft/s); FX-32C, a plasticizer supplied by Fox Industries, Inc., reduced the velocity from 1.76 to 0.75 m/s (5.6 to 2.45 ft/s).

  11. Coal-Water Slurry Fuels: An Overview,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-07-12

    coal gasification and liquefication processes, the capital investment required is modest. While those synthetic fuel processes cost in the order of $4 billion for a 50,000 barrel per day manufacturing facility, a coal-water plant of that size is estimated at abut $80 million (one fiftieth). While the cost of synthetic fuels has been projected at about double that of oil, the costs for coal-water are estimated at 30% to 40% less than oil. Put another way, assuming a 4% energy loss in the coal-water slurry, the resulting fuel cost of the CWM is approximately $3/million BTU.

  12. SIFCON (Slurry Infiltrated Fiber Concrete) with Sand

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-09-01

    Phtogrphsf tpe and Identifatio % flowt tests teyYiinders U& U6 10 LE~~ 150 1 3= O-4 slurries also contained microsilica . Three different fiber types...Ash Infiltration tests and selected mixes Water Facility 26025 tap water Kirtland A.F. Base well no. 2 All Microsilica EMS 960 (bagged) Elkem...the end instead of the two. When there are the three sets of numbers, the first set indicates the percent of microsilica with respect to the cement in

  13. Multi-stage slurry system used for grinding and polishing materials

    DOEpatents

    Hed, P. Paul; Fuchs, Baruch A.

    2001-01-01

    A slurry system draws slurry from a slurry tank via one of several intake pipes, where each pipe has an intake opening at a different depth in the slurry. The slurry is returned to the slurry tank via a bypass pipe in order to continue the agitation of the slurry. The slurry is then diverted to a delivery pipe, which supplies slurry to a polisher. The flow of slurry in the bypass pipe is stopped in order for the slurry in the slurry tank to begin to settle. As the polishing continues, slurry is removed from shallower depths in order to pull finer grit from the slurry. When the polishing is complete, the flow in the delivery pipe is ceased. The flow of slurry in the bypass pipe is resumed to start agitating the slurry. In another embodiment, the multiple intake pipes are replaced by a single adjustable pipe. As the slurry is settling, the pipe is moved upward to remove the finer grit near the top of the slurry tank as the polishing process continues.

  14. EVALUATION OF CARBON BLACK SLURRIES AS CLEAN BURNING FUELS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Experiments were performed to examine the pumpability, atomization and combustion characteristics of slurries made of mixtures of carbon black with No. 2 fuel oil and methanol. Carbon black-No. 2 fuel oil and carbon black-methanol slurries, with carbon black contents of up to 50 ...

  15. Technical Development of Slurry Three-Dimensional Printer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Cho-Pei; Hsu, Huang-Jan; Lee, Shyh-Yuan

    2017-09-01

    The aim of this paper is to review the technical development of slurry three-dimensional printer (3DP) which based on photo-polymerization and constrained surface method. Basically, slurry consists of ceramic powder, resin and photo-initiator. The light engines for solidifying the photo-curable slurry can be classified as laser, liquid crystal panel (LCD), digital light processing (DLP). The slurry can be reacted and solidified by selective ray according to the reaction spectrum of photo-initiator. Ceramic powder used in this study is zirconia oxide. Experimental results show that ceramic particle size affects the viscosity of slurry severely resulting in low accuracy and the occurrence of micro crack in the layer casting procedure. Therefore, the effect of particle size on the curability and accuracy of built green part is discussed. A single dental crown is proposed to be fabricated by these three light engines as a benchmark for comparison. In addition, the cost and the limitation are compared in the aspect of dental crown fabrication. Consequently, the lowest cost is LCD-type slurry 3DP system. DLP-type slurry 3DP can produce green body with the fastest fabrication time. The volumetric error of sintered part that made by these three fabrication methods is similar because the composition of slurry is the same.

  16. Lime slurry use at the Industrial Wastewater Pretreatment Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Rice, L.E.; Hughes, R.W.; Baggett, G.

    1996-04-01

    The use of lime slurry at the IWPF demonstrated many benefits. Hazardous chemical use was reduced, solids handling was improved, water quality was enhanced and there has been a cost savings. The lime slurry also enabled the plant to begin treating the soluble oil waste, which we were not able to do in the past.

  17. EVALUATION OF CARBON BLACK SLURRIES AS CLEAN BURNING FUELS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Experiments were performed to examine the pumpability, atomization and combustion characteristics of slurries made of mixtures of carbon black with No. 2 fuel oil and methanol. Carbon black-No. 2 fuel oil and carbon black-methanol slurries, with carbon black contents of up to 50 ...

  18. Method and apparatus for improved wire saw slurry

    SciTech Connect

    Costantini, Michael A.; Talbott, Jonathan A.; Chandra, Mohan; Prasad, Vishwanath; Caster, Allison; Gupta, Kedar P.; Leyvraz, Philippe

    2000-09-05

    A slurry recycle process for use in free-abrasive machining operations such as for wire saws used in wafer slicing of ingots, where the used slurry is separated into kerf-rich and abrasive-rich components, and the abrasive-rich component is reconstituted into a makeup slurry. During the process, the average particle size of the makeup slurry is controlled by monitoring the condition of the kerf and abrasive components and making necessary adjustments to the separating force and dwell time of the separator apparatus. Related pre-separator and post separator treatments, and feedback of one or the other separator slurry output components for mixing with incoming used slurry and recirculation through the separator, provide further effectiveness and additional control points in the process. The kerf-rich component is eventually or continually removed; the abrasive-rich component is reconstituted into a makeup slurry with a controlled, average particle size such that the products of the free-abrasive machining method using the recycled slurry process of the invention are of consistent high quality with less TTV deviation from cycle to cycle for a prolonged period or series of machining operations.

  19. Slaughterfloor decontamination of pork carcases with hot water or acidified sodium chlorite - a comparison in two Australian abattoirs.

    PubMed

    Hamilton, D; Holds, G; Lorimer, M; Kiermeier, A; Kidd, C; Slade, J; Pointon, A

    2010-11-01

    A decontamination trial on the effectiveness of hot water or acidified sodium chlorite (SANOVA) treatment on Salmonella spp., Escherichia coli and Total Viable Count (TVC) was undertaken on pork carcases prior to primary chilling in two large pork abattoirs in Australia using belly-strip excision sampling. A total of 123 samples from Abattoir A and 400 samples from Abattoir B were cultured and analysed. Test pigs were selected from herds with a known high level of on-farm Salmonella infection. At Abattoir A, Salmonella spp. were not isolated from carcases. The prevalence of E. coli on control carcases was 92.9% compared with 9.8% for hot water and 12.5% for SANOVA treated carcases. The mean log(10) E. coli concentration for control carcases was 0.89 cfu/gram, compared with -0.83 cfu/gram from hot water and -0.75 cfu/gram from SANOVA treated carcases. The mean log(10) TVC for control carcases was 4.06 compared with 1.81 cfu/gram for hot water and 2.76 cfu/gram for SANOVA treated carcases. At Abattoir B, the prevalence of Salmonella on control carcases was 16% compared with 2.7% for hot water and 7.0% for SANOVA treated carcases. The prevalence of E. coli on control carcases was 69.3% compared with 22% for hot water and 30% for SANOVA treated carcases. The mean log(10) E. coli concentration for control carcases was 0.45 cfu/gram, compared with -0.65 cfu/gram from hot water and -0.60 cfu/gram from SANOVA treated carcases. The mean log(10) TVC for control carcases was 3.00 cfu/gram compared with 2.10 cfu/gram for hot water and 2.53 cfu/gram for SANOVA treated carcases. The reductions in prevalence and mean log(10) concentrations in the present trial were all found to be statistically significant and indicate that carcases decontamination with either hot water or SANOVA are effective risk management options immediately available to the pork industry.

  20. Fuel injection of coal slurry using vortex nozzles and valves

    DOEpatents

    Holmes, Allen B.

    1989-01-01

    Injection of atomized coal slurry fuel into an engine combustion chamber is achieved at relatively low pressures by means of a vortex swirl nozzle. The outlet opening of the vortex nozzle is considerably larger than conventional nozzle outlets, thereby eliminating major sources of failure due to clogging by contaminants in the fuel. Control fluid, such as air, may be used to impart vorticity to the slurry and/or purge the nozzle of contaminants during the times between measured slurry charges. The measured slurry charges may be produced by a diaphragm pump or by vortex valves controlled by a separate control fluid. Fluidic circuitry, employing vortex valves to alternatively block and pass cool slurry fuel flow, is disclosed.

  1. Bubble column apparatus for separating wax from catalyst slurry

    SciTech Connect

    Neathery, James K.; Davis, Burtron H.

    2004-07-13

    Novel methods and devices for production of liquid hydrocarbon products from gaseous reactants are disclosed. In one aspect, a method for separating a liquid hydrocarbon, typically a wax, from a catalyst containing slurry is provided, comprising passing the slurry through at least one downcomer extending from an overhead separation chamber and discharging into the bottom of a slurry bubble column reactor. The downcomer includes a cross-flow filtration element for separating a substantially particle-free liquid hydrocarbon for downstream processing. In another aspect, a method for promoting plug-flow movement in a recirculating slurry bubble column reactor is provided, comprising discharging the recirculating slurry into the reactor through at least one downcomer which terminates near the bottom of the reactor. Devices for accomplishing the above methods are also provided.

  2. Chemists report slurry breakthroughs for syngas-to-alcohol process

    SciTech Connect

    Rotman, D.

    1996-04-24

    Scientists at North Carolina State University (Raleigh) report that they have developed an alcohol synthesis process that uses a high-temperature slurry reactor with a conventional zinc chromite methanol catalyst. The scientists say it is the first time zinc-chromite catalysts have been used in slurry reactors at temperatures as high as 375 C. They add that it could lead to a synthesis gas (syngas)-based route to higher alcohols and to broader commercial applications for slurry reactors. Slurry reactors typically operate at less than 300 C, limiting applications for many high-volume industrial applications. By extending the temperature 100 C, says George Roberts, a chemist at North Carolina State, the work could {open_quotes}open up chemistry never run in slurry reactors before.{close_quotes} Roberts points to potential for use in partial oxidation reactions and synthesis routes involving formaldehyde.

  3. Phenanthrene removal from soil slurries with surfactant-treated oxides

    SciTech Connect

    Park, J.W.; Jaffe, P.R.

    1995-06-01

    A soil-slurry washing technique to decontaminate soils containing low-solubility nonionic organic pollutants was investigated, using phenanthrene as a model pollutant. The technique is based on first transferring the sorbed phenanthrene from the soil to anionic surfactant-coated oxide particles, and then separating these anionic surfactant-coated oxide particles with the sorbed phenanthrene from the soil slurry via a magnetic separation technique. The decontamination of two soils with different particle sizes and soil organic matter content was investigated. The proposed soil-slurry washing technique was effective in removing a strongly sorbing nonionic organic contaminant from soil slurries. Various operational scenarios of multistage soil-slurry reactors were evaluated with a mathematical model.

  4. Improving feed slurry rheology by colloidal techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Heath, W.O.; Ternes, R.L.

    1984-06-01

    Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PSN) has investigated three colloidal techniques in the laboratory to improve the sedimentation and flowability of Hanford simulated (nonradioactive) current acid waste (CAW) melter feed slurry: polymer-induced bridging flocculation; manipulating glass former (raw SiO/sub 2/ or frit) particle size; and alteration of nitric acid content. All three methods proved successful in improving the rheology of the simulated CAW feed. This initially had exhibited nearly worst-case flow and clogging properties, but was transformed into a flowable, resuspendable (nonclogging) feed. While each has advantages and disadvantages, the following three specific alternatives proved successful: addition of a polyelectrolyte in 2000 ppM concentration to feed slurry; substitution of a 49 wt % SiO/sub 2/ colloidal suspension (approx. 10-micron particle size) for the -325 mesh (less than or equal to 44-micron particle size) raw-chemical SiO/sub 2/; and increase of nitric acid content from the reference 1.06 M to optimum 1.35 M. The first method, polymer-induced bridging flocculation, results in a high sediment volume, nonclogging CAW feed. The second method, involving the use of colloidal silica particles results in a nonsedimenting feed that when left unagitated forms a gel. The third method, increase in feed acidity, results in a highly resuspendable (nonclogging) melter feed. Further research is therefore required to determine which of the three alternatives is the preferred method of achieving rheological control of CAW melter feeds.

  5. Numerical simulation of turbulent slurry flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haghgoo, Mohammad Reza; Spiteri, Reymond J.; Bergstrom, Donlad J.

    2016-11-01

    Slurry flows, i.e., the flow of an agglomeration of liquid and particles, are widely employed in many industrial applications, such as hydro-transport systems, pharmaceutical batch crystallizers, and wastewater disposal. Although there are numerous studies available in the literature on turbulent gas-particle flows, the hydrodynamics of turbulent liquid-particle flows has received much less attention. In particular, the fluid-phase turbulence modulation due to the particle fluctuating motion is not yet well understood and remains challenging to model. This study reports the results of a numerical simulation of a vertically oriented slurry pipe flow using a two-fluid model based on the kinetic theory of granular flows. The particle stress model also includes the effects of frictional contact. Different turbulence modulation models are considered, and their capability to capture the characteristic features of the turbulent flow is assessed. The model predictions are validated against published experimental data and demonstrate the significant effect of the particles on the fluid-phase turbulence.

  6. Solids flow rate measurement in dense slurries

    SciTech Connect

    Porges, K.G.; Doss, E.D.

    1993-09-01

    Accurate and rapid flow rate measurement of solids in dense slurries remains an unsolved technical problem, with important industrial applications in chemical processing plants and long-distance solids conveyance. In a hostile two-phase medium, such a measurement calls for two independent parameter determinations, both by non-intrusive means. Typically, dense slurries tend to flow in laminar, non-Newtonian mode, eliminating most conventional means that usually rely on calibration (which becomes more difficult and costly for high pressure and temperature media). These issues are reviewed, and specific solutions are recommended in this report. Detailed calculations that lead to improved measuring device designs are presented for both bulk density and average velocity measurements. Cross-correlation, chosen here for the latter task, has long been too inaccurate for practical applications. The cause and the cure of this deficiency are discussed using theory-supported modeling. Fluid Mechanics are used to develop the velocity profiles of laminar non-Newtonian flow in a rectangular duct. This geometry uniquely allows the design of highly accurate `capacitive` devices and also lends itself to gamma transmission densitometry on an absolute basis. An absolute readout, though of less accuracy, is also available from a capacitive densitometer and a pair of capacitive sensors yields signals suitable for cross-correlation velocity measurement.

  7. Rheological Modifier Testing with DWPF Process Slurries

    SciTech Connect

    MICHAEL, STONE

    2004-02-01

    Rheological modification agents were tested on simulated SRAT and SME products to determine if a suitable agent could be found for the DWPF process slurries. The agents tested were dispersants that lower the rheological properties of slurries by preventing agglomerization. Dolapix CE64, an ethylene glycol, and Disperse-Ayd W28, a polyacrylate, were the most effective dispersants tested. Further evaluation and testing should be performed on Dolapix CE64 and Disperse-Ayd W28 to determine if implementation is possible in DWPF. The initial phase of future work will include optimization of the rheology modifier by the Illinois Institute of Technology (IIT) and development of a maximum concentration limit for the rheology modifiers. IIT has been commissioned to evaluate the properties of these chemicals to determine if the chemical makeup can be optimized to enhance the properties of these modifiers. An initial concentration limit based upon the DWPF flammability limit and other constraints should be calculated to determine the potential downstream impacts.

  8. Effective Compressibility of a Bubbly Slurry.

    PubMed

    Kam, S. I.; Gauglitz, P. A.; Rossen, W. R.

    2001-09-01

    The goal of this study is to fit model parameters to changes in waste level in response to barometric pressure changes in underground storage tanks at the Hanford Site. This waste compressibility is a measure of the quantity of gas, typically hydrogen and other flammable gases, that can pose a safety hazard, retained in the waste. A one-dimensional biconical-pore-network model for compressibility of a bubbly slurry is presented in a companion paper. Fitting these results to actual waste level changes in the tanks implies that bubbles in the slurry layer are long and the ratio of pore-body radius to pore-throat radius is close to 1; unfortunately, compressibility can not be quantified unambiguously from the data without additional information on pore geometry. Therefore, determining the quantity of gas in the tanks requires more than just waste-level data. The non-uniqueness of the fit is also found with two other simple models: a capillary-tube model with contact angle hysteresis and a spherical-pore model. Copyright 2001 Academic Press.

  9. Self-Organization in Granular Slurries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ottino, Julio M.; Jain, Nitin; Lueptow, Richard M.; Khakhar, Devang V.

    2000-11-01

    Mixtures of tumbled granular materials under flow exhibit various intriguing types of un-mixing or self-organization. Small differences in particles' density, size or shape may trigger the effect. Nearly all studies to date have addressed the case of dry granular media, where the interparticle fluid is typically air. Here we report the existence of self-organization in wet granular media or slurries, mixtures of particles of different sizes dispersed in a lower density liquid. Technological examples appear in cement, ceramics, fine chemicals, and in the food industry; examples in nature appear in evolution of landslides and transport in river sediments. In spite of significantly different physics at the particle level, both axial banding (alternating bands rich in small and large particles in a long rotating cylinder) and radial segregation (in quasi 2D containers) are observed in slurries. However, axial segregation is significantly faster and the spectrum of outcomes is richer. Moreover, experiments with suitable fluids, reveal, for the first time, the internal structure of axially segregated systems, something that up to now has been accessible only via magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) experimentation.

  10. Fresh and preserved green fodder modify effects of urinary acidifiers on urine pH of horses.

    PubMed

    Goren, G; Fritz, J; Dillitzer, N; Hipp, B; Kienzle, E

    2014-04-01

    Hay stabilises urine pH in horses. It is unknown whether this is an effect of structure or of chemical composition. In this study, four ponies (230-384 kg body weight [BW]) were fed six different diets with either a structure or a composition similar to hay with and without acidifiers in a cross-over experimental design in amounts to maintain body weight with the following main compounds: Fresh grass (GRASS), alfalfa hay (ALF), grass cobs (COBS), grass silage (SIL), straw (STR) or extruded straw (STRe) for 2 to 10 days. Urine pH was measured in all trials, blood pH, blood base excess and bicarbonate as well as mineral balance were determined in GRASS, ALF, STR and STRe. In the trials with straw and extruded straw, urine pH decreased significantly (STR control: 7.8 ± 0.23, acidifier: 5.2 ± 0.38) when acidifiers were added, whereas in all other diets that were based on fresh or preserved green fodder, pH did not decrease below 7. Blood pH was similarly affected by diet and acidifiers. Acidifiers had little effect on the pre-prandial blood pH, only in diet STR there was a significant reduction in relation to control. Post-prandial blood pH was significantly reduced by acidifiers in all diets. Blood bicarbonate and base excess showed corresponding effects. Faecal and renal mineral excretion and apparent mineral digestibility were not systematically affected by diet or acidifiers except for chloride. Chloride added as inorganic chloride salt had an even better apparent digestibility than chloride originating from feed. Because only green plant material stabilised acid base balance, chlorophyll and its metabolites are discussed as potential mediators of the effect of green fodder on acid base balance.

  11. Behaviour of liquid-fed growing pigs provided with straw in various amounts and frequencies.

    PubMed

    Oxholm, L C; Steinmetz, H V; Lahrmann, H P; Nielsen, M B F; Amdi, C; Hansen, C F

    2014-11-01

    Straw possesses many characteristics that make it attractive to pigs and can therefore be effective in preventing negative penmate-directed behaviours. However, straw is difficult to handle in current vacuum slurry systems under most commercial conditions and can therefore only be used in limited amounts. To occupy pigs effectively, straw must remain attractive to pigs throughout the whole day; hence, have a certain degree of novelty. We investigated the penmate-directed behaviour of liquid-fed growing pigs in a production herd, assigned to five experimental treatments: 1×25, 1×50, 1×100, 2×50 and 4×25 g of chopped straw/pig per day, with 20 replicates of each treatment (pen was regarded as experimental unit). Behaviour was observed at two different growth stages; ~40 and 80 kg live weight of the pigs. Activity and exploratory behaviour directed at penmates, straw, pen components and the slatted floor were registered continuously for 15 min of each hour during day time (0600 to 2200 h) by use of video observation of three focal pigs per pen. The pigs were active for about one-third of the day corresponding to ~5 h/day. Of the active time, an average of 7% (35 min) was spent on penmate-directed behaviour. The pigs were more active and increased their straw-directed behaviour when provided with 100 g straw/pig per day compared with 25 and 50 g (P<0.001). However, penmate-directed behaviour was not reduced with an increased amount of straw (P>0.05), and there was no effect on pigs' behaviour when straw provision was increased per day (P>0.05). Pigs became less active and reduced their straw-directed activities when their weight increased from 40 to 80 kg live weight (P<0.001), but the amount of penmate-directed behaviour was similar (P>0.05). Further, the residual straw results indicated that perhaps a more frequent straw provision could help establish a more even level of fresh available straw during the day. However, the frequent straw provision did not occupy

  12. Partitioning and bioavailability of mercury in an experimentally acidified Wisconsin lake

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wiener, James G.; Fitzgerald, William F.; Watras, Carl J.; Rada, Ronald G.

    1990-01-01

    We studied the partitioning of mercury (Hg) among air, water, sediments and fish at Little Rock Lake, a clear water seepage lake in north-central Wisconsin. The lake was divided with a sea curtain into two basins, one acidified with sulfuric acid to pH 5.6 for two years and the other an untreated reference site (mean pH 6.1), to document the effects of acidification. Trace-metal-free protocols were used to measure Hg at the picomolar level in air and water. Total gaseous Hg in air samples averaged 2.0 ng/m3. Total Hg in unfiltered water samples collected in 1986 after the fall overturn averaged about 1 ng/L in the acidified and reference basins. Mercury in surficial sediments was strongly correlated with volatile matter content and ranged from 10 to about 170 ng/g (dry weight) in both basins. Total Hg concentrations in whole, calendar age-1 yellow perch (Perca flavescens), sampled after one year of residence in the lake, averaged 114 ng/g (fresh weight) in the reference basin and 135 ng/g in the acidified basin – a highly significant (p < 0.01) difference. The mean whole-body burden (quantity) of Hg in age-1 perch did not differ between basins after the first year, but was significantly greater in the treatment basin than in the reference basin after the second year of acidification. Differences between the two basins in the bioaccumulation of Hg were attributed to internal (within-lake) processes that influence the bioavailability of the metal. An initial Hg budget for the treatment basin of Little Rock Lake showed that atmospheric deposition and sedimentary remobilization of Hg are potentially important processes influencing its biogeochemical cycling and uptake by fish.

  13. Metal accumulation and metallothionein concentrations in tree swallow nestlings near acidified lakes

    SciTech Connect

    St. Louis, V.; Breebaart, L. . Dept. of Zoology); Barlow, J.C. . Dept. of Zoology Royal Ontario Museum, Toronto, Ontario . Dept. of Ornithology); Klaverkamp, J.F. . Dept. of Fisheries and Oceans)

    1993-07-01

    The authors studied metal accumulation in hepatic and renal tissues of tree swallow (Tachycineta bicolor) nestlings at acidified and nonacid reference lakes in northwestern Ontario. Hepatic concentrations of metallothionein (metal-binding proteins, MT) in tree swallow nestlings were negatively correlated with pH of the nest-site lake. Combined concentrations of Cu and Zn in the liver were correlated with liver MT concentrations, but Cd was not. Although no overt signs of metal toxicity were observed in nestlings near acid lakes, the results clearly provided evidence that metals are transferred from acid lakes to birds and that these metals are correlated with increases in hepatic MT production.

  14. The effect of sucrose on unfrozen water and syneresis of acidified sodium caseinate-xanthan gels.

    PubMed

    Braga, A L M; Cunha, R L

    2005-07-01

    The influence of the ingredients of acidified Na caseinate-xanthan-sucrose gels on thermophysical properties and syneresis of the gels was studied. Sucrose concentration affected all of the gel equilibrium properties and the rate of syneresis. The positive effect of sucrose on syneresis and unfrozen water (UFW) values was attributed to different effects. The amount of UFW was governed mainly by the colligative properties of sucrose whereas the equilibrium syneresis behaviour was associated with the changes in network dynamics caused by the kosmotropic properties of sucrose. The latter could enhance xanthan-sucrose association or favour xanthan-protein interactions.

  15. Evaluation of sodium bisulphate and phosphoric acid as urine acidifiers for cats.

    PubMed

    Spears, Julie K; Grieshop, Christine M; Fahey, G C

    2003-10-01

    Eighteen cats were used to compare the urine acidifying properties of sodium bisulphate to phosphoric acid. Acidifying agents were added at one of three concentrations (0.4, 0.6, or 0.8%, as-is basis). Cats were offered a commercial diet to determine basal urinary pH, and then again for a 1 week period between blocks 1 and 2. Cats were acclimated to the diets for 6 days, and urine samples were collected on day 7 at 0, 4, and 8 h postfeeding to obtain pre- and postprandial urinary pH. Intakes of diets containing sodium bisulphate tended (P < 0.07) to be lower than intakes of diets containing phosphoric acid. Cats consuming the 0.8% phosphoric acid diet had higher (P < 0.05) food intakes than cats consuming either the 0.4 or 0.6% phosphoric acid-containing diets. There was significant (P = 0.01) linear and quadratic response for food intake in cats consuming the sodium bisulphate-containing diet. Cats consuming the 0.4 and 0.8% phosphoric acid-containing diets tended (P = 0.07) to have higher water intakes than cats consuming the 0.6% phosphoric acid-containing diet. There were no differences (P > 0.05) in urine pH and specific gravity between cats fed the different acidifier types. Cats consuming the 0.6% phosphoric acid-containing diet tended (P = 0.07) to have a higher urine pH 8 h post-feeding than cats consuming the 0.4 and 0.8% phosphoric acid-containing diets. Urine pH was highest at 4 h post-feeding except for cats fed the 0.4% sodium bisulphate- and the 0.6% phosphoric acid-containing diets. No differences (P > 0.05) between acidifiers were found in faecal score or in faecal dry matter and organic matter concentrations. A quadratic response was detected in faecal score for cats consuming the phosphoric acid-containing diets. Cats consuming the 0.6% phosphoric acid diet tended (P = 0.06) to have a lower faecal score than cats consuming the 0.4 and 0.8% phosphoric acid diets. For faecal dry matter, a linear trend was detected in cats consuming the sodium

  16. [Acidifying therapy in the combined treatment of patients with liver cirrhosis].

    PubMed

    Chervak, I M

    1998-01-01

    Data are submitted of clinical and biochemical examination of patients with cirrhosis of the liver complicated by different type encephalopathy. Examined before treatment and after the course of therapy involving administration of the acidifying drugs normase, dufalak were patients presenting with manifestations of hepatodepressive syndrome, parenchymal, mixed-type portosystemic encephalopathy, with n = 27, 12, 23 and 38 respectively. Clinical, biochemical findings, time course of the ratio blood serum levels of anticerebrotoxic: cerebrotoxic amino acids (valin + leucine + isoleucine) allowed judgement about efficacies of the treatments administered. The results obtained showed high clinical benefit from treatment with normase and dufalak in patients with hepatodepressive syndrome and portal-systemic encephalopathy.

  17. Improved Fischer-Tropsch Slurry Reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Andrew Lucero

    2009-03-20

    The conversion of synthesis gas to hydrocarbons or alcohols involves highly exothermic reactions. Temperature control is a critical issue in these reactors for a number of reasons. Runaway reactions can be a serious safety issue, even raising the possibility of an explosion. Catalyst deactivation rates tend to increase with temperature, particularly of there are hot spots in the reactor. For alcohol synthesis, temperature control is essential because it has a large effect on the selectivity of the catalysts toward desired products. For example, for molybdenum disulfide catalysts unwanted side products such as methane, ethane, and propane are produced in much greater quantities if the temperature increases outside an ideal range. Slurry reactors are widely regarded as an efficient design for these reactions. In a slurry reactor a solid catalyst is suspended in an inert hydrocarbon liquid, synthesis gas is sparged into the bottom of the reactor, un-reacted synthesis gas and light boiling range products are removed as a gas stream, and heavy boiling range products are removed as a liquid stream. This configuration has several positive effects for synthesis gas reactions including: essentially isothermal operation, small catalyst particles to reduce heat and mass transfer effects, capability to remove heat rapidly through liquid vaporization, and improved flexibility on catalyst design through physical mixtures in addition to use of compositions that cannot be pelletized. Disadvantages include additional mass transfer resistance, potential for significant back-mixing on both the liquid and gas phases, and bubble coalescence. In 2001 a multiyear project was proposed to develop improved FT slurry reactors. The planned focus of the work was to improve the reactors by improving mass transfer while considering heat transfer issues. During the first year of the project the work was started and several concepts were developed to prepare for bench-scale testing. Power

  18. Ammonia emissions from cattle, pig and poultry wastes applied to pasture.

    PubMed

    Lockyer, D R; Pain, B F; Klarenbeek, J V

    1989-01-01

    In four field experiments, carried out in The Netherlands, small wind-tunnels were used to make direct measurements of ammonia (NH(3)) volatilization from different types of slurry and manure applied to the surface of grassland. During periods of up to six days following application, losses of NH(3)-N often amounted to more than 40% of the NH(4)-N applied. Percentage loss was highest (83%) from a poultry slurry and least (21%) from an air-dried poultry manure. Losses of NH(3)-N were generally greater from pig slurry (36-78%) than from cattle slurry (41%). In most cases 80% or more of the total NH(3)-N loss occurred within 48 h of application. Estimates were made of total annual NH(3) emissions from four systems of poultry housing. The highest total loss (50% of the N voided in droppings) occurred with a battery house producing a slurry with a low content of dry-matter; most of the loss took place after spreading. With a second battery house, in which the droppings were air-dried, the total loss was only 12%, with much lower emissions from the housing and during spreading.

  19. Testing of In-Line Slurry Monitors and Pulsair Mixers with Radioactive Slurries

    SciTech Connect

    Hylton, T.D.; Bayne, C.K.

    1999-08-01

    Three in-line slurry monitoring instruments were demonstrated, tested, and evaluated for their capability to determine the transport properties of radioactive slurries. The instruments included the Endress + Hauser Promass 63M Coriolis meter for measuring density, the Lasentec M600P for measuring particle size distribution, and a prototype ultrasonic monitor that was developed by Argonne National Laboratory for measuring suspended solids concentration. In addition, the power consumption of the recirculation pump was monitored to determine whether this parameter could be used as a tool for in-line slurry monitoring. The Promass 63M and the M600P were also evaluated as potential indicators of suspended solids concentration. In order to use the Promass 63M as a suspended solids monitor, the densities of the fluid phase and the dry solid particle phase must be known. In addition, the fluid phase density and the dry solids density must remain constant, as any change will affect the correlation between the slurry density and the suspended solids concentration. For the M600P, the particle size distribution would need to remain relatively constant. These instruments were demonstrated and tested at the Gunite and Associated Tanks Remediation Project at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The testing of the instruments was conducted in parallel with the testing of a Pulsair mixing system, which was used to mix the contents of the selected tank. A total of six tests were performed. A submersible pump was positioned at two depths, while the Pulsair system was operated at three mixing rates.

  20. Effects of coal slurry on wastewater bacteria and bacteriophage

    SciTech Connect

    Margler, L.W.; Rogozen, M.B.

    1980-01-01

    Coal slurry was only mildly toxic to coliform bacteria, which serve as indicators of pathogenic microorganisms in wastewater, and the fecal streptococci concentration appeared to remain essentially unchanged with respect to the wastewater control. Thus the results do not support the supposition that wastewater would be naturally disinfected in a coal slurry pipeline. On the other hand, at least 99.8% of the E. coli C-specific phage present in the wastewater became noninfective in the coal slurry. Should water-borne pathogenic viruses lose infectivity to a similar extent, use of wastewater as the slurry medium would indeed result in upgrading of the water. Depending on the method of disposing of the slurry wastewater at the terminus of the pipeline, disinfection may be required. The possibility exists that future regulations would require disinfection of viruses in addition to indicator bacteria. Under such regulations, the task of disinfecting the slurry wastewater should be greatly facilitated because viruses are generally more resistent to disinfection than are bacteria. The important question remaining and requiring further study, however, is what effect would coal slurry have on pathogenic enteric viruses.

  1. Developing anthracite coal water slurry fuel. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Simmon, F.J.; Keller, D.V.; Marino, J.; Keller, D.S.; Ask, T.E.

    1993-09-01

    Public law has directed the Department of Defense (DOD) to increase the use of coal, particularly anthracite, at steam generating facilities. This study evaluates the feasibility of producing slurry fuel from anthracite coal and examines the combustion characteristics of the anthracite/water fuel slurry. The T-Process, a proprietary process developed by Otisca Industries, Ltd., Syracuse, NY, was used to produce anthracite-based coal water slurries for testing and combustion. Although it is feasible to manufacture anthracite water fuel, the slurries used in this research would not burn well without substantial amounts of natural gas cofiring. Stable combustion with reduced support fuel can probably be achieved by chemically or physically modifying the factors that affect combustion. Additional research to determine the differences between anthracite and bituminous slurries, to increase the residence time for anthracite slurries, and to manufacture slurries with oil rather than water needs to be conducted to help the DOD meet anthracite purchase/consumption targets. Coal, Combustion, Coal water fuel, Anthracite coal.

  2. Ice slurry cooling development and field testing

    SciTech Connect

    Kasza, K.E.; Hietala, J.; Wendland, R.D.; Collins, F.

    1992-07-01

    A new advanced cooling technology collaborative program is underway involving Argonne National Laboratory (ANL), Northern States Power (NSP) and the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI). The program will conduct field tests of an ice slurry distributed load network cooling concept at a Northern States Power utility service center to further develop and prove the technology and to facilitate technology transfer to the private sector. The program will further develop at Argonne National Laboratory through laboratory research key components of hardware needed in the field testing and develop an engineering data base needed to support the implementation of the technology. This program will sharply focus and culminate research and development funded by both the US Department of Energy and the Electric Power Research Institute on advanced cooling and load management technology over the last several years.

  3. Ice slurry cooling development and field testing

    SciTech Connect

    Kasza, K.E. ); Hietala, J. ); Wendland, R.D. ); Collins, F. )

    1992-01-01

    A new advanced cooling technology collaborative program is underway involving Argonne National Laboratory (ANL), Northern States Power (NSP) and the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI). The program will conduct field tests of an ice slurry distributed load network cooling concept at a Northern States Power utility service center to further develop and prove the technology and to facilitate technology transfer to the private sector. The program will further develop at Argonne National Laboratory through laboratory research key components of hardware needed in the field testing and develop an engineering data base needed to support the implementation of the technology. This program will sharply focus and culminate research and development funded by both the US Department of Energy and the Electric Power Research Institute on advanced cooling and load management technology over the last several years.

  4. Secondary breakup of coal water slurry drops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Hui; Liu, Hai-Feng; Xu, Jian-Liang; Li, Wei-Feng

    2011-11-01

    To investigate secondary atomization of coal water slurry (CWS), deformation and breakup of eight kinds of CWS drops are presented using high speed digital camera. Based on morphology, deformation and breakup regimes of CWS drops can be termed some different modes: deformation, multimode breakup (including two sub-modes: hole breakup and tensile breakup), and shear breakup. Correlations on the ranges of breakup modes are also obtained. The conventional Weber number and Ohnesorge number are found to be insufficient to classify all breakup modes of CWS drops, so two other non-dimensional numbers based on rheology of CWS are suggested to use in the deformation and breakup regime map. Finally, total breakup time is studied and correlated, which increases with Ohnesorge number.

  5. Hydrodynamic models for slurry bubble column reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Gidaspow, D.

    1995-12-31

    The objective of this investigation is to convert a {open_quotes}learning gas-solid-liquid{close_quotes} fluidization model into a predictive design model. This model is capable of predicting local gas, liquid and solids hold-ups and the basic flow regimes: the uniform bubbling, the industrially practical churn-turbulent (bubble coalescence) and the slugging regimes. Current reactor models incorrectly assume that the gas and the particle hold-ups (volume fractions) are uniform in the reactor. They must be given in terms of empirical correlations determined under conditions that radically differ from reactor operation. In the proposed hydrodynamic approach these hold-ups are computed from separate phase momentum balances. Furthermore, the kinetic theory approach computes the high slurry viscosities from collisions of the catalyst particles. Thus particle rheology is not an input into the model.

  6. Desulfurization from Bauxite Water Slurry (BWS) Electrolysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gong, Xuzhong; Ge, Lan; Wang, Zhi; Zhuang, Siyuan; Wang, Yuhua; Ren, Lihui; Wang, Mingyong

    2016-02-01

    Feasibility of high-sulfur bauxite electrolysis desulfurization was examined using the electrochemical characterization, XRD, DTA, and FTIR. The cyclic voltammetry curves indicated that bauxite water slurry (BWS) electrolysis in NaOH system was controlled by diffusion. Additionally, the desulfurization effect of NaCl as the electrolyte was significantly better than that of NaOH as an electrolyte. As the stirring rate increased, the desulfurization ratio in NaCl system was not increased obviously, while the desulfurization ratio in NaOH system increased significantly, indicating further that electrolysis desulfurization in NaOH solution was controlled by diffusion. According to XRD, DTA, and FTIR analysis, the characteristic peaks of sulfur-containing phase in bauxite after electrolysis weakened or disappeared, indicating that the pyrite in bauxite was removed from electrolysis. Finally, the electrolytic desulfurization technology of bauxite was proposed based on the characteristics of BWS electrolysis.

  7. PCB dechlorination in anaerobic soil slurry reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Klasson, K.T.; Evans, B.S.

    1993-11-29

    Many industrial locations, including the US Department of Energy`s, have identified needs for treatment of polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) wastes and remediation of PCB-contaminated sites. Biodegradation of PCBs is a potentially effective technology for the treatment of PCB-contaminated soils and sludges, including mixed wastes; however, a practical remediation technology has not yet been demonstrated. In laboratory experiments, soil slurry bioreactors inoculated with microorganisms extracted from PCB-contaminated sediments from the Hudson River have been used to obtain anaerobic dechlorination of PCBS. The onset of dechlorination activity can be accelerated by addition of nutritional amendments and inducers. After 15 weeks of incubation with PCB-contaminated soil and nutrient solution, dechlorination has been observed under several working conditions. The best results show that the average chlorine content steadily dropped from 4.3 to 3.5 chlorines per biphenyl over a 15-week period.

  8. Latex migration in battery slurries during drying.

    PubMed

    Lim, Sanghyuk; Ahn, Kyung Hyun; Yamamura, Masato

    2013-07-02

    We used real-time fluorescence microscopy to investigate the migration of latex particles in drying battery slurries. The time evolution of the fluorescence signals revealed that the migration of the latex particles was suppressed above the entanglement concentration of carboxymethyl cellulose (CMC), while it was significantly enhanced when CMC fully covered the surfaces of the graphite particles. In particular, a two-step migration was observed when the graphite particles flocculated by depletion attraction at high CMC/graphite mass ratios. The transient states of the nonadsorbing CMC and graphite particles in a medium were discussed, and the uses of this novel measurement technique to monitor the complex drying processes of films were demonstrated.

  9. ANALYSIS OF VENTING OF A RESIN SLURRY

    SciTech Connect

    Laurinat, J.; Hensel, S.

    2012-03-27

    A resin slurry venting analysis was conducted to address safety issues associated with overpressurization of ion exchange columns used in the Purex process at the Savannah River Site (SRS). If flow to these columns were inadvertently interrupted, an exothermic runaway reaction could occur between the ion exchange resin and the nitric acid used in the feed stream. The nitric acid-resin reaction generates significant quantities of noncondensable gases, which would pressurize the column. To prevent the column from rupturing during such events, rupture disks are installed on the column vent lines. The venting analysis models accelerating rate calorimeter (ARC) tests and data from tests that were performed in a vented test vessel with a rupture disk. The tests showed that the pressure inside the test vessel continued to increase after the rupture disk opened, though at a slower rate than prior to the rupture. Calculated maximum discharge rates for the resin venting tests exceeded the measured rates of gas generation, so the vent size was sufficient to relieve the pressure in the test vessel if the vent flow rate was constant. The increase in the vessel pressure is modeled as a transient phenomenon associated with expansion of the resin slurry/gas mixture upon rupture of the disk. It is postulated that the maximum pressure at the end of this expansion is limited by energy minimization to approximately 1.5 times the rupture disk burst pressure. The magnitude of this pressure increase is consistent with the measured pressure transients. The results of this analysis demonstrate the need to allow for a margin between the design pressure and the rupture disk burst pressure in similar applications.

  10. Slurry fired heater cold-flow modelling

    SciTech Connect

    Moujaes, S.F.

    1983-07-01

    This report summarizes the experimental and theoretical work leading to the scale-up of the SRC-I Demonstration Plant slurry fired heater. The scale-up involved a theoretical model using empirical relations in the derivation, and employed variables such as flow conditions, liquid viscosity, and slug frequency. Such variables have been shown to affect the heat transfer characteristics ofthe system. The model assumes that, if all other variables remain constant, the heat transfer coefficient can be scaled up proportional to D/sup -2/3/ (D = inside diameter of the fired heater tube). All flow conditions, liquid viscosities, and pipe inclinations relevant to the demonstration plant have indicated a slug flow regime in the slurry fired heater. The annular and stratified flow regimes should be avoided to minimize the potential for excessive pipe erosion and to decrease temperature gradients along the pipe cross section leading to coking and thermal stresses, respectively. Cold-flow studies in 3- and 6.75-in.-inside-diameter (ID) pipes were conducted to determine the effect of scale-up on flow regime, slug frequency, and slug dimensions. The developed model assumes that conduction heat transfer occurs through the liquid film surrounding the gas slug and laminar convective heat transfer to the liquid slug. A weighted average of these two heat transfer mechanisms gives a value for the average pipe heat transfer coefficient. The cold-flow work showed a decrease in the observed slug frequency between the 3- and 6.75-ID pipes. Data on the ratio of gas to liquid slug length in the 6.75-in. pipe are not yet complete, but are expected to yield generally lower values than those obtained in the 3-in. pipe; this will probably affect the scale-up to demonstration plant conditions. 5 references, 15 figures, 7 tables.

  11. Pipeline caliper pig

    SciTech Connect

    Rosenberg, J.S.; Lockyear, K.W.

    1990-09-04

    This patent describes an improved pipeline caliper pig for providing indications of the deviations of an inner wall of a pipeline from a nominal cross-sectional configuration. It comprises: a pig body assembly having a longitudinal axis and means for supporting the pig body assembly in a pipeline and for impeding the flow of fluid therepast so that the pig body is propelled by such fluid along the pipeline; an integrator plate carried by the pig body assembly; means for deflecting the integrator plate in response to deviations in the internal pipeline wall; means for axial oriented detection of the deflection of the integrator plate and for recording the detected deflections; and means for simultaneously determining and recording the orientation of the pig body assembly about its longitudinal axis relative to the vertical whereby the axial orientation of detected deviations is determinable.

  12. Development of Syringe/Bottle Hybrids for Sampling Slurries

    SciTech Connect

    Coleman, C.J.

    1998-01-08

    A convenient and effective sample bottle system based on simple modifications of disposable plastic syringes and bottles has been devised and tested for slurry samples. Syringe/ bottle hybrids (hereafter referred to as syringe bottles) have the convenience of regular flat-bottom bottles with screw cap closures. In addition, the syringe imparts a sliding and adjustable bottom to the bottle that forces the entire contents from the bottle. The system was designed especially to collect samples for high temperature work-ups of DWPF slurry samples. The syringe bottles together with fixed-bottom sample vial inserts would provide the DWPF with convenient and reliable methods for dealing with slurry samples.

  13. Preparing polymeric matrix composites using an aqueous slurry technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnston, Norman J. (Inventor); Towell, Timothy W. (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    An aqueous process was developed to prepare a consolidated composite laminate from an aqueous slurry. An aqueous poly(amic acid) surfactant solution was prepared by dissolving a poly(amic acid) powder in an aqueous ammonia solution. A polymeric powder was added to this solution to form a slurry. The slurry was deposited on carbon fiber to form a prepreg which was dried and stacked to form a composite laminate. The composite laminate was consolidated using pressure and was heated to form the polymeric matrix. The resulting composite laminate exhibited high fracture toughness and excellent consolidation.

  14. Protozoan grazing on bacteria at the sediment-water interface of an acidified lake

    SciTech Connect

    Tremaine, S.C.

    1988-01-01

    Protozoan grazing on bacteria has been hypothesized to link the detrital and grazer food chains in aquatic ecosystems. The current study of protozoan bacterivory, evaluated methods, quantified bacterivory, and evaluated the role of protozoa at the sediment-water interface of an acidified lake ecosystem, Lake Anna, Virginia. Three limnetic methods for determining protozoan bacterivory were tested for applicability at the sediment-water interface. The eucaryote inhibitor, cycloheximide, was found unsatisfactory because it did not uniformly inhibit growth of target eucaryotes, and because it inhibited non-target anaerobic procaryotes. The filtration method was found to have limited application in sediment systems due to filtrational loss of particle-associated bacteria. The dilution method was tested for violations of its critical assumptions: bacterial growth is exponential; grazing mortality is proportional to the dilution factor; and bacterial growth rates are unaltered under experimental conditions. These assumptions were found not to be violated, and this method was used in subsequent grazing experiments. Carbon loading to the acidified arm of Lake Anna was 41 {times} 10{sup 6} g C {times} y{sup {minus}1}. This appears to be adequate carbon loading to support bacterial production and, in turn, protozoan bacterivory and production. Though there is no direct evidence that zooplankton graze on protozoa in this system, however, there is sufficient protozoan production to support an additional trophic level.

  15. Spatial community shift from hard to soft corals in acidified water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inoue, Shihori; Kayanne, Hajime; Yamamoto, Shoji; Kurihara, Haruko

    2013-07-01

    Anthropogenic increases in the partial pressure of CO2 (pCO2) cause ocean acidification, declining calcium carbonate saturation states, reduced coral reef calcification and changes in the compositions of marine communities. Most projected community changes due to ocean acidification describe transitions from hard coral to non-calcifying macroalgal communities; other organisms have received less attention, despite the biotic diversity of coral reef communities. We show that the spatial distributions of both hard and soft coral communities in volcanically acidified, semi-enclosed waters off Iwotorishima Island, Japan, are related to pCO2 levels. Hard corals are restricted to non-acidified low- pCO2 (225μatm) zones, dense populations of the soft coral Sarcophyton elegans dominate medium- pCO2 (831μatm) zones, and both hard and soft corals are absent from the highest- pCO2 (1,465μatm) zone. In CO2-enriched culture experiments, high- pCO2 conditions benefited Sarcophyton elegans by enhancing photosynthesis rates and did not affect light calcification, but dark decalcification (negative net calcification) increased with increasing pCO2. These results suggest that reef communities may shift from reef-building hard corals to non-reef-building soft corals under pCO2 levels (550-970μatm) predicted by the end of this century, and that higher pCO2 levels would challenge the survival of some reef organisms.

  16. Esterification of acidified oil with methanol by SPES/PES catalytic membrane.

    PubMed

    Shi, Wenying; He, Benqiao; Li, Jianxin

    2011-05-01

    A sulfonated polyethersulfone (SPES)/polyethersulfone (PES) blend catalytic membrane was prepared and used as a heterogeneous catalyst in the esterification of the acidified oil (acid value 153 mg KOH/g) with methanol for producing biodiesel. The results showed that the free fatty acids conversion reached 97.6% using SPES/PES catalytic membrane under the optimal esterification conditions. Meanwhile, the SPES/PES membrane with 20.3% degree of sulfonation showed a good catalytic stability. A pseudo-homogeneous kinetic model was established. The results indicated that the reaction rate constant increased with increasing methanol/acidified oil molar ratio, the loading of catalytic membrane and reaction temperature. The reaction order was 2 and the activation energy decreased from 74.65 to 21.07 kJ/mol with increasing catalytic membrane loading from 0 to 0.135 meq/g(oil). It implies that the esterification is not diffusively controlled but kinetically controlled. The predicted results were in good agreement with the experimental data. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. [Effect of limestone and magnesite application on remediation of acidified forest soil in Chongqing, China].

    PubMed

    Yang, Yong-sen; Duan, Lei; Jin, Teng; Zhao, Da-wei; Zhang, Dong-bao; Hao, Ji-ming

    2006-09-01

    Effect of limestone and magnesite application on remediation of a typical acidified soil under a masson pine (Pinus massoniana) forest at Tieshanping, Chongqing in southwest China was studied through field experiments. The changes of soil water chemistry in different layers within one year after application of limestone or magnesite indicated that the remediation agents leaded to the recovery of acidified soil by significant increase of pH value and concentration of relative cation, i.e., Ca2+ or Mg2+, and notable decrease of inorganic monomeric aluminum (Ali). However, the accelerated leaching of NO3- and SO4(2-) might somewhat counteract the positive effects. Since the limestone powder applied was much finer and thus more soluble than the magnesite powder, it seemed that the addition of limestone was more effective than that of magnesite. However, the application of magnesite could probably improve the nutrient uptake and growth of plant, and thus limestone and magnesite should be used together. The change of soil water chemistry was much more notable in upper layer of soil than lower, which means that it will take long time to achieve the whole profile soil remediation.

  18. Growth and physiological condition of black ducks reared on acidified wetlands

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rattner, B.A.; Haramis, G.M.; Chu, D.S.; Bunck, C.M.; Scanes, C.G.

    1987-01-01

    Acid deposition has been identified as one of several possible factors contributing to the decline of some waterfowl populations in North America. In an effort to examine the effects of acidification on black duck (Anas rubripes) recruitment, growth and physiological condition were monitored in ducklings foraging for a 10-day trial (days 10-20 of life) on acidified (pH 5.0) and : circumneutral (pH 6.8) fish-free emergent wetlands. Acidification of these wetlands suppressed phytoplankton and algal growth, and reduced invertebrate biomass. Ducklings maintained on acidified wetlands grew poorly compared with ducklings reared on circumneutral wetlands, as evidenced by lower final body weight and culmen and tarsus length. Plasma growth hormone concentration was elevated and triiodothyronine levels were lower in stunted ducklings, in part substantiating impairment of growth-regulating processes. Ducklings exhibiting poor growth tended to have lower hematocrit, lower plasma protein, glucose, and cholesterol concentrations, and higher uric acid levels, presumably reflecting alterations in metabolism and development due to inanition. These findings suggest that acid deposition may lower food production in wetlands and ultimately impair duckling growth, condition, and survival.

  19. [Decoloration of reactive turquoise blue by acidified sludge-bentonite granule].

    PubMed

    Yue, Qin-Yan; Yuan, Ai-Juan; Li, Qian; Gao, Bao-Yu; Li, Jing

    2009-05-15

    Using sludge as pore-forming agent, bentonite granule was acidified by sulfuric acid solution as a decolorant. The specific surface area and SEM were performed to characterize the structure of samples, and the new acidified sludge-bentonite granule was applied to the decoloration of reactive turquoise blue. The influencing factors of pH value, dosage, reaction time and reaction temperature were studied on the removal of the dyes. The important thermodynamics parameters (DeltaH0, DeltaS0, DeltaG) and the activation energy Ea were also acquired by experiment data processing. The results indicated that the adsorption isotherm fitted the isothermal adsorption equations of Langmuir better than Freundlich. The adsorption dynamics followed the law of the pseudo-second order kinetic equation, while the adsorption rate is 313 K > 303 K > 293 K. The low value of Ea which is 5.52 kJ x mol(-1) shows that physical adsorption is primary. And DeltaH0 > TDeltaS0 means that the influence of enthalpy is more remarkable than the entropy in the activation reaction. DeltaG > 0 also means the chemical reactions are not spontaneous.

  20. Chemical Hydride Slurry for Hydrogen Production and Storage

    SciTech Connect

    McClaine, Andrew W

    2008-09-30

    The purpose of this project was to investigate and evaluate the attractiveness of using a magnesium chemical hydride slurry as a hydrogen storage, delivery, and production medium for automobiles. To fully evaluate the potential for magnesium hydride slurry to act as a carrier of hydrogen, potential slurry compositions, potential hydrogen release techniques, and the processes (and their costs) that will be used to recycle the byproducts back to a high hydrogen content slurry were evaluated. A 75% MgH2 slurry was demonstrated, which was just short of the 76% goal. This slurry is pumpable and storable for months at a time at room temperature and pressure conditions and it has the consistency of paint. Two techniques were demonstrated for reacting the slurry with water to release hydrogen. The first technique was a continuous mixing process that was tested for several hours at a time and demonstrated operation without external heat addition. Further work will be required to reduce this design to a reliable, robust system. The second technique was a semi-continuous process. It was demonstrated on a 2 kWh scale. This system operated continuously and reliably for hours at a time, including starts and stops. This process could be readily reduced to practice for commercial applications. The processes and costs associated with recycling the byproducts of the water/slurry reaction were also evaluated. This included recovering and recycling the oils of the slurry, reforming the magnesium hydroxide and magnesium oxide byproduct to magnesium metal, hydriding the magnesium metal with hydrogen to form magnesium hydride, and preparing the slurry. We found that the SOM process, under development by Boston University, offers the lowest cost alternative for producing and recycling the slurry. Using the H2A framework, a total cost of production, delivery, and distribution of $4.50/kg of hydrogen delivered or $4.50/gge was determined. Experiments performed at Boston

  1. Use of multivitamin, acidifier and Azolla in the diet of broiler chickens

    PubMed Central

    Islam, M. A.; Nishibori, M.

    2017-01-01

    Objective The experiments were carried out to measure the effect of multivitamin, acidifier and Azolla on growth performance, profitability and lipid profiles of blood of broiler chickens to produce safe and cost effective broilers. Methods In experiment 1, 240 day-old Cobb-500 broiler chicks were fed diets; D1 (control), D2 (D1 with 1 mL multivitamin/liter water), D3 (D1 with 1 mL acidifier/liter water), D4 (D1 with 1 mL multivitamin and 2 mL acidifier/liter water) having 3 replications in each, and 20 chicks/replication. In experiment 2, 150 day-old Cobb-500 broiler chicks were fed diets; T1 (control), T2 (5% Azolla in the diet), T3 (7% Azolla in the diet) and T4 (T1 with 1 mL multivitamin and 1 mL acidifier/liter water) having 3 replications in each, and 20 chicks/replication in control, and 10 chicks/replication in the remaining dietary treatment groups for 35 days. Results In experiment 1, the highest live weight was observed in D4 (p<0.05), however, feed intake was statistically similar between diets (p>0.05). The lowest feed conversion ratio (FCR) (p<0.001) and mortality (p<0.05) were observed in D2 followed by D4, D1, and D3, respectively. There were no significant differences between diets for feed cost and net profit (p>0.05). However, evidently but not significantly, the highest net profit was obtained in D2 followed by D4, D1, and D3, respectively. In experiment 2, the highest live weight (p<0.05) and feed intake (p<0.001) were observed in T4. Mortality (p<0.01), FCR (p<0.01), feed cost (p<0.05) and net profit (p<0.05) were significantly different among diets. Considering net profit, T2 was the best performing dietary group followed by T3, T1, and T4, respectively. The lowest lipid profiles were observed in D3 followed by D1, D4, and D2, respectively (p<0.05). In experiment 2, the lowest total cholesterol, TG, and the highest amount of high density lipoprotein were observed in T2, followed by T3, T1, and T4, respectively (p<0.05). Evidently but not

  2. Intracellular pH homeostasis plays a role in the tolerance of Debaryomyces hansenii and Candida zeylanoides to acidified nitrite.

    PubMed

    Mortensen, Henrik Dam; Jacobsen, Tomas; Koch, Anette Granly; Arneborg, Nils

    2008-08-01

    The effects of acidified-nitrite stress on the growth initiation and intracellular pH (pH(i)) of individual cells of Debaryomyces hansenii and Candida zeylanoides were investigated. Our results show that 200 microg/ml of nitrite caused pronounced growth inhibition and intracellular acidification of D. hansenii at an external pH (pH(ex)) value of 4.5 but did not at pH(ex) 5.5. These results indicate that nitrous acid as such plays an important role in the antifungal effect of acidified nitrite. Furthermore, both yeast species experienced severe growth inhibition and a pH(i) decrease at pH(ex) 4.5, suggesting that at least some of the antifungal effects of acidified nitrite may be due to intracellular acidification. For C. zeylanoides, this phenomenon could be explained in part by the uncoupling effect of energy generation from growth. Debaryomyces hansenii was more tolerant to acidified nitrite at pH(ex) 5.5 than C. zeylanoides, as determined by the rate of growth initiation. In combination with the fact that D. hansenii was able to maintain pH(i) homeostasis at pH(ex) 5.5 but C. zeylanoides was not, our results suggest that the ability to maintain pH(i) homeostasis plays a role in the acidified-nitrite tolerance of D. hansenii and C. zeylanoides. Possible mechanisms underlying the different abilities of the two yeast species to maintain their pH(i) homeostasis during acidified-nitrite stress, comprising the intracellular buffer capacity and the plasma membrane ATPase activity, were investigated, but none of these mechanisms could explain the difference.

  3. Intracellular pH Homeostasis Plays a Role in the Tolerance of Debaryomyces hansenii and Candida zeylanoides to Acidified Nitrite▿

    PubMed Central

    Mortensen, Henrik Dam; Jacobsen, Tomas; Koch, Anette Granly; Arneborg, Nils

    2008-01-01

    The effects of acidified-nitrite stress on the growth initiation and intracellular pH (pHi) of individual cells of Debaryomyces hansenii and Candida zeylanoides were investigated. Our results show that 200 μg/ml of nitrite caused pronounced growth inhibition and intracellular acidification of D. hansenii at an external pH (pHex) value of 4.5 but did not at pHex 5.5. These results indicate that nitrous acid as such plays an important role in the antifungal effect of acidified nitrite. Furthermore, both yeast species experienced severe growth inhibition and a pHi decrease at pHex 4.5, suggesting that at least some of the antifungal effects of acidified nitrite may be due to intracellular acidification. For C. zeylanoides, this phenomenon could be explained in part by the uncoupling effect of energy generation from growth. Debaryomyces hansenii was more tolerant to acidified nitrite at pHex 5.5 than C. zeylanoides, as determined by the rate of growth initiation. In combination with the fact that D. hansenii was able to maintain pHi homeostasis at pHex 5.5 but C. zeylanoides was not, our results suggest that the ability to maintain pHi homeostasis plays a role in the acidified-nitrite tolerance of D. hansenii and C. zeylanoides. Possible mechanisms underlying the different abilities of the two yeast species to maintain their pHi homeostasis during acidified-nitrite stress, comprising the intracellular buffer capacity and the plasma membrane ATPase activity, were investigated, but none of these mechanisms could explain the difference. PMID:18539814

  4. Section A, view at parking structure of the slurry wall ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Section A, view at parking structure of the slurry wall tiebacks with rods exposed from level B2, looking east/northeast. (BH) - World Trade Center Site, Bounded by Vesey, Church, Liberty Streets, & Route 9A, New York County, NY

  5. Dilute acid pretreatment of lignocellulose for whole slurry ethanol fermentation.

    PubMed

    Jung, Young Hoon; Kim, In Jung; Kim, Hyun Kyung; Kim, Kyoung Heon

    2013-03-01

    Dilute sulfuric acid pretreatment of oil palm empty fruit bunches (EFB) followed by the whole slurry fermentation of the pretreated EFB slurry was investigated. The optimized pretreatment conditions were at 1% (w/v) sulfuric acid with 3 min ramping to 190 °C in a microwave digester. Pretreated and washed EFB exhibited enzymatic digestibility of 88.5% of theoretical glucose yield after 48 h of hydrolysis. When the whole slurry of pretreated and neutralized EFB was used in simultaneous saccharification and fermentation (SSF) using cellulase and Saccharomyces cerevisiae, sulfuric acid-pretreated EFB resulted in 52.5% of theoretical ethanol yield based on total glucan in the untreated initial EFB after 72 h of SSF. When pretreated EFB slurry was treated with activated carbon before subjecting to SSF, the SSF furnished 87.5% ethanol yield based on the initial glucan content in untreated EFB (after 48 h of SSF). Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. New-Generation Sealing Slurries For Borehole Injection Purposes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stryczek, Stanisław; Gonet, Andrzej; Wiśniowski, Rafał; Złotkowski, Albert

    2015-12-01

    The development of techniques and technologies thanks to which parameters of the ground medium can be modified makes specialists look for new recipes of geopolymers - binders for the reinforcing and sealing of unstable and permeable grounds. The sealing slurries are expected to meet a number of strict requirements, therefore it is important to find new admixtures and additives which could modify the fresh and hardened slurry. Special attention has been recently paid to the fluid ash - a by-product of the combustion of hard coals. However, the use of this additive is associated with the application of appropriate superplastifier. Laboratory analyses of rheological parameters of fresh sealing slurries and the ways of improving their liquidity by a properly selected third-generation superplastifier are presented in the paper. The slurries were based on Portland cement CEM I, milled granulated large-furnace slag and fly ash from fluidized-bed combustion of hard coal.

  7. Economics of a commercial slurry-phase biological treatment process

    SciTech Connect

    Jerger, D.E.; Woodhull, P.M.

    1995-12-31

    Slurry-phase bioremediation is an engineered process for treating contaminated soils or sludges in a slurry of water at 10 to 40% solids. Slurry-phase treatment relies on the mobilization of contaminants to the aqueous phase, where they are susceptible to microbial degradation. The mobilization or dissolution step can be the result of either microbial or physical/chemical action. Operating parameters are maintained to provide optimal conditions for biological treatment of the contaminants. OHM Remediation Services Corp. has completed the full-scale slurry-phase biological treatment of 10,500 yd{sup 3} of Resource Conservation and Recovery Act-K001 wastes at the Southeastern Wood Preserving Superfund site in Canton, Mississippi. The polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) concentrations in the untreated material ranged from 8,000 mg/kg to 12,000 mg/kg dry-weight. A 95% reduction in total PAH concentration was achieved following treatment.

  8. Effective use of fly ash slurry as fill material.

    PubMed

    Horiuchi, S; Kawaguchi, M; Yasuhara, K

    2000-09-15

    A lot of effort has been put into increasing coal ash utilization; however, 50% of total amount is disposed of on land and in the sea. Several attempts have been reported recently concerning slurried coal fly ash use for civil engineering materials, such as for structural fill and backfill. The authors have studied this issue for more than 15 years and reported its potential for (1) underwater fills, (2) light weight backfills, and (3) light weight structural fills, through both laboratory tests and construction works. This paper is an overview of the results obtained for slurry, focusing on the following. (1) Coal fly ash reclaimed by slurry placement shows lower compressibility, higher ground density, and higher strength than by the other methods. This higher strength increases stability against liquefaction during earthquake. (2) Higher stability of the fly ash ground formed by slurry placement is caused by higher density and its self-hardening property. (3) Stability of fly ash reclaimed ground can be increased by increasing density and also by strength enhancement by cement addition. (4) Technical data obtained through a man-made island construction project shows the advantages of fly ash slurry in terms of mechanical properties such as higher stability against sliding failure, sufficient ground strength, and also in terms of cost saving. (5) Concentration in leachates from the placed slurry is lower than the Japanese environmental law. (6) In order to enlarge the fly ash slurry application toward a lightweight fill, mixtures of air foam, cement and fly ash were examined. Test results shows sufficient durability of this material against creep failure. This material was then used as lightweight structural fill around a high-rise building, and showed sufficient quality. From the above data, it can be concluded that coal fly ash slurry can be effectively utilized in civil engineering projects.

  9. Thermal Performance of Microencapsulated Phase Change Material Slurry

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-03-01

    tetradec- ane-containing microcapsules with an average size of 4.4 μm. Yamagishi et al. (1999) obtained empirical data for microencapsulated octadecane ob...MPCM slurry (90 – 150 μm). It should be noted that the mass of an average microcapsule is equal to the mass of microencapsulated PCM and the mass...ER D C TR -0 8 -4 Basic Research/Military Construction Thermal Performance of Microencapsulated Phase Change Material Slurry Jorge L

  10. Combustion of Agglomerates Formed by Carbon Slurry Fuels.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-11-01

    catalyst are small, suggesting that fuel development efforts should concentrate on properties which Improve atomization ; (2) combustor performance...concluded that major fuel formulation efforts should concentrate on improving the atomization quality of carbon-black slurries--as opposed to efforts to...concentrated on improving the atomization quality of carbon-black slurries as opposed to efforts to increase the fundamental reactivity of the

  11. Slurry burner for mixture of carbonaceous material and water

    DOEpatents

    Nodd, Dennis G.; Walker, Richard J.

    1987-01-01

    A carbonaceous material-water slurry burner includes a high pressure tip-emulsion atomizer for directing a carbonaceous material-water slurry into a combustion chamber for burning therein without requiring a support fuel or oxygen enrichment of the combustion air. Introduction of the carbonaceous material-water slurry under pressure forces it through a fixed atomizer wherein the slurry is reduced to small droplets by mixing with an atomizing air flow and directed into the combustion chamber. The atomizer includes a swirler located immediately adjacent to where the fuel slurry is introduced into the combustion chamber and which has a single center channel through which the carbonaceous material-water slurry flows into a plurality of diverging channels continuous with the center channel from which the slurry exits the swirler immediately adjacent to an aperture in the combustion chamber. The swirler includes a plurality of slots around its periphery extending the length thereof through which the atomizing air flows and by means of which the atomizing air is deflected so as to exert a maximum shear force upon the carbonaceous material-water slurry as it exits the swirler and enters the combustion chamber. A circulating coolant system or boiler feed water is provided around the periphery of the burner along the length thereof to regulate burner operating temperature, eliminate atomizer plugging, and inhibit the generation of sparklers, thus increasing combustion efficiency. A secondary air source directs heated air into the combustion chamber to promote recirculation of the hot combustion gases within the combustion chamber.

  12. Roles of additives and surface control in slurry atomization

    SciTech Connect

    Tsai, S.C.

    1992-01-01

    This project studies the rheology and airblast atomization of micronized coal slurries. Its major objectives are (1) to promote further understanding of the mechanisms and the roles of additives in airblast atomization of coal water slurry (CWS), and (2) to investigate the impacts of coal particle surface properties and interparticle forces on CWS rheology. We have found that the flow behavior index (n) of a suspension (or slurry) is determined by the relative importance of the interparticle van der Waals attraction and the interparticle electrostatic repulsion. The interparticle attraction, measured by the Hamaker constant scaled to the thermal energy at 25[degrees]C (A/kT), causes particle aggregation, which breaks down at high shear rates, and thus leads to slurry pseudoplastic behavior (n< 1). At a constant particle volume fraction and surface charge density (qualitatively measured by the zeta potential in deionized water), n decreases linearly as A/kT increases. The relative viscosity of the pseudoplastic suspension with respect to that of the suspending liquid is found to be independent of particle density and correlate well with the particle Peclet number which equals the particle diffusional relaxation time multiplied by shear rate. Specifically, the relative viscosities of the pseudoplastic glycerol/water coal slurry and the ethylene glycol/glycerol sand slurry, at same volume fractions as well as similar particle size distributions and liquid viscosities, as functions of the particle Peclet number fall along the same line.

  13. Testing of high temperature coal slurry pump packings

    SciTech Connect

    Hao, B.R.

    1982-12-01

    This report presents the results of a test program of packing designs and materials for high temperature coal slurry plunger pump services. The work was conducted to support the investigations and development of reliable and cost-effective reciprocating coal slurry pumps for future coal liquefaction process application. The short-term objectives were to screen, test and evaluate the state-of-the-art, commercially available packing designs and materials for the coal slurry feed pumps at the coal liquefaction pilot plants. Four major tasks were completed: failure analysis of slurry feed pumps packing components; selection of commercial packing designs and materials for testing; laboratory testing of high temperature coal slurry pump packings; and field testing of selected coalslurry pump packings. The results are presented. The primary root causes of the packing failures experienced at the pilot plants were identified as: insufficient packing lubrication, ineffective plunger flushing, unstable plunger alignment conditions of the pump, packing material incompatible to slurry and solvent, and undesirable packing installation, start-up, standby, and maintenance.

  14. Polishing slurry induced surface haze on phosphate laser glasses

    SciTech Connect

    Suratwala, T I; Miller, P E; Ehrmann, P R; Steele, R A

    2004-03-12

    The effects of residual polishing slurry on the surface topology of highly-polished, Nd-doped metaphosphate laser glasses are reported. Glass samples were pitched polished using cerium oxide or zirconium oxide slurry at different pHs and then washed by different methods that allowed varying amounts of residual slurry to ''dry'' on the surface. Upon re-washing with water, some of the samples showed surface haze (scatter), which scaled with the amount of residual slurry. Profilometry measurements showed that the haze is the result of shallow surface pits (100 nm - 20 {micro}m wide x {approx}15 nm deep). Chemical analyses of material removed during rewashing, confirmed the removal of glass components as well as the preferential removal of modifier ions (e.g. K{sup 1+} and Mg{sup 2+}). The surface pits appear to result from reaction of the glass with condensed liquid at the slurry particle-glass interface that produces water-soluble phosphate products that dissolves away with subsequent water contact. Aggressive washing, to remove residual slurry immediately following polishing, can minimize surface haze on phosphate glasses. It is desirable to eliminate haze from glass used in high-peak-power lasers, since it can cause scatter-induced optical modulation that can cause damage to downstream optics.

  15. A Novel Type of Environmentally Friendly Slurry Coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montero, Xabier; Galetz, Mathias C.; Schütze, Michael

    2015-01-01

    A variety of commercial slurries are available to aluminize the surfaces of nickel-based superalloys; however, they have three main disadvantages. First, the phosphates and chromates or halides used as binders or to activate the diffusion species are environmentally harmful and toxic; second, the slurry coatings can only produce high-aluminum-activity coatings which form precipitate-rich coatings that are detrimental to adherence. Finally, these coatings are limited to the incorporation of aluminum and silicon, whereas the co-deposition of other elements such as chromium or cobalt has not been achieved so far. In this work, the limitations of slurry coatings have been overcome by carefully designing the powder composition and controlling the process to produce co-deposition coatings with chromium, cobalt, or nickel by using nontoxic water-based slurries. This also opens an effective way to control Al activity and to produce low-activity aluminized coatings for the first time when using the slurry technique. These results expand the application range of slurry coatings so they can also be applied under ambient atmosphere, making it possible to fully coat aero engine pieces or large-scale industrial components, providing all properties that are usually only achieved by using more complex and expensive methods such as chemical vapor deposition. Furthermore, these new coatings offer unique advantages that can be very favorable especially as a repairing technique.

  16. Pig in the Middle.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mills, Sophie

    2000-01-01

    Explores themes relating to human transition as they appear in "Charlotte's Web" and four other stories using pigs as a subject. Discusses the motifs common to all these texts that recur in the film "Babe." Considers how the cycle of life and death is ceaseless, and pigs symbolize the necessary transitions that people must all…

  17. Pig in the Middle.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mills, Sophie

    2000-01-01

    Explores themes relating to human transition as they appear in "Charlotte's Web" and four other stories using pigs as a subject. Discusses the motifs common to all these texts that recur in the film "Babe." Considers how the cycle of life and death is ceaseless, and pigs symbolize the necessary transitions that people must all…

  18. Cysticercosis in the pig.

    PubMed

    de Aluja, A S

    2008-01-01

    Taenia solium cysticercosis is still an important parasitosis in rural pigs in many developing countries, México among them. The main causes for the persistence of this condition are lack of hygiene in the rural communities, lack of education of the animal owners, lack of control in the trade of pigs and their meat and lack of conscientious meat inspection. The pig production systems in the marginated areas of Mexico are briefly mentioned and it is stressed that among the important reasons for the persistence of the reproductive cycle of Taenia solium is the fact that appropriate toilet facilities in village dwellings are not mandatory. The diagnostic methods of cysticercosis in the living pigs and in their meat are discussed and the degenerative stages of the larvae as well as methods to test their viability are explained. The treatment of infected pigs and their meat is discussed. Recommendations for control programmes are given.

  19. Implications of the Differential Toxicological Effects of III-V Ionic and Particulate Materials for Hazard Assessment of Semiconductor Slurries.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Wen; Lin, Sijie; Chang, Chong Hyun; Ji, Zhaoxia; Sun, Bingbing; Wang, Xiang; Li, Ruibin; Pon, Nanetta; Xia, Tian; Nel, André E

    2015-12-22

    Because of tunable band gaps, high carrier mobility, and low-energy consumption rates, III-V materials are attractive for use in semiconductor wafers. However, these wafers require chemical mechanical planarization (CMP) for polishing, which leads to the generation of large quantities of hazardous waste including particulate and ionic III-V debris. Although the toxic effects of micron-sized III-V materials have been studied in vivo, no comprehensive assessment has been undertaken to elucidate the hazardous effects of submicron particulates and released III-V ionic components. Since III-V materials may contribute disproportionately to the hazard of CMP slurries, we obtained GaP, InP, GaAs, and InAs as micron- (0.2-3 μm) and nanoscale (<100 nm) particles for comparative studies of their cytotoxic potential in macrophage (THP-1) and lung epithelial (BEAS-2B) cell lines. We found that nanosized III-V arsenides, including GaAs and InAs, could induce significantly more cytotoxicity over a 24-72 h observation period. In contrast, GaP and InP particulates of all sizes as well as ionic GaCl3 and InCl3 were substantially less hazardous. The principal mechanism of III-V arsenide nanoparticle toxicity is dissolution and shedding of toxic As(III) and, to a lesser extent, As(V) ions. GaAs dissolves in the cell culture medium as well as in acidifying intracellular compartments, while InAs dissolves (more slowly) inside cells. Chelation of released As by 2,3-dimercapto-1-propanesulfonic acid interfered in GaAs toxicity. Collectively, these results demonstrate that III-V arsenides, GaAs and InAs nanoparticles, contribute in a major way to the toxicity of III-V materials that could appear in slurries. This finding is of importance for considering how to deal with the hazard potential of CMP slurries.

  20. Liquefaction of Douglas Fir wood slurries: titration of acids and anions in aqueous product and feed slurries

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, H.G.

    1981-03-01

    After hydrolytic pretreatment, wood slurries contain substantial amounts of organic acids. Additional acids are produced during the liquefaction step whether or not there is prehydrolysis. The acids have pH's in the range of about 3 to 5 and are easily titrated potentiometrically with sodium hydroxide. Anions present in neutralized slurry or in aqueous product can be titrated with hydrogen chloride solution with appropriate corrections for sulfate if present, and for excess titrant at the low pH of the endpoint.

  1. Technical Report on NETL's Non Newtonian Multiphase Slurry Workshop: A path forward to understanding non-Newtonian multiphase slurry flows

    SciTech Connect

    Edited by Guenther, Chris; Garg, Rahul

    2013-08-19

    The Department of Energy’s (DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) sponsored a workshop on non-Newtonian multiphase slurry at NETL’s Morgantown campus August 19 and 20, 2013. The objective of this special two-day meeting of 20-30 invited experts from industry, National Labs and academia was to identify and address technical issues associated with handling non-Newtonian multiphase slurries across various facilities managed by DOE. Particular emphasis during this workshop was placed on applications managed by the Office of Environmental Management (EM). The workshop was preceded by two webinars wherein personnel from ORP and NETL provided background information on the Hanford WTP project and discussed the critical design challenges facing this project. In non-Newtonian fluids, viscosity is not constant and exhibits a complex dependence on applied shear stress or deformation. Many applications under EM’s tank farm mission involve non-Newtonian slurries that are multiphase in nature; tank farm storage and handling, slurry transport, and mixing all involve multiphase flow dynamics, which require an improved understanding of the mechanisms responsible for rheological changes in non-Newtonian multiphase slurries (NNMS). To discuss the issues in predicting the behavior of NNMS, the workshop focused on two topic areas: (1) State-of-the-art in non-Newtonian Multiphase Slurry Flow, and (2) Scaling up with Confidence and Ensuring Safe and Reliable Long-Term Operation.

  2. New technology improves cement-slurry design

    SciTech Connect

    1997-08-01

    A promising geothermal concession is located in a tea plantation on the island of Java. A drilling project was undertaken to evaluate and harness this resource for geothermal electricity generation. The program used two slimhole rigs to drill appraisal wells to establish the potential of the field. Geothermal wells present the most severe conditions to which cements are exposed. As a result, their performance requirements are among the most stringent. Geothermal cements are usually designed to provide at least 1,000 psi compressive strength and no more than 1.0-md water permeability. While casings with tight annular clearances require that good cementing practices be observed, they also create conditions that demand much greater care and control in slurry and procedure design than regular casing cementation. Free-water and thickening-time requirements are similar for geothermal and slimhole conditions, but the use of perlite and silica flour complicate the rheology required for geothermal wells. The paper describes liquid-cement premix, applications, laboratory testing, field pilot testing, and field operations.

  3. Slurry combustion. Volume 1, Text: Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Essenhigh, R.

    1993-06-21

    The project described in this Report was to investigate the possibility of using sorbent added to coal-water fuel (CWF) mixtures as a means of reducing SOX emissions when burning Ohio coal. The results are significantly encouraging, with SOX concentrations reduced by amounts ranging from 25% to 65%, depending on the sorbent type and the firing conditions, where one major condition identified was the residence time in the flame gases. With the sorbent-loaded slurrys, the trend generally showed increasing SO{sub 2} capture with increasing sorbent loading. There were significant differences between the two different mixture formulations, however: The calcite/No. 8-seam mixture showed significantly higher SO{sub 2} capture at all times (ranging from 45% to 65%) than did the dolomite/No. 5 seam mixture (ranging from 25% to 45%). If the successes so far achieved are not to be wasted, advantage should be taken of these encouraging results by extending the work at both the present scale to determine the other unknown factors controlling sorption efficiency, and at larger scale to start implementation in commercial systems.

  4. Development of a Model for Planning Transportation and Application of Digested Slurry to Farmlands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamaoka, Masaru; Nakamura, Masato; Aihara, Hideki; Shimizu, Natsuki; Yuyama, Yoshito

    The authors developed a model for planning the transportation and application of digested slurry to farmlands as a fertilizer. The model requires the following parameters, daily production of the digested slurry, concentrations of fertilizer elements in the digested slurry, distances from the plant to each field where the slurry will be applied and application loads of slurry for each field. According to the data, the model simulates daily workloads for transportation of digested slurry from the plant to the fields by a vacuum truck and application of slurry to each field with a spreader. The model calculates the daily changes in digested slurry storage at the plant. Validity of the model was confirmed by data obtained from a pilot scale plant. The model is a useful tool for planning the transportation and application of digested slurry to farmland as a fertilizer.

  5. Shift from coral to macroalgae dominance on a volcanically acidified reef

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Enochs, I. C.; Manzello, D. P.; Donham, E. M.; Kolodziej, G.; Okano, R.; Johnston, L.; Young, C.; Iguel, J.; Edwards, C. B.; Fox, M. D.; Valentino, L.; Johnson, S.; Benavente, D.; Clark, S. J.; Carlton, R.; Burton, T.; Eynaud, Y.; Price, N. N.

    2015-12-01

    Rising anthropogenic CO2 in the atmosphere is accompanied by an increase in oceanic CO2 and a concomitant decline in seawater pH (ref. ). This phenomenon, known as ocean acidification (OA), has been experimentally shown to impact the biology and ecology of numerous animals and plants, most notably those that precipitate calcium carbonate skeletons, such as reef-building corals. Volcanically acidified water at Maug, Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands (CNMI) is equivalent to near-future predictions for what coral reef ecosystems will experience worldwide due to OA. We provide the first chemical and ecological assessment of this unique site and show that acidification-related stress significantly influences the abundance and diversity of coral reef taxa, leading to the often-predicted shift from a coral to an algae-dominated state. This study provides field evidence that acidification can lead to macroalgae dominance on reefs.

  6. Purification of empty fruit bunch (EFB) and kenaf soda lignin with acidified water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hashim, Sharifah Nurul Ain Syed; Zakaria, Sarani; Jaafar, Sharifah Nabihah Syed; Hua, Chia Chin

    2014-09-01

    In this current study, the soda lignins from empty fruit bunch (EFB) and kenaf core were recovered by two step precipitation method. The objective of this research is to study the purity of lignin by washing the lignins with acidified water. The purified lignins were undergone characterization by FT-IR, Uv-Vis and XRD. The FT-IR analysis shows that kenaf core has Guaiacyl(G) and Syringyl(S) unit meanwhile EFB has Hydroxyphenyl(H), Guaiacyl(G) and Syringyl(S) unit of lignin. As for XRD analysis, the non-purified shows that the existence of impurities which is salt (NaCl). The UV analysis shows the higher absorbance which lead to the purity of lignin.

  7. Rapid restoration of methanogenesis in an acidified UASB reactor treating 2,4,6-trichlorophenol (TCP).

    PubMed

    Díaz-Báez, María Consuelo; Valderrama-Rincon, Juan Daniel

    2017-02-15

    Anaerobic bioreactors are often used for removal of xenobiotic and highly toxic pollutants from wastewater. Most of the time, the pollutant is so toxic that the stability of the reactor becomes compromised. It is well known that methanogens are one of the most sensitive organisms in the anaerobic consortia and hence the stability of the reactors is highly dependant on methanogenesis. Unfortunately few studies have focused on recovering the methanogenic activity once it has been inhibited by highly toxic pollutants. Here we establish a quick recovery strategy for neutralization of an acidified UASB reactor after failure by intoxication with an excess of TCP in the influent. Once the reactor returned to pH values compatible with methanogenesis, biogas production was re-started after one day and the system was re-acclimated to TCP. Successful removal of TCP from synthetic wastewater was shown for concentrations up to 70mg/L after restoration.

  8. Type C bovine botulism outbreak due to carcass contaminated non-acidified silage.

    PubMed

    Myllykoski, J; Lindström, M; Keto-Timonen, R; Söderholm, H; Jakala, J; Kallio, H; Sukura, A; Korkeala, H

    2009-02-01

    The first reported bovine botulism outbreak in Finland is described. Nine out of 90 cattle on a dairy farm died after being fed non-acidified silage contaminated by animal carcasses. Type C botulinum neurotoxin gene was detected in one heifer by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and the neurotoxin was detected by the mouse bioassay. Clostridium botulinum type C was isolated from liver samples. The isolated strain was identified with amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) analysis as group III C. botulinum. To our knowledge, this is the first time that a type C bovine botulism outbreak has been diagnosed by PCR and confirmed by subsequent isolation and AFLP identification of the disease strain. The importance of the acidification process in silage production to inhibit C. botulinum toxin production in silage and thus to prevent further botulism outbreaks is emphasized. Nevertheless, preformed toxin in the carcass is not destroyed by acid.

  9. Fatty acid composition and biogenic amines in acidified and fermented fish silage: a comparison study.

    PubMed

    Özyurt, Gülsün; Gökdoğan, Saadet; Şimşek, Ayşe; Yuvka, Ilknur; Ergüven, Merve; Kuley Boga, Esmeray

    2016-01-01

    In the presented study, ensiling of discard fish by acidification or fermentation was evaluated. Klunzinger's ponyfish which is a discard fish was used for the production of fish silage by acidification (3% formic acid for Method FA; 1.5% formic and 1.5% sulphuric acid for Method FASA) and fermentation (Lactobacillus plantarum for Method LP and Streptococcus thermophilus for Method ST). The chemical, microbiological and nutritional properties of the differently preserved fish silages were estimated during a storage period of 60 d at ambient temperature. Compared to the raw material, a slight increase in saturated fatty acids and a slight decrease in polyunsaturated fatty acids were observed in all silages. At the end of the storage period, the aerobic bacteria counts after applying Methods FA, FASA, LP and ST amounted to 2.35, 2.39, 5.77 and 5.43 log cfu/g, respectively. The analysis of thiobarbituric acid revealed that acidification of silages accelerated the lipid oxidation. Nine biogenic amines were found in raw fish and different silages. The initial histamine concentration in raw fish was 0.17 mg/100 g and in all silages it remained at low levels during the storage period. The initial tyramine content was found to be 1.56 mg/100 g in raw fish and increased significantly in all silages. The increase of the tyramine content in fermented silages was considerably higher than in acidified silages (23-48 mg/100 g and 5-10 mg/100 g, respectively). It can be concluded that acidified or fermented fish silage should be considered as potential feed component for animals because of its high nutritional value and appropriate microbiological and chemical quality.

  10. Eubiotic effect of a dietary acidifier (potassium diformate) on the health status of cultured Oreochromis niloticus.

    PubMed

    Abu Elala, Nermeen M; Ragaa, Naela M

    2015-07-01

    In connection with the global demand for safe human food and the production of environmentally friendly aquaculture products, acidifiers are natural organic acids and salts that have received considerable attention as animal-feed additives. The current study was designed to evaluate the effects of potassium diformate (KDF) on the growth performance and immunity of cultured Oreochromis niloticus (O. niloticus). Four iso-nitrogenous and iso-caloric rations containing graded levels of KDF, including 0% (control basal diet), 0.1%, 0.2% and 0.3%, were fed separately to four equal fish groups (30 fish/group with an initial body weight of 53.49 ± 6.15 g) for sixty days. At the end of the experimental period, the fish groups fed on 0.2% and 0.3% KDF exhibited significant improvements in their feed intake, live weight gain, specific growth rate, feed conversion ratio and protein efficiency ratio, with concomitant improvement of their apparent protein digestibility (p < 0.05). Dietary supplementation of 0.3% KDF appeared to stimulate the beneficial intestinal flora; a proliferation was observed of indigenous probionts (Eubiosis) associated with the relative activation of cellular and humeral innate immunity (phagocytic activity/index, nitroblue tetrazolium reduction test and serum/gut mucous lysozyme activity). The cumulative mortality of the fish groups fed on KDF and challenged orally with Aeromonas hydrophila was lower than that of the control group. The resistance against diseases increased with dietary KDF in a dose-dependent manner. Thus, we conclude that the use of acidifiers can be an efficient tool to achieve sustainable, economical and safe fish production.

  11. Eubiotic effect of a dietary acidifier (potassium diformate) on the health status of cultured Oreochromis niloticus

    PubMed Central

    Abu Elala, Nermeen M.; Ragaa, Naela M.

    2014-01-01

    In connection with the global demand for safe human food and the production of environmentally friendly aquaculture products, acidifiers are natural organic acids and salts that have received considerable attention as animal-feed additives. The current study was designed to evaluate the effects of potassium diformate (KDF) on the growth performance and immunity of cultured Oreochromis niloticus (O. niloticus). Four iso-nitrogenous and iso-caloric rations containing graded levels of KDF, including 0% (control basal diet), 0.1%, 0.2% and 0.3%, were fed separately to four equal fish groups (30 fish/group with an initial body weight of 53.49 ± 6.15 g) for sixty days. At the end of the experimental period, the fish groups fed on 0.2% and 0.3% KDF exhibited significant improvements in their feed intake, live weight gain, specific growth rate, feed conversion ratio and protein efficiency ratio, with concomitant improvement of their apparent protein digestibility (p < 0.05). Dietary supplementation of 0.3% KDF appeared to stimulate the beneficial intestinal flora; a proliferation was observed of indigenous probionts (Eubiosis) associated with the relative activation of cellular and humeral innate immunity (phagocytic activity/index, nitroblue tetrazolium reduction test and serum/gut mucous lysozyme activity). The cumulative mortality of the fish groups fed on KDF and challenged orally with Aeromonas hydrophila was lower than that of the control group. The resistance against diseases increased with dietary KDF in a dose-dependent manner. Thus, we conclude that the use of acidifiers can be an efficient tool to achieve sustainable, economical and safe fish production. PMID:26199753

  12. Acidifier application rate impacts on ammonia emissions from US roaster chicken houses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shah, Sanjay B.; Grimes, Jesse L.; Oviedo-Rondón, Edgar O.; Westerman, Philip W.

    2014-08-01

    Due to its potential environmental and public health impacts, emissions of ammonia (NH3) as well as several other gases from US livestock farms may be regulated. Broiler houses are important sources of NH3 emissions. However, there are no emissions data from roaster (8-12 wk old broilers, ˜4 kg ea.) houses. Producers treat the litter in broiler houses with acidifiers, such as sodium bisulfate (SBS, NaHSO4) to reduce ammonia production and protect bird health. However, there is very little data on the effect of acidifiers, particularly at high application rates on ammonia emissions. The impact of different SBS application rates [High (0.95-1.46 kg m-2, whole house), Medium (0.73 kg m-2, whole house), Low (0.37-0.49 kg m-2, whole house), and Control (0.37-0.49 kg m-2, brood chamber)] on ammonia emissions was evaluated in commercial roaster houses over 22 months spanning eight flocks. Ammonia emission from each fan was measured with an acid scrubber that operated only when the fan operated. Emissions were calculated using >95% measured data with the rest being estimated using robust methods. Exhaust ammonia-N concentrations were inversely correlated with the SBS application rates. Emission rates on animal unit (AU, where 1 AU = 500 kg live-mass) basis (ER, g d-1 AU-1) were reduced by 27, 13, and 5%, respectively, in the High, Medium, and Low treatments vs. the Control treatment (mean: 100 g d-1 AU-1, range: 86-114 g d-1 AU-1). Emission rates for the Control treatment measured in this study on roasters were mostly higher than ERs in the literature. Differences in ERs are not only due to diet, environmental and management conditions, but also due to measurement methods.

  13. Does road salting confound the recovery of the microcrustacean community in an acidified lake?

    PubMed

    Jensen, Thomas Correll; Meland, Sondre; Schartau, Ann Kristin; Walseng, Bjørn

    2014-04-15

    Numerous boreal lakes across the Northern Hemisphere recovering from acidification are experiencing a simultaneous increase in chloride (Cl) concentrations from road salting. Increasing Cl may have profound effects on the lake ecosystem. We examine if an increase in Cl from road salting has modified the recovery of the microcrustacean community in an acidified boreal lake undergoing chemical recovery (study lake). Results from the study lake were compared with an acidified "reference lake". The community changed during the study period in the study lake mainly driven by the reduction in acidification pressure. Despite the community changes and an increase in species richness, the absence of several acid sensitive species, previously occurring in the lake, indicates a delayed biological recovery relative to the chemical recovery. Moreover, changes in occurrence of acid sensitive and acid tolerant species indicated that the biological recovery was slower in the study lake compared to the "reference". Although recurrent episodes of high aluminum and low pH and decreasing Ca are likely important factors for the delay, these do not explain, for instance, the shift from Cyclops scutifer to Bosmina longispina in the study lake. Although the contribution of Cl was not significant, the correlation between Cl and the variation in microcrustacean community was twice as high in the study lake compared to the "reference". We argue that small, sheltered forest lakes may be especially sensitive to increased Cl levels, through changes in pattern of stratification, thus providing a mechanism for the shift from C. scutifer to B. longispina. The reduction of the acidification pressure seems to override the Cl effects on microcrustaceans at low Cl levels in salt-affected lakes recovering from acidification. However, prognoses for growing traffic and increasing road salting raise concern for many recovering lakes located in proximity to roads and urbanized areas. Copyright © 2014

  14. Comparison of the effects of thermal stress and CO₂-driven acidified seawater on fertilization in coral Acropora digitifera.

    PubMed

    Iguchi, Akira; Suzuki, Atsushi; Sakai, Kazuhiko; Nojiri, Yukihiro

    2015-08-01

    Global warming (GW) and ocean acidification (OA) have been recognized as severe threats for reef-building corals that support coral reef ecosystems, but these effects on the early life history stage of corals are relatively unknown compared with the effects on calcification of adult corals. In this study, we evaluated the effects of thermal stress and CO2-driven acidified seawater on fertilization in a reef-building coral, Acropora digitifera. The fertilization rates of A. digitifera decreased in response to thermal stress compared with those under normal seawater conditions. In contrast, the changes of fertilization rates were not evident in the acidified seawater. Generalized Linear Mixed Model (GLMM) predicted that sperm/egg crosses and temperature were explanatory variables in the best-fitted model for the fertilization data. In the best model, interactions between thermal stress and acidified seawater on the fertilization rates were not selected. Our results suggested that coral fertilization is more sensitive to future GW than OA. Taking into consideration the previous finding that sperm motility of A. digitifera was decreased by acidified seawater, the decrease in coral cover followed by that of sperm concentration might cause the interacting effects of GW and OA on coral fertilization.

  15. Growth inhibition of Cronobacter spp. strains in reconstituted powdered infant formula acidified with organic acids supported by natural stomach acidity.

    PubMed

    Zhu, S; Schnell, S; Fischer, M

    2013-09-01

    Cronobacter is associated with outbreaks of rare, but life-threatening cases of meningitis, necrotizing enterocolitis, and sepsis in newborns. This study was conducted to determine the effect of organic acids on growth of Cronobacter in laboratory medium and reconstituted powdered infant formula (PIF) as well as the bacteriostatic effect of slightly acidified infant formula when combined with neonatal gastric acidity. Inhibitory effect of seven organic acids on four acid sensitive Cronobacter strains was determined in laboratory medium with broth dilution method at pH 5.0, 5.5 and 6.0. Acetic, butyric and propionic acids were most inhibitive against Cronobacter in the laboratory medium. The killing effect of these three acids was partially buffered in reconstituted PIF. Under neonatal gastric acid condition of pH 5.0, the slightly acidified formula which did not exert inhibition effect solely reduced significantly the Cronobacter populations. A synergistic effect of formula moderately acidified with organic acid combined with the physiological infant gastric acid was visible in preventing the rapid growth of Cronobacter in neonatal stomach. The study contributed to a better understanding of the inhibitory effect of organic acids on Cronobacter growth in different matrixes and provided new ideas in terms of controlling bacteria colonization and translocation by acidified formula. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Determination of 5-log reduction times for food pathogens in acidified cucumbers during storage at 10 and 25 degrees C.

    PubMed

    Breidt, Fred; Hayes, Janet; McFeeters, Roger F

    2007-11-01

    Outbreaks of acid-resistant foodborne pathogens in acid foods with pH values below 4.0, including apple cider and orange juice, have raised concerns about the safety of acidified vegetable products. For acidified vegetable products with pH values between 3.3 and 4.6, previous research has demonstrated that thermal treatments are needed to achieve a 5-log reduction in the numbers of Escherichia coli O157:H7, Listeria monocytogenes, or Salmonella enterica. For some acidified vegetable products with a pH of 3.3 or below, heat processing can result in unacceptable product quality. The purpose of this study was to determine the holding times needed to achieve a 5-log reduction in E. coli O157:H7, L. monocytogenes, and S. enterica strains in acidified vegetable products with acetic acid as the primary acidulant, a pH of 3.3 or below, and a minimum equilibrated temperature of 10 degrees C. We found E. coli O157:H7 to be the most acid-resistant microorganism for the conditions tested, with a predicted time to achieve a 5-log reduction in cell numbers at 10 degrees C of 5.7 days, compared with 2.1 days (51 h) for Salmonella or 0.5 days (11.2 h) for Listeria. At 25 degrees C, the E. coli O157:H7 population achieved a 5-log reduction in 1.4 days (34.3 h).

  17. Study of acidified ignitable liquid residues in fire debris by solid-phase microextraction with gas chromatography and mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Martín-Alberca, Carlos; García-Ruiz, Carmen; Delémont, Olivier

    2015-07-14

    The detection and identification of ignitable liquid residues in fire debris can be meaningful in fire investigations. However, background pyrolysis products and weathering hinder the identification and classification steps. In addition to those processes, the acidification of the ignitable liquids before the combustion process could make those tasks even more difficult. Nevertheless, there are no systematic studies assessing the extraction, analysis and composition of acidified ignitable liquid residues obtained from fire debris. In this work, a methodology for the study of acidified ignitable liquid residues in fire debris by solid-phase microextraction with gas chromatography and mass spectrometry is proposed. This methodology has been evaluated, first with simulated solutions (gasoline-sulphuric acid mixtures set on fire under controlled conditions), and then with analysis of samples from real fire debris obtained from 18 chemical ignition Molotov cocktails made with sulfuric acid and three different ignitable liquids (two types of gasoline and diesel fuel). In addition, the extensive modifications observed in chromatograms of acidified ignitable liquid residues regarding neat and weathered samples were studied. These alterations were produced by the combustion and acidification processes. As a consequence, tert-butylated compounds are proposed as diagnostic indicators for the identification of acidified gasoline in fire debris, even in strongly weathered samples. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  18. Thermal processing of acidified foods with pH 4.1 to pH 4.6

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Shelf-stable acidified foods with a pH at or below 4.6 must be processed to achieve a 5-log reduction for vegetative bacterial pathogens. Published research does not exist to adequately support the Food and Drug Administration process filings for products with pH 4.1–4.6 or to define critical limits...

  19. Trends in Surface Water Chemistry in Acidified Areas in Europe and North America from 1990 to 2008

    EPA Science Inventory

    Acidification of lakes and rivers is still an environmental concern despite reduced emissions of acidifying compounds. We analyzed trends in surface water chemistry of 173 acid-sensitive sites from 12 regions in Europe and North America. In 11 of 12 regions, non-marine sulphate (...

  20. Preservation of acidified cucumbers with a combination of fumaric acid and cinnamaldehyde that target lactic acid bacteria and yeasts

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The naturally occurring compound, fumaric acid, was evaluated as a potential preservative for the long-term storage of cucumbers. Fumaric acid inhibited growth of lactic acid bacteria (LAB) in an acidified cucumber juice medium model system resembling conditions that could allow preservation of cucu...

  1. Trends in Surface Water Chemistry in Acidified Areas in Europe and North America from 1990 to 2008

    EPA Science Inventory

    Acidification of lakes and rivers is still an environmental concern despite reduced emissions of acidifying compounds. We analyzed trends in surface water chemistry of 173 acid-sensitive sites from 12 regions in Europe and North America. In 11 of 12 regions, non-marine sulphate (...

  2. Effects of postchill application of acidified sodium chlorite to control Campylobacter spp. and Escherichia coli on commercial broiler carcasses.

    PubMed

    Oyarzabal, Omar A; Hawk, Christopher; Bilgili, Sacit F; Warf, C Cayce; Kemp, G Kere

    2004-10-01

    Experiments were performed to assess the reduction of Campylobacter spp. and Escherichia coli in commercial broiler carcasses by postchill dip applications of acidified sodium chlorite. Carcass rinses were collected before the inside-outside-bird washer (IOBW), post-IOBW, postchill, and after the postchill application of acidified sodium chlorite. Prevalence and counts of Campylobacter spp. and E. coli were determined. The mean values for Campylobacter spp. and E. coli counts differed significantly at sampling sites. The IOBW reduced the bacterial counts significantly in only one experiment. The chiller reduced Campylobacter counts significantly in both experiments but failed to significantly reduce the counts of E. coli in one experiment. No major reduction in the prevalence after enrichment for Campylobacter spp. was detected post-IOBW or postchill. However, a significant reduction in Campylobacter spp. and in E. coli counts and Campylobacter spp. prevalence was seen after the postchill application of acidified sodium chlorite. These results demonstrate that the antimicrobial effect of acidified sodium chlorite applied postchill may be used to significantly reduce Campylobacter spp. and E. coli in commercial broiler carcasses. Postchill systems may eventually be used in different applications, such as mist, spray, or bath, which could be applied closer to the final stages in processing.

  3. Rheological properties of concentrated aqueous injectable calcium phosphate cement slurry.

    PubMed

    Liu, Changsheng; Shao, Huifang; Chen, Feiyue; Zheng, Haiyan

    2006-10-01

    In this paper, the steady and dynamic rheological properties of concentrated aqueous injectable calcium phosphate cement (CPC) slurry were investigated. The results indicate that the concentrated aqueous injectable CPC showed both plastic and thixotropic behavior. As the setting process progressed, the yield stress of CPC slurry was raised, the area of the thixotropic hysteresis loop was enlarged, indicating that the strength of the net structure of the slurry had increased. The results of dynamic rheological behavior indicate that the slurry presented the structure similar to viscoelastic body and the property of shear thinning at the beginning. During the setting process, the slurry was transformed from a flocculent structure to a net structure, and the strength increased. Different factors had diverse effects on the rheological properties of the CPC slurry in the setting process, a reflection of the flowing properties (or injection), and the microstructure development of this concentrated suspension. Raising the powder-to-liquid ratio decreased the distance among the particles, increased the initial strength, and shortened the setting time. In addition, raising the temperature improved the initial strength, increased the order of reaction, and shortened the setting time, which was favorable to the setting process. The particle size of the raw material had much to do with the strength of original structure and setting time. The storage module G' of CPC slurry during the setting process followed the rule of power law function G'=A exp(Bt), which could be applied to forecast the setting time, and the calculated results thereafter are in agreement with the experimental data.

  4. Effect of Groove Pattern of Chemical Mechanical Polishing Pad on Slurry Flow Behavior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamazaki, Tsutomu; Doi, Toshiro K.; Uneda, Michio; Kurokawa, Syuhei; Ohnishi, Osamu; Seshimo, Kiyoshi; Aida, Hideo

    2012-05-01

    In chemical mechanical polishing (CMP), the slurry flow behavior on the polishing pad is very important both for improving polishing effectiveness and for reducing the slurry consumption. In this study, we aim to evaluate two types of CMP pad that have unique special groove patterns, slurry outflow and inflow pads, for controlling the slurry flow behavior. We describe the effect of the groove patterns on the slurry flow behavior observed using images recorded using a high-speed digital camera. The results of the study indicate several advantages of the proposed pads over the conventional pads from the viewpoint of slurry flow behavior.

  5. Pig manure application for remediation of mine soils in Murcia Province, SE Spain.

    PubMed

    Faz, A; Carmona, D M; Zanuzzi, A; Mermut, A R

    2008-08-31

    In southern Spain, specifically in Murcia Province, an increased pig population causes large amounts of slurry production that creates a very serious environmental concern. Our aim was to use this waste to reduce the acid mine drainage process, heavy metal mobilization, and to improve soil conditions to enhance plant establishment in mine soils. Pig manure, sewage sludge, and lime were used as soil amendments in a field experiment and in undisturbed soil column. Field experiments showed an increase in pH, total nitrogen, organic carbon, and carbonate contents; a reduction of diethylene-tetramine pentaacetic acid (DTPA)-- and water-extractable metals; and an improvement of plant establishment. The field studies showed that pig manure could be utilized to remediate polluted soils. Column studies in the laboratory showed that amendment of mine soil with pig manure initially increased soil pH from 2.21 to 6.34, promoted reduced conditions in the surface soil, and decreased the metal mobility. After 21 weeks, while the leachate was slightly acidic, however, the mobility of metals was substantially low. Additions of 7 and 14% of pig manure were insufficient to maintain a neutral pH in the leachate. Therefore, continuous application of the pig manure may be advised.

  6. Probiotic yogurt and acidified milk similarly reduce postprandial inflammation and both alter the gut microbiota of healthy, young men.

    PubMed

    Burton, Kathryn J; Rosikiewicz, Marta; Pimentel, Grégory; Bütikofer, Ueli; von Ah, Ueli; Voirol, Marie-Jeanne; Croxatto, Antony; Aeby, Sébastien; Drai, Jocelyne; McTernan, Philip G; Greub, Gilbert; Pralong, François P; Vergères, Guy; Vionnet, Nathalie

    2017-05-01

    Probiotic yogurt and milk supplemented with probiotics have been investigated for their role in 'low-grade' inflammation but evidence for their efficacy is inconclusive. This study explores the impact of probiotic yogurt on metabolic and inflammatory biomarkers, with a parallel study of gut microbiota dynamics. The randomised cross-over study was conducted in fourteen healthy, young men to test probiotic yogurt compared with milk acidified with 2 % d-(+)-glucono-δ-lactone during a 2-week intervention (400 g/d). Fasting assessments, a high-fat meal test (HFM) and microbiota analyses were used to assess the intervention effects. Baseline assessments for the HFM were carried out after a run-in during which normal milk was provided. No significant differences in the inflammatory response to the HFM were observed after probiotic yogurt compared with acidified milk intake; however, both products were associated with significant reductions in the inflammatory response to the HFM compared with the baseline tests (assessed by IL6, TNFα and chemokine ligand 5) (P<0·001). These observations were accompanied by significant changes in microbiota taxa, including decreased abundance of Bilophila wadsworthia after acidified milk (log 2-fold-change (FC)=-1·5, P adj=0·05) and probiotic yogurt intake (FC=-1·3, P adj=0·03), increased abundance of Bifidobacterium species after acidified milk intake (FC=1·4, P adj=0·04) and detection of Lactobacillus delbrueckii spp. bulgaricus (FC=7·0, P adj<0·01) and Streptococcus salivarius spp. thermophilus (FC=6·0, P adj<0·01) after probiotic yogurt intake. Probiotic yogurt and acidified milk similarly reduce postprandial inflammation that is associated with a HFM while inducing distinct changes in the gut microbiota of healthy men. These observations could be relevant for dietary treatments that target 'low-grade' inflammation.

  7. Hygienic aspects of livestock manure management and biogas systems operated by small-scale pig farmers in Vietnam.

    PubMed

    Huong, Luu Quynh; Madsen, Henry; Anh, Le Xuan; Ngoc, Pham Thi; Dalsgaard, Anders

    2014-02-01

    Biogas digesters are widely promoted and increasingly used to treat and generate gas from pig slurry worldwide. The objective of this study was to describe manure management practices with focus on biogas digestion among small scale pig farmers in Hue (50 farmers) and Hanoi (96 farmers) and to assess fecal contamination levels in biogas effluent. Results showed that 84% of the farmers in Hanoi and 42% in Hue used both pig slurry and human excreta for biogas production. Biogas digestion only reduced E. coli concentrations by 1 to 2 log units to 3.70 ± 0.84 Escherichia coli (log10) cfu/ml on average in effluent as compared with raw slurry. Biogas effluent was commonly used to fertilize vegetables or discharged directly into the garden or aquatic recipients. Reduced problems with bad smells and flies were reported as main reasons for establishing a biogas digester. Further studies are needed to assess human and animal health hazards associated with the discharge and use of biogas effluent from small-scale biogas systems. © 2013.

  8. Novel techniques for slurry bubble column hydrodynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Dudukovic, M.P.

    1999-05-14

    The objective of this cooperative research effort between Washington University, Ohio State University and Exxon Research Engineering Company was to improve the knowledge base for scale-up and operation of slurry bubble column reactors for syngas conversion and other coal conversion processes by increased reliance on experimentally verified hydrodynamic models. During the first year (July 1, 1995--June 30, 1996) of this three year program novel experimental tools (computer aided radioactive particle tracking (CARPT), particle image velocimetry (PIV), heat probe, optical fiber probe and gamma ray tomography) were developed and tuned for measurement of pertinent hydrodynamic quantities, such as velocity field, holdup distribution, heat transfer and bubble size. The accomplishments were delineated in the First Technical Annual Report. The second year (July, 1996--June 30, 1997) was spent on further development and tuning of the novel experimental tools (e.g., development of Monte Carlo calibration for CARPT, optical probe development), building up the hydrodynamic data base using these tools and comparison of the two techniques (PIV and CARPT) for determination of liquid velocities. A phenomenological model for gas and liquid backmixing was also developed. All accomplishments were summarized in the Second Annual Technical Report. During the third and final year of the program (July 1, 1997--June 30, 1998) and during the nine months no cost extension, the high pressure facility was completed and a set of data was taken at high pressure conditions. Both PIV, CT and CARPT were used. More fundamental hydrodynamic modeling was also undertaken and model predictions were compared to data. The accomplishments for this period are summarized in this report.

  9. Coal slurry pipelines: Blach Mesa and future projects

    SciTech Connect

    Brolick, H.J.

    1998-12-31

    Most people in the mining industry have some familiarity with pipelining of minerals in slurry form, however, many may not realize the extent that mineral slurry pipeline transport is used throughout the world. The author is referring to the shipment of the minerals in the raw or concentrate form, not tailings pipelines which are also commonplace in the minerals industry. There are over forty mineral pipelines around the world. The list covers a wide range of minerals, including copper ore concentrate, iron ore concentrate, limestone, phosphate concentrate, kaolin, Gilsonite and gold ore, with only eleven of the mineral pipelines located in the USA. It should be noted that one of the earliest slurry pipelines was a 108 mile coal slurry pipeline in Ohio, which started up in 1957. The pipeline only operated until 1963 when a railroad company literally bought out the transportation contract. This really was the beginning of the unit train concept. Each mineral has specific physical and chemical characteristics to be considered when evaluating transport by pipeline. The processing required at the pipeline origin, as well as at the pipeline termination, are also important factors in determining slurry pipeline feasibility. Transport distance, annual volume, and continuity of shipments are other important factors. One of the most difficult minerals to transport as a slurry is coal because the specific gravity is closer to water than most other minerals. Thus, the fine balance of creating enough fine particles to serve as a carrier for the coarser material, while at the same time having a material that can be economically dewatered is very sensitive and technical designs will vary with types of coal. Additionally, since coal is purchased for its thermal value, excess surface moisture can lower the value of the coal to the customer. One of the most successful slurry pipeline operations, and the only current operating long-distance coal slurry pipeline is the Black Mesa

  10. Roles of additives and surface control in slurry atomization

    SciTech Connect

    Tsai, S.C.

    1990-01-01

    This report focuses on the effects of interparticle forces on the rheology and airblast atomization of micronized coal water slurry (CWS). We found that the CWS flow behavior index is determined by the relative importance of the interparticle van der Waals attraction and the interparticle electrostatic repulsion. The former intensifies as the Hamaker constant increases and the interparticle distance reduces while the latter increases as the particle surface charge density increases. The interparticle attraction causes particle aggregation, which breaks down at high shear rates, and thus leads to slurry pseudoplastic behavior. In contrast, the interparticle repulsion prevents particle aggregation and thus leads to Newtonian behavior. Both atomized at low atomizing air pressures (less than 270 kPa) using twin-fluid jet atomizers of various distributor designs. We found that the atomized drop sizes of micronized coal water slurries substantially decrease as the atomizing air pressure exceeds a threshold value. The effects of coal volume fraction, coal particle surface charge, liquid composition and liquid viscosity on slurry atomization can be accounted for by their effects on slurry rheology. 26 refs.

  11. Suspension Electrodes Combining Slurries and Upflow Fluidized Beds.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Hagai; Eli, Shaked Ein; Jõgi, Morten; Suss, Matthew E

    2016-11-09

    Carbon-based suspension electrodes are currently intensively investigated for emerging electrochemical systems, such as flow batteries, flow capacitors, and capacitive deionization cells. The main limitation of such electrodes is their low electric conductivity, which is typically orders of magnitude lower than that of traditional static carbon electrodes. Two main categories of suspension electrodes exist: 1) slurry electrodes where particles are not significantly affected by gravity, and 2) fluidized bed electrodes where particles are affected by gravity. We introduce a novel category that we term "combined" suspension electrodes, which combine dilute slurries and dense fluidized beds. We present experimental measurements of the electrochemical impedance and electric conductivity of two combined electrodes. For one set of materials, the measured electric conductivity of the combined electrode is at least an order of magnitude above the fluidized bed and slurry components alone, demonstrating that a synergetic effect can be achieved when adding dilute slurry to dense fluidized bed. For a second set of materials, results show that the combined electrode conductivity is lower than the slurry component alone, a counter-intuitive result, demonstrating that increasing electrode carbon loading does not always enhance the electric conductivity. © 2016 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  12. Assessing The Durability of Polymer Modified Asphalt Emulsions Slurry Seal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singgih, C.; Handayani, D.; Setyawan, A.

    2017-02-01

    Slurry Seal is an application of road preservation in the form of impermeable nonstructural thin layer with maximum thickness of 10 mm, which consisting of a cold laid mixture of asphalt emulsion with continuous graded fine aggregate, mineral filler, water and other added ingredients. Road preservation use slurry seal only functioning as a surface layer on the existing pavement structure. This preliminary research was conducted to determine the value of consistency, setting time, and indirect tensile strength of polymer modified slurry seal. The laboratory tests were conducted to determine the optimum residual asphalt content. The results show that the value of the optimum water content by pre-wetting 5% is getting smaller with increasing levels of residual asphalt emulsion. The addition of water 0 - 2.5% with 5% water for pre-wetting, the mixture provides a sufficient consistency in accordance with the specifications. The increasing levels of residual asphalt emulsion obtained the longer setting time at all slurry seal mixtures, but all of the mixtures still meet the specifications. The use of polymer modified asphalt emulsion on slurry seal was improved durability significantly, based on the value of indirect tensile strength.

  13. Preparation and combustion of high ash coal tailing slurry

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Ziping; Zhang Wenfu; Fu Xiaoheng; Wang Zuna; Li Hui

    1998-12-31

    Flotation tailings from a coal preparation plant are known for their high ash, low heating value, high moisture content even after thickening and filtration, and difficult handability. However, they can be easily converted into a slurry fuel for boilers. Two flotation tailings, containing ash of 31.89% and 41.87% respectively, have been converted into slurry fuel with the following properties: solid content being 70.4% and 74.4% respectively; low heating value, 13,694kj/kg and 10,970kj/kg; and viscosity, 379 mPa.s and 180 mPa.s at a shear rate of 100s{sup {minus}1}. An eccentric slant jet coal slurry burner was installed at the boiler. Slurry atomizing nozzle operated at low pressure. Both slurries gave stable combustion without supporting fuel under the condition of cool air supply. A new way of flotation tailing utilization was demonstrated. China has more than 200 coal preparation plants washing more than 300 million tons of coal annually. These preparation plants generate more than 10 million tons of tailing annually, most of which is not currently being used, causing great environmental pollution and waste management difficulties for the enterprises. Comprehensive utilization of coal washer tailings is one of the key issues of environmental protection and energy saving in China.

  14. Combined on-board hydride slurry storage and reactor system and process for hydrogen-powered vehicles and devices

    SciTech Connect

    Brooks, Kriston P; Holladay, Jamelyn D; Simmons, Kevin L; Herling, Darrell R

    2014-11-18

    An on-board hydride storage system and process are described. The system includes a slurry storage system that includes a slurry reactor and a variable concentration slurry. In one preferred configuration, the storage system stores a slurry containing a hydride storage material in a carrier fluid at a first concentration of hydride solids. The slurry reactor receives the slurry containing a second concentration of the hydride storage material and releases hydrogen as a fuel to hydrogen-power devices and vehicles.

  15. Fate and transport of antimicrobials and antimicrobial resistance genes in soil and runoff following land application of swine manure slurry.

    PubMed

    Joy, Stacey R; Bartelt-Hunt, Shannon L; Snow, Daniel D; Gilley, John E; Woodbury, Bryan L; Parker, David B; Marx, David B; Li, Xu

    2013-01-01

    Due to the use of antimicrobials in livestock production, residual antimicrobials and antimicrobial resistance genes (ARGs) could enter the environment following the land application of animal wastes and could further contaminate surface and groundwater. The objective of this study was to determine the effect of various manure land application methods on the fate and transport of antimicrobials and ARGs in soil and runoff following land application of swine manure slurry. Swine manure slurries were obtained from facilities housing pigs that were fed chlortetracyline, tylosin or bacitracin and were land applied via broadcast, incorporation, and injection methods. Three rainfall simulation tests were then performed on amended and control plots. Results show that land application methods had no statistically significant effect on the aqueous concentrations of antimicrobials in runoff. However, among the three application methods tested broadcast resulted in the highest total mass loading of antimicrobials in runoff from the three rainfall simulation tests. The aqueous concentrations of chlortetracyline and tylosin in runoff decreased in consecutive rainfall events, although the trend was only statistically significant for tylosin. For ARGs, broadcast resulted in significantly higher erm genes in runoff than did incorporation and injection methods. In soil, the effects of land application methods on the fate of antimicrobials in top soil were compound specific. No clear trend was observed in the ARG levels in soil, likely because different host cells may respond differently to the soil environments created by various land application methods.

  16. Redox Potential as a Means to Control the Treatment of Slurry to Lower H2S Emissions

    PubMed Central

    Hjorth, Maibritt; Pedersen, Christina Ø; Feilberg, Anders

    2012-01-01

    Slurry can be oxidized to eliminate undesirable emissions, including malodorous hydrogen sulfide (H2S). However, it is difficult to assess the optimal amount of oxidizing agent required. In this study, one cow and one pig manure, each in three particle size ranges were oxidized with 0–350 mg ozone/L manure. Redox and H2S concentration were measured continuously. During ozonation the manures gave equivalent redox potential curves. A relatively rapid rise in redox potential was observed within a range of −275 mV to −10 mV, with all manures changing as a minimum from −200 mV to −80 mV. The gaseous H2S emissions were decreased by 99.5% during the redox increase (−200 mV to −80 mV). This is attributed to H2S oxidation by ozone and oxygen, and is not due to H2S deprotonation or gas flushing. By identifying the initiation of the final redox level following the rise, the amount of ozone required to remove H2S from the manure samples was estimated to be in the range of 6–24 mg O3/L manure, depending on the type of manure. Hence, continuous monitoring of redox potential (termination of the redox rise) during the oxidation treatment is a simple method of achieving cost-effective minimization of H2S emissions from slurry. PMID:22778588

  17. Pig production in the Solomon Islands. I. Village pig production.

    PubMed

    de Fredrick, D F

    1977-05-01

    In 181 villages in the Solomon Islands the pig: human ratio was 1:5-8 and the annual per capita pork consumption was 4-2 kg. Some communities did not keep pigs or eat pig meat. Sows weaned an average of 5-5 piglets per year and mean liveweight at 12 months of age was 28-4 kg. Most pigs were kept on the ground but some were housed in pens over the sea and very few lived in their owner's houses. Pigs were important in the social life of the people but proportionally fewer pigs were raised than in neighbouring Pacific countries.

  18. Gaseous emissions and modification of slurry composition during storage and after field application: Effect of slurry additives and mechanical separation.

    PubMed

    Owusu-Twum, Maxwell Yeboah; Polastre, Adele; Subedi, Raghunath; Santos, Ana Sofia; Mendes Ferreira, Luis Miguel; Coutinho, João; Trindade, Henrique

    2017-09-15

    The aim of the study was to evaluate the impact of slurry treatment by additives (EU200(®) (EU200), Bio-buster(®) (BB), JASS(®) and sulphuric acid (H2SO4)) and mechanical separation on the physical-chemical characteristics, gaseous emissions (NH3, CH4, CO2 and N2O) during anaerobic storage at ∼20 °C (experiment 1) and NH3 losses after field application (experiment 2). The treatments studied in experiment 1 were: whole slurry (WS), WS+H2SO4 to a pH of 6.0, WS+EU200 and WS+BB. Treatments for experiment 2 were: WS, slurry liquid fraction (LF), composted solid fraction (CSF), LFs treated with BB (LFB), JASS(®) (LFJ), H2SO4 to a pH of 5.5 (LFA) and soil only (control). The results showed an inhibition of the degradation of organic materials (cellulose, hemicellulose, dry matter organic matter and total carbon) in the WS+H2SO4 relative to the WS. When compared to the WS, the WS+H2SO4 increased electrical conductivity, ammonium (NH4(+)) and sulphur (S) concentrations whilst reducing slurry pH after storage. The WS+H2SO4 reduced NH3 volatilization by 69% relative to the WS but had no effect on emissions of CH4, CO2 and N2O during storage. Biological additive treatments (WS+EU200 and WS+BB) had no impact on slurry characteristics and gaseous emissions relative to the WS during storage. After field application, the cumulative NH3 lost in the LF was almost 50% lower than the WS. The losses in the LFA were reduced by 92% relative to the LF. The LFB and LFJ had no impact on NH3 losses relative to the LF. A significant effect of treatment on NH4(+) concentration was found at the top soil layer (0-5 cm) after NH3 measurements with higher concentrations in the LF treatments relative to the WS. Overall, the use of the above biological additives to decrease pollutant gases and to modify slurry characteristics are questionable. Reducing slurry dry matter through mechanical separation can mitigate NH3 losses after field application. Slurry acidification can increase the

  19. Functionalized bio-artifact fabricated via selective slurry extrusion. Part 1: Preparation of slurry containing tourmaline superfine powders.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Dongbin; Xu, Anping; Qu, Yunxia; Liu, Yushan

    2011-12-01

    The far infrared dental porcelain slurry for fabricating artificial tooth via selective slurry extrusion (SSE) of solid freeform fabrication (also known as rapid prototyping) techniques was prepared by using tourmaline as additive and employing ball-milling approach. After characterization by transmission electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, and Fourier transform infrared spectrometry, it was found that the far infrared emission properties of the dental porcelain were apparently improved in the ranges of 2000-1201 cm(-1) and 881-600 cm(-1). This is due to the increase of the number of infrared active bonds that are from the tourmaline superfine powders. Moreover, it was also found that the tourmaline superfine powders can improve the pseudo-plastic properties of dental porcelain slurries, which results from the increase of the absolute value of zeta potential of the suspensions. Slurries with pseudo-plastic behavior are highly desirable in controlling the shape of the extrudate during solid freeform fabrication. With the functionalized material, a variety of bio-artifacts beneficial to body health can be built by using selective slurry extrusion machine.

  20. Rheological behavior of molten Al-SiC slurries and comparison of their behavior with metallic slurries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heidary, D. Sohrabi Baba; Akhlagh, F.

    2013-07-01

    In this study a new precise rotational viscometer was developed and used to measure the viscosity of molten A356 alloy containing 5, 15, and 25vol.% of 90-106 μm SiC particles at 650 and 690 °C. Three types of typical curves viscosity (η) versus volume fraction of SiC particles, shear time (t), and shear rate (γ) were derived advantage from the results of viscosity measurements. It would present the viscosity got lowered by decreasing particle volume fraction and by increasing the amounts of shear time and shear rate. In the next step, the influence of the number of aggregates on apparent viscosity was studied by the special tests, developed in this research. Also the formation of aggregates in Al-SiC composite slurries was explained and compared with metallic slurries. It concluded that the origin of aggregation in Al-SiC slurries was long range electrical forces while in metallic slurries it was micro welds between particles. it would show the rheological behavior of Al-SiC slurries could be justified according to the nature and the numbers of their aggregates. At the end, the implications of findings in order to predict the gradient of particles in functionally graded Al-SiC composites, produced by casting, were discussed.

  1. Microalgal cultivation with biogas slurry for biofuel production.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Liandong; Yan, Cheng; Li, Zhaohua

    2016-11-01

    Microalgal growth requires a substantial amount of chemical fertilizers. An alternative to the utilization of fertilizer is to apply biogas slurry produced through anaerobic digestion to cultivate microalgae for the production of biofuels. Plenty of studies have suggested that anaerobic digestate containing high nutrient contents is a potentially feasible nutrient source to culture microalgae. However, current literature indicates a lack of review available regarding microalgal cultivation with biogas slurry for the production of biofuels. To help fill this gap, this review highlights the integration of digestate nutrient management with microalgal production. It first unveils the current status of microalgal production, providing basic background to the topic. Subsequently, microalgal cultivation technologies using biogas slurry are discussed in detail. A scale-up scheme for simultaneous biogas upgrade and digestate application through microalgal cultivation is then proposed. Afterwards, several uncertainties that might affect this practice are explored. Finally, concluding remarks are put forward. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Slurry sample introduction with microwave induced plasma atomic emission spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matusiewicz, Henryk; Sturgeon, Ralph E.

    1993-04-01

    The successful direct introduction of aqueous slurry samples into a highly efficient TE 101 microwave plasma has been demonstrated. Slurry samples from a spray chamber are fed directly into the cavity with no desolvation apparatus. A V-groove, clog-free Babington-type nebulizer was evaluated for use with high solids content solutions. Slurry concentrations up to 10% m/v were used for the microwave induced plasma work with calibration by the standard additions method. Results are presented for the analysis of two NRCC Standard Reference Materials, i.e. TORT-1 (Lobster Hepatopancreas) and PACS-21 (Marine Sediment). Agreement between analytical results and certified values for the test elements Cd, Cu, Fe and Zn (in the range of 28-850 μg/g) was good. No memory effects were evident and the nebulizer system had a rapid clean-out time.

  3. Tape casting of cobalt ferrite from nonaqueous slurry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jian, Gang; Zhou, Dongxiang; Yang, Junyou; Fu, Qiuyun

    2012-12-01

    This paper describes the fabrication of CoFe2O4 thick films using the tape casting method from nonaqueous slurry. CoFe2O4 particles with average size of ˜800 nm were prepared by the solid-state reaction method. Sediment volumes and viscosity were tested to study the effects of dispersant in reducing aggregations in slurry. Slurry with 0.25 wt% dispersant amounts and 41.3 wt% solid content showed the optimal stability and rheological properties. A tape velocity of 8 cm/s was used in this study considering the non-Newtonian flow behavior at low shear rate. CoFe2O4 ceramic films sintered at 1150 °C for 2 h have dense structure (relative density of 94%) and exhibited ferromagnetic properties with in-plane saturation magnetization of ˜324 emu/cm3.

  4. Slurry burner for mixture of carbonaceous material and water

    DOEpatents

    Nodd, D.G.; Walker, R.J.

    1985-11-05

    The present invention is intended to overcome the limitations of the prior art by providing a fuel burner particularly adapted for the combustion of carbonaceous material-water slurries which includes a stationary high pressure tip-emulsion atomizer which directs a uniform fuel into a shearing air flow as the carbonaceous material-water slurry is directed into a combustion chamber, inhibits the collection of unburned fuel upon and within the atomizer, reduces the slurry to a collection of fine particles upon discharge into the combustion chamber, and regulates the operating temperature of the burner as well as primary air flow about the burner and into the combustion chamber for improved combustion efficiency, no atomizer plugging and enhanced flame stability.

  5. Mud management, special slurries improve deepwater cementing operations

    SciTech Connect

    Griffith, J.; Faul, R.

    1997-10-20

    Successful deepwater cementing requires improved mud-management techniques to reduce fluid loss, shorten slurry transition times, and make mud and cement slurry weights compatible with formation pore pressure and fracture gradients. If any one of these conditions is not met, the cementing job is less likely to be successful. Previous attempts to drill in deep water have had a low success rate, and failures have cost operators an average $2 million/well. By using new mud-management techniques and specially designed cement mixtures, operators in the Gulf of Mexico (GOM) are effectively setting conductor casing in deepwater conditions and are greatly improving the success rate in cementing deepwater wells. Recent case histories in the GOM describe these new techniques and the advantages of using a specially formulated, lightweight, foamed cement slurry to avoid cement-sheath damage caused by shallow-water flow.

  6. Mycotoxic nephropathy in pigs*

    PubMed Central

    Elling, F.; Møller, T.

    1973-01-01

    In Denmark a nephropathy in pigs characterized by tubular atrophy and interstitial fibrosis has been identified frequently during the last 5 decades in the course of meat inspection in slaughterhouses. The disease was first described by Larsen, who recognized the connexion between feeding mouldy rye to pigs and the development of the nephropathy. In this study kidneys were examined from 19 pigs coming from a farm with an outbreak of nephropathy. The barley fed to the pigs was contaminated with the mycotoxin ochratoxin A. Histological examination revealed different degrees of change ranging from slight regressive changes in the tubular epithelium and periglomerular and interstitial fibrosis to tubular atrophy, thickened basement membranes, glomerular sclerosis, and marked fibrosis. These differences were considered to be due to differences in the length of time of exposure to the mouldy barley and differences in the amount of mycotoxin consumed by the individual pig. However, it will be necessary to carry out experiments using crystalline ochratoxin A in order to prove such a relationship. Mycotoxins have also been suggested as etiological factors in Balkan nephropathy in man, which in the initial stages is characterized by tubular lesions similar to those seen in mycotoxic nephropathy in pigs. ImagesFig. 1Fig. 2Fig. 7Fig. 8Fig. 9Fig. 3Fig. 4Fig. 5Fig. 6Fig. 10Fig. 11 PMID:4546872

  7. Method and apparatus for in-situ drying investigation and optimization of slurry drying methodology

    DOEpatents

    Armstrong, Beth L.; Daniel, Claus; Howe, Jane Y.; Kiggans, Jr, James O.; Sabau, Adrian S.; Wood, III, David L.; Kalnaus, Sergiy

    2016-05-10

    A method of drying casted slurries that includes calculating drying conditions from an experimental model for a cast slurry and forming a cast film. An infrared heating probe is positioned on one side of the casted slurry and a thermal probe is positioned on an opposing side of the casted slurry. The infrared heating probe may control the temperature of the casted slurry during drying. The casted slurry may be observed with an optical microscope, while applying the drying conditions from the experimental model. Observing the casted slurry includes detecting the incidence of micro-structural changes in the casted slurry during drying to determine if the drying conditions from the experimental model are optimal.

  8. Development of Alternative Rheological Measurements for DWPF Slurry Samples (U)

    SciTech Connect

    Koopman, D. c.

    2005-09-01

    Rheological measurements are used to evaluate the fluid dynamic behavior of Defense Waste Processing Facility, DWPF, slurry samples. Measurements are currently made on non-radioactive simulant slurries using two state-of-the-art rheometers located at the Aiken County Technical Laboratory, ACTL. Measurements are made on plant samples using a rheometer in the Savannah River National Laboratory, SRNL, Shielded Cells facility. Low activity simulants or plant samples can be analyzed using a rheometer located in a radioactive hood in SRNL. Variations in the rheology of SB2 simulants impacted the interpretation of results obtained in a number of related studies. A separate rheological study was initiated with the following four goals: (1) Document the variations seen in the simulant slurries, both by a review of recent data, and by a search for similar samples for further study. (2) Attempt to explain the variations in rheological behavior, or, failing that, reduce the number of possible causes. In particular, to empirically check for rheometer-related variations. (3) Exploit the additional capabilities of the rheometers by developing new measurement methods to study the simulant rheological properties in new ways. (4) Formalize the rheological measurement process for DWPF-related samples into a series of protocols. This report focuses on the third and fourth goals. The emphasis of this report is on the development and formalization of rheological measurement methods used to characterize DWPF slurry samples. The organization is by rheological measurement method. Progress on the first two goals was documented in a concurrent technical report, Koopman (2005). That report focused on the types and possible causes of unusual rheological behavior in simulant slurry samples. It was organized by the sample being studied. The experimental portion of this study was performed in the period of March to April 2004. A general rheology protocol for routine DWPF slurry samples, Koopman

  9. Sequestration of organic cations by acidified hepatic endocytic vesicles and implications for biliary excretion.

    PubMed

    Van Dyke, R W; Faber, E D; Meijer, D K

    1992-04-01

    A number of cationic amine drugs that are taken up by liver and excreted into bile may accumulate in acidified intracellular organelles such as lysosomes and endosomes. These studies were undertaken to assess directly the uptake and accumulation of three types of model organic cationic amines by endocytic vesicles, and the role of vesicle acidification in this process. Uptake of tubocurarine (TC), vecuronium and tributylmethylammonium (TBuMA) by purified rat liver multivesicular bodies (MVB) (prelysosomal endocytic vesicles) was dependent upon MgATP, time and drug concentration. After 60 min, 52 to 81% of MVB cation content was dependent upon vesicle acidification (due to an electrogenic proton pump), but not upon an interior positive vesicle membrane potential. Nineteen to 42% of MVB cation content appeared due to binding to MVB membranes or to internal lipoproteins. Vesicle-to-medium ATP-dependent apparent concentration ratios for these three cations were 3.3 to 51. MVB uptake of these cations resembled uptake of methylamine, a tertiary amine known to distribute across organellar membranes according to pH gradients. By contrast, MVB uptake of the lipophilic quaternary amine methyldeptropine was not dependent upon MgATP or on development of MVB pH or membrane potential gradients. In further studies, TC, vecuronium and TBuMA were rapidly taken up by the isolated perfused rat liver and excreted in bile. Exposure to 250 mciroM primaquin (which partially alkalinized acidic endosomes and lysosomes) reduced accumulation of [3H]vecuronium in a lysosomal fraction by 23%, decreased perfusate disappearance of TC and TBuMA, but not of vecuronium, and decreased biliary appearance of all three cations. These studies suggest that acidified intracellular organelles sequester certain organic cationic drugs, possibly via a drug/proton antiporter, and/or diffusion followed by intravesicular protonation and trapping of tertiary amines. However, attempts at partial displacement of

  10. Nutrient digestibility and mass balance in laying hens fed a commercial or acidifying diet.

    PubMed

    Wu-Haan, W; Powers, W J; Angel, C R; Hale, C E; Applegate, T J

    2007-04-01

    The objectives of the current study were to evaluate the effect of an acidifying diet (gypsum) combined with zeolite and slightly reduced crude protein (R) vs. a control diet (C) on nutrient retention in laying hens and compare 3 approaches to estimating nutrient excretion from hens: 1) mass balance calculation (feed nutrients - egg nutrient), 2) use of an indigestible marker with analyzed feed and excreta nutrient content, and 3) an environmental chamber that allowed for capturing all excreted and volatilized nutrients. Hens (n = 640) were allocated randomly to 8 environmental chambers for 3-wk periods. Excreta samples were collected at the end of each trial to estimate apparent retention of N, S, P, and Ca. No diet effects on apparent retention of N were observed (53.44%, P > 0.05). Apparent retention of S, P, and Ca decreased in hens fed R diet (18.7, - 11.4, and 22.6%, respectively) compared with hens fed the C diet (40.7, 0.3, and 28.6%, respectively; P < 0.05). Total N excretion from hens fed the C and R diet was not different (1.16 g/hen/d); however, mass of chamber N remaining in excreta following the 3-wk period was less from hens fed the C diet (1.27 kg) than from hens fed the R diet (1.43 kg). Gaseous emissions of NH(3) over the 3-wk period from hens fed the C diet (0.74 kg per chamber) were greater than emissions from hens fed the R diet (0.45 kg). The 3-wk S excretion mass (estimated using the calculation, indigestible marker, and environmental chamber methods, respectively) was greater from hens fed the R diet (1.85, 1.54, and 1.27 kg, respectively) compared with hens fed the C diet (0.24, 0.20, and 0.14 kg, respectively). The 3-wk P excretion was similar between diets (0.68 kg). Results demonstrate that feeding the acidified diet resulted in decreased N emissions, but because of the acidulant fed, greatly increased S excretion and emissions.

  11. Mathematical modeling of three-phase slurry bubble column reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Gamwo, I.K.; Soong, Y.; Schehl, R.R.; Zarochak, M.F.

    1994-12-31

    The behavior of gas-solid-liquid flow in a slurry bubble column reactor was simulated using a well-posed hydrodynamic model. The three phases under study are nitrogen, 5-{mu}m iron oxide, and SASOL wax. The phases volume fractions at various axial and radial positions in the column were computed. Preliminary results of axial solid volume fractions are consistent with experimental observations and demonstrate the potential of this method for design of such reactors. The overall objective of this study is to develop experimentally verified hydrodynamic and Fisher-Tropsch reaction models for slurry bubble column reactors.

  12. Morphometric analysis of polygonal cracking patterns in desiccated starch slurries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akiba, Yuri; Magome, Jun; Kobayashi, Hiroshi; Shima, Hiroyuki

    2017-08-01

    We investigate the geometry of two-dimensional polygonal cracking that forms on the air-exposed surface of dried starch slurries. Two different kinds of starches, made from potato and corn, exhibited distinguished crack evolution, and there were contrasting effects of slurry thickness on the probability distribution of the polygonal cell area. The experimental findings are believed to result from the difference in the shape and size of starch grains, which strongly influence the capillary transport of water and tensile stress field that drives the polygonal cracking.

  13. Steam Explosions in Slurry-fed Ceramic Melters

    SciTech Connect

    Carter, J.T.

    2001-03-28

    This report assesses the potential and consequences of a steam explosion in Slurry Feed Ceramic Melters (SFCM). The principles that determine if an interaction is realistically probable within a SFCM are established. Also considered are the mitigating effects due to dissolved, non-condensable gas(es) and suspended solids within the slurry feed, radiation, high glass viscosity, and the existence of a cold cap. The report finds that, even if any explosion were to occur, however, it would not be large enough to compromise vessel integrity.

  14. SYNTHESIS OF NON-RADIOACTIVE SLURRIES TO SIMULATE THE PROCESSING BEHAVIOR OF PARTICLES IN RADIOACTIVE WASTE SLURRIES 626-G

    SciTech Connect

    Koopman, D.; Lambert, D.; Eibling, R.; Newell, J.; Stone, M.

    2009-09-03

    Process development using non-radioactive analogs to high-level radioactive waste slurries is an established cost effective alternative to working with actual samples of the real waste. Current simulated waste slurries, however, do not capture all of the physical behavior of real waste. New methods of preparing simulants are under investigation along with mechanisms for altering certain properties of finished simulants. These methods have achieved several notable successes recently in the areas of rheology and foaminess. Particle size is also being manipulated more effectively than in the past, though not independently of the rheological properties. The interaction between rheology and foaminess has exhibited counter-intuitive behavior with more viscous slurries being less foamy even though drainage of liquid from the foam lamellae should be inhibited by higher viscosities.

  15. Effects of dairy slurry on the nutritive value and fermentation characteristics of alfalfa silages

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Dairy producers frequently ask questions about the risks associated with applying dairy slurry onto growing alfalfa. Our objectives were to determine the effects of dairy-slurry application on the subsequent nutritive value and fermentation characteristics of alfalfa silages. Dairy slurry was applie...

  16. Slurry pumping techniques for feeding high-pressure coal gasification reactors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bair, W. G.; Tarman, P. B.

    1977-01-01

    Operating experience in pumping coal and coal char slurries at pressures up to 1500 psig is discussed. The design specifications for the mixing tanks, pumps, piping, and slurry heaters are given along with pressure drop and minimum flow velocity data on water-lignite slurries.

  17. 30 CFR 77.216 - Water, sediment, or slurry impoundments and impounding structures; general.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Water, sediment, or slurry impoundments and... WORK AREAS OF UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Surface Installations § 77.216 Water, sediment, or slurry... structures which impound water, sediment, or slurry shall be required if such an existing or...

  18. 30 CFR 77.216 - Water, sediment, or slurry impoundments and impounding structures; general.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Water, sediment, or slurry impoundments and... WORK AREAS OF UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Surface Installations § 77.216 Water, sediment, or slurry... structures which impound water, sediment, or slurry shall be required if such an existing or...

  19. 30 CFR 77.216 - Water, sediment, or slurry impoundments and impounding structures; general.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Water, sediment, or slurry impoundments and... WORK AREAS OF UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Surface Installations § 77.216 Water, sediment, or slurry... structures which impound water, sediment, or slurry shall be required if such an existing or...

  20. 30 CFR 77.216 - Water, sediment, or slurry impoundments and impounding structures; general.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Water, sediment, or slurry impoundments and... WORK AREAS OF UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Surface Installations § 77.216 Water, sediment, or slurry... structures which impound water, sediment, or slurry shall be required if such an existing or...

  1. 30 CFR 77.216 - Water, sediment, or slurry impoundments and impounding structures; general.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Water, sediment, or slurry impoundments and... WORK AREAS OF UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Surface Installations § 77.216 Water, sediment, or slurry... structures which impound water, sediment, or slurry shall be required if such an existing or...

  2. DWPF DECON FRIT: SUMP AND SLURRY SOLIDS ANALYSIS

    SciTech Connect

    Crawford, C.; Peeler, D.; Click, D.

    2010-10-20

    The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) has been requested to perform analyses on samples of the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) decon frit slurry (i.e., supernate samples and sump solid samples). Four 1-L liquid slurry samples were provided to SRNL by Savannah River Remediation (SRR) from the 'front-end' decon activities. Additionally, two 1-L sump solids samples were provided to SRNL for compositional and physical analysis. In this report, the physical and chemical characterization results of the slurry solids and sump solids are reported. Crawford et al. (2010) provide the results of the supernate analysis. The results of the sump solids are reported on a mass basis given the samples were essentially dry upon receipt. The results of the slurry solids were converted to a volume basis given approximately 2.4 grams of slurry solids were obtained from the {approx}4 liters of liquid slurry sample. Although there were slight differences in the analytical results between the sump solids and slurry solids the following general summary statements can be made. Slight differences in the results are also captured for specific analysis. (1) Physical characterization - (a) SEM/EDS analysis suggested that the samples were enriched in Li and Si (B and Na not detectable using the current EDS system) which is consistent with two of the four principle oxides of Frit 418 (B{sub 2}O{sub 3}, Na{sub 2}O, Li{sub 2}O and SiO{sub 2}). (b) SEM/EDS analysis also identified impurities which were elementally consistent with stainless steel (i.e., Fe, Ni, Cr contamination). (c) XRD results indicated that the sump solids samples were amorphous which is consistent with XRD results expected for a Frit 418 based sample. (d) For the sump solids, SEM/EDS analysis indicated that the particle size of the sump solids were consistent with that of an as received Frit 418 sample from a current DWPF vendor. (e) For the slurry solids, SEM/EDS analysis indicated that the particle size range

  3. Elevated aluminium concentration in acidified headwater streams lowers aquatic hyphomycete diversity and impairs leaf-litter breakdown.

    PubMed

    Baudoin, J M; Guérold, F; Felten, V; Chauvet, E; Wagner, P; Rousselle, P

    2008-08-01

    Aquatic hyphomycetes play an essential role in the decomposition of allochthonous organic matter which is a fundamental process driving the functioning of forested headwater streams. We studied the effect of anthropogenic acidification on aquatic hyphomycetes associated with decaying leaves of Fagus sylvatica in six forested headwater streams (pH range, 4.3-7.1). Non-metric multidimensional scaling revealed marked differences in aquatic hyphomycete assemblages between acidified and reference streams. We found strong relationships between aquatic hyphomycete richness and mean Al concentration (r = -0.998, p < 0.0001) and mean pH (r = 0.962, p < 0.002), meaning that fungal diversity was severely depleted in acidified streams. By contrast, mean fungal biomass was not related to acidity. Leaf breakdown rate was drastically reduced under acidic conditions raising the issue of whether the functioning of headwater ecosystems could be impaired by a loss of aquatic hyphomycete species.

  4. Nitrite addition to acidified sludge significantly improves digestibility, toxic metal removal, dewaterability and pathogen reduction

    PubMed Central

    Du, Fangzhou; Keller, Jürg; Yuan, Zhiguo; Batstone, Damien J.; Freguia, Stefano; Pikaar, Ilje

    2016-01-01

    Sludge management is a major issue for water utilities globally. Poor digestibility and dewaterability are the main factors determining the cost for sludge management, whereas pathogen and toxic metal concentrations limit beneficial reuse. In this study, the effects of low level nitrite addition to acidified sludge to simultaneously enhance digestibility, toxic metal removal, dewaterability and pathogen reduction were investigated. Waste activated sludge (WAS) from a full-scale waste water treatment plant was treated at pH 2 with 10 mg NO2−-N/L for 5 h. Biochemical methane potential tests showed an increase in the methane production of 28%, corresponding to an improvement from 247 ± 8 L CH4/kg VS to 317 ± 1 L CH4/kg VS. The enhanced removal of toxic metals further increased the methane production by another 18% to 360 ± 6 L CH4/kg VS (a total increase of 46%). The solids content of dewatered sludge increased from 14.6 ± 1.4% in the control to 18.2 ± 0.8%. A 4-log reduction for both total coliforms and E. coli was achieved. Overall, this study highlights the potential of acidification with low level nitrite addition as an effective and simple method achieving multiple improvements in terms of sludge management. PMID:28004811

  5. The behavior of rare earth elements in naturally and anthropogenically acidified waters

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wood, Scott A.; Gammons, Christopher H.; Parker, Stephen R.

    2006-01-01

    In this paper, the behavior of rare earth elements (REE) in a watershed impacted by acid-mine drainage (Fisher Creek, Montana) is compared to that in a volcanically acidified watershed (Rio Agrio and Lake Caviahue, Argentina). The REE behave conservatively in acidic waters with pH values less than approximately 5.5. However, above pH 5.5, REE concentrations are controlled by adsorption onto or co-precipitation with a variety of Fe or Al oxyhydroxides. The heavy REE partition to a greater extent into the solid phase than the light REE as pH rises above 6. Concentrations of REE exhibit diel (24-h) cycling in waters that were initially acidic, but have become neutralized downstream. In Fisher Creek, at the most downstream sampling station investigated (pH 6.8), concentrations of dissolved REE were 190–840% higher in the early morning versus the late afternoon. This cycling can be related to temperature-dependent, cyclic adsorption–desorption of REE onto hydrous ferric or aluminum oxide or both. Similar but gentler diel cycling of the REE was found at Rio Agrio. The existence of such cycling has important ramifications for the study of REE in natural waters.

  6. Reef-building corals thrive within hot-acidified and deoxygenated waters.

    PubMed

    Camp, Emma F; Nitschke, Matthew R; Rodolfo-Metalpa, Riccardo; Houlbreque, Fanny; Gardner, Stephanie G; Smith, David J; Zampighi, Marco; Suggett, David J

    2017-05-26

    Coral reefs are deteriorating under climate change as oceans continue to warm and acidify and thermal anomalies grow in frequency and intensity. In vitro experiments are widely used to forecast reef-building coral health into the future, but often fail to account for the complex ecological and biogeochemical interactions that govern reefs. Consequently, observations from coral communities under naturally occurring extremes have become central for improved predictions of future reef form and function. Here, we present a semi-enclosed lagoon system in New Caledonia characterised by diel fluctuations of hot-deoxygenated water coupled with tidally driven persistently low pH, relative to neighbouring reefs. Coral communities within the lagoon system exhibited high richness (number of species = 20) and cover (24-35% across lagoon sites). Calcification rates for key species (Acropora formosa, Acropora pulchra, Coelastrea aspera and Porites lutea) for populations from the lagoon were equivalent to, or reduced by ca. 30-40% compared to those from the reef. Enhanced coral respiration, alongside high particulate organic content of the lagoon sediment, suggests acclimatisation to this trio of temperature, oxygen and pH changes through heterotrophic plasticity. This semi-enclosed lagoon therefore provides a novel system to understand coral acclimatisation to complex climatic scenarios and may serve as a reservoir of coral populations already resistant to extreme environmental conditions.

  7. Extracellular DNA Acidifies Biofilms and Induces Aminoglycoside Resistance in Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Wilton, Mike; Charron-Mazenod, Laetitia; Moore, Richard; Lewenza, Shawn

    2015-11-09

    Biofilms consist of surface-adhered bacterial communities encased in an extracellular matrix composed of DNA, exopolysaccharides, and proteins. Extracellular DNA (eDNA) has a structural role in the formation of biofilms, can bind and shield biofilms from aminoglycosides, and induces antimicrobial peptide resistance mechanisms. Here, we provide evidence that eDNA is responsible for the acidification of Pseudomonas aeruginosa planktonic cultures and biofilms. Further, we show that acidic pH and acidification via eDNA constitute a signal that is perceived by P. aeruginosa to induce the expression of genes regulated by the PhoPQ and PmrAB two-component regulatory systems. Planktonic P. aeruginosa cultured in exogenous 0.2% DNA or under acidic conditions demonstrates a 2- to 8-fold increase in aminoglycoside resistance. This resistance phenotype requires the aminoarabinose modification of lipid A and the production of spermidine on the bacterial outer membrane, which likely reduce the entry of aminoglycosides. Interestingly, the additions of the basic amino acid L-arginine and sodium bicarbonate neutralize the pH and restore P. aeruginosa susceptibility to aminoglycosides, even in the presence of eDNA. These data illustrate that the accumulation of eDNA in biofilms and infection sites can acidify the local environment and that acidic pH promotes the P. aeruginosa antibiotic resistance phenotype.

  8. Corrosion Fatigue Behavior of 316LN SS in Acidified Sodium Chloride Solution at Applied Potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poonguzhali, A.; Pujar, M. G.; Mallika, C.; Mudali, U. Kamachi

    2015-05-01

    The influence of acidified 1 M NaCl solution by addition of 2 ml/L of HCl on the cyclic plastic deformation of AISI Type 316LN SS containing 0.07 wt.% and 0.22 wt.% N was investigated as a function of the applied potentials. The corrosion fatigue (CF) behavior of stainless steel (SS) was explained vis-a-vis the dislocation behavior, the propensity to form microcracks, and the evolution of the current transients based on the studies carried out at both room-temperature and boiling conditions. CF experiments were conducted using round tensile specimens at a stress ratio of 0.5 and a frequency of 0.1 Hz. Two different kinds of damage mechanisms were observed (I) the damage mechanism in the stable-passive state was correlated with the localization of the anodic dissolution due to a depassivation-repassivation process, whereas (II) the cyclic stress induced pitting corrosion in the metastable pitting state, which resulted in formation of microcracks. The study of the microcracking process and its evolution is a key to the physical mechanism by which the fatigue life of stainless steels would be affected in an aqueous corrosive solution under the applied potential.

  9. Transplanted aquatic mosses for monitoring trace metal mobilization in acidified streams of the Vosges Mountains, France

    SciTech Connect

    Mersch, J.; Guerold, F.; Rousselle, P.; Pihan, J.C. )

    1993-08-01

    As a result of acid depositions, trace metals are mobilized from the soils to the aquatic environment. Especially in poorly mineralized waters, elevated metal concentrations may rapidly have adverse effects on aquatic organisms. In particular, it has been shown that aluminium, a key element in the acidification process, is a toxic cofactor for fish and other biota. An accurate assessment of this specific form of water pollution may not be possible when only based on analyses of single water samples. On the one hand, water metal concentrations are often close to the detection limit of usual analytical techniques, and on the other hand, levels in acidified streams undergo strong temporal variations caused by acid pulses following meteorological events such as heavy rainfall and snowmelt. Compared to water analyses, indirect monitoring methods provide undeniable advantages for assessing water contamination. Aquatic bryophytes, in particular, have been regarded as interesting indicator organisms for trace metal pollution. However, their use has mainly been restricted to the lower course of streams for evaluating the impact of industrial discharges. The purpose of this study was to test the suitability of transplanted aquatic mosses for monitoring aluminium and four other trace metals (copper, iron, lead and zinc) in the particular context of acidifed streams draining a forested headwater catchment. 15 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  10. Immature pea seeds: effect of storage under modified atmosphere packaging and sanitation with acidified sodium chlorite.

    PubMed

    Collado, Elena; Venzke Klug, Tâmmila; Martínez-Sánchez, Ascensión; Artés-Hernandez, Francisco; Aguayo, Encarna; Artés, Francisco; Fernández, Juan A; Gómez, Perla A

    2017-10-01

    Appropriate sanitation is a priority for extending the shelf life and promoting the consumption of immature pea seeds, as processing accelerates quality deterioration and microbial growth. The combined effect of disinfection with acidified sodium chlorite (ASC) or sodium hypochlorite (SH) and packaging under a passive modified atmosphere (MAP) at 1 or 4 °C on quality was analysed. After 14 days, greenness and vitamin C had decreased, especially in the SH-disinfected samples. Total phenols and antioxidant capacity were not affected by disinfection. Proteins levels fell by around 27%, regardless of the sanitizer and storage temperature. Compared with the initial microbial load, samples stored at 1 °C showed an increase of 1 log CFU g(-1) in psychrophiles when treated with SH, whereas no increase of note occurred with ASC. In general, microbial counts were always below 3 log CFU g(-1) for all the treatments. Immature pea seeds could be stored for 14 days at 1-4 °C under MAP with only minor quality changes. Disinfection with ASC resulted in better sensory quality, higher content of vitamin C and lower psychrophile counts. More research is needed to analyse the effect of these treatments on other quality parameters. © 2017 Society of Chemical Industry. © 2017 Society of Chemical Industry.

  11. Trichodesmium’s strategies to alleviate phosphorus limitation in the future acidified oceans.

    PubMed

    Spungin, Dina; Berman-Frank, Ilana; Levitan, Orly

    2014-06-01

    Global warming may exacerbate inorganic nutrient limitation, including phosphorus (P), in the surface waters of tropical oceans that are home to extensive blooms of the marine diazotrophic cyanobacterium, Trichodesmium. We examined the combined effects of P limitation and pCO(2), forecast under ocean acidification scenarios, on Trichodesmium erythraeum IMS101 cultures. We measured nitrogen acquisition,glutamine synthetase activity, C uptake rates, intracellular Adenosine Triphosphate (ATP) concentration and the pool sizes of related key proteins. Here, we present data supporting the idea that cellular energy re-allocation enables the higher growth and N(2) fixation rates detected in Trichodesmium cultured under high pCO(2). This is reflected in altered protein abundance and metabolic pools. Also modified are particulate organic carbon and nitrogen production rates,enzymatic activities, and cellular ATP concentrations. We suggest that adjusting these cellular pathways to changing environmental conditions enables Trichodesmium to compensate for low P availability and to thrive in acidified oceans. Moreover, elevated pCO(2) could provide Trichodesmium with a competitive dominance that would extend its niche, particularly in P-limited regions of the tropical and subtropical oceans.

  12. Experiments and modeling of variably permeable carbonate reservoir samples in contact with CO₂-acidified brines

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, Megan M.; Hao, Yue; Mason, Harris E.; Carroll, Susan A.

    2014-12-31

    Reactive experiments were performed to expose sample cores from the Arbuckle carbonate reservoir to CO₂-acidified brine under reservoir temperature and pressure conditions. The samples consisted of dolomite with varying quantities of calcite and silica/chert. The timescales of monitored pressure decline across each sample in response to CO₂ exposure, as well as the amount of and nature of dissolution features, varied widely among these three experiments. For all samples cores, the experimentally measured initial permeability was at least one order of magnitude or more lower than the values estimated from downhole methods. Nondestructive X-ray computed tomography (XRCT) imaging revealed dissolution features including “wormholes,” removal of fracture-filling crystals, and widening of pre-existing pore spaces. In the injection zone sample, multiple fractures may have contributed to the high initial permeability of this core and restricted the distribution of CO₂-induced mineral dissolution. In contrast, the pre-existing porosity of the baffle zone sample was much lower and less connected, leading to a lower initial permeability and contributing to the development of a single dissolution channel. While calcite may make up only a small percentage of the overall sample composition, its location and the effects of its dissolution have an outsized effect on permeability responses to CO₂ exposure. The XRCT data presented here are informative for building the model domain for numerical simulations of these experiments but require calibration by higher resolution means to confidently evaluate different porosity-permeability relationships.

  13. Modeling the fate of aluminum in a watershed system under acidified conditions

    SciTech Connect

    McAvoy, D.C.

    1987-01-01

    Acid deposition has impacted surface water quality to various degrees in many parts of the world. This study focuses on identifying the major mechanisms contributing to the increase of stream water acidity in an acid-sensitive watershed. Two mathematical models, a chemical equilibrium model and a transport simulation model, have been developed and utilized to gain a better understanding of the fate and transport of aluminum in an acidified watershed system. The chemical equilibrium model determines inorganic monomeric aluminum species by performing thermodynamic equilibrium calculations whereas the simulation model describes aluminum transport within a watershed system by incorporating soil chemistry, stream water chemistry, and hydrologic properties. Precipitation, soil, and stream water data were collected from the acid-sensitive West Wachusett Brook catchment. Organic ligands seem to regulate aluminum levels in the wetland stream whereas aluminum trihydroxide solubility appears to control the mountain stream levels. Furthermore, organic acids in the wetland drastically changes stream water quality by buffering pH changes and chelating aluminum. Soil and stream water data suggest that during intensive storm events the rainwater mostly travels through the upper soil horizons before entering the stream environment. Moreover, these data imply that rainfall volume may be more important than rainfall pH in affecting stream water acidity for this particular watershed. Equilibrium modeling showed the mountain stream to be potentially toxic to fish during moderate-to-intense rainfall events. The wetland stream, on the other hand, being dominated by organo-aluminum complexes revealed minimal toxicological effects.

  14. The natural rehabilitation of an anthropogenically acidified tropical Lake: two decades of monitoring.

    PubMed

    Araújo, Cristiano V M; Cohin-de-Pinho, Salomão J; Chastinet, Carla B A; Machado, Sandro L; da Silva, Eduardo M

    2013-01-01

    The rehabilitation of a pond after approximately 20 years of strong acidified conditions due to industrial and domestic waste deposition in its catchment basin is reviewed. We describe in this study the acidification process that occurred in a tropical pond in Northeast Brazil (Dunas Lake), the rehabilitation plan for the pond and the subsequent monitoring conducted over two decades. After the contamination assessment by the late 80s, a rehabilitation plan was carried out in the early 90s, in which the contaminated soil and water have been removed and reduced, respectively. No further attempt to neutralize the water or any remediation has been carried out. A toxicity monitoring plan based on toxicity assays with the fish Poecilia reticulata was employed to verify the natural rehabilitation of the pond. The data on toxicity, pH, conductivity, sulphate and dissolved iron recorded from 1994 to 2010 were also compiled and discussed. The collected data in 2003 and 2004 indicated changes in water quality and from them complementary management actions, namely improvement in the containment plant, were conducted in 2005. Results for toxicity assays and pH results indicated interannual changes in the water quality similar to rainy-dry periods. Moving average approach using pH data clearly showed the recovery process of Dunas Lake as well as the importance of the containment plan to reduce the contamination. Finally, a summary of the recent situation after two decades of rehabilitation is provided. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Treatment of Acidified Blood Using Reduced Osmolarity Mixed-Base Solutions

    PubMed Central

    Mason, Thomas G.; Kraut, Jeffrey A.

    2016-01-01

    We hypothesize that reduced osmolarity mixed-base (ROMB) solutions can potentially serve as customizable treatments for acidoses, going beyond standard solutions in clinical use, such as 1.0 M sodium bicarbonate. Through in silico quantitative modeling, by treating acidified canine blood using ROMB solutions, and by performing blood-gas and optical microscopy measurements in vitro, we demonstrate that ROMB solutions having a high proportion of a strong base, such as disodium carbonate or sodium hydroxide, can be effective in reducing carbon dioxide pressure PCO2 while raising pH and bicarbonate ion concentration without causing significant osmotic damage to red blood cells, which can occur during rapid administration of hypertonic solutions of weak bases. These results suggest that a ROMB solution, which is composed mostly of a strong base, could be administered in a safe and effective manner, when compared to a hypertonic solution of sodium bicarbonate. Because of the reduced osmolarity and the customizable content of strong base in ROMB solutions, this approach differs from prior approaches involving hypertonic solutions that only considered a single molar ratio of strong to weak base. Our calculations and measurements suggest that custom-tailored ROMB solutions merit consideration as potentially efficacious treatments for specific types of acidosis, particularly acute metabolic acidosis and acute respiratory acidosis. PMID:28082905

  16. Prewashing with acidified sodium chlorite reduces pathogenic bacteria in lightly fermented Chinese cabbage.

    PubMed

    Inatsu, Yasuhiro; Maeda, Yutaka; Bari, M L; Kawasaki, Susumu; Kawamoto, Shinichi

    2005-05-01

    Efficacy of prewashing with acidified sodium chlorite (ASC) for the sanitation of lightly fermented Chinese cabbage was evaluated. The population of the natural microflora on the cabbage leaves was reduced about 2.0 log CFU/g just after washing with ASC, a significant reduction compared with the control distilled water wash (P < or = 0.05). In the control experiment, viable aerobic bacteria increased gradually when incubated at 10 degrees C; however, ASC-washed cabbage maintained a lower microbial concentration. The treatment of Chinese cabbage with ASC reduced the population of artificially inoculated Escherichia coli O157:H7, Salmonella Enteritidis, Staphylococcus aureus, and Listeria monocytogenes by 2.4 log CFU/g. The sanitation efficacy of ASC was 1.6 log CFU/g higher than that of distilled water washing. The viable cell counts of all pathogenic bacteria tested remained constant during 8 days of storage at 10 degrees C for both washing treatments, with the exception of L. monocytogenes, whose viable cell counts increased gradually with time for both treatments. No significant differences in color, odor, taste, and texture in raw leaves were observed after the ASC wash compared with after the distilled water wash. These results indicate that prewashing with ASC could control bacterial growth in lightly fermented Chinese cabbage without changing the product quality.

  17. Effect of acidified sodium chlorite treatment on chicken carcases processed in South Australia.

    PubMed

    Sexton, Margaret; Raven, Geoff; Holds, Geoff; Pointon, Andrew; Kiermeier, Andreas; Sumner, John

    2007-04-10

    A trial on the effectiveness of acidified sodium chlorite (ASC) on Salmonella and Campylobacter was undertaken on chicken carcases after they exited the screw chiller of a commercial premises in Adelaide, Australia. On untreated carcases mean log10 total viable count (25 degrees C) was 2.78/cm2 compared with 1.23/cm2 on treated carcases. Prevalence of E. coli, Salmonella and Campylobacter was 100%, 90% and 100% respectively, on untreated carcases and 13%, 10% and 23% respectively, on treated carcases. The distributions of E. coli, Salmonella and Campylobacter (mean log10 of positive samples) from untreated carcases were 1.55, -1.80 and 1.59/cm2 respectively, and -0.64, -1.85 and -2.21/cm2 respectively, on treated carcases. On untreated carcases S. Sofia and S. Infantis were isolated from 73% and 37% of carcases, respectively; only S. Sofia was isolated from treated carcases. The significant reductions in both prevalence and concentration demonstrated in the present trial indicate that ASC is a risk management option immediately available to the poultry industry.

  18. Validation of thiosulfate for neutralization of acidified sodium chlorite in microbiological testing.

    PubMed

    Kemp, G K; Schneider, K R

    2000-12-01

    At low pH, acidified sodium chlorite (ASC) has antimicrobial activity against a variety of foodborne contaminants. To evaluate the antimicrobial efficacy of ASC at specific time points posttreatment, it is necessary to halt the action of the disinfectant by removing residual chlorite or by increasing the pH. In this study, thiosulfate was investigated at varying concentrations for its effect on microbial survival and was investigated at a concentration of 0.1% in the presence of ASC for its effect on the antimicrobial and chemical activity of the test solution. Additionally, sodium thiosulfate was tested in two buffering systems, buffered peptone water (BPW) and Butterfield's phopshate buffer (BPB), for its ability to inactivate ASC chemistry. The results of this study show that, at a concentration of 0.1%, sodium thiosulfate has no deleterious effect on Escherichia coli survival and is effective in halting the antimicrobial action of ASC by eliminating the production of residual chlorite. The BPW alone and BPB in combination with thiosulfate were found to be effective inactivators of ASC chemistry.

  19. Acidified sodium chlorite optimisation assessment to improve quality of fresh-cut tatsoi baby leaves.

    PubMed

    Tomás-Callejas, Alejandro; López-Velasco, Gabriela; Artés, Francisco; Artés-Hernández, Francisco

    2012-03-15

    The fresh-cut industry commonly uses sodium hypochlorite (NaClO) for disinfection. However, there are certain problems related to its use, and acidified sodium chlorite (ASC) could be an alternative sanitiser to replace it. There is limited research evaluating the effect of ASC on the overall quality of fresh-cut produce, especially sensory quality. In this study the decontamination efficacy and quality attribute effects of ASC on fresh-cut tatsoi after application and during storage were investigated. Tatsoi baby leaves were minimally processed at 8 °C and stored under passive modified atmosphere packaging for up to 11 days at 5 and 10 °C. Low to moderate doses of ASC (100-500 mg L⁻¹) showed an initial antimicrobial efficacy on natural microflora and Escherichia coli as effective as that of NaClO. Regarding contact time, ASC was effective in reducting the E. coli population during the first 30 s of washing, and an increase in contact time did not improve the antimicrobial effect. Sensory quality attributes were well kept for up to 11 days at 5 °C but for only 5 days at the abusive temperature of 10 °C. ASC provides an alternative sanitising technique to NaClO for maintaining the quality and safety of fresh-cut tatsoi baby leaves for up to 11 days at 5 °C. Copyright © 2011 Society of Chemical Industry.

  20. Efficacy of chlorine and acidified sodium chlorite on microbial population and quality changes of spinach leaves.

    PubMed

    Nei, Daisuke; Choi, Ji-Weon; Bari, Md Latiful; Kawasaki, Susumu; Kawamoto, Shinichi; Inatsu, Yasuhiro

    2009-06-01

    Efficacy of washing with distilled water, chlorine solution, and acidified sodium chlorite (ASC) solution on populations of microorganisms on spinach leaves was evaluated. Washing with chlorine (100 mg/L) and ASC (sodium chlorite, 15 mg/L; citric acid, 200 mg/L) resulted in significant population reduction (1.1-1.9 log CFU/g) of aerobic microflora, coliform, and Escherichia coli O157:H7 (p < 0.05). There was no remarkable difference in decontamination efficacy between chlorine and ASC solution. In recent years, several sodium chlorite chemicals have been commercially available, and no difference in decontamination efficacy among the chemicals was observed when same concentration of sodium chlorite and citric acid were used. In addition, the reduction of E. coli O157:H7 population was influenced depending on the inoculation method and type of washing. It has been seen that dip-inoculated spinach leaves showed lower reduction than that of spot-inoculated spinach. After washing, populations of aerobic microflora, coliform, and E. coli O157:H7 were increased during storage at 10 degrees C, and washing condition before storage did not affect the subsequent increases in microbial population. Color of spinach leaves washed with ASC solution was not different from the color of those washed with water or chlorine solution, and washing with ASC solution was concluded to has no effect on appearance of spinach leaves.

  1. Equilibrium of acidifying and alkalinizing metabolic acid-base disorders in cirrhosis.

    PubMed

    Funk, Georg-Christian; Doberer, Daniel; Osterreicher, Christoph; Peck-Radosavljevic, Markus; Schmid, Monika; Schneeweiss, Bruno

    2005-06-01

    Conflicting results exist with regard to metabolic acid-base status in liver cirrhosis, when the classic concept of acid-base analysis is applied. The influence of the common disturbances of water, electrolytes and albumin on acid-base status in cirrhosis has not been studied. The aim of this study was to clarify acid-base status in cirrhotic patients by analyzing all parameters with possible impact on acid-base equilibrium. Fifty stable cirrhotic patients admitted to a university hospital. Arterial acid-base status was analyzed using the principles of physical chemistry and compared with 10 healthy controls. Apart from mild hypoalbuminemic alkalosis, acid-base state was normal in Child-Pugh A cirrhosis. Respiratory alkalosis was the net acid-base disorder in Child-Pugh B and C cirrhosis with a normal overall metabolic acid-base state (Base excess-1.0 (-3.6 to 1.6) vs 1.1 (-0.2 to 1.1) mmol/l, P = 0.136, compared with healthy controls, median (interquartile range)). Absence of an apparent metabolic acid-base disorder was based on an equilibrium of hypoalbuminemic alkalosis and of dilutional acidosis and hyperchloremic acidosis. A balance of offsetting acidifying and alkalinizing metabolic acid-base disorders leaves the net metabolic acid-base status unchanged in cirrhosis.

  2. Alterations of Fractures in Carbonate Rocks by CO2-Acidified Brines.

    PubMed

    Deng, Hang; Fitts, Jeffrey P; Crandall, Dustin; McIntyre, Dustin; Peters, Catherine A

    2015-08-18

    Fractures in geological formations may enable migration of environmentally relevant fluids, as in leakage of CO2 through caprocks in geologic carbon sequestration. We investigated geochemically induced alterations of fracture geometry in Indiana Limestone specimens. Experiments were the first of their kind, with periodic high-resolution imaging using X-ray computed tomography (xCT) scanning while maintaining high pore pressure (100 bar). We studied two CO2-acidified brines having the same pH (3.3) and comparable thermodynamic disequilibrium but different equilibrated pressures of CO2 (PCO2 values of 12 and 77 bar). High-PCO2 brine has a faster calcite dissolution kinetic rate because of the accelerating effect of carbonic acid. Contrary to expectations, dissolution extents were comparable in the two experiments. However, progressive xCT images revealed extensive channelization for high PCO2, explained by strong positive feedback between ongoing flow and reaction. The pronounced channel increasingly directed flow to a small region of the fracture, which explains why the overall dissolution was lower than expected. Despite this, flow simulations revealed large increases in permeability in the high-PCO2 experiment. This study shows that the permeability evolution of dissolving fractures will be larger for faster-reacting fluids. The overall mechanism is not because more rock dissolves, as would be commonly assumed, but because of accelerated fracture channelization.

  3. Rheology and stability of acidified food emulsions treated with high pressure.

    PubMed

    Arora, Akshay; Chism, Grady W; Shellhammer, Thomas H

    2003-04-23

    The stability and rheology of acidified model oil-in-water emulsions (pH 3.6 +/- 0.1) were evaluated before and after high-pressure treatments. Varying concentrations of canola oil (0-50% w/w), whey protein isolate, polysorbate 60, soy lecithin (0.1-1.5% w/w each), and xanthan (0.0-0.2% w/w) were chosen. Exposure to high pressures (up to 800 MPa for 5 min at 30 degrees C) did not significantly affect the equivalent surface mean diameter D[3,2], flow behavior, and viscoelasticity of the whey protein isolate and polysorbate 60-stabilized emulsions. Pressure treatments had negligible effects on emulsion stability in these systems, except when xanthan (0.2% w/w) was present in which pressure improved the stability of polysorbate 60-stabilized emulsions. Soy lecithin-stabilized emulsions had larger mean particles sizes and lower emulsion volume indices than the others, indicating potential instability, and application of pressure further destabilized these emulsions.

  4. Nitrite addition to acidified sludge significantly improves digestibility, toxic metal removal, dewaterability and pathogen reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, Fangzhou; Keller, Jürg; Yuan, Zhiguo; Batstone, Damien J.; Freguia, Stefano; Pikaar, Ilje

    2016-12-01

    Sludge management is a major issue for water utilities globally. Poor digestibility and dewaterability are the main factors determining the cost for sludge management, whereas pathogen and toxic metal concentrations limit beneficial reuse. In this study, the effects of low level nitrite addition to acidified sludge to simultaneously enhance digestibility, toxic metal removal, dewaterability and pathogen reduction were investigated. Waste activated sludge (WAS) from a full-scale waste water treatment plant was treated at pH 2 with 10 mg NO2‑-N/L for 5 h. Biochemical methane potential tests showed an increase in the methane production of 28%, corresponding to an improvement from 247 ± 8 L CH4/kg VS to 317 ± 1 L CH4/kg VS. The enhanced removal of toxic metals further increased the methane production by another 18% to 360 ± 6 L CH4/kg VS (a total increase of 46%). The solids content of dewatered sludge increased from 14.6 ± 1.4% in the control to 18.2 ± 0.8%. A 4-log reduction for both total coliforms and E. coli was achieved. Overall, this study highlights the potential of acidification with low level nitrite addition as an effective and simple method achieving multiple improvements in terms of sludge management.

  5. Complex responses of intertidal molluscan embryos to a warming and acidifying ocean in the presence of UV radiation.

    PubMed

    Davis, Andrew R; Coleman, Daniel; Broad, Allison; Byrne, Maria; Dworjanyn, Symon A; Przeslawski, Rachel

    2013-01-01

    Climate change and ocean acidification will expose marine organisms to synchronous multiple stressors, with early life stages being potentially most vulnerable to changing environmental conditions. We simultaneously exposed encapsulated molluscan embryos to three abiotic stressors-acidified conditions, elevated temperate, and solar UV radiation in large outdoor water tables in a multifactorial design. Solar UV radiation was modified with plastic filters, while levels of the other factors reflected IPCC predictions for near-future change. We quantified mortality and the rate of embryonic development for a mid-shore littorinid, Bembicium nanum, and low-shore opisthobranch, Dolabrifera brazieri. Outcomes were consistent for these model species with embryos faring significantly better at 26°C than 22°C. Mortality sharply increased at the lowest temperature (22°C) and lowest pH (7.6) examined, producing a significant interaction. Under these conditions mortality approached 100% for each species, representing a 2- to 4-fold increase in mortality relative to warm (26°C) non-acidified conditions. Predictably, development was more rapid at the highest temperature but this again interacted with acidified conditions. Development was slowed under acidified conditions at the lowest temperature. The presence of UV radiation had minimal impact on the outcomes, only slowing development for the littorinid and not interacting with the other factors. Our findings suggest that a warming ocean, at least to a threshold, may compensate for the effects of decreasing pH for some species. It also appears that stressors will interact in complex and unpredictable ways in a changing climate.

  6. Chlamydiaceae infections in pig

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Chlamydiaceae are Gram-negative obligate intracellular bacteria. They are responsible for a broad range of diseases in animals and humans. In pigs, Chlamydia suis, Chlamydia abortus, Chlamydia pecorum and Chlamydia psittaci have been isolated. Chlamydiaceae infections in pigs are associated with different pathologies such as conjunctivitis, pneumonia, pericarditis, polyarthritis, polyserositis, pseudo-membranous or necrotizing enteritis, periparturient dysgalactiae syndrome, vaginal discharge, return to oestrus, abortion, mummification, delivery of weak piglets, increased perinatal and neonatal mortality and inferior semen quality, orchitis, epididymitis and urethritis in boars. However, Chlamydiaceae are still considered as non-important pathogens because reports of porcine chlamydiosis are rare. Furthermore, Chlamydiaceae infections are often unnoticed because tests for Chlamydiaceae are not routinely performed in all veterinary diagnostic laboratories and Chlamydiaceae are often found in association with other pathogens, which are sometimes more easily to detect. However, recent studies have demonstrated that Chlamydiaceae infections in breeding sows, boars and piglets occur more often than thought and are economically important. This paper presents an overview on: the taxonomy of Chlamydiaceae occurring in pigs, diagnostic considerations, epidemiology and pathology of infections with Chlamydiaceae in pigs, public health significance and finally on prevention and treatment of Chlamydiaceae infections in pigs. PMID:21314912

  7. The clinical and microbiological effects of a novel acidified sodium chlorite mouthrinse on oral bacterial mucosal infections.

    PubMed

    Fernandes-Naglik, L; Downes, J; Shirlaw, P; Wilson, R; Challacombe, S J; Kemp, G K; Wade, W G

    2001-09-01

    Acidified sodium chlorite mouthrinses have been shown to have equivalent anti-plaque activity to those containing chlorhexidine, the current 'gold standard'. In this study, sodium chlorite mouthrinses (ASC) acidified with either malic or gluconic acids were compared to each other and with a chlorhexidine rinse and sterile water for their effect on salivary bacterial counts. Sixteen subjects participated in the study, which had a cross-over Latin square design. In a second study, a sodium chlorite/gluconic acid rinse was compared with chlorhexidine for its clinical and microbiological effects in 36 patients with oral mucosal infections. The sodium chlorite rinses acidified with malic and gluconic acids and the chlorhexidine rinse caused significant reductions in salivary bacterial counts up to 7 h after a single rinse compared with water. There were no significant differences between the three active treatments. In the mucosal infection study, there was a significant reduction in erythema in the chlorhexidine group compared with the ASC group. Patients who received the ASC rinse reported significantly less discomfort following treatment than those receiving the chlorhexidine rinse. Staphylococcus aureus counts were significantly reduced in the group who received the sodium chlorite rinse. There were no other significant differences between the treatments. ASC appears to be an effective alternative to chlorhexidine mouthrinse.

  8. Anthropogenic oligotrophication via liming: Long-term phosphorus trends in acidified, limed, and neutral reference lakes in Sweden.

    PubMed

    Hu, Qian; Huser, Brian J

    2014-01-01

    Restoration of acidified lakes by liming does not, in many cases, improve productivity to a pre-acidified state. We hypothesize that the poor recovery detected in many of these lakes is due to constrained in-lake phosphorous (P) cycling caused by enhanced precipitation of metals in higher pH, limed waters. Long-term (1990-2012) data for 65 limed, circum-neutral (pH 6-8), and acidified lakes in Sweden were analyzed to determine trends for P and potential drivers of these trends. Limed lakes not only had lower mean values and stronger decreasing trends for total P than non-limed lakes, but they also had the highest percentage of decreasing trends (85 %). A P release factor (Hypolimnetic P/Epilimnetic P) was developed to elucidate differences in internal P cycling between lake groups. Consistently, lower P release factors in limed lakes show limitation of internal P cycling during summer months that may be a factor limiting P bioavailability and thus productivity of these systems.

  9. [Effects of simulated acid rain and its acidified soil on soluble sugar and nitrogen contents of wheat seedlings].

    PubMed

    Tong, Guanhe; Liang, Huiling

    2005-08-01

    The study showed that the cation release of simulated rain caused soil acidification and base ions release. With the decrease of simulated acid rain pH from 5.6 to 2.5, the acid rain-leached soil pH decreased from 6.06 to 3.41, and its total amount of exchange base ions decreased from 56.5 to 41.1 mmol x kg(-1). Spraying simulated acid rain on the shoots of wheat seedlings planted on such acidified soils caused a rapid decrease in the soluble sugar and nitrogen contents of wheat seedlings, and reduced some of their physiological activities. The effect of spraying simulated acid rain on the soluble sugar, nitrogen, and chlorophyll contents and photosynthetic rate of wheat stems and leaves was larger than that of acidified soil, while the effect of the latter on the soluble sugar and nitrogen contents and the physiological activity of NR and GOGAT in root system of wheat seedlings was larger than that of the former. The intensive acid rain of pH < or = 3.0 and the corresponding acidified soil had an obvious harm to the growth and physiological activity of wheat seedlings.

  10. NOVEL SLURRY PHASE DIESEL CATALYSTS FOR COAL-DERIVED SYNGAS

    SciTech Connect

    Dr. Dragomir B. Bukur; Dr. Ketil Hanssen; Alec Klinghoffer; Dr. Lech Nowicki; Patricia O'Dowd; Dr. Hien Pham; Jian Xu

    2001-01-07

    This report describes research conducted to support the DOE program in novel slurry phase catalysts for converting coal-derived synthesis gas to diesel fuels. The primary objective of this research program is to develop attrition resistant catalysts that exhibit high activities for conversion of coal-derived syngas.

  11. Apparatus for converting biomass to a pumpable slurry

    DOEpatents

    Ergun, Sabri; Schaleger, Larry L.; Wrathall, James A.; Yaghoubzadeh, Nasser

    1986-01-01

    An apparatus used in the pretreatment of wood chips in a process for converting biomass to a liquid hydrocarbonaceous fuel. The apparatus functions to break down the wood chips to a size distribution that can be readily handled in a slurry form. Low maintenance operation is obtained by hydrolyzing the chips in a pressure vessel having no moving parts.

  12. Debris flow rheology: Experimental analysis of fine-grained slurries

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Major, Jon J.; Pierson, Thomas C.

    1992-01-01

    The rheology of slurries consisting of ≤2-mm sediment from a natural debris flow deposit was measured using a wide-gap concentric-cylinder viscometer. The influence of sediment concentration and size and distribution of grains on the bulk rheological behavior of the slurries was evaluated at concentrations ranging from 0.44 to 0.66. The slurries exhibit diverse rheological behavior. At shear rates above 5 s−1 the behavior approaches that of a Bingham material; below 5 s−1, sand exerts more influence and slurry behavior deviates from the Bingham idealization. Sand grain interactions dominate the mechanical behavior when sand concentration exceeds 0.2; transient fluctuations in measured torque, time-dependent decay of torque, and hysteresis effects are observed. Grain rubbing, interlocking, and collision cause changes in packing density, particle distribution, grain orientation, and formation and destruction of grain clusters, which may explain the observed behavior. Yield strength and plastic viscosity exhibit order-of-magnitude variation when sediment concentration changes as little as 2–4%. Owing to these complexities, it is unlikely that debris flows can be characterized by a single rheological model.

  13. Particle sedimentation monitoring in high-concentration slurries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagasawa, Yoshihiro; Kato, Zenji; Tanaka, Satoshi

    2016-11-01

    In this study, the sedimentation states of particles in high-concentration slurries were elucidated by monitoring their internal states. We prepared transparent high-concentration silica slurries by adjusting the refractive index of the aqueous glycerol liquid in which the particles were dispersed to match that of the silica particles. In addition, a fluorescent dye was dissolved in the liquid. Then, we directly observed the individual and flocculated particles in the slurries during sedimentation by confocal laser scanning fluorescent microscopy. The particles were found to sediment very slowly while exhibiting fluctuating motion. The particle sedimentation rate in the high-concentration slurry with the aqueous glycerol solution (η =0.068 Pa. s ) and a particle volume fraction on the order of 0.3 was determined to be 1.58 ± 0.66 μ m. min-1 on the basis of the obtained image sequences for 24.9 h. In-situ observation provides a large amount of information about the sedimentation behavior of particles in condensed matter.

  14. Method for freeforming objects with low-binder slurry

    DOEpatents

    Cesarano, III, Joseph; Calvert, Paul D.

    2002-01-01

    In a rapid prototyping system, a part is formed by depositing a bead of slurry that has a sufficient high concentration of particles to be pseudoplastic and almost no organic binders. After deposition the bead is heated to drive off sufficient liquid to cause the bead to become dilatant.

  15. Breakup of evaporating/burning slurry drops by additives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choudhury, P. Roy; Gerstein, M.

    Single drops of silicon carbide-cumene slurry were suspended from a quartz fiber and ignited. An inert material such as silicon carbide was chosen so that the droplets can be burned until all the fuel is consumed and only the inert residue is left on the quartz fiber. Benzoyl peroxide was added to cumene and the time to disruption of the liquid drop was measured. In the case of benzoyl peroxide, the breaking up of the drop resulting from its thermal decomposition produced CO 2. Both the drop disruption time and the burning of the slurry to dryness were predicted theoretically. Radiation absorption was found to be an important factor in the case of the slurry. Benzoyl peroxide and carbamide peroxide were investigated as additives to a boron slurry to determine if effective drop break-up could be achieved. Both additives produced drop shattering. The carbamide peroxide was particularly effective due to the production of O 2. The green flame associated with boron burning was clearly evident.

  16. Design of slurry reactor for indirect liquefaction applications

    SciTech Connect

    Prakash, A.; Bendale, P.G.

    1991-01-01

    The objective of this project is to design and model a conceptual slurry reactor for two indirect liquefaction applications; (1) production of methanol and (2) production of hydrocarbon fuels via Fischer-Tropsch route. A slurry reactor is defined here as a three-phase bubble column reactor using a fine catalyst particle suspension in a high molecular weight liquid. The feed gas is introduced through spargers. It then bubbles through the column providing the agitation necessary for catalyst suspension and mass transfer. The reactor models for the two processes have been formulated using computer simulation. Process data, kinetic and thermodynamic data, heat and mass transfer data and hydrodynamic data have been used in the mathematical models to describe the slurry reactor for each of the two processes. Available data from process development units and demonstration units were used to test and validate the models. Commercial size slurry reactors for methanol and Fischer-Tropsch synthesis were sized using reactor models developed in this report.

  17. Design of slurry reactor for indirect liquefaction applications. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Prakash, A.; Bendale, P.G.

    1991-12-31

    The objective of this project is to design and model a conceptual slurry reactor for two indirect liquefaction applications; (1) production of methanol and (2) production of hydrocarbon fuels via Fischer-Tropsch route. A slurry reactor is defined here as a three-phase bubble column reactor using a fine catalyst particle suspension in a high molecular weight liquid. The feed gas is introduced through spargers. It then bubbles through the column providing the agitation necessary for catalyst suspension and mass transfer. The reactor models for the two processes have been formulated using computer simulation. Process data, kinetic and thermodynamic data, heat and mass transfer data and hydrodynamic data have been used in the mathematical models to describe the slurry reactor for each of the two processes. Available data from process development units and demonstration units were used to test and validate the models. Commercial size slurry reactors for methanol and Fischer-Tropsch synthesis were sized using reactor models developed in this report.

  18. METHOD OF MAKING UO$sub 2$-Bi SLURRIES

    DOEpatents

    Hahn, H.T.

    1960-05-24

    A process is given of preparing an easily dispersible slurry of uranium dioxide in bismuth. A mixture of bismuth oxide, uranium, and bismuth are heated in a capsule to a temperature over the melting point of bismuth oxide. The amount of bismuth oxide used is less than that stoichiometrically required because the oxygen in the capsule also enters into the reaction.

  19. Using Ultrasound to Characterize Pulp Slurries with Entrained Air

    SciTech Connect

    Bamberger, Judith A.

    2006-08-06

    The development of fast and practical methods for inspecting fiber suspensions is of great interest in the paper making industry. For process control and paper quality prediction, several elements of the refining process during paper making must be accurately monitored, including specific fiber properties, weight percent fiber (composition), degree of refining, amount of solids, and entrained air content. The results of previous ultrasonic studies applied to wood pulp provide guidance that ultrasound attenuation is information rich, and it does potentially provide a tool for consistency measurement. Ultrasound has the ability to penetrate dense suspensions such as wood pulp slurries. It is has been shown, in some studies, that ultrasound is sensitive to degree of refining. The effects of entrained air, additives, the origin and treatment of the fibers do however all influence the measured data. A series of measurements were made with hardwood and softwood slurries to evaluate the ability of measuring pulp consistency, solids, and entrained air. The attenuation through the slurry was measured as the ultrasound travels from one transducer through the slurry to the other. The measurements identified the presence of entrained air in the pulp samples. To better understand the effects of air, measurements were made at increasing pressures to show how increased pressure reduced the amount of air observed in the spectrum.

  20. HPLC determination of an oxytocin-like peptide produced by isolated guinea pig Leydig cells: stimulation by ascorbate.

    PubMed

    Kukucka, M A; Misra, H P

    1992-01-01

    Highly purified populations of guinea pig Leydig cells were incubated with a maximally stimulating dose of 100 ng/mL LH for 24 h in the presence of increasing concentrations of sodium ascorbate. Sample supernatants were extracted, concentrated under vacuum, and reconstituted with acidified absolute ethanol. Samples were analyzed for oxytocin using high-performance liquid chromatography with electrochemical detection and known concentrations of an authentic oxytocin standard. Leydig cells stimulated with 0, 25, and 50 microM ascorbate produced and secreted 40.1 +/- 1.23, 77.4 +/- 13.8, 74.2 +/- 26.3 pg of an oxytocin-like peptide, respectively, per 1 x 10(6) cells. These results indicate that guinea pig Leydig cells are capable of producing an oxytocin-like peptide de novo and that low concentrations of ascorbate stimulate the production of this peptide in Leydig cells cultured in vitro.

  1. Hanford Waste Vitrification Plant full-scale feed preparation testing with water and process simulant slurries

    SciTech Connect

    Gaskill, J.R.; Larson, D.E.; Abrigo, G.P.

    1996-03-01

    The Hanford Waste Vitrification Plant was intended to convert selected, pretreated defense high-level waste and transuranic waste from the Hanford Site into a borosilicate glass. A full-scale testing program was conducted with nonradioactive waste simulants to develop information for process and equipment design of the feed-preparation system. The equipment systems tested included the Slurry Receipt and Adjustment Tank, Slurry Mix Evaporator, and Melter-Feed Tank. The areas of data generation included heat transfer (boiling, heating, and cooling), slurry mixing, slurry pumping and transport, slurry sampling, and process chemistry. 13 refs., 129 figs., 68 tabs.

  2. Ice slurry ingestion increases running time in the heat.

    PubMed

    Dugas, Jonathan

    2011-11-01

    To examine the effect of drinking an ice slurry (slushy) compared with cold water on prolonged submaximal exercise performed in the heat and on thermoregulatory responses. Crossover trial, with the 2 conditions counterbalanced and in random order. Results were adjusted for multiple comparisons by the method of Bonferroni. Exercise laboratory study; Edith Cowan University, Western Australia. Moderately active male volunteers (n = 10; mean age, 28 years) who participated in recreational sport and who had no injuries or history of heat illness were included. Five to 14 days before the trials, the participants were familiarized with the procedure by a progressive treadmill run to volitional exhaustion at their previously determined first ventilatory threshold running speed, in the same hot environment as the trials (34°C, 55% relative humidity). The 2 experimental trials were completed at the same time of day, 5 to 20 days apart. During the first 15 minutes, the participants rested while baseline measurements were taken. Over the next 30 minutes, they drank either a 7.5 g/kg flavored ice slurry (-1°C) or the same volume of flavored cold water (4°C) and then commenced the treadmill run. Participants were instructed to keep their normal lifestyle habits stable. In the 24 hours preceding the trials, they were asked to avoid strenuous exercise and to consume a specified amount of carbohydrate and fluid but no alcohol, caffeine, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, or nutritional supplements. Urine and blood samples were taken, and respiratory variables, heart rate, and rectal and skin temperatures were continuously monitored. Heat storage was calculated from temperature and anthropomorphic measurements. The primary outcome measures were comparisons of run time to exhaustion, perceived exhaustion, heat storage capacity, and changes in rectal and skin body temperatures during the 2 trials. All 10 participants took longer to fatigue (range, 2.4-14.2 minutes) after ice

  3. Rheological Characterization of Unusual DWPF Slurry Samples (U)

    SciTech Connect

    Koopman, D. C.

    2005-09-01

    A study was undertaken to identify and clarify examples of unusual rheological behavior in Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) simulant slurry samples. Identification was accomplished by reviewing sludge, Sludge Receipt and Adjustment Tank (SRAT) product, and Slurry Mix Evaporator (SME) product simulant rheological results from the prior year. Clarification of unusual rheological behavior was achieved by developing and implementing new measurement techniques. Development of these new methods is covered in a separate report, WSRC-TR-2004-00334. This report includes a review of recent literature on unusual rheological behavior, followed by a summary of the rheological measurement results obtained on a set of unusual simulant samples. Shifts in rheological behavior of slurries as the wt. % total solids changed have been observed in numerous systems. The main finding of the experimental work was that the various unusual DWPF simulant slurry samples exhibit some degree of time dependent behavior. When a given shear rate is applied to a sample, the apparent viscosity of the slurry changes with time rather than remaining constant. These unusual simulant samples are more rheologically complex than Newtonian liquids or more simple slurries, neither of which shows significant time dependence. The study concludes that the unusual rheological behavior that has been observed is being caused by time dependent rheological properties in the slurries being measured. Most of the changes are due to the effect of time under shear, but SB3 SME products were also changing properties while stored in sample bottles. The most likely source of this shear-related time dependence for sludge is in the simulant preparation. More than a single source of time dependence was inferred for the simulant SME product slurries based on the range of phenomena observed. Rheological property changes were observed on the time-scale of a single measurement (minutes) as well as on a time scale of hours

  4. Urolithiasis in finishing pigs.

    PubMed

    Maes, D G D; Vrielinck, J; Millet, S; Janssens, G P J; Deprez, P

    2004-11-01

    Urolithiasis in sows and neonatal pigs is well-known, but information on its occurrence and impact in finishing pigs is sparse. This study reports three outbreaks of urolithiasis in finishing pigs. In one herd, no symptoms were observed, whereas in the other herds the presence of calculi caused obstruction of the urinary tract resulting in death. Using infra-red spectroscopy, the predominant mineral-type found in the uroliths was calcium carbonate (calcite). Only small amounts of calcium oxalate (< 1%) could be detected. A high urinary pH, small abnormalities in the mineral composition of the feed and insufficient drinking water were the most important risk factors identified. To prevent urolithiasis, it is important to ensure adequate water intake, to provide a balanced mineral diet, and to avoid urinary tract infections.

  5. Evaluation of abiotic fate mechanisms in soil slurry bioreactor treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Glaser, J.A.; McCauley, P.T.; Dosani, M.A.

    1995-10-01

    Biological treatment of contaminated soil slurries may offer a viable technology for soil bioremediation. Slurry bioreactor treatment of soils, however, has not sufficiently progressed to be a durable, reliable, and cost-effective treatment option. Critical to the evaluation of slurry bioreactors is a better description of pollutant mass transfer during the treatment phase. Losses attributable to abiotic means are generally overlooked in field application of the technology. Discussions with EPA regional personnel and inspection of active soil slurry bioreactor operations have identified operational problems such as foaming which could result in possible abiotic loss. Field bioslurry operations have adopted various approaches to reduce foaming: (1) the addition of defoaming agents, (2) the reduction of rotational speed of the agitator, and (3) the reduction of gas flow through the bioreactor system. We have conducted two bench-scale slurry bioreactor treatability studies, at the U.S. EPA Testing & Evaluation Facility in Cincinnati, Ohio, which were designed to investigate some of the operating factors leading to foam formation and identify the most advantageous means to deal with foaming. The initial study has been previously presented as a general treatability study for treatment of creosote contamination in a soil. During this study, foaming became a major problem for operation. The foaming conditions were mitigated by use of defoamer and, in the more extreme cases, through reduction of the mixer rotational speed and gas flow. A subsequent study which was devoted specifically to investigating the causes and conditions of foaming using a different batch of soil from the same site as the earlier study showed little foaming at the very beginning of the study.

  6. Indian Creek-AML: Coal slurry reclamation (Kansas case history)

    SciTech Connect

    Witthar, S.R.

    1998-12-31

    Black and Veatch, assisted by Jack Nawrot, developed conceptual and final designs and provided construction assistance to create grasslands and wetlands in order to reclaim an abandoned coal mine for the state of Kansas. The mine included spoils, a coal refuse dump, and slurry pond in the Indian Creek drainage basin in east central Kansas. The Indian Creek flowed from an off-site abandoned mine and through the coal slurry pond where its waters became more polluted. The intent of the reclamation project was to improve water quality and create a wildlife refuge. The coal refuse was covered and seeded with a diversity of vegetation including several grasses and legume. The slurry pond was developed into a series of large wetland cells to improve water quality. Prior to reclamation, the water leaving the site had a typical pH of 3.3, ranging from 2.4 to 5.6, an iron content which typically over 22 mg/L and ranging over 100 mg/L, and contained large amounts of coal slurry. The acid sediment in the slurry killed fish and caused visible damage to a new large concrete box culvert several miles downstream of the site. Post-reclamation water quality leaving the Indian Creek site showed immediate improvement even before vegetation was reestablished. The existing wetland treatment systems have been successfully treating water for over seven years with the pH of the water leaving the wetlands above 7 and soluble iron content less than 1 mg/L. Fish in the constructed wetlands support waterfowl which now nest onsite.

  7. Influence of acidifying or alkalinizing diets on bone mineral density and urine relative supersaturation with calcium oxalate and struvite in healthy cats.

    PubMed

    Bartges, Joseph W; Kirk, Claudia A; Cox, Sherry K; Moyers, Tamberlyn D

    2013-10-01

    To evaluate the influence of acidifying or alkalinizing diets on bone mineral density and urine relative supersaturation (URSS) with calcium oxalate and struvite in healthy cats. 6 castrated male and 6 spayed female cats. 3 groups of 4 cats each were fed diets for 12 months that differed only in acidifying or alkalinizing properties (alkalinizing, neutral, and acidifying). Body composition was estimated by use of dual energy x-ray absorptiometry, and 48-hour urine samples were collected for URSS determination. Urine pH differed significantly among diet groups, with the lowest urine pH values in the acidifying diet group and the highest values in the alkalinizing diet group. Differences were not observed in other variables except urinary ammonia excretion, which was significantly higher in the neutral diet group. Calcium oxalate URSS was highest in the acidifying diet group and lowest in the alkalinizing diet group; struvite URSS was not different among groups. Diet was not significantly associated with bone mineral content or density. Urinary undersaturation with calcium oxalate was achieved by inducing alkaluria. Feeding an alkalinizing diet was not associated with URSS with struvite. Bone mineral density and calcium content were not adversely affected by diet; therefore, release of calcium from bone caused by feeding an acidifying diet may not occur in healthy cats.

  8. Transport of Cryptosporidium parvum oocysts in soil columns following applications of raw and separated liquid slurries.

    PubMed

    Petersen, Heidi H; Enemark, Heidi L; Olsen, Annette; Amin, M G Mostofa; Dalsgaard, Anders

    2012-09-01

    The potential for the transport of viable Cryptosporidium parvum oocysts through soil to land drains and groundwater was studied using simulated rainfall and intact soil columns which were applied raw slurry or separated liquid slurry. Following irrigation and weekly samplings over a 4-week period, C. parvum oocysts were detected from all soil columns regardless of slurry type and application method, although recovery rates were low (<1%). Soil columns with injected liquid slurry leached 73 and 90% more oocysts compared to columns with injected and surface-applied raw slurries, respectively. Among leachate samples containing oocysts, 44/72 samples yielded viable oocysts as determined by a dye permeability assay (DAPI [4',6'-diamidino-2-phenylindole]/propidium iodide) with the majority (41%) of viable oocysts found in leachate from soil columns with added liquid slurry. The number of viable oocysts was positively correlated (r = 0.63) with the total number of oocysts found. Destructively sampling of the soil columns showed that type of slurry and irrigation played a role in the vertical distribution of oocysts, with more oocysts recovered from soil columns added liquid slurry irrespective of the irrigation status. Further studies are needed to determine the effectiveness of different slurry separation technologies to remove oocysts and other pathogens, as well as whether the application of separated liquid slurry to agricultural land may represent higher risks for groundwater contamination compared to application of raw slurry.

  9. Transport of Cryptosporidium parvum Oocysts in Soil Columns following Applications of Raw and Separated Liquid Slurries

    PubMed Central

    Petersen, Heidi H.; Enemark, Heidi L.; Olsen, Annette; Amin, M. G. Mostofa

    2012-01-01

    The potential for the transport of viable Cryptosporidium parvum oocysts through soil to land drains and groundwater was studied using simulated rainfall and intact soil columns which were applied raw slurry or separated liquid slurry. Following irrigation and weekly samplings over a 4-week period, C. parvum oocysts were detected from all soil columns regardless of slurry type and application method, although recovery rates were low (<1%). Soil columns with injected liquid slurry leached 73 and 90% more oocysts compared to columns with injected and surface-applied raw slurries, respectively. Among leachate samples containing oocysts, 44/72 samples yielded viable oocysts as determined by a dye permeability assay (DAPI [4′,6′-diamidino-2-phenylindole]/propidium iodide) with the majority (41%) of viable oocysts found in leachate from soil columns with added liquid slurry. The number of viable oocysts was positively correlated (r = 0.63) with the total number of oocysts found. Destructively sampling of the soil columns showed that type of slurry and irrigation played a role in the vertical distribution of oocysts, with more oocysts recovered from soil columns added liquid slurry irrespective of the irrigation status. Further studies are needed to determine the effectiveness of different slurry separation technologies to remove oocysts and other pathogens, as well as whether the application of separated liquid slurry to agricultural land may represent higher risks for groundwater contamination compared to application of raw slurry. PMID:22706058

  10. Evaluation of Hydroxyl Radical Diffusion and Acidified Thiourea as a Scavenger during Intracoronal Bleaching.

    PubMed

    Lou, Elizabeth K; Cathro, Peter; Marino, Victor; Damiani, Fabrizio; Heithersay, Geoffrey S

    2016-07-01

    The diffusion of hydroxyl radicals in intracoronal bleaching is associated with a risk of invasive cervical resorption. The use of acidified thiourea has been recommended as a scavenger of residual radicals generated during intracoronal bleaching. The aims of this study were to quantify hydroxyl radical diffusion to external root surfaces after intracoronal bleaching with commonly used materials and to evaluate the effect of using acidified thiourea with hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) on hydroxyl radical diffusion. Eighty-two human premolars were prepared, stained, root filled, and allocated to experimental and control groups as follows: group 1: sodium perborate (SP) and water (n = 21), group 2: H2O2 (n = 21), group 3: acidified thiourea and H2O2 (n = 21), group 4: neutral thiourea and H2O2 (n = 10), control group 1: negative control (water) (n = 10), and control group 2: positive control (SP and H2O2) (n = 10). Materials were placed into the pulp chamber, sealed, and placed in 5 mmol/L terephthalic acid at 37°C for 48 hours. Hydroxyl radicals were quantified using a fluorescence microplate reader and high-performance liquid chromatography with fluorescence detection. The H2O2 and SP mixture resulted in the greatest hydroxyl radical diffusion and was significantly greater than SP and water (P < .05) and H2O2 (P < .05). The addition of acidified thiourea resulted in higher radical diffusion, whereas the addition of neutral thiourea resulted in lower diffusion than H2O2 alone. The SP and water mixture resulted in the lowest hydroxyl radical diffusion, and the H2O2 and SP mixture resulted in the greatest. Although the addition of acidified thiourea to H2O2 did not reduce radicals detected, the addition of neutral thiourea had a positive effect. Copyright © 2016 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Composition for a lightweight cement slurry for cementing oil and gas wells

    SciTech Connect

    Parcevaux, P.; Sault, P.

    1988-01-26

    A homogeneous lightweight cement slurry for cementing the annulus of an oil or gas well is described comprising: cement, an extender in the form of solid particles, a styrenebutadiene latex, and water, having a specific gravity lying substantially in the range from 1.2 to 1.6 and having a volume ratio of the liquid phase of the slurry to the total volume of the slurry of less than about 70%. A method of cementing the annulus of a wellbore by pumping an aqueous cement slurry through the wellbore and into the annulus the aqueous cement slurry comprising is described comprising cement, an extender in the form of solid particles, a styrenebutadiene latex and water, having a specific gravity lying substantially in the range from 1.2 to 1.6 and having a volume ratio of the liquid phase of the slurry to the total volume of the slurry of less than about 70%.

  12. Slurry atomizer for a coal-feeder and dryer used to provide coal at gasifier pressure

    DOEpatents

    Loth, John L.; Smith, William C.; Friggens, Gary R.

    1982-01-01

    The present invention is directed to a coal-water slurry atomizer for use a high-pressure dryer employed in a pumping system utilized to feed coal into a pressurized coal gasifier. The slurry atomizer is provided with a venturi, constant area slurry injection conduit, and a plurality of tangentially disposed steam injection ports. Superheated steam is injected into the atomizer through these ports to provide a vortical flow of the steam, which, in turn, shears slurry emerging from the slurry injection conduit. The droplets of slurry are rapidly dispersed in the dryer through the venturi where the water is vaporized from the slurry by the steam prior to deleterious heating of the coal.

  13. Growth potential of Clostridium perfringens from spores in acidified beef, pork, and poultry products during chilling.

    PubMed

    Juneja, Vijay K; Baker, David A; Thippareddi, H; Snyder, O Peter; Mohr, Tim B

    2013-01-01

    The ability of Clostridium perfringens to germinate and grow in acidified ground beef as well as in 10 commercially prepared acidified beef, pork, and poultry products was assessed. The pH of ground beef was adjusted with organic vinegar to achieve various pH values between 5.0 and 5.6; the pH of the commercial products ranged from 4.74 to 6.35. Products were inoculated with a three-strain cocktail of C. perfringens spores to achieve ca. 2-log (low) or 4-log (high) inoculum levels, vacuum packaged, and cooled exponentially from 54.4 to 7.2°C for 6, 9, 12, 15, 18, or 21 h to simulate abusive cooling; the U.S. Department of Agriculture, Food Safety and Inspection Service (USDA-FSIS) recommends a cooling time of 6.5 h. Total germinated C. perfringens populations were determined after plating on tryptose-sulfite-cycloserine agar and incubating the plates anaerobically at 37°C for 48 h. In addition, C. perfringens growth from spores was assessed at an isothermal temperature of 44°C. Growth from spores was inhibited in ground beef with a pH of 5.5 or below, even during extended cooling from 54.4 to 7.2°C in 21 h. In ground beef with a pH of 5.6, the growth was >1 log after 18 h of cooling from 54.4 to 7.2°C. However, 15 h of cooling controlled the growth to <1 log, regardless of the inoculum level. In addition, no growth was observed in any product with a pH ranging from 4.74 to 5.17, both during exponential abusive cooling periods of up to 21 h and during storage for 21 h at 44°C. While <1-log growth of C. perfringens from spores was observed in the pH 5.63 product cooled exponentially from 54.4 to 7.2°C in 15 h or less, the pH 6.35 product supported growth, even after 6 h of cooling from 54.4 to 7.2°C. These challenge tests demonstrate that adjustment of ground beef to pH of 5.5 or less and of barbeque products to pH of 5.63 or less inhibits C. perfringens spore germination and outgrowth during extended cooling periods from 54.4 to 7.2°C up to 15 h. Therefore

  14. Coal slurry pump development. Final report, October 1, 1979-March 31, 1984

    SciTech Connect

    Wong, G.S.; Aukerman, R.E.

    1984-01-01

    A coal slurry pump development program for coal liquefaction was conducted by Rocketdyne Division, Rockwell International for the Department of Energy, Division of Fossil Fuel Processing. The program was initiated in October 1979 and consisted of fabrication and testing of a high-capacity, high-pressure, prototype, centrifugal slurry pump module that meets the following requiremennts for a coal/oil slurry with 50% concentration and 200 mesh coal: flowrate of 2500 gpm; operating pressure of 3000 psi; temperature of 550 F; pressure rise of 500 psi; a rotative speed of 3600 rpm; and a horsepower of 960. A two-stage, centrifugal slurry test pump was fabricated from steel castings and high wear-resistant materials for components exposed to slurry such as: cast white iron, titanium carbide, and tungsten carbide. A unique hydraulic design was utilized to reduce the severe wear on impeller and volute cutwater. The slurry pump incorporates a unique high-pressure, hydrostatic fluid seal capable of 3000 psi operating pressure. A slurry test facility for testing the centrifugal slurry pump was constructed at the Colorado School of Mines Research Institute (CSMRI), Golden, Colorado. The facility contains an 8-inch-diameter test loop, 1.7 million Btu/hr gas-fired oil heater, slurry head tank, boost pump, purge oil storage tank, high-pressure seal purge oil system, and a centrifuge/polishing filter system for recovering purge oil from the closed-loop coal slurry system. The prototype slurry pump successfully completed a three-phase hydraulic and wear test program in hot oil and hot coal/oil slurry, and achieved nearly continuous operation in slurry in excess of 242 hours with minimum wear. The feasibility of utilizing high-pressure centrifugal slurry pumps for coal liquefaction has been successfully demonstrated and further development is highly warranted. 73 figures, 19 tables.

  15. Disrupting Hypoxia-Induced Bicarbonate Transport Acidifies Tumor Cells and Suppresses Tumor Growth.

    PubMed

    McIntyre, Alan; Hulikova, Alzbeta; Ledaki, Ioanna; Snell, Cameron; Singleton, Dean; Steers, Graham; Seden, Peter; Jones, Dylan; Bridges, Esther; Wigfield, Simon; Li, Ji-Liang; Russell, Angela; Swietach, Pawel; Harris, Adrian L

    2016-07-01

    Tumor hypoxia is associated clinically with therapeutic resistance and poor patient outcomes. One feature of tumor hypoxia is activated expression of carbonic anhydrase IX (CA9), a regulator of pH and tumor growth. In this study, we investigated the hypothesis that impeding the reuptake of bicarbonate produced extracellularly by CA9 could exacerbate the intracellular acidity produced by hypoxic conditions, perhaps compromising cell growth and viability as a result. In 8 of 10 cancer cell lines, we found that hypoxia induced the expression of at least one bicarbonate transporter. The most robust and frequent inductions were of the sodium-driven bicarbonate transporters SLC4A4 and SLC4A9, which rely upon both HIF1α and HIF2α activity for their expression. In cancer cell spheroids, SLC4A4 or SLC4A9 disruption by either genetic or pharmaceutical approaches acidified intracellular pH and reduced cell growth. Furthermore, treatment of spheroids with S0859, a small-molecule inhibitor of sodium-driven bicarbonate transporters, increased apoptosis in the cell lines tested. Finally, RNAi-mediated attenuation of SLC4A9 increased apoptosis in MDA-MB-231 breast cancer spheroids and dramatically reduced growth of MDA-MB-231 breast tumors or U87 gliomas in murine xenografts. Our findings suggest that disrupting pH homeostasis by blocking bicarbonate import might broadly relieve the common resistance of hypoxic tumors to anticancer therapy. Cancer Res; 76(13); 3744-55. ©2016 AACR. ©2016 American Association for Cancer Research.

  16. Trends in emissions of acidifying species in Asia, 1985-1997.

    SciTech Connect

    Streets, D. G.; Tsai, N. Y.; Akimoto, H.; Oka, K.

    2000-05-31

    Acid deposition is a serious problem throughout much of Asia. Emissions of sulfur dioxide (SO{sub 2}) and nitrogen oxides (NO{sub x}) have been increasing steadily, as nations strive to increase their levels of economic development. Coal and fuel oil have been the main choices for powering industrial development; and, until recently, only a few countries (notably Japan and Taiwan) had taken significant steps to avert the atmospheric emissions that accompany fuel combustion. This paper discusses trends in emissions of SO{sub 2} and NO{sub x} that have occurred in Asian countries in the period 1985--1997, using results from the RAINS-ASIA computer model and energy-use trends from the IEA Energy Statistics and Balances database. Emissions of SO{sub 2} in Asia grew from 26.6 Tg in 1985 to 33.7 Tg in 1990 and to 39.2 Tg in 1997. Though SO{sub 2} emissions used to grow as fast as fossil-fuel use, recent limitations on the sulfur content of coal and oil have slowed the growth. The annual-average emissions growth between 1990 and 1997 was only 1.1%, considerably less than the economic growth rate. Emissions of NO{sub x}, on the other hand, continue to grow rapidly, from 14.1 Tg in 1985 to 18.7 Tg in 1990 and 28.5 Tg in 1997, with no signs of abating. Thus, though SO{sub 2} remains the major contributor to acidifying emissions in Asia, the role of NO{sub x}, will become more and more important in the future.

  17. Multiphase reactivity of gaseous hydroperoxide oligomers produced from isoprene ozonolysis in the presence of acidified aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riva, Matthieu; Budisulistiorini, Sri Hapsari; Zhang, Zhenfa; Gold, Avram; Thornton, Joel A.; Turpin, Barbara J.; Surratt, Jason D.

    2017-03-01

    Ozonolysis of alkenes results in the formation of primary ozonides (POZs), which can subsequently decompose into carbonyl compounds and stabilized Criegee intermediates (sCIs). The sCIs generated from isoprene ozonolysis include the simplest congener, formaldehyde oxide (CH2OO), and isomers of C4-sCI. Although the bimolecular reaction with H2O is expected to be the main fate of sCIs, it was reported that sCIs can also react with carboxylic acids and/or organic hydroperoxides leading to gas-phase oligomeric compounds. While the impact of the gas-phase composition (H2O, sCI scavenger) on the formation of such products was recently studied, their fate remains unclear. In the present work, formation of oligomeric hydroperoxides from isoprene ozonolysis, proposed as reaction products composed of the sCI as a chain unit and formed from the insertion of sCI into a hydroperoxide or a carboxylic acid, was systematically examined in the presence of aerosol with varying compositions. The effect of hydroxyl (OH) radicals on the gas- and particle-phase compositions was investigated using diethyl ether as an OH radical scavenger. Thirty-four oligomeric compounds resulting from the insertion of sCIs into organic hydroperoxides or carboxylic acids were identified using iodide chemical ionization high-resolution mass spectrometry. Large reactive uptake onto acidified sulfate aerosol was observed for most of the characterized gaseous oligomeric species, whereas the presence of organic coatings and the lack of aerosol water significantly reduced or halted the reactive uptake of these species. These results indicate that highly oxidized molecules, such as hydroperoxides, could undergo multiphase reactions, which are significantly influenced by the chemical composition of seed aerosol. Furthermore, in addition to functionalization and accretion, decomposition and re-volatilization should be considered in SOA formation.

  18. Experiments and modeling of variably permeable carbonate reservoir samples in contact with CO₂-acidified brines

    DOE PAGES

    Smith, Megan M.; Hao, Yue; Mason, Harris E.; ...

    2014-12-31

    Reactive experiments were performed to expose sample cores from the Arbuckle carbonate reservoir to CO₂-acidified brine under reservoir temperature and pressure conditions. The samples consisted of dolomite with varying quantities of calcite and silica/chert. The timescales of monitored pressure decline across each sample in response to CO₂ exposure, as well as the amount of and nature of dissolution features, varied widely among these three experiments. For all samples cores, the experimentally measured initial permeability was at least one order of magnitude or more lower than the values estimated from downhole methods. Nondestructive X-ray computed tomography (XRCT) imaging revealed dissolution featuresmore » including “wormholes,” removal of fracture-filling crystals, and widening of pre-existing pore spaces. In the injection zone sample, multiple fractures may have contributed to the high initial permeability of this core and restricted the distribution of CO₂-induced mineral dissolution. In contrast, the pre-existing porosity of the baffle zone sample was much lower and less connected, leading to a lower initial permeability and contributing to the development of a single dissolution channel. While calcite may make up only a small percentage of the overall sample composition, its location and the effects of its dissolution have an outsized effect on permeability responses to CO₂ exposure. The XRCT data presented here are informative for building the model domain for numerical simulations of these experiments but require calibration by higher resolution means to confidently evaluate different porosity-permeability relationships.« less

  19. Assessment of regional acidifying pollutants in the Athabasca oil sands area under different emission scenarios

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Sunny; Vijayaraghavan, Krish; Spink, David; Jung, Jaegun; Morris, Ralph; Pauls, Ron

    2017-05-01

    Acid deposition is a potential environmental impact of oil sands development in the Athabasca Oil Sands Region (AOSR) in Northeastern Alberta. An acid deposition management framework has been established to manage this issue. This framework includes an acid deposition modelling and time-to-effect impact assessment component that was recently implemented for four acidifying emissions cases using the Community Multi-scale Air Quality (CMAQ) model. Predicted gross Potential Acid Input (PAI) deposition in the AOSR increases from the historical to existing case with further increases predicted in two future cases due to the projected increase in NOx emissions. On average the total predicted PAI deposition in the AOSR is approximately 40% sulphur deposition and 60% nitrogen deposition. Sulphur deposition decreases by 7% from the historical to existing cases due to the reductions in SO2 emissions that have occurred in the AOSR but increases by 5% from the existing to future case 1 and by 8% from existing to future case 2 even though continued AOSR SO2 emission decreases were modelled. This is likely the result of the deposition reduction associated with a single large reduction in SO2 emissions from one facility's main stack being offset elsewhere in the AOSR by deposition increases due to small increases in SO2 emissions from several in situ sources with shorter stacks. Average nitrogen deposition over the AOSR increases by 10% from the historical to existing case and then further increases by 10.6% from the existing case to future case 1 and by 12.3% from the existing case to future case 2. The increasing relevance of NOx emissions over SO2 emissions in the AOSR suggests that a robust treatment of nitrogen chemistry such as in CMAQ is required for conducting deposition assessments in the region. The modelling results provide information that can be used to inform oil sands emission management priorities in the context of acid deposition and nitrogen eutrophication

  20. Enhanced bactericidal action of acidified sodium chlorite caused by the saturation of reactants.

    PubMed

    Kim, N H; Park, T H; Rhee, M S

    2014-06-01

    Factors affecting the antibacterial action of acidified sodium chlorite (ASC), a widely used disinfectant, have not been determined. This study investigated the significant factors suggesting efficient production method to maximize bactericidal action of ASC. The effects of (i) preparation procedures (total three methods); (ii) initial concentrations of reactants: sodium chlorite (SC) and citric acid (CTA) (up to maximum solubility of each reactant) and (iii) final pH values (3·0 and 2·5) to the bactericidal action of ASC were investigated with a fixed final concentration of SC (10 ppm) using various foodborne pathogens (Escherichia coli O157:H7, Listeria monocytogenes, Salmonella Typhimurium and Staphylococcus aureus). The antimicrobial compounds produced and the bactericidal effects depended on the preparation procedure and the initial concentrations of the reactants. The ASC prepared by premixing highly concentrated reactants (in particular > 40%) followed by dilution (dilution after reaction, DAR) was more effective in inactivating foodborne pathogens, and it produced higher antimicrobial compound (Cl(2) and ClO(2)) yields than the other procedures. A 5-min treatment with ASC, produced using the other procedures, resulted in a reduction of < 3·5 log CFU ml(-1) (Gram positive = 0·18-0·78; Gram negative = 0·03-3·49 log CFU ml(-1)), whereas ASC produced with the DAR procedure using the saturated reactants completely inactivated all of the test pathogens within 5 min without recovery (initial concentration = 6·94-7·08 log CFU ml(-1)). The ASC production with the DAR procedure using the saturated reactants maximizes both the antimicrobial compound yields and bactericidal effects of the ASC solutions. This study will contribute to increase the efficiency of ASC treatments for disinfections reducing the effective SC concentrations for industrial use. © 2014 The Society for Applied Microbiology.