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Sample records for acidified sodium nitrite

  1. Disinfection of Bacillus spores with acidified nitrite.

    PubMed

    Szabo, Jeffrey G; Adcock, Noreen J; Rice, Eugene W

    2014-10-01

    Disinfecting water generated from a bioterrorism contamination event will require large amounts of disinfectant since the volume of water flushed from a drinking water distribution system or wash water collected from a contaminated outdoor area can accumulate quickly. Commonly used disinfectants may be unavailable in the necessary amounts, so evaluation of alternative disinfectants is needed. This study focuses on disinfection of Bacillus spores in water using acidified nitrite. The effect of varying pH (2 or 3), temperature (5°C or 24°C), nitrite concentration (0.01 or 0.1M), buffer (Butterfields or Phosphate Buffered Saline, PBS) and Bacillus species (B. globigii and B. anthracis Sterne) was evaluated. B. globigii was more resistant to disinfection under all water quality conditions. Disinfection was more effective for B. globigii and B. anthracis Sterne at 0.1M nitrite, pH 2, and 24°C. Disinfection of B. anthracis Sterne was enhanced in low ionic strength Butterfields buffer compared to PBS.

  2. 21 CFR 181.34 - Sodium nitrite and potassium nitrite.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Sodium nitrite and potassium nitrite. 181.34... nitrite and potassium nitrite. Sodium nitrite and potassium nitrite are subject to prior sanctions issued... without sodium or potassium nitrate, in the curing of red meat and poultry products....

  3. 21 CFR 181.34 - Sodium nitrite and potassium nitrite.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Sodium nitrite and potassium nitrite. 181.34...-Sanctioned Food Ingredients § 181.34 Sodium nitrite and potassium nitrite. Sodium nitrite and potassium... fixatives and preservative agents, with or without sodium or potassium nitrate, in the curing of red...

  4. 21 CFR 181.34 - Sodium nitrite and potassium nitrite.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Sodium nitrite and potassium nitrite. 181.34...-Sanctioned Food Ingredients § 181.34 Sodium nitrite and potassium nitrite. Sodium nitrite and potassium... fixatives and preservative agents, with or without sodium or potassium nitrate, in the curing of red...

  5. 21 CFR 181.34 - Sodium nitrite and potassium nitrite.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Sodium nitrite and potassium nitrite. 181.34...-Sanctioned Food Ingredients § 181.34 Sodium nitrite and potassium nitrite. Sodium nitrite and potassium... fixatives and preservative agents, with or without sodium or potassium nitrate, in the curing of red...

  6. 21 CFR 181.34 - Sodium nitrite and potassium nitrite.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Sodium nitrite and potassium nitrite. 181.34...-Sanctioned Food Ingredients § 181.34 Sodium nitrite and potassium nitrite. Sodium nitrite and potassium... fixatives and preservative agents, with or without sodium or potassium nitrate, in the curing of red...

  7. 21 CFR 573.700 - Sodium nitrite.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Sodium nitrite. 573.700 Section 573.700 Food and... Listing § 573.700 Sodium nitrite. Sodium nitrite may be safely used in canned pet food containing meat and... as a preservative and color fixative in canned pet food containing fish, meat, and fish and...

  8. Acidified nitrite inhibits proliferation of Listeria monocytogenes - Transcriptional analysis of a preservation method.

    PubMed

    Müller-Herbst, Stefanie; Wüstner, Stefanie; Kabisch, Jan; Pichner, Rohtraud; Scherer, Siegfried

    2016-06-01

    Sodium nitrite (NaNO2) is added as a preservative during raw meat processing such as raw sausage production to inhibit growth of pathogenic bacteria. In the present study it was shown in challenge assays that the addition of sodium nitrite indeed inhibited growth and survival of Listeria monocytogenes in short-ripened spreadable raw sausages. Furthermore, in vitro growth analyses were performed, which took into account combinations of various parameters of the raw sausage ripening process like temperature, oxygen availability, pH, NaCl concentration, and absence or presence of NaNO2. Data based on 300 growth conditions revealed that the inhibitory effect of nitrite was most prominent in combination with acidification, a combination that is also achieved during short-ripened spreadable raw sausage production. At pH6.0 and below, L. monocytogenes was unable to replicate in the presence of 200mg/l NaNO2. During the adaptation of L. monocytogenes to acidified nitrite stress (pH6.0, 200mg/l NaNO2) in comparison to acid exposure only (pH6.0, 0mg/l NaNO2), a massive transcriptional adaptation was observed using microarray analyses. In total, 202 genes were up-regulated and 204 genes were down-regulated. In accordance with growth inhibition, a down-regulation of genes encoding for proteins which are involved in central cellular processes, like cell wall/membrane/envelope biogenesis, translation and ribosomal structure and biogenesis, transcription, and replication, recombination and repair, was observed. Among the up-regulated genes the most prominent group belonged to poorly characterized genes. A considerable fraction of the up-regulated genes has been shown previously to be up-regulated intracellularly in macrophages, after exposure to acid shock or to be part of the SigB regulon. These data indicate that the adaptation to acidified nitrite partly overlaps with the adaptation to stress conditions being present during host colonization. PMID:27017279

  9. Acidified nitrite inhibits proliferation of Listeria monocytogenes - Transcriptional analysis of a preservation method.

    PubMed

    Müller-Herbst, Stefanie; Wüstner, Stefanie; Kabisch, Jan; Pichner, Rohtraud; Scherer, Siegfried

    2016-06-01

    Sodium nitrite (NaNO2) is added as a preservative during raw meat processing such as raw sausage production to inhibit growth of pathogenic bacteria. In the present study it was shown in challenge assays that the addition of sodium nitrite indeed inhibited growth and survival of Listeria monocytogenes in short-ripened spreadable raw sausages. Furthermore, in vitro growth analyses were performed, which took into account combinations of various parameters of the raw sausage ripening process like temperature, oxygen availability, pH, NaCl concentration, and absence or presence of NaNO2. Data based on 300 growth conditions revealed that the inhibitory effect of nitrite was most prominent in combination with acidification, a combination that is also achieved during short-ripened spreadable raw sausage production. At pH6.0 and below, L. monocytogenes was unable to replicate in the presence of 200mg/l NaNO2. During the adaptation of L. monocytogenes to acidified nitrite stress (pH6.0, 200mg/l NaNO2) in comparison to acid exposure only (pH6.0, 0mg/l NaNO2), a massive transcriptional adaptation was observed using microarray analyses. In total, 202 genes were up-regulated and 204 genes were down-regulated. In accordance with growth inhibition, a down-regulation of genes encoding for proteins which are involved in central cellular processes, like cell wall/membrane/envelope biogenesis, translation and ribosomal structure and biogenesis, transcription, and replication, recombination and repair, was observed. Among the up-regulated genes the most prominent group belonged to poorly characterized genes. A considerable fraction of the up-regulated genes has been shown previously to be up-regulated intracellularly in macrophages, after exposure to acid shock or to be part of the SigB regulon. These data indicate that the adaptation to acidified nitrite partly overlaps with the adaptation to stress conditions being present during host colonization.

  10. 21 CFR 172.175 - Sodium nitrite.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... sodium nitrate, in smoked, cured sablefish, smoked, cured salmon, and smoked, cured shad so that the level of sodium nitrite does not exceed 200 parts per million and the level of sodium nitrate does not... sodium nitrate, in meat-curing preparations for the home curing of meat and meat products...

  11. Inhibition Of Washed Sludge With Sodium Nitrite

    SciTech Connect

    Congdon, J. W.; Lozier, J. S.

    2012-09-25

    This report describes the results of electrochemical tests used to determine the relationship between the concentration of the aggressive anions in washed sludge and the minimum effective inhibitor concentration. Sodium nitrate was added as the inhibitor because of its compatibility with the DWPF process. A minimum of 0.05M nitrite is required to inhibit the washed sludge simulant solution used in this study. When the worst case compositions and safety margins are considered, it is expected that a minimum operating limit of nearly 0.1M nitrite will be specified. The validity of this limit is dependent on the accuracy of the concentrations and solubility splits previously reported. Sodium nitrite additions to obtain 0.1M nitrite concentrations in washed sludge will necessitate the additional washing of washed precipitate in order to decrease its sodium nitrite inhibitor requirements sufficiently to remain below the sodium limits in the feed to the DWPF. Nitrite will be the controlling anion in "fresh" washed sludge unless the soluble chloride concentration is about ten times higher than predicted by the solubility splits. Inhibition of "aged" washed sludge will not be a problem unless significant chloride dissolution occurs during storage. It will be very important tomonitor the composition of washed sludge during processing and storage.

  12. 21 CFR 573.700 - Sodium nitrite.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Sodium nitrite. 573.700 Section 573.700 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS FOOD ADDITIVES PERMITTED IN FEED AND DRINKING WATER OF ANIMALS Food...

  13. 21 CFR 573.700 - Sodium nitrite.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Sodium nitrite. 573.700 Section 573.700 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS FOOD ADDITIVES PERMITTED IN FEED AND DRINKING WATER OF ANIMALS Food...

  14. 21 CFR 573.700 - Sodium nitrite.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Sodium nitrite. 573.700 Section 573.700 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS FOOD ADDITIVES PERMITTED IN FEED AND DRINKING WATER OF ANIMALS Food...

  15. 21 CFR 573.700 - Sodium nitrite.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Sodium nitrite. 573.700 Section 573.700 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS FOOD ADDITIVES PERMITTED IN FEED AND DRINKING WATER OF ANIMALS Food...

  16. Severe Methemoglobinemia due to Sodium Nitrite Poisoning

    PubMed Central

    Hayakawa, Mineji; Gando, Satoshi

    2016-01-01

    Case. We report a case of severe methemoglobinemia due to sodium nitrite poisoning. A 28-year-old man was brought to our emergency department because of transient loss of consciousness and cyanosis. He was immediately intubated and ventilated with 100% oxygen. A blood test revealed a methemoglobin level of 92.5%. Outcome. We treated the patient with gastric lavage, activated charcoal, and methylene blue (2 mg/kg) administered intravenously. Soon after receiving methylene blue, his cyanosis resolved and the methemoglobin level began to decrease. After relocation to the intensive care unit, his consciousness improved and he could recall ingesting approximately 15 g sodium nitrite about 1 hour before he was brought to our hospital. The patient was discharged on day 7 without neurologic impairment. Conclusion. Severe methemoglobinemia may be fatal. Therefore, accurate diagnosis of methemoglobinemia is very important so that treatment can be started as soon as possible. PMID:27563472

  17. Severe Methemoglobinemia due to Sodium Nitrite Poisoning.

    PubMed

    Katabami, Kenichi; Hayakawa, Mineji; Gando, Satoshi

    2016-01-01

    Case. We report a case of severe methemoglobinemia due to sodium nitrite poisoning. A 28-year-old man was brought to our emergency department because of transient loss of consciousness and cyanosis. He was immediately intubated and ventilated with 100% oxygen. A blood test revealed a methemoglobin level of 92.5%. Outcome. We treated the patient with gastric lavage, activated charcoal, and methylene blue (2 mg/kg) administered intravenously. Soon after receiving methylene blue, his cyanosis resolved and the methemoglobin level began to decrease. After relocation to the intensive care unit, his consciousness improved and he could recall ingesting approximately 15 g sodium nitrite about 1 hour before he was brought to our hospital. The patient was discharged on day 7 without neurologic impairment. Conclusion. Severe methemoglobinemia may be fatal. Therefore, accurate diagnosis of methemoglobinemia is very important so that treatment can be started as soon as possible. PMID:27563472

  18. Biomimetic modification of silicone tubes using sodium nitrite-collagen immobilization accelerates endothelialization.

    PubMed

    Salehi-Nik, Nasim; Amoabediny, Ghassem; Solouk, Atefeh; Shokrgozar, Mohammad Ali; Zandieh-Doulabi, Behrouz; Klein-Nulend, Jenneke

    2016-10-01

    Biomimetic coatings to increase endothelialization of blood-contacting materials in biomedical devices are promising to improve the biocompatibility of these devices. Although a stable extracellular matrix protein coating on a biomaterial's surface is a prerequisite for endothelial cell attachment, it also stimulates platelet adhesion. Therefore, antithrombotic additives, such as nitric oxide donors, to a stable protein coating might lead to successful endothelialization of a material's surface. We aimed to test whether immobilized bioactive nitrite and acidified nitrite-generating sodium nitrite-collagen conjugate on silicone tubes enhances endothelialization by increasing the number of endothelial cells as well as growth hormone production and by decreasing platelet adhesion. Stable collagen immobilization on acrylic acid-grafted silicone tubes decreased the water contact angle from 102° to 56°. Initial 25 µM sodium nitrite in conjugate resulted in maximal growth hormone production (2.5-fold increase) and endothelial cell number (1.8-fold increase) after 2 days. A 95% confluent endothelial cell monolayer on sodium nitrite-collagen conjugate coating was obtained after 6 days. Maximum (2.7-fold) inhibition of platelet adhesion was reached with initial 500 µM sodium nitrite in conjugate. Our data showing that sodium nitrite-collagen conjugate coating with 25-50 µM sodium nitrite on silicone tubes increases the number of endothelial cells attached and inhibits platelet adhesion suggest that this coating is highly promising for use in blood-contacting parts of biomedical devices. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part B: Appl Biomater, 104B: 1311-1321, 2016. PMID:26115382

  19. Substitution of Oxides of Nitrogen for Sodium Nitrite

    SciTech Connect

    Yeager, C.J.

    2001-08-22

    The purpose of this report is to discuss the chemistry of nitrous acid, the Savannah River Plant application of nitrogen, environmental effects, and outline a development program for nitrogen replacement of sodium nitrite.

  20. Antidotal action of sodium nitrite and sodium thiosulfate against cyanide poisoning. (Reannouncement with new availability information)

    SciTech Connect

    Baskin, S.I.; Horowitz, A.M.; Nealley, E.W.

    1992-04-01

    The combination of sodium thiosulfate and sodium nitrite has been used in the United States since the 1930s as the primary antidote for cyanide intoxication. Although this combination was shown to exhibit much greater efficacy than either ingredient alone, the two compounds could not be used prophylactically because each exhibits a number of side effects. This review discusses the pharmacodynamics, pharmacokinetics, and toxicology of the individual agents, and their combination....Cyanide, Blood agent, Chemical warfare agents, Antidotes, Sodium nitrite, Sodium thiosulfate.

  1. Susceptibility of Clostridium difficile to the food preservatives sodium nitrite, sodium nitrate and sodium metabisulphite.

    PubMed

    Lim, Su-Chen; Foster, Niki F; Riley, Thomas V

    2016-02-01

    Clostridium difficile is an important enteric pathogen of humans and food animals. Recently it has been isolated from retail foods with prevalences up to 42%, prompting concern that contaminated foods may be one of the reasons for increased community-acquired C. difficile infection (CA-CDI). A number of studies have examined the prevalence of C. difficile in raw meats and fresh vegetables; however, fewer studies have examined the prevalence of C. difficile in ready-to-eat meat. The aim of this study was to investigate the in vitro susceptibility of 11 C. difficile isolates of food animal and retail food origins to food preservatives commonly used in ready-to-eat meats. The broth microdilution method was used to determine the minimum inhibitory concentrations (MIC) and minimum bactericidal concentrations (MBC) for sodium nitrite, sodium nitrate and sodium metabisulphite against C. difficile. Checkerboard assays were used to investigate the combined effect of sodium nitrite and sodium nitrate, commonly used in combination in meats. Modal MIC values for sodium nitrite, sodium nitrate and sodium metabisulphite were 250 μg/ml, >4000 μg/ml and 1000 μg/ml, respectively. No bactericidal activity was observed for all three food preservatives. The checkerboard assays showed indifferent interaction between sodium nitrite and sodium nitrate. This study demonstrated that C. difficile can survive in the presence of food preservatives at concentrations higher than the current maximum permitted levels allowed in ready-to-eat meats. The possibility of retail ready-to-eat meats contaminated with C. difficile acting as a source of CDI needs to be investigated. PMID:26700884

  2. Susceptibility of Clostridium difficile to the food preservatives sodium nitrite, sodium nitrate and sodium metabisulphite.

    PubMed

    Lim, Su-Chen; Foster, Niki F; Riley, Thomas V

    2016-02-01

    Clostridium difficile is an important enteric pathogen of humans and food animals. Recently it has been isolated from retail foods with prevalences up to 42%, prompting concern that contaminated foods may be one of the reasons for increased community-acquired C. difficile infection (CA-CDI). A number of studies have examined the prevalence of C. difficile in raw meats and fresh vegetables; however, fewer studies have examined the prevalence of C. difficile in ready-to-eat meat. The aim of this study was to investigate the in vitro susceptibility of 11 C. difficile isolates of food animal and retail food origins to food preservatives commonly used in ready-to-eat meats. The broth microdilution method was used to determine the minimum inhibitory concentrations (MIC) and minimum bactericidal concentrations (MBC) for sodium nitrite, sodium nitrate and sodium metabisulphite against C. difficile. Checkerboard assays were used to investigate the combined effect of sodium nitrite and sodium nitrate, commonly used in combination in meats. Modal MIC values for sodium nitrite, sodium nitrate and sodium metabisulphite were 250 μg/ml, >4000 μg/ml and 1000 μg/ml, respectively. No bactericidal activity was observed for all three food preservatives. The checkerboard assays showed indifferent interaction between sodium nitrite and sodium nitrate. This study demonstrated that C. difficile can survive in the presence of food preservatives at concentrations higher than the current maximum permitted levels allowed in ready-to-eat meats. The possibility of retail ready-to-eat meats contaminated with C. difficile acting as a source of CDI needs to be investigated.

  3. Intra-hepatic vascular response to sodium nitrite

    PubMed Central

    Geumei, Aida; Issa, I.; Mahfouz, M.

    1969-01-01

    1. In the perfused liver of the dog, sodium nitrite produced vasoconstriction in the hepatic arterial bed and, particularly, in the portal venous vascular bed. 2. These effects on the hepatic vasculature may account in part for the reduction of venous return and diminution in cardiac output recorded by other workers, and may therefore be a factor in the clinical efficacy of the nitrites in angina pectoris. PMID:5809737

  4. 21 CFR 172.175 - Sodium nitrite.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... color fixative, with or without sodium nitrate, in smoked, cured sablefish, smoked, cured salmon, and... level of sodium nitrate does not exceed 500 parts per million in the finished product. (3) As a preservative and color fixative, with sodium nitrate, in meat-curing preparations for the home curing of...

  5. 21 CFR 172.175 - Sodium nitrite.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... color fixative, with or without sodium nitrate, in smoked, cured sablefish, smoked, cured salmon, and... level of sodium nitrate does not exceed 500 parts per million in the finished product. (3) As a preservative and color fixative, with sodium nitrate, in meat-curing preparations for the home curing of...

  6. 21 CFR 172.175 - Sodium nitrite.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... color fixative, with or without sodium nitrate, in smoked, cured sablefish, smoked, cured salmon, and... level of sodium nitrate does not exceed 500 parts per million in the finished product. (3) As a preservative and color fixative, with sodium nitrate, in meat-curing preparations for the home curing of...

  7. 21 CFR 172.175 - Sodium nitrite.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... color fixative, with or without sodium nitrate, in smoked, cured sablefish, smoked, cured salmon, and... level of sodium nitrate does not exceed 500 parts per million in the finished product. (3) As a preservative and color fixative, with sodium nitrate, in meat-curing preparations for the home curing of...

  8. UV-induced Lactobacillus gasseri mutants resisting sodium chloride and sodium nitrite for meat fermentation.

    PubMed

    Arihara, K; Itoh, M

    2000-06-01

    Lactobacillus gasseri, one of the predominant lactobacilli in human intestinal tracts, is utilized for probiotics and dairy starter cultures. However, since L. gasseri is relatively sensitive to sodium chloride and sodium nitrite (essential compounds for meat products), it is difficult to utilize this species for conventional fermented meat products. In this study, efforts were directed to generate mutants of L. gasseri resisting sodium chloride and sodium nitrite. UV irradiation of the strain of L. gasseri JCM1131(T) generated several mutants resisting these compounds. A mutant strain 1131-M8 demonstrated satisfactory growth in meat containing 3.3% sodium chloride and 200 ppm sodium nitrite. Although proteins extracted from the cell surface of 1131-M8 were slightly different from those of the original strain, other biochemical characteristics of both strains were indistinguishable. These results suggest that the L. gasseri mutant obtained in this study could be utilized as a starter culture to develop probiotic meat products.

  9. Comparison of the effectiveness of acidified sodium chlorite and sodium hypochlorite in reducing Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Elano, Rachel Ramos; Kitagawa, Tomoko; Bari, Md Latiful; Kawasaki, Susumu; Kawamoto, Shinichi; Inatsu, Yasuhiro

    2010-12-01

    This study was designed to compare the effectiveness of acidified sodium chlorite (ASC) and sodium hypochlorite (NaClO) in reducing several Escherichia coli strains isolated from different retail meat and fresh produce. Forty nonpathogenic E. coli strains were isolated and used in this study. A type strain of E. coli (JCM 1649) and four O157:H7 serotypes of E. coli (CR-3, MN-28, MY-29, and DT-66) were used as reference. In vitro assay results revealed that the viable cell counts of each isolated E. coli strain and control strains exhibited a reduction of ∼ 4.3 ± 0.9 log and 7.8 ± 1.7 log CFU/mL after a 3-minute exposure to 100 mg/L NaClO and 20 mg/L ASC (pH 4.6), respectively, at 25°C, when compared with the viable bacterial counts obtained from phosphate-buffered saline. The one exception was the flocs-forming strain, which showed a reduction of only 1.0 log CFU/mL with both disinfectants. However, reductions of only 1.7 ± 0.3 log and 1.9 ± 0.4 log CFU/g were observed in lettuce after 5 minutes of washing with NaClO and ASC, respectively. On the other hand, reductions of 1.6 ± 0.2 log and 1.6 ± 0.4 log CFU/g were observed in spinach after 5 minutes of washing with NaClO and ASC, respectively. No reduction in the population was observed after washing the inoculated, fresh-cut vegetables with distilled water only. No significant difference in the reduction of E. coli was observed among all the tested strains with both sanitizers in the in vivo assay. These data suggest that the tested sanitizers exhibit a similar reduction of the surface-attached E. coli on leafy vegetables irrespective of the strain source.

  10. Anaerobic killing of mucoid Pseudomonas aeruginosa by acidified nitrite derivatives under cystic fibrosis airway conditions

    PubMed Central

    Yoon, Sang Sun; Coakley, Ray; Lau, Gee W.; Lymar, Sergei V.; Gaston, Benjamin; Karabulut, Ahmet C.; Hennigan, Robert F.; Hwang, Sung-Hei; Buettner, Garry; Schurr, Michael J.; Mortensen, Joel E.; Burns, Jane L.; Speert, David; Boucher, Richard C.; Hassett, Daniel J.

    2006-01-01

    Mucoid, mucA mutant Pseudomonas aeruginosa cause chronic lung infections in cystic fibrosis (CF) patients and are refractory to phagocytosis and antibiotics. Here we show that mucoid bacteria perish during anaerobic exposure to 15 mM nitrite (NO2–) at pH 6.5, which mimics CF airway mucus. Killing required a pH lower than 7, implicating formation of nitrous acid (HNO2) and NO, that adds NO equivalents to cellular molecules. Eighty-seven percent of CF isolates possessed mucA mutations and were killed by HNO2 (3-log reduction in 4 days). Furthermore, antibiotic-resistant strains determined were also equally sensitive to HNO2. More importantly, HNO2 killed mucoid bacteria (a) in anaerobic biofilms; (b) in vitro in ultrasupernatants of airway secretions derived from explanted CF patient lungs; and (c) in mouse lungs in vivo in a pH-dependent fashion, with no organisms remaining after daily exposure to HNO2 for 16 days. HNO2 at these levels of acidity and NO2– also had no adverse effects on cultured human airway epithelia in vitro. In summary, selective killing by HNO2 may provide novel insights into the important clinical goal of eradicating mucoid P. aeruginosa from the CF airways. PMID:16440061

  11. Dog rose (Rosa canina L.) as a functional ingredient in porcine frankfurters without added sodium ascorbate and sodium nitrite.

    PubMed

    Vossen, Els; Utrera, Mariana; De Smet, Stefaan; Morcuende, David; Estévez, Mario

    2012-12-01

    The effect of dog rose (Rosa canina L.; RC), rich in polyphenols and ascorbic acid, on lipid and protein oxidation, colour stability and texture of frankfurters was investigated. Four treatments were prepared: with 5 or 30 g/kg RC extract and without sodium ascorbate and sodium nitrite (5RC and 30RC, respectively), a positive control (with sodium ascorbate and sodium nitrite; PC) and a negative control (without sodium ascorbate, sodium nitrite or RC extract; NC). Hexanal values were much higher throughout storage in NC compared to RC and PC frankfurters (P<0.001). The RC extracts protected against protein oxidation, but not as efficiently as PC (P<0.05). In the RC treated frankfurters, lower a* values were measured compared to PC due to the lack of sodium nitrite. In conclusion, dog rose can act as a natural antioxidant in frankfurters, but not as full replacer for sodium nitrite.

  12. Modeling the Impact of Ingoing Sodium Nitrite, Sodium Ascorbate, and Residual Nitrite Concentrations on Growth Parameters of Listeria monocytogenes in Cooked, Cured Pork Sausage.

    PubMed

    King, Amanda M; Glass, Kathleen A; Milkowski, Andrew L; Seman, Dennis L; Sindelar, Jeffrey J

    2016-02-01

    Sodium nitrite has been identified as a key antimicrobial ingredient to control pathogens in ready-to-eat (RTE) meat and poultry products, including Listeria monocytogenes. This study was designed to more clearly elucidate the relationship between chemical factors (ingoing nitrite, ascorbate, and residual nitrite) and L. monocytogenes growth in RTE meats. Treatments of cooked, cured pork sausage (65% moisture, 1.8% salt, pH 6.6, and water activity 0.98) were based on response surface methodology with ingoing nitrite and ascorbate concentrations as the two main factors. Concentrations of nitrite and ascorbate, including star points, ranged from 0 to 352 and 0 to 643 ppm, respectively. At one of two time points after manufacturing (days 0 and 28), half of each treatment was surface inoculated to target 3 log CFU/g of a five-strain L. monocytogenes cocktail, vacuum packaged, and stored at 7°C for up to 4 weeks. Growth of L. monocytogenes was measured twice per week, and enumerations were used to estimate lag time and growth rates for each treatment. Residual nitrite concentrations were measured on days 0, 4, 7, 14, 21, and 28, and nitrite depletion rate was estimated by using first-order kinetics. The response surface methodology was used to model L. monocytogenes lag time and growth rate based on ingoing nitrite, ascorbate, and the residual nitrite remaining at the point of inoculation. Modeling results showed that lag time was impacted by residual nitrite concentration remaining at inoculation, as well as the squared term of ingoing nitrite, whereas growth rate was affected by ingoing nitrite concentration but not by the remaining residual nitrite at the point of inoculation. Residual nitrite depletion rate was dependent upon ingoing nitrite concentration and was only slightly affected by ascorbate concentration. This study confirmed that ingoing nitrite concentration influences L. monocytogenes growth in RTE products, yet residual nitrite concentration contributes

  13. Microbiology of high-sodium-nitrite-wastewater treatment.

    PubMed

    Arquiaga, M C; Canter, L W; Sabatini, D A

    1993-01-01

    A microbiological study conducted as a complement to kinetic studies of biological denitrification as a process for treating high-sodium-nitrite wastewaters generated from ship-boiler-tube cleaning is described. The number, genera, and denitrifying capabilities of the organisms inhabiting anoxic suspended-growth reactors used in the kinetic studies were evaluated for four experimental phases. The results regarding the enumeration of bacteria supported the findings of the kinetic studies as follows: (i) the better nitrite-removal efficiencies observed in the nitrification/denitrification system as compared with direct denitrification were confirmed by the presence of larger populations of organisms capable of completely reducing nitrate or nitrite; (ii) the presence of metals in concentrations associated with boiler-tube wastewater did not affect removal performance in the nitrification/denitrification systems, nor did it affect the density of complete denitrifiers; (iii) increasing sludge ages resulted in increasing nitrite-removal efficiencies as well as populations of complete denitrifiers; and (iv) a decrease in nitrate-removal efficiencies when the actual wastewater was introduced to a system that had been acclimated to the synthetic wastewater coincided with a reduction in the number of complete denitrifiers. Regarding the types of organisms found in this study, denitrifying strains of Alcaligenes and Pseudomonas were always present in the anoxic reactors along with other denitrifying and non-denitrifying bacteria of the same genera, or other genera such as Acinetobacter and Flavobacterium. However, members of the genus Alcaligenes were the only complete denitrifiers found in the anoxic reactors, and hence they are likely to play a key role in the denitrification process.

  14. Raman scattering in sodium nitrite crystals near the phase transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorelik, V. S.; Pyatyshev, A. Yu.; Krylov, A. S.

    2016-01-01

    Optical Raman spectra of a ferroelectric sodium nitrite crystal have been detected in a wide spectrum range at various temperatures, including the region of the ferroelectric phase transition. A manifestation of a transverse soft polar mode of the A 1( z) type responsible for the ferroelectric phase transition has been discovered in the spectrum at room temperature. This mode has been found to become overdamped even far from the ferroelectric phase transition temperature. This mode also appears as a central peak under heating. It has been found that the pseudoscalar mode of the A 2 type has the highest intensity in the Raman spectrum of sodium nitrite. The frequency corresponding to the maximum intensity of this mode in the Raman spectrum varies from 130 cm-1 at 123 K to 106 cm-1 at T = 513 K. A fair agreement of the experimental data for the A 1( z) mode with the Lyddane-Sachs-Teller relation has been established. The polariton curves for the A 1( z) polar mode and the dispersion curves for axinons has been plotted.

  15. Assessment of sodium hypochlorite and acidified sodium chlorite as antimicrobial agents to inhibit growth of Escherichia coli O157:H7 and natural microflora on shredded carrots

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The influence of cold tap water, sodium hypochlorite (200 ppm) and acidified sodium chlorite (100, 250, 500 and 1000 ppm) washes on survival and growth of Escherichia coli O157:H7 inoculated onto shredded carrots was determined after treatment and 7 and 14 days of storage. Growth of total mesophilic...

  16. Acute cyanide intoxication treated with a combination of hydroxycobalamin, sodium nitrite, and sodium thiosulfate.

    PubMed

    Mannaioni, Guido; Vannacci, Alfredo; Marzocca, Cosimo; Zorn, Anna Monica; Peruzzi, Sandro; Moroni, Flavio

    2002-01-01

    An 80-year-old diabetic patient was admitted to the hospital because of sudden unconsciousness and severe metabolic acidosis. His son reported the possibility of cyanide poisoning. Clinical data and the detection of cyanide in blood and gastric material confirmed this possibility. Supportive therapy and the following antidotes--sodium nitrite two doses 300 mg i.v., sodium thiosulfate 3 g i.v., and hydroxocobalamin 4 g in 24 hours--were administered immediately and the patient completely recovered in 48 hours. Our observations suggest that timely and appropriate use of antidotes for cyanide intoxication may prevent death, even in aged diabetic patients. PMID:12126191

  17. Thymoquinone ameliorates testicular tissue inflammation induced by chronic administration of oral sodium nitrite.

    PubMed

    Alyoussef, A; Al-Gayyar, M M H

    2016-06-01

    Although sodium nitrite has been widely used as food preservative, building bases of scientific evidence about nitrite continues to oppose the general safety in human health. Moreover, thymoquinone (TQ) has therapeutic potential as antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, antibacterial and anticancer. Therefore, we investigated the effects of both sodium nitrite and TQ on testicular tissues of rats. Forty adult male Sprague Dawley rats were used. They received either 80 mg kg(-1) sodium nitrite or 50 mg kg(-1) TQ daily for twelve weeks. Serum testosterone was measured. Testis were weighed and the testicular tissue homogenates were used for measurements of tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-α, interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-4, IL-6, IL10, caspase-3, caspase-8 and caspase-9. Sodium nitrite resulted in significant reduction in serum testosterone concentration and elevation in testis weight and Gonado-Somatic Index. We found significant reduction in testicular tissues levels of IL-4 and IL-10 associated with elevated levels of TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-6, caspase-3, caspase-8 and caspase-9. In conclusion, chronic oral sodium nitrite induced changes in the weight of rat testis accompanied by elevation in the testicular tissue level of oxidative stress markers and inflammatory cytokines. TQ attenuated sodium nitrite-induced testicular tissue damage through blocking oxidative stress, restoration of normal inflammatory cytokines balance and blocking of apoptosis.

  18. Nanoliposomal Growth Hormone and Sodium Nitrite Release from Silicone Fibers Reduces Thrombus Formation Under Flow.

    PubMed

    Salehi-Nik, Nasim; Amoabediny, Ghassem; Banikarimi, Seyedeh Parnian; Pouran, Behdad; Malaie-Balasi, Zahra; Zandieh-Doulabi, Behrouz; Klein-Nulend, Jenneke

    2016-08-01

    Biocompatibility of artificial lungs can be improved by endothelialization of hollow fibers. Bioavailability of growth-inducing and anti-thrombotic agents on the hollow fiber-blood interface inhibits thrombosis. We investigated if nanoliposomal growth-inducing growth hormone (nGH) and anti-thrombotic sodium nitrite (nNitrite) incorporation into collagen-coating on silicone hollow fibers improves blood biocompatibility by increasing endothelial cell growth and nitrite bioavailability under flow. Nitrite production rate was assessed under varying flow conditions. Finite element (FE) modeling was used to simulate nitrite transport within the parallel-plate flow chamber, and nitrite bioavailability on the fiber-blood interface at 1-30 dyn/cm(2) shear stress. Endothelial cell number on fibers coated with nNitrite-nGH-collagen conjugate was 1.5-fold higher than on collagen-coated fibers. For collagen-coated fibers, nitrite production reached a maximum at 18 dyn/cm(2) shear stress. When fibers were coated with nNitrite-nGH-collagen conjugate, nitrite production increased continuously by increasing shear stress. FE modeling revealed that nitrite concentrations at the fiber-blood interface were affected by shear stress-induced nitrite production, and diffusion/convection-induced nitrite removal. Highest nitrite concentrations and lowest thrombus deposition were observed on fibers coated with nNitrite-nGH-collagen conjugate exposed to 6-12 dyn/cm(2) shear stress. In conclusion, our results suggest that nNitrite-nGH-Col conjugate coatings promote endothelialization of silicone hollow fibers in biohybrid artificial lungs.

  19. Efficacy of sodium hypochlorite and acidified sodium chlorite in preventing browning and microbial growth on fresh-cut produce.

    PubMed

    Sun, Shih Hui; Kim, Su Jin; Kwak, Soo Jin; Yoon, Ki Sun

    2012-09-01

    The use of suitable sanitizers can increase the quality of fresh-cut produce and reduce the risk of foodborne illnesses. The objective of this study was to compare the washing effects of 100 mg/L sodium hypochlorite (SH) and 500 mg/L acidified sodium chlorite (ASC) on the prevention of enzymatic browning and the growth of microbial populations, including aerobic plate counts, E. coli, and coliforms, throughout storage at 4°C and 10°C. Fresh-cut zucchini, cucumbers, green bell peppers, and root vegetables such as potatoes, sweet potatoes, carrots, and radishes were used. Compared to SH washing, ASC washing significantly (p<0.05) reduced microbial contamination on the fresh-cut produce and prevented browning of fresh-cut potatoes and sweet potatoes during storage. More effective inhibition of aerobic plate counts and coliforms growth was observed on fresh-cut produce treated with ASC during storage at 10°C. Polyphenol oxidase (PPO) activity of fresh-cut potatoes and sweet potatoes was more effectively inhibited after washing with ASC. The use of 500 mg/L ASC can provide effective antimicrobial and anti-browning treatments of fresh-cut produce, including processed root vegetables. PMID:24471086

  20. Efficacy of Sodium Hypochlorite and Acidified Sodium Chlorite in Preventing Browning and Microbial Growth on Fresh-Cut Produce

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Shih Hui; Kim, Su Jin; Kwak, Soo Jin; Yoon, Ki Sun

    2012-01-01

    The use of suitable sanitizers can increase the quality of fresh-cut produce and reduce the risk of foodborne illnesses. The objective of this study was to compare the washing effects of 100 mg/L sodium hypochlorite (SH) and 500 mg/L acidified sodium chlorite (ASC) on the prevention of enzymatic browning and the growth of microbial populations, including aerobic plate counts, E. coli, and coliforms, throughout storage at 4°C and 10°C. Fresh-cut zucchini, cucumbers, green bell peppers, and root vegetables such as potatoes, sweet potatoes, carrots, and radishes were used. Compared to SH washing, ASC washing significantly (p<0.05) reduced microbial contamination on the fresh-cut produce and prevented browning of fresh-cut potatoes and sweet potatoes during storage. More effective inhibition of aerobic plate counts and coliforms growth was observed on fresh-cut produce treated with ASC during storage at 10°C. Polyphenol oxidase (PPO) activity of fresh-cut potatoes and sweet potatoes was more effectively inhibited after washing with ASC. The use of 500 mg/L ASC can provide effective antimicrobial and anti-browning treatments of fresh-cut produce, including processed root vegetables. PMID:24471086

  1. Efficacy of sodium hypochlorite and acidified sodium chlorite in preventing browning and microbial growth on fresh-cut produce.

    PubMed

    Sun, Shih Hui; Kim, Su Jin; Kwak, Soo Jin; Yoon, Ki Sun

    2012-09-01

    The use of suitable sanitizers can increase the quality of fresh-cut produce and reduce the risk of foodborne illnesses. The objective of this study was to compare the washing effects of 100 mg/L sodium hypochlorite (SH) and 500 mg/L acidified sodium chlorite (ASC) on the prevention of enzymatic browning and the growth of microbial populations, including aerobic plate counts, E. coli, and coliforms, throughout storage at 4°C and 10°C. Fresh-cut zucchini, cucumbers, green bell peppers, and root vegetables such as potatoes, sweet potatoes, carrots, and radishes were used. Compared to SH washing, ASC washing significantly (p<0.05) reduced microbial contamination on the fresh-cut produce and prevented browning of fresh-cut potatoes and sweet potatoes during storage. More effective inhibition of aerobic plate counts and coliforms growth was observed on fresh-cut produce treated with ASC during storage at 10°C. Polyphenol oxidase (PPO) activity of fresh-cut potatoes and sweet potatoes was more effectively inhibited after washing with ASC. The use of 500 mg/L ASC can provide effective antimicrobial and anti-browning treatments of fresh-cut produce, including processed root vegetables.

  2. Comparison of the relative propensities of isoamyl nitrite and sodium nitrite to ameliorate acute cyanide poisoning in mice and a novel antidotal effect arising from anesthetics.

    PubMed

    Cambal, Leah K; Weitz, Andrew C; Li, Hui-Hua; Zhang, Yang; Zheng, Xi; Pearce, Linda L; Peterson, Jim

    2013-05-20

    Isoamyl nitrite has previously been considered acceptable as an inhaled cyanide antidote; therefore, the antidotal utility of this organic nitrite compared with sodium nitrite was investigated. To facilitate a quantitative comparison, doses of both sodium nitrite and isoamyl nitrite were given intraperitoneally in equimolar amounts to sublethally cyanide-challenged mice. Righting recovery from the knockdown state was clearly compromised in the isoamyl nitrite-treated animals, the effect being attributable to the toxicity of the isoamyl alchol produced during hydrolysis of the isoamyl nitrite to release nitrite anion. Subsequently, inhaled aqueous sodium nitrite aerosol was demonstrated to ameliorate sublethal cyanide toxicity, when provided to mice after the toxic dose, by the more rapid recovery of righting ability compared to that of the control animals given only the toxicant. Aerosolized sodium nitrite has thus been shown by these experiments to have promise as a better alternative to organic nitrites for development as an inhaled cyanide antidote. The inhaled sodium nitrite led to the production of NO in the bloodstream as determined by the appearance of EPR signals attributable to nitrosylhemoglobin and methemoglobin. The aerosol delivery was performed in an unmetered inhalation chamber, and in this study, no attempt was made to optimize the procedure. It is argued that administration of an effective inhaled aqueous sodium nitrite dose in humans is possible, though just beyond the capability of current individual metered-dose inhaler designs, such as those used for asthma. Finally, working at slightly greater than LD50 NaCN doses, it was fortuitously discovered that (i) anesthesia leads to significantly prolonged survival compared to that of unanesthetized animals and that (ii) the antidotal activity of nitrite anion was completely abolished under anesthesia. Plausible explanations for these effects in mice and their practical consequences in relation to

  3. Comparison of the relative propensities of isoamyl nitrite and sodium nitrite to ameliorate acute cyanide poisoning in mice and a novel antidotal effect arising from anesthetics.

    PubMed

    Cambal, Leah K; Weitz, Andrew C; Li, Hui-Hua; Zhang, Yang; Zheng, Xi; Pearce, Linda L; Peterson, Jim

    2013-05-20

    Isoamyl nitrite has previously been considered acceptable as an inhaled cyanide antidote; therefore, the antidotal utility of this organic nitrite compared with sodium nitrite was investigated. To facilitate a quantitative comparison, doses of both sodium nitrite and isoamyl nitrite were given intraperitoneally in equimolar amounts to sublethally cyanide-challenged mice. Righting recovery from the knockdown state was clearly compromised in the isoamyl nitrite-treated animals, the effect being attributable to the toxicity of the isoamyl alchol produced during hydrolysis of the isoamyl nitrite to release nitrite anion. Subsequently, inhaled aqueous sodium nitrite aerosol was demonstrated to ameliorate sublethal cyanide toxicity, when provided to mice after the toxic dose, by the more rapid recovery of righting ability compared to that of the control animals given only the toxicant. Aerosolized sodium nitrite has thus been shown by these experiments to have promise as a better alternative to organic nitrites for development as an inhaled cyanide antidote. The inhaled sodium nitrite led to the production of NO in the bloodstream as determined by the appearance of EPR signals attributable to nitrosylhemoglobin and methemoglobin. The aerosol delivery was performed in an unmetered inhalation chamber, and in this study, no attempt was made to optimize the procedure. It is argued that administration of an effective inhaled aqueous sodium nitrite dose in humans is possible, though just beyond the capability of current individual metered-dose inhaler designs, such as those used for asthma. Finally, working at slightly greater than LD50 NaCN doses, it was fortuitously discovered that (i) anesthesia leads to significantly prolonged survival compared to that of unanesthetized animals and that (ii) the antidotal activity of nitrite anion was completely abolished under anesthesia. Plausible explanations for these effects in mice and their practical consequences in relation to

  4. Analysis of responses to glyceryl trinitrate and sodium nitrite in the intact chest rat.

    PubMed

    Nossaman, Bobby D; Pankey, Edward A; Badejo, Adeleke R; Casey, David B; Uppu, Satvika; Murthy, Subramanyam N; Kadowitz, Philip J

    2012-05-15

    Responses to glyceryl trinitrate/nitroglycerin (GTN), S-nitrosoglutathione (GSNO), and sodium nitrite were compared in the intact chest rat. The iv injections of GTN, sodium nitrite, and GSNO produced dose-dependent decreases in pulmonary and systemic arterial pressures. In as much as cardiac output was not reduced, the decreases in pulmonary and systemic arterial pressures indicate that GTN, sodium nitrite, and GSNO have significant vasodilator activity in the pulmonary and systemic vascular beds in the rat. Responses to GTN were attenuated by cyanamide, but not allopurinol, whereas responses to nitrite formed by the metabolism of GTN were attenuated by allopurinol and cyanamide. The results with allopurinol and cyanamide suggest that only mitochondrial aldehyde dehydrogenase is involved in the bioactivation of GTN, sodium nitrite, and GSNO, whereas both pathways are involved in the bioactivation of nitrite anion in the intact rat. The comparison of vasodilator activity indicates that GSNO and GTN are more than 1000-fold more potent than sodium nitrite in decreasing pulmonary and systemic arterial pressures in the rat. Following administration of 1H-[1,2,4]-oxadizaolo[4,3-]quinoxaline-1-one (ODQ), responses to GTN were significantly attenuated, indicating that responses are mediated by the activation of soluble guanylyl cyclase. These data suggest that the reduction of nitrite to nitric oxide formed from the metabolism of GTN, cannot account for the vasodilator activity of GTN in the intact rat and that another mechanism; perhaps the formation of an S-NO, may mediate the vasodilator response to GTN in this species.

  5. Sodium nitrite: the "cure" for nitric oxide insufficiency.

    PubMed

    Parthasarathy, Deepa K; Bryan, Nathan S

    2012-11-01

    This process of "curing" food is a long practice that dates back thousands of years long before refrigeration or food safety regulations. Today food safety and mass manufacturing are dependent upon safe and effective means to cure and preserve foods including meats. Nitrite remains the most effective curing agent to prevent food spoilage and bacterial contamination. Despite decades of rigorous research on its safety and efficacy as a curing agent, it is still regarded by many as a toxic undesirable food additive. However, research within the biomedical science community has revealed enormous therapeutic benefits of nitrite that is currently being developed as novel therapies for conditions associated with nitric oxide (NO) insufficiency. Much of the same biochemistry that has been understood for decades in the meat industry has been rediscovered in human physiology. This review will highlight the fundamental biochemistry of nitrite in human physiology and highlight the risk benefit evaluation surrounding nitrite in food and meat products. Foods or diets enriched with nitrite can have profound positive health benefits.

  6. Preventing bovine mastitis by a postmilking teat disinfectant containing acidified sodium chlorite.

    PubMed

    Hillerton, J E; Cooper, J; Morelli, J

    2007-03-01

    A split-herd study was performed to determine if an acidified, sodium chlorite teat disinfectant, UDDERgold Platinum Germicidal Barrier Teat Dip (UG Pt, Ecolab Inc., Redmond, WA), was effective in preventing new intramammary infections (IMI) in lactating dairy cows compared with a licensed, iodophor teat disinfectant (Iosan, Novartis Animal Health, Ltd., Whittlesford, UK), and to show that the test product was tolerated equally well by teat skin. The study lasted 114 d and covered all weather conditions. The teats of 176 cows were dipped after each milking in UG Pt and the teats of 172 cows were dipped in Iosan, the positive-control product. Routine milk samples were taken from each quarter of every cow every 4 wk. Additional samples were taken from newly calved cows joining the trial and from cows with clinical signs of mastitis. Milk samples were cultured for the presence of bacteria and the cause of clinical mastitis. Each quarter was eligible for only 1 infection during the trial. The number of clinical cases was identical in each group (n = 13) and the number of subclinical infections was slightly lower in the UG Pt group than in the Iosan group (n = 27 and 31, respectively). These rates of infection suggest that the products did not differ in their ability to prevent a new IMI. At least 203 cows were assessed for skin integrity before the start of the trial and every 28 d throughout. The UG Pt teat dip had no adverse effects on teat condition. The prevalence of hyperkeratosis did not change with time for both groups (0.90 +/- 1.08 and 0.95 +/- 1.06 at wk 0 vs. 0.65 +/- 0.87 and 0.49 +/- 0.74 at wk 16 for fore and hind teats, respectively, for UG Pt and 1.02 +/- 1.25 and 1.16 +/- 1.11 at wk 0 vs. 0.51 +/- 0.71 and 0.45 +/- 0.65 at wk 16, respectively, for Iosan); no redness of the skin was observed in either group. Application of recommended statistical methods to demonstrate noninferiority was problematic. PMID:17297095

  7. Consistent antioxidant and antihypertensive effects of oral sodium nitrite in DOCA-salt hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Amaral, Jefferson H.; Ferreira, Graziele C.; Pinheiro, Lucas C.; Montenegro, Marcelo F.; Tanus-Santos, Jose E.

    2015-01-01

    Hypertension is a common disease that includes oxidative stress as a major feature, and oxidative stress impairs physiological nitric oxide (NO) activity promoting cardiovascular pathophysiological mechanisms. While inorganic nitrite and nitrate are now recognized as relevant sources of NO after their bioactivation by enzymatic and non-enzymatic pathways, thus lowering blood pressure, mounting evidence suggests that sodium nitrite also exerts antioxidant effects. Here we show for the first time that sodium nitrite exerts consistent systemic and vascular antioxidant and antihypertensive effects in the deoxycorticosterone-salt (DOCA-salt) hypertension model. This is particularly important because increased oxidative stress plays a major role in the DOCA-salt hypertension model, which is less dependent on activation of the renin-angiotensin system than other hypertension models. Indeed, antihypertensive effects of oral nitrite were associated with increased plasma nitrite and nitrate concentrations, and completely blunted hypertension-induced increases in plasma 8-isoprostane and lipid peroxide levels, in vascular reactive oxygen species, in vascular NADPH oxidase activity, and in vascular xanthine oxidoreductase activity. Together, these findings provide evidence that the oral administration of sodium nitrite consistently decreases the blood pressure in association with major antioxidant effects in experimental hypertension. PMID:26119848

  8. [Sodium nitrite reduces lipid accumulation in steatotic cells by enhancing autophagy].

    PubMed

    Zhang, You-jing; Zheng, Nai-rui; Liu, Bin; Ji, Ai-ling; Li, Yan-zhang; Huangfu, Chao-shen

    2015-08-01

    Recent data have revealed that inhibiting autophagy exacerbates lipid accumulation in hepatocytes and nitrite treatment reduces total triglyceride levels in the high-fat diet mice. Therefore, the present study aimed to determine the effects of nitrite on simple hepatic steatosis and the possible role of autophagy. Firstly, steatotic L-02 cells were induced by incubating L-02 cells with 1.2 mmol · L(-1) oleic acid (OA) for 24 h. Secondly, steatotic L-02 cells were treated with 0.2 mmol · L(-1) sodium nitrite (SN) plus 3-methyladenine (3-MA), or chloroquine (CQ) for 24 h, and then lipid accumulation was measured with oil red O staining and triglyceride quantification. The notable steatosis could be observed in L-02 cells following exposure to 1.2 mmol · L(-1) OA for 24 h. Treatment with 0.2 mmol · L(-1) sodium nitrite reduced lipid accumulation in steatotic L-02 cells. 3-MA weakened the ability of sodium nitrite to ameliorate hepatic steatosis. Additionally, the sodium nitrite increased number of LC3-II immunostaining puncta and LC3-II protein expression was confirmed by immunofluorescence or Western blot analysis, and the effects were enhanced by CQ treatment. The number of increased cytoplasm vacuoles and lysosomes increased was confirmed by phase contrast and fluorescence microscope respectively. The increased autolysosome was detected by electron microscopy, this phenomenon could be reversed by CQ treatment. These data demonstrated that sodium nitrite enhanced the autophagic flux and decomposition of triglycerides in steatotic L-02 cells. PMID:26669000

  9. [Sodium nitrite enhanced the potentials of migration and invasion of human hepatocellular carcinoma SMMC-7721 cells through induction of mitophagy].

    PubMed

    Gui, Guan; Meng, Shan-shan; Li, Lu-juan; Liu, Bin; Liang, Hong-xia; Huangfu, Chao-shen

    2016-01-01

    Nitrites play multiple characteristic functions in invasion and metastasis of hepatic cancer cells, but the exact mechanism is not yet known. Cancer cells can maintain the malignant characteristics via clearance of excess mitochondria by mitophagy. The purpose of this article was to determine the roles of nitrite, reactive oxygen species (ROS) and hypoxia inducing factor 1 alpha (HIF-1 α) in mitophagy of hepatic cancer cells. After exposure of human hepatocellular carcinoma SMMC-7721 cells to a serial concentrations of sodium nitrite for 24 h under normal oxygen, the maximal cell vitality was increased by 16 mg x (-1) sodium nitrite. In addition, the potentials of migration and invasion for SMMC-7721 cells were increased significantly at the same time. Furthermore, sodium nitrite exposure displayed an increase of stress fibers, lamellipodum and perinuclear mitochondrial distribution by cell staining with Actin-Tracker Green and Mito-Tracker Red, which was reversed by N-acetylcysteine (NAC, a reactive oxygen scavenger). DCFH-DA staining with fluorescent microscopy showed that the intracellular level of ROS concentration was increased by the sodium nitrite treatment. LC3 immunostaining and Western blot results showed that sodium nitrite enhanced cell autophagy flux. Under the transmission electron microscopy (TEM), more autolysosomes formed after sodium nitrite treatment and NAC could prevent autophagosome degradation. RT-PCR results indicated that the expression levels of COX I and COXIV mRNA were decreased significantly after sodium nitrite treatment. Meanwhile, laser scanning confocal microscopy showed that sodium nitrite significantly reduced mitochondrial mass detected by Mito-Tracker Green staining. The expression levels of HIF-1α, Beclin-1 and Bnip3 (mitophagy marker molecular) increased remarkably after sodium nitrite treatment, which were reversed by NAC. Our results demonstrated that sodium nitrite (16 mg x L(-1)) increased the potentials of invasion and

  10. Nitrite

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Nitrite ; CASRN 14797 - 65 - 0 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinogenic Effects

  11. Sodium nitrite supplementation improves motor function and skeletal muscle inflammatory profile in old male mice.

    PubMed

    Justice, Jamie N; Gioscia-Ryan, Rachel A; Johnson, Lawrence C; Battson, Micah L; de Picciotto, Natalie E; Beck, Hannah J; Jiang, Hong; Sindler, Amy L; Bryan, Nathan S; Enoka, Roger M; Seals, Douglas R

    2015-01-15

    Aging is associated with motor declines that lead to functional limitations and disability, necessitating the development of therapies to slow or reverse these events. We tested the hypothesis that sodium nitrite supplementation attenuates declines in motor function in older C57BL/6 mice. Motor function was assessed using a battery of tests (grip strength, open-field distance, rota-rod endurance) in old animals (age 20-24 mo) at baseline and after 8 wk of sodium nitrite (old nitrite, n = 22, 50 mg/liter) or no treatment (old control, n = 40), and in young reference animals (3 mo, n = 87). Eight weeks of sodium nitrite supplementation improved grip strength (old nitrite, +12.0 ± 14.9% vs. old control, +1.5 ± 15.2%, P < 0.05) and open field distance (old nitrite, +9.5 ± 7.7%, P < 0.01 vs. old control, -28.1 ± 2.0%) and completely restored rota-rod endurance-run time (old nitrite, +3.2 ± 7.1%, P < 0.01 vs. old control, -21.5 ± 7.2%; old nitrite after treatment P > 0.05 vs. young reference). Inflammatory cytokines were markedly increased in quadriceps of old compared with young reference animals (by ELISA, interleukin-1β [IL-1β] 3.86 ± 2.34 vs. 1.11 ± 0.74, P < 0.05; interferon-gamma [INF-γ] 8.31 ± 1.59 vs. 3.99 ± 2.59, P < 0.01; tumor necrosis factor-alpha [TNF-α] 1.69 ± 0.44 vs. 0.76 ± 0.30 pg/ml, P < 0.01), but were reduced to young reference levels after treatment (old nitrite, IL-1β 0.67 ± 0.95; INF-γ 5.22 ± 2.01, TNF-α 1.21 ± 0.39 pg/ml, P < 0.05 vs. old control, P > 0.05 vs. young reference). Cytokine expression and treatment (old nitrite vs. old control) predicted strength (R(2) = 0.822, P < 0.001, IL-1β, INF-γ, group), open field distance (R(2) = 0.574, P < 0.01, IL-1β, group) and endurance run time (R(2) = 0.477, P < 0.05, INF-γ). Our results suggest that sodium nitrite improves motor function in old mice, in part by reducing low-grade inflammation in muscle.

  12. [Effect of sodium nitrite on phosphorylation of cytoskeletal proteins and spatial learning and memory in rats].

    PubMed

    Hu, Zhi-Hong; Fan, Ling-Ling; Hu, Yong-Mei

    2015-10-25

    The present study was aimed to explore the effect of sodium nitrite on cytoskeletal protein phosphorylation and spatial learning and memory in rats. Rats were served with drinking water containing sodium nitrite (100 mg/kg) for 60 days, then, the ability of spatial learning and memory of the rats was measured by Morris water maze. Phosphorylation level of tau and neurofilament, and the expression of protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) catalytic subunit in the hippocampus were detected by immunohistochemistry and Western blot. In comparison with the rats served with normal tap water, the rats served with sodium nitrite water showed significantly longer latency to find the hidden platform in Morris water maze (P < 0.05), elevated phosphorylation level of tau and neurofilament, and decreased expression of PP2A catalytic subunit (P < 0.05). These results indicated that administration of sodium nitrite could impair the spatial learning and memory of the rats, and the hyperphosphorylation of cytoskeletal proteins and the down-regulation of PP2A might be underlying mechanisms for the impairment.

  13. Mitochondrial aldehyde dehydrogenase mediates vasodilator responses of glyceryl trinitrate and sodium nitrite in the pulmonary vascular bed of the rat.

    PubMed

    Badejo, Adeleke M; Hodnette, Chris; Dhaliwal, Jasdeep S; Casey, David B; Pankey, Edward; Murthy, Subramanyam N; Nossaman, Bobby D; Hyman, Albert L; Kadowitz, Philip J

    2010-09-01

    It has been reported that mitochondrial aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH2) catalyzes the formation of glyceryl dinitrate and inorganic nitrite from glyceryl trinitrate (GTN), leading to an increase in cGMP and vasodilation in the coronary and systemic vascular beds. However, the role of nitric oxide (NO) formed from nitrite in mediating the response to GTN in the pulmonary vascular bed is uncertain. The purpose of the present study was to determine if nitrite plays a role in mediating vasodilator responses to GTN. In this study, intravenous injections of GTN and sodium nitrite decreased pulmonary and systemic arterial pressures and increased cardiac output. The decreases in pulmonary arterial pressure under baseline and elevated tone conditions and decreases in systemic arterial pressure in response to GTN and sodium nitrite were attenuated by cyanamide, an ALDH2 inhibitor, whereas responses to the NO donor, sodium nitroprusside (SNP), were not altered. The decreases in pulmonary and systemic arterial pressure in response to GTN and SNP were not altered by allopurinol, an inhibitor of xanthine oxidoreductase, whereas responses to sodium nitrite were attenuated. GTN was approximately 1,000-fold more potent than sodium nitrite in decreasing pulmonary and systemic arterial pressures. These results suggest that ALDH2 plays an important role in the bioactivation of GTN and nitrite in the pulmonary and systemic vascular beds and that the reduction of nitrite to vasoactive NO does not play an important role in mediating vasodilator responses to GTN in the intact chest rat.

  14. The effect of sucrose on unfrozen water and syneresis of acidified sodium caseinate-xanthan gels.

    PubMed

    Braga, A L M; Cunha, R L

    2005-07-01

    The influence of the ingredients of acidified Na caseinate-xanthan-sucrose gels on thermophysical properties and syneresis of the gels was studied. Sucrose concentration affected all of the gel equilibrium properties and the rate of syneresis. The positive effect of sucrose on syneresis and unfrozen water (UFW) values was attributed to different effects. The amount of UFW was governed mainly by the colligative properties of sucrose whereas the equilibrium syneresis behaviour was associated with the changes in network dynamics caused by the kosmotropic properties of sucrose. The latter could enhance xanthan-sucrose association or favour xanthan-protein interactions.

  15. Refining the Use of Sodium Azide to Counteract Nitrite Interference in Dissolved Oxygen Analysis of Seawater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, M. T.

    2014-12-01

    High nitrite concentrations are known to interfere with the analysis of dissolved oxygen in seawater samples, though the affected range has yet to be defined. This error can be counteracted by the addition of sodium azide to the hydroxide-iodide pickling reagent. The 2013 US GEOTRACES zonal transect included stations off the coast of Peru with nitrite values up to 10μmol/kg in the upper 400 meters of the water column. Low concentrations of dissolved oxygen were also present in the upper 800 meters, providing an opportunity to study the effect of high nitrite levels on dissolved oxygen analysis over a range of concentrations. Without the addition of azide, the error in dissolved oxygen measurement increased linearly with nitrite concentration. The interference was only significant in samples with nitrite concentrations higher than 1.5 μmol/kg, all of which also had low dissolved oxygen concentrations (<45μmol/kg). The unique combination of high nitrite and low dissolved oxygen is present in such well known and relatively small areas of the world's oceans that the addition of azide is not necessary as a standard procedure for the vast majority of oceanographic measurements.

  16. A Putative ABC Transporter Permease Is Necessary for Resistance to Acidified Nitrite and EDTA in Pseudomonas aeruginosa under Aerobic and Anaerobic Planktonic and Biofilm Conditions

    PubMed Central

    McDaniel, Cameron; Su, Shengchang; Panmanee, Warunya; Lau, Gee W.; Browne, Tristan; Cox, Kevin; Paul, Andrew T.; Ko, Seung-Hyun B.; Mortensen, Joel E.; Lam, Joseph S.; Muruve, Daniel A.; Hassett, Daniel J.

    2016-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa (PA) is an important airway pathogen of cystic fibrosis and chronic obstructive disease patients. Multiply drug resistant PA is becoming increasing prevalent and new strategies are needed to combat such insidious organisms. We have previously shown that a mucoid, mucA22 mutant PA is exquisitely sensitive to acidified nitrite (A-NO2−, pH 6.5) at concentrations that are well tolerated in humans. Here, we used a transposon mutagenesis approach to identify PA mutants that are hypersensitive to A-NO2−. Among greater than 10,000 mutants screened, we focused on PA4455, in which the transposon was found to disrupt the production of a putative cytoplasmic membrane-spanning ABC transporter permease. The PA4455 mutant was not only highly sensitive to A-NO2−, but also the membrane perturbing agent, EDTA and the antibiotics doxycycline, tigecycline, colistin, and chloramphenicol, respectively. Treatment of bacteria with A-NO2− plus EDTA, however, had the most dramatic and synergistic effect, with virtually all bacteria killed by 10 mM A-NO2−, and EDTA (1 mM, aerobic, anaerobic). Most importantly, the PA4455 mutant was also sensitive to A-NO2− in biofilms. A-NO2− sensitivity and an anaerobic growth defect was also noted in two mutants (rmlC and wbpM) that are defective in B-band LPS synthesis, potentially indicating a membrane defect in the PA4455 mutant. Finally, this study describes a gene, PA4455, that when mutated, allows for dramatic sensitivity to the potential therapeutic agent, A-NO2− as well as EDTA. Furthermore, the synergy between the two compounds could offer future benefits against antibiotic resistant PA strains. PMID:27064218

  17. Effects of peroxyacetic acid, acidified sodium chlorite or lactic acid solutions on the microflora of chilled beef carcasses.

    PubMed

    Gill, C O; Badoni, M

    2004-02-15

    The effects of solutions of 0.02% peroxyacetic acid, acidified 0.16% sodium chlorite, 2% lactic acid and 4% lactic acid on the natural flora of the distal surfaces of pieces of brisket, from chilled beef carcass quarters delivered from two slaughtering plants to a processing plant, were investigated. Peroxyacetic acid and acidified sodium chlorite solutions had little effect on the numbers of aerobes, coliforms or Escherichia coli on meat from one plant, and were less effective than 4% lactic acid for reducing the numbers of bacteria on meat from the other plant. With meat from both plants, treatment of meat with 4% lactic acid and holding for 5 or 60 min at 7+/-1 degrees C before sampling resulted in reductions of all three groups of bacteria by >/=1.5 log unit. Treatment with 2% lactic acid resulted in similar reductions when meat was sampled 5 min after the treatment, but reductions were about 1 log unit when meat was sampled 60 min after the treatment. Treatment of carcass quarters with 4% lactic acid resulted in reductions of bacterial numbers of >/=2 log units at distal surfaces, but

  18. Corrosion Fatigue Behavior of 316LN SS in Acidified Sodium Chloride Solution at Applied Potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poonguzhali, A.; Pujar, M. G.; Mallika, C.; Mudali, U. Kamachi

    2015-05-01

    The influence of acidified 1 M NaCl solution by addition of 2 ml/L of HCl on the cyclic plastic deformation of AISI Type 316LN SS containing 0.07 wt.% and 0.22 wt.% N was investigated as a function of the applied potentials. The corrosion fatigue (CF) behavior of stainless steel (SS) was explained vis-a-vis the dislocation behavior, the propensity to form microcracks, and the evolution of the current transients based on the studies carried out at both room-temperature and boiling conditions. CF experiments were conducted using round tensile specimens at a stress ratio of 0.5 and a frequency of 0.1 Hz. Two different kinds of damage mechanisms were observed (I) the damage mechanism in the stable-passive state was correlated with the localization of the anodic dissolution due to a depassivation-repassivation process, whereas (II) the cyclic stress induced pitting corrosion in the metastable pitting state, which resulted in formation of microcracks. The study of the microcracking process and its evolution is a key to the physical mechanism by which the fatigue life of stainless steels would be affected in an aqueous corrosive solution under the applied potential.

  19. Electroencephalographic Response to Sodium Nitrite May Predict Delayed Cerebral Ischemia After Severe Subarachnoid Hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Rowland, Matthew J.; Ezra, Martyn; Herigstad, Mari; Hayen, Anja; Sleigh, Jamie W.; Westbrook, Jon; Warnaby, Catherine E.; Pattinson, Kyle T. S.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: Aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage often leads to death and poor clinical outcome. Injury occurring during the first 72 hours is termed “early brain injury,” with disruption of the nitric oxide pathway playing an important pathophysiologic role in its development. Quantitative electroencephalographic variables, such as α/δ frequency ratio, are surrogate markers of cerebral ischemia. This study assessed the quantitative electroencephalographic response to a cerebral nitric oxide donor (intravenous sodium nitrite) to explore whether this correlates with the eventual development of delayed cerebral ischemia. Design: Unblinded pilot study testing response to drug intervention. Setting: Neuroscience ICU, John Radcliffe Hospital, Oxford, United Kingdom. Patients: Fourteen World Federation of Neurosurgeons grades 3, 4, and 5 patients (mean age, 52.8 yr [range, 41–69 yr]; 11 women). Interventions: IV sodium nitrite (10 μg/kg/min) for 1 hour. Measurements and Main Results: Continuous electroencephalographic recording for 2 hours. The alpha/delta frequency ratio was measured before and during IV sodium nitrite infusion. Seven of 14 patients developed delayed cerebral ischemia. There was a +30% to +118% (range) increase in the alpha/delta frequency ratio in patients who did not develop delayed cerebral ischemia (p < 0.0001) but an overall decrease in the alpha/delta frequency ratio in those patients who did develop delayed cerebral ischemia (range, +11% to –31%) (p = 0.006, multivariate analysis accounting for major confounds). Conclusions: Administration of sodium nitrite after severe subarachnoid hemorrhage differentially influences quantitative electroencephalographic variables depending on the patient’s susceptibility to development of delayed cerebral ischemia. With further validation in a larger sample size, this response may be developed as a tool for risk stratification after aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage. PMID:27441898

  20. Thymoquinone ameliorated elevated inflammatory cytokines in testicular tissue and sex hormones imbalance induced by oral chronic toxicity with sodium nitrite.

    PubMed

    Alyoussef, Abdullah; Al-Gayyar, Mohammed M H

    2016-07-01

    Scientific evidence illustrated the health hazards of exposure to nitrites for prolonged time. Nitrites affected several body organs due to oxidative, inflammatory and apoptosis properties. Furthermore, thymoquinone (TQ) had curative effects against many diseases. We tried to discover the impact of both sodium nitrite and TQ on inflammatory cytokines contents in testicular tissues and hormonal balance both in vivo and in vitro. Fifty adult male SD rats received 80mg/kg sodium nitrite and treated with either 25 or 50mg/kg TQ daily by oral-gavage for twelve weeks. Testis were removed for sperms' count. Testicular tissue homogenates were used for assessment of protein and gene expression of IL-1β, IL-6, TNF-α, Nrf2 and caspase-3. Serum samples were used for measurement of testosterone, LH, FSH and prolactin. Moreover, all the parameters were measured in human normal testis cell-lines, CRL-7002. Sodium nitrite produced significant decrease in serum testosterone associated with raised FSH, LH and prolactin. Moreover, sodium nitrite significantly elevated TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-6, caspase-3 and reduced Nrf2. TQ significantly reversed all these effects both in vivo and in vitro. In conclusion, TQ ameliorated testicular tissue inflammation and restored the normal balance of sex hormones induced by sodium nitrite both in vivo and in vitro. PMID:27038016

  1. Thymoquinone ameliorated elevated inflammatory cytokines in testicular tissue and sex hormones imbalance induced by oral chronic toxicity with sodium nitrite.

    PubMed

    Alyoussef, Abdullah; Al-Gayyar, Mohammed M H

    2016-07-01

    Scientific evidence illustrated the health hazards of exposure to nitrites for prolonged time. Nitrites affected several body organs due to oxidative, inflammatory and apoptosis properties. Furthermore, thymoquinone (TQ) had curative effects against many diseases. We tried to discover the impact of both sodium nitrite and TQ on inflammatory cytokines contents in testicular tissues and hormonal balance both in vivo and in vitro. Fifty adult male SD rats received 80mg/kg sodium nitrite and treated with either 25 or 50mg/kg TQ daily by oral-gavage for twelve weeks. Testis were removed for sperms' count. Testicular tissue homogenates were used for assessment of protein and gene expression of IL-1β, IL-6, TNF-α, Nrf2 and caspase-3. Serum samples were used for measurement of testosterone, LH, FSH and prolactin. Moreover, all the parameters were measured in human normal testis cell-lines, CRL-7002. Sodium nitrite produced significant decrease in serum testosterone associated with raised FSH, LH and prolactin. Moreover, sodium nitrite significantly elevated TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-6, caspase-3 and reduced Nrf2. TQ significantly reversed all these effects both in vivo and in vitro. In conclusion, TQ ameliorated testicular tissue inflammation and restored the normal balance of sex hormones induced by sodium nitrite both in vivo and in vitro.

  2. Short communication: Use of a mixture of sodium nitrite, sodium benzoate, and potassium sorbate in aerobically challenged silages.

    PubMed

    Knicky, Martin; Spörndly, Rolf

    2015-08-01

    Aerobic instability is still a common problem with many types of silages, particularly well-fermented silages. This study evaluated the effect of adding an additive mixture based on sodium nitrite, sodium benzoate, and potassium sorbate to a variety of crop materials on fermentation quality and aerobic stability of silages. Ensiling conditions were challenged by using a low packing density (104±4.3kg of dry matter/m(3)) of forage and allowing air ingression into silos (at 14 and 7 d before the end of the storage, for 8 h per event). Additive-treated silages were found to have significantly lower pH and reduced formation of ammonia-N, 2.3-butanediol, and ethanol compared with untreated control silages. Yeast growth was significantly reduced by additive treatment in comparison with untreated control silage. Consequently, additive-treated silages were considerably more aerobically stable (6.7 d) than untreated control silages (0.5 d). Overall, adding 5mL/kg of fresh crop of the additive based on sodium nitrite, sodium benzoate, and potassium sorbate reduced undesirable microorganisms in silages and thereby provided suitable ensiling conditions and prolonged aerobic stability, even under air-challenged laboratory ensiling conditions. PMID:26026758

  3. Methemoglobinemia following unintentional ingestion of sodium nitrite--New York, 2002.

    PubMed

    2002-07-26

    Methemoglobinemia is an unusual and potentially fatal condition in which hemoglobin is oxidized to methemoglobin and loses its ability to bind and transport oxygen. The most common cause of methemoglobinemia is the ingestion or inhalation of oxidizing agents such as nitrates or nitrites (e.g., sodium nitrite, which is used commonly as a preservative in curing meats and fish). This report summarizes the investigation of an incident of methemoglobinemia in five members of a household in New York who became ill after eating a meal seasoned with a white crystalline substance from a plastic bag labeled "Refined Iodized Table Salt" (Figure). The findings underscore the need for proper storage of hazardous materials to avoid unintentional ingestion and the importance of collaboration by multiple agencies to address a potential public health emergency.

  4. Effects of water, sodium hypochlorite, peroxyacetic acid, and acidified sodium chlorite on in-shell hazelnuts inoculated with Salmonella enterica serovar Panama.

    PubMed

    Weller, Lisa D; Daeschel, Mark A; Durham, Catherine A; Morrissey, Michael T

    2013-12-01

    Recent foodborne disease outbreaks involving minimally processed tree nuts have generated a need for improved sanitation procedures. Chemical sprays and dips have shown promise for reducing pathogens on fresh produce, but little research has been conducted for in-shell hazelnuts. This study analyzed the effectiveness of 3 chemical sanitizers for reducing Salmonella on in-shell hazelnuts. Treatments of water, sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl; 25 and 50 ppm), peroxyacetic acid (PAA; 80 and 120 ppm), and acidified sodium chlorite (ASC; 450, 830, and 1013 ppm) were sprayed onto hazelnut samples inoculated with Salmonella enterica serovar Panama. Hazelnut samples were immersed in liquid cultures of S. Panama for 24 h, air-dried, and then sprayed with water and chemical treatments. Inoculation achieved S. Panama populations of approximately 8.04 log CFU/hazelnut. Surviving S. panama populations were evaluated using a nonselective medium (tryptic soy agar), incubated 3 h, and then overlaid with selective media (xylose lysine deoxycholate agar). All of the chemical treatments significantly reduced S. Panama populations (P ≤ 0.0001). The most effective concentrations of ASC, PAA, and NaOCl treatments reduced populations by 2.65, 1.46, and 0.66 log units, respectively. ASC showed the greatest potential for use as a postharvest sanitation treatment.

  5. Suggestive evidence for the induction of colonic aberrant crypts in mice fed sodium nitrite.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Lin; Zahid, Muhammad; Anwar, Muhammad M; Pennington, Karen L; Cohen, Samuel M; Wisecarver, James L; Shostrom, Valerie; Mirvish, Sidney S

    2016-01-01

    A reported linkage between processed (nitrite-treated) meat products and the incidence of colon cancer could be due to sodium nitrite (NaNO2) itself or to N-nitroso compounds produced from the nitrite. Exposure to nitrite occurs due to residual nitrite in processed meat and to salivary nitrite arising by reduction of nitrate in vegetables and drinking water. Here we tested whether NaNO2 could induce colonic aberrant crypts (ABC) or ABC foci (ACF), which are putative precursors of colon cancer. We fed NaNO2 in drinking water for 20-25 wk to groups of 8-20 adult female mice. After sacrifice, ABC and ACF were counted in 2-cm distal colonic segments. In Experiment 1, no significant differences in ABC/ACF induction were seen between groups of 13-14 A/J mice fed 0, 0.5, or 1.0 g NaNO2/l drinking water. NaNO2 also did not affect fasting blood glucose levels. In Experiment 2, we fed 0, 1.0, 1.25, or 1.5 g NaNO2/l water to groups of 15 CF-1 mice. Five of the mice fed 1.5 g NaNO2/l showed ABC, whereas all other groups showed only 0-2 ABC/group, including 0 ABC for the group fed 1.25 g NaNO2/l. Overall statistical analysis indicated a dose-response p trends of 0.04. Pairwise comparison of ABC between groups fed 1.25 and 1.5 g NaNO2/l showed p 0.02 for both ABC and ACF, but a similar comparison between the untreated and 1.5 g/l groups showed no significant effects. In Experiment 3, hot dogs (18% of diet), which were fed to CF-1 mice previously treated with azoxymethane, inhibited ABC and ACF induction, but this effect was not significant (P = 0.10-0.12). In conclusion, these results support the view that NaNO2 may be a risk factor for colon carcinogenesis.

  6. Effectiveness of trisodium phosphate, acidified sodium chlorite, citric acid, and peroxyacids against pathogenic bacteria on poultry during refrigerated storage.

    PubMed

    del Río, Elena; Muriente, Rebeca; Prieto, Miguel; Alonso-Calleja, Carlos; Capita, Rosa

    2007-09-01

    The effects of dipping treatments (15 min) in potable water or in solutions (wt/vol) of 12% trisodium phosphate (TSP), 1,200 ppm acidified sodium chlorite (ASC), 2% citric acid (CA), and 220 ppm peroxyacids (PA) on inoculated pathogenic bacteria (Listeria monocytogenes, Staphylococcus aureus, Bacillus cereus, Salmonella Enteritidis, Escherichia coli, and Yersinia enterocolitica) and skin pH were investigated throughout storage of chicken legs (days 0, 1, 3, and 5) at 3 +/- 1 degrees C. All chemical solutions reduced microbial populations (P < 0.001) as compared with the control (untreated) samples. Similar bacterial loads (P > 0.05) were observed on water-dipped and control legs. Type of treatment, microbial group, and sampling day influenced microbial counts (P < 0.001). Average reductions with regard to control samples were 0.28 to 2.41 log CFU/g with TSP, 0.33 to 3.15 log CFU/g with ASC, 0.82 to 1.97 log CFU/g with CA, and 0.07 to 0.96 log CFU/g with PA. Average reductions were lower (P < 0.001) for gram-positive (0.96 log CFU/g) than for gram-negative (1.33 log CFU/g) bacteria. CA and ASC were the most effective antimicrobial compounds against gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria, respectively. TSP was the second most effective compound for both bacterial groups. Average microbial reductions per gram of skin were 0.87 log CFU/g with TSP, 0.86 log CFU/g with ASC, 1.39 log CFU/g with CA, and 0.74 log CFU/g with PA for gram-positive bacteria, and 1.28 log CFU/g with TSP, 2.03 log CFU/g with ASC, 1.23 log CFU/g with CA, and 0.78 log CFU/g with PA for gram-negative bacteria. With only a few exceptions, microbial reductions in TSP- and ASC-treated samples decreased and those in samples treated with CA increased throughout storage. Samples treated with TSP and samples dipped in CA and ASC had the highest and lowest pH values, respectively, after treatment. The pH of the treated legs tended to return to normal (6.3 to 6.6) during storage. However, at the end of

  7. Hemorheological changes and hematometric erythrocyte characteristics in rats after sodium nitrite intoxication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanov, Ivan; Gluhcheva, Yordanka; Petrova, Emilia; Antonova, Nadia

    2014-05-01

    Sodium nitrite (NaNO2) is a precursor to a variety of organic compounds (pharmaceuticals, dyes and pesticides), but it is best known as a food additive. The aim of the study is to investigate the influence of acute (i.p.) treatment of Wistar rats with NaNO2 (at the dose of 50 mg/kg b.w.) on the blood rheological properties and erythrocyte hematometric indices (Hb, HCT, RBC, MCV, RDW, MCH, MCHC). The significant differences were not found in the whole blood viscosity (WBV) values of the control and NaNO2-treated groups. The changes in the erythrocyte hematometric indices were statistically significant for RDW, MCHC and MCH at the 1st hour, five- and ten days after NaNO2 administration. Interestingly, at the day 5th of the NaNO2 treatment we obtained statistically significant lower values for the RBC count, Hb, HCT, RDW, as well as elevated indices MCV (no statistically significant), MCH, MCHC. The results obtained indicate that hemorheological and hematometric parameters examined should be monitored in cases of acute exposure to nitrites — for the purposes of clinical toxicology. The quantitative values of hematometric indices reported in our experimental model could be suitable for predicting NaNO2 intoxication and methemoglobinemia in animals and humans.

  8. 78 FR 68474 - Sodium Nitrite From China And Germany; Scheduling of Expedited Five-Year Reviews Concerning the...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-14

    ... Commission determined that the domestic interested party group response to its notice of institution (78 FR... amendments took effect on November 7, 2011. See 76 FR 61937 (October 6, 2011) and the newly revised... COMMISSION Sodium Nitrite From China And Germany; Scheduling of Expedited Five-Year Reviews Concerning...

  9. 78 FR 69368 - Sodium Nitrite From Germany and the People's Republic of China: Final Results of the Expedited...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-19

    ...: Antidumping Duty Orders, 73 FR 50593 (August 27, 2008). \\2\\ See Initiation of Five-Year (``Sunset'') Review, 78 FR 39256 (July 1, 2013). As explained in the memorandum from the Assistant Secretary for... International Trade Administration Sodium Nitrite From Germany and the People's Republic of China: Final...

  10. 78 FR 69646 - Sodium Nitrite From the People's Republic of China: Final Results of the Expedited First Sunset...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-20

    ...-Year (``Sunset'') Reviews, 78 FR 39256 (July 1, 2013); see also Sodium Nitrite from the People's Republic of China: Countervailing Duty Order, 73 FR 50595 (August 27, 2008) (``CVD Order''). As explained...) Tianjin Soda Plant Tianjin Port Free Trade Zone Pan 169.01 Bohai International Trading Co., Ltd....

  11. Toxicity detection of sodium nitrite, borax and aluminum potassium sulfate using electrochemical method.

    PubMed

    Yu, Dengbin; Yong, Daming; Dong, Shaojun

    2013-04-01

    Based on the inhibition effect on the respiratory chain activity of microorganisms by toxicants, an electrochemical method has been developed to measure the current variation of a mediator in the presence of microorganisms contacted with a toxicant. Microelectrode arrays were adopted in this study, which can accelerate the mass transfer rate of an analyte to the electrode and also increase the total current signal, resulting in an improvement in detection sensitivity. We selected Escherichia coli as the testee and the standard glucose-glutamic acid as an exogenous material. Under oxygen restriction, the experiments in the presence of toxicant were performed at optimum conditions (solution pH 7.0, 37 degrees C and reaction for 3 hr). The resulting solution was then separated from the suspended microorganisms and was measured by an electrochemical method, using ferricyanide as a mediator. The current signal obtained represents the reoxidation of ferrocyanide, which was transformed to inhibiting efficiency, IC50, as a quantitative measure of toxicity. The IC50 values measured were 410, 570 and 830 mg/L for sodium nitrite, borax and aluminum potassium sulfate, respectively. The results show that the toxicity sequence for these three food additives is consistent with the value reported by other methods. Furthermore, the order of damage degree to the microorganism was also observed to be: sodium nitrite > borax > aluminum potassium sulfate > blank, according to the atomic force microscopy images of E. coli after being incubated for 3 hr with the toxic compound in buffer solutions. The electrochemical method is expected to be a sensitive and simple alternative to toxicity screening for chemical food additives. PMID:23923788

  12. Toxicity detection of sodium nitrite, borax and aluminum potassium sulfate using electrochemical method.

    PubMed

    Yu, Dengbin; Yong, Daming; Dong, Shaojun

    2013-04-01

    Based on the inhibition effect on the respiratory chain activity of microorganisms by toxicants, an electrochemical method has been developed to measure the current variation of a mediator in the presence of microorganisms contacted with a toxicant. Microelectrode arrays were adopted in this study, which can accelerate the mass transfer rate of an analyte to the electrode and also increase the total current signal, resulting in an improvement in detection sensitivity. We selected Escherichia coli as the testee and the standard glucose-glutamic acid as an exogenous material. Under oxygen restriction, the experiments in the presence of toxicant were performed at optimum conditions (solution pH 7.0, 37 degrees C and reaction for 3 hr). The resulting solution was then separated from the suspended microorganisms and was measured by an electrochemical method, using ferricyanide as a mediator. The current signal obtained represents the reoxidation of ferrocyanide, which was transformed to inhibiting efficiency, IC50, as a quantitative measure of toxicity. The IC50 values measured were 410, 570 and 830 mg/L for sodium nitrite, borax and aluminum potassium sulfate, respectively. The results show that the toxicity sequence for these three food additives is consistent with the value reported by other methods. Furthermore, the order of damage degree to the microorganism was also observed to be: sodium nitrite > borax > aluminum potassium sulfate > blank, according to the atomic force microscopy images of E. coli after being incubated for 3 hr with the toxic compound in buffer solutions. The electrochemical method is expected to be a sensitive and simple alternative to toxicity screening for chemical food additives.

  13. Predictive model for growth of Clostridium perfringens during cooling of cooked beef supplemented with NaCl, sodium nitrite and sodium pyrophosphate

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This paper presents a model for predicting relative growth of C. perfringens in ground beef products at different percentages of salt (0%, 1%, 2% and 3%) and nitrite (0 and 200 ppm). Included in the experiments were different levels of sodium pyrophosphate (SPP). The results of the experiments indic...

  14. The antilisterial effect of Leuconostoc carnosum 4010 and leucocins 4010 in the presence of sodium chloride and sodium nitrite examined in a structured gelatin system.

    PubMed

    Hornbaek, Tina; Brocklehurst, Tim F; Budde, Birgitte Bjørn

    2004-04-15

    To further enhance biopreservation of meat products, the antilisterial effect of the newly described protective culture Leuconostoc carnosum 4010 and its bacteriocins, leucocins 4010, was examined in the presence of sodium chloride and sodium nitrite in a solid matrix using a structured gelatin system. Interaction between Listeria monocytogenes 4140 and Leuc. carnosum 4010 or the leucocins 4010-resistant mutant L. monocytogenes 4140P showed that the inhibitory effect of Leuc. carnosum 4010 in the gelatin system was caused by the production and activity of leucocins 4010. The presence of sodium chloride (2.5% w/v) and sodium nitrite (60 mg/l) reduced the antilisterial effect of Leuc. carnosum 4010 in the structured gel system compared to the use of Leuc. carnosum 4010 alone. Investigations carried out at 10 degrees C showed that the lag phase of L. monocytogenes 4140 in the presence of Leuc. carnosum 4010 was reduced from 71 to 58 h by the addition of sodium chloride and to 40 h by the addition of sodium nitrite. Addition of sodium chloride increased the maximum specific growth rate of L. monocytogenes 4140 in the presence of Leuc. carnosum 4010 from 0.02 to 0.06 h(-1), whereas no change was observed by the addition of sodium nitrite. Compared to the antilisterial effect of leucocins 4010 alone, the addition of sodium chloride (2.5%, w/v) decreased the antilisterial effect at high concentrations of leucocins 4010 (5.3 and 10.6 AU/ml) as measured after 11 days of incubation at 10 degrees C. In gels with added leucocins 4010, the most pronounced reduction in growth of L. monocytogenes 4140 was observed at the highest concentration of leucocins 4010 (10.6 AU/ml) together with sodium nitrite (60 mg/l). More detailed information on the lag phase and the maximum specific growth rate of single colonies of L. monocytogenes 4140 in the presence of leucocins 4010 was obtained using microscopy and image analysis. No pronounced difference in the growth of single colonies was

  15. Sodium nitrite potentiates renal oxidative stress and injury in hemoglobin exposed guinea pigs.

    PubMed

    Baek, Jin Hyen; Zhang, Xiaoyuan; Williams, Matthew C; Hicks, Wayne; Buehler, Paul W; D'Agnillo, Felice

    2015-07-01

    Methemoglobin-forming drugs, such as sodium nitrite (NaNO2), may exacerbate oxidative toxicity under certain chronic or acute hemolytic settings. In this study, we evaluated markers of renal oxidative stress and injury in guinea pigs exposed to extracellular hemoglobin (Hb) followed by NaNO2 at doses sufficient to simulate clinically relevant acute methemoglobinemia. NaNO2 induced rapid and extensive oxidation of plasma Hb in this model. This was accompanied by increased renal expression of the oxidative response effectors nuclear factor erythroid 2-derived-factor 2 (Nrf-2) and heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1), elevated non-heme iron deposition, lipid peroxidation, interstitial inflammatory cell activation, increased expression of tubular injury markers kidney injury-1 marker (KIM-1) and liver-fatty acid binding protein (L-FABP), podocyte injury, and cell death. Importantly, these indicators of renal oxidative stress and injury were minimal or absent following infusion of Hb or NaNO2 alone. Together, these results suggest that the exposure to NaNO2 in settings associated with increased extracellular Hb may potentiate acute renal toxicity via processes that are independent of NaNO2 induced erythrocyte methemoglobinemia. PMID:25891524

  16. Efficacy of two acidified chlorite postmilking teat disinfectants with sodium dodecylbenzene sulfonic acid on prevention of contagious mastitis using an experimental challenge protocol.

    PubMed

    Oura, L Y; Fox, L K; Warf, C C; Kempt, G K

    2002-01-01

    Two acidified sodium chlorite postmilking teat disinfectants were evaluated for efficacy against Staphylococcus aureus and Streptococcus agalactiae by using National Mastitis Council experimental challenge procedures. The effect of these teat dips on teat skin and teat end condition was also determined. Both dips contained 0.32% sodium chlorite, 1.32% lactic, and 2.5% glycerin. Dips differed in the amount of sodium dodecylbenzene sulfonic acid (0.53 or 0.27%) added as a surfactant. Both dips significantly reduced new intramammary infection (IMI) rates compared with undipped controls. The dip containing 0.53% dodecylbenzene sulfonic acid reduced new IMI by Staph. aureus by 72% and Strep. agalactiae by 75%. The dip containing 0.27% dodecylbenzene sulfonic acid reduced new IMI by Staph. aureus by 100% and by Strep. agalactiae by 88%. Changes in teat skin and teat end condition for treatment and control groups varied in parallel over time. Teats treated with either teat dip had higher mean teat skin and teat end scores than control teats at some weeks. However, teat skin and teat end condition did not tend to change from the start to the completion of the trial. Application of the two new postmilking teat dips was effective in reducing new IMI from contagious mastitis pathogens. (Key words: teat dip, contagious mastitis, chlorous acid) PMID:11860118

  17. Susceptibility of Nile tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus) fed dietary sodium chloride to nitrite toxicity

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Juvenile Nile tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus) were fed diets supplemented with 0 or 6% NaCl for 10 weeks. Tilapia were exposed to approximately 21 mg/l nitrite-N after five and ten weeks of feeding to determine the effect of dietary NaCl supplementation on resistance to nitrite toxicity. Fish were...

  18. Garlic oil as a modulating agent for oxidative stress and neurotoxicity induced by sodium nitrite in male albino rats.

    PubMed

    Hassan, Hanaa A; Hafez, Hani S; Zeghebar, Fawzia E

    2010-07-01

    In the present study, we investigated the neurobiochemical alterations and oxidative stress induced by food preservative; sodium nitrite (NaNO2) as well as the role of the garlic oil in amelioration of the neurotoxicity in male albino rats. Serum and brain homogenates of the rats received NaNO2 (80 mg/kg body weight) for 3 months exhibited significant decrease in acetylcholine esterase (AChE) activity as well as the levels of phospholipids, total protein and the endogenous antioxidant system (glutathione; GSH and superoxide dismutase; SOD). In contrast, lactic dehydrogenase (LDH) activity, brain thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) and nitric oxide (NO) levels were significantly increased. On the other hand, the oral administration of garlic oil (5 ml/kg body weight) daily for 3 months significantly improved the neurobiochemical disorders and inhibited the oxidative stress induced by NaNO2 ingestion. So, this study reveals the neural toxic effects of NaNO2 by exerting oxidative stress and retrograde the endogenous antioxidant system. However, garlic oil has a promising role in attenuating the obtained hazard effects of sodium nitrite by its high antioxidant properties which may eventually be related with the preservation of SOD activity and primary mitochondrial role against nitrite-induced neurotoxicity in rats.

  19. Inhibition of nitrite-induced toxicity in channel catfish by calcium chloride and sodium chloride

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tommasso J.R., Wright; Simco, B.A.; Davis, K.B.

    1980-01-01

    Environmental chloride has been shown to inhibit methemoglobin formation in fish, thereby offering a protective effect against nitrite toxicity. Channel catfish (Ictalurus punctatus) were simultaneously exposed to various environmental nitrite and chloride levels (as either CaCl2 or NaCl) in dechlorinated tap water (40 mg/L total hardness, 47 mg/L alkalinity, 4 mg/L chloride, pH = 6.9-7.1, and temperature 21-24°C). Methemoglobin levels in fish simultaneously exposed to 2.5 mg/L nitrite and up to 30 mg/L chloride as either CaCl2 or NaCl were similar but significantly lower than in unprotected fish. Exposure to 10 mg/L nitrite and 60 mg/L chloride resulted in methemoglobin levels similar to those of the controls; most unprotected fish died. Fish exposed to 10 mg/L nitrite had significantly lower methemoglobin levels when protected with 15.0 mg/L chloride as CaCl2 than with NaCl. Fish exposed to nitrite in the presence of 60 mg/L chloride (as either CaCl2 or NaCl) had similar 24-h LC50 values that were significantly elevated above those obtained in the absence of chloride. Calcium had little effect on tolerance to nitrite toxicity in channel catfish in contrast to its large effect reported in steelhead trout (Salmo gairdneri).

  20. Biological nitrification/denitrification of high sodium nitrite (navy shipyard) wastewater.

    PubMed

    Kamath, S; Sabatini, D A; Canter, L W

    1991-01-01

    In the hydroblasting of ships' boiler tubes, a wastewater high in nitrite (as high as 1200 mg litre(-1)) is produced by the US Navy. This research has evaluated the use of a suspended-growth biological system to treat this wastewater by denitrification. Two biological treatment configurations were evaluated (direct denitrification versus nitrification/denitrification) with nitrification/denitrification producing better nitrite removal efficiencies (54 to 62% versus 40%, respectively). The introduction of metals (cadmium, chromium, lead, copper and iron) in concentrations typical for this wastewater did not inhibit the nitrite removal efficiencies. The influent metal concentrations ranged from 0.02 mg litre(-1) for cadmium to 22 mg litre(-1) for iron and the metal removal efficiencies ranged from 4.8% for cadmium to 50% for copper. Increasing sludge age resulted in improved nitrite removal efficiencies (52%, 57% and 74% for sludge ages of 4, 6 and 8 days, respectively). The resulting biokinetic constants were similar to those reported by others for lower influent concentrations of nitrite or nitrate (Ygs=0.02 mg/mg; Ygn=0.16 mg/mg; Yb=0.8 mg/mg; and b=0.006 h(-1)).

  1. Sodium nitrite exerts an antihypertensive effect and improves endothelial function through activation of eNOS in the SHR.

    PubMed

    Ling, Wei Chih; Murugan, Dharmani Devi; Lau, Yeh Siang; Vanhoutte, Paul M; Mustafa, Mohd Rais

    2016-01-01

    Sodium nitrite (NaNO2) induces relaxation in isolated arteries partly through an endothelium-dependent mechanism involving NO-eNOS-sGC-cGMP pathway. The present study was designed to investigate the effect of chronic NaNO2 administration on arterial systolic blood pressure (SBP) and vascular function in hypertensive rats. NaNO2 (150 mg L-1) was given in drinking water for four weeks to spontaneously (SHR) and Nω-Nitro-L-arginine methyl ester hydrochloride (L-NAME) treated hypertensive SD rats. Arterial SBP and vascular function in isolated aortae were studied. Total plasma nitrate/nitrite and vascular cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) levels were measured using commercially available assay kits. Vascular nitric oxide (NO) levels were evaluated by DAF-FM fluorescence while the proteins involved in endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) activation was determined by Western blotting. NaNO2 treatment reduced SBP, improved the impaired endothelium-dependent relaxation, increased plasma total nitrate/nitrite level and vascular tissue NO and cGMP levels in SHR. Furthermore, increased presence of phosphorylated eNOS and Hsp-90 was observed in NaNO2-treated SHR. The beneficial effect of nitrite treatment was not observed in L-NAME treated hypertensive SD rats. The present study provides evidence that chronic treatment of genetically hypertensive rats with NaNO2 improves endothelium-dependent relaxation in addition to its antihypertensive effect, partly through mechanisms involving activation of eNOS. PMID:27616322

  2. Sodium nitrite exerts an antihypertensive effect and improves endothelial function through activation of eNOS in the SHR

    PubMed Central

    Ling, Wei Chih; Murugan, Dharmani Devi; Lau, Yeh Siang; Vanhoutte, Paul M.; Mustafa, Mohd Rais

    2016-01-01

    Sodium nitrite (NaNO2) induces relaxation in isolated arteries partly through an endothelium-dependent mechanism involving NO-eNOS-sGC-cGMP pathway. The present study was designed to investigate the effect of chronic NaNO2 administration on arterial systolic blood pressure (SBP) and vascular function in hypertensive rats. NaNO2 (150 mg L−1) was given in drinking water for four weeks to spontaneously (SHR) and Nω-Nitro-L-arginine methyl ester hydrochloride (L-NAME) treated hypertensive SD rats. Arterial SBP and vascular function in isolated aortae were studied. Total plasma nitrate/nitrite and vascular cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) levels were measured using commercially available assay kits. Vascular nitric oxide (NO) levels were evaluated by DAF-FM fluorescence while the proteins involved in endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) activation was determined by Western blotting. NaNO2 treatment reduced SBP, improved the impaired endothelium-dependent relaxation, increased plasma total nitrate/nitrite level and vascular tissue NO and cGMP levels in SHR. Furthermore, increased presence of phosphorylated eNOS and Hsp-90 was observed in NaNO2-treated SHR. The beneficial effect of nitrite treatment was not observed in L-NAME treated hypertensive SD rats. The present study provides evidence that chronic treatment of genetically hypertensive rats with NaNO2 improves endothelium-dependent relaxation in addition to its antihypertensive effect, partly through mechanisms involving activation of eNOS. PMID:27616322

  3. In silico Logistic Model for Table Olive Related Microorganisms As a Function of Sodium Metabisulphite, Cinnamaldehyde, pH, and Type of Acidifying Agent

    PubMed Central

    Romero-Gil, Verónica; Garrido-Fernández, Antonio; Arroyo-López, Francisco N.

    2016-01-01

    A probabilistic/logistic model, based on binary data (growth/no growth), was used to assess the effects of sodium metabisulphite (SM) and cinnamaldehyde (CIN; 0–1000 mg/L) against the main microbial groups found in table olive environment [lactic acid bacteria (LAB), yeasts, and Enterobacteriaceae], according to pH (range 3.5–5.0), and type of acidifying agent (HCl or pyruvic acid). The inhibitory effect of SM depended on the pH while that of CIN was scarcely influenced by it (except for LAB). LAB were more sensitive to SM, while yeasts were to CIN. The use of pyruvic acid for correction of pH always produced a reduction (compared to HCl) of the inhibitory power of both preservatives. The in silico models for HCl showed that, at pH 4.0, and growth probability 0.01, the LAB population might be inhibited by the presence in the medium of 150 mg/L SM or 1000 mg/L CIN, while in the case of yeasts, 450 mg/L SM, or 150 mg/L CIN are required. No growth of Enterobacteriaceae was observed at this (or lower) pH level. The results obtained may contribute to the stabilization of non-thermally treated table olive packaging. PMID:27630627

  4. In silico Logistic Model for Table Olive Related Microorganisms As a Function of Sodium Metabisulphite, Cinnamaldehyde, pH, and Type of Acidifying Agent.

    PubMed

    Romero-Gil, Verónica; Garrido-Fernández, Antonio; Arroyo-López, Francisco N

    2016-01-01

    A probabilistic/logistic model, based on binary data (growth/no growth), was used to assess the effects of sodium metabisulphite (SM) and cinnamaldehyde (CIN; 0-1000 mg/L) against the main microbial groups found in table olive environment [lactic acid bacteria (LAB), yeasts, and Enterobacteriaceae], according to pH (range 3.5-5.0), and type of acidifying agent (HCl or pyruvic acid). The inhibitory effect of SM depended on the pH while that of CIN was scarcely influenced by it (except for LAB). LAB were more sensitive to SM, while yeasts were to CIN. The use of pyruvic acid for correction of pH always produced a reduction (compared to HCl) of the inhibitory power of both preservatives. The in silico models for HCl showed that, at pH 4.0, and growth probability 0.01, the LAB population might be inhibited by the presence in the medium of 150 mg/L SM or 1000 mg/L CIN, while in the case of yeasts, 450 mg/L SM, or 150 mg/L CIN are required. No growth of Enterobacteriaceae was observed at this (or lower) pH level. The results obtained may contribute to the stabilization of non-thermally treated table olive packaging.

  5. In silico Logistic Model for Table Olive Related Microorganisms As a Function of Sodium Metabisulphite, Cinnamaldehyde, pH, and Type of Acidifying Agent

    PubMed Central

    Romero-Gil, Verónica; Garrido-Fernández, Antonio; Arroyo-López, Francisco N.

    2016-01-01

    A probabilistic/logistic model, based on binary data (growth/no growth), was used to assess the effects of sodium metabisulphite (SM) and cinnamaldehyde (CIN; 0–1000 mg/L) against the main microbial groups found in table olive environment [lactic acid bacteria (LAB), yeasts, and Enterobacteriaceae], according to pH (range 3.5–5.0), and type of acidifying agent (HCl or pyruvic acid). The inhibitory effect of SM depended on the pH while that of CIN was scarcely influenced by it (except for LAB). LAB were more sensitive to SM, while yeasts were to CIN. The use of pyruvic acid for correction of pH always produced a reduction (compared to HCl) of the inhibitory power of both preservatives. The in silico models for HCl showed that, at pH 4.0, and growth probability 0.01, the LAB population might be inhibited by the presence in the medium of 150 mg/L SM or 1000 mg/L CIN, while in the case of yeasts, 450 mg/L SM, or 150 mg/L CIN are required. No growth of Enterobacteriaceae was observed at this (or lower) pH level. The results obtained may contribute to the stabilization of non-thermally treated table olive packaging.

  6. In silico Logistic Model for Table Olive Related Microorganisms As a Function of Sodium Metabisulphite, Cinnamaldehyde, pH, and Type of Acidifying Agent.

    PubMed

    Romero-Gil, Verónica; Garrido-Fernández, Antonio; Arroyo-López, Francisco N

    2016-01-01

    A probabilistic/logistic model, based on binary data (growth/no growth), was used to assess the effects of sodium metabisulphite (SM) and cinnamaldehyde (CIN; 0-1000 mg/L) against the main microbial groups found in table olive environment [lactic acid bacteria (LAB), yeasts, and Enterobacteriaceae], according to pH (range 3.5-5.0), and type of acidifying agent (HCl or pyruvic acid). The inhibitory effect of SM depended on the pH while that of CIN was scarcely influenced by it (except for LAB). LAB were more sensitive to SM, while yeasts were to CIN. The use of pyruvic acid for correction of pH always produced a reduction (compared to HCl) of the inhibitory power of both preservatives. The in silico models for HCl showed that, at pH 4.0, and growth probability 0.01, the LAB population might be inhibited by the presence in the medium of 150 mg/L SM or 1000 mg/L CIN, while in the case of yeasts, 450 mg/L SM, or 150 mg/L CIN are required. No growth of Enterobacteriaceae was observed at this (or lower) pH level. The results obtained may contribute to the stabilization of non-thermally treated table olive packaging. PMID:27630627

  7. Effects of curing sodium nitrite additive and natural meat fat on growth control of Listeria monocytogenes by the bacteriocin-producing Lactobacillus curvatus strain CWBI-B28.

    PubMed

    Kouakou, P; Ghalfi, H; Destain, J; Dubois-Dauphin, R; Evrard, P; Thonart, P

    2009-09-01

    In realistic model meat systems, the separate and combined effects of fat content and sodium nitrite on the antilisterial activity of the bacteriocin of Lactobacillus curvatus CWBI-B28 were studied. In laboratory fermentations where Listeria monocytogenes was co-cultured at 4 degrees C with bacteriocin-producing CWBI-B28 in lean pork meat (fat content: 13%) without added nitrite, a strong antilisterial effect was observed after one week. The effect was maintained for an additional week, after which a slight and very gradual rebound was observed. Both added nitrite (20 ppm) and a high-fat content (43%) were found to antagonise this antilisterial effect, the Listeria cfu count reached after six weeks being 200 times as high in high-fat meat with added nitrite than in lean meat without nitrite. This antagonism could not be attributed to slower growth of the bacteriocin-producing strain, since CWBI-B28 grew optimally in fat-rich meat with 20 ppm sodium nitrite. Bacteriocin activity was also measured in the samples. The observed activity levels are discussed in relation to the degree of antilisterial protection conferred.

  8. Electrocatalytic reduction of nitrate and nitrite at Nafion-coated electrodes in concentrated sodium hydroxide solution

    SciTech Connect

    Li, H. |; Chambers, J.Q.; Hobbs, D.T.

    1988-12-31

    The electrochemical reduction of nitrate ions in alkaline solution has been studied using various cathode materials and is the basis for a patent describing the conversion of nitrate into hydroxide ion in carbonate solutions. Recently, Taniguchi et al. have reported that certain well studied transition metal cyclic amine complexes, namely Co(III)-cyclam and Ni(II)-cyclam where cyclam is 1,4,8,11-tetraazacyclotetradecane, efficiently electrocatalyze the reduction of nitrate and nitrite to hydroxylamine at mercury electrodes. Here the authors report that the metal cyclam catalyst can be incorporated into a Nafion film electrode, and that the reduction of nitrate and nitrite proceeds efficiently at these electrodes in concentrated NaOH solution. Nafion is a perfluoroalkanesulfonated cation exchange material that has been widely used to immobilize redox couples at electrode surfaces, including electrocatalysis species.

  9. Comparison of the treatment of cyanide poisoning in the cynomolgus monkey with sodium nitrite of 4-dimethylaminophenol (4-dmap), with and without sodium thiosulfate. Technical report, April 1979-September 1981

    SciTech Connect

    Stemler, F.W.; Groff, W.A.; Kaminskis, A.; Johnson, R.P.; Froehlich, H.L.

    1994-02-01

    Two methemoglobin generating compounds, sodium nitrite (iv) or 4-dimethylaminophenol (4-DMAP) (im), with and without sodium thiosulfate (iv), were compared as post-treatment therapy in anesthetized monkeys poisoning with cyanide. Arterial blood samples were taken before and after an injection of sodium cyanide (8.4 mg/kg) and treatment for analyses of blood cyanide, plasma cyanide, thiocyanate and methemoglobin content. Physiologic parameters were monitored in these treated cyanide-poisoned animals. The time course of methemoglobin formation and physiologic parameters were also monitored in animals receiving only 4-DMAP or sodium nitrite. A maximal methemoglobin level was observed at 30 minutes following injection of 4-DMAP, and 60 minutes post injection with sodium nitrite. Volumes of distribution (Vd) of cyanide were calculated from the concentrations of cyanide in blood samples and doses of cyanide injected. Although 4-DMAP forms methemoglobin more rapidly than sodium nitrite, both compounds form methemoglobin quickly enough to provide protection against cyanide poisoning. The protection offered by either compound against the lethal effects of cyanide was potentiated when used in combination with sodium thiosulfate.

  10. Sodium nitrite enhances generation of reactive oxygen species that decrease antioxidant power and inhibit plasma membrane redox system of human erythrocytes.

    PubMed

    Ansari, Fariheen Aisha; Mahmood, Riaz

    2016-08-01

    Nitrite/nitrate salts are used in fertilizers and as food preservatives. Human exposure to high levels of nitrite results in its uptake and subsequent entry into blood where it can interact with erythrocytes. We show that treatment of human erythrocytes with sodium nitrite (NaNO2 ) results in a dose-dependent increase in the production of reactive oxygen species. This was accompanied by a decrease in the antioxidant power which lowered the free radical quenching and metal-reducing ability. NaNO2 treatment also inhibited plasma membrane redox system (PMRS) of erythrocytes. These changes increase the susceptibility of erythrocytes to oxidative damage, decrease the antioxidant power of whole blood, and can be a major cause of nitrite-induced cellular toxicity. PMID:27214747

  11. Sodium nitrite enhances generation of reactive oxygen species that decrease antioxidant power and inhibit plasma membrane redox system of human erythrocytes.

    PubMed

    Ansari, Fariheen Aisha; Mahmood, Riaz

    2016-08-01

    Nitrite/nitrate salts are used in fertilizers and as food preservatives. Human exposure to high levels of nitrite results in its uptake and subsequent entry into blood where it can interact with erythrocytes. We show that treatment of human erythrocytes with sodium nitrite (NaNO2 ) results in a dose-dependent increase in the production of reactive oxygen species. This was accompanied by a decrease in the antioxidant power which lowered the free radical quenching and metal-reducing ability. NaNO2 treatment also inhibited plasma membrane redox system (PMRS) of erythrocytes. These changes increase the susceptibility of erythrocytes to oxidative damage, decrease the antioxidant power of whole blood, and can be a major cause of nitrite-induced cellular toxicity.

  12. Effects of cetylpyridinium chloride, acidified sodium chlorite, and potassium sorbate on populations of Escherichia coli O157:H7, Listeria monocytogenes, and Staphylococcus aureus on fresh beef.

    PubMed

    Lim, Kyungwha; Mustapha, Azlin

    2004-02-01

    The effects of selected food-grade antimicrobial agents at decreasing the number of pathogenic bacteria on fresh beef were determined. Beef cubes inoculated with Escherichia coli O157:H7, Listeria monocytogenes, or Staphylococcus aureus were sprayed with 0.5% cetylpyridinium chloride (CPC), 0.12% acidified sodium chlorite (ASC), 0.1% potassium sorbate (PS), or an equal mix of any two solutions. The beef samples were placed on absorbent tray pads sprayed with each single or mixed solution, wrapped with polyvinyl chloride film, heat sealed, and stored at 4 degrees C for 2 weeks. Surface sanitization using CPC, ASC, or an equal mix of these two agents effectively reduced microbial numbers on the beef during storage. At day 0, ASC and the CPC-ASC mix reduced the number of E. coli O157:H7 by 2.50 and 1.58 log CFU/cm2, respectively. CPC demonstrated a 3.25-log reduction of L. monocytogenes and a 4.70-log reduction of S. aureus at 14 days. The CPC-PS mix reduced E. coli O157:H7 numbers by 1.46, L. monocytogenes by 2.95, and S. aureus by 4.41 log CFU/cm2 at 14 days. PS alone and the mixed solutions, CPC-ASC, CPC-PS, or ASC-PS, were not as effective as ASC or CPC alone. To effectively reduce E. coli O157:H7, L. monocytogenes, or S. aureus numbers, higher (> 0.1%) concentrations of PS were necessary. Loss of redness and light color of beef surfaces consistently coincided with decreases in pH for ASC-treated beef samples.

  13. Sodium nitrite attenuates hypertension-in-pregnancy and blunts increases in soluble fms-like tyrosine kinase-1 and in vascular endothelial growth factor.

    PubMed

    Gonçalves-Rizzi, Victor Hugo; Possomato-Vieira, Jose Sergio; Sales Graça, Tamiris Uracs; Nascimento, Regina Aparecida; Dias-Junior, Carlos A

    2016-07-01

    Preeclampsia is a pregnancy-associated disorder characterized by hypertension with uncertain pathogenesis. Increases in antiangiogenic soluble fms-like tyrosine kinase-1 (sFlt-1) and reductions in nitric oxide (NO) bioavailability have been observed in preeclamptic women. However, the specific mechanisms linking these detrimental changes to the hypertension-in-pregnancy are not clearly understood. In this regard, while recent findings have suggested that nitrite-derived NO formation exerts antihypertensive and antioxidant effects, no previous study has examined these responses to orally administered nitrite in hypertension-in-pregnancy. We then hypothesized restoring NO bioavailability with sodium nitrite in pregnant rats upon NO synthesis inhibition with N(omega)-nitro-l-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME) attenuates hypertension and high circulating levels of sFlt-1. Number and weight of pups and placentae were recorded to assess maternal-fetal interface. Plasma sFlt-1, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and biochemical determinants of NO formation and of antioxidant function were measured. We found that sodium nitrite blunts the hypertension-in-pregnancy and restores the NO bioavailability, and concomitantly prevents the L-NAME-induced high circulating sFlt-1 and VEGF levels. Also, our results suggest that nitrite-derived NO protected against reductions in litter size and placental weight caused by L-NAME, improving number of viable and resorbed fetuses and antioxidant function. Therefore, the present findings are consistent with the hypothesis that nitrite-derived NO may possibly be the driving force behind the maternal and fetal beneficial effects observed with sodium nitrite during hypertension-in-pregnancy. Certainly further investigations are required in preeclampsia, since counteracting the damages to the mother and fetal sides resulting from hypertension and elevated sFlt-1 levels may provide a great benefit in this gestational hypertensive disease

  14. The effect of pH and nitrite concentration on the antimicrobial impact of celery juice concentrate compared with conventional sodium nitrite on Listeria monocytogenes.

    PubMed

    Horsch, A M; Sebranek, J G; Dickson, J S; Niebuhr, S E; Larson, E M; Lavieri, N A; Ruther, B L; Wilson, L A

    2014-01-01

    The objectives of this study were to evaluate the impact of pH and nitrite from celery juice concentrate (CJ) on the growth of Listeria monocytogenes in broth and on ham slices, and to evaluate the impact of pH and nitrite from CJ on quality attributes of the ham. The pH of both broth and ham were increased by the addition of CJ. The CJ was less effective than conventional nitrite at 100 mg/kg nitrite in broth, but in ham, the CJ treatments at both 100 and 200 mg/kg resulted in growth of L. monocytogenes (p>0.05) similar to that of the conventional nitrite at the same concentrations. Reducing the pH of CJ before addition to the ham had greater impact on L. monocytogenes growth at 200 mg/kg nitrite than at 100 mg/kg. Celery juice concentrate may increase meat product pH which could have implications for the antimicrobial impact of nitrite in some products.

  15. Preliminary safe-handling experiments on a mixture of cesium nickel ferrocyanide and equimolar sodium nitrate/nitrite

    SciTech Connect

    Scheele, R.D.; Cady, H.H.

    1992-01-01

    As part of the Hanford Site`s evaluation of the potential hazards associated with the storage of ferrocyanide wastes generated when ferrocyanide was used to scavenge radiocesium from waste supernates in the 1950s, the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) subcontracted with Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) to perform a series of sensitivity tests. These test supplement PNL`s thermal sensitivity testing results on the reactivity of cesium nickel ferrocyanide (Cs{sub 2}NiFe(CN){sub 6}) and nitrates and nitrites (Burger and Schelle 1991). LANL used a selected set of their standard tests to determine the sensitivity of a mixture of Cs{sub 2}NiFe(CN){sub 6} (FECN-1) and equimolar sodium nitrate and nitrite oxidant to nonthermal and thermal stimuli. The stoichiometric ratio of oxidant to Cs{sub 2}NiFe(CN){sub 6} in the tested mixture FECN-1 was 1.1:1. The appendix presents the results of the LANL testing of the sensitivity of FECN-1 to initiation by mechanical impact, spark, friction, and various thermal conditions. In addition to the sensitivity testing, LANL used an Accelerating Rate Calorimeter (ARC) to estimate the behavior of large batches of the mixture.

  16. Preliminary safe-handling experiments on a mixture of cesium nickel ferrocyanide and equimolar sodium nitrate/nitrite

    SciTech Connect

    Scheele, R.D. ); Cady, H.H. )

    1992-01-01

    As part of the Hanford Site's evaluation of the potential hazards associated with the storage of ferrocyanide wastes generated when ferrocyanide was used to scavenge radiocesium from waste supernates in the 1950s, the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) subcontracted with Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) to perform a series of sensitivity tests. These test supplement PNL's thermal sensitivity testing results on the reactivity of cesium nickel ferrocyanide (Cs{sub 2}NiFe(CN){sub 6}) and nitrates and nitrites (Burger and Schelle 1991). LANL used a selected set of their standard tests to determine the sensitivity of a mixture of Cs{sub 2}NiFe(CN){sub 6} (FECN-1) and equimolar sodium nitrate and nitrite oxidant to nonthermal and thermal stimuli. The stoichiometric ratio of oxidant to Cs{sub 2}NiFe(CN){sub 6} in the tested mixture FECN-1 was 1.1:1. The appendix presents the results of the LANL testing of the sensitivity of FECN-1 to initiation by mechanical impact, spark, friction, and various thermal conditions. In addition to the sensitivity testing, LANL used an Accelerating Rate Calorimeter (ARC) to estimate the behavior of large batches of the mixture.

  17. In vivo evidence of hepato- and reno-protective effect of garlic oil against sodium nitrite-induced oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Hassan, Hanaa A; El-Agmy, Sherif M; Gaur, Rajiv L; Fernando, Augusta; Raj, Madhwa Hg; Ouhtit, Allal

    2009-01-01

    Sodium nitrite (NaNO2), a food color fixative and preservative, contributes to carcinogenesis. We investigated the protective role of garlic oil against NaNO2-induced abnormalities in metabolic biochemical parameters and oxidative status in male albino rats. NaNO2 treatment for a period of three months induced a significant increase in serum levels of glucose, aspartate aminotransferase (AST), alanine aminotransferase (ALT), alkaline phosphatase (ALP), bilirubin, urea and creatinine as well as hepatic AST and ALT. However, significant decrease was recorded in liver ALP activity, glycogen content, and renal urea and creatinine levels. In parallel, a significant increase in lipid peroxidation, and a decrease in glutathione content and catalase activity were observed in the liver and the kidney. However, garlic oil supplementation showed a remarkable amelioration of these abnormalities. Our data indicate that garlic is a phytoantioxidant with powerful chemopreventive properties against chemically-induced oxidative stress.

  18. Effect of meat ingredients (sodium nitrite and erythorbate) and processing (vacuum storage and packaging atmosphere) on germination and outgrowth of Clostridium perfringens spores in ham during abusive cooling

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The effect of nitrite and erythorbate on Clostridium perfringens spore germination and outgrowth in ham during abusive cooling (15 h) was evaluated. Ham was formulated with ground pork, NaNO2 (0, 50, 100, 150 or 200 ppm) and sodium erythorbate (0 or 547 ppm). Ten grams of meat (stored at 5C for 3 or...

  19. Exploring the Ideal Gas Law through a Quantitative Gasometric Analysis of Nitrogen Produced by the Reaction of Sodium Nitrite with Sulfamic Acid

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yu, Anne

    2010-01-01

    The gasometric analysis of nitrogen produced in a reaction between sodium nitrite, NaNO[superscript 2], and sulfamic acid, H(NH[superscript 2])SO[superscript 3], provides an alternative to more common general chemistry experiments used to study the ideal gas law, such as the experiment in which magnesium is reacted with hydrochloric acid. This…

  20. Effects of high hydrostatic pressure and varying concentrations of sodium nitrite from traditional and vegetable-based sources on the growth of Listeria monocytogenes on ready-to-eat (RTE) sliced ham.

    PubMed

    Myers, Kevin; Cannon, Jerry; Montoya, Damian; Dickson, James; Lonergan, Steven; Sebranek, Joseph

    2013-05-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the effect the source of added nitrite and high hydrostatic pressure (HHP) had on the growth of Listeria monocytogenes on ready-to-eat (RTE) sliced ham. Use of 600MPa HHP for 3min resulted in an immediate 3.9-4.3log CFU/g reduction in L. monocytogenes numbers, while use of 400MPa HHP (3min) provided less than 1log CFU/g reduction. With the 600MPa HHP treatment, sliced ham with a conventional concentration of sodium nitrite (200ppm) was not different in L. monocytogenes growth from use with 50 or 100ppm of sodium nitrite in pre-converted celery powder. Instrumental color values as well as residual nitrite and residual nitrate concentrations for cured (sodium nitrite and nitrite from celery powder) and uncured ham formulations are discussed.

  1. Sodium nitrite induces acute central nervous system toxicity in guinea pigs exposed to systemic cell-free hemoglobin

    SciTech Connect

    Buehler, Paul W.; Butt, Omer I.; D'Agnillo, Felice

    2011-06-10

    Highlights: {yields} Toxicological implications associated with the use of NaNO{sub 2} therapy to treat systemic cell-free Hb exposure are not well-defined. {yields} Systemic Hb exposure followed by NaNO{sub 2} infusion induces acute CNS toxicities in guinea pigs. {yields} These CNS effects were not reproduced by the infusion of cell-free Hb or NaNO{sub 2} alone. {yields} NaNO{sub 2}-mediated oxidation of cell-free Hb may play a causative role in the observed CNS changes. -- Abstract: Systemic cell-free hemoglobin (Hb) released via hemolysis disrupts vascular homeostasis, in part, through the scavenging of nitric oxide (NO). Sodium nitrite (NaNO{sub 2}) therapy can attenuate the hypertensive effects of Hb. However, the chemical reactivity of NaNO{sub 2} with Hb may enhance heme- or iron-mediated toxicities. Here, we investigate the effect of NaNO{sub 2} on the central nervous system (CNS) in guinea pigs exposed to systemic cell-free Hb. Intravascular infusion of NaNO{sub 2}, at doses sufficient to alleviate Hb-mediated blood pressure changes, reduced the expression of occludin, but not zona occludens-1 (ZO-1) or claudin-5, in cerebral tight junctions 4 h after Hb infusion. This was accompanied by increased perivascular heme oxygenase-1 expression, neuronal iron deposition, increased astrocyte and microglial activation, and reduced expression of neuron-specific nuclear protein (NeuN). These CNS changes were not observed in animals treated with Hb or NaNO{sub 2} alone. Taken together, these findings suggest that the use of nitrite salts to treat systemic Hb exposure may promote acute CNS toxicity.

  2. 21 CFR 172.177 - Sodium nitrite used in processing smoked chub.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... of smoked chub in accordance with the following prescribed conditions: (a) All fish in smoking... has a salt (NaCl) content of not less than 3.5 percent, as measured in the loin muscle, and the sodium... million and not greater than 200 parts per million, as measured in the loin muscle. (c) Smoked chub...

  3. 21 CFR 172.177 - Sodium nitrite used in processing smoked chub.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... of smoked chub in accordance with the following prescribed conditions: (a) All fish in smoking... has a salt (NaCl) content of not less than 3.5 percent, as measured in the loin muscle, and the sodium... million and not greater than 200 parts per million, as measured in the loin muscle. (c) Smoked chub...

  4. 21 CFR 172.177 - Sodium nitrite used in processing smoked chub.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... has a salt (NaCl) content of not less than 3.5 percent, as measured in the loin muscle, and the sodium... million and not greater than 200 parts per million, as measured in the loin muscle. (c) Smoked chub...

  5. 21 CFR 172.177 - Sodium nitrite used in processing smoked chub.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... has a salt (NaCl) content of not less than 3.5 percent, as measured in the loin muscle, and the sodium... million and not greater than 200 parts per million, as measured in the loin muscle. (c) Smoked chub...

  6. Therapeutic potential of sustained-release sodium nitrite for critical limb ischemia in the setting of metabolic syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Polhemus, David J.; Bradley, Jessica M.; Islam, Kazi N.; Brewster, Luke P.; Calvert, John W.; Tao, Ya-Xiong; Chang, Carlos C.; Pipinos, Iraklis I.; Goodchild, Traci T.

    2015-01-01

    Nitrite is a storage reservoir of nitric oxide that is readily reduced to nitric oxide under pathological conditions. Previous studies have demonstrated that nitrite levels are significantly reduced in cardiovascular disease states, including peripheral vascular disease. We investigated the cytoprotective and proangiogenic actions of a novel, sustained-release formulation of nitrite (SR-nitrite) in a clinically relevant in vivo swine model of critical limb ischemia (CLI) involving central obesity and metabolic syndrome. CLI was induced in obese Ossabaw swine (n = 18) by unilateral external iliac artery deployment of a full cross-sectional vessel occlusion device positioned within an endovascular expanded polytetrafluoroethylene-lined nitinol stent-graft. At post-CLI day 14, pigs were randomized to placebo (n = 9) or SR-nitrite (80 mg, n = 9) twice daily by mouth for 21 days. SR-nitrite therapy increased nitrite, nitrate, and S-nitrosothiol in plasma and ischemic skeletal muscle. Oxidative stress was reduced in ischemic limb tissue of SR-nitrite- compared with placebo-treated pigs. Ischemic limb tissue levels of proangiogenic growth factors were increased following SR-nitrite therapy compared with placebo. Despite the increases in cytoprotective and angiogenic signals with SR-nitrite therapy, new arterial vessel formation and enhancement of blood flow to the ischemic limb were not different from placebo. Our data clearly demonstrate cytoprotective and proangiogenic signaling in ischemic tissues following SR-nitrite therapy in a very severe model of CLI. Further studies evaluating longer-duration nitrite therapy and/or additional nitrite dosing strategies are warranted to more fully evaluate the therapeutic potential of nitrite therapy in peripheral vascular disease. PMID:25910804

  7. Therapeutic potential of sustained-release sodium nitrite for critical limb ischemia in the setting of metabolic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Polhemus, David J; Bradley, Jessica M; Islam, Kazi N; Brewster, Luke P; Calvert, John W; Tao, Ya-Xiong; Chang, Carlos C; Pipinos, Iraklis I; Goodchild, Traci T; Lefer, David J

    2015-07-01

    Nitrite is a storage reservoir of nitric oxide that is readily reduced to nitric oxide under pathological conditions. Previous studies have demonstrated that nitrite levels are significantly reduced in cardiovascular disease states, including peripheral vascular disease. We investigated the cytoprotective and proangiogenic actions of a novel, sustained-release formulation of nitrite (SR-nitrite) in a clinically relevant in vivo swine model of critical limb ischemia (CLI) involving central obesity and metabolic syndrome. CLI was induced in obese Ossabaw swine (n = 18) by unilateral external iliac artery deployment of a full cross-sectional vessel occlusion device positioned within an endovascular expanded polytetrafluoroethylene-lined nitinol stent-graft. At post-CLI day 14, pigs were randomized to placebo (n = 9) or SR-nitrite (80 mg, n = 9) twice daily by mouth for 21 days. SR-nitrite therapy increased nitrite, nitrate, and S-nitrosothiol in plasma and ischemic skeletal muscle. Oxidative stress was reduced in ischemic limb tissue of SR-nitrite- compared with placebo-treated pigs. Ischemic limb tissue levels of proangiogenic growth factors were increased following SR-nitrite therapy compared with placebo. Despite the increases in cytoprotective and angiogenic signals with SR-nitrite therapy, new arterial vessel formation and enhancement of blood flow to the ischemic limb were not different from placebo. Our data clearly demonstrate cytoprotective and proangiogenic signaling in ischemic tissues following SR-nitrite therapy in a very severe model of CLI. Further studies evaluating longer-duration nitrite therapy and/or additional nitrite dosing strategies are warranted to more fully evaluate the therapeutic potential of nitrite therapy in peripheral vascular disease.

  8. Synthesis and characterization of secondary nitrosamines from secondary amines using sodium nitrite and p-toluenesulfonic acid.

    PubMed

    Miró Sabaté, Carles; Delalu, Henri

    2015-03-01

    We synthesized nitrosamines (R2N-NO) with R = iPr (1), nPr (2), nBu (3), and hydroxyethyl (4) from the amine using sodium nitrite/p-toluenesulfonic acid in CH2Cl2. The rate of formation of 1-4 increases in the direction iPr

  9. [Case followed by delayed loss of consciousness after exposure to hydrogen sulfide that was treated with intermittent administration of sodium nitrite].

    PubMed

    Fujino, Yasuhisa; Inoue, Yoshihiro; Onodera, Makoto; Kikuchi, Satoshi; Endo, Jin; Endo, Shigeatsu; Fujita, Yuji

    2010-12-01

    A 49-year-old man lost consciousness after being accidentally exposed to what was probably hydrogen sulfide gas while performing maintenance on a machine producing feather meal. He was immediately taken to the hospital. Upon admission, his consciousness level was 14 (E4V4M6) on the Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS), but it subsequently decreased, and the patient was intubated when his respirations became depressed as well. About 5 hours after the initial incident, he was transferred to our department. His consciousness level was GCS 9 (E2V2M5), his blood pressure was 95/78 mmHg, and his heart rate was 90 beats per min. There was no metabolic acidosis. Mechanical ventilation was begun and 10% sodium nitrite was intermittently administered intravenously, with the goal of lowering arterial blood methemoglobin saturation to 20%. Two days following admission, the patient regained full consciousness and sodium nitrite administration was stopped. The following day mechanical ventilation was also discontinued. This patient exhibited severe recurring neurologic symptoms without metabolic acidosis; thus, the manifestations of toxicity in this case might have been due to the direct neurologic toxicity of hydrogen sulfide, hypoxia, or delayed post-ischemic cerebral hypoperfusion syndrome. The patient made a full recovery without any sequelae; therefore we would like to hypothesize that repetitive intravenous administration of sodium nitrite is effective in cases of hydrogen sulfide exposure.

  10. In vitro influence of D/L-lactic acid, sodium chloride and sodium nitrite on the infectivity of feline calicivirus and of ECHO virus as potential surrogates for foodborne viruses.

    PubMed

    Straube, J; Albert, T; Manteufel, J; Heinze, J; Fehlhaber, K; Truyen, U

    2011-11-15

    The importance of foodborne viruses is increasingly recognized. Thus, the effect of commonly used food preservation methods on the infectivity of viruses is questioned. In this context, we investigated the antiviral properties of D,L-lactic acid, sodium chloride and sodium nitrite by in vitro studies. Two model viruses, Feline Calicivirus (FCV) and Enteric Cytophatic Human Orphan (ECHO) virus, were chosen for this study simulating important foodborne viruses (human noroviruses (NoV) and human enteroviruses, resp.). The model viruses were exposed to different solutions of D,L-lactic acid (0.1-0.4% w/w, pH 6.0-3.2), of sodium chloride (2-20%, w/v) and of sodium nitrite (100, 150 and 200 ppm) at 4 and 20 °C for a maximum of 7 days. Different results were obtained for the two viruses. ECHO virus was highly stable against D,L-lactic acid and sodium chloride when tested under all conditions. On the contrary, FCV showed less stability but was not effectively inactivated when exposed to low acid and high salt conditions at refrigeration temperatures (4 °C). FCV titers decreased more markedly at 20 °C than 4 °C in all experiments. Sodium nitrite did not show any effect on the inactivation of both viruses. The results indicate that acidification, salting or curing maybe insufficient for effective inactivation of foodborne viruses such as NoV or human enteroviruses during food processing. Thus, application of higher temperature during fermentation and ripening processes maybe more effective toward the inactivation kinetics of less stable viruses. Nevertheless, more studies are needed to examine the antiviral properties of these preserving agents on virus survival and inactivation kinetics in the complex food matrix.

  11. Acute hemodynamic effects of inhaled sodium nitrite in pulmonary hypertension associated with heart failure with preserved ejection fraction

    PubMed Central

    Simon, Marc A.; Vanderpool, Rebecca R.; Nouraie, Mehdi; Bachman, Timothy N.; White, Pamela M.; Sugahara, Masataka; Gorcsan, John; Parsley, Ed L.; Gladwin, Mark T.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND. Pulmonary hypertension (PH) is associated with poor outcomes, yet specific treatments only exist for a small subset of patients. The most common form of PH is that associated with left heart disease (Group 2), for which there is no approved therapy. Nitrite has shown efficacy in preclinical animal models of Group 1 and 2 PH, as well as in patients with left heart failure with preserved ejection fraction (HFpEF). We evaluated the safety and efficacy of a potentially novel inhaled formulation of nitrite in PH-HFpEF patients as compared with Group 1 and 3 PH. METHODS. Cardiopulmonary hemodynamics were recorded after acute administration of inhaled nitrite at 2 doses, 45 and 90 mg. Safety endpoints included change in systemic blood pressure and methemoglobin levels. Responses were also compared with those administered inhaled nitric oxide. RESULTS. Thirty-six patients were enrolled (10 PH-HFpEF, 20 Group 1 pulmonary arterial hypertension patients on background PH-specific therapy, and 6 Group 3 PH). Drug administration was well tolerated. Nitrite inhalation significantly lowered pulmonary, right atrial, and pulmonary capillary wedge pressures, most pronounced in patients with PH-HFpEF. There was a modest decrease in cardiac output and systemic blood pressure. Pulmonary vascular resistance decreased only in Group 3 PH patients. There was substantial increase in pulmonary artery compliance, most pronounced in patients with PH-HFpEF. CONCLUSIONS. Inhaled nitrite is safe in PH patients and may be efficacious in PH-HFpEF and Group 3 PH primarily via improvements in left and right ventricular filling pressures and pulmonary artery compliance. The lack of change in pulmonary vascular resistance likely may limit efficacy for Group 1 patients. TRIAL REGISTRATION. ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01431313 FUNDING. This work was supported in part by the NIH grants P01HL103455 (to MAS and MTG), R01HL098032 (to MTG), and R01HL096973 (to MTG), and Mast Therapeutics, Inc. PMID

  12. Impact of organic load on Escherichia coli O157:H7 survival during pilot-scale processing of iceberg lettuce with acidified sodium hypochlorite.

    PubMed

    Davidson, Gordon R; Kaminski, Chelsea N; Ryser, Elliot T

    2014-10-01

    Chemical sanitizers are routinely used during commercial flume washing of fresh-cut leafy greens to minimize cross-contamination from the water. This study assessed the efficacy of three chlorine treatments against Escherichia coli O157:H7 on iceberg lettuce, in wash water, and on surfaces of a pilot-scale processing line using flume water containing various organic loads. Iceberg lettuce (5.4 kg) was inoculated to contain 10(6) CFU/g of a 4-strain cocktail of nontoxigenic, green fluorescent protein-labeled, ampicillin-resistant E. coli O157:H7 and held for 24 h at 4°C before processing. Lettuce was shredded using a Urschel TransSlicer, step conveyed to a flume tank, washed for 90 s using water alone or one of three different sanitizing treatments (50 ppm of total chlorine either alone or acidified to pH 6.5 with citric acid or T-128) in water containing organic loads of 0, 2.5, 5, or 10% (wt/vol) blended iceberg lettuce, and then dried using a shaker table and centrifugal dryer. Next, three 5.4-kg batches of uninoculated iceberg lettuce were processed identically. Various product (25 g), water (50 ml), and equipment surface swab (100 cm(2)) samples were homogenized in neutralizing buffer, diluted appropriately, and plated on tryptic soy agar containing 0.6% (wt/vol) yeast extract and 100 ppm of ampicillin without prior 0.45- m m membrane filtration to quantify E. coli O157:H7. Organic load negatively impacted the efficacy of all three chlorine treatments (P < 0.05) at the end of processing, with typical E. coli O157:H7 reductions of >5 and 0.9 to 3.7 log CFU/ml for organic loads of 0 and 10%, respectively. Organic load rarely had a significant impact (P < 0.05) on the efficacy of chlorine, chlorine plus citric acid, or chlorine plus T-128 against E. coli O157:H7 on iceberg lettuce. Reduced sanitizer efficacy generally corresponded to changes in total solids, chemical oxygen demand, turbidity, and maximum filterable volume, indicating that these tests may be

  13. A 26-Week Toxicity Assessment of AIR001 (Sodium Nitrite) by Inhalation Exposure in Rats and by Intravenous Administration in Dogs.

    PubMed

    Tepper, Jeffrey; Ochoa, Ricardo; Rix, Peter; Elliott, Gary; Hoglen, Niel; Poulin, Dominic; Parsley, Ed; Masamune, Hiroko

    2014-05-01

    Historically, nitrogen oxides (NOx) in food, drinking water, as well as in the atmosphere have been believed to be associated with adverse health consequences. More recently, NOx have been implicated in normal homeostatic regulation, and exogenous administration has been associated with health benefits. One such potential health benefit is the prospect that inhaled nitrite will lower pulmonary blood pressure (BP) in patients with pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH), a disease with poor prognosis due to the lack of effective treatment. To characterize potential chronic toxicity associated with inhaled AIR001 (sodium nitrite) for use in the treatment of PAH, 26-week exposures to AIR001 were carried out by inhalation administration in rats and by intravenous infusion in dogs. The studies revealed that methemoglobinemia was the primary adverse effect in both species. Methemoglobin levels less than 40% were well tolerated in both species, while levels greater than 50% methemoglobin caused death in some rats. Additionally, a decrease in systemic BP was also observed with inhaled AIR001 exposure in dogs. These acute secondary and exaggerated pharmacological effects occurred daily throughout the 26-week treatment period. Chronic exposure did not alter the magnitude of either methemoglobinemia or hypotension or result in additional toxicity or compensatory responses. Based on the exposure levels that produced these pharmacodynamic responses in animals, relative to those measured in early clinical studies, it appears that an adequate margin of safety exists to support the continued clinical development of inhaled AIR001.

  14. The curing agent sodium nitrite, used in the production of fermented sausages, is less inhibiting to the bacteriocin-producing meat starter culture Lactobacillus curvatus LTH 1174 under anaerobic conditions.

    PubMed

    Verluyten, Jurgen; Messens, Winy; De Vuyst, Luc

    2003-07-01

    Curvacin A is a listericidal bacteriocin produced by Lactobacillus curvatus LTH 1174, a strain isolated from fermented sausage. The response of this strain to an added curing agent (sodium nitrite) in terms of cell growth and bacteriocin production was investigated in vitro by laboratory fermentations with modified MRS broth. The strain was highly sensitive to nitrite; even a concentration of 10 ppm of curing agent inhibited its growth and both volumetric and specific bacteriocin production. A meat simulation medium containing 5 ppm of sodium nitrite was tested to investigate the influence of the gas phase on the growth and bacteriocin production of L. curvatus LTH 1174. Aerating the culture during growth had no effect on biomass formation, but the oxidative stress caused a higher level of specific bacteriocin production and led to a metabolic shift toward acetic acid production. Anaerobic conditions, on the other hand, led to an increased biomass concentration and less growth inhibition. Also, higher maximum volumetric bacteriocin activities and a higher level of specific bacteriocin production were obtained in the presence of sodium nitrite than in fermentations under aerobic conditions or standard conditions of air supply. These results indicate that the inhibitory effect of the curing agent is at least partially masked under anaerobic conditions. PMID:12839751

  15. The curing agent sodium nitrite, used in the production of fermented sausages, is less inhibiting to the bacteriocin-producing meat starter culture Lactobacillus curvatus LTH 1174 under anaerobic conditions.

    PubMed

    Verluyten, Jurgen; Messens, Winy; De Vuyst, Luc

    2003-07-01

    Curvacin A is a listericidal bacteriocin produced by Lactobacillus curvatus LTH 1174, a strain isolated from fermented sausage. The response of this strain to an added curing agent (sodium nitrite) in terms of cell growth and bacteriocin production was investigated in vitro by laboratory fermentations with modified MRS broth. The strain was highly sensitive to nitrite; even a concentration of 10 ppm of curing agent inhibited its growth and both volumetric and specific bacteriocin production. A meat simulation medium containing 5 ppm of sodium nitrite was tested to investigate the influence of the gas phase on the growth and bacteriocin production of L. curvatus LTH 1174. Aerating the culture during growth had no effect on biomass formation, but the oxidative stress caused a higher level of specific bacteriocin production and led to a metabolic shift toward acetic acid production. Anaerobic conditions, on the other hand, led to an increased biomass concentration and less growth inhibition. Also, higher maximum volumetric bacteriocin activities and a higher level of specific bacteriocin production were obtained in the presence of sodium nitrite than in fermentations under aerobic conditions or standard conditions of air supply. These results indicate that the inhibitory effect of the curing agent is at least partially masked under anaerobic conditions.

  16. A dissimilatory nitrite reductase in Paracoccus halodenitrificans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grant, M. A.; Hochstein, L. I.

    1984-01-01

    Paracoccus halodenitrificans produced a membrane-associated nitrite reductase. Spectrophotometric analysis showed it to be associated with a cd-cytochrome and located on the inner side of the cytoplasmic membrane. When supplied with nitrite, membrane preparations produced nitrous oxide and nitric oxide in different ratios depending on the electron donor employed. The nitrite reductase was maximally active at relatively low concentrations of sodium chloride and remained attached to the membranes at 100 mM sodium chloride.

  17. L-arginine and L-glutamine as immunonutrients and modulating agents for oxidative stress and toxicity induced by sodium nitrite in rats.

    PubMed

    El-Sheikh, Nora M; Khalil, Fatma A

    2011-04-01

    Sodium nitrite (NaNO(2)) is a flavoring, coloring and preservative agent in meat and fish products. The study aimed to evaluate the efficacy of L-arginine and L-glutamine supplementation as a potentially novel and useful strategy for the modulation of oxidative stress and toxicity induced by NaNO(2) in male rats. Rats were divided into six groups each of 10 rats and treated for 6 weeks: group 1 as normal control; group 2 fed standard diet containing 0.2% NaNO(2); group 3 and 4 fed the previous diet supplemented with 1% and 2% arginine, respectively; group 5 and 6 fed NaNO(2) diet supplemented with 1% and 2% glutamine, respectively. NaNO(2) treatment induced a significant increase in serum malondialdehyde, nitric oxide, arginase, glutathione-S-transferase activities, urea and creatinine as well as differential leucocytes%. However, a significant decrease was recorded in reduced glutathione, catalase activity, total protein, albumin and some hematological parameters as well as immunoglobulin G. On the other hand, arginine or glutamine showed a remarkable modulation of these abnormalities as indicated by reduction of malondialdehyde and improvement of the investigated antioxidant and hematological parameters. It can be concluded that arginine or glutamine supplementation may reduce oxidative stress and improve the hazard effects of NaNO(2).

  18. Application of In-Line Mid-Infrared (MIR) Spectroscopy Coupled with Calorimetry for the Determination of the Molar Enthalpy of Reaction between Ammonium Chloride and Sodium Nitrite.

    PubMed

    Kartnaller, Vinicius; Mariano, Danielly C O; Cajaiba, João

    2016-03-01

    The reaction between ammonium chloride and sodium nitrite has been known for its application as a source of heat because of its large enthalpy of reaction, for which it has been used by the oil industry. There have been no known calorimetric studies for the experimental determination of its molar enthalpy of reaction, which is necessary in order to predict the limits achieved for up-scale applications. Attenuated total reflection Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (ATR FT-IR) and reaction calorimetry were used to determine this value by using a simple methodology. Both techniques were used concomitantly as a source of information regarding the time-dependent moles converted (Δn) and the amount of exchanged heat (ΔH). The molar enthalpy of reaction was calculated to be -74 ± 4 kcal mol(-1). The percentage between the confidence interval and the calculated value was 5.4%, which shows that the methodology was precise. After the determination of the molar enthalpy of reaction, it was proved that the ATR FT-IR alone was able to be used as a substitute for the reaction calorimetry technique, in which the IR signal is converted to the heat information, presenting as an easier technique for the monitoring of the heat released by this system for future applications. PMID:26798078

  19. Application of In-Line Mid-Infrared (MIR) Spectroscopy Coupled with Calorimetry for the Determination of the Molar Enthalpy of Reaction between Ammonium Chloride and Sodium Nitrite.

    PubMed

    Kartnaller, Vinicius; Mariano, Danielly C O; Cajaiba, João

    2016-03-01

    The reaction between ammonium chloride and sodium nitrite has been known for its application as a source of heat because of its large enthalpy of reaction, for which it has been used by the oil industry. There have been no known calorimetric studies for the experimental determination of its molar enthalpy of reaction, which is necessary in order to predict the limits achieved for up-scale applications. Attenuated total reflection Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (ATR FT-IR) and reaction calorimetry were used to determine this value by using a simple methodology. Both techniques were used concomitantly as a source of information regarding the time-dependent moles converted (Δn) and the amount of exchanged heat (ΔH). The molar enthalpy of reaction was calculated to be -74 ± 4 kcal mol(-1). The percentage between the confidence interval and the calculated value was 5.4%, which shows that the methodology was precise. After the determination of the molar enthalpy of reaction, it was proved that the ATR FT-IR alone was able to be used as a substitute for the reaction calorimetry technique, in which the IR signal is converted to the heat information, presenting as an easier technique for the monitoring of the heat released by this system for future applications.

  20. New composite nitrite-free and low-nitrite meat-curing systems using natural colorants

    PubMed Central

    Eskandari, Mohammad H; Hosseinpour, Sara; Mesbahi, GholamReza; Shekarforoush, Shahram

    2013-01-01

    Nitrite-free and low-nitrite meat-curing systems were developed to eliminate or reduce nitrite in frankfurter-type sausages. Different composite meat-curing mixtures were formulated using cochineal and paprika as natural colorants, sodium hypophosphite (SHP) as antimicrobial agent, butylated hydroxyanisole (BHA) as antioxidant and sodium nitrite. The treatment, which contained 0.015% cochineal, most closely resembled the 120 ppm NaNO2 in its ability to create cured-meat color. BHA was found to be a strong antioxidant at the 30 ppm level in cooked sausages during refrigerated storage for 5 weeks. All treatments containing 40 ppm sodium nitrite were successful in replicating sensory attributes of frankfurter samples. Our findings support the use of SHP as possible antibotulinal agent in nitrite-free meat-curing systems. PMID:24804046

  1. Antimicrobial activity of Satureja montana L. essential oil against Clostridium perfringens type A inoculated in mortadella-type sausages formulated with different levels of sodium nitrite.

    PubMed

    de Oliveira, Thales Leandro Coutinho; de Araújo Soares, Rodrigo; Ramos, Eduardo Mendes; das Graças Cardoso, Maria; Alves, Eduardo; Piccoli, Roberta Hilsdorf

    2011-01-01

    This research evaluated the antimicrobial effect of the winter savory (Satureja montana L.) essential oil (EO) against Clostridium perfringens type A (ATCC 3624) inoculated in mortadella-type sausages formulated with different levels of sodium nitrite (NaNO₂: 0 ppm, 100 ppm and 200 ppm) in addition to EO at concentrations of 0.0%, 0.78%, 1.56% and 3.125% stored at 25°C for 30 days. The EO extracted by hydrodistillation and analyzed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (CG-MS) was tested in vitro using an agar well diffusion method for determination of minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) on C. perfringens. According to compositional analysis of the winter savory EO, 26 chemical compounds were identified, and the major constituents were thymol (28.99%), p-cymene (12.00%), linalool (11.00%) and carvacrol (10.71%). The results obtained showed that EO applied at a concentration of 1.56%, which was defined as the MIC, exhibited antimicrobial activity against C. perfringens in the in vitro assays, and the transmission electron microscopy (TEM) revealed structural damage and cell lysis of C. perfringens caused by EO treatment. A synergistic effect between NaNO₂ and EO was observed. In mortadella-type sausages formulated with 100 ppm of NaNO₂ and EO at all concentrations tested, the population of target microorganisms was reduced (p≤0.05) compared to control samples during all storage period. This data suggests the potential combined use of savory EO and minimal amounts of the synthetic additive, NaNO₂ to control C. perfringens in mortadella, which goes according to current market trends, where consumers are requesting natural products. PMID:21131083

  2. 7 CFR 58.720 - Acidifying agents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... Specifications for Dairy Plants Approved for USDA Inspection and Grading Service 1 Quality Specifications for Raw Material § 58.720 Acidifying agents. Acidifying agents if used shall be those permitted by the Food...

  3. 21 CFR 131.111 - Acidified milk.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Acidified milk. 131.111 Section 131.111 Food and... CONSUMPTION MILK AND CREAM Requirements for Specific Standardized Milk and Cream § 131.111 Acidified milk. (a) Description. Acidified milk is the food produced by souring one or more of the optional dairy...

  4. 21 CFR 131.111 - Acidified milk.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Acidified milk. 131.111 Section 131.111 Food and... CONSUMPTION MILK AND CREAM Requirements for Specific Standardized Milk and Cream § 131.111 Acidified milk. (a) Description. Acidified milk is the food produced by souring one or more of the optional dairy...

  5. 21 CFR 131.111 - Acidified milk.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Acidified milk. 131.111 Section 131.111 Food and... CONSUMPTION MILK AND CREAM Requirements for Specific Standardized Milk and Cream § 131.111 Acidified milk. (a) Description. Acidified milk is the food produced by souring one or more of the optional dairy...

  6. 21 CFR 131.111 - Acidified milk.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Acidified milk. 131.111 Section 131.111 Food and... CONSUMPTION MILK AND CREAM Requirements for Specific Standardized Milk and Cream § 131.111 Acidified milk. (a) Description. Acidified milk is the food produced by souring one or more of the optional dairy...

  7. 21 CFR 131.111 - Acidified milk.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Acidified milk. 131.111 Section 131.111 Food and... CONSUMPTION MILK AND CREAM Requirements for Specific Standardized Milk and Cream § 131.111 Acidified milk. (a) Description. Acidified milk is the food produced by souring one or more of the optional dairy...

  8. Boletus edulis Nitrite Reductase Reduces Nitrite Content of Pickles and Mitigates Intoxication in Nitrite-intoxicated Mice

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Weiwei; Tian, Guoting; Feng, Shanshan; Wong, Jack Ho; Zhao, Yongchang; Chen, Xiao; Wang, Hexiang; Ng, Tzi Bun

    2015-01-01

    Pickles are popular in China and exhibits health-promoting effects. However, nitrite produced during fermentation adversely affects health due to formation of methemoglobin and conversion to carcinogenic nitrosamine. Fruiting bodies of the mushroom Boletus edulis were capable of inhibiting nitrite production during pickle fermentation. A 90-kDa nitrite reductase (NiR), demonstrating peptide sequence homology to fungal nitrite reductase, was isolated from B. edulis fruiting bodies. The optimum temperature and pH of the enzyme was 45 °C and 6.8, respectively. B. edulis NiR was capable of prolonging the lifespan of nitrite-intoxicated mice, indicating that it had the action of an antidote. The enzyme could also eliminate nitrite from blood after intragastric administration of sodium nitrite, and after packaging into capsule, this nitrite-eliminating activity could persist for at least 120 minutes thus avoiding immediate gastric degradation. B. edulis NiR represents the first nitrite reductase purified from mushrooms and may facilitate subsequent applications. PMID:26446494

  9. Boletus edulis Nitrite Reductase Reduces Nitrite Content of Pickles and Mitigates Intoxication in Nitrite-intoxicated Mice.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Weiwei; Tian, Guoting; Feng, Shanshan; Wong, Jack Ho; Zhao, Yongchang; Chen, Xiao; Wang, Hexiang; Ng, Tzi Bun

    2015-10-08

    Pickles are popular in China and exhibits health-promoting effects. However, nitrite produced during fermentation adversely affects health due to formation of methemoglobin and conversion to carcinogenic nitrosamine. Fruiting bodies of the mushroom Boletus edulis were capable of inhibiting nitrite production during pickle fermentation. A 90-kDa nitrite reductase (NiR), demonstrating peptide sequence homology to fungal nitrite reductase, was isolated from B. edulis fruiting bodies. The optimum temperature and pH of the enzyme was 45 °C and 6.8, respectively. B. edulis NiR was capable of prolonging the lifespan of nitrite-intoxicated mice, indicating that it had the action of an antidote. The enzyme could also eliminate nitrite from blood after intragastric administration of sodium nitrite, and after packaging into capsule, this nitrite-eliminating activity could persist for at least 120 minutes thus avoiding immediate gastric degradation. B. edulis NiR represents the first nitrite reductase purified from mushrooms and may facilitate subsequent applications.

  10. Interactive inhibition of meat spoilage and pathogenic bacteria by lysozyme, nisin and EDTA in the presence of nitrite and sodium chloride at 24 degrees C.

    PubMed

    Gill, Alexander O; Holley, Richard A

    2003-02-15

    To develop a nisin- and lysozyme-based antimicrobial treatment for use with processed ham and bologna, in vitro experiments were conducted to determine whether inhibition enhancing interactions occur between the antimicrobials lysozyme, chrisin (a commercial nisin preparation), EDTA, NaCl and NaNO(2). Inhibitory interactions were observed between a number of agents when used against specific pathogenic and spoilage bacteria. The observed interactions included lysozyme with EDTA (Enterococcus faecalis and Weissella viridescens), chrisin with EDTA (all Gram-positive organisms), EDTA with NaCl (Escherichia coli, Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium, Serratia grimesii), EDTA with nitrite (E. coli, Lactobacillus curvatus, Leuconostoc mesenteroides, Listeria monocytogenes, S. Typhimurium), chrisin with nitrite (Lc. mesenteroides, L. monocytogenes), and NaCl with nitrite (S. Typhimurium, Shewanella putrefaciens). Previous reports have described interactions between nisin with EDTA that resulted in enhanced antimicrobial effect against Gram-negative bacteria, or lysozyme with nisin against Gram-positive bacteria. These interactions were not observed in these experiments. We observed that unlike previous studies, these experiments were conducted on growing cells in nutrient broth, rather than under conditions of nutrient limitation. We propose that screening of antimicrobials for use in food systems in nutrient-deficient systems is inappropriate and that new protocols should be developed. PMID:12423927

  11. 21 CFR 108.25 - Acidified foods.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Acidified foods. 108.25 Section 108.25 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN... With an Emergency Permit § 108.25 Acidified foods. (a) Inadequate or improper manufacture,...

  12. 21 CFR 108.25 - Acidified foods.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Acidified foods. 108.25 Section 108.25 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN... With an Emergency Permit § 108.25 Acidified foods. (a) Inadequate or improper manufacture,...

  13. 21 CFR 108.25 - Acidified foods.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Acidified foods. 108.25 Section 108.25 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN... With an Emergency Permit § 108.25 Acidified foods. (a) Inadequate or improper manufacture,...

  14. 21 CFR 108.25 - Acidified foods.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Acidified foods. 108.25 Section 108.25 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN... With an Emergency Permit § 108.25 Acidified foods. (a) Inadequate or improper manufacture,...

  15. Sodium

    MedlinePlus

    ... sodium. Doctors recommend you eat less than 2.4 grams per day. That equals about 1 teaspoon of table salt a day. Reading food labels can help you see how much sodium is in prepared foods. NIH: National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute

  16. Inorganic Nitrite Therapy: Historical perspective and future directions

    PubMed Central

    Kevil, Christopher G.; Kolluru, Gopi K.; Pattillo, Christopher B.; Giordano, Tony

    2015-01-01

    Over the past several years, investigators studying nitric oxide (NO) biology and metabolism have come to learn that the one electron oxidation product of NO, nitrite anion, serves as a unique player in modulating tissue NO bioavailability. Numerous studies have examined how this oxidized metabolite of NO can act as a salvage pathway for maintaining NO equivalents through multiple reduction mechanisms in permissive tissue environments. Moreover, it is now clear that nitrite anion production and distribution throughout the body can act in an endocrine manner to augment NO bioavailability that is important for physiological and pathological processes. These discoveries have led to renewed hope and efforts for an effective NO based therapeutic agent through the unique action of sodium nitrite as an NO pro-drug. More recent studies also indicate that sodium nitrate may also increase plasma nitrite levels via the enterosalivary circulatory system resulting in nitrate reduction to nitrite by microorganisms found within the oral cavity. In this review, we discuss the importance of nitrite anion in several disease models along with an appraisal of sodium nitrite therapy in the clinic, potential caveats of such clinical uses, and future possibilities of nitrite based therapies. PMID:21619929

  17. Characterization and inhibition of nitrite uptake in shortnose sturgeon fingerlings

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fontenot, Q.C.; Isely, J.J.; Tomasso, J.R.

    1999-01-01

    Efforts are underway to culture the endangered shortnose sturgeon Acipenser brevirostrum for possible reintroduction. As part of a larger project to develop culture techniques for this species, the uptake of nitrite was evaluated in fingerlings (16.5 ?? 4.85 g; mean ?? SD). Plasma nitrite concentrations increased significantly with exposure time (0-5 d) and dose (0-4 mg nitrite-N/L). Shortnose sturgeon fingerlings were able to concentrate nitrite in their plasma to more than 63 times the environmental concentration. Chloride, as either sodium chloride or calcium chloride, partially inhibited nitrite uptake. However, calcium chloride was a better inhibitor. After previous exposure (2 d at 2.13 ?? 0.080 mg nitrite-N/L) plasma nitrite-N decreased from 165.5 to 36.7 mg/L during a 3-d simultaneous exposure to 2.13 ?? 0.080 mg nitrite-N/L and treatment with 40 mg chloride/L as calcium chloride. The addition of calcium chloride to the water appeared to be an effective means of preventing nitrite uptake and treating nitrite toxicity in hatchery-reared shortnose sturgeon fingerlings.

  18. Nitrite in organ protection

    PubMed Central

    Rassaf, Tienush; Ferdinandy, Peter; Schulz, Rainer

    2014-01-01

    In the last decade, the nitrate-nitrite-nitric oxide pathway has emerged to therapeutical importance. Modulation of endogenous nitrate and nitrite levels with the subsequent S-nitros(yl)ation of the downstream signalling cascade open the way for novel cytoprotective strategies. In the following, we summarize the actual literature and give a short overview on the potential of nitrite in organ protection. PMID:23826831

  19. Inorganic nitrite supplementation for healthy arterial aging

    PubMed Central

    DeVan, Allison E.; Fleenor, Bradley S.; Seals, Douglas R.

    2014-01-01

    Aging is the major risk factor for cardiovascular diseases (CVD). This is attributable primarily to adverse changes in arteries, notably, increases in large elastic artery stiffness and endothelial dysfunction mediated by inadequate concentrations of the vascular-protective molecule, nitric oxide (NO), and higher levels of oxidative stress and inflammation. Inorganic nitrite is a promising precursor molecule for augmenting circulating and tissue NO bioavailability because it requires only a one-step reduction to NO. Nitrite also acts as an independent signaling molecule, exerting many of the effects previously attributed to NO. Results of recent studies indicate that nitrite may be effective in the treatment of vascular aging. In old mice, short-term oral sodium nitrite supplementation reduces aortic pulse wave velocity, the gold-standard measure of large elastic artery stiffness, and ameliorates endothelial dysfunction, as indicated by normalization of NO-mediated endothelium-dependent dilation. These improvements in age-related vascular dysfunction with nitrite are mediated by reductions in oxidative stress and inflammation, and may be linked to increases in mitochondrial biogenesis and health. Increasing nitrite levels via dietary intake of nitrate appears to have similarly beneficial effects in many of the same physiological and clinical settings. Several clinical trials are being performed to determine the broad therapeutic potential of increasing nitrite bioavailability on human health and disease, including studies related to vascular aging. In summary, inorganic nitrite, as well as dietary nitrate supplementation, represents a promising therapy for treatment of arterial aging and prevention of age-associated CVD in humans. PMID:24408999

  20. Microbiological Spoilage of Acidified Specialty Products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sperber, William H.

    Acidified specialty products or condiments are among the most microbiologically stable and safe food products. Often formulated, packaged, and distributed without heat treatments, they are microbiologically stable indefinitely at ambient temperatures in unopened containers. The packaged, acidified products are often intended for multiple uses, exposing them at the points of consumption to numerous opportunities for contamination with microorganisms. Nonetheless, they remain resistant to microbiological spoilage for many months, often under refrigerated conditions that are used to retard chemical reactions, flavor changes, and yeast growth.

  1. 21 CFR 108.25 - Acidified foods.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ..., or packing of acidified foods may result in the distribution in interstate commerce of processed... list of foods so processed in each establishment. These forms are available from the LACF Registration... processing. (h) This section shall not apply to the commercial processing of any food processed under...

  2. Chemical behavior of acidified chromium (3) solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Terman, D.K.

    1981-05-01

    A unique energy-storage system has been developed at NASA's Lewis Research Center called REDOX. This NASA-REDOX system is an electrochemical storage device that utilized the oxidation and reduction of two fully soluble redox couples for charging and discharging. The redox couples now being investigated are acidified chloride solutions of chromium (Cr(+2)/Cr(+3)) and iron (Fe(+2)/Fe(+3)).

  3. Oral nitrite therapy improves vascular function in diabetic mice

    PubMed Central

    Sindler, Amy L; Cox-York, Kimberly; Reese, Lauren; Bryan, Nathan S; Seals, Douglas R; Gentile, Christopher L

    2016-01-01

    Aim We tested the hypothesis that short-term oral sodium nitrite supplementation would improve vascular dysfunction in obese, diabetic mice. Methods and results Vascular function was determined in control mice and in db/db mice receiving drinking water with or without sodium nitrite (50 mg/L) for 5 weeks. Nitrite supplementation increased plasma nitrite concentrations in db/db mice (0.19±0.02 μM vs 0.80±0.26μM; p < 0.05). Db/db mice had lower endothelium-dependent dilation (EDD) in response to increasing doses of acetylcholine versus heterozygous control mice (71.2% ± 14.3% vs 93% ± 7.0%; p < 0.05), and sodium nitrite supplementation restored endothelium-dependent dilation to control levels (92.9% ± 2.3% vs 93% ± 7.0%; p < 0.05). The improvement in endothelial function was accompanied by a reduction in intrinsic stiffness, but not by alterations in plasma or vascular markers of inflammation. Conclusion These data suggest that sodium nitrite may be a novel therapy for treating diabetes-related vascular dysfunction; however, the mechanisms of improvement are unknown. PMID:25696116

  4. 21 CFR 181.33 - Sodium nitrate and potassium nitrate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Sodium nitrate and potassium nitrate. 181.33...-Sanctioned Food Ingredients § 181.33 Sodium nitrate and potassium nitrate. Sodium nitrate and potassium... nitrite, with or without sodium or potassium nitrite, in the production of cured red meat products...

  5. Color Developing Capacity of Plasma-treated Water as a Source of Nitrite for Meat Curing

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Samooel; Kim, Hyun Joo; Park, Sanghoo; Choe, Jun Ho; Jeon, Hee-Joon; Choe, Wonho

    2015-01-01

    The interaction of plasma with liquid generates nitrogen species including nitrite (NO−2). Therefore, the color developing capacity of plasma-treated water (PTW) as a nitrite source for meat curing was investigated in this study. PTW, which is generated by surface dielectric barrier discharge in air, and the increase of plasma treatment time resulted in increase of nitrite concentration in PTW. The PTW used in this study contains 46 ppm nitrite after plasma treatment for 30 min. To evaluate the effect of PTW on the cured meat color, meat batters were prepared under three different conditions (control, non-cured meat batter; PTW, meat batter cured with PTW; Sodium nitrite, meat batter cured with sodium nitrite). The meat batters were vacuum-packaged and cooked in a water-bath at 80℃ for 30 min. The typical color of cured meat developed in cooked meat batter treated with sodium nitrite or PTW. The lightness (L*) and yellowness (b*) values were similar in all conditions, whereas, the redness (a*) values of cooked meat batter with PTW and sodium nitrite (p<0.05) were significantly higher than the control. These data indicate that PTW can be used as a nitrite source in the curing process of meat without addition of other nitrite sources. PMID:26761900

  6. Color Developing Capacity of Plasma-treated Water as a Source of Nitrite for Meat Curing.

    PubMed

    Jung, Samooel; Kim, Hyun Joo; Park, Sanghoo; Yong, Hae In; Choe, Jun Ho; Jeon, Hee-Joon; Choe, Wonho; Jo, Cheorun

    2015-01-01

    The interaction of plasma with liquid generates nitrogen species including nitrite (NO(-) 2). Therefore, the color developing capacity of plasma-treated water (PTW) as a nitrite source for meat curing was investigated in this study. PTW, which is generated by surface dielectric barrier discharge in air, and the increase of plasma treatment time resulted in increase of nitrite concentration in PTW. The PTW used in this study contains 46 ppm nitrite after plasma treatment for 30 min. To evaluate the effect of PTW on the cured meat color, meat batters were prepared under three different conditions (control, non-cured meat batter; PTW, meat batter cured with PTW; Sodium nitrite, meat batter cured with sodium nitrite). The meat batters were vacuum-packaged and cooked in a water-bath at 80℃ for 30 min. The typical color of cured meat developed in cooked meat batter treated with sodium nitrite or PTW. The lightness (L*) and yellowness (b*) values were similar in all conditions, whereas, the redness (a*) values of cooked meat batter with PTW and sodium nitrite (p<0.05) were significantly higher than the control. These data indicate that PTW can be used as a nitrite source in the curing process of meat without addition of other nitrite sources.

  7. Nitrite Modulates Bacterial Antibiotic Susceptibility and Biofilm Formation in Association with Airway Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Zemke, Anna C; Shiva, Sruti; Burn, Jane L.; Moskowitz, Samuel M.; Pilewski, Joseph M.; Gladwin, Mark T.; Bomberger, Jennifer M.

    2014-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is the major pathogenic bacteria in cystic fibrosis and other forms of bronchiectasis. Growth in antibiotic resistant biofilms contributes to the virulence of this organism. Sodium nitrite has antimicrobial properties and has been tolerated as a nebulized compound at high concentrations in human subjects with pulmonary hypertension; however, its effects have not been evaluated on biotic biofilms or in combination with other clinically useful antibiotics. We grew P. aeruginosa on the apical surface of primary human airway epithelial cells to test the efficacy of sodium nitrite against biotic biofilms. Nitrite alone prevented 99% of biofilm growth. We then identified significant cooperative interactions between nitrite and polymyxins. For P. aeruginosa growing on primary CF airway cells, combining nitrite and colistimethate resulted in an additional log of bacterial inhibition compared to treating with either agent alone. Nitrite and colistimethate additively inhibited oxygen consumption by P. aeruginosa. Surprisingly, while the antimicrobial effects of nitrite in planktonic, aerated cultures are nitric oxide (NO) dependent, antimicrobial effects in other growth conditions are not. The inhibitory effect of nitrite on bacterial oxygen consumption and biofilm growth did not require NO as an intermediate as chemically scavenging NO did not block growth inhibition. These data suggest an NO-radical independent nitrosative or oxidative inhibition of respiration. The combination of nebulized sodium nitrite and colistimethate may provide a novel therapy for chronic P. aeruginosa airway infections, because sodium nitrite, unlike other antibiotic respiratory chain ‘poisons’, can be safely nebulized at high concentration in humans. PMID:25229185

  8. Color Developing Capacity of Plasma-treated Water as a Source of Nitrite for Meat Curing.

    PubMed

    Jung, Samooel; Kim, Hyun Joo; Park, Sanghoo; Yong, Hae In; Choe, Jun Ho; Jeon, Hee-Joon; Choe, Wonho; Jo, Cheorun

    2015-01-01

    The interaction of plasma with liquid generates nitrogen species including nitrite (NO(-) 2). Therefore, the color developing capacity of plasma-treated water (PTW) as a nitrite source for meat curing was investigated in this study. PTW, which is generated by surface dielectric barrier discharge in air, and the increase of plasma treatment time resulted in increase of nitrite concentration in PTW. The PTW used in this study contains 46 ppm nitrite after plasma treatment for 30 min. To evaluate the effect of PTW on the cured meat color, meat batters were prepared under three different conditions (control, non-cured meat batter; PTW, meat batter cured with PTW; Sodium nitrite, meat batter cured with sodium nitrite). The meat batters were vacuum-packaged and cooked in a water-bath at 80℃ for 30 min. The typical color of cured meat developed in cooked meat batter treated with sodium nitrite or PTW. The lightness (L*) and yellowness (b*) values were similar in all conditions, whereas, the redness (a*) values of cooked meat batter with PTW and sodium nitrite (p<0.05) were significantly higher than the control. These data indicate that PTW can be used as a nitrite source in the curing process of meat without addition of other nitrite sources. PMID:26761900

  9. 21 CFR 173.325 - Acidified sodium chlorite solutions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... or formed meat food products (unless precluded by standards of identity in 9 CFR part 319) prior to....S.C. 552(a) and 1 CFR part 51. Copies are available from the Division of Petition Control (HFS-215... crustaceans; or following the filleting of finfish; in accordance with current industry standards of...

  10. 21 CFR 173.325 - Acidified sodium chlorite solutions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... or formed meat food products (unless precluded by standards of identity in 9 CFR part 319) prior to....S.C. 552(a) and 1 CFR part 51. Copies are available from the Office of Food Additive Safety (HFS-200... crustaceans; or following the filleting of finfish; in accordance with current industry standards of...

  11. 21 CFR 173.325 - Acidified sodium chlorite solutions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... or formed meat food products (unless precluded by standards of identity in 9 CFR part 319) prior to....S.C. 552(a) and 1 CFR part 51. Copies are available from the Division of Petition Control (HFS-215... crustaceans; or following the filleting of finfish; in accordance with current industry standards of...

  12. 21 CFR 173.325 - Acidified sodium chlorite solutions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... precluded by standards of identity in 9 CFR part 319) prior to packaging of the food for commercial purposes... Corp., Redmond, WA, which is incorporated by reference in accordance with 5 U.S.C. 552(a) and 1 CFR..., butchering, storing, holding, packing, or packaging of finfish and crustaceans; or following the filleting...

  13. 21 CFR 173.325 - Acidified sodium chlorite solutions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... or formed meat food products (unless precluded by standards of identity in 9 CFR part 319) prior to....S.C. 552(a) and 1 CFR part 51. Copies are available from the Division of Petition Control (HFS-215... crustaceans; or following the filleting of finfish; in accordance with current industry standards of...

  14. Electrochemical Evaluation of Stainless Steels in Acidified Sodium Chloride Solutions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Calle, L. M.; MacDowell, L. G.; Vinje, R. D.

    2004-01-01

    This paper presents the results of an investigation in which several 300-series stainless steels (SS): AISI S30403 SS (UNS S30403), AISI 316L SS (UNS S31603), and AISI 317L SS (LINS S31703), as well as highly-alloyed: SS 254-SMO (UNS S32154), AL-6XN (N08367) and AL29-4C (UNS S44735), were evaluated using DC electrochemical techniques in three different electrolyte solutions. The solutions consisted of neutral 3.55% NaCl, 3.55% NaCl in 0.1N HCl, and 3.55% NaCl in 1.0N HCl. These solutions were chosen to simulate environments that are less, similar, and more aggressive, respectively, than the conditions at the Space Shuttle launch pads. The electrochemical test results were compared to atmospheric exposure data and evaluated for their ability to predict the long-term corrosion performance of the subject alloys. The electrochemical measurements for the six alloys indicated that the higher-alloyed SS 254-SMO, AL29-4C, and AL-6XN exhibited significantly higher resistance to localized corrosion than the 300-series SS. There was a correlation between the corrosion performance of the alloys during a two-year atmospheric exposure and the corrosion rates calculated from electrochemical (polarization resistance) measurements.

  15. Performance of Denitrifying Microbial Fuel Cell with Biocathode over Nitrite

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Huimin; Zhao, Jianqiang; Li, Fenghai; Li, Xiaoling

    2016-01-01

    Microbial fuel cell (MFC) with nitrite as an electron acceptor in cathode provided a new technology for nitrogen removal and electricity production simultaneously. The influences of influent nitrite concentration and external resistance on the performance of denitrifying MFC were investigated. The optimal effectiveness were obtained with the maximum total nitrogen (TN) removal rate of 54.80 ± 0.01 g m−3 d−1. It would be rather desirable for the TN removal than electricity generation at lower external resistance. Denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis suggested that Proteobacteria was the predominant phylum, accounting for 35.72%. Thiobacillus and Afipia might benefit to nitrite removal. The presence of nitrifying Devosia indicated that nitrite was oxidized to nitrate via a biochemical mechanism in the cathode. Ignavibacterium and Anaerolineaceae was found in the cathode as a heterotrophic bacterium with sodium acetate as substrate, which illustrated that sodium acetate in anode was likely permeated through proton exchange membrane to the cathode. PMID:27047462

  16. Increased consumption and vasodilatory effect of nitrite during exercise.

    PubMed

    Hon, Yuen Yi; Lin, Elaina E; Tian, Xin; Yang, Yang; Sun, He; Swenson, Erik R; Taveira-Dasilva, Angelo M; Gladwin, Mark T; Machado, Roberto F

    2016-02-15

    This study investigated the effects of aerobic-to-anaerobic exercise on nitrite stores in the human circulation and evaluated the effects of systemic nitrite infusion on aerobic and anaerobic exercise capacity and hemodynamics. Six healthy volunteers were randomized to receive sodium nitrite or saline for 70 min in two separate occasions in an exercise study. Subjects cycled on an upright electronically braked cycle ergometer 30 min into the infusion according to a ramp protocol designed to attain exhaustion in 10 min. They were allowed to recover for 30 min thereafter. The changes of whole blood nitrite concentrations over the 70-min study period were analyzed by pharmacokinetic modeling. Longitudinal measurements of hemodynamic and clinical variables were analyzed by fitting nonparametric regression spline models. During exercise, nitrite consumption/elimination rate was increased by ∼137%. Cardiac output (CO), mean arterial pressure (MAP), and pulmonary artery pressure (PAP) were increased, but smaller elevation of MAP and larger increases of CO and PAP were found during nitrite infusion compared with placebo control. The higher CO and lower MAP during nitrite infusion were likely attributed to vasodilation and a trend toward decrease in systemic vascular resistance. In contrast, there were no significant changes in mean pulmonary artery pressures and pulmonary vascular resistance. These findings, together with the increased consumption of nitrite and production of iron-nitrosyl-hemoglobin during exercise, support the notion of nitrite conversion to release NO resulting in systemic vasodilatation. However, at the dosing used in this protocol achieving micromolar plasma concentrations of nitrite, exercise capacity was not enhanced, as opposed to other reports using lower dosing.

  17. Effects of the presence of the curing agent sodium nitrite, used in the production of fermented sausages, on bacteriocin production by Weissella paramesenteroides DX grown in meat simulation medium.

    PubMed

    Papagianni, M; Sergelidis, D

    2013-06-10

    Weissellin A is a listericidal bacteriocin produced by the sausage-isolated strain of Weissella paramesenteroides DX. The response of the strain to various concentrations of the added curing agent NaNO2 (0.0025, 0.005 and 0.01g/L) was evaluated in bioreactor fermentations using a meat simulation medium. The presence of nitrite suppressed bacteriocin production - the effect being more pronounced with increasing concentrations. Weissellin A was produced as a growth-associated metabolite in the absence of nitrite or its presence in the low concentration of 0.005g/L under aerobic conditions. The suppressive effect of nitrite was apparent under conditions supporting increased specific production rates, e.g. 50% and 100% dissolved oxygen tension, but no effect was observed under anaerobic conditions. As the latter prevail in the microenvironment of fermented meat products, the absence of any influence of nitrite on bacteriocin production is an important finding that enlightens the role of this species of lactic acid bacteria in its common substrates.

  18. Lack of teratogenic and mutagenic effects of nitrite on mouse fetuses

    SciTech Connect

    Shimada, Takamichi )

    1988-10-01

    To assess embryotoxic effects of sodium nitrite, pregnant ICR mice were given drinking water containing sodium nitrite at a concentration of either 100 or 1,000 mg/L on days 7-18 of gestation. There were no significant differences between treated and control groups in measures of developmental toxicity, e.g., litter size, fetal weight, and number of resorbed or dead fetuses. The incidences of external and skeletal malformations in fetuses of treated groups were not significantly different from those in the controls. No significant increase was observed in the frequency of gaps and breaks of liver cell chromosomes in fetuses exposed in utero to sodium nitrite. Teratogenic and mutagenic effects of sodium nitrite were absent in mice at the doses used.

  19. Antimicrobial activity and stability of weakly acidified chlorous acid water.

    PubMed

    Horiuchi, Isanori; Kawata, Hiroyuki; Nagao, Tamiko; Imaohji, Haruyuki; Murakami, Kazuya; Kino, Yasuhiro; Yamasaki, Hisashi; Koyama, A Hajime; Fujita, Yatsuka; Goda, Hisataka; Kuwahara, Tomomi

    2015-01-01

    The antimicrobial activity of weakly acidified chlorous acid water (WACAW) against Staphylococcus aureus, non-pathogenic Escherichia coli, enterohemorrhagic E. coli (EHEC O157:H7), Candida albicans, and spore-forming Bacillus and Paenibacillus species was evaluated in vitro. The antiviral activity was also examined using feline calicivirus (FCV). Diluted WACAW (>100 ppm) effectively reduced the number of non-spore-forming bacteria (>4 log10 CFU reductions) within 5 min. Treatment with this sanitizer at 400 ppm for 30 min achieved>5 log10 CFU reductions in spore-forming Bacillus and Paenibacillus species while an equivalent concentration of sodium hypochlorite (NaClO) resulted in only a 0.98 and 2.72 log10 CFU reduction, respectively. The effect of this sanitizer against FCV was equivalent to that of NaClO. Immersion in WACAW (400 ppm) achieved >4 and 2.26 log10 CFU reductions in Campylobacter jejuni and EHEC, respectively, on artificially contaminated broiler carcass pieces. Finally, theantimicrobial activity of this sanitizer was shown to be maintained for at least 28 d when in contact with nonwoven fabric (100% cotton). This study showed that pH control of chlorous acid is expected to modify its antimicrobial activity and stability. WACAW is expected to have applications in various settings such as the food processing and healthcare industries. PMID:25817812

  20. Nitrite reduction in Veillonella alcalescens.

    PubMed Central

    Yordy, D M; Delwiche, E A

    1979-01-01

    Nitrite reduction was examined in Veillonella alcalescens C-1, and obligate anaerobe with an ATP-yielding nitrate-reducing system. Hydrogen donors for nitrite reduction included hydrosulfite, hydrogen gas, and pyruvate, but not pyridine nucleotides, in the presnece or absence of flavins. Pyruvate-linked nitrite reduction was not inhibited by 4,4,4-trifluoro-1-(2-thienyl) 1,3-butanedione, dicoumarol, or 2-heptyl-4-hydroxy-quinoline-N-oxide. The noninvolvement of membrane-bound factors was supported by the fact that 100% of pyruvate-linked activity remained in the soluble fraction after fractionation of crude extracts by ultracentrifugation. Using DEAE-cellulose column chromatography, however, the participation of ferredoxin in nitrite reduction was demonstrated. The product of nitrite reduction appeared to be ammonia, as determined from H2-to-NO2- ratios. Nitrite reductase was induced by nitrate or nitrite and was repressed by increased levels of reduced nitrogenous compounds. PMID:422515

  1. Nitrates and nitrites in the treatment of ischemic cardiac disease.

    PubMed

    Nossaman, Vaughn E; Nossaman, Bobby D; Kadowitz, Philip J

    2010-01-01

    The organic nitrite, amyl of nitrite, was initially used as a therapeutic agent in the treatment of angina pectoris, but was replaced over a decade later by the organic nitrate, nitroglycerin (NTG), due to the ease of administration and longer duration of action. The administration of organic nitrate esters, such as NTG, continues to be used in the treatment of angina pectoris and heart failure since the birth of modern pharmacology. Their clinical effectiveness is due to vasodilator activity in large veins and arteries through an as yet unidentified method of delivering nitric oxide (NO), or a NO-like compound. The major drawback is the development of tolerance with NTG, and the duration and route of administration with amyl of nitrite. Although the nitrites are no longer used in the treatment of hypertension or ischemic heart disease, the nitrite anion has recently been discovered to possess novel pharmacologic actions, such as modulating hypoxic vasodilation, and providing cytoprotection in ischemia-reperfusion injury. Although the actions of these 2 similar chemical classes (nitrites and organic nitrates) have often been considered to be alike, we still do not understand their mechanism of action. Finally, the nitrite anion, either from sodium nitrite or an intermediate NTG form, may act as a storage form for NO and provide support for investigating the use of these agents in the treatment of ischemic cardiovascular states. We review what is presently known about the use of nitrates and nitrites including the historical, current, and potential uses of these agents, and their mechanisms of action.

  2. 21 CFR 131.162 - Acidified sour cream.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ...,” section 16.023. (d) Nomenclature. The name of the food is “Acidified sour cream”. The full name of the... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Acidified sour cream. 131.162 Section 131.162 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD...

  3. 21 CFR 131.162 - Acidified sour cream.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ...,” section 16.023. (d) Nomenclature. The name of the food is “Acidified sour cream”. The full name of the... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Acidified sour cream. 131.162 Section 131.162 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD...

  4. 21 CFR 131.162 - Acidified sour cream.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ...,” section 16.023. (d) Nomenclature. The name of the food is “Acidified sour cream”. The full name of the... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Acidified sour cream. 131.162 Section 131.162 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD...

  5. The global distribution of acidifying wet deposition.

    PubMed

    Rodhe, Henning; Dentener, Frank; Schulz, Michael

    2002-10-15

    The acid-base status of precipitation is a result of a balance between acidifying compounds--mainly oxides of sulfur and nitrogen--and alkaline compounds--mainly ammonia and alkaline material in windblown soil dust. We use current models of the global atmospheric distribution of such compounds to estimate the geographical distribution of pH in precipitation and of the rate of deposition of hydrogen ion or bicarbonate ion. The lowest pH values--mainly due to high concentration of sulfuric acid--occur in eastern parts of North America, Europe, and China. A comparison with observed pH values shows fair agreement in most parts of the world. However, in some areas, e.g. western North America, southwestern Europe, and northern China the estimated pH is too low, indicating that we have underestimated the deposition flux of alkaline material, probably mainly CaCO3. Our neglect of organic acids may have contributed to an overestimate of pH especially in certain tropical areas. To illustrate the potential effects of acidifying deposition on nitrogen saturated terrestrial ecosystems we also calculate the deposition of "potential acidity" that takes into account the microbial transformation of ammonium to nitrate in such ecosystems, resulting in the release of hydrogen ion. Compared to the deposition of acidity, with its maxima over Europe, eastern North America, and southern China, the deposition of potential acidity exhibits an additional maximum in India and Bangladesh and in several other smaller hot spots where the cycling of ammonia is enhanced by a dense cattle population. To the extent that soils in these areas of high potential acidity deposition actually become nitrogen saturated a depletion of base cations and other changes in soil chemistry and biology should be expected. Potential problem areas forfuture soil acidification include several regions with sensitive soils in southern, southeastern, and eastern Asia as well as in central parts of South America.

  6. A novel nitrite biosensor based on conductometric electrode modified with cytochrome c nitrite reductase composite membrane.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhiqiang; Xia, Siqing; Leonard, Didier; Jaffrezic-Renault, Nicole; Zhang, Jiao; Bessueille, François; Goepfert, Yves; Wang, Xuejiang; Chen, Ling; Zhu, Zhiliang; Zhao, Jianfu; Almeida, M Gabriela; Silveira, Célia M

    2009-02-15

    A conductometric biosensor for nitrite detection was developed using cytochrome c nitrite reductase (ccNiR) extracted from Desulfovibrio desulfuricans ATCC 27774 cells immobilized on a planar interdigitated electrode by cross-linking with saturated glutaraldehyde (GA) vapour in the presence of bovine serum albumin, methyl viologen (MV), Nafion, and glycerol. The configuration parameters for this biosensor, including the enzyme concentration, ccNiR/BSA ratio, MV concentration, and Nafion concentration, were optimized. Various experimental parameters, such as sodium dithionite added, working buffer solution, and temperature, were investigated with regard to their effect on the conductance response of the biosensor to nitrite. Under the optimum conditions at room temperature (about 25 degrees C), the conductometric biosensor showed a fast response to nitrite (about 10s) with a linear range of 0.2-120 microM, a sensitivity of 0.194 microS/microM [NO(2)(-)], and a detection limit of 0.05 microM. The biosensor also showed satisfactory reproducibility (relative standard deviation of 6%, n=5). The apparent Michaelis-Menten constant (K(M,app)) was 338 microM. When stored in potassium phosphate buffer (100mM, pH 7.6) at 4 degrees C, the biosensor showed good stability over 1 month. No obvious interference from other ionic species familiar in natural waters was detected. The application experiments show that the biosensor is suitable for use in real water samples. PMID:18804367

  7. Chloride inhibition of nitrite-induced methemoglobinemia in channel catfish (Ictalurus punctatus)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tomasso, J.R.; Simco, B.A.; Davis, K.B.

    1979-01-01

    Exposure of channel catfish (Ictalurus punctatus) fingerlings for 24?h to 1.0, 2.5, and 5.0?mg/L nitrite (pH?=?7; hardness?=?40?mg/L; temperature?=?22–25 °C) produced methemoglobin levels of 20.7?±?1.9%, 59.8?±?1.9%, and 77.4?±?1.4% (SE), respectively. However, methemoglobin levels were not elevated when fish were simultaneously exposed to 1.0, 2.5, and 5.0?mg/L nitrite and 25, 50, and 100?mg/L sodium chloride, respectively. Acclimation to sodium chloride for 24?h before exposure to nitrite did not enhance the inhibitory action of sodium chloride. Fish exposed to 5?mg/L nitrite for 5?h developed 42.5?±?3.8% methemoglobin. When transferred to water containing 5?mg/L nitrite and 250?mg/L sodium chloride, methemoglobin levels returned to normal within 24?h. Environmental chloride probably inhibits methemoglobin formation by competing with nitrite for entrance into the gills of the fish. An ionic ratio of 16 Cl- to 1 NO2- is capable of complete suppression of nitrite-induced methemoglobin formation. Bicarbonate ion present in the test water (1?meq/L) may also have contributed to the inhibitive action of chloride.

  8. The use of atmospheric pressure plasma-treated water as a source of nitrite for emulsion-type sausage.

    PubMed

    Jung, Samooel; Kim, Hyun Joo; Park, Sanghoo; In Yong, Hae; Choe, Jun Ho; Jeon, Hee-Joon; Choe, Wonho; Jo, Cheorun

    2015-10-01

    We investigated the possible use of atmospheric pressure plasma-treated water (PTW) as a nitrite source in curing process. Emulsion-type sausages were manufactured with PTW, celery powder containing nitrite, and synthetic sodium nitrite at a concentration of nitrite ion 70mgkg(-1). In terms of sausage quality, there were no noticeable effects of PTW on the total aerobic bacterial counts, color, and peroxide values of sausages compared with those of celery powder and sodium nitrite throughout 28days of storage at 4°C. Sausage with added PTW had lower concentrations of residual nitrite compared to those of added celery powder and sodium nitrite during the storage period (P<0.05). The sensory properties of PTW-treated and sodium nitrite-treated sausages were not different, whereas the sausage with added celery powder received the lowest scores in taste and acceptability. From the results, it is concluded that PTW can be used as a nitrite source equivalent to a natural curing agent. PMID:26115346

  9. The use of atmospheric pressure plasma-treated water as a source of nitrite for emulsion-type sausage.

    PubMed

    Jung, Samooel; Kim, Hyun Joo; Park, Sanghoo; In Yong, Hae; Choe, Jun Ho; Jeon, Hee-Joon; Choe, Wonho; Jo, Cheorun

    2015-10-01

    We investigated the possible use of atmospheric pressure plasma-treated water (PTW) as a nitrite source in curing process. Emulsion-type sausages were manufactured with PTW, celery powder containing nitrite, and synthetic sodium nitrite at a concentration of nitrite ion 70mgkg(-1). In terms of sausage quality, there were no noticeable effects of PTW on the total aerobic bacterial counts, color, and peroxide values of sausages compared with those of celery powder and sodium nitrite throughout 28days of storage at 4°C. Sausage with added PTW had lower concentrations of residual nitrite compared to those of added celery powder and sodium nitrite during the storage period (P<0.05). The sensory properties of PTW-treated and sodium nitrite-treated sausages were not different, whereas the sausage with added celery powder received the lowest scores in taste and acceptability. From the results, it is concluded that PTW can be used as a nitrite source equivalent to a natural curing agent.

  10. Nitrite toxicity of Litopenaeus vannamei in water containing low concentrations of sea salt or mixed salts

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sowers, A.; Young, S.P.; Isely, J.J.; Browdy, C.L.; Tomasso, J.R.

    2004-01-01

    The uptake, depuration and toxicity of environmental nitrite was characterized in Litopenaeus vannamei exposed in water containing low concentrations of artificial sea salt or mixed salts. In 2 g/L artificial sea salts, nitrite was concentrated in the hemolymph in a dose-dependent and rapid manner (steady-state in about 2 d). When exposed to nitrite in 2 g/L artificial sea salts for 4 d and then moved to a similar environment without added nitrite, complete depuration occurred within a day. Increasing salinity up to 10 g/L decreased uptake of environmental nitrite. Nitrite uptake in environments containing 2 g/L mixed salts (combination of sodium, potassium, calcium and magnesium chlorides) was similar to or lower than rates in 2 g/L artificial sea salt. Toxicity was inversely related to total dissolved salt and chloride concentrations and was highest in 2 g/L artificial sea salt (96-h medial lethal concentration = 8.4 mg/L nitrite-N). Animals that molted during the experiments did not appear to be more susceptible to nitrite than animals that did not molt. The shallow slope of the curve describing the relationship between toxicity and salinity suggests that management of nitrite toxicity in low-salinity shrimp ponds by addition of more salts may not be practical. ?? Copyright by the World Aquaculture Society 2004.

  11. Nitrate Reduction to Nitrite, Nitric Oxide and Ammonia by Gut Bacteria under Physiological Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Tiso, Mauro; Schechter, Alan N.

    2015-01-01

    The biological nitrogen cycle involves step-wise reduction of nitrogen oxides to ammonium salts and oxidation of ammonia back to nitrites and nitrates by plants and bacteria. Neither process has been thought to have relevance to mammalian physiology; however in recent years the salivary bacterial reduction of nitrate to nitrite has been recognized as an important metabolic conversion in humans. Several enteric bacteria have also shown the ability of catalytic reduction of nitrate to ammonia via nitrite during dissimilatory respiration; however, the importance of this pathway in bacterial species colonizing the human intestine has been little studied. We measured nitrite, nitric oxide (NO) and ammonia formation in cultures of Escherichia coli, Lactobacillus and Bifidobacterium species grown at different sodium nitrate concentrations and oxygen levels. We found that the presence of 5 mM nitrate provided a growth benefit and induced both nitrite and ammonia generation in E.coli and L.plantarum bacteria grown at oxygen concentrations compatible with the content in the gastrointestinal tract. Nitrite and ammonia accumulated in the growth medium when at least 2.5 mM nitrate was present. Time-course curves suggest that nitrate is first converted to nitrite and subsequently to ammonia. Strains of L.rhamnosus, L.acidophilus and B.longum infantis grown with nitrate produced minor changes in nitrite or ammonia levels in the cultures. However, when supplied with exogenous nitrite, NO gas was readily produced independently of added nitrate. Bacterial production of lactic acid causes medium acidification that in turn generates NO by non-enzymatic nitrite reduction. In contrast, nitrite was converted to NO by E.coli cultures even at neutral pH. We suggest that the bacterial nitrate reduction to ammonia, as well as the related NO formation in the gut, could be an important aspect of the overall mammalian nitrate/nitrite/NO metabolism and is yet another way in which the microbiome

  12. Effect of luminal or circulating nitrite on colonic ion movement in the rat

    SciTech Connect

    Radcliffe, B.C.; Nance, S.H.; Deakin, E.J.; Roediger, W.E.W. )

    1987-08-01

    The disposition of intravenously or luminally administered nitrite across the colonic mucosa and its effect on ion movement into or from the colon was assessed in anesthetized Porton rats using the isolated colon instilled either with sodium chloride or sodium chloride with sodium butyrate. Ionic changes in the colon after intravenous injection of 10 {mu}mol NaNO{sub 2} were compared with those occurring after injection of 10 {mu}mol NaCl. After intravenous administration of nitrite, both nitrite and nitrate appeared in the colonic instillate in a ratio of 1:1. Nitrite increased chloride absorption (110%) and bicarbonate production (20%) when 40 mM butyrate was included in the instillate. Net sodium absorption, measured in the whole colon, was unchanged. Intravenous nitrite had no effect on ionic movement in the absence of butyrate. When NaNO{sub 2} was included luminally with the sodium chloride-butyrate instillate, bicarbonate production rate increased, but sodium and chloride absorption were unaffected. Nitrite concentration in the instillate decreased during the 40-min experimental period at a rate of 0.275 nmol{center dot}min{sup {minus}1}{center dot}cm{sup {minus}2} and nitrate appeared at a rate of 0.037 nmol{center dot}min{sup {minus}1}{center dot}cm{sup {minus}2}. The authors conclude that nitrite stimulates bicarbonate production in the colon, probably by stimulating the oxidation by butyrate, the main source of CO{sub 2} generation by the colonic mucosa.

  13. Growth and blood chemistry of ducklings reared on acidified wetlands

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rattner, B.A.; Haramis, G.; Linder, G.; Chu, D.

    1985-01-01

    Acid deposition is one factor that may be responsible for the decline of some waterfowl populations. Growth and physiological condition were monitored in captive-reared black ducks (Anas rubripes) exposed for 10-day trials (day 11-20 of life) on control (pH 6.8) and acidified (pH 5.0) man-made emergent wetlands. Impaired growth (body weight, culmen and tarsus length) and increased mortality (50%) were apparent in broods (hen + 4 ducklings) reared on acidified wetIands. Ducklings exbibiting poor growth had reduced hematocrit, plasma protein and cholesterol levels. This subset of birds had elevated plasma uric acid concentration and creatine kinase activity (perhaps due to enhanced protein and nucleotide catabolism). and elevated pIasma K+ levels. Based upon overt appearance, growth and blood chemistry, ducklings exposed to acidified wetlands were concluded to be in poorer condittion than those exposed on circumneutral pH wetlands.

  14. Decrease of aflatoxin B1 in yoghurt and acidified milks.

    PubMed

    Rasić, J L; Skrinjar, M; Markov, S

    1991-02-01

    Fermentation of yoghurt and acidified milks containing aflatoxin B1 (AB1) were studied. AB1 added to milk before fermentation at concentrations of 600, 1000 and 1400 micrograms/kg was reduced in yoghurts (pH 4.0) by 97, 91 and 90%, respectively. Coagulation time was approximately the same as in the controls. Streptococci had longer chains than those in the controls. The main decrease of AB1 occurred during the milk fermentation. A decrease of AB1 (conc. 1000 micrograms/kg) in milks acidified with citric, lactic and acetic acids (pH 4.0) was 90, 84 and 73%, respectively.

  15. Properties of reformulated hot dog sausage without added nitrites during chilled storage.

    PubMed

    Ruiz-Capillas, C; Herrero, A M; Tahmouzi, S; Razavi, S H; Triki, M; Rodríguez-Salas, L; Samcová, K; Jiménez-Colmenero, F

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the effect of a complete nitrite replacement strategy using celery, carmine, sodium lactate and orange dietary fibre combined with vitamins C and E, on the quality characteristics (technological, sensorial and safety properties) of hot dog sausages (five samples) during chilled storage (2 ± 1℃ 60 days). Nitrite replacers (combined with vitamins C and E) presented antioxidant activity, reducing lipid oxidation in reformulated samples. At the end of storage redness (a*) was similar in the control sample (with added nitrite) and in the sample without added nitrite. Sensory evaluation detected no significant difference between samples with and without added nitrite. All the reformulated samples were judged acceptable by the panellists. At the end of storage, the control sample contained more than four times as much residual nitrite as the reformulated samples. Growth of presumptive Clostridium perfringens was not observed in any of the samples. Samples without added nitrite had longer shelf-lives than control sausage. Samples containing 0.1% vitamin C registered the lowest microbiological levels. This strategy could be a good alternative to reduce and/or eliminate added nitrite in hot dog sausages.

  16. Properties of reformulated hot dog sausage without added nitrites during chilled storage.

    PubMed

    Ruiz-Capillas, C; Herrero, A M; Tahmouzi, S; Razavi, S H; Triki, M; Rodríguez-Salas, L; Samcová, K; Jiménez-Colmenero, F

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the effect of a complete nitrite replacement strategy using celery, carmine, sodium lactate and orange dietary fibre combined with vitamins C and E, on the quality characteristics (technological, sensorial and safety properties) of hot dog sausages (five samples) during chilled storage (2 ± 1℃ 60 days). Nitrite replacers (combined with vitamins C and E) presented antioxidant activity, reducing lipid oxidation in reformulated samples. At the end of storage redness (a*) was similar in the control sample (with added nitrite) and in the sample without added nitrite. Sensory evaluation detected no significant difference between samples with and without added nitrite. All the reformulated samples were judged acceptable by the panellists. At the end of storage, the control sample contained more than four times as much residual nitrite as the reformulated samples. Growth of presumptive Clostridium perfringens was not observed in any of the samples. Samples without added nitrite had longer shelf-lives than control sausage. Samples containing 0.1% vitamin C registered the lowest microbiological levels. This strategy could be a good alternative to reduce and/or eliminate added nitrite in hot dog sausages. PMID:25480689

  17. Antagonism of Acute Sulfide Poisoning in Mice by Nitrite Anion without Methemoglobinemia.

    PubMed

    Cronican, Andrea A; Frawley, Kristin L; Ahmed, Humza; Pearce, Linda L; Peterson, Jim

    2015-07-20

    There are currently no FDA-approved antidotes for H2S/sulfide intoxication. Sodium nitrite, if given prophylactically to Swiss Webster mice, was shown to be highly protective against the acute toxic effects of sodium hydrosulfide (∼LD40 dose) with both agents administered by intraperitoneal injections. However, sodium nitrite administered after the toxicant dose did not detectably ameliorate sulfide toxicity in this fast-delivery, single-shot experimental paradigm. Nitrite anion was shown to rapidly produce NO in the bloodstream, as judged by the appearance of EPR signals attributable to nitrosylhemoglobin and methemoglobin, together amounting to less than 5% of the total hemoglobin present. Sulfide-intoxicated mice were neither helped by the supplemental administration of 100% oxygen nor were there any detrimental effects. Compared to cyanide-intoxicated mice, animals surviving sulfide intoxication exhibited very short knockdown times (if any) and full recovery was extremely fast (∼15 min) irrespective of whether sodium nitrite was administered. Behavioral experiments testing the ability of mice to maintain balance on a rotating cylinder showed no motor impairment up to 24 h post sulfide exposure. It is argued that antagonism of sulfide inhibition of cytochrome c oxidase by NO is the crucial antidotal activity of nitrite rather than formation of methemoglobin.

  18. 75 FR 59268 - Draft Guidance for Industry: Acidified Foods; Availability

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-27

    .... 0910-0037; 73 FR 11649 at 11650, March 4, 2008). In that analysis, we estimated that there are 8,950... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Draft Guidance for Industry: Acidified Foods; Availability AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Food and Drug Administration...

  19. Nitrite toxicity to the crayfish Procambarus clarkii

    SciTech Connect

    Gutzmer, M.P.; Tomasso, J.R.

    1985-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of acute nitrite exposure to the crayfish Procambarus clarkii (Decapoda). Specific objectives of this study included (1) determining the 24-, 48-, 72- and 96-h LC-50's of nitrite to crayfish of different weights and genders in freshwater, (2) determining the LC-50's of nitrite to crayfish in water with elevated chloride concentrations, and (3), in order to gain insight into the mechanisms of nitrite toxicity in crayfish, determining hemolymph nitrite concentrations in crayfish exposed to nitrite in freshwater and water with elevated chloride concentrations.

  20. One-Pot Synthesis of 2,4,5-Trisubstituted Imidazoles via [2 + 2 + 1] Cycloannulation of 1,3-Bishet(aryl)-monothio-1,3-diketones, α-Substituted Methylamines and Sodium Nitrite through α-Nitrosation of Enaminones.

    PubMed

    Yugandar, S; Konda, S; Parameshwarappa, G; Ila, H

    2016-07-01

    An efficient one-pot synthesis of a series of diversely functionalized trisubstituted 4(5)het(aroyl)-2,5(4)-het(aryl)/alkylimidazoles from readily available 1,3-bishet(aryl)monothio-1,3-diketones has been reported. This novel sequential one-pot, three step protocol, wherein three new carbon nitrogen bonds are formed in contiguous fashion, involves in situ generation of enaminones by reaction of monothio-1,3-diketones with α-substituted methylamines, followed by their α-nitrosation with sodium nitrite and subsequent base mediated intramolecular heterocyclization of the resulting α-hydroxyiminoimines to trisubstituted imidazoles in high yields under mild conditions. These newly prepared 4(5)-het(aroyl)-5(4)-het(aryl)/alkylimidazoles are shown to exist as tautomeric mixture, however, their subsequent alkylation with methyl iodide in the presence of potassium carbonate affords 1-N-methy-2,5-bishet(aryl)-4-het(aroyl)imidazoles in highly regioselective fashion in most of the cases. Synthesis of few 4(5)-(2-hydroxyphenyl)-2,5(4)-substituted imidazoles, which are known to be good coordinating ligands, has also been reported. A probable mechanism for the formation of these imidazoles from hydroxyiminoimine intermediates has also been suggested. PMID:27194455

  1. One-Pot Synthesis of 2,4,5-Trisubstituted Imidazoles via [2 + 2 + 1] Cycloannulation of 1,3-Bishet(aryl)-monothio-1,3-diketones, α-Substituted Methylamines and Sodium Nitrite through α-Nitrosation of Enaminones.

    PubMed

    Yugandar, S; Konda, S; Parameshwarappa, G; Ila, H

    2016-07-01

    An efficient one-pot synthesis of a series of diversely functionalized trisubstituted 4(5)het(aroyl)-2,5(4)-het(aryl)/alkylimidazoles from readily available 1,3-bishet(aryl)monothio-1,3-diketones has been reported. This novel sequential one-pot, three step protocol, wherein three new carbon nitrogen bonds are formed in contiguous fashion, involves in situ generation of enaminones by reaction of monothio-1,3-diketones with α-substituted methylamines, followed by their α-nitrosation with sodium nitrite and subsequent base mediated intramolecular heterocyclization of the resulting α-hydroxyiminoimines to trisubstituted imidazoles in high yields under mild conditions. These newly prepared 4(5)-het(aroyl)-5(4)-het(aryl)/alkylimidazoles are shown to exist as tautomeric mixture, however, their subsequent alkylation with methyl iodide in the presence of potassium carbonate affords 1-N-methy-2,5-bishet(aryl)-4-het(aroyl)imidazoles in highly regioselective fashion in most of the cases. Synthesis of few 4(5)-(2-hydroxyphenyl)-2,5(4)-substituted imidazoles, which are known to be good coordinating ligands, has also been reported. A probable mechanism for the formation of these imidazoles from hydroxyiminoimine intermediates has also been suggested.

  2. The Effects of Physicochemical Factors and Cell Density on Nitrite Transformation in a Lipid-Rich Chlorella.

    PubMed

    Liang, Fang; Du, Kui; Wen, Xiaobin; Luo, Liming; Geng, Yahong; Li, Yeguang

    2015-12-28

    To understand the effects of physicochemical factors on nitrite transformation by microalgae, a lipid-rich Chlorella with high nitrite tolerance was cultured with 8 mmol/l sodium nitrite as sole nitrogen source under different conditions. The results showed that nitrite transformation was mainly dependent on the metabolic activities of algal cells rather than oxidation of nitrite by dissolved oxygen. Light intensity, temperature, pH, NaHCO3 concentrations, and initial cell densities had significant effects on the rate of nitrite transformation. Single-factor experiments revealed that the optimum conditions for nitrite transformation were light intensity: 300 μmol/m(2); temperature: 30°C; pH: 7-8; NaHCO3 concentration: 2.0 g/l; and initial cell density: 0.15 g/l; and the highest nitrite transformation rate of 1.36 mmol/l/d was achieved. There was a positive correlation between nitrite transformation rate and the growth of Chlorella. The relationship between nitrite transformation rate (mg/l/d) and biomass productivity (g/l/d) could be described by the regression equation y = 61.3x (R(2) = 0.9665), meaning that 61.3 mg N element was assimilated by 1.0 g dry biomass on average, which indicated that the nitrite transformation is a process of consuming nitrite as nitrogen source by Chlorella. The results demonstrated that the Chlorella suspension was able to assimilate nitrite efficiently, which implied the feasibility of using flue gas for mass production of Chlorella without preliminary removal of NOX.

  3. Prevalence of nitrite and nitrate contents and its effect on edible bird nest's color.

    PubMed

    Paydar, Mohammadjavad; Wong, Yi Li; Wong, Won Fen; Hamdi, Omer Abdalla Ahmed; Kadir, Noraniza Abd; Looi, Chung Yeng

    2013-12-01

    Edible bird nests (EBNs) are important ethnomedicinal commodity in the Chinese community. Recently, But and others showed that the white EBNs could turn red by vapors from sodium nitrite (NaNO2) in acidic condition or from bird soil, but this color-changing agent remained elusive. The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of nitrite and nitrate contents and its affects on EBN's color. EBNs were collected from swiftlet houses or caves in Southeast Asia. White EBNs were exposed to vapor from NaNO2 in 2% HCl, or bird soil. The levels of nitrite (NO2-) and nitrate (NO3-) in EBNs were determined through ion chromatography analysis. Vapors from NaNO2 in 2% HCl or bird soil stained white bird nests to brown/red colors, which correlated with increase nitrite and nitrate levels. Moreover, naturally formed cave-EBNs (darker in color) also contained higher nitrite and nitrate levels compared to white house-EBNs, suggesting a relationship between nitrite and nitrate with EBN's color. Of note, we detected no presence of hemoglobin in red "blood" nest. Using infrared spectra analysis, we demonstrated that red/brown cave-EBNs contained higher intensities of C-N and N-O bonds compared to white house-EBNs. Together, our study suggested that the color of EBNs was associated with the prevalence of the nitrite and nitrate contents. PMID:24279333

  4. Immediate Reduction of Salmonella enterica Serotype Typhimurium Viability via Membrane Destabilization following Exposure to Multiple-Hurdle Treatments with Heated, Acidified Organic Acid Salt Solutions▿†

    PubMed Central

    Milillo, S. R.; Martin, E.; Muthaiyan, A.; Ricke, S. C.

    2011-01-01

    The antimicrobial activity of organic acids in combination with nonchemical treatments was evaluated for inactivation of Salmonella enterica serotype Typhimurium within 1 min. It was observed that the effectiveness of the multiple-hurdle treatments was temperature (P ≤ 0.05) and pH (P ≤ 0.05) dependent and corresponded to the degree of organic acid lipophilicity (sodium acetate being least effective and sodium propionate being the most effective). This led to the hypothesis that the loss in viability was due at least in part to cell membrane disruption. Evaluation of osmotic response, potassium ion leakage, and transmission electron micrographs confirmed treatment effects on the cell membrane. Interestingly, all treatments, even those with no effect on viability, such as with sodium acetate, resulted in measurable cellular stress. Microarray experiments explored the specific response of S. Typhimurium to sodium acetate and sodium propionate, the most similar of the tested treatments in terms of pKa and ionic strength, and found little difference in the changes in gene expression following exposure to either, despite their very different effects on viability. Taken together, the results reported support our hypothesis that treatment with heated, acidified, organic acid salt solutions for 1 min causes loss of S. Typhimurium viability at least in part by membrane damage and that the degree of effectiveness can be correlated with lipophilicity of the organic acid. Overall, the data presented here indicate that a combined thermal, acidified sodium propionate treatment can provide an effective antimicrobial treatment against Salmonella. PMID:21478311

  5. Acute, sublethal cyanide poisoning in mice is ameliorated by nitrite alone: complications arising from concomitant administration of nitrite and thiosulfate as an antidotal combination.

    PubMed

    Cambal, Leah K; Swanson, Megan R; Yuan, Quan; Weitz, Andrew C; Li, Hui-Hua; Pitt, Bruce R; Pearce, Linda L; Peterson, Jim

    2011-07-18

    Sodium nitrite alone is shown to ameliorate sublethal cyanide toxicity in mice when given from ∼1 h before until 20 min after the toxic dose as demonstrated by the recovery of righting ability. An optimum dose (12 mg/kg) was determined to significantly relieve cyanide toxicity (5.0 mg/kg) when administered to mice intraperitoneally. Nitrite so administered was shown to rapidly produce NO in the bloodsteam as judged by the dose-dependent appearance of EPR signals attributable to nitrosylhemoglobin and methemoglobin. It is argued that antagonism of cyanide inhibition of cytochrome c oxidase by NO is the crucial antidotal activity rather than the methemoglobin-forming action of nitrite. Concomitant addition of sodium thiosulfate to nitrite-treated blood resulted in the detection of sulfidomethemoblobin by EPR spectroscopy. Sulfide is a product of thiosulfate hydrolysis and, like cyanide, is known to be a potent inhibitor of cytochrome c oxidase, the effects of the two inhibitors being essentially additive under standard assay conditions rather than dominated by either one. The findings afford a plausible explanation for an observed detrimental effect in mice associated with the use of the standard nitrite-thiosulfate combination therapy at sublethal levels of cyanide intoxication.

  6. [Electrical activity and circulatory effects of nitrite in the rat cerebrum].

    PubMed

    Shumilova, T E; Smirnov, A G; Shereshkov, V I; Fedorova, M A; Nozdrachev, A D

    2015-01-01

    An association between the cerebrum electrical activity (CEA) in rats, blood supply of its cortex microregions (linear blood flow), and general cerebrum blood flow under acute nitrite hypoxia was studied. The phase character of the change in hemodynamic indices and the total capacity of electroencephalography (EEG) spectrum for 75 min after sodium nitrite introduction (30 mg/kg of body weight) was detected. The first phase (30 min) was associated with cerebrum adaptation to hypotension caused by nitrite and was completed by EEG normalization. The second phase was characterized by pathological EEG changes (in spite of restoration of hemodynamics in the cerebrum) caused by the growth of oxygen debt in the nervous tissue as a result of a decrease in the blood oxygen capacity by 60-75 min of the effect of nitrite.

  7. Haematological and ion regulatory effects of nitrite in the air-breathing snakehead fish Channa striata.

    PubMed

    Lefevre, Sjannie; Jensen, Frank B; Huong, Do T T; Wang, Tobias; Phuong, Nguyen T; Bayley, Mark

    2012-08-15

    The tolerance and effects of nitrite on ion balance and haematology were investigated in the striped snakehead, Channa striata Bloch 1793, which is an air-breathing fish with reduced gills of importance for aquaculture in South East Asia. C. striata was nitrite tolerant with a 96 h LC50 of 4.7 mM. Effects of sub-lethal exposures to nitrite (0mM, 1.4mM, and 3.0mM) were determined during a 7-day exposure period. Plasma nitrite increased, but the internal concentration remained well below ambient levels. Extracellular nitrate rose by several mM, indicating that a large proportion of the nitrite taken up was converted to nitrate. Nitrite reacted with erythrocyte haemoglobin (Hb) causing methaemoglobin (metHb) to increase to 30% and nitrosylhaemoglobin (HbNO) to increase to 10% of total Hb. Both metHb and HbNO stabilised after 4 days, and functional Hb levels accordingly never fell below 60% of total Hb. Haematocrit and total Hb were unaffected by nitrite. Although the effects of nitrite exposure seemed minor in terms of plasma nitrite and metHb increases, ion balance was strongly affected. In the high exposure group, total osmolality decreased from 320 mOsm to 260 mOsm, and plasma sodium from 150 mM to 120 mM, while plasma chloride fell from 105 mM to 60mM and plasma bicarbonate rose from 12 mM in controls to 20mM in exposed fish. The extreme changes in ion balance in C. striata are different from the response reported in other fish, and further studies are needed to investigate the mechanism behind the observed changes in regulation. PMID:22516674

  8. Haematological and ion regulatory effects of nitrite in the air-breathing snakehead fish Channa striata.

    PubMed

    Lefevre, Sjannie; Jensen, Frank B; Huong, Do T T; Wang, Tobias; Phuong, Nguyen T; Bayley, Mark

    2012-08-15

    The tolerance and effects of nitrite on ion balance and haematology were investigated in the striped snakehead, Channa striata Bloch 1793, which is an air-breathing fish with reduced gills of importance for aquaculture in South East Asia. C. striata was nitrite tolerant with a 96 h LC50 of 4.7 mM. Effects of sub-lethal exposures to nitrite (0mM, 1.4mM, and 3.0mM) were determined during a 7-day exposure period. Plasma nitrite increased, but the internal concentration remained well below ambient levels. Extracellular nitrate rose by several mM, indicating that a large proportion of the nitrite taken up was converted to nitrate. Nitrite reacted with erythrocyte haemoglobin (Hb) causing methaemoglobin (metHb) to increase to 30% and nitrosylhaemoglobin (HbNO) to increase to 10% of total Hb. Both metHb and HbNO stabilised after 4 days, and functional Hb levels accordingly never fell below 60% of total Hb. Haematocrit and total Hb were unaffected by nitrite. Although the effects of nitrite exposure seemed minor in terms of plasma nitrite and metHb increases, ion balance was strongly affected. In the high exposure group, total osmolality decreased from 320 mOsm to 260 mOsm, and plasma sodium from 150 mM to 120 mM, while plasma chloride fell from 105 mM to 60mM and plasma bicarbonate rose from 12 mM in controls to 20mM in exposed fish. The extreme changes in ion balance in C. striata are different from the response reported in other fish, and further studies are needed to investigate the mechanism behind the observed changes in regulation.

  9. Toxicity of nitrite to fish: a review

    SciTech Connect

    Lewis, W.M. Jr.; Morris, D.P.

    1986-03-01

    Nitrite, an intermediate in the oxidation of ammonium to nitrate, changes hemoglobin to methemoglobin, which does not carry oxygen; nitrite may thus cause anoxia in fish and other aquatic organisms. The published literature on nitrite toxicity to fish, which consists of about 40 papers, shows that the ratio of the 24-h LC50 (concentration lethal to half of the test organisms in 24 h) to the 96-h LC50 has a median value of 2.0 and is fairly uniform across species; toxicity tests of differing duration can therefore be standardized to a common duration. In general, chronic effects are difficult to detect at concentrations below one-fifth of the 96-h LC50. Most fish concentrate nitrite in fresh water; chloride in the external environment offsets the toxicity of nitrite by competing with nitrite for uptake through the chloride cells of the gills. Bicarbonate also reduces the toxicity of nitrite, but it is less than 1% as effective as chloride. Calcium reduces the toxicity of nitrite, but much less than chloride; the effects of other metal cations have not been studied. Hydrogen ion concentration of the medium has not been shown to have a discrete effect on the toxicity of nitrite except at extreme concentrations uncharacteristic of the environments in which fish ordinarily live. Nitrite toxicity is exacerbated by low oxygen concentrations because nitrite reduces the oxygen-carrying capacity of the blood. Very small fish seem less sensitive to nitrite than fish of intermediate or large size. Present evidence suggests that salmonids are among the fishes most sensitive to nitrite. The least-sensitive species tested thus far are the largemouth bass Micropterus salmoides and bluegill Lepomis macrochirus; the largemouth bass does not concentrate nitrite.

  10. Acidifier application rate impacts on ammonia emissions from US roaster chicken houses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shah, Sanjay B.; Grimes, Jesse L.; Oviedo-Rondón, Edgar O.; Westerman, Philip W.

    2014-08-01

    Due to its potential environmental and public health impacts, emissions of ammonia (NH3) as well as several other gases from US livestock farms may be regulated. Broiler houses are important sources of NH3 emissions. However, there are no emissions data from roaster (8-12 wk old broilers, ˜4 kg ea.) houses. Producers treat the litter in broiler houses with acidifiers, such as sodium bisulfate (SBS, NaHSO4) to reduce ammonia production and protect bird health. However, there is very little data on the effect of acidifiers, particularly at high application rates on ammonia emissions. The impact of different SBS application rates [High (0.95-1.46 kg m-2, whole house), Medium (0.73 kg m-2, whole house), Low (0.37-0.49 kg m-2, whole house), and Control (0.37-0.49 kg m-2, brood chamber)] on ammonia emissions was evaluated in commercial roaster houses over 22 months spanning eight flocks. Ammonia emission from each fan was measured with an acid scrubber that operated only when the fan operated. Emissions were calculated using >95% measured data with the rest being estimated using robust methods. Exhaust ammonia-N concentrations were inversely correlated with the SBS application rates. Emission rates on animal unit (AU, where 1 AU = 500 kg live-mass) basis (ER, g d-1 AU-1) were reduced by 27, 13, and 5%, respectively, in the High, Medium, and Low treatments vs. the Control treatment (mean: 100 g d-1 AU-1, range: 86-114 g d-1 AU-1). Emission rates for the Control treatment measured in this study on roasters were mostly higher than ERs in the literature. Differences in ERs are not only due to diet, environmental and management conditions, but also due to measurement methods.

  11. Spectrophotometric study and potentiometric titration between sulfite and nitrite ions using acetaldehyde complex of nitroprusside as a carrier

    SciTech Connect

    Ahmed, Y.Z.; Abd-Elmottalb, M.

    1985-11-01

    A complex between sodium nitroprusside (NP) and acetaldehyde of 1:1 in aqueous solution of pH 10 has been prepared and used as an analytical reagent for the spectrophotometric determination of sulfite and nitrite ions. Nitrite ion can be titrated against sulfite ion and vise versa in equivalent amounts with high accuracy in the presence of the acetaldehyde complex of nitroprusside as a carrier using a potentiometric titration technique. 9 references, 3 figures, 2 tables.

  12. Nitrite and nitrate content in meat products and estimated intake in Denmark from 1998 to 2006.

    PubMed

    Leth, T; Fagt, S; Nielsen, S; Andersen, R

    2008-10-01

    The content of nitrite and nitrate in cured meat products has been monitored in Denmark seven times between 1995 and 2006. The maximum permitted added amounts of sodium nitrite in Denmark (60 mg kg(-1) for most products up to 150 mg kg(-1) for special products) have not been exceeded, except for a few samples back in 2002. The intake, mean and intake distribution of sodium nitrite have been calculated from 1998 to 2006 with data from the Danish dietary survey conducted in 2000-02 on Danes from four to 75 years of age. The amounts used by industry have been relatively stable through the whole period with levels varying between 6 and 20 mg sodium nitrite kg(-1) with sausages, meat for open sandwiches and salami-type sausages being the greatest contributors. The mean intake of sodium nitrate was around 1 mg day(-1), which is very low compared with the total intake of 61 mg day(-1). The mean intake of sodium nitrite was 0.017 and 0.014, 0.009 and 0.008, and 0.007 and 0.003 mg kg(-1) body weight day(-1) for men and women in the age groups 4-5, 6-14 and 15-75 years, respectively, which was much lower than the acceptable daily intake (ADI) of 0.09 mg kg(-1) body weight day(-1). The 99th percentile for the group of 4-year-olds was 0.107 and 0.123 mg kg(-1) body weight day(-1) for boys and girls, respectively, and the 95th percentile was 0.057 and 0.073 mg kg(-1) body weight day(-1) for boys and girls, respectively, highest for the girls. With fewer than 100 boys and girls in the 4-5-year age group, only very few persons were responsible for the high intake. The conversion of nitrate to nitrite in the saliva and the degradation of nitrite during production and storage must also be considered when evaluating the intake of nitrite. PMID:18608491

  13. Preservation of acidified cucumbers with a natural preservative combination of fumaric acid and allyl isothiocyanate that target lactic acid bacteria and yeasts.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Díaz, I M; McFeeters, R F

    2010-05-01

    Without the addition of preservative compounds cucumbers acidified with 150 mM acetic acid with pH adjusted to 3.5 typically undergo fermentation by lactic acid bacteria. Fumaric acid (20 mM) inhibited growth of Lactobacillus plantarum and the lactic acid bacteria present on fresh cucumbers, but spoilage then occurred due to growth of fermentative yeasts, which produced ethanol in the cucumbers. Allyl isothiocyanate (2 mM) prevented growth of Zygosaccharomyces globiformis, which has been responsible for commercial pickle spoilage, as well as the yeasts that were present on fresh cucumbers. However, allyl isothiocyanate did not prevent growth of Lactobacillus plantarum. When these compounds were added in combination to acidified cucumbers, the cucumbers were successfully preserved as indicated by the fact that neither yeasts or lactic acid bacteria increased in numbers nor were lactic acid or ethanol produced by microorganisms when cucumbers were stored at 30 degrees C for at least 2 mo. This combination of 2 naturally occurring preservative compounds may serve as an alternative approach to the use of sodium benzoate or sodium metabisulfite for preservation of acidified vegetables without a thermal process.

  14. Nitrate Reductase Regulates Expression of Nitrite Uptake and Nitrite Reductase Activities in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii 1

    PubMed Central

    Galván, Aurora; Cárdenas, Jacobo; Fernández, Emilio

    1992-01-01

    In Chlamydomonas reinhardtii mutants defective at the structural locus for nitrate reductase (nit-1) or at loci for biosynthesis of the molybdopterin cofactor (nit-3, nit-4, or nit-5 and nit-6), both nitrite uptake and nitrite reductase activities were repressed in ammonium-grown cells and expressed at high amounts in nitrogen-free media or in media containing nitrate or nitrite. In contrast, wild-type cells required nitrate induction for expression of high levels of both activities. In mutants defective at the regulatory locus for nitrate reductase (nit-2), very low levels of nitrite uptake and nitrite reductase activities were expressed even in the presence of nitrate or nitrite. Both restoration of nitrate reductase activity in mutants defective at nit-1, nit-3, and nit-4 by isolating diploid strains among them and transformation of a structural mutant upon integration of the wild-type nit-1 gene gave rise to the wild-type expression pattern for nitrite uptake and nitrite reductase activities. Conversely, inactivation of nitrate reductase by tungstate treatment in nitrate, nitrite, or nitrogen-free media made wild-type cells respond like nitrate reductase-deficient mutants with respect to the expression of nitrite uptake and nitrite reductase activities. Our results indicate that nit-2 is a regulatory locus for both the nitrite uptake system and nitrite reductase, and that the nitrate reductase enzyme plays an important role in the regulation of the expression of both enzyme activities. PMID:16668656

  15. Use of gamma radiation on control of Clostridium botulinum in mortadella formulated with different nitrite levels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dutra, Monalisa Pereira; Aleixo, Glécia de Cássia; Ramos, Alcinéia de Lemos Souza; Silva, Maurício Henriques Louzada; Pereira, Marcio Tadeu; Piccoli, Roberta Hilsdorf; Ramos, Eduardo Mendes

    2016-02-01

    This study investigated the effects of applying different doses of gamma radiation (0, 10 and 20 kGy) on Clostridium botulinum spores (107 spores/g) inoculated into mortadellas with different nitrite contents (0, 150 and 300 ppm). We also evaluated the order of application of heat (cooking) and irradiation processing. The products were evaluated for survival of C. botulinum, pH, water activity (Aw), redox potential (Eh) and residual nitrite content. In the non-irradiated raw batters, almost all spores could be recovered when no nitrite was added and only half was recovered with the addition of 150 ppm of nitrite. The use of 150 ppm of nitrite was able to inhibit the germination or growth of C. botulinum in non-irradiated cooked mortadellas after 48 h of processing. However, after 30 days of chilling storage (4 °C), it was possible to recover 105 UFC/g of this microorganism. The gamma irradiation (>10 kGy) had a positive effect on the inactivation of C. botulinum in mortadellas, independent of the sodium nitrite level used and the cooking/irradiation processing order.

  16. Production of cured meat color in nitrite-free Harbin red sausage by Lactobacillus fermentum fermentation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xue; Kong, Baohua; Xiong, Youling L

    2007-12-01

    Lactobacillus fermentum was substituted for nitrite to produce cured pink color in a Chinese-style sausage. Treatments included inoculations (10(4), 10(6), and 10(8)CFU/g meat) followed by fermentation at 30°C for 8h and then at 4°C for 16h. Control sausage (with sodium nitrite, 60mg/kg meat) was cured at 4°C for 24h without L. fermentum. The UV-Vis spectra of pigment extract from L. fermentum-treated sausage were identical to that of nitrosylmyoglobin (NO-Mb) formed in nitrite-treated control. The NO-Mb concentration and the colorimetric a(∗) value of sausage treated with 10(8)CFU/g meat of L. fermentum essentially replicated those in nitrite-cured meat. Free amino acid content in sausage treated with L. fermentum was greater and the pH slightly lower compared with the nitrite-cured control sample. This study showed that L. fermentum has the potential to substitute for nitrite in the sausage production.

  17. Anaerobic digestion of acidified slurry fractions derived from different solid-liquid separation methods.

    PubMed

    Sutaryo, Sutaryo; Ward, Alastair James; Møller, Henrik Bjarne

    2013-02-01

    Batch assays investigating the ultimate methane yields (B(0)) of acidified slurry fractions produced with different solid-liquid slurry separation techniques were done. The result showed that the anaerobic digestion (AD) process was inhibited when raw and liquid fractions of sow, pig and dairy cow acidified slurry are digested, but AD treating solid fractions (SF) acidified slurry showed no sulphide inhibition. The B(0) of SF acidified sow slurry increased significantly with increasing screen size in the screw press. No significant effect of acidification processes on B(0) of SF dairy cow slurry (DCS) was observed. The ultimate methane yields of SF acidified DCS and SF non acidified DCS were 278±13 and 289±1LkgVS(-1), while in term of fresh weigh substrate were 59±2.8 and 59±0.3Lkgsubstrate(-1), respectively. PMID:23313767

  18. Influence of acid tolerance responses on survival, growth, and thermal cross-protection of Escherichia coli O157:H7 in acidified media and fruit juices.

    PubMed

    Ryu, J H; Beuchat, L R

    1998-12-22

    A study was done to determine survival and growth characteristics of acid-adapted, acid-shocked, and control cells of Escherichia coli O157:H7 inoculated into tryptic soy broth (TSB) acidified with organic acids and three commercial brands of apple cider and orange juice. The three types of cells behaved similarly in TSB acidified with acetic acid; however, in TSB (pH 3.9) acidified with lactic acid, acid-adapted cells were more tolerant than acid-shocked cells which, in turn, were more tolerant than control cells. The ability of the three types of cells to grow after inoculation into acidified TSB, then plated on tryptic soy agar containing sodium chloride was determined. Tolerance of acid-adapted cells and, less markedly, acid-shocked cells to sodium chloride was diminished, compared to control cells. The pathogen showed extraordinary tolerance to the low pH of apple cider and orange juice held at 5 or 25 degrees C for up to 42 days. Growth occurred in one brand of apple cider (pH 3.98) incubated at 25 degrees C. Regardless of test parameters, there was no indication that cell types differed in tolerance to the acidic environment in apple cider or orange juice. Survival of control, acid-adapted, and acid-shocked cells heated in apple cider and orange juice was studied. Within each apple cider or orange juice, D(52 degrees C)-values of acid-adapted cells were considerably higher than those of acid-shocked or control cells, which indicates that heat tolerance can be substantially enhanced by acid adaptation compared to acid shock. PMID:9926995

  19. Sustained release nitrite therapy results in myocardial protection in a porcine model of metabolic syndrome with peripheral vascular disease

    PubMed Central

    Bradley, Jessica M.; Islam, Kazi N.; Polhemus, David J.; Donnarumma, Erminia; Brewster, Luke P.; Tao, Ya-Xiong; Goodchild, Traci T.

    2015-01-01

    Metabolic syndrome (MetS) reduces endothelial nitric oxide (NO) bioavailability and exacerbates vascular dysfunction in patients with preexisting vascular diseases. Nitrite, a storage form of NO, can mediate vascular function during pathological conditions when endogenous NO is reduced. The aims of the present study were to characterize the effects of severe MetS and obesity on dyslipidemia, myocardial oxidative stress, and endothelial NO synthase (eNOS) regulation in the obese Ossabaw swine (OS) model and to examine the effects of a novel, sustained-release formulation of sodium nitrite (SR-nitrite) on coronary vascular reactivity and myocardial redox status in obese OS subjected to critical limb ischemia (CLI). After 6 mo of an atherogenic diet, obese OS displayed a MetS phenotype. Obese OS had decreased eNOS functionality and NO bioavailability. In addition, obese OS exhibited increased oxidative stress and a significant reduction in antioxidant enzymes. The efficacy of SR-nitrite therapy was examined in obese OS subjected to CLI. After 3 wk of treatment, SR-nitrite (80 mg·kg−1·day−1 bid po) increased myocardial nitrite levels and eNOS function. Treatment with SR-nitrite reduced myocardial oxidative stress while increasing myocardial antioxidant capacity. Ex vivo assessment of vascular reactivity of left anterior descending coronary artery segments demonstrated marked improvement in vasoreactivity to sodium nitroprusside but not to substance P and bradykinin in SR-nitrite-treated animals compared with placebo-treated animals. In conclusion, in a clinically relevant, large-animal model of MetS and CLI, treatment with SR-nitrite enhanced myocardial NO bioavailability, attenuated oxidative stress, and improved ex vivo coronary artery vasorelaxation. PMID:25957218

  20. Sustained release nitrite therapy results in myocardial protection in a porcine model of metabolic syndrome with peripheral vascular disease.

    PubMed

    Bradley, Jessica M; Islam, Kazi N; Polhemus, David J; Donnarumma, Erminia; Brewster, Luke P; Tao, Ya-Xiong; Goodchild, Traci T; Lefer, David J

    2015-07-15

    Metabolic syndrome (MetS) reduces endothelial nitric oxide (NO) bioavailability and exacerbates vascular dysfunction in patients with preexisting vascular diseases. Nitrite, a storage form of NO, can mediate vascular function during pathological conditions when endogenous NO is reduced. The aims of the present study were to characterize the effects of severe MetS and obesity on dyslipidemia, myocardial oxidative stress, and endothelial NO synthase (eNOS) regulation in the obese Ossabaw swine (OS) model and to examine the effects of a novel, sustained-release formulation of sodium nitrite (SR-nitrite) on coronary vascular reactivity and myocardial redox status in obese OS subjected to critical limb ischemia (CLI). After 6 mo of an atherogenic diet, obese OS displayed a MetS phenotype. Obese OS had decreased eNOS functionality and NO bioavailability. In addition, obese OS exhibited increased oxidative stress and a significant reduction in antioxidant enzymes. The efficacy of SR-nitrite therapy was examined in obese OS subjected to CLI. After 3 wk of treatment, SR-nitrite (80 mg · kg(-1) · day(-1) bid po) increased myocardial nitrite levels and eNOS function. Treatment with SR-nitrite reduced myocardial oxidative stress while increasing myocardial antioxidant capacity. Ex vivo assessment of vascular reactivity of left anterior descending coronary artery segments demonstrated marked improvement in vasoreactivity to sodium nitroprusside but not to substance P and bradykinin in SR-nitrite-treated animals compared with placebo-treated animals. In conclusion, in a clinically relevant, large-animal model of MetS and CLI, treatment with SR-nitrite enhanced myocardial NO bioavailability, attenuated oxidative stress, and improved ex vivo coronary artery vasorelaxation.

  1. Effects of acidifying reagents on microwave treatment of dairy manure.

    PubMed

    Srinivasan, Asha; Nkansah-Boadu, Frank; Liao, Ping H; Lo, Kwang V

    2014-01-01

    Dairy manure, acidified using organic acids (acetic, oxalic, and citric acid) were treated with microwave enhanced advanced oxidation process (MW/H2O2-AOP). The effect of a mixture of oxalic acid and commonly used mineral acids (sulfuric and hydrochloric acid) on MW/H2O2-AOP was also examined. Substantial amounts of phosphorus were released under MW/H2O2-AOP, regardless of organic acid or mineral acid used. All three organic acids were good acidifying reagents; however, only oxalic acid could remove free calcium ion in the solution, and improve settleability of dairy manure. The MW/H2O2-AOP and calcium removal process could be combined into a single-stage process, which could release phosphate, solubilize solids and remove calcium from dairy manure at the same time. A mixture of oxalic acid and mineral acid produced the maximum volume of clear supernatant and had an ideal molar ratio of calcium to magnesium for effective struvite (magnesium ammonium phosphate) crystallization process. A single-stage MW/H2O2-AOP would simplify the process and reduce mineral acid consumption compared to a two-stage operation. The results of a pilot scale study demonstrate that MW/H2O2-AOP is effective in treating manure and recovering resource from dairy farms.

  2. The Kinetic Aspects of the Interaction of Nitrite Ions with Sulfanilic Acid and 1-Naphthylamine in Aqueous and Micellar Media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korneeva, O. I.; Chernova, R. K.; Doronin, S. Yu.

    2008-04-01

    The kinetics of the reaction of nitrite ions with sulfanilic acid and 1-naphthylamine in aqueous and micellar (sodium dodecyl sulfate) media was studied step-by-step. The diazotization of sulfanilic acid with the nitrite ion was found to occur virtually instantaneously. Anionic surfactant micelles did not influence the rate of this reaction. The calculated effective rate constants and activation energies of the azo coupling reaction between synthesized sulfophenyldiazonium and 1-naphthylamine showed that the passage from water into the micellar medium decelerated the reaction. It was found that sodium dodecyl sulfate micelles played the role of a reagent separator.

  3. The negative phonon confinement effect in nanoscopic sodium nitrite.

    PubMed

    Koroleva, E Yu; Nuzhnyy, D; Pokorny, J; Kamba, S; Kumzerov, Yu A; Vakhrushev, S B; Petzelt, J

    2009-09-30

    A nanocomposite of porous glass and a NaNO(2) ferroelectric (channels of approximately 7 nm diameter) was studied using infrared reflectivity, THz transmission and Raman spectroscopy as a function of temperature in the range of 300-500 K, including the ferroelectric transition. From the infrared and THz response the effective dielectric function was calculated and compared with the dielectric functions calculated from the Bruggeman and Lichtenecker models of the effective medium, using the known data on the polar phonon modes of the NaNO(2) single crystals. The results show good qualitative agreement, indicating that the stiffening of the effective modes is due to local depolarization fields on the glass-ferroelectric interfaces. The nonpolar Raman modes show no substantial modification compared to those of the bulk NaNO(2). Some signatures of the ferroelectric transition were even seen. The results indicate that the intrinsic size effect (phonon confinement) is negligible in this nanocomposite.

  4. Implications of Decreased Nitrite Concentrations on Clostridium perfringens Outgrowth during Cooling of Ready-to-Eat Meats.

    PubMed

    Myers, Megan I; Sebranek, Joseph G; Dickson, James S; Shaw, Angela M; Tarté, Rodrigo; Adams, Kristin R; Neibuhr, Steve

    2016-01-01

    Increased popularity of natural and organic processed meats can be attributed to the growing consumer demand for preservative-free foods, including processed meats. To meet this consumer demand, meat processors have begun using celery juice concentrate in place of sodium nitrite to create products labeled as no-nitrate or no-nitrite-added meat products while maintaining the characteristics unique to conventionally cured processed meats. Because of flavor limitations, natural cures with celery concentrate typically provide lower ingoing nitrite concentrations for ready-to-eat processed meats than do conventional cures, which could allow for increased growth of pathogens, such as Clostridium perfringens, during cooked product cooling such as that required by the U.S. Department of Agriculture. The objective of this study was to investigate the implications associated with reduced nitrite concentrations for preventing C. perfringens outgrowth during a typical cooling cycle used for cooked products. Nitrite treatments of 0, 50, and 100 ppm were tested in a broth system inoculated with a three-strain C. perfringens cocktail and heated with a simulated product thermal process followed by a typical cooling-stabilization process. The nitrite concentration of 50 ppm was more effective for preventing C. perfringens outgrowth than was 0 ppm but was not as effective as 100 ppm. The interaction between nitrite and temperature significantly affected (P < 0.05) C. perfringens outgrowth in both total population and number of vegetative cells. Both temperature and nitrite concentration significantly affected (P < 0.05) C. perfringens spore survival, but the interaction between nitrite and temperature did not have a significant effect (P > 0.05) on spore outgrowth. Results indicate that decreased nitrite concentrations (50 ppm) have increased potential for total C. perfringens population outgrowth during cooling and may require additional protective measures, such as faster chilling

  5. Implications of Decreased Nitrite Concentrations on Clostridium perfringens Outgrowth during Cooling of Ready-to-Eat Meats.

    PubMed

    Myers, Megan I; Sebranek, Joseph G; Dickson, James S; Shaw, Angela M; Tarté, Rodrigo; Adams, Kristin R; Neibuhr, Steve

    2016-01-01

    Increased popularity of natural and organic processed meats can be attributed to the growing consumer demand for preservative-free foods, including processed meats. To meet this consumer demand, meat processors have begun using celery juice concentrate in place of sodium nitrite to create products labeled as no-nitrate or no-nitrite-added meat products while maintaining the characteristics unique to conventionally cured processed meats. Because of flavor limitations, natural cures with celery concentrate typically provide lower ingoing nitrite concentrations for ready-to-eat processed meats than do conventional cures, which could allow for increased growth of pathogens, such as Clostridium perfringens, during cooked product cooling such as that required by the U.S. Department of Agriculture. The objective of this study was to investigate the implications associated with reduced nitrite concentrations for preventing C. perfringens outgrowth during a typical cooling cycle used for cooked products. Nitrite treatments of 0, 50, and 100 ppm were tested in a broth system inoculated with a three-strain C. perfringens cocktail and heated with a simulated product thermal process followed by a typical cooling-stabilization process. The nitrite concentration of 50 ppm was more effective for preventing C. perfringens outgrowth than was 0 ppm but was not as effective as 100 ppm. The interaction between nitrite and temperature significantly affected (P < 0.05) C. perfringens outgrowth in both total population and number of vegetative cells. Both temperature and nitrite concentration significantly affected (P < 0.05) C. perfringens spore survival, but the interaction between nitrite and temperature did not have a significant effect (P > 0.05) on spore outgrowth. Results indicate that decreased nitrite concentrations (50 ppm) have increased potential for total C. perfringens population outgrowth during cooling and may require additional protective measures, such as faster chilling

  6. Nitrates, Nitrites, and Health. Bulletin 750.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Deeb, Barbara S.; Sloan, Kenneth W.

    This review is intended to assess available literature in order to define the range of nitrate/nitrite effects on animals. Though the literature deals primarily with livestock and experimental animals, much of the contemporary research is concerned with human nitrite intoxication. Thus, the effects on man are discussed where appropriate. Some of…

  7. DFT Study on Nitrite Reduction Mechanism in Copper-Containing Nitrite Reductase.

    PubMed

    Lintuluoto, Masami; Lintuluoto, Juha M

    2016-01-12

    Dissimilatory reduction of nitrite by copper-containing nitrite reductase (CuNiR) is an important step in the geobiochemical nitrogen cycle. The proposed mechanisms for the reduction of nitrite by CuNiRs include intramolecular electron and proton transfers, and these two events are understood to couple. Proton-coupled electron transfer is one of the key processes in enzyme reactions. We investigated the geometric structure of bound nitrite and the mechanism of nitrite reduction on CuNiR using density functional theory calculations. Also, the proton transfer pathway, the key residues, and their roles in the reaction mechanism were clarified in this study. In our results, the reduction of T2 Cu site promotes the proton transfer, and the hydrogen bond network around the binding site has an important role not only to stabilize the nitrite binding but also to promote the proton transfer to nitrite.

  8. Extracellular DNA Acidifies Biofilms and Induces Aminoglycoside Resistance in Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Wilton, Mike; Charron-Mazenod, Laetitia; Moore, Richard

    2015-01-01

    Biofilms consist of surface-adhered bacterial communities encased in an extracellular matrix composed of DNA, exopolysaccharides, and proteins. Extracellular DNA (eDNA) has a structural role in the formation of biofilms, can bind and shield biofilms from aminoglycosides, and induces antimicrobial peptide resistance mechanisms. Here, we provide evidence that eDNA is responsible for the acidification of Pseudomonas aeruginosa planktonic cultures and biofilms. Further, we show that acidic pH and acidification via eDNA constitute a signal that is perceived by P. aeruginosa to induce the expression of genes regulated by the PhoPQ and PmrAB two-component regulatory systems. Planktonic P. aeruginosa cultured in exogenous 0.2% DNA or under acidic conditions demonstrates a 2- to 8-fold increase in aminoglycoside resistance. This resistance phenotype requires the aminoarabinose modification of lipid A and the production of spermidine on the bacterial outer membrane, which likely reduce the entry of aminoglycosides. Interestingly, the additions of the basic amino acid l-arginine and sodium bicarbonate neutralize the pH and restore P. aeruginosa susceptibility to aminoglycosides, even in the presence of eDNA. These data illustrate that the accumulation of eDNA in biofilms and infection sites can acidify the local environment and that acidic pH promotes the P. aeruginosa antibiotic resistance phenotype. PMID:26552982

  9. Extracellular DNA Acidifies Biofilms and Induces Aminoglycoside Resistance in Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Wilton, Mike; Charron-Mazenod, Laetitia; Moore, Richard; Lewenza, Shawn

    2016-01-01

    Biofilms consist of surface-adhered bacterial communities encased in an extracellular matrix composed of DNA, exopolysaccharides, and proteins. Extracellular DNA (eDNA) has a structural role in the formation of biofilms, can bind and shield biofilms from aminoglycosides, and induces antimicrobial peptide resistance mechanisms. Here, we provide evidence that eDNA is responsible for the acidification of Pseudomonas aeruginosa planktonic cultures and biofilms. Further, we show that acidic pH and acidification via eDNA constitute a signal that is perceived by P. aeruginosa to induce the expression of genes regulated by the PhoPQ and PmrAB two-component regulatory systems. Planktonic P. aeruginosa cultured in exogenous 0.2% DNA or under acidic conditions demonstrates a 2- to 8-fold increase in aminoglycoside resistance. This resistance phenotype requires the aminoarabinose modification of lipid A and the production of spermidine on the bacterial outer membrane, which likely reduce the entry of aminoglycosides. Interestingly, the additions of the basic amino acid L-arginine and sodium bicarbonate neutralize the pH and restore P. aeruginosa susceptibility to aminoglycosides, even in the presence of eDNA. These data illustrate that the accumulation of eDNA in biofilms and infection sites can acidify the local environment and that acidic pH promotes the P. aeruginosa antibiotic resistance phenotype. PMID:26552982

  10. Extracellular DNA Acidifies Biofilms and Induces Aminoglycoside Resistance in Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Wilton, Mike; Charron-Mazenod, Laetitia; Moore, Richard; Lewenza, Shawn

    2015-11-09

    Biofilms consist of surface-adhered bacterial communities encased in an extracellular matrix composed of DNA, exopolysaccharides, and proteins. Extracellular DNA (eDNA) has a structural role in the formation of biofilms, can bind and shield biofilms from aminoglycosides, and induces antimicrobial peptide resistance mechanisms. Here, we provide evidence that eDNA is responsible for the acidification of Pseudomonas aeruginosa planktonic cultures and biofilms. Further, we show that acidic pH and acidification via eDNA constitute a signal that is perceived by P. aeruginosa to induce the expression of genes regulated by the PhoPQ and PmrAB two-component regulatory systems. Planktonic P. aeruginosa cultured in exogenous 0.2% DNA or under acidic conditions demonstrates a 2- to 8-fold increase in aminoglycoside resistance. This resistance phenotype requires the aminoarabinose modification of lipid A and the production of spermidine on the bacterial outer membrane, which likely reduce the entry of aminoglycosides. Interestingly, the additions of the basic amino acid L-arginine and sodium bicarbonate neutralize the pH and restore P. aeruginosa susceptibility to aminoglycosides, even in the presence of eDNA. These data illustrate that the accumulation of eDNA in biofilms and infection sites can acidify the local environment and that acidic pH promotes the P. aeruginosa antibiotic resistance phenotype.

  11. Physiological ecology of Mougeotia (Zygnemataceae) from an experimentally acidified lake

    SciTech Connect

    Arancibia-Avila, P.E.

    1994-01-01

    Filamentous green algae were collected in July, 1989, from metaphytic blooms that occurred in the acidified (pH 5.2) basin, but not an unacidified reference basin (pH 6.1) of Little Rock Lake, Vilas Co., WI. Isolates of a Mougeotia species and Spirogyra reflexa were cultured at pH 5.5, with aeration. Measurements Of O[sub 2] production in a factorial experiment revealed optimal irradiance and temperature for photosynthesis in Mougeotia were 2500 [mu]E[center dot]m[sup [minus]2][center dot]s[sup [minus]l] and 25[degrees]C. Additional O[sub 2] evolution measurements showed that the optimal pH for Mougeotia photosynthesis was 8, but that net photosynthesis was positive from pH 8 to 3. Further studies indicated that Mougeotia was tolerant to concentrations of zinc and aluminum that were greater than levels observed in the acidified basin of the lake. Since inorganic carbon (C[sub i]) is known to limit Mougeotia photosynthesis and growth in acidified lakes, the occurrence of carbonic anhydrase (CA) as a mechanism for uptake and concentration of C[sub i] was investigated. No CA activity was detected in S. reflexa. In contrast, both external and internal CA were measured in Mougeotia at pH 3.7 and at pH 8. By comparison to pH 8, at pH 3.7 external CA activity increased by a factor of about 2. An antibody to Chlamydomonas external CA was used to localize CA in the plasma membrane and cell wall of both Chlamydomonas and Mougeotia. When unaerated (DIC-limited) Mougeotia was grown in SD11 medium supplemented with 1% glucose, chlorophyll a levels were significantly higher than for cultures grown without sugar. Chloroplast morphology was also judged superior for sugar-supplemented cultures. The data suggest that Mougeotia possesses a DIC-concentrating system, and may also be able to import DOC (glucose).

  12. Growth potential of Clostridium perfringens from spores in acidified beef, pork and poultry products during chilling

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The ability of C. perfringens to germinate and grow in acidified ground beef as well as in ten commercially prepared acidified beef, pork and poultry products was assessed. The pH of ground beef was adjusted using organic vinegar to achieve various pH values between 5.0 and 5.6; the pH of the commer...

  13. Antimicrobial effect of natural preservatives in a cooked and acidified chicken meat model.

    PubMed

    Lemay, Marie-Josée; Choquette, Julie; Delaquis, Pascal J; Claude, Gariépy; Rodrigue, Natalie; Saucier, Linda

    2002-10-25

    The inhibitory effect of Microgard 100, Microgard 300, nisin, Alta 2002, Perlac 1902, sodium lactate and essential oil of mustard on microorganisms experimentally inoculated was screened in an acidified chicken meat model (pH = 5.0) and stored for 2 weeks at a none restrictive growth temperature of 22 degrees C. All antimicrobials tested were used at the highest concentration recommended by their manufacturer. Sausage batter made with mechanically deboned chicken was inoculated with a mixed culture of Escherichia coli ATCC 25922, Brochothrix thermosphacta CRDAV452, and a protective culture Lactobacillus alimentarius BJ33 (FloraCan L-2). A final cell concentration of 3-4 log CFU g (-1) was targeted after cooking at a core temperature of 55 degrees C for each microorganism in order to assess cell count variation effectively. Composition, water activity (a(w)), pH and redox potential of the sausage model was also evaluated. The E. coli population decreased steadily during storage and was close or below detection level (< 1 log CFU g (-1)) for all treatments, including the control, after 14 days. Sodium lactate was most effective against B. thermosphacta; population was 4 log lower than the control after 14 days of storage. When essential oil of mustard was used, aerobic mesophilic bacteria and lactic acid bacteria were significantly lower than the control after 2 days of storage (P < or = 0.05). The other antimicrobial agents tested had no significant effect on the aerobic mesophilic bacteria, E. coli, B. thermosphacta and lactic acid bacteria counts, when compared to the control.

  14. Disrupting Hypoxia-Induced Bicarbonate Transport Acidifies Tumor Cells and Suppresses Tumor Growth.

    PubMed

    McIntyre, Alan; Hulikova, Alzbeta; Ledaki, Ioanna; Snell, Cameron; Singleton, Dean; Steers, Graham; Seden, Peter; Jones, Dylan; Bridges, Esther; Wigfield, Simon; Li, Ji-Liang; Russell, Angela; Swietach, Pawel; Harris, Adrian L

    2016-07-01

    Tumor hypoxia is associated clinically with therapeutic resistance and poor patient outcomes. One feature of tumor hypoxia is activated expression of carbonic anhydrase IX (CA9), a regulator of pH and tumor growth. In this study, we investigated the hypothesis that impeding the reuptake of bicarbonate produced extracellularly by CA9 could exacerbate the intracellular acidity produced by hypoxic conditions, perhaps compromising cell growth and viability as a result. In 8 of 10 cancer cell lines, we found that hypoxia induced the expression of at least one bicarbonate transporter. The most robust and frequent inductions were of the sodium-driven bicarbonate transporters SLC4A4 and SLC4A9, which rely upon both HIF1α and HIF2α activity for their expression. In cancer cell spheroids, SLC4A4 or SLC4A9 disruption by either genetic or pharmaceutical approaches acidified intracellular pH and reduced cell growth. Furthermore, treatment of spheroids with S0859, a small-molecule inhibitor of sodium-driven bicarbonate transporters, increased apoptosis in the cell lines tested. Finally, RNAi-mediated attenuation of SLC4A9 increased apoptosis in MDA-MB-231 breast cancer spheroids and dramatically reduced growth of MDA-MB-231 breast tumors or U87 gliomas in murine xenografts. Our findings suggest that disrupting pH homeostasis by blocking bicarbonate import might broadly relieve the common resistance of hypoxic tumors to anticancer therapy. Cancer Res; 76(13); 3744-55. ©2016 AACR. PMID:27197160

  15. Coral host cells acidify symbiotic algal microenvironment to promote photosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Barott, Katie L.; Venn, Alexander A.; Perez, Sidney O.; Tambutté, Sylvie; Tresguerres, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Symbiotic dinoflagellate algae residing inside coral tissues supply the host with the majority of their energy requirements through the translocation of photosynthetically fixed carbon. The algae, in turn, rely on the host for the supply of inorganic carbon. Carbon must be concentrated as CO2 in order for photosynthesis to proceed, and here we show that the coral host plays an active role in this process. The host-derived symbiosome membrane surrounding the algae abundantly expresses vacuolar H+-ATPase (VHA), which acidifies the symbiosome space down to pH ∼4. Inhibition of VHA results in a significant decrease in average H+ activity in the symbiosome of up to 75% and a significant reduction in O2 production rate, a measure of photosynthetic activity. These results suggest that host VHA is part of a previously unidentified carbon concentrating mechanism for algal photosynthesis and provide mechanistic evidence that coral host cells can actively modulate the physiology of their symbionts. PMID:25548188

  16. Decreased steroid hormone synthesis from inorganic nitrite and nitrate: studies in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Panesar, N S; Chan, K W

    2000-12-15

    Nitrites and nitrates are consumed nonchalantly in diet. Organic nitrates are also used as vasodilators in angina pectoris, but the therapy is associated with tolerance whose mechanism remains elusive. Previously, we found inorganic nitrate inhibited steroidogenesis in vitro. Because adrenocorticoids regulate water and electrolyte metabolism, tolerance may ensue from steroid deficiency. We have studied the effects of nitrite and nitrate on in vitro synthesis and in vivo blood levels of steroid hormones. In vitro, nitrite was more potent than nitrate in inhibiting human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG)-stimulated androgen synthesis by Mouse Leydig Tumor cells. At concentrations above 42 mM, nitrite completely inhibited androgen synthesis, and, unlike nitrate, the inhibition was irreversible by increasing hCG concentration. The cAMP production remained intact but reduced with both ions. The nitric oxide (NO) scavenger, 2-(4-carboxyphenyl)-4,4,5,5-tetramethylimidazoline-1-oxy-3-oxide (c-PTIO) significantly increased hCG- or cAMP-stimulated androgen synthesis in all buffers, suggesting that NO is a chemical species directly involved in the nitrite/nitrate-induced inhibition. This is further supported by c-PTIO countering the inhibitory action of methylene blue on androgen synthesis. Rats given distilled water containing 50 mg/L NaNO(2) or NaNO(3) for 4 weeks drank significantly less daily. At the end, their blood corticosterone and testosterone levels were significantly decreased. The adrenocortical histology showed bigger lipid droplets, which are pathogonomic of impaired steroidogenesis. Nitrite and nitrate are metabolized to NO, which binds heme in cytochrome P450 enzymes, thereby inhibiting steroidogenesis. Therapeutic nitrates likewise may decrease adrenal (and gonadal) steroidogenesis. Cortisol deficiency would impair water excretion causing volume expansion, and aldosterone deficiency would cause sodium loss and raised renin. Paradoxically, volume expansion without

  17. Effects of nitrite exposure on haematological parameters, oxidative stress and apoptosis in juvenile turbot (Scophthalmus maximus).

    PubMed

    Jia, Rui; Han, Cen; Lei, Ji-Lin; Liu, Bao-Liang; Huang, Bin; Huo, Huan-Huan; Yin, Shu-Ting

    2015-12-01

    Nitrite (NO2(-)) is commonly present as contaminant in aquatic environment and toxic to aquatic organisms. In the present study, we investigated the effects of nitrite exposure on haematological parameters, oxidative stress and apoptosis in juvenile turbot (Scophthalmus maximus). Fish were exposed to various concentrations of nitrite (0, 0.02, 0.08, 0.4 and 0.8mM) for 96 h. Fish blood and gills were collected to assay haematological parameters, oxidative stress and expression of genes after 0, 24, 48 and 96 h of exposure. In blood, the data showed that the levels of methemoglobin (MetHb), triglyceride (TG), potassium (K(+)), cortisol, heat shock protein 70 (HSP70) and glucose significantly increased in treatments with higher concentrations of nitrite (0.4 and/or 0.8mM) after 48 and 96 h, while the levels of haemoglobin (Hb) and sodium (Na(+)) significantly decreased in these treatments. In gills, nitrite (0.4 and/or 0.8mM) apparently reduced the levels of superoxide dismutase (SOD), glutathione peroxidase (GPx), catalase (CAT) and glutathione (GSH), increased the formation of malondialdehyde (MDA), up-regulated the mRNA levels of c-jun amino-terminal kinase (JUK1), p53, caspase-3, caspase-7 and caspase-9 after 48 and 96 h of exposure. The results suggested caspase-dependent and JUK signaling pathways played important roles in nitrite-induced apoptosis in fish. Further, this study provides new insights into how nitrite affects the physiological responses and apoptosis in a marine fish. PMID:26476021

  18. Acetate limitation and nitrite accumulation during denitrification

    SciTech Connect

    Oh, J.; Silverstein, J.

    1999-03-01

    Nitrite accumulated in denitrifying activated sludge mixed liquor when the carbon and electron source, acetate, was limited. If acetate was added to obtain a carbon-to-nitrogen (C:N) ratio in the range of 2:1 to 3:1, nitrate was completely consumed at the same rate with no nitrite accumulation, indicating that nitrate concentration controlled the respiration rate as long as sufficient substrate was present. However, when acetate was reduced to a C:N ratio of 1:1, while nitrate continued to be consumed, > 50% of the initial nitrate-nitrogen accumulated as nitrite and 29% persisted as nitrite throughout an endogenous denitrification period of 8--9 h. While nitrite accumulated during acetate-limited denitrification, the specific nitrate reduction rate increased significantly compared with the rate when excess acetate was provided as follows: 0.034 mg-NO{sub 3}-N/mg-mixed liquid volatile suspended solids/h versus 0.023 mg-NO{sub 3}-N/mg-mixed liquid volatile suspended solids/h, respective. This may be explained by nitrate respiration out-competing nitrite respiration for limited acetate electrons. Complete restoration of balanced denitrification and elimination of nitrite accumulation during denitrification required several weeks after the C:N ratio was increased back to 2:1.

  19. Properties of aqueous nitrate and nitrite from x-ray absorption spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, Jacob W.; Lam, Royce K.; Saykally, Richard J.; Shih, Orion; Rizzuto, Anthony M.; Prendergast, David

    2015-08-28

    Nitrate and nitrite ions are of considerable interest, both for their widespread use in commercial and research contexts and because of their central role in the global nitrogen cycle. The chemistry of atmospheric aerosols, wherein nitrate is abundant, has been found to depend on the interfacial behavior of ionic species. The interfacial behavior of ions is determined largely by their hydration properties; consequently, the study of the hydration and interfacial behavior of nitrate and nitrite comprises a significant field of study. In this work, we describe the study of aqueous solutions of sodium nitrate and nitrite via X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS), interpreted in light of first-principles density functional theory electronic structure calculations. Experimental and calculated spectra of the nitrogen K-edge XA spectra of bulk solutions exhibit a large 3.7 eV shift between the XA spectra of nitrate and nitrite resulting from greater stabilization of the nitrogen 1s energy level in nitrate. A similar shift is not observed in the oxygen K-edge XA spectra of NO{sub 3}{sup −} and NO{sub 2}{sup −}. The hydration properties of nitrate and nitrite are found to be similar, with both anions exhibiting a similar propensity towards ion pairing.

  20. SLUDGE CHARACTERIZATION AND SRAT SIMULATIONS USING A NITRITE-FREE SLUDGE SIMULANT

    SciTech Connect

    Koopman, D.

    2009-12-17

    Understanding catalytic hydrogen generation is fundamental to the safe operation of the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) Chemical Process Cell (CPC). Two Sludge Receipt and Adjustment Tank (SRAT) simulations were completed at the Aiken County Technology Laboratory (ACTL) of the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) using a nitrite-free starting simulant. One simulation was trimmed with Rh and Hg and the other with Ru and Hg. The two noble metals were trimmed at the upper end of the recent Rh-Ru-Hg study. Mercury was trimmed at 1.5 wt% in the total solids. Excess acid comparable in quantity to that in the recent Rh-Ru-Hg matrix study was used. In spite of the favorable conditions for hydrogen generation, virtually no hydrogen production was observed during either SRAT simulation. The Rh test result confirmed the postulated significance of nitrite ion to the catalytic reactions producing hydrogen in CPC testing with normal DWPF sludge simulants. As for Ru, however, previous testing has shown that Ru activated for hydrogen generation only after nitrite destruction. Therefore, Ru could have potentially been catalytically active from the start of the nitrite-free SRAT test, but no such activity was seen. The nitrite-free Ru test result suggests that the intermediate form detected in the bead-frit melter feed preparation Ru solubility profiles was some form of nitro-Ru complex. The nitro-Ru complex is apparently not catalytically active for hydrogen generation but is a precursor to the catalytically active form (presumably a different complex not involving nitrite ligands). Removing nitrite ion from the system prevented the Ru catalyst precursor from forming and consequently blocked formation of the catalytically active form. These results, along with the results of a simulation in which sodium nitrite was metered into the SRAT to prevent ligand substitution reactions that occur during nitrite destruction from occurring in order to reduce hydrogen generation

  1. Corrosion Behavior of Stainless Steels in Neutral and Acidified Sodium Chloride Solutions by Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Calle, L. M.; Kolady, M. R.; Vinje, R. D.

    2004-01-01

    The objective of this work was to evaluate the corrosion performance of three alloys by Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopy (EIS) and to compare the results with those obtained during a two-year atmospheric exposure study.' Three alloys: AL6XN (UNS N08367), 254SM0 (UNS S32154), and 304L (UNS S30403) were included in the study. 304L was included as a control. The alloys were tested in three electrolyte solutions which consisted of neutral 3.55% NaC1, 3.55% NaC1 in 0.lN HC1, and 3.55% NaC1 in 1.ON HC1. These conditions were expected to be less severe, similar, and more severe respectively than the conditions at NASA's Kennedy Space Center launch pads.

  2. Comparison of a Powdered, Acidified Liquid, and Non-Acidified Liquid Human Milk Fortifier on Clinical Outcomes in Premature Infants.

    PubMed

    Thoene, Melissa; Lyden, Elizabeth; Weishaar, Kara; Elliott, Elizabeth; Wu, Ruomei; White, Katelyn; Timm, Hayley; Anderson-Berry, Ann

    2016-01-01

    We previously compared infant outcomes between a powdered human milk fortifier (P-HMF) vs. acidified liquid HMF (AL-HMF). A non-acidified liquid HMF (NAL-HMF) is now commercially available. The purpose of this study is to compare growth and outcomes of premature infants receiving P-HMF, AL-HMF or NAL-HMF. An Institutional Review Board (IRB) approved retrospective chart review compared infant outcomes (born < 2000 g) who received one of three HMF. Growth, enteral nutrition, laboratory and demographic data were compared. 120 infants were included (P-HMF = 46, AL-HMF = 23, NAL-HMF = 51). AL-HMF infants grew slower in g/day (median 23.66 vs. P-HMF 31.27, NAL-HMF 31.74 (p < 0.05)) and in g/kg/day, median 10.59 vs. 15.37, 14.03 (p < 0.0001). AL-HMF vs. NAL-HMF infants were smaller at 36 weeks gestational age (median 2046 vs. 2404 g, p < 0.05). However AL-HMF infants received more daily calories (p = 0.21) and protein (p < 0.0001), mean 129 cal/kg, 4.2 g protein/kg vs. P-HMF 117 cal/kg, 3.7 g protein/kg , NAL-HMF 120 cal/kg, 4.0 g protein/kg. AL-HMF infants exhibited lower carbon dioxide levels after day of life 14 and 30 (p < 0.0001, p = 0.0038). Three AL-HMF infants (13%) developed necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC) vs. no infants in the remaining groups (p = 0.0056). A NAL-HMF is the most optimal choice for premature human milk-fed infants in a high acuity neonatal intensive care unit (NICU). PMID:27472359

  3. Comparison of a Powdered, Acidified Liquid, and Non-Acidified Liquid Human Milk Fortifier on Clinical Outcomes in Premature Infants

    PubMed Central

    Thoene, Melissa; Lyden, Elizabeth; Weishaar, Kara; Elliott, Elizabeth; Wu, Ruomei; White, Katelyn; Timm, Hayley; Anderson-Berry, Ann

    2016-01-01

    We previously compared infant outcomes between a powdered human milk fortifier (P-HMF) vs. acidified liquid HMF (AL-HMF). A non-acidified liquid HMF (NAL-HMF) is now commercially available. The purpose of this study is to compare growth and outcomes of premature infants receiving P-HMF, AL-HMF or NAL-HMF. An Institutional Review Board (IRB) approved retrospective chart review compared infant outcomes (born < 2000 g) who received one of three HMF. Growth, enteral nutrition, laboratory and demographic data were compared. 120 infants were included (P-HMF = 46, AL-HMF = 23, NAL-HMF = 51). AL-HMF infants grew slower in g/day (median 23.66 vs. P-HMF 31.27, NAL-HMF 31.74 (p < 0.05)) and in g/kg/day, median 10.59 vs. 15.37, 14.03 (p < 0.0001). AL-HMF vs. NAL-HMF infants were smaller at 36 weeks gestational age (median 2046 vs. 2404 g, p < 0.05). However AL-HMF infants received more daily calories (p = 0.21) and protein (p < 0.0001), mean 129 cal/kg, 4.2 g protein/kg vs. P-HMF 117 cal/kg, 3.7 g protein/kg , NAL-HMF 120 cal/kg, 4.0 g protein/kg. AL-HMF infants exhibited lower carbon dioxide levels after day of life 14 and 30 (p < 0.0001, p = 0.0038). Three AL-HMF infants (13%) developed necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC) vs. no infants in the remaining groups (p = 0.0056). A NAL-HMF is the most optimal choice for premature human milk-fed infants in a high acuity neonatal intensive care unit (NICU). PMID:27472359

  4. Fluorometric determination of nitrite with 4-hydroxycoumarin

    SciTech Connect

    Ohta, T.; Arai, Y.; Takitani, S.

    1986-12-01

    A simple, sensitive, and reproducible fluorometric method for determination of nitrite has been developed. This method is based on the nitrosation of 4-hydroxycoumarin in acidic medium and subsequent reduction to 3-amino-4-hydroxy-coumarin, which is fluorescent in alkaline medium. The fluorescence intensity is proportional to the nitrite concentration in the range of 3 ng/mL to 1 ..mu..g/mL in the sample solution, with a relative standard deviation of 0.5% (50 ng/mL). The method has been applied to the determination of nitrite in saliva.

  5. A new, fast and sensitive method for the determination of trace amounts of nitrite using differential pulse polarography.

    PubMed

    Somer, Güler; Kalaycı, Şükrü; Almas, Ziya

    2016-07-01

    Nitrite salts of sodium or potassium are being used for the protection of meat products. They provide color and taste of meat and they protect against clostridia. On the other hand, nitrite ions can interact with amines to form nitrosamines which are known as carcinogenic substances. They may also react with hemoglobin and reduce its oxygen carrying capacity. Thus, its concentration in food-stuff has to be controlled carefully by highly sensitive methods. A new DP polarographic method is established for the determination of nitrite. Nitrite cannot be determined directly with any analytical methods. Long and tedious procedures are necessary for many of them. In this polarographic method arsenite, As(III), ion is used for the reduction of nitrite. The nitrite is determined from the As(III) quantity left over after the reaction with nitrite. The peak of arsenite has been used since it is sharp and responds well for the standard addition of arsenite. The optimum conditions for the quantitative reaction between nitrite and arsenite have been studied. It was found that the pH for the reaction medium has to be 5-7, since nitrite is decomposed at lower pH values. The reaction medium has to be stirred for about 5 min with nitrogen gas in order to expel the NO gas formed and thus to shift the equilibrium to products side. The limit of detection, LOD, was found to be as 2 × 10(-7) M. No interference was observed from most common ions. PMID:27153987

  6. Oxygen isotopes in nitrite: Analysis, calibration, and equilibration

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Casciotti, K.L.; Böhlke, J.K.; McIlvin, M.R.; Mroczkowski, S.J.; Hannon, J.E.

    2007-01-01

    Nitrite is a central intermediate in the nitrogen cycle and can persist in significant concentrations in ocean waters, sediment pore waters, and terrestrial groundwaters. To fully interpret the effect of microbial processes on nitrate (NO3-), nitrite (NO2-), and nitrous oxide (N2O) cycling in these systems, the nitrite pool must be accessible to isotopic analysis. Furthermore, because nitrite interferes with most methods of nitrate isotopic analysis, accurate isotopic analysis of nitrite is essential for correct measurement of nitrate isotopes in a sample that contains nitrite. In this study, nitrite salts with varying oxygen isotopic compositions were prepared and calibrated and then used to test the denitrifier method for nitrite oxygen isotopic analysis. The oxygen isotopic fractionation during nitrite reduction to N2O by Pseudomonas aureofaciens was lower than for nitrate conversion to N2O, while oxygen isotopic exchange between nitrite and water during the reaction was similar. These results enable the extension of the denitrifier method to oxygen isotopic analysis of nitrite (in the absence of nitrate) and correction of nitrate isotopes for the presence of nitrite in "mixed" samples. We tested storage conditions for seawater and freshwater samples that contain nitrite and provide recommendations for accurate oxygen isotopic analysis of nitrite by any method. Finally, we report preliminary results on the equilibrium isotope effect between nitrite and water, which can play an important role in determining the oxygen isotopic value of nitrite where equilibration with water is significant. ?? 2007 American Chemical Society.

  7. Process performance of anaerobic co-digestion of raw and acidified pig slurry.

    PubMed

    Moset, V; Cerisuelo, A; Sutaryo, S; Møller, H B

    2012-10-15

    The effect of incorporating different ratios of acidified pig slurry on methane yield was evaluated in two scales of anaerobic digesters: Thermophilic (50 °C) pilot scale digester (120 l), operating with an average hydraulic retention time of 20 days and thermophilic (52 °C) full-scale digesters (10 and 30 m(3)), operating with an average hydraulic retention time of 30 days. In the lab-scale digester, different inclusion levels of acidified slurry (0-60%) were tested each 15 days, to determine the maximum ratio of acidified to non-acidified slurry causing inhibition and to find process state indicators helping to prevent process failure. In the full-scale digesters, the level of inclusion of the acidified slurry was chosen from the ratio causing methane inhibition in the pilot scale experiment and was carried on in a long-term process of 100 days. The optimal inclusion level of acidified pig slurry in anaerobic co-digestion with conventional slurry was 10%, which promoted anaerobic methane yield by nearly 20%. Higher inclusion levels caused methane inhibition and volatile fatty acids accumulations in both experiments. In order to prevent process failure, the most important traits to monitor in the anaerobic digestion of acidified pig slurry were found to be: sulfate content of the slurry, alkalinity parameters (especially partial alkalinity and the ratio of alkalinity) and total volatile fatty acids (especially acetic and butyric acids).

  8. Dietary nitrates, nitrites, and cardiovascular disease.

    PubMed

    Hord, Norman G

    2011-12-01

    Dietary nitrate (NO(3)), nitrite (NO(2)), and arginine can serve as sources for production of NO(x) (a diverse group of metabolites including nitric oxide, nitrosothiols, and nitroalkenes) via ultraviolet light exposure to skin, mammalian nitrate/nitrite reductases in tissues, and nitric oxide synthase enzymes, respectively. NO(x) are responsible for the hypotensive, antiplatelet, and cytoprotective effects of dietary nitrates and nitrites. Current regulatory limits on nitrate intakes, based on concerns regarding potential risk of carcinogenicity and methemoglobinemia, are exceeded by normal daily intakes of single foods, such as soya milk and spinach, as well as by some recommended dietary patterns such as the Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension diet. This review includes a call for regulatory bodies to consider all available data on the beneficial physiologic roles of nitrate and nitrite in order to derive rational bases for dietary recommendations.

  9. Prior exposure influences the behavioural avoidance by an intertidal gastropod, Bembicium auratum, of acidified waters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amaral, Valter; Cabral, Henrique N.; Bishop, Melanie J.

    2014-01-01

    Phenotypic plasticity may be critical to the maintenance of viable populations under future environmental change. Here we examined the role of behavioural avoidance of sub-optimal conditions in enabling the intertidal gastropod, Bembicium auratum, to persist in mangrove forests affected by the low pH runoff from acid sulphate soils (ASS). Behaviourally, the gastropod may be able to avoid periods of particularly high acidity by using pneumatophores and/or mangrove trunks to vertically migrate above the water line or by retreating into its shell. We hypothesised that (1) B. auratum would display greater and more rapid vertical migration out of acidified than reference estuarine waters, and (2) responses would be more pronounced in gastropods collected from acidified than reference sites. Gastropods from acidified sites showed significantly higher activity in and more rapid migration out of acidified waters of pH 6.2-7.0, than reference waters or waters of pH < 5.0. Gastropods from reference locations showed a significantly weaker response to acidified water than those from acidified waters, and which did not significantly differ from their response to reference water. At extremely low pHs, <5.0, a higher proportion of both acidified and reference gastropods retreated into their shell than at higher pHs. Both the migration of gastropods out of acidified waters and retraction into their shells serves to reduce exposure time to acidified waters and may reduce the impact of this stressor on their populations. The stronger response to acidification of gastropods from populations previously exposed to this stressor suggests that the response may be learned, inherited or induced over multiple exposures. Our study adds to growing evidence that estuarine organisms may exhibit considerable physiological and behaviour adaptive capacity to acidification. The potential for such adaptive capacity should be incorporated into studies seeking to forecast impacts to marine organisms

  10. Reduction of hexavalent chromium in water samples acidified for preservation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stollenwerk, K.G.; Grove, D.B.

    1985-01-01

    Reduction of hexavalent chromium, Cr(VI), in water samples, preserved by standard techniques, was investigated. The standard preservation technique for water samples that are to be analyzed for Cr(VI) consists of filtration through a 0.45-??m membrane, acidification to a pH < 2, and storage in plastic bottles. Batch experiments were conducted to evaluate the effect of H+ concentration, NO2, temperature, and dissolved organic carbon (DOC) on the reduction of Cr(VI) to Cr(III). The rate of reduction of Cr(VI) to Cr(III) increased with increasing NO2, DOC, H+, and temperature. Reduction of Cr(VI) by organic matter occurred in some samples even though the samples were unacidified. Reduction of Cr(VI) is inhibited to an extent by storing the sample at 4??C. Stability of Cr(VI) in water is variable and depends on the other constituents present in the sample. Water samples collected for the determination of Cr(VI) should be filtered (0.45-??m membrane), refrigerated, and analyzed as quickly as possible. Water samples should not be acidified. Measurement of total Cr in addition to Cr(VI) can serve as a check for Cr(VI) reduction. If total Cr is greater than Cr(VI), the possibility that Cr(VI) reduction has occurred needs to be considered.The rate of reduction of Cr(VI) to Cr(III) increased with increasing NO//2, DOC, H** plus , and temperature. Reduction of Cr(VI) by organic matter occurred in some samples even though the samples were unacidified. Reduction of Cr(VI) is inhibited to an extent by storing the sample at 4 degree C. Stability of Cr(VI) in water is variable and depends on the other constituents present in the sample. Water samples collected for the determination of Cr(VI) should be filtered (0. 45- mu m membrane), refrigerated, and analyzed as quickly as possible. Water samples should not be acidified. Measurement of total Cr in addition to Cr(VI) can serve as a check for Cr(VI) reduction. If total Cr is greater than Cr(VI), the possibility that Cr

  11. Nitrite complexes of uranium and thorium.

    PubMed

    Dulong, Florian; Pouessel, Jacky; Thuéry, Pierre; Berthet, Jean-Claude; Ephritikhine, Michel; Cantat, Thibault

    2013-03-25

    The first examples of inorganic nitrite complexes of the natural actinides are described, including the structures of the homoleptic thorium(IV) [PPh(4)](2)[Th(NO(2))(6)] and the uranyl(VI) [PPh(4)](2)[UO(2)(NO(2))(4)] complexes; the nitrite ligand can adopt two different coordination modes in the coordination sphere of the uranyl ion and is unstable towards reduction.

  12. 21 CFR 172.824 - Sodium mono- and dimethyl naphthalene sulfonates.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... systems to reduce hardness and aid in sedimentation and coagulation by raising the pH for the efficient utilization of other coagulation materials. (2) As an anticaking agent in sodium nitrite at a level not...

  13. Acute toxicity of ammonia and nitrite to shortnose sturgeon fingerlings

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fontenot, Q.C.; Isely, J.J.; Tomasso, J.R.

    1998-01-01

    The 96-h median-lethal concentration (96-h LC50) of total ammonia nitrogen (ammonia-N) to fingerling shortnose sturgeon Acipenser brevirostrum was 149.8 ?? 55.20 mg/L (mean ?? SD, 17.9 ?? 0.62??C, pH = 6.8-7.3). Calculated 96-h LC50 for un-ionized ammonia-N was 0.58 ?? 0.213 mg/L. The 96-h LC50 of nitrite nitrogen to shortnose sturgeon fingerlings was 11.3 ?? 8.17 mg/L (17.9 ?? 0.31??C, <1.0 mg chloride/L, <1.0 mg magnesium/L, 1.8 mg calcium/L, 7.7 mg sodium/L).

  14. High resolution mapping of total deposition of acidifying pollutants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Vos, Thierri; Zhang, Leiming

    2012-09-01

    A framework has been developed to estimate dry and wet deposition over Southern Belgium for a variety of acidifying substances on a 5 × 5 km2 grid. Concentrations of different compounds in the atmosphere or in the precipitation are provided by the measurement networks (both stations and gauges) and are interpolated over Southern Belgium. Dry deposition velocities are calculated using local meteorology and land use information, following the approach described in Zhang et al. (2001, 2003). Local precipitation is provided by merged radar-gauge observations. This is the first high resolution framework for Southern Belgium computing both time- and space-dependent deposition, using a modified kriging interpolation method (for SO2 and NO2), as well as radar-based precipitation. Estimated dry and wet depositions are compared with long range transport (LRT) model results, based on the European emission inventories. Although a good agreement is observed between our results and LRT model results on the annual totals averaged over Southern Belgium, the extent of agreement for the spatial variability of the annual deposition differs significantly from one pollutant to another. This new framework provides consistent high resolution maps for several pollutants, while improving the mapping of dry and wet deposition in Southern Belgium, in order to assess critical loads exceedances.

  15. Acidifying and yeast extract in diets for adults cats.

    PubMed

    Ogoshi, Rosana C S; Zangeronimo, Márcio G; Dos Reis, Jéssica S; França, Janine; Santos, João P F; Pires, Carolina P; Chizzotti, Ana F; Costa, Adriano C; Ferreira, Lívia G; Saad, Flávia M O B

    2014-05-01

    This study evaluated the effects of adding an acidifying agent based on phosphoric acid (A), a yeast extract from a specific strain (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) (Y) and the combination of these two additives in food for adult cats. A test was conducted with 24 animals (mean 3.5 years old), mixed breed, weighing 3.72 ± 0.74 kg, kept in individual metabolic cages and distributed in a completely randomized design with a 2 × 2 factorial design (with or without A 0.6% of dry matter, with or without Y 1.5% of dry matter) totalling four treatments and six replicates of each condition. The experimental period was 15 days. The A or the Y reduced (P< 0.01) the dry matter intake, but the effect was not observed when they were associated. The association improved (P<0.05) the digestibility of dry matter and ashes. The A reduced urine pH (P=0.05) regardless of the presence of the Y. There was no effect (P>0.09) on other parameters evaluated. Results of this study show that the isolated use of 0.6% A or 1.5% Y in diets for cats is not recommended. However, the association of these two additives was beneficial in increasing nutrient digestibility.

  16. Evaluation of dry deposition of acidifying N compounds to vegetation.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Ranjit; Kumari, K Maharaj

    2015-12-01

    This papers deals with direct measurements of dry deposition flux of total acidifying N species (gaseous HNO3 and particulate NO3(-)) and theoretically by parameterization method to vegetation (leaf surfaces) over a semiarid region in India. Annual average experimental dry deposition of NO3(-) to leaf of Cassia is 0.65 ± 0.61 mg m(-2) day(-1). Ambient concentrations of HNO3 vapor and particulate NO3(-) are 1.53 and 1.24 μg m(-3), respectively. Theoretically obtained dry deposition velocity of HNO3 and NO3(-) are 0.74 cm s(-1) for both while calculated dry deposition flux of total NO3(-) is found to be 1.3 ± 0.33 mg m(-2) day(-1). The measured dry deposition flux of NO3(-) to Cassia leaf is in the range of theoretically obtained flux. The annual input of N as nitrate is 3.8 mmol m(-2) year(-1) which is lower than the other forest site in China which is probably because of low pollution than China.

  17. Effects of different nitrite concentrations from a vegetable source with and without high hydrostatic pressure on the recovery of Listeria monocytogenes on ready-to-eat restructured ham.

    PubMed

    Lavieri, Nicolas A; Sebranek, Joseph G; Cordray, Joseph C; Dickson, James S; Horsch, Ashley M; Jung, Stephanie; Manu, David K; Brehm-Stecher, Byron F; Mendonça, Aubrey F

    2014-05-01

    Sodium nitrite exerts an inhibitory effect on the growth of Listeria monocytogenes. The objective of this study was to investigate the effects of various nitrite concentrations from a vegetable source with and without high hydrostatic pressure (HHP) on the recovery and growth of L. monocytogenes on ready-to-eat restructured ham. A preconverted celery powder was used as the vegetable source of nitrite. Targeted concentrations of natural nitrite investigated were 0, 50, and 100 mg/kg. HHP treatments evaluated were 400 MPa for 4 min and 600 MPa for 1 or 4 min at 12 ± 2 °C (initial temperature of the pressurization fluid). Viable L. monocytogenes populations were monitored on modified Oxford medium and thin agar layer medium through 98 days of storage at 4 ± 1 °C. Populations on both media did not differ. The HHP treatment at 600 MPa for 4 min resulted in L. monocytogenes populations below the detection limit of our sampling protocols throughout the storage period regardless of the natural nitrite concentration. The combination of HHP at 400 MPa for 4 min or 600 MPa for 1 min with natural nitrite resulted in initial inhibition of viable L. monocytogenes. Ham formulations that did not contain natural nitrite allowed faster growth of L. monocytogenes than did those with nitrite, regardless of whether they were treated with HHP. The results indicate that nitrite from a vegetable source at the concentrations used in this study resulted in slower growth of this microorganism. HHP treatments enhanced the inhibitory effects of natural nitrite on L. monocytogenes growth. Thus, the combination of natural nitrite plus HHP appears to have a synergistic inhibitory effect on L. monocytogenes growth.

  18. Levels of Nitrates and Nitrites in Chili Pepper and Ventricina Salami

    PubMed Central

    Piccirilli, Michele; Iafigliola, Luigi; Amadoro, Carmela

    2014-01-01

    Ventricina is a traditional sausage made from pork meat produced in the Abruzzi and Molise regions. The aim of this study was to detect the content of nitrates and nitrites in local cultivars of chilli pepper, and their concentration in ventricina samples spiced with the same chilli pepper. Furthermore, it was examined whether, in the samples of ventricina with nitrate addition, the spicing with chilli pepper could exceed the maximum added dose. The concentration of nitrates and nitrites in the organic chilli pepper was 531.0±94.6 mg/kg and less than 5.0 mg, respectively, in the traditional chilli pepper it was 394.0±39.6 and less than 5.0 mg, while in the commercial it was 325.0±115.0 and less than 5.0 mg. The determination of nitrites and nitrates was carried out by high performance ion chromatography. In ventricina samples produced without added sodium nitrate, nitrates and nitrites were below 5.0 mg/kg at the case-filling time (t0) and after 50 days of aging (t50). In the samples of ventricina with added sodium nitrate, nitrate concentration values were 134.0±20.9 mg/kg at t0 and 129.0±15.4 mg/kg at t50, while the nitrites were below 5.0 mg/kg at t0 and 28.8±15.8 mg/kg at t50. Although in ventricina the amount of chilli pepper is quite relevant, it did not lead to a detectable concentration of nitrates. The maximum allowed amount was never exceeded. PMID:27800331

  19. Nitrite-catalase interaction as an important element of nitrite toxicity.

    PubMed

    Titov, V Yu; Petrenko, Yu M

    2003-06-01

    It was established that nitrite in the presence of chloride, bromide, and thiocyanate decreases the rate of hydrogen peroxide decomposition by catalase. The decrease was recorded by the permanganatometric method and by a method of dynamic calorimetry. Nitrite was not destroyed in the course of the reaction and the total value of heat produced in the process was not changed by its presence. These facts suggest that nitrite induces inhibition of catalase with no change in the essence of the enzymatic process. Even micromolar nitrite concentrations induced a considerable decrease in catalase activity. However, in the absence of chloride, bromide, and thiocyanate inhibition was not observed. In contrast, fluoride protected catalase from nitrite inhibition in the presence of the above-mentioned halides and pseudohalide. As hydrogen peroxide is a necessary factor for triggering a number of important toxic effects of nitrite, the latter increases its toxicity by inhibiting catalase. This was shown by the example of nitrite-induced hemoglobin oxidation. The naturally existing gradient of chloride and other anion concentrations between intra- and extracellular media appears to be the most important mechanism of cell protection from inhibition of intracellular catalase by nitrite. Possible mechanisms of this inhibition are discussed. PMID:12943506

  20. Role of nitrite, urate and pepsin in the gastroprotective effects of saliva

    PubMed Central

    Rocha, Bárbara S.; Lundberg, Jon O; Radi, Rafael; Laranjinha, João

    2016-01-01

    Dietary nitrate is now recognized as an alternative substrate for nitric oxide (•NO) production in the gut. This novel pathway implies the sequential reduction of nitrate to nitrite, •NO and other bioactive nitrogen oxides but the physiological relevance of these oxidants has remained elusive. We have previously shown that dietary nitrite fuels an hitherto unrecognized nitrating pathway at acidic gastric pH, through which pepsinogen is nitrated in the gastric mucosa, yielding a less active form of pepsin in vitro. Here, we demonstrate that pepsin is nitrated in vivo and explore the functional impact of protein nitration by means of peptic ulcer development. Upon administration of pentagastrin and human nitrite-rich saliva or sodium nitrite to rats, nitrated pepsin was detected in the animal's stomach by immunoprecipitation. •NO was measured in the gastric headspace before and after nitrite instillation by chemiluminescence. At the end of each procedure, the stomach's lesions, ranging from gastric erosions to haemorrhagic ulcers, were scored. Nitrite increased gastric •NO by 200-fold (p<0.05) and nitrated pepsin was detected both in the gastric juice and the mucosa (p<0.05). Exogenous urate, a scavenger of nitrogen dioxide radical, blunted •NO detection and inhibited pepsin nitration, suggesting an underlining free radical-dependent mechanism for nitration. Functionally, pepsin nitration prevented the development of gastric ulcers, as the lesions were only apparent when pepsin nitration was inhibited by urate. In sum, this work unravels a novel dietary-dependent nitrating pathway in which pepsin is nitrated and inactivated in the stomach, preventing the progression of gastric ulcers. PMID:27156250

  1. Role of nitrite, urate and pepsin in the gastroprotective effects of saliva.

    PubMed

    Rocha, Bárbara S; Lundberg, Jon O; Radi, Rafael; Laranjinha, João

    2016-08-01

    Dietary nitrate is now recognized as an alternative substrate for nitric oxide (•NO) production in the gut. This novel pathway implies the sequential reduction of nitrate to nitrite, •NO and other bioactive nitrogen oxides but the physiological relevance of these oxidants has remained elusive. We have previously shown that dietary nitrite fuels an hitherto unrecognized nitrating pathway at acidic gastric pH, through which pepsinogen is nitrated in the gastric mucosa, yielding a less active form of pepsin in vitro. Here, we demonstrate that pepsin is nitrated in vivo and explore the functional impact of protein nitration by means of peptic ulcer development. Upon administration of pentagastrin and human nitrite-rich saliva or sodium nitrite to rats, nitrated pepsin was detected in the animal's stomach by immunoprecipitation. •NO was measured in the gastric headspace before and after nitrite instillation by chemiluminescence. At the end of each procedure, the stomach's lesions, ranging from gastric erosions to haemorrhagic ulcers, were scored. Nitrite increased gastric •NO by 200-fold (p<0.05) and nitrated pepsin was detected both in the gastric juice and the mucosa (p<0.05). Exogenous urate, a scavenger of nitrogen dioxide radical, blunted •NO detection and inhibited pepsin nitration, suggesting an underlining free radical-dependent mechanism for nitration. Functionally, pepsin nitration prevented the development of gastric ulcers, as the lesions were only apparent when pepsin nitration was inhibited by urate. In sum, this work unravels a novel dietary-dependent nitrating pathway in which pepsin is nitrated and inactivated in the stomach, preventing the progression of gastric ulcers. PMID:27156250

  2. Sodium Bicarbonate

    MedlinePlus

    ... pregnant, plan to become pregnant, or are breast-feeding. If you become pregnant while taking sodium bicarbonate, call your doctor. ... your body. If you are on a sodium-restricted diet, check with your doctor before taking sodium bicarbonate.

  3. Abuse potential and dopaminergic effect of alkyl nitrites.

    PubMed

    Jeon, Seo Young; Kim, Yun Ji; Kim, Young-Hoon; Shin, Jisoon; Yun, Jaesuk; Han, Kyoungmoon; Park, Hye-Kyung; Kim, Hyung Soo; Cha, Hye Jin

    2016-08-26

    The abuse of alkyl nitrites is common among adolescents and young adults worldwide. However, the information regarding the effects of alkyl nitrites on the central nervous system and the associated psychological abuse potential is scarce. The abuse potential of 3 representative alkyl nitrites - isobutyl nitrite, isoamyl nitrite, and butyl nitrite - was evaluated in mice using conditioned place preference tests with an unbiased method. The dopamine levels released by synaptosomes extracted from the striatal region were measured using high performance liquid chromatography. Mice treated with the test substances (50mg/kg, i.p.) exhibited a significantly increased drug-paired place preference. Moreover, greater levels of dopamine were released by striatal region synaptosomes in response to isobutyl nitrite treatment in mice. Thus, our findings suggest that alkyl nitrites could lead to psychological dependence and dopaminergic effects. Furthermore, these results provide scientific evidence to support the regulation of alkyl nitrites as psychoactive substances in the future.

  4. Release of Nitrogen and Phosphorus from Poultry Litter Amended with Acidified Biochar

    PubMed Central

    Doydora, Sarah A.; Cabrera, Miguel L.; Das, Keshav C.; Gaskin, Julia W.; Sonon, Leticia S.; Miller, William P.

    2011-01-01

    Application of poultry litter (PL) to soil may lead to nitrogen (N) losses through ammonia (NH3) volatilization and to potential contamination of surface runoff with PL-derived phosphorus (P). Amending litter with acidified biochar may minimize these problems by decreasing litter pH and by retaining litter-derived P, respectively. This study evaluated the effect of acidified biochars from pine chips (PC) and peanut hulls (PH) on NH3 losses and inorganic N and P released from surface-applied or incorporated PL. Poultry litter with or without acidified biochars was surface-applied or incorporated into the soil and incubated for 21 d. Volatilized NH3 was determined by trapping it in acid. Inorganic N and P were determined by leaching the soil with 0.01 M of CaCl2 during the study and by extracting it with 1 M KCl after incubation. Acidified biochars reduced NH3 losses by 58 to 63% with surface-applied PL, and by 56 to 60% with incorporated PL. Except for PH biochar, which caused a small increase in leached NH4 +-N with incorporated PL, acidified biochars had no effect on leached or KCl-extractable inorganic N and P from surface-applied or incorporated PL. These results suggest that acidified biochars may decrease NH3 losses from PL but may not reduce the potential for P loss in surface runoff from soils receiving PL. PMID:21655132

  5. The fate of sulfate in acidified pig slurry during storage and following application to cropped soil.

    PubMed

    Eriksen, Jørgen; Sørensen, Peter; Elsgaard, Lars

    2008-01-01

    Acidification of slurry with sulfuric acid is a recent agricultural practice that may serve a double purpose: reducing ammonia emission and ensuring crop sulfur sufficiency. We investigated S transformations in untreated and acidified pig slurry stored for up to 11 mo at 2, 10, or 20 degrees C. Furthermore, the fertilizer efficiency of sulfuric acid in acidified slurry was investigated in a pot experiment with spring barley. The sulfate content from acidification with sulfuric acid was relatively stable and even after 11 mo of storage the majority was in the plant-available sulfate form. Microbial sulfate reduction during storage of acidified pig slurry was limited, presumably due to initial pH effects and a limitation in the availability of easily degradable organic matter. Sulfide accumulation was observed during storage but the sulfide levels in acidified slurry did not exceed those of the untreated slurry for several months after addition. The S fertilizer value of the acidified slurry was considerable as a result of the stable sulfate pool during storage. The high content of inorganic S in the acidified slurry may potentially lead to development of odorous volatile sulfur-containing compounds and investigations are needed into the relationship between odor development and the C and S composition of the slurry. PMID:18178902

  6. Elevated Colonization of Microborers at a Volcanically Acidified Coral Reef

    PubMed Central

    Enochs, Ian C.; Manzello, Derek P.; Tribollet, Aline; Valentino, Lauren; Kolodziej, Graham; Donham, Emily M.; Fitchett, Mark D.; Carlton, Renee; Price, Nichole N.

    2016-01-01

    Experiments have demonstrated that ocean acidification (OA) conditions projected to occur by the end of the century will slow the calcification of numerous coral species and accelerate the biological erosion of reef habitats (bioerosion). Microborers, which bore holes less than 100 μm diameter, are one of the most pervasive agents of bioerosion and are present throughout all calcium carbonate substrates within the reef environment. The response of diverse reef functional groups to OA is known from real-world ecosystems, but to date our understanding of the relationship between ocean pH and carbonate dissolution by microborers is limited to controlled laboratory experiments. Here we examine the settlement of microborers to pure mineral calcium carbonate substrates (calcite) along a natural pH gradient at a volcanically acidified reef at Maug, Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands (CNMI). Colonization of pioneer microborers was higher in the lower pH waters near the vent field. Depth of microborer penetration was highly variable both among and within sites (4.2–195.5 μm) over the short duration of the study (3 mo.) and no clear relationship to increasing CO2 was observed. Calculated rates of biogenic dissolution, however, were highest at the two sites closer to the vent and were not significantly different from each other. These data represent the first evidence of OA-enhancement of microboring flora colonization in newly available substrates and provide further evidence that microborers, especially bioeroding chlorophytes, respond positively to low pH. The accelerated breakdown and dissolution of reef framework structures with OA will likely lead to declines in structural complexity and integrity, as well as possible loss of essential habitat. PMID:27467570

  7. Elevated Colonization of Microborers at a Volcanically Acidified Coral Reef.

    PubMed

    Enochs, Ian C; Manzello, Derek P; Tribollet, Aline; Valentino, Lauren; Kolodziej, Graham; Donham, Emily M; Fitchett, Mark D; Carlton, Renee; Price, Nichole N

    2016-01-01

    Experiments have demonstrated that ocean acidification (OA) conditions projected to occur by the end of the century will slow the calcification of numerous coral species and accelerate the biological erosion of reef habitats (bioerosion). Microborers, which bore holes less than 100 μm diameter, are one of the most pervasive agents of bioerosion and are present throughout all calcium carbonate substrates within the reef environment. The response of diverse reef functional groups to OA is known from real-world ecosystems, but to date our understanding of the relationship between ocean pH and carbonate dissolution by microborers is limited to controlled laboratory experiments. Here we examine the settlement of microborers to pure mineral calcium carbonate substrates (calcite) along a natural pH gradient at a volcanically acidified reef at Maug, Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands (CNMI). Colonization of pioneer microborers was higher in the lower pH waters near the vent field. Depth of microborer penetration was highly variable both among and within sites (4.2-195.5 μm) over the short duration of the study (3 mo.) and no clear relationship to increasing CO2 was observed. Calculated rates of biogenic dissolution, however, were highest at the two sites closer to the vent and were not significantly different from each other. These data represent the first evidence of OA-enhancement of microboring flora colonization in newly available substrates and provide further evidence that microborers, especially bioeroding chlorophytes, respond positively to low pH. The accelerated breakdown and dissolution of reef framework structures with OA will likely lead to declines in structural complexity and integrity, as well as possible loss of essential habitat. PMID:27467570

  8. Mechanisms of nitrite addition for simultaneous sludge fermentation/nitrite removal (SFNR).

    PubMed

    Wu, Chengcheng; Peng, Yongzhen; Wang, Shuying; Li, Baikun; Zhang, Liang; Cao, Shenbin; Du, Rui

    2014-11-01

    Simultaneous sludge fermentation and nitrite removal (SFNR) was investigated as a novel sludge/wastewater treatment process with high nitrogen concentrations. The results showed that introducing nitrite improved the primary sludge (PS) fermentation system by improving the chemical oxygen demand (COD) yields and the volatile suspend solid (VSS) reduction. At a nitrite dosage of 0.2 g g SS(-1), the COD production was 1.02 g g VSS(-1) and the VSS reduction was 63.4% within 7-day fermentation, while the COD production was only 0.17 g g VSS(-1) and the VSS reduction was only 4.9% in the blank test. Nitrite contained in wastewater was removed through denitrification process in the SFNR system. The solubility of carbohydrate and protein was substantially enhanced, and their contents reached the peak once nitrite was consumed. In addition, the nutrient release and methane generation were inhibited in the SFNR system, which alleviated the environmental pollution. Unlike traditional fermentation systems, neither alkaline condition nor high free nitrite acid (FNA) concentration affected the PS fermentation in the SFNR system. Molecular weight distribution (MWD) and Live/Dead cell analysis indicated that the sludge disruption by nitrite and the consumption of soluble organic substances in sludge might play important roles in SFNR.

  9. Carbon-Fiber Nitrite Microsensor for In Situ Biofilm Monitoring

    EPA Science Inventory

    During nitrification, nitrite is produced as an intermediate when ammonia is oxidized to nitrate. It is well established that nitrifying biofilm are involved in nitrification episodes in chloraminated drinking water distribution systems with nitrite accumulation occurring during...

  10. Carbon-Fiber Nitrite Microsensor for In Situ Biofilm Monitoring

    EPA Science Inventory

    During nitrification, nitrite is produced as an intermediate when ammonia is oxidized to nitrate. It is well established that nitrifying biofilm are involved in nitrification episodes in chloraminated drinking water distribution systems with nitrite accumulation occurring during ...

  11. 9 CFR 319.2 - Products and nitrates and nitrites.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Products and nitrates and nitrites... and nitrates and nitrites. Any product, such as frankfurters and corned beef, for which there is a standard in this part and to which nitrate or nitrite is permitted or required to be added, may be...

  12. 9 CFR 319.2 - Products and nitrates and nitrites.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Products and nitrates and nitrites... and nitrates and nitrites. Any product, such as frankfurters and corned beef, for which there is a standard in this part and to which nitrate or nitrite is permitted or required to be added, may be...

  13. 9 CFR 319.2 - Products and nitrates and nitrites.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Products and nitrates and nitrites... and nitrates and nitrites. Any product, such as frankfurters and corned beef, for which there is a standard in this part and to which nitrate or nitrite is permitted or required to be added, may be...

  14. 9 CFR 319.2 - Products and nitrates and nitrites.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Products and nitrates and nitrites... and nitrates and nitrites. Any product, such as frankfurters and corned beef, for which there is a standard in this part and to which nitrate or nitrite is permitted or required to be added, may be...

  15. 9 CFR 319.2 - Products and nitrates and nitrites.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Products and nitrates and nitrites... and nitrates and nitrites. Any product, such as frankfurters and corned beef, for which there is a standard in this part and to which nitrate or nitrite is permitted or required to be added, may be...

  16. Nitrite inhibition of denitrification by Pseudomonas fluorescens

    SciTech Connect

    Almeida, J.S.; Julio, S.M.; Reis, M.A.M. |

    1995-05-05

    Using a pure culture of Pseudomonas fluorescens as a model system nitrite inhibition of denitrification was studied. A mineral media with acetate and nitrate as sole electron donor and acceptor, respectively, was used. Results obtained in continuous stirred-tank reactors (CSTR) operated at pH values between 6.6 and 7.8 showed that growth inhibition depended only on the nitrite undissociated fraction concentration (nitrous acid). A mathematical model to describe this dependence is put forward. The maximum nitrous acid concentration compatible with cell growth and denitrification activity was found to be 66 {mu}g N/L. Denitrification activity was partially associated with growth, as described by the Luedeking-Piret equation. However, when the freshly inoculated reactor was operated discontinuously, nitrite accumulation caused growth uncoupling from denitrification activity. The authors suggest that these results can be interpreted considering that (a) nitrous acid acts as a proton uncoupler; and (b) cultures continuously exposed to nitrous acid prevent the uncoupling effect but not the growth inhibition. Examination of the growth dependence on nitrite concentration at pH 7.0 showed that adapted cultures (growth on CSTR) are less sensitive to nitrous acid inhibition than the ones cultivated in batch.

  17. Nitrite-free Asian hot dog sausages reformulated with nitrite replacers.

    PubMed

    Ruiz-Capillas, C; Tahmouzi, S; Triki, M; Rodríguez-Salas, L; Jiménez-Colmenero, F; Herrero, A M

    2015-07-01

    This research deals with the application of a global strategy designed to produce a nitrite-free Asian hot dog. Different ingredients such as annatto, cochineal, orange dietary fibre, vitamins E and C, lactate and celery were combined in order to study the appearance (colour), lipid oxidation stability and microbial stability of the nitrite-free formulations. The control sample contained much more (P < 0.05) residual nitrite (88.7 mg/kg) than the samples without added nitrite (23-24 mg/kg). Generally, no formulation-dependent variations were observed in fat and water binding properties. Control sample had the highest L* and a* values, while the product with annatto (RA) had the lowest a* values. Lipid oxidation levels were similar irrespective of formulation. The hot dog reformulated with cochineal (RC) scored higher for overall acceptability than RA, mainly due to its colour. PMID:26139898

  18. Natural inactivation of phosphorus by aluminum in atmospherically acidified water bodies.

    PubMed

    Kopácek, J; Ulrich, K U; Hejzlar, J; Borovec, J; Stuchlik, E

    2001-11-01

    Atmospheric acidification of catchment-lake ecosystems may provide natural conditions for the in-lake control of P cycling. This process is based on the elevated transport of aluminum from acidified soils and its subsequent precipitation in the water body and is described for strongly acidified forest lakes, acidified and circumneutral reservoirs, and a moderately acidified alpine lake. In water bodies with episodically or permanently acidified inflows a pH gradient develops between lake water and tributaries due to: (i) neutralization of acidic inflows after mixing with waters with undepleted carbonate buffering system, and/or (ii) the in-lake alkalinity generation dominated by biochemical removal of NO3- and SO4(2-). With the pH increasing towards neutrality, ionic Al species hydrolyze and form colloidal Al hydroxides (Al(part)) with large specific surfaces and strong ability to bind orthophosphate from the liquid phase. Moreover, Alpart settles and increases the P sorption capacity of the sediment. The presence of Al(part) on the bottom reduces orthophosphate release from sediments after its liberation from ferric oxyhydroxides during anoxia because Al(part) is not sensitive to redox changes. Consequently, the natural in-lake P inactivation may be expected in any water body with elevated Al input and a pH gradient between its inlet and outlet.

  19. 77 FR 71006 - Sodium Nitrite Injection and Sodium Thiosulfate Injection Drug Products Labeled for the Treatment...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-11-28

    ... poisoning are new drugs that require approved new drug applications (NDAs) or abbreviated new drug..., Office of New Drugs, Center for Drug Evaluation and Research, Food and Drug Administration, 10903 New... Research, Food and Drug Administration, 10903 New Hampshire Ave., Bldg. 51, Rm. 5239, Silver......

  20. Trace metal biogeochemistry in mangrove ecosystems: a comparative assessment of acidified (by acid sulfate soils) and non-acidified sites.

    PubMed

    Nath, Bibhash; Birch, Gavin; Chaudhuri, Punarbasu

    2013-10-01

    The generation of acidity and subsequent mobilization of toxic metals induced by acid sulfate soils (ASSs) are known to cause severe environmental damage to many coastal wetlands and estuaries of Australia and worldwide. Mangrove ecosystems serve to protect coastal environments, but are increasingly threatened from such ASS-induced acidification due to variable hydrological conditions (i.e., inundation-desiccation cycles). However, the impact of such behaviors on trace metal distribution, bio-availability and accumulation in mangrove tissues, i.e., leaves and pneumatophores, are largely unknown. In this study, we examined how ASS-induced acidifications controlled trace metal distribution and bio-availability in gray mangrove (Avicennia marina) soils and in tissues in the Kooragang wetland, New South Wales, Australia. We collected mangrove soils, leaves and pneumatophores from a part of the wetland acidified from ASS (i.e., an affected site) for detailed biogeochemical studies. The results were compared with samples collected from a natural intertidal mangrove forest (i.e., a control site) located within the same wetland. Soil pH (mean: 5.90) indicated acidic conditions in the affected site, whereas pH was near-neutral (mean: 7.17) in the control site. The results did not show statistically significant differences in near-total and bio-available metal concentrations, except for Fe and Mn, between affected and control sites. Iron concentrations were significantly (p values≤0.001) greater in the affected site, whereas Mn concentrations were significantly (p values≤0.001) greater in the control site. However, large proportions of near-total metals were potentially bio-available in control sites. Concentrations of Fe and Ni were significantly (p values≤0.001) greater in leaves and pneumatophores of the affected sites, whereas Mn, Cu, Pb and Zn were greater in control sites. The degree of metal bio-accumulation in leaves and pneumatophores suggest contrasting

  1. Trace metal biogeochemistry in mangrove ecosystems: a comparative assessment of acidified (by acid sulfate soils) and non-acidified sites.

    PubMed

    Nath, Bibhash; Birch, Gavin; Chaudhuri, Punarbasu

    2013-10-01

    The generation of acidity and subsequent mobilization of toxic metals induced by acid sulfate soils (ASSs) are known to cause severe environmental damage to many coastal wetlands and estuaries of Australia and worldwide. Mangrove ecosystems serve to protect coastal environments, but are increasingly threatened from such ASS-induced acidification due to variable hydrological conditions (i.e., inundation-desiccation cycles). However, the impact of such behaviors on trace metal distribution, bio-availability and accumulation in mangrove tissues, i.e., leaves and pneumatophores, are largely unknown. In this study, we examined how ASS-induced acidifications controlled trace metal distribution and bio-availability in gray mangrove (Avicennia marina) soils and in tissues in the Kooragang wetland, New South Wales, Australia. We collected mangrove soils, leaves and pneumatophores from a part of the wetland acidified from ASS (i.e., an affected site) for detailed biogeochemical studies. The results were compared with samples collected from a natural intertidal mangrove forest (i.e., a control site) located within the same wetland. Soil pH (mean: 5.90) indicated acidic conditions in the affected site, whereas pH was near-neutral (mean: 7.17) in the control site. The results did not show statistically significant differences in near-total and bio-available metal concentrations, except for Fe and Mn, between affected and control sites. Iron concentrations were significantly (p values≤0.001) greater in the affected site, whereas Mn concentrations were significantly (p values≤0.001) greater in the control site. However, large proportions of near-total metals were potentially bio-available in control sites. Concentrations of Fe and Ni were significantly (p values≤0.001) greater in leaves and pneumatophores of the affected sites, whereas Mn, Cu, Pb and Zn were greater in control sites. The degree of metal bio-accumulation in leaves and pneumatophores suggest contrasting

  2. A Novel Nanofilm Sensor Based on Poly-(Alizarin Red)/Fe3O4 Magnetic Nanoparticles-Multiwalled Carbon Nanotubes Composite Material for Determination of Nitrite.

    PubMed

    Qu, Jianying; Dong, Ying; Yong, Wang; Lou, Tongfang; Du, Xueping; Qu, Jianhang

    2016-03-01

    Fe3O4 magnetic nanoparticles were synthesized by chemical co-precipitation with sodium citrate as surfactant and were characterized by FT-IR spectrometer, X-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy. A novel nitrite sensor was fabricated by electropolymerization of alizarin red on the surface of glassy carbon electrode modified with Fe3O4-multiwalled carbon nanotubes composite nanofilm. Under the optimal experimental conditions, it was showed that the proposed sensor exhibited good electrocatalytic activity to the oxidation of nitrite, and the peak current increased linearly with the nitrite concentration from 9.64 x 10(-6) mol x L(-1) to 1.30 x 10(-3) mol x L(-1) (R = 0.9976) with a detection limit of 1.19 x 10(-6) mol x L(-1) (S/N = 3). This sensor showed excellent sensitivity, wide linear range, stability and repeatability for nitrite determination with potential applications.

  3. Oxidation phenomena and color properties of grape pomace on nitrite-reduced meat emulsion systems.

    PubMed

    Riazi, Fatemeh; Zeynali, Fariba; Hoseini, Ebrahim; Behmadi, Homa; Savadkoohi, Sobhan

    2016-11-01

    The present study focuses on the effect of different levels of red grape pomace (1 and 2%, w/w) on the color changes, lipid oxidation (TBARS), antioxidant activity, microbial counts, total phenol content and sensory attributes of the sausages formulated with various levels of sodium nitrite (30, 60 and 120mg/kg). It was found that the addition of grape pomace (1%, w/w) in combination of reduced nitrite levels to the beef sausage samples reduced TBARS content and the degree of lipid oxidation. Antioxidant activity and total phenol contents were further evaluated based on DPPH scavenging activity method. A significant reduction in lightness (L*) and yellowness (b*) of systems containing grape pomace was observed, following by an increase in the oxidative stability and the radical scavenging activity. Acceptability of beef sausages was not significantly (P>0.05) affected by the addition of grape pomace and had relatively greater scores from a sensory point of view. PMID:27424305

  4. Nitrite dismutase reaction mechanism: kinetic and spectroscopic investigation of the interaction between nitrophorin and nitrite.

    PubMed

    He, Chunmao; Howes, Barry D; Smulevich, Giulietta; Rumpel, Sigrun; Reijerse, Edward J; Lubitz, Wolfgang; Cox, Nicholas; Knipp, Markus

    2015-04-01

    Nitrite is an important metabolite in the physiological pathways of NO and other nitrogen oxides in both enzymatic and nonenzymatic reactions. The ferric heme b protein nitrophorin 4 (NP4) is capable of catalyzing nitrite disproportionation at neutral pH, producing NO. Here we attempt to resolve its disproportionation mechanism. Isothermal titration calorimetry of a gallium(III) derivative of NP4 demonstrates that the heme iron coordinates the first substrate nitrite. Contrary to previous low-temperature EPR measurements, which assigned the NP4-nitrite complex electronic configuration solely to a low-spin (S = 1/2) species, electronic absorption and resonance Raman spectroscopy presented here demonstrate that the NP4-NO2(-) cofactor exists in a high-spin/low-spin equilibrium of 7:3 which is in fast exchange in solution. Spin-state interchange is taken as evidence for dynamic NO2(-) coordination, with the high-spin configuration (S = 5/2) representing the reactive species. Subsequent kinetic measurements reveal that the dismutation reaction proceeds in two discrete steps and identify an {FeNO}(7) intermediate species. The first reaction step, generating the {FeNO}(7) intermediate, represents an oxygen atom transfer from the iron bound nitrite to a second nitrite molecule in the protein pocket. In the second step this intermediate reduces a third nitrite substrate yielding two NO molecules. A nearby aspartic acid residue side-chain transiently stores protons required for the reaction, which is crucial for NPs' function as nitrite dismutase. PMID:25751738

  5. Chemical reactivity of nitrates and nitrites towards TBP and potassium nickel ferrocyanide between 30 and 300 deg

    SciTech Connect

    Lambertin, D.; Chartier, D.; Joussot-Dubien, C.

    2007-07-01

    Since the late sixties, bitumen has been widely used by the nuclear industry as a matrix for the immobilization of low- and intermediate level radioactive waste originating mainly from the nuclear activities: precipitation or evaporator concentrates, ion exchange resins, incinerator ashes, and filter materials. Depending on bitumen and operating conditions, bituminization of radioactive waste can be operated between 130 and 180 deg. C, so chemical reaction can be induced with nitrate or nitrite towards elements contained in waste (TPB, potassium nickel ferrocyanide and cobalt compound) and bitumen. These reactions are mainly exothermic this is the reason why the enthalpy reaction and their temperature of initiation have to be determined independently of their concentration in waste. In this work, we have studied by Calvet Calorimetry at 0.1 deg. C/min heating rates, the behaviour of chemical elements especially oxido-reduction couples that can react at a temperature range 100- 300 deg. C (Nitrate/PPFeNi, Nitrite/PPFeNi, Nitrate/TBP, Nitrite/TBP, Nitrate/bitumen and Nitrite/bitumen). The initial temperature reaction of nitrates or nitrites towards potassium nickel ferrocyanide (PPFeNi) has been studied and is equal respectively to 225 deg. C and 175 deg. C. Because of the large scale temperature reaction of nitrate and PPFeNi, enthalpy reaction can not be calculated, although enthalpy reaction of nitrite and PPFeNi is equal to 270 kJ/mol of nitrite. Sodium Nitrate and TBP behaviour has been investigated, and an exothermic reaction at 135 deg. C until 250 deg. C is evidenced. The exothermic energy reaction is a function of TBP concentration and the enthalpy reaction has been determined. (authors)

  6. Nutrient cycling and the growth of benthic algae in experimentally acidified Little Rock Lake, WI

    SciTech Connect

    Detenbeck, N.E.

    1987-01-01

    Changes in nutrient-cycling and the growth of benthic algae resulting from decreased pH in low alkalinity lake systems were analyzed by laboratory, mesocosm, and whole-lake studies on Little Rock Lake, Wisconsin. Nutrients, transparency, an algal growth in the experimentally acidified basin were compared with conditions in an untreated reference basin. During the first summer following acidification (1985), accumulation rates of attached algae were significantly higher in the acidified basin than in the reference basin during June-August, but not in September. Color and winter silica values were significantly lower in the acidified basin relative to the reference basin following treatment. In addition, the lack of a fall decline in SiO/sub 2/ in the north basin in 1986 may signal pH-related changes in siliceous algal communities.

  7. Nitrite inhalants: history, epidemiology, and possible links to AIDS.

    PubMed Central

    Haverkos, H W; Kopstein, A N; Wilson, H; Drotman, P

    1994-01-01

    Nitrite inhalants have been commonly abused substances in the United States. Nitrite inhalants and AIDS was a popular topic in the early 1980s, when the cause of AIDS was not known. With the discovery of HIV, concern about nitrite use in the USA waned. However, nitrite inhalant use is associated with behavioral relapse and HIV transmission among gay men, with decreased lymphocyte counts and natural killer cell activity in a few laboratory studies, and it remains a candidate cofactor in the pathogenesis of AIDS-related Kaposi's sarcoma. Discouraging nitrite use continues to be a worthwhile public health goal. PMID:9644194

  8. Caustic-Side Solvent Extraction: Anti-Caking Surfactants Found to be Cause of Apparent Effect of High Nitrite Concentration on Cesium Stripping

    SciTech Connect

    Delmau, L.H.

    2002-06-13

    Experiments conducted in FY01 previously indicated a potential cesium stripping problem in the CSSX process due to the presence of nitrite in the waste simulant. The stripping issue seemed all the more important as the nitrite concentration increased. Experiments presented in this work have demonstrated that the true reason for the cesium stripping problem was in fact the presence of an anti-caking agent in the,sodium nitrite. used for the preparation of the simulants. The anti-caking agent is actually a mixture of well-known surfactants, sodium mono- and di-methyl naphthalene sulfonate that can partition into the organic-phase on extraction, then retain cesium upon stripping. The effect was demonstrated by adding known amounts of the anti-caking agent to clean systems. Data suggest that rejuvenation of the solvent can be obtained by a caustic wash following the stripping stage.

  9. Sodium Test

    MedlinePlus

    ... be limited. Home Visit Global Sites Search Help? Sodium Share this page: Was this page helpful? Also known as: Na Formal name: Sodium Related tests: Chloride , Bicarbonate , Potassium , Electrolytes , Osmolality , Basic ...

  10. Nitrites derived from Foneiculum vulgare (fennel) seeds promotes vascular functions.

    PubMed

    Swaminathan, Akila; Sridhara, Sree Rama Chaitanya; Sinha, Swaraj; Nagarajan, Shunmugam; Balaguru, Uma Maheswari; Siamwala, Jamila H; Rajendran, Saranya; Saran, Uttara; Chatterjee, Suvro

    2012-12-01

    Recent evidence has demonstrated that nitrites play an important role in the cardiovascular system. Fennel (Foneiculum vulgare) seeds are often used as mouth fresheners after a meal in both the Indian sub-continent and around the world. The present study aims to quantify the nitrite and nitrates in fennel seeds as well as elucidating the effect of fennel derived-nitrites on vascular functions. Results from our study show that fennel seeds contain significantly higher amount of nitrites when compared to other commonly used post-meal seeds. Furthermore our study confirmed the functional effects of fennel derived-nitrites using in vitro and ex vivo models that describe the promotion of angiogenesis, cell migration, and vasorelaxation. We also showed that chewing fennel seeds enhanced nitrite content of saliva. Thus our study indicates the potential role of fennel derived-nitrites on the vascular system.

  11. Influence of dietary nitrate on nitrite level of human saliva

    SciTech Connect

    Cingi, M.I.; Cingi, C.; Cingi, E. )

    1992-01-01

    The amount of nitrite in saliva depends directly on the amount of nitrate and nitrite ingested. Ingested nitrate and nitrite are absorbed by the upper gastrointestinal tract, concentrated from the plasma and excreted into the saliva by salivary glands. The presence of nitrate-reducing bacteria in the mouth caused nitrite to be formed, resulting in higher nitrite concentration. In recent years it has been shown that the measurement of some drugs and agents in mixed saliva might be a reliable guide to blood or body levels of those agents. In this present study the level of nitrite in mixed and parotid saliva in Eskisehir (Western part of middle Anatolia) and the correction between sex, smoking and age was determined. The effects of drinking water and meat products on nitrite levels were determined.

  12. Effect of pH and nitrite concentration on nitrite oxidation rate.

    PubMed

    Jiménez, E; Giménez, J B; Ruano, M V; Ferrer, J; Serralta, J

    2011-10-01

    The effect of pH and nitrite concentration on the activity of the nitrite oxidizing bacteria (NOB) in an activated sludge reactor has been determined by means of laboratory batch experiments based on respirometric techniques. The bacterial activity was measured at different pH and at different total nitrite concentrations (TNO₂). The experimental results showed that the nitrite oxidation rate (NOR) depends on the TNO₂ concentration independently of the free nitrous acid (FNA) concentration, so FNA cannot be considered as the real substrate for NOB. NOB were strongly affected by low pH values (no activity was detected at pH 6.5) but no inhibition was observed at high pH values (activity was nearly the same for the pH range 7.5-9.95). A kinetic expression for nitrite oxidation process including switch functions to model the effect of TNO₂ concentration and pH inhibition is proposed. Substrate half saturation constant and pH inhibition constants have been obtained.

  13. Nitrite controls the release of nitric oxide in Pseudomonas aeruginosa cd{sub 1} nitrite reductase

    SciTech Connect

    Rinaldo, Serena; Brunori, Maurizio; Cutruzzola, Francesca

    2007-11-23

    Nitrite reductase (cd{sub 1}NIR) from Pseudomonas aeruginosa, which catalyses the reduction of nitrite to nitric oxide (NO), contains a c-heme as the electron acceptor and a d{sub 1}-heme where catalysis occurs. Reduction involves binding of nitrite to the reduced d{sub 1}-heme, followed by dehydration to yield NO; release of NO and re-reduction of the enzyme close the cycle. Since NO is a powerful inhibitor of ferrous hemeproteins, enzymatic turnover demands the release of NO. We recently discovered that NO dissociation from the ferrous d{sub 1}-heme is fast, showing that cd{sub 1}NIR behaves differently from other hemeproteins. Here we demonstrate for the first time that the physiological substrate nitrite displaces NO from the ferrous enzyme, which enters a new catalytic cycle; this reaction depends on the conserved His369 whose role in substrate stabilization is crucial for catalysis. Thus we suggest that also in vivo the activity of cd{sub 1}NIR is controlled by nitrite.

  14. Nitrite in feed: from animal health to human health.

    PubMed

    Cockburn, Andrew; Brambilla, Gianfranco; Fernández, Maria-Luisa; Arcella, Davide; Bordajandi, Luisa R; Cottrill, Bruce; van Peteghem, Carlos; Dorne, Jean-Lou

    2013-08-01

    Nitrite is widely consumed from the diet by animals and humans. However the largest contribution to exposure results from the in vivo conversion of exogenously derived nitrate to nitrite. Because of its potential to cause to methaemoglobin (MetHb) formation at excessive levels of intake, nitrite is regulated in feed and water as an undesirable substance. Forages and contaminated water have been shown to contain high levels of nitrate and represent the largest contributor to nitrite exposure for food-producing animals. Interspecies differences in sensitivity to nitrite intoxication principally result from physiological and anatomical differences in nitrite handling. In the case of livestock both pigs and cattle are relatively susceptible. With pigs this is due to a combination of low levels of bacterial nitrite reductase and hence potential to reduce nitrite to ammonia as well as reduced capacity to detoxify MetHb back to haemoglobin (Hb) due to intrinsically low levels of MetHb reductase. In cattle the sensitivity is due to the potential for high dietary intake and high levels of rumen conversion of nitrate to nitrite, and an adaptable gut flora which at normal loadings shunts nitrite to ammonia for biosynthesis. However when this escape mechanism gets overloaded, nitrite builds up and can enter the blood stream resulting in methemoglobinemia. Looking at livestock case histories reported in the literature no-observed-effect levels of 3.3mg/kg body weight (b.w.) per day for nitrite in pigs and cattle were estimated and related to the total daily nitrite intake that would result from complete feed at the EU maximum permissible level. This resulted in margins of safety of 9-fold and 5-fold for pigs and cattle, respectively. Recognising that the bulkiness of animal feed limits their consumption, these margins in conjunction with good agricultural practise were considered satisfactory for the protection of livestock health. A human health risk assessment was also

  15. Nitrite in feed: From Animal health to human health

    SciTech Connect

    Cockburn, Andrew; Brambilla, Gianfranco; Fernández, Maria-Luisa; Arcella, Davide; Peteghem, Carlos van; Dorne, Jean-Lou

    2013-08-01

    Nitrite is widely consumed from the diet by animals and humans. However the largest contribution to exposure results from the in vivo conversion of exogenously derived nitrate to nitrite. Because of its potential to cause to methaemoglobin (MetHb) formation at excessive levels of intake, nitrite is regulated in feed and water as an undesirable substance. Forages and contaminated water have been shown to contain high levels of nitrate and represent the largest contributor to nitrite exposure for food-producing animals. Interspecies differences in sensitivity to nitrite intoxication principally result from physiological and anatomical differences in nitrite handling. In the case of livestock both pigs and cattle are relatively susceptible. With pigs this is due to a combination of low levels of bacterial nitrite reductase and hence potential to reduce nitrite to ammonia as well as reduced capacity to detoxify MetHb back to haemoglobin (Hb) due to intrinsically low levels of MetHb reductase. In cattle the sensitivity is due to the potential for high dietary intake and high levels of rumen conversion of nitrate to nitrite, and an adaptable gut flora which at normal loadings shunts nitrite to ammonia for biosynthesis. However when this escape mechanism gets overloaded, nitrite builds up and can enter the blood stream resulting in methemoglobinemia. Looking at livestock case histories reported in the literature no-observed-effect levels of 3.3 mg/kg body weight (b.w.) per day for nitrite in pigs and cattle were estimated and related to the total daily nitrite intake that would result from complete feed at the EU maximum permissible level. This resulted in margins of safety of 9-fold and 5-fold for pigs and cattle, respectively. Recognising that the bulkiness of animal feed limits their consumption, these margins in conjunction with good agricultural practise were considered satisfactory for the protection of livestock health. A human health risk assessment was also

  16. Nitrite in feed: from animal health to human health.

    PubMed

    Cockburn, Andrew; Brambilla, Gianfranco; Fernández, Maria-Luisa; Arcella, Davide; Bordajandi, Luisa R; Cottrill, Bruce; van Peteghem, Carlos; Dorne, Jean-Lou

    2013-08-01

    Nitrite is widely consumed from the diet by animals and humans. However the largest contribution to exposure results from the in vivo conversion of exogenously derived nitrate to nitrite. Because of its potential to cause to methaemoglobin (MetHb) formation at excessive levels of intake, nitrite is regulated in feed and water as an undesirable substance. Forages and contaminated water have been shown to contain high levels of nitrate and represent the largest contributor to nitrite exposure for food-producing animals. Interspecies differences in sensitivity to nitrite intoxication principally result from physiological and anatomical differences in nitrite handling. In the case of livestock both pigs and cattle are relatively susceptible. With pigs this is due to a combination of low levels of bacterial nitrite reductase and hence potential to reduce nitrite to ammonia as well as reduced capacity to detoxify MetHb back to haemoglobin (Hb) due to intrinsically low levels of MetHb reductase. In cattle the sensitivity is due to the potential for high dietary intake and high levels of rumen conversion of nitrate to nitrite, and an adaptable gut flora which at normal loadings shunts nitrite to ammonia for biosynthesis. However when this escape mechanism gets overloaded, nitrite builds up and can enter the blood stream resulting in methemoglobinemia. Looking at livestock case histories reported in the literature no-observed-effect levels of 3.3mg/kg body weight (b.w.) per day for nitrite in pigs and cattle were estimated and related to the total daily nitrite intake that would result from complete feed at the EU maximum permissible level. This resulted in margins of safety of 9-fold and 5-fold for pigs and cattle, respectively. Recognising that the bulkiness of animal feed limits their consumption, these margins in conjunction with good agricultural practise were considered satisfactory for the protection of livestock health. A human health risk assessment was also

  17. [Study the restoration technology of concentrated application-natural diffusion about amendments of acidified soil of hilly woodland].

    PubMed

    Fang, Xiong; Liu, Ju-Xiu; Yin, Guang-Cai; Zhao, Liang; Liu, Shi-Zhong; Chu, Guo-Wei; Li, Yi-Yong

    2013-01-01

    Through concentrated application of lime, sewage sludge and lime + sewage sludge on the sloping top of the hilly woodlands, the restoration effects of the three soil amendments on the acidified soil of hilly woodland were studied. The results showed that: (1) Joint application of sewage sludge + lime can significantly (P < 0.05) decrease soil acidity, promote the rapid increase in soil organic matter and nitrogen content, increase soil cation exchange capacity, and effectively improve acidified soil. (2) Through natural diffusion mechanisms of surface and subsurface runoff, a large area of acidified soil of hilly woodlands can be restored by concentrated application of soil amendments on the sloping top of the hilly woodlands. (3) It is conducive to solve the pollution problems of the urban sewage sludge by using municipal sewage sludge to restore acidified soil, but only for the restoration of acidified soil of timber forest.

  18. [Study the restoration technology of concentrated application-natural diffusion about amendments of acidified soil of hilly woodland].

    PubMed

    Fang, Xiong; Liu, Ju-Xiu; Yin, Guang-Cai; Zhao, Liang; Liu, Shi-Zhong; Chu, Guo-Wei; Li, Yi-Yong

    2013-01-01

    Through concentrated application of lime, sewage sludge and lime + sewage sludge on the sloping top of the hilly woodlands, the restoration effects of the three soil amendments on the acidified soil of hilly woodland were studied. The results showed that: (1) Joint application of sewage sludge + lime can significantly (P < 0.05) decrease soil acidity, promote the rapid increase in soil organic matter and nitrogen content, increase soil cation exchange capacity, and effectively improve acidified soil. (2) Through natural diffusion mechanisms of surface and subsurface runoff, a large area of acidified soil of hilly woodlands can be restored by concentrated application of soil amendments on the sloping top of the hilly woodlands. (3) It is conducive to solve the pollution problems of the urban sewage sludge by using municipal sewage sludge to restore acidified soil, but only for the restoration of acidified soil of timber forest. PMID:23487954

  19. Binding of nitrite and its reductive activation to nitric oxide at biomimetic copper centers.

    PubMed

    Monzani, E; Anthony, G J; Koolhaas, A; Spandre, A; Leggieri, E; Casella, L; Gullotti, M; Nardin, G; Randaccio, L; Fontani, M; Zanello, P; Reedijk, J

    2000-04-01

    The reactivity of nitrite towards the copper(II) and copper(I) centers of a series of complexes with tridentate nitrogen donor ligands has been investigated. The ligands are bis[(1-methylbenzimidazol-2-yl)methyl]amine (1-bb), bis[2-(1-methylbenzimidazol-2-yl)ethyl]amine (2-bb), and bis[2-(3,5-dimethyl-1-pyrazolyl)ethyl]amine (ddah) and carry two terminal benzimidazole (1-bb, 2-bb) or pyrazole (ddah) rings and a central amine donor residue. While 2-bb and ddah form two adjacent six-membered chelate rings on metal coordination, 1-bb forms two smaller rings of five members. The binding affinity of nitrite and azide to the Cu(II) complexes (ClO4- as counterion) has been determined in solution. The association constants for the two ligands are similar, but nitrite is a slightly stronger ligand than azide when it binds as a bidentate donor. The X-ray crystal structure of the nitrite complex [Cu(ddah)(NO2)]ClO4 (final R=0.056) has been determined: triclinic P1space group, a=8.200(2) A, b=9.582(3) A, c=15.541(4) A. It may be described as a perchlorate salt of a "supramolecular" species resulting from the assembly of two complex cations and one sodium perchlorate unit. The copper stereochemistry in the complex is intermediate between SPY and TBP, and nitrite binds to Cu(II) asymmetrically, with Cu-O distances of 2.037(2) and 2.390(3) A and a nearly planar CuO2N cycle. On standing, solutions of [Cu(ddah)(NO2)]ClO4 in methanol produce the dinuclear complex [Cu(ddah)(OMe)]2(ClO4)2, containing dibridging methoxy groups. In fact the crystal structure analysis (final R=0.083) showed that the crystals are built up by dinuclear cations, arranged on a crystallographic symmetry center, and perchlorate anions. Electrochemical analysis shows that binding of nitrite to the Cu(II) complexes of 2-bb and ddah shifts the reduction potential of the Cu(II)/Cu(I) couple towards negative values by about 0.3 V. The thermodynamic parameters of the Cu(II)/Cu(I) electron transfer have also been

  20. The chemical behavior of acidified chromium (3) solutions. B.S. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Terman, D. K.

    1981-01-01

    A unique energy-storage system has been developed at NASA's Lewis Research Center called REDOX. This NASA-REDOX system is an electrochemical storage device that utilized the oxidation and reduction of two fully soluble redox couples for charging and discharging. The redox couples now being investigated are acidified chloride solutions of chromium (Cr(+2)/Cr(+3)) and iron (Fe(+2)/Fe(+3)).

  1. Production performance and physiological responses of Angora goat kids fed acidified milk replacer.

    PubMed

    Sahlu, T; Carneiro, H; el Shaer, H M; Fernandez, J M

    1992-06-01

    Angora kids were blocked by birth weight and sex and assigned randomly to goat milk or acidified milk replacer. Daily milk intake, weekly BW, and heart girth measurements, and blood parameters (packed cell volume, total protein, glucose, and NEFA) were monitored at 3 d (initial) and at 4, 6, 8, and 9 wk of age. Both groups were fed their respective milks for ad libitum intake for 6 wk and then reduced to 75, 50, 25, and 0% of wk-6 intake during wk 7, 8, 9, and 10, respectively. Solid feed (20% CP and 3.1. Mcal of metabolizable energy/kg of DM) was provided for ad libitum intake starting on wk 3. Pretreatment BW (average 2.4 kg) and blood parameters were similar for milk and replacer groups. Packed cell volume (21.8 and 34.2%), total protein (50.3 and 46.6 g/L), and NEFA (.52 and .69 meq/L) for goat milk and acidified milk replacer groups, respectively, were affected by dietary treatment. Final BW (average 10.5 kg) and mean plasma glucose concentration (84 to 88 mg/dl) were similar between treatments; however, kids fed goat milk produced more mohair (13.8%) than those fed acidified milk replacer. Despite physiological differences, acidified milk replacer can be used successfully to raise Angora kids.

  2. Quality evaluation of packaged acidified vegetables subjected to continuous microwave pasteurization

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The study evaluated the use of 915 MHz continuous microwave processing with a rotation apparatus for pasteurization of acidified vegetable packages. Broccoli florets, and 1.2 cm cubes of broccoli stems, red bell pepper, and sweetpotato were pre-equilibrated to 1 g/100 g NaCl and 0.38 g/100 mL citric...

  3. The Reaction between Iron(II) Iodide and Potassium Dichromate(VI) in Acidified Aqueous Solution

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Talbot, Christopher

    2013-01-01

    This "Science note" teaching lesson explores the possible reaction between the ions in a reaction mixture consisting of iron(II) iodide and potassium dichromate(VI) in acidified aqueous solution. The electrode potentials will be used to deduce any spontaneous reactions under standard thermodynamic conditions (298 K, 1 bar (approximately…

  4. Economic reduction of acidifying deposition in Finland by decreasing emissions in Finland, Estonia and Russia.

    PubMed

    Tähtinen, M; Lehtilä, A; Pipatti, R; Wistbacka, M; Savolainen, I

    1997-09-26

    Here we consider cost-effective solutions of emission control measures in Finland and the nearby areas of Estonia, St. Petersburg region, Karelia and Kola, in order to limit the acidifying deposition in Finland. In the study, the emission control costs of SO2, NOx and NH3 are assessed for the areas studied and an optimisation model developed for calculation of cost-optimal deposition control policies. The input data of the model consist of the cost functions describing the emission control costs to achieve lower emission levels for the gases and areas considered and of dispersion coefficients which describe the deposition due to an emission source in the deposition receptor grid squares. In addition, the model includes a description to calculate the acidifying load. The optimisation is based on linear programming. When the acidifying load of Southern Finland is reduced by minimising the total control costs, approx, three quarters of the total control costs are due to measures in the nearby areas, Estonia, St. Peterburg region, Karelia and Kola, and approx. one quarter due to measures in Finland. The distribution of costs in the cost-optimised cases depends relatively little on the level to which the acidifying load due the source areas considered are required to be reduced. If the load reduction target is moderate, the emission control measures should mainly be allocated to sulphur emissions and to some extent to ammonia emissions and, if the load reduction target is stricter, also to the emissions of nitrogen oxides.

  5. Survival of Mycobacterium avium and Mycobacterium tuberculosis in Acidified Vacuoles of Murine Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Gomes, Maria Salomé; Paul, Simon; Moreira, Andre L.; Appelberg, Rui; Rabinovitch, Michel; Kaplan, Gilla

    1999-01-01

    Despite the antimicrobial mechanisms of vertebrate phagocytes, mycobacteria can survive within the phagosomes of these cells. These organisms use various strategies to evade destruction, including inhibition of acidification of the phagosome and inhibition of phagosome-lysosome fusion. In contrast to mycobacteria, Coxiella burnetii, the etiologic agent of Q fever, inhabits a spacious acidified intracellular vacuole which is prone to fusion with other vacuoles of the host cell, including phagosomes containing mycobacteria. The Coxiella-infected cell thus provides a unique model for investigating the survival of mycobacteria in an acidified phagosome-like compartment. In the present study, murine bone marrow-derived macrophages were infected with either Mycobacterium avium or Mycobacterium tuberculosis and then coinfected with C. burnetii. We observed that the majority of phagocytosed mycobacteria colocalized to the C. burnetii-containing vacuole, which maintained its acidic properties. In coinfected macrophages, the growth of M. avium was not impaired following fusion with the acidified vacuole. In contrast, the growth rate of M. tuberculosis was reduced in acidified vacuoles. These results suggest that although both species of mycobacteria inhibit phagosome-lysosome fusion, they may be differentially susceptible to the toxic effects of the acidic environment in the mature phagolysosome. PMID:10377091

  6. Dust in an acidified ocean: iron bioavailability, phytoplankton growth and DMS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mélançon, J.; Levasseur, M.; Lizotte, M.; Scarratt, M. G.; Tremblay, J. E.; Tortell, P. D.; Yang, G.; Shi, G. Y.; Gao, H.; Semeniuk, D.; Robert, M.; Arychuk, M.; Johnson, K.; Sutherland, N.; Davelaar, M.; Nemcek, N.; Pena, A.; Richardson, W.

    2015-12-01

    Ocean acidification (OA) is likely to have an effect on the fertilizing potential of desert dust in high-nutrient, low-chlorophyll oceanic regions, either by modifying Fe speciation and bioavailability, or by altering phytoplankton Fe requirements and acquisition. To address this issue, short incubations (4 days) of northeast subarctic Pacific waters enriched with either FeSO4 or dust, and maintained at pH 8.0 (in situ) and 7.8 were conducted in August 2010. We assessed the impact of a decrease in pH on dissolved Fe concentration, phytoplankton biomass, taxonomy and productivity, and the production of dimethylsulfide (DMS) and its algal precursor dimethylsulfoniopropionate (DMSP). Chlorophyll a (chl a) remained unchanged in the controls and doubled in both the FeSO4-enriched and dust-enriched incubations, confirming the Fe-limited status of the plankton assemblage during the experiment. In the acidified treatments, a significant reduction (by 16-38%) of the final concentration of chl a was measured compared to their non-acidified counterparts, and a 15% reduction in particulate organic carbon (POC) concentration was measured in the dust-enriched acidified treatment compared to the dust-enriched non-acidified treatment. FeSO4 and dust additions had a fertilizing effect mainly on diatoms and cyanobacteria. Lowering the pH affected mostly the haptophytes, but pelagophyte concentrations were also reduced in some acidified treatments. Acidification did not significantly alter DMSP and DMS concentrations. These results show that dust deposition events in a low-pH iron-limited Northeast subarctic Pacific are likely to stimulate phytoplankton growth to a lesser extent than in today's ocean during the few days following fertilization and point to a low initial sensitivity of the DMSP and DMS dynamics to OA.

  7. Inhibition of Listeria monocytogenes using natural antimicrobials in no-nitrate-or-nitrite-added ham.

    PubMed

    Sullivan, Gary A; Jackson-Davis, Armitra L; Niebuhr, Steven E; Xi, Yuan; Schrader, Kohl D; Sebranek, Joseph G; Dickson, James S

    2012-06-01

    Consumer demand for foods manufactured without the direct addition of chemical preservatives, such as sodium nitrite and organic acid salts, has resulted in a unique class of "naturally" cured meat products. Formulation with a natural nitrate source and nitrate-reducing bacteria results in naturally cured processed meats that possess traits similar to conventionally cured meats. However, previous research has shown that the naturally cured products are more susceptible to pathogen growth. This study evaluated Listeria monocytogenes growth on ham manufactured with natural curing methods and with commercially available clean-label antimicrobials (cultured sugar and vinegar blend; lemon, cherry, and vinegar powder blend) and assessed impacts on physicochemical characteristics of the product. Hams made with either of the antimicrobials supported L. monocytogenes growth similar to that in the traditionally cured control (P > 0.05). Hams made with prefermented celery juice powder had the lowest residual nitrite concentrations (P < 0.05), and when no antimicrobial was added, L. monocytogenes growth was similar to that of the uncured control (P > 0.05). Aside from residual nitrite and nitrate concentrations, few physicochemical differences were identified. These findings show that ham can be produced with natural curing methods and antimicrobials to provide similar L. monocytogenes inhibition and physicochemical traits as in traditionally cured ham. PMID:22691474

  8. Development of a method to manufacture uncured, no-nitrate/nitrite-added whole muscle jerky.

    PubMed

    Sindelar, Jeffrey J; Terns, Matthew J; Meyn, Elizabeth; Boles, Jane A

    2010-10-01

    "Natural curing" is accomplished by use of vegetable juice/powder high in naturally occurring nitrates combined with a nitrate reducing starter culture to result in indirectly "cured" products. Since the starter culture used is not water soluble, making "naturally cured" whole muscle jerky with current manufacturing techniques has been found ineffective. The objective was to investigate processes for whole muscle beef jerky that might provide cured meat characteristics similar to those of a nitrite-added control. Treatments where jerky was placed in a barrier bag during incubation were found to be the least similar to the nitrite-added control. Jerky placed in a 40.6 degrees C smokehouse during incubation resulted in significantly more (P<0.05) converted cured pigment than the barrier bag treatments but less (P<0.05) than the control. The processing methods investigated to manufacture "naturally cured" whole muscle jerky in this study were ineffective in resulting in products similar to those cured with sodium nitrite.

  9. The effect of sodium chloride on the two-step kinetics of the nitrifying process.

    PubMed

    Sánchez, Omar; Aspé, Estrella; Martí, María C; Roeckel, Marlene

    2004-01-01

    Sodium chloride affects the transformation rate of several compounds in bioreactors. Most authors report a decrease in microorganism activity at increasing salt concentrations. In this work, a kinetic model that relates sodium chloride concentration with the rates of each step of the nitrification process is proposed; thus, the effect of sodium chloride concentration (0 to 60 g/L) on the nitritation and nitratation rates was separately studied. To carry out the independent study of each step, a combination of the respirometric method with sodium azide, an inhibitor of the nitratation step, was performed. The dot-blot hybridization technique with 16S rRNA-targeted probes was used to determine the ammonia-oxidizing and nitrite-oxidizing bacterial fraction, then it was possible to relate the culture's function with its biological composition. Rates of both steps were linearly reduced at increasing salt concentrations: the nitratation rate was more affected than the nitritation rate. Simulations carried out in a nitrifying sequencing batch reactor indicate that nitrite might accumulate at high salt concentrations. Sodium chloride exerts a reversible inhibition on ammonia oxidation and nitrite oxidation.

  10. Growth of nitrite-oxidizing bacteria by aerobic hydrogen oxidation.

    PubMed

    Koch, Hanna; Galushko, Alexander; Albertsen, Mads; Schintlmeister, Arno; Gruber-Dorninger, Christiane; Lücker, Sebastian; Pelletier, Eric; Le Paslier, Denis; Spieck, Eva; Richter, Andreas; Nielsen, Per H; Wagner, Michael; Daims, Holger

    2014-08-29

    The bacterial oxidation of nitrite to nitrate is a key process of the biogeochemical nitrogen cycle. Nitrite-oxidizing bacteria are considered a highly specialized functional group, which depends on the supply of nitrite from other microorganisms and whose distribution strictly correlates with nitrification in the environment and in wastewater treatment plants. On the basis of genomics, physiological experiments, and single-cell analyses, we show that Nitrospira moscoviensis, which represents a widely distributed lineage of nitrite-oxidizing bacteria, has the genetic inventory to utilize hydrogen (H2) as an alternative energy source for aerobic respiration and grows on H2 without nitrite. CO2 fixation occurred with H2 as the sole electron donor. Our results demonstrate a chemolithoautotrophic lifestyle of nitrite-oxidizing bacteria outside the nitrogen cycle, suggesting greater ecological flexibility than previously assumed.

  11. [Myocardial electrogenesis in laboratory rats under conditions of acute nitrite intoxication].

    PubMed

    Shumilova, T E; Shereshkov, V I; Ianvareva, I N; Nozdrachev, A D

    2010-01-01

    In anesthetized male rats the arterial blood pressure in femoral artery and electrocardiogram in standard leads were recorded uninterruptedly for 1-1.5 h under conditions of acute nitrite intoxication produced by a subcutaneous injection of water solution of sodium nitrite (donor of nitric oxide) at concentrations of 10, 30, and 50 mg/kg body mass. Results of the study have shown dose-dependent changes of arterial pressure as well as of time and amplitude characteristics of electrocardiogram under effect of NaNO2. At the threshold hypoxic dose, an increase of amplitude of R and S waves was observed by the 30-45th min, while at the maximal NaNO2 dose, amplitude of all waves rose by the 15th min of intoxication. High nitric doses often caused an increase of the ST segment above the isoelectric line and a rise of the amplitude of the T wave, on which a notch appeared in some cases. The change of the ECG time parameters was expressed in the dose-dependent development of bradycardia for the first 4-7 min; its level correlated with the progressively decreasing arterial pressure in the beginning (the 2-4th min) of nitrite intoxication. Variation analysis of heart rate spectral characteristics by Baevskii has revealed a rise of the total spectral power of pulse oscillations. Under effect of nitrite, in the spectrum of cardiointervals, quent recovery of the normal ECG spectrum in the end of the experimental period. The maximal nitrite dose produced more pronounced shifts of the heart rate spectrum towards the LF and VLF diapasons that were not restored for 1 h of experiment. Transitory processes of readjustment of the cardiac rhythm had discrete character. The nitrite dose of 50 mg/kg body mass increased the RR-interval after 4-7 min with amplitude steps of 3-5 imp/s and the time constant of 20-40 s. The revealed ECG changes had the reflex (enhancement of parasympathetic tonus) and metabolic (the hypoxic and histotoxic damage of myocardium) nature.

  12. Effect of Sweet Orange Fruit Waste Diets and Acidifier on Haematology and Serum Chemistry of Weanling Rabbits

    PubMed Central

    Daudu, Oluremi Martha; Sani, Rahamatu Usman; Adedibu, Iyetunde Ifeyori; Ademu, Lawrence Anebi; Bawa, Gideon Shaibu; Olugbemi, Taiye Sunday

    2014-01-01

    A total of thirty-five mixed breed (35) rabbits of average weight of 700 g aged 5-6 weeks were allocated to seven treatments in a completely randomised design to investigate the effect of sweet orange fruit waste (SOFW) and acidomix acidifier on haematology and serum chemistry. The diets were 0% SOFW, 10% SOFW with 0.5% acidomix, 10% SOFW with 0.7 acidomix, 15% SOFW with 0.5% acidifier, 15% SOFW with 0.7% acidifier, 20% SOFW with 0.5% acidifier, and 20% SOFW with 0.7% acidifier. Blood samples were analyzed for haemoglobin (hb) concentration, white blood cells (WBC), red blood cells (RBC), differential WBC count (lymphocyte, basophil, eosinophil, monocyte, and neutrophil), alanine amino transferase (ALT), alkaline phosphatase (ALP), aspartate amino transferase (AST), total protein, albumin, and globulin. There was no interaction between SOFW and acidifier for the haematological and most of the serum chemistry parameters but significant difference was observed in ALT; however the values were within the normal range. SOFW had no significant effect on all haematological and serum chemistry parameters. Acidomix had significant effect (P < 0.05) on haemoglobin concentration; rabbits fed 0.5% acidomix diets had higher values which were within the normal range. It is therefore concluded that SOFW with acidifier up to 20% had no detrimental effect on serum chemistry and haematology. PMID:26464931

  13. Differences in nitrite-oxidizing communities and kinetics in a brackish environment after enrichment at low and high nitrite concentrations.

    PubMed

    Tangkitjawisut, Wipasanee; Limpiyakorn, Tawan; Powtongsook, Sorawit; Pornkulwat, Preeyaporn; Suwannasilp, Benjaporn Boonchayaanant

    2016-04-01

    Nitrite accumulation in shrimp ponds can pose serious adverse effects to shrimp production and the environment. This study aims to develop an effective process for the enrichment of ready-to-use nitrite-oxidizing bacteria (NOB) inocula that would be appropriate for nitrite removal in brackish shrimp ponds. To achieve this objective, the effects of nitrite concentrations on NOB communities and nitrite oxidation kinetics in a brackish environment were investigated. Moving-bed biofilm sequencing batch reactors and continuous moving-bed biofilm reactors were used for the enrichment of NOB at various nitrite concentrations, using sediment from brackish shrimp ponds as seed inoculum. The results from NOB population analysis with quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) show that only Nitrospira were detected in the sediment from the shrimp ponds. After the enrichment, both Nitrospira and Nitrobacter coexisted in the reactors controlling effluent nitrite at 0.1 and 0.5 mg-NO2(-)-N/L. On the other hand, in the reactors controlling effluent nitrite at 3, 20, and 100 mg-NO2(-)-N/L, Nitrobacter outcompeted Nitrospira in many orders of magnitude. The half saturation coefficients (Ks) for nitrite oxidation of the enrichments at low nitrite concentrations (0.1 and 0.5 mg-NO2(-)-N/L) were in the range of 0.71-0.98 mg-NO2(-)-N/L. In contrast, the K(s) values of NOB enriched at high nitrite concentrations (3, 20, and 100 mg-NO2(-)-N/L) were much higher (8.36-12.20 mg-NO2(-)-N/L). The results suggest that the selection of nitrite concentrations for the enrichment of NOB inocula can significantly influence NOB populations and kinetics, which could affect the effectiveness of their applications in brackish shrimp ponds.

  14. Differences in nitrite-oxidizing communities and kinetics in a brackish environment after enrichment at low and high nitrite concentrations.

    PubMed

    Tangkitjawisut, Wipasanee; Limpiyakorn, Tawan; Powtongsook, Sorawit; Pornkulwat, Preeyaporn; Suwannasilp, Benjaporn Boonchayaanant

    2016-04-01

    Nitrite accumulation in shrimp ponds can pose serious adverse effects to shrimp production and the environment. This study aims to develop an effective process for the enrichment of ready-to-use nitrite-oxidizing bacteria (NOB) inocula that would be appropriate for nitrite removal in brackish shrimp ponds. To achieve this objective, the effects of nitrite concentrations on NOB communities and nitrite oxidation kinetics in a brackish environment were investigated. Moving-bed biofilm sequencing batch reactors and continuous moving-bed biofilm reactors were used for the enrichment of NOB at various nitrite concentrations, using sediment from brackish shrimp ponds as seed inoculum. The results from NOB population analysis with quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) show that only Nitrospira were detected in the sediment from the shrimp ponds. After the enrichment, both Nitrospira and Nitrobacter coexisted in the reactors controlling effluent nitrite at 0.1 and 0.5 mg-NO2(-)-N/L. On the other hand, in the reactors controlling effluent nitrite at 3, 20, and 100 mg-NO2(-)-N/L, Nitrobacter outcompeted Nitrospira in many orders of magnitude. The half saturation coefficients (Ks) for nitrite oxidation of the enrichments at low nitrite concentrations (0.1 and 0.5 mg-NO2(-)-N/L) were in the range of 0.71-0.98 mg-NO2(-)-N/L. In contrast, the K(s) values of NOB enriched at high nitrite concentrations (3, 20, and 100 mg-NO2(-)-N/L) were much higher (8.36-12.20 mg-NO2(-)-N/L). The results suggest that the selection of nitrite concentrations for the enrichment of NOB inocula can significantly influence NOB populations and kinetics, which could affect the effectiveness of their applications in brackish shrimp ponds. PMID:27090693

  15. The Serum Metabolite Response to Diet Intervention with Probiotic Acidified Milk in Irritable Bowel Syndrome Patients Is Indistinguishable from that of Non-Probiotic Acidified Milk by 1H NMR-Based Metabonomic Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Pedersen, Simon M. M.; Nielsen, Niels Chr.; Andersen, Henrik J.; Olsson, Johan; Simrén, Magnus; Öhman, Lena; Svensson, Ulla; Malmendal, Anders; Bertram, Hanne C.

    2010-01-01

    The effects of a probiotic acidified milk product on the blood serum metabolite profile of patients suffering from Irritable Bowel Syndrome (IBS) compared to a non-probiotic acidified milk product was investigated using 1H NMR metabonomics. For eight weeks, IBS patients consumed 0.4 L per day of a probiotic fermented milk product or non-probiotic acidified milk. Both diets resulted in elevated levels of blood serum L-lactate and 3-hydroxybutyrate. Our results showed identical effects of acidified milk consumption independent of probiotic addition. A similar result was previously obtained in a questionnaire-based evaluation of symptom relief. A specific probiotic effect is thus absent both in the patient subjective symptom evaluations and at the blood serum metabolite level. However, there was no correspondence between symptom relief and metabolite response on the patient level. PMID:22254002

  16. Diverse coral communities in naturally acidified waters of a Western Pacific reef

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shamberger, Kathryn E. F.; Cohen, Anne L.; Golbuu, Yimnang; McCorkle, Daniel C.; Lentz, Steven J.; Barkley, Hannah C.

    2014-01-01

    Anthropogenic carbon dioxide emissions are acidifying the oceans, reducing the concentration of carbonate ions ([CO32-]) that calcifying organisms need to build and cement coral reefs. To date, studies of a handful of naturally acidified reef systems reveal depauperate communities, sometimes with reduced coral cover and calcification rates, consistent with results of laboratory-based studies. Here we report the existence of highly diverse, coral-dominated reef communities under chronically low pH and aragonite saturation state (Ωar). Biological and hydrographic processes change the chemistry of the seawater moving across the barrier reefs and into Palau's Rock Island bays, where levels of acidification approach those projected for the western tropical Pacific open ocean by 2100. Nevertheless, coral diversity, cover, and calcification rates are maintained across this natural acidification gradient. Identifying the combination of biological and environmental factors that enable these communities to persist could provide important insights into the future of coral reefs under anthropogenic acidification.

  17. Remediation of Cr(VI)-Contaminated Soil Using the Acidified Hydrazine Hydrate.

    PubMed

    Ma, Yameng; Li, Fangfang; Jiang, Yuling; Yang, Weihua; Lv, Lv; Xue, Haotian; Wang, Yangyang

    2016-09-01

    Acidified hydrazine hydrate was used to remediate Cr(VI)-contaminated soil. The content of water-soluble Cr(VI) in contaminated soil was 4977.53 mg/kg. The optimal initial pH of hydrazine hydrate solution, soil to solution ratio and molar ratio of Cr(VI) to hydrazine hydrate for remediation of Cr(VI)-contaminated soil were 5.0, 3:1 and 1:3, respectively. Over 99.50 % of water-soluble Cr(VI) in the contaminated soil was reduced at the optimal condition within 30 min. The remediated soil can keep stable within 4 months. Meanwhile the total phosphorus increased from 0.47 to 4.29 g/kg, indicating that using of acidified hydrazine hydrate is an effective method to remediate Cr(VI)-contaminated soil.

  18. Remediation of Cr(VI)-Contaminated Soil Using the Acidified Hydrazine Hydrate.

    PubMed

    Ma, Yameng; Li, Fangfang; Jiang, Yuling; Yang, Weihua; Lv, Lv; Xue, Haotian; Wang, Yangyang

    2016-09-01

    Acidified hydrazine hydrate was used to remediate Cr(VI)-contaminated soil. The content of water-soluble Cr(VI) in contaminated soil was 4977.53 mg/kg. The optimal initial pH of hydrazine hydrate solution, soil to solution ratio and molar ratio of Cr(VI) to hydrazine hydrate for remediation of Cr(VI)-contaminated soil were 5.0, 3:1 and 1:3, respectively. Over 99.50 % of water-soluble Cr(VI) in the contaminated soil was reduced at the optimal condition within 30 min. The remediated soil can keep stable within 4 months. Meanwhile the total phosphorus increased from 0.47 to 4.29 g/kg, indicating that using of acidified hydrazine hydrate is an effective method to remediate Cr(VI)-contaminated soil. PMID:27351195

  19. Cardiac contractility in Antarctic teleost is modulated by nitrite through xanthine oxidase and cytochrome p-450 nitrite reductase.

    PubMed

    Garofalo, Filippo; Amelio, Daniela; Gattuso, Alfonsina; Cerra, Maria Carmela; Pellegrino, Daniela

    2015-09-15

    In mammalian and non-mammalian vertebrates, nitrite anion, the largest pool of intravascular and tissue nitric oxide storage, represents a key player of many biological processes, including cardiac modulation. As shown by our studies on Antarctic teleosts, nitrite-dependent cardiac regulation is of great relevance also in cold-blooded vertebrates. This study analysed the influence elicited by nitrite on the performance of the perfused beating heart of two Antarctic stenotherm teleosts, the haemoglobinless Chionodraco hamatus (icefish) and the red-blooded Trematomus bernacchii. Since haemoglobin is crucial in nitric oxide homeostasis, the icefish, a naturally occurring genetic knockout for this protein, provides exclusive opportunities to investigate nitric oxide/nitrite signaling. In vivo, nitrite conversion to nitric oxide requires the nitrite reductase activity of xanthine oxidase and cytochrome P-450, thus the involvement of these enzymes was also evaluated. We showed that, in C. hamatus and T. bernacchii, nitrite influenced cardiac performance by inducing a concentration-dependent positive inotropic effect which was unaffected by nitric oxide scavenging by PTIO in C. hamatus, while it was abolished in T. bernacchii. Specific inhibition of xanthine oxidase and cytochrome P-450 revealed, in the two teleosts, that the nitrite-dependent inotropism required the nitrite reductase activity of both enzymes. We also found that xanthine oxidase is more expressed in C. hamatus than in T. bernacchii, while the opposite was observed concerning cytochrome P-450. Results suggested that in the heart of C. hamatus and T. bernacchii, nitrite is an integral physiological source of nitric oxide with important signaling properties, which require the nitrite reductase activity of xanthine oxidase and cytochrome P-450. PMID:26045289

  20. Cardiac contractility in Antarctic teleost is modulated by nitrite through xanthine oxidase and cytochrome p-450 nitrite reductase.

    PubMed

    Garofalo, Filippo; Amelio, Daniela; Gattuso, Alfonsina; Cerra, Maria Carmela; Pellegrino, Daniela

    2015-09-15

    In mammalian and non-mammalian vertebrates, nitrite anion, the largest pool of intravascular and tissue nitric oxide storage, represents a key player of many biological processes, including cardiac modulation. As shown by our studies on Antarctic teleosts, nitrite-dependent cardiac regulation is of great relevance also in cold-blooded vertebrates. This study analysed the influence elicited by nitrite on the performance of the perfused beating heart of two Antarctic stenotherm teleosts, the haemoglobinless Chionodraco hamatus (icefish) and the red-blooded Trematomus bernacchii. Since haemoglobin is crucial in nitric oxide homeostasis, the icefish, a naturally occurring genetic knockout for this protein, provides exclusive opportunities to investigate nitric oxide/nitrite signaling. In vivo, nitrite conversion to nitric oxide requires the nitrite reductase activity of xanthine oxidase and cytochrome P-450, thus the involvement of these enzymes was also evaluated. We showed that, in C. hamatus and T. bernacchii, nitrite influenced cardiac performance by inducing a concentration-dependent positive inotropic effect which was unaffected by nitric oxide scavenging by PTIO in C. hamatus, while it was abolished in T. bernacchii. Specific inhibition of xanthine oxidase and cytochrome P-450 revealed, in the two teleosts, that the nitrite-dependent inotropism required the nitrite reductase activity of both enzymes. We also found that xanthine oxidase is more expressed in C. hamatus than in T. bernacchii, while the opposite was observed concerning cytochrome P-450. Results suggested that in the heart of C. hamatus and T. bernacchii, nitrite is an integral physiological source of nitric oxide with important signaling properties, which require the nitrite reductase activity of xanthine oxidase and cytochrome P-450.

  1. The Interaction of Nitrites with Food, Drugs, and Contaminants.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greenland, Sander

    1978-01-01

    Nitrites commonly occur in food and drinking water as additives, contaminants, or products of biological processes. These highly reactive substances combine with other commonly ingested substances to form potent carcinogens. Controls are needed on levels of nitrites and reactive contaminants in food and drinking water. (RE)

  2. 40 CFR 721.4740 - Alkali metal nitrites.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... defined in 40 CFR 721.3) containing amines. (b) ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Alkali metal nitrites. 721.4740... Substances § 721.4740 Alkali metal nitrites. (a) Chemical substances and significant new use subject...

  3. 40 CFR 721.4740 - Alkali metal nitrites.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... defined in 40 CFR 721.3) containing amines. (b) ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Alkali metal nitrites. 721.4740... Substances § 721.4740 Alkali metal nitrites. (a) Chemical substances and significant new use subject...

  4. 40 CFR 721.4740 - Alkali metal nitrites.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... defined in 40 CFR 721.3) containing amines. (b) ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Alkali metal nitrites. 721.4740... Substances § 721.4740 Alkali metal nitrites. (a) Chemical substances and significant new use subject...

  5. 40 CFR 721.4740 - Alkali metal nitrites.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... defined in 40 CFR 721.3) containing amines. (b) ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Alkali metal nitrites. 721.4740... Substances § 721.4740 Alkali metal nitrites. (a) Chemical substances and significant new use subject...

  6. Amperometric Carbon Fiber Nitrite Microsensor for In Situ Biofilm Monitoring

    EPA Science Inventory

    A highly selective needle type solid state amperometric nitrite microsensor based on direct nitrite oxidation on carbon fiber was developed using a simplified fabrication method. The microsensor’s tip diameter was approximately 7 µm, providing a high spatial resolution of at lea...

  7. Inactivation of Salmonella on Sprouting Seeds Using a Spontaneous Carvacrol Nanoemulsion Acidified with Organic Acids.

    PubMed

    Landry, Kyle S; Komaiko, Jennifer; Wong, Dana E; Xu, Ting; McClements, David Julian; McLandsborough, Lynne

    2016-07-01

    Over the past decade, demand has increased for natural, minimally processed produce, including sprout-based products. Sanitization with 20,000 ppm of calcium hypochlorite is currently recommended for all sprouting seeds before germination to limit sprout-related foodborne outbreaks. A potentially promising disinfectant as an alternative to calcium hypochlorite is acidified spontaneous essential oil nanoemulsions. In this study, the efficacy of an acidified carvacrol nanoemulsion was tested against mung beans and broccoli seeds artificially contaminated with a Salmonella enterica Enteritidis cocktail (ATCC BAA-709, ATCC BAA-711, and ATCC BAA-1045). Treatments were performed by soaking inoculated seeds in acidified (50 mM acetic or levulinic acid) carvacrol nanoemulsions (4,000 or 8,000 ppm) for 30 or 60 min. After treatment, the number of surviving cells was determined via plate counts and/or the most probable number (MPN) approach. Treatment for 30 min successfully reduced Salmonella Enteritidis by 4 log CFU/g on mung beans (from an initial contamination level of 4.2 to 4.6 log CFU/g) and by 2 log CFU/g on broccoli seeds (from an initial contamination level of 2.4 to 2.6 log CFU/g) to below our detection limit (≤3 MPN/g). Treated seeds were sprouted and tested for the presence of pathogens and sprout yield. The final sprout product had no detectable pathogens, and total sprout yield was not influenced by any treatment.

  8. Determination of 5-log pathogen reduction times for heat-processed, acidified vegetable brines.

    PubMed

    Breidt, F; Hayes, J S; Osborne, J A; McFeeters, R F

    2005-02-01

    Recent outbreaks of acid-resistant food pathogens in acid foods, including apple cider and orange juice, have raised concerns about the safety of acidified vegetable products. We determined pasteurization times and temperatures needed to assure a 5-log reduction in the numbers of Escherichia coli O157:H7, Listeria monocytogenes, and Salmonella strains in acidified cucumber pickle brines. Cocktails of five strains of each pathogen were (separately) used for heat-inactivation studies between 50 and 60 degrees C in brines that had an equilibrated pH value of 4.1. Salmonella strains were found to be less heat resistant than E. coli O157:H7 or L. monocytogenes strains. The nonlinear killing curves generated during these studies were modeled using a Weibull function. We found no significant difference in the heat-killing data for E. coli O157:H7 and L. monocytogenes (P = 0.9709). The predicted 5-log reduction times for E. coli O157:H7 and L. monocytogenes were found to fit an exponential decay function. These data were used to estimate minimum pasteurization times and temperatures needed to ensure safe processing of acidified pickle products and show that current industry pasteurization practices offer a significant margin of safety.

  9. Long-term changes of acidifying deposition in Finland (1973-2000).

    PubMed

    Vuorenmaa, Jussi

    2004-01-01

    The long-term changes of acidifying deposition in Finland during the period 1973-2000 were studied using bulk deposition data from 19 stations belonging to the national monitoring network. The regional-scale approach (southern, central and northern Finland) was used for trend assessment with respect to implementation of European sulphur (S) emission reduction amendments involving deposition changes prior to (1973-1985) and after (1986-2000) the agreements (S protocols in 1985 and 1994). There were no marked changes in sulphate deposition between the 1970s and 1980s and consistent trends in 1973-1985 were not observed. Deposition of nitrogen (N) compounds, particularly NO3-N, were increasing between the 1970s and 1980s. Deposition of base cations exhibited a slight decline throughout the 1970s and 1980s. Decrease of calcium and magnesium deposition without corresponding decrease in sulphate resulted in increased acidifying potential (AP) of deposition. Due to successful implementation of S (and N) emission reduction measures, sulphate deposition has decreased substantially (30% in northern and up to 60% in southern Finland) since the late 1980s. N deposition also decreased, but less than S deposition. Base cation deposition has also declined substantially, but this decline appeared to be leveling off during the 1990s, accounting for the decrease of AP in deposition. The observed deposition pattern is in agreement with the on-going biochemical recovery of acidified small Finnish lakes taking place since the early 1990s.

  10. Inactivation of Salmonella on Sprouting Seeds Using a Spontaneous Carvacrol Nanoemulsion Acidified with Organic Acids.

    PubMed

    Landry, Kyle S; Komaiko, Jennifer; Wong, Dana E; Xu, Ting; McClements, David Julian; McLandsborough, Lynne

    2016-07-01

    Over the past decade, demand has increased for natural, minimally processed produce, including sprout-based products. Sanitization with 20,000 ppm of calcium hypochlorite is currently recommended for all sprouting seeds before germination to limit sprout-related foodborne outbreaks. A potentially promising disinfectant as an alternative to calcium hypochlorite is acidified spontaneous essential oil nanoemulsions. In this study, the efficacy of an acidified carvacrol nanoemulsion was tested against mung beans and broccoli seeds artificially contaminated with a Salmonella enterica Enteritidis cocktail (ATCC BAA-709, ATCC BAA-711, and ATCC BAA-1045). Treatments were performed by soaking inoculated seeds in acidified (50 mM acetic or levulinic acid) carvacrol nanoemulsions (4,000 or 8,000 ppm) for 30 or 60 min. After treatment, the number of surviving cells was determined via plate counts and/or the most probable number (MPN) approach. Treatment for 30 min successfully reduced Salmonella Enteritidis by 4 log CFU/g on mung beans (from an initial contamination level of 4.2 to 4.6 log CFU/g) and by 2 log CFU/g on broccoli seeds (from an initial contamination level of 2.4 to 2.6 log CFU/g) to below our detection limit (≤3 MPN/g). Treated seeds were sprouted and tested for the presence of pathogens and sprout yield. The final sprout product had no detectable pathogens, and total sprout yield was not influenced by any treatment. PMID:27357030

  11. Spectrophotometric determination of nitrite using salbutamol sulfate as a reagent

    SciTech Connect

    Agrawal, Y.K.; Bhatt, P.N.

    1988-01-01

    A simple spectrophotometric method for the trace determination of nitrite (NO/sub 2//sup /minus//) is described. Nitrite is reacted with Salbutamol sulfate in acidic medium which gives a yellow color in alkaline medium (less than or equal to pH 7) and can be determined in the presence of several cations and anions. Beer's law is obeyed in the range of 1.8 to 27.6 ppm of nitrite with the molar absorptivity 1.8 /times/ 10/sup 3/ 1 /times/ mole /sup /minus/1/ /times/ cm/sup /minus/1/ at 410 nm. The proposed method can also be utilized for the determination of nitrate (NO/sub 3//sup /minus//) after its reduction to nitrite. The method has been applied for the determination of various samples containing traces of nitrite.

  12. Dietary nitrate and nitrite: Benefits, risks, and evolving perceptions.

    PubMed

    Bedale, Wendy; Sindelar, Jeffrey J; Milkowski, Andrew L

    2016-10-01

    Consumers have an illogical relationship with nitrite (and its precursor, nitrate) in food. Despite a long history of use, nitrite was nearly banned from use in foods in the 1970s due to health concerns related to the potential for carcinogenic nitrosamine formation. Changes in meat processing methods reduced those potential risks, and nitrite continued to be used in foods. Since then, two opposing movements continue to shape how consumers view dietary nitrate and nitrite. The discovery of the profound physiological importance of nitric oxide led to the realization that dietary nitrate contributes significantly to the nitrogen reservoir for nitric oxide formation. Numerous clinical studies have also demonstrated beneficial effects from dietary nitrate consumption, especially in vascular and metabolic health. However, the latest wave of consumer sentiment against food additives, the clean-label movement, has renewed consumer fear and avoidance of preservatives, including nitrite. Education is necessary but may not be sufficient to resolve this disconnect in consumer perception. PMID:26994928

  13. Sources and sinks for ammonia and nitrite on the early Earth and the reaction of nitrite with ammonia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Summers, D. P.

    1999-01-01

    An analysis of sources and sinks for ammonia and nitrite on the early Earth was conducted. Rates of formation and destruction, and steady state concentrations of both species were determined by steady state kinetics. The importance of the reaction of nitrite with ammonia on the feasibility of ammonia formation from nitrite was evaluated. The analysis considered conditions such as temperature, ferrous iron concentration, and pH. For sinks we considered the reduction of nitrite to ammonia, reaction between nitrite and ammonia, photochemical destruction of both species, and destruction at hydrothermal vents. Under most environmental conditions, the primary sink for nitrite is reduction to ammonia. The reaction between ammonia and nitrite is not an important sink for either nitrite or ammonia. Destruction at hydrothermal vents is important at acidic pH's and at low ferrous iron concentrations. Photochemical destruction, even in a worst case scenario, is unimportant under many conditions except possibly under acidic, low iron concentration, or low temperature conditions. The primary sink for ammonia is photochemical destruction in the atmosphere. Under acidic conditions, more of the ammonia is tied up as ammonium (reducing its vapor pressure and keeping it in solution) and hydrothermal destruction becomes more important.

  14. Sodium Oxybate

    MedlinePlus

    ... used to prevent attacks of cataplexy (episodes of muscle weakness that begin suddenly and last for a ... of your body that you cannot control, sweating, muscle cramps, and fast heartbeat.Sodium oxybate may help ...

  15. Electrochemical Recovery of Sodium Hydroxide from Alkaline Salt Solution

    SciTech Connect

    Hobbs, D.T.; Edwards, T.B.

    1996-10-01

    A statistically designed set of tests determined the effects of current density, temperature, and the concentrations of nitrate/nitrite, hydroxide and aluminate on the recovery of sodium as sodium hydroxide (caustic) from solutions simulating those produced from the Savannah River Site (SRS) In-Tank Precipitation process. These tests included low nitrate and nitrite concentrations which would be produced by electrolytic nitrate/nitrite destruction. The tests used a two compartment electrochemical cell with a Nafion Type 324 ion-exchange membrane. Caustic was successfully recovered from the waste solutions. Evaluation of the testing results indicated that the transport of sodium across the membrane was not significantly affected by any of the varied parameters. The observed variance in the sodium flux is attributed to experimental errors and variations in the performance characteristics of individual pieces of the organic-based Nafion membrane.Additional testing is recommended to determine the maximum current density, to evaluate the chemical durability of the organic membrane as a function of current density and to compare the durability and performance characteristics of the organic-based Nafion membrane with that of other commercially available organic membranes and the inorganic class of membranes under development by Ceramatec and PNNL.

  16. Thermal inactivation of Salmonella Typhimurium on dressed chicken skin previously exposed to acidified sodium chlorite or carvacrol

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Salmonella is a leading cause of foodborne illness, and live poultry is a main reservoir of this pathogen. Cross-contamination and transportation of contaminated poultry meat act as an important vehicle of Salmonella infections in humans. In this study, we assessed the effect of two antimicrobials:...

  17. Crystal Structure of a Nitrate/Nitrite Exchanger

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Hongjin; Wisedchaisri, Goragot; Gonen, Tamir

    2013-01-01

    Summary Mineral nitrogen in nature is often found in the form of nitrate (NO3-). Numerous microorganisms evolved to assimilate nitrate and use it as a major source of mineral nitrogen uptake1. Nitrate, which is central in nitrogen metabolism, is first reduced to nitrite (NO2-) through a two-electron reduction reaction2,3. The accumulation of cellular nitrite can be harmful because nitrite can be reduced to the cytotoxic nitric oxide. Instead, nitrite is rapidly removed from the cell by channels and transporters, or reduced to ammonium or dinitrogen through the action of assimilatory enzymes3. Despite decades of effort no structure is currently available for any nitrate transport protein and the mechanism by which nitrate is transported remains largely obscure. Here we report the structure of a bacterial nitrate/nitrite transport protein, NarK, from Escherichia coli, with and without substrate. The structures reveal a positively charged substrate-translocation pathway lacking protonatable residues, suggesting that NarK functions as a nitrate/nitrite exchanger and that H+s are unlikely to be co-transported. Conserved arginine residues form the substrate-binding pocket, which is formed by association of helices from the two halves of NarK. Key residues that are important for substrate recognition and transport are identified and related to extensive mutagenesis and functional studies. We propose that NarK exchanges nitrate for nitrite by a rocker-switch mechanism facilitated by inter-domain H-bond networks. PMID:23665960

  18. Chemical switch based reusable dual optoelectronic sensor for nitrite.

    PubMed

    Vishnuvardhan, V; Kala, R; Prasada Rao, T

    2008-08-01

    An optical sensor was developed for sensing of nitrite based on the monotonous decrease in absorbance of Rhodamine 6G at 525 nm (the absorbance maximum of dye) with increasing concentration of nitrite. This sensor also permits naked eye detection. Various parameters like concentrations of sulphuric acid and Rhodamine 6G, response time and stability were varied and optimal conditions are reported. Under these conditions, the developed sensor enables the determination of nitrite in the concentration range 0-12.18 micromol L(-1). The nitrite response is selective as 60-2.5x10(5) fold amounts of several anions and cations have no deleterious effect. The addition of nitrite to Rhodamine 6G dye causes hypsochromic shift from 525 to 385 nm while several other anions like I(-), SCN(-), ClO(4)(-), [HgI(4)](2-) and [Zn (SCN)(4)](2-) showed a bathochromatic shift from 525 to 575 nm. The sequential addition of nitrite and sulphamic to Rhodamine 6G in 0.75 mol L(-1) sulphuric acid solution results in switching of "ON" and "OFF" absorbance. The time elapse and concentration of sulphamic acid required for chemical switching was also established. Similar "ON" and "OFF" switching behaviour was observed in fluorescence studies also. This enabled the design and development of reusable chemical switch based dual optoelectronic sensor, for monitoring of traces of nitrite in environmental and food samples. The plausible mechanism for above switching behaviour is also proposed.

  19. Stability of α-tocotrienol and α-tocopherol in salami-type sausages and curing brine depending on nitrite and pH.

    PubMed

    Gerling, Eva-Maria; Ternes, Waldemar

    2014-12-01

    We studied the stability of the valuable vitamer nutrients α-tocotrienol and α-tocopherol and options for their protection in salami-type sausages (blended with α-tocotrienol-rich barley oil) and curing brine. Four different sausage formulations were produced containing nitrite curing salt; nitrite curing salt and ascorbic acid (300mg/kg); nitrite curing salt and carnosic acid (45mg/kg); or sodium chloride. Initial vitamer contents (100mg/kg) did not decrease significantly during ripening and decreased only slightly during storage. Ascorbic acid and carnosic acid were found to be effective in preserving the vitamers in fresh sausages. Freeze-drying of sausages resulted in a significant loss of vitamers (97%), particularly after 14-day storage at room temperature, even in the presence of shielding gases. The vitamer content in the curing brine decreased with decreasing pH in the presence of nitrite. A nitrite concentration of 136mg/L at pH4 resulted in significant loss (90%) of the vitamers. Sufficient stability of the vitamers in salami-type sausage and curing brine can be achieved by processing, formulation, and storage conditions.

  20. Short-term hypoxic vasodilation in vivo is mediated by bioactive nitric oxide metabolites, rather than free nitric oxide derived from haemoglobin-mediated nitrite reduction

    PubMed Central

    Umbrello, Michele; Dyson, Alex; Pinto, Bernardo Bollen; Fernandez, Bernadette O; Simon, Verena; Feelisch, Martin; Singer, Mervyn

    2014-01-01

    Local increases in blood flow – ‘hypoxic vasodilation’ – confer cellular protection in the face of reduced oxygen delivery. The physiological relevance of this response is well established, yet ongoing controversy surrounds its underlying mechanisms. We sought to confirm that early hypoxic vasodilation is a nitric oxide (NO)-mediated phenomenon and to study putative pathways for increased levels of NO, namely production from NO synthases, intravascular nitrite reduction, release from preformed stores and reduced deactivation by cytochrome c oxidase. Experiments were performed on spontaneously breathing, anaesthetized, male Wistar rats undergoing short-term systemic hypoxaemia, who received pharmacological inhibitors and activators of the various NO pathways. Arterial blood pressure, cardiac output, tissue oxygen tension and the circulating pool of NO metabolites (oxidation, nitrosation and nitrosylation products) were measured in plasma and erythrocytes. Hypoxaemia caused a rapid and sustained vasodilation, which was only partially reversed by non-selective NO synthase inhibition. This was associated with significantly lower plasma nitrite, and marginally elevated nitrate levels, suggestive of nitrite bioinactivation. Administration of sodium nitrite had little effect in normoxia, but produced significant vasodilation and increased nitrosylation during hypoxaemia that could not be reversed by NO scavenging. Methodological issues prevented assessment of the contribution, if any, of reduced deactivation of NO by cytochrome c oxidase. In conclusion, acute hypoxic vasodilation is an adaptive NO-mediated response conferred through bioactive metabolites rather than free NO from haemoglobin-mediated reduction of nitrite. PMID:24396056

  1. Quantum mechanical interpretation of nitrite reduction by cytochrome cd1 nitrite reductase from Paracoccus pantotrophus.

    PubMed

    Ranghino, G; Scorza, E; Sjögren, T; Williams, P A; Ricci, M; Hajdu, J

    2000-09-12

    The reduction of nitrite to nitric oxide in respiratory denitrification is catalyzed by a cytochrome cd(1) nitrite reductase in Paracoccus pantotrophus (formerly known as Thiosphaera pantotropha LMD 92.63). High-resolution structures are available for the fully oxidized [Fülöp, V., Moir, J. W., Ferguson, S. J., and Hajdu, J. (1995) Cell 81, 369-377; Baker, S. C., Saunders, N. F., Willis, A. C., Ferguson, S. J., Hajdu, J., and Fülöp, V. (1997) J. Mol. Biol. 269, 440-455] and fully reduced forms of this enzyme, as well as for various intermediates in its catalytic cycle [Williams, P. A., Fülöp, V., Garman, E. F., Saunders, N. F., Ferguson, S. J., and Hajdu, J. (1997) Nature 389, 406-412]. On the basis of these structures, quantum mechanical techniques (QM), including density functional methods (DFT), were combined with simulated annealing (SA) and molecular mechanics techniques (MM) to calculate the electronic distribution of molecular orbitals in the active site during catalysis. The results show likely trajectories for electrons, protons, substrates, and products in the process of nitrite reduction, and offer an interpretation of the reaction mechanism. The calculations indicate that the redox state of the d(1) heme and charges on two histidines in the active site orchestrate catalysis locally. Binding of nitrite to the reduced iron is followed by proton transfer from His345 and His388 to one of the oxygens of nitrite, creating a water molecule and an [Fe(II)-NO(+)] complex. Valence isomerization within this complex gives [Fe(III)-NO]. The release of NO from the ferric iron is influenced by the protonation state of His345 and His388, and by the orientation of NO on the d(1) heme. Return of Tyr25 to a hydrogen-bonding position between His345 and His388 facilitates product release, but a rebinding of Tyr25 to the oxidized iron may be bypassed in steady-state catalysis.

  2. A comparison of organic and inorganic nitrates/nitrites.

    PubMed

    Omar, Sami A; Artime, Esther; Webb, Andrew J

    2012-05-15

    Although both organic and inorganic nitrates/nitrites mediate their principal effects via nitric oxide, there are many important differences. Inorganic nitrate and nitrite have simple ionic structures and are produced endogenously and are present in the diet, whereas their organic counterparts are far more complex, and, with the exception of ethyl nitrite, are all medicinally synthesised products. These chemical differences underlie the differences in pharmacokinetic properties allowing for different modalities of administration, particularly of organic nitrates, due to the differences in their bioavailability and metabolic profiles. Whilst the enterosalivary circulation is a key pathway for orally ingested inorganic nitrate, preventing an abrupt effect or toxic levels of nitrite and prolonging the effects, this is not used by organic nitrates. The pharmacodynamic differences are even greater; while organic nitrates have potent acute effects causing vasodilation, inorganic nitrite's effects are more subtle and dependent on certain conditions. However, in chronic use, organic nitrates are considerably limited by the development of tolerance and endothelial dysfunction, whereas inorganic nitrate/nitrite may compensate for diminished endothelial function, and tolerance has not been reported. Also, while inorganic nitrate/nitrite has important cytoprotective effects against ischaemia-reperfusion injury, continuous use of organic nitrates may increase injury. While there are concerns that inorganic nitrate/nitrite may induce carcinogenesis, direct evidence of this in humans is lacking. While organic nitrates may continue to dominate the therapeutic arena, this may well change with the increasing recognition of their limitations, and ongoing discovery of beneficial effects and specific advantages of inorganic nitrate/nitrite.

  3. The anoxic plant mitochondrion as a nitrite: NO reductase.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Kapuganti J; Igamberdiev, Abir U

    2011-07-01

    Under the conditions of oxygen deprivation, accumulating nitrite can be reduced in the mitochondrial electron transport chain forming free radical nitric oxide (NO). By reducing nitrite to NO, plant mitochondria preserve the capacity to oxidize external NADH and NADPH and retain a limited power for ATP synthesis complementing glycolytic ATP production. NO participates in O(2) balance in mitochondria by competitively inhibiting cytochrome c oxidase which can oxidize it to nitrite when oxygen concentration increases. Some of the NO escapes to the cytosol, where the efficient scavenging system involving non-symbiotic hemoglobin oxygenates NO to nitrate and supports continuous anaerobic turnover of nitrogen species.

  4. Partitioning and bioavailability of mercury in an experimentally acidified Wisconsin lake

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wiener, James G.; Fitzgerald, William F.; Watras, Carl J.; Rada, Ronald G.

    1990-01-01

    We studied the partitioning of mercury (Hg) among air, water, sediments and fish at Little Rock Lake, a clear water seepage lake in north-central Wisconsin. The lake was divided with a sea curtain into two basins, one acidified with sulfuric acid to pH 5.6 for two years and the other an untreated reference site (mean pH 6.1), to document the effects of acidification. Trace-metal-free protocols were used to measure Hg at the picomolar level in air and water. Total gaseous Hg in air samples averaged 2.0 ng/m3. Total Hg in unfiltered water samples collected in 1986 after the fall overturn averaged about 1 ng/L in the acidified and reference basins. Mercury in surficial sediments was strongly correlated with volatile matter content and ranged from 10 to about 170 ng/g (dry weight) in both basins. Total Hg concentrations in whole, calendar age-1 yellow perch (Perca flavescens), sampled after one year of residence in the lake, averaged 114 ng/g (fresh weight) in the reference basin and 135 ng/g in the acidified basin – a highly significant (p < 0.01) difference. The mean whole-body burden (quantity) of Hg in age-1 perch did not differ between basins after the first year, but was significantly greater in the treatment basin than in the reference basin after the second year of acidification. Differences between the two basins in the bioaccumulation of Hg were attributed to internal (within-lake) processes that influence the bioavailability of the metal. An initial Hg budget for the treatment basin of Little Rock Lake showed that atmospheric deposition and sedimentary remobilization of Hg are potentially important processes influencing its biogeochemical cycling and uptake by fish.

  5. 21 CFR 170.60 - Nitrites and/or nitrates in curing premixes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Nitrites and/or nitrates in curing premixes. 170... and Decisions § 170.60 Nitrites and/or nitrates in curing premixes. (a) Nitrites and/or nitrates are.... (b) Nitrites and/or nitrates, when packaged separately from flavoring and seasoning in...

  6. 21 CFR 170.60 - Nitrites and/or nitrates in curing premixes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Nitrites and/or nitrates in curing premixes. 170.60... Decisions § 170.60 Nitrites and/or nitrates in curing premixes. (a) Nitrites and/or nitrates are food.... (b) Nitrites and/or nitrates, when packaged separately from flavoring and seasoning in...

  7. 21 CFR 170.60 - Nitrites and/or nitrates in curing premixes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Nitrites and/or nitrates in curing premixes. 170... and Decisions § 170.60 Nitrites and/or nitrates in curing premixes. (a) Nitrites and/or nitrates are.... (b) Nitrites and/or nitrates, when packaged separately from flavoring and seasoning in...

  8. 21 CFR 170.60 - Nitrites and/or nitrates in curing premixes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Nitrites and/or nitrates in curing premixes. 170... and Decisions § 170.60 Nitrites and/or nitrates in curing premixes. (a) Nitrites and/or nitrates are.... (b) Nitrites and/or nitrates, when packaged separately from flavoring and seasoning in...

  9. Influence of low levels of water salinity on toxicity of nitrite to anuran larvae.

    PubMed

    Shinn, C; Marco, A; Serrano, L

    2013-08-01

    Reactive nitrogen compounds such as nitrite (NO2(-)) are highly toxic to aquatic animals and are partly responsible for the global decline of amphibians. On some fish and Caudata amphibian species low levels of sodium chloride significantly reduce the toxicity of nitrite. However, the nitrite-salinity interaction has not been properly studied in anuran amphibians. To verify if chloride (Cl(-)) attenuates NO2(-) toxicity, eggs and larvae of three anuran species were subjected to a series of NO2(-) solutions combined with three salt concentrations (0, 0.4 and 2 or 0, 0.052 and 0.2gL(-1)NaCl). One of the species tested originated from two different populations inhabiting highly contrasted nutrient richness environments: lowland Doñana Natural Park and Sierra de Gredos Mountain. In general, the presence of Cl(-) increased survival and growth of lowland Pelophylax perezi and activity of mountain P. perezi larvae exposed to NO2(-), thus attenuating the toxicity of NO2(-) to developing amphibians. Mountain amphibian populations appeared to be much more sensitive to the concentrations of NO2(-) and Cl(-) used in this experiment than coastal conspecifics, suggesting possible adaptation of populations to local conditions. Nitrogen pollution in coastal wetlands poses a serious threat to aquatic organisms, causing direct toxicity or indirect effects via ecosystem eutrophication. The presence of low to medium levels of salinity that would be common in coastal wetlands may attenuate the direct effects of increasing concentrations of nitrogenous compounds in water bodies. Furthermore, treating cultures of endangered anurans with small amounts of NaCl may provide an additional protective measure.

  10. Metal accumulation and metallothionein concentrations in tree swallow nestlings near acidified lakes

    SciTech Connect

    St. Louis, V.; Breebaart, L. . Dept. of Zoology); Barlow, J.C. . Dept. of Zoology Royal Ontario Museum, Toronto, Ontario . Dept. of Ornithology); Klaverkamp, J.F. . Dept. of Fisheries and Oceans)

    1993-07-01

    The authors studied metal accumulation in hepatic and renal tissues of tree swallow (Tachycineta bicolor) nestlings at acidified and nonacid reference lakes in northwestern Ontario. Hepatic concentrations of metallothionein (metal-binding proteins, MT) in tree swallow nestlings were negatively correlated with pH of the nest-site lake. Combined concentrations of Cu and Zn in the liver were correlated with liver MT concentrations, but Cd was not. Although no overt signs of metal toxicity were observed in nestlings near acid lakes, the results clearly provided evidence that metals are transferred from acid lakes to birds and that these metals are correlated with increases in hepatic MT production.

  11. Solubilization and Resolution of the Membrane-Bound Nitrite Reductase from Paracoccus Halodenitrificans into Nitrite and Nitric Oxide Reductases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grant, Michael A.; Cronin, Sonja E.; Hochstein, Lawrence I.

    1984-01-01

    Membranes prepared from Paracoccus halodenitrificans reduced nitrite or nitric oxide to nitrous oxide. Extraction of these membranes with the detergent CHAPSO [3-(3-Chlolamidoporopyldimethylammonio)-1-(2- hydroxy-1-propanesulfonate)], followed by ammonium sulfate fractionation of the solubilized proteins, resulted in the separation of nitrite and nitric oxide reductase activities. The fraction containing nitrite reductase activity spectrally resembled a cd-type cytochrome. Several cytochromes were detected in the nitric oxide reductase fraction. Which, if any, of these cytochromes is associated with the reduction of nitric oxide is not clear at this time.

  12. Toxicity of ammonia, nitrite, and nitrate to fishes. Book chapter

    SciTech Connect

    Russo, R.C.; Thurston, R.V.

    1991-01-01

    Ammonia and nitrite are highly toxic to fishes, with ammonia occurring in surface waters more commonly than nitrite. Nitrate is a related compound but is not significantly toxic to fishes. The acute toxicity of ammonia to aquatic organisms is affected by water pH, dissolved oxygen, temperature, concentration fluctuations, degree of salinity, presence of other chemicals, and prior acclimation. The acute toxicity of nitrite is known to be affected by water pH and the presence of chloride and calcium. More research is needed on the effects of these and other variables on the acute toxicity of both ammonia and nitrite, as well as the chronic effects of both of these toxins.

  13. Nitrite as a mediator of ischemic preconditioning and cytoprotection

    PubMed Central

    Murillo, Daniel; Kamga, Christelle; Mo, Li; Shiva, Sruti

    2011-01-01

    Ischemia/reperfusion (IR) injury is a central component in the pathogenesis of several diseases and is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality in the western world. Subcellularly, mitochondrial dysfunction, characterized by depletion of ATP, calcium-induced opening of the mitochondrial permeability transition pore, and exacerbated reactive oxygen species (ROS) formation, plays an integral role in the progression of IR injury. Nitric oxide (NO) and more recently nitrite (NO2-) are known to modulate mitochondrial function, mediate cytoprotection after IR and have been implicated in the signaling of the highly protective ischemic preconditioning (IPC) program. Here, we review what is known about the role of NO and nitrite in cytoprotection after IR and consider the putative role of nitrite in IPC. Focus is placed on the potential cytoprotective mechanisms involving NO and nitrite-dependent modulation of mitochondrial function. PMID:21277988

  14. Nitrite as a candidate substrate in microbial fuel cells.

    PubMed

    Faraghi, Neda; Ebrahimi, Sirous

    2012-08-01

    Current generation using nitrite as substrate (pH 6.9, 40 mgN l(-1)) in a nitrite-fed microbial fuel cell was investigated under anaerobic and aerobic anodic conditions as an alternative to the biological nitrite oxidation process. Cell current, coulombic efficiency (CE) and power generation of 0.04 mA, 30 ± 2 % and 19.3 ± 3.3 μW m(-2), respectively, were observed under anaerobic conditions while complete nitrite degradation (no current) was obtained under aerobic conditions. Switching from aerobic to anaerobic anode enhanced the CE and power generation (39 ± 1 % and 29 ± 4.3 μW m(-2)).

  15. Sodium diethyldithiocarbamate

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Sodium diethyldithiocarbamate ; CASRN 148 - 18 - 5 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Non

  16. Sodium fluoroacetate

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Sodium fluoroacetate ; CASRN 62 - 74 - 8 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinogen

  17. Sodium azide

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Sodium azide ; CASRN 26628 - 22 - 8 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinogenic Ef

  18. Acifluorfen, sodium

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Acifluorfen , sodium ; CASRN 62476 - 59 - 9 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcino

  19. Sodium cyanide

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Jump to main content . Integrated Risk Information System Recent Additions | Contact Us Search : All EPA IRIS • You are here : EPA Home • Research • Environmental Assessment • IRIS • IRIS Summaries Redirect Page As of September 28 , 2010 , the assessment summary for sodium cyanide is included in the

  20. Reactions of spinach nitrite reductase with its substrate, nitrite, and a putative intermediate, hydroxylamine.

    PubMed

    Kuznetsova, Sofya; Knaff, David B; Hirasawa, Masakazu; Sétif, Pierre; Mattioli, Tony A

    2004-08-24

    Plant nitrite reductase (NiR) catalyzes the reduction of nitrite (NO(2)(-)) to ammonia, using reduced ferredoxin as the electron donor. NiR contains a [4Fe-4S] cluster and an Fe-siroheme, which is the nitrite binding site. In the enzyme's as-isolated form ([4Fe-4S](2+)/Fe(3+)), resonance Raman spectroscopy indicated that the siroheme is in the high-spin ferric hexacoordinated state with a weak sixth axial ligand. Kinetic and spectroscopic experiments showed that the reaction of NiR with NO(2)(-) results in an unexpectedly EPR-silent complex formed in a single step with a rate constant of 0.45 +/- 0.01 s(-)(1). This binding rate is slow compared to that expected from the NiR turnover rates reported in the literature, suggesting that binding of NO(2)(-) to the as-isolated form of NiR is not the predominant type of substrate binding during enzyme turnover. Resonance Raman spectroscopic characterization of this complex indicated that (i) the siroheme iron is low-spin hexacoordinated ferric, (ii) the ligand coordination is unusually heterogeneous, and (iii) the ligand is not nitric oxide, most likely NO(2)(-). The reaction of oxidized NiR with hydroxylamine (NH(2)OH), a putative intermediate, results in a ferrous siroheme-NO complex that is spectroscopically identical to the one observed during NiR turnover. Resonance Raman and absorption spectroscopy data show that the reaction of oxidized NiR ([4Fe-4S](2+)/Fe(3+)) with hydroxylamine is binding-limited, while the NH(2)OH conversion to nitric oxide is much faster.

  1. Dietary nitrite prevents hypercholesterolemic microvascular inflammation and reverses endothelial dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Stokes, Karen Y; Dugas, Tammy R; Tang, Yaoping; Garg, Harsha; Guidry, Eric; Bryan, Nathan S

    2009-05-01

    The nitrite anion is an endogenous product of mammalian nitric oxide (NO) metabolism, a key intermediate in the nitrogen cycle in plants, and a constituent of many foods. Research over the past 6 years has revealed surprising biological and cytoprotective activity of this anion. Hypercholesterolemia causes a proinflammatory phenotype in the microcirculation. This phenotype appears to result from a decline in NO bioavailability that results from a reduction in NO biosynthesis, inactivation of NO by superoxide, or both. Since nitrite has been shown to be potently cytoprotective and restore NO biochemical homeostasis, we investigated if supplemental nitrite could attenuate microvascular inflammation caused by a high cholesterol diet. C57Bl/6J mice were fed either a normal diet or a high cholesterol diet for 3 wk to induce microvascular inflammation. Mice on the high cholesterol diet received either nitrite-free drinking water or supplemental nitrite at 33 or 99 mg/l ad libitum in their drinking water. The results from this investigation reveal that mice fed a cholesterol-enriched diet exhibited significantly elevated leukocyte adhesion to and emigration through the venular endothelium as well as impaired endothelium-dependent relaxation in arterioles. Administration of nitrite in the drinking water inhibited the leukocyte adhesion and emigration and prevented the arteriolar dysfunction. This was associated with sparing of reduced tetrahydrobiopterin and decreased levels of C-reactive protein. These data reveal novel anti-inflammatory properties of nitrite and implicate the use of nitrite as a new natural therapy for microvascular inflammation and endothelial dysfunction associated with hypercholesterolemia.

  2. Activation of accumulated nitrite reduction by immobilized Pseudomonas stutzeri T13 during aerobic denitrification.

    PubMed

    Ma, Fang; Sun, Yilu; Li, Ang; Zhang, Xuening; Yang, Jixian

    2015-01-01

    The excellent removal efficiency of nitrate by the aerobic denitrifier, Pseudomonas stutzeri T13, was achieved in free cells system. However, poor nitrite reduction prevents efficient aerobic denitrification because of the nitrite accumulation. This problem could be conquered by immobilizing the cells on supports. In this study, strain T13 was immobilized by mycelial pellets (MPs), polyurethane foam cubes (PFCs) and sodium alginate beads (SABs). Higher removal percentages of TN in MP (43.78%), PFC (42.31%) and SAB (57.25%) systems were achieved compared with the free cell system (29.7%). Furthermore, the optimal condition for immobilized cell systems was as follows: 30°C, 100rpm shaking speed and pH 7. The shock-resistance of SAB system was relatively poor, which could collapse under either alkaline (pH=9) or high rotating (200rpm) conditions. The recycling experiments demonstrated that the high steady TN removal rate could be maintained for seven cycles in both MP and PFC systems. PMID:25827250

  3. Molecular Components of Nitrate and Nitrite Efflux in Yeast

    PubMed Central

    Cabrera, Elisa; González-Montelongo, Rafaela; Giraldez, Teresa; de la Rosa, Diego Alvarez

    2014-01-01

    Some eukaryotes, such as plant and fungi, are capable of utilizing nitrate as the sole nitrogen source. Once transported into the cell, nitrate is reduced to ammonium by the consecutive action of nitrate and nitrite reductase. How nitrate assimilation is balanced with nitrate and nitrite efflux is unknown, as are the proteins involved. The nitrate assimilatory yeast Hansenula polymorpha was used as a model to dissect these efflux systems. We identified the sulfite transporters Ssu1 and Ssu2 as effective nitrate exporters, Ssu2 being quantitatively more important, and we characterize the Nar1 protein as a nitrate/nitrite exporter. The use of strains lacking either SSU2 or NAR1 along with the nitrate reductase gene YNR1 showed that nitrate reductase activity is not required for net nitrate uptake. Growth test experiments indicated that Ssu2 and Nar1 exporters allow yeast to cope with nitrite toxicity. We also have shown that the well-known Saccharomyces cerevisiae sulfite efflux permease Ssu1 is also able to excrete nitrite and nitrate. These results characterize for the first time essential components of the nitrate/nitrite efflux system and their impact on net nitrate uptake and its regulation. PMID:24363367

  4. Mutagenicity of some alkyl nitrites used as recreational drugs

    SciTech Connect

    Dunkel, V.C.; Cameron, T.P. ); Rogers-Back, A.M.; Lawlor, T.E.; Harbell, J.W. )

    1989-01-01

    When the AIDS epidemic was in its earliest stages, and prior to identification of HIV as the etiological factor, the use of volatile nitrites by the male homosexual community to enhance sexual activities appeared to have a significant role in this disease. Preliminary observations indicated that that portion of the male homosexual community which developed Kaposi's sarcoma were also heavy nitrite users. These nitrites had been demonstrated to be mutagenic in bacteria and thus it was postulated that they could be responsible for the appearance of the sarcoma. To evaluate further the genotoxic activity of these chemicals, six nitrites, including those most commonly used by homosexuals for sexual gratification, were selected for testing in the mouse lymphoma TK {plus minus} and Salmonell typhimurium mutagenicity assays. One chemical, n-amyl nitrite, was negative in the mouse lymphoma assay, while the other five chemicals, n-butyl, isobutyl, iso-amyl, sec-butyl, and n-propyl nitrite, were positive. All six compounds were positive in the Salmonella assay. The mutagenic and known toxic effects of these chemicals remain a concern because a large population of teenagers and young adults continue to abuse these substances.

  5. Nitrite therapy improves survival postexposure to chlorine gas.

    PubMed

    Honavar, Jaideep; Doran, Stephen; Oh, Joo-Yeun; Steele, Chad; Matalon, Sadis; Patel, Rakesh P

    2014-12-01

    Exposure to relatively high levels of chlorine (Cl₂) gas can occur in mass-casualty scenarios associated with accidental or intentional release. Recent studies have shown a significant postexposure injury phase to the airways, pulmonary, and systemic vasculatures mediated in part by oxidative stress, inflammation, and dysfunction in endogenous nitric oxide homeostasis pathways. However, there is a need for therapeutics that are amenable to rapid and easy administration in the field and that display efficacy toward toxicity after chlorine exposure. In this study, we tested whether nitric oxide repletion using nitrite, by intramuscular injection after Cl₂ exposure, could prevent Cl₂ gas toxicity. C57bl/6 male mice were exposed to 600 parts per million Cl₂ gas for 45 min, and 24-h survival was determined with or without postexposure intramuscular nitrite injection. A single injection of nitrite (10 mg/kg) administered either 30 or 60 min postexposure significantly improved 24-h survival (from ∼20% to 50%). Survival was associated with decreased neutrophil accumulation in the airways. Rendering mice neutropenic before Cl₂ exposure improved survival and resulted in loss of nitrite-dependent survival protection. Interestingly, female mice were more sensitive to Cl₂-induced toxicity compared with males and were also less responsive to postexposure nitrite therapy. These data provide evidence for efficacy and define therapeutic parameters for a single intramuscular injection of nitrite as a therapeutic after Cl₂ gas exposure that is amenable to administration in mass-casualty scenarios. PMID:25326579

  6. Nitrite-induced anemia in channel catfish, Ictalurus punctatus Rafinesque

    SciTech Connect

    Tucker, C.S. ); Francis-Floyd, R.; Beleau, M.H. )

    1989-08-01

    Since 1983 numerous cases of anemia have been reported in populations of channel catfish Ictalurus punctatus Rafinesque cultured in the southeastern United States. Environmental nitrite-nitrogen concentrations of 4 mg/L or more occur sporadically in channel catfish culture ponds, and the frequency of occurrence is greatest in the fall and spring. The authors have observed that some cases of anemia in populations of pond-raised channel catfish follow prolonged exposure to high concentrations of environmental nitrite. However, there was no evidence that exposure of channel catfish to environmental nitrite was the cause of the observed anemia. Hemolytic anemia following nitrite exposure has been described for sea bass Dicentrarchus labrax (L.) and rainbow trout Salmo gairdneri, but not for channel catfish. In the present study the authors show that a variable, but generally mild, anemia develops in channel catfish exposed to nitrite. They also offer a management procedure for preventing the development of anemia during periods of elevated environmental nitrite concentrations.

  7. Nitrite-Specific Active Transport System of the Cyanobacterium Synechococcus sp. Strain PCC 7942

    PubMed Central

    Maeda, Shin-ichi; Okamura, Masato; Kobayashi, Masaki; Omata, Tatsuo

    1998-01-01

    Studies on the nitrite uptake capability of a mutant of Synechococcus sp. strain PCC 7942 lacking the ATP-binding cassette-type nitrate-nitrite-bispecific transporter revealed the occurrence of a nitrite-specific active transport system with an apparent Km (NO2−) of about 20 μM. Similar to the nitrate-nitrite-bispecific transporter, the nitrite-specific transporter was reversibly inhibited by ammonium in the medium. PMID:9852027

  8. Automated, colorimetric methods for determination of nitrate plus nitrite, nitrite, ammonium and orthophosphate ions in natural water samples

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Antweiler, Ronald C.; Patton, Charles J.; Taylor, Howard E.

    1996-01-01

    The apparatus and methods used for the automatic, colorimetric determinations of dissolved nutrients (nitrate plus nitrite, nitrite, ammonium and orthophosphate) in natural waters are described. These techniques allow for the determination of nitrate plus nitrite for the concentration range 0.02 to 8 mg/L (milligrams per liter) as N (nitrogen); for nitrite, the range is 0.002 to 1.0 mg/L as N; for ammonium, the range is 0.006 to 2.0 mg/L as N; and for orthophosphate, the range is 0.002 to 1.0 mg/L as P (phosphorus). Data are presented that demonstrate the accuracy, precision and quality control of the methods.

  9. Rheological and structural properties of differently acidified and renneted milk gels.

    PubMed

    Liu, X T; Zhang, H; Wang, F; Luo, J; Guo, H Y; Ren, F Z

    2014-01-01

    In this study we assessed the rheological and structural properties of differently acidified and renneted milk gels by controlling pH value and renneting extent. Skim milk were exactly renneted to 4 extents (20, 35, 55, and 74%) and then direct acidified to the desired pH (4.8, 5.0, 5.2, 5.5, 5.8, and 6.2), respectively. Rheological properties were assessed by dynamic rheological measurements, structural properties were studied by spontaneous whey separation and confocal laser scanning micrograph, and protein interactions were studied by dissociation test. Results showed that minimally renneted milk samples (20 and 35%) formed weak gels with low storage modulus, and the acidification range within which gels could form was narrow (pH ≤ 5.2). Highly renneted milk samples formed more gels with high storage modulus. The results of this study revealed that acidification determined the structural properties of highly renneted milk gels. As pH increased from 5.0 to 6.2, highly renneted milk gels had lower loss tangent, decreased spontaneous syneresis, and smaller pores. For both the low and high rennetings, divalent calcium bonds contributed less at low pH than at high pH. In conclusion, renneting increased the pH range suitable for gel formation; acidification determined the spontaneous syneresis and microstructure of highly renneted milk gels.

  10. [Effect of flue gas desulfurization gypsum application on remediation of acidified forest soil].

    PubMed

    Luo, Yao; Kang, Rong-Hua; Yu, De-Xiang; Tan, Bing-Quan; Duan, Lei

    2012-06-01

    Effect of flue gas desulfurization gypsum (FGDG) application on remediation of a typical acidified forest soil was studied through field experiments at Tieshanping, Chongqing in southwest China for one year. To evaluate the effect and risk of FGDG application, pH value, major ions and heavy metal of soil water in different soil layers were observed dynamically, and heavy metal contained in soil and FGDG were measured. Results showed that Ca2+ and SO4(-2) concentration of soil water in FGDG plots increased with time, pH value was elevated slightly, and n(Ca)/n(Al) value of annual average increased from 2.16, 1.35 and 0.88 to 2.58, 1.52 and 1.12 compared with control plots. The concentration of As, Cu, Cr, Ni and Zn in soil water was not elevated significantly. However, slight enrichment of Cr, Ni and Zn in some upper soil layers was observed. Consequently, FGDG application can improve acidified forest soil, without obviously heavy metal increasing in soil water. However, risk for heavy metal enrichment still exists, which is need for further study. PMID:22946189

  11. Protozoan grazing on bacteria at the sediment-water interface of an acidified lake

    SciTech Connect

    Tremaine, S.C.

    1988-01-01

    Protozoan grazing on bacteria has been hypothesized to link the detrital and grazer food chains in aquatic ecosystems. The current study of protozoan bacterivory, evaluated methods, quantified bacterivory, and evaluated the role of protozoa at the sediment-water interface of an acidified lake ecosystem, Lake Anna, Virginia. Three limnetic methods for determining protozoan bacterivory were tested for applicability at the sediment-water interface. The eucaryote inhibitor, cycloheximide, was found unsatisfactory because it did not uniformly inhibit growth of target eucaryotes, and because it inhibited non-target anaerobic procaryotes. The filtration method was found to have limited application in sediment systems due to filtrational loss of particle-associated bacteria. The dilution method was tested for violations of its critical assumptions: bacterial growth is exponential; grazing mortality is proportional to the dilution factor; and bacterial growth rates are unaltered under experimental conditions. These assumptions were found not to be violated, and this method was used in subsequent grazing experiments. Carbon loading to the acidified arm of Lake Anna was 41 {times} 10{sup 6} g C {times} y{sup {minus}1}. This appears to be adequate carbon loading to support bacterial production and, in turn, protozoan bacterivory and production. Though there is no direct evidence that zooplankton graze on protozoa in this system, however, there is sufficient protozoan production to support an additional trophic level.

  12. Resilience of epilithic algal assemblages in atmospherically and experimentally acidified boreal lakes.

    PubMed

    Vinebrooke, Rolf D; Graham, Mark D; Findlay, David L; Turner, Michael A

    2003-04-01

    Algal assemblages can be highly responsive to environmental changes in recovering acidified lakes. We compared epilithic algal assemblages in boreal lakes during chemical recovery from atmospheric (Killarney Park, Ontario) and experimental (Lake 302S, Experimental Lakes Area, Ontario) acidification to assess the impact of spatial and temporal scale of severe acidification on taxonomic resilience (i.e. recovery rate). Resilience was measured as the distance traveled by lakes in ordination space during pH recovery based on canonical correspondence analysis. Resilience was relatively negligible in the Killarney lakes, suggesting that eight years of experimental acidification in Lake 302S had less impact on biological recovery than did decades of regional acidification. Increases in dissolved organic carbon, dissolved inorganic carbon, and calcium best explained temporal variance of epilithic species abundances in the recovering acidified lakes. In Lake 302S, contrasting trajectories of taxonomic resilience and resistance, i.e. displacement from reference conditions following a perturbation, indicated that ecological factors affecting epilithon differed at corresponding pH levels during recovery and acidification. Our findings reveal that modeling of ecosystem recovery from severe acidification must account for the spatial and temporal scale of the perturbation, and biological delay responses that result in differences between recovery and acidification trajectories.

  13. Anaerobic digestion of sulfate-acidified cattle slurry: One-stage vs. two-stage.

    PubMed

    Moset, Veronica; Ottosen, Lars Ditlev Mørck; Xavier, Cristiane de Almeida Neves; Møller, Henrik Bjarne

    2016-05-15

    Two strategies to include acidified cattle manure (AcCM) in co-digestion with normal cattle manure (CM) are presented in this work. The strategies are a single thermophilic (50 °C) continuous stirred tank reactor (CSTR) anaerobic digestion and a two-step (65 °C + 50 °C) CSTR process. In both strategies, two different inclusion levels of H2SO4-acidified CM (10% and 20%) in co-digestion with normal CM were tested and compared with a control CSTR fed only CM. Important enhancement of methane (CH4) yield and solid reductions were observed in the thermophilic one-step CSTR working with 10% AcCM. However, a higher inclusion level of AcCM (20%) caused volatile fatty acid accumulation in the reactor and a more than 30% reduction in CH4 production. In terms of CH4 production, when 10% of AcCM was co-digested with 90% of CM, the two-step anaerobic co-digestion yielded less than the single step. During the first step of the two-step CSTR process, acidogenesis and a partial sulfate reduction were achieved. However, sulfide stripping between the first and the second step must be promoted in order to advance this technology.

  14. [Effect of limestone and magnesite application on remediation of acidified forest soil in Chongqing, China].

    PubMed

    Yang, Yong-sen; Duan, Lei; Jin, Teng; Zhao, Da-wei; Zhang, Dong-bao; Hao, Ji-ming

    2006-09-01

    Effect of limestone and magnesite application on remediation of a typical acidified soil under a masson pine (Pinus massoniana) forest at Tieshanping, Chongqing in southwest China was studied through field experiments. The changes of soil water chemistry in different layers within one year after application of limestone or magnesite indicated that the remediation agents leaded to the recovery of acidified soil by significant increase of pH value and concentration of relative cation, i.e., Ca2+ or Mg2+, and notable decrease of inorganic monomeric aluminum (Ali). However, the accelerated leaching of NO3- and SO4(2-) might somewhat counteract the positive effects. Since the limestone powder applied was much finer and thus more soluble than the magnesite powder, it seemed that the addition of limestone was more effective than that of magnesite. However, the application of magnesite could probably improve the nutrient uptake and growth of plant, and thus limestone and magnesite should be used together. The change of soil water chemistry was much more notable in upper layer of soil than lower, which means that it will take long time to achieve the whole profile soil remediation.

  15. [Effect of flue gas desulfurization gypsum application on remediation of acidified forest soil].

    PubMed

    Luo, Yao; Kang, Rong-Hua; Yu, De-Xiang; Tan, Bing-Quan; Duan, Lei

    2012-06-01

    Effect of flue gas desulfurization gypsum (FGDG) application on remediation of a typical acidified forest soil was studied through field experiments at Tieshanping, Chongqing in southwest China for one year. To evaluate the effect and risk of FGDG application, pH value, major ions and heavy metal of soil water in different soil layers were observed dynamically, and heavy metal contained in soil and FGDG were measured. Results showed that Ca2+ and SO4(-2) concentration of soil water in FGDG plots increased with time, pH value was elevated slightly, and n(Ca)/n(Al) value of annual average increased from 2.16, 1.35 and 0.88 to 2.58, 1.52 and 1.12 compared with control plots. The concentration of As, Cu, Cr, Ni and Zn in soil water was not elevated significantly. However, slight enrichment of Cr, Ni and Zn in some upper soil layers was observed. Consequently, FGDG application can improve acidified forest soil, without obviously heavy metal increasing in soil water. However, risk for heavy metal enrichment still exists, which is need for further study.

  16. [Effect of limestone and magnesite application on remediation of acidified forest soil in Chongqing, China].

    PubMed

    Yang, Yong-sen; Duan, Lei; Jin, Teng; Zhao, Da-wei; Zhang, Dong-bao; Hao, Ji-ming

    2006-09-01

    Effect of limestone and magnesite application on remediation of a typical acidified soil under a masson pine (Pinus massoniana) forest at Tieshanping, Chongqing in southwest China was studied through field experiments. The changes of soil water chemistry in different layers within one year after application of limestone or magnesite indicated that the remediation agents leaded to the recovery of acidified soil by significant increase of pH value and concentration of relative cation, i.e., Ca2+ or Mg2+, and notable decrease of inorganic monomeric aluminum (Ali). However, the accelerated leaching of NO3- and SO4(2-) might somewhat counteract the positive effects. Since the limestone powder applied was much finer and thus more soluble than the magnesite powder, it seemed that the addition of limestone was more effective than that of magnesite. However, the application of magnesite could probably improve the nutrient uptake and growth of plant, and thus limestone and magnesite should be used together. The change of soil water chemistry was much more notable in upper layer of soil than lower, which means that it will take long time to achieve the whole profile soil remediation. PMID:17117649

  17. Spatial community shift from hard to soft corals in acidified water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inoue, Shihori; Kayanne, Hajime; Yamamoto, Shoji; Kurihara, Haruko

    2013-07-01

    Anthropogenic increases in the partial pressure of CO2 (pCO2) cause ocean acidification, declining calcium carbonate saturation states, reduced coral reef calcification and changes in the compositions of marine communities. Most projected community changes due to ocean acidification describe transitions from hard coral to non-calcifying macroalgal communities; other organisms have received less attention, despite the biotic diversity of coral reef communities. We show that the spatial distributions of both hard and soft coral communities in volcanically acidified, semi-enclosed waters off Iwotorishima Island, Japan, are related to pCO2 levels. Hard corals are restricted to non-acidified low- pCO2 (225μatm) zones, dense populations of the soft coral Sarcophyton elegans dominate medium- pCO2 (831μatm) zones, and both hard and soft corals are absent from the highest- pCO2 (1,465μatm) zone. In CO2-enriched culture experiments, high- pCO2 conditions benefited Sarcophyton elegans by enhancing photosynthesis rates and did not affect light calcification, but dark decalcification (negative net calcification) increased with increasing pCO2. These results suggest that reef communities may shift from reef-building hard corals to non-reef-building soft corals under pCO2 levels (550-970μatm) predicted by the end of this century, and that higher pCO2 levels would challenge the survival of some reef organisms.

  18. Growth and physiological condition of black ducks reared on acidified wetlands

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rattner, B.A.; Haramis, G.M.; Chu, D.S.; Bunck, C.M.; Scanes, C.G.

    1987-01-01

    Acid deposition has been identified as one of several possible factors contributing to the decline of some waterfowl populations in North America. In an effort to examine the effects of acidification on black duck (Anas rubripes) recruitment, growth and physiological condition were monitored in ducklings foraging for a 10-day trial (days 10-20 of life) on acidified (pH 5.0) and : circumneutral (pH 6.8) fish-free emergent wetlands. Acidification of these wetlands suppressed phytoplankton and algal growth, and reduced invertebrate biomass. Ducklings maintained on acidified wetlands grew poorly compared with ducklings reared on circumneutral wetlands, as evidenced by lower final body weight and culmen and tarsus length. Plasma growth hormone concentration was elevated and triiodothyronine levels were lower in stunted ducklings, in part substantiating impairment of growth-regulating processes. Ducklings exhibiting poor growth tended to have lower hematocrit, lower plasma protein, glucose, and cholesterol concentrations, and higher uric acid levels, presumably reflecting alterations in metabolism and development due to inanition. These findings suggest that acid deposition may lower food production in wetlands and ultimately impair duckling growth, condition, and survival.

  19. Anaerobic digestion of sulfate-acidified cattle slurry: One-stage vs. two-stage.

    PubMed

    Moset, Veronica; Ottosen, Lars Ditlev Mørck; Xavier, Cristiane de Almeida Neves; Møller, Henrik Bjarne

    2016-05-15

    Two strategies to include acidified cattle manure (AcCM) in co-digestion with normal cattle manure (CM) are presented in this work. The strategies are a single thermophilic (50 °C) continuous stirred tank reactor (CSTR) anaerobic digestion and a two-step (65 °C + 50 °C) CSTR process. In both strategies, two different inclusion levels of H2SO4-acidified CM (10% and 20%) in co-digestion with normal CM were tested and compared with a control CSTR fed only CM. Important enhancement of methane (CH4) yield and solid reductions were observed in the thermophilic one-step CSTR working with 10% AcCM. However, a higher inclusion level of AcCM (20%) caused volatile fatty acid accumulation in the reactor and a more than 30% reduction in CH4 production. In terms of CH4 production, when 10% of AcCM was co-digested with 90% of CM, the two-step anaerobic co-digestion yielded less than the single step. During the first step of the two-step CSTR process, acidogenesis and a partial sulfate reduction were achieved. However, sulfide stripping between the first and the second step must be promoted in order to advance this technology. PMID:26985731

  20. [Decoloration of reactive turquoise blue by acidified sludge-bentonite granule].

    PubMed

    Yue, Qin-Yan; Yuan, Ai-Juan; Li, Qian; Gao, Bao-Yu; Li, Jing

    2009-05-15

    Using sludge as pore-forming agent, bentonite granule was acidified by sulfuric acid solution as a decolorant. The specific surface area and SEM were performed to characterize the structure of samples, and the new acidified sludge-bentonite granule was applied to the decoloration of reactive turquoise blue. The influencing factors of pH value, dosage, reaction time and reaction temperature were studied on the removal of the dyes. The important thermodynamics parameters (DeltaH0, DeltaS0, DeltaG) and the activation energy Ea were also acquired by experiment data processing. The results indicated that the adsorption isotherm fitted the isothermal adsorption equations of Langmuir better than Freundlich. The adsorption dynamics followed the law of the pseudo-second order kinetic equation, while the adsorption rate is 313 K > 303 K > 293 K. The low value of Ea which is 5.52 kJ x mol(-1) shows that physical adsorption is primary. And DeltaH0 > TDeltaS0 means that the influence of enthalpy is more remarkable than the entropy in the activation reaction. DeltaG > 0 also means the chemical reactions are not spontaneous.

  1. Nitrate and Nitrite Content of Human, Formula, Bovine, and Soy Milks: Implications for Dietary Nitrite and Nitrate Recommendations

    PubMed Central

    Hord, Norman G.; Ghannam, Janine S.; Garg, Harsha K.; Berens, Pamela D.

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background Estimation of nitrate and nitrite concentrations of milk sources may provide insight into potential health risks and benefits of these food sources for infants, children, and adults. The World Health Organization and American Academy of Pediatrics recommends exclusive consumption of human milk for the first 6 months of life. Human milk is known to confer significant nutritional and immunological benefits for the infant. Consumption of formula, cow's, and soy milk may be used as alternatives to human milk for infants. Methods We sought to estimate potential exposure to nitrate and nitrite in human, formula, bovine, and soy milk to inform total dietary exposure estimates and recommendations. Using sensitive quantitative methodologies, nitrite and nitrate were analyzed in different samples of milk. Results Human milk concentrations of colostrum (expressed days 1–3 postpartum; n = 12), transition milk (expressed days 3–7 postpartum; n = 17), and mature milk (expressed >7 days postpartum; n = 50) were 0.08 mg/100 mL nitrite and 0.19 mg/100 mL nitrate, 0.001 mg/100 mL nitrite and 0.52 mg/100 mL nitrate, and 0.001 mg/100 mL nitrite and 0.3 mg/100 mL nitrate, respectively, revealing that the absolute amounts of these anions change as the composition of milk changes. When expressed as a percentage of the World Health Organization's Acceptable Daily Intake limits, Silk® Soy Vanilla (WhiteWave Foods, Broomfield, CO) intake could result in high nitrate intakes (104% of this standard), while intake of Bright Beginnings Soy Pediatric® formula (PBM Nutritionals, Georgia, VT) could result in the highest nitrite intakes (383% of this standard). Conclusions The temporal relationship between the provision of nitrite in human milk and the development of commensal microbiota capable of reducing dietary nitrate to nitrite supports a hypothesis that humans are adapted to provide nitrite to the gastrointestinal tract from birth

  2. Comparison of TGSCC and crevice corrosion in a brass/nitrite system

    SciTech Connect

    Edgemon, G.L.; Bell, G.E.C.; Mickalonis, J.I.

    1999-11-01

    The use of electrochemical noise based corrosion monitoring equipment to detect localized corrosion in laboratory and process systems has increased markedly over the last five years. One of the most interesting systems to study is the stress corrosion cracking of UNS C22000 brass exposed to 1-M sodium nitrite (NaNO{sub 2}) at ambient temperature. This test has been proposed as a possible standard for evaluating electrochemical noise equipment. Stressed brass specimens exposed to this environment consistently display the same movement from general corrosion to passivation to transgranular stress corrosion cracking. In an effort to better understand the complex patterns of data this system is capable of producing, crevice corrosion tests using similar specimens and environments were performed. Data from the stress corrosion cracking tests are presented and compared with data from the crevice corrosion tests.

  3. Experimental evaluation of the nitrite sensitivity coefficient in granular anammox biomass.

    PubMed

    Rosenthal, A; Ramalingam, K; Beckmann, K; Deur, A; Fillos, J

    2013-01-01

    Nitrite is widely reported to inhibit anammox activity and growth. One modeling approach for nitrite impairment of anammox growth is the use of a nitrite sensitivity coefficient which increases the endogenous decay coefficient of anammox bacteria proportionally to nitrite concentration. The objective of this study was to measure nitrite concentration profiles within active anammox granules incubated at fixed bulk nitrite concentrations and to compare these with nitrite concentration profiles predicted by a biofilm model that incorporates the nitrite sensitivity coefficient. We developed an apparatus for the repeated measurement of nitrite concentration profiles along the radius of granular anammox biomass over a period of 6 days at fixed bulk nitrite concentrations. Granular anammox biomass was obtained from a two-stage bench-scale partial nitritation/anammox reactor system. There was no apparent effect of nitrite concentration on nitrite utilization kinetics after 6 days at exposures up to 90 mg NO(2)(-)-N/L. These findings suggest that anammox bacteria tolerate extended exposures to elevated nitrite concentrations, and in its present form, the nitrite sensitivity coefficient is not applicable for anammox growth modeling.

  4. Enhancement of iron(II)-dependent reduction of nitrite to nitric oxide by thiocyanate and accumulation of iron(II)/thiocyanate/nitric oxide complex under conditions simulating the mixture of saliva and gastric juice.

    PubMed

    Takahama, Umeo; Hirota, Sachiko

    2012-01-13

    Iron(III) ingested as a food component or supplement for iron deficiencies can react with salivary SCN(-) to produce Fe(SCN)(2+) and can be reduced to iron(II) by ascorbic acid in the stomach. Iron(II) generated in the stomach can react with salivary nitrite and SCN(-) to produce nitric oxide (NO) and FeSCN(+), respectively. The purpose of this investigation is to make clear the reactions among nitrite, SCN(-), iron ions, and ascorbic acid under conditions simulating the mixture of saliva and gastric juice. Iron(II)-dependent reduction of nitrite to NO was enhanced by SCN(-) in acidic buffer solutions, and the oxidation product of iron(II) reacted with SCN(-) to produce Fe(SCN)(2+). Almost all of the NO produced was autoxidized to N(2)O(3) under aerobic conditions. Iron(II)-dependent production of NO was also observed in acidified saliva. Under anaerobic conditions, NO transformed Fe(SCN)(2+) and FeSCN(+) to Fe(SCN)NO(+) in acidic buffer solutions. Fe(SCN)NO(+) was also formed under aerobic conditions when excess ascorbic acid was added to iron(II)/nitrite/SCN(-) systems in acidic buffer solutions and acidified saliva. The Fe(SCN)NO(+) formed was transformed to Fe(SCN)(2+) and iron(III) at pH 2.0 and pH 7.4, respectively, by O(2). Salivary glycoproteins could complex with iron(III) in the stomach preventing the formation of Fe(SCN)(2+). Ascorbic acid reduced iron(III) to iron(II) to react with nitrite and SCN(-) as described above. The above results suggest (i) that iron(II) can have toxic effects on the stomach through the formation of reactive nitrogen oxide species from NO when supplemented without ascorbic acid and through the formation of both reactive nitrogen oxide species and Fe(SCN)NO(+) when supplemented with ascorbic acid, and (ii) that the toxic effects of iron(III) seemed to be smaller than and similar to those of iron(II) when supplemented without and with ascorbic acid, respectively. Possible mechanisms that cause oxidative stress on the stomach

  5. Enhancement of iron(II)-dependent reduction of nitrite to nitric oxide by thiocyanate and accumulation of iron(II)/thiocyanate/nitric oxide complex under conditions simulating the mixture of saliva and gastric juice.

    PubMed

    Takahama, Umeo; Hirota, Sachiko

    2012-01-13

    Iron(III) ingested as a food component or supplement for iron deficiencies can react with salivary SCN(-) to produce Fe(SCN)(2+) and can be reduced to iron(II) by ascorbic acid in the stomach. Iron(II) generated in the stomach can react with salivary nitrite and SCN(-) to produce nitric oxide (NO) and FeSCN(+), respectively. The purpose of this investigation is to make clear the reactions among nitrite, SCN(-), iron ions, and ascorbic acid under conditions simulating the mixture of saliva and gastric juice. Iron(II)-dependent reduction of nitrite to NO was enhanced by SCN(-) in acidic buffer solutions, and the oxidation product of iron(II) reacted with SCN(-) to produce Fe(SCN)(2+). Almost all of the NO produced was autoxidized to N(2)O(3) under aerobic conditions. Iron(II)-dependent production of NO was also observed in acidified saliva. Under anaerobic conditions, NO transformed Fe(SCN)(2+) and FeSCN(+) to Fe(SCN)NO(+) in acidic buffer solutions. Fe(SCN)NO(+) was also formed under aerobic conditions when excess ascorbic acid was added to iron(II)/nitrite/SCN(-) systems in acidic buffer solutions and acidified saliva. The Fe(SCN)NO(+) formed was transformed to Fe(SCN)(2+) and iron(III) at pH 2.0 and pH 7.4, respectively, by O(2). Salivary glycoproteins could complex with iron(III) in the stomach preventing the formation of Fe(SCN)(2+). Ascorbic acid reduced iron(III) to iron(II) to react with nitrite and SCN(-) as described above. The above results suggest (i) that iron(II) can have toxic effects on the stomach through the formation of reactive nitrogen oxide species from NO when supplemented without ascorbic acid and through the formation of both reactive nitrogen oxide species and Fe(SCN)NO(+) when supplemented with ascorbic acid, and (ii) that the toxic effects of iron(III) seemed to be smaller than and similar to those of iron(II) when supplemented without and with ascorbic acid, respectively. Possible mechanisms that cause oxidative stress on the stomach

  6. Time-dependent depletion of nitrite in pork/beef and chicken meat products and its effect on nitrite intake estimation

    PubMed Central

    Merino, Leonardo; Darnerud, Per Ola; Toldrá, Fidel; Ilbäck, Nils-Gunnar

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The food additive nitrite (E249, E250) is commonly used in meat curing as a food preservation method. Because of potential negative health effects of nitrite, its use is strictly regulated. In an earlier study we have shown that the calculated intake of nitrite in children can exceed the acceptable daily intake (ADI) when conversion from dietary nitrate to nitrite is included. This study examined time-dependent changes in nitrite levels in four Swedish meat products frequently eaten by children: pork/beef sausage, liver paté and two types of chicken sausage, and how the production process, storage and also boiling (e.g., simmering in salted water) and frying affect the initial added nitrite level. The results showed a steep decrease in nitrite level between the point of addition to the product and the first sampling of the product 24 h later. After this time, residual nitrite levels continued to decrease, but much more slowly, until the recommended use-by date. Interestingly, this continuing decrease in nitrite was much smaller in the chicken products than in the pork/beef products. In a pilot study on pork/beef sausage, we found no effects of boiling on residual nitrite levels, but frying decreased nitrite levels by 50%. In scenarios of time-dependent depletion of nitrite using the data obtained for sausages to represent all cured meat products and including conversion from dietary nitrate, calculated nitrite intake in 4-year-old children generally exceeded the ADI. Moreover, the actual intake of nitrite from cured meat is dependent on the type of meat source, with a higher residual nitrite levels in chicken products compared with pork/beef products. This may result in increased nitrite exposure among consumers shifting their consumption pattern of processed meats from red to white meat products. PMID:26743589

  7. Time-dependent depletion of nitrite in pork/beef and chicken meat products and its effect on nitrite intake estimation.

    PubMed

    Merino, Leonardo; Darnerud, Per Ola; Toldrá, Fidel; Ilbäck, Nils-Gunnar

    2016-01-01

    The food additive nitrite (E249, E250) is commonly used in meat curing as a food preservation method. Because of potential negative health effects of nitrite, its use is strictly regulated. In an earlier study we have shown that the calculated intake of nitrite in children can exceed the acceptable daily intake (ADI) when conversion from dietary nitrate to nitrite is included. This study examined time-dependent changes in nitrite levels in four Swedish meat products frequently eaten by children: pork/beef sausage, liver paté and two types of chicken sausage, and how the production process, storage and also boiling (e.g., simmering in salted water) and frying affect the initial added nitrite level. The results showed a steep decrease in nitrite level between the point of addition to the product and the first sampling of the product 24 h later. After this time, residual nitrite levels continued to decrease, but much more slowly, until the recommended use-by date. Interestingly, this continuing decrease in nitrite was much smaller in the chicken products than in the pork/beef products. In a pilot study on pork/beef sausage, we found no effects of boiling on residual nitrite levels, but frying decreased nitrite levels by 50%. In scenarios of time-dependent depletion of nitrite using the data obtained for sausages to represent all cured meat products and including conversion from dietary nitrate, calculated nitrite intake in 4-year-old children generally exceeded the ADI. Moreover, the actual intake of nitrite from cured meat is dependent on the type of meat source, with a higher residual nitrite levels in chicken products compared with pork/beef products. This may result in increased nitrite exposure among consumers shifting their consumption pattern of processed meats from red to white meat products. PMID:26743589

  8. Test Your Sodium Smarts

    MedlinePlus

    ... You may be surprised to learn how much sodium is in many foods. Sodium, including sodium chloride ... foods with little or no salt. Test your sodium smarts by answering these 10 questions about which ...

  9. Integration of denitrifying phosphorus removal via nitrite pathway, simultaneous nitritation-denitritation and anammox treating carbon-limited municipal sewage.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Wei; Li, Boxiao; Wang, Xiangdong; Bai, Xinlong; Peng, Yongzhen

    2014-11-01

    High nutrients removal above 90% from carbon-limited municipal sewage was obtained without adding external carbon source. Achieving nitritation was a prerequisite to improve nutrients removal. Denitrifying phosphorus (P) removal using nitrite as electron acceptor was the key pathway in anoxic zone, where nitrogen removal reached above 60% and average denitrifying P removal was 88%. Simultaneous nitritation/denitritation and anaerobic ammonia oxidation (anammox) possibly contributed to nitrogen removal of 26-36% in aerobic zone. Quantitative PCR assays presented that the abundance of anammox bacteria under nitritation was more than that under complete nitrification. The largest amount of anammox bacteria was 1.32×10(6)copies/gVSS, about 5.6 times increase over a period of 255days. Nitrite concentration of 17mg/L in aerobic zone inhibited anammox bacteria. Quantitative results suggested possible occurrence of anammox. Based on performance of nitritation, combining heterotrophic denitrification with autotrophic nitrogen removal is an effective strategy to improve nutrients removal from carbon-limited wastewater.

  10. SNOW2002: NOx Production From Nitrate-In-Ice Photolysis at Two pHs and Comparison with NOx Levels From Nitrite-In-Ice Photolysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peterson, M.; Dibb, J.

    2002-12-01

    We conducted experiments using artificial snow, synthetic air, and sunlight during January, 2002 (the SNOW2002 study) in order to test the influence of neutral and basic pH on the amount of NO, NO2, and NOx emitted from artificial snow during nitrate photolysis. We also conducted the first tests demonstrating that illumination of consolidated, sub-millimeter diameter ice particles (e.g., artificial snow) doped with nitrite produces NOx, confirming that nitrite photolysis occurs in ice and snow. Innovations in NOx instrument design were also implemented in order to estimate gaseous HONO levels using UV lamp photolysis. Nitrate was introduced into solution as sodium nitrate, pH was controlled using sodium hydroxide. Artificial snow particles were formed by spraying tiny water droplets down into a tall (3 meter) column chilled by a pool of liquid nitrogen at the column base. Although this method of creating artificial snow results in snow that is certainly different than natural snow, the tiny ice particles formed are powdery and sinter quickly. This artificial snow is relatively easy to make and is well suited for determining whether photolysis of nitrate or nitrite is occurring, and whether changes occur at various pH levels. The amounts of NO and NO2 produced by nitrate ion photolysis in aqueous solution depends on pH such that NO production is greatly enhanced in basic solutions. Our preliminary results indicate that the pH of the solutions used to make artificial snow does not effect the levels or partitioning of NOx produced from nitrate-in-ice photolysis. This result suggests that aqueous photochemical analogs of nitrate photolysis may not apply to nitrate-in-ice photochemistry and that more experiments are needed in order to understand nitrate-in-ice photochemistry. Experiments exploring nitrite-in-ice photolysis demonstrate that there is one to two orders of magnitude more NOx produced by nitrite photolysis than by nitrate photolysis at equivalent conditions

  11. Intracellular Conversion of Environmental Nitrate and Nitrite to Nitric Oxide with Resulting Developmental Toxicity to the Crustacean Daphnia magna

    PubMed Central

    Hannas, Bethany R.; Das, Parikshit C.; Li, Hong; LeBlanc, Gerald A.

    2010-01-01

    Background Nitrate and nitrite (jointly referred to herein as NOx) are ubiquitous environmental contaminants to which aquatic organisms are at particularly high risk of exposure. We tested the hypothesis that NOx undergo intracellular conversion to the potent signaling molecule nitric oxide resulting in the disruption of endocrine-regulated processes. Methodology/Principal Findings These experiments were performed with insect cells (Drosophila S2) and whole organisms Daphnia magna. We first evaluated the ability of cells to convert nitrate (NO3−) and nitrite (NO2−) to nitric oxide using amperometric real-time nitric oxide detection. Both NO3− and NO2− were converted to nitric oxide in a substrate concentration-dependent manner. Further, nitric oxide trapping and fluorescent visualization studies revealed that perinatal daphnids readily convert NO2− to nitric oxide. Next, daphnids were continuously exposed to concentrations of the nitric oxide-donor sodium nitroprusside (positive control) and to concentrations of NO3− and NO2−. All three compounds interfered with normal embryo development and reduced daphnid fecundity. Developmental abnormalities were characteristic of those elicited by compounds that interfere with ecdysteroid signaling. However, no compelling evidence was generated to indicate that nitric oxide reduced ecdysteroid titers. Conclusions/Significance Results demonstrate that nitrite elicits developmental and reproductive toxicity at environmentally relevant concentrations due likely to its intracellular conversion to nitric oxide. PMID:20805993

  12. Low sodium diet (image)

    MedlinePlus

    ... for you. Look for these words on labels: low-sodium, sodium-free, no salt added, sodium-reduced, or ... for you. Look for these words on labels: low-sodium, sodium-free, no salt added, sodium-reduced, or ...

  13. Magnetic resonance study of the transmembrane nitrite diffusion.

    PubMed

    Samouilov, A; Woldman, Ya Yu; Zweier, J L; Khramtsov, V V

    2007-05-01

    Nitrite (NO(2)-), being a product of metabolism of both nitric oxide (NO(*)) and nitrate (NO(3)-), can accumulate in tissues and regenerate NO() by several mechanisms. The effect of NO(2)- on ischemia/reperfusion injury was also reported. Nevertheless, the mechanisms of intracellular NO(2)- accumulation are poorly understood. We suggested significant role of nitrite penetration through biological membranes in the form of undissociated nitrous acid (HNO(2)). This hypothesis has been tested using large unilamellar phosphatidylcholine liposomes and several spectroscopic techniques. HNO(2) transport across the phospholipid bilayer of liposomes facilitates proton transfer resulting in intraliposomal acidification, which was measured using pH-sensitive probes. NO(2)(-)-mediated intraliposomal acidification was confirmed by EPR spectroscopy using membrane-impermeable pH-sensitive nitroxide, AMC (2,2,5,5-tetramethyl-1-yloxy-2,5-dihydro-1H-imidazol-3-ium-4-yl)-aminomethanesulfonic acid (pK 5.25), and by (31)P NMR spectroscopy using inorganic phosphate (pK 6.9). Nitrite accumulates inside liposomes in concentration exceeding its concentration in the bulk solution, when initial transmembrane pH gradient (alkaline inside) is applied. Intraliposomal accumulation of NO(2)- was observed by direct measurement using chemiluminescence technique. Perfusion of isolated rat hearts with buffer containing 4 microM NO(2)- was performed. The nitrite concentrations in the effluent and in the tissue, measured after 1 min perfusion, were close, supporting fast penetration of the nitrite through the tissue. Measurements of the nitrite/nitrate showed that total concentration of NO(x) in myocardium increased from initial 7.8 to 24.7 microM after nitrite perfusion. Physiological significance of passive transmembrane transport of NO(2)- and its coupling with intraliposomal acidification are discussed.

  14. Increased Salivary Nitrite and Nitrate Excretion in Rats with Cirrhosis.

    PubMed

    Mahmoodi, Somayeh; Rahmatollahi, Mahdieh; Shahsavari, Fatemeh; Shafaroodi, Hamed; Grayesh-Nejad, Siyavash; Dehpour, Ahmad R

    2015-11-01

    Increased nitric oxide (NO) formation is mechanistically linked to pathophysiology of the extrahepatic complications of cirrhosis. NO is formed by either enzymatic or non-enzymatic pathways. Enzymatic production is catalyzed by NO synthase (NOS) while entero-salivary circulation of nitrate and nitrite is linked to non-enzymatic formation of NO under acidic pH in the stomach. There is no data on salivary excretion of nitrate and nitrite in cirrhosis. This study was aimed to investigate salivary levels of nitrate and nitrite in a rat model of biliary cirrhosis. Cirrhosis was induced by bile duct ligation (BDL). Four weeks after the operation, submandibular ducts of anesthetized BDL and control rats were cannulated with polyethylene microtube for saliva collection. Assessment of pH, nitrite and nitrate levels was performed in our research. We also investigated NOS expression by real time RT-PCR to estimate eNOS, nNOS and iNOS mRNA levels in the submandibular glands. Salivary pH was significantly lower in BDL rats in comparison to control animals. We also observed a statistically significant increase in salivary levels of nitrite as well as nitrate in BDL rats while there was no elevation in the mRNA expression of nNOS, eNOS, and iNOS in submandibular glands of cirrhotic groups. This indicates that an increased salivary level of nitrite/nitrate is less likely to be linked to increased enzymatic production of NO in the salivary epithelium. It appears that nitrate/nitrite can be transported from the blood stream by submandibular glands and excreted into saliva as entero-salivary circulation, and this mechanism may have been exaggerated during cirrhosis. PMID:26786986

  15. Nitrogen cycling in the secondary nitrite maximum of the eastern tropical North Pacific off Costa Rica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buchwald, Carolyn; Santoro, Alyson E.; Stanley, Rachel H. R.; Casciotti, Karen L.

    2015-12-01

    Nitrite is a central intermediate in the marine nitrogen cycle and represents a critical juncture where nitrogen can be reduced to the less bioavailable N2 gas or oxidized to nitrate and retained in a more bioavailable form. We present an analysis of rates of microbial nitrogen transformations in the oxygen deficient zone (ODZ) within the eastern tropical North Pacific Ocean (ETNP). We determined rates using a novel one-dimensional model using the distribution of nitrite and nitrate concentrations, along with their natural abundance nitrogen (N) and oxygen (O) isotope profiles. We predict rate profiles for nitrate reduction, nitrite reduction, and nitrite oxidation throughout the ODZ, as well as the contributions of anammox to nitrite reduction and nitrite oxidation. Nitrate reduction occurs at a maximum rate of 25 nM d-1 at the top of the ODZ, at the same depth as the maximum rate of nitrite reduction, 15 nM d-1. Nitrite oxidation occurs at maximum rates of 10 nM d-1 above the secondary nitrite maximum, but also in the secondary nitrite maximum, within the ODZ. Anammox contributes to nitrite oxidation within the ODZ but cannot account for all of it. Nitrite oxidation within the ODZ that is not through anammox is also supported by microbial gene abundance profiles. Our results suggest the presence of nitrite oxidation within the ETNP ODZ, with implications for the distribution and physiology of marine nitrite-oxidizing bacteria, and for total nitrogen loss in the largest marine ODZ.

  16. Impacts of Nitrate and Nitrite on Physiology of Shewanella oneidensis

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Haiyan; Fu, Huihui; Wang, Jixuan; Sun, Linlin; Jiang, Yaoming; Zhang, Lili; Gao, Haichun

    2013-01-01

    Shewanella oneidensis exhibits a remarkable versatility in anaerobic respiration, which largely relies on its diverse respiratory pathways. Some of these are expressed in response to the existence of their corresponding electron acceptors (EAs) under aerobic conditions. However, little is known about respiration and the impact of non-oxygen EAs on the physiology of the microorganism when oxygen is present. Here we undertook a study to elucidate the basis for nitrate and nitrite inhibition of growth under aerobic conditions. We discovered that nitrate in the form of NaNO3 exerts its inhibitory effects as a precursor to nitrite at low concentrations and as an osmotic-stress provider (Na+) at high concentrations. In contrast, nitrite is extremely toxic, with 25 mM abolishing growth completely. We subsequently found that oxygen represses utilization of all EAs but nitrate. To order to utilize EAs with less positive redox potential, such as nitrite and fumarate, S. oneidensis must enter the stationary phase, when oxygen respiration becomes unfavorable. In addition, we demonstrated that during aerobic respiration the cytochrome bd oxidase confers S. oneidensis resistance to nitrite, which likely functions via nitric oxide (NO). PMID:23626841

  17. Nitrite as regulator of hypoxic signaling in mammalian physiology

    PubMed Central

    van Faassen, Ernst E.; Bahrami, Soheyl; Feelisch, Martin; Hogg, Neil; Kelm, Malte; Kim-Shapiro, Daniel B.; Kozlov, Andrey V.; Li, Haitao; Lundberg, Jon O.; Mason, Ron; Nohl, Hans; Rassaf, Tienush; Samouilov, Alexandre; Slama-Schwok, Anny; Shiva, Sruti; Vanin, Anatoly F.; Weitzberg, Eddie; Zweier, Jay; Gladwin, Mark T.

    2009-01-01

    In this review we consider the physiological effects of endogenous and pharmacological levels of nitrite under conditions of hypoxia. In humans, the nitrite anion has long been considered as metastable intermediate in the oxidation of nitric oxide radicals to the stable metabolite nitrate. This oxidation cascade was thought to be irreversible under physiological conditions. However, a growing body of experimental observations attests that the presence of endogenous nitrite regulates a number of signaling events along the physiological and pathophysiological oxygen gradient. Hypoxic signaling events include vasodilation, modulation of mitochondrial respiration, and cytoprotection following ischemic insult. These phenomena are attributed to the reduction of nitrite anions to nitric oxide if local oxygen levels in tissues decrease. Recent research identified a growing list of enzymatic and non-enzymatic pathways for this endogenous reduction of nitrite. Additional direct signaling events not involving free nitric oxide are proposed. We here discuss the mechanisms and properties of these various pathways and the role played by the local concentration of free oxygen in the affected tissue. PMID:19219851

  18. Determination of 5-log reduction times for food pathogens in acidified cucumbers during storage at 10 and 25°C

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Outbreaks of acid-resistant food pathogens in acid foods with pH values below 4.0, including apple cider and orange juice, have raised concerns about the safety of acidified vegetable products. For acidified vegetable products with pH values between 3.3 and 4.6, previous research has demonstrated t...

  19. Shift from coral to macroalgae dominance on a volcanically acidified reef

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Enochs, I. C.; Manzello, D. P.; Donham, E. M.; Kolodziej, G.; Okano, R.; Johnston, L.; Young, C.; Iguel, J.; Edwards, C. B.; Fox, M. D.; Valentino, L.; Johnson, S.; Benavente, D.; Clark, S. J.; Carlton, R.; Burton, T.; Eynaud, Y.; Price, N. N.

    2015-12-01

    Rising anthropogenic CO2 in the atmosphere is accompanied by an increase in oceanic CO2 and a concomitant decline in seawater pH (ref. ). This phenomenon, known as ocean acidification (OA), has been experimentally shown to impact the biology and ecology of numerous animals and plants, most notably those that precipitate calcium carbonate skeletons, such as reef-building corals. Volcanically acidified water at Maug, Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands (CNMI) is equivalent to near-future predictions for what coral reef ecosystems will experience worldwide due to OA. We provide the first chemical and ecological assessment of this unique site and show that acidification-related stress significantly influences the abundance and diversity of coral reef taxa, leading to the often-predicted shift from a coral to an algae-dominated state. This study provides field evidence that acidification can lead to macroalgae dominance on reefs.

  20. Leaching behaviour and environmental risk assessment of heavy metals from electronic solder in acidified soil.

    PubMed

    Lao, Xiaodong; Cheng, Congqian; Min, Xiaohua; Zhao, Jie; Zhou, Dayu; Li, Xiaogang

    2015-11-01

    The leaching behaviour of Sn and Pb elements from eutectic SnPb solder of electronic waste in acidic soil was investigated through acidification with HCl-H2SO4 solution and compared with saline solution. The amounts of Sn and Pb elements leached, when subjected to acidic soil, are higher than those with saline soil. Evidence for the significantly preferential release of Sn into the leachate is provided; the galvanic couple accelerated such preferential release. Surface product analysis reveals the slight damage of SnPb in saline soil. Serious dissolution due to electrochemical reaction and a thick, porous PbSO4 surface layer are observed in acidified soil, suggesting more severe toxicity potential of Pb in soil rather than in water. PMID:26154035

  1. Ethanol-based in situ bioremediation of acidified, nitrate-contaminated groundwater.

    PubMed

    Salminen, Jani M; Petäjäjärvi, Sanna J; Tuominen, Sirkku M; Nystén, Taina H

    2014-10-15

    A novel approach for the in situ bioremediation of acidified, nitrate-contaminated groundwater was developed. Ethanol was introduced into the groundwater to enhance the activity of intrinsic denitrifying micro-organisms. Infiltration of the carbon source was made via an infiltration gallery constructed in the unsaturated zone to avoid clogging problems and to allow wider distribution of ethanol in the groundwater. The changes in the groundwater geochemistry and soil gas composition were monitored at the site to evaluate the efficiencies of the infiltration system and nitrate removal. Moreover, the impact of pH and ethanol addition on the denitrification rate was studied in laboratory. A reduction of 95% was achieved in the groundwater nitrate concentrations during the study. Neither clogging problems nor inefficient introduction of ethanol into the saturated zone were observed. Most crucial to the denitrifying communities was pH, values above 6 were required for efficient denitrification.

  2. Laboratory and pilot scale pretreatment of sugarcane bagasse by acidified aqueous glycerol solutions.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhanying; Wong, Heng H; Albertson, Peter L; Doherty, William O S; O'Hara, Ian M

    2013-06-01

    Pretreatment of sugarcane bagasse with acidified aqueous glycerol solution was evaluated at both laboratory and pilot scales. Laboratory scale pretreatment (4.00 g dry mass in 40.00 g liquid) with glycerol solutions containing ≤ 20 wt.% water and 1.2 wt.% HCl at 130°C for 60 min resulted in biomass having glucan digestibilities of ≥ 88%. Comparable glucan enzymatic digestibility of 90% was achieved with bagasse pretreated at pilot scale (10 kg dry mass in 60 kg liquid) using a glycerol solution containing 0.4 wt.% HCl and 17 wt.% water at 130°C for 15 min. We attribute more efficient pretreatment at pilot scale (despite shorter reaction time and reduced acid content) to improved mixing and heat transfer in a horizontal reactor. Pretreatment of sugarcane bagasse with acid-catalysed glycerol solutions likely produces glycerol-glycosides, which together with hydrolysed lignin are potential substrates for the production of biopolymers.

  3. High Sodium Simulant Testing To Support SB8 Sludge Preparation

    SciTech Connect

    Newell, J. D.

    2012-09-19

    Scoping studies were completed for high sodium simulant SRAT/SME cycles to determine any impact to CPC processing. Two SRAT/SME cycles were performed with simulant having sodium supernate concentration of 1.9M at 130% and 100% of the Koopman Minimum Acid requirement. Both of these failed to meet DWPF processing objectives related to nitrite destruction and hydrogen generation. Another set of SRAT/SME cycles were performed with simulant having a sodium supernate concentration of 1.6M at 130%, 125%, 110%, and 100% of the Koopman Minimum Acid requirement. Only the run at 110% met DWPF processing objectives. Neither simulant had a stoichiometric factor window of 30% between nitrite destruction and excessive hydrogen generation. Based on the 2M-110 results it was anticipated that the 2.5M stoichiometric window for processing would likely be smaller than from 110-130%, since it appeared that it would be necessary to increase the KMA factor by at least 10% above the minimum calculated requirement to achieve nitrite destruction due to the high oxalate content. The 2.5M-130 run exceeded the DWPF hydrogen limits in both the SRAT and SME cycle. Therefore, testing of this wash endpoint was halted. This wash endpoint with this minimum acid requirement and mercury-noble metal concentration profile appears to be something DWPF should not process due to an overly narrow window of stoichiometry. The 2M case was potentially processable in DWPF, but modifications would likely be needed in DWPF such as occasionally accepting SRAT batches with undestroyed nitrite for further acid addition and reprocessing, running near the bottom of the as yet ill-defined window of allowable stoichiometric factors, potentially extending the SRAT cycle to burn off unreacted formic acid before transferring to the SME cycle, and eliminating formic acid additions in the frit slurry.

  4. Fatty acid composition and biogenic amines in acidified and fermented fish silage: a comparison study.

    PubMed

    Özyurt, Gülsün; Gökdoğan, Saadet; Şimşek, Ayşe; Yuvka, Ilknur; Ergüven, Merve; Kuley Boga, Esmeray

    2016-01-01

    In the presented study, ensiling of discard fish by acidification or fermentation was evaluated. Klunzinger's ponyfish which is a discard fish was used for the production of fish silage by acidification (3% formic acid for Method FA; 1.5% formic and 1.5% sulphuric acid for Method FASA) and fermentation (Lactobacillus plantarum for Method LP and Streptococcus thermophilus for Method ST). The chemical, microbiological and nutritional properties of the differently preserved fish silages were estimated during a storage period of 60 d at ambient temperature. Compared to the raw material, a slight increase in saturated fatty acids and a slight decrease in polyunsaturated fatty acids were observed in all silages. At the end of the storage period, the aerobic bacteria counts after applying Methods FA, FASA, LP and ST amounted to 2.35, 2.39, 5.77 and 5.43 log cfu/g, respectively. The analysis of thiobarbituric acid revealed that acidification of silages accelerated the lipid oxidation. Nine biogenic amines were found in raw fish and different silages. The initial histamine concentration in raw fish was 0.17 mg/100 g and in all silages it remained at low levels during the storage period. The initial tyramine content was found to be 1.56 mg/100 g in raw fish and increased significantly in all silages. The increase of the tyramine content in fermented silages was considerably higher than in acidified silages (23-48 mg/100 g and 5-10 mg/100 g, respectively). It can be concluded that acidified or fermented fish silage should be considered as potential feed component for animals because of its high nutritional value and appropriate microbiological and chemical quality.

  5. Does road salting confound the recovery of the microcrustacean community in an acidified lake?

    PubMed

    Jensen, Thomas Correll; Meland, Sondre; Schartau, Ann Kristin; Walseng, Bjørn

    2014-04-15

    Numerous boreal lakes across the Northern Hemisphere recovering from acidification are experiencing a simultaneous increase in chloride (Cl) concentrations from road salting. Increasing Cl may have profound effects on the lake ecosystem. We examine if an increase in Cl from road salting has modified the recovery of the microcrustacean community in an acidified boreal lake undergoing chemical recovery (study lake). Results from the study lake were compared with an acidified "reference lake". The community changed during the study period in the study lake mainly driven by the reduction in acidification pressure. Despite the community changes and an increase in species richness, the absence of several acid sensitive species, previously occurring in the lake, indicates a delayed biological recovery relative to the chemical recovery. Moreover, changes in occurrence of acid sensitive and acid tolerant species indicated that the biological recovery was slower in the study lake compared to the "reference". Although recurrent episodes of high aluminum and low pH and decreasing Ca are likely important factors for the delay, these do not explain, for instance, the shift from Cyclops scutifer to Bosmina longispina in the study lake. Although the contribution of Cl was not significant, the correlation between Cl and the variation in microcrustacean community was twice as high in the study lake compared to the "reference". We argue that small, sheltered forest lakes may be especially sensitive to increased Cl levels, through changes in pattern of stratification, thus providing a mechanism for the shift from C. scutifer to B. longispina. The reduction of the acidification pressure seems to override the Cl effects on microcrustaceans at low Cl levels in salt-affected lakes recovering from acidification. However, prognoses for growing traffic and increasing road salting raise concern for many recovering lakes located in proximity to roads and urbanized areas.

  6. Fatty acid composition and biogenic amines in acidified and fermented fish silage: a comparison study.

    PubMed

    Özyurt, Gülsün; Gökdoğan, Saadet; Şimşek, Ayşe; Yuvka, Ilknur; Ergüven, Merve; Kuley Boga, Esmeray

    2016-01-01

    In the presented study, ensiling of discard fish by acidification or fermentation was evaluated. Klunzinger's ponyfish which is a discard fish was used for the production of fish silage by acidification (3% formic acid for Method FA; 1.5% formic and 1.5% sulphuric acid for Method FASA) and fermentation (Lactobacillus plantarum for Method LP and Streptococcus thermophilus for Method ST). The chemical, microbiological and nutritional properties of the differently preserved fish silages were estimated during a storage period of 60 d at ambient temperature. Compared to the raw material, a slight increase in saturated fatty acids and a slight decrease in polyunsaturated fatty acids were observed in all silages. At the end of the storage period, the aerobic bacteria counts after applying Methods FA, FASA, LP and ST amounted to 2.35, 2.39, 5.77 and 5.43 log cfu/g, respectively. The analysis of thiobarbituric acid revealed that acidification of silages accelerated the lipid oxidation. Nine biogenic amines were found in raw fish and different silages. The initial histamine concentration in raw fish was 0.17 mg/100 g and in all silages it remained at low levels during the storage period. The initial tyramine content was found to be 1.56 mg/100 g in raw fish and increased significantly in all silages. The increase of the tyramine content in fermented silages was considerably higher than in acidified silages (23-48 mg/100 g and 5-10 mg/100 g, respectively). It can be concluded that acidified or fermented fish silage should be considered as potential feed component for animals because of its high nutritional value and appropriate microbiological and chemical quality. PMID:26635094

  7. Eubiotic effect of a dietary acidifier (potassium diformate) on the health status of cultured Oreochromis niloticus.

    PubMed

    Abu Elala, Nermeen M; Ragaa, Naela M

    2015-07-01

    In connection with the global demand for safe human food and the production of environmentally friendly aquaculture products, acidifiers are natural organic acids and salts that have received considerable attention as animal-feed additives. The current study was designed to evaluate the effects of potassium diformate (KDF) on the growth performance and immunity of cultured Oreochromis niloticus (O. niloticus). Four iso-nitrogenous and iso-caloric rations containing graded levels of KDF, including 0% (control basal diet), 0.1%, 0.2% and 0.3%, were fed separately to four equal fish groups (30 fish/group with an initial body weight of 53.49 ± 6.15 g) for sixty days. At the end of the experimental period, the fish groups fed on 0.2% and 0.3% KDF exhibited significant improvements in their feed intake, live weight gain, specific growth rate, feed conversion ratio and protein efficiency ratio, with concomitant improvement of their apparent protein digestibility (p < 0.05). Dietary supplementation of 0.3% KDF appeared to stimulate the beneficial intestinal flora; a proliferation was observed of indigenous probionts (Eubiosis) associated with the relative activation of cellular and humeral innate immunity (phagocytic activity/index, nitroblue tetrazolium reduction test and serum/gut mucous lysozyme activity). The cumulative mortality of the fish groups fed on KDF and challenged orally with Aeromonas hydrophila was lower than that of the control group. The resistance against diseases increased with dietary KDF in a dose-dependent manner. Thus, we conclude that the use of acidifiers can be an efficient tool to achieve sustainable, economical and safe fish production. PMID:26199753

  8. Does road salting confound the recovery of the microcrustacean community in an acidified lake?

    PubMed

    Jensen, Thomas Correll; Meland, Sondre; Schartau, Ann Kristin; Walseng, Bjørn

    2014-04-15

    Numerous boreal lakes across the Northern Hemisphere recovering from acidification are experiencing a simultaneous increase in chloride (Cl) concentrations from road salting. Increasing Cl may have profound effects on the lake ecosystem. We examine if an increase in Cl from road salting has modified the recovery of the microcrustacean community in an acidified boreal lake undergoing chemical recovery (study lake). Results from the study lake were compared with an acidified "reference lake". The community changed during the study period in the study lake mainly driven by the reduction in acidification pressure. Despite the community changes and an increase in species richness, the absence of several acid sensitive species, previously occurring in the lake, indicates a delayed biological recovery relative to the chemical recovery. Moreover, changes in occurrence of acid sensitive and acid tolerant species indicated that the biological recovery was slower in the study lake compared to the "reference". Although recurrent episodes of high aluminum and low pH and decreasing Ca are likely important factors for the delay, these do not explain, for instance, the shift from Cyclops scutifer to Bosmina longispina in the study lake. Although the contribution of Cl was not significant, the correlation between Cl and the variation in microcrustacean community was twice as high in the study lake compared to the "reference". We argue that small, sheltered forest lakes may be especially sensitive to increased Cl levels, through changes in pattern of stratification, thus providing a mechanism for the shift from C. scutifer to B. longispina. The reduction of the acidification pressure seems to override the Cl effects on microcrustaceans at low Cl levels in salt-affected lakes recovering from acidification. However, prognoses for growing traffic and increasing road salting raise concern for many recovering lakes located in proximity to roads and urbanized areas. PMID:24530583

  9. Comparison of the effects of thermal stress and CO₂-driven acidified seawater on fertilization in coral Acropora digitifera.

    PubMed

    Iguchi, Akira; Suzuki, Atsushi; Sakai, Kazuhiko; Nojiri, Yukihiro

    2015-08-01

    Global warming (GW) and ocean acidification (OA) have been recognized as severe threats for reef-building corals that support coral reef ecosystems, but these effects on the early life history stage of corals are relatively unknown compared with the effects on calcification of adult corals. In this study, we evaluated the effects of thermal stress and CO2-driven acidified seawater on fertilization in a reef-building coral, Acropora digitifera. The fertilization rates of A. digitifera decreased in response to thermal stress compared with those under normal seawater conditions. In contrast, the changes of fertilization rates were not evident in the acidified seawater. Generalized Linear Mixed Model (GLMM) predicted that sperm/egg crosses and temperature were explanatory variables in the best-fitted model for the fertilization data. In the best model, interactions between thermal stress and acidified seawater on the fertilization rates were not selected. Our results suggested that coral fertilization is more sensitive to future GW than OA. Taking into consideration the previous finding that sperm motility of A. digitifera was decreased by acidified seawater, the decrease in coral cover followed by that of sperm concentration might cause the interacting effects of GW and OA on coral fertilization.

  10. Growth inhibition of Cronobacter spp. strains in reconstituted powdered infant formula acidified with organic acids supported by natural stomach acidity.

    PubMed

    Zhu, S; Schnell, S; Fischer, M

    2013-09-01

    Cronobacter is associated with outbreaks of rare, but life-threatening cases of meningitis, necrotizing enterocolitis, and sepsis in newborns. This study was conducted to determine the effect of organic acids on growth of Cronobacter in laboratory medium and reconstituted powdered infant formula (PIF) as well as the bacteriostatic effect of slightly acidified infant formula when combined with neonatal gastric acidity. Inhibitory effect of seven organic acids on four acid sensitive Cronobacter strains was determined in laboratory medium with broth dilution method at pH 5.0, 5.5 and 6.0. Acetic, butyric and propionic acids were most inhibitive against Cronobacter in the laboratory medium. The killing effect of these three acids was partially buffered in reconstituted PIF. Under neonatal gastric acid condition of pH 5.0, the slightly acidified formula which did not exert inhibition effect solely reduced significantly the Cronobacter populations. A synergistic effect of formula moderately acidified with organic acid combined with the physiological infant gastric acid was visible in preventing the rapid growth of Cronobacter in neonatal stomach. The study contributed to a better understanding of the inhibitory effect of organic acids on Cronobacter growth in different matrixes and provided new ideas in terms of controlling bacteria colonization and translocation by acidified formula.

  11. Trends in Surface Water Chemistry in Acidified Areas in Europe and North America from 1990 to 2008

    EPA Science Inventory

    Acidification of lakes and rivers is still an environmental concern despite reduced emissions of acidifying compounds. We analyzed trends in surface water chemistry of 173 acid-sensitive sites from 12 regions in Europe and North America. In 11 of 12 regions, non-marine sulphate (...

  12. Thermal processing of acidified foods with pH 4.1 to pH 4.6

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Shelf-stable acidified foods with a pH at or below 4.6 must be processed to achieve a 5-log reduction for vegetative bacterial pathogens. Published research does not exist to adequately support the Food and Drug Administration process filings for products with pH 4.1–4.6 or to define critical limits...

  13. Biological Nitrogen Removal through Nitritation Coupled with Thiosulfate-Driven Denitritation

    PubMed Central

    Qian, Jin; Zhou, Junmei; Zhang, Zhen; Liu, Rulong; Wang, Qilin

    2016-01-01

    A novel biological nitrogen removal system based on nitritation coupled with thiosulfate-driven denitritation (Nitritation-TDD) was developed to achieve a high nitrogen removal rate and low sludge production. A nitritation sequential batch reactor (nitritation SBR) and an anoxic up-flow sludge bed (AnUSB) reactor were applied for effective nitritation and denitritation, respectively. Above 75% nitrite was accumulated in the nitritation SBR with an influent ammonia loading rate of 0.43 kg N/d/m3. During Nitritation-TDD operation, particle sizes (d50) of the sludge decreased from 406 to 225 um in nitritation SBR and from 327–183 um in AnUSB reactor. Pyrosequencing tests revealed that ammonium-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) population was stabilized at approximately 7.0% (calculated as population of AOB-related genus divided by the total microbial population) in the nitritation SBR. In contrast, nitrite-oxidizing bacteria (NOB) population decreased from 6.5–0.6% over the same time, indicating the effective nitrite accumulation in the nitritation SBR. Thiobacillus, accounting for 34.2% in the AnUSB reactor, was mainly responsible for nitrogen removal via autotrophic denitritation, using an external source of thiosulfate as electron donor. Also, it was found that free nitrous acid could directly affect the denitritation activity. PMID:27272192

  14. Chloride inhibition of nitrite uptake for non-teleost Actinopterygiian fishes.

    PubMed

    Boudreaux, Perry J; Ferrara, Allyse M; Fontenot, Quenton C

    2007-06-01

    Fish that transport environmental chloride with a gill uptake mechanism (gill epithelial Cl(-)/HCO(3)(-)cotransport exchange system), also transport nitrite into plasma through the same mechanism. Because of the relationship between nitrite uptake and the gill chloride uptake mechanism, nitrite uptake can provide insight regarding the method of chloride uptake for fish. This study was designed to determine if non-teleost fishes concentrate nitrite in their plasma, and to determine if chloride inhibits nitrite uptake in non-teleost fish. To determine if bowfin Amia calva, spotted gar Lepisosteus oculatus, alligator gar Atractosteus spatula, and paddlefish Polyodon spathula concentrate environmental nitrite in their plasma, individuals were exposed to concentrations of 0, 1, 10, or 100 mg/L nitrite-N. After exposure, all species had plasma nitrite-N concentrations greater than environmental levels. To determine if chloride inhibits nitrite uptake for spotted gar, alligator gar, and paddlefish, fish were exposed to 1 mg/L nitrite-N and 20 mg/L chloride as calcium chloride, or to 1 mg/L nitrite-N only. Chloride effectively prevented nitrite from being concentrated in the plasma of all species. It appears that non-teleost fish concentrate nitrite in their plasma via their chloride uptake mechanism and that this is an ancestral characteristic for teleost. PMID:17344081

  15. Chloride inhibition of nitrite uptake for non-teleost Actinopterygiian fishes.

    PubMed

    Boudreaux, Perry J; Ferrara, Allyse M; Fontenot, Quenton C

    2007-06-01

    Fish that transport environmental chloride with a gill uptake mechanism (gill epithelial Cl(-)/HCO(3)(-)cotransport exchange system), also transport nitrite into plasma through the same mechanism. Because of the relationship between nitrite uptake and the gill chloride uptake mechanism, nitrite uptake can provide insight regarding the method of chloride uptake for fish. This study was designed to determine if non-teleost fishes concentrate nitrite in their plasma, and to determine if chloride inhibits nitrite uptake in non-teleost fish. To determine if bowfin Amia calva, spotted gar Lepisosteus oculatus, alligator gar Atractosteus spatula, and paddlefish Polyodon spathula concentrate environmental nitrite in their plasma, individuals were exposed to concentrations of 0, 1, 10, or 100 mg/L nitrite-N. After exposure, all species had plasma nitrite-N concentrations greater than environmental levels. To determine if chloride inhibits nitrite uptake for spotted gar, alligator gar, and paddlefish, fish were exposed to 1 mg/L nitrite-N and 20 mg/L chloride as calcium chloride, or to 1 mg/L nitrite-N only. Chloride effectively prevented nitrite from being concentrated in the plasma of all species. It appears that non-teleost fish concentrate nitrite in their plasma via their chloride uptake mechanism and that this is an ancestral characteristic for teleost.

  16. Nitrite reduction by biogenic hydroxycarbonate green rusts: evidence for hydroxy-nitrite green rust formation as an intermediate reaction product.

    PubMed

    Guerbois, Delphine; Ona-Nguema, Georges; Morin, Guillaume; Abdelmoula, Mustapha; Laverman, Anniet M; Mouchel, Jean-Marie; Barthelemy, Kevin; Maillot, Fabien; Brest, Jessica

    2014-04-15

    The present study investigates for the first time the reduction of nitrite by biogenic hydroxycarbonate green rusts, bio-GR(CO3), produced from the bioreduction of ferric oxyhydroxycarbonate (Fohc), a poorly crystalline solid phase, and of lepidocrocite, a well-crystallized Fe(III)-oxyhydroxide mineral. Results show a fast Fe(II) production from Fohc, which leads to the precipitation of bio-GR(CO3) particles that were roughly 2-fold smaller (2.3 ± 0.4 μm) than those obtained from the bioreduction of lepidocrocite (5.0 ± 0.4 μm). The study reveals that both bio-GR(CO3) are capable of reducing nitrite ions into gaseous nitrogen species such as NO, N2O, or N2 without ammonium production at neutral initial pH and that nitrite reduction proceeded to a larger extent with smaller particles than with larger ones. On the basis of the identification of intermediates and end-reaction products using X-ray diffraction and X-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) spectroscopy at the Fe K-edge, our study shows the formation of hydroxy-nitrite green rust, GR(NO2), a new type of green rust 1, and suggests that the reduction of nitrite by biogenic GR(CO3) involves both external and internal reaction sites and that such a mechanism could explain the higher reactivity of green rust with respect to nitrite, compared to other mineral substrates possessing only external reactive sites.

  17. Low sodium level

    MedlinePlus

    Low sodium level is a condition in which the amount of sodium (salt) in the blood is lower than normal. The ... Sodium is found mostly in the body fluids outside the cells. It is very important for maintaining ...

  18. Theoretical study on reaction mechanisms of nitrite reduction by copper nitrite complexes: toward understanding and controlling possible mechanisms of copper nitrite reductase.

    PubMed

    Maekawa, Shintaro; Matsui, Toru; Hirao, Kimihiko; Shigeta, Yasuteru

    2015-04-30

    Using density functional theory, we studied denitrification reaction mechanisms of copper adducts of tris(pyrazolyl)methane and hydrotris(pyrazolyl)borate models of a copper nitrite reductase (Cu-NiR), and herein propose several possible reaction pathways, including some parts that have never been examined previously. Because electron and proton transfer reactions participate in the enzymatic cycles of Cu-NiR, the Gibbs energy of a proton in solution, G(H(+)), and the redox potential, Eredox, of the model Cu-NiR are also evaluated. Although the pathway where a nitrite is provided as HNO2 is energetically preferable, a well-known reaction pathway passing through the resting state with an active site occupied by a water molecule where nitrite is provided as NO2(-) is the main recognized pathway under normal conditions. These features do not change whether the electron transfer occurs before production of NO or not. However, our results suggest that the pathway involving HNO2 might become dominant under low pH conditions in conjunction with experimental results.

  19. Theoretical study on reaction mechanisms of nitrite reduction by copper nitrite complexes: toward understanding and controlling possible mechanisms of copper nitrite reductase.

    PubMed

    Maekawa, Shintaro; Matsui, Toru; Hirao, Kimihiko; Shigeta, Yasuteru

    2015-04-30

    Using density functional theory, we studied denitrification reaction mechanisms of copper adducts of tris(pyrazolyl)methane and hydrotris(pyrazolyl)borate models of a copper nitrite reductase (Cu-NiR), and herein propose several possible reaction pathways, including some parts that have never been examined previously. Because electron and proton transfer reactions participate in the enzymatic cycles of Cu-NiR, the Gibbs energy of a proton in solution, G(H(+)), and the redox potential, Eredox, of the model Cu-NiR are also evaluated. Although the pathway where a nitrite is provided as HNO2 is energetically preferable, a well-known reaction pathway passing through the resting state with an active site occupied by a water molecule where nitrite is provided as NO2(-) is the main recognized pathway under normal conditions. These features do not change whether the electron transfer occurs before production of NO or not. However, our results suggest that the pathway involving HNO2 might become dominant under low pH conditions in conjunction with experimental results. PMID:25845517

  20. Influence of sodium nitrite on protein oxidation and nitrosation of sausages subjected to processing and storage.

    PubMed

    Feng, Xianchao; Li, Chenyi; Jia, Xu; Guo, Yan; Lei, Na; Hackman, Robert M; Chen, Lin; Zhou, Guanghong

    2016-06-01

    The influence of NaNO2 content on protein oxidation and nitrosation was investigated in cooked sausages at different concentrations (0, 50, 100, 200 and 400 mg NaNO2/kg). Dependent on concentration, NaNO2 had both anti- and pro-oxidant effects on protein oxidation. The antioxidant effects of NaNO2 on the protein oxidation were evidenced by significantly lower carbonyl contents, higher free amines and lower surface hydrophobicities. The pro-oxidant effects of NaNO2 on protein oxidation resulted in a decrease of sulfhydryls and an increase of disulfide bonds. NaNO2 also improved the protein nitrosation inducing the formation of 3-nitrotyrosine (3-NT). Moreover, 3-NT had significant correlations with parameters of protein oxidation, indicating that 3-NT may be a possible marker for protein oxidation. Results of this study contribute to an understanding of the impact of NaNO2 on food quality and help to identify optimal formulations of cured meat products.

  1. 78 FR 39316 - Sodium Nitrite From China and Germany; Institution of Five-Year Reviews

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-01

    ... Commission conducts under Title VII of the Act, or in internal audits and investigations relating to the... Germany (73 FR 50593 and 73 FR 50595). The Commission is conducting reviews to determine whether... employment statute for Federal employees, and Commission rule 201.15(b) (19 CFR 201.15(b)), 73 FR 24609...

  2. Electrochemical reduction of nitrate and nitrite in concentrated sodium hydroxide at platinum and nickel electrodes

    SciTech Connect

    Hu Lin Li; Robertson, D.H.; Chambers, J.Q.; Hobbs, D.T.

    1996-10-01

    This work describes the electrochemical reduction of nitrate in alkaline solutions. Conditions which maximize the current efficiency for the production of dinitrogen and/or ammonia gases could be very important for the treatment of radioactive waste solutions.

  3. 21 CFR 172.177 - Sodium nitrite used in processing smoked chub.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ....177 Section 172.177 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... prescribed conditions: (a) All fish in smoking establishments shall be clean and wholesome and shall be...) The finished product shall be cooled to a temperature of 50 °F or below within 3 hours after...

  4. Neurotoxicity induced by alkyl nitrites: Impairment in learning/memory and motor coordination.

    PubMed

    Cha, Hye Jin; Kim, Yun Ji; Jeon, Seo Young; Kim, Young-Hoon; Shin, Jisoon; Yun, Jaesuk; Han, Kyoungmoon; Park, Hye-Kyung; Kim, Hyung Soo

    2016-04-21

    Although alkyl nitrites are used as recreational drugs, there is only little research data regarding their effects on the central nervous system including their neurotoxicity. This study investigated the neurotoxicity of three representative alkyl nitrites (isobutyl nitrite, isoamyl nitrite, and butyl nitrite), and whether it affected learning/memory function and motor coordination in rodents. Morris water maze test was performed in mice after administrating the mice with varying doses of the substances in two different injection schedules of memory acquisition and memory retention. A rota-rod test was then performed in rats. All tested alkyl nitrites lowered the rodents' capacity for learning and memory, as assessed by both the acquisition and retention tests. The results of the rota-rod test showed that isobutyl nitrite in particular impaired motor coordination in chronically treated rats. The mice chronically injected with isoamyl nitrite also showed impaired function, while butyl nitrite had no significant effect. The results of the water maze test suggest that alkyl nitrites may impair learning and memory. Additionally, isoamyl nitrite affected the rodents' motor coordination ability. Collectively, our findings suggest that alkyl nitrites may induce neurotoxicity, especially on the aspect of learning and memory function.

  5. 21 CFR 862.1510 - Nitrite (nonquantitative) test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Nitrite (nonquantitative) test system. 862.1510 Section 862.1510 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... diagnosis and treatment of uninary tract infection of bacterial origin. (b) Classification. Class I...

  6. Nitrate metabolism in tobacco leaves overexpressing Arabidopsis nitrite reductase.

    PubMed

    Davenport, Susie; Le Lay, Pascaline; Sanchez-Tamburrrino, Juan Pablo

    2015-12-01

    Primary nitrogen assimilation in plants includes the reduction of nitrite to ammonium in the chloroplasts by the enzyme nitrite reductase (NiR EC:1.7.7.1) or in the plastids of non-photosynthetic organs. Here we report on a study overexpressing the Arabidopsis thaliana NiR (AtNiR) gene in tobacco plants under the control of a constitutive promoter (CERV - Carnation Etched Ring Virus). The aim was to overexpress AtNiR in an attempt to alter the level of residual nitrite in the leaf which can act as precursor to the formation of nitrosamines. The impact of increasing the activity of AtNiR produced an increase in leaf protein and a stay-green phenotype in the primary transformed AtNiR population. Investigation of the T1 homozygous population demonstrated elevated nitrate reductase (NR) activity, reductions in leaf nitrite and nitrate and the amino acids proline, glutamine and glutamate. Chlorophyl content of the transgenic lines was increased, as evidenced by the stay-green phenotype. This reveals the importance of NiR in primary nitrogen assimilation and how modification of this key enzyme affects both the nitrogen and carbon metabolism of tobacco plants. PMID:26447683

  7. Modulating hemoglobin nitrite reductase activity through allostery: a mathematical model.

    PubMed

    Rong, Zimei; Alayash, Abdu I; Wilson, Michael T; Cooper, Chris E

    2013-11-30

    The production of nitric oxide by hemoglobin (Hb) has been proposed to play a major role in the control of blood flow. Because of the allosteric nature of hemoglobin, the nitrite reductase activity is a complex function of oxygen partial pressure PO2. We have previous developed a model to obtain the micro rate constants for nitrite reduction by R state (kR) and T state (kT) hemoglobin in terms of the experimental maximal macro rate constant kNmax and the corresponding oxygen concentration PO2max. However, because of the intrinsic difficulty in obtaining accurate macro rate constant kN, from available experiments, we have developed an alternative method to determine the micro reaction rate constants (kR and kT) by fitting the simulated macro reaction rate curve (kN versus PO2) to the experimental data. We then use our model to analyze the effect of pH (Bohr Effect) and blood ageing on the nitrite reductase activity, showing that the fall of bisphosphoglycerate (BPG) during red cell storage leads to increase NO production. Our model can have useful predictive and explanatory power. For example, the previously described enhanced nitrite reductase activity of ovine fetal Hb, in comparison to the adult protein, may be understood in terms of a weaker interaction with BPG and an increase in the value of kT from 0.0087M(-1)s(-1) to 0.083M(-1)s(-1).

  8. Ammonia and nitrite oxidation in the Eastern Tropical North Pacific

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Xuefeng; Fuchsman, Clara A.; Jayakumar, Amal; Oleynik, Sergey; Martens-Habbena, Willm; Devol, Allan H.; Ward, Bess B.

    2015-12-01

    Nitrification plays a key role in the marine nitrogen (N) cycle, including in oceanic oxygen minimum zones (OMZs), which are hot spots for denitrification and anaerobic ammonia oxidation (anammox). Recent evidence suggests that nitrification links the source (remineralized organic matter) and sink (denitrification and anammox) of fixed N directly in the steep oxycline in the OMZs. We performed shipboard incubations with 15N tracers to characterize the depth distribution of nitrification in the Eastern Tropical North Pacific (ETNP). Additional experiments were conducted to investigate photoinhibition. Allylthiourea (ATU) was used to distinguish the contribution of archaeal and bacterial ammonia oxidation. The abundance of archaeal and β-proteobacterial ammonia monooxygenase gene subunit A (amoA) was determined by quantitative polymerase chain reaction. The rates of ammonia and nitrite oxidation showed distinct subsurface maxima, with the latter slightly deeper than the former. The ammonia oxidation maximum coincided with the primary nitrite concentration maximum, archaeal amoA gene maximum, and the subsurface nitrous oxide maximum. Negligible rates of ammonia oxidation were found at anoxic depths, where high rates of nitrite oxidation were measured. Archaeal amoA gene abundance was generally 1 to 2 orders of magnitude higher than bacterial amoA gene abundance, and inhibition of ammonia-oxidizing bacteria with 10 μM ATU did not affect ammonia oxidation rates, indicating the dominance of archaea in ammonia oxidation. These results depict highly dynamic activities of ammonia and nitrite oxidation in the oxycline of the ETNP OMZ.

  9. Organic tank safety project: Preliminary results of energetics and thermal behavior studies of model organic nitrate and/or nitrite mixtures and a simulated organic waste

    SciTech Connect

    Scheele, R.D.; Sell, R.L.; Sobolik, J.L.; Burger, L.L.

    1995-08-01

    As a result of years of production and recovery of nuclear defense materials and subsequent waste management at the Hanford Site, organic-bearing radioactive high-level wastes (HLW) are currently stored in large (up to 3. ML) single-shell storage tanks (SSTs). Because these wastes contain both fuels (organics) and the oxidants nitrate and nitrite, rapid energetic reactions at certain conditions could occur. In support of Westinghouse Hanford Company`s (WHC) efforts to ensure continued safe storage of these organic- and oxidant-bearing wastes and to define the conditions necessary for reactions to occur, we measured the thermal sensitivities and thermochemical and thermokinetic properties of mixtures of selected organics and sodium nitrate and/or nitrite and a simulated Hanford organic-bearing waste using thermoanalytical technologies. These thermoanalytical technologies are used by chemical reactivity hazards evaluation organizations within the chemical industry to assess chemical reaction hazards.

  10. Mercury speciation, fluxes, and fate in the volcanically acidified fluids of Copahue volcano, Argentina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kading, T.; Varekamp, J. C.; Andersson, M.; Balcom, P.; Mason, R. P.

    2010-12-01

    The behavior of mercury in volcanic acid springs and acidified rivers is poorly known, despite the potential impact this vector of contamination has on local surface and ground water quality. Mercury was measured in a volcanically acidified river system (pH<1 - 3), the Rio Agrio in the Neuquen province of Argentina, which discharges into a large glacial lake (Lake Caviahue, pH 2.2-3.0). The Hg concentration ranged from 2 - 600 pM throughout the fluvial system. Mercury in the hot, hyperacidic source fluids was dominated by dissolved ionic species, with only 2% of total mercury as dissolved elemental mercury, and 11% being particulate bound. The Hg flux from the volcano, determined from river water flux measurements and Hg concentrations, was modest and varied between the 3/2008 and 3/2009 sampling campaigns resp. from 0.7 to 1.1 moles/year. The Hg:S ratio of the acid fluids was ~10-8, several orders of magnitude lower than that typically found in volcanic plumes and fumaroles. The small Hg flux and low Hg:S values suggest that the system is either inherently Hg-poor or has lost Hg through vapor loss deeper in the hydrothermal system. Support for the latter comes from high Hg concentrations in geothermal vents and mudpots on the flank of the mountain (24 - 55 ppm Hg). Mercury concentrations decreased conservatively downstream in the river as based on Hg/Cl and Hg/SO4. Non-conservative depletion occurs in the less acidic Lake Caviahue, suggesting that mercury is removed from the water column by sorption to organic matter or other phases. Mercury analyses of a short lake sediment core confirm this (Hg = 0.01 to 0.70 ppm). No evidence was found for preferential uptake of mercury by jarosite, schwertmannite, or goethite, although the latter two phases precipitate in the most distal and Hg-depleted section of the fluvial system.

  11. Sequestration of organic cations by acidified hepatic endocytic vesicles and implications for biliary excretion.

    PubMed

    Van Dyke, R W; Faber, E D; Meijer, D K

    1992-04-01

    A number of cationic amine drugs that are taken up by liver and excreted into bile may accumulate in acidified intracellular organelles such as lysosomes and endosomes. These studies were undertaken to assess directly the uptake and accumulation of three types of model organic cationic amines by endocytic vesicles, and the role of vesicle acidification in this process. Uptake of tubocurarine (TC), vecuronium and tributylmethylammonium (TBuMA) by purified rat liver multivesicular bodies (MVB) (prelysosomal endocytic vesicles) was dependent upon MgATP, time and drug concentration. After 60 min, 52 to 81% of MVB cation content was dependent upon vesicle acidification (due to an electrogenic proton pump), but not upon an interior positive vesicle membrane potential. Nineteen to 42% of MVB cation content appeared due to binding to MVB membranes or to internal lipoproteins. Vesicle-to-medium ATP-dependent apparent concentration ratios for these three cations were 3.3 to 51. MVB uptake of these cations resembled uptake of methylamine, a tertiary amine known to distribute across organellar membranes according to pH gradients. By contrast, MVB uptake of the lipophilic quaternary amine methyldeptropine was not dependent upon MgATP or on development of MVB pH or membrane potential gradients. In further studies, TC, vecuronium and TBuMA were rapidly taken up by the isolated perfused rat liver and excreted in bile. Exposure to 250 mciroM primaquin (which partially alkalinized acidic endosomes and lysosomes) reduced accumulation of [3H]vecuronium in a lysosomal fraction by 23%, decreased perfusate disappearance of TC and TBuMA, but not of vecuronium, and decreased biliary appearance of all three cations. These studies suggest that acidified intracellular organelles sequester certain organic cationic drugs, possibly via a drug/proton antiporter, and/or diffusion followed by intravesicular protonation and trapping of tertiary amines. However, attempts at partial displacement of

  12. Characterization of Sodium Nitrate as Phase Change Material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bauer, Thomas; Laing, Doerte; Tamme, Rainer

    2012-01-01

    In this article the results of material investigations of sodium nitrate (NaNO3) with a melting temperature of 306 °C as a phase change material (PCM) are presented. The thermal stability was examined by kinetic experiments and longduration oven tests. In these experiments the nitrite formation was monitored. Although some nitrite formation in the melt was detected, results show that the thermal stability of NaNO3 is sufficient for PCM applications. Various measurements of thermophysical properties of NaNO3 are reported. These properties include the thermal diffusivity by the laser-flash, the thermal conductivity by the transient hot wire, and the heat capacity by the differential scanning calorimeter method. The current measurements and literature values are compared. In this article comprehensive temperature-dependent thermophysical values of the density, heat capacity, thermal diffusivity, and thermal conductivity in the liquid and solid phases are reported.

  13. Evaluation of an experimental sodium chlorate product, with and without nitroethane, on Salmonella in cull dairy cattle

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Ruminant animals are natural reservoirs for Salmonella. These bacteria can reduce nitrate to nitrite through the membrane bound enzyme nitrate reductase which also has the ability to reduce chlorate to the cytotoxic end-product chlorite. An experimental product containing sodium chlorate (ECP) has...

  14. Juvenile Antarctic rockcod (Trematomus bernacchii) are physiologically robust to CO2-acidified seawater.

    PubMed

    Davis, Brittany E; Miller, Nathan A; Flynn, Erin E; Todgham, Anne E

    2016-04-15

    To date, numerous studies have shown negative impacts of CO2-acidified seawater (i.e. ocean acidification, OA) on marine organisms, including calcifying invertebrates and fishes; however, limited research has been conducted on the physiological effects of OA on polar fishes and even less on the impact of OA on early developmental stages of polar fishes. We evaluated aspects of aerobic metabolism and cardiorespiratory physiology of juvenile emerald rockcod, ITALIC! Trematomus bernacchii, an abundant fish in the Ross Sea, Antarctica, to elevated partial pressure of carbon dioxide ( ITALIC! PCO2 ) [420 (ambient), 650 (moderate) and 1050 (high) μatm ITALIC! PCO2 ] over a 1 month period. We examined cardiorespiratory physiology, including heart rate, stroke volume, cardiac output and ventilation rate, whole organism metabolism via oxygen consumption rate and sub-organismal aerobic capacity by citrate synthase enzyme activity. Juvenile fish showed an increase in ventilation rate under high ITALIC! PCO2 compared with ambient ITALIC! PCO2 , whereas cardiac performance, oxygen consumption and citrate synthase activity were not significantly affected by elevated ITALIC! PCO2 Acclimation time had a significant effect on ventilation rate, stroke volume, cardiac output and citrate synthase activity, such that all metrics increased over the 4 week exposure period. These results suggest that juvenile emerald rockcod are robust to near-future increases in OA and may have the capacity to adjust for future increases in ITALIC! PCO2  by increasing acid-base compensation through increased ventilation. PMID:26944503

  15. Experiments and modeling of variably permeable carbonate reservoir samples in contact with CO₂-acidified brines

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, Megan M.; Hao, Yue; Mason, Harris E.; Carroll, Susan A.

    2014-12-31

    Reactive experiments were performed to expose sample cores from the Arbuckle carbonate reservoir to CO₂-acidified brine under reservoir temperature and pressure conditions. The samples consisted of dolomite with varying quantities of calcite and silica/chert. The timescales of monitored pressure decline across each sample in response to CO₂ exposure, as well as the amount of and nature of dissolution features, varied widely among these three experiments. For all samples cores, the experimentally measured initial permeability was at least one order of magnitude or more lower than the values estimated from downhole methods. Nondestructive X-ray computed tomography (XRCT) imaging revealed dissolution features including “wormholes,” removal of fracture-filling crystals, and widening of pre-existing pore spaces. In the injection zone sample, multiple fractures may have contributed to the high initial permeability of this core and restricted the distribution of CO₂-induced mineral dissolution. In contrast, the pre-existing porosity of the baffle zone sample was much lower and less connected, leading to a lower initial permeability and contributing to the development of a single dissolution channel. While calcite may make up only a small percentage of the overall sample composition, its location and the effects of its dissolution have an outsized effect on permeability responses to CO₂ exposure. The XRCT data presented here are informative for building the model domain for numerical simulations of these experiments but require calibration by higher resolution means to confidently evaluate different porosity-permeability relationships.

  16. Salt in the wound: The interfering effect of road salt on acidified forest catchments.

    PubMed

    Schweiger, Andreas H; Audorff, Volker; Beierkuhnlein, Carl

    2015-11-01

    Atmospheric acidic depositions have strongly altered the functioning and biodiversity of Central European forest ecosystems. Most impacts occurred until the end of the 20(th) century but the situation substantially improved thereafter caused by legal regulations in the late 1980's to reduce acidifying atmospheric pollution. Since then slow recovery from acidification has been observed in forested catchments and adjacent waters. However, trends of recovery are inconsistent and underlying mechanisms diminishing recovery are still poorly understood. We propose that the input of road salt can significantly affect acidity regime and acidification recovery of forest ecosystems. By comparing the discharge hydro-chemistry and plant community composition of springs fed by forested catchments with and without high levels of salt input over two decades we observed a significant suppression of recovery and elevated levels of nutrient leaching (K(+), Ca(2+) and Mg(2+)) in highly salt contaminated catchments. We show that the pollution of near-surface groundwater (interflow) by road salt application can have lasting effects on ecosystem processes over distances of several hundred metres apart from the salt emitting road.

  17. Salt in the wound: The interfering effect of road salt on acidified forest catchments.

    PubMed

    Schweiger, Andreas H; Audorff, Volker; Beierkuhnlein, Carl

    2015-11-01

    Atmospheric acidic depositions have strongly altered the functioning and biodiversity of Central European forest ecosystems. Most impacts occurred until the end of the 20(th) century but the situation substantially improved thereafter caused by legal regulations in the late 1980's to reduce acidifying atmospheric pollution. Since then slow recovery from acidification has been observed in forested catchments and adjacent waters. However, trends of recovery are inconsistent and underlying mechanisms diminishing recovery are still poorly understood. We propose that the input of road salt can significantly affect acidity regime and acidification recovery of forest ecosystems. By comparing the discharge hydro-chemistry and plant community composition of springs fed by forested catchments with and without high levels of salt input over two decades we observed a significant suppression of recovery and elevated levels of nutrient leaching (K(+), Ca(2+) and Mg(2+)) in highly salt contaminated catchments. We show that the pollution of near-surface groundwater (interflow) by road salt application can have lasting effects on ecosystem processes over distances of several hundred metres apart from the salt emitting road. PMID:26115338

  18. Transplanted aquatic mosses for monitoring trace metal mobilization in acidified streams of the Vosges Mountains, France

    SciTech Connect

    Mersch, J.; Guerold, F.; Rousselle, P.; Pihan, J.C. )

    1993-08-01

    As a result of acid depositions, trace metals are mobilized from the soils to the aquatic environment. Especially in poorly mineralized waters, elevated metal concentrations may rapidly have adverse effects on aquatic organisms. In particular, it has been shown that aluminium, a key element in the acidification process, is a toxic cofactor for fish and other biota. An accurate assessment of this specific form of water pollution may not be possible when only based on analyses of single water samples. On the one hand, water metal concentrations are often close to the detection limit of usual analytical techniques, and on the other hand, levels in acidified streams undergo strong temporal variations caused by acid pulses following meteorological events such as heavy rainfall and snowmelt. Compared to water analyses, indirect monitoring methods provide undeniable advantages for assessing water contamination. Aquatic bryophytes, in particular, have been regarded as interesting indicator organisms for trace metal pollution. However, their use has mainly been restricted to the lower course of streams for evaluating the impact of industrial discharges. The purpose of this study was to test the suitability of transplanted aquatic mosses for monitoring aluminium and four other trace metals (copper, iron, lead and zinc) in the particular context of acidifed streams draining a forested headwater catchment. 15 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  19. Trichodesmium’s strategies to alleviate phosphorus limitation in the future acidified oceans.

    PubMed

    Spungin, Dina; Berman-Frank, Ilana; Levitan, Orly

    2014-06-01

    Global warming may exacerbate inorganic nutrient limitation, including phosphorus (P), in the surface waters of tropical oceans that are home to extensive blooms of the marine diazotrophic cyanobacterium, Trichodesmium. We examined the combined effects of P limitation and pCO(2), forecast under ocean acidification scenarios, on Trichodesmium erythraeum IMS101 cultures. We measured nitrogen acquisition,glutamine synthetase activity, C uptake rates, intracellular Adenosine Triphosphate (ATP) concentration and the pool sizes of related key proteins. Here, we present data supporting the idea that cellular energy re-allocation enables the higher growth and N(2) fixation rates detected in Trichodesmium cultured under high pCO(2). This is reflected in altered protein abundance and metabolic pools. Also modified are particulate organic carbon and nitrogen production rates,enzymatic activities, and cellular ATP concentrations. We suggest that adjusting these cellular pathways to changing environmental conditions enables Trichodesmium to compensate for low P availability and to thrive in acidified oceans. Moreover, elevated pCO(2) could provide Trichodesmium with a competitive dominance that would extend its niche, particularly in P-limited regions of the tropical and subtropical oceans.

  20. Leaf-associated fungal diversity in acidified streams: insights from combining traditional and molecular approaches.

    PubMed

    Clivot, Hugues; Cornut, Julien; Chauvet, Eric; Elger, Arnaud; Poupin, Pascal; Guérold, François; Pagnout, Christophe

    2014-07-01

    We combined microscopic and molecular methods to investigate fungal assemblages on alder leaf litter exposed in the benthic and hyporheic zones of five streams across a gradient of increasing acidification for 4 weeks. The results showed that acidification and elevated Al concentrations strongly depressed sporulating aquatic hyphomycetes diversity in both zones of streams, while fungal diversity assessed by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) appeared unaffected. Clone library analyses revealed that fungal communities on leaves were dominated by members of Ascomycetes and to a lesser extent by Basidiomycetes and Chytridiomycetes. An important contribution of terrestrial fungi was observed in both zones of the most acidified stream and in the hyporheic zone of the reference circumneutral stream. The highest leaf breakdown rate was observed in the circumneutral stream and occurred in the presence of both the highest diversity of sporulating aquatic hyphomycetes and the highest contribution to clone libraries of sequences affiliated with aquatic hyphomycetes. Both methods underline the major role played by aquatic hyphomycetes in leaf decomposition process. Our findings also bring out new highlights on the identity of leaf-associated fungal communities and their responses to anthropogenic alteration of running water ecosystems.

  1. Danaparoid sodium.

    PubMed

    Acostamadiedo, J M; Iyer, U G; Owen, J

    2000-05-01

    Danaparoid sodium (Orgaran, Organon) is a heparinoid glycosamino-glycuronan antithrombotic agent approved for the prophylaxis of post-operative deep vein thrombosis (DVT), which may lead to pulmonary embolism (PE) in patients undergoing elective hip replacement surgery. Danaparoid is a low molecular weight heparinoid consisting of a mixture of heparan sulphate (84%), dermatan sulphate (12%) and small amounts of chondroitin sulphate (4%), whose antithrombotic activity has been well established. Its pharmacological effect is exerted primarily by inhibiting Factors Xa (FXa) and IIa (FIIa) at a ratio greater than heparin, with a minimal effect on platelet function. Danaparoid exhibits low cross-reactivity with heparin-induced antibodies when compared with heparin or low molecular weight heparins (LMWH), thereby making it an excellent choice for the management of heparin-induced thrombocytopenia (HIT). It has excellent bioavailability following s.c. injection. Danaparoid has little effect on routine coagulation tests (activated partial thromboplastin time [aPTT], prothrombin time [PT], and thrombin time [TT]). Patients with elevated serum creatinine should be monitored carefully. For its FDA approved indication (DVT prophylaxis during hip replacement surgery), its cost per day is approximately eight times more than LMWH. Even though monitoring is not routinely necessary according to the manufacturer for its approved indication, monitoring is frequently necessary when it is used in other clinical scenarios. Its higher cost than comparable therapies for DVT prophylaxis and the low availability of the FXa assay in most non-tertiary care hospitals has limited the widespread use of danaparoid. Danaparoid has been found to be effective in the treatment of HIT although this is an off label use, despite being the most frequent reason why danaparoid is used. PMID:11249517

  2. Retention and leaching of nitrite by municipal solid waste incinerator bottom ash under the landfill circumstance.

    PubMed

    Yao, Jun; Kong, Qingna; Zhu, Huayue; Long, Yuyang; Shen, Dongsheng

    2015-01-01

    The retention and leaching of nitrite by municipal solid waste incinerator (MSWI) bottom ash could affect its migration in the landfill. In this study, the effect of the dosage of MSWI bottom ash as well as the variation of the landfill environmental parameters including pH, anions and organic matter on the nitrite retention and leaching behavior was investigated by batch experiments. The highest removal percentage (73.0%) of nitrite was observed when the dosage of MSWI bottom ash was 10 g L(-1) in 2 mg L(-1) nitrite solution. Further increase of the dosage would retard the retention, as the nitrite leaching from MSWI bottom ash was enhanced. The optimum retention of nitrite was observed when the pH was 5.0, while the leaching of nitrite showed a consistent reduction with the increase of pH. Besides, the presence of Cl(-), SO4(2)(-) and acetic acid could enhance the leaching of nitrite and mitigate the retention process. However, the retention of nitrite was enhanced by PO4(3)(-), which was probably due to the formation of the apatite, an active material for the adsorption of the nitrite. These results suggested that MSWI bottom ash could affect the migration of nitrite in the landfill, which was related to the variation of the landfill circumstance. PMID:25033242

  3. Retention and leaching of nitrite by municipal solid waste incinerator bottom ash under the landfill circumstance.

    PubMed

    Yao, Jun; Kong, Qingna; Zhu, Huayue; Long, Yuyang; Shen, Dongsheng

    2015-01-01

    The retention and leaching of nitrite by municipal solid waste incinerator (MSWI) bottom ash could affect its migration in the landfill. In this study, the effect of the dosage of MSWI bottom ash as well as the variation of the landfill environmental parameters including pH, anions and organic matter on the nitrite retention and leaching behavior was investigated by batch experiments. The highest removal percentage (73.0%) of nitrite was observed when the dosage of MSWI bottom ash was 10 g L(-1) in 2 mg L(-1) nitrite solution. Further increase of the dosage would retard the retention, as the nitrite leaching from MSWI bottom ash was enhanced. The optimum retention of nitrite was observed when the pH was 5.0, while the leaching of nitrite showed a consistent reduction with the increase of pH. Besides, the presence of Cl(-), SO4(2)(-) and acetic acid could enhance the leaching of nitrite and mitigate the retention process. However, the retention of nitrite was enhanced by PO4(3)(-), which was probably due to the formation of the apatite, an active material for the adsorption of the nitrite. These results suggested that MSWI bottom ash could affect the migration of nitrite in the landfill, which was related to the variation of the landfill circumstance.

  4. Complex responses of intertidal molluscan embryos to a warming and acidifying ocean in the presence of UV radiation.

    PubMed

    Davis, Andrew R; Coleman, Daniel; Broad, Allison; Byrne, Maria; Dworjanyn, Symon A; Przeslawski, Rachel

    2013-01-01

    Climate change and ocean acidification will expose marine organisms to synchronous multiple stressors, with early life stages being potentially most vulnerable to changing environmental conditions. We simultaneously exposed encapsulated molluscan embryos to three abiotic stressors-acidified conditions, elevated temperate, and solar UV radiation in large outdoor water tables in a multifactorial design. Solar UV radiation was modified with plastic filters, while levels of the other factors reflected IPCC predictions for near-future change. We quantified mortality and the rate of embryonic development for a mid-shore littorinid, Bembicium nanum, and low-shore opisthobranch, Dolabrifera brazieri. Outcomes were consistent for these model species with embryos faring significantly better at 26°C than 22°C. Mortality sharply increased at the lowest temperature (22°C) and lowest pH (7.6) examined, producing a significant interaction. Under these conditions mortality approached 100% for each species, representing a 2- to 4-fold increase in mortality relative to warm (26°C) non-acidified conditions. Predictably, development was more rapid at the highest temperature but this again interacted with acidified conditions. Development was slowed under acidified conditions at the lowest temperature. The presence of UV radiation had minimal impact on the outcomes, only slowing development for the littorinid and not interacting with the other factors. Our findings suggest that a warming ocean, at least to a threshold, may compensate for the effects of decreasing pH for some species. It also appears that stressors will interact in complex and unpredictable ways in a changing climate.

  5. Complex Responses of Intertidal Molluscan Embryos to a Warming and Acidifying Ocean in the Presence of UV Radiation

    PubMed Central

    Davis, Andrew R.; Coleman, Daniel; Broad, Allison; Byrne, Maria; Dworjanyn, Symon A.; Przeslawski, Rachel

    2013-01-01

    Climate change and ocean acidification will expose marine organisms to synchronous multiple stressors, with early life stages being potentially most vulnerable to changing environmental conditions. We simultaneously exposed encapsulated molluscan embryos to three abiotic stressors—acidified conditions, elevated temperate, and solar UV radiation in large outdoor water tables in a multifactorial design. Solar UV radiation was modified with plastic filters, while levels of the other factors reflected IPCC predictions for near-future change. We quantified mortality and the rate of embryonic development for a mid-shore littorinid, Bembicium nanum, and low-shore opisthobranch, Dolabrifera brazieri. Outcomes were consistent for these model species with embryos faring significantly better at 26°C than 22°C. Mortality sharply increased at the lowest temperature (22°C) and lowest pH (7.6) examined, producing a significant interaction. Under these conditions mortality approached 100% for each species, representing a 2- to 4-fold increase in mortality relative to warm (26°C) non-acidified conditions. Predictably, development was more rapid at the highest temperature but this again interacted with acidified conditions. Development was slowed under acidified conditions at the lowest temperature. The presence of UV radiation had minimal impact on the outcomes, only slowing development for the littorinid and not interacting with the other factors. Our findings suggest that a warming ocean, at least to a threshold, may compensate for the effects of decreasing pH for some species. It also appears that stressors will interact in complex and unpredictable ways in a changing climate. PMID:23405238

  6. Population dynamics of nitrifying bacteria for nitritation achieved in Johannesburg (JHB) process treating municipal wastewater.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Wei; Bai, Xinlong; Zhang, Limin; Wang, Anqi; Peng, Yongzhen

    2014-06-01

    Population dynamic of nitrifying bacteria was investigated for nitrogen removal from municipal wastewater. Nitritation was established with nitrite accumulation ratios above 85%. Quantitative PCR indicated that Nitrospira was dominant nitrite oxidizing bacteria (NOB) and Nitrobacter was few. During nitritation achieving, Nitrobacter was firstly eliminated, along with inhibition of Nitrospira bioactivities, then Nitrospira percentage declined and was finally washed out. Nitritation establishment depended on inhibiting and eliminating of NOB rather than ammonia oxidizing bacteria (AOB) enriching. This is the first study where population dynamics of Nitrobacter and Nitrospira were investigated to reveal mechanism of nitritation in a continuous-flow process. Phylogenetic analysis of AOB indicated that Nitrosomonas-like cluster and Nitrosomonas oligotropha were dominant AOB, accounting for 81.6% of amoA gene clone library. Community structure of AOB was similar to that of complete nitrification system with long hydraulic retention time, but different from that of nitritation reactor with low DO concentration.

  7. Role of nitrate and nitrite in the induction of nitrite reductase in leaves of barley seedlings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aslam, M.; Huffaker, R. C.

    1989-01-01

    The role of NO3- and NO2- in the induction of nitrite reductase (NiR) activity in detached leaves of 8-day-old barley (Hordeum vulgare L.) seedlings was investigated. Barley leaves contained 6 to 8 micromoles NO2-/gram fresh weight x hour of endogenous NiR activity when grown in N-free solutions. Supply of both NO2- and NO3- induced the enzyme activity above the endogenous levels (5 and 10 times, respectively at 10 millimolar NO2- and NO3- over a 24 hour period). In NO3(-)-supplied leaves, NiR induction occurred at an ambient NO3- concentration of as low as 0.05 millimolar; however, no NiR induction was found in leaves supplied with NO2- until the ambient NO2- concentration was 0.5 millimolar. Nitrate accumulated in NO2(-)-fed leaves. The amount of NO3- accumulating in NO2(-)-fed leaves induced similar levels of NiR as did equivalent amounts of NO3- accumulating in NO3(-)-fed leaves. Induction of NiR in NO2(-)-fed leaves was not seen until NO3- was detectable (30 nanomoles/gram fresh weight) in the leaves. The internal concentrations of NO3-, irrespective of N source, were highly correlated with the levels of NiR induced. When the reduction of NO3- to NO2- was inhibited by WO4(2-), the induction of NiR was inhibited only partially. The results indicate that in barley leaves in NiR is induced by NO3- directly, i.e. without being reduced to NO2-, and that absorbed NO2- induces the enzyme activity indirectly after being oxidized to NO3- within the leaf.

  8. An acidified thermostabilizing mini-peptide derived from the carboxyl extension of the larger isoform of the plant Rubisco activase.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Mengru; Li, Xujuan; Yang, Yumei; Luo, Zhu; Liu, Chang; Gong, Ming; Zou, Zhurong

    2015-10-20

    Thermostable fusion peptide partners are valuable in engineering thermostability in proteins. We evaluated the Arabidopsis counterpart (AtRAce) and an acidified derivative (mRAce) of the conserved carboxyl extension (RAce) of plant Rubisco activase (RCA) for their thermostabilizing properties in Escherichia coli and Saccharomyces cerevisiae using a protein fusion strategy. We used AtRAce and mRAce as fusion tails for the thermolabile protein RCA2 from Arabidopsis thaliana and Nicotiana tabacum. The homologous fusion of AtRAce with Arabidopsis RCA2 and the heterologous fusion of AtRAce with tobacco RCA2 increased the thermostability of both proteins. The acidified derivative mRAce conferred greater thermostability upon both proteins as compared with AtRAce. Moreover, mRAce enhanced the thermostability of other two thermolabile proteins from Jatropha curcas: the cytosolic ascorbate peroxidase 1 (JcAPX1) and the TATA-box binding protein isoform 1 (JcTBP1). We further report - for the first time - that JcTBP1 mediates heat tolerance in vivo in yeast. Thus, our study identifies a C-terminal acidic mini-peptide - the acidified derivative mRAce - with potential uses in improving the thermostability of heat-labile proteins and their associated heat tolerance in host organisms. PMID:26321073

  9. [Effects of simulated acid rain and its acidified soil on soluble sugar and nitrogen contents of wheat seedlings].

    PubMed

    Tong, Guanhe; Liang, Huiling

    2005-08-01

    The study showed that the cation release of simulated rain caused soil acidification and base ions release. With the decrease of simulated acid rain pH from 5.6 to 2.5, the acid rain-leached soil pH decreased from 6.06 to 3.41, and its total amount of exchange base ions decreased from 56.5 to 41.1 mmol x kg(-1). Spraying simulated acid rain on the shoots of wheat seedlings planted on such acidified soils caused a rapid decrease in the soluble sugar and nitrogen contents of wheat seedlings, and reduced some of their physiological activities. The effect of spraying simulated acid rain on the soluble sugar, nitrogen, and chlorophyll contents and photosynthetic rate of wheat stems and leaves was larger than that of acidified soil, while the effect of the latter on the soluble sugar and nitrogen contents and the physiological activity of NR and GOGAT in root system of wheat seedlings was larger than that of the former. The intensive acid rain of pH < or = 3.0 and the corresponding acidified soil had an obvious harm to the growth and physiological activity of wheat seedlings.

  10. An acidified thermostabilizing mini-peptide derived from the carboxyl extension of the larger isoform of the plant Rubisco activase.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Mengru; Li, Xujuan; Yang, Yumei; Luo, Zhu; Liu, Chang; Gong, Ming; Zou, Zhurong

    2015-10-20

    Thermostable fusion peptide partners are valuable in engineering thermostability in proteins. We evaluated the Arabidopsis counterpart (AtRAce) and an acidified derivative (mRAce) of the conserved carboxyl extension (RAce) of plant Rubisco activase (RCA) for their thermostabilizing properties in Escherichia coli and Saccharomyces cerevisiae using a protein fusion strategy. We used AtRAce and mRAce as fusion tails for the thermolabile protein RCA2 from Arabidopsis thaliana and Nicotiana tabacum. The homologous fusion of AtRAce with Arabidopsis RCA2 and the heterologous fusion of AtRAce with tobacco RCA2 increased the thermostability of both proteins. The acidified derivative mRAce conferred greater thermostability upon both proteins as compared with AtRAce. Moreover, mRAce enhanced the thermostability of other two thermolabile proteins from Jatropha curcas: the cytosolic ascorbate peroxidase 1 (JcAPX1) and the TATA-box binding protein isoform 1 (JcTBP1). We further report - for the first time - that JcTBP1 mediates heat tolerance in vivo in yeast. Thus, our study identifies a C-terminal acidic mini-peptide - the acidified derivative mRAce - with potential uses in improving the thermostability of heat-labile proteins and their associated heat tolerance in host organisms.

  11. [Effects of simulated acid rain and its acidified soil on soluble sugar and nitrogen contents of wheat seedlings].

    PubMed

    Tong, Guanhe; Liang, Huiling

    2005-08-01

    The study showed that the cation release of simulated rain caused soil acidification and base ions release. With the decrease of simulated acid rain pH from 5.6 to 2.5, the acid rain-leached soil pH decreased from 6.06 to 3.41, and its total amount of exchange base ions decreased from 56.5 to 41.1 mmol x kg(-1). Spraying simulated acid rain on the shoots of wheat seedlings planted on such acidified soils caused a rapid decrease in the soluble sugar and nitrogen contents of wheat seedlings, and reduced some of their physiological activities. The effect of spraying simulated acid rain on the soluble sugar, nitrogen, and chlorophyll contents and photosynthetic rate of wheat stems and leaves was larger than that of acidified soil, while the effect of the latter on the soluble sugar and nitrogen contents and the physiological activity of NR and GOGAT in root system of wheat seedlings was larger than that of the former. The intensive acid rain of pH < or = 3.0 and the corresponding acidified soil had an obvious harm to the growth and physiological activity of wheat seedlings. PMID:16262064

  12. Nedocromil sodium (Tilade).

    PubMed

    Bartels, L A; Farrington, E

    1994-01-01

    Nedocromil sodium is a well-tolerated antiasthmatic agent for initial therapy in patients with mild or moderate asthma not well controlled with inhaled beta-2 agonists and/or where methylxanthines are indicated. Like cromolyn sodium, nedocromil sodium offers a potential alternative to inhaled corticosteroids as maintenance therapy in patients with mild or moderate asthma not adequately controlled by bronchodilators. Furthermore, cromolyn sodium and nedocromil sodium may also reduce the usage of corticosteroids and provide some additional symptom control in patients whose asthma is not suitably controlled by optimal doses of inhaled corticosteroids. Both nedocromil sodium and cromolyn sodium are more efficacious than placebo for controlling of asthma, however, few studies have compared the effectiveness of cromolyn versus nedocromil at this time. Further experience and comparison studies of nedocromil sodium with cromolyn sodium in children are required before the role of nedocromil sodium as maintenance treatment in young asthmatic patients can be defined.

  13. Novel role of the nitrite transporter NirC in Salmonella pathogenesis: SPI2-dependent suppression of inducible nitric oxide synthase in activated macrophages.

    PubMed

    Das, Priyanka; Lahiri, Amit; Lahiri, Ayan; Chakravortty, Dipshikha

    2009-08-01

    Activation of macrophages by interferon gamma (IFN-gamma) and the subsequent production of nitric oxide (NO) are critical for the host defence against Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium infection. We report here the inhibition of IFN-gamma-induced NO production in RAW264.7 macrophages infected with wild-type Salmonella. This phenomenon was shown to be dependent on the nirC gene, which encodes a potential nitrite transporter. We observed a higher NO output from IFN-gamma-treated macrophages infected with a nirC mutant of Salmonella. The nirC mutant also showed significantly decreased intracellular proliferation in a NO-dependent manner in activated RAW264.7 macrophages and in liver, spleen and secondary lymph nodes of mice, which was restored by complementing the gene in trans. Under acidified nitrite stress, a twofold more pronounced NO-mediated repression of SPI2 was observed in the nirC knockout strain compared to the wild-type. This enhanced SPI2 repression in the nirC knockout led to a higher level of STAT-1 phosphorylation and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) expression than seen with the wild-type strain. In iNOS knockout mice, the organ load of the nirC knockout strain was similar to that of the wild-type strain, indicating that the mutant is exclusively sensitive to the host nitrosative stress. Taken together, these results reveal that intracellular Salmonella evade killing in activated macrophages by downregulating IFN-gamma-induced NO production, and they highlight the critical role of nirC as a virulence gene.

  14. Microchip capillary electrophoresis of nitrite and nitrate in cerebrospinal fluid.

    PubMed

    Masár, Marián; Bodor, Róbert; Troška, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Microchip capillary electrophoresis (MCE) is a relatively new analytical method requiring only small sample amounts, which is very favorable for the analysis of volume-limited biofluids. The practical use of MCE in bioanalysis is still restricted in terms of requirements for simplifying and/or concentrating sample pretreatment techniques. Here, we describe an MCE method for trace analysis of nitrite and nitrate, indicators of various neurological diseases, in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). The complex CSF samples were simplified by solid-phase microextraction prior to an online combination of isotachophoresis with capillary zone electrophoresis performed on a microchip with coupled channels and a high-volume sample injection channel (9.9 μL). The method is suitable for rapid (total analysis time lasted 20 min), reproducible (0.6-2.4 % RSD for migration time), and sensitive (3-9 nM limits of detection) determinations of nitrite and nitrate in 15-50 times diluted CSF samples. PMID:25673480

  15. Recyclable Magnetic Mesoporous Nanocomposite with Improved Sensing Performance toward Nitrite.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yihe; Su, Zisheng; Li, Bin; Zhang, Liming; Fan, Di; Ma, Heping

    2016-05-18

    A magnetic nanomaterial for nitrite ion detection was demonstrated in the present study. This nanomaterial was prepared by grafting a rhodamine 6G derivative (denoted as Rh 6G-OH) into the channels of core-shell magnetic mesoporous silica nanospheres. The nanocomposite (denoted as Fe3O4@Rh 6G) showed large surface area and improved fluorescent performance to accumulate and recognize NO2(-), and its superparamagnetic behavior played an important role in reusability. The fluorescent intensity decreased linearly along with the NO2(-) concentration in the range of 1-50 μM, and the detection limit was estimated to be 0.8 μM, which was much lower than the maximum limit of nitrite ion in drinking water (65 μM) recommended by World Health Organization. Importantly, Fe3O4@Rh 6G could be magnetically collected and effectively reutilized after six test cycles. PMID:27115527

  16. Microchip capillary electrophoresis of nitrite and nitrate in cerebrospinal fluid.

    PubMed

    Masár, Marián; Bodor, Róbert; Troška, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Microchip capillary electrophoresis (MCE) is a relatively new analytical method requiring only small sample amounts, which is very favorable for the analysis of volume-limited biofluids. The practical use of MCE in bioanalysis is still restricted in terms of requirements for simplifying and/or concentrating sample pretreatment techniques. Here, we describe an MCE method for trace analysis of nitrite and nitrate, indicators of various neurological diseases, in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). The complex CSF samples were simplified by solid-phase microextraction prior to an online combination of isotachophoresis with capillary zone electrophoresis performed on a microchip with coupled channels and a high-volume sample injection channel (9.9 μL). The method is suitable for rapid (total analysis time lasted 20 min), reproducible (0.6-2.4 % RSD for migration time), and sensitive (3-9 nM limits of detection) determinations of nitrite and nitrate in 15-50 times diluted CSF samples.

  17. Nitrate ammonification in mangrove soils: a hidden source of nitrite?

    PubMed Central

    Balk, Melike; Laverman, Anniet M.; Keuskamp, Joost A.; Laanbroek, Hendrikus J.

    2015-01-01

    Nitrate reduction is considered to be a minor microbial pathway in the oxidation of mangrove-derived organic matter due to a limited supply of nitrate in mangrove soils. At a limited availability of this electron acceptor compared to the supply of degradable carbon, nitrate ammonification is thought to be the preferential pathway of nitrate reduction. Mangrove forest mutually differ in their productivity, which may lead to different available carbon to nitrate ratios in their soil. Hence, nitrate ammonification is expected to be of more importance in high- compared to low-productive forests. The hypothesis was tested in flow-through reactors that contain undisturbed mangrove soils from high-productive Avicennia germinans and Rhizophora mangle forests in Florida and low-productive Avicennia marina forests in Saudi Arabia. Nitrate was undetectable in the soils from both regions. It was assumed that a legacy of nitrate ammonification would be reflected by a higher ammonium production from these soils upon the addition of nitrate. Unexpectedly, the soils from the low-productive forests in Saudi Arabia produced considerably more ammonium than the soils from the high-productive forests in Florida. Hence, other environmental factors than productivity must govern the selection of nitrate ammonification or denitrification. A rather intriguing observation was the 1:1 production of nitrite and ammonium during the consumption of nitrate, more or less independent from sampling region, location, sampling depth, mangrove species and from the absence or presence of additional degradable carbon. This 1:1 ratio points to a coupled production of ammonium and nitrite by one group of nitrate-reducing microorganisms. Such a production of nitrite will be hidden by the presence of active nitrite-reducing microorganisms under the nitrate-limited conditions of most mangrove forest soils. PMID:25784903

  18. Nitrate ammonification in mangrove soils: a hidden source of nitrite?

    PubMed

    Balk, Melike; Laverman, Anniet M; Keuskamp, Joost A; Laanbroek, Hendrikus J

    2015-01-01

    Nitrate reduction is considered to be a minor microbial pathway in the oxidation of mangrove-derived organic matter due to a limited supply of nitrate in mangrove soils. At a limited availability of this electron acceptor compared to the supply of degradable carbon, nitrate ammonification is thought to be the preferential pathway of nitrate reduction. Mangrove forest mutually differ in their productivity, which may lead to different available carbon to nitrate ratios in their soil. Hence, nitrate ammonification is expected to be of more importance in high- compared to low-productive forests. The hypothesis was tested in flow-through reactors that contain undisturbed mangrove soils from high-productive Avicennia germinans and Rhizophora mangle forests in Florida and low-productive Avicennia marina forests in Saudi Arabia. Nitrate was undetectable in the soils from both regions. It was assumed that a legacy of nitrate ammonification would be reflected by a higher ammonium production from these soils upon the addition of nitrate. Unexpectedly, the soils from the low-productive forests in Saudi Arabia produced considerably more ammonium than the soils from the high-productive forests in Florida. Hence, other environmental factors than productivity must govern the selection of nitrate ammonification or denitrification. A rather intriguing observation was the 1:1 production of nitrite and ammonium during the consumption of nitrate, more or less independent from sampling region, location, sampling depth, mangrove species and from the absence or presence of additional degradable carbon. This 1:1 ratio points to a coupled production of ammonium and nitrite by one group of nitrate-reducing microorganisms. Such a production of nitrite will be hidden by the presence of active nitrite-reducing microorganisms under the nitrate-limited conditions of most mangrove forest soils.

  19. Mechanism of autocatalytic oxidation of oxyhemoglobin by nitrite

    SciTech Connect

    Kosaka, H.; Tyuma, I.

    1987-08-01

    Oxidation of oxyhemoglobin by nitrite is characterized by the presence of a lag phase followed by autocatalysis. The stoichiometry of the overall reaction is described by the following equation: 4HbO/sub 2/ + 4NO/sub 2//sup -/ + 4H/sup +/ = 4Hb/sup +/ + 4NO/sub 3//sup -/ + O/sub 2/ + 2H/sub 2/O (Hb denotes hemoglobin monomer). During the oxidation, the authors detected a free radical at g = 2.005, which is very similar to the methemoglobin free radical generated by the reaction with hydrogen peroxide. Nitrosylhemoglobin was not detected. The oxidation was delayed by the addition of KCN or catalase, but was not modified by superoxide dismutase in phosphate buffer. In bistris buffer, however, superoxide dismutase markedly prolonged the lag phase. The results suggest that during the oxidation, the methemoglobin peroxide compound is generated and converts nitrite into nitrogen dioxide by its peroxidatic activity. Nitrogen dioxide oxidizes oxyhemoglobin to methemoglobin and nitrite, yielding the autocatalytic phase.

  20. Experiments and modeling of variably permeable carbonate reservoir samples in contact with CO₂-acidified brines

    DOE PAGES

    Smith, Megan M.; Hao, Yue; Mason, Harris E.; Carroll, Susan A.

    2014-12-31

    Reactive experiments were performed to expose sample cores from the Arbuckle carbonate reservoir to CO₂-acidified brine under reservoir temperature and pressure conditions. The samples consisted of dolomite with varying quantities of calcite and silica/chert. The timescales of monitored pressure decline across each sample in response to CO₂ exposure, as well as the amount of and nature of dissolution features, varied widely among these three experiments. For all samples cores, the experimentally measured initial permeability was at least one order of magnitude or more lower than the values estimated from downhole methods. Nondestructive X-ray computed tomography (XRCT) imaging revealed dissolution featuresmore » including “wormholes,” removal of fracture-filling crystals, and widening of pre-existing pore spaces. In the injection zone sample, multiple fractures may have contributed to the high initial permeability of this core and restricted the distribution of CO₂-induced mineral dissolution. In contrast, the pre-existing porosity of the baffle zone sample was much lower and less connected, leading to a lower initial permeability and contributing to the development of a single dissolution channel. While calcite may make up only a small percentage of the overall sample composition, its location and the effects of its dissolution have an outsized effect on permeability responses to CO₂ exposure. The XRCT data presented here are informative for building the model domain for numerical simulations of these experiments but require calibration by higher resolution means to confidently evaluate different porosity-permeability relationships.« less

  1. Strong Ion Regulatory Abilities Enable the Crab Xenograpsus testudinatus to Inhabit Highly Acidified Marine Vent Systems

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Marian Y.; Guh, Ying-Jey; Shao, Yi-Ta; Kuan, Pou-Long; Chen, Guan-Lin; Lee, Jay-Ron; Jeng, Ming-Shiou; Tseng, Yung-Che

    2016-01-01

    Hydrothermal vent organisms have evolved physiological adaptations to cope with extreme abiotic conditions including temperature and pH. To date, acid-base regulatory abilities of vent organisms are poorly investigated, although this physiological feature is essential for survival in low pH environments. We report the acid-base regulatory mechanisms of a hydrothermal vent crab, Xenograpsus testudinatus, endemic to highly acidic shallow-water vent habitats with average environment pH-values ranging between 5.4 and 6.6. Within a few hours, X. testudinatus restores extracellular pH (pHe) in response to environmental acidification of pH 6.5 (1.78 kPa pCO2) accompanied by an increase in blood HCO3- levels from 8.8 ± 0.3 to 31 ± 6 mM. Branchial Na+/K+-ATPase (NKA) and V-type H+-ATPase (VHA), the major ion pumps involved in branchial acid-base regulation, showed dynamic increases in response to acidified conditions on the mRNA, protein and activity level. Immunohistochemical analyses demonstrate the presence of NKA in basolateral membranes, whereas the VHA is predominantly localized in cytoplasmic vesicles of branchial epithelial- and pillar-cells. X. testudinatus is closely related to other strong osmo-regulating brachyurans, which is also reflected in the phylogeny of the NKA. Accordingly, our results suggest that the evolution of strong ion regulatory abilities in brachyuran crabs that allowed the occupation of ecological niches in euryhaline, freshwater, and terrestrial habitats are probably also linked to substantial acid-base regulatory abilities. This physiological trait allowed X. testudinatus to successfully inhabit one of the world's most acidic marine environments. PMID:26869933

  2. Trends in emissions of acidifying species in Asia, 1985-1997.

    SciTech Connect

    Streets, D. G.; Tsai, N. Y.; Akimoto, H.; Oka, K.

    2000-05-31

    Acid deposition is a serious problem throughout much of Asia. Emissions of sulfur dioxide (SO{sub 2}) and nitrogen oxides (NO{sub x}) have been increasing steadily, as nations strive to increase their levels of economic development. Coal and fuel oil have been the main choices for powering industrial development; and, until recently, only a few countries (notably Japan and Taiwan) had taken significant steps to avert the atmospheric emissions that accompany fuel combustion. This paper discusses trends in emissions of SO{sub 2} and NO{sub x} that have occurred in Asian countries in the period 1985--1997, using results from the RAINS-ASIA computer model and energy-use trends from the IEA Energy Statistics and Balances database. Emissions of SO{sub 2} in Asia grew from 26.6 Tg in 1985 to 33.7 Tg in 1990 and to 39.2 Tg in 1997. Though SO{sub 2} emissions used to grow as fast as fossil-fuel use, recent limitations on the sulfur content of coal and oil have slowed the growth. The annual-average emissions growth between 1990 and 1997 was only 1.1%, considerably less than the economic growth rate. Emissions of NO{sub x}, on the other hand, continue to grow rapidly, from 14.1 Tg in 1985 to 18.7 Tg in 1990 and 28.5 Tg in 1997, with no signs of abating. Thus, though SO{sub 2} remains the major contributor to acidifying emissions in Asia, the role of NO{sub x}, will become more and more important in the future.

  3. Reductive transformation of iron and sulfur in schwertmannite-rich accumulations associated with acidified coastal lowlands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burton, Edward D.; Bush, Richard T.; Sullivan, Leigh A.; Mitchell, David R. G.

    2007-09-01

    We examined the transformations of Fe and S associated with schwertmannite (Fe 8O 8(OH) 6SO 4) reduction in acidified coastal lowlands. This was achieved by conducting a 91 day diffusive-flux column experiment, which involved waterlogging of natural schwertmannite- and organic-rich soil material. This experiment was complemented by short-term batch experiments utilizing synthetic schwertmannite. Waterlogging readily induced bacterial reduction of schwertmannite-derived Fe(III), producing abundant pore-water Fe II, SO 4 and alkalinity. Production of alkalinity increased pH from pH 3.4 to pH ˜6.5 within the initial 14 days, facilitating the precipitation of siderite (FeCO 3). Interactions between schwertmannite and Fe II at pH ˜6.5 were found, for the first time, to catalyse the transformation of schwertmannite to goethite (αFeOOH). Thermodynamic calculations indicate that this Fe II-catalysed transformation shifted the biogeochemical regime from an initial dominance of Fe(III)-reduction to a subsequent co-occurrence of both Fe(III)- and SO 4-reduction. This lead firstly to the formation of elemental S via H 2S oxidation by goethite, and later also to formation of nanoparticulate mackinawite (FeS) via H 2S precipitation with Fe II. Pyrite (FeS 2) was a quantitatively insignificant product of reductive Fe and S mineralization. This study provides important new insights into Fe and S geochemistry in settings where schwertmannite is subjected to reducing conditions.

  4. Effect of κ-carrageenan and tetrasodium pyrophosphate on the yield of direct acidified cottage cheese.

    PubMed

    Makhal, Subarna; Giri, Apurba; Kanawjia, Suresh Kumar

    2013-12-01

    Recovery of whey proteins with improved water holding capacity, reduction of losses of curd fines as well as improvement of ability of curd to retain moisture appear some crucial approaches to result in a product with comparatively higher yield. In the present study, endeavours were made to improve the yield of direct acidified cottage cheese through the addition of κ-carrageenan in milk before heat treatment and tetrasodium pyrophosphate (TSPP) immediately before renneting. κ-carrageenan was added at the levels of 0.005, 0.015 and 0.025% and their effect on the total protein and whey proteins contents, moisture retention and the resultant curd yield as well as the quality of cottage cheese was studied. The study showed that addition of κ-carrageenan at 0.015% level followed by heat treatment at 90 °C for 5 min significantly (P < 0.01) increased the curd yield to 13.8% against 12.2% for the control. It was also observed that addition of κ-carrageenan at the level of 0.015% significantly (P < 0.01) increased the whey proteins and total protein contents to 14.8 and 88.5% against 73.4% and 1.2%, respectively with improved (P < 0.01) moisture retention of 75.4% as compared to 74.4% for the control. However, the study showed that addition of tetrasodium pyrophosphate (TSPP) at the levels of 0.02 to 0.08% neither had any effect on the recovery of whey proteins and moisture retention as well as the consequent curd yield nor the sensory quality of cottage cheese.

  5. Oocyte atresia and reproductive success in fathead minnows (Pimephales promelas) exposed to acidified hardwater environments.

    PubMed

    McCormick, J H; Stokes, G N; Hermanutz, R O

    1989-01-01

    The ovarian histology of fathead minnows (Pimephales promelas) chronically exposed to three levels of environmental pH was examined for evidence of reproductive impairment. Exposures occurred in three experimental running-water channels receiving Mississippi River water. One of these channels was not acidified and two were dosed with H2SO4. The pH was approximately 8 in untreated river water and 6 and 5 in the two channels receiving H2SO4. Fish for ovarian examination were taken from these channels at four stages of the reproductive season: initiation of spawning (June 19), mid-spawning (July 12), end of spawning (August 14-15), and approximately 1 mo. post-spawning (September 19). The fish exhibited ovarian histological changes and depression of reproductive success which were directly associated with the level of environmental stress experienced. The association between these three factors was most consistent and pronounced if the fish were sampled near the end of the spawning season. When sampled at this time, reproductive impairment in a population was found when the ratio of the volume of atretic (resorbing) oocytes present in the ovary to the total ovarian volume exceeded 20% in all fish sampled. This was the case in the pH 5 channel fish sampled in August. At this same time, not all of the fish in the pH 6 channel exhibited such an accumulation of atretic oocytes, and egg deposition in that population was not reduced. None of the fish from the pH 8 channel were so affected nor was their reproduction.

  6. Effect of κ-carrageenan and tetrasodium pyrophosphate on the yield of direct acidified cottage cheese.

    PubMed

    Makhal, Subarna; Giri, Apurba; Kanawjia, Suresh Kumar

    2013-12-01

    Recovery of whey proteins with improved water holding capacity, reduction of losses of curd fines as well as improvement of ability of curd to retain moisture appear some crucial approaches to result in a product with comparatively higher yield. In the present study, endeavours were made to improve the yield of direct acidified cottage cheese through the addition of κ-carrageenan in milk before heat treatment and tetrasodium pyrophosphate (TSPP) immediately before renneting. κ-carrageenan was added at the levels of 0.005, 0.015 and 0.025% and their effect on the total protein and whey proteins contents, moisture retention and the resultant curd yield as well as the quality of cottage cheese was studied. The study showed that addition of κ-carrageenan at 0.015% level followed by heat treatment at 90 °C for 5 min significantly (P < 0.01) increased the curd yield to 13.8% against 12.2% for the control. It was also observed that addition of κ-carrageenan at the level of 0.015% significantly (P < 0.01) increased the whey proteins and total protein contents to 14.8 and 88.5% against 73.4% and 1.2%, respectively with improved (P < 0.01) moisture retention of 75.4% as compared to 74.4% for the control. However, the study showed that addition of tetrasodium pyrophosphate (TSPP) at the levels of 0.02 to 0.08% neither had any effect on the recovery of whey proteins and moisture retention as well as the consequent curd yield nor the sensory quality of cottage cheese. PMID:24426035

  7. Crp-dependent cytochrome bd oxidase confers nitrite resistance to Shewanella oneidensis.

    PubMed

    Fu, Huihui; Chen, Haijiang; Wang, Jixuan; Zhou, Guangqi; Zhang, Haiyan; Zhang, Lili; Gao, Haichun

    2013-08-01

    Shewanella oneidensis is able to respire on a variety of organic and inorganic substrates, including nitrate and nitrite. Conversion of nitrate to nitrite and nitrite to ammonium is catalysed by periplasmic nitrate and nitrite reductases (NAP and NRF) respectively. Global regulator Crp (cyclic AMP receptor protein) is essential for growth of S. oneidensis on both nitrate and nitrite. In this study, we discovered that crp mutants are not only severely deficient in nitrate or nitrite respiration, but are also hypersensitive to nitrite. This hypersusceptibility phenotype is independent of nitrite respiration. Using random transposon mutagenesis, we obtained 73 Δcrp suppressor strains resistant to nitrite. Transposon insertion sites in 24 suppressor strains were exclusively mapped in the region upstream of the cyd operon encoding a cytochrome bd oxidase, resulting in expression of the operon now driven by a Crp-independent promoter. Further investigation indicated that the promoter in suppressor strains comes from the transposon. Mutational analysis of the cydB gene (encoding the essential subunit II of the bd oxidase) confirmed that the cytochrome bd oxidase confers nitrite resistance to S. oneidensis.

  8. Validation of a method to directly and specifically measure nitrite in biological matrices.

    PubMed

    Almeida, Luis E F; Kamimura, Sayuri; Kenyon, Nicholas; Khaibullina, Alfia; Wang, Li; de Souza Batista, Celia M; Quezado, Zenaide M N

    2015-02-15

    The bioactivity of nitric oxide (NO) is influenced by chemical species generated through reactions with proteins, lipids, metals, and its conversion to nitrite and nitrate. A better understanding of the functions played by each of these species could be achieved by developing selective assays able of distinguishing nitrite from other NO species. Nagababu and Rifkind developed a method using acetic and ascorbic acids to measure nitrite-derived NO in plasma. Here, we adapted, optimized, and validated this method to assay nitrite in tissues. The method yielded linear measurements over 1-300 pmol of nitrite and was validated for tissue preserved in a nitrite stabilization solution composed of potassium ferricyanide, N-ethylmaleimide and NP-40. When samples were processed with chloroform, but not with methanol, ethanol, acetic acid or acetonitrile, reliable and reproducible nitrite measurements in up to 20 sample replicates were obtained. The method's accuracy in tissue was ≈ 90% and in plasma 99.9%. In mice, during basal conditions, brain, heart, lung, liver, spleen and kidney cortex had similar nitrite levels. In addition, nitrite tissue levels were similar regardless of when organs were processed: immediately upon collection, kept in stabilization solution for later analysis or frozen and later processed. After ip nitrite injections, rapidly changing nitrite concentrations in tissue and plasma could be measured and were shown to change in significantly distinct patterns. This validated method could be valuable for investigations of nitrite biology in conditions such as sickle cell disease, cardiovascular disease, and diabetes, where nitrite is thought to play a role. PMID:25445633

  9. Inhibitory activity of reuterin, nisin, lysozyme and nitrite against vegetative cells and spores of dairy-related Clostridium species.

    PubMed

    Avila, Marta; Gómez-Torres, Natalia; Hernández, Marta; Garde, Sonia

    2014-02-17

    The butyric acid fermentation, responsible for late blowing of cheese, is caused by the outgrowth in cheese of some species of Clostridium, resulting in texture and flavor defects and economical losses. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of different antimicrobial compounds against vegetative cells and spores of C. tyrobutyricum, C. butyricum, C. beijerinckii and C. sporogenes strains isolated from cheeses with late blowing defect. Minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) for reuterin, nisin, lysozyme and sodium nitrite were determined against Clostridium strains in milk and modified RCM (mRCM) after 7d exposure. Although the sensitivity of Clostridium to the tested antimicrobials was strain-dependent, C. sporogenes and C. beijerinckii generally had higher MIC values than the rest of Clostridium species. The majority of Clostridium strains were more resistant to antimicrobials in milk than in mRCM, and vegetative cells exhibited higher sensitivity than spores. Reuterin (MIC values 0.51-32.5 mM) and nisin (MIC values 0.05-12.5 μg/ml) were able to inhibit the growth of vegetative cells and spores of all assayed Clostridium strains in milk and mRCM. Strains of C. tyrobutyricum exhibited the highest sensitivity to lysozyme (MIC values<0.20-400 μg/ml) and sodium nitrite (MIC values 18.75-150 μg/ml). These results suggest that reuterin and nisin, with a broad inhibitory activity spectrum against Clostridium spp. spores and vegetative cells, may be the best options to control Clostridium growth in dairy products and to prevent associated spoilage, such as late blowing defect of cheese. However, further studies in cheese would be necessary to validate this hypothesis.

  10. Endothelial TLR4 activation impairs intestinal microcirculatory perfusion in necrotizing enterocolitis via eNOS–NO–nitrite signaling

    PubMed Central

    Yazji, Ibrahim; Sodhi, Chhinder P.; Lee, Elizabeth K.; Good, Misty; Egan, Charlotte E.; Afrazi, Amin; Neal, Matthew D.; Jia, Hongpeng; Lin, Joyce; Branca, Maria F.; Prindle, Thomas; Richardson, Ward M.; Ozolek, John; Billiar, Timothy R.; Binion, David G.; Gladwin, Mark T.; Hackam, David J.

    2013-01-01

    Necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC) is a devastating disease of premature infants characterized by severe intestinal necrosis and for which breast milk represents the most effective protective strategy. Previous studies have revealed a critical role for the lipopolysaccharide receptor toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) in NEC development through its induction of mucosal injury, yet the reasons for which intestinal ischemia in NEC occurs in the first place remain unknown. We hypothesize that TLR4 signaling within the endothelium plays an essential role in NEC development by regulating perfusion to the small intestine via the vasodilatory molecule endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS). Using a unique mouse system in which we selectively deleted TLR4 from the endothelium, we now show that endothelial TLR4 activation is required for NEC development and that endothelial TLR4 activation impairs intestinal perfusion without effects on other organs and reduces eNOS expression via activation of myeloid differentiation primary response gene 88. NEC severity was significantly increased in eNOS−/− mice and decreased upon administration of the phosphodiesterase inhibitor sildenafil, which augments eNOS function. Strikingly, compared with formula, human and mouse breast milk were enriched in sodium nitrate—a precursor for enteral generation of nitrite and nitric oxide—and repletion of formula with sodium nitrate/nitrite restored intestinal perfusion, reversed the deleterious effects of endothelial TLR4 signaling, and reduced NEC severity. These data identify that endothelial TLR4 critically regulates intestinal perfusion leading to NEC and reveal that the protective properties of breast milk involve enhanced intestinal microcirculatory integrity via augmentation of nitrate–nitrite–NO signaling. PMID:23650378

  11. Formation of N-nitrosamine and N-nitrosamino acids from food products and nitrite under simulated gastric conditions.

    PubMed

    Groenen, P J; de Cock-Bethbeder, M W; Bouwman, J; Dhont, J H

    1980-01-01

    Average-sized portions of a variety of food products were reacted with nitrite under realistically simulated gastric conditions. The aqueous incubation medium contained sodium nitrite (10 mg/l) and potassium thiocyanate to mimic the incoming flux of saliva, as well as pepsin, sodium chloride and hydrochloric acid, reflecting the composition of gastric juice. After incubation for 2 hr at 37 degrees C, volatile N-nitrosamines and N-nitrosamino acids were determined in the reaction mixtures. Nitrosodimethylamine (NDMA) was present in the incubation mixtures of smoked mackerel (8.5 micrograms per portion), canned herring (0.66 micrograms per portion) and beer (0.70 micrograms per 'portion'). Smaller amounts per portion, sometimes of other nitrosamines as well, were observed with canned salmon and anchovy, mustard, yoghurt and coffee brew. Negative results were obtained for canned tuna, soya sauce, ketchup, white bread, 'nasi goreng', tea brew and cocoa milk. Nitrosamino acids were detected in the reaction mixtures of smoked mackerel (58 micrograms per portion), soya sauce (24 micrograms per portion) and canned salmon (6.9 micrograms per portion) and in smaller amounts in those of canned herring, anchovy and cocoa milk. In order to reduce the number of analyses to be performed, most products have been studied only after incubation, so that the nitrosamines and nitrosamino acids found may already have been present -- wholly or partly -- in the original products, before incubation. Such is the case for part of the NDMA in the reaction mixture of smoked mackerel and for all the NDMA in beer. The toxicological implications of these findings remain to be established. PMID:7228254

  12. Inhibitory activity of reuterin, nisin, lysozyme and nitrite against vegetative cells and spores of dairy-related Clostridium species.

    PubMed

    Avila, Marta; Gómez-Torres, Natalia; Hernández, Marta; Garde, Sonia

    2014-02-17

    The butyric acid fermentation, responsible for late blowing of cheese, is caused by the outgrowth in cheese of some species of Clostridium, resulting in texture and flavor defects and economical losses. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of different antimicrobial compounds against vegetative cells and spores of C. tyrobutyricum, C. butyricum, C. beijerinckii and C. sporogenes strains isolated from cheeses with late blowing defect. Minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) for reuterin, nisin, lysozyme and sodium nitrite were determined against Clostridium strains in milk and modified RCM (mRCM) after 7d exposure. Although the sensitivity of Clostridium to the tested antimicrobials was strain-dependent, C. sporogenes and C. beijerinckii generally had higher MIC values than the rest of Clostridium species. The majority of Clostridium strains were more resistant to antimicrobials in milk than in mRCM, and vegetative cells exhibited higher sensitivity than spores. Reuterin (MIC values 0.51-32.5 mM) and nisin (MIC values 0.05-12.5 μg/ml) were able to inhibit the growth of vegetative cells and spores of all assayed Clostridium strains in milk and mRCM. Strains of C. tyrobutyricum exhibited the highest sensitivity to lysozyme (MIC values<0.20-400 μg/ml) and sodium nitrite (MIC values 18.75-150 μg/ml). These results suggest that reuterin and nisin, with a broad inhibitory activity spectrum against Clostridium spp. spores and vegetative cells, may be the best options to control Clostridium growth in dairy products and to prevent associated spoilage, such as late blowing defect of cheese. However, further studies in cheese would be necessary to validate this hypothesis. PMID:24361835

  13. A new method for the determination of the nitrogen content of nitrocellulose based on the molar ratio of nitrite-to-nitrate ions released after alkaline hydrolysis.

    PubMed

    Alinat, Elodie; Delaunay, Nathalie; Archer, Xavier; Mallet, Jean-Maurice; Gareil, Pierre

    2015-04-01

    A new method was proposed to determine the nitrogen content of nitrocelluloses (NCs). It is based on the finding of a linear relationship between the nitrogen content and the molar ratio of nitrite-to-nitrate ions released after alkaline hydrolysis. Capillary electrophoresis was used to monitor the concentration of nitrite and nitrate ions. The influences of hydrolysis time and molar mass of NC on the molar ratio of nitrite-to-nitrate ions were investigated, and new insights into the understanding of the alkaline denitration mechanism of NCs, underlying this analytical strategy is provided. The method was then tested successfully with various explosive and non-explosive NC-containing samples such as various daily products and smokeless gunpowders. Inherently to its principle exploiting a concentration ratio, this method shows very good repeatability in the determination of nitrogen content in real samples with relative standard deviation (n = 3) inferior to 1.5%, and also provides very significant advantages with respect to sample extraction, analysis time (1h for alkaline hydrolysis, 3 min for electrophoretic separation), which was about 5 times shorter than for the classical Devarda's method, currently used in industry, and safety conditions (no need for preliminary drying NC samples, mild hydrolysis conditions with 1M sodium hydroxide for 1h at 60 °C). PMID:25562808

  14. A new method for the determination of the nitrogen content of nitrocellulose based on the molar ratio of nitrite-to-nitrate ions released after alkaline hydrolysis.

    PubMed

    Alinat, Elodie; Delaunay, Nathalie; Archer, Xavier; Mallet, Jean-Maurice; Gareil, Pierre

    2015-04-01

    A new method was proposed to determine the nitrogen content of nitrocelluloses (NCs). It is based on the finding of a linear relationship between the nitrogen content and the molar ratio of nitrite-to-nitrate ions released after alkaline hydrolysis. Capillary electrophoresis was used to monitor the concentration of nitrite and nitrate ions. The influences of hydrolysis time and molar mass of NC on the molar ratio of nitrite-to-nitrate ions were investigated, and new insights into the understanding of the alkaline denitration mechanism of NCs, underlying this analytical strategy is provided. The method was then tested successfully with various explosive and non-explosive NC-containing samples such as various daily products and smokeless gunpowders. Inherently to its principle exploiting a concentration ratio, this method shows very good repeatability in the determination of nitrogen content in real samples with relative standard deviation (n = 3) inferior to 1.5%, and also provides very significant advantages with respect to sample extraction, analysis time (1h for alkaline hydrolysis, 3 min for electrophoretic separation), which was about 5 times shorter than for the classical Devarda's method, currently used in industry, and safety conditions (no need for preliminary drying NC samples, mild hydrolysis conditions with 1M sodium hydroxide for 1h at 60 °C).

  15. A novel nitrite biosensor based on gold dendrites with egg white as template.

    PubMed

    He, Yaping; Zhang, Dawei; Dong, Sheying; Zheng, Jianbin

    2012-01-01

    Gold dendrites (AuD) were synthesized with egg white as the soft template and a novel nitrite (NO(2)(-)) biosensor was fabricated by assembly of a myoglobin (Mb)-L-cysteamine (Cys)-AuD biological hybrid. The results of Fourier transform infrared spectra and UV-visible spectra indicated that Mb retained its original structure in the resulting Mb-Cys-AuD. Electrochemical investigation of the biosensor showed a pair of well-defined, quasi-reversible redox peaks with E(pa) = -0.314 V and E(pc) = -0.344 V (vs. SCE) in 0.1 M, pH 7.0 sodium phosphate buffered saline at the scan rate of 200 mV/s. The transfer rate constant (k(s)) was 1.49 s(-1). The Mb-Cys-AuD showed a good electrochemical catalytic response for the reduction of NO(2)(-), with the linear range from 0.5 to 400 µM and the detection limit of 0.3 µM (S/N = 3). The apparent Michaelis-Menten constant (K(M)(app)) was estimated to be 0.2 mM. Therefore, the assembled bio-hybrid as a novel matrix opened up a further possibility for study on the design of enzymatic biosensors with potential applications.

  16. Nitrite survival and nitrous oxide production of denitrifying phosphorus removal sludges in long-term nitrite/nitrate-fed sequencing batch reactors.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yayi; Zhou, Shuai; Ye, Liu; Wang, Hong; Stephenson, Tom; Jiang, Xuxin

    2014-12-15

    Nitrite-based phosphorus (P) removal could be useful for innovative biological P removal systems where energy and carbon savings are a priority. However, using nitrite for denitrification may cause nitrous oxide (N2O) accumulation and emissions. A denitrifying nitrite-fed P removal system [Formula: see text] was successfully set up in a sequencing batch reactor (SBR) and was run for 210 days. The maximum pulse addition of nitrite to [Formula: see text] was 11 mg NO2(-)-N/L in the bulk, and a total of 34 mg NO2(-)-N/L of nitrite was added over three additions. Fluorescent in situ hybridization results indicated that the P-accumulating organisms (PAOs) abundance was 75 ± 1.1% in [Formula: see text] , approximately 13.6% higher than that in a parallel P removal SBR using nitrate [Formula: see text] . Type II Accumulibacter (PAOII) (unable to use nitrate as an electron acceptor) was the main PAOs species in [Formula: see text] , contributing 72% to total PAOs. Compared with [Formula: see text] , [Formula: see text] biomass had enhanced nitrite/free nitrous acid (FNA) endurance, as demonstrated by its higher nitrite denitrification and P uptake rates. N2O accumulated temporarily in [Formula: see text] after each pulse of nitrite. Peak N2O concentrations in the bulk for [Formula: see text] were generally 6-11 times higher than that in [Formula: see text] ; these accumulations were rapidly denitrified to nitrogen gases. N2O concentration increased rapidly in nitrate-cultivated biomass when 5 or 10 mg NO2(-)-N/L per pulse was added. Whereas, N2O accumulation did not occur in nitrite-cultivated biomass until up to 30 mg NO2(-)-N/L per pulse was added. Long-term acclimation to nitrite and pulse addition of nitrite in [Formula: see text] reduced the risk of nitrite accumulation, and mitigated N2O accumulation and emissions from denitrifying P removal by nitrite.

  17. Docusate Sodium and Pregnancy

    MedlinePlus

    ... live chat Live Help Fact Sheets Share Docusate Sodium Friday, 01 April 2016 In every pregnancy, a ... This sheet talks about whether exposure to docusate sodium may increase the risk for birth defects over ...

  18. Diclofenac sodium overdose

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/002630.htm Diclofenac sodium overdose To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Diclofenac sodium is a prescription medicine used to relieve pain ...

  19. Sodium Ferric Gluconate Injection

    MedlinePlus

    Sodium ferric gluconate injection is used to treat iron-deficiency anemia (a lower than normal number of ... are also receiving the medication epoetin (Epogen, Procrit). Sodium ferric gluconate injection is in a class of ...

  20. Fractional excretion of sodium

    MedlinePlus

    FE sodium; FENa ... to a lab. There, they are examined for salt (sodium) and creatinine levels. Creatinine is a chemical waste ... your normal foods with a normal amount of salt, unless otherwise instructed by your health care provider. ...

  1. Modifications of Carbonate Fracture Hydrodynamic Properties by CO{sub 2}-Acidified Brine Flow

    SciTech Connect

    Deng, Hang; Ellis, Brian R.; Peters, Catherine A.; Fitts, Jeffrey P.; Crandall, Dustin; Bromhal, Grant S.

    2013-08-01

    Acidic reactive flow in fractures is relevant in subsurface activities such as CO{sub 2} geological storage and hydraulic fracturing. Understanding reaction-induced changes in fracture hydrodynamic properties is essential for predicting subsurface flows such as leakage, injectability, and fluid production. In this study, x-ray computed tomography scans of a fractured carbonate caprock were used to create three dimensional reconstructions of the fracture before and after reaction with CO{sub 2}-acidified brine (Ellis et al., 2011, Greenhouse Gases: Sci. Technol., 1:248-260). As expected, mechanical apertures were found to increase substantially, doubling and even tripling in some places. However, the surface geometry evolved in complex ways including ‘comb-tooth’ structures created from preferential dissolution of calcite in transverse sedimentary bands, and the creation of degraded zones, i.e. porous calcite-depleted areas on reacted fracture surfaces. These geometric alterations resulted in increased fracture roughness, as measured by surface Z{sub 2} parameters and fractal dimensions D{sub f}. Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations were conducted to quantify the changes in hydraulic aperture, fracture transmissivity and permeability. The results show that the effective hydraulic apertures are smaller than the mechanical apertures, and the changes in hydraulic apertures are nonlinear. Overestimation of flow rate by a factor of two or more would be introduced if fracture hydrodynamic properties were based on mechanical apertures, or if hydraulic aperture is assumed to change proportionally with mechanical aperture. The differences can be attributed, in part, to the increase in roughness after reaction, and is likely affected by contiguous transverse sedimentary features. Hydraulic apertures estimated by the 1D statistical model and 2D local cubic law (LCL) model are consistently larger than those calculated from the CFD simulations. In addition, a novel

  2. Can the eastern red-backed salamander (Plethodon cinereus) persist in an acidified landscape?

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bondi, Cheryl A; Beier, Colin M.; Ducey, Peter K; Lawrence, Gregory B.; Bailey, Scott W.

    2016-01-01

    Hardwood forests of eastern North America have experienced decades of acidic deposition, leading to soil acidification where base cation supply was insufficient to neutralize acid inputs. Negative impacts of soil acidity on amphibians include disrupted embryonic development, lower growth rates, and habitat loss. However, some amphibians exhibit intraspecific variation in acid tolerance, suggesting the potential for local adaptation in areas where soils are naturally acidic. The eastern red-backed salamander (Plethodon cinereus) is a highly abundant top predator of the northern hardwood forest floor. Early research found that P. cinereus was sensitive to acidic soils, avoiding substrates with pH < 3.8 and experiencing decreased growth rates in acidic habitats. However, recent studies have documented P. cinereus populations in lower pH conditions than previously observed, suggesting some populations may persist in acidic conditions. Here, we evaluated relationships between organic horizon soil pH and P. cinereus abundance, adult health (body size and condition), and microhabitat selection, based on surveys of 34 hardwood forests in northeastern United States that encompass a regional soil pH gradient. We found no associations between soil pH and P. cinereus abundance or health, and observed that this salamander used substrates with pH similar to that available, suggesting that pH does not mediate their fine-scale distributions. The strongest negative predictor of P. cinereus abundance was the presence of dusky salamanders (Desmognathus spp.), which were most abundant in the western Adirondacks. Our results indicate that P. cinereus occupies a wider range of soil pH than has been previously thought, which has implications for their functional role in forest food webs and nutrient cycles in acid-impaired ecosystems. Tolerance of P. cinereus for more acidic habitats, including anthropogenically acidified forests, may be due to local adaptation in

  3. Simulating the evolution of fracture surface alteration exposed to CO2-acidified brine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, H.; Steefel, C. I.; Molins, S.; DePaolo, D. J.; Ajo Franklin, J. B.; Voltolini, M.

    2015-12-01

    Understanding the flow, transport, and reaction in fractures and the evolution of fracture geometries as a result of geochemical reactions is especially relevant to geologic carbon storage. Both natural and injection-induced fractures may be abundant and thus control fluid migration in the subsurface. A second effect is that the development of low pH fluid as the CO2 dissolves into the native brine can alter fracture geometries and thus dominant flow pathways substantially over relatively short time scales, particularly when rapidly-reacting carbonate minerals are present. Existing experimental studies performed under conditions relevant to geologic carbon storage have shown complex dissolution patterns, which depend on the flow regimes and spatial distributions of reactive minerals. One of the dissolution patterns observed is the formation of a porous altered layer in the near-fracture region that is created by preferential dissolution of a reactive phase (e.g. calcite) dispersed in the rock matrix. However, there is still a lack of predictive understanding of this phenomenon and an even more limited ability to predict how the altered layer may influence subsequent evolution of the fracture. In this study, we present a reactive transport model that captures and predicts the development of the altered layer when the fracture surfaces are exposed to CO2-acidified brine. The model explicitly accounts for permeability heterogeneity caused by initial fracture aperture variations, and updates fracture apertures and the porosity of rock matrix in the near-fracture region based on local reactions. The simulation results lend important insights into the factors that control the evolution of the spatial distribution and thickness of the altered layer. This altered layer in turn affects flow distribution in the fracture and formation of preferential flow channels. It also has an impact on the mass transport between the fracture and the rock matrix, the accessibility of

  4. Modelling nitrite dynamics and associated feedback processes in the Benguela oxygen minimum zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mashifane, T. B.; Vichi, M.; Waldron, H. N.; Machu, E.; Garçonc, V.

    2016-08-01

    Understanding nitrite dynamics in oxygen minimum zones (OMZs) is a challenge as it represents an intermediary nitrogen species with a short turnover time. Nitrite is also reduced to nitrogen in OMZs, preventing its accumulation. This creates difficulties in detecting nitrite with colorimetric methods as concentrations may occur below detection limits in some regions. Nitrite concentrations are key to understanding intermediate nitrogen processes and their implication for nitrogen loss in OMZs. A coupled physical-biogeochemical model is applied in the Benguela OMZ to study nitrite dynamics and its associated feedback processes. Simulated results show occurrence of primary and secondary nitrite maxima in the Benguela shelf waters. The primary nitrite maxima in the Benguela are attributed to nitrification and nitrate assimilation as they occur in association with the nitracline. Secondary nitrite maxima accumulate in the Angola-Benguela Front (ABF) OMZ and are attributed to denitrification. The secondary nitrite maxima are consumed by anaerobic ammonium oxidation (anammox) off Walvis Bay. Nitrite maxima are restricted to the shelf off Walvis Bay and advected offshore in the ABF region. Interchanges between the poleward South Atlantic Central Water (SACW) and the equatorward, well-aerated Eastern South Atlantic Central Water (ESACW) drive the seasonality of nitrogen processes in the Benguela. Subsequent nitrite reduction in the Benguela OMZ leads to nitrous oxide production, with high concentrations occurring in the ABF region as a result of nitrification and denitrification. Off Walvis Bay, nitrous oxide production is low since nitrite is consumed by anammox. Nitrous oxide production occurs in thermocline, intermediate and deeper water masses in the ABF region. High N fluxes in the Benguela are attributed to nitrification as compared to anammox and denitrification. Results from this study demonstrate the role of intermediate nitrogen species in nitrogen feedback

  5. Regulation of Nitrite Stress Response in Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough, a Model Sulfate-Reducing Bacterium

    PubMed Central

    Rajeev, Lara; Chen, Amy; Kazakov, Alexey E.; Luning, Eric G.; Zane, Grant M.; Novichkov, Pavel S.; Wall, Judy D.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) are sensitive to low concentrations of nitrite, and nitrite has been used to control SRB-related biofouling in oil fields. Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough, a model SRB, carries a cytochrome c-type nitrite reductase (nrfHA) that confers resistance to low concentrations of nitrite. The regulation of this nitrite reductase has not been directly examined to date. In this study, we show that DVU0621 (NrfR), a sigma54-dependent two-component system response regulator, is the positive regulator for this operon. NrfR activates the expression of the nrfHA operon in response to nitrite stress. We also show that nrfR is needed for fitness at low cell densities in the presence of nitrite because inactivation of nrfR affects the rate of nitrite reduction. We also predict and validate the binding sites for NrfR upstream of the nrfHA operon using purified NrfR in gel shift assays. We discuss possible roles for NrfR in regulating nitrate reductase genes in nitrate-utilizing Desulfovibrio spp. IMPORTANCE The NrfA nitrite reductase is prevalent across several bacterial phyla and required for dissimilatory nitrite reduction. However, regulation of the nrfA gene has been studied in only a few nitrate-utilizing bacteria. Here, we show that in D. vulgaris, a bacterium that does not respire nitrate, the expression of nrfHA is induced by NrfR upon nitrite stress. This is the first report of regulation of nrfA by a sigma54-dependent two-component system. Our study increases our knowledge of nitrite stress responses and possibly of the regulation of nitrate reduction in SRB. PMID:26283774

  6. Role of the denitrifying Haloarchaea in the treatment of nitrite-brines.

    PubMed

    Nájera-Fernández, Cindy; Zafrilla, Basilio; Bonete, María José; Martínez-Espinosa, Rosa María

    2012-09-01

    Haloferax mediterranei is a denitrifying halophilic archaeon able to reduce nitrate and nitrite under oxic and anoxic conditions. In the presence of oxygen, nitrate and nitrite are used as nitrogen sources for growth. Under oxygen scarcity, this haloarchaeon uses both ions as electron acceptors via a denitrification pathway. In the present work, the maximal nitrite concentration tolerated by this organism was determined by studying the growth of H. mediterranei in minimal medium containing 30, 40 and 50 mM nitrite as sole nitrogen source and under initial oxic conditions at 42 degrees C. The results showed the ability of H. mediterranei to withstand nitrite concentrations up to 50 mM. At the beginning of the incubation, nitrate was detected in the medium, probably due to the spontaneous oxidation of nitrite under the initial oxic conditions. The complete removal of nitrite and nitrate was accomplished in most of the tested conditions, except in culture medium containing 50 mM nitrite, suggesting that this concentration compromised the denitrification capacity of the cells. Nitrite and nitrate reductases activities were analyzed at different growth stages of H. mediterranei. In all cases, the activities of the respiratory enzymes were higher than their assimilative counterparts; this was especially the case for NirK. The denitrifying and possibly detoxifying role of this enzyme might explain the high nitrite tolerance of H. mediterranei. This archaeon was also able to remove 60% of the nitrate and 75% of the nitrite initially present in brine samples collected from a wastewater treatment facility. These results suggest that H. mediterranei, and probably other halophilic denitrifying Archaea, are suitable candidates for the bioremediation of brines with high nitrite and nitrate concentrations.

  7. Measurement of nitrite reductase in leaf tissue of Vigna mungo : A new method.

    PubMed

    Srivastava, R C; Bose, B; Mukerji, D; Mathur, S N; Srivastava, H S

    1979-12-01

    The enzyme nitrite reductase (EC 1.6.6.4) is generally assayed in terms of disappearance of nitrite from the assay medium. We describe a technique which allowed estimation of the enzyme level in leaf tissues of Vigna mungo (L). Hepper in terms of the release of the product (NH3) of the enzyme reaction. The technique is offered as an alternative, possibly more convenient method for assay of nitrite reductase in plant tissue in vivo.

  8. Inhibition of Listeria monocytogenes on cooked cured chicken breasts by acidified coating containing allyl isothiocyanate or deodorized Oriental mustard extract.

    PubMed

    Olaimat, Amin N; Holley, Richard A

    2016-08-01

    Ready-to-eat meats are considered foods at high risk to cause life-threatening Listeria monocytogenes infections. This study screened 5 L. monocytogenes strains for their ability to hydrolyze sinigrin (a glucosinolate in Oriental mustard), which formed allyl isothiocyanate (AITC) and reduced L. monocytogenes viability on inoculated vacuum-packed, cooked, cured roast chicken slices at 4 °C. Tests involved incorporation of 25-50 μl/g AITC directly or 100-250 mg/g Oriental mustard extract in 0.5% (w/v) κ-carrageenan/2% (w/v) chitosan-based coatings prepared using 1.5% malic or acetic acid. L. monocytogenes strains hydrolyzed 33.6%-48.4% pure sinigrin in MH broth by 21 d at 25 °C. Acidified κ-carrageenan/chitosan coatings containing 25-50 μl/g AITC or 100-250 mg/g mustard reduced the viability of L. monocytogenes and aerobic bacteria on cooked, cured roast chicken slices by 4.1 to >7.0 log10 CFU/g compared to uncoated chicken stored at 4 °C for 70 d. Coatings containing malic acid were significantly more antimicrobial than those with acetic acid. During storage for 70 d, acidified κ-carrageenan/chitosan coatings containing 25-50 μl/g AITC or 250 mg/g mustard extract reduced lactic acid bacteria (LAB) numbers 3.8 to 5.4 log10 CFU/g on chicken slices compared to uncoated samples. Acidified κ-carrageenan/chitosan-based coatings containing either AITC or Oriental mustard extract at the concentrations tested had the ability to control L. monocytogenes viability and delay growth of potential spoilage bacteria on refrigerated, vacuum-packed cured roast chicken. PMID:27052706

  9. Effect of rosiglitazone in sodium arsenite-induced experimental vascular endothelial dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Kaur, Tajpreet; Goel, Rajesh Kumar; Balakumar, Pitchai

    2010-04-01

    The present study has been designed to investigate the effect of rosiglitazone, a peroxisome proliferator activated receptor gamma agonist in sodium arsenite-induced vascular endothelial dysfunction (VED) in rats. The rats were administered sodium arsenite (1.5 mg/kg/day, i.p., 2 weeks) to induce VED. The development of VED was assessed by employing isolated aortic ring preparation and estimating serum nitrite/nitrate concentration. Further, the integrity of the aortic endothelium was assessed histologically using haematoxylin-eosin staining. Moreover, the oxidative stress was assessed by estimating serum thiobarbituric acid reactive substances, aortic reactive oxygen species and reduced form of glutathione. The administration of sodium arsenite produced VED by impairing acetylcholine-induced endothelium dependent relaxation, diminishing the integrity of vascular endothelium and decreasing the serum nitrite/nitrate concentration. In addition, sodium arsenite was noted to produce oxidative stress as it increased serum thiobarbituric acid reactive substances and aortic reactive oxygen species and consequently decreased glutathione. Treatment with rosiglitazone (3 mg/kg/day, p.o., 2 weeks and 5 mg/kg/day, p.o., 2 weeks) significantly prevented sodium arsenite-induced VED by enhancing acetylcholine-induced endothelium dependent relaxation, improving the integrity of vascular endothelium, increasing the nitrite/nitrate concentration and decreasing the oxidative stress. However, the vascular protective effect of rosiglitazone was markedly abolished by co-administration of nitric oxide synthase inhibitor, N-Omega-Nitro-L-Arginine Methyl Ester (L-NAME) (25 mg/kg/day, i.p., 2 weeks). Thus, it may be concluded that rosiglitazone reduces oxidative stress, activates eNOS and enhances the generation of nitric oxide to prevent sodium arsenite-induced VED in rats. PMID:20422371

  10. Can Urinary Nitrite Results Be Used to Conduct Antimicrobial Option for Urinary Tract Infection in Children?

    PubMed Central

    Mahyar, Abolfazl; Ayazi, Parviz; Froozesh, Mahta; Daneshi-Kohan, Mohammad-Mahdi; Barikani, Ameneh

    2012-01-01

    Objective This study was performed to determine the relationship between urinary nitrite results and bacterial resistance to antimicrobial drugs in urinary tract infection of children. Methods In a cross-section study 119 children younger than 12 years with urinary tract infection were evaluated in Qazvin children's hospital. Patients were divided into negative and positive nitrite groups depending on urinary nitrite test result. Rates of antibiotic resistance in the two groups were compared. Findings Sixty seven patients were in the negative nitrite group and 52 in the positive nitrite group. Resistance rates to ceftriaxone, trimethoprim sulfamethoxazole, ampicillin, gentamicin, amikacin, nalidixic acid, cephalothin and nitrofurantoin in the nitrite negative group were 7.5%, 31.3%, 50.7%, 11.9%, 9%, 3%, 14.9% and 11.9%, respectively. These values in the nitrite positive group were 21.2%, 28.8%, 63.5%, 7.7%, 5.8%, 1.9%, 9.6%, and 3.8%, respectively (P>0.05). Conclusion This study showed that there is no correlation between urinary nitrite results and bacterial resistance to antimicrobial drugs. Therefore, it seems that physicians should not adjust antibiotic therapy for UTI based on nitrite results. PMID:23056892

  11. Pharmacology and therapeutic role of inorganic nitrite and nitrate in vasodilatation.

    PubMed

    Bailey, J C; Feelisch, M; Horowitz, J D; Frenneaux, M P; Madhani, M

    2014-12-01

    Nitrite has emerged as an important bioactive molecule that can be biotransformed to nitric oxide (NO) related metabolites in normoxia and reduced to NO under hypoxic and acidic conditions to exert vasodilatory effects and confer a variety of other benefits to the cardiovascular system. Abundant research is currently underway to understand the mechanisms involved and define the role of nitrite in health and disease. In this review we discuss the impact of nitrite and dietary nitrate on vascular function and the potential therapeutic role of nitrite in acute heart failure.

  12. Exposure to inhaled isobutyl nitrite reduces T cell-dependent responsiveness

    SciTech Connect

    Soderberg, L.S.F.; Barnett, J.B. )

    1991-03-11

    Isobutyl nitrite is a drug of abuse popular among male homosexuals and among adolescents. In order to approximate the nitrite exposures of inhalant abusers, mice were treated with 900 ppm isobutyl nitrite in an inhalation chamber for 45 min per day for 14 days. At 72 hr after the last exposure, mice were assayed for immune competence. Under these conditions, mice gained only half the weight of mice exposed to air. The spleens of nitrite exposed mice weighed 15% less and had 24% fewer cells per spleen than controls. Adjusted for equal cell numbers, T cell mitogenic and allogeneic proliferative responses were significantly reduce by 33% and 47%, respectively. Unstimulated spleen cells had elevated levels of IL-2 transcription following exposure to isobutyl nitrite suggesting that nitrite inhalation caused a nonspecific induction of T cells. In contrast, B cell proliferative responses to LPS were unaltered. Exposure to the nitrite reduced the frequency of T-dependent antibody plaque-forming cells (PFC) by 63% and the total number of reduced by 60% after as few as five daily exposures to isobutyl nitrite. Therefore, the data suggest that habitual inhalation of isobutyl nitrite impairs immune competence and that toxicity appears to be directed toward T cell functions.

  13. Role of blood and vascular smooth muscle in the vasoactivity of nitrite.

    PubMed

    Liu, Taiming; Schroeder, Hobe J; Barcelo, Lisa; Bragg, Shannon L; Terry, Michael H; Wilson, Sean M; Power, Gordon G; Blood, Arlin B

    2014-10-01

    Recent evidence from humans and rats indicates that nitrite is a vasodilator under hypoxic conditions by reacting with metal-containing proteins to produce nitric oxide (NO). We tested the hypothesis that near-physiological concentrations of nitrite would produce vasodilation in a hypoxia- and concentration-dependent manner in the hind limb of sheep. Anesthetized sheep were instrumented to measure arterial blood pressure and femoral blood flows continuously in both hind limbs. Nitrite was infused into one femoral artery to raise the nitrite concentration in the femoral vein by 10 to 15-fold while the sheep breathed 50%, 14% or 12% oxygen in inspired air. In contrast to reports in humans and rats, the nitrite infusion had no measurable effect on mean femoral blood flows or vascular conductances, regardless of inspired O2 levels. In vitro experiments showed no significant difference in the release of NO from nitrite in sheep and human red blood cells. Further experiments demonstrated nitrite is converted to NO in rat artery homogenates faster than sheep arteries, and that this source of NO production is attenuated in the presence of a heme oxidizer. Finally, western blots indicate that concentrations of the heme-containing protein cytoglobin, but not myoglobin, are markedly lower in sheep arteries compared with rats. Overall, the results demonstrate that nitrite is not a physiological vasodilator in sheep. This is likely due to a lack of conversion of nitrite to NO within the vascular smooth muscle, perhaps due to deficient amounts of the heme-containing protein cytoglobin.

  14. Synthesis and intracrystalline oxidation of nitrite-intercalated layered double hydroxides

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, Nygil; Pradeep Kumar, G.; Rajamathi, Michael

    2009-03-15

    Nitrite-intercalated LDHs could be prepared by a two-stage process that involves coprecipitation in the presence of nitrite ions followed by stirring the product with excess of nitrite ions. The nitrite ion lies flat in these LDHs with its c{sub 2}-axis lying approximately perpendicular to the crystallographic c-axis. The interlayer nitrite ions in these LDHs could be quantitatively oxidized to nitrate ions using H{sub 2}O{sub 2} solution. In the LDHs thus obtained the nitrate ion lies flat with its c{sub 3}-axis parallel to the crystallographic c-axis (D{sub 3h} symmetry) in the interlayer region resulting in lower basal spacing. - Graphical abstract: Nitrite-intercalated LDHs could be prepared by a two-stage process that involves coprecipitation in the presence of nitrite ions followed by stirring the product with excess of nitrite ions. The interlayer nitrite ions in these LDHs could be quantitatively oxidized to nitrate ions.

  15. Suspected nitrite poisoning in pigs caused by Capsella bursa-pastoris (L.) Medik. ('herderstassie', shepherd's purse).

    PubMed

    Wiese, W J; Joubert, J P

    2001-09-01

    Nitrite poisoning in pigs was suspected when 4 of 18 pigs died in a piggery near Ellisras in the Northern Province. The pigs showed typical brownish discolouration of the blood at autopsy. It was established that they ingested vegetable tops and weeds from the adjacent garden as part of their daily ration. Of the available plants, only Capsella bursa-pastoris contained nitrites. The drinking water and some of the other plants tested positive for nitrates but not for nitrites. This is the first report of suspected nitrite poisoning in pigs caused by Capsella bursa-pastoris.

  16. Nitrite Transport Activity of the ABC-Type Cyanate Transporter of the Cyanobacterium Synechococcus elongatus▿

    PubMed Central

    Maeda, Shin-ichi; Omata, Tatsuo

    2009-01-01

    In addition to the ATP-binding cassette (ABC)-type nitrate/nitrite-bispecific transporter, which has a high affinity for both substrates (Km, ∼1 μM), Synechococcus elongatus has an active nitrite transport system with an apparent Km (NO2−) value of 20 μM. We found that this activity depends on the cynABD genes, which encode a putative cyanate (NCO−) ABC-type transporter. Accordingly, nitrite transport by CynABD was competitively inhibited by NCO− with a Ki value of 0.025 μM. The transporter was induced under conditions of nitrogen deficiency, and the induced cells showed a Vmax value of 11 to 13 μmol/mg of chlorophyll per h for cyanate or nitrite, which could supply ∼30% of the amount of nitrogen required for optimum growth. Its relative specificity for the substrates and regulation at transcriptional and posttranslational levels suggested that the physiological role of the bispecific cyanate/nitrite transporter in S. elongatus is to allow nitrogen-deficient cells to assimilate low concentrations of cyanate in the medium. Its contribution to nitrite assimilation was significant in a mutant lacking the ABC-type nitrate/nitrite transporter, suggesting a possible role for CynABD in nitrite assimilation by cyanobacterial species that lack another high-affinity mechanism(s) for nitrite transport. PMID:19286804

  17. Total salivary nitrates and nitrites in oral health and periodontal disease.

    PubMed

    Sánchez, Gabriel A; Miozza, Valeria A; Delgado, Alejandra; Busch, Lucila

    2014-01-30

    It is well known that nitrites are increased in saliva from patients with periodontal disease. In the oral cavity, nitrites may derive partly from the reduction of nitrates by oral bacteria. Nitrates have been reported as a defence-related mechanism. Thus, the aim of the present study was to determine the salivary levels of total nitrate and nitrite and their relationship, in unstimulated and stimulated saliva from periodontal healthy subjects, and from patients with chronic periodontal disease. Nitrates and nitrites were determined in saliva from thirty healthy subjects and forty-four patients with periodontal disease. A significant increase in salivary nitrates and nitrites was observed. Nitrates and nitrites concentration was related to clinical attachment level (CAL). A positive and significant Pearson's correlation was found between salivary total nitrates and nitrites. Periodontal treatment induced clinical improvement and decreased nitrates and nitrites. It is concluded that salivary nitrates and nitrites increase, in patients with periodontal disease, could be related to defence mechanisms. The possibility that the salivary glands respond to oral infectious diseases by increasing nitrate secretion should be explored further.

  18. Inhibitory effects of nitrite on the reactions of bovine carbonic anhydrase II with CO2 and bicarbonate consistent with zinc-bound nitrite.

    PubMed

    Nielsen, Per M; Fago, Angela

    2015-08-01

    Carbonic anhydrase (CA) is a zinc enzyme that catalyzes hydration of carbon dioxide (CO2) and dehydration of bicarbonate in red blood cells, thus facilitating CO2 transport and excretion. Bovine CA II may also react with nitrite to generate nitric oxide, although nitrite is a known inhibitor of the CO2 hydration reaction. To address the potential in vivo interference of these reactions and the nature of nitrite binding to the enzyme, we here investigate the inhibitory effect of 10-30 mM nitrite on Michaelis-Menten kinetics of CO2 hydration and bicarbonate dehydration by stopped-flow spectroscopy. Our data show that nitrite significantly affects the apparent dissociation constant KM for CO2 (11 mM) and bicarbonate (221 mM), and the turnover number kcat for the CO2 hydration (1.467 × 10(6) s(-1)) but not for the bicarbonate dehydration (7.927 × 10(5) s(-1)). These effects demonstrate mixed and competitive inhibition for the reaction with CO2 and bicarbonate, respectively, and are consistent with nitrite binding to the active site zinc. The high apparent dissociation constant found here for CO2, bicarbonate and nitrite (16-120 mM) are all overall consistent with published data and reveal a large capacity of free enzyme available for binding each of the three substrates at their in vivo levels, with little or no significant interference among reactions. The low affinity of the enzyme for nitrite suggests that the in vivo interaction between red blood cell CA II and nitrite requires compartmentalization at the anion exchanger protein of the red cell membrane to be physiologically relevant. PMID:25951615

  19. Cultivation, growth physiology, and chemotaxonomy of nitrite-oxidizing bacteria.

    PubMed

    Spieck, Eva; Lipski, André

    2011-01-01

    Lithoautotrophic nitrite-oxidizing bacteria (NOB) are known as fastidious microorganisms, which are hard to maintain and not many groups are trained to keep them in culture. They convert nitrite stoichiometrically to nitrate and growth is slow due to the poor energy balance. NOB are comprised of five genera, which are scattered among the phylogenetic tree. Because NOB proliferate in a broad range of environmental conditions (terrestrial, marine, acidic) and have diverse lifestyles (lithoautotrophic, mixotrophic, and heterotrophic), variation in media composition is necessary to match their individual growth requirements in the laboratory. From Nitrobacter and Nitrococcus relatively high cell amounts can be achieved by consumption of high nitrite concentrations, whereas accumulation of cells belonging to Nitrospira, Nitrospina, or the new candidate genus Nitrotoga needs prolonged feeding procedures. Isolation is possible for planktonic cells by dilution series or plating techniques, but gets complicated for strains with a tendency to develop microcolonies like Nitrospira. Physiological experiments including determination of the temperature or pH-optimum can be conducted with active laboratory cultures of NOB, but the attainment of reference values like cell protein content or cell numbers might be hard to realize due to the formation of flocs and the low cell density. Monitoring of laboratory enrichments is necessary especially if several species or genera coexist within the same culture and due to population shifts over time. Chemotaxonomy is a valuable method to identify and quantify NOB in biofilms and pure cultures alike, since fatty acid profiles reflect their phylogenetic heterogeneity. This chapter focusses on methods to enrich, isolate, and characterize NOB by various cultivation-based techniques.

  20. Ultraviolet absorption spectrum of chlorine nitrite, ClONO

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Molina, L. T.; Molina, M. J.

    1977-01-01

    The near-ultraviolet absorption spectrum of chlorine nitrite (ClONO) has been quantitatively investigated over the wavelength range 230-400 nm at 231 K. An absorption maximum was observed at 290 nm with a cross section of 1.5 by 10 to the -18th power sq cm. The calculated lifetime against photodissociation for ClONO in the atmosphere is 2 to 3 minutes. The large photolysis rate indicates that ClONO does not play a significant role in the stratosphere as a temporary holding tank for chlorine.

  1. Expression and purification of spinach nitrite reductase in E. coli

    SciTech Connect

    Bellissimo, D.; Privalle, L. )

    1991-03-11

    The study of structure-function relationships in nitrite reductase (NiR) by site-directed mutagenesis requires an expression system from which suitable quantities of active enzyme can be purified. Spinach NiR cDNA was cloned into pUC18 and expressed in E.coli JM109 as a beta-galactosidase fusion protein. The IPTG-induced fusion protein contains five additional amino acids at the N-terminus. The expressed NiR in aerobic cultures was mostly insoluble and inactive indicating the presence of inclusion bodies. By altering growth conditions, active NiR could represent 0.5-1.0% of the total E.coli protein, Effects of the addition of delta-aminolevulinic acid, a heme precursor, and anaerobic growth were also examined. Spinach NiR was purified approximately 200 fold to homogeneity. When subjected to electrophoresis on SDS polyacrylamide gels, the NiR migrated as a single band with similar mobility to pure spinach enzyme. The expressed enzyme also reacted with rabbit anti-spinach NiR antibody as visualized by Western blot analysis. The absorption spectrum of the E.coli-expressed enzyme was identical to spinach enzyme with a Soret and alpha band a 386 and 573 nm, respectively, and an A{sub 278}/A{sub 386} = 1.9. The addition of nitrite produced the characteristic shifts in the spectrum. The E. coli-expressed NiR catalyzed the methylviologen-dependent reduction of nitrite. The specific activity was 100 U/mg. The K{sub m} determined for nitrite was 0.3 mM which is in agreement with values reported for the enzyme. These results indicate that the E.coli-expressed NiR is fully comparable to spinach NiR in purity, catalytic activity and physical state. Site-directed mutants have been made using PCR to examine structure-function relationships in this enzyme.

  2. The nitrite reductase activity of horse heart carboxymethylated-cytochrome c is modulated by cardiolipin.

    PubMed

    Ascenzi, Paolo; Sbardella, Diego; Sinibaldi, Federica; Santucci, Roberto; Coletta, Massimo

    2016-06-01

    Horse heart carboxymethylated cytc (CM-cytc) displays myoglobin-like properties. Here, the effect of cardiolipin (CL) liposomes on the nitrite reductase activity of ferrous CM-cytc [CM-cytc-Fe(II)], in the presence of sodium dithionite, is reported between pH 5.5 and 7.6, at 20.0 °C. Cytc-Fe(II) displays a very low value of the apparent second-order rate constant for the NO2 (-)-mediated conversion of cytc-Fe(II) to cytc-Fe(II)-NO [k on = (7.3 ± 0.7) × 10(-2) M(-1) s(-1); at pH 7.4], whereas the value of k on for NO2 (-) reduction by CM-cytc-Fe(II) is 1.1 ± 0.2 M(-1) s(-1) (at pH 7.4). CL facilitates the NO2 (-)-mediated nitrosylation of CM-cytc-Fe(II) in a dose-dependent manner, the value of k on for the NO2 (-)-mediated conversion of CL-CM-cytc-Fe(II) to CL-CM-cytc-Fe(II)-NO (5.6 ± 0.6 M(-1) s(-1); at pH 7.4) being slightly higher than that for the NO2 (-)-mediated conversion of CL-cytc-Fe(II) to CL-cytc-Fe(II)-NO (2.6 ± 0.3 M(-1) s(-1); at pH 7.4). The apparent affinity of CL for CM-cytc-Fe(II) is essentially pH independent, the average value of B being (1.3 ± 0.3) × 10(-6) M. In the absence and presence of CL liposomes, the nitrite reductase activity of CM-cytc-Fe(II) increases linearly on lowering pH and the values of the slope of the linear fittings of Log k on versus pH are -1.05 ± 0.07 and -1.03 ± 0.03, respectively, reflecting the involvement of one proton for the formation of the transient ferric form, NO, and OH(-). These results indicate that Met80 carboxymethylation and CL binding cooperate in the stabilization of the highly reactive heme-Fe atom of CL-CM-cytc. PMID:27010463

  3. Evaluation of the impact on food safety of a Lactobacillus coryniformis strain from pickled vegetables with degradation activity against nitrite and other undesirable compounds.

    PubMed

    Fang, Fang; Feng, Tingting; Du, Guocheng; Chen, Jian

    2016-01-01

    Four strains of lactic acid bacteria showing antimicrobial activity against some food-spoilage microorganisms or pathogens, including both Gram-negative and -positive strains, were isolated from naturally fermented pickled vegetables and a traditional cheese product. Among these isolates, Lactobacillus coryniformis strain BBE-H3, characterised previously to be a non-biogenic amine producer, showed a high level of activity in degrading sodium nitrite and exhibited the ability to eliminate ethyl carbamate and one of its precursors, urea. The antimicrobial substance produced by L. coryniformis BBE-H3 was found to be active at an acidic pH range of 4.0-4.5. The antimicrobial activity of this strain decreased differentially after treatment with proteolytic enzymes (pepsin, papain, trypsin and proteinase K), implying this growth inhibitory compound is either a protein or a polypeptide. The results of this study show the suitability of L. coryniformis BBE-H3 as a starter in food manufacturing processes, and demonstrate its potential role in eliminating food origin carcinogens such as sodium nitrite and ethyl carbamate. PMID:26898528

  4. Spinach nitrite reductase. Purification and properties of a siroheme-containing iron-sulfur enzyme.

    PubMed

    Vega, J M; Kamin, H

    1977-02-10

    Ferredoxin-nitrite reductase (EC 1.7.7.1.) from spinach has been purified to homogeneity with a specific activity of 110 units/mg of protein. The enzyme, Mr = 61,000 has 3 iron atoms (of which one is in siroheme) and 2 labile sulfides, i.e. 1 (Fe2-S2) per molecule, with absorption maxima at 276, 386 (Soret), 573 (alpha), and 690 nm, with an E386 of 3.97 X 10(4) M-1-cm-1, and A276/A386 absorptivity ratio of 1.8. Anaerobic addition of dithionite results in the loss of the 690 nm peak and the splitting of the 573 nm absorption band into two broad peaks at 545 and 585 nm. Reduction by dithionite is enhanced by cyanide (Fig. 7) and requires about 3 electron eq per mol of enzyme. With nitrite or hydroxylamine (substrates of the enzyme), cyanide (a competitive inhibitor with respect to nitrite), or sulfite, the 690 nm absorption band of substrate-free enzyme disappears and the absorbance in the Soret and alpha region are altered. The high spin EPR signals disappear (J. M. Vega, H. Kamin, N. R. Orme-Johnson, and W. H. Orme-Johnson, unpublished observations). Titration permits calculation of 1 mol of nitrite bound/mol of enzyme with a Kdiss of 3.2 X 10(-6) M. Dithionite-reduced enzyme also forms complexes with added nitrite, hydroxylamine, or cyanide, characterized by marked alterations in the 573 (alpha) absorption band. THus, substrates or competitive inhibitors can be bound to the oxidized or reduced enzyme forms. CO inhibits nitrite reductase and forms a complex with reduced enzyme (epsilonmax at 395, 543, and 585 nm). Formation or dissociation of the spectrophotometrically detectable CO complex correlates with inhibition or inhibition-reversal of nitrite reduction catalysis. During steady state turnover with dithionite and nitrite, the enzyme forms a complex with added nitrite with absorption difference maxima at 445, 538, and 580 nm with respect to reduced enzyme. When nearly all substrate is depleted the spectrum of a new species appears, indicating that nitrite

  5. Nitrite and Nitrate Concentrations and Metabolism in Breast Milk, Infant Formula, and Parenteral Nutrition

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Jesica A.; Ninnis, Janet R.; Hopper, Andrew O.; Ibrahim, Yomna; Merritt, T. Allen; Wan, Kim-Wah; Power, Gordon G.; Blood, Arlin B.

    2015-01-01

    Dietary nitrate and nitrite are sources of gastric NO, which modulates blood flow, mucus production, and microbial flora. However, the intake and importance of these anions in infants is largely unknown. Nitrate and nitrite levels were measured in breast milk of mothers of preterm and term infants, infant formulas, and parenteral nutrition. Nitrite metabolism in breast milk was measured after freeze-thawing, at different temperatures, varying oxygen tensions, and after inhibition of potential nitrite-metabolizing enzymes. Nitrite concentrations averaged 0.07 ± 0.01 μM in milk of mothers of preterm infants, less than that of term infants (0.13 ± 0.02 μM) (P < .01). Nitrate concentrations averaged 13.6 ± 3.7 μM and 12.7 ± 4.9 μM, respectively. Nitrite and nitrate concentrations in infant formulas varied from undetectable to many-fold more than breast milk. Concentrations in parenteral nutrition were equivalent to or lower than those of breast milk. Freeze-thawing decreased nitrite concentration ∼64%, falling with a half-life of 32 minutes at 37°C. The disappearance of nitrite was oxygen-dependent and prevented by ferricyanide and 3 inhibitors of lactoperoxidase. Nitrite concentrations in breast milk decrease with storage and freeze-thawing, a decline likely mediated by lactoperoxidase. Compared to adults, infants ingest relatively little nitrite and nitrate, which may be of importance in the modulation of blood flow and the bacterial flora of the infant GI tract, especially given the protective effects of swallowed nitrite. PMID:23894175

  6. Nitrogen Removal over Nitrite by Aeration Control in Aerobic Granular Sludge Sequencing Batch Reactors

    PubMed Central

    Lochmatter, Samuel; Maillard, Julien; Holliger, Christof

    2014-01-01

    This study investigated the potential of aeration control for the achievement of N-removal over nitrite with aerobic granular sludge in sequencing batch reactors. N-removal over nitrite requires less COD, which is particularly interesting if COD is the limiting parameter for nutrient removal. The nutrient removal performances for COD, N and P have been analyzed as well as the concentration of nitrite-oxidizing bacteria in the granular sludge. Aeration phase length control combined with intermittent aeration or alternate high-low DO, has proven to be an efficient way to reduce the nitrite-oxidizing bacteria population and hence achieve N-removal over nitrite. N-removal efficiencies of up to 95% were achieved for an influent wastewater with COD:N:P ratios of 20:2.5:1. The total N-removal rate was 0.18 kgN·m−3·d−1. With N-removal over nitrate the N-removal was only 74%. At 20 °C, the nitrite-oxidizing bacteria concentration decreased by over 95% in 60 days and it was possible to switch from N-removal over nitrite to N-removal over nitrate and back again. At 15 °C, the nitrite-oxidizing bacteria concentration decreased too but less, and nitrite oxidation could not be completely suppressed. However, the combination of aeration phase length control and high-low DO was also at 15 °C successful to maintain the nitrite pathway despite the fact that the maximum growth rate of nitrite-oxidizing bacteria at temperatures below 20 °C is in general higher than the one of ammonium-oxidizing bacteria. PMID:25006970

  7. Effects of calcite and magnesite application to a declining Masson pine forest on strongly acidified soil in Southwestern China.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yongmei; Kang, Ronghua; Ma, Xiaoxiao; Qi, Yu; Mulder, Jan; Duan, Lei

    2014-05-15

    Liming of strongly acidified soil under a Masson pine (Pinus massoniana Lamb.) forest was studied through a seven-year field manipulation experiment at Tieshanping, Chongqing in Southwestern China. To distinguish between the individual effects of Ca(2+) and Mg(2+) addition, we separately applied calcite (CaCO3) and magnesite (MgCO3), rather than using dolomite [CaMg(CO3)2]. Both calcite and magnesite additions caused a significant increase in pH and a decrease in dissolved inorganic monomeric aluminium (Ali) concentration of soil water. Ecological recovery included increases of herb biomass (both treatments) and Mg content in Masson pine needles (magnesite treatment only). However, the growth rate of Masson pine did not increase under either treatment, possibly because of nutrient imbalance due to phosphorus (P) deficiency or limited observation period. In China, acid deposition in forest ecosystems commonly coincides with large inputs of atmogenic Ca(2+), both enhancing Mg(2+) leaching. Calcite addition may further decrease the Mg(2+) availability in soil water, thereby exacerbating Mg(2+) deficiency in the acidified forest soils of southern and southwestern China. The effect of anthropogenic acidification of naturally acid forest soils on P availability needs further study.

  8. Effects of calcite and magnesite application to a declining Masson pine forest on strongly acidified soil in Southwestern China.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yongmei; Kang, Ronghua; Ma, Xiaoxiao; Qi, Yu; Mulder, Jan; Duan, Lei

    2014-05-15

    Liming of strongly acidified soil under a Masson pine (Pinus massoniana Lamb.) forest was studied through a seven-year field manipulation experiment at Tieshanping, Chongqing in Southwestern China. To distinguish between the individual effects of Ca(2+) and Mg(2+) addition, we separately applied calcite (CaCO3) and magnesite (MgCO3), rather than using dolomite [CaMg(CO3)2]. Both calcite and magnesite additions caused a significant increase in pH and a decrease in dissolved inorganic monomeric aluminium (Ali) concentration of soil water. Ecological recovery included increases of herb biomass (both treatments) and Mg content in Masson pine needles (magnesite treatment only). However, the growth rate of Masson pine did not increase under either treatment, possibly because of nutrient imbalance due to phosphorus (P) deficiency or limited observation period. In China, acid deposition in forest ecosystems commonly coincides with large inputs of atmogenic Ca(2+), both enhancing Mg(2+) leaching. Calcite addition may further decrease the Mg(2+) availability in soil water, thereby exacerbating Mg(2+) deficiency in the acidified forest soils of southern and southwestern China. The effect of anthropogenic acidification of naturally acid forest soils on P availability needs further study. PMID:24631610

  9. Toluene nitration in irradiated nitric acid and nitrite solution

    SciTech Connect

    Gracy Elias; Bruce J. Mincher; Stephen P. Mezyk; Jim Muller; Leigh R. Martin

    2011-04-01

    The kinetics, mechanisms, and stable products produced for the aryl alkyl mild ortho-para director - toluene, in irradiated nitric acid and neutral nitrite solutions were investigated using ?, and pulse radiolysis. Electron pulse radiolysis was used to determine the bimolecular rate constants for the reaction of toluene with different transient species produced by irradiation. HPLC with UV detection was primarily used to assess the stable reaction products. GC-MS and LC-MS were used to confirm the results from HPLC. Free-radical nitration reaction products were found in irradiated acidic and neutral media. In acidic medium, the ring substitution and side chain substitution and oxidation produced different nitro products. In ring substitution, nitrogen oxide radicals were added mainly to hydroxyl radical-produced cyclohexadienyl radical, and in side chain substitution they were added to the carbon-centered benzyl radical produced by H-atom abstraction. In neutral nitrite toluene solution, radiolytic ring nitration products approached a statistically random distribution, suggesting a free-radical reaction involving addition of the •NO2 radical.

  10. Addition of nitrite enhances the electrochemical defluorination of 2-fluoroaniline.

    PubMed

    Feng, Huajun; Liang, Yuxiang; Guo, Kun; Long, Yuyang; Cong, Yanqing; Shen, Dongsheng

    2015-12-30

    This study introduces a novel approach that uses the interaction of pollutants with added nitrite to produce diazonium salts, which cause in situ self-assembly of the pollutants on carbon electrodes, to improve their 2-fluoroaniline (2-FA) defluorination and removal performance. The 2-FA degradation performance, electrode properties, electrochemical properties and degradation pathway were investigated. The reactor containing NO2(-) achieved a 2-FA removal efficiency of 90.1% and a defluorination efficiency of 38% within 48 h, 1.4 and 2.3 times higher than the corresponding results achieved without NO2(-), respectively. The residual NO2(-) was less than 0.5mg/L in the reactor containing added NO2(-), which would not cause serious secondary pollution. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) results proved that the carbon anode surface was successfully modified with benzene polymer, and electrochemical tests confirmed that the electrochemical activity of the modified anode was enhanced significantly. The C-F bond was weakened by the effect of the positive charge of the benzenediazonium groups, and the high electrochemical activity of the carbon anode enhanced the electrochemical performance of the system to accelerate defluorination. Thus, the present electrical method involving nitrite nitrogen is very promising for the treatment of wastewater containing fluoroaniline compounds.

  11. Evolutionary relationships among ammonia- and nitrite-oxidizing bacteria.

    PubMed Central

    Teske, A; Alm, E; Regan, J M; Toze, S; Rittmann, B E; Stahl, D A

    1994-01-01

    Comparative 16S rRNA sequencing was used to evaluate phylogenetic relationships among selected strains of ammonia- and nitrite-oxidizing bacteria. All characterized strains were shown to be affiliated with the proteobacteria. The study extended recent 16S rRNA-based studies of phylogenetic diversity among nitrifiers by the comparison of eight strains of the genus Nitrobacter and representatives of the genera Nitrospira and Nitrospina. The later genera were shown to be affiliated with the delta subdivision of the proteobacteria but did not share a specific relationship to each other or to other members of the delta subdivision. All characterized Nitrobacter strains constituted a closely related assemblage within the alpha subdivision of the proteobacteria. As previously observed, all ammonia-oxidizing genera except Nitrosococcus oceanus constitute a monophyletic assemblage within the beta subdivision of the proteobacteria. Errors in the 16S rRNA sequences for two strains previously deposited in the databases by other investigators (Nitrosolobus multiformis C-71 and Nitrospira briensis C-128) were corrected. Consideration of physiology and phylogenetic distribution suggested that nitrite-oxidizing bacteria of the alpha and gamma subdivisions are derived from immediate photosynthetic ancestry. Each nitrifier retains the general structural features of the specific ancestor's photosynthetic membrane complex. Thus, the nitrifiers, as a group, apparently are not derived from an ancestral nitrifying phenotype. PMID:7961414

  12. Source and sink of nitrite in heavily populated European River

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raimonet, M.; Viollier, E.; Culoma, L.; Laverman, A.

    2012-12-01

    The occurrence of nitrite (NO2-) accumulation is a major environmental issue, as NO2- is highly toxic to living organisms, even at low concentrations. Even if NO2- is generally quickly oxidized in the environment, NO2- accumulation has been reported in various terrestrial and aquatic environments. The Seine River - that receive water effluents from one of the most heavily populated system in Europe - is characterized by NO2- accumulation downstream of Paris city. The main hypotheses to explain the persistence of NO2- are high NO2- concentrations in outlets of the biggest European waste water treatment plant and the low growth rate of nitrifying bacteria - and especially, nitrite oxidizing bacteria - compared to river water residence time. However, the role of benthic processes and sediment resuspension on NO2- dynamics has not been investigated in the river, where fluvial transport generates episodic and frequent resuspension. In this study, we quantified reaction rates of processes involving NO2- production and/or consumption in surface water and sediments, as well as benthic exchanges at the sediment-water interface, under oxic and anoxic conditions. This work allowed estimating the contribution of the Seine River to NO2- dynamics and the response of riverine bacteria to high NO2- loads.

  13. Acrylic microspheres-based optosensor for visual detection of nitrite.

    PubMed

    Noor, Nur Syarmim Mohamed; Tan, Ling Ling; Heng, Lee Yook; Chong, Kwok Feng; Tajuddin, Saiful Nizam

    2016-09-15

    A new optosensor for visual quantitation of nitrite (NO2(-)) ion has been fabricated by physically immobilizing Safranine O (SO) reagent onto a self-adhesive poly(n-butyl acrylate) [poly(nBA)] microspheres matrix, which was synthesized via facile microemulsion UV lithography technique. Evaluation and optimization of the optical NO2(-) ion sensor was performed with a fiber optic reflectance spectrophotometer. Scanning electron micrograph showed well-shaped and smooth spherical morphology of the poly(nBA) microspheres with a narrow particles size distribution from 0.6 μm up to 1.8 μm. The uniform size distribution of the acrylic microspheres promoted homogeneity of the immobilized SO reagent molecules on the microspheres' surfaces, thereby enhanced the sensing response reproducibility (<5% RSD) with a linear range obtained from 10 to 100 ppm NO2(-) ion. The micro-sized acrylic immobilization matrix demonstrated no significant barrier for diffusion of reactant and product, and served as a good solid state ion transport medium for reflectometric nitrite determination in food samples. PMID:27080889

  14. Sugar-driven prebiotic synthesis of ammonia from nitrite.

    PubMed

    Weber, Arthur L

    2010-06-01

    Reaction of 3-5 carbon sugars, glycolaldehyde, and alpha-ketoaldehydes with nitrite under mild anaerobic aqueous conditions yielded ammonia, an essential substrate for the synthesis of nitrogen-containing molecules during abiogenesis. Under the same conditions, ammonia synthesis was not driven by formaldehyde, glyoxylate, 2-deoxyribose, and glucose, a result indicating that the reduction process requires an organic reductant containing either an accessible alpha-hydroxycarbonyl group or an alpha-dicarbonyl group. Small amounts of aqueous Fe(+3) catalyzed the sugar-driven synthesis of ammonia. The glyceraldehyde concentration dependence of ammonia synthesis, and control studies of ammonia's reaction with glyceraldehyde, indicated that ammonia formation is accompanied by incorporation of part of the synthesized ammonia into sugar-derived organic products. The ability of sugars to drive the synthesis of ammonia is considered important to abiogenesis because it provides a way to generate photochemically unstable ammonia at sites of sugar-based origin-of-life processes from nitrite, a plausible prebiotic nitrogen species. PMID:20213158

  15. Method 353.4 Determination of Nitrate and Nitrite in Estuarine and Coastal Waters by Gas Segmented Continuous Flow Colorimetric Analysis

    EPA Science Inventory

    This method provides a procedure for determining nitrate and nitrite concentrations in estuarine and coastal waters. Nitrate is reduced to nitrite by cadmium,1-3 and the resulting nitrite determined by formation of an azo dye.4-6

  16. A scalable chemical route to soluble acidified graphitic carbon nitride: an ideal precursor for isolated ultrathin g-C3N4 nanosheets.

    PubMed

    Du, Xiaorui; Zou, Guojun; Wang, Zhonghao; Wang, Xiaolai

    2015-05-21

    We propose an efficient method to synthesize large-scale soluble acidified graphitic carbon nitride (g-C3N4). The as-prepared material exhibits the characteristics of a poly-ammonium salt and is soluble in several solvents with good dissolution-recrystallization reversible equilibrium. The pH value- and temperature-dependent solubility of the acidified g-C3N4 facilitates its separation and purification. After dissolution, acidified g-C3N4 forms isolated ultrathin nanosheets, making it an ideal precursor for large quantities of g-C3N4 nanosheets. This study raises the possibility of liquid assembly for g-C3N4 nanosheets based composite materials, expanding the functionalization and application of g-C3N4. PMID:25913280

  17. Modelling Cometary Sodium Tails

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Birkett, K. S.; Jones, G. H.; Coates, A. J.

    2013-12-01

    Neutral sodium is readily observed in cometary spectra and can be seen to form its own distinct tail at high activity comets. Solar radiation pressure accelerates the sodium atoms antisunward and, as strong sodium absorption lines are present in the solar spectrum, the magnitude of this force is dependent upon the Doppler shift of the incident solar radiation. Therefore the heliocentric velocity of the sodium atom directly determines its acceleration. This can produce unique effects, such as a stagnation region. Sodium is relatively easy to detect and so can potentially be used to trace mechanisms in the coma that are otherwise difficult to observe. The source of neutral sodium in the tail currently remains unknown. We have therefore developed a new, three dimensional Monte-Carlo model of neutral cometary sodium in order to facilitate testing of different source production functions. It includes weightings due to neutral sodium lifetime, variation of cometary sodium emission due to Fraunhofer absorption lines and solar flux variation with heliocentric distance. The Swings and Greenstein effects, which can have particularly dramatic effects in near-Sun comets, are also considered comprehensively. Preliminary results from this model are presented, focusing on a comparison of predictions of the neutral sodium tail of Comet C/2012 S1 (ISON) with initial observations.

  18. 40 CFR 721.4740 - Alkali metal nitrites.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... periodic classification of chemical elements) lithium, sodium, potassium, rubidium, cesium, and francium...) of this section. (2) The significant new use is: Use as an ingredient in metalworking fluids (as defined in 40 CFR 721.3) containing amines. (b)...

  19. Mutagenicity of soy sauce treated with nitrite in the presence of ethanol or alcoholic beverages.

    PubMed

    Higashimoto, M; Yamamoto, T; Kinouchi, T; Handa, Y; Matsumoto, H; Ohnishi, Y

    1995-12-01

    The mutagenicity induced by soy sauce after reaction with 50 mM nitrite at pH 3, 37 degrees C, for 60 min in the presence of 1.25-10% ethanol was reduced in proportion to the ethanol concentration. The mutagenicity of soy sauce treated with nitrite was also reduced in the presence of commercial alcoholic beverages, Japanese sake, wine, 'shochu', whiskey and brandy, but not beer, in proportion to the concentration. The mutagenicity of nitrite-treated tyramine, which is a major precursor of a mutagen in soy sauce treated with nitrite, was strongly reduced in the presence of ethanol, n-propanol or isopropanol and more strongly reduced in the presence of methanol, but was increased twofold in the presence of the sugars glucose or sucrose. The reduction of the mutagenicity of nitrite-treated tyramine required simultaneous treatment of tyramine with ethanol and nitrite. The mutagenicity of tyramine treated with nitrite was clearly reduced in the presence of shochu and whiskey, similarly to ethanol. Analysis by high-performance liquid chromatography revealed that the reduction of the mutagenicity of nitrite-treated tyramine in the presence of ethanol resulted from the reduced production of mutagenic 3-diazotyramine from tyramine.

  20. Effects of Nitrite on Development of Embryos and Early Larval Stages of the Zebrafish (Danio rerio)

    PubMed Central

    Simmons, Alison E.; Karimi, Ida; Talwar, Mayank

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Epidemiological studies suggest that high nitrate levels in food and water may cause birth defects or spontaneous abortions in humans. Experimental mammalian studies show that high nitrite levels adversely affect reproductive outcomes, but have not shown congenital malformations. Consequently, the teratogenic potential of nitrite is unclear. In this study, the effects of nitrite on development of zebrafish embryos and early larval stages were investigated. Eggs were exposed to ethanol (a known teratogen), nitrite, or nitrate for 24 or 96 hours, and larvae examined at 120 hours. Sublethal exposure to 300 mM ethanol for 24 hours caused severe pericardial and yolk sac edema, craniofacial and axial malformations, and swim bladder noninflation. The 96 hour LC50 for nitrite was 411 mg/L. Less severe edema, craniofacial (but not axial) malformations, swim bladder noninflation, and immobility were observed after sublethal exposure to nitrite between 10 and 300 mg/L for 96 hours. Exposure to nitrite for 24 hours at concentrations as high as 2000 mg/L was not lethal. Only axial malformations and swim bladder noninflation were observed at 1500 mg/L. The results demonstrate that sublethal nitrite concentrations cause developmental defects. The type and magnitude of these defects differed after 24 and 96 hours of exposure. PMID:22823424