Science.gov

Sample records for acidified sodium nitrite

  1. In Vitro Killing of Mycobacterium ulcerans by Acidified Nitrite

    PubMed Central

    Phillips, R.; Kuijper, S.; Benjamin, N.; Wansbrough-Jones, M.; Wilks, M.; Kolk, A. H. J.

    2004-01-01

    Mycobacterium ulcerans, which causes Buruli ulcer, was exposed to acidified nitrite or to acid alone for 10 or 20 min. Killing was rapid, and viable counts were reduced below detectable limits within 10 min of exposure to 40 mM acidified nitrite. M. ulcerans is highly susceptible to acidified nitrite in vitro. PMID:15273132

  2. Stress Response of Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhimurium to Acidified Nitrite

    PubMed Central

    Mühlig, Anna; Behr, Jürgen; Scherer, Siegfried

    2014-01-01

    The antimicrobial action of the curing agent sodium nitrite (NaNO2), which is added as a preservative to raw meat products, depends on its conversion to nitric oxide and other reactive nitrogen species under acidic conditions. In this study, we used RNA sequencing to analyze the acidified-NaNO2 shock and adaptive responses of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium, a frequent contaminant in raw meat, considering parameters relevant for the production of raw-cured sausages. Upon a 10-min exposure to 150 mg/liter NaNO2 in LB (pH 5.5) acidified with lactic acid, genes involved in nitrosative-stress protection, together with several other stress-related genes, were induced. In contrast, genes involved in translation, transcription, replication, and motility were downregulated. The induction of stress tolerance and the reduction of cell proliferation obviously promote survival under harsh acidified-NaNO2 stress. The subsequent adaptive response was characterized by upregulation of NsrR-regulated genes and iron uptake systems and by downregulation of genes involved in anaerobic respiratory pathways. Strikingly, amino acid decarboxylase systems, which contribute to acid tolerance, displayed increased transcript levels in response to acidified NaNO2. The induction of systems known to be involved in acid resistance indicates a nitrite-mediated increase in the level of acid stress. Deletion of cadA, which encodes lysine decarboxylase, resulted in increased sensitivity to acidified NaNO2. Intracellular pH measurements using a pH-sensitive green fluorescent protein (GFP) variant showed that the cytoplasmic pH of S. Typhimurium in LB medium (pH 5.5) is decreased upon the addition of NaNO2. This study provides the first evidence that intracellular acidification is an additional antibacterial mode of action of acidified NaNO2. PMID:25107963

  3. Disinfection of Bacillus spores with acidified nitrite.

    PubMed

    Szabo, Jeffrey G; Adcock, Noreen J; Rice, Eugene W

    2014-10-01

    Disinfecting water generated from a bioterrorism contamination event will require large amounts of disinfectant since the volume of water flushed from a drinking water distribution system or wash water collected from a contaminated outdoor area can accumulate quickly. Commonly used disinfectants may be unavailable in the necessary amounts, so evaluation of alternative disinfectants is needed. This study focuses on disinfection of Bacillus spores in water using acidified nitrite. The effect of varying pH (2 or 3), temperature (5°C or 24°C), nitrite concentration (0.01 or 0.1M), buffer (Butterfields or Phosphate Buffered Saline, PBS) and Bacillus species (B. globigii and B. anthracis Sterne) was evaluated. B. globigii was more resistant to disinfection under all water quality conditions. Disinfection was more effective for B. globigii and B. anthracis Sterne at 0.1M nitrite, pH 2, and 24°C. Disinfection of B. anthracis Sterne was enhanced in low ionic strength Butterfields buffer compared to PBS. PMID:25065806

  4. 21 CFR 181.34 - Sodium nitrite and potassium nitrite.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Sodium nitrite and potassium nitrite. 181.34... nitrite and potassium nitrite. Sodium nitrite and potassium nitrite are subject to prior sanctions issued... without sodium or potassium nitrate, in the curing of red meat and poultry products....

  5. 21 CFR 181.34 - Sodium nitrite and potassium nitrite.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Sodium nitrite and potassium nitrite. 181.34...-Sanctioned Food Ingredients § 181.34 Sodium nitrite and potassium nitrite. Sodium nitrite and potassium... fixatives and preservative agents, with or without sodium or potassium nitrate, in the curing of red...

  6. 21 CFR 181.34 - Sodium nitrite and potassium nitrite.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Sodium nitrite and potassium nitrite. 181.34...-Sanctioned Food Ingredients § 181.34 Sodium nitrite and potassium nitrite. Sodium nitrite and potassium... fixatives and preservative agents, with or without sodium or potassium nitrate, in the curing of red...

  7. 21 CFR 181.34 - Sodium nitrite and potassium nitrite.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Sodium nitrite and potassium nitrite. 181.34...-Sanctioned Food Ingredients § 181.34 Sodium nitrite and potassium nitrite. Sodium nitrite and potassium... fixatives and preservative agents, with or without sodium or potassium nitrate, in the curing of red...

  8. 21 CFR 181.34 - Sodium nitrite and potassium nitrite.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Sodium nitrite and potassium nitrite. 181.34...-Sanctioned Food Ingredients § 181.34 Sodium nitrite and potassium nitrite. Sodium nitrite and potassium... fixatives and preservative agents, with or without sodium or potassium nitrate, in the curing of red...

  9. 21 CFR 573.700 - Sodium nitrite.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Sodium nitrite. 573.700 Section 573.700 Food and... Listing § 573.700 Sodium nitrite. Sodium nitrite may be safely used in canned pet food containing meat and... byproducts so that the level of sodium nitrite does not exceed 20 parts per million. (b) To assure safe...

  10. 21 CFR 573.700 - Sodium nitrite.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Sodium nitrite. 573.700 Section 573.700 Food and... Listing § 573.700 Sodium nitrite. Sodium nitrite may be safely used in canned pet food containing meat and... byproducts so that the level of sodium nitrite does not exceed 20 parts per million. (b) To assure safe...

  11. 21 CFR 573.700 - Sodium nitrite.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Sodium nitrite. 573.700 Section 573.700 Food and... Listing § 573.700 Sodium nitrite. Sodium nitrite may be safely used in canned pet food containing meat and... byproducts so that the level of sodium nitrite does not exceed 20 parts per million. (b) To assure safe...

  12. Enhancing toxic metal removal from acidified sludge with nitrite addition.

    PubMed

    Du, Fangzhou; Freguia, Stefano; Yuan, Zhiguo; Keller, Jürg; Pikaar, Ilje

    2015-05-19

    The production of sludge (biosolids) during wastewater treatment is a major issue for water utilities. A main issue limiting its beneficial reuse on agricultural lands is the presence of toxic metals. The currently used metal reduction technologies achieve insufficient removal of metals that are bound to the organic fraction of the sludge. In this study, we propose and demonstrate a novel method that involves the addition of nitrite during sludge acidification to enhance metal removal. Using waste activated sludge collected from three full-scale wastewater treatment plants, we found that acidification to pH 2.0 achieved good Zn solubilization of around 70%, but only 3-7% of Cu was being dissolved. Nitrite addition to the acidified sludge at a concentration of 20 mg NO2(-)-N/L (equals to 19.2 mg HNO2-N/L), substantially enhanced Cu removal to 45-64%, while Zn removal was also increased to over 81%. Metal distribution analysis using sequential chemical extraction revealed that the improvement of Cu and Zn removal was mainly due to the release of the organically bound metal fraction. We hypothesize that free nitrous acid (HNO2, FNA) may assist in the (partial) disruption of extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) and the subsequent release and solubilization of fixed metals. PMID:25872418

  13. 21 CFR 172.175 - Sodium nitrite.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Sodium nitrite. 172.175 Section 172.175 Food and... Preservatives § 172.175 Sodium nitrite. The food additive sodium nitrite may be safely used in or on specified... follows: (1) As a color fixative in smoked cured tunafish products so that the level of sodium...

  14. 21 CFR 172.175 - Sodium nitrite.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Sodium nitrite. 172.175 Section 172.175 Food and... Preservatives § 172.175 Sodium nitrite. The food additive sodium nitrite may be safely used in or on specified... follows: (1) As a color fixative in smoked cured tunafish products so that the level of sodium...

  15. 21 CFR 172.175 - Sodium nitrite.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Sodium nitrite. 172.175 Section 172.175 Food and... Preservatives § 172.175 Sodium nitrite. The food additive sodium nitrite may be safely used in or on specified... follows: (1) As a color fixative in smoked cured tunafish products so that the level of sodium...

  16. 21 CFR 172.175 - Sodium nitrite.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Sodium nitrite. 172.175 Section 172.175 Food and... Preservatives § 172.175 Sodium nitrite. The food additive sodium nitrite may be safely used in or on specified... follows: (1) As a color fixative in smoked cured tunafish products so that the level of sodium...

  17. 21 CFR 172.175 - Sodium nitrite.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Sodium nitrite. 172.175 Section 172.175 Food and... PERMITTED FOR DIRECT ADDITION TO FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION Food Preservatives § 172.175 Sodium nitrite. The food additive sodium nitrite may be safely used in or on specified foods in accordance with...

  18. Acidified nitrite inhibits proliferation of Listeria monocytogenes - Transcriptional analysis of a preservation method.

    PubMed

    Müller-Herbst, Stefanie; Wüstner, Stefanie; Kabisch, Jan; Pichner, Rohtraud; Scherer, Siegfried

    2016-06-01

    Sodium nitrite (NaNO2) is added as a preservative during raw meat processing such as raw sausage production to inhibit growth of pathogenic bacteria. In the present study it was shown in challenge assays that the addition of sodium nitrite indeed inhibited growth and survival of Listeria monocytogenes in short-ripened spreadable raw sausages. Furthermore, in vitro growth analyses were performed, which took into account combinations of various parameters of the raw sausage ripening process like temperature, oxygen availability, pH, NaCl concentration, and absence or presence of NaNO2. Data based on 300 growth conditions revealed that the inhibitory effect of nitrite was most prominent in combination with acidification, a combination that is also achieved during short-ripened spreadable raw sausage production. At pH6.0 and below, L. monocytogenes was unable to replicate in the presence of 200mg/l NaNO2. During the adaptation of L. monocytogenes to acidified nitrite stress (pH6.0, 200mg/l NaNO2) in comparison to acid exposure only (pH6.0, 0mg/l NaNO2), a massive transcriptional adaptation was observed using microarray analyses. In total, 202 genes were up-regulated and 204 genes were down-regulated. In accordance with growth inhibition, a down-regulation of genes encoding for proteins which are involved in central cellular processes, like cell wall/membrane/envelope biogenesis, translation and ribosomal structure and biogenesis, transcription, and replication, recombination and repair, was observed. Among the up-regulated genes the most prominent group belonged to poorly characterized genes. A considerable fraction of the up-regulated genes has been shown previously to be up-regulated intracellularly in macrophages, after exposure to acid shock or to be part of the SigB regulon. These data indicate that the adaptation to acidified nitrite partly overlaps with the adaptation to stress conditions being present during host colonization. PMID:27017279

  19. Inhibition Of Washed Sludge With Sodium Nitrite

    SciTech Connect

    Congdon, J. W.; Lozier, J. S.

    2012-09-25

    This report describes the results of electrochemical tests used to determine the relationship between the concentration of the aggressive anions in washed sludge and the minimum effective inhibitor concentration. Sodium nitrate was added as the inhibitor because of its compatibility with the DWPF process. A minimum of 0.05M nitrite is required to inhibit the washed sludge simulant solution used in this study. When the worst case compositions and safety margins are considered, it is expected that a minimum operating limit of nearly 0.1M nitrite will be specified. The validity of this limit is dependent on the accuracy of the concentrations and solubility splits previously reported. Sodium nitrite additions to obtain 0.1M nitrite concentrations in washed sludge will necessitate the additional washing of washed precipitate in order to decrease its sodium nitrite inhibitor requirements sufficiently to remain below the sodium limits in the feed to the DWPF. Nitrite will be the controlling anion in "fresh" washed sludge unless the soluble chloride concentration is about ten times higher than predicted by the solubility splits. Inhibition of "aged" washed sludge will not be a problem unless significant chloride dissolution occurs during storage. It will be very important tomonitor the composition of washed sludge during processing and storage.

  20. 21 CFR 573.700 - Sodium nitrite.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Sodium nitrite. 573.700 Section 573.700 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS FOOD ADDITIVES PERMITTED IN FEED AND DRINKING WATER OF ANIMALS Food...

  1. 21 CFR 573.700 - Sodium nitrite.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Sodium nitrite. 573.700 Section 573.700 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS FOOD ADDITIVES PERMITTED IN FEED AND DRINKING WATER OF ANIMALS Food...

  2. Severe Methemoglobinemia due to Sodium Nitrite Poisoning

    PubMed Central

    Hayakawa, Mineji; Gando, Satoshi

    2016-01-01

    Case. We report a case of severe methemoglobinemia due to sodium nitrite poisoning. A 28-year-old man was brought to our emergency department because of transient loss of consciousness and cyanosis. He was immediately intubated and ventilated with 100% oxygen. A blood test revealed a methemoglobin level of 92.5%. Outcome. We treated the patient with gastric lavage, activated charcoal, and methylene blue (2 mg/kg) administered intravenously. Soon after receiving methylene blue, his cyanosis resolved and the methemoglobin level began to decrease. After relocation to the intensive care unit, his consciousness improved and he could recall ingesting approximately 15 g sodium nitrite about 1 hour before he was brought to our hospital. The patient was discharged on day 7 without neurologic impairment. Conclusion. Severe methemoglobinemia may be fatal. Therefore, accurate diagnosis of methemoglobinemia is very important so that treatment can be started as soon as possible. PMID:27563472

  3. Severe Methemoglobinemia due to Sodium Nitrite Poisoning.

    PubMed

    Katabami, Kenichi; Hayakawa, Mineji; Gando, Satoshi

    2016-01-01

    Case. We report a case of severe methemoglobinemia due to sodium nitrite poisoning. A 28-year-old man was brought to our emergency department because of transient loss of consciousness and cyanosis. He was immediately intubated and ventilated with 100% oxygen. A blood test revealed a methemoglobin level of 92.5%. Outcome. We treated the patient with gastric lavage, activated charcoal, and methylene blue (2 mg/kg) administered intravenously. Soon after receiving methylene blue, his cyanosis resolved and the methemoglobin level began to decrease. After relocation to the intensive care unit, his consciousness improved and he could recall ingesting approximately 15 g sodium nitrite about 1 hour before he was brought to our hospital. The patient was discharged on day 7 without neurologic impairment. Conclusion. Severe methemoglobinemia may be fatal. Therefore, accurate diagnosis of methemoglobinemia is very important so that treatment can be started as soon as possible. PMID:27563472

  4. Substitution of Oxides of Nitrogen for Sodium Nitrite

    SciTech Connect

    Yeager, C.J.

    2001-08-22

    The purpose of this report is to discuss the chemistry of nitrous acid, the Savannah River Plant application of nitrogen, environmental effects, and outline a development program for nitrogen replacement of sodium nitrite.

  5. Acidified sodium chlorite as an alternative to chlorine for elimination of Salmonella on alfalfa seeds

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The disadvantage associated with the use of chlorine for food processing and water treatment had been documented previously. This study was conducted to determine if acidified sodium chlorite (ASC) could be used to replace calcium hypochlorite [Ca(OCl)2] for disinfection of alfalfa seeds. Seeds co...

  6. Susceptibility of Clostridium difficile to the food preservatives sodium nitrite, sodium nitrate and sodium metabisulphite.

    PubMed

    Lim, Su-Chen; Foster, Niki F; Riley, Thomas V

    2016-02-01

    Clostridium difficile is an important enteric pathogen of humans and food animals. Recently it has been isolated from retail foods with prevalences up to 42%, prompting concern that contaminated foods may be one of the reasons for increased community-acquired C. difficile infection (CA-CDI). A number of studies have examined the prevalence of C. difficile in raw meats and fresh vegetables; however, fewer studies have examined the prevalence of C. difficile in ready-to-eat meat. The aim of this study was to investigate the in vitro susceptibility of 11 C. difficile isolates of food animal and retail food origins to food preservatives commonly used in ready-to-eat meats. The broth microdilution method was used to determine the minimum inhibitory concentrations (MIC) and minimum bactericidal concentrations (MBC) for sodium nitrite, sodium nitrate and sodium metabisulphite against C. difficile. Checkerboard assays were used to investigate the combined effect of sodium nitrite and sodium nitrate, commonly used in combination in meats. Modal MIC values for sodium nitrite, sodium nitrate and sodium metabisulphite were 250 μg/ml, >4000 μg/ml and 1000 μg/ml, respectively. No bactericidal activity was observed for all three food preservatives. The checkerboard assays showed indifferent interaction between sodium nitrite and sodium nitrate. This study demonstrated that C. difficile can survive in the presence of food preservatives at concentrations higher than the current maximum permitted levels allowed in ready-to-eat meats. The possibility of retail ready-to-eat meats contaminated with C. difficile acting as a source of CDI needs to be investigated. PMID:26700884

  7. 21 CFR 172.177 - Sodium nitrite used in processing smoked chub.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Sodium nitrite used in processing smoked chub. 172... FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION Food Preservatives § 172.177 Sodium nitrite used in processing smoked chub. The food additive sodium nitrite may be safely used in combination with salt (NaCl) to aid...

  8. Effect of sodium ascorbate and sodium nitrite on protein and lipid oxidation in dry fermented sausages.

    PubMed

    Berardo, A; De Maere, H; Stavropoulou, D A; Rysman, T; Leroy, F; De Smet, S

    2016-11-01

    The effects of sodium nitrite and ascorbate on lipid and protein oxidation were studied during the ripening process of dry fermented sausages. Samples were taken at day 0, 2, 8, 14, 21 and 28 of ripening to assess lipid (malondialdehyde) and protein (carbonyls and sulfhydryl groups) oxidation. Sodium ascorbate and nitrite were separately able to reduce the formation of malondialdehyde. Their combined addition resulted in higher amounts of carbonyl compounds compared to their separate addition or the treatment without any of both compounds. Moreover, sodium nitrite limited the formation of γ-glutamic semialdehyde whereas sodium ascorbate showed a pro-oxidant effect. A loss of thiol groups was observed during ripening, which was not affected by the use of sodium ascorbate nor sodium nitrite. In conclusion, sodium nitrite and ascorbate affected protein and lipid oxidation in different manners. The possible pro-oxidant effect of their combined addition on carbonyl formation might influence the technological and sensory properties of these products. PMID:27424306

  9. [Role of sodium nitrite in histamine urticaria of dietary origin].

    PubMed

    Moneret-Vautrin, D A; Einhorn, C; Tisserand, J

    1980-01-01

    Although genuine gastro-intestinal allergy is sought as the cause of chronic urticaria or repeated vaso-motor headaches, a non-allergic intolerance of one or more ingested substances, additives to foodstuffs (colourants and conserving agents) are likely to be implicated. Dietary histories from such patients often reveal heavy consumption of charcuterie. Oral provocation tests, performed using additives and placebo, can reproduce symptoms reliably. The substance most frequently incriminated is sodium nitrite (E 250): out of 76 tests, 4 were positive and 4 doubtful. In these cases complete avoidance of E 250 led to significant improvement or cure. We discuss various hypotheses on the harmful effects of sodium nitrite, such as denaturation of histamine-binding SH-group rich mucoproteins, direct toxicity on microvilli or inhibition of intestinal histaminase. PMID:7258912

  10. Anaerobic killing of mucoid Pseudomonas aeruginosa by acidified nitrite derivatives under cystic fibrosis airway conditions.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Sang Sun; Coakley, Ray; Lau, Gee W; Lymar, Sergei V; Gaston, Benjamin; Karabulut, Ahmet C; Hennigan, Robert F; Hwang, Sung-Hei; Buettner, Garry; Schurr, Michael J; Mortensen, Joel E; Burns, Jane L; Speert, David; Boucher, Richard C; Hassett, Daniel J

    2006-02-01

    Mucoid, mucA mutant Pseudomonas aeruginosa cause chronic lung infections in cystic fibrosis (CF) patients and are refractory to phagocytosis and antibiotics. Here we show that mucoid bacteria perish during anaerobic exposure to 15 mM nitrite (NO2) at pH 6.5, which mimics CF airway mucus. Killing required a pH lower than 7, implicating formation of nitrous acid (HNO2) and NO, that adds NO equivalents to cellular molecules. Eighty-seven percent of CF isolates possessed mucA mutations and were killed by HNO2 (3-log reduction in 4 days). Furthermore, antibiotic-resistant strains determined were also equally sensitive to HNO2. More importantly, HNO2 killed mucoid bacteria (a) in anaerobic biofilms; (b) in vitro in ultrasupernatants of airway secretions derived from explanted CF patient lungs; and (c) in mouse lungs in vivo in a pH-dependent fashion, with no organisms remaining after daily exposure to HNO2 for 16 days. HNO2 at these levels of acidity and NO2 also had no adverse effects on cultured human airway epithelia in vitro. In summary, selective killing by HNO2 may provide novel insights into the important clinical goal of eradicating mucoid P. aeruginosa from the CF airways. PMID:16440061

  11. Anaerobic killing of mucoid Pseudomonas aeruginosa by acidified nitrite derivatives under cystic fibrosis airway conditions

    PubMed Central

    Yoon, Sang Sun; Coakley, Ray; Lau, Gee W.; Lymar, Sergei V.; Gaston, Benjamin; Karabulut, Ahmet C.; Hennigan, Robert F.; Hwang, Sung-Hei; Buettner, Garry; Schurr, Michael J.; Mortensen, Joel E.; Burns, Jane L.; Speert, David; Boucher, Richard C.; Hassett, Daniel J.

    2006-01-01

    Mucoid, mucA mutant Pseudomonas aeruginosa cause chronic lung infections in cystic fibrosis (CF) patients and are refractory to phagocytosis and antibiotics. Here we show that mucoid bacteria perish during anaerobic exposure to 15 mM nitrite (NO2–) at pH 6.5, which mimics CF airway mucus. Killing required a pH lower than 7, implicating formation of nitrous acid (HNO2) and NO, that adds NO equivalents to cellular molecules. Eighty-seven percent of CF isolates possessed mucA mutations and were killed by HNO2 (3-log reduction in 4 days). Furthermore, antibiotic-resistant strains determined were also equally sensitive to HNO2. More importantly, HNO2 killed mucoid bacteria (a) in anaerobic biofilms; (b) in vitro in ultrasupernatants of airway secretions derived from explanted CF patient lungs; and (c) in mouse lungs in vivo in a pH-dependent fashion, with no organisms remaining after daily exposure to HNO2 for 16 days. HNO2 at these levels of acidity and NO2– also had no adverse effects on cultured human airway epithelia in vitro. In summary, selective killing by HNO2 may provide novel insights into the important clinical goal of eradicating mucoid P. aeruginosa from the CF airways. PMID:16440061

  12. Transdermally administered nitric oxide by application of acidified nitrite increases blood flow in rat epigastric island skin flaps.

    PubMed

    Gribbe, Orjan; Gustafsson, Lars E; Wiklund, N Peter

    2008-01-01

    Surgical flaps are commonly used in the reconstruction of tissue defects after tumour surgery and trauma. Flap failure continues to be a clinical problem and the underlying causes are not fully understood. In the present study a system that generates nitric oxide (NO) in a non-enzymatic fashion was created through the acidification with vitamin C of a cream containing increasing concentrations (0.125%, 0.25%, 0.5%, 1.25% and 2.5%) of nitrite (NO(2)(-)). The cream was applied for 30 min to a modified epigastric island skin flap in the rat. Blood flow in the supplying artery was measured by transit-time ultrasound flowmetry throughout the experiment and superficial skin blood flow was measured by laser Doppler perfusion imaging before and after treatment. Mean arterial blood pressure was also monitored. NO and the gas nitrogen dioxide (NO(2)), which is formed when NO reacts with atmospheric oxygen, were measured above the cream using chemiluminescence. In flaps treated with the NO generating cream, a concentration-dependent increase in blood flow in the supplying artery and flap skin of up to 130% was observed. Cream base alone or cream base acidified with vitamin C had no effect on blood flow. Also, concentration-dependent formation of both NO and NO(2) was seen. NO increases both supplying artery blood flow and superficial cutaneous blood flow in an epigastric island skin flap model in the rat indicating that NO is of importance in flap physiology and possibly also for flap survival. PMID:17976572

  13. Modeling the Impact of Ingoing Sodium Nitrite, Sodium Ascorbate, and Residual Nitrite Concentrations on Growth Parameters of Listeria monocytogenes in Cooked, Cured Pork Sausage.

    PubMed

    King, Amanda M; Glass, Kathleen A; Milkowski, Andrew L; Seman, Dennis L; Sindelar, Jeffrey J

    2016-02-01

    Sodium nitrite has been identified as a key antimicrobial ingredient to control pathogens in ready-to-eat (RTE) meat and poultry products, including Listeria monocytogenes. This study was designed to more clearly elucidate the relationship between chemical factors (ingoing nitrite, ascorbate, and residual nitrite) and L. monocytogenes growth in RTE meats. Treatments of cooked, cured pork sausage (65% moisture, 1.8% salt, pH 6.6, and water activity 0.98) were based on response surface methodology with ingoing nitrite and ascorbate concentrations as the two main factors. Concentrations of nitrite and ascorbate, including star points, ranged from 0 to 352 and 0 to 643 ppm, respectively. At one of two time points after manufacturing (days 0 and 28), half of each treatment was surface inoculated to target 3 log CFU/g of a five-strain L. monocytogenes cocktail, vacuum packaged, and stored at 7°C for up to 4 weeks. Growth of L. monocytogenes was measured twice per week, and enumerations were used to estimate lag time and growth rates for each treatment. Residual nitrite concentrations were measured on days 0, 4, 7, 14, 21, and 28, and nitrite depletion rate was estimated by using first-order kinetics. The response surface methodology was used to model L. monocytogenes lag time and growth rate based on ingoing nitrite, ascorbate, and the residual nitrite remaining at the point of inoculation. Modeling results showed that lag time was impacted by residual nitrite concentration remaining at inoculation, as well as the squared term of ingoing nitrite, whereas growth rate was affected by ingoing nitrite concentration but not by the remaining residual nitrite at the point of inoculation. Residual nitrite depletion rate was dependent upon ingoing nitrite concentration and was only slightly affected by ascorbate concentration. This study confirmed that ingoing nitrite concentration influences L. monocytogenes growth in RTE products, yet residual nitrite concentration contributes

  14. Pharmacokinetics of sodium nitrite-induced methemoglobinemia in the rat.

    PubMed

    Kohn, Michael C; Melnick, Ronald L; Ye, Frank; Portier, Christopher J

    2002-06-01

    A biologically based mathematical model was created to characterize time and dose-dependent relationships between exposure to nitrite and induction of methemoglobinemia. The model includes mass action equations for processes known to occur: oral absorption of nitrite, elimination from the plasma, partitioning between plasma and erythrocytes, binding of nitrite to hemoglobin and methemoglobin, and the free radical chain reaction for hemoglobin oxidation. The model also includes Michaelis-Menten kinetics for methemoglobin reductase-catalyzed regeneration of hemoglobin. Body weight-scaled rate constants for absorption (k(a)) and elimination (k(e)), the effective erythrocyte/plasma partition coefficient (P), and the apparent K(m) for methemoglobin reductase were the only parameters estimated by formal optimization to reproduce the observed time course data. Time courses of plasma nitrite concentrations and blood levels of hemoglobin and methemoglobin in male and female rats that had received single intravenous or oral doses of sodium nitrite were measured. Peak plasma levels of nitrite were achieved in both sexes approximately 30 min after oral exposure, and peak methemoglobin levels were achieved after 100 min. The model predicts that 10% of the hemoglobin is oxidized to the ferric form after oral doses of 15.9 mg/kg in male rats and 11.0 mg/kg in female rats and after intravenous doses of 8.9 and 7.1 mg/kg in male and female rats, respectively. The t(1/2) for recovery from methemoglobinemia was 60 to 120 min depending on dose and route of administration. A sensitivity analysis of the model was performed to identify to which parameters the predictions of the model were most sensitive and guide attempts to simplify the model. Replacement of the V(max) of methemoglobin reductase with a value representative of humans predicted a 10% methemoglobinemia following an intravenous dose of 5.8 mg/kg, in close agreement with an observed value of 5.7 mg/kg for humans. PMID

  15. Microbiology of high-sodium-nitrite-wastewater treatment.

    PubMed

    Arquiaga, M C; Canter, L W; Sabatini, D A

    1993-01-01

    A microbiological study conducted as a complement to kinetic studies of biological denitrification as a process for treating high-sodium-nitrite wastewaters generated from ship-boiler-tube cleaning is described. The number, genera, and denitrifying capabilities of the organisms inhabiting anoxic suspended-growth reactors used in the kinetic studies were evaluated for four experimental phases. The results regarding the enumeration of bacteria supported the findings of the kinetic studies as follows: (i) the better nitrite-removal efficiencies observed in the nitrification/denitrification system as compared with direct denitrification were confirmed by the presence of larger populations of organisms capable of completely reducing nitrate or nitrite; (ii) the presence of metals in concentrations associated with boiler-tube wastewater did not affect removal performance in the nitrification/denitrification systems, nor did it affect the density of complete denitrifiers; (iii) increasing sludge ages resulted in increasing nitrite-removal efficiencies as well as populations of complete denitrifiers; and (iv) a decrease in nitrate-removal efficiencies when the actual wastewater was introduced to a system that had been acclimated to the synthetic wastewater coincided with a reduction in the number of complete denitrifiers. Regarding the types of organisms found in this study, denitrifying strains of Alcaligenes and Pseudomonas were always present in the anoxic reactors along with other denitrifying and non-denitrifying bacteria of the same genera, or other genera such as Acinetobacter and Flavobacterium. However, members of the genus Alcaligenes were the only complete denitrifiers found in the anoxic reactors, and hence they are likely to play a key role in the denitrification process. PMID:15091830

  16. 77 FR 71006 - Sodium Nitrite Injection and Sodium Thiosulfate Injection Drug Products Labeled for the Treatment...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-11-28

    ... and cardiac symptoms due to lack of adequate oxygen in body tissues. The approved Sodium Nitrite.... Cyanide antidotes carry serious risks and some unapproved drug products may lack Boxed Warnings and other... blood. Methemoglobin is an oxidized form of hemoglobin that has a decreased affinity for...

  17. Raman scattering in sodium nitrite crystals near the phase transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorelik, V. S.; Pyatyshev, A. Yu.; Krylov, A. S.

    2016-01-01

    Optical Raman spectra of a ferroelectric sodium nitrite crystal have been detected in a wide spectrum range at various temperatures, including the region of the ferroelectric phase transition. A manifestation of a transverse soft polar mode of the A 1( z) type responsible for the ferroelectric phase transition has been discovered in the spectrum at room temperature. This mode has been found to become overdamped even far from the ferroelectric phase transition temperature. This mode also appears as a central peak under heating. It has been found that the pseudoscalar mode of the A 2 type has the highest intensity in the Raman spectrum of sodium nitrite. The frequency corresponding to the maximum intensity of this mode in the Raman spectrum varies from 130 cm-1 at 123 K to 106 cm-1 at T = 513 K. A fair agreement of the experimental data for the A 1( z) mode with the Lyddane-Sachs-Teller relation has been established. The polariton curves for the A 1( z) polar mode and the dispersion curves for axinons has been plotted.

  18. Assessment of sodium hypochlorite and acidified sodium chlorite as antimicrobial agents to inhibit growth of Escherichia coli O157:H7 and natural microflora on shredded carrots

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The influence of cold tap water, sodium hypochlorite (200 ppm) and acidified sodium chlorite (100, 250, 500 and 1000 ppm) washes on survival and growth of Escherichia coli O157:H7 inoculated onto shredded carrots was determined after treatment and 7 and 14 days of storage. Growth of total mesophilic...

  19. Sodium nitrite therapy attenuates hypertensive effects of HBOC-201 via nitrite reduction

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez, Cilina; Vitturi, Dario A.; He, Jin; Vandromme, Marianne; Brandon, Angela; Hutchings, Anne; Rue, Loring W.; Kerby, Jeffrey D; Patel, Rakesh P.

    2009-01-01

    Synopsis Hypertension secondary to scavenging of nitric oxide (NO) remains a limitation in the use hemoglobin based oxygen carriers (HBOCs). Recent studies suggest that nitrite reduction to NO by deoxyhemoglobin supports NO-signaling. Herein, we tested whether nitrite would attenuate HBOC-mediated hypertension using HBOC-201 (Biopure), a bovine cross-linked, low oxygen affinity hemoglobin. Similar to unmodified hemoglobin, deoxygenated HBOC-201 reduced nitrite to NO with rates directly proportional to the extent of deoxygenation. The functional importance of HBOC-201 dependent nitrite reduction was demonstrated using isolated aortic rings and a murine model of trauma, hemorrhage and resuscitation. In the former, HBOC-201 inhibited NO-donor and nitrite-dependent vasodilation when oxygenated. However, deoxygenated HBOC-201 failed to affect nitrite dependent vasodilation but still inhibited NO-donor dependent vasodilation consistent with a model in which nitrite-reduction by deoxyHBOC-201 counters NO-scavenging. Finally, resuscitation using HBOC-201 after trauma and hemorrhage, resulted in mild hypertension (~5-10mmHg). Administration of a single bolus nitrite (30-100nmol) at the onset of HBOC-201 resuscitation prevented hypertension. Nitrite had no effect on mean arterial pressure during resuscitation with lactated Ringers suggesting a role for nitrite-HBOC reactions in attenuating HBOC-mediated hypertension. Taken together these data support the concept that nitrite can be used as an adjunct therapy to prevent HBOC-dependent hypertension. PMID:19555351

  20. Efficacy of sodium hypochlorite and acidified sodium chlorite in preventing browning and microbial growth on fresh-cut produce.

    PubMed

    Sun, Shih Hui; Kim, Su Jin; Kwak, Soo Jin; Yoon, Ki Sun

    2012-09-01

    The use of suitable sanitizers can increase the quality of fresh-cut produce and reduce the risk of foodborne illnesses. The objective of this study was to compare the washing effects of 100 mg/L sodium hypochlorite (SH) and 500 mg/L acidified sodium chlorite (ASC) on the prevention of enzymatic browning and the growth of microbial populations, including aerobic plate counts, E. coli, and coliforms, throughout storage at 4°C and 10°C. Fresh-cut zucchini, cucumbers, green bell peppers, and root vegetables such as potatoes, sweet potatoes, carrots, and radishes were used. Compared to SH washing, ASC washing significantly (p<0.05) reduced microbial contamination on the fresh-cut produce and prevented browning of fresh-cut potatoes and sweet potatoes during storage. More effective inhibition of aerobic plate counts and coliforms growth was observed on fresh-cut produce treated with ASC during storage at 10°C. Polyphenol oxidase (PPO) activity of fresh-cut potatoes and sweet potatoes was more effectively inhibited after washing with ASC. The use of 500 mg/L ASC can provide effective antimicrobial and anti-browning treatments of fresh-cut produce, including processed root vegetables. PMID:24471086

  1. Efficacy of Sodium Hypochlorite and Acidified Sodium Chlorite in Preventing Browning and Microbial Growth on Fresh-Cut Produce

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Shih Hui; Kim, Su Jin; Kwak, Soo Jin; Yoon, Ki Sun

    2012-01-01

    The use of suitable sanitizers can increase the quality of fresh-cut produce and reduce the risk of foodborne illnesses. The objective of this study was to compare the washing effects of 100 mg/L sodium hypochlorite (SH) and 500 mg/L acidified sodium chlorite (ASC) on the prevention of enzymatic browning and the growth of microbial populations, including aerobic plate counts, E. coli, and coliforms, throughout storage at 4°C and 10°C. Fresh-cut zucchini, cucumbers, green bell peppers, and root vegetables such as potatoes, sweet potatoes, carrots, and radishes were used. Compared to SH washing, ASC washing significantly (p<0.05) reduced microbial contamination on the fresh-cut produce and prevented browning of fresh-cut potatoes and sweet potatoes during storage. More effective inhibition of aerobic plate counts and coliforms growth was observed on fresh-cut produce treated with ASC during storage at 10°C. Polyphenol oxidase (PPO) activity of fresh-cut potatoes and sweet potatoes was more effectively inhibited after washing with ASC. The use of 500 mg/L ASC can provide effective antimicrobial and anti-browning treatments of fresh-cut produce, including processed root vegetables. PMID:24471086

  2. Thermal inactivation of Salmonella Enteritidis on chicken skin previously exposed to acidified Sodium chlorite or tri-sodium phosphate.

    PubMed

    Karuppasamy, K; Yadav, Ajit S; Saxena, Gaurav K

    2015-12-01

    Thermal inactivation of normal and starved cells of Salmonella Enteritidis on chicken skin previously exposed to different concentrations of acidified sodium chlorite (ASC) or tri-sodium phosphate (TSP) was investigated. Inoculated skin was pretreated with different concentration of ASC or TSP, packaged in bags, and then immersed in a circulating water bath at 60 to 68 °C. The recovery medium was Hektoen enteric agar. D-values, determined by linear regression, for normal cells on chicken skin, were 2.79, 1.17 and 0.53 min whereas D-values for starved cells were 4.15, 1.83 and 0.66 at 60, 64 and 68 °C, respectively. z-values for normal cells were 3.54 and for starved cells were 2.29. Pretreatment of Salmonella Enteritidis cells with 0 to 200 ppm of ASC or 0 to 1.0 % TSP resulted in lower D-values at all temperatures. Sensory results indicated no significance differences for control and treatments. Thus, results of this study indicated that pretreatment of chicken skin with ASC or TSP increased sensitivity of Salmonella Enteritidis to heat without affecting organoleptic quality of chicken meat. PMID:26604399

  3. Thymoquinone ameliorates testicular tissue inflammation induced by chronic administration of oral sodium nitrite.

    PubMed

    Alyoussef, A; Al-Gayyar, M M H

    2016-06-01

    Although sodium nitrite has been widely used as food preservative, building bases of scientific evidence about nitrite continues to oppose the general safety in human health. Moreover, thymoquinone (TQ) has therapeutic potential as antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, antibacterial and anticancer. Therefore, we investigated the effects of both sodium nitrite and TQ on testicular tissues of rats. Forty adult male Sprague Dawley rats were used. They received either 80 mg kg(-1) sodium nitrite or 50 mg kg(-1) TQ daily for twelve weeks. Serum testosterone was measured. Testis were weighed and the testicular tissue homogenates were used for measurements of tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-α, interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-4, IL-6, IL10, caspase-3, caspase-8 and caspase-9. Sodium nitrite resulted in significant reduction in serum testosterone concentration and elevation in testis weight and Gonado-Somatic Index. We found significant reduction in testicular tissues levels of IL-4 and IL-10 associated with elevated levels of TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-6, caspase-3, caspase-8 and caspase-9. In conclusion, chronic oral sodium nitrite induced changes in the weight of rat testis accompanied by elevation in the testicular tissue level of oxidative stress markers and inflammatory cytokines. TQ attenuated sodium nitrite-induced testicular tissue damage through blocking oxidative stress, restoration of normal inflammatory cytokines balance and blocking of apoptosis. PMID:26260072

  4. Nanoliposomal Growth Hormone and Sodium Nitrite Release from Silicone Fibers Reduces Thrombus Formation Under Flow.

    PubMed

    Salehi-Nik, Nasim; Amoabediny, Ghassem; Banikarimi, Seyedeh Parnian; Pouran, Behdad; Malaie-Balasi, Zahra; Zandieh-Doulabi, Behrouz; Klein-Nulend, Jenneke

    2016-08-01

    Biocompatibility of artificial lungs can be improved by endothelialization of hollow fibers. Bioavailability of growth-inducing and anti-thrombotic agents on the hollow fiber-blood interface inhibits thrombosis. We investigated if nanoliposomal growth-inducing growth hormone (nGH) and anti-thrombotic sodium nitrite (nNitrite) incorporation into collagen-coating on silicone hollow fibers improves blood biocompatibility by increasing endothelial cell growth and nitrite bioavailability under flow. Nitrite production rate was assessed under varying flow conditions. Finite element (FE) modeling was used to simulate nitrite transport within the parallel-plate flow chamber, and nitrite bioavailability on the fiber-blood interface at 1-30 dyn/cm(2) shear stress. Endothelial cell number on fibers coated with nNitrite-nGH-collagen conjugate was 1.5-fold higher than on collagen-coated fibers. For collagen-coated fibers, nitrite production reached a maximum at 18 dyn/cm(2) shear stress. When fibers were coated with nNitrite-nGH-collagen conjugate, nitrite production increased continuously by increasing shear stress. FE modeling revealed that nitrite concentrations at the fiber-blood interface were affected by shear stress-induced nitrite production, and diffusion/convection-induced nitrite removal. Highest nitrite concentrations and lowest thrombus deposition were observed on fibers coated with nNitrite-nGH-collagen conjugate exposed to 6-12 dyn/cm(2) shear stress. In conclusion, our results suggest that nNitrite-nGH-Col conjugate coatings promote endothelialization of silicone hollow fibers in biohybrid artificial lungs. PMID:26762283

  5. Comparison of the relative propensities of isoamyl nitrite and sodium nitrite to ameliorate acute cyanide poisoning in mice and a novel antidotal effect arising from anesthetics.

    PubMed

    Cambal, Leah K; Weitz, Andrew C; Li, Hui-Hua; Zhang, Yang; Zheng, Xi; Pearce, Linda L; Peterson, Jim

    2013-05-20

    Isoamyl nitrite has previously been considered acceptable as an inhaled cyanide antidote; therefore, the antidotal utility of this organic nitrite compared with sodium nitrite was investigated. To facilitate a quantitative comparison, doses of both sodium nitrite and isoamyl nitrite were given intraperitoneally in equimolar amounts to sublethally cyanide-challenged mice. Righting recovery from the knockdown state was clearly compromised in the isoamyl nitrite-treated animals, the effect being attributable to the toxicity of the isoamyl alchol produced during hydrolysis of the isoamyl nitrite to release nitrite anion. Subsequently, inhaled aqueous sodium nitrite aerosol was demonstrated to ameliorate sublethal cyanide toxicity, when provided to mice after the toxic dose, by the more rapid recovery of righting ability compared to that of the control animals given only the toxicant. Aerosolized sodium nitrite has thus been shown by these experiments to have promise as a better alternative to organic nitrites for development as an inhaled cyanide antidote. The inhaled sodium nitrite led to the production of NO in the bloodstream as determined by the appearance of EPR signals attributable to nitrosylhemoglobin and methemoglobin. The aerosol delivery was performed in an unmetered inhalation chamber, and in this study, no attempt was made to optimize the procedure. It is argued that administration of an effective inhaled aqueous sodium nitrite dose in humans is possible, though just beyond the capability of current individual metered-dose inhaler designs, such as those used for asthma. Finally, working at slightly greater than LD50 NaCN doses, it was fortuitously discovered that (i) anesthesia leads to significantly prolonged survival compared to that of unanesthetized animals and that (ii) the antidotal activity of nitrite anion was completely abolished under anesthesia. Plausible explanations for these effects in mice and their practical consequences in relation to

  6. Intracavernosal administration of sodium nitrite as an erectile pharmacotherapy.

    PubMed

    Lasker, George F; Matt, Christopher J; Badejo, Adeleke M; Casey, David B; Dhaliwal, Jasdeep S; Murthy, Subramanyam N; Kadowitz, Philip J

    2010-07-01

    It has been reported that sodium nitrite (NaNO2) can act as a storage form of nitric oxide (NO) that can have beneficial pharmacologic actions. The present study was undertaken to investigate the effects of NaNO2 on erectile function in the rat. The intracavernosal (i.c.) injection of NaNO2 produced dose-related increases in i.c. pressure and decreases in systemic arterial pressure. NaNO2 was 1000-fold less potent than sodium nitroprusside in increasing i.c. pressure. Increases in i.c. pressure in response to NaNO2 were attenuated by the nitric oxide synthase (NOS) inhibitor N-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME). The increases in i.c. pressure in response to NaNO2 were not altered by the xanthine oxidoreductase inhibitor allopurinol. The decreases in systemic arterial pressure in response to i.c. injections of NaNO2 were attenuated by allopurinol and were either unchanged or increased by L-NAME. These data suggest that NaNO2 is converted to vasoactive NO in the corpora cavernosum and systemic vascular bed of the rat by different mechanisms. The present data suggest that the conversion of NaNO2 to vasoactive NO is mediated by NOS in the corpora cavernosum and by xanthine oxidoreductase in the systemic vascular bed of the rat. These data show NaNO2 can serve as a NO donor that increases erectile activity in the rat. PMID:20651825

  7. EVALUATION OF THE DEVELOPMENTAL TOXICITY OF SODIUM NITRITE IN LONG-EVANS RATS (JOURNAL VERSION)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Sodium nitrite administered in the drinking water to Long-Evans rats during pregnancy and lactation severely affected arythropoietic development, growth and mortality in their offspring. There were no significant differences between treated and control litters at birth. Thereafte...

  8. Oxidation of cardiac myoglobin in vivo by sodium nitrite or hydroxylamine.

    PubMed

    Nichols, J W; Weber, L J

    1989-01-01

    A non-vascularized fish heart model was used to assess the oxidation of cardiac myoglobin in vivo by compounds known to cause methemoglobinemia. Buffalo sculpin (Enophrys bison) were cannulated from the afferent branchial artery to permit repeated blood sampling and injected intraperitoneally with sodium nitrite, hydroxylamine or aniline. Methemoglobin was formed by sublethal levels of sodium nitrite or hydroxylamine. For hydroxylamine, the time to peak effect was less than 1 h. For sodium nitrite, the onset was less rapid and the effect more prolonged. Aniline had no effect on hemoglobin at any concentration tested. Cardiac myoglobin, assayed at the time of peak effect on hemoglobin, was oxidized in a dose-dependent manner by sodium nitrite or hydroxylamine. At high doses of sodium nitrite (50 and 100 mg/kg), the oxidation of myoglobin exceeded that of hemoglobin. The reverse was true of hydroxylamine at all concentrations tested. This study suggests that possibility that cardiac myoglobin is oxidized in occupational or other exposures to sodium nitrite, hydroxylamine and related compounds. PMID:2619562

  9. Sodium Nitrite Blocks the Activity of Aminoglycosides against Pseudomonas aeruginosa Biofilms

    PubMed Central

    Zemke, Anna C.; Gladwin, Mark T.

    2015-01-01

    Sodium nitrite has broad antimicrobial activity at pH 6.5, including the ability to prevent biofilm growth by Pseudomonas aeruginosa on the surfaces of airway epithelial cells. Because of its antimicrobial activity, nitrite is being investigated as an inhaled agent for chronic P. aeruginosa airway infections in cystic fibrosis patients. However, the interaction between nitrite and commonly used aminoglycosides is unknown. This paper investigates the interaction between nitrite and tobramycin in liquid culture, abiotic biofilms, and a biotic biofilm model simulating the conditions in the cystic fibrosis airway. The addition of nitrite prevented killing by aminoglycosides in liquid culture, with dose dependence between 1.5 and 15 mM. The effect was not blocked by the nitric oxide scavenger CPTIO or dependent on efflux pump activity. Nitrite shifted the biofilm minimal bactericidal concentration (MBC-biofilm) from 256 μg/ml to >1,024 μg/ml in an abiotic biofilm model. In a biotic biofilm model, the addition of 50 mM nitrite decreased the antibiofilm activity of tobramycin by up to 1.2 log. Respiratory chain inhibition recapitulated the inhibition of aminoglycoside activity by nitrite, suggesting a potential mechanism of inhibition of energy-dependent aminoglycoside uptake. In summary, sodium nitrite induces resistance to both gentamicin and tobramycin in P. aeruginosa grown in liquid culture, as an abiotic biofilm, or as a biotic biofilm. PMID:25801569

  10. Single-Dose Pharmacokinetics of Different Oral Sodium Nitrite Formulations in Diabetes Patients

    PubMed Central

    Predmore, Benjamin L.; Flanagan, Douglas R.; Giordano, Tony; Qiu, Yang; Brandon, Angela; Lefer, David J.; Patel, Rakesh P.; Kevil, Christopher G.

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background Diabetic foot ulcers, although associated with macrovascular disease and neuropathy, have a microvascular disease causing ischemia not amenable to surgical intervention. Nitrite selectively releases nitric oxide in ischemic tissues, and diabetes subjects have low nitrite levels that do not increase with exercise. This study explores the safety and pharmacokinetics of a single dose of sodium nitrite in subjects with diabetic foot ulcers. Subjects and Methods Using a blinded, randomized crossover study design, 12 subjects with diabetes mellitus and active or healed foot ulcers received a single dose of sodium nitrite on two occasions 7–28 days apart, once with an immediate release (IR) formulation and once with an enteric-coated (EC) formulation for delayed release. Serum nitrite, nitrate, methemoglobin, sulfhemoglobin, blood pressure, pulse rate, complete blood count, chemistry panel, electrocardiogram, and adverse events were followed for up to 6 h after each dose. The IR and EC nitrite levels were analyzed by one-way analysis of variance and by pharmacokinetic modeling. Results The IR formulation elevated nitrite levels between 0.25 and 0.75 h (P<0.05). The EC formulation did not elevate nitrite levels significantly, but both formulations gave plasma nitrite levels previously suggested to be therapeutic (approximately 2–5 μM). The IR formulation gave an asymptomatic blood pressure drop of 10/6 mm Hg (P<0.003), and two subjects experienced mild flushing. There was no elevation of methemoglobin or other safety concerns. Pharmacokinetic modeling of plama nitrite levels gave r2 values of 0.81 and 0.97 for the fits for IR and EC formulations, respectively. Conclusions Oral sodium nitrite administration is well tolerated in diabetes patients. PMID:22468627

  11. Analysis of responses to glyceryl trinitrate and sodium nitrite in the intact chest rat.

    PubMed

    Nossaman, Bobby D; Pankey, Edward A; Badejo, Adeleke R; Casey, David B; Uppu, Satvika; Murthy, Subramanyam N; Kadowitz, Philip J

    2012-05-15

    Responses to glyceryl trinitrate/nitroglycerin (GTN), S-nitrosoglutathione (GSNO), and sodium nitrite were compared in the intact chest rat. The iv injections of GTN, sodium nitrite, and GSNO produced dose-dependent decreases in pulmonary and systemic arterial pressures. In as much as cardiac output was not reduced, the decreases in pulmonary and systemic arterial pressures indicate that GTN, sodium nitrite, and GSNO have significant vasodilator activity in the pulmonary and systemic vascular beds in the rat. Responses to GTN were attenuated by cyanamide, but not allopurinol, whereas responses to nitrite formed by the metabolism of GTN were attenuated by allopurinol and cyanamide. The results with allopurinol and cyanamide suggest that only mitochondrial aldehyde dehydrogenase is involved in the bioactivation of GTN, sodium nitrite, and GSNO, whereas both pathways are involved in the bioactivation of nitrite anion in the intact rat. The comparison of vasodilator activity indicates that GSNO and GTN are more than 1000-fold more potent than sodium nitrite in decreasing pulmonary and systemic arterial pressures in the rat. Following administration of 1H-[1,2,4]-oxadizaolo[4,3-]quinoxaline-1-one (ODQ), responses to GTN were significantly attenuated, indicating that responses are mediated by the activation of soluble guanylyl cyclase. These data suggest that the reduction of nitrite to nitric oxide formed from the metabolism of GTN, cannot account for the vasodilator activity of GTN in the intact rat and that another mechanism; perhaps the formation of an S-NO, may mediate the vasodilator response to GTN in this species. PMID:22465477

  12. Analysis of Responses to Glyceryl Trinitrate and Sodium Nitrite in the Intact Chest Rat

    PubMed Central

    Nossaman, Bobby D.; Pankey, Edward A.; Badejo, Adeleke R.; Casey, David B.; Uppu, Satvika; Murthy, Subramanyam N.; Kadowitz, Philip J.

    2012-01-01

    Responses to glyceryl trinitrate/nitroglycerin (GTN), S-nitrosoglutathione (GSNO), and sodium nitrite were compared in the intact chest rat. The iv injections of GTN, sodium nitrite, and GSNO produced dose-dependent decreases in pulmonary and systemic arterial pressures. In as much as cardiac output was not reduced, the decreases in pulmonary and systemic arterial pressures indicate that GTN, sodium nitrite, and GSNO have significant vasodilator activity in the pulmonary and systemic vascular beds in the rat. Responses to GTN were attenuated by cyanamide, but not allopurinol, whereas responses to nitrite formed by the metabolism of GTN were attenuated by allopurinol and cyanamide. The results with allopurinol and cyanamide suggest that only mitochondrial aldehyde dehydrogenase is involved in the bioactivation of GTN, sodium nitrite, and GSNO, whereas both pathways are involved in the bioactivation of nitrite anion in the intact rat. The comparison of vasodilator activity indicates that GSNO and GTN are more than 1000 fold more potent than sodium nitrite in decreasing pulmonary and systemic arterial pressures in the rat. Following administration of 1H-[1,2,4]-oxadizaolo[4,3-]quinoxaline-1-one (ODQ), responses to GTN were significantly attenuated, indicating that responses are mediated by the activation of soluble guanylyl cyclase. These data suggest that the reduction of nitrite to nitric oxide formed from the metabolism of GTN, cannot account for the vasodilator activity of GTN in the intact rat and that another mechanism; perhaps the formation of an S-NO, may mediate the vasodilator response to GTN in this species. PMID:22465477

  13. Preventing bovine mastitis by a postmilking teat disinfectant containing acidified sodium chlorite.

    PubMed

    Hillerton, J E; Cooper, J; Morelli, J

    2007-03-01

    A split-herd study was performed to determine if an acidified, sodium chlorite teat disinfectant, UDDERgold Platinum Germicidal Barrier Teat Dip (UG Pt, Ecolab Inc., Redmond, WA), was effective in preventing new intramammary infections (IMI) in lactating dairy cows compared with a licensed, iodophor teat disinfectant (Iosan, Novartis Animal Health, Ltd., Whittlesford, UK), and to show that the test product was tolerated equally well by teat skin. The study lasted 114 d and covered all weather conditions. The teats of 176 cows were dipped after each milking in UG Pt and the teats of 172 cows were dipped in Iosan, the positive-control product. Routine milk samples were taken from each quarter of every cow every 4 wk. Additional samples were taken from newly calved cows joining the trial and from cows with clinical signs of mastitis. Milk samples were cultured for the presence of bacteria and the cause of clinical mastitis. Each quarter was eligible for only 1 infection during the trial. The number of clinical cases was identical in each group (n = 13) and the number of subclinical infections was slightly lower in the UG Pt group than in the Iosan group (n = 27 and 31, respectively). These rates of infection suggest that the products did not differ in their ability to prevent a new IMI. At least 203 cows were assessed for skin integrity before the start of the trial and every 28 d throughout. The UG Pt teat dip had no adverse effects on teat condition. The prevalence of hyperkeratosis did not change with time for both groups (0.90 +/- 1.08 and 0.95 +/- 1.06 at wk 0 vs. 0.65 +/- 0.87 and 0.49 +/- 0.74 at wk 16 for fore and hind teats, respectively, for UG Pt and 1.02 +/- 1.25 and 1.16 +/- 1.11 at wk 0 vs. 0.51 +/- 0.71 and 0.45 +/- 0.65 at wk 16, respectively, for Iosan); no redness of the skin was observed in either group. Application of recommended statistical methods to demonstrate noninferiority was problematic. PMID:17297095

  14. Sodium nitrite: the "cure" for nitric oxide insufficiency.

    PubMed

    Parthasarathy, Deepa K; Bryan, Nathan S

    2012-11-01

    This process of "curing" food is a long practice that dates back thousands of years long before refrigeration or food safety regulations. Today food safety and mass manufacturing are dependent upon safe and effective means to cure and preserve foods including meats. Nitrite remains the most effective curing agent to prevent food spoilage and bacterial contamination. Despite decades of rigorous research on its safety and efficacy as a curing agent, it is still regarded by many as a toxic undesirable food additive. However, research within the biomedical science community has revealed enormous therapeutic benefits of nitrite that is currently being developed as novel therapies for conditions associated with nitric oxide (NO) insufficiency. Much of the same biochemistry that has been understood for decades in the meat industry has been rediscovered in human physiology. This review will highlight the fundamental biochemistry of nitrite in human physiology and highlight the risk benefit evaluation surrounding nitrite in food and meat products. Foods or diets enriched with nitrite can have profound positive health benefits. PMID:22464105

  15. [Sodium nitrite enhanced the potentials of migration and invasion of human hepatocellular carcinoma SMMC-7721 cells through induction of mitophagy].

    PubMed

    Gui, Guan; Meng, Shan-shan; Li, Lu-juan; Liu, Bin; Liang, Hong-xia; Huangfu, Chao-shen

    2016-01-01

    Nitrites play multiple characteristic functions in invasion and metastasis of hepatic cancer cells, but the exact mechanism is not yet known. Cancer cells can maintain the malignant characteristics via clearance of excess mitochondria by mitophagy. The purpose of this article was to determine the roles of nitrite, reactive oxygen species (ROS) and hypoxia inducing factor 1 alpha (HIF-1 α) in mitophagy of hepatic cancer cells. After exposure of human hepatocellular carcinoma SMMC-7721 cells to a serial concentrations of sodium nitrite for 24 h under normal oxygen, the maximal cell vitality was increased by 16 mg x (-1) sodium nitrite. In addition, the potentials of migration and invasion for SMMC-7721 cells were increased significantly at the same time. Furthermore, sodium nitrite exposure displayed an increase of stress fibers, lamellipodum and perinuclear mitochondrial distribution by cell staining with Actin-Tracker Green and Mito-Tracker Red, which was reversed by N-acetylcysteine (NAC, a reactive oxygen scavenger). DCFH-DA staining with fluorescent microscopy showed that the intracellular level of ROS concentration was increased by the sodium nitrite treatment. LC3 immunostaining and Western blot results showed that sodium nitrite enhanced cell autophagy flux. Under the transmission electron microscopy (TEM), more autolysosomes formed after sodium nitrite treatment and NAC could prevent autophagosome degradation. RT-PCR results indicated that the expression levels of COX I and COXIV mRNA were decreased significantly after sodium nitrite treatment. Meanwhile, laser scanning confocal microscopy showed that sodium nitrite significantly reduced mitochondrial mass detected by Mito-Tracker Green staining. The expression levels of HIF-1α, Beclin-1 and Bnip3 (mitophagy marker molecular) increased remarkably after sodium nitrite treatment, which were reversed by NAC. Our results demonstrated that sodium nitrite (16 mg x L(-1)) increased the potentials of invasion and

  16. Nitrite

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Nitrite ; CASRN 14797 - 65 - 0 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinogenic Effects

  17. Sodium nitrite supplementation improves motor function and skeletal muscle inflammatory profile in old male mice

    PubMed Central

    Gioscia-Ryan, Rachel A.; Johnson, Lawrence C.; Battson, Micah L.; de Picciotto, Natalie E.; Beck, Hannah J.; Jiang, Hong; Sindler, Amy L.; Bryan, Nathan S.; Enoka, Roger M.; Seals, Douglas R.

    2014-01-01

    Aging is associated with motor declines that lead to functional limitations and disability, necessitating the development of therapies to slow or reverse these events. We tested the hypothesis that sodium nitrite supplementation attenuates declines in motor function in older C57BL/6 mice. Motor function was assessed using a battery of tests (grip strength, open-field distance, rota-rod endurance) in old animals (age 20–24 mo) at baseline and after 8 wk of sodium nitrite (old nitrite, n = 22, 50 mg/liter) or no treatment (old control, n = 40), and in young reference animals (3 mo, n = 87). Eight weeks of sodium nitrite supplementation improved grip strength (old nitrite, +12.0 ± 14.9% vs. old control, +1.5 ± 15.2%, P < 0.05) and open field distance (old nitrite, +9.5 ± 7.7%, P < 0.01 vs. old control, −28.1 ± 2.0%) and completely restored rota-rod endurance-run time (old nitrite, +3.2 ± 7.1%, P < 0.01 vs. old control, −21.5 ± 7.2%; old nitrite after treatment P > 0.05 vs. young reference). Inflammatory cytokines were markedly increased in quadriceps of old compared with young reference animals (by ELISA, interleukin-1β [IL-1β] 3.86 ± 2.34 vs. 1.11 ± 0.74, P < 0.05; interferon-gamma [INF-γ] 8.31 ± 1.59 vs. 3.99 ± 2.59, P < 0.01; tumor necrosis factor-alpha [TNF-α] 1.69 ± 0.44 vs. 0.76 ± 0.30 pg/ml, P < 0.01), but were reduced to young reference levels after treatment (old nitrite, IL-1β 0.67 ± 0.95; INF-γ 5.22 ± 2.01, TNF-α 1.21 ± 0.39 pg/ml, P < 0.05 vs. old control, P > 0.05 vs. young reference). Cytokine expression and treatment (old nitrite vs. old control) predicted strength (R2 = 0.822, P < 0.001, IL-1β, INF-γ, group), open field distance (R2 = 0.574, P < 0.01, IL-1β, group) and endurance run time (R2 = 0.477, P < 0.05, INF-γ). Our results suggest that sodium nitrite improves motor function in old mice, in part by reducing low-grade inflammation in muscle. PMID:25377884

  18. Effect of chronic sodium nitrite therapy on monocrotaline-induced pulmonary hypertension.

    PubMed

    Pankey, Edward A; Badejo, Adeleke M; Casey, David B; Lasker, George F; Riehl, Russel A; Murthy, Subramanyam N; Nossaman, Bobby D; Kadowitz, Philip J

    2012-06-30

    Pulmonary hypertension (PH) is a rare disorder that without treatment is progressive and often fatal within 3 years. The treatment of PH involves the use of a diverse group of drugs and lung transplantation. Although nitrite was once thought to be an inactive metabolite of endothelial-derived nitric oxide (NO), there is increasing evidence that nitrite may be useful in the treatment of PH, but the mechanism by which nitrite exerts its beneficial effect remains uncertain. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of chronic sodium nitrite treatment in a PH model in the rat. Following induction of PH with a single injection of monocrotaline, 60 mg; daily ip injections of sodium nitrite (3mg/kg) starting on day 14 and continuing for 21 days, resulted in a significantly lower pulmonary arterial pressure on day 35 when compared to values in untreated animals with monocrotaline-induced PH. In monocrotaline-treated rats, daily treatment with ip nitrite injections for 21 days decreased right ventricular mass and pathologic changes in small pulmonary arteries. Nitrite therapy did not change systemic arterial pressure or cardiac output when values were measured on day 35. The decreases in pulmonary arterial pressure in response to iv injections of sodium nitroprusside, sodium nitrite, and BAY 41-8543 were not different in rats with monocrotaline-induced pulmonary hypertension and rats with chronic nitrite therapy when compared to responses in animals in which pulmonary arterial pressure was increased with U46619. These findings are consistent with the hypothesis that the mechanisms that convert nitrite to vasoactive NO, activate soluble guanylyl cyclase and mediate the vasodilator response to NO or an NO derivative are not impaired. The present data are consistent with the results of a previous study in monocrotaline-induced PH in which systemic arterial pressure and cardiac output were not evaluated and are consistent with the hypothesis that nitrite is

  19. Effect of Chronic Sodium Nitrite Therapy on Monocrotaline-Induced Pulmonary Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Pankey, Edward A.; Badejo, Adeleke M.; Casey, David B.; Lasker, George F.; Riehl, Russel A.; Murthy, Subramanyam N.; Nossaman, Bobby D.; Kadowitz, Philip J.

    2012-01-01

    Pulmonary hypertension (PH) is a rare disorder that without treatment is progressive and often fatal within 3 years. The treatment of PH involves the use of a diverse group of drugs and lung transplantation. Although nitrite was once thought to be an inactive metabolite of endothelial-derived nitric oxide (NO), there is increasing evidence that nitrite may be useful in the treatment of PH, but the mechanism by which nitrite exerts its beneficial effect remains uncertain. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of chronic sodium nitrite treatment in a PH model in the rat. Following induction of PH with a single injection of monocrotaline, 60 mg; daily ip injections of sodium nitrite (3 mg/kg) starting on day 14 and continuing for 21 days, resulted in a significantly lower pulmonary arterial pressure on day 35 when compared to values in untreated animals with monocrotaline-induced PH. In monocrotaline-treated rats, daily treatment with ip nitrite injections for 21 days decreased right ventricular mass and pathologic changes in small pulmonary arteries. Nitrite therapy did not change systemic arterial pressure or cardiac output when values were measured on day 35. The decreases in pulmonary arterial pressure in response to iv injections of sodium nitroprusside, sodium nitrite, and BAY 41-8543 were not different in rats with monocrotaline-induced pulmonary hypertension and rats with chronic nitrite therapy when compared to responses in animals in which pulmonary arterial pressure was increased with U46619. These findings are consistent with the hypothesis that the mechanisms that convert nitrite to vasoactive NO, activate soluble guanylyl cyclase and mediate the vasodilator response to NO or an NO derivative are not impaired. The present data are consistent with the results of a previous study in monocrotaline-induced PH in which systemic arterial pressure and cardiac output were not evaluated and are consistent with the hypothesis that nitrite is

  20. 78 FR 69646 - Sodium Nitrite From the People's Republic of China: Final Results of the Expedited First Sunset...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-20

    ...-Year (``Sunset'') Reviews, 78 FR 39256 (July 1, 2013); see also Sodium Nitrite from the People's Republic of China: Countervailing Duty Order, 73 FR 50595 (August 27, 2008) (``CVD Order''). As explained... International Trade Administration Sodium Nitrite From the People's Republic of China: Final Results of...

  1. Quantitative Systems Pharmacology Model of NO Metabolome and Methemoglobin Following Long-Term Infusion of Sodium Nitrite in Humans

    PubMed Central

    Vega-Villa, K; Pluta, R; Lonser, R; Woo, S

    2013-01-01

    A long-term sodium nitrite infusion is intended for the treatment of vascular disorders. Phase I data demonstrated a significant nonlinear dose-exposure-toxicity relationship within the therapeutic dosage range. This study aims to develop a quantitative systems pharmacology model characterizing nitric oxide (NO) metabolome and methemoglobin after sodium nitrite infusion. Nitrite, nitrate, and methemoglobin concentration–time profiles in plasma and RBC were used for model development. Following intravenous sodium nitrite administration, nitrite undergoes conversion in RBC and tissue. Nitrite sequestered by RBC interacts more extensively with deoxyhemoglobin, which contributes greatly to methemoglobin formation. Methemoglobin is formed less-than-proportionally at higher nitrite doses as characterized with facilitated methemoglobin removal. Nitrate-to-nitrite reduction occurs in tissue and via entero-salivary recirculation. The less-than-proportional increase in nitrite and nitrate exposure at higher nitrite doses is modeled with a dose-dependent increase in clearance. The model provides direct insight into NO metabolome disposition and is valuable for nitrite dosing selection in clinical trials. PMID:23903463

  2. 21 CFR 172.177 - Sodium nitrite used in processing smoked chub.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... percent, as measured in the loin muscle, and the sodium nitrite content of the edible portion of the..., as measured in the loin muscle. (c) Smoked chub shall be heated by a controlled heat process which provides a monitoring system positioned in as many strategic locations in the smokehouse as necessary...

  3. A Putative ABC Transporter Permease Is Necessary for Resistance to Acidified Nitrite and EDTA in Pseudomonas aeruginosa under Aerobic and Anaerobic Planktonic and Biofilm Conditions

    PubMed Central

    McDaniel, Cameron; Su, Shengchang; Panmanee, Warunya; Lau, Gee W.; Browne, Tristan; Cox, Kevin; Paul, Andrew T.; Ko, Seung-Hyun B.; Mortensen, Joel E.; Lam, Joseph S.; Muruve, Daniel A.; Hassett, Daniel J.

    2016-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa (PA) is an important airway pathogen of cystic fibrosis and chronic obstructive disease patients. Multiply drug resistant PA is becoming increasing prevalent and new strategies are needed to combat such insidious organisms. We have previously shown that a mucoid, mucA22 mutant PA is exquisitely sensitive to acidified nitrite (A-NO2−, pH 6.5) at concentrations that are well tolerated in humans. Here, we used a transposon mutagenesis approach to identify PA mutants that are hypersensitive to A-NO2−. Among greater than 10,000 mutants screened, we focused on PA4455, in which the transposon was found to disrupt the production of a putative cytoplasmic membrane-spanning ABC transporter permease. The PA4455 mutant was not only highly sensitive to A-NO2−, but also the membrane perturbing agent, EDTA and the antibiotics doxycycline, tigecycline, colistin, and chloramphenicol, respectively. Treatment of bacteria with A-NO2− plus EDTA, however, had the most dramatic and synergistic effect, with virtually all bacteria killed by 10 mM A-NO2−, and EDTA (1 mM, aerobic, anaerobic). Most importantly, the PA4455 mutant was also sensitive to A-NO2− in biofilms. A-NO2− sensitivity and an anaerobic growth defect was also noted in two mutants (rmlC and wbpM) that are defective in B-band LPS synthesis, potentially indicating a membrane defect in the PA4455 mutant. Finally, this study describes a gene, PA4455, that when mutated, allows for dramatic sensitivity to the potential therapeutic agent, A-NO2− as well as EDTA. Furthermore, the synergy between the two compounds could offer future benefits against antibiotic resistant PA strains. PMID:27064218

  4. Mitochondrial aldehyde dehydrogenase mediates vasodilator responses of glyceryl trinitrate and sodium nitrite in the pulmonary vascular bed of the rat.

    PubMed

    Badejo, Adeleke M; Hodnette, Chris; Dhaliwal, Jasdeep S; Casey, David B; Pankey, Edward; Murthy, Subramanyam N; Nossaman, Bobby D; Hyman, Albert L; Kadowitz, Philip J

    2010-09-01

    It has been reported that mitochondrial aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH2) catalyzes the formation of glyceryl dinitrate and inorganic nitrite from glyceryl trinitrate (GTN), leading to an increase in cGMP and vasodilation in the coronary and systemic vascular beds. However, the role of nitric oxide (NO) formed from nitrite in mediating the response to GTN in the pulmonary vascular bed is uncertain. The purpose of the present study was to determine if nitrite plays a role in mediating vasodilator responses to GTN. In this study, intravenous injections of GTN and sodium nitrite decreased pulmonary and systemic arterial pressures and increased cardiac output. The decreases in pulmonary arterial pressure under baseline and elevated tone conditions and decreases in systemic arterial pressure in response to GTN and sodium nitrite were attenuated by cyanamide, an ALDH2 inhibitor, whereas responses to the NO donor, sodium nitroprusside (SNP), were not altered. The decreases in pulmonary and systemic arterial pressure in response to GTN and SNP were not altered by allopurinol, an inhibitor of xanthine oxidoreductase, whereas responses to sodium nitrite were attenuated. GTN was approximately 1,000-fold more potent than sodium nitrite in decreasing pulmonary and systemic arterial pressures. These results suggest that ALDH2 plays an important role in the bioactivation of GTN and nitrite in the pulmonary and systemic vascular beds and that the reduction of nitrite to vasoactive NO does not play an important role in mediating vasodilator responses to GTN in the intact chest rat. PMID:20543077

  5. Mitochondrial aldehyde dehydrogenase mediates vasodilator responses of glyceryl trinitrate and sodium nitrite in the pulmonary vascular bed of the rat

    PubMed Central

    Badejo, Adeleke M.; Hodnette, Chris; Dhaliwal, Jasdeep S.; Casey, David B.; Pankey, Edward; Murthy, Subramanyam N.; Nossaman, Bobby D.; Hyman, Albert L.

    2010-01-01

    It has been reported that mitochondrial aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH2) catalyzes the formation of glyceryl dinitrate and inorganic nitrite from glyceryl trinitrate (GTN), leading to an increase in cGMP and vasodilation in the coronary and systemic vascular beds. However, the role of nitric oxide (NO) formed from nitrite in mediating the response to GTN in the pulmonary vascular bed is uncertain. The purpose of the present study was to determine if nitrite plays a role in mediating vasodilator responses to GTN. In this study, intravenous injections of GTN and sodium nitrite decreased pulmonary and systemic arterial pressures and increased cardiac output. The decreases in pulmonary arterial pressure under baseline and elevated tone conditions and decreases in systemic arterial pressure in response to GTN and sodium nitrite were attenuated by cyanamide, an ALDH2 inhibitor, whereas responses to the NO donor, sodium nitroprusside (SNP), were not altered. The decreases in pulmonary and systemic arterial pressure in response to GTN and SNP were not altered by allopurinol, an inhibitor of xanthine oxidoreductase, whereas responses to sodium nitrite were attenuated. GTN was ∼1,000-fold more potent than sodium nitrite in decreasing pulmonary and systemic arterial pressures. These results suggest that ALDH2 plays an important role in the bioactivation of GTN and nitrite in the pulmonary and systemic vascular beds and that the reduction of nitrite to vasoactive NO does not play an important role in mediating vasodilator responses to GTN in the intact chest rat. PMID:20543077

  6. Refining the Use of Sodium Azide to Counteract Nitrite Interference in Dissolved Oxygen Analysis of Seawater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, M. T.

    2014-12-01

    High nitrite concentrations are known to interfere with the analysis of dissolved oxygen in seawater samples, though the affected range has yet to be defined. This error can be counteracted by the addition of sodium azide to the hydroxide-iodide pickling reagent. The 2013 US GEOTRACES zonal transect included stations off the coast of Peru with nitrite values up to 10μmol/kg in the upper 400 meters of the water column. Low concentrations of dissolved oxygen were also present in the upper 800 meters, providing an opportunity to study the effect of high nitrite levels on dissolved oxygen analysis over a range of concentrations. Without the addition of azide, the error in dissolved oxygen measurement increased linearly with nitrite concentration. The interference was only significant in samples with nitrite concentrations higher than 1.5 μmol/kg, all of which also had low dissolved oxygen concentrations (<45μmol/kg). The unique combination of high nitrite and low dissolved oxygen is present in such well known and relatively small areas of the world's oceans that the addition of azide is not necessary as a standard procedure for the vast majority of oceanographic measurements.

  7. Intravenous sodium nitrite in acute ST-elevation myocardial infarction: a randomized controlled trial (NIAMI)

    PubMed Central

    Siddiqi, Nishat; Neil, Christopher; Bruce, Margaret; MacLennan, Graeme; Cotton, Seonaidh; Papadopoulou, Sofia; Feelisch, Martin; Bunce, Nicholas; Lim, Pitt O.; Hildick-Smith, David; Horowitz, John; Madhani, Melanie; Boon, Nicholas; Dawson, Dana; Kaski, Juan Carlos; Frenneaux, Michael; Siddiqi, Nishat; Neil, Christopher; Bruce, Margaret; MacLennan, Graeme; Cotton, Seonaidh; Dawson, Dana; Frenneaux, Michael; Singh, Satnam; Schwarz, Konstantin; Jagpal, Baljit; Metcalfe, Malcolm; Stewart, Andrew; Hannah, Andrew; Awsan, Noman; Broadhurst, Paul; Hogg, Duncan; Garg, Deepak; Slattery, Elaine; Davidson, Tracey; McDonald, Alison; McPherson, Gladys; Kaski, Juan-Carlos; Lim, Pitt O; Brown, Sue; Papadopoulou, Sofia A; Gonzalvez, Fatima; Roy, David; Firoozi, Sami; Bogle, Richard; Roberts, Elved; Rhodes, Jonathan; Hildick-Smith, David; de Belder, Adam; Cooter, Nina; Bennett, Lorraine; Horowitz, John; Rajendran, Sharmalar; Dautov, Rustem; Black, Marilyn; Jansen, Else; Boon, Nicholas; Struthers, Allan; Toff, William; Dargie, Henry; Lang, Chim; Nightingale, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Aim Despite prompt revascularization of acute myocardial infarction (AMI), substantial myocardial injury may occur, in part a consequence of ischaemia reperfusion injury (IRI). There has been considerable interest in therapies that may reduce IRI. In experimental models of AMI, sodium nitrite substantially reduces IRI. In this doubleblind randomized placebo controlled parallel-group trial, we investigated the effects of sodium nitrite administered immediately prior to reperfusion in patients with acute ST-elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI). Methods and results A total of 229 patients presenting with acute STEMI were randomized to receive either an i.v. infusion of 70 μmol sodium nitrite (n = 118) or matching placebo (n = 111) over 5 min immediately before primary percutaneous intervention (PPCI). Patients underwent cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (CMR) at 6–8 days and at 6 months and serial blood sampling was performed over 72 h for the measurement of plasma creatine kinase (CK) and Troponin I. Myocardial infarct size (extent of late gadolinium enhancement at 6–8 days by CMR-the primary endpoint) did not differ between nitrite and placebo groups after adjustment for area at risk, diabetes status, and centre (effect size −0.7% 95% CI: −2.2%, +0.7%; P = 0.34). There were no significant differences in any of the secondary endpoints, including plasma troponin I and CK area under the curve, left ventricular volumes (LV), and ejection fraction (EF) measured at 6–8 days and at 6 months and final infarct size (FIS) measured at 6 months. Conclusions Sodium nitrite administered intravenously immediately prior to reperfusion in patients with acute STEMI does not reduce infarct size. PMID:24639423

  8. Corrosion Fatigue Behavior of 316LN SS in Acidified Sodium Chloride Solution at Applied Potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poonguzhali, A.; Pujar, M. G.; Mallika, C.; Mudali, U. Kamachi

    2015-05-01

    The influence of acidified 1 M NaCl solution by addition of 2 ml/L of HCl on the cyclic plastic deformation of AISI Type 316LN SS containing 0.07 wt.% and 0.22 wt.% N was investigated as a function of the applied potentials. The corrosion fatigue (CF) behavior of stainless steel (SS) was explained vis-a-vis the dislocation behavior, the propensity to form microcracks, and the evolution of the current transients based on the studies carried out at both room-temperature and boiling conditions. CF experiments were conducted using round tensile specimens at a stress ratio of 0.5 and a frequency of 0.1 Hz. Two different kinds of damage mechanisms were observed (I) the damage mechanism in the stable-passive state was correlated with the localization of the anodic dissolution due to a depassivation-repassivation process, whereas (II) the cyclic stress induced pitting corrosion in the metastable pitting state, which resulted in formation of microcracks. The study of the microcracking process and its evolution is a key to the physical mechanism by which the fatigue life of stainless steels would be affected in an aqueous corrosive solution under the applied potential.

  9. Pulmonary vasodilator responses to sodium nitrite are mediated by an allopurinol-sensitive mechanism in the rat

    PubMed Central

    Casey, David B.; Badejo, Adeleke M.; Dhaliwal, Jasdeep S.; Murthy, Subramanyam N.; Hyman, Albert L.; Nossaman, Bobby D.; Kadowitz, Philip J.

    2009-01-01

    Recent studies show that pulmonary vasodilator responses to nitrite are enhanced by hypoxia. However, the mechanism by which nitrite is converted to vasoactive nitric oxide (NO) is uncertain. In the present study, intravenous injections of sodium nitrite decreased pulmonary and systemic arterial pressures and increased cardiac output. The decreases in pulmonary arterial pressure were enhanced when tone in the pulmonary vascular bed was increased with U-46619. Under elevated tone conditions, decreases in pulmonary and systemic arterial pressures in response to nitrite were attenuated by allopurinol in a dose that did not alter responses to the NO donors, sodium nitroprusside and diethylamine/NO, suggesting that xanthine oxidoreductase is the major enzyme-reducing nitrite to NO. Ventilation with a 10% O2 gas mixture increased pulmonary arterial pressure, and the response to hypoxia was enhanced by NG-nitro-l-arginine methyl ester and not altered by allopurinol. This suggests that NO formed by the endothelium and not from the reduction of plasma nitrite modulates the hypoxic pulmonary vasoconstrictor response. Although intravenous injections of sodium nitrite reversed pulmonary hypertensive responses to U-46619, hypoxia, and NG-nitro-l-arginine methyl ester, the pulmonary vasodilator response to nitrite was not altered by ventilation with 10% O2 when baseline pulmonary arterial pressure was increased to similar values in animals breathing room air or the hypoxic gas. These data provide evidence that xanthine oxidoreductase is the major enzyme-reducing nitrite to vasoactive NO, and that this mechanism is not modified by hypoxia. PMID:19074675

  10. Thymoquinone ameliorated elevated inflammatory cytokines in testicular tissue and sex hormones imbalance induced by oral chronic toxicity with sodium nitrite.

    PubMed

    Alyoussef, Abdullah; Al-Gayyar, Mohammed M H

    2016-07-01

    Scientific evidence illustrated the health hazards of exposure to nitrites for prolonged time. Nitrites affected several body organs due to oxidative, inflammatory and apoptosis properties. Furthermore, thymoquinone (TQ) had curative effects against many diseases. We tried to discover the impact of both sodium nitrite and TQ on inflammatory cytokines contents in testicular tissues and hormonal balance both in vivo and in vitro. Fifty adult male SD rats received 80mg/kg sodium nitrite and treated with either 25 or 50mg/kg TQ daily by oral-gavage for twelve weeks. Testis were removed for sperms' count. Testicular tissue homogenates were used for assessment of protein and gene expression of IL-1β, IL-6, TNF-α, Nrf2 and caspase-3. Serum samples were used for measurement of testosterone, LH, FSH and prolactin. Moreover, all the parameters were measured in human normal testis cell-lines, CRL-7002. Sodium nitrite produced significant decrease in serum testosterone associated with raised FSH, LH and prolactin. Moreover, sodium nitrite significantly elevated TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-6, caspase-3 and reduced Nrf2. TQ significantly reversed all these effects both in vivo and in vitro. In conclusion, TQ ameliorated testicular tissue inflammation and restored the normal balance of sex hormones induced by sodium nitrite both in vivo and in vitro. PMID:27038016

  11. Inhibitor of Clostridium perfringens Formed by Heating Sodium Nitrite in a Chemically Defined Medium

    PubMed Central

    Moran, Dennis M.; Tannenbaum, Steven R.; Archer, Michael C.

    1975-01-01

    An inhibitor of Clostridium perfringens formed when low levels of nitrite were autoclaved with a defined chemical medium. A systematic study of the medium revealed that only amino acids and mineral salts were involved in the production of this inhibitor, which was proven to be a toxic compound formed from cysteine, ferrous sulfate, and sodium nitrite. The inhibitor was compared to several known compounds. S-nitrosocysteine inhibited the test organism, but would not form in the test system in amounts large enough to explain the observed inhibition. Roussin red salt was unstable in the test system and therefore was not the inhibitor. Roussin black salt, which was also inhibitory, could form in sufficient amounts to explain the inhibition. A complex of cysteine, iron, and nitrie oxide was detected in the autoclaved solution of cysteine, ferrous sulfate, and sodium nitrite; this cysteine complex did not appear to be inhibitory, however, at levels which could form in the autoclaved medium. The observed inhibition may have been due to the combined effects of sublethal concentrations of each compound. PMID:173239

  12. Temperature dependent structural and spectroscopic studies of sodium gallosilicate nitrite sodalite

    SciTech Connect

    Gesing, Thorsten M.; Schmidt, Burkhard C.; Murshed, M. Mangir

    2010-11-15

    We report on temperature dependent crystal structures of sodium gallosilicate nitrite sodalite Na{sub 8}[GaSiO{sub 4}]{sub 6}(NO{sub 2}){sub 2} between 293 and 973 K. The crystal structures were refined from X-ray powder data Rietveld refinements in the space group P4-bar 3n. The gallium and silicon atoms on the tetrahedral framework positions are totally ordered. The nitrite anion was found slightly away from the center of the sodalite cage, which is tetrahedrally surrounded by four sodium atoms. The linear thermal expansion coefficient was calculated from the lattice expansion data. The change of the geometries of the framework has been observed on heating the polycrystalline sample, that is, T-O bond lengths slightly decreased, T-O-T angle non-linearly increased, tilt of the TO{sub 4} tetrahedra decreased (framework untwist) and their tetragonal tetrahedral distortion decreased with some scatterings. Of particular note, the tetragonal tetrahedra distortion of GaO{sub 4} tetrahedra approached close to zero at higher temperatures, which points to a distortion direction to a relaxed state of GaO{sub 4} tetrahedra on heating. The mobility of sodium atoms above 600 K leads to different sodium content in some sodalite cages and results in the appearance of different domains. The consequence of this domain formation to the strain of the crystalline system and to the average crystals size have been explained. Both Fourier transform infrared and micro-Raman spectra showed typical absorption bands of nitrite sodalite. The change of the frequency shift and full-width at half-maximum of some selected bands has been studied as function of temperature.

  13. Effectiveness of acidified sodium chlorite and other sanitizers to control Escherichia coli O157:H7 on tomato surfaces.

    PubMed

    Inatsu, Yasuhiro; Kitagawa, Tomoko; Bari, Md Latiful; Nei, Daisuke; Juneja, Vijay; Kawamoto, Shinichi

    2010-06-01

    The use of a suitable sanitizer can reduce the risk of produce-related foodborne illnesses. We evaluated the effectiveness of several sanitizers to reduce inoculated Escherichia coli O157:H7 on the surface of cherry tomatoes (Solanum lycopersicum var. cerasiform). Depending on the method of inoculation (dipping/spotting), each of 80 g (eight tomatoes) of inoculated cherry tomatoes was washed in 400 mL of sanitizer solutions or 400 mL distilled water for 5 minutes. The effectiveness of sanitizers on spot-inoculated E. coli O157:H7 on tomato surfaces was found higher than on dip-inoculated tomatoes. Washing with water or chlorine water (0.1 g/L as free chlorine) could reduce 1.3 log CFU/g of E. coli O157:H7 in dip-inoculated (6.8 log CFU/g) tomatoes. Washing with lactic acid (LA) solution (1.0 g/L), phytic acid solution (1.0 g/L), calcinated seashells (oyster/sakhalin surf clam), and 1.0 g/L chitosan in 0.5 g/L LA (Chito) did not exhibit a significant higher effectiveness than that of water wash alone (1.0 log CFU/g). Acidified sodium chlorite (ASC) solution prepared from 0.5 g/L of sodium chlorite and 1.0 g/L LA or phytic acid reduced 3.5 log CFU/g of E. coli O157:H7 in dip-inoculated tomato surfaces. ASC (0.5 g/L of sodium chlorite and 1.0 g/L of LA) wash followed by a second wash with LA exhibited an additional sanitary effectiveness compared to a single wash with ASC. However, washing with ASC followed by a second wash with Chito exhibited an additional 1.0 log CFU/g reduction compared to a secondary wash with water. No significant difference of color, taste, and texture was observed among the washed cherry tomatoes. PMID:20113205

  14. Pulmonary vasodilator responses to sodium nitrite are mediated by an allopurinol-sensitive mechanism in the rat.

    PubMed

    Casey, David B; Badejo, Adeleke M; Dhaliwal, Jasdeep S; Murthy, Subramanyam N; Hyman, Albert L; Nossaman, Bobby D; Kadowitz, Philip J

    2009-02-01

    Recent studies show that pulmonary vasodilator responses to nitrite are enhanced by hypoxia. However, the mechanism by which nitrite is converted to vasoactive nitric oxide (NO) is uncertain. In the present study, intravenous injections of sodium nitrite decreased pulmonary and systemic arterial pressures and increased cardiac output. The decreases in pulmonary arterial pressure were enhanced when tone in the pulmonary vascular bed was increased with U-46619. Under elevated tone conditions, decreases in pulmonary and systemic arterial pressures in response to nitrite were attenuated by allopurinol in a dose that did not alter responses to the NO donors, sodium nitroprusside and diethylamine/NO, suggesting that xanthine oxidoreductase is the major enzyme-reducing nitrite to NO. Ventilation with a 10% O(2) gas mixture increased pulmonary arterial pressure, and the response to hypoxia was enhanced by N(G)-nitro-l-arginine methyl ester and not altered by allopurinol. This suggests that NO formed by the endothelium and not from the reduction of plasma nitrite modulates the hypoxic pulmonary vasoconstrictor response. Although intravenous injections of sodium nitrite reversed pulmonary hypertensive responses to U-46619, hypoxia, and N(G)-nitro-l-arginine methyl ester, the pulmonary vasodilator response to nitrite was not altered by ventilation with 10% O(2) when baseline pulmonary arterial pressure was increased to similar values in animals breathing room air or the hypoxic gas. These data provide evidence that xanthine oxidoreductase is the major enzyme-reducing nitrite to vasoactive NO, and that this mechanism is not modified by hypoxia. PMID:19074675

  15. Suggestive evidence for the induction of colonic aberrant crypts in mice fed sodium nitrite.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Lin; Zahid, Muhammad; Anwar, Muhammad M; Pennington, Karen L; Cohen, Samuel M; Wisecarver, James L; Shostrom, Valerie; Mirvish, Sidney S

    2016-01-01

    A reported linkage between processed (nitrite-treated) meat products and the incidence of colon cancer could be due to sodium nitrite (NaNO2) itself or to N-nitroso compounds produced from the nitrite. Exposure to nitrite occurs due to residual nitrite in processed meat and to salivary nitrite arising by reduction of nitrate in vegetables and drinking water. Here we tested whether NaNO2 could induce colonic aberrant crypts (ABC) or ABC foci (ACF), which are putative precursors of colon cancer. We fed NaNO2 in drinking water for 20-25 wk to groups of 8-20 adult female mice. After sacrifice, ABC and ACF were counted in 2-cm distal colonic segments. In Experiment 1, no significant differences in ABC/ACF induction were seen between groups of 13-14 A/J mice fed 0, 0.5, or 1.0 g NaNO2/l drinking water. NaNO2 also did not affect fasting blood glucose levels. In Experiment 2, we fed 0, 1.0, 1.25, or 1.5 g NaNO2/l water to groups of 15 CF-1 mice. Five of the mice fed 1.5 g NaNO2/l showed ABC, whereas all other groups showed only 0-2 ABC/group, including 0 ABC for the group fed 1.25 g NaNO2/l. Overall statistical analysis indicated a dose-response p trends of 0.04. Pairwise comparison of ABC between groups fed 1.25 and 1.5 g NaNO2/l showed p 0.02 for both ABC and ACF, but a similar comparison between the untreated and 1.5 g/l groups showed no significant effects. In Experiment 3, hot dogs (18% of diet), which were fed to CF-1 mice previously treated with azoxymethane, inhibited ABC and ACF induction, but this effect was not significant (P = 0.10-0.12). In conclusion, these results support the view that NaNO2 may be a risk factor for colon carcinogenesis. PMID:26699517

  16. Hemorheological changes and hematometric erythrocyte characteristics in rats after sodium nitrite intoxication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanov, Ivan; Gluhcheva, Yordanka; Petrova, Emilia; Antonova, Nadia

    2014-05-01

    Sodium nitrite (NaNO2) is a precursor to a variety of organic compounds (pharmaceuticals, dyes and pesticides), but it is best known as a food additive. The aim of the study is to investigate the influence of acute (i.p.) treatment of Wistar rats with NaNO2 (at the dose of 50 mg/kg b.w.) on the blood rheological properties and erythrocyte hematometric indices (Hb, HCT, RBC, MCV, RDW, MCH, MCHC). The significant differences were not found in the whole blood viscosity (WBV) values of the control and NaNO2-treated groups. The changes in the erythrocyte hematometric indices were statistically significant for RDW, MCHC and MCH at the 1st hour, five- and ten days after NaNO2 administration. Interestingly, at the day 5th of the NaNO2 treatment we obtained statistically significant lower values for the RBC count, Hb, HCT, RDW, as well as elevated indices MCV (no statistically significant), MCH, MCHC. The results obtained indicate that hemorheological and hematometric parameters examined should be monitored in cases of acute exposure to nitrites — for the purposes of clinical toxicology. The quantitative values of hematometric indices reported in our experimental model could be suitable for predicting NaNO2 intoxication and methemoglobinemia in animals and humans.

  17. 78 FR 68474 - Sodium Nitrite From China And Germany; Scheduling of Expedited Five-Year Reviews Concerning the...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-14

    ... Commission determined that the domestic interested party group response to its notice of institution (78 FR... amendments took effect on November 7, 2011. See 76 FR 61937 (October 6, 2011) and the newly revised... COMMISSION Sodium Nitrite From China And Germany; Scheduling of Expedited Five-Year Reviews Concerning...

  18. Toxicity detection of sodium nitrite, borax and aluminum potassium sulfate using electrochemical method.

    PubMed

    Yu, Dengbin; Yong, Daming; Dong, Shaojun

    2013-04-01

    Based on the inhibition effect on the respiratory chain activity of microorganisms by toxicants, an electrochemical method has been developed to measure the current variation of a mediator in the presence of microorganisms contacted with a toxicant. Microelectrode arrays were adopted in this study, which can accelerate the mass transfer rate of an analyte to the electrode and also increase the total current signal, resulting in an improvement in detection sensitivity. We selected Escherichia coli as the testee and the standard glucose-glutamic acid as an exogenous material. Under oxygen restriction, the experiments in the presence of toxicant were performed at optimum conditions (solution pH 7.0, 37 degrees C and reaction for 3 hr). The resulting solution was then separated from the suspended microorganisms and was measured by an electrochemical method, using ferricyanide as a mediator. The current signal obtained represents the reoxidation of ferrocyanide, which was transformed to inhibiting efficiency, IC50, as a quantitative measure of toxicity. The IC50 values measured were 410, 570 and 830 mg/L for sodium nitrite, borax and aluminum potassium sulfate, respectively. The results show that the toxicity sequence for these three food additives is consistent with the value reported by other methods. Furthermore, the order of damage degree to the microorganism was also observed to be: sodium nitrite > borax > aluminum potassium sulfate > blank, according to the atomic force microscopy images of E. coli after being incubated for 3 hr with the toxic compound in buffer solutions. The electrochemical method is expected to be a sensitive and simple alternative to toxicity screening for chemical food additives. PMID:23923788

  19. Reversal of cerebral vasospasm via intravenous sodium nitrite after subarachnoid hemorrhage in primates

    PubMed Central

    Fathi, Ali Reza; Pluta, Ryszard M.; Bakhtian, Kamran D.; Qi, Meng; Lonser, Russell R.

    2016-01-01

    Object Subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH)-induced vasospasm is a significant underlying cause of aneurysm rupture-related morbidity and death. While long-term intravenous infusion of sodium nitrite (NaNO2) can prevent cerebral vasospasm after SAH, it is not known if the intravenous administration of this compound can reverse established SAH-induced vasospasm. To determine if the intravenous infusion of NaNO2 can reverse established vasospasm, the authors infused primates with the compound after SAH-induced vasospasm was established. Methods Subarachnoid hemorrhage–induced vasospasm was created in 14 cynomolgus macaques via subarachnoid implantation of a 5-ml blood clot. On Day 7 after clot implantation, animals were randomized to either control (saline infusion, 5 monkeys) or treatment groups (intravenous NaNO2 infusion at 300 μg/kg/hr for 3 hours [7 monkeys] or 8 hours [2 monkeys]). Arteriographic vessel diameter was blindly analyzed to determine the degree of vasospasm before, during, and after treatment. Nitric oxide metabolites (nitrite, nitrate, and S-nitrosothiols) were measured in whole blood and CSF. Results Moderate-to-severe vasospasm was present in all animals before treatment (control, 36.2% ± 8.8% [mean ± SD]; treatment, 45.5% ± 12.5%; p = 0.9). While saline infusion did not reduce vasospasm, NaNO2 infusion significantly reduced the degree of vasospasm (26.9% ± 7.6%; p = 0.008). Reversal of the vasospasm lasted more than 2 hours after cessation of the infusion and could be maintained with a prolonged infusion. Nitrite (peak value, 3.7 ± 2.1 μmol/L), nitrate (18.2 ± 5.3 μmol/L), and S-nitrosothiols (33.4 ± 11.4 nmol/L) increased significantly in whole blood, and nitrite increased significantly in CSF. Conclusions These findings indicate that the intravenous infusion of NaNO2 can reverse SAH-induced vasospasm in primates. Further, these findings indicate that a similar treatment paradigm could be useful in reversing cerebral vasospasm after

  20. EFFECTS OF ADDITION RATE AND ACID MATRIX ON THE DESTRUCTION OF AMMONIUM BY THE SEMI-CONTINUOUS ADDITION OF SODIUM NITRITE DURING EVAPORATION

    SciTech Connect

    Kyser, E

    2007-08-27

    The destruction of ammonium by the semi-continuous addition of sodium nitrite during acidic evaporation can be achieved with a wide range of waste compositions. The efficiency of nitrite utilization for ammonium destruction was observed to vary from less than 20% to 60% depending on operating conditions. The effects of nitric acid concentration and nitrite addition rate are dominant factors that affect the efficiency of nitrite utilization for ammonium destruction. Reducing the acid concentration by performing acid recovery via steam stripping prior to performing nitrite destruction of ammonium will require more nitrite due to the low destruction efficiency. The scale-up of the baseline rate nitrite addition rate from the 100 mL to the 1600 gallon batch size has significant uncertainty and poses the risk of lower efficiency at the plant scale. Experience with plant scale processing will improve confidence in the application of nitrite destruction of ammonium to different waste streams.

  1. Predictive model for growth of Clostridium perfringens during cooling of cooked beef supplemented with NaCl, sodium nitrite and sodium pyrophosphate

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This paper presents a model for predicting relative growth of C. perfringens in ground beef products at different percentages of salt (0%, 1%, 2% and 3%) and nitrite (0 and 200 ppm). Included in the experiments were different levels of sodium pyrophosphate (SPP). The results of the experiments indic...

  2. Susceptibility of channel catfish (Ictalurus punctatus) fed dietary sodium chloride to nitrite toxicity

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Juvenile channel catfish (Ictalurus punctatus) were fed nutritionally complete, practical basal diets supplemented with NaCl at 0, 1, 2, or 4 % of diet to apparent satiation twice daily for 10 weeks. Catfish were exposed to nitrite after six (7.70 mg/l nitrite-N) and ten (7.18 mg/l nitrite-N) weeks ...

  3. Protocol: does sodium nitrite administration reduce ischaemia-reperfusion injury in patients presenting with acute ST segment elevation myocardial infarction? Nitrites in acute myocardial infarction (NIAMI)

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Whilst advances in reperfusion therapies have reduced early mortality from acute myocardial infarction, heart failure remains a common complication, and may develop very early or long after the acute event. Reperfusion itself leads to further tissue damage, a process described as ischaemia-reperfusion-injury (IRI), which contributes up to 50% of the final infarct size. In experimental models nitrite administration potently protects against IRI in several organs, including the heart. In the current study we investigate whether intravenous sodium nitrite administration immediately prior to percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) in patients with acute ST segment elevation myocardial infarction will reduce myocardial infarct size. This is a phase II, randomised, placebo-controlled, double-blinded and multicentre trial. Methods and outcomes The aim of this trial is to determine whether a 5 minute systemic injection of sodium nitrite, administered immediately before opening of the infarct related artery, results in significant reduction of IRI in patients with first acute ST elevation myocardial infarction (MI). The primary clinical end point is the difference in infarct size between sodium nitrite and placebo groups measured using cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging (CMR) performed at 6–8 days following the AMI and corrected for area at risk (AAR) using the endocardial surface area technique. Secondary end points include (i) plasma creatine kinase and Troponin I measured in blood samples taken pre-injection of the study medication and over the following 72 hours; (ii) infarct size at six months; (iii) Infarct size corrected for AAR measured at 6–8 days using T2 weighted triple inversion recovery (T2-W SPAIR or STIR) CMR imaging; (iv) Left ventricular (LV) ejection fraction measured by CMR at 6–8 days and six months following injection of the study medication; and (v) LV end systolic volume index at 6–8 days and six months. Funding, ethics and

  4. Role of glycogen in processes of cerebellar glial cells under conditions of its damage with sodium nitrite.

    PubMed

    Samosudova, N V; Reutov, V P; Larionova, N P

    2010-12-01

    Ultrastructure of processes of glial cell, astrocytes of the molecular layer of cerebellar cortex in Rana temporaria frog, under conditions of damage to the cerebellum caused by NO-generating compound sodium nitrite was studied under an electron microscope. It was found that astrocytes have at least two types of processes: the first (fibrillar) primarily contained numerous fibrils and few glycogen granules and the second (granular) primarily containing glycogen granules. In the presence of NO-generating compound in toxic doses, fibrillar processes are damaged or completely degrade more rapidly than granular ones. The processes containing glycogen can protect both damaged synapses and individual synaptic buttons by forming a compact structure, wrapping, around them. We analyzed the possible role of glycogen of cerebellar glial cell processes in neuroglial interactions in the presence of sodium nitrite. PMID:21240384

  5. Sodium nitrite potentiates renal oxidative stress and injury in hemoglobin exposed guinea pigs.

    PubMed

    Baek, Jin Hyen; Zhang, Xiaoyuan; Williams, Matthew C; Hicks, Wayne; Buehler, Paul W; D'Agnillo, Felice

    2015-07-01

    Methemoglobin-forming drugs, such as sodium nitrite (NaNO2), may exacerbate oxidative toxicity under certain chronic or acute hemolytic settings. In this study, we evaluated markers of renal oxidative stress and injury in guinea pigs exposed to extracellular hemoglobin (Hb) followed by NaNO2 at doses sufficient to simulate clinically relevant acute methemoglobinemia. NaNO2 induced rapid and extensive oxidation of plasma Hb in this model. This was accompanied by increased renal expression of the oxidative response effectors nuclear factor erythroid 2-derived-factor 2 (Nrf-2) and heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1), elevated non-heme iron deposition, lipid peroxidation, interstitial inflammatory cell activation, increased expression of tubular injury markers kidney injury-1 marker (KIM-1) and liver-fatty acid binding protein (L-FABP), podocyte injury, and cell death. Importantly, these indicators of renal oxidative stress and injury were minimal or absent following infusion of Hb or NaNO2 alone. Together, these results suggest that the exposure to NaNO2 in settings associated with increased extracellular Hb may potentiate acute renal toxicity via processes that are independent of NaNO2 induced erythrocyte methemoglobinemia. PMID:25891524

  6. Efficacy of two acidified chlorite postmilking teat disinfectants with sodium dodecylbenzene sulfonic acid on prevention of contagious mastitis using an experimental challenge protocol.

    PubMed

    Oura, L Y; Fox, L K; Warf, C C; Kempt, G K

    2002-01-01

    Two acidified sodium chlorite postmilking teat disinfectants were evaluated for efficacy against Staphylococcus aureus and Streptococcus agalactiae by using National Mastitis Council experimental challenge procedures. The effect of these teat dips on teat skin and teat end condition was also determined. Both dips contained 0.32% sodium chlorite, 1.32% lactic, and 2.5% glycerin. Dips differed in the amount of sodium dodecylbenzene sulfonic acid (0.53 or 0.27%) added as a surfactant. Both dips significantly reduced new intramammary infection (IMI) rates compared with undipped controls. The dip containing 0.53% dodecylbenzene sulfonic acid reduced new IMI by Staph. aureus by 72% and Strep. agalactiae by 75%. The dip containing 0.27% dodecylbenzene sulfonic acid reduced new IMI by Staph. aureus by 100% and by Strep. agalactiae by 88%. Changes in teat skin and teat end condition for treatment and control groups varied in parallel over time. Teats treated with either teat dip had higher mean teat skin and teat end scores than control teats at some weeks. However, teat skin and teat end condition did not tend to change from the start to the completion of the trial. Application of the two new postmilking teat dips was effective in reducing new IMI from contagious mastitis pathogens. (Key words: teat dip, contagious mastitis, chlorous acid) PMID:11860118

  7. Susceptibility of channel catfish (Ictalurus punctatus) fed dietary sodium chloride to nitrite toxicity

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Toxicity of nitrite to fish is caused by the oxidation of hemoglobin (Hb) to form methemoglobin (MetHb), which is incapable of binding oxygen. Methemoglobinemia causes blood to turn brown in color and has been termed “brown blood disease”. Treatment of nitrite toxicity in fish has primarily consiste...

  8. Susceptibility of Nile tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus) fed dietary sodium chloride to nitrite toxicity

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Juvenile Nile tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus) were fed diets supplemented with 0 or 6% NaCl for 10 weeks. Tilapia were exposed to approximately 21 mg/l nitrite-N after five and ten weeks of feeding to determine the effect of dietary NaCl supplementation on resistance to nitrite toxicity. Fish were...

  9. Growth of Staphylococcus and Salmonella on Frankfurters With and Without Sodium Nitrite

    PubMed Central

    Bayne, Henry G.; Michener, H. David

    1975-01-01

    Conventional and nitrite-free frankfurters in loosely wrapped packages were compared as to their ability to support growth of Salmonella, Staphylococcus, and their naturally occurring spoilage flora at 7 C (simulating refrigerated storage) and 20 C (simulating possible temperature abuse). At 7 C Salmonella did not grow in either type of frankfurter; Staphylococcus and the natural spoilage flora sometimes grew more rapidly in the absence of nitrite, but the difference was not significant. At 20 C growth of Salmonella, Staphylococcus, and of the spoilage flora was, at most, only slightly faster on nitrite-free frankfurters. Salmonella was not suppressed in broth culture experiments at the pH and nitrite content found in frankfurters. Although either type of frankfurter can become hazardous due to growth of Salmonella or Staphylococcus, no unusual or additional hazard resulted from the omission of nitrite from frankfurters. PMID:952

  10. Sodium Nitrite-Mediated Killing of the Major Cystic Fibrosis Pathogens Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Staphylococcus aureus, and Burkholderia cepacia under Anaerobic Planktonic and Biofilm Conditions▿

    PubMed Central

    Major, Tiffany A.; Panmanee, Warunya; Mortensen, Joel E.; Gray, Larry D.; Hoglen, Niel; Hassett, Daniel J.

    2010-01-01

    A hallmark of airways in patients with cystic fibrosis (CF) is highly refractory, chronic infections by several opportunistic bacterial pathogens. A recent study demonstrated that acidified sodium nitrite (A-NO2−) killed the highly refractory mucoid form of Pseudomonas aeruginosa, a pathogen that significantly compromises lung function in CF patients (S. S. Yoon et al., J. Clin. Invest. 116:436-446, 2006). Therefore, the microbicidal activity of A-NO2− (pH 6.5) against the following three major CF pathogens was assessed: P. aeruginosa (a mucoid, mucA22 mutant and a sequenced nonmucoid strain, PAO1), Staphylococcus aureus USA300 (methicillin resistant), and Burkholderia cepacia, a notoriously antibiotic-resistant organism. Under planktonic, anaerobic conditions, growth of all strains except for P. aeruginosa PAO1 was inhibited by 7.24 mM (512 μg ml−1 NO2−). B. cepacia was particularly sensitive to low concentrations of A-NO2− (1.81 mM) under planktonic conditions. In antibiotic-resistant communities known as biofilms, which are reminiscent of end-stage CF airway disease, A-NO2− killed mucoid P. aeruginosa, S. aureus, and B. cepacia; 1 to 2 logs of cells were killed after a 2-day incubation with a single dose of ∼15 mM A-NO2−. Animal toxicology and phase I human trials indicate that these bactericidal levels of A-NO2− can be easily attained by aerosolization. Thus, in summary, we demonstrate that A-NO2− is very effective at killing these important CF pathogens and could be effective in other infectious settings, particularly under anaerobic conditions where bacterial defenses against the reduction product of A-NO2−, nitric oxide (NO), are dramatically reduced. PMID:20696868

  11. Inhibition of nitrite-induced toxicity in channel catfish by calcium chloride and sodium chloride

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tommasso J.R., Wright, M. I.; Simco, B.A.; Davis, K.B.

    1980-01-01

    Environmental chloride has been shown to inhibit methemoglobin formation in fish, thereby offering a protective effect against nitrite toxicity. Channel catfish (Ictalurus punctatus) were simultaneously exposed to various environmental nitrite and chloride levels (as either CaCl2 or NaCl) in dechlorinated tap water (40 mg/L total hardness, 47 mg/L alkalinity, 4 mg/L chloride, pH = 6.9-7.1, and temperature 21-24°C). Methemoglobin levels in fish simultaneously exposed to 2.5 mg/L nitrite and up to 30 mg/L chloride as either CaCl2 or NaCl were similar but significantly lower than in unprotected fish. Exposure to 10 mg/L nitrite and 60 mg/L chloride resulted in methemoglobin levels similar to those of the controls; most unprotected fish died. Fish exposed to 10 mg/L nitrite had significantly lower methemoglobin levels when protected with 15.0 mg/L chloride as CaCl2 than with NaCl. Fish exposed to nitrite in the presence of 60 mg/L chloride (as either CaCl2 or NaCl) had similar 24-h LC50 values that were significantly elevated above those obtained in the absence of chloride. Calcium had little effect on tolerance to nitrite toxicity in channel catfish in contrast to its large effect reported in steelhead trout (Salmo gairdneri).

  12. In silico Logistic Model for Table Olive Related Microorganisms As a Function of Sodium Metabisulphite, Cinnamaldehyde, pH, and Type of Acidifying Agent

    PubMed Central

    Romero-Gil, Verónica; Garrido-Fernández, Antonio; Arroyo-López, Francisco N.

    2016-01-01

    A probabilistic/logistic model, based on binary data (growth/no growth), was used to assess the effects of sodium metabisulphite (SM) and cinnamaldehyde (CIN; 0–1000 mg/L) against the main microbial groups found in table olive environment [lactic acid bacteria (LAB), yeasts, and Enterobacteriaceae], according to pH (range 3.5–5.0), and type of acidifying agent (HCl or pyruvic acid). The inhibitory effect of SM depended on the pH while that of CIN was scarcely influenced by it (except for LAB). LAB were more sensitive to SM, while yeasts were to CIN. The use of pyruvic acid for correction of pH always produced a reduction (compared to HCl) of the inhibitory power of both preservatives. The in silico models for HCl showed that, at pH 4.0, and growth probability 0.01, the LAB population might be inhibited by the presence in the medium of 150 mg/L SM or 1000 mg/L CIN, while in the case of yeasts, 450 mg/L SM, or 150 mg/L CIN are required. No growth of Enterobacteriaceae was observed at this (or lower) pH level. The results obtained may contribute to the stabilization of non-thermally treated table olive packaging.

  13. Urinary Excretion of N-Nitroso Compounds in Rats Fed Sodium Nitrite and/or Hot Dogs

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Nitrite-treated meat is a reported risk factor for colon cancer. Mice that ingested sodium nitrite (NaNO2) or hot dogs (a nitrite-treated product) showed increased fecal excretion of apparent N-nitroso compounds (ANC). Here, we investigated for the first time whether rats excrete increased amounts of ANC in their urine after they are fed NaNO2 and/or hot dogs. Rats were treated for 7 days with NaNO2 in drinking water or were fed hot dogs. Their 24 h urine samples were analyzed for ANC by thermal energy analysis on days 1–4 after nitrite or hot dog treatment was stopped. For two rats fed 480 mg NaNO2/L drinking water, mean urinary ANC excretion on days 1–4 was 30, 5.2, 2.5, and 0.8 nmol/day, respectively. For two to eight rats/dose given varied NaNO2 doses, mean urinary ANC output on day 1 increased from 0.9 (for no nitrite) to 37 (for 1000 mg NaNO2/L drinking water) nmol ANC/day. Urine samples of four rats fed 40–60% hot dogs contained 12–13 nmol ANC on day 1. Linear regression analysis showed highly significant correlations between urinary ANC excretion on day 1 after stopping treatment and varied (a) NaNO2 level in drinking water for rats fed semipurified or commercials diet and (b) hot dog levels in the diet. Some correlations remained significant up to 4 days after nitrite treatment was stopped. Urinary output of ANC precursors (compounds that yield ANC after mild nitrosation) for rats fed semipurified or commercial diet was 11–17 or 23–48 μmol/day, respectively. Nitrosothiols and iron nitrosyls were not detected in urinary ANC and ANCP. Excretion of urinary ANC was about 60% of fecal ANC excretion for 1 to 2 days after NaNO2 was fed. Administered NaNO2 was not excreted unchanged in rat urine. We conclude that urinary ANC excretion in humans could usefully be surveyed to indicate exposure to N-nitroso compounds. PMID:25183213

  14. Sodium nitrite exerts an antihypertensive effect and improves endothelial function through activation of eNOS in the SHR.

    PubMed

    Ling, Wei Chih; Murugan, Dharmani Devi; Lau, Yeh Siang; Vanhoutte, Paul M; Mustafa, Mohd Rais

    2016-01-01

    Sodium nitrite (NaNO2) induces relaxation in isolated arteries partly through an endothelium-dependent mechanism involving NO-eNOS-sGC-cGMP pathway. The present study was designed to investigate the effect of chronic NaNO2 administration on arterial systolic blood pressure (SBP) and vascular function in hypertensive rats. NaNO2 (150 mg L-1) was given in drinking water for four weeks to spontaneously (SHR) and Nω-Nitro-L-arginine methyl ester hydrochloride (L-NAME) treated hypertensive SD rats. Arterial SBP and vascular function in isolated aortae were studied. Total plasma nitrate/nitrite and vascular cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) levels were measured using commercially available assay kits. Vascular nitric oxide (NO) levels were evaluated by DAF-FM fluorescence while the proteins involved in endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) activation was determined by Western blotting. NaNO2 treatment reduced SBP, improved the impaired endothelium-dependent relaxation, increased plasma total nitrate/nitrite level and vascular tissue NO and cGMP levels in SHR. Furthermore, increased presence of phosphorylated eNOS and Hsp-90 was observed in NaNO2-treated SHR. The beneficial effect of nitrite treatment was not observed in L-NAME treated hypertensive SD rats. The present study provides evidence that chronic treatment of genetically hypertensive rats with NaNO2 improves endothelium-dependent relaxation in addition to its antihypertensive effect, partly through mechanisms involving activation of eNOS. PMID:27616322

  15. Sodium nitrite enhances generation of reactive oxygen species that decrease antioxidant power and inhibit plasma membrane redox system of human erythrocytes.

    PubMed

    Ansari, Fariheen Aisha; Mahmood, Riaz

    2016-08-01

    Nitrite/nitrate salts are used in fertilizers and as food preservatives. Human exposure to high levels of nitrite results in its uptake and subsequent entry into blood where it can interact with erythrocytes. We show that treatment of human erythrocytes with sodium nitrite (NaNO2 ) results in a dose-dependent increase in the production of reactive oxygen species. This was accompanied by a decrease in the antioxidant power which lowered the free radical quenching and metal-reducing ability. NaNO2 treatment also inhibited plasma membrane redox system (PMRS) of erythrocytes. These changes increase the susceptibility of erythrocytes to oxidative damage, decrease the antioxidant power of whole blood, and can be a major cause of nitrite-induced cellular toxicity. PMID:27214747

  16. Comparison of the treatment of cyanide poisoning in the cynomolgus monkey with sodium nitrite of 4-dimethylaminophenol (4-dmap), with and without sodium thiosulfate. Technical report, April 1979-September 1981

    SciTech Connect

    Stemler, F.W.; Groff, W.A.; Kaminskis, A.; Johnson, R.P.; Froehlich, H.L.

    1994-02-01

    Two methemoglobin generating compounds, sodium nitrite (iv) or 4-dimethylaminophenol (4-DMAP) (im), with and without sodium thiosulfate (iv), were compared as post-treatment therapy in anesthetized monkeys poisoning with cyanide. Arterial blood samples were taken before and after an injection of sodium cyanide (8.4 mg/kg) and treatment for analyses of blood cyanide, plasma cyanide, thiocyanate and methemoglobin content. Physiologic parameters were monitored in these treated cyanide-poisoned animals. The time course of methemoglobin formation and physiologic parameters were also monitored in animals receiving only 4-DMAP or sodium nitrite. A maximal methemoglobin level was observed at 30 minutes following injection of 4-DMAP, and 60 minutes post injection with sodium nitrite. Volumes of distribution (Vd) of cyanide were calculated from the concentrations of cyanide in blood samples and doses of cyanide injected. Although 4-DMAP forms methemoglobin more rapidly than sodium nitrite, both compounds form methemoglobin quickly enough to provide protection against cyanide poisoning. The protection offered by either compound against the lethal effects of cyanide was potentiated when used in combination with sodium thiosulfate.

  17. Sodium nitrite attenuates hypertension-in-pregnancy and blunts increases in soluble fms-like tyrosine kinase-1 and in vascular endothelial growth factor.

    PubMed

    Gonçalves-Rizzi, Victor Hugo; Possomato-Vieira, Jose Sergio; Sales Graça, Tamiris Uracs; Nascimento, Regina Aparecida; Dias-Junior, Carlos A

    2016-07-01

    Preeclampsia is a pregnancy-associated disorder characterized by hypertension with uncertain pathogenesis. Increases in antiangiogenic soluble fms-like tyrosine kinase-1 (sFlt-1) and reductions in nitric oxide (NO) bioavailability have been observed in preeclamptic women. However, the specific mechanisms linking these detrimental changes to the hypertension-in-pregnancy are not clearly understood. In this regard, while recent findings have suggested that nitrite-derived NO formation exerts antihypertensive and antioxidant effects, no previous study has examined these responses to orally administered nitrite in hypertension-in-pregnancy. We then hypothesized restoring NO bioavailability with sodium nitrite in pregnant rats upon NO synthesis inhibition with N(omega)-nitro-l-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME) attenuates hypertension and high circulating levels of sFlt-1. Number and weight of pups and placentae were recorded to assess maternal-fetal interface. Plasma sFlt-1, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and biochemical determinants of NO formation and of antioxidant function were measured. We found that sodium nitrite blunts the hypertension-in-pregnancy and restores the NO bioavailability, and concomitantly prevents the L-NAME-induced high circulating sFlt-1 and VEGF levels. Also, our results suggest that nitrite-derived NO protected against reductions in litter size and placental weight caused by L-NAME, improving number of viable and resorbed fetuses and antioxidant function. Therefore, the present findings are consistent with the hypothesis that nitrite-derived NO may possibly be the driving force behind the maternal and fetal beneficial effects observed with sodium nitrite during hypertension-in-pregnancy. Certainly further investigations are required in preeclampsia, since counteracting the damages to the mother and fetal sides resulting from hypertension and elevated sFlt-1 levels may provide a great benefit in this gestational hypertensive disease

  18. Preliminary safe-handling experiments on a mixture of cesium nickel ferrocyanide and equimolar sodium nitrate/nitrite

    SciTech Connect

    Scheele, R.D. ); Cady, H.H. )

    1992-01-01

    As part of the Hanford Site's evaluation of the potential hazards associated with the storage of ferrocyanide wastes generated when ferrocyanide was used to scavenge radiocesium from waste supernates in the 1950s, the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) subcontracted with Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) to perform a series of sensitivity tests. These test supplement PNL's thermal sensitivity testing results on the reactivity of cesium nickel ferrocyanide (Cs{sub 2}NiFe(CN){sub 6}) and nitrates and nitrites (Burger and Schelle 1991). LANL used a selected set of their standard tests to determine the sensitivity of a mixture of Cs{sub 2}NiFe(CN){sub 6} (FECN-1) and equimolar sodium nitrate and nitrite oxidant to nonthermal and thermal stimuli. The stoichiometric ratio of oxidant to Cs{sub 2}NiFe(CN){sub 6} in the tested mixture FECN-1 was 1.1:1. The appendix presents the results of the LANL testing of the sensitivity of FECN-1 to initiation by mechanical impact, spark, friction, and various thermal conditions. In addition to the sensitivity testing, LANL used an Accelerating Rate Calorimeter (ARC) to estimate the behavior of large batches of the mixture.

  19. Preliminary safe-handling experiments on a mixture of cesium nickel ferrocyanide and equimolar sodium nitrate/nitrite

    SciTech Connect

    Scheele, R.D.; Cady, H.H.

    1992-01-01

    As part of the Hanford Site`s evaluation of the potential hazards associated with the storage of ferrocyanide wastes generated when ferrocyanide was used to scavenge radiocesium from waste supernates in the 1950s, the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) subcontracted with Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) to perform a series of sensitivity tests. These test supplement PNL`s thermal sensitivity testing results on the reactivity of cesium nickel ferrocyanide (Cs{sub 2}NiFe(CN){sub 6}) and nitrates and nitrites (Burger and Schelle 1991). LANL used a selected set of their standard tests to determine the sensitivity of a mixture of Cs{sub 2}NiFe(CN){sub 6} (FECN-1) and equimolar sodium nitrate and nitrite oxidant to nonthermal and thermal stimuli. The stoichiometric ratio of oxidant to Cs{sub 2}NiFe(CN){sub 6} in the tested mixture FECN-1 was 1.1:1. The appendix presents the results of the LANL testing of the sensitivity of FECN-1 to initiation by mechanical impact, spark, friction, and various thermal conditions. In addition to the sensitivity testing, LANL used an Accelerating Rate Calorimeter (ARC) to estimate the behavior of large batches of the mixture.

  20. Exploring the Ideal Gas Law through a Quantitative Gasometric Analysis of Nitrogen Produced by the Reaction of Sodium Nitrite with Sulfamic Acid

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yu, Anne

    2010-01-01

    The gasometric analysis of nitrogen produced in a reaction between sodium nitrite, NaNO[superscript 2], and sulfamic acid, H(NH[superscript 2])SO[superscript 3], provides an alternative to more common general chemistry experiments used to study the ideal gas law, such as the experiment in which magnesium is reacted with hydrochloric acid. This…

  1. Effect of meat ingredients (sodium nitrite and erythorbate) and processing (vacuum storage and packaging atmosphere) on germination and outgrowth of Clostridium perfringens spores in ham during abusive cooling

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The effect of nitrite and erythorbate on Clostridium perfringens spore germination and outgrowth in ham during abusive cooling (15 h) was evaluated. Ham was formulated with ground pork, NaNO2 (0, 50, 100, 150 or 200 ppm) and sodium erythorbate (0 or 547 ppm). Ten grams of meat (stored at 5C for 3 or...

  2. Efficacy of UV, acidified sodium hypochlorite, and mild heat for decontamination of surface and infiltrated Escherichia coli O157:H7 on green onions and baby spinach.

    PubMed

    Durak, M Zeki; Churey, John J; Worobo, Randy W

    2012-07-01

    Produce-associated foodborne illnesses outbreaks have highlighted the need for more effective decontamination methods to ensure the safety of fresh produce. The main objective of this study was to evaluate the individual and combined efficacies of germicidal UV light (12.5 to 500 mJ/cm(2)), acidified sodium hypochlorite (ASC 10 to 200 ppm), and mild heat (40 to 50°C) for decontaminating green onions and baby spinach infected with Escherichia coli O157:H7. Samples were inoculated by spot and dip inoculation methods to mimic surface and infiltrated E. coli O157:H7 contamination, respectively. In green onions and baby spinach, the individual efficacies of UV, ASC, and mild-heat treatments varied based on the produce type and contamination method. Following analysis of the efficacies of the single treatments, a combined treatment with 125 mJ/cm(2) UV and 200 ppm of ASC at 50°C was selected for spot-inoculated green onions, and a combined treatment with 125 mJ/cm(2) UV and 200 ppm of ASC at 20°C was selected for spot- and dip-inoculated baby spinach. While a >5-log reduction was achieved with the combination treatment for spot-inoculated green onions with an initial contamination level of 7.2 log CFU per spot, the same treatment reduced E. coli O157:H7 populations below the detection limit (<1 log) on green onions spot inoculated at a lower contamination level (4.3 log CFU per spot). On spot- and dip-inoculated baby spinach, the combined treatment reduced E. coli O157:H7 populations by 2.8 log CFU per spot and 2.6 log CFU/g, respectively. The combined treatment of 500 mJ/cm(2) UV and 200 ppm of ASC at 50°C selected for the decontamination of dip-inoculated green onions resulted in a 2.2-log CFU/g reduction. These findings suggest that when foodborne pathogens contaminate produce and subsequently infiltrate, attach to, or become localized into protected areas, the individual or combined applications of UV, ASC, and mild-heat treatments have limited decontamination

  3. The interaction of phosphate coatings on a carbon steel surface with a sodium nitrite and silicate solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramanauskas, R.; Girčienė, O.; Gudavičiūtė, L.; Selskis, A.

    2015-02-01

    Mono-cation PZn, bi-cation PZnCa, PZnNi and three-cation PZnNiMn crystalline phosphate coatings were modified with an inhibitor mixture: a sodium nitrite and sodium silicate solution with the aim to establish the reasons of protective ability enhancement of passive films on a carbon steel surface in an alkaline media. The SEM, EDS, XRD and XPS techniques were applied for the structural, phase and composition characterization of the phosphate coatings, voltammetric measurements were carried out to determine the passive layer protective ability, while EIS studies yielded information on the coatings porosity. Compact films of Si compounds were formed on the surface of the phosphate coatings during their modification procedure, which was accompanied by an increase in the protective ability of phosphate layer. A higher porosity and regularly shaped crystallites of the phosphate layer were favourable for accumulation of a greater amount of Si in the modified coatings. The protective ability of the modified coatings remains fairly pronounced, which testifies that the phosphate layer porosity is not the only factor influencing the corrosion behaviour of the coating. The difference in the nature of Si compounds comprising modified phosphate coatings leads to the differences in their protective ability.

  4. Topical sodium nitrite for chronic leg ulcers in patients with sickle cell anaemia: a phase 1 dose-finding safety and tolerability trial

    PubMed Central

    Minniti, Caterina P; Gorbach, Alexander M; Xu, Dihua; Hon, Yuen Yi; Delaney, Kara-Marie; Seidel, Miles; Malik, Nitin; Peters-Lawrence, Marlene; Cantilena, Carly; Nichols, James S; Mendelsohn, Laurel; Conrey, Anna; Grimes, George; Kato, Gregory J

    2015-01-01

    Summary Background Well-tolerated and effective treatments are needed for chronic leg ulcers in sickle cell anaemia. Topical sodium nitrite, a known nitric oxide donor, enhances blood flow in ulcers and has known bacteriostatic effects. We aimed to assess the safety, tolerability, and pharmacokinetics of topical sodium nitrite in patients with sickle cell disease and chronic leg ulcers. Methods We enrolled adult patients from an ambulatory clinic at the National Institutes of Health (Bethesda, MD, USA) with sickle cell anaemia with leg ulcers (with a surface area of 2.5–100 cm2) persisting for at least 4 weeks into a safety and tolerability phase 1 dose-escalation trial of topical sodium nitrite. Increasing concentrations of sodium nitrite cream were applied twice weekly for 4 weeks to one ulcer per patient at five dose levels (0.5%, 1%, 1.5%, 1.8%, and 2%). The primary endpoints were safety and tolerability, with secondary endpoints of pharmacokinetics, blood flow, and wound healing. Pain relief was analysed post hoc. Endpoints were analysed over time for the whole study population and according to dose level. This study is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov, number NCT01316796. Findings Between April 4, 2011, and March 19, 2013, we enrolled 18 adult patients with sickle cell anaemia and leg ulcers into our trial. We assigned three patients into each cohort, and each cohort was treated with a different concentration of sodium nitrite cream (cohort 1: 0.5%, cohort 2: 1.0%, cohort 3: 1.5%, and cohort 4: 2.0%). Patients were not enrolled into the next cohort dose until we were able to establish that no dose-limiting toxicities were observed. An additional six patients were enrolled to cohort 3a: 1.8%, after two patients in cohort 4 had asymptomatic drops in diastolic blood pressure. No grade 3–4 adverse events were observed, and there were no serious adverse events or dose-limiting side-effects. Pharmacokinetic analysis showed that systemic absorption of sodium

  5. Sodium nitrite induces acute central nervous system toxicity in guinea pigs exposed to systemic cell-free hemoglobin

    SciTech Connect

    Buehler, Paul W.; Butt, Omer I.; D'Agnillo, Felice

    2011-06-10

    Highlights: {yields} Toxicological implications associated with the use of NaNO{sub 2} therapy to treat systemic cell-free Hb exposure are not well-defined. {yields} Systemic Hb exposure followed by NaNO{sub 2} infusion induces acute CNS toxicities in guinea pigs. {yields} These CNS effects were not reproduced by the infusion of cell-free Hb or NaNO{sub 2} alone. {yields} NaNO{sub 2}-mediated oxidation of cell-free Hb may play a causative role in the observed CNS changes. -- Abstract: Systemic cell-free hemoglobin (Hb) released via hemolysis disrupts vascular homeostasis, in part, through the scavenging of nitric oxide (NO). Sodium nitrite (NaNO{sub 2}) therapy can attenuate the hypertensive effects of Hb. However, the chemical reactivity of NaNO{sub 2} with Hb may enhance heme- or iron-mediated toxicities. Here, we investigate the effect of NaNO{sub 2} on the central nervous system (CNS) in guinea pigs exposed to systemic cell-free Hb. Intravascular infusion of NaNO{sub 2}, at doses sufficient to alleviate Hb-mediated blood pressure changes, reduced the expression of occludin, but not zona occludens-1 (ZO-1) or claudin-5, in cerebral tight junctions 4 h after Hb infusion. This was accompanied by increased perivascular heme oxygenase-1 expression, neuronal iron deposition, increased astrocyte and microglial activation, and reduced expression of neuron-specific nuclear protein (NeuN). These CNS changes were not observed in animals treated with Hb or NaNO{sub 2} alone. Taken together, these findings suggest that the use of nitrite salts to treat systemic Hb exposure may promote acute CNS toxicity.

  6. 21 CFR 172.177 - Sodium nitrite used in processing smoked chub.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... has a salt (NaCl) content of not less than 3.5 percent, as measured in the loin muscle, and the sodium... million and not greater than 200 parts per million, as measured in the loin muscle. (c) Smoked chub shall be heated by a controlled heat process which provides a monitoring system positioned in as...

  7. 21 CFR 172.177 - Sodium nitrite used in processing smoked chub.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... has a salt (NaCl) content of not less than 3.5 percent, as measured in the loin muscle, and the sodium... million and not greater than 200 parts per million, as measured in the loin muscle. (c) Smoked chub shall be heated by a controlled heat process which provides a monitoring system positioned in as...

  8. 21 CFR 172.177 - Sodium nitrite used in processing smoked chub.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... has a salt (NaCl) content of not less than 3.5 percent, as measured in the loin muscle, and the sodium... million and not greater than 200 parts per million, as measured in the loin muscle. (c) Smoked chub shall be heated by a controlled heat process which provides a monitoring system positioned in as...

  9. Therapeutic potential of sustained-release sodium nitrite for critical limb ischemia in the setting of metabolic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Polhemus, David J; Bradley, Jessica M; Islam, Kazi N; Brewster, Luke P; Calvert, John W; Tao, Ya-Xiong; Chang, Carlos C; Pipinos, Iraklis I; Goodchild, Traci T; Lefer, David J

    2015-07-01

    Nitrite is a storage reservoir of nitric oxide that is readily reduced to nitric oxide under pathological conditions. Previous studies have demonstrated that nitrite levels are significantly reduced in cardiovascular disease states, including peripheral vascular disease. We investigated the cytoprotective and proangiogenic actions of a novel, sustained-release formulation of nitrite (SR-nitrite) in a clinically relevant in vivo swine model of critical limb ischemia (CLI) involving central obesity and metabolic syndrome. CLI was induced in obese Ossabaw swine (n = 18) by unilateral external iliac artery deployment of a full cross-sectional vessel occlusion device positioned within an endovascular expanded polytetrafluoroethylene-lined nitinol stent-graft. At post-CLI day 14, pigs were randomized to placebo (n = 9) or SR-nitrite (80 mg, n = 9) twice daily by mouth for 21 days. SR-nitrite therapy increased nitrite, nitrate, and S-nitrosothiol in plasma and ischemic skeletal muscle. Oxidative stress was reduced in ischemic limb tissue of SR-nitrite- compared with placebo-treated pigs. Ischemic limb tissue levels of proangiogenic growth factors were increased following SR-nitrite therapy compared with placebo. Despite the increases in cytoprotective and angiogenic signals with SR-nitrite therapy, new arterial vessel formation and enhancement of blood flow to the ischemic limb were not different from placebo. Our data clearly demonstrate cytoprotective and proangiogenic signaling in ischemic tissues following SR-nitrite therapy in a very severe model of CLI. Further studies evaluating longer-duration nitrite therapy and/or additional nitrite dosing strategies are warranted to more fully evaluate the therapeutic potential of nitrite therapy in peripheral vascular disease. PMID:25910804

  10. Therapeutic potential of sustained-release sodium nitrite for critical limb ischemia in the setting of metabolic syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Polhemus, David J.; Bradley, Jessica M.; Islam, Kazi N.; Brewster, Luke P.; Calvert, John W.; Tao, Ya-Xiong; Chang, Carlos C.; Pipinos, Iraklis I.; Goodchild, Traci T.

    2015-01-01

    Nitrite is a storage reservoir of nitric oxide that is readily reduced to nitric oxide under pathological conditions. Previous studies have demonstrated that nitrite levels are significantly reduced in cardiovascular disease states, including peripheral vascular disease. We investigated the cytoprotective and proangiogenic actions of a novel, sustained-release formulation of nitrite (SR-nitrite) in a clinically relevant in vivo swine model of critical limb ischemia (CLI) involving central obesity and metabolic syndrome. CLI was induced in obese Ossabaw swine (n = 18) by unilateral external iliac artery deployment of a full cross-sectional vessel occlusion device positioned within an endovascular expanded polytetrafluoroethylene-lined nitinol stent-graft. At post-CLI day 14, pigs were randomized to placebo (n = 9) or SR-nitrite (80 mg, n = 9) twice daily by mouth for 21 days. SR-nitrite therapy increased nitrite, nitrate, and S-nitrosothiol in plasma and ischemic skeletal muscle. Oxidative stress was reduced in ischemic limb tissue of SR-nitrite- compared with placebo-treated pigs. Ischemic limb tissue levels of proangiogenic growth factors were increased following SR-nitrite therapy compared with placebo. Despite the increases in cytoprotective and angiogenic signals with SR-nitrite therapy, new arterial vessel formation and enhancement of blood flow to the ischemic limb were not different from placebo. Our data clearly demonstrate cytoprotective and proangiogenic signaling in ischemic tissues following SR-nitrite therapy in a very severe model of CLI. Further studies evaluating longer-duration nitrite therapy and/or additional nitrite dosing strategies are warranted to more fully evaluate the therapeutic potential of nitrite therapy in peripheral vascular disease. PMID:25910804

  11. Synthesis and characterization of secondary nitrosamines from secondary amines using sodium nitrite and p-toluenesulfonic acid.

    PubMed

    Miró Sabaté, Carles; Delalu, Henri

    2015-03-01

    We synthesized nitrosamines (R2N-NO) with R = iPr (1), nPr (2), nBu (3), and hydroxyethyl (4) from the amine using sodium nitrite/p-toluenesulfonic acid in CH2Cl2. The rate of formation of 1-4 increases in the direction iPr

  12. Cerebroprotective effect of isolated harmine alkaloids extracts of seeds of Peganum harmala L. on sodium nitrite-induced hypoxia and ethanol-induced neurodegeneration in young mice.

    PubMed

    Biradar, S M; Joshi, Hanumanthachar; Tarak, K C

    2013-12-01

    The aim of the study was to isolate the harmine alkaloids from the seeds of Peganum harmala (TAPH) and its cerebroprotective effect on cognitive deficit mice. The tested doses of TAPH were screened for Sodium nitrite induced hypoxia and Ethanol induced neurodegeneration using behavioral models. The TAPH was found to be non-neurotoxic and Psychoactive by preventing the motor impairment and increasing the locomotion activity of animals in Rota rod and Actophotometer respectively. TAPH (5, 2.5 and 1.25 mg kg(-1) p.o.) significantly (p < 0.001) protected the Sodium nitrite induced memory impairment by decreasing the time require to find the water bottle in special water bottle case model. In Elevated Plus Maze (EPM) and Passive Shock Avoidance paradigm (PSA) the TAPH shown improved acquisition and retention memory significantly (p < 0.001) by decreasing the Transverse Latency Time (TLT) and increasing the Step Down Latency (SDL), respectively in dose dependent manner. The results were well supported by biochemical parameters, by inhibiting the Acetylcholinestrase (p < 0.01) activity, increasing the GSH (p < 0.001) level and decreasing the TBARS (p < 0.001) level of whole brain. Moreover TAPH has shown the significant Monoamine oxidase-A (MAO-A) inhibition action (p < 0.001), hence it reduces the metabolism of epinephrine, 5-HT and other monoamines and enhances the action of these neurotransmitters indirectly; this adrenergic system plays an important role in learning and memory. Further, TAPH (5 mg kg(-1)) protect the DNA fragmentation of frontotemporal cortex of the brain from hypoxic effect induced by Sodium nitrite in Gel Electrophoresis studies. The results were comparable to their respective standards. Hence, harmine alkaloids are potential enough to utilize in the management of Neurodegenerative disorders of the type Alzheimer's diseases. PMID:24506035

  13. Improved motor and cognitive performance with sodium nitrite supplementation is related to small metabolite signatures: a pilot trial in middle-aged and older adults

    PubMed Central

    DeVan, Allison E.; Cruickshank-Quinn, Charmion; Reisdorph, Nichole; Bassett, Candace J.; Evans, Trent D.; Brooks, Forrest A.; Bryan, Nathan S.; Chonchol, Michel B.; Giordano, Tony; McQueen, Matthew B.; Seals, Douglas R.

    2015-01-01

    Advancing age is associated with reductions in nitric oxide bioavailability and changes in metabolic activity, which are implicated in declines in motor and cognitive function. In preclinical models, sodium nitrite supplementation (SN) increases plasma nitrite and improves motor function, whereas other nitric oxide-boosting agents improve cognitive function. This pilot study was designed to translate these findings to middle-aged and older (MA/O) humans to provide proof-of-concept support for larger trials. SN (10 weeks, 80 or 160 mg/day capsules, TheraVasc, Inc.) acutely and chronically increased plasma nitrite and improved performance on measures of motor and cognitive outcomes (all p<0.05 or better) in healthy MA/O adults (62 ± 7 years). Untargeted metabolomics analysis revealed that SN significantly altered 33 (160 mg/day) to 45 (80 mg/day) different metabolites, 13 of which were related to changes in functional outcomes; baseline concentrations of 99 different metabolites predicted functional improvements with SN. This pilot study provides the first evidence that SN improves aspects of motor and cognitive function in healthy MA/O adults, and that these improvements are associated with, and predicted by, the plasma metabolome. Our findings provide the necessary support for larger clinical trials on this promising pharmacological strategy for preserving physiological function with aging. PMID:26626856

  14. Improved motor and cognitive performance with sodium nitrite supplementation is related to small metabolite signatures: a pilot trial in middle-aged and older adults.

    PubMed

    Justice, Jamie N; Johnson, Lawrence C; DeVan, Allison E; Cruickshank-Quinn, Charmion; Reisdorph, Nichole; Bassett, Candace J; Evans, Trent D; Brooks, Forrest A; Bryan, Nathan S; Chonchol, Michel B; Giordano, Tony; McQueen, Matthew B; Seals, Douglas R

    2015-11-01

    Advancing age is associated with reductions in nitric oxide bioavailability and changes in metabolic activity, which are implicated in declines in motor and cognitive function. In preclinical models, sodium nitrite supplementation (SN) increases plasma nitrite and improves motor function, whereas other nitric oxide-boosting agents improve cognitive function. This pilot study was designed to translate these findings to middle-aged and older (MA/O) humans to provide proof-of-concept support for larger trials. SN (10 weeks, 80 to 160 mg/day capsules, TheraVasc, Inc.) acutely and chronically increased plasma nitrite and improved performance on measures of motor and cognitive outcomes (all p<0.05 or better) in healthy MA/O adults (62 ± 7 years). Untargeted metabolomics analysis revealed that SN significantly altered 33 (160 mg/day) to 45 (80 mg/day) different metabolites, 13 of which were related to changes in functional outcomes; baseline concentrations of 99 different metabolites predicted functional improvements with SN. This pilot study provides the first evidence that SN improves aspects of motor and cognitive function in healthy MA/O adults, and that these improvements are associated with, and predicted by, the plasma metabolome. Our findings provide the necessary support for larger clinical trials on this promising pharmacological strategy for preserving physiological function with aging. PMID:26626856

  15. Impact of organic load on Escherichia coli O157:H7 survival during pilot-scale processing of iceberg lettuce with acidified sodium hypochlorite.

    PubMed

    Davidson, Gordon R; Kaminski, Chelsea N; Ryser, Elliot T

    2014-10-01

    Chemical sanitizers are routinely used during commercial flume washing of fresh-cut leafy greens to minimize cross-contamination from the water. This study assessed the efficacy of three chlorine treatments against Escherichia coli O157:H7 on iceberg lettuce, in wash water, and on surfaces of a pilot-scale processing line using flume water containing various organic loads. Iceberg lettuce (5.4 kg) was inoculated to contain 10(6) CFU/g of a 4-strain cocktail of nontoxigenic, green fluorescent protein-labeled, ampicillin-resistant E. coli O157:H7 and held for 24 h at 4°C before processing. Lettuce was shredded using a Urschel TransSlicer, step conveyed to a flume tank, washed for 90 s using water alone or one of three different sanitizing treatments (50 ppm of total chlorine either alone or acidified to pH 6.5 with citric acid or T-128) in water containing organic loads of 0, 2.5, 5, or 10% (wt/vol) blended iceberg lettuce, and then dried using a shaker table and centrifugal dryer. Next, three 5.4-kg batches of uninoculated iceberg lettuce were processed identically. Various product (25 g), water (50 ml), and equipment surface swab (100 cm(2)) samples were homogenized in neutralizing buffer, diluted appropriately, and plated on tryptic soy agar containing 0.6% (wt/vol) yeast extract and 100 ppm of ampicillin without prior 0.45- m m membrane filtration to quantify E. coli O157:H7. Organic load negatively impacted the efficacy of all three chlorine treatments (P < 0.05) at the end of processing, with typical E. coli O157:H7 reductions of >5 and 0.9 to 3.7 log CFU/ml for organic loads of 0 and 10%, respectively. Organic load rarely had a significant impact (P < 0.05) on the efficacy of chlorine, chlorine plus citric acid, or chlorine plus T-128 against E. coli O157:H7 on iceberg lettuce. Reduced sanitizer efficacy generally corresponded to changes in total solids, chemical oxygen demand, turbidity, and maximum filterable volume, indicating that these tests may be

  16. A 26-Week Toxicity Assessment of AIR001 (Sodium Nitrite) by Inhalation Exposure in Rats and by Intravenous Administration in Dogs.

    PubMed

    Tepper, Jeffrey; Ochoa, Ricardo; Rix, Peter; Elliott, Gary; Hoglen, Niel; Poulin, Dominic; Parsley, Ed; Masamune, Hiroko

    2014-05-01

    Historically, nitrogen oxides (NOx) in food, drinking water, as well as in the atmosphere have been believed to be associated with adverse health consequences. More recently, NOx have been implicated in normal homeostatic regulation, and exogenous administration has been associated with health benefits. One such potential health benefit is the prospect that inhaled nitrite will lower pulmonary blood pressure (BP) in patients with pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH), a disease with poor prognosis due to the lack of effective treatment. To characterize potential chronic toxicity associated with inhaled AIR001 (sodium nitrite) for use in the treatment of PAH, 26-week exposures to AIR001 were carried out by inhalation administration in rats and by intravenous infusion in dogs. The studies revealed that methemoglobinemia was the primary adverse effect in both species. Methemoglobin levels less than 40% were well tolerated in both species, while levels greater than 50% methemoglobin caused death in some rats. Additionally, a decrease in systemic BP was also observed with inhaled AIR001 exposure in dogs. These acute secondary and exaggerated pharmacological effects occurred daily throughout the 26-week treatment period. Chronic exposure did not alter the magnitude of either methemoglobinemia or hypotension or result in additional toxicity or compensatory responses. Based on the exposure levels that produced these pharmacodynamic responses in animals, relative to those measured in early clinical studies, it appears that an adequate margin of safety exists to support the continued clinical development of inhaled AIR001. PMID:24801488

  17. A dissimilatory nitrite reductase in Paracoccus halodenitrificans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grant, M. A.; Hochstein, L. I.

    1984-01-01

    Paracoccus halodenitrificans produced a membrane-associated nitrite reductase. Spectrophotometric analysis showed it to be associated with a cd-cytochrome and located on the inner side of the cytoplasmic membrane. When supplied with nitrite, membrane preparations produced nitrous oxide and nitric oxide in different ratios depending on the electron donor employed. The nitrite reductase was maximally active at relatively low concentrations of sodium chloride and remained attached to the membranes at 100 mM sodium chloride.

  18. Validation of lactic acid bacteria, lactic acid, and acidified sodium chlorite as decontaminating interventions to control Escherichia coli O157:H7 and Salmonella Typhimurium DT 104 in mechanically tenderized and brine-enhanced (nonintact) beef at the purveyor.

    PubMed

    Echeverry, Alejandro; Brooks, J Chance; Miller, Markus F; Collins, Jesse A; Loneragan, Guy H; Brashears, Mindy M

    2010-12-01

    After three different outbreaks were linked to the consumption of nonintact meat products contaminated with Escherichia coli O157:H7, the U.S. Food Safety and Inspection Service published notice requiring establishments producing mechanically tenderized and moisture-enhanced beef products to reassess their respective hazard analysis and critical control point systems, due to potential risk to the consumers. The objective of this study was to validate the use of lactic acid bacteria (LAB), acidified sodium chlorite (ASC), and lactic acid (LA) sprays when applied under a simulated purveyor setting as effective interventions to control and reduce E. coli O157:H7 and Salmonella Typhimurium DT 104 in inoculated U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) Choice strip loins (longissimus lumborum muscles) pieces intended for either mechanical blade tenderization or injection enhancement with a brine solution after an aging period of 14 or 21 days at 4.4°C under vacuum. After the mechanical process, translocation of E. coli O157:H7 and Salmonella Typhimurium DT 104 from the surface into the internal muscles occurred at levels between 1.00 and 5.72 log CFU/g, compared with controls. LAB and LA reduced internal E. coli O157:H7 loads up to 3.0 log, while ASC reduced the pathogen 1.4 to 2.3 log more than the control (P < 0.05), respectively. Salmonella Typhimurium DT 104 was also reduced internally 1.3 to 2.8, 1.0 to 2.3, and 1.4 to 1.8 log after application of LAB, LA, and ASC, respectively. The application of antimicrobials by purveyors prior to mechanical tenderization or enhancement of steaks should increase the safety of these types of products. PMID:21219733

  19. The curing agent sodium nitrite, used in the production of fermented sausages, is less inhibiting to the bacteriocin-producing meat starter culture Lactobacillus curvatus LTH 1174 under anaerobic conditions.

    PubMed

    Verluyten, Jurgen; Messens, Winy; De Vuyst, Luc

    2003-07-01

    Curvacin A is a listericidal bacteriocin produced by Lactobacillus curvatus LTH 1174, a strain isolated from fermented sausage. The response of this strain to an added curing agent (sodium nitrite) in terms of cell growth and bacteriocin production was investigated in vitro by laboratory fermentations with modified MRS broth. The strain was highly sensitive to nitrite; even a concentration of 10 ppm of curing agent inhibited its growth and both volumetric and specific bacteriocin production. A meat simulation medium containing 5 ppm of sodium nitrite was tested to investigate the influence of the gas phase on the growth and bacteriocin production of L. curvatus LTH 1174. Aerating the culture during growth had no effect on biomass formation, but the oxidative stress caused a higher level of specific bacteriocin production and led to a metabolic shift toward acetic acid production. Anaerobic conditions, on the other hand, led to an increased biomass concentration and less growth inhibition. Also, higher maximum volumetric bacteriocin activities and a higher level of specific bacteriocin production were obtained in the presence of sodium nitrite than in fermentations under aerobic conditions or standard conditions of air supply. These results indicate that the inhibitory effect of the curing agent is at least partially masked under anaerobic conditions. PMID:12839751

  20. Gastric S-nitrosothiol formation drives the antihypertensive effects of oral sodium nitrite and nitrate in a rat model of renovascular hypertension.

    PubMed

    Pinheiro, Lucas C; Amaral, Jefferson H; Ferreira, Graziele C; Portella, Rafael L; Ceron, Carla S; Montenegro, Marcelo F; Toledo, Jose Carlos; Tanus-Santos, Jose E

    2015-10-01

    Many effects of nitrite and nitrate are attributed to increased circulating concentrations of nitrite, ultimately converted into nitric oxide (NO(•)) in the circulation or in tissues by mechanisms associated with nitrite reductase activity. However, nitrite generates NO(•) , nitrous anhydride, and other nitrosating species at low pH, and these reactions promote S-nitrosothiol formation when nitrites are in the stomach. We hypothesized that the antihypertensive effects of orally administered nitrite or nitrate involve the formation of S-nitrosothiols, and that those effects depend on gastric pH. The chronic effects of oral nitrite or nitrate were studied in two-kidney, one-clip (2K1C) hypertensive rats treated with omeprazole (or vehicle). Oral nitrite lowered blood pressure and increased plasma S-nitrosothiol concentrations independently of circulating nitrite levels. Increasing gastric pH with omeprazole did not affect the increases in plasma nitrite and nitrate levels found after treatment with nitrite. However, treatment with omeprazole severely attenuated the increases in plasma S-nitrosothiol concentrations and completely blunted the antihypertensive effects of nitrite. Confirming these findings, very similar results were found with oral nitrate. To further confirm the role of gastric S-nitrosothiol formation, we studied the effects of oral nitrite in hypertensive rats treated with the glutathione synthase inhibitor buthionine sulfoximine (BSO) to induce partial thiol depletion. BSO treatment attenuated the increases in S-nitrosothiol concentrations and antihypertensive effects of oral nitrite. These data show that gastric S-nitrosothiol formation drives the antihypertensive effects of oral nitrite or nitrate and has major implications, particularly to patients taking proton pump inhibitors. PMID:26159506

  1. Antimicrobial activity of Satureja montana L. essential oil against Clostridium perfringens type A inoculated in mortadella-type sausages formulated with different levels of sodium nitrite.

    PubMed

    de Oliveira, Thales Leandro Coutinho; de Araújo Soares, Rodrigo; Ramos, Eduardo Mendes; das Graças Cardoso, Maria; Alves, Eduardo; Piccoli, Roberta Hilsdorf

    2011-01-01

    This research evaluated the antimicrobial effect of the winter savory (Satureja montana L.) essential oil (EO) against Clostridium perfringens type A (ATCC 3624) inoculated in mortadella-type sausages formulated with different levels of sodium nitrite (NaNO₂: 0 ppm, 100 ppm and 200 ppm) in addition to EO at concentrations of 0.0%, 0.78%, 1.56% and 3.125% stored at 25°C for 30 days. The EO extracted by hydrodistillation and analyzed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (CG-MS) was tested in vitro using an agar well diffusion method for determination of minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) on C. perfringens. According to compositional analysis of the winter savory EO, 26 chemical compounds were identified, and the major constituents were thymol (28.99%), p-cymene (12.00%), linalool (11.00%) and carvacrol (10.71%). The results obtained showed that EO applied at a concentration of 1.56%, which was defined as the MIC, exhibited antimicrobial activity against C. perfringens in the in vitro assays, and the transmission electron microscopy (TEM) revealed structural damage and cell lysis of C. perfringens caused by EO treatment. A synergistic effect between NaNO₂ and EO was observed. In mortadella-type sausages formulated with 100 ppm of NaNO₂ and EO at all concentrations tested, the population of target microorganisms was reduced (p≤0.05) compared to control samples during all storage period. This data suggests the potential combined use of savory EO and minimal amounts of the synthetic additive, NaNO₂ to control C. perfringens in mortadella, which goes according to current market trends, where consumers are requesting natural products. PMID:21131083

  2. Combined treatment with green tea catechins and sodium nitrite selectively promotes rat forestomach carcinogenesis after initiation with N-methyl-N'- nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine.

    PubMed

    Kuroiwa, Yuichi; Ishii, Yuji; Umemura, Takashi; Kanki, Keita; Mitsumori, Kunitoshi; Nishikawa, Akiyoshi; Nakazawa, Hiroyuki; Hirose, Masao

    2007-07-01

    Combined treatment with several phenolic antioxidants and sodium nitrite (NaNO(2)) has already shown to enhance rat forestomach carcinogenesis. In the present experiment, effects of green tea catechins (GTC) alone or in combination with NaNO(2) on gastric carcinogenesis were investigated in a rat two-stage carcinogenesis model. Groups of eight, 6-week-old F344 male rats were given 0.01%N-methyl-N'-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine (MNNG) in their drinking water and 5% NaCl in the diet for 10 weeks for glandular stomach initiation and a single intragastric administration of 100 mg/kg/bodyweight of MNNG at week 9 for forestomach initiation. From week 11, they received either drinking water containing 0.2% NaNO(2) and a diet supplemented with 1% GTC in combination, each individual chemical alone or a basal diet until the end of week 42. In the forestomach, incidences and multiplicities of neoplastic lesions were clearly increased by the combined treatment, in spite of GTC alone suppressing the occurrence of papillomas. In a short-term experiment with similar protocol without MNNG pretreatment, a significant increase of 8-hydroxydeoxyguanosine (8-OHdG) levels in forestomach DNA occurred 24 h after the combined treatment, concomitant with erosion and inflammatory cell infiltration. In an in vitro study, electron spin resonance demonstrated hydroxyl radical formation after incubation of epigallocatechin gallate or epicatechin gallate with the NO generator, NOC-7. Thus, GTC alone showed a weak chemopreventive effect on forestomach carcinogenesis, but in the presence of NaNO(2) it exerted a promotive effect which might involve hydroxyl-radical-associated oxidative DNA damage. However, no influence was exerted in the glandular stomach. PMID:17428254

  3. 7 CFR 58.720 - Acidifying agents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... Specifications for Dairy Plants Approved for USDA Inspection and Grading Service 1 Quality Specifications for Raw Material § 58.720 Acidifying agents. Acidifying agents if used shall be those permitted by the Food...

  4. 7 CFR 58.720 - Acidifying agents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... Specifications for Dairy Plants Approved for USDA Inspection and Grading Service 1 Quality Specifications for Raw Material § 58.720 Acidifying agents. Acidifying agents if used shall be those permitted by the Food...

  5. 21 CFR 131.111 - Acidified milk.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Acidified milk. 131.111 Section 131.111 Food and... CONSUMPTION MILK AND CREAM Requirements for Specific Standardized Milk and Cream § 131.111 Acidified milk. (a) Description. Acidified milk is the food produced by souring one or more of the optional dairy...

  6. 21 CFR 131.111 - Acidified milk.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Acidified milk. 131.111 Section 131.111 Food and... CONSUMPTION MILK AND CREAM Requirements for Specific Standardized Milk and Cream § 131.111 Acidified milk. (a) Description. Acidified milk is the food produced by souring one or more of the optional dairy...

  7. 21 CFR 131.111 - Acidified milk.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Acidified milk. 131.111 Section 131.111 Food and... CONSUMPTION MILK AND CREAM Requirements for Specific Standardized Milk and Cream § 131.111 Acidified milk. (a) Description. Acidified milk is the food produced by souring one or more of the optional dairy...

  8. Mechanisms for nitrite loss from the stomach.

    PubMed

    Licht, W R; Schultz, D S; Fox, J G; Tannenbaum, S R; Deen, W M

    1986-10-01

    Nitrite loss from the stomach was studied using dogs equipped with Thomas cannulas for direct access to the stomach lumen. Solutions containing sodium nitrite and non-absorbable volume marker (polyethylene glycol, PEG) were infused into the stomach, and samples were taken over 60 min to determine the concentration of 'total nitrite' (including NO2-, HNO2 and other species in equilibrium with NO2-) and rate of dilution of the stomach contents as a function of time. Changes in stomach volume were also measured. Nitrite loss was found to be very rapid, with total nitrite concentrations declining to less than half the initial levels in 10 min. The decay in total nitrite concentrations was due predominantly to gastric absorption, with small additional contributions from dilution of the stomach contents (inferred from PEG concentrations) and chemical reactions (from in vitro kinetic data). Results for initial nitrite concentrations varying over a range of 0.15-4.5 mM showed absorption to be first order in total nitrite. The permeability-area product for nitrite absorption (PA) was about 0.6 l/h, and was unaffected by the addition of 1 mM SCN- or Cl-. All of these results are consistent with nitrite absorption in the form of NO2- or HNO2. Buffering the infusate with HCO3- to increase luminal pH from approximately 2 to 7 caused a three-fold reduction in the apparent value of PA. When pentagastrin was used to stimulate acid secretion, nitrite absorption was only half as fast as when acid secretion was inhibited with cimetidine, or when no drug was given. This effect could not be explained by variations in luminal pH, and suggests that acid secretion either decreases PA or is accompanied by active secretion of nitrite. Based on these data, a mathematical model was developed to stimulate the physical and chemical factors governing nitrite concentrations in the stomach. PMID:3757171

  9. Boletus edulis Nitrite Reductase Reduces Nitrite Content of Pickles and Mitigates Intoxication in Nitrite-intoxicated Mice

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Weiwei; Tian, Guoting; Feng, Shanshan; Wong, Jack Ho; Zhao, Yongchang; Chen, Xiao; Wang, Hexiang; Ng, Tzi Bun

    2015-01-01

    Pickles are popular in China and exhibits health-promoting effects. However, nitrite produced during fermentation adversely affects health due to formation of methemoglobin and conversion to carcinogenic nitrosamine. Fruiting bodies of the mushroom Boletus edulis were capable of inhibiting nitrite production during pickle fermentation. A 90-kDa nitrite reductase (NiR), demonstrating peptide sequence homology to fungal nitrite reductase, was isolated from B. edulis fruiting bodies. The optimum temperature and pH of the enzyme was 45 °C and 6.8, respectively. B. edulis NiR was capable of prolonging the lifespan of nitrite-intoxicated mice, indicating that it had the action of an antidote. The enzyme could also eliminate nitrite from blood after intragastric administration of sodium nitrite, and after packaging into capsule, this nitrite-eliminating activity could persist for at least 120 minutes thus avoiding immediate gastric degradation. B. edulis NiR represents the first nitrite reductase purified from mushrooms and may facilitate subsequent applications. PMID:26446494

  10. Boletus edulis Nitrite Reductase Reduces Nitrite Content of Pickles and Mitigates Intoxication in Nitrite-intoxicated Mice.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Weiwei; Tian, Guoting; Feng, Shanshan; Wong, Jack Ho; Zhao, Yongchang; Chen, Xiao; Wang, Hexiang; Ng, Tzi Bun

    2015-01-01

    Pickles are popular in China and exhibits health-promoting effects. However, nitrite produced during fermentation adversely affects health due to formation of methemoglobin and conversion to carcinogenic nitrosamine. Fruiting bodies of the mushroom Boletus edulis were capable of inhibiting nitrite production during pickle fermentation. A 90-kDa nitrite reductase (NiR), demonstrating peptide sequence homology to fungal nitrite reductase, was isolated from B. edulis fruiting bodies. The optimum temperature and pH of the enzyme was 45 °C and 6.8, respectively. B. edulis NiR was capable of prolonging the lifespan of nitrite-intoxicated mice, indicating that it had the action of an antidote. The enzyme could also eliminate nitrite from blood after intragastric administration of sodium nitrite, and after packaging into capsule, this nitrite-eliminating activity could persist for at least 120 minutes thus avoiding immediate gastric degradation. B. edulis NiR represents the first nitrite reductase purified from mushrooms and may facilitate subsequent applications. PMID:26446494

  11. Interactive inhibition of meat spoilage and pathogenic bacteria by lysozyme, nisin and EDTA in the presence of nitrite and sodium chloride at 24 degrees C.

    PubMed

    Gill, Alexander O; Holley, Richard A

    2003-02-15

    To develop a nisin- and lysozyme-based antimicrobial treatment for use with processed ham and bologna, in vitro experiments were conducted to determine whether inhibition enhancing interactions occur between the antimicrobials lysozyme, chrisin (a commercial nisin preparation), EDTA, NaCl and NaNO(2). Inhibitory interactions were observed between a number of agents when used against specific pathogenic and spoilage bacteria. The observed interactions included lysozyme with EDTA (Enterococcus faecalis and Weissella viridescens), chrisin with EDTA (all Gram-positive organisms), EDTA with NaCl (Escherichia coli, Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium, Serratia grimesii), EDTA with nitrite (E. coli, Lactobacillus curvatus, Leuconostoc mesenteroides, Listeria monocytogenes, S. Typhimurium), chrisin with nitrite (Lc. mesenteroides, L. monocytogenes), and NaCl with nitrite (S. Typhimurium, Shewanella putrefaciens). Previous reports have described interactions between nisin with EDTA that resulted in enhanced antimicrobial effect against Gram-negative bacteria, or lysozyme with nisin against Gram-positive bacteria. These interactions were not observed in these experiments. We observed that unlike previous studies, these experiments were conducted on growing cells in nutrient broth, rather than under conditions of nutrient limitation. We propose that screening of antimicrobials for use in food systems in nutrient-deficient systems is inappropriate and that new protocols should be developed. PMID:12423927

  12. Acidified Litter Benefits the Intestinal Flora Balance of Broiler Chickens

    PubMed Central

    Garrido, Margarita Novoa; Skjervheim, Magne; Oppegaard, Hanne; Sørum, Henning

    2004-01-01

    The alterations in the balance of the normal intestinal bacterial flora of chickens exposed to acidified wood-derived litter were analyzed and compared to those of a control group exposed to nonacidified litter. A total of 1,728 broilers were divided into two groups, with six replicates in each. One group was exposed to dry wood-derived litter, and the other was exposed to dry wood-derived litter sprayed with a mixture of sodium lignosulfonate, formic acid, and propionic acid. At five different times, five chickens from each pen were killed and the intestinal contents from ileum and caeca were collected. The samples were diluted and plated onto selective media to identify coliforms, Lactobacillus spp., Clostridium perfringens, and Enterococcus spp. Covariance analysis of bacterial counts showed significantly lower counts for C. perfringens in the caeca and the ileum and for Enterococcus spp. and Lactobacillus spp. in the ileum in chickens exposed to the acidified litter. Lactobacillus spp. showed significantly higher counts in the caeca in chickens exposed to acidified litter. There was no difference between the two litters with regard to coliforms in the ileum and the caeca or to Enterococcus spp. in the caeca. The study shows that exposing the chickens to acidified litter lowers the intestinal bacterial number, especially in the ileum, without negative consequences for the chicken's health or performance. Of special interest are the lower counts of C. perfringens and Enterococcus spp. that might reduce the risk of developing clinical or subclinical necrotic enteritis and growth depression. PMID:15345401

  13. Radiation preservation of low nitrite bacon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Harwant

    Sodium nitrite, a key ingredient of the mix used to cure bacon and other meats, promotes and fixes bacon's characteristic pink color, inhibits lipid peroxidation and prevents growth of microorganisms, particularly Clostridium botulinum spores. Unfortunately, nitrite leads to the formation of carcinogenic nitrosamines in bacon. This has led to a search for alternatives to the use of nitrite. Irradiation with reduced level of nitrite is a promising alternative. Radurization of bacon containing 20 to 40 mg/kg of nitrite in evacuated packages, irradiated and stored at 4°C, gives a product with good organoleptic qualities and extended shelf life of ⩾ 90 days, as opposed to ˜ 30 days for the conventionally treated bacon. Radappertization of bacon containing 20 mg/kg of nitrite at a dose of about 30 kGy, irradiated at temperature of -20° or lower in evacuated packages, results in a product that is shelf stable at room temperature for months to years. It has organoleptic qualities comparable to commercial bacon in terms of color, flavor, odor and texture. Irradiation also reduces the nitrite and preformed nitrosamines present in bacon. Various aspects of preservation of bacon are reviewed in this report with emphasis on radiation processing.

  14. Characterization and inhibition of nitrite uptake in shortnose sturgeon fingerlings

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fontenot, Q.C.; Isely, J.J.; Tomasso, J.R.

    1999-01-01

    Efforts are underway to culture the endangered shortnose sturgeon Acipenser brevirostrum for possible reintroduction. As part of a larger project to develop culture techniques for this species, the uptake of nitrite was evaluated in fingerlings (16.5 ?? 4.85 g; mean ?? SD). Plasma nitrite concentrations increased significantly with exposure time (0-5 d) and dose (0-4 mg nitrite-N/L). Shortnose sturgeon fingerlings were able to concentrate nitrite in their plasma to more than 63 times the environmental concentration. Chloride, as either sodium chloride or calcium chloride, partially inhibited nitrite uptake. However, calcium chloride was a better inhibitor. After previous exposure (2 d at 2.13 ?? 0.080 mg nitrite-N/L) plasma nitrite-N decreased from 165.5 to 36.7 mg/L during a 3-d simultaneous exposure to 2.13 ?? 0.080 mg nitrite-N/L and treatment with 40 mg chloride/L as calcium chloride. The addition of calcium chloride to the water appeared to be an effective means of preventing nitrite uptake and treating nitrite toxicity in hatchery-reared shortnose sturgeon fingerlings.

  15. Microbiological Spoilage of Acidified Specialty Products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sperber, William H.

    Acidified specialty products or condiments are among the most microbiologically stable and safe food products. Often formulated, packaged, and distributed without heat treatments, they are microbiologically stable indefinitely at ambient temperatures in unopened containers. The packaged, acidified products are often intended for multiple uses, exposing them at the points of consumption to numerous opportunities for contamination with microorganisms. Nonetheless, they remain resistant to microbiological spoilage for many months, often under refrigerated conditions that are used to retard chemical reactions, flavor changes, and yeast growth.

  16. Nitrite in organ protection

    PubMed Central

    Rassaf, Tienush; Ferdinandy, Peter; Schulz, Rainer

    2014-01-01

    In the last decade, the nitrate-nitrite-nitric oxide pathway has emerged to therapeutical importance. Modulation of endogenous nitrate and nitrite levels with the subsequent S-nitros(yl)ation of the downstream signalling cascade open the way for novel cytoprotective strategies. In the following, we summarize the actual literature and give a short overview on the potential of nitrite in organ protection. PMID:23826831

  17. Inorganic nitrite supplementation for healthy arterial aging

    PubMed Central

    DeVan, Allison E.; Fleenor, Bradley S.; Seals, Douglas R.

    2014-01-01

    Aging is the major risk factor for cardiovascular diseases (CVD). This is attributable primarily to adverse changes in arteries, notably, increases in large elastic artery stiffness and endothelial dysfunction mediated by inadequate concentrations of the vascular-protective molecule, nitric oxide (NO), and higher levels of oxidative stress and inflammation. Inorganic nitrite is a promising precursor molecule for augmenting circulating and tissue NO bioavailability because it requires only a one-step reduction to NO. Nitrite also acts as an independent signaling molecule, exerting many of the effects previously attributed to NO. Results of recent studies indicate that nitrite may be effective in the treatment of vascular aging. In old mice, short-term oral sodium nitrite supplementation reduces aortic pulse wave velocity, the gold-standard measure of large elastic artery stiffness, and ameliorates endothelial dysfunction, as indicated by normalization of NO-mediated endothelium-dependent dilation. These improvements in age-related vascular dysfunction with nitrite are mediated by reductions in oxidative stress and inflammation, and may be linked to increases in mitochondrial biogenesis and health. Increasing nitrite levels via dietary intake of nitrate appears to have similarly beneficial effects in many of the same physiological and clinical settings. Several clinical trials are being performed to determine the broad therapeutic potential of increasing nitrite bioavailability on human health and disease, including studies related to vascular aging. In summary, inorganic nitrite, as well as dietary nitrate supplementation, represents a promising therapy for treatment of arterial aging and prevention of age-associated CVD in humans. PMID:24408999

  18. Nitrite anion stimulates ischemic arteriogenesis involving NO metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Bir, Shyamal C.; Pattillo, Christopher B.; Pardue, Sibile; Kolluru, Gopi K.; Docherty, John; Goyette, Dave; Dvorsky, Peter

    2012-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) is a potential regulator of ischemic vascular remodeling, and as such therapies augmenting its bioavailability may be useful for the treatment of ischemic tissue diseases. Here we examine the effect of administering the NO prodrug sodium nitrite on arteriogenesis activity during established tissue ischemia. Chronic hindlimb ischemia was induced by permanent unilateral femoral artery and vein ligation. Five days postligation; animals were randomized to control PBS or sodium nitrite (165 μg/kg) therapy twice daily. In situ vascular remodeling was measured longitudinally using SPY angiography and Microfil vascular casting. Delayed sodium nitrite therapy rapidly increased ischemic limb arterial vessel diameter and branching in a NO-dependent manner. SPY imaging angiography over time showed that nitrite therapy enhanced ischemic gracillis collateral vessel formation from the profunda femoris to the saphenous artery. Immunofluorescent staining of smooth muscle cell actin also confirmed that sodium nitrite therapy increased arteriogenesis in a NO-dependent manner. The NO prodrug sodium nitrite significantly increases arteriogenesis and reperfusion of established severe chronic tissue ischemia. PMID:22610173

  19. 21 CFR 108.25 - Acidified foods.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... continuous inspection of the meat and poultry inspection program of the Food Safety and Inspection Service of... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Acidified foods. 108.25 Section 108.25 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR...

  20. 21 CFR 108.25 - Acidified foods.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Acidified foods. 108.25 Section 108.25 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION EMERGENCY PERMIT CONTROL Specific Requirements and Conditions for Exemption From or Compliance With an Emergency Permit §...

  1. 21 CFR 108.25 - Acidified foods.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... continuous inspection of the meat and poultry inspection program of the Food Safety and Inspection Service of... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Acidified foods. 108.25 Section 108.25 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR...

  2. Chemical behavior of acidified chromium (3) solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Terman, D.K.

    1981-05-01

    A unique energy-storage system has been developed at NASA's Lewis Research Center called REDOX. This NASA-REDOX system is an electrochemical storage device that utilized the oxidation and reduction of two fully soluble redox couples for charging and discharging. The redox couples now being investigated are acidified chloride solutions of chromium (Cr(+2)/Cr(+3)) and iron (Fe(+2)/Fe(+3)).

  3. 21 CFR 108.25 - Acidified foods.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Acidified foods. 108.25 Section 108.25 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN... after these foods have entered into interstate commerce. The Commissioner of Food and Drugs...

  4. 21 CFR 108.25 - Acidified foods.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Acidified foods. 108.25 Section 108.25 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION EMERGENCY PERMIT CONTROL Specific Requirements and Conditions for Exemption From or Compliance With an Emergency Permit §...

  5. 21 CFR 131.162 - Acidified sour cream.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... with safe and suitable acidifiers, with or without addition of lactic acid producing bacteria.... Acidified sour cream has a titratable acidity of not less than 0.5 percent, calculated as lactic acid....

  6. 21 CFR 131.162 - Acidified sour cream.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... with safe and suitable acidifiers, with or without addition of lactic acid producing bacteria.... Acidified sour cream has a titratable acidity of not less than 0.5 percent, calculated as lactic acid....

  7. 21 CFR 131.162 - Acidified sour cream.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... with safe and suitable acidifiers, with or without addition of lactic acid producing bacteria.... Acidified sour cream has a titratable acidity of not less than 0.5 percent, calculated as lactic acid....

  8. 21 CFR 131.162 - Acidified sour cream.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... with safe and suitable acidifiers, with or without addition of lactic acid producing bacteria.... Acidified sour cream has a titratable acidity of not less than 0.5 percent, calculated as lactic acid....

  9. 21 CFR 131.162 - Acidified sour cream.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... with safe and suitable acidifiers, with or without addition of lactic acid producing bacteria.... Acidified sour cream has a titratable acidity of not less than 0.5 percent, calculated as lactic acid....

  10. 21 CFR 181.33 - Sodium nitrate and potassium nitrate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Sodium nitrate and potassium nitrate. 181.33...-Sanctioned Food Ingredients § 181.33 Sodium nitrate and potassium nitrate. Sodium nitrate and potassium... nitrite, with or without sodium or potassium nitrite, in the production of cured red meat products...

  11. 21 CFR 181.33 - Sodium nitrate and potassium nitrate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Sodium nitrate and potassium nitrate. 181.33...-Sanctioned Food Ingredients § 181.33 Sodium nitrate and potassium nitrate. Sodium nitrate and potassium... nitrite, with or without sodium or potassium nitrite, in the production of cured red meat products...

  12. 21 CFR 181.33 - Sodium nitrate and potassium nitrate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Sodium nitrate and potassium nitrate. 181.33...-Sanctioned Food Ingredients § 181.33 Sodium nitrate and potassium nitrate. Sodium nitrate and potassium... nitrite, with or without sodium or potassium nitrite, in the production of cured red meat products...

  13. 21 CFR 181.33 - Sodium nitrate and potassium nitrate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Sodium nitrate and potassium nitrate. 181.33...-Sanctioned Food Ingredients § 181.33 Sodium nitrate and potassium nitrate. Sodium nitrate and potassium... nitrite, with or without sodium or potassium nitrite, in the production of cured red meat products...

  14. Color Developing Capacity of Plasma-treated Water as a Source of Nitrite for Meat Curing

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Samooel; Kim, Hyun Joo; Park, Sanghoo; Choe, Jun Ho; Jeon, Hee-Joon; Choe, Wonho

    2015-01-01

    The interaction of plasma with liquid generates nitrogen species including nitrite (NO−2). Therefore, the color developing capacity of plasma-treated water (PTW) as a nitrite source for meat curing was investigated in this study. PTW, which is generated by surface dielectric barrier discharge in air, and the increase of plasma treatment time resulted in increase of nitrite concentration in PTW. The PTW used in this study contains 46 ppm nitrite after plasma treatment for 30 min. To evaluate the effect of PTW on the cured meat color, meat batters were prepared under three different conditions (control, non-cured meat batter; PTW, meat batter cured with PTW; Sodium nitrite, meat batter cured with sodium nitrite). The meat batters were vacuum-packaged and cooked in a water-bath at 80℃ for 30 min. The typical color of cured meat developed in cooked meat batter treated with sodium nitrite or PTW. The lightness (L*) and yellowness (b*) values were similar in all conditions, whereas, the redness (a*) values of cooked meat batter with PTW and sodium nitrite (p<0.05) were significantly higher than the control. These data indicate that PTW can be used as a nitrite source in the curing process of meat without addition of other nitrite sources. PMID:26761900

  15. 21 CFR 173.325 - Acidified sodium chlorite solutions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... precluded by standards of identity in 9 CFR part 319) prior to packaging of the food for commercial purposes... Corp., Redmond, WA, which is incorporated by reference in accordance with 5 U.S.C. 552(a) and 1 CFR..., tuber, bulb, legume, fruiting (i.e., eggplant, groundcherry, pepino, pepper, tomatillo, and tomato),...

  16. Electrochemical Evaluation of Stainless Steels in Acidified Sodium Chloride Solutions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Calle, L. M.; MacDowell, L. G.; Vinje, R. D.

    2004-01-01

    This paper presents the results of an investigation in which several 300-series stainless steels (SS): AISI S30403 SS (UNS S30403), AISI 316L SS (UNS S31603), and AISI 317L SS (LINS S31703), as well as highly-alloyed: SS 254-SMO (UNS S32154), AL-6XN (N08367) and AL29-4C (UNS S44735), were evaluated using DC electrochemical techniques in three different electrolyte solutions. The solutions consisted of neutral 3.55% NaCl, 3.55% NaCl in 0.1N HCl, and 3.55% NaCl in 1.0N HCl. These solutions were chosen to simulate environments that are less, similar, and more aggressive, respectively, than the conditions at the Space Shuttle launch pads. The electrochemical test results were compared to atmospheric exposure data and evaluated for their ability to predict the long-term corrosion performance of the subject alloys. The electrochemical measurements for the six alloys indicated that the higher-alloyed SS 254-SMO, AL29-4C, and AL-6XN exhibited significantly higher resistance to localized corrosion than the 300-series SS. There was a correlation between the corrosion performance of the alloys during a two-year atmospheric exposure and the corrosion rates calculated from electrochemical (polarization resistance) measurements.

  17. 21 CFR 173.325 - Acidified sodium chlorite solutions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... with current industry standards of good manufacturing practice. The additive is produced by mixing an... industry standards of good manufacturing practice. Applied as a dip or a spray, the additive is used at... manufacturing practice. Applied as a dip or spray, the additive is used at levels that result in a...

  18. 21 CFR 173.325 - Acidified sodium chlorite solutions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... or formed meat food products (unless precluded by standards of identity in 9 CFR part 319) prior to....S.C. 552(a) and 1 CFR part 51. Copies are available from the Division of Petition Control (HFS-215... crustaceans; or following the filleting of finfish; in accordance with current industry standards of...

  19. 21 CFR 173.325 - Acidified sodium chlorite solutions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... or formed meat food products (unless precluded by standards of identity in 9 CFR part 319) prior to....S.C. 552(a) and 1 CFR part 51. Copies are available from the Division of Petition Control (HFS-215... crustaceans; or following the filleting of finfish; in accordance with current industry standards of...

  20. 21 CFR 173.325 - Acidified sodium chlorite solutions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... or formed meat food products (unless precluded by standards of identity in 9 CFR part 319) prior to....S.C. 552(a) and 1 CFR part 51. Copies are available from the Office of Food Additive Safety (HFS-200... crustaceans; or following the filleting of finfish; in accordance with current industry standards of...

  1. Performance of Denitrifying Microbial Fuel Cell with Biocathode over Nitrite

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Huimin; Zhao, Jianqiang; Li, Fenghai; Li, Xiaoling

    2016-01-01

    Microbial fuel cell (MFC) with nitrite as an electron acceptor in cathode provided a new technology for nitrogen removal and electricity production simultaneously. The influences of influent nitrite concentration and external resistance on the performance of denitrifying MFC were investigated. The optimal effectiveness were obtained with the maximum total nitrogen (TN) removal rate of 54.80 ± 0.01 g m−3 d−1. It would be rather desirable for the TN removal than electricity generation at lower external resistance. Denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis suggested that Proteobacteria was the predominant phylum, accounting for 35.72%. Thiobacillus and Afipia might benefit to nitrite removal. The presence of nitrifying Devosia indicated that nitrite was oxidized to nitrate via a biochemical mechanism in the cathode. Ignavibacterium and Anaerolineaceae was found in the cathode as a heterotrophic bacterium with sodium acetate as substrate, which illustrated that sodium acetate in anode was likely permeated through proton exchange membrane to the cathode. PMID:27047462

  2. Mechanisms of Nitrite Bioactivation

    PubMed Central

    Kim-Shapiro, Daniel B.; Gladwin, Mark T.

    2014-01-01

    It is now accepted that the anion nitrite, once considered an inert oxidation product of nitric oxide (NO), contributes to hypoxic vasodilation, physiological blood pressure control, and redox signaling. As such, its application in therapeutics is being actively testing in pre-clinical models and in human phase I–II clinical trials. Major pathways for nitrite bioactivation involve its reduction to NO by members of the hemoglobin or molybdopterin family of proteins, or catalyzed dysproportionation. These conversions occur preferentially under hypoxic and acidic conditions. A number of enzymatic systems reduce nitrite to NO and their activity and importance are defined by oxygen tension, specific organ system and allosteric and redox effectors. In this work, we review different proposed mechanisms of nitrite bioactivation, focusing on analysis of kinetics and experimental evidence for the relevance of each mechanism under different conditions. PMID:24315961

  3. The carcinogenic danger of nitrite pollution of the environment

    SciTech Connect

    Rubenchik, B.L.; Osinkovskaya, N.D.; Mikhailenko, V.M.; Furman, M.A.; Boim, T.M. )

    1990-11-01

    Presented are the literature data as well as the results of our own investigations on the genotoxic and carcinogenic effects of sodium nitrite (SN). The carcinogenicity of SN detected in animal experiments appears to be related to the formation of nitroso compounds from endogenous nitrosable precursors. Sodium nitrite possesses transforming and promoting effects in cell cultures, as well as mutagenic effects in the bacterial systems, where the predominant effect of SN was compared to that of N-nitrosodimethylamine (NDMA). Prolonged pretreatment with SN amplifies the liver DNA damage in rats in case of NDMA endogenous synthesis.

  4. Increased consumption and vasodilatory effect of nitrite during exercise.

    PubMed

    Hon, Yuen Yi; Lin, Elaina E; Tian, Xin; Yang, Yang; Sun, He; Swenson, Erik R; Taveira-Dasilva, Angelo M; Gladwin, Mark T; Machado, Roberto F

    2016-02-15

    This study investigated the effects of aerobic-to-anaerobic exercise on nitrite stores in the human circulation and evaluated the effects of systemic nitrite infusion on aerobic and anaerobic exercise capacity and hemodynamics. Six healthy volunteers were randomized to receive sodium nitrite or saline for 70 min in two separate occasions in an exercise study. Subjects cycled on an upright electronically braked cycle ergometer 30 min into the infusion according to a ramp protocol designed to attain exhaustion in 10 min. They were allowed to recover for 30 min thereafter. The changes of whole blood nitrite concentrations over the 70-min study period were analyzed by pharmacokinetic modeling. Longitudinal measurements of hemodynamic and clinical variables were analyzed by fitting nonparametric regression spline models. During exercise, nitrite consumption/elimination rate was increased by ∼137%. Cardiac output (CO), mean arterial pressure (MAP), and pulmonary artery pressure (PAP) were increased, but smaller elevation of MAP and larger increases of CO and PAP were found during nitrite infusion compared with placebo control. The higher CO and lower MAP during nitrite infusion were likely attributed to vasodilation and a trend toward decrease in systemic vascular resistance. In contrast, there were no significant changes in mean pulmonary artery pressures and pulmonary vascular resistance. These findings, together with the increased consumption of nitrite and production of iron-nitrosyl-hemoglobin during exercise, support the notion of nitrite conversion to release NO resulting in systemic vasodilatation. However, at the dosing used in this protocol achieving micromolar plasma concentrations of nitrite, exercise capacity was not enhanced, as opposed to other reports using lower dosing. PMID:26684248

  5. Peroxynitrous-acid-induced chemiluminescence detection of nitrite based on Microfluidic chip.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jing; Wang, Xiong; Lin, Yitong; Zheng, Yongzan; Lin, Jin-Ming

    2016-07-01

    A chemiluminescent method for nitrite detection was developed on microfluidic chip. Carbon dots-NaNO2(-) acidified H2O2 system was adopted. Chemiluminescence (CL) spectrum of this system was detected. The radiative recombination of hole-injected and electron-injected carbon dots explained their CL property. Spiral microchannels were designed on the microfluidic chip to allow enough reaction time for the carbon dots-NaNO2-acidified H2O2 system. Carbon dots and NaNO2 were premixed in the branch microchannel, then, the mixture reacted with acidified H2O2 in spiral microchannels. Concentrations of H2SO4 and H2O2, dilution ratio of carbon dots in H2O and flow rate were optimized to obtain the best CL signals. The approach presented satisfactory linear relationship between NaNO2 concentration and CL intensity. The tolerance of metal ions in determination of 1×10(-5)M nitrite was analyzed. The nitrites in water and beverage samples were successfully analyzed on the microfluidic chip with good repeatability. The data were well accordance with the results obtained from GB 5009.33(-) 2010. This microfluidic CL detection method is believed to be a simple, automatic and agent-save approach for inorganic ion analysis. PMID:27154650

  6. 21 CFR 172.170 - Sodium nitrate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Sodium nitrate. 172.170 Section 172.170 Food and... Preservatives § 172.170 Sodium nitrate. The food additive sodium nitrate may be safely used in or on specified... follows: (1) As a preservative and color fixative, with or without sodium nitrite, in smoked,...

  7. 21 CFR 172.170 - Sodium nitrate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Sodium nitrate. 172.170 Section 172.170 Food and... Preservatives § 172.170 Sodium nitrate. The food additive sodium nitrate may be safely used in or on specified... follows: (1) As a preservative and color fixative, with or without sodium nitrite, in smoked,...

  8. 21 CFR 172.170 - Sodium nitrate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Sodium nitrate. 172.170 Section 172.170 Food and... Preservatives § 172.170 Sodium nitrate. The food additive sodium nitrate may be safely used in or on specified... follows: (1) As a preservative and color fixative, with or without sodium nitrite, in smoked,...

  9. 21 CFR 172.170 - Sodium nitrate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Sodium nitrate. 172.170 Section 172.170 Food and... Preservatives § 172.170 Sodium nitrate. The food additive sodium nitrate may be safely used in or on specified... follows: (1) As a preservative and color fixative, with or without sodium nitrite, in smoked,...

  10. Comparison Between Sodium Nitrite & Sodium Hydroxide Spray Accident

    SciTech Connect

    WILLIAMS, J.C.; HEY, B.E.

    2001-11-07

    The purpose of this analysis is to compare the consequences of an 8 molar NaNO2 spray leak to the Tank Farm Final Safety Analysis Report (FSAR) evaluation of sprays of up to 19 molar (50%) NaOH. Four conditions were evaluated. These are: a spray during transfers from a one-inch pipe, a spray resulting from a truck tank Crack, a spray resulting from a truck tank rupture, and a spray in the 204-AR Waste Unloading Facility.

  11. A novel nitrite biosensor based on conductometric electrode modified with cytochrome c nitrite reductase composite membrane.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhiqiang; Xia, Siqing; Leonard, Didier; Jaffrezic-Renault, Nicole; Zhang, Jiao; Bessueille, François; Goepfert, Yves; Wang, Xuejiang; Chen, Ling; Zhu, Zhiliang; Zhao, Jianfu; Almeida, M Gabriela; Silveira, Célia M

    2009-02-15

    A conductometric biosensor for nitrite detection was developed using cytochrome c nitrite reductase (ccNiR) extracted from Desulfovibrio desulfuricans ATCC 27774 cells immobilized on a planar interdigitated electrode by cross-linking with saturated glutaraldehyde (GA) vapour in the presence of bovine serum albumin, methyl viologen (MV), Nafion, and glycerol. The configuration parameters for this biosensor, including the enzyme concentration, ccNiR/BSA ratio, MV concentration, and Nafion concentration, were optimized. Various experimental parameters, such as sodium dithionite added, working buffer solution, and temperature, were investigated with regard to their effect on the conductance response of the biosensor to nitrite. Under the optimum conditions at room temperature (about 25 degrees C), the conductometric biosensor showed a fast response to nitrite (about 10s) with a linear range of 0.2-120 microM, a sensitivity of 0.194 microS/microM [NO(2)(-)], and a detection limit of 0.05 microM. The biosensor also showed satisfactory reproducibility (relative standard deviation of 6%, n=5). The apparent Michaelis-Menten constant (K(M,app)) was 338 microM. When stored in potassium phosphate buffer (100mM, pH 7.6) at 4 degrees C, the biosensor showed good stability over 1 month. No obvious interference from other ionic species familiar in natural waters was detected. The application experiments show that the biosensor is suitable for use in real water samples. PMID:18804367

  12. Chloride inhibition of nitrite-induced methemoglobinemia in channel catfish (Ictalurus punctatus)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tomasso, J.R.; Simco, B.A.; Davis, K.B.

    1979-01-01

    Exposure of channel catfish (Ictalurus punctatus) fingerlings for 24?h to 1.0, 2.5, and 5.0?mg/L nitrite (pH?=?7; hardness?=?40?mg/L; temperature?=?22–25 °C) produced methemoglobin levels of 20.7?±?1.9%, 59.8?±?1.9%, and 77.4?±?1.4% (SE), respectively. However, methemoglobin levels were not elevated when fish were simultaneously exposed to 1.0, 2.5, and 5.0?mg/L nitrite and 25, 50, and 100?mg/L sodium chloride, respectively. Acclimation to sodium chloride for 24?h before exposure to nitrite did not enhance the inhibitory action of sodium chloride. Fish exposed to 5?mg/L nitrite for 5?h developed 42.5?±?3.8% methemoglobin. When transferred to water containing 5?mg/L nitrite and 250?mg/L sodium chloride, methemoglobin levels returned to normal within 24?h. Environmental chloride probably inhibits methemoglobin formation by competing with nitrite for entrance into the gills of the fish. An ionic ratio of 16 Cl- to 1 NO2- is capable of complete suppression of nitrite-induced methemoglobin formation. Bicarbonate ion present in the test water (1?meq/L) may also have contributed to the inhibitive action of chloride.

  13. Spectrophotometric determination of nitrite and nitrate using phosphomolybdenum blue complex.

    PubMed

    Zatar, N A; Abu-Eid, M A; Eid, A F

    1999-11-15

    A method for spectrophotometric determination of nitrite and nitrate is described. This method is based on the reduction of phosphomolybdic acid to phosphomolybdenum blue complex by sodium sulfide. The obtained phosphomolybdenum blue complex is oxidized by the addition of nitrite and this causes a reduction in intensity of the blue color. The absolute decrease in the absorbance of the blue color or the rate of its decrease is found to be directly proportional to the amount of nitrite added. The absorbance of the phosphomolybdenum blue complex is monitored spectrophotometrically at 814 nm and related to the concentration of nitrite present. The effect of different factors such as acidity, stability of the complex, time, temperature, phosphate concentration, molybdenum concentration, sodium sulfide concentration and the tolerance amount of other ions have been reported. Maximum absorbance is at 814 nm. The range of linearity using the conventional method is 0.5-2.0 ppm with molar absorptivity of 1.1 x 10(4) l mol(-1) cm(-1). and a relative standard deviation of 2.6% for five measurements. The range of linearity using the reaction rate method is 0.2-3.6 ppm with a relative standard deviation of 2.4% for five measurements. The method is applied for determination of nitrite and nitrate in water, meat products and vegetables. PMID:18967772

  14. The use of atmospheric pressure plasma-treated water as a source of nitrite for emulsion-type sausage.

    PubMed

    Jung, Samooel; Kim, Hyun Joo; Park, Sanghoo; In Yong, Hae; Choe, Jun Ho; Jeon, Hee-Joon; Choe, Wonho; Jo, Cheorun

    2015-10-01

    We investigated the possible use of atmospheric pressure plasma-treated water (PTW) as a nitrite source in curing process. Emulsion-type sausages were manufactured with PTW, celery powder containing nitrite, and synthetic sodium nitrite at a concentration of nitrite ion 70mgkg(-1). In terms of sausage quality, there were no noticeable effects of PTW on the total aerobic bacterial counts, color, and peroxide values of sausages compared with those of celery powder and sodium nitrite throughout 28days of storage at 4°C. Sausage with added PTW had lower concentrations of residual nitrite compared to those of added celery powder and sodium nitrite during the storage period (P<0.05). The sensory properties of PTW-treated and sodium nitrite-treated sausages were not different, whereas the sausage with added celery powder received the lowest scores in taste and acceptability. From the results, it is concluded that PTW can be used as a nitrite source equivalent to a natural curing agent. PMID:26115346

  15. Nitrate Reduction to Nitrite, a Possible Source of Nitrite for Growth of Nitrite-Oxidizing Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Belser, L. W.

    1977-01-01

    Growth yields and other parameters characterizing the kinetics of growth of nitrite-oxidizing bacteria are presented. These parameters were measured during laboratory enrichments of soil samples with added nitrite. They were then used to reanalyze data for nitrite oxidizer growth in a previously reported field study (M. G. Volz, L. W. Belser, M. S. Ardakani, and A. D. McLaren, J. Environ. Qual. 4:179-182, 1975), where nitrate, but not nitrite or ammonium, was added. In that report, analysis of the field data indicated that in unsaturated soils, the reduction of nitrate to nitrite may be a significant source of nitrite for the growth of nitrite oxidizers. A yield of 1.23 × 104 cells per μg of N was determined to be most appropriate for application to the field. It was determined that if nitrite came only from mineralized organic nitrogen via ammonium oxidation, 35 to 90% of the organic nitrogen would have had to have been mineralized to produce the growth observed. However, it is estimated that only about 2% of the organic nitrogen could have been mineralized during the growth period. Thus, it appears that another source of nitrite is required, the most likely being the reduction of nitrate to nitrite coupled to the oxidation of organic matter. PMID:921264

  16. Nitrite toxicity of Litopenaeus vannamei in water containing low concentrations of sea salt or mixed salts

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sowers, A.; Young, S.P.; Isely, J.J.; Browdy, C.L.; Tomasso, J.R., Jr.

    2004-01-01

    The uptake, depuration and toxicity of environmental nitrite was characterized in Litopenaeus vannamei exposed in water containing low concentrations of artificial sea salt or mixed salts. In 2 g/L artificial sea salts, nitrite was concentrated in the hemolymph in a dose-dependent and rapid manner (steady-state in about 2 d). When exposed to nitrite in 2 g/L artificial sea salts for 4 d and then moved to a similar environment without added nitrite, complete depuration occurred within a day. Increasing salinity up to 10 g/L decreased uptake of environmental nitrite. Nitrite uptake in environments containing 2 g/L mixed salts (combination of sodium, potassium, calcium and magnesium chlorides) was similar to or lower than rates in 2 g/L artificial sea salt. Toxicity was inversely related to total dissolved salt and chloride concentrations and was highest in 2 g/L artificial sea salt (96-h medial lethal concentration = 8.4 mg/L nitrite-N). Animals that molted during the experiments did not appear to be more susceptible to nitrite than animals that did not molt. The shallow slope of the curve describing the relationship between toxicity and salinity suggests that management of nitrite toxicity in low-salinity shrimp ponds by addition of more salts may not be practical. ?? Copyright by the World Aquaculture Society 2004.

  17. Nitrate Reduction to Nitrite, Nitric Oxide and Ammonia by Gut Bacteria under Physiological Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Tiso, Mauro; Schechter, Alan N.

    2015-01-01

    The biological nitrogen cycle involves step-wise reduction of nitrogen oxides to ammonium salts and oxidation of ammonia back to nitrites and nitrates by plants and bacteria. Neither process has been thought to have relevance to mammalian physiology; however in recent years the salivary bacterial reduction of nitrate to nitrite has been recognized as an important metabolic conversion in humans. Several enteric bacteria have also shown the ability of catalytic reduction of nitrate to ammonia via nitrite during dissimilatory respiration; however, the importance of this pathway in bacterial species colonizing the human intestine has been little studied. We measured nitrite, nitric oxide (NO) and ammonia formation in cultures of Escherichia coli, Lactobacillus and Bifidobacterium species grown at different sodium nitrate concentrations and oxygen levels. We found that the presence of 5 mM nitrate provided a growth benefit and induced both nitrite and ammonia generation in E.coli and L.plantarum bacteria grown at oxygen concentrations compatible with the content in the gastrointestinal tract. Nitrite and ammonia accumulated in the growth medium when at least 2.5 mM nitrate was present. Time-course curves suggest that nitrate is first converted to nitrite and subsequently to ammonia. Strains of L.rhamnosus, L.acidophilus and B.longum infantis grown with nitrate produced minor changes in nitrite or ammonia levels in the cultures. However, when supplied with exogenous nitrite, NO gas was readily produced independently of added nitrate. Bacterial production of lactic acid causes medium acidification that in turn generates NO by non-enzymatic nitrite reduction. In contrast, nitrite was converted to NO by E.coli cultures even at neutral pH. We suggest that the bacterial nitrate reduction to ammonia, as well as the related NO formation in the gut, could be an important aspect of the overall mammalian nitrate/nitrite/NO metabolism and is yet another way in which the microbiome

  18. Nitrate reduction to nitrite, nitric oxide and ammonia by gut bacteria under physiological conditions.

    PubMed

    Tiso, Mauro; Schechter, Alan N

    2015-01-01

    The biological nitrogen cycle involves step-wise reduction of nitrogen oxides to ammonium salts and oxidation of ammonia back to nitrites and nitrates by plants and bacteria. Neither process has been thought to have relevance to mammalian physiology; however in recent years the salivary bacterial reduction of nitrate to nitrite has been recognized as an important metabolic conversion in humans. Several enteric bacteria have also shown the ability of catalytic reduction of nitrate to ammonia via nitrite during dissimilatory respiration; however, the importance of this pathway in bacterial species colonizing the human intestine has been little studied. We measured nitrite, nitric oxide (NO) and ammonia formation in cultures of Escherichia coli, Lactobacillus and Bifidobacterium species grown at different sodium nitrate concentrations and oxygen levels. We found that the presence of 5 mM nitrate provided a growth benefit and induced both nitrite and ammonia generation in E.coli and L.plantarum bacteria grown at oxygen concentrations compatible with the content in the gastrointestinal tract. Nitrite and ammonia accumulated in the growth medium when at least 2.5 mM nitrate was present. Time-course curves suggest that nitrate is first converted to nitrite and subsequently to ammonia. Strains of L.rhamnosus, L.acidophilus and B.longum infantis grown with nitrate produced minor changes in nitrite or ammonia levels in the cultures. However, when supplied with exogenous nitrite, NO gas was readily produced independently of added nitrate. Bacterial production of lactic acid causes medium acidification that in turn generates NO by non-enzymatic nitrite reduction. In contrast, nitrite was converted to NO by E.coli cultures even at neutral pH. We suggest that the bacterial nitrate reduction to ammonia, as well as the related NO formation in the gut, could be an important aspect of the overall mammalian nitrate/nitrite/NO metabolism and is yet another way in which the microbiome

  19. Growth and blood chemistry of ducklings reared on acidified wetlands

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rattner, B.A.; Haramis, G.; Linder, G.; Chu, D.

    1985-01-01

    Acid deposition is one factor that may be responsible for the decline of some waterfowl populations. Growth and physiological condition were monitored in captive-reared black ducks (Anas rubripes) exposed for 10-day trials (day 11-20 of life) on control (pH 6.8) and acidified (pH 5.0) man-made emergent wetlands. Impaired growth (body weight, culmen and tarsus length) and increased mortality (50%) were apparent in broods (hen + 4 ducklings) reared on acidified wetIands. Ducklings exbibiting poor growth had reduced hematocrit, plasma protein and cholesterol levels. This subset of birds had elevated plasma uric acid concentration and creatine kinase activity (perhaps due to enhanced protein and nucleotide catabolism). and elevated pIasma K+ levels. Based upon overt appearance, growth and blood chemistry, ducklings exposed to acidified wetlands were concluded to be in poorer condittion than those exposed on circumneutral pH wetlands.

  20. Uptake of Nitrite by Neurospora crassa

    PubMed Central

    Schloemer, Robert H.; Garrett, Reginald H.

    1974-01-01

    Like the nitrate transport system, the nitrite uptake system in Neurospora crassa is induced by either nitrate or nitrite. This induction is prevented by cycloheximide, puromycin, or 6-methyl purine. The Km for nitrite of the induced nitrite uptake system is 86 μM, and the Vmax is 100 μmol of nitrite per g (wet weight) per h. Nitrite uptake is inhibited by metabolic poisons such as arsenate, dinitrophenol, cyanide, and antimycin A. No repression or inhibition of the nitrite transport system by ammonia, nitrate, or Casamino Acids was observed. PMID:4274458

  1. Considerations of acidifying water samples for 99Tc analysis.

    PubMed

    Blanchard, R L; Lieberman, R; Richardson, W S; Wakamo, C L

    1993-08-01

    Environmental water samples are routinely acidified before radionuclide analysis to prevent adsorption of radionuclides on the container walls. This study addresses the concern for volatilizing 99Tc from acid solutions during evaporation before beta analysis has been addressed. Water samples can be acidified to pH 1.7 with nitric acid and evaporated to dryness on planchets without significant losses of technetium due to volatilization. However, the planchets should not be flamed unless a detergent is used, and control samples should be flamed to determine the loss of activity under the conditions used. PMID:8392504

  2. Formation of sodium chlorate in diaphragmed chlorine electrolyzers

    SciTech Connect

    Gorbachev, A.K.; Andryushchenko, F.K.; Maksimchuk, E.F.; Potapov, V.N.

    1985-11-01

    This paper examines the formation of sodium chlorate under conditions of diaphragmed electrolysis with ruthenium-titanium oxide anodes. The authors establish that the sodium chlorate is formed chemically in such an electrolyzer. The data indicate that effective methods of reducing the amounts of sodium chlorate in diaphragm chlorine electrolyzers are to supply an acidified brine and to ensure catalytic decomposition of hypochlorous acid and sodium chlorate directly in the electrolyzer.

  3. Properties of reformulated hot dog sausage without added nitrites during chilled storage.

    PubMed

    Ruiz-Capillas, C; Herrero, A M; Tahmouzi, S; Razavi, S H; Triki, M; Rodríguez-Salas, L; Samcová, K; Jiménez-Colmenero, F

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the effect of a complete nitrite replacement strategy using celery, carmine, sodium lactate and orange dietary fibre combined with vitamins C and E, on the quality characteristics (technological, sensorial and safety properties) of hot dog sausages (five samples) during chilled storage (2 ± 1℃ 60 days). Nitrite replacers (combined with vitamins C and E) presented antioxidant activity, reducing lipid oxidation in reformulated samples. At the end of storage redness (a*) was similar in the control sample (with added nitrite) and in the sample without added nitrite. Sensory evaluation detected no significant difference between samples with and without added nitrite. All the reformulated samples were judged acceptable by the panellists. At the end of storage, the control sample contained more than four times as much residual nitrite as the reformulated samples. Growth of presumptive Clostridium perfringens was not observed in any of the samples. Samples without added nitrite had longer shelf-lives than control sausage. Samples containing 0.1% vitamin C registered the lowest microbiological levels. This strategy could be a good alternative to reduce and/or eliminate added nitrite in hot dog sausages. PMID:25480689

  4. Nitrite spray treatment to promote red color stability of vacuum packaged beef.

    PubMed

    Song, Xiao; Cornforth, Daren; Whittier, Dick; Luo, Xin

    2015-01-01

    Sodium nitrite solutions were sprayed on select grade boneless rib (M. longissimus thoracis) and bottom round (mainly M. biceps femoris) steaks individually, to form bright red nitric oxide myoglobin (NO-Mb) in vacuum packages. Our objective was to determine the optimum level of nitrite in spray for stable raw steak redness, low or no residual nitrite, and low surface pinking (ham-like cured color) after cooking. Results showed that steaks sprayed with 100-350 ppm nitrite solutions had 3.0-3.6g weight gain and a calculated level of 1.3-5.3mg nitrite added/kg steak, but very low (<1 ppm) residual nitrite. Nitrite sprays of 250-350 ppm were optimum for raw steak color during 21 days of storage at 1°C (a*>10; chroma C*>16). Raw steak redness was less stable in round than rib. Visual scores for pinkness after cooking were low, indicating that cooked color at even the highest nitrite treatment (350 ppm) was acceptable. PMID:25280357

  5. Citrus co-products as technological strategy to reduce residual nitrite content in meat products.

    PubMed

    Viuda-Martos, M; Fernández-López, J; Sayas-Barbera, E; Sendra, E; Navarro, C; Pérez-Alvarez, J A

    2009-10-01

    Sodium or potassium nitrite is widely used as a curing agent in cured meat products because it inhibits outgrowth and neurotoxin formation by Clostridium botulinum, delays the development of oxidative rancidity, develops the characteristic flavor of cured meats, and reacts with myoglobin and stabilizes the red meat color. As soon as nitrite is added in the meat formulation, it starts to disappear and the nitrite that has not reacted with myoglobin and it is available corresponds to residual nitrite level. Health concerns relating to the use of nitrates and nitrites in cured meats (cooked and dry cured) trend toward decreased usage to alleviate the potential risk to the consumers from formation of carcinogenic compounds. Recently, some new ingredients principally agro-industrial co-products in general and those from the citrus industry in particular (albedo [with different treatments], dietetic fiber obtained from the whole co-product, and washing water used in the process to obtain the dietetic fiber) are seen as good sources of bio-compounds that may help to reduce the residual nitrite level in meat products. From these co-products, citrus fiber shows the highest potential to reduce the residual nitrite level, followed by the albedo and finally the washing water. The aim of this article is to describe the latest advances concerning the use of citrus co-products in meat products as a potential ingredient to reduce the nitrite level. PMID:19799678

  6. Nitrite Anion Therapy Protects Against Chronic Ischemic Tissue Injury in db/db Diabetic Mice in a NO/VEGF-Dependent Manner

    PubMed Central

    Bir, Shyamal C.; Pattillo, Christopher B.; Pardue, Sibile; Kolluru, Gopi K.; Shen, Xinggui; Giordano, Tony; Kevil, Christopher G.

    2014-01-01

    Nitrite anion has been demonstrated to be a prodrug of nitric oxide (NO) with positive effects on tissue ischemia/reperfusion injury, cytoprotection, and vasodilation. However, effects of nitrite anion therapy for ischemic tissue vascular remodeling during diabetes remain unknown. We examined whether sodium nitrite therapy altered ischemic revascularization in BKS-Leprdb/db mice subjected to permanent unilateral femoral artery ligation. Sodium nitrite therapy completely restored ischemic hind limb blood flow compared with nitrate or PBS therapy. Importantly, delayed nitrite therapy 5 days after ischemia restored ischemic limb blood flow in aged diabetic mice. Restoration of blood flow was associated with increases in ischemic tissue angiogenesis activity and cell proliferation. Moreover, nitrite but not nitrate therapy significantly prevented ischemia-mediated tissue necrosis in aged mice. Nitrite therapy significantly increased ischemic tissue vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) protein expression that was essential for nitrite-mediated reperfusion of ischemic hind limbs. Nitrite significantly increased ischemic tissue NO bioavailability along with concomitant reduction of superoxide formation. Lastly, nitrite treatment also significantly stimulated hypoxic endothelial cell proliferation and migration in the presence of high glucose in an NO/VEGF-dependent manner. These results demonstrate that nitrite therapy effectively stimulates ischemic tissue vascular remodeling in the setting of metabolic dysfunction that may be clinically useful. PMID:24009258

  7. SOLUBLE ALUMINUM IN ACIDIFIED ORGANIC HORIZONS OF FOREST SOILS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Concentrations of labile and total Al in soil extracts were measured as a function of equilibrium solution pH in six forest soil organic horizons acidified with HNO, (0-20 cmol H+.kg-1) under controlled conditions of ionic strength (0.05 M NaNO3), temperature (23 C), and solution...

  8. Use of Linear Models for Thermal Processing Acidified Foods

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Acidified vegetable products with a pH above 3.3 must be pasteurized to assure the destruction of acid resistant pathogenic bacteria. The times and temperatures needed to assure a five log reduction by pasteurization have previously been determined using a non-linear (Weibull) model. Recently, the F...

  9. Antagonism of Acute Sulfide Poisoning in Mice by Nitrite Anion without Methemoglobinemia.

    PubMed

    Cronican, Andrea A; Frawley, Kristin L; Ahmed, Humza; Pearce, Linda L; Peterson, Jim

    2015-07-20

    There are currently no FDA-approved antidotes for H2S/sulfide intoxication. Sodium nitrite, if given prophylactically to Swiss Webster mice, was shown to be highly protective against the acute toxic effects of sodium hydrosulfide (∼LD40 dose) with both agents administered by intraperitoneal injections. However, sodium nitrite administered after the toxicant dose did not detectably ameliorate sulfide toxicity in this fast-delivery, single-shot experimental paradigm. Nitrite anion was shown to rapidly produce NO in the bloodstream, as judged by the appearance of EPR signals attributable to nitrosylhemoglobin and methemoglobin, together amounting to less than 5% of the total hemoglobin present. Sulfide-intoxicated mice were neither helped by the supplemental administration of 100% oxygen nor were there any detrimental effects. Compared to cyanide-intoxicated mice, animals surviving sulfide intoxication exhibited very short knockdown times (if any) and full recovery was extremely fast (∼15 min) irrespective of whether sodium nitrite was administered. Behavioral experiments testing the ability of mice to maintain balance on a rotating cylinder showed no motor impairment up to 24 h post sulfide exposure. It is argued that antagonism of sulfide inhibition of cytochrome c oxidase by NO is the crucial antidotal activity of nitrite rather than formation of methemoglobin. PMID:25951111

  10. Thermophilic treatment of acidified and partially acidified wastewater using an anaerobic submerged MBR: Factors affecting long-term operational flux.

    PubMed

    Jeison, D; van Lier, J B

    2007-09-01

    The long-term operation of two thermophilic anaerobic submerged membrane bioreactors (AnSMBRs) was studied using acidified and partially acidified synthetic wastewaters. In both reactors, cake formation was identified as the key factor governing critical flux. Even though cake formation was observed to be mostly reversible, particle deposition proceeds fast once the critical flux is exceeded. Very little irreversible fouling was observed during long-term operation, irrespective of the substrate. Critical flux values at the end of the reactors operation were 7 and 3L/m(2)h for the AnSMBRs fed with acidified and partially acidified wastewaters, respectively, at a gas superficial velocity of 70m/h. Small particle size was identified as the responsible parameter for the low observed critical flux values. The degree of wastewater acidification significantly affected the physical properties of the sludge, determining the attainable flux. Based on the fluxes observed in this research, the membrane costs would be in the range of 0.5euro/m(3) of treated wastewater. Gas sparging was ineffective in increasing the critical flux values. However, preliminary tests showed that cross-flow operation may be a feasible alternative to reduce particle deposition. PMID:17644148

  11. Nitrite toxicity to the crayfish Procambarus clarkii

    SciTech Connect

    Gutzmer, M.P.; Tomasso, J.R.

    1985-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of acute nitrite exposure to the crayfish Procambarus clarkii (Decapoda). Specific objectives of this study included (1) determining the 24-, 48-, 72- and 96-h LC-50's of nitrite to crayfish of different weights and genders in freshwater, (2) determining the LC-50's of nitrite to crayfish in water with elevated chloride concentrations, and (3), in order to gain insight into the mechanisms of nitrite toxicity in crayfish, determining hemolymph nitrite concentrations in crayfish exposed to nitrite in freshwater and water with elevated chloride concentrations.

  12. One-Pot Synthesis of 2,4,5-Trisubstituted Imidazoles via [2 + 2 + 1] Cycloannulation of 1,3-Bishet(aryl)-monothio-1,3-diketones, α-Substituted Methylamines and Sodium Nitrite through α-Nitrosation of Enaminones.

    PubMed

    Yugandar, S; Konda, S; Parameshwarappa, G; Ila, H

    2016-07-01

    An efficient one-pot synthesis of a series of diversely functionalized trisubstituted 4(5)het(aroyl)-2,5(4)-het(aryl)/alkylimidazoles from readily available 1,3-bishet(aryl)monothio-1,3-diketones has been reported. This novel sequential one-pot, three step protocol, wherein three new carbon nitrogen bonds are formed in contiguous fashion, involves in situ generation of enaminones by reaction of monothio-1,3-diketones with α-substituted methylamines, followed by their α-nitrosation with sodium nitrite and subsequent base mediated intramolecular heterocyclization of the resulting α-hydroxyiminoimines to trisubstituted imidazoles in high yields under mild conditions. These newly prepared 4(5)-het(aroyl)-5(4)-het(aryl)/alkylimidazoles are shown to exist as tautomeric mixture, however, their subsequent alkylation with methyl iodide in the presence of potassium carbonate affords 1-N-methy-2,5-bishet(aryl)-4-het(aroyl)imidazoles in highly regioselective fashion in most of the cases. Synthesis of few 4(5)-(2-hydroxyphenyl)-2,5(4)-substituted imidazoles, which are known to be good coordinating ligands, has also been reported. A probable mechanism for the formation of these imidazoles from hydroxyiminoimine intermediates has also been suggested. PMID:27194455

  13. The isolation of a hexaheme cytochrome from Desulfovibrio desulfuricans and its identification as a new type of nitrite reductase

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, M.-C.; Peck, H.D., Jr.

    1981-12-01

    Desulfovibrio desulfuricans (ATCC 27774), a strictly anaerobic sulfate-reducing bacteria, is able to perform anaerobic nitrate respiration in which nitrate is first reduced to nitrite by the action of nitrate reductase, and nitrite reductase then catalyzes the six-electron reduction of nitrite to ammonia. The nitrite reductase was found to be a membrane-bound enzyme and has been purified to electrophoretic homogeneity. The purified enzyme has a minimal M/sub r/=66,000 as judged by sodium dodecyl sulfate gel electrophoresis and contains 6 c-type heme groups/molecule. Pure nitrite reductase exhibits a typical c-type cytochrome absorption spectrum with reduced..cap alpha..-band at 552.5 nm. NADH and NADPH do not function as direct electron donors for the nitrite reductase. Desulfovibrio vulgaris hydrogenase,however, is able to transfer electrons from H/sub 2/ to the nitrite reductase using FAD as the electron transfer mediator. The dithionite-reduced nitrite reductase was demonstrated to be auto-oxidizable even in the presence of potassium cyanide. On addition of nitrite, the dithionite-reduced enzyme is re-oxidized immediately. Hydroxylamine, however, can only partially reoxidize the reduced enzyme. Ascorbate reduces the enzyme to a limited extent and the partially reduced enzyme is neither auto-oxidizable by nitrite or hydroxylamine. Purified nitrite reductase has a pH optimum in the range of 8.0-9.5 and optimal activity at 57/sup o/C. Purified nitrite reductase also has hydroxylamine reductase activity, and the K/sub m/ for nitrite was determined to be 1.14 mM.

  14. The Effects of Physicochemical Factors and Cell Density on Nitrite Transformation in a Lipid-Rich Chlorella.

    PubMed

    Liang, Fang; Du, Kui; Wen, Xiaobin; Luo, Liming; Geng, Yahong; Li, Yeguang

    2015-12-28

    To understand the effects of physicochemical factors on nitrite transformation by microalgae, a lipid-rich Chlorella with high nitrite tolerance was cultured with 8 mmol/l sodium nitrite as sole nitrogen source under different conditions. The results showed that nitrite transformation was mainly dependent on the metabolic activities of algal cells rather than oxidation of nitrite by dissolved oxygen. Light intensity, temperature, pH, NaHCO3 concentrations, and initial cell densities had significant effects on the rate of nitrite transformation. Single-factor experiments revealed that the optimum conditions for nitrite transformation were light intensity: 300 μmol/m(2); temperature: 30°C; pH: 7-8; NaHCO3 concentration: 2.0 g/l; and initial cell density: 0.15 g/l; and the highest nitrite transformation rate of 1.36 mmol/l/d was achieved. There was a positive correlation between nitrite transformation rate and the growth of Chlorella. The relationship between nitrite transformation rate (mg/l/d) and biomass productivity (g/l/d) could be described by the regression equation y = 61.3x (R(2) = 0.9665), meaning that 61.3 mg N element was assimilated by 1.0 g dry biomass on average, which indicated that the nitrite transformation is a process of consuming nitrite as nitrogen source by Chlorella. The results demonstrated that the Chlorella suspension was able to assimilate nitrite efficiently, which implied the feasibility of using flue gas for mass production of Chlorella without preliminary removal of NOX. PMID:26323272

  15. Immediate Reduction of Salmonella enterica Serotype Typhimurium Viability via Membrane Destabilization following Exposure to Multiple-Hurdle Treatments with Heated, Acidified Organic Acid Salt Solutions▿†

    PubMed Central

    Milillo, S. R.; Martin, E.; Muthaiyan, A.; Ricke, S. C.

    2011-01-01

    The antimicrobial activity of organic acids in combination with nonchemical treatments was evaluated for inactivation of Salmonella enterica serotype Typhimurium within 1 min. It was observed that the effectiveness of the multiple-hurdle treatments was temperature (P ≤ 0.05) and pH (P ≤ 0.05) dependent and corresponded to the degree of organic acid lipophilicity (sodium acetate being least effective and sodium propionate being the most effective). This led to the hypothesis that the loss in viability was due at least in part to cell membrane disruption. Evaluation of osmotic response, potassium ion leakage, and transmission electron micrographs confirmed treatment effects on the cell membrane. Interestingly, all treatments, even those with no effect on viability, such as with sodium acetate, resulted in measurable cellular stress. Microarray experiments explored the specific response of S. Typhimurium to sodium acetate and sodium propionate, the most similar of the tested treatments in terms of pKa and ionic strength, and found little difference in the changes in gene expression following exposure to either, despite their very different effects on viability. Taken together, the results reported support our hypothesis that treatment with heated, acidified, organic acid salt solutions for 1 min causes loss of S. Typhimurium viability at least in part by membrane damage and that the degree of effectiveness can be correlated with lipophilicity of the organic acid. Overall, the data presented here indicate that a combined thermal, acidified sodium propionate treatment can provide an effective antimicrobial treatment against Salmonella. PMID:21478311

  16. Prevalence of nitrite and nitrate contents and its effect on edible bird nest's color.

    PubMed

    Paydar, Mohammadjavad; Wong, Yi Li; Wong, Won Fen; Hamdi, Omer Abdalla Ahmed; Kadir, Noraniza Abd; Looi, Chung Yeng

    2013-12-01

    Edible bird nests (EBNs) are important ethnomedicinal commodity in the Chinese community. Recently, But and others showed that the white EBNs could turn red by vapors from sodium nitrite (NaNO2) in acidic condition or from bird soil, but this color-changing agent remained elusive. The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of nitrite and nitrate contents and its affects on EBN's color. EBNs were collected from swiftlet houses or caves in Southeast Asia. White EBNs were exposed to vapor from NaNO2 in 2% HCl, or bird soil. The levels of nitrite (NO2-) and nitrate (NO3-) in EBNs were determined through ion chromatography analysis. Vapors from NaNO2 in 2% HCl or bird soil stained white bird nests to brown/red colors, which correlated with increase nitrite and nitrate levels. Moreover, naturally formed cave-EBNs (darker in color) also contained higher nitrite and nitrate levels compared to white house-EBNs, suggesting a relationship between nitrite and nitrate with EBN's color. Of note, we detected no presence of hemoglobin in red "blood" nest. Using infrared spectra analysis, we demonstrated that red/brown cave-EBNs contained higher intensities of C-N and N-O bonds compared to white house-EBNs. Together, our study suggested that the color of EBNs was associated with the prevalence of the nitrite and nitrate contents. PMID:24279333

  17. Acidifier application rate impacts on ammonia emissions from US roaster chicken houses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shah, Sanjay B.; Grimes, Jesse L.; Oviedo-Rondón, Edgar O.; Westerman, Philip W.

    2014-08-01

    Due to its potential environmental and public health impacts, emissions of ammonia (NH3) as well as several other gases from US livestock farms may be regulated. Broiler houses are important sources of NH3 emissions. However, there are no emissions data from roaster (8-12 wk old broilers, ˜4 kg ea.) houses. Producers treat the litter in broiler houses with acidifiers, such as sodium bisulfate (SBS, NaHSO4) to reduce ammonia production and protect bird health. However, there is very little data on the effect of acidifiers, particularly at high application rates on ammonia emissions. The impact of different SBS application rates [High (0.95-1.46 kg m-2, whole house), Medium (0.73 kg m-2, whole house), Low (0.37-0.49 kg m-2, whole house), and Control (0.37-0.49 kg m-2, brood chamber)] on ammonia emissions was evaluated in commercial roaster houses over 22 months spanning eight flocks. Ammonia emission from each fan was measured with an acid scrubber that operated only when the fan operated. Emissions were calculated using >95% measured data with the rest being estimated using robust methods. Exhaust ammonia-N concentrations were inversely correlated with the SBS application rates. Emission rates on animal unit (AU, where 1 AU = 500 kg live-mass) basis (ER, g d-1 AU-1) were reduced by 27, 13, and 5%, respectively, in the High, Medium, and Low treatments vs. the Control treatment (mean: 100 g d-1 AU-1, range: 86-114 g d-1 AU-1). Emission rates for the Control treatment measured in this study on roasters were mostly higher than ERs in the literature. Differences in ERs are not only due to diet, environmental and management conditions, but also due to measurement methods.

  18. Role of xanthine oxidoreductase in the anti-thrombotic effects of nitrite in rats in vivo.

    PubMed

    Kramkowski, K; Leszczynska, A; Przyborowski, K; Kaminski, T; Rykaczewska, U; Sitek, B; Zakrzewska, A; Proniewski, B; Smolenski, R T; Chabielska, E; Buczko, W; Chlopicki, S

    2016-05-01

    The mechanisms underlying nitrite-induced effects on thrombosis and hemostasis in vivo are not clear. The goal of the work described here was to investigate the role of xanthine oxidoreductase (XOR) in the anti-platelet and anti-thrombotic activities of nitrite in rats in vivo. Arterial thrombosis was induced electrically in rats with renovascular hypertension by partial ligation of the left renal artery. Sodium nitrite (NaNO2, 0.17 mmol/kg twice daily for 3 days, p.o) was administered with or without one of the XOR-inhibitors: allopurinol (ALLO) and febuxostat (FEB) (100 and 5 mg/kg, p.o., for 3 days). Nitrite treatment (0.17 mmol/kg), which was associated with a significant increase in NOHb, nitrite/nitrate plasma concentration, resulted in a substantial decrease in thrombus weight (TW) (0.48 ± 0.03 mg vs. vehicle [VEH] 0.88 ± 0.08 mg, p < 0.001) without a significant hypotensive effect. The anti-thrombotic effect of nitrite was partially reversed by FEB (TW = 0.63 ± 0.06 mg, p < 0.05 vs. nitrites), but not by ALLO (TW = 0.43 ± 0.02 mg). In turn, profound anti-platelet effect of nitrite measured ex vivo using collagen-induced whole-blood platelet aggregation (70.5 ± 7.1% vs. VEH 100 ± 4.5%, p < 0.05) and dynamic thromboxaneB2 generation was fully reversed by both XOR-inhibitors. In addition, nitrite decreased plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 concentration (0.47 ± 0.13 ng/ml vs. VEH 0.62 ± 0.04 ng/ml, p < 0.05) and FEB/ALLO reversed this effect. In vitro the anti-platelet effect of nitrite (1 mM) was reversed by FEB (0.1 mM) under hypoxia (0.5%O2) and normoxia (20%O2). Nitrite treatment had no effect on coagulation parameters. In conclusion, the nitrite-induced anti-platelet effect in rats in vivo is mediated by XOR, but XOR does not fully account for the anti-thrombotic effects of nitrite. PMID:26374946

  19. Haematological and ion regulatory effects of nitrite in the air-breathing snakehead fish Channa striata.

    PubMed

    Lefevre, Sjannie; Jensen, Frank B; Huong, Do T T; Wang, Tobias; Phuong, Nguyen T; Bayley, Mark

    2012-08-15

    The tolerance and effects of nitrite on ion balance and haematology were investigated in the striped snakehead, Channa striata Bloch 1793, which is an air-breathing fish with reduced gills of importance for aquaculture in South East Asia. C. striata was nitrite tolerant with a 96 h LC50 of 4.7 mM. Effects of sub-lethal exposures to nitrite (0mM, 1.4mM, and 3.0mM) were determined during a 7-day exposure period. Plasma nitrite increased, but the internal concentration remained well below ambient levels. Extracellular nitrate rose by several mM, indicating that a large proportion of the nitrite taken up was converted to nitrate. Nitrite reacted with erythrocyte haemoglobin (Hb) causing methaemoglobin (metHb) to increase to 30% and nitrosylhaemoglobin (HbNO) to increase to 10% of total Hb. Both metHb and HbNO stabilised after 4 days, and functional Hb levels accordingly never fell below 60% of total Hb. Haematocrit and total Hb were unaffected by nitrite. Although the effects of nitrite exposure seemed minor in terms of plasma nitrite and metHb increases, ion balance was strongly affected. In the high exposure group, total osmolality decreased from 320 mOsm to 260 mOsm, and plasma sodium from 150 mM to 120 mM, while plasma chloride fell from 105 mM to 60mM and plasma bicarbonate rose from 12 mM in controls to 20mM in exposed fish. The extreme changes in ion balance in C. striata are different from the response reported in other fish, and further studies are needed to investigate the mechanism behind the observed changes in regulation. PMID:22516674

  20. NITRIC OXIDE AND NITRITE TREATMENTS REDUCE ETHYLENE EVOLUTION FROM APPLE FRUIT DISKS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    ‘Golden Delicious’ apple [Malus sylvestris var. domestica (Borkh.)] cortex disks suspended in solutions containing a nitric oxide ('NO) donor [S-nitrosoglutathione (GSNO) or sodium nitroprusside (SNP)], 'NO gas, or nitrite (KNO2) were utilized to identify impacts of 'NO on ethylene production and NO...

  1. Nitrite Therapy Improves Left Ventricular Function During Heart Failure via Restoration of Nitric Oxide (NO) Mediated Cytoprotective Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Bhushan, Shashi; Kondo, Kazuhisa; Polhemus, David; Otsuka, Hiroyuki; Nicholson, Chad; Tao, Ya-Xiong; Huang, Hui; Georgiopoulou, Vasiliki V.; Murohara, Toyoaki; Calvert, John W.; Butler, Javed; Lefer, David J.

    2014-01-01

    Rationale Nitric oxide (NO) bioavailability is reduced in the setting of heart failure. Nitrite (NO2) is a critically important NO intermediate that is metabolized to NO during pathological states. We have previously demonstrated that sodium nitrite ameliorates acute myocardial ischemia/reperfusion (MI/R) injury. Objective No evidence exists as to whether increasing NO bioavailability via nitrite therapy attenuates heart failure severity following pressure overload-induced hypertrophy. Methods and Results Serum from heart failure patients exhibited significantly decreased nitrosothiol and cGMP levels. TAC was performed in mice at 10–12 weeks of age. Sodium nitrite (50 mg/L) or saline vehicle (VEH) was administered daily in the drinking water post-operative from day 1 for 9 weeks. Echocardiography was performed at baseline and at 1, 3, 6, and 9 weeks post TAC to assess left ventricular dimensions and ejection fraction (LVEF). We observed increased cardiac nitrite, RXNO, and cGMP levels in mice treated with nitrite. Sodium nitrite preserved LVEF and improved LV dimensions) at 9 weeks (p < 0.001 vs. VEH). In addition, circulating and cardiac brain natriuretic peptide (BNP) levels were attenuated in mice receiving nitrite (p < 0.05 vs. VEH). Western blot analyses revealed upregulation of Akt-eNOS-NO-cGMP-GS3Kβ signaling early in the progression of hypertrophy and heart failure. Conclusions These results support the emerging concept that nitrite therapy may be a viable clinical option for increasing NO levels and may have a practical clinical use in the treatment of heart failure. PMID:24599803

  2. Spectrophotometric study and potentiometric titration between sulfite and nitrite ions using acetaldehyde complex of nitroprusside as a carrier

    SciTech Connect

    Ahmed, Y.Z.; Abd-Elmottalb, M.

    1985-11-01

    A complex between sodium nitroprusside (NP) and acetaldehyde of 1:1 in aqueous solution of pH 10 has been prepared and used as an analytical reagent for the spectrophotometric determination of sulfite and nitrite ions. Nitrite ion can be titrated against sulfite ion and vise versa in equivalent amounts with high accuracy in the presence of the acetaldehyde complex of nitroprusside as a carrier using a potentiometric titration technique. 9 references, 3 figures, 2 tables.

  3. Mechanisms of human erythrocytic bioactivation of nitrite.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chen; Wajih, Nadeem; Liu, Xiaohua; Basu, Swati; Janes, John; Marvel, Madison; Keggi, Christian; Helms, Christine C; Lee, Amber N; Belanger, Andrea M; Diz, Debra I; Laurienti, Paul J; Caudell, David L; Wang, Jun; Gladwin, Mark T; Kim-Shapiro, Daniel B

    2015-01-01

    Nitrite signaling likely occurs through its reduction to nitric oxide (NO). Several reports support a role of erythrocytes and hemoglobin in nitrite reduction, but this remains controversial, and alternative reductive pathways have been proposed. In this work we determined whether the primary human erythrocytic nitrite reductase is hemoglobin as opposed to other erythrocytic proteins that have been suggested to be the major source of nitrite reduction. We employed several different assays to determine NO production from nitrite in erythrocytes including electron paramagnetic resonance detection of nitrosyl hemoglobin, chemiluminescent detection of NO, and inhibition of platelet activation and aggregation. Our studies show that NO is formed by red blood cells and inhibits platelet activation. Nitric oxide formation and signaling can be recapitulated with isolated deoxyhemoglobin. Importantly, there is limited NO production from erythrocytic xanthine oxidoreductase and nitric-oxide synthase. Under certain conditions we find dorzolamide (an inhibitor of carbonic anhydrase) results in diminished nitrite bioactivation, but the role of carbonic anhydrase is abrogated when physiological concentrations of CO2 are present. Importantly, carbon monoxide, which inhibits hemoglobin function as a nitrite reductase, abolishes nitrite bioactivation. Overall our data suggest that deoxyhemoglobin is the primary erythrocytic nitrite reductase operating under physiological conditions and accounts for nitrite-mediated NO signaling in blood. PMID:25471374

  4. Nitrite and nitrate content in meat products and estimated intake in Denmark from 1998 to 2006.

    PubMed

    Leth, T; Fagt, S; Nielsen, S; Andersen, R

    2008-10-01

    The content of nitrite and nitrate in cured meat products has been monitored in Denmark seven times between 1995 and 2006. The maximum permitted added amounts of sodium nitrite in Denmark (60 mg kg(-1) for most products up to 150 mg kg(-1) for special products) have not been exceeded, except for a few samples back in 2002. The intake, mean and intake distribution of sodium nitrite have been calculated from 1998 to 2006 with data from the Danish dietary survey conducted in 2000-02 on Danes from four to 75 years of age. The amounts used by industry have been relatively stable through the whole period with levels varying between 6 and 20 mg sodium nitrite kg(-1) with sausages, meat for open sandwiches and salami-type sausages being the greatest contributors. The mean intake of sodium nitrate was around 1 mg day(-1), which is very low compared with the total intake of 61 mg day(-1). The mean intake of sodium nitrite was 0.017 and 0.014, 0.009 and 0.008, and 0.007 and 0.003 mg kg(-1) body weight day(-1) for men and women in the age groups 4-5, 6-14 and 15-75 years, respectively, which was much lower than the acceptable daily intake (ADI) of 0.09 mg kg(-1) body weight day(-1). The 99th percentile for the group of 4-year-olds was 0.107 and 0.123 mg kg(-1) body weight day(-1) for boys and girls, respectively, and the 95th percentile was 0.057 and 0.073 mg kg(-1) body weight day(-1) for boys and girls, respectively, highest for the girls. With fewer than 100 boys and girls in the 4-5-year age group, only very few persons were responsible for the high intake. The conversion of nitrate to nitrite in the saliva and the degradation of nitrite during production and storage must also be considered when evaluating the intake of nitrite. PMID:18608491

  5. Anaerobic digestion of acidified slurry fractions derived from different solid-liquid separation methods.

    PubMed

    Sutaryo, Sutaryo; Ward, Alastair James; Møller, Henrik Bjarne

    2013-02-01

    Batch assays investigating the ultimate methane yields (B(0)) of acidified slurry fractions produced with different solid-liquid slurry separation techniques were done. The result showed that the anaerobic digestion (AD) process was inhibited when raw and liquid fractions of sow, pig and dairy cow acidified slurry are digested, but AD treating solid fractions (SF) acidified slurry showed no sulphide inhibition. The B(0) of SF acidified sow slurry increased significantly with increasing screen size in the screw press. No significant effect of acidification processes on B(0) of SF dairy cow slurry (DCS) was observed. The ultimate methane yields of SF acidified DCS and SF non acidified DCS were 278±13 and 289±1LkgVS(-1), while in term of fresh weigh substrate were 59±2.8 and 59±0.3Lkgsubstrate(-1), respectively. PMID:23313767

  6. Study of Spectral Modifications in Acidified Ignitable Liquids by Attenuated Total Reflection Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Martín-Alberca, Carlos; Ojeda, Fernando Ernesto Ortega; García-Ruiz, Carmen

    2016-03-01

    In this work, the spectral characteristics of two types of acidified gasoline and acidified diesel fuel are discussed. Neat and acidified ignitable liquids (ILs) infrared absorption spectra obtained by attenuated total reflection Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy were compared in order to identify the modifications produced by the reaction of the ILs with sulfuric acid. Several bands crucial for gasoline identification were modified, and new bands appeared over the reaction time. In the case of acidified diesel fuel, no significant modifications were observed. Additionally, the neat and acidified ILs spectra were used to perform a principal components analysis in order to confirm objectively the results. The complete discrimination among samples was successfully achieved, including the complete differentiation among gasoline types. Taking into account the results obtained in this work, it is possible to propose spectral fingerprints for the identification of non-burned acidified ILs in forensic investigations related with arson or the use of improvised incendiary devices (IIDs). PMID:26810182

  7. Use of gamma radiation on control of Clostridium botulinum in mortadella formulated with different nitrite levels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dutra, Monalisa Pereira; Aleixo, Glécia de Cássia; Ramos, Alcinéia de Lemos Souza; Silva, Maurício Henriques Louzada; Pereira, Marcio Tadeu; Piccoli, Roberta Hilsdorf; Ramos, Eduardo Mendes

    2016-02-01

    This study investigated the effects of applying different doses of gamma radiation (0, 10 and 20 kGy) on Clostridium botulinum spores (107 spores/g) inoculated into mortadellas with different nitrite contents (0, 150 and 300 ppm). We also evaluated the order of application of heat (cooking) and irradiation processing. The products were evaluated for survival of C. botulinum, pH, water activity (Aw), redox potential (Eh) and residual nitrite content. In the non-irradiated raw batters, almost all spores could be recovered when no nitrite was added and only half was recovered with the addition of 150 ppm of nitrite. The use of 150 ppm of nitrite was able to inhibit the germination or growth of C. botulinum in non-irradiated cooked mortadellas after 48 h of processing. However, after 30 days of chilling storage (4 °C), it was possible to recover 105 UFC/g of this microorganism. The gamma irradiation (>10 kGy) had a positive effect on the inactivation of C. botulinum in mortadellas, independent of the sodium nitrite level used and the cooking/irradiation processing order.

  8. Influence of acid tolerance responses on survival, growth, and thermal cross-protection of Escherichia coli O157:H7 in acidified media and fruit juices.

    PubMed

    Ryu, J H; Beuchat, L R

    1998-12-22

    A study was done to determine survival and growth characteristics of acid-adapted, acid-shocked, and control cells of Escherichia coli O157:H7 inoculated into tryptic soy broth (TSB) acidified with organic acids and three commercial brands of apple cider and orange juice. The three types of cells behaved similarly in TSB acidified with acetic acid; however, in TSB (pH 3.9) acidified with lactic acid, acid-adapted cells were more tolerant than acid-shocked cells which, in turn, were more tolerant than control cells. The ability of the three types of cells to grow after inoculation into acidified TSB, then plated on tryptic soy agar containing sodium chloride was determined. Tolerance of acid-adapted cells and, less markedly, acid-shocked cells to sodium chloride was diminished, compared to control cells. The pathogen showed extraordinary tolerance to the low pH of apple cider and orange juice held at 5 or 25 degrees C for up to 42 days. Growth occurred in one brand of apple cider (pH 3.98) incubated at 25 degrees C. Regardless of test parameters, there was no indication that cell types differed in tolerance to the acidic environment in apple cider or orange juice. Survival of control, acid-adapted, and acid-shocked cells heated in apple cider and orange juice was studied. Within each apple cider or orange juice, D(52 degrees C)-values of acid-adapted cells were considerably higher than those of acid-shocked or control cells, which indicates that heat tolerance can be substantially enhanced by acid adaptation compared to acid shock. PMID:9926995

  9. Modelling hydrological management for the restoration of acidified floating fens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dekker, Stefan C.; Barendregt, Aat; Bootsma, Margien C.; Schot, Paul P.

    2005-12-01

    Wetlands show a large decline in biodiversity. To protect and restore this biodiversity, many restoration projects are carried out. Hydrology in wetlands controls the chemical and biological processes and may be the most important factor regulating wetland function and development. Hydrological models may be used to simulate these processes and to evaluate management scenarios for restoration. HYDRUS2D, a combined saturated-unsaturated groundwater flow and transport model, is presented. This simulates near-surface hydrological processes in an acidified floating fen, with the aim to evaluate the effect of hydrological restoration in terms of conditions for biodiversity. In the acidified floating fen in the nature reserve Ilperveld (The Netherlands), a trench system was dug for the purpose of creating a runoff channel for acid rainwater in wet periods and to enable circum-neutral surface water to enter the fen in dry periods. The model is calibrated against measured conductivity values for a 5 year period. From the model simulations, it was found that lateral flow in the floating raft is limited. Furthermore, the model shows that the best management option is a combination of trenches and inundation, which gave the best soil water quality in the root zone. It is concluded that hydrological models can be used for the calculation of management scenarios in restoration projects. The combined saturated-unsaturated model concept used in this paper is able to incorporate the governing hydrological processes in the wetland root zones. Copyright

  10. Effects of acidifying reagents on microwave treatment of dairy manure.

    PubMed

    Srinivasan, Asha; Nkansah-Boadu, Frank; Liao, Ping H; Lo, Kwang V

    2014-01-01

    Dairy manure, acidified using organic acids (acetic, oxalic, and citric acid) were treated with microwave enhanced advanced oxidation process (MW/H2O2-AOP). The effect of a mixture of oxalic acid and commonly used mineral acids (sulfuric and hydrochloric acid) on MW/H2O2-AOP was also examined. Substantial amounts of phosphorus were released under MW/H2O2-AOP, regardless of organic acid or mineral acid used. All three organic acids were good acidifying reagents; however, only oxalic acid could remove free calcium ion in the solution, and improve settleability of dairy manure. The MW/H2O2-AOP and calcium removal process could be combined into a single-stage process, which could release phosphate, solubilize solids and remove calcium from dairy manure at the same time. A mixture of oxalic acid and mineral acid produced the maximum volume of clear supernatant and had an ideal molar ratio of calcium to magnesium for effective struvite (magnesium ammonium phosphate) crystallization process. A single-stage MW/H2O2-AOP would simplify the process and reduce mineral acid consumption compared to a two-stage operation. The results of a pilot scale study demonstrate that MW/H2O2-AOP is effective in treating manure and recovering resource from dairy farms. PMID:24813989

  11. 21 CFR 862.1510 - Nitrite (nonquantitative) test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Nitrite (nonquantitative) test system. 862.1510... Systems § 862.1510 Nitrite (nonquantitative) test system. (a) Identification. A nitrite (nonquantitative) test system is a device intended to identify nitrite in urine. Nitrite identification is used in...

  12. Changes in the mutagenic and estrogenic activities of bisphenol A upon treatment with nitrite.

    PubMed

    Masuda, Shuichi; Terashima, Yumeko; Sano, Ayako; Kuruto, Ryoko; Sugiyama, Yasumasa; Shimoi, Kayoko; Tanji, Kenichi; Yoshioka, Hisashi; Terao, Yoshiyasu; Kinae, Naohide

    2005-08-01

    Bisphenol A (4,4'isopropylidenediphenol: BPA), an endocrine-disrupting chemical, is contained in food-packaging and can-coating agents as well as in dental sealants. Nitrite is present in vegetables, fish and tap water as an ingredient or contaminant, and also in human saliva. Here, we explored the possible generation of genotoxicity from the reactions of BPA and nitrite under acidic conditions, a situation simulating the stomach. We determined the changes in the mutagenic and estrogenic activities of BPA before and after nitrite treatment. Untreated BPA did not exhibit any mutagenicity. However, the mixture of BPA and sodium nitrite after incubation at pH 3.0 showed strong mutagenic activity toward Salmonella typhimurium strains TA 100 and TA 98 either with or without a metabolic activation system (S9 mix). The clastogenic properties of nitrite-treated and untreated BPA were analyzed by a micronucleus test with male ICR mice. A single gastric intubation of nitrite-treated BPA induced a significantly higher frequency of micronucleated reticulocytes (MNRETs) in mice. The results of analysis of electron spin resonance (ESR) suggest that the expression of the mutagenic activity of nitrite-treated BPA is related to the generation of radicals in the reaction mixture. By applying 1H and 13C NMR, AB-MS and APCI/LC/MS, we identified two compounds 3-nitrobisphenol A and 3,3'-dinitro-bisphenol A. These compounds were synthesized by the reaction of BPA with nitric acid. 3,3'-Dinitro-bisphenol induced a significantly greater frequency of MNRETs in male ICR mice. By applying a green fluorescent protein (GFP)-reporter expression system and an estrogen R(alpha) competitor screening kit, we found that nitrite-treated BPA and 3,3'-dinitro-bisphenol A showed weak estrogenic activity compared to that of untreated BPA. PMID:15936980

  13. Characterization of nitrite uptake in Arabidopsis thaliana: evidence for a nitrite-specific transporter.

    PubMed

    Kotur, Zorica; Siddiqi, Yaeesh M; Glass, Anthony D M

    2013-10-01

    Nitrite-specific plasma membrane transporters have been described in bacteria, algae and fungi, but there is no evidence of a nitrite-specific plasma membrane transporter in higher plants. We have used 13NO2(-) to characterize nitrite influx into roots of Arabidopsis thaliana. Hydroponically grown Arabidopsis mutants, defective in high-affinity nitrate transport, were used to distinguish between nitrate and nitrite uptake by means of the short-lived tracers 13NO2(-) and 13NO3(-). This approach allowed us to characterize a nitrite-specific transporter. The Atnar2.1-2 mutant, lacking a functional high-affinity nitrate transport system, is capable of nitrite influx that is constitutive and thermodynamically active. The corresponding fluxes conform to a rectangular hyperbola, exhibiting saturation at concentrations above 200 μM (Km = 185 μM and Vmax = 1.89 μmol g(-1) FW h(-1)). Nitrite influx via the putative nitrite transporter is not subject to competitive inhibition by nitrate but is downregulated after 6 h exposure to ammonium. These results signify the existence of a nitrite-specific transporter in Arabidopsis. This transporter enables Atnar2.1-2 mutants, which are incapable of sustained growth on low nitrate, to maintain significant growth on low nitrite. In wild-type plants, this nitrite flux may increase nitrogen acquisition and also participate in the induction of genes specifically induced by nitrite. PMID:23763619

  14. Sustained release nitrite therapy results in myocardial protection in a porcine model of metabolic syndrome with peripheral vascular disease

    PubMed Central

    Bradley, Jessica M.; Islam, Kazi N.; Polhemus, David J.; Donnarumma, Erminia; Brewster, Luke P.; Tao, Ya-Xiong; Goodchild, Traci T.

    2015-01-01

    Metabolic syndrome (MetS) reduces endothelial nitric oxide (NO) bioavailability and exacerbates vascular dysfunction in patients with preexisting vascular diseases. Nitrite, a storage form of NO, can mediate vascular function during pathological conditions when endogenous NO is reduced. The aims of the present study were to characterize the effects of severe MetS and obesity on dyslipidemia, myocardial oxidative stress, and endothelial NO synthase (eNOS) regulation in the obese Ossabaw swine (OS) model and to examine the effects of a novel, sustained-release formulation of sodium nitrite (SR-nitrite) on coronary vascular reactivity and myocardial redox status in obese OS subjected to critical limb ischemia (CLI). After 6 mo of an atherogenic diet, obese OS displayed a MetS phenotype. Obese OS had decreased eNOS functionality and NO bioavailability. In addition, obese OS exhibited increased oxidative stress and a significant reduction in antioxidant enzymes. The efficacy of SR-nitrite therapy was examined in obese OS subjected to CLI. After 3 wk of treatment, SR-nitrite (80 mg·kg−1·day−1 bid po) increased myocardial nitrite levels and eNOS function. Treatment with SR-nitrite reduced myocardial oxidative stress while increasing myocardial antioxidant capacity. Ex vivo assessment of vascular reactivity of left anterior descending coronary artery segments demonstrated marked improvement in vasoreactivity to sodium nitroprusside but not to substance P and bradykinin in SR-nitrite-treated animals compared with placebo-treated animals. In conclusion, in a clinically relevant, large-animal model of MetS and CLI, treatment with SR-nitrite enhanced myocardial NO bioavailability, attenuated oxidative stress, and improved ex vivo coronary artery vasorelaxation. PMID:25957218

  15. Physiological ecology of Mougeotia (Zygnemataceae) from an experimentally acidified lake

    SciTech Connect

    Arancibia-Avila, P.E.

    1994-01-01

    Filamentous green algae were collected in July, 1989, from metaphytic blooms that occurred in the acidified (pH 5.2) basin, but not an unacidified reference basin (pH 6.1) of Little Rock Lake, Vilas Co., WI. Isolates of a Mougeotia species and Spirogyra reflexa were cultured at pH 5.5, with aeration. Measurements Of O[sub 2] production in a factorial experiment revealed optimal irradiance and temperature for photosynthesis in Mougeotia were 2500 [mu]E[center dot]m[sup [minus]2][center dot]s[sup [minus]l] and 25[degrees]C. Additional O[sub 2] evolution measurements showed that the optimal pH for Mougeotia photosynthesis was 8, but that net photosynthesis was positive from pH 8 to 3. Further studies indicated that Mougeotia was tolerant to concentrations of zinc and aluminum that were greater than levels observed in the acidified basin of the lake. Since inorganic carbon (C[sub i]) is known to limit Mougeotia photosynthesis and growth in acidified lakes, the occurrence of carbonic anhydrase (CA) as a mechanism for uptake and concentration of C[sub i] was investigated. No CA activity was detected in S. reflexa. In contrast, both external and internal CA were measured in Mougeotia at pH 3.7 and at pH 8. By comparison to pH 8, at pH 3.7 external CA activity increased by a factor of about 2. An antibody to Chlamydomonas external CA was used to localize CA in the plasma membrane and cell wall of both Chlamydomonas and Mougeotia. When unaerated (DIC-limited) Mougeotia was grown in SD11 medium supplemented with 1% glucose, chlorophyll a levels were significantly higher than for cultures grown without sugar. Chloroplast morphology was also judged superior for sugar-supplemented cultures. The data suggest that Mougeotia possesses a DIC-concentrating system, and may also be able to import DOC (glucose).

  16. Extracellular DNA Acidifies Biofilms and Induces Aminoglycoside Resistance in Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Wilton, Mike; Charron-Mazenod, Laetitia; Moore, Richard

    2015-01-01

    Biofilms consist of surface-adhered bacterial communities encased in an extracellular matrix composed of DNA, exopolysaccharides, and proteins. Extracellular DNA (eDNA) has a structural role in the formation of biofilms, can bind and shield biofilms from aminoglycosides, and induces antimicrobial peptide resistance mechanisms. Here, we provide evidence that eDNA is responsible for the acidification of Pseudomonas aeruginosa planktonic cultures and biofilms. Further, we show that acidic pH and acidification via eDNA constitute a signal that is perceived by P. aeruginosa to induce the expression of genes regulated by the PhoPQ and PmrAB two-component regulatory systems. Planktonic P. aeruginosa cultured in exogenous 0.2% DNA or under acidic conditions demonstrates a 2- to 8-fold increase in aminoglycoside resistance. This resistance phenotype requires the aminoarabinose modification of lipid A and the production of spermidine on the bacterial outer membrane, which likely reduce the entry of aminoglycosides. Interestingly, the additions of the basic amino acid l-arginine and sodium bicarbonate neutralize the pH and restore P. aeruginosa susceptibility to aminoglycosides, even in the presence of eDNA. These data illustrate that the accumulation of eDNA in biofilms and infection sites can acidify the local environment and that acidic pH promotes the P. aeruginosa antibiotic resistance phenotype. PMID:26552982

  17. Improvement of heating uniformity in packaged acidified vegetables pasteurized with a 915 MHz continuous microwave system

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Continuous microwave processing to produce shelf-stable acidified vegetables with moderate to high salt contents poses challenges in pasteurization due to reduced microwave penetration depths and non-uniform heating. Cups of sweetpotato, red bell pepper, and broccoli acidified to pH 3.8 with citric...

  18. Growth potential of Clostridium perfringens from spores in acidified beef, pork and poultry products during chilling

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The ability of C. perfringens to germinate and grow in acidified ground beef as well as in ten commercially prepared acidified beef, pork and poultry products was assessed. The pH of ground beef was adjusted using organic vinegar to achieve various pH values between 5.0 and 5.6; the pH of the commer...

  19. Implications of Decreased Nitrite Concentrations on Clostridium perfringens Outgrowth during Cooling of Ready-to-Eat Meats.

    PubMed

    Myers, Megan I; Sebranek, Joseph G; Dickson, James S; Shaw, Angela M; Tarté, Rodrigo; Adams, Kristin R; Neibuhr, Steve

    2016-01-01

    Increased popularity of natural and organic processed meats can be attributed to the growing consumer demand for preservative-free foods, including processed meats. To meet this consumer demand, meat processors have begun using celery juice concentrate in place of sodium nitrite to create products labeled as no-nitrate or no-nitrite-added meat products while maintaining the characteristics unique to conventionally cured processed meats. Because of flavor limitations, natural cures with celery concentrate typically provide lower ingoing nitrite concentrations for ready-to-eat processed meats than do conventional cures, which could allow for increased growth of pathogens, such as Clostridium perfringens, during cooked product cooling such as that required by the U.S. Department of Agriculture. The objective of this study was to investigate the implications associated with reduced nitrite concentrations for preventing C. perfringens outgrowth during a typical cooling cycle used for cooked products. Nitrite treatments of 0, 50, and 100 ppm were tested in a broth system inoculated with a three-strain C. perfringens cocktail and heated with a simulated product thermal process followed by a typical cooling-stabilization process. The nitrite concentration of 50 ppm was more effective for preventing C. perfringens outgrowth than was 0 ppm but was not as effective as 100 ppm. The interaction between nitrite and temperature significantly affected (P < 0.05) C. perfringens outgrowth in both total population and number of vegetative cells. Both temperature and nitrite concentration significantly affected (P < 0.05) C. perfringens spore survival, but the interaction between nitrite and temperature did not have a significant effect (P > 0.05) on spore outgrowth. Results indicate that decreased nitrite concentrations (50 ppm) have increased potential for total C. perfringens population outgrowth during cooling and may require additional protective measures, such as faster chilling

  20. Disrupting Hypoxia-Induced Bicarbonate Transport Acidifies Tumor Cells and Suppresses Tumor Growth.

    PubMed

    McIntyre, Alan; Hulikova, Alzbeta; Ledaki, Ioanna; Snell, Cameron; Singleton, Dean; Steers, Graham; Seden, Peter; Jones, Dylan; Bridges, Esther; Wigfield, Simon; Li, Ji-Liang; Russell, Angela; Swietach, Pawel; Harris, Adrian L

    2016-07-01

    Tumor hypoxia is associated clinically with therapeutic resistance and poor patient outcomes. One feature of tumor hypoxia is activated expression of carbonic anhydrase IX (CA9), a regulator of pH and tumor growth. In this study, we investigated the hypothesis that impeding the reuptake of bicarbonate produced extracellularly by CA9 could exacerbate the intracellular acidity produced by hypoxic conditions, perhaps compromising cell growth and viability as a result. In 8 of 10 cancer cell lines, we found that hypoxia induced the expression of at least one bicarbonate transporter. The most robust and frequent inductions were of the sodium-driven bicarbonate transporters SLC4A4 and SLC4A9, which rely upon both HIF1α and HIF2α activity for their expression. In cancer cell spheroids, SLC4A4 or SLC4A9 disruption by either genetic or pharmaceutical approaches acidified intracellular pH and reduced cell growth. Furthermore, treatment of spheroids with S0859, a small-molecule inhibitor of sodium-driven bicarbonate transporters, increased apoptosis in the cell lines tested. Finally, RNAi-mediated attenuation of SLC4A9 increased apoptosis in MDA-MB-231 breast cancer spheroids and dramatically reduced growth of MDA-MB-231 breast tumors or U87 gliomas in murine xenografts. Our findings suggest that disrupting pH homeostasis by blocking bicarbonate import might broadly relieve the common resistance of hypoxic tumors to anticancer therapy. Cancer Res; 76(13); 3744-55. ©2016 AACR. PMID:27197160

  1. Antimicrobial effect of natural preservatives in a cooked and acidified chicken meat model.

    PubMed

    Lemay, Marie-Josée; Choquette, Julie; Delaquis, Pascal J; Claude, Gariépy; Rodrigue, Natalie; Saucier, Linda

    2002-10-25

    The inhibitory effect of Microgard 100, Microgard 300, nisin, Alta 2002, Perlac 1902, sodium lactate and essential oil of mustard on microorganisms experimentally inoculated was screened in an acidified chicken meat model (pH = 5.0) and stored for 2 weeks at a none restrictive growth temperature of 22 degrees C. All antimicrobials tested were used at the highest concentration recommended by their manufacturer. Sausage batter made with mechanically deboned chicken was inoculated with a mixed culture of Escherichia coli ATCC 25922, Brochothrix thermosphacta CRDAV452, and a protective culture Lactobacillus alimentarius BJ33 (FloraCan L-2). A final cell concentration of 3-4 log CFU g (-1) was targeted after cooking at a core temperature of 55 degrees C for each microorganism in order to assess cell count variation effectively. Composition, water activity (a(w)), pH and redox potential of the sausage model was also evaluated. The E. coli population decreased steadily during storage and was close or below detection level (< 1 log CFU g (-1)) for all treatments, including the control, after 14 days. Sodium lactate was most effective against B. thermosphacta; population was 4 log lower than the control after 14 days of storage. When essential oil of mustard was used, aerobic mesophilic bacteria and lactic acid bacteria were significantly lower than the control after 2 days of storage (P < or = 0.05). The other antimicrobial agents tested had no significant effect on the aerobic mesophilic bacteria, E. coli, B. thermosphacta and lactic acid bacteria counts, when compared to the control. PMID:12227640

  2. Nitrite Uptake into Intact Pea Chloroplasts 1

    PubMed Central

    Brunswick, Pamela; Cresswell, Christopher F.

    1988-01-01

    The relationship between net nitrite uptake and its reduction in intact pea chloroplasts was investigated employing electron transport regulators, uncouplers, and photophosphorylation inhibitors. Observations confirmed the dependence of nitrite uptake on stromal pH and nitrite reduction but also suggested a partial dependance upon PSI phosphorylation. It was also suggested that ammonia stimulates nitrogen assimilation in the dark by association with stromal protons. Inhibition of nitrite uptake by N-ethylmaleimide and dinitrofluorobenzene could not be completely attributed to their inhibition of carbon dioxide fixation. Other protein binding reagents which inhibited photosynthesis showed no effect on nitrite uptake, except for p-chlormercuribenzoate which stimulated nitrite uptake. The results with N-ethylmaleimide and dinitrofluorobenzene tended to support the proposed presence of a protein permeation channel for nitrite uptake in addition to HNO2 penetration. On the basis of a lack of effect by known anion uptake inhibitors, it was concluded that the nitrite uptake mechanism was distinct from that of phosphate and chloride/sulfate transport. PMID:16665917

  3. Nitrates, Nitrites, and Health. Bulletin 750.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Deeb, Barbara S.; Sloan, Kenneth W.

    This review is intended to assess available literature in order to define the range of nitrate/nitrite effects on animals. Though the literature deals primarily with livestock and experimental animals, much of the contemporary research is concerned with human nitrite intoxication. Thus, the effects on man are discussed where appropriate. Some of…

  4. Cardioprotective effects of inorganic nitrate/nitrite in chronic anthracycline cardiotoxicity: Comparison with dexrazoxane.

    PubMed

    Lenčová-Popelová, Olga; Jirkovský, Eduard; Jansová, Hana; Jirkovská-Vávrová, Anna; Vostatková-Tichotová, Lucie; Mazurová, Yvona; Adamcová, Michaela; Chládek, Jaroslav; Hroch, Miloš; Pokorná, Zuzana; Geršl, Vladimír; Šimůnek, Tomáš; Štěrba, Martin

    2016-02-01

    Dexrazoxane (DEX) is a clinically available cardioprotectant that reduces the toxicity induced by anthracycline (ANT) anticancer drugs; however, DEX is seldom used and its action is poorly understood. Inorganic nitrate/nitrite has shown promising results in myocardial ischemia-reperfusion injury and recently in acute high-dose ANT cardiotoxicity. However, the utility of this approach for overcoming clinically more relevant chronic forms of cardiotoxicity remains elusive. Hence, in this study, the protective potential of inorganic nitrate and nitrite against chronic ANT cardiotoxicity was investigated, and the results were compared to those using DEX. Chronic cardiotoxicity was induced in rabbits with daunorubicin (DAU). Sodium nitrate (1g/L) was administered daily in drinking water, while sodium nitrite (0.15 or 5mg/kg) or DEX (60mg/kg) was administered parenterally before each DAU dose. Although oral nitrate induced a marked increase in plasma NOx, it showed no improvement in DAU-induced mortality, myocardial damage or heart failure. Instead, the higher nitrite dose reduced the incidence of end-stage cardiotoxicity, prevented related premature deaths and significantly ameliorated several molecular and cellular perturbations induced by DAU, particularly those concerning mitochondria. The latter result was also confirmed in vitro. Nevertheless, inorganic nitrite failed to prevent DAU-induced cardiac dysfunction and molecular remodeling in vivo and failed to overcome the cytotoxicity of DAU to cardiomyocytes in vitro. In contrast, DEX completely prevented all of the investigated molecular, cellular and functional perturbations that were induced by DAU. Our data suggest that the difference in cardioprotective efficacy between DEX and inorganic nitrite may be related to their different abilities to address a recently proposed upstream target for ANT in the heart - topoisomerase IIβ. PMID:26724189

  5. Comparison of a Powdered, Acidified Liquid, and Non-Acidified Liquid Human Milk Fortifier on Clinical Outcomes in Premature Infants

    PubMed Central

    Thoene, Melissa; Lyden, Elizabeth; Weishaar, Kara; Elliott, Elizabeth; Wu, Ruomei; White, Katelyn; Timm, Hayley; Anderson-Berry, Ann

    2016-01-01

    We previously compared infant outcomes between a powdered human milk fortifier (P-HMF) vs. acidified liquid HMF (AL-HMF). A non-acidified liquid HMF (NAL-HMF) is now commercially available. The purpose of this study is to compare growth and outcomes of premature infants receiving P-HMF, AL-HMF or NAL-HMF. An Institutional Review Board (IRB) approved retrospective chart review compared infant outcomes (born < 2000 g) who received one of three HMF. Growth, enteral nutrition, laboratory and demographic data were compared. 120 infants were included (P-HMF = 46, AL-HMF = 23, NAL-HMF = 51). AL-HMF infants grew slower in g/day (median 23.66 vs. P-HMF 31.27, NAL-HMF 31.74 (p < 0.05)) and in g/kg/day, median 10.59 vs. 15.37, 14.03 (p < 0.0001). AL-HMF vs. NAL-HMF infants were smaller at 36 weeks gestational age (median 2046 vs. 2404 g, p < 0.05). However AL-HMF infants received more daily calories (p = 0.21) and protein (p < 0.0001), mean 129 cal/kg, 4.2 g protein/kg vs. P-HMF 117 cal/kg, 3.7 g protein/kg , NAL-HMF 120 cal/kg, 4.0 g protein/kg. AL-HMF infants exhibited lower carbon dioxide levels after day of life 14 and 30 (p < 0.0001, p = 0.0038). Three AL-HMF infants (13%) developed necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC) vs. no infants in the remaining groups (p = 0.0056). A NAL-HMF is the most optimal choice for premature human milk-fed infants in a high acuity neonatal intensive care unit (NICU). PMID:27472359

  6. Comparison of a Powdered, Acidified Liquid, and Non-Acidified Liquid Human Milk Fortifier on Clinical Outcomes in Premature Infants.

    PubMed

    Thoene, Melissa; Lyden, Elizabeth; Weishaar, Kara; Elliott, Elizabeth; Wu, Ruomei; White, Katelyn; Timm, Hayley; Anderson-Berry, Ann

    2016-01-01

    We previously compared infant outcomes between a powdered human milk fortifier (P-HMF) vs. acidified liquid HMF (AL-HMF). A non-acidified liquid HMF (NAL-HMF) is now commercially available. The purpose of this study is to compare growth and outcomes of premature infants receiving P-HMF, AL-HMF or NAL-HMF. An Institutional Review Board (IRB) approved retrospective chart review compared infant outcomes (born < 2000 g) who received one of three HMF. Growth, enteral nutrition, laboratory and demographic data were compared. 120 infants were included (P-HMF = 46, AL-HMF = 23, NAL-HMF = 51). AL-HMF infants grew slower in g/day (median 23.66 vs. P-HMF 31.27, NAL-HMF 31.74 (p < 0.05)) and in g/kg/day, median 10.59 vs. 15.37, 14.03 (p < 0.0001). AL-HMF vs. NAL-HMF infants were smaller at 36 weeks gestational age (median 2046 vs. 2404 g, p < 0.05). However AL-HMF infants received more daily calories (p = 0.21) and protein (p < 0.0001), mean 129 cal/kg, 4.2 g protein/kg vs. P-HMF 117 cal/kg, 3.7 g protein/kg , NAL-HMF 120 cal/kg, 4.0 g protein/kg. AL-HMF infants exhibited lower carbon dioxide levels after day of life 14 and 30 (p < 0.0001, p = 0.0038). Three AL-HMF infants (13%) developed necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC) vs. no infants in the remaining groups (p = 0.0056). A NAL-HMF is the most optimal choice for premature human milk-fed infants in a high acuity neonatal intensive care unit (NICU). PMID:27472359

  7. Corrosion Behavior of Stainless Steels in Neutral and Acidified Sodium Chloride Solutions by Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Calle, L. M.; Kolady, M. R.; Vinje, R. D.

    2004-01-01

    The objective of this work was to evaluate the corrosion performance of three alloys by Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopy (EIS) and to compare the results with those obtained during a two-year atmospheric exposure study.' Three alloys: AL6XN (UNS N08367), 254SM0 (UNS S32154), and 304L (UNS S30403) were included in the study. 304L was included as a control. The alloys were tested in three electrolyte solutions which consisted of neutral 3.55% NaC1, 3.55% NaC1 in 0.lN HC1, and 3.55% NaC1 in 1.ON HC1. These conditions were expected to be less severe, similar, and more severe respectively than the conditions at NASA's Kennedy Space Center launch pads.

  8. Effects of nitrite exposure on haematological parameters, oxidative stress and apoptosis in juvenile turbot (Scophthalmus maximus).

    PubMed

    Jia, Rui; Han, Cen; Lei, Ji-Lin; Liu, Bao-Liang; Huang, Bin; Huo, Huan-Huan; Yin, Shu-Ting

    2015-12-01

    Nitrite (NO2(-)) is commonly present as contaminant in aquatic environment and toxic to aquatic organisms. In the present study, we investigated the effects of nitrite exposure on haematological parameters, oxidative stress and apoptosis in juvenile turbot (Scophthalmus maximus). Fish were exposed to various concentrations of nitrite (0, 0.02, 0.08, 0.4 and 0.8mM) for 96 h. Fish blood and gills were collected to assay haematological parameters, oxidative stress and expression of genes after 0, 24, 48 and 96 h of exposure. In blood, the data showed that the levels of methemoglobin (MetHb), triglyceride (TG), potassium (K(+)), cortisol, heat shock protein 70 (HSP70) and glucose significantly increased in treatments with higher concentrations of nitrite (0.4 and/or 0.8mM) after 48 and 96 h, while the levels of haemoglobin (Hb) and sodium (Na(+)) significantly decreased in these treatments. In gills, nitrite (0.4 and/or 0.8mM) apparently reduced the levels of superoxide dismutase (SOD), glutathione peroxidase (GPx), catalase (CAT) and glutathione (GSH), increased the formation of malondialdehyde (MDA), up-regulated the mRNA levels of c-jun amino-terminal kinase (JUK1), p53, caspase-3, caspase-7 and caspase-9 after 48 and 96 h of exposure. The results suggested caspase-dependent and JUK signaling pathways played important roles in nitrite-induced apoptosis in fish. Further, this study provides new insights into how nitrite affects the physiological responses and apoptosis in a marine fish. PMID:26476021

  9. 21 CFR 181.33 - Sodium nitrate and potassium nitrate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Sodium nitrate and potassium nitrate. 181.33... nitrate and potassium nitrate. Sodium nitrate and potassium nitrate are subject to prior sanctions issued... potassium nitrite, in the production of cured red meat products and cured poultry products....

  10. Properties of aqueous nitrate and nitrite from x-ray absorption spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Jacob W.; Lam, Royce K.; Shih, Orion; Rizzuto, Anthony M.; Prendergast, David; Saykally, Richard J.

    2015-08-01

    Nitrate and nitrite ions are of considerable interest, both for their widespread use in commercial and research contexts and because of their central role in the global nitrogen cycle. The chemistry of atmospheric aerosols, wherein nitrate is abundant, has been found to depend on the interfacial behavior of ionic species. The interfacial behavior of ions is determined largely by their hydration properties; consequently, the study of the hydration and interfacial behavior of nitrate and nitrite comprises a significant field of study. In this work, we describe the study of aqueous solutions of sodium nitrate and nitrite via X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS), interpreted in light of first-principles density functional theory electronic structure calculations. Experimental and calculated spectra of the nitrogen K-edge XA spectra of bulk solutions exhibit a large 3.7 eV shift between the XA spectra of nitrate and nitrite resulting from greater stabilization of the nitrogen 1s energy level in nitrate. A similar shift is not observed in the oxygen K-edge XA spectra of NO3- and NO2-. The hydration properties of nitrate and nitrite are found to be similar, with both anions exhibiting a similar propensity towards ion pairing.

  11. Properties of aqueous nitrate and nitrite from x-ray absorption spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, Jacob W.; Lam, Royce K.; Saykally, Richard J.; Shih, Orion; Rizzuto, Anthony M.; Prendergast, David

    2015-08-28

    Nitrate and nitrite ions are of considerable interest, both for their widespread use in commercial and research contexts and because of their central role in the global nitrogen cycle. The chemistry of atmospheric aerosols, wherein nitrate is abundant, has been found to depend on the interfacial behavior of ionic species. The interfacial behavior of ions is determined largely by their hydration properties; consequently, the study of the hydration and interfacial behavior of nitrate and nitrite comprises a significant field of study. In this work, we describe the study of aqueous solutions of sodium nitrate and nitrite via X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS), interpreted in light of first-principles density functional theory electronic structure calculations. Experimental and calculated spectra of the nitrogen K-edge XA spectra of bulk solutions exhibit a large 3.7 eV shift between the XA spectra of nitrate and nitrite resulting from greater stabilization of the nitrogen 1s energy level in nitrate. A similar shift is not observed in the oxygen K-edge XA spectra of NO{sub 3}{sup −} and NO{sub 2}{sup −}. The hydration properties of nitrate and nitrite are found to be similar, with both anions exhibiting a similar propensity towards ion pairing.

  12. SLUDGE CHARACTERIZATION AND SRAT SIMULATIONS USING A NITRITE-FREE SLUDGE SIMULANT

    SciTech Connect

    Koopman, D.

    2009-12-17

    Understanding catalytic hydrogen generation is fundamental to the safe operation of the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) Chemical Process Cell (CPC). Two Sludge Receipt and Adjustment Tank (SRAT) simulations were completed at the Aiken County Technology Laboratory (ACTL) of the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) using a nitrite-free starting simulant. One simulation was trimmed with Rh and Hg and the other with Ru and Hg. The two noble metals were trimmed at the upper end of the recent Rh-Ru-Hg study. Mercury was trimmed at 1.5 wt% in the total solids. Excess acid comparable in quantity to that in the recent Rh-Ru-Hg matrix study was used. In spite of the favorable conditions for hydrogen generation, virtually no hydrogen production was observed during either SRAT simulation. The Rh test result confirmed the postulated significance of nitrite ion to the catalytic reactions producing hydrogen in CPC testing with normal DWPF sludge simulants. As for Ru, however, previous testing has shown that Ru activated for hydrogen generation only after nitrite destruction. Therefore, Ru could have potentially been catalytically active from the start of the nitrite-free SRAT test, but no such activity was seen. The nitrite-free Ru test result suggests that the intermediate form detected in the bead-frit melter feed preparation Ru solubility profiles was some form of nitro-Ru complex. The nitro-Ru complex is apparently not catalytically active for hydrogen generation but is a precursor to the catalytically active form (presumably a different complex not involving nitrite ligands). Removing nitrite ion from the system prevented the Ru catalyst precursor from forming and consequently blocked formation of the catalytically active form. These results, along with the results of a simulation in which sodium nitrite was metered into the SRAT to prevent ligand substitution reactions that occur during nitrite destruction from occurring in order to reduce hydrogen generation

  13. Prior exposure influences the behavioural avoidance by an intertidal gastropod, Bembicium auratum, of acidified waters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amaral, Valter; Cabral, Henrique N.; Bishop, Melanie J.

    2014-01-01

    Phenotypic plasticity may be critical to the maintenance of viable populations under future environmental change. Here we examined the role of behavioural avoidance of sub-optimal conditions in enabling the intertidal gastropod, Bembicium auratum, to persist in mangrove forests affected by the low pH runoff from acid sulphate soils (ASS). Behaviourally, the gastropod may be able to avoid periods of particularly high acidity by using pneumatophores and/or mangrove trunks to vertically migrate above the water line or by retreating into its shell. We hypothesised that (1) B. auratum would display greater and more rapid vertical migration out of acidified than reference estuarine waters, and (2) responses would be more pronounced in gastropods collected from acidified than reference sites. Gastropods from acidified sites showed significantly higher activity in and more rapid migration out of acidified waters of pH 6.2-7.0, than reference waters or waters of pH < 5.0. Gastropods from reference locations showed a significantly weaker response to acidified water than those from acidified waters, and which did not significantly differ from their response to reference water. At extremely low pHs, <5.0, a higher proportion of both acidified and reference gastropods retreated into their shell than at higher pHs. Both the migration of gastropods out of acidified waters and retraction into their shells serves to reduce exposure time to acidified waters and may reduce the impact of this stressor on their populations. The stronger response to acidification of gastropods from populations previously exposed to this stressor suggests that the response may be learned, inherited or induced over multiple exposures. Our study adds to growing evidence that estuarine organisms may exhibit considerable physiological and behaviour adaptive capacity to acidification. The potential for such adaptive capacity should be incorporated into studies seeking to forecast impacts to marine organisms

  14. Reduction of hexavalent chromium in water samples acidified for preservation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stollenwerk, K.G.; Grove, D.B.

    1985-01-01

    Reduction of hexavalent chromium, Cr(VI), in water samples, preserved by standard techniques, was investigated. The standard preservation technique for water samples that are to be analyzed for Cr(VI) consists of filtration through a 0.45-??m membrane, acidification to a pH < 2, and storage in plastic bottles. Batch experiments were conducted to evaluate the effect of H+ concentration, NO2, temperature, and dissolved organic carbon (DOC) on the reduction of Cr(VI) to Cr(III). The rate of reduction of Cr(VI) to Cr(III) increased with increasing NO2, DOC, H+, and temperature. Reduction of Cr(VI) by organic matter occurred in some samples even though the samples were unacidified. Reduction of Cr(VI) is inhibited to an extent by storing the sample at 4??C. Stability of Cr(VI) in water is variable and depends on the other constituents present in the sample. Water samples collected for the determination of Cr(VI) should be filtered (0.45-??m membrane), refrigerated, and analyzed as quickly as possible. Water samples should not be acidified. Measurement of total Cr in addition to Cr(VI) can serve as a check for Cr(VI) reduction. If total Cr is greater than Cr(VI), the possibility that Cr(VI) reduction has occurred needs to be considered.The rate of reduction of Cr(VI) to Cr(III) increased with increasing NO//2, DOC, H** plus , and temperature. Reduction of Cr(VI) by organic matter occurred in some samples even though the samples were unacidified. Reduction of Cr(VI) is inhibited to an extent by storing the sample at 4 degree C. Stability of Cr(VI) in water is variable and depends on the other constituents present in the sample. Water samples collected for the determination of Cr(VI) should be filtered (0. 45- mu m membrane), refrigerated, and analyzed as quickly as possible. Water samples should not be acidified. Measurement of total Cr in addition to Cr(VI) can serve as a check for Cr(VI) reduction. If total Cr is greater than Cr(VI), the possibility that Cr

  15. A new, fast and sensitive method for the determination of trace amounts of nitrite using differential pulse polarography.

    PubMed

    Somer, Güler; Kalaycı, Şükrü; Almas, Ziya

    2016-07-01

    Nitrite salts of sodium or potassium are being used for the protection of meat products. They provide color and taste of meat and they protect against clostridia. On the other hand, nitrite ions can interact with amines to form nitrosamines which are known as carcinogenic substances. They may also react with hemoglobin and reduce its oxygen carrying capacity. Thus, its concentration in food-stuff has to be controlled carefully by highly sensitive methods. A new DP polarographic method is established for the determination of nitrite. Nitrite cannot be determined directly with any analytical methods. Long and tedious procedures are necessary for many of them. In this polarographic method arsenite, As(III), ion is used for the reduction of nitrite. The nitrite is determined from the As(III) quantity left over after the reaction with nitrite. The peak of arsenite has been used since it is sharp and responds well for the standard addition of arsenite. The optimum conditions for the quantitative reaction between nitrite and arsenite have been studied. It was found that the pH for the reaction medium has to be 5-7, since nitrite is decomposed at lower pH values. The reaction medium has to be stirred for about 5 min with nitrogen gas in order to expel the NO gas formed and thus to shift the equilibrium to products side. The limit of detection, LOD, was found to be as 2 × 10(-7) M. No interference was observed from most common ions. PMID:27153987

  16. Oxygen isotopes in nitrite: Analysis, calibration, and equilibration

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Casciotti, K.L.; Böhlke, J.K.; McIlvin, M.R.; Mroczkowski, S.J.; Hannon, J.E.

    2007-01-01

    Nitrite is a central intermediate in the nitrogen cycle and can persist in significant concentrations in ocean waters, sediment pore waters, and terrestrial groundwaters. To fully interpret the effect of microbial processes on nitrate (NO3-), nitrite (NO2-), and nitrous oxide (N2O) cycling in these systems, the nitrite pool must be accessible to isotopic analysis. Furthermore, because nitrite interferes with most methods of nitrate isotopic analysis, accurate isotopic analysis of nitrite is essential for correct measurement of nitrate isotopes in a sample that contains nitrite. In this study, nitrite salts with varying oxygen isotopic compositions were prepared and calibrated and then used to test the denitrifier method for nitrite oxygen isotopic analysis. The oxygen isotopic fractionation during nitrite reduction to N2O by Pseudomonas aureofaciens was lower than for nitrate conversion to N2O, while oxygen isotopic exchange between nitrite and water during the reaction was similar. These results enable the extension of the denitrifier method to oxygen isotopic analysis of nitrite (in the absence of nitrate) and correction of nitrate isotopes for the presence of nitrite in "mixed" samples. We tested storage conditions for seawater and freshwater samples that contain nitrite and provide recommendations for accurate oxygen isotopic analysis of nitrite by any method. Finally, we report preliminary results on the equilibrium isotope effect between nitrite and water, which can play an important role in determining the oxygen isotopic value of nitrite where equilibration with water is significant. ?? 2007 American Chemical Society.

  17. A Reacidification Model for Acidified Lakes Neutralized With Calcite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sverdrup, Harald; Warfvinge, Per

    1985-09-01

    In lake liming operations in Sweden, acidified lakes are reclaimed by neutralization with calcite powder. The amount added is intended to neutralize the water column as well as to delay the reacidification. The reacidification of limed lakes is dependent on the dilution of the dissolved calcium carbonate with time and, for a limited period of time, the dissolution of calcite from the lake sediments. Calcite on the lake bottom will, in addition to being covered by sedimentation, become inactivated by precipitates of humus and clay minerals clogging the calcite surfaces. A model has been developed to calculate the reacidification of a limed lake which includes the following mechanisms: (1) the dissolution of calcite and a subsequent neutralization of acid water, (2) owing to the increase inpH value, occurrence of precipitation of humus and dissolved metals onto the calcite surface and inhibition of the dissolution of calcite (3) reversible sorbtion of calcium from the water column by sediments not covered with calcite, and (4) diffusive transport through a boundary bottom layer to the water column. In a first approach the lake was modeled as a continuously stirred tank. The equations were derived from a mass balance and the dissolution kinetics for calcite to describe the long-term development ofpH, alkalinity, and calcium concentration in the lake. The differential equations describing the mechanisms were solved with the help of a computer code. The model accurately describes the reacidification and the mass balances observed in several limed lakes.

  18. 21 CFR 172.824 - Sodium mono- and dimethyl naphthalene sulfonates.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... systems to reduce hardness and aid in sedimentation and coagulation by raising the pH for the efficient utilization of other coagulation materials. (2) As an anticaking agent in sodium nitrite at a level not...

  19. Effect of rosemary extract dose on lipid oxidation, colour stability and antioxidant concentrations, in reduced nitrite liver pâtés.

    PubMed

    Doolaege, Evelyne H A; Vossen, Els; Raes, Katleen; De Meulenaer, Bruno; Verhé, Roland; Paelinck, Hubert; De Smet, Stefaan

    2012-04-01

    The oxidative stability of liver pâté was investigated in relation to different doses of rosemary extract (RE) and sodium nitrite. Colour stability, lipid oxidation (TBARS) and concentrations of ascorbic acid, α-tocopherol, carnosic acid and nitrite were measured on the batters before cooking and on the cooked liver pâté before and after exposure to light and air for 48 h at 4°C. Results showed that the use of RE significantly reduced lipid oxidation, whereas it had no effect on colour stability. Ascorbic acid and nitrite concentrations were significantly higher and lower respectively when RE was added. RE dose-dependently increased the concentration of carnosic acid. Lower sodium nitrite doses resulted in significantly lower nitrite concentrations and slightly lower TBARS values. It was concluded that in liver pâté sodium nitrite levels may be lowered to 80 mg/kg without negatively affecting colour and lipid stability and that the use of RE may help in maintaining lipid stability. PMID:22196091

  20. Acute toxicity of ammonia and nitrite to shortnose sturgeon fingerlings

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fontenot, Q.C.; Isely, J.J.; Tomasso, J.R.

    1998-01-01

    The 96-h median-lethal concentration (96-h LC50) of total ammonia nitrogen (ammonia-N) to fingerling shortnose sturgeon Acipenser brevirostrum was 149.8 ?? 55.20 mg/L (mean ?? SD, 17.9 ?? 0.62??C, pH = 6.8-7.3). Calculated 96-h LC50 for un-ionized ammonia-N was 0.58 ?? 0.213 mg/L. The 96-h LC50 of nitrite nitrogen to shortnose sturgeon fingerlings was 11.3 ?? 8.17 mg/L (17.9 ?? 0.31??C, <1.0 mg chloride/L, <1.0 mg magnesium/L, 1.8 mg calcium/L, 7.7 mg sodium/L).

  1. The fate of sulfate in acidified pig slurry during storage and following application to cropped soil.

    PubMed

    Eriksen, Jørgen; Sørensen, Peter; Elsgaard, Lars

    2008-01-01

    Acidification of slurry with sulfuric acid is a recent agricultural practice that may serve a double purpose: reducing ammonia emission and ensuring crop sulfur sufficiency. We investigated S transformations in untreated and acidified pig slurry stored for up to 11 mo at 2, 10, or 20 degrees C. Furthermore, the fertilizer efficiency of sulfuric acid in acidified slurry was investigated in a pot experiment with spring barley. The sulfate content from acidification with sulfuric acid was relatively stable and even after 11 mo of storage the majority was in the plant-available sulfate form. Microbial sulfate reduction during storage of acidified pig slurry was limited, presumably due to initial pH effects and a limitation in the availability of easily degradable organic matter. Sulfide accumulation was observed during storage but the sulfide levels in acidified slurry did not exceed those of the untreated slurry for several months after addition. The S fertilizer value of the acidified slurry was considerable as a result of the stable sulfate pool during storage. The high content of inorganic S in the acidified slurry may potentially lead to development of odorous volatile sulfur-containing compounds and investigations are needed into the relationship between odor development and the C and S composition of the slurry. PMID:18178902

  2. Release of Nitrogen and Phosphorus from Poultry Litter Amended with Acidified Biochar

    PubMed Central

    Doydora, Sarah A.; Cabrera, Miguel L.; Das, Keshav C.; Gaskin, Julia W.; Sonon, Leticia S.; Miller, William P.

    2011-01-01

    Application of poultry litter (PL) to soil may lead to nitrogen (N) losses through ammonia (NH3) volatilization and to potential contamination of surface runoff with PL-derived phosphorus (P). Amending litter with acidified biochar may minimize these problems by decreasing litter pH and by retaining litter-derived P, respectively. This study evaluated the effect of acidified biochars from pine chips (PC) and peanut hulls (PH) on NH3 losses and inorganic N and P released from surface-applied or incorporated PL. Poultry litter with or without acidified biochars was surface-applied or incorporated into the soil and incubated for 21 d. Volatilized NH3 was determined by trapping it in acid. Inorganic N and P were determined by leaching the soil with 0.01 M of CaCl2 during the study and by extracting it with 1 M KCl after incubation. Acidified biochars reduced NH3 losses by 58 to 63% with surface-applied PL, and by 56 to 60% with incorporated PL. Except for PH biochar, which caused a small increase in leached NH4 +-N with incorporated PL, acidified biochars had no effect on leached or KCl-extractable inorganic N and P from surface-applied or incorporated PL. These results suggest that acidified biochars may decrease NH3 losses from PL but may not reduce the potential for P loss in surface runoff from soils receiving PL. PMID:21655132

  3. Elevated Colonization of Microborers at a Volcanically Acidified Coral Reef

    PubMed Central

    Enochs, Ian C.; Manzello, Derek P.; Tribollet, Aline; Valentino, Lauren; Kolodziej, Graham; Donham, Emily M.; Fitchett, Mark D.; Carlton, Renee; Price, Nichole N.

    2016-01-01

    Experiments have demonstrated that ocean acidification (OA) conditions projected to occur by the end of the century will slow the calcification of numerous coral species and accelerate the biological erosion of reef habitats (bioerosion). Microborers, which bore holes less than 100 μm diameter, are one of the most pervasive agents of bioerosion and are present throughout all calcium carbonate substrates within the reef environment. The response of diverse reef functional groups to OA is known from real-world ecosystems, but to date our understanding of the relationship between ocean pH and carbonate dissolution by microborers is limited to controlled laboratory experiments. Here we examine the settlement of microborers to pure mineral calcium carbonate substrates (calcite) along a natural pH gradient at a volcanically acidified reef at Maug, Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands (CNMI). Colonization of pioneer microborers was higher in the lower pH waters near the vent field. Depth of microborer penetration was highly variable both among and within sites (4.2–195.5 μm) over the short duration of the study (3 mo.) and no clear relationship to increasing CO2 was observed. Calculated rates of biogenic dissolution, however, were highest at the two sites closer to the vent and were not significantly different from each other. These data represent the first evidence of OA-enhancement of microboring flora colonization in newly available substrates and provide further evidence that microborers, especially bioeroding chlorophytes, respond positively to low pH. The accelerated breakdown and dissolution of reef framework structures with OA will likely lead to declines in structural complexity and integrity, as well as possible loss of essential habitat. PMID:27467570

  4. Elevated Colonization of Microborers at a Volcanically Acidified Coral Reef.

    PubMed

    Enochs, Ian C; Manzello, Derek P; Tribollet, Aline; Valentino, Lauren; Kolodziej, Graham; Donham, Emily M; Fitchett, Mark D; Carlton, Renee; Price, Nichole N

    2016-01-01

    Experiments have demonstrated that ocean acidification (OA) conditions projected to occur by the end of the century will slow the calcification of numerous coral species and accelerate the biological erosion of reef habitats (bioerosion). Microborers, which bore holes less than 100 μm diameter, are one of the most pervasive agents of bioerosion and are present throughout all calcium carbonate substrates within the reef environment. The response of diverse reef functional groups to OA is known from real-world ecosystems, but to date our understanding of the relationship between ocean pH and carbonate dissolution by microborers is limited to controlled laboratory experiments. Here we examine the settlement of microborers to pure mineral calcium carbonate substrates (calcite) along a natural pH gradient at a volcanically acidified reef at Maug, Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands (CNMI). Colonization of pioneer microborers was higher in the lower pH waters near the vent field. Depth of microborer penetration was highly variable both among and within sites (4.2-195.5 μm) over the short duration of the study (3 mo.) and no clear relationship to increasing CO2 was observed. Calculated rates of biogenic dissolution, however, were highest at the two sites closer to the vent and were not significantly different from each other. These data represent the first evidence of OA-enhancement of microboring flora colonization in newly available substrates and provide further evidence that microborers, especially bioeroding chlorophytes, respond positively to low pH. The accelerated breakdown and dissolution of reef framework structures with OA will likely lead to declines in structural complexity and integrity, as well as possible loss of essential habitat. PMID:27467570

  5. Nitrite Production Mechanisms in the Primary Nitrite Maximum of the Tropical South Pacific Inferred from Nitrite Isotopes Collected during the Geotraces 2013 Cruise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peters, B. D.; Casciotti, K. L.

    2014-12-01

    Nitrite has been observed to accumulate near the bottom of the euphotic zone in many regions of the world ocean. This recurring feature is referred to as the primary nitrite maximum (PNM). The production of nitrite in the PNM has been attributed to both nitrate reduction and ammonium oxidation, depending on the location. However, the factors driving nitrite accumulation are not well understood. We use nitrite isotope data collected during the GEOTRACES 2013 Eastern Pacific Zonal Transect (EPZT) to examine differences in nitrite production mechanisms in the PNM of a gradient from coastal to oligotrophic offshore waters in the tropical south Pacific. Large differences in the nitrogen and oxygen isotopic composition of nitrite (reported as δ15N vs air N2 and δ18O vs VSMOW in units of ‰, respectively) were found between eastern and western parts of the transect (eastern and central south Pacific, respectively). δ15N of nitrite ranged between -5 and -54‰ in the in the eastern PNM, while ranging between 1 and 7‰ in the central PNM. δ18O of nitrite was between 10 and 45‰ in the eastern PNM, and 10 to 14‰ the central PNM. These differences in δ15N and δ18O of nitrite in the eastern versus central PNM may be related to differences in nitrite production mechanisms, namely nitrate reduction and ammonium oxidation. We hypothesize that nitrate reduction may be the more important nitrite-producing process in the eastern PNM, while ammonium oxidation is likely to be more important in the central PNM. Furthermore, since nitrite oxidation has been observed to exhibit an inverse kinetic isotope effect, the strongly negative δ15N values of nitrite in the eastern PNM suggest that nitrite oxidation may be an important nitrite sink there. Analysis of nitrate isotopes will allow us to further constrain the contributions of these processes, and this is currently underway.

  6. A Family Clustered Nitrite Intoxication Investigation in Gaoxin District, Suzhou, China, 2013

    PubMed Central

    WANG, Ruiping; TENG, Chengang; ZHANG, Ning; ZHANG, Jun; CONWAY, George

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Background In April, 2013, a Suzhou Hospital reported a nitrite intoxication patient in coma as well as 2 family members with the similar symptom 5 days ahead. We investigated the event to identify the cause, source and possible pollution ways of the contamination. Methods We defined case as any person living in YSHY community who has cyanosis and with at least one of the following symptoms: dizziness, headache, fatigue, tachycardia, drowsiness, nausea, vomiting, abdominal pain or diar-rhea during April 15 to April 25, 2013. We searched for case by interviewing community residents and reviewing clinics’ medical records; information was then retrospectively collected on the patient’s food history, cooking procedures and food sources. Results We identified 3 nitrite intoxication cases, 1 male and 2 female from a family. The interval time between dinner and onset was < 1 hour. Retrospective survey showed ‘sugar stir and mix asparagus’ on April 17 and ‘scrambled asparagus’ on April 21 were suspected foods. Both suspected dishes had ‘sugar’ added, sourced from a clean-up of a neighboring rental house. Nitrite was detected in a vomitus sample, the ‘sugar’ and two leftover food samples. Conclusion This family clustered nitrite intoxication was induced by using unidentified nitrite as sugar to cook dishes. We recommend sodium nitrite should be dyed with bright colors to avoid mistaking it for plain salt or sugar, health departments strengthen food hygiene propaganda to improve people’s recognition of food safety, and to alert them the dangerous of eating unidentified or unknown source food. PMID:26060649

  7. Role of nitrite, urate and pepsin in the gastroprotective effects of saliva

    PubMed Central

    Rocha, Bárbara S.; Lundberg, Jon O; Radi, Rafael; Laranjinha, João

    2016-01-01

    Dietary nitrate is now recognized as an alternative substrate for nitric oxide (•NO) production in the gut. This novel pathway implies the sequential reduction of nitrate to nitrite, •NO and other bioactive nitrogen oxides but the physiological relevance of these oxidants has remained elusive. We have previously shown that dietary nitrite fuels an hitherto unrecognized nitrating pathway at acidic gastric pH, through which pepsinogen is nitrated in the gastric mucosa, yielding a less active form of pepsin in vitro. Here, we demonstrate that pepsin is nitrated in vivo and explore the functional impact of protein nitration by means of peptic ulcer development. Upon administration of pentagastrin and human nitrite-rich saliva or sodium nitrite to rats, nitrated pepsin was detected in the animal's stomach by immunoprecipitation. •NO was measured in the gastric headspace before and after nitrite instillation by chemiluminescence. At the end of each procedure, the stomach's lesions, ranging from gastric erosions to haemorrhagic ulcers, were scored. Nitrite increased gastric •NO by 200-fold (p<0.05) and nitrated pepsin was detected both in the gastric juice and the mucosa (p<0.05). Exogenous urate, a scavenger of nitrogen dioxide radical, blunted •NO detection and inhibited pepsin nitration, suggesting an underlining free radical-dependent mechanism for nitration. Functionally, pepsin nitration prevented the development of gastric ulcers, as the lesions were only apparent when pepsin nitration was inhibited by urate. In sum, this work unravels a novel dietary-dependent nitrating pathway in which pepsin is nitrated and inactivated in the stomach, preventing the progression of gastric ulcers. PMID:27156250

  8. Role of nitrite, urate and pepsin in the gastroprotective effects of saliva.

    PubMed

    Rocha, Bárbara S; Lundberg, Jon O; Radi, Rafael; Laranjinha, João

    2016-08-01

    Dietary nitrate is now recognized as an alternative substrate for nitric oxide (•NO) production in the gut. This novel pathway implies the sequential reduction of nitrate to nitrite, •NO and other bioactive nitrogen oxides but the physiological relevance of these oxidants has remained elusive. We have previously shown that dietary nitrite fuels an hitherto unrecognized nitrating pathway at acidic gastric pH, through which pepsinogen is nitrated in the gastric mucosa, yielding a less active form of pepsin in vitro. Here, we demonstrate that pepsin is nitrated in vivo and explore the functional impact of protein nitration by means of peptic ulcer development. Upon administration of pentagastrin and human nitrite-rich saliva or sodium nitrite to rats, nitrated pepsin was detected in the animal's stomach by immunoprecipitation. •NO was measured in the gastric headspace before and after nitrite instillation by chemiluminescence. At the end of each procedure, the stomach's lesions, ranging from gastric erosions to haemorrhagic ulcers, were scored. Nitrite increased gastric •NO by 200-fold (p<0.05) and nitrated pepsin was detected both in the gastric juice and the mucosa (p<0.05). Exogenous urate, a scavenger of nitrogen dioxide radical, blunted •NO detection and inhibited pepsin nitration, suggesting an underlining free radical-dependent mechanism for nitration. Functionally, pepsin nitration prevented the development of gastric ulcers, as the lesions were only apparent when pepsin nitration was inhibited by urate. In sum, this work unravels a novel dietary-dependent nitrating pathway in which pepsin is nitrated and inactivated in the stomach, preventing the progression of gastric ulcers. PMID:27156250

  9. Nitrite and nitrite reductases: from molecular mechanisms to significance in human health and disease.

    PubMed

    Castiglione, Nicoletta; Rinaldo, Serena; Giardina, Giorgio; Stelitano, Valentina; Cutruzzolà, Francesca

    2012-08-15

    Nitrite, previously considered physiologically irrelevant and a simple end product of endogenous nitric oxide (NO) metabolism, is now envisaged as a reservoir of NO to be activated in response to oxygen (O(2)) depletion. In the first part of this review, we summarize and compare the mechanisms of nitrite-dependent production of NO in selected bacteria and in eukaryotes. Bacterial nitrite reductases, which are copper or heme-containing enzymes, play an important role in the adaptation of pathogens to O(2) limitation and enable microrganisms to survive in the human body. In mammals, reduction of nitrite to NO under hypoxic conditions is carried out in tissues and blood by an array of metalloproteins, including heme-containing proteins and molybdenum enzymes. In humans, tissues play a more important role in nitrite reduction, not only because most tissues produce more NO than blood, but also because deoxyhemoglobin efficiently scavenges NO in blood. In the second part of the review, we outline the significance of nitrite in human health and disease and describe the recent advances and pitfalls of nitrite-based therapy, with special attention to its application in cardiovascular disorders, inflammation, and anti-bacterial defence. It can be concluded that nitrite (as well as nitrate-rich diet for long-term applications) may hold promise as therapeutic agent in vascular dysfunction and ischemic injury, as well as an effective compound able to promote angiogenesis. PMID:22304560

  10. Nitrite Reductase Activity in Engineered Azurin Variants.

    PubMed

    Berry, Steven M; Strange, Jacob N; Bladholm, Erika L; Khatiwada, Balabhadra; Hedstrom, Christine G; Sauer, Alexandra M

    2016-05-01

    Nitrite reductase (NiR) activity was examined in a series of dicopper P.a. azurin variants in which a surface binding copper site was added through site-directed mutagenesis. Four variants were synthesized with copper binding motifs inspired by the catalytic type 2 copper binding sites found in the native noncoupled dinuclear copper enzymes nitrite reductase and peptidylglycine α-hydroxylating monooxygenase. The four azurin variants, denoted Az-NiR, Az-NiR3His, Az-PHM, and Az-PHM3His, maintained the azurin electron transfer copper center, with the second designed copper site located over 13 Å away and consisting of mutations Asn10His,Gln14Asp,Asn16His-azurin, Asn10His,Gln14His,Asn16His-azurin, Gln8Met,Gln14His,Asn16His-azurin, and Gln8His,Gln14His,Asn16His-azurin, respectively. UV-visible absorption spectroscopy, EPR spectroscopy, and electrochemistry of the sites demonstrate copper binding as well as interaction with small exogenous ligands. The nitrite reduction activity of the variants was determined, including the catalytic Michaelis-Menten parameters. The variants showed activity (0.34-0.59 min(-1)) that was slower than that of native NiRs but comparable to that of other model systems. There were small variations in activity of the four variants that correlated with the number of histidines in the added copper site. Catalysis was found to be reversible, with nitrite produced from NO. Reactions starting with reduced azurin variants demonstrated that electrons from both copper centers were used to reduce nitrite, although steady-state catalysis required the T2 copper center and did not require the T1 center. Finally, experiments separating rates of enzyme reduction from rates of reoxidation by nitrite demonstrated that the reaction with nitrite was rate limiting during catalysis. PMID:27055058

  11. Abuse potential and dopaminergic effect of alkyl nitrites.

    PubMed

    Jeon, Seo Young; Kim, Yun Ji; Kim, Young-Hoon; Shin, Jisoon; Yun, Jaesuk; Han, Kyoungmoon; Park, Hye-Kyung; Kim, Hyung Soo; Cha, Hye Jin

    2016-08-26

    The abuse of alkyl nitrites is common among adolescents and young adults worldwide. However, the information regarding the effects of alkyl nitrites on the central nervous system and the associated psychological abuse potential is scarce. The abuse potential of 3 representative alkyl nitrites - isobutyl nitrite, isoamyl nitrite, and butyl nitrite - was evaluated in mice using conditioned place preference tests with an unbiased method. The dopamine levels released by synaptosomes extracted from the striatal region were measured using high performance liquid chromatography. Mice treated with the test substances (50mg/kg, i.p.) exhibited a significantly increased drug-paired place preference. Moreover, greater levels of dopamine were released by striatal region synaptosomes in response to isobutyl nitrite treatment in mice. Thus, our findings suggest that alkyl nitrites could lead to psychological dependence and dopaminergic effects. Furthermore, these results provide scientific evidence to support the regulation of alkyl nitrites as psychoactive substances in the future. PMID:27369324

  12. Platelet Inhibition by Nitrite Is Dependent on Erythrocytes and Deoxygenation

    PubMed Central

    Srihirun, Sirada; Sriwantana, Thanaporn; Unchern, Supeenun; Kittikool, Dusadee; Noulsri, Egarit; Pattanapanyasat, Kovit; Fucharoen, Suthat; Piknova, Barbora; Schechter, Alan N.; Sibmooh, Nathawut

    2012-01-01

    Background Nitrite is a nitric oxide (NO) metabolite in tissues and blood, which can be converted to NO under hypoxia to facilitate tissue perfusion. Although nitrite is known to cause vasodilation following its reduction to NO, the effect of nitrite on platelet activity remains unclear. In this study, the effect of nitrite and nitrite+erythrocytes, with and without deoxygenation, on platelet activity was investigated. Methodology/Finding Platelet aggregation was studied in platelet-rich plasma (PRP) and PRP+erythrocytes by turbidimetric and impedance aggregometry, respectively. In PRP, DEANONOate inhibited platelet aggregation induced by ADP while nitrite had no effect on platelets. In PRP+erythrocytes, the inhibitory effect of DEANONOate on platelets decreased whereas nitrite at physiologic concentration (0.1 µM) inhibited platelet aggregation and ATP release. The effect of nitrite+erythrocytes on platelets was abrogated by C-PTIO (a membrane-impermeable NO scavenger), suggesting an NO-mediated action. Furthermore, deoxygenation enhanced the effect of nitrite as observed from a decrease of P-selectin expression and increase of the cGMP levels in platelets. The ADP-induced platelet aggregation in whole blood showed inverse correlations with the nitrite levels in whole blood and erythrocytes. Conclusion Nitrite alone at physiological levels has no effect on platelets in plasma. Nitrite in the presence of erythrocytes inhibits platelets through its reduction to NO, which is promoted by deoxygenation. Nitrite may have role in modulating platelet activity in the circulation, especially during hypoxia. PMID:22276188

  13. Carbon-Fiber Nitrite Microsensor for In Situ Biofilm Monitoring

    EPA Science Inventory

    During nitrification, nitrite is produced as an intermediate when ammonia is oxidized to nitrate. It is well established that nitrifying biofilm are involved in nitrification episodes in chloraminated drinking water distribution systems with nitrite accumulation occurring during...

  14. Carbon-Fiber Nitrite Microsensor for In Situ Biofilm Monitoring

    EPA Science Inventory

    During nitrification, nitrite is produced as an intermediate when ammonia is oxidized to nitrate. It is well established that nitrifying biofilm are involved in nitrification episodes in chloraminated drinking water distribution systems with nitrite accumulation occurring during ...

  15. Autotrophic nitrite removal in the cathode of microbial fuel cells.

    PubMed

    Puig, Sebastià; Serra, Marc; Vilar-Sanz, Ariadna; Cabré, Marina; Bañeras, Lluís; Colprim, Jesús; Balaguer, M Dolors

    2011-03-01

    Nitrification to nitrite (nitritation process) followed by reduction to dinitrogen gas decreases the energy demand and the carbon requirements of the overall process of nitrogen removal. This work studies autotrophic nitrite removal in the cathode of microbial fuel cells (MFCs). Special attention was paid to determining whether nitrite is used as the electron acceptor by exoelectrogenic bacteria (biologic reaction) or by graphite electrodes (abiotic reaction). The results demonstrated that, after a nitrate pulse at the cathode, nitrite was initially accumulated; subsequently, nitrite was removed. Nitrite and nitrate can be used interchangeably as an electron acceptor by exoelectrogenic bacteria for nitrogen reduction from wastewater while producing bioelectricity. However, if oxygen is present in the cathode chamber, nitrite is oxidised via biological or electrochemical processes. The identification of a dominant bacterial member similar to Oligotropha carboxidovorans confirms that autotrophic denitrification is the main metabolism mechanism in the cathode of an MFC. PMID:21262566

  16. 9 CFR 319.2 - Products and nitrates and nitrites.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Products and nitrates and nitrites... and nitrates and nitrites. Any product, such as frankfurters and corned beef, for which there is a standard in this part and to which nitrate or nitrite is permitted or required to be added, may be...

  17. Nitrite oxidation in the Namibian oxygen minimum zone

    PubMed Central

    Füssel, Jessika; Lam, Phyllis; Lavik, Gaute; Jensen, Marlene M; Holtappels, Moritz; Günter, Marcel; Kuypers, Marcel MM

    2012-01-01

    Nitrite oxidation is the second step of nitrification. It is the primary source of oceanic nitrate, the predominant form of bioavailable nitrogen in the ocean. Despite its obvious importance, nitrite oxidation has rarely been investigated in marine settings. We determined nitrite oxidation rates directly in 15N-incubation experiments and compared the rates with those of nitrate reduction to nitrite, ammonia oxidation, anammox, denitrification, as well as dissimilatory nitrate/nitrite reduction to ammonium in the Namibian oxygen minimum zone (OMZ). Nitrite oxidation (⩽372 nM NO2− d−1) was detected throughout the OMZ even when in situ oxygen concentrations were low to non-detectable. Nitrite oxidation rates often exceeded ammonia oxidation rates, whereas nitrate reduction served as an alternative and significant source of nitrite. Nitrite oxidation and anammox co-occurred in these oxygen-deficient waters, suggesting that nitrite-oxidizing bacteria (NOB) likely compete with anammox bacteria for nitrite when substrate availability became low. Among all of the known NOB genera targeted via catalyzed reporter deposition fluorescence in situ hybridization, only Nitrospina and Nitrococcus were detectable in the Namibian OMZ samples investigated. These NOB were abundant throughout the OMZ and contributed up to ∼9% of total microbial community. Our combined results reveal that a considerable fraction of the recently recycled nitrogen or reduced NO3− was re-oxidized back to NO3− via nitrite oxidation, instead of being lost from the system through the anammox or denitrification pathways. PMID:22170426

  18. 9 CFR 319.2 - Products and nitrates and nitrites.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Products and nitrates and nitrites... and nitrates and nitrites. Any product, such as frankfurters and corned beef, for which there is a standard in this part and to which nitrate or nitrite is permitted or required to be added, may be...

  19. 9 CFR 319.2 - Products and nitrates and nitrites.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Products and nitrates and nitrites... and nitrates and nitrites. Any product, such as frankfurters and corned beef, for which there is a standard in this part and to which nitrate or nitrite is permitted or required to be added, may be...

  20. 9 CFR 319.2 - Products and nitrates and nitrites.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Products and nitrates and nitrites... and nitrates and nitrites. Any product, such as frankfurters and corned beef, for which there is a standard in this part and to which nitrate or nitrite is permitted or required to be added, may be...

  1. 9 CFR 319.2 - Products and nitrates and nitrites.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Products and nitrates and nitrites... and nitrates and nitrites. Any product, such as frankfurters and corned beef, for which there is a standard in this part and to which nitrate or nitrite is permitted or required to be added, may be...

  2. The Effects of Sodium Bisulfate on the Bacterial Population Structure of Dairy Cow Waste

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Sodium bisulfate (SBS) is commonly used in the poultry industry, and is beginning to be used on dairies, to acidify animal waste for the reduction of ammonia emissions. However, little is know about the effects of SBS on the bacterial populations in waste. Methods: SBS was applied at 0, 50, 100, 150...

  3. Nitrite-free Asian hot dog sausages reformulated with nitrite replacers.

    PubMed

    Ruiz-Capillas, C; Tahmouzi, S; Triki, M; Rodríguez-Salas, L; Jiménez-Colmenero, F; Herrero, A M

    2015-07-01

    This research deals with the application of a global strategy designed to produce a nitrite-free Asian hot dog. Different ingredients such as annatto, cochineal, orange dietary fibre, vitamins E and C, lactate and celery were combined in order to study the appearance (colour), lipid oxidation stability and microbial stability of the nitrite-free formulations. The control sample contained much more (P < 0.05) residual nitrite (88.7 mg/kg) than the samples without added nitrite (23-24 mg/kg). Generally, no formulation-dependent variations were observed in fat and water binding properties. Control sample had the highest L* and a* values, while the product with annatto (RA) had the lowest a* values. Lipid oxidation levels were similar irrespective of formulation. The hot dog reformulated with cochineal (RC) scored higher for overall acceptability than RA, mainly due to its colour. PMID:26139898

  4. Nitrite inhibition of denitrification by Pseudomonas fluorescens

    SciTech Connect

    Almeida, J.S.; Julio, S.M.; Reis, M.A.M. |

    1995-05-05

    Using a pure culture of Pseudomonas fluorescens as a model system nitrite inhibition of denitrification was studied. A mineral media with acetate and nitrate as sole electron donor and acceptor, respectively, was used. Results obtained in continuous stirred-tank reactors (CSTR) operated at pH values between 6.6 and 7.8 showed that growth inhibition depended only on the nitrite undissociated fraction concentration (nitrous acid). A mathematical model to describe this dependence is put forward. The maximum nitrous acid concentration compatible with cell growth and denitrification activity was found to be 66 {mu}g N/L. Denitrification activity was partially associated with growth, as described by the Luedeking-Piret equation. However, when the freshly inoculated reactor was operated discontinuously, nitrite accumulation caused growth uncoupling from denitrification activity. The authors suggest that these results can be interpreted considering that (a) nitrous acid acts as a proton uncoupler; and (b) cultures continuously exposed to nitrous acid prevent the uncoupling effect but not the growth inhibition. Examination of the growth dependence on nitrite concentration at pH 7.0 showed that adapted cultures (growth on CSTR) are less sensitive to nitrous acid inhibition than the ones cultivated in batch.

  5. Metal Nitrite: A Powerful Oxidizing Reagent

    PubMed Central

    Baidya, Mahiuddin; Yamamoto, Hisashi

    2011-01-01

    An efficient and simple source of nitroso reagents and their oxidation reactions are described. The combination of a Lewis acid and a metal nitrite is applied to the oxidation of silyl enol ethers. Amino acid and peptide derivatives were easily accessed through in situ C-C bond cleavage of fully substituted silyl enol ethers upon oxidation. PMID:21830770

  6. Inhibition of Clostridium perfringens by heated combinations of nitrite, sulfur, and ferrous or ferric ions.

    PubMed Central

    Asan, T; Solberg, M

    1976-01-01

    Heating mixtures of sodium nitrite, cysteine, and either ferrous sulfate or ferric chloride at 121 C for 20 min at pH 6.5 or 6.3 produced a potent inhibitor of Clostridium perfringens vegetative cells and spores when added to previously heat-sterilized fluid thioglycolate medium. When the mixtures containing FeSO4 at pH 5.2 or FeCl3 at pH 2.7 were heated, the inhibitory effect was not produced. These responses seem to eliminate the possibility that cysteine nitrosothiol is the agent responsible for the heated-nitrite inhibition known as the Perigo effect. The variable pH responses also cast doubt upon the role of the black Roussin salt as the agent of the Perigo effect. PMID:8004

  7. Oxidation phenomena and color properties of grape pomace on nitrite-reduced meat emulsion systems.

    PubMed

    Riazi, Fatemeh; Zeynali, Fariba; Hoseini, Ebrahim; Behmadi, Homa; Savadkoohi, Sobhan

    2016-11-01

    The present study focuses on the effect of different levels of red grape pomace (1 and 2%, w/w) on the color changes, lipid oxidation (TBARS), antioxidant activity, microbial counts, total phenol content and sensory attributes of the sausages formulated with various levels of sodium nitrite (30, 60 and 120mg/kg). It was found that the addition of grape pomace (1%, w/w) in combination of reduced nitrite levels to the beef sausage samples reduced TBARS content and the degree of lipid oxidation. Antioxidant activity and total phenol contents were further evaluated based on DPPH scavenging activity method. A significant reduction in lightness (L*) and yellowness (b*) of systems containing grape pomace was observed, following by an increase in the oxidative stability and the radical scavenging activity. Acceptability of beef sausages was not significantly (P>0.05) affected by the addition of grape pomace and had relatively greater scores from a sensory point of view. PMID:27424305

  8. ACUTE TOXICITY OF NITRITE TO RAINBOW TROUT (SALMO GAIRDNERI): EFFECTS OF PH, NITRITE SPECIES, AND ANION SPECIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The toxicity of nitrite to rainbow trout is pH-dependent within the range considered acceptable to most freshwater aquatic life (pH 6.5-9.0). Both of the nitrite species, NO2(-) and HNO2, are toxic. It is recommended that nitrite criteria to protect freshwater aquatic life be bas...

  9. Heme-induced biomarkers associated with red meat promotion of colon cancer are not modulated by the intake of nitrite.

    PubMed

    Chenni, Fatima Z; Taché, Sylviane; Naud, Nathalie; Guéraud, Françoise; Hobbs, Ditte A; Kunhle, Gunter G C; Pierre, Fabrice H; Corpet, Denis E

    2013-01-01

    Red and processed meat consumption is associated with the risk of colorectal cancer. Three hypotheses are proposed to explain this association, via heme-induced oxidation of fat, heterocyclic amines, or N-nitroso compounds. Rats have often been used to study these hypotheses, but the lack of enterosalivary cycle of nitrate in rats casts doubt on the relevance of this animal model to predict nitroso- and heme-associated human colon carcinogenesis. The present study was thus designed to clarify whether a nitrite intake that mimics the enterosalivary cycle can modulate heme-induced nitrosation and fat peroxidation. This study shows that, in contrast with the starting hypothesis, drinking water added with nitrite to mimic the salivary nitrite content did not change the effect of hemoglobin on biochemical markers linked to colon carcinogenesis, notably lipid peroxidation and cytotoxic activity in the colon of rat. However, ingested sodium nitrite increased fecal nitroso-compounds level, but their fecal concentration and their nature (iron-nitrosyl) would probably not be associated with an increased risk of cancer. We thus suggest that the rat model could be relevant for study the effect of red meat on colon carcinogenesis, in spite of the lack of nitrite in the saliva of rats. PMID:23441609

  10. Preparation of cellulose acetate nano-biocomposites using acidified gelatin-montmorillonite as nanofiller: Morphology and thermal properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferfera-Harrar, Hafida; Dairi, Nassima

    2012-07-01

    Nano-biocomposites, based on natural polymer as matrix and layered silicates as inorganic nano-fillers, represent an emerging group of hybrid materials. Their advance has strong promise in designing eco-friendlynanocomposites with enhanced properties (mechanical, barrier, thermal…), at low filler levels, of great interest forseveral applications. Thus, this current contribution focuses on the development of Eco-friendly nanocomposites filmsbased on cellulose acetate (CA) and a novel organoclay, prepared from sodium montmorillonite and acidified gelatin asbio-modifier (MMT-AGe), using solution casting process. The effect of clay loading on morphology and properties ofbiomaterials was studied. The nano-hybrids materials elaborated at different clay content were characterized by Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR). The clay dispersion was investigated by X-Ray Diffraction (XRD). It wassuggested the formation of disordered intercalated structures or partially exfoliated/intercalated ones, with small claytactoïds remaining. Tg and Tm values, evaluated using Differential Scanning Calorimeter analysis (DSC), were slightlyaffected with addition of clay compared to neat CA, while significant improvement in thermal stability, was observed bymeans of thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), being the highest at 5 wt % clay loading. The unique properties of thesenano-biocomposites may result from the interactions developed between the groups of CA and bio-modified MMT.

  11. Caustic-Side Solvent Extraction: Anti-Caking Surfactants Found to be Cause of Apparent Effect of High Nitrite Concentration on Cesium Stripping

    SciTech Connect

    Delmau, L.H.

    2002-06-13

    Experiments conducted in FY01 previously indicated a potential cesium stripping problem in the CSSX process due to the presence of nitrite in the waste simulant. The stripping issue seemed all the more important as the nitrite concentration increased. Experiments presented in this work have demonstrated that the true reason for the cesium stripping problem was in fact the presence of an anti-caking agent in the,sodium nitrite. used for the preparation of the simulants. The anti-caking agent is actually a mixture of well-known surfactants, sodium mono- and di-methyl naphthalene sulfonate that can partition into the organic-phase on extraction, then retain cesium upon stripping. The effect was demonstrated by adding known amounts of the anti-caking agent to clean systems. Data suggest that rejuvenation of the solvent can be obtained by a caustic wash following the stripping stage.

  12. Sodium Test

    MedlinePlus

    ... be limited. Home Visit Global Sites Search Help? Sodium Share this page: Was this page helpful? Also known as: Na Formal name: Sodium Related tests: Chloride , Bicarbonate , Potassium , Electrolytes , Osmolality , Basic ...

  13. [Study the restoration technology of concentrated application-natural diffusion about amendments of acidified soil of hilly woodland].

    PubMed

    Fang, Xiong; Liu, Ju-Xiu; Yin, Guang-Cai; Zhao, Liang; Liu, Shi-Zhong; Chu, Guo-Wei; Li, Yi-Yong

    2013-01-01

    Through concentrated application of lime, sewage sludge and lime + sewage sludge on the sloping top of the hilly woodlands, the restoration effects of the three soil amendments on the acidified soil of hilly woodland were studied. The results showed that: (1) Joint application of sewage sludge + lime can significantly (P < 0.05) decrease soil acidity, promote the rapid increase in soil organic matter and nitrogen content, increase soil cation exchange capacity, and effectively improve acidified soil. (2) Through natural diffusion mechanisms of surface and subsurface runoff, a large area of acidified soil of hilly woodlands can be restored by concentrated application of soil amendments on the sloping top of the hilly woodlands. (3) It is conducive to solve the pollution problems of the urban sewage sludge by using municipal sewage sludge to restore acidified soil, but only for the restoration of acidified soil of timber forest. PMID:23487954

  14. Effects of acid, salt and soaking time on the dielectric properties of acidified vegetables

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In order to design a continuous microwave process for pasteurization of acidified vegetables, equilibration phenomena in acid and salt solutions must be examined with regards to changes in dielectric properties. The objective of this study was to examine the effects of acid and salt concentration o...

  15. The Reaction between Iron(II) Iodide and Potassium Dichromate(VI) in Acidified Aqueous Solution

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Talbot, Christopher

    2013-01-01

    This "Science note" teaching lesson explores the possible reaction between the ions in a reaction mixture consisting of iron(II) iodide and potassium dichromate(VI) in acidified aqueous solution. The electrode potentials will be used to deduce any spontaneous reactions under standard thermodynamic conditions (298 K, 1 bar (approximately…

  16. Quality evaluation of packaged acidified vegetables subjected to continuous microwave pasteurization

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The study evaluated the use of 915 MHz continuous microwave processing with a rotation apparatus for pasteurization of acidified vegetable packages. Broccoli florets, and 1.2 cm cubes of broccoli stems, red bell pepper, and sweetpotato were pre-equilibrated to 1 g/100 g NaCl and 0.38 g/100 mL citric...

  17. The chemical behavior of acidified chromium (3) solutions. B.S. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Terman, D. K.

    1981-01-01

    A unique energy-storage system has been developed at NASA's Lewis Research Center called REDOX. This NASA-REDOX system is an electrochemical storage device that utilized the oxidation and reduction of two fully soluble redox couples for charging and discharging. The redox couples now being investigated are acidified chloride solutions of chromium (Cr(+2)/Cr(+3)) and iron (Fe(+2)/Fe(+3)).

  18. Dust in an acidified ocean: iron bioavailability, phytoplankton growth and DMS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mélançon, J.; Levasseur, M.; Lizotte, M.; Scarratt, M. G.; Tremblay, J. E.; Tortell, P. D.; Yang, G.; Shi, G. Y.; Gao, H.; Semeniuk, D.; Robert, M.; Arychuk, M.; Johnson, K.; Sutherland, N.; Davelaar, M.; Nemcek, N.; Pena, A.; Richardson, W.

    2015-12-01

    Ocean acidification (OA) is likely to have an effect on the fertilizing potential of desert dust in high-nutrient, low-chlorophyll oceanic regions, either by modifying Fe speciation and bioavailability, or by altering phytoplankton Fe requirements and acquisition. To address this issue, short incubations (4 days) of northeast subarctic Pacific waters enriched with either FeSO4 or dust, and maintained at pH 8.0 (in situ) and 7.8 were conducted in August 2010. We assessed the impact of a decrease in pH on dissolved Fe concentration, phytoplankton biomass, taxonomy and productivity, and the production of dimethylsulfide (DMS) and its algal precursor dimethylsulfoniopropionate (DMSP). Chlorophyll a (chl a) remained unchanged in the controls and doubled in both the FeSO4-enriched and dust-enriched incubations, confirming the Fe-limited status of the plankton assemblage during the experiment. In the acidified treatments, a significant reduction (by 16-38%) of the final concentration of chl a was measured compared to their non-acidified counterparts, and a 15% reduction in particulate organic carbon (POC) concentration was measured in the dust-enriched acidified treatment compared to the dust-enriched non-acidified treatment. FeSO4 and dust additions had a fertilizing effect mainly on diatoms and cyanobacteria. Lowering the pH affected mostly the haptophytes, but pelagophyte concentrations were also reduced in some acidified treatments. Acidification did not significantly alter DMSP and DMS concentrations. These results show that dust deposition events in a low-pH iron-limited Northeast subarctic Pacific are likely to stimulate phytoplankton growth to a lesser extent than in today's ocean during the few days following fertilization and point to a low initial sensitivity of the DMSP and DMS dynamics to OA.

  19. Nitrite controls the release of nitric oxide in Pseudomonas aeruginosa cd{sub 1} nitrite reductase

    SciTech Connect

    Rinaldo, Serena; Brunori, Maurizio; Cutruzzola, Francesca

    2007-11-23

    Nitrite reductase (cd{sub 1}NIR) from Pseudomonas aeruginosa, which catalyses the reduction of nitrite to nitric oxide (NO), contains a c-heme as the electron acceptor and a d{sub 1}-heme where catalysis occurs. Reduction involves binding of nitrite to the reduced d{sub 1}-heme, followed by dehydration to yield NO; release of NO and re-reduction of the enzyme close the cycle. Since NO is a powerful inhibitor of ferrous hemeproteins, enzymatic turnover demands the release of NO. We recently discovered that NO dissociation from the ferrous d{sub 1}-heme is fast, showing that cd{sub 1}NIR behaves differently from other hemeproteins. Here we demonstrate for the first time that the physiological substrate nitrite displaces NO from the ferrous enzyme, which enters a new catalytic cycle; this reaction depends on the conserved His369 whose role in substrate stabilization is crucial for catalysis. Thus we suggest that also in vivo the activity of cd{sub 1}NIR is controlled by nitrite.

  20. A Nitrite Microsensor for Profiling Environmental Biofilms

    PubMed Central

    De Beer, D.; Schramm, A.; Santegoeds, C. M.; Kuhl, M.

    1997-01-01

    A highly selective liquid membrane nitrite microsensor based on the hydrophobic ion-carrier aquocyanocobalt(III)-hepta(2-phenylethyl)-cobrynate is described. The sensor has a tip diameter of 10 to 15 (mu)m. The response is log-linear in freshwater down to 1 (mu)M NO(inf2)(sup-) and in seawater to 10 (mu)M NO(inf2)(sup-). A method is described for preparation of relatively large polyvinyl chloride (PVC)-gelled liquid membrane microsensors with a tip diameter of 5 to 15 (mu)m, having a hydrophilic coating on the tip. The coating and increased tip diameter resulted in more sturdy sensors, with a lower detection limit and a more stable signal than uncoated nitrite sensors with a tip diameter of 1 to 3 (mu)m. The coating protects the sensor membrane from detrimental direct contact with biomass and can be used for all PVC-gelled liquid membrane sensors meant for profiling microbial mats, biofilms, and sediments. Thanks to these improvements, liquid membrane sensors can now be used in complex environmental samples and in situ, e.g., in operating bioreactors. Examples of measurements in denitrifying, nitrifying, and nitrifying/denitrifying biofilms from wastewater treatment plants are shown. In all of these biofilms high nitrite concentrations were found in narrow zones of less than 1 mm. PMID:16535560

  1. Nitrite in feed: From Animal health to human health

    SciTech Connect

    Cockburn, Andrew; Brambilla, Gianfranco; Fernández, Maria-Luisa; Arcella, Davide; Peteghem, Carlos van; Dorne, Jean-Lou

    2013-08-01

    Nitrite is widely consumed from the diet by animals and humans. However the largest contribution to exposure results from the in vivo conversion of exogenously derived nitrate to nitrite. Because of its potential to cause to methaemoglobin (MetHb) formation at excessive levels of intake, nitrite is regulated in feed and water as an undesirable substance. Forages and contaminated water have been shown to contain high levels of nitrate and represent the largest contributor to nitrite exposure for food-producing animals. Interspecies differences in sensitivity to nitrite intoxication principally result from physiological and anatomical differences in nitrite handling. In the case of livestock both pigs and cattle are relatively susceptible. With pigs this is due to a combination of low levels of bacterial nitrite reductase and hence potential to reduce nitrite to ammonia as well as reduced capacity to detoxify MetHb back to haemoglobin (Hb) due to intrinsically low levels of MetHb reductase. In cattle the sensitivity is due to the potential for high dietary intake and high levels of rumen conversion of nitrate to nitrite, and an adaptable gut flora which at normal loadings shunts nitrite to ammonia for biosynthesis. However when this escape mechanism gets overloaded, nitrite builds up and can enter the blood stream resulting in methemoglobinemia. Looking at livestock case histories reported in the literature no-observed-effect levels of 3.3 mg/kg body weight (b.w.) per day for nitrite in pigs and cattle were estimated and related to the total daily nitrite intake that would result from complete feed at the EU maximum permissible level. This resulted in margins of safety of 9-fold and 5-fold for pigs and cattle, respectively. Recognising that the bulkiness of animal feed limits their consumption, these margins in conjunction with good agricultural practise were considered satisfactory for the protection of livestock health. A human health risk assessment was also

  2. Nitrite in feed: from animal health to human health.

    PubMed

    Cockburn, Andrew; Brambilla, Gianfranco; Fernández, Maria-Luisa; Arcella, Davide; Bordajandi, Luisa R; Cottrill, Bruce; van Peteghem, Carlos; Dorne, Jean-Lou

    2013-08-01

    Nitrite is widely consumed from the diet by animals and humans. However the largest contribution to exposure results from the in vivo conversion of exogenously derived nitrate to nitrite. Because of its potential to cause to methaemoglobin (MetHb) formation at excessive levels of intake, nitrite is regulated in feed and water as an undesirable substance. Forages and contaminated water have been shown to contain high levels of nitrate and represent the largest contributor to nitrite exposure for food-producing animals. Interspecies differences in sensitivity to nitrite intoxication principally result from physiological and anatomical differences in nitrite handling. In the case of livestock both pigs and cattle are relatively susceptible. With pigs this is due to a combination of low levels of bacterial nitrite reductase and hence potential to reduce nitrite to ammonia as well as reduced capacity to detoxify MetHb back to haemoglobin (Hb) due to intrinsically low levels of MetHb reductase. In cattle the sensitivity is due to the potential for high dietary intake and high levels of rumen conversion of nitrate to nitrite, and an adaptable gut flora which at normal loadings shunts nitrite to ammonia for biosynthesis. However when this escape mechanism gets overloaded, nitrite builds up and can enter the blood stream resulting in methemoglobinemia. Looking at livestock case histories reported in the literature no-observed-effect levels of 3.3mg/kg body weight (b.w.) per day for nitrite in pigs and cattle were estimated and related to the total daily nitrite intake that would result from complete feed at the EU maximum permissible level. This resulted in margins of safety of 9-fold and 5-fold for pigs and cattle, respectively. Recognising that the bulkiness of animal feed limits their consumption, these margins in conjunction with good agricultural practise were considered satisfactory for the protection of livestock health. A human health risk assessment was also

  3. Inhibition by Vitamin E of Cholangiocarcinoma Induction due to Combined Nitrite and Aminopyrine.

    PubMed

    Thamavit, Witaya; Pratoomtone, Pakasit; Kongtim, Surapol; Shirai, Tomoyuki; Ito, Nobuyuki

    2001-01-01

    The present experiment was conducted to assess the influence of vitamin E, given in the diet at 0.5 or 1%, on induction of lesions in the Syrian hamster liver by long term combined administration of sodium nitrite and aminopyrine in the drinking water. Inhibition of both cholangiofibrosis and cholangiocarcinoma development, as well as a reduction in hepatocellular nodules was the result. The underlying mechanisms presumably involve alteration of endogenous dimethylnitrosamine formation by the vitamin, with clear implications for prevention in the human environment. PMID:12718657

  4. The functional nitrite reductase activity of the heme-globins

    PubMed Central

    2008-01-01

    Hemoglobin and myoglobin are among the most extensively studied proteins, and nitrite is one of the most studied small molecules. Recently, multiple physiologic studies have surprisingly revealed that nitrite represents a biologic reservoir of NO that can regulate hypoxic vasodilation, cellular respiration, and signaling. These studies suggest a vital role for deoxyhemoglobin- and deoxymyoglobin-dependent nitrite reduction. Biophysical and chemical analysis of the nitrite-deoxyhemoglobin reaction has revealed unexpected chemistries between nitrite and deoxyhemoglobin that may contribute to and facilitate hypoxic NO generation and signaling. The first is that hemoglobin is an allosterically regulated nitrite reductase, such that oxygen binding increases the rate of nitrite conversion to NO, a process termed R-state catalysis. The second chemical property is oxidative denitrosylation, a process by which the NO formed in the deoxyhemoglobin-nitrite reaction that binds to other deoxyhemes can be released due to heme oxidation, releasing free NO. Third, the reaction undergoes a nitrite reductase/anhydrase redox cycle that catalyzes the anaerobic conversion of 2 molecules of nitrite into dinitrogen trioxide (N2O3), an uncharged molecule that may be exported from the erythrocyte. We will review these reactions in the biologic framework of hypoxic signaling in blood and the heart. PMID:18596228

  5. Development of a method to manufacture uncured, no-nitrate/nitrite-added whole muscle jerky.

    PubMed

    Sindelar, Jeffrey J; Terns, Matthew J; Meyn, Elizabeth; Boles, Jane A

    2010-10-01

    "Natural curing" is accomplished by use of vegetable juice/powder high in naturally occurring nitrates combined with a nitrate reducing starter culture to result in indirectly "cured" products. Since the starter culture used is not water soluble, making "naturally cured" whole muscle jerky with current manufacturing techniques has been found ineffective. The objective was to investigate processes for whole muscle beef jerky that might provide cured meat characteristics similar to those of a nitrite-added control. Treatments where jerky was placed in a barrier bag during incubation were found to be the least similar to the nitrite-added control. Jerky placed in a 40.6 degrees C smokehouse during incubation resulted in significantly more (P<0.05) converted cured pigment than the barrier bag treatments but less (P<0.05) than the control. The processing methods investigated to manufacture "naturally cured" whole muscle jerky in this study were ineffective in resulting in products similar to those cured with sodium nitrite. PMID:20510525

  6. Inhibition of Listeria monocytogenes using natural antimicrobials in no-nitrate-or-nitrite-added ham.

    PubMed

    Sullivan, Gary A; Jackson-Davis, Armitra L; Niebuhr, Steven E; Xi, Yuan; Schrader, Kohl D; Sebranek, Joseph G; Dickson, James S

    2012-06-01

    Consumer demand for foods manufactured without the direct addition of chemical preservatives, such as sodium nitrite and organic acid salts, has resulted in a unique class of "naturally" cured meat products. Formulation with a natural nitrate source and nitrate-reducing bacteria results in naturally cured processed meats that possess traits similar to conventionally cured meats. However, previous research has shown that the naturally cured products are more susceptible to pathogen growth. This study evaluated Listeria monocytogenes growth on ham manufactured with natural curing methods and with commercially available clean-label antimicrobials (cultured sugar and vinegar blend; lemon, cherry, and vinegar powder blend) and assessed impacts on physicochemical characteristics of the product. Hams made with either of the antimicrobials supported L. monocytogenes growth similar to that in the traditionally cured control (P > 0.05). Hams made with prefermented celery juice powder had the lowest residual nitrite concentrations (P < 0.05), and when no antimicrobial was added, L. monocytogenes growth was similar to that of the uncured control (P > 0.05). Aside from residual nitrite and nitrate concentrations, few physicochemical differences were identified. These findings show that ham can be produced with natural curing methods and antimicrobials to provide similar L. monocytogenes inhibition and physicochemical traits as in traditionally cured ham. PMID:22691474

  7. The effect of nitrite inhibition on the anammox process.

    PubMed

    Lotti, T; van der Star, W R L; Kleerebezem, R; Lubello, C; van Loosdrecht, M C M

    2012-05-15

    The negative effect of nitrite on anammox activity has been reported widely during the past decade. Although the adverse effect is clear, conflicting reports exist on the level at which it occurs and its reversible/irreversible nature. An in depth study on nitrite inhibition therefore was performed in which the influence of environmental factors was evaluated. Anammox activity was measured in anammox granules by continuously monitored standardized manometric batch tests extending the interpretation by evaluation of lag times, maximum conversion rates during the tests and substrates/product conversion ratios. The granules where obtained from a one-stage anammox reactor, the dominant anammox organisms belonged to the Brocadia type. The observed 50% activity inhibition for nitrite (IC(50)) was 0.4 g N L(-1). The activity recovered fully after removal of the nitrite. Conversion in fresh medium after exposure to up to 6 g NO(2)(-)-N L(-1) for 24 h showed less then 60% loss of activity. Presence of ammonium during nitrite (2 g N L(-1)) exposure resulted in a stronger loss of activity after nitrite exposure (50% and 30% in presence and absence of ammonium respectively). Presence of oxygen during nitrite incubation led to a maximum activity reduction of 32%. The recovery after exposure indicates that the adverse effect of nitrite is reversible and thus inhibitory rather than toxic in nature. Similarities between exposure at three different pH-values indicate that nitrite rather than nitrous acid is the actual inhibiting compound. PMID:22424965

  8. The Serum Metabolite Response to Diet Intervention with Probiotic Acidified Milk in Irritable Bowel Syndrome Patients Is Indistinguishable from that of Non-Probiotic Acidified Milk by 1H NMR-Based Metabonomic Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Pedersen, Simon M. M.; Nielsen, Niels Chr.; Andersen, Henrik J.; Olsson, Johan; Simrén, Magnus; Öhman, Lena; Svensson, Ulla; Malmendal, Anders; Bertram, Hanne C.

    2010-01-01

    The effects of a probiotic acidified milk product on the blood serum metabolite profile of patients suffering from Irritable Bowel Syndrome (IBS) compared to a non-probiotic acidified milk product was investigated using 1H NMR metabonomics. For eight weeks, IBS patients consumed 0.4 L per day of a probiotic fermented milk product or non-probiotic acidified milk. Both diets resulted in elevated levels of blood serum L-lactate and 3-hydroxybutyrate. Our results showed identical effects of acidified milk consumption independent of probiotic addition. A similar result was previously obtained in a questionnaire-based evaluation of symptom relief. A specific probiotic effect is thus absent both in the patient subjective symptom evaluations and at the blood serum metabolite level. However, there was no correspondence between symptom relief and metabolite response on the patient level. PMID:22254002

  9. Diverse coral communities in naturally acidified waters of a Western Pacific reef

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shamberger, Kathryn E. F.; Cohen, Anne L.; Golbuu, Yimnang; McCorkle, Daniel C.; Lentz, Steven J.; Barkley, Hannah C.

    2014-01-01

    Anthropogenic carbon dioxide emissions are acidifying the oceans, reducing the concentration of carbonate ions ([CO32-]) that calcifying organisms need to build and cement coral reefs. To date, studies of a handful of naturally acidified reef systems reveal depauperate communities, sometimes with reduced coral cover and calcification rates, consistent with results of laboratory-based studies. Here we report the existence of highly diverse, coral-dominated reef communities under chronically low pH and aragonite saturation state (Ωar). Biological and hydrographic processes change the chemistry of the seawater moving across the barrier reefs and into Palau's Rock Island bays, where levels of acidification approach those projected for the western tropical Pacific open ocean by 2100. Nevertheless, coral diversity, cover, and calcification rates are maintained across this natural acidification gradient. Identifying the combination of biological and environmental factors that enable these communities to persist could provide important insights into the future of coral reefs under anthropogenic acidification.

  10. Remediation of Cr(VI)-Contaminated Soil Using the Acidified Hydrazine Hydrate.

    PubMed

    Ma, Yameng; Li, Fangfang; Jiang, Yuling; Yang, Weihua; Lv, Lv; Xue, Haotian; Wang, Yangyang

    2016-09-01

    Acidified hydrazine hydrate was used to remediate Cr(VI)-contaminated soil. The content of water-soluble Cr(VI) in contaminated soil was 4977.53 mg/kg. The optimal initial pH of hydrazine hydrate solution, soil to solution ratio and molar ratio of Cr(VI) to hydrazine hydrate for remediation of Cr(VI)-contaminated soil were 5.0, 3:1 and 1:3, respectively. Over 99.50 % of water-soluble Cr(VI) in the contaminated soil was reduced at the optimal condition within 30 min. The remediated soil can keep stable within 4 months. Meanwhile the total phosphorus increased from 0.47 to 4.29 g/kg, indicating that using of acidified hydrazine hydrate is an effective method to remediate Cr(VI)-contaminated soil. PMID:27351195

  11. Differences in nitrite-oxidizing communities and kinetics in a brackish environment after enrichment at low and high nitrite concentrations.

    PubMed

    Tangkitjawisut, Wipasanee; Limpiyakorn, Tawan; Powtongsook, Sorawit; Pornkulwat, Preeyaporn; Suwannasilp, Benjaporn Boonchayaanant

    2016-04-01

    Nitrite accumulation in shrimp ponds can pose serious adverse effects to shrimp production and the environment. This study aims to develop an effective process for the enrichment of ready-to-use nitrite-oxidizing bacteria (NOB) inocula that would be appropriate for nitrite removal in brackish shrimp ponds. To achieve this objective, the effects of nitrite concentrations on NOB communities and nitrite oxidation kinetics in a brackish environment were investigated. Moving-bed biofilm sequencing batch reactors and continuous moving-bed biofilm reactors were used for the enrichment of NOB at various nitrite concentrations, using sediment from brackish shrimp ponds as seed inoculum. The results from NOB population analysis with quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) show that only Nitrospira were detected in the sediment from the shrimp ponds. After the enrichment, both Nitrospira and Nitrobacter coexisted in the reactors controlling effluent nitrite at 0.1 and 0.5 mg-NO2(-)-N/L. On the other hand, in the reactors controlling effluent nitrite at 3, 20, and 100 mg-NO2(-)-N/L, Nitrobacter outcompeted Nitrospira in many orders of magnitude. The half saturation coefficients (Ks) for nitrite oxidation of the enrichments at low nitrite concentrations (0.1 and 0.5 mg-NO2(-)-N/L) were in the range of 0.71-0.98 mg-NO2(-)-N/L. In contrast, the K(s) values of NOB enriched at high nitrite concentrations (3, 20, and 100 mg-NO2(-)-N/L) were much higher (8.36-12.20 mg-NO2(-)-N/L). The results suggest that the selection of nitrite concentrations for the enrichment of NOB inocula can significantly influence NOB populations and kinetics, which could affect the effectiveness of their applications in brackish shrimp ponds. PMID:27090693

  12. Determination of 5-log pathogen reduction times for heat-processed, acidified vegetable brines.

    PubMed

    Breidt, F; Hayes, J S; Osborne, J A; McFeeters, R F

    2005-02-01

    Recent outbreaks of acid-resistant food pathogens in acid foods, including apple cider and orange juice, have raised concerns about the safety of acidified vegetable products. We determined pasteurization times and temperatures needed to assure a 5-log reduction in the numbers of Escherichia coli O157:H7, Listeria monocytogenes, and Salmonella strains in acidified cucumber pickle brines. Cocktails of five strains of each pathogen were (separately) used for heat-inactivation studies between 50 and 60 degrees C in brines that had an equilibrated pH value of 4.1. Salmonella strains were found to be less heat resistant than E. coli O157:H7 or L. monocytogenes strains. The nonlinear killing curves generated during these studies were modeled using a Weibull function. We found no significant difference in the heat-killing data for E. coli O157:H7 and L. monocytogenes (P = 0.9709). The predicted 5-log reduction times for E. coli O157:H7 and L. monocytogenes were found to fit an exponential decay function. These data were used to estimate minimum pasteurization times and temperatures needed to ensure safe processing of acidified pickle products and show that current industry pasteurization practices offer a significant margin of safety. PMID:15726973

  13. Inactivation of Salmonella on Sprouting Seeds Using a Spontaneous Carvacrol Nanoemulsion Acidified with Organic Acids.

    PubMed

    Landry, Kyle S; Komaiko, Jennifer; Wong, Dana E; Xu, Ting; McClements, David Julian; McLandsborough, Lynne

    2016-07-01

    Over the past decade, demand has increased for natural, minimally processed produce, including sprout-based products. Sanitization with 20,000 ppm of calcium hypochlorite is currently recommended for all sprouting seeds before germination to limit sprout-related foodborne outbreaks. A potentially promising disinfectant as an alternative to calcium hypochlorite is acidified spontaneous essential oil nanoemulsions. In this study, the efficacy of an acidified carvacrol nanoemulsion was tested against mung beans and broccoli seeds artificially contaminated with a Salmonella enterica Enteritidis cocktail (ATCC BAA-709, ATCC BAA-711, and ATCC BAA-1045). Treatments were performed by soaking inoculated seeds in acidified (50 mM acetic or levulinic acid) carvacrol nanoemulsions (4,000 or 8,000 ppm) for 30 or 60 min. After treatment, the number of surviving cells was determined via plate counts and/or the most probable number (MPN) approach. Treatment for 30 min successfully reduced Salmonella Enteritidis by 4 log CFU/g on mung beans (from an initial contamination level of 4.2 to 4.6 log CFU/g) and by 2 log CFU/g on broccoli seeds (from an initial contamination level of 2.4 to 2.6 log CFU/g) to below our detection limit (≤3 MPN/g). Treated seeds were sprouted and tested for the presence of pathogens and sprout yield. The final sprout product had no detectable pathogens, and total sprout yield was not influenced by any treatment. PMID:27357030

  14. Heme-Induced Biomarkers Associated with Red Meat Promotion of colon Cancer Are Not Modulated by the Intake of Nitrite

    PubMed Central

    Chenni, Fatima Z; Taché, Sylviane; Naud, Nathalie; Guéraud, Françoise; Hobbs, Ditte A; Kunhle, Gunter G C; Pierre, Fabrice H; Corpet, Denis E

    2013-01-01

    Red and processed meat consumption is associated with the risk of colorectal cancer. Three hypotheses are proposed to explain this association, via heme/alcenal, heterocyclic amines or N-nitroso compounds. Rats have often been used to study these hypotheses, but the lack of enterosalivary cycle of nitrate in rats casts doubt on the relevance of this animal model to predict nitroso- and heme-associated human colon carcinogenesis. The present study was thus designed to clarify whether a nitrite intake that mimics the enterosalivary cycle can modulate heme-induced nitrosation and fat peroxidation. This study shows that, in contrast with the starting hypothesis, salivary nitrite did not change the effect of hemoglobin on biochemical markers linked to colon carcinogenesis, notably lipid peroxidation and cytotoxic activity in the colon of rat. However, ingested sodium nitrite increased fecal nitroso-compounds level, but their fecal concentration and their nature (iron-nitrosyl) would not be associated with an increased risk of cancer. The rat model could thus be relevant to study the effect of red meat on colon carcinogenesis in spite of the lack of nitrite recycling in rat’s saliva. PMID:23441609

  15. Sodium Oxybate

    MedlinePlus

    ... if you use or have ever used street drugs, or if you have overused prescription medications. Sodium oxybate may be harmful when taken by people other than the person for whom it was prescribed. Do not sell or give your sodium oxybate to anyone else; selling or sharing it is against the law. Store ...

  16. Cardiac contractility in Antarctic teleost is modulated by nitrite through xanthine oxidase and cytochrome p-450 nitrite reductase.

    PubMed

    Garofalo, Filippo; Amelio, Daniela; Gattuso, Alfonsina; Cerra, Maria Carmela; Pellegrino, Daniela

    2015-09-15

    In mammalian and non-mammalian vertebrates, nitrite anion, the largest pool of intravascular and tissue nitric oxide storage, represents a key player of many biological processes, including cardiac modulation. As shown by our studies on Antarctic teleosts, nitrite-dependent cardiac regulation is of great relevance also in cold-blooded vertebrates. This study analysed the influence elicited by nitrite on the performance of the perfused beating heart of two Antarctic stenotherm teleosts, the haemoglobinless Chionodraco hamatus (icefish) and the red-blooded Trematomus bernacchii. Since haemoglobin is crucial in nitric oxide homeostasis, the icefish, a naturally occurring genetic knockout for this protein, provides exclusive opportunities to investigate nitric oxide/nitrite signaling. In vivo, nitrite conversion to nitric oxide requires the nitrite reductase activity of xanthine oxidase and cytochrome P-450, thus the involvement of these enzymes was also evaluated. We showed that, in C. hamatus and T. bernacchii, nitrite influenced cardiac performance by inducing a concentration-dependent positive inotropic effect which was unaffected by nitric oxide scavenging by PTIO in C. hamatus, while it was abolished in T. bernacchii. Specific inhibition of xanthine oxidase and cytochrome P-450 revealed, in the two teleosts, that the nitrite-dependent inotropism required the nitrite reductase activity of both enzymes. We also found that xanthine oxidase is more expressed in C. hamatus than in T. bernacchii, while the opposite was observed concerning cytochrome P-450. Results suggested that in the heart of C. hamatus and T. bernacchii, nitrite is an integral physiological source of nitric oxide with important signaling properties, which require the nitrite reductase activity of xanthine oxidase and cytochrome P-450. PMID:26045289

  17. 40 CFR 721.4740 - Alkali metal nitrites.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... defined in 40 CFR 721.3) containing amines. (b) ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Alkali metal nitrites. 721.4740... Substances § 721.4740 Alkali metal nitrites. (a) Chemical substances and significant new use subject...

  18. 40 CFR 721.4740 - Alkali metal nitrites.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... defined in 40 CFR 721.3) containing amines. (b) ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Alkali metal nitrites. 721.4740... Substances § 721.4740 Alkali metal nitrites. (a) Chemical substances and significant new use subject...

  19. 40 CFR 721.4740 - Alkali metal nitrites.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... defined in 40 CFR 721.3) containing amines. (b) ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Alkali metal nitrites. 721.4740... Substances § 721.4740 Alkali metal nitrites. (a) Chemical substances and significant new use subject...

  20. 40 CFR 721.4740 - Alkali metal nitrites.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... defined in 40 CFR 721.3) containing amines. (b) ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Alkali metal nitrites. 721.4740... Substances § 721.4740 Alkali metal nitrites. (a) Chemical substances and significant new use subject...

  1. TOXICITY OF AMMONIA, NITRITE AND NITRATE TO FISHES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Ammonia and nitrite are highly toxic to fishes, wig ammonia occurring in urface waters more commonly than nitrite. itrate is a related compound but is not ignificantly toxic to fishes. he acute toxicity of ammonia to aquatic organisms s affected by water pH, dissolved oxygen, tem...

  2. The Interaction of Nitrites with Food, Drugs, and Contaminants.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greenland, Sander

    1978-01-01

    Nitrites commonly occur in food and drinking water as additives, contaminants, or products of biological processes. These highly reactive substances combine with other commonly ingested substances to form potent carcinogens. Controls are needed on levels of nitrites and reactive contaminants in food and drinking water. (RE)

  3. 40 CFR 721.4740 - Alkali metal nitrites.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... CONTROL ACT SIGNIFICANT NEW USES OF CHEMICAL SUBSTANCES Significant New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.4740 Alkali metal nitrites. (a) Chemical substances and significant new use subject to reporting. (1) The category of chemical substances which are nitrites of the alkali metals (Group IA in...

  4. Amperometric Carbon Fiber Nitrite Microsensor for In Situ Biofilm Monitoring

    EPA Science Inventory

    A highly selective needle type solid state amperometric nitrite microsensor based on direct nitrite oxidation on carbon fiber was developed using a simplified fabrication method. The microsensor’s tip diameter was approximately 7 µm, providing a high spatial resolution of at lea...

  5. Dietary nitrate and nitrite: Benefits, risks, and evolving perceptions.

    PubMed

    Bedale, Wendy; Sindelar, Jeffrey J; Milkowski, Andrew L

    2016-10-01

    Consumers have an illogical relationship with nitrite (and its precursor, nitrate) in food. Despite a long history of use, nitrite was nearly banned from use in foods in the 1970s due to health concerns related to the potential for carcinogenic nitrosamine formation. Changes in meat processing methods reduced those potential risks, and nitrite continued to be used in foods. Since then, two opposing movements continue to shape how consumers view dietary nitrate and nitrite. The discovery of the profound physiological importance of nitric oxide led to the realization that dietary nitrate contributes significantly to the nitrogen reservoir for nitric oxide formation. Numerous clinical studies have also demonstrated beneficial effects from dietary nitrate consumption, especially in vascular and metabolic health. However, the latest wave of consumer sentiment against food additives, the clean-label movement, has renewed consumer fear and avoidance of preservatives, including nitrite. Education is necessary but may not be sufficient to resolve this disconnect in consumer perception. PMID:26994928

  6. ¹⁸O-Labeled nitrous acid and nitrite: Synthesis, characterization, and oxyhemoglobin-catalyzed oxidation to ¹⁸O-labeled nitrate.

    PubMed

    Böhmer, Anke; Mitschke, Anja; Reib, Anna; Gutzki, Frank-Mathias; Tsikas, Dimitrios

    2012-02-15

    We describe a simple laboratory method for specific labeling of nitrite with ¹⁸O for use in chemical and biochemical studies in the area of nitric oxide research. NaNO₂ (0.1 mmol) is diluted in H₂¹⁸O (45 μl) and acidified with HCl (1 μl, 5 M), and the solution is allowed to equilibrate. Subsequently, the sample is mixed by vortexing with ethyl acetate (500 μl), and the organic phase is dried over anhydrous Na₂SO(4). Ethyl acetate is evaporated to dryness, and the residue is reconstituted in phosphate-buffered saline. In human blood hemolysate, oxyhemoglobin (HbFe¹⁶O₂) was shown to oxidize N¹⁸O₂⁻ to ¹⁶ON¹⁸O₂⁻. PMID:22206936

  7. Purification and characterization of assimilatory nitrite reductase from Candida utilis.

    PubMed Central

    Sengupta, S; Shaila, M S; Rao, G R

    1996-01-01

    Nitrate assimilation in many plants, algae, yeasts and bacteria is mediated by two enzymes, nitrate reductase (EC 1.6.6.2) and nitrite reductase (EC 1.7.7.1). They catalyse the stepwise reduction of nitrate to nitrite and nitrite to ammonia respectively. The nitrite reductase from an industrially important yeast, Candida utilis, has been purified to homogeneity. Purified nitrite reductase is a heterodimer and the molecular masses of the two subunits are 58 and 66 kDa. The native enzyme exhibits a molecular mass of 126 kDa as analysed by gel filtration. The identify of the two subunits of nitrite reductase was confirmed by immunoblotting using antibody for Cucurbita pepo leaf nitrite reductase. The presence of two different sized transcripts coding for the two subunits was confirmed by (a) in vitro translation of mRNA from nitrate-induced C. utilis followed by immunoprecipitation of the in vitro translated products with heterologous nitrite reductase antibody and (b) Northern-blot analysis. The 66 kDa subunit is acidic in nature which is probably due to its phosphorylated status. The enzyme is stable over a range of temperatures. Both subunits can catalyse nitrite reduction, and the reconstituted enzyme, at a higher protein concentration, shows an activity similar to that of the purified enzyme. Each of these subunits has been shown to contain a few unique peptides in addition to a large number of common peptides. Reduced Methyl Viologen has been found to be as effective an electron donor as NADPH in the catalytic process, a phenomenon not commonly seen for nitrite reductases from other systems. PMID:8694757

  8. Sources and sinks for ammonia and nitrite on the early Earth and the reaction of nitrite with ammonia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Summers, D. P.

    1999-01-01

    An analysis of sources and sinks for ammonia and nitrite on the early Earth was conducted. Rates of formation and destruction, and steady state concentrations of both species were determined by steady state kinetics. The importance of the reaction of nitrite with ammonia on the feasibility of ammonia formation from nitrite was evaluated. The analysis considered conditions such as temperature, ferrous iron concentration, and pH. For sinks we considered the reduction of nitrite to ammonia, reaction between nitrite and ammonia, photochemical destruction of both species, and destruction at hydrothermal vents. Under most environmental conditions, the primary sink for nitrite is reduction to ammonia. The reaction between ammonia and nitrite is not an important sink for either nitrite or ammonia. Destruction at hydrothermal vents is important at acidic pH's and at low ferrous iron concentrations. Photochemical destruction, even in a worst case scenario, is unimportant under many conditions except possibly under acidic, low iron concentration, or low temperature conditions. The primary sink for ammonia is photochemical destruction in the atmosphere. Under acidic conditions, more of the ammonia is tied up as ammonium (reducing its vapor pressure and keeping it in solution) and hydrothermal destruction becomes more important.

  9. Effectiveness of acidified sodium chlorite and other sanitizers to control Escherichia coli O157:H7 on tomato surfaces

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The use of a suitable sanitizer can reduce the risk of produce related food-borne illnesses. We evaluated the effectiveness of several sanitizers to reduce inoculated Escherichia coli O157:H7 on petit tomatoes. Depending on the method of inoculation (dipping / spotting), each of 80g of inoculated to...

  10. Thermal inactivation of Salmonella Typhimurium on dressed chicken skin previously exposed to acidified sodium chlorite or carvacrol

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Salmonella is a leading cause of foodborne illness, and live poultry is a main reservoir of this pathogen. Cross-contamination and transportation of contaminated poultry meat act as an important vehicle of Salmonella infections in humans. In this study, we assessed the effect of two antimicrobials:...

  11. Fresh and preserved green fodder modify effects of urinary acidifiers on urine pH of horses.

    PubMed

    Goren, G; Fritz, J; Dillitzer, N; Hipp, B; Kienzle, E

    2014-04-01

    Hay stabilises urine pH in horses. It is unknown whether this is an effect of structure or of chemical composition. In this study, four ponies (230-384 kg body weight [BW]) were fed six different diets with either a structure or a composition similar to hay with and without acidifiers in a cross-over experimental design in amounts to maintain body weight with the following main compounds: Fresh grass (GRASS), alfalfa hay (ALF), grass cobs (COBS), grass silage (SIL), straw (STR) or extruded straw (STRe) for 2 to 10 days. Urine pH was measured in all trials, blood pH, blood base excess and bicarbonate as well as mineral balance were determined in GRASS, ALF, STR and STRe. In the trials with straw and extruded straw, urine pH decreased significantly (STR control: 7.8 ± 0.23, acidifier: 5.2 ± 0.38) when acidifiers were added, whereas in all other diets that were based on fresh or preserved green fodder, pH did not decrease below 7. Blood pH was similarly affected by diet and acidifiers. Acidifiers had little effect on the pre-prandial blood pH, only in diet STR there was a significant reduction in relation to control. Post-prandial blood pH was significantly reduced by acidifiers in all diets. Blood bicarbonate and base excess showed corresponding effects. Faecal and renal mineral excretion and apparent mineral digestibility were not systematically affected by diet or acidifiers except for chloride. Chloride added as inorganic chloride salt had an even better apparent digestibility than chloride originating from feed. Because only green plant material stabilised acid base balance, chlorophyll and its metabolites are discussed as potential mediators of the effect of green fodder on acid base balance. PMID:23551706

  12. Stability of α-tocotrienol and α-tocopherol in salami-type sausages and curing brine depending on nitrite and pH.

    PubMed

    Gerling, Eva-Maria; Ternes, Waldemar

    2014-12-01

    We studied the stability of the valuable vitamer nutrients α-tocotrienol and α-tocopherol and options for their protection in salami-type sausages (blended with α-tocotrienol-rich barley oil) and curing brine. Four different sausage formulations were produced containing nitrite curing salt; nitrite curing salt and ascorbic acid (300mg/kg); nitrite curing salt and carnosic acid (45mg/kg); or sodium chloride. Initial vitamer contents (100mg/kg) did not decrease significantly during ripening and decreased only slightly during storage. Ascorbic acid and carnosic acid were found to be effective in preserving the vitamers in fresh sausages. Freeze-drying of sausages resulted in a significant loss of vitamers (97%), particularly after 14-day storage at room temperature, even in the presence of shielding gases. The vitamer content in the curing brine decreased with decreasing pH in the presence of nitrite. A nitrite concentration of 136mg/L at pH4 resulted in significant loss (90%) of the vitamers. Sufficient stability of the vitamers in salami-type sausage and curing brine can be achieved by processing, formulation, and storage conditions. PMID:25089791

  13. Short-term hypoxic vasodilation in vivo is mediated by bioactive nitric oxide metabolites, rather than free nitric oxide derived from haemoglobin-mediated nitrite reduction

    PubMed Central

    Umbrello, Michele; Dyson, Alex; Pinto, Bernardo Bollen; Fernandez, Bernadette O; Simon, Verena; Feelisch, Martin; Singer, Mervyn

    2014-01-01

    Local increases in blood flow – ‘hypoxic vasodilation’ – confer cellular protection in the face of reduced oxygen delivery. The physiological relevance of this response is well established, yet ongoing controversy surrounds its underlying mechanisms. We sought to confirm that early hypoxic vasodilation is a nitric oxide (NO)-mediated phenomenon and to study putative pathways for increased levels of NO, namely production from NO synthases, intravascular nitrite reduction, release from preformed stores and reduced deactivation by cytochrome c oxidase. Experiments were performed on spontaneously breathing, anaesthetized, male Wistar rats undergoing short-term systemic hypoxaemia, who received pharmacological inhibitors and activators of the various NO pathways. Arterial blood pressure, cardiac output, tissue oxygen tension and the circulating pool of NO metabolites (oxidation, nitrosation and nitrosylation products) were measured in plasma and erythrocytes. Hypoxaemia caused a rapid and sustained vasodilation, which was only partially reversed by non-selective NO synthase inhibition. This was associated with significantly lower plasma nitrite, and marginally elevated nitrate levels, suggestive of nitrite bioinactivation. Administration of sodium nitrite had little effect in normoxia, but produced significant vasodilation and increased nitrosylation during hypoxaemia that could not be reversed by NO scavenging. Methodological issues prevented assessment of the contribution, if any, of reduced deactivation of NO by cytochrome c oxidase. In conclusion, acute hypoxic vasodilation is an adaptive NO-mediated response conferred through bioactive metabolites rather than free NO from haemoglobin-mediated reduction of nitrite. PMID:24396056

  14. Crystal Structure of a Nitrate/Nitrite Exchanger

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Hongjin; Wisedchaisri, Goragot; Gonen, Tamir

    2013-01-01

    Summary Mineral nitrogen in nature is often found in the form of nitrate (NO3-). Numerous microorganisms evolved to assimilate nitrate and use it as a major source of mineral nitrogen uptake1. Nitrate, which is central in nitrogen metabolism, is first reduced to nitrite (NO2-) through a two-electron reduction reaction2,3. The accumulation of cellular nitrite can be harmful because nitrite can be reduced to the cytotoxic nitric oxide. Instead, nitrite is rapidly removed from the cell by channels and transporters, or reduced to ammonium or dinitrogen through the action of assimilatory enzymes3. Despite decades of effort no structure is currently available for any nitrate transport protein and the mechanism by which nitrate is transported remains largely obscure. Here we report the structure of a bacterial nitrate/nitrite transport protein, NarK, from Escherichia coli, with and without substrate. The structures reveal a positively charged substrate-translocation pathway lacking protonatable residues, suggesting that NarK functions as a nitrate/nitrite exchanger and that H+s are unlikely to be co-transported. Conserved arginine residues form the substrate-binding pocket, which is formed by association of helices from the two halves of NarK. Key residues that are important for substrate recognition and transport are identified and related to extensive mutagenesis and functional studies. We propose that NarK exchanges nitrate for nitrite by a rocker-switch mechanism facilitated by inter-domain H-bond networks. PMID:23665960

  15. Partitioning and bioavailability of mercury in an experimentally acidified Wisconsin lake

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wiener, James G.; Fitzgerald, William F.; Watras, Carl J.; Rada, Ronald G.

    1990-01-01

    We studied the partitioning of mercury (Hg) among air, water, sediments and fish at Little Rock Lake, a clear water seepage lake in north-central Wisconsin. The lake was divided with a sea curtain into two basins, one acidified with sulfuric acid to pH 5.6 for two years and the other an untreated reference site (mean pH 6.1), to document the effects of acidification. Trace-metal-free protocols were used to measure Hg at the picomolar level in air and water. Total gaseous Hg in air samples averaged 2.0 ng/m3. Total Hg in unfiltered water samples collected in 1986 after the fall overturn averaged about 1 ng/L in the acidified and reference basins. Mercury in surficial sediments was strongly correlated with volatile matter content and ranged from 10 to about 170 ng/g (dry weight) in both basins. Total Hg concentrations in whole, calendar age-1 yellow perch (Perca flavescens), sampled after one year of residence in the lake, averaged 114 ng/g (fresh weight) in the reference basin and 135 ng/g in the acidified basin – a highly significant (p < 0.01) difference. The mean whole-body burden (quantity) of Hg in age-1 perch did not differ between basins after the first year, but was significantly greater in the treatment basin than in the reference basin after the second year of acidification. Differences between the two basins in the bioaccumulation of Hg were attributed to internal (within-lake) processes that influence the bioavailability of the metal. An initial Hg budget for the treatment basin of Little Rock Lake showed that atmospheric deposition and sedimentary remobilization of Hg are potentially important processes influencing its biogeochemical cycling and uptake by fish.

  16. Quantum mechanical interpretation of nitrite reduction by cytochrome cd1 nitrite reductase from Paracoccus pantotrophus.

    PubMed

    Ranghino, G; Scorza, E; Sjögren, T; Williams, P A; Ricci, M; Hajdu, J

    2000-09-12

    The reduction of nitrite to nitric oxide in respiratory denitrification is catalyzed by a cytochrome cd(1) nitrite reductase in Paracoccus pantotrophus (formerly known as Thiosphaera pantotropha LMD 92.63). High-resolution structures are available for the fully oxidized [Fülöp, V., Moir, J. W., Ferguson, S. J., and Hajdu, J. (1995) Cell 81, 369-377; Baker, S. C., Saunders, N. F., Willis, A. C., Ferguson, S. J., Hajdu, J., and Fülöp, V. (1997) J. Mol. Biol. 269, 440-455] and fully reduced forms of this enzyme, as well as for various intermediates in its catalytic cycle [Williams, P. A., Fülöp, V., Garman, E. F., Saunders, N. F., Ferguson, S. J., and Hajdu, J. (1997) Nature 389, 406-412]. On the basis of these structures, quantum mechanical techniques (QM), including density functional methods (DFT), were combined with simulated annealing (SA) and molecular mechanics techniques (MM) to calculate the electronic distribution of molecular orbitals in the active site during catalysis. The results show likely trajectories for electrons, protons, substrates, and products in the process of nitrite reduction, and offer an interpretation of the reaction mechanism. The calculations indicate that the redox state of the d(1) heme and charges on two histidines in the active site orchestrate catalysis locally. Binding of nitrite to the reduced iron is followed by proton transfer from His345 and His388 to one of the oxygens of nitrite, creating a water molecule and an [Fe(II)-NO(+)] complex. Valence isomerization within this complex gives [Fe(III)-NO]. The release of NO from the ferric iron is influenced by the protonation state of His345 and His388, and by the orientation of NO on the d(1) heme. Return of Tyr25 to a hydrogen-bonding position between His345 and His388 facilitates product release, but a rebinding of Tyr25 to the oxidized iron may be bypassed in steady-state catalysis. PMID:10998232

  17. Metal accumulation and metallothionein concentrations in tree swallow nestlings near acidified lakes

    SciTech Connect

    St. Louis, V.; Breebaart, L. . Dept. of Zoology); Barlow, J.C. . Dept. of Zoology Royal Ontario Museum, Toronto, Ontario . Dept. of Ornithology); Klaverkamp, J.F. . Dept. of Fisheries and Oceans)

    1993-07-01

    The authors studied metal accumulation in hepatic and renal tissues of tree swallow (Tachycineta bicolor) nestlings at acidified and nonacid reference lakes in northwestern Ontario. Hepatic concentrations of metallothionein (metal-binding proteins, MT) in tree swallow nestlings were negatively correlated with pH of the nest-site lake. Combined concentrations of Cu and Zn in the liver were correlated with liver MT concentrations, but Cd was not. Although no overt signs of metal toxicity were observed in nestlings near acid lakes, the results clearly provided evidence that metals are transferred from acid lakes to birds and that these metals are correlated with increases in hepatic MT production.

  18. Reaction of ferric heme proteins with nitrite and sulfite

    SciTech Connect

    Young, L.J.; Siegel, L.M.

    1988-04-19

    Optical and EPR spectroscopy of ferric heme proteins of the porphyrin, oxyporphyrin, and isobacteriochlorin classes has indicated that nitrite reacts with these proteins at the heme iron. Sulfite has been conclusively proven to react only with proteins containing the isobacteriochlorin macrocycle. Quantitative EPR spectroscopy of these nitrite and sulfite adducts showed that most contained a substantial quantity of undetectable heme. It is suggested that protein-induced autoreduction of nitrite (but not sulfite) and a strained and/or uniaxial g-tensor are the principal ways by which the silent state is produced.

  19. Direct formation of thienopyridine-derived nitrosothiols--just add nitrite!

    PubMed

    Bundhoo, Shantu S; Anderson, Richard A; Sagan, Ewelina; Hassan, Nurudeen; Pinder, Andrew G; Rogers, Stephen C; Morris, Keith; James, Philip E

    2011-11-30

    Thienopyridines (ticlopidine, clopidogrel and prasugrel) are pro-drugs that require metabolism to exhibit a critical thiol group in the active form that binds to the P2Y₁₂ receptor to inhibit platelet activation and prevent thrombus formation in vivo. We investigated whether these thienopyridines participate in S-nitrosation (SNO) reactions that might exhibit direct anti-platelet behaviour. Optimum conditions for in vitro formation of thienopyridine-SNO formation were studied by crushing ticlopidine, clopidogrel or prasugrel into aqueous solution and adding sodium nitrite, or albumin-SNO. Ozone-based chemiluminescence techniques were utilised to specifically detect NO release from the SNO produced. Effect on agonist-induced platelet aggregation was monitored using light transmittance in a 96 well microplate assay. Pharmaceutical grade preparations of ticlopidine, clopidogrel and prasugrel were found to exhibit significant free thiol and formed SNO derivatives directly from anionic nitrite in water under laboratory conditions without the need for prior metabolism. Thienopyridine-SNO formation was dependent on pH, duration of mixing and nitrite concentration, with prasugrel-SNO being more favourably formed. The SNO moiety readily participated in trans-nitrosation reactions with albumin and plasma. Prasugrel-SNO showed significantly better inhibition of platelet aggregation compared with clopidogrel-SNO, however when compared on the basis of SNO concentration these were equally effective (IC₅₀=7.91 ± 1.03 v/s 10.56 ± 1.43 μM, ns). Thienopyridine-derived SNO is formed directly from the respective base drug without the need for prior in vivo metabolism and therefore may be an important additional contributor to the pharmacological effectiveness of thienopyridines not previously considered. PMID:21946108

  20. Nitrite-Mediated Antagonism of Cyanide Inhibition of Cytochrome c Oxidase in Dopamine Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Leavesley, Heather B.; Li, Li; Mukhopadhyay, Soma; Borowitz, Joseph L.; Isom, Gary E.

    2010-01-01

    Cyanide inhibits aerobic metabolism by binding to the binuclear heme center of cytochrome c oxidase (CcOX). Amyl nitrite and sodium nitrite (NaNO2) antagonize cyanide toxicity in part by oxidizing hemoglobin to methemoglobin (mHb), which then scavenges cyanide. mHb generation is thought to be a primary mechanism by which the NO2− ion antagonizes cyanide. On the other hand, NO2− can undergo biotransformation to generate nitric oxide (NO), which may then directly antagonize cyanide inhibition of CcOX. In this study, nitrite-mediated antagonism of cyanide inhibition of oxidative phosphorylation was examined in rat dopaminergic N27 cells. NaNO2 produced a time- and concentration-dependent increase in whole-cell and mitochondrial levels of NO. The NO scavenger 2-phenyl-4,4,5,5-tetramethylimidazoline-1-oxy 3-oxide (PTIO) reversed this increase in cellular and mitochondrial NO. NO generated from NaNO2 decreased cellular oxygen consumption and inhibited CcOX activity. PTIO reversed the NO-mediated inhibition, thus providing strong evidence that NO mediates the action of NaNO2. Under similar conditions, KCN (20μM) inhibited cellular state-3 oxygen consumption and CcOX activity. Pretreatment with NaNO2 reversed KCN-mediated inhibition of both oxygen consumption and CcOX activity. The NaNO2 antagonism of cyanide was blocked by pretreatment with the NO scavenger PTIO. It was concluded that NaNO2 antagonizes cyanide inhibition of CcOX by generating of NO, which then interacts directly with the binding of KCN × CcOX to reverse the toxicity. In vivo antagonism of cyanide by NO2− appears to be due to both generation of mHb and direct displacement of cyanide from CcOX by NO. PMID:20335280

  1. Solubilization and Resolution of the Membrane-Bound Nitrite Reductase from Paracoccus Halodenitrificans into Nitrite and Nitric Oxide Reductases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grant, Michael A.; Cronin, Sonja E.; Hochstein, Lawrence I.

    1984-01-01

    Membranes prepared from Paracoccus halodenitrificans reduced nitrite or nitric oxide to nitrous oxide. Extraction of these membranes with the detergent CHAPSO [3-(3-Chlolamidoporopyldimethylammonio)-1-(2- hydroxy-1-propanesulfonate)], followed by ammonium sulfate fractionation of the solubilized proteins, resulted in the separation of nitrite and nitric oxide reductase activities. The fraction containing nitrite reductase activity spectrally resembled a cd-type cytochrome. Several cytochromes were detected in the nitric oxide reductase fraction. Which, if any, of these cytochromes is associated with the reduction of nitric oxide is not clear at this time.

  2. Growth and physiological condition of black ducks reared on acidified wetlands

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rattner, B.A.; Haramis, G.M.; Chu, D.S.; Bunck, C.M.; Scanes, C.G.

    1987-01-01

    Acid deposition has been identified as one of several possible factors contributing to the decline of some waterfowl populations in North America. In an effort to examine the effects of acidification on black duck (Anas rubripes) recruitment, growth and physiological condition were monitored in ducklings foraging for a 10-day trial (days 10-20 of life) on acidified (pH 5.0) and : circumneutral (pH 6.8) fish-free emergent wetlands. Acidification of these wetlands suppressed phytoplankton and algal growth, and reduced invertebrate biomass. Ducklings maintained on acidified wetlands grew poorly compared with ducklings reared on circumneutral wetlands, as evidenced by lower final body weight and culmen and tarsus length. Plasma growth hormone concentration was elevated and triiodothyronine levels were lower in stunted ducklings, in part substantiating impairment of growth-regulating processes. Ducklings exhibiting poor growth tended to have lower hematocrit, lower plasma protein, glucose, and cholesterol concentrations, and higher uric acid levels, presumably reflecting alterations in metabolism and development due to inanition. These findings suggest that acid deposition may lower food production in wetlands and ultimately impair duckling growth, condition, and survival.

  3. Protozoan grazing on bacteria at the sediment-water interface of an acidified lake

    SciTech Connect

    Tremaine, S.C.

    1988-01-01

    Protozoan grazing on bacteria has been hypothesized to link the detrital and grazer food chains in aquatic ecosystems. The current study of protozoan bacterivory, evaluated methods, quantified bacterivory, and evaluated the role of protozoa at the sediment-water interface of an acidified lake ecosystem, Lake Anna, Virginia. Three limnetic methods for determining protozoan bacterivory were tested for applicability at the sediment-water interface. The eucaryote inhibitor, cycloheximide, was found unsatisfactory because it did not uniformly inhibit growth of target eucaryotes, and because it inhibited non-target anaerobic procaryotes. The filtration method was found to have limited application in sediment systems due to filtrational loss of particle-associated bacteria. The dilution method was tested for violations of its critical assumptions: bacterial growth is exponential; grazing mortality is proportional to the dilution factor; and bacterial growth rates are unaltered under experimental conditions. These assumptions were found not to be violated, and this method was used in subsequent grazing experiments. Carbon loading to the acidified arm of Lake Anna was 41 {times} 10{sup 6} g C {times} y{sup {minus}1}. This appears to be adequate carbon loading to support bacterial production and, in turn, protozoan bacterivory and production. Though there is no direct evidence that zooplankton graze on protozoa in this system, however, there is sufficient protozoan production to support an additional trophic level.

  4. [Effect of limestone and magnesite application on remediation of acidified forest soil in Chongqing, China].

    PubMed

    Yang, Yong-sen; Duan, Lei; Jin, Teng; Zhao, Da-wei; Zhang, Dong-bao; Hao, Ji-ming

    2006-09-01

    Effect of limestone and magnesite application on remediation of a typical acidified soil under a masson pine (Pinus massoniana) forest at Tieshanping, Chongqing in southwest China was studied through field experiments. The changes of soil water chemistry in different layers within one year after application of limestone or magnesite indicated that the remediation agents leaded to the recovery of acidified soil by significant increase of pH value and concentration of relative cation, i.e., Ca2+ or Mg2+, and notable decrease of inorganic monomeric aluminum (Ali). However, the accelerated leaching of NO3- and SO4(2-) might somewhat counteract the positive effects. Since the limestone powder applied was much finer and thus more soluble than the magnesite powder, it seemed that the addition of limestone was more effective than that of magnesite. However, the application of magnesite could probably improve the nutrient uptake and growth of plant, and thus limestone and magnesite should be used together. The change of soil water chemistry was much more notable in upper layer of soil than lower, which means that it will take long time to achieve the whole profile soil remediation. PMID:17117649

  5. Esterification of acidified oil with methanol by SPES/PES catalytic membrane.

    PubMed

    Shi, Wenying; He, Benqiao; Li, Jianxin

    2011-05-01

    A sulfonated polyethersulfone (SPES)/polyethersulfone (PES) blend catalytic membrane was prepared and used as a heterogeneous catalyst in the esterification of the acidified oil (acid value 153 mg KOH/g) with methanol for producing biodiesel. The results showed that the free fatty acids conversion reached 97.6% using SPES/PES catalytic membrane under the optimal esterification conditions. Meanwhile, the SPES/PES membrane with 20.3% degree of sulfonation showed a good catalytic stability. A pseudo-homogeneous kinetic model was established. The results indicated that the reaction rate constant increased with increasing methanol/acidified oil molar ratio, the loading of catalytic membrane and reaction temperature. The reaction order was 2 and the activation energy decreased from 74.65 to 21.07 kJ/mol with increasing catalytic membrane loading from 0 to 0.135 meq/g(oil). It implies that the esterification is not diffusively controlled but kinetically controlled. The predicted results were in good agreement with the experimental data. PMID:20951577

  6. Anaerobic digestion of sulfate-acidified cattle slurry: One-stage vs. two-stage.

    PubMed

    Moset, Veronica; Ottosen, Lars Ditlev Mørck; Xavier, Cristiane de Almeida Neves; Møller, Henrik Bjarne

    2016-05-15

    Two strategies to include acidified cattle manure (AcCM) in co-digestion with normal cattle manure (CM) are presented in this work. The strategies are a single thermophilic (50 °C) continuous stirred tank reactor (CSTR) anaerobic digestion and a two-step (65 °C + 50 °C) CSTR process. In both strategies, two different inclusion levels of H2SO4-acidified CM (10% and 20%) in co-digestion with normal CM were tested and compared with a control CSTR fed only CM. Important enhancement of methane (CH4) yield and solid reductions were observed in the thermophilic one-step CSTR working with 10% AcCM. However, a higher inclusion level of AcCM (20%) caused volatile fatty acid accumulation in the reactor and a more than 30% reduction in CH4 production. In terms of CH4 production, when 10% of AcCM was co-digested with 90% of CM, the two-step anaerobic co-digestion yielded less than the single step. During the first step of the two-step CSTR process, acidogenesis and a partial sulfate reduction were achieved. However, sulfide stripping between the first and the second step must be promoted in order to advance this technology. PMID:26985731

  7. [Effect of flue gas desulfurization gypsum application on remediation of acidified forest soil].

    PubMed

    Luo, Yao; Kang, Rong-Hua; Yu, De-Xiang; Tan, Bing-Quan; Duan, Lei

    2012-06-01

    Effect of flue gas desulfurization gypsum (FGDG) application on remediation of a typical acidified forest soil was studied through field experiments at Tieshanping, Chongqing in southwest China for one year. To evaluate the effect and risk of FGDG application, pH value, major ions and heavy metal of soil water in different soil layers were observed dynamically, and heavy metal contained in soil and FGDG were measured. Results showed that Ca2+ and SO4(-2) concentration of soil water in FGDG plots increased with time, pH value was elevated slightly, and n(Ca)/n(Al) value of annual average increased from 2.16, 1.35 and 0.88 to 2.58, 1.52 and 1.12 compared with control plots. The concentration of As, Cu, Cr, Ni and Zn in soil water was not elevated significantly. However, slight enrichment of Cr, Ni and Zn in some upper soil layers was observed. Consequently, FGDG application can improve acidified forest soil, without obviously heavy metal increasing in soil water. However, risk for heavy metal enrichment still exists, which is need for further study. PMID:22946189

  8. Toxicity of ammonia, nitrite, and nitrate to fishes. Book chapter

    SciTech Connect

    Russo, R.C.; Thurston, R.V.

    1991-01-01

    Ammonia and nitrite are highly toxic to fishes, with ammonia occurring in surface waters more commonly than nitrite. Nitrate is a related compound but is not significantly toxic to fishes. The acute toxicity of ammonia to aquatic organisms is affected by water pH, dissolved oxygen, temperature, concentration fluctuations, degree of salinity, presence of other chemicals, and prior acclimation. The acute toxicity of nitrite is known to be affected by water pH and the presence of chloride and calcium. More research is needed on the effects of these and other variables on the acute toxicity of both ammonia and nitrite, as well as the chronic effects of both of these toxins.

  9. Modulation of nitrate-nitrite conversion in the oral cavity.

    PubMed

    van Maanen, J M; van Geel, A A; Kleinjans, J C

    1996-01-01

    The formation of nitrite from ingested nitrate can give rise to the induction of methemoglobinemia and endogenous nitrosation resulting in the formation of carcinogenic N-nitroso compounds. We investigated the possibility of modulation of the conversion of nitrate into nitrite in the oral cavity in order to seek ways of reducing the formation of the deleterious nitrite. We investigated the effectiveness of several mouthwash solutions with antibacterial constituents on the reduction of nitrate into nitrite in the oral cavity. In 15 studied subjects, the mean percentage of salivary nitrate reduced to nitrite after ingestion of 235 mg (3.8 mmol) nitrate was found to be 16.1 +/- 6.2%. The use of an antiseptic mouthwash with active antibacterial constituent chlorhexidine resulted in an almost complete decrease of the mean percentage of reduced nitrate, to 0.9 +/- 0.8%. Mouthwash solutions with antibacterial component triclosan or antimicrobial enzymes amyloglucosidase and glucose oxidase did not affect the reduction of nitrate into nitrite. A toothpaste with active components triclosan and zinc citrate with synergistic antiplaque activity was also without effect. Use of a pH-regulating chewing gum resulted in a rise in the pH in the oral cavity from 6.8 to 7.3. At 30 min after nitrate ingestion, this rise was accompanied by a significant increase in the salivary nitrite concentration, which might be explained by the pH being close to the optimal pH for nitrate reductase of 8. In conclusion, a limited number of possibilities of modulation of the conversion of nitrate into nitrite in the oral cavity are available. PMID:8939344

  10. Structures of complexes of octahaem cytochrome c nitrite reductase from Thioalkalivibrio nitratireducens with sulfite and cyanide.

    PubMed

    Trofimov, Anton A; Polyakov, Konstantin M; Boyko, Konstantin M; Tikhonova, Tamara V; Safonova, Tatyana N; Tikhonov, Alexey V; Popov, Alexandre N; Popov, Vladimir O

    2010-10-01

    The structures of complexes of octahaem cytochrome c nitrite reductase from the bacterium Thioalkalivibrio nitratireducens (TvNiR) with the substrate sulfite (1.4 Å resolution; R(cryst) = 0.126) and the inhibitor cyanide (1.55 Å resolution; R(cryst) = 0.148) have been established. The complex with sulfite was prepared by the reduction of the protein crystal with sodium dithionite. The sulfite ion is bound to the iron ion of the catalytic haem through the S atom. The Fe-S distance is 2.24 Å. The structure of the cyanide complex with full occupancy of the ligand site was established for the first time for cytochrome c nitrite reductases. The cyanide ion is bound to the catalytic haem iron through the C atom. The Fe-C distance is 1.91 Å and the Fe-C-N angle is 171°. The sulfite reductase activity of TvNiR was measured at different pH values. The activity is 0.02 µmol of HS(-) per minute per milligram at pH 7.0; it decreases with increasing pH and is absent at pH 9.0. PMID:20944237

  11. Activation of accumulated nitrite reduction by immobilized Pseudomonas stutzeri T13 during aerobic denitrification.

    PubMed

    Ma, Fang; Sun, Yilu; Li, Ang; Zhang, Xuening; Yang, Jixian

    2015-01-01

    The excellent removal efficiency of nitrate by the aerobic denitrifier, Pseudomonas stutzeri T13, was achieved in free cells system. However, poor nitrite reduction prevents efficient aerobic denitrification because of the nitrite accumulation. This problem could be conquered by immobilizing the cells on supports. In this study, strain T13 was immobilized by mycelial pellets (MPs), polyurethane foam cubes (PFCs) and sodium alginate beads (SABs). Higher removal percentages of TN in MP (43.78%), PFC (42.31%) and SAB (57.25%) systems were achieved compared with the free cell system (29.7%). Furthermore, the optimal condition for immobilized cell systems was as follows: 30°C, 100rpm shaking speed and pH 7. The shock-resistance of SAB system was relatively poor, which could collapse under either alkaline (pH=9) or high rotating (200rpm) conditions. The recycling experiments demonstrated that the high steady TN removal rate could be maintained for seven cycles in both MP and PFC systems. PMID:25827250

  12. Acifluorfen, sodium

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Acifluorfen , sodium ; CASRN 62476 - 59 - 9 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcino

  13. Sodium diethyldithiocarbamate

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Sodium diethyldithiocarbamate ; CASRN 148 - 18 - 5 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Non

  14. Sodium fluoroacetate

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Sodium fluoroacetate ; CASRN 62 - 74 - 8 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinogen

  15. Sodium azide

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Sodium azide ; CASRN 26628 - 22 - 8 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinogenic Ef

  16. Sodium cyanide

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Jump to main content . Integrated Risk Information System Recent Additions | Contact Us Search : All EPA IRIS • You are here : EPA Home • Research • Environmental Assessment • IRIS • IRIS Summaries Redirect Page As of September 28 , 2010 , the assessment summary for sodium cyanide is included in the

  17. Nitrite-induced anemia in channel catfish, Ictalurus punctatus Rafinesque

    SciTech Connect

    Tucker, C.S. ); Francis-Floyd, R.; Beleau, M.H. )

    1989-08-01

    Since 1983 numerous cases of anemia have been reported in populations of channel catfish Ictalurus punctatus Rafinesque cultured in the southeastern United States. Environmental nitrite-nitrogen concentrations of 4 mg/L or more occur sporadically in channel catfish culture ponds, and the frequency of occurrence is greatest in the fall and spring. The authors have observed that some cases of anemia in populations of pond-raised channel catfish follow prolonged exposure to high concentrations of environmental nitrite. However, there was no evidence that exposure of channel catfish to environmental nitrite was the cause of the observed anemia. Hemolytic anemia following nitrite exposure has been described for sea bass Dicentrarchus labrax (L.) and rainbow trout Salmo gairdneri, but not for channel catfish. In the present study the authors show that a variable, but generally mild, anemia develops in channel catfish exposed to nitrite. They also offer a management procedure for preventing the development of anemia during periods of elevated environmental nitrite concentrations.

  18. Molecular Components of Nitrate and Nitrite Efflux in Yeast

    PubMed Central

    Cabrera, Elisa; González-Montelongo, Rafaela; Giraldez, Teresa; de la Rosa, Diego Alvarez

    2014-01-01

    Some eukaryotes, such as plant and fungi, are capable of utilizing nitrate as the sole nitrogen source. Once transported into the cell, nitrate is reduced to ammonium by the consecutive action of nitrate and nitrite reductase. How nitrate assimilation is balanced with nitrate and nitrite efflux is unknown, as are the proteins involved. The nitrate assimilatory yeast Hansenula polymorpha was used as a model to dissect these efflux systems. We identified the sulfite transporters Ssu1 and Ssu2 as effective nitrate exporters, Ssu2 being quantitatively more important, and we characterize the Nar1 protein as a nitrate/nitrite exporter. The use of strains lacking either SSU2 or NAR1 along with the nitrate reductase gene YNR1 showed that nitrate reductase activity is not required for net nitrate uptake. Growth test experiments indicated that Ssu2 and Nar1 exporters allow yeast to cope with nitrite toxicity. We also have shown that the well-known Saccharomyces cerevisiae sulfite efflux permease Ssu1 is also able to excrete nitrite and nitrate. These results characterize for the first time essential components of the nitrate/nitrite efflux system and their impact on net nitrate uptake and its regulation. PMID:24363367

  19. Inhibitory effect of nitrite on coagulation processes demonstrated by thrombelastography

    PubMed Central

    Park, J. W.; Piknova, B.; Nghiem, K.; Lozier, J. N.; Schechter, A. N.

    2014-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) can be generated by two-step reduction pathway in which nitrate is converted first into nitrite and then into NO via several mechanisms, as well as from arginine by endogenous nitric oxide synthase (NOS). We have recently shown that nitrite ions in the presence of erythrocytes inhibit platelet aggregation and activation, as measured by aggregometry and flow cytometric analysis of P-selectin, through its reduction to NO under partially deoxygenated conditions. In the current study, we investigated how nitrite may affect overall clotting processes via modulating platelet function using thrombelastography (TEG). We measured three major TEG parameters, reaction time (R, time to initial fibrin formation), α angle (velocity of clot growth) and maximum amplitude (MA, maximum clot strength) using blood from healthy volunteers. An NO donor (DEANONOate) showed inhibitory effects on all TEG parameters in platelet rich plasma (PRP) and whole blood, resulting in delayed R, decreased angle, and reduced MA in a dose dependent manner. Nitrite ions also exhibited inhibitory effects in whole blood at 20% hematocrit, and this was greatly enhanced under hypoxic conditions, being demonstrable at 0.1 μM concentration. Neither compound changed any TEG parameters in plasma. Our results suggest that nitrite affects overall blood clotting and that TEG may be used to follow this process. Further the physiological effects of factors which determine NO bioavailability, such as endogenous levels of blood and tissue nitrite, may be useful as biomarkers for predicting hemostatic potential. PMID:24858214

  20. Mutagenicity of some alkyl nitrites used as recreational drugs

    SciTech Connect

    Dunkel, V.C.; Cameron, T.P. ); Rogers-Back, A.M.; Lawlor, T.E.; Harbell, J.W. )

    1989-01-01

    When the AIDS epidemic was in its earliest stages, and prior to identification of HIV as the etiological factor, the use of volatile nitrites by the male homosexual community to enhance sexual activities appeared to have a significant role in this disease. Preliminary observations indicated that that portion of the male homosexual community which developed Kaposi's sarcoma were also heavy nitrite users. These nitrites had been demonstrated to be mutagenic in bacteria and thus it was postulated that they could be responsible for the appearance of the sarcoma. To evaluate further the genotoxic activity of these chemicals, six nitrites, including those most commonly used by homosexuals for sexual gratification, were selected for testing in the mouse lymphoma TK {plus minus} and Salmonell typhimurium mutagenicity assays. One chemical, n-amyl nitrite, was negative in the mouse lymphoma assay, while the other five chemicals, n-butyl, isobutyl, iso-amyl, sec-butyl, and n-propyl nitrite, were positive. All six compounds were positive in the Salmonella assay. The mutagenic and known toxic effects of these chemicals remain a concern because a large population of teenagers and young adults continue to abuse these substances.

  1. Automated, colorimetric methods for determination of nitrate plus nitrite, nitrite, ammonium and orthophosphate ions in natural water samples

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Antweiler, Ronald C.; Patton, Charles J.; Taylor, Howard E.

    1996-01-01

    The apparatus and methods used for the automatic, colorimetric determinations of dissolved nutrients (nitrate plus nitrite, nitrite, ammonium and orthophosphate) in natural waters are described. These techniques allow for the determination of nitrate plus nitrite for the concentration range 0.02 to 8 mg/L (milligrams per liter) as N (nitrogen); for nitrite, the range is 0.002 to 1.0 mg/L as N; for ammonium, the range is 0.006 to 2.0 mg/L as N; and for orthophosphate, the range is 0.002 to 1.0 mg/L as P (phosphorus). Data are presented that demonstrate the accuracy, precision and quality control of the methods.

  2. Enhancement of iron(II)-dependent reduction of nitrite to nitric oxide by thiocyanate and accumulation of iron(II)/thiocyanate/nitric oxide complex under conditions simulating the mixture of saliva and gastric juice.

    PubMed

    Takahama, Umeo; Hirota, Sachiko

    2012-01-13

    Iron(III) ingested as a food component or supplement for iron deficiencies can react with salivary SCN(-) to produce Fe(SCN)(2+) and can be reduced to iron(II) by ascorbic acid in the stomach. Iron(II) generated in the stomach can react with salivary nitrite and SCN(-) to produce nitric oxide (NO) and FeSCN(+), respectively. The purpose of this investigation is to make clear the reactions among nitrite, SCN(-), iron ions, and ascorbic acid under conditions simulating the mixture of saliva and gastric juice. Iron(II)-dependent reduction of nitrite to NO was enhanced by SCN(-) in acidic buffer solutions, and the oxidation product of iron(II) reacted with SCN(-) to produce Fe(SCN)(2+). Almost all of the NO produced was autoxidized to N(2)O(3) under aerobic conditions. Iron(II)-dependent production of NO was also observed in acidified saliva. Under anaerobic conditions, NO transformed Fe(SCN)(2+) and FeSCN(+) to Fe(SCN)NO(+) in acidic buffer solutions. Fe(SCN)NO(+) was also formed under aerobic conditions when excess ascorbic acid was added to iron(II)/nitrite/SCN(-) systems in acidic buffer solutions and acidified saliva. The Fe(SCN)NO(+) formed was transformed to Fe(SCN)(2+) and iron(III) at pH 2.0 and pH 7.4, respectively, by O(2). Salivary glycoproteins could complex with iron(III) in the stomach preventing the formation of Fe(SCN)(2+). Ascorbic acid reduced iron(III) to iron(II) to react with nitrite and SCN(-) as described above. The above results suggest (i) that iron(II) can have toxic effects on the stomach through the formation of reactive nitrogen oxide species from NO when supplemented without ascorbic acid and through the formation of both reactive nitrogen oxide species and Fe(SCN)NO(+) when supplemented with ascorbic acid, and (ii) that the toxic effects of iron(III) seemed to be smaller than and similar to those of iron(II) when supplemented without and with ascorbic acid, respectively. Possible mechanisms that cause oxidative stress on the stomach

  3. Salivary thiocyanate/nitrite inhibits hydroxylation of 2-hydroxybenzoic acid induced by hydrogen peroxide/Fe(II) systems under acidic conditions: possibility of thiocyanate/nitrite-dependent scavenging of hydroxyl radical in the stomach.

    PubMed

    Takahama, Umeo; Oniki, Takayuki

    2004-11-18

    Formation of OH radicals in the stomach is possible by Fenton-type reactions, as gastric juice contains ascorbic acid (AA), iron ions and H2O2. An objective of the present study is to elucidate the effects of salivary SCN- and NO2- on the hydroxylation of salicylic acid which was induced by H2O2/Fe(II) and AA/H2O2/Fe(II) systems. Thiocyanate ion inhibited the hydroxylation of salicylic acid by the above systems in acidic buffer solutions and in acidified saliva. The inhibition by SCN- was deduced to be due to SCN- -dependent scavenging of OH radicals. Nitrite ion could enhance the SCN- -dependent inhibition of the hydroxylation induced by AA/H2O2/Fe(II) systems. The enhancement was suggested to be due to scavenging of OH radicals by NO which was formed by the reactions among AA, HNO2 and SCN- contained in the reaction mixture. The concentrations of SCN- and NO2-, which were effective for the inhibition, were in ranges of their normal salivary concentrations. These results suggest that salivary SCN- can cooperate with NO2- to protect stomach from OH radicals formed by AA/H2O2/Fe(II) systems under acidic conditions. PMID:15535976

  4. A single channel for nitrate uptake, nitrite export and nitrite uptake by Escherichia coli NarU and a role for NirC in nitrite export and uptake.

    PubMed

    Jia, Wenjing; Tovell, Nicholas; Clegg, Stephanie; Trimmer, Mark; Cole, Jeffrey

    2009-01-01

    Two related polytopic membrane proteins of the major facilitator family, NarK and NarU, catalyse nitrate uptake, nitrite export and nitrite uptake across the Escherichia coli cytoplasmic membrane by an unknown mechanism. A 12-helix model of NarU was constructed based upon six alkaline phosphatase and beta-galactosidase fusions to NarK and the predicted hydropathy for the NarK family. Fifteen residues conserved in the NarK-NarU protein family were substituted by site-directed mutagenesis, including four residues that are essential for nitrate uptake by Aspergillus nidulans: arginines Arg(87) and Arg(303) in helices 2 and 8, and two glycines in a nitrate signature motif. Despite the wide range of substitutions studied, in no case did mutation result in loss of one biochemical function without simultaneous loss of all other functions. A NarU+ NirC+ strain grew more rapidly and accumulated nitrite more rapidly than the isogenic NarU+ NirC(-) strain. Only the NirC+ strain consumed nitrite rapidly during the later stages of growth. Under conditions in which the rate of nitrite reduction was limited by the rate of nitrite uptake, NirC+ strains reduced nitrite up to 10 times more rapidly than isogenic NarU+ strains, indicating that both nitrite efflux and nitrite uptake are largely dependent on NirC. Isotope tracer experiments with [15N]nitrate and [14N]nitrite revealed that [15N]nitrite accumulated in the extracellular medium even when there was a net rate of nitrite uptake and reduction. We propose that NarU functions as a single channel for nitrate uptake and nitrite expulsion, either as a nitrate-nitrite antiporter, or more likely as a nitrate/H+ or nitrite/H+ channel. PMID:18691156

  5. Time-dependent depletion of nitrite in pork/beef and chicken meat products and its effect on nitrite intake estimation

    PubMed Central

    Merino, Leonardo; Darnerud, Per Ola; Toldrá, Fidel; Ilbäck, Nils-Gunnar

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The food additive nitrite (E249, E250) is commonly used in meat curing as a food preservation method. Because of potential negative health effects of nitrite, its use is strictly regulated. In an earlier study we have shown that the calculated intake of nitrite in children can exceed the acceptable daily intake (ADI) when conversion from dietary nitrate to nitrite is included. This study examined time-dependent changes in nitrite levels in four Swedish meat products frequently eaten by children: pork/beef sausage, liver paté and two types of chicken sausage, and how the production process, storage and also boiling (e.g., simmering in salted water) and frying affect the initial added nitrite level. The results showed a steep decrease in nitrite level between the point of addition to the product and the first sampling of the product 24 h later. After this time, residual nitrite levels continued to decrease, but much more slowly, until the recommended use-by date. Interestingly, this continuing decrease in nitrite was much smaller in the chicken products than in the pork/beef products. In a pilot study on pork/beef sausage, we found no effects of boiling on residual nitrite levels, but frying decreased nitrite levels by 50%. In scenarios of time-dependent depletion of nitrite using the data obtained for sausages to represent all cured meat products and including conversion from dietary nitrate, calculated nitrite intake in 4-year-old children generally exceeded the ADI. Moreover, the actual intake of nitrite from cured meat is dependent on the type of meat source, with a higher residual nitrite levels in chicken products compared with pork/beef products. This may result in increased nitrite exposure among consumers shifting their consumption pattern of processed meats from red to white meat products. PMID:26743589

  6. Time-dependent depletion of nitrite in pork/beef and chicken meat products and its effect on nitrite intake estimation.

    PubMed

    Merino, Leonardo; Darnerud, Per Ola; Toldrá, Fidel; Ilbäck, Nils-Gunnar

    2016-01-01

    The food additive nitrite (E249, E250) is commonly used in meat curing as a food preservation method. Because of potential negative health effects of nitrite, its use is strictly regulated. In an earlier study we have shown that the calculated intake of nitrite in children can exceed the acceptable daily intake (ADI) when conversion from dietary nitrate to nitrite is included. This study examined time-dependent changes in nitrite levels in four Swedish meat products frequently eaten by children: pork/beef sausage, liver paté and two types of chicken sausage, and how the production process, storage and also boiling (e.g., simmering in salted water) and frying affect the initial added nitrite level. The results showed a steep decrease in nitrite level between the point of addition to the product and the first sampling of the product 24 h later. After this time, residual nitrite levels continued to decrease, but much more slowly, until the recommended use-by date. Interestingly, this continuing decrease in nitrite was much smaller in the chicken products than in the pork/beef products. In a pilot study on pork/beef sausage, we found no effects of boiling on residual nitrite levels, but frying decreased nitrite levels by 50%. In scenarios of time-dependent depletion of nitrite using the data obtained for sausages to represent all cured meat products and including conversion from dietary nitrate, calculated nitrite intake in 4-year-old children generally exceeded the ADI. Moreover, the actual intake of nitrite from cured meat is dependent on the type of meat source, with a higher residual nitrite levels in chicken products compared with pork/beef products. This may result in increased nitrite exposure among consumers shifting their consumption pattern of processed meats from red to white meat products. PMID:26743589

  7. Intracellular Conversion of Environmental Nitrate and Nitrite to Nitric Oxide with Resulting Developmental Toxicity to the Crustacean Daphnia magna

    PubMed Central

    Hannas, Bethany R.; Das, Parikshit C.; Li, Hong; LeBlanc, Gerald A.

    2010-01-01

    Background Nitrate and nitrite (jointly referred to herein as NOx) are ubiquitous environmental contaminants to which aquatic organisms are at particularly high risk of exposure. We tested the hypothesis that NOx undergo intracellular conversion to the potent signaling molecule nitric oxide resulting in the disruption of endocrine-regulated processes. Methodology/Principal Findings These experiments were performed with insect cells (Drosophila S2) and whole organisms Daphnia magna. We first evaluated the ability of cells to convert nitrate (NO3−) and nitrite (NO2−) to nitric oxide using amperometric real-time nitric oxide detection. Both NO3− and NO2− were converted to nitric oxide in a substrate concentration-dependent manner. Further, nitric oxide trapping and fluorescent visualization studies revealed that perinatal daphnids readily convert NO2− to nitric oxide. Next, daphnids were continuously exposed to concentrations of the nitric oxide-donor sodium nitroprusside (positive control) and to concentrations of NO3− and NO2−. All three compounds interfered with normal embryo development and reduced daphnid fecundity. Developmental abnormalities were characteristic of those elicited by compounds that interfere with ecdysteroid signaling. However, no compelling evidence was generated to indicate that nitric oxide reduced ecdysteroid titers. Conclusions/Significance Results demonstrate that nitrite elicits developmental and reproductive toxicity at environmentally relevant concentrations due likely to its intracellular conversion to nitric oxide. PMID:20805993

  8. Test Your Sodium Smarts

    MedlinePlus

    ... You may be surprised to learn how much sodium is in many foods. Sodium, including sodium chloride ... foods with little or no salt. Test your sodium smarts by answering these 10 questions about which ...

  9. Low sodium level

    MedlinePlus

    Low sodium level is a condition in which the amount of sodium (salt) in the blood is lower ... and this causes many of the symptoms of low sodium. With low sodium level (hyponatremia), the imbalance of ...

  10. Nitrite reduction mechanism on a Pd surface.

    PubMed

    Shin, Hyeyoung; Jung, Sungyoon; Bae, Sungjun; Lee, Woojin; Kim, Hyungjun

    2014-11-01

    Nitrate (NO3-) is one of the most harmful contaminants in the groundwater, and it causes various health problems. Bimetallic catalysts, usually palladium (Pd) coupled with secondary metallic catalyst, are found to properly treat nitrate-containing wastewaters; however, the selectivity toward N2 production over ammonia (NH3) production still requires further improvement. Because the N2 selectivity is determined at the nitrite (NO2-) reduction step on the Pd surface, which occurs after NO3- is decomposed into NO2- on the secondary metallic catalyst, we here performed density functional theory (DFT) calculations and experiments to investigate the NO2- reduction pathway on the Pd surface activated by hydrogen. Based on extensive DFT calculations on the relative energetics among ∼100 possible intermediates, we found that NO2- is easily reduced to NO* on the Pd surface, followed by either sequential hydrogenation steps to yield NH3 or a decomposition step to N* and O* (an adsorbate on Pd is denoted using an asterisk). Based on the calculated high migration barrier of N*, we further discussed that the direct combination of two N* to yield N2 is kinetically less favorable than the combination of a highly mobile H* with N* to yield NH3. Instead, the reduction of NO2- in the vicinity of the N* can yield N2O* that can be preferentially transformed into N2 via diverse reaction pathways. Our DFT results suggest that enhancing the likelihood of N* encountering NO2- in the solution phase before combination with surface H* is important for maximizing the N2 selectivity. This is further supported by our experiments on NO2- reduction by Pd/TiO2, showing that both a decreased H2 flow rate and an increased NO2- concentration increased the N2 selectivity (78.6-93.6% and 57.8-90.9%, respectively). PMID:25280017

  11. Determination of 5-log reduction times for food pathogens in acidified cucumbers during storage at 10 and 25°C

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Outbreaks of acid-resistant food pathogens in acid foods with pH values below 4.0, including apple cider and orange juice, have raised concerns about the safety of acidified vegetable products. For acidified vegetable products with pH values between 3.3 and 4.6, previous research has demonstrated t...

  12. Increased Salivary Nitrite and Nitrate Excretion in Rats with Cirrhosis.

    PubMed

    Mahmoodi, Somayeh; Rahmatollahi, Mahdieh; Shahsavari, Fatemeh; Shafaroodi, Hamed; Grayesh-Nejad, Siyavash; Dehpour, Ahmad R

    2015-11-01

    Increased nitric oxide (NO) formation is mechanistically linked to pathophysiology of the extrahepatic complications of cirrhosis. NO is formed by either enzymatic or non-enzymatic pathways. Enzymatic production is catalyzed by NO synthase (NOS) while entero-salivary circulation of nitrate and nitrite is linked to non-enzymatic formation of NO under acidic pH in the stomach. There is no data on salivary excretion of nitrate and nitrite in cirrhosis. This study was aimed to investigate salivary levels of nitrate and nitrite in a rat model of biliary cirrhosis. Cirrhosis was induced by bile duct ligation (BDL). Four weeks after the operation, submandibular ducts of anesthetized BDL and control rats were cannulated with polyethylene microtube for saliva collection. Assessment of pH, nitrite and nitrate levels was performed in our research. We also investigated NOS expression by real time RT-PCR to estimate eNOS, nNOS and iNOS mRNA levels in the submandibular glands. Salivary pH was significantly lower in BDL rats in comparison to control animals. We also observed a statistically significant increase in salivary levels of nitrite as well as nitrate in BDL rats while there was no elevation in the mRNA expression of nNOS, eNOS, and iNOS in submandibular glands of cirrhotic groups. This indicates that an increased salivary level of nitrite/nitrate is less likely to be linked to increased enzymatic production of NO in the salivary epithelium. It appears that nitrate/nitrite can be transported from the blood stream by submandibular glands and excreted into saliva as entero-salivary circulation, and this mechanism may have been exaggerated during cirrhosis. PMID:26786986

  13. Low sodium diet (image)

    MedlinePlus

    ... for you. Look for these words on labels: low-sodium, sodium-free, no salt added, sodium-reduced, or ... for you. Look for these words on labels: low-sodium, sodium-free, no salt added, sodium-reduced, or ...

  14. Purification of empty fruit bunch (EFB) and kenaf soda lignin with acidified water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hashim, Sharifah Nurul Ain Syed; Zakaria, Sarani; Jaafar, Sharifah Nabihah Syed; Hua, Chia Chin

    2014-09-01

    In this current study, the soda lignins from empty fruit bunch (EFB) and kenaf core were recovered by two step precipitation method. The objective of this research is to study the purity of lignin by washing the lignins with acidified water. The purified lignins were undergone characterization by FT-IR, Uv-Vis and XRD. The FT-IR analysis shows that kenaf core has Guaiacyl(G) and Syringyl(S) unit meanwhile EFB has Hydroxyphenyl(H), Guaiacyl(G) and Syringyl(S) unit of lignin. As for XRD analysis, the non-purified shows that the existence of impurities which is salt (NaCl). The UV analysis shows the higher absorbance which lead to the purity of lignin.

  15. Leaching behaviour and environmental risk assessment of heavy metals from electronic solder in acidified soil.

    PubMed

    Lao, Xiaodong; Cheng, Congqian; Min, Xiaohua; Zhao, Jie; Zhou, Dayu; Li, Xiaogang

    2015-11-01

    The leaching behaviour of Sn and Pb elements from eutectic SnPb solder of electronic waste in acidic soil was investigated through acidification with HCl-H2SO4 solution and compared with saline solution. The amounts of Sn and Pb elements leached, when subjected to acidic soil, are higher than those with saline soil. Evidence for the significantly preferential release of Sn into the leachate is provided; the galvanic couple accelerated such preferential release. Surface product analysis reveals the slight damage of SnPb in saline soil. Serious dissolution due to electrochemical reaction and a thick, porous PbSO4 surface layer are observed in acidified soil, suggesting more severe toxicity potential of Pb in soil rather than in water. PMID:26154035

  16. Shift from coral to macroalgae dominance on a volcanically acidified reef

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Enochs, I. C.; Manzello, D. P.; Donham, E. M.; Kolodziej, G.; Okano, R.; Johnston, L.; Young, C.; Iguel, J.; Edwards, C. B.; Fox, M. D.; Valentino, L.; Johnson, S.; Benavente, D.; Clark, S. J.; Carlton, R.; Burton, T.; Eynaud, Y.; Price, N. N.

    2015-12-01

    Rising anthropogenic CO2 in the atmosphere is accompanied by an increase in oceanic CO2 and a concomitant decline in seawater pH (ref. ). This phenomenon, known as ocean acidification (OA), has been experimentally shown to impact the biology and ecology of numerous animals and plants, most notably those that precipitate calcium carbonate skeletons, such as reef-building corals. Volcanically acidified water at Maug, Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands (CNMI) is equivalent to near-future predictions for what coral reef ecosystems will experience worldwide due to OA. We provide the first chemical and ecological assessment of this unique site and show that acidification-related stress significantly influences the abundance and diversity of coral reef taxa, leading to the often-predicted shift from a coral to an algae-dominated state. This study provides field evidence that acidification can lead to macroalgae dominance on reefs.

  17. Regulation of nitrite transport in red blood cells by hemoglobin oxygen fractional saturation.

    PubMed

    Vitturi, Dario A; Teng, Xinjun; Toledo, José C; Matalon, Sadis; Lancaster, Jack R; Patel, Rakesh P

    2009-05-01

    Allosteric regulation of nitrite reduction by deoxyhemoglobin has been proposed to mediate nitric oxide (NO) formation during hypoxia. Nitrite is predominantly an anion at physiological pH, raising questions about the mechanism by which it enters the red blood cell (RBC) and whether this is regulated and coupled to deoxyhemoglobin-mediated reduction. We tested the hypothesis that nitrite transport by RBCs is regulated by fractional saturation. Using human RBCs, nitrite consumption was faster at lower fractional saturations, consistent with faster reactions with deoxyheme. A membrane-based regulation was suggested by slower nitrite consumption with intact versus lysed RBCs. Interestingly, upon nitrite addition, intracellular nitrite concentrations attained a steady state that, despite increased rates of consumption, did not change with decreasing oxygen tensions, suggesting a deoxygenation-sensitive step that either increases nitrite import or decreases the rate of nitrite export. A role for anion exchanger (AE)-1 in the control of nitrite export was suggested by increased intracellular nitrite concentrations in RBCs treated with DIDS. Moreover, deoxygenation decreased steady-state levels of intracellular nitrite in AE-1-inhibited RBCs. Based on these data, we propose a model in which deoxyhemoglobin binding to AE-1 inhibits nitrite export under low oxygen tensions allowing for the coupling between deoxygenation and nitrite reduction to NO along the arterial-to-venous gradient. PMID:19286940

  18. Nitrogen cycling in the secondary nitrite maximum of the eastern tropical North Pacific off Costa Rica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buchwald, Carolyn; Santoro, Alyson E.; Stanley, Rachel H. R.; Casciotti, Karen L.

    2015-12-01

    Nitrite is a central intermediate in the marine nitrogen cycle and represents a critical juncture where nitrogen can be reduced to the less bioavailable N2 gas or oxidized to nitrate and retained in a more bioavailable form. We present an analysis of rates of microbial nitrogen transformations in the oxygen deficient zone (ODZ) within the eastern tropical North Pacific Ocean (ETNP). We determined rates using a novel one-dimensional model using the distribution of nitrite and nitrate concentrations, along with their natural abundance nitrogen (N) and oxygen (O) isotope profiles. We predict rate profiles for nitrate reduction, nitrite reduction, and nitrite oxidation throughout the ODZ, as well as the contributions of anammox to nitrite reduction and nitrite oxidation. Nitrate reduction occurs at a maximum rate of 25 nM d-1 at the top of the ODZ, at the same depth as the maximum rate of nitrite reduction, 15 nM d-1. Nitrite oxidation occurs at maximum rates of 10 nM d-1 above the secondary nitrite maximum, but also in the secondary nitrite maximum, within the ODZ. Anammox contributes to nitrite oxidation within the ODZ but cannot account for all of it. Nitrite oxidation within the ODZ that is not through anammox is also supported by microbial gene abundance profiles. Our results suggest the presence of nitrite oxidation within the ETNP ODZ, with implications for the distribution and physiology of marine nitrite-oxidizing bacteria, and for total nitrogen loss in the largest marine ODZ.

  19. Fatty acid composition and biogenic amines in acidified and fermented fish silage: a comparison study.

    PubMed

    Özyurt, Gülsün; Gökdoğan, Saadet; Şimşek, Ayşe; Yuvka, Ilknur; Ergüven, Merve; Kuley Boga, Esmeray

    2016-01-01

    In the presented study, ensiling of discard fish by acidification or fermentation was evaluated. Klunzinger's ponyfish which is a discard fish was used for the production of fish silage by acidification (3% formic acid for Method FA; 1.5% formic and 1.5% sulphuric acid for Method FASA) and fermentation (Lactobacillus plantarum for Method LP and Streptococcus thermophilus for Method ST). The chemical, microbiological and nutritional properties of the differently preserved fish silages were estimated during a storage period of 60 d at ambient temperature. Compared to the raw material, a slight increase in saturated fatty acids and a slight decrease in polyunsaturated fatty acids were observed in all silages. At the end of the storage period, the aerobic bacteria counts after applying Methods FA, FASA, LP and ST amounted to 2.35, 2.39, 5.77 and 5.43 log cfu/g, respectively. The analysis of thiobarbituric acid revealed that acidification of silages accelerated the lipid oxidation. Nine biogenic amines were found in raw fish and different silages. The initial histamine concentration in raw fish was 0.17 mg/100 g and in all silages it remained at low levels during the storage period. The initial tyramine content was found to be 1.56 mg/100 g in raw fish and increased significantly in all silages. The increase of the tyramine content in fermented silages was considerably higher than in acidified silages (23-48 mg/100 g and 5-10 mg/100 g, respectively). It can be concluded that acidified or fermented fish silage should be considered as potential feed component for animals because of its high nutritional value and appropriate microbiological and chemical quality. PMID:26635094

  20. Does road salting confound the recovery of the microcrustacean community in an acidified lake?

    PubMed

    Jensen, Thomas Correll; Meland, Sondre; Schartau, Ann Kristin; Walseng, Bjørn

    2014-04-15

    Numerous boreal lakes across the Northern Hemisphere recovering from acidification are experiencing a simultaneous increase in chloride (Cl) concentrations from road salting. Increasing Cl may have profound effects on the lake ecosystem. We examine if an increase in Cl from road salting has modified the recovery of the microcrustacean community in an acidified boreal lake undergoing chemical recovery (study lake). Results from the study lake were compared with an acidified "reference lake". The community changed during the study period in the study lake mainly driven by the reduction in acidification pressure. Despite the community changes and an increase in species richness, the absence of several acid sensitive species, previously occurring in the lake, indicates a delayed biological recovery relative to the chemical recovery. Moreover, changes in occurrence of acid sensitive and acid tolerant species indicated that the biological recovery was slower in the study lake compared to the "reference". Although recurrent episodes of high aluminum and low pH and decreasing Ca are likely important factors for the delay, these do not explain, for instance, the shift from Cyclops scutifer to Bosmina longispina in the study lake. Although the contribution of Cl was not significant, the correlation between Cl and the variation in microcrustacean community was twice as high in the study lake compared to the "reference". We argue that small, sheltered forest lakes may be especially sensitive to increased Cl levels, through changes in pattern of stratification, thus providing a mechanism for the shift from C. scutifer to B. longispina. The reduction of the acidification pressure seems to override the Cl effects on microcrustaceans at low Cl levels in salt-affected lakes recovering from acidification. However, prognoses for growing traffic and increasing road salting raise concern for many recovering lakes located in proximity to roads and urbanized areas. PMID:24530583

  1. Eubiotic effect of a dietary acidifier (potassium diformate) on the health status of cultured Oreochromis niloticus.

    PubMed

    Abu Elala, Nermeen M; Ragaa, Naela M

    2015-07-01

    In connection with the global demand for safe human food and the production of environmentally friendly aquaculture products, acidifiers are natural organic acids and salts that have received considerable attention as animal-feed additives. The current study was designed to evaluate the effects of potassium diformate (KDF) on the growth performance and immunity of cultured Oreochromis niloticus (O. niloticus). Four iso-nitrogenous and iso-caloric rations containing graded levels of KDF, including 0% (control basal diet), 0.1%, 0.2% and 0.3%, were fed separately to four equal fish groups (30 fish/group with an initial body weight of 53.49 ± 6.15 g) for sixty days. At the end of the experimental period, the fish groups fed on 0.2% and 0.3% KDF exhibited significant improvements in their feed intake, live weight gain, specific growth rate, feed conversion ratio and protein efficiency ratio, with concomitant improvement of their apparent protein digestibility (p < 0.05). Dietary supplementation of 0.3% KDF appeared to stimulate the beneficial intestinal flora; a proliferation was observed of indigenous probionts (Eubiosis) associated with the relative activation of cellular and humeral innate immunity (phagocytic activity/index, nitroblue tetrazolium reduction test and serum/gut mucous lysozyme activity). The cumulative mortality of the fish groups fed on KDF and challenged orally with Aeromonas hydrophila was lower than that of the control group. The resistance against diseases increased with dietary KDF in a dose-dependent manner. Thus, we conclude that the use of acidifiers can be an efficient tool to achieve sustainable, economical and safe fish production. PMID:26199753

  2. Comparison of the effects of thermal stress and CO₂-driven acidified seawater on fertilization in coral Acropora digitifera.

    PubMed

    Iguchi, Akira; Suzuki, Atsushi; Sakai, Kazuhiko; Nojiri, Yukihiro

    2015-08-01

    Global warming (GW) and ocean acidification (OA) have been recognized as severe threats for reef-building corals that support coral reef ecosystems, but these effects on the early life history stage of corals are relatively unknown compared with the effects on calcification of adult corals. In this study, we evaluated the effects of thermal stress and CO2-driven acidified seawater on fertilization in a reef-building coral, Acropora digitifera. The fertilization rates of A. digitifera decreased in response to thermal stress compared with those under normal seawater conditions. In contrast, the changes of fertilization rates were not evident in the acidified seawater. Generalized Linear Mixed Model (GLMM) predicted that sperm/egg crosses and temperature were explanatory variables in the best-fitted model for the fertilization data. In the best model, interactions between thermal stress and acidified seawater on the fertilization rates were not selected. Our results suggested that coral fertilization is more sensitive to future GW than OA. Taking into consideration the previous finding that sperm motility of A. digitifera was decreased by acidified seawater, the decrease in coral cover followed by that of sperm concentration might cause the interacting effects of GW and OA on coral fertilization. PMID:24847859

  3. Trends in Surface Water Chemistry in Acidified Areas in Europe and North America from 1990 to 2008

    EPA Science Inventory

    Acidification of lakes and rivers is still an environmental concern despite reduced emissions of acidifying compounds. We analyzed trends in surface water chemistry of 173 acid-sensitive sites from 12 regions in Europe and North America. In 11 of 12 regions, non-marine sulphate (...

  4. Preservation of acidified cucumbers with a combination of fumaric acid and cinnamaldehyde that target lactic acid bacteria and yeasts

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The naturally occurring compound, fumaric acid, was evaluated as a potential preservative for the long-term storage of cucumbers. Fumaric acid inhibited growth of lactic acid bacteria (LAB) in an acidified cucumber juice medium model system resembling conditions that could allow preservation of cucu...

  5. Nitrogen removal via nitrite from municipal landfill leachate.

    PubMed

    Wu, Lina; Peng, Chengyao; Zhang, Shujun; Peng, Yongzhen

    2009-01-01

    A system consisting of a two-stage up-flow anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB), an anoxic/aerobic (A/O) reactor and a sequencing batch reactor (SBR), was used to treat landfill leachate. During operation, denitrification and methanogenesis took place simultaneously in the first stage UASB, and the effluent chemical oxygen demand (COD) was further removed in the second stage UASB. Then the denitrification of nitrite and nitrate in the returned sludge by using the residual COD was accomplished in the A/O reactor, and ammonia was removed via nitrite in it. Last but not least, the residual ammonia was removed in SBR as well as nitrite and nitrate which were produced by nitrification. The results over 120 d (60 d for phase I and 60 d for phase II) were as follows: when the total nitrogen (TN) concentration of influent leachate was about 2500 mg/L and the ammonia nitrogen concentration was about 2000 mg/L, the short-cut nitrification with 85%-90% nitrite accumulation was achieved stably in the A/O reactor. The TN and ammonia nitrogen removal efficiencies of the system were 98% and 97%, respectively. The residual ammonia, nitrite and nitrate produced during nitrification in the A/O reactor could be washed out almost completely in SBR. The TN and ammonia nitrogen concentrations of final effluent were about 39 mg/L and 12 mg/L, respectively. PMID:20108678

  6. Impacts of Nitrate and Nitrite on Physiology of Shewanella oneidensis

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Haiyan; Fu, Huihui; Wang, Jixuan; Sun, Linlin; Jiang, Yaoming; Zhang, Lili; Gao, Haichun

    2013-01-01

    Shewanella oneidensis exhibits a remarkable versatility in anaerobic respiration, which largely relies on its diverse respiratory pathways. Some of these are expressed in response to the existence of their corresponding electron acceptors (EAs) under aerobic conditions. However, little is known about respiration and the impact of non-oxygen EAs on the physiology of the microorganism when oxygen is present. Here we undertook a study to elucidate the basis for nitrate and nitrite inhibition of growth under aerobic conditions. We discovered that nitrate in the form of NaNO3 exerts its inhibitory effects as a precursor to nitrite at low concentrations and as an osmotic-stress provider (Na+) at high concentrations. In contrast, nitrite is extremely toxic, with 25 mM abolishing growth completely. We subsequently found that oxygen represses utilization of all EAs but nitrate. To order to utilize EAs with less positive redox potential, such as nitrite and fumarate, S. oneidensis must enter the stationary phase, when oxygen respiration becomes unfavorable. In addition, we demonstrated that during aerobic respiration the cytochrome bd oxidase confers S. oneidensis resistance to nitrite, which likely functions via nitric oxide (NO). PMID:23626841

  7. Nitrite as regulator of hypoxic signaling in mammalian physiology

    PubMed Central

    van Faassen, Ernst E.; Bahrami, Soheyl; Feelisch, Martin; Hogg, Neil; Kelm, Malte; Kim-Shapiro, Daniel B.; Kozlov, Andrey V.; Li, Haitao; Lundberg, Jon O.; Mason, Ron; Nohl, Hans; Rassaf, Tienush; Samouilov, Alexandre; Slama-Schwok, Anny; Shiva, Sruti; Vanin, Anatoly F.; Weitzberg, Eddie; Zweier, Jay; Gladwin, Mark T.

    2009-01-01

    In this review we consider the physiological effects of endogenous and pharmacological levels of nitrite under conditions of hypoxia. In humans, the nitrite anion has long been considered as metastable intermediate in the oxidation of nitric oxide radicals to the stable metabolite nitrate. This oxidation cascade was thought to be irreversible under physiological conditions. However, a growing body of experimental observations attests that the presence of endogenous nitrite regulates a number of signaling events along the physiological and pathophysiological oxygen gradient. Hypoxic signaling events include vasodilation, modulation of mitochondrial respiration, and cytoprotection following ischemic insult. These phenomena are attributed to the reduction of nitrite anions to nitric oxide if local oxygen levels in tissues decrease. Recent research identified a growing list of enzymatic and non-enzymatic pathways for this endogenous reduction of nitrite. Additional direct signaling events not involving free nitric oxide are proposed. We here discuss the mechanisms and properties of these various pathways and the role played by the local concentration of free oxygen in the affected tissue. PMID:19219851

  8. High Sodium Simulant Testing To Support SB8 Sludge Preparation

    SciTech Connect

    Newell, J. D.

    2012-09-19

    Scoping studies were completed for high sodium simulant SRAT/SME cycles to determine any impact to CPC processing. Two SRAT/SME cycles were performed with simulant having sodium supernate concentration of 1.9M at 130% and 100% of the Koopman Minimum Acid requirement. Both of these failed to meet DWPF processing objectives related to nitrite destruction and hydrogen generation. Another set of SRAT/SME cycles were performed with simulant having a sodium supernate concentration of 1.6M at 130%, 125%, 110%, and 100% of the Koopman Minimum Acid requirement. Only the run at 110% met DWPF processing objectives. Neither simulant had a stoichiometric factor window of 30% between nitrite destruction and excessive hydrogen generation. Based on the 2M-110 results it was anticipated that the 2.5M stoichiometric window for processing would likely be smaller than from 110-130%, since it appeared that it would be necessary to increase the KMA factor by at least 10% above the minimum calculated requirement to achieve nitrite destruction due to the high oxalate content. The 2.5M-130 run exceeded the DWPF hydrogen limits in both the SRAT and SME cycle. Therefore, testing of this wash endpoint was halted. This wash endpoint with this minimum acid requirement and mercury-noble metal concentration profile appears to be something DWPF should not process due to an overly narrow window of stoichiometry. The 2M case was potentially processable in DWPF, but modifications would likely be needed in DWPF such as occasionally accepting SRAT batches with undestroyed nitrite for further acid addition and reprocessing, running near the bottom of the as yet ill-defined window of allowable stoichiometric factors, potentially extending the SRAT cycle to burn off unreacted formic acid before transferring to the SME cycle, and eliminating formic acid additions in the frit slurry.

  9. Use of tocopherol extract and different nitrite sources and starter cultures in the production of organic botifarra catalana, a cooked cured sausage.

    PubMed

    Magrinyà, Núria; Bou, Ricard; Rius, Núria; Codony, Rafael; Guardiola, Francesc

    2016-04-01

    This research evaluates the effects of adding a tocopherol mix (0 or 200 mg/kg), two nitrite sources (sodium nitrite or a nitrate-rich vegetable concentrate) and the use ofStaphylococcus carnosustogether with fermentation types that varied in temperature (12 h at 4 ℃ or 16 ℃) on different quality parameters and acceptability of cooked cured sausages after vacuum packing and storage at 4 ℃ for 120 days. In the presence ofS. carnosus, residual nitrate and nitrite levels were reduced. Sausages containing vegetable concentrates and withoutS. carnosusresulted in higher amounts of residual nitrate and lower curing efficiency. The lowest values in redness and acceptability were observed in those sausages without starter cultures. The addition of tocopherols had no effect on oxidative status and susceptibility to oxidation. However, the highest amount of hydroperoxides was related with nitrite decreased formation. Overall, vegetable concentrates can be used as curing agents if fermentation with a nitrate-reducing starter culture is allowed. PMID:25990636

  10. [Effect of various forms of diet on the nitrosation of sodium metamizole (analgin tablets) under simulated conditions of the human stomach].

    PubMed

    Ziebarth, D; Kuldmäe, L A

    1989-01-01

    The influence of a simple and a more complex diet on the formation of nitrosometamizole from sodium metamizole (analgin tablets) under simulated human gastric conditions was estimated with extremely different nitrite concentrations. Only with the complex diet and only with low nitrite concentrations, the formation of nitrosometamizole was distinctly lowered. The quantitative estimation of the formed amounts was done by a colorimetric method after extraction with dichloromethane. PMID:2719537

  11. Biological Nitrogen Removal through Nitritation Coupled with Thiosulfate-Driven Denitritation.

    PubMed

    Qian, Jin; Zhou, Junmei; Zhang, Zhen; Liu, Rulong; Wang, Qilin

    2016-01-01

    A novel biological nitrogen removal system based on nitritation coupled with thiosulfate-driven denitritation (Nitritation-TDD) was developed to achieve a high nitrogen removal rate and low sludge production. A nitritation sequential batch reactor (nitritation SBR) and an anoxic up-flow sludge bed (AnUSB) reactor were applied for effective nitritation and denitritation, respectively. Above 75% nitrite was accumulated in the nitritation SBR with an influent ammonia loading rate of 0.43 kg N/d/m(3). During Nitritation-TDD operation, particle sizes (d50) of the sludge decreased from 406 to 225 um in nitritation SBR and from 327-183 um in AnUSB reactor. Pyrosequencing tests revealed that ammonium-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) population was stabilized at approximately 7.0% (calculated as population of AOB-related genus divided by the total microbial population) in the nitritation SBR. In contrast, nitrite-oxidizing bacteria (NOB) population decreased from 6.5-0.6% over the same time, indicating the effective nitrite accumulation in the nitritation SBR. Thiobacillus, accounting for 34.2% in the AnUSB reactor, was mainly responsible for nitrogen removal via autotrophic denitritation, using an external source of thiosulfate as electron donor. Also, it was found that free nitrous acid could directly affect the denitritation activity. PMID:27272192

  12. Biological Nitrogen Removal through Nitritation Coupled with Thiosulfate-Driven Denitritation

    PubMed Central

    Qian, Jin; Zhou, Junmei; Zhang, Zhen; Liu, Rulong; Wang, Qilin

    2016-01-01

    A novel biological nitrogen removal system based on nitritation coupled with thiosulfate-driven denitritation (Nitritation-TDD) was developed to achieve a high nitrogen removal rate and low sludge production. A nitritation sequential batch reactor (nitritation SBR) and an anoxic up-flow sludge bed (AnUSB) reactor were applied for effective nitritation and denitritation, respectively. Above 75% nitrite was accumulated in the nitritation SBR with an influent ammonia loading rate of 0.43 kg N/d/m3. During Nitritation-TDD operation, particle sizes (d50) of the sludge decreased from 406 to 225 um in nitritation SBR and from 327–183 um in AnUSB reactor. Pyrosequencing tests revealed that ammonium-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) population was stabilized at approximately 7.0% (calculated as population of AOB-related genus divided by the total microbial population) in the nitritation SBR. In contrast, nitrite-oxidizing bacteria (NOB) population decreased from 6.5–0.6% over the same time, indicating the effective nitrite accumulation in the nitritation SBR. Thiobacillus, accounting for 34.2% in the AnUSB reactor, was mainly responsible for nitrogen removal via autotrophic denitritation, using an external source of thiosulfate as electron donor. Also, it was found that free nitrous acid could directly affect the denitritation activity. PMID:27272192

  13. Effect of the liquid upflow velocity on thermophilic sulphate reduction in acidifying granular sludge reactors.

    PubMed

    Lens, P N; Korthout, D; van Lier, J B; Hulshoff Pol, L W; Lettinga, G

    2001-02-01

    The effect of the superficial liquid upflow velocity on the acidifying and sulfate reducing capacity of thermophilic (55 degrees C; pH 6.0) granular sludge bed reactors treating partly acidified wastewater was investigated. A comparison was made between a UASB and an EGSB reactor, operated at an upflow velocity of 1 m.h-1 and 6.8 m.h-1, respectively. Both reactors were inoculated with a mixture of mesophilic sulphidogenic, thermophilic sulphidogenic and thermophilic methanogenic sludge (ratio 2:1:1). They were fed a synthetic wastewater containing starch, sucrose, lactate, propionate and acetate and a low sulphate concentration (COD/SO4(2-) ratio of 10). At the end of the experiment, the sulphate level of the influent was slightly increased to a COD/SO4(2-) ratio of 8. The reactors were operated at a hydraulic retention time of about 5 h and the imposed volumetric organic loading rates (OLR) ranged from 4.9 to 40.0 g COD l-1d-1. When imposing an OLR of 40.0 g COD l-1d-1, the acidification efficiency dropped to 80% and the sulphate reduction efficiency decreased to 50% in the UASB reactor. In the EGSB reactor, the sulphate reduction efficiency dropped to 30% directly following the OLR increase to 40 g COD l-1d-1, but recovered rapidly to 100% (at an OLR of 35 g COD l-1d-1) until the end of the experiment. In the UASB reactor, there was a net acetate and propionate production. At the higher organic loading rates, propionate was converted to n-butyrate and n-valerate. These back reactions did not occur in the EGSB reactor, in which an active methanogenic population developed, leading to a net acetate removal (up to 50%) and a high gas loading rate (up to 8.5 l l-1d-1). In both reactors, the effluent sulphide concentration was always below 200 mg l-1, of which about 90% was present as undissociated H2S (under the given conditions--pH 5.8-6.1 and 55 degrees C). The biogas (including CH4 and CO2) production rates in the UASB were very low, i.e. < 31 biogas l-1 reactor d

  14. Theoretical study on reaction mechanisms of nitrite reduction by copper nitrite complexes: toward understanding and controlling possible mechanisms of copper nitrite reductase.

    PubMed

    Maekawa, Shintaro; Matsui, Toru; Hirao, Kimihiko; Shigeta, Yasuteru

    2015-04-30

    Using density functional theory, we studied denitrification reaction mechanisms of copper adducts of tris(pyrazolyl)methane and hydrotris(pyrazolyl)borate models of a copper nitrite reductase (Cu-NiR), and herein propose several possible reaction pathways, including some parts that have never been examined previously. Because electron and proton transfer reactions participate in the enzymatic cycles of Cu-NiR, the Gibbs energy of a proton in solution, G(H(+)), and the redox potential, Eredox, of the model Cu-NiR are also evaluated. Although the pathway where a nitrite is provided as HNO2 is energetically preferable, a well-known reaction pathway passing through the resting state with an active site occupied by a water molecule where nitrite is provided as NO2(-) is the main recognized pathway under normal conditions. These features do not change whether the electron transfer occurs before production of NO or not. However, our results suggest that the pathway involving HNO2 might become dominant under low pH conditions in conjunction with experimental results. PMID:25845517

  15. Neurotoxicity induced by alkyl nitrites: Impairment in learning/memory and motor coordination.

    PubMed

    Cha, Hye Jin; Kim, Yun Ji; Jeon, Seo Young; Kim, Young-Hoon; Shin, Jisoon; Yun, Jaesuk; Han, Kyoungmoon; Park, Hye-Kyung; Kim, Hyung Soo

    2016-04-21

    Although alkyl nitrites are used as recreational drugs, there is only little research data regarding their effects on the central nervous system including their neurotoxicity. This study investigated the neurotoxicity of three representative alkyl nitrites (isobutyl nitrite, isoamyl nitrite, and butyl nitrite), and whether it affected learning/memory function and motor coordination in rodents. Morris water maze test was performed in mice after administrating the mice with varying doses of the substances in two different injection schedules of memory acquisition and memory retention. A rota-rod test was then performed in rats. All tested alkyl nitrites lowered the rodents' capacity for learning and memory, as assessed by both the acquisition and retention tests. The results of the rota-rod test showed that isobutyl nitrite in particular impaired motor coordination in chronically treated rats. The mice chronically injected with isoamyl nitrite also showed impaired function, while butyl nitrite had no significant effect. The results of the water maze test suggest that alkyl nitrites may impair learning and memory. Additionally, isoamyl nitrite affected the rodents' motor coordination ability. Collectively, our findings suggest that alkyl nitrites may induce neurotoxicity, especially on the aspect of learning and memory function. PMID:26971703

  16. Metabolic Interactions between Spinach Leaf Nitrite Reductase and Ferredoxin-NADP Reductase

    PubMed Central

    Baysdorfer, Chris; Robinson, J. Michael

    1985-01-01

    Steady state rates of NADP reduction decline upon commencement of nitrite reduction in reconstituted chloroplast preparations. Similarly, steady state rates of nitrite reduction are lower, but not zero, during concurrent NADP reduction. These results imply that competition for substrate occurs and suggest that nitrite reduction can successfully compete for reduced ferredoxin, even at high rates of NADP reduction. PMID:16664050

  17. Investigation of the Reaction of Myosmine with Sodium Nitrite in vitro and in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Hecht, Stephen S.; Han, Shaomei; Kenney, Patrick M.J.; Wang, Mingyao; Lindgren, Bruce; Wang, Yong; Lao, Yanbin; Hochalter, J. Bradley; Upadhyaya, Pramod

    2008-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that the minor tobacco alkaloid myosmine (5) reacts with NaNO2 in the presence of acid to yield 4-hydroxy-1-(3-pyridyl)-1-butanone (HPB, 8) via 4-(3- pyridyl)-4-oxobutanediazohydroxide (7). Intermediate 7 is also formed in the metabolism of the tobacco-specific nitrosamines N′-nitrosonornicotine (NNN, 1) and 4-(methylnitrosamino)-1-(3- pyridyl)-1-butanone (NNK, 2), resulting in pyridyloxobutylation of DNA and Hb. These pyridyloxobutyl adducts can be quantified by analyzing HPB released upon acid treatment of DNA or base treatment of Hb. Quantitation of HPB-releasing DNA and Hb adducts has been used to assess the metabolic activation of NNN and NNK in smokers and smokeless tobacco users. Since myosmine is found in the diet as well as in tobacco products, it has been suggested that nitrosation of myosmine could lead to the formation of HPB-releasing adducts in people not exposed to tobacco products. We investigated the nitrosation of myosmine in vitro and in vivo in rats. Reaction of myosmine with NaNO2 under acidic conditions produced HPB, as previously reported. A new product was identified as 3′-oximinomyosmine (11) based on its spectral properties. NNN was not detected. Groups of rats were treated with NNN, NNK, myosmine, NaNO2, or combinations of myosmine and NaNO2. HPB-releasing Hb and DNA adducts were clearly detected in the rats treated with NNN or NNK, but we found no evidence for production of these adducts from the combination of myosmine plus NaNO2. The results of this study do not support the hypothesis that exposure to dietary myosmine could lead to HPB-releasing DNA or Hb adducts in humans. PMID:17291014

  18. Influence of sodium nitrite on protein oxidation and nitrosation of sausages subjected to processing and storage.

    PubMed

    Feng, Xianchao; Li, Chenyi; Jia, Xu; Guo, Yan; Lei, Na; Hackman, Robert M; Chen, Lin; Zhou, Guanghong

    2016-06-01

    The influence of NaNO2 content on protein oxidation and nitrosation was investigated in cooked sausages at different concentrations (0, 50, 100, 200 and 400mg NaNO2/kg). Dependent on concentration, NaNO2 had both anti- and pro-oxidant effects on protein oxidation. The antioxidant effects of NaNO2 on the protein oxidation were evidenced by significantly lower carbonyl contents, higher free amines and lower surface hydrophobicities. The pro-oxidant effects of NaNO2 on protein oxidation resulted in a decrease of sulfhydryls and an increase of disulfide bonds. NaNO2 also improved the protein nitrosation inducing the formation of 3-nitrotyrosine (3-NT). Moreover, 3-NT had significant correlations with parameters of protein oxidation, indicating that 3-NT may be a possible marker for protein oxidation. Results of this study contribute to an understanding of the impact of NaNO2 on food quality and help to identify optimal formulations of cured meat products. PMID:26923991

  19. 78 FR 39316 - Sodium Nitrite From China and Germany; Institution of Five-Year Reviews

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-01

    ... Germany (73 FR 50593 and 73 FR 50595). The Commission is conducting reviews to determine whether... employment statute for Federal employees, and Commission rule 201.15(b) (19 CFR 201.15(b)), 73 FR 24609 (May.... See 76 FR 61937 (Oct. 6, 2011) and the newly revised Commission's Handbook on E-Filing, available...

  20. An efficient non-mediated amperometric biosensor for nitrite determination.

    PubMed

    Silveira, Célia M; Gomes, Sofia P; Araújo, Alberto N; Montenegro, M Conceição B S M; Todorovic, Smilja; Viana, Ana S; Silva, Rui J C; Moura, José J G; Almeida, M Gabriela

    2010-05-15

    In this paper we propose the construction of a new non-mediated electrochemical biosensor for nitrite determination in complex samples. The device is based on the stable and selective cytochrome c nitrite reductase (ccNiR) from Desulfovibrio desulfuricans, which has both high turnover and heterogeneous electron transfer rates. In opposition to previous efforts making use of several redox mediators, in this work we exploited the capacity of ccNiR to display a direct electrochemical response when interacting with pyrolytic graphite (PG) surfaces. To enable the analytical application of such bioelectrode the protein was successfully incorporated within a porous silica glass made by the sol-gel process. In the presence of nitrite, the ccNiR/sol-gel/PG electrode promptly displays catalytic currents indicating that the entrapped ccNiR molecules are reduced via direct electron transfer. This result is noteworthy since the protein molecules are caged inside a non-conductive silica network, in the absence of any mediator species or electron relay. At optimal conditions, the minimum detectable concentration is 120 nM. The biosensor sensitivity is 430 mA M(-1) cm(-2) within a linear range of 0.25-50 microM, keeping a stable response up to two weeks. The analysis of nitrites in freshwaters using the method of standard addition was highly accurated. PMID:20188536

  1. Ammonia and nitrite oxidation in the Eastern Tropical North Pacific

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Xuefeng; Fuchsman, Clara A.; Jayakumar, Amal; Oleynik, Sergey; Martens-Habbena, Willm; Devol, Allan H.; Ward, Bess B.

    2015-12-01

    Nitrification plays a key role in the marine nitrogen (N) cycle, including in oceanic oxygen minimum zones (OMZs), which are hot spots for denitrification and anaerobic ammonia oxidation (anammox). Recent evidence suggests that nitrification links the source (remineralized organic matter) and sink (denitrification and anammox) of fixed N directly in the steep oxycline in the OMZs. We performed shipboard incubations with 15N tracers to characterize the depth distribution of nitrification in the Eastern Tropical North Pacific (ETNP). Additional experiments were conducted to investigate photoinhibition. Allylthiourea (ATU) was used to distinguish the contribution of archaeal and bacterial ammonia oxidation. The abundance of archaeal and β-proteobacterial ammonia monooxygenase gene subunit A (amoA) was determined by quantitative polymerase chain reaction. The rates of ammonia and nitrite oxidation showed distinct subsurface maxima, with the latter slightly deeper than the former. The ammonia oxidation maximum coincided with the primary nitrite concentration maximum, archaeal amoA gene maximum, and the subsurface nitrous oxide maximum. Negligible rates of ammonia oxidation were found at anoxic depths, where high rates of nitrite oxidation were measured. Archaeal amoA gene abundance was generally 1 to 2 orders of magnitude higher than bacterial amoA gene abundance, and inhibition of ammonia-oxidizing bacteria with 10 μM ATU did not affect ammonia oxidation rates, indicating the dominance of archaea in ammonia oxidation. These results depict highly dynamic activities of ammonia and nitrite oxidation in the oxycline of the ETNP OMZ.

  2. Nitrate metabolism in tobacco leaves overexpressing Arabidopsis nitrite reductase.

    PubMed

    Davenport, Susie; Le Lay, Pascaline; Sanchez-Tamburrrino, Juan Pablo

    2015-12-01

    Primary nitrogen assimilation in plants includes the reduction of nitrite to ammonium in the chloroplasts by the enzyme nitrite reductase (NiR EC:1.7.7.1) or in the plastids of non-photosynthetic organs. Here we report on a study overexpressing the Arabidopsis thaliana NiR (AtNiR) gene in tobacco plants under the control of a constitutive promoter (CERV - Carnation Etched Ring Virus). The aim was to overexpress AtNiR in an attempt to alter the level of residual nitrite in the leaf which can act as precursor to the formation of nitrosamines. The impact of increasing the activity of AtNiR produced an increase in leaf protein and a stay-green phenotype in the primary transformed AtNiR population. Investigation of the T1 homozygous population demonstrated elevated nitrate reductase (NR) activity, reductions in leaf nitrite and nitrate and the amino acids proline, glutamine and glutamate. Chlorophyl content of the transgenic lines was increased, as evidenced by the stay-green phenotype. This reveals the importance of NiR in primary nitrogen assimilation and how modification of this key enzyme affects both the nitrogen and carbon metabolism of tobacco plants. PMID:26447683

  3. ACUTE TOXICITY OF AMMONIA AND NITRITE TO CUTTHROAT TROUT FRY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The toxicity of ammonia and of nitrite was tested on cutthroat trout (Salmo clarki) fry (1-3 g) for periods up to a month in eight laboratory flow-through bioassays. Median lethal concentration (LC50) values for ammonia (mg/liter un-ionized NH3) were 0.5-0.8 for 96 hours, and 0.3...

  4. Nitrite as an antidote for acute hydrogen sulfide intoxication

    SciTech Connect

    Beck, J.F.; Bradbury, C.M.; Connors, A.J.; Donini, J.C.

    1981-11-01

    The detoxification of hydrogen sulfide (H/sub 2/S) by a heme catalyzed oxidation was examined as part of an on-going study of H/sub 2/S toxicity. Interlocking O/sub 2/ absorption and sulfide depletion data indicate that both oxyhemoglobin and methemoglobin are effective catalytic agents. Although the latter is more efficacious, the life time of excess sulfide in the presence of oxygen and either of the above is of the order of minutes. It has also been established that the formation of methemoglobin following nitrite administration occurs preferentially under oxygen poor conditions. Under an atmospheric or oxygen enriched environment, which favors sulfide depletion, the nitrite retards sulfide oxidation. Thus nitrite as an antidote for acute H/sub 2/S intoxication can only be effective within the first few minutes after the exposure, at which time resuscitation and/or ventilation of the victim is likely to produce conditions in which the nitrite actually slows sulfide removal.

  5. One-stage partial nitritation and anammox in membrane bioreactor.

    PubMed

    Huang, Xiaowu; Sun, Kaihang; Wei, Qiaoyan; Urata, Kohei; Yamashita, Yuki; Hong, Nian; Hama, Takehide; Kawagoshi, Yasunori

    2016-06-01

    Partial nitritation and anammox (PN/A) was applied in a lab-scale membrane bioreactor (MBR) to investigate its technical feasibility for treating ammonium-rich wastewater with low C/N ratio. The bacterial community was analyzed by molecular cloning and 16S rRNA sequence analysis. Partial nitritation (PN) was first realized in MBR by seeding aerobic activated sludge. With dissolved oxygen control, a steady effluent mixture with NO2 (-)-N/NH4 (+)-N ratio of 1.13 ± 0.08 was generated from the PN process. Subsequently, the MBR was seeded with anammox biomass on day 59. After running 300 days, the one-stage PN/A achieved a maximum nitrogen removal rate of 1.45 kg N/m(3)/day at the nitrogen removal efficiency of 89.5 %. Microbial community analysis revealed that Nitrosomonas sp. HKU and Nitrosospira sp. YKU corresponded to nitritation; meanwhile, Candidatus Brocadia TKU sp. accounted for nitrogen removal of the PN/A system. Specifically, Nitrosomonas sp. were enriched in the reactor at the PN/A phase and then conquered Nitrosospira sp. to be the predominant ammonia oxidizers. Nitrite oxidizers and denitrifiers were detected in symbiosis with aforementioned microbes. Denitrification promised potential plus nitrogen depletion. The present one-stage PN/A process allows a significant decrease in operational costs compared with classical nitrification/denitrification. PMID:26916267

  6. Low sodium level

    MedlinePlus

    Low sodium level is a condition in which the amount of sodium (salt) in the blood is lower than normal. The ... Sodium is found mostly in the body fluids outside the cells. It is very important for maintaining ...

  7. Organic tank safety project: Preliminary results of energetics and thermal behavior studies of model organic nitrate and/or nitrite mixtures and a simulated organic waste

    SciTech Connect

    Scheele, R.D.; Sell, R.L.; Sobolik, J.L.; Burger, L.L.

    1995-08-01

    As a result of years of production and recovery of nuclear defense materials and subsequent waste management at the Hanford Site, organic-bearing radioactive high-level wastes (HLW) are currently stored in large (up to 3. ML) single-shell storage tanks (SSTs). Because these wastes contain both fuels (organics) and the oxidants nitrate and nitrite, rapid energetic reactions at certain conditions could occur. In support of Westinghouse Hanford Company`s (WHC) efforts to ensure continued safe storage of these organic- and oxidant-bearing wastes and to define the conditions necessary for reactions to occur, we measured the thermal sensitivities and thermochemical and thermokinetic properties of mixtures of selected organics and sodium nitrate and/or nitrite and a simulated Hanford organic-bearing waste using thermoanalytical technologies. These thermoanalytical technologies are used by chemical reactivity hazards evaluation organizations within the chemical industry to assess chemical reaction hazards.

  8. Salt in the wound: The interfering effect of road salt on acidified forest catchments.

    PubMed

    Schweiger, Andreas H; Audorff, Volker; Beierkuhnlein, Carl

    2015-11-01

    Atmospheric acidic depositions have strongly altered the functioning and biodiversity of Central European forest ecosystems. Most impacts occurred until the end of the 20(th) century but the situation substantially improved thereafter caused by legal regulations in the late 1980's to reduce acidifying atmospheric pollution. Since then slow recovery from acidification has been observed in forested catchments and adjacent waters. However, trends of recovery are inconsistent and underlying mechanisms diminishing recovery are still poorly understood. We propose that the input of road salt can significantly affect acidity regime and acidification recovery of forest ecosystems. By comparing the discharge hydro-chemistry and plant community composition of springs fed by forested catchments with and without high levels of salt input over two decades we observed a significant suppression of recovery and elevated levels of nutrient leaching (K(+), Ca(2+) and Mg(2+)) in highly salt contaminated catchments. We show that the pollution of near-surface groundwater (interflow) by road salt application can have lasting effects on ecosystem processes over distances of several hundred metres apart from the salt emitting road. PMID:26115338

  9. Juvenile Antarctic rockcod (Trematomus bernacchii) are physiologically robust to CO2-acidified seawater.

    PubMed

    Davis, Brittany E; Miller, Nathan A; Flynn, Erin E; Todgham, Anne E

    2016-04-15

    To date, numerous studies have shown negative impacts of CO2-acidified seawater (i.e. ocean acidification, OA) on marine organisms, including calcifying invertebrates and fishes; however, limited research has been conducted on the physiological effects of OA on polar fishes and even less on the impact of OA on early developmental stages of polar fishes. We evaluated aspects of aerobic metabolism and cardiorespiratory physiology of juvenile emerald rockcod, ITALIC! Trematomus bernacchii, an abundant fish in the Ross Sea, Antarctica, to elevated partial pressure of carbon dioxide ( ITALIC! PCO2 ) [420 (ambient), 650 (moderate) and 1050 (high) μatm ITALIC! PCO2 ] over a 1 month period. We examined cardiorespiratory physiology, including heart rate, stroke volume, cardiac output and ventilation rate, whole organism metabolism via oxygen consumption rate and sub-organismal aerobic capacity by citrate synthase enzyme activity. Juvenile fish showed an increase in ventilation rate under high ITALIC! PCO2 compared with ambient ITALIC! PCO2 , whereas cardiac performance, oxygen consumption and citrate synthase activity were not significantly affected by elevated ITALIC! PCO2 Acclimation time had a significant effect on ventilation rate, stroke volume, cardiac output and citrate synthase activity, such that all metrics increased over the 4 week exposure period. These results suggest that juvenile emerald rockcod are robust to near-future increases in OA and may have the capacity to adjust for future increases in ITALIC! PCO2  by increasing acid-base compensation through increased ventilation. PMID:26944503

  10. Experiments and modeling of variably permeable carbonate reservoir samples in contact with CO₂-acidified brines

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, Megan M.; Hao, Yue; Mason, Harris E.; Carroll, Susan A.

    2014-12-31

    Reactive experiments were performed to expose sample cores from the Arbuckle carbonate reservoir to CO₂-acidified brine under reservoir temperature and pressure conditions. The samples consisted of dolomite with varying quantities of calcite and silica/chert. The timescales of monitored pressure decline across each sample in response to CO₂ exposure, as well as the amount of and nature of dissolution features, varied widely among these three experiments. For all samples cores, the experimentally measured initial permeability was at least one order of magnitude or more lower than the values estimated from downhole methods. Nondestructive X-ray computed tomography (XRCT) imaging revealed dissolution features including “wormholes,” removal of fracture-filling crystals, and widening of pre-existing pore spaces. In the injection zone sample, multiple fractures may have contributed to the high initial permeability of this core and restricted the distribution of CO₂-induced mineral dissolution. In contrast, the pre-existing porosity of the baffle zone sample was much lower and less connected, leading to a lower initial permeability and contributing to the development of a single dissolution channel. While calcite may make up only a small percentage of the overall sample composition, its location and the effects of its dissolution have an outsized effect on permeability responses to CO₂ exposure. The XRCT data presented here are informative for building the model domain for numerical simulations of these experiments but require calibration by higher resolution means to confidently evaluate different porosity-permeability relationships.

  11. Transplanted aquatic mosses for monitoring trace metal mobilization in acidified streams of the Vosges Mountains, France

    SciTech Connect

    Mersch, J.; Guerold, F.; Rousselle, P.; Pihan, J.C. )

    1993-08-01

    As a result of acid depositions, trace metals are mobilized from the soils to the aquatic environment. Especially in poorly mineralized waters, elevated metal concentrations may rapidly have adverse effects on aquatic organisms. In particular, it has been shown that aluminium, a key element in the acidification process, is a toxic cofactor for fish and other biota. An accurate assessment of this specific form of water pollution may not be possible when only based on analyses of single water samples. On the one hand, water metal concentrations are often close to the detection limit of usual analytical techniques, and on the other hand, levels in acidified streams undergo strong temporal variations caused by acid pulses following meteorological events such as heavy rainfall and snowmelt. Compared to water analyses, indirect monitoring methods provide undeniable advantages for assessing water contamination. Aquatic bryophytes, in particular, have been regarded as interesting indicator organisms for trace metal pollution. However, their use has mainly been restricted to the lower course of streams for evaluating the impact of industrial discharges. The purpose of this study was to test the suitability of transplanted aquatic mosses for monitoring aluminium and four other trace metals (copper, iron, lead and zinc) in the particular context of acidifed streams draining a forested headwater catchment. 15 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  12. Complex Responses of Intertidal Molluscan Embryos to a Warming and Acidifying Ocean in the Presence of UV Radiation

    PubMed Central

    Davis, Andrew R.; Coleman, Daniel; Broad, Allison; Byrne, Maria; Dworjanyn, Symon A.; Przeslawski, Rachel

    2013-01-01

    Climate change and ocean acidification will expose marine organisms to synchronous multiple stressors, with early life stages being potentially most vulnerable to changing environmental conditions. We simultaneously exposed encapsulated molluscan embryos to three abiotic stressors—acidified conditions, elevated temperate, and solar UV radiation in large outdoor water tables in a multifactorial design. Solar UV radiation was modified with plastic filters, while levels of the other factors reflected IPCC predictions for near-future change. We quantified mortality and the rate of embryonic development for a mid-shore littorinid, Bembicium nanum, and low-shore opisthobranch, Dolabrifera brazieri. Outcomes were consistent for these model species with embryos faring significantly better at 26°C than 22°C. Mortality sharply increased at the lowest temperature (22°C) and lowest pH (7.6) examined, producing a significant interaction. Under these conditions mortality approached 100% for each species, representing a 2- to 4-fold increase in mortality relative to warm (26°C) non-acidified conditions. Predictably, development was more rapid at the highest temperature but this again interacted with acidified conditions. Development was slowed under acidified conditions at the lowest temperature. The presence of UV radiation had minimal impact on the outcomes, only slowing development for the littorinid and not interacting with the other factors. Our findings suggest that a warming ocean, at least to a threshold, may compensate for the effects of decreasing pH for some species. It also appears that stressors will interact in complex and unpredictable ways in a changing climate. PMID:23405238

  13. Evaluation of an experimental sodium chlorate product, with and without nitroethane, on Salmonella in cull dairy cattle

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Ruminant animals are natural reservoirs for Salmonella. These bacteria can reduce nitrate to nitrite through the membrane bound enzyme nitrate reductase which also has the ability to reduce chlorate to the cytotoxic end-product chlorite. An experimental product containing sodium chlorate (ECP) has...

  14. [Effects of simulated acid rain and its acidified soil on soluble sugar and nitrogen contents of wheat seedlings].

    PubMed

    Tong, Guanhe; Liang, Huiling

    2005-08-01

    The study showed that the cation release of simulated rain caused soil acidification and base ions release. With the decrease of simulated acid rain pH from 5.6 to 2.5, the acid rain-leached soil pH decreased from 6.06 to 3.41, and its total amount of exchange base ions decreased from 56.5 to 41.1 mmol x kg(-1). Spraying simulated acid rain on the shoots of wheat seedlings planted on such acidified soils caused a rapid decrease in the soluble sugar and nitrogen contents of wheat seedlings, and reduced some of their physiological activities. The effect of spraying simulated acid rain on the soluble sugar, nitrogen, and chlorophyll contents and photosynthetic rate of wheat stems and leaves was larger than that of acidified soil, while the effect of the latter on the soluble sugar and nitrogen contents and the physiological activity of NR and GOGAT in root system of wheat seedlings was larger than that of the former. The intensive acid rain of pH < or = 3.0 and the corresponding acidified soil had an obvious harm to the growth and physiological activity of wheat seedlings. PMID:16262064

  15. An acidified thermostabilizing mini-peptide derived from the carboxyl extension of the larger isoform of the plant Rubisco activase.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Mengru; Li, Xujuan; Yang, Yumei; Luo, Zhu; Liu, Chang; Gong, Ming; Zou, Zhurong

    2015-10-20

    Thermostable fusion peptide partners are valuable in engineering thermostability in proteins. We evaluated the Arabidopsis counterpart (AtRAce) and an acidified derivative (mRAce) of the conserved carboxyl extension (RAce) of plant Rubisco activase (RCA) for their thermostabilizing properties in Escherichia coli and Saccharomyces cerevisiae using a protein fusion strategy. We used AtRAce and mRAce as fusion tails for the thermolabile protein RCA2 from Arabidopsis thaliana and Nicotiana tabacum. The homologous fusion of AtRAce with Arabidopsis RCA2 and the heterologous fusion of AtRAce with tobacco RCA2 increased the thermostability of both proteins. The acidified derivative mRAce conferred greater thermostability upon both proteins as compared with AtRAce. Moreover, mRAce enhanced the thermostability of other two thermolabile proteins from Jatropha curcas: the cytosolic ascorbate peroxidase 1 (JcAPX1) and the TATA-box binding protein isoform 1 (JcTBP1). We further report - for the first time - that JcTBP1 mediates heat tolerance in vivo in yeast. Thus, our study identifies a C-terminal acidic mini-peptide - the acidified derivative mRAce - with potential uses in improving the thermostability of heat-labile proteins and their associated heat tolerance in host organisms. PMID:26321073

  16. Retention and leaching of nitrite by municipal solid waste incinerator bottom ash under the landfill circumstance.

    PubMed

    Yao, Jun; Kong, Qingna; Zhu, Huayue; Long, Yuyang; Shen, Dongsheng

    2015-01-01

    The retention and leaching of nitrite by municipal solid waste incinerator (MSWI) bottom ash could affect its migration in the landfill. In this study, the effect of the dosage of MSWI bottom ash as well as the variation of the landfill environmental parameters including pH, anions and organic matter on the nitrite retention and leaching behavior was investigated by batch experiments. The highest removal percentage (73.0%) of nitrite was observed when the dosage of MSWI bottom ash was 10 g L(-1) in 2 mg L(-1) nitrite solution. Further increase of the dosage would retard the retention, as the nitrite leaching from MSWI bottom ash was enhanced. The optimum retention of nitrite was observed when the pH was 5.0, while the leaching of nitrite showed a consistent reduction with the increase of pH. Besides, the presence of Cl(-), SO4(2)(-) and acetic acid could enhance the leaching of nitrite and mitigate the retention process. However, the retention of nitrite was enhanced by PO4(3)(-), which was probably due to the formation of the apatite, an active material for the adsorption of the nitrite. These results suggested that MSWI bottom ash could affect the migration of nitrite in the landfill, which was related to the variation of the landfill circumstance. PMID:25033242

  17. Effects of Certain Herbicides and Their Combinations on Nitrate and Nitrite Reduction 1

    PubMed Central

    Klepper, Lowell A.

    1979-01-01

    A study was made concerning the effect of various herbicides, when used alone or in combination, on nitrite accumulation in excised leaves of wheat (Triticum aestivum L., var. `Centurk'). Treatment of leaves with photosynthetic inhibitor herbicides, known to interfere with the transfer of light energy, caused accumulation of nitrite under illuminated, aerobic conditions. When certain other herbicides, which do not interfere with the photosynthetic process, were applied to leaves and incubated under dark, aerobic conditions, nitrite accumulations were enhanced over those treated with photosynthetic inhibitors or the controls. The combination of photosynthetic inhibitor herbicides and certain other “nonphotosynthetic inhibitor” herbicides caused relatively large amounts of nitrite to accumulate in light or in darkness. Nitrite accumulation occurs when nitrate and nitrite reduction are not in balance. The proposed actions of the herbicides used in this study are discussed. This discussion provides a rationale for the accumulation of nitrite by the herbicide-treated leaves. PMID:16660947

  18. Diclofenac sodium.

    PubMed

    Small, R E

    1989-08-01

    The pharmacology, pharmacokinetics, clinical efficacy, adverse effects, and dosage of diclofenac sodium are reviewed. Diclofenac, the first nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory agent (NSAID) to be approved that is a phenylacetic acid derivative, competes with arachidonic acid for binding to cyclo-oxygenase, resulting in decreased formation of prostaglandins. The drug has both analgesic and antipyretic activities. Diclofenac is efficiently absorbed from the gastrointestinal tract; peak plasma concentrations occur 1.5 to 2.0 hours after ingestion in fasting subjects. Even though diclofenac has a relatively short elimination half-life in plasma (1.5 hours), it persists in synovial fluid. The drug is metabolized in the liver and is eliminated by urinary and biliary excretion. In clinical trials, diclofenac was as effective as aspirin, diflunisal, indomethacin, sulindac, ibuprofen, ketoprofen, and naproxen in improving function and reducing pain in patients with rheumatoid arthritis. For treatment of osteoarthritis, diclofenac was equivalent in efficacy to aspirin, diflunisal, indomethacin, sulindac, ibuprofen, ketoprofen, naproxen, flurbiprofen, mefenamic acid, and piroxicam. Diclofenac was as effective as indomethacin or sulindac in treating ankylosing spondylitis. The most frequent adverse effects reported for diclofenac were gastrointestinal, but these effects were fewer and less serious than occurred with aspirin or indomethacin; in addition, diclofenac caused fewer central nervous system reactions than indomethacin. Diclofenac is administered in divided doses with meals. The recommended total daily dosage is 100 to 150 mg (osteoarthritis and ankylosing spondylitis) or 150 to 200 mg (rheumatoid arthritis). Diclofenac is effective, but no more so than other NSAIDs. It is structurally distinct and offers another choice in the treatment of rheumatological conditions. PMID:2670397

  19. Growth potential of Clostridium perfringens from spores in acidified beef, pork, and poultry products during chilling.

    PubMed

    Juneja, Vijay K; Baker, David A; Thippareddi, H; Snyder, O Peter; Mohr, Tim B

    2013-01-01

    The ability of Clostridium perfringens to germinate and grow in acidified ground beef as well as in 10 commercially prepared acidified beef, pork, and poultry products was assessed. The pH of ground beef was adjusted with organic vinegar to achieve various pH values between 5.0 and 5.6; the pH of the commercial products ranged from 4.74 to 6.35. Products were inoculated with a three-strain cocktail of C. perfringens spores to achieve ca. 2-log (low) or 4-log (high) inoculum levels, vacuum packaged, and cooled exponentially from 54.4 to 7.2°C for 6, 9, 12, 15, 18, or 21 h to simulate abusive cooling; the U.S. Department of Agriculture, Food Safety and Inspection Service (USDA-FSIS) recommends a cooling time of 6.5 h. Total germinated C. perfringens populations were determined after plating on tryptose-sulfite-cycloserine agar and incubating the plates anaerobically at 37°C for 48 h. In addition, C. perfringens growth from spores was assessed at an isothermal temperature of 44°C. Growth from spores was inhibited in ground beef with a pH of 5.5 or below, even during extended cooling from 54.4 to 7.2°C in 21 h. In ground beef with a pH of 5.6, the growth was >1 log after 18 h of cooling from 54.4 to 7.2°C. However, 15 h of cooling controlled the growth to <1 log, regardless of the inoculum level. In addition, no growth was observed in any product with a pH ranging from 4.74 to 5.17, both during exponential abusive cooling periods of up to 21 h and during storage for 21 h at 44°C. While <1-log growth of C. perfringens from spores was observed in the pH 5.63 product cooled exponentially from 54.4 to 7.2°C in 15 h or less, the pH 6.35 product supported growth, even after 6 h of cooling from 54.4 to 7.2°C. These challenge tests demonstrate that adjustment of ground beef to pH of 5.5 or less and of barbeque products to pH of 5.63 or less inhibits C. perfringens spore germination and outgrowth during extended cooling periods from 54.4 to 7.2°C up to 15 h. Therefore

  20. Role of nitrate and nitrite in the induction of nitrite reductase in leaves of barley seedlings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aslam, M.; Huffaker, R. C.

    1989-01-01

    The role of NO3- and NO2- in the induction of nitrite reductase (NiR) activity in detached leaves of 8-day-old barley (Hordeum vulgare L.) seedlings was investigated. Barley leaves contained 6 to 8 micromoles NO2-/gram fresh weight x hour of endogenous NiR activity when grown in N-free solutions. Supply of both NO2- and NO3- induced the enzyme activity above the endogenous levels (5 and 10 times, respectively at 10 millimolar NO2- and NO3- over a 24 hour period). In NO3(-)-supplied leaves, NiR induction occurred at an ambient NO3- concentration of as low as 0.05 millimolar; however, no NiR induction was found in leaves supplied with NO2- until the ambient NO2- concentration was 0.5 millimolar. Nitrate accumulated in NO2(-)-fed leaves. The amount of NO3- accumulating in NO2(-)-fed leaves induced similar levels of NiR as did equivalent amounts of NO3- accumulating in NO3(-)-fed leaves. Induction of NiR in NO2(-)-fed leaves was not seen until NO3- was detectable (30 nanomoles/gram fresh weight) in the leaves. The internal concentrations of NO3-, irrespective of N source, were highly correlated with the levels of NiR induced. When the reduction of NO3- to NO2- was inhibited by WO4(2-), the induction of NiR was inhibited only partially. The results indicate that in barley leaves in NiR is induced by NO3- directly, i.e. without being reduced to NO2-, and that absorbed NO2- induces the enzyme activity indirectly after being oxidized to NO3- within the leaf.

  1. Strong Ion Regulatory Abilities Enable the Crab Xenograpsus testudinatus to Inhabit Highly Acidified Marine Vent Systems

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Marian Y.; Guh, Ying-Jey; Shao, Yi-Ta; Kuan, Pou-Long; Chen, Guan-Lin; Lee, Jay-Ron; Jeng, Ming-Shiou; Tseng, Yung-Che

    2016-01-01

    Hydrothermal vent organisms have evolved physiological adaptations to cope with extreme abiotic conditions including temperature and pH. To date, acid-base regulatory abilities of vent organisms are poorly investigated, although this physiological feature is essential for survival in low pH environments. We report the acid-base regulatory mechanisms of a hydrothermal vent crab, Xenograpsus testudinatus, endemic to highly acidic shallow-water vent habitats with average environment pH-values ranging between 5.4 and 6.6. Within a few hours, X. testudinatus restores extracellular pH (pHe) in response to environmental acidification of pH 6.5 (1.78 kPa pCO2) accompanied by an increase in blood HCO3- levels from 8.8 ± 0.3 to 31 ± 6 mM. Branchial Na+/K+-ATPase (NKA) and V-type H+-ATPase (VHA), the major ion pumps involved in branchial acid-base regulation, showed dynamic increases in response to acidified conditions on the mRNA, protein and activity level. Immunohistochemical analyses demonstrate the presence of NKA in basolateral membranes, whereas the VHA is predominantly localized in cytoplasmic vesicles of branchial epithelial- and pillar-cells. X. testudinatus is closely related to other strong osmo-regulating brachyurans, which is also reflected in the phylogeny of the NKA. Accordingly, our results suggest that the evolution of strong ion regulatory abilities in brachyuran crabs that allowed the occupation of ecological niches in euryhaline, freshwater, and terrestrial habitats are probably also linked to substantial acid-base regulatory abilities. This physiological trait allowed X. testudinatus to successfully inhabit one of the world's most acidic marine environments. PMID:26869933

  2. Trends in emissions of acidifying species in Asia, 1985-1997.

    SciTech Connect

    Streets, D. G.; Tsai, N. Y.; Akimoto, H.; Oka, K.

    2000-05-31

    Acid deposition is a serious problem throughout much of Asia. Emissions of sulfur dioxide (SO{sub 2}) and nitrogen oxides (NO{sub x}) have been increasing steadily, as nations strive to increase their levels of economic development. Coal and fuel oil have been the main choices for powering industrial development; and, until recently, only a few countries (notably Japan and Taiwan) had taken significant steps to avert the atmospheric emissions that accompany fuel combustion. This paper discusses trends in emissions of SO{sub 2} and NO{sub x} that have occurred in Asian countries in the period 1985--1997, using results from the RAINS-ASIA computer model and energy-use trends from the IEA Energy Statistics and Balances database. Emissions of SO{sub 2} in Asia grew from 26.6 Tg in 1985 to 33.7 Tg in 1990 and to 39.2 Tg in 1997. Though SO{sub 2} emissions used to grow as fast as fossil-fuel use, recent limitations on the sulfur content of coal and oil have slowed the growth. The annual-average emissions growth between 1990 and 1997 was only 1.1%, considerably less than the economic growth rate. Emissions of NO{sub x}, on the other hand, continue to grow rapidly, from 14.1 Tg in 1985 to 18.7 Tg in 1990 and 28.5 Tg in 1997, with no signs of abating. Thus, though SO{sub 2} remains the major contributor to acidifying emissions in Asia, the role of NO{sub x}, will become more and more important in the future.

  3. Experiments and modeling of variably permeable carbonate reservoir samples in contact with CO₂-acidified brines

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Smith, Megan M.; Hao, Yue; Mason, Harris E.; Carroll, Susan A.

    2014-12-31

    Reactive experiments were performed to expose sample cores from the Arbuckle carbonate reservoir to CO₂-acidified brine under reservoir temperature and pressure conditions. The samples consisted of dolomite with varying quantities of calcite and silica/chert. The timescales of monitored pressure decline across each sample in response to CO₂ exposure, as well as the amount of and nature of dissolution features, varied widely among these three experiments. For all samples cores, the experimentally measured initial permeability was at least one order of magnitude or more lower than the values estimated from downhole methods. Nondestructive X-ray computed tomography (XRCT) imaging revealed dissolution featuresmore » including “wormholes,” removal of fracture-filling crystals, and widening of pre-existing pore spaces. In the injection zone sample, multiple fractures may have contributed to the high initial permeability of this core and restricted the distribution of CO₂-induced mineral dissolution. In contrast, the pre-existing porosity of the baffle zone sample was much lower and less connected, leading to a lower initial permeability and contributing to the development of a single dissolution channel. While calcite may make up only a small percentage of the overall sample composition, its location and the effects of its dissolution have an outsized effect on permeability responses to CO₂ exposure. The XRCT data presented here are informative for building the model domain for numerical simulations of these experiments but require calibration by higher resolution means to confidently evaluate different porosity-permeability relationships.« less

  4. Strong Ion Regulatory Abilities Enable the Crab Xenograpsus testudinatus to Inhabit Highly Acidified Marine Vent Systems.

    PubMed

    Hu, Marian Y; Guh, Ying-Jey; Shao, Yi-Ta; Kuan, Pou-Long; Chen, Guan-Lin; Lee, Jay-Ron; Jeng, Ming-Shiou; Tseng, Yung-Che

    2016-01-01

    Hydrothermal vent organisms have evolved physiological adaptations to cope with extreme abiotic conditions including temperature and pH. To date, acid-base regulatory abilities of vent organisms are poorly investigated, although this physiological feature is essential for survival in low pH environments. We report the acid-base regulatory mechanisms of a hydrothermal vent crab, Xenograpsus testudinatus, endemic to highly acidic shallow-water vent habitats with average environment pH-values ranging between 5.4 and 6.6. Within a few hours, X. testudinatus restores extracellular pH (pHe) in response to environmental acidification of pH 6.5 (1.78 kPa pCO2) accompanied by an increase in blood [Formula: see text] levels from 8.8 ± 0.3 to 31 ± 6 mM. Branchial Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase (NKA) and V-type H(+)-ATPase (VHA), the major ion pumps involved in branchial acid-base regulation, showed dynamic increases in response to acidified conditions on the mRNA, protein and activity level. Immunohistochemical analyses demonstrate the presence of NKA in basolateral membranes, whereas the VHA is predominantly localized in cytoplasmic vesicles of branchial epithelial- and pillar-cells. X. testudinatus is closely related to other strong osmo-regulating brachyurans, which is also reflected in the phylogeny of the NKA. Accordingly, our results suggest that the evolution of strong ion regulatory abilities in brachyuran crabs that allowed the occupation of ecological niches in euryhaline, freshwater, and terrestrial habitats are probably also linked to substantial acid-base regulatory abilities. This physiological trait allowed X. testudinatus to successfully inhabit one of the world's most acidic marine environments. PMID:26869933

  5. Effect of κ-carrageenan and tetrasodium pyrophosphate on the yield of direct acidified cottage cheese.

    PubMed

    Makhal, Subarna; Giri, Apurba; Kanawjia, Suresh Kumar

    2013-12-01

    Recovery of whey proteins with improved water holding capacity, reduction of losses of curd fines as well as improvement of ability of curd to retain moisture appear some crucial approaches to result in a product with comparatively higher yield. In the present study, endeavours were made to improve the yield of direct acidified cottage cheese through the addition of κ-carrageenan in milk before heat treatment and tetrasodium pyrophosphate (TSPP) immediately before renneting. κ-carrageenan was added at the levels of 0.005, 0.015 and 0.025% and their effect on the total protein and whey proteins contents, moisture retention and the resultant curd yield as well as the quality of cottage cheese was studied. The study showed that addition of κ-carrageenan at 0.015% level followed by heat treatment at 90 °C for 5 min significantly (P < 0.01) increased the curd yield to 13.8% against 12.2% for the control. It was also observed that addition of κ-carrageenan at the level of 0.015% significantly (P < 0.01) increased the whey proteins and total protein contents to 14.8 and 88.5% against 73.4% and 1.2%, respectively with improved (P < 0.01) moisture retention of 75.4% as compared to 74.4% for the control. However, the study showed that addition of tetrasodium pyrophosphate (TSPP) at the levels of 0.02 to 0.08% neither had any effect on the recovery of whey proteins and moisture retention as well as the consequent curd yield nor the sensory quality of cottage cheese. PMID:24426035

  6. Effect of acidified feed on the prevalence of Salmonella in market-age pigs.

    PubMed

    Creus, E; Pérez, J F; Peralta, B; Baucells, F; Mateu, E

    2007-01-01

    Two trials were carried out to determine the effect of feed acidification upon Salmonella carriage in market-age pigs. In the first trial, the administration for the last 14 weeks of the fattening period of a commercial pelleted feed added with 0.6% lactic acid plus 0.6% formic acid (Lac-Formic-1.2) was compared to an unacidified standard diet (STD). A second experiment was carried out in two herds of growing pigs (Herd I, 3000 pigs; Herd II, 900 pigs) in which three different diets were assayed during the last 8-9 weeks of the fattening period: a diet containing 0.8% formic acid (Formic-0.8), a diet containing 0.4% lactic acid plus 0.4% formic acid (Lac-Formic-0.8) and a STD. In the first experiment, serological evolution of the infection was examined by ELISA and microbiological cultures (rectal samples and mesenteric lymph nodes) were also done. Feed intake by pen and the individual weight of the animals were also measured. In the second trial, blood, rectal samples and mesenteric lymph nodes were collected at slaughter in both herds (30 pigs per experimental group). In the first experiment, the acidified diet (Lac-Formic-1.2) reduced Salmonella carriers in mesenteric lymph nodes (Fisher's exact P < 0.01). In the second trial, Lac-Formic-0.8 diet significantly reduced Salmonella seroprevalence compared to the STD (P = 0.001) in both herds. Also Lac-Formic-0.8 and Formic-0.8 diets in Herd II showed a lower faecal excretion and Salmonella carriage in mesenteric lymph nodes than the STD (P < 0.05). Our results suggest that the administration of a combination of lactic and formic acids at the levels used in this study could be used to reduce Salmonella prevalence in finishing pigs. PMID:17894642

  7. Sulfite Oxidase Catalyzes Single-Electron Transfer at Molybdenum Domain to Reduce Nitrite to Nitric Oxide

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jun; Krizowski, Sabina; Fischer-Schrader, Katrin; Niks, Dimitri; Tejero, Jesús; Sparacino-Watkins, Courtney; Wang, Ling; Ragireddy, Venkata; Frizzell, Sheila; Kelley, Eric E.; Zhang, Yingze; Basu, Partha; Hille, Russ

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Aims: Recent studies suggest that the molybdenum enzymes xanthine oxidase, aldehyde oxidase, and mARC exhibit nitrite reductase activity at low oxygen pressures. However, inhibition studies of xanthine oxidase in humans have failed to block nitrite-dependent changes in blood flow, leading to continued exploration for other candidate nitrite reductases. Another physiologically important molybdenum enzyme—sulfite oxidase (SO)—has not been extensively studied. Results: Using gas-phase nitric oxide (NO) detection and physiological concentrations of nitrite, SO functions as nitrite reductase in the presence of a one-electron donor, exhibiting redox coupling of substrate oxidation and nitrite reduction to form NO. With sulfite, the physiological substrate, SO only facilitates one turnover of nitrite reduction. Studies with recombinant heme and molybdenum domains of SO indicate that nitrite reduction occurs at the molybdenum center via coupled oxidation of Mo(IV) to Mo(V). Reaction rates of nitrite to NO decreased in the presence of a functional heme domain, mediated by steric and redox effects of this domain. Using knockdown of all molybdopterin enzymes and SO in fibroblasts isolated from patients with genetic deficiencies of molybdenum cofactor and SO, respectively, SO was found to significantly contribute to hypoxic nitrite signaling as demonstrated by activation of the canonical NO-sGC-cGMP pathway. Innovation: Nitrite binds to and is reduced at the molybdenum site of mammalian SO, which may be allosterically regulated by heme and molybdenum domain interactions, and contributes to the mammalian nitrate-nitrite-NO signaling pathway in human fibroblasts. Conclusion: SO is a putative mammalian nitrite reductase, catalyzing nitrite reduction at the Mo(IV) center. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 23, 283–294. PMID:25314640

  8. The nasB operon and nasA gene are required for nitrate/nitrite assimilation in Bacillus subtilis.

    PubMed Central

    Ogawa, K; Akagawa, E; Yamane, K; Sun, Z W; LaCelle, M; Zuber, P; Nakano, M M

    1995-01-01

    Bacillus subtilis can use either nitrate or nitrite as a sole source of nitrogen. The isolation of the nasABCDEF genes of B. subtilis, which are required for nitrate/nitrite assimilation, is reported. The probable gene products include subunits of nitrate/nitrite reductases and an enzyme involved in the synthesis of siroheme, a cofactor for nitrite reductase. PMID:7868621

  9. Sodium blood test

    MedlinePlus

    ... foods. The most common form of sodium is sodium chloride, which is table salt. This test is usually done as part of an electrolyte or basic metabolic panel blood test . Your blood sodium level represents a balance between the sodium and ...

  10. Recyclable Magnetic Mesoporous Nanocomposite with Improved Sensing Performance toward Nitrite.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yihe; Su, Zisheng; Li, Bin; Zhang, Liming; Fan, Di; Ma, Heping

    2016-05-18

    A magnetic nanomaterial for nitrite ion detection was demonstrated in the present study. This nanomaterial was prepared by grafting a rhodamine 6G derivative (denoted as Rh 6G-OH) into the channels of core-shell magnetic mesoporous silica nanospheres. The nanocomposite (denoted as Fe3O4@Rh 6G) showed large surface area and improved fluorescent performance to accumulate and recognize NO2(-), and its superparamagnetic behavior played an important role in reusability. The fluorescent intensity decreased linearly along with the NO2(-) concentration in the range of 1-50 μM, and the detection limit was estimated to be 0.8 μM, which was much lower than the maximum limit of nitrite ion in drinking water (65 μM) recommended by World Health Organization. Importantly, Fe3O4@Rh 6G could be magnetically collected and effectively reutilized after six test cycles. PMID:27115527

  11. Nitrate ammonification in mangrove soils: a hidden source of nitrite?

    PubMed

    Balk, Melike; Laverman, Anniet M; Keuskamp, Joost A; Laanbroek, Hendrikus J

    2015-01-01

    Nitrate reduction is considered to be a minor microbial pathway in the oxidation of mangrove-derived organic matter due to a limited supply of nitrate in mangrove soils. At a limited availability of this electron acceptor compared to the supply of degradable carbon, nitrate ammonification is thought to be the preferential pathway of nitrate reduction. Mangrove forest mutually differ in their productivity, which may lead to different available carbon to nitrate ratios in their soil. Hence, nitrate ammonification is expected to be of more importance in high- compared to low-productive forests. The hypothesis was tested in flow-through reactors that contain undisturbed mangrove soils from high-productive Avicennia germinans and Rhizophora mangle forests in Florida and low-productive Avicennia marina forests in Saudi Arabia. Nitrate was undetectable in the soils from both regions. It was assumed that a legacy of nitrate ammonification would be reflected by a higher ammonium production from these soils upon the addition of nitrate. Unexpectedly, the soils from the low-productive forests in Saudi Arabia produced considerably more ammonium than the soils from the high-productive forests in Florida. Hence, other environmental factors than productivity must govern the selection of nitrate ammonification or denitrification. A rather intriguing observation was the 1:1 production of nitrite and ammonium during the consumption of nitrate, more or less independent from sampling region, location, sampling depth, mangrove species and from the absence or presence of additional degradable carbon. This 1:1 ratio points to a coupled production of ammonium and nitrite by one group of nitrate-reducing microorganisms. Such a production of nitrite will be hidden by the presence of active nitrite-reducing microorganisms under the nitrate-limited conditions of most mangrove forest soils. PMID:25784903

  12. Hydration properties determining the reactivity of nitrite in aqueous solution.

    PubMed

    Vchirawongkwin, Saowapak; Kritayakornupong, Chinapong; Tongraar, Anan; Vchirawongkwin, Viwat

    2014-08-28

    The knowledge of the hydration properties of the nitrite ion is key to understanding its reaction mechanism controlled by solvent effects. Here, ab initio quantum mechanical charge field molecular dynamics was performed to obtain the structural and dynamical properties of the hydration shell in an aqueous solution of nitrite ions, elucidated by data analysis using a molecular approach and an extended quantitative analysis of all superimposed trajectories with three-dimensional alignment (density map). The pattern of the power spectra corresponded to the experimental data, indicating the suitability of the Hartree-Fock method coupled with double-ζ plus polarization and diffuse functional basis sets to study this system. The density maps revealed the structure of the hydration shell, that presented a higher density in the N-O bond direction than in the axis vertical to the molecular plane, whereas the atomic and molecular radial distribution functions provided vague information. The number of actual contacts indicated 4.6 water molecules interacting with a nitrite ion, and 1.5 extra water molecules located in the molecular hydration shell, forming a H-bonding network with the bulk water. The mean residence times for the water ligands designated the strength of the hydration spheres for the oxygen sites, whilst the results for the nitrogen sites over-estimated the number of water molecules from other sites and indicated a weak structure. These results show the influence of the water molecules surrounding the nitrite ion creating an anisotropic hydration shell, suggesting that the reactive sites are situated above and below the molecular plane with a lower water density. PMID:24840033

  13. A sub-minute CZE method to determine nitrate and nitrite in meat products: An alternative for routine analysis.

    PubMed

    Della Betta, Fabiana; Pereira, Lais Morilla; Siqueira, Mariana Araújo; Valese, Andressa Camargo; Daguer, Heitor; Fett, Roseane; Vitali, Luciano; Costa, Ana Carolina Oliveira

    2016-09-01

    A sub-minute capillary zone electrophoresis (CZE) method was optimized and a simple sample preparation procedure based on the extraction of the analytes with water and sodium tetraborate was developed for the simultaneous determination of nitrate and nitrite levels in meat products. The background electrolyte (BGE) was composed of 20mmolL(-1) perchloric acid and 65mmolL(-1) β-alanine at pH3.83. Thiocyanate was used as the internal standard. The proposed method was validated and the uncertainty estimated according to Eurachem guidelines. The run time was only 30s, allowing analyzing more than 25samples/h, the good analytical performance confirms the suitability of the method for the analysis of meat products. One sample presented residual nitrite levels above the limit established by MERCOSUL legislation (150mgkg(-1)). The use of a fast method in association with a simple sample preparation step means that this procedure represents a possible alternative to fulfill the demand for high throughput in routine laboratory analysis. PMID:27132205

  14. Molecular Cloning of Complementary DNA Encoding Maize Nitrite Reductase

    PubMed Central

    Lahners, Kristine; Kramer, Vance; Back, Eduard; Privalle, Laura; Rothstein, Steven

    1988-01-01

    Complementary DNA has been isolated that codes for maize nitrite reductase (NiR) by using the corresponding spinach gene (E Back et al. 1988 Mol Gen Genet 212:20-26) as a heterologous probe. The sequences of the complementary DNAs from the two species are 66% homologous while the deduced amino acid sequences are 86% similar when analogous amino acids are included. A high percentage of the differences in the DNA sequences is due to the extremely strong bias in the corn gene to have a G/C base in the third codon position with 559/569 codons ending in a G or C. Using a hydroponic system, maize seedlings grown in the absence of an exogenous nitrogen source were induced with nitrate or nitrite. Nitrate stimulated a rapid induction of the NiR mRNA in both roots and leaves. There is also a considerable induction of this gene in roots upon the addition of nitrite, although under the conditions used the final mRNA level was not as high as when nitrate was the inducer. There is a small but detectable level of NiR mRNA in leaves prior to induction, but no constitutive NiR mRNA can be seen in the roots. Analysis of genomic DNA supports the notion that there are at least two NiR genes in maize. Images Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 PMID:16666376

  15. Selective nitrite reduction at heterobimetallic CoMg complexes.

    PubMed

    Uyeda, Christopher; Peters, Jonas C

    2013-08-14

    Heme-containing nitrite reductases bind and activate nitrite by a mechanism that is proposed to involve interactions with Brønsted acidic residues in the secondary coordination sphere. To model this functionality using synthetic platforms that incorporate a Lewis acidic site, heterobimetallic CoMg complexes supported by diimine-dioxime ligands are described. The neutral (μ-NO2)CoMg species 3 is synthesized from the [(μ-OAc)(Br)CoMg](+) complex 1 by a sequence of one-electron reduction and ligand substitution reactions. Data are presented for a redox series of nitrite adducts, featuring a conserved μ-(η(1)-N:η(1)-O)-NO2 motif, derived from this synthon. Conditions are identified for the proton-induced N-O bond heterolysis of bound NO2(-) in the most reduced member of this series, affording the [(NO)(Cl)CoMg(H2O)](+) complex 6. Reduction of this complex followed by protonation leads to the evolution of free N2O. On the basis of these stoichiometric reactivity studies, the competence of complex 1 as a NO2(-) reduction catalyst is evaluated using electrochemical methods. In bulk electrolysis experiments, conducted at -1.2 V vs SCE using Et3NHCl as a proton source, N2O is produced selectively without the competing formation of NH3, NH2OH, or H2. PMID:23865638

  16. Cardboard versus sterile containers: more nitrite-positive urinalysis results?

    PubMed

    Eley, Rhiannon

    Urinalysis is a frequently performed test that provides valuable information as to the health of individuals. The presence of nitrites in the urine may indicate infection. Antibiotic therapy is commonly started following the results of dipstick urine taken from non-sterile urine samples. This is especially prevalent in men who are immobile, because sterile containers large enough to hold a full bladder of urine are not available (at the author's trust). Urine samples were taken from 25 male A&E patients in a sterile container. Half of each sample was decanted into an ordinary cardboard urine bottle and both samples were then tested using dipstick urinalysis after 1 minute and after 10 minutes to see if there was a difference in the presence of nitrites between the two container types. After 10 minutes, 21 of the 25 samples showed a positive nitrite dipstick in the cardboard container while it remained negative when the urine remained in the sterile container. These results demonstrate that care needs to be taken when collecting urine samples, and the results of dipstick urinalysis should be used with caution depending on the collection method. PMID:25978475

  17. Monitoring nitrite, N-nitrosodiethanolamine, and mutagenicity in cutting fluids used in the metal industry.

    PubMed Central

    Monarca, S; Scassellati Sforzolini, G; Spiegelhalder, B; Pasquini, R; Fatigoni, C

    1993-01-01

    We carried out an integrated environmental/biological monitoring program to evaluate cancer hazards among metal industry workers exposed to cutting fluids. Several cutting fluids were sampled according to response to a semiquantitative nitrite rapid test in metal factories in central Italy. The nitrite-positive samples were analyzed for nitrite and nitrosodiethanolamine (NDELA) content and mutagenic activity. The nitrite-negative samples were analyzed only for mutagenicity. Of the total samples, 20.6% were nitrite positive, and all contained NDELA. However, nitrite content was not quantitatively predictive of the NDELA content, which varied enormously among samples (0.3-1900 mg/kg). Nitrite-negative samples were always nonmutagenic. Mutagenicity was found in half the NDELA-containing samples but was not related to nitrite or NDELA content. Nitrite screening of cutting fluids in the field is an interesting method for identifying samples that potentially contain NDELA and other unknown mutagens and, when performed with short-term mutagenicity tests, nitrite screening seems to be a valid tool by which industrial managers and health officers could minimize the health hazards associated with occupational exposure to cutting fluids. Images p126-a PMID:8354197

  18. Stable-isotope dilution GC-MS approach for nitrite quantification in human whole blood, erythrocytes, and plasma using pentafluorobenzyl bromide derivatization: nitrite distribution in human blood.

    PubMed

    Schwarz, Alexandra; Modun, Darko; Heusser, Karsten; Tank, Jens; Gutzki, Frank-Mathias; Mitschke, Anja; Jordan, Jens; Tsikas, Dimitrios

    2011-05-15

    Previously, we reported on the usefulness of pentafluorobenzyl bromide (PFB-Br) for the simultaneous derivatization and quantitative determination of nitrite and nitrate in various biological fluids by GC-MS using their (15)N-labelled analogues as internal standards. As nitrite may be distributed unevenly in plasma and blood cells, its quantification in whole blood rather than in plasma or serum may be the most appropriate approach to determine nitrite concentration in the circulation. So far, GC-MS methods based on PFB-Br derivatization failed to measure nitrite in whole blood and erythrocytes because of rapid nitrite loss by oxidation and other unknown reactions during derivatization. The present article reports optimized and validated procedures for sample preparation and nitrite derivatization which allow for reliable quantification of nitrite in human whole blood and erythrocytes. Essential measures for stabilizing nitrite in these samples include sample cooling (0-4°C), hemoglobin (Hb) removal by precipitation with acetone and short derivatization of the Hb-free supernatant (5 min, 50°C). Potassium ferricyanide (K(3)Fe(CN)(6)) is useful in preventing Hb-caused nitrite loss, however, this chemical is not absolutely required in the present method. Our results show that accurate GC-MS quantification of nitrite as PFB derivative is feasible virtually in every biological matrix with similar accuracy and precision. In EDTA-anticoagulated venous blood of 10 healthy young volunteers, endogenous nitrite concentration was measured to be 486±280 nM in whole blood, 672±496 nM in plasma (C(P)), and 620±350 nM in erythrocytes (C(E)). The C(E)-to-C(P) ratio was 0.993±0.188 indicating almost even distribution of endogenous nitrite between plasma and erythrocytes. By contrast, the major fraction of nitrite added to whole blood remained in plasma. The present GC-MS method is useful to investigate distribution and metabolism of endogenous and exogenous nitrite in blood

  19. Validation of a method to directly and specifically measure nitrite in biological matrices.

    PubMed

    Almeida, Luis E F; Kamimura, Sayuri; Kenyon, Nicholas; Khaibullina, Alfia; Wang, Li; de Souza Batista, Celia M; Quezado, Zenaide M N

    2015-02-15

    The bioactivity of nitric oxide (NO) is influenced by chemical species generated through reactions with proteins, lipids, metals, and its conversion to nitrite and nitrate. A better understanding of the functions played by each of these species could be achieved by developing selective assays able of distinguishing nitrite from other NO species. Nagababu and Rifkind developed a method using acetic and ascorbic acids to measure nitrite-derived NO in plasma. Here, we adapted, optimized, and validated this method to assay nitrite in tissues. The method yielded linear measurements over 1-300 pmol of nitrite and was validated for tissue preserved in a nitrite stabilization solution composed of potassium ferricyanide, N-ethylmaleimide and NP-40. When samples were processed with chloroform, but not with methanol, ethanol, acetic acid or acetonitrile, reliable and reproducible nitrite measurements in up to 20 sample replicates were obtained. The method's accuracy in tissue was ≈ 90% and in plasma 99.9%. In mice, during basal conditions, brain, heart, lung, liver, spleen and kidney cortex had similar nitrite levels. In addition, nitrite tissue levels were similar regardless of when organs were processed: immediately upon collection, kept in stabilization solution for later analysis or frozen and later processed. After ip nitrite injections, rapidly changing nitrite concentrations in tissue and plasma could be measured and were shown to change in significantly distinct patterns. This validated method could be valuable for investigations of nitrite biology in conditions such as sickle cell disease, cardiovascular disease, and diabetes, where nitrite is thought to play a role. PMID:25445633

  20. The most acidified Austrian lake in comparison to a neutralized mining lake

    PubMed Central

    Moser, Michael; Weisse, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    This study investigated two mining lakes located in the north of Lower Austria. These lakes arose 45 years ago when open cast lignite mining ceased. The lakes are separated by a 7-m wide dam. Due to the oxidation of pyrite, both lakes have been acidified and exhibit iron, sulphate, and heavy metal concentrations several orders of magnitude higher than in circumneutral lakes. The water column of both lakes is divided into two layers by a pronounced chemocline. The smaller mining lake (AML), with pH close to of 2.6, is the most acidic lake in Austria, whereas flooding with stream water and by drainage from the surrounding fields neutralized the adjacent larger pit lake. The goal of our study was to investigate the effect of flooding on its physical, chemical and biological properties, in comparison to the pristine AML. Even relative to other extremely acidic lakes, the flora and fauna in the AML was reduced and composed of only two flagellate, one ciliate, and one rotifer species. The simplified pelagic food web in the mixolimnion consisted of heterotrophic bacteria, the mixotrophic flagellates Chlamydomonas acidophila and Ochromonas sp., the ciliate Oxytricha sp., and the rotifer Cephalodella sp. The latter two are as yet undescribed new species. The heliozoan Actinophrys sp. that may act as top predator occurred only in low abundance. The euglenid Lepocinclis buetschlii formed a stable deep chlorophyll maximum (DCM) at 7 m depth. Highest cell numbers of L. buetschlii in the DCM exceeded 108 L−1. The neutralized mining lake harboured higher plankton diversity similar to that of natural circumneutral lakes. A peak of at least 16 different phytoplankton taxa was observed during summer. The zooplankton consisted of several copepod species, daphnids and other cladocerans, and at least six different rotifer species. Several fish species occurred in the neutralized lake. Although the effect of non-permanent flooding was largely sustainable, interannual fluctuations of

  1. Modifications of Carbonate Fracture Hydrodynamic Properties by CO{sub 2}-Acidified Brine Flow

    SciTech Connect

    Deng, Hang; Ellis, Brian R.; Peters, Catherine A.; Fitts, Jeffrey P.; Crandall, Dustin; Bromhal, Grant S.

    2013-08-01

    Acidic reactive flow in fractures is relevant in subsurface activities such as CO{sub 2} geological storage and hydraulic fracturing. Understanding reaction-induced changes in fracture hydrodynamic properties is essential for predicting subsurface flows such as leakage, injectability, and fluid production. In this study, x-ray computed tomography scans of a fractured carbonate caprock were used to create three dimensional reconstructions of the fracture before and after reaction with CO{sub 2}-acidified brine (Ellis et al., 2011, Greenhouse Gases: Sci. Technol., 1:248-260). As expected, mechanical apertures were found to increase substantially, doubling and even tripling in some places. However, the surface geometry evolved in complex ways including ‘comb-tooth’ structures created from preferential dissolution of calcite in transverse sedimentary bands, and the creation of degraded zones, i.e. porous calcite-depleted areas on reacted fracture surfaces. These geometric alterations resulted in increased fracture roughness, as measured by surface Z{sub 2} parameters and fractal dimensions D{sub f}. Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations were conducted to quantify the changes in hydraulic aperture, fracture transmissivity and permeability. The results show that the effective hydraulic apertures are smaller than the mechanical apertures, and the changes in hydraulic apertures are nonlinear. Overestimation of flow rate by a factor of two or more would be introduced if fracture hydrodynamic properties were based on mechanical apertures, or if hydraulic aperture is assumed to change proportionally with mechanical aperture. The differences can be attributed, in part, to the increase in roughness after reaction, and is likely affected by contiguous transverse sedimentary features. Hydraulic apertures estimated by the 1D statistical model and 2D local cubic law (LCL) model are consistently larger than those calculated from the CFD simulations. In addition, a novel

  2. Simulating the evolution of fracture surface alteration exposed to CO2-acidified brine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, H.; Steefel, C. I.; Molins, S.; DePaolo, D. J.; Ajo Franklin, J. B.; Voltolini, M.

    2015-12-01

    Understanding the flow, transport, and reaction in fractures and the evolution of fracture geometries as a result of geochemical reactions is especially relevant to geologic carbon storage. Both natural and injection-induced fractures may be abundant and thus control fluid migration in the subsurface. A second effect is that the development of low pH fluid as the CO2 dissolves into the native brine can alter fracture geometries and thus dominant flow pathways substantially over relatively short time scales, particularly when rapidly-reacting carbonate minerals are present. Existing experimental studies performed under conditions relevant to geologic carbon storage have shown complex dissolution patterns, which depend on the flow regimes and spatial distributions of reactive minerals. One of the dissolution patterns observed is the formation of a porous altered layer in the near-fracture region that is created by preferential dissolution of a reactive phase (e.g. calcite) dispersed in the rock matrix. However, there is still a lack of predictive understanding of this phenomenon and an even more limited ability to predict how the altered layer may influence subsequent evolution of the fracture. In this study, we present a reactive transport model that captures and predicts the development of the altered layer when the fracture surfaces are exposed to CO2-acidified brine. The model explicitly accounts for permeability heterogeneity caused by initial fracture aperture variations, and updates fracture apertures and the porosity of rock matrix in the near-fracture region based on local reactions. The simulation results lend important insights into the factors that control the evolution of the spatial distribution and thickness of the altered layer. This altered layer in turn affects flow distribution in the fracture and formation of preferential flow channels. It also has an impact on the mass transport between the fracture and the rock matrix, the accessibility of

  3. Can the eastern red-backed salamander (Plethodon cinereus) persist in an acidified landscape?

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bondi, Cheryl A; Beier, Colin M.; Ducey, Peter K; Lawrence, Gregory B.; Bailey, Scott W.

    2016-01-01

    Hardwood forests of eastern North America have experienced decades of acidic deposition, leading to soil acidification where base cation supply was insufficient to neutralize acid inputs. Negative impacts of soil acidity on amphibians include disrupted embryonic development, lower growth rates, and habitat loss. However, some amphibians exhibit intraspecific variation in acid tolerance, suggesting the potential for local adaptation in areas where soils are naturally acidic. The eastern red-backed salamander (Plethodon cinereus) is a highly abundant top predator of the northern hardwood forest floor. Early research found that P. cinereus was sensitive to acidic soils, avoiding substrates with pH < 3.8 and experiencing decreased growth rates in acidic habitats. However, recent studies have documented P. cinereus populations in lower pH conditions than previously observed, suggesting some populations may persist in acidic conditions. Here, we evaluated relationships between organic horizon soil pH and P. cinereus abundance, adult health (body size and condition), and microhabitat selection, based on surveys of 34 hardwood forests in northeastern United States that encompass a regional soil pH gradient. We found no associations between soil pH and P. cinereus abundance or health, and observed that this salamander used substrates with pH similar to that available, suggesting that pH does not mediate their fine-scale distributions. The strongest negative predictor of P. cinereus abundance was the presence of dusky salamanders (Desmognathus spp.), which were most abundant in the western Adirondacks. Our results indicate that P. cinereus occupies a wider range of soil pH than has been previously thought, which has implications for their functional role in forest food webs and nutrient cycles in acid-impaired ecosystems. Tolerance of P. cinereus for more acidic habitats, including anthropogenically acidified forests, may be due to local adaptation in

  4. A new method for the determination of the nitrogen content of nitrocellulose based on the molar ratio of nitrite-to-nitrate ions released after alkaline hydrolysis.

    PubMed

    Alinat, Elodie; Delaunay, Nathalie; Archer, Xavier; Mallet, Jean-Maurice; Gareil, Pierre

    2015-04-01

    A new method was proposed to determine the nitrogen content of nitrocelluloses (NCs). It is based on the finding of a linear relationship between the nitrogen content and the molar ratio of nitrite-to-nitrate ions released after alkaline hydrolysis. Capillary electrophoresis was used to monitor the concentration of nitrite and nitrate ions. The influences of hydrolysis time and molar mass of NC on the molar ratio of nitrite-to-nitrate ions were investigated, and new insights into the understanding of the alkaline denitration mechanism of NCs, underlying this analytical strategy is provided. The method was then tested successfully with various explosive and non-explosive NC-containing samples such as various daily products and smokeless gunpowders. Inherently to its principle exploiting a concentration ratio, this method shows very good repeatability in the determination of nitrogen content in real samples with relative standard deviation (n = 3) inferior to 1.5%, and also provides very significant advantages with respect to sample extraction, analysis time (1h for alkaline hydrolysis, 3 min for electrophoretic separation), which was about 5 times shorter than for the classical Devarda's method, currently used in industry, and safety conditions (no need for preliminary drying NC samples, mild hydrolysis conditions with 1M sodium hydroxide for 1h at 60 °C). PMID:25562808

  5. Inhibition of Listeria monocytogenes on cooked cured chicken breasts by acidified coating containing allyl isothiocyanate or deodorized Oriental mustard extract.

    PubMed

    Olaimat, Amin N; Holley, Richard A

    2016-08-01

    Ready-to-eat meats are considered foods at high risk to cause life-threatening Listeria monocytogenes infections. This study screened 5 L. monocytogenes strains for their ability to hydrolyze sinigrin (a glucosinolate in Oriental mustard), which formed allyl isothiocyanate (AITC) and reduced L. monocytogenes viability on inoculated vacuum-packed, cooked, cured roast chicken slices at 4 °C. Tests involved incorporation of 25-50 μl/g AITC directly or 100-250 mg/g Oriental mustard extract in 0.5% (w/v) κ-carrageenan/2% (w/v) chitosan-based coatings prepared using 1.5% malic or acetic acid. L. monocytogenes strains hydrolyzed 33.6%-48.4% pure sinigrin in MH broth by 21 d at 25 °C. Acidified κ-carrageenan/chitosan coatings containing 25-50 μl/g AITC or 100-250 mg/g mustard reduced the viability of L. monocytogenes and aerobic bacteria on cooked, cured roast chicken slices by 4.1 to >7.0 log10 CFU/g compared to uncoated chicken stored at 4 °C for 70 d. Coatings containing malic acid were significantly more antimicrobial than those with acetic acid. During storage for 70 d, acidified κ-carrageenan/chitosan coatings containing 25-50 μl/g AITC or 250 mg/g mustard extract reduced lactic acid bacteria (LAB) numbers 3.8 to 5.4 log10 CFU/g on chicken slices compared to uncoated samples. Acidified κ-carrageenan/chitosan-based coatings containing either AITC or Oriental mustard extract at the concentrations tested had the ability to control L. monocytogenes viability and delay growth of potential spoilage bacteria on refrigerated, vacuum-packed cured roast chicken. PMID:27052706

  6. Endothelial TLR4 activation impairs intestinal microcirculatory perfusion in necrotizing enterocolitis via eNOS–NO–nitrite signaling

    PubMed Central

    Yazji, Ibrahim; Sodhi, Chhinder P.; Lee, Elizabeth K.; Good, Misty; Egan, Charlotte E.; Afrazi, Amin; Neal, Matthew D.; Jia, Hongpeng; Lin, Joyce; Branca, Maria F.; Prindle, Thomas; Richardson, Ward M.; Ozolek, John; Billiar, Timothy R.; Binion, David G.; Gladwin, Mark T.; Hackam, David J.

    2013-01-01

    Necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC) is a devastating disease of premature infants characterized by severe intestinal necrosis and for which breast milk represents the most effective protective strategy. Previous studies have revealed a critical role for the lipopolysaccharide receptor toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) in NEC development through its induction of mucosal injury, yet the reasons for which intestinal ischemia in NEC occurs in the first place remain unknown. We hypothesize that TLR4 signaling within the endothelium plays an essential role in NEC development by regulating perfusion to the small intestine via the vasodilatory molecule endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS). Using a unique mouse system in which we selectively deleted TLR4 from the endothelium, we now show that endothelial TLR4 activation is required for NEC development and that endothelial TLR4 activation impairs intestinal perfusion without effects on other organs and reduces eNOS expression via activation of myeloid differentiation primary response gene 88. NEC severity was significantly increased in eNOS−/− mice and decreased upon administration of the phosphodiesterase inhibitor sildenafil, which augments eNOS function. Strikingly, compared with formula, human and mouse breast milk were enriched in sodium nitrate—a precursor for enteral generation of nitrite and nitric oxide—and repletion of formula with sodium nitrate/nitrite restored intestinal perfusion, reversed the deleterious effects of endothelial TLR4 signaling, and reduced NEC severity. These data identify that endothelial TLR4 critically regulates intestinal perfusion leading to NEC and reveal that the protective properties of breast milk involve enhanced intestinal microcirculatory integrity via augmentation of nitrate–nitrite–NO signaling. PMID:23650378

  7. Formation of N-nitrosamine and N-nitrosamino acids from food products and nitrite under simulated gastric conditions.

    PubMed

    Groenen, P J; de Cock-Bethbeder, M W; Bouwman, J; Dhont, J H

    1980-01-01

    Average-sized portions of a variety of food products were reacted with nitrite under realistically simulated gastric conditions. The aqueous incubation medium contained sodium nitrite (10 mg/l) and potassium thiocyanate to mimic the incoming flux of saliva, as well as pepsin, sodium chloride and hydrochloric acid, reflecting the composition of gastric juice. After incubation for 2 hr at 37 degrees C, volatile N-nitrosamines and N-nitrosamino acids were determined in the reaction mixtures. Nitrosodimethylamine (NDMA) was present in the incubation mixtures of smoked mackerel (8.5 micrograms per portion), canned herring (0.66 micrograms per portion) and beer (0.70 micrograms per 'portion'). Smaller amounts per portion, sometimes of other nitrosamines as well, were observed with canned salmon and anchovy, mustard, yoghurt and coffee brew. Negative results were obtained for canned tuna, soya sauce, ketchup, white bread, 'nasi goreng', tea brew and cocoa milk. Nitrosamino acids were detected in the reaction mixtures of smoked mackerel (58 micrograms per portion), soya sauce (24 micrograms per portion) and canned salmon (6.9 micrograms per portion) and in smaller amounts in those of canned herring, anchovy and cocoa milk. In order to reduce the number of analyses to be performed, most products have been studied only after incubation, so that the nitrosamines and nitrosamino acids found may already have been present -- wholly or partly -- in the original products, before incubation. Such is the case for part of the NDMA in the reaction mixture of smoked mackerel and for all the NDMA in beer. The toxicological implications of these findings remain to be established. PMID:7228254

  8. Inhibitory activity of reuterin, nisin, lysozyme and nitrite against vegetative cells and spores of dairy-related Clostridium species.

    PubMed

    Avila, Marta; Gómez-Torres, Natalia; Hernández, Marta; Garde, Sonia

    2014-02-17

    The butyric acid fermentation, responsible for late blowing of cheese, is caused by the outgrowth in cheese of some species of Clostridium, resulting in texture and flavor defects and economical losses. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of different antimicrobial compounds against vegetative cells and spores of C. tyrobutyricum, C. butyricum, C. beijerinckii and C. sporogenes strains isolated from cheeses with late blowing defect. Minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) for reuterin, nisin, lysozyme and sodium nitrite were determined against Clostridium strains in milk and modified RCM (mRCM) after 7d exposure. Although the sensitivity of Clostridium to the tested antimicrobials was strain-dependent, C. sporogenes and C. beijerinckii generally had higher MIC values than the rest of Clostridium species. The majority of Clostridium strains were more resistant to antimicrobials in milk than in mRCM, and vegetative cells exhibited higher sensitivity than spores. Reuterin (MIC values 0.51-32.5 mM) and nisin (MIC values 0.05-12.5 μg/ml) were able to inhibit the growth of vegetative cells and spores of all assayed Clostridium strains in milk and mRCM. Strains of C. tyrobutyricum exhibited the highest sensitivity to lysozyme (MIC values<0.20-400 μg/ml) and sodium nitrite (MIC values 18.75-150 μg/ml). These results suggest that reuterin and nisin, with a broad inhibitory activity spectrum against Clostridium spp. spores and vegetative cells, may be the best options to control Clostridium growth in dairy products and to prevent associated spoilage, such as late blowing defect of cheese. However, further studies in cheese would be necessary to validate this hypothesis. PMID:24361835

  9. Nitrite survival and nitrous oxide production of denitrifying phosphorus removal sludges in long-term nitrite/nitrate-fed sequencing batch reactors.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yayi; Zhou, Shuai; Ye, Liu; Wang, Hong; Stephenson, Tom; Jiang, Xuxin

    2014-12-15

    Nitrite-based phosphorus (P) removal could be useful for innovative biological P removal systems where energy and carbon savings are a priority. However, using nitrite for denitrification may cause nitrous oxide (N2O) accumulation and emissions. A denitrifying nitrite-fed P removal system [Formula: see text] was successfully set up in a sequencing batch reactor (SBR) and was run for 210 days. The maximum pulse addition of nitrite to [Formula: see text] was 11 mg NO2(-)-N/L in the bulk, and a total of 34 mg NO2(-)-N/L of nitrite was added over three additions. Fluorescent in situ hybridization results indicated that the P-accumulating organisms (PAOs) abundance was 75 ± 1.1% in [Formula: see text] , approximately 13.6% higher than that in a parallel P removal SBR using nitrate [Formula: see text] . Type II Accumulibacter (PAOII) (unable to use nitrate as an electron acceptor) was the main PAOs species in [Formula: see text] , contributing 72% to total PAOs. Compared with [Formula: see text] , [Formula: see text] biomass had enhanced nitrite/free nitrous acid (FNA) endurance, as demonstrated by its higher nitrite denitrification and P uptake rates. N2O accumulated temporarily in [Formula: see text] after each pulse of nitrite. Peak N2O concentrations in the bulk for [Formula: see text] were generally 6-11 times higher than that in [Formula: see text] ; these accumulations were rapidly denitrified to nitrogen gases. N2O concentration increased rapidly in nitrate-cultivated biomass when 5 or 10 mg NO2(-)-N/L per pulse was added. Whereas, N2O accumulation did not occur in nitrite-cultivated biomass until up to 30 mg NO2(-)-N/L per pulse was added. Long-term acclimation to nitrite and pulse addition of nitrite in [Formula: see text] reduced the risk of nitrite accumulation, and mitigated N2O accumulation and emissions from denitrifying P removal by nitrite. PMID:25261626

  10. Regulation of Nitrite Stress Response in Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough, a Model Sulfate-Reducing Bacterium

    PubMed Central

    Rajeev, Lara; Chen, Amy; Kazakov, Alexey E.; Luning, Eric G.; Zane, Grant M.; Novichkov, Pavel S.; Wall, Judy D.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) are sensitive to low concentrations of nitrite, and nitrite has been used to control SRB-related biofouling in oil fields. Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough, a model SRB, carries a cytochrome c-type nitrite reductase (nrfHA) that confers resistance to low concentrations of nitrite. The regulation of this nitrite reductase has not been directly examined to date. In this study, we show that DVU0621 (NrfR), a sigma54-dependent two-component system response regulator, is the positive regulator for this operon. NrfR activates the expression of the nrfHA operon in response to nitrite stress. We also show that nrfR is needed for fitness at low cell densities in the presence of nitrite because inactivation of nrfR affects the rate of nitrite reduction. We also predict and validate the binding sites for NrfR upstream of the nrfHA operon using purified NrfR in gel shift assays. We discuss possible roles for NrfR in regulating nitrate reductase genes in nitrate-utilizing Desulfovibrio spp. IMPORTANCE The NrfA nitrite reductase is prevalent across several bacterial phyla and required for dissimilatory nitrite reduction. However, regulation of the nrfA gene has been studied in only a few nitrate-utilizing bacteria. Here, we show that in D. vulgaris, a bacterium that does not respire nitrate, the expression of nrfHA is induced by NrfR upon nitrite stress. This is the first report of regulation of nrfA by a sigma54-dependent two-component system. Our study increases our knowledge of nitrite stress responses and possibly of the regulation of nitrate reduction in SRB. PMID:26283774

  11. Modelling nitrite dynamics and associated feedback processes in the Benguela oxygen minimum zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mashifane, T. B.; Vichi, M.; Waldron, H. N.; Machu, E.; Garçonc, V.

    2016-08-01

    Understanding nitrite dynamics in oxygen minimum zones (OMZs) is a challenge as it represents an intermediary nitrogen species with a short turnover time. Nitrite is also reduced to nitrogen in OMZs, preventing its accumulation. This creates difficulties in detecting nitrite with colorimetric methods as concentrations may occur below detection limits in some regions. Nitrite concentrations are key to understanding intermediate nitrogen processes and their implication for nitrogen loss in OMZs. A coupled physical-biogeochemical model is applied in the Benguela OMZ to study nitrite dynamics and its associated feedback processes. Simulated results show occurrence of primary and secondary nitrite maxima in the Benguela shelf waters. The primary nitrite maxima in the Benguela are attributed to nitrification and nitrate assimilation as they occur in association with the nitracline. Secondary nitrite maxima accumulate in the Angola-Benguela Front (ABF) OMZ and are attributed to denitrification. The secondary nitrite maxima are consumed by anaerobic ammonium oxidation (anammox) off Walvis Bay. Nitrite maxima are restricted to the shelf off Walvis Bay and advected offshore in the ABF region. Interchanges between the poleward South Atlantic Central Water (SACW) and the equatorward, well-aerated Eastern South Atlantic Central Water (ESACW) drive the seasonality of nitrogen processes in the Benguela. Subsequent nitrite reduction in the Benguela OMZ leads to nitrous oxide production, with high concentrations occurring in the ABF region as a result of nitrification and denitrification. Off Walvis Bay, nitrous oxide production is low since nitrite is consumed by anammox. Nitrous oxide production occurs in thermocline, intermediate and deeper water masses in the ABF region. High N fluxes in the Benguela are attributed to nitrification as compared to anammox and denitrification. Results from this study demonstrate the role of intermediate nitrogen species in nitrogen feedback

  12. Role of the denitrifying Haloarchaea in the treatment of nitrite-brines.

    PubMed

    Nájera-Fernández, Cindy; Zafrilla, Basilio; Bonete, María José; Martínez-Espinosa, Rosa María

    2012-09-01

    Haloferax mediterranei is a denitrifying halophilic archaeon able to reduce nitrate and nitrite under oxic and anoxic conditions. In the presence of oxygen, nitrate and nitrite are used as nitrogen sources for growth. Under oxygen scarcity, this haloarchaeon uses both ions as electron acceptors via a denitrification pathway. In the present work, the maximal nitrite concentration tolerated by this organism was determined by studying the growth of H. mediterranei in minimal medium containing 30, 40 and 50 mM nitrite as sole nitrogen source and under initial oxic conditions at 42 degrees C. The results showed the ability of H. mediterranei to withstand nitrite concentrations up to 50 mM. At the beginning of the incubation, nitrate was detected in the medium, probably due to the spontaneous oxidation of nitrite under the initial oxic conditions. The complete removal of nitrite and nitrate was accomplished in most of the tested conditions, except in culture medium containing 50 mM nitrite, suggesting that this concentration compromised the denitrification capacity of the cells. Nitrite and nitrate reductases activities were analyzed at different growth stages of H. mediterranei. In all cases, the activities of the respiratory enzymes were higher than their assimilative counterparts; this was especially the case for NirK. The denitrifying and possibly detoxifying role of this enzyme might explain the high nitrite tolerance of H. mediterranei. This archaeon was also able to remove 60% of the nitrate and 75% of the nitrite initially present in brine samples collected from a wastewater treatment facility. These results suggest that H. mediterranei, and probably other halophilic denitrifying Archaea, are suitable candidates for the bioremediation of brines with high nitrite and nitrate concentrations. PMID:23847815

  13. Diclofenac sodium overdose

    MedlinePlus

    Diclofenac sodium is a prescription medicine used to relieve pain and swelling. It is a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID). Diclofenac sodium overdose occurs when someone takes more than the ...

  14. Sodium Ferric Gluconate Injection

    MedlinePlus

    Sodium ferric gluconate injection is used to treat iron-deficiency anemia (a lower than normal number of ... are also receiving the medication epoetin (Epogen, Procrit). Sodium ferric gluconate injection is in a class of ...

  15. Docusate Sodium and Pregnancy

    MedlinePlus

    ... live chat Live Help Fact Sheets Share Docusate Sodium Friday, 01 April 2016 In every pregnancy, a ... This sheet talks about whether exposure to docusate sodium may increase the risk for birth defects over ...

  16. Sodium carbonate poisoning

    MedlinePlus

    Sodium carbonate (known as washing soda or soda ash) is a chemical found in many household and ... products. This article focuses on poisoning due to sodium carbonate. This article is for information only. Do ...

  17. Diclofenac sodium overdose

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/002630.htm Diclofenac sodium overdose To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Diclofenac sodium is a prescription medicine used to relieve pain ...

  18. Fractional excretion of sodium

    MedlinePlus

    FE sodium; FENa ... to a lab. There, they are examined for salt (sodium) and creatinine levels. Creatinine is a chemical waste ... your normal foods with a normal amount of salt, unless otherwise instructed by your health care provider. ...

  19. Sodium blood test

    MedlinePlus

    ... able to conserve water) Too much salt or sodium bicarbonate in the diet Use of certain medicines, including corticosteroids, laxatives, lithium, and medicines such as ibuprofen or naproxen Lower than normal sodium level is called hyponatremia. It may be due ...

  20. Effect of rosiglitazone in sodium arsenite-induced experimental vascular endothelial dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Kaur, Tajpreet; Goel, Rajesh Kumar; Balakumar, Pitchai

    2010-04-01

    The present study has been designed to investigate the effect of rosiglitazone, a peroxisome proliferator activated receptor gamma agonist in sodium arsenite-induced vascular endothelial dysfunction (VED) in rats. The rats were administered sodium arsenite (1.5 mg/kg/day, i.p., 2 weeks) to induce VED. The development of VED was assessed by employing isolated aortic ring preparation and estimating serum nitrite/nitrate concentration. Further, the integrity of the aortic endothelium was assessed histologically using haematoxylin-eosin staining. Moreover, the oxidative stress was assessed by estimating serum thiobarbituric acid reactive substances, aortic reactive oxygen species and reduced form of glutathione. The administration of sodium arsenite produced VED by impairing acetylcholine-induced endothelium dependent relaxation, diminishing the integrity of vascular endothelium and decreasing the serum nitrite/nitrate concentration. In addition, sodium arsenite was noted to produce oxidative stress as it increased serum thiobarbituric acid reactive substances and aortic reactive oxygen species and consequently decreased glutathione. Treatment with rosiglitazone (3 mg/kg/day, p.o., 2 weeks and 5 mg/kg/day, p.o., 2 weeks) significantly prevented sodium arsenite-induced VED by enhancing acetylcholine-induced endothelium dependent relaxation, improving the integrity of vascular endothelium, increasing the nitrite/nitrate concentration and decreasing the oxidative stress. However, the vascular protective effect of rosiglitazone was markedly abolished by co-administration of nitric oxide synthase inhibitor, N-Omega-Nitro-L-Arginine Methyl Ester (L-NAME) (25 mg/kg/day, i.p., 2 weeks). Thus, it may be concluded that rosiglitazone reduces oxidative stress, activates eNOS and enhances the generation of nitric oxide to prevent sodium arsenite-induced VED in rats. PMID:20422371

  1. Exposure to inhaled isobutyl nitrite reduces T cell-dependent responsiveness

    SciTech Connect

    Soderberg, L.S.F.; Barnett, J.B. )

    1991-03-11

    Isobutyl nitrite is a drug of abuse popular among male homosexuals and among adolescents. In order to approximate the nitrite exposures of inhalant abusers, mice were treated with 900 ppm isobutyl nitrite in an inhalation chamber for 45 min per day for 14 days. At 72 hr after the last exposure, mice were assayed for immune competence. Under these conditions, mice gained only half the weight of mice exposed to air. The spleens of nitrite exposed mice weighed 15% less and had 24% fewer cells per spleen than controls. Adjusted for equal cell numbers, T cell mitogenic and allogeneic proliferative responses were significantly reduce by 33% and 47%, respectively. Unstimulated spleen cells had elevated levels of IL-2 transcription following exposure to isobutyl nitrite suggesting that nitrite inhalation caused a nonspecific induction of T cells. In contrast, B cell proliferative responses to LPS were unaltered. Exposure to the nitrite reduced the frequency of T-dependent antibody plaque-forming cells (PFC) by 63% and the total number of reduced by 60% after as few as five daily exposures to isobutyl nitrite. Therefore, the data suggest that habitual inhalation of isobutyl nitrite impairs immune competence and that toxicity appears to be directed toward T cell functions.

  2. Role of the anion nitrite in ischemia-reperfusion cytoprotection and therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Dezfulian, Cameron; Raat, Nicolaas; Shiva, Sruti; Gladwin, Mark T

    2007-07-15

    The anion nitrite (NO(2)(-)) constitutes a biochemical reservoir for nitric oxide (NO). Nitrite reduction to NO may be catalyzed by hemoglobin, myoglobin or other metal-containing enzymes and occurs at increasing rates under conditions of physiologic hypoxia or ischemia. A number of laboratories have now demonstrated in animal models the ability of nitrite to provide potent cytoprotection following focal ischemia-reperfusion (IR) injury of the heart, liver, brain, and kidney. While the mechanism of nitrite-mediated cytoprotection remains to be fully characterized, the release of nitrite-derived NO following IR appears to be central to this mechanism. The evidence of nitrite-mediated cytoprotection against IR injury in multiple animal models opens the door to potential therapeutic opportunities in human disease. Here we review the mechanisms for nitrite formation in blood and tissue, its metabolic equilibrium with NO, nitrate, and NO-modified proteins, the evidence supporting nitrite-mediated cytoprotection, and the potential mechanisms driving cytoprotection, and we explore the opportunities for the therapeutic application of nitrite for human disease. PMID:17568573

  3. Model-based evaluation on the conversion ratio of ammonium to nitrite in a nitritation process for ammonium-rich wastewater treatment.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiao-Ming; Yang, Qi; Zeng, Guang-Ming; Cornelius, A; Rosenwinkel, K H; Kunst, S; Weichgrebe, D

    2004-01-01

    Modeling for nitritation process was discussed and analyzed quantitatively for the factors that influence nitrite accumulation. The results indicated that pH, inorganic carbon source and Hydraulic Retention Time (HRT) as well as biomass concentration are the main factors that influenced the conversion ratio of ammonium to nitrite. A constant high pH can lead to a high nitritation rate and results in high conversion ratio on condition that free ammonia inhibition do not happen. In a CSTR system, without pH control, this conversion ratio can be monitored by pH variation in the reactor. The pH goes down far from the inlet level means a strongly nitrite accumulation. High concentration of alkalinity can promoted the conversion ratio by means of accelerating the nitritation rate through providing sufficient inorganic carbon source(carbon dioxide). When inorganic carbon source was depleted, the nitritation process stopped. HRT adjustment could be an efficient way to make the nitritation system run more flexible, which to some extent can meet the requirements of the fluctuant of inlet parameters such as ammonium concentration, pH, and temperature and so on. Biomass concentration is the key point, especially for a CSTR system in steady state, which was normally circumscribed by the characteristics of bacteria and may also affected by aeration mode and can be increased by prolonging the HRT on the condition of no nitrate accumulation when no recirculation available. The higher the biomass concentration is, the better the nitrite accumulation can be obtained. PMID:15900739

  4. Effects of calcite and magnesite application to a declining Masson pine forest on strongly acidified soil in Southwestern China.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yongmei; Kang, Ronghua; Ma, Xiaoxiao; Qi, Yu; Mulder, Jan; Duan, Lei

    2014-05-15

    Liming of strongly acidified soil under a Masson pine (Pinus massoniana Lamb.) forest was studied through a seven-year field manipulation experiment at Tieshanping, Chongqing in Southwestern China. To distinguish between the individual effects of Ca(2+) and Mg(2+) addition, we separately applied calcite (CaCO3) and magnesite (MgCO3), rather than using dolomite [CaMg(CO3)2]. Both calcite and magnesite additions caused a significant increase in pH and a decrease in dissolved inorganic monomeric aluminium (Ali) concentration of soil water. Ecological recovery included increases of herb biomass (both treatments) and Mg content in Masson pine needles (magnesite treatment only). However, the growth rate of Masson pine did not increase under either treatment, possibly because of nutrient imbalance due to phosphorus (P) deficiency or limited observation period. In China, acid deposition in forest ecosystems commonly coincides with large inputs of atmogenic Ca(2+), both enhancing Mg(2+) leaching. Calcite addition may further decrease the Mg(2+) availability in soil water, thereby exacerbating Mg(2+) deficiency in the acidified forest soils of southern and southwestern China. The effect of anthropogenic acidification of naturally acid forest soils on P availability needs further study. PMID:24631610

  5. Ultraviolet absorption spectrum of chlorine nitrite, ClONO

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Molina, L. T.; Molina, M. J.

    1977-01-01

    The near-ultraviolet absorption spectrum of chlorine nitrite (ClONO) has been quantitatively investigated over the wavelength range 230-400 nm at 231 K. An absorption maximum was observed at 290 nm with a cross section of 1.5 by 10 to the -18th power sq cm. The calculated lifetime against photodissociation for ClONO in the atmosphere is 2 to 3 minutes. The large photolysis rate indicates that ClONO does not play a significant role in the stratosphere as a temporary holding tank for chlorine.

  6. Detecting and monitoring NO, SNO and nitrite in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Bellavia, Landon; Kim-Shapiro, Daniel B; King, S Bruce

    2015-01-01

    The detection and quantification of nitric oxide and related reactive nitrogen species in vivo is vital to the understanding of the pathology and/or treatment of numerous conditions. To that end, several detection and quantification methods have been developed to study NO, as well as its redox relatives, nitrite and S-nitrosothiols. While no single technique can offer a complete picture of the nitrogen cycle in a given system in vivo, familiarity with the benefits and limitations of several common tools for NOx determination can assist in the development of new diagnostics and therapeutics. PMID:26848400

  7. Expression and purification of spinach nitrite reductase in E. coli

    SciTech Connect

    Bellissimo, D.; Privalle, L. )

    1991-03-11

    The study of structure-function relationships in nitrite reductase (NiR) by site-directed mutagenesis requires an expression system from which suitable quantities of active enzyme can be purified. Spinach NiR cDNA was cloned into pUC18 and expressed in E.coli JM109 as a beta-galactosidase fusion protein. The IPTG-induced fusion protein contains five additional amino acids at the N-terminus. The expressed NiR in aerobic cultures was mostly insoluble and inactive indicating the presence of inclusion bodies. By altering growth conditions, active NiR could represent 0.5-1.0% of the total E.coli protein, Effects of the addition of delta-aminolevulinic acid, a heme precursor, and anaerobic growth were also examined. Spinach NiR was purified approximately 200 fold to homogeneity. When subjected to electrophoresis on SDS polyacrylamide gels, the NiR migrated as a single band with similar mobility to pure spinach enzyme. The expressed enzyme also reacted with rabbit anti-spinach NiR antibody as visualized by Western blot analysis. The absorption spectrum of the E.coli-expressed enzyme was identical to spinach enzyme with a Soret and alpha band a 386 and 573 nm, respectively, and an A{sub 278}/A{sub 386} = 1.9. The addition of nitrite produced the characteristic shifts in the spectrum. The E. coli-expressed NiR catalyzed the methylviologen-dependent reduction of nitrite. The specific activity was 100 U/mg. The K{sub m} determined for nitrite was 0.3 mM which is in agreement with values reported for the enzyme. These results indicate that the E.coli-expressed NiR is fully comparable to spinach NiR in purity, catalytic activity and physical state. Site-directed mutants have been made using PCR to examine structure-function relationships in this enzyme.

  8. A non-fatal intoxication with a high-dose sodium nitrate

    PubMed Central

    Joosen, Dorien; Stolk, Leo; Henry, Ronald

    2014-01-01

    A 67-year-old man accidentally ingested 75 g of sodium nitrate. He had instant gastrointestinal symptoms. On physical examination, he was respiratorily and haemodynamically stable and there were no signs of central or peripheral cyanosis. Repeated methaemoglobin levels were normal and he made an uneventful recovery. Sodium nitrate intoxication is rare. Serious effects can occur, mainly through formation of nitrite and nitric oxide, which can cause methaemoglobinaemia and vasodilation. Even if the presenting symptoms are mild, it is important to remain cautious since more serious symptoms can occur later. Monitoring of respiratory and haemodynamic status and repeated blood gas analysis in order to detect methaemoglobinaemia are recommended. PMID:24879739

  9. The nitrite reductase activity of horse heart carboxymethylated-cytochrome c is modulated by cardiolipin.

    PubMed

    Ascenzi, Paolo; Sbardella, Diego; Sinibaldi, Federica; Santucci, Roberto; Coletta, Massimo

    2016-06-01

    Horse heart carboxymethylated cytc (CM-cytc) displays myoglobin-like properties. Here, the effect of cardiolipin (CL) liposomes on the nitrite reductase activity of ferrous CM-cytc [CM-cytc-Fe(II)], in the presence of sodium dithionite, is reported between pH 5.5 and 7.6, at 20.0 °C. Cytc-Fe(II) displays a very low value of the apparent second-order rate constant for the NO2 (-)-mediated conversion of cytc-Fe(II) to cytc-Fe(II)-NO [k on = (7.3 ± 0.7) × 10(-2) M(-1) s(-1); at pH 7.4], whereas the value of k on for NO2 (-) reduction by CM-cytc-Fe(II) is 1.1 ± 0.2 M(-1) s(-1) (at pH 7.4). CL facilitates the NO2 (-)-mediated nitrosylation of CM-cytc-Fe(II) in a dose-dependent manner, the value of k on for the NO2 (-)-mediated conversion of CL-CM-cytc-Fe(II) to CL-CM-cytc-Fe(II)-NO (5.6 ± 0.6 M(-1) s(-1); at pH 7.4) being slightly higher than that for the NO2 (-)-mediated conversion of CL-cytc-Fe(II) to CL-cytc-Fe(II)-NO (2.6 ± 0.3 M(-1) s(-1); at pH 7.4). The apparent affinity of CL for CM-cytc-Fe(II) is essentially pH independent, the average value of B being (1.3 ± 0.3) × 10(-6) M. In the absence and presence of CL liposomes, the nitrite reductase activity of CM-cytc-Fe(II) increases linearly on lowering pH and the values of the slope of the linear fittings of Log k on versus pH are -1.05 ± 0.07 and -1.03 ± 0.03, respectively, reflecting the involvement of one proton for the formation of the transient ferric form, NO, and OH(-). These results indicate that Met80 carboxymethylation and CL binding cooperate in the stabilization of the highly reactive heme-Fe atom of CL-CM-cytc. PMID:27010463

  10. A scalable chemical route to soluble acidified graphitic carbon nitride: an ideal precursor for isolated ultrathin g-C3N4 nanosheets.

    PubMed

    Du, Xiaorui; Zou, Guojun; Wang, Zhonghao; Wang, Xiaolai

    2015-05-21

    We propose an efficient method to synthesize large-scale soluble acidified graphitic carbon nitride (g-C3N4). The as-prepared material exhibits the characteristics of a poly-ammonium salt and is soluble in several solvents with good dissolution-recrystallization reversible equilibrium. The pH value- and temperature-dependent solubility of the acidified g-C3N4 facilitates its separation and purification. After dissolution, acidified g-C3N4 forms isolated ultrathin nanosheets, making it an ideal precursor for large quantities of g-C3N4 nanosheets. This study raises the possibility of liquid assembly for g-C3N4 nanosheets based composite materials, expanding the functionalization and application of g-C3N4. PMID:25913280

  11. Rechargeable sodium alloy anode

    SciTech Connect

    Jow, T.R.

    1988-06-28

    A secondary battery is described comprising: (a) an anode which comprises an alloy of sodium and one or metals selected from the group consisting of tin, lead antimony, bismuth, selenium and tellerium, (b) an electrolyte comprising one or more organic solvents and one or more sodium salts dissolved therein forming dissolved sodium cations in solution; and (c) a cathode; the sodium cations from the electrolyte alloying with the one or more metals of the alloy in the anode during the charging of the battery and sodium in the alloy disoloving in the electrolyte during the discharging of the battery.

  12. Evaluation of the impact on food safety of a Lactobacillus coryniformis strain from pickled vegetables with degradation activity against nitrite and other undesirable compounds.

    PubMed

    Fang, Fang; Feng, Tingting; Du, Guocheng; Chen, Jian

    2016-04-01

    Four strains of lactic acid bacteria showing antimicrobial activity against some food-spoilage microorganisms or pathogens, including both Gram-negative and -positive strains, were isolated from naturally fermented pickled vegetables and a traditional cheese product. Among these isolates, Lactobacillus coryniformis strain BBE-H3, characterised previously to be a non-biogenic amine producer, showed a high level of activity in degrading sodium nitrite and exhibited the ability to eliminate ethyl carbamate and one of its precursors, urea. The antimicrobial substance produced by L. coryniformis BBE-H3 was found to be active at an acidic pH range of 4.0-4.5. The antimicrobial activity of this strain decreased differentially after treatment with proteolytic enzymes (pepsin, papain, trypsin and proteinase K), implying this growth inhibitory compound is either a protein or a polypeptide. The results of this study show the suitability of L. coryniformis BBE-H3 as a starter in food manufacturing processes, and demonstrate its potential role in eliminating food origin carcinogens such as sodium nitrite and ethyl carbamate. PMID:26898528

  13. Determination of the nonnutritive sweetener sodium cyclopentylsulfamate and three of its metabolites, cyclopentylamine, cyclopentanone, and cyclopentanol, in urine of rats and rabbits.

    PubMed

    Benson, G A; Spillane, W J

    1976-12-01

    The nonnutritive sweetener sodium cyclopentylsulfamate was fed to Wistar albino rats and New Zealand White rabbits. Urine was collected for 3 days after feeding, combined, and examined for the metabolites cyclopentylamine, cyclopentanone, and cyclopentanol and for sodium cyclopentylsulfamate was assayed by hydrolysis in acidified dioxane-water and subsequent measurement of the absorbance of the product formed (lambdamax = 490 nm) by the liberated amine with p-benzoquinone. The average conversion to cyclopentylamine, cyclopentanone, and cyclopentanol was 0.103, 0.171, and 0.054% in the rabbit and 0.057, 0.016, and 0.008% in the rat, respectively. PMID:1032676

  14. Nitrogen removal over nitrite by aeration control in aerobic granular sludge sequencing batch reactors.

    PubMed

    Lochmatter, Samuel; Maillard, Julien; Holliger, Christof

    2014-07-01

    This study investigated the potential of aeration control for the achievement of N-removal over nitrite with aerobic granular sludge in sequencing batch reactors. N-removal over nitrite requires less COD, which is particularly interesting if COD is the limiting parameter for nutrient removal. The nutrient removal performances for COD, N and P have been analyzed as well as the concentration of nitrite-oxidizing bacteria in the granular sludge. Aeration phase length control combined with intermittent aeration or alternate high-low DO, has proven to be an efficient way to reduce the nitrite-oxidizing bacteria population and hence achieve N-removal over nitrite. N-removal efficiencies of up to 95% were achieved for an influent wastewater with COD:N:P ratios of 20:2.5:1. The total N-removal rate was 0.18 kgN·m-3·d-1. With N-removal over nitrate the N-removal was only 74%. At 20 °C, the nitrite-oxidizing bacteria concentration decreased by over 95% in 60 days and it was possible to switch from N-removal over nitrite to N-removal over nitrate and back again. At 15 °C, the nitrite-oxidizing bacteria concentration decreased too but less, and nitrite oxidation could not be completely suppressed. However, the combination of aeration phase length control and high-low DO was also at 15 °C successful to maintain the nitrite pathway despite the fact that the maximum growth rate of nitrite-oxidizing bacteria at temperatures below 20 °C is in general higher than the one of ammonium-oxidizing bacteria. PMID:25006970

  15. Nitrogen Removal over Nitrite by Aeration Control in Aerobic Granular Sludge Sequencing Batch Reactors

    PubMed Central

    Lochmatter, Samuel; Maillard, Julien; Holliger, Christof

    2014-01-01

    This study investigated the potential of aeration control for the achievement of N-removal over nitrite with aerobic granular sludge in sequencing batch reactors. N-removal over nitrite requires less COD, which is particularly interesting if COD is the limiting parameter for nutrient removal. The nutrient removal performances for COD, N and P have been analyzed as well as the concentration of nitrite-oxidizing bacteria in the granular sludge. Aeration phase length control combined with intermittent aeration or alternate high-low DO, has proven to be an efficient way to reduce the nitrite-oxidizing bacteria population and hence achieve N-removal over nitrite. N-removal efficiencies of up to 95% were achieved for an influent wastewater with COD:N:P ratios of 20:2.5:1. The total N-removal rate was 0.18 kgN·m−3·d−1. With N-removal over nitrate the N-removal was only 74%. At 20 °C, the nitrite-oxidizing bacteria concentration decreased by over 95% in 60 days and it was possible to switch from N-removal over nitrite to N-removal over nitrate and back again. At 15 °C, the nitrite-oxidizing bacteria concentration decreased too but less, and nitrite oxidation could not be completely suppressed. However, the combination of aeration phase length control and high-low DO was also at 15 °C successful to maintain the nitrite pathway despite the fact that the maximum growth rate of nitrite-oxidizing bacteria at temperatures below 20 °C is in general higher than the one of ammonium-oxidizing bacteria. PMID:25006970

  16. Nitrite and Nitrate Concentrations and Metabolism in Breast Milk, Infant Formula, and Parenteral Nutrition

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Jesica A.; Ninnis, Janet R.; Hopper, Andrew O.; Ibrahim, Yomna; Merritt, T. Allen; Wan, Kim-Wah; Power, Gordon G.; Blood, Arlin B.

    2015-01-01

    Dietary nitrate and nitrite are sources of gastric NO, which modulates blood flow, mucus production, and microbial flora. However, the intake and importance of these anions in infants is largely unknown. Nitrate and nitrite levels were measured in breast milk of mothers of preterm and term infants, infant formulas, and parenteral nutrition. Nitrite metabolism in breast milk was measured after freeze-thawing, at different temperatures, varying oxygen tensions, and after inhibition of potential nitrite-metabolizing enzymes. Nitrite concentrations averaged 0.07 ± 0.01 μM in milk of mothers of preterm infants, less than that of term infants (0.13 ± 0.02 μM) (P < .01). Nitrate concentrations averaged 13.6 ± 3.7 μM and 12.7 ± 4.9 μM, respectively. Nitrite and nitrate concentrations in infant formulas varied from undetectable to many-fold more than breast milk. Concentrations in parenteral nutrition were equivalent to or lower than those of breast milk. Freeze-thawing decreased nitrite concentration ∼64%, falling with a half-life of 32 minutes at 37°C. The disappearance of nitrite was oxygen-dependent and prevented by ferricyanide and 3 inhibitors of lactoperoxidase. Nitrite concentrations in breast milk decrease with storage and freeze-thawing, a decline likely mediated by lactoperoxidase. Compared to adults, infants ingest relatively little nitrite and nitrate, which may be of importance in the modulation of blood flow and the bacterial flora of the infant GI tract, especially given the protective effects of swallowed nitrite. PMID:23894175

  17. The effect of environmental hypercapnia and size on nitrite toxicity in the striped catfish (Pangasianodon hypophthalmus).

    PubMed

    Hvas, Malthe; Damsgaard, Christian; Gam, Le Thi Hong; Huong, Do Thi Thanh; Jensen, Frank B; Bayley, Mark

    2016-07-01

    Striped catfish (Pangasianodon hypophthalmus) are farmed intensively at high stocking densities in Vietnam where they are likely to encounter environmental hypercapnia as well as occasional high levels of aquatic nitrite. Nitrite competes with Cl(-) for uptake at the branchial HCO3(-)/Cl(-) exchanger, causing a drastic reduction in the blood oxygen carrying capacity through the formation of methaemoglobin and nitrosylhaemoglobin. Environmental hypercapnia induces a respiratory acidosis where the branchial HCO3(-)/Cl(-) exchange activity is reduced in order to retain HCO3(-) for pH recovery, which should lead to a reduced nitrite uptake. To assess the effect of hypercapnia on nitrite uptake, fish were cannulated in the dorsal aorta, allowing repeated blood sampling for measurements of haemoglobin derivatives, plasma ions and acid-base status during exposure to 0.9mM nitrite alone and in combination with acute and 48h acclimated hypercapnia over a period of 72h. Nitrite uptake was initially reduced during the hypercapnia-induced acidosis, but after pH recovery the situation was reversed, resulting in higher plasma nitrite concentrations and lower functional haemoglobin levels that eventually caused mortality. This suggests that branchial HCO3(-)/Cl(-) exchange activity is reduced only during the initial acid-base compensation, but subsequently increases with the greater availability of internal HCO3(-) counter-ions as pH is compensated. The data further suggest that branchial Na(+)/H(+) exchange plays a significant role in the initial phase of acid-base compensation. Overall, longer term environmental hypercapnia does not protect against nitrite uptake in P. hypophthalmus, but instead enhances it. In addition, we observed a significant size effect in nitrite accumulation, where large fish attained plasma [nitrite] above the ambient concentration, while small fish did not. Small P. hypophthalmus instead had significantly higher plasma [nitrate], and haemoglobin

  18. A composite biochemical system for bacterial nitrate and nitrite assimilation as exemplified by Paracoccus denitrificans.

    PubMed

    Gates, Andrew J; Luque-Almagro, Victor M; Goddard, Alan D; Ferguson, Stuart J; Roldán, M Dolores; Richardson, David J

    2011-05-01

    The denitrifying bacterium Paracoccus denitrificans can grow aerobically or anaerobically using nitrate or nitrite as the sole nitrogen source. The biochemical pathway responsible is expressed from a gene cluster comprising a nitrate/nitrite transporter (NasA), nitrite transporter (NasH), nitrite reductase (NasB), ferredoxin (NasG) and nitrate reductase (NasC). NasB and NasG are essential for growth with nitrate or nitrite as the nitrogen source. NADH serves as the electron donor for nitrate and nitrite reduction, but only NasB has a NADH-oxidizing domain. Nitrate and nitrite reductase activities show the same Km for NADH and can be separated by anion-exchange chromatography, but only fractions containing NasB retain the ability to oxidize NADH. This implies that NasG mediates electron flux from the NADH-oxidizing site in NasB to the sites of nitrate and nitrite reduction in NasC and NasB respectively. Delivery of extracellular nitrate to NasBGC is mediated by NasA, but both NasA and NasH contribute to nitrite uptake. The roles of NasA and NasC can be substituted during anaerobic growth by the biochemically distinct membrane-bound respiratory nitrate reductase (Nar), demonstrating functional overlap. nasG is highly conserved in nitrate/nitrite assimilation gene clusters, which is consistent with a key role for the NasG ferredoxin, as part of a phylogenetically widespread composite nitrate and nitrite reductase system. PMID:21348864

  19. A scalable chemical route to soluble acidified graphitic carbon nitride: an ideal precursor for isolated ultrathin g-C3N4 nanosheets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, Xiaorui; Zou, Guojun; Wang, Zhonghao; Wang, Xiaolai

    2015-05-01

    We propose an efficient method to synthesize large-scale soluble acidified graphitic carbon nitride (g-C3N4). The as-prepared material exhibits the characteristics of a poly-ammonium salt and is soluble in several solvents with good dissolution-recrystallization reversible equilibrium. The pH value- and temperature-dependent solubility of the acidified g-C3N4 facilitates its separation and purification. After dissolution, acidified g-C3N4 forms isolated ultrathin nanosheets, making it an ideal precursor for large quantities of g-C3N4 nanosheets. This study raises the possibility of liquid assembly for g-C3N4 nanosheets based composite materials, expanding the functionalization and application of g-C3N4.We propose an efficient method to synthesize large-scale soluble acidified graphitic carbon nitride (g-C3N4). The as-prepared material exhibits the characteristics of a poly-ammonium salt and is soluble in several solvents with good dissolution-recrystallization reversible equilibrium. The pH value- and temperature-dependent solubility of the acidified g-C3N4 facilitates its separation and purification. After dissolution, acidified g-C3N4 forms isolated ultrathin nanosheets, making it an ideal precursor for large quantities of g-C3N4 nanosheets. This study raises the possibility of liquid assembly for g-C3N4 nanosheets based composite materials, expanding the functionalization and application of g-C3N4. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Experimental details, supporting information for XRD and XPS analysis, FT-IR and UV-vis spectra of the recovered g-C3N4, EIS Nyquist plots, solubility experiments and results, TEM and AFM images of g-C3N4 nanosheets, and photographs and TEM images of Pt@CNS. See DOI: 10.1039/c5nr00665a

  20. Six-electron reduction of nitrite to ammonia by cytochrome c nitrite reductase: insights from density functional theory studies.

    PubMed

    Bykov, Dmytro; Neese, Frank

    2015-10-01

    In this Forum Article, an extensive discussion of the mechanism of six-electron, seven-proton nitrite reduction by the cytochrome c nitrite reductase enzyme is presented. On the basis of previous studies, the entire mechanism is summarized and a unified picture of the most plausible sequence of elementary steps is presented. According to this scheme, the mechanism can be divided into five functional stages. The first phase of the reaction consists of substrate binding and N-O bond cleavage. Here His277 plays a crucial role as a proton donor. In this step, the N-O bond is cleaved heterolytically through double protonation of the substrate. The second phase of the mechanism consists of two proton-coupled electron-transfer events, leading to an HNO intermediate. The third phase involves the formation of hydroxylamine, where Arg114 provides the necessary proton for the reaction. The second N-O bond is cleaved in the fourth phase of the mechanism, again triggered by proton transfer from His277. The Tyr218 side chain governs the fifth and last phase of the mechanism. It consists of radical transfer and ammonia formation. Thus, this mechanism implies that all conserved active-site side chains work in a concerted way in order to achieve this complex chemical transformation from nitrite to ammonia. The Forum Article also provides a detailed discussion of the density functional theory based cluster model approach to bioinorganic reactivity. A variety of questions are considered: the resting state of enzyme and substrate binding modes, interaction with the metal site and with active-site side chains, electron- and proton-transfer events, substrate dissociation, etc. PMID:26237518

  1. Method 353.4 Determination of Nitrate and Nitrite in Estuarine and Coastal Waters by Gas Segmented Continuous Flow Colorimetric Analysis

    EPA Science Inventory

    This method provides a procedure for determining nitrate and nitrite concentrations in estuarine and coastal waters. Nitrate is reduced to nitrite by cadmium,1-3 and the resulting nitrite determined by formation of an azo dye.4-6

  2. Acrylic microspheres-based optosensor for visual detection of nitrite.

    PubMed

    Noor, Nur Syarmim Mohamed; Tan, Ling Ling; Heng, Lee Yook; Chong, Kwok Feng; Tajuddin, Saiful Nizam

    2016-09-15

    A new optosensor for visual quantitation of nitrite (NO2(-)) ion has been fabricated by physically immobilizing Safranine O (SO) reagent onto a self-adhesive poly(n-butyl acrylate) [poly(nBA)] microspheres matrix, which was synthesized via facile microemulsion UV lithography technique. Evaluation and optimization of the optical NO2(-) ion sensor was performed with a fiber optic reflectance spectrophotometer. Scanning electron micrograph showed well-shaped and smooth spherical morphology of the poly(nBA) microspheres with a narrow particles size distribution from 0.6 μm up to 1.8 μm. The uniform size distribution of the acrylic microspheres promoted homogeneity of the immobilized SO reagent molecules on the microspheres' surfaces, thereby enhanced the sensing response reproducibility (<5% RSD) with a linear range obtained from 10 to 100 ppm NO2(-) ion. The micro-sized acrylic immobilization matrix demonstrated no significant barrier for diffusion of reactant and product, and served as a good solid state ion transport medium for reflectometric nitrite determination in food samples. PMID:27080889

  3. Addition of nitrite enhances the electrochemical defluorination of 2-fluoroaniline.

    PubMed

    Feng, Huajun; Liang, Yuxiang; Guo, Kun; Long, Yuyang; Cong, Yanqing; Shen, Dongsheng

    2015-12-30

    This study introduces a novel approach that uses the interaction of pollutants with added nitrite to produce diazonium salts, which cause in situ self-assembly of the pollutants on carbon electrodes, to improve their 2-fluoroaniline (2-FA) defluorination and removal performance. The 2-FA degradation performance, electrode properties, electrochemical properties and degradation pathway were investigated. The reactor containing NO2(-) achieved a 2-FA removal efficiency of 90.1% and a defluorination efficiency of 38% within 48 h, 1.4 and 2.3 times higher than the corresponding results achieved without NO2(-), respectively. The residual NO2(-) was less than 0.5mg/L in the reactor containing added NO2(-), which would not cause serious secondary pollution. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) results proved that the carbon anode surface was successfully modified with benzene polymer, and electrochemical tests confirmed that the electrochemical activity of the modified anode was enhanced significantly. The C-F bond was weakened by the effect of the positive charge of the benzenediazonium groups, and the high electrochemical activity of the carbon anode enhanced the electrochemical performance of the system to accelerate defluorination. Thus, the present electrical method involving nitrite nitrogen is very promising for the treatment of wastewater containing fluoroaniline compounds. PMID:26266896

  4. Nitrite and nitrate as electron acceptors for biological sulphide oxidation.

    PubMed

    Munz, G; Mannucci, A; Arreola-Vargas, J; Alatriste-Mondragon, F; Giaccherini, F; Mori, G

    2015-01-01

    Autotrophic denitrification with sulphide using nitrate (R1) and nitrite (R2) as electron acceptor was investigated at bench scale. Different solids retention times (SRT) (5 and 20 d) have been tested in R1 while R2 was operated at SRT=13 d. The results indicated that the process allows complete sulphide removal to be achieved in all tested conditions. Tested sulphide loads were estimated from the H2S produced in a pilot-scale anaerobic digester treating vegetable tannery primary sludge; nitrogen loads originated from the nitrification of the supernatant. Average nitrogen removal efficiencies higher than 80% were observed in all the tested conditions once steady state was reached. A maximum specific nitrate removal rate equal to 0.35 g N-NO3- g VSS(-1) d(-1) was reached in R1. Due to sulphide limitation, incomplete denitrification was observed and nitrite and thiosulphate tend to accumulate especially in the presence of variable environmental conditions in both R1 and R2. Lower SRT caused higher NO2accumulated/NO3reduced ratios (0.22 and 0.24, with SRT of 5 d and 20 d, respectively) using nitrate as electron acceptor in steady-state condition. Temperature decrease caused sudden NO2accumulated/NO3reduced ratio increase in R1 and NO2- removal decrease in R2. PMID:26247758

  5. Source and sink of nitrite in heavily populated European River

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raimonet, M.; Viollier, E.; Culoma, L.; Laverman, A.

    2012-12-01

    The occurrence of nitrite (NO2-) accumulation is a major environmental issue, as NO2- is highly toxic to living organisms, even at low concentrations. Even if NO2- is generally quickly oxidized in the environment, NO2- accumulation has been reported in various terrestrial and aquatic environments. The Seine River - that receive water effluents from one of the most heavily populated system in Europe - is characterized by NO2- accumulation downstream of Paris city. The main hypotheses to explain the persistence of NO2- are high NO2- concentrations in outlets of the biggest European waste water treatment plant and the low growth rate of nitrifying bacteria - and especially, nitrite oxidizing bacteria - compared to river water residence time. However, the role of benthic processes and sediment resuspension on NO2- dynamics has not been investigated in the river, where fluvial transport generates episodic and frequent resuspension. In this study, we quantified reaction rates of processes involving NO2- production and/or consumption in surface water and sediments, as well as benthic exchanges at the sediment-water interface, under oxic and anoxic conditions. This work allowed estimating the contribution of the Seine River to NO2- dynamics and the response of riverine bacteria to high NO2- loads.

  6. Sugar-Driven Prebiotic Synthesis of Ammonia from Nitrite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weber, Arthur L.

    2010-03-01

    Reaction of 3-5 carbon sugars, glycolaldehyde, and α-ketoaldehydes with nitrite under mild anaerobic aqueous conditions yielded ammonia, an essential substrate for the synthesis of nitrogen-containing molecules during abiogenesis. Under the same conditions, ammonia synthesis was not driven by formaldehyde, glyoxylate, 2-deoxyribose, and glucose, a result indicating that the reduction process requires an organic reductant containing either an accessible α-hydroxycarbonyl group or an α-dicarbonyl group. Small amounts of aqueous Fe+3 catalyzed the sugar-driven synthesis of ammonia. The glyceraldehyde concentration dependence of ammonia synthesis, and control studies of ammonia’s reaction with glyceraldehyde, indicated that ammonia formation is accompanied by incorporation of part of the synthesized ammonia into sugar-derived organic products. The ability of sugars to drive the synthesis of ammonia is considered important to abiogenesis because it provides a way to generate photochemically unstable ammonia at sites of sugar-based origin-of-life processes from nitrite, a plausible prebiotic nitrogen species.

  7. Sugar-driven prebiotic synthesis of ammonia from nitrite.

    PubMed

    Weber, Arthur L

    2010-06-01

    Reaction of 3-5 carbon sugars, glycolaldehyde, and alpha-ketoaldehydes with nitrite under mild anaerobic aqueous conditions yielded ammonia, an essential substrate for the synthesis of nitrogen-containing molecules during abiogenesis. Under the same conditions, ammonia synthesis was not driven by formaldehyde, glyoxylate, 2-deoxyribose, and glucose, a result indicating that the reduction process requires an organic reductant containing either an accessible alpha-hydroxycarbonyl group or an alpha-dicarbonyl group. Small amounts of aqueous Fe(+3) catalyzed the sugar-driven synthesis of ammonia. The glyceraldehyde concentration dependence of ammonia synthesis, and control studies of ammonia's reaction with glyceraldehyde, indicated that ammonia formation is accompanied by incorporation of part of the synthesized ammonia into sugar-derived organic products. The ability of sugars to drive the synthesis of ammonia is considered important to abiogenesis because it provides a way to generate photochemically unstable ammonia at sites of sugar-based origin-of-life processes from nitrite, a plausible prebiotic nitrogen species. PMID:20213158

  8. Toluene nitration in irradiated nitric acid and nitrite solution

    SciTech Connect

    Gracy Elias; Bruce J. Mincher; Stephen P. Mezyk; Jim Muller; Leigh R. Martin

    2011-04-01

    The kinetics, mechanisms, and stable products produced for the aryl alkyl mild ortho-para director - toluene, in irradiated nitric acid and neutral nitrite solutions were investigated using ?, and pulse radiolysis. Electron pulse radiolysis was used to determine the bimolecular rate constants for the reaction of toluene with different transient species produced by irradiation. HPLC with UV detection was primarily used to assess the stable reaction products. GC-MS and LC-MS were used to confirm the results from HPLC. Free-radical nitration reaction products were found in irradiated acidic and neutral media. In acidic medium, the ring substitution and side chain substitution and oxidation produced different nitro products. In ring substitution, nitrogen oxide radicals were added mainly to hydroxyl radical-produced cyclohexadienyl radical, and in side chain substitution they were added to the carbon-centered benzyl radical produced by H-atom abstraction. In neutral nitrite toluene solution, radiolytic ring nitration products approached a statistically random distribution, suggesting a free-radical reaction involving addition of the •NO2 radical.

  9. Coastal water column ammonium and nitrite oxidation are decoupled in summer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heiss, Elise M.; Fulweiler, Robinson W.

    2016-09-01

    Water column nitrification is a key process in the nitrogen cycle as it links reduced and oxidized forms of nitrogen and also provides the substrate (nitrate) needed for reactive nitrogen removal by denitrification. We measured potential water column ammonium and nitrite oxidation rates at four sites along an estuary to continental shelf gradient over two summers. In most cases, nitrite oxidation rates outpaced ammonium oxidation rates. Overall, ammonium and nitrite oxidation rates were higher outside of the estuary, and this trend was primarily driven by higher oxidation rates in deeper waters. Additionally, both ammonium and nitrite oxidation rates were impacted by different in situ variables. Ammonium oxidation rates throughout the water column as a whole were most positively correlated to depth and salinity and negatively correlated to dissolved oxygen and light. In contrast, nitrite oxidation rates throughout the water column were negatively correlated with light and pH. Multivariate regression analysis revealed that while both surface (<20 m) and deep (>20 m) ammonium oxidation rates were most strongly predicted by depth and light, surface rates were also regulated by salinity and deep rates by temperature. Surface (<20 m) nitrite oxidation rates were best explained by [H+] (i.e. pH) alone, while salinity, [H+], temperature, and depth all played a role in predicting deep (>20 m) nitrite oxidation rates. These results support the growing body of evidence that ammonium oxidation and nitrite oxidation are not always coupled, should be measured separately, and are influenced by different environmental conditions.

  10. Green Alternatives to Nitrates and Nitrites in Meat-based Products-A Review.

    PubMed

    Gassara, Fatma; Kouassi, Anne Patricia; Brar, Satinder Kaur; Belkacemi, Khaled

    2016-10-01

    Several food additives are added in food for their preservation to maintain the freshness of food (antioxidants) or to slow down or stop the growth of microorganisms (preservative agents). Nitrites and nitrates are used as preservative agents in meat. Nitrites give a smoked taste, a pinkish color in the meat and protect the consumers against the risk of bacterial deterioration. Their addition is however very limited as, in high dose, it can have risks on human health and the environment. Nitrites may also combine with secondary or tertiary amines to form N-nitroso derivatives. Certain N-nitroso compounds have been shown to produce cancers in a wide range of laboratory animals. Thus, alternatives of nitrates and nitrites are the object of numerous research studies. Alternatives, such as the addition of vitamins, fruits, chemicals products, natural products containing nitrite or spices, which have similar properties of nitrites, are in evaluation. In fact, spices are considered to have several organoleptic and anti-microbial properties which would be interesting to study. Several spices and combinations of spices are being progressively evaluated. This review discusses the sources of nitrites and nitrates, their use as additives in food products, their physicochemical properties, their negatives effects and the use of alternatives of nitrites and nitrates in preserving meat products. PMID:25750989

  11. 75 FR 29534 - Inorganic Nitrates-Nitrite, Carbon and Carbon Dioxide, and Sulfur Registration Review; Draft...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-26

    ... AGENCY Inorganic Nitrates-Nitrite, Carbon and Carbon Dioxide, and Sulfur Registration Review; Draft... draft ecological risk assessment for the registration review of inorganic nitrates - nitrites, carbon and carbon dioxide, and gas cartridge uses of sulfur, and opens a public comment period on...

  12. Volatile fatty acid impacts on nitrite oxidation and carbon dioxide fixation in activated sludge.

    PubMed

    Oguz, Merve T; Robinson, Kevin G; Layton, Alice C; Sayler, Gary S

    2006-02-01

    Batch test were performed to assess nitrite removal, nitrate formation, CO2 fixation, gaseous nitrogen production and microbial density in activated sludge exposed to volatile fatty acid (VFA) mixtures. Nitrite removal and nitrate formation were both affected by the presence of VFAs, but to different degrees. Nitrate formation rates were reduced to a greater extent (79%) than nitrite removal rates (36%) resulting in an apparent unbalanced nitrite oxidation reaction. Since the total bacterial density and the nitrite oxidizing bacteria (NOB, Nitrospira) concentration remained essentially constant under all test conditions, the reduction in rates was not due to heterotrophic uptake of nitrogen or to a decrease in the NOB population. In contrast to the nitrogen results, VFAs were not found to impact CO2 fixation efficiency. It appeared that nitrite oxidation occurred when VFAs were present since the oxidation of nitrite provides energy for CO2 fixation. However, nitrate produced from the oxidation of nitrite was reduced to gaseous nitrogen products. N2O gas was detected in the presence of VFAs which was a clear indication that VFAs stimulated an alternative pathway, such as aerobic denitrification, during biotransformation of nitrogen in activated sludge. PMID:16436292

  13. Nitrite Inhalants Use and HIV Infection among Men Who Have Sex with Men in China

    PubMed Central

    Li, Dongliang; Yang, Xueying; Zhang, Zheng; Qi, Xiao; Ruan, Yuhua; Jia, Yujiang; Pan, Stephen W.; Xiao, Dong; Jennifer Huang, Z.; Luo, Fengji; Hu, Yifei

    2014-01-01

    Objective. This is the first study in China to examine the use of nitrite inhalants and its correlates among men who have sex with men (MSM) in Beijing, China. Methods. A cross-sectional survey was conducted in 2012. Structured interviews collected data on demographics, sexual and drug use behaviors, and the use of HIV services. Blood specimens were collected and tested for HIV and syphilis. Results. A total of 400 MSM eligible for the study were between 19 and 63 years of age and overall HIV prevalence was 6.0% (9.0% among nitrite inhalant users and 3.3% among nonusers). Nearly half (47.3%) of them reported ever using nitrite inhalants and 42.3% admitted using nitrite inhalants in the past year. Multivariable logistic analysis revealed that ever using nitrite inhalants in the past was independently associated with being aged ≤25 years, having higher education attainment, seeking sex via Internet, having casual partners in the past three months, and being HIV positive. Conclusion. The use of nitrite inhalants was alarmingly prevalent among MSM in Beijing. The independent association of the nitrite inhalant use with more casual sex partners and HIV infection underscored the need for intervention and prevention of nitrite inhalant use. PMID:24800219

  14. MECHANISM OF PITTING CORROSION PREVENTION BY NITRITE IN CARBON STEEL EXPOSED TO DILUTE SALT SOLUTIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The overall goal of this project is to develop a fundamental understanding of the role of nitrite in preventing the breakdown of protective oxide coating on steel and the onset of pitting. A fundamental understanding of the materials science and electrochemistry of the nitrite ro...

  15. Metabolic fates and effects of nitrite in brown trout under normoxic and hypoxic conditions: blood and tissue nitrite metabolism and interactions with branchial NOS, Na+/K+-ATPase and hsp70 expression.

    PubMed

    Jensen, Frank B; Gerber, Lucie; Hansen, Marie N; Madsen, Steffen S

    2015-07-01

    Nitrite secures essential nitric oxide (NO) bioavailability in hypoxia at low endogenous concentrations, whereas it becomes toxic at high concentrations. We exposed brown trout to normoxic and hypoxic water in the absence and presence of added ambient nitrite to decipher the cellular metabolism and effects of nitrite at basal and elevated concentrations under different oxygen regimes. We also tested hypotheses concerning the influence of nitrite on branchial nitric oxide synthase (NOS), Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase (nka) and heat shock protein (hsp70) mRNA expression. Basal plasma and erythrocyte nitrite levels were higher in hypoxia than normoxia, suggesting increased NOS activity. Nitrite exposure strongly elevated nitrite concentrations in plasma, erythrocytes, heart tissue and white muscle, which was associated with an extensive metabolism of nitrite to nitrate and to iron-nitrosylated and S-nitrosated compounds. Nitrite uptake was slightly higher in hypoxia than normoxia, and high internal nitrite levels extensively converted blood hemoglobin to methemoglobin and nitrosylhemoglobin. Hypoxia increased inducible NOS (iNOS) mRNA levels in the gills, which was overruled by a strong inhibition of iNOS expression by nitrite in both normoxia and hypoxia, suggesting negative-feedback regulation of iNOS gene expression by nitrite. A similar inhibition was absent for neuronal NOS. Branchial NKA activity stayed unchanged, but mRNA levels of the nkaα1a subunit increased with hypoxia and nitrite, which may have countered an initial NKA inhibition. Nitrite also increased hsp70 gene expression, probably contributing to the cytoprotective effects of nitrite at low concentrations. Nitrite displays a concentration-dependent switch between positive and negative effects similar to other signaling molecules. PMID:25908056

  16. Modelling Cometary Sodium Tails

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Birkett, K. S.; Jones, G. H.; Coates, A. J.

    2013-12-01

    Neutral sodium is readily observed in cometary spectra and can be seen to form its own distinct tail at high activity comets. Solar radiation pressure accelerates the sodium atoms antisunward and, as strong sodium absorption lines are present in the solar spectrum, the magnitude of this force is dependent upon the Doppler shift of the incident solar radiation. Therefore the heliocentric velocity of the sodium atom directly determines its acceleration. This can produce unique effects, such as a stagnation region. Sodium is relatively easy to detect and so can potentially be used to trace mechanisms in the coma that are otherwise difficult to observe. The source of neutral sodium in the tail currently remains unknown. We have therefore developed a new, three dimensional Monte-Carlo model of neutral cometary sodium in order to facilitate testing of different source production functions. It includes weightings due to neutral sodium lifetime, variation of cometary sodium emission due to Fraunhofer absorption lines and solar flux variation with heliocentric distance. The Swings and Greenstein effects, which can have particularly dramatic effects in near-Sun comets, are also considered comprehensively. Preliminary results from this model are presented, focusing on a comparison of predictions of the neutral sodium tail of Comet C/2012 S1 (ISON) with initial observations.

  17. Nitrite binding to globins: linkage isomerism, EPR silence and reductive chemistry

    PubMed Central

    Silaghi-Dumitrescu, Radu; Svistunenko, Dimitri A.; Cioloboc, Daniela; Bischin, Cristina; Scurtu, Florina; Cooper, Chris E.

    2014-01-01

    The nitrite adducts of globins can potentially bind via O- or N- linkage to the heme iron. We have used EPR (electron paramagnetic resonance) and DFT (density functional theory) to explore these binding modes to myoglobin and hemoglobin. We demonstrate that the nitrite adducts of both globins have detectable EPR signals; we provide an explanation for the difficulty in detecting these EPR features, based on uniaxial state considerations. The EPR and DFT data show that both nitrite linkage isomers can be present at the same time and that the two isomers are readily interconvertible in solution. The millisecond-scale process of nitrite reduction by Hb is investigated in search of the elusive Fe(II)-nitrite adduct. PMID:25172022

  18. Photoluminescent Detection of Nitrite with Carbon Nanodots Prepared by Microwave-assisted Synthesis.

    PubMed

    Morita, Kotaro; Kobayashi, Akane; Nagatani, Hirohisa; Imura, Hisanori

    2015-01-01

    A photoluminescent detection method for nitrite with high selectivity and sensitivity using carbon nanodots (CNDs) is demonstrated. The selectivity of nitrite is accomplished by a highly specific diazotization reaction between nitrite and p-phenylenediamine (p-PDA). In the presence of nitrite, p-PDA easily reacts to form the diazonium cation in the acidic aqueous solution. By alkalization of the reaction mixture, diazonium cation of p-PDA was converted to an aryl radical to form aggregated CNDs, which causes the change in the photoluminescent intensity of CNDs. In the present method, nitrite can be selectively detected down to 1 μM over several anions, such as nitrate, perchlorate, sulfate, fluoride, chloride, and bromide at mM levels. PMID:26063009

  19. Inhibition, but not uncoupling, of respiratory energy coupling of three bacterial species by nitrite.

    PubMed Central

    Rake, J B; Eagon, R G

    1980-01-01

    The effect of nitrite on respiratory energy coupling of three bacteria was studied in light of a recent report that nitrite acted as an uncoupling agent with Paracoccus denitrificans grown under denitrifying conditions. Our determinations of proton translocation stoichiometry of Pseudomonas putida (aerobically grown), Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and P. denitrificans (grown both aerobically and under denitrifying conditions) showed nitrite inhibition of proton-to-oxidant stoichiometry, but not uncoupling. Nitrite both reduced the H+/O ratio and decreased the rate of proton resorption. Increased proton resorption rates, characteristic of authentic uncoupling agents, were not observed. The lack of enhanced proton permeability due to nitrite was verified via passive proton permeability assays. The H+/O ratio of P. aeruginosa increased when growth conditions were changed from aerobic to denitrifying. This suggested the induction of an additional coupling site in the electron transport chain of denitrifying P. aeruginosa. PMID:6777373

  20. Biochemical predetermination of the NO synthase and nitrite reductase components of the nitric oxide cycle.

    PubMed

    Reutov, V P

    1999-05-01

    This review presents some aspects of a concept of cellular evolution bearing a relationship to nitrate--nitrite respiration, the endosymbiosis theory, and the origin of NO synthase and nitrite reductase activity in heme-containing proteins. Analysis of structural and functional unity of the NO synthase and nitrite reductase systems suggests that these systems did not arise without any relation to evolutionarily ancient energetic systems of cells. The use of symmetry principles reveals commonalities among many electron transport chains which in the language of physics is called "invariance". This work also comparatively analyzes the nitric oxide cycle and the known nitrogen cycle. The ideas about evolution of the NO synthase and nitrite reductase systems developed here are clearly compatible with the endosymbiotic theory and the hypothesis that nitrate--nitrite respiration was a precursor of oxygen-dependent respiration. PMID:10381613

  1. NxrB encoding the beta subunit of nitrite oxidoreductase as functional and phylogenetic marker for nitrite-oxidizing Nitrospira.

    PubMed

    Pester, Michael; Maixner, Frank; Berry, David; Rattei, Thomas; Koch, Hanna; Lücker, Sebastian; Nowka, Boris; Richter, Andreas; Spieck, Eva; Lebedeva, Elena; Loy, Alexander; Wagner, Michael; Daims, Holger

    2014-10-01

    Nitrospira are the most widespread and diverse known nitrite-oxidizing bacteria and key nitrifiers in natural and engineered ecosystems. Nevertheless, their ecophysiology and environmental distribution are understudied because of the recalcitrance of Nitrospira to cultivation and the lack of a molecular functional marker, which would allow the detection of Nitrospira in the environment. Here we introduce nxrB, the gene encoding subunit beta of nitrite oxidoreductase, as a functional and phylogenetic marker for Nitrospira. Phylogenetic trees based on nxrB of Nitrospira were largely congruent to 16S ribosomal RNA-based phylogenies. By using new nxrB-selective polymerase chain reaction primers, we obtained almost full-length nxrB sequences from Nitrospira cultures, two activated sludge samples, and several geographically and climatically distinct soils. Amplicon pyrosequencing of nxrB fragments from 16 soils revealed a previously unrecognized diversity of terrestrial Nitrospira with 1801 detected species-level operational taxonomic units (OTUs) (using an inferred species threshold of 95% nxrB identity). Richness estimates ranged from 10 to 946 coexisting Nitrospira species per soil. Comparison with an archaeal amoA dataset obtained from the same soils [Environ. Microbiol. 14: 525-539 (2012)] uncovered that ammonia-oxidizing archaea and Nitrospira communities were highly correlated across the soil samples, possibly indicating shared habitat preferences or specific biological interactions among members of these nitrifier groups. PMID:24118804

  2. Determination of 5-log reduction times for Escherichia coli O157:H7, Salmonella enterica, or Listeria monocytogenes in acidified foods with pH 3.5 or 3.8

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A critical factor in ensuring the safety of acidified foods is the establishment of a thermal process that assures the destruction of acid-resistant vegetative pathogenic and spoilage bacteria. For acidified foods such as dressings and mayonnaises with pH values of 3.5 or higher, the high water phas...

  3. Conjugated linoleic acid and nitrite attenuate mitochondrial dysfunction during myocardial ischemia.

    PubMed

    Van Hoose, Patrick M; Kelm, Natia Qipshidze; Piell, Kellianne M; Cole, Marsha P

    2016-08-01

    Cardiovascular health is influenced by dietary composition and the western diet is composed of varying types/amounts of fat. Conjugated linoleic acid (cLA) is an abundant dietary unsaturated fatty acid associated with health benefits but its biological signaling is not well understood. Nitrite is enriched in vegetables within the diet and can impact signaling of unsaturated fatty acids; however, its role on cLA signaling is not well understood. Elucidating how nitrite may impact the biological signaling of cLA is important due to the dietary consumption of both cLA and nitrite in the western diet. Since co-administration of cLA and nitrite results in cardioprotection during myocardial infarction (MI), it was hypothesized that cLA and nitrite may affect cardiac mitochondrial respiratory function and complex activity in MI. C57BL/6J mice were treated with cLA and nitrite for either 10 or 13days, where MI was induced on day 3. Following treatment, respiration and complex activity were measured. Among the major findings of this study, cLA treatment (10days) decreases state 3 respiration in vivo. Following MI, nitrite alone and in combination with cLA attenuates increased state 3 respiration and decreases hydrogen peroxide levels. Further, nitrite and cLA co-treatment attenuates increased complex III activity after MI. These results suggest that cLA, nitrite and the combination significantly alter cardiac mitochondrial respiratory and electron transport chain activity in vivo and following MI. Overall, the daily consumption of cLA and nitrite in the diet can have diverse cardiovascular implications, some of which occur at the mitochondrial level. PMID:27156147

  4. Characterization of nitrite degradation by Lactobacillus casei subsp. rhamnosus LCR 6013.

    PubMed

    Liu, Dong-mei; Wang, Pan; Zhang, Xin-yue; Xu, Xi-lin; Wu, Hui; Li, Li

    2014-01-01

    Nitrites are potential carcinogens. Therefore, limiting nitrites in food is critically important for food safety. The nitrite degradation capacity of Lactobacillus casei subsp. rhamnosus LCR 6013 was investigated in pickle fermentation. After LCR 6013 fermentation for 120 h at 37°C, the nitrite concentration in the fermentation system was significantly lower than that in the control sample without the LCR 6013 strain. The effects of NaCl and Vc on nitrite degradation by LCR 6013 in the De Man, Rogosa and Sharpe (MRS) medium were also investigated. The highest nitrite degradations, 9.29 mg/L and 9.89 mg/L, were observed when NaCl and Vc concentrations were 0.75% and 0.02%, respectively in the MRS medium, which was significantly higher than the control group (p ≤ 0.01). Electron capture/gas chromatography and indophenol blue staining were used to study the nitrite degradation pathway of LCR 6013. The nitrite degradation products contained N2O, but no NH4(+). The LCR 6013 strain completely degraded all NaNO2 (50.00 mg/L) after 16 h of fermentation. The enzyme activity of NiR in the periplasmic space was 2.5 times of that in the cytoplasm. Our results demonstrated that L. casei subsp. rhamnosus LCR 6013 can effectively degrade nitrites in both the pickle fermentation system and in MRS medium by NiR. Nitrites are degraded by the LCR 6013 strain, likely via the nitrate respiration pathway (NO2(-)>NO->N2O->N2), rather than the aammonium formation pathway (dissimilatory nitrate reduction to ammonium, DNRA), because the degradation products contain N2O, but not NH4(+). PMID:24755671

  5. The redox interplay between nitrite and nitric oxide: From the gut to the brain☆

    PubMed Central

    Pereira, Cassilda; Ferreira, Nuno R.; Rocha, Bárbara S.; Barbosa, Rui M.; Laranjinha, João

    2013-01-01

    The reversible redox conversion of nitrite and nitric oxide (•NO) in a physiological setting is now widely accepted. Nitrite has long been identified as a stable intermediate of •NO oxidation but several lines of evidence support the reduction of nitrite to nitric oxide in vivo. In the gut, this notion implies that nitrate from dietary sources fuels the longstanding production of nitrite in the oral cavity followed by univalent reduction to •NO in the stomach. Once formed, •NO boosts a network of reactions, including the production of higher nitrogen oxides that may have a physiological impact via the post-translational modification of proteins and lipids. Dietary compounds, such as polyphenols, and different prandial states (secreting specific gastric mediators) modulate the outcome of these reactions. The gut has unusual characteristics that modulate nitrite and •NO redox interplay: (1) wide range of pH (neutral vs acidic) and oxygen tension (c.a. 70 Torr in the stomach and nearly anoxic in the colon), (2) variable lumen content and (3) highly developed enteric nervous system (sensitive to •NO and dietary compounds, such as glutamate). The redox interplay of nitrite and •NO might also participate in the regulation of brain homeostasis upon neuronal glutamatergic stimulation in a process facilitated by ascorbate and a localized and transient decrease of oxygen tension. In a way reminiscent of that occurring in the stomach, a nitrite/•NO/ascorbate redox interplay in the brain at glutamatergic synapses, contributing to local •NO increase, may impact on •NO-mediated process. We here discuss the implications of the redox conversion of nitrite to •NO in the gut, how nitrite-derived •NO may signal from the digestive to the central nervous system, influencing brain function, as well as a putative ascorbate-driven nitrite/NO pathway occurring in the brain. PMID:24024161

  6. Estimation of nitrite in source-separated nitrified urine with UV spectrophotometry.

    PubMed

    Mašić, Alma; Santos, Ana T L; Etter, Bastian; Udert, Kai M; Villez, Kris

    2015-11-15

    Monitoring of nitrite is essential for an immediate response and prevention of irreversible failure of decentralized biological urine nitrification reactors. Although a few sensors are available for nitrite measurement, none of them are suitable for applications in which both nitrite and nitrate are present in very high concentrations. Such is the case in collected source-separated urine, stabilized by nitrification for long-term storage. Ultraviolet (UV) spectrophotometry in combination with chemometrics is a promising option for monitoring of nitrite. In this study, an immersible in situ UV sensor is investigated for the first time so to establish a relationship between UV absorbance spectra and nitrite concentrations in nitrified urine. The study focuses on the effects of suspended particles and saturation on the absorbance spectra and the chemometric model performance. Detailed analysis indicates that suspended particles in nitrified urine have a negligible effect on nitrite estimation, concluding that sample filtration is not necessary as pretreatment. In contrast, saturation due to very high concentrations affects the model performance severely, suggesting dilution as an essential sample preparation step. However, this can also be mitigated by simple removal of the saturated, lower end of the UV absorbance spectra, and extraction of information from the secondary, weaker nitrite absorbance peak. This approach allows for estimation of nitrite with a simple chemometric model and without sample dilution. These results are promising for a practical application of the UV sensor as an in situ nitrite measurement in a urine nitrification reactor given the exceptional quality of the nitrite estimates in comparison to previous studies. PMID:26340062

  7. Remediation of nitrite contamination in ground and surface waters using aquatic macrophytes.

    PubMed

    Rawat, S K; Singh, R K; Singh, Rana P

    2012-01-01

    The study was carried out to determine the seasonal variation of nitrite levels in drinking and surface waters of urban, peri-urban and rural areas of Lucknow, during 2007-2008, and to evaluate the nitrite removal and accumulation potential of certain native aquatic macrophytes. Most of the drinking and surface water samples were collected from urbanized region of the city. All drinking water samples detected, showed higher nitrite level in winter, when compared with that in summer and rainy seasons. However, in drinking water samples nitrite level was below the permissible limit i.e. 3.29 mg l(-1) NO2. The surface water showed more than 3 fold higher levels of nitrite over the permissible level i.e. 0.06 mg l(-1), and the level was higher during rainy season than in summer and winterseasons. Eight macrophytes viz. Peltandra virginica, Utricularia vulgaris, Eichhomia crassipes, Trapa natans, Mimulus glabratus, Marsilea quadrifolia, Pistia stratiotes and Polygonum persicaria were studied for phytoremediation potential of nitrite from the water under simulated laboratory conditions. The gradual diminution in the level of nitrite in the water and simultaneously it's increase in the plant tissues was recorded at 5th, 10th and 15th d after plant culture. All the plants selected, removed nitrite from water but Polygonum persicaria, Mimulus glabratus, Trapa natans and Pistia stratiotes were found more efficient and removed nitrite upto 60.91, 58.09, 60.97 and 72.28%, respectively. Observations revealed that Pistia stratiotes can be used forthe effective removal of nitrite from the contaminated water. PMID:23033643

  8. Role of aldehyde dehydrogenase in hypoxic vasodilator effects of nitrite in rats and humans

    PubMed Central

    Arif, Sayqa; Borgognone, Alessandra; Lin, Erica Lai-Sze; O'Sullivan, Aine G; Sharma, Vishal; Drury, Nigel E; Menon, Ashvini; Nightingale, Peter; Mascaro, Jorge; Bonser, Robert S; Horowitz, John D; Feelisch, Martin; Frenneaux, Michael P; Madhani, Melanie

    2015-01-01

    Background and Purpose Hypoxic conditions favour the reduction of nitrite to nitric oxide (NO) to elicit vasodilatation, but the mechanism(s) responsible for bioconversion remains ill defined. In the present study, we assess the role of aldehyde dehydrogenase 2 (ALDH2) in nitrite bioactivation under normoxia and hypoxia in the rat and human vasculature. Experimental Approach The role of ALDH2 in vascular responses to nitrite was studied using rat thoracic aorta and gluteal subcutaneous fat resistance vessels from patients with heart failure (HF; 16 patients) in vitro and by measurement of changes in forearm blood flow (FBF) during intra-arterial nitrite infusion (21 patients) in vivo. Specifically, we investigated the effects of (i) ALDH2 inhibition by cyanamide or propionaldehyde and the (ii) tolerance-independent inactivation of ALDH2 by glyceryl trinitrate (GTN) on the vasodilator activity of nitrite. In each setting, nitrite effects were measured via evaluation of the concentration–response relationship under normoxic and hypoxic conditions in the absence or presence of ALDH2 inhibitors. Key Results Both in rat aorta and human resistance vessels, dilatation to nitrite was diminished following ALDH2 inhibition, in particular under hypoxia. In humans there was a non-significant trend towards attenuation of nitrite-mediated increases in FBF. Conclusions and Implications In human and rat vascular tissue in vitro, hypoxic nitrite-mediated vasodilatation involves ALDH2. In patients with HF in vivo, the role of this enzyme in nitrite bioactivation is at the most, modest, suggesting the involvement of other more important mechanisms. PMID:25754766

  9. Sodium remote from Io

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, R. A.; Schneider, N. M.

    1981-12-01

    Measurements of sodium emission lines originating in the middle Jupiter magnetosphere are measured, confirming the wide dispersal of neutral sodium in the Jovian system in at least two distinct manifestations. Candidate neutral transport processes in the context of the observed kinematical signatures are discussed. It is argued that the normal emission feature is produced by sodium atoms on bound elliptical orbits originating in the Io sodium cloud but with apojove in the field of view. Observations of the fast sodium feature indicate that atoms episodically acquire a broad range of line-of-sight velocities above the Jupiter gravitational escape speed and far above the speeds characteristic of surface-sputtered atoms. Three suggested reactions are distinguished according to (1) production rates based on estimated plasmaspheric properties, (2) kinematical signature, and (3) the timing of occurrences of the fast sodium feature.

  10. Microwave assisted esterification of acidified oil from waste cooking oil by CERP/PES catalytic membrane for biodiesel production.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Honglei; Ding, Jincheng; Zhao, Zengdian

    2012-11-01

    The traditional heating and microwave assisted method for biodiesel production using cation ion-exchange resin particles (CERP)/PES catalytic membrane were comparatively studied to achieve economic and effective method for utilization of free fatty acids (FFAs) from waste cooking oil (WCO). The optimal esterification conditions of the two methods were investigated and the experimental results showed that microwave irradiation exhibited a remarkable enhanced effect for esterification compared with that of traditional heating method. The FFAs conversion of microwave assisted esterification reached 97.4% under the optimal conditions of reaction temperature 60°C, methanol/acidified oil mass ratio 2.0:1, catalytic membrane (annealed at 120°C) loading 3g, microwave power 360W and reaction time 90min. The study results showed that it is a fast, easy and green way to produce biodiesel applying microwave irradiation. PMID:22940301

  11. Sodium Polystyrene Sulfonate

    MedlinePlus

    ... allergic to sodium polystyrene sulfonate, other polystyrene sulfonate resins, any other medications, or any of the ingredients ... salt substitutes containing potassium or foods that are high in potassium.

  12. Effects of acetic acid and arginine on pH elevation and growth of Bacillus licheniformis in an acidified cucumber juice medium

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Bacillus licheniformis has been shown to cause pH elevation in tomato products having an initial pH below 4.6 and metabiotic effects that can lead to the growth of pathogenic bacteria. Because of this, the organism poses a potential risk to acidified vegetable products; however, little is known abou...

  13. Preservation of acidified cucumbers with a natural preservative combination of fumaric acid and allyl isothiocyanate that target lactic acid bacteria and yeasts

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Without the addition of preservative compounds cucumbers acidified with 150 mM acetic acid with pH adjusted to 3.5 typically undergo fermentation by lactic acid bacteria. Fumaric acid (20 mM) inhibited growth of Lactobacillus plantarum and the lactic acid bacteria present on fresh cucumbers, but sp...

  14. Role of nitrogen-metabolism genes expressed during pathogenicity of the alkalinizing Colletotrichum gloeosporioides and their differential expression in acidifying pathogens.

    PubMed

    Miyara, I; Shnaiderman, C; Meng, X; Vargas, W A; Diaz-Minguez, J M; Sherman, A; Thon, M; Prusky, D

    2012-09-01

    Pathogens can actively alter fruit pH around the infection site, signaling modulation of pathogenicity-factor expression, as found for alkalinizing (Colletotrichum and Alternaria spp.) and acidifying (Penicillium, Botrytis, and Sclerotinia spp.) fungi. The nitrogen-metabolism genes GDH2, GS1, GLT, and MEP genes are differentially expressed during colonization by Colletotrichum gloeosporioides, and a Δgdh2 strain reduces ammonia accumulation and pathogenicity. We analyzed the contribution of transporters GLT and MEPB to C. gloeosporiodes pathogenicity. Germinating spores of Δglt strains showed reduced appressorium formation; those of ΔmepB mutants showed rapid ammonia uptake and accumulation inside the hyphae, indicating deregulated uptake. Both mutants reduced pathogenicity, indicating that these transporters function during alkalinizing species pathogenicity. We compared the expressions of these genes in C. gloeosporioides and Sclerotinia sclerotiorum, and found five to 10-fold higher expression at the transcript level in the former. Interestingly, GLT and MEPB in the alkalinizing species showed no and very low sequence identity, respectively, with their counterparts in the acidifying species. Knockout analysis of GLT and MEPB and their differential transcript regulation in the alkalinizing and acidifying species suggest that the ammonia accumulation contributing to pathogenicity in the former is modulated by factors at the gene-regulation levels that are lacking in the acidifying species. PMID:22571816

  15. Tempol improves xanthine oxidoreductase-mediated vascular responses to nitrite in experimental renovascular hypertension.

    PubMed

    Oliveira-Paula, Gustavo H; Pinheiro, Lucas C; Guimaraes, Danielle A; Tella, Sandra O Conde; Blanco, Ana L Furlan; Angelis, Celio D; Schechter, Alan N; Tanus-Santos, Jose E

    2016-08-01

    Upregulation of xanthine oxidoreductase (XOR) increases vascular reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels and contributes to nitroso-redox imbalance. However, XOR can generate nitric oxide (NO) from nitrite, and increased superoxide could inactivate NO formed from nitrite. This study tested the hypothesis that XOR contributes to the cardiovascular effects of nitrite in renovascular hypertension, and that treatment with the antioxidant tempol (4-hydroxy-2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidine-N-oxyl) improves XOR-mediated effects of nitrite. Blood pressure was assessed weekly in two-kidney one-clip (2K1C) and control rats. After six weeks of hypertension, the relaxing responses to nitrite were assessed in aortic rings in the presence of the XOR inhibitor oxypurinol (or vehicle), either in the absence or in the presence of tempol. Moreover, in vivo hypotensive responses to nitrite were also examined in the presence of oxypurinol (or vehicle) and tempol (or vehicle). Aortic XOR activity and expression were evaluated by fluorescence and Western blot, respectively. Vascular ROS production was assessed by the dihydroethidium assay. 2K1C hypertensive rats showed increased aortic XOR activity and vascular ROS production compared with control rats. Oxypurinol shifted the nitrite concentration-response curve to the right in aortic rings from 2K1C rats (but not in controls). Oxypurinol also attenuated the hypotensive responses to nitrite in 2K1C rats (but not in controls). These functional findings agree with increased aortic and plasma XOR activity found in 2K1C rats. Tempol treatment enhanced oxypurinol-induced shift of the nitrite concentration-response curve to the right. However, antioxidant treatment did not affect XOR-mediated hypotensive effects of nitrite. Our results show that XOR is important to the cardiovascular responses to nitrite in 2K1C hypertension, and XOR inhibitors commonly used by patients may cancel this effect. This finding suggests that nitrite treatment may not be

  16. Inhibition of hypochlorous acid-induced cellular toxicity by nitrite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whiteman, Matthew; Hooper, D. Craig; Scott, Gwen S.; Koprowski, Hilary; Halliwell, Barry

    2002-09-01

    Chronic inflammation results in increased nitrogen monoxide (NO) formation and the accumulation of nitrite (NO). Neutrophils stimulated by various inflammatory mediators release myeloperoxidase to produce the cytotoxic agent hypochlorous acid (HOCl). Exposure of chondrocytic SW1353 cells to HOCl resulted in a concentration- and time-dependent loss in viability, ATP, and glutathione levels. Treatment of cells with NO but not nitrate (NO) substantially decreased HOCl-dependent cellular toxicity even when NO was added at low (μM) concentrations. In contrast, NO alone (even at 1 mM concentrations) did not affect cell viability or ATP and glutathione levels. These data suggest that NO accumulation at chronic inflammatory sites, where both HOCl and NO are overproduced, may be cytoprotective against damage caused by HOCl. We propose that this is because HOCl is removed by reacting with NO to give nitryl chloride (NO2Cl), which is less damaging in our cell system. inflammation | cell toxicity | nitryl chloride | nitric oxide | arthritis

  17. Baroreceptor sensitivity in supine man following inhalation of amyl nitrite

    SciTech Connect

    Rubal, B.J.; Moody, J.M.; Bailey, S.R. Univ. of Texas, San Antonio )

    1991-03-15

    This study compares baroreceptor sensitivity derived from high-fidelity central aortic blood pressure (BP) measurements following amyl nitrite inhalation (ANI) during BP fall and recovery in seven male subjects undergoing diagnostic catheterization for chest pain syndrome. Continuous beat-by-beat plots of BP va pulse interval revealed that all subjects exhibited a counter-clockwise loop with varying degrees of hysteresis. Baroreceptor sensitivity was derived from the slope of a linear plot of systolic BP vs pulse interval and central aortic BP. When baroreceptor sensitivities were compared during BP fall and recovery, the mean values did not differ for the group; however, the slope of regression lines differed in six of the seven subjects. In summary, this study: describes the use of hi-fi central aortic pressure recordings in assessments of baroreceptor sensitivity which avoids the influence of local BP wave reflections in determining baroreceptor sensitivity, and demonstrates the complex nature of the baroreceptor responses to ANI.

  18. Potentially fatal new trend in performance enhancement: a cautionary note on nitrite

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Considerable interest has been shown by athletes and scientists in the potential for nitric oxide and associated vasodilators to enhance performance. This study aims to explore potential misuse of vasodilators by the athletes, and to highlight the growing concern over these agents. Methods Retrospective analyses of anonymous inquiries recorded in the Drug Information Database™ (DID™) between January 2006 and June 2008 (inclusive). In this 30-month period, the DID™ recorded 198,023 inquiries, of which 118,724 were UK Licensed Pharmaceutical products with a further 79,299 inquiries made for substance not found in the database. Results Phosphodiesterase type 5 (PDE-5) inhibitors, dominated by Viagra®, ranked 16th among the substance groups. The proportion of the inquiries made regarding PDE-5 inhibitors, especially in comparison to antibiotics, painkillers or alcohol, appears to be above the level that would normally be expected from medical need. No significant change in the months leading up to the Beijing Olympics was observed. On the contrary, the Nitric/Nitrate group showed a notable increase between 2006-2007 and 2008, suggesting a potential increase in interest in using nitric oxide among athletes. Conclusions With patents recently filed for the use of agents containing sodium nitrite/nitrate to enhance blood flow for performance enhancement in sport, coupled with anecdotal evidence from internet athlete forums and media, there is a concern that athletes may endanger their health by using vasodilators to enhance athletic performance. PDE-5 inhibitors or chemicals in the nitrate/nitrate group are currently not prohibited or tested for by the doping control agencies but some are highly dangerous to health and can lead to cardiovascular collapse, coma and death. Its promotion among athletes as a performance enhancing supplement is ethically and medically questionable. PMID:20587040

  19. Determining Nitrate and Nitrite Content in Beverages, Fruits, Vegetables, and Stews Marketed in Arak, Iran

    PubMed Central

    Rezaei, Mohammad; Fani, Ali; Moini, A. Latif; Mirzajani, Parisa; Malekirad, Ali Akbar; Rafiei, Mohammad

    2014-01-01

    Background and Objectives. Presence of excessive nitrite and nitrate in foodstuff can have toxic and carcinogenic effects on humans. This study is aimed at measuring nitrate and nitrite in different foodstuffs available in Arak city market, Iran, in 2013. Methods. Totally 323 samples including stew (102 samples), beverage (116 samples), fruit (55 samples), and vegetables (50 samples) were randomly collected and analyzed according to official AOAC method 973 and ISO 6635 through spectrophotometric method. Results. Average concentration of nitrate and nitrite in the samples was 6.58–136.76, 1.52–38.22 mg kg−1 or liter, respectively. Presence of nitrate and nitrite was confirmed in all samples. High levels of nitrate and nitrite were observed in celery and ghormeh stew; and lower level of nitrate and nitrite was found in traditionally produced vinegar, verjuice, and tomato. Conclusions. It was found that the mean values for nitrite in investigated products were higher than ADI levels of WHO. PMID:27379270

  20. Oxidation efficiencies of nitrite to nitrate by freezing of field rain samples

    SciTech Connect

    Takenaka, Norimichi; Daimon, Tohru; Sato, Keiichi

    1996-12-31

    Nitrite is known to be oxidized to nitrate by freezing much more rapidly than in solution. Furthermore, the oxidation efficiency of nitrite to nitrate by freezing is varied by pH or kinds and concentration of coexistences. We report here the oxidation efficiencies of nitrite to nitrate by freezing of field rain samples. The field rain samples were collected at Mt. Ikoma, which is located at about 20 km east of Osaka city, and Osaka Prefecture University. Concentration of nitrite was usually sub to a few {mu}mol/L order in rain and {mu}mol/L order in fog and less than 1 {mu}mol/L in snow. The highest value of nitrite concentration was 43 {mu}mol/L in rain and 620 {mu}mol/L in fog. Nitrite was oxidized immediately to nitrate by freezing at pH lower than 5.2, even when the sample droplet (about 1 mm diameter) was frozen very quickly in liquid nitrogen (77K). The oxidation efficiency was higher at lower pH. However, the efficiency varied from sample to sample. This is probably due to that kinds and concentration of coexistences were difference between samples. The effect of solutes will be also reported. Freezing of rain droplets are observed in freezing of super cooled droplets, growing of graupel and hail, growing of cumulonimbus, and so on. Ratio of nitrate to nitrite was higher in snow than that in rain or fog.