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Sample records for acidosis-stimulated renal ammonia

  1. Effect of intercalated cell-specific Rh C glycoprotein deletion on basal and metabolic acidosis-stimulated renal ammonia excretion

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hyun-Wook; Verlander, Jill W.; Bishop, Jesse M.; Nelson, Raoul D.; Handlogten, Mary E.

    2010-01-01

    Rh C glycoprotein (Rhcg) is an NH3-specific transporter expressed in both intercalated cells (IC) and principal cells (PC) in the renal collecting duct. Recent studies show that deletion of Rhcg from both intercalated and principal cells inhibits both basal and acidosis-stimulated renal ammonia excretion. The purpose of the current studies was to better understand the specific role of Rhcg expression in intercalated cells in basal and metabolic acidosis-stimulated renal ammonia excretion. We generated mice with intercalated cell-specific Rhcg deletion (IC-Rhcg-KO) using Cre-loxP techniques; control (C) mice were floxed Rhcg but Cre negative. Under basal conditions, IC-Rhcg-KO and C mice excreted urine with similar ammonia content and pH. Mice were then acid loaded by adding HCl to their diet. Ammonia excretion after acid loading increased similarly in IC-Rhcg-KO and C mice during the first 2 days of acid loading but on day 3 was significantly less in IC-Rhcg-KO than in C mice. During the first 2 days of acid loading, urine was significantly more acidic in IC-Rhcg-KO mice than in C mice; there was no difference on day 3. In IC-Rhcg-KO mice, acid loading increased principal cell Rhcg expression in both the cortex and outer medulla as well as expression of another ammonia transporter, Rh glycoprotein B (Rhbg), in principal cells in the outer medulla. We conclude that 1) Rhcg expression in intercalated cells is necessary for the normal renal response to metabolic acidosis; 2) principal cell Rhcg contributes to both basal and acidosis-stimulated ammonia excretion; and 3) adaptations in Rhbg expression occur in response to acid-loading. PMID:20462967

  2. Collecting duct-specific Rh C glycoprotein deletion alters basal and acidosis-stimulated renal ammonia excretion

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hyun-Wook; Verlander, Jill W.; Bishop, Jesse M.; Igarashi, Peter; Handlogten, Mary E.; Weiner, I. David

    2009-01-01

    NH3 movement across plasma membranes has traditionally been ascribed to passive, lipid-phase diffusion. However, ammonia-specific transporters, Mep/Amt proteins, are present in primitive organisms and mammals express orthologs of Mep/Amt proteins, the Rh glycoproteins. These findings suggest that the mechanisms of NH3 movement in mammalian tissues should be reexamined. Rh C glycoprotein (Rhcg) is expressed in the collecting duct, where NH3 secretion is necessary for both basal and acidosis-stimulated ammonia transport. To determine whether the collecting duct secretes NH3 via Rhcg or via lipid-phase diffusion, we generated mice with collecting duct-specific Rhcg deletion (CD-KO). CD-KO mice had loxP sites flanking exons 5 and 9 of the Rhcg gene (Rhcgfl/fl) and expressed Cre-recombinase under control of the Ksp-cadherin promoter (Ksp-Cre). Control (C) mice were Rhcgfl/fl but Ksp-Cre negative. We confirmed kidney-specific genomic recombination using PCR analysis and collecting duct-specific Rhcg deletion using immunohistochemistry. Under basal conditions, urinary ammonia excretion was less in KO vs. C mice; urine pH was unchanged. After acid-loading for 7 days, CD-KO mice developed more severe metabolic acidosis than did C mice. Urinary ammonia excretion did not increase significantly on the first day of acidosis in CD-KO mice, despite an intact ability to increase urine acidification, whereas it increased significantly in C mice. On subsequent days, urinary ammonia excretion slowly increased in CD-KO mice, but was always significantly less than in C mice. We conclude that collecting duct Rhcg expression contributes to both basal and acidosis-stimulated renal ammonia excretion, indicating that collecting duct ammonia secretion is, at least in part, mediated by Rhcg and not solely by lipid diffusion. PMID:19321595

  3. Proximal tubule-specific glutamine synthetase deletion alters basal and acidosis-stimulated ammonia metabolism.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hyun-Wook; Osis, Gunars; Handlogten, Mary E; Lamers, Wouter H; Chaudhry, Farrukh A; Verlander, Jill W; Weiner, I David

    2016-06-01

    Glutamine synthetase (GS) catalyzes the recycling of NH4 (+) with glutamate to form glutamine. GS is highly expressed in the renal proximal tubule (PT), suggesting ammonia recycling via GS could decrease net ammoniagenesis and thereby limit ammonia available for net acid excretion. The purpose of the present study was to determine the role of PT GS in ammonia metabolism under basal conditions and during metabolic acidosis. We generated mice with PT-specific GS deletion (PT-GS-KO) using Cre-loxP techniques. Under basal conditions, PT-GS-KO increased urinary ammonia excretion significantly. Increased ammonia excretion occurred despite decreased expression of key proteins involved in renal ammonia generation. After the induction of metabolic acidosis, the ability to increase ammonia excretion was impaired significantly by PT-GS-KO. The blunted increase in ammonia excretion occurred despite greater expression of multiple components of ammonia generation, including SN1 (Slc38a3), phosphate-dependent glutaminase, phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase, and Na(+)-coupled electrogenic bicarbonate cotransporter. We conclude that 1) GS-mediated ammonia recycling in the PT contributes to both basal and acidosis-stimulated ammonia metabolism and 2) adaptive changes in other proteins involved in ammonia metabolism occur in response to PT-GS-KO and cause an underestimation of the role of PT GS expression.

  4. Renal ammonia metabolism and transport.

    PubMed

    Weiner, I David; Verlander, Jill W

    2013-01-01

    Renal ammonia metabolism and transport mediates a central role in acid-base homeostasis. In contrast to most renal solutes, the majority of renal ammonia excretion derives from intrarenal production, not from glomerular filtration. Renal ammoniagenesis predominantly results from glutamine metabolism, which produces 2 NH4(+) and 2 HCO3(-) for each glutamine metabolized. The proximal tubule is the primary site for ammoniagenesis, but there is evidence for ammoniagenesis by most renal epithelial cells. Ammonia produced in the kidney is either excreted into the urine or returned to the systemic circulation through the renal veins. Ammonia excreted in the urine promotes acid excretion; ammonia returned to the systemic circulation is metabolized in the liver in a HCO3(-)-consuming process, resulting in no net benefit to acid-base homeostasis. Highly regulated ammonia transport by renal epithelial cells determines the proportion of ammonia excreted in the urine versus returned to the systemic circulation. The traditional paradigm of ammonia transport involving passive NH3 diffusion, protonation in the lumen and NH4(+) trapping due to an inability to cross plasma membranes is being replaced by the recognition of limited plasma membrane NH3 permeability in combination with the presence of specific NH3-transporting and NH4(+)-transporting proteins in specific renal epithelial cells. Ammonia production and transport are regulated by a variety of factors, including extracellular pH and K(+), and by several hormones, such as mineralocorticoids, glucocorticoids and angiotensin II. This coordinated process of regulated ammonia production and transport is critical for the effective maintenance of acid-base homeostasis.

  5. Renal Ammonia Metabolism and Transport

    PubMed Central

    Weiner, I. David; Verlander, Jill W.

    2015-01-01

    Renal ammonia metabolism and transport mediates a central role in acid-base homeostasis. In contrast to most renal solutes, the majority of renal ammonia excretion derives from intrarenal production, not from glomerular filtration. Renal ammoniagenesis predominantly results from glutamine metabolism, which produces 2 NH4+ and 2 HCO3− for each glutamine metabolized. The proximal tubule is the primary site for ammoniagenesis, but there is evidence for ammoniagenesis by most renal epithelial cells. Ammonia produced in the kidney is either excreted into the urine or returned to the systemic circulation through the renal veins. Ammonia excreted in the urine promotes acid excretion; ammonia returned to the systemic circulation is metabolized in the liver in a HCO3−-consuming process, resulting in no net benefit to acid-base homeostasis. Highly regulated ammonia transport by renal epithelial cells determines the proportion of ammonia excreted in the urine versus returned to the systemic circulation. The traditional paradigm of ammonia transport involving passive NH3 diffusion, protonation in the lumen and NH4+ trapping due to an inability to cross plasma membranes is being replaced by the recognition of limited plasma membrane NH3 permeability in combination with the presence of specific NH3-transporting and NH4+-transporting proteins in specific renal epithelial cells. Ammonia production and transport are regulated by a variety of factors, including extracellular pH and K+, and by several hormones, such as mineralocorticoids, glucocorticoids and angiotensin II. This coordinated process of regulated ammonia production and transport is critical for the effective maintenance of acid-base homeostasis. PMID:23720285

  6. Role of the Rhesus glycoprotein, Rh B glycoprotein, in renal ammonia excretion

    PubMed Central

    Bishop, Jesse M.; Verlander, Jill W.; Lee, Hyun-Wook; Nelson, Raoul D.; Weiner, Arthur J.; Handlogten, Mary E.

    2010-01-01

    Rh B glycoprotein (Rhbg) is a member of the Rh glycoprotein family of ammonia transporters. In the current study, we examine Rhbg's role in basal and acidosis-stimulated acid-base homeostasis. Metabolic acidosis induced by HCl administration increased Rhbg expression in both the cortex and outer medulla. To test the functional significance of increased Rhbg expression, we used a Cre-loxP approach to generate mice with intercalated cell-specific Rhbg knockout (IC-Rhbg-KO). On normal diet, intercalated cell-specific Rhbg deletion did not alter urine ammonia excretion, pH, or titratable acid excretion significantly, but it did decrease glutamine synthetase expression in the outer medulla significantly. After metabolic acidosis was induced, urinary ammonia excretion was significantly less in IC-Rhbg-KO than in control (C) mice on days 2–4 of acid loading, but not on day 5. Urine pH and titratable acid excretion and dietary acid intake did not differ significantly between acid-loaded IC-Rhcg-KO and C mice. In IC-Rhbg-KO mice, acid loading increased connecting segment (CNT) cell and outer medullary collecting duct principal cell Rhbg expression. In both C and IC-Rhbg-KO mice, acid loading decreased glutamine synthetase in both the cortex and outer medulla; the decrease on day 3 was similar in IC-Rhbg-KO and C mice, but on day 5 it was significantly greater in IC-Rhbg-KO than in C mice. We conclude 1) intercalated cell Rhbg contributes to acidosis-stimulated renal ammonia excretion, 2) Rhbg in CNT and principal cells may contribute to renal ammonia excretion, and 3) decreased glutamine synthetase expression may enable normal rates of ammonia excretion under both basal conditions and on day 5 of acid loading in IC-Rhbg-KO mice. PMID:20719974

  7. Molecular Mechanisms of Renal Ammonia Transport

    PubMed Central

    Weiner, I. David; Hamm, L. Lee

    2015-01-01

    Acid-base homeostasis to a great extent relies on renal ammonia metabolism. In the past several years, seminal studies have generated important new insights into the mechanisms of renal ammonia transport. In particular, the theory that ammonia transport occurs almost exclusively through nonionic NH3 diffusion and NH4+ trapping has given way to a model postulating that a variety of proteins specifically transport NH3 and NH4+ and that this transport is critical for normal ammonia metabolism. Many of these proteins transport primarily H+ or K+ but also transport NH4+. Nonerythroid Rh glycoproteins transport ammonia and may represent critical facilitators of ammonia transport in the kidney. This review discusses the underlying aspects of renal ammonia transport as well as specific proteins with important roles in renal ammonia transport. PMID:17002591

  8. Metabolic acidosis stimulates protein degradation in rat muscle by a glucocorticoid-dependent mechanism.

    PubMed Central

    May, R C; Kelly, R A; Mitch, W E

    1986-01-01

    Metabolic acidosis is associated with enhanced renal ammonia-genesis which is regulated, in part, by glucocorticoids. The interaction between glucocorticoids and chronic metabolic acidosis on nitrogen utilization and muscle protein metabolism is unknown. In rats pair-fed by gavage, we found that chronic acidosis stunted growth and caused a 43% increase in urinary nitrogen and an 87% increase in urinary corticosterone. Net protein degradation in incubated epitrochlearis muscles from chronically acidotic rats was stimulated at all concentrations of insulin from 0 to 10(4) microU/ml. This effect of acidosis persisted despite supplementation of the media with amino acids with or without insulin, indomethacin, and inhibitors of lysosomal thiol cathepsins. Acidosis did not change protein synthesis; hence, the increase in net protein degradation was caused by stimulation of proteolysis. Acidosis did not increase glutamine production in muscle. The protein catabolic effect of acidosis required glucocorticoids; protein degradation was stimulated in muscle of acidotic, adrenalectomized rats only if they were treated with dexamethasone. Moreover, when nonacidotic animals were given 3 micrograms/100 g of body weight dexamethasone twice a day, muscle protein degradation was increased if the muscles were simply incubated in acidified media. We conclude that chronic metabolic acidosis depresses nitrogen utilization and increases glucocorticoid production. The combination of increased glucocorticoids and acidosis stimulates muscle proteolysis but does not affect protein synthesis. These changes in muscle protein metabolism may play a role in the defense against acidosis by providing amino acid nitrogen to support the glutamine production necessary for renal ammoniagenesis. PMID:3511100

  9. Effect of dietary protein restriction on renal ammonia metabolism.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hyun-Wook; Osis, Gunars; Handlogten, Mary E; Guo, Hui; Verlander, Jill W; Weiner, I David

    2015-06-15

    Dietary protein restriction has multiple benefits in kidney disease. Because protein intake is a major determinant of endogenous acid production, it is important that net acid excretion change in parallel during protein restriction. Ammonia is the primary component of net acid excretion, and inappropriate ammonia excretion can lead to negative nitrogen balance. Accordingly, we examined ammonia excretion in response to protein restriction and then we determined the molecular mechanism of the changes observed. Wild-type C57Bl/6 mice fed a 20% protein diet and then changed to 6% protein developed an 85% reduction in ammonia excretion within 2 days, which persisted during a 10-day study. The expression of multiple proteins involved in renal ammonia metabolism was altered, including the ammonia-generating enzymes phosphate-dependent glutaminase (PDG) and phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK) and the ammonia-metabolizing enzyme glutamine synthetase. Rhbg, an ammonia transporter, increased in expression in the inner stripe of outer medullary collecting duct intercalated cell (OMCDis-IC). However, collecting duct-specific Rhbg deletion did not alter the response to protein restriction. Rhcg deletion did not alter ammonia excretion in response to dietary protein restriction. These results indicate 1) dietary protein restriction decreases renal ammonia excretion through coordinated regulation of multiple components of ammonia metabolism; 2) increased Rhbg expression in the OMCDis-IC may indicate a biological role in addition to ammonia transport; and 3) Rhcg expression is not necessary to decrease ammonia excretion during dietary protein restriction.

  10. Effect of dietary protein restriction on renal ammonia metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hyun-Wook; Osis, Gunars; Handlogten, Mary E.; Guo, Hui; Verlander, Jill W.

    2015-01-01

    Dietary protein restriction has multiple benefits in kidney disease. Because protein intake is a major determinant of endogenous acid production, it is important that net acid excretion change in parallel during protein restriction. Ammonia is the primary component of net acid excretion, and inappropriate ammonia excretion can lead to negative nitrogen balance. Accordingly, we examined ammonia excretion in response to protein restriction and then we determined the molecular mechanism of the changes observed. Wild-type C57Bl/6 mice fed a 20% protein diet and then changed to 6% protein developed an 85% reduction in ammonia excretion within 2 days, which persisted during a 10-day study. The expression of multiple proteins involved in renal ammonia metabolism was altered, including the ammonia-generating enzymes phosphate-dependent glutaminase (PDG) and phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK) and the ammonia-metabolizing enzyme glutamine synthetase. Rhbg, an ammonia transporter, increased in expression in the inner stripe of outer medullary collecting duct intercalated cell (OMCDis-IC). However, collecting duct-specific Rhbg deletion did not alter the response to protein restriction. Rhcg deletion did not alter ammonia excretion in response to dietary protein restriction. These results indicate 1) dietary protein restriction decreases renal ammonia excretion through coordinated regulation of multiple components of ammonia metabolism; 2) increased Rhbg expression in the OMCDis-IC may indicate a biological role in addition to ammonia transport; and 3) Rhcg expression is not necessary to decrease ammonia excretion during dietary protein restriction. PMID:25925252

  11. Mathematical Model of Ammonia Handling in the Rat Renal Medulla

    PubMed Central

    Noiret, Lorette; Baigent, Stephen; Jalan, Rajiv; Thomas, S. Randall

    2015-01-01

    The kidney is one of the main organs that produces ammonia and release it into the circulation. Under normal conditions, between 30 and 50% of the ammonia produced in the kidney is excreted in the urine, the rest being absorbed into the systemic circulation via the renal vein. In acidosis and in some pathological conditions, the proportion of urinary excretion can increase to 70% of the ammonia produced in the kidney. Mechanisms regulating the balance between urinary excretion and renal vein release are not fully understood. We developed a mathematical model that reflects current thinking about renal ammonia handling in order to investigate the role of each tubular segment and identify some of the components which might control this balance. The model treats the movements of water, sodium chloride, urea, NH3 and NH4+, and non-reabsorbable solute in an idealized renal medulla of the rat at steady state. A parameter study was performed to identify the transport parameters and microenvironmental conditions that most affect the rate of urinary ammonia excretion. Our results suggest that urinary ammonia excretion is mainly determined by those parameters that affect ammonia recycling in the loops of Henle. In particular, our results suggest a critical role for interstitial pH in the outer medulla and for luminal pH along the inner medullary collecting ducts. PMID:26280830

  12. Mathematical Model of Ammonia Handling in the Rat Renal Medulla.

    PubMed

    Noiret, Lorette; Baigent, Stephen; Jalan, Rajiv; Thomas, S Randall

    2015-01-01

    The kidney is one of the main organs that produces ammonia and release it into the circulation. Under normal conditions, between 30 and 50% of the ammonia produced in the kidney is excreted in the urine, the rest being absorbed into the systemic circulation via the renal vein. In acidosis and in some pathological conditions, the proportion of urinary excretion can increase to 70% of the ammonia produced in the kidney. Mechanisms regulating the balance between urinary excretion and renal vein release are not fully understood. We developed a mathematical model that reflects current thinking about renal ammonia handling in order to investigate the role of each tubular segment and identify some of the components which might control this balance. The model treats the movements of water, sodium chloride, urea, NH3 and [Formula: see text], and non-reabsorbable solute in an idealized renal medulla of the rat at steady state. A parameter study was performed to identify the transport parameters and microenvironmental conditions that most affect the rate of urinary ammonia excretion. Our results suggest that urinary ammonia excretion is mainly determined by those parameters that affect ammonia recycling in the loops of Henle. In particular, our results suggest a critical role for interstitial pH in the outer medulla and for luminal pH along the inner medullary collecting ducts.

  13. NBCe1 expression is required for normal renal ammonia metabolism.

    PubMed

    Handlogten, Mary E; Osis, Gunars; Lee, Hyun-Wook; Romero, Michael F; Verlander, Jill W; Weiner, I David

    2015-10-01

    The mechanisms regulating proximal tubule ammonia metabolism are incompletely understood. The present study addressed the role of the proximal tubule basolateral electrogenic Na(+)-coupled bicarbonate cotransporter (NBCe1; Slc4a4) in renal ammonia metabolism. We used mice with heterozygous and homozygous NBCe1 gene deletion and compared these mice with their wild-type littermates. Because homozygous NBCe1 gene deletion causes 100% mortality before day 25, we studied mice at day 8 (±1 day). Both heterozygous and homozygous gene deletion caused a gene dose-related decrease in serum bicarbonate. The ability to lower urinary pH was intact, and even accentuated, with NBCe1 deletion. However, in contrast to the well-known effect of metabolic acidosis to increase urinary ammonia excretion, NBCe1 deletion caused a gene dose-related decrease in ammonia excretion. There was no identifiable change in proximal tubule structure by light microscopy. Examination of proteins involved in renal ammonia metabolism showed decreased expression of phosphate-dependent glutaminase and phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase, key enzymes in proximal tubule ammonia generation, and increased expression of glutamine synthetase, which recycles intrarenal ammonia and regenerates glutamine. Expression of key proteins involved in ammonia transport outside of the proximal tubule (rhesus B glycoprotein and rhesus C glycoprotein) was not significantly changed by NBCe1 deletion. We conclude from these findings that NBCe1 expression is necessary for normal proximal tubule ammonia metabolism.

  14. NBCe1 expression is required for normal renal ammonia metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Handlogten, Mary E.; Osis, Gunars; Lee, Hyun-Wook; Romero, Michael F.; Verlander, Jill W.

    2015-01-01

    The mechanisms regulating proximal tubule ammonia metabolism are incompletely understood. The present study addressed the role of the proximal tubule basolateral electrogenic Na+-coupled bicarbonate cotransporter (NBCe1; Slc4a4) in renal ammonia metabolism. We used mice with heterozygous and homozygous NBCe1 gene deletion and compared these mice with their wild-type littermates. Because homozygous NBCe1 gene deletion causes 100% mortality before day 25, we studied mice at day 8 (±1 day). Both heterozygous and homozygous gene deletion caused a gene dose-related decrease in serum bicarbonate. The ability to lower urinary pH was intact, and even accentuated, with NBCe1 deletion. However, in contrast to the well-known effect of metabolic acidosis to increase urinary ammonia excretion, NBCe1 deletion caused a gene dose-related decrease in ammonia excretion. There was no identifiable change in proximal tubule structure by light microscopy. Examination of proteins involved in renal ammonia metabolism showed decreased expression of phosphate-dependent glutaminase and phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase, key enzymes in proximal tubule ammonia generation, and increased expression of glutamine synthetase, which recycles intrarenal ammonia and regenerates glutamine. Expression of key proteins involved in ammonia transport outside of the proximal tubule (rhesus B glycoprotein and rhesus C glycoprotein) was not significantly changed by NBCe1 deletion. We conclude from these findings that NBCe1 expression is necessary for normal proximal tubule ammonia metabolism. PMID:26224717

  15. Molecular physiology of the Rh ammonia transport proteins

    PubMed Central

    Weiner, I. David; Verlander, Jill W.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose of review Recent studies have identified a new family of ammonia-specific transporters, Rh glycoproteins, which enable NH3-specific transport. The purpose of this review is to summarize recent evidence regarding the role of Rh glycoproteins in renal ammonia transport. Recent findings The Rh glycoproteins, RhAG/Rhag, RhBG/Rhbg and RhCG/Rhcg, transport ammonia in the form of molecular NH3, although there is some evidence suggesting the possibility of NH4+ transport. RhAG/Rhag is expressed only in erythrocytes, and not in the kidney. Rhbg and Rhcg are expressed in distal nephron sites, from the distal convoluted tubule through the inner medullary collecting duct, with basolateral Rhbg expression and both apical and basolateral Rhcg expression. Whether Rhbg contributes to renal ammonia transport remains controversial. Rhcg expression parallels ammonia excretion in multiple experimental models and genetic deletion studies, both global and collecting duct-specific, demonstrate a critical role for Rhcg in both basal and acidosis-stimulated renal ammonia excretion. X-ray crystallography has defined critical structural elements in Rh glycoprotein-mediated ammonia transport. Finally, Rh glycoproteins may also function as CO2 transporters. Summary No longer can NH3 transport be considered to occur only through diffusive NH3 movement. Transporter-mediated NH3 movement is fundamental to ammonia metabolism. PMID:20539225

  16. Urea and Ammonia Metabolism and the Control of Renal Nitrogen Excretion.

    PubMed

    Weiner, I David; Mitch, William E; Sands, Jeff M

    2015-08-07

    Renal nitrogen metabolism primarily involves urea and ammonia metabolism, and is essential to normal health. Urea is the largest circulating pool of nitrogen, excluding nitrogen in circulating proteins, and its production changes in parallel to the degradation of dietary and endogenous proteins. In addition to serving as a way to excrete nitrogen, urea transport, mediated through specific urea transport proteins, mediates a central role in the urine concentrating mechanism. Renal ammonia excretion, although often considered only in the context of acid-base homeostasis, accounts for approximately 10% of total renal nitrogen excretion under basal conditions, but can increase substantially in a variety of clinical conditions. Because renal ammonia metabolism requires intrarenal ammoniagenesis from glutamine, changes in factors regulating renal ammonia metabolism can have important effects on glutamine in addition to nitrogen balance. This review covers aspects of protein metabolism and the control of the two major molecules involved in renal nitrogen excretion: urea and ammonia. Both urea and ammonia transport can be altered by glucocorticoids and hypokalemia, two conditions that also affect protein metabolism. Clinical conditions associated with altered urine concentrating ability or water homeostasis can result in changes in urea excretion and urea transporters. Clinical conditions associated with altered ammonia excretion can have important effects on nitrogen balance.

  17. Urea and Ammonia Metabolism and the Control of Renal Nitrogen Excretion

    PubMed Central

    Mitch, William E.; Sands, Jeff M.

    2015-01-01

    Renal nitrogen metabolism primarily involves urea and ammonia metabolism, and is essential to normal health. Urea is the largest circulating pool of nitrogen, excluding nitrogen in circulating proteins, and its production changes in parallel to the degradation of dietary and endogenous proteins. In addition to serving as a way to excrete nitrogen, urea transport, mediated through specific urea transport proteins, mediates a central role in the urine concentrating mechanism. Renal ammonia excretion, although often considered only in the context of acid-base homeostasis, accounts for approximately 10% of total renal nitrogen excretion under basal conditions, but can increase substantially in a variety of clinical conditions. Because renal ammonia metabolism requires intrarenal ammoniagenesis from glutamine, changes in factors regulating renal ammonia metabolism can have important effects on glutamine in addition to nitrogen balance. This review covers aspects of protein metabolism and the control of the two major molecules involved in renal nitrogen excretion: urea and ammonia. Both urea and ammonia transport can be altered by glucocorticoids and hypokalemia, two conditions that also affect protein metabolism. Clinical conditions associated with altered urine concentrating ability or water homeostasis can result in changes in urea excretion and urea transporters. Clinical conditions associated with altered ammonia excretion can have important effects on nitrogen balance. PMID:25078422

  18. Renal ammonia and glutamine metabolism during liver insufficiency-induced hyperammonemia in the rat.

    PubMed Central

    Dejong, C H; Deutz, N E; Soeters, P B

    1993-01-01

    Renal glutamine uptake and subsequent urinary ammonia excretion could be an important alternative pathway of ammonia disposal from the body during liver failure (diminished urea synthesis), but this pathway has received little attention. Therefore, we investigated renal glutamine and ammonia metabolism in midly hyperammonemic, portacaval shunted rats and severely hyperammonemic rats with acute liver ischemia compared to their respective controls, to investigate whether renal ammonia disposal from the body is enhanced during hyperammonemia and to explore the limits of the pathway. Renal fluxes, urinary excretion, and renal tissue concentrations of amino acids and ammonia were measured 24 h after portacaval shunting, and 2, 4, and 6 h after liver ischemia induction and in the appropriate controls. Arterial ammonia increased to 247 +/- 22 microM after portacaval shunting compared to controls (51 +/- 8 microM) (P < 0.001) and increased to 934 +/- 54 microM during liver ischemia (P < 0.001). Arterial glutamine increased to 697 +/- 93 microM after portacaval shunting compared to controls (513 +/- 40 microM) (P < 0.01) and further increased to 3781 +/- 248 microM during liver ischemia (P < 0.001). In contrast to controls, in portacaval shunted rats the kidney net disposed ammonia from the body by diminishing renal venous ammonia release (from 267 +/- 33 to -49 +/- 59 nmol/100 g body wt per min) and enhancing urinary ammonia excretion from 113 +/- 24 to 305 +/- 52 nmol/100 g body wt per min (both P < 0.01). Renal glutamine uptake diminished in portacaval shunted rats compared to controls (-107 +/- 33 vs. -322 +/- 41 nmol/100 g body wt per min) (P < 0.01). However, during liver ischemia, net renal ammonia disposal from the body did not further increase (294 +/- 88 vs. 144 +/- 101 nmol/100 g body wt per min during portacaval shunting versus liver ischemia). Renal glutamine uptake was comparable in both hyperammonemic models. These results indicate that the rat kidney plays

  19. Effect of reduced renal mass on renal ammonia transporter family, Rh C glycoprotein and Rh B glycoprotein, expression.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hye-Young; Baylis, Chris; Verlander, Jill W; Han, Ki-Hwan; Reungjui, Sirirat; Handlogten, Mary E; Weiner, I David

    2007-10-01

    Kidneys can maintain acid-base homeostasis, despite reduced renal mass, through adaptive changes in net acid excretion, of which ammonia excretion is the predominant component. The present study examines whether these adaptations are associated with changes in the ammonia transporter family members, Rh B glycoprotein (Rhbg) and Rh C glycoprotein (Rhcg). We used normal Sprague-Dawley rats and a 5/6 ablation-infarction model of reduced renal mass; control rats underwent sham operation. After 1 wk, glomerular filtration rate, assessed as creatinine clearance, was decreased, serum bicarbonate was slightly increased, and Na(+) and K(+) were unchanged. Total urinary ammonia excretion was unchanged, but urinary ammonia adjusted for creatinine clearance, an index of per nephron ammonia metabolism, increased significantly. Although reduced renal mass did not alter total Rhcg protein expression, both light microscopy and immunohistochemistry with quantitative morphometric analysis demonstrated hypertrophy of both intercalated cells and principal cells in the cortical and outer medullary collecting duct that was associated with increased apical and basolateral Rhcg polarization. Rhbg expression, analyzed using immunoblot analysis, immunohistochemistry, and measurement of cell-specific expression, was unchanged. We conclude that altered subcellular localization of Rhcg contributes to adaptive changes in single-nephron ammonia metabolism and maintenance of acid-base homeostasis in response to reduced renal mass.

  20. Intercalated cell-specific Rh B glycoprotein deletion diminishes renal ammonia excretion response to hypokalemia

    PubMed Central

    Bishop, Jesse M.; Lee, Hyun-Wook; Handlogten, Mary E.; Han, Ki-Hwan; Verlander, Jill W.

    2013-01-01

    The ammonia transporter family member, Rh B Glycoprotein (Rhbg), is an ammonia-specific transporter heavily expressed in the kidney and is necessary for the normal increase in ammonia excretion in response to metabolic acidosis. Hypokalemia is a common clinical condition in which there is increased renal ammonia excretion despite the absence of metabolic acidosis. The purpose of this study was to examine Rhbg's role in this response through the use of mice with intercalated cell-specific Rhbg deletion (IC-Rhbg-KO). Hypokalemia induced by feeding a K+-free diet increased urinary ammonia excretion significantly. In mice with intact Rhbg expression, hypokalemia increased Rhbg protein expression in intercalated cells in the cortical collecting duct (CCD) and in the outer medullary collecting duct (OMCD). Deletion of Rhbg from intercalated cells inhibited hypokalemia-induced changes in urinary total ammonia excretion significantly and completely prevented hypokalemia-induced increases in urinary ammonia concentration, but did not alter urinary pH. We conclude that hypokalemia increases Rhbg expression in intercalated cells in the cortex and outer medulla and that intercalated cell Rhbg expression is necessary for the normal increase in renal ammonia excretion in response to hypokalemia. PMID:23220726

  1. Effect of volume expansion on renal citrate and ammonia metabolism in KCl-deficient rats.

    PubMed Central

    Adler, S; Zett, B; Anderson, B; Fraley, D S

    1975-01-01

    When rats with desoxycorticosterone acetate (DOCA)-induced potassium chloride deficiency are given sodium chloride there is simultaneously a partial correction of metabolic alkalosis and a marked reduction in urinary citrate excretion and renal citrate content. To examine DOCA's role in this phenomenon and to determine how sodium chloride alters renal metabolism, rats were made KC1 deficient using furosemide and a KC1-deficient diet. Renal citrate and ammonia metabolism were then studied after chronic oral sodium chloride administration or acute volume expansion with isotonic mannitol. Although both maneuvers partially corrected metabolic alkalosis, sodium chloride raised serum chloride concentration while mannitol significantly decreased it. Urinary citrate excretion decreased to 10% of control in rats given NaCl and to 50% of control in rats infused with mannitol. The filtered load of citrate was constant or increased indicating increased tubular citrate reabsorption. Renal cortical citrate content also decreased approximately 50%. Renal cortical slices from KCl-deficient rats incubated in low or normal chloride media produced equal amounts of 14CO2 from (1, 5-14C) citrate. In addition, urinary ammonia excretion increased by over 300% in both groups. This occurred in the mannitol group despite increased urinary pH and flow rate indicating a rise in renal ammonia production. It seems that neither DOCA nor an increase in serum chloride concentration explains the experimental results. Rather, it appears that volume expansion is responsible for increased renal tubular citrate reabsorption and renal ammonia production. As these renal metabolic responses ordinarily occur in response to acidosis, the data are consistent with the hypothesis that volume expansion reduces renal cell pH in 3KCl-deficient rats. PMID:239022

  2. Ethylene and ammonia traces measurements from the patients' breath with renal failure via LPAS method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popa, C.; Dutu, D. C. A.; Cernat, R.; Matei, C.; Bratu, A. M.; Banita, S.; Dumitras, D. C.

    2011-11-01

    The application of laser photoacoustic spectroscopy (LPAS) for fast and precise measurements of breath biomarkers has opened up new promises for monitoring and diagnostics in recent years, especially because breath test is a non-invasive method, safe, rapid and acceptable to patients. Our study involved assessment of breath ethylene and breath ammonia levels in patients with renal failure receiving haemodialysis (HD) treatment. Breath samples from healthy subjects and from patients with renal failure were collected using chemically inert aluminized bags and were subsequently analyzed using the LPAS technique. We have found out that the composition of exhaled breath in patients with renal failure contains not only ethylene, but also ammonia and gives valuable information for determining efficacy and endpoint of HD. Analysis of ethylene and ammonia traces from the human breath may provide insight into severity of oxidative stress and metabolic disturbances and may ensure optimal therapy and prevention of pathology at patients on continuous HD.

  3. Renal Regulation of Acid-Base Balance: Ammonia Excretion.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tanner, George A.

    1984-01-01

    Describes an experiment which demonstrates changes in ammonia excretion and urine pH that occur in response to metabolic acidosis (induced by ammonium chloride ingestion) or metabolic alkalosis (produced by sodium bicarbonate ingestion). List of materials needed and background information are included. Typical results are provided and discussed.…

  4. Renal Regulation of Acid-Base Balance: Ammonia Excretion.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tanner, George A.

    1984-01-01

    Describes an experiment which demonstrates changes in ammonia excretion and urine pH that occur in response to metabolic acidosis (induced by ammonium chloride ingestion) or metabolic alkalosis (produced by sodium bicarbonate ingestion). List of materials needed and background information are included. Typical results are provided and discussed.…

  5. Physiological and molecular responses of the goldfish (Carassius auratus) kidney to metabolic acidosis, and potential mechanisms of renal ammonia transport.

    PubMed

    Lawrence, Michael J; Wright, Patricia A; Wood, Chris M

    2015-07-01

    Relative to the gills, the mechanisms by which the kidney contributes to ammonia and acid-base homeostasis in fish are poorly understood. Goldfish were exposed to a low pH environment (pH 4.0, 48 h), which induced a characteristic metabolic acidosis and an increase in total plasma [ammonia] but reduced plasma ammonia partial pressure (PNH3). In the kidney tissue, total ammonia, lactate and intracellular pH remained unchanged. The urinary excretion rate of net base under control conditions changed to net acid excretion under low pH, with contributions from both the NH4 (+) (∼30%) and titratable acidity minus bicarbonate (∼70%; TA-HCO3 (-)) components. Inorganic phosphate (Pi), urea and Na(+) excretion rates were also elevated while Cl(-) excretion rates were unchanged. Renal alanine aminotransferase activity increased under acidosis. The increase in renal ammonia excretion was due to significant increases in both the glomerular filtration and the tubular secretion rates of ammonia, with the latter accounting for ∼75% of the increase. There was also a 3.5-fold increase in the mRNA expression of renal Rhcg-b (Rhcg1) mRNA. There was no relationship between ammonia secretion and Na(+) reabsorption. These data indicate that increased renal ammonia secretion during acidosis is probably mediated through Rhesus (Rh) glycoproteins and occurs independently of Na(+) transport, in contrast to branchial and epidermal models of Na(+)-dependent ammonia transport in freshwater fish. Rather, we propose a model of parallel H(+)/NH3 transport as the primary mechanism of renal tubular ammonia secretion that is dependent on renal amino acid catabolism.

  6. Renal ammonia excretion in response to hypokalemia: effect of collecting duct-specific Rh C glycoprotein deletion

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hyun-Wook; Verlander, Jill W.; Bishop, Jesse M.; Handlogten, Mary E.; Han, Ki-Hwan

    2013-01-01

    The Rhesus factor protein, Rh C glycoprotein (Rhcg), is an ammonia transporter whose expression in the collecting duct is necessary for normal ammonia excretion both in basal conditions and in response to metabolic acidosis. Hypokalemia is a common clinical condition associated with increased renal ammonia excretion. In contrast to basal conditions and metabolic acidosis, increased ammonia excretion during hypokalemia can lead to an acid-base disorder, metabolic alkalosis, rather than maintenance of acid-base homeostasis. The purpose of the current studies was to determine Rhcg's role in hypokalemia-stimulated renal ammonia excretion through the use of mice with collecting duct-specific Rhcg deletion (CD-Rhcg-KO). In mice with intact Rhcg expression, a K+-free diet increased urinary ammonia excretion and urine alkalinization and concurrently increased Rhcg expression in the collecting duct in the outer medulla. Immunohistochemistry and immunogold electron microscopy showed hypokalemia increased both apical and basolateral Rhcg expression. In CD-Rhcg-KO, a K+-free diet increased urinary ammonia excretion and caused urine alkalinization, and the magnitude of these changes did not differ from mice with intact Rhcg expression. In mice on a K+-free diet, CD-Rhcg-KO increased phosphate-dependent glutaminase (PDG) expression in the outer medulla. We conclude that hypokalemia increases collecting duct Rhcg expression, that this likely contributes to the hypokalemia-stimulated increase in urinary ammonia excretion, and that adaptive increases in PDG expression can compensate for the absence of collecting duct Rhcg. PMID:23195675

  7. Ammonia

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Ammonia ; CASRN 7664 - 41 - 7 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinogenic Effects

  8. The Role of the Renal Ammonia Transporter Rhcg in Metabolic Responses to Dietary Protein

    PubMed Central

    Bounoure, Lisa; Ruffoni, Davide; Müller, Ralph; Kuhn, Gisela Anna; Devuyst, Olivier

    2014-01-01

    High dietary protein imposes a metabolic acid load requiring excretion and buffering by the kidney. Impaired acid excretion in CKD, with potential metabolic acidosis, may contribute to the progression of CKD. Here, we investigated the renal adaptive response of acid excretory pathways in mice to high-protein diets containing normal or low amounts of acid-producing sulfur amino acids (SAA) and examined how this adaption requires the RhCG ammonia transporter. Diets rich in SAA stimulated expression of enzymes and transporters involved in mediating NH4+ reabsorption in the thick ascending limb of the loop of Henle. The SAA-rich diet increased diuresis paralleled by downregulation of aquaporin-2 (AQP2) water channels. The absence of Rhcg transiently reduced NH4+ excretion, stimulated the ammoniagenic pathway more strongly, and further enhanced diuresis by exacerbating the downregulation of the Na+/K+/2Cl− cotransporter (NKCC2) and AQP2, with less phosphorylation of AQP2 at serine 256. The high protein acid load affected bone turnover, as indicated by higher Ca2+ and deoxypyridinoline excretion, phenomena exaggerated in the absence of Rhcg. In animals receiving a high-protein diet with low SAA content, the kidney excreted alkaline urine, with low levels of NH4+ and no change in bone metabolism. Thus, the acid load associated with high-protein diets causes a concerted response of various nephron segments to excrete acid, mostly in the form of NH4+, that requires Rhcg. Furthermore, bone metabolism is altered by a high-protein acidogenic diet, presumably to buffer the acid load. PMID:24652796

  9. Randomized controlled trial: lisinopril reduces proteinuria, ammonia, and renal polypeptide tubular catabolism in patients with chronic allograft nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Amara, Alieu B; Sharma, Asheesh; Alexander, John L; Alfirevic, Ana; Mohiuddin, Atif; Pirmohamed, Munir; Close, Graeme L; Grime, Steve; Maltby, Paul; Shawki, Howida; Heyworth, Sally; Shenkin, Alan; Smith, Linda; Sharma, Ajay K; Hammad, Abdel; Rustom, Rana

    2010-01-15

    Angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors in native nephropathies reduce proteinuria and delay progression to renal failure. Data in renal transplantation remain limited. A negative effect on glomerular filtration rate was concluded in a recent systematic review. In this novel randomized controlled trial, 47 patients with chronic allograft nephropathy, severe renal impairment, and more than or equal to 1 g/24 hr proteinuria were randomized to lisinopril (group A) or other hypotensives (group B) for 1 year. Sodium bicarbonate was given to all patients to treat metabolic acidosis prophylactically (acidosis increases significantly with lisinopril). The annual rate of decline of graft function was measured isotopically (primary outcome) and 24 hr proteinuria, genotyping, radiolabeled polypeptide aprotinin proximal tubular catabolic studies (in group A only) as secondary outcome measurements were undertaken. At baseline, groups were comparable except for greater proteinuria in group A. After 1 year, the rate of decline of graft function and graft survival were comparable in both groups. Proteinuria decreased significantly in group A patients only. Lisinopril also significantly reduced radiolabeled aprotinin uptake and metabolism, plasma aldosterone, and ammonia excretion. Plasma potassium, bicarbonate, and mean arterial pressures were comparable in both groups. Patients with more than or equal to 30% reduction in proteinuria had a significant association with rs699 polymorphism in the angiotensinogen gene. The rate of decline of renal graft function in patients with chronic allograft nephropathy was not adversely affected by lisinopril therapy given for 1 year. Lisinopril significantly reduced proteinuria, renal proximal tubular polypeptide catabolism, plasma aldosterone, and ammonia excretion suggesting relative preservation of graft function. Treating metabolic acidosis allowed safe and prolonged use of angiotensinogen-converting enzyme inhibitors.

  10. Effect of collecting duct-specific deletion of both Rh B Glycoprotein (Rhbg) and Rh C Glycoprotein (Rhcg) on renal response to metabolic acidosis.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hyun-Wook; Verlander, Jill W; Handlogten, Mary E; Han, Ki-Hwan; Weiner, I David

    2014-02-15

    The Rhesus (Rh) glycoproteins, Rh B and Rh C Glycoprotein (Rhbg and Rhcg, respectively), are ammonia-specific transporters expressed in renal distal nephron and collecting duct sites that are necessary for normal rates of ammonia excretion. The purpose of the current studies was to determine the effect of their combined deletion from the renal collecting duct (CD-Rhbg/Rhcg-KO) on basal and acidosis-stimulated acid-base homeostasis. Under basal conditions, urine pH and ammonia excretion and serum HCO3(-) were similar in control (C) and CD-Rhbg/Rhcg-KO mice. After acid-loading for 7 days, CD-Rhbg/Rhcg-KO mice developed significantly more severe metabolic acidosis than did C mice. Acid loading increased ammonia excretion, but ammonia excretion increased more slowly in CD-Rhbg/Rhcg-KO and it was significantly less than in C mice on days 1-5. Urine pH was significantly more acidic in CD-Rhbg/Rhcg-KO mice on days 1, 3, and 5 of acid loading. Metabolic acidosis increased phosphenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK) and Na(+)/H(+) exchanger NHE-3 and decreased glutamine synthetase (GS) expression in both genotypes, and these changes were significantly greater in CD-Rhbg/Rhcg-KO than in C mice. We conclude that 1) Rhbg and Rhcg are critically important in the renal response to metabolic acidosis; 2) the significantly greater changes in PEPCK, NHE-3, and GS expression in acid-loaded CD-Rhbg/Rhcg-KO compared with acid-loaded C mice cause the role of Rhbg and Rhcg to be underestimated quantitatively; and 3) in mice with intact Rhbg and Rhcg expression, metabolic acidosis does not induce maximal changes in PEPCK, NHE-3, and GS expression despite the presence of persistent metabolic acidosis.

  11. Rh versus pH: the role of Rhesus glycoproteins in renal ammonia excretion during metabolic acidosis in a freshwater teleost fish.

    PubMed

    Wright, Patricia A; Wood, Chris M; Wilson, Jonathan M

    2014-08-15

    Increased renal ammonia excretion in response to metabolic acidosis is thought to be a conserved response in vertebrates. We tested the hypothesis that Rhesus (Rh) glycoproteins in the kidney of the freshwater common carp, Cyprinus carpio, play a crucial role in regulating renal ammonia excretion during chronic metabolic acidosis. Exposure to water pH 4.0 (72 h) resulted in a classic metabolic acidosis with reduced plasma arterial pH and [HCO3(-)], no change in PCO2 and large changes in renal function. Urine [NH4(+)] as well as [titratable acidity-HCO3(-)] rose significantly over the acid exposure, but the profound reduction (fivefold) in urine flow rates eliminated the expected elevations in renal ammonia excretion. Low urine flow rates may be a primary strategy to conserve ions, as urinary excretion rates of Na(+), Cl(-) and Ca(2+) were significantly lower during the acid exposure relative to the control period. Interestingly, renal Rhcg1 mRNA and protein levels were elevated in acid-exposed relative to control groups, along with mRNA levels of several ion transporters, including the Na(+)/H(+) exchanger, H(+)-ATPase and Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase. Immunofluorescence microscopy showed a strong apical Rhcg1 signal in distal tubules. Taken together, these data show that renal Rh glycoproteins and associated ion transporters are responsive to metabolic acidosis, but conservation of ions through reduced urine flow rates takes primacy over renal acid-base regulation in the freshwater C. carpio. We propose that an 'acid/base-ion balance' compromise explains the variable renal responses to metabolic acidosis in freshwater teleosts. © 2014. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  12. Effect of hypokalemia on renal expression of the ammonia transporter family members, Rh B Glycoprotein and Rh C Glycoprotein, in the rat kidney

    PubMed Central

    Han, Ki-Hwan; Lee, Hyun-Wook; Handlogten, Mary E.; Bishop, Jesse M.; Levi, Moshe; Kim, Jin; Verlander, Jill W.

    2011-01-01

    Hypokalemia is a common electrolyte disorder that increases renal ammonia metabolism and can cause the development of an acid-base disorder, metabolic alkalosis. The ammonia transporter family members, Rh B glycoprotein (Rhbg) and Rh C glycoprotein (Rhcg), are expressed in the distal nephron and collecting duct and mediate critical roles in acid-base homeostasis by facilitating ammonia secretion. In the current studies, the effect of hypokalemia on renal Rhbg and Rhcg expression was examined. Normal Sprague-Dawley rats received either K+-free or control diets for 2 wk. Rats receiving the K+-deficient diet developed hypokalemia and metabolic alkalosis associated with significant increases in both urinary ammonia excretion and urine pH. Rhcg expression increased in the outer medullary collecting duct (OMCD). In OMCD intercalated cells, hypokalemia resulted in more discrete apical Rhcg expression and a marked increase in apical plasma membrane immunolabel. In principal cells, in the OMCD, hypokalemia increased both apical and basolateral Rhcg immunolabel intensity. Cortical Rhcg expression was not detectably altered by immunohistochemistry, although there was a slight decrease in total expression by immunoblot analysis. Rhbg protein expression was decreased slightly in the cortex and not detectably altered in the outer medulla. We conclude that in rat OMCD, hypokalemia increases Rhcg expression, causes more polarized apical expression in intercalated cells, and increases both apical and basolateral expression in the principal cell. Increased plasma membrane Rhcg expression in response to hypokalemia in the rat, particularly in the OMCD, likely contributes to the increased ammonia excretion and thereby to the development of metabolic alkalosis. PMID:21753075

  13. Renal

    MedlinePlus

    ... term "renal" refers to the kidney. For example, renal failure means kidney failure. Related topics: Kidney disease Kidney disease - diet Kidney failure Kidney function tests Renal scan Kidney transplant

  14. The metabolic effect of resistant starch and yoghurt on the renal and faecal nitrogen and ammonia excretion in humans as measured by lactose-[(15)N2]ureide.

    PubMed

    Wutzke, Klaus D; Scholübbers, Debora

    2013-01-01

    Resistant starch (RS) and Lactobacillus acidophilus yoghurt (LC1) were supplemented simultaneously in healthy adults to evaluate the effect on the urinary and faecal nitrogen and ammonia excretion by means of lactose-[(15)N2]ureide ((15)N-LU) degradation. Nineteen subjects received a regular daily diet either without or with supplementation of an RS-LC1-mixture composed of fibre of potatoes (RS type 1), wrinkle pea starch (RS type 2), and LC1 over a 20-day period in randomised order. Thereafter, (15)N-LU was administered together with breakfast. Urine and faeces were collected over a period of 48 and 72 h, respectively. The (15)N abundances were measured by isotope ratio mass spectrometry. The intake of the pre- and probiotic mixture composed of RS of type 1, type 2 and of LC1 significantly lowered the colonic generation and the renal excretion of toxic (15)NH3 and functioned as an ammonia shift from urinary to faecal (15)N excretion when using (15)N-LU as a xenobiotic marker.

  15. Ammonia Monitor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sauer, Richard L. (Inventor); Akse, James R. (Inventor); Thompson, John O. (Inventor); Atwater, James E. (Inventor)

    1999-01-01

    Ammonia monitor and method of use are disclosed. A continuous, real-time determination of the concentration of ammonia in an aqueous process stream is possible over a wide dynamic range of concentrations. No reagents are required because pH is controlled by an in-line solid-phase base. Ammonia is selectively transported across a membrane from the process stream to an analytical stream to an analytical stream under pH control. The specific electrical conductance of the analytical stream is measured and used to determine the concentration of ammonia.

  16. Ammonia transport in the kidney by Rhesus glycoproteins.

    PubMed

    Weiner, I David; Verlander, Jill W

    2014-05-15

    Renal ammonia metabolism is a fundamental element of acid-base homeostasis, comprising a major component of both basal and physiologically altered renal net acid excretion. Over the past several years, a fundamental change in our understanding of the mechanisms of renal epithelial cell ammonia transport has occurred, replacing the previous model which was based upon diffusion equilibrium for NH3 and trapping of NH4(+) with a new model in which specific and regulated transport of both NH3 and NH4(+) across renal epithelial cell membranes via specific membrane proteins is required for normal ammonia metabolism. A major advance has been the recognition that members of a recently recognized transporter family, the Rhesus glycoprotein family, mediate critical roles in renal and extrarenal ammonia transport. The erythroid-specific Rhesus glycoprotein, Rh A Glycoprotein (Rhag), was the first Rhesus glycoprotein recognized as an ammonia-specific transporter. Subsequently, the nonerythroid Rh glycoproteins, Rh B Glycoprotein (Rhbg) and Rh C Glycoprotein (Rhcg), were cloned and identified as ammonia transporters. They are expressed in specific cell populations and membrane domains in distal renal epithelial cells, where they facilitate ammonia secretion. In this review, we discuss the distribution of Rhbg and Rhcg in the kidney, the regulation of their expression and activity in physiological disturbances, the effects of genetic deletion on renal ammonia metabolism, and the molecular mechanisms of Rh glycoprotein-mediated ammonia transport.

  17. Ammonia transport in the kidney by Rhesus glycoproteins

    PubMed Central

    Verlander, Jill W.

    2014-01-01

    Renal ammonia metabolism is a fundamental element of acid-base homeostasis, comprising a major component of both basal and physiologically altered renal net acid excretion. Over the past several years, a fundamental change in our understanding of the mechanisms of renal epithelial cell ammonia transport has occurred, replacing the previous model which was based upon diffusion equilibrium for NH3 and trapping of NH4+ with a new model in which specific and regulated transport of both NH3 and NH4+ across renal epithelial cell membranes via specific membrane proteins is required for normal ammonia metabolism. A major advance has been the recognition that members of a recently recognized transporter family, the Rhesus glycoprotein family, mediate critical roles in renal and extrarenal ammonia transport. The erythroid-specific Rhesus glycoprotein, Rh A Glycoprotein (Rhag), was the first Rhesus glycoprotein recognized as an ammonia-specific transporter. Subsequently, the nonerythroid Rh glycoproteins, Rh B Glycoprotein (Rhbg) and Rh C Glycoprotein (Rhcg), were cloned and identified as ammonia transporters. They are expressed in specific cell populations and membrane domains in distal renal epithelial cells, where they facilitate ammonia secretion. In this review, we discuss the distribution of Rhbg and Rhcg in the kidney, the regulation of their expression and activity in physiological disturbances, the effects of genetic deletion on renal ammonia metabolism, and the molecular mechanisms of Rh glycoprotein-mediated ammonia transport. PMID:24647713

  18. Ammonia Transporters and Their Role in Acid-Base Balance.

    PubMed

    Weiner, I David; Verlander, Jill W

    2017-04-01

    Acid-base homeostasis is critical to maintenance of normal health. Renal ammonia excretion is the quantitatively predominant component of renal net acid excretion, both under basal conditions and in response to acid-base disturbances. Although titratable acid excretion also contributes to renal net acid excretion, the quantitative contribution of titratable acid excretion is less than that of ammonia under basal conditions and is only a minor component of the adaptive response to acid-base disturbances. In contrast to other urinary solutes, ammonia is produced in the kidney and then is selectively transported either into the urine or the renal vein. The proportion of ammonia that the kidney produces that is excreted in the urine varies dramatically in response to physiological stimuli, and only urinary ammonia excretion contributes to acid-base homeostasis. As a result, selective and regulated renal ammonia transport by renal epithelial cells is central to acid-base homeostasis. Both molecular forms of ammonia, NH3 and NH4(+), are transported by specific proteins, and regulation of these transport processes determines the eventual fate of the ammonia produced. In this review, we discuss these issues, and then discuss in detail the specific proteins involved in renal epithelial cell ammonia transport. Copyright © 2017 the American Physiological Society.

  19. Contribution of individual superficial nephron segments to ammonium handling in chronic metabolic acidosis in the rat. Evidence for ammonia disequilibrium in the renal cortex.

    PubMed Central

    Simon, E; Martin, D; Buerkert, J

    1985-01-01

    Ammonia entry along surface nephron segments of rats was studied with micropuncture techniques under control and chronic metabolic acidosis conditions. Tubule fluid was collected successively from sites at the end and beginning of the distal tubule and at the end of the proximal tubule of the same nephron. During chronic metabolic acidosis, ammonium excretion doubled. As anticipated, the ammonium concentration (TFNH+4) was significantly higher in proximal tubule fluid during acidosis, and ammonium delivery to end proximal sites increased from 19.4 +/- 2.3 to 34.0 +/- 3.2 pmol/min (P less than 0.001). Although chronic acidosis did not affect TFNH+4 at the beginning of the distal tubule, ammonium delivery to the end of the distal tubule increased from 5.72 +/- 0.97 to 9.88 +/- 0.97 pmol/min. In both control and acidotic groups ammonium delivery was lower (P less than 0.001) to end distal sites than to end proximal sites, indicating net loss in the intervening segment. This loss was greater during chronic metabolic acidosis (23.9 +/- 3.3 vs. 13.6 +/- 2.0 pmol/min in controls, P less than 0.025). In both groups net entry of ammonia, in similar amounts, occurred along the distal tubule (P less than 0.05). In situ pH averaged 6.80 +/- 0.05 at end proximal tubule sites and fell to 6.54 +/- 0.08 at the beginning of the distal tubule (P less than 0.005). Chronic metabolic acidosis did not affect these measurements. The calculated free ammonia at the end of the proximal tubule rose from 9.3 +/- 2.2 to 21 +/- 9 microM (P less than 0.005) during chronic metabolic acidosis, and was also higher at beginning distal sites during acidosis (8.8 +/- 2.4 vs. 2.7 +/- 0.7 microM in controls, P less than 0.05). In both groups ammonia values for the beginning distal tubule fluid were lower than for end proximal tubule fluid. Thus, loss of ammonium in the loop segment is enhanced by chronic metabolic acidosis. Distal entry of ammonia is markedly less than along the proximal tubule and does

  20. Ammonia synthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Mandelik, B.G.; Cassata, J.R.; Katy, P.J.S.; Van Dijk, C.P.

    1986-02-04

    In a process for producing ammonia in a synthesis loop in which fresh synthesis gas containing hydrogen, nitrogen and, lesser amounts of argon and methane is combined with a hydrogen enriched recycle gas to provide combined synthesis gas, the combined synthesis is introduced to and reacted over ammonia synthesis catalyst under synthesis conditions to provide converted gas containing ammonia, hydrogen, and nitrogen. The ammonia is recovered from the converted gas to provide recycle gas, and a purge stream is removed from the synthesis loop. A hydrogen-rich gas is recovered from the purge stream, and the hydrogen-rich gas is combined with the recycle gas to provide the hydrogen enriched gas. The improvement described in this patent consists of (a) providing the fresh synthesis gas at a hydrogen to nitrogen molar ratio between 1.7 and 2.5 and providing the hydrogen enriched recycle gas at a hydrogen to nitrogen molar ratio between 0.5 and 1.7 to provide the combined synthesis gas at a hydrogen to nitrogen molar ratio between 0.8 and 1.8. The volumetric flow rate ratio of the hydrogen enriched recycle gas to the fresh synthesis gas is between 2.2 and 3.7; and (b) introducing the combined synthesis gas from step (a) to an ammonia synthesis catalyst at a temperature between 315/sup 0/C. and 400/sup 0/C. and a pressure between 50 kg/cm/sup 2/ and 150 kg/cm/sup 2/.

  1. Renal arteriography

    MedlinePlus

    Renal angiogram; Angiography - kidney; Renal angiography; Renal artery stenosis - arteriography ... an artery by a blood clot Renal artery stenosis Renal cell cancer Angiomyolipomas (noncancerous tumors of the ...

  2. Hyperammonaemia with distal renal tubular acidosis.

    PubMed

    Miller, S G; Schwartz, G J

    1997-11-01

    The case is reported of an infant with hyperammonaemia secondary to severe distal renal tubular acidosis. A clinical association between increased concentrations of ammonia in serum and renal tubular acidosis has not previously been described. In response to acidosis the infant's kidneys presumably increased ammonia synthesis but did not excrete ammonia, resulting in hyperammonaemia. The patient showed poor feeding, frequent vomiting, and failure to thrive, but did not have an inborn error of metabolism. This case report should alert doctors to consider renal tubular acidosis in the differential diagnosis of severely ill infants with metabolic acidosis and hyperammonaemia.

  3. Ammonia toxicity in fish.

    PubMed

    Randall, D J; Tsui, T K N

    2002-01-01

    Ammonia is present in the aquatic environment due to agricultural run-off and decomposition of biological waste. Ammonia is toxic to all vertebrates causing convulsions, coma and death, probably because elevated NH4+ displaces K+ and depolarizes neurons, causing activation of NMDA type glutamate receptor, which leads to an influx of excessive Ca2+ and subsequent cell death in the central nervous system. Present ammonia criteria for aquatic systems are based on toxicity tests carried out on, starved, resting, non-stressed fish. This is doubly inappropriate. During exhaustive exercise and stress, fish increase ammonia production and are more sensitive to external ammonia. Present criteria do not protect swimming fish. Fish have strategies to protect them from the ammonia pulse following feeding, and this also protects them from increases in external ammonia, as a result starved fish are more sensitive to external ammonia than fed fish. There are a number of fish species that can tolerate high environmental ammonia. Glutamine formation is an important ammonia detoxification strategy in the brain of fish, especially after feeding. Detoxification of ammonia to urea has also been observed in elasmobranches and some teleosts. Reduction in the rate of proteolysis and the rate of amino acid catabolism, which results in a decrease in ammonia production, may be another strategy to reduce ammonia toxicity. The weather loach volatilizes NH3, and the mudskipper, P. schlosseri, utilizes yet another unique strategy, it actively pumps NH4+ out of the body.

  4. Aquatic Life Criteria - Ammonia

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Documents related to EPA's final 2013 Aquatic Life Ambient Water Quality Criteria for Ammonia (Freshwater). These documents pertain to the safe levels of Ammonia in water that should protect to the majority of species.

  5. Ammonia photolysis on Jupiter.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nicodem, D. E.; Ferris, J. P.

    1973-01-01

    Ammonia photolysis under simulated Jovian conditions indicates that the photochemical reaction would rapidly convert all the ammonia of Jupiter to nitrogen even in a large excess of hydrogen. It is suggested that ammonia is observed because the planet's atmosphere is deep and hot and/or because electrical discharge phenomena are important.

  6. Sources of atmospheric ammonia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harriss, R. C.; Michaels, J. T.

    1982-01-01

    The information available on factors that influence emissions from the principal societal sources of ammonia to the atmosphere, namely combustion processes, volatilization of farm animal wastes, and volatilization of fertilizers, is reviewed. Emission factors are established for each major source of atmospheric ammonia. The factors are then multiplied by appropriate source characterization descriptors to obtain calculated fluxes of ammonia to the atmosphere on a state-by-state basis for the United States.

  7. Sources of atmospheric ammonia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harriss, R. C.; Michaels, J. T.

    1982-01-01

    The information available on factors that influence emissions from the principal societal sources of ammonia to the atmosphere, namely combustion processes, volatilization of farm animal wastes, and volatilization of fertilizers, is reviewed. Emission factors are established for each major source of atmospheric ammonia. The factors are then multiplied by appropriate source characterization descriptors to obtain calculated fluxes of ammonia to the atmosphere on a state-by-state basis for the United States.

  8. Photosynthesis of ammonia

    SciTech Connect

    Mallow, W.A.

    1984-09-24

    This study has demonstrated the technical feasibility of producing ammonia using an innovative technique of combining air, water and sunlight. The technique involves passing moist air over a catalyst-doped, open-celled silica foam bed illuminated by concentrated sunlight. A catalytic reaction results in tounts of ammonia. The work summarized in this report included testing of a pilot (small scale) ammonia production system located on the roof of a Southwest Research Institute (SwRI) Laboratory located in San Antonio, Texas. The system consisted of a catalyst foam bed located in a glass tube about three meters long and 5 centimeters in diameter and mounted on the focal line of a parabolic trough solar collector focused at the sun. The primary active ingredient in the catalyst was titanium dioxide. Moist air was blown through the glass tube, over illuminated catalyst foam bed. A catalytic reaction took place in the foam bed resulting in the production of ammonia gas. The ammonia gas was bubbled through a water scrubber where the ammonia was dissolved. The ammonia concentration in the scrubber water was then measured using chemiluminescence and spectrophotometry techniques to determine the ammonia production rate. Thirty-one tests were conducted in the roof top facility. A number of important process parameters were evaluated. The ammonia production rate from these tests varied from several milligrams per hour to a few micrograms per hour. The tests showed that ammonia production was possible although the yields were relatively low. Several aspects of the process could be improved to increase the yield rates. Specifically, better techniques for illuminating the catalyst with concentrated sunlight and for providing moisture at the catalyst surface should enhance the ammonia production rate. 13 references, 7 figures, 1 table.

  9. Method for forming ammonia

    DOEpatents

    Kong, Peter C.; Pink, Robert J.; Zuck, Larry D.

    2008-08-19

    A method for forming ammonia is disclosed and which includes the steps of forming a plasma; providing a source of metal particles, and supplying the metal particles to the plasma to form metal nitride particles; and providing a substance, and reacting the metal nitride particles with the substance to produce ammonia, and an oxide byproduct.

  10. Assessing Ammonia Treatment Options

    EPA Science Inventory

    This is the second of three articles to help water system operators understand ammonia and how to monitor and control its effects at the plant and in the distribution system. The first article (Opflow, April 2012) provided an overview of ammonia's chemistry, origins, and water sy...

  11. Assessing Ammonia Treatment Options

    EPA Science Inventory

    This is the second of three articles to help water system operators understand ammonia and how to monitor and control its effects at the plant and in the distribution system. The first article (Opflow, April 2012) provided an overview of ammonia's chemistry, origins, and water sy...

  12. An infrared spectroscopy method to detect ammonia in gastric juice.

    PubMed

    Giovannozzi, Andrea M; Pennecchi, Francesca; Muller, Paul; Balma Tivola, Paolo; Roncari, Silvia; Rossi, Andrea M

    2015-11-01

    Ammonia in gastric juice is considered a potential biomarker for Helicobacter pylori infection and as a factor contributing to gastric mucosal injury. High ammonia concentrations are also found in patients with chronic renal failure, peptic ulcer disease, and chronic gastritis. Rapid and specific methods for ammonia detection are urgently required by the medical community. Here we present a method to detect ammonia directly in gastric juice based on Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. The ammonia dissolved in biological liquid samples as ammonium ion was released in air as a gas by the shifting of the pH equilibrium of the ammonium/ammonia reaction and was detected in line by a Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy system equipped with a gas cell for the quantification. The method developed provided high sensitivity and selectivity in ammonia detection both in pure standard solutions and in a simulated gastric juice matrix over the range of diagnostic concentrations tested. Preliminary analyses were also performed on real gastric juice samples from patients with gastric mucosal injury and with symptoms of H. pylori infection, and the results were in agreement with the clinicopathology information. The whole analysis, performed in less than 10 min, can be directly applied on the sample without extraction procedures and it ensures high specificity of detection because of the ammonia fingerprint absorption bands in the infrared spectrum. This method could be easily used with endoscopy instrumentation to provide information in real time and would enable the endoscopist to improve and integrate gastroscopic examinations.

  13. Renal tubular acidosis type 4 in pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Jakes, Adam Daniel; Baynes, Kevin; Nelson-Piercy, Catherine

    2016-03-17

    We describe the clinical course of renal tubular acidosis (RTA) type 4 in pregnancy, which has not been previously published. Renal tubular acidosis type 4 is a condition associated with increased urinary ammonia secondary to hypoaldosteronism or pseudohypoaldosteronism. Pregnancy may worsen the hyperkalaemia and acidosis of renal tubular acidosis type 4, possibly through an antialdosterone effect. We advise regular monitoring of potassium and pH throughout pregnancy to ensure safe levels are maintained.

  14. Interorgan ammonia and amino acid metabolism in metabolically stable patients with cirrhosis and a TIPSS.

    PubMed

    Olde Damink, Steven W M; Jalan, Rajiv; Redhead, Doris N; Hayes, Peter C; Deutz, Nicolaas E P; Soeters, Peter B

    2002-11-01

    Ammonia is central to the pathogenesis of hepatic encephalopathy. This study was designed to determine the quantitative dynamics of ammonia metabolism in patients with cirrhosis and previous treatment with a transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic stent shunt (TIPSS). We studied 24 patients with cirrhosis who underwent TIPSS portography. Blood was sampled and blood flows were measured across portal drained viscera, leg, kidney, and liver, and arteriovenous differences across the spleen and the inferior and superior mesenteric veins. The highest amount of ammonia was produced by the portal drained viscera. The kidneys also produced ammonia in amounts that equaled total hepatosplanchnic area production. Skeletal muscle removed more ammonia than the cirrhotic liver. The amount of nitrogen that was taken up by muscle in the form of ammonia was less than the glutamine that was released. The portal drained viscera consumed glutamine and produced ammonia, alanine, and citrulline. Urea was released in the splenic and superior mesenteric vein, contributing to whole-body ureagenesis in these cirrhotic patients. In conclusion, hyperammonemia in metabolically stable, overnight-fasted patients with cirrhosis of the liver and a TIPSS results from portosystemic shunting and renal ammonia production. Skeletal muscle removes more ammonia from the circulation than the cirrhotic liver. Muscle releases excessive amounts of the nontoxic nitrogen carrier glutamine, which can lead to ammonia production in the portal drained viscera (PDV) and kidneys. Urinary ammonia excretion and urea synthesis appear to be the only way to remove ammonia from the body.

  15. Ammonia Leak Locator Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dodge, Franklin T.; Wuest, Martin P.; Deffenbaugh, Danny M.

    1995-01-01

    The thermal control system of International Space Station Alpha will use liquid ammonia as the heat exchange fluid. It is expected that small leaks (of the order perhaps of one pound of ammonia per day) may develop in the lines transporting the ammonia to the various facilities as well as in the heat exchange equipment. Such leaks must be detected and located before the supply of ammonia becomes critically low. For that reason, NASA-JSC has a program underway to evaluate instruments that can detect and locate ultra-small concentrations of ammonia in a high vacuum environment. To be useful, the instrument must be portable and small enough that an astronaut can easily handle it during extravehicular activity. An additional complication in the design of the instrument is that the environment immediately surrounding ISSA will contain small concentrations of many other gases from venting of onboard experiments as well as from other kinds of leaks. These other vapors include water, cabin air, CO2, CO, argon, N2, and ethylene glycol. Altogether, this local environment might have a pressure of the order of 10(exp -7) to 10(exp -6) torr. Southwest Research Institute (SwRI) was contracted by NASA-JSC to provide support to NASA-JSC and its prime contractors in evaluating ammonia-location instruments and to make a preliminary trade study of the advantages and limitations of potential instruments. The present effort builds upon an earlier SwRI study to evaluate ammonia leak detection instruments [Jolly and Deffenbaugh]. The objectives of the present effort include: (1) Estimate the characteristics of representative ammonia leaks; (2) Evaluate the baseline instrument in the light of the estimated ammonia leak characteristics; (3) Propose alternative instrument concepts; and (4) Conduct a trade study of the proposed alternative concepts and recommend promising instruments. The baseline leak-location instrument selected by NASA-JSC was an ion gauge.

  16. Evaluation of ammonia absorption coefficients by photoacoustic spectroscopy for detection of ammonia levels in human breath

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dumitras, D. C.; Dutu, D. C.; Matei, C.; Cernat, R.; Banita, S.; Patachia, M.; Bratu, A. M.; Petrus, M.; Popa, C.

    2011-04-01

    Photoacoustic spectroscopy represents a powerful technique for measuring extremely low absorptions independent of the path length and offers a degree of parameter control that cannot be attained by other methods. We report precise measurements of the ammonia absorption coefficients at the CO2 laser wavelengths by using a photoacoustic (PA) cell in an extracavity configuration and we compare our results with other values reported in the literature. Ammonia presents a clear fingerprint spectrum and high absorption strengths in the CO2 wavelengths region. Because more than 250 molecular gases of environmental concern for atmospheric, industrial, medical, military, and scientific spheres exhibit strong absorption bands in the region 9.2-10.8 μm, we have chosen a frequency tunable CO2 laser. In the present work, ammonia absorption coefficients were measured at both branches of the CO2 laser lines by using a calibrated mixture of 10 ppm NH3 in N2. We found the maximum absorption in the 9 μm region, at 9R(30) line of the CO2 laser. One of the applications based on the ammonia absorption coefficients is used to measure the ammonia levels in exhaled human breath. This can be used to determine the exact time necessary at every session for an optimal degree of dialysis at patients with end-stage renal disease.

  17. Ammonia blood test

    MedlinePlus

    ... any time the skin is broken) Alternative Names Serum ammonia Images Blood test References Nevah MI, Fallon MB. Hepatic encephalopathy, hepatorenal syndrome, hepatopulmonary syndrome, and other systemic complications of liver disease. In: Feldman M, Friedman LS, Brandt LJ, eds. ...

  18. Ammonia Release on ISS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Macatangay, Ariel

    2009-01-01

    Crew: Approximately 53% metabolic load Product of protein metabolism Limit production of ammonia by external regulation NOT possbile Payloads Potential source Scientific experiments Thorough safety review ensures sufficient levels of containment

  19. Ammonia Clouds on Jupiter

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2007-10-09

    In this movie, put together from false-color images taken by the New Horizons Ralph instrument as the spacecraft flew past Jupiter in early 2007, show ammonia clouds appearing as bright blue areas as they form and disperse.

  20. Reactor for removing ammonia

    DOEpatents

    Luo, Weifang [Livermore, CA; Stewart, Kenneth D [Valley Springs, CA

    2009-11-17

    Disclosed is a device for removing trace amounts of ammonia from a stream of gas, particularly hydrogen gas, prepared by a reformation apparatus. The apparatus is used to prevent PEM "poisoning" in a fuel cell receiving the incoming hydrogen stream.

  1. Reactor for removing ammonia

    DOEpatents

    Luo, Weifang; Stewart, Kenneth D.

    2009-11-17

    Disclosed is a device for removing trace amounts of ammonia from a stream of gas, particularly hydrogen gas, prepared by a reformation apparatus. The apparatus is used to prevent PEM "poisoning" in a fuel cell receiving the incoming hydrogen stream.

  2. Ammonia and sediment toxicity

    SciTech Connect

    Ogle, R.S.; Hansen, S.R.

    1994-12-31

    Ammonia toxicity to aquatic organisms has received considerable study, with most of these studies focusing on water column organisms. However, with the development and implementation of sediment (and pore water) toxicity tests, the toxicity of ammonia to benthic infauna and other sediment toxicity test organisms has become important, especially since sediment/porewater ammonia occurs at higher concentrations than in the water column. Unfortunately, there has been very little of this type information, especially for marine/estuarine organisms. This laboratory determined the toxicity of ammonia to three key marine/estuarine test organisms: the amphipod Eohaustorius estuarius, the bivalve Mytilus edulis, and the echinoderm Strongylocentrotus purpuratus. Because sediment/porewater pH can differ substantially from typical seawater pH, the toxicity evaluations covered a range of pH levels (6, 7, 8, and 9). Eohaustorius results indicate that while Total Ammonia increased in toxicity (measured as EC50) as pH increased (from 460 mg/L at pH 6, to 13 mg/L at pH 9), unionized ammonia toxicity decreased from 0.13 mg/L at pH 6 to 2.8 mg/L at pH 9. The amphipod was much less sensitive to ammonia than were the bivalve and echinoderm, with an unionized ammonia EC50 at pH 8 of 2.14 mg/L relative to 0.43 mg/L for the mussel and 0.13 mg/L for the purple urchin. These results are discussed with respect to design and interpretation of sediment toxicity test results, including an interpretation approach based on partitioning of Toxic Units (TU).

  3. Titan's Ammonia Feature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smythe, W.; Nelson, R.; Boryta, M.; Choukroun, M.

    2011-01-01

    NH3 has long been considered an important component in the formation and evolution of the outer planet satellites. NH3 is particularly important for Titan, since it may serve as the reservoir for atmospheric nitrogen. A brightening seen on Titan starting in 2004 may arise from a transient low-lying fog or surface coating of ammonia. The spectral shape suggests the ammonia is anhydrous, a molecule that hydrates quickly in the presence of water.

  4. Ammonia Clouds on Jupiter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Click on the image for movie of Ammonia Ice Clouds on Jupiter

    In this movie, put together from false-color images taken by the New Horizons Ralph instrument as the spacecraft flew past Jupiter in early 2007, show ammonia clouds (appearing as bright blue areas) as they form and disperse over five successive Jupiter 'days.' Scientists noted how the larger cloud travels along with a small, local deep hole.

  5. Titan's Ammonia Feature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smythe, W.; Nelson, R.; Boryta, M.; Choukroun, M.

    2011-01-01

    NH3 has long been considered an important component in the formation and evolution of the outer planet satellites. NH3 is particularly important for Titan, since it may serve as the reservoir for atmospheric nitrogen. A brightening seen on Titan starting in 2004 may arise from a transient low-lying fog or surface coating of ammonia. The spectral shape suggests the ammonia is anhydrous, a molecule that hydrates quickly in the presence of water.

  6. Ammonia Clouds on Jupiter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Click on the image for movie of Ammonia Ice Clouds on Jupiter

    In this movie, put together from false-color images taken by the New Horizons Ralph instrument as the spacecraft flew past Jupiter in early 2007, show ammonia clouds (appearing as bright blue areas) as they form and disperse over five successive Jupiter 'days.' Scientists noted how the larger cloud travels along with a small, local deep hole.

  7. Ammonia diffusion through Nalophan™ bags.

    PubMed

    Sironi, Selena; Eusebio, Lidia; Dentoni, Licinia; Capelli, Laura; Del Rosso, Renato

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the work is to verify the diffusion rate of ammonia through the Nalophan™ film that constitutes the sampling bag, considering storage times ranging from 1 to 26 h. The ammonia decay over time was evaluated using gas-chromatography for the quantification of ammonia concentration inside the bag. The research assesses the roles of both of ammonia and water concentration gradients at the polymeric film interface on the diffusion process. The results show that both the ammonia concentration gradient and, in a less pronounced way, the water concentration gradient are the main 'engines' of ammonia diffusion. Double bags seem to represent a simple solution for preventing ammonia losses during storage. Another interesting result concerns the role of the bag surface on the ammonia diffusion rate: the higher the surface/volume (S/V) ratio, the higher the ammonia diffusion rate through the polymeric film.

  8. [Analysis of the relationship between hepatorenal syndrome and plasma ammonia].

    PubMed

    He, Yong; Li, Gui-Xing; Xia, Yong

    2010-01-01

    To analyze the relationship between hepatorenal syndrome (HRS) and plasma ammonia. Plasma ammonia, liver and renal function of 465 patients with liver cirrhosis in our hospital, from June 2007 to March 2009, were analyzed. 80 renal dysfunction patients and 80 healthy controls were recruited in the control group. In addition, 40 patients with HRS were followed up. Using urea as the diagnosis standard of HRS, the morbidity rate of HRS was 39.6%, which was higher than that using creatinine as the diagnosis standard of HRS (Chi-square test = 97.33, P less than 0.01). using urea and creatinine as the diagnosis standard of HRS, the ammonia level of HRS groups was (57.39+/-48.83)mumol/L, (64.80+/-47.25)mumol/L, which were higher than that in the non-HRS groups (t = -3.07, t = -3.67, P less than 0.01). The ammonia level of patients with renal dysfunction was (26.59+/-14.34)mumol/L, which was lower than that in HRS group, non-HRS group (P less than 0.01), but there was no statistical significance between the patients with renal dysfunction and the healthy peoples [(22.36+/-8.72)mumol/L] (t = 1.52, P more than 0.05). The followed-up analysis of 40 patients with HRS indicated that plasma ammonia level was positively correlated with urea and creatinine, and correlation coefficients were 0.874 and 0.834 (P less than 0.05). Hepatic encephalopathy is liver-kidney-intestine-brain syndrome. HRS plays an important role in the development of hepatic encephalopathy.

  9. Hypokalemic nephropathy in the rat. Role of ammonia in chronic tubular injury.

    PubMed

    Tolins, J P; Hostetter, M K; Hostetter, T H

    1987-05-01

    Chronic potassium deficiency results in progressive tubulointerstitial injury, associated with augmented renal ammoniagenesis. We investigated the role of elevated renal ammonia levels and the interaction of ammonia with the complement system in this injury. Potassium deficiency was induced in rats by feeding a low potassium diet. Experimental animals received 150 mM NaHCO3 or equimolar NaCl, as drinking water. After 3 wk, NaHCO3 supplemented rats demonstrated decreased ammonia production, less renal hypertrophy, less histologic evidence of injury, and less proteinuria. In in vitro studies on normal cortical tubular fragments, the addition of ammonia to serum in concentrations comparable to renal cortical levels in potassium-deficient animals significantly increased tubular deposition of C3 as quantitated by a radiolabeled antibody binding technique. Thus, alkali supplementation reduced chronic tubulointerstitial disease in a rat model of hypokalemic nephropathy. We propose that increased cortical ammonia levels contribute to hypokalemic nephropathy through ammonia-mediated activation of the alternative complement pathway.

  10. The Ammonia-Soda Process.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tingle, M.

    1979-01-01

    This article is a condensed version of a commentary written to accompany a set of slides which describes the ammonia-soda process used by the ammonia-soda plant at Northwich of the United Kingdom. (HM)

  11. The Chemistry of Liquid Ammonia.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lagowski, J. J.

    1978-01-01

    The solvent and chemical properties of liquid ammonia are presented. In a certain sense, ammonia is a more versatile solvent than is water because of its ability to solubilize, without reaction, highly negative or reducing species. (Author/BB)

  12. Liberation of ammonia by cyanobacteria

    SciTech Connect

    Newton, J.W.

    1986-04-01

    Photoheterotrophic nitrogen-fixing cyanobacteria release ammonia when treated with methionine sulfoximine (MSX) to inhibit nitrogen incorporation into protein. This released ammonia can be derived from recently fixed nitrogen (nitrogen atmosphere) or endogenous reserves (argon atmosphere). Anaerobic ammonia release requires light and is stimulated by the photosystem II herbicides DCMU and Atrazine, regardless of the source of ammonia. As much as one quarter of the total cellular nitrogen can be released as ammonia by cyanbacteria treated with MSX and DCMU under argon in light. Chromatography of cell extracts indicates that virtually all cellular proteins are degraded. DCMU and Atrazine, at very low concentration, inhibit sustained uptake of the ammonia analog /sup 14/C methylamine. These data indicate that the herbicides interrupt ammonia uptake and retention by the cells, and support a role for photosystem II in ammonia metabolism.

  13. The Ammonia-Soda Process.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tingle, M.

    1979-01-01

    This article is a condensed version of a commentary written to accompany a set of slides which describes the ammonia-soda process used by the ammonia-soda plant at Northwich of the United Kingdom. (HM)

  14. The Chemistry of Liquid Ammonia.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lagowski, J. J.

    1978-01-01

    The solvent and chemical properties of liquid ammonia are presented. In a certain sense, ammonia is a more versatile solvent than is water because of its ability to solubilize, without reaction, highly negative or reducing species. (Author/BB)

  15. The role of glutamate dehydrogenase in mammalian ammonia metabolism.

    PubMed

    Spanaki, Cleanthe; Plaitakis, Andreas

    2012-01-01

    Glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH) catalyzes the reversible inter-conversion of glutamate to α-ketoglutarate and ammonia. High levels of GDH activity is found in mammalian liver, kidney, brain, and pancreas. In the liver, GDH reaction appears to be close-to-equilibrium, providing the appropriate ratio of ammonia and amino acids for urea synthesis in periportal hepatocytes. In addition, GDH produces glutamate for glutamine synthesis in a small rim of pericentral hepatocytes. Hence, hepatic GDH can be either a source for ammonia or an ammonia scavenger. In the kidney, GDH function produces ammonia from glutamate to control acidosis. In the human, the presence of two differentially regulated isoforms (hGDH1 and hGDH2) suggests a complex role for GDH in ammonia homeostasis. Whereas hGDH1 is sensitive to GTP inhibition, hGDH2 has dissociated its function from GTP control. Furthermore, hGDH2 shows a lower optimal pH than hGDH1. The hGDH2 enzyme is selectively expressed in human astrocytes and Sertoli cells, probably facilitating metabolic recycling processes essential for their supportive role. Here, we report that hGDH2 is also expressed in the epithelial cells lining the convoluted tubules of the renal cortex. As hGDH2 functions more efficiently under acidotic conditions without the operation of the GTP energy switch, its presence in the kidney may increase the efficacy of the organ to maintain acid base equilibrium.

  16. Ammonia tank failure

    SciTech Connect

    Sweat, M.E.

    1983-04-01

    An ammonia tank failure at Hawkeye Chemical of Clinton, Iowa is discussed. The tank was a double-wall, 27,000 metric-ton tank built in 1968 and commissioned in December 1969. The paper presented covers the cause of the failure, repair, and procedural changes made to prevent recurrence of the failure. (JMT)

  17. Ammonia Can Crush

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vitz, Ed

    1999-07-01

    When a 12-oz aluminum soft drink can filled with ammonia or hydrogen chloride gas is inverted and dipped into water, the rapidly dissolving gas evacuates the can and the can is crushed before water can be drawn into it. This demonstrates, among other things, the remarkable strength of hydrogen bonds.

  18. Planar amplitude ammonia sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karasinski, Pawel; Rogozinski, Roman

    2004-09-01

    The paper presents the results of investigation involving the influence of the change of launching conditions on the characteristics of amplitude ammonia sensors produced with the application of strip waveguides of different refractive profiles. Strip waveguides were produced using ion exchange technique, and the absorption sensitive films were produced using sol-gel technology.

  19. Atmospheric ammonia - Measurements and modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoell, J. M., Jr.; Levine, J. S.; Augustsson, T. R.; Harward, C. N.

    1981-01-01

    Ammonia possesses a unique position in the terrestrial atmosphere in that it is the only gaseous basic constituent. Ammonia readily forms aerosols, and by virtue of its high solubility controls the pH of cloud droplets and precipitation. Over the past year a ground-based solar viewing Infrared Heterodyne Radiometer has been used at Langley Research Center to infer the vertical distribution of ammonia. Ground level in situ measurements of ammonia have also been obtained to supplement the profile data. The ammonia profiles have been analyzed and interpreted with a one-dimensional photochemical model of the troposphere to assess the sources and sinks of NH3.

  20. Role of NH3 and NH4+ transporters in renal acid-base transport

    PubMed Central

    Verlander, Jill W.

    2011-01-01

    Renal ammonia excretion is the predominant component of renal net acid excretion. The majority of ammonia excretion is produced in the kidney and then undergoes regulated transport in a number of renal epithelial segments. Recent findings have substantially altered our understanding of renal ammonia transport. In particular, the classic model of passive, diffusive NH3 movement coupled with NH4+ “trapping” is being replaced by a model in which specific proteins mediate regulated transport of NH3 and NH4+ across plasma membranes. In the proximal tubule, the apical Na+/H+ exchanger, NHE-3, is a major mechanism of preferential NH4+ secretion. In the thick ascending limb of Henle's loop, the apical Na+-K+-2Cl− cotransporter, NKCC2, is a major contributor to ammonia reabsorption and the basolateral Na+/H+ exchanger, NHE-4, appears to be important for basolateral NH4+ exit. The collecting duct is a major site for renal ammonia secretion, involving parallel H+ secretion and NH3 secretion. The Rhesus glycoproteins, Rh B Glycoprotein (Rhbg) and Rh C Glycoprotein (Rhcg), are recently recognized ammonia transporters in the distal tubule and collecting duct. Rhcg is present in both the apical and basolateral plasma membrane, is expressed in parallel with renal ammonia excretion, and mediates a critical role in renal ammonia excretion and collecting duct ammonia transport. Rhbg is expressed specifically in the basolateral plasma membrane, and its role in renal acid-base homeostasis is controversial. In the inner medullary collecting duct (IMCD), basolateral Na+-K+-ATPase enables active basolateral NH4+ uptake. In addition to these proteins, several other proteins also contribute to renal NH3/NH4+ transport. The role and mechanisms of these proteins are discussed in depth in this review. PMID:21048022

  1. Ammonia abundances in comets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wyckoff, S.; Tegler, S.; Engel, L.

    The emission band strengths of the NH2 bands of Comets Halley, Hartley-Good, Thiele, and Borrelly were measured to determine the NH2 column densities for the comets. Production rates obtained using the Haser and vectorial models are in agreement within the observational errors, suggesting that a simple two-step decay model may be used to approximate the NH2 distribution in a comet's coma. Ammonia-to-water abundance ratios from 0.01 to 0.4 percent were found for the four comets. The ratio in Comet Halley is found to be Q(NH3)/Q(H2O) = 0.002 + or - 0.001. No significant difference in the ammonia abundance was found before or after perihelion in Comet Halley.

  2. Oceanic emissions of ammonia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paulot, F.; Jacob, D. J.; Johnson, M.; Bell, T. G.; Stock, C. A.; Doney, S. C.

    2013-12-01

    Half of natural ammonia (NH3) emissions is thought to originate from the oceans. Such large emissions have implications for the global budget of N and the acidity of marine aerosols. We develop two new inventories of oceanic NH3 emissions based on simulated monthly NH3 seawater concentrations from the GFDL-COBALT and the CESM-BEC ocean models. These new inventories explicitly account for the effect of temperature on the water-atmosphere exchange of NH3. We evaluate these inventory using cruise observations of gas-phase ammonia (AMT cruises) and ammonium (NOAA cruises) as well as seawater measurement of NHx. Implications of atmospheric NHx observations for the exchange of N between ocean and land and ocean N/P limitations are discussed.

  3. Tritiated ammonia formation

    SciTech Connect

    Heung, L.K.

    1994-03-01

    A rate equation that closely simulates experimental data has been developed. this rate equation can be used to calculate the formation of tritiated ammonia from different concentrations of tritium and nitrogen. The reaction of T{sub 2} and N{sub 2} to form NT{sub 3} is a slow process, particularly when the tritium concentration is low. The reaction requires weeks or months to reach equilibrium dependent on the concentrations of the reactants.

  4. Industrial ammonia gassing

    PubMed Central

    Walton, M.

    1973-01-01

    Walton, M. (1972).British Journal of Industrial Medicine,30, 78-86. Industrial ammonia gassing. Seven cases of ammonia gassing are described with follow-up for five years of the six survivors and the post-mortem findings of the fatal case. All the survivors attributed continuing symptoms to the gassing. The study failed to demonstrate permanent ill effects in the one case of mild exposure. Of the more serious cases one has stopped smoking and taken up physical training teaching. He now has above average lung function. Two serious cases who continued to smoke have the lung function abnormalities expected from their smoking. In the other two seriously exposed cases, who also continued to smoke, there is a persistent reduction in ventilation and gas transfer which seems to be due to the ammonia gassing. The post-mortem findings in the fatal case showed acute congestion and oedema of the mucosa of the respiratory tract, the bronchial walls being stripped of their lining epithelium and the alveoli stuffed with red blood cells and oedema fluid. Images PMID:4685304

  5. Tunable fiber laser based photoacoustic spectrometer for breath ammonia analysis during hemodialysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, J. W.; Xie, H.; Liang, L. R.; Zhang, W.; Peng, W.; Yu, Q. X.

    2011-11-01

    A photoacoustic (PA) spectrometer based on a near-IR tunable fiber laser is developed and used for breath ammonia analysis. We successfully measured the breath ammonia level variation of six patients with end-stage renal disease while they were undergoing hemodialysis in the hospital. The measurement results showed that the initial concentration level of the breath ammonia were from 1600 to 2200 ppb before dialysis treatment, the levels decreased to 200-600 ppb in the end stage of dialysis, which close to the levels of healthy persons. Further improvement and applications of this PA spectrometer are discussed.

  6. Combustion driven ammonia generation strategies for passive ammonia SCR system

    SciTech Connect

    Toner, Joel G.; Narayanaswamy, Kushal; Szekely, Jr., Gerald A.; Najt, Paul M.

    2016-12-06

    A method for controlling ammonia generation in an exhaust gas feedstream output from an internal combustion engine equipped with an exhaust aftertreatment system including a first aftertreatment device includes executing an ammonia generation cycle to generate ammonia on the first aftertreatment device. A desired air-fuel ratio output from the engine and entering the exhaust aftertreatment system conducive for generating ammonia on the first aftertreatment device is determined. Operation of a selected combination of a plurality of cylinders of the engine is selectively altered to achieve the desired air-fuel ratio entering the exhaust aftertreatment system.

  7. Hyperammonaemia in four cats with renal azotaemia.

    PubMed

    Adagra, Carl; Foster, Darren J

    2015-02-01

    Hyperammonaemia is well reported in animals with advanced hepatic disease and portosystemic shunts, but is unreported in cats with renal disease. This case series describes four cats with severe renal azotaemia in which elevated ammonia levels were detected during the course of treatment. In two cases hyperammonaemia was detected at a time when neurological signs consistent with encephalopathy had developed. This raises the possibility that hyperammonaemia may play a role in the development of encephalopathy in cats with renal azotaemia. © ISFM and AAFP 2014.

  8. Ammonia caramels: specifications and analysis.

    PubMed

    Patey, A L; Shearer, G; Knowles, M E; Denner, W H

    1985-01-01

    Twenty three UK commercially produced ammonia caramels and eight experimentally produced ammonia caramels have been analysed by a range of physical and chemical tests, which include solids content, nitrogen levels, colour intensity and pH. A statistical treatment of the results is reported.

  9. Micelle Formation in Liquid Ammonia.

    PubMed

    Griffin, Joseph M; Atherton, John H; Page, Michael I

    2015-07-17

    Perfluorinated long chain alkyl amides aggregate in liquid ammonia with increasing concentration which reflects micelle-type formation based on changes in (19)F NMR chemical shifts. The critical micelle concentrations (cmc) decrease with increasing chain length and give Kleven parameters A = 0.18 and B = 0.19. The micelles catalyze the ammonolysis of esters in liquid ammonia. The corresponding perfluorinated long chain alkyl carboxylates form ion pairs in liquid ammonia, but the equilibrium dissociation constants indicate favorable interactions between the chains in addition to the electrostatic forces. These perfluorinated carboxylates form micelles in aqueous solution, and their cmc's generate a Kleven B-value = 0.52 compared with 0.30 for the analogous alkyl carboxylates. The differences in hydrophobicity of CH2 and CF2 units in water and liquid ammonia are discussed, as is the possible relevance to life forms in liquid ammonia.

  10. Ammonia modifies enteric neuromuscular transmission through glial gamma-aminobutyric acid signaling.

    PubMed

    Fried, David E; Watson, Ralph E; Robson, Simon C; Gulbransen, Brian D

    2017-08-24

    Impaired gut motility may contribute, at least in part, to the development of systemic hyperammonemia and systemic neurological disorders in inherited metabolic disorders, or in severe liver and renal disease. It is not known whether enteric neurotransmission regulates intestinal luminal and hence systemic ammonia levels by induced changes in motility. Here, we propose and test the hypothesis that ammonia acts through specific enteric circuits to influence gut motility. We tested our hypothesis by recording the effects of ammonia on neuromuscular transmission in tissue samples from mice, pigs and humans, and investigated specific mechanisms using novel mutant mice, selective drugs, cellular imaging and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays. Exogenous ammonia increased neurogenic contractions and decreased neurogenic relaxations in segments of mouse, pig and human intestine. Enteric glial cells responded to ammonia with intracellular Ca(2+) responses. Inhibition of glial glutamine synthetase and the deletion of glial connexin-43 channels in hGFAP::CreER(T2+/-)/connexin43(f/f) mice potentiated the effects of ammonia on neuromuscular transmission. The effects of ammonia on neuromuscular transmission were blocked by GABAA receptor antagonists and ammonia drove substantive GABA release as did the selective pharmacological activation of enteric glia in GFAP::hM3Dq transgenic mice. We propose a novel mechanism whereby local ammonia is operational through GABAergic glial signaling to influence enteric neuromuscular circuits that regulate intestinal motility. Therapeutic manipulation of these mechanisms may benefit a number of neurological, hepatic and renal disorders manifesting hyperammonemia. Copyright © 2017, American Journal of Physiology-Gastrointestinal and Liver Physiology.

  11. Treatment of chronic renal failure with dietary fiber.

    PubMed

    Rampton, D S; Cohen, S L; Crammond, V D; Gibbons, J; Lilburn, M F; Rabet, J Y; Vince, A J; Wager, J D; Wrong, O M

    1984-03-01

    We have tested the hypothesis that dietary fiber, by inhibiting colonic bacterial ammonia generation and increasing fecal nitrogen excretion, might decrease hepatic urea synthesis and thereby reduce plasma urea in patients with chronic renal failure. Six and 8 week courses of two different hemicelluloses, arabinogalactan and ispaghula, reduced mean plasma urea in uremic subjects by 11% and 19% respectively. Ispaghula also reduced the rate of rise of plasma creatinine to zero and, in one formal balance study, increased fecal nitrogen excretion by 39%. Experiments in vitro showed that ispaghula depressed anaerobic fecal bacterial net ammonia generation by 30%, and adsorbed neither urea nor ammonia. The reduction in plasma urea caused by dietary fiber is likely to be due to inhibition of colonic bacterial production of ammonia; such therapy could conceivably alleviate some of the symptoms of uremia and postpone dialysis in patients with endstage renal disease.

  12. CADDIS Volume 2. Sources, Stressors and Responses: Ammonia

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Introduction to the ammonia module, when to list ammonia as a candidate cause, ways to measure ammonia, simple and detailed conceptual diagrams for ammonia, literature reviews and references for the ammonia module.

  13. Ammonia metabolism and hyperammonemic disorders.

    PubMed

    Walker, Valerie

    2014-01-01

    Human adults produce around 1000 mmol of ammonia daily. Some is reutilized in biosynthesis. The remainder is waste and neurotoxic. Eventually most is excreted in urine as urea, together with ammonia used as a buffer. In extrahepatic tissues, ammonia is incorporated into nontoxic glutamine and released into blood. Large amounts are metabolized by the kidneys and small intestine. In the intestine, this yields ammonia, which is sequestered in portal blood and transported to the liver for ureagenesis, and citrulline, which is converted to arginine by the kidneys. The amazing developments in NMR imaging and spectroscopy and molecular biology have confirmed concepts derived from early studies in animals and cell cultures. The processes involved are exquisitely tuned. When they are faulty, ammonia accumulates. Severe acute hyperammonemia causes a rapidly progressive, often fatal, encephalopathy with brain edema. Chronic milder hyperammonemia causes a neuropsychiatric illness. Survivors of severe neonatal hyperammonemia have structural brain damage. Proposed explanations for brain edema are an increase in astrocyte osmolality, generally attributed to glutamine accumulation, and cytotoxic oxidative/nitrosative damage. However, ammonia neurotoxicity is multifactorial, with disturbances also in neurotransmitters, energy production, anaplerosis, cerebral blood flow, potassium, and sodium. Around 90% of hyperammonemic patients have liver disease. Inherited defects are rare. They are being recognized increasingly in adults. Deficiencies of urea cycle enzymes, citrin, and pyruvate carboxylase demonstrate the roles of isolated pathways in ammonia metabolism. Phenylbutyrate is used routinely to treat inherited urea cycle disorders, and its use for hepatic encephalopathy is under investigation.

  14. Factors influencing breath ammonia determination.

    PubMed

    Solga, Steven F; Mudalel, Matthew; Spacek, Lisa A; Lewicki, Rafal; Tittel, Frank; Loccioni, Claudio; Russo, Adolfo; Risby, Terence H

    2013-09-01

    Amongst volatile compounds (VCs) present in exhaled breath, ammonia has held great promise and yet it has confounded researchers due to its inherent reactivity. Herein we have evaluated various factors in both breath instrumentation and the breath collection process in an effort to reduce variability. We found that the temperature of breath sampler and breath sensor, mouth rinse pH, and mode of breathing to be important factors. The influence of the rinses is heavily dependent upon the pH of the rinse. The basic rinse (pH 8.0) caused a mean increase of the ammonia concentration by 410 ± 221 ppb. The neutral rinse (pH 7.0), slightly acidic rinse (pH 5.8), and acidic rinse (pH 2.5) caused a mean decrease of the ammonia concentration by 498 ± 355 ppb, 527 ± 198 ppb, and 596 ± 385 ppb, respectively. Mode of breathing (mouth-open versus mouth-closed) demonstrated itself to have a large impact on the rate of recovery of breath ammonia after a water rinse. Within 30 min, breath ammonia returned to 98 ± 16% that of the baseline with mouth open breathing, while mouth closed breathing allowed breath ammonia to return to 53 ± 14% of baseline. These results contribute to a growing body of literature that will improve reproducibly in ammonia and other VCs.

  15. Ammonia Ice Clouds on Jupiter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    The top cloud layer on Jupiter is thought to consist of ammonia ice, but most of that ammonia 'hides' from spectrometers. It does not absorb light in the same way ammonia does. To many scientists, this implies that ammonia churned up from lower layers of the atmosphere 'ages' in some way after it condenses, possibly by being covered with a photochemically generated hydrocarbon mixture. The New Horizons Linear Etalon Imaging Spectral Array (LEISA), the half of the Ralph instrument that is able to 'see' in infrared wavelengths that are absorbed by ammonia ice, spotted these clouds and watched them evolve over five Jupiter days (about 40 Earth hours). In these images, spectroscopically identified fresh ammonia clouds are shown in bright blue. The largest cloud appeared as a localized source on day 1, intensified and broadened on day 2, became more diffuse on days 3 and 4, and disappeared on day 5. The diffusion seemed to follow the movement of a dark spot along the boundary of the oval region. Because the source of this ammonia lies deeper than the cloud, images like these can tell scientists much about the dynamics and heat conduction in Jupiter's lower atmosphere.

  16. Ammonia Ice Clouds on Jupiter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    The top cloud layer on Jupiter is thought to consist of ammonia ice, but most of that ammonia 'hides' from spectrometers. It does not absorb light in the same way ammonia does. To many scientists, this implies that ammonia churned up from lower layers of the atmosphere 'ages' in some way after it condenses, possibly by being covered with a photochemically generated hydrocarbon mixture. The New Horizons Linear Etalon Imaging Spectral Array (LEISA), the half of the Ralph instrument that is able to 'see' in infrared wavelengths that are absorbed by ammonia ice, spotted these clouds and watched them evolve over five Jupiter days (about 40 Earth hours). In these images, spectroscopically identified fresh ammonia clouds are shown in bright blue. The largest cloud appeared as a localized source on day 1, intensified and broadened on day 2, became more diffuse on days 3 and 4, and disappeared on day 5. The diffusion seemed to follow the movement of a dark spot along the boundary of the oval region. Because the source of this ammonia lies deeper than the cloud, images like these can tell scientists much about the dynamics and heat conduction in Jupiter's lower atmosphere.

  17. Anhydrous Ammonia Frost on Titan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smythe, W. D.; Nelson, R.; Boryta, M. D.

    2009-12-01

    Ammonia has been suggested as a probable source for sustaining Titan's thick nitrogen-dominated atmosphere. Ammonia is believed to be important to maintaining nitrogen in Titan's atmosphere. Ammonia is seen in clouds in the atmospheres of Jupiter and Saturn, but has yet to be detected on any of the satellites. This may be because all forms of NH3 are unstable in the ambient conditions of the satellites surfaces or that its spectral features are altered by other components of the surface, and have not been identified. It has recently been demonstrated[1] that brightening occurs in Titan’s atmosphere that is transient on the time-scale of months. The spectral shape of the brightening is more consistent with that of the transient apparition of a pure ammonia frost than of an ammonia monohydrate or ammonia dihydrate frost. However, the phase behavior of the ammonia water system has peritectics at compositions of 1:1 and 1:2. These hydrate forms would be expected to dominate if the frost, or the reservoir from which the frost was derived had any water present. Physical mechanisms for producing measurable quanitities of anhydrous ammonia can include chemical dehydration or dehydration of the vapor phase - but it is challenging to store significant quantities of the anhydrous material because of the phase behavior in the solid state. [1] Nelson, R.M., et al. Saturn’s Titan: Surface Change, Ammonia, and Implications for Atmospheric and Tectonic Activity., Icarus, 199, pp. 429-441, 2009 This work was performed at JPL under contract to NASA

  18. ENGINEERING DESIGN CONFIGURATIONS FOR BIOLOGICAL AMMONIA REMOVAL

    EPA Science Inventory

    Many regions in the United States have excessive levels of nutrients including ammonia in their source waters. For example, farming and agricultural sources of ammonia in the Midwest contribute to relatively high levels of ammonia in many ground waters. Although ammonia in water ...

  19. ENGINEERING DESIGN CONFIGURATIONS FOR BIOLOGICAL AMMONIA REMOVAL

    EPA Science Inventory

    Many regions in the United States have excessive levels of nutrients including ammonia in their source waters. For example, farming and agricultural sources of ammonia in the Midwest contribute to relatively high levels of ammonia in many ground waters. Although ammonia in water ...

  20. Renal Stones

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Renal stones are never convenient, but they are a particular concern for astronauts who have limited access to treatment during flight. Researchers are examining how earthbound preventions for renal stone formation work in flight, ensuring missions are not ended prematurely due to this medical condition. The micrograph shows calcium oxalate crystals in urine. These small crystals can develop to form renal stones. Principal Investigator: Dr. Peggy Whitson, NASA Johnson Space Center, Houston, TX.

  1. A courier service for ammonia

    PubMed Central

    Knepper, Mark A.

    2008-01-01

    Physiological studies in knockout mice demonstrate a surprising role for a kidney protein related to the Rh-factor protein of red blood cells – an ammonia channel critical to maintainence of body fluid pH. PMID:19020610

  2. Compatibility testing with anhydrous ammonia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benner, Steve M.; Schweickart, Russell B.

    1992-01-01

    Anhydrous ammonia has been proposed as the working fluid for a number of two-phase thermal control systems to be used in future space applications, including the Space Station Freedom and the Earth Observing Station (EOS). The compatibility of ammonia with the components in these systems is a major concern due to the corrosive nature of the fluid. Compatibility of ammonia with stainless steel and some aluminum alloys is well documented; however, data on other materials potentially suitable for aerospace use is less common. This paper documents the compatibility testing of nine materials with both gaseous and liquid ammonia. The test procedures are presented along with the resulting measurement data. Tensile strength was the only mechanical property tested that indicated a significant material incompatibility.

  3. Observation of interstellar ammonia ice

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knacke, R. F.; Mccorkle, S.; Puetter, R. C.; Erickson, E. F.; Kraetschmer, W.

    1982-01-01

    An absorption band probably due to solid ammonia on interstellar grains has been detected in the infrared spectrum at 2.97 microns of the Becklin-Neugebauer object and probably in NGC 2264-IR. An ammonia-water amorphous ice mixture can explain the structure of the new band and of the 3.07 microns interstellar absorption. Laboratory data suggest that a long wavelength wind extending to 3.5 microns in interstellar dust spectra may be absorption by NH3-H2O complexes in the ices. In the molecular cloud obscuring the BN object, about 20 times as much NH3 is frozen in grains as exists in the gas phase, suggesting the gas-grain interactions may be important in the ammonia chemistry of molecular clouds. Arguments are given that interstellar features at 6.0 and 6.8 microns are also ammonia-related absorptions.

  4. Getter materials for cracking ammonia

    DOEpatents

    Boffito, Claudio; Baker, John D.

    1999-11-02

    A method is provided for cracking ammonia to produce hydrogen. The method includes the steps of passing ammonia over an ammonia-cracking catalyst which is an alloy including (1) alloys having the general formula Zr.sub.1-x Ti.sub.x M.sub.1 M.sub.2, wherein M.sub.1 and M.sub.2 are selected independently from the group consisting of Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, and Ni, and x is between about 0.0 and about 1.0 inclusive; and between about 20% and about 50% Al by weight. In another aspect, the method of the invention is used to provide methods for operating hydrogen-fueled internal combustion engines and hydrogen fuel cells. In still another aspect, the present invention provides a hydrogen-fueled internal combustion engine and a hydrogen fuel cell including the above-described ammonia-cracking catalyst.

  5. Satellite Observations of Tropospheric Ammonia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shephard, M. W.; Luo, M.; Rinsland, C. P.; Cady-Pereira, K. E.; Beer, R.; Pinder, R. W.; Henze, D.; Payne, V. H.; Clough, S.; Rodgers, C. D.; Osterman, G. B.; Bowman, K. W.; Worden, H. M.

    2008-12-01

    Global high-spectral resolution (0.06 cm-1) nadir measurements from TES-Aura enable the simultaneous retrieval of a number of tropospheric pollutants and trace gases in addition to the TES standard operationally retrieved products (e.g. carbon monoxide, ozone). Ammonia (NH3) is one of the additional species that can be retrieved in conjunction with the TES standard products, and is important for local, regional, and global tropospheric chemistry studies. Ammonia emissions contribute significantly to several well-known environmental problems, yet the magnitude and seasonal/spatial variability of the emissions are poorly constrained. In the atmosphere, an important fraction of fine particulate matter is composed of ammonium nitrate and ammonium sulfate. These particles are statistically associated with health impacts. When deposited to ecosystems in excess, nitrogen, including ammonia can cause nutrient imbalances, change in ecosystem species composition, eutrophication, algal blooms and hypoxia. Ammonia is also challenging to measure in-situ. Observations of surface concentrations are rare and are particularly sparse in North America. Satellite observations of ammonia are therefore highly desirable. We recently demonstrated that tropospheric ammonia is detectable in the TES spectra and presented some corresponding preliminary retrievals over a very limited range of conditions (Beer et al., 2008). Presented here are results that expand upon these initial TES ammonia retrievals in order to evaluate/validate the retrieval results utilizing in-situ surface observations (e.g. LADCO, CASTNet, EPA /NC State) and chemical models (e.g. GEOS-Chem and CMAQ). We also present retrievals over regions of interest that have the potential to help further understand air quality and the active nitrogen cycle. Beer, R., M. W. Shephard, S. S. Kulawik, S. A. Clough, A. Eldering, K. W. Bowman, S. P. Sander, B. M. Fisher, V. H. Payne, M. Luo, G. B. Osterman, and J. R. Worden, First

  6. Cloud temperatures from ammonia observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuiper, T. B. H.

    1987-01-01

    In association with an ammonia survey of the southern Galaxy (Peters et al., 1986), a search was made for improved analytical formulas to expedite the data analysis. Semi-empirical formulas are presented which relate the kinetic temperature of a molecular cloud to the kinetic temperature used in full statistical equilibrium calculations. The formulas can be used in a simple way to improve the estimate of the kinetic temperature obtained from ammonia observations.

  7. Ammonia Synthesis at Low Pressure.

    PubMed

    Cussler, Edward; McCormick, Alon; Reese, Michael; Malmali, Mahdi

    2017-08-23

    Ammonia can be synthesized at low pressure by the use of an ammonia selective absorbent. The process can be driven with wind energy, available locally in areas requiring ammonia for synthetic fertilizer. Such wind energy is often called "stranded," because it is only available far from population centers where it can be directly used. In the proposed low pressure process, nitrogen is made from air using pressure swing absorption, and hydrogen is produced by electrolysis of water. While these gases can react at approximately 400 °C in the presence of a promoted conventional catalyst, the conversion is often limited by the reverse reaction, which makes this reaction only feasible at high pressures. This limitation can be removed by absorption on an ammine-like calcium or magnesium chloride. Such alkaline metal halides can effectively remove ammonia, thus suppressing the equilibrium constraints of the reaction. In the proposed absorption-enhanced ammonia synthesis process, the rate of reaction may then be controlled not by the chemical kinetics nor the absorption rates, but by the rate of the recycle of unreacted gases. The results compare favorably with ammonia made from a conventional small scale Haber-Bosch process.

  8. Structural studies of ammonia and metallic lithium-ammonia solutions.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Helen; Wasse, Jonathan C; Skipper, Neal T; Hayama, Shusaku; Bowron, Daniel T; Soper, Alan K

    2003-03-05

    The technique of hydrogen/deuterium isotopic substitution has been used to extract detailed information concerning the solvent structure in pure ammonia and metallic lithium-ammonia solutions. In pure ammonia we find evidence for approximately 2.0 hydrogen bonds around each central nitrogen atom, with an average N-H distance of 2.4 A. On addition of alkali metal, we observe directly significant disruption of this hydrogen bonding. At 8 mol % metal there remains only around 0.7 hydrogen bond per nitrogen atom. This value decreases to 0.0 for the saturated solution of 21 mol % metal, as all ammonia molecules have then become incorporated into the tetrahedral first solvation spheres of the lithium cations. In conjunction with a classical three-dimensional computer modeling technique, we are now able to identify a well-defined second cationic solvation shell. In this secondary shell the nitrogen atoms tend to reside above the faces and edges of the primary tetrahedral shell. Furthermore, the computer-generated models reveal that on addition of alkali metal the solvent molecules form voids of approximate radius 2.5-3.0 A. Our data therefore provide new insight into the structure of the polaronic cavities and tunnels, which have been theoretically predicted for lithium-ammonia solutions.

  9. Global Seabird Ammonia Emissions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riddick, S. N.; Blackall, T. D.; Dragosits, U.; Daunt, F. H.; Braban, C. F.; Tang, Y. S.; Trathan, P.; Wanless, S.; Sutton, M. A.

    2010-12-01

    Seabird colonies represent a major source of atmospheric ammonia (NH3) in remote coastal and marine systems in temperate, tropical and polar regions. Previous studies have shown that NH3 emissions from Scottish seabird colonies were substantial - of similar magnitude to the most intensive agricultural point source emissions. The UK data were used to model global seabird NH3 emissions and suggested that penguins are a major source of emissions on and around the Antarctic continent. The largest seabird colonies are in the order of millions of seabirds. Due to the isolation of these colonies from anthropogenic nitrogen sources, they may play a major role in the nitrogen cycle within these ecosystems. A global seabird database was constructed and used in conjunction with a species-specific seabird bioenergetics model to map the locations of NH3 emissions from seabird colonies. The accuracy of the modelled emissions was validated with field data of NH3 emissions measured at key seabird colonies in different climatic regions of the world: temperate (Isle of May, Scotland), tropical (Ascension Island) and polar (Signy Island, South Georgia). The field data indicated good agreement between modelled and measured NH3 emissions. The measured NH3 emissions also showed the variability of emission with climate. Climate dependence of seabird NH3 emissions may have further implications under a changing global climate. Seabird colonies represent NH3 emission ‘hotspots’, often far from anthropogenic sources, and are likely to be the major source of nitrogen input to these remote coastal ecosystems. The direct manuring by seabirds at colony locations may strongly influence species richness and biodiversity. The subsequent volatilisation and deposition of NH3 increases the spatial extent of seabird influence on nitrogen cycling in their local ecosystem. As many seabird populations are fluctuating due to changing food supply, climate change or anthropogenic pressures, these factors

  10. Ammonia transport across the skin of adult rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) exposed to high environmental ammonia (HEA).

    PubMed

    Zimmer, Alex M; Brauner, Colin J; Wood, Chris M

    2014-01-01

    Recent molecular evidence points towards a capacity for ammonia transport across the skin of adult rainbow trout. A series of in vivo and in vitro experiments were conducted to understand the role of cutaneous ammonia excretion (J amm) under control conditions and after 12-h pre-exposure to high environmental ammonia (HEA; 2 mmol/l NH4HCO3). Divided chamber experiments with bladder-catheterized, rectally ligated fish under light anesthesia were performed to separate cutaneous J amm from branchial, renal, and intestinal J amm. Under control conditions, cutaneous J amm accounted for 4.5 % of total J amm in vivo. In fish pre-exposed to HEA, plasma total ammonia concentration increased 20-fold to approximately 1,000 μmol/l, branchial J amm increased 1.5- to 2.7-fold, and urinary J amm increased about 7-fold. Urinary J amm still accounted for less than 2 % of total J amm. Cutaneous J amm increased 4-fold yet amounted to only 5.7 % of total J amm in these fish. Genes (Rhcg1, Rhcg2, Rhbg, NHE-2, v-type H(+)-ATPase) known to be involved in ammonia excretion at the gills of trout were all expressed at the mRNA level in the skin, but their expression did not increase with HEA pre-exposure. In vitro analyses using [(14)C] methylamine (MA), an ammonia analog which is transported by Rh proteins, demonstrated that MA permeability in isolated skin sections was higher in HEA pre-exposed fish than in control fish. The addition of basolateral ammonia (1,000 μmol/l) to this system abolished this increase in permeability, suggesting ammonia competition with MA for Rh-mediated transport across the skin of HEA pre-exposed trout; this did not occur in skin sections from control trout. Moreover, in vitro J amm by the skin of fish which had been pre-exposed to HEA was also higher than in control fish in the absence of basolateral ammonia, pointing towards a possible cutaneous ammonia loading in response to HEA. In vitro MA permeability was reduced upon the addition of amiloride (10

  11. MEASUREMENT OF AMMONIA RELEASE FROM SALTSTONE

    SciTech Connect

    Zamecnik, J; Alex Cozzi, A

    2009-01-15

    SRNL was requested by WSRC Waste Solidification Engineering to characterize the release of ammonia from saltstone curing at 95 C by performing experimental testing. These tests were performed with an MCU-type Tank 50H salt simulant containing 0, 50, and 200 mg/L ammonia. The testing program showed that above saltstone made from the 200 mg/L ammonia simulant, the vapor space ammonia concentration was about 2.7 mg/L vapor at 95 C. An upper 95% confidence value for this concentration was found to be 3.9 mg/L. Testing also showed that ammonia was chemically generated from curing saltstone at 95 C; the amount of ammonia generated was estimated to be equivalent to 121 mg/L additional ammonia in the salt solution feed. Even with chemical generation, the ammonia release from saltstone was found to be lower than its release from salt solution only with 200 mg/L ammonia.

  12. Alkalosis and renal excretion of ammonia by rat kidney.

    PubMed

    Solomon, S

    1988-05-15

    Upon sulfate administration, UpH falls more in alkalotic rats than in controls. Alkalosis can lead to a reduction in UNH3 V at highly acidic urine. The significance of this process is doubtful at UpH ranging from about 6 to 7. At lower UpH less NH3 would be excreted, thereby less H+ would be trapped in urine and some acid would be conserved.

  13. Effects of chronic lithium administration on renal acid excretion in humans and rats

    PubMed Central

    Weiner, I. David; Leader, John P.; Bedford, Jennifer J.; Verlander, Jill W.; Ellis, Gaye; Kalita, Priyakshi; Vos, Frederiek; de Jong, Sylvia; Walker, Robert J.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Lithium therapy's most common side effects affecting the kidney are nephrogenic diabetes insipidus (NDI) and chronic kidney disease. Lithium may also induce a distal renal tubular acidosis. This study investigated the effect of chronic lithium exposure on renal acid–base homeostasis, with emphasis on ammonia and citrate excretion. We compared 11 individuals on long‐term lithium therapy with six healthy individuals. Under basal conditions, lithium‐treated individuals excreted significantly more urinary ammonia than did control subjects. Following an acute acid load, urinary ammonia excretion increased approximately twofold above basal rates in both lithium‐treated and control humans. There were no significant differences between lithium‐treated and control subjects in urinary pH or urinary citrate excretion. To elucidate possible mechanisms, rats were randomized to diets containing lithium or regular diet for 6 months. Similar to humans, basal ammonia excretion was significantly higher in lithium‐treated rats; in addition, urinary citrate excretion was also significantly greater. There were no differences in urinary pH. Expression of the critical ammonia transporter, Rhesus C Glycoprotein (Rhcg), was substantially greater in lithium‐treated rats than in control rats. We conclude that chronic lithium exposure increases renal ammonia excretion through mechanisms independent of urinary pH and likely to involve increased collecting duct ammonia secretion via the ammonia transporter, Rhcg. PMID:25501430

  14. Effect of vortex flows on ammonia oxidation

    SciTech Connect

    Beskov, V.S.; Shpinel', E.E.

    1988-09-01

    The oxidation of ammonia over platinum sieve catalysts was investigated given the vortex flows found in industrial contact units. Mathematical and physical models were used to assess the influence of vortices on ammonia oxidation. The flow pattern of the ammonia-air mixture in the reactor was modeled as a stream with a partial recycle. It is shown that vortex flows reduce the conversion of ammonia to nitrogen monoxide and increase the passage of unconverted ammonia through the catalyst sieve. Over long contact periods, the main effect of vortices is to increase the passage of unconverted ammonia, which may lead to the formation of explosive compounds.

  15. Mechanisms in hyperkalemic renal tubular acidosis.

    PubMed

    Karet, Fiona E

    2009-02-01

    The form of renal tubular acidosis associated with hyperkalemia is usually attributable to real or apparent hypoaldosteronism. It is therefore a common feature in diabetes and a number of other conditions associated with underproduction of renin or aldosterone. In addition, the close relationship between potassium levels and ammonia production dictates that hyperkalemia per se can lead to acidosis. Here I describe the modern relationship between molecular function of the distal portion of the nephron, pathways of ammoniagenesis, and hyperkalemia.

  16. Expression of Ammonia Transporters, Rhbg and Rhcg, in Chronic Cyclosporine Nephropathy in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Sun Woo; Ahn, Kyung Ohk; Kim, Wan Young; Han, Dong He; Li, Can; Ghee, Jung Yeon; Han, Ki Hwan; Kim, Hye-Young; Handlogten, Mary E.; Kim, Jin; Yang, Chul Woo; Weiner, I. David

    2015-01-01

    Background/Aims Cyclosporine (CsA)-induced renal injury causes renal tubular acidosis. The current study was performed to evaluate the influence of CsA-induced renal injury on the ammonia transporter family members, Rh B-glyco-protein (Rhbg) and Rh C-glycoprotein (Rhcg). Methods Rats were treated daily for 1 or 4 weeks with vehicle (VH) or CsA. Induction of chronic CsA-induced nephropathy was confirmed by demonstrating impaired renal function and characteristic histopathology. Rhbg and Rhcg expression was evaluated with immunoblot, immunohistochemistry, real-time RT-PCR and electron microscopy. Results CsA treatment for 4 weeks developed mild metabolic acidosis and decreased urinary ammonia excretion. Rhcg mRNA expression was unchanged in both the cortex and outer medulla, but Rhcg protein expression in the CsA group was significantly reduced in the cortex and outer medulla. There were no significant differences in Rhbg mRNA and protein expression between the CsA and VH group. Conclusion Long-term treatment with CsA in rats results in decreased urinary ammonia excretion accompanied by decreased expression of Rhcg; these changes are likely to mediate the CsA-induced defect in ammonium excretion in the collecting duct. PMID:18776723

  17. Catalytic Organometallic Reactions of Ammonia

    PubMed Central

    Klinkenberg, Jessica L.

    2012-01-01

    Until recently, ammonia had rarely succumbed to catalytic transformations with homogeneous catalysts, and the development of such reactions that are selective for the formation of single products under mild conditions has encountered numerous challenges. However, recently developed catalysts have allowed several classes of reactions to create products with nitrogen-containing functional groups from ammonia. These reactions include hydroaminomethylation, reductive amination, alkylation, allylic substitution, hydroamination, and cross-coupling. This Minireview describes examples of these processes and the factors that control catalyst activity and selectivity. PMID:20857466

  18. Porous silicon ammonia gas sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaillou, A.; Charrier, J.; Lorrain, N.; Sarret, M.; Haji, L.

    2006-04-01

    A planar optical waveguide is manufactured by the functionnalisation of oxidised mesoporous silicon with Bromothymol Blue to achieve a sensitive ammonia sensor suitable for low gas concentrations. The propagated light intensity is measured at the output of the waveguide. The sensitivity at low concentrations and the short time of reaction of the sensor are enhanced by a confinement effect of the gas molecules inside the pores. The dependence of the output signal with gas concentration is demonstrated. When the ammonia flow is stopped, the reversibility of the initial characteristics of the propagated light is naturally obtained with the disappearance of the gas molecules.

  19. Renal Scintigraphy

    MedlinePlus

    ... size with caption Related Articles and Media General Nuclear Medicine Radiation Dose in X-Ray and CT Exams X-ray, Interventional Radiology and Nuclear Medicine Radiation Safety Images related to Renal Scintigraphy Sponsored by ...

  20. RESULTS OF INITIAL AMMONIA OXIDATION TESTING

    SciTech Connect

    Nash, C.; Fowley, M.

    2016-12-30

    This memo presents an experimental survey of aqueous phase chemical processes to remove aqueous ammonia from waste process streams. Ammonia is generated in both the current Hanford waste flowsheet and in future waste processing. Much ammonia will be generated in the Low Activity Waste (LAW) melters.i Testing with simulants in glass melters at Catholic University has demonstrated the significant ammonia production.ii The primary reaction there is the reducing action of sugar on nitrate in the melter cold cap. Ammonia has been found to be a problem in secondary waste stabilization. Ammonia vapors are noxious and destruction of ammonia could reduce hazards to waste treatment process personnel. It is easily evolved especially when ammonia-bearing solutions are adjusted to high pH.

  1. 21 CFR 573.180 - Anhydrous ammonia.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS FOOD ADDITIVES PERMITTED IN FEED AND DRINKING WATER OF ANIMALS Food Additive Listing § 573.180 Anhydrous ammonia. (a) The food additive anhydrous ammonia is applied directly...: (1)(i) The food additive anhydrous ammonia is applied as a component of an aqueous premix containing...

  2. 21 CFR 573.180 - Anhydrous ammonia.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS FOOD ADDITIVES PERMITTED IN FEED AND DRINKING WATER OF ANIMALS Food Additive Listing § 573.180 Anhydrous ammonia. (a) The food additive anhydrous ammonia is applied directly...: (1)(i) The food additive anhydrous ammonia is applied as a component of an aqueous premix containing...

  3. 21 CFR 573.180 - Anhydrous ammonia.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS FOOD ADDITIVES PERMITTED IN FEED AND DRINKING WATER OF ANIMALS Food Additive Listing § 573.180 Anhydrous ammonia. (a) The food additive anhydrous ammonia is applied directly...: (1)(i) The food additive anhydrous ammonia is applied as a component of an aqueous premix containing...

  4. 46 CFR 154.1760 - Liquid ammonia.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Liquid ammonia. 154.1760 Section 154.1760 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) CERTAIN BULK DANGEROUS CARGOES SAFETY STANDARDS FOR....1760 Liquid ammonia. The master shall ensure that no person sprays liquid ammonia into a cargo...

  5. 46 CFR 154.1760 - Liquid ammonia.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Liquid ammonia. 154.1760 Section 154.1760 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) CERTAIN BULK DANGEROUS CARGOES SAFETY STANDARDS FOR....1760 Liquid ammonia. The master shall ensure that no person sprays liquid ammonia into a cargo...

  6. 46 CFR 154.1760 - Liquid ammonia.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Liquid ammonia. 154.1760 Section 154.1760 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) CERTAIN BULK DANGEROUS CARGOES SAFETY STANDARDS FOR....1760 Liquid ammonia. The master shall ensure that no person sprays liquid ammonia into a cargo...

  7. 46 CFR 154.1760 - Liquid ammonia.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Liquid ammonia. 154.1760 Section 154.1760 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) CERTAIN BULK DANGEROUS CARGOES SAFETY STANDARDS FOR....1760 Liquid ammonia. The master shall ensure that no person sprays liquid ammonia into a cargo...

  8. 46 CFR 154.1760 - Liquid ammonia.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Liquid ammonia. 154.1760 Section 154.1760 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) CERTAIN BULK DANGEROUS CARGOES SAFETY STANDARDS FOR....1760 Liquid ammonia. The master shall ensure that no person sprays liquid ammonia into a cargo...

  9. 27 CFR 21.96 - Ammonia, aqueous.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Ammonia, aqueous. 21.96 Section 21.96 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU, DEPARTMENT... Ammonia, aqueous. (a) Alkalinity. Strongly alkaline to litmus. (b) Ammonia content. 27 to 30 percent by...

  10. 27 CFR 21.96 - Ammonia, aqueous.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Ammonia, aqueous. 21.96 Section 21.96 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU, DEPARTMENT... Ammonia, aqueous. (a) Alkalinity. Strongly alkaline to litmus. (b) Ammonia content. 27 to 30 percent by...

  11. 27 CFR 21.96 - Ammonia, aqueous.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Ammonia, aqueous. 21.96 Section 21.96 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU, DEPARTMENT... Ammonia, aqueous. (a) Alkalinity. Strongly alkaline to litmus. (b) Ammonia content. 27 to 30 percent by...

  12. 27 CFR 21.96 - Ammonia, aqueous.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Ammonia, aqueous. 21.96 Section 21.96 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU, DEPARTMENT... Ammonia, aqueous. (a) Alkalinity. Strongly alkaline to litmus. (b) Ammonia content. 27 to 30 percent by...

  13. 27 CFR 21.96 - Ammonia, aqueous.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Ammonia, aqueous. 21.96 Section 21.96 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU, DEPARTMENT... Ammonia, aqueous. (a) Alkalinity. Strongly alkaline to litmus. (b) Ammonia content. 27 to 30 percent by...

  14. Ammonia emissions from cattle feeding operations.

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Ammonia is a colorless gas with an pungent odor that occurs naturally in trace amounts in the atmosphere, where it is the dominant base. Ammonia is produced during the decomposition of livestock manure. There is concern about atmospheric ammonia because of its potential effects on air quality, wat...

  15. Glycopyrrolate in toxic exposure to ammonia gas

    PubMed Central

    Bhalla, A; Mahi, S; Sharma, N; Singh, S

    2011-01-01

    Ammonia (NH3) is a highly water-soluble, colorless, irritant gas with a unique pungent odor. Liquid ammonia stored under high pressure is still widely used for refrigeration in cold stores used for storing grains. Severe toxicity may occur following accidental exposure. We report an interesting case of accidental exposure to ammonia treated with glycopyrrolate along with other supportive measures. PMID:21633586

  16. Effect of respiratory acidosis and respiratory alkalosis on renal transport enzymes.

    PubMed

    Eiam-ong, S; Laski, M E; Kurtzman, N A; Sabatini, S

    1994-09-01

    We studied the effect of respiratory acidosis and respiratory alkalosis on acid-base composition and on microdissected renal adenosinetriphosphatase (ATPase) enzymes. Rats were subjected to hypercapnia or hypocapnia of 6, 24, and 72 h duration. After 6 h of hypercapnia, collecting tubule (CT) ATPases were not changed. At 24 h, plasma bicarbonate was 35 +/- 1 meq/l (P < 0.01) and CT H-ATPase and H-K-ATPase activities were 90% greater than controls (P < 0.01). By 72 h, plasma bicarbonate was 37 +/- 1 meq/l (P < 0.005 vs. control) and CT enzyme activity had increased even more, averaging approximately 130% of control (P < 0.05). Significant increases in enzyme activities were also observed in the proximal convoluted tubule and medullary thick ascending limb. Plasma aldosterone was three to four times that of control at all three time periods. In hormone-replete adrenalectomized rats, acid-base parameters and ATPase activities were the same as those seen in adrenal intact animals. After 6 h of hypocapnia, plasma bicarbonate was not significantly changed, but H-ATPase and Na-K-ATPase activities were decreased by 35% along the entire nephron (P < 0.05). H-K-ATPase activity in CT also decreased by 35%. At 24 h, plasma bicarbonate was 20.5 +/- 0.5 meq/l (P < 0.05 vs. control) and CT H-ATPase and H-K-ATPase activities were 60% less than control (P < 0.01). By 72 h, plasma bicarbonate was 18.5 +/- 0.5 meq/l (P < 0.05); however, only CT H-ATPase activity continued to fall, averaging 75% less than control (P < 0.005). Hypocapnia had no effect on plasma aldosterone or potassium. These results demonstrate that chronic, but not acute, respiratory acidosis stimulates activity of both renal proton ATPases. By contrast, both acute and chronic respiratory alkalosis decrease the two renal proton pumps. The stimulatory effect of hypercapnia and the inhibitory effect of hypocapnia on the renal ATPases appear to be potassium and aldosterone independent. Although the precise mechanisms

  17. Shuttle ECLSS ammonia delivery capability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    The possible effects of excessive requirements on ammonia flow rates required for entry cooling, due to extreme temperatures, on mission plans for the space shuttles, were investigated. An analysis of worst case conditions was performed, and indicates that adequate flow rates are available. No mission impact is therefore anticipated.

  18. Preparation of ammonia synthesis gas

    SciTech Connect

    Shires, P.J.; van Dijk, C.P.; Cassata, J.R.; Mandelik, B.G.

    1984-10-30

    Ammonia synthesis gas having excess nitrogen is produced in a reactor-exchanger primary reformer followed by an autothermal secondary reformer wherein process air for the latter is preheated by heat exchange with gas turbine exhaust and the primary reformer is heated by synthesis gas from the secondary reformer.

  19. Ammonia excretion by Azobacter chroococcum

    SciTech Connect

    Narula, N.; Lakshminarayana, K.; Tauro, P.

    1981-02-01

    In recent years, research has focused attention on the development of biological systems for nitrogen fixation. In this report, two strains of Azotobacter chroococcum are identified which can excrete as much as 45 mg ammonia/ml of the culture broth in a sucrose supplemented synthetic medium.

  20. Inhibiting Wet Oxidation of Ammonia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Onisko, D. B. L.

    1985-01-01

    Simple modification of wet-oxidation process for treating organicwaste reduces loss of fixed nitrogen, potentially valuable byproduct of process. Addition of sufficient sulfuric acid to maintain reaction pH below 3 greatly reduces oxidation of ammonia to free nitrogen. No equipment modification required.

  1. Hydrogen production using ammonia borane

    DOEpatents

    Hamilton, Charles W; Baker, R. Thomas; Semelsberger, Troy A; Shrestha, Roshan P

    2013-12-24

    Hydrogen ("H.sub.2") is produced when ammonia borane reacts with a catalyst complex of the formula L.sub.nM-X wherein M is a base metal such as iron, X is an anionic nitrogen- or phosphorus-based ligand or hydride, and L is a neutral ancillary ligand that is a neutral monodentate or polydentate ligand.

  2. Inhibiting Wet Oxidation of Ammonia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Onisko, D. B. L.

    1985-01-01

    Simple modification of wet-oxidation process for treating organicwaste reduces loss of fixed nitrogen, potentially valuable byproduct of process. Addition of sufficient sulfuric acid to maintain reaction pH below 3 greatly reduces oxidation of ammonia to free nitrogen. No equipment modification required.

  3. Transcriptional response of the archaeal ammonia oxidizer Nitrosopumilus maritimus to low and environmentally relevant ammonia concentrations.

    PubMed

    Nakagawa, Tatsunori; Stahl, David A

    2013-11-01

    The ability of chemoautotrophic ammonia-oxidizing archaea to compete for ammonia among marine microorganisms at low ambient concentrations has been in part attributed to their extremely high affinity for ammonia, but as yet there is no mechanistic understanding of supporting metabolism. We examined transcription of selected genes for anabolic functions (CO2 fixation, ammonia transport, and cell wall synthesis) and a central catabolic function (ammonia oxidation) in the thaumarchaeon Nitrosopumilus maritimus SCM1 growing at two ammonia concentrations, as measured by combined ammonia and ammonium, one well above the Km for ammonia oxidation (∼500 μM) and the other well below the Km (<10 nM). Transcript levels were generally immediately and differentially repressed when cells transitioned from ammonia-replete to ammonia-limiting conditions. Transcript levels for ammonia oxidation, CO2 fixation, and one of the ammonia transport genes were approximately the same at high and low ammonia availability. Transcripts for all analyzed genes decreased with time in the complete absence of ammonia, but with various rates of decay. The new steady-state mRNA levels established are presumably more reflective of the natural physiological state of ammonia-oxidizing archaea and offer a reference for interpreting message abundance patterns in the natural environment.

  4. Transcriptional Response of the Archaeal Ammonia Oxidizer Nitrosopumilus maritimus to Low and Environmentally Relevant Ammonia Concentrations

    PubMed Central

    Stahl, David A.

    2013-01-01

    The ability of chemoautotrophic ammonia-oxidizing archaea to compete for ammonia among marine microorganisms at low ambient concentrations has been in part attributed to their extremely high affinity for ammonia, but as yet there is no mechanistic understanding of supporting metabolism. We examined transcription of selected genes for anabolic functions (CO2 fixation, ammonia transport, and cell wall synthesis) and a central catabolic function (ammonia oxidation) in the thaumarchaeon Nitrosopumilus maritimus SCM1 growing at two ammonia concentrations, as measured by combined ammonia and ammonium, one well above the Km for ammonia oxidation (∼500 μM) and the other well below the Km (<10 nM). Transcript levels were generally immediately and differentially repressed when cells transitioned from ammonia-replete to ammonia-limiting conditions. Transcript levels for ammonia oxidation, CO2 fixation, and one of the ammonia transport genes were approximately the same at high and low ammonia availability. Transcripts for all analyzed genes decreased with time in the complete absence of ammonia, but with various rates of decay. The new steady-state mRNA levels established are presumably more reflective of the natural physiological state of ammonia-oxidizing archaea and offer a reference for interpreting message abundance patterns in the natural environment. PMID:23995944

  5. Cobalt-based Catalysts for Ammonia Decomposition

    PubMed Central

    Lendzion-Bielun, Zofia; Narkiewicz, Urszula; Arabczyk, Walerian

    2013-01-01

    An effect of promoters such as calcium, aluminium, and potassium oxides and also addition of chromium and manganese on the structure of cobalt catalysts was examined. Studies of the catalytic ammonia decomposition over the cobalt catalysts are presented. The studies of the ammonia decomposition were carried out for various ammonia-hydrogen mixtures in which ammonia concentration varied in the range from 10% to 100%. Co(0) catalyst, promoted by oxides of aluminium, calcium, and potassium, showed the highest activity in the ammonia decomposition reaction. Contrary to expectations, it was found that chromium and manganese addition into the catalysts decreased their activity. PMID:28809280

  6. Ammonia Level and Mortality in Acute Liver Failure: A Single-Center Experience.

    PubMed

    Niranjan-Azadi, Ashwini M; Araz, Filiz; Patel, Yuval A; Alachkar, Nada; Alqahtani, Saleh; Cameron, Andrew M; Stevens, Robert D; Gurakar, Ahmet

    2016-08-02

    BACKGROUND Acute liver failure (ALF) is an emergent condition that requires intensive care and manifests in particular by significant elevation in serum ammonia level. Patients with ALF with concomitant renal failure experience a further rise in ammonia levels due to decreased kidney excretion. The aim of this study was to evaluate the relationship between elevated ammonia levels and mortality and to characterize the subgroup of ALF patients who develop acute kidney injury (AKI) and require renal replacement therapy. MATERIAL AND METHODS This was a retrospective study of 36 consecutive patients admitted to Johns Hopkins Hospital's intensive care units from December 2008 to May 2013 who presented with grade III and IV hepatic encephalopathy (HE). Patients who developed AKI and required hemodialysis (HD) were compared to those without AKI. Patients with chronic kidney disease were excluded. RESULTS Sixteen patients developed AKI and underwent HD (HD group). Median ammonia levels in the HD and non-HD groups were not significantly different (p=0.95). In the HD group, 4 patients underwent liver transplantation (LT) and 3 of them survived the hospitalization. Among the 12 HD patients who did not receive LT, 6 (50%) survived. Out of 20 non-HD patients, 3 were transplanted, all of whom survived the hospitalization. Among the 17 non-HD patients who did not receive LT, 14 (82%) survived. Admission ammonia level (>120 µmol/L) was associated with higher mortality rate (OR=7.188 [95% CI 1.3326-38.952], p=0.026) in all patients. CONCLUSIONS Admission ammonia level is predictive of mortality in ALF patients with grade 3-4 HE.

  7. Ammonia abundances in four comets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wyckoff, S.; Tegler, S. C.; Engel, L.

    1991-02-01

    NH2 emission band strengths were measured in four comets and the NH2 column densities were determined in order to measure the ammonia content of the comets. The mean ammonia/water abundance ratio derived for the four comets is found to be 0.13 + or - 0.06 percent, with no significant variation among the comets. The uniformity of this abundance attests to a remarkable degree of chemical homogeneity over large scales in the comet-forming region of the primordial solar nebula, and contrasts with the CO abundance variations found previously in comets. The N2 and NH3 abundances indicate a condensation temperature in the range 20-160 K, consistent with virtually all comet formation hypotheses.

  8. Ammonia abundances in four comets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wickoff, Susan; Tegler, Stephen C.; Engel, Lisa

    1991-01-01

    NH2 emission band strengths were measured in four comets and the NH2 column densities were determined in order to measure the ammonia content of the comets. The mean ammonia/water abundance ratio derived for the four comets is found to be 0.13 + or - 0.06 percent, with no significant variation among the comets. The uniformity of this abundance attests to a remarkable degree of chemical homogeneity over large scales in the comet-forming region of the primordial solar nebula, and contrasts with the CO abundance variations found previously in comets. The N2 and NH3 abundances indicate a condensation temperature in the range 20-160 K, consistent with virtually all comet formation hypotheses.

  9. Saturn - Tropospheric ammonia and nitrogen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Atreya, S. K.; Kuhn, W. R.; Donahue, T. M.

    1980-01-01

    Photochemical calculations based on recent data on the Saturn temperature structure and Lyman-alpha albedo indicate that detectable amounts of gaseous ammonia may exist between 20 and 35 km above the cloud tops. An instrument that might be able to observe this gas is the spectrometer on board the International Ultraviolet Explorer satellite. The calculations also yield a maximum nitrogen mixing ratio at the cloud tops between 1.8 x 10 to the -10th to 6 x 10 to the -8th by volume, depending upon the degree of supersaturation of ammonia and hydrazine. Even the lower limit could produce intense emissions if electrical discharges such as those observed on Jupiter by Voyager are also present on Saturn, or if high energy particles penetrate to the Saturnian troposphere.

  10. Planar waveguide sensor of ammonia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rogoziński, Roman; Tyszkiewicz, Cuma; Karasiński, Paweł; Izydorczyk, Weronika

    2015-12-01

    The paper presents the concept of forming ammonia sensor based on a planar waveguide structure. It is an amplitude sensor produced on the basis of the multimode waveguide. The technological base for this kind of structure is the ion exchange method and the sol-gel method. The planar multimode waveguide of channel type is produced in glass substrate (soda-lime glass of Menzel-Glaser company) by the selective Ag+↔Na+ ion exchange. On the surface of the glass substrate a porous (~40%) silica layer is produced by the sol-gel method. This layer is sensitized to the presence of ammonia in the surrounding atmosphere by impregnation with Bromocresol Purple (BCP) dye. Therefore it constitutes a sensor layer. Spectrophotometric tests carried out showed about 50% reduction of cross-transmission changes of such sensor layer for a wave λ=593 nm caused by the presence of 25% ammonia water vapor in its ambience. The radiation source used in this type of sensor structure is a light emitting diode LED. The gradient channel waveguide is designed for frontal connection (optical glue) with a standard multimode telecommunications waveguide 62.5/125μm.

  11. Fluorographene based Ultrasensitive Ammonia Sensor.

    PubMed

    Tadi, Kiran Kumar; Pal, Shubhadeep; Narayanan, Tharangattu N

    2016-05-04

    Single molecule detection using graphene can be brought by tuning the interactions via specific dopants. Electrostatic interaction between the most electronegative element fluorine (F) and hydrogen (H) is one of the strong interactions in hydrogen bonding, and here we report the selective binding of ammonia/ammonium with F in fluorographene (FG) resulting to a change in the impedance of the system. Very low limit of detection value of ~0.44 pM with linearity over wide range of concentrations (1 pM-0.1 μM) is achieved using the FG based impedance sensor, andthisscreen printed FG sensor works in both ionized (ammonium) and un-ionized ammonia sensing platforms. The interaction energies of FG and NH3/NH4(+) are evaluated using density functional theory calculations and the interactions are mapped. Here FGs with two different amounts of fluorinecontents -~5 atomic% (C39H16F2) and ~24 atomic% (C39H16F12) - are theoretically and experimentally studied for selective, high sensitive and ultra-low level detection of ammonia. Fast responding, high sensitive, large area patternable FG based sensor platform demonstrated here can open new avenues for the development of point-of-care devices and clinical sensors.

  12. Fluorographene based Ultrasensitive Ammonia Sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tadi, Kiran Kumar; Pal, Shubhadeep; Narayanan, Tharangattu N.

    2016-05-01

    Single molecule detection using graphene can be brought by tuning the interactions via specific dopants. Electrostatic interaction between the most electronegative element fluorine (F) and hydrogen (H) is one of the strong interactions in hydrogen bonding, and here we report the selective binding of ammonia/ammonium with F in fluorographene (FG) resulting to a change in the impedance of the system. Very low limit of detection value of ~0.44 pM with linearity over wide range of concentrations (1 pM–0.1 μM) is achieved using the FG based impedance sensor, andthisscreen printed FG sensor works in both ionized (ammonium) and un-ionized ammonia sensing platforms. The interaction energies of FG and NH3/NH4+ are evaluated using density functional theory calculations and the interactions are mapped. Here FGs with two different amounts of fluorinecontents ‑~5 atomic% (C39H16F2) and ~24 atomic% (C39H16F12) - are theoretically and experimentally studied for selective, high sensitive and ultra-low level detection of ammonia. Fast responding, high sensitive, large area patternable FG based sensor platform demonstrated here can open new avenues for the development of point-of-care devices and clinical sensors.

  13. Fluorographene based Ultrasensitive Ammonia Sensor

    PubMed Central

    Tadi, Kiran Kumar; Pal, Shubhadeep; Narayanan, Tharangattu N.

    2016-01-01

    Single molecule detection using graphene can be brought by tuning the interactions via specific dopants. Electrostatic interaction between the most electronegative element fluorine (F) and hydrogen (H) is one of the strong interactions in hydrogen bonding, and here we report the selective binding of ammonia/ammonium with F in fluorographene (FG) resulting to a change in the impedance of the system. Very low limit of detection value of ~0.44 pM with linearity over wide range of concentrations (1 pM–0.1 μM) is achieved using the FG based impedance sensor, andthisscreen printed FG sensor works in both ionized (ammonium) and un-ionized ammonia sensing platforms. The interaction energies of FG and NH3/NH4+ are evaluated using density functional theory calculations and the interactions are mapped. Here FGs with two different amounts of fluorinecontents −~5 atomic% (C39H16F2) and ~24 atomic% (C39H16F12) - are theoretically and experimentally studied for selective, high sensitive and ultra-low level detection of ammonia. Fast responding, high sensitive, large area patternable FG based sensor platform demonstrated here can open new avenues for the development of point-of-care devices and clinical sensors. PMID:27142522

  14. Fiber-Optic Ammonia Sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carter, Michael T.

    2003-01-01

    Reversible, colorimetric fiber-optic sensors are undergoing development for use in measuring concentrations of ammonia in air at levels relevant to human health [0 to 50 parts per million (ppm)]. A sensor of this type includes an optical fiber that has been modified by replacing a portion of its cladding with a polymer coat that contains a dye that reacts reversibly with ammonia and changes color when it does so. The change in color is measured as a change in the amount of light transmitted from one end of the fiber to the other. Responses are reversible and proportional to the concentration of ammonia over the range from 9 to 175 ppm and in some cases the range of reversibility extends up to 270 ppm. The characteristic time for the response of a sensor to rise from 10 to 90 percent of full scale is about 25 seconds. These sensors are fully operational in pure carbon dioxide and are not adversely affected by humidity. This work was done by Michael T. Carter

  15. Renal Cysts

    MedlinePlus

    ... as “simple” cysts, meaning they have a thin wall and contain water-like fluid. Renal cysts are fairly common in ... simple kidney cysts, meaning they have a thin wall and only water-like fluid inside. They are fairly common in ...

  16. Ammonia Emissions from Agriculture in China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Y.; Zhang, L.; Zhao, Y.; Huang, B.

    2016-12-01

    Ammonia (NH3) is an important alkaline pollutant in the atmosphere and it has various environmental and climatic effects. We will present an improved bottom-up estimate of ammonia emissions from agriculture in China at 0.5°×0.5° horizontal resolution and monthly variability. Ammonia emissions from fertilizer use are derived using data of crop planting area, fertilizer application time and rate for 18 main crops. Ammonia emission factors from fertilizer use are estimated as a function of soil properties such as soil pH, cation exchange capacity (CEC), and agricultural activity information such as crop type, fertilizer type, and application mode. We further consider ambient temperature and wind speed to account for the meteorological influences on ammonia emission factors of fertilizer use. We also estimate the ammonia emission from livestock over China using the mass-flow methodology. The derived ammonia emissions in China for the year 2005 are 4.55 Tg NH3 from fertilizer use and 6.96 Tg from livestock. Henan and Jiangsu provinces are the two largest emitting areas for ammonia from fertilizer use (470 Gg NH3 and 365 Gg NH3). Henan (621 Gg NH3) and Shandong (533 Gg NH3) have the largest ammonia emissions from livestock. Both ammonia emissions from fertilizer use and livestock have distinct seasonal variations; peaking in June for fertilizer use (822 Gg NH3) and in July for livestock (1244 Gg NH3), and are both lowest in January (80 Gg and 241 Gg, respectively). Combining with other ammonia source (eg. human waste and transport) estimates from the REAS v2.1 emission inventory, we show that total ammonia emissions in China for the year 2005 are 14.0 Tg NH3 a-1. Comparisons with satellite measurements of ammonia columns will also be presented.

  17. Ammonia and amino acid profiles in liver cirrhosis: effects of variables leading to hepatic encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Holecek, Milan

    2015-01-01

    Hyperammonemia and severe amino acid imbalances play central role in hepatic encephalopathy (HE). In the article is demonstrated that the main source of ammonia in cirrhotic subjects is activated breakdown of glutamine (GLN) in enterocytes and the kidneys and the main source of GLN is ammonia detoxification to GLN in the brain and skeletal muscle. Branched-chain amino acids (BCAA; valine, leucine, and isoleucine) decrease due to activated GLN synthesis in muscle. Aromatic amino acids (AAA; phenylalanine, tyrosine, and tryptophan) and methionine increase due to portosystemic shunts and reduced ability of diseased liver. The effects on aminoacidemia of the following variables that may affect the course of liver disease are discussed: nutritional status, starvation, protein intake, inflammation, acute hepatocellular damage, bleeding from varices, portosystemic shunts, hepatic cancer, and renal failure. It is concluded that (1) neither ammonia nor amino acid concentrations correlate closely with the severity of liver disease; (2) BCAA/AAA ratio could be used as a good index of liver impairment and for early detection of derangements in amino acid metabolism; (3) variables potentially leading to overt encephalopathy exert substantial but uneven effects; and (4) careful monitoring of ammonia and aminoacidemia may discover important break points in the course of liver disease and indicate appropriate therapeutic approach. Of special importance might be isoleucine deficiency in bleeding from varices, arginine deficiency in sepsis, and a marked rise of GLN and ammonia levels that may appear in all events leading to HE.

  18. Ammonia gas concentrations over the Southern Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ayers, G. P.; Gras, J. L.

    1980-04-01

    Measurements of the concentration of ammonia in the atmosphere over the Southern Ocean in the vicinity of Tasmania are reported. Air samples were collected over a period of three or more hours on oxalic acid-impregnated filters using a PTFE prefilter, and ammonia was determined colorimetrically. For air apparently free of influence by land areas for several thousand km, as indicated by low levels of Aitken nuclei and ammonia, a mean ammonia gas concentration of 0.06 microgram/cu m is obtained, which is significantly lower than those determined elsewhere. The value is used to estimate a dissolved ammonia concentration in the ocean of 0.3 micromole/l, assuming equilibrium between the surface water and the air, is in agreement with measurements by other investigators and direct ocean water ammonia determinations.

  19. Ammonia Process by Pressure Swing Adsorption

    SciTech Connect

    Dr Felix Jegede

    2010-12-27

    The overall objective of the project is to design, develop and demonstrate a technically feasible and commercially viable system to produce ammonia along with recovery of the products by adsorption separation methods and significantly decrease the energy requirement in ammonia production. This is achieved through a significantly more efficient ammonia psa recovery system. The new ammonia recovery system receives the reactor effluents and achieves complete ammonia recovery, (which completely eliminates the energy intensive refrigeration and condensation system currently used in ammonia production). It also recovers the unused reactants and recycles them back to the reactor, free of potential reactor contaminants, and without the need for re-compression and re-heat of recycle stream thereby further saving more energy. The result is a significantly lower energy consumption, along with capital cost savings.

  20. Thermodynamic Properties of Aqueous Solution of Ammonia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kitamura, Hiroshi; Oguchi, Kosei

    Present status on the thermodynamic properties of experimental data and their correlations of both ammonia and aqueous solution of ammonia was introduced in this paper. The aqueous solution of ammonia is used for not only a working fluid in absorption refrigerator cycles but also working fluids in bottoming cycles of steam power plants and other heat recovering systems. Therefore, the thermodynamic properties of this substance are required in a wide range of temperatures, pressures and compositions. The experimental results of pVTx properties for ammonia and aqueous solution of ammonia and their comparisons with a formulation by Tillner-Roth and Friend1) were critically surveyed. The “Guideline on the IAPWS Formulation 2000 for the Thermodynamic Properties of Ammonia-Water Mixtures”, correlated by Tillner-Roth and Friend1), was approved on September, 2001, by the International Association for the Properties of Water and Steam (IAPWS) 2).

  1. Inhibitor performance in process water containing ammonia

    SciTech Connect

    Sherwood, N.S.

    1998-12-31

    Ammonia is a prevalent contaminant and issue in water reuse. Since ammonia exhibits decreasing dissociation with increasing pH, operation of cooling systems at high pH is effective in improving corrosion control, biocide demand and overall system performance. Polyamino polyether methylene phosphate based programs for high pH conditions provided scale and corrosion control at very high levels of ammonia contamination at a northern steel mill.

  2. Polyaniline-based optical ammonia detector

    DOEpatents

    Duan, Yixiang; Jin, Zhe; Su, Yongxuan

    2002-01-01

    Electronic absorption spectroscopy of a polyaniline film deposited on a polyethylene surface by chemical oxidation of aniline monomer at room temperature was used to quantitatively detect ammonia gas. The present optical ammonia gas detector was found to have a response time of less than 15 s, a regeneration time of less than 2 min. at room temperature, and a detection limit of 1 ppm (v/v) for ammonia, with a linear dynamic range from 180 ppm to 18,000 ppm.

  3. Atmospheric ammonia: absorption by plant leaves.

    PubMed

    Hutchinson, G L; Millington, R J; Peters, D B

    1972-02-18

    By monitoring the disappearance of ammonia from an airstream flowing through a small growth chamber containing a single plant seedling, it was discovered that plant leaves absorb significant quantities of ammonia from the air, even at naturally occurring low atmospheric concentrations. The measured absorption rates of ammonia showed large diurnal fluctuations and varied somewhat among species, but differed little with the nitrogen fertility level of plants within a species.

  4. Adsorption of ammonia on multilayer iron phthalocyanine

    SciTech Connect

    Isvoranu, Cristina; Knudsen, Jan; Ataman, Evren; Andersen, Jesper N.; Schnadt, Joachim; Schulte, Karina; Wang Bin; Bocquet, Marie-Laure

    2011-03-21

    The adsorption of ammonia on multilayers of well-ordered, flat-lying iron phthalocyanine (FePc) molecules on a Au(111) support was investigated by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. We find that the electron-donating ammonia molecules coordinate to the metal centers of iron phthlalocyanine. The coordination of ammonia induces changes of the electronic structure of the iron phthalocyanine layer, which, in particular, lead to a modification of the FePc valence electron spin.

  5. 21 CFR 862.1065 - Ammonia test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Ammonia test system. 862.1065 Section 862.1065....1065 Ammonia test system. (a) Identification. An ammonia test system is a device intended to measure ammonia levels in blood, serum, and plasma, Ammonia measurements are used in the diagnosis and...

  6. 21 CFR 862.1065 - Ammonia test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Ammonia test system. 862.1065 Section 862.1065....1065 Ammonia test system. (a) Identification. An ammonia test system is a device intended to measure ammonia levels in blood, serum, and plasma, Ammonia measurements are used in the diagnosis and...

  7. 21 CFR 862.1065 - Ammonia test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Ammonia test system. 862.1065 Section 862.1065....1065 Ammonia test system. (a) Identification. An ammonia test system is a device intended to measure ammonia levels in blood, serum, and plasma, Ammonia measurements are used in the diagnosis and...

  8. 21 CFR 862.1065 - Ammonia test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Ammonia test system. 862.1065 Section 862.1065....1065 Ammonia test system. (a) Identification. An ammonia test system is a device intended to measure ammonia levels in blood, serum, and plasma, Ammonia measurements are used in the diagnosis and...

  9. The taste response to ammonia in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Delventhal, R.; Menuz, K.; Joseph, R.; Park, J.; Sun, J. S.; Carlson, J. R.

    2017-01-01

    Ammonia is both a building block and a breakdown product of amino acids and is found widely in the environment. The odor of ammonia is attractive to many insects, including insect vectors of disease. The olfactory response of Drosophila to ammonia has been studied in some detail, but the taste response has received remarkably little attention. Here, we show that ammonia is a taste cue for Drosophila. Nearly all sensilla of the major taste organ of the Drosophila head house a neuron that responds to neutral solutions of ammonia. Ammonia is toxic at high levels to many organisms, and we find that it has a negative valence in two paradigms of taste behavior, one operating over hours and the other over seconds. Physiological and behavioral responses to ammonia depend at least in part on Gr66a+ bitter-sensing taste neurons, which activate a circuit that deters feeding. The Amt transporter, a critical component of olfactory responses to ammonia, is widely expressed in taste neurons but is not required for taste responses. This work establishes ammonia as an ecologically important taste cue in Drosophila, and shows that it can activate circuits that promote opposite behavioral outcomes via different sensory systems. PMID:28262698

  10. Hyperammonaemia in a child with distal renal tubular acidosis.

    PubMed

    Seracini, D; Poggi, G M; Pela, I

    2005-11-01

    A 5-month-old girl with distal renal tubular acidosis (RTA) and hyperammonaemia that had lasted for 12 days, despite metabolic acidosis correction, is presented in this report. The patient showed failure to thrive, poor feeding, hypotonia and vomiting crisis in absence of inborn errors of metabolism. Probably, hyperammonaemia was the result of an imbalance between the increased ammonia synthesis, in response to metabolic acidosis, and the impaired ammonia excretion, typical of distal RTA. Our case confirms that hyperammonaemia may be observed in distal RTA, mimicking an inborn error of metabolism, and it underlines that hyperammonaemia may persist several days after metabolic acidosis correction.

  11. Renal Calculi

    PubMed Central

    Yendt, E. R.

    1970-01-01

    The pathogenesis of renal calculi is reviewed in general terms followed by the results of investigation of 439 patients with renal calculi studied by the author at Toronto General Hospital over a 13-year period. Abnormalities of probable pathogenetic significance were encountered in 76% of patients. Idiopathic hypercalciuria was encountered in 42% of patients, primary hyperparathyroidism in 11%, urinary infection in 8% and miscellaneous disorders in 8%. The incidence of uric acid stones and cystinuria was 5% and 2% respectively. In the remaining 24% of patients in whom no definite abnormalities were encountered the mean urinary magnesium excretion was less than normal. Of 180 patients with idiopathic hypercalciuria, only 24 were females. In the diagnosis of hyperparathyroidism, the importance of detecting minimal degrees of hypercalcemia is stressed; attention is also drawn to the new observation that the upper limit of normal for serum calcium is slightly lower in females than in males. The efficacy of various measures advocated for the prevention of renal calculi is also reviewed. In the author's experience the administration of thiazides has been particularly effective in the prevention of calcium stones. Thiazides cause a sustained reduction in urinary calcium excretion and increase in urinary magnesium excretion. These agents also appear to affect the skeleton by diminishing bone resorption and slowing down bone turnover. PMID:5438766

  12. Electrostatic trapping of ammonia molecules

    PubMed

    Bethlem; Berden; Crompvoets; Jongma; van Roij AJ; Meijer

    2000-08-03

    The ability to cool and slow atoms with light for subsequent trapping allows investigations of the properties and interactions of the trapped atoms in unprecedented detail. By contrast, the complex structure of molecules prohibits this type of manipulation, but magnetic trapping of calcium hydride molecules thermalized in ultra-cold buffer gas and optical trapping of caesium dimers generated from ultra-cold caesium atoms have been reported. However, these methods depend on the target molecules being paramagnetic or able to form through the association of atoms amenable to laser cooling, respectively, thus restricting the range of species that can be studied. Here we describe the slowing of an adiabatically cooled beam of deuterated ammonia molecules by time-varying inhomogeneous electric fields and subsequent loading into an electrostatic trap. We are able to trap state-selected ammonia molecules with a density of 10(6) cm(-3) in a volume of 0.25 cm3 at temperatures below 0.35 K. We observe pronounced density oscillations caused by the rapid switching of the electric fields during loading of the trap. Our findings illustrate that polar molecules can be efficiently cooled and trapped, thus providing an opportunity to study collisions and collective quantum effects in a wide range of ultra-cold molecular systems.

  13. Temperature, diet control ammonia loss from feedyards

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Ammonia that escapes as a gas from beef cattle feedyards can negatively impact sensitive ecosystems and degrade air quality when it reacts with other pollutants in the atmosphere. Ammonia emissions were measured at two cattle feedyards on the Southern High Plains continuously for two years. Annual p...

  14. Evaluation of ammonia emissions from broiler litter

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Ammonia emissions from poultry litter results in air pollution and can cause high levels of ammonia in poultry houses, which negatively impacts bird performance. The objectives of this study were to: (1) conduct a nitrogen (N) mass balance in broiler houses by measuring the N inputs (bedding, chick...

  15. Oxidative and nitrosative stress in ammonia neurotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Skowrońska, Marta; Albrecht, Jan

    2013-04-01

    Increased ammonia accumulation in the brain due to liver dysfunction is a major contributor to the pathogenesis of hepatic encephalopathy (HE). Fatal outcome of rapidly progressing (acute) HE is mainly related to cytotoxic brain edema associated with astrocytic swelling. An increase of brain ammonia in experimental animals or treatment of cultured astrocytes with ammonia generates reactive oxygen and nitrogen species in the target tissues, leading to oxidative/nitrosative stress (ONS). In cultured astrocytes, ammonia-induced ONS is invariably associated with the increase of the astrocytic cell volume. Interrelated mechanisms underlying this response include increased nitric oxide (NO) synthesis which is partly coupled to the activation of NMDA receptors and increased generation of reactive oxygen species by NADPH oxidase. ONS and astrocytic swelling are further augmented by excessive synthesis of glutamine (Gln) which impairs mitochondrial function following its accumulation in there and degradation back to ammonia ("the Trojan horse" hypothesis). Ammonia also induces ONS in other cell types of the CNS: neurons, microglia and the brain capillary endothelial cells (BCEC). ONS in microglia contributes to the central inflammatory response, while its metabolic and pathophysiological consequences in the BCEC evolve to the vasogenic brain edema associated with HE. Ammonia-induced ONS results in the oxidation of mRNA and nitration/nitrosylation of proteins which impact intracellular metabolism and potentiate the neurotoxic effects. Simultaneously, ammonia facilitates the antioxidant response of the brain, by activating astrocytic transport and export of glutathione, in this way increasing the availability of precursors of neuronal glutathione synthesis.

  16. Method for releasing hydrogen from ammonia borane

    SciTech Connect

    Varma, Arvind; Diwan, Moiz; Shafirovich, Evgeny; Hwang, Hyun-Tae; Al-Kukhun, Ahmad

    2013-02-19

    A method of releasing hydrogen from ammonia borane is disclosed. The method comprises heating an aqueous ammonia borane solution to between about 80-135.degree. C. at between about 14.7 and 200 pounds per square inch absolute (psia) to release hydrogen by hydrothermolysis.

  17. Regeneration of ammonia borane from polyborazylene

    SciTech Connect

    Sutton, Andrew; Gordon, John C; Ott, Kevin C; Burrell, Anthony K

    2013-02-05

    Method of producing ammonia borane, comprising providing a reagent comprising a dehydrogenated material in a suitable solvent; and combining the reagent with a reducing agent comprising hydrazine, a hydrazine derivative, or combinations thereof, in a reaction which produces a mixture comprising ammonia borane.

  18. Plasma Ammonia Levels in Newborns with Asphyxia.

    PubMed

    Khalessi, Nasrin; Khosravi, Nastaran; Mirjafari, Maryam; Afsharkhas, Ladan

    2016-01-01

    Perinatal asphyxia may result in hypoxic damage in various body organs, especially in the central nervous system. It could induce cascade of biochemical events leading to the cell death and metabolic changes, eventually may increase plasma ammonia levels. The purpose of this study was to determine the prevalence of hyperammonemia in neonates with asphyxia and to find the relationship between ammonia levels and severity of asphyxia. In this cross-sectional study, we included 100 neonates with perinatal asphyxia in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit of Ali-Asghar Hospital, Iran University of Medical Science, Tehran, Iran in 2010-2011. All full term patients diagnosed of asphyxia were enrolled. The relationship between plasma ammonia levels and sex, gestational age, birth weight and severity of asphyxia were determined. Data were analyzed using SPSS software. Fifty six percent of neonates were male. The mean gestational age was 38.0± 1.2 wk. Mean plasma ammonia level was 222 ± 100 μg/dl and 20% of the neonates had hyperammonemia. It was not associated with gender, gestational age, birth weight, and asphyxia severity. Six patients died and mean plasma ammonia levels was 206±122 μg/dl. In this group, there was no significant relation between plasma ammonia levels and severity of asphyxia. No significant different was seen between plasma ammonia in dead and lived neonates. According to high prevalence of hyperammonemia in neonatal asphyxia, measurement of plasma ammonia levels, is suggested to improve management of asphyxia.

  19. Ammonia and hydrogen sulfide removal using biochar

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Reducing ammonia and hydrogen sulfide emissions from livestock facilities is an important issue for many communities and livestock producers. Ammonia has been regarded as odorous, precursor for particulate matter (PM), and contributed to livestock mortality. Hydrogen sulfide is highly toxic at elev...

  20. DIRECT AMMONIA-AIR FUEL CELL.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    Experimental runs were conducted on direct ammonia fuel cells . Effects of temperature, composition, as well as run effect and block effect were...cells and to electrode flooding are discussed. Data on performance of complete laboratory direct ammonia-oxygen fuel cells are presented and discussed. (Author)

  1. Ammonia Solubility in High Concentration Salt Solutions

    SciTech Connect

    HEDENGREN, D.C.

    2000-02-01

    Solubility data for ammonia in water and various dilute solutions are abundant in the literature. However, there is a noticeable lack of ammonia solubility data for high salt, basic solutions of various mixtures of salts including those found in many of the Hanford Washington underground waste tanks. As a result, models based on solubility data for dilute salt solutions have been used to extrapolate to high salt solutions. These significant extrapolations need to be checked against actual laboratory data. Some indirect vapor measurements have been made. A more direct approach is to determine the ratio of solubility of ammonia in water to its solubility in high salt solutions. In various experiments, pairs of solutions, one of which is water and the other a high salt solution, are allowed to come to equilibrium with a common ammonia vapor pressure. The ratio of concentrations of ammonia in the two solutions is equal to the ratio of the respective ammonia solubilities (Henry's Law constants) at a given temperature. This information can then be used to refine the models that predict vapor space compositions of ammonia. Ammonia at Hanford is of concern because of its toxicity in the environment and its contribution to the flammability of vapor space gas mixtures in waste tanks.

  2. Ammonia Production Using Pressure Swing Adsorption

    SciTech Connect

    2009-02-01

    This factsheet describes a research project whose overall objective is to develop and demonstrate a technically feasible and commercially viable system that integrates reaction to produce ammonia along with recovery of the products by adsorption separation methods and significantly decrease the energy requirement in ammonia production.

  3. Ammonia emissions from land application of manures

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Ammonia volatilization can be a major nitrogen (N) loss process for surface-applied manures. There is concern that current manure management practices are contributing to ammonia losses in the Mid-Atlantic region with subsequent reductions in air quality and increases in N losses to streams and est...

  4. Critical litter moisture maximizes ammonia generation

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The natural breakdown of litter (bedding material mixed with deposits of feces, feathers, spilled feed and water) generates ammonia in poultry houses. Good management practices can reduce ammonia concentrations in poultry houses. Findings from a recent publication indicate there is a critical litt...

  5. Poultry litter moisture management to reduce ammonia

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Ammonia generation in poultry houses results from the natural breakdown of litter (bedding material mixed with deposits of feces, feathers, spilled feed and water). Good management practices can reduce ammonia concentrations in poultry houses. This factsheet relates findings from a recent publicat...

  6. Renal Denervation

    PubMed Central

    Persu, Alexandre; Renkin, Jean; Thijs, Lutgarde; Staessen, Jan A.

    2013-01-01

    The term “ultima ratio” has multiple, though related, meanings. The motto “ultima ratio regum,” cast on the cannons of the French army of King Louis XIV, meant that war is the last argument of kings, that is, the one to be used after all diplomatic arguments have failed. Along similar lines, we propose that, given the current evidence, renal denervation should be used as a last resort, after state-of-the-art drug treatment optimized at expert centers failed to control blood pressure. PMID:22851728

  7. Renal disease in pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Thorsen, Martha S; Poole, Judith H

    2002-03-01

    Anatomic and physiologic adaptations within the renal system during pregnancy are significant. Alterations are seen in renal blood flow and glomerular filtration, resulting in changes in normal renal laboratory values. When these normal renal adaptations are coupled with pregnancy-induced complications or preexisting renal dysfunction, the woman may demonstrate a reduction of renal function leading to an increased risk of perinatal morbidity and mortality. This article will review normal pregnancy adaptations of the renal system and discuss common pregnancy-related renal complications.

  8. Clinical utility of breath ammonia for evaluation of ammonia physiology in healthy and cirrhotic adults.

    PubMed

    Spacek, Lisa A; Mudalel, Matthew; Tittel, Frank; Risby, Terence H; Solga, Steven F

    2015-12-14

    Blood ammonia is routinely used in clinical settings to assess systemic ammonia in hepatic encephalopathy and urea cycle disorders. Despite its drawbacks, blood measurement is often used as a comparator in breath studies because it is a standard clinical test. We sought to evaluate sources of measurement error and potential clinical utility of breath ammonia compared to blood ammonia. We measured breath ammonia in real time by quartz enhanced photoacoustic spectrometry and blood ammonia in 10 healthy and 10 cirrhotic participants. Each participant contributed 5 breath samples and blood for ammonia measurement within 1 h. We calculated the coefficient of variation (CV) for 5 breath ammonia values, reported medians of healthy and cirrhotic participants, and used scatterplots to display breath and blood ammonia. For healthy participants, mean age was 22 years (±4), 70% were men, and body mass index (BMI) was 27 (±5). For cirrhotic participants, mean age was 61 years (±8), 60% were men, and BMI was 31 (±7). Median blood ammonia for healthy participants was within normal range, 10 μmol L(-1) (interquartile range (IQR), 3-18) versus 46 μmol L(-1) (IQR, 23-66) for cirrhotic participants. Median breath ammonia was 379 pmol mL(-1) CO2 (IQR, 265-765) for healthy versus 350 pmol mL(-1) CO2 (IQR, 180-1013) for cirrhotic participants. CV was 17  ±  6%. There remains an important unmet need in the evaluation of systemic ammonia, and breath measurement continues to demonstrate promise to fulfill this need. Given the many differences between breath and blood ammonia measurement, we examined biological explanations for our findings in healthy and cirrhotic participants. We conclude that based upon these preliminary data breath may offer clinically important information this is not provided by blood ammonia.

  9. Clinical utility of breath ammonia for evaluation of ammonia physiology in healthy and cirrhotic adults

    PubMed Central

    Spacek, Lisa A; Mudalel, Matthew; Tittel, Frank; Risby, Terence H; Solga, Steven F

    2016-01-01

    Blood ammonia is routinely used in clinical settings to assess systemic ammonia in hepatic encephalopathy and urea cycle disorders. Despite its drawbacks, blood measurement is often used as a comparator in breath studies because it is a standard clinical test. We sought to evaluate sources of measurement error and potential clinical utility of breath ammonia compared to blood ammonia. We measured breath ammonia in real time by quartz enhanced photoacoustic spectrometry and blood ammonia in 10 healthy and 10 cirrhotic participants. Each participant contributed 5 breath samples and blood for ammonia measurement within 1 h. We calculated the coefficient of variation (CV) for 5 breath ammonia values, reported medians of healthy and cirrhotic participants, and used scatterplots to display breath and blood ammonia. For healthy participants, mean age was 22 years (±4), 70% were men, and body mass index (BMI) was 27 (±5). For cirrhotic participants, mean age was 61 years (±8), 60% were men, and BMI was 31 (±7). Median blood ammonia for healthy participants was within normal range, 10 μmol L−1 (interquartile range (IQR), 3–18) versus 46 μmol L−1 (IQR, 23–66) for cirrhotic participants. Median breath ammonia was 379 pmol mL−1 CO2 (IQR, 265–765) for healthy versus 350 pmol mL−1 CO2 (IQR, 180–1013) for cirrhotic participants. CV was 17 ± 6%. There remains an important unmet need in the evaluation of systemic ammonia, and breath measurement continues to demonstrate promise to fulfill this need. Given the many differences between breath and blood ammonia measurement, we examined biological explanations for our findings in healthy and cirrhotic participants. We conclude that based upon these preliminary data breath may offer clinically important information this is not provided by blood ammonia. PMID:26658550

  10. Ammonia gas permeability of meat packaging materials.

    PubMed

    Karim, Faris; Hijaz, Faraj; Kastner, Curtis L; Smith, J Scott

    2011-03-01

    Meat products are packaged in polymer films designed to protect the product from exterior contaminants such as light, humidity, and harmful chemicals. Unfortunately, there is almost no data on ammonia permeability of packaging films. We investigated ammonia permeability of common meat packaging films: low-density polyethylene (LDPE; 2.2 mil), multilayer polyolefin (MLP; 3 mil), and vacuum (V-PA/PE; 3 mil, 0.6 mil polyamide/2.4 mil polyethylene). The films were fabricated into 10 × 5 cm pouches and filled with 50 mL deionized water. Pouches were placed in a plexiglass enclosure in a freezer and exposed to 50, 100, 250, or 500 ppm ammonia gas for 6, 12, 24, and 48 h at -17 ± 3 °C and 21 ± 3 °C. At freezing temperatures, no ammonia residues were detected and no differences in pH were found in the water. At room temperature, ammonia levels and pH of the water increased significantly (P < 0.05) with increasing exposure times and ammonia concentrations. Average ammonia levels in the water were 7.77 ppm for MLP, 5.94 ppm for LDPE, and 0.89 ppm for V-PA/PE at 500 ppm exposure for 48 h at 21 ± 3 °C. Average pH values were 8.64 for MLP, 8.38 for LDPE, and 7.23 for V-PA/PE (unexposed ranged from 5.49 to 6.44) at 500 ppm exposure for 48 h. The results showed that temperature influenced ammonia permeability. Meat packaging materials have low ammonia permeability and protect meat products exposed to ammonia leaks during frozen storage.

  11. Autotrophic ammonia oxidation by soil thaumarchaea

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Li-Mei; Offre, Pierre R.; He, Ji-Zheng; Verhamme, Daniel T.; Nicol, Graeme W.; Prosser, James I.

    2010-01-01

    Nitrification plays a central role in the global nitrogen cycle and is responsible for significant losses of nitrogen fertilizer, atmospheric pollution by the greenhouse gas nitrous oxide, and nitrate pollution of groundwaters. Ammonia oxidation, the first step in nitrification, was thought to be performed by autotrophic bacteria until the recent discovery of archaeal ammonia oxidizers. Autotrophic archaeal ammonia oxidizers have been cultivated from marine and thermal spring environments, but the relative importance of bacteria and archaea in soil nitrification is unclear and it is believed that soil archaeal ammonia oxidizers may use organic carbon, rather than growing autotrophically. In this soil microcosm study, stable isotope probing was used to demonstrate incorporation of 13C-enriched carbon dioxide into the genomes of thaumarchaea possessing two functional genes: amoA, encoding a subunit of ammonia monooxygenase that catalyses the first step in ammonia oxidation; and hcd, a key gene in the autotrophic 3-hydroxypropionate/4-hydroxybutyrate cycle, which has been found so far only in archaea. Nitrification was accompanied by increases in archaeal amoA gene abundance and changes in amoA gene diversity, but no change was observed in bacterial amoA genes. Archaeal, but not bacterial, amoA genes were also detected in 13C-labeled DNA, demonstrating inorganic CO2 fixation by archaeal, but not bacterial, ammonia oxidizers. Autotrophic archaeal ammonia oxidation was further supported by coordinate increases in amoA and hcd gene abundance in 13C-labeled DNA. The results therefore provide direct evidence for a role for archaea in soil ammonia oxidation and demonstrate autotrophic growth of ammonia oxidizing archaea in soil. PMID:20855593

  12. CADDIS Volume 2. Sources, Stressors and Responses: Ammonia - Simple Conceptual Diagram

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Introduction to the ammonia module, when to list ammonia as a candidate cause, ways to measure ammonia, simple and detailed conceptual diagrams for ammonia, literature reviews and references for the ammonia module.

  13. CADDIS Volume 2. Sources, Stressors and Responses: Ammonia - Detailed Conceptual Diagram

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Introduction to the ammonia module, when to list ammonia as a candidate cause, ways to measure ammonia, simple and detailed conceptual diagrams for ammonia, literature reviews and references for the ammonia module.

  14. Vapor Phase Catalytic Ammonia Reduction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flynn, Michael T.; Harper, Lynn D. (Technical Monitor)

    1994-01-01

    This paper discusses the development of a Vapor Phase Catalytic Ammonia Reduction (VPCAR) teststand and the results of an experimental program designed to evaluate the potential of the technology as a water purification process. In the experimental program the technology is evaluated based upon product water purity, water recovery rate, and power consumption. The experimental work demonstrates that the technology produces high purity product water and attains high water recovery rates at a relatively high specific power consumption. The experimental program was conducted in 3 phases. In phase I an Igepon(TM) soap and water mixture was used to evaluate the performance of an innovative Wiped-Film Rotating-Disk evaporator and associated demister. In phase II a phenol-water solution was used to evaluate the performance of the high temperature catalytic oxidation reactor. In phase III a urine analog was used to evaluate the performance of the combined distillation/oxidation functions of the processor.

  15. Dakota Gasification Company - ammonia scrubber

    SciTech Connect

    Wallach, D.L.

    1995-12-31

    Amain stack BACT assessment for sulfur dioxide emissions conducted in 1990 for the Dakota Gasification Company`s (DGC) Great Plains Synfuels Plant identified wet limestone flue gas desulfurization system as BACT. During the development of the design specification for the wet limestone FGD, GE Environmental Systems Inc. and DGC jointly demonstrated a new ammonia-based process for flue gas desulfurization on a large pilot plant located at the Great Plains Synfuels Plant. The production of saleable ammonium sulfate, rather than a waste product, was of interest to DGC as it fit into the plant`s on-going by-product recovery efforts. With the success of the pilot plant, DGC and GEESI entered into an agreement to build the first commercial scale Ammonium Sulfate Forced Oxidation FGD system. Construction of this system is well in progress with an anticipated start-up date of August, 1996.

  16. Vapor Phase Catalytic Ammonia Reduction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flynn, Michael T.; Harper, Lynn D. (Technical Monitor)

    1994-01-01

    This paper discusses the development of a Vapor Phase Catalytic Ammonia Reduction (VPCAR) teststand and the results of an experimental program designed to evaluate the potential of the technology as a water purification process. In the experimental program the technology is evaluated based upon product water purity, water recovery rate, and power consumption. The experimental work demonstrates that the technology produces high purity product water and attains high water recovery rates at a relatively high specific power consumption. The experimental program was conducted in 3 phases. In phase I an Igepon(TM) soap and water mixture was used to evaluate the performance of an innovative Wiped-Film Rotating-Disk evaporator and associated demister. In phase II a phenol-water solution was used to evaluate the performance of the high temperature catalytic oxidation reactor. In phase III a urine analog was used to evaluate the performance of the combined distillation/oxidation functions of the processor.

  17. Breath ammonia measurement in Helicobacter pylori infection.

    PubMed

    Kearney, David J; Hubbard, Todd; Putnam, David

    2002-11-01

    Our aim was to define the utility of breath ammonia measurement in assessing Helicobacter pylori infection. Volunteers breathed into a device containing three fiberoptic NH3 sensors at baseline and after ingesting 300 mg of urea. Breath ammonia levels were compared to the [14C]urea breath test. Thirteen subjects were tested. Before urea ingestion, H. pylori-positive subjects had significantly lower breath ammonia levels than negative subjects (mean +/- SD, 0.04 ppm +/- 0.09 vs 0.49 ppm +/- 0.24, P = 0.002) and had a significantly greater increases in breath ammonia after urea ingestion (range 198-1,494% vs 6-98%). One H. pylori-positive subject underwent treatment and breath ammonia levels shifted from the pattern seen in positive subjects to that seen in negative subjects. In conclusion, breath ammonia measurement for H. Pylori-positive and negative subjects showed distinct patterns. Breath ammonia measurement may be feasible as a diagnostic test for H. pylori.

  18. INFRARED SPECTRA OF AMMONIA-WATER ICES

    SciTech Connect

    Zheng Weijun; Jewitt, David; Kaiser, Ralf I. E-mail: ralfk@hawaii.edu

    2009-03-15

    We conducted a systematic study of the near-IR and mid-IR spectra of ammonia-water ices at various NH{sub 3}/H{sub 2}O ratios. The differences between the spectra of amorphous and crystalline ammonia-water ices were also investigated. The 2.0 {mu}m ammonia band central wavelength is a function of the ammonia/water ratio. It shifts from 2.006 {+-} 0.003 {mu}m (4985 {+-} 5 cm{sup -1}) to 1.993 {+-} 0.003 {mu}m (5018 {+-} 5 cm{sup -1}) as the percentage of ammonia decreases from 100% to 1%. The 2.2 {mu}m ammonia band center shifts from 2.229 {+-} 0.003 {mu}m (4486 {+-} 5 cm{sup -1}) to 2.208 {+-} 0.003 {mu}m (4528 {+-} 5 cm{sup -1}) over the same range. Temperature-dependent shifts of those bands are below the uncertainty of the measurement, and therefore are not detectable. These results are important for comparison with astronomical observations as well as for estimating the concentration of ammonia in outer solar system ices.

  19. Ammonia synthesis using magnetic induction method (MIM)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puspitasari, P.; Razak, J. Abd; Yahya, N.

    2012-09-01

    The most challenging issues for ammonia synthesis is to get the high yield. New approach of ammonia synthesis by using Magnetic Induction Method (MIM) and the Helmholtz Coils has been proposed. The ammonia detection was done by using Kjeldahl Method and FTIR. The system was designed by using Autocad software. The magnetic field of MIM was vary from 100mT-200mT and the magnetic field for the Helmholtz coils was 14mT. The FTIR result shows that ammonia has been successfully formed at stretching peaks 1097,1119,1162,1236, 1377, and 1464 cm-1. UV-VIS result shows the ammonia bond at 195nm of wavelength. The ammonia yield was increase to 244.72μmole/g.h by using the MIM and six pairs of Helmholtz coils. Therefore this new method will be a new promising method to achieve the high yield ammonia at ambient condition (at 25δC and 1atm), under the Magnetic Induction Method (MIM).

  20. IRIS Toxicological Review of Ammonia (Revised External ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    In August 2013, EPA submitted a revised draft IRIS assessment of ammonia to the agency's Science Advisory Board (SAB) and posted this draft on the IRIS website. EPA had previously released a draft of the assessment for public comment, held a public meeting about the draft, and then revised it based on the comments received. The SAB CAAC-Ammonia panel will review this draft assessment. Details about the meeting dates, times, and location are available via the Federal Register Notice posted on March 25, 2014. The SAB provided information on how the public can participate in the external peer review meetings, as well as instructions about how to provide comments to the SAB in the notice. Additional information on the SAB review of ammonia is on the SAB website. Report Information: The Toxicological Review of Ammonia was originally released for a 60-day public comment period on June 8, 2012. [Federal Register Notice Jun 8, 2012] EPA revised the toxicological review in response to the public comments received. EPA has released the revised external review draft ammonia assessment and the SAB CAAC is conducting a peer review of the scientific basis supporting the assessment that will appear in the Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS) database. Information regarding the peer review can be found at the SAB review of ammonia website. EPA is undertaking an Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS) health assessment for ammonia. IRIS is an EPA database cont

  1. Resveratrol Prevents Ammonia Toxicity in Astroglial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Guerra, Maria Cristina; Leite, Marina Concli; Souza, Diogo Onofre; Gonçalves, Carlos-Alberto; Gottfried, Carmem

    2012-01-01

    Ammonia is implicated as a neurotoxin in brain metabolic disorders associated with hyperammonemia. Acute ammonia toxicity can be mediated by an excitotoxic mechanism, oxidative stress and nitric oxide (NO) production. Astrocytes interact with neurons, providing metabolic support and protecting against oxidative stress and excitotoxicity. Astrocytes also convert excess ammonia and glutamate into glutamine via glutamine synthetase (GS). Resveratrol, a polyphenol found in grapes and red wines, exhibits antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties and modulates glial functions, such as glutamate metabolism. We investigated the effect of resveratrol on the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS), GS activity, S100B secretion, TNF-α, IL-1β and IL-6 levels in astroglial cells exposed to ammonia. Ammonia induced oxidative stress, decreased GS activity and increased cytokines release, probably by a mechanism dependent on protein kinase A (PKA) and extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) pathways. Resveratrol prevented ammonia toxicity by modulating oxidative stress, glial and inflammatory responses. The ERK and nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) are involved in the protective effect of resveratrol on cytokines proinflammatory release. In contrast, other antioxidants (e.g., ascorbic acid and trolox) were not effective against hyperammonemia. Thus, resveratrol could be used to protect against ammonia-induced neurotoxicity. PMID:23284918

  2. Femtosecond multiphoton ionization of ammonia clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Wei, S.; Purnell, J.; Buzza, S.A.; Stanley, R.J.; Castleman, A.W. Jr. )

    1992-12-15

    Herein, we report on femtosecond time-resolved experiments in ammonia clusters. The mechanisms of their ionization and the subsequent formation of the protonated ammonia cluster ions are studied using a femtosecond pump-probe technique at 620 nm. It is found that an intermediate corresponding to [ital C][prime] states of the monomer is responsible for the ionization of ammonia clusters. Femtosecond pump--probe studies show that the lifetime of the intermediate to the formation of the protonated cluster ions (NH[sub 3])[sub [ital n

  3. Functions of the Renal Nerves.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koepke, John P.; DiBona, Gerald F.

    1985-01-01

    Discusses renal neuroanatomy, renal vasculature, renal tubules, renin secretion, renorenal reflexes, and hypertension as related to renal nerve functions. Indicates that high intensitites of renal nerve stimulation have produced alterations in several renal functions. (A chart with various stimulations and resultant renal functions and 10-item,…

  4. Functions of the Renal Nerves.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koepke, John P.; DiBona, Gerald F.

    1985-01-01

    Discusses renal neuroanatomy, renal vasculature, renal tubules, renin secretion, renorenal reflexes, and hypertension as related to renal nerve functions. Indicates that high intensitites of renal nerve stimulation have produced alterations in several renal functions. (A chart with various stimulations and resultant renal functions and 10-item,…

  5. Ammonia manipulates the ammonia-oxidizing archaea and bacteria in the coastal sediment-water microcosms.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yan; Chen, Lujun; Dai, Tianjiao; Sun, Renhua; Wen, Donghui

    2015-08-01

    Ammonia was observed as a potential significant factor to manipulate the abundance and activity of ammonia-oxidizing microorganisms (AOMs) in water environments. For the first time, this study confirmed this phenomenon by laboratory cultivation. In a series of estuarine sediment-coastal water microcosms, we investigated the AOM's phylogenetic composition and activity change in response to ammonia concentration. Increase of ammonia concentration promoted bacterial amoA gene abundance in a linear pattern. The ratio of transcribed ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) amoA gene/ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA) amoA gene increased from 0.1 to 43 as NH4 (+)-N increased from less than 0.1 to 12 mg L(-1), and AOA amoA transcription was undetected under 20 mg NH4 (+)-N L(-1). The incubation of stable isotope probing (SIP) microcosms revealed a faster (13)C-NaHCO3 incorporation rate of AOA amoA gene under 0.1 mg NH4 (+)-N L(-1) and a sole (13)C-NaHCO3 utilization of the AOB amoA gene under 20 mg NH4 (+)-N L(-1). Our results indicate that ammonia concentration manipulates the structure of AOM. AOA prefers to live and perform higher amoA transcription activity than AOB in ammonia-limited water environments, and AOB tends to take the first contributor place in ammonia-rich ones.

  6. Stimulation of thaumarchaeal ammonia oxidation by ammonia derived from organic nitrogen but not added inorganic nitrogen.

    PubMed

    Levičnik-Höfferle, Spela; Nicol, Graeme W; Ausec, Luka; Mandić-Mulec, Ines; Prosser, James I

    2012-04-01

    Ammonia oxidation, the first step in nitrification, is performed by autotrophic bacteria and thaumarchaea, whose relative contributions vary in different soils. Distinctive environmental niches for the two groups have not been identified, but evidence from previous studies suggests that activity of thaumarchaea, unlike that of bacterial ammonia oxidizers, is unaffected by addition of inorganic N fertilizer and that they preferentially utilize ammonia generated from the mineralization of organic N. This hypothesis was tested by determining the influence of both inorganic and organic N sources on nitrification rate and ammonia oxidizer growth and community structure in microcosms containing acidic, forest soil in which ammonia oxidation was dominated by thaumarchaea. Nitrification rate was unaffected by the incubation of soil with inorganic ammonium but was significantly stimulated by the addition of organic N. Oxidation of ammonia generated from native soil organic matter or added organic N, but not added inorganic N, was accompanied by increases in abundance of the thaumarchaeal amoA gene, a functional gene for ammonia oxidation, but changes in community structure were not observed. Bacterial amoA genes could not be detected. Ammonia oxidation was completely inhibited by 0.01% acetylene in all treatments, indicating ammonia monooxygenase-dependent activity. The findings have implications for current models of soil nitrification and for nitrification control strategies to minimize fertilizer loss and nitrous oxide production. © 2011 Federation of European Microbiological Societies. Published by Blackwell Publishing Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. IRIS Toxicological Review of Ammonia Noncancer Inhalation ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    EPA has finalized the Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS) Assessment of Ammonia (Noncancer Inhalation). This assessment addresses the potential noncancer human health effects from long-term inhalation exposure to ammonia. Now final, this assessment will update the current toxicological information on ammonia posted in 1991. EPA’s program and regional offices may use this assessment to inform decisions to protect human health. EPA completed the Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS) health assessment for ammonia. IRIS is an EPA database containing Agency scientific positions on potential adverse human health effects that may result from chronic (or lifetime) exposure to chemicals in the environment. IRIS contains chemical-specific summaries of qualitative and quantitative health information in support of two steps of the risk assessment paradigm, i.e., hazard identification and dose-response evaluation. IRIS assessments are used in combination with specific situational exposure assessment information to evaluate potential public health risk associated with environmental contaminants.

  8. Ammonia emissions during vermicomposting of sheep manure.

    PubMed

    Velasco-Velasco, Joel; Parkinson, Robert; Kuri, Victor

    2011-12-01

    The effect of C:N ratio, temperature and water content on ammonia volatilization during two-phase composting of sheep manure was evaluated. The aerobic phase was conducted under field conditions. This was followed by Phase II, vermicomposting, conducted in the laboratory under controlled conditions of water content (70% and 80%) and temperature (15 and 22 °C). The addition of extra straw lead to a 10% reduction in NH3 volatilization compared to sheep manure composted without extra straw. Temperature and water content significantly effected ammonia volatilization at 0 day in Phase II, with a water content of 70% and temperature of 22 °C leading to greater losses of ammonia. Nitrogen loss by ammonia volatilization during vermicomposting ranged from 8% to 15% of the initial N content. The addition of extra straw did not result in significant differences in total carbon content following vermicomposting. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Ammonia Affects Astroglial Proliferation in Culture

    PubMed Central

    Bodega, Guillermo; Segura, Berta; Ciordia, Sergio; Mena, María del Carmen; López-Fernández, Luis Andrés; García, María Isabel; Trabado, Isabel; Suárez, Isabel

    2015-01-01

    Primary cultures of rat astroglial cells were exposed to 1, 3 and 5 mM NH4Cl for up to 10 days. Dose- and time-dependent reductions in cell numbers were seen, plus an increase in the proportion of cells in the S phase. The DNA content was reduced in the treated cells, and BrdU incorporation diminished. However, neither ammonia nor ammonia plus glutamine had any effect on DNA polymerase activity. iTRAQ analysis showed that exposure to ammonia induced a significant reduction in histone and heterochromatin protein 1 expression. A reduction in cell viability was also noted. The ammonia-induced reduction of proliferative activity in these cultured astroglial cells seems to be due to a delay in the completion of the S phase provoked by the inhibition of chromatin protein synthesis. PMID:26421615

  10. Ultrafast Dynamics of Electrons in Ammonia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vöhringer, Peter

    2015-04-01

    Solvated electrons were first discovered in solutions of metals in liquid ammonia. The physical and chemical properties of these species have been studied extensively for many decades using an arsenal of electrochemical, spectroscopic, and theoretical techniques. Yet, in contrast to their hydrated counterpart, the ultrafast dynamics of ammoniated electrons remained completely unexplored until quite recently. Femtosecond pump-probe spectroscopy on metal-ammonia solutions and femtosecond multiphoton ionization spectroscopy on the neat ammonia solvent have provided new insights into the optical properties and the reactivities of this fascinating species. This article reviews the nature of the optical transition, which gives the metal-ammonia solutions their characteristic blue appearance, in terms of ultrafast relaxation processes involving bound and continuum excited states. The recombination processes following the injection of an electron via photoionization of the solvent are discussed in the context of the electronic structure of the liquid and the anionic defect associated with the solvated electron.

  11. Sensitive ammonia observations in the southern hemisphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dickinson, D. F.; Gulkis, S.; Klein, M. J.; Kuiper, T. B. H.; Batty, M.; Gardner, F. F.; Jauncey, D. L.; Whiteoak, J. B.

    1982-01-01

    The 64-m spacecraft communication antenna of the NASA-JPL Deep Space Network has been equipped for spectral line observations at K band (18-25 GHz). To demonstrate the potential of this system, preliminary observations of the (1, 1) transition of ammonia are reported for a selection of eight southern molecular clouds. Estimates of gas density and ammonia column density are reported for six sources.

  12. Corrosion inhibitor for aqueous ammonia absorption system

    DOEpatents

    Phillips, B.A.; Whitlow, E.P.

    1998-09-22

    A method is described for inhibiting corrosion and the formation of hydrogen and thus improving absorption in an ammonia/water absorption refrigeration, air conditioning or heat pump system by maintaining the hydroxyl ion concentration of the aqueous ammonia working fluid within a selected range under anaerobic conditions at temperatures up to 425 F. This hydroxyl ion concentration is maintained by introducing to the aqueous ammonia working fluid an inhibitor in an amount effective to produce a hydroxyl ion concentration corresponding to a normality of the inhibitor relative to the water content ranging from about 0.015 N to about 0.2 N at 25 C. Also, working fluids for inhibiting the corrosion of carbon steel and resulting hydrogen formation and improving absorption in an ammonia/water absorption system under anaerobic conditions at up to 425 F. The working fluids may be aqueous solutions of ammonia and a strong base or aqueous solutions of ammonia, a strong base, and a specified buffer. 5 figs.

  13. Corrosion inhibitor for aqueous ammonia absorption system

    DOEpatents

    Phillips, Benjamin A.; Whitlow, Eugene P.

    1998-09-22

    A method of inhibiting corrosion and the formation of hydrogen and thus improving absorption in an ammonia/water absorption refrigeration, air conditioning or heat pump system by maintaining the hydroxyl ion concentration of the aqueous ammonia working fluid within a selected range under anaerobic conditions at temperatures up to 425.degree. F. This hydroxyl ion concentration is maintained by introducing to the aqueous ammonia working fluid an inhibitor in an amount effective to produce a hydroxyl ion concentration corresponding to a normality of the inhibitor relative to the water content ranging from about 0.015 N to about 0.2 N at 25.degree. C. Also, working fluids for inhibiting the corrosion of carbon steel and resulting hydrogen formation and improving absorption in an ammonia/water absorption system under anaerobic conditions at up to 425.degree. F. The working fluids may be aqueous solutions of ammonia and a strong base or aqueous solutions of ammonia, a strong base, and a specified buffer.

  14. Using ammonia as a sustainable fuel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zamfirescu, C.; Dincer, I.

    In this study, ammonia is identified as a sustainable fuel for mobile and remote applications. Similar to hydrogen, ammonia is a synthetic product that can be obtained either from fossil fuels, biomass, or other renewable sources. Some advantages of ammonia with respect to hydrogen are less expensive cost per unit of stored energy, higher volumetric energy density that is comparable with that of gasoline, easier production, handling and distribution with the existent infrastructure, and better commercial viability. Here, the possible ways to use ammonia as a sustainable fuel in internal combustion engines and fuel-cells are discussed and analysed based on some thermodynamic performance models through efficiency and effectiveness parameters. The refrigeration effect of ammonia, which is another advantage, is also included in the efficiency calculations. The study suggests that the most efficient system is based on fuel-cells which provide simultaneously power, heating and cooling and its only exhaust consists of water and nitrogen. If the cooling effect is taken into consideration, the system's effectiveness reaches 46% implying that a medium size car ranges over 500 km with 50 l fuel at a cost below 2 per 100 km. The cooling power represents about 7.2% from the engine power, being thus a valuable side benefit of ammonia's presence on-board.

  15. Ammonia chemistry in a flameless jet

    SciTech Connect

    Zieba, Mariusz; Schuster, Anja; Scheffknecht, Guenter; Brink, Anders; Hupa, Mikko

    2009-10-15

    In this paper, the nitrogen chemistry in an ammonia (NH{sub 3}) doped flameless jet is investigated using a kinetic reactor network model. The reactor network model is used to explain the main differences in ammonia chemistry for methane (CH{sub 4})-containing fuels and methane-free fuels. The chemical pathways of nitrogen oxides (NO{sub x}) formation and destruction are identified using rate-of-production analysis. The results show that in the case of natural gas, ammonia reacts relatively late at fuel lean condition leading to high NO{sub x} emissions. In the pre-ignition zone, the ammonia chemistry is blocked due to the absence of free radicals which are consumed by methane-methyl radical (CH{sub 3}) conversion. In the case of methane-free gas, the ammonia reacted very rapidly and complete decomposition was reached in the fuel rich region of the jet. In this case the necessary radicals for the ammonia conversion are generated from hydrogen (H{sub 2}) oxidation. (author)

  16. Use of zeolite for removing ammonia and ammonia-caused toxicity in marine toxicity identification evaluations.

    PubMed

    Burgess, R M; Perron, M M; Cantwell, M G; Ho, K T; Serbst, J R; Pelletier, M C

    2004-11-01

    Ammonia occurs in marine waters including effluents, receiving waters, and sediment interstitial waters. At sufficiently high concentrations, ammonia can be toxic to aquatic species. Toxicity identification evaluation (TIE) methods provide researchers with tools for identifying aquatic toxicants. For identifying ammonia toxicity, there are several possible methods including pH alteration and volatilization, Ulva lactuca addition, microbial degradation, and zeolite addition. Zeolite addition has been used successfully in freshwater systems to decrease ammonia concentrations and toxicity for several decades. However, zeolite in marine systems has been used less because ions in the seawater interfere with zeolite's ability to adsorb ammonia. The objective of this study was to develop a zeolite method for removing ammonia from marine waters. To accomplish this objective, we performed a series of zeolite slurry and column chromatography studies to determine uptake rate and capacity and to evaluate the effects of salinity and pH on ammonia removal. We also assessed the interaction of zeolite with several toxic metals. Success of the methods was also evaluated by measuring toxicity to two marine species: the mysid Americamysis bahia and the amphipod Ampelisca abdita. Column chromatography proved to be effective at removing a wide range of ammonia concentrations under several experimental conditions. Conversely, the slurry method was inconsistent and variable in its overall performance in removing ammonia and cannot be recommended. The metals copper, lead, and zinc were removed by zeolite in both the slurry and column treatments. The zeolite column was successful in removing ammonia toxicity for both the mysid and the amphipod, whereas the slurry was less effective. This study demonstrated that zeolite column chromatography is a useful tool for conducting marine water TIEs to decrease ammonia concentrations and characterize toxicity.

  17. ACCESSORY RENAL VESSELS

    PubMed Central

    Ali Mohammed, Ammar Mohammed; Elseed Abdalrasol, Rami Gusm; Alamin Abdalhai, Khatim; Gommaa Hamad, Mohamed

    2012-01-01

    Knowledge of the variations of the renal artery has grown in importance with increasing of renal transplants, vascular reconstructions and various surgical and radiologic techniques performing in recent years. We report the presence of unilateral doubled renal vessels, discovered on routine dissection of a male cadaver, on the right side; additional renal artery originated from the abdominal aorta. In addition the right suprarenal gland received arteries from right renal and inferior phrenic arteries only. The right inferior phrenic originated from the right renal artery. PMID:23322980

  18. Pathogenesis of Hepatic Encephalopathy: Role of Ammonia and Systemic Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Aldridge, Dominic R.; Tranah, Edward J.; Shawcross, Debbie L.

    2015-01-01

    The syndrome we refer to as Hepatic Encephalopathy (HE) was first characterized by a team of Nobel Prize winning physiologists led by Pavlov and Nencki at the Imperial Institute of Experimental Medicine in Russia in the 1890's. This focused upon the key observation that performing a portocaval shunt, which bypassed nitrogen-rich blood away from the liver, induced elevated blood and brain ammonia concentrations in association with profound neurobehavioral changes. There exists however a spectrum of metabolic encephalopathies attributable to a variety (or even absence) of liver hepatocellular dysfunctions and it is this spectrum rather than a single disease entity that has come to be defined as HE. Differences in the underlying pathophysiology, treatment responses and outcomes can therefore be highly variable between acute and chronic HE. The term also fails to articulate quite how systemic the syndrome of HE can be and how it can be influenced by the gastrointestinal, renal, nervous, or immune systems without any change in background liver function. The pathogenesis of HE therefore encapsulates a complex network of interdependent organ systems which as yet remain poorly characterized. There is nonetheless a growing recognition that there is a complex but influential synergistic relationship between ammonia, inflammation (sterile and non-sterile) and oxidative stress in the pathogenesis HE which develops in an environment of functional immunoparesis in patients with liver dysfunction. Therapeutic strategies are thus moving further away from the traditional specialty of hepatology and more towards novel immune and inflammatory targets which will be discussed in this review. PMID:26041962

  19. Ammonia transformations and abundance of ammonia oxidizers in a clay soil underlying a manure pond.

    PubMed

    Sher, Yonatan; Baram, Shahar; Dahan, Ofer; Ronen, Zeev; Nejidat, Ali

    2012-07-01

    Unlined manure ponds are constructed on clay soil worldwide to manage farm waste. Seepage of ammonia-rich liquor into underlying soil layers contributes to groundwater contamination by nitrate. To identify the possible processes that lead to the production of nitrate from ammonia in this oxygen-limited environment, we studied the diversity and abundance of ammonia-transforming microorganisms under an unlined manure pond. The numbers of ammonia-oxidizing bacteria and anammox bacteria were most abundant in the top of the soil profile and decreased significantly with depth (0.5 m), correlating with soil pore-water ammonia concentrations and soil ammonia concentrations, respectively. On the other hand, the numbers of ammonia-oxidizing archaea were relatively constant throughout the soil profile (10(7) amoA copies per g(soil)). Nitrite-oxidizing bacteria were detected mainly in the top 0.2 m. The results suggest that nitrate accumulation in the vadose zone under the manure pond could be the result of complete aerobic nitrification (ammonia oxidation to nitrate) and could exist as a byproduct of anammox activity. While the majority of the nitrogen was removed within the 0.5-m soil section, possibly by combined anammox and heterotrophic denitrification, a fraction of the produced nitrate leached into the groundwater.

  20. Inhibition of biohydrogen production by ammonia.

    PubMed

    Salerno, Michael B; Park, Wooshin; Zuo, Yi; Logan, Bruce E

    2006-03-01

    Ammonia inhibition of biohydrogen production was investigated in batch and continuous flow reactors with glucose as a substrate. In batch tests, biohydrogen production rate was highly dependent on pH and ammonia (defined as the sum of NH3 of NH4+ species) concentrations above 2 g N/L. At pH = 6.2, the maximum production decreased from 56 mL/h at 2 g N/L to 16 mL/h at 10 g N/L. At pH = 5.2, production decreased from 49 mL/h (2g N/L) to 7 mL/h (16 g N/L). Hydrogen yield remained relatively constant in batch tests, varying from 0.96 to 1.17 mol-H2/mol-glucose. In continuous flow tests, both hydrogen production rates and yields were adversely affected by ammonia. When the reactor (2.0 L) was first acclimated under batch conditions to a low nitrogen concentration (<0.8 g N/L), H2 production and yields under continuous flow mode conditions were 170 mL/h and 1.9 mol-H2/mol-glucose, but decreased with increased ammonia concentrations up to 7.8 g N/L to 105 mL/h and 1.1 mol-H2/mol-glucose. There was no hydrogen production under continuous flow conditions if the reactor was initially operated under batch flow conditions at ammonia concentrations above 0.8 g N/L. It is concluded that the hydrogen production is possible at high concentrations (up to 7.8 g N/L) of ammonia in continuous flow systems as long as the reactor is initially acclimated to a lower ammonia concentration (<0.8 g N/L).

  1. L-Ornithine phenylacetate reduces ammonia in pigs with acute liver failure through phenylacetylglycine formation: a novel ammonia-lowering pathway.

    PubMed

    Kristiansen, Rune Gangsøy; Rose, Christopher F; Fuskevåg, Ole-Martin; Mæhre, Hanne; Revhaug, Arthur; Jalan, Rajiv; Ytrebø, Lars Marius

    2014-11-15

    Glycine is an important ammoniagenic amino acid, which is increased in acute liver failure (ALF). We have previously shown that L-ornithine phenylacetate (OP) attenuates ammonia rise and intracranial pressure in pigs suffering from ALF but failed to demonstrate a stoichiometric relationship between change in plasma ammonia levels and excretion of phenylacetylglutamine in urine. The aim was to investigate the impact of OP treatment on the phenylacetylglycine pathway as an alternative and additional ammonia-lowering pathway. A well-validated and -characterized large porcine model of ALF (portacaval anastomosis, followed by hepatic artery ligation), which recapitulates the cardinal features of human ALF, was used. Twenty-four female pigs were randomized into three groups: (1) sham operated + vehicle, (2) ALF + vehicle, and (3) ALF + OP. There was a significant increase in arterial glycine concentration in ALF (P < 0.001 compared with sham), with a three-fold increase in glycine release into the systemic circulation from the kidney compared with the sham group. This increase was attenuated in both the blood and brain of the OP-treated animals (P < 0.001 and P < 0.05, respectively), and the attenuation was associated with renal removal of glycine through excretion of the conjugation product phenylacetylglycine in urine (ALF + vehicle: 1,060 ± 106 μmol/l; ALF + OP: 27,625 ± 2,670 μmol/l; P < 0.003). Data from this study provide solid evidence for the existence of a novel, additional pathway for ammonia removal in ALF, involving glycine production and removal, which is targeted by OP. Copyright © 2014 the American Physiological Society.

  2. Kidney (Renal) Failure

    MedlinePlus

    ... News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Kidney Failure Kidney failure, also known as renal failure, ... evaluated? How is kidney failure treated? What is kidney (renal) failure? The kidneys are designed to maintain ...

  3. Primary renal carcinoid tumor.

    PubMed

    Kanodia, K V; Vanikar, A V; Patel, R D; Suthar, K S; Kute, V B; Modi, P R; Trivedi, H L

    2013-09-01

    Primary renal carcinoid tumor is extremely rare and, therefore, its pathogenesis and prognosis is not well known. We report a primary renal carcinoid in a 26-year-old man treated by radical nephrectomy.

  4. Renal arteries (image)

    MedlinePlus

    A renal angiogram is a test used to examine the blood vessels of the kidneys. The test is performed ... main vessel of the pelvis, up to the renal artery that leads into the kidney. Contrast medium ...

  5. Renal vein thrombosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... the kidneys. Possible Complications Complications may include: Acute renal failure (especially if thrombosis occurs in a dehydrated child) ... Saunders; 2012:chap 34. Read More Acute kidney failure Arteriogram Blood ... embolus Renal Tumor Review Date 5/19/2015 Updated by: ...

  6. The Ammonia-Hydrogen System under Pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Chidester, Bethany A; Strobel, Timothy A

    2012-01-20

    Binary mixtures of hydrogen and ammonia were compressed in diamond anvil cells to 15 GPa at room temperature over a range of compositions. The phase behavior was characterized using optical microscopy, Raman spectroscopy, and synchrotron X-ray diffraction. Below 1.2 GPa we observed two-phase coexistence between liquid ammonia and fluid hydrogen phases with limited solubility of hydrogen within the ammonia-rich phase. Complete immiscibility was observed subsequent to the freezing of ammonia phase III at 1.2 GPa, although hydrogen may become metastably trapped within the disordered face-centered-cubic lattice upon rapid solidification. For all compositions studied, the phase III to phase IV transition of ammonia occurred at ~3.8 GPa and hydrogen solidified at ~5.5 GPa, transition pressures equivalent to those observed for the pure components. A P-x phase diagram for the NH3-H2 system is proposed on the basis of these observations with implications for planetary ices, molecular compound formation, and possible hydrogen storage materials.

  7. Energy Efficient Operation of Ammonia Refrigeration Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Mohammed, Abdul Qayyum; Wenning, Thomas J; Sever, Franc; Kissock, Professor Kelly

    2013-01-01

    Ammonia refrigeration systems typically offer many energy efficiency opportunities because of their size and complexity. This paper develops a model for simulating single-stage ammonia refrigeration systems, describes common energy saving opportunities, and uses the model to quantify those opportunities. The simulation model uses data that are typically available during site visits to ammonia refrigeration plants and can be calibrated to actual consumption and performance data if available. Annual electricity consumption for a base-case ammonia refrigeration system is simulated. The model is then used to quantify energy savings for six specific energy efficiency opportunities; reduce refrigeration load, increase suction pressure, employ dual suction, decrease minimum head pressure set-point, increase evaporative condenser capacity, and reclaim heat. Methods and considerations for achieving each saving opportunity are discussed. The model captures synergistic effects that result when more than one component or parameter is changed. This methodology represents an effective method to model and quantify common energy saving opportunities in ammonia refrigeration systems. The results indicate the range of savings that might be expected from common energy efficiency opportunities.

  8. Ammonia stripping of biologically treated liquid manure.

    PubMed

    Alitalo, Anni; Kyrö, Aleksis; Aura, Erkki

    2012-01-01

    A prerequisite for efficient ammonia removal in air stripping is that the pH of the liquid to be stripped is sufficiently high. Swine manure pH is usually around 7. At pH 7 (at 20°C), only 0.4% of ammonium is in ammonia form, and it is necessary to raise the pH of swine slurry to achieve efficient ammonia removal. Because manure has a very high buffering capacity, large amounts of chemicals are needed to change the slurry pH. The present study showed that efficient air stripping of manure can be achieved with a small amount of chemicals and without strong bases like NaOH. Slurry was subjected to aerobic biological treatment to raise pH before stripping. This facilitated 8 to 32% ammonia removal without chemical treatment. The slurry was further subjected to repeated cycles of stripping with MgO and Ca(OH)(2) additions after the first and second strippings, respectively, to raise slurry pH in between the stripping cycles. After three consecutive stripping cycles, 59 to 86% of the original ammonium had been removed. It was shown that the reduction in buffer capacity of the slurry was due to ammonia and carbonate removal during the stripping cycles. Copyright © by the American Society of Agronomy, Crop Science Society of America, and Soil Science Society of America, Inc.

  9. Renal Denervation

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Tao; Guo, Jin-he; Teng, Gao-jun

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) is a group of metabolic diseases of multiple etiologies. Although great progress has been made, researchers are still working on the pathogenesis of T2DM and how to best use the treatments available. Aside from several novel pharmacological approaches, catheter-based sympathetic renal denervation (RDN) has gained a significant role in resistant hypertension, as well as improvements in glycemic control in T2DM. In this article, we will summarize herein the role sympathetic activation plays in the progression of T2DM and review the recent clinical RDN experience in glucose metabolism. We performed systematic review in online databases, including PubMed, EmBase, and Web of Science, from inception until 2015. Studies were included if a statistical relationship was investigated between RDN and T2DM. The quality of each included study was assessed by Newcastle–Ottawa scale score. To synthesize these studies, a random-effects model or a fixed-effects model was applied as appropriate. Then, we calculated heterogeneity, performed sensitivity analysis, tested publication bias, and did meta-regression analysis. Finally, we identified 4 eligible articles. In most studies, RDN achieved via novel catheter-based approach using radiofrequency energy has gained a significant role in resistant hypertension, as well as improvements in glycemic control in T2DM. But the DREAMS-Study showed that RDN did not change median insulin sensitivity nor systemic sympathetic activity. Firstly, the current published studies lacked a proper control group, along with the sample capacity was small. Also, data obtained in the subgroups of diabetic patients were not separately analyzed and the follow-up period was very short. In addition, a reduction in blood pressure accounts for the improvements in glucose metabolism and insulin resistance cannot be excluded. If the favorable result of better glucose metabolism is confirmed in large-scale, randomized studies

  10. Renal disease in pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Sanders, C L; Lucas, M J

    2001-09-01

    Women with renal disease who conceive and continue a pregnancy are at significant risk for adverse maternal and fetal outcomes. Risk is inversely related to the degree of renal insufficiency. Pregnancy-induced changes in the urinary tract can temporarily increase renal function compromise, such as nephrosis, but most often results in no net increase in dysfunction. Common complications of pregnancy--such as hypertension and hypovolemia--can be associated with acute renal injury or aggravation of pre-existing disease.

  11. Ammonia-oxidizing archaea have more important role than ammonia-oxidizing bacteria in ammonia oxidation of strongly acidic soils

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Li-Mei; Hu, Hang-Wei; Shen, Ju-Pei; He, Ji-Zheng

    2012-01-01

    Increasing evidence demonstrated the involvement of ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA) in the global nitrogen cycle, but the relative contributions of AOA and ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) to ammonia oxidation are still in debate. Previous studies suggest that AOA would be more adapted to ammonia-limited oligotrophic conditions, which seems to be favored by protonation of ammonia, turning into ammonium in low-pH environments. Here, we investigated the autotrophic nitrification activity of AOA and AOB in five strongly acidic soils (pH<4.50) during microcosm incubation for 30 days. Significantly positive correlations between nitrate concentration and amoA gene abundance of AOA, but not of AOB, were observed during the active nitrification. 13CO2-DNA-stable isotope probing results showed significant assimilation of 13C-labeled carbon source into the amoA gene of AOA, but not of AOB, in one of the selected soil samples. High levels of thaumarchaeal amoA gene abundance were observed during the active nitrification, coupled with increasing intensity of two denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis bands for specific thaumarchaeal community. Addition of the nitrification inhibitor dicyandiamide (DCD) completely inhibited the nitrification activity and CO2 fixation by AOA, accompanied by decreasing thaumarchaeal amoA gene abundance. Bacterial amoA gene abundance decreased in all microcosms irrespective of DCD addition, and mostly showed no correlation with nitrate concentrations. Phylogenetic analysis of thaumarchaeal amoA gene and 16S rRNA gene revealed active 13CO2-labeled AOA belonged to groups 1.1a-associated and 1.1b. Taken together, these results provided strong evidence that AOA have a more important role than AOB in autotrophic ammonia oxidation in strongly acidic soils. PMID:22134644

  12. Ammonia-oxidizing archaea have more important role than ammonia-oxidizing bacteria in ammonia oxidation of strongly acidic soils.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Li-Mei; Hu, Hang-Wei; Shen, Ju-Pei; He, Ji-Zheng

    2012-05-01

    Increasing evidence demonstrated the involvement of ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA) in the global nitrogen cycle, but the relative contributions of AOA and ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) to ammonia oxidation are still in debate. Previous studies suggest that AOA would be more adapted to ammonia-limited oligotrophic conditions, which seems to be favored by protonation of ammonia, turning into ammonium in low-pH environments. Here, we investigated the autotrophic nitrification activity of AOA and AOB in five strongly acidic soils (pH<4.50) during microcosm incubation for 30 days. Significantly positive correlations between nitrate concentration and amoA gene abundance of AOA, but not of AOB, were observed during the active nitrification. (13)CO(2)-DNA-stable isotope probing results showed significant assimilation of (13)C-labeled carbon source into the amoA gene of AOA, but not of AOB, in one of the selected soil samples. High levels of thaumarchaeal amoA gene abundance were observed during the active nitrification, coupled with increasing intensity of two denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis bands for specific thaumarchaeal community. Addition of the nitrification inhibitor dicyandiamide (DCD) completely inhibited the nitrification activity and CO(2) fixation by AOA, accompanied by decreasing thaumarchaeal amoA gene abundance. Bacterial amoA gene abundance decreased in all microcosms irrespective of DCD addition, and mostly showed no correlation with nitrate concentrations. Phylogenetic analysis of thaumarchaeal amoA gene and 16S rRNA gene revealed active (13)CO(2)-labeled AOA belonged to groups 1.1a-associated and 1.1b. Taken together, these results provided strong evidence that AOA have a more important role than AOB in autotrophic ammonia oxidation in strongly acidic soils.

  13. [Idiopathic renal arteriovenous fistula].

    PubMed

    Bennani, S; Ait Bolbarod, A; el Mrini, M; Kadiri, R; Benjelloun, S

    1996-06-01

    The authors report a case of idiopathic renal arteriovenous fistula. The diagnosis was established angiographically in a 24 year old man presenting gross hematuria. Embolization of the fistula was performed. Efficiency of this treatment was appreciated clinically and by duplex renal ultrasonography. The characteristics of renal arteriovenous fistulas are reviewed.

  14. Cardio-renal syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Gnanaraj, Joseph; Radhakrishnan, Jai

    2016-01-01

    Cardio-renal syndrome is a commonly encountered problem in clinical practice. Its pathogenesis is not fully understood. The purpose of this article is to highlight the interaction between the cardiovascular system and the renal system and how their interaction results in the complex syndrome of cardio-renal dysfunction. Additionally, we outline the available therapeutic strategies to manage this complex syndrome. PMID:27635229

  15. [Renal leiomyoma. Case report].

    PubMed

    Joual, A; Guessous, H; Rabii, R; Benjelloun, M; Benlemlih, A; Skali, K; el Mrini, M; Benjelloun, S

    1999-01-01

    The authors report a case of renal leiomyoma observed in a 56-year-old man. This cyst presented in the from of loin pain. Computed tomography revealed a homogeneous renal tumor. Treatment consisted of radical nephrectomy. Histological examination of the specimen showed benign renal leiomyoma.

  16. Effect of gaseous ammonia on nicotine sorption

    SciTech Connect

    Webb, A.M.; Singer, B.C.; Nazaroff, W.W.

    2002-06-01

    Nicotine is a major constituent of environmental tobacco smoke. Sorptive interactions of nicotine with indoor surfaces can substantially alter indoor concentrations. The phenomenon is poorly understood, including whether sorption is fully reversible or partially irreversible. They hypothesize that acid-base chemistry on indoor surfaces might contribute to the apparent irreversibility of nicotine sorption under some circumstances. Specifically, they suggest that nicotine may become protonated on surfaces, markedly reducing its vapor pressure. If so, subsequent exposure of the surface to gaseous ammonia, a common base, could raise the surface pH, causing deprotonation and desorption of nicotine from surfaces. A series of experiments was conducted to explore the effect of ammonia on nicotine sorption to and reemission from surfaces. The results indicate that, under some conditions, exposure to gaseous ammonia can substantially increase the rate of desorption of previously sorbed nicotine from common indoor surface materials.

  17. Nitric oxide scavengers differentially inhibit ammonia oxidation in ammonia-oxidizing archaea and bacteria.

    PubMed

    Sauder, Laura A; Ross, Ashley A; Neufeld, Josh D

    2016-04-01

    Differential inhibitors are important for measuring the relative contributions of microbial groups, such as ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) and ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA), to biogeochemical processes in environmental samples. In particular, 2-phenyl-4,4,5,5-tetramethylimidazoline-1-oxyl 3-oxide (PTIO) represents a nitric oxide scavenger used for the specific inhibition of AOA, implicating nitric oxide as an intermediate of thaumarchaeotal ammonia oxidation. This study investigated four alternative nitric oxide scavengers for their ability to differentially inhibit AOA and AOB in comparison to PTIO. Caffeic acid, curcumin, methylene blue hydrate and trolox were tested onNitrosopumilus maritimus, two unpublished AOA representatives (AOA-6f and AOA-G6) as well as the AOB representative Nitrosomonas europaea All four scavengers inhibited ammonia oxidation by AOA at lower concentrations than for AOB. In particular, differential inhibition of AOA and AOB by caffeic acid (100 μM) and methylene blue hydrate (3 μM) was comparable to carboxy-PTIO (100 μM) in pure and enrichment culture incubations. However, when added to aquarium sponge biofilm microcosms, both scavengers were unable to inhibit ammonia oxidation consistently, likely due to degradation of the inhibitors themselves. This study provides evidence that a variety of nitric oxide scavengers result in differential inhibition of ammonia oxidation in AOA and AOB, and provides support to the proposed role of nitric oxide as a key intermediate in the thaumarchaeotal ammonia oxidation pathway.

  18. Ammonia emission time profiles based on manure transport data improve ammonia modelling across north western Europe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hendriks, C.; Kranenburg, R.; Kuenen, J. J. P.; Van den Bril, B.; Verguts, V.; Schaap, M.

    2016-04-01

    Accurate modelling of mitigation measures for nitrogen deposition and secondary inorganic aerosol (SIA) episodes requires a detailed representation of emission patterns from agriculture. In this study the meteorological influence on the temporal variability of ammonia emissions from livestock housing and application of manure and fertilizer are included in the chemistry transport model LOTOS-EUROS. For manure application, manure transport data from Flanders (Belgium) were used as a proxy to derive the emission variability. Using improved ammonia emission variability strongly improves model performance for ammonia, mainly by a better representation of the spring maximum. The impact on model performance for SIA was negligible as explained by the limited, ammonia rich region in which the emission variability was updated. The contribution of Flemish agriculture to modelled annual mean ammonia and SIA concentrations in Flanders were quantified at respectively 7-8 and 1-2 μg/m3. A scenario study was performed to investigate the effects of reducing ammonia emissions from manure application during PM episodes by 75%, yielding a maximum reduction in modelled SIA levels of 1-3 μg/m3 during episodes. Year-to-year emission variability and a soil module to explicitly model the emission process from manure and fertilizer application are needed to further improve the modelling of the ammonia budget.

  19. Evaluation and improvement of ammonia emissions inventories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Battye, William; Aneja, Viney P.; Roelle, Paul A.

    Two case studies are performed to improve ammonia emissions inputs used to model fine particulate matter (PM 2.5 is the portion of particulate matter smaller than 2.5 μm aerodynamic diameter) formation of ammonium sulfate and ammonium nitrate. Ammonia emissions are analyzed in detail for North Carolina and the San Joaquin Valley (SJV) of California, with a focus on the Charlotte, NC, and Fresno, California metropolitan areas. A new gridded ammonia emissions inventories suitable for atmospheric modeling for the two case study cities was also developed. Agricultural sources accounted for the bulk of ammonia emissions in both case studies. Livestock waste contributed about 80% in North Carolina and 64% in the SJV, while fertilizer application contributed about 6-7% in both domains. Forests and non-agricultural vegetation contributed 5% in North Carolina and 12% in the SJV. Motor vehicles accounted for about 6% of ammonia emissions in North Carolina and 14% in the SJV. In the Charlotte and Fresno urban areas, the distribution of emissions is less heavily weighted toward agricultural sources and more heavily weighted toward highway vehicles (highway vehicles account for an estimated 64% of emissions in Charlotte and 51% of emissions in Fresno). The emissions estimates for agricultural sources (livestock and fertilizer application) decline to approximately 14% in the winter for both the Charlotte and Fresno urban areas. Emissions estimates for soils and vegetation also decline to approximately 0 during the winter for both the Fresno and Charlotte area. As a result, motor vehicles account for a larger fraction (approximately 73% and 70% for Charlotte and Fresno, respectively) of winter ammonia emissions, particularly in the Charlotte urban area.

  20. Renal artery aneurysms.

    PubMed

    González, J; Esteban, M; Andrés, G; Linares, E; Martínez-Salamanca, J I

    2014-01-01

    A renal artery aneurysm is defined as a dilated segment of renal artery that exceeds twice the diameter of a normal renal artery. Although rare, the diagnosis and incidence of this entity have been steadily increasing due to the routine use of cross-sectional imaging. In certain cases, renal artery aneurysms may be clinically important and potentially lethal. However, knowledge of their occurrence, their natural history, and their prognosis with or without treatment is still limited. This article aims to review the recent literature concerning renal artery aneurysms, with special consideration given to physiopathology, indications for treatment, different technical options, post-procedure complications and treatment outcomes.

  1. Enantioselective, iridium-catalyzed monoallylation of ammonia.

    PubMed

    Pouy, Mark J; Stanley, Levi M; Hartwig, John F

    2009-08-19

    Highly enantioselective, iridium-catalyzed monoallylations of ammonia are reported. These reactions occur with electron-neutral, -rich, and -poor cinnamyl carbonates, alkyl and trityloxy-substituted allylic carbonates, and dienyl carbonates in moderate to good yields and excellent enantioselectivities. This process is enabled by the use of an iridium catalyst that does not require a Lewis acid for activation and that is stable toward a large excess of ammonia. This selective formation of primary allylic amines allows for one-pot syntheses of heterodiallylamines and allylic amides that are not otherwise accessible via iridium-catalyzed allylic amination without the use of blocking groups and protective group manipulations.

  2. Ammonia Results Review for Retained Gas Sampling

    SciTech Connect

    Mahoney, Lenna A.

    2000-09-20

    This report was prepared as part of a task supporting the deployment of the retained gas sampler (RGS) system in Flammable Gas Watch List Tanks. The emphasis of this report is on presenting supplemental information about the ammonia measurements resulting from retained gas sampling of Tanks 241-AW-101, A-101, AN-105, AN-104, AN-103, U-103, S-106, BY-101, BY-109, SX-106, AX-101, S-102, S-111, U-109, and SY-101. This information provides a better understanding of the accuracy of past RGS ammonia measurements, which will assist in determining flammable and toxicological hazards.

  3. Biochemistry of Ammonia Monoxygenase from Nitrosomonas

    SciTech Connect

    Alan Hooper

    2009-07-15

    Major results. 1. CytochromecM552, a protein in the electron transfer chain to ammonia monooxygenase. Purification, modeling of protein structure based on primary structure, characterization of 4 hemes by magnetic spectroscopy, potentiometry, ligand binding and turnover. Kim, H. J., ,Zatsman, et al. 2008). 2. Characterization of proteins which thought to be involved in the AMO reaction or to protect AMO from toxic nitrogenous intermediates such as NO. Nitrosocyanin is a protein present only in bacteria which catalyze the ammonia monoxygenase reaction (1). Cytochrome c P460 beta and cytochrome c’ beta.

  4. Enantioselective, Iridium-Catalyzed Monoallylation of Ammonia

    PubMed Central

    Pouy, Mark J.; Stanley, Levi M.; Hartwig, John F.

    2009-01-01

    Highly enantioselective, iridium-catalyzed monoallylations of ammonia are reported. These reactions occur with electron-neutral, -rich, and -poor cinnamyl carbonates, alkyl and trityloxy-substituted allylic carbonates, and dienyl carbonates in moderate to good yields and excellent enantioselectivities. This process is enabled by the use of an iridium catalyst that does not require a Lewis acid for activation and that is stable toward a large excess of ammonia. This selective formation of primary allylic amines allows for one-pot syntheses of heterodiallylamines and allylic amides that are not otherwise accessible via iridium-catalyzed allylic amination without the use of blocking groups and protective group manipulations. PMID:19722644

  5. Urinary ammonia and ammonia-producing microorganisms in infants with and without diaper dermatitis.

    PubMed

    Leyden, J J; Katz, S; Stewart, R; Kligman, A M

    1977-12-01

    Free ammonia was determined in diaper squeezings from 26 infants with "ammoniacal dermatitis" and in 82 controls. No significant difference was found (402 ppm in diaper dermatitis compared to 465 in controls). The groups did not differ with regard to the incidence of organisms capable of splitting ammonia from urea. Experimental application of highly ammoniacal urine on intact infant and adult skin failed to provoke a dermatitis. Erythema could be induced only when ammoniacal urine was applied occlusively to scarified skin. These findings do not support the notion that ammonia is a primary factor in common diaper rash, but do not exclude a possible role for further irritation in an already existent condition.

  6. Ammonia as a Potential Neurotoxic Factor in Alzheimer's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Adlimoghaddam, Aida; Sabbir, Mohammad G.; Albensi, Benedict C.

    2016-01-01

    Ammonia is known to be a potent neurotoxin that causes severe negative effects on the central nervous system. Excessive ammonia levels have been detected in the brain of patients with neurological disorders such as Alzheimer disease (AD). Therefore, ammonia could be a factor contributing to the progression of AD. In this review, we provide an introduction to the toxicity of ammonia and putative ammonia transport proteins. We also hypothesize how ammonia may be linked to AD. Additionally, we discuss the evidence that support the hypothesis that ammonia is a key factor contributing to AD progression. Lastly, we summarize the old and new experimental evidence that focuses on energy metabolism, mitochondrial function, inflammatory responses, excitatory glutamatergic, and GABAergic neurotransmission, and memory in support of our ammonia-related hypotheses of AD. PMID:27551259

  7. Ammonia volatilisation in waste stabilisation ponds: a cascade of misinterpretations?

    PubMed

    Camargo Valero, M A; Mara, D D

    2010-01-01

    Ammonia volatilisation has generally been reported as, or assumed to be, the main nitrogen removal mechanism in waste stabilisation ponds (WSP). Nitrogen removal via ammonia volatilisation is based on two observations: (a) in-pond pH values can reach high values (>9, even >10), so increasing the proportion of the total ammonia present as the un-ionized form or free ammonia (NH(3)); and (b) in-pond temperatures can also be high, so improving the mass transfer rate of free ammonia to the atmosphere. Consequently, one of the most widely accepted models for ammonia removal in WSP is that reported by Pano & Middlebrooks in 1982, which was developed to reflect the occurrence of these two observations. This work reports how simple mathematical models for ammonia volatilisation in WSP, in spite of the possibility of their giving good predictions, may not accurately describe the main pathways and mechanisms involved in ammonia removal in WSP.

  8. Ammonia Production, Excretion, Toxicity, and Defense in Fish: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Ip, Yuen K.; Chew, Shit F.

    2010-01-01

    Many fishes are ammonotelic but some species can detoxify ammonia to glutamine or urea. Certain fish species can accumulate high levels of ammonia in the brain or defense against ammonia toxicity by enhancing the effectiveness of ammonia excretion through active NH4+transport, manipulation of ambient pH, or reduction in ammonia permeability through the branchial and cutaneous epithelia. Recent reports on ammonia toxicity in mammalian brain reveal the importance of permeation of ammonia through the blood–brain barrier and passages of ammonia and water through transporters in the plasmalemma of brain cells. Additionally, brain ammonia toxicity could be related to the passage of glutamine through the mitochondrial membranes into the mitochondrial matrix. On the other hand, recent reports on ammonia excretion in fish confirm the involvement of Rhesus glycoproteins in the branchial and cutaneous epithelia. Therefore, this review focuses on both the earlier literature and the up-to-date information on the problems and mechanisms concerning the permeation of ammonia, as NH3, NH4+ or proton-neutral nitrogenous compounds, across mitochondrial membranes, the blood–brain barrier, the plasmalemma of neurons, and the branchial and cutaneous epithelia of fish. It also addresses how certain fishes with high ammonia tolerance defend against ammonia toxicity through the regulation of the permeation of ammonia and related nitrogenous compounds through various types of membranes. It is hoped that this review would revive the interests in investigations on the passage of ammonia through the mitochondrial membranes and the blood–brain barrier of ammonotelic fishes and fishes with high brain ammonia tolerance, respectively. PMID:21423375

  9. Inorganic carbon and emission of ammonia from manure

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Animal agriculture, and manure in particular, is a major source of ammonia emissions, and numerous models have been developed for predicting ammonia emission from manure. However, even the most comprehensive models are often inaccurate. Ammonia emission is complicated by volatilization of carbon dio...

  10. Comparison of ammonia emissions determined using different sampling methods

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Dynamic, flow-through flux chambers are sometimes used to estimate ammonia emissions from livestock operations; however, ammonia emissions from the surfaces are affected by many factors which can be affected by the chamber. Ammonia emissions estimated using environmental flow-through chambers may be...

  11. Temperature dependence of feedyard ammonia emissions: The Arrhenius equation

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Ammonia emissions from beef cattle feedyards exhibit an annual pattern-like temperature. This suggests that ammonia emissions may obey the Arrhenius temperature relationship. Our objective was to determine the Arrhenius relationship between mean monthly ammonia emissions from cattle feedyards and me...

  12. The Ammonia Smoke Fountain: An Interesting Thermodynamic Adventure.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alexander, M. Dale

    1999-01-01

    Describes a new demonstration that uses an apparatus like the ammonia-fountain apparatus but with modifications designed to produce ammonium-chloride smoke. This demonstration is easy to perform, interesting to observe, and allows demonstration of the solubility of ammonia in water, the basic nature of ammonia, the acidic nature of hydrogen…

  13. 46 CFR 151.50-32 - Ammonia, anhydrous.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Ammonia, anhydrous. 151.50-32 Section 151.50-32 Shipping... BULK LIQUID HAZARDOUS MATERIAL CARGOES Special Requirements § 151.50-32 Ammonia, anhydrous. (a) The anhydrous ammonia tanks may be installed in the bulk liquid cargo tanks provided the liquid surrounding the...

  14. 46 CFR 151.50-32 - Ammonia, anhydrous.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Ammonia, anhydrous. 151.50-32 Section 151.50-32 Shipping... BULK LIQUID HAZARDOUS MATERIAL CARGOES Special Requirements § 151.50-32 Ammonia, anhydrous. (a) The anhydrous ammonia tanks may be installed in the bulk liquid cargo tanks provided the liquid surrounding the...

  15. The Ammonia Smoke Fountain: An Interesting Thermodynamic Adventure.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alexander, M. Dale

    1999-01-01

    Describes a new demonstration that uses an apparatus like the ammonia-fountain apparatus but with modifications designed to produce ammonium-chloride smoke. This demonstration is easy to perform, interesting to observe, and allows demonstration of the solubility of ammonia in water, the basic nature of ammonia, the acidic nature of hydrogen…

  16. 46 CFR 151.50-32 - Ammonia, anhydrous.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Ammonia, anhydrous. 151.50-32 Section 151.50-32 Shipping... BULK LIQUID HAZARDOUS MATERIAL CARGOES Special Requirements § 151.50-32 Ammonia, anhydrous. (a) The anhydrous ammonia tanks may be installed in the bulk liquid cargo tanks provided the liquid surrounding the...

  17. Management Options for Reducing Ammonia Emissions from Poultry Litter

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Ammonia emissions from poultry litter not only result in air pollution; high levels of ammonia in poultry houses cause poor bird performance, increase the susceptibility of birds to viral diseases, and negatively impact human health. Although ammonia emissions are a concern, few cost-effective best ...

  18. Removal of ammonia from tarry water using a tubular furnace

    SciTech Connect

    V.V. Grabko; V.A. Kofanova; V.M. Li; M.A. Solov'ev

    2009-07-15

    An ammonia-processing system without the use of live steam from OAO Alchevskkoks plant's supply network is considered. Steam obtained from the wastewater that leaves the ammonia column is used to process the excess tarry water, with the release of volatile ammonia.

  19. Chemical Safety Alert: Hazards of Ammonia Releases at Ammonia Refrigeration Facilities

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Anhydrous ammonia is used as a refrigerant in mechanical compression systems, often liquefied under pressure which increases exposure risk due to potential for rapid release into the air as a toxic gas.

  20. Adsorption of Ammonia on Regenerable Carbon Sorbents

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wójtowicz, Marek A.; Cosgrove, Jesph E.; Serio, Michael A..; Wilburn, Monique

    2015-01-01

    Results are presented on the development of reversible sorbents for the combined carbon dioxide, moisture, and trace-contaminant (TC) removal for use in Extravehicular Activities (EVAs), and more specifically in the Primary Life Support System (PLSS). The currently available life support systems use separate units for carbon dioxide, trace contaminants, and moisture control, and the long-term objective is to replace the above three modules with a single one. Data on sorption and desorption of ammonia, which is a major TC of concern, are presented in this paper. The current TC-control technology involves the use of a packed bed of acid-impregnated granular charcoal, which is non-regenerable, and the carbon-based sorbent under development in this project can be regenerated by exposure to vacuum at room temperature. In this study, several carbon sorbents were fabricated and tested for ammonia sorption. Ammonia-sorption capacity was related to carbon pore structure characteristics, and the temperature of oxidative carbon-surface treatment was optimized for enhanced ammonia-sorption performance.

  1. 21 CFR 573.180 - Anhydrous ammonia.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Anhydrous ammonia. 573.180 Section 573.180 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS FOOD ADDITIVES PERMITTED IN FEED AND DRINKING WATER OF ANIMALS Food...

  2. Effect of ammonia on Swiss albino mice

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hilado, C. J.; Casey, C. J.; Furst, A.

    1977-01-01

    Times to incapacitation and death and LC /50/ values were determined for Swiss albino male mice exposed to different concentrations of ammonia in a 4.2 liter hemispherical chamber. The LC/50/ for a 30 minute exposure was 21,430 ppm.

  3. Sensitivity of Mytilus galloprovincialis larvae to ammonia

    SciTech Connect

    Gardiner, W.W.; Antrim, L.D.; Word, J.Q.

    1994-12-31

    Free ammonia is a constituent of some marine effluents and sediments. The authors evaluated the sensitivity of the larval stage of the marine bivalve, Mytilus galloprovincialis, to concentrations of ammonium sulfate, as well as to suspended-particulate-phase (SPP) preparations of marine sediments and petroleum-based marine effluents. Mytilus larvae are commonly used test organisms because of their sensitivity to toxicants and their use in evaluation of water-column impacts of dredged material disposal. Ammonia-only EC{sub 50} values were between 3 mg/L NH{sub 3} and 8 mg/L NH{sub 3}; LC{sub 50} values ranged from 66 mg/L NH{sub 3} to 100 mg/L NH{sub 3}. Abnormalities included exogastrulation and arrested development at early gastrulation. The EC{sub 50} values for ammonia in SPP and effluents were within similar ranges, which indicates that ammonia may contribute significantly to toxicity of these materials. Exposure of larvae during different developmental stages and time periods will also be discussed.

  4. AMMONIA EMISSION FACTORS FROM SWINE FINISHING OPERATIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper presents results from two new studies at swine finishing facilities. (NOTE: Concentrated anaimal feeding operations (CAFOs) are being examined in several regions of the U.S. as major sources of ammonia and particulate matter precursors. EPA's National Risk Management Re...

  5. USDA-EPA Collaborative Ammonia Research

    EPA Science Inventory

    In 2014, a work group was formed between USDA and EPA to facilitate information exchange on ammonia emissions from agriculture, air quality impacts and emission mitigation options and to identify opportunities for collaboration. This document provides background on the work grou...

  6. Radiation Chemistry in Ammonia-Water Ices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Loeffler, M. J.; Raut, U.; Baragiola, R. A.

    2010-01-01

    We studied the effects of 100 keV proton irradiation on films of ammonia-water mixtures between 20 and 120 K. Irradiation destroys ammonia, leading to the formation and trapping of H2, N2 NO, and N2O, the formation of cavities containing radiolytic gases, and ejection of molecules by sputtering. Using infrared spectroscopy, we show that at all temperatures the destruction of ammonia is substantial, but at higher temperatures (120 K), it is nearly complete (approximately 97% destroyed) after a fluence of 10(exp 16) ions per square centimeter. Using mass spectroscopy and microbalance gravimetry, we measure the sputtering yield of our sample and the main components of the sputtered flux. We find that the sputtering yield depends on fluence. At low temperatures, the yield is very low initially and increases quadratically with fluence, while at 120 K the yield is constant and higher initially. The increase in the sputtering yield with fluence is explained by the formation and trapping of the ammonia decay products, N2 and H2 which are seen to be ejected from the ice at all temperatures.

  7. Ammonia in comet P/Halley

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meier, R.; Eberhardt, P.; Krankowsky, D.; Hodges, R. R.

    1994-01-01

    In comet P/Halley the abundances of ammonia relative to water reported in the literature differ by about one order of magnitude from roughly 0.1% up to 2%. Different observational techniques seem to have inherent systematic errors. Using the ion mass channels m/q = 19 amu/e, 18 amu/e and 17 amu/e of the Neutral Mass Spectrometer experiment aboard the spacecraft Giotto, we derive a production rate of ammonia of (1.5(sub -0.7)(sup +0.5))% relative to water. Inside the contact surface we can explain our data by a nuclear source only. The uncertainty in our abundance of ammonia is primarily a result of uncertainties in some key reaction coefficients. We discuss in detail these reactions and the range of error indicated results from extreme assumptions in the rate coefficients. From our data, even in the worst case, we can exclude the ammonia abundance to be only of the order of a few per mill.

  8. Ammonia release method for depositing metal oxides

    DOEpatents

    Silver, G.L.; Martin, F.S.

    1994-12-13

    A method is described for depositing metal oxides on substrates which is indifferent to the electrochemical properties of the substrates and which comprises forming ammine complexes containing metal ions and thereafter effecting removal of ammonia from the ammine complexes so as to permit slow precipitation and deposition of metal oxide on the substrates. 1 figure.

  9. Radiation Chemistry in Ammonia-Water Ices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Loeffler, M. J.; Raut, U.; Baragiola, R. A.

    2010-01-01

    We studied the effects of 100 keV proton irradiation on films of ammonia-water mixtures between 20 and 120 K. Irradiation destroys ammonia, leading to the formation and trapping of H2, N2 NO, and N2O, the formation of cavities containing radiolytic gases, and ejection of molecules by sputtering. Using infrared spectroscopy, we show that at all temperatures the destruction of ammonia is substantial, but at higher temperatures (120 K), it is nearly complete (approximately 97% destroyed) after a fluence of 10(exp 16) ions per square centimeter. Using mass spectroscopy and microbalance gravimetry, we measure the sputtering yield of our sample and the main components of the sputtered flux. We find that the sputtering yield depends on fluence. At low temperatures, the yield is very low initially and increases quadratically with fluence, while at 120 K the yield is constant and higher initially. The increase in the sputtering yield with fluence is explained by the formation and trapping of the ammonia decay products, N2 and H2 which are seen to be ejected from the ice at all temperatures.

  10. Ammonia release method for depositing metal oxides

    DOEpatents

    Silver, Gary L.; Martin, Frank S.

    1994-12-13

    A method of depositing metal oxides on substrates which is indifferent to the electrochemical properties of the substrates and which comprises forming ammine complexes containing metal ions and thereafter effecting removal of ammonia from the ammine complexes so as to permit slow precipitation and deposition of metal oxide on the substrates.

  11. Ammonia in comet P/Halley

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meier, R.; Eberhardt, P.; Krankowsky, D.; Hodges, R. R.

    1994-01-01

    In comet P/Halley the abundances of ammonia relative to water reported in the literature differ by about one order of magnitude from roughly 0.1% up to 2%. Different observational techniques seem to have inherent systematic errors. Using the ion mass channels m/q = 19 amu/e, 18 amu/e and 17 amu/e of the Neutral Mass Spectrometer experiment aboard the spacecraft Giotto, we derive a production rate of ammonia of (1.5(sub -0.7)(sup +0.5))% relative to water. Inside the contact surface we can explain our data by a nuclear source only. The uncertainty in our abundance of ammonia is primarily a result of uncertainties in some key reaction coefficients. We discuss in detail these reactions and the range of error indicated results from extreme assumptions in the rate coefficients. From our data, even in the worst case, we can exclude the ammonia abundance to be only of the order of a few per mill.

  12. AMMONIA EMISSION FACTORS FROM SWINE FINISHING OPERATIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper presents results from two new studies at swine finishing facilities. (NOTE: Concentrated animal feeding operations (CAFOs) are being examined in several regions of the U,.S. as major sources of ammonia and particulate matter precursors. EPA's National Risk Management Re...

  13. AMMONIA EMISSION FACTORS FROM SWINE FINISHING OPERATIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper presents results from two new studies at swine finishing facilities. (NOTE: Concentrated anaimal feeding operations (CAFOs) are being examined in several regions of the U.S. as major sources of ammonia and particulate matter precursors. EPA's National Risk Management Re...

  14. USDA-EPA Collaborative Ammonia Research

    EPA Science Inventory

    In 2014, a work group was formed between USDA and EPA to facilitate information exchange on ammonia emissions from agriculture, air quality impacts and emission mitigation options and to identify opportunities for collaboration. This document provides background on the work grou...

  15. Ammonia masers in the interstellar medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, T. L.; Schilke, P.

    Since 1986, 10 ammonia masers have been found. Most of these are found in the sources W51D, W51e1/e2, NGC7538, DR21, and W33. Among them are a few masers or maser candidates, arising from metastable inversion lines. There are many more masers arising from nonmetastable inversion lines. The most outstanding is intense maser emission from the (J,K) = (9,6) inversion line. Only in W51D are any masering nonmetastable transitions of para-NH3 to be found. Since the masering levels are more than 500 K above ground state, there are a large number of levels populated, and the excitation scheme must be complex. It is likely that there is no unique excitation scheme for all types of ammonia masers. Although there have been a few attempts to model the ammonia maser excitation, including excitation involving vibrationally excited levels, the quest for an all-encompassing ammonia maser excitation model is still going on.

  16. 21 CFR 573.180 - Anhydrous ammonia.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... to corn plant material and thoroughly blended prior to ensiling. It is used or intended for use as a... daily in shelled corn; and a warning not to use additional trace mineral supplementation with treated silage. (2)(i) The food additive anhydrous ammonia is applied directly to corn plant material for use in...

  17. Ironmaking with ammonia at low temperature.

    PubMed

    Hosokai, Sou; Kasiwaya, Yoshiaki; Matsui, Kosuke; Okinaka, Noriyuki; Akiyama, Tomohiro

    2011-01-15

    This paper describes the reduction of hematite with ammonia for ironmaking, in which the effect of temperature on the products was examined. The results showed that the reduction process began at 430 °C during heating, and with an increase in temperature, the reduction mechanism changed apparently from a direct reduction of ammonia (Fe(2)O(3) + 2NH(3) → 2Fe + N(2) + 3H(2)O) to an indirect reduction via the thermal decomposition of ammonia (2NH(3) → N(2) + 3H(2), Fe(2)O(3) + 3H(2) → 2Fe + 3H(2)O) at temperatures over 530 °C. The final product obtained at 600 and 700 °C was pure metallic iron, in contrast with that formed at 450 °C, that is, a mixture of metallic iron and iron nitride. The results suggest the possibility of using ammonia as a reducing agent for carbonless ironmaking, which is operated at a much lower temperature than 900 °C in conventional coal-based ironmaking.

  18. Ag(I) ion in liquid ammonia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Armunanto, Ria; Schwenk, Christian F.; Randolf, Bernhard R.; Rode, Bernd M.

    2004-04-01

    Structural and dynamical properties of Ag + in liquid ammonia have been evaluated on the basis of a molecular dynamics (MD) simulation by the ab initio quantum mechanical/molecular mechanical (QM/MM) method. The most important region, the first solvation shell, was treated by ab initio quantum mechanics at RHF (Restricted Hartree-Fock) level using double- ζ plus polarization basis sets for Ag + and ammonia, respectively. For the remaining region in the system newly constructed three-body corrected potential functions were used. The first solvation shell shows a tetrahedral structure with an Ag-N distance of 2.54 Å, with no ammonia exchange process observable within a simulation time of 16 ps. The mean residence time (MRT) of ammonia molecules in the second solvation shell was determined as 12.7 ps. A force constant of 26 N m -1 was observed for the ion-ligand stretching frequency, indicating a more the stable solvate complex than for Ag + in water.

  19. The origin of mouth-exhaled ammonia.

    PubMed

    Chen, W; Metsälä, M; Vaittinen, O; Halonen, L

    2014-09-01

    It is known that the oral cavity is a production site for mouth-exhaled NH3. However, the mechanism of NH3 production in the oral cavity has been unclear. Since bacterial urease in the oral cavity has been found to produce ammonia from oral fluid urea, we hypothesize that oral fluid urea is the origin of mouth-exhaled NH3. Our results show that under certain conditions a strong correlation exists between oral fluid urea and oral fluid ammonia (NH4(+)+NH3) (rs = 0.77, p < 0.001). We also observe a strong correlation between oral fluid NH3 and mouth-exhaled NH3 (rs = 0.81, p < 0.001). We conclude that three main factors affect the mouth-exhaled NH3 concentration: urea concentration, urease activity and oral fluid pH. Bacterial urease catalyses the hydrolysis of oral fluid urea to ammonia (NH4(+)+NH3). Oral fluid ammonia (NH4(+)+NH3) and pH determine the concentration of oral fluid NH3, which evaporates from oral fluid into gas phase and turns to mouth-exhaled NH3.

  20. Laser-Based Pulsed Photoacoustic Ammonia Detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vallespi, Arturo; Slezak, Verónica; Peuriot, Alejandro; Santiago, Guillermo

    2013-09-01

    Detecting ammonia traces is relevant in health, manufacturing, and security areas, among others. As ammonia presents a strong absorption band (the mode) around 10 m, some of the physical properties which may influence its detection by means of pulsed photoacoustic (PA) spectroscopy with a TEA laser have been studied. The characteristics of the ammonia molecule and the laser intensity may result in a nonlinear dependence of the PA signal amplitude on the laser fluence. Ammonia absorption can be described as a simple two-level system with power broadening. As is a polar molecule, it strongly undergoes adsorption phenomena in contact with different surfaces. Therefore, physical adsorption-desorption at the cell’s wall is studied. A theoretical model, based on Langmuir’s assumptions, fits well to the experimental results with stainless steel. Related to these studies, measurements led to the conclusion that, at the used fluenced values, dissociation by multiphotonic absorption at the 10P(32) laser line may be discarded. A calibration of the system was performed, and a detection limit around 190 ppb (at 224 ) was achieved.

  1. Renal replacement therapy for acute renal failure.

    PubMed

    Macedo, E; Bouchard, J; Mehta, R L

    2009-09-01

    Renal replacement therapy became a common clinical tool to treat patients with severe acute kidney injury (AKI) since the 1960s. During this time dialytic options have expanded considerably; biocompatible membranes, bicarbonate dialysate and dialysis machines with volumetric ultrafiltration control have improved the treatment for acute kidney injury. Along with advances in methods of intermittent hemodialysis, continuous renal replacement therapies have gained widespread acceptance in the treatment of dialysis-requiring AKI. However, many of the fundamental aspects of the renal replacement treatment such as indication, timing of dialytic intervention, and choice of dialysis modality are still controversial and may influence AKI patient's outcomes. This review outlines current concepts in the use of dialysis techniques for AKI and suggests an approach for selecting the optimal method of renal replacement therapy.

  2. Renal scintiscanning. A review

    PubMed Central

    Davies, E. Rhys

    1970-01-01

    Renal scintiscanning is a simple investigation that does not require special preparation and is well tolerated by patients. Radiopharmaceuticals used in linear scanning are accumulated in the renal cortex. This accumulation is diminished: (a) when the cortex is destroyed, e.g. by pyelonephritis, injury, etc.; and (b) when the amount available to the cortex is reduced, e.g. by ischaemia. The scintigram depicts the kidneys unimpeded by bowel contents, gives a qualitative assessment of renal function and shows the distribution of zones of normal function. Recent technical improvements show great promise in deriving a quantitative measure of renal function in some circumstances. The location of normally functioning cortex is often important in the management of renal diseases and the value of scintiscanning is then considerable. It is occasionally useful in planning surgery. The anatomy of the renal collecting system can be shown only by urography. High dose techniques achieve this even in the face of renal failure, and scintiscanning has few indications in investigating lesions that distort the renal anatomy, e.g. tumours and cysts. Renal scintiscanning is a very valuable additional method to urography, arteriography and renography in investigation of renal disorders. ImagesFig. 1Fig. 2Fig. 3Fig. 4Fig. 5Fig. 6Fig. 7Fig. 8 PMID:4905447

  3. Recurrent renal giant leiomyosarcoma

    PubMed Central

    Öziş, Salih Erpulat; Gülpınar, Kamil; Şahlı, Zafer; Konak, Baha Burak; Keskin, Mete; Özdemir, Süleyman; Ataoğlu, Ömür

    2016-01-01

    Primary renal leiomyosarcomas are rare, aggressive tumors. They constitute 1–2% of adult malignant renal tumors. Although leiomyosarcomas are the most common histological type (50–60%) of renal sarcomas, information on renal leiomyosarcoma is limited. Local or systemic recurrences are common. The radiological appearance of renal leiomyosarcomas is not specific, therefore renal leiomyosarcoma cannot be distinguished from renal cell carcinoma by imaging methods in all patients. A 74-year-old female patient presented to our clinic complaining of a palpable mass on the right side of her abdomen in November 2012. The abdominal magnetic resonance imaging revealed a mass, 25 × 24 × 23 cm in size. Her past medical history revealed that she has undergone right radical nephrectomy in 2007, due to a 11 × 12 × 13 cm renal mass that was then reported as renal cell carcinoma on abdominal magnetic resonance imaging, but the pathological diagnosis was low-grade renal leiomyosarcoma. The most recent follow-up of the patient was in 2011, with no signs of local recurrence or distant metastases within this four-year period. The patient underwent laparotomy on November 2012, and a 35 cm retroperitoneal mass was excised. The pathological examination of the mass was reported as high-grade leiomyosarcoma. The formation of this giant retroperitoneal mass in 1 year can be explained by the transformation of the lesion’s pathology from low-grade to a high-grade tumor. PMID:27436926

  4. Development of simple and sensitive hydrogel based colorimetric sensor array for the real-time quantification of gaseous ammonia.

    PubMed

    Krishnan, Sanduru Thamarai; Son, Kuk Hui; Kim, Namhyoung; Viswanath, Buddolla; Kim, Sanghyo; An, Jeong Ho

    2017-03-01

    A real-time colorimetric sensor array (CSA) offers the advantages of diversity and accuracy for the quantification of multiple analytes; however, traditional sensors require a complex fabrication process. Therefore, to take full advantage of this sensing platform, we have developed a simple CSA system composed of a polymer, a reducing agent, and different pH indicators. Distinctive color response patterns were classified by extracting the hidden information, (i.e., red, green, and blue (RGB) values) from the indicators. This triple-channel sensing platform is further applied for statistical analysis, to quantify different concentrations of ammonia and other analytes. The sensor array showed a limit of detection of 0.3ppm, which is well below the diagnostic criteria for ammonia concentration in the breath of healthy individuals and of patients with end-stage renal disease. As this sensor would be able to quantify gaseous ammonia in the breath, it is relevant to the point-of-care diagnosis of patients with renal diseases.

  5. Ammonia downstream from HH 80 North

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Girart, Jose M.; Rodriguez, Luis F.; Anglada, Guillem; Estalella, Robert; Torrelles, Jose, M.; Marti, Josep; Pena, Miriam; Ayala, Sandra; Curiel, Salvador; Noriega-Crespo, Alberto

    1994-01-01

    HH 80-81 are two optically visible Herbig-Haro (HH) objects located about 5 minutes south of their exciting source IRAS 18162-2048. Displaced symmetrically to the north of this luminous IRAS source, a possible HH counterpart was recently detected as a radio continuum source with the very large array (VLA). This radio source, HH 80 North, has been proposed to be a member of the Herbig-Haro class since its centimeter flux density, angular size, spectral index, and morphology are all similar to those of HH 80. However, no object has been detected at optical wavelengths at the position of HH 80 North, possibly because of high extinction, and the confirmation of the radio continuum source as an HH object has not been possible. In the prototypical Herbig-Haro objects HH 1 and 2, ammonia emission has been detected downstream of the flow in both objects. This detection has been intepreted as a result of an enhancement in the ammonia emission produced by the radiation field of the shock associated with the HH object. In this Letter we report the detection of the (1,1) and (2,2) inversion transitions of ammonia downstream HH 80 North. This detection gives strong suppport to the interpretation of HH 80 North as a heavily obscured HH object. In addition, we suggest that ammonia emission may be a tracer of embedded Herbig-Haro objects in other regions of star formation. A 60 micrometer IRAS source could be associated with HH 80 North and with the ammonia condensation. A tentative explanation for the far-infrared emission as arising in dust heated by their optical and UV radiation of the HH object is presented.

  6. Ammonia downstream from HH 80 North

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Girart, Jose M.; Rodriguez, Luis F.; Anglada, Guillem; Estalella, Robert; Torrelles, Jose, M.; Marti, Josep; Pena, Miriam; Ayala, Sandra; Curiel, Salvador; Noriega-Crespo, Alberto

    1994-01-01

    HH 80-81 are two optically visible Herbig-Haro (HH) objects located about 5 minutes south of their exciting source IRAS 18162-2048. Displaced symmetrically to the north of this luminous IRAS source, a possible HH counterpart was recently detected as a radio continuum source with the very large array (VLA). This radio source, HH 80 North, has been proposed to be a member of the Herbig-Haro class since its centimeter flux density, angular size, spectral index, and morphology are all similar to those of HH 80. However, no object has been detected at optical wavelengths at the position of HH 80 North, possibly because of high extinction, and the confirmation of the radio continuum source as an HH object has not been possible. In the prototypical Herbig-Haro objects HH 1 and 2, ammonia emission has been detected downstream of the flow in both objects. This detection has been intepreted as a result of an enhancement in the ammonia emission produced by the radiation field of the shock associated with the HH object. In this Letter we report the detection of the (1,1) and (2,2) inversion transitions of ammonia downstream HH 80 North. This detection gives strong suppport to the interpretation of HH 80 North as a heavily obscured HH object. In addition, we suggest that ammonia emission may be a tracer of embedded Herbig-Haro objects in other regions of star formation. A 60 micrometer IRAS source could be associated with HH 80 North and with the ammonia condensation. A tentative explanation for the far-infrared emission as arising in dust heated by their optical and UV radiation of the HH object is presented.

  7. Orion Ammonia Boiler System Preflight Test Preparations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levitt, Julia L.

    2017-01-01

    The Environmental Controls and Life Support Systems (ECLSS) branch at Kennedy Space Center (KSC) is currently undergoing preparations for ground testing of the Orion Multi-Purpose Crew Vehicle (MPCV) to prepare its subsystems for EM-1 (Exploration Mission-1). EM-1, Orions second unmanned flight, is a three-week long lunar mission during which the vehicle will complete a 6-day retrograde lunar orbit before returning to Earth. This paper focuses on the work done during the authors 16-week internship with the Mechanical Engineering Branch of KSCs Engineering Directorate. The authors project involved assisting with the preparations for testing the Orion MPCVs ammonia boiler system. The purpose of the ammonia boiler system is to keep the spacecraft sufficiently cool during the reentry portion of its mission, from service module (SM) separation to post-landing. This system is critical for keeping both the spacecraft (avionics and electronics) and crew alive during reentry, thus a successful test of the system is essential to the success of EM-1. XXXX The author was able to draft a detailed outline of the procedure for the ammonia system functional test. More work will need to be done on the vehicle power-up and power-down portions of the procedure, but the ammonia system testing portion of the procedure is thorough and includes vehicle test configurations, vehicle commands, and GSE. The author was able to compile a substantial list of questions regarding the ammonia system functional test with the help of her mentors. A significant number of these questions were answered in the teleconferences with Lockheed Martin.

  8. AMMONIA CONCENTRATION IN SALTSTONE HEADSPACE SUMMARY REPORT

    SciTech Connect

    Zamecnik, J; Alex Cozzi, A

    2008-09-26

    The Saltstone Facility Documented Safety Analysis (DSA) is under revision to accommodate changes in the Composite Lower Flammability Limit (CLFL) from the introduction of Isopar into Tank 50. Saltstone samples were prepared with an 'MCU' type salt solution spiked with ammonia. The ammonia released from the saltstone was captured and analyzed. The ammonia concentration found in the headspace of samples maintained at 95 C and 1 atm was, to 95% confidence, less than or equal to 3.9 mg/L. Tank 50 is fed by several influent streams. The salt solution from Tank 50 is pumped to the salt feed tank (SFT) in the Saltstone Production Facility (SPF). The premix materials cement, slag and fly ash are blended together prior to transfer to the grout mixer. The premix is fed to the grout mixer in the SPF and the salt solution is incorporated into the premix in the grout mixer, yielding saltstone slurry. The saltstone slurry drops into a hopper and then is pumped to the vault. The Saltstone Facility Documented Safety Analysis (DSA) is under revision to accommodate changes in the Composite Lower Flammability Limit (CLFL) from the introduction of Isopar{reg_sign} L into Tank 50. Waste Solidification-Engineering requested that the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) perform testing to characterize the release of ammonia in curing saltstone at 95 C. The test temperature represents the maximum allowable temperature in the Saltstone Disposal Facility (SDF). Ammonia may be present in the salt solution and premix materials, or may be produced by chemical reactions when the premix and salt solution are combined. A final report (SRNS-STI-2008-00120, Rev. 0) will be issued that will cover in more depth the information presented in this report.

  9. Ammonia and ammonium hydroxide sensors for ammonia/water absorption machines: Literature review and data compilation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anheier, N. C., Jr.; McDonald, C. E.; Cuta, J. M.; Cuta, F. M.; Olsen, K. B.

    1995-05-01

    This report describes an evaluation of various sensing techniques for determining the ammonia concentration in the working fluid of ammonia/water absorption cycle systems. The purpose was to determine if any existing sensor technology or instrumentation could provide an accurate, reliable, and cost-effective continuous measure of ammonia concentration in water. The resulting information will be used for design optimization and cycle control in an ammonia-absorption heat pump. Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) researchers evaluated each sensing technology against a set of general requirements characterizing the potential operating conditions within the absorption cycle. The criteria included the physical constraints for in situ operation, sensor characteristics, and sensor application. PNL performed an extensive literature search, which uncovered several promising sensing technologies that might be applicable to this problem. Sixty-two references were investigated, and 33 commercial vendors were identified as having ammonia sensors. The technologies for ammonia sensing are acoustic wave, refractive index, electrode, thermal, ion-selective field-effect transistor (ISFET), electrical conductivity, pH/colormetric, and optical absorption. Based on information acquired in the literature search, PNL recommends that follow-on activities focus on ISFET devices and a fiber optic evanescent sensor with a colormetric indicator. The ISFET and fiber optic evanescent sensor are inherently microminiature and capable of in situ measurements. Further, both techniques have been demonstrated selective to the ammonium ion (NH4(+)). The primary issue remaining is how to make the sensors sufficiently corrosion-resistant to be useful in practice.

  10. Ammonia and ammonium hydroxide sensors for ammonia/water absorption machines: Literature review and data compilation

    SciTech Connect

    Anheier, N.C. Jr.; McDonald, C.E.; Cuta, J.M.; Cuta, F.M.; Olsen, K.B.

    1995-05-01

    This report describes an evaluation of various sensing techniques for determining the ammonia concentration in the working fluid of ammonia/water absorption cycle systems. The purpose of this work was to determine if any existing sensor technology or instrumentation could provide an accurate, reliable, and cost-effective continuous measure of ammonia concentration in water. The resulting information will be used for design optimization and cycle control in an ammonia-absorption heat pump. PNL researchers evaluated each sensing technology against a set of general requirements characterizing the potential operating conditions within the absorption cycle. The criteria included the physical constraints for in situ operation, sensor characteristics, and sensor application. PNL performed an extensive literature search, which uncovered several promising sensing technologies that might be applicable to this problem. Sixty-two references were investigated, and 33 commercial vendors were identified as having ammonia sensors. The technologies for ammonia sensing are acoustic wave, refractive index, electrode, thermal, ion-selective field-effect transistor (ISFET), electrical conductivity, pH/colormetric, and optical absorption. Based on information acquired in the literature search, PNL recommends that follow-on activities focus on ISFET devices and a fiber optic evanescent sensor with a colormetric indicator. The ISFET and fiber optic evanescent sensor are inherently microminiature and capable of in situ measurements. Further, both techniques have been demonstrated selective to the ammonium ion (NH{sub 4}{sup +}). The primary issue remaining is how to make the sensors sufficiently corrosion-resistant to be useful in practice.

  11. Ammonia concentration determines differential growth of ammonia-oxidising archaea and bacteria in soil microcosms.

    PubMed

    Verhamme, Daniel T; Prosser, James I; Nicol, Graeme W

    2011-06-01

    The first step of nitrification, oxidation of ammonia to nitrite, is performed by both ammonia-oxidising archaea (AOA) and ammonia-oxidising bacteria (AOB) in soil, but their relative contributions to ammonia oxidation and existence in distinct ecological niches remain to be determined. To determine whether available ammonia concentration has a differential effect on AOA and AOB growth, soil microcosms were incubated for 28 days with ammonium at three concentrations: native (control), intermediate (20 μg NH(4)(+)-N per gram of soil) and high (200 μg NH(4)(+)-N per gram of soil). Quantitative PCR demonstrated growth of AOA at all concentrations, whereas AOB growth was prominent only at the highest concentration. Similarly, denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) analysis revealed changes in AOA communities at all ammonium concentrations, whereas AOB communities changed significantly only at the highest ammonium concentration. These results provide evidence that ammonia concentration contributes to the definition of distinct ecological niches of AOA and AOB in soil.

  12. Ammonia concentration determines differential growth of ammonia-oxidising archaea and bacteria in soil microcosms

    PubMed Central

    Verhamme, Daniel T; Prosser, James I; Nicol, Graeme W

    2011-01-01

    The first step of nitrification, oxidation of ammonia to nitrite, is performed by both ammonia-oxidising archaea (AOA) and ammonia-oxidising bacteria (AOB) in soil, but their relative contributions to ammonia oxidation and existence in distinct ecological niches remain to be determined. To determine whether available ammonia concentration has a differential effect on AOA and AOB growth, soil microcosms were incubated for 28 days with ammonium at three concentrations: native (control), intermediate (20 μg NH4+-N per gram of soil) and high (200 μg NH4+-N per gram of soil). Quantitative PCR demonstrated growth of AOA at all concentrations, whereas AOB growth was prominent only at the highest concentration. Similarly, denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) analysis revealed changes in AOA communities at all ammonium concentrations, whereas AOB communities changed significantly only at the highest ammonium concentration. These results provide evidence that ammonia concentration contributes to the definition of distinct ecological niches of AOA and AOB in soil. PMID:21228892

  13. Pre-acclimation to low ammonia improves ammonia handling in common carp (Cyprinus carpio) when exposed subsequently to high environmental ammonia.

    PubMed

    Shrivastava, Jyotsna; Sinha, Amit Kumar; Datta, Surjya Narayan; Blust, Ronny; De Boeck, Gudrun

    2016-11-01

    We tested whether exposing fish to low ammonia concentrations induced acclimation processes and helped fish to tolerate subsequent (sub)lethal ammonia exposure by activating ammonia excretory pathways. Common carp (Cyprinus carpio) were pre-exposed to 0.27mM ammonia (∼10% 96h LC50) for 3, 7 and 14days. Thereafter, each of these pre-exposed and parallel naïve groups were exposed to 1.35mM high environmental ammonia (HEA, ∼50% 96h LC50) for 12h and 48h to assess the occurrence of ammonia acclimation based on sub-lethal end-points, and to lethal ammonia concentrations (2.7mM, 96h LC50) in order to assess improved survival time. Results show that fish pre-exposed to ammonia for 3 and 7days had a longer survival time than the ammonia naïve fish. However, this effect disappeared after prolonged (14days) pre-exposure. Ammonia excretion rate (Jamm) was strongly inhibited (or even reversed) in the unacclimated groups during HEA. On the contrary, after 3days the pre-exposure fish maintained Jamm while after 7days these pre-acclimated fish were able to increase Jamm efficiently. Again, this effect disappeared after 14days of pre-acclimation. The efficient ammonia efflux in pre-acclimated fish was associated with the up-regulation of branchial mRNA expression of ammonia transporters and exchangers. Pre-exposure with ammonia for 3-7days stimulated an increment in the transcript level of gill Rhcg-a and Rhcg-b mRNA relative to the naïve control group and the up-regulation of these two Rhcg homologs was reinforced during subsequent HEA exposure. No effect of pre-exposure was noted for Rhbg. Relative to unacclimated fish, the transcript level of Na(+)/H(+) exchangers (NHE-3) was raised in 3-7days pre-acclimated fish and remained higher during the subsequent HEA exposure while gill H(+)-ATPase activities and mRNA levels were not affected by pre-acclimation episodes. Likewise, ammonia pre-acclimated fish with or without HEA exposure displayed pronounced up-regulation in Na

  14. Is blood ammonia influenced by kidney function? A prospective study.

    PubMed

    Imran, Muhammad; Shah, Yaser; Nundlall, Seema; Roberts, Norman B; Howse, Matthew

    2012-03-01

    We have investigated whether blood ammonia is increased with worsening CKD. Fifty eight subjects with a range of CKD were recruited for analysis of plasma ammonia and other electrolytes. The concentrations of plasma ammonia were all within the normal reference range and there was no correlation between ammonia and CKD without any effect of dialysis. Blood ammonia is not elevated in or related to the severity of chronic kidney disease. Copyright © 2011 The Canadian Society of Clinical Chemists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Renal Artery Embolization

    PubMed Central

    Sauk, Steven; Zuckerman, Darryl A.

    2011-01-01

    Renal artery embolization (RAE) is an effective minimally invasive alternative procedure for the treatment of a variety of conditions. Since the 1970s when RAE was first developed, technical advances and growing experience have expanded the indications to not only include treatment of conditions such as symptomatic hematuria and palliation for metastatic renal cancer, but also preoperative infarction of renal tumors, treatment of angiomyolipomas, vascular malformations, medical renal disease, and complications following renal transplantation. With the drastically improved morbidity associated with this technique in part due to the introduction of more precise embolic agents and smaller delivery catheters, RAE continues to gain popularity for various urologic conditions. The indications and techniques for renal artery embolization are reviewed in the following sections. PMID:23204638

  16. Future direction of renal positron emission tomography.

    PubMed

    Szabo, Zsolt; Xia, Jinsong; Mathews, William B; Brown, Phillip R

    2006-01-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) is perfectly suited for quantitative imaging of the kidneys, and the recent improvements in detector technology, computer hardware, and image processing software add to its appeal. Multiple positron emitting radioisotopes can be used for renal imaging. Some, including carbon-11, nitrogen-13, and oxygen-15, can be used at institutions with an on-site cyclotron. Other radioisotopes that may be even more useful in a clinical setting are those that either can be obtained from radionuclide generators (rubidium-82, copper-62) or have a sufficiently long half-life for transportation (fluorine-18). The clinical use of functional renal PET studies (blood flow, glomerular filtration rate) has been slow, in part because of the success of concurrent technologies, including single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) and planar gamma camera imaging. Renal blood flow studies can be performed with O-15-labeled water, N-13-labeled ammonia, rubidium-82, and copper-labeled PTSM. With these tracers, renal blood flow can be quantified using a modified microsphere kinetic model. Glomerular filtration can be imaged and quantified with gallium-68 EDTA or cobalt-55 EDTA. Measurements of renal blood flow with PET have potential applications in renovascular disease, in transplant rejection or acute tubular necrosis, in drug-induced nephropathies, ureteral obstruction, before and after revascularization, and before and after the placement of ureteral stents. The most important clinical application for imaging glomerular function with PET would be renovascular hypertension. Molecular imaging of the kidneys with PET is rather limited. At present, research is focused on the investigation of metabolism (acetate), membrane transporters (organic cation and anion transporters, pepT1 and pepT2, GLUT, SGLT), enzymes (ACE), and receptors (AT1R). Because many nephrological and urological disorders are initiated at the molecular and organelle levels and may

  17. Bilateral Renal Lymphangiectasia.

    PubMed

    Pandya, Vaidehi K; Shah, Maulin K; Gandhi, Shruti P; Patel, Himanshu V

    2016-09-01

    Renal Lymphangiectasia (RLM) is very rare benign lymphatic malformation. It can be misdiagnosed for other cystic renal masses, most commonly polycystic kidneys. Though incidentally found in most cases, it may be the cause for hypertension and renal failure in undiagnosed patients. Here, we report a case of an adult asymptomatic male with bilateral RLM which was detected as an incidental finding on ultrasound. Confirmation by CT-scan and laboratory diagnosis of aspirated fluid was done, and patient was managed conservatively.

  18. Study of Hydrogen Supply System with Ammonia Fuel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saika, Takashi; Nakamura, Mitsuhiro; Nohara, Tetsuo; Ishimatsu, Shinji

    Carbon-free fuel is effective in preventing global warming. Hydrogen has no carbon and can be made also from nuclear energy or reproducible energies other than fossil fuels. However, hydrogen lacks portability because of its difficulty in liquefying, but ammonia can easily be liquefied at a room temperature and dissociated into high-content hydrogen and nitrogen using a suitable catalyst. An ammonia dissociation system for fuel cells is proposed in this paper. The residual ammonia by 13ppm or more in the dissociated gas (H2+ N2) causes a decrease in the output of fuel cells. To separate residual ammonia, it should be sent to an ammonia separator and then to an ammonia distiller. In the experiment, the authors examine the concentrations of ammonia after dissociation at various temperatures, pressures and space velocities. The ammonia separator uses the fact that ammonia dissolves well in water. Then the ammonia water is distilled in the distiller. Thereby, the authors have proposed an ammonia circulation system that is a clean energy system.

  19. Observations of atmospheric ammonia from TANSO-FTS/GOSAT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Someya, Yu; Imasu, Ryoichi; Saitoh, Naoko; Shiomi, Kei

    2017-04-01

    Atmospheric ammonia has large impacts on the nitrogen cycles or atmospheric environment such as nucleation of PM2.5 particles. It is reported that ammonia in the atmosphere has been increasing rapidly with the growth of population globally and this trend must continue in the future. Satellite observation is an effective approach to get to know the global perspectives of the gas. Atmospheric ammonia is observable using the thermal infrared (TIR) spectra, and IASI, TES and CrIS had been revealed those distributions. GOSAT also has TIR band including the ammonia absorption bands. GOSAT has the shorter revisit cycle than that of the other hyper-spectral TIR sounders mentioned above, therefore, the shorter time-scale events can be represented. In addition to the importance of the impacts of ammonia itself, the concentration ratio between ammonia and the other trace gases such as CO which is one of the main targets of the GOSAT-2 project is useful as the indicator of their emission sources. In this study, we introduce an algorithm to retrieve the column amount of atmospheric ammonia based on non-linear optimal estimation (Rogers, 2000) from GOSAT spectra in the ammonia absorption band between 960 - 970 cm-1. Temperature and water vapor profiles are estimated in advance of the ammonia retrieval. The preliminary results showed significant high concentrations of ammonia in the Northern India and the Eastern China as pointed out in the previous researches. We will discuss the global distribution of ammonia in the presentation.

  20. Establishing relative sensitivities of various toxicity testing organisms to ammonia

    SciTech Connect

    Karle, L.M.; Mayhew, H.L.; Barrows, M.E.; Karls, R.K.

    1994-12-31

    The toxicity of ammonia to various organisms was examined to develop a baseline for mortality in several commonly used testing species. This baseline data will assist in choosing the proper test species and in interpreting results as they pertain to ammonia. Responses for two juvenile fish species, three marine amphipods, and two species of mysid shrimp were compared for their sensitivity to levels of ammonia. All mortality caused by ammonia in the bottom-dwelling Citharichthys stigmaeus occurred within 24 h of exposure, whereas mortality in the silverside, Menidia beryllina, occurred over the entire 96-h test duration. Responses to ammonia varied among the amphipods Rhepoxynius abronius, Ampelisca abdita, and Eohaustorius estuarius. R. abronius and A. abdita showed similar sensitivity to ammonia at lower concentrations; A. abdita appeared more sensitive than R. abronius at levels above 40 mg/L. Concentrations of ammonia required to produce significant mortality in the amphipod E. estuarius were far higher than the other species examined (> 100 mg/L NH{sub 3}). A comparison of ammonia toxicity with two commonly used invertebrates, Holmesimysis sculpts and Mysidopsis bahia, suggest that these two species of mysid have similar sensitivities to ammonia. Further studies with ammonia that examine sensitivity of different organisms should be conducted to assist regulatory and environmental agencies in determining appropriate test species and in interpreting toxicological results as they may be affected by levels of ammonia.

  1. Advanced water resource management in ammonia and fertilizer industries

    SciTech Connect

    Goodman, W.H.; Campmajo, C.

    1999-11-01

    Ammonia plants typically use high volumes of water, predominantly as make-up for process steam use and as cooling water. Water use minimization in the ammonia and fertilizer industries presents unique challenges related to the potential for ammonia contamination. This can lead to concerns with water or air discharge of ammonia, increased microbiological activity, and concern for ammonia-enhanced corrosion. Copper-based metallurgy is understandably rare in ammonia plants, consequently the last concern is of little practical importance. Developing an advanced water resource management strategy for the ammonia and fertilizer industries requires a plant audit with a complete water and contaminant mass balance. Analysis of this information allows development of potential conceptual design flowsheets, incorporating options for reduced water use. Attractive options for water use minimization in an ammonia plant often include the reuse of process condensates as make-up to the demineralization system or as make-up to the cooling water system. Modeling the water chemistry resulting from water reuse, as well as the effectiveness of any recommended treatment operations, allows for a technical and economic comparison of the options. Operations of particular interest to the ammonia industry include ammonia stripping across an open cooling tower and ammonia removal techniques such as air or steam stripping. This paper will outline the general approach to water resource management, and present case studies illustrating the effectiveness of this approach.

  2. Pretreatment of biomass by aqueous ammonia for bioethanol production.

    PubMed

    Kim, Tae Hyun; Gupta, Rajesh; Lee, Y Y

    2009-01-01

    The methods of pretreatment of lignocellulosic biomass using aqueous ammonia are described. The main effect of ammonia treatment of biomass is delignification without significantly affecting the carbohydrate contents. It is a very effective pretreatment method especially for substrates that have low lignin contents such as agricultural residues and herbaceous feedstock. The ammonia-based pretreatment is well suited for simultaneous saccharification and co-fermentation (SSCF) because the treated biomass retains cellulose as well as hemicellulose. It has been demonstrated that overall ethanol yield above 75% of the theoretical maximum on the basis of total carbohydrate is achievable from corn stover pretreated with aqueous ammonia by way of SSCF. There are two different types of pretreatment methods based on aqueous ammonia: (1) high severity, low contact time process (ammonia recycle percolation; ARP), (2) low severity, high treatment time process (soaking in aqueous ammonia; SAA). Both of these methods are described and discussed for their features and effectiveness.

  3. Pretreatment of Biomass by Aqueous Ammonia for Bioethanol Production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Tae Hyun; Gupta, Rajesh; Lee, Y. Y.

    The methods of pretreatment of lignocellulosic biomass using aqueous ammonia are described. The main effect of ammonia treatment of biomass is delignification without significantly affecting the carbohydrate contents. It is a very effective pretreatment method especially for substrates that have low lignin contents such as agricultural residues and herbaceous feedstock. The ammonia-based pretreatment is well suited for simultaneous saccharification and co-fermentation (SSCF) because the treated biomass retains cellulose as well as hemicellulose. It has been demonstrated that overall ethanol yield above 75% of the theoretical maximum on the basis of total carbohydrate is achievable from corn stover pretreated with aqueous ammonia by way of SSCF. There are two different types of pretreatment methods based on aqueous ammonia: (1) high severity, low contact time process (ammonia recycle percolation; ARP), (2) low severity, high treatment time process (soaking in aqueous ammonia; SAA). Both of these methods are described and discussed for their features and effectiveness.

  4. Exchange of Atmospheric Ammonia in a Mature Corn Canopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Myles, L.; Heuer, M.

    2015-12-01

    Dry deposition of atmospheric ammonia increases nitrogen levels in terrestrial ecosystems, which contributes to nutrient imbalances and other environmental changes. The exchange of ammonia between the atmosphere and land is dynamic, and vegetative canopies can act as sources or sinks of ammonia under certain conditions. A field study was conducted during summer 2014 in a mature corn field at the University of Illinois using an automated exchange mechanism and a cavity ring-down spectrometer to sample atmospheric ammonia at eight levels between 0.2 m and 4.5 m above the surface. Ammonia concentrations, along with micrometeorological measurements, were evaluated to quantify and characterize ammonia flux profiles to improve understanding of the distribution of ammonia through vegetation.

  5. Potentials and limitations of microorganisms as renal failure biotherapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Jain, Poonam; Shah, Sapna; Coussa, Razek; Prakash, Satya

    2009-01-01

    Renal insufficiency leads to uremia, a complicated syndrome. It thus becomes vital to reduce waste metabolites and regulate water and electrolytes in kidney failure. The most common treatment of this disease is either dialysis or transplantation. Although these treatments are very effective, they are extremely costly. Recently artificial cells, microencapsulated live bacterial cells, and other cells have been studied to manage renal failure metabolic wastes. The procedure for microencapsulation of biologically active material is well documented and offers many biomedical applications. Microencapsulated bacteria have been documented to efficiently remove urea and several uremic markers such as ammonia, creatinine, uric acid, phosphate, potassium, magnesium, sodium, and chloride. These bacteria also have further potential as biotherapeutic agents because they can be engineered to remove selected unwanted waste. This application has enormous potential for removal of waste metabolites and electrolytes in renal failure as well as other diseases such as liver failure, phenylketonuria, and Crohn’s disease, to name a few. This paper discusses the various options available to date to manage renal failure metabolites and focuses on the potential of using encapsulated live cells as biotherapeutic agents to control renal failure waste metabolites and electrolytes. PMID:19707412

  6. Chromophobe cell renal carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Megumi, Y; Nishimura, K

    1998-01-01

    Chromophobe cell renal carcinoma is a recently established subtype of renal cell carcinoma. Herein we report a case of chromophobe cell renal carcinoma in a 67-year-old male patient who occasionally underwent computed tomography. In a microscopic study with hematoxylin and eosin stain, clear eosinophilic cytoplasm, and a moderately atypical nucleus were observed. And it was stained positively by Hale's colloidal iron. Ultrastructurally, the cytoplasm was filled with numerous microvesicles. From these results, this tumor was pathologically diagnosed as chromophobe cell renal carcinoma.

  7. Renal pelvis or ureter cancer

    MedlinePlus

    Transitional cell cancer of the renal pelvis or ureter; Kidney cancer - renal pelvis; Ureter cancer ... Cancer can grow in the urine collection system, but it is uncommon. Renal pelvis and ureter cancers ...

  8. Short-term effect of ammonia concentration and salinity on activity of ammonia oxidizing bacteria.

    PubMed

    Claros, J; Jiménez, E; Borrás, L; Aguado, D; Seco, A; Ferrer, J; Serralta, J

    2010-01-01

    A continuously aerated SHARON (single reactor high activity ammonia removal over nitrite) system has been operated to achieve partial nitritation. Two sets of batch experiments were carried out to study the effect of ammonia concentration and salinity on the activity of ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB). Activity of AOB raised as free ammonia concentration was increased reaching its maximum value at 4.5 mg NH3-N l(-1). The half saturation constant for free ammonia was determined (K(NH3)=0.32 mg NH3-N l(-1)). Activity decreased at TAN (total ammonium-nitrogen) concentration over 2,000 mg NH4-N l(-1). No free ammonia inhibition was detected. The effect of salinity was studied by adding different concentrations of different salts to the biomass. No significant differences were observed between the experiments carried out with a salt containing or not containing NH4. These results support that AOB are inhibited by salinity, not by free ammonia. A mathematical expression to represent this inhibition is proposed. To compare substrate affinity and salinity inhibitory effect on different AOB populations, similar experiments were carried out with biomass from a biological nutrient removal pilot plant. The AOB activity reached its maximum value at 0.008 mg NH3-N l(-1) and decreased at TAN concentration over 400 mg NH4-N l(-1). These differences can be explained by the different AOB predominating species: Nitrosomonas europaea and N. eutropha in the SHARON biomass and Nitrosomonas oligotropha in the pilot plant.

  9. Ammonia in London: is it increasing and what is the relevance of urban ammonia for air quality impacts?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braban, Christine; Tang, Sim; Poskitt, Janet; Van Dijk, Netty; Leeson, Sarah; Dragosits, Ulli; Hutchings, Torben; Twigg, Marsailidh; Di Marco, Chiara; Langford, Ben; Tremper, Anja; Nemitz, Eiko; Sutton, Mark

    2017-04-01

    Emissions of ammonia affect both rural and urban air quality primarily via reaction of ammonia in the atmosphere forming secondary ammonium salts in particulate matter (PM). Urban ammonia emissions come from a variety of sources including biological decomposition, human waste, industrial processes and combustion engines. In the UK, the only long-term urban ammonia measurement is a UK National Ammonia Monitoring Network site at London Cromwell Road, recording monthly average concentrations. Short term measurements have also been made in the past decade at Marylebone Road, North Kensington and on the BT Tower. Cromwell Road is a kerbside site operational since 1999. The Cromwell Road data indicates that ammonia concentrations may be increasing since 2010-2012 after a long period of decreasing. Data from the National Atmospheric Emissions Inventory indicates ammonia emissions from diesel fleet exhausts increasing over this time period but an overall net decrease in ammonia emissions. With changes in engine and exhaust technology to minimise pollutant emissions and the importance of ammonia as a precursor gas for secondary PM, there is a challenge to understand urban ammonia concentrations and subsequent impacts on urban air quality. In this paper the long term measurements are assessed in conjunction with the short-term measurements.The challenges to assess the relative importance of local versus long range ammonia emission are discussed.

  10. Effective Hyperfine-structure Functions of Ammonia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Augustovičová, L.; Soldán, P.; Špirko, V.

    2016-06-01

    The hyperfine structure of the rotation-inversion (v 2 = 0+, 0-, 1+, 1-) states of the 14NH3 and 15NH3 ammonia isotopomers is rationalized in terms of effective (ro-inversional) hyperfine-structure (hfs) functions. These are determined by fitting to available experimental data using the Hougen’s effective hyperfine-structure Hamiltonian within the framework of the non-rigid inverter theory. Involving only a moderate number of mass independent fitting parameters, the fitted hfs functions provide a fairly close reproduction of a large majority of available experimental data, thus evidencing adequacy of these functions for reliable prediction. In future experiments, this may help us derive spectroscopic constants of observed inversion and rotation-inversion transitions deperturbed from hyperfine effects. The deperturbed band centers of ammonia come to the forefront of fundamental physics especially as the probes of a variable proton-to-electron mass ratio.

  11. Ammonia sensors based on metal oxide nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sekhar Rout, Chandra; Hegde, Manu; Govindaraj, A.; Rao, C. N. R.

    2007-05-01

    Ammonia sensing characteristics of nanoparticles as well as nanorods of ZnO, In2O3 and SnO2 have been investigated over a wide range of concentrations (1 800 ppm) and temperatures (100 300 °C). The best values of sensitivity are found with ZnO nanoparticles and SnO2 nanostructures. Considering all the characteristics, the SnO2 nanostructures appear to be good candidates for sensing ammonia, with sensitivities of 222 and 19 at 300 °C and 100 °C respectively for 800 ppm of NH3. The recovery and response times are respectively in the ranges 12 68 s and 22 120 s. The effect of humidity on the performance of the sensors is not marked up to 60% at 300 °C. With the oxide sensors reported here no interference for NH3 is found from H2, CO, nitrogen oxides, H2S and SO2.

  12. Tin oxide nanocluster hydrogen and ammonia sensors.

    PubMed

    Lassesson, A; Schulze, M; van Lith, J; Brown, S A

    2008-01-09

    We have prepared sensitive hydrogen and ammonia sensors from thin films of tin nanoclusters with diameters between 3 and 10 nm. By baking the samples at 200 °C in ambient air the clusters were oxidized, resulting in very stable films of tin oxide clusters with similar diameters to the original Sn clusters. By monitoring the electrical resistance, it is shown that the cluster films are highly responsive to hydrogen and ammonia at relatively low temperatures, thereby making them attractive for commercial applications in which low power consumption is required. Doping of the films by depositing Pd on top of the clusters resulted in much improved sensor response and response times. It is shown that optimal sensor properties are achieved for very thin cluster films (a few monolayers of clusters).

  13. Crystal structure of rubidium peroxide ammonia disolvate.

    PubMed

    Grassl, Tobias; Korber, Nikolaus

    2017-02-01

    The title compound, Rb2O2·2NH3, has been obtained as a reaction product of rubidium metal dissolved in liquid ammonia and glucuronic acid. As a result of the low-temperature crystallization, a disolvate was formed. To our knowledge, only one other solvate of an alkali metal peroxide is known: Na2O2·8H2O has been reported by Grehl et al. [Acta Cryst. (1995), C51, 1038-1040]. We determined the peroxide bond length to be 1.530 (11) Å, which is in accordance with the length reported by Bremm & Jansen [Z. Anorg. Allg. Chem. (1992), 610, 64-66]. One of the ammonia solvate molecules is disordered relative to a mirror plane, with 0.5 occupancy for the corresponding nitrogen atom.

  14. Crystal structure of rubidium peroxide ammonia disolvate

    PubMed Central

    Grassl, Tobias; Korber, Nikolaus

    2017-01-01

    The title compound, Rb2O2·2NH3, has been obtained as a reaction product of rubidium metal dissolved in liquid ammonia and glucuronic acid. As a result of the low-temperature crystallization, a disolvate was formed. To our knowledge, only one other solvate of an alkali metal peroxide is known: Na2O2·8H2O has been reported by Grehl et al. [Acta Cryst. (1995), C51, 1038–1040]. We determined the peroxide bond length to be 1.530 (11) Å, which is in accordance with the length reported by Bremm & Jansen [Z. Anorg. Allg. Chem. (1992), 610, 64–66]. One of the ammonia solvate molecules is disordered relative to a mirror plane, with 0.5 occupancy for the corresponding nitrogen atom. PMID:28217342

  15. An intercomparison of five ammonia measurement techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, E. J.; Sandholm, S. T.; Bradshaw, J. D.; Schendel, J. S.; Langford, A. O.; Quinn, P. K.; Lebel, P. J.; Vay, S. A.; Roberts, P. D.; Norton, R. B.

    1992-01-01

    Results obtained from five techniques for measuring gas-phase ammonia at low concentration in the atmosphere are compared. These methods are: (1) a photofragmentation/laser-induced fluorescence (PF/LIF) instrument; (2) a molybdenum oxide annular denuder sampling/chemiluminescence detection technique; (3) a tungsten oxide denuder sampling/chemiluminescence detection system; (4) a citric-acid-coated denuder sampling/ion chromatographic analysis (CAD/IC) method; and (5) an oxalic-acid-coated filter pack sampling/colorimetric analysis method. It was found that two of the techniques, the PF/LIF and the CAD/IC methods, measured approximately 90 percent of the calculated ammonia added in the spiking tests and agreed very well with each other in the ambient measurements.

  16. An intercomparison of five ammonia measurement techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, E. J.; Sandholm, S. T.; Bradshaw, J. D.; Schendel, J. S.; Langford, A. O.; Quinn, P. K.; Lebel, P. J.; Vay, S. A.; Roberts, P. D.; Norton, R. B.

    1992-01-01

    Results obtained from five techniques for measuring gas-phase ammonia at low concentration in the atmosphere are compared. These methods are: (1) a photofragmentation/laser-induced fluorescence (PF/LIF) instrument; (2) a molybdenum oxide annular denuder sampling/chemiluminescence detection technique; (3) a tungsten oxide denuder sampling/chemiluminescence detection system; (4) a citric-acid-coated denuder sampling/ion chromatographic analysis (CAD/IC) method; and (5) an oxalic-acid-coated filter pack sampling/colorimetric analysis method. It was found that two of the techniques, the PF/LIF and the CAD/IC methods, measured approximately 90 percent of the calculated ammonia added in the spiking tests and agreed very well with each other in the ambient measurements.

  17. Optically pumped isotopic ammonia laser system

    DOEpatents

    Buchwald, Melvin I.; Jones, Claude R.; Nelson, Leonard Y.

    1982-01-01

    An optically pumped isotopic ammonia laser system which is capable of producing a plurality of frequencies in the middle infrared spectral region. Two optical pumping mechanisms are disclosed, i.e., pumping on R(J) and lasing on P(J) in response to enhancement of rotational cascade lasing including stimulated Raman effects, and, pumping on R(J) and lasing on P(J+2). The disclosed apparatus for optical pumping include a hole coupled cavity and a grating coupled cavity.

  18. Ammonia Optical Sensing by Microring Resonators.

    PubMed

    Passaro, Vittorio M N; Dell'Olio, Francesco; De Leonardis, Francesco

    2007-11-15

    A very compact (device area around 40 μm²) optical ammonia sensor based on amicroring resonator is presented in this work. Silicon-on-insulator technology is used insensor design and a dye doped polymer is adopted as sensing material. The sensor exhibitsa very good linearity and a minimum detectable refractive index shift of sensing materialas low as 8x10(-5), with a detection limit around 4 ‰.

  19. Ammonia Optical Sensing by Microring Resonators

    PubMed Central

    Passaro, Vittorio M. N.; Dell'Olio, Francesco; De Leonardis, Francesco

    2007-01-01

    A very compact (device area around 40 μm2) optical ammonia sensor based on a microring resonator is presented in this work. Silicon-on-insulator technology is used in sensor design and a dye doped polymer is adopted as sensing material. The sensor exhibits a very good linearity and a minimum detectable refractive index shift of sensing material as low as 8×10-5, with a detection limit around 4 ‰. PMID:28903258

  20. Dynamics of dissociative electron attachment to ammonia

    SciTech Connect

    Rescigno, T. N.; Trevisan, C. S.; Orel, A. E.; Slaughter, D. S.; Adaniya, H.; Belkacem, A.; Weyland, Marvin; Dorn, Alexander; McCurdy, C. W.

    2016-05-12

    We present that ab initio theoretical studies and momentum-imaging experiments are combined to provide a consistent picture of the dynamics of dissociative electron attachment to ammonia through its 5.5- and 10.5-eV resonance channels. The present study clarifies the character and symmetry of the anion states involved and the dynamics that leads to the observed fragment-ion channels, their branching ratios, and angular distributions.

  1. Niche specialization of terrestrial archaeal ammonia oxidizers.

    PubMed

    Gubry-Rangin, Cécile; Hai, Brigitte; Quince, Christopher; Engel, Marion; Thomson, Bruce C; James, Phillip; Schloter, Michael; Griffiths, Robert I; Prosser, James I; Nicol, Graeme W

    2011-12-27

    Soil pH is a major determinant of microbial ecosystem processes and potentially a major driver of evolution, adaptation, and diversity of ammonia oxidizers, which control soil nitrification. Archaea are major components of soil microbial communities and contribute significantly to ammonia oxidation in some soils. To determine whether pH drives evolutionary adaptation and community structure of soil archaeal ammonia oxidizers, sequences of amoA, a key functional gene of ammonia oxidation, were examined in soils at global, regional, and local scales. Globally distributed database sequences clustered into 18 well-supported phylogenetic lineages that dominated specific soil pH ranges classified as acidic (pH <5), acido-neutral (5 ≤ pH <7), or alkalinophilic (pH ≥ 7). To determine whether patterns were reproduced at regional and local scales, amoA gene fragments were amplified from DNA extracted from 47 soils in the United Kingdom (pH 3.5-8.7), including a pH-gradient formed by seven soils at a single site (pH 4.5-7.5). High-throughput sequencing and analysis of amoA gene fragments identified an additional, previously undiscovered phylogenetic lineage and revealed similar pH-associated distribution patterns at global, regional, and local scales, which were most evident for the five most abundant clusters. Archaeal amoA abundance and diversity increased with soil pH, which was the only physicochemical characteristic measured that significantly influenced community structure. These results suggest evolution based on specific adaptations to soil pH and niche specialization, resulting in a global distribution of archaeal lineages that have important consequences for soil ecosystem function and nitrogen cycling.

  2. Ammonia in breath and emitted from skin.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, F M; Vaittinen, O; Metsälä, M; Lehto, M; Forsblom, C; Groop, P-H; Halonen, L

    2013-03-01

    Ammonia concentrations in exhaled breath (eNH3) and skin gas of 20 healthy subjects were measured on-line with a commercial cavity ring-down spectrometer and compared to saliva pH and plasma ammonium ion (NH(+)4), urea and creatinine concentrations. Special attention was given to mouth, nose and skin sampling procedures and the accurate quantification of ammonia in humid gas samples. The obtained median concentrations were 688 parts per billion by volume (ppbv) for mouth-eNH3, 34 ppbv for nose-eNH3, and 21 ppbv for both mouth- and nose-eNH3 after an acidic mouth wash (MW). The median ammonia emission rate from the lower forearm was 0.3 ng cm(-2) min(-1). Statistically significant (p < 0.05) correlations between the breath, skin and plasma ammonia/ammonium concentrations were not found. However, mouth-eNH3 strongly (p < 0.001) correlated with saliva pH. This dependence was also observed in detailed measurements of the diurnal variation and the response of eNH3 to the acidic MW. It is concluded that eNH3 as such does not reflect plasma but saliva and airway mucus NH(+)4 concentrations and is affected by saliva and airway mucus pH. After normalization with saliva pH using the Henderson-Hasselbalch equation, mouth-eNH3 correlated with plasma NH(+)4, which points to saliva and plasma NH(+)4 being linked via hydrolysis of salivary urea.

  3. Dynamics of dissociative electron attachment to ammonia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rescigno, T. N.; Trevisan, C. S.; Orel, A. E.; Slaughter, D. S.; Adaniya, H.; Belkacem, A.; Weyland, Marvin; Dorn, Alexander; McCurdy, C. W.

    2016-05-01

    Ab initio theoretical studies and momentum-imaging experiments are combined to provide a consistent picture of the dynamics of dissociative electron attachment to ammonia through its 5.5- and 10.5-eV resonance channels. The present study clarifies the character and symmetry of the anion states involved and the dynamics that leads to the observed fragment-ion channels, their branching ratios, and angular distributions.

  4. Dynamics of dissociative electron attachment to ammonia

    DOE PAGES

    Rescigno, T. N.; Trevisan, C. S.; Orel, A. E.; ...

    2016-05-12

    We present that ab initio theoretical studies and momentum-imaging experiments are combined to provide a consistent picture of the dynamics of dissociative electron attachment to ammonia through its 5.5- and 10.5-eV resonance channels. The present study clarifies the character and symmetry of the anion states involved and the dynamics that leads to the observed fragment-ion channels, their branching ratios, and angular distributions.

  5. Diverse microbial species survive high ammonia concentrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelly, Laura C.; Cockell, Charles S.; Summers, Stephen

    2012-04-01

    Planetary protection regulations are in place to control the contamination of planets and moons with terrestrial micro-organisms in order to avoid jeopardizing future scientific investigations relating to the search for life. One environmental chemical factor of relevance in extraterrestrial environments, specifically in the moons of the outer solar system, is ammonia (NH3). Ammonia is known to be highly toxic to micro-organisms and may disrupt proton motive force, interfere with cellular redox reactions or cause an increase of cell pH. To test the survival potential of terrestrial micro-organisms exposed to such cold, ammonia-rich environments, and to judge whether current planetary protection regulations are sufficient, soil samples were exposed to concentrations of NH3 from 5 to 35% (v/v) at -80°C and room temperature for periods up to 11 months. Following exposure to 35% NH3, diverse spore-forming taxa survived, including representatives of the Firmicutes (Bacillus, Sporosarcina, Viridibacillus, Paenibacillus, Staphylococcus and Brevibacillus) and Actinobacteria (Streptomyces). Non-spore forming organisms also survived, including Proteobacteria (Pseudomonas) and Actinobacteria (Arthrobacter) that are known to have environmentally resistant resting states. Clostridium spp. were isolated from the exposed soil under anaerobic culture. High NH3 was shown to cause a reduction in viability of spores over time, but spore morphology was not visibly altered. In addition to its implications for planetary protection, these data show that a large number of bacteria, potentially including spore-forming pathogens, but also environmentally resistant non-spore-formers, can survive high ammonia concentrations.

  6. Ammonia emissions in Europe, part II: How ammonia emission abatement strategies affect secondary aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Backes, Anna M.; Aulinger, Armin; Bieser, Johannes; Matthias, Volker; Quante, Markus

    2016-02-01

    In central Europe, ammonium sulphate and ammonium nitrate make up a large fraction of fine particles which pose a threat to human health. Most studies on air pollution through particulate matter investigate the influence of emission reductions of sulphur- and nitrogen oxides on aerosol concentration. Here, we focus on the influence of ammonia (NH3) emissions. Emission scenarios have been created on the basis of the improved ammonia emission parameterization implemented in the SMOKE for Europe and CMAQ model systems described in part I of this study. This includes emissions based on future European legislation (the National Emission Ceilings) as well as a dynamic evaluation of the influence of different agricultural sectors (e.g. animal husbandry) on particle formation. The study compares the concentrations of NH3, NH4+, NO3 -, sulphur compounds and the total concentration of particles in winter and summer for a political-, technical- and behavioural scenario. It was found that a reduction of ammonia emissions by 50% lead to a 24% reduction of the total PM2.5 concentrations in northwest Europe. The observed reduction was mainly driven by reduced formation of ammonium nitrate. Moreover, emission reductions during winter had a larger impact than during the rest of the year. This leads to the conclusion that a reduction of the ammonia emissions from the agricultural sector related to animal husbandry could be more efficient than the reduction from other sectors due to its larger share in winter ammonia emissions.

  7. Bacterial Ammonia Causes Significant Plant Growth Inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Weise, Teresa; Kai, Marco; Piechulla, Birgit

    2013-01-01

    Many and complex plant-bacteria inter-relationships are found in the rhizosphere, since plants release a variety of photosynthetic exudates from their roots and rhizobacteria produce multifaceted specialized compounds including rich mixtures of volatiles, e.g., the bouquet of Serratia odorifera 4Rx13 is composed of up to 100 volatile organic and inorganic compounds. Here we show that when growing on peptone-rich nutrient medium S. odorifera 4Rx13 and six other rhizobacteria emit high levels of ammonia, which during co-cultivation in compartmented Petri dishes caused alkalization of the neighboring plant medium and subsequently reduced the growth of A. thaliana. It is argued that in nature high-protein resource degradations (carcasses, whey, manure and compost) are also accompanied by bacterial ammonia emission which alters the pH of the rhizosphere and thereby influences organismal diversity and plant-microbe interactions. Consequently, bacterial ammonia emission may be more relevant for plant colonization and growth development than previously thought. PMID:23691060

  8. Ammonia transfer across rotating joints in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Warner, Mark H.

    1988-01-01

    Thermal control of future large space facilities, such as the space station, will require the transfer of anhydrous ammonia across rotating joints with near zero leakage. Anhydrous ammonia is the primary heat transfer fluid aboard the station, providing critical thermal management of habitat and payload systems. The solar radiator joints, as well as the various payload pointing systems, are obvious examples of the need for a reliable fluid transfer device. Low weight, tight temperature control, low parasitic drag torque, long life, and high reliability, in addition to near zero leakage, are important characteristics necessary for the successful operation of such a device. In late 1986, Lockheed initiated a project to develop a Rotary Transfer Coupling (RTC) directed toward space station requirements. Fabrication and assembly of this device is now complete and testing is scheduled. The design and development of the face seal-type rotary fluid coupling that utilizes a unique cover gas concept (an inert gas such as nitrogen) to provide full containment of the ammonia was addressed.

  9. IRIS Toxicological Review of Ammonia Noncancer Inhalation ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    In September 2016, EPA finalized the IRIS assessment of Ammonia (Noncancer Inhalation). The Toxicological Review was reviewed internally by EPA and by other federal agencies and White House Offices before public release in June 2016. Consistent with the May 2009 IRIS assessment development process, all written comments on IRIS assessments submitted by other federal agencies and White House Offices are made publicly available. Accordingly, interagency comments and the interagency science discussion materials provided to other agencies, including interagency review drafts of the IRIS Toxicological Review of Ammonia (Noncancer Inhalation) are posted on this site. Note: No major science comments were received on the Interagency Science Discussion Draft. EPA is undertaking an Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS) health assessment for ammonia. IRIS is an EPA database containing Agency scientific positions on potential adverse human health effects that may result from chronic (or lifetime) exposure to chemicals in the environment. IRIS contains chemical-specific summaries of qualitative and quantitative health information in support of two steps of the risk assessment paradigm, i.e., hazard identification and dose-response evaluation. IRIS assessments are used in combination with specific situational exposure assessment information to evaluate potential public health risk associated with environmental contaminants.

  10. IRIS Toxicological Review of Ammonia (Interagency Science ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    On June 1, 2012, the draft Toxicological Review of Ammonia and the draft charge to external peer reviewers were released for external peer review and public comment. The Toxicological Review and charge were reviewed internally by EPA and by other federal agencies and White House Offices before public release. Consistent with the May 2009 IRIS assessment development process, all written comments on IRIS assessments submitted by other federal agencies and White House Offices are made publicly available. Accordingly, interagency comments and the interagency science consultation materials provided to other agencies, including interagency review drafts of the IRIS Toxicological Review of Ammonia and the charge to external peer reviewers, are posted on this site. EPA is undertaking an Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS) health assessment for ammonia. IRIS is an EPA database containing Agency scientific positions on potential adverse human health effects that may result from chronic (or lifetime) exposure to chemicals in the environment. IRIS contains chemical-specific summaries of qualitative and quantitative health information in support of two steps of the risk assessment paradigm, i.e., hazard identification and dose-response evaluation. IRIS assessments are used in combination with specific situational exposure assessment information to evaluate potential public health risk associated with environmental contaminants.

  11. Methylamine and ammonia transport in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed Central

    Roon, R J; Even, H L; Dunlop, P; Larimore, F L

    1975-01-01

    Methylamine (methylammonium ion) entered Saccharomyces cerevisiae X2180-A by means of a specific active transport system. Methylamine uptake was pH dependent (maximum rate between pH 6.0 and 6.5) and temperature dependent (increasing up to 35 C) and required the presence of a fermentable or oxidizable energy source in the growth medium. At 23 C the vmax for methylamine transport was similar 17 nmol/min per mg of cells (dry weight) and the apparent Km was 220 muM. The transport system exhibited maximal activity in ammonia-grown cells and was repressed 60 to 70 percent when glutamine or asparagine was added to the growth medium. There was no significant derepression of the transport system during nitrogen starvation. Ammonia (ammonium ion) was a strong competitive inhibitor of methylamine uptake, whereas other amines inhibited to a much lesser extent. Mutants selected on the basis of their reduced ability to transport methylamine (Mea-R) simultaneously exhibited a decreased ability to transport ammonia. PMID:236281

  12. Renewable Reagent Fiber Optic Based Ammonia Sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berman, Richard J.; Burgess, Lloyd W.

    1990-02-01

    Many fiber optic based chemical sensors have been described which rely on a reagent chemistry fixed at the fiber endface to provide analyte specificity. In such systems, problems involving probe-to-probe reproducibility, reagent photolability and reagent leaching are frequently encountered. As a result, calibration and standardization of these sensors becomes difficult or impossible and thus inhibits their application for long term in situ chemical monitoring. Many of these problems can be addressed and several additional advantages gained by continuously renewing the reagent chemistry. To illustrate this concept, a fiber optic ammonia sensor is described in which the reagent is delivered under direct control to a sensing volume of approximately 400 nanoliters located at the probe tip. Using an acid-base indicator (bromothymol blue) as the reagent, the sample ammonia concentrations are related to modulations in light intensity with a lower limit of detection of 10 ppb. The sensor performance was studied with respect to reagent pH, concentration and reagent delivery rate. Compared with previous fiber optic ammonia sensors, the ability to reproducibly renew the reagent has resulted in improvements with respect to response and return times, probe-to-probe reproducibility, probe lifetime and flexibility of use.

  13. Ammonia sanitisation of sewage sludge using urea.

    PubMed

    Fidjeland, Jørgen; Lalander, Cecilia; Jönsson, Håkan; Vinnerås, Björn

    2013-01-01

    The aim of the study was to develop a simple, low-cost treatment for sewage sludge using urea as a sanitising agent. Sewage sludge was spiked with Enterococcus faecalis and Salmonella typhimurium, treated with 0.5, 1, 1.5 and 2% w/w urea at laboratory scale, and the viability was monitored during 4 months of storage at 4, 10 and 22 °C (only 0.5%). A linear relationship was identified between Salmonella spp. inactivation rate and ammonia (NH3) concentration. Temperature had a positive impact on Salmonella spp. inactivation at higher temperatures, but in the range 4-10 °C temperature influenced this inactivation merely by its impact on the ammonia equilibrium. Enterococcus spp. was more persistent and a lag phase of up to 11 weeks was observed. Higher temperature and ammonia concentration reduced the lag phase duration significantly, and also had a clear effect on the inactivation rate for the treatments with 0.5% urea at 22 °C and 2% urea at 4 and 10 °C. Urea sanitisation of sewage sludge can give a 2 log10 reduction of Enterococcus spp. and more than a 5 log10 reduction of Salmonella spp. within 6 weeks with either 0.5% w/w urea at 22 °C or 2% urea at 10 °C.

  14. Ammonia fiber explosion treatment of corn stover.

    PubMed

    Teymouri, Farzaneh; Laureano-Pérez, Lizbeth; Alizadeh, Hasan; Dale, Bruce E

    2004-01-01

    Optimizing process conditions and parameters such as ammonia loading, moisture content of biomass, temperature, and residence time is necessary for maximum effectiveness of the ammonia fiber explosion process. Approximate optimal pretreatment conditions for corn stover were found to be temperature of 90 degrees C, ammonia:dry corn stover mass ratio of 1:1, moisture content of corn stover of 60% (dry weight basis), and residence time (holding at target temperature), of 5 min. Approximately 98% of the theoretical glucose yield was obtained during enzymatic hydrolysis of the optimal treated corn stover using 60 filter paper units (FPU) of cellulase enzyme/g of glucan (equal to 22 FPU/g of dry corn stover). The ethanol yield from this sample was increased up to 2.2 times over that of untreated sample. Lowering enzyme loading to 15 and 7.5 FPU/g of glucan did not significantly affect the glucose yield compared with 60 FPU, and any differences between effects at different enzyme levels decreased as the treatment temperature increased.

  15. Renal dysfunction in cirrhosis

    PubMed Central

    Urrunaga, Nathalie H.; Mindikoglu, Ayse L.; Rockey, Don C.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose of review Renal dysfunction causes significant morbidity in cirrhotic patients. Diagnosis is challenging because it is based on serum creatinine, which is used to calculate estimated glomerular filtration rate, which itself is not an ideal measure of renal function in patients with cirrhosis. Finding the exact cause of renal injury in patients with cirrhosis remains problematic due to the limitations of the current diagnostic tests. The purpose of this review is to highlight studies used to diagnose renal dysfunction in patients with renal dysfunction and review current treatments. Recent findings New diagnostic criteria and classification of renal dysfunction, especially for acute kidney injury (AKI), have been proposed in hopes of optimizing treatment and improving outcomes. New biomarkers that help to differentiate structural from functional AKI in cirrhotic patients have been developed, but require further investigation. Vasoconstrictors are the most commonly recommended treatment of hepatorenal syndrome (HRS). Given the high mortality in patients with type 1 HRS, all patients with HRS should be evaluated for liver transplantation. When renal dysfunction is considered irreversible, combined liver–kidney transplantation is advised. Summary Development of new biomarkers to differentiate the different types of AKI in cirrhosis holds promise. Early intervention in cirrhotic patients with renal dysfunction offers the best hope of improving outcomes. PMID:25763790

  16. [Hemorrhagic bilateral renal angiomyolipoma].

    PubMed

    Benjelloun, Mohamed; Rabii, Redouane; Mezzour, Mohamed Hicham; Joual, Abdenbi; Bennani, Saâd; el Mrini, Mohamed

    2003-09-01

    Renal angiomyolipoma is a rare benign tumour, often associated with congenital diseases especially de Bourneville's tuberous sclerosis. Bilateral angiomyolipoma is exceptional. The authors report a case of bilateral renal angiomyolipoma in a 33-year-old patient presenting with haemorrhagic shock. In the light of this case and a review of the literature, the authors discuss the diagnostic and therapeutic aspects of this disease.

  17. Renal osteodystrophy and aging.

    PubMed

    Sherrard, Donald J

    2009-11-01

    The bone disease seen in our aging dialysis population is a complex mixture of osteoporosis and renal osteodystrophy. Attention must be paid to both of these issues. Hip fractures are increased with aging and this increase is further aggravated by renal failure. Preventive management with Vitamin D and bisphosphonates is reviewed.

  18. Ammonia causes decreased brain monoamines in fathead minnows (Pimephales promelas)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ronan, Patrick J.; Gaikowski, Mark P.; Hamilton, Steven J.; Buhl, Kevin J.; Summers, Cliff H.

    2007-01-01

    Hyperammonemia, arising from variety of disorders, leads to severe neurological dysfunction. The mechanisms of ammonia toxicity in brain are not completely understood. This study investigated the effects of ammonia on monoaminergic systems in brains of fathead minnows (Pimephales promelas). Fish serve as a good model system to investigate hyperammonemic effects on brain function since no liver manipulations are necessary to increase endogenous ammonia concentrations. Using high performance liquid chromatography with electrochemical detection, monoamines and some associated metabolites were measured from whole brain homogenate. Adult males were exposed for 48 h to six different concentrations of ammonia (0.01–2.36 mg/l unionized) which bracketed the 96-h LC50 for this species. Ammonia concentration-dependent decreases were found for the catecholamines (norepinephrine and dopamine) and the indoleamine serotonin (5-HT). After an initial increase in the 5-HT precursor 5-hydroxytryptophan it too decreased with increasing ammonia concentrations. There were also significant increases in the 5-HIAA/5-HT and DOPAC/DA ratios, often used as measures of turnover. There were no changes in epinephrine (Epi) or monoamine catabolites (DOPAC, 5-HIAA) at any ammonia concentrations tested. Results suggest that ammonia causes decreased synthesis while also causing increased release and degradation. Increased release may underlie behavioral reactions to ammonia exposure in fish. This study adds weight to a growing body of evidence demonstrating that ammonia leads to dysfunctional monoaminergic systems in brain which may underlie neurological symptoms associated with human disorders such as hepatic encephalopathy.

  19. Ammonia and nitrite oxidation in the Eastern Tropical North Pacific

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Xuefeng; Fuchsman, Clara A.; Jayakumar, Amal; Oleynik, Sergey; Martens-Habbena, Willm; Devol, Allan H.; Ward, Bess B.

    2015-12-01

    Nitrification plays a key role in the marine nitrogen (N) cycle, including in oceanic oxygen minimum zones (OMZs), which are hot spots for denitrification and anaerobic ammonia oxidation (anammox). Recent evidence suggests that nitrification links the source (remineralized organic matter) and sink (denitrification and anammox) of fixed N directly in the steep oxycline in the OMZs. We performed shipboard incubations with 15N tracers to characterize the depth distribution of nitrification in the Eastern Tropical North Pacific (ETNP). Additional experiments were conducted to investigate photoinhibition. Allylthiourea (ATU) was used to distinguish the contribution of archaeal and bacterial ammonia oxidation. The abundance of archaeal and β-proteobacterial ammonia monooxygenase gene subunit A (amoA) was determined by quantitative polymerase chain reaction. The rates of ammonia and nitrite oxidation showed distinct subsurface maxima, with the latter slightly deeper than the former. The ammonia oxidation maximum coincided with the primary nitrite concentration maximum, archaeal amoA gene maximum, and the subsurface nitrous oxide maximum. Negligible rates of ammonia oxidation were found at anoxic depths, where high rates of nitrite oxidation were measured. Archaeal amoA gene abundance was generally 1 to 2 orders of magnitude higher than bacterial amoA gene abundance, and inhibition of ammonia-oxidizing bacteria with 10 μM ATU did not affect ammonia oxidation rates, indicating the dominance of archaea in ammonia oxidation. These results depict highly dynamic activities of ammonia and nitrite oxidation in the oxycline of the ETNP OMZ.

  20. Peripheral Ammonia as a Mediator of Methamphetamine Neurotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Halpin, Laura E.; Yamamoto, Bryan K.

    2012-01-01

    Ammonia is metabolized by the liver and has established neurological effects. The current study examined the possibility that ammonia contributes to the neurotoxic effects of methamphetamine (METH). The results show that a binge dosing regimen of METH to the rat increased plasma and brain ammonia concentrations that were paralleled by evidence of hepatotoxicity. The role of peripheral ammonia in the neurotoxic effects of METH was further substantiated by the demonstration that the enhancement of peripheral ammonia excretion blocked the increases in brain and plasma ammonia and attenuated the long term depletions of dopamine and serotonin typically produced by METH. Conversely, the localized perfusion of ammonia in combination with METH, but not METH alone or ammonia alone, into the striatum recapitulated the neuronal damage produced by the systemic administration of METH. Furthermore, this damage produced by the local administration of ammonia and METH was blocked by the GYKI 52466, an AMPA receptor antagonist. These findings highlight the importance of ammonia derived from the periphery as a small molecule mediator of METH neurotoxicity and more broadly emphasize the importance of peripheral organ damage as a possible mechanism that mediates the neuropathology produced by drugs of abuse and other neuroactive molecules. PMID:22993432

  1. Treatment of ammonia contaminated water by ozone and hydrogen peroxide

    SciTech Connect

    Yuan, F.; Hill, D.O.; Kuo, C.H.

    1995-12-31

    The present research concerns kinetics of oxidation of ammonia by ozone and ozone-hydrogen peroxide mixtures in alkaline solutions. Experiments were carried out at 15 to 35{degrees}C in solutions with pH values varying from 8 to 10 utilizing a stopped-flow spectrophotometer system. Fractions of free ammonia present in acidic and neutral solutions are negligible, and the reaction is very slow. This confirms that only free ammonia can react with ozone in the aqueous phase. The reaction proceeds at moderate rates in the alkaline solutions requiring four moles of ozone to react with each mole of ammonia. The free ammonia is oxidized and converted completely to nitrate in the solutions. The overall reaction between ammonia and ozone is second order with first order in each reactant. The reaction rate constant increases with temperature and pH value of the solution. The average activation energy is 59 Kcal/gmol for all systems investigated at different pH values. The results of the kinetic experiments suggest that the reaction is predominated by the direct oxidation between ammonia and ozone molecules, and that the hydroxyl radical reactions play insignificant roles in the ozonation process. The oxidation rate of ammonia is enhanced considerably in the presence of hydrogen peroxide and ozone mixtures. The formation of hydroxyl radical from interactions between ozone and hydrogen peroxide and the subsequent free radical reactions of ammonia seem important in controlling the destruction rate of free ammonia, as suggested by the results of this study.

  2. Peripheral ammonia as a mediator of methamphetamine neurotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Halpin, Laura E; Yamamoto, Bryan K

    2012-09-19

    Ammonia is metabolized by the liver and has established neurological effects. The current study examined the possibility that ammonia contributes to the neurotoxic effects of methamphetamine (METH). The results show that a binge dosing regimen of METH to the rat increased plasma and brain ammonia concentrations that were paralleled by evidence of hepatotoxicity. The role of peripheral ammonia in the neurotoxic effects of METH was further substantiated by the demonstration that the enhancement of peripheral ammonia excretion blocked the increases in brain and plasma ammonia and attenuated the long-term depletions of dopamine and serotonin typically produced by METH. Conversely, the localized perfusion of ammonia in combination with METH, but not METH alone or ammonia alone, into the striatum recapitulated the neuronal damage produced by the systemic administration of METH. Furthermore, this damage produced by the local administration of ammonia and METH was blocked by the GYKI 52466 [4-(8-methyl-9H-1,3-dioxolo[4,5-h][2,3]benzodiazepin-5-yl)-benzamine hydrochloride], an AMPA receptor antagonist. These findings highlight the importance of ammonia derived from the periphery as a small-molecule mediator of METH neurotoxicity and more broadly emphasize the importance of peripheral organ damage as a possible mechanism that mediates the neuropathology produced by drugs of abuse and other neuroactive molecules.

  3. Atheroembolic renal disease.

    PubMed

    Scolari, Francesco; Ravani, Pietro

    2010-05-08

    Atheroembolic renal disease develops when atheromatous aortic plaques rupture, releasing cholesterol crystals into the small renal arteries. Embolisation often affects other organs, such as the skin, gastrointestinal system, and brain. Although the disease can develop spontaneously, it usually develops after vascular surgery, catheterisation, or anticoagulation. The systemic nature of atheroembolism makes diagnosis difficult. The classic triad of a precipitating event, acute or subacute renal failure, and skin lesions, are strongly suggestive of the disorder. Eosinophilia further supports the diagnosis, usually confirmed by biopsy of an affected organ or by the fundoscopic finding of cholesterol crystals in the retinal circulation. Renal and patient prognosis are poor. Treatment is mostly preventive, based on avoidance of further precipitating factors, and symptomatic, aimed to the optimum treatment of hypertension and cardiac and renal failure. Statins, which stabilise atherosclerotic plaques, should be offered to all patients. Steroids might have a role in acute or subacute progressive forms with systemic inflammation.

  4. Renal angiomyoadenomatous tumour.

    PubMed

    Jayalakshmy, P S; Jose, Merin; Feroze, M; Kumar, Rajesh K

    2017-09-01

    Renal angiomyoadenomatous tumour is a newly described rare neoplasm. This tumour is characterised microscopically by admixture of three components- epithelial cells arranged in tubules and nests, angiomyomatous stroma and capillary sized interconnecting vascular channels in close association with the epithelial cell clusters. Microscopically it has wide range of differential diagnoses which include mixed epithelial and stromal tumour of kidney, angiomyolipoma and clear cell renal cell carcinoma with angiomyolipomatous/angiomyoadenomatous areas. Renal angiomyoadenomatous tumour should be differentiated from these tumours. Till now, only 10 cases have been reported in English medical literature. Here, we are reporting a case of renal angiomyoadenomatous tumour in a 29 year- old female patient who presented with hematuria and low backache and describing its main features so as to differentiate this entity from other renal tumours. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first case to be reported from India.

  5. [Sarcoidosis : Renal manifestations].

    PubMed

    Löffler, C; Bergner, R

    2017-04-12

    Renal involvement in sarcoidosis is much more common than generally assumed from old epidemiological studies and is often only detected when actively searched for. Many patients with renal sarcoidosis present with no or only few symptoms. The diagnostic work-up of sarcoidosis should always include a possible renal involvement. In cases of impaired renal function, proteinuria or a pathological urine sediment, a renal biopsy specimen should be obtained to assess the type, severity and prognosis of the kidney disease. Treatment is primarily based on the use of corticosteroids. Steroid-sparing agents, such as disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs and infliximab can be applied; however, the evidence for efficacy of these therapies is mostly based on case series and expert opinions. Discontinuation of immunosuppression therapy bears a high risk of relapse.

  6. Impaired expression of key molecules of ammoniagenesis underlies renal acidosis in a rat model of chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Bürki, Remy; Mohebbi, Nilufar; Bettoni, Carla; Wang, Xueqi; Serra, Andreas L; Wagner, Carsten A

    2015-05-01

    Advanced chronic kidney disease (CKD) is associated with the development of renal metabolic acidosis. Metabolic acidosis per se may represent a trigger for progression of CKD. Renal acidosis of CKD is characterized by low urinary ammonium excretion with preserved urinary acidification indicating a defect in renal ammoniagenesis, ammonia excretion or both. The underlying molecular mechanisms, however, have not been addressed to date. We examined the Han:SPRD rat model and used a combination of metabolic studies, mRNA and protein analysis of renal molecules involved in acid-base handling. We demonstrate that rats with reduced kidney function as evident from lower creatinine clearance, lower haematocrit, higher plasma blood urea nitrogen, creatinine, phosphate and potassium had metabolic acidosis that could be aggravated by HCl acid loading. Urinary ammonium excretion was highly reduced whereas urinary pH was more acidic in CKD compared with control animals. The abundance of key enzymes and transporters of proximal tubular ammoniagenesis (phosphate-dependent glutaminase, PEPCK and SNAT3) and bicarbonate transport (NBCe1) was reduced in CKD compared with control animals. In the collecting duct, normal expression of the B1 H(+)-ATPase subunit is in agreement with low urinary pH. In contrast, the RhCG ammonia transporter, critical for the final secretion of ammonia into urine was strongly down-regulated in CKD animals. In the Han:SPRD rat model for CKD, key molecules required for renal ammoniagenesis and ammonia excretion are highly down-regulated providing a possible molecular explanation for the development and maintenance of renal acidosis in CKD patients. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of ERA-EDTA. All rights reserved.

  7. Maize phenylalanine ammonia-lyase has tyrosine ammonia-lyase activity.

    PubMed Central

    Rösler, J; Krekel, F; Amrhein, N; Schmid, J

    1997-01-01

    A full-length cDNA encoding phenylalanine ammonia-lyase (PAL) from Zea mays L. was isolated and the coding region was expressed in Escherichia coli as a C-terminal fusion to glutathione S-transferase. After purification by glutathione-Sepharose chromatography, the glutathione S-transferase moiety was cleaved off and the resulting PAL enzyme analyzed. In contrast to PAL from dicots, this maize PAL isozyme catalyzed the deamination of both L-phenylalanine (PAL activity) and L-tyrosine (tyrosine ammonia-lyase activity). These results provide unequivocal proof that PAL and tyrosine ammonia-lyase activities reside in the same polypeptide. In spite of large differences in the Michaelis constant and turnover number of the two activities, their catalytic efficiencies are very similar. Also, both activities have the same pH and temperature optima. These results imply that maize can produce p-coumaric acid from both phenylalanine and tyrosine. PMID:9008393

  8. Ammonia oxidation and ammonia-oxidizing bacteria and archaea from estuaries with differing histories of hypoxia.

    PubMed

    Caffrey, Jane M; Bano, Nasreen; Kalanetra, Karen; Hollibaugh, James T

    2007-11-01

    Nitrification, the oxidation of NH(4)(+) to NO(2)(-) and subsequently to NO(3)(-), plays a central role in the nitrogen cycle and is often a critical first step in nitrogen removal from estuarine and coastal environments. The first and rate-limiting step in nitrification is catalyzed by the enzyme ammonia monooxygenase (AmoA). We evaluate the relationships between the abundance of ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA) and ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) amoA genes; potential nitrification rates and environmental variables to identify factors influencing AOA abundance and nitrifier activity in estuarine sediments. Our results showed that potential nitrification rates increased as abundance of AOA amoA increased. In contrast, there was no relationship between potential nitrification rates and AOB amoA abundance. This suggests that AOA are significant in estuarine nitrogen cycling. Surprisingly, more of the variability in potential nitrification rates was predicted by salinity and pore water sulfide than by dissolved oxygen history.

  9. Sources and sinks for ammonia and nitrite on the early Earth and the reaction of nitrite with ammonia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Summers, D. P.

    1999-01-01

    An analysis of sources and sinks for ammonia and nitrite on the early Earth was conducted. Rates of formation and destruction, and steady state concentrations of both species were determined by steady state kinetics. The importance of the reaction of nitrite with ammonia on the feasibility of ammonia formation from nitrite was evaluated. The analysis considered conditions such as temperature, ferrous iron concentration, and pH. For sinks we considered the reduction of nitrite to ammonia, reaction between nitrite and ammonia, photochemical destruction of both species, and destruction at hydrothermal vents. Under most environmental conditions, the primary sink for nitrite is reduction to ammonia. The reaction between ammonia and nitrite is not an important sink for either nitrite or ammonia. Destruction at hydrothermal vents is important at acidic pH's and at low ferrous iron concentrations. Photochemical destruction, even in a worst case scenario, is unimportant under many conditions except possibly under acidic, low iron concentration, or low temperature conditions. The primary sink for ammonia is photochemical destruction in the atmosphere. Under acidic conditions, more of the ammonia is tied up as ammonium (reducing its vapor pressure and keeping it in solution) and hydrothermal destruction becomes more important.

  10. Sources and sinks for ammonia and nitrite on the early Earth and the reaction of nitrite with ammonia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Summers, D. P.

    1999-01-01

    An analysis of sources and sinks for ammonia and nitrite on the early Earth was conducted. Rates of formation and destruction, and steady state concentrations of both species were determined by steady state kinetics. The importance of the reaction of nitrite with ammonia on the feasibility of ammonia formation from nitrite was evaluated. The analysis considered conditions such as temperature, ferrous iron concentration, and pH. For sinks we considered the reduction of nitrite to ammonia, reaction between nitrite and ammonia, photochemical destruction of both species, and destruction at hydrothermal vents. Under most environmental conditions, the primary sink for nitrite is reduction to ammonia. The reaction between ammonia and nitrite is not an important sink for either nitrite or ammonia. Destruction at hydrothermal vents is important at acidic pH's and at low ferrous iron concentrations. Photochemical destruction, even in a worst case scenario, is unimportant under many conditions except possibly under acidic, low iron concentration, or low temperature conditions. The primary sink for ammonia is photochemical destruction in the atmosphere. Under acidic conditions, more of the ammonia is tied up as ammonium (reducing its vapor pressure and keeping it in solution) and hydrothermal destruction becomes more important.

  11. Preliminary data on the optical properties of solid ammonia and scattering parameters for ammonia cloud particles.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, F. W.

    1973-01-01

    The infrared absorption spectrum of solid ammonia is obtained from 2 to 125 microns as a composite of the published measurements. From this, the absorption coefficient and the complex refractive index are calculated as a function of frequency by integration of the Kramers-Kroenig dispersion relations. These data are used in a Mie theory analysis to obtain the basic parameters for scattering of long wavelength radiation by solid ammonia particles; this is believed to be an important process in radiative transfer within the atmospheres of the giant planets.

  12. Methods for reducing the ammonia in hybridoma cell cultures.

    PubMed

    Capiaumont, J; Legrand, C; Carbonell, D; Dousset, B; Belleville, F; Nabet, P

    1995-02-21

    The factors which limit the proliferation of eukaryotic cells in vitro are still not well known. Ammonia is believed to be toxic for mammalian cell proliferation and secretion. We have tried two approaches to reducing the ammonia in the medium. We first limited the ammonia produced by the cells by replacing glutamine by glutamate. Then, we used two chemical engineering methods to eliminate accumulated ammonia. In one the used medium was passed through a natural cation exchanger: the clinoptilolite. In the other, the culture medium was passed through a hydrophobic microporous hollow fiber module. Replacing the glutamine by glutamate reduced the medium ammonia concentration. The physicochemical removal of ammonia induced a better cell growth, but not a better specific antibody secretion.

  13. Ambient ammonia measurements using laser photo-acoustic spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aldridge, M. D., III; Copeland, G. E.; Harward, C. N.

    1981-01-01

    Ammonia concentrations reached minimal levels (approximately 0.1 ppb) in early winter, followed by a sudden later winter increase. A direct relationship between ambient ammonia levels and air temperature was inferred from the data (linear correlation coefficient r=0.53). Ammonia concentrations were determined to be directly related to the absolute humidity of the air (r=0.72); a weaker relationship between ammonia concentrations and relative humidity was discovered (r=0.37). The data also indicated that ammonia levels were generally higher within continental air masses than those of maritime origin. Soil parameters such as pH and moisture content were found to have a major bearing on the release of gaseous ammonia from soils in the region.

  14. Renal autotransplantation: current perspectives.

    PubMed

    Stewart, B H; Banowsky, L H; Hewitt, C B; Straffon, R A

    1977-09-01

    Autotransplantation, with or without an extracorporeal renal operation, has been done 39 times in 37 patients. Indications for the procedure included several ureteral injury in 4 patients, failed supravesical diversion in 2, renal carcinoma in a solitary kidney in 1, renovascular hypertension in 1 and donor arterial reconstruction before renal transplantation in 29. Success was obtained in all but 2 procedures, both of which involved previously operated kidneys with severe inflammation and adhesions involving the renal pelvis and pedicle. Based on our experience and a review of currently available literature we believe that renal autotransplantation and extracorporeal reconstruction can provide the best solution for patients with severe renovascular and ureteral disease not correctable by conventional operative techniques. The technique can be of particular value in removing centrally located tumors in solitary kidneys and in preparing donor kidneys with abnormal arteries for renal transplantation. The role of autotransplantation in the management of advanced renal trauma and calculus disease is less clear. A long-term comparison of patients treated by extracorporeal nephrolithotomy versus conventional lithotomy techniques will be necessary before a conclusion is reached in these disease categories.

  15. Renal autotransplantation: current perspectives.

    PubMed

    Stewart, B H; Banowsky, L H; Hewitt, C B; Straffon, R A

    1976-01-01

    Autotransplantation, with or without an extracorporeal renal operation, has been done 39 times in 37 patients. Indications for the procedure included severe ureteral injury in 4 patients, failed supravesical diversion in 2, renal carcinoma in a solitary kidney in 1, renovascular hypertension in 1 and donor arterial reconstruction before renal transplantation in 29. Success was obtained in all but 2 procedures, both of which involved previously operated kidneys with severe inflammation and adhesions involving the renal pelvis and pedicle. Based on our experience and a review of currently available literature we believe that renal autotransplantation and extracorporeal reconstruction can provide the best solution for patients with severe renovascular and ureteral disease not correctable by conventional operative techniques. The technique can be of particular value in removing centrally located tumors in solitary kidneys and in preparing donor kidneys with abnormal arteries for renal transplantation. The role of autotransplantation in the management of advanced renal trauma and calculus disease is less clear. A long-term comparison of patients treated by extracorporeal nephrolithotomy versus conventional lithotomy techniques will be necessary before a conclusion is reached in these disease categories.

  16. Exhaled breath volatile organic and inorganic compound composition in end-stage renal disease.

    PubMed

    Schönermarck, Ulf; Dengler, Christina; Gmeinwieser, Annegret; Praun, Siegfried; Schelling, Gustav; Fischereder, Michael; Boulesteix, Anne-Laure; Dolch, Michael E

    2016-09-01

    Patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) are characterized by uremia and increased oxidative stress. The aim of this study was to investigate the influence of hemodialysis on breath ammonia and volatile oxidative stress parameters. Breath analysis was performed in 18 ESRD patients prior, during, and 30 minutes after a hemodialysis session. Parameters of hemodialysis efficiency and oxidative stress (lipid peroxides, total antioxidative capacity, myeloperoxidase, and malondialdehyde) were measured in blood at the beginning, after 30 minutes, and at the end of the dialysis session. 11 healthy volunteers with normal renal function served as a control group. Ion-molecule reaction mass spectrometry was used for breath-gas analysis. Initial elevated concentrations of breath ammonia decreased during hemodialysis and correlated with serum urea levels (r2 = 0.74), whereas isoprene concentrations increased. Breath concentrations of malondialdehyde and pentane (MDA-P) were significantly elevated in ESRD patients (p < 0.01). Within the blood, a significant decrease of malondialdehyde was notable during hemodialysis treatment, whereas levels of lipid peroxides and myeloperoxidase increased. Exhaled breath of patients with ESRD on regular hemodialysis treatment is characterized by an increase in ammonia and MDA-P. The efficient decrease of breath ammonia and its close correlation to serum urea during hemodialysis suggests its possible use as a noninvasive marker to monitor dialysis efficacy.

  17. Clinoptilolite as an ammonia binder in pig slurry.

    PubMed

    Janssens, G P; Debal, V; Hesta, M; Millet, S; De Wilde, R O

    2001-01-01

    Six gilts and six barrows are used in a 2 x 2 experiment with two phase feeding versus multiphase feeding and celite addition versus clinoptilolite addition. Nitrogen and ammonia concentration in the slurry on dry matter basis was reduced by 30% and 35% respectively by multiphase feeding, together with a decreased ratio of ammonia over nitrogen. Ammonia fixation in pig slurry by clinoptilolite increased from 21% after 14 days of supplementation upto 35% at 8 weeks after the supplementation period.

  18. Stable Isotope Probing Analysis of Interactions between Ammonia Oxidizers▿

    PubMed Central

    Tourna, Maria; Freitag, Thomas E.; Prosser, James I.

    2010-01-01

    The response of natural microbial communities to environmental change can be assessed by determining DNA- or RNA-targeted changes in relative abundance of 16S rRNA gene sequences by using fingerprinting techniques such as denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DNA-DGGE and RNA-DGGE, respectively) or by stable isotope probing (SIP) of 16S rRNA genes following incubation with a 13C-labeled substrate (DNA-SIP-DGGE). The sensitivities of these three approaches were compared during batch growth of communities containing two or three Nitrosospira pure or enriched cultures with different tolerances to a high ammonia concentration. Cultures were supplied with low, intermediate, or high initial ammonia concentrations and with 13C-labeled carbon dioxide. DNA-SIP-DGGE provided the most direct evidence for growth and was the most sensitive, with changes in DGGE profiles evident before changes in DNA- and RNA-DGGE profiles and before detectable increases in nitrite and nitrate production. RNA-DGGE provided intermediate sensitivity. In addition, the three molecular methods were used to follow growth of individual strains within communities. In general, changes in relative activities of individual strains within communities could be predicted from monoculture growth characteristics. Ammonia-tolerant Nitrosospira cluster 3b strains dominated mixed communities at all ammonia concentrations, and ammonia-sensitive strains were outcompeted at an intermediate ammonia concentration. However, coexistence of ammonia-tolerant and ammonia-sensitive strains occurred at the lowest ammonia concentration, and, under some conditions, strains inhibited at high ammonia in monoculture were active at high ammonia in mixed cultures, where they coexisted with ammonia-tolerant strains. The results therefore demonstrate the sensitivity of SIP for detection of activity of organisms with relatively low yield and low activity and its ability to follow changes in the structure of interacting microbial

  19. Procedures for the synthesis of ethylenediamine bisborane and ammonia borane

    DOEpatents

    Ramachandran, Padi Veeraraghavan; Gagare, Pravin D.; Mistry, Hitesh; Biswas, Bidyut

    2017-01-03

    A method for synthesizing ammonia borane includes (a) preparing a reaction mixture in one or more solvents, the reaction mixture containing sodium borohydride, at least one ammonium salt, and ammonia; and (b) incubating the reaction mixture at temperatures between about 0.degree. C. to about room temperature in an ambient air environment under conditions sufficient to form ammonia borane. Methods for synthesizing ethylenediamine bisborane, and methods for dehydrogenation of ethylenediamine bisborane are also described.

  20. Process model for ammonia volatilization from anaerobic swine lagoons incorporating varying wind speeds and biogas bubbling

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Ammonia volatilization from treatment lagoons varies widely with the total ammonia concentration, pH, temperature, suspended solids, atmospheric ammonia concentration above the water surface, and wind speed. Ammonia emissions were estimated with a process-based mechanistic model integrating ammonia ...

  1. 46 CFR 98.25-5 - How anhydrous ammonia may be carried.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false How anhydrous ammonia may be carried. 98.25-5 Section 98... Anhydrous Ammonia in Bulk § 98.25-5 How anhydrous ammonia may be carried. (a) Anhydrous ammonia shall be..., except as otherwise provided in paragraph (b) of this section. (b) When anhydrous ammonia is to...

  2. 46 CFR 98.25-5 - How anhydrous ammonia may be carried.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false How anhydrous ammonia may be carried. 98.25-5 Section 98... Anhydrous Ammonia in Bulk § 98.25-5 How anhydrous ammonia may be carried. (a) Anhydrous ammonia shall be..., except as otherwise provided in paragraph (b) of this section. (b) When anhydrous ammonia is to...

  3. 46 CFR 98.25-5 - How anhydrous ammonia may be carried.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false How anhydrous ammonia may be carried. 98.25-5 Section 98... Anhydrous Ammonia in Bulk § 98.25-5 How anhydrous ammonia may be carried. (a) Anhydrous ammonia shall be..., except as otherwise provided in paragraph (b) of this section. (b) When anhydrous ammonia is to...

  4. 46 CFR 98.25-5 - How anhydrous ammonia may be carried.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false How anhydrous ammonia may be carried. 98.25-5 Section 98... Anhydrous Ammonia in Bulk § 98.25-5 How anhydrous ammonia may be carried. (a) Anhydrous ammonia shall be..., except as otherwise provided in paragraph (b) of this section. (b) When anhydrous ammonia is to...

  5. 46 CFR 98.25-5 - How anhydrous ammonia may be carried.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false How anhydrous ammonia may be carried. 98.25-5 Section 98... Anhydrous Ammonia in Bulk § 98.25-5 How anhydrous ammonia may be carried. (a) Anhydrous ammonia shall be..., except as otherwise provided in paragraph (b) of this section. (b) When anhydrous ammonia is to...

  6. Acute renal failure.

    PubMed

    Bellomo, Rinaldo

    2011-10-01

    Acute renal failure (now acute kidney injury) is a common complication of critical illness affecting between 30 and 60% of critically ill patients. The development of a consensus definition (RIFLE--risk, injury, failure, loss, end-stage system) has allowed standardization of reporting and epidemiological work. Multicenter multinational epidemiological studies indicate that sepsis is now the most common cause of acute renal failure in the intensive care unit (ICU) followed by cardiac surgery-associated acute kidney injury. Unfortunately, our understanding of the pathogenesis of acute renal failure in these settings remains limited. Because of such limited understanding, no reproducibly effective therapies have been developed. In addition the diagnosis of acute renal failure still rests upon the detection of changes in serum creatinine, which only occur if more than 50% of glomerular filtration is lost and are often delayed by more than 24 hours. Such diagnostic delays make the implementation of early therapy nearly impossible. In response to these difficulties, there has been a concerted effort to use proteomics to identify novel early biomarkers of acute renal failure. The identification and study of neutrophil gelatinase- associated lipocalin has been an important step in this field. Another area of active interest and investigation relates to the role of intravenous fluid resuscitation and fluid balance. Data from large observational studies and randomized, controlled trials consistently indicate that a positive fluid balance in patients with acute renal failure represents a major independent risk factor for mortality and provides no protection of renal function. The pendulum is clearly swinging away from a fluid-liberal approach to a fluid-conservative approach in these patients. Finally, there is a growing appreciation that acute renal failure may identify patients who are at increased risk of subsequent chronic renal dysfunction and mortality, opening the way

  7. Cadmium and renal cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Il'yasova, Dora; Schwartz, Gary G. . E-mail: gschwart@wfubmc.edu

    2005-09-01

    Background: Rates of renal cancer have increased steadily during the past two decades, and these increases are not explicable solely by advances in imaging modalities. Cadmium, a widespread environmental pollutant, is a carcinogen that accumulates in the kidney cortex and is a cause of end-stage renal disease. Several observations suggest that cadmium may be a cause of renal cancer. Methods: We performed a systematic review of the literature on cadmium and renal cancer using MEDLINE for the years 1966-2003. We reviewed seven epidemiological and eleven clinical studies. Results: Despite different methodologies, three large epidemiologic studies indicate that occupational exposure to cadmium is associated with increased risk renal cancer, with odds ratios varying from 1.2 to 5.0. Six of seven studies that compared the cadmium content of kidneys from patients with kidney cancer to that of patients without kidney cancer found lower concentrations of cadmium in renal cancer tissues. Conclusions: Exposure to cadmium appears to be associated with renal cancer, although this conclusion is tempered by the inability of studies to assess cumulative cadmium exposure from all sources including smoking and diet. The paradoxical findings of lower cadmium content in kidney tissues from patients with renal cancer may be caused by dilution of cadmium in rapidly dividing cells. This and other methodological problems limit the interpretation of studies of cadmium in clinical samples. Whether cadmium is a cause of renal cancer may be answered more definitively by future studies that employ biomarkers of cadmium exposure, such as cadmium levels in blood and urine.

  8. Lactulose and renal failure.

    PubMed

    Vogt, B; Frey, F J

    1997-01-01

    The introduction of lactulose as a new therapeutic agent for treatment of hepatic encephalopathy was a major breakthrough in this field. It was hypothesized that lactulose might prevent postoperative renal impairment after biliary surgery in patients with obstructive jaundice. The presumable mechanism purported was the diminished endotoxinemia by lactulose. Unfortunately, such a reno-protective effect has not been shown conclusively until now in clinical studies. In chronic renal failure lactulose is known to promote fecal excretion of water, sodium, potassium, amonium, urea, creatinine and protons. Thus, lactulose could be useful for the treatment of chronic renal failure. However, compliance to the therapy represents a major problem.

  9. Traumatic bilateral renal infarction.

    PubMed

    Peterson, N E

    1989-02-01

    Published examples of unilateral and bilateral renal artery thrombosis attest to their usual subjection to nephrectomy at diagnosis or soon thereafter, eliminating the opportunity for spontaneous improvement which would enlighten the issue of how often late recovery may occur, and under what circumstances. Seven cases of renal artery thrombosis and five patients with renal artery embolization extracted from the literature have included documentation of patchy histologic viability within otherwise total infarction. Conversely, 47 reports of renal artery thrombosis culminating in nephrectomy or examined post mortem include no reference to any of these histologic features. Presumptions are speculative regarding whether these features were absent, overlooked, or unexamined. Their incidence cannot be estimated--only the possibility of recoverable renal function in an unknown number of involved patients. It may be presumed that the majority of kidneys exposed to sustained arterial interruption will undergo irreversible infarction, with an undefined small subgroup later developing renal hypertension. An unknown number, however, may fortuitously possess arterial collateralization competent to support sufficient numbers of viable nephrons to sustain adequate renal function. It is further speculated that shared pathophysiologic features establish the opportunity for misdiagnosis of renal cortical necrosis, which carries a documented potential for spontaneous recovery. Impulsive bilateral nephrectomy may therefore be unjustified, particularly in consideration of the minimal potential hazards of nonremoval. In the event of convalescent problems of renal origin, delayed nephrectomy remains an option. The requirement for interval hemodialysis is further influenced by the advantages accruing from retention of the native kidneys relative to calcium metabolism and blood product replacement. A final consideration relates to the advisability of secondary revascularization of

  10. Renal oncocytoma: new observations

    SciTech Connect

    Quinn, M.J.; Hartman, D.S.; Friedman, A.C.; Sherman, J.L.; Lautin, E.M.; Pyatt, R.S.; Ho, C.K.; Csere, R.; Fromowitz, F.B.

    1984-10-01

    Renal oncocytomas are uncommon, benign tumors that can be treated by local incision or heminephrectomy; their preoperative differentiation from renal cell carcinoma, treated by radical nephrectomy, would be invaluable. A particularly important finding, a central scar, not stressed in previous reports, is frequently demonstrated by CT examination. The authors evaluated radiographic studies of 18 pathologically confirmed cases of oncocytoma and compared findings with results of CT, sonography, and angiogrpahy studies of 18 renal cell carcinoma cases. Oncocytomas can be suggested if a stellate scar is identified within an otherwise homogeneous tumor on ultrasound (US) and CT; if the mass appears homogeneous but no scar is present, angiography should be performed.

  11. [Toxic effects of high concentrations of ammonia on Euglena gracilis].

    PubMed

    Liu, Yan; Shi, Xiao-Rong; Cui, Yi-Bin; Li, Mei

    2013-11-01

    Ammonia is among the common contaminants in aquatic environments. The present study aimed at evaluation of the toxicity of ammonia at high concentration by detecting its effects on the growth, pigment contents, antioxidant enzyme activities, and DNA damage (comet assay) of a unicellular microalga, Euglena gracilis. Ammonia restrained the growth of E. gracilis, while at higher concentrations, ammonia showed notable inhibition effect, the growth at 2 000 mg x L(-1) was restrained to 55.7% compared with that of the control; The contents of photosynthetic pigments and protein went up with increasing ammonia dosage and decreased when the ammonia concentration was above 1000 mg x L(-1); In addition, there was an obvious increase in SOD and POD activities, at higher concentration (2 000 mg x L(-1)), activities of SOD and POD increased by 30.7% and 49.4% compared with those of the control, indicating that ammonia could promote activities of antioxidant enzymes in E. gracilis; The degree of DNA damage observed in the comet assay increased with increasing ammonia concentration, which suggested that high dose of ammonia may have potential mutagenicity on E. gracilis.

  12. Release of ammonia from HAN-type PHA

    SciTech Connect

    Zamecnik, J.R.

    1992-06-10

    A preliminary design basis for ammonia scrubbers in the DWPF has been issued. This design basis is based on a theoretical model of ammonia evolution from the SRAT, SME and RCT. It is desirable to acquire actual process data on ammonia evolution prior to performing detailed design of scrubbers for DWPF. The evolution of ammonia from the SRAT and SME in the Integrated DWPF Melter System (IDMS) was investigated during the HM4 run. In this run, Precipitate Hydrolysis Aqueous (PHA), which was made in the Precipitate Hydrolysis Experimental Facility (PHEF) using the HAN (hydroxylamine nitrate) process was used, thus resulting in PHA with a high concentration of ammonium ion.

  13. Development of ratiometric optical fiber sensor for ammonia gas detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chu, Cheng-Shane; Chen, Yen-Fu

    2017-04-01

    A simple, low cost technique to fabricate a ratiometric optical fiber ammonia (NH3) sensor has been presented. The ratiometric optical fiber ammonia sensor was based on the ammonia induced absorbance change of sensing material Oxazine 170 perchlorate (O170) in ethyl cellulose (EC) with the luminescence intensity of 7-amino-4-trifluoromethyl coumarin (AFC). The observed luminescence intensity from AFC at 487 nm decreased with increasing the ammonia concentration. The sensitivity of optical ammonia sensor is quantified in terms of the ratio I0/I100, where I0 and I100 represent the detected luminescence intensities in nitrogen and 1000 ppm ammonia concentration, respectively. The experimental result shows that the sensitivity of the ratiometric optical fiber ammonia sensor is estimated to be 1.44. The sensitive optical ammonia sensor based on fluorescence intensity changes of AFC due to the absorption change of Oxazine 170 perchlorate in EC layer with ammonia is achieved. The ratiometric sensing approach presented in this study has the advantage of suppressing spurious fluctuations in the intensity of the excitation source and optical transmission properties of the optical sensor.

  14. Trends in on-road vehicle emissions of ammonia

    SciTech Connect

    Kean, A.J.; Littlejohn, D.; Ban-Weiss, G.A.; Harley, R.A.; Kirchstetter, T.W.; Lunden, M. M.

    2008-07-15

    Motor vehicle emissions of ammonia have been measured at a California highway tunnel in the San Francisco Bay area. Between 1999 and 2006, light-duty vehicle ammonia emissions decreased by 38 {+-} 6%, from 640 {+-} 40 to 400 {+-} 20 mg kg{sup -1}. High time resolution measurements of ammonia made in summer 2001 at the same location indicate a minimum in ammonia emissions correlated with slower-speed driving conditions. Variations in ammonia emission rates track changes in carbon monoxide more closely than changes in nitrogen oxides, especially during later evening hours when traffic speeds are highest. Analysis of remote sensing data of Burgard et al. (Environ Sci. Technol. 2006, 40, 7018-7022) indicates relationships between ammonia and vehicle model year, nitrogen oxides, and carbon monoxide. Ammonia emission rates from diesel trucks were difficult to measure in the tunnel setting due to the large contribution to ammonia concentrations in a mixed-traffic bore that were assigned to light-duty vehicle emissions. Nevertheless, it is clear that heavy-duty diesel trucks are a minor source of ammonia emissions compared to light-duty gasoline vehicles.

  15. Sugar-driven prebiotic synthesis of ammonia from nitrite.

    PubMed

    Weber, Arthur L

    2010-06-01

    Reaction of 3-5 carbon sugars, glycolaldehyde, and alpha-ketoaldehydes with nitrite under mild anaerobic aqueous conditions yielded ammonia, an essential substrate for the synthesis of nitrogen-containing molecules during abiogenesis. Under the same conditions, ammonia synthesis was not driven by formaldehyde, glyoxylate, 2-deoxyribose, and glucose, a result indicating that the reduction process requires an organic reductant containing either an accessible alpha-hydroxycarbonyl group or an alpha-dicarbonyl group. Small amounts of aqueous Fe(+3) catalyzed the sugar-driven synthesis of ammonia. The glyceraldehyde concentration dependence of ammonia synthesis, and control studies of ammonia's reaction with glyceraldehyde, indicated that ammonia formation is accompanied by incorporation of part of the synthesized ammonia into sugar-derived organic products. The ability of sugars to drive the synthesis of ammonia is considered important to abiogenesis because it provides a way to generate photochemically unstable ammonia at sites of sugar-based origin-of-life processes from nitrite, a plausible prebiotic nitrogen species.

  16. Ammonia pollution characteristics of centralized drinking water sources in China.

    PubMed

    Fu, Qing; Zheng, Binghui; Zhao, Xingru; Wang, Lijing; Liu, Changming

    2012-01-01

    The characteristics of ammonia in drinking water sources in China were evaluated during 2005-2009. The spatial distribution and seasonal changes of ammonia in different types of drinking water sources of 22 provinces, 5 autonomous regions and 4 municipalities were investigated. The levels of ammonia in drinking water sources follow the order of river > lake/reservoir > groundwater. The levels of ammonia concentration in river sources gradually decreased from 2005 to 2008, while no obvious change was observed in the lakes/reservoirs and groundwater drinking water sources. The proportion of the type of drinking water sources is different in different regions. In river drinking water sources, the ammonia level was varied in different regions and changed seasonally. The highest value and wide range of annual ammonia was found in South East region, while the lowest value was found in Southwest region. In lake/reservoir drinking water sources, the ammonia levels were not varied obviously in different regions. In underground drinking water sources, the ammonia levels were varied obviously in different regions due to the geological permeability and the natural features of regions. In the drinking water sources with higher ammonia levels, there are enterprises and wastewater drainages in the protected areas of the drinking water sources.

  17. Use and recovery of ammonia in power plant cycles

    SciTech Connect

    Pflug, H.D.; Bettenworth, H.J.; Syring, H.A.

    1995-01-01

    The paper presents some practical and theoretical aspects of the use of ammonia in power plant water/steam cycles. The plants considered are fully automated units with once-through boilers, which operate under complex conditions and are subject to frequent starts and load changes. The boilers are chemically conditioned with combined oxygen ammonia treatment and the condensate polishing plant is only operated during start-up, in the event of a condenser leak or to remove excess ammonia. The paper also covers the recovery of ammonia from the condensate polishing plant waste regenerants and reuse for conditioning the feedwater. In particular, the paper deals with the following points: theoretical analysis of the chemical equilibrium of ammonia and carbon dioxide in water, including calculation of the concentrations from the parameters normally measured, such as conductivities and pH; equipment for monitoring and controlling the amount of ammonia fed to the water/steam cycle, including the optimum positioning of the sampling and feed-points, the parameters suitable for feed control and their temperature dependence; the partial pressure and distribution coefficient of ammonia; the consumption and losses of ammonia through the water/steam cycle during operation; the recovery of ammonia from condensate polishing plant waste regenerants by steam stripping. The paper should be of interest to both planning engineers and plant operators.

  18. 57. PHOTOCOPY OF DRAWING AMMONIA LEACHING PLANT GENERAL, DOUBLE EFFECT ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    57. PHOTOCOPY OF DRAWING AMMONIA LEACHING PLANT GENERAL, DOUBLE EFFECT EVAPORATOR UNIT - Kennecott Copper Corporation, On Copper River & Northwestern Railroad, Kennicott, Valdez-Cordova Census Area, AK

  19. 56. PHOTOCOPY OF DRAWING AMMONIA LEACHING PLANT GENERAL, DOUBLE EFFECT ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    56. PHOTOCOPY OF DRAWING AMMONIA LEACHING PLANT GENERAL, DOUBLE EFFECT EVAPORATOR UNIT - Kennecott Copper Corporation, On Copper River & Northwestern Railroad, Kennicott, Valdez-Cordova Census Area, AK

  20. 55. PHOTOCOPY OF DRAWING AMMONIA LEACHING PLANT FLOW DIAGRAM, REPRESENTING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    55. PHOTOCOPY OF DRAWING AMMONIA LEACHING PLANT FLOW DIAGRAM, REPRESENTING ONE COMPLETE CYCLE - Kennecott Copper Corporation, On Copper River & Northwestern Railroad, Kennicott, Valdez-Cordova Census Area, AK

  1. Removal of ammonia from poultry manure by aluminosilicates.

    PubMed

    Wlazło, Łukasz; Nowakowicz-Dębek, Bożena; Kapica, Jacek; Kwiecień, Małgorzata; Pawlak, Halina

    2016-12-01

    The aim of the study was to test the possibility of using aluminosilicates as natural sorbents of ammonia from poultry manure. The ammonia-absorbing properties of sodium bentonite and zeolite were confirmed in ex situ conditions. The most significant reduction in the level of ammonia with respect to the control was noted for 2% bentonite and 1% zeolite. The mean reduction for the entire period of the experiment ranged from 26.41% to 29.04%. The aluminosilicates tested can be used to neutralize ammonia released on poultry farms. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. 54. PHOTOCOPY OF DRAWING AMMONIA LEACHING PLANT FLOW DIAGRAM, REPRESENTING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    54. PHOTOCOPY OF DRAWING AMMONIA LEACHING PLANT FLOW DIAGRAM, REPRESENTING ONE COMPLETE CYCLE - Kennecott Copper Corporation, On Copper River & Northwestern Railroad, Kennicott, Valdez-Cordova Census Area, AK

  3. 53. PHOTOCOPY OF DRAWING AMMONIA LEACHING PLANT FLOW DIAGRAM, REPRESENTING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    53. PHOTOCOPY OF DRAWING AMMONIA LEACHING PLANT FLOW DIAGRAM, REPRESENTING ONE COMPLETE CYCLE - Kennecott Copper Corporation, On Copper River & Northwestern Railroad, Kennicott, Valdez-Cordova Census Area, AK

  4. Ammonia sources, transport, and deposition in northern Colorado

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collett, J. L., Jr.; Benedict, K. B.; Li, Y.; Shao, Y.; Wentworth, G.; Sullivan, A.; Evanoski-Cole, A. R.; Bangs, E.; Murphy, J. G.; Schichtel, B. A.

    2016-12-01

    Expanded measurements of ammonia in northern Colorado are providing new insight into ammonia sources in the region, their spatial variability, and their contributions to reactive nitrogen deposition in sensitive regions such as Rocky Mountain National Park (RMNP). Regional ammonia concentrations have been examined through a combination of a passive ammonia monitoring network, through mobile measurements, and through an east-west transect of real-time ammonia monitors stretching from the agricultural source region of NE Colorado through the Rocky Mountain foothills west of the Front Range urban corridor, to Rocky Mountain National Park. Several years of ammonia observations in NE Colorado reveal considerable concentration variability, with the highest concentrations observed near animal feeding observations. Multi-year concentration increases have been observed at some locations and significant decreases at other locations, but most sites exhibit no significant long-term trends. Ammonia concentrations in RMNP are strongly influenced by episodic transport from ammonia-rich NE Colorado, but an imprtant influence is also observed from wildfire emissions. Local recylcing of boundary layer ammonia through formation and evaporation of dew also exerts a strong influence on local concentrations, a phenomenon that has received little prior attention.

  5. Release of ammonia from HAN-type PHA

    SciTech Connect

    Zamecnik, J.R.

    1992-06-10

    A preliminary design basis for ammonia scrubbers in the DWPF has been issued. This design basis is based on a theoretical model of ammonia evolution from the SRAT, SME and RCT. It is desirable to acquire actual process data on ammonia evolution prior to performing detailed design of scrubbers for DWPF. The evolution of ammonia from the SRAT and SME in the Integrated DWPF Melter System (IDMS) was investigated during the HM4 run. In this run, Precipitate Hydrolysis Aqueous (PHA), which was made in the Precipitate Hydrolysis Experimental Facility (PHEF) using the HAN (hydroxylamine nitrate) process was used, thus resulting in PHA with a high concentration of ammonium ion.

  6. Nitrogen removal via ammonia volatilization in maturation ponds.

    PubMed

    Camargo Valero, M A; Mara, D D

    2007-01-01

    A simple apparatus was designed to collect ammonia gas coming out from waste stabilization ponds (WSP). The apparatus has a capture chamber and an absorption system, which were optimized under laboratory conditions prior to being used to assess ammonia volatilization rates in a pilot-scale maturation pond during summer 2005. Under laboratory conditions (water temperature = 17.1 degrees C and pH = 10.1), the average ammonia volatilization rate was 2,517 g NH3-N/ha d and the apparatus absorbed 79% of volatilized ammonia. On site, the mean ammonia volatilization rate was 15 g N/ha d, which corresponds to 3% of the total nitrogen removed (531 g N/ha d) in the maturation pond studied. A net nitrogen mass balance showed that ammonia volatilization was not the most important mechanism involved in either total nitrogen or ammonia removal. Nitrogen fractions (suspended organic nitrogen, soluble organic nitrogen, ammonia, nitrite and nitrate) from the M1 influent and effluent showed that ammonia is removed by biological (mainly algal) uptake and total nitrogen removal by sedimentation of dead algal biomass.

  7. Ammonia - Did it have a role in chemical evolution. [abiogenesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferris, J. P.; Nicodem, D. E.

    1974-01-01

    The significance of ammonia in the chemical evolution related to the origin of life is evaluated. A computer program was employed to calculate the time needed for the decomposition of ammonia by means of a photochemical reaction. Various possible protection mechanisms for ammonia are discussed, giving attention to hydrogen sulfide, hydrogen, ozone, and CO. It is concluded that in the absence of a sufficiently high pressure of hydrogen, any ammonia present in the primitive atmosphere would have been decomposed by photolysis in a million years.

  8. Removal of ammonia solutions used in catalytic wet oxidation processes.

    PubMed

    Hung, Chang Mao; Lou, Jie Chung; Lin, Chia Hua

    2003-08-01

    Ammonia (NH(3)) is an important product used in the chemical industry, and is common place in industrial wastewater. Industrial wastewater containing ammonia is generally either toxic or has concentrations or temperatures such that direct biological treatment is unfeasible. This investigation used aqueous solutions containing more of ammonia for catalytic liquid-phase oxidation in a trickle-bed reactor (TBR) based on Cu/La/Ce composite catalysts, prepared by co-precipitation of Cu(NO(3))(2), La(NO(3))(2), and Ce(NO(3))(3) at 7:2:1 molar concentrations. The experimental results indicated that the ammonia conversion of the wet oxidation in the presence of the Cu/La/Ce composite catalysts was determined by the Cu/La/Ce catalyst. Minimal ammonia was removed from the solution by the wet oxidation in the absence of any catalyst, while approximately 91% ammonia removal was achieved by wet oxidation over the Cu/La/Ce catalyst at 230 degrees C with oxygen partial pressure of 2.0 MPa. Furthermore, the effluent streams were conducted at a liquid hourly space velocity of under 9 h(-1) in the wet catalytic processes, and a reaction pathway was found linking the oxidizing ammonia to nitric oxide, nitrogen and water. The solution contained by-products, including nitrates and nitrites. Nitrite selectivity was minimized and ammonia removal maximized when the feed ammonia solution had a pH of around 12.0.

  9. Ammonia effects on microinvertebrates and fish in outdoor experimental streams

    SciTech Connect

    Hermanutz, R.O.; Hedtke, S.F.; Arthur, J.W.; Andrew, R.W.; Allen, K.N.

    1987-01-01

    Laboratory data on ammonia effects, the US EPA national-water-quality criteria for ammonia, and ammonia site-specific criteria were evaluated in four outdoor experimental streams (one control and three treatment streams) over a 76-week period. Calculated un-ionized ammonia concentrations varied daily and seasonally according to pH and temperature changes. Populations of four major microinvertebrate taxonomic groups (cladocerans, copepods, rotifers and protozoans) were monitored during a 4-week period early in the study, and six fish species (fathead minnows, bluegills, channel catfish, white suckers, walleyes, and rainbow trout) were tested for various time intervals, from 4 to 26 weeks, throughout the 76-week study period.

  10. Evolution of non-condensable gas in ammonia heat pipes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richter, Robert

    1990-01-01

    Accumulation of noncondensible gas (NCG) has been observed in ammonia heat pipes. NCG has been found to be detrimental to the performance of heat pipes and can result in complete operational failure. A kinetic and thermodynamic analysis has been performed that evaluates the dissociation of ammonia under various conditions and predicts the amount of NCG present in heat pipes. The analysis indicates that the observed NCG in ammonia heat pipes can be attributed to the dissociation of ammonia into its constituents, hydrogen and nitrogen. It shows time and temperature to be the important parameters, in conjunction with the catalytic characteristic of the container material.

  11. Renal tubule cell repair following acute renal injury.

    PubMed

    Humes, H D; Lake, E W; Liu, S

    1995-01-01

    Experimental data suggests the recovery of renal function after ischemic or nephrotoxic acute renal failure is due to a replicative repair process dependent upon predominantly paracrine release of growth factors. These growth factors promote renal proximal tubule cell proliferation and a differentiation phase dependent on the interaction between tubule cells and basement membrane. These insights identify the molecular basis of renal repair and ischemic and nephrotoxic acute renal failure, and may lead to potential therapeutic modalities that accelerate renal repair and lessen the morbidity and mortality associated with these renal disease processes. In this regard, there is a prominent vasoconstrictor response of the renal vasculature during the postischemic period of developing acute renal failure. The intravenous administration of pharmacologic doses of atrial natriuretic factor (ANF) in the postischemic period have proven efficacious by altering renal vascular resistance, so that renal blood flow and glomerular filtration rate improve. ANF also appears to protect renal tubular epithelial integrity and holds significant promise as a therapeutic agent in acute renal failure. Of equal or greater promise are the therapeutic interventions targeting the proliferative reparative zone during the postischemic period. The exogenous administration of epidermal growth factor or insulin-like growth factor-1 in the postischemic period have effectively decreased the degree of renal insufficiency as measured by the peak serum creatinine and has hastened renal recovery as measured by the duration of time required to return the baseline serum creatinine values. A similarly efficacious role for hepatocyte growth factor has also been recently demonstrated.

  12. AMMONIA-FREE NOx CONTROL SYSTEM

    SciTech Connect

    Song Wu; Zhen Fan; Andrew H. Seltzer; Richard G. Herman

    2006-06-01

    This report describes a novel NOx control system that has the potential to drastically reduce cost, and enhance performance, operation and safety of power plant NOx control. The new system optimizes the burner and the furnace to achieve very low NOx levels and to provide an adequate amount of CO, and uses the CO for reducing NO both in-furnace and over a downstream AFSCR (ammonia-free selective catalytic reduction) reactor. The AF-SCR combines the advantages of the highly successful SCR technology for power plants and the TWC (three-way catalytic converter) widely used on automobiles. Like the SCR, it works in oxidizing environment of combustion flue gas and uses only base metal catalysts. Like the TWC, the AF-SCR removes NO and excess CO simultaneously without using any external reagent, such as ammonia. This new process has been studied in a development program jointed funded by the US Department of Energy and Foster Wheeler. The report outlines the experimental catalyst work performed on a bench-scale reactor, including test procedure, operating conditions, and results of various catalyst formulations. Several candidate catalysts, prepared with readily available transition metal oxides and common substrate materials, have shown over 80-90% removal for both NO and CO in oxidizing gas mixtures and at elevated temperatures. A detailed combustion study of a 400 MWe coal-fired boiler, applying computational fluid dynamics techniques to model boiler and burner design, has been carried out to investigate ways to optimize the combustion process for the lowest NOx formation and optimum CO/NO ratios. Results of this boiler and burner optimization work are reported. The paper further discusses catalyst scale-up considerations and the conceptual design of a 400 MWe size AF-SCR reactor, as well as economics analysis indicating large cost savings of the ammonia-free NOx control process over the current SCR technology.

  13. Ammonia emissions of a rotational grazing system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voglmeier, Karl; Häni, Christoph; Jocher, Markus; Ammann, Christof

    2017-04-01

    Intensive agricultural livestock production is the main source of air pollution by ammonia (NH3). Grazing is considered to reduce emissions significantly. However, ammonia emissions measurements on pastures are very rare and most emission models base their emissions factors for grazing on studies from the 1990s, which report a large emission range from 2.7% to 13.6% of the applied total ammonia nitrogen (TAN). We present first results of the Posieux pasture experiment in 2016 where NH3 concentration and fluxes were measured during the grazing season. The applied methods include an eddy covariance system with a two channel reactive nitrogen (Nr) converter measuring in parallel the sum of oxidized Nr species and the sum of the total Nr species. The difference of the two channels corresponds to the sum of reduced Nr species. Furthermore four MiniDOAS instruments for line integrated concentration measurements without an inlet system were used. The fluxes were estimated by applying a backward Lagrangian stochastic model (bLS) to the concentration difference of paired MiniDOAS up- and downwind of a sub-plot of the field. Monitoring of dung (visual survey) and urine patch locations (with soil electrical conductivity sensor) was carried out after each grazing rotation on selected sub-plots. It helped to compute statistics of the dung/urine patch distribution on the pasture. The experimental setup and the environmental conditions resulted in high temporal and spatial dynamics of NH3 concentrations and fluxes. The calculated fluxes were used to estimate the total net emission during the grazing period. Based on the average dung/urine patch distribution on the field an emission factor for the pasture was computed and compared to results from the literature. We discuss the applicability and limitations of the two measurement systems, reconsider the main emission drivers and explain differences in the results.

  14. Ammonia and urea excretion in the swimming crab Portunus trituberculatus exposed to elevated ambient ammonia-N.

    PubMed

    Ren, Qin; Pan, Luqing; Zhao, Qun; Si, Lingjun

    2015-09-01

    In the present study of the swimming crab Portunus trituberculatus exposed to 0, 1, and 5 mg L(-1) NH4Cl, the effects of ammonia exposure on ammonia and urea content in hemolymph; activity of H(+)-ATPase (subunit A) and Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase (α-subunit) (NKA) in gills; mRNA expression levels of the crustacean Rh-like ammonia transporter (Rh), K(+) Channel, Na(+)/K(+)/2Cl(-) co-transporter (NKCC), Na(+)/H(+)-exchanger (NHE), urea transporter (UT) and vesicle associated membrane protein (VAMP) in gills were investigated. The ultrastructure of gills was also evaluated. All these results in this study showed a dose-dependent effect with ammonia exposure concentration. The data displayed a significant increase in hemolymph ammonia and urea concentrations under ammonia exposure. The up-regulation of Rh mRNA together with up-regulation of K(+)-channel mRNA, NKA activity, down-regulation of NKCC and NHE mRNA suggested a coordinated protective response to maintain a relatively low ammonia concentration in the body fluids during ambient ammonia exposure. The up-regulation of VAMP, H(+)-ATPase activity along with the ultrastructure of gills suggested a mechanism of exocytotic ammonia excretion that may exit in the gill of P. trituberculatus. An increased production of urea and the up-regulated expression of UT suggested that the crab can detoxify elevated ammonia levels in the body fluids into urea when pathways of ammonia excretion are decreased after long term ammonia exposure.

  15. Renal scintigraphy in veterinary medicine.

    PubMed

    Tyson, Reid; Daniel, Gregory B

    2014-01-01

    Renal scintigraphy is performed commonly in dogs and cats and has been used in a variety of other species. In a 2012 survey of the members of the Society of Veterinary Nuclear Medicine, 95% of the respondents indicated they perform renal scintigraphy in their practice. Renal scintigraphy is primarily used to assess renal function and to evaluate postrenal obstruction. This article reviews how renal scintigraphy is used in veterinary medicine and describes the methods of analysis. Species variation is also discussed.

  16. TES ammonia retrieval strategy and global observations of the spatial and seasonal variability of ammonia (journal)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Presently only limited sets of tropospheric ammonia (NH3) measurements in the Earth's atmosphere have been reported from satellite and surface station measurements, despite the well-documented negative impact of NH3 on the environment and human health. Presented here is a detaile...

  17. AMBIENT AMMONIA AND AMMONIUM AEROSOL ACROSS A REGION OF VARIABLE AMMONIA EMISSION DENSITY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper presents one year of ambient ammonia (NH3), ammonium (NH4+), hydrochloric acid (HCI), chloride (CI¯), nitric acid (HNO3), nitrate (NO3¯), nitrous acid (HONO), sulfur dioxide (SO2), and sulfate (SO4

  18. AMBIENT AMMONIA AND AMMONIUM AEROSOL ACROSS A REGION OF VARIABLE AMMONIA EMISSION DENSITY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper presents one year of ambient ammonia (NH3), ammonium (NH4+), hydrochloric acid (HCI), chloride (CI¯), nitric acid (HNO3), nitrate (NO3¯), nitrous acid (HONO), sulfur dioxide (SO2), and sulfate (SO4

  19. TES ammonia retrieval strategy and global observations of the spatial and seasonal variability of ammonia (journal)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Presently only limited sets of tropospheric ammonia (NH3) measurements in the Earth's atmosphere have been reported from satellite and surface station measurements, despite the well-documented negative impact of NH3 on the environment and human health. Presented here is a detaile...

  20. Nonadiabatic transitions in electrostatically trapped ammonia molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Kirste, Moritz; Schnell, Melanie; Meijer, Gerard; Sartakov, Boris G.

    2009-05-15

    Nonadiabatic transitions are known to be major loss channels for atoms in magnetic traps but have thus far not been experimentally reported upon for trapped molecules. We have observed and quantified losses due to nonadiabatic transitions for three isotopologues of ammonia in electrostatic traps by comparing the trapping times in traps with a zero and a nonzero electric field at the center. Nonadiabatic transitions are seen to dominate the overall loss rate even for the present samples that are at relatively high temperatures of 30 mK. It is anticipated that losses due to nonadiabatic transitions in electric fields are omnipresent in ongoing experiments on cold molecules.

  1. DIRECT AMMONIA-AIR FUEL CELL.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    fuel cell was investigated. This cell is based on the use of a non-aqueous fused hydroxide electrolyte matrix, and operates in the intermediate temperature range of 180-300 C. Studies have been carried out to determine the nature of the ratecontrolling step in the kinetics of the anodic oxidation of ammonia. A new type of Ni/NiOOH reference electrode was developed for the measurement of single electrode potentials in experimental galvanic fuel cells employing this type of matrix electrolyte. In addition to various exploratory studies, two statistical analysis

  2. Ammonia-Free NOx Control System

    SciTech Connect

    Song Wu; Zhen Fan; Andrew H. Seltzer; Richard G. Herman

    2005-03-31

    Research is being conducted under United States Department of Energy (DOE) Contract DE-FC26-03NT41865 to develop a new technology to achieve very low levels of NOx emissions from pulverized coal fired boiler systems by employing a novel system level integration between the PC combustion process and the catalytic NOx reduction with CO present in the combustion flue gas. The combustor design and operating conditions will be optimized to achieve atypical flue gas conditions. This approach will not only suppress NOx generation during combustion but also further reduce NOx over a downstream catalytic reactor that does not require addition of an external reductant, such as ammonia.

  3. Ammonia-Free NOx Control System

    SciTech Connect

    Song Wu; Zhen Fan; Andrew H. Seltzer

    2005-06-30

    Research is being conducted under United States Department of Energy (DOE) Contract DEFC26-03NT41865 to develop a new technology to achieve very low levels of NOx emissions from pulverized coal fired boiler systems by employing a novel system level integration between the PC combustion process and the catalytic NOx reduction with CO present in the combustion flue gas. The combustor design and operating conditions will be optimized to achieve atypical flue gas conditions. This approach will not only suppress NOx generation during combustion but also further reduce NOx over a downstream catalytic reactor that does not require addition of an external reductant, such as ammonia.

  4. Effect of Continuous Renal Replacement Therapy on Outcome in Pediatric Acute Liver Failure.

    PubMed

    Deep, Akash; Stewart, Claire E; Dhawan, Anil; Douiri, Abdel

    2016-10-01

    To establish the effect of continuous renal replacement therapy on outcome in pediatric acute liver failure. Retrospective cohort study. Sixteen-bed PICU in a university-affiliated tertiary care hospital and specialist liver centre. All children (0-18 yr) admitted to PICU with pediatric acute liver failure between January 2003 and December 2013. Children with pediatric acute liver failure were managed according to a set protocol. The guidelines for continuous renal replacement therapy in pediatric acute liver failure were changed in 2011 following preliminary results to indicate the earlier use of continuous renal replacement therapy for both renal dysfunction and detoxification. Of 165 children admitted with pediatric acute liver failure, 136 met the inclusion criteria and 45 of these received continuous renal replacement therapy prior to transplantation or recovery. Of the children managed with continuous renal replacement therapy, 26 (58%) survived: 19 were successfully bridged to liver transplantation and 7 spontaneously recovered. Cox proportional hazards regression model clearly showed reducing hyperammonemia by 48 hours after initiating continuous renal replacement therapy significantly improved survival (HR, 1.04; 95% CI, 1.013-1.073; p = 0.004). On average, for every 10% decrease in ammonia from baseline at 48 hours, the likelihood of survival increased by 50%. Time to initiate continuous renal replacement therapy from PICU admission was lower in survivors compared to nonsurvivors (HR, 0.96; 95% CI, 0.916-1.007; p = 0.095). Change in practice to initiate early and high-dose continuous renal replacement therapy led to increased survival with maximum effect being visible in the first 14 days (HR, 3; 95% CI, 1.0-10.3; p = 0.063). Among children with pediatric acute liver failure who did not receive a liver transplant, use of continuous renal replacement therapy significantly improved survival (HR, 4; 95% CI, 1.5-11.6; p = 0.006). Continuous renal replacement

  5. Proximal renal tubular acidosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... References Krapf R, Seldin DW, Alpern RJ. Clinical syndromes of metabolic acidosis. In: Alpern RJ, Caplan M, Moe OW, ... 529. Read More Distal renal tubular acidosis Fanconi syndrome Low potassium level Metabolic acidosis Osteomalacia Respiratory acidosis Rickets Review Date 10/ ...

  6. Renal tubular acidosis.

    PubMed

    Chan, J C

    1983-03-01

    In the past decade major advances in our understanding of renal tubular hydrogen ion secretion and bicarbonate reabsorption have provided new insight into the pathophysiology of renal tubular acidosis. Thus "fragment to fragment clings" and the number of disorders categorized within the syndrome grows, until we have come to know and name four types, with many subtypes. We hope this new perspective provides a basis for the physician to recognize renal tubular acidosis in its several forms so that an informed decision may be arrived at in choosing the best therapy. The physician may also be prepared to reasonably project the prognosis for each patient. We also hope that our detailed examination of renal acidification will provide a reference for delineation of new clinical expressions of acid-base disorders and kidney malfunction certain to be described in the years ahead.

  7. Renal and perirenal abscesses

    SciTech Connect

    Patterson, J.E.; Andriole, V.T.

    1987-12-01

    Our knowledge of the spectrum of renal abscesses has increased as a result of more sensitive radiologic techniques. The classification of intrarenal abscess now includes acute focal bacterial nephritis and acute multifocal bacterial nephritis, as well as the previously recognized renal cortical abscess, renal corticomedullary abscess, and xanthogranulomatous pyelonephritis. In general, the clinical presentation of these entities does not differentiate them; various radiographic studies can distinguish them, however. The intrarenal abscess is usually treated successfully with antibiotic therapy alone. Antistaphylococcal therapy is indicated for the renal cortical abscess, whereas therapy directed against the common gram-negative uropathogens is indicated for most of the other entities. The perinephric abscess is often an elusive diagnosis, has a more serious prognosis, and is more difficult to treat. Drainage of the abscess and sometimes partial or complete nephrectomy are required for resolution. 73 references.

  8. Renal Mitochondrial Cytopathies

    PubMed Central

    Emma, Francesco; Montini, Giovanni; Salviati, Leonardo; Dionisi-Vici, Carlo

    2011-01-01

    Renal diseases in mitochondrial cytopathies are a group of rare diseases that are characterized by frequent multisystemic involvement and extreme variability of phenotype. Most frequently patients present a tubular defect that is consistent with complete De Toni-Debré-Fanconi syndrome in most severe forms. More rarely, patients present with chronic tubulointerstitial nephritis, cystic renal diseases, or primary glomerular involvement. In recent years, two clearly defined entities, namely 3243 A > G tRNALEU mutations and coenzyme Q10 biosynthesis defects, have been described. The latter group is particularly important because it represents the only treatable renal mitochondrial defect. In this paper, the physiopathologic bases of mitochondrial cytopathies, the diagnostic approaches, and main characteristics of related renal diseases are summarized. PMID:21811680

  9. Renal mitochondrial cytopathies.

    PubMed

    Emma, Francesco; Montini, Giovanni; Salviati, Leonardo; Dionisi-Vici, Carlo

    2011-01-01

    Renal diseases in mitochondrial cytopathies are a group of rare diseases that are characterized by frequent multisystemic involvement and extreme variability of phenotype. Most frequently patients present a tubular defect that is consistent with complete De Toni-Debré-Fanconi syndrome in most severe forms. More rarely, patients present with chronic tubulointerstitial nephritis, cystic renal diseases, or primary glomerular involvement. In recent years, two clearly defined entities, namely 3243 A > G tRNA(LEU) mutations and coenzyme Q10 biosynthesis defects, have been described. The latter group is particularly important because it represents the only treatable renal mitochondrial defect. In this paper, the physiopathologic bases of mitochondrial cytopathies, the diagnostic approaches, and main characteristics of related renal diseases are summarized.

  10. Distal renal tubular acidosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... get better with treatment. When to Contact a Medical Professional Call your health care provider if you have symptoms of distal renal tubular acidosis. Get medical help right away if you develop emergency symptoms ...

  11. Renal papillary necrosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Kidney infection (pyelonephritis) Kidney transplant rejection Sickle cell anemia , a common cause of renal papillary necrosis in ... Controlling diabetes or sickle cell anemia may reduce your risk. To ... provider's instructions when using medicines, including over- ...

  12. Renal primitive neuroectodermal tumors.

    PubMed

    Bartholow, Tanner; Parwani, Anil

    2012-06-01

    Primitive neuroectodermal tumors exist as a part of the Ewing sarcoma/primitive neuroectodermal tumor family. These tumors most commonly arise in the chest wall and paraspinal regions; cases with a renal origin are rare entities, but have become increasingly reported in recent years. Although such cases occur across a wide age distribution, the average age for a patient with a renal primitive neuroectodermal tumor is the mid- to late 20s, with both males and females susceptible. Histologically, these tumors are characterized by pseudorosettes. Immunohistochemically, CD99 is an important diagnostic marker. Clinically, these are aggressive tumors, with an average 5-year disease-free survival rate of only 45% to 55%. Given that renal primitive neuroectodermal tumor bears many similarities to other renal tumors, it is important to review the histologic features, immunostaining profile, and genetic abnormalities that can be used for its correct diagnosis.

  13. Modeling and simulation of ammonia removal from purge gases of ammonia plants using a catalytic Pd-Ag membrane reactor.

    PubMed

    Rahimpour, M R; Asgari, A

    2008-05-01

    In this work, the removal of ammonia from synthesis purge gas of an ammonia plant has been investigated. Since the ammonia decomposition is thermodynamically limited, a membrane reactor is used for complete decomposition. A double pipe catalytic membrane reactor is used to remove ammonia from purge gas. The purge gas is flowing in the reaction side and is converted to hydrogen and nitrogen over nickel-alumina catalyst. The hydrogen is transferred through the Pd-Ag membrane of tube side to the shell side. A mathematical model including conservation of mass in the tube and shell side of reactor is proposed. The proposed model was solved numerically and the effects of different parameters on the rector performance were investigated. The effects of pressure, temperature, flow rate (sweep ratio), membrane thickness and reactor diameter have been investigated in the present study. Increasing ammonia conversion was observed by raising the temperature, sweep ratio and reducing membrane thickness. When the pressure increases, the decomposition is gone toward completion but, at low pressure the ammonia conversion in the outset of reactor is higher than other pressures, but complete destruction of the ammonia cannot be achieved. The proposed model can be used for design of an industrial catalytic membrane reactor for removal of ammonia from ammonia plant and reducing NO(x) emissions.

  14. Renal pathology in reptiles.

    PubMed

    Zwart, Peernel

    2006-01-01

    The class of Reptilia varies widely. Both the gross morphology and microscopic anatomy of the kidneys are specific for each species. In each species of reptile, the physiology of the renal system has adapted to the specific conditions of life, including, among other factors, the type of food, environmental temperature, and the availability of water. The pathology of the kidneys in reptiles has been poorly studied, but in recent years a number of investigators have specifically studied reptilian renal pathology.

  15. 'Transcollateral' Renal Angioplasty for a Completely Occluded Renal Artery

    SciTech Connect

    Chandra, Subash; Chadha, Davinder S. Swamy, Ajay

    2011-02-15

    Percutaneous transluminal renal angioplasty with stenting has been effective in the control of hypertension, renal function, and pulmonary edema caused by atherosclerotic renal artery stenosis. However, the role of the procedure has not been fully established in the context of chronic total occlusion of renal artery. We report the successful use of this procedure in 57-year-old male patient who reported for evaluation of a recent episode of accelerated hypertension. A renal angiogram in this patient showed ostial stenosis of the right renal artery, which was filling by way of the collateral artery. Renal angioplasty for chronic total occlusion of right renal artery was successfully performed in a retrograde fashion through a collateral artery, thereby leading to improvement of renal function and blood pressure control.

  16. Staging properties of potassium-ammonia ternary graphite intercalation compounds at high ammonia pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qian, X. W.; Solin, S. A.

    1989-04-01

    The pressure dependence of the (00l) x-ray diffraction patterns of the ternary graphite intercalation compound K(NH3)xC24 has been studied in the range 0.5-11 kbar (for which x~4.5) using a diamond anvil cell. A special apparatus for loading the cell with liquid ammonia at room temperature has been constructed and is briefly described. In these experiments, the pressure-transmitting fluid was also an intercalant, namely ammonia. Therefore, the chemical potential of this species was linearly coupled to the applied pressure in contrast to the usual case where the pressure-transmitting fluid is chemically passive. The pressure dependences of the basal spacings and of the relative intensities of key reflections have been measured, as have the compressibilities of the stage-1 and stage-2 components of the two-phase system. Basal-spacing anomalies and anomalies in the relative intensities occur at pressures of ~3.5 and 8.0 kbar and are tentatively attributed to in-plane coordination changes in the potassium-ammonia ratio. Using thermodynamic arguments and Le Chatelier's principle we show quantitatively that a staging phase transition from pure stage-1 phase to an admixture of stage-1 and stage-2 is expected with increased pressure above 10 bar in agreement with experiment. The saturation ammonia compositions (x values) of the admixed stages are found to be 4.5 and 5.4 for the stage-1 and -2 components, respectively. This result is interpreted as evidence that the composition is not sterically limited but is determined by the binding energy of ammonia for potassium and by the perturbation to this energy from the guest-host interaction.

  17. Improving The Efficiency Of Ammonia Electrolysis For Hydrogen Production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palaniappan, Ramasamy

    Given the abundance of ammonia in domestic and industrial wastes, ammonia electrolysis is a promising technology for remediation and distributed power generation in a clean and safe manner. Efficiency has been identified as one of the key issues that require improvement in order for the technology to enter the market phase. Therefore, this research was performed with the aim of improving the efficiency of hydrogen production by finding alternative materials for the cathode and electrolyte. 1. In the presence of ammonia the activity for hydrogen evolution reaction (HER) followed the trend Rh>Pt>Ru>Ni. The addition of ammonia resulted in lower rates for HER for Pt, Ru, and Ni, which have been attributed to competition from the ammonia adsorption reaction. 2. The addition of ammonia offers insight into the role of metal-hydrogen underpotential deposition (M-Hupd) on HER kinetics. In addition to offering competition via ammonia adsorption it resulted in fewer and weaker M-Hupd bonds for all metals. This finding substantiates the theory that M-Hupd bonds favor HER on Pt electrocatalyst. However, for Rh results suggest that M-Hupd bond may hinder the HER. In addition, the presence of unpaired valence shell electrons is suggested to provide higher activity for HER in the presence of ammonia. 3. Bimetals PtxM1-x (M = Ir, Ru, Rh, and Ni) offered lower overpotentials for HER compared to the unalloyed metals in the presence of ammonia. The activity of HER in the presence of ammonia follows the trend Pt-Ir>Pt-Rh>Pt-Ru>Pt-Ni. The higher activity of HER is attributed to the synergistic effect of the alloy, where ammonia adsorbs onto the more electropositive alloying metal leaving Pt available for Hupd formation and HER to take place. Additionally, this supports the theory that the presence of a higher number of unpaired electrons favors the HER in the presence of ammonia. 4. Potassium polyacrylate (PAA-K) was successfully used as a substitute for aqueous KOH for ammonia

  18. Emergency planning and the acute toxic potency of inhaled ammonia.

    PubMed Central

    Michaels, R A

    1999-01-01

    Ammonia is present in agriculture and commerce in many if not most communities. This report evaluates the toxic potency of ammonia, based on three types of data: anecdotal data, in some cases predating World War 1, reconstructions of contemporary industrial accidents, and animal bioassays. Standards and guidelines for human exposure have been driven largely by the anecdotal data, suggesting that ammonia at 5,000-10,000 parts per million, volume/volume (ppm-v), might be lethal within 5-10 min. However, contemporary accident reconstructions suggest that ammonia lethality requires higher concentrations. For example, 33,737 ppm-v was a 5-min zero-mortality value in a major ammonia release in 1973 in South Africa. Comparisons of secondary reports of ammonia lethality with original sources revealed discrepancies in contemporary sources, apparently resulting from failure to examine old documents or accurately translate foreign documents. The present investigation revealed that contemporary accident reconstructions yield ammonia lethality levels comparable to those in dozens of reports of animal bioassays, after adjustment of concentrations to human equivalent concentrations via U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) procedures. Ammonia levels potentially causing irreversible injury or impairing the ability of exposed people to escape from further exposure or from coincident perils similarly have been biased downwardly in contemporary sources. The EPA has identified ammonia as one of 366 extremely hazardous substances subject to community right-to-know provisions of the Superfund Act and emergency planning provisions of the Clean Air Act. The Clean Air Act defines emergency planning zones (EPZs) around industrial facilities exceeding a threshold quantity of ammonia on-site. This study suggests that EPZ areas around ammonia facilities can be reduced, thereby also reducing emergency planning costs, which will vary roughly with the EPZ radius squared. Images Figure 1

  19. Ammonia Mediates Methamphetamine-Induced Increases in Glutamate and Excitotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Halpin, Laura E; Northrop, Nicole A; Yamamoto, Bryan K

    2014-01-01

    Ammonia has been identified to have a significant role in the long-term damage to dopamine and serotonin terminals produced by methamphetamine (METH), but how ammonia contributes to this damage is unknown. Experiments were conducted to identify whether increases in brain ammonia affect METH-induced increases in glutamate and subsequent excitotoxicity. Increases in striatal glutamate were measured using in vivo microdialysis. To examine the role of ammonia in mediating changes in extracellular glutamate after METH exposure, lactulose was used to decrease plasma and brain ammonia. Lactulose is a non-absorbable disaccharide, which alters the intestinal lumen through multiple mechanisms that lead to the increased peripheral excretion of ammonia. METH caused a significant increase in extracellular glutamate that was prevented by lactulose. Lactulose had no effect on METH-induced hyperthermia. To determine if ammonia contributed to excitotoxicity, the effect of METH and lactulose treatment on calpain-mediated spectrin proteolysis was measured. METH significantly increased calpain-specific spectrin breakdown products, and this increase was prevented with lactulose treatment. To examine if ammonia-induced increases in extracellular glutamate were mediated by excitatory amino-acid transporters, the reverse dialysis of ammonia, the glutamate transporter inhibitor, DL-threo-β-benzyloxyaspartic acid (TBOA), or the combination of the two directly into the striatum of awake, freely moving rats was conducted. TBOA blocked the increases in extracellular glutamate produced by the reverse dialysis of ammonia. These findings demonstrate that ammonia mediates METH-induced increases in extracellular glutamate through an excitatory amino-acid transporter to cause excitotoxicity. PMID:24165886

  20. Ammonia mediates methamphetamine-induced increases in glutamate and excitotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Halpin, Laura E; Northrop, Nicole A; Yamamoto, Bryan K

    2014-03-01

    Ammonia has been identified to have a significant role in the long-term damage to dopamine and serotonin terminals produced by methamphetamine (METH), but how ammonia contributes to this damage is unknown. Experiments were conducted to identify whether increases in brain ammonia affect METH-induced increases in glutamate and subsequent excitotoxicity. Increases in striatal glutamate were measured using in vivo microdialysis. To examine the role of ammonia in mediating changes in extracellular glutamate after METH exposure, lactulose was used to decrease plasma and brain ammonia. Lactulose is a non-absorbable disaccharide, which alters the intestinal lumen through multiple mechanisms that lead to the increased peripheral excretion of ammonia. METH caused a significant increase in extracellular glutamate that was prevented by lactulose. Lactulose had no effect on METH-induced hyperthermia. To determine if ammonia contributed to excitotoxicity, the effect of METH and lactulose treatment on calpain-mediated spectrin proteolysis was measured. METH significantly increased calpain-specific spectrin breakdown products, and this increase was prevented with lactulose treatment. To examine if ammonia-induced increases in extracellular glutamate were mediated by excitatory amino-acid transporters, the reverse dialysis of ammonia, the glutamate transporter inhibitor, DL-threo-β-benzyloxyaspartic acid (TBOA), or the combination of the two directly into the striatum of awake, freely moving rats was conducted. TBOA blocked the increases in extracellular glutamate produced by the reverse dialysis of ammonia. These findings demonstrate that ammonia mediates METH-induced increases in extracellular glutamate through an excitatory amino-acid transporter to cause excitotoxicity.

  1. Hereditary Renal Cancer Syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Haas, Naomi B.

    2013-01-01

    Inherited susceptibility to kidney cancer is a fascinating and complex topic. Our knowledge about types of genetic syndromes associated with an increased risk of disease is continually expanding. Currently, there are 10 syndromes associated with an increased risk of all types of renal cancer, which are reviewed herein. Clear cell renal cancer is associated with von Hippel Lindau disease, chromosome 3 translocations, PTEN hamartomatous syndrome and mutations in BAP1, as well as several of the genes encoding the proteins comprising the succinate dehydrogenase complex (SDHB/C/D). Type 1 papillary renal cancers arise in conjunction with germline mutations in MET and type 2 as part of Hereditary Leiomyomatosis and Renal Cell Cancer (FH mutations). Chromophone and oncocytic renal cancers are predominantly associated with Birt Hogg Dubé syndrome. Angiomyolipomas are commonly and their malignant counterpart epitheliod angiomyolipomas rarely are found in patients with Tuberous Sclerosis Complex. The targeted therapeutic options for the renal cancer associated with these diseases are just starting to expand, and are an area of active clinical research. PMID:24359990

  2. Laparoscopic Renal Cryoablation

    PubMed Central

    Schiffman, Marc; Moshfegh, Amiel; Talenfeld, Adam; Del Pizzo, Joseph J.

    2014-01-01

    In light of evidence linking radical nephrectomy and consequent suboptimal renal function to adverse cardiovascular events and increased mortality, research into nephron-sparing techniques for renal masses widely expanded in the past two decades. The American Urological Association (AUA) guidelines now explicitly list partial nephrectomy as the standard of care for the management of T1a renal tumors. Because of the increasing utilization of cross-sectional imaging, up to 70% of newly detected renal masses are stage T1a, making them more amenable to minimally invasive nephron-sparing therapies including laparoscopic and robotic partial nephrectomy and ablative therapies. Cryosurgery has emerged as a leading option for renal ablation, and compared with surgical techniques it offers benefits in preserving renal function with fewer complications, shorter hospitalization times, and allows for quicker convalescence. A mature dataset exists at this time, with intermediate and long-term follow-up data available. Cryosurgical recommendations as a first-line therapy are made at this time in limited populations, including elderly patients, patients with multiple comorbidities, and those with a solitary kidney. As more data emerge on oncologic efficacy, and technical experience and the technology continue to improve, the application of this modality will likely be extended in future treatment guidelines. PMID:24596441

  3. Cryoglobulinemia and renal disease.

    PubMed

    Alpers, Charles E; Smith, Kelly D

    2008-05-01

    Cryoglobulinemia occurs in a variety of clinical settings including lymphoproliferative disorders, infection and autoimmune disease. The worldwide pandemic of hepatitis C virus infection has resulted in a significant increase in its extrahepatic complications including cryoglobulinemia and renal disease. Here we review the types of cryoglobulins, mechanisms of cryoglobulin formation, links between hepatitis C virus and renal disease, and current approaches to therapy. The prevalence of cryoglobulinemia in hepatitis C virus-infected individuals is surprisingly large and may be found in more than 50% of some infected subpopulations. Most of these patients will not have overt renal disease, but there is a population of unknown size of patients with subclinical glomerular disease that has the potential to become clinically significant. In cases of hepatitis C virus-associated cryoglobulinemia, treatment remains focused on eradication of viremia, but interventions directed at B lymphocytes are increasingly utilized. The mechanisms of cryoglobulin formation and renal injury remain largely obscure, but recent evidence implicates the innate immune system in the initiation of disease. The most common renal injury associated with hepatitis C virus infection, in patients both with and without evidence of cryoglobulinemia, is membranoproliferative glomerulonephritis. There has been increasing focus on defining the mechanisms that link these processes and the evolution of renal injury in all clinical settings of cryoglobulinemia.

  4. Neonatal renal vein thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Brandão, Leonardo R; Simpson, Ewurabena A; Lau, Keith K

    2011-12-01

    Neonatal renal vein thrombosis (RVT) continues to pose significant challenges for pediatric hematologists and nephrologists. The precise mechanism for the onset and propagation of renal thrombosis within the neonatal population is unclear, but there is suggestion that acquired and/or inherited thrombophilia traits may increase the risk for renal thromboembolic disease during the newborn period. This review summarizes the most recent studies of neonatal RVT, examining its most common features, the prevalence of acquired and inherited prothrombotic risk factors among these patients, and evaluates their short and long term renal and thrombotic outcomes as they may relate to these risk factors. Although there is some consensus regarding the management of neonatal RVT, the most recent antithrombotic therapy guidelines for the management of childhood thrombosis do not provide a risk-based algorithm for the acute management of RVT among newborns with hereditary prothrombotic disorders. Whereas neonatal RVT is not a condition associated with a high mortality rate, it is associated with significant morbidity due to renal impairment. Recent evidence to evaluate the effects of heparin-based anticoagulation and thrombolytic therapy on the long term renal function of these patients has yielded conflicting results. Long term cohort studies and randomized trials may be helpful to clarify the impact of acute versus prolonged antithrombotic therapy for reducing the morbidity that is associated with neonatal RVT. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. BIOLOGICAL FILTRATION FOR THE NITRIFICATION OF EXCESSIVE LEVELS OF FREE AMMONIA

    EPA Science Inventory

    Ammonia in source waters can cause water treatment and distribution system problems. Research on the presence of ammonia in drinking water distribution systems for example has suggested some correlation between excess ammonia and increased biological activity (Servais, 1995; Wilc...

  6. BIOLOGICAL FILTRATION FOR THE NITRIFICATION OF EXCESSIVE LEVELS OF FREE AMMONIA

    EPA Science Inventory

    Ammonia in source waters can cause water treatment and distribution system problems. Research on the presence of ammonia in drinking water distribution systems for example has suggested some correlation between excess ammonia and increased biological activity (Servais, 1995; Wilc...

  7. AMMONIA: ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACTS, EMISSIONS, INORGANIC PM 2.5, AND CLEAN AIR INTERSTATE RULE

    EPA Science Inventory

    This presentation discusses the role of ammonia as an atmospheric pollutant. Ammonia is emitted primarily from agricultural sources, although vehicles are the largest sources in urban centers. When combined with nitrate and sulfate, ammonia forms particulate matter which has be...

  8. AMMONIA: ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACTS, EMISSIONS, INORGANIC PM 2.5, AND CLEAN AIR INTERSTATE RULE

    EPA Science Inventory

    This presentation discusses the role of ammonia as an atmospheric pollutant. Ammonia is emitted primarily from agricultural sources, although vehicles are the largest sources in urban centers. When combined with nitrate and sulfate, ammonia forms particulate matter which has be...

  9. Fast and accurate exhaled breath ammonia measurement.

    PubMed

    Solga, Steven F; Mudalel, Matthew L; Spacek, Lisa A; Risby, Terence H

    2014-06-11

    This exhaled breath ammonia method uses a fast and highly sensitive spectroscopic method known as quartz enhanced photoacoustic spectroscopy (QEPAS) that uses a quantum cascade based laser. The monitor is coupled to a sampler that measures mouth pressure and carbon dioxide. The system is temperature controlled and specifically designed to address the reactivity of this compound. The sampler provides immediate feedback to the subject and the technician on the quality of the breath effort. Together with the quick response time of the monitor, this system is capable of accurately measuring exhaled breath ammonia representative of deep lung systemic levels. Because the system is easy to use and produces real time results, it has enabled experiments to identify factors that influence measurements. For example, mouth rinse and oral pH reproducibly and significantly affect results and therefore must be controlled. Temperature and mode of breathing are other examples. As our understanding of these factors evolves, error is reduced, and clinical studies become more meaningful. This system is very reliable and individual measurements are inexpensive. The sampler is relatively inexpensive and quite portable, but the monitor is neither. This limits options for some clinical studies and provides rational for future innovations.

  10. Fast and Accurate Exhaled Breath Ammonia Measurement

    PubMed Central

    Solga, Steven F.; Mudalel, Matthew L.; Spacek, Lisa A.; Risby, Terence H.

    2014-01-01

    This exhaled breath ammonia method uses a fast and highly sensitive spectroscopic method known as quartz enhanced photoacoustic spectroscopy (QEPAS) that uses a quantum cascade based laser. The monitor is coupled to a sampler that measures mouth pressure and carbon dioxide. The system is temperature controlled and specifically designed to address the reactivity of this compound. The sampler provides immediate feedback to the subject and the technician on the quality of the breath effort. Together with the quick response time of the monitor, this system is capable of accurately measuring exhaled breath ammonia representative of deep lung systemic levels. Because the system is easy to use and produces real time results, it has enabled experiments to identify factors that influence measurements. For example, mouth rinse and oral pH reproducibly and significantly affect results and therefore must be controlled. Temperature and mode of breathing are other examples. As our understanding of these factors evolves, error is reduced, and clinical studies become more meaningful. This system is very reliable and individual measurements are inexpensive. The sampler is relatively inexpensive and quite portable, but the monitor is neither. This limits options for some clinical studies and provides rational for future innovations. PMID:24962141

  11. Ammonia hardening of porous silica antireflective coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belleville, Philippe F.; Floch, Herve G.

    1994-10-01

    The adhesion of sol-gel antireflective porous silica coatings on vitreous optical substrates has been dramatically improved by exposure to ammonia vapors or a dip in basic solutions. The approximately 70 to 270-nm thick coatings consisted of monolayers of spherical, 20-nm diameter amorphous silica particles deposited from ethanolic colloidal suspensions by conventional liquid coating techniques. Although, the as-deposited coatings had only low adhesion and were easily damaged when cleaned by standard drag-wiping procedures, coatings exposed over 5 hours to ammonia vapors passed both adhesive-tape and moderate abrasive- resistance tests. The increase in strength was accompanied by a roughly 20% shrinkage of the original coating thickness but the antireflective properties were retained. Our explanation of this chemical effect is a base-catalyzed phenomenon leading to surface silanol condensation and hydrogen-bonding of neighbor silica particles. In addition, since this basic treatment enhanced the laser damage resistance, such strengthened antireflective coatings have been successfully evaluated on flashlamps used on Phebus, Europe's most powerful laser. This allows an increase of the laser-disk pumping efficiency.

  12. Amt/MEP/Rh proteins conduct ammonia.

    PubMed

    Winkler, Fritz K

    2006-03-01

    The structure determination of the ammonium transport protein AmtB from Escherichia coli strongly indicates that the members of the ubiquitous ammonium transporter/methylamine permease/Rhesus (Amt/MEP/Rh) protein family are ammonia-conducting channels rather than ammonium ion transporters. The most conserved part of these proteins, apart from the common overall structure with 11 transmembrane helices, is the pore lined by hydrophobic side chains except for two highly conserved histidine residues. A high-affinity ion-binding site specific for ammonium is present at the extracellular pore entry of the Amt/MEP proteins. It is proposed to play an important role in enhancing net transport at very low external ammonium concentrations and to provide discrimination against water. The site is not conserved in the animal Rhesus proteins which are implicated in ammonium homeostasis and saturate at millimolar ammonium concentrations. Many aspects of the biological function of these ammonia channels are still poorly understood and further studies in cellular systems are needed. Likewise, studies with purified, reconstituted Amt/MEP/Rh proteins will be needed to resolve open mechanistic questions and gain a more quantitative understanding of the conduction mechanism in general and for different subfamily representatives.

  13. Observations of ammonia in comets with Herschel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biver, N.; Bockelée-Morvan, D.; Hartogh, P.; Crovisier, J.; de Val-Borro, M.; Kidger, M.; Küppers, M.; Lis, D.; Moreno, R.; Szutowicz, S.; HssO Team

    2014-07-01

    Ammonia is the most abundant nitrogen bearing species in comets. However, it has been scarcely observed in comets due to the weakness of the lines observable from the ground at infrared and centimetre wavelengths. Nevertheless, its main photodissociation product NH_2 has been observed in several comets in the visible. The fundamental rotational J_{K}=(1_0-0_0) transition of NH_3 at 572.5 GHz has been observed in comets since 2004, with the Odin satellite (Biver et al. 2007). In the frame of the Herschel guaranteed time key program ''HssO'' (Hartogh et al. 2009), ammonia was detected with the HIFI instrument in comets 10P/Tempel 2 (Biver et al. 2012), 45P/Honda- Mrkos-Pajdusakova, 103P/Hartley 2, and C/2009 P1 (Garradd). The hyperfine structure of the line is resolved. We have built a complete excitation model to interpret these observations, including the radial distribution in comet 103P. The derived abundances relative to water are on the order of 0.5 %, similar to the values inferred from visible observations of NH_2.

  14. Doppler assessment of splanchnic arterial flow in patients with liver cirrhosis: correlation with ammonia plasma levels and MELD score.

    PubMed

    Glišić, Tijana M; Perišić, Mirjana D; Dimitrijevic, Sladjana; Jurišić, Vladimir

    2014-06-01

    To assess the clinical significance of blood flow velocity and resistance index (RI) in the visceral arteries of patients with liver cirrhosis with respect to plasma ammonia (NH3) level and liver function. We included 80 patients with liver cirrhosis (58 men) and 20 healthy controls (11 men). Duplex Doppler ultrasonography was used to assess flow velocity and RI in the hepatic (HA), right (RRA), and left renal (LRA), and splenic (SA) (LA) artery. Plasma NH3 was measured by biochemistry. Liver function was assessed by MELD score (model of end-stage liver disease). HA, LRA, and SA systolic flow velocities were greater, whereas RRA diastolic velocity was lower in patients with liver cirrhosis than in controls RI was higher in LRA, RRA, SA, and HA in patients with liver cirrhosis than in controls. NH3 levels were significantly elevated in all patients with liver cirrhosis (p < 0.05) and significantly correlated with RI of RRA, LRA, and SA. We found greater renal, hepatic, and LA RI in patients with liver cirrhosis than in healthy controls. The correlation we found between elevated renal artery RI (≥0.70) and MELD score emphasizes the risk of renal dysfunction during progression of liver cirrhosis. Copyright © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. The Effects of Acute Copper and Ammonia Challenges on Ammonia and Urea Excretion by the Blue Crab Callinectes sapidus.

    PubMed

    Zimmer, Alex M; Jorge, Marianna Basso; Wood, Chris M; Martins, Camila M G; Bianchini, Adalto

    2017-04-01

    Copper (Cu) is a persistent environmental contaminant that elicits several physiological disturbances in aquatic organisms, including a disruption in ammonia regulation. We hypothesized that exposure to Cu in a model crustacean (blue crab, Callinectes sapidus) acclimated to brackish water (2 ppt) would lead to hyperammonemia by stimulating an increase in ammonia production and/or by inhibiting ammonia excretion. We further hypothesized that urea production would represent an ammonia detoxification strategy in response to Cu. In a pilot experiment, exposure to 0, 100, and 200 µg/L Cu for 6 h caused significant concentration-dependent increases in ammonia excretion (J amm). Based on these results, an acute 24-h 100 µg/L Cu exposure was conducted and this similarly caused an overall stimulation of J amm during the 24-h period, indicative of an increase in ammonia production. Terminal haemolymph total ammonia content (T amm) was unchanged, suggesting that while ammonia production was increased, there was no inhibition of the excretion mechanism. In support of our second hypothesis, urea excretion (J urea) increased in response to Cu exposure; haemolymph [urea] was unaffected. This suggested that urea production also was increased. To further test the hypothesis that J urea increased to prevent hyperammonemia during Cu exposure, crabs were exposed to high environmental ammonia (HEA; 2.5 mmol/L NH4HCO3) for 12 h in a separate experiment. This led to a fourfold increase in haemolymph T amm, whereas J urea increased only transiently and haemolymph [urea] was unchanged, indicating that urea production likely does not contribute to the attenuation of hyperammonemia in blue crabs. Overall, Cu exposure in blue crabs led to increased ammonia and urea production, which were both eliminated by excretion. These results may have important implications in aquaculture systems where crabs may be exposed to elevated Cu and/or ammonia.

  16. Dissociation and Mass Transfer Coefficients for Ammonia Volatilization Models

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Process-based models are being used to predict ammonia emissions from manure sources, but their accuracy has not been fully evaluated for cattle manure. Laboratory trials were conducted to measure the dissociation and mass transfer coefficients for ammonia volatilization from media of buffered ammon...

  17. IRIS Toxicological Review of Ammonia Noncancer Inhalation (Final Report)

    EPA Science Inventory

    EPA has finalized the Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS) Assessment of Ammonia (Noncancer Inhalation). This assessment addresses the potential noncancer human health effects from long-term inhalation exposure to ammonia. Now final, this assessment will update the ...

  18. The role of carbon dioxide in ammonia emission from manure

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Ammonia emission from manure is a significant loss of fixed N from agricultural systems, and contributes to air pollution and ecosystem degradation. Despite the development of numerous mathematical models for predicting ammonia emission, the interactions between carbon dioxide emission, manure pH, a...

  19. Bioluminescent bioreporter integrated circuit devices and methods for detecting ammonia

    DOEpatents

    Simpson, Michael L [Knoxville, TN; Paulus, Michael J [Knoxville, TN; Sayler, Gary S [Blaine, TN; Applegate, Bruce M [West Lafayette, IN; Ripp, Steven A [Knoxville, TN

    2007-04-24

    Monolithic bioelectronic devices for the detection of ammonia includes a microorganism that metabolizes ammonia and which harbors a lux gene fused with a heterologous promoter gene stably incorporated into the chromosome of the microorganism and an Optical Application Specific Integrated Circuit (OASIC). The microorganism is generally a bacterium.

  20. Bilogical Treatment for Ammonia Oxidation in Drinking Water Facilities

    EPA Science Inventory

    Ammonia is an unregulated compound, but is naturally occurring in many drinking water sources. It is also used by some treatment facilities to produce chloramines for disinfection purposes. Because ammonia is non-toxic, its presence in drinking water is often disregarded. Thro...

  1. Ammonia-in-oil-microemulsions and their application.

    PubMed

    Gyger, Fabian; Bockstaller, Pascal; Gerthsen, Dagmar; Feldmann, Claus

    2013-11-18

    Liquid ammonia on the nanoscale: Ammonia-in-oil microemulsions are used to synthesize Bi, Re, CoN, and GaN nanoparticles, which can be obtained without further thermal treatment. These microemulsions are as reproducible and simple as their water-in-oil conterparts, with the exception of the required low temperature of -40 °C.

  2. Ammonia stripping for enhanced biomethanization of piggery wastewater.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lei; Lee, Yong-Woo; Jahng, Deokjin

    2012-01-15

    In this study, the effects of ammonia removal by air stripping as a pretreatment on the anaerobic digestion of piggery wastewater were investigated. Ammonia stripping results indicated that ammonia removal was strongly dependent on pH and aeration rate, and the ammonia removal rate followed the pseudo-first-order kinetics. A significant enhancement of biomethanization was observed for wastewaters of which ammonia was air-stripped at pH 9.5 and pH 10.0. The methane productivity increased from 0.23 ± 0.08 L CH(4)/Ld of the control (raw piggery wastewater) to 0.75 ± 0.11 L CH(4)/Ld (ammonia-stripped at pH 9.5) and 0.57 ± 0.04 L CH(4)/Ld (ammonia-stripped at pH 10.0). However, the improvement of methane production from the piggery wastewater pretreated at pH 11.0 was negligible compared to the control, which was thought to be due to the high concentration of sodium ions supplied from sodium hydroxide for pH adjustment. From these results, it was concluded that ammonia removal through air stripping at the alkaline pH could be a viable option for preventing the failure of anaerobic digestion of the raw piggery wastewater. Additionally, it was also found that a high concentration of sodium ion originated from sodium hydroxide for pH adjustment inhibited methane production.

  3. Ammonia and nitrous oxide fluxes from a novel swine housing

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Ammonia emission and subsequent deposition can be a major source of pollution, causing nitrogen enrichment, acidification of soils and surface waters, and aerosol formation. In livestock production housing, ammonia emissions can also adversely affect the health, performance, and welfare of both ani...

  4. Ammonia Induces Autophagy through Dopamine Receptor D3 and MTOR.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhiyuan; Ji, Xinmiao; Wang, Wenchao; Liu, Juanjuan; Liang, Xiaofei; Wu, Hong; Liu, Jing; Eggert, Ulrike S; Liu, Qingsong; Zhang, Xin

    2016-01-01

    Hyperammonemia is frequently seen in tumor microenvironments as well as in liver diseases where it can lead to severe brain damage or death. Ammonia induces autophagy, a mechanism that tumor cells may use to protect themselves from external stresses. However, how cells sense ammonia has been unclear. Here we show that culture medium alone containing Glutamine can generate milimolar of ammonia at 37 degrees in the absence of cells. In addition, we reveal that ammonia acts through the G protein-coupled receptor DRD3 (Dopamine receptor D3) to induce autophagy. At the same time, ammonia induces DRD3 degradation, which involves PIK3C3/VPS34-dependent pathways. Ammonia inhibits MTOR (mechanistic target of Rapamycin) activity and localization in cells, which is mediated by DRD3. Therefore, ammonia has dual roles in autophagy: one to induce autophagy through DRD3 and MTOR, the other to increase autophagosomal pH to inhibit autophagic flux. Our study not only adds a new sensing and output pathway for DRD3 that bridges ammonia sensing and autophagy induction, but also provides potential mechanisms for the clinical consequences of hyperammonemia in brain damage, neurodegenerative diseases and tumors.

  5. Determination of Ammonia in Household Cleaners: An Instrumental Analysis Experiment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Graham, Richard C.; DePew, Steven

    1983-01-01

    Briefly discusses three techniques for assessing amount of ammonia present in household cleaners. Because of disadvantages with these methods, the thermometric titration technique is suggested in which students judge the best buy based on relative cost of ammonia present in samples. Laboratory procedures, typical results, and reactions involved…

  6. Ammonia Induces Autophagy through Dopamine Receptor D3 and MTOR

    PubMed Central

    Li, Zhiyuan; Ji, Xinmiao; Wang, Wenchao; Liu, Juanjuan; Liang, Xiaofei; Wu, Hong; Liu, Jing; Eggert, Ulrike S.; Liu, Qingsong

    2016-01-01

    Hyperammonemia is frequently seen in tumor microenvironments as well as in liver diseases where it can lead to severe brain damage or death. Ammonia induces autophagy, a mechanism that tumor cells may use to protect themselves from external stresses. However, how cells sense ammonia has been unclear. Here we show that culture medium alone containing Glutamine can generate milimolar of ammonia at 37 degrees in the absence of cells. In addition, we reveal that ammonia acts through the G protein-coupled receptor DRD3 (Dopamine receptor D3) to induce autophagy. At the same time, ammonia induces DRD3 degradation, which involves PIK3C3/VPS34-dependent pathways. Ammonia inhibits MTOR (mechanistic target of Rapamycin) activity and localization in cells, which is mediated by DRD3. Therefore, ammonia has dual roles in autophagy: one to induce autophagy through DRD3 and MTOR, the other to increase autophagosomal pH to inhibit autophagic flux. Our study not only adds a new sensing and output pathway for DRD3 that bridges ammonia sensing and autophagy induction, but also provides potential mechanisms for the clinical consequences of hyperammonemia in brain damage, neurodegenerative diseases and tumors. PMID:27077655

  7. Bilogical Treatment for Ammonia Oxidation in Drinking Water Facilities

    EPA Science Inventory

    Ammonia is an unregulated compound, but is naturally occurring in many drinking water sources. It is also used by some treatment facilities to produce chloramines for disinfection purposes. Because ammonia is non-toxic, its presence in drinking water is often disregarded. Thro...

  8. Determination of Ammonia in Household Cleaners: An Instrumental Analysis Experiment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Graham, Richard C.; DePew, Steven

    1983-01-01

    Briefly discusses three techniques for assessing amount of ammonia present in household cleaners. Because of disadvantages with these methods, the thermometric titration technique is suggested in which students judge the best buy based on relative cost of ammonia present in samples. Laboratory procedures, typical results, and reactions involved…

  9. Ammonia And Ethylene Optrodes For Research On Plant Growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhou, Quan; Tabacco, Mary Beth

    1995-01-01

    Fiber-optic sensors developed for use in measuring concentrations of ammonia and ethylene near plants during experiments on growth of plants in enclosed environments. Developmental fiber-optic sensors satisfy need to measure concentrations as low as few parts per billion (ppb) and expected to contribute to research on roles of ethylene and ammonia in growth of plants.

  10. Crystal Structure of an Ammonia-Permeable Aquaporin

    PubMed Central

    Kirscht, Andreas; Kaptan, Shreyas S.; Bienert, Gerd Patrick; Chaumont, François; Nissen, Poul; de Groot, Bert L.; Kjellbom, Per; Gourdon, Pontus; Johanson, Urban

    2016-01-01

    Aquaporins of the TIP subfamily (Tonoplast Intrinsic Proteins) have been suggested to facilitate permeation of water and ammonia across the vacuolar membrane of plants, allowing the vacuole to efficiently sequester ammonium ions and counteract cytosolic fluctuations of ammonia. Here, we report the structure determined at 1.18 Å resolution from twinned crystals of Arabidopsis thaliana aquaporin AtTIP2;1 and confirm water and ammonia permeability of the purified protein reconstituted in proteoliposomes as further substantiated by molecular dynamics simulations. The structure of AtTIP2;1 reveals an extended selectivity filter with the conserved arginine of the filter adopting a unique unpredicted position. The relatively wide pore and the polar nature of the selectivity filter clarify the ammonia permeability. By mutational studies, we show that the identified determinants in the extended selectivity filter region are sufficient to convert a strictly water-specific human aquaporin into an AtTIP2;1-like ammonia channel. A flexible histidine and a novel water-filled side pore are speculated to deprotonate ammonium ions, thereby possibly increasing permeation of ammonia. The molecular understanding of how aquaporins facilitate ammonia flux across membranes could potentially be used to modulate ammonia losses over the plasma membrane to the atmosphere, e.g., during photorespiration, and thereby to modify the nitrogen use efficiency of plants. PMID:27028365

  11. AIR QUALITY MODELING OF AMMONIA: A REGIONAL MODELING PERSPECTIVE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The talk will address the status of modeling of ammonia from a regional modeling perspective, yet the observations and comments should have general applicability. The air quality modeling system components that are central to modeling ammonia will be noted and a perspective on ...

  12. Crystal Structure of an Ammonia-Permeable Aquaporin.

    PubMed

    Kirscht, Andreas; Kaptan, Shreyas S; Bienert, Gerd Patrick; Chaumont, François; Nissen, Poul; de Groot, Bert L; Kjellbom, Per; Gourdon, Pontus; Johanson, Urban

    2016-03-01

    Aquaporins of the TIP subfamily (Tonoplast Intrinsic Proteins) have been suggested to facilitate permeation of water and ammonia across the vacuolar membrane of plants, allowing the vacuole to efficiently sequester ammonium ions and counteract cytosolic fluctuations of ammonia. Here, we report the structure determined at 1.18 Å resolution from twinned crystals of Arabidopsis thaliana aquaporin AtTIP2;1 and confirm water and ammonia permeability of the purified protein reconstituted in proteoliposomes as further substantiated by molecular dynamics simulations. The structure of AtTIP2;1 reveals an extended selectivity filter with the conserved arginine of the filter adopting a unique unpredicted position. The relatively wide pore and the polar nature of the selectivity filter clarify the ammonia permeability. By mutational studies, we show that the identified determinants in the extended selectivity filter region are sufficient to convert a strictly water-specific human aquaporin into an AtTIP2;1-like ammonia channel. A flexible histidine and a novel water-filled side pore are speculated to deprotonate ammonium ions, thereby possibly increasing permeation of ammonia. The molecular understanding of how aquaporins facilitate ammonia flux across membranes could potentially be used to modulate ammonia losses over the plasma membrane to the atmosphere, e.g., during photorespiration, and thereby to modify the nitrogen use efficiency of plants.

  13. Managing Ammonia Emissions From Screwworm Larval Rearing Media.

    PubMed

    Sagel, Agustin; Phillips, Pamela; Chaudhury, Muhammad; Skoda, Steven

    2016-02-01

    Mass production, sterilization, and release of screwworms (Cochliomyia hominivorax (Coquerel)) that were competitive in the field significantly contributed to the successful application of the sterile insect technique for eradication of screwworms from continental North America. Metabolic byproducts resulting from protein-rich diets required for larval screwworms lead to ammonia liberation, sometimes at high levels, within the mass rearing facility. Until recently a sodium polyacrylate gel bulking agent was used for the larval media and adsorbed much of the ammonia. A need to replace the gel with an environmentally "friendly" bulking agent, while not increasing ammonia levels in the rearing facility, led to a series of experiments with the objective of developing procedures to reduce ammonia emissions from the larval media bulked with cellulose fiber. Additives of ammonia-converting bacteria, potassium permanganate, and Yucca schidigera Roezl ex Otrgies powder extract, previously reported to reduce ammonia levels in organic environments, were evaluated. Ammonia-converting bacteria did not have a positive effect. Addition of Y. schidigera powder extract (∼1% of total volume), potassium permanganate (∼250 ppm), and a combination of these two additives (at these same concentrations) kept ammonia at equivalent levels as when larval media was bulked with gel. Potassium permanganate also had sufficient antimicrobial properties that the use of formaldehyde in the diet was not necessary. Further testing is needed, at a mass rearing level, before full implementation into the screwworm eradication program.

  14. Ammonia And Ethylene Optrodes For Research On Plant Growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhou, Quan; Tabacco, Mary Beth

    1995-01-01

    Fiber-optic sensors developed for use in measuring concentrations of ammonia and ethylene near plants during experiments on growth of plants in enclosed environments. Developmental fiber-optic sensors satisfy need to measure concentrations as low as few parts per billion (ppb) and expected to contribute to research on roles of ethylene and ammonia in growth of plants.

  15. A Case of near Fatal Ammonia Gas Poisoning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, E.

    1971-01-01

    A report is given of the near fatal effects of anhydrous ammonia poisoning to a repairman working on a compression room cooling system. The repairman was exposed for approximately 5 minutes to an environment of nearly 100% ammonia gas. Descriptions are given of body burns, breathing problems, and eye burns suffered by the worker.

  16. Ammonia: its effects on biological systems, metabolic hormones, and reproduction.

    PubMed

    Visek, W J

    1984-03-01

    The physical, chemical properties of ammonia, its sources and detoxification, its effects in biological systems, its influence upon insulin action and glucose metabolism, and its possible effects on reproduction are discussed. Present chemical methods do not distinguish nonionic from ionic forms. At physiological pH, nonionic ammonia concentrations remain low but are primarily responsible for toxic effects. Thus, biologically significant changes of ammonia concentrations may not be revealed by determinations of ammonia in blood plasma. For these and other reasons the subacute toxicity of ammonia often is unrecognized, and its effects on intermediary metabolism and the hormonal milieu in normal and disease states remain poorly understood. Effects of ammonia may be stimulatory at low concentrations and inhibitory as concentrations rise or exposure is extended. Extensive experiments in eight ureotelic species, including man, show that urinary excretion of orotic acid becomes significantly elevated when the quantity of ammonia presented to the liver exceeds the capacity for normal detoxification. Present evidence with arginine and other intermediates of the urea cycle suggest that these substances influence glucose metabolism and insulin action. Recent studies of dairy cattle provide speculative evidence that high protein feeding or forms of protein that lead to elevated ammonia concentrations in tissue decrease conception rates and increase the calving to conception interval of dairy cows. Limited data concerning luteinizing hormone concentrations and steroid hormone metabolism are insufficient to establish whether differences in reproductive performance are due to changes of hormonal physiology, intrauterine environment, or metabolism.

  17. IRIS Toxicological Review of Ammonia Noncancer Inhalation (Final Report)

    EPA Science Inventory

    EPA has finalized the Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS) Assessment of Ammonia (Noncancer Inhalation). This assessment addresses the potential noncancer human health effects from long-term inhalation exposure to ammonia. Now final, this assessment will update the ...

  18. Nitrogen sustainability and beef cattle feedyards: II. Ammonia emissions

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Sustainable management of beef cattle feedyard nitrogen (N) helps avoid environmental degradation and loss of manure fertilizer value due to ammonia volatilization. In this review we report the state-of-the-science concerning feedyard ammonia and evaluate methods to mitigate N losses. Up to 90% of f...

  19. Ammonia excretion in the freshwater planarian Schmidtea mediterranea.

    PubMed

    Weihrauch, Dirk; Chan, Ainsely C; Meyer, Heiko; Döring, Carmen; Sourial, Mary; O'Donnell, Michael J

    2012-09-15

    In aquatic invertebrates, metabolic nitrogenous waste is excreted predominately as ammonia. Very little is known, however, of the underlying mechanisms of ammonia excretion, particularly in freshwater species. Our results indicate that in the non-parasitic freshwater planarian Schmidtea mediterranea, ammonia excretion depends on acidification of the apical unstirred layer of the body surface and consequent ammonia trapping. Buffering of the environment to a pH of 7 or higher decreased the excretion rate. Inhibitor experiments suggested further that the excretion mechanism involves the participation of the V-type H(+)-ATPase and carbonic anhydrase and possibly also the Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase and Na(+)/H(+) exchangers. Alkalinization (pH 8.5, 2 days) of the environment led to a 1.9-fold increase in body ammonia levels and to a downregulation of V-ATPase (subunit A) and Rh-protein mRNA. Further, a 2 day exposure to non-lethal ammonia concentrations (1 mmol l(-1)) caused a doubling of body ammonia levels and led to an increase in Rh-protein and Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase (α-subunit) mRNA expression levels. In situ hybridization studies indicated a strong mRNA expression of the Rh-protein in the epidermal epithelium. The ammonia excretion mechanism proposed for S. mediterranea reveals striking similarities to the current model suggested to function in the gills of freshwater fish.

  20. GLUTAMINE AS A MEDIATOR OF AMMONIA NEUROTOXICITY: A CRITICAL APPRAISAL

    PubMed Central

    Albrecht, Jan; Zielińska, Magdalena; Norenberg, Michael D.

    2010-01-01

    Ammonia is a major neurotoxin implicated in hepatic encephalopathy (HE). Here we discuss evidence that many aspects of ammonia toxicity in HE-affected brain are mediated by glutamine (Gln), synthesized in excess from ammonia and glutamate by glutamine synthetase (GS), an astrocytic enzyme. The degree to which Gln is increased in brains of patients with HE was found to positively correlate with the grade of HE. In animals with HE, a GS inhibitor, methionine sulfoximine (MSO), reversed a spectrum of manifestations of ammonia toxicity, including brain edema and increased intracranial pressure, even though MSO itself increased brain ammonia levels. MSO inhibited, while incubation with Gln reproduced the oxidative stress and cell swelling observed in ammonia-exposed cultured astrocytes. Recent studies have shown that astrocytes swell subsequent to Gln transport into mitochondria and its degradation back to ammonia, which then generates reactive oxygen species and the mitochondrial permeability transition. This sequence of events led to the formulation of the “Trojan Horse” hypothesis. Further verification of the role of Gln in the pathogenesis of HE will have to account for: 1) modification of the effects of Gln by interaction of astrocytes with other CNS cells; and 2) direct effects of Gln on these cells. Recent studies have demonstrated a “Trojan Horse”-like effect of Gln in microglia, as well as an interference by Gln with the activation of the NMDA/NO/cGMP pathway by ammonia as measured in whole brain, a process that likely also involves neurons. PMID:20654582

  1. Characterizing solid phase ammonia toxicity in marine sediments

    SciTech Connect

    Ho, K.T.; Burgess, R.M.; Kuhn, A.

    1994-12-31

    The presence and toxicity of ammonia in sediments represents an interesting scientific and regulatory concern. From a scientific perspective, ammonia toxicity is largely pH dependent and easily detected under special exposure conditions. Regulating the concentration of ammonia is difficult because ammonia concentrations may be elevated by naturally occurring anaerobic sediment bacteria; however, these bacteria may be enhanced by excessive carbon inputs into a system. This presentation will demonstrate progress toward characterizing ammonia toxicity.in solid phase exposure. Toxicity tests were conducted using the mysid (Mysidopsis bahia) and the amphipod (Ampelisca abdita). Results from ammonia spiked and ammonia induced whole marine sediments demonstrate pH dependent toxicity under a graduated pH (7, 8 and 9) testing regime. Several metals (Cd, Cu, Ni, Pb and Zn) tested under the graduated pH testing regime showed varying toxicity patterns also as a function of pH. Other compounds, the toxicity of which are pH dependent will be discussed. In addition the results of testing with complex environmental sediments containing high ammonia concentrations and other contaminants will be reported.

  2. Scavenging of ammonia by raindrops in Saturn's great storm clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delitsky, M. L.; Baines, Kevin

    2016-10-01

    Observations of the great Saturn storms of 2010-2011 by Cassini instruments showed a very large depletion in atmospheric ammonia. While dynamics will play a role, the very high solubility of ammonia in water may be another important contributor to ammonia depletion in storms. Ammonia exists in Earth's atmosphere and rainstorms dissolve ammonia to a great degree, leaving almost no NH3 in the atmosphere. Studies by Elperin et al (2011, 2013) show that scavenging of ammonia is greatest as a rainstorm starts and lessens as raindrops fall, tapering off to almost zero by the time the rain reaches the ground (Elperin et al 2009). Ammonia is reaching saturation as it dissolves in the aqueous solution. As concentration increases, NH3 is then converted to aqueous species (NH3)x.(H2O)y (Max and Chapados 2013).Ammonia has the highest solubility in water compared to all other gases in the Saturn atmosphere. The Henry's Law constant for NH3 in water is 60 M/atm at 25 C. For H2S, it is 0.001 M/atm. In Saturn storms, it is "raining UP": As water-laden storm clouds convectively rise, ammonia gas will be scavenged and go into solution to a great degree, whilst all the other gases remain mostly in the gas phase. Aqueous ammonia acts as an antifreeze: if ammonia is dissolved in water cloud droplets to the limit of its solubility, as water droplets rise, they can stay liquid (and continue to scavenge NH3) to well below their normal freezing point of 0 Celsius (273 K). The freezing point for a 30 wt % water-ammonia solution is ~189 K. The pressure level where T = 189 K is at 2.8 bars. The normal freezing point of water occurs at the 9 bar pressure level in Saturn's atmosphere. 2.8 bars occurs at the -51 km altitude (below the 1 bar level). 9 bars is at the -130 km level: a difference of 79 km. A water droplet containing 30 wt% NH3 can move upwards from 9 bars to 2.8 bars (79 km) and still remain liquid, only freezing above that altitude. Calculations by the E-AIM model show that ammonia

  3. Therapeutic effects of renal denervation on renal failure.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yutang; Seto, Sai-Wang; Golledge, Jonathan

    2013-05-01

    Sympathetic nerve activity (SNA) is increased in both patients and experimental animals with renal failure. The kidney is a richly innervated organ and has both efferent and afferent nerves. Renal denervation shows protective effects against renal failure in both animals and humans. The underlying mechanisms include a decrease in blood pressure, a decrease in renal efferent SNA, a decrease in central SNA and sympathetic outflow, and downregulation of the reninangiotensin system. It has been demonstrated that re-innervation occurs within weeks after renal denervation in animals but that no functional re-innervation occurs in humans for over two years after denervation. Renal denervation might not be renal protective in some situations including bile duct ligation-induced renal failure and ischemia/reperfusion-induced acute kidney injury. Catheter-based renal denervation has been applied to patients with both early and end stage renal failure and the published results so far suggest that this procedure is safe and effective at decreasing blood pressure. The effectiveness of renal denervation in improving renal function in patients with renal failure needs to be further investigated.

  4. Alkaline Ammonia Electrolysis on Electrodeposited Platinum for Controllable Hydrogen Production.

    PubMed

    Gwak, Jieun; Choun, Myounghoon; Lee, Jaeyoung

    2016-02-19

    Ammonia is beginning to attract a great deal of attention as an alternative energy source carrier, because clean hydrogen can be produced through electrolytic processes without the emission of COx . In this study, we deposited various shapes of Pt catalysts under potentiostatic mode; the electrocatalytic oxidation behavior of ammonia using these catalysts was studied in alkaline media. The electrodeposited Pt was characterized by both qualitative and quantitative analysis. To discover the optimal structure and the effect of ammonia concentration, the bulk pH value, reaction temperature, and applied current of ammonia oxidation were investigated using potential sweep and galvanostatic methods. Finally, ammonia electrolysis was conducted using a zero-gap cell, producing highly pure hydrogen with an energy efficiency over 80 %. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  5. Ammonia and the NOx budget of the troposphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levine, J. S.; Augustsson, T. R.; Hoell, J. M.

    1982-01-01

    Liu et al. (1980) suggested that NOx transported from the stratosphere, as opposed to the anthropogenic source of NOx, may be the dominant source that controls the distribution of NOx in the global troposphere. These ideas require a reinvestigation, and, in particular, an assessment of the role of the oxidation of ammonia as a source of NOx. Attention is given to the results of an ammonia measurement program, in which the vertical distribution of ammonia in the troposphere and lower stratosphere could be studied with the aid of the Infrared Heterodyne Radiometer (IHR), a solar-viewing remote sensor. A one-dimensional photochemical model of the troposphere reported by Levine et al. (1980) was employed to study the chemical and physical processes that control the loss of ammonia in the troposphere. The results of the considered investigation suggest that the oxidation of ammonia may indeed be a significant source of NOx in the troposphere.

  6. Copper-induced ammonia N-H functionalization.

    PubMed

    Álvarez, María; Álvarez, Eleuterio; Fructos, Manuel R; Urbano, Juan; Pérez, Pedro J

    2016-10-07

    The activation of ammonia has been achieved with the aid of the Tp(Ms)Cu core (Tp(Ms) = hydrotris(3-mesityl-pyrazolyl)borate). Complexes of the general composition Tp(Ms)Cu(amine) (1-4) including the ammonia adduct Tp(Ms)Cu(NH3) (1) have been synthesized and fully spectroscopical- and structurally characterized. Coordinated ammonia in 1 has been reacted with Ph3CPF6 yielding Tp(Ms)Cu(NH2CPh3) (5) as a result of N-H cleavage and N-C bond formation. In a parallel manner the catalytic functionalization of ammonia with ethyl diazoacetate leading to glycinate derivatives has been developed with Tp(Ms)Cu(THF) as the catalyst, in the first example of this transformation with ammonia and a copper-based system.

  7. [Hereditary renal cancer].

    PubMed

    Sanz-Ortega, Julián; Olivier, Carlos; Pérez Segura, Pedro; Galante Romo, Isabel; San José Mansó, Luis; Saez, Mamen

    2009-02-01

    Kidney cancer is the tenth most common cause of cancer death. There are a growing number of genes known to be associated with an increased risk of specific types of kidney cancer. People with Von Hippel-Lindau syndrome have about a 40% risk of developing multiple bilateral clear cell kidney cancers. They can also develop retinal and brain hemangioblastoma, kidneys or pancreas cysts, pheochromocytoma and endolymphatic sac tumor. Four phenotypes with different renal cancer and pheocromocitoma risk have been described depending on the germline mutation. Hereditary papillary renal cell carcinoma syndrome has type 1 papillary renal cell carcinomas associated with protooncogene c-MET germline mutations. Birt-Hogg-Dubé syndrome has FLCN gene mutations associated with fibrofolliculomas, lung cysts with a high risk for spontaneous pneumothorax, and a 15% to 30% risk of kidney cancer (most classified as chromophobe carcinoma, oncocytoma or oncocytic hybrid, but clear cell and papillary kidney cancers have also been reported). Histopathological findings such as oncocytosis and oncocytic hybrids are very unusual outside the syndrome. Hereditary leiomyomatosis and renal cell cancer syndrome shows mutations of Fumarate hydratase gene and cutaneous leiomyomata in 76% of affected individuals, uterine leiomyomata in 100% of females, and unilateral, solitary, and aggressive papillary renal cancer in 10 to 16% of patients. A specific histopathological change is eosinophilic prominent nucleoli with a perinucleolar halo. Tuberous sclerosis complex is one of the most prevalent (1/5.800) hereditary syndromes where renal disease is the second leading cause of death, associated with angiomyolipomas (70%), renal cysts, oncocytomas or clear cell cancer.

  8. Ammonia emissions in Europe, part I: Development of a dynamical ammonia emission inventory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Backes, Anna; Aulinger, Armin; Bieser, Johannes; Matthias, Volker; Quante, Markus

    2016-04-01

    Nitrogen input from agricultural ammonia emissions into the environment causes numerous environmental and health problems. The purpose of this study is to present and evaluate an improved ammonia emission inventory based on a dynamical temporal parameterization suitable to compare and assess ammonia abatement strategies. The setup of the dynamical time profile (DTP) consists of individual temporal profiles for ammonia emissions, calculated for each model grid cell, depending on temperature, crop type, fertilizer and manure application, as well as on local legislation. It is based on the method of Skjøth et al., 2004 and Gyldenkærne et al., 2005. The method has been modified to cover the study area and to improve the performance of the emission model. To compare the results of the dynamical approach with the results of the static time profile (STP) the ammonia emission parameterizations have been implemented in the SMOKE for Europe emission model. Furthermore, the influence on secondary aerosol formation in the North Sea region and possible changes triggered through the use of a modified temporal distribution of ammonia emissions were analysed with the CMAQ chemistry transport model. The results were evaluated with observations of the European Monitoring and Evaluation Programme (EMEP). The correlation coefficient of NH3 improved significantly for 12 out of 16 EMEP measurement stations and an improvement in predicting the Normalized Mean Error can be seen for particulate NH4+ and NO3-. The prediction of the 95th percentile of the daily average concentrations has improved for NH3, NH4+ and NO3-. The NH3 concentration modelled with the STP is 157% higher in winter, and about 22% lower in early summer than the one modelled with the new DTP. Consequently, the influence of the DTP on the formation of secondary aerosols is particularly noticeable in winter, when the PM2.5 concentration is 25% lower in comparison to the use of STP for temporal disaggregation. Besides

  9. Update on Renal Mass Biopsy.

    PubMed

    Haifler, Miki; Kutikov, Alexander

    2017-04-01

    Renal masses are diagnosed with an increasing frequency. However, a significant proportion of these masses are benign, and the majority of malignant tumors are biologically indolent. Furthermore, renal tumors are often harbored by the elderly and comorbid patients. As such, matching of renal tumor biology to appropriate treatment intensity is an urgent clinical need. Renal mass biopsy is currently a very useful clinical tool that can assist with critical clinical decision-making in patients with renal mass. Yet, renal mass biopsy is associated with limitations and, as such, may not be appropriate for all patients.

  10. Malignant renal tumors in children

    PubMed Central

    Sanchez, Thomas Ray; Wootton-Gorges, Sandra

    2015-01-01

    Renal malignancies are common in children. While the majority of malignant renal masses are secondary to Wilms tumor, it can be challenging to distinguish from more aggressive renal masses. For suspicious renal lesions, it is crucial to ensure prompt diagnosis in order to select the appropriate surgical procedure and treatment. This review article will discuss the common differential diagnosis that can be encountered when evaluating a suspicious renal mass in the pediatric population. This includes clear cell sarcoma of the kidney, malignant rhabdoid tumor, renal medullary carcinoma and lymphoma. PMID:28326263

  11. Cerebrovascular, cardiovascular and strength responses to acute ammonia inhalation.

    PubMed

    Perry, Blake G; Pritchard, Hayden J; Barnes, Matthew J

    2016-03-01

    Ammonia is used as a stimulant in strength based sports to increase arousal and offset fatigue however little is known about its physiological and performance effects. The purpose of this study was twofold (1) establish the physiological response to acute ammonia inhalation (2) determine whether the timing of the physiological response corresponds with a performance enhancement, if any. Fifteen healthy males completed two trials. Trial one investigated the beat-to-beat middle cerebral artery blood flow velocity (MCAv), heart rate (HR) and mean arterial pressure (MAP) response to ammonia inhalation. During trial two, participants performed a maximal single mid-thigh pull (MTP) at various time points following ammonia inhalation in a randomised order: MTPs were conducted immediately, 15, 30 and 60 s following ammonia inhalation. A MTP with no ammonia inhalation served as the control. During this trial maximal MTP force, rate of force development (RFD) and electromyography (EMG) activity were recorded. MCAvmean increased and peaked on average by 6 cm s(-1) (P < 0.001), 9.4 ± 5.5 s following ammonia inhalation. Similarly, HR was increased by 6 ± 11 beats per minute 15 s following ammonia inhalation (P < 0.001). MAP remained unchanged following inhalation (P = 0.51). The use and timing of ammonia inhalation had no effect on maximal force, RFD or EMG (all P > 0.2) compared to control. MCAv was elevated despite no increase in MAP occurring; this is indicative of a cerebrovascular vasodilation. Despite the marked cerebrovascular and cardiovascular response to ammonia inhalation no ergogenic effect was observed during the MTP, irrespective of the timing of administration.

  12. Toxic levels of ammonia in human brain abscess.

    PubMed

    Dahlberg, Daniel; Ivanovic, Jugoslav; Hassel, Bjørnar

    2016-03-01

    Brain abscesses could lead to cerebral symptoms through tissue destruction, edema, changes in brain architecture, and increased intracranial pressure. However, the possibility that the pus itself could contribute to symptoms has received little attention. Brain abscesses are areas of tissue destruction, proteolysis, and formation of free amino acids, which are energy substrates for bacteria and possible sources of ammonia. Ammonia is neurotoxic, may cause brain edema, and could contribute to the symptoms of brain abscesses. The authors analyzed the extracellular phase of pus from 14 patients with brain abscesses with respect to ammonia and amino acids. For comparison, CSF from 10 patients undergoing external ventricular drainage was included. The ammonia-forming ability of Streptococcus intermedius and Staphylococcus aureus, two common microbial isolates in brain abscesses, was studied in vitro. In brain abscesses ammonia was 15.5 mmol/L (median value; range 1.7-69.2 mmol/L). In CSF ammonia was 29 μmol/L (range 17-55 μmol/L; difference from value in pus: p < 0.001). The total concentration of amino acids in brain abscesses was 1.12-16 times higher than the ammonia concentration (p = 0.011). The median glucose value in pus was 0 mmol/L (range 0-2.1 mmol/L), lactate was 21 mmol/L (range 3.3-26.5 mmol/L), and pH was 6.8 (range 6.2-7.3). In vitro, S. intermedius and S. aureus formed ammonia at 6-7 mmol/L in 24 hours when incubated with 20 proteinogenic amino acids plus g-aminobutyric acid (GABA), taurine, and glutathione at 1 mmol/L. Intracerebral abscesses contain toxic levels of ammonia. At the concentrations found in pus, ammonia could contribute to the brain edema and the symptoms of brain abscesses.

  13. The plasma ammonia response to cycle exercise in COPD.

    PubMed

    Calvert, L D; Singh, S J; Greenhaff, P L; Morgan, M D; Steiner, M C

    2008-04-01

    The plasma ammonia response to exercise in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) was examined and the relationship between plasma ammonia concentration and muscle adenine nucleotide metabolism was explored. In total, 25 stable COPD patients and 13 similar-aged controls underwent incremental and constant-work rate cycle exercise tests. Arterialised venous blood was sampled at rest, at 1-min intervals during exercise and ammonia and lactate concentration. Peak incremental work rate was significantly less in COPD subjects (67+/-21 W) than similar-aged controls (156+/-46 W). In COPD and control subjects, plasma ammonia concentration increased during incremental exercise until 2 min post-exercise and then declined by 5 min post-exercise. However, two distinct patterns were seen in COPD subjects. In one group (n = 16), ammonia increased (42.8+/-3.3 micromol x L(-1)) by a similar magnitude as the controls (55.5+/-7.0 micromol x L(-1)). In the second COPD group (n = 9), no ammonia increase was observed despite a similar lactate increase. Ammonia change with incremental and constant-work rate exercise strongly correlated in COPD subjects. Plasma ammonia increase correlated with muscle inosine-5'-monophosphate formation after constant-work rate exercise. Plasma ammonia concentration increases during incremental and constant-work rate cycle exercise in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease subjects at lower absolute work rates compared with similar-aged controls. The plasma ammonia response may provide useful information about adenine nucleotide metabolism and, therefore, muscle fatigue during exercise in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

  14. Elevated plasma ammonia level in hepatic cirrhosis: role of glucagon.

    PubMed

    Kabadi, U M; Eisenstein, A B; Konda, J

    1985-03-01

    Elevated plasma ammonia level in hepatic cirrhosis has been attributed to a lack of conversion of enteric ammonia into urea or to its entry into systemic circulation via portasystemic shunting, or to both. It is exaggerated by excessive protein intake. Because hyperglucagonemia is well documented in cirrhosis and a protein meal is an effective glucagon secretagogue, plasma glucose, insulin, glucagon, and ammonia levels were determined in 50 cirrhotic patients after an overnight fast. Effects of a protein meal were also assessed in 20 of these patients. Plasma glucose was normal and remained unaltered after a protein meal. Insulin, glucagon, and ammonia levels were elevated, but only in patients with advanced liver dysfunction. Ammonia levels correlated significantly with glucagon (r = 0.61, p less than 0.001), but not with insulin or glucose levels. Insulin and glucagon levels rose after a protein meal in all patients and controls; whereas a significant rise in the ammonia level occurred only in decompensated cirrhotics. Elevation of the ammonia level was significantly correlated with fasting glucagon (r = 0.54, p less than 0.05), as well as with glucagon response (r = 0.65, p less than 0.01), but not with basal insulin or insulin response. Furthermore, the rise in ammonia level occurred too early to be accounted for by enteric generation. Finally, direct effects of glucagon administration on plasma glucose and serum ammonia were examined in 15 cirrhotic patients. Glucose response was significantly blunted in cirrhotic patients as compared with normal subjects, whereas serum ammonia rose promptly but only in cirrhotics, with maximum rise being noted in cirrhotic patients with advanced liver dysfunction. This study, therefore, suggests that hyperglucagonemia may contribute significantly to hyperammonemia in hepatic cirrhosis.

  15. Doppler spectroscopy of hydrogen Balmer lines in a hollow cathode glow discharge in ammonia and argon-ammonia mixture

    SciTech Connect

    Sisovic, N. M.; Konjevic, N.

    2008-11-15

    The results of Doppler spectroscopy of hydrogen Balmer lines from a stainless steel (SS) and copper (Cu) hollow cathode (HC) glow discharge in ammonia and argon-ammonia mixture are reported. The experimental profiles in ammonia discharge are fitted well by superposing three Gaussian profiles. The half widths, in energy units, of narrow and medium Gaussians are in the ranges 0.3-0.4 eV and 3-4 eV, respectively, for both hollow cathodes what is expected on the basis of earlier electron beam{yields}NH{sub 3} experiments. The half widths of the largest Gaussian in ammonia are 46 and 55 eV for SS and Cu HC, respectively. In argon-ammonia discharge, three Gaussians are also required to fit experimental profiles. While half widths of narrow and medium Gaussians are similar to those in ammonia, the half widths of the largest Gaussians are 35 and 42 eV for SS and Cu HC, respectively. The half widths of the largest Gaussians in ammonia and in argon-ammonia mixture indicate the presence of excessive Doppler broadening.

  16. Simple renal cyst and renal dysfunction: A pilot study using dimercaptosuccinic acid renal Scan.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Taekmin; Lim, Bumjin; You, Dalsan; Hong, Bumsik; Hong, Jun Hyuk; Kim, Choung-Soo; Jeong, In Gab

    2016-08-01

    Little is known about the association between renal cyst and renal dysfunction. We evaluated the deterioration of renal function in patients with unilateral, large, simple renal cysts. Fifty patients with unilateral, simple renal cysts measuring ≥ 4 cm (cyst group) and 50 kidney donors (control group) were enrolled. Dimercaptosuccinic acid (DMSA) renal scans were performed to calculate split renal function. The differences between split renal function were calculated and compared. Clinical factors affecting decreased renal function in the cyst group were assessed. The mean age of the patients in the cyst group was higher than the control group (59.1 vs 39.2 years; P = 0.001). Patients with renal cysts tended to be diagnosed with hypertension (P = 0.001), However, the two groups did not significantly differ in terms of the other characteristics. The median cyst size was 7.2 cm (range, 4.5-14.2), and 31 of the 50 patients (60.2%) in the cyst group demonstrated decreased renal function in the cystic kidney units (median: 5.8%; range, 0.2-33). Although there were no differences in split renal function (50.1% vs 49.9%; P = 0.629) in the control group, the relative renal function of the cystic kidney units were significantly lower than the contralateral kidney units in the cyst group (48.3% vs 51.7%; P = 0.001). The decrease in relative renal function (>8%) in the cystic kidney units was associated with a higher serum uric acid levels and higher RENAL complexity (P = 0.035 and P = 0.007, respectively). A significant proportion of unilateral, large, simple renal cysts are associated with decreased relative renal function on DMSA renal scans. © 2015 Asian Pacific Society of Nephrology.

  17. Visualizing renal primary cilia.

    PubMed

    Deane, James A; Verghese, Elizabeth; Martelotto, Luciano G; Cain, Jason E; Galtseva, Alya; Rosenblum, Norman D; Watkins, D Neil; Ricardo, Sharon D

    2013-03-01

    Renal primary cilia are microscopic sensory organelles found on the apical surface of epithelial cells of the nephron and collecting duct. They are based upon a microtubular cytoskeleton, bounded by a specialized membrane, and contain an array of proteins that facilitate their assembly, maintenance and function. Cilium-based signalling is important for the control of epithelial differentiation and has been implicated in the pathogenesis of various cystic kidney diseases and in renal repair. As such, visualizing renal primary cilia and understanding their composition has become an essential component of many studies of inherited kidney disease and mechanisms of epithelial regeneration. Primary cilia were initially identified in the kidney using electron microscopy and this remains a useful technique for the high resolution examination of these organelles. New reagents and techniques now also allow the structure and composition of primary cilia to be analysed in detail using fluorescence microscopy. Primary cilia can be imaged in situ in sections of kidney, and many renal-derived cell lines produce primary cilia in culture providing a simplified and accessible system in which to investigate these organelles. Here we outline microscopy-based techniques commonly used for studying renal primary cilia.

  18. Renal aneurysms and pseudoaneurysms.

    PubMed

    Cura, Marco; Elmerhi, Fadi; Bugnogne, Alejandro; Palacios, Raul; Suri, Rajeev; Dalsaso, Timothy

    2011-01-01

    Pseudoaneurysms and aneurysms are abnormal dilatations of the vessel lumen. Pseudoaneurysm is a perfused hematoma contained by the adventitia and perivascular tissues that is in communication with the lumen of an adjacent artery or vein. Aneurysm is a dilatation of the vessel lumen involving all three layers of the blood vessel wall. Renal artery aneurysms (RAA) are uncommon but the widespread use of cross-sectional imaging and incidental detection of RAA may result in an increasing number of cases diagnosed. Renal artery pseudoaneurysms are suspected in bleeding patients after penetrating renal trauma. Imaging plays a major role in the detection of renal pseudoaneurysms and aneurysms and diagnoses aneurysm rupture and active bleeding. Computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance imaging, and digital subtraction angiography can characterize lesion size, shape, and location and identify other aneurysms and pseudoaneurysms, helping to narrow the differential diagnosis and to understand the vascular anatomy for guiding proper treatment. Endovascular treatments have contributed considerably in the management of renal pseudoaneurysms and aneurysms. The use of coil embolization or covered stent placement prevents the mortality and mobility of surgery. The article describes imaging features and the endovascular therapies to treat these vascular processes and their possible complications. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Renal disease in Colombia.

    PubMed

    Gómez, Rafael Alberto

    2006-01-01

    Chronic renal disease represents a problem of public health in Colombia. Its prevalence has increased in last decade, with a prevalence of 44.7 patients per million (ppm) in 1993 to 294.6 ppm in 2004, considering that only 56.2% of the population has access to the health. This increase complies with the implementation of Law 100 of 1993, offering greater coverage of health services to the Colombian population. The cost of these pathologies is equivalent to the 2.49% of the budget for health of the nation. The three most common causes of renal failure are diabetes mellitus (DM; 30%), arterial hypertension (30%), and glomerulonephritis (7.85%). In incident patients, the DM accounts for 32.9%. The rate of global mortality is 15.8%, 17.4% in hemodialysis and 15.1% in peritoneal dialysis. In 2004, 467 renal transplants were made, 381 of deceased donor with an incidence of 10.3 ppm. The excessive cost of these pathologies can cause the nation's health care system to collapse if preventative steps are not taken. In December of 2004, the Colombian Association of Nephrology with the participation of the Latin American Society of Nephrology and Arterial Hypertension wrote the "Declaration of Bogotá," committing the state's scientific societies and promotional health companies to develop a model of attention for renal health that, in addition to implementing national registries, continues to manage renal disease.

  20. Renal physiology of nocturia.

    PubMed

    Verbalis, Joseph G

    2014-04-01

    Renal function, diurnal fluctuations in arginine vasopressin (AVP) secretion, sex, and advanced age affect urine formation and may contribute to nocturia. Renal effects of AVP are mediated by AVP V2 receptors in the kidney collecting duct. Changes in AVP concentration have the greatest relative effects on urine volume when AVP levels are low; therefore small changes can have a large effect on renal water excretion. AVP is the major regulator of water excretion by the kidneys, and AVP levels have been shown to affect nocturnal voiding. Results of several studies show that patients with nocturia had no significant variation in plasma AVP, whereas patients without nocturia had significant diurnal variation in plasma AVP. The V2 receptor gene is located on the X chromosome, which has important sex-specific consequences. For example, mutations in the V2 gene can cause nephrogenic diabetes insipidus, predominantly in men. Age-related changes in water metabolism are associated with overall body composition, kidney, and brain. Older people generally experience decreased extracellular fluid and plasma volume, which leads to increased adverse consequences from net body water gain or loss. Renal function declines with age, and the ability to concentrate urine and conserve sodium is reduced in the elderly. Thirst perception is also decreased in the elderly, who, compared with younger people, tend to hypersecrete AVP in response to higher plasma osmolality, possibly resulting in hyponatremia. These aspects of renal physiology should be considered when antidiuretic drugs are prescribed for the treatment of nocturia.

  1. Percutaneous renal tumour biopsy.

    PubMed

    Delahunt, Brett; Samaratunga, Hemamali; Martignoni, Guido; Srigley, John R; Evans, Andrew J; Brunelli, Matteo

    2014-09-01

    The use of percutaneous renal tumour biopsy (RTB) as a diagnostic tool for the histological characterization of renal masses has increased dramatically within the last 30 years. This increased utilization has paralleled advances in imaging techniques and an evolving knowledge of the clinical value of nephron sparing surgery. Improved biopsy techniques using image guidance, coupled with the use of smaller gauge needles has led to a decrease in complication rates. Reports from series containing a large number of cases have shown the non-diagnostic rate of RTB to range from 4% to 21%. Re-biopsy has been shown to reduce this rate, while the use of molecular markers further improves diagnostic sensitivity. In parallel with refinements of the biopsy procedure, there has been a rapid expansion in our understanding of the complexity of renal cell neoplasia. The 2013 Vancouver Classification is the current classification for renal tumours, and contains five additional entities recognized as novel forms of renal malignancy. The diagnosis of tumour morphotype on RTB is usually achievable on routine histology; however, immunohistochemical studies may be of assistance in difficult cases. The morphology of the main tumour subtypes, based upon the Vancouver Classification, is described and differentiating features are discussed. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Dynamic study of rectally absorbed ammonia in liver cirrhosis using (13N)ammonia and a positron camera

    SciTech Connect

    Koen, H.; Okuda, K.; Musha, H.; Tateno, Y.; Fukuda, N.; Matsumoto, T.; Shisido, F.; Rikitake, T,; Iinuma, T.; Kurisu, A.; Arimizu, N.

    1980-11-01

    (13N)Ammonia produced by the cyclotron was instilled intrarectally in patients with cirrhosis and other liver diseases to study the turnover of rectally absorbed (12N)ammonia. In the control, (13N)ammonia was absorbed quickly and visualized the liver, whereas in patients with cirrhosis, the lungs and heart were first visualized, and 13N activity over the head was also higher. It was suggested that a large proportion of absorbed (13N)ammonia bypassed hepatocytes and reached peripheral tissues in cirrhosis. The heart/liver ratio of 13N and 13N over the head were correlated with various indices of portal hypertension. The relative proportion of nonammonia 13N metabolites in blood was lower at 5 and 15 min after administration in cirrhosis, suggesting a reduced capacity of the liver to remove and metabolize ammonia.

  3. Characteristic of local boiling heat transfer of ammonia and ammonia / water binary mixture on the plate type evaporator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okamoto, Akio; Arima, Hirofumi; Ikegami, Yasuyuki

    2011-08-01

    Power generation using small temperature difference such as ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC) and discharged thermal energy conversion (DTEC) is expected to be the countermeasures against global warming problem. As ammonia and ammonia/water are used in evaporators for OTEC and DTEC as working fluids, the research of their local boiling heat transfer is important for improvement of the power generation efficiency. Measurements of local boiling heat transfer coefficients were performed for ammonia /water mixture ( z = 0.9-1) on a vertical flat plate heat exchanger in a range of mass flux (7.5-15 kg/m2 s), heat flux (15-23 kW/m2), and pressure (0.7-0.9 MPa). The result shows that in the case of ammonia /water mixture, the local heat transfer coefficients increase with an increase of mass flux and composition of ammonia, and decrease with an increase of heat flux.

  4. Study on the mechanism of copper-ammonia complex decomposition in struvite formation process and enhanced ammonia and copper removal.

    PubMed

    Peng, Cong; Chai, Liyuan; Tang, Chongjian; Min, Xiaobo; Song, Yuxia; Duan, Chengshan; Yu, Cheng

    2017-01-01

    Heavy metals and ammonia are difficult to remove from wastewater, as they easily combine into refractory complexes. The struvite formation method (SFM) was applied for the complex decomposition and simultaneous removal of heavy metal and ammonia. The results indicated that ammonia deprivation by SFM was the key factor leading to the decomposition of the copper-ammonia complex ion. Ammonia was separated from solution as crystalline struvite, and the copper mainly co-precipitated as copper hydroxide together with struvite. Hydrogen bonding and electrostatic attraction were considered to be the main surface interactions between struvite and copper hydroxide. Hydrogen bonding was concluded to be the key factor leading to the co-precipitation. In addition, incorporation of copper ions into the struvite crystal also occurred during the treatment process. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  5. Regeneration of ammonia borane spent fuel by direct reaction with hydrazine and liquid ammonia.

    PubMed

    Sutton, Andrew D; Burrell, Anthony K; Dixon, David A; Garner, Edward B; Gordon, John C; Nakagawa, Tessui; Ott, Kevin C; Robinson, J Pierce; Vasiliu, Monica

    2011-03-18

    Ammonia borane (H(3)N-BH(3), AB) is a lightweight material containing a high density of hydrogen (H(2)) that can be readily liberated for use in fuel cell-powered applications. However, in the absence of a straightforward, efficient method for regenerating AB from dehydrogenated polymeric spent fuel, its full potential as a viable H(2) storage material will not be realized. We demonstrate that the spent fuel type derived from the removal of greater than two equivalents of H(2) per molecule of AB (i.e., polyborazylene, PB) can be converted back to AB nearly quantitatively by 24-hour treatment with hydrazine (N(2)H(4)) in liquid ammonia (NH(3)) at 40°C in a sealed pressure vessel.

  6. Fungal and Plant Phenylalanine Ammonia-lyase

    PubMed Central

    Hyun, Min Woo; Yun, Yeo Hong; Kim, Jun Young

    2011-01-01

    L-Phenylalanine is one of the essential amino acids that cannot be synthesized in mammals in adequate amounts to meet the requirements for protein synthesis. Fungi and plants are able to synthesize phenylalanine via the shikimic acid pathway. L-Phenylalanine, derived from the shikimic acid pathway, is used directly for protein synthesis in plants or metabolized through the phenylpropanoid pathway. This phenylpropanoid metabolism leads to the biosynthesis of a wide array of phenylpropanoid secondary products. The first step in this metabolic sequence involves the action of phenylalanine ammonia-lyase (PAL). The discovery of PAL enzyme in fungi and the detection of 14CO2 production from 14C-ring-labeled phenylalanine and cinnamic acid demonstrated that certain fungi can degrade phenylalanine by a pathway involving an initial deamination to cinnamic acid, as happens in plants. In this review, we provide background information on PAL and a recent update on the presence of PAL genes in fungi. PMID:22783113

  7. Ammonia-Free NOx Control System

    SciTech Connect

    S. Wu; Z. Fan; R. Herman

    2004-03-31

    Research is being conducted under United States Department of Energy (DOE) Contract DEFC26-03NT41865 to develop a new technology to achieve very low levels of NOx emissions from pulverized coal fired boiler systems by employing a novel system level integration between the PC combustion process and the catalytic NOx reduction with CO present in the combustion flue gas. The combustor design and operating conditions will be optimized to achieve atypical flue gas conditions. This approach will not only suppress NOx generation during combustion but also further reduce NOx over a downstream catalytic reactor that does not require addition of an external reductant, such as ammonia. This report describes the work performed during the January 1 to March 31, 2004 time period.

  8. Ammonia-Free NOx Control System

    SciTech Connect

    S. Wu

    2003-12-31

    Research is being conducted under United States Department of Energy (DOE) Contract DEFC26-03NT41865 to develop a new technology to achieve very low levels of NOx emissions from pulverized coal fired boiler systems by employing a novel system level integration between the PC combustion process and the catalytic NOx reduction with CO present in the combustion flue gas. The combustor design and operating conditions will be optimized to achieve atypical flue gas conditions. This approach will not only suppress NOx generation during combustion but also further reduce NOx over a downstream catalytic reactor that does not require addition of an external reductant, such as ammonia. This report describes the work performed during the October 1 to December 31, 2003 time period.

  9. Nitridation of chromium powder in ammonia atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Ling; Zhen, Qiang; Li, Rong

    2015-03-01

    CrN powder was synthesized by nitriding Cr metal in ammonia gas flow, and its chemical reaction mechanism and nitridation process were studied. Through thermodynamic calculations, the Cr-N-O predominance diagrams were constructed for different temperatures. Chromium nitride formed at 7002-1200°C under relatively higher nitrogen and lower oxygen partial pressures. Phases in the products were then investigated using X-ray diffraction (XRD), and the Cr2N content varied with reaction temperature and holding time. The results indicate that the Cr metal powder nitridation process can be explained by a diffusion model. Further, Cr2N formed as an intermediate product because of an incomplete reaction, which was observed by high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM). After nitriding at 1000°C for 20 h, CrN powder with an average grain size of 63 nm was obtained, and the obtained sample was analyzed by using a scanning electron microscope (SEM).

  10. Ammonia-Free NOx Control System

    SciTech Connect

    Song Wu; Zhen Fan; Andrew H. Seltzer; Richard G. Herman

    2004-09-30

    Research is being conducted under United States Department of Energy (DOE) Contract DEFC26-03NT41865 to develop a new technology to achieve very low levels of NOx emissions from pulverized coal fired boiler systems by employing a novel system level integration between the PC combustion process and the catalytic NOx reduction with CO present in the combustion flue gas. The combustor design and operating conditions will be optimized to achieve atypical flue gas conditions. This approach will not only suppress NOx generation during combustion but also further reduce NOx over a downstream catalytic reactor that does not require addition of an external reductant, such as ammonia. This report describes the work performed during the July 1 to September 30, 2004 time period.

  11. Hydrogen production from ammonia using sodium amide.

    PubMed

    David, William I F; Makepeace, Joshua W; Callear, Samantha K; Hunter, Hazel M A; Taylor, James D; Wood, Thomas J; Jones, Martin O

    2014-09-24

    This paper presents a new type of process for the cracking of ammonia (NH3) that is an alternative to the use of rare or transition metal catalysts. Effecting the decomposition of NH3 using the concurrent stoichiometric decomposition and regeneration of sodium amide (NaNH2) via sodium metal (Na), this represents a significant departure in reaction mechanism compared with traditional surface catalysts. In variable-temperature NH3 decomposition experiments, using a simple flow reactor, the Na/NaNH2 system shows superior performance to supported nickel and ruthenium catalysts, reaching 99.2% decomposition efficiency with 0.5 g of NaNH2 in a 60 sccm NH3 flow at 530 °C. As an abundant and inexpensive material, the development of NaNH2-based NH3 cracking systems may promote the utilization of NH3 for sustainable energy storage purposes.

  12. Ammonia-Free NOx Control System

    SciTech Connect

    Song Wu; Zhen Fan; Richard G. Herman

    2004-12-31

    Research is being conducted under United States Department of Energy (DOE) Contract DEFC26-03NT41865 to develop a new technology to achieve very low levels of NOx emissions from pulverized coal fired boiler systems by employing a novel system level integration between the PC combustion process and the catalytic NOx reduction with CO present in the combustion flue gas. The combustor design and operating conditions will be optimized to achieve atypical flue gas conditions. This approach will not only suppress NOx generation during combustion but also further reduce NOx over a downstream catalytic reactor that does not require addition of an external reductant, such as ammonia. This report describes the work performed during the October 1 to December 30, 2004 time period.

  13. Ammonia-Free NOx Control System

    SciTech Connect

    Zhen Fan; Song Wu; Richard G. Herman

    2004-06-30

    Research is being conducted under United States Department of Energy (DOE) Contract DEFC26-03NT41865 to develop a new technology to achieve very low levels of NOx emissions from pulverized coal fired boiler systems by employing a novel system level integration between the PC combustion process and the catalytic NOx reduction with CO present in the combustion flue gas. The combustor design and operating conditions will be optimized to achieve atypical flue gas conditions. This approach will not only suppress NOx generation during combustion but also further reduce NOx over a downstream catalytic reactor that does not require addition of an external reductant, such as ammonia. This report describes the work performed during the April 1 to June 30, 2004 time period.

  14. Chronic toxicity of ammonia to fathead minnows

    SciTech Connect

    Thurston, R.V.; Russo, R.C.; Meyn, E.L.; Zajdel, R.K.; Smith, C.E.

    1986-03-01

    Chronic effects of ammonia on the fathead minnow Pimephales promelas were studied in the laboratory in two flow-through tests, each test lasting approximately 1 year. Fish were exposed to five test concentrations over the range 0.07-0.96 mg/L un-ionized ammonia (NH/sub 3/); the mean pH of the test water was 8.0, and the mean temperature was 24.2/sup 0/C. The tests started with 3- to 5-d-old larvae that were reared to sexual maturity; progeny of these fish (F/sub 1/) were reared until they were 60 d old. The 5% probability level was chosen to indicate significance. No effects were observed on growth or survival of parental fish at 0.44 mg/L NH/sub 3/, or on egg production or viability at 0.37 mg/L, but effects on all of these were observed at 0.91 mg/L. Growth and survival of F/sub 1/ larvae were not affected at 0.36 mg/L NH/sub 3/, which was the highest concentration at which these were tested. Egg hatching success was not affected at 0.19 mg/L NH/sub 3/, but was at 0.37 mg/L. Brain lesions were common in parental fish at all stages of development at exposure concentrations of 0.21 mg/L NH/sub 3/ and higher, but not at 0.11 mg/L; no other histopathologic effects were observed at any of the test concentrations. The chronic-effects threshold concentration, based on survival, growth, and reproductive success, is estimated to be 0.27 mg/L NH/sub 3/ for the conditions of these tests. Based on histological damage, however, this concentration is estimated to be 0.15 mg/L NH/sub 3/.

  15. Ammonium recruitment and ammonia transport by E. coli ammonia channel AmtB.

    PubMed

    Nygaard, Thomas P; Rovira, Carme; Peters, Günther H; Jensen, Morten Ø

    2006-12-15

    To investigate substrate recruitment and transport across the Escherichia coli Ammonia transporter B (AmtB) protein, we performed molecular dynamics simulations of the AmtB trimer. We have identified residues important in recruitment of ammonium and intraluminal binding sites selective of ammonium, which provide a means of cation selectivity. Our results indicate that A162 guides translocation of an extraluminal ammonium into the pore lumen. We propose a mechanism for transporting the intraluminally recruited proton back to periplasm. Our mechanism conforms to net transport of ammonia and can explain why ammonia conduction is lost upon mutation of the conserved residue D160. We unify previous suggestions of D160 having either a structural or an ammonium binding function. Finally, our simulations show that the channel lumen is hydrated from the cytoplasmic side via the formation of single file water, while the F107/F215 stack at the inner-most part of the periplasmic vestibule constitutes a hydrophobic filter preventing AmtB from conducting water.

  16. Ammonium Recruitment and Ammonia Transport by E. coli Ammonia Channel AmtB

    PubMed Central

    Nygaard, Thomas P.; Rovira, Carme; Peters, Günther H.; Jensen, Morten Ø.

    2006-01-01

    To investigate substrate recruitment and transport across the Escherichia coli Ammonia transporter B (AmtB) protein, we performed molecular dynamics simulations of the AmtB trimer. We have identified residues important in recruitment of ammonium and intraluminal binding sites selective of ammonium, which provide a means of cation selectivity. Our results indicate that A162 guides translocation of an extraluminal ammonium into the pore lumen. We propose a mechanism for transporting the intraluminally recruited proton back to periplasm. Our mechanism conforms to net transport of ammonia and can explain why ammonia conduction is lost upon mutation of the conserved residue D160. We unify previous suggestions of D160 having either a structural or an ammonium binding function. Finally, our simulations show that the channel lumen is hydrated from the cytoplasmic side via the formation of single file water, while the F107/F215 stack at the inner-most part of the periplasmic vestibule constitutes a hydrophobic filter preventing AmtB from conducting water. PMID:17012311

  17. Paecilomyces variotii: A Fungus Capable of Removing Ammonia Nitrogen and Inhibiting Ammonia Emission from Manure

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Zhiyun; Liu, Guohua; Cai, Huiyi; Shi, Pengjun; Chang, Wenhuan; Zhang, Shu; Zheng, Aijuan; Xie, Qing; Ma, Jianshuang

    2016-01-01

    Ammonia (NH3) emissions from animal manure are a significant environmental and public concern. Despite the numerous studies regarding NH3 emissions from manure, few of them have considered microbial nitrification approaches, especially fungal nitrification. In this study, a filamentous fungus was isolated from chicken manure and was used for nitrification. The species was Paecilomyces variotii by morphological characteristics and 18S rDNA gene sequencing. It played the biggest role in the removal of ammonium at pH 4.0–7.0, C/N ratio of 10–40, temperature of 25–37°C, shaking speed of 150 rpm, and with glucose as the available carbon source. Further analysis revealed that all ammonium was removed when the initial ammonium concentration was less than 100 mg/L; 40% ammonium was removed when the initial ammonium concentration was 1100 mg/L. The results showed that the concentration of ammonia from chicken manure with strain Paecilomyces variotii was significantly lower than that in the control group. We concluded that Paecilomyces variotii has good potential for future applications in in situ ammonium removal as well as ammonia emissions control from poultry manure. PMID:27348533

  18. Homocysteine in Renal Injury

    PubMed Central

    Long, Yanjun; Nie, Jing

    2016-01-01

    Background Homocysteine (Hcy) is an intermediate of methionine metabolism. Hyperhomocysteinemia (HHcy) can result from a deficiency in the enzymes or vitamin cofactors required for Hcy metabolism. Patients with renal disease tend to be hyperhomocysteinemic, particularly as renal function declines, although the underlying cause of HHcy in renal disease is not entirely understood. Summary HHcy is considered a risk or pathogenic factor in the progression of chronic kidney disease (CKD) as well as the cardiovascular complications. Key Messages In this review, we summarize both clinical and experimental findings that reveal the contribution of Hcy as a pathogenic factor to the development of CKD. In addition, we discuss several important mechanisms mediating the pathogenic action of Hcy in the kidney, such as local oxidative stress, endoplasmic reticulum stress, inflammation and hypomethylation. PMID:27536696

  19. Genetics Home Reference: renal hypouricemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... Facebook Share on Twitter Your Guide to Understanding Genetic Conditions Search MENU Toggle navigation Home Page Search ... Conditions Genes Chromosomes & mtDNA Resources Help Me Understand Genetics Home Health Conditions renal hypouricemia renal hypouricemia Enable ...

  20. Renal involvement in antiphospholipid syndrome.

    PubMed

    Pons-Estel, Guillermo J; Cervera, Ricard

    2014-02-01

    Renal involvement can be a serious problem for patients with antiphospholipid syndrome (APS). However, this complication has been poorly recognized and studied. It can be present in patients who have either primary or systemic lupus erythematosus-associated APS. Clinical and laboratory features of renal involvement in APS include hypertension, hematuria, acute renal failure, and progressive chronic renal insufficiency with mild levels of proteinuria that can progress to nephrotic-range proteinuria. The main lesions are renal artery stenosis, venous renal thrombosis, and glomerular lesions (APS nephropathy) that may be acute (thrombotic microangiopathy) and/or chronic (arteriosclerosis, arterial fibrous intimal hyperplasia, tubular thyroidization, arteriolar occlusions, and focal cortical atrophy). APS can also cause end-stage renal disease and allograft vascular thrombosis. This article reviews the range of renal abnormalities associated with APS, and their diagnosis and treatment options.