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Sample records for acids aa including

  1. Ascorbic acid (AA) metabolism in protection against radiation damage

    SciTech Connect

    Rose, R.C.; Koch, M.J.

    1986-03-05

    The possibility is considered that AA protects tissues against radiation damage by scavenging free radicals that result from radiolysis of water. A physiologic buffer (pH 6.7) was incubated with /sup 14/C-AA and 1 mM thiourea (to slow spontaneous oxidation of AA). Aliquots were assayed by HPLC and scintillation spectrometry to identify the /sup 14/C-label. Samples exposed to Cobalt-60 radiation had a half time of AA decay of < 3 minutes compared with nonirradiated samples (t/sub 1/2/ > 30 minutes) indicating that AA scavenges radiation-induced free radicals and forms the ascorbate free radical (AFR). Pairs of /sup 14/C-AFR disproportionate, with the net effect of /sup 14/C-dehydroascorbic acid formation from /sup 14/C-AA. Having established that AFR result from ionizing radiation in an aqueous solution, the possibility was evaluated that a tissue factor reduces AFR. Cortical tissue from the kidneys of male rats was minced, homogenized in buffer and centrifuged at 8000 xg. The supernatant was found to slow the rate of radiation-induced AA degradation by > 90% when incubated at 23/sup 0/C in the presence of 15 ..mu..M /sup 14/C-AA. Samples of supernatant maintained at 100/sup 0/C for 10 minutes or precipitated with 5% PCA did not prevent radiation-induced AA degradation. AA may have a specific role in scavenging free radicals generated by ionizing radiation and thereby protect body tissues.

  2. Amino acid composition, including key derivatives of eccrine sweat: potential biomarkers of certain atopic skin conditions.

    PubMed

    Mark, Harker; Harding, Clive R

    2013-04-01

    The free amino acid (AA) composition of eccrine sweat is different from other biological fluids, for reasons which are not properly understood. We undertook the detailed analysis of the AA composition of freshly isolated pure human eccrine sweat, including some of the key derivatives of AA metabolism, to better understand the key biological mechanisms governing its composition. Eccrine sweat was collected from the axillae of 12 healthy subjects immediately upon formation. Free AA analysis was performed using an automatic AA analyser after ninhydrin derivatization. Pyrrolidine-5-carboxylic acid (PCA) and urocanic acid (UCA) levels were determined using GC/MS. The free AA composition of sweat was dominated by the presence of serine accounting for just over one-fifth of the total free AA composition. Glycine was the next most abundant followed by PCA, alanine, citrulline and threonine, respectively. The data obtained indicate that the AA content of sweat bears a remarkable similarity to the AA composition of the epidermal protein profilaggrin. This protein is the key source of free AAs and their derivatives that form a major part of the natural moisturizing factor (NMF) within the stratum corneum (SC) and plays a major role in maintaining the barrier integrity of human skin. As perturbations in the production of NMF can lead to abnormal barrier function and can arise as a consequence of filaggrin genotype, we propose the quantification of AAs in sweat may serve as a non-invasive diagnostic biomarker for certain atopic skin conditions, that is, atopic dermatitis (AD). PMID:23075272

  3. AA-PMe, a novel asiatic acid derivative, induces apoptosis and suppresses proliferation, migration, and invasion of gastric cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Jing, Yue; Wang, Gang; Ge, Ying; Xu, Minjie; Tang, Shuainan; Gong, Zhunan

    2016-01-01

    Asiatic acid (AA; 2α,3β,23-trihydroxyurs-12-ene-28-oic acid) is widely used for medicinal purposes in many Asian countries due to its various bioactivities. A series of AA derivatives has been synthesized in attempts to improve its therapeutic potencies. Herein we investigated the anti-tumor activities of N-(2α,3β,23-acetoxyurs-12-en-28-oyl)-l-proline methyl ester (AA-PMe), a novel AA derivative. AA-PMe exhibited a stronger anti-cancer activity than its parent compound AA. AA-PMe inhibited the proliferation of SGC7901 and HGC27 human gastric cancer cells in a dose-dependent manner but had no significant toxicity in human gastric mucosa epithelial cells (GES-1). AA-PMe induced cell cycle arrest in G0/G1 phase and blocked G1-S transition, which correlated well with marked decreases in levels of cyclin D1, cyclin-dependent kinase CKD4, and phosphorylated retinoblastoma protein, and increase in cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor P15. Further, AA-PMe induced apoptosis of human gastric cancer cells by affecting Bcl-2, Bax, c-Myc, and caspase-3. Moreover, AA-PMe suppressed the migration and invasion of human gastric cancer cells (SGC7901 and HGC27) cells by downregulating the expression of MMP-2 and MMP-9. Overall, this study investigated the potential anti-cancer activities of AA-PMe including inducing apoptosis and suppressing proliferation, migration and invasion of gastric cancer cells, as well as the underlying mechanisms, suggesting that AA-PMe is a promising anti-cancer drug candidate in gastric cancer therapy. PMID:27073325

  4. AA-PMe, a novel asiatic acid derivative, induces apoptosis and suppresses proliferation, migration, and invasion of gastric cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Jing, Yue; Wang, Gang; Ge, Ying; Xu, Minjie; Tang, Shuainan; Gong, Zhunan

    2016-01-01

    Asiatic acid (AA; 2α,3β,23-trihydroxyurs-12-ene-28-oic acid) is widely used for medicinal purposes in many Asian countries due to its various bioactivities. A series of AA derivatives has been synthesized in attempts to improve its therapeutic potencies. Herein we investigated the anti-tumor activities of N-(2α,3β,23-acetoxyurs-12-en-28-oyl)-l-proline methyl ester (AA-PMe), a novel AA derivative. AA-PMe exhibited a stronger anti-cancer activity than its parent compound AA. AA-PMe inhibited the proliferation of SGC7901 and HGC27 human gastric cancer cells in a dose-dependent manner but had no significant toxicity in human gastric mucosa epithelial cells (GES-1). AA-PMe induced cell cycle arrest in G0/G1 phase and blocked G1-S transition, which correlated well with marked decreases in levels of cyclin D1, cyclin-dependent kinase CKD4, and phosphorylated retinoblastoma protein, and increase in cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor P15. Further, AA-PMe induced apoptosis of human gastric cancer cells by affecting Bcl-2, Bax, c-Myc, and caspase-3. Moreover, AA-PMe suppressed the migration and invasion of human gastric cancer cells (SGC7901 and HGC27) cells by downregulating the expression of MMP-2 and MMP-9. Overall, this study investigated the potential anti-cancer activities of AA-PMe including inducing apoptosis and suppressing proliferation, migration and invasion of gastric cancer cells, as well as the underlying mechanisms, suggesting that AA-PMe is a promising anti-cancer drug candidate in gastric cancer therapy. PMID:27073325

  5. Intrauterine, postpartum and adult relationships between arachidonic acid (AA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA).

    PubMed

    Kuipers, Remko S; Luxwolda, Martine F; Janneke Dijck-Brouwer, D A; Muskiet, Frits A J

    2011-11-01

    Erythrocyte (RBC) fatty acid compositions from populations with stable dietary habits but large variations in RBC-arachidonic (AA) and RBC-docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) provided us with insight into relationships between DHA and AA. It also enabled us to estimate the maternal RBC-DHA (mRBC-DHA) status that corresponded with no decrease in mRBC-DHA during pregnancy, or in infant (i) RBC-DHA or mRBC-DHA during the first 3 months postpartum (DHA-equilibrium) while exclusively breastfeeding. At delivery, iRBC-AA is uniformly high and independent of mRBC-AA. Infants born to mothers with low RBC-DHA exhibit higher, but infants born to mothers with high RBC-DHA exhibit lower RBC-DHA than their mothers. This switch from 'biomagnification' into 'bioattenuation' occurs at 6g% mRBC-DHA. At 6g%, mRBC-DHA is stable throughout pregnancy, corresponds with postpartum infant DHA-equilibrium of 6 and 0.4g% DHA in mature milk, but results in postpartum depletion of mRBC-DHA to 5g%. Postpartum maternal DHA-equilibrium is reached at 8g% mRBC-DHA, corresponding with 1g% DHA in mature milk and 7g% iRBC-DHA at delivery that increases to 8g% during lactation. This 8g% RBC-DHA concurs with the lowest risks of cardiovascular and psychiatric diseases in adults. RBC-data from 1866 infants, males and (non-)pregnant females indicated AA vs. DHA synergism at low RBC-DHA, but antagonism at high RBC-DHA. These data, together with high intakes of AA and DHA from our Paleolithic diet, suggest that bioattenuation of DHA during pregnancy and postnatal antagonism between AA and DHA are the physiological standard for humans across the life cycle. PMID:21561751

  6. Performance of AA5052 alloy anode in alkaline ethylene glycol electrolyte with dicarboxylic acids additives for aluminium-air batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, DaPeng; Zhang, DaQuan; Lee, KangYong; Gao, LiXin

    2015-11-01

    Dicarboxylic acid compounds, i.e. succinic acid (SUA), adipic acid (ADA) and sebacic acid (SEA), are used as electrolyte additives in the alkaline ethylene glycol solution for AA5052 aluminium-air batteries. It shows that the addition of dicarboxylic acids lowers the hydrogen gas evolution rate of commercial AA5052 aluminium alloy anode. AA5052 aluminium alloy has wide potential window for electrochemical activity and better discharge performance in alkaline ethylene glycol solution containing dicarboxylic acid additives. ADA has the best inhibition effect for the self-corrosion of AA5052 anode among the three dicarboxylic acid additives. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) reveals that dicarboxylic acids and aluminium ions can form coordination complexes. Quantum chemical calculations shows that ADA has a smaller energy gap (ΔE, the energy difference between the lowest unoccupied orbital and the highest occupied orbital), indicating that ADA has the strongest interaction with aluminium ions.

  7. Synergism and Rules of the new Combination drug Yiqijiedu Formulae (YQJD) on Ischemic Stroke based on amino acids (AAs) metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Jian; Chen, Chang; Chen, Jian-Xin; Wen, Li-Mei; Yang, Geng-Liang; Duan, Fei-Peng; Huang, Zhi-Ying; Li, De-Feng; Yu, Ding-Rong; Yang, Hong-Jun; Li, Shao-Jing

    2014-01-01

    The use of combination drugs is considered to be a promising strategy to control complex diseases such as ischemic stroke. The detection of metabolites has been used as a versatile tool to reveal the potential mechanism of diverse diseases. In this study, the levels of 12 endogenous AAs were simultaneously determined quantitatively in the MCAO rat brain using RRLC-QQQ method. Seven AAs were chosen as the potential biomarkers, and using PLS-DA analysis, the effects of the new combination drug YQJD, which is composed of ginsenosides, berberine, and jasminoidin, on those 7 AAs were evaluated. Four AAs, glutamic acid, homocysteine, methionine, and tryptophan, which changed significantly in the YQJD-treated groups compared to the vehicle groups (P < 0.05), were identified and designated as the AAs to use to further explore the synergism of YQJD. The result of a PCA showed that the combination of these three drugs exhibits the strongest synergistic effect compared to other combination groups and that ginsenosides might play a pivotal role, especially when combined with jasminoidin. We successfully explored the synergetic mechanism of multi-component and provided a new method for evaluating the integrated effects of combination drugs in the treatment of complex diseases. PMID:24889025

  8. EB1 Levels Are Elevated in Ascorbic Acid (AA)-stimulated Osteoblasts and Mediate Cell-Cell Adhesion-induced Osteoblast Differentiation*

    PubMed Central

    Pustylnik, Sofia; Fiorino, Cara; Nabavi, Noushin; Zappitelli, Tanya; da Silva, Rosa; Aubin, Jane E.; Harrison, Rene E.

    2013-01-01

    Osteoblasts are differentiated mesenchymal cells that function as the major bone-producing cells of the body. Differentiation cues including ascorbic acid (AA) stimulation provoke intracellular changes in osteoblasts leading to the synthesis of the organic portion of the bone, which includes collagen type I α1, proteoglycans, and matrix proteins, such as osteocalcin. During our microarray analysis of AA-stimulated osteoblasts, we observed a significant up-regulation of the microtubule (MT) plus-end binding protein, EB1, compared with undifferentiated osteoblasts. EB1 knockdown significantly impaired AA-induced osteoblast differentiation, as detected by reduced expression of osteoblast differentiation marker genes. Intracellular examination of AA-stimulated osteoblasts treated with EB1 siRNA revealed a reduction in MT stability with a concomitant loss of β-catenin distribution at the cell cortex and within the nucleus. Diminished β-catenin levels in EB1 siRNA-treated osteoblasts paralleled an increase in phospho-β-catenin and active glycogen synthase kinase 3β, a kinase known to target β-catenin to the proteasome. EB1 siRNA treatment also reduced the expression of the β-catenin gene targets, cyclin D1 and Runx2. Live immunofluorescent imaging of differentiated osteoblasts revealed a cortical association of EB1-mcherry with β-catenin-GFP. Immunoprecipitation analysis confirmed an interaction between EB1 and β-catenin. We also determined that cell-cell contacts and cortically associated EB1/β-catenin interactions are necessary for osteoblast differentiation. Finally, using functional blocking antibodies, we identified E-cadherin as a major contributor to the cell-cell contact-induced osteoblast differentiation. PMID:23740245

  9. Extraterrestrial Amino Acids in Ureilites Including Almahata Sitta

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burton, A. S.; Glavin, D. P.; Callahan, M. P.; Dworkin, J. P.

    2011-01-01

    Ureilites are a class of meteorites that lack chondrules (achondrites) but have relatively high carbon abundances, averaging approx.3 wt %. Using highly sensitive liquid chromatography coupled with UV fluorescence and time-of-flight mass spectrometry (LC-FD/ToF-MS), it was recently determined that there are amino acids in. fragment 94 of the Almahata Sitta ureilite[l]. Based on the presence of amino acids that are rare in the Earth's biosphere, as well as the near-racemic enantiomeric ratios of marry of the more common amino acids, it was concluded that most of the detected amino acids were indigenous to the meteorite. Although the composition of the Almahata Sitta ureilite appears to be unlike other recovered ureilites, the discovery of amino acids in this meteorite raises the question of whether other ureilites rnav also contain amino acids. Herein we present the results of LC-FDlTo.F-MS analyses of: a sand sample from the Almahata Sitta strewn held, Almahata Sitta fragments 425 (an ordinary H5 chondrite) and 427 (ureilite), as well as an Antarctic ureilite (Allan lulls, ALHA 77257).

  10. Mildly abnormal general movement quality in infants is associated with higher Mead acid and lower arachidonic acid and shows a U-shaped relation with the DHA/AA ratio.

    PubMed

    van Goor, S A; Schaafsma, A; Erwich, J J H M; Dijck-Brouwer, D A J; Muskiet, F A J

    2010-01-01

    We showed that docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) supplementation during pregnancy and lactation was associated with more mildly abnormal (MA) general movements (GMs) in the infants. Since this finding was unexpected and inter-individual DHA intakes are highly variable, we explored the relationship between GM quality and erythrocyte DHA, arachidonic acid (AA), DHA/AA and Mead acid in 57 infants of this trial. MA GMs were inversely related to AA, associated with Mead acid, and associated with DHA/AA in a U-shaped manner. These relationships may indicate dependence of newborn AA status on synthesis from linoleic acid. This becomes restricted during the intrauterine period by abundant de novo synthesis of oleic and Mead acids from glucose, consistent with reduced insulin sensitivity during the third trimester. The descending part of the U-shaped relation between MA GMs and DHA/AA probably indicates DHA shortage next to AA shortage. The ascending part may reflect a different developmental trajectory that is not necessarily unfavorable. PMID:20022733

  11. Effect of adding amino acids residues in N- and C-terminus of Vip3Aa16 (L121I) toxin.

    PubMed

    Sellami, Sameh; Cherif, Marwa; Jamoussi, Kaïs

    2016-06-01

    To study the importance of N- and C-terminus of Bacillus thuringiensis Vip3Aa16 (L121I) toxin (88 kDa), a number of mutants were generated. The addition of two (2R: RS) or eleven (11R: RSRPGHHHHHH) amino acid residues at the Vip3Aa16 (L121I) C-terminus allowed to an unappropriated folding illustrated by the abundant presence of the 62 kDa proteolytic form. The produced Vip3Aa16 (L121I) full length form was less detected when increasing the number of amino acids residues in the C-terminus. Bioassays demonstrated that the growth of the lepidopteran Ephestia kuehniella was slightly affected by Vip3Aa16 (L121I)-2R and not affected by Vip3Aa16 (L121I)-11R. Additionally, the fusion at the Vip3Aa16 (L121I) N-terminus of 39 amino acids harboring the E. coli OmpA leader peptide and the His-tag sequence allowed to the increase of protease sensitivity of Vip3Aa16 (L121I) full length form, as only the 62 kDa proteolysis form was detected. Remarkably, this fused protein produced in Escherichia coli (E. coli) was biologically inactive toward Ephestia kuehniella larvae. Thus, the N-terminus of the protein is required to the accomplishment of the insecticidal activity of Vip3 proteins. This report serves as guideline for the study of Vip3Aa16 (L121I) protein stability and activity. PMID:26876111

  12. Cu(II)-catalyzed reactions in ternary [Cu(AA)(AA - H)]+ complexes (AA = Gly, Ala, Val, Leu, Ile, t-Leu, Phe).

    PubMed

    Wang, Ping; Ohanessian, Gilles; Wesdemiotis, Chrys

    2009-01-01

    The unimolecular chemistry of [Cu(II)AA(AA - H)](+) complexes, composed of an intact and a deprotonated amino acid (AA) ligand, have been probed in the gas phase by tandem and multistage mass spectrometry in an electrospray ionization quadrupole ion trap mass spectrometer. The amino acids examined include Gly, Ala, Val, Leu, Ile, t-Leu and Phe. Upon collisionally-activated dissociation (CAD), the [Cu(II)AA(AA - H)](+) complexes undergo decarboxylation with simultaneous reduction of Cu(II) to Cu(I); during this process, a radical site is created at the alpha-carbon of the decarboxylated ligand (H(2)N(1) - (*)C(alpha)H - C(beta)H(2) - R; R = side chain substituent). The radical site is able to move along the backbone of the decarboxylated amino acid to form two new radicals (HN(1)(*) - C(alpha)H(2) - C(beta)H(2) - R and H(2)N(1) - C(alpha)H(2) - (*)C(beta)H - R). From the complexes of Gly and t-Leu, only C(alpha) and N(1) radicals can be formed. The whole radical ligand can be lost to form [Cu(I)AA](+) from these three isomeric radicals. Alternatively, further radical induced dissociations can take place along the backbone of the decarboxylated amino acid ligand to yield [Cu(II)AA(AA - 2H - CO(2))](+), [Cu(I)AA((*)NH(2))](+), [Cu(I)AA(HN = C(alpha)H(2))](+), or [Cu(I)AA(H(2)N - C(alpha)H = C(beta)H - R'](+) (R' = partial side chain substituent). The sodiated copper complexes, [Cu(II)(AA - H + Na)(AA - H)](+), show the same fragmentation patterns as their non-sodiated counterparts; sodium ion is retained on the intact amino acid ligand and is not involved in the CAD pathways. The amino groups of both AA units, the carbonyl group of the intact amino acid, and the deprotonated hydroxyl oxygen coordinate Cu(II) in square-planar fashion. Ab initio calculations indicate that the metal ion facilitates hydrogen atom shuttling between the N(1), C(alpha) and C(beta) atoms of the decarboxylated amino acid ligand. The dissociations of the decarboxylated radical ions unveil

  13. The cytochrome P450 2AA gene cluster in zebrafish (Danio rerio): Expression of CYP2AA1 and CYP2AA2 and response to phenobarbital-type inducers

    SciTech Connect

    Kubota, Akira; Bainy, Afonso C.D.; Woodin, Bruce R.; Goldstone, Jared V.; Stegeman, John J.

    2013-10-01

    The cytochrome P450 (CYP) 2 gene family is the largest and most diverse CYP gene family in vertebrates. In zebrafish, we have identified 10 genes in a new subfamily, CYP2AA, which does not show orthology to any human or other mammalian CYP genes. Here we report evolutionary and structural relationships of the 10 CYP2AA genes and expression of the first two genes, CYP2AA1 and CYP2AA2. Parsimony reconstruction of the tandem duplication pattern for the CYP2AA cluster suggests that CYP2AA1, CYP2AA2 and CYP2AA3 likely arose in the earlier duplication events and thus are most diverged in function from the other CYP2AAs. On the other hand, CYP2AA8 and CYP2AA9 are genes that arose in the latest duplication event, implying functional similarity between these two CYPs. A molecular model of CYP2AA1 showing the sequence conservation across the CYP2AA cluster reveals that the regions with the highest variability within the cluster map onto CYP2AA1 near the substrate access channels, suggesting differing substrate specificities. Zebrafish CYP2AA1 transcript was expressed predominantly in the intestine, while CYP2AA2 was most highly expressed in the kidney, suggesting differing roles in physiology. In the liver CYP2AA2 expression but not that of CYP2AA1, was increased by 1,4-bis [2-(3,5-dichloropyridyloxy)] benzene (TCPOBOP) and, to a lesser extent, by phenobarbital (PB). In contrast, pregnenolone 16α-carbonitrile (PCN) increased CYP2AA1 expression, but not CYP2AA2 in the liver. The results identify a CYP2 subfamily in zebrafish that includes genes apparently induced by PB-type chemicals and PXR agonists, the first concrete in vivo evidence for a PB-type response in fish. - Highlights: • A tandemly duplicated cluster of ten CYP2AA genes was described in zebrafish. • Parsimony and duplication analyses suggest pathways to CYP2AA diversity. • Homology models reveal amino acid positions possibly related to functional diversity. • The CYP2AA locus does not share synteny with

  14. Catalysis of the Carbonylation of Alcohols to Carboxylic Acids Including Acetic Acid Synthesis from Methanol.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Forster, Denis; DeKleva, Thomas W.

    1986-01-01

    Monsanto's highly successful synthesis of acetic acid from methanol and carbon monoxide illustrates use of new starting materials to replace pretroleum-derived ethylene. Outlines the fundamental aspects of the acetic acid process and suggests ways of extending the synthesis to higher carboxylic acids. (JN)

  15. Effect of Dietary L-ascorbic Acid (L-AA) on Production Performance, Egg Quality Traits and Fertility in Japanese Quail (Coturnix japonica) at Low Ambient Temperature.

    PubMed

    Shit, N; Singh, R P; Sastry, K V H; Agarwal, R; Singh, R; Pandey, N K; Mohan, J

    2012-07-01

    Environmental stress boosts the levels of stress hormones and accelerates energy expenditure which subsequently imbalance the body's homeostasis. L-ascorbic acid (L-AA) has been recognized to mitigate the negative impact of environmental stress on production performances in birds. The present investigation was carried out to elucidate the effect of different dietary levels of L-AA on production performance, egg quality traits and fertility in Japanese quail at low ambient temperature. Sixty matured females (15 wks) were equally divided into three groups (20/group) based on the different dietary levels of L-AA (0, 250 and 500 ppm) and coupled with an equal number of males (1:1) obtained from the same hatch. They were managed in uniform husbandry conditions without restriction of feed and water at 14 h photo-schedule. Except for feed efficiency, body weight change, feed consumption and hen-day egg production were recorded highest in 500 ppm L-AA supplemented groups. Among the all egg quality traits studied, only specific gravity, shell weight and thickness differed significantly (p<0.05) in the present study. Fertility was improved significantly (p<0.01) to a dose dependent manner of L-AA. The findings of the present study concluded that dietary L-AA can be a caring management practice at least in part to alleviate the adverse effect of cold induced stress on production performance in Japanese quail. PMID:25049657

  16. Polymerase chain reaction system using magnetic beads for analyzing a sample that includes nucleic acid

    SciTech Connect

    Nasarabadi, Shanavaz

    2011-01-11

    A polymerase chain reaction system for analyzing a sample containing nucleic acid includes providing magnetic beads; providing a flow channel having a polymerase chain reaction chamber, a pre polymerase chain reaction magnet position adjacent the polymerase chain reaction chamber, and a post pre polymerase magnet position adjacent the polymerase chain reaction chamber. The nucleic acid is bound to the magnetic beads. The magnetic beads with the nucleic acid flow to the pre polymerase chain reaction magnet position in the flow channel. The magnetic beads and the nucleic acid are washed with ethanol. The nucleic acid in the polymerase chain reaction chamber is amplified. The magnetic beads and the nucleic acid are separated into a waste stream containing the magnetic beads and a post polymerase chain reaction mix containing the nucleic acid. The reaction mix containing the nucleic acid flows to an analysis unit in the channel for analysis.

  17. Comparison between the AA/EPA ratio in depressed and non depressed elderly females: omega-3 fatty acid supplementation correlates with improved symptoms but does not change immunological parameters

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Depression is one of the most frequently missed diagnoses in elderly people, with obvious negative effects on quality of life. Various studies have shown that long chain omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (n-3 PUFA) may be useful in its management. Our objective was to evaluate whether a supplement containing n-3 PUFA improves depressive symptoms in depressed elderly patients, and whether the blood fatty acid pattern is correlated with these changes. Methods The severity of depressive symptoms according to the Geriatric Depression Scale (GDS), blood fatty acid composition and erythrocyte phospholipids were analyzed in 46 depressed females aged 66-95y, diagnosed with depression according to DSMIV, within the context of a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial. 22 depressed females were included in the intervention group (2.5 g/day of n-3 PUFA for 8 weeks), and 24 in the placebo group. We also measured immunological parameters (CD2, CD3, CD4, CD8, CD16, CD19 and cytokines (IL-5, IL-15). Results The mean GDS score and AA/EPA ratio, in whole blood and RBC membrane phospholipids, were significantly lower after 2 months supplementation with n-3 PUFA. A significant correlation between the amelioration of GDS and the AA/EPA ratio with some immunological parameters, such as CD2, CD19, CD4, CD16 and the ratio CD4/CD8, was also found. Nevertheless, omega-3 supplementation did not significantly improve the studied immunological functions. Conclusions n-3 PUFA supplementation ameliorates symptoms in elderly depression. The n-3 PUFA status may be monitored by means of the determination of whole blood AA/EPA ratio. PMID:23046564

  18. USEPA METHOD STUDY 37 - SW-846 METHOD 3050, ACID DIGESTION OF SEDIMENTS, SLUDGES AND SOILS BY AA-DIRECT ASPIRATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    An interlaboratory collaborative study was conducted to determine the precision and accuracy of Method 3050 for the analysis of 23 elements in sediments, sludqes and soils. Method 3050 is entitled, "Acid Digestion of Sediments, Sludges and Soils." It includes instructions for qua...

  19. Influence of ascorbic acid (AA) on iron (Fe) utilization in copper (Cu) deficient male and female rats

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, M.A. )

    1989-02-09

    Interactions between Cu status (-Cu: 1.0 mg Cu/kg diet or +Cu: 5.8 mg Cu/kg diet) and AA (0 or 1% of the diet) were compared in male and female weanling rats. Food intakes were controlled so that final body weights were similar on day 23 when rats were killed. On day 17 rats were given an oral dose of 4 uCi of Fe-59 and feces were collected for 5 days. Heart weights (g/100 g body weight) were increased in both male and female -Cu rats. Among -Cu rats, AA increased heart weight by 25% in females but by only 6% in males. Similarly, among -Cu rats AA increased liver weight (g/100 g body weight) by 16% in females but not at all in males. Hematocrits (%) were similar among +Cu rats but were decreased in -Cu rats to a greater in male than in female rats. However, among -Cu rats AA decreased hematocrits from 34.1 to 26.4% in females but from only 30.0 to 26.8% in males. Compared to -Cu rats, +Cu rats apparently absorbed 2-times more Fe-59 and retained 2.5- times more absorbed Fe-59 in their whole blood. Among -Cu rats, AA decreased the absorption of Fe-59 and whole blood Fe-59 to a greater extent in female than in male rats. These results suggest that female rats may be somewhat more sensitive to the adverse effects of AA during Cu deficiency than are male rats.

  20. Fatty Acid Composition of Egg Yolk from Chickens Fed a Diet including Marigold (Tagetes erecta L.)

    PubMed Central

    Altuntaş, A.; Aydin, R.

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the effects of diet supplemented with marigold on egg yolk fatty acid composition and egg quality parameters. Sixty hens were assigned into three groups and fed diets supplemented with 0 (control), 10 g kg−1, or 20 g kg−1 marigold for 42 days. Eggs collected at the 6th week of the study were analyzed for fatty acid analysis. Laying performance, egg quality parameters, and feed intake were also evaluated. Yolk color scores in the group fed the 20 g kg−1 marigold-supplemented diet were found greater than control (10.77 versus 9.77). Inclusion of 20 g kg−1 marigold in diet influenced egg weights adversely compared to the control. Diet supplemented with 10 g kg−1 or 20 g kg−1 marigold increased the levels of C16:0 and C18:0 and decreased levels of C16:1 (n-7) and C18:1 (n-9) in the egg yolk. Also, diet including marigold increased total saturated fatty acids (SFA) and decreased monounsaturated fatty acids (MUFA) in the egg yolk. PMID:25587451

  1. Does the autoantibody immunodominant region on thyroid peroxidase include amino acid residues 742-771?

    PubMed

    Xiong, Z; Farilla, L; Guo, J; McLachlan, S; Rapoport, B

    2001-03-01

    Identification of the thyroid peroxidase (TPO) amino acid residues that comprise the autoantibody immunodominant region is an important goal that has proven difficult because of the conformational nature of the epitopes involved. Recent data suggest that the immunodominant region has been located. Thus, by autoantibody recognition of tryptic fragments of native TPO, as well as of conformational portions of TPO expressed as cell-free translates, the autoantibody immunodominant region appears to include amino acid residues 742-771, near the C terminus of the ectodomain. To evaluate this deduction, we expressed as cell-free translates the full TPO ectodomain, as well as TPO truncated after residues 741 and 771. The epitopic integrity of these molecules was first confirmed by immunoprecipitation by patient sera containing TPO autoantibodies. However, autoantibody recognition could involve a minority of TPO autoantibodies with the individual sera, not fulfilling the strict criteria for immunodominance. In order to obtain definitive data, we performed immunoprecipitations on these TPO variants with four recombinant human monoclonal autoantibodies that define the immunodominant region. All four monoclonal autoantibodies immunoprecipitated TPO 1-741 to the same extent as they did TPO 1-771 and the full TPO ectodomain, indicating that the immunodominant region comprises (at least in large part) amino acid residues upstream of residue 741. PMID:11327613

  2. 40 CFR Appendix A to Subpart Aa of... - Applicability of General Provisions (40 CFR Part 63, Subpart A) to Subpart AA

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... (40 CFR Part 63, Subpart A) to Subpart AA A Appendix A to Subpart AA of Part 63 Protection of... Hazardous Air Pollutants From Phosphoric Acid Manufacturing Plants Pt. 63, Subpt. AA, App. A Appendix A to Subpart AA of Part 63—Applicability of General Provisions (40 CFR Part 63, Subpart A) to Subpart AA 40...

  3. 40 CFR Appendix A to Subpart Aa of... - Applicability of General Provisions (40 CFR Part 63, Subpart A) to Subpart AA

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... (40 CFR Part 63, Subpart A) to Subpart AA A Appendix A to Subpart AA of Part 63 Protection of... Hazardous Air Pollutants From Phosphoric Acid Manufacturing Plants Pt. 63, Subpt. AA, App. A Appendix A to Subpart AA of Part 63—Applicability of General Provisions (40 CFR Part 63, Subpart A) to Subpart AA 40...

  4. 40 CFR Appendix A to Subpart Aa of... - Applicability of General Provisions (40 CFR Part 63, Subpart A) to Subpart AA

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... (40 CFR Part 63, Subpart A) to Subpart AA A Appendix A to Subpart AA of Part 63 Protection of... Hazardous Air Pollutants From Phosphoric Acid Manufacturing Plants Pt. 63, Subpt. AA, App. A Appendix A to Subpart AA of Part 63—Applicability of General Provisions (40 CFR Part 63, Subpart A) to Subpart AA 40...

  5. 40 CFR Appendix A to Subpart Aa of... - Applicability of General Provisions (40 CFR Part 63, Subpart A) to Subpart AA

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... (40 CFR Part 63, Subpart A) to Subpart AA A Appendix A to Subpart AA of Part 63 Protection of... Hazardous Air Pollutants From Phosphoric Acid Manufacturing Plants Pt. 63, Subpt. AA, App. A Appendix A to Subpart AA of Part 63—Applicability of General Provisions (40 CFR Part 63, Subpart A) to Subpart AA 40...

  6. 40 CFR Appendix A to Subpart Aa of... - Applicability of General Provisions (40 CFR Part 63, Subpart A) to Subpart AA

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... (40 CFR Part 63, Subpart A) to Subpart AA A Appendix A to Subpart AA of Part 63 Protection of... Hazardous Air Pollutants From Phosphoric Acid Manufacturing Plants Pt. 63, Subpt. AA, App. A Appendix A to Subpart AA of Part 63—Applicability of General Provisions (40 CFR Part 63, Subpart A) to Subpart AA 40...

  7. Synthesis of Branched Methyl Hydroxy Stearates Including an Ester from Bio-Based Levulinic Acid

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We report the synthesis of 5 useful branched methyl alpha-hydroxy oleate esters from commercially available methyl oleate and common organic acids. Of special interest is the synthesis utilizing the natural byproduct, levulinic acid. The other common organic acids used herein were propionic acid, ...

  8. American Astronomical Society (AAS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murdin, P.

    2000-11-01

    Founded in 1899, the AAS is a non-profit scientific society created to promote the advancement of astronomy and closely related branches of science. Its membership consists primarily of professional researchers in the astronomical sciences, but also includes educators, students and others interested in the advancement of astronomical research. About 85% of the membership is drawn from North Ame...

  9. Doped copolymer of polyanthranilic acid and o-aminophenol (AA-co-OAP): Synthesis, spectral characterization and the use of the doped copolymer as precursor of α-Fe2O3 nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hosny, Nasser Mohammed; Nowesser, Nourhan; Al-Hussaini, A. S.; Zoromba, Mohamed Shafick

    2016-02-01

    The copolymer of anthranilic acid and o-aminophenol (AA-co-OAP) was synthesized and characterized by IR, UV-Vis. and thermal analyses (TGA). Linear chain mode was suggested for the pure (AA-co-OAP). The effect of inclusion of MnCl2, CoCl2, NiCl2, CuCl2 and FeCl3 on the spectral, thermal and optical properties of AA-co-OAP has been studied. Octahedral stereochemistry was suggested for Fe, Mn and Ni doped AA-co-OAP, while tetrahedral and square-planar geometries were suggested for Co and Cu doped AA-co-OAP, respectively. Fe doped AA-co-OAP has been used as a precursor for α-Fe2O3 nanoparticles by thermal decomposition route at 800 °C. The obtained hematite has been characterized by XRD and TEM. The average size of the prepared nanoparticles was estimated as 34 nm. The optical band gap of the synthesized hematite nanoparticles was measured and compared with the bulk.

  10. Fatty acid composition including cis-9, trans-11 CLA of cooked ground lamb

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Little information is available on effect of cooking on beneficial fatty acids such as conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) and n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA). The objective of this study was to examine impact of cooking on the FA composition of ground lamb of two different muscles. Samples were p...

  11. AAS Oral History Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buxner, Sanlyn; Holbrook, Jarita; AAS Oral History Team

    2016-06-01

    Now in its fourth year, the AAS Oral History Project has interviewed over 80 astronomers from all over the world. Led by the AAS Historical Astronomy Division (HAD) and partially funded by the American Institute of Physics Niels Bohr Library and ongoing support from the AAS, volunteers have collected oral histories from astronomers at professional meetings starting in 2015, including AAS, DPS, and the IAU general assembly. Each interview lasts one and a half to two hours and focuses on interviewees’ personal and professional lives. Questions include those about one’s family, childhood, strong influences on one’s scientific career, career path, successes and challenges, perspectives on how astronomy is changing as a field, and advice to the next generation. Each interview is audio recorded and transcribed, the content of which is checked with each interviewee. Once complete, interview transcripts are posted online as part of a larger oral history library at https://www.aip.org/history-programs/niels-bohr-library/oral-histories. Future analysis will reveal a rich story of astronomers and will help the community address issues of diversity, controversies, and the changing landscape of science. We are still recruiting individuals to be interviewed from all stages of career from undergraduate students to retired and emeritus astronomers. Contact Jarita Holbrook to schedule an interview or to find out more information about the project (astroholbrook@gmail.com). Also, contact Jarita Holbrook if you would like to become an interviewer for the project.

  12. Influence of Fatty Acid Precursors, Including Food Preservatives, on the Growth and Fatty Acid Composition of Listeria monocytogenes at 37 and 10°C ▿

    PubMed Central

    Julotok, Mudcharee; Singh, Atul K.; Gatto, Craig; Wilkinson, Brian J.

    2010-01-01

    Listeria monocytogenes is a food-borne pathogen that grows at refrigeration temperatures and increases its content of anteiso-C15:0 fatty acid, which is believed to be a homeoviscous adaptation to ensure membrane fluidity, at these temperatures. As a possible novel approach for control of the growth of the organism, the influences of various fatty acid precursors, including branched-chain amino acids and branched- and straight-chain carboxylic acids, some of which are also well-established food preservatives, on the growth and fatty acid composition of the organism at 37°C and 10°C were studied in order to investigate whether the organism could be made to synthesize fatty acids that would result in impaired growth at low temperatures. The results indicate that the fatty acid composition of L. monocytogenes could be modulated by the feeding of branched-chain amino acid, C4, C5, and C6 branched-chain carboxylic acid, and C3 and C4 straight-chain carboxylic acid fatty acid precursors, but the growth-inhibitory effects of several preservatives were independent of effects on fatty acid composition, which were minor in the case of preservatives metabolized via acetyl coenzyme A. The ability of a precursor to modify fatty acid composition was probably a reflection of the substrate specificities of the first enzyme, FabH, in the condensation of primers of fatty acid biosynthesis with malonyl acyl carrier protein. PMID:20048057

  13. Oxidative potential of ambient water-soluble PM2.5 in the southeastern United States: contrasts in sources and health associations between ascorbic acid (AA) and dithiothreitol (DTT) assays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Ting; Verma, Vishal; Bates, Josephine T.; Abrams, Joseph; Klein, Mitchel; Strickland, Matthew J.; Sarnat, Stefanie E.; Chang, Howard H.; Mulholland, James A.; Tolbert, Paige E.; Russell, Armistead G.; Weber, Rodney J.

    2016-03-01

    The ability of certain components of particulate matter to induce oxidative stress through the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in vivo may be one mechanism accounting for observed linkages between ambient aerosols and adverse health outcomes. A variety of assays have been used to measure this so-called aerosol oxidative potential. We developed a semi-automated system to quantify oxidative potential of filter aqueous extracts utilizing the dithiothreitol (DTT) assay and report here the development of a similar semi-automated system for the ascorbic acid (AA) assay. Approximately 500 PM2.5 filter samples collected in contrasting locations in the southeastern US were analyzed for a host of aerosol species, along with AA and DTT activities. We present a detailed contrast in findings from these two assays. Water-soluble AA activity was higher in summer and fall than in winter, with highest levels near heavily trafficked highways, whereas DTT activity was higher in winter compared to summer and fall and more spatially homogeneous. AA activity was nearly exclusively correlated with water-soluble Cu (r = 0.70-0.94 at most sites), whereas DTT activity was correlated with organic and metal species. Source apportionment models, positive matrix factorization (PMF) and a chemical mass balance method with ensemble-averaged source impact profiles (CMB-E), suggest a strong contribution from traffic emissions and secondary processes (e.g., organic aerosol oxidation or metals mobilization by secondary acids) to both AA and DTT activities in urban Atlanta. In contrast, biomass burning was a large source for DTT activity, but insignificant for AA. AA activity was not correlated with PM2.5 mass, while DTT activity co-varied strongly with mass (r = 0.49-0.86 across sites and seasons). Various linear models were developed to estimate AA and DTT activities for the central Atlanta Jefferson Street site, based on the CMB-E sources. The models were then used to estimate daily

  14. Oxidative potential of ambient water-soluble PM2.5 measured by Dithiothreitol (DTT) and Ascorbic Acid (AA) assays in the southeastern United States: contrasts in sources and health associations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, T.; Verma, V.; Bates, J. T.; Abrams, J.; Klein, M.; Strickland, M. J.; Sarnat, S. E.; Chang, H. H.; Mulholland, J. A.; Tolbert, P. E.; Russell, A. G.; Weber, R. J.

    2015-11-01

    The ability of certain components of particulate matter to induce oxidative stress through catalytic generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in vivo may be one mechanism accounting for observed linkages between ambient aerosols and adverse health outcomes. A variety of assays have been used to measure this so-called aerosol oxidative potential. We developed a semi-automated system to quantify oxidative potential of filter aqueous extracts utilizing the dithiothreitol (DTT) assay and have recently developed a similar semi-automated system using the ascorbic acid (AA) assay. Approximately 500 PM2.5 filter samples collected in contrasting locations in the southeastern US were analyzed using both assays. We found that water-soluble DTT activity on a per air volume basis was more spatially uniform than water-soluble AA activity. DTT activity was higher in winter than in summer/fall, whereas AA activity was higher in summer/fall compared to winter, with highest levels near highly trafficked highways. DTT activity was correlated with organic and metal species, whereas AA activity was correlated with water-soluble metals (especially water-soluble Cu, r=0.70-0.91 at most sites). Source apportionment models, Positive Matrix Factorization (PMF) and a Chemical Mass Balance Method with ensemble-averaged source impact profiles (CMB-E), suggest a strong contribution from secondary processes (e.g., organic aerosol oxidation or metal mobilization by formation of an aqueous particle with secondary acids) and traffic emissions to both DTT and AA activities in urban Atlanta. Biomass burning was a large source for DTT activity, but insignificant for AA. DTT activity was well correlated with PM2.5 mass (r=0.49-0.86 across sites/seasons), while AA activity did not co-vary strongly with mass. A linear model was developed to estimate DTT and AA activities for the central Atlanta Jefferson Street site, based on the CMB-E sources that are statistically significant with positive

  15. Fatty acid-releasing activities in Sinorhizobium meliloti include unusual diacylglycerol lipase.

    PubMed

    Sahonero-Canavesi, Diana X; Sohlenkamp, Christian; Sandoval-Calderón, Mario; Lamsa, Anne; Pogliano, Kit; López-Lara, Isabel M; Geiger, Otto

    2015-09-01

    Phospholipids are well known for their membrane-forming properties and thereby delimit any cell from the exterior world. In addition, membrane phospholipids can act as precursors for signals and other biomolecules during their turnover. Little is known about phospholipid signalling, turnover and remodelling in bacteria. Recently, we showed that a FadD-deficient mutant of Sinorhizobium meliloti, unable to convert free fatty acids to their coenzyme A derivatives, accumulates free fatty acids during the stationary phase of growth. Enzymatic activities responsible for the generation of these free fatty acids were unknown in rhizobia. Searching the genome of S. meliloti, we identified a potential lysophospholipase (SMc04041) and two predicted patatin-like phospholipases A (SMc00930, SMc01003). Although SMc00930 as well as SMc01003 contribute to the release of free fatty acids in S. meliloti, neither one can use phospholipids as substrates. Here we show that SMc01003 converts diacylglycerol to monoacylglycerol and a fatty acid, and that monoacylglycerol can be further degraded by SMc01003 to another fatty acid and glycerol. A SMc01003-deficient mutant of S. meliloti transiently accumulates diacylglycerol, suggesting that SMc01003 also acts as diacylglycerol lipase (DglA) in its native background. Expression of the DglA lipase in Escherichia coli causes lysis of cells in stationary phase of growth. PMID:25711932

  16. Real-time monitoring of matrix acidizing including the effects of diverting agents

    SciTech Connect

    Hill, A.D.; Zhu, D.

    1996-05-01

    Real-time monitoring of the injection rate and pressure during matrix acidizing provides operators with a way to determine the changing skin factor as stimulation proceeds. Current methods are based either on the assumption of steady-state flow in the region around the wellbore affected by acid injection or on computer solution of the transient flow equations describing the unsteady reservoir flow process occurring during acidizing. In this paper, a new method for real-time monitoring of matrix acidizing, the inverse injectivity vs. superposition time function plot, is presented. This new method can be applied with a spreadsheet computer program or a programmable calculator and accounts for the transient flow effects occurring during matrix acidizing at multiple rates and injection pressures. The evolving skin factor during a matrix treatment is readily obtained from the diagnostic plot. Hypothetical examples show how the inverse injectivity plot can be used to assess the efficiency of stimulation and diversion. Comparisons with previously presented field cases show the new method to be a simple and accurate means of monitoring the evolving skin factor during matrix acidizing.

  17. Kinetic model of water disinfection using peracetic acid including synergistic effects.

    PubMed

    Flores, Marina J; Brandi, Rodolfo J; Cassano, Alberto E; Labas, Marisol D

    2016-01-01

    The disinfection efficiencies of a commercial mixture of peracetic acid against Escherichia coli were studied in laboratory scale experiments. The joint and separate action of two disinfectant agents, hydrogen peroxide and peracetic acid, were evaluated in order to observe synergistic effects. A kinetic model for each component of the mixture and for the commercial mixture was proposed. Through simple mathematical equations, the model describes different stages of attack by disinfectants during the inactivation process. Based on the experiments and the kinetic parameters obtained, it could be established that the efficiency of hydrogen peroxide was much lower than that of peracetic acid alone. However, the contribution of hydrogen peroxide was very important in the commercial mixture. It should be noted that this improvement occurred only after peracetic acid had initiated the attack on the cell. This synergistic effect was successfully explained by the proposed scheme and was verified by experimental results. Besides providing a clearer mechanistic understanding of water disinfection, such models may improve our ability to design reactors. PMID:26819382

  18. Case Studies in Systems Chemistry. Final Report. [Includes Complete Case Study, Carboxylic Acid Equilibria

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fleck, George

    This publication was produced as a teaching tool for college chemistry. The book is a text for a computer-based unit on the chemistry of acid-base titrations, and is designed for use with FORTRAN or BASIC computer systems, and with a programmable electronic calculator, in a variety of educational settings. The text attempts to present computer…

  19. Site-saturation engineering of lysine 47 in cyclodextrin glycosyltransferase from Paenibacillus macerans to enhance substrate specificity towards maltodextrin for enzymatic synthesis of 2-O-D-glucopyranosyl-L-ascorbic acid (AA-2G).

    PubMed

    Han, Ruizhi; Liu, Long; Shin, Hyun-dong; Chen, Rachel R; Du, Guocheng; Chen, Jian

    2013-07-01

    In this work, the site-saturation engineering of lysine 47 in cyclodextrin glycosyltransferase (CGTase) from Paenibacillus macerans was conducted to improve the specificity of CGTase towards maltodextrin, which can be used as a cheap and easily soluble glycosyl donor for the enzymatic synthesis of 2-O-D-glucopyranosyl-L-ascorbic acid (AA-2G) by CGTase. When using maltodextrin as glycosyl donor, four mutants K47F (lysine→ phenylalanine), K47L (lysine→ leucine), K47V (lysine→ valine) and K47W (lysine→ tryptophan) showed higher AA-2G yield as compared with that produced by the wild-type CGTase. The transformation conditions (temperature, pH and the mass ratio of L-ascorbic acid to maltodextrin) were optimized and the highest titer of AA-2G produced by the mutant K47L could reach 1.97 g/l, which was 64.2% higher than that (1.20 g/l) produced by the wild-type CGTase. The reaction kinetics analysis confirmed the enhanced maltodextrin specificity, and it was also found that compared with the wild-type CGTase, the four mutants had relatively lower cyclization activities and higher disproportionation activities, which was favorable for AA-2G synthesis. The mechanism responsible for the enhanced substrate specificity was further explored by structure modeling and it was indicated that the enhancement of maltodextrin specificity may be due to the short residue chain and the removal of hydrogen bonding interactions between the side chain of residue 47 and the sugar at -3 subsite. Here the obtained mutant CGTases, especially the K47L, has a great potential in the production of AA-2G with maltodextrin as a cheap and easily soluble substrate. PMID:23129181

  20. Longitudinal distributions of dicarboxylic acids, ω-oxoacids, pyruvic acid, α-dicarbonyls, and fatty acids in the marine aerosols from the central Pacific including equatorial upwelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoque, Mir Md. Mozammal; Kawamura, Kimitaka

    2016-03-01

    Remote marine aerosol samples (total suspended particles) were collected during a cruise in the central Pacific from Japan to Mexico (1°59'N-35°N and 171°54'E-90°58'W). The aerosol samples were analyzed for dicarboxylic acids (C2-C11), ω-oxoacids, pyruvic acid, α-dicarbonyls, and fatty acids as well as organic and elemental carbon, water-soluble organic carbon, and total nitrogen (WSTN). During the study, diacids were the most abundant compound class followed by fatty acids, ω-oxoacids, and α-dicarbonyls. Molecular compositions of diacids showed a predominance of oxalic (C2) acid followed by malonic (C3) and succinic (C4) acids. Oxalic acid comprises 74% of total diacids. This result suggests that photochemical production of oxalic acid is significant over the central Pacific. Spatial distributions of diacids, ω-oxoacids, pyruvic acid, α-dicarbonyls, and fatty acids together with total carbon and WSTN showed higher abundances in the eastern equatorial Pacific where the upwelling of high-nutrient waters followed by high biological productivity is common, indicating that their in situ production is important in the warmer central Pacific through photochemical oxidation from their gaseous and particulate precursors. This study demonstrates that there is a strong linkage in biogeochemical cycles of carbon in the sea-air interface via ocean upwelling, phytoplankton productivity, sea-to-air emissions of organic matter, and formation of secondary organic aerosols in the eastern equatorial Pacific.

  1. Chemical Genetics Uncovers Novel Inhibitors of Lignification, Including p-Iodobenzoic Acid Targeting CINNAMATE-4-HYDROXYLASE.

    PubMed

    Van de Wouwer, Dorien; Vanholme, Ruben; Decou, Raphaël; Goeminne, Geert; Audenaert, Dominique; Nguyen, Long; Höfer, René; Pesquet, Edouard; Vanholme, Bartel; Boerjan, Wout

    2016-09-01

    Plant secondary-thickened cell walls are characterized by the presence of lignin, a recalcitrant and hydrophobic polymer that provides mechanical strength and ensures long-distance water transport. Exactly the recalcitrance and hydrophobicity of lignin put a burden on the industrial processing efficiency of lignocellulosic biomass. Both forward and reverse genetic strategies have been used intensively to unravel the molecular mechanism of lignin deposition. As an alternative strategy, we introduce here a forward chemical genetic approach to find candidate inhibitors of lignification. A high-throughput assay to assess lignification in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) seedlings was developed and used to screen a 10-k library of structurally diverse, synthetic molecules. Of the 73 compounds that reduced lignin deposition, 39 that had a major impact were retained and classified into five clusters based on the shift they induced in the phenolic profile of Arabidopsis seedlings. One representative compound of each cluster was selected for further lignin-specific assays, leading to the identification of an aromatic compound that is processed in the plant into two fragments, both having inhibitory activity against lignification. One fragment, p-iodobenzoic acid, was further characterized as a new inhibitor of CINNAMATE 4-HYDROXYLASE, a key enzyme of the phenylpropanoid pathway synthesizing the building blocks of the lignin polymer. As such, we provide proof of concept of this chemical biology approach to screen for inhibitors of lignification and present a broad array of putative inhibitors of lignin deposition for further characterization. PMID:27485881

  2. Protective effects of ascorbic acid against the genetic and epigenetic alterations induced by 3,5-dimethylaminophenol in AA8 cells.

    PubMed

    Chao, Ming-Wei; Erkekoglu, Pınar; Tseng, Chia-Yi; Ye, Wenjie; Trudel, Laura J; Skipper, Paul L; Tannenbaum, Steven R; Wogan, Gerald N

    2015-05-01

    Exposure to monocyclic aromatic alkylanilines (MAAs), namely 2,6-dimethylaniline (2,6-DMA), 3,5-dimethylaniline (3,5-DMA) and 3-ethylaniline (3-EA), was significantly and independently associated with bladder cancer incidence. 3,5-DMAP (3,5-dimethylaminophenol), a metabolite of 3,5-DMA, was shown to induce an imbalance in cytotoxicity cellular antioxidant/oxidant status, and DNA damage in mammalian cell lines. This study was designed to evaluate the protective effect of ascorbic acid (Asc) against the cytotoxicity, reactive oxygen species (ROS) production, genotoxicity and epigenetic changes induced by 3,5-DMAP in AA8 Chinese Hamster Ovary (CHO) cells. In different cellular fractions, 3,5-DMAP caused alterations in the enzyme activities orchestrating a cellular antioxidant balance, decreases in reduced glutathione levels and a cellular redox ratio as well as increases in lipid peroxidation and protein oxidation. We also suggest that the cellular stress caused by this particular alkylaniline leads to both genetic (Aprt mutagenesis) and epigenetic changes in histones 3 and 4 (H3 and H4). This may further cause molecular events triggering different pathological conditions and eventually cancer. In both cytoplasm and nucleus, Asc provided increases in 3,5-DMAP-reduced glutathione levels and cellular redox ratio and decreases in the lipid peroxidation and protein oxidation. Asc was also found to be protective against the genotoxic and epigenetic effects initiated by 3,5-DMAP. In addition, Asc supplied protection against the cell cycle (G1 phase) arrest induced by this particular alkylaniline metabolite. PMID:25178734

  3. AAS 227: Day 1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2016-01-01

    The mission was featured on the front pages of 450 newspapers worldwide on every single continent (including Antartica!)New Horizons reached the Moon in9 HOURSafter launch (compared to the ~3 days it took the Apollo missions)The mission controllers were aiming for a 100km window of space all the way from EarthThere was a window of ~400seconds which the probe had to arrive within the probe arrived90 seconds early! Putting tardy astronomers everywhere to shame.Charon was the only satellite of Pluto known at the time of the mission proposalThe canyon found on Charon is not only bigger than the Grand Canyon but bigger than Mariner Valley on Mars which is already4000 km (2500 mi) long and reaches depths of up to 7 km (4 mi)!Charons surface. Tectonic feature runs about 1500 km, around 10 km deep. Eat it, Mars. #aas227 pic.twitter.com/blewwJaXEn Danny Barringer (@HeavyFe_H) January 5, 2016The mountains ringing the Sputnik Planum (aka the heart of Pluto) are over 4km high and are snow capped with methane icePlutos mountain ranges. Means surface nitrogen layer is thin, probably water ice according to @AlanStern. #aas227 pic.twitter.com/0yyHZvpBOE Danny Barringer (@HeavyFe_H) January 5, 2016Plutos atmosphere has a dozendistincthaze layers but how they arecreated is a mystery#aas227 hazes on Pluto wow pic.twitter.com/VPx99ZhPj1 Lisa StorrieLombardi (@lisajsl) January 5, 2016Alan also spoke about the future of New Horizons there is a new mission proposal for a fly by of a Kuiper Belt object 2014MU69 in Jan 2019 which should give us a better understanding of this icy frontier at the edge ofthe Solar System. As a parting gift Alan playedthemost gorgeously detailed fly over video of Plutos surface that had all in the room melting into their flip flops. Its safe to say that the whole room is now Pluto-curious and wondering whether a change of discipline is in order!Press Conference: Black Holes and Exoplanets (by Susanna Kohler)This morning marked the first press conference of the meeting

  4. Systemic AA amyloidosis in the common marmoset.

    PubMed

    Ludlage, E; Murphy, C L; Davern, S M; Solomon, A; Weiss, D T; Glenn-Smith, D; Dworkin, S; Mansfield, K G

    2005-03-01

    The common marmoset (Callithrix jacchus) is a small New World primate native to Brazil that has been used extensively in biomedical research. A retrospective analysis of archived hematoxylin and eosin-stained tissue sections and clinical records was conducted at the New England Primate Research Center on 86 marmosets more than 1 year of age that were euthanized during the past decade because of morbidity and failure to thrive. Approximately 17% (15 of 86) were found to have amyloid deposits in one or more organs, including the liver, adrenal glands, kidneys, and intestine. This material was shown by amino acid sequence analysis to be composed of serum amyloid A (SAA)-related protein. This type of amyloidosis, designated AA or "secondary," is associated typically with an inflammatory process that induces elevated levels of the SAA amyloidogenic precursor molecule. Notably, there were no significant pathologic differences or other distinguishing features in animals with amyloid versus those without; furthermore, on the basis of the limited number of serum specimens available for analysis, the SAA concentrations in the two groups were comparable, thus suggesting the possible inheritable nature of the disorder. In this respect, the common marmoset provides a unique experimental model for study of the pathogenesis and treatment of AA and other forms of systemic amyloidosis. PMID:15753464

  5. Single amino acid insertions in extracellular loop 2 of Bombyx mori ABCC2 disrupt its receptor function for Bacillus thuringiensis Cry1Ab and Cry1Ac but not Cry1Aa toxins.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Shiho; Miyamoto, Kazuhisa; Noda, Hiroaki; Endo, Haruka; Kikuta, Shingo; Sato, Ryoichi

    2016-04-01

    In a previous report, seven Cry1Ab-resistant strains were identified in the silkworm, Bombyx mori; these strains were shown to have a tyrosine insertion at position 234 in extracellular loop 2 of the ABC transporter C2 (BmABCC2). This insertion was confirmed to destroy the receptor function of BmABCC2 and confer the strains resistance against Cry1Ab and Cry1Ac. However, these strains were susceptible to Cry1Aa. In this report, we examined the mechanisms of the loss of receptor function of the transporter by expressing mutations in Sf9 cells. After replacement of one or two of the five amino acid residues in loop 2 of the susceptible BmABCC2 gene [BmABCC2_S] with alanine, cells still showed susceptibility, retaining the receptor function. Five mutants with single amino acid insertions at position 234 in BmABCC2 were also generated, resulting in loop 2 having six amino acids, which corresponds to replacing the tyrosine insertion in the resistant BmABCC2 gene [BmABCC2_R(+(234)Y)] with another amino acid. All five mutants exhibited loss of function against Cry1Ab and Cry1Ac. These results suggest that the amino acid sequence in loop 2 is less important than the loop size (five vs. six amino acids) or loop structure for Cry1Ab and Cry1Ac activity. Several domain-swapped mutant toxins were then generated among Cry1Aa, Cry1Ab, and Cry1Ac, which are composed of three domains. Swapped mutants containing domain II of Cry1Ab or Cry1Ac did not kill Sf9 cells expressing BmABCC2_R(+(234)Y), suggesting that domain II of the Cry toxin is related to the interaction with the receptor function of BmABCC2. This also suggests that different reactions against Bt-toxins in some B. mori strains, that is, Cry1Ab resistance or Cry1Aa susceptibility, are attributable to structural differences in domain II of Cry1A toxins. PMID:26928903

  6. AAS 227: Day 2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2016-01-01

    Editors Note:This week were at the 227th AAS Meeting in Kissimmee, FL. Along with several fellow authors from astrobites.com, I will bewritingupdates on selectedevents at themeeting and posting at the end of each day. Follow along here or atastrobites.com, or catch ourlive-tweeted updates from the@astrobites Twitter account. The usual posting schedule for AAS Nova will resumenext week.Welcome to Day 2 of the winter American Astronomical Society (AAS) meeting in Kissimmee! Several of us are attending the conference this year, and we will report highlights from each day here on astrobites. If youd like to see more timely updates during the day, we encourage you to follow @astrobites on twitter or search the #aas227 hashtag.Plenary Session: Black Hole Physics with the Event Horizon Telescope (by Susanna Kohler)If anyone needed motivation to wake up early this morning, they got it in the form of Feryal Ozel (University of Arizona) enthralling us all with exciting pictures, videos, and words about black holes and the Event Horizon Telescope. Ozel spoke to a packed room (at 8:30am!) about where the project currently stands, and where its heading in the future.The EHT has pretty much the coolest goal ever: actually image the event horizons of black holes in our universe. The problem is that the largest black hole we can look at (Sgr A*, in the center of our galaxy) has an event horizon size of 50 as. For this kind of resolution roughly equivalent to trying to image a DVD on the Moon! wed need an Earth-sized telescope. EHT has solved this problem by linking telescopes around the world, creating one giant, mm-wavelength effective telescope with a baseline the size of Earth.Besides producing awesome images, the EHT will be able to test properties of black-hole spacetime, the no-hair theorem, and general relativity (GR) in new regimes.Ozel walked us through some of the theory prep work we need to do now in order to get the most science out of the EHT, including devising new

  7. Effect of allicin (diallyl disulfide-oxide) on prostaglandin endoperoxide H/sub 2/ (PGH/sub 2/) and arachidonic acid (AA) metabolism and platelet aggregation

    SciTech Connect

    Mayeux, P.R.; Agrawal, K.C.; King, B.T.; Kadowitz, P.J.; McNamara, D.B.

    1986-03-01

    The authors report here the effects of pure allicin (the antibacterial component of GO), synthesized from diallyl disulfide and hydrogen peroxide, on human platelet aggregation, PGH/sub 2/ metabolism in microsomes of bovine lung (BL) and bovine coronary artery (BCA), homogenates of human platelet (HP), and on AA metabolism in HP. Allicin at 16 ..mu..g/ml to 160 ..mu..g/ml produced concentration-dependent inhibition of platelet aggregation to 1.6 mM AA and 2.8 ..mu..M U 46619, a stable analog of PGH/sub 2/ and a TXA/sub 2/ minic. BL (200 ..mu..g protein), BCA (10 ..mu..g protein), and HP (1500 ..mu..g protein) were incubated with 10 ..mu..M (/sup 14/C) PGH/sub 2/ +/- allicin. HP (1500 ..mu..g protein) were incubated with 20 ..mu..M (/sup 14/C) AA +/- allicin. Products were separated by TLC and quantified by radiochromatographic scan. Allicin in the concentration range of 10-/sup 6/M-10-/sup 3/M induced no change in the formation of prostacyclin by BL and BCA or of TXA/sub 2/ by BL and HP. These data suggest that the platelet antiaggregatory action of allicin is not due to inhibition of cyclooxygenase or TXA/sub 2/ synthetase in the human platelet, but may be related to interactions at the TXA/sub 2/ receptor or on cyclic nucleotide levels.

  8. AAS 227: Day 2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2016-01-01

    Editors Note:This week were at the 227th AAS Meeting in Kissimmee, FL. Along with several fellow authors from astrobites.com, I will bewritingupdates on selectedevents at themeeting and posting at the end of each day. Follow along here or atastrobites.com, or catch ourlive-tweeted updates from the@astrobites Twitter account. The usual posting schedule for AAS Nova will resumenext week.Welcome to Day 2 of the winter American Astronomical Society (AAS) meeting in Kissimmee! Several of us are attending the conference this year, and we will report highlights from each day here on astrobites. If youd like to see more timely updates during the day, we encourage you to follow @astrobites on twitter or search the #aas227 hashtag.Plenary Session: Black Hole Physics with the Event Horizon Telescope (by Susanna Kohler)If anyone needed motivation to wake up early this morning, they got it in the form of Feryal Ozel (University of Arizona) enthralling us all with exciting pictures, videos, and words about black holes and the Event Horizon Telescope. Ozel spoke to a packed room (at 8:30am!) about where the project currently stands, and where its heading in the future.The EHT has pretty much the coolest goal ever: actually image the event horizons of black holes in our universe. The problem is that the largest black hole we can look at (Sgr A*, in the center of our galaxy) has an event horizon size of 50 as. For this kind of resolution roughly equivalent to trying to image a DVD on the Moon! wed need an Earth-sized telescope. EHT has solved this problem by linking telescopes around the world, creating one giant, mm-wavelength effective telescope with a baseline the size of Earth.Besides producing awesome images, the EHT will be able to test properties of black-hole spacetime, the no-hair theorem, and general relativity (GR) in new regimes.Ozel walked us through some of the theory prep work we need to do now in order to get the most science out of the EHT, including devising new

  9. AAS 227: Day 1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2016-01-01

    The mission was featured on the front pages of 450 newspapers worldwide on every single continent (including Antartica!)New Horizons reached the Moon in9 HOURSafter launch (compared to the ~3 days it took the Apollo missions)The mission controllers were aiming for a 100km window of space all the way from EarthThere was a window of ~400seconds which the probe had to arrive within the probe arrived90 seconds early! Putting tardy astronomers everywhere to shame.Charon was the only satellite of Pluto known at the time of the mission proposalThe canyon found on Charon is not only bigger than the Grand Canyon but bigger than Mariner Valley on Mars which is already4000 km (2500 mi) long and reaches depths of up to 7 km (4 mi)!Charons surface. Tectonic feature runs about 1500 km, around 10 km deep. Eat it, Mars. #aas227 pic.twitter.com/blewwJaXEn Danny Barringer (@HeavyFe_H) January 5, 2016The mountains ringing the Sputnik Planum (aka the heart of Pluto) are over 4km high and are snow capped with methane icePlutos mountain ranges. Means surface nitrogen layer is thin, probably water ice according to @AlanStern. #aas227 pic.twitter.com/0yyHZvpBOE Danny Barringer (@HeavyFe_H) January 5, 2016Plutos atmosphere has a dozendistincthaze layers but how they arecreated is a mystery#aas227 hazes on Pluto wow pic.twitter.com/VPx99ZhPj1 Lisa StorrieLombardi (@lisajsl) January 5, 2016Alan also spoke about the future of New Horizons there is a new mission proposal for a fly by of a Kuiper Belt object 2014MU69 in Jan 2019 which should give us a better understanding of this icy frontier at the edge ofthe Solar System. As a parting gift Alan playedthemost gorgeously detailed fly over video of Plutos surface that had all in the room melting into their flip flops. Its safe to say that the whole room is now Pluto-curious and wondering whether a change of discipline is in order!Press Conference: Black Holes and Exoplanets (by Susanna Kohler)This morning marked the first press conference of the meeting

  10. Influence of cold stress on contents of soluble sugars, vitamin C and free amino acids including gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) in spinach (Spinacia oleracea).

    PubMed

    Yoon, Young-Eun; Kuppusamy, Saranya; Cho, Kye Man; Kim, Pil Joo; Kwack, Yong-Bum; Lee, Yong Bok

    2017-01-15

    The contents of soluble sugars (sucrose, fructose, glucose, maltose and raffinose), vitamin C and free amino acids (34 compounds, essential and non-essential) were quantified in open-field and greenhouse-grown spinaches in response to cold stress using liquid chromatography. In general, greenhouse cultivation produced nutritionally high value spinach in a shorter growing period, where the soluble sugars, vitamin C and total amino acids concentrations, including essential were in larger amounts compared to those grown in open-field scenarios. Further, low temperature exposure of spinach during a shorter growth period resulted in the production of spinach with high sucrose, ascorbate, proline, gamma-aminobutyric acid, valine and leucine content, and these constitute the most important energy/nutrient sources. In conclusion, cultivation of spinach in greenhouse at a low temperature (4-7°C) and exposure for a shorter period (7-21days) before harvest is recommended. This strategy will produce a high quality product that people can eat. PMID:27542466

  11. Impact of hedonic evaluation on consumers' preferences for beef attributes including its enrichment with n-3 and CLA fatty acids.

    PubMed

    Baba, Yasmina; Kallas, Zein; Costa-Font, Montserrat; Gil, José María; Realini, Carolina E

    2016-01-01

    The impact of hedonic evaluation on consumers' preferences for beef attributes was evaluated (origin, animal diet, fat content, color, price) including its enrichment with omega-3 (n-3) and conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) fatty acids. One group of consumers (n=325) received information about n-3 and CLA, while the other group (n=322) received no information. Consumers conducted a Discrete Choice Experiment (DCE), using the recently developed Generalized Multinomial Logit model; followed by a blind hedonic evaluation of beef samples, which were identified after tasting, and finally repeated the DCE. Results showed that hedonic evaluation had a significant impact on consumers' preferences, which were similar after tasting for all consumers, with less emphasis on the fat content, color, and origin attributes and greater emphasis on animal diet. Preference for n-3 enriched beef increased, while preference for CLA enriched beef was still not significant after tasting. The information provided had a significant effect on consumers' beef preferences, but no significant impact on beef liking scores. PMID:26331961

  12. JBIR-78 and JBIR-95: phenylacetylated peptides isolated from Kibdelosporangium sp. AK-AA56.

    PubMed

    Izumikawa, Miho; Takagi, Motoki; Shin-Ya, Kazuo

    2012-02-24

    The search for metabolites of Kibdelosporangium sp. AK-AA56 resulted in the discovery of novel N-phenylacetylated peptides, JBIR-78 (1) and JBIR-95 (2). Compounds 1 and 2 were established to be N-phenylacetylated heptapeptides by extensive NMR and HRESIMS analyses. The absolute configuration of the standard amino acids including a cysteic acid moiety was determined using Marfey's method on the acid hydrolysates of 1 and 2. The relative and absolute configurations of a nonstandard amino acid, β-hydroxyleucine, were elucidated using the J-based and modified Mosher's methods, respectively. In an antimicrobial test, 1 showed antibacterial activity against Micrococcus luteus. PMID:22264203

  13. Section AA Pre2004 Fire, Section AA 2009, Section AA, South ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Section A-A Pre-2004 Fire, Section A-A 2009, Section A-A, South Elevation - Boston & Maine Railroad, Berlin Branch Bridge #148.81, Formerly spanning Moose Brook at former Boston & Maine Railroad, Gorham, Coos County, NH

  14. AAS 227: Day 3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2016-01-01

    many orbits has made it a powerhouse for learning about the temperatures, atmospheres, and orbits of exoplanets. The list of examples that Fazio provided included the first global temperature map of an exoplanet (HD 189733b), the detection of the closest transiting exoplanet (HD 219134b), and the measurement of thermal emission from a super-Earth (55 Cnc e). Spitzers large distance from the Earth (specifically, the ground-based telescopes on Earth) even allowed astronomers to observe an exoplanet via gravitational microlensing using a special technique called space-based parallax.Spitzer has also been extremely useful for observing everything from Solar System scales (such as the enormous infrared dust ring around Saturn) to galactic structures. Comparing images of galaxies observed at visible wavelengths with Spitzer images of the same galaxies at infrared wavelengths has allowed us to probe the structure and composition of galaxies at a new level.Astronomers have also used Spitzer to explore the evolution of stars. Thanks to its infrared detectors, Spitzer can look through large clouds of dust that are opaque at visible wavelengths, and observe young stellar objects in their birth environments. Cosmologists can use Spitzer to study the early universe and the formation of galaxies over twelve billion years ago. Fazio used all of these examples and more to demonstrate that Spitzer has truly changed our understanding of the universe.Climate Change for Astronomers (Meredith Rawls)Every astronomer at #aas227 wants to learn about climate change! WOW this room is ridiculously full. pic.twitter.com/ud9an0gLJG Meredith Rawls (@merrdiff) January 7, 2016The second half of the session was a presentation by Doug Duncan featuring an activity from his 101-level college course. He uses climate change as a way to teach critical thinking and scientific reasoning. Members of the audience were walked through an exercise that included interpreting plots of changing surface temperatures

  15. The cytochrome P450 2AA gene cluster in zebrafish (Danio rerio); expression of CYP2AA1 and CYP2AA2 and response to phenobarbital-type inducers

    PubMed Central

    Kubota, Akira; Bainy, Afonso C.D.; Woodin, Bruce R.; Goldstone, Jared V.; Stegeman, John J.

    2013-01-01

    The cytochrome P450 (CYP) 2 gene family is the largest and most diverse CYP gene family in vertebrates. In zebrafish, we have identified 10 genes in a new subfamily CYP2AA, which does not show orthology to any human or other mammalian CYP genes. Here we report evolutionary and structural relationships of the 10 CYP2AA genes and expression of the first two genes, CYP2AA1 and CYP2AA2. Parsimony reconstruction of the tandem duplication pattern for the CYP2AA cluster suggests that CYP2AA1, CYP2AA2 and CYP2AA3 likely arose in the earlier duplication events and thus are most diverged in function from the other CYP2AAs. On the other hand, CYP2AA8 and CYP2AA9 are genes that arose in the latest duplication event, implying functional similarity between these two CYPs. A molecular model of CYP2AA1 showing the sequence conservation across the CYP2AA cluster reveals that the regions with the highest variability within the cluster map into CYP2AA1 near the substrate access channels, suggesting differing substrate specificity. Zebrafish CYP2AA1 transcript was expressed predominantly in intestine, while CYP2AA2 was most highly expressed in kidney, suggesting differing roles in physiology. In liver CYP2AA2 expression but not that of CYP2AA1, was increased by 1,4-bis [2-(3,5-dichloropyridyloxy)] benzene (TCPOBOP) and, to a lesser extent, by phenobarbital (PB). In contrast, pregnenolone 16α-carbonitrile (PCN) increased CYP2AA1, but not CYP2AA2 in liver. The results identify a CYP2 subfamily in zebrafish that includes genes apparently induced by PB-type chemicals and PXR agonists, the first concrete in vivo evidence for a PB-type response in fish. PMID:23726801

  16. Stability studies of ascorbic acid 2-glucoside in cosmetic lotion using surface response methodology.

    PubMed

    Huang, Wen-Ying; Lee, Pei-Chi; Huang, Ling-Kuei; Lu, Li-Ping; Liao, Wayne C

    2013-03-15

    Ascorbic acid 2-glucoside (AA-2G) has been widely used in cream and lotion types of cosmetic products. Thus, the degradation of AA-2G caused by the temperature change and pH variation was very critical for determining the bio-functionality of cosmetics. Response surface methodology (RSM) was introduced to study the influence of temperature and pH on the stability of AA-2G. The optimal condition of retaining AA-2G with the highest stability was determined to be 55.3°C and pH 6.4. The antioxidative activities of AA-2G including DPPH and ABTS free radical scavenging activities, metal chelating activity, and reducing ability were also determined. AA-2G was a good ascorbic acid derivative which could be used in cosmetic products as an active ingredient. PMID:23416010

  17. Ascorbic acid and rates of cognitive decline in Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Bowman, Gene L; Dodge, Hiroko; Frei, Balz; Calabrese, Carlo; Oken, Barry S; Kaye, Jeffrey A; Quinn, Joseph F

    2009-01-01

    The brain maintains high levels of ascorbic acid (AA) despite a concentration gradient favoring diffusion from brain to peripheral tissues. Dietary antioxidants, including AA, appear to modify the risk of Alzheimer's disease (AD). The objective of this study was to test the hypothesis that neurodegeneration in AD is modified by brain levels of AA. Thirty-two patients with mild to moderate AD participated in a biomarker study involving standardized clinical assessments over one year. Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and serum were collected at baseline for AA and albumin content. Cognitive measures were collected at baseline and one year. CSF and plasma AA failed to predict cognitive decline independently, however, CSF: plasma AA ratio did. After adding CSF Albumin Index (an established marker of blood-brain barrier integrity) to the regression models the effect of CSF: plasma AA ratio as a predictor of cognitive decline was weakened. CSF: plasma AA ratio predicts rate of decline in AD. This relationship may indicate that the CSF: plasma AA ratio is an index of AA availability to the brain or may be an artifact of a relationship between blood-brain barrier impairment and neurodegeneration. PMID:19158425

  18. The AAS Workforce Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Postman, Marc; Norman, D. J.; Evans, N. R.; Ivie, R.

    2014-01-01

    The AAS Demographics Committee, on behalf of the AAS, was tasked with initiating a biennial survey to improve the Society's ability to serve its members and to inform the community about changes in the community's demographics. A survey, based in part on similar surveys for other scientific societies, was developed in the summer of 2012 and was publicly launched in January 2013. The survey randomly targeted 2500 astronomers who are members of the AAS. The survey was closed 4 months later (April 2013). The response rate was excellent - 63% (1583 people) completed the survey. I will summarize the results from this survey, highlighting key results and plans for their broad dissemination.

  19. AAS 227: Day 3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2016-01-01

    many orbits has made it a powerhouse for learning about the temperatures, atmospheres, and orbits of exoplanets. The list of examples that Fazio provided included the first global temperature map of an exoplanet (HD 189733b), the detection of the closest transiting exoplanet (HD 219134b), and the measurement of thermal emission from a super-Earth (55 Cnc e). Spitzers large distance from the Earth (specifically, the ground-based telescopes on Earth) even allowed astronomers to observe an exoplanet via gravitational microlensing using a special technique called space-based parallax.Spitzer has also been extremely useful for observing everything from Solar System scales (such as the enormous infrared dust ring around Saturn) to galactic structures. Comparing images of galaxies observed at visible wavelengths with Spitzer images of the same galaxies at infrared wavelengths has allowed us to probe the structure and composition of galaxies at a new level.Astronomers have also used Spitzer to explore the evolution of stars. Thanks to its infrared detectors, Spitzer can look through large clouds of dust that are opaque at visible wavelengths, and observe young stellar objects in their birth environments. Cosmologists can use Spitzer to study the early universe and the formation of galaxies over twelve billion years ago. Fazio used all of these examples and more to demonstrate that Spitzer has truly changed our understanding of the universe.Climate Change for Astronomers (Meredith Rawls)Every astronomer at #aas227 wants to learn about climate change! WOW this room is ridiculously full. pic.twitter.com/ud9an0gLJG Meredith Rawls (@merrdiff) January 7, 2016The second half of the session was a presentation by Doug Duncan featuring an activity from his 101-level college course. He uses climate change as a way to teach critical thinking and scientific reasoning. Members of the audience were walked through an exercise that included interpreting plots of changing surface temperatures

  20. AAS 227: Welcome!

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2016-01-01

    Greetings from the 227th American Astronomical Society meeting in Kissimmee, Florida! This week, along with several fellow authors from astrobites, Iwill bewritingupdates on selectedevents at themeeting and posting at the end of each day. You can follow along here or atastrobites.com, or catch ourlive-tweeted updates from the@astrobites Twitter account. The usual posting schedule for AAS Nova will resumenext week.If youre an author or referee (or plan to be!) and youre here at the meeting, consider joining us at our Author and Referee Workshop on Wednesday in the Tallahassee room, where well be sharingsome of the exciting new features of the AAS journals. You can drop intoeither of the two-hour sessions(10 AM 12 PM or 1 PM 3 PM), and there will be afree buffet lunch at noon.Heres the agenda:Morning SessionTopic Speaker10:00 am 10:05 amIntroductionsJulie Steffen10:05 am 10:35 amChanges at AAS Journals; How to Be a Successful AAS AuthorEthan Vishniac10:35 am 11:00 amThe Peer Review ProcessButler Burton11:00 am 11:15 amAAS Nova: Sharing AAS Authors Research with the Broader CommunitySusanna Kohler11:15 am 11:30 amFixing Software and Instrumentation Publishing: New Paper Styles in AAS JournalsChris Lintott11:30 am 11:45 amMaking Article Writing Easier with the New AASTeX v6.0Greg Schwarz11:45 am 12:00 pmBringing JavaScript and Interactivity to Your AAS Journal FiguresGus MuenchLunch SessionTopic Speaker12:00 pm 12:15 pmUnified Astronomy ThesaurusKatie Frey12:15 pm 12:30 pmAAS/ADS ORCID Integration ToolAlberto Accomazzi12:30 pm 12:45 pmWorldWide Telescope and Video AbstractsJosh Peek12:45 pm 01:00 pmArizona Astronomical Data Hub (AADH)Bryan HeidornAfternoon SessionTopic Speaker01:00 pm 01:05 pmIntroductionsJulie Steffen01:05 pm 01:35 pmChanges at AAS Journals; How to Be a Successful AAS AuthorEthan Vishniac01:35 pm 02:00 pmThe Peer Review ProcessButler Burton02:00 pm 02:15 pmAAS Nova: Sharing AAS Authors Research with the Broader CommunitySusanna Kohler02:15 pm 02:30 pm

  1. AAS 228: Welcome!

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2016-06-01

    Greetings from the 228th American Astronomical Society meeting in San Diego, California! This week, along with a team of fellow authorsfrom astrobites, Iwill bewritingupdates on selectedevents at themeeting and posting twiceeach day. You can follow along here or atastrobites.com, or catch ourlive-tweeted updates from the@astrobites Twitter account. The usual posting schedule for AAS Nova will resumenext week.If youre at the meeting, come stop by the AAS booth (Booth #211-213) to learn about the newly-announced partnership between AAS and astrobites and pick up some swag.And dont forget to visit the IOP booth in the Exhibit Hall (Booth #223) to learn more about the new corridors for AAS Journals and to pick up a badge pin to representyour corridor!

  2. DEVELOPMENTAL TOXICITY AND STRUCTURE-ACTIVITY RELATIONSHIPS OF ALIPHATIC ACIDS, INCLUDING DOSE-RESPONSE ASSESSMENT OF VALPROIC ACID IN MICE AND RATS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The anticonvulsant valproic acid (VPA), or 2-propylpentanoic acid, is a short-chain aliphatic acid that is teratogenic in humans and rodents. PA and 14 related using the Chernoff/Kavlock assay Sprague-Dawley rats were gavaged with the test agent in corn oil once daily organogenes...

  3. Fatty acid composition, including CLA's isomers and cholesterol content of m. longissimus lumborum and m. semimebranosus of Katahdin, Suffolk, Katahdin x Suffolk, and Suffolk x Katahdin lambs

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Lipids in meat products have important human health implications. Muscle tissues from Katahdin (KK), Suffolk (SS), Katahdin x Suffolk (KS), and Suffolk x Katahdin (SS) lambs were analyzed to determine the effect of breed-type on muscle fatty acid composition, including conjugated linoleic acid (CLA)...

  4. 2,3,7,8-Tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) induced P-450 mediated arachidonic acid (AA) metabolism in chick embryo liver (CEL) occurs in parenchymal cells (PC) rather than in non-parenchymal cells (NPC)

    SciTech Connect

    Paroli, L.; Rifkind, A.B. )

    1992-02-26

    TCDD induces cytochrome P-450 mediated AA metabolism in CEL and changes the dominant metabolite(s) from {omega}-OH AA to AA epoxygenase products (EETs and EET-diols). PC and NPC from CEL were separated by differential centrifugation and characterized by morphology, immunohistochemistry and P-450 mediated xenobiotic metabolism; purities were >95%. PC and NPC, from 16 day old chick embryos treated for 5 days with TCDD or vehicle alone, were cultured for 48 hr, homogenized and incubated with ({sup 14}C)-AA {plus minus} NADPH. AA products were resolved by reverse phase HPLC. The major product in control PC, {omega}-OH AA was not significantly affected by TCDD. All of the AA metabolism was NADPH dependent. Control and TCDD treated PC had the same metabolite patterns as whole liver microsomes. Neither control nor TCDD treated NPC generated P-450 AA metabolites. Also co-culturing NPC with PC did not affect AA metabolism of either cell type. The findings indicate that TCDD-induced changes in AA metabolism are retained in culture and that hepatocytes rather than NPC effect P-450 mediated AA metabolism in both control and TCDD-induced CEL.

  5. Activity of vegetative insecticidal proteins Vip3Aa58 and Vip3Aa59 of Bacillus thuringiensis against lepidopteran pests.

    PubMed

    Baranek, Jakub; Kaznowski, Adam; Konecka, Edyta; Naimov, Samir

    2015-09-01

    Vegetative insecticidal proteins (Vips) secreted by some isolates of Bacillus thuringiensis show activity against insects and are regarded as insecticides against pests. A number of B. thuringiensis strains harbouring vip3A genes were isolated from different sources and identified by using a PCR based approach. The isolates with the highest insecticidal activity were indicated in screening tests, and their vip genes were cloned and sequenced. The analysis revealed two polymorphic Vip protein forms, which were classified as Vip3Aa58 and Vip3Aa59. After expression of the vip genes, the proteins were isolated and characterized. The activity of both toxins was estimated against economically important lepidopteran pests of woodlands (Dendrolimus pini), orchards (Cydia pomonella) and field crops (Spodoptera exigua). Vip3Aa58 and Vip3Aa59 were highly toxic and their potency surpassed those of many Cry proteins used in commercial bioinsecticides. Vip3Aa59 revealed similar larvicidal activity as Vip3Aa58 against S. exigua and C. pomonella. Despite 98% similarity of amino acid sequences of both proteins, Vip3Aa59 was significantly more active against D. pini. Additionally the effect of proteolytic activation of Vip58Aa and Vip3Aa59 on toxicity of D. pini and S. exigua was studied. Both Vip3Aa proteins did not show any activity against Tenebrio molitor (Coleoptera) larvae. The results suggest that the Vip3Aa58 and Vip3Aa59 toxins might be useful for controlling populations of insect pests of crops and forests. PMID:26146224

  6. Rapid identification of triterpenoid sulfates and hydroxy fatty acids including two new constituents from Tydemania expeditionis by LC-MS

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jian-Long; Kubanek, Julia; Hay, Mark E.; Aalbersberg, William; Ye, Wen-Cai; Jiang, Ren-Wang

    2011-01-01

    Tydemania expeditionis Weber-van Bosse (Udoteaceae) is a weakly calcified green alga. In the present paper, liquid chromatography coupled with photodiode array detection and electrospray mass spectrometry was developed to identify the fingerprint components. A total of four triterpenoid sulfates and three hydroxy fatty acids in the ethyl acetate fraction of the crude extract were structurally characterized on the basis of retention time, online UV spectrum and mass fragmentation pattern. Furthermore, detailed LC-MS analysis revealed two new hydroxy fatty acids, which were then prepared and characterized by extensive NMR analyses. The proposed method provides a scientific and technical platform for the rapid identification of triterpenoid sulfates and hydroxy fatty acids in similar marine algae and terrestrial plants. PMID:21915955

  7. AAS Career Services

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marvel, Kevin B.

    2012-08-01

    The American Astronomical Society provides substantial programs in the area of Career Services.Motivated by the Society's mission to enhance and share humanity's understanding of the Universe, the AAS provides a central resource for advertising positions, interviewing opportunities at its annual winter meeting and information, workshops and networks to enable astronomers to find employment.The programs of the Society in this area are overseen by an active committee on employment and the AAS Council itself.Additional resources that help characterize the field, its growth and facts about employment such as salaries and type of jobs available are regularly summarized and reported on by the American Institute of Physics.

  8. The 9aaTAD Transactivation Domains: From Gal4 to p53.

    PubMed

    Piskacek, Martin; Havelka, Marek; Rezacova, Martina; Knight, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    The family of the Nine amino acid Transactivation Domain, 9aaTAD family, comprises currently over 40 members. The 9aaTAD domains are universally recognized by the transcriptional machinery from yeast to man. We had identified the 9aaTAD domains in the p53, Msn2, Pdr1 and B42 activators by our prediction algorithm. In this study, their competence to activate transcription as small peptides was proven. Not surprisingly, we elicited immense 9aaTAD divergence in hundreds of identified orthologs and numerous examples of the 9aaTAD species' convergence. We found unforeseen similarity of the mammalian p53 with yeast Gal4 9aaTAD domains. Furthermore, we identified artificial 9aaTAD domains generated accidentally by others. From an evolutionary perspective, the observed easiness to generate 9aaTAD transactivation domains indicates the natural advantage for spontaneous generation of transcription factors from DNA binding precursors. PMID:27618436

  9. Experimental sink removal induces stress responses, including shifts in amino acid and phenylpropanoid metabolism, in soybean leaves

    PubMed Central

    Turner, Glenn W.; Cuthbertson, Daniel J.; Voo, Siau Sie; Settles, Matthew L.; Grimes, Howard D.

    2012-01-01

    The repeated removal of flower, fruit, or vegetative buds is a common treatment to simulate sink limitation. These experiments usually lead to the accumulation of specific proteins, which are degraded during later stages of seed development, and have thus been designated as vegetative storage proteins. We used oligonucleotide microarrays to assess global effects of sink removal on gene expression patterns in soybean leaves and found an induction of the transcript levels of hundreds of genes with putative roles in the responses to biotic and abiotic stresses. In addition, these data sets indicated potential changes in amino acid and phenylpropanoid metabolism. As a response to sink removal we detected an induced accumulation of γ-aminobutyric acid, while proteinogenic amino acid levels decreased. We also observed a shift in phenylpropanoid metabolism with an increase in isoflavone levels, concomitant with a decrease in flavones and flavonols. Taken together, we provide evidence that sink removal leads to an up-regulation of stress responses in distant leaves, which needs to be considered as an unintended consequence of this experimental treatment. PMID:22109846

  10. Fatty acid composition of ruminal digesta and longissimus muscle from lambs fed silage mixtures including red clover, sainfoin, and timothy.

    PubMed

    Campidonico, L; Toral, P G; Priolo, A; Luciano, G; Valenti, B; Hervás, G; Frutos, P; Copani, G; Ginane, C; Niderkorn, V

    2016-04-01

    This work investigated the effects of feeding silage mixtures of a plant containing polyphenol oxidase (PPO; red clover [; RC]), a plant containing tannins (sainfoin [; SF]), and a grass species not containing these compounds (timothy [; T]) on ruminal and intramuscular (i.m.) fatty acids of lambs. Forty 4-mo-old castrated male Romane lambs, divided into 5 groups, received 1 of the following silages: 1) T (100%), 2) a binary mixture of timothy and tannin-containing sainfoin ( cv. Perly; 50:50 [T-SF]), 3) a binary mixture of timothy and PPO-containing red clover ( cv. Mervius; 50:50 [T-RC]), 4) a ternary mixture of timothy, sainfoin, and red clover containing both tannins and PPO (50:25:25, respectively [T-SF-RC]), and 5) a binary mixture of tannin-containing sainfoin and PPO-containing red clover (50:50 [SF-RC]). In the rumen digesta, the partial or total replacement of T with forage legumes was associated with greater concentrations of PUFA ( < 0.001) and 1esser concentrations of MUFA ( < 0.001). The inclusion of forage legumes in the silage favored the accumulation of 18:3 -3 ( < 0.001), with the greatest concentrations being observed in SF-RC. This latter diet also led to the greatest percentage of 18:2 -6 ( < 0.001). Forage legumes decreased the -11 18:1 to 30% of T in rumen digesta ( < 0.001). Forage legumes decreased the total concentration of branched-chain fatty acids in the rumen digesta (on average, -28%; < 0.001), this effect being less marked (-17%; = 0.014) in T-RC in comparison with T. The dietary treatment tended to affect the proportion of MUFA ( = 0.081) and of PUFA ( = 0.079) in the i.m. fat of the LM, respectively, at the highest and lowest numerical value in the T group. The sum of -3 fatty acids was less in the T and T-SF groups compared with the mixture of legumes without T (SF-RC; < 0.001 and < 0.008, respectively). The latter group had also a lesser -6-to--3 ratio than the T-SF group ( = 0.01). -11 18:1 was greater ( < 0.03) in lambs given T

  11. Liquid chromatographic resolution of amino acid esters of acyclovir including racemic valacyclovir on crown ether-based chiral stationary phases.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Seong Ae; Hyun, Myung Ho

    2015-03-01

    Valacyclovir, a potential prodrug for the treatment of patients with herpes simplex and herpes zoster, and its analogs were resolved on two chiral stationary phases (CSPs) based on (3,3'-diphenyl-1,1'-binaphthyl)-20-crown-6 covalently bonded to silica gel. In order to find out an appropriate mobile phase condition, various mobile phases consisting of various organic modifiers in water containing various acidic modifiers were applied to the resolution of valacyclovir and its analogs. When 30% acetonitrile in water containing any of 0.05 M, 0.10 M, or 0.15 M perchloric acid was used as a mobile phase, valacyclovir and its analogs were resolved quite well on the two CSPs with the separation factors (α) in the range of 2.49 ~ 6.35 and resolutions (RS ) in the range of 2.95 ~ 12.21. Between the two CSPs, the CSP containing residual silanol protecting n-octyl groups on the silica surface was found to be better than the CSP containing residual silanol groups. PMID:25626672

  12. Anacardic acid sensitizes prostate cancer cells to radiation therapy by regulating H2AX expression

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Kun; Jiang, Xianzhen; He, leye; Tang, Yuxin; Yin, Guangming; Zeng, Qing; Jiang, Zhiqiang; Tan, Jing

    2015-01-01

    Anacardic acid (6-pentadecylsalicylic acid, AA), a natural compound isolated from the traditional medicine Amphipterygiumadstringens, has been reported as potential antitumor agents in various cancers including prostate cancer (PC). However, the effects and mechanism of AA on the radiosensitivity of prostate cancer remains unknown. The results indicated that AA exhibited strong antitumor activity in PC cell lines, either as a single agentor in combination with radiation. AA significantly induced the downregulation of H2AX and p-H2AX expression, increase of cell apoptosis and decreasing of cell invasion, which were reversed by overexpressed H2AX. These results suggest that AA sensitize prostate cancer cells to radiation therapy by repressing H2AX expression. PMID:26884865

  13. AAS 228: Day 1 morning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2016-06-01

    Editors Note:This week were at the 228th AAS Meeting in San Diego, CA. Along with a team ofauthors from astrobites.com, I will bewritingupdates on selectedevents at themeeting and posting twiceeach day. Follow along here or atastrobites.com, or catch ourlive-tweeted updates from the@astrobites Twitter account. The usual posting schedule for AAS Nova will resumenext week.Come visit astrobites at the AAS booth we have swag!Things kicked off last night at our undergraduate reception booth. Thanks to all of you who stopped by we were delightedto hear from undergrads who already know and love the site, educators who want to use it in their classrooms, and students who had not yet been introduced to astrobites and were excited about a new resource!For the rest of the meeting we will be stationed at theAAS booth in the exhibit hall (booth #211-213), so drop by if you want to learn more (or pick up swag: weve got lots of stickers and sunglasses)!Mondaymorning was the official start of the meeting. Here are just a few of the talks and workshops astrobiters attended this morning.Opening Address(by Susanna Kohler)AAS President Meg Urry kicked off the meeting this morning at 8am with an overview of some of the great endeavors AAS is supporting. We astrobiters had personal motivation to drag ourselves out of bed that early: during this session, Urryannounced the new partnership between AAS and astrobites!Urry touched on some difficult topics in her welcome, including yesterdays tragedy in Orlando. Shereiteratedthe AASs support fortheCommittee for Sexual-Orientation and Gender Minorities in Astronomy (SGMA). She also reminded meeting attendees about the importance ofkeeping conference interactions professional, and pointed to the meetings anti-harassment policy.Partnership Announcement (by Michael Zevin)This morning, the American Astronomical Society announced the new partnership that it will have with Astrobites! We are beyond excited to embark on this new partnership with the

  14. Differential Ratios of Omega Fatty Acids (AA/EPA+DHA) Modulate Growth, Lipid Peroxidation and Expression of Tumor Regulatory MARBPs in Breast Cancer Cell Lines MCF7 and MDA-MB-231

    PubMed Central

    Mansara, Prakash P.; Deshpande, Rashmi A.; Vaidya, Milind M.; Kaul-Ghanekar, Ruchika

    2015-01-01

    Omega 3 (n3) and Omega 6 (n6) polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) have been reported to exhibit opposing roles in cancer progression. Our objective was to determine whether different ratios of n6/n3 (AA/EPA+DHA) FAs could modulate the cell viability, lipid peroxidation, total cellular fatty acid composition and expression of tumor regulatory Matrix Attachment Region binding proteins (MARBPs) in breast cancer cell lines and in non-cancerous, MCF10A cells. Low ratios of n6/n3 (1:2.5, 1:4, 1:5, 1:10) FA decreased the viability and growth of MDA-MB-231 and MCF7 significantly compared to the non-cancerous cells (MCF10A). Contrarily, higher n6/n3 FA (2.5:1, 4:1, 5:1, 10:1) decreased the survival of both the cancerous and non-cancerous cell types. Lower ratios of n6/n3 selectively induced LPO in the breast cancer cells whereas the higher ratios induced in both cancerous and non-cancerous cell types. Interestingly, compared to higher n6/n3 FA ratios, lower ratios increased the expression of tumor suppressor MARBP, SMAR1 and decreased the expression of tumor activator Cux/CDP in both breast cancer and non-cancerous, MCF10A cells. Low n6/n3 FAs significantly increased SMAR1 expression which resulted into activation of p21WAF1/CIP1 in MDA-MB-231 and MCF7, the increase being ratio dependent in MDA-MB-231. These results suggest that increased intake of n3 fatty acids in our diet could help both in the prevention as well as management of breast cancer. PMID:26325577

  15. Skin aging and photoaging alter fatty acids composition, including 11,14,17-eicosatrienoic acid, in the epidermis of human skin.

    PubMed

    Kim, Eun Ju; Kim, Min-Kyoung; Jin, Xing-Ji; Oh, Jang-Hee; Kim, Ji Eun; Chung, Jin Ho

    2010-06-01

    We investigated the alterations of major fatty acid components in epidermis by natural aging and photoaging processes, and by acute ultraviolet (UV) irradiation in human skin. Interestingly, we found that 11,14,17-eicosatrienoic acid (ETA), which is one of the omega-3 polyunsaturated acids, was significantly increased in photoaged human epidermis in vivo and also in the acutely UV-irradiated human skin in vivo, while it was significantly decreased in intrinsically aged human epidermis. The increased ETA content in the epidermis of photoaged human skin and acute UV-irradiated human skin is associated with enhanced expression of human elongase 1 and calcium-independent phosphodiesterase A(2). We demonstrated that ETA inhibited matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-1 expression after UV-irradiation, and that inhibition of ETA synthesis using EPTC and NA-TCA, which are elongase inhibitors, increased MMP-1 expression. Therefore, our results suggest that the UV increases the ETA levels, which may have a photoprotective effect in the human skin. PMID:20514327

  16. Skin Aging and Photoaging Alter Fatty Acids Composition, Including 11,14,17-eicosatrienoic Acid, in the Epidermis of Human Skin

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Eun Ju; Kim, Min-Kyoung; Jin, Xing-Ji; Oh, Jang-Hee; Kim, Ji Eun

    2010-01-01

    We investigated the alterations of major fatty acid components in epidermis by natural aging and photoaging processes, and by acute ultraviolet (UV) irradiation in human skin. Interestingly, we found that 11,14,17-eicosatrienoic acid (ETA), which is one of the omega-3 polyunsaturated acids, was significantly increased in photoaged human epidermis in vivo and also in the acutely UV-irradiated human skin in vivo, while it was significantly decreased in intrinsically aged human epidermis. The increased ETA content in the epidermis of photoaged human skin and acute UV-irradiated human skin is associated with enhanced expression of human elongase 1 and calcium-independent phophodiesterase A2. We demonstrated that ETA inhibited matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-1 expression after UV-irradiation, and that inhibition of ETA synthesis using EPTC and NA-TCA, which are elongase inhibitors, increased MMP-1 expression. Therefore, our results suggest that the UV increases the ETA levels, which may have a photoprotective effect in the human skin. PMID:20514327

  17. Processing and Optimization of Dissimilar Friction Stir Welding of AA 2219 and AA 7039 Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Venkateswarlu, D.; Nageswara rao, P.; Mahapatra, M. M.; Harsha, S. P.; Mandal, N. R.

    2015-12-01

    The present paper discusses the optimization of dissimilar friction stir welding of AA 2219 and AA 7039 alloys with respect to tool design issues including microstructural study of weld. The optimized ultimate tensile strength was ~280 MPa, and % elongation was ~11.5. It was observed that the extent of tool shoulder flat surface and tool rotational speed influenced the weld quality significantly. A mathematical model was also developed using response surface regression analysis to predict the effects of tool geometry and process variables on dissimilar AA 2219 and AA 7039 alloys welds. The microstructure evolution and mechanical properties were investigated by employing electron backscatter diffraction technique, Vickers microhardness, and tensile testing, respectively. The microstructural observations indicated that the grain size obtained at advancing side (AA 2219 alloy side) was much finer compared to the retreating side (AA 7039 alloy side). Hardness distribution in the stir zone was inhomogeneous, which might be due to inadequate mixing of weld zone material. The hardness values observed at the weld zone were lower than that in the base materials.

  18. Pharmacokinetic and Pharmacodynamic Interaction of Boswellic Acids and Andrographolide with Glyburide in Diabetic Rats: Including Its PK/PD Modeling.

    PubMed

    Samala, Sujatha; Veeresham, Ciddi

    2016-03-01

    The effect of boswellic acids (BA) and andrographolide (AD) on the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of glyburide in normal as well as in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats was studied. In normal and diabetic rats, the combination of glyburide with BA or AD increased significantly (p < 0.01) all the pharmacokinetic parameters, such as Cmax, AUC0-n, AUCtotal, t1/2, and mean residence time, and decreased the clearance, Vd, markedly as compared with the control group. In rat liver, microsomes BA and AD have shown CYP3A4 inhibitory activity significantly (p < 0.01), compared with the vehicle group. The increase in hypoglycemic action by concomitant administration of glyburide with BA or AD was more in diabetic rats than when the drugs were used singly and with the control group, which suggests the enhancement of glucose reduction capacity of glyburide in diabetic rats along with BA or AD. In PK/PD modeling of BA and AD with glyburide, the predicted PK and PD parameters are in line with the observed PK and PD parameters. The results revealed that BA and AD led to the PK/PD changes because of glyburide-increased bioavailability and because of the inhibition of CYP3A4 enzyme. In conclusion, add-on preparations containing BA or AD may increase the bioavailability of glyburide, and hence the dose should be monitored. PMID:26762235

  19. The accurate determination of bismuth in lead concentrates and other non-ferrous materials by AAS after separation and preconcentration of the bismuth with mercaptoacetic acid.

    PubMed

    Howell, D J; Dohnt, B R

    1982-05-01

    A method for determining 0.0001% and upwards of bismuth in lead, zinc or copper concentrates, metals or alloys and other smelter residues is described. Bismuth is separated from lead, iron and gangue materials with mercaptoacetic acid after reduction of the iron with hydrazine. Large quantities of tin can be removed during the dissolution. An additional separation is made for materials high in copper and/or sulphate. The separated and concentrated bismuth is determined by atomic-absorption spectrometry using the Bi line at 223.1 nm. The proposed method also allows the simultaneous separation and determination of silver. PMID:18963145

  20. Retinoic Acid Induced 1, RAI1: A Dosage Sensitive Gene Related to Neurobehavioral Alterations Including Autistic Behavior

    PubMed Central

    Carmona-Mora, Paulina; Walz, Katherina

    2010-01-01

    Genomic structural changes, such as gene Copy Number Variations (CNVs) are extremely abundant in the human genome. An enormous effort is currently ongoing to recognize and catalogue human CNVs and their associations with abnormal phenotypic outcomes. Recently, several reports related neuropsychiatric diseases (i.e. autism spectrum disorders, schizophrenia, mental retardation, behavioral problems, epilepsy) with specific CNV. Moreover, for some conditions, both the deletion and duplication of the same genomic segment are related to the phenotype. Syndromes associated with CNVs (microdeletion and microduplication) have long been known to display specific neurobehavioral traits. It is important to note that not every gene is susceptible to gene dosage changes and there are only a few dosage sensitive genes. Smith-Magenis (SMS) and Potocki-Lupski (PTLS) syndromes are associated with a reciprocal microdeletion and microduplication within chromosome 17p11.2. in humans. The dosage sensitive gene responsible for most phenotypes in SMS has been identified: the Retinoic Acid Induced 1 (RAI1). Studies on mouse models and humans suggest that RAI1 is likely the dosage sensitive gene responsible for clinical features in PTLS. In addition, the human RAI1 gene has been implicated in several neurobehavioral traits as spinocerebellar ataxia (SCA2), schizophrenia and non syndromic autism. In this review we discuss the evidence of RAI1 as a dosage sensitive gene, its relationship with different neurobehavioral traits, gene structure and mutations, and what is known about its molecular and cellular function, as a first step in the elucidation of the mechanisms that relate dosage sensitive genes with abnormal neurobehavioral outcomes. PMID:21629438

  1. Omega-3 fatty acid concentrate from Dunaliella salina possesses anti-inflammatory properties including blockade of NF-κB nuclear translocation.

    PubMed

    Chitranjali, T; Anoop Chandran, P; Muraleedhara Kurup, G

    2015-02-01

    The health benefits of omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (ω-3 PUFA), mainly eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA 20:5) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA, 22:6), have been long known. Although various studies have demonstrated the health benefits of ω-3 PUFA, the mechanisms of action of ω-3 PUFAs are still not completely understood. While the major commercial source is marine fish oil, in this study we suggest the marine micro algae, Dunaliella salina as an alternate source of omega-3 fatty acids. Treatment with this algal omega-3 fatty acid concentrate (Ds-ω-3 FA) resulted in significant down-regulation of LPS-induced production of TNF-α and IL-6 by peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs). The concentrate was also found to be a potent blocker of cyclooxygenase (COX-2) and matrix metalloproteinase (MMP-2 and MMP-9) expression. The present study reveals the anti-inflammatory properties of Ds-ω-3 FA concentrate including the inhibition of NF-κB translocation. PMID:25391558

  2. New CE-ESI-MS analytical method for the separation, identification and quantification of seven phenolic acids including three isomer compounds in virgin olive oil.

    PubMed

    Nevado, Juan José Berzas; Peñalvo, Gregorio Castañeda; Robledo, Virginia Rodríguez; Martínez, Gabriela Vargas

    2009-10-15

    A sensitive and expeditious CE-ESI-MS analytical method for the separation, identification and determination of seven selected antioxidants (cinnamic and benzoic acids), including three isomers of coumaric acid (ortho-, meta- and para-) has been developed. In order to obtain the analytical separation, capillary electrophoresis and CE-MS interface parameters (e.g., buffer pH and composition, sheath liquid and gas flow rates, sheath liquid composition, electrospray voltage, etc.) were carefully optimized. The polar fraction containing the selected phenolic acids was obtained using a previously optimized SPE pretreatment. An MS detector in order to extract structural information about the target compounds and facilitate their qualitative analysis was used in the negative ion mode. The proposed off-line SPE CE-ESI-MS method was validated by assessing its precision, LODs and LOQs, linearity range and accuracy. The optimized and validated method was used in order to quantify the selected antioxidants in various samples of virgin olive oil and extra-virgin olive oil obtained from the main olive varieties cropped in Castilla-La Mancha, Spain. Salicylic acid was used as internal standard throughout in order to ensure reproducibility in the quantitative analysis of the oil samples. The results confirmed the presence of hydroxyphenyl acetic, p-coumaric, ferulic and vanillic acids in substantial amounts (microg g(-1) level) in all samples. PMID:19635353

  3. Carbon Dots and 9AA as a Binary Matrix for the Detection of Small Molecules by Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption/Ionization Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yongli; Gao, Dan; Bai, Hangrui; Liu, Hongxia; Lin, Shuo; Jiang, Yuyang

    2016-07-01

    Application of matrix-assisted laser-desorption/ionization mass spectrometry (MALDI MS) to analyze small molecules have some limitations, due to the inhomogeneous analyte/matrix co-crystallization and interference of matrix-related peaks in low m/z region. In this work, carbon dots (CDs) were for the first time applied as a binary matrix with 9-Aminoacridine (9AA) in MALDI MS for small molecules analysis. By 9AA/CDs assisted desorption/ionization (D/I) process, a wide range of small molecules, including nucleosides, amino acids, oligosaccharides, peptides, and anticancer drugs with a higher sensitivity were demonstrated in the positive ion mode. A detection limit down to 5 fmol was achieved for cytidine. 9AA/CDs matrix also exhibited excellent reproducibility compared with 9AA matrix. Moreover, by exploring the ionization mechanism of the matrix, the influence factors might be attributed to the four parts: (1) the strong UV absorption of 9AA/CDs due to their π-conjugated network; (2) the carboxyl groups modified on the CDs surface act as protonation sites for proton transfer in positive ion mode; (3) the thin layer crystal of 9AA/CDs could reach a high surface temperature more easily and lower transfer energy for LDI MS; (4) CDs could serve as a matrix additive to suppress 9AA ionization. Furthermore, this matrix was allowed for the analysis of glucose as well as nucleosides in human urine, and the level of cytidine was quantified with a linear range of 0.05-5 mM (R2 > 0.99). Therefore, the 9AA/CDs matrix was proven to be an effective MALDI matrix for the analysis of small molecules with improved sensitivity and reproducibility. This work provides an alternative solution for small molecules detection that can be further used in complex samples analysis.

  4. Carbon Dots and 9AA as a Binary Matrix for the Detection of Small Molecules by Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption/Ionization Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yongli; Gao, Dan; Bai, Hangrui; Liu, Hongxia; Lin, Shuo; Jiang, Yuyang

    2016-07-01

    Application of matrix-assisted laser-desorption/ionization mass spectrometry (MALDI MS) to analyze small molecules have some limitations, due to the inhomogeneous analyte/matrix co-crystallization and interference of matrix-related peaks in low m/z region. In this work, carbon dots (CDs) were for the first time applied as a binary matrix with 9-Aminoacridine (9AA) in MALDI MS for small molecules analysis. By 9AA/CDs assisted desorption/ionization (D/I) process, a wide range of small molecules, including nucleosides, amino acids, oligosaccharides, peptides, and anticancer drugs with a higher sensitivity were demonstrated in the positive ion mode. A detection limit down to 5 fmol was achieved for cytidine. 9AA/CDs matrix also exhibited excellent reproducibility compared with 9AA matrix. Moreover, by exploring the ionization mechanism of the matrix, the influence factors might be attributed to the four parts: (1) the strong UV absorption of 9AA/CDs due to their π-conjugated network; (2) the carboxyl groups modified on the CDs surface act as protonation sites for proton transfer in positive ion mode; (3) the thin layer crystal of 9AA/CDs could reach a high surface temperature more easily and lower transfer energy for LDI MS; (4) CDs could serve as a matrix additive to suppress 9AA ionization. Furthermore, this matrix was allowed for the analysis of glucose as well as nucleosides in human urine, and the level of cytidine was quantified with a linear range of 0.05-5 mM (R(2) > 0.99). Therefore, the 9AA/CDs matrix was proven to be an effective MALDI matrix for the analysis of small molecules with improved sensitivity and reproducibility. This work provides an alternative solution for small molecules detection that can be further used in complex samples analysis. Graphical Abstract ᅟ. PMID:27075876

  5. Carbon Dots and 9AA as a Binary Matrix for the Detection of Small Molecules by Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption/Ionization Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yongli; Gao, Dan; Bai, Hangrui; Liu, Hongxia; Lin, Shuo; Jiang, Yuyang

    2016-04-01

    Application of matrix-assisted laser-desorption/ionization mass spectrometry (MALDI MS) to analyze small molecules have some limitations, due to the inhomogeneous analyte/matrix co-crystallization and interference of matrix-related peaks in low m/z region. In this work, carbon dots (CDs) were for the first time applied as a binary matrix with 9-Aminoacridine (9AA) in MALDI MS for small molecules analysis. By 9AA/CDs assisted desorption/ionization (D/I) process, a wide range of small molecules, including nucleosides, amino acids, oligosaccharides, peptides, and anticancer drugs with a higher sensitivity were demonstrated in the positive ion mode. A detection limit down to 5 fmol was achieved for cytidine. 9AA/CDs matrix also exhibited excellent reproducibility compared with 9AA matrix. Moreover, by exploring the ionization mechanism of the matrix, the influence factors might be attributed to the four parts: (1) the strong UV absorption of 9AA/CDs due to their π-conjugated network; (2) the carboxyl groups modified on the CDs surface act as protonation sites for proton transfer in positive ion mode; (3) the thin layer crystal of 9AA/CDs could reach a high surface temperature more easily and lower transfer energy for LDI MS; (4) CDs could serve as a matrix additive to suppress 9AA ionization. Furthermore, this matrix was allowed for the analysis of glucose as well as nucleosides in human urine, and the level of cytidine was quantified with a linear range of 0.05-5 mM (R2 > 0.99). Therefore, the 9AA/CDs matrix was proven to be an effective MALDI matrix for the analysis of small molecules with improved sensitivity and reproducibility. This work provides an alternative solution for small molecules detection that can be further used in complex samples analysis.

  6. Retargeting of the Bacillus thuringiensis toxin Cyt2Aa against hemipteran insect pests

    PubMed Central

    Chougule, Nanasaheb P.; Li, Huarong; Liu, Sijun; Linz, Lucas B.; Narva, Kenneth E.; Meade, Thomas; Bonning, Bryony C.

    2013-01-01

    Although transgenic crops expressing Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) toxins have been used successfully for management of lepidopteran and coleopteran pest species, the sap-sucking insects (Hemiptera) are not particularly susceptible to Bt toxins. To overcome this limitation, we demonstrate that addition of a short peptide sequence selected for binding to the gut of the targeted pest species serves to increase toxicity against said pest. Insertion of a 12-aa pea aphid gut-binding peptide by adding to or replacing amino acids in one of three loops of the Bt cytolytic toxin, Cyt2Aa, resulted in enhanced binding and toxicity against both the pea aphid, Acyrthosiphon pisum, and the green peach aphid, Myzus persicae. This strategy may allow for transgenic plant-mediated suppression of other hemipteran pests, which include some of the most important pests of global agriculture. PMID:23650347

  7. Monitoring urinary mercapturic acids as biomarkers of human dietary exposure to acrylamide in combination with acrylamide uptake assessment based on duplicate diets.

    PubMed

    Ruenz, Meike; Bakuradze, Tamara; Eisenbrand, Gerhard; Richling, Elke

    2016-04-01

    The present human intervention study investigated the relation between the intake of acrylamide (AA) in diets with minimized, low, and high AA contents and the levels of urinary exposure biomarkers. As biomarkers, the mercapturic acids, N-acetyl-S-(carbamoylethyl)-L-cysteine (AAMA), and N-acetyl-S-(1-carbamoyl-2-hydroxyethyl)-L-cysteine (GAMA) were monitored. The study was performed with 14 healthy male volunteers over a period of 9 days, under controlled conditions excluding any inadvertent AA exposure. Dietary exposure to AA was measured by determining AA contents in duplicates of all meals consumed by the volunteers. The study design included an initial washout period of 3 days on AA-minimized diet, resulting in dietary AA exposure not exceeding 41 ng/kg bw/d. Identical washout periods of 2 days each followed the AA exposure days (day 4, low exposure, and day 7, high exposure). At the respective AA intake days, volunteers ingested 0.6-0.8 (low exposure) or 1.3-1.8 (high exposure) μg AA/kg bw/d with their food. Both low and high AA intakes resulted in an AAMA output within 72 h corresponding to 58 % of the respective AA intake. At the end of the initial 3-day washout period, an AAMA baseline level of 93 ± 31 nmol/d was recorded, suggestive for an assumed net AA baseline exposure level of 0.2-0.3 μg AA/kg bw/d. PMID:25757395

  8. High-speed civil transport impact: Role of sulfate, nitric acid trihydrate, and ice aerosols studied with a two-dimensional model including aerosol physics

    SciTech Connect

    Pitari, G.; Ricciardulli, L.; Visconti, G.; Rizi, V.

    1993-12-20

    The authors discuss a two-dimensional model used to study the atmospheric interactions of ozone with exhaust gases from high speed civil transport (HSCT) fleets. Their model encompases the stratosphere and troposphere, includes photochemical reactions as part of the sulfur cycle, and models sulfuric acid aerosols. The inclusion of heterogeneous chemistry effects tempers the impact of nitrogen oxide emissions from HSCT on ozone depletion, in support of previous work from other studies.

  9. Extension of a PBPK model for ethylene glycol and glycolic acid to include the competitive formation and clearance of metabolites associated with kidney toxicity in rats and humans

    SciTech Connect

    Corley, R.A.; Saghir, S.A.; Bartels, M.J.; Hansen, S.C.; Creim, J.; McMartin, K.E.; Snellings, W.M.

    2011-02-01

    A previously developed PBPK model for ethylene glycol and glycolic acid was extended to include glyoxylic acid, oxalic acid, and the precipitation of calcium oxalate that is associated with kidney toxicity in rats and humans. The development and evaluation of the PBPK model was based upon previously published pharmacokinetic studies coupled with measured blood and tissue partition coefficients and rates of in vitro metabolism of glyoxylic acid to oxalic acid, glycine and other metabolites using primary hepatocytes isolated from male Wistar rats and humans. Precipitation of oxalic acid with calcium in the kidneys was assumed to occur only at concentrations exceeding the thermodynamic solubility product for calcium oxalate. This solubility product can be affected by local concentrations of calcium and other ions that are expressed in the model using an ion activity product estimated from toxicity studies such that calcium oxalate precipitation would be minimal at dietary exposures below the NOAEL for kidney toxicity in the sensitive male Wistar rat. The resulting integrated PBPK predicts that bolus oral or dietary exposures to ethylene glycol would result in typically 1.4-1.6-fold higher peak oxalate levels and 1.6-2-fold higher AUC's for calcium oxalate in kidneys of humans as compared with comparably exposed male Wistar rats over a dose range of 1-1000 mg/kg. The converse (male Wistar rats predicted to have greater oxalate levels in the kidneys than humans) was found for inhalation exposures although no accumulation of calcium oxalate is predicted to occur until exposures are well in excess of the theoretical saturated vapor concentration of 200 mg/m{sup 3}. While the current model is capable of such cross-species, dose, and route-of-exposure comparisons, it also highlights several areas of potential research that will improve confidence in such predictions, especially at low doses relevant for most human exposures.

  10. Strategic Change in AAS Publishing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steffen, Julie

    2015-08-01

    The American Astronomical Society has embarked on a process of strategic change in its publishing program. The process has incuded authors, AAS leaders, editors, publishing experts, librarians, and data scientists. This session will outline the still ongoing process and present some both upcoming and already available new AAS Publishing features and services to the global astronomy community.

  11. In Vitro Antibacterial and Antibiofilm Activities of Chlorogenic Acid against Clinical Isolates of Stenotrophomonas maltophilia including the Trimethoprim/Sulfamethoxazole Resistant Strain

    PubMed Central

    Karunanidhi, Arunkumar; Thomas, Renjan; van Belkum, Alex; Neela, Vasanthakumari

    2013-01-01

    The in vitro antibacterial and antibiofilm activity of chlorogenic acid against clinical isolates of Stenotrophomonas maltophilia was investigated through disk diffusion, minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC), minimum bactericidal concentration (MBC), time-kill and biofilm assays. A total of 9 clinical S. maltophilia isolates including one isolate resistant to trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole (TMP/SMX) were tested. The inhibition zone sizes for the isolates ranged from 17 to 29 mm, while the MIC and MBC values ranged from 8 to 16 μg mL−1 and 16 to 32 μg mL−1. Chlorogenic acid appeared to be strongly bactericidal at 4x MIC, with a 2-log reduction in viable bacteria at 10 h. In vitro antibiofilm testing showed a 4-fold reduction in biofilm viability at 4x MIC compared to 1x MIC values (0.085 < 0.397 A 490 nm) of chlorogenic acid. The data from this study support the notion that the chlorogenic acid has promising in vitro antibacterial and antibiofilm activities against S. maltophilia. PMID:23509719

  12. Long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acid sources and evaluation of their nutritional and functional properties

    PubMed Central

    Abedi, Elahe; Sahari, Mohammad Ali

    2014-01-01

    Recent studies have clearly shown the importance of polyunsaturated fatty acids (as essential fatty acids) and their nutritional value for human health. In this review, various sources, nutritional properties, and metabolism routes of long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids (LC-PUFA) are introduced. Since the conversion efficiency of linoleic acid (LA) to arachidonic acid (AA) and also α-linolenic acid (ALA) to docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) and eicosatetraenoic acid (EPA) is low in humans, looking for the numerous sources of AA, EPA and EPA fatty acids. The sources include aquatic (fish, crustaceans, and mollusks), animal sources (meat, egg, and milk), plant sources including 20 plants, most of which were weeds having a good amount of LC-PUFA, fruits, herbs, and seeds; cyanobacteria; and microorganisms (bacteria, fungi, microalgae, and diatoms). PMID:25473503

  13. AAS 228: Day 1 morning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2016-06-01

    Editors Note:This week were at the 228th AAS Meeting in San Diego, CA. Along with a team ofauthors from astrobites.com, I will bewritingupdates on selectedevents at themeeting and posting twiceeach day. Follow along here or atastrobites.com, or catch ourlive-tweeted updates from the@astrobites Twitter account. The usual posting schedule for AAS Nova will resumenext week.Come visit astrobites at the AAS booth we have swag!Things kicked off last night at our undergraduate reception booth. Thanks to all of you who stopped by we were delightedto hear from undergrads who already know and love the site, educators who want to use it in their classrooms, and students who had not yet been introduced to astrobites and were excited about a new resource!For the rest of the meeting we will be stationed at theAAS booth in the exhibit hall (booth #211-213), so drop by if you want to learn more (or pick up swag: weve got lots of stickers and sunglasses)!Mondaymorning was the official start of the meeting. Here are just a few of the talks and workshops astrobiters attended this morning.Opening Address(by Susanna Kohler)AAS President Meg Urry kicked off the meeting this morning at 8am with an overview of some of the great endeavors AAS is supporting. We astrobiters had personal motivation to drag ourselves out of bed that early: during this session, Urryannounced the new partnership between AAS and astrobites!Urry touched on some difficult topics in her welcome, including yesterdays tragedy in Orlando. Shereiteratedthe AASs support fortheCommittee for Sexual-Orientation and Gender Minorities in Astronomy (SGMA). She also reminded meeting attendees about the importance ofkeeping conference interactions professional, and pointed to the meetings anti-harassment policy.Partnership Announcement (by Michael Zevin)This morning, the American Astronomical Society announced the new partnership that it will have with Astrobites! We are beyond excited to embark on this new partnership with the

  14. Introduction of poly[(2-acryloyloxyethyl trimethyl ammonium chloride)-co-(acrylic acid)] branches onto starch for cotton warp sizing.

    PubMed

    Shen, Shiqi; Zhu, Zhifeng; Liu, Fengdan

    2016-03-15

    An attempt has been made to reveal the effect of amphoteric poly(2-acryloyloxyethyl trimethyl ammonium chloride-co-acrylic acid) [P(ATAC-co-AA)] branches grafted onto the backbones of starch upon the adhesion-to-cotton, film properties, and desizability of maize starch for cotton warp sizing. Starch-g-poly[(2-acryloyloxyethyl trimethyl ammonium chloride)-co-(acrylic acid) [S-g-P(ATAC-co-AA)] was prepared by the graft copolymerization of 2-acryloyloxyethyl trimethyl ammonium chloride (ATAC) and acrylic acid (AA) with acid-converted starch (ACS) in aqueous medium using Fe(2+)-H2O2 initiator. The adhesion was evaluated in term of bonding strength according to the FZ/T 15001-2008 whereas the film properties considered included tensile strength, work and percentage elongation at break. The evaluation was undertaken through the comparison of S-g-P(ATAC-co-AA) with ACS, starch-g-poly(acrylic acid), and starch-g-poly(2-acryloyloxyethyl trimethyl ammonium chloride). It was found that the amphoteric branch was able to significantly improve the adhesion and mitigate the brittleness of starch film. Zeta potential of cooked S-g-P(ATAC-co-AA) paste, depending on the mole ratio of ATAC to AA units on P(ATAC-co-AA) branches, had substantial effect on the adhesion and desizability. Increasing the mole ratio raised the potential, which favored the adhesion but disfavored the removal of S-g-P(ATAC-co-AA) from sized cotton warps. Electroneutral S-g-P(ATAC-co-AA) was superior to negatively grafted starch in adhesion and to positively grafted starch in desizability. Generally, it showed better sizing property than ACS, starch-g-poly(acrylic acid), and starch-g-poly(2-acryloyloxyethyl trimethyl ammonium chloride), and had potential in the application of cotton warp sizing. PMID:26794764

  15. Targeted mutation of Δ12 and Δ15 desaturase genes in hemp produce major alterations in seed fatty acid composition including a high oleic hemp oil.

    PubMed

    Bielecka, Monika; Kaminski, Filip; Adams, Ian; Poulson, Helen; Sloan, Raymond; Li, Yi; Larson, Tony R; Winzer, Thilo; Graham, Ian A

    2014-06-01

    We used expressed sequence tag library and whole genome sequence mining to identify a suite of putative desaturase genes representing the four main activities required for production of polyunsaturated fatty acids in hemp seed oil. Phylogenetic-based classification and developing seed transcriptome analysis informed selection for further analysis of one of seven Δ12 desaturases and one of three Δ15 desaturases that we designate CSFAD2A and CSFAD3A, respectively. Heterologous expression of corresponding cDNAs in Saccharomyces cerevisiae showed CSFAD2A to have Δx+3 activity, while CSFAD3A activity was exclusively at the Δ15 position. TILLING of an ethyl methane sulphonate mutagenized population identified multiple alleles including non-sense mutations in both genes and fatty acid composition of seed oil confirmed these to be the major Δ12 and Δ15 desaturases in developing hemp seed. Following four backcrosses and sibling crosses to achieve homozygosity, csfad2a-1 was grown in the field and found to produce a 70 molar per cent high oleic acid (18:1(Δ9) ) oil at yields similar to wild type. Cold-pressed high oleic oil produced fewer volatiles and had a sevenfold increase in shelf life compared to wild type. Two low abundance octadecadienoic acids, 18:2(Δ6,9) and 18:2(Δ9,15), were identified in the high oleic oil, and their presence suggests remaining endogenous desaturase activities utilize the increased levels of oleic acid as substrate. Consistent with this, CSFAD3A produces 18:2(Δ9,15) from endogenous 18:1(Δ9) when expressed in S. cerevisiae. This work lays the foundation for the development of additional novel oil varieties in this multipurpose low input crop. PMID:24506492

  16. Bacterial cellulose based hydrogel (BC-g-AA) and preliminary result of swelling behavior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hakam, Adil; Lazim, Azwan Mat; Abdul Rahman, I. Irman

    2013-11-01

    In this study, hydrogel based on Bacterial cellulose (BC) or local known as Nata de Coco, which grafted with monomer: Acrylic acid (AA) is synthesis by using gamma radiation technique. These hydrogel (BC-g-AA) has unique characteristic whereby responsive to pH buffer solution.

  17. Bacterial cellulose based hydrogel (BC-g-AA) and preliminary result of swelling behavior

    SciTech Connect

    Hakam, Adil; Lazim, Azwan Mat; Abdul Rahman, I. Irman

    2013-11-27

    In this study, hydrogel based on Bacterial cellulose (BC) or local known as Nata de Coco, which grafted with monomer: Acrylic acid (AA) is synthesis by using gamma radiation technique. These hydrogel (BC-g-AA) has unique characteristic whereby responsive to pH buffer solution.

  18. Artemisinic Acid Serves as a Novel ORCA3 Inducer to Enhance Biosynthesis of Terpenoid Indole Alkaloids in Catharanthus roseus Cambial Meristematic Cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Mingxuan; Zi, Jiachen; Zhu, Jianhua; Chen, Shan; Wang, Pu; Song, Liyan; Yu, Rongmin

    2016-06-01

    To investigate the effect of artemisinic acid (AA) on improving the production of terpenoid indole alkaloids (TIAs) of Catharanthus roseus cambial meristematic cells (CMCs), feeding AA to C. roseus CMCs caused 2.35-fold and 2.51-fold increases in the production of vindoline and catharanthine, respectively, compared with those of the untreated CMCs. qRT-PCR experiments showed that AA resulted in a 1.36-8.52 fold increase in the transcript levels of several related genes, including octadecanoid-derivative responsive Catharanthus AP2-domain protein 3 (ORCA3), tryptophan decarboxylase (TDC), strictosidine synthase (STR) and desacetoxyvindoline 4-hydroxylase (D4H). However, no effect was observed on the concentration of either jasmonic acid (JA), or the octadecanoid-pathway inhibitors block TIA accumulation caused by AA. The results indicated that AA might serve as a novel ORCA3 inducer to manipulate biosynthesis of TIAs in C. roseus CMCs via an unknown mechanism. PMID:27534099

  19. AAS 228: Day 4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2016-06-01

    Editors Note: Lastweek we were at the 228th AAS Meeting in San Diego, CA. Here is a final post aboutselectedevents on the last day of the meeting, written by authors fromastrobites.com, a grad-student collaborative project with which we recently announced a new partnership! Starting in July,keep an eye out for astrobites postsat AAS Nova in between Highlights(i.e., on Tuesdays and Thursdays).Were excited to be working together to bring you more recent astronomy research from AAS journals!Extrasolar Planets: Detection (by Leonardo dos Santos)Thursdays first session on exoplanets was about detecting these distant worlds, and the opening talk was given by Robert Siverd (Las Cumbres Observatory). He describes the NRES, a network of spectrographs that will look for exoplanets using the radial velocity method. One of the coolest aspects of this instrument is that it will feature an on the fly scheduling system that will perform observations as efficiently as possible. The spectrograph is still being tested, but a unit will be deployed at CTIO later this year.@lcogt contracted by @NASA_TESS for follow up of their candidates. #aas228 Jessie Christiansen (@aussiastronomer) June 16, 2016Measuring the depths of transits and eclipses in Spitzer has been problematic in the past, since the Spitzer instrument IRAC (InfraRed Array Camera) has a non-uniform response in its detectors pixels. But, as reported by James Ingalls (Spitzer Science Center, Caltech), observers are circumventing this issue by using what they call the staring mode (avoiding large pointing jumps) and an algorithm to pick sweet spot pixels. Moreover, the results from the IRAC Data Challenge are helping to better understand its behavior. Giuseppe Morello (University College London), on the other hand, explained how his research group gets rid of instrumental effects from IRAC using machine learning. This method removes systematics from exoplanet transit data no matter if the noise source is from an instrument or

  20. Asymmetric Synthesis, Structure, and Reactivity of Unexpectedly Stable Spiroepoxy-β-Lactones Including Facile Conversion to Tetronic Acids: Application to (+)-Maculalactone A

    PubMed Central

    Duffy, Richard J.; Morris, Kay A.; Vallakati, Ravikrishna; Zhang, Wei; Romo, Daniel

    2009-01-01

    A novel class of small spirocyclic heterocycles, spiroepoxy-β-lactones (1,4-dioxaspiro[2.3]-hexan-5-ones), is described that exhibit a number of interesting reactivity patterns. These spiroheterocycles, including an optically active series, are readily synthesized by epoxidation of ketene dimers (4-alkylidene-2-oxetanones) available from homo- or heteroketene dimerization. An analysis of bond lengths in these systems by X-ray crystallography and comparison to data for known spirocycles and those determined computationally, suggest that anomeric effects in these systems may be more pronounced due to their rigidity and may contribute to their surprising stability. The synthetic utility of spiroepoxy-β-lactones was explored and one facile rearrangement identified under several conditions provides a 3-step route from acid chlorides to optically active tetronic acids, ubiquitous heterocycles in bioactive natural products. The addition of various nucleophiles to these spirocycles leads primarily to addition at C5 and C2. The utility of an optically active spiroepoxy-β-lactone was demonstrated in the concise, enantioselective synthesis of the anti-fouling agent, (+)-maculalactone A, which proceeds in 5 steps from hydrocinnamoyl chloride by way of a tetronic acid intermediate. PMID:19453152

  1. Asymmetric synthesis, structure, and reactivity of unexpectedly stable spiroepoxy-beta-lactones including facile conversion to tetronic acids: application to (+)-maculalactone A.

    PubMed

    Duffy, Richard J; Morris, Kay A; Vallakati, Ravikrishna; Zhang, Wei; Romo, Daniel

    2009-07-01

    A novel class of small spirocyclic heterocycles, spiroepoxy-beta-lactones (1,4-dioxaspiro[2.3]-hexan-5-ones), is described that exhibit a number of interesting reactivity patterns. These spiroheterocycles, including an optically active series, are readily synthesized by epoxidation of ketene dimers (4-alkylidene-2-oxetanones) available from homo- or heteroketene dimerization. An analysis of bond lengths in these systems by X-ray crystallography and comparison to data for known spirocycles and those determined computationally suggest that anomeric effects in these systems may be more pronounced due to their rigidity and may contribute to their surprising stability. The synthetic utility of spiroepoxy-beta-lactones was explored, and one facile rearrangement identified under several conditions provides a three-step route from acid chlorides to optically active tetronic acids, ubiquitous heterocycles in bioactive natural products. The addition of various nucleophiles to these spirocycles leads primarily to addition at C5 and C2. The utility of an optically active spiroepoxy-beta-lactone was demonstrated in the concise, enantioselective synthesis of the antifouling agent, (+)-maculalactone A, which proceeds in five steps from hydrocinnamoyl chloride by way of a tetronic acid intermediate. PMID:19453152

  2. Section AA through main entrance gates & west stairs. San ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Section AA through main entrance gates & west stairs. San Bernardino Valley Union Junior College, Science Building. Also includes plans and sections of boys' and girls' toilets. Howard E. Jones, Architect, San Bernardino, California. Sheet 5, job no. 311. Scales 1/4 inch to the foot (section AA) and 1/2 inch to the foot (toilet rooms). February 15, 1927. - San Bernardino Valley College, Life Science Building, 701 South Mount Vernon Avenue, San Bernardino, San Bernardino County, CA

  3. AA9 and AA10: from enigmatic to essential enzymes.

    PubMed

    Corrêa, Thamy Lívia Ribeiro; dos Santos, Leandro Vieira; Pereira, Gonçalo Amarante Guimarães

    2016-01-01

    The lignocellulosic biomass, comprised mainly of cellulose, hemicellulose, and lignin, is a strong competitor for petroleum to obtain fuels and other products because of its renewable nature, low cost, and non-competitiveness with food production when obtained from agricultural waste. Due to its recalcitrance, lignocellulosic material requires an arsenal of enzymes for its deconstruction and the consequent release of fermentable sugars. In this context, enzymes currently classified as auxiliary activity 9 (AA9/formerly GH61) and 10 (AA10/formerly CBM 33) or lytic polysaccharide monooxygenases (LPMO) have emerged as cellulase boosting enzymes. AA9 and AA10 are the new paradigm for deconstruction of lignocellulosic biomass by enhancing the activity and decreasing the loading of classical enzymes to the reaction and, consequently, reducing costs of the hydrolysis step in the second-generation ethanol production chain. In view of that disclosed above, the goal of this work is to review experimental data that supports the relevance of AA9 and AA10 for the biomass deconstruction field. PMID:26476647

  4. Amyloid beta peptide and NMDA induce ROS from NADPH oxidase and AA release from cytosolic phospholipase A2 in cortical neurons.

    PubMed

    Shelat, Phullara B; Chalimoniuk, Malgorzata; Wang, Jing-Hung; Strosznajder, Joanna B; Lee, James C; Sun, Albert Y; Simonyi, Agnes; Sun, Grace Y

    2008-07-01

    Increase in oxidative stress has been postulated to play an important role in the pathogenesis of a number of neurodegenerative diseases including Alzheimer's disease. There is evidence for involvement of amyloid-beta peptide (Abeta) in mediating the oxidative damage to neurons. Despite yet unknown mechanism, Abeta appears to exert action on the ionotropic glutamate receptors, especially the N-methyl-D-aspartic acid (NMDA) receptor subtypes. In this study, we showed that NMDA and oligomeric Abeta(1-42) could induce reactive oxygen species (ROS) production from cortical neurons through activation of NADPH oxidase. ROS derived from NADPH oxidase led to activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2, phosphorylation of cytosolic phospholipase A(2)alpha (cPLA(2)alpha), and arachidonic acid (AA) release. In addition, Abeta(1-42)-induced AA release was inhibited by d(-)-2-amino-5-phosphonopentanoic acid and memantine, two different NMDA receptor antagonists, suggesting action of Abeta through the NMDA receptor. Besides serving as a precursor for eicosanoids, AA is also regarded as a retrograde messenger and plays a role in modulating synaptic plasticity. Other phospholipase A(2) products such as lysophospholipids can perturb membrane phospholipids. These results suggest an oxidative-degradative mechanism for oligomeric Abeta(1-42) to induce ROS production and stimulate AA release through the NMDA receptors. This novel mechanism may contribute to the oxidative stress hypothesis and synaptic failure that underline the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease. PMID:18346200

  5. Survey analysis and chemical characterization of solid inhomogeneous samples using a general homogenization procedure including acid digestion, drying, grinding and briquetting together with X-ray fluorescence.

    PubMed

    Sahlin, Eskil; Magnusson, Bertil

    2012-08-15

    A survey analysis and chemical characterization methodology for inhomogeneous solid waste samples of relatively large samples (typically up to 100g) using X-ray fluorescence following a general homogenization procedure is presented. By using a combination of acid digestion and grinding various materials can be homogenized e.g. pure metals, alloys, salts, ores, plastics, organics. In the homogenization step, solid material is fully or partly digested in a mixture of nitric acid and hydrochloric acid in an open vessel. The resulting mixture is then dried, grinded, and finally pressed to a wax briquette. The briquette is analyzed using wave-length dispersive X-ray fluorescence with fundamental parameters evaluation. The recovery of 55 elements were tested by preparing samples with known compositions using different alloys, pure metals or elements, oxides, salts and solutions of dissolved compounds. It was found that the methodology was applicable to 49 elements including Na, Mg, Al, Si, P, K, Ca, Sc, Ti, V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, Cu, Zn, Ga, As, Se, Rb, Sr, Y, Zr, Nb, Mo, Ru, Rh, Pd, Ag, Cd, In, Sn, Sb, Te, Cs, Ba, La, Ce, Ta, W, Re, Ir, Pt, Au, Tl, Pb, Bi, and Th, that all had recoveries >0.8. 6 elements were lost by volatilization, including Br, I, Os, and Hg that were completely lost, and S and Ge that were partly lost. Since all lanthanides are chemically similar to La and Ce, all actinides are chemically similar to Th, and Hf is chemically similar to Zr, it is likely that the method is applicable to 77 elements. By using an internal standard such as strontium, added as strontium nitrate, samples containing relatively high concentrations of elements not measured by XRF (hydrogen to fluorine), e.g. samples containing plastics, can be analyzed. PMID:22841048

  6. AAS 227: Day 4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2016-01-01

    Editors Note:This week were at the 227th AAS Meeting in Kissimmee, FL. Along with several fellow authors from astrobites.com, I will bewritingupdates on selectedevents at themeeting and posting at the end of each day. Follow along here or atastrobites.com, or catch ourlive-tweeted updates from the@astrobites Twitter account. The usual posting schedule for AAS Nova will resumenext week.Welcome to Day 4 of the winter American Astronomical Society (AAS) meeting in Kissimmee! Several of us are attending the conference this year, and we will report highlights from each day here on astrobites. If youd like to see more timely updates during the day, we encourage you to follow @astrobites on twitter or search the #aas227 hashtag.Helen B. Warner Prize: Origins of Structure in Planetary Systems (by Erika Nesvold)Another excellent prize lecture started off todays sessions. The Helen B. Warner Prize is awarded for achievement in observational or theoretical astrophysics by a young researcher (no more than eight years after their Ph.D.). This years Warner Prize was presented to Ruth Murray-Clay of UC Santa Barbara. For her award lecture, Murray-Clay told us all about planetary system architecture: the number, masses, and orbits of planets in a given system.Ruth Murray-Clay [photo from http://web.physics.ucsb.edu/ ~murray/biocv.html]The underlying question motivating this type of research is: How rare is the Solar System? In other words, how likely is it that a given planetary system will have rocky planets close to their star, gas giants farther out, and ice giants at the outer reaches of the system? Answering this question will help us solve the physics problem of how and where planets form, and will also help us on our search for other planets like Earth.The data on exoplanet population from transit and radial velocity observations and from direct imaging tell us that our Solar System is not common (many systems we observe have much more eccentric gas giants), but that doesnt

  7. Role of Arachidonic Acid in Promoting Hair Growth

    PubMed Central

    Munkhbayar, Semchin; Jang, Sunhyae; Cho, A-Ri; Choi, Soon-Jin; Shin, Chang Yup; Eun, Hee Chul; Kim, Kyu Han

    2016-01-01

    Background Arachidonic acid (AA) is an omega-6 polyunsaturated fatty acid present in all mammalian cell membranes, and involved in the regulation of many cellular processes, including cell survival, angiogenesis, and mitogenesis. The dermal papilla, composed of specialized fibroblasts located in the bulb of the hair follicle, contributes to the control of hair growth and the hair cycle. Objective This study investigated the effect of AA on hair growth by using in vivo and in vitro models. Methods The effect of AA on human dermal papilla cells (hDPCs) and hair shaft elongation was evaluated by MTT assay and hair follicle organ culture, respectively. The expression of various growth and survival factors in hDPCs were investigated by western blot or immunohistochemistry. The ability of AA to induce and prolong anagen phase in C57BL/6 mice was analyzed. Results AA was found to enhance the viability of hDPCs and promote the expression of several factors responsible for hair growth, including fibroblast growth factor-7 (FGF-7) and FGF-10. Western blotting identified the role of AA in the phosphorylation of various transcription factors (ERK, CREB, and AKT) and increased expression of Bcl-2 in hDPCs. In addition, AA significantly promoted hair shaft elongation, with increased proliferation of matrix keratinocytes, during ex vivo hair follicle culture. It was also found to promote hair growth by induction and prolongation of anagen phase in telogen-stage C57BL/6 mice. Conclusion This study concludes that AA plays a role in promoting hair growth by increasing the expression of growth factors in hDPCs and enhancing follicle proliferation and survival. PMID:26848219

  8. AAS 228: Day 4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2016-06-01

    Editors Note: Lastweek we were at the 228th AAS Meeting in San Diego, CA. Here is a final post aboutselectedevents on the last day of the meeting, written by authors fromastrobites.com, a grad-student collaborative project with which we recently announced a new partnership! Starting in July,keep an eye out for astrobites postsat AAS Nova in between Highlights(i.e., on Tuesdays and Thursdays).Were excited to be working together to bring you more recent astronomy research from AAS journals!Extrasolar Planets: Detection (by Leonardo dos Santos)Thursdays first session on exoplanets was about detecting these distant worlds, and the opening talk was given by Robert Siverd (Las Cumbres Observatory). He describes the NRES, a network of spectrographs that will look for exoplanets using the radial velocity method. One of the coolest aspects of this instrument is that it will feature an on the fly scheduling system that will perform observations as efficiently as possible. The spectrograph is still being tested, but a unit will be deployed at CTIO later this year.@lcogt contracted by @NASA_TESS for follow up of their candidates. #aas228 Jessie Christiansen (@aussiastronomer) June 16, 2016Measuring the depths of transits and eclipses in Spitzer has been problematic in the past, since the Spitzer instrument IRAC (InfraRed Array Camera) has a non-uniform response in its detectors pixels. But, as reported by James Ingalls (Spitzer Science Center, Caltech), observers are circumventing this issue by using what they call the staring mode (avoiding large pointing jumps) and an algorithm to pick sweet spot pixels. Moreover, the results from the IRAC Data Challenge are helping to better understand its behavior. Giuseppe Morello (University College London), on the other hand, explained how his research group gets rid of instrumental effects from IRAC using machine learning. This method removes systematics from exoplanet transit data no matter if the noise source is from an instrument or

  9. Efficient capillary electrophoresis separation and determination of free amino acids in beer samples.

    PubMed

    Tian, Miaomiao; Zhang, Junfu; Mohamed, Amara Camara; Han, Yingzi; Guo, Liping; Yang, Li

    2014-02-01

    Simultaneous detection of various o-phthalaldehyde (OPA)-labeled amino acids (AAs) in food samples was reported based on CE separation. Ionic liquid was used for the first time for CE analysis of AAs with in-capillary derivatization. Several other additives, including SDS, α/β-CD, and ACN, as well as key parameters for CE separation (buffer pH value, separation voltage), were also investigated. Our results show that the multiple additive strategy exhibits good stable and repeatable character for CE analysis of OPA-labeled AAs, for either in-capillary derivatization or CE separation, and allows simultaneous quantification of different OPA-labeled AAs in a large concentration range of 50 μM to 3.0 mM with LOD down to 10 μM. Seventeen OPA-labeled AAs, except for two pairs of AAs (His/Gln and Phe/Leu), which were separated with resolutions of 1.1 and 1.2, respectively, were baseline separated and identified within 23 min using the present multiple additive strategy. The method was successfully applied for simultaneous analysis of AAs in seven beer samples and as many as eleven trace-amount AAs were detected and quantified, indicating the valuable potential application of the present method for food analysis. PMID:24339046

  10. Multi-Biomarkers for Early Detection of Type 2 Diabetes, Including 10- and 12-(Z,E)-Hydroxyoctadecadienoic Acids, Insulin, Leptin, and Adiponectin

    PubMed Central

    Umeno, Aya; Yoshino, Kohzoh; Hashimoto, Yoshiko; Shichiri, Mototada; Kataoka, Masatoshi; Yoshida, Yasukazu

    2015-01-01

    We have previously found that fasting plasma levels of totally assessed 10- and 12-(Z,E)-hydroxyoctadecadienoic acid (HODE) correlated well with levels of glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) and glucose during oral glucose tolerance tests (OGTT); these levels were determined via liquid chromatography—mass spectrometry after reduction and saponification. However, 10- and 12-(Z,E)-HODE alone cannot perfectly detect early impaired glucose tolerance (IGT) and/or insulin resistance, which ultimately lead to diabetes. In this study, we randomly recruited healthy volunteers (n = 57) who had no known history of any diseases, and who were evaluated using the OGTT, the HODE biomarkers, and several additional proposed biomarkers, including retinol binding protein 4 (RBP4), adiponectin, leptin, insulin, glycoalbumin, and high sensitivity-C-reactive protein. The OGTT revealed that our volunteers included normal individuals (n = 44; Group N), “high-normal” individuals (fasting plasma glucose 100–109 mg/dL) with IGT (n = 11; Group HN+IGT), and diabetic individuals (n = 2; Group D). We then used these groups to evaluate the potential biomarkers for the early detection of type 2 diabetes. Plasma levels of RBP4 and glycoalbumin were higher in Group HN+IGT, compared to those in Group N, and fasting levels of 10- and 12-(Z,E)-HODE/linoleic acids were significantly correlated with levels of RBP4 (p = 0.003, r = 0.380) and glycoalbumin (p = 0.006, r = 0.316). Furthermore, we developed a stepwise multiple linear regression models to predict the individuals’ insulin resistance index (the Matsuda Index 3). Fasting plasma levels of 10- and 12-(Z,E)-HODE/linoleic acids, glucose, insulin, and leptin/adiponectin were selected as the explanatory variables for the models. The risks of type 2 diabetes, early IGT, and insulin resistance were perfectly predicted by comparing fasting glucose levels to the estimated Matsuda Index 3 (fasting levels of 10- and 12-(Z,E)-HODE/linoleic acids, insulin

  11. Enteric Bacterial Metabolites Propionic and Butyric Acid Modulate Gene Expression, Including CREB-Dependent Catecholaminergic Neurotransmission, in PC12 Cells - Possible Relevance to Autism Spectrum Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Nankova, Bistra B.; Agarwal, Raj; MacFabe, Derrick F.; La Gamma, Edmund F.

    2014-01-01

    Alterations in gut microbiome composition have an emerging role in health and disease including brain function and behavior. Short chain fatty acids (SCFA) like propionic (PPA), and butyric acid (BA), which are present in diet and are fermentation products of many gastrointestinal bacteria, are showing increasing importance in host health, but also may be environmental contributors in neurodevelopmental disorders including autism spectrum disorders (ASD). Further to this we have shown SCFA administration to rodents over a variety of routes (intracerebroventricular, subcutaneous, intraperitoneal) or developmental time periods can elicit behavioral, electrophysiological, neuropathological and biochemical effects consistent with findings in ASD patients. SCFA are capable of altering host gene expression, partly due to their histone deacetylase inhibitor activity. We have previously shown BA can regulate tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) mRNA levels in a PC12 cell model. Since monoamine concentration is known to be elevated in the brain and blood of ASD patients and in many ASD animal models, we hypothesized that SCFA may directly influence brain monoaminergic pathways. When PC12 cells were transiently transfected with plasmids having a luciferase reporter gene under the control of the TH promoter, PPA was found to induce reporter gene activity over a wide concentration range. CREB transcription factor(s) was necessary for the transcriptional activation of TH gene by PPA. At lower concentrations PPA also caused accumulation of TH mRNA and protein, indicative of increased cell capacity to produce catecholamines. PPA and BA induced broad alterations in gene expression including neurotransmitter systems, neuronal cell adhesion molecules, inflammation, oxidative stress, lipid metabolism and mitochondrial function, all of which have been implicated in ASD. In conclusion, our data are consistent with a molecular mechanism through which gut related environmental signals such as

  12. Rapid Stimulation of 5-Lipoxygenase Activity in Potato by the Fungal Elicitor Arachidonic Acid 1

    PubMed Central

    Bostock, Richard M.; Yamamoto, Hiroyuki; Choi, Doil; Ricker, Karin E.; Ward, Bernard L.

    1992-01-01

    The activity of lipoxygenase (LOX) in aged potato tuber discs increased by almost 2-fold following treatment of the discs with the fungal elicitor arachidonic acid (AA). Enzyme activity increased above that in untreated discs within 30 min after AA treatment, peaked at 1 to 3 h, and returned to near control levels by 6 h. The majority of the activity was detected in a soluble fraction (105,000g supernatant), but a minor portion was also associated with a particulate fraction enriched in microsomal membranes (105,000g pellet); both activities were similarly induced. 5-Hydroperoxyeicosatetraenoic acid was the principal product following incubation of these extracts with AA. Antibodies to soybean LOX strongly reacted with a protein with a molecular mass of approximately 95-kD present in both soluble and particulate fractions whose abundance generally corresponded with LOX activity in extracts. LOX activity was not enhanced by treatment of the discs with nonelicitor fatty acids or by branched β-glucans from the mycelium of Phytophthora infestans. Prior treatment of the discs with abscisic acid, salicylhydroxamic acid, or n-propyl gallate, all of which have been shown to suppress AA induction of the hypersensitive response, inhibited the AA-induced increment in LOX activity. Cycloheximide pretreatment, which abolishes AA elicitor activity for other responses such as phytoalexin induction, did not inhibit LOX activity in water- or elicitor-treated discs but enhanced activity similar to that observed by AA treatment. The elicitor-induced increase in 5-LOX activity preceded or temporally paralleled the induction of other studied responses to AA, including the accumulation of mRNAs for 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase and phenylalanine ammonia lyase reported here. The results are discussed in relation to the proposed role of the 5-LOX in signal-response coupling of arachidonate elicitation of the hypersensitive response. Images Figure 4 Figure 7 PMID

  13. Total Synthesis of the Aristolochic Acids, Their Major Metabolites, and Related Compounds

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Plants from the Aristolochia genus have been recommended for the treatment of a variety of human ailments since the time of Hippocrates. However, many species produce the highly toxic aristolochic acids (AAs), which are both nephrotoxic and carcinogenic. For the purposes of extensive biological studies, a versatile approach to the synthesis of the AAs and their major metabolites was devised based primarily on a Suzuki–Miyaura coupling reaction. The key to success lies in the preparation of a common ring-A precursor, namely, the tetrahydropyranyl ether of 2-nitromethyl-3-iodo-4,5-methylendioxybenzyl alcohol (27), which was generated in excellent yield by oxidation of the aldoxime precursor 26. Suzuki–Miyaura coupling of 27 with a variety of benzaldehyde 2-boronates was accompanied by an aldol condensation/elimination reaction to give the desired phenanthrene intermediate directly. Deprotection of the benzyl alcohol followed by two sequential oxidation steps gave the desired phenanthrene nitrocarboxylic acids. This approach was used to synthesize AAs I–IV and several other related compounds, including AA I and AA II bearing an aminopropyloxy group at position-6, which were required for further conversion to fluorescent biological probes. Further successful application of the Suzuki–Miyaura coupling reaction to the synthesis of the N-hydroxyaristolactams of AA I and AA II then allowed the synthesis of the putative, but until now elusive, N-acetoxy- and N-sulfonyloxy-aristolactam metabolites. PMID:24877584

  14. AAS 227: Day 4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2016-01-01

    Editors Note:This week were at the 227th AAS Meeting in Kissimmee, FL. Along with several fellow authors from astrobites.com, I will bewritingupdates on selectedevents at themeeting and posting at the end of each day. Follow along here or atastrobites.com, or catch ourlive-tweeted updates from the@astrobites Twitter account. The usual posting schedule for AAS Nova will resumenext week.Welcome to Day 4 of the winter American Astronomical Society (AAS) meeting in Kissimmee! Several of us are attending the conference this year, and we will report highlights from each day here on astrobites. If youd like to see more timely updates during the day, we encourage you to follow @astrobites on twitter or search the #aas227 hashtag.Helen B. Warner Prize: Origins of Structure in Planetary Systems (by Erika Nesvold)Another excellent prize lecture started off todays sessions. The Helen B. Warner Prize is awarded for achievement in observational or theoretical astrophysics by a young researcher (no more than eight years after their Ph.D.). This years Warner Prize was presented to Ruth Murray-Clay of UC Santa Barbara. For her award lecture, Murray-Clay told us all about planetary system architecture: the number, masses, and orbits of planets in a given system.Ruth Murray-Clay [photo from http://web.physics.ucsb.edu/ ~murray/biocv.html]The underlying question motivating this type of research is: How rare is the Solar System? In other words, how likely is it that a given planetary system will have rocky planets close to their star, gas giants farther out, and ice giants at the outer reaches of the system? Answering this question will help us solve the physics problem of how and where planets form, and will also help us on our search for other planets like Earth.The data on exoplanet population from transit and radial velocity observations and from direct imaging tell us that our Solar System is not common (many systems we observe have much more eccentric gas giants), but that doesnt

  15. Impact resistance of AA6005 panels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clausen, A. H.; Borvik, T.; Hopperstad, O. S.; Langseth, M.

    2003-09-01

    The interest regarding use of extruded aluminium panels as lightweight protective structures is cmrently increasing. Even so, there are few experimental and computational investigations considering such structures. This paper presents some perforation tests on AA6005-T6 aluminium panels impacted by ogival-nose steel projectiles, where special emphasis was paid to the determination of the ballistic limit. Moreover, a material test programme including high strain rate tests using a split-Hopkinson tension bar was carried out in order to calibrate the Johnson-Cook constitutive model. Results from numerical analyses with LS-DYNA are finally included.

  16. AAS 228: Day 3 morning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2016-06-01

    Editors Note:This week were at the 228th AAS Meeting in San Diego, CA. Along with a team ofauthors from astrobites.com, I will bewritingupdates on selectedevents at themeeting and posting twiceeach day. Follow along here or atastrobites.com, or catch ourlive-tweeted updates from the@astrobites Twitter account. The usual posting schedule for AAS Nova will resumenext week.Plenary Session 2015 Newton Lacy Pierce Prize Lecture: The Elephant in the Room: Effects of Distant, Massive Companions on Planetary System Architectures (by Leonardo dos Santos)The first session on Wednesday at 228th AAS Meeting was the Newton Lacy Pierce Prize Lecture by Heather Knutson (California Institute of Technology). This talk featured a broad range of research efforts on exoplanets, with the main focus on how we study the composition of their atmospheres, and how multi-body interactions carve the structure of the planetary systems we observe.One of her first points is the well-known idea that the Solar System is an oddball, compared to the exoplanet systems we have found so far: most of these systems contain hot Jupiters and mini-Neptunes at very close-in orbits around their host stars. Moreover, even when studying their transmission spectra, it is difficult to know the exact composition of their atmospheres.Knutson: it is difficult to constrain atmospheric composition of exoplanets (H-poor or H-rich+clouds?) #aas228pic.twitter.com/LdyN4o9RC7 astrobites (@astrobites) June 15, 2016The main proposal on how these systems formed is the migration scenario. In order to validate this idea, Dr. Knutson and her group The Friends of Hot Jupiters study systems with close-in gas giants and their frequency of binary companions, which are supposed to be the main culprits causing gas-giant migration. They found that approximately half of the observed systems have long-distance companions, providing strong validation of the migration scenario. Moreover, Dr. Knutson speculates that wide binaries have more

  17. Alterations of amino acid metabolism in osteoarthritis: its implications for nutrition and health.

    PubMed

    Li, Yusheng; Xiao, Wenfeng; Luo, Wei; Zeng, Chao; Deng, Zhenhan; Ren, Wenkai; Wu, Guoyao; Lei, Guanghua

    2016-04-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is a common form of arthritis in humans. It has long been regarded as a non-inflammatory disease, but a degree of inflammation is now recognized as being a vital inducer of subpopulation of OA. Besides inflammation, the establishment and development of OA are associated with alterations in metabolism and profiles of amino acids (AA), including glutamate- and arginine-family AA as well as their related metabolites (e.g., creatinine, hydroxyproline, γ-aminobutyrate, dimethylarginines and homoarginine). Functional AA (e.g., glutamine, arginine, glutamate, glycine, proline, and tryptophan) have various benefits (i.e., anti-inflammation and anti-oxidation) in treatment of inflammation-associated diseases, including OA. Thus, these AA have potential as immunomodulatory nutrients for patients with inflammation-induced OA. PMID:26767374

  18. Discovery of arjunolic acid as a novel non-zinc binding carbonic anhydrase II inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Kalyanavenkataraman, Subhalakshmi; Nanjan, Pandurangan; Banerji, Asoke; Nair, Bipin G; Kumar, Geetha B

    2016-06-01

    Elevated levels of carbonic anhydrase II (CA II) have been shown to be associated with cardiac hypertrophy and heart failure. Although arjunolic acid (AA) has a diverse range of therapeutic applications including cardio-protection, there have been no reports on the effect of AA on CA II. The present study describes for the first time, the novel zinc independent inhibition of CA II by AA. The molecular docking studies of AA indicated that the hydroxyl group at C2 of the A-ring, which hydrogen bonds with the catalytic site residues (His64, Asn62 and Asn67), along with the gem-dimethyl group at C20 of the E-ring, greatly influences the inhibitory activity, independent of the catalytic zinc, unlike the inhibition observed with most CA II inhibitors. Among the triterpenoids tested viz. arjunolic acid, arjunic acid, asiatic acid, oleanolic acid and ursolic acid, AA was the most potent in inhibiting CA II in vitro with an IC50 of 9μM. It was interesting to note, that in spite of exhibiting very little differences in their structures, these triterpenoids exhibited vast differences in their inhibitory activities, with IC50 values ranging from 9μM to as high as 333μM. Furthermore, AA also inhibited the cytosolic activity of CA in H9c2 cardiomyocytes, as reflected by the decrease in acidification of the intracellular pH (pHi). The decreased acidification reduced the intracellular calcium levels, which further prevented the mitochondrial membrane depolarization. Thus, these studies provide a better understanding for establishing the novel molecular mechanism involved in CA II inhibition by the non-zinc binding inhibitor AA. PMID:27038848

  19. Fatty acid composition of the postmortem prefrontal cortex of adolescent male and female suicide victims.

    PubMed

    McNamara, Robert K; Jandacek, Ronald; Rider, Therese; Tso, Patrick; Dwivedi, Yogesh; Roberts, Rosalinda C; Conley, Robert R; Pandey, Ghanshyam N

    2009-01-01

    Prior epidemiological, prospective intervention, and peripheral and central fatty acid composition studies suggest that omega-3 fatty acid deficiency may be associated with the pathoaetiology of depression and suicide. In the present study, we determined the fatty acid composition of the postmortem prefrontal cortex (PFC) of adolescent male and female suicide victims and age-matched controls. Fatty acid composition (wt% total fatty acids) and concentrations (micromol/g) were determined in the postmortem PFC (Brodmann area 10) of male and female adolescent (aged 13-20 years) suicide victims (n=20) and age-matched controls (n=20) by gas chromatography. None of the major polyunsaturated fatty acids including the principle brain omega-3 fatty acid, docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), monounsaturated fatty acids, or saturated fatty acids differed significantly between adolescent suicide victims and controls before or after segregation by gender. The arachidonic acid (AA, 20:4n-6): DHA ratio and adrenic acid (22:4n-6) composition were negatively correlated with age at death in controls but not in suicides, and males exhibited a greater AA:DHA ratio irrespective of cause-of-death. These results demonstrate that adolescent male and female suicide victims do not exhibit DHA deficits in the postmortem PFC relative to age-matched controls, and suggest that suicide victims do not exhibit the normal age-related decrease in adrenic acid composition and the AA:DHA ratio. PMID:19064316

  20. A highly acid-resistant novel strain of Lactobacillus johnsonii No. 1088 has antibacterial activity, including that against Helicobacter pylori, and inhibits gastrin-mediated acid production in mice

    PubMed Central

    Aiba, Yuji; Nakano, Yasuhiro; Koga, Yasuhiro; Takahashi, Kenji; Komatsu, Yasuhiko

    2015-01-01

    A novel strain of Lactobacillus johnsonii No. 1088 was isolated from the gastric juice of a healthy Japanese male volunteer, and characterized for its effectiveness in the stomach environment. Lactobacillus johnsonii No. 1088 was found to have the strongest acid resistance among several lactobacilli examined (>10% of cells survived at pH 1.0 after 2 h), and such a high acid resistance property was a specific characteristic of this strain of L. johnsonii. When cultured with various virulent bacteria, L. johnsonii No. 1088 inhibited the growth of Helicobacter pylori,Escherichia coli O-157, Salmonella Typhimurium, and Clostridium difficile, in which case its effectiveness was more potent than that of a type strain of L. johnsonii,JCM2012. In addition to its effect in vitro, L. johnsonii No. 1088 inhibited the growth of H. pylori in human intestinal microbiota-associated mice in both its live and lyophilized forms. Moreover, L. johnsonii No. 1088 suppressed gastric acid secretion in mice via decreasing the number of gastrin-positive cells in the stomach. These results taken together suggest that L. johnsonii No. 1088 is a unique lactobacillus having properties beneficial for supporting H. pylori eradication by triple therapy including the use of a proton pump inhibitor (PPI) and also for prophylaxis of gastroesophageal reflux disease possibly caused after H. pylori eradication as a side effect of PPI. PMID:25771812

  1. AAS 228: Day 3 morning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2016-06-01

    Editors Note:This week were at the 228th AAS Meeting in San Diego, CA. Along with a team ofauthors from astrobites.com, I will bewritingupdates on selectedevents at themeeting and posting twiceeach day. Follow along here or atastrobites.com, or catch ourlive-tweeted updates from the@astrobites Twitter account. The usual posting schedule for AAS Nova will resumenext week.Plenary Session 2015 Newton Lacy Pierce Prize Lecture: The Elephant in the Room: Effects of Distant, Massive Companions on Planetary System Architectures (by Leonardo dos Santos)The first session on Wednesday at 228th AAS Meeting was the Newton Lacy Pierce Prize Lecture by Heather Knutson (California Institute of Technology). This talk featured a broad range of research efforts on exoplanets, with the main focus on how we study the composition of their atmospheres, and how multi-body interactions carve the structure of the planetary systems we observe.One of her first points is the well-known idea that the Solar System is an oddball, compared to the exoplanet systems we have found so far: most of these systems contain hot Jupiters and mini-Neptunes at very close-in orbits around their host stars. Moreover, even when studying their transmission spectra, it is difficult to know the exact composition of their atmospheres.Knutson: it is difficult to constrain atmospheric composition of exoplanets (H-poor or H-rich+clouds?) #aas228pic.twitter.com/LdyN4o9RC7 astrobites (@astrobites) June 15, 2016The main proposal on how these systems formed is the migration scenario. In order to validate this idea, Dr. Knutson and her group The Friends of Hot Jupiters study systems with close-in gas giants and their frequency of binary companions, which are supposed to be the main culprits causing gas-giant migration. They found that approximately half of the observed systems have long-distance companions, providing strong validation of the migration scenario. Moreover, Dr. Knutson speculates that wide binaries have more

  2. Vascular composition data supporting the role of N-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids in the prevention of cardiovascular disease events

    PubMed Central

    Ohwada, Takayuki; Yokokawa, Tetsuro; Kanno, Yuki; Hotsuki, Yu; Sakamoto, Takayuki; Watanabe, Kenichi; Nakazato, Kazuhiko; Takeishi, Yasuchika

    2016-01-01

    N-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) are thought to have protective effects against cardiovascular disease. Here, we report the relationship between serum PUFA concentrations and plaque composition, as evaluated by virtual histology-intravascular ultrasound (VH-IVUS). Consecutive patients (n=61) who underwent percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) were pre-operatively examined using VH-IVUS to assess the composition of culprit plaques. Gray-scale IVUS and VH-IVUS data of fibrous, fibro-fatty, necrotic core, and dense calcium regions of plaques were estimated at the minimal luminal area sites of culprit lesions. Serum levels of high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hsCRP) and PUFAs, including eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA), docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), and arachidonic acid (AA), were compared between patients with (ACS, n=27) and without acute coronary syndrome (non-ACS, n=34) before PCI. Multiple logistic regression analysis of the data showed that EPA/AA under the median was more highly associated with ACS than hsCRP over the median. In addition, EPA/AA was negatively correlated with the percentage of fibrous plaque regions and EPA/AA and DHA/AA were positively correlated with the percentage of dense calcium regions in plaques. Furthermore, the correlation index of EPA/AA was the most highly (R=0.513) correlated with the percentage of dense calcium regions in plaques. PMID:27222841

  3. Vascular composition data supporting the role of N-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids in the prevention of cardiovascular disease events.

    PubMed

    Ohwada, Takayuki; Yokokawa, Tetsuro; Kanno, Yuki; Hotsuki, Yu; Sakamoto, Takayuki; Watanabe, Kenichi; Nakazato, Kazuhiko; Takeishi, Yasuchika

    2016-06-01

    N-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) are thought to have protective effects against cardiovascular disease. Here, we report the relationship between serum PUFA concentrations and plaque composition, as evaluated by virtual histology-intravascular ultrasound (VH-IVUS). Consecutive patients (n=61) who underwent percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) were pre-operatively examined using VH-IVUS to assess the composition of culprit plaques. Gray-scale IVUS and VH-IVUS data of fibrous, fibro-fatty, necrotic core, and dense calcium regions of plaques were estimated at the minimal luminal area sites of culprit lesions. Serum levels of high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hsCRP) and PUFAs, including eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA), docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), and arachidonic acid (AA), were compared between patients with (ACS, n=27) and without acute coronary syndrome (non-ACS, n=34) before PCI. Multiple logistic regression analysis of the data showed that EPA/AA under the median was more highly associated with ACS than hsCRP over the median. In addition, EPA/AA was negatively correlated with the percentage of fibrous plaque regions and EPA/AA and DHA/AA were positively correlated with the percentage of dense calcium regions in plaques. Furthermore, the correlation index of EPA/AA was the most highly (R=0.513) correlated with the percentage of dense calcium regions in plaques. PMID:27222841

  4. Synaptic vesicles contain small ribonucleic acids (sRNAs) including transfer RNA fragments (trfRNA) and microRNAs (miRNA)

    PubMed Central

    Li, Huinan; Wu, Cheng; Aramayo, Rodolfo; Sachs, Matthew S.; Harlow, Mark L.

    2015-01-01

    Synaptic vesicles (SVs) are neuronal presynaptic organelles that load and release neurotransmitter at chemical synapses. In addition to classic neurotransmitters, we have found that synaptic vesicles isolated from the electric organ of Torpedo californica, a model cholinergic synapse, contain small ribonucleic acids (sRNAs), primarily the 5′ ends of transfer RNAs (tRNAs) termed tRNA fragments (trfRNAs). To test the evolutionary conservation of SV sRNAs we examined isolated SVs from the mouse central nervous system (CNS). We found abundant levels of sRNAs in mouse SVs, including trfRNAs and micro RNAs (miRNAs) known to be involved in transcriptional and translational regulation. This discovery suggests that, in addition to inducing changes in local dendritic excitability through the release of neurotransmitters, SVs may, through the release of specific trfRNAs and miRNAs, directly regulate local protein synthesis. We believe these findings have broad implications for the study of chemical synaptic transmission. PMID:26446566

  5. AAS 228: Day 1 afternoon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2016-06-01

    is less likely to see, and vice versa. Angela Berti detected the signal of galactic conformity all the way to redshift z=1, an effect that makes galaxies more likely to be found around neighbors that are very similar (in terms of color or shape) than different kinds. Georgiana Ogrean closed the session by showing a merger between two galaxies that is not producing a strong shock front. 112: Astronomy Education for All: The 2017 Eclipse, Accessibility and NASA (by Meredith Rawls)This afternoon session kicked off with an advertisement for US-based astronomers favorite upcoming event: the 2017 Solar Eclipse. Jay Pasachoff reviewed plans for the August 21, 2017 event and pointed us to resources about choosing the best viewing site and what to expect on the momentous day. We also heard from Denise Smith, Jim Manning, and Daniel McIntosh about various NASA-funded efforts for education and outreach in the classroom and beyond. A sampling of NASA education and outreach resources compiled over several years, presented by Jim Manning #aas228 pic.twitter.com/T41gdHFoDv Meredith Rawls (@merrdiff) June 13, 2016The other two talks from this session focused on the newly-formed AAS Working Group for Accessibility and Disability and what the astronomical community can do to cultivate a more accessible culture. Speakers Jackie Monkiewicz and Lauren Gilbert described how and why inaccessibility is driving people away from the field: by requiring people with disabilities to disclose those disabilities, by maintaining inaccessible buildings and observatories, by acting inappropriately when accommodations are requested, and by not working well in advance of a course or event to anticipate the needs of people with disabilities. To learn more about what you can do to make astronomy accessible, and what efforts are already underway (including right here at AAS 228), see these resources compiled by AstroBetter.Press Conference: From Molecules to Galaxies (by Leonardo dos Santos

  6. Metabolic evidence of vitamin B-12 deficiency, including high homocysteine and methylmalonic acid and low holotranscobalamin, is more pronounced in older adults with elevated plasma folate

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Background: An analysis of data from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey indicated that in older adults exposed to folic acid fortification, the combination of low serum vitamin B-12 and elevated folate is associated with higher concentrations of homocysteine and methylmalonic acid ...

  7. Functional Amino Acids in Growth, Reproduction, and Health12

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Guoyao

    2010-01-01

    Amino acids (AA) were traditionally classified as nutritionally essential or nonessential for animals and humans based on nitrogen balance or growth. A key element of this classification is that all nonessential AA (NEAA) were assumed to be synthesized adequately in the body as substrates to meet the needs for protein synthesis. Unfortunately, regulatory roles for AA in nutrition and metabolism have long been ignored. Such conceptual limitations were not recognized until recent seminal findings that dietary glutamine is necessary for intestinal mucosal integrity and dietary arginine is required for maximum neonatal growth and embryonic survival. Some of the traditionally classified NEAA (e.g. glutamine, glutamate, and arginine) play important roles in regulating gene expression, cell signaling, antioxidative responses, and immunity. Additionally, glutamate, glutamine, and aspartate are major metabolic fuels for the small intestine and they, along with glycine, regulate neurological function. Among essential AA (EAA), much emphasis has been placed on leucine (which activates mammalian target of rapamycin to stimulate protein synthesis and inhibit proteolysis) and tryptophan (which modulates neurological and immunological functions through multiple metabolites, including serotonin and melatonin). A growing body of literature leads to a new concept of functional AA, which are defined as those AA that regulate key metabolic pathways to improve health, survival, growth, development, lactation, and reproduction of organisms. Both NEAA and EAA should be considered in the classic “ideal protein” concept or formulation of balanced diets to maximize protein accretion and optimize health in animals and humans. PMID:22043449

  8. Metabolic profiling of plasma amino acids shows that histidine increases following the consumption of pork

    PubMed Central

    Samman, Samir; Crossett, Ben; Somers, Miles; Bell, Kirstine J; Lai, Nicole T; Sullivan, David R; Petocz, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Amino acid (AA) status is determined by factors including nutrition, metabolic rate, and interactions between the metabolism of AA, carbohydrates, and lipids. Analysis of the plasma AA profile, together with markers of glucose and lipid metabolism, will shed light on metabolic regulation. The objectives of this study were to investigate the acute responses to the consumption of meals containing either pork (PM) or chicken (CM), and to identify relationships between plasma AA and markers of glycemic and lipemic control. A secondary aim was to explore AA predictors of plasma zinc concentrations. Ten healthy adults participated in a postprandial study on two separate occasions. In a randomized cross-over design, participants consumed PM or CM. The concentrations of 21 AA, glucose, insulin, triglycerides, nonesterified fatty acids, and zinc were determined over 5 hours postprandially. The meal composition did not influence glucose, insulin, triglyceride, nonesterified fatty acid, or zinc concentrations. Plasma histidine was higher following the consumption of PM (P=0.014), with consistently higher changes observed after 60 minutes (P<0.001). Greater percentage increases were noted at limited time points for valine and leucine + isoleucine in those who consumed CM compared to PM. In linear regression, some AAs emerged as predictors of the metabolic responses, irrespective of the meal that was consumed. The present study demonstrates that a single meal of PM or CM produces a differential profile of AA in the postprandial state. The sustained increase in histidine following the consumption of a PM is consistent with the reported effects of lean pork on cardiometabolic risk factors. PMID:24971025

  9. Mechanism underlying mitochondrial protection of asiatic acid against hepatotoxicity in mice.

    PubMed

    Gao, Jing; Chen, Jin; Tang, Xinhui; Pan, Liya; Fang, Feng; Xu, Lizhi; Zhao, Xiaoning; Xu, Qiang

    2006-02-01

    Asiatic acid (AA) is one of the triterpenoid components of Terminalia catappa L., which has antioxidative, anti-inflammatory and hepatoprotective activity. This research focused on the mitochondrial protection of AA against acute liver injury induced by lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and D-galactosamine (D-GalN) in mice. It was found that pretreatment with 25, 50 or 100 mg kg(-1) AA significantly blocked the LPS + D-GalN-induced increase in both serum aspartate aminotransferase (sAST) and serum alanine aminotransferase (sALT) levels, which was confirmed by ultrastructural observation under an electron microscope, showing improved nuclear condensation, ameliorated mitochondrion proliferation and less lipid deposition. Meanwhile, different doses of AA could decrease both the transcription and the translation level of voltage-dependent anion channels (VDACs), the most important mitochondrial PTP component protein, and block the translocation of cytochrome c from mitochondria to cytosol. On the other hand, pre-incubation with 25, 50 and 100 microg mL(-1) AA inhibited the Ca(2+)-induced mitochondrial permeability transition (MPT), including mitochondrial swelling, membrane potential dissipation and releasing of matrix Ca(2+) in liver mitochondria separated from normal mice, indicating the direct role of AA on mitochondria. Collectively, the above data suggest that AA could protect liver from damage and the mechanism might be related to up-regulating mitochondrial VDACs and inhibiting the process of MPT. PMID:16451751

  10. Arachidonic acid stimulates formation of a novel complex containing nucleolin and RhoA.

    PubMed

    Garcia, Melissa C; Williams, Jason; Johnson, Katina; Olden, Kenneth; Roberts, John D

    2011-02-18

    Arachidonic acid (AA) stimulates cell adhesion through a p38 mitogen activated protein kinase-mediated RhoA signaling pathway. Here we report that a proteomic screen following AA-treatment identified nucleolin, a multifunctional nucleolar protein, in a complex with the GTPase, RhoA, that also included the Rho kinase, ROCK. AA-stimulated cell adhesion was inhibited by expression of nucleolin-targeted shRNA and formation of the multiprotein complex was blocked by expression of dominant-negative RhoA. AA-treatment also induced ROCK-dependent serine phosphorylation of nucleolin and translocation of nucleolin from the nucleus to the cytoplasm, where it appeared to co-localize with RhoA. These data suggest the existence of a new signaling pathway through which the location and post-translational state of nucleolin are modulated. PMID:21281639

  11. AAS Special Session: Policy Making in Astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cardelli, J. A.; Massa, D.

    1995-12-01

    The professional astronomical community today is more diverse than at any time in its history. Individuals participating in creative research programs can be found in a wide range of positions. This type of diversity, which mixes research, education, and service (e.g. contract) work, represents the strength of contemporary astronomy. While recognizing the unavoidable reductions in funding and restructuring of organizations like NASA, it is imperative that the significance of the current diversity be considered during these processes. Creative ideas are one of the cornerstones of quality research, and they can originate anywhere. Consequently, it is essential that adequate research resources remain available for free and open competition by all astronomers. Our goal in this session is to bring together officials from the AAS, NASA, and the NSF to discuss how the policy and decision making process operates and whether it should be changed to better serve the general needs of the professional astronomical community. Examples of the issues we believe are important include: In establishing new policy, how can the needs of the average research astronomer be better addressed? How could input from such astronomers be provided to those who craft NASA/NSF policy? How can/should the AAS serve as an interface between policy/decision making bodies and its membership? Should the AAS membership become more actively/effectively involved in the decision making process and, if so, how? More information on this session and related issues can be found at the Association of Research Astronomers Home Page: http://www.phy.vill.edu/astro/faculty/ara/ara_home.htm

  12. The Pasadena Recommendations: Five Years After AAS Endorsement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knezek, Patricia; Frattare, L.; Ulvestad, J.

    2010-01-01

    It has been five years since the AAS Council unanimously endorsed the document, known as "Equity Now: The Pasadena Recommendations for Gender Equality in Astronomy," in January 2005. This document was the main product of the conference entitled "Women in Astronomy II: Ten Years After” (WIA II), held in June 2003 in Pasadena, CA. Participants of that 2003 meeting assessed the progress for women in science, offering insights into causes of the slower advancement of women, and discussed strategies to accelerate the achievement of equality. These insights and strategies were then incorporated into the "Pasadena Recommendations" by the CSWA. It was subsequently released to the entire AAS community for review and comments prior to its endorsement by the AAS. We will discuss the Recommendations and their impact since the endorsement by the AAS, including the process that is in place for organizations and departments to formally endorse the Pasadena Recommendations, thus making an organizational commitment to their implementation (see http://www.aas.org/cswa/pasadena_endorse.html).

  13. L-Ascorbic acid as an alternative fuel for direct oxidation fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujiwara, Naoko; Yamazaki, Shin-ichi; Siroma, Zyun; Ioroi, Tsutomu; Yasuda, Kazuaki

    L-Ascorbic acid (AA) was directly supplied to polymer electrolyte fuel cells (PEFCs) as an alternative fuel. Only dehydroascorbic acid (DHAA) was detected as a product released by the electrochemical oxidation of AA via a two-electron transfer process regardless of the anode catalyst used. The ionomer in the anode may inhibit the mass transfer of AA to the reaction sites by electrostatic repulsion. In addition, polymer resins without an ionic group such as poly(vinylidene fluoride) and poly(vinyl butyral) were also useful for reducing the contact resistance between Nafion membrane and carbon black used as an anode, although an ionomer like Nafion is needed for typical PEFCs. A reaction mechanism at the two-phase boundaries between AA and carbon black was proposed for the anode structure of DAAFCs, since lack of the proton conductivity was compensated by AA. There was too little crossover of AA through a Nafion membrane to cause a serious technical problem. The best performance (maximum power density of 16 mW cm -2) was attained with a Vulcan XC72 anode that included 5 wt.% Nafion at room temperature, which was about one-third of that for a DMFC with a PtRu anode.

  14. The Arachidonic Acid Metabolome Serves as a Conserved Regulator of Cholesterol Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Demetz, Egon; Schroll, Andrea; Auer, Kristina; Heim, Christiane; Patsch, Josef R.; Eller, Philipp; Theurl, Markus; Theurl, Igor; Theurl, Milan; Seifert, Markus; Lener, Daniela; Stanzl, Ursula; Haschka, David; Asshoff, Malte; Dichtl, Stefanie; Nairz, Manfred; Huber, Eva; Stadlinger, Martin; Moschen, Alexander R.; Li, Xiaorong; Pallweber, Petra; Scharnagl, Hubert; Stojakovic, Tatjana; März, Winfried; Kleber, Marcus E.; Garlaschelli, Katia; Uboldi, Patrizia; Catapano, Alberico L.; Stellaard, Frans; Rudling, Mats; Kuba, Keiji; Imai, Yumiko; Arita, Makoto; Schuetz, John D.; Pramstaller, Peter P.; Tietge, Uwe J.F.; Trauner, Michael; Norata, Giuseppe D.; Claudel, Thierry; Hicks, Andrew A.; Weiss, Guenter; Tancevski, Ivan

    2014-01-01

    Summary Cholesterol metabolism is closely interrelated with cardiovascular disease in humans. Dietary supplementation with omega-6 polyunsaturated fatty acids including arachidonic acid (AA) was shown to favorably affect plasma LDL-C and HDL-C. However, the underlying mechanisms are poorly understood. By combining data from a GWAS screening in >100,000 individuals of European ancestry, mediator lipidomics, and functional validation studies in mice, we identify the AA metabolome as an important regulator of cholesterol homeostasis. Pharmacological modulation of AA metabolism by aspirin induced hepatic generation of leukotrienes (LTs) and lipoxins (LXs), thereby increasing hepatic expression of the bile salt export pump Abcb11. Induction of Abcb11 translated in enhanced reverse cholesterol transport, one key function of HDL. Further characterization of the bioactive AA-derivatives identified LX mimetics to lower plasma LDL-C. Our results define the AA metabolome as conserved regulator of cholesterol metabolism, and identify AA derivatives as promising therapeutics to treat cardiovascular disease in humans. PMID:25444678

  15. AAS 228: Day 2 afternoon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2016-06-01

    Editors Note:This week were at the 228th AAS Meeting in San Diego, CA. Along with a team ofauthors from astrobites.com, I will bewritingupdates on selectedevents at themeeting and posting twiceeach day. Follow along here or atastrobites.com, or catch ourlive-tweeted updates from the@astrobites Twitter account. The usual posting schedule for AAS Nova will resumenext week.The Limits of Scientific Cosmology: Setting the Stage: Accepted Facts, and Testing Limitations in Theory and Data (by Gourav Khullar)With a stellar lineup of speakers to talk about current and future prospects of cosmology and its limits (or lack thereof), the first session kicked off with talks by Risa Wechsler, Joseph Silk, and Sean Carroll (his talk on Multiverses is described below, by Nathan Sanders). Risa set the stage with an elaborate description of the current accepted facts in the era of precision cosmology including the standard model of concordance cosmology, described by seven parameters and an accepted Lambda-CDM paradigm (with a cosmological constant and cold dark matter). The talk stressed on the fact that all these parameters are understood to a percent order precision, which is a remarkable deviation from the time in 1990s when according to Risa, Alan Guth never thought that any of these numbers could be measured precisely!Risa Wechsler describing our current constraints on what Dark Matter could constitute.Joseph Silk discussing limits on cosmological parameters.The CMB measurements, Big Bang Nucleosynthesis estimates and galaxy clustering statistics all contribute to locking down the description of our universe. She emphasized on the tensions between different probes to measure expansion rate H0 of the universe, and small scale predictions of cold dark matter simulations, but she is hopeful that these shall be resolved eventually. Joe Silk followed this up with his interpretation of trying to understand our place in the universe and placing limits on different parameters and

  16. Enterococcus faecalis lipoteichoic acid suppresses Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans lipopolysaccharide-induced IL-8 expression in human periodontal ligament cells.

    PubMed

    Im, Jintaek; Baik, Jung Eun; Kim, Kyoung Whun; Kang, Seok-Seong; Jeon, Jun Ho; Park, Ok-Jin; Kim, Hyun Young; Kum, Kee-Yeon; Yun, Cheol-Heui; Han, Seung Hyun

    2015-08-01

    Periodontitis is caused by multi-bacterial infection and Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans and Enterococcus faecalis are closely associated with inflammatory periodontal diseases. Although lipopolysaccharide (LPS) of A. actinomycetemcomitans (Aa.LPS) and lipoteichoic acid of E. faecalis (Ef.LTA) are considered to be major virulence factors evoking inflammatory responses, their combinatorial effect on the induction of chemokines has not been investigated. In this study, we investigated the interaction between Aa.LPS and Ef.LTA on IL-8 expression in human periodontal ligament (PDL) cells. Aa.LPS, but not Ef.LTA, substantially induced IL-8 expression at the protein and mRNA levels. Interestingly, Ef.LTA suppressed Aa.LPS-induced IL-8 expression without affecting the binding of Aa.LPS to Toll-like receptor (TLR) 4. Ef.LTA reduced Aa.LPS-induced phosphorylation of mitogen-activated protein kinases, including ERK, JNK and p38 kinase. Furthermore, Ef.LTA inhibited the Aa.LPS-induced transcriptional activities of the activating protein 1, CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein and nuclear factor-kappa B transcription factors, all of which are known to regulate IL-8 gene expression. Ef.LTA augmented the expression of IL-1 receptor-associated kinase-M (IRAK-M), a negative regulator of TLR intracellular signaling pathways, in the presence of Aa.LPS at both the mRNA and protein levels. Small interfering RNA silencing IRAK-M reversed the attenuation of Aa.LPS-induced IL-8 expression by Ef.LTA. Collectively, these results suggest that Ef.LTA down-regulates Aa.LPS-induced IL-8 expression in human PDL cells through up-regulation of the negative regulator IRAK-M. PMID:25840438

  17. Aristolochic acid-induced apoptosis and G2 cell cycle arrest depends on ROS generation and MAP kinases activation.

    PubMed

    Romanov, Victor; Whyard, Terry C; Waltzer, Wayne C; Grollman, Arthur P; Rosenquist, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Ingestion of aristolochic acids (AAs) contained in herbal remedies results in a renal disease and, frequently, urothelial malignancy. The genotoxicity of AA in renal cells, including mutagenic DNA adducts formation, is well documented. However, the mechanisms of AA-induced tubular atrophy and renal fibrosis are largely unknown. To better elucidate some aspects of this process, we studied cell cycle distribution and cell survival of renal epithelial cells treated with AAI at low and high doses. A low dose of AA induces cell cycle arrest in G2/M phase via activation of DNA damage checkpoint pathway ATM-Chk2-p53-p21. DNA damage signaling pathway is activated more likely via increased production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) caused by AA treatment then via DNA damage induced directly by AA. Higher AA concentration induced cell death partly via apoptosis. Since mitogen-activated protein kinases play an important role in cell survival, death and cell cycle progression, we assayed their function in AA-treated renal tubular epithelial cells. ERK1/2 and p38 but not JNK were activated in cells treated with AA. In addition, pharmacological inhibition of ERK1/2 and p38 as well as suppression of ROS generation with N-acetyl-L-cysteine resulted in the partial relief of cells from G2/M checkpoint and a decline of apoptosis level. Cell cycle arrest may be a mechanism for DNA repair, cell survival and reprogramming of epithelial cells to the fibroblast type. An apoptosis of renal epithelial cells at higher AA dose might be necessary to provide space for newly reprogrammed fibrotic cells. PMID:24792323

  18. Arsenic Metabolites, Including N-Acetyl-4-hydroxy-m-arsanilic Acid, in Chicken Litter from a Roxarsone-Feeding Study Involving 1600 Chickens.

    PubMed

    Yang, Zonglin; Peng, Hanyong; Lu, Xiufen; Liu, Qingqing; Huang, Rongfu; Hu, Bin; Kachanoski, Gary; Zuidhof, Martin J; Le, X Chris

    2016-07-01

    The poultry industry has used organoarsenicals, such as 3-nitro-4-hydroxyphenylarsonic acid (Roxarsone, ROX), to prevent disease and to promote growth. Although previous studies have analyzed arsenic species in chicken litter after composting or after application to agricultural lands, it is not clear what arsenic species were excreted by chickens before biotransformation of arsenic species during composting. We describe here the identification and quantitation of arsenic species in chicken litter repeatedly collected on days 14, 24, 28, 30, and 35 of a Roxarsone-feeding study involving 1600 chickens of two strains. High performance liquid chromatography separation with simultaneous detection by both inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry and electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry provided complementary information necessary for the identification and quantitation of arsenic species. A new metabolite, N-acetyl-4-hydroxy-m-arsanilic acid (N-AHAA), was identified, and it accounted for 3-12% of total arsenic. Speciation analyses of litter samples collected from ROX-fed chickens on days 14, 24, 28, 30, and 35 showed the presence of N-AHAA, 3-amino-4-hydroxyphenylarsonic acid (3-AHPAA), inorganic arsenite (As(III)), arsenate (As(V)), monomethylarsonic acid (MMA(V)), dimethylarsinic acid (DMA(V)), and ROX. 3-AHPAA accounted for 3-19% of the total arsenic. Inorganic arsenicals (the sum of As(III) and As(V)) comprised 2-6% (mean 3.5%) of total arsenic. Our results on the detection of inorganic arsenicals, methylarsenicals, 3-AHPAA, and N-AHAA in the chicken litter support recent findings that ROX is actually metabolized by the chicken or its gut microbiome. The presence of the toxic metabolites in chicken litter is environmentally relevant as chicken litter is commonly used as fertilizer. PMID:26876684

  19. Laboratory Astrophysics Division of The AAS (LAD)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salama, Farid; Drake, R. P.; Federman, S. R.; Haxton, W. C.; Savin, D. W.

    2012-10-01

    The purpose of the Laboratory Astrophysics Division (LAD) is to advance our understanding of the Universe through the promotion of fundamental theoretical and experimental research into the underlying processes that drive the Cosmos. LAD represents all areas of astrophysics and planetary sciences. The first new AAS Division in more than 30 years, the LAD traces its history back to the recommendation from the scientific community via the White Paper from the 2006 NASA-sponsored Laboratory Astrophysics Workshop. This recommendation was endorsed by the Astronomy and Astrophysics Advisory Committee (AAAC), which advises the National Science Foundation (NSF), the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) on selected issues within the fields of astronomy and astrophysics that are of mutual interest and concern to the agencies. In January 2007, at the 209th AAS meeting, the AAS Council set up a Steering Committee to formulate Bylaws for a Working Group on Laboratory Astrophysics (WGLA). The AAS Council formally established the WGLA with a five-year mandate in May 2007, at the 210th AAS meeting. From 2008 through 2012, the WGLA annually sponsored Meetings in-a-Meeting at the AAS Summer Meetings. In May 2011, at the 218th AAS meeting, the AAS Council voted to convert the WGLA, at the end of its mandate, into a Division of the AAS and requested draft Bylaws from the Steering Committee. In January 2012, at the 219th AAS Meeting, the AAS Council formally approved the Bylaws and the creation of the LAD. The inaugural gathering and the first business meeting of the LAD were held at the 220th AAS meeting in Anchorage in June 2012. You can learn more about LAD by visiting its website at http://lad.aas.org/ and by subscribing to its mailing list.

  20. Laboratory Astrophysics Division of the AAS (LAD)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salama, Farid; Drake, R. P.; Federman, S. R.; Haxton, W. C.; Savin, D. W.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of the Laboratory Astrophysics Division (LAD) is to advance our understanding of the Universe through the promotion of fundamental theoretical and experimental research into the underlying processes that drive the Cosmos. LAD represents all areas of astrophysics and planetary sciences. The first new AAS Division in more than 30 years, the LAD traces its history back to the recommendation from the scientific community via the White Paper from the 2006 NASA-sponsored Laboratory Astrophysics Workshop. This recommendation was endorsed by the Astronomy and Astrophysics Advisory Committee (AAAC), which advises the National Science Foundation (NSF), the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) on selected issues within the fields of astronomy and astrophysics that are of mutual interest and concern to the agencies. In January 2007, at the 209th AAS meeting, the AAS Council set up a Steering Committee to formulate Bylaws for a Working Group on Laboratory Astrophysics (WGLA). The AAS Council formally established the WGLA with a five-year mandate in May 2007, at the 210th AAS meeting. From 2008 through 2012, the WGLA annually sponsored Meetings in-a-Meeting at the AAS Summer Meetings. In May 2011, at the 218th AAS meeting, the AAS Council voted to convert the WGLA, at the end of its mandate, into a Division of the AAS and requested draft Bylaws from the Steering Committee. In January 2012, at the 219th AAS Meeting, the AAS Council formally approved the Bylaws and the creation of the LAD. The inaugural gathering and the first business meeting of the LAD were held at the 220th AAS meeting in Anchorage in June 2012. You can learn more about LAD by visiting its website at http://lad.aas.org/ and by subscribing to its mailing list.

  1. Dependence of intestinal amino acid uptake on dietary protein or amino acid levels

    SciTech Connect

    Karasov, W.H.; Solberg, D.H.; Diamond, J.M.

    1987-05-01

    To understand how intestinal amino acid (AA) transport is regulated by dietary substrate levels, the authors measured uptake of seven radioactively-labelled AAs and glucose across the jejunal brush-border membrane of mice kept on one of three isocaloric rations differing in nitrogen content. In the high-protein ration, uptake increased by 77-81% for the nonessential, less toxic AAs, proline, and aspartate but only by 32-61% for the more toxic essential AAs tested. In the nitrogen-deficient ration, uptake decreased for the nonessential aspartate and proline but stayed constant or increased for essential AAs and for the nonessential alanine. These patterns imply independent regulation of the intestine's various AA transporters. With decreasing dietary AA (or protein), the imino acid and acidic AA private transporters are repressed, while activities of the basic AA transporter and the neutral AA public transporter decrease to an asymptote or else go through a minimum. These regulatory patterns can be understood as a compromise among conflicting constraints imposed by protein's multiple roles as a source of calories, nitrogen, and essential AAs and by the toxicity of essential AAs at high concentrations.

  2. AAS 228: Day 2 afternoon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2016-06-01

    Editors Note:This week were at the 228th AAS Meeting in San Diego, CA. Along with a team ofauthors from astrobites.com, I will bewritingupdates on selectedevents at themeeting and posting twiceeach day. Follow along here or atastrobites.com, or catch ourlive-tweeted updates from the@astrobites Twitter account. The usual posting schedule for AAS Nova will resumenext week.The Limits of Scientific Cosmology: Setting the Stage: Accepted Facts, and Testing Limitations in Theory and Data (by Gourav Khullar)With a stellar lineup of speakers to talk about current and future prospects of cosmology and its limits (or lack thereof), the first session kicked off with talks by Risa Wechsler, Joseph Silk, and Sean Carroll (his talk on Multiverses is described below, by Nathan Sanders). Risa set the stage with an elaborate description of the current accepted facts in the era of precision cosmology including the standard model of concordance cosmology, described by seven parameters and an accepted Lambda-CDM paradigm (with a cosmological constant and cold dark matter). The talk stressed on the fact that all these parameters are understood to a percent order precision, which is a remarkable deviation from the time in 1990s when according to Risa, Alan Guth never thought that any of these numbers could be measured precisely!Risa Wechsler describing our current constraints on what Dark Matter could constitute.Joseph Silk discussing limits on cosmological parameters.The CMB measurements, Big Bang Nucleosynthesis estimates and galaxy clustering statistics all contribute to locking down the description of our universe. She emphasized on the tensions between different probes to measure expansion rate H0 of the universe, and small scale predictions of cold dark matter simulations, but she is hopeful that these shall be resolved eventually. Joe Silk followed this up with his interpretation of trying to understand our place in the universe and placing limits on different parameters and

  3. Constitutive behavior of as-cast AA1050, AA3104, and AA5182

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Haaften, W. M.; Magnin, B.; Kool, W. H.; Katgerman, L.

    2002-07-01

    Recent thermomechanical modeling to calculate the stress field in industrially direct-chill (DC) cast-aluminum slabs has been successful, but lack of material data limits the accuracy of these calculations. Therefore, the constitutive behavior of three aluminum alloys (AA1050, AA3104, and AA5182) was determined in the as-cast condition using tensile tests at low strain rates and from room temperature to solidus temperature. The parameters of two constitutive equations, the extended Ludwik equation and a combination of the Sellars-Tegart equation with a hardening law, were determined. In order to study the effect of recovery, the constitutive behavior after prestraining at higher temperatures was also investigated. To evaluate the quantified constitutive equations, tensile tests were performed simulating the deformation and cooling history experienced by the material during casting. It is concluded that both constitutive equations perform well, but the combined hardening-Sellars-Tegart (HST) equation has temperature-independent parameters, which makes it easier to implement in a DC casting model. Further, the deformation history of the ingot should be taken into account for accurate stress calculations.

  4. Diet quality influences isotopic discrimination among amino acids in an aquatic vertebrate.

    PubMed

    Chikaraishi, Yoshito; Steffan, Shawn A; Takano, Yoshinori; Ohkouchi, Naohiko

    2015-05-01

    Stable nitrogen isotopic composition of amino acids (δ (15)NAA) has recently been employed as a powerful tool in ecological food web studies, particularly for estimating the trophic position (TP) of animal species in food webs. However, the validity of these estimates depends on the consistency of the trophic discrimination factor (TDF; - Δδ (15)NAA at each shift of trophic level) among a suite of amino acids within the tissues of consumer species. In this study, we determined the TDF values of amino acids in tadpoles (the Japanese toad, Bufo japonicus) reared exclusively on one of three diets that differed in nutritional quality. The diets were commercial fish-food pellets (plant and animal biomass), bloodworms (animal biomass), and boiled white rice (plant carbohydrate), representing a balanced, protein-rich, and protein-poor diet, respectively. The TDF values of two "source amino acids" (Src-AAs), methionine and phenylalanine, were close to zero (0.3-0.5‰) among the three diets, typifying the values reported in the literature (∼0.5‰ and ∼0.4‰, respectively). However, TDF values of "trophic amino acids" (Tr-AAs) including alanine, valine, leucine, isoleucine, and glutamic acid varied by diet: for example, the glutamic acid TDF was similar to the standard value (∼8.0‰) when tadpoles were fed either the commercial pellets (8.0‰) or bloodworms (7.9‰), but when they were fed boiled rice, the TDF was significantly reduced (0.6‰). These results suggest that a profound lack of dietary protein may alter the TDF values of glutamic acid (and other Tr-AAs and glycine) within consumer species, but not the two Src-AAs (i.e., methionine and phenylalanine). Knowledge of how a nutritionally poor diet can influence the TDF of Tr- and Src-AAs will allow amino acid isotopic analyses to better estimate TP among free-roaming animals. PMID:26045955

  5. Sex Differences in the Association between the Eicosapentaenoic Acid/Arachidonic Acid Ratio and the Visceral Fat Area among Patients with Type 2 Diabetes.

    PubMed

    Nakanishi, Shuhei; Nagano, Chihiro; Miyahara, Mitsue; Sawano, Fumio

    2016-01-01

    Objective To examine the serum levels of eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and the ratios of docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), and the EPA/arachidonic acid (AA) and DHA/AA and to clarify their association with the areas of subcutaneous and visceral fat separately by sex among patients with type 2 diabetes. Methods The study participants included 118 men and 96 women who were hospitalized to receive treatment for type 2 diabetes. We examined the serum levels of EPA and DHA and the ratios of EPA/AA and DHA/AA, and analyzed their association with the total fat area (TFA), subcutaneous fat area (SFA), and visceral fat area (VFA), as measured by computed tomography. Results The mean age of the study participants was 62.6±13.6 years. The mean HbA1c level was 9.37±2.27%. Among men, a multivariate regression analysis adjusted for age and BMI, revealed a significant negative association between VFA and the EPA/AA ratio. When the multivariate regression analysis was adjusted for age, BMI, and HbA1c level, VFA was still found to be significantly negatively associated with the EPA/AA ratio. Although a crude analysis revealed a significant negative association between SFA and the EPA/AA ratio in women, no association was observed in multivariate regression analyses. Conclusion These results suggest the possibility that EPA inhibits the accumulation of visceral fat in men. Furthermore, there appear to be marked differences in the relationships between EPA and DHA and visceral fat accumulation. PMID:27181531

  6. Effect of including carob pulp in the diet of fattening pigs on the fatty acid composition and oxidative stability of pork.

    PubMed

    Inserra, L; Luciano, G; Bella, M; Scerra, M; Cilione, C; Basile, P; Lanza, M; Priolo, A

    2015-02-01

    The effect of feeding pigs with carob pulp on meat quality was investigated. Nine pigs were finished on a conventional concentrate-based diet (control), while two groups received a diet comprising of the same ingredients with the inclusion of 8% or 15% carob pulp (Carob 8% and Carob 15%, respectively). Feeding carob-containing diets reduced the concentration of saturated fatty acids in the muscle, increased the concentration of monounsaturated fatty acids in meat (P < 0.01) and of n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) and reduced the n-6/n-3 PUFA ratio (P < 0.001). The meat underwent slow oxidative deterioration over 9 days of storage. However, the Carob 15% treatment increased meat susceptibility to lipid oxidation across storage (P = 0.03), while the dietary treatment did not affect meat colour stability. In conclusion, feeding pigs with carob pulp could represent a strategy,in the Mediterranean areas, to naturally improve meat nutritional value and to promote the exploitation of this local feed resource. PMID:25460134

  7. Transmission of systemic AA amyloidosis in animals.

    PubMed

    Murakami, T; Ishiguro, N; Higuchi, K

    2014-03-01

    Amyloidoses are a group of protein-misfolding disorders that are characterized by the deposition of amyloid fibrils in organs and/or tissues. In reactive amyloid A (AA) amyloidosis, serum AA (SAA) protein forms deposits in mice, domestic and wild animals, and humans that experience chronic inflammation. AA amyloid fibrils are abnormal β-sheet-rich forms of the serum precursor SAA, with conformational changes that promote fibril formation. Extracellular deposition of amyloid fibrils causes disease in affected animals. Recent findings suggest that AA amyloidosis could be transmissible. Similar to the pathogenesis of transmissible prion diseases, amyloid fibrils induce a seeding-nucleation process that may lead to development of AA amyloidosis. We review studies of possible transmission in bovine, avian, mouse, and cheetah AA amyloidosis. PMID:24280941

  8. 47 CFR 1.9005 - Included services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... to 47 CFR 90.187(b)(2)(v)); (z) The 218-219 MHz band (part 95 of this chapter); (aa) The Local... Spectrum Leasing Scope and Authority § 1.9005 Included services. The spectrum leasing policies and rules...

  9. 47 CFR 1.9005 - Included services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... to 47 CFR 90.187(b)(2)(v)); (z) The 218-219 MHz band (part 95 of this chapter); (aa) The Local... Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION GENERAL PRACTICE AND PROCEDURE Spectrum Leasing Scope and Authority § 1.9005 Included services. The spectrum leasing policies and rules of this subpart apply to...

  10. 47 CFR 1.9005 - Included services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... to 47 CFR 90.187(b)(2)(v)); (z) The 218-219 MHz band (part 95 of this chapter); (aa) The Local... Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION GENERAL PRACTICE AND PROCEDURE Spectrum Leasing Scope and Authority § 1.9005 Included services. The spectrum leasing policies and rules of this subpart apply to...

  11. 47 CFR 1.9005 - Included services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... to 47 CFR 90.187(b)(2)(v)); (z) The 218-219 MHz band (part 95 of this chapter); (aa) The Local... Spectrum Leasing Scope and Authority § 1.9005 Included services. The spectrum leasing policies and rules...

  12. New in vitro insights on a cell death pathway induced by magnolol and honokiol in aristolochic acid tubulotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Bunel, Valérian; Antoine, Marie-Hélène; Stévigny, Caroline; Nortier, Joëlle; Duez, Pierre

    2016-01-01

    Aristolochic acids (AA) are nephrotoxic agents found in Aristolochia species whose consumption leads to the onset of a progressive tubulointerstitial fibrosis. This AA-nephropathy was first reported during the Belgian outbreak of the 1990's in which more than a hundred patients consumed slimming pills containing an Aristolochia species and Magnolia officinalis. The patients developed an end-stage kidney disease requiring dialysis or transplantation. Magnolol and honokiol are bioactive compounds from M. officinalis known for their potent antioxidant activity. As they can alleviate oxidative stress, we investigated their respective effects on AA-mediated tubulotoxicity using HK-2 cells. Magnolol and honokiol were able to reduce the oxidative stress associated with AA-treatment. Cytotoxicity alleviation was further investigated and overall cell viability measurements unexpectedly revealed that both compounds worsened the survival of AA-treated cells. Flow cytometry analyses of annexin V/PI stained cells indicated that the lignans efficiently prevented AA-induced apoptosis; but favored necrosis. Microscopy observations highlighted extensive vacuolization; other types of cell death, including autophagy, paraptosis or accelerated senescence were excluded. Ki-67 index and cell cycle analysis indicated that both magnolol and honokiol inhibited proliferation by blocking the cell cycle at the G1 phase; they also prevented the AA-induced G2/M arrest. PMID:26631295

  13. States' Participation Guidelines for Alternate Assessments Based on Modified Academic Achievement Standards (AA-MAS) in 2009. Synthesis Report 75

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lazarus, Sheryl S.; Hodgson, Jennifer; Thurlow, Martha L.

    2010-01-01

    All students, including students with disabilities, must be included in state accountability systems as required by law. In April 2007, federal regulations provided states the flexibility to offer another assessment option--an Alternate Assessment based on Modified Achievement Standards (AA-MAS) for some students with disabilities. The AA-MAS is…

  14. Gamma-linolenic acid, Dihommo-gamma linolenic, Eicosanoids and Inflammatory Processes.

    PubMed

    Sergeant, Susan; Rahbar, Elaheh; Chilton, Floyd H

    2016-08-15

    Gamma-linolenic acid (GLA, 18:3n-6) is an omega-6 (n-6), 18 carbon (18C-) polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA) found in human milk and several botanical seed oils and is typically consumed as part of a dietary supplement. While there have been numerous in vitro and in vivo animal models which illustrate that GLA-supplemented diets attenuate inflammatory responses, clinical studies utilizing GLA or GLA in combination with omega-3 (n-3) PUFAs have been much less conclusive. A central premise of this review is that there are critical metabolic and genetic factors that affect the conversion of GLA to dihommo-gamma linolenic acid (DGLA, 20:3n-6) and arachidonic acid (AA, 20:4n-6), which consequently affects the balance of DGLA- and AA- derived metabolites. As a result, these factors impact the clinical effectiveness of GLA or GLA/(n-3) PUFA supplementations in treating inflammatory conditions. Specifically, these factors include: 1) the capacity for different human cells and tissues to convert GLA to DGLA and AA and to metabolize DGLA and AA to bioactive metabolites; 2) the opposing effects of DGLA and AA metabolites on inflammatory processes and diseases; and 3) the impact of genetic variations within the fatty acid desaturase (FADS) gene cluster, in particular, on AA/DGLA ratios and bioactive metabolites. We postulate that these factors influence the heterogeneity of results observed in GLA supplement-based clinical trials and suggest that "one-size fits all" approaches utilizing PUFA-based supplements may no longer be appropriate for the prevention and treatment of complex human diseases. PMID:27083549

  15. AAS 228: Day 3 afternoon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2016-06-01

    Editors Note:This week were at the 228th AAS Meeting in San Diego, CA. Along with a team ofauthors from astrobites.com, I will bewritingupdates on selectedevents at themeeting and posting twiceeach day. Follow along here or atastrobites.com, or catch ourlive-tweeted updates from the@astrobites Twitter account. The usual posting schedule for AAS Nova will resumenext week.Wikipedia Year of Science Editathon (by Meredith Rawls)Whats your first go-to source for an unfamiliar topic on the internet? If you said Wikipedia, youre not alone. For many people, Wikipedia is the primary source of information about astronomy and science. However, many Wikipedia articles about science topics are incomplete or missing, and women are underrepresented among scientists with biographies.To address this, the AAS Astronomy Education Board teamed up with the Wiki Education Foundation to host an edit-a-thon as part of the Wikipedia Year of Science. More than forty attendees spent the better part of three hours working through tutorials, creating new articles, and editing existing ones. The session was generously sponsored by the Simons Foundation.The Year of Science initiative seeks to bring Wikipedia editing skills to the classroom and help new editors find sustainable ways to contribute to Wikipedia in the long term. Anybody can create a free account and start editing!As a first-time Wikipedia contributor, I took the time to go through nearly all the tutorial exercises and familiarize myself with the process of editing a page. I decided to flesh out one section in an existing page about asteroseismology. Others created biography pages from scratch or selected various astronomical topics to write about. To me, the editing process felt like a cross between writing a blog post and a journal article, in a hack day type environment. Working through the tutorial and some examples renewed my empathy for learners who are tackling a new skill set for the first time. A full summary of our

  16. Bacillus thuringiensis subsp. israelensis Cyt1Aa synergizes Cry11Aa toxin by functioning as a membrane-bound receptor.

    PubMed

    Pérez, Claudia; Fernandez, Luisa E; Sun, Jianguang; Folch, Jorge Luis; Gill, Sarjeet S; Soberón, Mario; Bravo, Alejandra

    2005-12-20

    Bacillus thuringiensis subsp. israelensis produces crystal proteins, Cry (4Aa, 4Ba, 10Aa, and 11Aa) and Cyt (1Aa and 2Ba) proteins, toxic to mosquito vectors of human diseases. Cyt1Aa overcomes insect resistance to Cry11Aa and Cry4 toxins and synergizes the toxicity of these toxins. However, the molecular mechanism of synergism remains unsolved. Here, we provide evidence that Cyt1Aa functions as a receptor of Cry11Aa. Sequential-binding analysis of Cyt1Aa and Cry11Aa revealed that Cyt1Aa binding to Aedes aegypti brush border membrane vesicles enhanced the binding of biotinylated-Cry11Aa. The Cyt1Aa- and Cry11Aa-binding epitopes were mapped by means of the yeast two-hybrid system, peptide arrays, and heterologous competition assays with synthetic peptides. Two exposed regions in Cyt1Aa, loop beta6-alphaE and part of beta7, bind Cry11Aa. On the other side, Cry11Aa binds Cyt1Aa proteins by means of domain II-loop alpha8 and beta-4, which are also involved in midgut receptor interaction. Characterization of single-point mutations in Cry11Aa and Cyt1Aa revealed key Cry11Aa (S259 and E266) and Cyt1Aa (K198, E204 and K225) residues involved in the interaction of both proteins and in synergism. Additionally, a Cyt1Aa loop beta6-alphaE mutant (K198A) with enhanced synergism to Cry11Aa was isolated. Data provided here strongly indicates that Cyt1Aa synergizes or suppresses resistance to Cry11Aa toxin by functioning as a membrane-bound receptor. Bacillus thuringiensis subsp. israelensis is a highly effective pathogenic bacterium because it produces a toxin and also its functional receptor, promoting toxin binding to the target membrane and causing toxicity. PMID:16339907

  17. AAS 228: Day 3 afternoon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2016-06-01

    Editors Note:This week were at the 228th AAS Meeting in San Diego, CA. Along with a team ofauthors from astrobites.com, I will bewritingupdates on selectedevents at themeeting and posting twiceeach day. Follow along here or atastrobites.com, or catch ourlive-tweeted updates from the@astrobites Twitter account. The usual posting schedule for AAS Nova will resumenext week.Wikipedia Year of Science Editathon (by Meredith Rawls)Whats your first go-to source for an unfamiliar topic on the internet? If you said Wikipedia, youre not alone. For many people, Wikipedia is the primary source of information about astronomy and science. However, many Wikipedia articles about science topics are incomplete or missing, and women are underrepresented among scientists with biographies.To address this, the AAS Astronomy Education Board teamed up with the Wiki Education Foundation to host an edit-a-thon as part of the Wikipedia Year of Science. More than forty attendees spent the better part of three hours working through tutorials, creating new articles, and editing existing ones. The session was generously sponsored by the Simons Foundation.The Year of Science initiative seeks to bring Wikipedia editing skills to the classroom and help new editors find sustainable ways to contribute to Wikipedia in the long term. Anybody can create a free account and start editing!As a first-time Wikipedia contributor, I took the time to go through nearly all the tutorial exercises and familiarize myself with the process of editing a page. I decided to flesh out one section in an existing page about asteroseismology. Others created biography pages from scratch or selected various astronomical topics to write about. To me, the editing process felt like a cross between writing a blog post and a journal article, in a hack day type environment. Working through the tutorial and some examples renewed my empathy for learners who are tackling a new skill set for the first time. A full summary of our

  18. Toward Radiocarbon Measurement of Individual Amino Acids in Marine Dissolved Organic Matter (DOM): Δ14C Blank Quantification for an HPLC Purification Method.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bour, A. L.; Broek, T.; Walker, B. D.; Mccarthy, M. D.

    2014-12-01

    The presence of much of the marine dissolved organic nitrogen (DON) pool as uncharacterized, biologically recalcitrant molecules is a central mystery in the marine nitrogen cycle. Radiocarbon (Δ14C) isotopic measurements have been perhaps the most important data constraining the cycling of dissolved organic matter (DOM), but little Δ14C data specific to DON is available. Amino acids (AAs) are the major component of DON that can be isolated on a molecular level. Δ14C measurements for the operational "protein-like" fraction of DOM in the deep ocean indicate that this compound class has radiocarbon ages greater than several ocean mixing cycles, suggesting remarkable preservation of labile AAs exported from the surface. However, it is possible that the previously defined operational "protein-like" fraction may also contain non-AA material. Radiocarbon measurement of purified individual AAs would provide a more direct and reliable proxy for DON Δ14C age and cycling rate. We present here Δ14C blank characterization of an AA purification method based on HPLC, with on-line fraction collection. This method allows the recovery of unmodified AAs, but accurate measurement of small AA samples that can be extracted from DOM requires a system with extremely low Δ 14C blanks. Here we assess the impact of HPLC purification on the Δ14C age of known amino acids standards. Individual AA standards with contrasting (modern vs. dead) and well- characterized Δ14C ages were processed in a range of sample sizes. The eluted peaks were collected and dried, and measurement of their post-chromatography Δ14C content allowed for determination of the Δ14C blank by method of additions. The same protocol was applied to a mixture of six AA standards, to evaluate tailing effects in consecutive AA peaks of contrasting Δ14C age. AA standards were selected to include both Δ14C modern and dead AAs that elute both early and late in the chromatographic solvent program. We discuss implications

  19. Interface Formation During Fusion™ Casting of AA3003/AA4045 Aluminum Alloy Ingots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Ciano, Massimo; Caron, E. J. F. R.; Weckman, D. C.; Wells, M. A.

    2015-12-01

    Fusion™ casting is a unique Direct Chill continuous casting process whereby two different alloys can be cast simultaneously, producing a laminated ingot for rolling into clad sheet metal such as AA3003/AA4045 brazing sheet. Better understanding of the wetting and interface formation process during Fusion™ casting is required to further improve process yields and also explore use of other alloy systems for new applications. In this research, AA3003-core/AA4045-clad ingots were cast using a well-instrumented lab-scale Fusion™ casting system. As-cast Fusion™ interfaces were examined metallurgically and by mechanical testing. Computational fluid dynamic analyses of the FusionTM casts were also performed. It was shown that the liquid AA4045-clad alloy was able to successfully wet and create an oxide-free, metallurgical, and mechanically sound interface with the lightly oxidized AA3003-core shell material. Based on the results of this study, it is proposed that the bond formation process at the alloys interface during casting is a result of discrete penetration of AA4045 liquid at defects in the preexisting AA3003 oxide, dissolution of underlying AA3003 by liquid AA4045, and subsequent bridging between penetration sites. Spot exudation on the AA3003 chill cast surface due to remelting and inverse segregation may also improve the wetting and bonding process.

  20. New members of the brachyurins family in lobster include a trypsin-like enzyme with amino acid substitutions in the substrate-binding pocket.

    PubMed

    Perera, Erick; Pons, Tirso; Hernandez, Damir; Moyano, Francisco J; Martínez-Rodríguez, Gonzalo; Mancera, Juan M

    2010-09-01

    Crustacean serine proteases (Brachyurins, EC 3.4.21.32) exhibit a wide variety of primary specificities and no member of this family has been reported for spiny lobsters. The aim of this work was to study the diversity of trypsins in the digestive gland of Panulirus argus. Several trypsin-like proteases were cloned and the results suggest that at least three gene families encode trypsins in the lobster. Three-dimensional comparative models of each trypsin anticipated differences in the interaction of these enzymes with proteinaceous substrates and inhibitors. Most of the studied enzymes were typical trypsins, but one could not be allocated to any of the brachyurins groups due to amino acid substitutions found in the vicinity of the active site. Among other changes in this form of the enzyme, conserved Gly216 and Gly226 (chymotrypsin numbering) are substituted by Leu and Pro, respectively, while retaining all other key residues for trypsin specificity. These substitutions may impair the access of bulky residues to the S1 site while they make the pocket more hydrophobic. The physiological role of this form of the enzyme could be relevant as it was found to be highly expressed in lobster. Further studies on the specificity and structure of this variant must be performed to locate it within the brachyurins family. It is suggested that specificity within this family of enzymes is broader than is currently believed. PMID:20649906

  1. Osteogenesis from Dental Pulp Derived Stem Cells: A Novel Conditioned Medium Including Melatonin within a Mixture of Hyaluronic, Butyric, and Retinoic Acids

    PubMed Central

    Maioli, Margherita; Basoli, Valentina; Santaniello, Sara; Cruciani, Sara; Delitala, Alessandro Palmerio; Pinna, Roberto; Milia, Egle; Grillari-Voglauer, Regina; Fontani, Vania; Rinaldi, Salvatore; Muggironi, Roberta; Pigliaru, Gianfranco; Ventura, Carlo

    2016-01-01

    Human dental pulp stem cells (hDPSCs) have shown relevant potential for cell therapy in the orthopedic and odontoiatric fields. The optimization of their osteogenic potential is currently a major challenge. Vascular endothelial growth factor A (VEGF A) has been recently reported to act as a major conductor of osteogenesis in vitro and in vivo. Here, we attempted to prime endogenous VEGF A expression without the need for viral vector mediated gene transfer technologies. We show that hDPSCs exposure to a mixture of hyaluronic, butyric, and retinoic acids (HA + BU + RA) induced the transcription of a gene program of osteogenesis and the acquirement of an osteogenic lineage. Such response was also elicited by cell exposure to melatonin, a pleiotropic agent that recently emerged as a remarkable osteogenic inducer. Interestingly, the commitment to the osteogenic fate was synergistically enhanced by the combinatorial exposure to a conditioned medium containing both melatonin and HA + BU + RA. These in vitro results suggest that in vivo osteogenesis might be improved and further studies are needed. PMID:26880937

  2. AaCAT1 of the Yellow Fever Mosquito, Aedes aegypti

    PubMed Central

    Hansen, Immo A.; Boudko, Dmitri Y.; Shiao, Shin-Hong; Voronov, Dmitri A.; Meleshkevitch, Ella A.; Drake, Lisa L.; Aguirre, Sarah E.; Fox, Jeffrey M.; Attardo, Geoffrey M.; Raikhel, Alexander S.

    2011-01-01

    Insect yolk protein precursor gene expression is regulated by nutritional and endocrine signals. A surge of amino acids in the hemolymph of blood-fed female mosquitoes activates a nutrient signaling system in the fat bodies, which subsequently derepresses yolk protein precursor genes and makes them responsive to activation by steroid hormones. Orphan transporters of the SLC7 family were identified as essential upstream components of the nutrient signaling system in the fat body of fruit flies and the yellow fever mosquito, Aedes aegypti. However, the transport function of these proteins was unknown. We report expression and functional characterization of AaCAT1, cloned from the fat body of A. aegypti. Expression of AaCAT1 transcript and protein undergoes dynamic changes during postembryonic development of the mosquito. Transcript expression was especially high in the third and fourth larval stages; however, the AaCAT1 protein was detected only in pupa and adult stages. Functional expression and analysis of AaCAT1 in Xenopus oocytes revealed that it acts as a sodium-independent cationic amino acid transporter, with unique selectivity to l-histidine at neutral pH (K0.5l-His = 0.34 ± 0.07 mm, pH 7.2). Acidification to pH 6.2 dramatically increases AaCAT1-specific His+-induced current. RNAi-mediated silencing of AaCAT1 reduces egg yield of subsequent ovipositions. Our data show that AaCAT1 has notable differences in its transport mechanism when compared with related mammalian cationic amino acid transporters. It may execute histidine-specific transport and signaling in mosquito tissues. PMID:21262963

  3. Theophylline-7-acetic acid: lack of absorption and therapeutic effectiveness.

    PubMed Central

    Fleetham, J A; Owen, J A; May, B; Munt, P W; Nakatsu, K

    1979-01-01

    A double-blind cross-over trial was conducted to evaluate the effectiveness of oral theophylline-7-acetic acid (T7AA) in 13 asthmatic patients. Pulmonary function tests showed no difference between T7AA and placebo. No T7AA or theophylline was found in the sera of these patients or of healthy volunteers who took T7AA tablets or syrup. PMID:388714

  4. A fluorescence-based demonstration of intestinal villi and epithelial cell in chickens fed dietary silicic acid powder including bamboo vinegar compound liquid.

    PubMed

    Ruttanavut, J; Matsumoto, Y; Yamauchi, K

    2012-10-01

    This study investigates the combined effect of silicic acid and bamboo vinegar compound liquid (SPV) on the growth and intestinal histological alterations in poultry. Forty-eight 7-day-old male Sanuki Cochin chickens were fed a commercial mash diet supplemented with SPV at 0, 0.1, 0.2, and 0.3% level ad libitum for 112 days. Body weight gain tended to improve with increased concentrations of dietary SPV, although these results were not statistically significant (P<0.1). Tissue observation by light microscopy revealed that the jejunal villus height (P<0.01) and duodenal and jejunal villus area (P<0.05) increased in the 0.2 and 0.3% SPV groups, respectively, compared with the control. Cell mitosis within the duodenum and jejunum also increased in the 0.2 and 0.3% SPV groups. Scanning electron microscopy revealed a prominent increase in the number of protuberant cells on the villus apical surface of the duodenum and jejunum for the 0.2 and 0.3% SPV groups compared with the control. Poultry in the 0.3% SPV group had the highest body weight gain and hypertrophied histological alterations of intestinal villi. Fluorescent microscopic images of cell mitosis and protuberant cells in the duodenal crypt clearly confirmed positive reactions for the activator protein 2α (AP-2α) and proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA), compared with the control. The present results indicate that dietary SPV stimulates adsorption by the epithelial cells, which activate cell proliferation and self-renewal and regulate the expression of cell cycle regulators AP-2α and PCNA, resulting in higher body weight gain. Thus, we can conclude that a concentration of 0.3% dietary SPV is ideal for promoting growth in poultry. PMID:22936452

  5. Dihydropyrimidinone positive modulation of delta-subunit-containing gamma-aminobutyric acid type A receptors, including an epilepsy-linked mutant variant.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Ryan W; Mabry, John; Polisar, Jason G; Eagen, Kyle P; Ganem, Bruce; Hess, George P

    2010-06-15

    Gamma-aminobutyric acid type A receptors (GABA(A) receptors) are ligand-gated chloride channels that play a central role in signal transmission within the mammalian central nervous system. Compounds that modulate specific GABA(A) receptor subtypes containing the delta-subunit are scarce but would be valuable research tools and starting points for potential therapeutic agents. Here we report a class of dihydropyrimidinone (DHPM) heterocycles that preferentially potentiate peak currents of recombinant GABA(A) receptor subtypes containing the delta-subunit expressed in HEK293T cells. Using the three-component Biginelli reaction, 13 DHPMs with structural features similar to those of the barbiturate phenobarbital were synthesized; one DHPM used (monastrol) is commercially available. An up to approximately 3-fold increase in the current from recombinant alpha1beta2delta receptors was observed with the DHPM compound JM-II-43A or monastrol when co-applied with saturating GABA concentrations, similar to the current potentiation observed with the nonselective potentiating compounds phenobarbital and tracazolate. No agonist activity was observed for the DHPMs at the concentrations tested. A kinetic model was used in conjunction with dose-dependent measurements to calculate apparent dissociation constant values for JM-II-43A (400 muM) and monastrol (200 microM) at saturating GABA concentrations. We examined recombinant receptors composed of combinations of subunits alpha1, alpha4, alpha5, alpha6, beta2, beta3, gamma2L, and delta with JM-II-43A to demonstrate the preference for potentiation of delta-subunit-containing receptors. Lastly, reduced currents from receptors containing the mutated delta(E177A) subunit, described by Dibbens et al. [(2004) Hum. Mol. Genet. 13, 1315-1319] as a heritable susceptibility allele for generalized epilepsy with febrile seizures plus, are also potentiated by these DHPMs. PMID:20450160

  6. [Evaluation of ten fish species to be included as part of renal diet, due to their protein, phosphorus and fatty acids content].

    PubMed

    Castro-González, Maria Isabel; Maafs-Rodríguez, Ana Gabriela; Pérez-Gil Romo, Fernando

    2012-06-01

    Because renal disease is highly complex, its nutritional treatment is complicated and many foods are restricted, including fish because its phosphorus content. The aim of the present study was to analyze ten fillet fish species, commonly consumed in Mexico (Cyprinus carpio carpio, Ophichthus rex, Symphurus elongatus, Eucinostomus entomelas, Chirostoma patzcuaro, Bairdiella chrysoura, Salmo salar Oreochromis urolepis hornorum, Sphyraena guachancho, Istiophorus albicans), to determine their phosphorus (P), protein (Pr), cholesterol, sodium, potassium, vitamins D3 and E, and n-3 PUFA (EPA+DHA) according to the AOAC techniques, in order to identify which species could be included in renal diet; particularly because of their risk:benefit relations (calculated with those results). Protein values ranged from 16.5 to 33.5g/100 g of fillet; the specie with the highest phosphorus contest was Salmo salar, and with the lowest, Symphurus elongatus. EPA+DHA quantity ranged from 79.64 mg/100 g to 1,381.53 mg/100 g. Considering de P/Pr relation recommended to renal patients, all analyzed species (except Salmo salar, Ophichthus rex and Istiophorus albicans) could be included in their diet. As for the P/EPA+DHA relation, the species most recommended to renal patients are Symphurus elongatus, Bairdiella chrysoura and Sphyraena guachancho. PMID:23610899

  7. Omega-6 fatty acids and greater likelihood of suicide risk and major depression in early pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Vaz, Juliana S.; Kac, Gilberto; Nardi, Antonio E.; Hibbeln, Joseph R.

    2014-01-01

    Objective To estimate the prevalence of suicide risk (SR) and major depressive episode (MDE) in early pregnancy, and the relationship of fatty acids serum status to these outcomes. Method Cross-sectional analyses of 234 pregnant women enrolled in a prospective cohort study in Rio de Janeiro/Brazil were performed. SR and MDE were defined according to MINI International Neuropsychiatric Interview. Fatty acids compositions were determined in serum samples obtained between the 6th and 13th gestational week. Statistical analyses included univariate and multiple logistic regressions. Fatty acids data were expressed both as percent of total fatty acids and converted to Z scores then entered as continuous variable into regression models. Results The prevalence of SR was 19.6% and MDE was 17.0%. Higher likelihood of SR was observed among women with higher arachidonic acid [AA (20:4n-6): OR=1.45, 95% CI 1.02-2.07] and adrenic acid [AdA (22:4 n-6): OR=1.43, 95% CI 1.01-2.04], and for MDE: AA [OR=1.47, 95% CI 1.03-2.10], and AdA [OR=1.59, 95% CI 1.09-2.32], per standard deviation of fatty acid, in adjusted logistic regressions. Conclusion Higher serum status of AA and AdA, two omega-6 fatty acids, were associated with greater likelihood of SR and MDE among pregnant Brazilian women independently of confounding variables. PMID:23726775

  8. Two novel PRPF31 premessenger ribonucleic acid processing factor 31 homolog mutations including a complex insertion-deletion identified in Chinese families with retinitis pigmentosa

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Bing; Chen, Jieqiong; Zhang, Xiaohui; Pan, Zhe; Bai, Fengge

    2013-01-01

    Objective To identify the causative mutations in two Chinese families with retinitis pigmentosa (RP), and to describe the associated phenotype. Methods Individuals from two unrelated families underwent full ophthalmic examinations. After informed consent was obtained, genomic DNA was extracted from the venous blood of all participants. Linkage analysis was performed on the known genetic loci for autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa with a panel of polymorphic markers in the two families, and then all coding exons of the PRP31 premessenger ribonucleic acid processing factor 31 homolog (PRPF31) gene were screened for mutations with direct sequencing of PCR-amplified DNA fragments. Allele-specific PCR was used to validate a substitution in all available family members and 100 normal controls. A large deletion was detected with real-time quantitative PCR (RQ-PCR) using a panel of primers from regions around the PRPF31 gene. Long-range PCR, followed by DNA sequencing, was used to define the breakpoints. Results Clinical examination and pedigree analysis revealed two four-generation families (RP24 and RP106) with autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa. A significant two-point linkage odd disequilibrium score was generated at marker D19S926 (Zmax=3.55, θ=0) for family RP24 and D19S571 (Zmax=3.21, θ=0) for family RP106, and further linkage and haplotype studies confined the disease locus to chromosome 19q13.42 where the PRPF31 gene is located. Mutation screening of the PRPF31 gene revealed a novel deletion c.1215delG (p.G405fs+7X) in family RP106. The deletion cosegregated with the family’s disease phenotype, but was not found in 100 normal controls. No disease-causing mutation was detected in family RP24 with PCR-based sequencing analysis. RQ-PCR and long-range PCR analysis revealed a complex insertion-deletion (indel) in the patients of family RP24. The deletion is more than 19 kb and encompasses part of the PRPF31 gene (exons 1–3), together with three adjacent

  9. Amino acids and mammary gland development: nutritional implications for milk production and neonatal growth.

    PubMed

    Rezaei, Reza; Wu, Zhenlong; Hou, Yongqing; Bazer, Fuller W; Wu, Guoyao

    2016-01-01

    Milk is synthesized by mammary epithelial cells of lactating mammals. The synthetic capacity of the mammary gland depends largely on the number and efficiency of functional mammary epithelial cells. Structural development of the mammary gland occurs during fetal growth, prepubertal and post-pubertal periods, pregnancy, and lactation under the control of various hormones (particularly estrogen, growth hormone, insulin-like growth factor-I, progesterone, placental lactogen, and prolactin) in a species- and stage-dependent manner. Milk is essential for the growth, development, and health of neonates. Amino acids (AA), present in both free and peptide-bound forms, are the most abundant organic nutrients in the milk of farm animals. Uptake of AA from the arterial blood of the lactating dam is the ultimate source of proteins (primarily β-casein and α-lactalbumin) and bioactive nitrogenous metabolites in milk. Results of recent studies indicate extensive catabolism of branched-chain AA (leucine, isoleucine and valine) and arginine to synthesize glutamate, glutamine, alanine, aspartate, asparagine, proline, and polyamines. The formation of polypeptides from AA is regulated not only by hormones (e.g., prolactin, insulin and glucocorticoids) and the rate of blood flow across the lactating mammary gland, but also by concentrations of AA, lipids, glucose, vitamins and minerals in the maternal plasma, as well as the activation of the mechanistic (mammalian) target rapamycin signaling by certain AA (e.g., arginine, branched-chain AA, and glutamine). Knowledge of AA utilization (including metabolism) by mammary epithelial cells will enhance our fundamental understanding of lactation biology and has important implications for improving the efficiency of livestock production worldwide. PMID:27042295

  10. Whole-body amino acid composition of adult fancy ranchu goldfish (Carassius auratus).

    PubMed

    Snellgrove, Donna L; Alexander, Lucille G

    2011-10-01

    Aqua feeds should be formulated to provide complete and balanced nutrition to achieve optimal health and growth in fish, including adequate levels of essential amino acids (EAA). There are few or no data relating to the EAA requirements for ornamental fish species, with the majority of quantitative data for these nutrients being available for commercially farmed fish. The determination of EAA requirements is usually established through dose-response studies, which can be costly and time consuming, especially if determining the requirement for many amino acids (AA). An alternative method for predicting the EAA of fish, which is also relatively fast and inexpensive, is the assessment of whole-body AA composition. A total of eight goldfish with a mean wet weight of 34.2 (SEM 1.4) g were obtained as a result of a routine cull by breeders. The fish were freeze-dried and AA was content analysed by hydrolysis or performic 'acid' oxidation. EAA values ranged between 0.97 (SEM 0.02) for tryptophan and 7.9 (SEM 0.14) for lysine (g/100 g AA). Compositional data were also used to estimate the essential amino acid ratios of these fish. The findings are in agreement with those for juvenile common goldfish, suggesting that there are no differences in whole-body AA composition between juvenile and adult, or fancy and common goldfish. However, these indices do not provide a quantitative total amount of each AA required by the fish, but can be used proportionally to provide guidelines to formulate diets for ornamental species. PMID:22005403

  11. Prediction of individual milk proteins including free amino acids in bovine milk using mid-infrared spectroscopy and their correlations with milk processing characteristics.

    PubMed

    McDermott, A; Visentin, G; De Marchi, M; Berry, D P; Fenelon, M A; O'Connor, P M; Kenny, O A; McParland, S

    2016-04-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of mid-infrared spectroscopy in predicting milk protein and free amino acid (FAA) composition in bovine milk. Milk samples were collected from 7 Irish research herds and represented cows from a range of breeds, parities, and stages of lactation. Mid-infrared spectral data in the range of 900 to 5,000 cm(-1) were available for 730 milk samples; gold standard methods were used to quantify individual protein fractions and FAA of these samples with a view to predicting these gold standard protein fractions and FAA levels with available mid-infrared spectroscopy data. Separate prediction equations were developed for each trait using partial least squares regression; accuracy of prediction was assessed using both cross validation on a calibration data set (n=400 to 591 samples) and external validation on an independent data set (n=143 to 294 samples). The accuracy of prediction in external validation was the same irrespective of whether undertaken on the entire external validation data set or just within the Holstein-Friesian breed. The strongest coefficient of correlation obtained for protein fractions in external validation was 0.74, 0.69, and 0.67 for total casein, total β-lactoglobulin, and β-casein, respectively. Total proteins (i.e., total casein, total whey, and total lactoglobulin) were predicted with greater accuracy then their respective component traits; prediction accuracy using the infrared spectrum was superior to prediction using just milk protein concentration. Weak to moderate prediction accuracies were observed for FAA. The greatest coefficient of correlation in both cross validation and external validation was for Gly (0.75), indicating a moderate accuracy of prediction. Overall, the FAA prediction models overpredicted the gold standard values. Near-unity correlations existed between total casein and β-casein irrespective of whether the traits were based on the gold standard (0.92) or mid

  12. Participation and Performance Reporting for the Alternate Assessment Based on Modified Achievement Standards (AA-MAS). Technical Report 58

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Albus, Deb; Thurlow, Martha L.; Lazarus, Sheryl S.

    2011-01-01

    This report examines publicly reported participation and performance data for the alternate assessment based on modified achievement standards (AA-MAS). The authors' analysis of these data included all states publicly reporting AA-MAS data, regardless of whether they had received approval to use the results for Title I accountability calculations.…

  13. Determining the Optimum Dietary Tryptophan to Lysine Ratio in Growing Pigs Fed Diets Formulated with Hhigher Levels of Other Essential Amino Acids

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Studies on amino acid (AA) ratios require the first limiting AA (generally Lys) to be set below the requirement estimate. Graded levels of the AA being investigated are then fed to determine the required ratio. Essential AA (EAA) not under investigation are often set at their presumed requirement ra...

  14. Evidence for the essentiality of arachidonic and docosahexaenoic acid in the postnatal maternal and infant diet for the development of the infant's immune system early in life.

    PubMed

    Richard, Caroline; Lewis, Erin D; Field, Catherine J

    2016-05-01

    Long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids (LCPUFA), especially the balance between arachidonic (AA) and docosahexaenoic (DHA) acids are known to have important immunomodulatory roles during the postnatal period when the immune system is rapidly developing. AA and DHA are required in infant formula in many countries but are optional in North America. The rationale for adding these LCPUFA to full-term formula is based on their presence in breast milk and randomized controlled studies that suggest improved cognitive function in preterm infants, but results are more variable in full-term infants. Recently, the European Food Safety Authority has proposed, based on a lack of functional evidence, that AA is not required in infant formula for full-term infants during the first year of life but DHA should remain mandatory. The purpose of this review is to review the evidence from epidemiological and intervention studies regarding the essentiality of AA and DHA in the postnatal infant and maternal diet (breast-feeding) for the immune system development early in life. Although studies support the essentiality of DHA for the immune system development, more research is needed to rule out the essentiality of AA. Nevertheless, intervention studies have demonstrated improvement in many markers of immune function in infants fed formula supplemented with AA and DHA compared with unsupplemented formula, which appears to consistently result in beneficial health outcomes including reduction in the risk of developing allergic and atopic disease early in life. PMID:27138971

  15. 3-(1H-Indol-3-yl)-2-(2-nitro­benzene­sulfonamido)­propanoic acid including an unknown solvate

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Islam Ullah; Mubashar-ur-Rehman, Hafiz; Aziz, Salman; Harrison, William T. A.

    2012-01-01

    In the title compound, C17H15N3O6S, which crystallized with highly disordered methanol and/or water solvent mol­ecules, the dihedral angle between the the indole and benzene ring systems is 5.3 (2)°, which allows for the formation of intra­molecular π–π stacking inter­actions [centroid–centroid separations = 3.641 (3) and 3.694 (3) Å] and an approximate overall U-shape for the mol­ecule. In the crystal, dimers linked by pairs of Ns—H⋯Oc (s = sulfonamide and c = carboxyl­ate) hydrogen bonds generate R 2 2(10) loops, whereas Ni—H⋯π (i = indole) inter­actions lead to chains propagating in [100] or [010]. Together, these lead to a three-dimensional network in which the solvent voids are present as inter­secting (two-dimensional) systems of [100] and [010] channels. The title compound was found to contain a heavily disordered solvent mol­ecule, which could be methanol or water or a mixture of the two. Due to its uncertain nature and the unresolvable disorder, the data were processed with the SQUEEZE option in PLATON [Spek (2009 ▶). Acta Cryst. D65, 148–155], which revealed 877.8 Å3 of solvent-accessible volume per unit cell and 126 electron-units of scattering density or 109.7 Å3 (16 electron units) per organic mol­ecule.. This was not included in the calculations of overall formula weight, density and absorption coefficient. PMID:22807845

  16. A sensitive and practical RP-HPLC-FLD for determination of the low neuroactive amino acid levels in body fluids and its application in depression.

    PubMed

    Wu, Juan-Li; Yu, Si-Yang; Wu, Shi-Hua; Bao, Ai-Min

    2016-03-11

    Ion-exchange high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) generally fails as a method to determine low levels of free amino acids (AAs) in body fluids. Here we present a modified reversed-phase HPLC (RP-HPLC) protocol for the determination of AAs in body fluids and its application in mood disorder patients. We improved a previous research protocol by modifying i) sample preparation, including deproteination, ii) derivitization, including derivating agent and condition, and iii) sample separation, which is mainly determined by the pH value, the components and the additives of the mobile phases. The combination of these modifications, together with fluorescence detection (FLD), allows sensitive and practical determination of free AA levels in body fluids of depressive patients. This protocol was validated by determining the postmortem cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) glutamic acid (Glu) and γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) levels of 8 major depressive disorder (MDD) patients, 9 bipolar disorder (BD) patients, and 19 well-matched controls, while also testing the plasma and CSF AA levels of living MDD patients. CSF Glu and GABA levels were both significantly decreased in MDD but not in BD patients. The data indicate that this RP-HPLC-FLD protocol is applicable for detection of low levels of neuroactive AAs in body fluids, as well as for routine clinical applications. PMID:26808642

  17. Age Differences of Salivary Alpha-Amylase Levels of Basal and Acute Responses to Citric Acid Stimulation Between Chinese Children and Adults

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Ze-Min; Chen, Long-Hui; Zhang, Min; Lin, Jing; Zhang, Jie; Chen, Wei-Wen; Yang, Xiao-Rong

    2015-01-01

    It remains unclear how salivary alpha-amylase (sAA) levels respond to mechanical stimuli in different age groups. In addition, the role played by the sAA gene (AMY1) copy number and protein expression (glycosylated and non-glycosylated) in sAA activity has also been rarely reported. In this study, we analyzed saliva samples collected before and after citric acid stimulation from 47 child and 47 adult Chinese subjects. We observed that adults had higher sAA activity and sAA glycosylated levels (glycosylated sAA amount/total sAA amount) in basal and stimulated saliva when compared with children, while no differences were found in total or glycosylated sAA amount between them. Interestingly, adults showed attenuated sAA activity levels increase over those of children after stimulation. Correlation analysis showed that total sAA amount, glycosylated sAA amount, and AMY1 copy number × total sAA amount were all positively correlated with sAA activity before and after stimulation in both groups. Interestingly, correlation r between sAA levels (glycosylated sAA amount and total sAA amount) and sAA activity decreased after stimulation in children, while adults showed an increase in correlation r. In addition, the correlation r between AMY1 copy number × total sAA amount and sAA activity was higher than that between AMY1 copy number, total sAA amount, and sAA activity, respectively. Taken together, our results suggest that total sAA amount, glycosylated sAA amount, and the positive interaction between AMY1 copy number and total sAA amount are crucial in influencing sAA activity before and after stimulation in children and adults. PMID:26635626

  18. AAS Committee on Employment Panel Introduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borne, Kirk; Fanelli, M. N.; Storrie-Lombardi, L. J.; Krishnamurthi, A.

    2006-12-01

    Many younger astronomers are unaware of the dangers and pitfalls that await them in the job market. Issues related to fringe benefits (if any), moving expenses, medical coverage for family members, teaching versus research expectations, etc. can lead to misunderstandings and to serious difficulties if these are not addressed early in the job interview process. The AAS Committee on Employment has often received letters from concerned junior members of the society, who feel that they needed more guidance and assistance in entering the job market for the first time. The major areas of concern have included those just listed, but there may be others. The session is structured as a panel presentation, whose members are asked to prepare in advance their top 10 questions that job applicants should ask, and we will instruct our panel members not to discuss their list at all with the other panel members prior to their presentations. This will ensure independent viewpoints and novel responses. The panel will consist of astronomers who have different perspectives on this issue, including old and young, postdoc and beyond, academic and non-academic. To kick off the session, we will invite a brief humorous presentation of the Top Ten List, in the style of The Night Show host David Letterman.

  19. AA amyloidosis in vaccinated growing chickens.

    PubMed

    Murakami, T; Inoshima, Y; Sakamoto, E; Fukushi, H; Sakai, H; Yanai, T; Ishiguro, N

    2013-01-01

    Systemic amyloid-A (AA) amyloidosis in birds occurs most frequently in waterfowl such as Pekin ducks. In chickens, AA amyloidosis is observed as amyloid arthropathy. Outbreaks of systemic amyloidosis in flocks of layers are known to be induced by repeated inflammatory stimulation, such as those resulting from multiple vaccinations with oil-emulsified bacterins. Outbreaks of fatal AA amyloidosis were observed in growing chickens in a large scale poultry farm within 3 weeks of vaccination with multiple co-administered vaccines. This study documents the histopathological changes in tissues from these birds. Amyloid deposits were also observed at a high rate in the tissues of apparently healthy chickens. Vaccination should therefore be considered as a potential risk factor for the development of AA amyloidosis in poultry. PMID:23570943

  20. The impact of AA on non-professional substance abuse recovery programs and sober living houses.

    PubMed

    Polcin, Douglas L; Borkman, Thomasina

    2008-01-01

    In addition to being a widely used and effective approach for alcohol problems, AA has been central to the development of several types of nonprofessional recovery programs. Known as "social model recovery," these programs were staffed by individuals in recovery and they encouraged program participants to become involved in AA as a way to address their drinking problems. In addition, they relied on the traditions, beliefs, and recovery practices of AA as a guide for managing and operating programs (e.g., democratic group processes, shared and rotated leadership, and experiential knowledge). This chapter reviews the philosophy, history, and recent changes in several types of these programs, along with a depiction of AA's influence on them. Programs examined include neighborhood recovery centers, residential social model recovery programs, and two types of sober living houses: California Sober Living Houses and Oxford Houses. Recent outcome evaluations on both types of sober living houses are presented. PMID:19115765

  1. A novel voltammetric sensor for ascorbic acid based on molecularly imprinted poly(o-phenylenediamine-co-o-aminophenol).

    PubMed

    Kong, Yong; Shan, Xueling; Ma, Jianfeng; Chen, Meilan; Chen, Zhidong

    2014-01-27

    A molecularly imprinted copolymer, poly(o-phenylenediamine-co-o-aminophenol) (PoPDoAP), was prepared as a new ascorbic acid (AA) sensor. The copolymer was synthesized by incorporation of AA as template molecules during the electrochemical copolymerization of o-phenylenediamine and o-aminophenol, and complementary sites were formed after the copolymer was electrochemically reduced in ammonium aqueous solution. The molecularly imprinted copolymer sensor exhibited a high sensitivity and selectivity toward AA. Differential pulse voltammograms (DPVs) showed a linear concentration range of AA from 0.1 to 10 mM, and the detection limit was calculated to be 36.4 μM. Compared to conventional polyaniline-based AA sensors, the analytical performance of the imprinted copolymer sensor was improved due to the broadened usable pH range of PoPDoAP (from pH 1.0 to pH 8.0). The sensor also exhibited a good reproducibility and stability. And it has been successfully applied in the determination of AA in real samples, including vitamin C tablet and orange juices, with satisfactory results. PMID:24418133

  2. Omega 3 but not omega 6 fatty acids inhibit AP-1 activity and cell transformation in JB6 cells

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Guangming; Bibus, Douglas M.; Bode, Ann M.; Ma, Wei-Ya; Holman, Ralph T.; Dong, Zigang

    2001-01-01

    Epidemiological and animal-based investigations have indicated that the development of skin cancer is in part associated with poor dietary practices. Lipid content and subsequently the derived fatty acid composition of the diet are believed to play a major role in the development of tumorigenesis. Omega 3 (ω3) fatty acids, including docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) and eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA), can effectively reduce the risk of skin cancer whereas omega 6 (ω6) fatty acids such as arachidonic acid (AA) reportedly promote risk. To investigate the effects of fatty acids on tumorigenesis, we performed experiments to examine the effects of the ω3 fatty acids EPA and DHA and of the ω6 fatty acid AA on phorbol 12-tetradecanoate 13-acetate (TPA)-induced or epidermal growth factor (EGF)-induced transcription activator protein 1 (AP-1) transactivation and on the subsequent cellular transformation in a mouse epidermal JB6 cell model. DHA treatment resulted in marked inhibition of TPA- and EGF-induced cell transformation by inhibiting AP-1 transactivation. EPA treatment also inhibited TPA-induced AP-1 transactivation and cell transformation but had no effect on EGF-induced transformation. AA treatment had no effect on either TPA- or EGF-induced AP-1 transactivation or transformation, but did abrogate the inhibitory effects of DHA on TPA- or EGF-induced AP-1 transactivation and cell transformation in a dose-dependent manner. The results of this study demonstrate that the inhibitory effects of ω3 fatty acids on tumorigenesis are more significant for DHA than for EPA and are related to an inhibition of AP-1. Similarly, because AA abrogates the beneficial effects of DHA, the dietary ratio of ω6 to ω3 fatty acids may be a significant factor in mediating tumor development. PMID:11416221

  3. Dietary arachidonic acid dose-dependently increases the arachidonic acid concentration in human milk.

    PubMed

    Weseler, Antje R; Dirix, Chantal E H; Bruins, Maaike J; Hornstra, Gerard

    2008-11-01

    Lactation hampers normalization of the maternal arachidonic acid (AA) status, which is reduced after pregnancy and can further decline by the presently recommended increased consumption of (n-3) long-chain PUFA [(n-3) LCPUFA]. This may be unfavorable for breast-fed infants, because they also require an optimum supply of (n-6) LCPUFA. We therefore investigated the LCPUFA responses in nursing mothers upon increased consumption of AA and (n-3) LCPUFA. In a parallel, double-blind, controlled trial, lactating women received for 8 wk no extra LCPUFA (control group, n = 8), 200 (low AA group, n = 9), or 400 (high AA group, n = 8) mg/d AA in combination with (n-3) LCPUFA [320 mg/d docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), 80 mg/d eicosapentaenoic acid, and 80 mg/d other (n-3) fatty acids], or this dose of (n-3) LCPUFA alone [DHA + eicosapentaenoic acid group, n = 8]. Relative concentrations of AA, DHA, and sums of (n-6) and (n-3) LCPUFA were measured in milk total lipids (TL) and erythrocyte phospholipids (PL) after 2 and 8 wk and changes were compared by ANCOVA. The combined consumption of AA and (n-3) LCPUFA caused dose-dependent elevations of AA and total (n-6) LCPUFA concentrations in milk TL and did not significantly affect the DHA and total (n-3) LCPUFA increases caused by (n-3) LCPUFA supplementation only. This latter treatment did not significantly affect breast milk AA and total (n-6) LCPUFA concentrations. AA and DHA concentrations in milk TL and their changes were strongly and positively correlated with their corresponding values in erythrocyte PL (r(2) = 0.27-0.50; P AA in addition to extra (n-3) LCPUFA dose dependently increased the AA concentration of their milk TL. PMID:18936218

  4. The Changing Shape of the AAS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boyce, P. B.

    1995-12-01

    What is the astronomical workforce like? Where do astronomers work? How old are they? How permanent are their jobs? As we move into a period of increased uncertainty in federal funding for science it is important to know the answers to these questions. There are four sources of information for answers: 1. Information from the AAS membership database. 2. A survey of the AAS membership. 3. Surveys of samples of the AAS membership by AIP. 4. Information from the NRC and NSF. We have gender and age data from 1. A survey of the AAS membershWe will have age and gender data from 1. We will complete and analyze a new membersip survey shortly. The latest AIP data is from 1994. They will do a new sample in 1996. Much of the NRC data is aggregated with physics, and that does not give information about astronomers. Nevertheless, we do have some interesting information. The ages and genders of AAS members are available for 1972, 1990 and 1995. The time sequence provides an interesting look at the AAS. For instance, from 1990 to 1995 the number of women in each 5-year age group below the the age of 65 increased. Contrary to popular perception, women are not leaving the Society as they get older. However, the number of men actually decreased in each age group above the age of 35. This and other interesting trends will be discussed.

  5. Radiocarbon Analysis of Individual Amino Acids: Carbon Blank Quantification for a Small-Sample High-Pressure Liquid Chromatography Purification Method.

    PubMed

    Bour, Amy L; Walker, Brett D; Broek, Taylor A B; McCarthy, Matthew D

    2016-04-01

    Compound-specific radiocarbon analysis (CSRA) of amino acids (AAs) is of great interest as a proxy for organic nitrogen (N) cycling rates, dating archeological bone collagen, and investigating processes shaping the biogeochemistry of global N reservoirs. However, recoverable quantities of individual compounds from natural samples are often insufficient for radiocarbon ((14)C) analyses (<50 μg C). Constraining procedural carbon (C) blanks and their isotopic contributions is critical for reporting of accurate CSRA measurements. Here, we report the first detailed quantification of C blanks (including sources, magnitudes, and variability) for a high-pressure liquid chromatography (HPLC) method designed to purify individual AAs from natural samples. We used pairs of AA standards with either modern (M) or dead (D) fraction modern (Fm) values to quantify MC and DC blanks within several chromatographic regions. Blanks were determined for both individual and mixed AA standard injections with peak loadings ranging from 10 to 85 μg C. We found 0.8 ± 0.4 μg of MC and 1.0 ± 0.5 μg of DC were introduced by downstream sample preparation (drying, combustion, and graphitization), which accounted for essentially the entire procedural blank for early eluting AAs. For late-eluting AAs, higher eluent organic content and fraction collected volumes contributed to total blanks of 1.5 ± 0.75 μg of MC and 3.0 ± 1.5 μg of DC. Our final measurement uncertainty for 20 μg of C of most AAs was ±0.02 Fm, although sample size requirements are larger for similar uncertainty in late-eluting AAs. These results demonstrate the first CSRA protocol for many protein AAs with uncertainties comparable to the lowest achieved in prior studies. PMID:26855019

  6. Amino acids and hexosamines in the Hess Rise core during the past 220,000 years

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, Lallan Prasad; Kawahata, Hodaka

    2003-11-01

    Core sediment samples collected from the Hess Rise, North Pacific, were analyzed for 20 common amino acids (AA) and two hexosamines (HA) to understand the relation between glacial-interglacial variations and deposition/preservation of sedimentary organic matter (OM). The sediments are predominantly carbonaceous (carbonates 35-80%). AA-based parameters—aspartic acid/glycine ratio and serine+threonine relative mole content—suggest that calcareous plankton was the major source of OM in these sediments. This inference is supported by the similarity in distribution patterns of AA and HA contents with that of organic carbon. Low values of AA/HA and glucosamine/galactosamine ratios (average 4.4 and 1.1, respectively) imply that much of the planktonic OM was replaced by microbial OM. The relative molar concentration of two nonprotein AA (β-alanine and γ-aminobutyric acid) varied with age of sediments; i.e., they were less abundant in recent sediments and more abundant in the oldest sediments. This trend is an indicator of extremely slow but continuous enzymatic degradation of proteinaceous OM within the sediments. So far, bulk OM has been believed to be one of the best proxies for estimation of primary productivity. However, it may be an underestimate, even for the late Quaternary sediments. Comparison of AA and HA content variations with SPECMAP stack revealed their enhanced deposition and preservation during glacial periods relative to interglacial periods. This, in turn, affected not only the planktonic production in surface waters but also the benthic community, including bacteria on the seafloor.

  7. Effect of Arachidonic Acid-enriched Oil Diet Supplementation on the Taste of Broiler Meat

    PubMed Central

    Takahashi, H.; Rikimaru, K.; Kiyohara, R.; Yamaguchi, S.

    2012-01-01

    To elucidate the relationship between the arachidonic acid (AA) content and the taste of broiler meat, the effects of AA-enriched oil (AAO) supplements on the fatty acid content and sensory perceptions of thigh meat were evaluated. Four types of oil, including corn oil (CO), a 1:1 mixture of AAO and palm oil (PO) (1/2 AAO), a 1:3 mixture of AAO and PO (1/4 AAO), and a 1:7 mixture of AAO and PO (1/8 AAO) were prepared. Each type of oil was mixed with silicate at a ratio of 7:3, and added to the diet at a final proportion of 5% of fresh matter. Broiler chickens were fed these diets for 1 wk before slaughter. In thigh meat, the AA content of the 1/2 and 1/4 AAO groups was significantly higher than that of the CO group. The AA content in thigh meat (y, mg/g) increased linearly with increasing dietary AAO content (x, g/100 g of diet), according to the equation y = 0.5674+0.4596× (r2 = 0.8454). The content of other fatty acids was not significantly different among the 4 diet groups. Sensory evaluation showed that the flavor intensity, umami (L-glutamate taste), kokumi (continuity, mouthfulness, and thickness), and aftertaste of the 1/2 and 1/4 AAO groups were significantly higher than that of the CO group. There were significant positive correlations between AA content in thigh meat and the flavor intensity, total taste intensity, umami, and aftertaste. These data suggest that the taste of broiler meat can be improved by the amount of dietary AA supplementation. PMID:25049636

  8. Composition of amino acids in feed ingredients for animal diets.

    PubMed

    Li, Xilong; Rezaei, Reza; Li, Peng; Wu, Guoyao

    2011-04-01

    Dietary amino acids (AA) are crucial for animal growth, development, reproduction, lactation, and health. However, there is a scarcity of information regarding complete composition of "nutritionally nonessential AA" (NEAA; those AA which can be synthesized by animals) in diets. To provide a much-needed database, we quantified NEAA (including glutamate, glutamine, aspartate, and asparagine) in feed ingredients for comparison with "nutritionally essential AA" (EAA; those AA whose carbon skeletons cannot be formed by animals). Except for gelatin and feather meal, animal and plant ingredients contained high percentages of glutamate plus glutamine, branched-chain AA, and aspartate plus asparagine, which were 10-32, 15-25, and 8-14% of total protein, respectively. In particular, leucine and glutamine were most abundant in blood meal and casein (13% of total protein), respectively. Notably, gelatin, feather meal, fish meal, meat and bone meal, and poultry byproduct had high percentages of glycine, proline plus hydroxyproline, and arginine, which were 10-35, 9.6-35, and 7.2-7.9% of total protein, respectively. Among plant products, arginine was most abundant in peanut meal and cottonseed meal (14-16% of total protein), whereas corn and sorghum had low percentages of cysteine, lysine, methionine, and tryptophan (0.9-3% of total protein). Overall, feed ingredients of animal origin (except for gelatin) are excellent sources of NEAA and EAA for livestock, avian, and aquatic species, whereas gelatin provides highest amounts of arginine, glycine, and proline plus hydroxyproline. Because casein, corn, soybean, peanut, fish, and gelatin are consumed by children and adults, our findings also have important implications for human nutrition. PMID:20842395

  9. AAS 228: Day 1 afternoon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2016-06-01

    Editors Note:This week were at the 228th AAS Meeting in San Diego, CA. Along with a team ofauthors from astrobites.com, I will bewritingupdates on selectedevents at themeeting and posting twiceeach day. Follow along here or atastrobites.com, or catch ourlive-tweeted updates from the@astrobites Twitter account. The usual posting schedule for AAS Nova will resumenext week.Plenary Session: From Space Archeology to Serving the World Today: A 20-year Journey from the Jungles of Guatemala to a Network of Satellite Remote Sensing Facilities Around the World(by Michael Zevin)In the conferences second plenary session, NASAs Daniel Irwin turned the eyes of the conference back to Earth by highlighting the huge impact that NASA missions play in protecting and developing our own planet.Daniel Irwin: using satellite imagery to detect differences in vegetation and find ancient Mayan cities. #aas228 pic.twitter.com/9LFPQdCHTM astrobites (@astrobites) June 13, 2016Irwin came to be involved in NASA through his work mapping Guatemalan jungles, where he would spend 22 days at a time exploring the treacherous jungles on foot armed with a 1st generation GPS, a compass, and a machete. A colleague introduced Irwin to the satellite imagery thathe was exploring, demonstratinghow these images are a strong complement to field work. The sharing of this satellite data with nearby villages helped to show the encroachment of agriculture and the necessity of connecting space to the village. Satellite imagery also played a role in archeological endeavors, uncovering dozens of Mayan cities that have been buried for over a millennia by vegetation, and it provided evidence that the fall of the Mayan civilization may have been due to massive deforestation that ledto drought.Glacial retreat in Chile imaged by ISERV.Irwin displayed the constellation of NASAs Earth-monitoring satellites that have played an integral role in conserving our planet and alerting the world of natural disasters. He also showed

  10. Intermolecular interaction between Cry2Aa and Cyt1Aa and its effect on larvicidal activity against Culex quinquefasciatus.

    PubMed

    Bideshi, Dennis K; Waldrop, Greer; Fernandez-Luna, Maria Teresa; Diaz-Mendoza, Mercedes; Wirth, Margaret C; Johnson, Jeffrey J; Park, Hyun-Woo; Federici, Brian A

    2013-08-01

    The Cyt1Aa protein of Bacillus thuringiensis susbp. israelensis elaborates demonstrable toxicity to mosquito larvae, but more importantly, it enhances the larvicidal activity of this species Cry proteins (Cry11Aa, Cry4Aa, and Cry4Ba) and delays the phenotypic expression of resistance to these that has evolved in Culex quinquefasciatus. It is also known that Cyt1Aa, which is highly lipophilic, synergizes Cry11Aa by functioning as a surrogate membrane-bound receptor for the latter protein. Little is known, however, about whether Cyt1Aa can interact similarly with other Cry proteins not primarily mosquitocidal; for example, Cry2Aa, which is active against lepidopteran larvae, but essentially inactive or has very low toxicity to mosquito larvae. Here we demonstrate by ligand binding and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays that Cyt1Aa and Cry2Aa form intermolecular complexes in vitro, and in addition show that Cyt1Aa facilitates binding of Cry2Aa throughout the midgut of C. quinquefasciatus larvae. As Cry2Aa and Cry11Aa share structural similarity in domain II, the interaction between Cyt1Aa and Cry2Aa could be a result of a similar mechanism previously proposed for Cry11Aa and Cyt1Aa. Finally, despite the observed interaction between Cry2Aa and Cyt1Aa, only a 2-fold enhancement in toxicity resulted against C. quinquefasciatus. Regardless, our results suggest that Cry2Aa could be a useful component of mosquitocidal endotoxin complements being developed for recombinant strains of B. thuringiensis subsp. israelensis and B. sphaericus aimed at improving the efficacy of commercial products and avoiding resistance. PMID:23727800

  11. N-terminal sequence of amino acids and some properties of an acid-stable alpha-amylase from citric acid-koji (Aspergillus usamii var.).

    PubMed

    Suganuma, T; Tahara, N; Kitahara, K; Nagahama, T; Inuzuka, K

    1996-01-01

    An acid-stable alpha-amylase (AA) was purified from an acidic extract of citric acid-koji (A. usamii var.). The N-terminal sequence of the first 20 amino acids of the enzyme was identical with that of AA from A. niger, but the two enzymes differed in molecular weight. HPLC analysis for identifying the anomers of products indicated that the AA hydrolyzed maltopentaose (G5) at the third glycoside bond predominantly, which differed from Taka-amylase A and the neutral alpha-amylase (NA) from the citric acid-koji. PMID:8824843

  12. Computational Modeling of Competitive Metabolism between ω3- and ω6-Polyunsaturated Fatty Acids in Inflammatory Macrophages.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Shakti; Kihara, Yasuyuki; Maurya, Mano R; Norris, Paul C; Dennis, Edward A; Subramaniam, Shankar

    2016-08-25

    Arachidonic acid (AA), a representative ω6-polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA), is a precursor of 2-series prostaglandins (PGs) that play important roles in inflammation, pain, fever, and related disorders including cardiovascular diseases. Eating fish or supplementation with the ω3-PUFAs such as eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) is widely assumed to be beneficial in preventing cardiovascular diseases. A proposed mechanism for a cardio-protective role of ω3-PUFAs assumes competition between AA and ω3-PUFAs for cyclooxygenases (COX), leading to reduced production of 2-series PGs. In this study, we have used a systems biology approach to integrate existing knowledge and novel high-throughput data that facilitates a quantitative understanding of the molecular mechanism of ω3- and ω6-PUFA metabolism in mammalian cells. We have developed a quantitative computational model of the competitive metabolism of AA and EPA via the COX pathway through a two-step matrix-based approach to estimate the rate constants. This model was developed by using lipidomic data sets that were experimentally obtained from EPA-supplemented ATP-stimulated RAW264.7 macrophages. The resulting model fits the experimental data well for all metabolites and demonstrates that the integrated metabolic and signaling networks and the experimental data are consistent with one another. The robustness of the model was validated through parametric sensitivity and uncertainty analysis. We also validated the model by predicting the results from other independent experiments involving AA- and DHA-supplemented ATP-stimulated RAW264.7 cells using the parameters estimated with EPA. Furthermore, we showed that the higher affinity of EPA binding to COX compared with AA was able to inhibit AA metabolism effectively. Thus, our model captures the essential features of competitive metabolism of ω3- and ω6-PUFAs. PMID:27063350

  13. IgE binding to peanut allergens is inhibited by combined D-aspartic and D-glutamic acids

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    D-amino acids (D-aas) are reported to bind to IgE antibodies from people with allergy and asthma. The objectives of this study were to determine if D-aas bind or inhibit IgE binding to peanut allergens, and if they are more effective than L-amino acids (L-aas) in this respect. Several D-aa cocktails...

  14. Genome-Wide Association Study of Plasma Polyunsaturated Fatty Acids in the InCHIANTI Study

    PubMed Central

    Tanaka, Toshiko; Shen, Jian; Abecasis, Gonçalo R.; Kisialiou, Aliaksei; Ordovas, Jose M.; Guralnik, Jack M.; Singleton, Andrew; Bandinelli, Stefania; Cherubini, Antonio; Arnett, Donna; Tsai, Michael Y.; Ferrucci, Luigi

    2009-01-01

    Polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) have a role in many physiological processes, including energy production, modulation of inflammation, and maintenance of cell membrane integrity. High plasma PUFA concentrations have been shown to have beneficial effects on cardiovascular disease and mortality. To identify genetic contributors of plasma PUFA concentrations, we conducted a genome-wide association study of plasma levels of six omega-3 and omega-6 fatty acids in 1,075 participants in the InCHIANTI study on aging. The strongest evidence for association was observed in a region of chromosome 11 that encodes three fatty acid desaturases (FADS1, FADS2, FADS3). The SNP with the most significant association was rs174537 near FADS1 in the analysis of arachidonic acid (AA; p = 5.95×10−46). Minor allele homozygotes had lower AA compared to the major allele homozygotes and rs174537 accounted for 18.6% of the additive variance in AA concentrations. This SNP was also associated with levels of eicosadienoic acid (EDA; p = 6.78×10−9) and eicosapentanoic acid (EPA; p = 1.07×10−14). Participants carrying the allele associated with higher AA, EDA, and EPA also had higher low-density lipoprotein (LDL-C) and total cholesterol levels. Outside the FADS gene cluster, the strongest region of association mapped to chromosome 6 in the region encoding an elongase of very long fatty acids 2 (ELOVL2). In this region, association was observed with EPA (rs953413; p = 1.1×10−6). The effects of rs174537 were confirmed in an independent sample of 1,076 subjects participating in the GOLDN study. The ELOVL2 SNP was associated with docosapentanoic and DHA but not with EPA in GOLDN. These findings show that polymorphisms of genes encoding enzymes in the metabolism of PUFA contribute to plasma concentrations of fatty acids. PMID:19148276

  15. Direct-Chill Co-Casting of AA3003/AA4045 Aluminum Ingots via Fusion™ Technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caron, Etienne J. F. R.; Pelayo, Rosa E. Ortega; Baserinia, Amir R.; Wells, Mary A.; Weckman, David C.; Barker, Simon; Gallerneault, Mark

    2014-06-01

    Laboratory-scale experiments were conducted to cast AA3003/AA4045 clad ingots via Fusion™ Technology, a novel process developed by Novelis Inc. for the production of aluminum clad materials such as brazing sheet. Experimental results were used to validate a steady-state thermofluids model of the Fusion™ Technology co-casting process. The numerical model was able to accurately predict the temperature field within the AA3003/AA4045 clad ingot as well as the shape of the AA3003 liquid sump. The model was also used to quantify the temperature, fraction solid, and velocity fields in a clad ingot cast with an asymmetrical molten metal-feeding system. Feeding of core and clad molten metals at opposite corners of the mold was found to reduce the risks of hot spots and liquid metal breakthrough from the core sump to the clad side of the Fusion™ Technology mold. The use of a diffuser for the AA3003 core molten metal and of a vertical feeding tube for the AA4045 clad produced different flow patterns and liquid sump shapes on either side of the mold. The quality of the metallurgical bond at the core/clad interface appeared good near the clad inlet and at the ingot centerline, but poor near the edges of the ingot. SEM-EDS analysis of the chemical composition across the interface showed that a 1 to 20- μm-deep penetration of silicon from the AA4045 clad into the AA3003 core had occurred at visually acceptable interfaces, whereas silicon diffusion across poor interfaces was very limited. A study of the model-predicted fraction solid history at different points along the interface indicated that reheating of the AA3003 core is not required to form a visually acceptable metallurgical bond. However, a sufficient amount of interaction time between the solid AA3003 core shell and the silicon-rich AA4045 clad liquid is required to chemically dissolve the surface of the core and form a good metallurgical bond. An approximate dissolution depth of 750 to 1000 μm was observed along

  16. Doping with anabolic androgenic steroids (AAS): Adverse effects on non-reproductive organs and functions.

    PubMed

    Nieschlag, Eberhard; Vorona, Elena

    2015-09-01

    Since the 1970s anabolic androgenic steroids (AAS) have been abused at ever increasing rates in competitive athletics, in recreational sports and in bodybuilding. Exceedingly high doses are often consumed over long periods, in particular by bodybuilders, causing acute or chronic adverse side effects frequently complicated by additional polypharmacy. This review summarizes side effects on non-reproductive organs and functions; effects on male and female reproduction have been recently reviewed in a parallel paper. Among the most striking AAS side effects are increases in haematocrit and coagulation causing thromboembolism, intracardiac thrombosis and stroke as well as other cardiac disturbances including arrhythmias, cardiomyopathies and possibly sudden death. 17α-alkylated AAS are liver toxic leading to cholestasis, peliosis, adenomas and carcinomas. Hyperbilirubinaemia can cause cholemic nephrosis and kidney failure. AAS abuse may induce exaggerated self-confidence, reckless behavior, aggressiveness and psychotic symptoms. AAS withdrawal may be accompanied by depression and suicidal intentions. Since AAS abuse is not or only reluctantly admitted physicians should be aware of the multitude of serious side effects when confronted with unclear symptoms. PMID:26373946

  17. Particle Production in AA Collisions from Saturation Phyisics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kovchegov, Yuri

    2002-10-01

    We discuss gluon production mechanism in heavy ion collisions including the effects of saturation of partons in the small-x tails of gluon wave functions of the colliding nuclei. We begin by discussing particle production in the quasi-classical approximation (McLerran-Venugopalan model) for pA collisions. We continue by deriving an ansatz for particle production in AA collisions in the quasi-classical approximation. We conclude by proposing a generalization of this classical gluon production result including the effects of nonlinear quantum evolution in energy.

  18. Detection of AA76, a Common Form of Amyloid A Protein, as a Way of Diagnosing AA Amyloidosis.

    PubMed

    Sato, Junji; Okuda, Yasuaki; Kuroda, Takeshi; Yamada, Toshiyuki

    2016-03-01

    Reactive amyloid deposits consist of amyloid A (AA) proteins, the degradation products of serum amyloid A (SAA). Since the most common species of AA is the amino terminal portion produced by cleavage between residues 76 and 77 of SAA (AA76), the presence of AA76 in tissues could be a consequence of AA amyloid deposition. This study assessed the diagnostic significance of the detection of AA76 for AA amyloidosis using two different approaches. Biopsy specimens (n=130 from 54 subjects) from gastroduodenal mucosa or abdominal fat (n=9 from 9 subjects) of patients who had already been diagnosed with or were suspected of having AA amyloidosis were used. Fixed mucosal sections were subjected to immunohistochemistry using a newly developed antibody recognizing the carboxyl terminal end of AA76 (anti-AA76). The non-fixed materials from gastroduodenal mucosa or abdominal fat were subjected to immunoblotting for detection of the size of AA76. Among the gastroduodenal specimens (n=115) from already diagnosed patients, the positive rates of Congo red staining, immunohistochemistry using anti-AA76, and immunoblotting were 68.4%, 73.0%, and 92.2%, respectively. The anti-AA76 did not stain the supposed SAA in the blood or leakage, which was stained by anti-SAA antibody. AA76 was not detected either by immunohistochemistry or by immunoblot in the materials from patients in whom AA amyloidosis had been ruled out. In the abdominal fat, the immunoblot detected AA76 in 8 materials from 8 already diagnosed patients and did not in 1 patient whose gastroduodenal mucosa was negative. In conclusion, the detection of AA76 may alter the ability to diagnose AA amyloidosis. In immunohistochemistry for fixed specimens, the new anti-AA76 antibody can improve the specificity. Immunoblot for non-fixed materials, which can considerably improve the sensitivity, should be beneficial for small materials like abdominal fat. PMID:27098620

  19. MDCT evaluation of acute aortic syndrome (AAS).

    PubMed

    Valente, Tullio; Rossi, Giovanni; Lassandro, Francesco; Rea, Gaetano; Marino, Maurizio; Muto, Maurizio; Molino, Antonio; Scaglione, Mariano

    2016-05-01

    Non-traumatic acute thoracic aortic syndromes (AAS) describe a spectrum of life-threatening aortic pathologies with significant implications on diagnosis, therapy and management. There is a common pathway for the various manifestations of AAS that eventually leads to a breakdown of the aortic intima and media. Improvements in biology and health policy and diffusion of technology into the community resulted in an associated decrease in mortality and morbidity related to aortic therapeutic interventions. Hybrid procedures, branched and fenestrated endografts, and percutaneous aortic valves have emerged as potent and viable alternatives to traditional surgeries. In this context, current state-of-the art multidetector CT (MDCT) is actually the gold standard in the emergency setting because of its intrinsic diagnostic value. Management of acute aortic disease has changed with the increasing realization that endovascular therapies may offer distinct advantages in these situations. This article provides a summary of AAS, focusing especially on the MDCT technique, typical and atypical findings and common pitfalls of AAS, as well as recent concepts regarding the subtypes of AAS, consisting of aortic dissection, intramural haematoma, penetrating atherosclerotic ulcer and unstable aortic aneurysm or contained aortic rupture. MDCT findings will be related to pathophysiology, timing and management options to achieve a definite and timely diagnostic and therapeutic definition. In the present article, we review the aetiology, pathophysiology, clinical presentation, outcomes and therapeutic approaches to acute aortic syndromes. PMID:27033344

  20. Amino acid nitrogen isotopic composition patterns in lacustrine sedimenting matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carstens, Dörte; Lehmann, Moritz F.; Hofstetter, Thomas B.; Schubert, Carsten J.

    2013-11-01

    Amino acids (AAs) comprise a large fraction of organic nitrogen (N) in plankton and sedimenting matter. Aquatic studies of organic N compounds in general and of AAs in particular, mostly concentrate on marine environments. In order to study the cycling and fate of organic N and AAs in lakes, we measured the N isotopic composition (δ15N) of bulk organic matter (OM) and of single hydrolysable AAs in sediment trap and sediment samples from two Swiss lakes with contrasting trophic state: Lake Brienz, an oligotrophic lake with an oxic water column, and Lake Zug a eutrophic, meromictic lake. We also measured the N isotopic composition of water column nitrate, the likely inorganic N source during biosynthesis in both lakes. The δ15N-AA patterns found for the sediment trap material were consistent with published δ15N-AA data for marine plankton. The AA composition and primary δ15N-AA signatures are preserved until burial in the sediments. During early sedimentary diagenesis, the δ15N values of single AAs appear to increase, exceeding those of the bulk OM. This increase in δ15N-AA is paralleled by a decreased contribution of AAs to the total OM pool with progressed degradation, suggesting preferential AA degradation associated with a significant N isotope fractionation. Indicators for trophic level based on δ15N-AAs were determined, for the first time in lacustrine systems. In our samples, the trophic AAs were generally enriched in 15N compared to source AAs and higher trophic δ15N-AA values in Lake Zug were consistent with a higher trophic level of the bulk biomass compared to Lake Brienz. Especially the difference between average trophic δ15N-AAs and average source δ15N-AAs was sensitive to the trophic states of the two lakes. A proxy for total heterotrophic AA re-synthesis (ΣV), which is strongly associated with heterotrophic microbial reworking of the OM, was calculated based on δ15N values of trophic AAs. Higher ΣV in Lake Brienz indicate enhanced

  1. Ascorbic acid, cognitive function, and Alzheimer's disease: a current review and future direction.

    PubMed

    Bowman, Gene L

    2012-01-01

    This narrative review appraises the human and animal studies implicating ascorbic acid (AA) in normal cognitive function and Alzheimer's disease. A research framework for how nutrition affects brain aging is proposed with emphasis on AA intake, status, metabolism, and transport into brain tissue. A final synopsis highlights areas for future research regarding AA nourishment and healthy brain aging. PMID:22419527

  2. Insulin and amino acids stimulate whole body protein synthesis in neonates

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Insulin and amino acids (AA) stimulate muscle protein synthesis in neonatal pigs. To determine the effects of insulin and AA on whole body protein turnover, hyperinsulinemic (0 and 100 ng/(kg[0.66]/min))-euglycemic-AA clamps were performed during euaminoacidemia or hyperaminoacidemia in fasted 7-d-...

  3. Impact of Q139R substitution of MEB4-Cry2Aa toxin on its stability, accessibility and toxicity against Ephestia kuehniella.

    PubMed

    Nouha, Abdelmalek; Sameh, Sellami; Fakher, Frikha; Slim, Tounsi; Souad, Rouis

    2015-11-01

    The Bacillus thuringiensis subsp. kurstaki strain MEB4 was previously found to be highly toxic to Ephestia kuehniella. SDS-PAGE analysis of the recombinant strain DH5α (pBS-cry2Aa-MEB4) showed that Cry2Aa-MEB4 delta-endotoxins were forming inclusion bodies, and were 2.75 fold more toxic towards E. kuehniella than those of Cry2Aa-BNS3. Besides to the 65kDa active toxin, proteolysis activation of Cry2Aa-BNS3 protein with E. kuehniella midgut juice generated an extra proteolysis form of 49kDa, which was the result of another chymotrypsin cleavage located in Leu144. The amino acid sequences alignment of Cry2Aa-MEB4 and Cry2Aa-BNS3 showed that among the different 15 amino acids, the Q139R substitution was found to be interesting. In fact, due to its presence within the loop α3-α4, the chymotrypsin-like protease was unable to access to its site in Cry2Aa-MEB4, resulting to the production of only the 65kDa form. The accessible surface and the stability studies of the structure model of the Cry2Aa-BNS3-49 form showed a lower hydrophobicity surface due to the omission of 144 amino acids from the N-terminal comparing with the active Cry2Aa-MEB4 protein. All these features caused the diminishing of Cry2Aa-BNS3 toxicity towards E. kuehniella. PMID:26321422

  4. AAS 228: Day 2 morning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2016-06-01

    Editors Note:This week were at the 228th AAS Meeting in San Diego, CA. Along with a team ofauthors from astrobites.com, I will bewritingupdates on selectedevents at themeeting and posting twiceeach day. Follow along here or atastrobites.com, or catch ourlive-tweeted updates from the@astrobites Twitter account. The usual posting schedule for AAS Nova will resumenext week.Plenary Session (Day 1) The Galaxy Zoo(by Benny Tsang)Galaxy Zoo was so hot that the servers hosting the galaxy images got melted down soon after being launched.Kevin Schawinski from ETH Zurich took us on a tour ofhis wonderful Galaxy Zoo. It is a huge zoo with about a quarter million zookeepers, they are citizen astronomers who collaboratively classify galaxies by their looks as an attempt to understand galaxy evolution. The big question that is being answered is: how do blue, actively star-forming galaxies evolve into red, quiescent (non-star-forming) galaxies? The Zoo helped reveal that blue galaxies turn into red galaxies via two possible paths galaxies might run out of supply of gas and shut off star formation slowly; or they could merge with one another and turn off star formation by destroying the gas reservoir rapidly!The Galaxy Zoo project also led to the discoveries of:Green Peas: they are the living fossils of galaxy evolution; compact, bright, green galaxies that are actively forming starsOverlapping galaxies: they are pairs of galaxies that are separated physically but happen to lie on the same line of sight; they provide excellent laboratories for studying dust extinctionHannys Voorwerp: an unusual object named after Hanny the discoverer, which is believed to be the first detection of quasar light echoThe idea of Galaxy Zoo in getting help from citizen scientists was further extended into an award-winningproject known as the Zooniverse, which is an online platform for streamlined crowd-sourcing for scientific research that requires human input. The future of astronomy is going to be

  5. Outcomes From AAS Hack Day at the 227th AAS Meeting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2016-01-01

    paper, Ruth is seeking contributions of one-minute audio recordings.RadioFree LST: Radio observers dont care when the Sun is up, but they do care if their astronomical objects of interest are above the horizon. Demitri Muna (Ohio State) and Amanda Kepley (NRAO) created a calculator which uses local sidereal time (LST) to determine when sources rise and set based on the position of the observatory and the coordinates of the target..@demitrimuna @aakepley are creating a LST calculator for radio telescopes. #radiofreelst #hackaas pic.twitter.com/TEAdYe3hvi astrobites (@astrobites) January 8, 2016Hidden Killer Detective: The Kepler spacecraft has enabled many discoveries related to exoplanets and stars. But now that K2 is observing in the ecliptic plane, it should also find asteroids. Geert Barentsen (NASA Ames), Tom Barclay (NASA Ames), Meg Schwamb (ASIAA), and Brooke Simmons (UC San Diego) created a new crowd-sourced Zooniverse project so anyone can help search for moving objects that may be asteroids.Expanding Astronomy on Tap: This casual science pub night, started in 2013, is now a regular event in seven cities worldwide. Jeff Silverman (UT Austin) created a Launch Manifesto and guide for bringing Astronomy on Tap to your own city. If youre interested, fill out their survey to get more information.The Arceli Project: Arceli is publishing online astronomy content. A team led by ScienceBetter and Kelle Cruz (CUNY) including Daina Bouquin (Harvard CfA), Aram Zucker-Scharff, Lars Holm Nielsen (CERN), Jonathan Sick (LSST), Chris Erdmann (Harvard CfA), and Meredith Rawls (NMSU) worked on getting each component of Arceli to talk to the others. Eventually, Arceli will accept submissions of informal scholarly contentlike blog postswhich will become archived and citable just like traditional papers.Special Dark: Leonidas Moustakas (JPL/Caltech) and Tonima Ananna (Yale) hosted a special session at this years AAS meeting all about dark matter. During hack day, they began a

  6. Developmental nephrotoxicity of aristolochic acid in a zebrafish model

    SciTech Connect

    Ding, Yu-Ju; Chen, Yau-Hung

    2012-05-15

    Aristolochic acid (AA) is a component of Aristolochia plant extracts which is used as a treatment for different pathologies and their toxicological effects have not been sufficiently studied. The aim of this study was to evaluate AA-induced nephrotoxicity in zebrafish embryos. After soaking zebrafish embryos in AA, the embryos displayed malformed kidney phenotypes, such as curved, cystic pronephric tubes, pronephric ducts, and cases of atrophic glomeruli. The percentages of embryos with malformed kidney phenotypes increased as the exposure dosages of AA increased. Furthermore, AA-treated embryos exhibited significantly reduced glomerular filtration rates (GFRs) in comparison with mock-control littermates (mock-control: 100 ± 2.24% vs. 10 ppm AA treatment for 3–5 h: 71.48 ± 18.84% ∼ 39.41 ± 15.88%), indicating that AA treatment not only caused morphological kidney changes but also induced renal failure. In addition to kidney malformations, AA-treated zebrafish embryos also exhibited deformed hearts, swollen pericardiums, impaired blood circulation and the accumulation(s) of red blood cells. Whole-mount in situ hybridization studies using cmlc2 and wt1b as riboprobes indicated that the kidney is more sensitive than the heart to AA damage. Real-time PCR showed that AA can up-regulate the expression of proinflammatory genes like TNFα, cox2 and mpo. These results support the following conclusions: (1) AA-induced renal failure is mediated by inflammation, which causes circulation dysfunction followed by serious heart malformation; and (2) the kidney is more sensitive than the heart to AA injury. -- Highlights: ► Zebrafish were used to evaluate aristolochic acid (AA)-induced nephrotoxicity. ► AA-treated zebrafish embryos exhibited deformed heart as well as malformed kidney. ► Kidney is more sensitive to AA injury than the heart.

  7. Syntheses and Transformations of α-Amino Acids via Palladium-Catalyzed Auxiliary-Directed sp(3) C-H Functionalization.

    PubMed

    He, Gang; Wang, Bo; Nack, William A; Chen, Gong

    2016-04-19

    α-Amino acidsAA) are one of the most useful chiral building blocks for synthesis. There are numerous general strategies that have commonly been used for αAA synthesis, many of which employ de novo synthesis focused on enantioselective bond construction around the Cα center and others that consider conversion of existing αAA precursors carrying suitable functional groups on side chains (e.g., serine and aspartic acid). Despite significant advances in synthetic methodology, the efficient synthesis of enantiopure αAAs carrying complex side chains, as seen in numerous peptide natural products, remains challenging. Complementary to these "conventional" strategies, a strategy based on the selective functionalization of side chain C-H bonds, particularly sp(3) hybridized C-H bonds, of various readily available αAA precursors may provide a more straightforward and broadly applicable means for the synthesis and transformation of αAAs. However, many hurdles related to the low reactivity of C(sp(3))-H bonds and the difficulty of controlling selectivity must be overcome to realize the potential of C-H functionalization chemistry in this synthetic application. Over the past few years, we have carried out a systematic investigation of palladium-catalyzed bidentate auxiliary-directed C-H functionalization reactions for αAA substrates. Our strategies utilize two different types of amide-linked auxiliary groups, attached at the N or C terminus of αAA substrates, to exert complementary regio- and stereocontrol on C-H functionalization reactions through palladacycle intermediates. A variety of αAA precursors can undergo multiple modes of C(sp(3))-H functionalization, including arylation, alkenylation, alkynylation, alkylation, alkoxylation, and intramolecular aminations, at the β, γ, and even δ positions to form new αAA products with diverse structures. In addition to transforming αAAs at previously unreachable positions, these palladium-catalyzed C

  8. The AAS: Its Next 100 Years

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolff, S.

    1999-05-01

    The AAS: Its Next Hundred Years "We are probably nearing the limit of all we can know about astronomy."-- Simon Newcomb, 1888. The best way to celebrate the centennial of the AAS is to look forward, not backward, and to begin planning for the next 100 years. However, predicting the future is even more difficult than it was in Newcomb's time. We live in an era characterized by an unprecedented rate of change in the kinds of scientific questions we ask, the tools we use to answer them, and the way we communicate our results. This talk will highlight some of the issues that we will face as a community during the next 10--but not the next 100!--years and suggests that the AAS has a fundamental role to play in shaping the community response to these issues.

  9. Ascorbic acid: its role in immune system and chronic inflammation diseases.

    PubMed

    Sorice, Angela; Guerriero, Eliana; Capone, Francesca; Colonna, Giovanni; Castello, Giuseppe; Costantini, Susan

    2014-05-01

    Ascorbic acid (AA), also known as vitamin C, was initially identified as the factor preventing the scurvy disease, and became very popular for its antioxidant properties. It is an important co-substrate of a large class of enzymes, and regulates gene expression by interacting with important transcription factors. AA is important in all stressful conditions that are linked to inflammatory processes and involve immunity. It has been known for decades that the persistence of an inflammatory stimulus is responsible for the onset of many diseases. AA is essential to stimulate the immune system by increasing the strength and protection of the organism. Therefore, its immunostimulant, antinflammatory, antiviral and antibacterial roles are well known, we have summarized its main functions in different types of diseases related to the immune system and chronic inflammation. We can conclude that AA, due to its effects and diversity of regulated pathways, is suitable for use in various fields of medicine including immunology, toxicology, radiobiology and others. AA is not preferable to be used as an isolated mode of treatment, but it can be co-applied as an adjuvant to regulate immunity, gene expression and other important physiological processes. However, we propose that future studies will take into consideration the research of new combinations of antioxidant natural substances and drugs. PMID:24766384

  10. AAS 228: Day 2 morning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2016-06-01

    Editors Note:This week were at the 228th AAS Meeting in San Diego, CA. Along with a team ofauthors from astrobites.com, I will bewritingupdates on selectedevents at themeeting and posting twiceeach day. Follow along here or atastrobites.com, or catch ourlive-tweeted updates from the@astrobites Twitter account. The usual posting schedule for AAS Nova will resumenext week.Plenary Session (Day 1) The Galaxy Zoo(by Benny Tsang)Galaxy Zoo was so hot that the servers hosting the galaxy images got melted down soon after being launched.Kevin Schawinski from ETH Zurich took us on a tour ofhis wonderful Galaxy Zoo. It is a huge zoo with about a quarter million zookeepers, they are citizen astronomers who collaboratively classify galaxies by their looks as an attempt to understand galaxy evolution. The big question that is being answered is: how do blue, actively star-forming galaxies evolve into red, quiescent (non-star-forming) galaxies? The Zoo helped reveal that blue galaxies turn into red galaxies via two possible paths galaxies might run out of supply of gas and shut off star formation slowly; or they could merge with one another and turn off star formation by destroying the gas reservoir rapidly!The Galaxy Zoo project also led to the discoveries of:Green Peas: they are the living fossils of galaxy evolution; compact, bright, green galaxies that are actively forming starsOverlapping galaxies: they are pairs of galaxies that are separated physically but happen to lie on the same line of sight; they provide excellent laboratories for studying dust extinctionHannys Voorwerp: an unusual object named after Hanny the discoverer, which is believed to be the first detection of quasar light echoThe idea of Galaxy Zoo in getting help from citizen scientists was further extended into an award-winningproject known as the Zooniverse, which is an online platform for streamlined crowd-sourcing for scientific research that requires human input. The future of astronomy is going to be

  11. Development of a portable infrared emission spectrometer AA460 PIRES

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lehotsky, James P.; Cach, Steven D.

    1990-01-01

    The purpose of this Phase 2 research effort was to design and build a prototype field portable thermal infrared emission spectrometer (PIRES). This phase of work would build on the design concepts and analysis completed during Phase 1. The AA460 PIRES System is a field-portable thermal emission spectral radiometer which operates over the 2.5-14.5 microns wavelength range. Its primary function is to characterize the spectral emission signatures of objects at reasonable terrestrial temperatures (0 deg to 50 deg). However, the instrument design is flexible enough to allow useful data collection to occur from objects outside this temperature range or from sources other than thermal radiators. While ideally suited for two-man operation in the field, the instrument can be transported and operated effectively by a single user. The AA460 Pires System gives the user the capability to collect and display processed thermal emission data on-site. This eliminates the need for the user/researcher to remove a sample from its natural setting in order to accommodate laboratory analysis. The AA460 PIRES instrument was fabricated, assembled, tested, and documented during this Phase 2 work period. Software development included a user friendly menu structure, control, and communications process. Testing included optical and spectral characterization of the instrument and general performance. The test results concluded that the instrument met most of the original design goals set forward in the Phase 1 work including size, weight, portability, rugged, menu driven operation, and in-field analysis. The area in which the instrument did not meet our design goals is in the signal-to-noise (SNR) performance. Testing concluded that this poor SNR performance was due primarily to data collection scheme and our inability to properly amplify and stabilize the detector signals. Modification to this collection scheme could improve the SNR performance and verification is necessary before

  12. Development of a portable infrared emission spectrometer AA460 PIRES

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lehotsky, James P.; Cach, Steven D.

    1990-07-01

    The purpose of this Phase 2 research effort was to design and build a prototype field portable thermal infrared emission spectrometer (PIRES). This phase of work would build on the design concepts and analysis completed during Phase 1. The AA460 PIRES System is a field-portable thermal emission spectral radiometer which operates over the 2.5-14.5 microns wavelength range. Its primary function is to characterize the spectral emission signatures of objects at reasonable terrestrial temperatures (0 deg to 50 deg). However, the instrument design is flexible enough to allow useful data collection to occur from objects outside this temperature range or from sources other than thermal radiators. While ideally suited for two-man operation in the field, the instrument can be transported and operated effectively by a single user. The AA460 Pires System gives the user the capability to collect and display processed thermal emission data on-site. This eliminates the need for the user/researcher to remove a sample from its natural setting in order to accommodate laboratory analysis. The AA460 PIRES instrument was fabricated, assembled, tested, and documented during this Phase 2 work period. Software development included a user friendly menu structure, control, and communications process. Testing included optical and spectral characterization of the instrument and general performance. The test results concluded that the instrument met most of the original design goals set forward in the Phase 1 work including size, weight, portability, rugged, menu driven operation, and in-field analysis. The area in which the instrument did not meet our design goals is in the signal-to-noise (SNR) performance. Testing concluded that this poor SNR performance was due primarily to data collection scheme and our inability to properly amplify and stabilize the detector signals. Modification to this collection scheme could improve the SNR performance and verification is necessary before

  13. Using Focus Groups to Inform the Development of Stroke Recovery and Prevention Programs for Younger African-American (AA) Men

    PubMed Central

    Blixen, Carol; Perzynski, Adam; Cage, Jamie; Smyth, Kathleen; Moore, Shirley; Sila, Cathy; Pundik, Svetlana; Sajatovic, Martha

    2016-01-01

    Objective To assess perceived facilitators and recommendations for stroke recovery and prevention among younger AA men (< age 65) in order to inform the development and pilot testing of an intervention for this high risk group. Method Focus group methodology was used to collect data from ten community-dwelling AA stroke survivors and seven of their care partners (CPs) (N=17. Thematic analysis of session transcripts and the constant comparative method were used to generate themes. Results Participants cited facilitators to post-stroke care and recovery as Family Support, Stress Reduction and Dietary Changes. Specific person-level recommendations for AA men included following established stroke guidelines, use of complementary and alternative medicine, and never give up recovery efforts. Community-level recommendations included making a list of community resources available, providing support and education to care partners, using videos that feature AA men to deliver information and use AA men stroke survivors to help disseminate the information. Provider and health system recommendations included consolidation of medical bills, improving provider communication skills and making providers aware of needs specific to AA men and their families. Conclusions While AA men and their CPs acknowledged and welcomed learning more about the American Health Assocation Stroke Prevention Guidelines, it is clear they desired approaches that addressed their specific needs and preferences as young AA men who sometimes felt de-valued by their community and care providers. Specific person, community and care-system level approaches that are of perceived value to AA men offer potential to improve health outcomes and reduce health disparities. PMID:26084323

  14. Effect of Insulin Sensitizer Therapy on Amino Acids and their Metabolites

    PubMed Central

    Irving, B.A.; Carter, R.E.; Soop, M.; Weymiller, A.; Syed, H.; Karakelides, H.; Bhagra, S.; Short, K.R.; Tatpati, L.; Barazzoni, R.; Nair, K.S.

    2015-01-01

    Aims Prior studies have reported that elevated concentrations of several plasma amino acids (AA) in plasma, particularly branched chain (BCAA) and aromatic AA predict the onset of type 2 diabetes. We sought to test the hypothesis that circulating BCAA, aromatic AA and related AA metabolites decline in response to the use of insulin sensitizing agents in overweight/obese adults with impaired fasting glucose or untreated diabetes. Methods We performed a secondary analysis of a randomized, double-blind, placebo, controlled study conducted in twenty five overweight/obese (BMI~30 kg/m2) adults with impaired fasting glucose or untreated diabetes. Participants were randomized to three months of pioglitazone (45 mg per day) plus metformin (1000 mg twice per day, N = 12 participants) or placebo (N = 13). We measured insulin sensitivity by the euglycemic-hyperinsulinemic clamp and fasting concentrations of AA and AA metabolites using ultra-pressure liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry before and after the three-month intervention. Results Insulin sensitizer therapy that significantly enhanced insulin sensitivity reduced 9 out of 33 AA and AA metabolites measured compared to placebo treatment. Moreover, insulin sensitizer therapy significantly reduced three functionally clustered AA and metabolite pairs: i) phenylalanine/tyrosine, ii) citrulline/arginine, and iii) lysine/α-aminoadipic acid. Conclusions Reductions in plasma concentrations of several AA and AA metabolites in response to three months of insulin sensitizer therapy support the concept that reduced insulin sensitivity alters AA and AA metabolites. PMID:25733201

  15. Ascorbic acid/Fe@Fe2O3: A highly efficient combined Fenton reagent to remove organic contaminants.

    PubMed

    Hou, Xiaojing; Huang, Xiaopeng; Ai, Zhihui; Zhao, Jincai; Zhang, Lizhi

    2016-06-01

    In this study, we demonstrate that the combination of ascorbic acid and Fe@Fe2O3 core-shell nanowires (AA/Fe@Fe2O3) offers a highly efficient Fenton reagent. This combined Fenton reagent exhibited extremely high activity on the decomposition of H2O2 to produce OH for the degradation of various organic contaminants, including rhodamine B, methylene blue, alachlor, atrazine, siduron, lincomycin, and chloroamphenicol. The contaminant degradation constants in the AA/Fe@Fe2O3/H2O2 Fenton systems were 38-53 times higher than those in the conventional homogeneous Fenton system (Fe(II)/H2O2) at pH 3.8. Moreover, the OH generation rate constant in the AA/Fe@Fe2O3/H2O2 Fenton system was 1-3 orders of magnitudes greater than those of heterogeneous Fenton systems developed with other iron-containing materials (α-FeOOH, α-Fe2O3, FeOCl, and so on). The high activity of AA/Fe@Fe2O3 was attributed to the effective Fe(III)/Fe(II) cycle and the iron-ascorbate complex formation to stabilize ferrous ions with desirable and steady concentrations. During the AA/Fe@Fe2O3/H2O2 Fenton process, ascorbic acid served as a reducing and complexing reagent, enabling the reuse of Fe@Fe2O3 nanowires. We systematically investigated the alachlor and ascorbic acid degradation and found that they could be effectively degraded in the AA/Fe@Fe2O3/H2O2 system, accompanying with 100% of dechlorination and 92% of denitrification. This study sheds light on the importance of Fe(III)/Fe(II) cycle for the design of high efficient Fenton system and provides an alternative pathway for the organic contaminants removal. PMID:26921510

  16. Dietary uptake of omega-3 fatty acids in mouse tissue studied by time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (TOF-SIMS).

    PubMed

    Sjövall, Peter; Rossmeisl, Martin; Hanrieder, Jörg; Kuda, Ondrej; Kopecky, Jan; Bryhn, Morten

    2015-07-01

    Dietary intake of omega-3 fatty acids is associated with considerable health benefits, including the prevention of metabolic disorders such as cardiovascular disease and type 2 diabetes. Furthermore, incorporation of the main omega-3 fatty acids, eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), at the systemic level has been found to be more efficient when these fatty acids are supplied in the form of marine phospholipids compared to triglycerides. In this work, the uptake of omega-3 fatty acids and their incorporation in specific lipids were studied in adipose, skeletal muscle, and liver tissues of mice given high-fat diets with or without omega-3 supplements in the form of phospholipids or triglycerides using time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (TOF-SIMS). The results demonstrate significant uptake of EPA and DHA, and the incorporation of these fatty acids in specific lipid molecules, in all three tissue types in response to the dietary omega-3 supplements. Moreover, the results indicate reduced concentrations of arachidonic acid (AA) and depletion of lipids containing AA in tissue samples from mice given supplementary omega-3, as compared to the control mice. The effect on the lipid composition, in particular the DHA uptake and AA depletion, was found to be significantly stronger when the omega-3 supplement was supplied in the form of phospholipids, as compared to triglycerides. TOF-SIMS was found to be a useful technique for screening the lipid composition and simultaneously obtaining the spatial distributions of various lipid classes on tissue surfaces. PMID:25694146

  17. 7 CFR 51.596 - U.S. Grade AA.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ..., CERTIFICATION, AND STANDARDS) United States Consumer Standards for Celery Stalks Grades § 51.596 U.S. Grade AA. U.S. Grade AA shall consist of stalks of celery of similar varietal characteristics, which are...

  18. 7 CFR 51.596 - U.S. Grade AA.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ..., CERTIFICATION, AND STANDARDS) United States Consumer Standards for Celery Stalks Grades § 51.596 U.S. Grade AA. U.S. Grade AA shall consist of stalks of celery of similar varietal characteristics, which are...

  19. 7 CFR 51.596 - U.S. Grade AA.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... Consumer Standards for Celery Stalks Grades § 51.596 U.S. Grade AA. U.S. Grade AA shall consist of stalks of celery of similar varietal characteristics, which are well developed, and have good...

  20. 7 CFR 51.596 - U.S. Grade AA.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... Consumer Standards for Celery Stalks Grades § 51.596 U.S. Grade AA. U.S. Grade AA shall consist of stalks of celery of similar varietal characteristics, which are well developed, and have good...

  1. Aspartic acid

    MedlinePlus

    ... also called asparaginic acid. Aspartic acid helps every cell in the body work. It plays a role in: Hormone production and release Normal nervous system function Plant sources of aspartic acid include: Legumes such as ...

  2. Electronic coupling through natural amino acids.

    PubMed

    Berstis, Laura; Beckham, Gregg T; Crowley, Michael F

    2015-12-14

    Myriad scientific domains concern themselves with biological electron transfer (ET) events that span across vast scales of rate and efficiency through a remarkably fine-tuned integration of amino acid (AA) sequences, electronic structure, dynamics, and environment interactions. Within this intricate scheme, many questions persist as to how proteins modulate electron-tunneling properties. To help elucidate these principles, we develop a model set of peptides representing the common α-helix and β-strand motifs including all natural AAs within implicit protein-environment solvation. Using an effective Hamiltonian strategy with density functional theory, we characterize the electronic coupling through these peptides, furthermore considering side-chain dynamics. For both motifs, predictions consistently show that backbone-mediated electronic coupling is distinctly sensitive to AA type (aliphatic, polar, aromatic, negatively charged and positively charged), and to side-chain orientation. The unique properties of these residues may be employed to design activated, deactivated, or switch-like superexchange pathways. Electronic structure calculations and Green's function analyses indicate that localized shifts in the electron density along the peptide play a role in modulating these pathways, and further substantiate the experimentally observed behavior of proline residues as superbridges. The distinct sensitivities of tunneling pathways to sequence and conformation revealed in this electronic coupling database help improve our fundamental understanding of the broad diversity of ET reactivity and provide guiding principles for peptide design. PMID:26671404

  3. Electronic coupling through natural amino acids

    SciTech Connect

    Berstis, Laura; Beckham, Gregg T. E-mail: gregg.beckham@nrel.gov; Crowley, Michael F. E-mail: gregg.beckham@nrel.gov

    2015-12-14

    Myriad scientific domains concern themselves with biological electron transfer (ET) events that span across vast scales of rate and efficiency through a remarkably fine-tuned integration of amino acid (AA) sequences, electronic structure, dynamics, and environment interactions. Within this intricate scheme, many questions persist as to how proteins modulate electron-tunneling properties. To help elucidate these principles, we develop a model set of peptides representing the common α-helix and β-strand motifs including all natural AAs within implicit protein-environment solvation. Using an effective Hamiltonian strategy with density functional theory, we characterize the electronic coupling through these peptides, furthermore considering side-chain dynamics. For both motifs, predictions consistently show that backbone-mediated electronic coupling is distinctly sensitive to AA type (aliphatic, polar, aromatic, negatively charged and positively charged), and to side-chain orientation. The unique properties of these residues may be employed to design activated, deactivated, or switch-like superexchange pathways. Electronic structure calculations and Green’s function analyses indicate that localized shifts in the electron density along the peptide play a role in modulating these pathways, and further substantiate the experimentally observed behavior of proline residues as superbridges. The distinct sensitivities of tunneling pathways to sequence and conformation revealed in this electronic coupling database help improve our fundamental understanding of the broad diversity of ET reactivity and provide guiding principles for peptide design.

  4. Electronic coupling through natural amino acids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berstis, Laura; Beckham, Gregg T.; Crowley, Michael F.

    2015-12-01

    Myriad scientific domains concern themselves with biological electron transfer (ET) events that span across vast scales of rate and efficiency through a remarkably fine-tuned integration of amino acid (AA) sequences, electronic structure, dynamics, and environment interactions. Within this intricate scheme, many questions persist as to how proteins modulate electron-tunneling properties. To help elucidate these principles, we develop a model set of peptides representing the common α-helix and β-strand motifs including all natural AAs within implicit protein-environment solvation. Using an effective Hamiltonian strategy with density functional theory, we characterize the electronic coupling through these peptides, furthermore considering side-chain dynamics. For both motifs, predictions consistently show that backbone-mediated electronic coupling is distinctly sensitive to AA type (aliphatic, polar, aromatic, negatively charged and positively charged), and to side-chain orientation. The unique properties of these residues may be employed to design activated, deactivated, or switch-like superexchange pathways. Electronic structure calculations and Green's function analyses indicate that localized shifts in the electron density along the peptide play a role in modulating these pathways, and further substantiate the experimentally observed behavior of proline residues as superbridges. The distinct sensitivities of tunneling pathways to sequence and conformation revealed in this electronic coupling database help improve our fundamental understanding of the broad diversity of ET reactivity and provide guiding principles for peptide design.

  5. A fast, simple, and reliable hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography method for the determination of ascorbic and isoascorbic acids.

    PubMed

    Barros, Ana I R N A; Silva, Ana P; Gonçalves, Berta; Nunes, Fernando M

    2010-03-01

    A reliable method for the determination of total vitamin C must be able to resolve ascorbic acid (AA) and the epimeric isoascorbic acid (IAA) and determine the sum of AA and its oxidized form dehydroascorbic acid. AA and IAA are polar molecules with a low retention time in conventional reversed phase systems, and hence of difficult resolution. Hydrophilic interaction chromatography using a TSKgel Amide-80 stationary phase with isocratic elution was successful in resolving the two epimers. The column was compatible with injections of high concentrations of metaphosphoric acid, tris(2-carboxyethyl)-phosphine, and EDTA without drift of baseline and retention time. Total AA and IAA were extracted, stabilized, and reduced in one step at 40 °C, using 5% m-phosphoric acid, 2 mM of EDTA, and 2 mM of tris(2-carboxyethyl)-phosphine as reducing agent. This simple, fast, and robust hydrophilic interaction chromatography-DAD method was applied for the analysis of food products namely fruit juices, chestnut, and ham and also in pharmaceutical and multivitamin tablets. Method validation was performed on the food products, including parameters of precision, accuracy, linearity, limit of detection, and quantification (LOQ). The absence of matrix interferences was assessed by the standard addition method and Youden calibration. The method was fast, accurate, and precise with a LOQ(AA) of 1.5 mg/L and LOQ(IAA) of 3.7 mg/L. The simple experimental procedure, completed in 1 h, the possibility of using IAA as an internal standard, and low probability of artifacts are the major advantages of the proposed method for the routine determination of these compounds in a large number of samples. PMID:20091158

  6. Concordance between isolated cleft palate in mice and alterations within a region including the gene encoding the [beta][sub 3] subunit of the type A [gamma]-aminobutyric acid receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Culiat, C.T.; Stubbs, L.; Nicholls, R.D.; Montgomery, C.S.; Russell, L.B.; Johnson, D.K. ); Rinchik, E.M. Univ. of Florida, Gainesville )

    1993-06-01

    Genetic and molecular analyses of a number of radiation-induced deletion mutations of the pink-eyed dilution (p) locus in mouse chromosome 7 have identified a specific interval on the genetic map associated with a neonatally lethal mutation that results in cleft palate. This interval, closely linked and distal to p, and bracketed by the genes encoding the [alpha][sub 5] and [beta][sub 3] subunits of the type A [gamma]-aminobutyric acid receptor (Gabra5 and Gabrb3, respectively), contains a gene(s) (cp1; cleft palate 1) necessary for normal palate development. The cp1 interval extends from the distal breakpoint of the prenatally lethal p[sup 83FBFo] deletion to the Gabrb3 locus. Among 20 p deletions tested, there was complete concordance between alterations at the Gabrb3 transcription unit and inability to complement the cleft-palate defect. These mapping data, along with previously described in vivo and in vitro teratological effects of [gamma]-aminobutyric acid or its agonists on palate development, suggest the possibility that a particular type A [gamma]-aminobutyric acid receptor that includes the [beta][sub 3] subunit may be necessary for normal palate development. The placement of the cp1 gene within a defined segment of the larger D15S12h (p)-D15S9h-1 interval in the mouse suggests that the highly homologous region of the human genome, 15q11-q13, be evaluated for a role(s) in human fetal facial development. 29 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  7. Post-exercise whey protein hydrolysate supplementation induces a greater increase in muscle protein synthesis than its constituent amino acid content.

    PubMed

    Kanda, Atsushi; Nakayama, Kyosuke; Fukasawa, Tomoyuki; Koga, Jinichiro; Kanegae, Minoru; Kawanaka, Kentaro; Higuchi, Mitsuru

    2013-09-28

    It is well known that ingestion of a protein source is effective in stimulating muscle protein synthesis after exercise. In addition, there are numerous reports on the impact of leucine and leucine-rich whey protein on muscle protein synthesis and mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) signalling. However, there is only limited information on the effects of whey protein hydrolysates (WPH) on muscle protein synthesis and mTOR signalling. The aim of the present study was to compare the effects of WPH and amino acids on muscle protein synthesis and the initiation of translation in skeletal muscle during the post-exercise phase. Male Sprague–Dawley rats swam for 2 h to depress muscle protein synthesis. Immediately after exercise, the animals were administered either carbohydrate (CHO), CHO plus an amino acid mixture (AA) or CHO plus WPH. At 1 h after exercise, the supplements containing whey-based protein (AA and WPH) caused a significant increase in the fractional rate of protein synthesis (FSR) compared with CHO. WPH also caused a significant increase in FSR compared with AA. Post-exercise ingestion of WPH caused a significant increase in the phosphorylation of mTOR levels compared with AA or CHO. In addition, WPH caused greater phosphorylation of ribosomal protein S6 kinase and eukaryotic initiation factor 4E-binding protein 1 than AA and CHO. In contrast, there was no difference in plasma amino acid levels following supplementation with either AA or WPH. These results indicate that WPH may include active components that are superior to amino acids for stimulating muscle protein synthesis and initiating translation. PMID:23388415

  8. 7 CFR 51.596 - U.S. Grade AA.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false U.S. Grade AA. 51.596 Section 51.596 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing... Consumer Standards for Celery Stalks Grades § 51.596 U.S. Grade AA. U.S. Grade AA shall consist of...

  9. A novel system combining biocatalytic dephosphorylation of L-ascorbic acid 2-phosphate and electrochemical oxidation of resulting ascorbic acid.

    PubMed

    Kuwahara, Takashi; Homma, Toshimasa; Kondo, Mizuki; Shimomura, Masato

    2011-03-15

    An enzyme electrode was prepared with acid phosphatase (ACP) for development of a new electric power generation system using ascorbic acid 2-phosphate (AA2P) as a fuel. The properties of the electrode were investigated with respect to biocatalytic dephosphorylation of AA2P and electrochemical oxidation of resulting ascorbic acid (AA). The enzyme electrode was fabricated by immobilization of ACP through amide linkage onto a self-assembled monolayer of 3-mercaptopropionic acid on a gold electrode. AA2P was not oxidized on a bare gold electrode in the potential sweep range from -0.1 to +0.5 V vs. Ag/AgCl. However, the enzyme electrode gave an oxidation current in citric buffer solution of pH 5 containing 10 mM of AA2P. The oxidation current began to increase at +0.2V, and reached to 5.0 μA cm(-2) at +0.5 V. The potential +0.2 V corresponded to the onset of oxidation of ascorbic acid (AA). These results suggest that the oxidation current observed with the enzyme electrode is due to AA resulting from dephosphorylation of AA2P. The oxidation current increased with increasing concentration of AA2P and almost leveled off at around the concentration of 5mM. Thus the enzyme electrode brought about biocatalytic conversion of AA2P to AA, followed by electrochemical oxidation of the AA. The oxidation current is likely to be controlled by the biocatalytic reaction. PMID:21247749

  10. Systemic AA amyloidosis: epidemiology, diagnosis, and management

    PubMed Central

    Real de Asúa, Diego; Costa, Ramón; Galván, Jose María; Filigheddu, María Teresa; Trujillo, Davinia; Cadiñanos, Julen

    2014-01-01

    The term “amyloidosis” encompasses the heterogeneous group of diseases caused by the extracellular deposition of autologous fibrillar proteins. The global incidence of amyloidosis is estimated at five to nine cases per million patient-years. While amyloid light-chain (AL) amyloidosis is more frequent in developed countries, amyloid A (AA) amyloidosis is more common in some European regions and in developing countries. The spectrum of AA amyloidosis has changed in recent decades owing to: an increase in the median age at diagnosis; a percent increase in the frequency of primary AL amyloidosis with respect to the AA type; and a substantial change in the epidemiology of the underlying diseases. Diagnosis of amyloidosis is based on clinical organ involvement and histological evidence of amyloid deposits. Among the many tinctorial characteristics of amyloid deposits, avidity for Congo red and metachromatic birefringence under unidirectional polarized light remain the gold standard. Once the initial diagnosis has been made, the amyloid subtype must be identified and systemic organ involvement evaluated. In this sense, the 123I-labeled serum amyloid P component scintigraphy is a safe and noninvasive technique that has revolutionized the diagnosis and monitoring of treatment in systemic amyloidosis. It can successfully identify anatomical patterns of amyloid deposition throughout the body and enables not only an initial estimation of prognosis, but also the monitoring of the course of the disease and the response to treatment. Given the etiologic diversity of AA amyloidosis, common therapeutic strategies are scarce. All treatment options should be based upon a greater control of the underlying disease, adequate organ support, and treatment of symptoms. Nevertheless, novel therapeutic strategies targeting the formation of amyloid fibrils and amyloid deposition may generate new expectations for patients with AA amyloidosis. PMID:25378951

  11. Temporal Variation of Aristolochia chilensis Aristolochic Acids during Spring.

    PubMed

    Santander, Rocío; Urzúa, Alejandro; Olguín, Ángel; Sánchez, María

    2015-01-01

    In this communication, we report the springtime variation of the composition of aristolochic acids (AAs) in Aristolochia chilensis leaves and stems. The dominant AA in the leaves of all samples, which were collected between October and December, was AA-I (1), and its concentration varied between 212.6±3.8 and 145.6±1.2 mg/kg and decreased linearly. This decrease occurred in parallel with the increase in AA-Ia (5) concentration from 15.9±0.8 mg/kg at the beginning of October to 96.8±7.8 mg/kg in mid-December. Both acids are enzymatically related by methylation-demethylation reactions. Other AAs also showed important variations: AA-II (2) significantly increased in concentration, reaching a maximum in the first two weeks of November and subsequently decreasing in mid-December to approximately the October levels. The principal component in the AA mixture of the stems was also AA-I (1); similar to AA-II (2), its concentration increased beginning in October, peaked in the second week of November and subsequently decreased. The concentrations of AA-IIIa (6) and AA-IVa (7) in the leaves and stems varied throughout the study period, but no clear pattern was identified. Based on the variation of AAs in A. chilensis leaves and stems during the study period, the reduced contents of non-phenolic AAs and increased concentrations of phenolic AAs are likely associated with a decrease in this plant's toxicity during the spring. PMID:26580587

  12. Bacillus thuringiensis Crystal Protein Cry6Aa Triggers Caenorhabditis elegans Necrosis Pathway Mediated by Aspartic Protease (ASP-1)

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Fengjuan; Peng, Donghai; Cheng, Chunsheng; Zhou, Wei; Ju, Shouyong; Wan, Danfeng; Yu, Ziquan; Shi, Jianwei; Deng, Yaoyao; Wang, Fenshan; Ye, Xiaobo; Hu, Zhenfei; Lin, Jian; Ruan, Lifang; Sun, Ming

    2016-01-01

    Cell death plays an important role in host-pathogen interactions. Crystal proteins (toxins) are essential components of Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) biological pesticides because of their specific toxicity against insects and nematodes. However, the mode of action by which crystal toxins to induce cell death is not completely understood. Here we show that crystal toxin triggers cell death by necrosis signaling pathway using crystal toxin Cry6Aa-Caenorhabditis elegans toxin-host interaction system, which involves an increase in concentrations of cytoplasmic calcium, lysosomal lyses, uptake of propidium iodide, and burst of death fluorescence. We find that a deficiency in the necrosis pathway confers tolerance to Cry6Aa toxin. Intriguingly, the necrosis pathway is specifically triggered by Cry6Aa, not by Cry5Ba, whose amino acid sequence is different from that of Cry6Aa. Furthermore, Cry6Aa-induced necrosis pathway requires aspartic protease (ASP-1). In addition, ASP-1 protects Cry6Aa from over-degradation in C. elegans. This is the first demonstration that deficiency in necrosis pathway confers tolerance to Bt crystal protein, and that Cry6A triggers necrosis represents a newly added necrosis paradigm in the C. elegans. Understanding this model could lead to new strategies for nematode control. PMID:26795495

  13. Low-coverage exome sequencing screen in formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tumors reveals evidence of exposure to carcinogenic aristolochic acid

    PubMed Central

    Castells, Xavier; Karanović, Sandra; Ardin, Maude; Tomić, Karla; Xylinas, Evanguelos; Durand, Geoffroy; Villar, Stephanie; Forey, Nathalie; Le Calvez-Kelm, Florence; Voegele, Catherine; Karlović, Krešimir; Mišić, Maja; Dittrich, Damir; Dolgalev, Igor; McKay, James; Shariat, Shahrokh F.; Sidorenko, Viktoria S.; Fernandes, Andrea; Heguy, Adriana; Dickman, Kathleen G.; Olivier, Magali; Grollman, Arthur P.; Jelaković, Bojan; Zavadil, Jiri

    2015-01-01

    Background Dietary exposure to cytotoxic and carcinogenic aristolochic acid (AA) causes severe nephropathy typically associated with urological cancers. Monitoring of AA exposure uses biomarkers such as aristolactam-DNA adducts, detected by mass spectrometry in the kidney cortex, or the somatic A>T transversion pattern characteristic of exposure to AA, as revealed by previous DNA sequencing studies using fresh frozen tumors. Methods Here we report a low-coverage whole-exome sequencing method (LC-WES) optimized for multi-sample detection of the AA mutational signature, and demonstrate its utility in 17 formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded urothelial tumors obtained from 15 patients with endemic nephropathy, an environmental form of aristolochic acid nephropathy. Results LC-WES identified the AA signature, alongside signatures of age and APOBEC enzyme activity, in 15 samples sequenced at the average per-base coverage of ~10x. Analysis at 3–9x coverage revealed the signature in 91% of the positive samples. The exome-wide distribution of the predominant A>T transversions exhibited a stochastic pattern whereas 83 cancer driver genes were enriched for recurrent non-synonymous A>T mutations. In two patients, pairs of tumors from different parts of the urinary tract, including the bladder, harbored overlapping mutation patterns, suggesting tumor dissemination via cell seeding. Conclusion LC-WES analysis of archived tumor tissues is a reliable method applicable to investigations of both the exposure to AA and its biologic effects in human carcinomas. Impact By detecting cancers associated with AA exposure in high-risk populations, LC-WES can support future molecular epidemiology studies and provide evidence-base for relevant preventive measures. PMID:26383547

  14. Protection of free radical-induced cytotoxicity by 2-O-α-D-glucopyranosyl-L-ascorbic acid in human dermal fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Hanada, Yukako; Iomori, Atsuko; Ishii, Rie; Gohda, Eiichi; Tai, Akihiro

    2014-01-01

    The stable ascorbic acid (AA) derivative, 2-O-α-D-glucopyranosyl-L-ascorbic acid (AA-2G), exhibits vitamin C activity after enzymatic hydrolysis to AA. The biological activity of AA-2G per se has not been studied in detail, although AA-2G has been noted as a stable source for AA supply. The protective effect of AA-2G against the oxidative cell death of human dermal fibroblasts induced by incubating with 2,2'-azobis(2-amidinopropane) dihydrochloride (AAPH) for 24 h was investigated in this study. AA-2G showed a significant protective effect against the oxidative stress in a concentration-dependent manner. AA-2G did not exert a protective effect during the initial 12 h of incubation, but had a significant protective effect in the later part of the incubation period. Experiments using a α-glucosidase inhibitor and comparative experiments using a stereoisomer of AA-2G confirmed that AA-2G had a protective effect against AAPH-induced cytotoxicity without being converted to AA. Our results provide an insight into the efficacy of AA-2G as a biologically interesting antioxidant and suggest the practical use of AA-2G even before being converted into AA as a beneficial antioxidant. PMID:25036685

  15. Branched-chain amino acids and brain function.

    PubMed

    Fernstrom, John D

    2005-06-01

    Branched-chain amino acids (BCAAs) influence brain function by modifying large, neutral amino acid (LNAA) transport at the blood-brain barrier. Transport is shared by several LNAAs, notably the BCAAs and the aromatic amino acids (ArAAs), and is competitive. Consequently, when plasma BCAA concentrations rise, which can occur in response to food ingestion or BCAA administration, or with the onset of certain metabolic diseases (e.g., uncontrolled diabetes), brain BCAA concentrations rise, and ArAA concentrations decline. Such effects occur acutely and chronically. Such reductions in brain ArAA concentrations have functional consequences: biochemically, they reduce the synthesis and the release of neurotransmitters derived from ArAAs, notably serotonin (from tryptophan) and catecholamines (from tyrosine and phenylalanine). The functional effects of such neurochemical changes include altered hormonal function, blood pressure, and affective state. Although the BCAAs thus have biochemical and functional effects in the brain, few attempts have been made to characterize time-course or dose-response relations for such effects. And, no studies have attempted to identify levels of BCAA intake that might produce adverse effects on the brain. The only "model" of very high BCAA exposure is a very rare genetic disorder, maple syrup urine disease, a feature of which is substantial brain dysfunction but that probably cannot serve as a useful model for excessive BCAA intake by normal individuals. Given the known biochemical and functional effects of the BCAAs, it should be a straightforward exercise to design studies to assess dose-response relations for biochemical and functional effects and, in this context, to explore for adverse effect thresholds. PMID:15930466

  16. Plasma BDNF and PDGF-AA levels are associated with high TCD velocity and stroke in children with sickle cell anemia

    PubMed Central

    Hyacinth, Hyacinth I.; Gee, Beatrice E.; Adamkiewicz, Thomas V.; Adams, Robert J.; Kutlar, Abdullah; Stiles, Jonathan K.; Hibbert, Jacqueline M.

    2012-01-01

    Sickle cell anemia (SCA) associated cerebrovascular disease includes vascular remodeling, abnormal cerebral blood flow (CBF) and infarction. We studied the relationships between plasma brain derived neurotropic factor (BDNF), platelet derived growth factors (PDGF-AA and -AB/BB) and high trans-cranial Doppler (TCD) velocity, an indication of CBF velocity. Baseline plasma samples from 39 children (19 SCA with abnormal/high TCD [SATCD], 13 SCA with normal TCD [SNTCD] and 7 healthy non-SCA), were assayed for BDNF, PDGF-AA and – AB/BB plus 11 other cytokines. The sensitivity, specificity and usefulness of these biomarkers for prediction of stroke incidence was investigated. All subject groups were of similar age and gender distribution. Mean BDNF was significantly higher among SATCD than SNTCD (p=0.004) as was mean PDGF-AA (p=0.001). Similarly, mean PDGF-AA was higher among SCA subjects who developed stroke than for those who did not (p=0.012). Elevated BDNF and PDGF-AA were both associated with severity of anemia. Elevated BDNF and PDGF-AA were good predictors of the presence of abnormally high CBF velocity, and PDGF-AA predicted stroke development. Stroke incidence and high TCD velocity were associated with elevated BDNF and PDGF-AA. These findings suggest a role for BDNF and PDGF-AA in the patho-physiological mechanism of cerebrovascular disease in SCA. PMID:22704695

  17. Comparative study of two chitin-active and two cellulose-active AA10-type lytic polysaccharide monooxygenases.

    PubMed

    Forsberg, Zarah; Røhr, Asmund Kjendseth; Mekasha, Sophanit; Andersson, K Kristoffer; Eijsink, Vincent G H; Vaaje-Kolstad, Gustav; Sørlie, Morten

    2014-03-18

    Lytic polysaccharide monooxygenases (LPMOs), found in family 9 (previously GH61), family 10 (previously CBM33), and the newly discovered family 11 of auxiliary activities (AA) in the carbohydrate-active enzyme classification system, are copper-dependent enzymes that oxidize sp(3)-carbons in recalcitrant polysaccharides such as chitin and cellulose in the presence of an external electron donor. In this study, we describe the activity of two AA10-type LPMOs whose activities have not been described before and we compare in total four different AA10-type LPMOs with the aim of finding possible correlations between their substrate specificities, sequences, and EPR signals. EPR spectra indicate that the electronic environment of the copper varies within the AA10 family even though amino acids directly interacting with the copper atom are identical in all four enzymes. This variation seems to be correlated to substrate specificity and is likely caused by sequence variation in areas that affect substrate binding geometry and/or by variation in a cluster of conserved aromatic residues likely involved in electron transfer. Interestingly, EPR signals for cellulose-active AA10 enzymes were similar to those previously observed for cellulose-active AA9 enzymes. Mutation of the conserved phenylalanine positioned in close proximity to the copper center in AA10-type LPMOs to Tyr (the corresponding residue in most AA9-type LPMOs) or Ala, led to complete or partial inactivation, respectively, while in both cases the ability to bind copper was maintained. Moreover, substrate binding affinity and degradation ability seemed hardly correlated, further emphasizing the crucial role of the active site configuration in determining LPMO functionality. PMID:24559135

  18. Distinct Plasma Profile of Polar Neutral Amino Acids, Leucine, and Glutamate in Children with Autism Spectrum Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tirouvanziam, Rabindra; Obukhanych, Tetyana V.; Laval, Julie; Aronov, Pavel A.; Libove, Robin; Banerjee, Arpita Goswami; Parker, Karen J.; O'Hara, Ruth; Herzenberg, Leonard A.; Herzenberg, Leonore A.; Hardan, Antonio Y.

    2012-01-01

    The goal of this investigation was to examine plasma amino acid (AA) levels in children with Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD, N = 27) and neuro-typically developing controls (N = 20). We observed reduced plasma levels of most polar neutral AA and leucine in children with ASD. This AA profile conferred significant post hoc power for discriminating…

  19. Evaluation of AA5052 alloy anode in alkaline electrolyte with organic rare-earth complex additives for aluminium-air batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Dapeng; Li, Heshun; Liu, Jie; Zhang, Daquan; Gao, Lixin; Tong, Lin

    2015-10-01

    Behaviours of the AA5052 aluminium alloy anode of the alkaline aluminium-air battery are studied by the hydrogen evolution test, the electrochemical measurements and the surface analysis method. The combination of amino-acid and rare earth as electrolyte additives effectively retards the self-corrosion of AA5052 aluminium alloy in 4 M NaOH solution. It shows that the combination of L-cysteine and cerium nitrate has a synergistic effect owing to the formation of a complex film on AA5052 alloy surface. The organic rare-earth complex can decrease the anodic polarisation, suppress the hydrogen evolution and increase the anodic utilization rate.

  20. 34 CFR 303.15 - Include; including.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 34 Education 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Include; including. 303.15 Section 303.15 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department of Education (Continued) OFFICE OF SPECIAL EDUCATION AND REHABILITATIVE SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION EARLY INTERVENTION PROGRAM FOR INFANTS AND TODDLERS...

  1. Introducing the AAS Working Group on Astroinformatics and Astrostatistics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivezic, Zeljko

    2014-01-01

    In response to two White Papers submitted to the Astro2010 Decadal Survey (1,2), a new AAS Working Group on Astroinformatics and Astrostatistics (WGAA) has been approved by the AAS Council at the 220th Meeting, June 2012, in Anchorage. The motivation for this WG is the growing importance of the interface between astronomy and various branches of applied mathematics, computer science and the emerging field of data science. With the new data-intensive projects envisioned for the coming decade, the need for advice derived from the focused attention of a group of AAS members who work in these areas is bound to increase. The Working Group is charged with spreading awareness of rapidly advancing computational techniques, sophsticated statistical methods, and highly capble software to further the goals of astronomical and astrophysical research. The three main strategic goals adopted by the WGAA Steering Committee for the next few years are to: (i) develop, organize and maintain methodological resources (such as software tools, papers, books, and lectures); (ii) enhance human resources (such as foster the creation of career paths, establish a Speakers' Bureau, establish and maintain an archived discussion forum, enable periodic news distribution); and (iii) organize topical meetings. The WGAA Steering Committee at this time includes twelve members: Kirk Borne, George Djorgovski, Eric Feigelson, Eric Ford, Alyssa Goodman, Joe Hilbe, Zeljko Ivezic (chair), Ashish Mahabal, Aneta Siemiginowska, Alex Szalay, Rick White, and Padma Yanamandra-Fisher. I will summarize our accomplishments since July 2012. (1) Astroinformatics: A 21st Century Approach to Astronomy (Borne & 90 coauthors), (2) The Astronomical Information Sciences: A Keystone for 21st-Century Astronomy (Loredo & 72 coauthors)

  2. Dietary supplementation with Astragalus polysaccharide enhances ileal digestibilities and serum concentrations of amino acids in early weaned piglets.

    PubMed

    Yin, F G; Liu, Y L; Yin, Y L; Kong, X F; Huang, R L; Li, T J; Wu, G Y; Hou, Yongqing

    2009-07-01

    Two experiments were conducted to evaluate the effects of dietary supplementation with Astragalus polysaccharide (APS) on growth performance, apparent ileal digestibilities (AID) of amino acids (AA), and their serum concentrations in early weaned piglets. In Exp. 1, 60 pigs were weaned at 21 days of age (BW 7.35 +/- 0.23 kg) and allocated to three treatments (20 pigs/treatment), representing supplementing 0.0% (control), 0.02% colistin (antibiotic), or 0.1% APS to a corn- and soybean meal-based diet. Average daily gain (ADG), average daily feed intake (ADFI), and feed/gain ratio (F/G) were measured weekly. Blood samples were obtained from five pigs selected randomly from each treatment for the measurement of serum free AA concentrations on days 7, 14, and 28. In Exp. 2, 12 pigs were weaned at 21 day of age (BW 7.64 +/- 0.71 kg), assigned to three treatment groups as in Exp. 1, and surgically fitted with a simple T-cannula at the terminal ileum. Ileal digesta samples were obtained for the measurement of AID of AA on days 7, 14 and 28. Dietary APS did not affect ADFI, but enhanced (P < 0.05) ADG by 11 and 4.4%, and improved F/G by 5.6 and 8.4%, respectively, compared with the control and antibiotic groups. Addition of APS to the diet increased AID and serum concentrations of most nutritionally essential and non-essential AA (including arginine, proline, glutamate, lysine, methionine, tryptophan, and threonine) on days 14 and 28. Circulating levels of total AA were affected by the age of pigs and treatment x time interaction. Collectively, these findings indicate that APS may ameliorate the digestive and absorptive function and regulate AA metabolism to beneficially increase the entry of dietary AA into the systemic circulation, which provide a mechanism to explain the growth-promoting effect of APS in early weaned piglets. PMID:18622730

  3. Protective effect of nitric oxide in aristolochic acid-induced toxic acute kidney injury: an old friend with new assets.

    PubMed

    Declèves, Anne-Émilie; Jadot, Inès; Colombaro, Vanessa; Martin, Blanche; Voisin, Virginie; Nortier, Joëlle; Caron, Nathalie

    2016-01-01

    Aristolochic acid (AA) nephropathy (AAN), a progressive tubulointerstitial injury of toxic origin, is characterized by early and transient acute tubular necrosis. This process has been demonstrated to be associated with reduced nitric oxide (NO) production, which can disrupt the regulation of renal function. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that L-arginine (L-Arg) supplementation could restore renal function and reduce renal injury after AA intoxication. C57BL/6 J male mice were randomly subjected to daily i.p. injection of either sterile saline solution or AA (2.5 mg kg(-1)) for 4 days. To determine whether AA-induced renal injuries were linked to reduced NO production, L-Arg, a substrate for NO synthase, was supplemented (5%) in drinking water. Mice intoxicated with AA exhibited features of rapid-onset acute kidney injury, including polyuria, significantly increased plasma creatinine concentrations, proteinuria and fractional excretion of sodium (P < 0.05), along with severe proximal tubular cell injury and increased NADPH oxidase 2 (Nox2)-derived oxidative stress (P < 0.05). This was associated with a significant reduction in NO bioavailability. L-Arg supplementation in AA-treated mice significantly increased NO bioavailability, which in turn improved renal function (creatininaemia, polyuria, proteinuria, fractional excreted sodium and N-acetyl-β-D-glucosaminidase enzymuria) and renal structure (tubular necrosis and tubular cell apoptosis). These changes were associated with significant reductions in Nox2 expression and in production of reactive oxygen species and with an increase in antioxidant concentrations. Our results demonstrate that preservation of NO bioavailability leads to renal protection in AA-induced acute kidney injury by reducing oxidative stress and maintaining renal function. PMID:26442795

  4. Dietary essentiality of "nutritionally non-essential amino acids" for animals and humans.

    PubMed

    Hou, Yongqing; Yin, Yulong; Wu, Guoyao

    2015-08-01

    Based on growth or nitrogen balance, amino acids (AA) had traditionally been classified as nutritionally essential (indispensable) or non-essential (dispensable) for animals and humans. Nutritionally essential AA (EAA) are defined as either those AA whose carbon skeletons cannot be synthesized de novo in animal cells or those that normally are insufficiently synthesized de novo by the animal organism relative to its needs for maintenance, growth, development, and health and which must be provided in the diet to meet requirements. In contrast, nutritionally non-essential AA (NEAA) are those AA which can be synthesized de novo in adequate amounts by the animal organism to meet requirements for maintenance, growth, development, and health and, therefore, need not be provided in the diet. Although EAA and NEAA had been described for over a century, there are no compelling data to substantiate the assumption that NEAA are synthesized sufficiently in animals and humans to meet the needs for maximal growth and optimal health. NEAA play important roles in regulating gene expression, cell signaling pathways, digestion and absorption of dietary nutrients, DNA and protein synthesis, proteolysis, metabolism of glucose and lipids, endocrine status, men and women fertility, acid-base balance, antioxidative responses, detoxification of xenobiotics and endogenous metabolites, neurotransmission, and immunity. Emerging evidence indicates dietary essentiality of "nutritionally non-essential amino acids" for animals and humans to achieve their full genetic potential for growth, development, reproduction, lactation, and resistance to metabolic and infectious diseases. This concept represents a new paradigm shift in protein nutrition to guide the feeding of mammals (including livestock), poultry, and fish. PMID:26041391

  5. Expression of cationic amino acid transporters, carcass traits, and performance of growing pigs fed low-protein amino acid-supplemented versus high protein diets.

    PubMed

    Morales, A; Grageola, F; García, H; Araiza, A; Zijlstra, R T; Cervantes, M

    2013-01-01

    Free amino acids (AA) appear to be absorbed faster than protein-bound AA (PB-AA). We conducted an experiment to assess the effect of feeding pigs with a partially free (F-AA) or totally PB-AA diet on expression of selected genes and performance of pigs. The expression of cationic AA transporters b(0,+) and CAT-1 in intestinal mucosa, liver, and longissimus (LM) and semitendinosus (SM) muscles, as well as that of myosin in LM and SM, was analyzed. Twelve pigs (31.7 ± 2.7 kg) were used. The F-AA diet was based on wheat, supplemented with 0.59% L-Lys, 0.33% L-Thr, and 0.10% DL-Met. The PB-AA diet was formulated with wheat-soybean meal. Average daily feed intake was 1.53 kg per pig. The expression of b(0,+) and CAT-1 was analyzed in jejunal and ileal mucosa, liver, LM, and SM; myosin expression was also analyzed in both muscles. Pigs fed the PB-AA diet tended to have higher weight gain and feed efficiency (P < 0.10), and had thinner back fat (P = 0.02). The expression of b(0,+) was higher (P < 0.01) in jejunum but lower (P < 0.01) in the liver of pigs fed the F-AA diet; CAT-1 tended to be lower in liver but higher in LM of PB-AA pigs. Myosin expression was not affected. Intestinal AA absorption was faster in pigs fed the F-AA diet, but AA uptake by the liver seemed to be faster in pigs fed the PB-AA. Performance and expression of AA transporters and myosin suggest that the dietary content of free or protein-bound AA does not affect their availability for protein synthesis in pigs. PMID:24222247

  6. MAPK signaling triggers transcriptional induction of cFOS during amino acid limitation of HepG2 cells.

    PubMed

    Shan, Jixiu; Donelan, William; Hayner, Jaclyn N; Zhang, Fan; Dudenhausen, Elizabeth E; Kilberg, Michael S

    2015-03-01

    Amino acid (AA) deprivation in mammalian cells activates a collection of signaling cascades known as the AA response (AAR), which is characterized by transcriptional induction of stress-related genes, including FBJ murine osteosarcoma viral oncogene homolog (cFOS). The present study established that the signaling mechanism underlying the AA-dependent transcriptional regulation of the cFOS gene in HepG2 human hepatocellular carcinoma cells is independent of the classic GCN2-eIF2-ATF4 pathway. Instead, a RAS-RAF-MEK-ERK cascade mediates AAR signaling to the cFOS gene. Increased cFOS transcription is observed from 4-24 h after AAR-activation, exhibiting little or no overlap with the rapid and transient increase triggered by the well-known serum response. Furthermore, serum is not required for the AA-responsiveness of the cFOS gene and no phosphorylation of promoter-bound serum response factor (SRF) is observed. The ERK-phosphorylated transcription factor E-twenty six-like (p-ELK1) is increased in its association with the cFOS promoter after activation of the AAR. This research identified cFOS as a target of the AAR and further highlights the importance of AA-responsive MAPK signaling in HepG2 cells. PMID:25523140

  7. Differential effects of polybrominated diphenyl ethers and polychlorinated biphenyls on [3H]arachidonic acid release in rat cerebellar granule neurons.

    PubMed

    Kodavanti, Prasada Rao S; Derr-Yellin, Ethel C

    2002-08-01

    Polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs), which are widely used as flame-retardants, have been increasing in environmental and human tissue samples during the past 20-30 years, while other structurally related, persistent organic pollutants such as polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) and polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins (on a TEQ basis), have decreased. PBDEs have been detected in human blood, adipose tissue, and breast milk, and developmental and long-term exposure to these contaminants may pose a human health risk, especially to children. Previously, we demonstrated that PCBs, which cause neurotoxic effects, including changes in learning and memory, stimulated the release of [(3)H]arachidonic acid ([(3)H]AA) by a cPLA(2)/iPLA(2)-dependent mechanism. PLA(2)(phospholipase A(2)) activity has been associated with learning and memory, and AA has been identified as a second messenger involved in synaptic plasticity. The objective of the present study was to test whether PBDE mixtures (DE-71 and DE-79), like other organohalogen mixtures, have a similar action on [(3)H]AA release in an in vitro neuronal culture model. Cerebellar granule cells at 7 days in culture were labeled with [(3)H]AA for 16-20 h and then exposed in vitro to PBDEs. DE-71, a mostly pentabromodiphenyl ether mixture, significantly stimulated [(3)H]AA release at concentrations as low as 10 microg/ml, while DE-79, a mostly octabromodiphenyl ether mixture, did not stimulate [(3)H]AA release, even at 50 microg/ml. The release of [(3)H]AA by DE-71 is time-dependent, and a significant increase was seen after only 5-10 min of exposure. The removal and chelation of calcium from the exposure buffer, using 0.3 mM EGTA, significantly attenuated the DE-71-stimulated [(3)H]AA release; however, only an 18% inhibition of the release was demonstrated for the calcium replete conditions at 30 microg/ml DE-71. Methyl arachidonylfluorophosphonate (5 microM), an inhibitor of cPLA(2)/iPLA(2), completely attenuated the DE-71

  8. Structural and Energetic Effects in the Molecular Recognition of Acetylated Amino Acids by 18-Crown-6

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yu; Rodgers, M. T.

    2012-11-01

    Absolute 18-crown-6 (18C6) binding affinities of four protonated acetylated amino acids (AcAAs) are determined using guided ion beam tandem mass spectrometry techniques. The AcAAs examined in this work include: N-terminal acetylated lysine (Nα-AcLys), histidine (Nα-AcHis), and arginine (Nα-AcArg) as well as side chain acetylated lysine (Nɛ-AcLys). The kinetic-energy-dependent cross sections for collision-induced dissociation (CID) of the (AcAA)H+(18C6) complexes are analyzed using an empirical threshold law to extract absolute 0 and 298 K (AcAA)H+-18C6 bond dissociation energies (BDEs) after accounting for the effects of multiple collisions, kinetic and internal energy distributions of the reactants, and unimolecular dissociation lifetimes. Theoretical electronic structure calculations are performed to determine stable geometries and energetics for neutral and protonated 18C6 and the AcAAs as well as the proton bound complexes of these species, (AcAA)H+(18C6), at the B3LYP/6-311+G(2d,2p)//B3LYP/6-31 G* and M06/6-311+G(2d,2p)//B3LYP/6-31G* levels of theory. For all four (AcAA)H+(18C6) complexes, loss of neutral 18C6 corresponds to the most favorable dissociation pathway. At elevated energies, products arising from sequential dissociation of the primary CID product, H+(AcAA), are also observed. Protonated Nα-AcLys exhibits a greater 18C6 binding affinity than other protonated Nα-AcAAs, suggesting that the side chains of Lys residues are the preferred binding sites for 18C6 complexation to peptides and proteins. Nα-AcLys exhibits a greater 18C6 binding affinity than Nɛ-AcLys, suggesting that binding of 18C6 to the side chain of Lys residues is more favorable than to the N-terminal amino group of Lys.

  9. An equation to estimate the difference between theoretically predicted and SDS PAGE-displayed molecular weights for an acidic peptide.

    PubMed

    Guan, Yihong; Zhu, Qinfang; Huang, Delai; Zhao, Shuyi; Jan Lo, Li; Peng, Jinrong

    2015-01-01

    The molecular weight (MW) of a protein can be predicted based on its amino acids (AA) composition. However, in many cases a non-chemically modified protein shows an SDS PAGE-displayed MW larger than its predicted size. Some reports linked this fact to high content of acidic AA in the protein. However, the exact relationship between the acidic AA composition and the SDS PAGE-displayed MW is not established. Zebrafish nucleolar protein Def is composed of 753 AA and shows an SDS PAGE-displayed MW approximately 13 kDa larger than its predicted MW. The first 188 AA in Def is defined by a glutamate-rich region containing ~35.6% of acidic AA. In this report, we analyzed the relationship between the SDS PAGE-displayed MW of thirteen peptides derived from Def and the AA composition in each peptide. We found that the difference between the predicted and SDS PAGE-displayed MW showed a linear correlation with the percentage of acidic AA that fits the equation y = 276.5x - 31.33 (x represents the percentage of acidic AA, 11.4% ≤ x ≤ 51.1%; y represents the average ΔMW per AA). We demonstrated that this equation could be applied to predict the SDS PAGE-displayed MW for thirteen different natural acidic proteins. PMID:26311515

  10. Colchicine use in isolated renal AA amyloidosis.

    PubMed

    Meneses, Carlos F; Egües, César A; Uriarte, Miren; Belzunegui, Joaquín; Rezola, Marta

    2015-01-01

    We present the case of a 45-year-old woman, with two-year history of chronic renal insufficiency and proteinuria. A kidney biopsy showed the presence of AA amyloidosis (positive Congo red staining and immunohistochemistry). There was no evidence of amyloid deposits in other organs and there was no underlying disease. AA amyloidosis normally is secondary to chronic inflammatory or infectious diseases. High levels of IL-1, IL-6 and TNF-α play a role in the pathogenesis of amyloidosis and induce the synthesis of serum amyloid A protein (SAA), a precursor of tissue amyloid deposits. We empirically treated the patient with a low dose colchicine. The patient responded well. Colchicine has been used for the treatment of Familiar Mediterranean Fever and related auto-inflammatory diseases. To monitor treatment responses, we measured SAA finding low titers. Soon after treatment onset there were signs of improvement pertaining to proteinuria and stabilization of renal function. PMID:25453598

  11. The Effectiveness of the AAS REU Program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hemenway, M. K.; Boyce, P. B.; Milkey, R. W.

    1996-05-01

    In an attempt to address the particular needs of astronomy faculty and undergraduate students, in 1991 the Education Office of the American Astronomical Society approached the National Science Foundation with a unique proposal for funding through the Research Experiences for Undergraduates program. The goals of the AAS program were to "slow the hemorrhage of students out of science...", extend the REU program to non-NSF-funded scientists, to reach under-represented women and minority students particularly in small educational institutions, and to encourage research scientists there to mentor students. As this grant has now expired, the AAS has surveyed the 44 mentors and their students to assess the program's effect on the mentor and the mentor's career; the educational institution; and the student's education and career choices. More than half the mentors responded by the abstract deadline. The program clearly had an effect upon the individuals involved. The greatest effect (in 85% of the cases) was to develop more interest in the mentor's research project both among the students and among the mentor's faculty colleagues. The mentors rated the grant to be a medium or strong factor in their student's decision to pursue graduate study, which 90% of them did. All but one of the AAS-REU students attended an AAS meeting and 3/4 of those gave a paper on their project research. Over 90% of the mentors felt that the research experience strongly promoted a greater interest in science, a greater understanding of science and a desire to continue in science. According to the mentors, this was a very positive and beneficial program for the students as well as for themselves.

  12. Ascorbic acid supplementation does not alter oxidative stress markers in healthy volunteers engaged in a supervised exercise program.

    PubMed

    Bunpo, Piyawan; Anthony, Tracy G

    2016-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the impact of ascorbic acid (AA) consumption on the oxidative stress status of untrained volunteers participating in a supervised exercise program. The study included 46 young adults (average age, 23.5 ± 0.59 years; 37 females, 9 males) who remained sedentary (n = 16) or participated in 30 min of outdoor aerobic running (n = 30) at an intensity corresponding to 65%-75% of maximum heart rate for 3 times per week for 12 weeks. Exercised subjects were randomly assigned to an exercise group without AA supplementation (control; n = 10) or received either 250 mg (n = 10) or 500 mg (n = 10) of AA supplementation previous to each exercise session. Blood samples were taken on day 0 and day 84 to evaluate metabolic profiles and antioxidant status. Sedentary subjects underwent in a single bout of aerobic running to determine total antioxidant status (TAS) and malondiadehyde (MDA) at pre- and postexercise with or without AA supplementation. No significant change in TAS was observed. Plasma MDA significantly increased at postexercise (P < 0.05), and AA supplementation decreased MDA level significantly (P < 0.05). After 3 months of exercise, there was no significant change in blood glucose, lipid profile, MDA, TAS, superoxide dismutase (SOD), glutathione peroxidase (GPx), and catalase activities amongst groups. Supplementation of AA was associated with minor and inconsistent reductions in SOD, GPx, and catalase activities (P < 0.05). These findings indicate that pre-exercise supplementation of ascorbic acid does not alter oxidative stress markers in the plasma and erythrocytes of young adults engaged in a supervised exercise program. PMID:26789096

  13. The RNA-Binding Chaperone Hfq Is an Important Global Regulator of Gene Expression in Pasteurella multocida and Plays a Crucial Role in Production of a Number of Virulence Factors, Including Hyaluronic Acid Capsule.

    PubMed

    Mégroz, Marianne; Kleifeld, Oded; Wright, Amy; Powell, David; Harrison, Paul; Adler, Ben; Harper, Marina; Boyce, John D

    2016-05-01

    The Gram-negative bacterium Pasteurella multocida is the causative agent of a number of economically important animal diseases, including avian fowl cholera. Numerous P. multocida virulence factors have been identified, including capsule, lipopolysaccharide (LPS), and filamentous hemagglutinin, but little is known about how the expression of these virulence factors is regulated. Hfq is an RNA-binding protein that facilitates riboregulation via interaction with small noncoding RNA (sRNA) molecules and their mRNA targets. Here, we show that a P. multocida hfq mutant produces significantly less hyaluronic acid capsule during all growth phases and displays reduced in vivo fitness. Transcriptional and proteomic analyses of the hfq mutant during mid-exponential-phase growth revealed altered transcript levels for 128 genes and altered protein levels for 78 proteins. Further proteomic analyses of the hfq mutant during the early exponential growth phase identified 106 proteins that were produced at altered levels. Both the transcript and protein levels for genes/proteins involved in capsule biosynthesis were reduced in the hfq mutant, as were the levels of the filamentous hemagglutinin protein PfhB2 and its secretion partner LspB2. In contrast, there were increased expression levels of three LPS biosynthesis genes, encoding proteins involved in phosphocholine and phosphoethanolamine addition to LPS, suggesting that these genes are negatively regulated by Hfq-dependent mechanisms. Taken together, these data provide the first evidence that Hfq plays a crucial role in regulating the global expression of P. multocida genes, including the regulation of key P. multocida virulence factors, capsule, LPS, and filamentous hemagglutinin. PMID:26883595

  14. AAS Publishing News: Astronomical Software Citation Workshop

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2015-07-01

    Do you write code for your research? Use astronomical software? Do you wish there were a better way of citing, sharing, archiving, or discovering software for astronomy research? You're not alone! In April 2015, AAS's publishing team joined other leaders in the astronomical software community in a meeting funded by the Sloan Foundation, with the purpose of discussing these issues and potential solutions. In attendance were representatives from academic astronomy, publishing, libraries, for-profit software sharing platforms, telescope facilities, and grantmaking institutions. The goal of the group was to establish “protocols, policies, and platforms for astronomical software citation, sharing, and archiving,” in the hopes of encouraging a set of normalized standards across the field. The AAS is now collaborating with leaders at GitHub to write grant proposals for a project to develop strategies for software discoverability and citation, in astronomy and beyond. If this topic interests you, you can find more details in this document released by the group after the meeting: http://astronomy-software-index.github.io/2015-workshop/ The group hopes to move this project forward with input and support from the broader community. Please share the above document, discuss it on social media using the hashtag #astroware (so that your conversations can be found!), or send private comments to julie.steffen@aas.org.

  15. Introducing the AAS Astronomy Ambassadors Program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gurton, S.; Fienberg, R. T.; Fraknoi, A.; Prather, E. E.

    2013-04-01

    Newly established by the American Astronomical Society (AAS), the Astronomy Ambassadors program is designed to support early-career AAS members with training in resources and techniques for effective outreach to students and/or the public. A pilot Astronomy Ambassadors workshop will be held at the January 2013 AAS meeting. Workshop participants will learn to communicate effectively with public and school audiences; find outreach opportunities and establish ongoing partnerships with local schools, science centers, museums, parks, and/or community centers; reach audiences with personal stories, hands-on activities, and jargon-free language; identify strategies and techniques to improve their presentation skills; gain access to a menu of outreach resources that work in a variety of settings; and become part of an active community of astronomers who do outreach. Applications are welcome from advanced undergraduates (those doing research and committed to continuing in astronomy), graduate students, and postdocs and new faculty in their first two years after receipt of the PhD. We especially encourage applications from members of groups that are presently underrepresented in science.

  16. Oocyte-Specific Expression of Mouse MEX3C652AA in the Ovary and Its Potential Role in Regulating Maternal Fos mRNA.

    PubMed

    Li, Xue; Li, Yan; Liu, Chunlian; Jin, Mulan; Lu, Baisong

    2016-05-01

    Currently, the human MEX3C gene is known to encode an RNA-binding protein of 659 amino acid residues. Here we show that the MEX3C gene has alternative splicing forms giving rise to multiple MEX3C variants, and some cells express MEX3C transcripts coding for short MEX3C isoforms but not transcripts for MEX3C(659AA) MEX3C(659AA) functions as an adaptor protein for Exportin 1 (XPO1)-mediated nuclear export since it increases the cytoplasmic distribution of poly(A)(+) RNA and since addition of the nuclear export signal (NES) sequence to a short MEX3C isoform MEX3C(464AA) confers similar cytoplasmic poly(A)(+) RNA accumulation activity as MEX3C(659AA) FOS mRNA is a potential MEX3C target mRNA. One mechanism by which MEX3C(659AA) could regulate FOS mRNA is by promoting its nuclear export. Overexpressing MEX3C(659AA) significantly increased FOS mRNA expression, whereas mutating the NES of MEX3C(659AA) and treating cells with leptomycin B to inhibit XPO1-mediated nuclear export attenuated FOS upregulation. FOS mRNA is unstable in somatic cells but less so in oocytes; how it is stabilized in the oocytes is unknown. Transcripts for the mouse counterpart of human MEX3C(659AA) (MEX3C(652AA)) are specifically expressed in developing oocytes in the ovary, although total Mex3c transcripts are expressed in both granulosa cells and oocytes. The specific expression of this long MEX3C isoform in oocytes and its ability to enhance FOS mRNA nuclear export and stability all suggest that MEX3C(659AA) is an RNA-binding protein that preserves maternal FOS mRNA in oocytes. PMID:27053362

  17. High cycle fatigue of AA6082 and AA6063 aluminum extrusions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nanninga, Nicholas E.

    The high cycle fatigue behavior of hollow extruded AA6082 and AA6063 aluminum extrusions has been studied. Hollow extruded aluminum profiles can be processed into intricate shapes, and may be suitable replacements for fatigue critical automotive applications requiring reduced weight. There are several features inherent in hollow aluminum extrusions, such as seam welds, charge welds, microstructural variations and die lines. The effects of such extrusion variables on high cycle fatigue properties were studied by taking specimens from an actual car bumper extrusion. It appears that extrusion die lines create large anisotropy differences in fatigue properties, while welds themselves have little effect on fatigue lives. Removal of die lines greatly increased fatigue properties of AA6082 specimens taken transverse to the extrusion direction. Without die lines, anisotropy in fatigue properties between AA6082 specimens taken longitudinal and transverse to the extrusion direction, was significantly reduced, and properties associated with the orientation of the microstructure appears to be isotropic. A fibrous microstructure for AA6082 specimens showed great improvements in fatigue behavior. The effects of elevated temperatures and exposure of specimens to NaCl solutions was also studied. Exposure to the salt solution greatly reduced the fatigue lives of specimens, while elevated temperatures showed more moderate reductions in fatigue lives.

  18. LCG/AA build infrastructure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hodgkins, Alex Liam; Diez, Victor; Hegner, Benedikt

    2012-12-01

    The Software Process & Infrastructure (SPI) project provides a build infrastructure for regular integration testing and release of the LCG Applications Area software stack. In the past, regular builds have been provided using a system which has been constantly growing to include more features like server-client communication, long-term build history and a summary web interface using present-day web technologies. However, the ad-hoc style of software development resulted in a setup that is hard to monitor, inflexible and difficult to expand. The new version of the infrastructure is based on the Django Python framework, which allows for a structured and modular design, facilitating later additions. Transparency in the workflows and ease of monitoring has been one of the priorities in the design. Formerly missing functionality like on-demand builds or release triggering will support the transition to a more agile development process.

  19. Asiatic Acid Isolated From Centella Asiatica Inhibits TGF-β1-induced Collagen Expression in Human Keloid Fibroblasts via PPAR-γ Activation

    PubMed Central

    Bian, Difei; Zhang, Jizhou; Wu, Xin; Dou, Yannong; Yang, Yan; Tan, Qian; Xia, Yufeng; Gong, Zhunan; Dai, Yue

    2013-01-01

    Keloids are fibroproliferative disorders characterized by exuberant extracellular matrix deposition and transforming growth factor (TGF)-β/Smad pathway plays a pivotal role in keloid pathogenesis. Centella asiatica extract has been applied in scar management for ages. As one of its major components, asiatic acid (AA) has been recently reported to inhibit liver fibrosis by blocking TGF-β/Smad pathway. However, its effect on keloid remains unknown. In order to investigate the effects of AA on cell proliferation, invasion and collagen synthesis, normal and keloid fibroblasts were exposed to TGF-β1 with or without AA. Relevant experiments including 3-(4, 5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2, 5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay, 5-ethynyl-2-deoxyuridine (EdU) incorporation assay, Transwell invasion assay, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, Western blot, quantitative polymerase chain reaction and RNA interference assay were conducted. As a result, keloid fibroblasts showed higher responsiveness to TGF-β1 stimulation than normal fibroblasts in terms of invasion and collagen synthesis. AA could suppress TGF-β1-induced expression of collagen type I, inhibit Smad 2/3 phosphorylation and plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) expression, while elevate Smad 7 protein level. Noteworthy, the effects of AA on keloid fibroblasts could be abrogated by PPAR-γ antagonist GW9662 and by silencing of PPAR-γ. The present study demonstrated that AA inhibited TGF-β1-induced collagen and PAI-1 expression in keloid fibroblasts through PPAR-γ activation, which suggested that AA was one of the active constituents of C. asiatica responsible for keloid management, and could be included in the arsenal for combating against keloid. PMID:24250248

  20. Spectroscopic observations and analysis of the peculiar SN1999aa

    SciTech Connect

    Garavini, G.; Folatelli, G.; Goobar, A.; Nobili, S.; Aldering,G.; Amadon, A.; Amanullah, R.; Astier, P.; Balland, C.; Blanc, G.; Burns,M.S.; Conley, A.; Dahlen, T.; Deustua, S.E.; Ellis, R.; Fabbro, S.; Fan,X.; Frye, B.; Gates, E.L.; Gibbons, R.; Goldhaber, G.; Goldman, B.; Groom, D.E.; Haissinski, J.; Hardin, D.; Hook, I.M.; Howell, D.A.; Kasen,D.; Kent, S.; Kim, A.G.; Knop, R.A.; Lee, B.C.; Lidman, C.; Mendez, J.; Miller, G.J.; Moniez, M.; Mourao, A.; Newberg, H.; Nugent, P.E.; Pain,R.; Perdereau, O.; Perlmutter, S.; Prasad, V.; Quimby, R.; Raux, J.; Regnault, N.; Rich, J.; Richards, G.T.; Ruiz-Lapuente, P.; Sainton, G.; Schaefer, B.E.; Schahmaneche, K.; Smith, E.; Spadafora, A.L.; Stanishev,V.; Walton, N.A.; Wang, L.; Wood-Vasey, W.M.

    2003-12-10

    We present an extensive new time series of spectroscopic data of the peculiar SN 1999aa in NGC 2595. Our data set includes 25 optical spectra between -11 and +58 days with respect to B-band maximum light, providing an unusually complete time history. The early spectra resemble those of an SN 1991T-like object but with a relatively strong CaH and K absorption feature. The first clear sign of Si II lambda 6355, characteristic of Type Ia supernovae, is found at day -7, and its velocity remains constant up to at least the first month after B-band maximum light. The transition to normal-looking spectra is found to occur earlier than in SN 1991T, suggesting SN 1999aa as a possible link between SN 1991T-like and Branch-normal supernovae. Comparing the observations with synthetic spectra, doubly ionized Fe, Si, and Ni are identified at early epochs. These are characteristic of SN 1991 T-like objects. Furthermore, in the day -11 spectrum, evidence is found for an absorption feature that could be identified as high velocity C II lambda 6580 or H alpha. At the same epoch C III lambda 4648.8 at photospheric velocity is probably responsible for the absorption feature at 4500 8. High-velocity Ca is found around maximum light together with Si II and Fe II confined in a narrow velocity window. Implied constraints on supernovae progenitor systems and explosion hydrodynamic models are briefly discussed.

  1. Helical 1:1 α/Sulfono-γ-AA Heterogeneous Peptides with Antibacterial Activity.

    PubMed

    She, Fengyu; Nimmagadda, Alekhya; Teng, Peng; Su, Ma; Zuo, Xiaobing; Cai, Jianfeng

    2016-05-01

    As one of the greatest threats facing the 21st century, antibiotic resistance is now a major public health concern. Host-defense peptides (HDPs) offer an alternative approach to combat emerging multi-drug-resistant bacteria. It is known that helical HDPs such as magainin 2 and its analogs adopt cationic amphipathic conformations upon interaction with bacterial membranes, leading to membrane disruption and subsequent bacterial cell death. We have previously shown that amphipathic sulfono-γ-AApeptides could mimic magainin 2 and exhibit bactericidal activity. In this article, we demonstrate for the first time that amphipathic helical 1:1 α/sulfono-γ-AA heterogeneous peptides, in which regular amino acids and sulfono-γ-AApeptide building blocks are alternatively present in a 1:1 pattern, display potent antibacterial activity against both Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacterial pathogens. Small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) suggests that the lead sequences adopt defined helical structures. The subsequent studies including fluorescence microscopy and time-kill experiments indicate that these hybrid peptides exert antimicrobial activity by mimicking the mechanism of HDPs. Our findings may lead to the development of HDP-mimicking antimicrobial peptidomimetics that combat drug-resistant bacterial pathogens. In addition, our results also demonstrate the effective design of a new class of helical foldamer, which could be employed to interrogate other important biological targets such as protein-protein interactions in the future. PMID:27030636

  2. Positive cooperativity between the thrombin and bradykinin B2 receptors enhances arachidonic acid release

    PubMed Central

    Hecquet, Claudie; Biyashev, Dauren; Tan, Fulong; Erdös, Ervin G.

    2006-01-01

    Bradykinin (BK) or kallikreins activate B2 receptors (R) which couple Gαi and Gαq proteins to release arachidonic acid (AA) and elevate [Ca2+]i. Thrombin cleaves the protease-activated-receptor-1 (PAR1) that couples Gαi, Gαq and Gα12/13 proteins. In CHO cells stably transfected with human B2R, thrombin liberated little AA, but it significantly potentiated AA release by B2R agonists. We explored mechanisms of cooperativity between constitutively expressed PAR1 and B2R. We also examined human endothelial cells expressing both Rs constitutively. The PAR1 agonist hexapeptide (TRAP) was as effective as thrombin. Inhibitors of components of Gαi, Gαq and Gα12/13 signaling pathways, and a PKCα inhibitor, Gö6976 blocked potentiation while phorbol, an activator, enhanced it. Several inhibitors, including a RhoA kinase inhibitor, a [Ca2+]i antagonist, and an inositol-(1,3,4)-trisphosphate R antagonist, reduced mobilization of [Ca2+]i by thrombin and blocked potentiation of AA release by B2R agonists. Because either a non-selective inhibitor (isotetrandrine) of phospholipase A2 (PLA2) or a Ca2+-dependent PLA2 inhibitor abolished potentiation of AA release by thrombin, while a Ca2+-independent PLA2 inhibitor did not, we concluded that the mechanism involves Ca2+-dependent PLA2 activation. Both thrombin and TRAP modified activation and phosphorylation of the B2R induced by BK. In lower concentrations they enhanced it, while higher concentrations inhibited phosphorylation and diminished B2R activation. Protection of the N-terminal Ser1-Phe2 bond of TRAP by an aminopeptidase inhibitor made this peptide much more active than the unprotected agonist. Thus, PAR1 activation enhances AA release by B2R agonists through signal transduction pathway. PMID:16183725

  3. The AAS Visiting Professor Programs: Three Anniversaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Philip, A. G. Davis

    2003-05-01

    The AAS Program of Visiting Professors was started in 1958 with three astronomers as lecturers. They were Paul Merrill (Mt. Wilson and Palomar Observatories), Seth Nicholson (Mt. Wilson and Palomar Observatories) and Harlow Shapley (Harvard College Observatory). The program was run by a Committee on Visiting Professors from 1958 through 1963. The program was funded by grants from the National Science Foundation. The Executive Officer of the AAS, Paul Routley headed the program from the 1963 - 64 academic year through the 1968 - 69 academic year. Larry Fredrick headed the program for 1969 - 70 and then Hank Gurin headed it through 1973 -74, the last year of the program. At the end of this summer meeting, the combined Visiting Professors Program and the Shapley Program will be starting their 47th year. The Shapley Visiting Lectureships in Astronomy Program was started in the 1974 - 75 academic year under the leadership of Hank Gurin. The original funding came from the Perkin Fund and a three year grant from the Research Corporation. In 1975 the Shapley Endowment fund was set up to help pay the expenses of the program. In 1976 there was support from the Slipher fund which lasted through the 1978 - 79 academic year. From 1979 to the present the program is financed by the Shapley Endowment Fund and by the contributions made by institutions which host the visits. In the fall of 1998 the fee that Institutions pay to the AAS in support of their Shapley visits was reduced from 300 to 250 to make it easier for them to apply for visits. Members of the AAS have made contributions to the program over the years and we are very appreciative of this support. In 1974 there were 42 lecturers in the program, of whom four are still active giving lectures (George Carruthers, Larry Fredrick, Arlo Landolt and Davis Philip). After the summer meeting, the Shapley Program will be embarking on its 30th year. Now there are 82 astronomers in the program and we get from 40 to 60 requests a year

  4. A liquid chromatography/mass spectrometric method for simultaneous analysis of arachidonic acid and its endogenous eicosanoid metabolites prostaglandins, dihydroxyeicosatrienoic acids, hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acids, and epoxyeicosatrienoic acids in rat brain tissue.

    PubMed

    Yue, Hongfei; Jansen, Susan A; Strauss, Kenneth I; Borenstein, Michael R; Barbe, Mary F; Rossi, Luella J; Murphy, Elise

    2007-02-19

    A sensitive, specific, and robust liquid chromatography/mass spectrometric (LC/MS) method was developed and validated that allows simultaneous analysis of arachidonic acid (AA) and its cyclooxygenase, cytochrome P450, and lipoxygenase pathway metabolites prostaglandins (PGs), dihydroxyeicosatrienoic acids (DiHETrEs), hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acids (HETEs) and epoxyeicosatrienoic acids (EETs), including PGF(2alpha), PGE(2), PGD(2), PGJ(2), 14,15-DiHETrE, 11,12-DiHETrE, 8,9-DiHETrE, 5,6-DiHETrE, 20-HETE, 15-HETE, 12-HETE, 9-HETE, 8-HETE, 5-HETE, 14,15-EET, 11,12-EET, 8,9-EET, and 5,6-EET in rat brain tissues. Deuterium labeled PGF(2alpha)-d(4), PGD(2)-d(4), 15(S)-HETE-d(8), 14,15-EET-d(8), 11,12-EET-d(8), 8,9-EET-d(8), and AA-d(8) were used as internal standards. Solid phase extraction was used for sample preparation. A gradient LC/MS method using a C18 column and electrospray ionization source under negative ion mode was optimized for the best sensitivity and separation within 35 min. The method validation, including LC/MS instrument qualification, specificity, calibration model, accuracy, precision (without brain matrix and with brain matrix), and extraction efficiency were performed. The linear ranges of the calibration curves were 2-1000 pg for PGs, DiHETrEs, HETEs, and EETs, 10-2400 pg for PGE(2) and PGD(2), and 20-2000 ng for AA, respectively. PMID:17125954

  5. AAS Publishing News: Preparing Your Manuscript Just Got Easier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2016-03-01

    Watermarking using the command watermark{DRAFT, v2}.Are you an astronomer considering submitting a paper to an AAS journal (i.e., AJ, ApJ, ApJ Letters, or ApJ Supplements)? If so, this post is for you! Read on to find out about the exciting new things you can do with the AASs newest LaTeX class file, available for download now.Why the Update?AAS publishing has maintained a consistent class file for LaTeX manuscript preparation for the past decade. But academic publishing is changing rapidly in todays era of electronic journals! Since its journals went fully electronic, the AAS has been continuously adding new publishing capabilities based on the recommendations of the Journals Task Force and the needs and requests of AAS authors. The AASs manuscript preparation tools are now being updated accordingly.Whats New in AASTex 6.0?There are many exciting new features and capabilities in AASTex 6.0. Here are just a few:Tracking options for author revisions include added{text}, deleted{text}, replaced{old}{new}, and explain{text}.Based on emulateapjDo you use the popular class file emulateapj to prepare your manuscripts? AASTex 6.0 is based on emulateapj, rather than on the older AASTex 5.2 (though 5.2 is still supported). This means that it is easy to produce a double-columned, single-spaced, and astro-ph-ready manuscript. Since two thirds of the AAS journals authors use emulateapj, this transition was designed to make manuscript preparation and sharing an easier and more seamless process.Tools for collaborationsDo you work in a large collaboration? AASTex now includes new tools to make preparing a manuscript within a collaboration easier. Drafts can now be watermarked to differentiate between versions. New markup for large author lists streamlines the display so that readers can access article information immediately, yet they can still access the full author list and affiliations at the end of the paper. And author revision markup allows members of a collaboration to

  6. ASCORBID ACID IS DECREASED IN INDUCED SPUTUM OF MILD ASTHMATICS

    EPA Science Inventory

    ABSTRACT
    Evidence suggests that the antioxidant ascorbic acid (AA), plays an essential role in defending against oxidant attack in the airways. Decreased levels of AA have been reported in asthmatics but not at the site directly proximal to asthma pathology, i.e. the bronchial...

  7. Acid Rain.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Openshaw, Peter

    1987-01-01

    Provides some background information on acid deposition. Includes a historical perspective, describes some effects of acid precipitation, and discusses acid rain in the United Kingdom. Contains several experiments that deal with the effects of acid rain on water quality and soil. (TW)

  8. Comparison between ARB and CARB processes on an AA5754/AA6061 composite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verstraete, K.; Helbert, A.-L.; Brisset, F.; Baudin, T.

    2014-08-01

    The present work aims to compare two processes: Accumulative Roll Bonding and Cross Accumulative Roll Bonding (CARB). Both processes consist in the repetition of rolling but the second technique adds a 90° rotation of the sheet around its normal direction between each rolling. Microstructure, mechanical properties and texture were compared for both processes on an AA5754/AA6061 composite. As a result a thinner and less elongated microstructure was obtained in the CARB process leading to an isotropy and an improvement of the mechanical properties. Besides, the texture was characterized by the rotated Cube component for both processes but for CARB it is of less strength.

  9. Supramolecular Recognition of Amino Acids by Twisted Cucurbit[14]uril.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jing; Xi, Yun-Yun; Li, Qing; Tang, Qing; Wang, Ruibing; Huang, Ying; Tao, Zhu; Xue, Sai-Feng; Lindoy, Leonard F; Wei, Gang

    2016-08-19

    Binding interactions between twisted cucurbit[14]uril (tQ[14]) and twenty standard amino acids (AAs) have been investigated by NMR spectroscopy and isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) in aqueous HCl solutions and in DMSO. The results showed that tQ[14] displays clear binding affinity for AAs with a positively charged side chain or containing an aromatic ring, but weaker binding affinity for AAs with hydrophobic or polar side chains, with the binding mode depending on the type of side chain present in the AAs. PMID:27349365

  10. Residue-specific force field based on the protein coil library. RSFF1: modification of OPLS-AA/L.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Fan; Zhou, Chen-Yang; Wu, Yun-Dong

    2014-06-26

    Traditional protein force fields use one set of parameters for most of the 20 amino acids (AAs), allowing transferability of the parameters. However, a significant shortcoming is the difficulty to fit the Ramachandran plots of all AA residues simultaneously, affecting the accuracy of the force field. In this Feature Article, we report a new strategy for protein force field parametrization. Backbone and side-chain conformational distributions of all 20 AA residues obtained from protein coil library were used as the target data. The dihedral angle (torsion) potentials and some local nonbonded (1-4/1-5/1-6) interactions in OPLS-AA/L force field were modified such that the target data can be excellently reproduced by molecular dynamics simulations of dipeptides (blocked AAs) in explicit water, resulting in a new force field with AA-specific parameters, RSFF1. An efficient free energy decomposition approach was developed to separate the corrections on ϕ and ψ from the two-dimensional Ramachandran plots. RSFF1 is shown to reproduce the experimental NMR (3)J-coupling constants of AA dipeptides better than other force fields. It has a good balance between α-helical and β-sheet secondary structures. It can successfully fold a set of α-helix proteins (Trp-cage and Homeodomain) and β-hairpins (Trpzip-2, GB1 hairpin), which cannot be consistently stabilized by other state-of-the-art force fields. Interestingly, the RSFF1 force field systematically overestimates the melting temperature (and the stability of native state) of these peptides/proteins. It has a potential application in the simulation of protein folding and protein structure refinement. PMID:24815738

  11. The time effect of chronic ethanol feeding on phospholipid fatty acids

    SciTech Connect

    Nakamura, M.T.; Tang, A.B.; Halsted, C.H.; Phinney, S.D. )

    1992-02-26

    The authors have previously shown that chronic ethanol feeding reduces arachidonic acid (AA) and other products of {delta}6 and {delta}5 desaturases in various tissues including muscle, the largest phospholipid (PL) pool. In this study they investigated the time-course effect of ethanol feeding on tissue fatty acid (FA) profiles. Five Yucatan micropigs were fed 89 kcal/kg body wt of diet containing ethanol and fat as 40 and 34% of energy, respectively. Five control pigs were pairfed corn starch instead of ethanol. Corn oil, 61% linoleic acid (LA), supplied most of dietary fat. PL fatty acids were quantitated by thin layer and gas chromatography. Below are FA profiles of control/ethanol groups by wt%. Underlined values differ p<0.05. In liver PL, ethanol resulted in increased LA but decreased palmitic acid, AA and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) at 2 months. These changes remained constant for 12 months, whereas alpha-linolenic acid and DHA showed a progressive decline. For muscle, however, significant differences were not seen until 12 months. These results indicate time differences in ethanol effect on w6 and w3 FA composition, and that liver and muscle differ in their rates of response to ethanol. Their findings suggest that ethanol affects both desaturase activity and the precursor pool, and thus may alter membrane function.

  12. Ascorbic acid intake and oxalate synthesis.

    PubMed

    Knight, John; Madduma-Liyanage, Kumudu; Mobley, James A; Assimos, Dean G; Holmes, Ross P

    2016-08-01

    In humans, approximately 60 mg of ascorbic acid (AA) breaks down in the body each day and has to be replaced by a dietary intake of 70 mg in women and 90 mg in men to maintain optimal health and AA homeostasis. The breakdown of AA is non-enzymatic and results in oxalate formation. The exact amount of oxalate formed has been difficult to ascertain primarily due to the limited availability of healthy human tissue for such research and the difficulty in measuring AA and its breakdown products. The breakdown of 60 mg of AA to oxalate could potentially result in the formation of up to 30 mg oxalate per day. This exceeds our estimates of the endogenous production of 10-25 mg oxalate per day, indicating that degradative pathways that do not form oxalate exist. In this review, we examine what is known about the pathways of AA metabolism and how oxalate forms. We further identify how gaps in our knowledge may be filled to more precisely determine the contribution of AA breakdown to oxalate production in humans. The use of stable isotopes of AA to directly assess the conversion of vitamin to oxalate should help fill this void. PMID:27002809

  13. Preparation of thin film nanofibrous composite NF membrane based on EDC/NHS modified PAN-AA nanofibrous substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Y.; Wang, X.; Hsiao, B. S.

    2016-07-01

    A novel kind of thin-film nanofibrous composite (TFNC) nanofiltration (NF) membranes consisting of a polyamide (PA) barrier layer were successfully fabricated by interfacial polymerization (IFP) based on electrospun double-layer nanofibrous substrates, which have an ultrathin poly (acrylonitrile-co-acrylic acid) (PAN-AA) nanofibrous layer as top layer and a thicker polyacrylonitrile (PAN) nanofiber layer as bottom porous support layer. Immersing PAN/PAN-AA nanofibrous substrates into 1-ethyl-(3-3-dimethylaminopropyl) carbodiimide hydrochloride/N-hydroxysuccinimide (EDC/NHS) aqueous solution and piperazine (PIP) aqueous solution (0.20 wt%) sequentially for a period of time, the carboxyl groups on PAN-AA nanofibers were activated by carbodiimide and then reacted with the amide groups. The as prepared composite membrane has an integrated structure with high rejection rate (98.0%); high permeate flux (40.4 L/m2h) for MgSO4 aqueous solution (2 g/L).

  14. Effects of long-term AA attendance and spirituality on the course of depressive symptoms in individuals with alcohol use disorder.

    PubMed

    Wilcox, Claire E; Pearson, Matthew R; Tonigan, J Scott

    2015-06-01

    Alcohol use disorder (AUD) is associated with depression. Although attendance at Alcoholics Anonymous (AA) meetings predicts reductions in drinking, results have been mixed about the salutary effects of AA on reducing depressive symptoms. In this single-group study, early AA affiliates (n = 253) were recruited, consented, and assessed at baseline, 3, 6, 9, 12, 18, and 24 months. Lagged growth models were used to investigate the predictive effect of AA attendance on depression, controlling for concurrent drinking and treatment attendance. Depression was measured using the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) and was administered at baseline 3, 6, 12, 18, and 24 months. Additional predictors of depression tested included spiritual gains (Religious Background and Behavior questionnaire [RBB]) and completion of 12-step work (Alcoholics Anonymous Inventory [AAI]). Eighty-five percent of the original sample provided follow-up data at 24 months. Overall, depression decreased over the 24 month follow-up period. AA attendance predicted later reductions in depression (slope = -3.40, p = .01) even after controlling for concurrent drinking and formal treatment attendance. Finally, increased spiritual gains (RBB) also predicted later reductions in depression (slope = -0.10, p = .02) after controlling for concurrent drinking, treatment, and AA attendance. In summary, reductions in alcohol consumption partially explained decreases in depression in this sample of early AA affiliates, and other factors such as AA attendance and increased spiritual practices also accounted for reductions in depression beyond that explained by drinking. (PsycINFO Database Record PMID:26076099

  15. Effects of Long-Term AA Attendance and Spirituality on the Course of Depressive Symptoms in Individuals with Alcohol Use Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Wilcox, Claire E.; Pearson, Matthew R.; Tonigan, J. Scott

    2016-01-01

    Alcohol use disorder (AUD) is associated with depression. Although attendance at Alcoholics Anonymous (AA) meetings predicts reductions in drinking, results have been mixed about the salutary effects of AA on reducing depressive symptoms. In this single-group study, early AA affiliates (n=253) were recruited, consented, and assessed at baseline, 3, 6, 9, 12, 18 and 24 months. Lagged growth models were used to investigate the predictive effect of AA attendance on depression, controlling for concurrent drinking and treatment attendance. Depression was measured using the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) and was administered at baseline 3, 6, 12, 18 and 24 months. Additional predictors of depression tested included spiritual gains, [Religious Background and Behavior questionnaire (RBB)] and completion of 12-step work [(Alcoholics Anonymous Inventory (AAI)]. Eighty-five percent of the original sample provided follow-up data at 24 months. Overall, depression decreased over the 24 month follow-up period. AA attendance predicted later reductions in depression (slope=−3.40, p= 0.01) even after controlling for concurrent drinking and formal treatment attendance. Finally, increased spiritual gains (RBB) also predicted later reductions in depression (slope=−0.10, p=0.02) after controlling for concurrent drinking, treatment, and AA attendance. In sum, reductions in alcohol consumption partially explained decreases in depression in this sample of early AA affiliates, and other factors such as AA attendance and increased spiritual practices also accounted for reductions in depression beyond that explained by drinking. PMID:26076099

  16. Transition of basaltic lava from pahoehoe to aa, Kilauea Volcano, Hawaii: Field observations and key factors

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Peterson, D.W.; Tilling, R.I.

    1980-01-01

    Nearly all Hawaiian basaltic lava erupts as pahoehoe, and some changes to aa during flowage and cooling; factors governing the transition involve certain critical relations between viscosity and rate of shear strain. If the lava slows, cools, and stops in direct response to concomitant increase in viscosity before these critical relations are reached, it remains pahoehoe. But, if flow mechanics (flow rate, flow dimensions, slope, momentum, etc.) impel the lava to continue to move and deform even after it has become highly viscous, the critical relations may be reached and the lava changes to aa. Typical modes of transition from pahoehoe to aa include: (1) spontaneous formation of relatively stiff clots in parts of the flowing lava where shear rate is highest; these clots grow into discrete, rough, sticky masses to which the remaining fluid lava incrementally adheres; (2) fragmentation and immersion of solid or semi-solid surface crusts of pahoehoe by roiling movements of the flow, forming cores of discrete, tacky masses; (3) sudden renewed movement of lava stored and cooled within surface reservoirs to form clots. The masses, fragments, and clots in these transition modes are characterized by spinose, granulated surfaces; as flow movement continues, the masses and fragments aggregate, fracture, and grind together, completing the transition to aa. Observations show that the critical relation between viscosity and rate of shear strain is inverse: if viscosity is low, a high rate of shear is required to begin the transition to aa; conversely, if viscosity is high, a much lower rate of shear will induce the transition. These relations can be demonstrated qualitatively with simple graphs, which can be used to examine the flow history of any selected finite lava element by tracing the path represented by its changing viscosity and shear rate. A broad, diffuse "transition threshold zone" in these graphs portrays the inverse critical relation between viscosity and shear

  17. Nomogram including the total tumoral load in the sentinel nodes assessed by one-step nucleic acid amplification as a new factor for predicting nonsentinel lymph node metastasis in breast cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Rubio, Isabel T; Espinosa-Bravo, Martin; Rodrigo, Maxi; Amparo Viguri Diaz, Maria; Hardisson, David; Sagasta, Amaia; Dueñas, Basilio; Peg, Vicente

    2014-09-01

    Several models have been developed to predict non-sentinel nodes (NSLN) metastasis in patients with a positive sentinel node (SLN) that incorporates a standard pathology examination of the SLN. It has been reported that total tumoral load (TTL) in the SLNs assessed by one-step nucleic acid amplification (OSNA) is a predictive factor for additional NSLN metastasis in the axillary lymph node dissection (ALND). The objective was to develop a nomogram that predicts patient´s risk of additional NSLN metastasis incorporating TTL in the SLNs assessed by OSNA. Six hundred and ninety-seven consecutive patients with positive SLN evaluation by OSNA and a completion ALND were recruited. Pathologic features of the primary tumor and SLN metastases, including TTL were collected. Multivariate logistic regression identified factors predictive of non-SLN metastasis. A nomogram was developed with these variables and validated in an external cohort. On multivariate logistic regression analysis, tumor size, number of affected SLN, Her2 overexpression, lymphovascular invasion, and TTL were each associated with the likelihood of additional NSLN metastasis (p < 0.05). The overall predictive accuracy of the nomogram, as measured by the AUC was 0.7552 (95 %CI 0.7159-0.7945). When applied to the external cohort the nomogram was accurate with an AUC = 0.678 (95 %CI 0.621-0.736). This novel nomogram that incorporates TTL assessed by OSNA performs well and may help clinicians to make decisions about ALND for individual patients. Moreover, the standardization of pathologic assessment by OSNA may help to achieve interinstitutional reproducibility among nomograms. PMID:25164972

  18. The jasmonate-responsive AaMYC2 transcription factor positively regulates artemisinin biosynthesis in Artemisia annua.

    PubMed

    Shen, Qian; Lu, Xu; Yan, Tingxiang; Fu, Xueqing; Lv, Zongyou; Zhang, Fangyuan; Pan, Qifang; Wang, Guofeng; Sun, Xiaofen; Tang, Kexuan

    2016-06-01

    The plant Artemisia annua is well known due to the production of artemisinin, a sesquiterpene lactone that is widely used in malaria treatment. Phytohormones play important roles in plant secondary metabolism, such as jasmonic acid (JA), which can induce artemisinin biosynthesis in A. annua. Nevertheless, the JA-inducing mechanism remains poorly understood. The expression of gene AaMYC2 was rapidly induced by JA and AaMYC2 binds the G-box-like motifs within the promoters of gene CYP71AV1 and DBR2, which are key structural genes in the artemisinin biosynthetic pathway. Overexpression of AaMYC2 in A. annua significantly activated the transcript levels of CYP71AV1 and DBR2, which resulted in an increased artemisinin content. By contrast, artemisinin content was reduced in the RNAi transgenic A. annua plants in which the expression of AaMYC2 was suppressed. Meanwhile, the RNAi transgenic A. annua plants showed lower sensitivity to methyl jasmonate treatment than the wild-type plants. These results demonstrate that AaMYC2 is a positive regulator of artemisinin biosynthesis and is of great value in genetic engineering of A. annua for increased artemisinin production. PMID:26864531

  19. Is the serum amyloid A protein in acute phase plasma high density lipoprotein the precursor of AA amyloid fibrils?

    PubMed Central

    Baltz, M L; Rowe, I F; Caspi, D; Turnell, W G; Pepys, M B

    1986-01-01

    Serum amyloid A protein (SAA), an apolipoprotein of high density lipoprotein (HDL), is generally considered to be the precursor of AA protein, which forms the fibrils in reactive systemic amyloidosis in man and animals. This view is based on amino acid sequence identity between AA and the amino-terminal portion of SAA. However, in extensive and well-controlled studies of experimentally induced murine AA amyloidosis, we were unable to demonstrate a direct precursor-product relationship between SAA, in SAA-rich HDL preparations from acute phase or amyloidotic mouse or human serum, and AA protein in the amyloid deposits. This raises the possibility that SAA in its usual form, as an apolipoprotein of HDL synthesized during the acute phase response, may not be the major precursor of AA fibrils. The amyloidogenic forms of circulating SAA molecules may not be isolated during the preparation of HDL. Alternatively, particularly in the light of recent evidence that SAA mRNA is expressed in many different tissues throughout the body of appropriately stimulated animals, amyloidogenic SAA may be derived from sources other than the liver cells in which SAA-rich HDL is synthesized. PMID:3105937

  20. Development and validation of a CE-MS method for the targeted assessment of amino acids in urine.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, Karina T; Mekahli, Djalila; Tavares, Marina F M; Van Schepdael, Ann

    2016-04-01

    A CE-ESI-MS method was developed and validated for the separation and quantitative analysis of amino acids (AA) in urine. Experimental parameters related to the CE-MS interface, BGE, and mass spectrometer (MS) settings were optimized providing a good separation of 27 AA, including the isomers L-leucine, L-isoleucine, and L-alloisoleucine, in less than 30 min. The sheath liquid was composed by 0.50% formic acid in 60% (v,v) methanol-water delivered at a flow rate of 5 μL/min. The BGE consisted of 0.80 mol/L formic acid at pH 1.96 and 15% methanol. A pH stacking procedure was implemented to enhance sensitivity (a 12.5% NH4 OH solution was injected at 0.5 psi/9 s prior to samples injected at 0.6 psi/20 s). The proposed method was validated according to FDA and ICH protocols exhibiting acceptable parameters. Analytical curves presented coefficients of determination from 0.996 to 0.9997 (with large F statistics and low p-values). LODs and quantification ranged from 0.63 to 29 μmol/L and from 1.9 to 86 μmol/L, respectively. Practical repeatability was obtained for all AA with coefficients of variation better than 0.55% CV (migration time) and 1.7% CV (peak area ratios; methionine sulfone as internal standard). Recoveries of AA in spiked urine ranged from 92.0 to 123% with few exceptions. Moreover, a successful quantification of AA in pooled control and test urine samples, which compose a vesicoureteral reflux cohort, was achieved showing the potential applicability of the proposed method for targeted metabolomics studies using CE-ESI-MS with an Ion Trap as mass analyzer. PMID:26826549

  1. cDNA cloning and expression of Bacillus thuringiensis Cry1Aa toxin binding 120 kDa aminopeptidase N from Bombyx mori.

    PubMed

    Yaoi, K; Nakanishi, K; Kadotani, T; Imamura, M; Koizumi, N; Iwahana, H; Sato, R

    1999-01-18

    Bacillus thuringiensis Cry1Aa toxin binds to a 120 kDa putative receptor protein in the Bombyx mori midgut. Recently, this protein was purified and identified as glycosyl-phosphatidylinositol (GPI) anchored aminopeptidase N (APN). In this study, a full-length cDNA thought to encode this 120 kDa APN was isolated and sequenced. It has a 2958 bp ORF encoding 986 amino acids. In the deduced amino acid sequence, we identified GPI-anchor and zinc-metallopeptidase signals, which are the same as those of APNs of other insects that are reported to be putative Cry1 toxin receptors. The B. mori APN amino acid sequence also has a high similarity with those of the other APNs. Subsequently, the recombinant APN was expressed by Escherichia coli and its Cry1Aa toxin binding ability was analyzed. Ligand blotting showed that Cry1Aa toxin bound to the recombinant APN. PMID:9931470

  2. Attenuated acute salivary α-amylase responses to gustatory stimulation with citric acid in thin children.

    PubMed

    Chen, Long Hui; Yang, Ze Min; Chen, Wei Wen; Lin, Jing; Zhang, Min; Yang, Xiao Rong; Zhao, Ling Bo

    2015-04-14

    Salivary α-amylase (sAA) is responsible for the 'pre-digestion' of starch in the oral cavity and accounts for up to 50 % of salivary protein in human saliva. An accumulating body of literature suggests that sAA is of nutritional importance; however, it is still not clear how sAA is related to individual's nutritional status. Although copy number variations (CNV) of the salivary amylase gene (AMY1) are associated with variation in sAA levels, a significant amount of sAA variation is not explained by AMY1 CNV. To measure sAA responses to gustatory stimulation with citric acid, we used sAA ratio (the ratio of stimulated sAA levels to those of resting sAA) and investigated acute sAA responses to citric acid in children with normal (Normal-BMI, n 22) and low (Low-BMI, n 21) BMI. The AMY1 gene copy number was determined by quantitative PCR. We, for the first time, demonstrated attenuated acute sAA responses (decreased sAA ratio) to gustatory stimulation in Low-BMI (thinness grade 3) children compared with the Normal-BMI children, which suggest that sAA responses to gustatory stimulation may be of nutritional importance. However, child's nutritional status was not directly related to their resting or stimulated sAA levels, and it was not associated with AMY1 gene copy number. Finally, AMY1 CNV might influence, but did not eventually determine, sAA levels in children. PMID:25784372

  3. Study on Fabrication of AA4032/AA6069 Cladding Billet Using Direct Chill Casting Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Xing; Zhang, Haitao; Shao, Bo; Li, Lei; Liu, Xuan; Cui, Jianzhong

    2016-04-01

    AA4032/AA6069 cladding billet in size of φ130 mm/φ110 mm was prepared by the modified direct chill casting process, and the parametric effect on casting performance was investigated using numerical simulation. Microstructures, elements distribution, and mechanical properties of the bonding interface were examined. The results show that metallurgical bonding interface can be obtained with the optimal parameters: the casting speed of 130 to 140 mm/min, the internal liquid level height of 50 to 60 mm, and the contact height of 40 to 50 mm. The metallurgical bonding interface is free of any discontinuities due to the fact that the alloying elements diffused across the interface and formed Ni-containing phase. Tensile strength of the cladding billet reaches 225.3 MPa, and the fracture position was located in AA6069 side, suggesting that the interface bonding strength is higher than the strength of AA6069. The interfacial shearing strength is 159.3 MPa, indicating excellent metallurgical bonding.

  4. Genetic loci that affect aristolochic acid-induced nephrotoxicity in the mouse

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Aristolochic acids (AA) are plant-derived nephrotoxins and carcinogens found in traditional medicines and herbal remedies. AA causes aristolochic acid nephropathy (AAN) and is a suspected environmental agent in Balkan endemic nephropathy (BEN) and its associated upper urothelial cancer. Approximately 5–10% of individuals exposed to AA develop renal insufficiency and/or cancer; thus a genetic predisposition to AA sensitivity has been proposed. The mouse is an established animal model of AAN, and inbred murine strains vary in AA sensitivity, confirming the genetic predisposition. We mapped quantitative trait loci (QTL) correlated with proximal tubule dysfunction after exposure to AA in an F2 population of mice, derived from breeding an AA-resistant strain (C57BL/6J) and an AA-sensitive strain (DBA/2J). A single main QTL was identified on chromosome 4 (Aanq1); three other interacting QTLs, (Aanq2–4) also were detected. The Aanq1 region was also detected in untreated mice, raising the possibility that preexisting differences in proximal tubule function may affect the severity of AA-elicited toxicity. This study lays the groundwork for identifying the genetic pathways contributing to AA sensitivity in the mouse and will further our understanding of human susceptibility to AA found widely in traditional medicines. PMID:21429970

  5. Impaired reductive regeneration of ascorbic acid in the Goto-Kakizaki diabetic rat.

    PubMed Central

    Kashiba, M; Oka, J; Ichikawa, R; Kageyama, A; Inayama, T; Kageyama, H; Ishikawa, T; Nishikimi, M; Inoue, M; Inoue, S

    2000-01-01

    Ascorbic acid (AA) is a naturally occurring major antioxidant that is essential for the scavenging of toxic free radicals in both plasma and tissues. AA levels in plasma and tissues have been reported to be significantly lower than normal in diabetic animals and humans, and might contribute to the complications found at the late stages of diabetes. In this study, plasma and hepatic AA levels and AA regeneration were studied in the Goto-Kakizaki diabetic rat (GK rat) to elucidate the mechanism of decreasing plasma and hepatic AA levels in diabetes. AA concentrations in the plasma and liver were significantly lower in GK than in control rats. AA levels in primary cultured hepatocytes derived from GK rats were lower than those derived from control Wistar rats with or without dehydroascorbic acid (DHA) in the medium. Among various enzyme activities that reduce DHA to AA, the NADPH-dependent regeneration of AA in the liver was significantly suppressed in GK rats. Northern blot analysis revealed that only the expression of 3-alpha-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (AKR) was significantly suppressed in these rats. These results suggest that decreased AA-regenerating activity, probably through decreased expression of AKR, contributes to the decreased AA levels and increased oxidative stress in GK rats. PMID:11023815

  6. Nonenzymatic amperometric sensor for ascorbic acid based on hollow gold/ruthenium nanoshells.

    PubMed

    Jo, Ara; Kang, Minkyung; Cha, Areum; Jang, Hye Su; Shim, Jun Ho; Lee, Nam-Suk; Kim, Myung Hwa; Lee, Youngmi; Lee, Chongmok

    2014-03-28

    We report a new nonenzymatic amperometric detection of ascorbic acid (AA) using a glassy carbon (GC) disk electrode modified with hollow gold/ruthenium (hAu-Ru) nanoshells, which exhibited decent sensing characteristics. The hAu-Ru nanoshells were prepared by the incorporation of Ru on hollow gold (hAu) nanoshells from Co nanoparticle templates, which enabled AA selectivity against glucose without aid of enzyme or membrane. The structure and electrocatalytic activities of the hAu-Ru catalysts were characterized by spectroscopic and electrochemical techniques. The hAu-Ru loaded on GC electrode (hAu-Ru/GC) showed sensitivity of 426 μA mM(-1) cm(-2) (normalized to the GC disk area) for the linear dynamic range of <5 μM to 2 mM AA at physiological pH. The response time and detection limit were 1.6 s and 2.2 μM, respectively. Furthermore, the hAu-Ru/GC electrode displayed remarkable selectivity for ascorbic acid over all potential biological interferents, including glucose, uric acid (UA), dopamine (DA), 4-acetamidophenol (AP), and nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH), which could be especially good for biological sensing. PMID:24636416

  7. Bacillus thuringiensis insecticidal Cry1Aa toxin binds to a highly conserved region of aminopeptidase N in the host insect leading to its evolutionary success.

    PubMed

    Nakanishi, K; Yaoi, K; Shimada, N; Kadotani, T; Sato, R

    1999-06-15

    Bacillus thuringiensis insecticidal protein, Cry1Aa toxin, binds to a specific receptor in insect midguts and has insecticidal activity. Therefore, the structure of the receptor molecule is probably a key factor in determining the binding affinity of the toxin and insect susceptibility. The cDNA fragment (PX frg1) encoding the Cry1Aa toxin-binding region of an aminopeptidase N (APN) or an APN family protein from diamondback moth, Plutella xylostella midgut was cloned and sequenced. A comparison between the deduced amino acid sequence of PX frg1 and other insect APN sequences shows that Cry1Aa toxin binds to a highly conserved region of APN family protein. In this paper, we propose a model to explain the mechanism that causes B. thuringiensis evolutionary success and differing insect susceptibility to Cry1Aa toxin. PMID:10366728

  8. Diet quality influences isotopic discrimination among amino acids in an aquatic vertebrate

    PubMed Central

    Chikaraishi, Yoshito; Steffan, Shawn A; Takano, Yoshinori; Ohkouchi, Naohiko

    2015-01-01

    Stable nitrogen isotopic composition of amino acids (δ15NAA) has recently been employed as a powerful tool in ecological food web studies, particularly for estimating the trophic position (TP) of animal species in food webs. However, the validity of these estimates depends on the consistency of the trophic discrimination factor (TDF; - Δδ15NAA at each shift of trophic level) among a suite of amino acids within the tissues of consumer species. In this study, we determined the TDF values of amino acids in tadpoles (the Japanese toad, Bufo japonicus) reared exclusively on one of three diets that differed in nutritional quality. The diets were commercial fish-food pellets (plant and animal biomass), bloodworms (animal biomass), and boiled white rice (plant carbohydrate), representing a balanced, protein-rich, and protein-poor diet, respectively. The TDF values of two “source amino acids” (Src-AAs), methionine and phenylalanine, were close to zero (0.3–0.5‰) among the three diets, typifying the values reported in the literature (∼0.5‰ and ∼0.4‰, respectively). However, TDF values of “trophic amino acids” (Tr-AAs) including alanine, valine, leucine, isoleucine, and glutamic acid varied by diet: for example, the glutamic acid TDF was similar to the standard value (∼8.0‰) when tadpoles were fed either the commercial pellets (8.0‰) or bloodworms (7.9‰), but when they were fed boiled rice, the TDF was significantly reduced (0.6‰). These results suggest that a profound lack of dietary protein may alter the TDF values of glutamic acid (and other Tr-AAs and glycine) within consumer species, but not the two Src-AAs (i.e., methionine and phenylalanine). Knowledge of how a nutritionally poor diet can influence the TDF of Tr- and Src-AAs will allow amino acid isotopic analyses to better estimate TP among free-roaming animals. PMID:26045955

  9. Bacterial lipopolysaccharide primes human neutrophils for enhanced release of arachidonic acid and causes phosphorylation of an 85-kD cytosolic phospholipase A2.

    PubMed Central

    Doerfler, M E; Weiss, J; Clark, J D; Elsbach, P

    1994-01-01

    Production of leukotriene B4 (LTB4) by human neutrophils (PMN) in response to different stimuli is increased after pretreatment with lipopolysaccharides (LPS). We have analyzed the steps in arachidonic acid (AA) metabolism affected by LPS by examining release of AA and its metabolites from [3H]AA prelabeled PMN. Pretreatment of PMN for 60 min with up to 1 microgram/ml of LPS alone had no effect, but release of [3H]AA was stimulated up to fivefold during subsequent stimulation with a second agent. In the absence of LPS-binding protein (LBP), priming was maximal after pretreatment of PMN with 10 ng of LPS/ml for 60 min; in the presence of LBP maximal priming occurred within 45 min at 0.1 ng of LPS/ml and within 15 min at 100 ng of LPS/ml. Treatment of PMN with 10 ng of LPS/ml also increased uptake of opsonized zymosan by up to 60%. Phospholipids are the source of released [3H]AA. No release was observed from [14C]oleic acid (OA)-labeled PMN suggesting that phospholipolysis may be specific for [3H]AA-labeled phospholipid pools. Cytosol from PMN primed with LPS contains two to three times the phospholipase A2 (PLA2) activity of control PMN, against 1-palmitoyl-[2-14C]arachidonoyl-phosphatidylcholine. This activity is Ca2+ dependent and dithiothreitol resistant. LPS priming is accompanied by reduced migration during SDS-PAGE of an 85-kD protein, identified as a cytosolic PLA2. The extent and kinetics of this effect of LPS on cPLA2 parallel the priming of [3H]AA release, both depending on LPS concentration either with or without LBP. These findings suggest that priming by LPS of AA metabolism by PMN includes phosphorylation of an AA-phospholipid-selective cytosolic PLA2 that is dissociated from activation until a second stimulus is applied. Images PMID:7512985

  10. Intraperitoneal administration of butyrate prevents the severity of acetic acid colitis in rats

    PubMed Central

    Malago, Joshua J.; Sangu, Catherine L.

    2015-01-01

    Intrarectal infusion of butyrate improves colorectal disorders including ulcerative colitis (UC). However, it is not established whether systemically administered butyrate benefits such patients. The current study aimed at exploring and comparing the potential of intraperitoneally, intrarectally, and orally administered butyrate against acetic acid (AA)-induced UC in rats. Intrarectal administration of 2 ml of 50% AA was done after or without prior treatment of rats for 7 consecutive days with 100 mg/kg sodium butyrate (SB) intraperitoneally, intrarectally, or orally. Rats were sacrificed after 48 h of AA-treatment. Subsequently, colon sections were processed routinely for histopathological examination. We clinically observed diarrhea, loose stools, and hemoccult-positive stools, and histologically, epithelial loss and ulceration, crypt damage, goblet cell depletion, hemorrhage, and mucosal infiltration of inflammatory cells. The changes were significantly reduced by intraperitoneal, intrarectal, or oral butyrate, with intraperitoneal butyrate exhibiting the highest potency. It is concluded that intraperitoneal administration of butyrate abrogates the lesions of AA-induced UC and its potency surpasses that of intrarectal or oral butyrate. PMID:25743124

  11. Mefenamic Acid

    MedlinePlus

    Mefenamic acid is used to relieve mild to moderate pain, including menstrual pain (pain that happens before or during a menstrual period). Mefenamic acid is in a class of medications called NSAIDs. ...

  12. Dietary arachidonic acid in perinatal nutrition: a commentary.

    PubMed

    Lauritzen, Lotte; Fewtrell, Mary; Agostoni, Carlo

    2015-01-01

    Arachidonic acid (AA) is supplied together with docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) in infant formulas, but we have limited knowledge about the effects of supplementation with either of these long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids (LCPUFA) on growth and developmental outcomes. AA is present in similar levels in breast milk throughout the world, whereas the level of DHA is highly diet dependent. Autopsy studies show similar diet-dependent variation in brain DHA, whereas AA is little affected by intake. Early intake of DHA has been shown to affect visual development, but the effect of LCPUFA on neurodevelopment remains to be established. Few studies have found any functional difference between infants supplemented with DHA alone compared to DHA+AA, but some studies show neurodevelopmental advantages in breast-fed infants of mothers supplemented with n-3 LCPUFA alone. It also remains to be established whether the AA/DHA balance could affect allergic and inflammatory outcomes later in life. Disentangling effects of genetic variability and dietary intake on AA and DHA-status and on functional outcomes may be an important step in the process of determining whether AA-intake is of any physiological or clinical importance. However, based on the current evidence we hypothesize that dietary AA plays a minor role on growth and development relative to the impact of dietary DHA. PMID:25314584

  13. Evaluating placental inter-ordinal phylogenies with novel sequences including RAG1, gamma-fibrinogen, ND6, and mt-tRNA, plus MCMC-driven nucleotide, amino acid, and codon models.

    PubMed

    Waddell, Peter J; Shelley, Shawn

    2003-08-01

    It is essential to test a priori scientific hypotheses with independent data, not least to partly negate factors such as gene-specific base composition biases misleading our models. Seven new gene segments and sequences plus Bayesian likelihood phylogenetic methods were used to compare and test five recent placental phylogenies. These five phylogenies are similar to each other, yet quite different from Fthose of previously proposed trees, and span Waddell et al. [Syst. Biol. 48 (1999) 1] to Murphy et al. [Science 294 (2001b) 2348]. Trees for RAG1, gamma-fibrinogen, ND6, mt-tRNA, mt-RNA, c-MYC, epsilon -globin, and GHR are significantly congruent with the four main groups of mammals common to the five phylogenies, i.e., Afrotheria, Laurasiatheria, Euarchontoglires, Xenarthra plus Boreoeutheria (Laurasiatheria plus Euarchontoglires). Where these five a priori phylogenies differ, remain areas generally hard to resolve with the new sequences. The root remains ambiguous and does not reject a basal Afrotheria (the Exafroplacentalia hypothesis), Afrotheria plus Xenarthra together with basal (Atlantogenata), or Epitheria (Xenarthra basal) convincingly. Good evidence is found that Eulipotyphla is monophyletic and is located at the base of Laurasiatheria. The shrew mole, Uropsilus, is found to cluster consistently with other moles, while Solenodon may be the sister taxa to all other eulipotyphlans. Support is found for a probable sister pairing of just hedgehogs/gymnures and shrews. Relationships within Afrotheria, except the Paenungulata clade, remain hard to resolve, although there is congruent support for Afroinsectiphillia (aardvark, elephant shrews, golden moles, and tenrecs). A first-time use is made of MCMC enacted general time-reversible (GTR) amino acid and codon-based models for general tree selection. Even with ND6, a GTR amino acid model provided resolution of fine features, such as the sister group relationship of walrus to Otatriidae, and with BRCA a more

  14. Arachidonic Acid Enhances Reproduction in Daphnia magna and Mitigates Changes in Sex Ratios Induced by Pyriproxyfen

    PubMed Central

    Ginjupalli, Gautam K.; Gerard, Patrick D.; Baldwin, William S.

    2016-01-01

    Arachidonic acid (AA) is one of only two unsaturated fatty acids retained in the ovaries of crustaceans, and an inhibitor of HR97g, a nuclear receptor expressed in adult ovaries. We hypothesized that as a key fatty acid, AA may be associated with reproduction and potentially environmental sex determination in Daphnia. Reproduction assays with AA indicate that it alters female/male sex ratios by increasing female production. This reproductive effect only occurred during a restricted P. subcapitata diet. Next, we tested whether enriching a poorer algal diet (C. vulgaris) with AA enhances overall reproduction and sex ratios. AA enrichment of a C. vulgaris diet also enhances fecundity at 1.0 and 4.0μM by 30–40% in the presence and absence of pyriproxyfen. This indicates that AA is crucial in reproduction regardless of environmental sex determination. Furthermore, our data indicates that P. subcapitata may provide a threshold concentration of AA needed for reproduction. Diet switch experiments from P. subcapitata to C. vulgaris mitigate some but not all of AA’s effects when compared to a C. vulgaris only diet, suggesting that some AA provided by P. subcapitata is retained. In summary, AA supplementation increases reproduction and represses pyriproxyfen-induced environmental sex determination in D. magna in restricted diets. A diet rich in AA may provide protection from some reproductive toxicants such as the juvenile hormone agonist, pyriproxyfen. PMID:25393616

  15. The ribosome can discriminate the chirality of amino acids within its peptidyl-transferase center.

    PubMed

    Englander, Michael T; Avins, Joshua L; Fleisher, Rachel C; Liu, Bo; Effraim, Philip R; Wang, Jiangning; Schulten, Klaus; Leyh, Thomas S; Gonzalez, Ruben L; Cornish, Virginia W

    2015-05-12

    The cellular translational machinery (TM) synthesizes proteins using exclusively L- or achiral aminoacyl-tRNAs (aa-tRNAs), despite the presence of D-amino acids in nature and their ability to be aminoacylated onto tRNAs by aa-tRNA synthetases. The ubiquity of L-amino acids in proteins has led to the hypothesis that D-amino acids are not substrates for the TM. Supporting this view, protein engineering efforts to incorporate D-amino acids into proteins using the TM have thus far been unsuccessful. Nonetheless, a mechanistic understanding of why D-aa-tRNAs are poor substrates for the TM is lacking. To address this deficiency, we have systematically tested the translation activity of D-aa-tRNAs using a series of biochemical assays. We find that the TM can effectively, albeit slowly, accept D-aa-tRNAs into the ribosomal aa-tRNA binding (A) site, use the A-site D-aa-tRNA as a peptidyl-transfer acceptor, and translocate the resulting peptidyl-D-aa-tRNA into the ribosomal peptidyl-tRNA binding (P) site. During the next round of continuous translation, however, we find that ribosomes carrying a P-site peptidyl-D-aa-tRNA partition into subpopulations that are either translationally arrested or that can continue translating. Consistent with its ability to arrest translation, chemical protection experiments and molecular dynamics simulations show that P site-bound peptidyl-D-aa-tRNA can trap the ribosomal peptidyl-transferase center in a conformation in which peptidyl transfer is impaired. Our results reveal a novel mechanism through which D-aa-tRNAs interfere with translation, provide insight into how the TM might be engineered to use D-aa-tRNAs, and increase our understanding of the physiological role of a widely distributed enzyme that clears D-aa-tRNAs from cells. PMID:25918365

  16. The ribosome can discriminate the chirality of amino acids within its peptidyl-transferase center

    PubMed Central

    Englander, Michael T.; Avins, Joshua L.; Fleisher, Rachel C.; Liu, Bo; Effraim, Philip R.; Wang, Jiangning; Schulten, Klaus; Leyh, Thomas S.; Gonzalez, Ruben L.; Cornish, Virginia W.

    2015-01-01

    The cellular translational machinery (TM) synthesizes proteins using exclusively L- or achiral aminoacyl-tRNAs (aa-tRNAs), despite the presence of D-amino acids in nature and their ability to be aminoacylated onto tRNAs by aa-tRNA synthetases. The ubiquity of L-amino acids in proteins has led to the hypothesis that D-amino acids are not substrates for the TM. Supporting this view, protein engineering efforts to incorporate D-amino acids into proteins using the TM have thus far been unsuccessful. Nonetheless, a mechanistic understanding of why D-aa-tRNAs are poor substrates for the TM is lacking. To address this deficiency, we have systematically tested the translation activity of D-aa-tRNAs using a series of biochemical assays. We find that the TM can effectively, albeit slowly, accept D-aa-tRNAs into the ribosomal aa-tRNA binding (A) site, use the A-site D-aa-tRNA as a peptidyl-transfer acceptor, and translocate the resulting peptidyl-D-aa-tRNA into the ribosomal peptidyl-tRNA binding (P) site. During the next round of continuous translation, however, we find that ribosomes carrying a P-site peptidyl-D-aa-tRNA partition into subpopulations that are either translationally arrested or that can continue translating. Consistent with its ability to arrest translation, chemical protection experiments and molecular dynamics simulations show that P site-bound peptidyl-D-aa-tRNA can trap the ribosomal peptidyl-transferase center in a conformation in which peptidyl transfer is impaired. Our results reveal a novel mechanism through which D-aa-tRNAs interfere with translation, provide insight into how the TM might be engineered to use D-aa-tRNAs, and increase our understanding of the physiological role of a widely distributed enzyme that clears D-aa-tRNAs from cells. PMID:25918365

  17. Effect of SBD.4A--a defined multicomponent preparation of Angelica sinensis--in periodontal regeneration models.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Hui; Alexeev, Alexei; Sharma, Vrushali; Guzman, Lorenzo Dave T; Bojanowski, Krzysztof

    2008-07-01

    Periodontitis is a major cause of tooth motility and loss, resulting in destruction of the supporting structures of the tooth, including periodontal ligaments and alveolar bone. Periodontal surgery can slow the progression of the disease, but is costly, invasive, limited by contraindications and technique-sensitive. Recently, non-invasive pharmacological treatments using proteinaceous biologicals have become available. Here, for the first time, the bone-regenerative capabilities of a non-proteinaceous biological--SBD.4A--a novel, stable multicomponent growth factor isolated from a medicinal plant Angelica sinensis are reported. SBD.4A was tested in osteoblast proliferation and differentiation systems, as well as in a fibroblast-secreted hyaluronic acid assay. Furthermore, SBD.4A was formulated in a slow release matrix and tested in the rat calvarial defect model. Apart from the previously reported strong stimulation of angiogenesis, fibroblast growth and collagen synthesis--the activities needed for periodontal regeneration--SBD.4A enhanced the deposition of hyaluronic acid and proliferation of osteoblasts in vitro, as well as bone regeneration in the rat calvarial defect model. Together, these results indicate the beneficial effect of SBD.4 on periodontal ligament and bone regeneration making the case for further development of this botanical growth factor. PMID:18389473

  18. LC/ESI-MS/MS method for determination of salivary eicosapentaenoic acid concentration to arachidonic acid concentration ratio.

    PubMed

    Ogawa, Shoujiro; Tomaru, Koki; Matsumoto, Nagisa; Watanabe, Shui; Higashi, Tatsuya

    2016-01-01

    A simple liquid chromatography/electrospray ionization-tandem mass spectrometry (LC/ESI-MS/MS) method for determination of the eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) concentration to arachidonic acid (AA) concentration ratio in human saliva has been developed. The EPA/AA ratio in serum or plasma is widely recognized as a useful indicator in identifying the risk of cardiovascular disease, especially atherosclerosis. The salivary EPA/AA ratio is expected to be a convenient alternative to the serum or plasma EPA/AA ratio, because saliva offers the advantages of easy and noninvasive sampling. The saliva was deproteinized with acetonitrile, purified using an Oasis HLB cartridge, and derivatized with 1-[(4-dimethylaminophenyl)carbonyl]piperazine (DAPPZ). The derivatized EPA and AA were subjected to LC/ESI-MS/MS, and the EPA/AA ratio was determined using the selected reaction monitoring mode. The DAPPZ-derivatization increased the ESI sensitivity by 100- and 300-fold for EPA and AA, respectively, and enabled the detection of trace fatty acids in saliva using a 200 μL sample. The assay reproducibility was satisfactory (relative standard deviation, <5.0%). The method was successfully applied to the measurement of the salivary EPA/AA ratios of healthy Japanese subjects and their changes owing to the supplementation of EPA. PMID:25620210

  19. Effect of mitochondrial ascorbic acid synthesis on photosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Senn, M E; Gergoff Grozeff, G E; Alegre, M L; Barrile, F; De Tullio, M C; Bartoli, C G

    2016-07-01

    Ascorbic acid (AA) is synthesized in plant mitochondria through the oxidation of l-galactono-1,4-lactone (l-GalL) and then distributed to different cell compartments. AA-deficient Arabidopsis thaliana mutants (vtc2) and exogenous applications of l-GalL were used to generate plants with different AA content in their leaves. This experimental approach allows determining specific AA-dependent effects on carbon metabolism. No differences in O2 uptake, malic and citric acid and NADH content suggest that AA synthesis or accumulation did not affect mitochondrial activity; however, l-GalL treatment increased CO2 assimilation and photosynthetic electron transport rate in vtc2 (but not wt) leaves demonstrating a stimulation of photosynthesis after l-GalL treatment. Increased CO2 assimilation correlated with increased leaf stomatal conductance observed in l-GalL-treated vtc2 plants. PMID:27010742

  20. Polyunsaturated Fatty Acids in Lipid Bilayers and Tubules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirst, Linda S.; Yuan, Jing; Pramudya, Yohannes; Nguyen, Lam T.

    2007-03-01

    Omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) are found in a variety of biological membranes and have been implicated with lipid raft formation and possible function, typical molecules include DHA (Docosahexanoic Acid) and AA (Alphalinoleic Acid) which have been the focus of considerable attention in recent years. We are interested in the phase behavior of these molecules in the lipid bilayer. The addition of lipid molecules with polyunsaturated chains has a clear effect on the fluidity and curvature of the membrane and we investigate the effects the addition of polyunsaturated lipids on bilayer structure and tubule formation. Self-assembled cylindrical lipid tubules have attracted considerable attention because of their interesting structures and potential technological applications. Using x-ray diffraction techniques, Atomic Force Microscopy and confocal fluorescence imaging, both symmetric and mixed chain lipids were incorporated into model membranes and the effects on bilayer structure and tubule formation investigated.

  1. Capillary gas chromatography of amino acids, including asparagine and glutamine: sensitive gas chromatographic-mass spectrometric and selected ion monitoring gas chromatographic-mass spectrometric detection of the N,O(S)-tert.-butyldimethylsilyl derivatives.

    PubMed

    Chaves Das Neves, H J; Vasconcelos, A M

    1987-04-17

    Amino acids and the amino acid amides glutamine and asparagine can be simultaneously derivatized to the corresponding N,O(S)-tert.-butyldimethylsilyl derivatives in a one-step reaction with N-methyl-N-(tert.-butyldimethylsilyl)trifluoroacetamide in acetonitrile. The solution is used directly for gas chromatography (GC). Losses due to evaporation steps are avoided. Except for the more basic amino acids, derivatization occurs at room temperature. Lysine, arginine and histidine require additional heating at 150 degrees C for 2.5 h in order to complete derivatization. The derivatization has high reproducibility. The response factors relative to norvaline or cycloleucine lie between 0.40 and 1.30. Arginine is the most difficult amino acid to derivatize. The size of the tert.-butyldimethylsilyl (TBDMS) group prevents multiple silylation of the nitrogen atoms. Only a single peak is observed for each compound. Twenty-seven amino acid (and glutamine and asparagine) derivatives were simultaneously chromatographed and well separated in a single run on a 25 m X 0.20 mm I.D. glass capillary column coated with OV-1. The TBDMS derivatives possess very characteristic EI mass spectra at 70 eV, with intense diagnostic ions. This makes them very appropriate for GC-mass spectrometric (MS) work and selected ion monitoring GC-MS at the picomole level. The detection limit for arginine as the TBDMS derivative is less than 0.3 ng. The usefulness of the method is illustrated by the detection of amino acids in a peptide hydrolysate obtained from 1 microgram of bovin insulin B-chain. PMID:3597576

  2. Floor Plans: Section "AA", Section "BB"; Floor Framing Plans: Section ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Floor Plans: Section "A-A", Section "B-B"; Floor Framing Plans: Section "A-A", Section "B-B" - Fort Washington, Fort Washington Light, Northeast side of Potomac River at Fort Washington Park, Fort Washington, Prince George's County, MD

  3. Idiopathic systemic AA-amyloidosis in a skunk (Mephitis mephitis).

    PubMed

    Elhensheri, Mohamed; Linke, Reinhold P; Blankenburg, Anja; Beineke, Andreas

    2012-03-01

    This report describes a case of systemic amyloidosis in a captive striped skunk. At necropsy, bilateral alopecia, as well as reno-, hepato-, and splenomegaly were present. Congo red staining and immunohistochemistry revealed depositions of AA-amyloid in different organs. The lack of a predisposing disease is suggestive of idiopathic systemic AA-amyloidosis. PMID:22448530

  4. Hepatotoxicity of Pentavalent Antimonial Drug: Possible Role of Residual Sb(III) and Protective Effect of Ascorbic Acid

    PubMed Central

    Kato, Kelly C.; Morais-Teixeira, Eliane; Reis, Priscila G.; Silva-Barcellos, Neila M.; Salaün, Pascal; Campos, Paula P.; Dias Corrêa-Junior, José; Rabello, Ana; Demicheli, Cynthia

    2014-01-01

    Pentavalent antimonial drugs such as meglumine antimoniate (Glucantime [Glu; Sanofi-Aventis, São Paulo, Brazil]) produce severe side effects, including cardiotoxicity and hepatotoxicity, during the treatment of leishmaniasis. We evaluated the role of residual Sb(III) in the hepatotoxicity of meglumine antimoniate, as well as the protective effect of the antioxidant ascorbic acid (AA) during antimonial chemotherapy in a murine model of visceral leishmaniasis. BALB/c mice infected with Leishmania infantum were treated intraperitoneally at 80 mg of Sb/kg/day with commercial meglumine antimoniate (Glu) or a synthetic meglumine antimoniate with lower Sb(III) level (MA), in association or not with AA (15 mg/kg/day), for a 20-day period. Control groups received saline or saline plus AA. Livers were evaluated for hepatocytes histological alterations, peroxidase activity, and apoptosis. Increased proportions of swollen and apoptotic hepatocytes were observed in animals treated with Glu compared to animals treated with saline or MA. The peroxidase activity was also enhanced in the liver of animals that received Glu. Cotreatment with AA reduced the extent of histological changes, the apoptotic index, and the peroxidase activity to levels corresponding to the control group. Moreover, the association with AA did not affect the hepatic uptake of Sb and the ability of Glu to reduce the liver and spleen parasite loads in infected mice. In conclusion, our data supports the use of pentavalent antimonials with low residue of Sb(III) and the association of pentavalent antimonials with AA, as effective strategies to reduce side effects in antimonial therapy. PMID:24189251

  5. Effects of Dietary Lysine Levels on Apparent Nutrient Digestibility and Serum Amino Acid Absorption Mode in Growing Pigs

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, P. L.; Yan, H. C.; Wang, X. Q.; Zhang, C. M.; Zhu, C.; Shu, G.; Jiang, Q. Y.

    2013-01-01

    Two experiments were conducted to determine the effects of different dietary lysine levels on the apparent nutrient digestibility, the serum amino acid (AA) concentration, and the biochemical parameters of the precaval and portal vein blood in growing pigs. In Experiment 1, 15 noncannulated pigs received diets with different lysine densities (0.65%, 0.95%, and 1.25% lysine) for 13 d. A total collection digestion test was performed, and blood samples were collected from the precaval vein at the end of the experiment. In Experiment 2, four cannulated pigs were fed the same diets of Experiment 1. The experiment used a self-control experimental design and was divided into three periods. On d 5 of each period, at 0.5 h before feeding and hourly up to 8 h after feeding, single blood samples were collected from catheters placed in the portal vein. In Experiment 1, some serum AAs (including lysine), serum urinary nitrogen (SUN), and total protein (TP) concentrations were significantly affected by the dietary lysine levels (p<0.05). Moreover, the 0.65% lysine treatment showed a significant lower apparent digestibility of gross energy, dry matter, crude protein, and phosphorus than the other treatments (p<0.05). In Experiment 2, serum lysine, histidine, phenylalanine, threonine, valine, isoleucine (p = 0.0588), triglyceride, and SUN (p = 0.0572) concentrations were significantly affected by the dietary lysine levels (p<0.05). Additionally, almost all of the determined serum AA and total AA concentrations reached their lowest values at 0.5 h before feeding and their highest values at 2 h after feeding (p<0.05). These findings indicate that the greatest absorption of AA occurred at 2 h after feeding and that the dynamic profile of serum AA is affected by the dietary lysine levels. Moreover, when the dietary lysine content was 0.95%, the growing pigs achieved a better nutrient digestibility and serum metabolites levels. PMID:25049879

  6. Effects of Nigella sativa oil and ascorbic acid against oxytetracycline-induced hepato-renal toxicity in rabbits

    PubMed Central

    Abdel-Daim, Mohamed M.; Ghazy, Emad W.

    2015-01-01

    Objective(s): Oxytetracycline (OTC) is a broad spectrum antibiotic widely used for treatment of a wide range of infections. However, its improper human and animal use leads to toxic effects, including hepatonephrotoxicity. Our objective was to evaluate protective effects of Nigella sativa oil (NSO) and/or ascorbic acid (AA), against OTC-induced hepatonephrotoxicity in rabbits. Materials and Methods: Forty male white New Zealand rabbits were divided into 5 groups of eight each. The 1st group (control) was given saline. The 2nd group was given OTC (200 mg/kg, orally). The 3rd and 4th groups were orally administered NSO and AA (2 ml/kg and 200 mg/kg respectively) 1 hr before OTC administration at the same dose regimen used for the 2nd group. Both NSO and AA were given in combination for the 5th group along with OTC administration. Serum biochemical parameters related to liver and kidney injury were evaluated, and lipid peroxidation as well as antioxidant markers in hepatic and renal tissues were examined. Results: OTC-treated animals revealed significant alterations in serum biochemical hepato-renal injury markers, and showed a markedly increase in hepato-renal lipid peroxidation and inhibition in tissue antioxidant biomarkers. NSO and AA protect against OTC-induced serum and tissue biochemical alterations when each of them is used alone or in combination along with OTC treatment. Furthermore, both NSO and AA produced synergetic hepatoprotective and antioxidant properties. Conclusion: The present study revealed the preventive role of NSO and/or AA against the toxic effects of OTC through their free radical-scavenging and potent antioxidant activities. PMID:25945233

  7. Supramolecular Adducts of Cucurbit[7]uril and Amino Acids in the Gas Phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kovalenko, Ekaterina; Vilaseca, Marta; Díaz-Lobo, Mireia; Masliy, A. N.; Vicent, Cristian; Fedin, Vladimir P.

    2016-02-01

    The complexation of the macrocyclic cavitand cucurbit[7]uril (Q7) with a series of amino acids (AA) with different side chains (Asp, Asn, Gln, Ser, Ala, Val, and Ile) is investigated by ESI-MS techniques. The 1:1 [Q7 + AA + 2H]2+ adducts are observed as the base peak when equimolar Q7:AA solutions are electrosprayed, whereas the 1:2 [Q7 + 2AA + 2H]2+ dications are dominant when an excess of the amino acid is used. A combination of ion mobility mass spectrometry (IM-MS) and DFT calculations of the 1:1 [Q7 + AA + 2H]2+ (AA = Tyr, Val, and Ser) adducts is also reported and proven to be unsuccessful at discriminating between exclusion or inclusion-type conformations in the gas phase. Collision induced dissociation (CID) revealed that the preferred dissociation pathways of the 1:1 [Q7 + AA + 2H]2+ dications are strongly influenced by the identity of the amino acid side chain, whereas ion molecule reactions towards N-butylmethylamine displayed a common reactivity pattern comprising AA displacement. Special emphasis is given on the differences between the gas-phase behavior of the supramolecular adducts with amino acids (AA = Asp, Asn, Gln, Ser, Ala, Val, and Ile) and those featuring basic (Lys and Arg) and aromatic (Tyr and Phe) side chains.

  8. Study of the Binding Energies between Unnatural Amino Acids and Engineered Orthogonal Tyrosyl-tRNA Synthetases

    PubMed Central

    Ren, Wei; Truong, Tan M.; Ai, Hui-wang

    2015-01-01

    We utilized several computational approaches to evaluate the binding energies of tyrosine (Tyr) and several unnatural Tyr analogs, to several orthogonal aaRSes derived from Methanocaldococcus jannaschii and Escherichia coli tyrosyl-tRNA synthetases. The present study reveals the following: (1) AutoDock Vina and ROSETTA were able to distinguish binding energy differences for individual pairs of favorable and unfavorable aaRS-amino acid complexes, but were unable to cluster together all experimentally verified favorable complexes from unfavorable aaRS-Tyr complexes; (2) MD-MM/PBSA provided the best prediction accuracy in terms of clustering favorable and unfavorable enzyme-substrate complexes, but also required the highest computational cost; and (3) MM/PBSA based on single energy-minimized structures has a significantly lower computational cost compared to MD-MM/PBSA, but still produced sufficiently accurate predictions to cluster aaRS-amino acid interactions. Although amino acid-aaRS binding is just the first step in a complex series of processes to acylate a tRNA with its corresponding amino acid, the difference in binding energy, as shown by MD-MM/PBSA, is important for a mutant orthogonal aaRS to distinguish between a favorable unnatural amino acid (unAA) substrate from unfavorable natural amino acid substrates. Our computational study should assist further designing and engineering of orthogonal aaRSes for the genetic encoding of novel unAAs. PMID:26220470

  9. Study of the Binding Energies between Unnatural Amino Acids and Engineered Orthogonal Tyrosyl-tRNA Synthetases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Wei; Truong, Tan M.; Ai, Hui-Wang

    2015-07-01

    We utilized several computational approaches to evaluate the binding energies of tyrosine (Tyr) and several unnatural Tyr analogs, to several orthogonal aaRSes derived from Methanocaldococcus jannaschii and Escherichia coli tyrosyl-tRNA synthetases. The present study reveals the following: (1) AutoDock Vina and ROSETTA were able to distinguish binding energy differences for individual pairs of favorable and unfavorable aaRS-amino acid complexes, but were unable to cluster together all experimentally verified favorable complexes from unfavorable aaRS-Tyr complexes; (2) MD-MM/PBSA provided the best prediction accuracy in terms of clustering favorable and unfavorable enzyme-substrate complexes, but also required the highest computational cost; and (3) MM/PBSA based on single energy-minimized structures has a significantly lower computational cost compared to MD-MM/PBSA, but still produced sufficiently accurate predictions to cluster aaRS-amino acid interactions. Although amino acid-aaRS binding is just the first step in a complex series of processes to acylate a tRNA with its corresponding amino acid, the difference in binding energy, as shown by MD-MM/PBSA, is important for a mutant orthogonal aaRS to distinguish between a favorable unnatural amino acid (unAA) substrate from unfavorable natural amino acid substrates. Our computational study should assist further designing and engineering of orthogonal aaRSes for the genetic encoding of novel unAAs.

  10. Differential effects of eicosapentaenoic and docosahexaenoic acids upon oxidant-stimulated release and uptake of arachidonic acid in human lymphoma U937 cells.

    PubMed

    Obajimi, Oluwakemi; Black, Kenneth D; MacDonald, Donald J; Boyle, Rose M; Glen, Iain; Ross, Brian M

    2005-08-01

    The use of n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids, as found in fish-oil derived dietary supplements, as anti-inflammatory agents is supported by a variety of biochemical and physiological data. Recent studies investigating the therapeutic potential of long chain (>C20) n-3 fatty acids in mental illness have lead to the conclusion, however, that not all n-3 fatty acid types are equally efficacious. In particular eicosapentaeoic acid (EPA) appears to possess antidepressant and antipsychotic activity, while docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) does not, an effect suggested to be due to a differential ability to antagonize arachidonic acid (AA)-dependent cell signalling. In this study, we examine the effect of EPA and DHA supplementation upon uptake and release of arachidonic acid stimulated by tert-butyl hydroperoxide/Fe2+ in U937 cells. Oxidant-stimulated 3H-AA release from cells was enhanced by pre-treatment with EPA, DHA and AA, but not stearic or oleic acids for 18 days, with the order of effect magnitude being EPA > DHA = AA. Supplementation of cells for 1 day gave qualitatively similar results, although the effect magnitude was smaller. To determine whether enhanced release was due to decreased reuptake of AA, cells were cultured in the presence of 10 microM fatty acids. Pre-treatment of cells with EPA, and to a lesser extent AA, but not DHA, inhibited uptake of 3H-AA measured subsequent to the removal of unesterified fatty acids. This study suggests that, in U937 cells, EPA can alter the rate of uptake and release of AA from phospholipids in an exposure time-dependent manner, whereas DHA has no or little effect. Our results predict that EPA will have a more pronounced effect upon AA-dependent processes compared to DHA, and suggests that the relative amounts of EPA and DHA in fish oil supplements may modify their biochemical, and potentially, behavioural effects. PMID:15967385

  11. Protective effect of anacardic acids from cashew (Anacardium occidentale) on ethanol-induced gastric damage in mice.

    PubMed

    Morais, Talita C; Pinto, Natália B; Carvalho, Karine Maria M B; Rios, Jeison B; Ricardo, Nagila Maria P S; Trevisan, Maria Teresa S; Rao, Vietla S; Santos, Flávia A

    2010-01-01

    Cashew nut-shell liquid and the contained anacardic acids (AAs) have been shown to possess antioxidant, lipoxygenase inhibitory, anti-Helicobacter pylori and antitumor properties. Despite these known effects, hitherto there were no published reports on their likely gastroprotective effects. The present study was designed to verify whether AAs afford gastroprotection against the ethanol-induced gastric damage and to examine the underlying mechanism(s). Gastric damage was induced by intragastric administration of 0.2mL of ethanol (96%). Mice in groups were pretreated orally with AAs (10, 30 and 100mg/kg), misoprostol (50 microg/kg), or vehicle (2% Tween 80 in saline, 10mL/kg), 45min before ethanol administration. They were sacrificed 30min later, the stomachs excised, and the mucosal lesion area (mm(2)) measured by planimetry. Gastroprotection was assessed in relation to inhibition of gastric lesion area. To study the gastroprotective mechanism(s), its relations to capsaicin-sensitive fibers, endogenous prostaglandins, nitric oxide and ATP-sensitive potassium channels were analysed. Treatments effects on ethanol-associated oxidative stress markers GSH, MDA, catalase, SOD, and total nitrate/nitrite levels as an index of NO were measured in gastric tissue. Besides, the effects of AAs on gastric secretory volume and total acidity were analysed in 4-h pylorus-ligated rat. AAs afforded a dose-related gastroprotection against the ethanol damage and further prevented the ethanol-induced changes in the levels of GSH, MDA, catalase, SOD and nitrate/nitrite. However, they failed to modify the gastric secretion or the total acidity. It was observed that the gastroprotection by AAs was greatly reduced in animals pretreated with capsazepine, indomethacin, l-NAME or glibenclamide. These results suggest that AAs afford gastroprotection principally through an antioxidant mechanism. Other complementary mechanisms include the activation of capsaicin-sensitive gastric afferents

  12. Reductive dechlorination of carbon tetrachloride using buffered alkaline ascorbic acid.

    PubMed

    Lin, Ya-Ting; Liang, Chenju

    2015-10-01

    Alkaline ascorbic acid (AA) was recently discovered as a novel in-situ chemical reduction (ISCR) reagent for remediating chlorinated solvents in the subsurface. For this ISCR process, the maintenance of an alkaline pH is essential. This study investigated the possibility of the reduction of carbon tetrachloride (CT) using alkaline AA solution buffered by phosphate and by NaOH. The results indicated that CT was reduced by AA, and chloroform (CF) was a major byproduct at a phosphate buffered pH of 12. However, CT was completely reduced by AA in 2M NaOH without CF formation. In the presence of iron/soil minerals, iron could be reduced by AA and Fe(2+) tends to precipitate on the mineral surface to accelerate CT degradation. A simultaneous transfer of hydrogenolysis and dichloroelimination would occur under phosphate buffered pH 12. This implies that a high alkaline environment is a crucial factor for maintaining the dominant pathway of two electron transfer from dianionic AA to dehydroascorbic acid, and to undergo dichloroelimination of CT. Moreover, threonic acid and oxalic acid were identified to be the major AA decomposition products in alkaline solutions. PMID:25912910

  13. Pump apparatus including deconsolidator

    DOEpatents

    Sonwane, Chandrashekhar; Saunders, Timothy; Fitzsimmons, Mark Andrew

    2014-10-07

    A pump apparatus includes a particulate pump that defines a passage that extends from an inlet to an outlet. A duct is in flow communication with the outlet. The duct includes a deconsolidator configured to fragment particle agglomerates received from the passage.

  14. States' Flexibility Waiver Plans for Alternate Assessments Based on Alternate Achievement Standards (AA-AAS). Synthesis Report 96

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lazarus, Sheryl S.; Edwards, Lynn M.; Thurlow, Martha L.; Hodgson, Jennifer R.

    2014-01-01

    All states have alternate assessments based on alternate achievement standards (AA-AAS) for students with the most significant cognitive disabilities. For accountability purposes, the Elementary and Secondary Education Act (ESEA) allows up to 1% of students to be counted as proficient with this assessment option. In 2011 the U.S. Department of…

  15. Mutant Rep protein of the porcine circovirus type 2 N-glycosylation:23-25aa, 256-258aa mutation reduced virus replication but 286-288aa mutation enhanced virus replication in PK-15 cells.

    PubMed

    Shi, Jianli; Peng, Zhe; Fu, Fang; Xu, Shaojian; Xu, Shengnan; Cong, Xiaoyan; Yuan, Xiaoyuan; Yu, Jiang; Wu, Jiaqiang; Sun, Wenbo; Du, Yijun; Li, Jun; Wang, Jinbao

    2015-06-12

    Porcine circovirus type 2 (PCV2) Rep protein and the splice variant Rep' protein impact genome replication. The Rep protein contains three potential N-glycosylation at positions 23-25aa (NPS), 256-258aa (NQT) and 286-288aa (NAT). Three double copy infectious clones with Rep protein N-glycosylation at positions mutations 23-25aa (DPS), 256-258aa (DQT) and 286-288aa (DAT) were constructed and their function in virus replication in PK-15 cells was investigated. The results showed that the double copy infectious clone with N-glycosylation site mutation could be rescued in vitro and 23-25aa, 256-258aa mutation reduced virus replication but 286-288aa mutation enhanced virus replication. PMID:25829242

  16. Optical modulator including grapene

    DOEpatents

    Liu, Ming; Yin, Xiaobo; Zhang, Xiang

    2016-06-07

    The present invention provides for a one or more layer graphene optical modulator. In a first exemplary embodiment the optical modulator includes an optical waveguide, a nanoscale oxide spacer adjacent to a working region of the waveguide, and a monolayer graphene sheet adjacent to the spacer. In a second exemplary embodiment, the optical modulator includes at least one pair of active media, where the pair includes an oxide spacer, a first monolayer graphene sheet adjacent to a first side of the spacer, and a second monolayer graphene sheet adjacent to a second side of the spacer, and at least one optical waveguide adjacent to the pair.

  17. A review of acid sulfate soil impacts, actions and policies that impact on water quality in Great Barrier Reef catchments, including a case study on remediation at East Trinity.

    PubMed

    Powell, B; Martens, M

    2005-01-01

    An estimated 666,000 ha of acid sulfate soils (ASS) occur within the Great Barrier Reef (GBR) catchments of Queensland, Australia. Extensive areas have been drained causing acidification, metal contamination, deoxygenation and iron precipitation in reef receiving waters. The close proximity of ASS to reef waters makes them a substantial threat to water quality. Another important issue linked with ASS is their release of soluble iron, which is known to stimulate nuisance marine algal blooms, in particular Lyngbya majuscula. Known blooms of the cyanobacteria in reef waters have been confirmed at Shoalwater Bay, Corio Bay, the Whitsunday area and Hinchinbrook Channel. Acid sulfate soils are intimately related to coastal wetland landscapes. Where landscapes containing ASS have been disturbed (such as for agriculture, aquaculture, marinas, etc.) the biodiversity of adjacent wetlands can be adversely affected. However, there is no clear knowledge of the real extent of the so-called "hotspot" ASS areas that occur within the GBR catchments. Management of ASS in reef catchments has benefited from the implementation of the Queensland Acid Sulfate Soils Management Strategy through policy development, mapping, training programs, an advisory service, research and community participation. However, major gaps remain in mapping the extent and nature of ASS. Areas of significant acidification (i.e. hotspots) need to be identified and policies developed for their remediation. Research has a critical role to play in understanding ASS risk and finding solutions, to prevent the adverse impacts that may be caused by ASS disturbance. A case study is presented of the East Trinity site near Cairns, a failed sugar cane development that episodically discharges large amounts of acid into Trinity Inlet, resulting in periodic fish kills. Details are presented of scientific investigations, and a lime-assisted tidal exchange strategy that are being undertaken to remediate a serious ASS problem

  18. Lower fetal status of docosahexaenoic acid, arachidonic acid and essential fatty acids is associated with less favorable neonatal neurological condition.

    PubMed

    Dijck-Brouwer, D A Janneke; Hadders-Algra, Mijna; Bouwstra, Hylco; Decsi, Tamás; Boehm, Günther; Martini, Ingrid A; Boersma, E Rudy; Muskiet, Frits A J

    2005-01-01

    Long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids, notably arachidonic (AA) and docosahexaenoic (DHA) acids are abundant in brain and may be conditionally essential in fetal life. We investigated umbilical artery (UA) and vein (UV) fatty acid compositions and early neonatal neurological condition in 317 term infants. Neurological condition was summarized as a clinical classification and a 'neurological optimality score' (NOS). Neurologically abnormal infants (n=27) had lower UV DHA and essential fatty acid (EFA) status. NOS correlated positively with AA (UV), and EFA (UV) and DHA status (UV and UA) and negatively with 18:2omega6 and omega9 (UV), and 20:3omega9, omega7 and C18 trans fatty acids (UV and UA). UV DHA, AA, saturated fatty acids, gestational age and obstetrical optimality score explained 16.2% of the NOS variance. Early postnatal neurological condition seems negatively influenced by lower fetal DHA, AA and EFA status. C18 trans fatty acids and 18:2omega6 may exert negative effects by impairment of LCP status. PMID:15589396

  19. Folic acid - test

    MedlinePlus

    Folic acid is a type of B vitamin. This article discusses the test to measure the amount of folic acid in the blood. ... that may interfere with test results, including folic acid supplements. Drugs that can decrease folic acid measurements ...

  20. Structural basis for the varying propensities of different amino acids to adopt the collagen conformation.

    PubMed

    Raman, S Sundar; Gopalakrishnan, R; Wade, R C; Subramanian, V

    2011-03-24

    Although previous experimental studies have shown the positional preference of different amino acids (AAs) to form a stable triple helical collagen motif, the structural basis for the variations in the sequence and the positional propensity has not been systematically investigated. Thus, we have here probed the origin of the structural stability offered by the 20 naturally occurring AAs to collagen by means of classical molecular dynamics (MD) simulation. Simulations were carried out on 39 collagen-like peptides employing a host-guest approach. The results show that the propensity of the different AAs to adopt collagen-like conformations depends primarily on their ϕ and ψ angle preferences. Changes in these angles upon substitution of different AAs in the X(AA) and Y(AA) positions in the canonical ((Gly-X(AA)-Y(AA))(7))(3) motif dictate the formation of interchain hydrogen bonds, solvent interactions, and puckering of neighboring imino acids and, thus, the structural stability of the collagen. The role of solvent-mediated hydrogen bonds in the stabilization of collagen has also been elucidated from the MD simulations. In addition to the conventional hydrogen bonds known to be present in collagen, a hitherto unidentified direct interchain hydrogen bond, between the X(AA) N-H group and the Hyp O-H group of the neighboring chain, was observed during the simulations. Its occupancy was ∼36% when Leu was present at the X(AA) position. PMID:21361324

  1. Eicosanoids Derived From Arachidonic Acid and Their Family Prostaglandins and Cyclooxygenase in Psychiatric Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Yui, Kunio; Imataka, George; Nakamura, Hiroyuki; Ohara, Naoki; Naito, Yukiko

    2015-01-01

    Arachidonic acid (AA)-derived lipid mediators are called eicosanoids. Eicosanoids have emerged as key regulators of a wide variety of physiological responses and pathological processes, and control important cellular processes. AA can be converted into biologically active compounds by metabolism by cyclooxygenases (COX). Beneficial effect of COX-2 inhibitor celecoxib add-on therapy has been reported in early stage of schizophrenia. Moreover, add-on treatment of celecoxib attenuated refractory depression and bipolar depression. Further, the COX/prostaglandin E pathway play an important role in synaptic plasticity and may be included in pathophysiology in autism spectrum disorders (ASD). In this regard, plasma transferrin, which is an iron mediator related to eicosanoid signaling, may be related to social impairment of ASD. COX-2 is typically induced by inflammatory stimuli in the majority of tissues, and the only isoform responsible for propagating the inflammatory response. Thus, COX-2 inhibitors considered as the best target for Alzheimer’s disease. PMID:26521945

  2. Uptake and release of adrenal ascorbic acid in the guinea pig after injection of ACTH

    SciTech Connect

    Kipp, D.E.; Rivers, J.M.

    1987-09-01

    The effect of a single injection of ACTH (3 IU/100 g body weight) on the distribution of ascorbic acid (AA) and radiolabeled AA in 20 tissues was studied in adult male guinea pigs consuming 500 mg AA/kg diet. Saline- or ACTH-injected animals were simultaneously injected with (1-/sup 14/C)AA, and killed at 0.5, 1, 2, 4 and 6 h after injection. There was no significant difference between treatments in the weight of any tissue over the 6-h experimental period. As anticipated, the concentration of AA in the adrenals of animals injected with ACTH was 33% of that of animals injected with saline at 4 h. Unexpectedly, the concentration of radiolabeled AA in the adrenals at 0.5 h after ACTH injection was 172% of that after saline injection. The concentration of radiolabeled AA in the adrenal of the saline-injected animals increased slowly over time to reach a level similar to that of ACTH-injected animals by 6 h. There was no effect of ACTH on the level of AA or uptake in any of the other tissues examined. These results demonstrate that a single dose of ACTH markedly influences the retention of AA in the adrenal gland without similarly altering retention of AA in other tissues. Furthermore, ACTH treatment causes both accelerated uptake and release of AA into the adrenals.

  3. The 35-amino acid C2 protein of Cotton leaf curl Kokhran virus, Burewala, implicated in resistance breaking in cotton, retains some activities of the full-length protein.

    PubMed

    Akbar, Fazal; Iqbal, Zafar; Briddon, Rob W; Vazquez, Franck; Saeed, Muhammad

    2016-10-01

    With one exception, all the begomoviruses characterized so far encode an ~134-amino acid (aa) (A)C2 protein. The exception is the "Burewala" strain of Cotton leaf curl Kokhran virus (CLCuKoV-Bu), associated with resistance breaking in cotton across Pakistan and northwestern India, that encodes a truncated 35-aa C2. The C2 protein encoded by begomoviruses performs multiple functions including suppression of post-transcriptional gene silencing (PTGS), modulating microRNA (miRNA) expression and may be a pathogenicity determinant. The study described here was designed to investigate whether the CLCuKoV-Bu 35-aa C2 retains the activities of the full-length C2 protein. The results showed the 35-aa C2 of CLCuKoV-Bu acts as a pathogenicity determinant, suppresses PTGS and upregulates miRNA expression when expressed from a Potato virus X vector in Nicotiana benthamiana. The symptoms induced by expression of full-length C2 were more severe than those induced by the 35-aa C2. The accumulation of most developmental miRNAs decreases with the full-length C2 protein and increases with the 35-aa peptide of CLCuKoV-Bu. The study also revealed that 35-aa peptide of CLCuKoV-Bu maintains suppressor of silencing activity at a level equal to that of full-length C2. The significance of the results with respect to virus fitness and resistance breaking is discussed. PMID:27209537

  4. Dietary Echium Oil Increases Long-Chain n–3 PUFAs, Including Docosapentaenoic Acid, in Blood Fractions and Alters Biochemical Markers for Cardiovascular Disease Independently of Age, Sex, and Metabolic Syndrome12

    PubMed Central

    Kuhnt, Katrin; Fuhrmann, Claudia; Köhler, Melanie; Kiehntopf, Michael; Jahreis, Gerhard

    2014-01-01

    Dietary supplementation with echium oil (EO) containing stearidonic acid (SDA) is a plant-based strategy to improve long-chain (LC) n–3 (ω-3) polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA) status in humans. We investigated the effect of EO on LC n–3 PUFA accumulation in blood and biochemical markers with respect to age, sex, and metabolic syndrome. This double-blind, parallel-arm, randomized controlled study started with a 2-wk run-in period, during which participants (n = 80) were administered 17 g/d run-in oil. Normal-weight individuals from 2 age groups (20–35 and 49–69 y) were allotted to EO or fish oil (FO; control) groups. During the 8-wk intervention, participants were administered either 17 g/d EO (2 g SDA; n = 59) or FO [1.9 g eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA); n = 19]. Overweight individuals with metabolic syndrome (n = 19) were recruited for EO treatment only. During the 10-wk study, the participants followed a dietary n–3 PUFA restriction, e.g., no fish. After the 8-wk EO treatment, increases in the LC n–3 metabolites EPA (168% and 79%) and docosapentaenoic acid [DPA (68% and 39%)] were observed, whereas docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) decreased (−5% and −23%) in plasma and peripheral blood mononuclear cells, respectively. Compared with FO, the efficacy of EO to increase EPA and DPA in blood was significantly lower (∼25% and ∼50%, respectively). A higher body mass index (BMI) was associated with lower relative and net increases in EPA and DPA. Compared with baseline, EO significantly reduced serum cholesterol, LDL cholesterol, oxidized LDL, and triglyceride (TG), but also HDL cholesterol, regardless of age and BMI. In the FO group, only TG decreased. Overall, daily intake of 15–20 g EO increased EPA and DPA in blood but had no influence on DHA. EO lowered cardiovascular risk markers, e.g., serum TG, which is particularly relevant for individuals with metabolic syndrome. Natural EO could be a noteworthy source of n–3 PUFA in human nutrition. This trial

  5. Analysis of amino acid composition in proteins of animal tissues and foods as pre-column o-phthaldialdehyde derivatives by HPLC with fluorescence detection.

    PubMed

    Dai, Zhaolai; Wu, Zhenlong; Jia, Sichao; Wu, Guoyao

    2014-08-01

    Studies of protein nutrition and biochemistry require reliable methods for analysis of amino acid (AA) composition in polypeptides of animal tissues and foods. Proteins are hydrolyzed by 6M HCl (110°C for 24h), 4.2M NaOH (105°C for 20 h), or proteases. Analytical techniques that require high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) include pre-column derivatization with 4-chloro-7-nitrobenzofurazan, 9-fluorenyl methylchloroformate, phenylisothiocyanate, naphthalene-2,3-dicarboxaldehyde, 6-aminoquinolyl-N-hydroxysuccinimidyl carbamate, and o-phthaldialdehyde (OPA). OPA reacts with primary AA (except cysteine or cystine) in the presence of 2-mercaptoethanol or 3-mercaptopropionic acid to form a highly fluorescent adduct. OPA also reacts with 4-amino-1-butanol and 4-aminobutane-1,3-diol produced from oxidation of proline and 4-hydroxyproline, respectively, in the presence of chloramine-T plus sodium borohydride at 60°C, or with S-carboxymethyl-cysteine formed from cysteine and iodoacetic acid at 25°C. Fluorescence of OPA derivatives is monitored at excitation and emission wavelengths of 340 and 455 nm, respectively. Detection limits are 50 fmol for AA. This technique offers the following advantages: simple procedures for preparation of samples, reagents, and mobile-phase solutions; rapid pre-column formation of OPA-AA derivatives and their efficient separation at room temperature (e.g., 20-25°C); high sensitivity of detection; easy automation on the HPLC apparatus; few interfering side reactions; a stable chromatography baseline for accurate integration of peak areas; and rapid regeneration of guard and analytical columns. Thus, the OPA method provides a useful tool to determine AA composition in proteins of animal tissues (e.g., skeletal muscle, liver, intestine, placenta, brain, and body homogenates) and foods (e.g., milk, corn grain, meat, and soybean meal). PMID:24731621

  6. Protein Restriction with Amino Acid-Balanced Diets Shrinks Circulating Pool Size of Amino Acid by Decreasing Expression of Specific Transporters in the Small Intestine.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Kai; Qin, Chun Fu; Luo, Min; Zhang, Xin; Sun, Wen Juan; Jiao, Ning; Li, De Fa; Yin, Jing Dong

    2016-01-01

    Dietary protein restriction is not only beneficial to health and longevity in humans, but also protects against air pollution and minimizes feeding cost in livestock production. However, its impact on amino acid (AA) absorption and metabolism is not quite understood. Therefore, the study aimed to explore the effect of protein restriction on nitrogen balance, circulating AA pool size, and AA absorption using a pig model. In Exp.1, 72 gilts weighting 29.9 ± 1.5 kg were allocated to 1 of the 3 diets containing 14, 16, or 18% CP for a 28-d trial. Growth (n = 24), nitrogen balance (n = 6), and the expression of small intestinal AA and peptide transporters (n = 6) were evaluated. In Exp.2, 12 barrows weighting 22.7 ± 1.3 kg were surgically fitted with catheters in the portal and jejunal veins as well as the carotid artery and assigned to a diet containing 14 or 18% CP. A series of blood samples were collected before and after feeding for determining the pool size of circulating AA and AA absorption in the portal vein, respectively. Protein restriction did not sacrifice body weight gain and protein retention, since nitrogen digestibility was increased as dietary protein content reduced. However, the pool size of circulating AA except for lysine and threonine, and most AA flux through the portal vein were reduced in pigs fed the low protein diet. Meanwhile, the expression of peptide transporter 1 (PepT-1) was stimulated, but the expression of the neutral and cationic AA transporter systems was depressed. These results evidenced that protein restriction with essential AA-balanced diets, decreased AA absorption and reduced circulating AA pool size. Increased expression of small intestinal peptide transporter PepT-1 could not compensate for the depressed expression of jejunal AA transporters for AA absorption. PMID:27611307

  7. Detection of calcium based neutralizers in milk and milk products by AAS.

    PubMed

    Sowmya, R; Indumathi, K P; Arora, S; Sharma, V; Singh, A K

    2015-02-01

    Current study was carried out with the intent to standardize detection and estimation method for calcium (Ca) based neutralizers in milk and milk based indigenous products (khoa and paneer) using atomic absorption spectroscopy (AAS). Neutralized milk, khoa and paneer samples were prepared using milk with developed acidity to which calculated quantity of neutralizer (Ca based) was added. Rosalic acid test results get masked at times due to developed acidity which neutralizes the alkalinity imparted by neutralizer and hence gives false result with time in neutralizer added samples. Atomic absorption spectroscopy proved to be an accurate estimate which could detect the abnormal rise in mineral concentration even with slight addition of neutralizers in comparison with control milk and milk products. Formalin, which is a commonly used preservative in milk samples for chemical analysis, did not have any significant impact on estimation of calcium in the neutralized milk during storage. PMID:25694738

  8. Induction of the endoplasmic reticulum stress and autophagy in human lung carcinoma A549 cells by anacardic acid.

    PubMed

    Seong, Yeong-Ae; Shin, Pyung-Gyun; Yoon, Jin-Soo; Yadunandam, Anandam Kasin; Kim, Gun-Do

    2014-03-01

    Anacardic acid (AA, 2-hydroxy-6-pentadecylbenzoic acid), a constituent of the cashew-nut shell, has a variety of beneficial effects on the treatment of cancer and tumors. However, the fact that AA induces ER stress and autophagy in cancer cell is not known. We investigated the effect of AA on ER-stress and autophagy-induced cell death in cancer cells. Because of our interest in lung cancer, we used the non-small cell lung adenocarcinoma A549 cells treated with 3.0 μg/ml of AA for this research. In this research we found that AA induces intracellular Ca(2+) mobilization and ER stress. AA induced the ER stress-inducing factors, especially IRE1α, and the hallmarks of UPR, Grp78/Bip and GADD153/CHOP. AA inhibited the expression of p-PERK and its downstream substrate, p-elF2α. We also demonstrated that AA induces autophagy. Up-regulation of autophagy-related genes and the appearance of autophagosome in transfected cells with green fluorescent protein (GFP)-LC3 and GFP-Beclin1 plasmids showed the induction of autophagy in AA-treated A549 cells. The morphological analysis of intracellular organelles by TEM also showed the evidence that AA induces ER stress and autophagy. For the first time, our research showed that AA induces ER stress and autophagy in cancer cells. PMID:23955513

  9. Fatty acids - trans fatty acids

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The data supporting a negative effect of dietary trans fatty acids on cardiovascular disease risk is consistent. The primary dietary sources of trans fatty acids include partially hydrogenated fat and rudiment fat. The adverse effect of trans fatty acids on plasma lipoprotein profiles is consisten...

  10. Docosahexaenoic acid supplementation fully restores fertility and spermatogenesis in male delta-6 desaturase-null mice

    PubMed Central

    Roqueta-Rivera, Manuel; Stroud, Chad K.; Haschek, Wanda M.; Akare, Sandeep J.; Segre, Mariangela; Brush, Richard S.; Agbaga, Martin-Paul; Anderson, Robert E.; Hess, Rex A.; Nakamura, Manabu T.

    2010-01-01

    Delta-6 desaturase-null mice (−/−) are unable to synthesize highly unsaturated fatty acids (HUFAs): arachidonic acid (AA), docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), and n6-docosapentaenoic acid (DPAn6). The −/− males exhibit infertility and arrest of spermatogenesis at late spermiogenesis. To determine which HUFA is essential for spermiogenesis, a diet supplemented with either 0.2% (w/w) AA or DHA was fed to wild-type (+/+) and −/− males at weaning until 16 weeks of age (n = 3–5). A breeding success rate of DHA-supplemented −/− was comparable to +/+. DHA-fed −/− showed normal sperm counts and spermiogenesis. Dietary AA was less effective in restoring fertility, sperm count, and spermiogenesis than DHA. Testis fatty acid analysis showed restored DHA in DHA-fed −/−, but DPAn6 remained depleted. In AA-fed −/−, AA was restored at the +/+ level, and 22:4n6, an AA elongated product, accumulated in testis. Cholesta-3,5-diene was present in testis of +/+ and DHA-fed −/−, whereas it diminished in −/− and AA-fed −/−, suggesting impaired sterol metabolism in these groups. Expression of spermiogenesis marker genes was largely normal in all groups. In conclusion, DHA was capable of restoring all observed impairment in male reproduction, whereas 22:4n6 formed from dietary AA may act as an inferior substitute for DHA. PMID:19690334

  11. A human dietary arachidonic acid supplementation study conducted in a metabolic research unit: rationale and design.

    PubMed

    Nelson, G J; Kelley, D S; Emken, E A; Phinney, S D; Kyle, D; Ferretti, A

    1997-04-01

    While there are many reports of studies that fed arachidonic acid (AA) to animals, there are very few reports of AA feeding to humans under controlled conditions. This 130-d study was conceived as a controlled, symmetrical crossover design with healthy, adult male volunteers. They lived in the metabolic research unit (MRU) of the Western Human Nutrition Research (WHNRC) for the entire study. All food was prepared by the WHNRC kitchen. The basal (low-AA) diet consisted of natural foods (30 en% fat, 15 en% protein, and 55 en% carbohydrate), containing 210 mg/d of AA, and met the recommended daily allowance for all nutrients. The high-AA (intervention) diet was similar except that 1.5 g/d of AA in the form of a triglyceride containing 50% AA replaced an equal amount of high-oleic safflower oil in the basal diet. The subjects (ages 20 to 39) were within -10 to +20% of ideal body weight, nonsmoking, and not allowed alcohol in the MRU. Their exercise level was constant, and their body weights were maintained within 2% of entry level. Subjects were initially fed the low-AA diet for 15 d. On day 16, half of the subjects (group A) wee placed on the high-AA diet, and the other group (B) remained on the low-AA diets. On day 65, the two groups switched diets. On day 115, group B returned to the low-AA diet. This design, assuming no carryover effect, allowed us to merge the data from the two groups, with the data comparison days being 65 (low-AA) and 115 (high-AA) for group B and 130 (low-AA) and 65 (high-AA) for group A. The main indices studied were the fatty acid composition of the plasma, red blood cells, platelets, and adipose tissue; in vitro platelet aggregation, bleeding times, clotting factors; immune response as measured by delayed hypersensitivity skin tests, cellular proliferation of peripheral blood mononuclear cells in response to various mitogens and antigens, natural killer cell activity, and response to measles/mumps/rubella and influenza vaccines; the

  12. Adsorption of prototypical amino acids on silica: Influence of the pre-adsorbed water multilayer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Remesal, Elena R.; Amaya, Javier; Graciani, Jesús; Márquez, Antonio M.; Sanz, Javier Fdez.

    2016-04-01

    We explore the interaction between acetic acid, some typical α-amino acids (α-AAs), and a fully hydroxylated (0001) surface of α-quartz by means of theoretical calculations based on the density functional theory (DFT) under periodic boundary conditions. The influence of microsolvation, represented by a water multilayer, and dispersion forces is analyzed. All the considered molecules strongly adsorb on the hydroxylated surface and prefer to adsorb molecularly. The inclusion of dispersion forces increases the interaction energies by 15-30 kJ/mol, without significant changes in structure and mode of adsorption except for histidine where the interaction is improved through protonation of the α-amine group. When the water multilayer is included a decrease in the surface-adsorbate interaction energies is observed. Also, some α-AAs, glycine and alanine, change their adsorption mode and, now, the more stable structure is the zwitterion. Adsorption as zwitterions is always favored with respect to molecular interaction when dispersion forces are taken into account. Comparing the energies of adsorbed and solvated α-AA zwitterions, it turns out that inclusion of dispersion forces predicts that solvated zwitterions are the lower energy configurations.

  13. Composition of free and peptide-bound amino acids in beef chuck, loin, and round cuts.

    PubMed

    Wu, G; Cross, H R; Gehring, K B; Savell, J W; Arnold, A N; McNeill, S H

    2016-06-01

    Meat is a food for humans. However, beef consumption in the United States has steadily declined by >14% over the past decade due to a variety of factors, including insufficient knowledge of animal protein. This study quantified all proteinogenic AA as well as nutritionally and physiologically significant nonproteinogenic AA and small peptides in beef cuts from 3 subprimals (chuck, round, and loin). Beef carcasses ( = 10) were selected at 3 commercial packing plants in the United States. Retail-cut samples were analyzed for the nitrogenous substances after acid, alkaline, or enzymatic hydrolysis and after deproteinization. In these chuck, round, and loin cuts, total amounts of glutamate (free plus peptide bound) were the highest (69-75 mg/g dry weight) followed by lysine, leucine, arginine, and glutamine in descending order. This is the first study to determine aspartate, asparagine, glutamate, and glutamine in meat proteins of any animal species. In all the beef samples evaluated, glutamine was the most abundant free AA (4.0-5.7 mg/g dry weight) followed by taurine, alanine, glutamate, and β-alanine. Additionally, samples from all beef cuts had high concentrations of anserine, carnosine, and glutathione, which were 2.8 to 3.7, 15.2 to 24.2, and 0.68 to 0.79 mg/g dry weight, respectively. Beef top loin steaks appear to provide higher protein nutrition values than top round steaks and under blade roasts, but all are excellent sources of proteinogenic AA as well as antioxidant AA and peptides to improve human growth, development, and health. Our findings may help guide future decisions regarding human and animal nutrition. PMID:27285936

  14. Selective amino acid restriction therapy (SAART): a non-pharmacological strategy against all types of cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    López-Lázaro, Miguel

    2015-01-01

    Metastasis will continue to be an incurable disease for most patients until we develop highly selective anticancer therapies. The development of these therapies requires finding and exploiting major differences between cancer cells and normal cells. Although the sum of the many DNA alterations of cancer cells makes up such a major difference, there is currently no way of exploiting these alterations as a whole. Here I propose a non-pharmacological strategy to selectively kill any type of cancer cell, including cancer stem cells, by exploiting their complete set of DNA alterations. It is based on creating challenging environmental conditions that only cells with undamaged DNAs can overcome. Cell survival requires continuous protein synthesis, which in turn requires adequate levels of 20 amino acids (AAs). If we temporarily restrict specific AAs and keep high levels of others whose deficit triggers proteolysis, we will force cells to activate a variety of genetic programs to obtain adequate levels of each of the 20 proteinogenic AAs. Because cancer cells have an extremely altered DNA that has evolved under particular environmental conditions, they may be unable to activate the genetic programs required to adapt to and survive the new environment. Cancer patients may be successfully treated with a protein-free artificial diet in which the levels of specific AAs are manipulated. Practical considerations for testing and implementing this cheap and universal anticancer strategy are discussed. PMID:26682277

  15. Antibody conjugates with unnatural amino acids.

    PubMed

    Hallam, Trevor J; Wold, Erik; Wahl, Alan; Smider, Vaughn V

    2015-06-01

    Antibody conjugates are important in many areas of medicine and biological research, and antibody-drug conjugates (ADCs) are becoming an important next generation class of therapeutics for cancer treatment. Early conjugation technologies relied upon random conjugation to multiple amino acid side chains, resulting in heterogeneous mixtures of labeled antibody. Recent studies, however, strongly support the notion that site-specific conjugation produces a homogeneous population of antibody conjugates with improved pharmacologic properties over randomly coupled molecules. Genetically incorporated unnatural amino acids (uAAs) allow unique orthogonal coupling strategies compared to those used for the 20 naturally occurring amino acids. Thus, uAAs provide a novel paradigm for creation of next generation ADCs. Additionally, uAA-based site-specific conjugation could also empower creation of additional multifunctional conjugates important as biopharmaceuticals, diagnostics, or reagents. PMID:25898256

  16. Evolution of a "conserved" amino acid sequence: a model study of an in silico investigation of the phylogenesis of some immune receptors.

    PubMed

    Panaro, M A; Acquafredda, A; Sisto, M; Lisi, S; Saccia, M; Mitolo, V

    2006-01-01

    In this paper we analyze a 55-amino acid (aa) sequence which is relatively well conserved in several seven-transmembrane receptor families (from Insects to Mammals) and in some Viruses. This sequence, which covers the second transmembrane domain, the first extracellular loop and the third transmembrane domain, appears in its complete configuration in most of the seven-transmembrane receptor families, as well as in the protein products of some viruses. Other seven-transmembrane receptors and viruses exhibit reduced configurations of the conserved sequence, lacking either aa 31 or aa 30-31. 53-aa configurations are typically found in most chemokine receptor (CKR) subfamilies, as well as in some viral protein products. However, the CCR1, CCR3, and CCR6 subfamilies comprise a 54-aa configuration and the CKR-related protein products, ChemR23 and RDC1, include the complete 55-aa sequence. For each CKR subfamily the "modal sequence" of the conserved segment was constructed by selecting the most frequently occurring aa at each position. Then, pairwise alignments were made between: (i) the modal CKR sequences, and (ii) the sequence (53-aa) of the Yaba-like disease virus - 7L protein. From the alignments two consensus matrices were derived: (i) the consensus 1 matrix with reference to the whole conserved segment, and (ii) the consensus 2 matrix with reference to aa 22-29, which appear to be the most variable segment of the sequence. Based on the obtained consensus values and with reference to this specific conserved segment, the following conclusions are proposed: (1) ChemR23 and RDC1 are probably the more primitive CKR forms; (2) CCR1 and CCR3 may be grouped in a single cluster; (3) CCRs 2, 4, and 5 are closely related to each other and may be grouped in a cluster; CCR7 is likely to be evolutionarily related to this cluster; (4) CXCRs 2, 3, and 4 and CCX CKR appear to be evolutionarily related to each other and very likely derived from an CCR6-like gene; (5) CCR2/4/5 and

  17. Effects of arachidonic acid on ATP-sensitive K+ current in murine colonic smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Jun, Jae Yeoul; Yeum, Cheol Ho; Park, Yoo Whan; Jang, In Youb; Kong, In Deok; Sim, Jae Hoon; So, Insuk; Kim, Ki Whan; You, Ho Jin

    2002-09-01

    The effects of arachidonic acid (AA) and the mechanism through which it modulates ATP-sensitive K+ (K(ATP)) currents were examined in single smooth muscle cells of murine proximal colon. In the current-clamping mode, AA and glibenclamide induced depolarization of membrane potential. Using 0.1 mM ATP and 140 mM K+ solution in the pipette and 90 mM K+ in the bath solution at a -80 mV of holding potential, pinacidil activated the glibenclamide-sensitive inward current. The potential of these currents was reversed to near the equilibrium potential of K+ by 60 mM K+ in the bath solution. AA inhibited K(ATP) currents in a dose-dependent manner. This inhibition was not changed when 1 mM GDPbetaS was present in the pipette. Chelerythrine, protein kinase C inhibitor, did not block the AA effects. Superoxide dismutase and metabolic inhibitors (indomethacin and nordihydroguaiacretic acid) of AA did not affect the AA-induced inhibition. Eicosatetraynoic acid, a nonmetabolizable analogue of AA, inhibited the K(ATP) currents. These results suggest that AA-induced inhibition of K(ATP) currents is not mediated by G-protein or protein kinase C activation. The inhibitory action is likely to be a possible mechanism of AA-induced membrane depolarization. PMID:12396031

  18. Evaluation of AaDOP2 receptor antagonists reveals antidepressants and antipsychotics as novel lead molecules for control of the yellow fever mosquito, Aedes aegypti.

    PubMed

    Conley, Jason M; Meyer, Jason M; Nuss, Andrew B; Doyle, Trevor B; Savinov, Sergey N; Hill, Catherine A; Watts, Val J

    2015-01-01

    The yellow fever mosquito, Aedes aegypti, vectors disease-causing agents that adversely affect human health, most notably the viruses causing dengue and yellow fever. The efficacy of current mosquito control programs is challenged by the emergence of insecticide-resistant mosquito populations, suggesting an urgent need for the development of chemical insecticides with new mechanisms of action. One recently identified potential insecticide target is the A. aegypti D1-like dopamine receptor, AaDOP2. The focus of the present study was to evaluate AaDOP2 antagonism both in vitro and in vivo using assay technologies with increased throughput. The in vitro assays revealed AaDOP2 antagonism by four distinct chemical scaffolds from tricyclic antidepressant or antipsychotic chemical classes, and elucidated several structure-activity relationship trends that contributed to enhanced antagonist potency, including lipophilicity, halide substitution on the tricyclic core, and conformational rigidity. Six compounds displayed previously unparalleled potency for in vitro AaDOP2 antagonism, and among these, asenapine, methiothepin, and cis-(Z)-flupenthixol displayed subnanomolar IC50 values and caused rapid toxicity to A. aegypti larvae and/or adults in vivo. Our study revealed a significant correlation between in vitro potency for AaDOP2 antagonism and in vivo toxicity, suggesting viability of AaDOP2 as an insecticidal target. Taken together, this study expanded the repertoire of known AaDOP2 antagonists, enhanced our understanding of AaDOP2 pharmacology, provided further support for rational targeting of AaDOP2, and demonstrated the utility of efficiency-enhancing in vitro and in vivo assay technologies within our genome-to-lead pipeline for the discovery of next-generation insecticides. PMID:25332454

  19. Evaluation of AaDOP2 Receptor Antagonists Reveals Antidepressants and Antipsychotics as Novel Lead Molecules for Control of the Yellow Fever Mosquito, Aedes aegypti

    PubMed Central

    Conley, Jason M.; Meyer, Jason M.; Nuss, Andrew B.; Doyle, Trevor B.; Savinov, Sergey N.; Hill, Catherine A.

    2015-01-01

    The yellow fever mosquito, Aedes aegypti, vectors disease-causing agents that adversely affect human health, most notably the viruses causing dengue and yellow fever. The efficacy of current mosquito control programs is challenged by the emergence of insecticide-resistant mosquito populations, suggesting an urgent need for the development of chemical insecticides with new mechanisms of action. One recently identified potential insecticide target is the A. aegypti D1-like dopamine receptor, AaDOP2. The focus of the present study was to evaluate AaDOP2 antagonism both in vitro and in vivo using assay technologies with increased throughput. The in vitro assays revealed AaDOP2 antagonism by four distinct chemical scaffolds from tricyclic antidepressant or antipsychotic chemical classes, and elucidated several structure-activity relationship trends that contributed to enhanced antagonist potency, including lipophilicity, halide substitution on the tricyclic core, and conformational rigidity. Six compounds displayed previously unparalleled potency for in vitro AaDOP2 antagonism, and among these, asenapine, methiothepin, and cis-(Z)-flupenthixol displayed subnanomolar IC50 values and caused rapid toxicity to A. aegypti larvae and/or adults in vivo. Our study revealed a significant correlation between in vitro potency for AaDOP2 antagonism and in vivo toxicity, suggesting viability of AaDOP2 as an insecticidal target. Taken together, this study expanded the repertoire of known AaDOP2 antagonists, enhanced our understanding of AaDOP2 pharmacology, provided further support for rational targeting of AaDOP2, and demonstrated the utility of efficiency-enhancing in vitro and in vivo assay technologies within our genome-to-lead pipeline for the discovery of next-generation insecticides. PMID:25332454

  20. Abnormalities in the fatty acid composition of the postmortem orbitofrontal cortex of schizophrenic patients: gender differences and partial normalization with antipsychotic medications.

    PubMed

    McNamara, Robert K; Jandacek, Ronald; Rider, Therese; Tso, Patrick; Hahn, Chang-Gyu; Richtand, Neil M; Stanford, Kevin E

    2007-03-01

    Previous studies have observed significant abnormalities in the fatty acid composition of peripheral tissues from drug-naïve first-episode schizophrenic (SZ) patients relative to normal controls, including deficits in omega-3 and omega-6 polyunsaturated fatty acids, which are partially normalized following chronic antipsychotic treatment. We hypothesized that postmortem cortical tissue from patients with SZ would also exhibit deficits in cortical docosahexaenoic acid (DHA, 22:6n-3) and arachidonic acid (AA; 20:4n-6) relative to normal controls, and that these deficits would be greater in drug-free SZ patients. We determined the total fatty acid composition of postmortem orbitofrontal cortex (OFC) (Brodmann area 10) from drug-free and antipsychotic-treated SZ patients (n=21) and age-matched normal controls (n=26) by gas chromatography. After correction for multiple comparisons, significantly lower DHA (-20%) concentrations, and significantly greater vaccenic acid (VA) (+12.5) concentrations, were found in the OFC of SZ patients relative to normal controls. Relative to age-matched same-gender controls, OFC DHA deficits, and elevated AA:DHA, oleic acid:DHA and docosapentaenoic acid (22:5n-6):DHA ratios, were found in male but not female SZ patients. SZ patients that died of cardiovascular-related disease exhibited lower DHA (-31%) and AA (-19%) concentrations, and greater OA (+20%) and VA (+17%) concentrations, relative to normal controls that also died of cardiovascular-related disease. OFC DHA and AA deficits, and elevations in oleic acid and vaccenic acid, were numerically greater in drug-free SZ patients and were partially normalized in SZ patients treated with antipsychotic medications (atypical>typical). Fatty acid abnormalities could not be wholly attributed to lifestyle or postmortem tissue variables. These findings add to a growing body of evidence implicating omega-3 fatty acid deficiency as well as the OFC in the pathoaetiology of SZ, and suggest that

  1. Functional amino acids in fish nutrition, health and welfare.

    PubMed

    Andersen, Synne M; Waagbø, Rune; Espe, Marit

    2016-01-01

    Protein is the most expensive part of fish diets and supplies amino acids (AA) for energy, growth, protein synthesis and as substrates for key metabolic pathways. Functional AA is a term used to describe AA that are involved in cellular processes apart from protein synthesis. A deficiency, or imbalance, in functional AA may impair body metabolism and homeostasis. Recent years have seen an increased interest in AA to increase disease resistance, immune response, reproduction, behavior and more. This has led to a boost of commercially available functional fish feeds that aim to optimize fish performance and quality of the product. This review aim to collect recent findings of functional AA and of how they may improve fish health and welfare. It will focus on functional properties of some of the most studied AA, namely arginine, glutamine, glutamate, tryptophan, sulfur amino acids (methionine, cysteine and taurine), histidine and branched chain amino acids. Where information is not available in fish, we will point towards functions known in animals and humans, with possible translational functions to fish. PMID:26709652

  2. The Postnatal Development of d-Serine in the Retinas of Two Mouse Strains, Including a Mutant Mouse with a Deficiency in d-Amino Acid Oxidase and a Serine Racemase Knockout Mouse

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    d-Serine, an N-methyl d-aspartate receptor coagonist, and its regulatory enzymes, d-amino acid oxidase (DAO; degradation) and serine racemase (SR; synthesis), have been implicated in crucial roles of the developing central nervous system, yet the functional position that they play in regulating the availability of d-serine throughout development of the mammalian retina is not well-known. Using capillary electrophoresis and a sensitive method of enantiomeric amino acid separation, we were able to determine total levels of d-serine at specific ages during postnatal development of the mouse retina in two different strains of mice, one of which contained a loss-of-function point mutation for DAO while the other was a SR knockout line. Each mouse line was tested against conspecific wild type (WT) mice for each genetic strain. The universal trend in all WT and transgenic mice was a large amount of total retinal d-serine at postnatal age 2 (P2), followed by a dramatic decrease as the mice matured into adulthood (P70–80). SR knockout mice retinas had 41% less d-serine than WT retinas at P2, and 10 times less as an adult. DAO mutant mice retinas had significantly elevated levels of d-serine when compared to WT retinas at P2 (217%), P4 (223%), P8 (194%), and adulthood (227%). PMID:25083578

  3. Structural Basis of Fatty Acid Substrate Binding to Cyclooxygenase-2*

    PubMed Central

    Vecchio, Alex J.; Simmons, Danielle M.; Malkowski, Michael G.

    2010-01-01

    The cyclooxygenases (COX-1 and COX-2) are membrane-associated heme-containing homodimers that generate prostaglandin H2 from arachidonic acid (AA). Although AA is the preferred substrate, other fatty acids are oxygenated by these enzymes with varying efficiencies. We determined the crystal structures of AA, eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA), and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) bound to Co3+-protoporphyrin IX-reconstituted murine COX-2 to 2.1, 2.4, and 2.65 Å, respectively. AA, EPA, and docosahexaenoic acid bind in different conformations in each monomer constituting the homodimer in their respective structures such that one monomer exhibits nonproductive binding and the other productive binding of the substrate in the cyclooxygenase channel. The interactions identified between protein and substrate when bound to COX-1 are conserved in our COX-2 structures, with the only notable difference being the lack of interaction of the carboxylate of AA and EPA with the side chain of Arg-120. Leu-531 exhibits a different side chain conformation when the nonproductive and productive binding modes of AA are compared. Unlike COX-1, mutating this residue to Ala, Phe, Pro, or Thr did not result in a significant loss of activity or substrate binding affinity. Determination of the L531F:AA crystal structure resulted in AA binding in the same global conformation in each monomer. We speculate that the mobility of the Leu-531 side chain increases the volume available at the opening of the cyclooxygenase channel and contributes to the observed ability of COX-2 to oxygenate a broad spectrum of fatty acid and fatty ester substrates. PMID:20463020

  4. Allometric scaling of dietary linoleic acid on changes in tissue arachidonic acid using human equivalent diets in mice

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background It is hypothesized that dietary linoleic acid (LA) promotes chronic and acute diseases in humans by enriching tissues with arachidonic acid (AA), its downstream metabolite, and dietary studies with rodents have been useful for validation. However, levels of LA in research diets of rodents, as published in the literature, are notoriously erratic making interspecies comparisons unreliable. Therefore, the ability to extrapolate the biological effects of dietary LA from experimental rodents to humans necessitates an allometric scaling model that is rooted within a human equivalent context. Methods To determine the physiological response of dietary LA on tissue AA, a mathematical model for extrapolating nutrients based on energy was used, as opposed to differences in body weight. C57BL/6J mice were divided into 9 groups fed a background diet equivalent to that of the US diet (% energy) with supplemental doses of LA or AA. Changes in the phospholipid fatty acid compositions were monitored in plasma and erythrocytes and compared to data from humans supplemented with equivalent doses of LA or AA. Results Increasing dietary LA had little effect on tissue AA, while supplementing diets with AA significantly increased tissue AA levels, importantly recapitulating results from human trials. Conclusions Thus, interspecies comparisons for dietary LA between rodents and humans can be achieved when rodents are provided human equivalent doses based on differences in metabolic activity as defined by energy consumption. PMID:21702942

  5. Simultaneous voltammetric determination for DA, AA and NO₂⁻ based on graphene/poly-cyclodextrin/MWCNTs nanocomposite platform.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yu; Yuan, Ruo; Chai, Yaqin; Li, Wenjuan; Zhong, Xia; Zhong, Huaan

    2011-05-15

    In the present work, graphene sheets (GS) and multiwall carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) were dispersed in the mixed solution of cyclodextrin (CD) and cyclodextrin prepolymer (pre-CD) and were used as modifier to fabricate chemical modified electrode to simultaneous detect dopamine (DA), ascorbic acid (AA) and nitrite (NO2(-)). CD cross-linked pre-CD (CDP) displays excellent film forming ability, which made the electrode stable. Comparing with CDP-GS, CDP-MWCNTs and CDP-GS-MWCNTs modified electrodes, the CDP-GS-MWCNTs displays higher catalytic activity and selectivity toward the oxidation of DA, AA and NO2(-), revealing that MWCNTs effectively inhibited the stacking of individual GS and enhanced the utilization of GS based composites. The host-guest chemical reaction ability of CD and π-π stacking interaction between detected molecules and GS-MWCNTs surface were considered as the main reasons of the successfully simultaneous detection of DA, AA and NO2(-). Cyclic voltammetry (CV), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and different pulse voltammetry (DPV) were employed to characterize the biosensor. The linear response range for AA, DA and NO2(-) were 5 μM-0.48 mM, 0.15-21.65 μM and 5 μM-6.75 mM, respectively and the detection limits were 1.65 μM, 0.05 μM and 1.65 μM. PMID:21497078

  6. Molecular Characteristic, Protein Distribution and Potential Regulation of HSP90AA1 in the Anadromous Fish Coilia nasus

    PubMed Central

    Fang, Di-An; Duan, Jin-Rong; Zhou, Yan-Feng; Zhang, Min-Ying; Xu, Dong-Po; Liu, Kai; Xu, Pao

    2016-01-01

    Heat shock proteins play essential roles in basic cellular events. Spawning migration is a complex process, with significant structural and biochemical changes taking place in the adult gonad. To date, the molecular mechanisms underlying migration reproductive biology remain undetermined. In this regard, a full length HSP90AA1 comprising 2608 nucleotides from the anadromous fish Coilia nasus was characterized, encoding 742 amino acid (aa) residues with potential phosphorylation sites. HSP90AA1 mRNA transcripts were detected in all organs, especially in the gonad. Furthermore, the greatest transcript levels were found during the developmental phase, while the lowest levels were found during the resting phase. In addition, the strongest immunolabeling positive signal was found in the primary spermatocyte and oocyte, with lower positive staining in secondary germ cells, and a weak or absent level in the mature sperm and oocyte. Interestingly, HSP90AA1 was mainly located in the cytoplasm of germ cells. These results are important for understanding the molecular mechanism of anadromous migration reproductive biology. In combination with data from other fish species, the result of this present study may facilitate further investigations on the spawning migration mechanism. PMID:26828521

  7. Localization of the adenovirus E1Aa protein, a positive-acting transcriptional factor, in infected cells infected cells.

    PubMed Central

    Feldman, L T; Nevins, J R

    1983-01-01

    The function of the adenovirus E1Aa protein (the product of the 13S E1A mRNA) during a productive viral infection is to activate transcription of the six early viral transcription units. To study the mechanism of action of this protein, a peptide which was 13 amino acids long and had a sequence unique to the protein product of the adenovirus 13S E1A mRNA (pE1Aa) was coupled to keyhole limpet hemocyanin and used to raise an antibody in rabbits. The resulting antiserum was specific to this protein and did not react with the protein product of the 12S E1A mRNA, which shares considerable sequence with the E1Aa protein. This antiserum was used to probe for the E1Aa protein in situ by indirect immunofluorescence and in extracts of infected HeLa cells. We found that the protein was associated with large cellular structures both in the nucleus and in the cytoplasm. The nuclear form of the protein was analyzed further and was found to purify with the nuclear matrix. Images PMID:6346057

  8. Nephrotic Syndrome Associated with Lung Cancer: A Rare Case of Malignancy Associated with AA Amyloidosis

    PubMed Central

    Gueutin, Victor; Langlois, Anne-Lyse; Shehwaro, Nathalie; Elharraqui, Ryme; Rouvier, Philippe; Izzedine, Hassane

    2013-01-01

    Nonhematologic malignancies are rarely reported to be associated with AA amyloidosis. Although the association between renal cell carcinoma and systemic AA amyloidosis has been established, the evidence linking pulmonary cancer to AA amyloidosis is scarce. Here, a case of biopsy-proven renal AA amyloidosis complicated with nephrotic syndrome associated with lung carcinoma is reported. PMID:24558629

  9. Effects of ascorbic acid supplementation on male reproductive system during exposure to hypoxia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Havazhagan, G.; Riar, S. S.; Kain, A. K.; Bardhan, Jaya; Thomas, Pauline

    1989-09-01

    Two groups of male rats were exposed to simulated altitudes of 6060 m and 7576 m for 6 h/day for 7 days (intermittent exposure). In two additional groups of animals exposed to the same altitude, 100 mg of ascorbic acid (AA) was fed daily for 5 days prior to the exposure period and also during the exposure period. Rats that did not receive AA showed loss of body weight and weight of reproductive organs after exposure. Sex organs showed atrophy on histological examination and there was a deterioration in spermatozoal quality. There was an increase in alkaline and acid phosphatase, and decrease in protein, sialic acid and glyceryl phosphorylcholine content in various reproductive tissues after exposure. All the above changes in histology and biochemical composition could be partially prevented by AA supplementation. AA supplementation can therefore protect the male reproductive system from deleterious effects of hypoxia. The probable mechanism of action of AA is discussed.

  10. Section BB, Section DD, Plan AA, Plan CC, Typical Framing ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Section B-B, Section D-D, Plan A-A, Plan C-C, Typical Framing Detail of Upper Stringers, Typical Framing Detail of Lower Stringers - Covered Bridge, Spanning Connecticut River, Orford, Grafton County, NH

  11. Figure Types in the AAS Journals: A Treasure Trove of Unmined Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwarz, Greg

    2013-01-01

    I present an analysis of the types of figures submitted to the AAS Journals as the prelude of a long term AAS project to capture more of the supporting data. Figures can be classified into 3 broad categories, diagrams, line art, and images. Diagrams are schematic, drawings, or illustrations and are meant to convey purely visual information. There is no intrinsic machine readable data underlying them. Line art and images, on the other hand, are snapshots of the larger underlying observational and model generated data sets. The advantages of including more data in a Virtual Observatory supported format is obvious for the reader but would also be an advantage for the author through greater visibility and thus higher citation counts. In this poster I present statistics from the August 2012 Astronomical Journal (V144 n2) and September 10th, 2012 Astrophysical Journal (v756 n2) issues and outline the near term challenges in capturing this "missing mass".

  12. Microstructure and properties of AA 2090 weldments

    SciTech Connect

    Sunwoo, A.J.; Morris, J.W. Jr.

    1988-06-01

    The effects of welding on AA 2090 are examined along with the metallurgical changes associated with welding and aging. The results of the study show that the GTA and EB weldment properties are controlled by the precipitate size and distribution. There is a trade-off between strength and elongation. In the as-welded condition, solid solution strengthening is the primary strengthening mechanism present. As a result, the weldment strengths are less than 200 MPa, but the elongations are greater than 4%. In the post-weld aged condition, an inhomogeneous distribution of solutes results in an inhomogeneous distribution of precipitates, causing strain localization. Although the weldment strengths increase, the weldment elongations decrease precipitously. The peak strengths of EB and GTA weldments are obtained aging at 160{degree}C for 32 hours with 75% joint efficiency and at 190{degree}C for 16 hours with 65% joint efficiency, respectively. Aging at 230{degree}C leads to coarsening of precipitates as well as the intermetallic constituents; the weldment strengths deteriorate rapidly, but the elongations improve. The best overall weldment properties are obtained in the solution heat treated and aged conditions, and are associated with a homogeneous distribution of strengthening precipitates. 13 refs.

  13. Recrystallization behaviour of AA6063 extrusions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, K.; Pettersen, T.; Paulsen, C. O.; Marthinsen, K.; Holmedal, B.; Segatori, A.

    2015-08-01

    Cylindrical profiles of an AA6063 aluminium alloy were produced in a lab-scale direct extrusion set-up. The extrusion was performed at 300 °C, 450 °C and 550 °C, respectively, with the same ram speed. Immediate water quenching was applied to the profiles and the end of billet (butt-end) after extrusion. Microstructure and texture of the material in different states were measured by electron back-scattered diffraction. Only the profile extruded at 300 °C, was found in the deformed state after extrusion, featuring a fibrous grain structure and a strong <111> and weak <100> double fibre texture. Post-extrusion annealing of this profile at 450 °C resulted in an almost fully recrystallized structure (recrystallized fraction of 87%) and with a texture similar to that of the as-deformed state. The profile extruded at 450 °C was almost fully recrystallized (recrystallization fraction 91%) already after quenching, and with a texture characterized by a weak <111> and strong <100> double fibre. The profile extruded at 550 °C showed a partially recrystallized grain structure with recrystallization fraction of 71%, and with a texture dominated by a <100> fibre. The influence of the deformation conditions on the recrystallization behaviour, in terms of recrystallization kinetics and mechanisms, are discussed in view of these results.

  14. Influence of the interactions between tea (Camellia sinensis) extracts and ascorbic acid on their antioxidant activity: analysis with interaction indexes and isobolograms.

    PubMed

    Enko, Jolanta; Gliszczyńska-Świgło, Anna

    2015-01-01

    Products containing natural additives, including antioxidants, are usually perceived by consumers as safer than those with synthetic ones. Natural antioxidants, besides having a preservative activity, may exert beneficial health effects. Interactions between antioxidants may significantly change their antioxidant activity, thus in designing functional foods or food/cosmetic ingredients knowledge about the type of interactions could be useful. In the present study, the interactions between ascorbic acid (AA; vitamin C) and different black and green tea extracts and the influence on their antioxidant activities were investigated. The antioxidant activities of tea extracts and their mixtures with AA prepared in several different weight ratios were measured using the trolox equivalent antioxidant capacity (TEAC), 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH), and ferric-reducing antioxidant power (FRAP) methods. The type of interaction was determined by interaction indexes and isobolograms. It was found that the weight ratio of extracts to AA significantly influenced the antioxidant activity of a mixture and the type of interaction between these components. The weight ratio of tea extract to AA can cause the change of interaction, e.g. from antagonism to additivism or from additivism to synergism. The observed differences in the type of interactions were probably also a result of different extracts' polyphenol composition and content. The type of interaction may also be affected by the medium in which extracts and AA interact, especially its pH and the solvent used. To obtain the best antioxidant effect, all these factors should be taken into account during the design of a tea extract-AA mixture. PMID:26035225

  15. Outcomes From AAS Hack Day at the 227th AAS Meeting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2016-01-01

    Editors Note:This is a final post from the 227th AAS Meeting in Kissimmee, FL. This special summary of AAS Hack Day, a meeting of AAS members to collaboratively work on various small projects, was written by Meredith Rawls (@Merrdiff) and was originally posted on astrobites.com.As the 227thAmerican Astronomical Society meeting drew to a close (see highlights from Day 1, Day 2, Day 3, and Day 4), a group of at least 50 attendees spent Day 4working on small projects fondly called hacks. Thanks to sponsorship from LSST and Northrup Grumman, the industrious hackers werewell-caffeinated and fed so we could devote time and energy toworking in groups on one-day projects.TheHack Day beganat 10am with pitches. Anybody with a project idea was welcome to briefly speak and try to convince others to work with them. Only someideas panned out, but the enthusiasm was palpable. Its not every day you get a full room of astronomers and affiliates eager to spend hours working on fun and useful projects to benefit the community.#hackAAS is getting underway! #aas227 pic.twitter.com/yX7jlOnSCK James R A Davenport (@jradavenport) January 8, 2016Here is a rundown of what we accomplished. Pretty impressive for a single day! Many thanks to fellow astrobiter Erika Nesvold (now at Carnegie DTM; @erikanesvold) whose hack was live-documenting all the other hacks. Her tweets as @astrobites appeared with the #hackaas hashtag, and her notes made this recap post infinitely easier to write.Interested in joining the fun? Sign up for Hack Day at the 2017 JanuaryAAS meeting (its free with meeting registration), and consider applying for the .Astronomy conference this summer.Towards Optimal Session Scheduling:Adrian Price-Whelan (Columbia), David Hogg (NYU), and Scott Idem (AAS) began writing a program to take all submitted abstracts to a conference like AAS and sort them using keywords to avoid scheduling similar talks in parallel sessions. Its impossible to make everyone happy, but minimizing conflicts

  16. Asiago spectroscopic classification of SN2016aa in PGC 22658

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciabattari, F.; Tomasella, L.; Pastorello, A.; Benetti, S.; Cappellaro, E.; Elias-Rosa, N.; Ochner, P.; Tartaglia, L.; Terreran, G.; Turatto, M.; Briganti, F.; Caimmi, M.; Campaner, P.; Donati, S.; Mazzoni, E.

    2016-02-01

    We report the spectroscopic classification of SN2016aa in PGC 22658 through observations obtained with the 1.82-m Copernico Telescope in Asiago (+ AFOSC; range 340-820 nm, resolution 1.3 nm). A low signal-to-noise spectrogram obtained on Jan 04.97 UT indicates that SN2016aa is a Type II SNe, a few weeks after the explosion.

  17. EDP Sciences and A&A: partnering to providing services to support the scientific community

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henri, Agnes

    2015-08-01

    Scholarly publishing is no longer about simply producing and packaging articles and sending out to subscribers. To be successful, as well as being global and digital, Publishers and their journals need to be fully engaged with their stakeholders (authors, readers, funders, libraries etc), and constantly developing new products and services to support their needs in the ever-changing environment that we work in.Astronomy & Astrophysics (A&A) is a high quality, major international Journal that belongs to the astronomical communities of a consortium of European and South American countries supported by ESO who sponsor the journal. EDP Sciences is a non-profit publisher belonging to several learned societies and is appointed by ESO to publish the journal.Over the last decade, as well as publishing the results of worldwide astronomical and astrophysical research, A&A and EDP Sciences have worked in partnership to develop a wide range of services for the authors and readers of A&A:- A specialist language editing service: to provide a clear and excellent level of English ensuring full understanding of the high-quality science.- A flexible and progressive Open Access Policy including Gold and Green options and strong links with arXiv.- Enriched articles: authors are able to enhance their articles using a wide range of rich media such as 3D models, videos and animations.Multiple publishing formats: allowing readers to browse articles on multiple devices including eReaders and Kindles.- “Scientific Writing for Young Astronomers”: In 2008 EDP Sciences and A&A set up the Scientific Writing for Young Astronomers (SWYA) School with the objective to teach early PhD Students how write correct and efficient scientific papers for different mediums (journals, proceedings, thesis manuscripts, etc.).

  18. AA amyloidosis as a complication of primary lymphedema.

    PubMed

    Beloncle, François; Sayegh, Johnny; Eymerit-Morin, Caroline; Duveau, Agnès; Augusto, Jean-François

    2014-03-01

    Primary lymphedema is a rare disease caused by a disorder of lymphangiogenesis. Clinical presentation and age at onset are variable. AA amyloidosis is usually due to chronic inflammatory diseases, malignant tumors or less frequently chronic infectious diseases. We report here the first two cases of AA amyloidosis present with renal failure and nephrotic syndrome in patients with primary lymphedema-induced chronic leg ulcers. The first patient was a 62-year-old female who presented with chronic untreated leg ulcers for 8 years secondary to primary lymphedema. A kidney biopsy done for nephrotic syndrome allowed the diagnosis of AA amyloidosis. The second patient was a 54-year-old male who presented with hereditary lymphedema and elephantiasis since the age of 12. A salivary gland biopsy allowed the diagnosis of AA amyloidosis. Renal function deteriorated progressively needing chronic haemodialysis. Chronic leg ulcers have been rarely reported to induce AA amyloidosis. Only five other cases have been reported in the literature, but none of them with chronic lymphedema. We believe that the relation between lymphedema, chronic leg ulcers and AA amyloidosis is underestimated. PMID:23964754

  19. Modulating the gut flora alters amino acid metabolism in neonatal pigs

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Intestinal microbes consume and produce amino acids (AA). This may impact intestinal threonine (THR) metabolism necessary for adequate gut function. We hypothesized that modulating the gut flora results in an alteration of intestinal THR utilization and hence whole body AA metabolism. Neonatal pigs ...

  20. Metabolomic profiling of amino acids and beta-cell function relative to insulin sensitivity in youth

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In longitudinal studies of adults, elevated amino acid (AA) concentrations predicted future type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). The aim of the present investigation was to examine whether increased plasma AA concentrations are associated with impaired beta-cell function relative to insulin sensitivity ...

  1. Contribution of Fermentation Yeast to Final Amino Acid Profile in DDGS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    One major factor affecting DDGS quality and market values is amino acid (AA) composition. DDGS proteins come from corn and yeast. Yet, the effect of fermentation yeast on DDGS protein quantity and quality (AA profile) has not been well documented. Based on literature review, there are at least 4 met...

  2. Docosahexaenoic Acid Status in Pregnancy Determines the Maternal Docosahexaenoic Acid Status 3-, 6- and 12 Months Postpartum. Results from a Longitudinal Observational Study

    PubMed Central

    Markhus, Maria Wik; Rasinger, Josef Daniel; Malde, Marian Kjellevold; Frøyland, Livar; Skotheim, Siv; Braarud, Hanne Cecilie; Stormark, Kjell Morten; Graff, Ingvild Eide

    2015-01-01

    Background Essential fatty acid status as well as docosahexaenoic acid (DHA, 22:6n-3) declines during pregnancy and lactation. As a result, the DHA status may not be optimal for child development and may increase the risk for maternal postpartum depression. The objective of this study was to assess changes in the maternal fatty acid status from pregnancy to 12 months postpartum, and to study the impact of seafood consumption on the individual fatty acid status. Methods Blood samples and seafood consumption habits (gestation week 28, and three-, six- and 12 months postpartum) were collected in a longitudinal observational study of pregnant and postpartum women (n = 118). Multilevel linear modeling was used to assess both changes over time in the fatty acid status of red blood cells (RBC), and in the seafood consumption. Results Six fatty acids varied the most (>80%) across the four time points analyzed, including the derivative of the essential α-linoleic acid (ALA, 18:3n-3), DHA; the essential linoleic acid (LA, 18:2 n-6); and the LA derivative, arachidonic acid (AA, 20:4n-6). Over all, a large variation in individuals’ DHA- and AA status was observed; however, over the 15-month study period only small inter-individual differences in the longitudinal trajectory of DHA- and AA abundance in the RBC were detected. The median intake of seafood was lower than recommended. Regardless, the total weekly frequency of seafood and eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA, 20:5n-3)/DHA-supplement intake predicted the maternal level of DHA (μg/g RBC). Conclusion The period of depletion of the maternal DHA status during pregnancy and lactation, seem to turn to repletion from about six months postpartum towards one year after childbirth, irrespective of RBC concentration of DHA during pregnancy. Seafood and EPA/DHA-supplement intake predicted the DHA levels over time. Trial Registration www.helseforskning.etikkom.no 2009/570/REC, project number: 083.09 PMID:26331947

  3. Transcriptional profiling analysis of Spodoptera litura larvae challenged with Vip3Aa toxin and possible involvement of trypsin in the toxin activation

    PubMed Central

    Song, Feifei; Chen, Chen; Wu, Songqing; Shao, Ensi; Li, Mengnan; Guan, Xiong; Huang, Zhipeng

    2016-01-01

    Vip proteins, a new group of insecticidal toxins produced by Bacillus thuringiensis, are effective against specific pests including Spodoptera litura. Here, we report construction of a transcriptome database of S. litura by de novo assembly along with detection of the transcriptional response of S. litura larvae to Vip3Aa toxin. In total, 56,498 unigenes with an N50 value of 1,853 bp were obtained. Results of transcriptome abundance showed that Vip3Aa toxin provoked a wide transcriptional response of the S. litura midgut. The differentially expressed genes were enriched for immunity-related, metabolic-related and Bt-related genes. Twenty-nine immunity-related genes, 102 metabolic-related genes and 62 Bt-related genes with differential expression were found. On the basis of transcriptional profiling analysis, we focus on the functional validation of trypsin which potentially participated in the activation of Vip3Aa protoxin. Zymogram analysis indicated that the presence of many proteases, including trypsin, in S. litura larvae midgut. Results of enzymolysis in vitro of Vip3Aa by trypsin, and bioassay and histopathology of the trypsin-digested Vip3Aa toxin showed that trypsin was possibly involved in the Vip3Aa activation. This study provides a transcriptome foundation for the identification and functional validation of the differentially expressed genes in an agricultural important pest, S. litura. PMID:27025647

  4. Transcriptional profiling analysis of Spodoptera litura larvae challenged with Vip3Aa toxin and possible involvement of trypsin in the toxin activation.

    PubMed

    Song, Feifei; Chen, Chen; Wu, Songqing; Shao, Ensi; Li, Mengnan; Guan, Xiong; Huang, Zhipeng

    2016-01-01

    Vip proteins, a new group of insecticidal toxins produced by Bacillus thuringiensis, are effective against specific pests including Spodoptera litura. Here, we report construction of a transcriptome database of S. litura by de novo assembly along with detection of the transcriptional response of S. litura larvae to Vip3Aa toxin. In total, 56,498 unigenes with an N50 value of 1,853 bp were obtained. Results of transcriptome abundance showed that Vip3Aa toxin provoked a wide transcriptional response of the S. litura midgut. The differentially expressed genes were enriched for immunity-related, metabolic-related and Bt-related genes. Twenty-nine immunity-related genes, 102 metabolic-related genes and 62 Bt-related genes with differential expression were found. On the basis of transcriptional profiling analysis, we focus on the functional validation of trypsin which potentially participated in the activation of Vip3Aa protoxin. Zymogram analysis indicated that the presence of many proteases, including trypsin, in S. litura larvae midgut. Results of enzymolysis in vitro of Vip3Aa by trypsin, and bioassay and histopathology of the trypsin-digested Vip3Aa toxin showed that trypsin was possibly involved in the Vip3Aa activation. This study provides a transcriptome foundation for the identification and functional validation of the differentially expressed genes in an agricultural important pest, S. litura. PMID:27025647

  5. Lithium and the other mood stabilizers effective in bipolar disorder target the rat brain arachidonic acid cascade.

    PubMed

    Rapoport, Stanley I

    2014-06-18

    This Review evaluates the arachidonic acid (AA, 20:4n-6) cascade hypothesis for the actions of lithium and other FDA-approved mood stabilizers in bipolar disorder (BD). The hypothesis is based on evidence in unanesthetized rats that chronically administered lithium, carbamazepine, valproate, or lamotrigine each downregulated brain AA metabolism, and it is consistent with reported upregulated AA cascade markers in post-mortem BD brain. In the rats, each mood stabilizer reduced AA turnover in brain phospholipids, cyclooxygenase-2 expression, and prostaglandin E2 concentration. Lithium and carbamazepine also reduced expression of cytosolic phospholipase A2 (cPLA2) IVA, which releases AA from membrane phospholipids, whereas valproate uncompetitively inhibited in vitro acyl-CoA synthetase-4, which recycles AA into phospholipid. Topiramate and gabapentin, proven ineffective in BD, changed rat brain AA metabolism minimally. On the other hand, the atypical antipsychotics olanzapine and clozapine, which show efficacy in BD, decreased rat brain AA metabolism by reducing plasma AA availability. Each of the four approved mood stabilizers also dampened brain AA signaling during glutamatergic NMDA and dopaminergic D2 receptor activation, while lithium enhanced the signal during cholinergic muscarinic receptor activation. In BD patients, such signaling effects might normalize the neurotransmission imbalance proposed to cause disease symptoms. Additionally, the antidepressants fluoxetine and imipramine, which tend to switch BD depression to mania, each increased AA turnover and cPLA2 IVA expression in rat brain, suggesting that brain AA metabolism is higher in BD mania than depression. The AA hypothesis for mood stabilizer action is consistent with reports that low-dose aspirin reduced morbidity in patients taking lithium, and that high n-3 and/or low n-6 polyunsaturated fatty acid diets, which in rats reduce brain AA metabolism, were effective in BD and migraine patients. PMID

  6. Individual variation and intraclass correlation in arachidonic acid and eicosapentaenoic acid in chicken muscle

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Chicken meat with reduced concentration of arachidonic acid (AA) and reduced ratio between omega-6 and omega-3 fatty acids has potential health benefits because a reduction in AA intake dampens prostanoid signaling, and the proportion between omega-6 and omega-3 fatty acids is too high in our diet. Analyses for fatty acid determination are expensive, and finding the optimal number of analyses to give reliable results is a challenge. The objective of the present study was i) to analyse the intraclass correlation of different fatty acids in five meat samples, of one gram each, within the same chicken thigh, and ii) to study individual variations in the concentrations of a range of fatty acids and the ratio between omega-6 and omega-3 fatty acid concentrations among fifteen chickens. Fifteen newly hatched broilers were fed a wheat-based diet containing 4% rapeseed oil and 1% linseed oil for three weeks. Five muscle samples from the mid location of the thigh of each chicken were analysed for fatty acid composition. The intraclass correlation (sample correlation within the same animal) was 0.85-0.98 for the ratios of total omega-6 to total omega-3 fatty acids and of AA to eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA). This indicates that when studying these fatty acid ratios, one sample of one gram per animal is sufficient. However, due to the high individual variation between chicken for these ratios, a relatively high number of animals (minimum 15) are required to obtain a sufficiently high power to reveal significant effects of experimental factors (e.g. feeding regimes). The present experiment resulted in meat with a favorable concentration ratio between omega-6 and omega-3 fatty acids. The AA concentration varied from 1.5 to 2.8 g/100 g total fatty acids in thigh muscle in the fifteen broilers, and the ratio between AA and EPA concentrations ranged from 2.3 to 3.9. These differences among the birds may be due to genetic variance that can be exploited by breeding for lower AA

  7. Ascorbic acid serum levels are reduced in patients with hematological malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Huijskens, Mirelle J.A.J.; Wodzig, Will K.W.H.; Walczak, Mateusz; Germeraad, Wilfred T.V.; Bos, Gerard M.J.

    2016-01-01

    In this paper we demonstrate that patients treated with chemotherapy and/or hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) have highly significant reduced serum ascorbic acid (AA) levels compared to healthy controls. We recently observed in in vitro experiments that growth of both T and NK cells from hematopoietic stem cells is positively influenced by AA. It might be of clinical relevance to study the function and recovery of immune cells after intensive treatment, its correlation to AA serum levels and the possible effect of AA supplementation. PMID:27014565

  8. Ascorbic Acid and the Brain: Rationale for the Use against Cognitive Decline

    PubMed Central

    Harrison, Fiona E.; Bowman, Gene L.; Polidori, Maria Cristina

    2014-01-01

    This review is focused upon the role of ascorbic acid (AA, vitamin C) in the promotion of healthy brain aging. Particular attention is attributed to the biochemistry and neuronal metabolism interface, transport across tissues, animal models that are useful for this area of research, and the human studies that implicate AA in the continuum between normal cognitive aging and age-related cognitive decline up to Alzheimer’s disease. Vascular risk factors and comorbidity relationships with cognitive decline and AA are discussed to facilitate strategies for advancing AA research in the area of brain health and neurodegeneration. PMID:24763117

  9. The effects of different thermal treatments and organic acid levels on nutrient digestibility in broilers.

    PubMed

    Goodarzi Boroojeni, F; Mader, A; Knorr, F; Ruhnke, I; Röhe, I; Hafeez, A; Männer, K; Zentek, J

    2014-05-01

    Poultry feed is a potential vector for pathogens. Heat processing and organic acid treatments may decontaminate feed and can affect bird performance as well as feed digestibility. The present study was performed to investigate the effect of different thermal treatments including pelleting (P), long-term conditioning at 85°C for 3 min (L), or expanding at 110°C (E110) and 130°C for 3 to 5 s (E130) without or with 0.75 and 1.5% organic acid supplementation (63.75% formic acid, 25.00% propionic acid, and 11.25% water) on performance, nutrient digestibility, and organ weights of broilers. In total, 960 one-day-old broiler chicks were randomly assigned to 8 replicates using a 3 × 4 factorial arrangement. Performance variables were determined, and the relative organ weights and ileal and total amino acid (AA) digestibilities were measured at d 35. The organic acid inclusion linearly improved feed efficiency in the first week (P ≤ 0.05). The acid inclusion levels and thermal treatments had no significant effect on the performance variables at later intervals of the growing period of the birds. The L group showed the lowest ileal AA and CP digestibility. The inclusion of organic acids had a quadratic effect on total and ileal digestibility of isoleucine (P ≤ 0.05), whereas it had no significant effect on the ileal digestibility of other AA and nutrients. The relative weights of the jejunum and small intestine were significantly higher in the E130 group compared with P and L (P ≤ 0.05). In conclusion, our study demonstrated that long-term heat conditioning can decrease ileal nutrient digestibility, whereas pelleting and expansion, independently of organic acid addition, seemed to have no negative impact on broiler performance and nutrient digestibilities. Moreover, adding a blend of organic acids to broiler diets had neither positive nor negative effects on nutrient digestibility and final broiler performance. This indicates the feasibility of short-term thermal

  10. Amino acid digestibility of heat damaged distillers dried grains with solubles fed to pigs

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    The primary objective of this experiment was to determine the effects of heat treatment on the standardized ileal digestibility (SID) of amino acids (AA) in corn distillers dried grains with solubles (DDGS) fed to growing pigs. The second objective was to develop regression equations that may be used to predict the concentration of SID AA in corn DDGS. A source of corn DDGS was divided into 4 batches that were either not autoclaved or autoclaved at 130°C for 10, 20, or 30 min. Four diets containing DDGS from each of the 4 batches were formulated with DDGS being the only source of AA and CP in the diets. A N-free diet also was formulated and used to determine the basal endogenous losses of CP and AA. Ten growing pigs (initial BW: 53.5 ± 3.9 kg) were surgically equipped with a T-cannula in the distal ileum and allotted to a replicated 5 × 4 Youden square design with 5 diets and 4 periods in each square. The SID of CP decreased linearly (P < 0.05) from 77.9% in non-autoclaved DDGS to 72.1, 66.1, and 68.5% in the DDGS samples that were autoclaved for 10, 20, or 30 min, respectively. The SID of lysine was quadratically reduced (P < 0.05) from 66.8% in the non-autoclaved DDGS to 54.9, 55.3, and 51.9% in the DDGS autoclaved for 10, 20, or 30 min, respectively. The concentrations of SID Arginine, Histidine, Leucine, Lysine, Methionine, Phenylalanine, or Threonine may be best predicted by equations that include the concentration of acid detergent insoluble N in the model (r2 = 0.76, 0.68, 0.67, 0.84, 0.76, 0.73, or 0.54, respectively). The concentrations of SID Isoleucine and Valine were predicted (r2 = 0.58 and 0.54, respectively) by the Lysine:CP ratio, whereas the concentration of SID Tryptophan was predicted (r2 = 0.70) by the analyzed concentration of Tryptophan in DDGS. In conclusion, the SID of AA is decreased as a result of heat damage and the concentration of SID AA in heat-damaged DDGS may be predicted by regression equations

  11. Arachidonic acid stimulates DNA synthesis in brown preadipocytes through the activation of protein kinase C and MAPK.

    PubMed

    Garcia, Bibian; Martinez-de-Mena, Raquel; Obregon, Maria-Jesus

    2012-10-01

    Arachidonic acid (AA) is a polyunsaturated fatty acid that stimulates the proliferation of many cellular types. We studied the mitogenic potential of AA in rat brown preadipocytes in culture and the signaling pathways involved. AA is a potent mitogen which induces 4-fold DNA synthesis in brown preadipocytes. The AA mitogenic effect increases by NE addition. AA also increases the mitogenic action of different growth factor combinations. Other unsaturated and saturated fatty acids do not stimulate DNA synthesis to the same extent as AA. We analyzed the role of PKC and MEK/MAPK signaling pathways. PKC inhibition by bisindolilmaleimide I (BIS) abolishes AA and phorbol ester stimulation of DNA synthesis and reduces the mitogenic activity of different growth factors in brown preadipocytes. Brown preadipocytes in culture express PKC α, δ, ε and ζ isoforms. Pretreatment with high doses of the phorbol ester PDBu, induces downregulation of PKCs ε and δ and reproduces the effect of BIS indicating that AA-dependent induction of DNA synthesis requires PKC activity. AA also activates MEK/MAPK pathway and the inhibition of MEK activity inhibits AA stimulation of DNA synthesis and brown adipocyte proliferation. Inhibition of PKC δ by rottlerin abolishes AA-dependent stimulation of DNA synthesis and MAPK activation, whereas PKC ε inhibition does not produce any effect. In conclusion, our results identify AA as a potent mitogen for brown adipocytes and demonstrate the involvement of the PDBu-sensitive PKC δ isoform and MEK/MAPK pathway in AA-induced proliferation of brown adipocytes. Increased proliferative activity might increase the thermogenic capacity of brown fat. PMID:22766489

  12. 40 CFR Table Aa-2 to Subpart Aa of... - Kraft Lime Kiln and Calciner Emissions Factors for CH4 and N2O

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Kraft Lime Kiln and Calciner Emissions... Manufacturing Pt. 98, Subpt. AA, Table AA -2 Table AA-2 to Subpart AA of Part 98—Kraft Lime Kiln and Calciner Emissions Factors for CH4 and N2O Fuel Fossil fuel-based emissions factors (kg/mmBtu HHV) Kraft lime...

  13. Easy modification of glassy carbon electrode for simultaneous determination of ascorbic acid, dopamine and uric acid.

    PubMed

    Thiagarajan, Soundappan; Tsai, Tsung-Hsuan; Chen, Shen-Ming

    2009-04-15

    A glassy carbon electrode (GCE) has been modified by electrochemical oxidation in mild acidic media (0.1 mol l(-1) H(2)SO(4)) and could be applied for individual and simultaneous determination of ascorbic acid (AA), dopamine (DA) and uric acid (UA). Oxidized GCE shows a single redox couple (E(0)'=-2.5 mV) which is based on the formation functional groups during the electrochemical pretreatment process. Proposed GCE successfully decreases the over potentials for the oxidation process of these species (AA, DA and UA) comparing with bare GCE. The oxidized GCE has its own simplicity, stability, high sensitivity and possesses the potential for simultaneous determination of AA, DA and UA. PMID:19162467

  14. Regulatory signals for intestinal amino acid transporters and peptidases

    SciTech Connect

    Ferraris, R.P.; Kwan, W.W.; Diamond, J. )

    1988-08-01

    Dietary protein ultimately regulates many processes involved in protein digestion, but it is often unclear whether proteins themselves, peptides, or amino acids (AAs) are the proximate regulatory signal. Hence the authors compared several processes involved in protein digestion in mice adapted to one of three rations, identical except for containing 54% of either casein, a partial hydrolysate of casein, or a free AA mixture simulating a complete hydrolysate of casein. The authors measured brush-border uptakes of seven AAs that variously serve as substrates for four AA transporters, and brush-border and cytosolic activities of four peptidases. The three rations yielded essentially the same AA uptake rates. Peptidase activities tended to be lower on the AA ration than on the protein ration. In other studies, all three rations yielded the same rates of brush-border peptide uptake; protein is only modestly more effective than AAs at inducing synthesis of pancreatic proteases; and, depending on the animal species, protein is either much less or much more effective than AAs at stimulating release of cholecystokinin and hence of pancreatic enzymes. Thus the regulators of each process involved in protein digestion are not necessarily that process's substrate.

  15. A CA(+) pair adjacent to a sheared GA or AA pair stabilizes size-symmetric RNA internal loops.

    PubMed

    Chen, Gang; Kennedy, Scott D; Turner, Douglas H

    2009-06-23

    RNA internal loops are often important sites for folding and function. Residues in internal loops can have pKa values shifted close to neutral pH because of the local structural environment. A series of RNA internal loops were studied at different pH by UV absorbance versus temperature melting experiments and imino proton nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). A stabilizing CA pair forms at pH 7 in the CG/AA and CA/AA nearest neighbors when the CA pair is the first noncanonical pair (loop-terminal pair) in 3 x 3 nucleotide and larger size-symmetric internal loops. These CG/AA and CA/AA nearest neighbors, with CA adjacent to a closing Watson-Crick pair, are further stabilized when the pH is lowered from 7 to 5.5. The results are consistent with a significantly larger fraction (from approximately 20% at pH 7 to approximately 90% at pH 5.5) of adenines being protonated at the N1 position to form stabilizing wobble CA+ pairs adjacent to a sheared GA or AA pair. The noncanonical pair adjacent to the GA pair in CG/AA can either stabilize or destabilize the loop, consistent with the sequence-dependent thermodynamics of GA pairs. No significant pH-dependent stabilization is found for most of the other nearest neighbor combinations involving CA pairs (e.g., CA/AG and AG/CA), which is consistent with the formation of various nonwobble pairs observed in different local sequence contexts in crystal and NMR structures. A revised free-energy model, including stabilization by wobble CA+ pairs, is derived for predicting stabilities of medium-size RNA internal loops. PMID:19485416

  16. Prenatal arachidonic acid exposure and selected immune-related variables in childhood.

    PubMed

    Dirix, Chantal E H; Hogervorst, Janneke G F; Rump, Patrick; Hendriks, Johannes J E; Bruins, Maaike; Hornstra, Gerard

    2009-08-01

    Arachidonic acid (AA) is considered essential in fetal development and some of its metabolites are thought to be important mediators of the immune responses. Therefore, we studied whether prenatal exposure to AA is associated with some immune-related clinical conditions and plasma markers in childhood. In 280 children aged 7 years, atopy, lung function and plasma inflammation markers were measured and their relationships with early AA exposure were studied by linear and logistic regression analyses. AA exposure was deduced from AA concentrations in plasma phospholipids of the mothers collected at several time points during pregnancy and at delivery, and in umbilical cord plasma and arterial and venous wall phospholipids. In unadjusted regression analyses, significant positive associations were observed between maternal AA concentrations at 16 and 32 weeks of pregnancy (proxies for fetal AA exposure) and peak expiratory flow decline after maximal physical exercise and plasma fibrinogen concentrations of their children, respectively. However, after correction for relevant covariables, only trends remained. A significant negative relationship was observed between AA concentrations in cord plasma (reflecting prenatal AA exposure) and the average daily amplitude of peak expiratory flow at rest, which lost significance after appropriate adjustment. Because of these few, weak and inconsistent relationships, a major impact of early-life exposure to AA on atopy, lung function and selected plasma inflammation markers of children at 7 years of age seems unlikely. PMID:19173768

  17. Ascorbic Acid and BSA Protein in Solution and Films: Interaction and Surface Morphological Structure

    PubMed Central

    Maciel, Rafael R. G.; de Almeida, Adriele A.; Godinho, Odin G. C.; Gorza, Filipe D. S.; Pedro, Graciela C.; Trescher, Tarquin F.; Silva, Josmary R.; de Souza, Nara C.

    2013-01-01

    This paper reports on the study of the interactions between ascorbic acid (AA) and bovine serum albumin (BSA) in aqueous solution as well as in films (BSA/AA films) prepared by the layer-by-layer technique. Regarding to solution studies, a hyperchromism (in the range of ultraviolet) was found as a function of AA concentration, which suggested the formation of aggregates from AA and BSA. Binding constant, K, determined for aggregates from BSA and AA was found to be about 102 M−1, which indicated low affinity of AA with BSA. For the BSA/AA films, it was also noted that the AA adsorption process and surface morphological structures depended on AA concentration. By changing the contact time between the AA and BSA, a hypochromism was revealed, which was associated to decrease of accessibility of solvent to tryptophan due to formation of aggregates. Furthermore, different morphological structures of aggregates were observed, which were attributed to the diffusion-limited aggregation. Since most of studies of interactions of drugs and proteins are performed in solution, the analysis of these processes by using films can be very valuable because this kind of system is able to employ several techniques of investigation in solid state. PMID:23984366

  18. Ascorbic acid and BSA protein in solution and films: interaction and surface morphological structure.

    PubMed

    Maciel, Rafael R G; de Almeida, Adriele A; Godinho, Odin G C; Gorza, Filipe D S; Pedro, Graciela C; Trescher, Tarquin F; Silva, Josmary R; de Souza, Nara C

    2013-01-01

    This paper reports on the study of the interactions between ascorbic acid (AA) and bovine serum albumin (BSA) in aqueous solution as well as in films (BSA/AA films) prepared by the layer-by-layer technique. Regarding to solution studies, a hyperchromism (in the range of ultraviolet) was found as a function of AA concentration, which suggested the formation of aggregates from AA and BSA. Binding constant, K, determined for aggregates from BSA and AA was found to be about 10(2) M(-1), which indicated low affinity of AA with BSA. For the BSA/AA films, it was also noted that the AA adsorption process and surface morphological structures depended on AA concentration. By changing the contact time between the AA and BSA, a hypochromism was revealed, which was associated to decrease of accessibility of solvent to tryptophan due to formation of aggregates. Furthermore, different morphological structures of aggregates were observed, which were attributed to the diffusion-limited aggregation. Since most of studies of interactions of drugs and proteins are performed in solution, the analysis of these processes by using films can be very valuable because this kind of system is able to employ several techniques of investigation in solid state. PMID:23984366

  19. Expression of apical Na(+)-L-glutamine co-transport activity, B(0)-system neutral amino acid co-transporter (B(0)AT1) and angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 along the jejunal crypt-villus axis in young pigs fed a liquid formula

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Gut apical amino acid (AA) transport activity is high at birth and during suckling, thus being essential to maintain luminal nutrient-dependent mucosal growth through providing AA as essential metabolic fuel, substrates and nutrient stimuli for cellular growth. Because system-B(0) Na(+)-neutral AA c...

  20. Amino acid supplementation alters bone metabolism during simulated weightlessness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zwart, S. R.; Davis-Street, J. E.; Paddon-Jones, D.; Ferrando, A. A.; Wolfe, R. R.; Smith, S. M.

    2005-01-01

    High-protein and acidogenic diets induce hypercalciuria. Foods or supplements with excess sulfur-containing amino acids increase endogenous sulfuric acid production and therefore have the potential to increase calcium excretion and alter bone metabolism. In this study, effects of an amino acid/carbohydrate supplement on bone resorption were examined during bed rest. Thirteen subjects were divided at random into two groups: a control group (Con, n = 6) and an amino acid-supplemented group (AA, n = 7) who consumed an extra 49.5 g essential amino acids and 90 g carbohydrate per day for 28 days. Urine was collected for n-telopeptide (NTX), deoxypyridinoline (DPD), calcium, and pH determinations. Bone mineral content was determined and potential renal acid load was calculated. Bone-specific alkaline phosphatase was measured in serum samples collected on day 1 (immediately before bed rest) and on day 28. Potential renal acid load was higher in the AA group than in the Con group during bed rest (P < 0.05). For all subjects, during bed rest urinary NTX and DPD concentrations were greater than pre-bed rest levels (P < 0.05). Urinary NTX and DPD tended to be higher in the AA group (P = 0.073 and P = 0.056, respectively). During bed rest, urinary calcium was greater than baseline levels (P < 0.05) in the AA group but not the Con group. Total bone mineral content was lower after bed rest than before bed rest in the AA group but not the Con group (P < 0.05). During bed rest, urinary pH decreased (P < 0.05), and it was lower in the AA group than the Con group. These data suggest that bone resorption increased, without changes in bone formation, in the AA group.

  1. Cloning and epitope mapping of Cry11Aa-binding sites in the Cry11Aa-receptor alkaline phosphatase from Aedes aegypti.

    PubMed

    Fernandez, Luisa E; Martinez-Anaya, Claudia; Lira, Erandi; Chen, Jianwu; Evans, Amy; Hernández-Martínez, Salvador; Lanz-Mendoza, Humberto; Bravo, Alejandra; Gill, Sarjeet S; Soberón, Mario

    2009-09-22

    Cry11Aa is the most active Bacillus thuringiensis israelensis toxin against Aedes aegypti larvae. Ae. aegypti alkaline phosphatase (ALP) was previously identified as a Cry11Aa receptor mediating toxicity. Here we report the cloning and functional characterization of this Ae. aegypti Cry11Aa-ALP receptor. Of three ALP's cDNA clones, the recombinant produced ALP1 isoform was shown to bind Cry11Aa and P1.BBMV peptide phage that specifically binds the midgut ALP-Cry11Aa receptor. An anti-ALP1 antibody inhibited binding to brush border membrane vesicles and toxicity of Cry11Aa in isolated cultured guts. Two ALP1 Cry11Aa binding regions (R59-G102 and N257-I296) were mapped by characterizing binding of Cry11Aa to nine recombinant overlapping peptides covering the ALP1 sequence. Finally, by using a peptide spot array of Cry11Aa domain III and site-directed mutagenesis, we show that the ALP1 R59-G102 region binds Cry11Aa through domain II loop alpha-8 while ALP1 N257-I296 interacts with Cry11Aa through domain III 561RVQSQNSGNN570 located in beta18-beta19. Our results show that Cry11Aa domain II and domain III are involved in the binding with two distinct binding sites in the ALP1 receptor. PMID:19697959

  2. Cloning and Epitope Mapping of Cry11Aa-Binding Sites in the Cry11Aa-Receptor Alkaline Phosphatase from Aedes aegypti†

    PubMed Central

    Fernandez, Luisa E.; Martinez-Anaya, Claudia; Lira, Erandi; Chen, Jianwu; Evans, Amy; Hernández-Martínez, Salvador; Lanz-Mendoza, Humberto; Bravo, Alejandra; Gill, Sarjeet S.; Soberón, Mario

    2013-01-01

    Cry11Aa is the most active Bacillus thuringiensis israelensis toxin against Aedes aegypti larvae. Ae. aegypti alkaline phosphatase (ALP) was previously identified as a Cry11Aa receptor mediating toxicity. Here we report the cloning and functional characterization of this Ae. aegypti Cry11Aa-ALP receptor. Of three ALP’s cDNA clones, the recombinant produced ALP1 isoform was shown to bind Cry11Aa and P1.BBMV peptide phage that specifically binds the midgut ALP-Cry11Aa receptor. An anti-ALP1 antibody inhibited binding to brush border membrane vesicles and toxicity of Cry11Aa in isolated cultured guts. Two ALP1 Cry11Aa binding regions (R59–G102 and N257–I296) were mapped by characterizing binding of Cry11Aa to nine recombinant overlapping peptides covering the ALP1 sequence. Finally, by using a peptide spot array of Cry11Aa domain III and site-directed mutagenesis, we show that the ALP1 R59–G102 region binds Cry11Aa through domain II loop α-8 while ALP1 N257–I296 interacts with Cry11Aa through domain III 561RVQSQNSGNN570 located in β18-β19. Our results show that Cry11Aa domain II and domain III are involved in the binding with two distinct binding sites in the ALP1 receptor. PMID:19697959

  3. What Astronomers and the AAS Need to be Doing to Curb Light Pollution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Green, D. W. E.

    2001-12-01

    Astronomers and especially the AAS are doing apalling little in the war on light pollution. This is quite surprising, considering that optical groundbased astronomy may become nearly extinct in the 21st century if we don't get more serious about the loss of our night skies to artificial lighting. Part of the blame must be placed on astronomers throughout the 20th century (particularly before 1980), as very few of them seem to have set an example by starting an early crusade against bad outdoor night lighting (save for a handful of important individuals near large U.S. observatories, and a few connected with smaller observatories); this apathy of earlier generations of astronomers fueled the current general apathy within the AAS and aided the opening of the floodgates in terms of the disastrous lighting situation now upon us in terms of drowning out the night sky. There are possible solutions, and they need to be discussed and acted upon quickly. For example, the AAS should require that all members include a useful amount (say, \\$30) in annual membership fees to be directly transmitted to the International Dark Sky Association, and the AAS should make constant visible strides to educate the public and government officials of the absolute need to reduce outdoor lighting levels and to fully shield all outdoor lighting. There are many other areas of research into outdoor lighting that the AAS should fund or officially/strongly support, so that the astronomical community can better be educated (and can better educate the public) on the evils of bad and thoughtless outdoor-lighting practices; such research includes developing a comprehensive database of national statistics on numbers and types of different outdoor lamps, as a function of time (thus, historical), and also a comprehensive database including all local, state, and federal lighting laws and ordinances together with legal court cases (and their outcomes) involving outdoor night lighting. And professional

  4. Chinese Herbs Containing Aristolochic Acid Associated with Renal Failure and Urothelial Carcinoma: A Review from Epidemiologic Observations to Causal Inference

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Hsiao-Yu; Chen, Pau-Chung; Wang, Jung-Der

    2014-01-01

    Herbal remedies containing aristolochic acid (AA) have been designated to be a strong carcinogen. This review summarizes major epidemiologic evidence to argue for the causal association between AA exposure and urothelial carcinoma as well as nephropathy. The exposure scenarios include the following: Belgian women taking slimming pills containing single material Guang Fang Ji, consumptions of mixtures of Chinese herbal products in the general population and patients with chronic renal failure in Taiwan, occupational exposure in Chinese herbalists, and food contamination in farming villages in valleys of the Danube River. Such an association is corroborated by detecting specific DNA adducts in the tumor tissue removed from affected patients. Preventive actions of banning such use and education to the healthcare professionals and public are necessary for the safety of herbal remedies. PMID:25431765

  5. Effects of Dimethylaminoethanol and Compound Amino Acid on D-Galactose Induced Skin Aging Model of Rat

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Su; Chen, Zhenyu; Cai, Xia; Sun, Ying; Zhao, Cailing

    2014-01-01

    A lasting dream of human beings is to reverse or postpone aging. In this study, dimethylaminoethanol (DMAE) and compound amino acid (AA) in Mesotherapy were investigated for their potential antiaging effects on D-galactose induced aging skin. At 18 days after D-gal induction, each rat was treated with intradermal microinjection of saline, AA, 0.1% DMAE, 0.2% DMAE, 0.1% DMAE + AA, or 0.2% DMAE + AA, respectively. At 42 days after treatment, the skin wound was harvested and assayed. Measurement of epidermal and dermal thickness in 0.1% DMAE + AA and 0.2% DMAE + AA groups appeared significantly thicker than aging control rats. No differences were found in tissue water content among groups. Hydroxyproline in 0.1% DMAE + AA, 0.2% DMAE + AA, and sham control groups was much higher than all other groups. Collagen type I, type III, and MMP-1 expression was highly upregulated in both 0.1% DMAE + AA and 0.2% DMAE + AA groups compared with aging control. In contrast, TIMP-1 expression levels of various aging groups were significantly reduced when compared to sham control. Coinjection of DMAE and AA into target tissue has marked antiaging effects on D-galactose induced skin aging model of rat. PMID:25133239

  6. Effects of dimethylaminoethanol and compound amino acid on D-galactose induced skin aging model of rat.

    PubMed

    Liu, Su; Chen, Zhenyu; Cai, Xia; Sun, Ying; Zhao, Cailing; Liu, Fangjun; Liu, Dalie

    2014-01-01

    A lasting dream of human beings is to reverse or postpone aging. In this study, dimethylaminoethanol (DMAE) and compound amino acid (AA) in Mesotherapy were investigated for their potential antiaging effects on D-galactose induced aging skin. At 18 days after D-gal induction, each rat was treated with intradermal microinjection of saline, AA, 0.1% DMAE, 0.2% DMAE, 0.1% DMAE + AA, or 0.2% DMAE + AA, respectively. At 42 days after treatment, the skin wound was harvested and assayed. Measurement of epidermal and dermal thickness in 0.1% DMAE + AA and 0.2% DMAE + AA groups appeared significantly thicker than aging control rats. No differences were found in tissue water content among groups. Hydroxyproline in 0.1% DMAE + AA, 0.2% DMAE + AA, and sham control groups was much higher than all other groups. Collagen type I, type III, and MMP-1 expression was highly upregulated in both 0.1% DMAE + AA and 0.2% DMAE + AA groups compared with aging control. In contrast, TIMP-1 expression levels of various aging groups were significantly reduced when compared to sham control. Coinjection of DMAE and AA into target tissue has marked antiaging effects on D-galactose induced skin aging model of rat. PMID:25133239

  7. Amino Acid Polymorphisms in Hepatitis C Virus Core Affect Infectious Virus Production and Major Histocompatibility Complex Class I Molecule Expression.

    PubMed

    Tasaka-Fujita, Megumi; Sugiyama, Nao; Kang, Wonseok; Masaki, Takahiro; Masaski, Takahiro; Murayama, Asako; Yamada, Norie; Sugiyama, Ryuichi; Tsukuda, Senko; Watashi, Koichi; Asahina, Yasuhiro; Sakamoto, Naoya; Wakita, Takaji; Shin, Eui-Cheol; Kato, Takanobu

    2015-01-01

    Amino acid (aa) polymorphisms in the hepatitis C virus (HCV) genotype 1b core protein have been reported to be a potent predictor for poor response to interferon (IFN)-based therapy and a risk factor for hepatocarcinogenesis. We investigated the effects of these polymorphisms with genotype 1b/2a chimeric viruses that contained polymorphisms of Arg/Gln at aa 70 and Leu/Met at aa 91. We found that infectious virus production was reduced in cells transfected with chimeric virus RNA that had Gln at aa 70 (aa70Q) compared with RNA with Arg at aa 70 (aa70R). Using flow cytometry analysis, we confirmed that HCV core protein accumulated in aa70Q clone transfected cells, and it caused a reduction in cell-surface expression of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I molecules induced by IFN treatment through enhanced protein kinase R phosphorylation. We could not detect any effects due to the polymorphism at aa 91. In conclusion, the polymorphism at aa 70 was associated with efficiency of infectious virus production, and this deteriorated virus production in strains with aa70Q resulted in the intracellular accumulation of HCV proteins and attenuation of MHC class I molecule expression. These observations may explain the strain-associated resistance to IFN-based therapy and hepatocarcinogenesis of HCV. PMID:26365522

  8. Anthranilic Acid: A Potential Biomarker and Treatment Target for Schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Oxenkrug, Gregory; van der Hart, Marieke; Roeser, Julien; Summergrad, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Dysregulation of Trp-Kyn pathway is the most recent hypothesis of mechanisms of schizophrenia. In particular, over-production of kynurenic acid (KYNA), one of the three immediate downstream metabolites of kynurenine (Kyn) along tryptophan (Trp): Kyn pathway, has been considered as a new target for therapeutic intervention in schizophrenia. Up-regulation of KYNA formation was suggested to occur at the expense of down-regulated production of 3-hydroxyKyn (3-HK), the second immediate downstream metabolite of Kyn. We were interested to assess the third immediate downstream Kyn metabolite, anthranilic acid (AA). Serum AA concentrations were evaluated in schizophrenia patients and control subjects by HPLC-mass spectrometry method. We found 2-fold increase of AA and 3-fold decrease of 3-HK concentrations in serum of schizophrenia patients. Up regulated formation of AA might contribute to mechanisms of schizophrenia considering experimental evidences of AA augmentation of autoimmune processes in rat and mice; clinical findings of AA elevation in rheumatoid arthritis and type 1 diabetes, autoimmune diseases diametrical to schizophrenia; and involvement of autoimmunity in development of schizophrenia. Present data warrant further studies of AA as biological marker in, at least, a subgroup (associated with autoimmune mechanisms) of schizophrenia patients and as a new target for therapeutic intervention. PMID:27042691

  9. Laboratory study on the behaviour of spent AA household alkaline batteries in incineration

    SciTech Connect

    Almeida, Manuel F. Xara, Susana M.; Delgado, Julanda; Costa, Carlos A.

    2009-01-15

    The quantitative evaluation of emissions from incineration is essential when Life Cycle Assessment (LCA) studies consider this process as an end-of-life solution for some wastes. Thus, the objective of this work is to quantify the main gaseous emissions produced when spent AA alkaline batteries are incinerated. With this aim, batteries were kept for 1 h at 1273 K in a refractory steel tube hold in a horizontal electric furnace with temperature control. At one end of the refractory steel tube, a constant air flow input assures the presence of oxygen in the atmosphere and guides the gaseous emissions to a filter system followed by a set of two bubbler flasks having an aqueous solution of 10% (v/v) nitric acid. After each set of experiments, sulphur, chlorides and metals (As, Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Fe, Hg, Mn, Ni, Pb, Sb, Tl and Zn) were analyzed in both the solutions obtained from the steel tube washing and from the bubblers. Sulphur, chlorides and metals were quantified, respectively, using barium sulfate gravimetry, the Volhard method and atomic absorption spectrometry (AAS). The emissions of zinc, the most emitted metal, represent about 6.5% of the zinc content in the batteries. Emissions of manganese (whose oxide is the main component of the cathode) and iron (from the cathode collector) are negligible when compared with their amount in AA alkaline batteries. Mercury is the metal with higher volatility in the composition of the batteries and was collected even in the second bubbler flask. The amount of chlorides collected corresponds to about 36% of the chlorine in the battery sleeve that is made from PVC. A considerable part of the HCl formed in PVC plastic sleeve incineration is neutralized with KOH, zinc and manganese oxides and, thus, it is not totally released in the gas. Some of the emissions are predictable through a thermodynamic data analysis at temperatures in the range of 1200-1300 K taking into account the composition of the batteries. This analysis was done

  10. Laboratory study on the behaviour of spent AA household alkaline batteries in incineration.

    PubMed

    Almeida, Manuel F; Xará, Susana M; Delgado, Julanda; Costa, Carlos A

    2009-01-01

    The quantitative evaluation of emissions from incineration is essential when Life Cycle Assessment (LCA) studies consider this process as an end-of-life solution for some wastes. Thus, the objective of this work is to quantify the main gaseous emissions produced when spent AA alkaline batteries are incinerated. With this aim, batteries were kept for 1h at 1273K in a refractory steel tube hold in a horizontal electric furnace with temperature control. At one end of the refractory steel tube, a constant air flow input assures the presence of oxygen in the atmosphere and guides the gaseous emissions to a filter system followed by a set of two bubbler flasks having an aqueous solution of 10% (v/v) nitric acid. After each set of experiments, sulphur, chlorides and metals (As, Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Fe, Hg, Mn, Ni, Pb, Sb, Tl and Zn) were analyzed in both the solutions obtained from the steel tube washing and from the bubblers. Sulphur, chlorides and metals were quantified, respectively, using barium sulfate gravimetry, the Volhard method and atomic absorption spectrometry (AAS). The emissions of zinc, the most emitted metal, represent about 6.5% of the zinc content in the batteries. Emissions of manganese (whose oxide is the main component of the cathode) and iron (from the cathode collector) are negligible when compared with their amount in AA alkaline batteries. Mercury is the metal with higher volatility in the composition of the batteries and was collected even in the second bubbler flask. The amount of chlorides collected corresponds to about 36% of the chlorine in the battery sleeve that is made from PVC. A considerable part of the HCl formed in PVC plastic sleeve incineration is neutralized with KOH, zinc and manganese oxides and, thus, it is not totally released in the gas. Some of the emissions are predictable through a thermodynamic data analysis at temperatures in the range of 1200-1300K taking into account the composition of the batteries. This analysis was done

  11. Long noncoding RNA HIF1A-AS1A reduces apoptosis of vascular smooth muscle cells: implications for the pathogenesis of thoracoabdominal aorta aneurysm.

    PubMed

    He, Qing; Tan, Jinyun; Yu, Bo; Shi, Weihao; Liang, Kun

    2015-05-01

    Long non-coding RNAs (IncRNAs) play important roles in various biological processes, such as transcriptional regulation, cell growth and tumorigenesis. However, little is known about the role of IncRNA HIF 1 alpha-antisense RNA 1 (HIF1a-AS1) in regulating the proliferation and apoptosis of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) and the expression of HIF1a-AS1 in serum of thoracoabdominal aortic aneurysm (TAAA) patients. The cell viability was detected by the CCK8 assay. The cell apoptosis was assessed by annexin V-PI double-labeling staining. Expression of genes and proteins were analyzed by real-time PCR and western blotting, respectively. Cells were transfected with siRNAs as a gene silencing method. In serum of TAAA patients, the expression of HIF1a-AS1 was significantly increased (superior to 6-fold) compared to the normal control. Moreover, Palmitic acid (PA) induced cell apoptosis in VSMCs in a time- and dose-dependent manner, and the proportion of the apoptotic cells had gained as compared to untreatment group. PA also induced up-regulation expression of HIF1a-AS1. We also found that transfection of cells with HIF1a-AS1 siRNA decreased the expression of caspase-3 and caspase-8 and increased the expression of Bcl2, and protected PA-induced cell apoptosis in VSMCs. HIF1a-AS1 was overexpressed in the TAAA and the interaction between HIF1a-AS1 and apoptotic proteins plays a key role in the proliferation and apoptosis of VSMCs in vitro, which may contribute to the pathogenesis of TAAA. PMID:26062299

  12. In the brain of mice, 3-iodothyronamine (T1AM) is converted into 3-iodothyroacetic acid (TA1) and it is included within the signaling network connecting thyroid hormone metabolites with histamine.

    PubMed

    Laurino, Annunziatina; De Siena, Gaetano; Saba, Alessandro; Chiellini, Grazia; Landucci, Elisa; Zucchi, Riccardo; Raimondi, Laura

    2015-08-15

    3-iodothyronamine (T1AM) and its oxidative product, 3-iodotyhyroacetic acid (TTA1A), are known to stimulate learning and induce hyperalgesia in mice. We investigated whether i)TA1 may be generated in vivo from T1AM, ii) T1AM shares with TA1 the ability to activate the histaminergic system. Tandem mass spectrometry was used to measure TA1 and T1AM levels in i) the brain of mice following intracerebroventricular (i.c.v.) injection of T1AM (11μgkg(-1)), with or without pretreatment with clorgyline, (2.5mgkg(-1) i.p.), a monoamine oxidase inhibitor; ii) the medium of organotypic hippocampal slices exposed to T1AM (50nM). In addition, learning and pain threshold were evaluated by the light-dark box task and the hot plate test, respectively, in mice pre-treated subcutaneously with pyrilamine (10mgkg(-1)) or zolantidine (5mgkg(-1)), 20min before i.c.v. injection of T1AM (1.32 and 11μgkg(-1)). T1AM-induced hyperalgesia (1.32 and 11μgkg(-1)) was also evaluated in histidine decarboxylase (HDC(-/-)) mice. T1AM and TA1 brain levels increased in parallel in mice injected with T1AM with the TA1/T1AM averaging 1.7%. Clorgyline pre-treatment reduced the increase in both T1AM and TA1. TA1 was the main T1AM metabolite detected in the hippocampal preparations. Pretreatment with pyrilamine or zolantidine prevented the pro-learning effect of 1.32 and 4μgkg(-1) T1AM while hyperalgesia was conserved at the dose of 11μgkg(-1) T1AM. T1AM failed to induce hyperalgesia in HDC(-/-) mice at all the doses. In conclusion, TA1 generated from T1AM, but also T1AM, appears to act by modulating the histaminergic system. PMID:25941083

  13. STEREOLOGICAL ESTIMATES OF THE BASAL FOREBRAIN CELL POPULATION IN THE RAT, INCLUDING NEURONS CONTAINING CHOLINE ACETYLTRANSFERASE (ChAT), GLUTAMIC ACID DECARBOXYLASE (GAD) OR PHOSPHATE-ACTIVATED GLUTAMINASE (PAG) AND COLOCALIZING VESICULAR GLUTAMATE TRANSPORTERS (VGluTs)

    PubMed Central

    GRITTI, I.; HENNY, P.; GALLONI, F.; MAINVILLE, L.; MARIOTTI, M.; JONES, B. E.

    2006-01-01

    The basal forebrain (BF) plays an important role in modulating cortical activity and influencing attention, learning and memory. These activities are fulfilled importantly yet not entirely by cholinergic neurons. Noncholinergic neurons also contribute and are comprised by GABAergic neurons and other possibly glutamatergic neurons. The aim of the present study was to estimate the total number of cells in the BF of the rat and the proportions of that total represented by cholinergic, GABAergic and glutamatergic neurons. For this purpose, cells were counted using unbiased stereological methods within the medial septum, diagonal band, magnocellular preoptic nucleus, substantia innominata and globus pallidus in sections stained for Nissl substance and/or the neurotransmitter enzymes, choline acetyltransferase (ChAT), glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD) or phosphate-activated glutaminase (PAG). In Nissl-stained sections, the total number of neurons in the BF was estimated as ~355,000 and the numbers of ChAT-immuno-positive (+) as ~22,000, GAD+ ~119,000 and PAG+ ~316,000, corresponding to ~5%, ~35% and ~90% of the total. Thus, of the large population of BF neurons, only a small proportion has the capacity to synthesize acetylcholine (ACh), one third to synthesize GABA and the vast majority to synthesize glutamate (Glu). Moreover, through the presence of PAG, a proportion of ACh- and GABA-synthesizing neurons also have the capacity to synthesize Glu. In sections dual fluorescent immunostained for vesicular transporters, VGluT3 and not VGluT2 was present in the cell bodies of most PAG+ and ChAT+ and half the GAD+ cells. Given previous results showing that VGluT2 and not VGluT3 was present in BF axon terminals and not colocalized with VAChT or VGAT, we conclude that the BF cell population influences cortical and subcortical regions through neurons which release ACh, GABA or Glu from their terminals but which in part can also synthesize and release Glu from their soma or

  14. Analysis of cytochrome P450 metabolites of arachidonic acid by stable isotope probe labeling coupled with ultra high-performance liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Quan-Fei; Hao, Yan-Hong; Liu, Ming-Zhou; Yue, Jiang; Ni, Jian; Yuan, Bi-Feng; Feng, Yu-Qi

    2015-09-01

    Cytochrome P450 metabolites of arachidonic acid (AA) belong to eicosanoids and are potent lipid mediators of inflammation. It is well-known that eicosanoids play an important role in numerous pathophysiological processes. Therefore, quantitative analysis of cytochrome P450 metabolites of AA, including hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acids (HETEs), epoxyeicosatreinoic acids (EETs), and dihydroxyeicosatrienoic acids (DHETs) can provide crucial information to uncover underlying mechanisms of cytochrome P450 metabolites of AA related diseases. Herein, we developed a highly sensitive method to identify and quantify HETEs, EETs, and DHETs in lipid extracts of biological samples based on stable isotope probe labeling coupled with ultra high-performance liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry. To this end, a pair of stable isotope probes, 2-dimethylaminoethylamine (DMED) and d4-2-dimethylaminoethylamine (d4-DMED), were utilized to facilely label eicosanoids. The heavy labeled eicosanoid standards were prepared and used as internal standards for quantification to minimize the matrix and ion suppression effects in mass spectrometry analysis. In addition, the detection sensitivities of DMED labeled eicosanoids improved by 3-104 folds in standard solution and 5-138 folds in serum matrix compared with unlabeled analytes. Moreover, a good separation of eicosanoids isomers was achieved upon DMED labeling. The established method provided substantial sensitivity (limit of quantification at sub-picogram), high specificity, and broad linear dynamics range (3 orders of magnitude). We further quantified cytochrome P450 metabolites of AA in rat liver, heart, brain tissues and human serum using the developed method. The results showed that 19 eicosanoids could be distinctly detected and the contents of 11-, 15-, 16-, 20-HETE, 5,6-EET, and 14,15-EET in type 2 diabetes mellitus patients and 5-, 11-, 12-, 15-, 16-, 20-HETE, 8,9-EET, and 5,6-DHET in myeloid leukemia patients had significant changes

  15. How Do Haloarchaea Synthesize Aromatic Amino Acids?

    PubMed Central

    Gulko, Miriam Kolog; Dyall-Smith, Mike; Gonzalez, Orland; Oesterhelt, Dieter

    2014-01-01

    Genomic analysis of H. salinarum indicated that the de novo pathway for aromatic amino acid (AroAA) biosynthesis does not follow the classical pathway but begins from non-classical precursors, as is the case for M. jannaschii. The first two steps in the pathway were predicted to be carried out by genes OE1472F and OE1475F, while the 3rd step follows the canonical pathway involving gene OE1477R. The functions of these genes and their products were tested by biochemical and genetic methods. In this study, we provide evidence that supports the role of proteins OE1472F and OE1475F catalyzing consecutive enzymatic reactions leading to the production of 3-dehydroquinate (DHQ), after which AroAA production proceeds via the canonical pathway starting with the formation of DHS (dehydroshikimate), catalyzed by the product of ORF OE1477R. Nutritional requirements and AroAA uptake studies of the mutants gave results that were consistent with the proposed roles of these ORFs in AroAA biosynthesis. DNA microarray data indicated that the 13 genes of the canonical pathway appear to be utilised for AroAA biosynthesis in H. salinarum, as they are differentially expressed when cells are grown in medium lacking AroAA. PMID:25216252

  16. Folic acid - test

    MedlinePlus

    ... folic acid measurements include: Alcohol Aminosalicylic acid Birth control pills Estrogens Tetracyclines Ampicillin Chloramphenicol Erythromycin Methotrexate Penicillin Aminopterin Phenobarbital Phenytoin Drugs to treat malaria

  17. Oxalic acid poisoning

    MedlinePlus

    Symptoms of oxalic acid poisoning include: Abdominal pain Burns and blisters where the acid contacted the skin Collapse Convulsions Mouth pain Shock Throat pain Tremors (unintentional trembling) Vomiting

  18. Quantitation of Aristolochic Acids in Corn, Wheat Grain, and Soil Samples Collected in Serbia: Identifying a Novel Exposure Pathway in the Etiology of Balkan Endemic Nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Chan, Wan; Pavlović, Nikola M; Li, Weiwei; Chan, Chi-Kong; Liu, Jingjing; Deng, Kailin; Wang, Yinan; Milosavljević, Biljana; Kostić, Emina N

    2016-07-27

    While to date investigations provided convincing evidence on the role of aristolochic acids (AAs) in the etiology of Balkan endemic nephropathy (BEN) and upper urothelial cancer (UUC), the exposure pathways by which AAs enter human bodies to cause BEN and UUC remain obscure. The goal of this study is to test the hypothesis that environmental pollution by AAs and root uptake of AAs in the polluted soil may be one of the pathways by which AAs enter the human food chain. The hypothesis driving this study was that the decay of Aristolochia clematitis L., a AA-containing herbaceous plant that is found growing widespread in the endemic regions, could release free AAs to the soil, which could be taken up by food crops growing nearby, thereby transferring this potent human nephrotoxin and carcinogen into their edible parts. Using the highly sensitive and selective high-performance liquid chromatography coupled with fluorescence detection method, we identified and quantitated in this study for the first time AAs in corn, wheat grain, and soil samples collected from the endemic village Kutles in Serbia. Our results provide the first direct evidence that food crops and soil in the Balkans are contaminated with AAs. It is possible that the presence of AAs in edible parts of crops originating from the AA-contaminated soil could be one of the major pathways by which humans become exposed to AAs. PMID:27362729

  19. Genome of brown tide virus (AaV), the little giant of the Megaviridae, elucidates NCLDV genome expansion and host-virus coevolution.

    PubMed

    Moniruzzaman, Mohammad; LeCleir, Gary R; Brown, Christopher M; Gobler, Christopher J; Bidle, Kay D; Wilson, William H; Wilhelm, Steven W

    2014-10-01

    Aureococcus anophagefferens causes economically and ecologically destructive "brown tides" in the United States, China and South Africa. Here we report the 370,920bp genomic sequence of AaV, a virus capable of infecting and lysing A. anophagefferens. AaV is a member of the nucleocytoplasmic large DNA virus (NCLDV) group, harboring 377 putative coding sequences and 8 tRNAs. Despite being an algal virus, AaV shows no phylogenetic affinity to the Phycodnaviridae family, to which most algae-infecting viruses belong. Core gene phylogenies, shared gene content and genome-wide similarities suggest AaV is the smallest member of the emerging clade "Megaviridae". The genomic architecture of AaV demonstrates that the ancestral virus had an even smaller genome, which expanded through gene duplication and assimilation of genes from diverse sources including the host itself - some of which probably modulate important host processes. AaV also harbors a number of genes exclusive to phycodnaviruses - reinforcing the hypothesis that Phycodna- and Mimiviridae share a common ancestor. PMID:25035289

  20. Arachidonic acid-mediated inhibition of a potassium current in the giant neurons of Aplysia

    SciTech Connect

    Carlson, R.O.

    1990-01-01

    Biochemical and electrophysiological approaches were used to investigate the role of arachidonic acid (AA) in the modulation of an inwardly rectifying potassium current (I{sub R}) in the giant neurons of the marine snail, Aplysia californica. Using ({sup 3}H)AA as tracer, the intracellular free AA pool in Aplysia ganglia was found to be in a state of constant and rapid turnover through deacylation and reacylation of phospholipid, primarily phosphatidyl-inositol. This constant turnover was accompanied by a constant release of free AA and eicosanoids into the extracellular medium. The effects of three pharmacological agents were characterized with regard to AA metabolism in Aplysia ganglia. 4-O-tetra-decanoylphorbol 13-acetate (TPA), an activator of protein kinase C, stimulated liberation of AA from phospholipid, and 4-bromophenacylbromide (BPB), an inhibitor of phospholipate A{sub 2}, inhibited this liberation. Indomethacin at 250 {mu}M was found to inhibit uptake of AA, likely through inhibition of acyl-CoA synthetase. These agents were also found to modulate I{sub R} in ways which were consistent with their biological effects: TPA inhibited I{sub R}, and both BPB and indomethacin stimulated I{sub R} . Modulation of I{sub R} by these substances was found not to involve cAMP metabolism. Acute application of exogenous AA did not affect I{sub R}; however, I{sub R} in giant neurons was found to be inhibited after dialysis with AA or other unsaturated fatty acids. Also, after perfusion with BSA overnight, a treatment which strips the giant neurons of AA in lipid storage, I{sub R} was found to have increased over 2-fold. This perfusion-induced increase was inhibited by the presence of AA or by pretreatment of the giant neurons with BPB. These results suggest AA, provided through constant turnover from phospholipid, mediates constitutive inhibition of I{sub R}.

  1. High-Resolution Electrospray Ionization/Ion Mobility Spectrometer for Detection of Abiotic Amino Acids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beegle, L. W.; Terrell, C. A.; Kim, H.; Kanik, I.

    2003-01-01

    One of the primary goals of the current NASA thrust in Astrobiology is the detection and identification of organic molecules as part of an in-situ lander platform on the surface of Mars or Europa. The identification of these molecules should help determine whether indigenous organisms exist on the surface of Mars or in an undersea environment on Europa. In addition, a detailed organic chemical inventory of surface and near surface molecules will help elucidate the possibilities of life elsewhere in the Universe. Terrestrial life has, as its backbone, the family of molecules known as the amino acids (AA), and while AA can be found in the terrestrial environments as part of more complex molecules, such as peptides, and proteins, they also exist as individual molecules due to of the hydrolyses of biopolymers. In terrestrial biochemistry, there are 20 principal amino acids which are necessary for life. However, some forms of these molecules can be found in nature synthesized via abiotic process. For example, they are known to exist extraterrestrially as a component of carbonaceous meteorites. The idea that amino acids are readily created by abiotic means has been demonstrated by their positive identification in the Murchison CM2 meteorite, which fell in 1969. This meteorite was analyzed before contamination by terrestrial microbes could result. Three laboratories individually tested parts of the meteorite and concluded that the amino acids present in them were indigenous to the meteorite because, among other reasons, they had equal L- and D- enantiomers. Final identification of the constituents of the Murchison included 33 amino acids which have no known biotic source, 11 amino acids which have limited distribution and 8 (Glycine, Alanine, Valine, Proline, Leucine, Isoleucine, Aspartic Acid, and Glutamic Acid), which readily occur in terrestrial proteins.

  2. The use of amino acid analyses in (palaeo-) limnological investigations: A comparative study of four Indian lakes in different climate regimes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menzel, Philip; Anupama, Krishnamurthy; Basavaiah, Nathani; Das, Brijraj Krishna; Gaye, Birgit; Herrmann, Nicole; Prasad, Sushma

    2015-07-01

    In the present study, we report the results of comprehensive amino acid (AA) analyses of four Indian lakes from different climate regimes. We focus on the investigation of sediment cores retrieved from the lakes but data of modern sediment as well as vascular plant, soil, and suspended particulate matter samples from individual lakes are also presented. Commonly used degradation and organic matter source indices are tested for their applicability to the lake sediments, and we discuss potential reasons for possible limitations. A principal component analysis including the monomeric AA composition of organic matter of all analysed samples indicates that differences in organic matter sources and the environmental properties of the individual lakes are responsible for the major variability in monomeric AA distribution of the different samples. However, the PCA also gives a factor that most probably separates the samples according to their state of organic matter degradation. Using the factor loadings of the individual AA monomers, we calculate a lake sediment degradation index (LI) that might be applicable to other palaeo-lake investigations.

  3. Ascorbic acid ameliorates oxidative stress and inflammation in dextran sulfate sodium-induced ulcerative colitis in mice.

    PubMed

    Yan, Haiyan; Wang, Hongjuan; Zhang, Xiaoli; Li, Xiaoqin; Yu, Jing

    2015-01-01

    Ascorbic acid (AA) has been shown to exert beneficial effects, including mitigating oxidative stress and inhibiting inflammation. However, the preventative effect of vitamin C in chronic inflammatory diseases such as inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) remains unclear. In our study, we investigated the anti-inflammatory effects of AA and possible mechanism involved in inhibiting dextran sulfate sodium (DSS)-induced ulcerative colitis in mice. Male C57BL/6 mice were randomly divided to three groups: control group, DSS group, and DSS plus ascorbic acid treated group. Several clinical and inflammatory parameters as well as oxidative stress were evaluated. The results demonstrated that ascorbic acid significantly reduced clinical signs, inflammatory cytokines, myeloperoxidase (MPO) and malonaldehyde (MDA) activities, whereas the activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT) and glutathione peroxidase (GPx) were increased in DSS-induced mice. In addition, ascorbic acid was capable of inhibiting NF-κB, COX-2 and iNOS expression in the colonic. Taken together, these findings suggest that ascorbic acid contributes to the reduction of oxidative stress and inflammatory response in DSS-induced colitis and exerts the potential to prevent and clinical treatment of inflammatory bowel disease. PMID:26884937

  4. Ascorbic acid ameliorates oxidative stress and inflammation in dextran sulfate sodium-induced ulcerative colitis in mice

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Haiyan; Wang, Hongjuan; Zhang, Xiaoli; Li, Xiaoqin; Yu, Jing

    2015-01-01

    Ascorbic acid (AA) has been shown to exert beneficial effects, including mitigating oxidative stress and inhibiting inflammation. However, the preventative effect of vitamin C in chronic inflammatory diseases such as inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) remains unclear. In our study, we investigated the anti-inflammatory effects of AA and possible mechanism involved in inhibiting dextran sulfate sodium (DSS)-induced ulcerative colitis in mice. Male C57BL/6 mice were randomly divided to three groups: control group, DSS group, and DSS plus ascorbic acid treated group. Several clinical and inflammatory parameters as well as oxidative stress were evaluated. The results demonstrated that ascorbic acid significantly reduced clinical signs, inflammatory cytokines, myeloperoxidase (MPO) and malonaldehyde (MDA) activities, whereas the activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT) and glutathione peroxidase (GPx) were increased in DSS-induced mice. In addition, ascorbic acid was capable of inhibiting NF-κB, COX-2 and iNOS expression in the colonic. Taken together, these findings suggest that ascorbic acid contributes to the reduction of oxidative stress and inflammatory response in DSS-induced colitis and exerts the potential to prevent and clinical treatment of inflammatory bowel disease. PMID:26884937

  5. Observations of AA Tau requested to schedule XMM-Newton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waagen, Elizabeth O.

    2013-08-01

    Dr. Hans Moritz Guenther (Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics) has requested nightly observations of the classical T Tauri star AA Tau in order to schedule x-ray observations with XMM-Newton that have been planned for between 2013 August 15 and September 15. The purpose of the AAVSO observations is to determine whether AA Tau is at a suitable magnitude for the satellite observations. Taurus is difficult to observe during this time period but that is exactly why AAVSO assistance is needed! AA Tau is a morning object, and also, many of the professional ground-based telescopes are offline because of the US southwest monsoon season. Since it is critical to know the brightness of AA Tau, AAVSO observations will be truly essential. Nightly visual and snapshot (not more than once per night) observations beginning now and continuing through September 20 are needed. Coverage beginning ahead of the XMM window is requested because there is a one- to two-week lead time for the target to be inserted into the telescope schedule. Continuing the nightly observations a few days beyond the end of the XMM window will give better optical context for the x-ray data. AA Tau ranges between ~12.8V and ~16.1V; since December 2011 or earlier it has been at ~14.5V. The most recent observation in the AAVSO International Database shows it at 14.779V on 2013 Feb 5 (J. Roe, Bourbon, MO). Dr. Guenther writes, "AA Tau is surrounded by a thick accretion disk which is seen nearly edge-on. For decades the light curve of AA Tau showed regular eclipsing events when the accretion funnel rotated through the line of sight. However, earlier this year J. Bouvier and his group found that this behavior changed dramatically: AA Tau now seems to be deeply absorbed all the time (V band 14.5 mag). In collaboration with this group we will perform X-ray observations of AA Tau with the XMM-Newton satellite." Finder charts with sequence may be created using the AAVSO Variable Star Plo! tter (http

  6. The AaDREB1 Transcription Factor from the Cold-Tolerant Plant Adonis amurensis Enhances Abiotic Stress Tolerance in Transgenic Plant

    PubMed Central

    Zong, Jun-Mei; Li, Xiao-Wei; Zhou, Yuan-Hang; Wang, Fa-Wei; Wang, Nan; Dong, Yuan-Yuan; Yuan, Yan-Xi; Chen, Huan; Liu, Xiu-Ming; Yao, Na; Li, Hai-Yan

    2016-01-01

    Dehydration-responsive element binding (DREB) transcription factors (TFs) play important roles in the regulation of plant resistance to environmental stresses and can specifically bind to dehydration-responsive element/C-repeat element (DRE/CRT) proteins (G/ACCGAC) and activate expression of many stress-inducible genes. Here, we cloned and characterized a novel gene (AaDREB1) encoding the DREB1 transcription factor from the cold-tolerant plant Adonis amurensis. Quantitative real-time (qRT)-PCR results indicated that AaDREB1 expression was induced by salt, drought, cold stress, and abscisic acid application. A yeast one-hybrid assay demonstrated that AaDREB1 encodes a transcription activator and specifically binds to DRE/CRT. Furthermore, transgenic Arabidopsis and rice harboring AaDREB1 showed enhanced tolerance to salt, drought, and low temperature. These results indicated that AaDREB1 might be useful in genetic engineering to improve plant stress tolerance. PMID:27110776

  7. Evaluation of a generalized use of the log Sum(k+1)AA descriptor in a QSRR model to predict peptide retention on RPLC systems.

    PubMed

    Bodzioch, Karolina; Dejaegher, Bieke; Baczek, Tomasz; Kaliszan, Roman; Vander Heyden, Yvan

    2009-06-01

    At the current state of knowledge, the rational optimization of the chromatographic separation of peptides, as well as the identification of proteins in proteomics are challenges for analytical chemists. In this paper the generalized applicability of a recently derived descriptor log Sum(k+1)AA in a QSRR equation to model peptide retention in RP-LC systems was evaluated. For that purpose, two sets of peptides analyzed on dissimilar RP-LC systems were considered. A first set of 28 peptides was measured on 17 columns/systems, while a second of 70 peptides was eluted on four. The aim of this work was to confirm the usefulness of the partly experimental log Sum(k+1)AA descriptor for the prediction of peptides retention compared to the initially applied, fully experimental log SumAA descriptor. The verification of the predictive abilities of both QSRR models, applying either the initial or the alternative descriptor, was done by using the leave-one-out and leave-three-out cross-validation procedures. The results seem to demonstrate that the QSRR model with log Sum(k+1)AA, for which the retention measurement of only seven out of 20 existing amino acids is necessary, possesses similar or in some cases even better predictive abilities than that containing log SumAA. PMID:19479750

  8. The AaDREB1 Transcription Factor from the Cold-Tolerant Plant Adonis amurensis Enhances Abiotic Stress Tolerance in Transgenic Plant.

    PubMed

    Zong, Jun-Mei; Li, Xiao-Wei; Zhou, Yuan-Hang; Wang, Fa-Wei; Wang, Nan; Dong, Yuan-Yuan; Yuan, Yan-Xi; Chen, Huan; Liu, Xiu-Ming; Yao, Na; Li, Hai-Yan

    2016-01-01

    Dehydration-responsive element binding (DREB) transcription factors (TFs) play important roles in the regulation of plant resistance to environmental stresses and can specifically bind to dehydration-responsive element/C-repeat element (DRE/CRT) proteins (G/ACCGAC) and activate expression of many stress-inducible genes. Here, we cloned and characterized a novel gene (AaDREB1) encoding the DREB1 transcription factor from the cold-tolerant plant Adonis amurensis. Quantitative real-time (qRT)-PCR results indicated that AaDREB1 expression was induced by salt, drought, cold stress, and abscisic acid application. A yeast one-hybrid assay demonstrated that AaDREB1 encodes a transcription activator and specifically binds to DRE/CRT. Furthermore, transgenic Arabidopsis and rice harboring AaDREB1 showed enhanced tolerance to salt, drought, and low temperature. These results indicated that AaDREB1 might be useful in genetic engineering to improve plant stress tolerance. PMID:27110776

  9. Boramino acid as a marker for amino acid transporters

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Zhibo; Chen, Haojun; Chen, Kai; Shao, Yihan; Kiesewetter, Dale O.; Niu, Gang; Chen, Xiaoyuan

    2015-01-01

    Amino acid transporters (AATs) are a series of integral channels for uphill cellular uptake of nutrients and neurotransmitters. Abnormal expression of AATs is often associated with cancer, addiction, and multiple mental diseases. Although methods to evaluate in vivo expression of AATs would be highly useful, efforts to develop them have been hampered by a lack of appropriate tracers. We describe a new class of AA mimics—boramino acids (BAAs)—that can serve as general imaging probes for AATs. The structure of a BAA is identical to that of the corresponding natural AA, except for an exotic replacement of the carboxylate with -BF3−. Cellular studies demonstrate strong AAT-mediated cell uptake, and animal studies show high tumor-specific accumulation, suggesting that BAAs hold great promise for the development of new imaging probes and smart AAT-targeting drugs. PMID:26601275

  10. Acid rain

    SciTech Connect

    White, J.C. )

    1988-01-01

    This book presents the proceedings of the third annual conference sponsored by the Acid Rain Information Clearinghouse (ARIC). Topics covered include: Legal aspects of the source-receptor relationship: an energy perspective; Scientific uncertainty, agency inaction, and the courts; and Acid rain: the emerging legal framework.

  11. Solvent effect on anthranilic acid spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Abou-Zied, Osama K; Al-Busaidi, Badriya Y; Husband, John

    2014-01-01

    The spectroscopy of anthranilic acid (AA) was examined in neat and binary solvents of varying polarity and hydrogen bonding strength in order to understand the role of water in solvating the polar sites of the molecule. With the exception of water, the Stokes shift of AA in different solvents was found to be linearly correlated with the normalized molar transition energy of solvent polarity (ETN), indicating the major role of the hydrogen bonding effect in solution. Analysis of the absorption and fluorescence spectra reveals that AA exists as an anion in neutral water. The pKa (4.50) and pKa* (4.44) values were estimated from the spectral shift in the absorption and fluorescence spectra measured in different pH solutions. The shortest fluorescence lifetime was measured in cyclohexane and is attributed to intramolecular hydrogen dislocation/transfer in the excited state. The lifetime values in polar solvents point to the dominant effect of the hydrogen-bond donating strength (α value) of the solvent. The number of water molecules solvating the polar region of the neutral form of AA was estimated to be three from the absorbance change in dioxane/buffer (pH 3.5) binary mixtures. The structures of AA:water complexes were calculated from density functional theory using the B3LYP method with a 6-311++G(2d,p) basis set. A stepwise addition of water molecules (1–3) to the polar region of AA leads to a preferential solvation of the COOH group of the molecule in a closed-cyclic geometry. It is worth noting that the spectral shift as a function of pH suggests the suitability of AA as a probe to estimate the local acidity of binding sites in macromolecules in the pH range 3.0–7.0. PMID:24102373

  12. Quantitative analysis of texture evolution of cold-rolled direct-chill-cast and continuous-cast AA5052 and AA5182 aluminum alloys during isothermal annealing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Y. M.; Liu, W. C.; Morris, J. G.

    2004-11-01

    The as-received direct-chill-cast (DC) and continuous-cast (CC) AA5052 and AA5182 hot bands were preheated at 454 °C for 4 hours, followed by cold rolling to an 80 pct reduction in thickness. The texture evolution of these cold-rolled samples during isothermal annealing was investigated by X-ray diffraction. The variation in texture volume fractions with annealing time was quantitatively analyzed by using the Johnson-Mehl-Avrami-Kolmogorov (JMAK) equation. The differences in recrystallization textures between the AA5052 and AA5182 alloys and between the DC and CC alloys were compared. It was found that the AA5052 alloy possessed a stronger cube recrystallization texture than the AA5182 alloy for the DC and CC materials. The recrystallization textures of the AA5182 alloy were affected strongly by the annealing temperature. As the annealing temperature increased, the cube recrystallization texture strengthened, whereas the R texture weakened. The annealing temperature had little influence on the recrystallization textures of the AA5052 alloy. The DC AA5052 and 5182 alloys also exhibited stronger cube recrystallization textures than the corresponding CC alloys. For the DC and CC AA5052 alloys, the n value in the JMAK-type equation increased with an increase in the annealing temperature, while the n values varied only slightly with the annealing temperature for the DC and CC AA5182 alloys.

  13. Pretreatment of Gymnema sylvestre revealed the protection against acetic acid-induced ulcerative colitis in rats

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Overproduction of free radicals and decreased antioxidant capacity are well-known risk factors for inflammatory bowel diseases. Gymnema sylvestre (GS) leaves extract is distinguished for its anti-diabetic, antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties. Present study is designed to evaluate the preventative activities of GS against acetic acid (AA)-induced ulcerative colitis in Wistar rats. Methods Experimentally ulcerative colitis (UC) was induced by AA in animals pretreated with three different doses of GS leaves extract (50, 100, 200 mg/kg/day) and a single dose of mesalazine (MES, 300 mg/kg/day) for seven days. Twenty four hours later, animals were sacrificed and the colonic tissues were collected. Colonic mucus content was determined using Alcian blue dye binding technique. Levels of thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS), total glutathione sulfhydryl group (T-GSH) and non-protein sulfhydryl group (NPSH) as well as the activity of the antioxidant enzymes superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase (CAT) were estimated in colon tissues. Colonic nucleic acids (DNA and RNA) and total protein (TP) concentrations were also determined. Levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines including interleukin-1 beta (IL-1β), tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) and interleukin-6 (IL-6) as well as prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) and nitric oxide (NO) were estimated in colonic tissues. The histopathological changes of the colonic tissues were also observed. Results In AA administered group TBARS levels were increased, while colonic mucus content, T-GSH and NP-SH, SOD and CAT were reduced in colon. Pretreatment with GS inhibited TBARS elevation as well as mucus content, T-GSH and NP-SH reduction. Enzymatic activities of SOD and CAT were brought back to their normal levels in GS pretreated group. A significant reduction in DNA, RNA and TP levels was seen following AA administration and this inhibition was significantly eliminated by GS treatment. GS pretreatment also inhibited

  14. Effect of glycine supplementation in low protein diets with amino acids from soy protein isolate or free amino acids on broiler growth and nitrogen utilisation.

    PubMed

    Siegert, W; Wild, K J; Schollenberger, M; Helmbrecht, A; Rodehutscord, M

    2016-06-01

    Here, it was investigated whether substitution of amino acids (AA) from soy protein isolate with free AA in low crude protein diets influences the growth performance and N utilisation in broilers, and whether interactions with dietary glycine equivalent (Glyequi) concentration exist. Birds were distributed in two 2 × 2 factorial arrangements of 48 floor pens containing 10 birds each, plus 48 metabolism cages containing two birds each. Experimental feed was provided for ad libitum consumption from d 7 to 22. Diets contained either a soy protein isolate at 79 g/kg or a mix of free AA, which supplied the same amount of 18 proteinogenic AA. A mix of free glycine and l-serine was used to obtain low and high (12.0 and 20.5 g/kg dry matter) levels of dietary Glyequi. Substitution of soy protein isolate with free AA reduced the average daily gain and feed efficiency, mainly due to reduced feed intake. Efficiency of N accretion was not influenced by the AA source or Glyequi concentration on d 21, possibly due to the lower AA digestibility of soy protein isolate and higher urinary excretion of nitrogenous substances in the treatments with the AA mix. The average daily weight gain of the treatments with high Glyequi concentration was higher for both AA sources. This increase was due to higher average daily feed intake by broilers in the treatments with soy protein isolate and due to the increased feed efficiency in the treatments with the AA mix. Broilers exhibited different growth responses to dietary Glyequi between the AA sources; however, these responses could not be attributed to the different utilisation of Glyequi for uric acid synthesis. PMID:26955743

  15. Anger induced by interferon-alpha is moderated by ratio of arachidonic acid to omega-3 fatty acids

    PubMed Central

    Lotrich, Francis E.; Sears, Barry; McNamara, Robert K.

    2013-01-01

    Objective Anger worsens in some patients during interferon-alpha (IFN-α) therapy. Elevated anger has also been associated with lower long-chain omega-3 (LCn-3) fatty acid levels. We examined whether fatty acids could influence vulnerability to anger during IFN-α exposure. Methods Plasma arachidonic acid (AA), eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA), and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) levels were determined prior to IFN-α therapy by mass spectroscopy. Repeated-measure analyses examined the relationship between AA/EPA+DHA and the subsequent development of labile anger and irritability in 82 subjects who prospectively completed the Anger, Irritability, and Assault Questionnaire (AIAQ) during the first eight weeks of IFN-α therapy. Results Prior to IFN-α therapy, AA/EPA+DHA did not correlate with either labile anger or irritability. Pre-treatment AA/EPA+DHA did correlate with the subsequent maximal increase in labile anger during IFN-α therapy (r=0.33; p=0.005). Over time, labile anger increased more in subjects with above median AA/EPA+DHA ratios (p<0.05). Of the 17 subjects ultimately requiring psychiatric intervention for anger, 14/17 had above-median AA/EPA+DHA ratios (p=0.009). There was also an interaction with the tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) promoter polymorphism (A-308G), such that only those with both elevated AA/EPA+DHA and the A allele had increased labile anger (p=0.001). In an additional 18 subjects, we conversely observed that selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor treatment was associated with increased irritability during IFN-α therapy. Conclusion LCn-3 fatty acid status may influence anger development during exposure to elevated inflammatory cytokines, and may interact with genetic risk for increased brain TNF-α. LCn-3 supplements may be one strategy for minimizing this adverse side effect of IFN-α. PMID:24182638

  16. Amino Acid Metabolism Disorders

    MedlinePlus

    ... defects & other health conditions > Amino acid metabolism disorders Amino acid metabolism disorders E-mail to a friend Please ... baby’s newborn screening may include testing for certain amino acid metabolism disorders. These are rare health conditions that ...

  17. Chlamydia pneumoniae encodes a functional aromatic amino acid hydroxylase.

    PubMed

    Abromaitis, Stephanie; Hefty, P Scott; Stephens, Richard S

    2009-03-01

    Chlamydia pneumoniae is a community-acquired respiratory pathogen that has been associated with the development of atherosclerosis. Analysis of the C. pneumoniae genome identified a gene (Cpn1046) homologous to eukaryotic aromatic amino acid hydroxylases (AroAA-Hs). AroAA-Hs hydroxylate phenylalanine, tyrosine, and tryptophan into tyrosine, dihydroxyphenylalanine, and 5-hydroxytryptophan, respectively. Sequence analysis of Cpn1046 demonstrated that residues essential for AroAA-H enzymatic function are conserved and that a subset of Chlamydia species contain an AroAA-H homolog. The chlamydial AroAA-Hs are transcriptionally linked to a putative bacterial membrane transport protein. We determined that recombinant Cpn1046 is able to hydroxylate phenylalanine, tyrosine, and tryptophan with roughly equivalent activity for all three substrates. Cpn1046 is expressed within 24 h of infection, allowing C. pneumoniae to hydroxylate host stores of aromatic amino acids during the period of logarithmic bacterial growth. From these results we can conclude that C. pneumoniae, as well as a subset of other Chlamydia species, encode an AroAA-H that is able to use all three aromatic amino acids as substrates. The maintenance of this gene within a number of Chlamydia suggests that the enzyme may have an important role in shaping the metabolism or overall pathogenesis of these bacteria. PMID:19141112

  18. Hypothesis for the Mechanism of Ascorbic Acid Activity in Living Cells Related to Its Electron-Accepting Properties.

    PubMed

    Pshenichnyuk, Stanislav A; Modelli, Alberto; Lazneva, Eleonora F; Komolov, Alexei S

    2016-05-01

    Electron-accepting properties, and in particular resonance dissociative electron attachment (DEA) to ascorbic acid (AA), are investigated by means of DEA spectroscopy in vacuo. The experimental features are assigned in silico and discussed in relation to expected dissociative electron transfer processes in vivo with the support of density functional theory calculations and the polarizable continuum model. It is shown that formation of the two most abundant AA metabolites in living cells, namely monodehydroascorbic acid and dehydroascorbic acid, can be stimulated by cellular electron transfer to AA under reductive conditions. Prooxidant effects caused by AA are suggested to be mediated by hydroxyl radicals formation via the DEA mechanism. The involvement of excited electronic states under UV-irradiation in plants could open additional DEA channels leading to specific AA activity forbidden under dark state conditions. PMID:27074645

  19. Achievements and perspectives in yeast acetic acid-induced programmed cell death pathways.

    PubMed

    Guaragnella, Nicoletta; Antonacci, Lucia; Passarella, Salvatore; Marra, Ersilia; Giannattasio, Sergio

    2011-10-01

    The use of non-mammalian model organisms, including yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, can provide new insights into eukaryotic PCD (programmed cell death) pathways. In the present paper, we report recent achievements in the elucidation of the events leading to PCD that occur as a response to yeast treatment with AA (acetic acid). In particular, ROS (reactive oxygen species) generation, cyt c (cytochrome c) release and mitochondrial function and proteolytic activity will be dealt with as they vary along the AA-PCD time course by using both wild-type and mutant yeast cells. Two AA-PCD pathways are described sharing common features, but distinct from one another with respect to the role of ROS and mitochondria, the former in which YCA1 acts upstream of cyt c release and caspase-like activation in a ROS-dependent manner and the latter in which cyt c release does not occur, but caspase-like activity increases, in a ROS-independent manner. PMID:21936848

  20. Accumulation of arachidonic acid-containing phosphatidylinositol at the outer edge of colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Hiraide, Takanori; Ikegami, Koji; Sakaguchi, Takanori; Morita, Yoshifumi; Hayasaka, Takahiro; Masaki, Noritaka; Waki, Michihiko; Sugiyama, Eiji; Shinriki, Satoru; Takeda, Makoto; Shibasaki, Yasushi; Miyazaki, Shinichiro; Kikuchi, Hirotoshi; Okuyama, Hiroaki; Inoue, Masahiro; Setou, Mitsutoshi; Konno, Hiroyuki

    2016-01-01

    Accumulating evidence indicates that cancer cells show specific alterations in phospholipid metabolism that contribute to tumour progression in several types of cancer, including colorectal cancer. Questions still remain as to what lipids characterize the outer edge of cancer tissues and whether those cancer outer edge-specific lipid compositions emerge autonomously in cancer cells. Cancer tissue-originated spheroids (CTOSs) that are composed of pure primary cancer cells have been developed. In this study, we aimed to seek out the cancer cell-autonomous acquisition of cancer outer edge-characterizing lipids in colorectal cancer by analysing phospholipids in CTOSs derived from colorectal cancer patients with matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI)-imaging mass spectrometry (IMS). A signal at m/z 885.5 in negative ion mode was detected specifically at the surface regions. The signal was identified as an arachidonic acid (AA)-containing phosphatidylinositol (PI), PI(18:0/20:4), by tandem mass spectrometry analysis. Quantitative analysis revealed that the amount of PI(18:0/20:4) in the surface region of CTOSs was two-fold higher than that in the medial region. Finally, PI(18:0/20:4) was enriched at the cancer cells/stromal interface in colorectal cancer patients. These data imply a possible importance of AA-containing PI for colorectal cancer progression, and suggest cells expressing AA-containing PI as potential targets for anti-cancer therapy. PMID:27435310

  1. Accumulation of arachidonic acid-containing phosphatidylinositol at the outer edge of colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Hiraide, Takanori; Ikegami, Koji; Sakaguchi, Takanori; Morita, Yoshifumi; Hayasaka, Takahiro; Masaki, Noritaka; Waki, Michihiko; Sugiyama, Eiji; Shinriki, Satoru; Takeda, Makoto; Shibasaki, Yasushi; Miyazaki, Shinichiro; Kikuchi, Hirotoshi; Okuyama, Hiroaki; Inoue, Masahiro; Setou, Mitsutoshi; Konno, Hiroyuki

    2016-01-01

    Accumulating evidence indicates that cancer cells show specific alterations in phospholipid metabolism that contribute to tumour progression in several types of cancer, including colorectal cancer. Questions still remain as to what lipids characterize the outer edge of cancer tissues and whether those cancer outer edge-specific lipid compositions emerge autonomously in cancer cells. Cancer tissue-originated spheroids (CTOSs) that are composed of pure primary cancer cells have been developed. In this study, we aimed to seek out the cancer cell-autonomous acquisition of cancer outer edge-characterizing lipids in colorectal cancer by analysing phospholipids in CTOSs derived from colorectal cancer patients with matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI)-imaging mass spectrometry (IMS). A signal at m/z 885.5 in negative ion mode was detected specifically at the surface regions. The signal was identified as an arachidonic acid (AA)-containing phosphatidylinositol (PI), PI(18:0/20:4), by tandem mass spectrometry analysis. Quantitative analysis revealed that the amount of PI(18:0/20:4) in the surface region of CTOSs was two-fold higher than that in the medial region. Finally, PI(18:0/20:4) was enriched at the cancer cells/stromal interface in colorectal cancer patients. These data imply a possible importance of AA-containing PI for colorectal cancer progression, and suggest cells expressing AA-containing PI as potential targets for anti-cancer therapy. PMID:27435310

  2. Anacardic acid from brazilian cashew nut trees reduces dentine erosion.

    PubMed

    Silveira, Cintia; Oliveira, Flávia; Dos Santos, Maria Lucilia; de Freitas, Thiago; Imparato, José Carlos; Magalhães, Ana Carolina

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze the effect of solutions containing saturated anacardic acid (AA) on dentine erosion in vitro. AA was chemically isolated from natural cashew nutshell liquid obtained by continuous extraction in a Soxhlet extractor and was fully saturated by catalytic hydrogenation. Matrix metalloproteinase 2 (MMP-2) activity, when exposed to buffers containing 100 µmol/l AA, was analyzed using zymography. Bovine root samples were subjected to erosive demineralization (Sprite Zero™, 4 × 90 s/day) and remineralization with artificial saliva between the erosive cycles for 5 days. The samples were treated as follows, after the first and the last acid exposure (1 min; n = 12/group): (1) 100 µmol/l epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG) (positive control); (2) 0.05% NaF; (3) 100 µmol/l saturated AA; (4) saturated AA and EGCG; (5) saturated AA, EGCG and NaF; (6) untreated (negative control). Dentine erosion was measured using a contact profilometer. Two dentine samples from each group were analyzed using scanning electron microscopy. Saturated AA reduced the activity of MMP-2. ANOVA and Tukey's test revealed that all treatments significantly reduced dentine loss compared to the negative control (6.03 ± 0.98 µm). Solutions containing saturated AA (1.97 ± 1.02 µm) showed the greatest reduction in dentine erosion compared to the NaF (3.93 ± 1.54 µm) and EGCG (3.79 ± 0.83 µm) solutions. Therefore, it may be concluded that AA significantly reduces dentine erosion in vitro, possibly by acting as an MMP-2 inhibitor. PMID:24993776

  3. Arachidonic acid actions on functional integrity and attenuation of the negative effects of palmitic acid in a clonal pancreatic β-cell line

    PubMed Central

    Keane, Deirdre C.; Takahashi, Hilton K.; Dhayal, Shalinee; Morgan, Noel G.; Curi, Rui; Newsholme, Philip

    2010-01-01

    Chronic exposure of pancreatic β-cells to saturated non-esterified fatty acids can lead to inhibition of insulin secretion and apoptosis. Several previous studies have demonstrated that saturated fatty acids such as PA (palmitic acid) are detrimental to β-cell function compared with unsaturated fatty acids. In the present study, we describe the effect of the polyunsaturated AA (arachidonic acid) on the function of the clonal pancreatic β-cell line BRIN-BD11 and demonstrate AA-dependent attenuation of PA effects. When added to β-cell incubations at 100 μM, AA can stimulate cell proliferation and chronic (24 h) basal insulin secretion. Microarray analysis and/or real-time PCR indicated significant AA-dependent up-regulation of genes involved in proliferation and fatty acid metabolism [e.g. Angptl (angiopoietin-like protein 4), Ech1 (peroxisomal Δ3,5,Δ2,4-dienoyl-CoA isomerase), Cox-1 (cyclo-oxygenase-1) and Cox-2, P<0.05]. Experiments using specific COX and LOX (lipoxygenase) inhibitors demonstrated the importance of COX-1 activity for acute (20 min) stimulation of insulin secretion, suggesting that AA metabolites may be responsible for the insulinotropic effects. Moreover, concomitant incubation of AA with PA dose-dependently attenuated the detrimental effects of the saturated fatty acid, so reducing apoptosis and decreasing parameters of oxidative stress [ROS (reactive oxygen species) and NO levels] while improving the GSH/GSSG ratio. AA decreased the protein expression of iNOS (inducible NO synthase), the p65 subunit of NF-κB (nuclear factor κB) and the p47 subunit of NADPH oxidase in PA-treated cells. These findings indicate that AA has an important regulatory and protective β-cell action, which may be beneficial to function and survival in the ‘lipotoxic’ environment commonly associated with Type 2 diabetes mellitus. PMID:20840078

  4. Severe hidradenitis suppurativa complicated by renal AA amyloidosis.

    PubMed

    Utrera-Busquets, M; Romero-Maté, A; Castaño, Á; Alegre, L; García-Donoso, C; Borbujo, J

    2016-04-01

    Hidradenitis suppurativa (HS) is a chronic, recurrent inflammatory disease affecting the skin folds. Multiple therapeutic options have been proposed for severe cases, but persistent responses are rarely seen. Important complications of HS are uncommon, and usually seen only in severe and unresponsive disease. Amyloid A (AA) amyloidosis is secondary to inflammatory chronic diseases, and is an uncommon complication of dermatological diseases. Only a few cases related with HS have been reported. We report the case of a 37-year-old patient who developed AA amyloidosis secondary to severe HS. PMID:26206410

  5. Improved Monitoring of Female Codling Moth (Lepidoptera: Tortricidae) with Pear Ester Plus Acetic Acid in Sex Pheromone-treated Orchards

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Catch of codling moth, Cydia pomonella (L.), in clear delta traps baited with ethyl (E,Z)-2,4-decadienoate (pear ester, PE) and acetic acid (AA) in separate lures (PE+AA) was compared with catch in orange delta traps baited with a single lure containing PE and the sex pheromone, (E,E)-8,10-dodecadie...

  6. Lipoxygenase- and cyclooxygenase-reaction products and incorporation into glycerolipids or radiolabeled arachidonic acid in the bovine retina

    SciTech Connect

    Birkle, D.L.; Bazan, N.G.

    1984-02-01

    The metabolism of radiolabeled arachidonic acid (AA) by the intact bovine retina in vitro has been studied. Synthesis of prostaglandins (PGs) and hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acids (HETEs), and incorporation of AA into glycerolipids has been measured by reverse-phase and straight-phase high performance liquid chromatography with flow scintillation detection, and by thin-layer chromatography. AA was actively acylated into glycerolipids, particularly triglycerides, phosphatidylcholine and phosphatidylinositol. AA was also converted to the major PGs, PGF2 alpha, PGE2, PGD2, 6-keto-PGF1 alpha and TXB2, and to the lipoxygenase reaction products, 12-HETE, 5-HETE, and other monohydroxy isomers. Approximately 6% of the radiolabeled AA was converted to eicosanoids. The synthesis of HETEs was inhibited in a concentration-dependent manner (IC50 . 8.3 nM) by nordihydroguaiaretic acid (NDGA). PG synthesis was inhibited by aspirin (10 microM), indomethacin (1 microM) and NDGA (IC50 . 380 nM). Metabolism of AA via lipoxygenase, cyclooxygenase and activation-acylation was inhibited by boiling retinal tissue prior to incubation. These studies demonstrate an active system for the uptake and utilization of AA in the bovine retina, and provide the first evidence of lipoxygenase-mediated metabolism of AA, resulting in the synthesis of mono-hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acids, in the retina.

  7. Biotribological properties of UHMWPE grafted with AA under lubrication as artificial joint.

    PubMed

    Deng, Yaling; Xiong, Dangsheng; Wang, Kun

    2013-09-01

    Osteolysis caused by wear particles from polyethylene in the artificial hip joints is a serious issue. In order to endow the low friction and wear of the bearing surface of ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) artificial joint for a longer term, hydrophilic acrylic acid (AA) was grafted on UHMWPE powders with the method of ultraviolet irradiation and then the modified powders were hot pressed. The tribological properties of modified UHMWPE sliding against CoCrMo metallic plate on reciprocating tribometer under calf serum, saline and distilled water lubrication during a long-term friction were investigated. The measurement of Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy indicates that AA is successfully grafted on the surface of UHMWPE powders by photo-induced graft polymerization. Contact angles of UHMWPE are decreased from 83° to 35° by grafting and the surface wettability is effectively improved. The tensile strength of modified sample decreases. The friction coefficient and wear rate of UHMWPE-g-PAA under calf serum, saline and distilled water lubrication are lower than that of untreated UHMWPE. With the increase of grafting ratio, the wear rate of UHMWPE-g-PAA decreases firstly and then increases. The modified UHMWPE with grafting ratio of 3.5 % has the lowest wear rate, which is just quarter of the untreated UHMWPE. The hydrated PAA polymer brushes enclosed in the UHMWPE bulk material provide continuous lubrication during long term sliding. PMID:23793532

  8. [Determination the chemical speciation of Cu, Zn, Fe and Mn in Radix Scutellariae by AAS].

    PubMed

    Miao, Shan; Sun, Ji-yuan; Xie, Yan-hua; Wang, Jian-bo; Shi, Xiao-peng; Ding, Yuan-yuan; Bi, Lin-lin; Gao, Shuang-bin; Wang, Si-wang

    2009-05-01

    An analysis method was developed to determine the chemical speciation of Cu, Zn, Fe and Mn in radix scutellariae decoction using atomic absorption spectroscopy(AAS). The decoction can be divided into suspension and soluble species by 0.45 microm filter membrane and the soluble species can be separated into organism and inorganic species by LSA-10 macroporous resin. These elements in water-soluble test samples can be divided into alcohol-soluble and water-soluble by adopting n-octyl alcohol-water allocation system in man-made gastric acidity. Then, the concentration of these elements was determined by AAS, which provided more chemical speciation information about these elements instead of the total amount of them only in radix scutellariae. Deteotion limit of Cu, Zn and Mn by using the method was all 0.01 microg x mL(-1) and was 0.02 microg x mL(-1) for Fe. The RSD was in the range of 1.5%-3.6% (n=11) and the recovery rate of soluble species and inorganic species were in range of 96.7%-105.0%. The method has been successfully applied to determine the chemical speciation of Cu, Zn, Fe and Mn in radix scutellariae, which was very important for overall study of radix scutellariae. PMID:19650506

  9. Protective efficacy of Anopheles minimus CYP6P7 and CYP6AA3 against cytotoxicity of pyrethroid insecticides in Spodoptera frugiperda (Sf9) insect cells.

    PubMed

    Duangkaew, P; Kaewpa, D; Rongnoparut, P

    2011-08-01

    Cytochrome P450 monooxygenases (P450s) are enzymes known to metabolize a wide variety of compounds including insecticides. Their overexpression leading to enhanced insecticide detoxification could result in insecticide resistance in insects. The increased mRNA expression of two P450 genes, CYP6P7 and CYP6AA3, has been previously observed in laboratory-selected deltamethrin-resistant Anopheles minimus, a major malaria vector in Southeast Asia, suggesting their role in detoxification of pyrethroids. In this study CYP6P7 and CYP6AA3 were expressed in insect Spodoptera frugiperda (Sf9) cells via baculovirusdirected expression system. Insecticide detoxification capabilities of Sf9 cells with and without expression of CYP6P7 or CYP6AA3 were evaluated using 3-(4,5-dimethyl-thiazol-2- yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assays. The results revealed that CYP6P7- or CYP6AA3-expressing cells showed significantly higher cytoprotective capability than parental Sf9 cells against cytotoxicity of pyrethroids including permethrin, cypermethrin and deltamethrin. Such cytoprotective effect was not observed for bioallethrin (pyrethroid), chlorpyrifos (organophosphate) and propoxur (carbamate). Moreover, expression of CYP6AA3, but not CYP6P7, could protect cells against λ-cyhalothrin cytotoxicity. In MTT assays upon co-incubation with piperonyl butoxide (P450 inhibitor), cytoprotective ability of CYP6P7 and CYP6AA3 against deltamethrin was diminished, implying that pyrethroid detoxification was due to activities of P450 enzymes. Insecticide detoxification capabilities of CYP6P7 and CYP6AA3 observed from MTT assays were correlated to their pyrethroid metabolizing activities observed from in vitro reconstitution enzymatic assays. Thus MTT assays using cells expressing P450 enzymes of interest could be primarily used to determine detoxification activities of enzymes against cytotoxic insecticides. PMID:22041748

  10. Eicosapentaenoic and dihomo gamma linolenic acid metabolism by cultured rat mesangial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Scharschmidt, L.A.; Gibbons, N.B.; Neuwirth, R.

    1989-01-01

    To better understand the effects of dietary fatty acid manipulations on glomerular function, we compared mesangial incorporation, release, and metabolism of arachidonic (AA), eicosapentaenoic (EPA), and dihomo gamma linolenic (DHG) acids. We found marked differences in mesangial handling of these fatty acids. AA was incorporated into lipids of mesangial cells much more rapidly than EPA or DHG. Ionophore-induced stimulation of fatty acid release from mesangial cells prelabeled with (/sup 14/C)AA, (/sup 14/C)EPA, or (/sup 14/C)DHG caused a release of labeled AA greater than DHG much less than EPA, respectively. Preloading mesangial cells with DHG or EPA for 24 h reduced subsequent basal, ionophore-, and hormone-stimulated prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) synthesis. Finally, unlike AA, neither EPA nor DHG was converted to a significant extent by mesangial cyclooxygenase or lipoxygenase. Thus the mesangial metabolism of DHG and EPA differs both quantitatively and qualitatively from that of AA. Furthermore, EPA and DHG inhibit metabolism of AA at the level of mesangial cyclooxygenase.

  11. Assessment of the arachidonic acid content in foods commonly consumed in the American diet.

    PubMed

    Taber, L; Chiu, C H; Whelan, J

    1998-12-01

    Arachidonic acid (AA) is an extremely important fatty acid involved in cell regulation. When provided in the diet, it is cogently incorporated in membrane phospholipids and enhances eicosanoid biosynthesis in vivo and in vitro; however, controversy exists as to the levels of AA in food and in the diet. This study determined the amount of AA in cooked and raw portions of beef (rib eye), chicken (breast and thigh), eggs, pork (loin), turkey (breast), and tuna; it compared these results to values published in Agriculture Handbook No. 8 (HB-8). The cooked portions were prepared as described in HB-8. With the exception of chicken thigh and tuna, the levels of AA (w/w) in the selected foods analyzed were significantly higher, in general, than those values published in HB-8. The greatest differences were observed in beef (raw and cooked), turkey breast (raw and cooked), and pork (cooked) where AA levels were twice that of the values in HB-8. In contrast, the AA and n-3 fatty acid contents in tuna were almost half the HB-8 values. The present data indicate that HB-8 tends to underreport the amounts of AA in a number of foods commonly consumed in the American diet, and new initiatives should be considered to validate and update the current database for fatty acid composition of foods. PMID:9930399

  12. Recoded organisms engineered to depend on synthetic amino acids.

    PubMed

    Rovner, Alexis J; Haimovich, Adrian D; Katz, Spencer R; Li, Zhe; Grome, Michael W; Gassaway, Brandon M; Amiram, Miriam; Patel, Jaymin R; Gallagher, Ryan R; Rinehart, Jesse; Isaacs, Farren J

    2015-02-01

    Genetically modified organisms (GMOs) are increasingly used in research and industrial systems to produce high-value pharmaceuticals, fuels and chemicals. Genetic isolation and intrinsic biocontainment would provide essential biosafety measures to secure these closed systems and enable safe applications of GMOs in open systems, which include bioremediation and probiotics. Although safeguards have been designed to control cell growth by essential gene regulation, inducible toxin switches and engineered auxotrophies, these approaches are compromised by cross-feeding of essential metabolites, leaked expression of essential genes, or genetic mutations. Here we describe the construction of a series of genomically recoded organisms (GROs) whose growth is restricted by the expression of multiple essential genes that depend on exogenously supplied synthetic amino acids (sAAs). We introduced a Methanocaldococcus jannaschii tRNA:aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase pair into the chromosome of a GRO derived from Escherichia coli that lacks all TAG codons and release factor 1, endowing this organism with the orthogonal translational components to convert TAG into a dedicated sense codon for sAAs. Using multiplex automated genome engineering, we introduced in-frame TAG codons into 22 essential genes, linking their expression to the incorporation of synthetic phenylalanine-derived amino acids. Of the 60 sAA-dependent variants isolated, a notable strain harbouring three TAG codons in conserved functional residues of MurG, DnaA and SerS and containing targeted tRNA deletions maintained robust growth and exhibited undetectable escape frequencies upon culturing ∼10(11) cells on solid media for 7 days or in liquid media for 20 days. This is a significant improvement over existing biocontainment approaches. We constructed synthetic auxotrophs dependent on sAAs that were not rescued by cross-feeding in environmental growth assays. These auxotrophic GROs possess alternative genetic codes that

  13. Novel nonadride, heptadride and maleic acid metabolites from the byssochlamic acid producer Byssochlamys fulva IMI 40021 – an insight into the biosynthesis of maleidrides† †Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Details of any supplementary information available should be included here. See DOI: 10.1039/c5cc06988b Click here for additional data file.

    PubMed Central

    Szwalbe, Agnieszka J.; Williams, Katherine; O'Flynn, Daniel E.; Bailey, Andrew M.; Mulholland, Nicholas P.; Vincent, Jason L.; Willis, Christine L.

    2015-01-01

    The filamentous fungus Byssochlamys fulva strain IMI 40021 produces (+)-byssochlamic acid 1, its novel dihydroanalogue 2 and four related secondary metabolites. Agnestadrides A, 17 and B, 18 constitute a novel class of seven-membered ring, maleic anhydride-containing (hence termed heptadride) natural products. The putative maleic anhydride precursor 5 for both nonadride and heptadride biosynthesis was isolated as a fermentation product for the first time and its structure confirmed by synthesis. Acid 5 undergoes facile decarboxylation to anhydride 6. The generic term maleidrides is proposed to encompass biosynthetically-related compounds containing maleic anhydride moieties fused to an alicyclic ring, varying in size and substituents. PMID:26452099

  14. The mRNA expression of amino acid transporters, aminopeptidase, and the di- and tri-peptide transporter PepT1 in the intestine and liver of post-hatch broiler chicks

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Amino acid transporter (AAT) proteins are responsible for the movement of amino acids (AA) in and out of cells. Aminopeptidase (APN) cleaves AAs from the N terminus of polypeptides making them available for transport, while PepT1 is a di- and tri- peptide transporter. In the intestine, these prote...

  15. Effect of cooling rate on microstructure of friction-stir welded AA1100 aluminum alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yi, D.; Mironov, S.; Sato, Y. S.; Kokawa, H.

    2016-06-01

    In this work, the microstructural changes occurring during cooling of friction-stir welded aluminum alloy AA1100 were evaluated. To this end, friction-stir welding (FSW) was performed in a wide range of cooling rates of 20-62 K/s and the evolved microstructures were studied by using electron backscatter diffraction. Below 0.6 Tm (Tm being the melting point), the stir zone material was found to experience no significant changes during cooling. At higher FSW temperatures, however, notable changes occurred in the welded material, including grain growth, sharpening of texture, reduction of the fraction of high-angle boundaries and material softening.

  16. Effect of Weld Tool Geometry on Friction Stir Welded AA2219-T87 Properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Querin, Joseph A.; Schneider, Judy A.

    2008-01-01

    In this study, flat panels of AA2219-T87 were friction stir welded (FSWed) using weld tools with tapered pins The three pin geometries of the weld tools included: 0 (straight cylinder), 30 , and 60 angles on the frustum. For each weld tool geometry, the FSW process parameters were optimized to eliminate defects. A constant heat input was maintained while varying the process parameters of spindle rpm and travel speed. This provided a constant heat input for each FSW weld panel while altering the hot working conditions imparted to the workpiece. The resulting mechanical properties were evaluated from tensile test results of the FSW joint.

  17. Experimental induction and oral transmission of avian AA amyloidosis in vaccinated white hens.

    PubMed

    Murakami, Tomoaki; Muhammad, Naeem; Inoshima, Yasuo; Yanai, Tokuma; Goryo, Masanobu; Ishiguro, Naotaka

    2013-06-01

    Avian AA amyloidosis is commonly observed in adult birds afflicted with bacterial infections or chronic inflammatory disorders. Experimental AA amyloidosis in birds can be induced by repeated inflammatory stimulation, such as injection with casein or vaccination with oil-emulsified bacterins. However, the transmission of amyloidosis among avian species has not been studied well to date. In the present study, we confirm the potential induction of avian AA amyloidosis by inoculation of Salmonella enteritidis (SE) vaccine or Mycoplasma gallisepticum vaccine. To determine the transmission of chicken AA amyloidosis among white hens, we induced experimental AA amyloidosis in vaccinated chickens by intravenous or oral administration of chicken AA fibrils. Amyloid deposits were observed in chickens injected with SE and inoculated with chicken AA fibrils intravenously (21/26: 81%) and orally (8/12: 67%). These results suggest that chicken AA amyloidosis can be induced by vaccinations, and may be transmitted among like species by oral administration. PMID:23548152

  18. Insulinogenic sucrose+amino acid mixture ingestion immediately after resistance exercise has an anabolic effect on bone compared with non-insulinogenic fructose+amino acid mixture in growing rats.

    PubMed

    Notomi, Takuya; Karasaki, Ikuaki; Okazaki, Yuichi; Okimoto, Nobukazu; Kato, Yushi; Ohura, Kiyoshi; Noda, Masaki; Nakamura, Toshitaka; Suzuki, Masashige

    2014-08-01

    Maximizing peak bone mass is an important factor in osteoporosis prevention. Resistance exercise increases bone mass and strength, while nutritional supplements have beneficial effects on bone loss reduction. We have previously shown that the combined intake of sucrose and amino acids (AA), which is strongly insulinogenic, efficiently increased muscle protein synthesis. To investigate the effects of sugar and an AA solution immediately after resistance exercise, we compared insulinogenic sucrose and non-insulinogenic fructose combined with an AA solution with or without resistance exercise. Sucrose intake immediately after resistance exercise increased the trabecular bone mass and compressive maximum load compared with fructose+AA intake after exercise. Additionally, combined sucrose+AA and exercise increased trabecular bone formation and decreased bone resorption more than combined fructose and exercise. Serum insulin levels were greatly increased by sucrose+AA intake with exercise. In culture experiments, neither sugar+AA affected osteoblast and osteoclast differentiation. In a gene expression study, sucrose+AA intake after resistance exercise was shown to upregulate the Runx2 expression level and decrease RANKL/OPG ratio. These results suggest that the combined intake of sucrose and an AA solution immediately after resistance exercise exerts anabolic effects on bone by altering gene expression related to bone remodeling. Although translation of our bone remodeling findings from animal to human studies has been challenging, our findings suggest that exercise with sugar+AA intake may contribute to improved bone health. PMID:24815919

  19. Ascorbic acid improves embryonic cardiomyoblast cell survival and promotes vascularization in potential myocardial grafts in vivo.

    PubMed

    Martinez, Eliana C; Wang, Jing; Gan, Shu Uin; Singh, Rajeev; Lee, Chuen Neng; Kofidis, Theo

    2010-04-01

    Organ restoration via cell therapy and tissue transplantation is limited by impaired graft survival. We tested the hypothesis that ascorbic acid (AA) reduces cell death in myocardial grafts both in vitro and in vivo and introduced a new model of autologous graft vascularization for later transplantation. Luciferase (Fluc)- and green fluorescent protein (GFP)-expressing H9C2 cardiomyoblasts were seeded in gelatin scaffolds to form myocardial artificial grafts (MAGs). MAGs were supplemented with AA (5 or 50 mumol/L) or plain growth medium. Bioluminescence imaging showed increased cell photon emission from day 1 to 5 in grafts supplemented with 5 mumol/L (p < 0.001) and 50 mumol/L (p < 0.01) AA. The amount of apoptotic cells in plain MAGs was significantly higher than in AA-enriched grafts. In our in vitro model, AA also enhanced H9C2 cell myogenic differentiation. For in vivo studies, MAGs containing H9C2-GFP-Fluc cells and enriched with AA (n = 10) or phosphate-buffered saline (n = 10) were implanted in the renal pouch of Wistar rats. At day 6, postimplantation bioluminescence signals decreased by 74% of baseline in plain MAGs versus 36% in AA-enriched MAGs (p < 0.0001). AA grafts contained significantly higher amounts of blood vessels, GFP(+) donor cells, and endothelial cells. In this study, we identified AA as a potent supplement that improves cardiomyoblast survival and promotes neovascularization in bioartificial grafts. PMID:19908964

  20. Quantitative analysis of amino acids and acylcarnitines combined with untargeted metabolomics using ultra-high performance liquid chromatography and quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Roy, Cynthia; Tremblay, Pierre-Yves; Bienvenu, Jean-François; Ayotte, Pierre

    2016-08-01

    Metabolomics is an "omic" technique being increasingly used in epidemiological and clinical studies. We developed a method combining untargeted metabolomics with the quantitative determination of eight amino acids (AA) and eight acylcarnitines (AC) in plasma using ultra-high pressure liquid chromatography (UHPLC), electrospray ionization (ESI) and quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry (QTOFMS). Separation of metabolites is performed by ion-pair reverse phase UHPLC using a HSS T3 column (2.1×100mm, 100Å, 1.8μm particle size) and formic acid-ammonium acetate-heptafluorobutyric acid in water and formic acid-ammonium acetate in methanol as mobile phases. Metabolite identification and quantification are achieved using a QTOFMS operating in ESI-positive and full-scan mode along with MS(E) acquisition of fragmentation patterns. Targeted metabolites are quantified using the appropriate labeled standards and include branched-chain AA (leucine, isoleucine, valine), aromatic AA (phenylalanine, tyrosine) as well as acetylcarnitine and propionylcarnitine, which have been identified as biomarkers of future cardiometabolic disease risk. The inter-day precision (relative standard deviation) for the targeted method was <15% for all but one metabolite and accuracy (bias) of amino acids ranged from 0.5% to 13.9% using SRM 1950 as the external standard. Untargeted metabolomics in 30 plasma samples from the general Canadian population revealed 5018 features, of which 48 metabolites were identified using the MZmine 2.19 software including 23 by our in-house library that comprises 671 annotated metabolites. SRM 1950 analysis revealed 11,684 features, among which 154 metabolites were identified. Our method is currently applied in several epidemiological studies to better characterize cardiometabolic diseases and identify new biomarkers for disease prevention. PMID:27240302

  1. Mechanism of arachidonic acid liberation in platelet-activating factor-stimulated human polymorphonuclear neutrophils

    SciTech Connect

    Nakashima, S.; Suganuma, A.; Sato, M.; Tohmatsu, T.; Nozawa, Y. )

    1989-08-15

    Upon stimulation of human polymorphonuclear neutrophils with platelet-activating factor (PAF), arachidonic acid (AA) is released from membrane phospholipids. The mechanism for AA liberation, a key step in the synthesis of biologically active eicosanoids, was investigated. PAF was found to elicit an increase in the cytoplasmic level of free Ca2+ as monitored by fluorescent indicator fura 2. When (3H) AA-labeled neutrophils were exposed to PAF, the enhanced release of AA was observed with a concomitant decrease of radioactivity in phosphatidylinositol and phosphatidylcholine fractions. The inhibitors of phospholipase A2, mepacrine and 2-(p-amylcinnamoyl)-amino-4-chlorobenzoic acid, effectively suppressed the liberation of (3H)AA from phospholipids, indicating that liberation of AA is mainly catalyzed by the action of phospholipase A2. The extracellular Ca2+ is not required for AA release. However, intracellular Ca2+ antagonists, TMB-8 and high dose of quin 2/AM drastically reduced the liberation of AA induced by PAF, indicating that Ca2+ is an essential factor for phospholipase A2 activation. PAF raised the fluorescence of fura 2 at concentrations as low as 8 pM which reached a maximal level about 8 nM, whereas more than nM order concentrations of PAF was required for the detectable release of (3H)AA. Pretreatment of neutrophils with pertussis toxin resulted in complete abolition of AA liberation in response to PAF. However, the fura 2 response to PAF was not effectively inhibited by toxin treatment. In human neutrophil homogenate and membrane preparations, guanosine 5'-O-(thiotriphosphate) stimulated AA release and potentiated the action of PAF. Guanosine 5'-O-(thiodiphosphate) inhibited the effects of guanosine 5'-O-(thiotriphosphate).

  2. The relationship of physicochemical properties to the antioxidative activity of free amino acids in Fenton system.

    PubMed

    Milić, Sonja; Bogdanović Pristov, Jelena; Mutavdžić, Dragosav; Savić, Aleksandar; Spasić, Mihajlo; Spasojević, Ivan

    2015-04-01

    Herein we compared antioxidative activities (AA) of 25 free L-amino acids (FAA) against Fenton system-mediated hydroxyl radical (HO(•)) production in aqueous solution, and examined the relation between AA and a set of physicochemical properties. The rank order according to AA was: Trp > norleucine > Phe, Leu > Ile > His >3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine, Arg > Val > Lys, Tyr, Pro > hydroxyproline > α-aminobutyric acid > Gln, Thr, Ser > Glu, Ala, Gly, Asn, Asp. Sulfur-containing FAA generated different secondary reactive products, which were discriminated by the means of electron paramagnetic resonance spin-trapping spectroscopy. AA showed a general positive correlation with hydrophobicity. However, when taken separately, uncharged FAA exhibited strong positive correlation of AA with hydrophobicity whereas charged FAA showed negative or no significant correlation depending on the scale applied. A general strong negative correlation was found between AA and polarity. Steric parameters and hydration numbers correlated positively with AA of nonpolar side-chain FAA. In addition, a decrease of temperature which promotes hydrophobic hydration resulted in increased AA. This implies that HO(•)-provoked oxidation of FAA is strongly affected by hydrophobic hydration. Our findings are important for the understanding of oxidation processes in natural and waste waters. PMID:25764263

  3. 32. SECTIONS AA, BB, CC, DD, AND EE WASTE CALCINATION ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    32. SECTIONS A-A, B-B, C-C, D-D, AND E-E WASTE CALCINATION FACILITY SHOWING RELATIONSHIPS OF DIFFERENT FLOOR LEVELS TO ONE ANOTHER. INEEL DRAWING NUMBER 200-0633-00-287-106353. FLUOR NUMBER 5775-CPP-633-A-3. - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Old Waste Calcining Facility, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  4. Bridge Types: Suspension Bridge Spans, Section AA; Cantilever Truss Spans, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Bridge Types: Suspension Bridge Spans, Section A-A; Cantilever Truss Spans, Section B-B; Through Truss Spans, Section C-C; Deck Truss Spans, Section D-D - San Francisco Oakland Bay Bridge, Spanning San Francisco Bay, San Francisco, San Francisco County, CA

  5. Controlling Works, Section AA at Bear Trap Dam, Section BB ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Controlling Works, Section A-A at Bear Trap Dam, Section B-B at Bear-Trap Dam, Section C-C at Sluice Gate - Chicago Sanitary and Ship Canal, Lockport Controlling Works, Illinois Waterway River Mile 293.2, Lockport, Will County, IL

  6. Fatty acid regulates gene expression and growth of human prostate cancer PC-3 cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hughes-Fulford, M.; Chen, Y.; Tjandrawinata, R. R.

    2001-01-01

    It has been proposed that the omega-6 fatty acids increase the rate of tumor growth. Here we test that hypothesis in the PC-3 human prostate tumor. We found that the essential fatty acids, linoleic acid (LA) and arachidonic acid (AA), and the AA metabolite PGE(2) stimulate tumor growth while oleic acid (OA) and the omega-3 fatty acid, eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) inhibited growth. In examining the role of AA in growth response, we extended our studies to analyze changes in early gene expression induced by AA. We demonstrate that c-fos expression is increased within minutes of addition in a dose-dependent manner. Moreover, the immediate early gene cox-2 is also increased in the presence of AA in a dose-dependent manner, while the constitutive cox-1 message was not increased. Three hours after exposure to AA, the synthesis of PGE(2) via COX-2 was also increased. Previous studies have demonstrated that AA was primarily delivered by low density lipoprotein (LDL) via its receptor (LDLr). Since it is known that hepatomas, acute myelogenous leukemia and colorectal tumors lack normal cholesterol feedback, we examined the role of the LDLr in growth regulation of the PC-3 prostate cancer cells. Analysis of ldlr mRNA expression and LDLr function demonstrated that human PC-3 prostate cancer cells lack normal feedback regulation. While exogenous LDL caused a significant stimulation of cell growth and PGE(2) synthesis, no change was seen in regulation of the LDLr by LDL. Taken together, these data show that normal cholesterol feedback of ldlr message and protein is lost in prostate cancer. These data suggest that unregulated over-expression of LDLr in tumor cells would permit increased availability of AA, which induces immediate early genes c-fos and cox-2 within minutes of uptake.

  7. 49 CFR 178.56 - Specification 4AA480 welded steel cylinders.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Specification 4AA480 welded steel cylinders. 178... FOR PACKAGINGS Specifications for Cylinders § 178.56 Specification 4AA480 welded steel cylinders. (a) Type, size, and service pressure. A DOT 4AA480 cylinder is a welded steel cylinder having a...

  8. 49 CFR 178.37 - Specification 3AA and 3AAX seamless steel cylinders.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Specification 3AA and 3AAX seamless steel...) SPECIFICATIONS FOR PACKAGINGS Specifications for Cylinders § 178.37 Specification 3AA and 3AAX seamless steel... conform to the following: (1) A DOT-3AA cylinder is a seamless steel cylinder with a water...

  9. 49 CFR 178.37 - Specification 3AA and 3AAX seamless steel cylinders.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Specification 3AA and 3AAX seamless steel...) SPECIFICATIONS FOR PACKAGINGS Specifications for Cylinders § 178.37 Specification 3AA and 3AAX seamless steel... conform to the following: (1) A DOT-3AA cylinder is a seamless steel cylinder with a water...

  10. 49 CFR 178.56 - Specification 4AA480 welded steel cylinders.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Specification 4AA480 welded steel cylinders. 178... FOR PACKAGINGS Specifications for Cylinders § 178.56 Specification 4AA480 welded steel cylinders. (a) Type, size, and service pressure. A DOT 4AA480 cylinder is a welded steel cylinder having a...

  11. 49 CFR 178.56 - Specification 4AA480 welded steel cylinders.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Specification 4AA480 welded steel cylinders. 178... FOR PACKAGINGS Specifications for Cylinders § 178.56 Specification 4AA480 welded steel cylinders. (a) Type, size, and service pressure. A DOT 4AA480 cylinder is a welded steel cylinder having a...

  12. 49 CFR 178.37 - Specification 3AA and 3AAX seamless steel cylinders.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Specification 3AA and 3AAX seamless steel...) SPECIFICATIONS FOR PACKAGINGS Specifications for Cylinders § 178.37 Specification 3AA and 3AAX seamless steel... conform to the following: (1) A DOT-3AA cylinder is a seamless steel cylinder with a water...

  13. 49 CFR 178.37 - Specification 3AA and 3AAX seamless steel cylinders.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Specification 3AA and 3AAX seamless steel...) SPECIFICATIONS FOR PACKAGINGS Specifications for Cylinders § 178.37 Specification 3AA and 3AAX seamless steel... conform to the following: (1) A DOT-3AA cylinder is a seamless steel cylinder with a water...

  14. 49 CFR 178.56 - Specification 4AA480 welded steel cylinders.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Specification 4AA480 welded steel cylinders. 178... FOR PACKAGINGS Specifications for Cylinders § 178.56 Specification 4AA480 welded steel cylinders. (a) Type, size, and service pressure. A DOT 4AA480 cylinder is a welded steel cylinder having a...

  15. Displaying Now-Understanding: The Finnish Change-of-State Token "aa"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koivisto, Aino

    2015-01-01

    This article discusses the use of the Finnish change-of-state token "aa" that has previously not been identified. The central claim is that even though "aa" indicates a cognitive shift experienced by the speaker, it does not function as a receipt of new information. Instead, the token "aa" indicates that the speaker…

  16. An Analysis of the Rise and Fall of the AA-MAS Policy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lazarus, Sheryl S.; Thurlow, Martha L.; Ysseldyke, James E.; Edwards, Lynn M.

    2015-01-01

    In 2005, to address concerns about students who might fall in the "gap" between the regular assessment and the alternate assessment based on alternate achievement standards (AA-AAS), the U.S. Department of Education announced that states could develop alternate assessments based on modified achievement standards (AA-MAS). This article…

  17. An Existential Approach: An Alternative to the AA Model of Recovery

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rogers, Maria A.; Cobia, Debra

    2008-01-01

    Alcoholics Anonymous (AA) is the most widely used organization for the treatment of alcoholism. AA's philosophy has changed how many people view themselves and their substance use. The majority of substance abuse programs in the United States use the 12 steps, either by making them the basis of their treatment program, or by introducing AA to…

  18. A Status Report on the AAS Astronomy Ambassadors Program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fienberg, Richard Tresch; Fraknoi, Andrew; Gurton, Suzanne; Hurst, Anna; Schatz, Dennis L.

    2014-06-01

    The American Astronomical Society, in partnership with the Astronomical Society of the Pacific (ASP), has launched a series of professional-development workshops and a community of practice designed to improve early-career astronomers’ ability to communicate effectively with students and the public. Called AAS Astronomy Ambassadors, the program provides training and mentoring for young astronomers, from advanced undergraduates to beginning faculty; it also provides them access to resources and a network of contacts within the astronomy education and public outreach (EPO) community. Ambassadors are provided with a library of outreach activities and resource materials suitable for a range of venues and audiences. For much of this library we are using resources developed by organizations such as the ASP, the Pacific Science Center, and the Center for Astronomy Education for other outreach programs, though some resources have been created by one of us (AF) specifically for this program. After a period of evaluation and revision, the program’s “Menu of Outreach Opportunities for Science Education” (MOOSE) is now posted on the AAS website at http://aas.org/outreach/moose-menu-outreach-opportunities-science-education.The first two Astronomy Ambassadors workshops were held at AAS meetings in January 2013 and January 2014; each served 30 young astronomers chosen from about twice that many applicants. Web-based follow-up activities are being provided through a website at the ASP designed to keep cohorts of educators trained in their programs in touch with one another. The AAS is exploring ways to fund additional workshops at future winter meetings; suggestions are most welcome. Meanwhile, the Astronomy Ambassadors trained to date have logged more than 150 outreach events, reaching many thousands of children and adults across the U.S. and Canada.

  19. 2002 AA 29: Earth's recurrent quasi-satellite?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wajer, Paweł

    2009-03-01

    We study the dynamical evolution of Asteroid 2002 AA 29. This object moves in the co-orbital region of the Earth and is the first known asteroid which experiences recurrent horseshoe-quasi-satellite transitions. The transitions between the HS and QS states are unique among other known Earth co-orbital asteroids and in the QS state 2002 AA 29 remains very close to Earth (within 0.2 AU for several decades [Connors, M., Chodas, P., Mikkola, S., Wiegert, P., Veillet, C., Innanen, K., 2002. Meteorit. Planet. Sci. 37, 1435-1441]). Based on results obtained analytically by Brasser et al. [Brasser, R., Heggie, D.C., Mikkola, S., 2004b. Celest. Mech. Dynam. Astron. 88, 123-152] we developed a simple analytical method to describe and analyze the motion of 2002 AA 29. We distinguish a few moments in time crucial for understanding its dynamics. Near 2400 and 2500 this object will be close to going through the maxima of the averaged disturbing function and it will either change its co-orbital regime by transition from the HS into QS state, or leave the librating mode. These approaches generate instability in the motion of 2002 AA 29. By means of 66 observations, covering a two-year interval, we extend the analysis of the long term evolution of this object presented by Connors et al. [Connors, M., Chodas, P., Mikkola, S., Wiegert, P., Veillet, C., Innanen, K., 2002. Meteorit. Planet. Sci. 37, 1435-1441] and Brasser et al. [Brasser, R., Innanen, K.A., Connors, M., Veillet, C., Wiegert, P., Mikkola, S., Chodas, P.W., 2004a. Icarus 171, 102-109]. Our analysis is based on a sample of 100 cloned orbits. We show that the motion of 2002 AA 29 is predictable in the time interval [-2600,7100] and outside of this interval the past and future orbital history can be studied using statistical methods.

  20. Novel graphene flowers modified carbon fibers for simultaneous determination of ascorbic acid, dopamine and uric acid.

    PubMed

    Du, Jiao; Yue, Ruirui; Ren, Fangfang; Yao, Zhangquan; Jiang, Fengxing; Yang, Ping; Du, Yukou

    2014-03-15

    A novel and sensitive carbon fiber electrode (CFE) modified by graphene flowers was prepared and used to simultaneously determine ascorbic acid (AA), dopamine (DA) and uric acid (UA). SEM images showed that beautiful and layer-petal graphene flowers homogeneously bloomed on the surface of CFE. Moreover, sharp and obvious oxidation peaks were found at the obtained electrode when compared with CFE and glassy carbon electrode (GCE) for the oxidation of AA, DA and UA. Also, the linear calibration plots for AA, DA and UA were observed, respectively, in the ranges of 45.4-1489.23 μM, 0.7-45.21 μM and 3.78-183.87 μM in the individual detection of each component. By simultaneously changing the concentrations of AA, DA and UA, their oxidation peaks appeared at -0.05 V, 0.16 V and 2.6 V, and the good linear responses ranges were 73.52-2305.53 μM, 1.36-125.69 μM and 3.98-371.49 μM, respectively. In addition, the obtained electrode showed satisfactory results when applied to the determination of AA, DA and UA in urine and serum samples. PMID:24140872

  1. Determination of free and total myo-inositol in infant formula and adult/pediatric nutritional formula by high- performance anion exchange chromatography with pulsed amperometric detection, including a novel total extraction using microwave-assisted acid hydrolysis and enzymatic treatment: first action 2012.12.

    PubMed

    Ellingson, David; Pritchard, Ted; Foy, Pamela; King, Kathryn; Mitchell, Barbara; Austad, John; Winters, Doug; Sullivan, Darryl; Dowell, Dawn

    2013-01-01

    After an assessment of data generated from a single-laboratory validation study published in J. AOAC Int. 95, 1469-1478 (2012), a method for determining total myo-inositol in infant formula and adult/ pediatric nutritional formula by high-performance anion exchange chromatography with pulsed amperometric detection (HPAEC-PAD), including extraction by using microwave-assisted acid hydrolysis and enzymatic treatment was presented for consideration by AOAC during the AOAC Annual Meeting held in Las Vegas, NV, from September 30 to October 3, 2012. The Expert Review Panel on Infant Formula and Adult Nutritionals concluded that the method met the criteria set by the standard method performance requirements (SMPRs) for the determination of free myo-inositol and approved the method as AOAC Official First Action. The method also determines total myo-inositol, but includes bound sources that the SMPRs exclude. The method involves using HPAEC-PAD for free myo-inositol and a total myo-inositol determination by two different techniques. The first technique uses the conventional acid hydrolysis with 6 h incubation in an autoclave. The second uses a microwave-assisted acid hydrolysis with enzymatic treatment that decreases the extraction time. PMID:24282949

  2. Chlamydia pneumoniae encodes a functional aromatic amino acid hydroxylase

    PubMed Central

    Abromaitis, Stephanie; Hefty, P. Scott; Stephens, Richard S.

    2010-01-01

    Chlamydia pneumoniae is a community-acquired respiratory pathogen that has been associated with the development of atherosclerosis. Analysis of the C. pneumoniae genome identified a gene (Cpn1046) homologous to eukaryotic aromatic amino acid hydroxylases. Aromatic amino acid hydroxylases (AroAA-H) hydroxylate phenylalanine, tyrosine, and tryptophan into tyrosine, dihydroxyphenylalanine (L-DOPA), and 5-hydroxytryptophan, respectively. Sequence analysis of Cpn1046 demonstrated that residues essential for AroAA-H enzymatic function are conserved and that a subset of Chlamydia species contain an AroAA-H homolog. The chlamydial AroAA-H are transcriptionally linked to a putative bacterial membrane transport protein. We determined that recombinant Cpn1046 is able to hydroxylate phenylalanine, tyrosine, and tryptophan with roughly equivalent activity for all three substrates. Cpn1046 is expressed within 24 h of infection, allowing C. pneumoniae to hydroxylae host stores of aromatic amino acids during the period of logarithmic bacterial growth. From these results we can conclude that C. pneumoniae, as well as a subset of other Chlamydia species, encode an AroAA-H that is able to use all three aromatic amino acids as substrates. The maintenance of this gene within a number of Chlamydia suggests that the enzyme may have an important role in shaping the metabolism or overall pathogenesis of these bacteria. PMID:19141112

  3. The transcription factor-like nuclear regulator (TFNR) contains a novel 55-amino-acid motif repeated nine times and maps closely to SMN1.

    PubMed

    Kelter, A R; Herchenbach, J; Wirth, B

    2000-12-15

    The transcription factor-like nuclear regulator (TFNR) is a novel human gene that maps on 5q13, distal to the duplicated region that includes SMN1, the spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) determining gene. The location of TFNR allowed us to design an evolutionary model of the SMA region. The 9.5-kb TFNR transcript is highly expressed in cerebellum and weakly in all other tissues tested. TFNR encodes a protein of 2254 amino acids (aa) and contains nine repeats of a novel 55-aa motif, of yet unknown function. The coding region is organized in 32 exons. Alternative splicing of exon 15 results in a truncated protein of 796 aa. TFNR comprises a series of polypeptides that range from 55 to 250 kDa. Immunocytological studies showed that the TFNR protein is present exclusively in the nucleus, where it is concentrated in several nuclear structures. Amino acids 155-474 show significant homology to TFC5, a subunit of the yeast transcription factor TFIIIB, suggesting that TFNR is a putative transcription factor. Based on its proximity to SMN1 and its expression pattern, TFNR may be a candidate gene for atypical forms of SMA with cerebral atrophy and axonal neuropathy that have been shown to carry large deletions in the SMA region. PMID:11161782

  4. Glucagon-like peptide 1 receptor activation regulates cocaine actions and dopamine homeostasis in the lateral septum by decreasing arachidonic acid levels.

    PubMed

    Reddy, I A; Pino, J A; Weikop, P; Osses, N; Sørensen, G; Bering, T; Valle, C; Bluett, R J; Erreger, K; Wortwein, G; Reyes, J G; Graham, D; Stanwood, G D; Hackett, T A; Patel, S; Fink-Jensen, A; Torres, G E; Galli, A

    2016-01-01

    Agonism of the glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1) receptor (GLP-1R) has been effective at treating aspects of addictive behavior for a number of abused substances, including cocaine. However, the molecular mechanisms and brain circuits underlying the therapeutic effects of GLP-1R signaling on cocaine actions remain elusive. Recent evidence has revealed that endogenous signaling at the GLP-1R within the forebrain lateral septum (LS) acts to reduce cocaine-induced locomotion and cocaine conditioned place preference, both considered dopamine (DA)-associated behaviors. DA terminals project from the ventral tegmental area to the LS and express the DA transporter (DAT). Cocaine acts by altering DA bioavailability by targeting the DAT. Therefore, GLP-1R signaling might exert effects on DAT to account for its regulation of cocaine-induced behaviors. We show that the GLP-1R is highly expressed within the LS. GLP-1, in LS slices, significantly enhances DAT surface expression and DAT function. Exenatide (Ex-4), a long-lasting synthetic analog of GLP-1 abolished cocaine-induced elevation of DA. Interestingly, acute administration of Ex-4 reduces septal expression of the retrograde messenger 2-arachidonylglycerol (2-AG), as well as a product of its presynaptic degradation, arachidonic acid (AA). Notably, AA reduces septal DAT function pointing to AA as a novel regulator of central DA homeostasis. We further show that AA oxidation product γ-ketoaldehyde (γ-KA) forms adducts with the DAT and reduces DAT plasma membrane expression and function. These results support a mechanism in which postsynaptic septal GLP-1R activation regulates 2-AG levels to alter presynaptic DA homeostasis and cocaine actions through AA. PMID:27187231

  5. Computational Investigation of Hardness Evolution During Friction-Stir Welding of AA5083 and AA2139 Aluminum Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grujicic, M.; Arakere, G.; Yen, C.-F.; Cheeseman, B. A.

    2011-10-01

    A fully coupled thermo-mechanical finite-element analysis of the friction-stir welding (FSW) process developed in our previous work is combined with the basic physical metallurgy of two wrought aluminum alloys to predict/assess their FSW behaviors. The two alloys selected are AA5083 (a solid-solution strengthened and strain-hardened/stabilized Al-Mg-Mn alloy) and AA2139 (a precipitation hardened quaternary Al-Cu-Mg-Ag alloy). Both of these alloys are currently being used in military-vehicle hull structural and armor systems. In the case of non-age-hardenable AA5083, the dominant microstructure-evolution processes taking place during FSW are extensive plastic deformation and dynamic re-crystallization of highly deformed material subjected to elevated temperatures approaching the melting temperature. In the case of AA2139, in addition to plastic deformation and dynamic recrystallization, precipitates coarsening, over-aging, dissolution, and re-precipitation had to be also considered. Limited data available in the open literature pertaining to the kinetics of the aforementioned microstructure-evolution processes are used to predict variation in the material hardness throughout the various FSW zones of the two alloys. The computed results are found to be in reasonably good agreement with their experimental counterparts.

  6. Altered arachidonic acid metabolism and platelet size in atopic subjects

    SciTech Connect

    Audera, C.; Rocklin, R.; Vaillancourt, R.; Jakubowski, J.A.; Deykin, D.

    1988-03-01

    The release and metabolism of endogenous arachidonic acid (AA) in physiologically activated platelets obtained from 11 atopic patients with allergic rhinitis and/or asthma was compared to that of sex- and age-matched nonatopic controls. Prelabeled (/sup 3/H)AA platelets were stimulated with thrombin or collagen and the amount of free (/sup 3/H)AA and radiolabeled metabolites released were measured by high-performance liquid chromatography. The results obtained indicate that although the incorporation of (/sup 3/H)AA into platelet phospholipids and total release of /sup 3/H-radioactivity upon stimulation were comparable in the two groups, the percentage of /sup 3/H-radioactivity released from platelets as free AA was significantly lower (P less than 0.01) in the atopic group. The reduction in free (/sup 3/H)AA was accompanied by an increase (P less than 0.01) in the percentage of /sup 3/H-radioactivity released as cyclooxygenase products in atopic platelets (compared to nonatopic cells) after stimulation with 10 and 25 micrograms/ml collagen. The amount of platelet lipoxygenase product released was comparable between the two groups. Although the blood platelet counts were similar, the mean platelet volume was statistically higher (P less than 0.01) in the atopic group. These results indicate that arachidonic acid metabolism in atopic platelets is altered, the pathophysiological significance of which remains to be clarified.

  7. Acid rain

    SciTech Connect

    Sweet, W.

    1980-06-20

    Acid precipitation includes not only rain but also acidified snow, hail and frost, as well as sulfur and nitrogen dust. The principal source of acid precipitation is pollution emitted by power plants and smelters. Sulfur and nitrogen compounds contained in the emissions combine with moisture to form droplets with a high acid content - sometimes as acidic as vinegar. When sufficiently concentrated, these acids can kill fish and damage material structures. Under certain circumstances they may reduce crop and forest yields and cause or aggravate respiratory diseases in humans. During the summer, especially, pollutants tend to collect over the Great Lakes in high pressure systems. Since winds typically are westerly and rotate clockwise around high pressure systems, the pollutants gradually are dispersed throughout the eastern part of the continent.

  8. Asparagusic acid.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, Stephen C; Waring, Rosemary H

    2014-01-01

    Asparagusic acid (1,2-dithiolane-4-carboxylic acid) is a simple sulphur-containing 5-membered heterocyclic compound that appears unique to asparagus, though other dithiolane derivatives have been identified in non-food species. This molecule, apparently innocuous toxicologically to man, is the most probable culprit responsible for the curious excretion of odorous urine following asparagus ingestion. The presence of the two adjacent sulphur atoms leads to an enhanced chemical reactivity, endowing it with biological properties including the ability to substitute potentially for α-lipoic acid in α-keto-acid oxidation systems. This brief review collects the scattered data available in the literature concerning asparagusic acid and highlights its properties, intermediary metabolism and exploratory applications. PMID:24099657

  9. Arachidonic acid release from rat Leydig cells: the involvement of G protein, phospholipase A2 and regulation of cAMP production.

    PubMed

    Ronco, A M; Moraga, P F; Llanos, M N

    2002-01-01

    We have previously demonstrated that the release of arachidonic acid (AA) from human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG)-stimulated Leydig cells occurs in a dose- and time-dependent manner. In addition, the amount of AA released was dependent on the hormone-receptor interaction and the concentration of LH-hCG binding sites on the cell surface. The present study was conducted to evaluate the involvement of phospholipase A(2) (PLA(2)) and G proteins in AA release from hormonally stimulated rat Leydig cells, and the possible role of this fatty acid in cAMP production. Cells were first prelabelled with [(14)C]AA to incorporate the fatty acid into cell phospholipids, and then treated in different ways to evaluate AA release. hCG (25 mIU) increased the release of AA to 180+/-12% when compared with AA released from control cells, arbitrarily set as 100%. Mepacrine and parabromophenacyl bromide (pBpB), two PLA(2) inhibitors, decreased the hormone-stimulated AA release to 85+/-9 and 70+/-24% respectively. Conversely, melittin, a PLA(2) stimulator, increased the release of AA up to 200% over control. The inhibitory effect of mepacrine on the release of AA was evident in hCG-treated Leydig cells, but not in the melittin-treated cells. To determine if the release of AA was also mediated through a G protein, cells were first permeabilized and subsequently treated with pertussis toxin or GTPgammaS, a non-hydrolyzable analog of GTP. Results demonstrate that GTPgammaS was able to induce a similar level of the release of AA as hCG. In addition, pertussis toxin completely abolished the stimulatory effect of hCG on the release of AA, indicating that a member of the G(i) family was involved in the hCG-dependent release of AA. Cells treated with PLA(2) inhibitors did not modify cAMP production, but exogenously added AA significantly reduced cAMP production from hCG-treated Leydig cells, in a manner dependent on the concentration of AA and hCG. Results presented here suggest an involvement of

  10. Standardized Ileal Amino Acid Digestibility of Commonly Used Feed Ingredients in Growing Broilers.

    PubMed

    Ullah, Zafar; Ahmed, Gulraiz; Nisa, Mehr Un; Sarwar, Muhammad

    2016-09-01

    This experiment was conducted to determine standardized ileal amino acid digestibility (SIAAD) of commonly used feed ingredients in poultry diets in Pakistan. These feed ingredients included corn, rice broken (RB), rice polishings (RP), wheat bran (WB), sunflower meal (SFM), cottonseed meal (CSM), guar meal (GM), soybean meal (SBM) from India and Argentine and fish meal (FM). The SIAAD of each ingredient was determined in triplicate using 21-days-old broilers. Day-old male broiler chicks (Hubbard× Hubbard) were reared on corn-SBM based diet from 1 to 13 days and thereafter birds were fed experimental diets from day 14 to 21. Each diet was fed to 36 birds kept in six replicate cages, each cage had six birds. In cereals, the SIAAD of corn's amino acid (AA) (90.1%) was similar (p>0.05) to RB (89.0%). Isoleucine (97.8%) and lysine (96.9%) were highly digestible AA in corn and RB, respectively. Among cereal-by products, WB's SIAAD (76.9%) was same (p>0.05) as RP (71.9%). Arginine from WB (82.5%) and RP (83.2%) was highly digestible. However, threonine in WB (72.7%) and leucine in RP (69.6%) were the lowest digestible AAs. In plant protein meals, AAs from Argentine-SBM (85.1%) and Indian-SBM (83.4%) had higher (p<0.5) SIAAD than other protein meals. However, SIAAD of SFM (77.1%) and CSM (71.7%) was intermediate while GM (60.3%) exhibited the lowest (p<0.05) SIAAD among all ingredients. Arginine from GM (76.9%), CSM (85.8%), SBM-India (89.5%) and SBM-Argentine (91.5%) was highly digestible from indispensable AAs. In SFM, methionine (91.4%) SIAAD was the greatest. The average SIAAD of FM was 77.6%. Alanine from FM had the highest (84.0%) but cysteine (62.8%) had the lowest SIAAD. In conclusion, cereals i.e. corn and RB had higher (p<0.05) SIAAD of the cereals by-products. The SIAAD of RP and WB was same (p>0.05). The SBM from plant protein meals had higher (p<0.05) SIAAD than other studied feed ingredients. However, the GM had the lowest (p<0.05) SIAAD among protein meals

  11. Standardized Ileal Amino Acid Digestibility of Commonly Used Feed Ingredients in Growing Broilers

    PubMed Central

    Ullah, Zafar; Ahmed, Gulraiz; Nisa, Mehr un; Sarwar, Muhammad

    2016-01-01

    This experiment was conducted to determine standardized ileal amino acid digestibility (SIAAD) of commonly used feed ingredients in poultry diets in Pakistan. These feed ingredients included corn, rice broken (RB), rice polishings (RP), wheat bran (WB), sunflower meal (SFM), cottonseed meal (CSM), guar meal (GM), soybean meal (SBM) from India and Argentine and fish meal (FM). The SIAAD of each ingredient was determined in triplicate using 21-days-old broilers. Day-old male broiler chicks (Hubbard× Hubbard) were reared on corn-SBM based diet from 1 to 13 days and thereafter birds were fed experimental diets from day 14 to 21. Each diet was fed to 36 birds kept in six replicate cages, each cage had six birds. In cereals, the SIAAD of corn’s amino acid (AA