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Sample records for acids glutamic acid

  1. Glutamic acid as anticancer agent: An overview

    PubMed Central

    Dutta, Satyajit; Ray, Supratim; Nagarajan, K.

    2013-01-01

    The objective of the article is to highlight various roles of glutamic acid like endogenic anticancer agent, conjugates to anticancer agents, and derivatives of glutamic acid as possible anticancer agents. Besides these emphases are given especially for two endogenous derivatives of glutamic acid such as glutamine and glutamate. Glutamine is a derivative of glutamic acid and is formed in the body from glutamic acid and ammonia in an energy requiring reaction catalyzed by glutamine synthase. It also possesses anticancer activity. So the transportation and metabolism of glutamine are also discussed for better understanding the role of glutamic acid. Glutamates are the carboxylate anions and salts of glutamic acid. Here the roles of various enzymes required for the metabolism of glutamates are also discussed. PMID:24227952

  2. 21 CFR 182.1045 - Glutamic acid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Glutamic acid. 182.1045 Section 182.1045 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN....1045 Glutamic acid. (a) Product. Glutamic acid. (b) (c) Limitations, restrictions, or explanation....

  3. 21 CFR 182.1045 - Glutamic acid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Glutamic acid. 182.1045 Section 182.1045 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN....1045 Glutamic acid. (a) Product. Glutamic acid. (b) (c) Limitations, restrictions, or explanation....

  4. 21 CFR 182.1045 - Glutamic acid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Glutamic acid. 182.1045 Section 182.1045 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN....1045 Glutamic acid. (a) Product. Glutamic acid. (b) (c) Limitations, restrictions, or explanation....

  5. 21 CFR 182.1045 - Glutamic acid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Glutamic acid. 182.1045 Section 182.1045 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN....1045 Glutamic acid. (a) Product. Glutamic acid. (b) (c) Limitations, restrictions, or explanation....

  6. 21 CFR 182.1045 - Glutamic acid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Glutamic acid. 182.1045 Section 182.1045 Food and... GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Multiple Purpose GRAS Food Substances § 182.1045 Glutamic acid. (a) Product. Glutamic acid. (b) (c) Limitations, restrictions, or explanation. This substance is generally recognized...

  7. The Degradation of 14C-Glutamic Acid by L-Glutamic Acid Decarboxylase.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dougherty, Charles M; Dayan, Jean

    1982-01-01

    Describes procedures and semi-micro reaction apparatus (carbon dioxide trap) to demonstrate how a particular enzyme (L-Glutamic acid decarboxylase) may be used to determine the site or sites of labeling in its substrate (carbon-14 labeled glutamic acid). Includes calculations, solutions, and reagents used. (Author/SK)

  8. Glutamic Acid Decarboxylation in Chlorella12

    PubMed Central

    Lane, T. R.; Stiller, Mary

    1970-01-01

    The decarboxylation of endogenous free glutamic acid by Chlorella pyrenoidosa, Marburg strain, was induced by a variety of metabolic poisons, by anaerobic conditions, and by freezing and thawing the cells. The rate of decarboxylation was proportional to the concentration of inhibitor present. Possible mechanisms which relate the effects of the various conditions on glutamate decarboxylation and oxygen consumption by Chlorella are discussed. Images PMID:5429350

  9. 21 CFR 182.1047 - Glutamic acid hydrochloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Glutamic acid hydrochloride. 182.1047 Section 182.1047 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED... Food Substances § 182.1047 Glutamic acid hydrochloride. (a) Product. Glutamic acid hydrochloride....

  10. 21 CFR 182.1047 - Glutamic acid hydrochloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Glutamic acid hydrochloride. 182.1047 Section 182.1047 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED... Food Substances § 182.1047 Glutamic acid hydrochloride. (a) Product. Glutamic acid hydrochloride....

  11. 21 CFR 182.1047 - Glutamic acid hydrochloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Glutamic acid hydrochloride. 182.1047 Section 182.1047 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED... Food Substances § 182.1047 Glutamic acid hydrochloride. (a) Product. Glutamic acid hydrochloride....

  12. 21 CFR 182.1047 - Glutamic acid hydrochloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Glutamic acid hydrochloride. 182.1047 Section 182...) SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Multiple Purpose GRAS Food Substances § 182.1047 Glutamic acid hydrochloride. (a) Product. Glutamic acid hydrochloride. (b) (c) Limitations, restrictions, or explanation....

  13. 21 CFR 182.1047 - Glutamic acid hydrochloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Glutamic acid hydrochloride. 182.1047 Section 182.1047 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED... Food Substances § 182.1047 Glutamic acid hydrochloride. (a) Product. Glutamic acid hydrochloride....

  14. A Glutamic Acid-Producing Lactic Acid Bacteria Isolated from Malaysian Fermented Foods

    PubMed Central

    Zareian, Mohsen; Ebrahimpour, Afshin; Bakar, Fatimah Abu; Mohamed, Abdul Karim Sabo; Forghani, Bita; Ab-Kadir, Mohd Safuan B.; Saari, Nazamid

    2012-01-01

    l-glutamaic acid is the principal excitatory neurotransmitter in the brain and an important intermediate in metabolism. In the present study, lactic acid bacteria (218) were isolated from six different fermented foods as potent sources of glutamic acid producers. The presumptive bacteria were tested for their ability to synthesize glutamic acid. Out of the 35 strains showing this capability, strain MNZ was determined as the highest glutamic-acid producer. Identification tests including 16S rRNA gene sequencing and sugar assimilation ability identified the strain MNZ as Lactobacillus plantarum. The characteristics of this microorganism related to its glutamic acid-producing ability, growth rate, glucose consumption and pH profile were studied. Results revealed that glutamic acid was formed inside the cell and excreted into the extracellular medium. Glutamic acid production was found to be growth-associated and glucose significantly enhanced glutamic acid production (1.032 mmol/L) compared to other carbon sources. A concentration of 0.7% ammonium nitrate as a nitrogen source effectively enhanced glutamic acid production. To the best of our knowledge this is the first report of glutamic acid production by lactic acid bacteria. The results of this study can be further applied for developing functional foods enriched in glutamic acid and subsequently γ-amino butyric acid (GABA) as a bioactive compound. PMID:22754309

  15. Therapeutic Effects of Glutamic Acid in Piglets Challenged with Deoxynivalenol

    PubMed Central

    Ren, Wenkai; Yin, Jie; Tan, Bie; Liu, Gang; Li, Lili; Nyachoti, Charles Martin; Xiong, Xia; Wu, Guoyao

    2014-01-01

    The mycotoxin deoxynivalenol (DON), one of the most common food contaminants, primarily targets the gastrointestinal tract to affect animal and human health. This study was conducted to examine the protective function of glutamic acid on intestinal injury and oxidative stress caused by DON in piglets. Twenty-eight piglets were assigned randomly into 4 dietary treatments (7 pigs/treatment): 1) uncontaminated control diet (NC), 2) NC+DON at 4 mg/kg (DON), 3) NC+2% glutamic acid (GLU), and 4) NC+2% glutamic acid + DON at 4 mg/kg (DG). At day 15, 30 and 37, blood samples were collected to determine serum concentrations of CAT (catalase), T-AOC (total antioxidant capacity), H2O2 (hydrogen peroxide), NO (nitric oxide), MDA (maleic dialdehyde), DAO (diamine oxidase) and D-lactate. Intestinal morphology, and the activation of Akt/mTOR/4EBP1 signal pathway, as well as the concentrations of H2O2, MDA, and DAO in kidney, liver and small intestine, were analyzed at day 37. Results showed that DON significantly (P<0.05) induced oxidative stress in piglets, while this stress was remarkably reduced with glutamic acid supplementation according to the change of oxidative parameters in blood and tissues. Meanwhile, DON caused obvious intestinal injury from microscopic observations and permeability indicators, which was alleviated by glutamic acid supplementation. Moreover, the inhibition of DON on Akt/mTOR/4EBP1 signal pathway was reduced by glutamic acid supplementation. Collectively, these data suggest that glutamic acid may be a useful nutritional regulator for DON-induced damage manifested as oxidative stress, intestinal injury and signaling inhibition. PMID:24984001

  16. Synthesis of biobased succinonitrile from glutamic acid and glutamine.

    PubMed

    Lammens, Tijs M; Le Nôtre, Jérôme; Franssen, Maurice C R; Scott, Elinor L; Sanders, Johan P M

    2011-06-20

    Succinonitrile is the precursor of 1,4-diaminobutane, which is used for the industrial production of polyamides. This paper describes the synthesis of biobased succinonitrile from glutamic acid and glutamine, amino acids that are abundantly present in many plant proteins. Synthesis of the intermediate 3-cyanopropanoic amide was achieved from glutamic acid 5-methyl ester in an 86 mol% yield and from glutamine in a 56 mol % yield. 3-Cyanopropanoic acid can be converted into succinonitrile, with a selectivity close to 100% and a 62% conversion, by making use of a palladium(II)-catalyzed equilibrium reaction with acetonitrile. Thus, a new route to produce biobased 1,4-diaminobutane has been discovered. PMID:21557494

  17. Neonatal hyperammonemia: the N-carbamoyl-L-glutamic acid test.

    PubMed

    Guffon, Nathalie; Schiff, Manuel; Cheillan, David; Wermuth, Bendicht; Häberle, Johannes; Vianey-Saban, Christine

    2005-08-01

    In a prospective study, patients with a suspected urea cycle defect underwent oral N-carbamoyl-L-glutamic acid loading testing. In patients with subsequently confirmed N-acetylglutamate synthase deficiency, hyperammonemia normalized within 8 hours. This test may be useful in the early diagnosis of patients with suspected urea cycle disorders. PMID:16126063

  18. 40 CFR 721.3821 - L-Glutamic acid, N-(1-oxododecyl)-.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false L-Glutamic acid, N-(1-oxododecyl... Substances § 721.3821 L-Glutamic acid, N-(1-oxododecyl)-. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified as L-Glutamic acid, N-(1-oxododecyl)- (PMN...

  19. 40 CFR 721.3821 - L-Glutamic acid, N-(1-oxododecyl)-.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false L-Glutamic acid, N-(1-oxododecyl... Substances § 721.3821 L-Glutamic acid, N-(1-oxododecyl)-. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified as L-Glutamic acid, N-(1-oxododecyl)- (PMN...

  20. 40 CFR 721.3821 - L-Glutamic acid, N-(1-oxododecyl)-.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false L-Glutamic acid, N-(1-oxododecyl... Substances § 721.3821 L-Glutamic acid, N-(1-oxododecyl)-. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified as L-Glutamic acid, N-(1-oxododecyl)- (PMN...

  1. 40 CFR 721.3821 - L-Glutamic acid, N-(1-oxododecyl)-.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false L-Glutamic acid, N-(1-oxododecyl... Substances § 721.3821 L-Glutamic acid, N-(1-oxododecyl)-. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified as L-Glutamic acid, N-(1-oxododecyl)- (PMN...

  2. 40 CFR 721.3821 - L-Glutamic acid, N-(1-oxododecyl)-.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false L-Glutamic acid, N-(1-oxododecyl... Substances § 721.3821 L-Glutamic acid, N-(1-oxododecyl)-. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified as L-Glutamic acid, N-(1-oxododecyl)- (PMN...

  3. [PECULIARITIES OF THE CEREBROVASCULAR EFFECTS OF GLUTAMIC ACID].

    PubMed

    Gan'shina, T S; Kurza, E V; Kurdyumov, I N; Maslennikov, D V; Mirzoyan, R S

    2016-01-01

    Experiments on nonlinear rats subjected to global transient cerebral ischemia revealed the ability of glutamic acid to improve cerebral circulation. Consequently, the excitatory amino acid can produce adverse (neurotoxic) and positive (anti-ischemic) effects in cerebral ischemia. The cerebrovascular effect of glutamic acid in cerebral ischemia is attenuated on the background action of the MNDA receptor blocker MK-801 (0.5 mg/kg intravenously) and eliminated by bicuculline. When glutamic acid is combined with the non-competitive MNDA receptor antagonist MK-801, neither one nor another drug shows its vasodilator effect. The results are indicative of the interaction between excitatory and inhibitory systems on the level of cerebral vessels and once again confirm our previous conclusion about the decisive role of GABA(A) receptors in brain vessels in the implementation of anti-ischemic activity of endogenous compounds (melatonin) and well-known pharmacological substances (mexidol, afobazole), and new chemical compounds based on GABA-containing lipid derivatives. PMID:27455572

  4. [Cardioprotective properties of new glutamic acid derivative under stress conditions].

    PubMed

    Perfilova, V N; Sadikova, N V; Berestovitskaia, V M; Vasil'eva, O S

    2014-01-01

    The effect of new glutamic acid derivative on the cardiac ino- and chronotropic functions has been studied in experiments on rats exposed to 24-hour immobilization-and-pain stress. It is established that glutamic acid derivative RGPU-238 (glufimet) at a dose of 28.7 mg/kg increases the increment of myocardial contractility and relaxation rates and left ventricular pressure in stress-tested animals by 13 1,1, 72.4, and 118.6%, respectively, as compared to the control group during the test for adrenoreactivity. Compound RGPU-238 increases the increment of the maximum intensity of myocardium functioning by 196.5 % at 30 sec of isometric workload as compared to the control group. The cardioprotective effect of compound RGPU-238 is 1.5 - 2 times higher than that of the reference drug phenibut. PMID:25365864

  5. The dissolution of natural and artificial dusts in glutamic acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ling, Zhang; Faqin, Dong; Xiaochun, He

    2015-06-01

    This article describes the characteristics of natural dusts, industrial dusts, and artificial dusts, such as mineral phases, chemical components, morphological observation and size. Quartz and calcite are the main phases of natural dusts and industrial dusts with high SiO2 and CaO and low K2O and Na2O in the chemical composition. The dissolution and electrochemical action of dusts in glutamic acid liquor at the simulated human body temperature (37 °C) in 32 h was investigated. The potential harm that the dust could lead to in body glutamic acid acidic environment, namely biological activity, is of great importance for revealing the human toxicological mechanism. The changes of pH values and electric conductivity of suspension of those dusts were similar, increased slowly in the first 8 h, and then the pH values increased rapidly. The total amount of dissolved ions of K, Ca, Na, and Mg was 35.4 to 429 mg/kg, particularly Ca was maximal of 20 to 334 mg/kg. The total amount of dissolved ions of Fe, Zn, Mn, Pb, and Ba was 0.18 to 5.59 mg/kg and in Al and Si was 3.0 to 21.7 mg/kg. The relative solubility order of dusts in glutamic acid is wollastonite > serpentine > sepiolite, the cement plant industrial dusts > natural dusts > power plant industrial dusts. The wollastonite and cement plant industrial dusts have the highest solubility, which also have high content of CaO; this shows that there are a poorer corrosion-resisting ability and lower bio-resistibility. Sepiolite and power plant industrial dusts have lowest solubility, which also have high content of SiO2; this shows that there are a higher corrosion-resisting ability and stronger bio-resistibility.

  6. Conformation of poly(γ-glutamic acid) in aqueous solution.

    PubMed

    Muroga, Yoshio; Nakaya, Asami; Inoue, Atsuki; Itoh, Daiki; Abiru, Masaya; Wada, Kaori; Takada, Masako; Ikake, Hiroki; Shimizu, Shigeru

    2016-04-01

    Local conformation and overall conformation of poly(γ-DL-glutamic acid) (PγDLGA) and poly(γ-L-glutamic acid) (PγLGA) in aqueous solution was studied as a function of degree of ionization ε by (1) H-NMR, circular dichroism, and potentiometric titration. It was clarified that their local conformation is represented by random coil over an entire ε range and their overall conformation is represented by expanded random-coil in a range of ε > ε(*) , where ε(*) is about 0.3, 0.35, 0.45, and 0.5 for added-salt concentration of 0.02M, 0.05M, 0.1M, and 0.2M, respectively. In a range of ε < ε(*) , however, ε dependence of their overall conformation is significantly differentiated from each other. PγDLGA tends to aggregate intramolecularly and/or intermolecularly with decreasing ε, but PγLGA still behaves as expanded random-coil. It is speculated that spatial arrangement of adjacent carboxyl groups along the backbone chain essentially affects the overall conformation of PγGA in acidic media. PMID:26574908

  7. Simultaneous and selective production of levan and poly(gamma-glutamic acid) by Bacillus subtilis.

    PubMed

    Shih, Ing-Lung; Yu, Yun-Ti

    2005-01-01

    Bacillus subtilis(natto) Takahashi, used to prepare the fermented soybean product natto, was grown in a basal medium containing 5% (w/w) sucrose and 1.5% (w/w) L-glutamate and produced 58% (w/w) poly(gamma-glutamic acid) and 42% (w/w) levan simultaneously. After 21 h, 40-50 mg levan ml-1 had been produced in medium containing 20% (w/w) sucrose but without L-glutamate. In medium containing L-glutamic acid but without sucrose, mainly poly(gamma-glutamic acid) was produced. PMID:15703872

  8. Stability of Poly(α-L Glutamic Acid).

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Peter; Chen, Y. Z.; Prohofsky, E. W.

    1996-03-01

    For the protein to go to their folded biologically active state, it must first undergo formation of the stabilizing α-helix structure. Taking the repeating unit cells of Glutamic acid in an α-helix structure, the analysis can be made of the vibrational dynamics of the Poly(α-L Glutamic acid). The method used was mean field, modified, self-consistent phonon theory (MSPA) developed by Prohofsky et al. The modes contributing to the fluctuations of the α-helix hydrogen bonds were analyzed yielding the break down probability from the room temperature to the critical temperature Tc where the hydrogen bond probability is over 0.5. The inverse proportionality of the opening bond probability to the relaxation time τ * was then used to compare our results to ultra sonic and electric-field jump experiments. These experiments were done at temperatures ranging from 295 K to 310 K. The data obtained from these experiments agrees well with the temperature dependent MSPA open bond probabilities with correlation constant of (1.6 ± 0.1)x10e-8. Our calculation also yielded critical melting temperature of Tc=332 K.

  9. A novel glutamate transport system in poly(γ-glutamic acid)-producing strain Bacillus subtilis CGMCC 0833.

    PubMed

    Wu, Qun; Xu, Hong; Zhang, Dan; Ouyang, Pingkai

    2011-08-01

    Bacillus subtilis CGMCC 0833 is a poly(γ-glutamic acid) (γ-PGA)-producing strain. It has the capacity to tolerate high concentration of extracellular glutamate and to utilize glutamate actively. Such a high uptake capacity was owing to an active transport system for glutamate. Therefore, a specific transport system for L-glutamate has been observed in this strain. It was a novel transport process in which glutamate was symported with at least two protons, and an inward-directed sodium gradient had no stimulatory effect on it. K(m) and V(m) for glutamate transport were estimated to be 67 μM and 152 nmol⁻¹ min⁻¹ mg⁻¹ of protein, respectively. The transport system showed structural specificity and stereospecificity and was strongly dependent on extracellular pH. Moreover, it could be stimulated by Mg²⁺, NH₄⁺, and Ca²⁺. In addition, the glutamate transporter in this strain was studied at the molecular level. As there was no important mutation of the transporter protein, it appeared that the differences of glutamate transporter properties between this strain and other B. subtilis strains were not due to the differences of the amino acid sequence and the structure of transporter protein. This is the first extensive report on the properties of glutamate transport system in γ-PGA-producing strain. PMID:21437781

  10. 21 CFR 573.500 - Condensed, extracted glutamic acid fermentation product.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS FOOD ADDITIVES PERMITTED IN FEED... fermentation product. Condensed, extracted glutamic acid fermentation product may be safely used in animal feed... glutamic acid. (b) It is used or intended for use as follows: (1) In poultry feed as a source of protein...

  11. 21 CFR 573.500 - Condensed, extracted glutamic acid fermentation product.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS FOOD ADDITIVES PERMITTED IN FEED... fermentation product. Condensed, extracted glutamic acid fermentation product may be safely used in animal feed... glutamic acid. (b) It is used or intended for use as follows: (1) In poultry feed as a source of protein...

  12. 21 CFR 573.500 - Condensed, extracted glutamic acid fermentation product.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS FOOD ADDITIVES PERMITTED IN FEED... fermentation product. Condensed, extracted glutamic acid fermentation product may be safely used in animal feed... glutamic acid. (b) It is used or intended for use as follows: (1) In poultry feed as a source of protein...

  13. 21 CFR 573.500 - Condensed, extracted glutamic acid fermentation product.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS FOOD ADDITIVES PERMITTED IN FEED... fermentation product. Condensed, extracted glutamic acid fermentation product may be safely used in animal feed... glutamic acid. (b) It is used or intended for use as follows: (1) In poultry feed as a source of protein...

  14. 40 CFR 721.3820 - L-Glutamic acid, N-(1-oxododecyl)-, disodium salt.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false L-Glutamic acid, N-(1-oxododecyl... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.3820 L-Glutamic acid, N-(1-oxododecyl)-, disodium salt. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified as...

  15. 40 CFR 180.1187 - L-glutamic acid; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 23 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false L-glutamic acid; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance. 180.1187 Section 180.1187 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION... Exemptions From Tolerances § 180.1187 L-glutamic acid; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance....

  16. 40 CFR 180.1187 - L-glutamic acid; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false L-glutamic acid; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance. 180.1187 Section 180.1187 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION... Exemptions From Tolerances § 180.1187 L-glutamic acid; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance....

  17. 40 CFR 721.3820 - L-Glutamic acid, N-(1-oxododecyl)-, disodium salt.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false L-Glutamic acid, N-(1-oxododecyl... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.3820 L-Glutamic acid, N-(1-oxododecyl)-, disodium salt. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified as...

  18. Effects of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase desensitization on glutamic acid production in Corynebacterium glutamicum ATCC 13032.

    PubMed

    Wada, Masaru; Sawada, Kazunori; Ogura, Kotaro; Shimono, Yuta; Hagiwara, Takuya; Sugimoto, Masakazu; Onuki, Akiko; Yokota, Atsushi

    2016-02-01

    Phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC) in Corynebacterium glutamicum ATCC13032, a glutamic-acid producing actinobacterium, is subject to feedback inhibition by metabolic intermediates such as aspartic acid and 2-oxoglutaric acid, which implies the importance of PEPC in replenishing oxaloacetic acid into the TCA cycle. Here, we investigated the effects of feedback-insensitive PEPC on glutamic acid production. A single amino-acid substitution in PEPC, D299N, was found to relieve the feedback control by aspartic acid, but not by 2-oxoglutaric acid. A simple mutant, strain R1, having the D299N substitution in PEPC was constructed from ATCC 13032 using the double-crossover chromosome replacement technique. Strain R1 produced glutamic acid at a concentration of 31.0 g/L from 100 g/L glucose in a jar fermentor culture under biotin-limited conditions, which was significantly higher than that of the parent, 26.0 g/L (1.19-fold), indicative of the positive effect of desensitized PEPC on glutamic acid production. Another mutant, strain DR1, having both desensitized PEPC and PYK-gene deleted mutations, was constructed in a similar manner using strain D1 with a PYK-gene deleted mutation as the parent. This mutation had been shown to enhance glutamic acid production in our previous study. Although marginal, strain D1 produced higher glutamic acid, 28.8 g/L, than ATCC13032 (1.11-fold). In contrast, glutamic acid production by strain DR-1 was elevated up to 36.9 g/L, which was 1.42-fold higher than ATCC13032 and significantly higher than the other three strains. The results showed a synergistic effect of these two mutations on glutamic acid production in C. glutamicum. PMID:26168906

  19. Anti-glutamic acid decarboxylase antibody positive neurological syndromes.

    PubMed

    Tohid, Hassaan

    2016-07-01

    A rare kind of antibody, known as anti-glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD) autoantibody, is found in some patients. The antibody works against the GAD enzyme, which is essential in the formation of gamma aminobutyric acid (GABA), an inhibitory neurotransmitter found in the brain. Patients found with this antibody present with motor and cognitive problems due to low levels or lack of GABA, because in the absence or low levels of GABA patients exhibit motor and cognitive symptoms. The anti-GAD antibody is found in some neurological syndromes, including stiff-person syndrome, paraneoplastic stiff-person syndrome, Miller Fisher syndrome (MFS), limbic encephalopathy, cerebellar ataxia, eye movement disorders, and epilepsy. Previously, excluding MFS, these conditions were calledhyperexcitability disorders. However, collectively, these syndromes should be known as "anti-GAD positive neurological syndromes." An important limitation of this study is that the literature is lacking on the subject, and why patients with the above mentioned neurological problems present with different symptoms has not been studied in detail. Therefore, it is recommended that more research is conducted on this subject to obtain a better and deeper understanding of these anti-GAD antibody induced neurological syndromes. PMID:27356651

  20. Arachidonic acid induces a prolonged inhibition of glutamate uptake into glial cells.

    PubMed

    Barbour, B; Szatkowski, M; Ingledew, N; Attwell, D

    Activation of NMDA (N-methyl-D-aspartate) receptors by neurotransmitter glutamate stimulates phospholipase A2 to release arachidonic acid. This second messenger facilitates long-term potentiation of glutamatergic synapses in the hippocampus, possibly by blocking glutamate uptake. We have studied the effect of arachidonic acid on glutamate uptake into glial cells using the whole-cell patch-clamp technique to monitor the uptake electrically. Micromolar levels of arachidonic acid inhibit glutamate uptake, mainly by reducing the maximum uptake rate with only small effects on the affinity for external glutamate and sodium. On removal of arachidonic acid a rapid (5 minutes) phase of partial recovery is followed by a maintained suppression of uptake lasting at least 20 minutes. Surprisingly, the action of arachidonic acid is unaffected by cyclo-oxygenase or lipoxygenase inhibitors suggesting that it inhibits uptake directly, possibly by increasing membrane fluidity. As blockade of phospholipase A2 prevents the induction of long-term potentiation (LTP), inhibition of glutamate uptake by arachidonic acid may contribute to the increase of synaptic gain that occurs in LTP. During anoxia, release of arachidonic acid could severely compromise glutamate uptake and thus contribute to neuronal death. PMID:2512508

  1. The Monosodium Glutamate Story: The Commercial Production of MSG and Other Amino Acids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ault, Addison

    2004-03-01

    Examples of the industrial synthesis of pure amino acids are presented. The emphasis is on the synthesis of ( S )-glutamic acid and, to a lesser extent, ( S )-lysine and ( R,S )-methionine. These amino acids account for about 90% of the total world production of amino acids, ( S )-glutamic acid being used as a flavor-enhancing additive (MSG) for the human diet, and ( S )-lysine and ( R,S )-methionine as supplements for the feeding of domestic animals. Examples include chemical, enzymatic, and fermentation synthesis, and two clever continuous processes for the resolution of enantiomers. See Featured Molecules .

  2. Specificity of Aspartate Aminotransferases from Leguminous Plants for 4-Substituted Glutamic Acids 1

    PubMed Central

    Winter, Harry C.; Dekker, Eugene E.

    1989-01-01

    Aspartate aminotransferase (glutamate-oxalacetate transaminase) was partially purified from extracts of germinating seeds of peanut (Arachis hypogaea), honey locust (Gleditsia triacanthos), soybean (Glycine max), and Sophora japonica. The ability of these enzyme preparations, as well as aspartate aminotransferase purified from pig heart cytosol, to use 4-substituted glutamic acids as amino group donors and their corresponding 2-oxo acids as amino group acceptors in the aminotransferase reaction was measured. All 4-substituted glutamic acid analogs tested were poorer substrates than was glutamate or 2-oxoglutarate. 2-Oxo-4-methyleneglutarate was least effective (lowest relative Vm/Km) as a substrate for the enzyme from peanuts and honey locust, which are the two species studied that accumulate 4-methyleneglutamic acid and 4-methyleneglutamine. Of the different aminotransferases tested, the enzyme from honey locust was the least active with 2-oxo-4-hydroxy-4-methylglutarate, the corresponding amino acid of which also accumulates in that species. These results suggest that transamination of 2-oxo-4-substituted glutaric acids is not involved in the biosynthesis of the corresponding 4-substituted glutamic acids in these species. Rather, accumulation of certain 4-substituted glutamic acids in these instances may be, in part, the result of the inefficacy of their transamination by aspartate aminotransferase. PMID:16666674

  3. [Effect of excitant amino acid antagonists on glutamate receptors in the locust and on convulsions induced by glutamate, aspartate, kynurenine and quinolinic acid in mice].

    PubMed

    Ryzhov, I V; Slepokurov, M V; Lapin, I P; Mandel'shtam, Iu E; Aleksandrov, V G

    1986-03-01

    All excitatory amino acid antagonists studied: diethyl esters of aspartic (DEEA) and glutamic (DEEG) acids, 2-amino-3-phosphono-propionic acid (APPA) and 2-amino-4-phosphono-butanoic acid (APBA), diminished the amplitude of excitatory postsynaptic potentials (EPP) of the locust (Locusta migratoria migratorioides) muscle fibers and arbitrary blocked glutamate (GLU) and aspartate (ASP) responses. Kynurenine (KYN) and quinolinic (QUI) acid had no effect on EPP even at a concentration of 2 X 10(-2) M. The antagonists were not strictly selective against intracerebroventricularly administered endogenous convulsants: GLU, ASP, KYN and QUI and in simulation of experimental seizures in mice. The antagonists structurally similar to ASP prevented ASP- and KYN-induced seizures in lower doses than GLU derivatives. Anti-KYN, but not anti-QUI DEEA, DEEG, APPA and APBA efficacy suggests that KYN and QUI act on different structures or binding sites. PMID:2869799

  4. Conformational analysis of glutamic acid: a density functional approach using implicit continuum solvent model.

    PubMed

    Turan, Başak; Selçuki, Cenk

    2014-09-01

    Amino acids are constituents of proteins and enzymes which take part almost in all metabolic reactions. Glutamic acid, with an ability to form a negatively charged side chain, plays a major role in intra and intermolecular interactions of proteins, peptides, and enzymes. An exhaustive conformational analysis has been performed for all eight possible forms at B3LYP/cc-pVTZ level. All possible neutral, zwitterionic, protonated, and deprotonated forms of glutamic acid structures have been investigated in solution by using polarizable continuum model mimicking water as the solvent. Nine families based on the dihedral angles have been classified for eight glutamic acid forms. The electrostatic effects included in the solvent model usually stabilize the charged forms more. However, the stability of the zwitterionic form has been underestimated due to the lack of hydrogen bonding between the solute and solvent; therefore, it is observed that compact neutral glutamic acid structures are more stable in solution than they are in vacuum. Our calculations have shown that among all eight possible forms, some are not stable in solution and are immediately converted to other more stable forms. Comparison of isoelectronic glutamic acid forms indicated that one of the structures among possible zwitterionic and anionic forms may dominate over the other possible forms. Additional investigations using explicit solvent models are necessary to determine the stability of charged forms of glutamic acid in solution as our results clearly indicate that hydrogen bonding and its type have a major role in the structure and energy of conformers. PMID:25135067

  5. The selective conversion of glutamic acid in amino acid mixtures using glutamate decarboxylase--a means of separating amino acids for synthesizing biobased chemicals.

    PubMed

    Teng, Yinglai; Scott, Elinor L; Sanders, Johan P M

    2014-01-01

    Amino acids (AAs) derived from hydrolysis of protein rest streams are interesting feedstocks for the chemical industry due to their functionality. However, separation of AAs is required before they can be used for further applications. Electrodialysis may be applied to separate AAs, but its efficiency is limited when separating AAs with similar isoelectric points. To aid the separation, specific conversion of an AA to a useful product with different charge behavior to the remaining compounds is desired. Here the separation of L-aspartic acid (Asp) and L-glutamic acid (Glu) was studied. L-Glutamate α-decarboxylase (GAD, Type I, EC 4.1.1.15) was applied to specifically convert Glu into γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA). GABA has a different charge behavior from Asp therefore allowing a potential separation by electrodialysis. Competitive inhibition and reduced operational stability caused by Asp could be eliminated by maintaining a sufficiently high concentration of Glu. Immobilization of GAD does not reduce the enzyme's initial activity. However, the operational stability was slightly reduced. An initial study on the reaction operating in a continuous mode was performed using a column reactor packed with immobilized GAD. As the reaction mixture was only passed once through the reactor, the conversion of Glu was lower than expected. To complete the conversion of Glu, the stream containing Asp and unreacted Glu might be recirculated back to the reactor after GABA has been removed. Overall, the reaction by GAD is specific to Glu and can be applied to aid the electrodialysis separation of Asp and Glu. PMID:24616376

  6. Electrochemical synthesis of adiponitrile from the renewable raw material glutamic acid.

    PubMed

    Dai, Jian-Jun; Huang, Yao-Bing; Fang, Chi; Guo, Qing-Xiang; Fu, Yao

    2012-04-01

    Current affairs: Adiponitrile, used to produce nylon 6.6, is prepared from the renewable compound glutamic acid by an electrochemical route, involving electro-oxidative decarboxylation and Kolbe coupling reactions. The new route is an example of the use of glutamic acid as a versatile substrate in the transformation of biomass into chemicals. Also, it highlights the use of electrochemical methods in biomass conversion. PMID:22441826

  7. Glutamic acid decarboxylase isoform distribution in transgenic mouse septum: an anti-GFP immunofluorescence study.

    PubMed

    Verimli, Ural; Sehirli, Umit S

    2016-09-01

    The septum is a basal forebrain region located between the lateral ventricles in rodents. It consists of lateral and medial divisions. Medial septal projections regulate hippocampal theta rhythm whereas lateral septal projections are involved in processes such as affective functions, memory formation, and behavioral responses. Gamma-aminobutyric acidergic neurons of the septal region possess the 65 and 67 isoforms of the enzyme glutamic acid decarboxylase. Although data on the glutamic acid decarboxylase isoform distribution in the septal region generally appears to indicate glutamic acid decarboxylase 67 dominance, different studies have given inconsistent results in this regard. The aim of this study was therefore to obtain information on the distributions of both of these glutamic acid decarboxylase isoforms in the septal region in transgenic mice. Two animal groups of glutamic acid decarboxylase-green fluorescent protein knock-in transgenic mice were utilized in the experiment. Brain sections from the region were taken for anti-green fluorescent protein immunohistochemistry in order to obtain estimated quantitative data on the number of gamma-aminobutyric acidergic neurons. Following the immunohistochemical procedures, the mean numbers of labeled cells in the lateral and medial septal nuclei were obtained for the two isoform groups. Statistical analysis yielded significant results which indicated that the 65 isoform of glutamic acid decarboxylase predominates in both lateral and medial septal nuclei (unpaired two-tailed t-test p < 0.0001 for LS, p < 0.01 for MS). This study is the first to reveal the dominance of glutamic acid decarboxylase isoform 65 in the septal region in glutamic acid decarboxylase-green fluorescent protein transgenic mice. PMID:26643381

  8. Paraneoplastic Neurological Syndromes and Glutamic Acid Decarboxylase Antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Ariño, Helena; Höftberger, Romana; Gresa-Arribas, Nuria; Martínez-Hernandez, Eugenia; Armangue, Thaís; Kruer, Michael C.; Arpa, Javier; Domingo, Julio; Rojc, Bojan; Bataller, Luis; Saiz, Albert; Dalmau, Josep; Graus, Francesc

    2016-01-01

    IMPORTANCE Little is known of glutamic acid decarboxylase antibodies (GAD-abs) in the paraneoplastic context. Clinical recognition of such cases will lead to prompt tumor diagnosis and appropriate treatment. OBJECTIVE To report the clinical and immunological features of patients with paraneoplastic neurological syndromes (PNS) and GAD-abs. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS Retrospective case series study and immunological investigations conducted in February 2014 in a center for autoimmune neurological disorders. Fifteen cases with GAD65-abs evaluated between 1995 and 2013 who fulfilled criteria of definite or possible PNS without concomitant onconeural antibodies were included in this study. MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES Analysis of the clinical records of 15 patients and review of 19 previously reported cases. Indirect immunofluorescence with rat hippocampal neuronal cultures and cell-based assays with known neuronal cell-surface antigens were used. One hundred six patients with GAD65-abs and no cancer served as control individuals. RESULTS Eight of the 15 patients with cancer presented as classic paraneoplastic syndromes (5 limbic encephalitis, 1 paraneoplastic encephalomyelitis, 1 paraneoplastic cerebellar degeneration, and 1 opsoclonus-myoclonus syndrome). When compared with the 106 non-PNS cases, those with PNS were older (median age, 60 years vs 48 years; P = .03), more frequently male (60% vs 13%; P < .001), and had more often coexisting neuronal cell-surface antibodies, mainly against γ-aminobutyric acid receptors (53%vs 11%; P < .001). The tumors more frequently involved were lung (n = 6) and thymic neoplasms (n = 4). The risk for an underlying tumor was higher if the presentation was a classic PNS, if it was different from stiff-person syndrome or cerebellar ataxia (odds ratio, 10.5; 95%CI, 3.2–34.5), or if the patient had coexisting neuronal cell-surface antibodies (odds ratio, 6.8; 95%CI, 1.1–40.5). Compared with the current series, the 19 previously

  9. Independent and additive effects of glutamic acid and methionine on yeast longevity.

    PubMed

    Wu, Ziyun; Song, Lixia; Liu, Shao Quan; Huang, Dejian

    2013-01-01

    It is established that glucose restriction extends yeast chronological and replicative lifespan, but little is known about the influence of amino acids on yeast lifespan, although some amino acids were reported to delay aging in rodents. Here we show that amino acid composition greatly alters yeast chronological lifespan. We found that non-essential amino acids (to yeast) methionine and glutamic acid had the most significant impact on yeast chronological lifespan extension, restriction of methionine and/or increase of glutamic acid led to longevity that was not the result of low acetic acid production and acidification in aging media. Remarkably, low methionine, high glutamic acid and glucose restriction additively and independently extended yeast lifespan, which could not be further extended by buffering the medium (pH 6.0). Our preliminary findings using yeasts with gene deletion demonstrate that glutamic acid addition, methionine and glucose restriction prompt yeast longevity through distinct mechanisms. This study may help to fill a gap in yeast model for the fast developing view that nutrient balance is a critical factor to extend lifespan. PMID:24244480

  10. The glutamate and neutral amino acid transporter family: physiological and pharmacological implications.

    PubMed

    Kanai, Yoshikatsu; Hediger, Matthias A

    2003-10-31

    The solute carrier family 1 (SLC1) is composed of five high affinity glutamate transporters, which exhibit the properties of the previously described system XAG-, as well as two Na+-dependent neutral amino acid transporters with characteristics of the so-called "ASC" (alanine, serine and cysteine). The SLC1 family members are structurally similar, with almost identical hydropathy profiles and predicted membrane topologies. The transporters have eight transmembrane domains and a structure reminiscent of a pore loop between the seventh and eighth domains [Neuron 21 (1998) 623]. However, each of these transporters exhibits distinct functional properties. Glutamate transporters mediate transport of L-Glu, L-Asp and D-Asp, accompanied by the cotransport of 3 Na+ and one 1 H+, and the countertransport of 1 K+, whereas ASC transporters mediate Na+-dependent exchange of small neutral amino acids such as Ala, Ser, Cys and Thr. Given the high concentrating capacity provided by the unique ion coupling pattern of glutamate transporters, they play crucial roles in protecting neurons against glutamate excitotoxicity in the central nervous system (CNS). The regulation and manipulation of their function is a critical issue in the pathogenesis and treatment of CNS disorders involving glutamate excitotoxicity. Loss of function of the glial glutamate transporter GLT1 (SLC1A2) has been implicated in the pathogenesis of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), resulting in damage of adjacent motor neurons. The importance of glial glutamate transporters in protecting neurons from extracellular glutamate was further demonstrated in studies of the slc1A2 glutamate transporter knockout mouse. The findings suggest that therapeutic upregulation of GLT1 may be beneficial in a variety of pathological conditions. Selective inhibition of the neuronal glutamate transporter EAAC1 (SLC1A1) but not the glial glutamate transporters may be of therapeutic interest, allowing blockage of glutamate exit from

  11. Catalysis of the Oligomerization of O-Phospho-Serine, Aspartic Acid, or Glutamic Acid by Cationic Micelles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boehler, Christof; Hill, Aubrey R., Jr.; Orgel, Leslie E.

    1996-01-01

    Treatment of relatively concentrated aqueous solutions of O-phospho-serine (50 mM), aspartic acid (100 mM) or glutamic acid (100 mM) with carbonyldiimidazole leads to the formation of an activated intermediate that oligomerizes efficiently. When the concentration of amino acid is reduced tenfold, few long oligomers can be detected. Positively-charged cetyltrimethyl ammonium bromide micelles concentrate the negatively-charged activated intermediates of the amino acids at their surfaces and catalyze efficient oligomerization even from dilute solutions.

  12. Catalysis of the Oligomerization of O-Phospho-Serine, Aspartic Acid, or Glutamic Acid by Cationic Micelles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bohler, Christof; Hill, Aubrey R., Jr.; Orgel, Leslie E.

    1996-01-01

    Treatment of relatively concentrated aqueous solutions of 0-phospho-serine (50 mM), aspartic acid (100 mM) or glutamic acid (100 mM) with carbonyldiimidazole leads to the formation of an activated intermediate that oligomerizes efficiently. When the concentration of amino acid is reduced tenfold, few long oligomers can be detected. Positively-charged cetyltrimethyl ammonium bromide micelles concentrate the negatively-charged activated intermediates of the amino acids at their surfaces and catalyze efficient oligomerization even from dilute solutions.

  13. NOVEL POLY-GLUTAMIC ACID FUNCTIONALIZED MICROFILTRATION MEMBRANES FOR SORPTION OF HEAVY METALS AT HIGH CAPACITY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Various sorbent/ion exchange materials have been reported in the literature for metal ion entrapment. We have developed a highly innovative and new approach to obtain high metal pick-up utilizing poly-amino acids (poly-L-glutamic acid, 14,000 MW) covalently attached to membrane p...

  14. Environmental comparison of biobased chemicals from glutamic acid with their petrochemical equivalents.

    PubMed

    Lammens, Tijs M; Potting, José; Sanders, Johan P M; De Boer, Imke J M

    2011-10-01

    Glutamic acid is an important constituent of waste streams from biofuels production. It is an interesting starting material for the synthesis of biobased chemicals, thereby decreasing the dependency on fossil fuels. The objective of this paper was to compare the environmental impact of four biobased chemicals from glutamic acid with their petrochemical equivalents, that is, N-methylpyrrolidone (NMP), N-vinylpyrrolidone (NVP), acrylonitrile (ACN), and succinonitrile (SCN). A consequential life cycle assessment was performed, wherein glutamic acid was obtained from sugar beet vinasse. The removed glutamic acid was substituted with cane molasses and ureum. The comparison between the four biobased and petrochemical products showed that for NMP and NVP the biobased version had less impact on the environment, while for ACN and SCN the petrochemical version had less impact on the environment. For the latter two an optimized scenario was computed, which showed that the process for SCN can be improved to a level at which it can compete with the petrochemical process. For biobased ACN large improvements are required to make it competitive with its petrochemical equivalent. The results of this LCA and the research preceding it also show that glutamic acid can be a building block for a variety of molecules that are currently produced from petrochemical resources. Currently, most methods to produce biobased products are biotechnological processes based on sugar, but this paper demonstrates that the use of amino acids from low-value byproducts can certainly be a method as well. PMID:21870885

  15. Identification and quantitation of new glutamic acid derivatives in soy sauce by UPLC/MS/MS.

    PubMed

    Frerot, Eric; Chen, Ting

    2013-10-01

    Glutamic acid is an abundant amino acid that lends a characteristic umami taste to foods. In fermented foods, glutamic acid can be found as a free amino acid formed by proteolysis or as a non-proteolytic derivative formed by microorganisms. The aim of the present study was to identify different structures of glutamic acid derivatives in a typical fermented protein-based food product, soy sauce. An acidic fraction was prepared with anion-exchange solid-phase extraction (SPE) and analyzed by UPLC/MS/MS and UPLC/TOF-MS. α-Glutamyl, γ-glutamyl, and pyroglutamyl dipeptides, as well as lactoyl amino acids, were identified in the acidic fraction of soy sauce. They were chemically synthesized for confirmation of their occurrence and quantified in the selected reaction monitoring (SRM) mode. Pyroglutamyl dipeptides accounted for 770 mg/kg of soy sauce, followed by lactoyl amino acids (135 mg/kg) and γ-glutamyl dipeptides (70 mg/kg). In addition, N-succinoylglutamic acid was identified for the first time in food as a minor compound in soy sauce (5 mg/kg). PMID:24130027

  16. Methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase deficiency alters levels of glutamate and γ-aminobutyric acid in brain tissue

    PubMed Central

    Jadavji, N.M.; Wieske, F.; Dirnagl, U.; Winter, C.

    2015-01-01

    Methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) is an enzyme key regulator in folate metabolism. Deficiencies in MTHFR result in increased levels of homocysteine, which leads to reduced levels of S-adenosylmethionine (SAM). In the brain, SAM donates methyl groups to catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT), which is involved in neurotransmitter analysis. Using the MTHFR-deficient mouse model the purpose of this study was to investigate levels of monoamine neurotransmitters and amino acid levels in brain tissue. MTHFR deficiency affected levels of both glutamate and γ-aminobutyric acid in within the cerebellum and hippocampus. Mthfr−/− mice had reduced levels of glutamate in the amygdala and γ-aminobutyric acid in the thalamus. The excitatory mechanisms of homocysteine through activation of the N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor in brain tissue might alter levels of glutamate and γ-aminobutyric acid. PMID:26937386

  17. Biochemical and spectroscopic properties of Brucella microti glutamate decarboxylase, a key component of the glutamate-dependent acid resistance system

    PubMed Central

    Grassini, Gaia; Pennacchietti, Eugenia; Cappadocio, Francesca; Occhialini, Alessandra; De Biase, Daniela

    2015-01-01

    In orally acquired bacteria, the ability to counteract extreme acid stress (pH ⩽ 2.5) ensures survival during transit through the animal host stomach. In several neutralophilic bacteria, the glutamate-dependent acid resistance system (GDAR) is the most efficient molecular system in conferring protection from acid stress. In Escherichia coli its structural components are either of the two glutamate decarboxylase isoforms (GadA, GadB) and the antiporter, GadC, which imports glutamate and exports γ-aminobutyrate, the decarboxylation product. The system works by consuming protons intracellularly, as part of the decarboxylation reaction, and exporting positive charges via the antiporter. Herein, biochemical and spectroscopic properties of GadB from Brucella microti (BmGadB), a Brucella species which possesses GDAR, are described. B. microti belongs to a group of lately described and atypical brucellae that possess functional gadB and gadC genes, unlike the most well-known “classical” Brucella species, which include important human pathogens. BmGadB is hexameric at acidic pH. The pH-dependent spectroscopic properties and activity profile, combined with in silico sequence comparison with E. coli GadB (EcGadB), suggest that BmGadB has the necessary structural requirements for the binding of activating chloride ions at acidic pH and for the closure of its active site at neutral pH. On the contrary, cellular localization analysis, corroborated by sequence inspection, suggests that BmGadB does not undergo membrane recruitment at acidic pH, which was observed in EcGadB. The comparison of GadB from evolutionary distant microorganisms suggests that for this enzyme to be functional in GDAR some structural features must be preserved. PMID:25853037

  18. Sequential generation of hydrogen and methane from glutamic acid through combined photo-fermentation and methanogenesis.

    PubMed

    Xia, Ao; Cheng, Jun; Lin, Richen; Liu, Jianzhong; Zhou, Junhu; Cen, Kefa

    2013-03-01

    Glutamic acid can hardly produce hydrogen via dark- or photo-fermentation without pretreatment. In this study, a novel process of acidogenic pretreatment with bacteria and zeolite treatment for NH4(+) removal was proposed to use glutamic acid as feedstock in photo-fermentation for efficient hydrogen production. Glutamic acid pretreated with acidogenic bacteria produces soluble metabolite products. After zeolite treatment, the acidulated solution, which mainly contains acetate, butyrate, and NH4(+), shows a decrease in NH4(+) concentration from 36.7mM to 3.2mM (NH4(+) removal efficiency of 91.1%). After NH4(+) removal, the treated solution is incubated with photosynthetic bacteria, exhibiting a maximum hydrogen yield of 292.9mL/g(-glutamic acid) during photo-fermentation. The residual solution from photo-fermentation is reused by methanogenic bacteria to produce a maximum methane yield of 102.7mL/g. The heating value conversion efficiency from glutamic acid to gas fuel significantly increases from 18.9% during photo-fermentation to 40.9% in the combined photo-fermentation and methanogenesis process. PMID:23347921

  19. Extracellular expression of glutamate decarboxylase B in Escherichia coli to improve gamma-aminobutyric acid production.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Anqi; Hu, Xiaoqing; Li, Ye; Chen, Cheng; Wang, Xiaoyuan

    2016-12-01

    Escherichia coli overexpressing glutamate decarboxylase GadB can produce gamma-aminobutyric acid with addition of monosodium glutamate. The yield and productivity of gamma-aminobutyric acid might be significantly improved if the overexpressed GadB in E. coli cells can be excreted outside, where it can directly transforms monosodium glutamate to gamma-aminobutyric acid. In this study, GadB was fused to signal peptides TorA or PelB, respectively, and overexpressed in E. coli BL21(DE3). It was found that TorA could facilitate GadB secretion much better than PelB. Conditions for GadB secretion and gamma-aminobutyric acid production were optimized in E. coli BL21(DE3)/pET20b-torA-gadB, leading the secretion of more than half of the overexpressed GadB. Fed-batch fermentation for GadB expression and gamma-aminobutyric acid production of BL21(DE3)/pET20b-torA-gadB was sequentially performed in one fermenter; 264.4 and 313.1 g/L gamma-aminobutyric acid were obtained with addition of monosodium glutamate after 36 and 72 h, respectively. PMID:27549808

  20. The urinary excretion of orally administered pteroyl-l-glutamic acid by the rat

    PubMed Central

    Blair, J. A.; Dransfield, E.

    1971-01-01

    1. The urinary excretion of folates after oral administration of [2-14C]pteroyl-l-glutamic acid was studied by assaying the radioactivity in the urine and in materials purified and characterized by t.l.c. 2. Radioactivity excreted was 6.8, 5.9 and 30.7% of the oral dose in the first 24h after doses of 3.1, 32 and 320μg/kg respectively. 3. Extensive decomposition of urinary folates to pteroyl-l-glutamic acid was prevented by antioxidants or collection of urine frozen. 4. At the three dosages, two major and one minor radioactive compounds were isolated. One of the major metabolites was 5-methyltetrahydropteroylglutamic acid. The others were unidentified but were not pteroylglutamic acid, 7,8-dihydro-, 5,6,7,8-tetrahydro-, 5- or 10-formyl-tetrahydro-, 5,10-methylidyne-tetrahydro-, 5-formimidoyl-tetrahydro-, 5,10-methylene-tetrahydro-, 5-methyltetrahydro-pteroylglutamic acid, nor any decomposition products of these compounds formed during isolation. Labelled unconjugated pteridines were absent. 5. Labelled pteroyl-l-glutamic acid was displaced by oral administration of unlabelled pteroyl-l-glutamic acid (1.6mg/kg) when given 3.5h after, but not when given 24h after the labelled dose. 6. The results show that orally administered [2-14C]pteroyl-l-glutamic acid is absorbed without metabolism and is then metabolized into naturally occurring tetrahydro-folates. 7. These findings are discussed with reference to previous work. PMID:5124394

  1. Glutamine, glutamate, and arginine-based acid resistance in Lactobacillus reuteri.

    PubMed

    Teixeira, Januana S; Seeras, Arisha; Sanchez-Maldonado, Alma Fernanda; Zhang, Chonggang; Su, Marcia Shu-Wei; Gänzle, Michael G

    2014-09-01

    This study aimed to determine whether glutamine deamidation improves acid resistance of Lactobacillus reuteri, and to assess whether arginine, glutamine, and glutamate-mediated acid resistance are redundant or complementary mechanisms of acid resistance. Three putative glutaminase genes, gls1, gls2, and gls3, were identified in L. reuteri 100-23. All three genes were expressed during growth in mMRS and wheat sourdough. L. reuteri consistently over-expressed gls3 and the glutamate decarboxylase gadB. L. reuteri 100-23ΔgadB over-expressed gls3 and the arginine deiminase gene adi. Analysis of the survival of L. reuteri in acidic conditions revealed that arginine conversion is effective at pH of 3.5 while glutamine or glutamate conversion were effective at pH of 2.5. Arginine conversion increased the pHin but not ΔΨ; glutamate decarboxylation had only a minor effect on the pHin but increased the ΔΨ. This study demonstrates that glutamine deamidation increases the acid resistance of L. reuteri independent of glutamate decarboxylase activity. Arginine and glutamine/glutamate conversions confer resistance to lactate at pH of 3.5 and phosphate at pH of 2.5, respectively. Knowledge of L. reuteri's acid resistance improves the understanding of the adaptation of L. reuteri to intestinal ecosystems, and facilitates the selection of probiotic and starter cultures. PMID:24929734

  2. Nonfunctional tricarboxylic acid cycle and the mechanism of glutamate biosynthesis in Acetobacter suboxydans.

    PubMed

    Greenfield, S; Claus, G W

    1972-12-01

    Acetobacter suboxydans does not contain an active tricarboxylic acid cycle, yet two pathways have been suggested for glutamate synthesis from acetate catalyzed by cell extracts: a partial tricarboxylic acid cycle following an initial condensation of oxalacetate and acetyl coenzyme A. and the citramalate-mesaconate pathway following an initial condensation of pyruvate and acetyl coenzyme A. To determine which pathway functions in growing cells, acetate-1-(14)C was added to a culture growing in minimal medium. After growth had ceased, cells were recovered and fractionated. Radioactive glutamate was isolated from the cellular protein fraction, and the position of the radioactive label was determined. Decarboxylation of the C5 carbon removed 100% of the radioactivity found in the purified glutamate fraction. These experiments establish that growing cells synthesize glutamate via a partial tricarboxylic acid cycle. Aspartate isolated from these hydrolysates was not radioactive, thus providing further evidence for the lack of a complete tricarboxylic acid cycle. When cell extracts were analyzed, activity of all tricarboxylic acid cycle enzymes, except succinate dehydrogenase, was demonstrated. PMID:4640504

  3. The cyst wall of Colpoda steinii. A substance rich in glutamic acid residues

    PubMed Central

    Tibbs, J.

    1966-01-01

    1. The cyst wall of Colpoda steinii has been isolated and its chemical nature examined. It had a nitrogen content 13·9±0·2% (s.d.) and an ash 8·6±1·6% (s.d.). After lipid and hot-acid extraction there was a variable residual phosphorus of 0·19–0·64%. The protein nature, indicated by infrared and ultraviolet absorption, was confirmed when 100μg. of hydrolysed wall gave a ninhydrin colour equivalent to that given by 0·88–1·01μmoles of glycine. Hexosamine, hexose, pentose, lipid and dipicolinic acid were absent. 2. Paper chromatography of hydrolysates, besides showing the presence of the usual protein amino acids and three unidentified ninhydrin-reacting spots, indicated the presence of large amounts of glutamic acid. Estimated by chromatography, the amount present was 52·9±0·6 (s.d.) g./100g. of ash-free wall; manometric estimation of l-glutamic acid with l-glutamate 1-carboxy-lyase gave 46·5±0·9 (s.d.) g./100g. 3. Free carboxyl groups were estimated by titration as 0·159±0·011 (s.d.) mole/100g. and those present as amide as 0·154±0·004 (s.d.) mole/100g., and the total was compared with the dicarboxylic acid content 0·360±0·010 (s.d.) mole/100g. 4. After treatment with 98% formic acid 25–30% of the wall material could be extracted by 0·05m-sodium carbonate solution (extract 1); after treatment of the residue with performic acid a further 62–63% based on the original weight could be extracted by 0·05m-sodium carbonate (extract 2). 5. The average values found for the glutamic acid contents were 21·7g./100g. for extract 1 and 58·0g./100g. for extract 2. The cysteic acid content of whole oxidized wall was about 5·8g./100g. and of extract 2 also about 5·8g./100g. The glutamic acid and cysteic acid contents of the final residue were also investigated. 6. The significance of these extraction experiments in relation to the wall structure is discussed. ImagesPlate 1. PMID:4957913

  4. Characterization of a Glutamate Transporter Operon, glnQHMP, in Streptococcus mutans and Its Role in Acid Tolerance▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Krastel, Kirsten; Senadheera, Dilani B.; Mair, Richard; Downey, Jennifer S.; Goodman, Steven D.; Cvitkovitch, Dennis G.

    2010-01-01

    Glutamate contributes to the acid tolerance response (ATR) of many Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria, but its role in the ATR of the oral bacterium Streptococcus mutans is unknown. This study describes the discovery and characterization of a glutamate transporter operon designated glnQHMP (Smu.1519 to Smu.1522) and investigates its potential role in acid tolerance. Deletion of glnQHMP resulted in a 95% reduction in transport of radiolabeled glutamate compared to the wild-type UA159 strain. The addition of glutamate to metabolizing UA159 cells resulted in an increased production of acidic end products, whereas the glnQHMP mutant produced less lactic acid than UA159, suggesting a link between glutamate metabolism and acid production and possible acid tolerance. To investigate this possibility, we conducted a microarray analysis with glutamate and under pH 5.5 and pH 7.5 conditions which showed that expression of the glnQHMP operon was downregulated by both glutamate and mild acid. We also measured the growth kinetics of UA159 and its glnQHMP-negative derivative at pH 5.5 and found that the mutant doubled at a much slower rate than the parent strain but survived at pH 3.5 significantly better than the wild type. Taken together, these findings support the involvement of the glutamate transporter operon glnQHMP in the acid tolerance response in S. mutans. PMID:20023025

  5. Preparation of molecularly imprinted cross-linked chitosan/glutaraldehyde resin for enantioselective separation of L-glutamic acid.

    PubMed

    Monier, M; El-Sokkary, A M A

    2010-08-01

    In the present study, separation of L-glutamic acid from dilute aqueous solution by solid-phase extraction based on molecular imprinting technique using cross-linked chitosan/glutaraldehyde resin was investigated. L-Glutamic acid imprinted cross-linked chitosan (LGIC) was prepared by cross-linking of chitosan by glutaraldehyde cross-linker, in the presence of L-glutamic acid. Non-imprinted cross-linked chitosan (NIC) as control was also prepared by the same procedure in the absence of template molecules. The morphological structures of both LGIC and NIC were examined by scanning electron microscope (SEM). LGIC particles were applied to determine the optimum operational condition for l-glutamic acid separation from dilute aqueous solution. In adsorption step, optimum pH and retention time were 5.5 and 100 min, while corresponding values in extraction step were 2.5 and 60 min, respectively. The adsorption isotherms indicated that the maximum adsorption capacities of L- and D-glutamic acid on LGIC were 42+/-0.8 and 26+/-1.2mg/g, respectively, while in case of NIC, both L- and D-glutamic acid present the same maximum adsorption capacity 7+/-0.6 mg/g, which confirm that the molecular imprinting technique creates an enantioselectivity of LGIC toward L-glutamic acid. In addition, chiral resolution of l-, d-glutamic acid racemic mixture was carried out using column of LGIC. PMID:20441776

  6. Adsorption dynamics of L-glutamic acid copolymers at a heptane/water interface.

    PubMed

    Beverung, C J; Radke, C J; Blanch, H W

    1998-02-16

    Random copolymers of glutamic acid (glu-ala, glu-leu, glu-phe, glu-tyr) were employed to investigate the relationship between side chain structure and peptide charge on adsorption behavior at an oil/water boundary. Adsorption of a series of glutamate copolymers at a heptane/water interface was examined by the dynamic pendant-drop method to determine interfacial tension. Incorporation of leucine or phenylalanine into a glutamate copolymer results in greater tension reduction than incorporation of alanine or tyrosine. These effects are amplified at pH values near the isoelectric point of glutamate, where macroscopic adsorbed films of glu-leu and glu-phe exhibit gel-like properties in response to interfacial area compression. Differences in interfacial tension behavior of glu-tyr and glu-phe indicate the importance of the tyrosine p-hydroxyl group on adsorption and aggregation at the oil/water interface. PMID:9540205

  7. [Effect of cholinomimetics on L-glutamic acid release and uptake in the neostriatum of rats].

    PubMed

    Godukhin, O V; Budantsev, A Iu; Selifonova, O V; Agapova, V N

    1983-12-01

    The effects of cholinomimetics on release and uptake of exogenic glutamic acid in the rat brain neostriatum in vivo and in vitro were studied. Carbocholine and nicotin were shown to inhibit the release, carbocholine acting directly on the presynaptic receptors whereas nicotin acting indirectly through the interneurons of neostriatum. PMID:6141074

  8. 21 CFR 573.500 - Condensed, extracted glutamic acid fermentation product.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Condensed, extracted glutamic acid fermentation product. 573.500 Section 573.500 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS FOOD ADDITIVES PERMITTED IN FEED AND DRINKING WATER OF ANIMALS Food...

  9. Phospholipids and poly(glutamic acid)/hydrolyzed gluten: interaction and kinetics

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The effect of poly (glutamic acid) (PGA) and Hydrolyzed wheat gluten (HG) on the thermal and kinetics properties of lysophosphatidylcholine (LPC) was determined using Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC). A model system containing 3, 6 and 10% PGA or HG was added to 40% LPC aqueous suspension. ...

  10. [Glutamic acid group poisoning. So-called Chinese restaurant syndrome].

    PubMed

    Rudin, O; Stauffer, E; Cramer, Y; Krämer, M

    1989-01-01

    After eating a soup 10 persons (out of 100) fell sick; within 10 minutes they suffered from nervous muscle convulsions, trembling, mouth desiccation and dilatation of the pupils. The soup contained glutamate as flavour enhancer in an unusually high concentration of 31 grams per litre. PMID:2573344

  11. Synthesis and antiproliferative activity of glutamic acid-based dipeptides.

    PubMed

    Silveira-Dorta, Gastón; Martín, Víctor S; Padrón, José M

    2015-08-01

    A small and focused library of 22 dipeptides derived from N,N-dibenzylglutamic acid α- and γ-benzyl esters was prepared in a straightforward manner. The evaluation of the antiproliferative activity in the human solid tumor cell lines HBL-100 (breast), HeLa (cervix), SW1573 (non-small cell lung), T-47D (breast), and WiDr (colon) provided γ-glutamyl methionine (GI50 = 6.0-41 μM) and α-glutamyl proline (GI50 = 7.5-18 μM) as lead compounds. In particular, glutamyl serine and glutamyl proline dipeptides were more active in the resistant cancer cell line WiDr than the conventional anticancer drugs cisplatin and etoposide. Glutamyl tryptophan dipeptides did not affect cell growth of HBL-100, while in T-47D cells, proliferation was inhibited. This result might be attributed to the inhibition of the ATB(0,+) transporter. PMID:25900811

  12. Influence of Glutamic Acid on the Endogenous Respiration of Bacillus subtilis

    PubMed Central

    Clifton, C. E.; Cherry, John

    1966-01-01

    Clifton, C. E. (Stanford University, Stanford, Calif.), and John Cherry. Influence of glutamic acid on the endogenous respiration of Bacillus subtilis. J. Bacteriol. 91:546–550. 1966.—Amino acids serve as the major initial endogenous substrate for Bacillus subtilis. The endogenous activity of freshly harvested washed cells is high and falls off rapidly with time of shaking at 30 C to lower but still significant levels. The rate of O2 consumption after the addition of glutamic acid also decreases as the cells age, but more slowly than noted for endogenous respiration. When cells were fed glutamate as soon as possible after harvesting, an apparent stimulation of endogenous respiration was noted. However, endogenous activity was inhibited if the cell suspensions were shaken for at least 1 hr before addition of the glutamate. Similar results were obtained with glycerol or glucose as exogenous substrates. Variation in rates of respiration with age of the cells, inherent instability of B. subtilis, and possible utilization of substances initially excreted by the cells appear to account for the variations noted regarding the influence of an exogenous substrate on endogenous respiration. PMID:4956754

  13. 2-Methylcitric acid impairs glutamate metabolism and induces permeability transition in brain mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Amaral, Alexandre Umpierrez; Cecatto, Cristiane; Castilho, Roger Frigério; Wajner, Moacir

    2016-04-01

    Accumulation of 2-methylcitric acid (2MCA) is observed in methylmalonic and propionic acidemias, which are clinically characterized by severe neurological symptoms. The exact pathogenetic mechanisms of brain abnormalities in these diseases are poorly established and very little has been reported on the role of 2MCA. In the present work we found that 2MCA markedly inhibited ADP-stimulated and uncoupled respiration in mitochondria supported by glutamate, with a less significant inhibition in pyruvate plus malate respiring mitochondria. However, no alterations occurred when α-ketoglutarate or succinate was used as respiratory substrates, suggesting a defect on glutamate oxidative metabolism. It was also observed that 2MCA decreased ATP formation in glutamate plus malate or pyruvate plus malate-supported mitochondria. Furthermore, 2MCA inhibited glutamate dehydrogenase activity at concentrations as low as 0.5 mM. Kinetic studies revealed that this inhibitory effect was competitive in relation to glutamate. In contrast, assays of osmotic swelling in non-respiring mitochondria suggested that 2MCA did not significantly impair mitochondrial glutamate transport. Finally, 2MCA provoked a significant decrease in mitochondrial membrane potential and induced swelling in Ca(2+)-loaded mitochondria supported by different substrates. These effects were totally prevented by cyclosporine A plus ADP or ruthenium red, indicating induction of mitochondrial permeability transition. Taken together, our data strongly indicate that 2MCA behaves as a potent inhibitor of glutamate oxidation by inhibiting glutamate dehydrogenase activity and as a permeability transition inducer, disturbing mitochondrial energy homeostasis. We presume that 2MCA-induced mitochondrial deleterious effects may contribute to the pathogenesis of brain damage in patients affected by methylmalonic and propionic acidemias. We propose that brain glutamate oxidation is disturbed by 2-methylcitric acid (2MCA), which

  14. Glutamic Acid Residues in HIV-1 p6 Regulate Virus Budding and Membrane Association of Gag

    PubMed Central

    Friedrich, Melanie; Setz, Christian; Hahn, Friedrich; Matthaei, Alina; Fraedrich, Kirsten; Rauch, Pia; Henklein, Petra; Traxdorf, Maximilian; Fossen, Torgils; Schubert, Ulrich

    2016-01-01

    The HIV-1 Gag p6 protein regulates the final abscission step of nascent virions from the cell membrane by the action of its two late (l-) domains, which recruit Tsg101 and ALIX, components of the ESCRT system. Even though p6 consists of only 52 amino acids, it is encoded by one of the most polymorphic regions of the HIV-1 gag gene and undergoes various posttranslational modifications including sumoylation, ubiquitination, and phosphorylation. In addition, it mediates the incorporation of the HIV-1 accessory protein Vpr into budding virions. Despite its small size, p6 exhibits an unusually high charge density. In this study, we show that mutation of the conserved glutamic acids within p6 increases the membrane association of Pr55 Gag followed by enhanced polyubiquitination and MHC-I antigen presentation of Gag-derived epitopes, possibly due to prolonged exposure to membrane bound E3 ligases. The replication capacity of the total glutamic acid mutant E0A was almost completely impaired, which was accompanied by defective virus release that could not be rescued by ALIX overexpression. Altogether, our data indicate that the glutamic acids within p6 contribute to the late steps of viral replication and may contribute to the interaction of Gag with the plasma membrane. PMID:27120610

  15. The role of ascorbic acid and monosodium glutamate in thymocyte apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Pavlovic, V; Sarac, M

    2010-01-01

    The studies on experimental animals have confirmed toxic effect of monosodium glutamate in different organs, mainly manifested by increased oxidative stress and cytotoxicity, strongly correlated with numerous diseases. Continuous intake of this flavor enhancer in modern nutrition also resulted with toxic effects on human health, known as Chinese restaurant syndrome. The reference data about influence of monosodium glutamate on the cells of the immune system or primary immune organs and possible protective effects of specific antioxidants are still largely unknown. This review summarizes recently known facts about the role of monosodium glutamate in the cells of the immune system, especially in thymocytes. Also, in this review many new data on positive effects of ascorbic acid on immune system and the mechanisms of its protective influence on thymocytes are discussed (Tab. 1, Ref. 52). PMID:20635684

  16. Effect of L (+) ascorbic acid and monosodium glutamate concentration on the morphology of calcium carbonate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saraya, Mohamed El-shahte Ismaiel

    2015-11-01

    In this study, monosodium glutamate and ascorbic acid were used as crystal and growth modifiers to control the crystallization of CaCO3. Calcium carbonate prepared by reacting a mixed solution of Na2CO3 with CaCl2 at ambient temperature, (25 °C), constant Ca++/ CO3- - molar ratio and pH with stirring. The polymorph and morphology of the crystals were characterized using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). The results indicate that rhombohedral calcite was only formed in water without organic additives, and both calcite and spherical vaterite with various morphologies were produced in the presence of monosodium glutamate. The content of vaterite increased as the monosodium glutamate increased. In addition, spherical vaterite was obtained in the presence of different concentrations of ascorbic acid. The spherical vaterite posses an aggregate shape composed of nano-particles, ranging from 30 to 50 nm as demonstrated by the SEM and TEM analyses. Therefore, the ascorbic stabilizes vaterite and result in nano-particles compared to monosodium glutamate.

  17. Glutamic Acid Not Beneficial for the Prevention of Vincristine Neurotoxicity in Children with Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Bradfield, Scott M.; Sandler, Eric; Geller, Thomas; Tamura, Roy N.; Krischer, Jeffrey P.

    2014-01-01

    Background Vincristine causes known side effects of peripheral sensory, motor, autonomic and cranial neuropathies. No preventive interventions are known. Procedure We performed a randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blind trial of oral glutamic acid as a preventive agent in pediatric patients with cancer who would be receiving vincristine therapy for at least 9 consecutive weeks (Stratum 1= Wilms tumor and rhabdomyosarcoma) or 4 consecutive weeks in conjunction with steroids (Stratum 2=Acute lymphoblastic leukemia and Non-Hodgkin lymphoma). At designated time points, a scored neurologic exam using the Modified Balis Pediatric Scale of Peripheral Neuropathies was performed to document neurologic toxicity. Results Between 2007–12, 250 patients were enrolled (Stratum 1=50, Stratum 2=200). The glutamic acid treated group did not have a significantly lower percentage of neurotoxicity compared to placebo treated group either overall or within stratum or age subgroups. The only subgroup which was suggestive of treatment effect was for age. Patients 13 years or older showed a larger benefit in favor of glutamic acid (p=0.055) compared to patients less than 13 years (p=1.00). Constipation was the most frequently reported (14%) Grade II or higher neurotoxicity. Conclusion Vincristine-associated neurotoxicity in pediatric oncology remains a frequent complication of chemotherapy for multiple diagnoses with an approximate 30% of patients affected. Glutamic acid is not effective for prevention in pre-adolescents. There is a suggestion of benefit in patients 13 years or older, but the study was not designed to provide adequate power to test the treatment effect within this age group alone. PMID:25545757

  18. Synthesis and proteinase inhibitory properties of diphenyl phosphonate analogues of aspartic and glutamic acids.

    PubMed

    Hamilton, R; Walker, B; Walker, B J

    1998-07-01

    The synthesis of diphenyl phosphonate analogues of aspartic and glutamic acid, and their inhibitory activity against S. aureus V8 protease and granzyme B, is described. The study has revealed difficulties with protecting group compatibility in the synthesis of these analogues. Two analogues, Acetyl. AspP (OPh)2 and Acetyl.GluP (OPh)2 were found to function as irreversible inactivators of V8 proteinase, yet exhibit no activity against granzyme B. PMID:9873408

  19. Designing Novel Nanoformulations Targeting Glutamate Transporter Excitatory Amino Acid Transporter 2: Implications in Treating Drug Addiction

    PubMed Central

    Rao, PSS; Yallapu, Murali M.; Sari, Youssef; Fisher, Paul B.; Kumar, Santosh

    2015-01-01

    Chronic drug abuse is associated with elevated extracellular glutamate concentration in the brain reward regions. Deficit of glutamate clearance has been identified as a contributing factor that leads to enhanced glutamate concentration following extended drug abuse. Importantly, normalization of glutamate level through induction of glutamate transporter 1 (GLT1)/ excitatory amino acid transporter 2 (EAAT2) expression has been described in several in vivo studies. GLT1 upregulators including ceftriaxone, a beta-lactam antibiotic, have been effective in attenuating drug-seeking and drug-consumption behavior in rodent models. However, potential obstacles toward clinical translation of GLT1 (EAAT2) upregulators as treatment for drug addiction might include poor gastrointestinal absorption, serious peripheral adverse effects, and/or suboptimal CNS concentrations. Given the growing success of nanotechnology in targeting CNS ailments, nanoformulating known GLT1 (EAAT2) upregulators for selective uptake across the blood brain barrier presents an ideal therapeutic approach for treating drug addiction. In this review, we summarize the results obtained with promising GLT1 (EAAT2) inducing compounds in animal models recapitulating drug addiction. Additionally, the various nanoformulations that can be employed for selectively increasing the CNS bioavailability of GLT1 (EAAT2) upregulators are discussed. Finally, the applicability of GLT1 (EAAT2) induction via central delivery of drug-loaded nanoformulations is described. PMID:26635971

  20. Synergistic effects of sodium lauroyl sarcosinate and glutamic acid in inhibition assembly against copper corrosion in acidic solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Yinzhe; Zhang, Daquan; Zeng, Huijing; Xie, Bin; Gao, Lixin; Lin, Tong

    2015-11-01

    A self-assembled multilayer (SAM) from sodium lauroyl sarcosinate (SLS) and glutamic acid (GLU) is formed on copper surface. Its inhibition ability against copper corrosion is examined by electrochemical analysis and weight loss test. In comparison to SAM formed by just SLS or GLU, a synergistic effect is observed when the coexistence of SLS and GLU in SAM. The SLS/GLU SAM has an acicular multilayer structure, and SAM prepared under the condition of 5 mM SLS and 1 mM GLU shows the best protection efficiency. PM6 calculation reveals that the synergistic effect stems from interactions between SLS, GLU and cupric ions.

  1. Cloning and primary structure of a human islet isoform of glutamic acid decarboxylase from chromosome 10

    SciTech Connect

    Karlsen, A.E.; Hagopian, W.A.; Grubin, C.E.; Dube, S.; Disteche, C.M.; Adler, D.A.; Baermeier, H.; Lernmark, A. ); Mathewes, S.; Grant, F.J.; Foster, D. )

    1991-10-01

    Glutamic acid decarboxylase which catalyzes formation of {gamma}-aminobutyric acid from L-glutamic acid, is detectable in different isoforms with distinct electrophoretic and kinetic characteristics. GAD has also been implicated as an autoantigen in the vastly differing autoimmune disease stiff-man syndrome and insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus. Despite the differing GAD isoforms, only one type of GAD cDNA (GAD-1), localized to a syntenic region of chromosome 2, has been isolated from rat, mouse, and cat. Using sequence information from GAD-1 to screen a human pancreatic islet cDNA library, the authors describe the isolation of an additional GAD cDNA (GAD-2), which was mapped to the short arm of human chromosome 10. Genomic Southern blotting with GAD-2 demonstrated a hybridization pattern different form that detected by GAD-1. GAD-2 recognizes a 5.6-kilobase transcript in both islets and brain, in contrast to GAD-1, which detects a 3.7-kilobase transcript in brain only. The deduced 585-amino acid sequence coded for by GAD-2 shows < 65% identify to previously published, highly conserved GAD-1 brain sequences, which show > 96% deduced amino acid sequence homology among the three species.

  2. Self-Healing Supramolecular Self-Assembled Hydrogels Based on Poly(L-glutamic acid).

    PubMed

    Li, Guifei; Wu, Jie; Wang, Bo; Yan, Shifeng; Zhang, Kunxi; Ding, Jianxun; Yin, Jingbo

    2015-11-01

    Self-healing polymeric hydrogels have the capability to recover their structures and functionalities upon injury, which are extremely attractive in emerging biomedical applications. This research reports a new kind of self-healing polypeptide hydrogels based on self-assembly between cholesterol (Chol)-modified triblock poly(L-glutamic acid)-block-poly(ethylene glycol)-block-poly(L-glutamic acid) ((PLGA-b-PEG-b-PLGA)-g-Chol) and β-cyclodextrin (β-CD)-modified poly(L-glutamic acid) (PLGA-g-β-CD). The hydrogel formation relied on the host and guest linkage between β-CD and Chol. This study demonstrates the influences of polymer concentration and β-CD/Chol molar ratio on viscoelastic behavior of the hydrogels. The results showed that storage modulus was highest at polymer concentration of 15% w/v and β-CD/Chol molar ratio of 1:1. The effect of the PLGA molecular weight in (PLGA-b-PEG-b-PLGA)-g-Chol on viscoelastic behavior, mechanical properties and in vitro degradation of the supramolecular hydrogels was also studied. The hydrogels showed outstanding self-healing capability and good cytocompatibility. The multilayer structure was constructed using hydrogels with self-healing ability. The developed hydrogels provide a fascinating glimpse for the applications in tissue engineering. PMID:26414083

  3. Bifurcated hydrogen bonds stabilize fibrils of poly(L-glutamic) acid.

    PubMed

    Fulara, Aleksandra; Dzwolak, Wojciech

    2010-06-24

    Model fibrillating homopolypeptides have been providing many insightful analogies to the clinically important phenomena of protein misfolding and amyloidogenesis. Here we show that the beta(2) structural variant of poly(l-glutamic) acid forms fibrils with an amyloid-like morphology, ability to enhance fluorescence of thioflavin T, and seeding properties. The beta(2) fibrils are formed upon heating of aqueous solutions of alpha-helical poly(l-glutamic) acid, which leads to a significant increase of pD (pH) of unbuffered samples and a concomitant precipitation of fibrils with unusual infrared traits: amide I' band being dramatically red-shifted to 1596 cm(-1), and the -COOD stretching band split into two peaks around 1730 and 1719 cm(-1). We are proposing that formation of three-center hydrogen bonds involving bifurcated peptide carbonyl acceptors (>C=O) and main chains' NH, as well as side chains' -COOH proton donors is likely to underlie the observed infrared characteristics of beta(2) fibrils. Such bonds provide additional conformational constraints in a tightly packed environment around glutamate side chains resulting in the decreased overall acidity of the polypeptide. The presence of bifurcated hydrogen bonds in amyloid fibrils may be an overlooked factor in fibrils' robustness, thermodynamic stability and the ability to propagate their own growth. PMID:20509699

  4. Monitoring of free glutamic acid in Malaysian processed foods, dishes and condiments.

    PubMed

    Khairunnisak, M; Azizah, A H; Jinap, S; Nurul Izzah, A

    2009-04-01

    A study to quantify the free glutamic acid content of six processed foods, 44 dishes and 26 condiments available in Malaysia was performed using high-performance liquid chromatography with a fluorescence detector (HPLC-FRD). Recovery tests were carried out with spiked samples at levels from 6 to 31 mg g(-1). High recovery in different matrices was achieved ranging from 88% +/- 13% to 102% +/- 5.12%, with an average of 97% +/- 8.92%. Results from the study revealed that the average free glutamic acid content ranged from 0.34 +/- 0.20 to 4.63 +/- 0.41 mg g(-1) in processed foods, while in prepared dishes it was as low as 0.24 +/- 0.15 mg g(-1) in roti canai (puffed bread served with curry or dhal) to 8.16 +/- 1.99 mg g(-1) in dim sum (a small casing of dough, usually filled with minced meat, seafood, and vegetables, either steamed or fried). Relatively, the content of free glutamic acid was found to be higher in condiments at 0.28 +/- 0 mg g(-1) in mayonnaise to 170.90 +/- 6.40 mg g(-1) in chicken stock powder. PMID:19680916

  5. Microbial synthesis of poly-γ-glutamic acid: current progress, challenges, and future perspectives.

    PubMed

    Luo, Zhiting; Guo, Yuan; Liu, Jidong; Qiu, Hua; Zhao, Mouming; Zou, Wei; Li, Shubo

    2016-01-01

    Poly-γ-glutamic acid (γ-PGA) is a naturally occurring biopolymer made from repeating units of l-glutamic acid, d-glutamic acid, or both. Since some bacteria are capable of vigorous γ-PGA biosynthesis from renewable biomass, γ-PGA is considered a promising bio-based chemical and is already widely used in the food, medical, and wastewater industries due to its biodegradable, non-toxic, and non-immunogenic properties. In this review, we consider the properties, biosynthetic pathway, production strategies, and applications of γ-PGA. Microbial biosynthesis of γ-PGA and the molecular mechanisms regulating production are covered in particular detail. Genetic engineering and optimization of the growth medium, process control, and downstream processing have proved to be effective strategies for lowering the cost of production, as well as manipulating the molecular mass and conformational/enantiomeric properties that facilitate screening of competitive γ-PGA producers. Finally, future prospects of microbial γ-PGA production are discussed in light of recent progress, challenges, and trends in this field. PMID:27366207

  6. Cooperative Effects Between Arginine and Glutamic Acid in the Amino Acid-Catalyzed Aldol Reaction.

    PubMed

    Valero, Guillem; Moyano, Albert

    2016-08-01

    Catalysis of the aldol reaction between cyclohexanone and 4-nitrobenzaldehyde by mixtures of L-Arg and of L-Glu in wet dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) takes place with higher enantioselectivity (up to a 7-fold enhancement in the anti-aldol for the 1:1 mixture) than that observed when either L-Glu or L-Arg alone are used as the catalysts. These results can be explained by the formation of a catalytically active hydrogen-bonded complex between both amino acids, and demonstrate the possibility of positive cooperative effects in catalysis by two different α-amino acids. Chirality 28:599-605, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27362554

  7. Preparation and evaluation of lysozyme-loaded nanoparticles coated with poly-γ-glutamic acid and chitosan.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yong; Sun, Yan; Xu, Yaoxing; Feng, Hai; Fu, Sida; Tang, Jiangwu; Liu, Wei; Sun, Dongchang; Jiang, Hua; Xu, Shaochun

    2013-08-01

    To improve the application of lysozymes, methods for coating lysozymes with poly-γ-glutamic acid and chitosan were studied. Several lysozyme-loaded chitosan/poly-γ-glutamic acid composite nanosystems for loading and controlling the release of lysozymes were established. The lysozyme loading content and efficiency of the different systems were examined. The antibacterial activity of the composite nanoparticles was also investigated. Results showed that when the lysozymes were coated with poly-γ-glutamic acid and further rewrapped with chitosan, smooth spherical composite nanoparticles were obtained; the loading efficiency and loading content reached 76% and 40%, respectively. The lysozyme release in vitro was slow and presented a two-stage programmed release. Antibacterial testing in vitro indicated that lysozyme-loaded nanoparticles coated with poly-γ-glutamic acid/chitosan had outstanding antibacterial activity. An obvious assembly of bacterial cells and composite nanoparticles was observed during co-incubation. Therefore, the poly-γ-glutamic acid/chitosan composite coating broadened the antibacterial spectrum of the composite lysozyme nanoreagent, and presented satisfactory antibacterial effect. The lysozyme-loaded chitosan/poly-γ-glutamic acid nanocoating system established in this research could provide reference for coating and controlled releasing of alkaline proteins. PMID:23628585

  8. An NMR-Based Metabolomic Approach to Investigate the Effects of Supplementation with Glutamic Acid in Piglets Challenged with Deoxynivalenol

    PubMed Central

    Ren, Wenkai; Yin, Jie; Hu, Jiayu; Duan, Jielin; Liu, Gang; Tan, Bie; Xiong, Xia; Oso, Abimbola Oladele; Adeola, Olayiwola; Yao, Kang; Yin, Yulong; Li, Tiejun

    2014-01-01

    Deoxynivalenol (DON) has various toxicological effects in humans and pigs that result from the ingestion of contaminated cereal products. This study was conducted to investigate the protective effects of dietary supplementation with glutamic acid on piglets challenged with DON. A total of 20 piglets weaned at 28 d of age were randomly assigned to receive 1 of 4 treatments (5 piglets/treatment): 1) basal diet, negative control (NC); 2) basal diet +4 mg/kg DON (DON); 3) basal diet +2% (g/g) glutamic acid (GLU); 4) basal diet +4 mg/kg DON +2% glutamic acid (DG). A 7-d adaptation period was followed by 30 days of treatment. A metabolite analysis using nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (1H-NMR)-based metabolomic technology and the determination of superoxide dismutase (SOD) and glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px) activities for plasma, as well as the activity of Caspase-3 and the proliferation of epithelial cells were conducted. The results showed that contents of low-density lipoprotein, alanine, arginine, acetate, glycoprotein, trimethylamine-N-oxide (TMAO), glycine, lactate, and urea, as well as the glutamate/creatinine ratio were higher but high-density lipoprotein, proline, citrate, choline, unsaturated lipids and fumarate were lower in piglets of DON treatment than that of NC treatment (P<0.05). Compared with DON treatment, dietary supplementation with glutamic acid increased the plasma concentrations of proline, citrate, creatinine, unsaturated lipids, and fumarate, and decreased the concentrations of alanine, glycoprotein, TMAO, glycine, and lactate, as well as the glutamate/creatinine ratio (P<0.05). Addition glutamic acid to DON treatment increased the plasma activities of SOD and GSH-Px and the proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) labeling indexes for the jejunum and ileum (P<0.05). These novel findings indicate that glutamic acid has the potential to repair the injuries associated with oxidative stress as well as the disturbances of energy and amino

  9. An NMR-based metabolomic approach to investigate the effects of supplementation with glutamic acid in piglets challenged with deoxynivalenol.

    PubMed

    Wu, Miaomiao; Xiao, Hao; Ren, Wenkai; Yin, Jie; Hu, Jiayu; Duan, Jielin; Liu, Gang; Tan, Bie; Xiong, Xia; Oso, Abimbola Oladele; Adeola, Olayiwola; Yao, Kang; Yin, Yulong; Li, Tiejun

    2014-01-01

    Deoxynivalenol (DON) has various toxicological effects in humans and pigs that result from the ingestion of contaminated cereal products. This study was conducted to investigate the protective effects of dietary supplementation with glutamic acid on piglets challenged with DON. A total of 20 piglets weaned at 28 d of age were randomly assigned to receive 1 of 4 treatments (5 piglets/treatment): 1) basal diet, negative control (NC); 2) basal diet +4 mg/kg DON (DON); 3) basal diet +2% (g/g) glutamic acid (GLU); 4) basal diet +4 mg/kg DON +2% glutamic acid (DG). A 7-d adaptation period was followed by 30 days of treatment. A metabolite analysis using nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (1H-NMR)-based metabolomic technology and the determination of superoxide dismutase (SOD) and glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px) activities for plasma, as well as the activity of Caspase-3 and the proliferation of epithelial cells were conducted. The results showed that contents of low-density lipoprotein, alanine, arginine, acetate, glycoprotein, trimethylamine-N-oxide (TMAO), glycine, lactate, and urea, as well as the glutamate/creatinine ratio were higher but high-density lipoprotein, proline, citrate, choline, unsaturated lipids and fumarate were lower in piglets of DON treatment than that of NC treatment (P<0.05). Compared with DON treatment, dietary supplementation with glutamic acid increased the plasma concentrations of proline, citrate, creatinine, unsaturated lipids, and fumarate, and decreased the concentrations of alanine, glycoprotein, TMAO, glycine, and lactate, as well as the glutamate/creatinine ratio (P<0.05). Addition glutamic acid to DON treatment increased the plasma activities of SOD and GSH-Px and the proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) labeling indexes for the jejunum and ileum (P<0.05). These novel findings indicate that glutamic acid has the potential to repair the injuries associated with oxidative stress as well as the disturbances of energy and amino

  10. Effect of supersaturation on L-glutamic acid polymorphs under droplet-based microchannels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Nan; Wang, Zhanzhong; Dang, Leping; Wei, Hongyuan

    2016-07-01

    Supersaturation is an important controlling factor for crystallization process and polymorphism. Droplet-based microchannels and conventional crystallization were used to investigate polymorphs of L-gluatamic acid in this work. The results illustrate that it is easy to realize the accurate and rapid control of the crystallization temperature in the droplets, which is especially beneficial to heat and mass transfer during crystallization. It is also noted that higher degree of supersaturation favors the nucleation of α crystal form, while lower degree of supersaturation favors the nucleation of β crystal form under droplet-based microchannels for L-gluatamic acid. In addition, there is a different nucleation behavior to be found under droplet-based microchannels both for the β form and α form of L-glutamic acid. This new finding can provide important insight into the development and design of investigation meanings for drug polymorph.

  11. Cysteine pK[subscript a] Depression by a Protonated Glutamic Acid in Human DJ-1

    SciTech Connect

    Witt, Anna C.; Lakshminarasimhan, Mahadevan; Remington, Benjamin C.; Hasim, Sahar; Pozharski, Edwin; Wilson, Mark A.

    2008-07-09

    Human DJ-1, a disease-associated protein that protects cells from oxidative stress, contains an oxidation-sensitive cysteine (C106) that is essential for its cytoprotective activity. The origin of C106 reactivity is obscure, due in part to the absence of an experimentally determined pK{sub a} value for this residue. We have used atomic-resolution X-ray crystallography and UV spectroscopy to show that C106 has a depressed pK{sub a} of 5.4 {+-} 0.1 and that the C106 thiolate accepts a hydrogen bond from a protonated glutamic acid side chain (E18). X-ray crystal structures and cysteine pK{sub a} analysis of several site-directed substitutions at residue 18 demonstrate that the protonated carboxylic acid side chain of E18 is required for the maximal stabilization of the C106 thiolate. A nearby arginine residue (R48) participates in a guanidinium stacking interaction with R28 from the other monomer in the DJ-1 dimer and elevates the pK{sub a} of C106 by binding an anion that electrostatically suppresses thiol ionization. Our results show that the ionizable residues (E18, R48, and R28) surrounding C106 affect its pK{sub a} in a way that is contrary to expectations based on the typical ionization behavior of glutamic acid and arginine. Lastly, a search of the Protein Data Bank (PDB) produces several candidate hydrogen-bonded aspartic/glutamic acid-cysteine interactions, which we propose are particularly common in the DJ-1 superfamily.

  12. Atorvastatin Prevents Glutamate Uptake Reduction Induced by Quinolinic Acid Via MAPKs Signaling.

    PubMed

    Vandresen-Filho, S; Martins, W C; Bertoldo, D B; Rieger, D K; Maestri, M; Leal, R B; Tasca, C I

    2016-08-01

    Statins have been shown to promote neuroprotection in a wide range of neurological disorders. However, the mechanisms involved in such effects of statins are not fully understood. Quinolinic acid (QA) is a neurotoxin that induces seizures when infused in vivo and promotes glutamatergic excitotoxicity in the central nervous system. The aim of this study was to evaluate the putative glutamatergic mechanisms and the intracellular signaling pathways involved in the atorvastatin neuroprotective effects against QA toxicity. Atorvastatin (10 mg/kg) treatment for 7 days prevented the QA-induced decrease in glutamate uptake, but had no effect on increased glutamate release induced by QA. Moreover, atorvastatin treatment increased the phosphorylation of ERK1 and prevented the decrease in Akt phosphorylation induced by QA. Neither atorvastatin treatment nor QA infusion altered glutamine synthetase activity or the levels of phosphorylation of p38(MAPK) or JNK1/2 during the evaluation. Inhibition of MEK/ERK signaling pathway, but not PI3K/Akt signaling, abolished the neuroprotective effect of atorvastatin against QA-induced decrease in glutamate uptake. Our data suggest that atorvastatin protective effects against QA toxicity are related to modulation of glutamate transporters via MAPK/ERK signaling pathway. PMID:27084771

  13. Pharmacology of Glutamate Transport in the CNS: Substrates and Inhibitors of Excitatory Amino Acid Transporters (EAATs) and the Glutamate/Cystine Exchanger System x c -

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bridges, Richard J.; Patel, Sarjubhai A.

    As the primary excitatory neurotransmitter in the mammalian CNS, l-glutamate participates not only in standard fast synaptic communication, but also contributes to higher order signal processing, as well as neuropathology. Given this variety of functional roles, interest has been growing as to how the extracellular concentrations of l-glutamate surrounding neurons are regulated by cellular transporter proteins. This review focuses on two prominent systems, each of which appears capable of influencing both the signaling and pathological actions of l-glutamate within the CNS: the sodium-dependent excitatory amino acid transporters (EAATs) and the glutamate/cystine exchanger, system x c - (Sx c -). While the family of EAAT subtypes limit access to glutamate receptors by rapidly and efficiently sequestering l-glutamate in neurons and glia, Sxc - provides a route for the export of glutamate from cells into the extracellular environment. The primary intent of this work is to provide an overview of the inhibitors and substrates that have been developed to delineate the pharmacological specificity of these transport systems, as well as be exploited as probes with which to selectively investigate function. Particular attention is paid to the development of small molecule templates that mimic the structural properties of the endogenous substrates, l-glutamate, l-aspartate and l-cystine and how strategic control of functional group position and/or the introduction of lipophilic R-groups can impact multiple aspects of the transport process, including: subtype selectivity, inhibitory potency, and substrate activity.

  14. Glutamate Decarboxylase-Dependent Acid Resistance in Brucella spp.: Distribution and Contribution to Fitness under Extremely Acidic Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Damiano, Maria Alessandra; Bastianelli, Daniela; Al Dahouk, Sascha; Köhler, Stephan; Cloeckaert, Axel

    2014-01-01

    Brucella is an expanding genus of major zoonotic pathogens, including at least 10 genetically very close species occupying a wide range of niches from soil to wildlife, livestock, and humans. Recently, we have shown that in the new species Brucella microti, the glutamate decarboxylase (Gad)-dependent system (GAD system) contributes to survival at a pH of 2.5 and also to infection in mice by the oral route. In order to study the functionality of the GAD system in the genus Brucella, 47 isolates, representative of all known species and strains of this genus, and 16 strains of the closest neighbor genus, Ochrobactrum, were studied using microbiological, biochemical, and genetic approaches. In agreement with the genome sequences, the GAD system of classical species was not functional, unlike that of most strains of Brucella ceti, Brucella pinnipedialis, and newly described species (B. microti, Brucella inopinata BO1, B. inopinata-like BO2, and Brucella sp. isolated from bullfrogs). In the presence of glutamate, these species were more acid resistant in vitro than classical terrestrial brucellae. Expression in trans of the gad locus from representative Brucella species in the Escherichia coli MG1655 mutant strain lacking the GAD system restored the acid-resistant phenotype. The highly conserved GAD system of the newly described or atypical Brucella species may play an important role in their adaptation to acidic external and host environments. Furthermore, the GAD phenotype was shown to be a useful diagnostic tool to distinguish these latter Brucella strains from Ochrobactrum and from classical terrestrial pathogenic Brucella species, which are GAD negative. PMID:25381237

  15. A glutamic acid decarboxylase (CgGAD) highly expressed in hemocytes of Pacific oyster Crassostrea gigas.

    PubMed

    Li, Meijia; Wang, Lingling; Qiu, Limei; Wang, Weilin; Xin, Lusheng; Xu, Jiachao; Wang, Hao; Song, Linsheng

    2016-10-01

    Glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD), a rate-limiting enzyme to catalyze the reaction converting the excitatory neurotransmitter glutamate to inhibitory neurotransmitter γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA), not only functions in nervous system, but also plays important roles in immunomodulation in vertebrates. However, GAD has rarely been reported in invertebrates, and never in molluscs. In the present study, one GAD homologue (designed as CgGAD) was identified from Pacific oyster Crassostrea gigas. The full length cDNA of CgGAD was 1689 bp encoding a polypeptide of 562 amino acids containing a conserved pyridoxal-dependent decarboxylase domain. CgGAD mRNA and protein could be detected in ganglion and hemocytes of oysters, and their abundance in hemocytes was unexpectedly much higher than those in ganglion. More importantly, CgGAD was mostly located in those granulocytes without phagocytic capacity in oysters, and could dynamically respond to LPS stimulation. Further, after being transfected into HEK293 cells, CgGAD could promote the production of GABA. Collectively, these findings suggested that CgGAD, as a GABA synthase and molecular marker of GABAergic system, was mainly distributed in hemocytes and ganglion and involved in neuroendocrine-immune regulation network in oysters, which also provided a novel insight to the co-evolution between nervous system and immune system. PMID:27208883

  16. Potentiation of acid-sensing ion channel activity by peripheral group I metabotropic glutamate receptor signaling.

    PubMed

    Gan, Xiong; Wu, Jing; Ren, Cuixia; Qiu, Chun-Yu; Li, Yan-Kun; Hu, Wang-Ping

    2016-05-01

    Glutamate activates peripheral group I metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluRs) and contributes to inflammatory pain. However, it is still not clear the mechanisms are involved in group I mGluR-mediated peripheral sensitization. Herein, we report that group I mGluRs signaling sensitizes acid-sensing ion channels (ASICs) in dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons and contributes to acidosis-evoked pain. DHPG, a selective group I mGluR agonist, can potentiate the functional activity of ASICs, which mediated the proton-induced events. DHPG concentration-dependently increased proton-gated currents in DRG neurons. It shifted the proton concentration-response curve upwards, with a 47.3±7.0% increase of the maximal current response to proton. Group I mGluRs, especially mGluR5, mediated the potentiation of DHPG via an intracellular cascade. DHPG potentiation of proton-gated currents disappeared after inhibition of intracellular Gq/11 proteins, PLCβ, PKC or PICK1 signaling. Moreover, DHPG enhanced proton-evoked membrane excitability of rat DRG neurons and increased the amplitude of the depolarization and the number of spikes induced by acid stimuli. Finally, peripherally administration of DHPG dose-dependently exacerbated nociceptive responses to intraplantar injection of acetic acid in rats. Potentiation of ASIC activity by group I mGluR signaling in rat DRG neurons revealed a novel peripheral mechanism underlying group I mGluRs involvement in hyperalgesia. PMID:26946972

  17. Antiepileptic Potential of Matrine via Regulation the Levels of Gamma-Aminobutyric Acid and Glutamic Acid in the Brain

    PubMed Central

    Xiang, Jun; Jiang, Yugang

    2013-01-01

    Our present study aimed to determine the antiepileptic activity of matrine, and explore the possible molecular mechanism. To evaluate the antiepileptic activity of matrine, seizures in mice induced by PTZ and MES were established, then the pentobarbital sodium-induced anaesthetizing time and locomotor activity tests in mice were also carried out. For the molecular mechanism investigations, contents of aspartic acid (Asp), gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA), glutamic acid (Glu), glycine (Gly) in seizures mice were determined; then, the chronic seizures rats induced by PTZ were prepared, and western blotting was used to determine the expressions of GAD 65, GABAA and GABAB in the brains. In the results, matrine showed significant antiepileptic effects on seizures mice induced by MES and PTZ. Moreover, the pentobarbital sodium-induced anaesthetizing time and locomotor activity tests were also demonstrated that matrine had obvious antiepileptic effects. Additionally, our results revealed that after treatment with matrine, contents of GABA can be elevated, and the contents of Glu were obviously decreased. Furthermore, western blotting revealed that the mechanism regarding the antiepileptic effect of may be related to the up-regulations of GAD 65 and GABAA in the brain. Collectively, we suggested that matrine can be developed as an effective antiseptic drug. PMID:24317434

  18. Adsorption of L-glutamic acid and L-aspartic acid to γ-Al2O3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greiner, Edward; Kumar, Kartik; Sumit, Madhuresh; Giuffre, Anthony; Zhao, Weilong; Pedersen, Joel; Sahai, Nita

    2014-05-01

    The interactions of amino acids with mineral surfaces have potential relevance for processes ranging from pre-biotic chemistry to biomineralization to protein adsorption on biomedical implants in vivo. Here, we report the results of experiments investigating the adsorption of L-glutamic (Glu) and L-aspartic (Asp) acids to γ-Al2O3. We examined the extent of Glu and Asp coverage as a function of pH and solution concentration (pH edges and isotherms) in solution-depletion experiments and used in situ Attenuated Total Refkectance Fourier Transform Infrared (ATR-FTIR) spectroscopy to estimate the molecular conformations of the adsorbed molecules. Glu and Asp exhibited similar adsorption behavior on γ-Al2O3 with respect to pH and solution concentration. In general, adsorption decreased as pH increased. At low and high amino acid concentrations, the isotherms exhibited two apparent saturation coverages, which could be interpreted as 1:4 or 1:2 ratios of adsorbed molecule/surface Al sites. Tetradentate tetranuclear and bidentate binuclear species were the dominant conformations inferred independently from FTIR spectra. In these conformations, both carboxylate groups are involved in bonding to either four or to two Al surface atoms, through direct covalent bonds or via H-bonds. An outer sphere species, in which one carboxylate group interacts with a surface Al atom, could not be ruled out based on the FTIR spectra.

  19. Apraxia in anti-glutamic acid decarboxylase-associated stiff person syndrome: link to corticobasal degeneration?

    PubMed

    Bowen, Lauren N; Subramony, S H; Heilman, Kenneth M

    2015-01-01

    Corticobasal syndrome (CBS) is associated with asymmetrical rigidity as well as asymmetrical limb-kinetic and ideomotor apraxia. Stiff person syndrome (SPS) is characterized by muscle stiffness and gait difficulties. Whereas patients with CBS have several forms of pathology, many patients with SPS have glutamic acid decarboxylase antibodies (GAD-ab), but these 2 disorders have not been reported to coexist. We report 2 patients with GAD-ab-positive SPS who also had signs suggestive of CBS, including asymmetrical limb rigidity associated with both asymmetrical limb-kinetic and ideomotor apraxia. Future studies should evaluate patients with CBS for GAD-ab and people with SPS for signs of CBS. PMID:25100431

  20. Elevated spectroscopic glutamate/gamma-amino butyric acid in rats bred for learned helplessness.

    PubMed

    Sartorius, Alexander; Mahlstedt, Magdalena M; Vollmayr, Barbara; Henn, Fritz A; Ende, Gabriele

    2007-09-17

    The theory of depression is dominated by the monoamine hypothesis but there is increasing evidence that beyond monoamines, glutamate (Glu) and gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) play an essential role in the pathogenesis of depression. In this study, the effect of alterations of GABA and Glu were investigated in the congenital learned helplessness paradigm. Proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy is an important monitoring tool to bridge the findings in clinical and preclinical studies. We found increased Glu/GABA ratios in the hippocampus and prefrontal cortex of placebo-treated (saline intraperitoneally) congenital learned helplessness rats versus wild-type rats, and a treatment-induced (desipramine 10 mg/kg intraperitoneally or electroconvulsive shock) decrease of this monoamine ratio in both brain regions. Our results corroborate previous findings of an amino-acid influence on the pathomechanisms of mood disorders. PMID:17712276

  1. Genetic Examination of Initial Amino Acid Oxidation and Glutamate Catabolism in the Hyperthermophilic Archaeon Thermococcus kodakarensis

    PubMed Central

    Yokooji, Yuusuke; Sato, Takaaki; Fujiwara, Shinsuke; Imanaka, Tadayuki

    2013-01-01

    Amino acid catabolism in Thermococcales is presumed to proceed via three steps: oxidative deamination of amino acids by glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH) or aminotransferases, oxidative decarboxylation by 2-oxoacid:ferredoxin oxidoreductases (KOR), and hydrolysis of acyl-coenzyme A (CoA) by ADP-forming acyl-CoA synthetases (ACS). Here, we performed a genetic examination of enzymes involved in Glu catabolism in Thermococcus kodakarensis. Examination of amino acid dehydrogenase activities in cell extracts of T. kodakarensis KUW1 (ΔpyrF ΔtrpE) revealed high NADP-dependent GDH activity, along with lower levels of NAD-dependent activity. NADP-dependent activities toward Gln/Ala/Val/Cys and an NAD-dependent threonine dehydrogenase activity were also detected. In KGDH1, a gene disruption strain of T. kodakarensis GDH (Tk-GDH), only threonine dehydrogenase activity was detected, indicating that all other activities were dependent on Tk-GDH. KGDH1 could not grow in a medium in which growth was dependent on amino acid catabolism, implying that Tk-GDH is the only enzyme that can discharge the electrons (to NADP+/NAD+) released from amino acids in their oxidation to 2-oxoacids. In a medium containing excess pyruvate, KGDH1 displayed normal growth, but higher degrees of amino acid catabolism were observed compared to those for KUW1, suggesting that Tk-GDH functions to suppress amino acid oxidation and plays an anabolic role under this condition. We further constructed disruption strains of 2-oxoglutarate:ferredoxin oxidoreductase and succinyl-CoA synthetase. The two strains displayed growth defects in both media compared to KUW1. Succinate generation was not observed in these strains, indicating that the two enzymes are solely responsible for Glu catabolism among the multiple KOR and ACS enzymes in T. kodakarensis. PMID:23435976

  2. A poly-γ-(D)-glutamic acid depolymerase that degrades the protective capsule of Bacillus anthracis.

    PubMed

    Negus, David; Taylor, Peter W

    2014-03-01

    A mixed culture of Pseudomonas fluorescens and Pusillimonas noertemanii, obtained by soil enrichment, elaborated an enzyme (EnvD) which rapidly hydrolysed poly-γ-d-glutamic acid (PDGA), the constituent of the anti-phagocytic capsule conferring virulence on Bacillus anthracis. The EnvD gene is carried on the P. noertemanii genome but co-culture is required for the elaboration of PDGA depolymerase activity. EnvD showed strong sequence homology to dienelactone hydrolases from other Gram-negative bacteria, possessed no general protease activity but cleaved γ-links in both d- and l-glutamic acid-containing polymers. The stability at 37°C was markedly superior to that of CapD, a γ-glutamyltranspeptidase with PDGA depolymerase activity. Recombinant EnvD was recovered from inclusion bodies in soluble form from an Escherichia coli expression vector and the enzyme stripped the PDGA capsule from the surface of B. anthracis Pasteur within 5 min. We conclude from this in vitro study that rEnvD shows promise as a potential therapeutic for the treatment of anthrax. PMID:24428662

  3. Rapid glutamic acid decarboxylase test for identification of Bacteroides and Clostridium spp.

    PubMed Central

    Jilly, B J; Schreckenberger, P C; LeBeau, L J

    1984-01-01

    A rapid 4-h test for glutamic acid decarboxylase is described for the identification of certain anaerobic bacteria. The test substrate consisted of 1.0 g of L-glutamic acid, 0.3 ml of Triton X-155, and 0.05 g of bromcresol green sodium salt in 1 liter of water. The substrate was dispensed in 0.5-ml amounts into test tubes, and a turbid suspension was made with the test organism. The test was then incubated aerobically at 35 degrees C for 4 h. The development of a blue color was considered positive. A total of 345 strains of clinically isolated anaerobic bacteria were tested. All isolates of Bacteroides fragilis, Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron, Bacteroides uniformis. Clostridium perfringens, and Clostridium sordellii gave a positive reaction. Some isolates of Bacteroides distasonis and Bacteroides vulgatus were also positive. The use of this rapid test in conjunction with other rapid methods, such as the spot indol test, will enable laboratory workers to report these pathogens on the same day on which an inoculum of pure culture growth on agar is available. PMID:6376535

  4. Inhibitory effect of glutamic acid on the scale formation process using electrochemical methods.

    PubMed

    Karar, A; Naamoune, F; Kahoul, A; Belattar, N

    2016-08-01

    The formation of calcium carbonate CaCO3 in water has some important implications in geoscience researches, ocean chemistry studies, CO2 emission issues and biology. In industry, the scaling phenomenon may cause technical problems, such as reduction in heat transfer efficiency in cooling systems and obstruction of pipes. This paper focuses on the study of the glutamic acid (GA) for reducing CaCO3 scale formation on metallic surfaces in the water of Bir Aissa region. The anti-scaling properties of glutamic acid (GA), used as a complexing agent of Ca(2+) ions, have been evaluated by the chronoamperometry and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy methods in conjunction with a microscopic examination. Chemical and electrochemical study of this water shows a high calcium concentration. The characterization using X-ray diffraction reveals that while the CaCO3 scale formed chemically is a mixture of calcite, aragonite and vaterite, the one deposited electrochemically is a pure calcite. The effect of temperature on the efficiency of the inhibitor was investigated. At 30 and 40°C, a complete scaling inhibition was obtained at a GA concentration of 18 mg/L with 90.2% efficiency rate. However, the efficiency of GA decreased at 50 and 60°C. PMID:26824779

  5. Post-polymerization modification of poly(L-glutamic acid) with D-(+)-glucosamine.

    PubMed

    Perdih, Peter; Cebašek, Sašo; Možir, Alenka; Zagar, Ema

    2014-01-01

    Carboxyl functional groups of poly(L-glutamic acid) (PGlu) were modified with a D-(+)-glucosamine (GlcN) by amidation using 4-(4,6-dimethoxy-1,3,5-triazin-2-yl)-4-methylmorpholinium chloride (DMTMM) as a coupling reagent. The coupling reaction was performed in aqueous medium without protection of hydroxyl functional groups of D-(+)-glucosamine. Poly(L-glutamic acid) and GlcN functionalized polyglutamates (P(Glu-GlcN)) were thoroughly characterized by 1D and 2D NMR spectroscopy and SEC-MALS to gain detailed information on their structure, composition and molar mass characteristics. The results reveal successful functionalization with GlcN through the amide bond and also to a minor extent through ester bond formation in position 1 of GlcN. In addition, a ratio between the α- and β-form of glucosamine substituent coupled to polyglutamate repeating units as well as the content of residual dimethoxy triazinyl active ester moiety in the samples were evaluated. PMID:25438084

  6. Stacking interaction and its role in kynurenic acid binding to glutamate ionotropic receptors.

    PubMed

    Zhuravlev, Alexander V; Zakharov, Gennady A; Shchegolev, Boris F; Savvateeva-Popova, Elena V

    2012-05-01

    Stacking interaction is known to play an important role in protein folding, enzyme-substrate and ligand-receptor complex formation. It has been shown to make a contribution into the aromatic antagonists binding with glutamate ionotropic receptors (iGluRs), in particular, the complex of NMDA receptor NR1 subunit with the kynurenic acid (KYNA) derivatives. The specificity of KYNA binding to the glutamate receptors subtypes might partially result from the differences in stacking interaction. We have calculated the optimal geometry and binding energy of KYNA dimers with the four types of aromatic amino acid residues in Rattus and Drosophila ionotropic iGluR subunits. All ab initio quantum chemical calculations were performed taking into account electron correlations at MP2 and MP4 perturbation theory levels. We have also investigated the potential energy surfaces (PES) of stacking and hydrogen bonds (HBs) within the receptor binding site and calculated the free energy of the ligand-receptor complex formation. The energy of stacking interaction depends both on the size of aromatic moieties and the electrostatic effects. The distribution of charges was shown to determine the geometry of polar aromatic ring dimers. Presumably, stacking interaction is important at the first stage of ligand binding when HBs are weak. The freedom of ligand movements and rotation within receptor site provides the precise tuning of the HBs pattern, while the incorrect stacking binding prohibits the ligand-receptor complex formation. PMID:21833825

  7. High-molecular-weight polymers for protein crystallization: poly-γ-glutamic acid-based precipitants

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, Ting-Chou; Korczyńska, Justyna; Smith, David K.; Brzozowski, Andrzej Marek

    2008-09-01

    High-molecular-weight poly-γ-glutamic acid-based polymers have been synthesized, tested and adopted for protein crystallization. Protein crystallization has been revolutionized by the introduction of high-throughput technologies, which have led to a speeding up of the process while simultaneously reducing the amount of protein sample necessary. Nonetheless, the chemistry dimension of protein crystallization has remained relatively undeveloped. Most crystallization screens are based on the same set of precipitants. To address this shortcoming, the development of new protein precipitants based on poly-γ-glutamic acid (PGA) polymers with different molecular-weight ranges is reported here: PGA-LM (low molecular weight) of ∼400 kDa and PGA-HM (high molecular weight) of >1000 kDa. It is also demonstrated that protein precipitants can be expanded further to polymers with much higher molecular weight than those that are currently in use. Furthermore, the modification of PGA-like polymers by covalent attachments of glucosamine substantially improved their solubility without affecting their crystallization properties. Some preliminary PGA-based screens are presented here.

  8. Glutamate Utilization Couples Oxidative Stress Defense and the Tricarboxylic Acid Cycle in Francisella Phagosomal Escape

    PubMed Central

    Ramond, Elodie; Gesbert, Gael; Rigard, Mélanie; Dairou, Julien; Dupuis, Marion; Dubail, Iharilalao; Meibom, Karin; Henry, Thomas; Barel, Monique; Charbit, Alain

    2014-01-01

    Intracellular bacterial pathogens have developed a variety of strategies to avoid degradation by the host innate immune defense mechanisms triggered upon phagocytocis. Upon infection of mammalian host cells, the intracellular pathogen Francisella replicates exclusively in the cytosolic compartment. Hence, its ability to escape rapidly from the phagosomal compartment is critical for its pathogenicity. Here, we show for the first time that a glutamate transporter of Francisella (here designated GadC) is critical for oxidative stress defense in the phagosome, thus impairing intra-macrophage multiplication and virulence in the mouse model. The gadC mutant failed to efficiently neutralize the production of reactive oxygen species. Remarkably, virulence of the gadC mutant was partially restored in mice defective in NADPH oxidase activity. The data presented highlight links between glutamate uptake, oxidative stress defense, the tricarboxylic acid cycle and phagosomal escape. This is the first report establishing the role of an amino acid transporter in the early stage of the Francisella intracellular lifecycle. PMID:24453979

  9. Interaction of Peptide Transporter 1 With D-Glucose and L-Glutamic Acid; Possible Involvement of Taste Receptors.

    PubMed

    Arakawa, Hiroshi; Ohmachi, Taichi; Ichiba, Kiko; Kamioka, Hiroki; Tomono, Takumi; Kanagawa, Masahiko; Idota, Yoko; Hatano, Yasuko; Yano, Kentaro; Morimoto, Kaori; Ogihara, Takuo

    2016-01-01

    We investigated the influence of sweet and umami (savory) tastants on the intestinal absorption of cephalexin (CEX), a substrate of peptide transporter 1 (PEPT1, SLC15A1) in rats. After oral administration of glucose or mannitol to rats, CEX was administered together with a second dose of glucose or mannitol. Western blot analysis indicated that expression of PEPT1 in rat jejunum membrane was decreased by glucose, compared to mannitol. Furthermore, the maximum plasma concentration (Cmax) of orally administered CEX was reduced by glucose compared to mannitol. The effect of glucose was diminished by nifedipine, a L-type Ca(2+) channel blocker. We also found that Cmax of orally administered CEX was reduced by treatment with L-glutamic acid, compared to D-glutamic acid. Thus, excessive intake of glucose and L-glutamic acid may impair oral absorption of PEPT1 substrates. PMID:26852864

  10. Efficient production of gamma-aminobutyric acid using Escherichia coli by co-localization of glutamate synthase, glutamate decarboxylase, and GABA transporter.

    PubMed

    Dung Pham, Van; Somasundaram, Sivachandiran; Lee, Seung Hwan; Park, Si Jae; Hong, Soon Ho

    2016-01-01

    Gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) is an important bio-product, which is used in pharmaceutical formulations, nutritional supplements, and biopolymer monomer. The traditional GABA process involves the decarboxylation of glutamate. However, the direct production of GABA from glucose is a more efficient process. To construct the recombinant strains of Escherichia coli, a novel synthetic scaffold was introduced. By carrying out the co-localization of glutamate synthase, glutamate decarboxylase, and GABA transporter, we redirected the TCA cycle flux to GABA pathway. The genetically engineered E. coli strain produced 1.08 g/L of GABA from 10 g/L of initial glucose. Thus, with the introduction of a synthetic scaffold, we increased GABA production by 2.2-fold. The final GABA concentration was increased by 21.8% by inactivating competing pathways. PMID:26620318

  11. Binding of Ca2+ to Glutamic Acid-Rich Polypeptides from the Rod Outer Segment

    PubMed Central

    Haber-Pohlmeier, S.; Abarca-Heidemann, K.; Körschen, H. G.; Dhiman, H. Kaur; Heberle, J.; Schwalbe, H.; Klein-Seetharaman, J.; Kaupp, U. B.; Pohlmeier, A.

    2007-01-01

    Rod photoreceptors contain three different glutamic acid-rich proteins (GARPs) that have been proposed to control the propagation of Ca2+ from the site of its entry at the cyclic nucleotide-gated channel to the cytosol of the outer segment. We tested this hypothesis by measuring the binding of Ca2+ to the following five constructs related to GARPs of rod photoreceptors: a 32-mer peptide containing 22 carboxylate groups, polyglutamic acid, a recombinant segment comprising 73 carboxylate groups (GLU), GARP1, and GARP2. Ca2+ binding was investigated by means of a Ca2+-sensitive electrode. In all cases, Ca2+ binds with low affinity; the half-maximum binding constant K1/2 ranges from 6 to 16 mM. The binding stoichiometry between Ca2+ ions and carboxylic groups is ∼1:1; an exception is GARP2, where a binding stoichiometry of ∼1:2 was found. Hydrodynamic radii of 1.6, 2.8, 3.3, 5.7, and 6.7 nm were determined by dynamic light scattering for the 32-mer, polyglutamic acid, GLU, GARP2, and GARP1 constructs, respectively. These results suggest that the peptides as well as GARP1 and GARP2 do not adopt compact globular structures. We conclude that the structures should be regarded as loose coils with low-affinity, high-capacity Ca2+ binding. PMID:17218469

  12. Synthesis of potent inhibitors of anthrax toxin based on poly-L-glutamic acid.

    PubMed

    Joshi, Amit; Saraph, Arundhati; Poon, Vincent; Mogridge, Jeremy; Kane, Ravi S

    2006-01-01

    We report the synthesis of biodegradable polyvalent inhibitors of anthrax toxin based on poly-L-glutamic acid (PLGA). These biocompatible polyvalent inhibitors are at least 4 orders of magnitude more potent than the corresponding monovalent peptides in vitro and are comparable in potency to polyacrylamide-based inhibitors of anthrax toxin assembly. We have elucidated the influence of peptide density on inhibitory potency and demonstrated that these inhibitory potencies are limited by kinetics, with even higher activities seen when the inhibitors are preincubated with the heptameric receptor-binding subunit of anthrax toxin prior to exposure to cells. These polyvalent inhibitors are also effective at neutralizing anthrax toxin in vivo and represent attractive leads for designing biocompatible anthrax therapeutics. PMID:16984137

  13. [Experience in using glutamic acid electrophoresis in the early treatment of craniocerebral injuries].

    PubMed

    Naĭdin, V L; Karaseva, T A; Salazkina, S I; Zhukov, P V; Krotkova, O A

    1982-01-01

    Endonasal electrophoresis with alpha-glutamic acid was used in 76 patients with severe craniocerebral injury. The result was good in 24 (38%) and satisfactory in 40 (55%) patients. Thus, a positive result of treatment was obtained in 88% of cases, which was confirmed by electrophysiological and neuropsychological studies. The method produced the greatest effect on the patients' psychic status: 74% of all disorders of higher psychic functions, mainly memory, were restored on the average by the end of treatment. Good tolerance of electrophoresis and its efficacy in the early period after severe injury, i. e. in the first month, were established. Contraindications for treatment were defined more precisely. Since the method is simple and does not call for special conditions, it may be widely used in any medical establishment equipped with galvanization apparatuses. PMID:6121438

  14. Intrathecal-specific glutamic acid decarboxylase antibodies at low titers in autoimmune neurological disorders.

    PubMed

    Sunwoo, Jun-Sang; Chu, Kon; Byun, Jung-Ick; Moon, Jangsup; Lim, Jung-Ah; Kim, Tae-Joon; Lee, Soon-Tae; Jung, Keun-Hwa; Park, Kyung-Il; Jeon, Daejong; Jung, Ki-Young; Kim, Manho; Lee, Sang Kun

    2016-01-15

    Autoantibodies to glutamic acid decarboxylase (Gad-Abs) are implicated in various neurological syndromes. The present study aims to identify intrathecal-specific GAD-Abs and to determine clinical manifestations and treatment outcomes. Nineteen patients had GAD-Abs in cerebrospinal fluid but not in paired serum samples. Neurological syndromes included limbic encephalitis, temporal lobe epilepsy, cerebellar ataxia, autonomic dysfunction, and stiff-person syndrome. Immunotherapy had beneficial effects in 57.1% of patients, and the patients with limbic encephalitis responded especially well to immunotherapy. Intrathecal-specific antibodies to GAD at low titers may appear as nonspecific markers of immune activation within the central nervous system rather than pathogenic antibodies causing neuronal dysfunction. PMID:26711563

  15. Neuregulin 1 Controls Glutamate Uptake by Up-regulating Excitatory Amino Acid Carrier 1 (EAAC1).

    PubMed

    Yu, Ha-Nul; Park, Woo-Kyu; Nam, Ki-Hoan; Song, Dae-Yong; Kim, Hye-Sun; Baik, Tai-Kyoung; Woo, Ran-Sook

    2015-08-14

    Neuregulin 1 (NRG1) is a trophic factor that is thought to have important roles in the regulating brain circuitry. Recent studies suggest that NRG1 regulates synaptic transmission, although the precise mechanisms remain unknown. Here we report that NRG1 influences glutamate uptake by increasing the protein level of excitatory amino acid carrier (EAAC1). Our data indicate that NRG1 induced the up-regulation of EAAC1 in primary cortical neurons with an increase in glutamate uptake. These in vitro results were corroborated in the prefrontal cortex (PFC) of mice given NRG1. The stimulatory effect of NRG1 was blocked by inhibition of the NRG1 receptor ErbB4. The suppressed expression of ErbB4 by siRNA led to a decrease in the expression of EAAC1. In addition, the ablation of ErbB4 in parvalbumin (PV)-positive neurons in PV-ErbB4(-/-) mice suppressed EAAC1 expression. Taken together, our results show that NRG1 signaling through ErbB4 modulates EAAC1. These findings link proposed effectors in schizophrenia: NRG1/ErbB4 signaling perturbation, EAAC1 deficit, and neurotransmission dysfunction. PMID:26092725

  16. Gamma-aminobutyric acid production using immobilized glutamate decarboxylase followed by downstream processing with cation exchange chromatography.

    PubMed

    Lee, Seungwoon; Ahn, Jungoh; Kim, Yeon-Gu; Jung, Joon-Ki; Lee, Hongweon; Lee, Eun Gyo

    2013-01-01

    We have developed a gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) production technique using his-tag mediated immobilization of Escherichia coli-derived glutamate decarboxylase (GAD), an enzyme that catalyzes the conversion of glutamate to GABA. The GAD was obtained at 1.43 g/L from GAD-overexpressed E. coli fermentation and consisted of 59.7% monomer, 29.2% dimer and 2.3% tetramer with a 97.6% soluble form of the total GAD. The harvested GAD was immobilized to metal affinity gel with an immobilization yield of 92%. Based on an investigation of specific enzyme activity and reaction characteristics, glutamic acid (GA) was chosen over monosodium glutamate (MSG) as a substrate for immobilized GAD, resulting in conversion of 2.17 M GABA in a 1 L reactor within 100 min. The immobilized enzymes retained 58.1% of their initial activities after ten consecutive uses. By using cation exchange chromatography followed by enzymatic conversion, GABA was separated from the residual substrate and leached GAD. As a consequence, the glutamic acid was mostly removed with no detectable GAD, while 91.2% of GABA was yielded in the purification step. PMID:23322022

  17. Effect of l-glutamic acid supplementation on performance and nitrogen balance of broilers fed low protein diets.

    PubMed

    Bezerra, R M; Costa, F G P; Givisiez, P E N; Freitas, E R; Goulart, C C; Santos, R A; Souza, J G; Brandão, P A; Lima, M R; Melo, M L; Rodrigues, V P; Nogueira, E T; Vieira, D V G

    2016-06-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of protein reduction and supplementation of l-glutamic acid in male broiler diets. A total of 648 chicks of the Cobb 500 strain were distributed in a completely randomized design with six treatments and six replications with eighteen birds per experimental unit. The study comprised pre-starter (1-7 days), starter (8-21 days), growth (22-35 days) and final (36-45 days) phases. The first treatment consisted of a control diet formulated according to the requirements of essential amino acids for each rearing phase. The second and third treatments had crude protein (CP) reduced by 1.8 and 3.6 percentage points (pp) in relation to the control diet respectively. In the fourth treatment, l-glutamic acid was added to provide the same glutamate level as the control diet, and in the last two treatments, the broilers were supplemented with 1 and 2 pp of glutamate above that of the control diet respectively. The reduction in CP decreased the performance of broilers and the supplementation of l-glutamic acid did not influence performance when supplied in the diets with excess of glutamate. The lowest excreted nitrogen values were observed in the control diet, and treatments 2 and 3, respectively, in comparison with treatments with the use of l-glutamic acid (5 and 6). Retention efficiency of nitrogen was better in the control diet and in the treatment with a reduction of 1.8 pp of CP. It was verified that the serum uric acid level decreased with the CP reduction. A reduction in CP levels of up to 21.3%, 18.8%, 18.32% and 17.57% is recommended in phases from 1 to 7, 8 to 21, 22 to 35 and at 36 to 42 days, respectively, with a level of glutamate at 5.32%, 4.73%, 4.57%, 4.38%, also in these phases. PMID:26614118

  18. Draft Genome Sequence of Bacillus subtilis subsp. natto Strain CGMCC 2108, a High Producer of Poly-γ-Glutamic Acid

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Siyuan; Su, Anping; Zhang, Chen; Ren, Yuanyuan

    2016-01-01

    Here, we report the 4.1-Mb draft genome sequence of Bacillus subtilis subsp. natto strain CGMCC 2108, a high producer of poly-γ-glutamic acid (γ-PGA). This sequence will provide further help for the biosynthesis of γ-PGA and will greatly facilitate research efforts in metabolic engineering of B. subtilis subsp. natto strain CGMCC 2108. PMID:27231363

  19. Growth and characterization of a new NLO material: L-Glutamic acid hydro bromide [L-GluHBr

    SciTech Connect

    Sathyalakshmi, R.; Bhagavannarayana, G.; Ramasamy, P.

    2009-05-06

    L-(+)-Glutamic acid hydro bromide, an isomorphic salt of L-glutamic acid hydrochloride, was synthesized and the synthesis was confirmed using Fourier transform infrared analysis. Solubility of the material in water was determined. L-Glutamic acid hydro bromide crystals were grown by low temperature solution growth using the solvent evaporation technique. Single crystal X-ray diffraction studies were carried out and the cell parameters, atomic co-ordinates, bond lengths and bond angles were reported. High-resolution X-ray diffraction studies were carried out and good crystallinity for the grown crystal was observed from the diffraction curve. The grown crystals were subjected to dielectric studies. Ultraviolet-visible-near infrared spectral analysis shows good optical transmission in the visible and infrared region of the grown crystals. The second harmonic generation efficiency of L-glutamic acid hydro bromide crystal was determined using the Kurtz powder test and it was found that it had efficiency comparable with that of the potassium di-hydrogen phosphate crystal.

  20. Preparation of starch-poly-glutamic acid graft copolymers by microwave irradiation and the characterization of their properties

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Graft copolymers of waxy maize starch and poly-y-glutamic acid (PGA) were produced in an aqueous solution using microwave irradiation. The microwave reaction conditions were optimized with regard to temperature and pH. The temperature of 180 deg C and pH 7.0 were the best reaction conditions resulti...

  1. Draft Genome Sequence of Bacillus subtilis subsp. natto Strain CGMCC 2108, a High Producer of Poly-γ-Glutamic Acid.

    PubMed

    Tan, Siyuan; Meng, Yonghong; Su, Anping; Zhang, Chen; Ren, Yuanyuan

    2016-01-01

    Here, we report the 4.1-Mb draft genome sequence of Bacillus subtilis subsp. natto strain CGMCC 2108, a high producer of poly-γ-glutamic acid (γ-PGA). This sequence will provide further help for the biosynthesis of γ-PGA and will greatly facilitate research efforts in metabolic engineering of B. subtilis subsp. natto strain CGMCC 2108. PMID:27231363

  2. Nanoporous multilayer poly(L-glutamic acid)/chitosan microcapsules for drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Yan, Shifeng; Rao, Shuiqin; Zhu, Jie; Wang, Zhichun; Zhang, Ying; Duan, Yourong; Chen, Xuesi; Yin, Jingbo

    2012-05-10

    Nanoporous poly(L-glutamic acid)/chitosan (PLGA/CS) multilayer microcapsules were fabricated by layer-by-layer (LbL) assembly using the porous silica particles as sacrificial templates. The LbL assembled nanoporous PLGA/CS microcapsules were characterized by Zeta-potential analyzer, FTIR, TGA, SEM, TEM and CLSM. 5-Fluorouracil (5-FU) was chosen as model drug. The drug loading content of PLGA/CS microcapsules depends on loading time, loading temperature, pH value and NaCl concentration. High loading capacity of microcapsules can be achieved by simply adjusting pH value and salt concentration. Moreover, 5-Fu loaded microcapsules take on a sustained release behavior, especially in an acid solution, in contrast to burst release of bare 5-Fu. The kinetics of 5-Fu release from PLGA/CS microcapsules conforms to Korsmeyer-Peppas and Baker-Lonsdale models, the mechanism of which can be ascribed to priority of drug diffusion and subordination of polymer degradation. The MTT cytotoxicity assay in vitro reveals the satisfactory anticancer activity of the drug-loaded PLGA/CS microcapsules. Therefore, the novel nanoporous PLGA/CS microcapsules is expected to find application in drug delivery systems. PMID:22301425

  3. Glutamic acid ameliorates estrogen deficiency-induced menopausal-like symptoms in ovariectomized mice.

    PubMed

    Han, Na-Ra; Kim, Hee-Yun; Yang, Woong Mo; Jeong, Hyun-Ja; Kim, Hyung-Min

    2015-09-01

    Some amino acids are considered alternative therapies for improving menopausal symptoms. Glutamic acid (GA), which is abundant in meats, fish, and protein-rich plant foods, is known to be a neurotransmitter or precursor of γ-aminobutyric acid. Although it is unclear if GA functions in menopausal symptoms, we hypothesized that GA would attenuate estrogen deficiency-induced menopausal symptoms. The objective to test our hypothesis was to examine an estrogenic effect of GA in ovariectomized (OVX) mice, estrogen receptor (ER)-positive human osteoblast-like MG-63 cells, and ER-positive human breast cancer MCF-7 cells. The results demonstrated that administration with GA to mice suppressed body weight gain and vaginal atrophy when compared with the OVX mice. A microcomputed tomographic analysis of the trabecular bone showed increases in bone mineral density, trabecular number, and connectivity density as well as a significant decrease in total porosity of the OVX mice treated with GA. In addition, GA increased serum levels of alkaline phosphatase and estrogen compared with the OVX mice. Furthermore, GA induced proliferation and increased ER-β messenger RNA (mRNA) expression, estrogen response element (ERE) activity, extracellular signal-regulated kinase phosphorylation, and alkaline phosphatase activity in MG-63 cells. In MCF-7 cells, GA also increased proliferation, Ki-67 mRNA expression, ER-β mRNA expression, and ERE activity. Estrogen response element activity increased by GA was inhibited by an estrogen antagonist. Taken together, our data demonstrated that GA has estrogenic and osteogenic activities in OVX mice, MG-63 cells, and MCF-7 cells. PMID:26144993

  4. Brain infection with Staphylococcus aureus leads to high extracellular levels of glutamate, aspartate, γ-aminobutyric acid, and zinc.

    PubMed

    Hassel, Bjørnar; Dahlberg, Daniel; Mariussen, Espen; Goverud, Ingeborg Løstegaard; Antal, Ellen-Ann; Tønjum, Tone; Maehlen, Jan

    2014-12-01

    Staphylococcal brain infections may cause mental deterioration and epileptic seizures, suggesting interference with normal neurotransmission in the brain. We injected Staphylococcus aureus into rat striatum and found an initial 76% reduction in the extracellular level of glutamate as detected by microdialysis at 2 hr after staphylococcal infection. At 8 hr after staphylococcal infection, however, the extracellular level of glutamate had increased 12-fold, and at 20 hr it had increased >30-fold. The extracellular level of aspartate and γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) also increased greatly. Extracellular Zn(2+) , which was estimated at ∼2.6 µmol/liter in the control situation, was increased by 330% 1-2.5 hr after staphylococcal infection and by 100% at 8 and 20 hr. The increase in extracellular glutamate, aspartate, and GABA appeared to reflect the degree of tissue damage. The area of tissue damage greatly exceeded the area of staphylococcal infiltration, pointing to soluble factors being responsible for cell death. However, the N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor antagonist MK-801 ameliorated neither tissue damage nor the increase in extracellular neuroactive amino acids, suggesting the presence of neurotoxic factors other than glutamate and aspartate. In vitro staphylococci incubated with glutamine and glucose formed glutamate, so bacteria could be an additional source of infection-related glutamate. We conclude that the dramatic increase in the extracellular concentration of neuroactive amino acids and zinc could interfere with neurotransmission in the surrounding brain tissue, contributing to mental deterioration and a predisposition to epileptic seizures, which are often seen in brain abscess patients. PMID:25043715

  5. Convulsant and subconvulsant doses of norfloxacin in the presence and absence of biphenylacetic acid alter extracellular hippocampal glutamate but not gamma-aminobutyric acid levels in conscious rats.

    PubMed

    Smolders, I; Gousseau, C; Marchand, S; Couet, W; Ebinger, G; Michotte, Y

    2002-02-01

    Fluoroquinolones are antibiotics with central excitatory side effects. These adverse effects presumably result from inhibition of gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) binding to GABA(A) receptors. This GABA antagonistic effect is greatly potentiated by the active metabolite of fenbufen, biphenylacetic acid (BPAA). Nevertheless, it remains questionable whether GABA receptor antagonism alone can explain the convulsant activity potentials of these antimicrobial agents. The present study was undertaken to investigate the possible effects of norfloxacin, both in the absence and in the presence of BPAA, on the extracellular hippocampal levels of GABA and glutamate, the main central inhibitory and excitatory amino acid neurotransmitters, respectively. This in vivo microdialysis approach with conscious rats allows monitoring of behavioral alterations and concomitant transmitter modulation in the hippocampus. Peroral administration of 100 mg of BPAA per kg of body weight had no effect on behavior and did not significantly alter extracellular GABA or glutamate concentrations. Intravenous perfusion of 300 mg of norfloxacin per kg did not change the rat's behavior or the concomitant neurotransmitter levels in about half of the experiments, while the remaining animals exhibited severe seizures. These norfloxacin-induced convulsions did not affect extracellular hippocampal GABA levels but were accompanied by enhanced glutamate concentrations. Half of the rats receiving both 100 mg of BPAA per kg and 50 mg of norfloxacin per kg displayed lethal seizures, while the remaining animals showed no seizure-related behavior. In the latter subgroup, again no significant alterations in extracellular GABA levels were observed, but glutamate overflow remained significantly elevated for at least 3 h. In conclusion, norfloxacin exerts convulsant activity in rats, accompanied by elevations of extracellular hippocampal glutamate levels but not GABA levels, even in the presence of BPAA. PMID:11796360

  6. Convulsant and Subconvulsant Doses of Norfloxacin in the Presence and Absence of Biphenylacetic Acid Alter Extracellular Hippocampal Glutamate but Not Gamma-Aminobutyric Acid Levels in Conscious Rats

    PubMed Central

    Smolders, I.; Gousseau, C.; Marchand, S.; Couet, W.; Ebinger, G.; Michotte, Y.

    2002-01-01

    Fluoroquinolones are antibiotics with central excitatory side effects. These adverse effects presumably result from inhibition of γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) binding to GABAA receptors. This GABA antagonistic effect is greatly potentiated by the active metabolite of fenbufen, biphenylacetic acid (BPAA). Nevertheless, it remains questionable whether GABA receptor antagonism alone can explain the convulsant activity potentials of these antimicrobial agents. The present study was undertaken to investigate the possible effects of norfloxacin, both in the absence and in the presence of BPAA, on the extracellular hippocampal levels of GABA and glutamate, the main central inhibitory and excitatory amino acid neurotransmitters, respectively. This in vivo microdialysis approach with conscious rats allows monitoring of behavioral alterations and concomitant transmitter modulation in the hippocampus. Peroral administration of 100 mg of BPAA per kg of body weight had no effect on behavior and did not significantly alter extracellular GABA or glutamate concentrations. Intravenous perfusion of 300 mg of norfloxacin per kg did not change the rat's behavior or the concomitant neurotransmitter levels in about half of the experiments, while the remaining animals exhibited severe seizures. These norfloxacin-induced convulsions did not affect extracellular hippocampal GABA levels but were accompanied by enhanced glutamate concentrations. Half of the rats receiving both 100 mg of BPAA per kg and 50 mg of norfloxacin per kg displayed lethal seizures, while the remaining animals showed no seizure-related behavior. In the latter subgroup, again no significant alterations in extracellular GABA levels were observed, but glutamate overflow remained significantly elevated for at least 3 h. In conclusion, norfloxacin exerts convulsant activity in rats, accompanied by elevations of extracellular hippocampal glutamate levels but not GABA levels, even in the presence of BPAA. PMID:11796360

  7. Possible role for glutamic acid decarboxylase in fibromyalgia symptoms: a conceptual model for chronic pain.

    PubMed

    Fitzgerald, Caris T; Carter, Lawrence P

    2011-09-01

    Fibromyalgia (FM) is a condition of chronic generalized musculoskeletal pain that is thought to be a disorder of central pain sensitization. A number of neurotransmitters in the ascending and descending pain pathways have been implicated in FM including glutamate and GABA. Glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD) is the rate-limiting enzyme in the conversion of glutamate to GABA and decreased expression or activity of this enzyme could result in an imbalance of excitatory and inhibitory neurotransmission in the ascending and descending pain pathways. Specifically, the expression and activity of the predominant isoform of GAD (GAD65) is influenced by several factors that are associated with FM such as female sex, poor diet, obesity, sedentary lifestyle, and stress. We hypothesize that decreased GAD expression and/or activity plays a role in the development and exacerbation of FM leading to impairments in the three common domains of FM symptomatology: increased pain (hyperalgesia and allodynia), disrupted sleep, and disturbances in mood (anxiety and depression). There are several lines of evidence that appear to support a role of GAD in FM. First, the defining symptom of FM is pain and GAD65 knockout mice have been shown to exhibit supraspinal hyperalgesia. Second, GAD has been implicated in disorders of muscle stiffness and rigidity and morning stiffness is a common symptom of FM. Third, stress, depression, and anxiety, which are often comorbid with FM, decrease GAD activity. Fourth, FM is associated with poor sleep, specifically disrupted non-rapid eye movement (NREM) sleep, and the pharmacological induction of NREM sleep is associated with the activation of GAD-containing neurons in the preoptic hypothalamus. Fifth, FM is more commonly diagnosed in women than men and the activity of GAD is reduced by low levels of its cofactor pyroxidine, which is less well-absorbed by women and can be further lowered by diet, tobacco, and alcohol intake. Sixth, FM patients tend to be

  8. Delayed translocation of NGFI-B/RXR in glutamate stimulated neurons allows late protection by 9-cis retinoic acid

    SciTech Connect

    Mathisen, Gro H.; Fallgren, Asa B.; Strom, Bjorn O.; Boldingh Debernard, Karen A.; Mohebi, Beata U.; Paulsen, Ragnhild E.

    2011-10-14

    Highlights: {yields} NGFI-B and RXR translocate out of the nucleus after glutamate treatment. {yields} Arresting NGFI-B/RXR in the nucleus protects neurons from excitotoxicity. {yields} Late protection by 9-cis RA is possible due to a delayed translocation of NGFI-B/RXR. -- Abstract: Nuclear receptor and apoptosis inducer NGFI-B translocates out of the nucleus as a heterodimer with RXR in response to different apoptosis stimuli, and therefore represents a potential pharmacological target. We found that the cytosolic levels of NGFI-B and RXR{alpha} were increased in cultures of cerebellar granule neurons 2 h after treatment with glutamate (excitatory neurotransmitter in the brain, involved in stroke). To find a time-window for potential intervention the neurons were transfected with gfp-tagged expressor plasmids for NGFI-B and RXR. The default localization of NGFI-Bgfp and RXRgfp was nuclear, however, translocation out of the nucleus was observed 2-3 h after glutamate treatment. We therefore hypothesized that the time-window between treatment and translocation would allow late protection against neuronal death. The RXR ligand 9-cis retinoic acid was used to arrest NGFI-B and RXR in the nucleus. Addition of 9-cis retinoic acid 1 h after treatment with glutamate reduced the cytosolic translocation of NGFI-B and RXR{alpha}, the cytosolic translocation of NGFI-Bgfp observed in live neurons, as well as the neuronal death. However, the reduced translocation and the reduced cell death were not observed when 9-cis retinoic acid was added after 3 h. Thus, late protection from glutamate induced death by addition of 9-cis retinoic acid is possible in a time-window after apoptosis induction.

  9. The effect of glutamic acid side chain on acidity constant of lysine in beta-sheet: A density functional theory study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sargolzaei, M.; Afshar, M.; Sadeghi, M. S.; Kavee, M.

    2014-07-01

    In this work, the possibility of proton transfer between side chain of lysine and glutamic acid in peptide of Glu--Ala-Lys+ was demonstrated using density functional theory (DFT). We have shown that the proton transfer takes place between side chain of glutamic and lysine residues through the hydrogen bond formation. The structures of transition state for proton transfer reaction were detected in gas and solution phases. Our kinetic studies show that the proton transfer reaction rate in gas phase is higher than solution phase. The ionization constant (p K a) value of lysine residue in peptide was estimated 1.039 which is lower than intrinsic p K a of lysine amino acid.

  10. The synthesis of glutamic acid in the absence of enzymes: Implications for biogenesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morowitz, Harold; Peterson, Eta; Chang, Sherwood

    1995-01-01

    This paper reports on the non-enzymatic aqueous phase synthesis of amino acids from keto acids, ammonia and reducing agents. The facile synthesis of key metabolic intermediates, particularly in the glycolytic pathway, the citric acid cycle, and the first step of amino acid synthesis, lead to new ways of looking at the problem of biogenesis.

  11. A 13C{31P} REDOR NMR Investigation of the Role of Glutamic Acid Residues in Statherin-Hydroxyapatite Recognition

    PubMed Central

    Ndao, Moise; Ash, Jason T.; Breen, Nicholas F.; Goobes, Gil; Stayton, Patrick S.; Drobny, Gary P.

    2011-01-01

    The side chain carboxyl groups of acidic proteins found in the extra-cellular matrix (ECM) of mineralized tissues play a key role in promoting or inhibiting the growth of minerals such as hydroxyapatite (HAP), the principal mineral component of bone and teeth. Among the acidic proteins found in the saliva is statherin, a 43-residue tyrosine-rich peptide that is a potent lubricant in the salivary pellicle and an inhibitor of both HAP crystal nucleation and growth. Three acidic amino acids – D1, E4, and E5 – are located in the N-terminal 15 amino acid segment, with a fourth amino acid, E26, located outside the N-terminus. We have utilized 13C{31P} REDOR NMR to analyze the role played by acidic amino acids in the binding mechanism of statherin to the HAP surface by measuring the distance between the δ-carboxyl 13C spins of the three glutamic acid side chains of statherin (residues E4, E5, E26) and 31P spins of the phosphate groups at the HAP surface. 13C{31P} REDOR studies of glutamic-5-13C acid incorporated at positions E4 and E26 indicate a 13C–31P distance of more than 6.5 Å between the side chain carboxyl 13C spin of E4 and the closest 31P in the HAP surface. In contrast, the carboxyl 13C spin at E5 has a much shorter 13C–31P internuclear distance of 4.25±0.09 Å, indicating that the carboxyl group of this side chain interacts directly with the surface. 13C T1ρ and slow-spinning MAS studies indicate that the motions of the side chains of E4 and E5 are more restricted than that of E26. Together, these results provide further insight into the molecular interactions of statherin with HAP surfaces. PMID:19678690

  12. Quantum Computational Calculations of the Ionization Energies of Acidic and Basic Amino Acids: Aspartate, Glutamate, Arginine, Lysine, and Histidine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Guzman, C. P.; Andrianarijaona, M.; Lee, Y. S.; Andrianarijaona, V.

    An extensive knowledge of the ionization energies of amino acids can provide vital information on protein sequencing, structure, and function. Acidic and basic amino acids are unique because they have three ionizable groups: the C-terminus, the N-terminus, and the side chain. The effects of multiple ionizable groups can be seen in how Aspartate's ionizable side chain heavily influences its preferred conformation (J Phys Chem A. 2011 April 7; 115(13): 2900-2912). Theoretical and experimental data on the ionization energies of many of these molecules is sparse. Considering each atom of the amino acid as a potential departing site for the electron gives insight on how the three ionizable groups affect the ionization process of the molecule and the dynamic coupling between the vibrational modes. In the following study, we optimized the structure of each acidic and basic amino acid then exported the three dimensional coordinates of the amino acids. We used ORCA to calculate single point energies for a region near the optimized coordinates and systematically went through the x, y, and z coordinates of each atom in the neutral and ionized forms of the amino acid. With the calculations, we were able to graph energy potential curves to better understand the quantum dynamic properties of the amino acids. The authors thank Pacific Union College Student Association for providing funds.

  13. Betaxanthin formation and free amino acids in hairy roots of Beta vulgaris var. lutea depending on nutrient medium and glutamate or glutamine feeding.

    PubMed

    Böhm, Hartmut; Mäck, Gisela

    2004-05-01

    Feeding of amino acids to hairy roots of the yellow beet (Beta vulgaris var. lutea) usually results in the formation of the respective betaxanthins. One exception is (S)-glutamate whose feeding leads to an increase in the betaxanthin vulgaxanthin I (glutamine as amino-acid moiety) instead of vulgaxanthin II (glutamate as amino-acid moiety). To elucidate this phenomenon, hairy roots were cultivated in modified standard medium and (S)-glutamate was fed. Under most nutrient conditions tested, glutamine and vulgaxanthin I in the tissue dominated over glutamate and vulgaxanthin II. Glutamate, opposed to glutamine, was readily metabolized so that its concentration was lower than that of glutamine. Maximum concentrations of glutamate were reached when the activity of glutamine synthetase was low. Even then, however, vulgaxanthin II stayed on a low level. In contrast, the level of vulgaxanthin I increased with increasing concentrations of glutamine in the tissue. Also 4-aminobutyric acid (GABA) was a major amino acid in the hairy roots. Its concentration reached maximum levels when (S)-glutamate, a GABA precursor, was fed, or when sucrose, the C source of the roots, was replaced by glucose. The respective GABA-betaxanthin, however, was hardly detectable. When both (S)-glutamate and glucose were supplied, the GABA concentration exceeded that of all other amino acids. Only then the GABA-betaxanthin could be characterized in small amounts. Interestingly, the level of the main betaxanthin, miraxanthin V, consisting of betalamic acid and dopamine, was most markedly reduced by a replacement of sucrose with glucose. We conclude that the reaction of betalamic acid with glutamate and GABA was considerably lower than with glutamine and dopamine, irrespective of the concentration of the amino acid in the tissue. Possible reasons will be discussed, also with respect to the occurrence of species-specific patterns of betaxanthins. PMID:15231409

  14. Fatty acid biosynthesis from glutamate and glutamine is specifically induced in neuronal cells under hypoxia

    PubMed Central

    Brose, Stephen A.; Marquardt, Amanda L.; Golovko, Mikhail Y.

    2014-01-01

    Hypoxia is involved in many neuronal and non-neuronal diseases, and defining the mechanisms for tissue adaptation to hypoxia is critical for the understanding and treatment of these diseases. One mechanism for tissue adaptation to hypoxia is increased glutamine and/or glutamate (Gln/Glu) utilization. To address this mechanism, we determined total Gln/Glu incorporation into lipids and fatty acids in both primary neurons and a neuronal cell line under normoxic and hypoxic conditions and compared this to non-neuronal primary cells and non-neuronal cell lines. Incorporation of Gln/Glu into total lipids was dramatically and specifically increased under hypoxia in neuronal cells including both primary (2.0- and 3.0- fold for Gln and Glu, respectively) and immortalized cultures (3.5- and 8.0- fold for Gln and Glu, respectively), and 90% to 97% of this increase was accounted for by incorporation into fatty acids (FA) depending upon substrate and cell type. All other non-neuronal cells tested demonstrated decreased or unchanged FA synthesis from Gln/Glu under hypoxia. Consistent with these data, total FA mass was also increased in neuronal cells under hypoxia that was mainly accounted for by the increase in saturated and monounsaturated FA with carbon length from 14 to 24. Incorporation of FA synthesized from Gln/Glu was increased in all major lipid classes including cholesteryl esters, TAGs, DAGs, free FA, and phospholipids, with the highest rate of incorporation into TAGs. These results indicate that increased FA biosynthesis from Gln/Glu followed by esterification may be a neuronal specific pathway for adaptation to hypoxia. PMID:24266789

  15. Expression of the neurotransmitter-synthesizing enzyme glutamic acid decarboxylase in male germ cells.

    PubMed Central

    Persson, H; Pelto-Huikko, M; Metsis, M; Söder, O; Brene, S; Skog, S; Hökfelt, T; Ritzén, E M

    1990-01-01

    The gene encoding glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD), the key enzyme in the synthesis of the inhibitory neurotransmitter gamma-aminobutyric acid, is shown to be expressed in the testis of several different species. Nucleotide sequence analysis of a cDNA clone isolated from the human testis confirmed the presence of GAD mRNA in the testis. The major GAD mRNA in the testis was 2.5 kilobases. Smaller amounts of a 3.7-kilobase mRNA with the same size as GAD mRNA in the brain was also detected in the testis. In situ hybridization using a GAD-specific probe revealed GAD mRNA expressing spermatocytes and spermatids located in the middle part of rat seminiferous tubules. Studies on the ontogeny of GAD mRNA expression showed low levels of GAD mRNA in testes of prepubertal rats, with increasing levels as sexual maturation is reached, compatible with GAD mRNA expression in germ cells. In agreement with this, fractionation of cells from the rat seminiferous epithelium followed by Northern (RNA) blot analysis showed the highest levels of GAD mRNA associated with spermatocytes and spermatids. Evidence for the presence of GAD protein in the rat testis was obtained from the demonstration of GAD-like immunoreactivity in seminiferous tubules, predominantly at a position where spermatids and spermatozoa are found. Furthermore, GAD-like immunoreactivity was seen in the midpiece of ejaculated human spermatozoa, the part that is responsible for generating energy for spermatozoan motility. Images PMID:1697032

  16. Reduction of Endogenous Kynurenic Acid Formation Enhances Extracellular Glutamate, Hippocampal Plasticity, and Cognitive Behavior

    PubMed Central

    Potter, Michelle C; Elmer, Greg I; Bergeron, Richard; Albuquerque, Edson X; Guidetti, Paolo; Wu, Hui-Qiu; Schwarcz, Robert

    2010-01-01

    At endogenous brain concentrations, the astrocyte-derived metabolite kynurenic acid (KYNA) antagonizes the α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor and, possibly, the glycine co-agonist site of the NMDA receptor. The functions of these two receptors, which are intimately involved in synaptic plasticity and cognitive processes, may, therefore, be enhanced by reductions in brain KYNA levels. This concept was tested in mice with a targeted deletion of kynurenine aminotransferase II (KAT II), a major biosynthetic enzyme of brain KYNA. At 21 days of age, KAT II knock-out mice had reduced hippocampal KYNA levels (−71%) and showed significantly increased performance in three cognitive paradigms that rely in part on the integrity of hippocampal function, namely object exploration and recognition, passive avoidance, and spatial discrimination. Moreover, compared with wild-type controls, hippocampal slices from KAT II-deficient mice showed a significant increase in the amplitude of long-term potentiation in vitro. These functional changes were accompanied by reduced extracellular KYNA (−66%) and increased extracellular glutamate (+51%) concentrations, measured by hippocampal microdialysis in vivo. Taken together, a picture emerges in which a reduction in the astrocytic formation of KYNA increases glutamatergic tone in the hippocampus and enhances cognitive abilities and synaptic plasticity. Our studies raise the prospect that interventions aimed specifically at reducing KYNA formation in the brain may constitute a promising molecular strategy for cognitive improvement in health and disease. PMID:20336058

  17. Non-convulsive status epilepticus associated with glutamic acid decarboxylase antibody.

    PubMed

    Cikrikçili, Ugur; Ulusoy, Canan; Turan, Selin; Yildiz, Senay; Bilgiç, Basar; Hanagasi, Hasmet; Baykan, Betül; Tüzün, Erdem; Gürvit, Hakan

    2013-07-01

    Autoimmune encephalitis associated with glutamic acid decarboxylase antibodies (GAD-Ab) often presents with treatment-resistant partial seizures, as well as other central nervous system symptoms. In contrast to several other well-characterized autoantibodies, GAD-Ab has very rarely been associated with status epilepticus. We report a 63-year-old woman initially admitted with somnolence and psychiatric findings. The EEG findings, of generalized and rhythmical slow spike-wave activity over the posterior regions of both hemispheres, together with the clinical deterioration in responsiveness, led to the diagnosis of non-convulsive status epilepticus. Investigation of a broad panel of autoantibodies, revealed only increased serum GAD-Ab levels. Following methylprednisolone and intravenous immunoglobulin treatments, the patient's neurological symptoms improved, EEG findings disappeared and GAD-Ab levels significantly decreased. GAD-Ab should be added to the list of anti-neuronal antibodies associated with non-convulsive status epilepticus. Disappearance of clinical findings and seroreversion after immunotherapy suggest that GAD-Ab might be involved in seizure pathogenesis.  PMID:23820312

  18. Alginate/Poly(γ-glutamic Acid) Base Biocompatible Gel for Bone Tissue Engineering

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Wing P.; Kung, Fu-Chen; Kuo, Yu-Lin; Yang, Ming-Chen; Lai, Wen-Fu Thomas

    2015-01-01

    A technique for synthesizing biocompatible hydrogels by cross-linking calcium-form poly(γ-glutamic acid), alginate sodium, and Pluronic F-127 was created, in which alginate can be cross-linked by Ca2+ from Ca–γ-PGA directly and γ-PGA molecules introduced into the alginate matrix to provide pH sensitivity and hemostasis. Mechanical properties, swelling behavior, and blood compatibility were investigated for each hydrogel compared with alginate and for γ-PGA hydrogel with the sodium form only. Adding F-127 improves mechanical properties efficiently and influences the temperature-sensitive swelling of the hydrogels but also has a minor effect on pH-sensitive swelling and promotes anticoagulation. MG-63 cells were used to test biocompatibility. Gelation occurred gradually through change in the elastic modulus as the release of calcium ions increased over time and caused ionic cross-linking, which promotes the elasticity of gel. In addition, the growth of MG-63 cells in the gel reflected nontoxicity. These results showed that this biocompatible scaffold has potential for application in bone materials. PMID:26504784

  19. Rigidity of poly-L-glutamic acid scaffolds: Influence of secondary and supramolecular structure

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Nickels, Jonathan D.; Perticaroli, Stefania; Ehlers, Georg; Feygenson, Mikhail; Sokolov, Alexei P.

    2015-03-06

    Poly-L-glutamic acid (PGA) is a widely used biomaterial, with applications ranging from drug delivery and biological glues to food products and as a tissue engineering scaffold. A biodegradable material with flexible conjugation functional groups, tunable secondary structure, and mechanical properties, PGA has potential as a tunable matrix material in mechanobiology. Some recent studies in proteins connecting dynamics, nanometer length scale rigidity, and secondary structure suggest a new point of view from which to analyze and develop this promising material. Our paper characterizes the structure, topology, and rigidity properties of PGA prepared with different molecular weights and secondary structures through variousmore » techniques including scanning electron microscopy, FTIR, light, and neutron scattering spectroscopy. On the length scale of a few nanometers, rigidity is determined by hydrogen bonding interactions in the presence of neutral species and by electrostatic interactions when the polypeptide is negatively charged. Finally, when probed over hundreds of nanometers, the rigidity of these materials is modified by long range intermolecular interactions that are introduced by the supramolecular structure.« less

  20. Transcriptional regulation of glutamic acid decarboxylase in the male mouse amygdala by dietary phyto-oestrogens.

    PubMed

    Sandhu, K V; Yanagawa, Y; Stork, O

    2015-04-01

    Phyto-oestrogens are biologically active components of many human and laboratory animal diets. In the present study, we investigated, in adult male mice with C57BL/6 genetic background, the effects of a reduced phyto-oestrogens intake on anxiety-related behaviour and associated gene expression in the amygdala. After 6 weeks on a low-phyto-oestrogen diet (< 20 μg/g cumulative phyto-oestrogen content), animals showed reduced centre exploration in an open-field task compared to their littermates on a soybean-based standard diet (300 μg/g). Freezing behaviour in an auditory fear memory task, in contrast, was not affected. We hypothesised that this mildly increased anxiety may involve changes in the function of GABAergic local circuit neurones in the amygdala. Using GAD67(+/GFP) mice, we could demonstrate reduced transcription of the GAD67 gene in the lateral and basolateral amygdala under the low-phyto-oestrogen diet. Analysis of mRNA levels in microdissected samples confirmed this regulation and demonstrated concomitant changes in expression of the second glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD) isoform, GAD65, as well as the anxiolytic neuropeptide Y. These molecular and behavioural alterations occurred without apparent changes in circulating oestrogens or testosterone levels. Our data suggest that expression regulation of interneurone-specific gene products in the amygdala may provide a mechanism for the control of anxiety-related behaviour through dietary phyto-oestrogens. PMID:25650988

  1. An amphipathic polypeptide derived from poly-γ-glutamic acid for the stabilization of membrane proteins

    PubMed Central

    Han, Seong-Gu; Na, Jung-Hyun; Lee, Won-Kyu; Park, Dongkook; Oh, Jihye; Yoon, Sung-Ho; Lee, Cheng-Kang; Sung, Moon-Hee; Shin, Yeon-Kyun; Yu, Yeon Gyu

    2014-01-01

    Difficulties in the extraction of membrane proteins from cell membrane and their solubilization in native conformations have hindered their structural and biochemical analysis. To overcome these difficulties, an amphipathic polypeptide was synthesized by the conjugation of octyl and glucosyl groups to the carboxyl groups of poly-γ-glutamic acid (PGA). This polymer, called amphipathic PGA (APG), self-assembles as mono-disperse oligomers consisted of 4–5 monomers. APG shows significantly low value of critical micelle concentration and stabilization activity toward membrane proteins. Most of the sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS)-solubilized membrane proteins from Escherichia coli remain soluble state in the presence of APG even after the removal of SDS. In addition, APG stabilizes purified 7 transmembrane proteins such as bacteriorhodopsin and human endothelin receptor Type A (ETA) in their active conformations. Furthermore, ETA in complex with APG is readily inserted into liposomes without disrupting the integrity of liposomes. These properties of APG can be applied to overcome the difficulties in the stabilization and reconstitution of membrane proteins. PMID:25283538

  2. Rigidity of poly-L-glutamic acid scaffolds: Influence of secondary and supramolecular structure.

    PubMed

    Nickels, Jonathan D; Perticaroli, Stefania; Ehlers, Georg; Feygenson, Mikhail; Sokolov, Alexei P

    2015-09-01

    Poly-l-glutamic acid (PGA) is a widely used biomaterial, with applications ranging from drug delivery and biological glues to food products and as a tissue engineering scaffold. A biodegradable material with flexible conjugation functional groups, tunable secondary structure, and mechanical properties, PGA has potential as a tunable matrix material in mechanobiology. Recent studies in proteins connecting dynamics, nanometer length scale rigidity, and secondary structure suggest a new point of view from which to analyze and develop this promising material. We have characterized the structure, topology, and rigidity properties of PGA prepared with different molecular weights and secondary structures through various techniques including scanning electron microscopy, FTIR, light, and neutron scattering spectroscopy. On the length scale of a few nanometers, rigidity is determined by hydrogen bonding interactions in the presence of neutral species and by electrostatic interactions when the polypeptide is negatively charged. When probed over hundreds of nanometers, the rigidity of these materials is modified by long range intermolecular interactions that are introduced by the supramolecular structure. PMID:25690698

  3. In vitro properties and performance of glutaraldehyde-crosslinked bovine pericardial bioprostheses treated with glutamic acid.

    PubMed

    Braile, Maria Christiane Valéria Braga; Carnevalli, Nelly Cristina; Goissis, Gilberto; Ramirez, Vladimir Aparecido; Braile, Domingo Marcolino

    2011-05-01

    Calcification is one of the major causes of failure of heart valve bioprostheses (HVBs) derived from glutaraldehyde (GA)-processed bovine pericardium (BP) or porcine aortic valves. New crosslinking reagent procedures are still far from giving satisfactory results, and this is the main reason why GA is still the reagent of choice for the fixation of native tissue intended for HVB manufacture. Nevertheless, two new findings with respect to GA processing may significantly improve HVB performance postimplantation: the finding that increasing concentrations of GA result in a decrease in calcification; the blocking of free aldehyde usually by nucleophyles or the treatment of processed material at low pH. This work investigates the in vitro properties of BP fixed with GA followed by the treatment with glutamic acid under alkaline conditions in order to prepare BP materials with lower calcification potential postimplantation. In comparison to conventional processing, except for the tensile strength that was slightly lower, elongation and toughness were higher than the accepted values. No significant differences were observed in the performance indexes (mean pressure gradient, mean effective area, regurgitant fraction, performance and efficiency indexes) with wear resistance over 150 × 10⁶ cycles. These results indicate that the processing of BP described in this work may be of potential use in the manufacture of HVBs. PMID:21595718

  4. MULTIFUNCTIONAL SYNTHETIC POLY(L-GLUTAMIC ACID)-BASED CANCER THERAPEUTIC AND IMAGING AGENTS

    PubMed Central

    Melancon, Marites P.

    2012-01-01

    Modern polymer chemistry has led to the generation of a number of biocompatible synthetic polymers have been increasingly studied as efficient carriers for drugs and imaging agents. Synthetic biocompatible polymers have been used to improve the efficacy of both small-molecular-weight therapeutics and imaging agents. Furthermore, multiple targeted anticancer agents and/or imaging reporters can be attached to a single polymer chain, allowing multifunctional and/or multimodality therapy and molecular imaging. Having both an anticancer drug and an imaging reporter in a single polymer chain allows noninvasive real-time visualization of the pharmacokinetics of polymeric drug delivery systems, which can uncover and explain the complicated mechanisms of in vivo drug delivery and their correlation to pharmacodynamics. This review examines use of the synthetic biocompatible polymer poly(L-glutamic acid) (PG) as an efficient carrier of cancer therapeutics and imaging agents. This review will summarize and update our recent research on use of PG as a platform for drug delivery and molecular imaging, including recent clinical findings with respect to PG-paclitaxel (PG-TXL); the combination of PG-TXL with radiotherapy; mechanisms of action of PG-TXL; and noninvasive visualization of in vivo delivery of polymeric conjugates with contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), optical imaging, and multimodality imaging. PMID:21303613

  5. Rigidity of poly-L-glutamic acid scaffolds: Influence of secondary and supramolecular structure

    SciTech Connect

    Nickels, Jonathan D.; Perticaroli, Stefania; Ehlers, Georg; Feygenson, Mikhail; Sokolov, Alexei P.

    2015-03-06

    Poly-L-glutamic acid (PGA) is a widely used biomaterial, with applications ranging from drug delivery and biological glues to food products and as a tissue engineering scaffold. A biodegradable material with flexible conjugation functional groups, tunable secondary structure, and mechanical properties, PGA has potential as a tunable matrix material in mechanobiology. Some recent studies in proteins connecting dynamics, nanometer length scale rigidity, and secondary structure suggest a new point of view from which to analyze and develop this promising material. Our paper characterizes the structure, topology, and rigidity properties of PGA prepared with different molecular weights and secondary structures through various techniques including scanning electron microscopy, FTIR, light, and neutron scattering spectroscopy. On the length scale of a few nanometers, rigidity is determined by hydrogen bonding interactions in the presence of neutral species and by electrostatic interactions when the polypeptide is negatively charged. Finally, when probed over hundreds of nanometers, the rigidity of these materials is modified by long range intermolecular interactions that are introduced by the supramolecular structure.

  6. Alginate/Poly(γ-glutamic Acid) Base Biocompatible Gel for Bone Tissue Engineering.

    PubMed

    Chan, Wing P; Kung, Fu-Chen; Kuo, Yu-Lin; Yang, Ming-Chen; Lai, Wen-Fu Thomas

    2015-01-01

    A technique for synthesizing biocompatible hydrogels by cross-linking calcium-form poly(γ-glutamic acid), alginate sodium, and Pluronic F-127 was created, in which alginate can be cross-linked by Ca(2+) from Ca-γ-PGA directly and γ-PGA molecules introduced into the alginate matrix to provide pH sensitivity and hemostasis. Mechanical properties, swelling behavior, and blood compatibility were investigated for each hydrogel compared with alginate and for γ-PGA hydrogel with the sodium form only. Adding F-127 improves mechanical properties efficiently and influences the temperature-sensitive swelling of the hydrogels but also has a minor effect on pH-sensitive swelling and promotes anticoagulation. MG-63 cells were used to test biocompatibility. Gelation occurred gradually through change in the elastic modulus as the release of calcium ions increased over time and caused ionic cross-linking, which promotes the elasticity of gel. In addition, the growth of MG-63 cells in the gel reflected nontoxicity. These results showed that this biocompatible scaffold has potential for application in bone materials. PMID:26504784

  7. Oxytocin induces penile erection when injected into the ventral subiculum: role of nitric oxide and glutamic acid.

    PubMed

    Melis, Maria Rosaria; Succu, Salvatora; Cocco, Cristina; Caboni, Emanuela; Sanna, Fabrizio; Boi, Antonio; Ferri, Gian Luca; Argiolas, Antonio

    2010-06-01

    Oxytocin (100 ng) induces penile erection when injected unilaterally into the ventral subiculum of the hippocampus of male rats. The pro-erectile effect started mostly 30 min after treatment and occurred 15 min after an increase in both nitric oxide (NO) production, measured by the concentration of NO(2)(-) and NO(3)(-), the main metabolites of newly formed NO, and extra-cellular glutamic acid concentration in the dialysate obtained from the ventral subiculum by intracerebral microdialysis. These responses were abolished by d(CH(2))(5)Tyr(Me)(2)-Orn(8)-vasotocin (2 microg), an oxytocin receptor antagonist, S-methyl-L-thiocitrulline (SMTC), a selective inhibitor of neuronal NO-synthase (25 microg), and haemoglobin, a NO scavenger (25 microg), given into the ventral subiculum before oxytocin. Unlike d(CH(2))(5)Tyr(Me)(2)-Orn(8)-vasotocin, SMTC and haemoglobin, (+)MK-801 (5 microg), a noncompetitive antagonist of NMDA receptors abolished oxytocin-induced penile erection, but reduced only partially the increase in NO production and extra-cellular glutamic acid. As NMDA (0.25-1 microg) injected into the ventral subiculum induces penile erection episodes, which also occurred with an increase of NO production and extra-cellular glutamic acid, and NMDA responses were abolished by (+)MK-801 (5 microg), but not by SMTC (25 microg) or haemoglobin (25 microg), injected into the ventral subiculum, these results show that oxytocin injected into the ventral subiculum increases NO production by activating its own receptors. NO in turn increases glutamic acid neurotransmission, leading to penile erection, possibly through neural (glutamatergic) efferent projections from the ventral subiculum to extra-hippocampal brain areas (e.g., prefrontal cortex) modulating the activity of mesolimbic dopaminergic neurons. PMID:20156463

  8. Poly-γ-Glutamic Acid (PGA)-Producing Bacillus Species Isolated from Kinema, Indian Fermented Soybean Food

    PubMed Central

    Chettri, Rajen; Bhutia, Meera O.; Tamang, Jyoti P.

    2016-01-01

    Kinema, an ethnic fermented, non-salted and sticky soybean food is consumed in the eastern part of India. The stickiness is one of the best qualities of good kinema preferred by consumers, which is due to the production of poly-γ-glutamic acid (PGA). Average load of Bacillus in kinema was 107 cfu/g and of lactic acid bacteria was 103 cfu/g. Bacillus spp. were screened for PGA-production and isolates of lactic acid bacteria were also tested for degradation of PGA. Only Bacillus produced PGA, none of lactic acid bacteria produced PGA. PGA-producing Bacillus spp. were identified by phenotypic characterization and also by 16S rRNA gene sequencing as Bacillus subtilis, B. licheniformis and B. sonorensis. PMID:27446012

  9. Peroxide-dependent amino acid oxidation and chemiluminescence catalysed by magnesium-pyridoxal phosphate-glutamate complex.

    PubMed

    Meyer, B U; Schneider, W; Elstner, E F

    1992-08-01

    Magnesium-pyridoxal-5'-phosphate-glutamate (MPPG) has been shown to ameliorate atherosclerotic symptoms in rabbits. In vitro, MPPG in the presence of peroxides such as cholesterolhydroperoxide or cumene hydroperoxide and Mn2+ ions produces "excited states" measurable as chemiluminescence or ethylene release from 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid (ACC). The reactions are stimulated synergistically by unsaturated fatty acids. Pyridoxal phosphate exhibits similar properties, but can be differentiated from the activities of MPPG or the sum of the components present in MPPG. PMID:1510700

  10. The preparation and characterization of an immobilized l-glutamic decarboxylase and its application for determination of l-glutamic acid.

    PubMed

    Ling; Wu; Wang; Wang; Song

    2000-10-01

    This paper is to study the preparation and characterization of an immobilized L-glutamic decarboxylase (GDC) and develop a sensitive method for the determination of L-glutamate using a new biosensor, which consists of an enzyme column reactor of GDC immobilized on a novel ion exchange resin (carboxymethyl-copolymer of allyl dextran and N.N'-methylene-bisacrylamide CM-CADB) and ion analyzer coupled with a CO(2) electrode. The conditions for the enzyme immobilization were optimized by the parameters: buffer composition and concentration, adsorption equilibration time, amount of enzyme, temperature, ionic strength and pH. The dynamic response of Na(2)HPO(4)-citric acid buffer system selected is much better than that of the others, 0.10 M HAc-0.10 M NaAc and 0.10 M sodium citrate-0.10 M citric acid. The initial rate of the enzyme reaction v(0) in this buffer system is 1.76 mol. l(-1) min(-1), moreover, the rate of the enzyme reaction appears linear in the first 4 min. The optimum adsorption equilibrium time is around 6 h. The amount of enzyme adsorbed on CM-CADB resin affects the response to substrate L-glutamic acid, the widest range of linearity is obtained with over 30 mg (GDC)/g(resin). The GDC activity immobilized on CM-CADB reaches a maximum when the immobilization temperature was kept around 40 degrees C. pH was kept at 4.4 when measuring the activity of the immobilized GDC. No variation of the activity of immobilized GDC is observed when the capacity is over 2.5 meq/g.(CM-CADB resin). The properties of the immobilized enzyme on CM-CADB were characterized. No significant improvement can be achieved when the substrate concentration exceeds 12.00 mmol/l, where the activity of immobilized GDC is equal to 1.58 mmol/l.min.g. The optimum pH is found to be 5.2, which changes 0.2 unit, comparing with that of the free GDC (5.0). The optimum temperature is found to be around 48 degrees C, which is lower than that of free GDC (55 degrees C). The critical temperature of the

  11. Production of L-glutamic Acid with Corynebacterium glutamicum (NCIM 2168) and Pseudomonas reptilivora (NCIM 2598): A Study on Immobilization and Reusability

    PubMed Central

    Shyamkumar, Rajaram; Moorthy, Innasi Muthu Ganesh; Ponmurugan, Karuppiah; Baskar, Rajoo

    2014-01-01

    Background L-glutamic acid is one of the major amino acids that is present in a wide variety of foods. It is mainly used as a food additive and flavor enhancer in the form of sodium salt. Corynebacterium glutamicum (C. glutamicum) is one of the major organisms widely used for glutamic acid production. Methods The study was dealing with immobilization of C. glutamicum and mixed culture of C. glutamicum and Pseudomonas reptilivora (P. reptilivora) for L-glutamic acid production using submerged fermentation. 2, 3 and 5% sodium alginate concentrations were used for production and reusability of immobilized cells for 5 more trials. Results The results revealed that 2% sodium alginate concentration produced the highest yield (13.026±0.247 g/l by C. glutamicum and 16.026±0.475 g/l by mixed immobilized culture). Moreover, reusability of immobilized cells was evaluated in 2% concentration with 5 more trials. However, when the number of cycles increased, the production of L-glutamic acid decreased. Conclusion Production of glutamic acid using optimized medium minimizes the time needed for designing the medium composition. It also minimizes external contamination. Glutamic acid production gradually decreased due to multiple uses of beads and consequently it reduces the shelf life. PMID:25215180

  12. Modes and nodes explain the mechanism of action of vortioxetine, a multimodal agent (MMA): modifying serotonin's downstream effects on glutamate and GABA (gamma amino butyric acid) release.

    PubMed

    Stahl, Stephen M

    2015-08-01

    Vortioxetine is an antidepressant with multiple pharmacologic modes of action at targets where serotonin neurons connect with other neurons. These actions modify the release of both glutamate and GABA (gamma amino butyric acid) within various brain circuits. PMID:26062900

  13. Lack of effect of entorhinal kindling on L-(/sup 3/H)glutamic acid presynaptic uptake and postsynaptic binding in hippocampus

    SciTech Connect

    Slevin, J.T.; Ferrara, L.P.

    1985-07-01

    Sodium-independent L-(/sup 3/H)glutamic acid binding and sodium-dependent L-(/sup 3/H)glutamic acid high affinity uptake were measured in hippocampal membranes of rats administered electroshock seizures or kindled to class 5 seizures by entorhinal cortical stimulation. There were no differences in these glutamatergic synaptic markers among electroshocked, kindled, or surgical control animals. Entorhinal kindling is not a reflection of activity-regulated facilitation of perforant path glutamatergic neurotransmission.

  14. Metabotropic glutamate receptors are involved in the detection of IMP and L-amino acids by mouse taste sensory cells.

    PubMed

    Pal Choudhuri, S; Delay, R J; Delay, E R

    2016-03-01

    G-protein-coupled receptors are thought to be involved in the detection of umami and L-amino acid taste. These include the heterodimer taste receptor type 1 member 1 (T1r1)+taste receptor type 1 member 3 (T1r3), taste and brain variants of mGluR4 and mGluR1, and calcium sensors. While several studies suggest T1r1+T1r3 is a broadly tuned lLamino acid receptor, little is known about the function of metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluRs) in L-amino acid taste transduction. Calcium imaging of isolated taste sensory cells (TSCs) of T1r3-GFP and T1r3 knock-out (T1r3 KO) mice was performed using the ratiometric dye Fura 2 AM to investigate the role of different mGluRs in detecting various L-amino acids and inosine 5' monophosphate (IMP). Using agonists selective for various mGluRs such as (RS)-3,5-dihydroxyphenylglycine (DHPG) (an mGluR1 agonist) and L-(+)-2-amino-4-phosphonobutyric acid (l-AP4) (an mGluR4 agonist), we evaluated TSCs to determine if they might respond to these agonists, IMP, and three L-amino acids (monopotassium L-glutamate, L-serine and L-arginine). Additionally, we used selective antagonists against different mGluRs such as (RS)-L-aminoindan-1,5-dicarboxylic acid (AIDA) (an mGluR1 antagonist), and (RS)-α-methylserine-O-phosphate (MSOP) (an mGluR4 antagonist) to determine if they can block responses elicited by these L-amino acids and IMP. We found that L-amino acid- and IMP-responsive cells also responded to each agonist. Antagonists for mGluR4 and mGluR1 significantly blocked the responses elicited by IMP and each of the L-amino acids. Collectively, these data provide evidence for the involvement of taste and brain variants of mGluR1 and mGluR4 in L-amino acid and IMP taste responses in mice, and support the concept that multiple receptors contribute to IMP and L-amino acid taste. PMID:26701297

  15. Combining disulfiram and poly(l-glutamic acid)-cisplatin conjugates for combating cisplatin resistance.

    PubMed

    Song, Wantong; Tang, Zhaohui; Shen, Na; Yu, Haiyang; Jia, Yanjie; Zhang, Dawei; Jiang, Jian; He, Chaoliang; Tian, Huayu; Chen, Xuesi

    2016-06-10

    A poly(l-glutamic acid) graft polyethylene glycol-cisplatin complex (PGA-CisPt) performs well in reducing the toxicity of free cisplatin and greatly enhances the accumulation and retention of cisplatin in solid tumors. However, there is a lack of effective treatment options for cisplatin-resistant tumors. A major reason for this is the dense PEG shell, which ensures that the PGA-CisPt maintains a long retention time in the blood that may result in it bypassing the tumor cells or failing to be endocytosed within the tumor microenvironment. Consequently, the cisplatin from PGA-CisPt is released to the extracellular space in the presence of cisplatin-resistant tumor cells and the resistant problem to free cisplatin still valid. Therefore, we devised a strategy to combat the resistance of cisplatin in the tumor microenvironment using nanoparticles-loaded disulfiram (NPs-DSF) as a modulator. In vitro, cisplatin, in combination with DSF, had a synergistic effect and decreased cell survival rate of cisplatin-resistant A549DDP cells. This effect was also observed when combining PGA-CisPt with NPs-DSF. Similarly, in Balb/C nude mice with A549DDP xenografts, NPs-DSF improved PGA-CisPt effectiveness in inhibiting tumor growth while maintaining low toxicity. Our data demonstrate that DSF reduces intracellular glutathione (GSH) levels, inhibits NFκB activity, and modulates the expression of apoptosis-related proteins Bcl-2 and Bax, thereby improves the effectiveness of cisplatin in resistant cell lines. Here, we provide a promising method for overcoming cisplatin resistance in tumors, while maintaining the in vivo benefits of the PGA-CisPt complex. PMID:26928530

  16. Bioactivity in silica/poly(γ-glutamic acid) sol-gel hybrids through calcium chelation.

    PubMed

    Valliant, Esther M; Romer, Frederik; Wang, Daming; McPhail, David S; Smith, Mark E; Hanna, John V; Jones, Julian R

    2013-08-01

    Bioactive glasses and inorganic/organic hybrids have great potential as biomedical implant materials. Sol-gel hybrids with interpenetrating networks of silica and biodegradable polymers can combine the bioactive properties of a glass with the toughness of a polymer. However, traditional calcium sources such as calcium nitrate and calcium chloride are unsuitable for hybrids. In this study calcium was incorporated by chelation to the polymer component. The calcium salt form of poly(γ-glutamic acid) (γCaPGA) was synthesized for use as both a calcium source and as the biodegradable toughening component of the hybrids. Hybrids of 40wt.% γCaPGA were successfully formed and had fine scale integration of Ca and Si ions, according to secondary ion mass spectrometry imaging, indicating a homogeneous distribution of organic and inorganic components. (29)Si magic angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance data demonstrated that the network connectivity was unaltered with changing polymer molecular weight, as there was no perturbation to the overall Si speciation and silica network formation. Upon immersion in simulated body fluid a hydroxycarbonate apatite surface layer formed on the hybrids within 1week. The polymer molecular weight (Mw 30-120kDa) affected the mechanical properties of the resulting hybrids, but all hybrids had large strains to failure, >26%, and compressive strengths, in excess of 300MPa. The large strain to failure values showed that γCaPGA hybrids exhibited non-brittle behaviour whilst also incorporating calcium. Thus calcium incorporation by chelation to the polymer component is justified as a novel approach in hybrids for biomedical materials. PMID:23632373

  17. Structural Characterization and Epitope Mapping of the Glutamic Acid/Alanine-rich Protein from Trypanosoma congolense

    PubMed Central

    Loveless, Bianca C.; Mason, Jeremy W.; Sakurai, Tatsuya; Inoue, Noboru; Razavi, Morteza; Pearson, Terry W.; Boulanger, Martin J.

    2011-01-01

    Trypanosoma congolense is an African trypanosome that causes serious disease in cattle in Sub-Saharan Africa. The four major life cycle stages of T. congolense can be grown in vitro, which has led to the identification of several cell-surface molecules expressed on the parasite during its transit through the tsetse vector. One of these, glutamic acid/alanine-rich protein (GARP), is the first expressed on procyclic forms in the tsetse midgut and is of particular interest because it replaces the major surface coat molecule of bloodstream forms, the variant surface glycoprotein (VSG) that protects the parasite membrane, and is involved in antigenic variation. Unlike VSG, however, the function of GARP is not known, which necessarily limits our understanding of parasite survival in the tsetse. Toward establishing the function of GARP, we report its three-dimensional structure solved by iodide phasing to a resolution of 1.65 Å. An extended helical bundle structure displays an unexpected and significant degree of homology to the core structure of VSG, the only other major surface molecule of trypanosomes to be structurally characterized. Immunofluorescence microscopy and immunoaffinity-tandem mass spectrometry were used in conjunction with monoclonal antibodies to map both non-surface-disposed and surface epitopes. Collectively, these studies enabled us to derive a model describing the orientation and assembly of GARP on the surface of trypanosomes. The data presented here suggest the possible structure-function relationships involved in replacement of the bloodstream form VSG by GARP as trypanosomes differentiate in the tsetse vector after a blood meal. PMID:21471223

  18. In vitro adsorption of aluminum by an edible biopolymer poly(γ-glutamic acid).

    PubMed

    Rajan, Yesudoss Christu; Inbaraj, Baskaran Stephen; Chen, Bing Huei

    2014-05-21

    Accumulation of aluminum in human has been reported to be associated with dementia, Parkinson's disease, and Alzheimer's disease. The objectives of this study were to evaluate an edible biopolymer poly(γ-glutamic acid) (γ-PGA) for aluminum removal efficiency under in vitro conditions as affected by pH, contact time, aluminum concentration, temperature, ionic strength, and essential metals in both aqueous aluminum solution and simulated gastrointestinal fluid (GIF). A low aluminum adsorption occurred at pH 1.5-2.5, followed by a maximum adsorption at pH 3.0-4.0 and precipitating thereafter as aluminum hydroxide at pH > 4. Adsorption was extremely fast with 81-96% of total adsorption being attained within 1 min, reaching equilibrium in 5-10 min. Kinetic data at low (10 mg/L) and high (50 mg/L) concentrations were well described by pseudo-first-order and pseudo-second-order models, respectively. Equilibrium adsorption isotherms at different temperatures were precisely fitted by both Langmuir and Redlich-Peterson models with the maximum adsorption capacities at 25, 37, and 50 °C being 35.85, 38.68, and 44.23 mg/g, respectively. Thermodynamic calculations suggested endothermic and spontaneous nature of aluminum adsorption by γ-PGA with increased randomness at the solid/solution interface. Variation in ionic strengths did not alter the adsorption capacity, however, the incorporation of essential metals significantly reduced the aluminum adsorption by following the order copper > iron > zinc > calcium > potassium. Compared to aqueous solution, the aluminum adsorption from simulated GIF was high at all studied pH (1-4) with Langmuir monolayer adsorption capacity being 49.43 mg/g at 37 °C and pH 4. The outcome of this study suggests that γ-PGA could be used as a safe detoxifying agent for aluminum. PMID:24799126

  19. Simultaneous detection of resolved glutamate, glutamine, and γ-aminobutyric acid at 4 T

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Jiani; Yang, Shaolin; Xuan, Yang; Jiang, Quan; Yang, Yihong; Haacke, E. Mark

    2007-04-01

    A new approach is introduced to simultaneously detect resolved glutamate (Glu), glutamine (Gln), and γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) using a standard STEAM localization pulse sequence with the optimized sequence timing parameters. This approach exploits the dependence of the STEAM spectra of the strongly coupled spin systems of Glu, Gln, and GABA on the echo time TE and the mixing time TM at 4 T to find an optimized sequence parameter set, i.e., {TE, TM}, where the outer-wings of the Glu C4 multiplet resonances around 2.35 ppm, the Gln C4 multiplet resonances around 2.45 ppm, and the GABA C2 multiplet resonance around 2.28 ppm are significantly suppressed and the three resonances become virtual singlets simultaneously and thus resolved. Spectral simulation and optimization were conducted to find the optimized sequence parameters, and phantom and in vivo experiments (on normal human brains, one patient with traumatic brain injury, and one patient with brain tumor) were carried out for verification. The results have demonstrated that the Gln, Glu, and GABA signals at 2.2-2.5 ppm can be well resolved using a standard STEAM sequence with the optimized sequence timing parameters around {82 ms, 48 ms} at 4 T, while the other main metabolites, such as N-acetyl aspartate (NAA), choline (tCho), and creatine (tCr), are still preserved in the same spectrum. The technique can be easily implemented and should prove to be a useful tool for the basic and clinical studies associated with metabolism of Glu, Gln, and/or GABA.

  20. Refractory status epilepticus and glutamic acid decarboxylase antibodies in adults: presentation, treatment and outcomes.

    PubMed

    Khawaja, Ayaz M; Vines, Brannon L; Miller, David W; Szaflarski, Jerzy P; Amara, Amy W

    2016-03-01

    Glutamic acid decarboxylase antibodies (GAD-Abs) have been implicated in refractory epilepsy. The association with refractory status epilepticus in adults has been rarely described. We discuss our experience in managing three adult patients who presented with refractory status epilepticus associated with GAD-Abs. Case series with retrospective chart and literature review. Three patients without pre-existing epilepsy who presented to our institution with generalized seizures between 2013 and 2014 were identified. Seizures proved refractory to first and second-line therapies and persisted beyond 24 hours. Patient 1 was a 22-year-old female who had elevated serum GAD-Ab titres at 0.49 mmol/l (normal: <0.02) and was treated with multiple immuno- and chemotherapies, with eventual partial seizure control. Patient 2 was a 61-year-old black female whose serum GAD-Ab titre was 0.08 mmol/l. EEG showed persistent generalized periodic discharges despite maximized therapy with anticonvulsants but no immunotherapy, resulting in withdrawal of care and discharge to nursing home. Patient 3 was a 50-year-old black female whose serum GAD-Ab titre was 0.08 mmol/l, and was discovered to have pulmonary sarcoidosis. Treatment with steroids and intravenous immunoglobulin resulted in seizure resolution. Due to the responsiveness to immunotherapy, there may be an association between GAD-Abs and refractory seizures, including refractory status epilepticus. Causation cannot be established since GAD-Abs may be elevated secondary to concurrent autoimmune diseases or formed de novo in response to GAD antigen exposure by neuronal injury. Based on this report and available literature, there may be a role for immuno- and chemotherapy in the management of refractory status epilepticus associated with GAD-Abs. PMID:26878120

  1. Bio-derived poly(gamma-glutamic acid) nanogels as controlled anticancer drug delivery carriers.

    PubMed

    Bae, Hee Ho; Cho, Mi Young; Hong, Ji Hyeon; Poo, Haryoung; Sung, Moon-Hee; Lim, Yong Taik

    2012-12-01

    We have developed a novel type of polymer nanogel loaded with anticancer drug based on bio-derived poly(gamma- glutamic acid) (gamma-PGA). gamma-PGA is a highly anionic polymer that is synthesized naturally by microbial species, most prominently in various bacilli, and has been shown to have excellent biocompatibility. Thiolated gamma-PGA was synthesized by covalent coupling between the carboxyl groups of gamma-PGA and the primary amine group of cysteamine. Doxorubicin (Dox)-loaded gamma-PGA nanogels were fabricated using the following steps: (1) an ionic nanocomplex was formed between thiolated gamma-PGA as the negative charge component, and Dox as the positive charge component; (2) addition of poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) induced hydrogen-bond interactions between thiol groups of thiolated gamma-PGA and hydroxyl groups of PEG, resulting in the nanocomplex; and (3) disulfide crosslinked gamma-PGA nanogels were fabricated by ultrasonication. The average size and surface charge of Dox-loaded disulfide cross-linked gamma-PGA nanogels in aqueous solution were 136.3 +/- 37.6 nm and -32.5 +/- 5.3 mV, respectively. The loading amount of Dox was approximately 38.7 microgram per mg of gamma-PGA nanogel. The Dox-loaded disulfide cross-linked gamma-PGA nanogels showed controlled drug release behavior in the presence of reducing agents, glutathione (GSH) (1- 10 mM). Through fluorescence microscopy and FACS, the cellular uptake of gamma-PGA nanogels into breast cancer cells (MCF-7) was analyzed. The cytotoxic effect was evaluated using the MTT assay and was determined to be dependent on both the concentration and treatment time of gamma-PGA nanogels. The bio-derived gamma-PGA nanogels are expected to be a well-designed delivery carrier for controlled drug delivery applications. PMID:23221543

  2. [Effect of vitamin B3-active compounds on the content of free and combined gamma-aminobutyric acid and glutamic acid in the brain of mice].

    PubMed

    Rozanov, V A; Reĭtarova, T E

    1983-01-01

    The bound and free GABA and glutamic acid content in the brain of F1 (CBA X C57B1/6) hybrid mice was investigated by the Eliott method. A tendency to a decrease of GABA and glutamate content in the brain with their practically constant bound/free ratio was observed 24 h after calcium-D-pantothenate injections (150 mumole/kg, 9 injections for 3 days). Calcium-D-homopantothenate injected in the same way caused a significant decrease in the GABA content, and a sharp drop of the bound/free GABA ratio. The effect is not associated with the influence of calcium ions in the composition of the injected compounds. PMID:6140785

  3. Dietary Glutamate Supplementation Ameliorates Mycotoxin-Induced Abnormalities in the Intestinal Structure and Expression of Amino Acid Transporters in Young Pigs

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Miaomiao; Liao, Peng; Deng, Dun; Liu, Gang; Wen, Qingqi; Wang, Yongfei; Qiu, Wei; Liu, Yan; Wu, Xingli; Ren, Wenkai; Tan, Bie; Chen, Minghong; Xiao, Hao; Wu, Li; Li, Tiejun; Nyachoti, Charles M.; Adeola, Olayiwola; Yin, Yulong

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the hypothesis that dietary supplementation with glutamic acid has beneficial effects on growth performance, antioxidant system, intestinal morphology, serum amino acid profile and the gene expression of intestinal amino acid transporters in growing swine fed mold-contaminated feed. Fifteen pigs (Landrace×Large White) with a mean body weight (BW) of 55 kg were randomly divided into control group (basal feed), mycotoxin group (contaminated feed) and glutamate group (2% glutamate+contaminated feed). Compared with control group, mold-contaminated feed decreased average daily gain (ADG) and increased feed conversion rate (FCR). Meanwhile, fed mold-contaminated feed impaired anti-oxidative system and intestinal morphology, as well as modified the serum amino acid profile in growing pigs. However, supplementation with glutamate exhibited potential positive effects on growth performance of pigs fed mold-contaminated feed, ameliorated the imbalance antioxidant system and abnormalities of intestinal structure caused by mycotoxins. In addition, dietary glutamate supplementation to some extent restored changed serum amino acid profile caused by mold-contaminated feed. In conclusion, glutamic acid may be act as a nutritional regulating factor to ameliorate the adverse effects induced by mycotoxins. PMID:25405987

  4. The importance of glutamate, glycine, and {gamma}-aminobutyric acid transport and regulation in manganese, mercury and lead neurotoxicity

    SciTech Connect

    Fitsanakis, Vanessa A.; Aschner, Michael . E-mail: michael.aschner@vanderbilt.edu

    2005-05-01

    Historically, amino acids were studied in the context of their importance in protein synthesis. In the 1950s, the focus of research shifted as amino acids were recognized as putative neurotransmitters. Today, many amino acids are considered important neurochemicals. Although many amino acids play a role in neurotransmission, glutamate (Glu), glycine (Gly), and {gamma}-aminobutyric acid (GABA) are among the more prevalent and better understood. Glu, the major excitatory neurotransmitter, and Gly and GABA, the major inhibitory neurotransmitters, in the central nervous system, are known to be tightly regulated. Prolonged exposure to environmental toxicants, such as manganese (Mn), mercury (Hg), or lead (Pb), however, can lead to dysregulation of these neurochemicals and subsequent neurotoxicity. While the ability of these metals to disrupt the regulation of Glu, Gly and GABA have been studied, few articles have examined the collective role of these amino acids in the respective metal's mechanism of toxicity. For each of the neurotransmitters above, we will provide a brief synopsis of their regulatory function, including the importance of transport and re-uptake in maintaining their optimal function. Additionally, the review will address the hypothesis that aberrant homeostasis of any of these amino acids, or a combination of the three, plays a role in the neurotoxicity of Mn, Hg, or Pb.

  5. Detection of Glutamic Acid in Oilseed Rape Leaves Using Near Infrared Spectroscopy and the Least Squares-Support Vector Machine

    PubMed Central

    Bao, Yidan; Kong, Wenwen; Liu, Fei; Qiu, Zhengjun; He, Yong

    2012-01-01

    Amino acids are quite important indices to indicate the growth status of oilseed rape under herbicide stress. Near infrared (NIR) spectroscopy combined with chemometrics was applied for fast determination of glutamic acid in oilseed rape leaves. The optimal spectral preprocessing method was obtained after comparing Savitzky-Golay smoothing, standard normal variate, multiplicative scatter correction, first and second derivatives, detrending and direct orthogonal signal correction. Linear and nonlinear calibration methods were developed, including partial least squares (PLS) and least squares-support vector machine (LS-SVM). The most effective wavelengths (EWs) were determined by the successive projections algorithm (SPA), and these wavelengths were used as the inputs of PLS and LS-SVM model. The best prediction results were achieved by SPA-LS-SVM (Raw) model with correlation coefficient r = 0.9943 and root mean squares error of prediction (RMSEP) = 0.0569 for prediction set. These results indicated that NIR spectroscopy combined with SPA-LS-SVM was feasible for the fast and effective detection of glutamic acid in oilseed rape leaves. The selected EWs could be used to develop spectral sensors, and the important and basic amino acid data were helpful to study the function mechanism of herbicide. PMID:23203052

  6. Synthesis of p-aminophenyl aryl H-phosphinic acids and esters via cross-coupling reactions: elaboration to phosphinic acid pseudopeptide analogues of pteroyl glutamic acid and related antifolates.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yonghong; Coward, James K

    2007-07-20

    The synthesis of suitably protected p-aminophenyl H-phosphinic acids and esters from the corresponding para-substituted aryl halides has been accomplished via the Pd-catalyzed cross-coupling reaction of anilinium hypophosphite, either in the absence or presence of a tetraalkyl orthosilicate, to provide the free H-phosphinic acid or the corresponding ester, respectively. Subsequent conjugate addition of either a PIII species or phosphorus anion, generated in situ from either the free H-phosphinic acid or ester, to a 2-methylene glutaric acid ester provided the aryl phosphinic acid analogue of p-aminobenzoyl glutamic acid. Alkylation of these suitably protected p-aminophenyl phosphinic acid esters with a 6-(bromomethyl)pteridine or the corresponding (bromomethyl)pyridopyrmidine, followed by hydrolytic removal of protecting groups, provided the target aryl phosphinic acid analogues of folic acid and related antifolates. Alternatively, for the synthesis of the folate or 5-deazafolate analogues on a slightly larger scale, reductive amination with either N2-acetyl or N2-pivaloyl-6-formylpterin or the corresponding formylpyridopyrmidine and the same suitably protected p-aminophenyl phosphinic acid esters, followed by removal of protecting groups, is preferred. In the course of this research, it was observed that the nucleophilicity of both the aniline nitrogen and various PIII species derived from p-aminophenyl phosphinic acid derivatives is significantly reduced compared to that of the unsubstituted counterpart. PMID:17602593

  7. Mechanism of specific influence of L-Glutamic acid on the shape of L-Valine crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshiura, Hiromu; Nagano, Hiroshi; Hirasawa, Izumi

    2013-01-01

    The specific interaction between L-valine (L-Val) and L-glutamic acid (L-Glu) in the process of evaporative crystallization from an aqueous solution has been investigated. It was found that only 2.0% (wt/wt) of L-Glu against the total amount of L-Val was required to induce significant agglomeration of L-Val. Interestingly, the agglomeration was only induced under acidic conditions, suggesting that the electrostatic interaction was an effective factor for the agglomeration process. As well as the electrostatic interaction, the length of the amino acid side chain was identified as another important factor. In addition, we confirmed that the incorporation rate of L-Glu into L-Val crystals was different during the nucleation and crystal growth stages. Based on these results, a mechanism has been proposed for the interaction of L-Glu and L-Val during the agglomeration process.

  8. Overexpression and optimization of glutamate decarboxylase in Lactobacillus plantarum Taj-Apis362 for high gamma-aminobutyric acid production

    PubMed Central

    Tajabadi, Naser; Baradaran, Ali; Ebrahimpour, Afshin; Rahim, Raha A; Bakar, Fatimah A; Manap, Mohd Yazid A; Mohammed, Abdulkarim S; Saari, Nazamid

    2015-01-01

    Gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) is an important bioactive compound biosynthesized by microorganisms through decarboxylation of glutamate by glutamate decarboxylase (GAD). In this study, a full-length GAD gene was obtained by cloning the template deoxyribonucleic acid to pTZ57R/T vector. The open reading frame of the GAD gene showed the cloned gene was composed of 1410 nucleotides and encoded a 469 amino acids protein. To improve the GABA-production, the GAD gene was cloned into pMG36e-LbGAD, and then expressed in Lactobacillus plantarum Taj-Apis362 cells. The overexpression was confirmed by SDS-PAGE and GAD activity, showing a 53 KDa protein with the enzyme activity increased by sevenfold compared with the original GAD activity. The optimal fermentation conditions for GABA production established using response surface methodology were at glutamic acid concentration of 497.973 mM, temperature 36°C, pH 5.31 and time 60 h. Under the conditions, maximum GABA concentration obtained (11.09 mM) was comparable with the predicted value by the model at 11.23 mM. To our knowledge, this is the first report of successful cloning (clone-back) and overexpression of the LbGAD gene from L. plantarum to L. plantarum cells. The recombinant Lactobacillus could be used as a starter culture for direct incorporation into a food system during fermentation for production of GABA-rich products. PMID:25757029

  9. Metabolic engineering of the mixed-acid fermentation pathway of Escherichia coli for anaerobic production of glutamate and itaconate.

    PubMed

    Vuoristo, Kiira S; Mars, Astrid E; Sangra, Jose Vidal; Springer, Jan; Eggink, Gerrit; Sanders, Johan P M; Weusthuis, Ruud A

    2015-12-01

    Itaconic acid, an unsaturated C5-dicarboxylic acid, is a biobased building block for the polymer industry. The purpose of this study was to establish proof of principle for an anaerobic fermentation process for the production of itaconic acid by modification of the mixed acid fermentation pathway of E. coli. E. coli BW25113 (DE3) and the phosphate acetyltransferase (pta) and lactate dehydrogenase (ldhA) deficient strain E. coli BW25113 (DE3) Δpta-ΔldhA were used to study anaerobic itaconate production in E. coli. Heterologous expression of the gene encoding cis-aconitate decarboxylase (cadA) from A. terreus in E. coli BW25113 (DE3) did not result in itaconate production under anaerobic conditions, but 0.08 mM of itaconate was formed when the genes encoding citrate synthase (gltA) and aconitase (acnA) from Corynebacterium glutamicum were also expressed. The same amount was produced when cadA was expressed in E. coli BW25113 (DE3) Δpta-ΔldhA. The titre increased 8 times to 0.66 mM (1.2 % Cmol) when E. coli BW25113 (DE3) Δpta-ΔldhA also expressed gltA and acnA. In addition, this strain produced 8.5 mM (13 % Cmol) of glutamate. The use of a nitrogen-limited growth medium reduced the accumulation of glutamate by nearly 50 % compared to the normal medium, and also resulted in a more than 3-fold increase of the itaconate titre to 2.9 mM. These results demonstrated that E. coli has potential to produce itaconate and glutamate under anaerobic conditions, closing the redox balance by co-production of succinate or ethanol with H2 and CO2. PMID:26384341

  10. Stereospecific enzymatic transformation of alpha-ketoglutarate to (2S,3R)-3-methyl glutamate during acidic lipopeptide biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Mahlert, Christoph; Kopp, Florian; Thirlway, Jenny; Micklefield, Jason; Marahiel, Mohamed A

    2007-10-01

    The acidic lipopeptides, including the calcium-dependent antibiotics (CDA), daptomycin, and A54145, are important macrocyclic peptide natural products produced by Streptomyces species. All three compounds contain a 3-methyl glutamate (3-MeGlu) as the penultimate C-terminal residue, which is important for bioactivity. Here, biochemical in vitro reconstitution of the 3-MeGlu biosynthetic pathway is presented, using exclusively enzymes from the CDA producer Streptomyces coelicolor. It is shown that the predicted 3-MeGlu methyltransferase GlmT and its homologues DptI from the daptomycin producer Streptomyces roseosporus and LptI from the A54145 producer Streptomyces fradiae do not methylate free glutamic acid, PCP-bound glutamate, or Glu-containing CDA in vitro. Instead, GlmT, DptI, and LptI are S-adenosyl methionine (SAM)-dependent alpha-ketoglutarate methyltransferases that catalyze the stereospecific methylation of alpha-ketoglutarate (alphaKG) leading to (3R)-3-methyl-2-oxoglutarate. Subsequent enzyme screening identified the branched chain amino acid transaminase IlvE (SCO5523) as an efficient catalyst for the transformation of (3R)-3-methyl-2-oxoglutarate into (2S,3R)-3-MeGlu. Comparison of reversed-phase HPLC retention time of dabsylated 3-MeGlu generated by the coupled enzymatic reaction with dabsylated synthetic standards confirmed complete stereocontrol during enzymatic catalysis. This stereospecific two-step conversion of alphaKG to (2S,3R)-3-MeGlu completes our understanding of the biosynthesis and incorporation of beta-methylated amino acids into the nonribosomal lipopeptides. Finally, understanding this pathway may provide new possibilities for the production of modified peptides in engineered microbes. PMID:17784761

  11. Overexpression and optimization of glutamate decarboxylase in Lactobacillus plantarum Taj-Apis362 for high gamma-aminobutyric acid production.

    PubMed

    Tajabadi, Naser; Baradaran, Ali; Ebrahimpour, Afshin; Rahim, Raha A; Bakar, Fatimah A; Manap, Mohd Yazid A; Mohammed, Abdulkarim S; Saari, Nazamid

    2015-07-01

    Gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) is an important bioactive compound biosynthesized by microorganisms through decarboxylation of glutamate by glutamate decarboxylase (GAD). In this study, a full-length GAD gene was obtained by cloning the template deoxyribonucleic acid to pTZ57R/T vector. The open reading frame of the GAD gene showed the cloned gene was composed of 1410 nucleotides and encoded a 469 amino acids protein. To improve the GABA-production, the GAD gene was cloned into pMG36e-LbGAD, and then expressed in Lactobacillus plantarum Taj-Apis362 cells. The overexpression was confirmed by SDS-PAGE and GAD activity, showing a 53 KDa protein with the enzyme activity increased by sevenfold compared with the original GAD activity. The optimal fermentation conditions for GABA production established using response surface methodology were at glutamic acid concentration of 497.973 mM, temperature 36°C, pH 5.31 and time 60 h. Under the conditions, maximum GABA concentration obtained (11.09 mM) was comparable with the predicted value by the model at 11.23 mM. To our knowledge, this is the first report of successful cloning (clone-back) and overexpression of the LbGAD gene from L. plantarum to L. plantarum cells. The recombinant Lactobacillus could be used as a starter culture for direct incorporation into a food system during fermentation for production of GABA-rich products. PMID:25757029

  12. Disruption of pknG enhances production of gamma-aminobutyric acid by Corynebacterium glutamicum expressing glutamate decarboxylase

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA), a building block of the biodegradable plastic polyamide 4, is synthesized from glucose by Corynebacterium glutamicum that expresses Escherichia coli glutamate decarboxylase (GAD) B encoded by gadB. This strain was engineered to produce GABA more efficiently from biomass-derived sugars. To enhance GABA production further by increasing the intracellular concentration of its precursor glutamate, we focused on engineering pknG (encoding serine/threonine protein kinase G), which controls the activity of 2-oxoglutarate dehydrogenase (Odh) in the tricarboxylic acid cycle branch point leading to glutamate synthesis. We succeeded in expressing GadB in a C. glutamicum strain harboring a deletion of pknG. C. glutamicum strains GAD and GAD ∆pknG were cultured in GP2 medium containing 100 g L−1 glucose and 0.1 mM pyridoxal 5′-phosphate. Strain GAD∆pknG produced 31.1 ± 0.41 g L−1 (0.259 g L−1 h−1) of GABA in 120 hours, representing a 2.29-fold higher level compared with GAD. The production yield of GABA from glucose by GAD∆pknG reached 0.893 mol mol−1. PMID:24949255

  13. The effects of temperature, pH and redox state on the stability of glutamic acid in hydrothermal fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Namhey; Foustoukos, Dionysis I.; Sverjensky, Dimitri A.; Cody, George D.; Hazen, Robert M.

    2014-06-01

    Natural hydrothermal vent environments cover a wide range of physicochemical conditions involving temperature, pH and redox state. The stability of simple biomolecules such as amino acids in such environments is of interest in various fields of study from the origin of life to the metabolism of microbes at the present day. Numerous previous experimental studies have suggested that amino acids are unstable under hydrothermal conditions and decompose rapidly. However, previous studies have not effectively controlled the redox state of the hydrothermal fluids. Here we studied the stability of glutamate with and without reducing hydrothermal conditions imposed by 13 mM aqueous H2 at temperatures of 150, 200 and 250 °C and initial (25 °C) pH values of 6 and 10 in a flow-through hydrothermal reactor with reaction times from 3 to 36 min. We combined the experimental measurements with theoretical calculations to model the in situ aqueous speciation and pH values. As previously observed under hydrothermal conditions, the main reaction involves glutamate cyclizing to pyroglutamate through a simple dehydration reaction. However, the amounts of decomposition products of the glutamate detected, including succinate, formate, carbon dioxide and ammonia depend on the temperature, the pH and particularly the redox state of the fluid. In the absence of dissolved H2, glutamate decomposes in the sequence glutamate, glutaconate, α-hydroxyglutarate, ketoglutarate, formate and succinate, and ultimately to CO2 and micromolar quantities of H2(aq). Model speciation calculations indicate the CO2, formate and H2(aq) are not in metastable thermodynamic equilibrium. However, with 13 mM H2(aq) concentrations, the amounts of decomposition products are suppressed at all temperatures and pH values investigated. The small amounts of CO2 and formate present are calculated to be in metastable equilibrium with the H2. It is further proposed that there is a metastable equilibrium between glutamate

  14. Thermostability Improvement of a Streptomyces Xylanase by Introducing Proline and Glutamic Acid Residues

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Kun; Tian, Jian; Turunen, Ossi; Huang, Huoqing; Shi, Pengjun; Hua, Huifang; Wang, Caihong; Wang, Shuanghe

    2014-01-01

    Protein engineering is commonly used to improve the robustness of enzymes for activity and stability at high temperatures. In this study, we identified four residues expected to affect the thermostability of Streptomyces sp. strain S9 xylanase XynAS9 through multiple-sequence analysis (MSA) and molecular dynamic simulations (MDS). Site-directed mutagenesis was employed to construct five mutants by replacing these residues with proline or glutamic acid (V81P, G82E, V81P/G82E, D185P/S186E, and V81P/G82E/D185P/S186E), and the mutant and wild-type enzymes were expressed in Pichia pastoris. Compared to the wild-type XynAS9, all five mutant enzymes showed improved thermal properties. The activity and stability assays, including circular dichroism and differential scanning calorimetry, showed that the mutations at positions 81 and 82 increased the thermal performance more than the mutations at positions 185 and 186. The mutants with combined substitutions (V81P/G82E and V81P/G82E/D185P/S186E) showed the most pronounced shifts in temperature optima, about 17°C upward, and their half-lives for thermal inactivation at 70°C and melting temperatures were increased by >9 times and approximately 7.0°C, respectively. The mutation combination of V81P and G82E in adjacent positions more than doubled the effect of single mutations. Both mutation regions were at the end of long secondary-structure elements and probably rigidified the local structure. MDS indicated that a long loop region after positions 81 and 82 located at the end of the inner β-barrel was prone to unfold. The rigidified main chain and filling of a groove by the mutations on the bottom of the active site canyon may stabilize the mutants and thus improve their thermostability. PMID:24463976

  15. Cell proliferation on PVA/sodium alginate and PVA/poly(γ-glutamic acid) electrospun fiber.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jen Ming; Yang, Jhe Hao; Tsou, Shu Chun; Ding, Chian Hua; Hsu, Chih Chin; Yang, Kai Chiang; Yang, Chun Chen; Chen, Ko Shao; Chen, Szi Wen; Wang, Jong Shyan

    2016-09-01

    To overcome the obstacles of easy dissolution of PVA nanofibers without crosslinking treatment and the poor electrospinnability of the PVA cross-linked nanofibers via electrospinning process, the PVA based electrospun hydrogel nanofibers are prepared with post-crosslinking method. To expect the electrospun hydrogel fibers might be a promising scaffold for cell culture and tissue engineering applications, the evaluation of cell proliferation on the post-crosslinking electrospun fibers is conducted in this study. At beginning, poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA), PVA/sodium alginate (PVASA) and PVA/poly(γ-glutamic acid) (PVAPGA) electrospun fibers were prepared by electrospinning method. The electrospun PVA, PVASA and PVAPGA nanofibers were treated with post-cross-linking method with glutaraldehyde (Glu) as crosslinking agent. These electrospun fibers were characterized with thermogravimetry analysis (TGA) and their morphologies were observed with a scanning electron microscope (SEM). To support the evaluation and explanation of cell growth on the fiber, the study of 3T3 mouse fibroblast cell growth on the surface of pure PVA, SA, and PGA thin films is conducted. The proliferation of 3T3 on the electrospun fiber surface of PVA, PVASA, and PVAPGA was evaluated by seeding 3T3 fibroblast cells on these crosslinked electrospun fibers. The cell viability on electrospun fibers was conducted with water-soluble tetrazolium salt-1 assay (Cell Proliferation Reagent WST-1). The morphology of the cells on the fibers was also observed with SEM. The results of WST-1 assay revealed that 3T3 cells cultured on different electrospun fibers had similar viability, and the cell viability increased with time for all electrospun fibers. From the morphology of the cells on electrospun fibers, it is found that 3T3 cells attached on all electrospun fiber after 1day seeded. Cell-cell communication was noticed on day 3 for all electrospun fibers. Extracellular matrix (ECM) productions were found and

  16. Cholera Toxin B Subunit Linked to Glutamic Acid Decarboxylase Suppresses Dendritic Cell Maturation and Function

    PubMed Central

    Odumosu, Oludare; Nicholas, Dequina; Payne, Kimberly; Langridge, William

    2012-01-01

    Dendritic cells are the largest population of antigen presenting cells in the body. One of their main functions is to regulate the delicate balance between immunity and tolerance responsible for maintenance of immunological homeostasis. Disruption of this delicate balance often results in chronic inflammation responsible for initiation of organ specific autoimmune diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis, multiple sclerosis and type I diabetes. The cholera toxin B subunit (CTB) is a weak mucosal adjuvant known for its ability to stimulate immunity to antigenic proteins. However, conjugation of CTB to many autoantigens can induce immunological tolerance resulting in suppression of autoimmunity. In this study, we examined whether linkage of CTB to a 5 kDa C-terminal protein fragment of the major diabetes autoantigen glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD35), can block dendritic cell (DC) functions such as biosynthesis of co-stimulatory factor proteins CD86, CD83, CD80 and CD40 and secretion of inflammatory cytokines. The results of human umbilical cord blood monocyte-derived DC - GAD35 autoantigen incubation experiments showed that inoculation of immature DCs (iDCs), with CTB-GAD35 protein dramatically suppressed levels of CD86, CD83, CD80 and CD40 co-stimulatory factor protein biosynthesis in comparison with GAD35 alone inoculated iDCs. Surprisingly, incubation of iDCs in the presence of the CTB-autoantigen and the strong immunostimulatory molecules PMA and Ionomycin revealed that CTB-GAD35 was capable of arresting PMA + Ionomycin induced DC maturation. Consistant with this finding, CTB-GAD35 mediated suppression of DC maturation was accompanied by a dramatic decrease in the secretion of the pro-inflammatory cytokines IL-12/23p40 and IL-6 and a significant increase in secretion of the immunosuppressive cytokine IL-10. Taken together, our experimental data suggest that linkage of the weak adjuvant CTB to the dominant type 1 diabetes autoantigen GAD strongly inhibits DC

  17. Low dose of L-glutamic acid attenuated the neurological dysfunctions and excitotoxicity in bilateral common carotid artery occluded mice.

    PubMed

    Ramanathan, Muthiah; Abdul, Khadar K; Justin, Antony

    2016-10-01

    Glutamate, an excitatory neurotransmitter in the brain, produces excitotoxicity through its agonistic action on postsynaptic N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor, resulting in neurodegeneration. We hypothesized that the administration of low doses of glutamate in cerebral ischemia could attenuate the excitotoxicity in neurons through its autoreceptor regulatory mechanism, and thereby control neurodegeneration. To test the hypothesis, the effect of L-glutamic acid (L-GA) 400 μmol/l/kg was evaluated in a bilateral common carotid artery occlusion-induced global ischemic mouse model. Memantine was used as a positive control. Global ischemia in mice was induced by occlusion of both the common carotid artery (bilateral common carotid artery occlusion) for 20 min, followed by reperfusion injury. L-GA was infused slowly through the tail vein 30 min before the surgery and every 24 h thereafter until the end of the experiment. The time-dependent change in cerebral blood flow was monitored using a laser Doppler image analyzer. The neurotransmitters glutamate and γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) and the neurobiochemicals ATP, glutathione, and nitric oxide were measured in the different regions of brain at 0, 24, 48, and 72 h after reperfusion injury. L-GA increased locomotor activity, muscle coordination, and cerebral blood flow in ischemic mice at 72 h after ischemic insult. L-GA reduced glutamate levels in the cortex, striatum, and hippocampus at 72 h, whereas GABA levels were elevated in all three brain regions studied. Further, L-GA elevated glutathione levels and attenuated nitric oxide levels, but failed to restore ATP levels 72 h after ischemia-reperfusion. We conclude that the gradual reduction of glutamate along with elevation of GABA in different brain regions could have contributed toward the neuroprotective effect of L-GA. Hence, a slow infusion of a low dose of L-GA could be beneficial in controlling excitotoxicity-induced neurodegeneration following ischemia

  18. Crystal growth and preliminary X-ray study of glutamic acid specific serine protease from Bacillus intermedius

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuranova, I. P.; Blagova, E. V.; Levdikov, V. M.; Rudenskaya, G. N.; Balaban, N. P.; Shakirov, E. V.

    1999-01-01

    The glutamic acid specific protease (glutamyl-endopeptidase) from Bacillus intermedius, strain 3-19, was isolated and purified using ion exchange chromatography on CM-cellulose and Mono-S FPLC column. The conditions for crystallization of the enzyme have been discussed. The crystals of enzyme were grown using hanging-drop vapor-diffusion technique. Crystals belong to the space group C2 with unit cell parameters of a=61.62 Å, b=55.84 Å, c=60.40 Å, β=117.6° X-ray diffraction data to 1.68 Å resolution were collected using synchrotron radiation (EMBL, Hamburg) and an imaging plate scanner.

  19. Effects of a New Glutamic Acid Derivative on Myocardial Contractility of Stressed Animals under Conditions of Nitric Oxide Synthesis Blockade.

    PubMed

    Tyurenkov, I N; Perfilova, V N; Sadikova, N V; Berestovitskaya, V M; Vasil'eva, O S

    2015-07-01

    Glufimet (glutamic acid derivative) in a dose of 28.7 mg/kg limited the reduction of the cardiac functional reserve in animals subjected to 24-h stress under conditions of nonselective NO synthase blockade with L-NAME (10 mg/kg). Adrenoreactivity and increased afterload tests showed that the increment of myocardial contraction/relaxation rates, left-ventricular pressure, and HR were significantly higher in glufimet-treated stressed animals with NO synthesis blockade than in animals which received no glufimet. The efficiency of glufimet was higher than that of phenibut (the reference drug). PMID:26205724

  20. A Nucleic Acid Biosensor for Detection of Hepatitis C Virus Genotype 1a Using Poly(L-Glutamic Acid)-Modified Electrode.

    PubMed

    Donmez, Soner; Arslan, Fatma; Arslan, Halit

    2015-07-01

    An electrochemical nucleic acid biosensor based on label-free DNA detection method was prepared for the first time by using electropolymerized poly(L-glutamic acid)-modified pencil graphite electrode (PGA/PGE) for detection of hepatitis C virus genotype 1a (HCV1a). Inosine-substituted 20-mer probes related to the HCV1a were immobilized onto PGA/PGE surface by covalent linking with the formation of amide bonds. Square wave voltammetry (SWV) was used to monitor the oxidation signal of guanine in the hybridization events, which gave an oxidation peak at +1.05 V. An increase in the oxidation signal of guanine was showed by hybridization of the probe with the complementary DNA. Noncomplementary oligonucleotides were also used to investigate the selectivity of the biosensor. The proposed nucleic acid biosensor was linear in the range of 50 nM to 1.0 μM, exhibiting a limit of detection of 40.6 nM. Finally, single-stranded synthetic PCR product analogues of HCV1a were performed in optimal condition. This PGA-modified nucleic acid sensor is cost-effective and disposable, and besides, it has superior electrocatalytic effect on the oxidation of guanine. PMID:25947619

  1. Multifunctional PLGA particles containing poly(l-glutamic acid)-capped silver nanoparticles and ascorbic acid with simultaneous antioxidative and prolonged antimicrobial activity.

    PubMed

    Stevanović, Magdalena; Bračko, Ines; Milenković, Marina; Filipović, Nenad; Nunić, Jana; Filipič, Metka; Uskoković, Dragan P

    2014-01-01

    A water-soluble antioxidant (ascorbic acid, vitamin C) was encapsulated together with poly(l-glutamic acid)-capped silver nanoparticles (AgNpPGA) within a poly(lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA) polymeric matrix and their synergistic effects were studied. The PLGA/AgNpPGA/ascorbic acid particles synthesized by a physicochemical method with solvent/non-solvent systems are spherical, have a mean diameter of 775 nm and a narrow size distribution with a polydispersity index of 0.158. The encapsulation efficiency of AgNpPGA/ascorbic acid within PLGA was determined to be >90%. The entire amount of encapsulated ascorbic acid was released in 68 days, and the entire amount of AgNpPGAs was released in 87 days of degradation. The influence of PLGA/AgNpPGA/ascorbic acid on cell viability, generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in HepG2 cells, as well as antimicrobial activity against seven different pathogens was investigated. The 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide assay indicated good biocompatibility of these PLGA/AgNpPGA/ascorbic acid particles. We measured the kinetics of ROS formation in HepG2 cells by a DCFH-DA assay, and found that PLGA/AgNpPGA/ascorbic acid caused a significant decrease in DCF fluorescence intensity, which was 2-fold lower than that in control cells after a 5h exposure. This indicates that the PLGA/AgNpPGA/ascorbic acid microspheres either act as scavengers of intracellular ROS and/or reduce their formation. Also, the results of antimicrobial activity of PLGA/AgNpPGA/ascorbic acid obtained by the broth microdilution method showed superior and extended activity of these particles. The samples were characterized using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, field-emission scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, zeta potential and particle size analysis. This paper presents a new approach to the treatment of infection that at the same time offers a very pronounced antioxidant effect. PMID:23988864

  2. L-Aspartic and l-glutamic acid ester-based ProTides of anticancer nucleosides: Synthesis and antitumoral evaluation.

    PubMed

    Gao, Ling-Jie; De Jonghe, Steven; Daelemans, Dirk; Herdewijn, Piet

    2016-05-01

    A series of novel aryloxyphosphoramidate nucleoside prodrugs based on l-aspartic acid and l-glutamic acid as amino acid motif has been synthesized and evaluated for antitumoral activity. Depending on the cancer cell line studied and on the nature of the parent nucleoside compound (gemcitabine, 5-iodo-2'-deoxy-uridine, floxuridine or brivudin), the corresponding ProTides are endowed with an improved or decreased cytotoxic activity. PMID:27032331

  3. Recognition of the folded conformation of plant hormone (auxin, IAA) conjugates with glutamic and aspartic acids and their amides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antolić, S.; Kveder, M.; Klaić, B.; Magnus, V.; Kojić-Prodić, B.

    2001-01-01

    The molecular structure of the endogenous plant hormone (auxin) conjugate, N-(indol-3-ylacetyl)- L-glutamic acid, is deduced by comparison with N2-(indol-3-ylacetyl)glutamine (IAA-Gln), N2-(indol-3-ylacetyl)asparagine (IAA-Asn) and N-(indol-3-ylacetyl)- L-aspartic acid using X-ray structure analysis, 1H-NMR spectroscopy (NOE measurements) and molecular modelling. The significance of the overall molecular shape, and of the resulting amphiphilic properties, of the compounds studied are discussed in terms of possible implications for trafficking between cell compartments. Both in the solid state and in solution, the molecules are in the hair-pin (folded) conformation in which the side chain is folded over the indole ring. While extended conformations can be detected by molecular dynamics simulations, they are so short-lived that any major influence on the biological properties of the compounds studied is unlikely.

  4. Pyridoxine Supplementation Improves the Activity of Recombinant Glutamate Decarboxylase and the Enzymatic Production of Gama-Aminobutyric Acid.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yan; Su, Lingqia; Wu, Jing

    2016-01-01

    Glutamate decarboxylase (GAD) catalyzes the irreversible decarboxylation of L-glutamate to the valuable food supplement γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA). In this study, GAD from Escherichia coli K12, a pyridoxal phosphate (PLP)-dependent enzyme, was overexpressed in E. coli. The GAD produced in media supplemented with 0.05 mM soluble vitamin B6 analog pyridoxine hydrochloride (GAD-V) activity was 154.8 U mL-1, 1.8-fold higher than that of GAD obtained without supplementation (GAD-C). Purified GAD-V exhibited increased activity (193.4 U mg-1, 1.5-fold higher than that of GAD-C), superior thermostability (2.8-fold greater than that of GAD-C), and higher kcat/Km (1.6-fold higher than that of GAD-C). Under optimal conditions in reactions mixtures lacking added PLP, crude GAD-V converted 500 g L-1 monosodium glutamate (MSG) to GABA with a yield of 100%, and 750 g L-1 MSG with a yield of 88.7%. These results establish the utility of pyridoxine supplementation and lay the foundation for large-scale enzymatic production of GABA. PMID:27438707

  5. Pyridoxine Supplementation Improves the Activity of Recombinant Glutamate Decarboxylase and the Enzymatic Production of Gama-Aminobutyric Acid

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Yan; Su, Lingqia; Wu, Jing

    2016-01-01

    Glutamate decarboxylase (GAD) catalyzes the irreversible decarboxylation of L-glutamate to the valuable food supplement γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA). In this study, GAD from Escherichia coli K12, a pyridoxal phosphate (PLP)-dependent enzyme, was overexpressed in E. coli. The GAD produced in media supplemented with 0.05 mM soluble vitamin B6 analog pyridoxine hydrochloride (GAD-V) activity was 154.8 U mL-1, 1.8-fold higher than that of GAD obtained without supplementation (GAD-C). Purified GAD-V exhibited increased activity (193.4 U mg-1, 1.5-fold higher than that of GAD-C), superior thermostability (2.8-fold greater than that of GAD-C), and higher kcat/Km (1.6-fold higher than that of GAD-C). Under optimal conditions in reactions mixtures lacking added PLP, crude GAD-V converted 500 g L-1 monosodium glutamate (MSG) to GABA with a yield of 100%, and 750 g L-1 MSG with a yield of 88.7%. These results establish the utility of pyridoxine supplementation and lay the foundation for large-scale enzymatic production of GABA. PMID:27438707

  6. Variable clinical manifestations of a glycine to glutamic acid substitution of the COL3A1 gene at residue 736

    SciTech Connect

    Pope, F.M.; Narcisi, P.; Richards, A.J.

    1994-09-01

    Glycine substitutions at the 3{prime} end of the COL3A1 gene generally produce a characteristic clinical phenotype including acrogeria and severe vascular fragility. Here we report a three generation British family in which the propositus presented with aneurysms of the groins. He, his mother, sister and elder daughter all had the external clinical phenotype of vascular EDS IV whilst another daughter and nephew were clinically normal. Cultured skin fibroblasts from the propositus and his clinically affected relatives poorly secreted normal and overmodified collagen III species. Normal components of secreted proteins predominated whilst overmodified molecules were prominent in intracellular material. Surprisingly the normal children also secreted less collagen type III than expected (though more than their clinically abnormal relatives). cDNA from bases 2671 to 3714 were amplified as four overlapping PCR fragments and analysed by DGGE. The region between 2671 and 3015 was heterozygous. Sequencing showed a mutation of glycine to glutamic acid at residue 736. This mutation created an extra Apa 1 restriction site which was suitable for family studies. These showed inheritance of the mutant gene by both vascular and non-vascular clinical phenotypes. This family therefore illustrates that replacement of glycine to glutamic acid at position 736 produces variable clinical and biochemical phenotypes ranging from easily recognizable vascular EDS IV with very poor collagen secretion to an EDS III-like picture and with less severe protein disturbance. The reasons for these differences are at present unexplained.

  7. Poly-glutamic acid modified carbon nanotube-doped carbon paste electrode for sensitive detection of L-tryptophan.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiao; Luo, Liqiang; Ding, Yaping; Ye, Daixin

    2011-08-01

    A novel poly-glutamic acid (PGA) film modified carbon paste electrode (CPE) incorporating carbon nanotubes (CNTs) was first prepared for the determination of l-tryptophan (l-Trp). Scanning electron microscopy and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy were applied for characterization of the surface morphology of the modified electrodes and cyclic voltammetry was used to investigate the electrochemical properties of the proposed electrode towards the oxidation of l-Trp. Optimization of the experimental parameters was performed with regard to pH, ratio of CNTs, concentration of glutamic acid, electro-polymerization cycles, accumulation time and concentration of sodium dodecylbenzene sulfonate. The linearity between the oxidation peak current and the l-Trp concentration was obtained in the range of 5.0×10(-8) to 1.0×10(-4)M with a detection limit of 1.0×10(-8)M (S/N=3) and the sensitivity was calculated to be 1143.79μA∙mM(-1)∙cm(-2). In addition, the PGA modified CPE incorporating CNTs displayed high selectivity, good stability and reproducibility, making it suitable for the routine analysis of l-Trp in clinical use. PMID:21640670

  8. Synthesis and evaluation of a glutamic acid-modified hPAMAM complex as a promising versatile gene carrier.

    PubMed

    Hemmati, Mohammad; Kazemi, Bahram; Najafi, Farhood; Zarebkohan, Amir; Shirkoohi, Reza

    2016-06-01

    Hyperbranched poly(amidoamine) (HPAMAM), structurally analogous to polyamidoamine dendrimer (PAMAM) dendrimers, has been suggested to be an effective carrier for gene delivery. In the present study, glutamic acid-modified hPAMAM was developed as a novel non-viral gene carrier for the first time. The hPAMAM was synthesized by using a modified one-pot method. DNA was found to be bound to hPAMAM at different weight ratios (WhPAMAM/WDNA). The resulting HPAMAM-Glu20 was able to efficiently protect the encapsulated-DNA against degradation for over 2 h. In addition to low cytotoxicity, the transfection efficiency of hPAMAM-Glu20 represented much higher (p < 0.05) than that of Lipofectamine 2000 in both MCF7 and MDA-MB231 cells. Cellular uptake of the hPAMAM-Glu20 in MDA-MB231 cells, 173.56 ± 1.37%, was significantly higher than that of MCF7 cells, 65.00 ± 1.73% (p < 0.05). The results indicated that hPAMAM-Glu20-mediated gene delivery to breast cancer cells is a feasible and effective strategy that may provide a new therapeutic avenue as a non-viral gene delivery carrier. In addition, it was found that hPAMAM-glutamic amino acid (Glu)-based gene delivery is an economical, effective and biocompatible method. PMID:26339844

  9. Effect of Glutamine, Glutamic Acid and Nucleotides on the Turnover of Carbon (δ13C) in Organs of Weaned Piglets

    PubMed Central

    Amorim, Alessandro Borges; Berto, Dirlei Antonio; Saleh, Mayra Anton Dib; Telles, Filipe Garcia; Denadai, Juliana Célia; Sartori, Maria Márcia Pereira; Luiggi, Fabiana Golin; Santos, Luan Sousa; Ducatti, Carlos

    2016-01-01

    Morphological and physiological alterations occur in the digestive system of weanling piglets, compromising the performance in subsequent phases. This experiment aimed at verifying the influence of glutamine, glutamate and nucleotides on the carbon turnover in the pancreas and liver of piglets weaned at 21 days of age. Four diets were evaluated: glutamine, glutamic acid or nucleotides-free diet (CD); containing 1% glutamine (GD); containing 1% glutamic acid (GAD) and containing 1% nucleotides (ND). One hundred and twenty-three piglets were utilized with three pigs slaughtered at day zero (weaning day) and three at each one of the experimental days (1, 2, 4, 5, 7, 9, 13, 20, 27, and 49 post-weaning), in order to collect organ samples, which were analyzed for the δ13C isotopic composition and compared by means of time. No differences were found (p>0.05) among treatments for the turnover of the 13C in the pancreas (T50% = 13.91, 14.37, 11.07, and 9.34 days; T95% = 46.22, 47.73, 36.79, and 31.04 days for CD, GD, GAD, and ND, respectively). In the liver, the ND presented accelerated values of carbon turnover (T50% = 7.36 and T95% = 24.47 days) in relation to the values obtained for the GD (T50% = 10.15 and T95% = 33.74 days). However, the values obtained for the CD (T50% = 9.12 and T95% = 30.31 days) and GAD (T50% = 7.83 and T95% = 26.03 days) had no differences (p>0.05) among other diets. The technique of 13C isotopic dilution demonstrated trophic action of nucleotides in the liver. PMID:26954179

  10. Effect of Glutamine, Glutamic Acid and Nucleotides on the Turnover of Carbon (δ(13)C) in Organs of Weaned Piglets.

    PubMed

    Amorim, Alessandro Borges; Berto, Dirlei Antonio; Saleh, Mayra Anton Dib; Telles, Filipe Garcia; Denadai, Juliana Célia; Sartori, Maria Márcia Pereira; Luiggi, Fabiana Golin; Santos, Luan Sousa; Ducatti, Carlos

    2016-08-01

    Morphological and physiological alterations occur in the digestive system of weanling piglets, compromising the performance in subsequent phases. This experiment aimed at verifying the influence of glutamine, glutamate and nucleotides on the carbon turnover in the pancreas and liver of piglets weaned at 21 days of age. Four diets were evaluated: glutamine, glutamic acid or nucleotides-free diet (CD); containing 1% glutamine (GD); containing 1% glutamic acid (GAD) and containing 1% nucleotides (ND). One hundred and twenty-three piglets were utilized with three pigs slaughtered at day zero (weaning day) and three at each one of the experimental days (1, 2, 4, 5, 7, 9, 13, 20, 27, and 49 post-weaning), in order to collect organ samples, which were analyzed for the δ(13)C isotopic composition and compared by means of time. No differences were found (p>0.05) among treatments for the turnover of the (13)C in the pancreas (T50% = 13.91, 14.37, 11.07, and 9.34 days; T95% = 46.22, 47.73, 36.79, and 31.04 days for CD, GD, GAD, and ND, respectively). In the liver, the ND presented accelerated values of carbon turnover (T50% = 7.36 and T95% = 24.47 days) in relation to the values obtained for the GD (T50% = 10.15 and T95% = 33.74 days). However, the values obtained for the CD (T50% = 9.12 and T95% = 30.31 days) and GAD (T50% = 7.83 and T95% = 26.03 days) had no differences (p>0.05) among other diets. The technique of (13)C isotopic dilution demonstrated trophic action of nucleotides in the liver. PMID:26954179

  11. S-Isovaline Contained in Meteorites, Induces Enantiomeric Excess in D,L-glutamic Acid During Recrystallization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kojo, Shosuke

    2015-06-01

    S-Isovaline (S-Iva: 6.7 mmol) and D,L-glutamic acid (Glu: 2 mmol) were dissolved in 10 ml of hot water, and the resulting solution was divided in 5 vessels. After recrystallization, the crystals were collected from each vessel, and the enantiomeric excess (ee) of Glu was determined with chemical derivatization using 1-fluoro-2,4-dinitrophenyl- 5-L-leucinamide followed by high-performance liquid chromatography. Ten crystallizations provided all D-rich Glu with ee values of 2.69 % ± 0.81 % (mean ± standard deviation), and those using R-Iva provided all L-rich Glu with ee values of 6.24 % ± 2.20 %. Five recrystallizations of D,L-Glu alone provided ee values of 0.474 % ± 0.33 %. The differences among these three ee values were statistically significant, showing that S-Iva, which was present in meteorites caused a significant induction of ee in this physiological amino acid. This is the first outcome that S-Iva induced ee changes in a physiological amino acid. S-Iva did not induce any ee changes in D,L-asparagine, leucine, valine, methionine, phenylalanine, tryptophan, glutamine, tyrosine, aspartic acid, or histidine under similar recrystallizations.

  12. IgE binding to peanut allergens is inhibited by combined D-aspartic and D-glutamic acids.

    PubMed

    Chung, Si-Yin; Reed, Shawndrika

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study was to determine if D-amino acids (D-aas) bind and inhibit immunoglobulin E (IgE) binding to peanut allergens. D-aas such as D-Asp (aspartic acid), D-Glu (glutamic acid), combined D-[Asp/Glu] and others were each prepared in a cocktail of 9 other D-aas, along with L-amino acids (L-aas) and controls. Each sample was mixed with a pooled plasma from peanut-allergic donors, and tested by ELISA (enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay) and Western blots for IgE binding to peanut allergens. Results showed that D-[Asp/Glu] (4 mg/ml) inhibited IgE binding (75%) while D-Glu, D-Asp and other D-aas had no inhibitory effect. A higher inhibition was seen with D-[Asp/Glu] than with L-[Asp/Glu]. We concluded that IgE was specific for D-[Asp/Glu], not D-Asp or D-Glu, and that D-[Asp/Glu] was more reactive than was L-[Asp/Glu] in IgE inhibition. The finding indicates that D-[Asp/Glu] may have the potential for removing IgE or reducing IgE binding to peanut allergens in vitro. PMID:25053052

  13. S-Isovaline Contained in Meteorites, Induces Enantiomeric Excess in D,L-glutamic Acid During Recrystallization.

    PubMed

    Kojo, Shosuke

    2015-06-01

    S-Isovaline (S-Iva: 6.7 mmol) and D,L-glutamic acid (Glu: 2 mmol) were dissolved in 10 ml of hot water, and the resulting solution was divided in 5 vessels. After recrystallization, the crystals were collected from each vessel, and the enantiomeric excess (ee) of Glu was determined with chemical derivatization using 1-fluoro-2,4-dinitrophenyl- 5-L-leucinamide followed by high-performance liquid chromatography. Ten crystallizations provided all D-rich Glu with ee values of 2.69 % ± 0.81% (mean ± standard deviation), and those using R-Iva provided all L-rich Glu with ee values of 6.24 % ± 2.20%. Five recrystallizations of D,L-Glu alone provided ee values of 0.474 % ± 0.33%. The differences among these three ee values were statistically significant, showing that S-Iva, which was present in meteorites caused a significant induction of ee in this physiological amino acid. This is the first outcome that S-Iva induced ee changes in a physiological amino acid. S-Iva did not induce any ee changes in D,L-asparagine, leucine, valine, methionine, phenylalanine, tryptophan, glutamine, tyrosine, aspartic acid, or histidine under similar recrystallizations. PMID:25754590

  14. Stable isotope dilution HILIC-MS/MS method for accurate quantification of glutamic acid, glutamine, pyroglutamic acid, GABA and theanine in mouse brain tissues.

    PubMed

    Inoue, Koichi; Miyazaki, Yasuto; Unno, Keiko; Min, Jun Zhe; Todoroki, Kenichiro; Toyo'oka, Toshimasa

    2016-01-01

    In this study, we developed the stable isotope dilution hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography with tandem mass spectrometry (HILIC-MS/MS) technique for the accurate, reasonable and simultaneous quantification of glutamic acid (Glu), glutamine (Gln), pyroglutamic acid (pGlu), γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) and theanine in mouse brain tissues. The quantification of these analytes was accomplished using stable isotope internal standards and the HILIC separating mode to fully correct the intramolecular cyclization during the electrospray ionization. It was shown that linear calibrations were available with high coefficients of correlation (r(2)  > 0.999, range from 10 pmol/mL to 50 mol/mL). For application of the theanine intake, the determination of Glu, Gln, pGlu, GABA and theanine in the hippocampus and central cortex tissues was performed based on our developed method. In the region of the hippocampus, the concentration levels of Glu and pGlu were significantly reduced during reality-based theanine intake. Conversely, the concentration level of GABA increased. This result showed that transited theanine has an effect on the metabolic balance of Glu analogs in the hippocampus. PMID:26033549

  15. Propofol differentially inhibits the release of glutamate, γ-aminobutyric acid and glycine in the spinal dorsal horn of rats

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Jing; Wang, Wei; Yong, Zheng; Mi, Weidong; Zhang, Hong

    2015-01-01

    Objective(s): Propofol (2, 6-diisopropylphenol) is an intravenous anesthetic that is commonly used for the general anesthesia. It is well known that the spinal cord is one of the working targets of general anesthesia including propofol. However, there is a lack of investigation of the effects of propofol on spinal dorsal horn which is important for the sensory transmission of nociceptive signals. The objective of this study was to investigate the effects of increasing dosage of propofol on the release of glutamate (Glu), γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) and glycine (Gly) in the spinal dorsal horn. Materials and Methods: The efflux of Glu, GABA or Gly in the spinal dorsal horn of rats was detected using transverse spinal microdialysis under an awake condition and various depths of propofol anesthesia. The infusion rates of propofol were, in order, 400 µg/(kg·min), 600 µg/(kg·min) and 800 µg/(kg·min), with a 20 min infusion period being maintained at each infusion rate. Results: Propofol decreased the glutamate efflux within spinal dorsal horn in a dose-dependent manner, and the maximum decrease was 56.8 ± 6.0% at high-dose propofol infusion producing immobility. The inhibitory GABA and Gly efflux was also decreased about 15–20% at low-dose propofol infusion only producing sedation, but did not continue to drop with higher doses of propofol. Conclusion: Propofol decreased both excitatory and inhibitory amino acids efflux in spinal dorsal horn, and the preferential suppression of the excitatory amino acid might be associated with the analgesic effect of propofol. PMID:26557972

  16. Preservation of glutamic acid-iron chelate into montmorillonite to efficiently degrade Reactive Blue 19 in a Fenton system under sunlight irradiation at neutral pH

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Zhujian; Wu, Pingxiao; Gong, Beini; Yang, Shanshan; Li, Hailing; Zhu, Ziao; Cui, Lihua

    2016-05-01

    To further enhance the visible light responsive property and the chemical stability of Fe/clay mineral catalysts, glutamic acid-iron chelate intercalated montmorillonite (G-Fe-Mt) was developed. The physiochemical properties of G-Fe-Mt were investigated by X-ray diffraction (XRD), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), UV-vis diffuse reflectance spectroscopy (DRS), etc. The results showed that glutamic acid-iron chelates were successfully intercalated into the gallery of montmorillonite and the intercalated glutamic acid-iron chelate molecules were well preserved. The product G-Fe-Mt displayed excellent catalytic performance in heterogeneous photo-Fenton reaction under sunlight irradiation at acidic and neutral pH values. The chelation and the visible light responsiveness of glutamic acid produce a synergistic effect leading to greatly enhanced sunlight-Fenton reaction catalyzed by the heterogeneous G-Fe-Mt under neutral pH. G-Fe-Mt is a promising catalyst for advanced oxidation processes.

  17. Enzymatic synthesis of theanine from glutamic acid γ-methyl ester and ethylamine by immobilized Escherichia coli cells with γ-glutamyltranspeptidase activity.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Fei; Zheng, Qing-Zhong; Jiao, Qing-Cai; Liu, Jun-Zhong; Zhao, Gen-Hai

    2010-11-01

    Theanine (γ-glutamylethylamide) is the main amino acid component in green tea. The demand for theanine in the food and pharmaceutical industries continues to increase because of its special flavour and multiple physiological effects. In this research, an improved method for enzymatic theanine synthesis is reported. An economical substrate, glutamic acid γ-methyl ester, was used in the synthesis catalyzed by immobilized Escherichia coli cells with γ-glutamyltranspeptidase (GGT) activity. The results show that GGT activity with glutamic acid γ-methyl ester as substrate was about 1.2-folds higher than that with glutamine as substrate. Reaction conditions were optimized by using 300 mmol/l glutamic acid γ-methyl ester, 3,000 mmol/l ethylamine, and 0.1 g/ml of immobilized GGT cells at pH 10 and 50°C. Under these conditions, the immobilized cells were continuously used ten times, yielding an average glutamic acid γ-methyl ester to theanine conversion rate of 69.3%. Bead activity did not change significantly the first six times they were used, and the average conversion rate during the first six instances was 87.2%. The immobilized cells exhibited favourable operational stability. PMID:20238131

  18. L-glutamic acid: a neurotransmitter candidate for cone photoreceptors in human and rat retinas.

    PubMed Central

    Brandon, C; Lam, D M

    1983-01-01

    We have combined immunocytochemical localization of L-aspartate aminotransferase (L-aspartate:2-oxoglutarate aminotransferase, EC 2.6.1.1; glutamic-oxaloacetic transaminase) with autoradiographic localization of high-affinity uptake sites for L-glutamate or L-aspartate to identify the neurotransmitters of mammalian photoreceptors. In both human and rat retinas, high aspartate aminotransferase immunoreactivity is found in cones but not in rods; certain putative bipolar and amacrine cells are also heavily stained. In the human retina, and perhaps also in the rat retina, cones possess a high-affinity uptake mechanism for L-glutamate but not L-aspartate, whereas rods and Müller (glial) cells take up both L-glutamate and L-aspartate. Taken together, our results indicate that (i) L-glutamate is much more likely than L-aspartate to be the transmitter for human cones, and possibly for cones of other mammalian species as well, and (ii) major differences exist between mammalian cones and rods in the transport and metabolism or utilization of L-aspartate and L-glutamate. Images PMID:6136039

  19. A modified, high yield procedure for the synthesis of unlabeled and 14C-labeled 4-methylene-DL-glutamic acid.

    PubMed

    Powell, G K; Dekker, E E

    1981-01-01

    This paper describes the complete chemical synthesis of 4-methylene-DL-glutamic acid from diethylmalonate, formaldehyde and diethyl acetamidomalonate. The amino acid was obtained pure following ion-exchange chromatography and/or crystallization from hot water in an overall yield of 30% based on the amount of diethylmalonate used. Several physico-chemical characteristics of the synthetic compound were determined, including ir and pmr spectra, chromatography on paper, retention time on an amino acid analyzer, pK values and melting point; all properties of the synthetic material were found to be identical to those seen with the naturally occurring L-isomer. The procedure for obtaining gram quantities of the unlabeled compound has also been modified for the synthesis of high specific activity (10.6 mCi/mol) 4-methylene-[2-14C]-DL-glutamic acid. PMID:6265898

  20. Heavy metal removal from sludge with organic chelators: Comparative study of N, N-bis(carboxymethyl) glutamic acid and citric acid.

    PubMed

    Suanon, Fidèle; Sun, Qian; Dimon, Biaou; Mama, Daouda; Yu, Chang-Ping

    2016-01-15

    The applicability and performance of a new generation of biodegradable chelator, N, N-Bis(carboxymethyl) glutamic acid (GLDA), for extracting heavy metals from sewage sludge was carried out and compared with citric acid (CA). Targeted metals included Cd, Co, Cu, Zn, Ni and Cr, and their contents in the raw sludge were 63.1, 73.4, 1103.2, 2060.3, 483.9 and 604.1 mg kg(-1) (dry sludge basis), respectively. Metals were divided into six fractions including water soluble, exchangeable, carbonates bound, Fe-Mn bound, organic matters bound and residual fraction via chemical fractionation. Washing results showed that in general GLDA exhibited better performance compared with CA, with removal efficiency of 83.9, 87.3, 81.2, 85.6, 89.3 and 90.2% for Cd, Co, Cu, Zn, Ni and Cr, respectively at equilibrium pH = 3.3. Residual metals were better stabilized in the GLAD-washed sludge than in the CA-washed sludge, and were mostly tightly bonded to the residual fraction. Furthermore, CA promoted phosphorus (P) release while GLDA had an opposite effect and tended to retain P within sludge, which could be beneficial for further application in agricultural use. Findings from this study suggested that GLDA could be a potential replacement for refractory and less environmentally-friendly chelators in the extraction of metals from sludge. PMID:26520041

  1. Biomimetic vaterite formation at surfaces structurally templated by oligo(glutamic acid) peptides.

    PubMed

    Lu, Hao; Hood, Matthew A; Mauri, Sergio; Baio, Joe E; Bonn, Mischa; Muñoz-Espí, Rafael; Weidner, Tobias

    2015-11-14

    Previous studies have reported that the metastable vaterite phase of calcium carbonate can be stabilized in solution by acidic additives. Here we demonstrate that vaterite can also be stabilized directly at surfaces by engineered peptides. Our data show that the mineralisation occurs in a 'self-templating' process where calcium ions restructure the peptide backbone, which in turn allows for effective vaterite precipitation. PMID:26376942

  2. [Studying the neuroprotective effect of the novel glutamic acid derivative neiroglutam on focal cerebral ischemia in rats].

    PubMed

    Tiurenkov, I N; Kurkin, D V; Bakulin, D A; Volotova, E V

    2014-01-01

    We have studied the neuroprotective effect of the novel glutamic acid derivative neiroglutam on reversible focal cerebral ischemia in rats. The neuroprotective drug action was assessed by the ability to reduce the severity of neurological deficit (1, 2, 3, 5 and 7 days), forelimb fine-motor disorders (in the ladder test), hind limb motor activity (beam-walking test), and volume of the infarct zone upon 7-day pathologic exposure. It was found that the therapeutic administration of neiroglutam (26 mg/kg, i.p., for 7 days) reduces the volume of necrosis of cerebral tissues in case of focal brain ischemia in animals (on the average by 38%, (p < 0.05) and decreases the severity of motor disorders, which indicates the presence of neuroprotective effect of this compound. PMID:25365863

  3. Control generating of bacterial magnetic nanoparticle-doxorubicin conjugates by poly-L-glutamic acid surface modification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Lin; Huang, Ji; Zheng, Li-Min

    2011-04-01

    By using poly-L-glutamic acid (PLGA) to modify the membrane surface of bacterial magnetic nanoparticles (BMPs), (BMP)-doxorubicin conjugates (DBMP-P) could be control generated. The doxorubicin loading ratio could be raised up to 81.7% (w/w) in comparison with that of dual functional linkers. DBMP-P was characterized by transmission electron micrographs, attenuated total reflection infrared spectroscopy, magnetic properties, and dynamic light scattering. It is found that increase of the doxorubicin/PLGA modified BMP (PBMP) ratio leads to an increase of the drug loading ratio and a decrease of saturation magnetization. Besides, DBMP-P is sensitive to pH to facilitate drug release, shows enhancement of uptake by cancer cells, and is strongly cytotoxic to HePG2 and MCF-7 cells.

  4. Preparation of pixantrone/poly(γ-glutamic acid) nanoparticles through complex self-assembly for oral chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Meng, Lili; Ji, Bing; Huang, Wei; Wang, Dali; Tong, Gangsheng; Su, Yue; Zhu, Xinyuan; Yan, Deyue

    2012-11-01

    A facile and green approach is reported to construct pixantrone/poly(γ-glutamic acid) nanoparticles (PIX/γ-PGA NPs) as an oral drug delivery system through the complex self-assembly of polyelectrolyte γ-PGA and the anticancer drug pixantrone dimaleate (PDM). The complex self-assembly behavior is investigated in detail. The results demonstrate that PDM can interact with γ-PGA to conveniently form NPs and the size of NPs can be controlled by adjusting the solution volume ratio of PDM to γ-PGA. These NPs illustrate their pH-dependent release behavior, efficient cellular uptake and enhanced drug efficacy through an in vitro release study, flow cytometry, CLSM analysis and the MTT assay. In summary, PIX/γ-PGA NPs may serve as a promising oral drug delivery system for cancer therapy. PMID:23008063

  5. Interfacial electron transfer of glucose oxidase on poly(glutamic acid)-modified glassy carbon electrode and glucose sensing.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Xuechou; Tan, Bingcan; Zheng, Xinyu; Kong, Dexian; Li, Qinglu

    2015-11-15

    The interfacial electron transfer of glucose oxidase (GOx) on a poly(glutamic acid)-modified glassy carbon electrode (PGA/GCE) was investigated. The redox peaks measured for GOx and flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD) are similar, and the anodic peak of GOx does not increase in the presence of glucose in a mediator-free solution. These indicate that the electroactivity of GOx is not the direct electron transfer (DET) between GOx and PGA/GCE and that the observed electroactivity of GOx is ascribed to free FAD that is released from GOx. However, efficient electron transfer occurred if an appropriate mediator was placed in solution, suggesting that GOx is active. The PGA/GCE-based biosensor showed wide linear response in the range of 0.5-5.5 mM with a low detection limit of 0.12 mM and high sensitivity and selectivity for measuring glucose. PMID:26278169

  6. A novel poly(γ-glutamic acid)/silk-sericin hydrogel for wound dressing: Synthesis, characterization and biological evaluation.

    PubMed

    Shi, Lu; Yang, Ning; Zhang, Hao; Chen, Li; Tao, Lei; Wei, Yen; Liu, Hui; Luo, Ying

    2015-03-01

    A novel multifunctional poly(γ-glutamic acid)/silk sericin (γ-PGA/SS) hydrogel has been developed and used as wound dressing. The physical and chemical properties of the γ-PGA/SS gels were systemically investigated. Furthermore, these γ-PGA/SS gels have been found to promote the L929 fibroblast cells proliferate, and in the in vivo study, significant stimulatory effects were also observed on granulation and capillary formation on day 9 in H-2-treated wounds, indicating that this new complex hydrogel could maintain a moist healing environment, protect the wound from bacterial infection, absorb excess exudates, and promote cell proliferation to reconstruct damaged tissue. Considering the simple preparation process and excellent biological property, this γ-PGA/SS hydrogel might have a wide range of applications in biomedical and clinical areas. PMID:25579954

  7. Eu-doped Mg-Al layered double hydroxide as a responsive fluorescent material and its interaction with glutamic acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yufeng; Li, Fei; Yu, Gensheng; Wei, Junchao

    2012-10-01

    The paper describes a study on the fluorescence of a Eu-doped Mg-Al layered double hydroxide (Eu-doped LDH) response to glutamic acid (Glu). Various characterizations (UV-Vis transmittance, TG-DTA and IR-spectrum) indicated that there is an interaction between the Eu-doped LDH and Glu. Fluorescent study was found that the red emissions resulted from 5D0-7FJ transition (J = 1, 2) of Eu3+ markedly decreased, while the blue emission at 440 nm contributed to Glu shifted to low energy after the addition of Glu to the Eu-doped LDH. The fluorescent changes may be relevant to the hydrogen-bond interaction between the Eu-doped LDH and Glu, and the mechanism of the interaction between Eu-doped LDH and Glu was discussed.

  8. 2-D DIGE proteomic profiles of three strains of Fusarium graminearum grown in agmatine or glutamic acid medium

    PubMed Central

    Serchi, Tommaso; Pasquali, Matias; Leclercq, Céline C.; Planchon, Sébastien; Hoffmann, Lucien; Renaut, Jenny

    2016-01-01

    2D DIGE proteomics data obtained from three strains belonging to Fusarium graminearum s.s. species growing in a glutamic acid or agmatine containing medium are provided. A total of 381 protein species have been identified which do differ for abundance among the two treatments and among the strains (ANOVA<0.05 and abundance ratio>±1.3). Data on the diversity of protein species profiles between the two media for each strain are made available. Shared profiles among strains are discussed in Pasquali et al. [1]. Here proteins that with diverse profile can be used to differentiate strains are highlighted. The full dataset allow to obtaining single strain proteomic profiles. PMID:26981549

  9. 2-D DIGE proteomic profiles of three strains of Fusarium graminearum grown in agmatine or glutamic acid medium.

    PubMed

    Serchi, Tommaso; Pasquali, Matias; Leclercq, Céline C; Planchon, Sébastien; Hoffmann, Lucien; Renaut, Jenny

    2016-03-01

    2D DIGE proteomics data obtained from three strains belonging to Fusarium graminearum s.s. species growing in a glutamic acid or agmatine containing medium are provided. A total of 381 protein species have been identified which do differ for abundance among the two treatments and among the strains (ANOVA<0.05 and abundance ratio>±1.3). Data on the diversity of protein species profiles between the two media for each strain are made available. Shared profiles among strains are discussed in Pasquali et al. [1]. Here proteins that with diverse profile can be used to differentiate strains are highlighted. The full dataset allow to obtaining single strain proteomic profiles. PMID:26981549

  10. Effect of corona electric field on the production of gamma-poly glutamic acid based on bacillus natto

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qi, Hong; Na, Ri; Xin, Jiletu; Jie Xie, Ya; Guo, Jiu Feng

    2013-03-01

    Bacillus Natto is an important strain for gamma-poly glutamic acid (γ-PGA) production. The mutagenesis of Bacillus Natto 20646 under corona electric field and the screening of high γ-PGA producing mutant were investigated. A new mutant bacillus natto Ndlz01 was isolated from Bacillus Natto 20646 after mutation in corona electric field at 9kV for 2min. The Ndlz01 exhibited genetic stability of high γ-PGA producing ability even after five generation cultures. When the bacterium was mutated in streamer discharge state at 9kV for 2min, its death rate was more than 90%. Compared with the yield of γ-PGA based on the original Bacillus Natto 20646, the γ-PGA yield of mutant bacillus natto Ndlz01 increased from 2.6 to 5.94 g/L, with an increase rate of 129.78%.

  11. How Imaging Glutamate, γ-Aminobutyric Acid, and Dopamine Can Inform the Clinical Treatment of Alcohol Dependence and Withdrawal.

    PubMed

    Hillmer, Ansel T; Mason, Graeme F; Fucito, Lisa M; O'Malley, Stephanie S; Cosgrove, Kelly P

    2015-12-01

    Neuroimaging studies have dramatically advanced our understanding of the neurochemical basis of alcohol dependence, a major public health issue. In this paper, we review the research generated from neurochemical specific imaging modalities including magnetic resonance spectroscopy, positron emission tomography, and single-photon emission computed tomography in studies of alcohol dependence and withdrawal. We focus on studies interrogating γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA), glutamate, and dopamine, as these are prominent neurotransmitter systems implicated in alcohol dependence. Highlighted findings include diminished dopaminergic functioning and modulation of the GABA system by tobacco smoking during alcohol withdrawal. Then, we consider how these findings impact the clinical treatment of alcohol dependence and discuss directions for future experiments to address existing gaps in the literature, for example, sex differences and smoking comorbidity. These and other considerations provide opportunities to build upon the current neurochemistry imaging literature of alcohol dependence and withdrawal, which may usher in improved therapeutic and relapse prevention strategies. PMID:26510169

  12. Xanthurenic Acid Activates mGlu2/3 Metabotropic Glutamate Receptors and is a Potential Trait Marker for Schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Fazio, Francesco; Lionetto, Luana; Curto, Martina; Iacovelli, Luisa; Cavallari, Michele; Zappulla, Cristina; Ulivieri, Martina; Napoletano, Flavia; Capi, Matilde; Corigliano, Valentina; Scaccianoce, Sergio; Caruso, Alessandra; Miele, Jessica; De Fusco, Antonio; Di Menna, Luisa; Comparelli, Anna; De Carolis, Antonella; Gradini, Roberto; Nisticò, Robert; De Blasi, Antonio; Girardi, Paolo; Bruno, Valeria; Battaglia, Giuseppe; Nicoletti, Ferdinando; Simmaco, Maurizio

    2015-01-01

    The kynurenine pathway of tryptophan metabolism has been implicated in the pathophysiology of psychiatric disorders, including schizophrenia. We report here that the kynurenine metabolite, xanturenic acid (XA), interacts with, and activates mGlu2 and mGlu3 metabotropic glutamate receptors in heterologous expression systems. However, the molecular nature of this interaction is unknown, and our data cannot exclude that XA acts primarily on other targets, such as the vesicular glutamate transporter, in the CNS. Systemic administration of XA in mice produced antipsychotic-like effects in the MK-801-induced model of hyperactivity. This effect required the presence of mGlu2 receptors and was abrogated by the preferential mGlu2/3 receptor antagonist, LY341495. Because the mGlu2 receptor is a potential drug target in the treatment of schizophrenia, we decided to measure serum levels of XA and other kynurenine metabolites in patients affected by schizophrenia. Serum XA levels were largely reduced in a large cohort of patients affected by schizophrenia, and, in patients with first-episode schizophrenia, levels remained low after 12 months of antipsychotic medication. As opposed to other kynurenine metabolites, XA levels were also significantly reduced in first-degree relatives of patients affected by schizophrenia. We suggest that lowered serum XA levels might represent a novel trait marker for schizophrenia. PMID:26643205

  13. Clavulanic acid enhances glutamate transporter subtype I (GLT-1) expression and decreases reinforcing efficacy of cocaine in mice.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jae; John, Joel; Langford, Dianne; Walker, Ellen; Ward, Sara; Rawls, Scott M

    2016-03-01

    The β-lactam antibiotic ceftriaxone (CTX) reduces cocaine reinforcement and relapse in preclinical assays through a mechanism involving activation of glutamate transporter subtype 1 (GLT-1). However, its poor brain penetrability and intravenous administration route may limit its therapeutic utility for indications related to CNS diseases. An alternative is clavulanic acid (CA), a structural analog of CTX that retains the β-lactam core required for GLT-1 activity but displays enhanced brain penetrability and oral activity relative to CTX. Here, we tested the hypothesis that CA (1, 10 mg/kg ip) would enhance GLT-1 expression and decrease cocaine self-administration (SA) in mice, but at lower doses than CTX. Experiments revealed that GLT-1 transporter expression in the nucleus accumbens of mice treated with repeated CA (1, 10 mg/kg) was enhanced relative to saline-treated mice. Repeated CA treatment (1 mg/kg) reduced the reinforcing efficacy of cocaine (0.56 mg/kg/inf) in mice maintained on a progressive-ratio (PR) schedule of reinforcement but did not affect acquisition of cocaine SA under fixed-ratio responding or acquisition or retention of learning. These findings suggest that the β-lactamase inhibitor CA can activate the cellular glutamate reuptake system in the brain reward circuit and reduce cocaine's reinforcing efficacy at 100-fold lower doses than CTX. PMID:26543027

  14. Neuroprotective effect of estradiol-loaded poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) nanoparticles on glutamate-induced excitotoxic neuronal death.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jeong Hwan; Kim, Gyu Hyun; Jeong, Ji Heun; Lee, In Ho; Lee, Ye Ji; Lee, Nam Seob; Jeong, Young Gil; Lee, Je Hun; Yu, Kwang Sik; Lee, Shin Hye; Hong, Seul Ki; Kang, Seong Hee; Kang, Bo Sun; Kim, Do Kyung; Han, Seung Yun

    2014-11-01

    Different concentrations of estradiol (E2)-loaded poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) nanoparticles (E2-PLGA-NPs) were synthesized using the emulsion-diffusion method. Transmission electron microscopy results showed that the average particle size of E2-PLGA-NPs was 98 ± 1.9 nm when stabilized with polyvinyl alcohol and 103 ± 4.9 nm when stabilized with Tween-80. Fourier transform-infrared spectroscopy with diamond attenuated total reflectance was used to identify the presence or absence of E2 molecules in PLGA nanocapsules. Cell proliferation was assessed after treating SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cells with 1 nM-1 μM of E2 and E2-PLGA-NPs. The neuroprotective efficacy against glutamate-induced excitotoxicity was also investigated in SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cells. Neuroprotection was greater in E2-PLGA-NP-treated cells than in cells treated with the same concentration of E2. Furthermore, E2- and E2-PLGA-NP-treated cells expressed more p-ERK1/2 and p-CREB than cells treated with glutamate only. Moreover, the expression of p-ERK1/2 was higher than that of p-CREB. In this study, p-ERK1/2 had a greater influence on the neuroprotective effect of E2 and E2-PLGA-NPs than p-CREB. PMID:25958534

  15. Cortical Gene Expression After a Conditional Knockout of 67 kDa Glutamic Acid Decarboxylase in Parvalbumin Neurons.

    PubMed

    Georgiev, Danko; Yoshihara, Toru; Kawabata, Rika; Matsubara, Takurou; Tsubomoto, Makoto; Minabe, Yoshio; Lewis, David A; Hashimoto, Takanori

    2016-07-01

    In the cortex of subjects with schizophrenia, expression of glutamic acid decarboxylase 67 (GAD67), the enzyme primarily responsible for cortical GABA synthesis, is reduced in the subset of GABA neurons that express parvalbumin (PV). This GAD67 deficit is accompanied by lower cortical levels of other GABA-associated transcripts, including GABA transporter-1, PV, brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), tropomyosin receptor kinase B, somatostatin, GABAA receptor α1 subunit, and KCNS3 potassium channel subunit mRNAs. In contrast, messenger RNA (mRNA) levels for glutamic acid decarboxylase 65 (GAD65), another enzyme for GABA synthesis, are not altered. We tested the hypothesis that this pattern of GABA-associated transcript levels is secondary to the GAD67 deficit in PV neurons by analyzing cortical levels of these GABA-associated mRNAs in mice with a PV neuron-specific GAD67 knockout. Using in situ hybridization, we found that none of the examined GABA-associated transcripts had lower cortical expression in the knockout mice. In contrast, PV, BDNF, KCNS3, and GAD65 mRNA levels were higher in the homozygous mice. In addition, our behavioral test battery failed to detect a change in sensorimotor gating or working memory, although the homozygous mice exhibited increased spontaneous activities. These findings suggest that reduced GAD67 expression in PV neurons is not an upstream cause of the lower levels of GABA-associated transcripts, or of the characteristic behaviors, in schizophrenia. In PV neuron-specific GAD67 knockout mice, increased levels of PV, BDNF, and KCNS3 mRNAs might be the consequence of increased neuronal activity secondary to lower GABA synthesis, whereas increased GAD65 mRNA might represent a compensatory response to increase GABA synthesis. PMID:26980143

  16. Poly(γ-Glutamic Acid) as an Exogenous Promoter of Chondrogenic Differentiation of Human Mesenchymal Stem/Stromal Cells

    PubMed Central

    Antunes, Joana C.; Tsaryk, Roman; Gonçalves, Raquel M.; Pereira, Catarina Leite; Landes, Constantin; Brochhausen, Christoph; Ghanaati, Shahram

    2015-01-01

    Cartilage damage and/or aging effects can cause constant pain, which limits the patient's quality of life. Although different strategies have been proposed to enhance the limited regenerative capacity of cartilage tissue, the full production of native and functional cartilaginous extracellular matrix (ECM) has not yet been achieved. Poly(γ-glutamic acid) (γ-PGA), a naturally occurring polyamino acid, biodegradable into glutamate residues, has been explored for tissue regeneration. In this work, γ-PGA's ability to support the production of cartilaginous ECM by human bone marrow mesenchymal stem/stromal cells (MSCs) and nasal chondrocytes (NCs) was investigated. MSC and NC pellets were cultured in basal medium (BM), chondrogenic medium (CM), and CM-γ-PGA-supplemented medium (CM+γ-PGA) over a period of 21 days. Pellet size/shape was monitored with time. At 14 and 21 days of culture, the presence of sulfated glycosaminoglycans (sGAGs), type II collagen (Col II), Sox-9, aggrecan, type XI collagen (Col XI), type X collagen (Col X), calcium deposits, and type I collagen (Col I) was analyzed. After excluding γ-PGA's cytotoxicity, earlier cell condensation, higher sGAG content, Col II, Sox-9 (day 14), aggrecan, and Col X (day 14) production was observed in γ-PGA-supplemented MSC cultures, with no signs of mineralization or Col I. These effects were not evident with NCs. However, Sox-9 (at day 14) and Col X (at days 14 and 21) were increased, decreased, or absent, respectively. Overall, γ-PGA improved chondrogenic differentiation of MSCs, increasing ECM production earlier in culture. It is proposed that γ-PGA incorporation in novel biomaterials has a beneficial impact on future approaches for cartilage regeneration. PMID:25760236

  17. Glutamate-evoked release of endogenous brain dopamine: inhibition by an excitatory amino acid antagonist and an enkephalin analogue.

    PubMed Central

    Jhamandas, K.; Marien, M.

    1987-01-01

    The present study examined the effect of a selective delta-opioid receptor agonist [D-Ala2-D-Leu5] enkephalin (DADL) on the spontaneous and the L-glutamic acid (L-Glu)-evoked release of endogenous dopamine from superfused slices of rat caudate-putamen. The amount of dopamine in slice superfusates was measured by a sensitive method employing high-performance liquid chromatography with electrochemical detection (h.p.l.c.-e.d.) after a two-step separation procedure. The spontaneous release of endogenous dopamine was partially dependent on Ca2+, enhanced in Mg2+-free superfusion medium, partially reduced by tetrodotoxin (TTX, 0.3 microM), partially reduced by the putative excitatory amino acid receptor antagonist DL-2-amino-7-phosphonoheptanoic acid (DL-APH, 1 mM), and increased 10 fold by the dopamine uptake blocker, nomifensine (10 microM). DADL (5 and 50 nM) did not significantly affect spontaneous dopamine release. L-Glu (0.1-10 mM) produced a concentration-dependent release of endogenous dopamine from slices of caudate-putamen. This effect was Ca2+-dependent, strongly inhibited by 1.2 mM Mg2+, attenuated by DL-APH (1 mM), attenuated by TTX (0.3 microM), and enhanced by nomifensine (10 microM). In the presence of nomifensine DADL (50 nM) reduced significantly the L-Glu-evoked release of endogenous dopamine by 20%. The inhibitory effect of DADL was blocked by 10 microM naloxone. These results indicate that L-Glu stimulates the Ca2+-dependent release of endogenous dopamine in the caudate-putamen by activation of N-methy-D-aspartate-type of excitatory amino acid receptors. This release can be selectively modified by the delta-opioid agonist DADL in a naloxone-sensitive manner. PMID:2884003

  18. Influence of nitrogen source and pH value on undesired poly(γ-glutamic acid) formation of a protease producing Bacillus licheniformis strain.

    PubMed

    Meissner, Lena; Kauffmann, Kira; Wengeler, Timo; Mitsunaga, Hitoshi; Fukusaki, Eiichiro; Büchs, Jochen

    2015-09-01

    Bacillus spp. are used for the production of industrial enzymes but are also known to be capable of producing biopolymers such as poly(γ-glutamic acid). Biopolymers increase the viscosity of the fermentation broth, thereby impairing mixing, gas/liquid mass and heat transfer in any bioreactor system. Undesired biopolymer formation has a significant impact on the fermentation and downstream processing performance. This study shows how undesirable poly(γ-glutamic acid) formation of an industrial protease producing Bacillus licheniformis strain was prevented by switching the nitrogen source from ammonium to nitrate. The viscosity was reduced from 32 to 2.5 mPa s. A constant or changing pH value did not influence the poly(γ-glutamic acid) production. Protease production was not affected: protease activities of 38 and 46 U mL(-1) were obtained for ammonium and nitrate, respectively. With the presented results, protease production with industrial Bacillus strains is now possible without the negative impact on fermentation and downstream processing by undesired poly(γ-glutamic acid) formation. PMID:26153501

  19. Glutamate is the major anaplerotic substrate in the tricarboxylic acid cycle of isolated rumen epithelial and duodenal mucosal cells from beef cattle

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This study aimed to determine the contribution of substrates to tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle fluxes in rumen epithelial (REC) and duodenal mucosal (DMC) cells isolated from bulls (n = 6) fed either a 75% forage (HF) or 75% concentrate (HC) diet. In separate incubations, [13C6]glucose, [13C5]glutam...

  20. Association Between a Genetic Variant Related to Glutamic Acid Metabolism and Coronary Heart Disease in Type 2 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Qi, Qibin; Prudente, Sabrina; Mendonca, Christine; Andreozzi, Francesco; di Pietro, Natalia; Sturma, Mariella; Novelli, Valeria; Mannino, Gaia Chiara; Formoso, Gloria; Gervino, Ernest V.; Hauser, Thomas H.; Muehlschlegel, Jochen D.; Niewczas, Monika A.; Krolewski, Andrzej S.; Biolo, Gianni; Pandolfi, Assunta; Rimm, Eric; Sesti, Giorgio; Trischitta, Vincenzo; Hu, Frank

    2013-01-01

    levels of γ-glutamyl cycle intermediates pyroglutamic and glutamic acid in two independent studies (P=0.029 and P=0.003, respectively). CONCLUSIONS AND RELEVANCE A SNP was identified that was significantly associated with CHD among persons with diabetes but not in those without diabetes. This SNP was functionally related to glutamic acid metabolism, suggesting a mechanistic link. PMID:23982368

  1. Altered mRNA editing and expression of ionotropic glutamate receptors after kainic acid exposure in cyclooxygenase-2 deficient mice.

    PubMed

    Caracciolo, Luca; Barbon, Alessandro; Palumbo, Sara; Mora, Cristina; Toscano, Christopher D; Bosetti, Francesca; Barlati, Sergio

    2011-01-01

    Kainic acid (KA) binds to the AMPA/KA receptors and induces seizures that result in inflammation, oxidative damage and neuronal death. We previously showed that cyclooxygenase-2 deficient (COX-2(-/-)) mice are more vulnerable to KA-induced excitotoxicity. Here, we investigated whether the increased susceptibility of COX-2(-/-) mice to KA is associated with altered mRNA expression and editing of glutamate receptors. The expression of AMPA GluR2, GluR3 and KA GluR6 was increased in vehicle-injected COX-2(-/-) mice compared to wild type (WT) mice in hippocampus and cortex, whereas gene expression of NMDA receptors was decreased. KA treatment decreased the expression of AMPA, KA and NMDA receptors in the hippocampus, with a significant effect in COX-2(-/-) mice. Furthermore, we analyzed RNA editing levels and found that the level of GluR3 R/G editing site was selectively increased in the hippocampus and decreased in the cortex in COX-2(-/-) compared with WT mice. After KA, GluR4 R/G editing site, flip form, was increased in the hippocampus of COX-2(-/-) mice. Treatment of WT mice with the COX-2 inhibitor celecoxib for two weeks decreased the expression of AMPA/KA and NMDAR subunits after KA, as observed in COX-2(-/-) mice. After KA exposure, COX-2(-/-) mice showed increased mRNA expression of markers of inflammation and oxidative stress, such as cytokines (TNF-α, IL-1β and IL-6), inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), microglia (CD11b) and astrocyte (GFAP). Thus, COX-2 gene deletion can exacerbate the inflammatory response to KA. We suggest that COX-2 plays a role in attenuating glutamate excitotoxicity by modulating RNA editing of AMPA/KA and mRNA expression of all ionotropic glutamate receptor subunits and, in turn, neuronal excitability. These changes may contribute to the increased vulnerability of COX-2(-/-) mice to KA. The overstimulation of glutamate receptors as a consequence of COX-2 gene deletion suggests a functional coupling between COX-2 and the

  2. ERKs and mitochondria-related pathways are essential for glycyrrhizic acid-mediated neuroprotection against glutamate-induced toxicity in differentiated PC12 cells

    PubMed Central

    Wang, D.; Guo, T.Q.; Wang, Z.Y.; Lu, J.H.; Liu, D.P.; Meng, Q.F.; Xie, J.; Zhang, X.L.; Liu, Y.; Teng, L.S.

    2014-01-01

    The present study focuses on the neuroprotective effect of glycyrrhizic acid (GA, a major compound separated from Glycyrrhiza Radix, which is a crude Chinese traditional drug) against glutamate-induced cytotoxicity in differentiated PC12 (DPC12) cells. The results showed that GA treatment improved cell viability and ameliorated abnormal glutamate-induced alterations in mitochondria in DPC12 cells. GA reversed glutamate-suppressed B-cell lymphoma 2 levels, inhibited glutamate-enhanced expressions of Bax and cleaved caspase 3, and reduced cytochrome C (Cyto C) release. Exposure to glutamate strongly inhibited phosphorylation of AKT (protein kinase B) and extracellular signal-regulated kinases (ERKs); however, GA pretreatment enhanced activation of ERKs but not AKT. The presence of PD98059 (a mitogen-activated protein/extracellular signal-regulated kinase kinase [MEK] inhibitor) but not LY294002 (a phosphoinositide 3-kinase [PI3K] inhibitor) diminished the potency of GA for improving viability of glutamate-exposed DPC12 cells. These results indicated that ERKs and mitochondria-related pathways are essential for the neuroprotective effect of GA against glutamate-induced toxicity in DPC12 cells. The present study provides experimental evidence supporting GA as a potential therapeutic agent for use in the treatment of neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:25075574

  3. The Monosodium Glutamate Story: The Commercial Production of MSG and Other Amino Acids

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ault, Addison

    2004-01-01

    Monosodium glutamate (MSG) is both the basis of a trillion dollar worldwide industry and a presence in the diet of a majority of the inhabitants of the world. Some parts of the "story" of MSG that might be of most interest to chemists, chemistry teachers and their students are presented.

  4. GLUTAMATE NEUROTOXICITY IN THE DEVELOPING RAT COCHLEA IS ANTAGONIZED BY KUNURENIC ACID AND MK-801

    EPA Science Inventory

    Glutamate (GLU) is neurotoxic in the neonatal rat cochlea, producing hearing impairment which is largely due to the death of spiral ganglion cells, whereas the receptor hair cells are spared. endritic fibers of the spiral ganglion are post-synaptic to the primary afferent synapse...

  5. Fabrication and morphology control of electrospun poly(γ-glutamic acid) nanofibers for biomedical applications.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shige; Cao, Xueyan; Shen, Mingwu; Guo, Rui; Bányai, István; Shi, Xiangyang

    2012-01-01

    We report the fabrication of water-stable electrospun γ-polyglutamic acid (γ-PGA) nanofibers with morphology control for biomedical applications. In this study, the processing variables including polymer concentration, flow rate, applied voltage, collection distance, and ambient humidity were systematically optimized to generate uniform γ-PGA nanofibers with a smooth morphology. By changing the trifluoroacetic acid concentration in the electrospinning solution, the diameter of the γ-PGA nanofibers can be controlled within the range of 186-603 nm. To render the γ-PGA nanofibers with good water stability, cystamine was employed as a crosslinking agent to amidate the carboxyl groups of γ-PGA. Furthermore, 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide colorimetric assay in conjunction of cell morphology observation reveals that the obtained γ-PGA nanofibers have an excellent biocompatibility to promote the cell adhesion and proliferation. We anticipate that the fabricated electrospun γ-PGA nanofibers with controllable morphology and good water stability may find extensive applications in future development of tissue engineering scaffold materials, drug delivery systems, environmental remediation, and sensing. PMID:21982215

  6. Poly(amidoamine) dendrimer-enabled simultaneous stabilization and functionalization of electrospun poly(γ-glutamic acid) nanofibers.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shige; Zhu, Jingyi; Shen, Mingwu; Zhu, Meifang; Shi, Xiangyang

    2014-02-12

    We report a facile and general approach to using generation 2 (G2) poly(amidoamine) (PAMAM) dendrimers for simultaneous stabilization and functionalization of electrospun poly(γ-glutamic acid) nanofibers (γ-PGA NFs). In this study, uniform γ-PGA NFs with a smooth morphology were generated using electrospinning technology. In order to endow the NFs with good water stability, amine-terminated G2.NH2 PAMAM dendrimers were utilized to crosslink the γ-PGA NFs via 1-ethyl-3-(3-dimethylami-nopropyl) carbodiimide coupling chemistry. Under the optimized crosslinking conditions, G2.NH2 dendrimers partially modified with fluorescein isothiocyanate (FI) or folic acid (FA) were used to crosslink γ-PGA NFs. Our results reveal that G2.NH2-FI is able to simultaneously render the NFs with good water stability and fluorescence property, while G2.NH2-FA is able to simultaneously endow the NFs with water stability and the ability to capture FA receptor-overexpressing cancer cells in vitro via ligand-receptor interaction. With the tunable dendrimer surface chemistry, multifunctional water-stable γ-PGA-based NFs may be generated via a dendrimer crosslinking approach, thereby providing diverse applications in the areas of biosensing, tissue engineering, drug delivery, and environmental sciences. PMID:24456208

  7. Lesions of nucleus accumbens affect morphine-induced release of ascorbic acid and GABA but not of glutamate in rats.

    PubMed

    Sun, Ji Y; Yang, Jing Y; Wang, Fang; Wang, Jian Y; Song, Wu; Su, Guang Y; Dong, Ying X; Wu, Chun F

    2011-10-01

    Our previous studies have shown that local perfusion of morphine causes an increase of extracellular ascorbic acid (AA) levels in nucleus accumbens (NAc) of freely moving rats. Lines of evidence showed that glutamatergic and GABAergic were associated with morphine-induced effects on the neurotransmission of the brain, especially on the release of AA. In the present study, the effects of morphine on the release of extracellular AA, γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) and glutamate (Glu) in the NAc following bilateral NAc lesions induced by kainic acid (KA) were studied by using the microdialysis technique, coupled to high performance liquid chromatography with electrochemical detection (HPLC-ECD) and fluorescent detection (HPLC-FD). The results showed that local perfusion of morphine (100 µM, 1 mM) in NAc dose-dependently increased AA and GABA release, while attenuated Glu release in the NAc. Naloxone (0.4 mM) pretreated by local perfusion to the NAc, significantly blocked the effects of morphine. After NAc lesion by KA (1 µg), morphine-induced increase in AA and GABA were markedly eliminated, while decrease in Glu was not affected. The loss effect of morphine on AA and GABA release after KA lesion could be recovered by GABA agonist, musimol. These results indicate that morphine-induced AA release may be mediated at least by µ-opioid receptor. Moreover, this effect of morphine possibly depend less on the glutamatergic afferents, but more on the GABAergic circuits within this nucleus. Finally, AA release induced by local perfusion of morphine may be GABA-receptor mediated and synaptically localized in the NAc. PMID:20731632

  8. The formation of a novel supramolecular structure by amyloid of poly-L-glutamic acid

    SciTech Connect

    Bai Fan; Zeng Chengming; Yang Shixin; Zhang Yizheng He Yi; Jin Jun

    2008-05-09

    Polyglutamic acid (PE) has been shown to form amyloid fibrils in vitro under pH value of 4.0. However, under the pH of 2.0, a further self-association process resulting in a novel supramolecular structure was observed. These supramolecular assemblies had diameters ranging from 1 to 20 {mu}m and lengths up to several hundred microns, which were significantly larger than those of typical 'amyloid fibrils'. The existence of amyloid-like structure within these assemblies was confirmed with Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and Thioflavin T fluorescence assay. The aggregation process of PE was studied by direct observation of electronic microscopy. The supramolecular assemblies appeared to be formed in a hierarchical process in which the preformed amyloid-like subunits self-assembled into higher-order assemblies in a well-organized pattern.

  9. Role of GlnR in Acid-Mediated Repression of Genes Encoding Proteins Involved in Glutamine and Glutamate Metabolism in Streptococcus mutans▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Chen , Pei-Min; Chen, Yi-Ywan M.; Yu, Sung-Liang; Sher, Singh; Lai, Chern-Hsiung; Chia, Jean-San

    2010-01-01

    The acid tolerance response (ATR) is one of the major virulence traits of Streptococcus mutans. In this study, the role of GlnR in acid-mediated gene repression that affects the adaptive ATR in S. mutans was investigated. Using a whole-genome microarray and in silico analyses, we demonstrated that GlnR and the GlnR box (ATGTNAN7TNACAT) were involved in the transcriptional repression of clusters of genes encoding proteins involved in glutamine and glutamate metabolism under acidic challenge. Reverse transcription-PCR (RT-PCR) analysis revealed that the coordinated regulation of the GlnR regulon occurred 5 min after acid treatment and that prolonged acid exposure (30 min) resulted in further reduction in expression. A lower level but consistent reduction in response to acidic pH was also observed in chemostat-grown cells, confirming the negative regulation of GlnR. The repression by GlnR through the GlnR box in response to acidic pH was further confirmed in the citBZC operon, containing genes encoding the first three enzymes in the glutamine/glutamate biosynthesis pathway. The survival rate of the GlnR-deficient mutant at pH 2.8 was more than 10-fold lower than that in the wild-type strain 45 min after acid treatment, suggesting that the GlnR regulon participates in S. mutans ATR. It is hypothesized that downregulation of the synthesis of the amino acid precursors in response to acid challenge would promote citrate metabolism to pyruvate, with the consumption of H+ and potential ATP synthesis. Such regulation will ensure an optimal acid adaption in S. mutans. PMID:20173059

  10. Increased glutamate and homocysteine and decreased glutamine levels in autism: a review and strategies for future studies of amino acids in autism.

    PubMed

    Ghanizadeh, Ahmad

    2013-01-01

    There are many reports about the significant roles of some amino acids in neurobiology and treatment of autism. This is a critical review of amino acids levels in autism. No published review article about the level of amino acids in autism was found. The levels of glutamate and homocystein are increased in autism while the levels of glutamine and tryptophan are decreased. Findings regarding the plasma levels of taurine and lysine are controversial. The urinary levels of homocysteine and essential amino acids in both the untreated and treated autistic children are significantly less than those in the controls. The current literature suffers from many methodological shortcomings which needed to be considered in future studies. Some of them are age, gender, developmental level, autism symptoms severity, type of autism spectrum disorders, medical comorbidities, intelligent quotient, diet, concomitant medications, body mass index, and technical method of assessment of amino acids. PMID:24167375

  11. The metabolism of 5-methyltetrahydropteroyl-L-glutamic acid and its oxidation products in the rat.

    PubMed Central

    Kennelly, J C; Blair, J A; Pheasant, A E

    1982-01-01

    Folate metabolism in the rat was investigated using radiolabelled 5-methyltetrahydropteroylglutamate (5-CH3-H4PteGlu) and its oxidation products. 5-CH3-H4PteGlu is absorbed completely from the intestine, although in some preparations it is an equimolecular mixture of C-6 epimers, only one of which is naturally present in biological systems. The methyl group is incorporated into non-folate compounds, including methionine and creatine. No evidence was observed for the oxidation of the methyl group of 5-CH3-H4PteGlu to form other folate types. The tetrahydrofolate moiety of 5-CH3-H4PteGlu is metabolized in a similar manner to folic acid, forming formyl folates and tissue polyglutamates, and is catabolized by scission. The triazine oxidation product of 5-CH3-H4PteGlu is not metabolized by the rat or its gut microflora. 5-Methyl-5,6-dihydropteroylglutamate, however, is assimilated into the folate pool, but is substantially broken down by passage through the gut. The possible implication of this in scorbutic diets is discussed. PMID:7150248

  12. Improved poly-γ-glutamic acid production in Bacillus amyloliquefaciens by modular pathway engineering.

    PubMed

    Feng, Jun; Gu, Yanyan; Quan, Yufen; Cao, Mingfeng; Gao, Weixia; Zhang, Wei; Wang, Shufang; Yang, Chao; Song, Cunjiang

    2015-11-01

    A Bacillus amyloliquefaciens strain with enhanced γ-PGA production was constructed by metabolically engineering its γ-PGA synthesis-related metabolic networks: by-products synthesis, γ-PGA degradation, glutamate precursor synthesis, γ-PGA synthesis and autoinducer synthesis. The genes involved in by-products synthesis were firstly deleted from the starting NK-1 strain. The obtained NK-E7 strain with deletions of the epsA-O (responsible for extracellular polysaccharide synthesis), sac (responsible for levan synthesis), lps (responsible for lipopolysaccharide synthesis) and pta (encoding phosphotransacetylase) genes, showed increased γ-PGA purity and slight increase of γ-PGA titer from 3.8 to 4.15 g/L. The γ-PGA degrading genes pgdS (encoding poly-gamma-glutamate depolymerase) and cwlO (encoding cell wall hydrolase) were further deleted. The obtained NK-E10 strain showed further increased γ-PGA production from 4.15 to 9.18 g/L. The autoinducer AI-2 synthetase gene luxS was deleted in NK-E10 strain and the resulting NK-E11 strain showed comparable γ-PGA titer to NK-E10 (from 9.18 to 9.54 g/L). In addition, we overexpressed the pgsBCA genes (encoding γ-PGA synthetase) in NK-E11 strain; however, the overexpression of these genes led to a decrease in γ-PGA production. Finally, the rocG gene (encoding glutamate dehydrogenase) and the glnA gene (glutamine synthetase) were repressed by the expression of synthetic small regulatory RNAs in NK-E11 strain. The rocG-repressed NK-anti-rocG strain exhibited the highest γ-PGA titer (11.04 g/L), which was 2.91-fold higher than that of the NK-1 strain. Fed-batch cultivation of the NK-anti-rocG strain resulted in a final γ-PGA titer of 20.3g/L, which was 5.34-fold higher than that of the NK-1 strain in shaking flasks. This work is the first report of a systematically metabolic engineering approach that significantly enhanced γ-PGA production in a B. amyloliquefaciens strain. The engineering strategies explored here are

  13. Long-term depression of glutamate-induced gamma-aminobutyric acid release in cerebellum by insulin-like growth factor I.

    PubMed Central

    Castro-Alamancos, M A; Torres-Aleman, I

    1993-01-01

    We tested the possibility that insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I) acts as a neuromodulator in the adult cerebellar cortex since previous observations indicated that IGF-I is located in the olivo-cerebellar system encompassing the inferior olive and Purkinje cells. We found that conjoint administration of IGF-I and glutamate through a microdialysis probe stereotaxically implanted into the cerebellar cortex and deep cerebellar nuclei greatly depressed the release of gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA), which normally follows a glutamate pulse. This inhibition was dose-dependent and long-lasting. Moreover, the effect was specific for glutamate since KCl-induced GABA release was not modified by IGF-I. Basic fibroblast growth factor, another growth-related peptide present in the cerebellum, did not alter the response of GABA to glutamate stimulation. In addition, electrical stimulation of the inferior olivary complex significantly raised IGF-I levels in the cerebellar cortex. Interestingly, when the inferior olive was stimulated in conjunction with glutamate administration, GABA release by cerebellar cells in response to subsequent glutamate pulses was depressed in a manner reminiscent of that seen after IGF-I. These findings indicate that IGF-I produces a long-lasting depression of GABA release by Purkinje cells in response to glutamate. IGF-I might be present in climbing fiber terminals and/or cells within the cerebellar cortex and thereby might affect Purkinje cell function. Whether this IGF-I-induced impairment of glutamate stimulation of Purkinje cells underlies functionally plastic processes such as long-term depression is open to question. Images Fig. 1 PMID:8346260

  14. Improving survival of probiotic bacteria using bacterial poly-γ-glutamic acid.

    PubMed

    Bhat, A R; Irorere, V U; Bartlett, T; Hill, D; Kedia, G; Charalampopoulos, D; Nualkaekul, S; Radecka, I

    2015-03-01

    A major hurdle in producing a useful probiotic food product is bacterial survival during storage and ingestion. The aim of this study was to test the effect of γ-PGA immobilisation on the survival of probiotic bacteria when stored in acidic fruit juice. Fruit juices provide an alternative means of probiotic delivery, especially to lactose intolerant individuals. In addition, the survival of γ-PGA-immobilised cells in simulated gastric juice was also assessed. Bifidobacteria strains (Bifidobacteria longum, Bifidobacteria breve), immobilised on 2.5% γ-PGA, survived significantly better (P<0.05) in orange and pomegranate juice for 39 and 11 days respectively, compared to free cells. However, cells survived significantly better (P<0.05) when stored in orange juice compared to pomegranate juice. Moreover, both strains, when protected with 2.5% γ-PGA, survived in simulated gastric juice (pH2.0) with a marginal reduction (<0.47 log CFU/ml) or no significant reduction in viable cells after 4h, whereas free cells died within 2h. In conclusion, this research indicates that γ-PGA can be used to protect Bifidobacteria cells in fruit juice, and could also help improve the survival of cells as they pass through the harsh conditions of the gastrointestinal tract (GIT). Following our previous report on the use of γ-PGA as a cryoprotectant for probiotic bacteria, this research further suggests that γ-PGA could be used to improve probiotic survival during the various stages of preparation, storage and ingestion of probiotic cells. PMID:25506798

  15. Upregulation of capacity for glutathione synthesis in response to amino acid deprivation: regulation of glutamate-cysteine ligase subunits.

    PubMed

    Sikalidis, Angelos K; Mazor, Kevin M; Lee, Jeong-In; Roman, Heather B; Hirschberger, Lawrence L; Stipanuk, Martha H

    2014-05-01

    Using HepG2/C3A cells and MEFs, we investigated whether induction of GSH synthesis in response to sulfur amino acid deficiency is mediated by the decrease in cysteine levels or whether it requires a decrease in GSH levels per se. Both the glutamate-cysteine ligase catalytic (GCLC) and modifier (GCLM) subunit mRNA levels were upregulated in response to a lack of cysteine or other essential amino acids, independent of GSH levels. This upregulation did not occur in MEFs lacking GCN2 (general control non-derepressible 2, also known as eIF2α kinase 4) or in cells expressing mutant eIF2α lacking the eIF2α kinase Ser(51) phosphorylation site, indicating that expression of both GCLC and GCLM was mediated by the GCN2/ATF4 stress response pathway. Only the increase in GCLM mRNA level, however, was accompanied by a parallel increase in protein expression, suggesting that the enhanced capacity for GSH synthesis depended largely on increased association of GCLC with its regulatory subunit. Upregulation of both GCLC and GLCM mRNA levels in response to cysteine deprivation was dependent on new protein synthesis, which is consistent with expression of GCLC and GCLM being mediated by proteins whose synthesis depends on activation of the GCN2/ATF4 pathway. Our data suggest that the regulation of GCLC expression may be mediated by changes in the abundance of transcriptional regulators, whereas the regulation of GCLM expression may be mediated by changes in the abundance of mRNA stabilizing or destabilizing proteins. Upregulation of GCLM levels in response to low cysteine levels may serve to protect the cell in the face of a future stress requiring GSH as an antioxidant or conjugating/detoxifying agent. PMID:24557597

  16. Hair dye-incorporated poly-γ-glutamic acid/glycol chitosan nanoparticles based on ion-complex formation

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hye-Young; Jeong, Young-IL; Choi, Ki-Choon

    2011-01-01

    Background p-Phenylenediamine (PDA) or its related chemicals are used more extensively than oxidative hair dyes. However, permanent hair dyes such as PDA are known to have potent contact allergy reactions in humans, and severe allergic reactions are problematic. Methods PDA-incorporated nanoparticles were prepared based on ion-complex formation between the cationic groups of PDA and the anionic groups of poly(γ-glutamic acid) (PGA). To reinforce PDA/PGA ion complexes, glycol chitosan (GC) was added. PDA-incorporated nanoparticles were characterized using field-emission scanning electron microscopy, Fourier- transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy, dynamic light scattering, and powder X-ray diffractometry (XRD). Results Nanoparticles were formed by ion-complex formation between the amine groups of PDA and the carboxyl groups of PGA. PDA-incorporated nanoparticles are small in size (<100 nm), and morphological observations showed spherical shapes. FT-IR spectra results showed that the carboxylic acid peak of PGA decreased with increasing PDA content, indicating that the ion complexes were formed between the carboxyl groups of PGA and the amine groups of PDA. Furthermore, the intrinsic peak of the carboxyl groups of PGA was also decreased by the addition of GC. Intrinsic crystalline peaks of PDA were observed by XRD. This crystalline peak of PDA was completely nonexistent when nanoparticles were formed by ion complex between PDA, PGA, and GC, indicating that PDA was complexed with PGA and no free drug existed in the formulation. During the drug-release experiment, an initial burst release of PDA was observed, and then PDA was continuously released over 1 week. Cytotoxicity testing against HaCaT human skin keratinocyte cells showed PDA-incorporated nanoparticles had lower toxicity than PDA itself. Furthermore, PDA-incorporated nanoparticles showed reduced apoptosis and necrosis reaction at HaCaT cells. Conclusion The authors suggest that these microparticles are ideal

  17. Islet glutamic acid decarboxylase modified by reactive oxygen species is recognized by antibodies from patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Trigwell, S M; Radford, P M; Page, S R; Loweth, A C; James, R F L; Morgan, N G; Todd, I

    2001-01-01

    The generation of an autoimmune response against islet beta-cells is central to the pathogenesis of type 1 diabetes mellitus, and this response is driven by the stimulation of autoreactive lymphocytes by components of the beta-cells themselves. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) have been implicated in the beta-cell destruction which leads to type 1 diabetes and may modify beta-cell components so as to enhance their immunogenicity. We investigated the effects of oxidation reactions catalysed by copper or iron on the major beta-cell autoantigen glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD). Lysates of purified rat islets were exposed to copper or iron sulphate with or without hydrogen peroxide or ascorbic acid. Immunostaining showed that these treatments generated high molecular weight covalently linked aggregates containing GAD. These are not formed by intermolecular disulphide bonds between cysteine residues since they cannot be resolved into monomeric form when electrophoresed under extreme reducing conditions. There was no modification of insulin or pro-insulin by ROS. The same oxidative changes to GAD could be induced in viable islet cells treated with copper sulphate and hydrogen peroxide, and thus the modifications are not an artefact of the catalysed oxidation of cell-free lysates. Sera from patients with type 1 diabetes and stiffman syndrome containing GAD antibodies reacted predominantly with the highest molecular weight modified protein band of GAD: normal human sera did not precipitate GAD. Thus, oxidatively modified aggregates of GAD react with serum antibodies of type 1 diabetes patients and some SMS patients: this is consistent with oxidative modifications of autoantigens being relevant to the pathogenesis of type 1 diabetes. PMID:11703367

  18. Islet glutamic acid decarboxylase modified by reactive oxygen species is recognized by antibodies from patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Trigwell, S M; Radford, P M; Page, S R; Loweth, A C; James, R F; Morgan, N G; Todd, I

    2001-11-01

    The generation of an autoimmune response against islet beta-cells is central to the pathogenesis of type 1 diabetes mellitus, and this response is driven by the stimulation of autoreactive lymphocytes by components of the beta-cells themselves. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) have been implicated in the beta-cell destruction which leads to type 1 diabetes and may modify beta-cell components so as to enhance their immunogenicity. We investigated the effects of oxidation reactions catalysed by copper or iron on the major beta-cell autoantigen glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD). Lysates of purified rat islets were exposed to copper or iron sulphate with or without hydrogen peroxide or ascorbic acid. Immunostaining showed that these treatments generated high molecular weight covalently linked aggregates containing GAD. These are not formed by intermolecular disulphide bonds between cysteine residues since they cannot be resolved into monomeric form when electrophoresed under extreme reducing conditions. There was no modification of insulin or pro-insulin by ROS. The same oxidative changes to GAD could be induced in viable islet cells treated with copper sulphate and hydrogen peroxide, and thus the modifications are not an artefact of the catalysed oxidation of cell-free lysates. Sera from patients with type 1 diabetes and stiffman syndrome containing GAD antibodies reacted predominantly with the highest molecular weight modified protein band of GAD: normal human sera did not precipitate GAD. Thus, oxidatively modified aggregates of GAD react with serum antibodies of type 1 diabetes patients and some SMS patients: this is consistent with oxidative modifications of autoantigens being relevant to the pathogenesis of type 1 diabetes. PMID:11703367

  19. Interaction of mechanisms involving epoxyeicosatrienoic acids, adenosine receptors, and metabotropic glutamate receptors in neurovascular coupling in rat whisker barrel cortex

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Yanrong; Liu, Xiaoguang; Gebremedhin, Debebe; Falck, John R; Harder, David R; Koehler, Raymond C

    2008-01-01

    Adenosine, astrocyte metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluRs), and epoxyeicosatrienoic acids (EETs) have been implicated in neurovascular coupling. Although A2A and A2B receptors mediate cerebral vasodilation to adenosine, the role of each receptor in the cerebral blood flow (CBF) response to neural activation remains to be fully elucidated. In addition, adenosine can amplify astrocyte calcium, which may increase arachidonic acid metabolites such as EETs. The interaction of these pathways was investigated by determining if combined treatment with antagonists exerted an additive inhibitory effect on the CBF response. During whisker stimulation of anesthetized rats, the increase in cortical CBF was reduced by approximately half after individual administration of A2B, mGluR and EET antagonists and EET synthesis inhibitors. Combining treatment of either a mGluR antagonist, an EET antagonist, or an EET synthesis inhibitor with an A2B receptor antagonist did not produce an additional decrement in the CBF response. Likewise, the CBF response also remained reduced by ~50% when an EET antagonist was combined with an mGluR antagonist or an mGluR antagonist plus an A2B receptor antagonist. In contrast, A2A and A3 receptor antagonists had no effect on the CBF response to whisker stimulation. We conclude that (1) adenosine A2B receptors, rather than A2A or A3 receptors, play a significant role in coupling cortical CBF to neuronal activity, and (2) the adenosine A2B receptor, mGluR, and EETs signaling pathways are not functionally additive, consistent with the possibility of astrocytic mGluR and adenosine A2B receptor linkage to the synthesis and release of vasodilatory EETs. PMID:17519974

  20. Upregulation of capacity for glutathione synthesis in response to amino acid deprivation: regulation of glutamate-cysteine ligase subunits

    PubMed Central

    Sikalidis, Angelos K.; Mazor, Kevin M.; Lee, Jeong-In; Roman, Heather B.; Hirschberger, Lawrence L.; Stipanuk, Martha H.

    2014-01-01

    Using HepG2/C3A cells and MEFs, we investigated whether induction of GSH synthesis in response to sulfur amino acid deficiency is mediated by the decrease in cysteine levels or whether it requires a decrease in GSH levels per se. Both the glutamate-cysteine ligase catalytic (GCLC) and modifier (GCLM) subunit mRNA levels were upregulated in response to a lack of cysteine or other essential amino acids, independent of GSH levels. This upregulation did not occur in MEFs lacking GCN2 (general control non-derepressible 2, also known as eIF2α kinase 4) or in cells expressing mutant eIF2α lacking the eIF2α kinase Ser51 phosphorylation site, indicating that expression of both GCLC and GCLM was mediated by the GCN2/ATF4 stress response pathway. Only the increase in GCLM mRNA level, however, was accompanied by a parallel increase in protein expression, suggesting that the enhanced capacity for GSH synthesis depended largely on increased association of GCLC with its regulatory subunit. Upregulation of both GCLC and GLCM mRNA levels in response to cysteine deprivation was dependent on new protein synthesis, which is consistent with expression of GCLC and GCLM being mediated by proteins whose synthesis depends on activation of the GCN2/ATF4 pathway. Our data suggest that the regulation of GCLC expression may be mediated by changes in the abundance of transcriptional regulators, whereas the regulation of GCLM expression may be mediated by changes in the abundance of mRNA stabilizing or destabilizing proteins. Upregulation of GCLM levels in response to low cysteine levels may serve to protect the cell in the face of a future stress requiring GSH as an antioxidant or conjugating/detoxifying agent. PMID:24557597

  1. In-capillary derivatization with o-phthalaldehyde in the presence of 3-mercaptopropionic acid for the simultaneous determination of monosodium glutamate, benzoic acid, and sorbic acid in food samples via capillary electrophoresis with ultraviolet detection.

    PubMed

    Aung, Hnin-Pwint; Pyell, Ute

    2016-06-01

    For the rapid simultaneous determination of monosodium glutamate (MSG), benzoic acid (BA), and sorbic acid (SA) in canned food and other processed food samples, we developed a method that combines in-capillary derivatization with separation by capillary electrophoresis. This method employs the rapid derivatization of MSG with o-phthalaldehyde (OPA) in the presence of 3-mercaptopropionic acid (3-MPA) and enables the detection of the resulting OPA-MSG derivative and of non-derivatized BA and SA at 230nm. The composition of the background electrolyte and the parameters of derivatization and separation are as follows: 25mM borax containing 5mM OPA and 6mM 3-MPA, separation voltage 25mV, injection at 30mbar for 20s, and column temperature 25°C. Because of the high reaction rate and suitably adapted effective electrophoretic mobilities, band broadening due to the derivatization reaction at the start of the separation process is kept to a minimum. The optimized method is validated with respect to LOD, LOQ, linearity, recovery, and precision. This method can be applied to real samples such as soy, fish, oyster and sweet and sour chili sauces after application of appropriate clean-up steps. Mechanisms of zone broadening and zone focusing are discussed showing the validity of the employed theoretical approach regarding the dependence of the peak shape for OPA-MSG on the concentration of MSG in the sample. PMID:27156753

  2. Frontal Glutamate and γ-Aminobutyric Acid Levels and Their Associations With Mismatch Negativity and Digit Sequencing Task Performance in Schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Rowland, Laura M.; Summerfelt, Ann; Wijtenburg, S. Andrea; Du, Xiaoming; Chiappelli, Joshua J.; Krishna, Nithin; West, Jeffrey; Muellerklein, Florian; Kochunov, Peter; Hong, L. Elliot

    2016-01-01

    IMPORTANCE Auditory mismatch negativity (MMN) is a biomarker for schizophrenia thought to reflect glutamatergic N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor function and excitatory-inhibitory neurotransmission balance. However, the association of glutamate level with MMN has not been directly examined in patients with schizophrenia, to our knowledge. OBJECTIVE To investigate the contributions of glutamate and γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) to MMN and digit sequencing task (DST) performance, an assessment of verbal working memory, in schizophrenia. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS Fifty-three control participants from the community and 45 persons with schizophrenia from outpatient clinics completed an electroencephalographic session for MMN, magnetic resonance spectroscopy for glutamate and GABA, and a DST. The study dates were July 2011 to May 2014, and the dates of our analysis were May 2014 to August 2015. MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES Glutamate, GABA, the ratio of glutamine to glutamate, MMN amplitude, and DST. Structural equation modeling was used to test the effects of neurochemistry and MMN amplitude on DST performance. RESULTS The 45 persons with schizophrenia were a mean (SD) of 37.7 (12.8) years and the control participants were 37.1 (13.1) years. The schizophrenia group had a mean (SD) of 14.7 (12.1) years of illness. Mismatch negativity amplitude (F = 4.39, P = .04) and glutamate (F = 9.69, P = .002) were reduced in the schizophrenia group. Smaller MMN amplitude was significantly associated with lower GABA level (P = .008), lower glutamate level (P = .05), and higher ratio of glutamine to glutamate (P = .003). Reduced MMN amplitude was linked to poor verbal working memory in schizophrenia (P = .002). Modeling revealed that a proxy of glutamatergic function, indexed by the ratio of glutamine to glutamate, influenced a path from the ratio of glutamine to glutamate to MMN to verbal working memory (P = .38 [root-mean-square error of approximation, P < .001] by χ2 test

  3. Removal kinetics of antibodies against glutamic acid decarboxylase by various plasmapheresis modalities in the treatment of neurological disorders.

    PubMed

    Ohkubo, Atsushi; Okado, Tomokazu; Kurashima, Naoki; Maeda, Takuma; Miyamoto, Satoko; Nakamura, Ayako; Seshima, Hiroshi; Iimori, Soichiro; Sohara, Eisei; Uchida, Shinichi; Rai, Tatemitsu

    2014-06-01

    Plasmapheresis is one of the acute treatment modalities for neurological disorders associated with antibodies against glutamic acid decarboxylase (anti-GAD). However, there is little information about the removal kinetics of anti-GAD by various plasmapheresis modalities. Here, we investigated the removal rate of anti-GAD and fibrinogen (Fib) by immunoadsorption (IA), plasma exchange using a conventional plasma separator (OP-PE), and plasma exchange using a high cut-off selective membrane plasma separator (EC-PE) in two cases of anti-GAD-associated neurological diseases. In case 1, IA and OP-PE were used, and the percent reductions were as follows: anti-GAD: 38.2% and 69.1% and Fib: 67.7% and 68.2%, respectively. In case 2, OP-PE and EC-PE were used, and the percent reductions were as follows: anti-GAD: 65.8% and 48.5% and Fib: 68.5% and 19.8%, respectively. OP-PE could remove anti-GAD more efficiently than IA. Further, EC-PE could maintain coagulation factors such as Fib better than IA and OP-PE. It is important to select the appropriate plasmapheresis modality on the basis of the removal kinetics. PMID:24965288

  4. In vitro evaluation of new functional properties of poly-γ-glutamic acid produced by Bacillus subtilis D7

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Na-Ri; Go, Tae-Hun; Lee, Sang-Mee; Jeong, Seong-Yun; Park, Geun-Tae; Hong, Chang-Oh; Son, Hong-Joo

    2013-01-01

    We investigated the functionality of poly-γ-glutamic acid (γ-PGA), which is produced by Bacillus subtilis D7, for its potential applications in medicine and cosmetics. The γ-PGA had angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibition activity. ACE inhibition activity was dependent on the γ-PGA concentration; the highest ACE inhibition activity was observed at 1.25 mg/l of γ-PGA. IC50 (0.108 mg/ml) of the γ-PGA was lower than that of standard ACE inhibitory drug, N-[(S)-mercapto-2-methylpropionyl]-L-proline (0.247 mg/ml). The γ-PGA also had water-holding capacity and hygroscopicity. Furthermore, the γ-PGA inhibited growth of some pathogenic bacteria, including Listeria monocytogenes, Salmonella typhimurium, Staphylococcus aureus, Klebsiella pneumonia and Esherichia coli. The γ-PGA exhibited a good metal adsorption capacity; Cr (VI) adsorption capacity of γ-PGA increased with decreasing pH, and the maximal adsorption was observed at pH 2. Our results suggest that γ-PGA may be expected to be widely applied in cosmetics, biomedical and environmental industries with the feature of being less harmful to humans and the environment. PMID:24600308

  5. IGF2BP2 Alternative Variants Associated with Glutamic Acid Decarboxylase Antibodies Negative Diabetes in Malaysian Subjects

    PubMed Central

    Salem, Sameer D.; Saif-Ali, Riyadh; Ismail, Ikram S.; Al-Hamodi, Zaid; Poh, Rozaida; Muniandy, Sekaran

    2012-01-01

    Background The association of Insulin-like growth factor 2 mRNA-binding protein 2 (IGF2BP2) common variants (rs4402960 and rs1470579) with type 2 diabetes (T2D) has been performed in different populations. The aim of this study was to evaluate the association of alternative variants of IGF2BP2; rs6777038, rs16860234 and rs7651090 with glutamic acid decarboxylase antibodies (GADA) negative diabetes in Malaysian Subjects. Methods/Principal Findings IGF2BP2; rs6777038, rs16860234 and rs7651090 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were genotyped in 1107 GADA negative diabetic patients and 620 control subjects of Asian from Malaysia. The additive genetic model adjusted for age, race, gender and BMI showed that alternative variants; rs6777038, rs16860234 and rs7651090 of IGF2BP2 associated with GADA negative diabetes (OR = 1.21; 1.36; 1.35, P = 0.03; 0.0004; 0.0002, respectively). In addition, the CCG haplotype and diplotype CCG-TCG increased the risk of diabetes (OR = 1.51, P = 0.01; OR = 2.36, P = 0.009, respectively). Conclusions/Significance IGF2BP2 alternative variants were associated with GADA negative diabetes. The IGF2BP2 haplotypes and diplotypes increased the risk of diabetes in Malaysian subject. PMID:23029108

  6. Densities of L-Glutamic Acid HCl Drug in Aqueous NaCl and KCl Solutions at Different Temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryshetti, Suresh; Raghuram, Noothi; Rani, Emmadi Jayanthi; Tangeda, Savitha Jyostna

    2016-04-01

    Densities (ρ ) of (0.01 to 0.07) {mol}{\\cdot } {kg}^{-1} L-Glutamic acid HCl (L-HCl) drug in water, and in aqueous NaCl and KCl (0.5 and 1.0) {mol}{\\cdot } {kg}^{-1} solutions have been reported as a function of temperature at T = (298.15, 303.15, 308.15, and 313.15) K and atmospheric pressure. The accurate density (ρ ) values are used to estimate the various parameters such as the apparent molar volume (V_{2,{\\upphi }}), the partial molar volume (V2^{∞}), the isobaric thermal expansion coefficient (α 2), the partial molar expansion (E2^{∞}), and Hepler's constant (partial 2V2^{∞}/partial T2)P. The Cosphere overlap model is used to understand the solute-solvent interactions in a ternary mixture (L-HCl drug + NaCl or KCl + water). Hepler's constant (partial 2V2^{∞}/partial T2)_P is utilized to interpret the structure-making or -breaking ability of L-HCl drug in aqueous NaCl and KCl solutions, and the results are inferred that L-HCl drug acts as a structure maker, i.e., kosmotrope in aqueous NaCl solutions and performs as a structure breaker, i.e., chaotrope in aqueous KCl solutions.

  7. Activators of the Glutamate-Dependent Acid Resistance System Alleviate Deleterious Effects of YidC Depletion in Escherichia coli▿

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Zhong; Bekker, Martijn; Tramonti, Angela; Cook, Gregory M.; van Ulsen, Peter; Scheffers, Dirk-Jan; de Mattos, Joost Teixeira; De Biase, Daniela; Luirink, Joen

    2011-01-01

    The function of the essential inner membrane protein (IMP) YidC in Escherichia coli has been studied for a limited number of model IMPs and primarily using targeted approaches. These studies suggested that YidC acts at the level of insertion, folding, and quality control of IMPs, both in the context of the Sec translocon and as a separate entity. To further our understanding of YidC's role in IMP biogenesis, we screened a random overexpression library for factors that rescued the growth of cells upon YidC depletion. We found that the overexpression of the GadX and GadY regulators of the glutamate-dependent acid resistance system complemented the growth defect of YidC-depleted cells. Evidence is presented that GadXY overexpression counteracts the deleterious effects of YidC depletion on at least two fronts. First, GadXY prepares the cells for the decrease in respiratory capacity upon the depletion of YidC. Most likely, GadXY-regulated processes reduce the drop in proton-motive force that impairs the fitness of YidC-depleted cells. Second, in GadXY-overproducing cells increased levels of the general chaperone GroEL cofractionate with the inner membranes, which may help to keep newly synthesized inner membrane proteins in an insertion-competent state when YidC levels are limiting. PMID:21216990

  8. Improvement of poly-γ-glutamic acid biosynthesis in a moving bed biofilm reactor by Bacillus subtilis NX-2.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Yongxiang; Tang, Bao; Xu, Zongqi; Liu, Kun; Xu, Zheng; Feng, Xiaohai; Xu, Hong

    2016-10-01

    The production of poly-γ-glutamic acid (γ-PGA) by Bacillus subtilis NX-2 using a moving bed biofilm reactor (MBBR) system was tested for the first time in this study. Polypropylene TL-2 was chosen as a suitable carrier, and γ-PGA concentration of 42.7±0.86g/L and productivity of 0.59±0.06g/(Lh) were obtained in batch fermentation. After application of the strategy of dissolved oxygen (DO)-stat feeding, higher γ-PGA concentration and productivity were achieved than with glucose feedback feeding. Finally, the repeated fed-batch cultures implemented in the MBBR system showed high stability, and the maximal γ-PGA concentration and productivity of 74.2g/L and 1.24g/(Lh) were achieved, respectively. In addition, the promotion of oxygen transfer by an MBBR carrier was well explained by a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulation. These results suggest that an MBBR system could be applied to large-scale γ-PGA production. PMID:27376835

  9. The apparent absence of involvement of biotin in the vitamin K-dependent carboxylation of glutamic acid residues of proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Friedman, P A; Shia, M A

    1977-01-01

    The mechanism of the vitamin K-dependent post-translational carboxylation of the gamma-carbon atom of glutamic acid residues in proteins remains obscure. Experiments were performed in vivo and in vitro in an attempt to establish a role for biotin in the transfer of the carboxyl group. Weanling male rats were fed on a biotin-deficient diet until severe biotin deficiency was induced. Their degree of biotin deficiency was documented by assaying for liver acetyl-CoA carboxylase activity, which was about 15% of normal. However, one-stage and two-stage prothrombin times measured on the plasmas were normal. In addition, the liver microsomal fraction did not contain any more prothrombin precursor than did that of normal rat liver. Experiments were done in vitro in which vitamin K-dependent fixing of 14CO2 was measured in the liver microsomal fraction from vitamin K-deficient male rats in the presence or absence of avidin. No evidence for an avidin-sensitive critical biotin-containing site was obtained. Thus neither series of experiments suggests a role for biotin; the data are compatible with carboxyl transfer occurring either through a carboxylated vitamin K intermediate; or via a yet to be identified intermediate, or perhaps via CO2 itself. PMID:17395

  10. Intracellular traffic of the lysine and glutamic acid rich protein KERP1 reveals features of endomembrane organization in Entamoeba histolytica.

    PubMed

    Perdomo, Doranda; Manich, Maria; Syan, Sylvie; Olivo-Marin, Jean-Christophe; Dufour, Alexandre C; Guillén, Nancy

    2016-08-01

    The development of amoebiasis is influenced by the expression of the lysine and glutamic acid rich protein 1 (KERP1), a virulence factor involved in Entamoeba histolytica adherence to human cells. Up to date, it is unknown how the protein transits the parasite cytoplasm towards the plasma membrane, specially because this organism lacks a well-defined endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and Golgi apparatus. In this work we demonstrate that KERP1 is present at the cell surface and in intracellular vesicles which traffic in a pathway that is independent of the ER-Golgi anterograde transport. The intracellular displacement of vesicles enriched in KERP1 relies on the actin-rich cytoskeleton activities. KERP1 is also present in externalized vesicles deposited on the surface of human cells. We further report the interactome of KERP1 with its association to endomembrane components and lipids. The model for KERP1 traffic here proposed hints for the first time elements of the endocytic and exocytic paths of E. histolytica. PMID:26857352

  11. Actin depolymerization under force is governed by lysine 113:glutamic acid 195-mediated catch-slip bonds.

    PubMed

    Lee, Cho-yin; Lou, Jizhong; Wen, Kuo-kuang; McKane, Melissa; Eskin, Suzanne G; Ono, Shoichiro; Chien, Shu; Rubenstein, Peter A; Zhu, Cheng; McIntire, Larry V

    2013-03-26

    As a key element in the cytoskeleton, actin filaments are highly dynamic structures that constantly sustain forces. However, the fundamental question of how force regulates actin dynamics is unclear. Using atomic force microscopy force-clamp experiments, we show that tensile force regulates G-actin/G-actin and G-actin/F-actin dissociation kinetics by prolonging bond lifetimes (catch bonds) at a low force range and by shortening bond lifetimes (slip bonds) beyond a threshold. Steered molecular dynamics simulations reveal force-induced formation of new interactions that include a lysine 113(K113):glutamic acid 195 (E195) salt bridge between actin subunits, thus suggesting a molecular basis for actin catch-slip bonds. This structural mechanism is supported by the suppression of the catch bonds by the single-residue replacements K113 to serine (K113S) and E195 to serine (E195S) on yeast actin. These results demonstrate and provide a structural explanation for actin catch-slip bonds, which may provide a mechanoregulatory mechanism to control cell functions by regulating the depolymerization kinetics of force-bearing actin filaments throughout the cytoskeleton. PMID:23460697

  12. Molecularly imprinted nanohybrids based on dopamine-modified poly(γ-glutamic acid) for electrochemical sensing of melamine.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Rongli; Xu, Sheng; Zhu, Ye; Zhao, Wei; Luo, Jing; Liu, Xiaoya; Tang, Dingxing

    2016-11-15

    A voltammetric sensor for melamine (MEL) was prepared from molecularly imprinted nanohybrids (MINBs). A dopamine modified poly-γ-glutamic acid copolymer (γ-PGA-DA) and MEL were self-assembled into MEL/γ-PGA-DA nanoparticles (NPs) in aqueous solution via weak interactions, followed by adding an aqueous AgNO3 solution into the mixture. The Ag(+) was adsorbed in the MEL/γ-PGA-DA NPs and spontaneously reduced to Ag NPs by the dopamine moieties of γ-PGA-DA, forming Ag/MEL/γ-PGA-DA MINBs, which were then cast on a gold electrode to form a MINBs film. The MEL was removed by electrolysis via catalysis of Ag NPs at a constant potential of 1.4V in phosphate buffer saline solution, to obtain a voltammetric sensor for MEL. The sensor responded linearly to MEL in the concentration range of 5×10(-18) to 5×10(-7)molL(-1). Compared to other published molecularly imprinted polymer sensors for sensing MEL, the prepared MINBs sensor had much wider detection range with lower detection limit. PMID:27196255

  13. Highly efficient rice straw utilization for poly-(γ-glutamic acid) production by Bacillus subtilis NX-2.

    PubMed

    Tang, Bao; Lei, Peng; Xu, Zongqi; Jiang, Yongxiang; Xu, Zheng; Liang, Jinfeng; Feng, Xiaohai; Xu, Hong

    2015-10-01

    Lignocellulosic biomass has been identified as an economic and environmental feedstock for future biotechnological production. Here, for the first time, poly-(γ-glutamic acid) (PGA) production by Bacillus subtilis NX-2 using rice straw is investigated. Based on two-stage hydrolysis and characteristic consumption of xylose and glucose by B. subtilis NX-2, a co-fermentation strategy was designed to better accumulate PGA in a 7.5L fermentor by two feeding methods. The maximum cumulative respective PGA production and PGA productivity were 73.0 ± 0.5 g L(-1) and 0.81 g L(-1) h(-1) by the continuous feeding method, with carbon source cost was saved by 84.2% and 42.5% compared with glucose and cane molasse, respectively. These results suggest that rice straw, a type of abundant, low-cost, non-food lignocellulosic feedstock, may be feasibly and efficiently utilized for industrial-scale production of PGA. PMID:26143572

  14. Preparation of starch-poly-glutamic acid graft copolymers by microwave irradiation and the characterization of their properties.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jingyuan; Krietemeyer, Elizabeth F; Finkenstadt, Victoria L; Solaiman, Daniel; Ashby, Richard D; Garcia, Rafael A

    2016-04-20

    Graft copolymers of waxy maize starch and poly-γ-glutamic acid (PGA) were produced in an aqueous solution using microwave irradiation. The microwave reaction conditions were optimized with regard to temperature and pH. The temperature of 180°C and pH7.0 were the best reaction conditions resulting in a PGA graft of 0.45% based on nitrogen analysis. The average graft content and graft efficiency for the starch-PGA graft copolymer prepared at 180°C and pH7.0 were 4.20% and 2.73%, respectively. The starch-PGA graft copolymer produced at 180°C and pH7.0 could absorb more than 20 times its own weight amount of water and form a gel. The preliminary rheology study revealed that the starch-PGA graft copolymer gel exhibited viscoelastic solid behavior while the control sample of waxy starch showed viscoelastic liquid behavior. PMID:26876849

  15. Preparation and affinity identification of glutamic acid-urea small molecule analogs in prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zhiwei; Zhu, Zheng; Yang, Deyong; Fan, Weiwei; Wang, Jianbo; Li, Xiancheng; Chen, Xiaochi; Wang, Qifeng; Song, Xishuang

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, study concerning activity inhibitors of prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA) has been concentrated on the glutamic urea (Glu-urea-R) small molecule and its analogs. The present study aimed to synthesize 4 analogs of Glu-urea-R and identify the affinities of these compounds to PSMA. The compounds were synthesized from raw materials, and the experimental procedures of the present study were in accordance with standard techniques under anhydrous and anaerobic conditions. Glu-urea-Lysine (Glu-urea-Lys), Glu-urea-Ornithine (Glu-urea-Orn), Glu-urea-Glutamine (Glu-urea-Gln) and Glu-urea-Asparagine (Glu-urea-Asn) were successfully synthesized, and their structures were confirmed to be as desired using nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and mass spectrometry. An affinity assay was performed to detect the affinity between the various compounds and PSMA expressed from the prostate cancer LNCap cell line. Glu-urea-Gln had the highest affinity to PSMA, followed by Glu-urea-Asn, Glu-urea-Orn and Glu-urea-Lys. In conclusion, the present study demonstrated that Glu-urea-R specifically binds PSMA expressed in the LNCap cell line and inhibits its activity. PMID:27446384

  16. The Amino Acid Transporter JhI-21 Coevolves with Glutamate Receptors, Impacts NMJ Physiology, and Influences Locomotor Activity in Drosophila Larvae.

    PubMed

    Ziegler, Anna B; Augustin, Hrvoje; Clark, Nathan L; Berthelot-Grosjean, Martine; Simonnet, Mégane M; Steinert, Joern R; Geillon, Flore; Manière, Gérard; Featherstone, David E; Grosjean, Yael

    2016-01-01

    Changes in synaptic physiology underlie neuronal network plasticity and behavioral phenomena, which are adjusted during development. The Drosophila larval glutamatergic neuromuscular junction (NMJ) represents a powerful synaptic model to investigate factors impacting these processes. Amino acids such as glutamate have been shown to regulate Drosophila NMJ physiology by modulating the clustering of postsynaptic glutamate receptors and thereby regulating the strength of signal transmission from the motor neuron to the muscle cell. To identify amino acid transporters impacting glutmatergic signal transmission, we used Evolutionary Rate Covariation (ERC), a recently developed bioinformatic tool. Our screen identified ten proteins co-evolving with NMJ glutamate receptors. We selected one candidate transporter, the SLC7 (Solute Carrier) transporter family member JhI-21 (Juvenile hormone Inducible-21), which is expressed in Drosophila larval motor neurons. We show that JhI-21 suppresses postsynaptic muscle glutamate receptor abundance, and that JhI-21 expression in motor neurons regulates larval crawling behavior in a developmental stage-specific manner. PMID:26805723

  17. The Amino Acid Transporter JhI-21 Coevolves with Glutamate Receptors, Impacts NMJ Physiology, and Influences Locomotor Activity in Drosophila Larvae

    PubMed Central

    Ziegler, Anna B.; Augustin, Hrvoje; Clark, Nathan L.; Berthelot-Grosjean, Martine; Simonnet, Mégane M.; Steinert, Joern R.; Geillon, Flore; Manière, Gérard; Featherstone, David E.; Grosjean, Yael

    2016-01-01

    Changes in synaptic physiology underlie neuronal network plasticity and behavioral phenomena, which are adjusted during development. The Drosophila larval glutamatergic neuromuscular junction (NMJ) represents a powerful synaptic model to investigate factors impacting these processes. Amino acids such as glutamate have been shown to regulate Drosophila NMJ physiology by modulating the clustering of postsynaptic glutamate receptors and thereby regulating the strength of signal transmission from the motor neuron to the muscle cell. To identify amino acid transporters impacting glutmatergic signal transmission, we used Evolutionary Rate Covariation (ERC), a recently developed bioinformatic tool. Our screen identified ten proteins co-evolving with NMJ glutamate receptors. We selected one candidate transporter, the SLC7 (Solute Carrier) transporter family member JhI-21 (Juvenile hormone Inducible-21), which is expressed in Drosophila larval motor neurons. We show that JhI-21 suppresses postsynaptic muscle glutamate receptor abundance, and that JhI-21 expression in motor neurons regulates larval crawling behavior in a developmental stage-specific manner. PMID:26805723

  18. Synthesis of theanine from glutamic acid gamma-methyl ester and ethylamine catalyzed by Escherichia coli having gamma-glutamyltranspeptidase activity.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Fei; Zheng, Qing-Zhong; Jiao, Qing-Cai; Liu, Jun-Zhong; Zhao, Gen-Hai

    2010-08-01

    Glutamic acid gamma-methyl ester (GAME) was used as substrate for theanine synthesis catalyzed by Escherichia coli cells possessing gamma-glutamyltranspeptidase activity. The yield was about 1.2-fold higher than with glutamine as substrate. The reaction was optimal at pH 10 and 45 degrees C, and the optimal substrate ratio of GAME to ethylamine was 1:10 (mol/mol). With GAME at 100 mmol, 95 mmol theanine was obtained after 8 h. PMID:20383735

  19. L-glutamate diethyl ester and deaminated analogues as excitatory amino acid antagonists in rat cerebral cortex.

    PubMed

    Turner, J P; Meldrum, B S

    1991-10-01

    1. The effects of L-glutamate diethyl ester (GDEE) HCl, glutarate diethyl ester (GlrDEE) and glutarate dimethyl ester (GlrDME) on depolarizing responses to alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5- methyl-4-isoxazolepropionate (AMPA), kainate (Kain), N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) and quisqualate (Quis), and spontaneous paroxysmal discharges (SPDs) were examined. Experiments were performed on slices of rat cingulate cortex using the in vitro grease gap recording technique in nominally Mg(2+)-free Krebs medium. 2. GDEE HCl (3-14 mM) caused a concentration-dependent depolarization of the d.c. baseline potential. L-Glutamate (0.1-0.5 mM), HCl (15 mM) and sucrose (30 mM) also depolarized the baseline. GlrDEE (3-12 mM) and GlrDME (4-26 mM) had no consistent effect on baseline potential. 3. GDEE HCl (10 mM) had no effect on depolarizing responses to AMPA, Kain and NMDA, but caused potentiation of those to Quis with a dose-ratio of 0.53 (0.44-0.63) (n = 4). In two other experiments, where the depolarization of the baseline induced by GDEE HCl was large, a depression of Quis response amplitude was observed. 4. GlrDEE (10 mM) antagonized depolarizing responses to Kain, and to a lesser extent NMDA, with dose-ratios of 2.14 (1.92-2.38) and 1.61 (1.39-1.87), respectively. This concentration of GlrDEE had no effect on AMPA responses, but potentiated Quis responses, with a dose-ratio of 0.64 (0.58-0.71). 5. GlrDME (10 mM) antagonized depolarizing responses to Kain and to Quis, with dose-ratios of 1.66 (1.48-1.85) and 1.22 (1.15-1.29), respectively, and had no effect on responses to NMDA. 6. The SPDs were inhibited by GDEE HCI (IC50 6.7 +/- 0.37mM), GlrDEE (IC50 5.6 +/- 0.38 mM) and GlrDME (IC50 10.4 +/- 0.73 mM). 7. In conclusion, there is little evidence that GDEE HCI is an antagonist of the postsynaptic excitatory amino acid receptors in the rat neocortex, and its effects may result from its contamination with Lglutamate and increased osmolarity of the bathing medium at high concentrations. The

  20. The Last C-Terminal Residue of VP3, Glutamic Acid 257, Controls Capsid Assembly of Infectious Bursal Disease Virus

    PubMed Central

    Chevalier, Christophe; Lepault, Jean; Da Costa, Bruno; Delmas, Bernard

    2004-01-01

    Infectious bursal disease virus (IBDV) is a nonenveloped virus with an icosahedral capsid composed of two proteins, VP2 and VP3, that derive from the processing of the polyprotein NH2-pVP2-VP4-VP3-COOH. The virion contains VP1, the viral polymerase, which is both free and covalently linked to the two double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) genomic segments. In this study, the virus assembly process was studied further with the baculovirus expression system. While expression of the wild-type polyprotein was not found to be self-sufficient to give rise to virus-like particles (VLPs), deletion or replacement of the five C-terminal residues of VP3 was observed to promote capsid assembly. Indeed, the single deletion of the C-terminal glutamic acid was sufficient to induce VLP formation. Moreover, fusion of various peptides or small proteins (a green fluorescent protein or a truncated form of ovalbumin) at the C terminus of VP3 also promoted capsid assembly, suggesting that assembly required screening of the negative charges at the C terminus of VP3. The fused polypeptides mimicked the effect of VP1, which interacts with VP3 to promote VLP assembly. The C-terminal segment of VP3 was found to contain two functional domains. While the very last five residues of VP3 mainly controlled both assembly and capsid architecture, the five preceding residues constituted the VP1 (and possibly the pVP2/VP2) binding domain. Finally, we showed that capsid formation is associated with VP2 maturation, demonstrating that the protease VP4 is involved in the virus assembly process. PMID:15016850

  1. Lower Expression of Glutamic Acid Decarboxylase 67 in the Prefrontal Cortex in Schizophrenia: Contribution of Altered Regulation by Zif268

    PubMed Central

    Kimoto, Sohei; Bazmi, H. Holly; Lewis, David A.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Cognitive deficits of schizophrenia may be due at least in part to lower expression of the 67-kDa isoform of glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD67), a key enzyme for GABA synthesis, in the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex of individuals with schizophrenia. However, little is known about the molecular regulation of lower cortical GAD67 levels in schizophrenia. The GAD67 promoter region contains a conserved Zif268 binding site, and Zif268 activation is accompanied by increased GAD67 expression. Thus, altered expression of the immediate early gene Zif268 may contribute to lower levels of GAD67 mRNA in the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex in schizophrenia. Method The authors used polymerase chain reaction to quantify GAD67 and Zif268 mRNA levels in dorsolateral pre-frontal cortex area 9 from 62 matched pairs of schizophrenia and healthy comparison subjects, and in situ hybridization to assess Zif268 expression at laminar and cellular levels of resolution. The effects of potentially confounding variables were assessed in human subjects, and the effects of antipsychotic treatments were tested in antipsychotic-exposed monkeys. The specificity of the Zif268 findings was assessed by quantifying mRNA levels for other immediate early genes. Results GAD67 and Zif268 mRNA levels were significantly lower and were positively correlated in the schizophrenia subjects. Both Zif268 mRNA-positive neuron density and Zif268 mRNA levels per neuron were significantly lower in the schizophrenia subjects. These findings were robust to the effects of the confounding variables examined and differed from other immediate early genes. Conclusions Deficient Zif268 mRNA expression may contribute to lower cortical GAD67 levels in schizophrenia, suggesting a potential mechanistic basis for altered cortical GABA synthesis and impaired cognition in schizophrenia. PMID:24874453

  2. POSTTRANSLATIONAL MODIFICATION OF GLUTAMIC ACID DECARBOXYLASE 67 BY INTERMITTENT HYPOXIA: Evidence for the involvement of dopamine D1 receptor signaling$

    PubMed Central

    Raghuraman, Gayatri; Prabhakar, Nanduri R.; Kumar, Ganesh K.

    2010-01-01

    Intermittent hypoxia (IH) associated with sleep apnea leads to cardio-respiratory morbidities. Previous studies have shown that IH alters the synthesis of neurotransmitters including catecholamines and neuropeptides in brainstem regions associated with regulation of cardio-respiratory functions. GABA, a major inhibitory neurotransmitter in the central nervous system, has been implicated in cardio-respiratory control. GABA synthesis is primarily catalyzed by glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD). Here, we tested the hypothesis that IH like its effect on other transmitters also alters GABA synthesis. The impact of IH on GABA synthesis was investigated in pheochromocytoma 12 (PC12) cells, a neuronal cell line which is known to express active form of GAD67 in the cytosolic fraction and also assessed the underlying mechanisms contributing to IH-evoked response. Exposure of cell cultures to IH decreased GAD67 activity and GABA level. IH-evoked decrease in GAD67 activity was due to increased cAMP - protein kinase A (PKA) - dependent phosphorylation of GAD67, but not as a result of changes in either GAD67 mRNA or protein expression. PKA inhibitor restored GAD67 activity and GABA levels in IH treated cells. PC12 cells express dopamine 1 receptor (D1R), a G-protein coupled receptor whose activation increased adenylyl cyclase (AC) activity. Treatment with either D1R antagonist or AC inhibitor reversed IH-evoked GAD67 inhibition. Silencing D1R expression with siRNA reversed cAMP elevation and GAD67 inhibition by IH. These results provide evidence for the role of D1R-cAMP-PKA signaling in IH mediated inhibition of GAD67 via protein phosphorylation resulting in down regulation of GABA synthesis. PMID:20969567

  3. Protective Effects of Indole-3-Carbinol-Loaded Poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) Nanoparticles Against Glutamate-Induced Neurotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Ji Heun; Kim, Jwa-Jin; Bak, Dong Ho; Yu, Kwang Sik; Lee, Je Hun; Lee, Nam Seob; Jeong, Young Gil; Kim, Do Kyung; Kim, Dong-Kwan; Han, Seung-Yun

    2015-10-01

    Indole-3-carbinol (I3C) has anti-oxidant and anti-inflammatory properties. Nonetheless, the potential of I3C to treat neurodegenerative diseases remains unclear because of its poor ability to penetrate the blood-brain barrier (BBB). Because polymer-based drug delivery systems stabilized by surfactants have been intensively utilized as a strategy to cross the blood-brain barrier, we prepared I3C-loaded poly(D,L-lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) nanoparticles (NPs) that were stabilized by Tween 80 (T80) (I3C-PLGA-T80-NPs) and examined their neuroprotective potential in vitro. We prepared I3C-PLGA-T80-NPs with an oil-in-water (o/w) emulsion solvent evaporation technique and confirmed their successful synthesis with both transmission electron microscopy and Fourier transform-infrared spectroscopy. I3C-PLGA-T80-NPs were then used to treat PC12 neuronal cells injured by glutamate excitotoxicity (GE) and examined the resulting survival rates compared with PC12 cells treated with I3C only. The 3-[4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl]-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay revealed higher survival rates in I3C-PLGA-T80-NPs-treated cells after GE injury compared with those treated with I3C only. Furthermore, I3C-PLGA-T80-NPs decreased the levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and apoptosis-related enzymes (Caspase-3 and -8) in GE-damaged neuronal cells. Taken together, I3C-PLGA-T80-NPs might possess neuroprotective effects against GE through ROS scavenging and subsequent apoptosis blockage. PMID:26726441

  4. Proline-, glutamic acid-, and leucine-rich protein 1 mediates estrogen rapid signaling and neuroprotection in the brain

    PubMed Central

    Sareddy, Gangadhara R.; Zhang, Quanguang; Wang, Ruimin; Scott, Erin; Zou, Yi; O'Connor, Jason C.; Chen, Yidong; Dong, Yan; Vadlamudi, Ratna K.; Brann, Darrell

    2015-01-01

    17-β estradiol (E2) has been implicated as neuroprotective in a variety of neurodegenerative disorders. However, the underlying mechanism remains unknown. Here, we provide genetic evidence, using forebrain-specific knockout (FBKO) mice, that proline-, glutamic acid-, and leucine-rich protein 1 (PELP1), an estrogen receptor coregulator protein, is essential for the extranuclear signaling and neuroprotective actions of E2 in the hippocampal CA1 region after global cerebral ischemia (GCI). E2-mediated extranuclear signaling (including activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase and Akt) and antiapoptotic effects [such as attenuation of JNK signaling and increase in phosphorylation of glycogen synthase kinase-3β (GSK3β)] after GCI were compromised in PELP1 FBKO mice. Mechanistic studies revealed that PELP1 interacts with GSK3β, E2 modulates interaction of PELP1 with GSK3β, and PELP1 is a novel substrate for GSK3β. RNA-seq analysis of control and PELP1 FBKO mice after ischemia demonstrated alterations in several genes related to inflammation, metabolism, and survival in PELP1 FBKO mice, as well as a significant reduction in the activation of the Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway. In addition, PELP1 FBKO studies revealed that PELP1 is required for E2-mediated neuroprotection and for E2-mediated preservation of cognitive function after GCI. Collectively, our data provide the first direct in vivo evidence, to our knowledge, of an essential role for PELP1 in E2-mediated rapid extranuclear signaling, neuroprotection, and cognitive function in the brain. PMID:26627258

  5. A novel expression platform for the production of diabetes-associated autoantigen human glutamic acid decarboxylase (hGAD65)

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xiaofeng; Brandsma, Martin; Tremblay, Reynald; Maxwell, Denis; Jevnikar, Anthony M; Huner, Norm; Ma, Shengwu

    2008-01-01

    Background Human glutamic acid decarboxylase 65 (hGAD65) is a key autoantigen in type 1 diabetes, having much potential as an important marker for the prediction and diagnosis of type 1 diabetes, and for the development of novel antigen-specific therapies for the treatment of type 1 diabetes. However, recombinant production of hGAD65 using conventional bacterial or mammalian cell culture-based expression systems or nuclear transformed plants is limited by low yield and low efficiency. Chloroplast transformation of the unicellular eukaryotic alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii may offer a potential solution. Results A DNA cassette encoding full-length hGAD65, under the control of the C. reinhardtii chloroplast rbcL promoter and 5'- and 3'-UTRs, was constructed and introduced into the chloroplast genome of C. reinhardtii by particle bombardment. Integration of hGAD65 DNA into the algal chloroplast genome was confirmed by PCR. Transcriptional expression of hGAD65 was demonstrated by RT-PCR. Immunoblotting verified the expression and accumulation of the recombinant protein. The antigenicity of algal-derived hGAD65 was demonstrated with its immunoreactivity to diabetic sera by ELISA and by its ability to induce proliferation of spleen cells from NOD mice. Recombinant hGAD65 accumulated in transgenic algae, accounts for approximately 0.25–0.3% of its total soluble protein. Conclusion Our results demonstrate the potential value of C. reinhardtii chloroplasts as a novel platform for rapid mass production of immunologically active hGAD65. This demonstration opens the future possibility for using algal chloroplasts as novel bioreactors for the production of many other biologically active mammalian therapeutic proteins. PMID:19014643

  6. Effects of MreB paralogs on poly-γ-glutamic acid synthesis and cell morphology in Bacillus amyloliquefaciens.

    PubMed

    Gao, Weixia; Zhang, Zhongxiong; Feng, Jun; Dang, Yulei; Quan, Yufen; Gu, Yanyan; Wang, Shufang; Song, Cunjiang

    2016-09-01

    Actin-like MreB paralogs play important roles in cell shape maintenance, cell wall synthesis and the regulation of the D,L-endopeptidases, CwlO and LytE. The gram-positive bacteria, Bacillus amyloliquefaciens LL3, is a poly-γ-glutamic acid (γ-PGA) producing strain that contains three MreB paralogs: MreB, Mbl and MreBH. In B. amyloliquefaciens, CwlO and LytE can degrade γ-PGA. In this study, we aimed to test the hypothesis that modulating transcript levels of MreB paralogs would alter the synthesis and degradation of γ-PGA. The results showed that overexpression or inhibition of MreB, Mbl or MreBH had distinct effects on cell morphology and the molecular weight of the γ-PGA products. In fermentation medium, cells of mreB inhibition mutant were 50.2% longer than LL3, and the γ-PGA titer increased by 55.7%. However, changing the expression level of mbl showed only slight effects on the morphology, γ-PGA molecular weight and titer. In the mreBH inhibition mutant, γ-PGA production and its molecular weight increased by 56.7% and 19.4%, respectively. These results confirmed our hypothesis that suppressing the expression of MreB paralogs might reduce γ-PGA degradation, and that improving the cell size could strengthen γ-PGA synthesis. This is the first report of enhanced γ-PGA production via suppression of actin-like MreB paralogs. PMID:27481703

  7. Assessment of the effects of glutamic acid decarboxylase antibodies and trace elements on cognitive performance in older adults

    PubMed Central

    Alghadir, Ahmad H; Gabr, Sami A; Al-Eisa, Einas S

    2015-01-01

    Background Homeostatic imbalance of trace elements such as iron (Fe), copper (Cu), and zinc (Zn) demonstrated adverse effects on brain function among older adults. Objective The present study aimed to investigate the effects of trace elements and the presence of anti-glutamic acid decarboxylase antibodies (GADAs) in human cognitive abilities among healthy older adults. Methods A total of 100 healthy subjects (65 males, 35 females; age range; 64–96 years) were recruited for this study. Based on Loewenstein Occupational Therapy Cognitive Assessment (LOTCA) score, the participants were classified according to cognitive performance into normal (n=45), moderate (n=30), and severe (n=25). Cognitive functioning, leisure-time physical activity (LTPA), serum trace elements – Fe, Cu, Zn, Zn/Cu, and GADAs were assessed using LOTCA battery, pre-validated physical activity (PA) questionnaire, atomic absorption, and immunoassay techniques, respectively. Results Approximately 45% of the study population (n=45) had normal distribution of cognitive function and 55% of the study population (n=55) had abnormal cognitive function; they were classified into moderate (score 62–92) and severe (score 31–62). There was a significant reduction in the level of Zn and Zn/Cu ratio along with an increase in the level of Fe, Cu, and anti-GADAs in subjects of severe (P=0.01) and moderate (P=0.01) cognitive performance. LOTCA-cognitive scores correlated positively with sex, HbA1c, Fe, Cu, Zn, and Zn/Cu ratio, and negatively with age, PA, body mass index, and anti-GADAs. Significant inter-correlation was reported between serum trace element concentrations and anti-GADAs which suggest producing a cognitive decline via oxidative and neural damage mechanism. Conclusion This study found significant associations among trace elements, anti-GADAs, and cognitive function in older adults. The homeostatic balance of trace elements should be recommended among older adults for better cognitive

  8. Preparation and properties of EDC/NHS mediated crosslinking poly (gamma-glutamic acid)/epsilon-polylysine hydrogels.

    PubMed

    Hua, Jiachuan; Li, Zheng; Xia, Wen; Yang, Ning; Gong, Jixian; Zhang, Jianfei; Qiao, Changsheng

    2016-04-01

    In this paper, a novel pH-sensitive poly (amino acid) hydrogel based on poly γ-glutamic acid (γ-PGA) and ε-polylysine (ε-PL) was prepared by carbodiimide (EDC) and N-hydroxysuccinimide (NHS) mediated polymerization. The influence of PGA/PL molar ratio and EDC/NHS concentration on the structure and properties was studied. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) proved that hydrogels were crosslinked through amide bond linkage, and the conversion rate of a carboxyl group could reach 96%. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) results showed a regularly porous structure with 20 μm pore size in average. The gelation time in the crosslink process of PGA/PL hydrogels was within less than 5 min. PGA/PL hydrogels had excellent optical performance that was evaluated by a novel optotype method. Furthermore, PGA/PL hydrogels were found to be pH-sensitive, which could be adjusted to the pH of swelling media intelligently. The terminal pH of swelling medium could be controlled at 5 ± 1 after equilibrium when the initial pH was within 3-11. The swelling kinetics was found to follow a Voigt model in deionized water but a pseudo-second-order model in normal saline and phosphate buffer solution, respectively. The differential swelling degrees were attributed to the swelling theory based on the different ratio of -COOH/-NH2 and pore size in hydrogels. The results of mechanical property indicated that PGA/PL hydrogels were soft and elastic. Moreover, PGA/PL hydrogels exhibited excellent biocompatibility by cell proliferation experiment. PGA/PL hydrogels could be degraded in PBS solution and the degradation rate was decreased with the increase of the molar ratio of PL. Considering the simple preparation process and pH-sensitive property, these PGA/PL hydrogels might have high potential for use in medical and clinical fields. PMID:26838920

  9. Escherichia coli O157:H7 Glutamate- and Arginine-dependent Acid Resistance Systems Protect Against Oxidative Stress During Extreme Acid Challenge

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    To investigate the protection that several known Escherichia coli O157:H7 acid resistance systems provide against oxidative stress, the addition of diamide or hydrogen peroxide were used concomitant with acid challenge at pH 2.5 to determine bacterial survival. Diamide and hydrogen peroxide both de...

  10. Escherichia coli O157:H7 Glutamate- and Arginine-dependent Acid Resistance Systems Protect Against Oxidative Stress During Extreme Acid Challenge

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Microorganisms may simultaneously encounter multiple stresses in their environment. To investigate the protection that several known Escherichia coli O157:H7 acid resistance systems might provide against both oxidative and acid stress, the addition of diamide, a membrane-permeable thiol-specific ox...

  11. Analysis of the Metabolic Pathways Affected by Poly(γ-glutamic Acid) in Arabidopsis thaliana Based on GeneChip Microarray.

    PubMed

    Xu, Zongqi; Lei, Peng; Feng, Xiaohai; Li, Sha; Xu, Hong

    2016-08-17

    Plant growth is promoted by poly(γ-glutamic acid) (γ-PGA). However, the molecular mechanism underlying such promotion is not yet well understood. Therefore, we used GeneChip microarrays to explore the effects of γ-PGA on gene transcription in Arabidopsis thaliana. Our results revealed 299 genes significantly regulated by γ-PGA. These differently expressed genes participate mainly in metabolic and cellular processes and in stimuli responses. The metabolic pathways linked to these differently expressed genes were also investigated. A total of 64 of the 299 differently expressed genes were shown to be directly involved in 24 pathways such as brassinosteroid biosynthesis, α-linolenic acid metabolism, phenylpropanoid biosynthesis, and nitrogen metabolism, all of which were influenced by γ-PGA. The analysis demonstrated that γ-PGA promoted nitrogen assimilation and biosynthesis of brassinosteroids, jasmonic acid, and lignins, providing a better explanation for why γ-PGA promotes growth and enhances stress tolerance in plants. PMID:27465513

  12. Non-sterilized fermentative co-production of poly(γ-glutamic acid) and fibrinolytic enzyme by a thermophilic Bacillus subtilis GXA-28.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Wei; Li, Wei; Shu, Lin; Yi, Juyang; Chen, Guiguang; Liang, Zhiqun

    2013-08-01

    Poly(γ-glutamic acid), as a naturally occurring homopolymer, is widely used in industry, agriculture, food and medicine. Fibrinolytic enzyme has a great potential for the prevention and/or treatment of vascular diseases caused by fibrin clots. Co-production of γ-PGA and fibrinolytic enzyme by Bacillus subtilis GXA-28 (CCTCC M 2012347) from soybean residue using cane molasses and monosodium glutamate waste liquor under sterilized and non-sterilized condition were investigated. It was observed that total sugar from cane molasses of 3% (w/w) and glutamate from monosodium glutamate waste liquor of 2% (w/w) were favorable for γ-PGA and fibrinolytic enzyme co-production at pH 7.0 and 45°C. Based on the optimal medium, the γ-PGA and fibrinolytic activity reached 103.5 g/kg-substrates at 22 h and 986 U/g-substrates at 24h under non-sterilized condition, respectively. To our knowledge, the yield of γ-PGA was highest in all reported literatures. PMID:23725975

  13. Effects of sufentanil on the release and metabolism of dopamine and ascorbic acid and glutamate release in the striatum of freely moving rats.

    PubMed

    Serra, Pier Andrea; Susini, Giuseppe; Rocchitta, Gaia; Migheli, Rossana; Dessanti, Giuseppina; Miele, Egidio; Desole, Maria Speranza; Miele, Maddalena

    2003-06-19

    The effects of either intraperitoneally (i.p.) or intrastriatally administered sufentanil on the release and metabolism of dopamine (DA) in the rat striatum were evaluated using in vivo microdialysis. Dialysate concentrations of DA and its acidic metabolites dihydroxyphenylacetic acid (DOPAC) and homovanillic acid (HVA) were increased following i.p. administration of either clinical anesthetic (20 microg/kg) or clinical analgesic (1 microg/kg) sufentanil doses. In addition, sufentanil also increased uric acid concentrations. In contrast, dialysate ascorbic acid and glutamate concentrations were unaffected. Intrastriatal infusion of sufentanil (250 nM) induced only a short lasting decrease in dialysate DA. Subcutaneous naloxone (1.0 mg/kg) abolished sufentanil-induced increases in dialysate DA, DOPAC+HVA and uric acid; however, naloxone (0.1 mM) failed to affect these increases when infused intrastriatally. These results demonstrate that sufentanil, at clinical doses, increases striatal DA release and oxidative metabolism of both DA and xanthine acting at extrastriatal sites with a mu-receptor-mediated mechanism. PMID:12781909

  14. Both Dietary Supplementation with Monosodium L-Glutamate and Fat Modify Circulating and Tissue Amino Acid Pools in Growing Pigs, but with Little Interactive Effect

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Zemeng; Zhou, Xiaoli; Wu, Fei; Yao, Kang; Kong, Xiangfeng; Li, Tiejun; Blachier, Francois; Yin, Yulong

    2014-01-01

    Background The Chinese population has undergone rapid transition to a high-fat diet. Furthermore, monosodium L-glutamate (MSG) is widely used as a daily food additive in China. Little information is available on the effects of oral MSG and dietary fat supplementation on the amino acid balance in tissues. The present study aimed to determine the effects of both dietary fat and MSG on amino acid metabolism in growing pigs, and to assess any possible interactions between these two nutrients. Methods and Results Four iso-nitrogenous and iso-caloric diets (basal diet, high fat diet, basal diet with 3% MSG and high fat diet with 3% MSG) were provided to growing pigs. The dietary supplementation with fat and MSG used alone and in combination were found to modify circulating and tissue amino acid pools in growing pigs. Both dietary fat and MSG modified the expression of gene related to amino acid transport in jejunum. Conclusions Both dietary fat and MSG clearly influenced amino acid content in tissues but in different ways. Both dietary fat and MSG enhance the absorption of amino acids in jejunum. However, there was little interaction between the effects of dietary fat and MSG. PMID:24465415

  15. Increased humoral antibody response of foot-and-mouth disease virus vaccine in growing pigs pre-treated with poly-γ-glutamic acid

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jee-Hoon; Kang, Ik-Jae; Kim, A-Reum; Noh, You-Sun; Chung, Hee-Chun

    2016-01-01

    This study was conducted to determine if humoral antibody response of foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) vaccine improved in 8-week-old growing pigs born to well-vaccinated sows pre-treated with 60 mg of poly-γ-glutamic acid (γ-PGA) three days before vaccination. Antibody against FMD virus serotype O was measured 0, 2, 4 and 6 weeks post-vaccination, using a PrioCHECK FMDV type O ELISA kit. The results showed that positive antibody reactions against FMDV serotype O antigen among a component of the vaccine significantly increased in response to pre-injection with γ-PGA. PMID:26645341

  16. Increased humoral antibody response of foot-and-mouth disease virus vaccine in growing pigs pre-treated with poly-γ-glutamic acid.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jee-Hoon; Kang, Ik-Jae; Kim, A-Reum; Noh, You-Sun; Chung, Hee-Chun; Park, Bong-Kyun

    2016-06-30

    This study was conducted to determine if humoral antibody response of foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) vaccine improved in 8-week-old growing pigs born to well-vaccinated sows pre-treated with 60 mg of poly-γ-glutamic acid (γ-PGA) three days before vaccination. Antibody against FMD virus serotype O was measured 0, 2, 4 and 6 weeks post-vaccination, using a PrioCHECK FMDV type O ELISA kit. The results showed that positive antibody reactions against FMDV serotype O antigen among a component of the vaccine significantly increased in response to pre-injection with γ-PGA. PMID:26645341

  17. Simulation of energetic stability of facetted l-glutamic acid nanocrystalline clusters in relation to their polymorphic phase stability as a function of crystal size.

    PubMed

    Hammond, R B; Pencheva, K; Roberts, K J

    2005-10-27

    A molecular modeling approach is used to study the stability of different polymorphic forms of l-glutamic acid through building and optimizing molecular clusters of different sizes and shapes with the latter corresponding to the predicted crystal growth morphologies. The results reveal that the initially nucleating (according to Oswald rule) metastable (alpha) form is the more energetically stable form at small cluster sizes of ca. 200 molecular units, whereas the stable (beta) form is more stable when the cluster size is larger. PMID:16853527

  18. Electron paramagnetic resonance studies of gamma-irradiated DL-alanine ethyl ester hydrochloride, L-theanine and L-glutamic acid dimethyl ester hydrochloride.

    PubMed

    Başkan, M Halim; Aydın, Murat

    2013-08-01

    The electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) of gamma irradiated powders of DL-alanine ethyl ester hydrochloride, L-theanine and L-glutamic acid dimethyl ester hydrochloride were investigated at room temperature. The observed paramagnetic species were attributed to the CH3ĊHCOOC2H5, -CH2ĊHCOOH and -CH2ĊHCOOCH3 radicals, respectively. Hyperfine structure constants and g-values were determined for these three radicals. Some spectroscopic properties and suggestions concerning the possible structure of the radicals were also discussed. PMID:23680512

  19. Electron paramagnetic resonance studies of gamma-irradiated DL-alanine ethyl ester hydrochloride, L-theanine and L-glutamic acid dimethyl ester hydrochloride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Başkan, M. Halim; Aydın, Murat

    2013-08-01

    The electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) of gamma irradiated powders of DL-alanine ethyl ester hydrochloride, L-theanine and L-glutamic acid dimethyl ester hydrochloride were investigated at room temperature. The observed paramagnetic species were attributed to the CH3ĊHCOOC2H5, -CH2ĊHCOOH and -CH2ĊHCOOCH3 radicals, respectively. Hyperfine structure constants and g-values were determined for these three radicals. Some spectroscopic properties and suggestions concerning the possible structure of the radicals were also discussed.

  20. Immunocytochemical localization of glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD) and glutamine synthetase (GS) in the area postrema of the cat. Light and electron microscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    D'Amelio, Fernando E.; Mehler, William R.; Gibbs, Michael A.; Eng, Lawrence F.; Wu, Jang-Yen

    1987-01-01

    Morphological evidence is presented of the existence of the putative neurotransmitter gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) in axon terminals and of glutamine synthetase (GS) in ependymoglial cells and astroglial components of the area postrema (AP) of the cat. Purified antiserum directed against the GABA biosynthetic enzyme glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD) and GS antiserum were used. The results showed that punctate structures of variable size corresponding to axon terminals exhibited GAD-immunoreactivity and were distributed in varying densities. The greatest accumulation occurred in the caudal and middle segment of the AP and particularly in the area subpostrema, where the aggregation of terminals was extremely dense. The presence of both GAD-immunoreactive profiles and GS-immunostained ependymoglial cells and astrocytes in the AP provide further evidence of the functional correlation between the two enzymes.

  1. Generation of reactive oxygen species from 5-aminolevulinic acid and Glutamate in cooperation with excited CdSe/ZnS QDs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duong, Hong Dinh; Lee, Jee Won; Rhee, Jong Il

    2014-08-01

    CdSe/ZnS quantum dots (QDs) can be joined in the reductive pathway involving the electron transfer to an acceptor or in the oxidative pathway involving the hole transfer to a donor. They were exploited in the oxidation reactions of 5-aminolevulinic acid (ALA) and glutamate (GLU) for the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) such as hydroxyl radical (HO●) and superoxide anion (O2 ● -). Fast and highly efficient oxidation reactions of ALA to produce HO● and of GLU to produce O2 ●- were observed in the cooperation of mercaptopropionic acid (MPA)-capped CdSe/ZnS QDs under LED irradiation. Fluorescence spectroscopy and electron spin resonance (ESR) spectroscopy were used to evaluate the generation of different forms of ROS. Confocal fluorescent microscopic images of the size and morphology of HeLa cells confirmed the ROS generation from ALA or GLU in cooperation with CdSe/ZnS QDs under LED irradiation.

  2. IgE binding to peanut allergens is inhibited by combined D-aspartic and D-glutamic acids

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    D-amino acids (D-aas) are reported to bind to IgE antibodies from people with allergy and asthma. The objectives of this study were to determine if D-aas bind or inhibit IgE binding to peanut allergens, and if they are more effective than L-amino acids (L-aas) in this respect. Several D-aa cocktails...

  3. CDDP supramolecular micelles fabricated from adamantine terminated mPEG and β-cyclodextrin based seven-armed poly (L-glutamic acid)/CDDP complexes.

    PubMed

    Yong, Dawei; Luo, Yu; Du, Fang; Huang, Jin; Lu, Wei; Dai, Zhaoyun; Yu, Jiahui; Liu, Shiyuan

    2013-05-01

    This research is aimed to develop a nano-sized supramolecular micelle delivery system of cis-dichlorodiammine platinum (II) (CDDP) in order to achieve the passive tumor targeting. Firstly, star-shaped poly (γ-benzyl-L-glutamate) was synthesized by the ring-opening polymerization of γ-benzyl-L-glutamate-N-carboxyanhydride initiated with per-6-amino-β-cyclodextrin. After removal of benzyl groups, β-cyclodextrin based seven-armed poly (L-glutamic acid) (β-CD-7PLGA) was obtained. β-CD-7PLGA/CDDP complexes were prepared by the complex reaction between the carboxylic groups of β-CD-7PLGA and CDDP. Further inclusion of β-CD-7PLGA/CDDP complexes with adamantine terminated mPEG (mPEG-Ad) gave CDDP supramolecular micelles (mPEG-Ad@β-CD-7PLGA/CDDP). The formation of mPEG-Ad@β-CD-7PLGA/CDDP supramolecular micelles was confirmed by fluorescence spectrophotoscopy and particle size measurements. All the micelles showed spherical shape, and their sizes increased from 100 to 135 nm with the increase of PLGA arm molecular weight. mPEG-Ad@CD-7PLGA/CDDP micelles showed sustained drug release profiles over 50h in PBS. Compared with CDDP, mPEG-Ad@β-CD-7PLGA/CDDP supramolecular micelles showed essential decreased cytotoxicity to KB cells, suggesting their great potential as the delivery carriers of CDDP. PMID:23352945

  4. Conversion of agroindustrial residues for high poly(γ-glutamic acid) production by Bacillus subtilis NX-2 via solid-state fermentation.

    PubMed

    Tang, Bao; Xu, Hong; Xu, Zongqi; Xu, Cen; Xu, Zheng; Lei, Peng; Qiu, Yibin; Liang, Jinfeng; Feng, Xiaohai

    2015-04-01

    Poly(γ-glutamic acid) (γ-PGA) production by Bacillus subtilis NX-2 was carried out through solid-state fermentation with dry mushroom residues (DMR) and monosodium glutamate production residues (MGPR; a substitute of glutamate) for the first time. Dry shiitake mushroom residue (DSMR) was found to be the most suitable solid substrate among these DMRs; the optimal DSMR-to-MGPR ratio was optimized as 12:8. To increase γ-PGA production, industrial waste glycerol was added as a carbon source supplement to the solid-state medium. As a result, γ-PGA production increased by 34.8%. The batch fermentation obtained an outcome of 115.6 g kg(-1) γ-PGA and 39.5×10(8) colony forming units g(-1) cells. Furthermore, a satisfactory yield of 107.7 g kg(-1) γ-PGA was achieved by compost experiment on a scale of 50 kg in open air, indicating that economically large-scale γ-PGA production was feasible. Therefore, this study provided a novel method to produce γ-PGA from abundant and low-cost agroindustrial residues. PMID:25670398

  5. Synergistic activities of a silver(I) glutamic acid complex and reactive oxygen species (ROS): a novel antimicrobial and chemotherapeutic agent.

    PubMed

    Batarseh, K I; Smith, M A

    2012-01-01

    The antimicrobial and chemotherapeutic activities of a silver(I) glutamic acid complex with the synergistic concomitant generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) were investigated here. The ROS generation system employed was via Fenton chemistry. The antimicrobial and chemotherapeutic activities were investigated on Staphylococcus aureus ATCC 43300 and Escherichia coli bacteria, and Vero and MCF-7 tumor cell lines, respectively. Antimicrobial activities were conducted by determining minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC), while chemotherapeutic efficacies were done by serial dilution using standard techniques to determine the half maximal inhibitory concentration (IC50). The antimicrobial and chemotherapeutic results obtained were compared with positive control drugs gentamicin, oxacillin, penicillin, streptomycin and cisplatin, a ubiquitously used platinum-based antitumor drug, and with the silver(I) glutamic acid complex and hydrogen peroxide separately. Based on MIC and IC50 values, it was determined that this synergistic approach was very effective at extremely low concentrations, especially when compared with the other drugs evaluated here. This finding might be of great significance regarding metronomic dosing when this synergistic approach is clinically implemented. Since silver at low concentrations exhibits no toxic, mutagenic and carcinogenic activities, this might offer an alternative approach for the development of safer silver-based antimicrobial and chemotherapeutic drugs, thereby reducing or even eliminating the toxicity associated with current drugs. Accordingly, the present approach might be integrated into the systemic clinical treatment of infectious diseases and cancer. PMID:22680634

  6. Arabidopsis Glutamate Receptor Homolog3.5 Modulates Cytosolic Ca2+ Level to Counteract Effect of Abscisic Acid in Seed Germination1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Kong, Dongdong; Ju, Chuanli; Parihar, Aisha; Kim, So; Cho, Daeshik; Kwak, June M.

    2015-01-01

    Seed germination is a critical step in a plant’s life cycle that allows successful propagation and is therefore strictly controlled by endogenous and environmental signals. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying germination control remain elusive. Here, we report that the Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) glutamate receptor homolog3.5 (AtGLR3.5) is predominantly expressed in germinating seeds and increases cytosolic Ca2+ concentration that counteracts the effect of abscisic acid (ABA) to promote germination. Repression of AtGLR3.5 impairs cytosolic Ca2+ concentration elevation, significantly delays germination, and enhances ABA sensitivity in seeds, whereas overexpression of AtGLR3.5 results in earlier germination and reduced seed sensitivity to ABA. Furthermore, we show that Ca2+ suppresses the expression of ABSCISIC ACID INSENSITIVE4 (ABI4), a key transcription factor involved in ABA response in seeds, and that ABI4 plays a fundamental role in modulation of Ca2+-dependent germination. Taken together, our results provide molecular genetic evidence that AtGLR3.5-mediated Ca2+ influx stimulates seed germination by antagonizing the inhibitory effects of ABA through suppression of ABI4. These findings establish, to our knowledge, a new and pivotal role of the plant glutamate receptor homolog and Ca2+ signaling in germination control and uncover the orchestrated modulation of the AtGLR3.5-mediated Ca2+ signal and ABA signaling via ABI4 to fine-tune the crucial developmental process, germination, in Arabidopsis. PMID:25681329

  7. Effects of an oral dose of l-glutamic acid on circulating neurotransmitters: Possible roles of the C1(Ad) and the A5(NA) pontomedullary nuclei

    PubMed Central

    Lechin, Fuad; van der Dijs, Bertha; Pardey-Maldonado, Betty; Rivera, Jairo E; Lechin, Marcel E; Baez, Scarlet

    2010-01-01

    Objective Investigation of the effects of an oral administration of a small dose of l-glutamic acid on the two peripheral sympathetic branches (neural and adrenal) of the autonomic nervous system. Research design and methods Circulating neurotransmitters and cardiovascular parameters were assessed in 28 healthy volunteers before and after the administration of 500 mg of l-glutamic acid or placebo. Results The drug triggered a significant and sustained enhancement of the noradrenaline and dopamine circulating levels which were paralleled and positively correlated with the diastolic blood pressure increases. Conversely, both platelet and plasma serotonin showed significant falls throughout the test. Significant positive correlations were registered between noradrenaline, dopamine, and noradrenaline/dopamine ratio versus diastolic blood pressure but not versus systolic blood pressure or heart rate. Conclusion The above results allowed us to postulate that the drug provoked a significant enhancement of peripheral neural sympathetic activity and the reduction of adrenal sympathetic and parasympathetic drives. Both sympathetic branches are positively correlated with the A5 noradrenergic and the C1 adrenergic pontomedullary nuclei, which interchange inhibitory axons that act at post-synaptic α2 inhibitory autoreceptors. In addition, we discussed the mechanisms able to explain why the drug acted preferentially at the A5 noradrenergic rather than the C1 adrenergic nuclei.

  8. Central control of penile erection: a re-visitation of the role of oxytocin and its interaction with dopamine and glutamic acid in male rats.

    PubMed

    Melis, Maria Rosaria; Argiolas, Antonio

    2011-01-01

    Oxytocin is a potent inducer of penile erection when injected into the central nervous system. In male rats, the most sensitive brain area for the pro-erectile effect of oxytocin is the paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus. This nucleus and surrounding regions contain the cell bodies of all oxytocinergic neurons projecting to extra-hypothalamic brain areas and the spinal cord. This review shows that oxytocin induces penile erection also when injected in some of these areas (e.g., ventral tegmental area, ventral subiculum of the hippocampus, posteromedial cortical nucleus of the amygdala and thoraco-lumbar spinal cord). Microinjection studies combined with intra-cerebral microdialysis and double immuno-fluorescence studies suggest that oxytocin in these areas activates directly or indirectly (mainly through glutamic acid) mesolimbic dopaminergic neurons. Dopamine released in the nucleus accumbens in turn activates neural pathways leading to the activation of incerto-hypothalamic dopaminergic neurons in the paraventricular nucleus. This activates not only oxytocinergic neurons projecting to the spinal cord and mediating penile erection, but also those projecting to the above extra-hypothalamic areas, modulating directly or indirectly (through glutamic acid) the activity of mesolimbic dopaminergic neurons controlling motivation and reward. Together these neural pathways may constitute a complex hypothetical circuit, which plays a role not only in the consummatory phase of sexual activity (erectile function and copulation), but also in the motivational and rewarding aspects of the anticipatory phase of sexual behaviour. PMID:21050872

  9. The Lathyrus excitotoxin beta-N-oxalyl-L-alpha,beta-diaminopropionic acid is a substrate of the L-cystine/L-glutamate exchanger system xc-.

    PubMed

    Warren, Brady A; Patel, Sarjubhai A; Nunn, Peter B; Bridges, Richard J

    2004-10-15

    Beta-N-oxalyl-L-alpha-beta-diaminopropionic acid (beta-L-ODAP) is an unusual amino acid present in seeds of plants from the Lathyrus genus that is generally accepted as the causative agent underlying the motor neuron degeneration and spastic paraparesis in human neurolathyrism. Much of the neuropathology produced by beta-L-ODAP appears to be a direct consequence of its structural similarities to the excitatory neurotransmitter L-glutamate and its ability to induce excitotoxicity as an agonist of non-NMDA receptors. Its actions within the CNS are, however, not limited to non-NMDA receptors, raising the likely possibility that the anatomical and cellular specificity of the neuronal damage observed in neurolathyrism may result from the cumulative activity of beta-L-ODAP at multiple sites. Accumulating evidence suggests that system xc-, a transporter that mediates the exchange of L-cystine and L-glutamate, is one such site. In the present work, two distinct approaches were used to define the interactions of beta-L-ODAP with system xc-: Traditional radiolabel-uptake assays were employed to quantify inhibitory activity, while fluorometrically coupled assays that follow the exchange-induced efflux of L-glutamate were used to assess substrate activity. In addition to confirming that beta-L-ODAP is an effective competitive inhibitor of system xc-, we report that the compound exhibits a substrate activity comparable to that of the endogenous substrate L-cystine. The ability of system xc- to transport and accumulate beta-L-ODAP identifies additional variables that could influence its toxicity within the CNS, including the ability to limit its access to EAA receptors by clearing the excitotoxin from the extracellular synaptic environment, as well as serving as a point of entry through which beta-L-ODAP could have increased access to intracellular targets. PMID:15476861

  10. Hydrodynamic and pharmacological characterization of putative alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid/kainate-sensitive L-glutamate receptors solubilized from pig brain.

    PubMed Central

    Wu, T Y; Chang, Y C

    1994-01-01

    L-[3H]Glutamate binding sites with characteristics resembling that of membrane-bound alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid (AMPA)/kainate-subtype L-glutamate receptors have been solubilized from pig brain synaptic junctions by Triton X-114. Binding of [3H]AMPA to these soluble sites in the presence of KSCN results in a curvilinear Scatchard plot that can be resolved into a high-affinity component and a low-affinity component. These Triton-X-114-solubilized sites can be further separated into two species of binding sites by gel-filtration chromatography or sucrose-density-gradient centrifugation. The pharmacological profiles of these two species of binding site are almost identical, and the rank orders of potency for glutamatergic drugs in displacing L-[3H]glutamate binding to these sites are quisqualate > 6,7-dinitroquinoxaline-2,3-dione > 6-cyano-7-nitroquinoxaline-2,3-dione > AMPA > L-glutamate > kainate >> N-methyl-D-aspartate = L-2-amino-4-phosphonobutyrate. Both sites are found to bind [3H]AMPA, and in the presence of KSCN the binding activities are significantly enhanced. Analysis of the hydrodynamic behaviour of these binding sites by sucrose-density-gradient centrifugation in H2O- and 2H2O-based solvents and gel-filtration chromatography has revealed that one of these sites (Stokes radius 8.3 nm, sedimentation coefficient 18.5 S) consists of 562 kDa protein and 281 kDa detergent, and the other site (Stokes radius 9.6 nm, sedimentation coefficient 13.4 S) consists of 352 kDa protein and 569 kDa detergent. Frictional coefficients of these sites indicate that these receptor-detergent complexes are asymmetrical in structure, consistent with large transmembrane proteins. PMID:7516151

  11. Hydrodynamic and pharmacological characterization of putative alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid/kainate-sensitive L-glutamate receptors solubilized from pig brain.

    PubMed

    Wu, T Y; Chang, Y C

    1994-06-01

    L-[3H]Glutamate binding sites with characteristics resembling that of membrane-bound alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid (AMPA)/kainate-subtype L-glutamate receptors have been solubilized from pig brain synaptic junctions by Triton X-114. Binding of [3H]AMPA to these soluble sites in the presence of KSCN results in a curvilinear Scatchard plot that can be resolved into a high-affinity component and a low-affinity component. These Triton-X-114-solubilized sites can be further separated into two species of binding sites by gel-filtration chromatography or sucrose-density-gradient centrifugation. The pharmacological profiles of these two species of binding site are almost identical, and the rank orders of potency for glutamatergic drugs in displacing L-[3H]glutamate binding to these sites are quisqualate > 6,7-dinitroquinoxaline-2,3-dione > 6-cyano-7-nitroquinoxaline-2,3-dione > AMPA > L-glutamate > kainate > N-methyl-D-aspartate = L-2-amino-4-phosphonobutyrate. Both sites are found to bind [3H]AMPA, and in the presence of KSCN the binding activities are significantly enhanced. Analysis of the hydrodynamic behaviour of these binding sites by sucrose-density-gradient centrifugation in H2O- and 2H2O-based solvents and gel-filtration chromatography has revealed that one of these sites (Stokes radius 8.3 nm, sedimentation coefficient 18.5 S) consists of 562 kDa protein and 281 kDa detergent, and the other site (Stokes radius 9.6 nm, sedimentation coefficient 13.4 S) consists of 352 kDa protein and 569 kDa detergent. Frictional coefficients of these sites indicate that these receptor-detergent complexes are asymmetrical in structure, consistent with large transmembrane proteins. PMID:7516151

  12. Glutamatergic or GABAergic neuron-specific, long-term expression in neocortical neurons from helper virus-free HSV-1 vectors containing the phosphate-activated glutaminase, vesicular glutamate transporter-1, or glutamic acid decarboxylase promoter

    PubMed Central

    Rasmussen, Morten; Kong, Lingxin; Zhang, Guo-rong; Liu, Meng; Wang, Xiaodan; Szabo, Gabor; Curthoys, Norman P.; Geller, Alfred I.

    2009-01-01

    Many potential uses of direct gene transfer into neurons require restricting expression to one of the two major types of forebrain neurons, glutamatergic or GABAergic neurons. Thus, it is desirable to develop virus vectors that contain either a glutamatergic or GABAergic neuron-specific promoter. The brain/kidney phosphate-activated glutaminase (PAG), the product of the GLS1 gene, produces the majority of the glutamate for release as neurotransmitter, and is a marker for glutamatergic neurons. A PAG promoter was partially characterized using a cultured kidney cell line. The three vesicular glutamate transporters (VGLUTs) are expressed in distinct populations of neurons, and VGLUT1 is the predominant VGLUT in the neocortex, hippocampus, and cerebellar cortex. Glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD) produces GABA; the two molecular forms of the enzyme, GAD65 and GAD67, are expressed in distinct, but largely overlapping, groups of neurons, and GAD67 is the predominant form in the neocortex. In transgenic mice, an ∼9 kb fragment of the GAD67 promoter supports expression in most classes of GABAergic neurons. Here, we constructed plasmid (amplicon) Herpes Simplex Virus (HSV-1) vectors that placed the Lac Z gene under the regulation of putative PAG, VGLUT1, or GAD67 promoters. Helper virus-free vector stocks were delivered into postrhinal cortex, and the rats were sacrificed 4 days or 2 months later. The PAG or VGLUT1 promoters supported ∼90 % glutamatergic neuron-specific expression. The GAD67 promoter supported ∼90 % GABAergic neuron-specific expression. Long-term expression was observed using each promoter. Principles for obtaining long-term expression from HSV-1 vectors, based on these and other results, are discussed. Long-term glutamatergic or GABAergic neuron-specific expression may benefit specific experiments on learning or specific gene therapy approaches. Of note, promoter analyses might identify regulatory elements that determine a glutamatergic or GABAergic

  13. Effect of surface modification of nanofibres with glutamic acid peptide on calcium phosphate nucleation and osteogenic differentiation of marrow stromal cells.

    PubMed

    Karaman, Ozan; Kumar, Ankur; Moeinzadeh, Seyedsina; He, Xuezhong; Cui, Tong; Jabbari, Esmaiel

    2016-02-01

    Biomineralization is mediated by extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins with amino acid sequences rich in glutamic acid. The objective of this study was to investigate the effect of calcium phosphate deposition on aligned nanofibres surface-modified with a glutamic acid peptide on osteogenic differentiation of rat marrow stromal cells. Blend of EEGGC peptide (GLU) conjugated low molecular weight polylactide (PLA) and high molecular weight poly(lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA) was electrospun to form aligned nanofibres (GLU-NF). The GLU-NF microsheets were incubated in a modified simulated body fluid for nucleation of calcium phosphate crystals on the fibre surface. To achieve a high calcium phosphate to fibre ratio, a layer-by-layer approach was used to improve diffusion of calcium and phosphate ions inside the microsheets. Based on dissipative particle dynamics simulation of PLGA/PLA-GLU fibres, > 80% of GLU peptide was localized to the fibre surface. Calcium phosphate to fibre ratios as high as 200%, between those of cancellous (160%) and cortical (310%) bone, was obtained with the layer-by-layer approach. The extent of osteogenic differentiation and mineralization of marrow stromal cells seeded on GLU-NF microsheets was directly related to the amount of calcium phosphate deposition on the fibres prior to cell seeding. Expression of osteogenic markers osteopontin, alkaline phosphatase (ALP), osteocalcin and type 1 collagen increased gradually with calcium phosphate deposition on GLU-NF microsheets. Results demonstrate that surface modification of aligned synthetic nanofibres with EEGGC peptide dramatically affects nucleation and growth of calcium phosphate crystals on the fibres leading to increased osteogenic differentiation of marrow stromal cells and mineralization. PMID:23897753

  14. Amino acids

    MedlinePlus

    Amino acids are organic compounds that combine to form proteins . Amino acids and proteins are the building blocks of life. When proteins are digested or broken down, amino acids are left. The human body uses amino acids ...

  15. Occurrence and metabolism of 4-substituted glutamic acids in the seedlings of various species of legumes. [Sophora japonica

    SciTech Connect

    Winter, H.C.; Dekker, E.E.

    1987-04-01

    The authors measured the levels of 4-methyleneglutamic acid (Meglu), 4-methyleneglutamine (Megln), erythro-4-methylglutamic acid (e-Mglu), and threo-4-methylglutamic acid (t-Mglu) in seedlings of various species of legumes by HPLC and ion exchange chromatography. High levels of e-Mglu and Megln but no t-Mglu or Meglu are present in Sophora japonica. Peanut seedling contain both e-Mglu and t-Mglu at 20-50% and 5%, resp., of the level of Meglu whereas only traces of Meglu and Mglu occur in soybean seedlings. Excised peanut embryos germinated on Linsmaier and Skoog medium + (U-/sup 14/C)-leucine incorporated isotope into e-Mglu, Meglu, and Megln; (U-/sup 14/C)-proline or glycine was not so incorporated. Soybean embryos rapidly converted added (2-/sup 14/C)-Meglu to a variety of non-amino acid products; peanut embryos, in contrast, retain 25% of added Meglu unchanged and 50% as Megln. These results suggest that in a variety of legumes leucine may serve as a precursor of Mglu and Meglu during germination; also, whereas Meglu remains as such or as Megln in some species, it is rapidly metabolized in others.

  16. Distinct Plasma Profile of Polar Neutral Amino Acids, Leucine, and Glutamate in Children with Autism Spectrum Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tirouvanziam, Rabindra; Obukhanych, Tetyana V.; Laval, Julie; Aronov, Pavel A.; Libove, Robin; Banerjee, Arpita Goswami; Parker, Karen J.; O'Hara, Ruth; Herzenberg, Leonard A.; Herzenberg, Leonore A.; Hardan, Antonio Y.

    2012-01-01

    The goal of this investigation was to examine plasma amino acid (AA) levels in children with Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD, N = 27) and neuro-typically developing controls (N = 20). We observed reduced plasma levels of most polar neutral AA and leucine in children with ASD. This AA profile conferred significant post hoc power for discriminating…

  17. Effects of prenatal exposure to 2,4-D/2,4,5-T mixture on postnatal changes in rat brain glutamate, GABA protein, and nucleic acid levels

    SciTech Connect

    Mohammad, F.K.; Omer, V.E.V.

    1988-02-01

    The opportunity of maternal exposure to various chemicals in the work place and the general environments have increased, and the fetus and neonate may be at greater risk than the adult. However, the embryotoxic and teratogenic effects of the chlorinated phenoxy herbicides 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D) and 2,4,5-trichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4,5-T), the main chemicals in Agent Orange, are well documented only in laboratory animals. The brain of the developing fetus is vulnerable to the toxic effects of the phenoxy herbicides which readily cross the placental barrier and distribute into fetal tissues, including brain. Although the neurochemical basis for the behavioral teratogenicity of the phenoxy herbicides is not know, it was recently reported that non-teratogenic doses of a 1:1 mixture of 2,4-D and 2,4,5-T delayed the ontogeny of dopamine and serotonin in the brain of the developing rate. This communication provides further descriptive information about the ontogeny of rat brain nucleic acid, protein, glutamate and ..gamma..-aminobutyrate (GABA) following in utero exposure to non-teratogenic levels of a 1:1 mixture of 2,4-D/2,4,5-T.

  18. Synthesis of a specific monolithic column with artificial recognition sites for L-glutamic acid via cryo-crosslinking of imprinted nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Göktürk, Ilgım; Üzek, Recep; Uzun, Lokman; Denizli, Adil

    2016-06-01

    In this study, a new molecular imprinting (MIP)-based monolithic cryogel column was prepared using chemically crosslinked molecularly imprinted nanoparticles, to achieve a simplified chromatographic separation (SPE) for a model compound, L-glutamic acid (L-Glu). Cryogelation through crosslinking of imprinted nanoparticles forms stable monolithic cryogel columns. This technique reduces the leakage of nanoparticles and increases the surface area, while protecting the structural features of the cryogel for stable and efficient recognition of the template molecule. A non-imprinted monolithic cryogel column (NIP) was also prepared, using non-imprinted nanoparticles produced without the addition of L-Glu during polymerization. The molecularly imprinted monolithic cryogel column (MIP) indicates apparent recognition selectivity and a good adsorption capacity compared to the NIP. Also, we have achieved a significant increase in the adsorption capacity, using the advantage of high surface area of the nanoparticles. PMID:25749280

  19. Evidence for the vitamin K-dependent gamma-carboxylation of the first glutamic acid residue in peptide substrates containing a diglutamyl sequence.

    PubMed Central

    Burgess, A I; Esnouf, M P; Rose, K; Offord, R E

    1983-01-01

    The peptide substrate commonly used in vitamin K-dependent carboxylation, Phe-Leu-Glu-Glu-Val, has been shown, by the use of high-voltage paper electrophoresis, to be degraded from the N-terminus by a microsomal leucine amino-peptidase. The replacement of phenylalanine with a N-t-butoxycarbonyl group resulted in a tetrapeptide substrate with a blocked N-terminus resistant to enzymic degradation. Vitamin K-dependent carboxylation of this non-degradable substrate gave a unique carboxylated product, which was separated from microsomal protein and unchanged substrate by using DEAE-Sephadex A25 as a final step. The carboxylated product was subsequently decarboxylated in 2HCl and analysed by using g.l.c. coupled to a mass spectrometer. This showed that only the first glutamic acid residue in the peptide substrate was carboxylated. PMID:6138032

  20. Protein loop compaction and the origin of the effect of arginine and glutamic acid mixtures on solubility, stability and transient oligomerization of proteins.

    PubMed

    Blobel, Jascha; Brath, Ulrika; Bernadó, Pau; Diehl, Carl; Ballester, Lidia; Sornosa, Alejandra; Akke, Mikael; Pons, Miquel

    2011-12-01

    Addition of a 50 mM mixture of L: -arginine and L: -glutamic acid (RE) is extensively used to improve protein solubility and stability, although the origin of the effect is not well understood. We present Small Angle X-ray Scattering (SAXS) and Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) results showing that RE induces protein compaction by collapsing flexible loops on the protein core. This is suggested to be a general mechanism preventing aggregation and improving resistance to proteases and to originate from the polyelectrolyte nature of RE. Molecular polyelectrolyte mixtures are expected to display long range correlation effects according to dressed interaction site theory. We hypothesize that perturbation of the RE solution by dissolved proteins is proportional to the volume occupied by the protein. As a consequence, loop collapse, minimizing the effective protein volume, is favored in the presence of RE. PMID:21390527

  1. Rapid Normalization of High Glutamic Acid Decarboxylase Autoantibody Titers and Preserved Endogenous Insulin Secretion in a Patient with Diabetes Mellitus: A Case Report and Literature Review.

    PubMed

    Ohara, Nobumasa; Kaneko, Masanori; Furukawa, Tatsuo; Koike, Tadashi; Sone, Hirohito; Tanaka, Shoichiro; Kaneko, Kenzo; Kamoi, Kyuzi

    2016-01-01

    A 59-year-old Japanese woman developed diabetes mellitus without ketoacidosis in the presence of glutamic acid decarboxylase autoantibody (GADA) (24.7 U/mL). After the amelioration of her hyperglycemia, the patient had a relatively preserved serum C-peptide level. Her endogenous insulin secretion capacity remained almost unchanged during 5 years of insulin therapy. The patient's GADA titers normalized within 15 months. The islet-related autoantibodies, including GADA, are believed to be produced following the autoimmune destruction of pancreatic beta cells and are predictive markers of type 1 diabetes mellitus. Therefore, the transient appearance of GADA in our patient may have reflected pancreatic autoimmune processes that terminated without progression to insulin deficiency. PMID:26935368

  2. A patch clamp study of the effects of ciprofloxacin and biphenyl acetic acid on rat hippocampal neurone GABAA and ionotropic glutamate receptors.

    PubMed

    Halliwell, R F; Davey, P G; Lambert, J J

    1995-12-01

    The neurotoxic effects of 4-quinolones alone and in combination with certain non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) may be related to an interaction at GABAA and/or ionotropic glutamate receptors. In the present study, the effects of the fluoroquinolone, ciprofloxacin, alone and in combination with the NSAID, biphenyl acetic acid (BPAA), were examined on GABAA-, NMDA-, AMPA-, and kainate-evoked current responses recorded from cultured rat hippocampal neurones, using the whole cell patch clamp technique. GABA-evoked currents were reversibly inhibited by bicuculline (3 microM) and ciprofloxacin (100 microM) to 11 +/- 5 and 38 +/- 7% of control, respectively. BPAA (100 microM) had little affect on the GABA current (the response was 82 +/- 4% of control) but enhanced the inhibitory potency of ciprofloxacin by approx. 3000-fold. The antagonist effects of ciprofloxacin (30 microM) and ciprofloxacin (0.03 microM) together with BPAA (100 microM) on the GABA-evoked current were not voltage-dependent. Whole cell currents evoked by NMDA, AMPA or kainate were little influenced by ciprofloxacin (100 microM), BPAA (100 microM), or ciprofloxacin plus BPAA (both at 100 microM); the responses being > or = 90% of control in all cases. These data suggest that the proconvulsant effects of quinolones when combined with BPAA may be related to antagonism of central GABAA receptors but not to an interaction at ionotropic glutamate receptors. PMID:8788959

  3. Production of the amino acids l-glutamate, l-lysine, l-ornithine and l-arginine from arabinose by recombinant Corynebacterium glutamicum.

    PubMed

    Schneider, Jens; Niermann, Karin; Wendisch, Volker F

    2011-07-10

    Amino acid production processes with Corynebacterium glutamicum are based on media containing glucose from starch hydrolysis or fructose and sucrose as present in molasses. Simultaneous utilization of various carbon sources, including glucose, fructose and sucrose, in blends is a typical characteristic of this bacterium. The renewable non-food carbon source arabinose, which is present in hemicellulosic hydrolysates, cannot be utilized by most C. glutamicum strains. Heterologous expression of the araBAD operon from Escherichia coli in the wild-type and in an l-lysine producing strain of C. glutamicum was shown to enable production of l-glutamate and l-lysine, respectively, from arabinose as sole carbon source. l-Ornithine and l-arginine producing strains were constructed and shown to produce l-ornithine and l-arginine from arabinose when araBAD from E. coli was expressed. Moreover, the recombinant strains produced l-glutamate, l-lysine, l-ornithine and l-arginine respectively, from arabinose also when glucose-arabinose blends were used as carbon sources. PMID:20638422

  4. Dual mechanisms regulating glutamate decarboxylases and accumulation of gamma-aminobutyric acid in tea (Camellia sinensis) leaves exposed to multiple stresses

    PubMed Central

    Mei, Xin; Chen, Yiyong; Zhang, Lingyun; Fu, Xiumin; Wei, Qing; Grierson, Don; Zhou, Ying; Huang, Yahui; Dong, Fang; Yang, Ziyin

    2016-01-01

    γ-Aminobutyric acid (GABA) is one of the major inhibitory neurotransmitters in the central nervous system. It has multiple positive effects on mammalian physiology and is an important bioactive component of tea (Camellia sinensis). GABA generally occurs at a very low level in plants but GABA content increases substantially after exposure to a range of stresses, especially oxygen-deficiency. During processing of tea leaves, a combination of anoxic stress and mechanical damage are essential for the high accumulation of GABA. This is believed to be initiated by a change in glutamate decarboxylase activity, but the underlying mechanisms are unclear. In the present study we characterized factors regulating the expression and activity of three tea glutamate decarboxylase genes (CsGAD1, 2, and 3), and their encoded enzymes. The results suggests that, unlike the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana, there are dual mechanisms regulating the accumulation of GABA in tea leaves exposed to multiple stresses, including activation of CsGAD1 enzymatic activity by calmodulin upon the onset of the stress and accumulation of high levels of CsGAD2 mRNA induced by a combination of anoxic stress and mechanical damage. PMID:27021285

  5. Dual mechanisms regulating glutamate decarboxylases and accumulation of gamma-aminobutyric acid in tea (Camellia sinensis) leaves exposed to multiple stresses.

    PubMed

    Mei, Xin; Chen, Yiyong; Zhang, Lingyun; Fu, Xiumin; Wei, Qing; Grierson, Don; Zhou, Ying; Huang, Yahui; Dong, Fang; Yang, Ziyin

    2016-01-01

    γ-Aminobutyric acid (GABA) is one of the major inhibitory neurotransmitters in the central nervous system. It has multiple positive effects on mammalian physiology and is an important bioactive component of tea (Camellia sinensis). GABA generally occurs at a very low level in plants but GABA content increases substantially after exposure to a range of stresses, especially oxygen-deficiency. During processing of tea leaves, a combination of anoxic stress and mechanical damage are essential for the high accumulation of GABA. This is believed to be initiated by a change in glutamate decarboxylase activity, but the underlying mechanisms are unclear. In the present study we characterized factors regulating the expression and activity of three tea glutamate decarboxylase genes (CsGAD1, 2, and 3), and their encoded enzymes. The results suggests that, unlike the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana, there are dual mechanisms regulating the accumulation of GABA in tea leaves exposed to multiple stresses, including activation of CsGAD1 enzymatic activity by calmodulin upon the onset of the stress and accumulation of high levels of CsGAD2 mRNA induced by a combination of anoxic stress and mechanical damage. PMID:27021285

  6. Surgical removal of visceral fat decreases plasma free fatty acid and increases insulin sensitivity on liver and peripheral tissue in monosodium glutamate (MSG)-obese rats.

    PubMed

    Kim, Y W; Kim, J Y; Lee, S K

    1999-10-01

    In order to evaluate the role of visceral and subcutaneous fat tissue in insulin sensitivity and lipid metabolism, we measured the fasting levels of plasma free fatty acid (FFA) and insulin, glucose disappearance rate (Rd), and hepatic glucose production rate (HGP) after surgical removal of visceral (VF) or subcutaneous (SF) fat tissue in monosodium glutamate-obese (MSG-Ob) rats. Monosodium glutamate obesity was induced in rats by neonatal injection of MSG. Surgery to remove fat was done at 15 weeks of age. The experiments were done four weeks after the surgery. MSG-Ob rats showed increased levels of FFA, insulin, and HGP and decreased Rd compared to normal rats. In the VF group, the FFA level and HGP were decreased to normal values, Rd was partially normalized, but the level of insulin did not change significantly compared to MSG-Ob. In the SF group, FFA and Rd were partially normalized, but HGP was not suppressed significantly compared to MSG-Ob. These results suggest that visceral fat affects the insulin sensitivity of liver and FFA concentration more than subcutaneous fat; however, no significant difference was shown on whole body insulin sensitivity and fasting insulin concentration. PMID:10576150

  7. Immunogenicity and protective efficacy of Bacillus anthracis poly-gamma-D-glutamic acid capsule covalently coupled to a protein carrier using a novel triazine-based conjugation strategy.

    PubMed

    Joyce, Joseph; Cook, James; Chabot, Donald; Hepler, Robert; Shoop, Wesley; Xu, Qiuwei; Stambaugh, Thomas; Aste-Amezaga, Miguel; Wang, Su; Indrawati, Lani; Bruner, Mark; Friedlander, Arthur; Keller, Paul; Caulfield, Michael

    2006-02-24

    The capsular polypeptide of Bacillus anthracis is composed of a unique polyglutamic acid polymer in which D-glutamate monomers are joined by gamma-peptidyl bonds. The capsule is poorly immunogenic, and efforts at exploiting the polymer for vaccine development have focused on increasing its inherent immunogenicity through chemical coupling to immune-stimulating protein carriers. The usual strategy has employed carbodiimide-based condensing reagents for activation of free alpha-carboxyl groups, despite reports that this chemistry may lead to chain scission. We have purified the high molecular mass capsule to >95% homogeneity and have demonstrated that the polymer contains >99% poly-gamma-D-glutamic acid. The predominant structure of the polymer as assessed by circular dichroism and multiangle laser light scattering was unordered at near-neutral pH. We investigated the effects of various activation chemistries, and we demonstrated that carbodiimide treatment under aqueous conditions results in significant cleavage of the gamma-peptidyl bond, whereas scission is significantly reduced in nonaqueous polar solvents, although undesired side chain modification was still observed. An activation chemistry was developed using the triazine-based reagent 4-(4,6-dimethoxy (1,3,5)triazin-2-yl)-4-methylmorpholinium chloride, which allowed for controlled and reproducible derivatization of alpha-carbonyls. In a two-pot reaction scheme, activated capsule was derivatized with a sulfhydryl-reactive heterobifunctional moiety and was subsequently coupled to thiolated carrier protein. This conjugate elicited very high capsule-specific immune titers in mice. More importantly, mice immunized with conjugated capsule exhibited good protection against lethal challenge from a virulent B. anthracis strain in two models of infection. We also showed, for the first time, that treatment of capsule with carbodiimide significantly reduced recognition by capsule-specific antisera concurrent with the

  8. Temperature-Induced Aggregate Transitions in Mixtures of Cationic Ammonium Gemini Surfactant with Anionic Glutamic Acid Surfactant in Aqueous Solution.

    PubMed

    Ji, Xiuling; Tian, Maozhang; Wang, Yilin

    2016-02-01

    The aggregation behaviors of the mixtures of cationic gemini surfactant 1,4-bis(dodecyl-N,N-dimethylammonium bromide)-2,3-butanediol (C12C4(OH)2C12Br2) and anionic amino acid surfactant N-dodecanoylglutamic acid (C12Glu) in aqueous solution of pH = 10.0 have been studied. The mixture forms spherical micelles, vesicles, and wormlike micelles at 25 °C by changing mixing ratios and/or total surfactant concentration. Then these aggregates undergo a series of transitions upon increasing the temperature. Smaller spherical micelles transfer into larger vesicles, vesicles transfer into solid spherical aggregates and then into larger irregular aggregates, and entangled wormlike micelles transfer into branched wormlike micelles. Moreover, the larger irregular aggregates and branched micelles finally lead to precipitation and clouding phenomenon, respectively. All these transitions are thermally reversible, and the transition temperatures can be tuned by varying the mixing ratios and/or total concentration. These temperature-dependent aggregate transitions can be elucidated on the basis of the temperature-induced variations in the dehydration, electrostatic interaction, and hydrogen bonds of the headgroup area and in the hydrophobic interaction between the hydrocarbon chains. The results suggest that the surfactants carrying multiple binding sites will greatly improve the regulation ability and temperature sensitivity. PMID:26750978

  9. Bioactive Co-Cr alloy for biomedical applications prepared by surface modification using self-assembled monolayers and poly-γ-glutamic acid.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chao; Matsunami, Chisato; Shirosaki, Yuki; Miyazaki, Toshiki

    2015-01-01

    Cobalt-chromium (Co-Cr) alloys are used in clinical practice for the hard tissue reconstruction because of their favorable biocompatibility and mechanical properties. However, their applications have been limited because of their poor bioactivity, making them poor at bone-bonding. In this study, the bioactivity of a Co-Cr alloy was evaluated following the immobilization of cross-linked poly-γ-glutamic acid (γ-PGA) onto its surface via the formation of 11-aminoundecylphosphonic acid self-assembled monolayers (SAMs). Results of X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy revealed the presence of a new P2p peak, which confirms SAMs formation. Furthermore, the surface became highly hydrophobic following the immobilization with γ-PGA. Subsequent treatment with CaCl2 at 0.5 M or more and soaking in a simulated body fluid led to the formation of a low crystalline apatite. The present results show that chemical modification can be used to induce the formation of an apatite layer on the surface of a Co-Cr alloy in simulated body fluid. PMID:26438996

  10. Glutamic acid decarboxylase activity is stimulated in quail retina neuronal cells transformed by Rous sarcoma virus and is regulated by pp60v-src.

    PubMed Central

    Crisanti, P; Lorinet, A M; Calothy, G; Pessac, B

    1985-01-01

    Rous sarcoma virus (RSV) stimulates in quail embryo neuro-retina (NR) cultures the specific activity of glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD), the enzyme responsible for the synthesis of gamma-aminobutyric acid, a major inhibitory neurotransmitter in NR and in central nervous system. In quail embryo NR cultures transformed by ts NY-68, a thermodependent transformation-defective mutant of RSV, stimulation of GAD activity is regulated by pp60v-src, the product of the src gene of RSV. Fibroblasts and myoblasts have a very low GAD activity that is not stimulated after transformation by RSV. Neuronal clones, previously derived from ts NY-68-transformed established NR cell lines, have a high GAD activity which is regulated by pp60v-src, while other clones have a low GAD activity apparently not regulated by pp60v-src. These data indicate that pp60v-src selectively activates the expression of GAD in distinct neuronal cells of quail embryo NR cultures transformed by RSV. GAD activity is also stimulated in NR cells infected with viruses containing v-mil. PMID:2992933

  11. The expression of a mitochondria-localized glutamic acid-rich protein (MGARP/OSAP) is under the regulation of the HPG axis.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Mingxue; Wang, Yifeng; Qi, Shaoling; Wang, Jian; Zhang, Shuping

    2011-06-01

    The hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal (HPG) axis exerts a profound effect on animal development, reproduction, and response to stress, and new insights into its complicated functional activities are continuously being made. In the present study, by using immunohistochemical studies and different mouse models (ovariectomy and ob/ob mice), we systemically analyzed the expression of a novel mitochondria-localized glutamic acid-rich protein (MGARP)/ovary-specific acid protein and demonstrated that MGARP is under the regulation of the HPG axis. MGARP is highly enriched in steroidogenic tissues and the visual system. Interestingly, its expression increases as mice develop. Early in development, MGARP is mainly detected in the retina and adrenal gland. At this early developmental stage, its expression is not detectable in the gonads, but its expression in the gonads dramatically increases during the first 2-4 wk after birth. Importantly, MGARP levels correlate with estrogen levels in the ovaries during the estrous cycle, and estrogen regulates the expression of MGARP in a tissue-specific manner and through a feedback regulatory mechanism. Functional inhibition of GnRH with an antagonist strongly reduces MGARP levels, and knockout of leptin (ob/ob) significantly reduces the MGARP expression in follicular granular cells. We proposed a model that elucidates the role MGARP plays in the HPG axis. Within the HPG axis loop, MGARP participates in hormone biosynthesis while being under the regulation of the hormones derived from the HPG axis. PMID:21447634

  12. The use of concentrated monosodium glutamate wastewater as a conditioning agent for adjusting acidity and minimizing ammonia volatilization in livestock manure composting.

    PubMed

    Liu, Li; Kong, Haimin; Lu, Beibei; Wang, Jibing; Xie, Yuan; Fang, Ping

    2015-09-15

    In this study, concentrated monosodium glutamate waste (CMGW) was proposed as a conditioning agent to adjust acidity and decrease ammonia (NH3) volatilization in thermophilic aerobic composting based on two incubation experiments. The results showed that with the addition of CMGW, NH3 volatilization of compost mixture under high temperature phase decreased significantly and pH met the current national standard within 5.5-8.5. When CMGW dosage increased to 2% (v/w), the decrease in NH3 volatilization was as high as 78.9%. This effect was enhanced by repeated application of CMGW. Furthermore, although the electrical conductivity increased with the application of CMGW, both the germination index and the microbial respiration of compost mixture implied that CMGW had no negative effects on the maturity of compost, instead, a comprehensive maturity might be accelerated. It was concluded that CMGW was an optional conditioning agent for thermophilic aerobic composting of livestock manure in regards to adjusting acidity and preventing nitrogen loss from NH3 volatilization. PMID:26164271

  13. Folic Acid

    MedlinePlus

    Folic acid is a B vitamin. It helps the body make healthy new cells. Everyone needs folic acid. For women who may get pregnant, it is really important. Getting enough folic acid before and during pregnancy can prevent major birth ...

  14. Folic Acid

    MedlinePlus

    Folic acid is used to treat or prevent folic acid deficiency. It is a B-complex vitamin needed by ... Folic acid comes in tablets. It usually is taken once a day. Follow the directions on your prescription label ...

  15. Aspartic acid

    MedlinePlus

    ... also called asparaginic acid. Aspartic acid helps every cell in the body work. It plays a role in: Hormone production and release Normal nervous system function Plant sources of aspartic acid include: Legumes such as ...

  16. Immunocytochemical localization of glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD) and substance P in neural areas mediating motion-induced emesis: Effects of vagal stimulation on GAD immunoreactivity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Damelio, F.; Gibbs, M. A.; Mehler, W. R.; Daunton, Nancy G.; Fox, Robert A.

    1991-01-01

    Immunocytochemical methods were employed to localize the neurotransmitter amino acid gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) by means of its biosynthetic enzyme glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD) and the neuropeptide substance P in the area postrema (AP), area subpostrema (ASP), nucleus of the tractus solitarius (NTS), and gelatinous nucleus (GEL). In addition, electrical stimulation was applied to the night vagus nerve at the cervical level to assess the effects on GAD-immunoreactivity (GAR-IR). GAD-IR terminals and fibers were observed in the AP, ASP, NTS, and GEL. They showed pronounced density at the level of the ASP and gradual decrease towards the solitary complex. Nerve cells were not labelled in our preparations. Ultrastructural studies showed symmetric or asymmetric synaptic contracts between labelled terminals and non-immunoreactive dendrites, axons, or neurons. Some of the labelled terminals contained both clear- and dense-core vesicles. Our preliminary findings, after electrical stimulation of the vagus nerve, revealed a bilateral decrease of GAD-IR that was particularly evident at the level of the ASP. SP-immunoreactive (SP-IR) terminals and fibers showed varying densities in the AP, ASP, NTS, and GEL. In our preparations, the lateral sub-division of the NTS showed the greatest accumulation. The ASP showed medium density of immunoreactive varicosities and terminals and the AP and GEL displayed scattered varicose axon terminals. The electron microscopy revealed that all immunoreactive terminals contained clear-core vesicles which make symmetric or asymmetric synaptic contact with unlabelled dendrites. It is suggested that the GABAergic terminals might correspond to vagal afferent projections and that GAD/GABA and substance P might be co-localized in the same terminal allowing the possibility of a regulated release of the transmitters in relation to demands.

  17. New Method for Determining Isotopic Values of Glutamic Acid and Phenylalanine for Estimation of Precise Trophic Position in Food Web Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamath, T.; Broek, T.; McCarthy, M.

    2012-12-01

    Compound Specific Isotope Analysis of Amino Acids (CSI-AA) has emerged as a highly precise new method of determining trophic levels of both aquatic and terrestrial organisms. Multiple studies have now shown that δ15N values for glutamic acid (Glu) and phenylalanine (Phe) can be coupled to provide extremely precise estimates of trophic position in diverse food web studies. The standard gas chromatography—isotope ratio mass spectrometer (GC-IRMS) approach is presently limited to a select number of labs since necessary equipment is both expensive and not widely accessible. Furthermore, typical GC-IRMS δ15N precision (±1‰) is significantly lower than usual bulk δ15N values (±0.1‰), thus presenting a considerable setback for precise trophic level calculations. In this study, we develop a new dual-column method to purify Glu and Phe using high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). Phe is purified using an analytical scale reverse phase column embedded with anionic ion-pairing reagents and collected using automated fraction collection. Glu is separated from the non-polar amino acids using the same column and further purified using a hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography (HILIC) cation and anion-exchange column and collected via automated fraction collection. Isotopic analysis of the purified AAs is then conducted on an elemental analyzer—isotope ratio mass spectrometer (EA-IRMS). As a test of this method, we present and compare the trophic position of five marine organisms—cyanobacteria, deep-sea bamboo coral, juvenile and adult white sea bass, and harbor seal, calculated using Glu and Phe δ15N values produced by both GC-IRMS and our HPLC-EA-IRMS approach. The preliminary results of this study suggest that the HPLC-EA-IRMS method is a viable alternative to GC-IRMS, which should allow accurate trophic position estimates to be made by more researchers using more readily available instrumentation.

  18. N-Acetylglucosaminidases from CAZy Family GH3 Are Really Glycoside Phosphorylases, Thereby Explaining Their Use of Histidine as an Acid/Base Catalyst in Place of Glutamic Acid*

    PubMed Central

    Macdonald, Spencer S.; Blaukopf, Markus; Withers, Stephen G.

    2015-01-01

    CAZy glycoside hydrolase family GH3 consists primarily of stereochemistry-retaining β-glucosidases but also contains a subfamily of β-N-acetylglucosaminidases. Enzymes from this subfamily were recently shown to use a histidine residue within a His-Asp dyad contained in a signature sequence as their catalytic acid/base residue. Reasons for their use of His rather than the Glu or Asp found in other glycosidases were not apparent. Through studies on a representative member, the Nag3 β-N-acetylglucosaminidase from Cellulomonas fimi, we now show that these enzymes act preferentially as glycoside phosphorylases. Their need to accommodate an anionic nucleophile within the enzyme active site explains why histidine is used as an acid/base catalyst in place of the anionic glutamate seen in other GH3 family members. Kinetic and mechanistic studies reveal that these enzymes also employ a double-displacement mechanism involving a covalent glycosyl-enzyme intermediate, which was directly detected by mass spectrometry. Phosphate has no effect on the rates of formation of the glycosyl-enzyme intermediate, but it accelerates turnover of the N-acetylglucosaminyl-enzyme intermediate ∼3-fold, while accelerating turnover of the glucosyl-enzyme intermediate several hundredfold. These represent the first reported examples of retaining β-glycoside phosphorylases, and the first instance of free β-GlcNAc-1-phosphate in a biological context. PMID:25533455

  19. Resolution and isolation of enantiomers of (±)-isoxsuprine using thin silica gel layers impregnated with L-glutamic acid, comparison of separation of its diastereomers prepared with chiral derivatizing reagents having L-amino acids as chiral auxiliaries.

    PubMed

    Bhushan, Ravi; Nagar, Hariom

    2015-03-01

    Thin silica gel layers impregnated with optically pure l-glutamic acid were used for direct resolution of enantiomers of (±)-isoxsuprine in their native form. Three chiral derivatizing reagents, based on DFDNB moiety, were synthesized having l-alanine, l-valine and S-benzyl-l-cysteine as chiral auxiliaries. These were used to prepare diastereomers under microwave irradiation and conventional heating. The diastereomers were separated by reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography on a C18 column with detection at 340 nm using gradient elution with mobile phase containing aqueous trifluoroacetic acid and acetonitrile in different compositions and by thin-layer chromatography (TLC) on reversed phase (RP) C18 plates. Diastereomers prepared with enantiomerically pure (+)-isoxsuprine were used as standards for the determination of the elution order of diastereomers of (±)-isoxsuprine. The elution order in the experimental study of RP-TLC and RP-HPLC supported the developed optimized structures of diastereomers based on density functional theory. The limit of detection was 0.1-0.09 µg/mL in TLC while it was in the range of 22-23 pg/mL in HPLC and 11-13 ng/mL in RP-TLC for each enantiomer. The conditions of derivatization and chromatographic separation were optimized. The method was validated for accuracy, precision, limit of detection and limit of quantification. PMID:25044026

  20. Amino acid residues involved in the catalytic mechanism of NAD-dependent glutamate dehydrogenase from Halobacterium salinarum.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Pomares, F; Ferrer, J; Camacho, M; Pire, C; LLorca, F; Bonete, M J

    1999-02-01

    The pH dependence of kinetic parameters for a competitive inhibitor (glutarate) was determined in order to obtain information on the chemical mechanism for NAD-dependent glutamate dehydrogenase from Halobacterium salinarum. The maximum velocity is pH dependent, decreasing at low pHs giving a pK value of 7.19+/-0.13, while the V/K for l-glutamate at 30 degrees C decreases at low and high pHs, yielding pK values of 7.9+/-0.2 and 9.8+/-0.2, respectively. The glutarate pKis profile decreases at high pHs, yielding a pK of 9. 59+/-0.09 at 30 degrees C. The values of ionization heat calculated from the change in pK with temperature are: 1.19 x 10(4), 5.7 x 10(3), 7 x 10(3), 6.6 x 10(3) cal mol-1, for the residues involved. All these data suggest that the groups required for catalysis and/or binding are lysine, histidine and tyrosine. The enzyme shows a time-dependent loss in glutamate oxidation activity when incubated with diethyl pyrocarbonate (DEPC). Inactivation follows pseudo-first-order kinetics with a second-order rate constant of 53 M-1min-1. The pKa of the titratable group was pK1=6.6+/-0.6. Inactivation with ethyl acetimidate also shows pseudo-first-order kinetics as well as inactivation with TNM yielding second-order constants of 1.2 M-1min-1 and 2.8 M-1min-1, and pKas of 8.36 and 9.0, respectively. The proposed mechanism involves hydrogen binding of each of the two carboxylic groups to tyrosyl residues; histidine interacts with one of the N-hydrogens of the l-glutamate amino group. We also corroborate the presence of a conservative lysine that has a remarkable ability to coordinate a water molecule that would act as general base. PMID:10076069

  1. Gabaculine-resistant glutamate 1-semialdehyde aminotransferase of Synechococcus. Deletion of a tripeptide close to the NH2 terminus and internal amino acid substitution.

    PubMed

    Grimm, B; Smith, A J; Kannangara, C G; Smith, M

    1991-07-01

    Glutamate 1-semialdehyde aminotransferase (GSA-AT) is the last enzyme in the C5 pathway converting glutamate into the tetrapyrrole precursor delta-aminolevulinate in plants, algae, and several bacteria. Sequence analysis of the genes encoding GSA-AT in barley, Synechococcus, and Escherichia coli revealed 50-70% similarity in the primary structures of the proteins. The enzyme is inhibited rapidly by gabaculine when added in approximately stoichiometric amounts with the enzyme. A gabaculine-tolerant Synechococcus strain, GR6, was found to produce a GSA-AT less sensitive to the inhibitor. Accordingly, the mutant gene was isolated and sequenced. In comparison with the wild-type gene it contains a deletion of nine nucleotides (position 12-20) and a guanine to adenine substitution (position 743). This resulted in the loss of the amino acids serine, proline, and phenylalanine (position 5-7) close to the NH2 terminus of the enzyme and an exchange of Met-248 for isoleucine in the middle of the polypeptide chain. Wild-type and mutant GSA-AT were expressed in E. coli and purified close to homogeneity. Although the specific activity of the mutant GSA-AT was only one-fifth of the wild type, it displayed a 100-fold increased resistance to gabaculine. Peaks in the absorption spectrum of the purified recombinant GSA-ATs at 335 and 417 nm are typical of a transaminase containing a B6 cofactor. Incubation with substrate and with inhibitor induced spectral changes characteristic of other gabaculine-sensitive, B6-requiring enzymes. PMID:1905724

  2. Biosynthesis of a Novel Glutamate Racemase Containing a Site-Specific 7-Hydroxycoumarin Amino Acid: Enzyme–Ligand Promiscuity Revealed at the Atomistic Level

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Glutamate racemase (GR) catalyzes the cofactor independent stereoinversion of l- to d-glutamate for biosynthesis of bacterial cell walls. Because of its essential nature, this enzyme is under intense scrutiny as a drug target for the design of novel antimicrobial agents. However, the flexibility of the enzyme has made inhibitor design challenging. Previous steered molecular dynamics (MD), docking, and experimental studies have suggested that the enzyme forms highly varied complexes with different competitive inhibitor scaffolds. The current study employs a mutant orthogonal tRNA/aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase pair to genetically encode a non-natural fluorescent amino acid, l-(7-hydroxycoumarin-4-yl) ethylglycine (7HC), into a region (Tyr53) remote from the active site (previously identified by MD studies as undergoing ligand-associated changes) to generate an active mutant enzyme (GRY53/7HC). The GRY53/7HC enzyme is an active racemase, which permitted us to examine the nature of these idiosyncratic ligand-associated phenomena. One type of competitive inhibitor resulted in a dose-dependent quenching of the fluorescence of GRY53/7HC, while another type of competitive inhibitor resulted in a dose-dependent increase in fluorescence of GRY53/7HC. In order to investigate the environmental changes of the 7HC ring system that are distinctly associated with each of the GRY53/7HC–ligand complexes, and thus the source of the disparate quenching phenomena, a parallel computational study is described, which includes essential dynamics, ensemble docking and MD simulations of the relevant GRY53/7HC–ligand complexes. The changes in the solvent exposure of the 7HC ring system due to ligand-associated GR changes are consistent with the experimentally observed quenching phenomena. This study describes an approach for rationally predicting global protein allostery resulting from enzyme ligation to distinctive inhibitor scaffolds. The implications for fragment-based drug discovery and

  3. Acid Rain.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Openshaw, Peter

    1987-01-01

    Provides some background information on acid deposition. Includes a historical perspective, describes some effects of acid precipitation, and discusses acid rain in the United Kingdom. Contains several experiments that deal with the effects of acid rain on water quality and soil. (TW)

  4. Three new 2-D metal-organic frameworks containing 1-D metal chains bridged by N-benzesulfonyl-glutamic acid: Syntheses, crystal structures and properties

    SciTech Connect

    Ma Lufang; Huo Xiankuan; Wang Liya Wang Jiange; Fan Yaoting

    2007-05-15

    To explore the possibility of obtaining the metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) bearing the bsgluH{sub 2} ligand, two new Cd(II) and one Cu(II) coordination polymers, [Cd(bsglu)(bipy)] {sub n} (1), [Cd(bsglu).(H{sub 2}O)] {sub n} (2) and {l_brace}[Cu{sub 2}(bsglu){sub 2}(bipy){sub 2}].4H{sub 2}O{r_brace} {sub n} (3) (bsglu=N-benzesulfonyl-glutamic acid bianion, bipy=2,2'-bipyridine) were synthesized and characterized by IR, elemental analysis and X-ray diffraction analysis. Compounds 1 and 3 exhibit one-dimensional coordination chains, which are further connected to form two-dimensional supramolecular networks through {pi}-{pi} aromatic stacking interactions in a novel zipper-like way. Compound 2 presents a two-dimensional layer structure. To the best of our knowledge, 2 is the first two-dimensional complex formed from transition metal and bsgluH{sub 2} ligand. Interestingly, the bsglu anion exhibits remarkable versatile coordination modes in these complexes. Fluorescent analyses show that 1 exhibits photoluminescence in the solid state. Magnetic measurements for 3 revealed that the Cu(II) chain exhibit a weak antiferromagnetic behavior with a J value of -0.606 cm{sup -1}. - Graphical abstract: Three new complexes, [Cd(bsglu)(bipy)] {sub n} (1), [Cd(bsglu).(H{sub 2}O)] {sub n} (2) and {l_brace}[Cu{sub 2}(bsglu){sub 2}(bipy){sub 2}].4H{sub 2}O{r_brace} {sub n} (3), constructed from Cd(II) or Cu(II) salt with N-benzesulfonyl-glutamic acid were synthesized and characterized. Compounds 1 and 3 exhibit one-dimensional chains which are further connected to form two-dimensional supramolecular networks through {pi}-{pi} aromatic stacking interactions in a novel zipper-like way. Compound 2 presents a two-dimensional layer structure. Luminescence of 1 and magnetic properties of 3 are also investigated.

  5. Brain amino acid sensing.

    PubMed

    Tsurugizawa, T; Uneyama, H; Torii, K

    2014-09-01

    The 20 different amino acids, in blood as well as in the brain, are strictly maintained at the same levels throughout the day, regardless of food intake. Gastric vagal afferents only respond to free glutamate and sugars, providing recognition of food intake and initiating digestion. Metabolic control of amino acid homeostasis and diet-induced thermogenesis is triggered by this glutamate signalling in the stomach through the gut-brain axis. Rats chronically fed high-sugar and high-fat diets do not develop obesity when a 1% (w/v) monosodium glutamate (MSG) solution is available in a choice paradigm. Deficiency of the essential amino acid lysine (Lys) induced a plasticity in rats in response to Lys. This result shows how the body is able to identify deficient nutrients to maintain homeostasis. This plastic effect is induced by activin A activity in the brain, particularly in certain neurons in the lateral hypothalamic area (LHA) which is the centre for amino acid homeostasis and appetite. These neurons respond to glutamate signalling in the oral cavity by which umami taste is perceived. They play a quantitative role in regulating ingestion of deficient nutrients, thereby leading to a healthier life. After recovery from malnutrition, rats prefer MSG solutions, which serve as biomarkers for protein nutrition. PMID:25200295

  6. STEREOLOGICAL ESTIMATES OF THE BASAL FOREBRAIN CELL POPULATION IN THE RAT, INCLUDING NEURONS CONTAINING CHOLINE ACETYLTRANSFERASE (ChAT), GLUTAMIC ACID DECARBOXYLASE (GAD) OR PHOSPHATE-ACTIVATED GLUTAMINASE (PAG) AND COLOCALIZING VESICULAR GLUTAMATE TRANSPORTERS (VGluTs)

    PubMed Central

    GRITTI, I.; HENNY, P.; GALLONI, F.; MAINVILLE, L.; MARIOTTI, M.; JONES, B. E.

    2006-01-01

    The basal forebrain (BF) plays an important role in modulating cortical activity and influencing attention, learning and memory. These activities are fulfilled importantly yet not entirely by cholinergic neurons. Noncholinergic neurons also contribute and are comprised by GABAergic neurons and other possibly glutamatergic neurons. The aim of the present study was to estimate the total number of cells in the BF of the rat and the proportions of that total represented by cholinergic, GABAergic and glutamatergic neurons. For this purpose, cells were counted using unbiased stereological methods within the medial septum, diagonal band, magnocellular preoptic nucleus, substantia innominata and globus pallidus in sections stained for Nissl substance and/or the neurotransmitter enzymes, choline acetyltransferase (ChAT), glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD) or phosphate-activated glutaminase (PAG). In Nissl-stained sections, the total number of neurons in the BF was estimated as ~355,000 and the numbers of ChAT-immuno-positive (+) as ~22,000, GAD+ ~119,000 and PAG+ ~316,000, corresponding to ~5%, ~35% and ~90% of the total. Thus, of the large population of BF neurons, only a small proportion has the capacity to synthesize acetylcholine (ACh), one third to synthesize GABA and the vast majority to synthesize glutamate (Glu). Moreover, through the presence of PAG, a proportion of ACh- and GABA-synthesizing neurons also have the capacity to synthesize Glu. In sections dual fluorescent immunostained for vesicular transporters, VGluT3 and not VGluT2 was present in the cell bodies of most PAG+ and ChAT+ and half the GAD+ cells. Given previous results showing that VGluT2 and not VGluT3 was present in BF axon terminals and not colocalized with VAChT or VGAT, we conclude that the BF cell population influences cortical and subcortical regions through neurons which release ACh, GABA or Glu from their terminals but which in part can also synthesize and release Glu from their soma or

  7. Nanoscaled poly(L-glutamic acid)/doxorubicin-amphiphile complex as pH-responsive drug delivery system for effective treatment of nonsmall cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Li, Mingqiang; Song, Wantong; Tang, Zhaohui; Lv, Shixian; Lin, Lin; Sun, Hai; Li, Quanshun; Yang, Yan; Hong, Hua; Chen, Xuesi

    2013-03-13

    Nonsmall cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is the leading cause of cancer-related death worldwide. Herein, we develop a polypeptide-based block ionomer complex formed by anionic methoxy poly(ethylene glycol)-b-poly(L-glutamic acid) (mPEG-b-PLG) and cationic anticancer drug doxorubicin hydrochloride (DOX·HCl) for NSCLC treatment. This complex spontaneously self-assembled into spherical nanoparticles (NPs) in aqueous solutions via electrostatic interaction and hydrophobic stack, with a high loading efficiency (almost 100%) and negative surface charge. DOX·HCl release from the drug-loaded micellar nanoparticles (mPEG-b-PLG-DOX·HCl) was slow at physiological pH, but obviously increased at the acidic pH mimicking the endosomal/lysosomal environment. In vitro cytotoxicity and hemolysis assays demonstrated that the block copolypeptide was cytocompatible and hemocompatible, and the presence of copolypeptide carrier could reduce the hemolysis ratio of DOX·HCl significantly. Cellular uptake and cytotoxicity studies suggested that mPEG-b-PLG-DOX·HCl was taken up by A549 cells via endocytosis, with a slightly slower cellular internalization and lower cytotoxicity compared with free DOX·HCl. The pharmacokinetics study in rats showed that DOX·HCl-loaded micellar NPs significantly prolonged the blood circulation time. Moreover, mPEG-b-PLG-DOX·HCl exhibited enhanced therapeutic efficacy, increased apoptosis in tumor tissues, and reduced systemic toxicity in nude mice bearing A549 lung cancer xenograft compared with free DOX·HCl, which were further confirmed by histological and immunohistochemical analyses. The results demonstrated that mPEG-b-PLG was a promising vector to deliver DOX·HCl into tumors and achieve improved pharmacokinetics, biodistribution and efficacy of DOX·HCl with reduced toxicity. These features strongly supported the interest of developing mPEG-b-PLG-DOX·HCl as a valid therapeutic modality in the therapy of human NSCLC and other solid tumors. PMID:23410916

  8. A trilogy on. delta. -aminolevulinic acid biosynthesis in plants and algae: I. Glutamate is the sole precursor to protoheme and heme a in maize. II. The UUC glutamate anticodon is a general feature of the tRNA required for ALA biosynthesis. III. Protein and ALA biosynthesis use the same tRNA

    SciTech Connect

    Schneegurt, M.A.

    1989-01-01

    Specifically radiolabeled substrates can be used to determine whether the heme and chlorophyll precursor {delta}-aminolevulinic acid (ALA) is synthesized via the fife-carbon pathway (incorporation from L-1-({sup 14}C)glutamate) or ALA synthase (incorporation from 2-({sup 14}C)glycine). In etiolated maize epicotyl sections, highly purified total cellular protoheme was labeled 29.7 times more effectively by glutamate than by glycine. Mitochondrial heme {alpha} was labeled 4.1 times more effectively by glutamate than by glycine. Cell-free plant and algal preparations require tRNA for the enzymatic conversion of glutamate to ALA. The tRNA required for ALA biosynthesis ahs been shown to contain the UUC glutamate anticodon, as determined by its specific retention through anticodon:anticodon interactions by tRNA{sup Phe(GAA)}-acrylamide. A fraction that was highly enriched in the RNA which supported ALA formation was obtained by affinity chromatography of RNA extracts from Chlorella vulgaris, Euglena garcilis, Cyanidium caldarium, Synechocystis, sp. PCC 6803, pea, and spinach. Other glutamate-accepting RNAs that were not retained by the affinity column were ineffective in supporting ALA formation.

  9. Expression pattern conferred by a glutamic acid-rich protein gene promoter in field-grown transgenic cassava (Manihot esculenta Crantz).

    PubMed

    Beltrán, J; Prías, M; Al-Babili, S; Ladino, Y; López, D; Beyer, P; Chavarriaga, P; Tohme, J

    2010-05-01

    A major constraint for incorporating new traits into cassava using biotechnology is the limited list of known/tested promoters that encourage the expression of transgenes in the cassava's starchy roots. Based on a previous report on the glutamic-acid-rich protein Pt2L4, indicating a preferential expression in roots, we cloned the corresponding gene including promoter sequence. A promoter fragment (CP2; 731 bp) was evaluated for its potential to regulate the expression of the reporter gene GUSPlus in transgenic cassava plants grown in the field. Intense GUS staining was observed in storage roots and vascular stem tissues; less intense staining in leaves; and none in the pith. Consistent with determined mRNA levels of the GUSPlus gene, fluorometric analyses revealed equal activities in root pulp and stems, but 3.5 times less in leaves. In a second approach, the activity of a longer promoter fragment (CP1) including an intrinsic intron was evaluated in carrot plants. CP1 exhibited a pronounced tissue preference, conferring high expression in the secondary phloem and vascular cambium of roots, but six times lower expression levels in leaf vascular tissues. Thus, CP1 and CP2 may be useful tools to improve nutritional and agronomical traits of cassava by genetic engineering. To date, this is the first study presenting field data on the specificity and potential of promoters for transgenic cassava. PMID:20336312

  10. Transferrin conjugated poly (γ-glutamic acid-maleimide-co-L-lactide)-1,2-dipalmitoylsn-glycero-3-phosphoethanolamine copolymer nanoparticles for targeting drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Caiyan; Liu, Xiaoguang; Liu, Junxing; Yang, Zhiwei; Rong, Xianghui; Li, Mingjun; Liang, Xingjie; Wu, Yan

    2014-11-01

    Targeted drug delivery strategies have shown great potential in solving some problems of chemotherapy, such as non-selectivity and severe side effects, thus enhancing the anti-tumor efficiency of chemotherapeutic agents. In this work, we have prepared a novel nanoparticle consisted of amphiphilic poly(γ-glutamic acid-maleimide-co-L-lactide)-1,2-dipalmitoylsn-glycero-3-phosphoethanolamine (γ-PGA-MAL-PLA-DPPE) copolymer decorated with transferrin (Tf), which can specifically deliver anti-cancer drug paclitaxel (PTX) to the tumor cells for targeting chemotherapy. These nanoparticles (NPs) have preferable particle size, high encapsulation efficiency and a pH-dependent release profile. As expected, The Tf modification mediate specific targeting to nasopharyngeal carcinoma (C666-1) cells and human cervical carcinoma (Hela) cells with the transferrin receptor (TfR) overexpressed and enhance cellular uptake of the NPs, as demonstrated by flow cytometry and confocal microscopy assays. In vitro cytotoxicity studies reveal that the NPs have excellent biocompatibility, and the presence of Tf enhance the activity of PTX to the targeted cells. All these results prove that Tf modified γ-PGA-MAL-PLA-DPPE NPs could facilitate the tumor-specific therapy. Therefore, such a targeting drug delivery system provides significant advances toward cancer therapy. PMID:25454663

  11. The synthesis and characterization of poly(γ-glutamic acid)-coated magnetite nanoparticles and their effects on antibacterial activity and cytotoxicity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inbaraj, B. Stephen; Kao, T. H.; Tsai, T. Y.; Chiu, C. P.; Kumar, R.; Chen, B. H.

    2011-02-01

    Magnetite nanoparticles (MNPs) modified with sodium and calcium salts of poly(γ-glutamic acid) (NaPGA and CaPGA) were synthesized by the coprecipitation method, followed by characterization and evaluation of their antibacterial and cytotoxic effects. Superparamagnetic MNPs are particularly attractive for magnetic driving as well as bacterial biofilm and cell targeting in in vivo applications. Characterization of synthesized MNPs by the Fourier transform infrared spectra and magnetization curves confirmed the PGA coating on MNPs. The mean diameter of NaPGA- and CaPGA-coated MNPs as determined by transmission electron microscopy was 11.8 and 14 nm, respectively, while the x-ray diffraction pattern revealed the as-synthesized MNPs to be pure magnetite. Based on agar dilution assay, both NaPGA- and CaPGA-coated MNPs showed a lower minimum inhibitory concentration in Salmonella enteritidis SE 01 than the commercial antibiotics linezolid and cefaclor, but the former was effective against Escherichia coli ATCC 8739 and Staphylococcus aureus ATCC 10832, whereas the latter was effective against Escherichia coli O157:H7 TWC 01. An in vitro cytotoxicity study in human skin fibroblast cells as measured by MTT assay implied the as-synthesized MNPs to be nontoxic. This outcome demonstrated that both γ-PGA-modified MNPs are cytocompatible and possess antibacterial activity in vitro, and thereby should be useful in in vivo studies for biomedical applications.

  12. A new, simple, green, and one-pot four-component synthesis of bare and poly(α,γ, L-glutamic acid)-capped silver nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Savanović, Igor; Uskoković, Vuk; Škapin, Srečo D.; Bračko, Ines; Jovanović, Uroš; Uskoković, Dragan

    2013-01-01

    A simple and green chemical method has been developed to synthesize stable bare and capped silver nanoparticles based on the reduction of silver ions by glucose and capping by poly(α,γ,L-glutamic acid) (PGA). The use of ammonia during synthesis was avoided. PGA has had a dual role in the synthesis and was used as a capping agent to make the silver nanoparticle more biocompatible and to protect the nanoparticles from agglomerating in the liquid medium. The synthesized PGA-capped silver nanoparticles in the size range 5–45 nm were stable over long periods of time, without signs of precipitation. Morphological examination has shown that the silver nanoparticles had a nearly spherical, multiply twinned structure. The effects of the reaction temperature and the reaction time during the synthesis were investigated too. The biocompatibility of the PGA-capped silver nano-particles is discussed in terms of in vitro toxicity with human intestinal Caco-2 cells. The samples were characterized by UV–Visible spectroscopy, field emission scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, and zeta potential measurements. PMID:24062597

  13. In vivo effects of ketamine on glutamate-glutamine and gamma-aminobutyric acid in obsessive-compulsive disorder: Proof of concept.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez, Carolyn I; Kegeles, Lawrence S; Levinson, Amanda; Ogden, R Todd; Mao, Xiangling; Milak, Matthew S; Vermes, Donna; Xie, Shan; Hunter, Liane; Flood, Pamela; Moore, Holly; Shungu, Dikoma C; Simpson, Helen B

    2015-08-30

    We previously reported the rapid and robust clinical effects of ketamine versus saline infusions in a proof-of-concept crossover trial in unmedicated adults with obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD). This study examined the concurrent neurochemical effects of ketamine versus saline infusions using proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy ((1)H MRS) during the clinical proof-of-concept crossover trial. Levels of the inhibitory neurotransmitter gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) and the excitatory neurochemicals glutamate+glutamine (Glx) were acquired in the medial prefrontal cortex (MPFC), a region implicated in OCD pathology. Seventeen unmedicated OCD adults received two intravenous infusions at least 1 week apart, one of saline and one of ketamine, while lying supine in a 3.0 T GE MR scanner. The order of each infusion pair was randomized. Levels of GABA and Glx were measured in the MPFC before, during, and after each infusion and normalized to water (W). A mixed effects model found that MPFC GABA/W significantly increased over time in the ketamine compared with the saline infusion. In contrast, there were no significant differences in Glx/W between the ketamine and saline infusions. Together with earlier evidence of low cortical GABA in OCD, our findings suggest that models of OCD pathology should consider the role of GABAergic abnormalities in OCD symptomatology. PMID:26104826

  14. Beware of Cocktails: Chain-Length Bidispersity Triggers Explosive Self-Assembly of Poly-l-Glutamic Acid β2-Fibrils.

    PubMed

    Hernik-Magoń, Agnieszka; Puławski, Wojciech; Fedorczyk, Bartłomiej; Tymecka, Dagmara; Misicka, Aleksandra; Szymczak, Piotr; Dzwolak, Wojciech

    2016-04-11

    Chain-length polydispersity is among the least understood factors governing the fibrillation propensity of homopolypeptides. For monodisperse poly-l-glutamic acid (PLGA), the tendency to form fibrils depends of the main-chain length. Long-chained PLGA, so-called (Glu)200, fibrillates more readily than short (Glu)5 fragments. Here we show that conversion of α-helical (Glu)200 into amyloid-like β-fibrils is dramatically accelerated in the presence of intrinsically disordered (Glu)5. While separately self-assembled fibrils of (Glu)200 and (Glu)5 reveal distinct morphological and infrared characteristics, accelerated fibrillation in mixed (Glu)200 and (Glu)5 leads to aggregates similar to neat (Glu)200 fibrils, even in excess of (Glu)5. According to molecular dynamics simulations and circular dichroism measurements, local events of "misfolding transfer" from (Glu)5 to (Glu)200 may play a key role in the initial stages of conformational dynamics underlying the observed phenomenon. Our results highlight chain-length polydispersity as a potent, although so-far unrecognized factor profoundly affecting the fibrillation propensity of homopolypeptides. PMID:26909651

  15. Deficiency of the 65 kDa isoform of glutamic acid decarboxylase impairs extinction of cued but not contextual fear memory.

    PubMed

    Sangha, Susan; Narayanan, Rajeevan T; Bergado-Acosta, Jorge R; Stork, Oliver; Seidenbecher, Thomas; Pape, Hans-Christian

    2009-12-16

    Extinction procedures are clinically relevant for reducing pathological fear, and the mechanisms of fear regulation are a subject of intense research. The amygdala, hippocampus, and prefrontal cortex (PFC) have all been suggested to be key brain areas in extinction of conditioned fear. GABA has particularly been implicated in extinction learning, and the 65 kDa isoform of glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD65) may be important in elevating GABA levels in response to environmental signals. Extinction of conditioned fear was examined in Gad65(-/-) mice while recording local field potentials from the amygdala, hippocampus, and PFC simultaneously while monitoring behavior. Gad65(-/-) mice showed generalization of cued fear, as reported previously, and impaired extinction of cued fear, such that fear remained high across extinction training. This endurance in cued fear was associated with theta frequency synchronization between the amygdala and hippocampus. Extinction of contextual fear, however, was unaltered in Gad65(-/-) mice when compared with wild-type littermates. The data imply that GAD65 plays a critical role in regulating cued fear responses during extinction learning and that, during this process, GABAergic signaling is involved in modulating synchronized activity between the amygdala and hippocampus. In view of the more pronounced effect on cued versus contextual fear extinction, these influences may rely more on GABAergic mechanisms in the amygdala. PMID:20016086

  16. Therapeutic alteration of insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus progression by T cell tolerance to glutamic acid decarboxylase 65 peptides in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Wilson, S S; White, T C; DeLuca, D

    2001-07-01

    We have reported previously that nonobese diabetic (NOD) fetal pancreas organ cultures lose the ability to produce insulin when maintained in contact with NOD fetal thymus organ cultures (FTOC). Initial studies indicated that exposure to glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD65) peptides in utero resulted in delay or transient protection from insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (IDDM) in NOD mice. We also found that exposure of young adult NOD mice to the same peptides could result in acceleration of the disease. To more closely examine the effects of early and late exposure to diabetogenic Ags on T cells, we applied peptides derived from GAD65 (GAD AA 246-266, 509-528, and 524-543), to our "in vitro IDDM" (ivIDDM) model. T cells derived from NOD FTOC primed during the latter stages of organ culture, when mature T cell phenotypes are present, had the ability to proliferate to GAD peptides. ivIDDM was exacerbated under these conditions, suggesting that GAD responsiveness correlates with the ivIDDM phenotype, and parallels the acceleration of IDDM we had seen in young adult NOD mice. When GAD peptides were present during the initiation of FTOC, GAD proliferative responses were inhibited, and ivIDDM was reduced. This result suggests that tolerance to GAD peptides may reduce the production of diabetogenic T cells or their capacity to respond, as suggested by the in utero therapies studied in NOD mice. PMID:11418696

  17. Syntheses, DNA binding and anticancer profiles of L-glutamic acid ligand and its copper(II) and ruthenium(III) complexes.

    PubMed

    Ali, Imran; Wani, Waseem A; Saleem, Kishwar; Wesselinova, Diana

    2013-02-01

    A new multidentate ligand (L) has been synthesized by the controlled condensation of L-glutamic acid with formaldehyde and ethylenediamine. Cu(II) and Ru(III) metal ion complexes of the synthesized ligand have also been prepared. The ligand and the metal complexes were purified by chromatography and characterized by spectroscopy and other techniques. Molar conductance measurements suggested ionic nature of the complexes. The ligand and the complexes are soluble in water with quite good stabilities; essential requirements for effective anticancer drugs. DNA binding constants (Kbs) for copper and ruthenium complexes were 1.8 x 103 and 2.6 x 103 M-1 while their Ksv values were 7.9 x 103, and 7.3 x 103; revealing strong binding of these complexes with DNA. Hemolytic assays of the reported compounds indicated their significantly less toxicity to RBCs than the standard anticancer drug letrazole. Anticancer profiles of all the compounds were determined on HepG2, HT-29, MDA-MB-231 and HeLa human cancer cell lines. All the compounds have quite good activities on HeLa cell lines but the best results were of CuL on HepG2, HT-29 and MDA-MB-231 cell lines. PMID:22741786

  18. Poly-γ-glutamic acid produced from Bacillus licheniformis CGMCC 2876 as a potential substitute for polyacrylamide in the sugarcane industry.

    PubMed

    Yan, Shan; Yao, Haosheng; Chen, Zhen; Zeng, Shengquan; Xi, Xi; Wang, Yuanpeng; He, Ning; Li, Qingbiao

    2015-01-01

    As an environmentally friendly and industrially useful biopolymer, poly-γ-glutamic acid (γ-PGA) from Bacillus licheniformis CGMCC 2876 was characterized by the high-resolution mass spectrometry and (1)H NMR. A flocculating activity of 11,474.47 U mL(-1) obtained with γ-PGA, and the effects of carbon sources, ions, and chemical properties (D-/L-composition and molecular weight) on the production and flocculating activity of γ-PGA were discussed. Being a bioflocculant in the sugar refinery process, the color and turbidity of the sugarcane juice was IU 1,877.36 and IU 341.41 with 0.8 ppm of γ-PGA, respectively, which was as good as the most widely used chemically synthesized flocculant in the sugarcane industry--polyacrylamide with 1 ppm. The γ-PGA produced from B. licheniformis CGMCC 2876 could be a promising alternate of chemically synthesized flocculants in the sugarcane industry. PMID:26033934

  19. Poly-γ-Glutamic Acid Induces Apoptosis via Reduction of COX-2 Expression in TPA-Induced HT-29 Human Colorectal Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Eun Ju; Sung, Mi Jeong; Park, Jae Ho; Yang, Hye Jeong; Kim, Myung Sunny; Hur, Haeng Jeon; Hwang, Jin-Taek

    2015-01-01

    Poly-γ-glutamic acid (PGA) is one of the bioactive compounds found in cheonggukjang, a fast-fermented soybean paste widely utilized in Korean cooking. PGA is reported to have a number of beneficial health effects, and interestingly, it has been identified as a possible anti-cancer compound through its ability to promote apoptosis in cancer cells, although the precise molecular mechanisms remain unclear. Our findings demonstrate that PGA inhibits the pro-proliferative functions of the phorbol ester 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA), a known chemical carcinogen in HT-29 human colorectal cancer cells. This inhibition was accompanied by hallmark apoptotic phenotypes, including DNA fragmentation and the cleavage of poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) and caspase 3. In addition, PGA treatment reduced the expression of genes known to be overexpressed in colorectal cancer cells, including cyclooxygenase 2 (COX-2) and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS). Lastly, PGA promoted activation of 5' adenosine monophosphate-activated protein (AMPK) in HT-29 cells. Taken together, our results suggest that PGA treatment enhances apoptosis in colorectal cancer cells, in part by modulating the activity of the COX-2 and AMPK signaling pathways. These anti-cancer functions of PGA make it a promising compound for future study. PMID:25854428

  20. Congenital encephalomyopathy and adult-onset myopathy and diabetes mellitus: different phenotypic associations of a new heteroplasmic mtDNA tRNA glutamic acid mutation.

    PubMed Central

    Hanna, M G; Nelson, I; Sweeney, M G; Cooper, J M; Watkins, P J; Morgan-Hughes, J A; Harding, A E

    1995-01-01

    We report the clinical, biochemical, and molecular genetic findings in a family with an unusual mitochondrial disease phenotype harboring a novel mtDNA tRNA glutamic acid mutation at position 14709. The proband and his sister presented with congenital myopathy and mental retardation and subsequently developed cerebellar ataxia. Other family members had either adult-onset diabetes mellitus with muscle weakness or adult-onset diabetes mellitus alone. Ragged-red and cytochrome c oxidase (COX)-negative fibers were present in muscle biopsies. Biochemical studies of muscle mitochondria showed reduced complex I and IV activities. The mtDNA mutation was heteroplasmic in blood and muscle in all matrilineal relatives analyzed. Primary myoblast, but not fibroblast, cultures containing high proportions of mutant mtDNA exhibited impaired mitochondrial translation. These observations indicate that mtDNA tRNA point mutations should be considered in the differential diagnosis of congenital myopathy. In addition they illustrate the diversity of phenotypes associated with this mutation in the same family and further highlight the association between mtDNA mutations and diabetes mellitus. Images Figure 1 Figure 3 Figure 4 PMID:7726155

  1. Comparative studies on the influence of ONK (N(5-hydroxynicotinoil) glutamic acid), piracetam and meclofenoxate on the learning- and memory-impairing effect of scopolamine, clonidine, and methergoline.

    PubMed

    Voronina, T A; Garibova, T L; Trofimov, S S; Sopyev, Zh A; Petkov, V D; Lazarova, M B

    1991-01-01

    The effects of the new compound N(5-hydroxynicotinoil)glutamic acid (ONK) in comparison with the well-known nootropic drugs piracetam and meclofenoxate on cognitive functions impaired by scopolamine, clonidine or methergoline were examined in albino rats and mice. The changes in learning and memory were studied by the two-way active avoidance "shuttle-box", passive avoidance "step-down" in rats and passive avoidance "step-through" in mice. The present results showed that ONK (50 mg/kg) injected intraperitoneally (i. p.), piracetam (800 mg/kg) and meclofenoxate (100 mg/kg) administered orally once daily for 5 days before training completely antagonized the scopolamine-provoked amnesia in step-through-trained mice. ONK (50 mg/kg) administered i. p., piracetam (600 mg/kg) and meclofenoxate (100 mg/kg) administered orally once daily for 5 days before training abolished the memory-impairing effect of clonidine in shuttle-box-trained rats and the amnestic effect of methergoline in step-down trained rats. The observed antiamnestic effects of the nootropic drugs studied are probably realised through their influence on cholinergic, noradrenergic and serotoninergic neurotransmission. The favourable effect of ONK on cognition might be of interest for therapeutic practice. PMID:1841522

  2. Congenital encephalomyopathy and adult-onset myopathy and diabetes mellitus: Different phenotypic associations of a new heteroplasmic mtDNA tRNA glutamic acid mutation

    SciTech Connect

    Hanna, M.G.; Nelson, I.; Sweeney, M.G.; Cooper, J.M.; Watkins, P.J.; Morgan-Hughes, J.A.; Harding, A.E.

    1995-05-01

    We report the clinical, biochemical, and molecular genetic findings in a family with an unusual mitochondrial disease phenotype harboring a novel mtDNA tRNA glutamic acid mutation at position 14709. The proband and his sister presented with congenital myopathy and mental retardation and subsequently developed cerebellar ataxia. Other family members had either adult-onset diabetes mellitus with muscle weakness or adult-onset diabetes mellitus alone. Ragged-red and cytochrome c oxidase (COX)-negative fibers were present in muscle biopsies. Biochemical studies of muscle mitochondria showed reduced complex I and IV activities. The mtDNA mutation was heteroplasmic in blood and muscle in all matrilineal relatives analyzed. Primary myoblast, but not fibroblast, cultures containing high proportions of mutant mtDNA exhibited impaired mitochondrial translation. These observations indicate that mtDNA tRNA point mutations should be considered in the differential diagnosis of congenital myopathy. In addition they illustrate the diversity of phenotypes associated with this mutation in the same family and further highlight the association between mtDNA mutations and diabetes mellitus. 43 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  3. Development, validation, and application of a surrogate analyte method for determining N-acetyl-l-aspartyl-l-glutamic acid levels in rat brain, plasma, and cerebrospinal fluid.

    PubMed

    Kinoshita, Kohnosuke; Arai, Kotaro; Kawaura, Kazuaki; Hiyoshi, Tetsuaki; Yamaguchi, Jun-ichi

    2015-10-15

    A bioanalytical strategy for the simple and accurate determination of endogenous substances in a variety of biological matrices using liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry is described. The robust method described here uses two stable isotope-labeled compounds as a surrogate analyte and an internal standard to construct calibration curves with authentic matrices that can be applied to determine N-acetyl-l-aspartyl-l-glutamic acid (NAAG) levels in rat brain, plasma, and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) using a simple extraction and with a short analysis time of 4min. The validated lower limits of quantification were 1.00nmol/g for brain and 0.0100nmol/mL for plasma and CSF. Using this method, regional differences in NAAG levels in the brain as well as plasma and CSF levels that were much lower than those in the brain were successfully confirmed in treatment-naïve rats. Moreover, after the rats were treated with the intraventricular administration of a NAAG peptidase inhibitor, the NAAG levels increased rapidly and dramatically in the CSF and slightly in the plasma in a time-dependent manner, while the brain levels were not affected. Thus, the procedure described here was easily applied to the determination of NAAG in different matrices in the same manner as that used for xenobiotics, and this method would also be easily applicable to the accurate measurement of endogenous substances in a variety of biological matrices. PMID:26386976

  4. Effect of Poly(γ-glutamic acid) on the Physiological Responses and Calcium Signaling of Rape Seedlings (Brassica napus L.) under Cold Stress.

    PubMed

    Lei, Peng; Xu, Zongqi; Ding, Yan; Tang, Bao; Zhang, Yunxia; Li, Huashan; Feng, Xiaohai; Xu, Hong

    2015-12-01

    Cold stress adversely affects plant growth and development. Poly(γ-glutamic acid) (γ-PGA) is a potential plant growth regulator that may be an effective cryoprotectant that prevents crops from damage during cold weather. In this study, the effects of γ-PGA on the physiological responses of rape seedlings subject to cold stress were investigated using hydroponic experiments. We determined that the malondialdehyde content was decreased by 33.4% and the proline content was increased by 62.5% by γ-PGA after 144 h under cold stress. Antioxidant enzymes activities were also evidently enhanced after treatment with γ-PGA. These responses counteracted increases in the fresh weight and chlorophyll content of rape seedlings, which increased by 24.5 and 50.9%, respectively, after 144 h, which meant that growth inhibition caused by cold was mitigated by γ-PGA. Our results also showed that γ-PGA also regulated Ca(2+) concentrations in the cytoplasm and calcium-dependent protein kinases, which are associated with cold resistance. In conclusion, we suggest that the Ca(2+)/CPKs signal pathway is involved in the γ-PGA-mediated enhancement of cold resistance in rape seedlings. PMID:26585291

  5. Co-producing iturin A and poly-γ-glutamic acid from rapeseed meal under solid state fermentation by the newly isolated Bacillus subtilis strain 3-10.

    PubMed

    Yao, Dehui; Ji, Zhixia; Wang, Changjun; Qi, Gaofu; Zhang, Lili; Ma, Xin; Chen, Shouwen

    2012-03-01

    The strain 3-10 was isolated from soil and identified as B. subtilis according to morphological and physiological characteristics and nucleotide sequence of 16S rRNA. It co-produced anti-fungal iturin A and fertilizer synergist of poly-γ-glutamic acid (γ-PGA) under solid state fermentation (SSF) with rapeseed meal. The co-production of iturin A and γ-PGA reached 5.3 and 51.3 g/kg-dry weight culture, respectively, and the number of viable cells reached 1.9 × 10(10) CFU/g-dry weight culture. In pot tests, the shoot length and dry weight of watermelon seedlings treated by the SSF culture improved by 48.0 and 30.8%, respectively compared to the control; and its biocontrol effect on watermelon fusarium wilt achieved 89.6%. These results highlight a novel strategy to exploit the low-cost and widely available rapeseed meal as dual-functional bio-organic fertilizer under SSF by B. subtilis. PMID:22805819

  6. Central phencyclidine (PCP) receptor binding is glutamate dependent: evidence for a PCP/excitatory amino acid receptor (EAAR) complex

    SciTech Connect

    Loo, P.; Braunwalder, A.; Lehmann, J.; Williams, M.

    1986-03-01

    PCP and other dissociative anesthetica block the increase in neuronal firing rate evoked by the EAAR agonist, N-methyl-Daspartate. NMDA and other EAAs such as glutamate (glu) have not been previously shown to affect PCP ligand binding. In the present study, using once washed rat forebrain membranes, 10 ..mu..M-glu was found to increase the binding of (/sup 3/H)TCP, a PCP analog, to defined PCP recognition sites by 20%. Removal of glu and aspartate (asp) by extensive washing decreased TCP binding by 75-90%. In these membranes, 10 ..mu..M L-glu increased TCP binding 3-fold. This effect was stereospecific and evoked by other EAAs with the order of activity, L-glu > D-asp > L- asp > NMDA > D-glu > quisqualate. Kainate, GABA, NE, DA, 5-HT, 2-chloroadenosine, oxotremorine and histamine had no effect on TCP binding at concentrations up to 100 ..mu..M. The effects of L-glu were attenuated by the NMDA-type receptor antagonist, 2-amino-7--phosphonoheptanoate (AP7; 10 ..mu..M-1 mM). These findings indicate that EAAS facilitate TCP binding, possibly through NMDA-type receptors. The observed interaction between the PCP receptor and EAARs may reflect the existence of a macromolecular receptor complex similar to that demonstrated for the benzodiazepines and GABA.

  7. Gamma-aminobutyric acid and glutamic acid levels in the auditory pathway of rats with chronic tinnitus: a direct determination using high resolution point-resolved proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy (1H-MRS)

    PubMed Central

    Brozoski, Thomas; Odintsov, Boris; Bauer, Carol

    2012-01-01

    Damage to the auditory system following high-level sound exposure reduces afferent input. Homeostatic mechanisms appear to compensate for the loss. Overcompensation may produce the sensation of sound without an objective physical correlate, i.e., tinnitus. Several potential compensatory neural processes have been identified, such as increased spontaneous activity. The cellular mechanisms enabling such compensatory processes may involve down-regulation of inhibitory neurotransmission mediated by γ-amino butyric acid (GABA), and/or up-regulation of excitatory neurotransmission, mediated by glutamic acid (Glu). Because central processing systems are integrated and well-regulated, compensatory changes in one system may produce reactive changes in others. Some or all may be relevant to tinnitus. To examine the roles of GABA and Glu in tinnitus, high resolution point-resolved proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy (1H-MRS) was used to quantify their levels in the dorsal cochlear nucleus (DCN), inferior colliculus (IC), medial geniculate body (MGB), and primary auditory cortex (A1) of rats. Chronic tinnitus was produced by a single high-level unilateral exposure to noise, and was measured using a psychophysical procedure sensitive to tinnitus. Decreased GABA levels were evident only in the MGB, with the greatest decrease, relative to unexposed controls, obtained in the contralateral MGB. Small GABA increases may have been present bilaterally in A1 and in the contralateral DCN. Although Glu levels showed considerable variation, Glu was moderately and bilaterally elevated both in the DCN and in A1. In the MGB Glu was increased ipsilaterally but decreased contralaterally. These bidirectional and region-specific alterations in GABA and Glu may reflect large-scale changes in inhibitory and excitatory equilibrium accompanying chronic tinnitus. The present results also suggest that targeting both neurotransmitter systems may be optimal in developing more effective therapeutics

  8. [Comparative analysis of action of beta-phenyl derivatives of glutamic and gamma-aminobutyric acid on cerebral blood flow and cerebrovascular endothelium after irreversible occlusion of the common carotid artery].

    PubMed

    Volotova, E V; Kurkin, D V; Mazina, N V; Berestovitskaia, V M; Vasil'eva, O S

    2013-01-01

    A comparative analysis of the effect of phenyl derivatives of glutamic (RGPU-135) and gamma-aminobutyric acid (Phenibut) on cerebral blood flow, vasodilatory endothelial function and the number of circulating endothelial cells desquamated in animals after irreversible occlusion of the common carotid arteries. It was found that animals treated prophylactically by RGPU-135, after occlusion of the common carotid arteries have higher cerebral blood flow and lower the severity of endothelial dysfunction than in animals treated with Phenibut. PMID:24003482

  9. Amino acids

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/002222.htm Amino acids To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Amino acids are organic compounds that combine to form proteins . ...

  10. Mefenamic Acid

    MedlinePlus

    Mefenamic acid is used to relieve mild to moderate pain, including menstrual pain (pain that happens before or during a menstrual period). Mefenamic acid is in a class of medications called NSAIDs. ...

  11. Aminocaproic Acid

    MedlinePlus

    Aminocaproic acid is used to control bleeding that occurs when blood clots are broken down too quickly. This type ... the baby is ready to be born). Aminocaproic acid is also used to control bleeding in the ...

  12. Ascorbic Acid

    MedlinePlus

    Ascorbic acid is used to prevent and treat scurvy, a disease caused by a lack of vitamin C in ... Ascorbic acid comes in extended-release (long-acting) capsules and tablets, lozenges, syrup, chewable tablets, and liquid drops to ...

  13. Acid mucopolysaccharides

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003368.htm Acid mucopolysaccharides To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Acid mucopolysaccharides is a test that measures the amount ...

  14. Ethacrynic Acid

    MedlinePlus

    Ethacrynic acid, a 'water pill,' is used to treat swelling and fluid retention caused by various medical problems. It ... Ethacrynic acid comes as a tablet to take by mouth. It is usually taken once or twice a day ...

  15. Effects of pH and aeration on gamma-poly(glutamic acid) formation by Bacillus licheniformis in controlled batch fermentor cultures.

    PubMed

    Cromwick, A M; Birrer, G A; Gross, R A

    1996-04-20

    Bacillus licheniformis ATCC 9945A was grown on Medium E in batch fermentations in which the pH was maintained at 5.5., 6.5, 7.4, and 8.25. The effects of pH on cell growth, carbon source utilization, and gamma-polyglutamic acid (gamma-PGA) production, molecular weight, and polymer stereochemistry were determined. The gamma-PGA yield was highest (15 g/L, 96 h growth time) at pH 6.5. The increase in gamma-PGA formation at pH 6.5 corresponded with a relatively high specific production rate at high gamma-PGA concentration (0.09 h(-1), approximately 15 g/L gamma-PGA). In contrast, the specific gamma-PGA production rates at fermentor pH values of 5.5 and 7.4 decreased significantly for gamma-PGA fermentor yields > approximately 5 g/L. Interestingly, alteration of the medium pH had little to no significant effects on the product quality as measured by stereochemical composition and molecular weight. While glutamate and glycerol utilization were similar as a function of pH, citrate consumption increased at pH 6.5, indicating that the formation of gamma-PGA from citrate at pH 6.5 was of increased importance. The effect of aeration was evaluated by increasing the agitation speed (250 to 800 rpm) and aeration rate (0.5 to 2.0 L/min) at pH 6.5, the pH of maximal gamma-PGA production. Increased aeration resulted in doubling of the cell dry weights (2 to 4 g/L), increasing gamma-PGA yields (6.3 to 23 g/L by 48 h) and increasing in the maximum gamma-PGA-specific production rate (0.09 to 0.11 h(-1)). Other effects of increased agitation included a rapid depletion of glutamate and citrate (by 50 h) and a decrease in product molecular weight. Despite the increase in agitation and aeration, oxygen limitation of the culture was not avoided, because the partial pressure decreased to <1.0% by 29 h. PMID:18626940

  16. Valproic Acid

    MedlinePlus

    Valproic acid is used alone or with other medications to treat certain types of seizures. Valproic acid is also used to treat mania (episodes of ... to relieve headaches that have already begun. Valproic acid is in a class of medications called anticonvulsants. ...

  17. Enantiomeric Excesses of Acid Labile Amino Acid Precursors of the Murchison Meteorite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pizzarello, Sandra

    1998-01-01

    Amino acids present in carbonaceous chondrite are extracted in water in part as free compounds and in approximately equal part as acid labile precursors. On the assumption that they would be free of contamination, the precursors of two Murchison amino acids that have terrestrial occurrence, alanine and glutamic acid, have been targeted for analysis of their enantiomeric ratios. Pyroglutamic acid, the precursor of glutamic acid, was found with an L-enantiomeric excess comparable to that of the free acid, while alanine's precursor, N-acetyl alanine, appears approximately racemic. Also alpha-imino propioacetic acid, a proposed end product of alanine synthesis in the meteorite, was analyzed and found racemic.

  18. Fatty acids - trans fatty acids

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The data supporting a negative effect of dietary trans fatty acids on cardiovascular disease risk is consistent. The primary dietary sources of trans fatty acids include partially hydrogenated fat and rudiment fat. The adverse effect of trans fatty acids on plasma lipoprotein profiles is consisten...

  19. The poly-γ-d-glutamic acid capsule surrogate of the Bacillus anthracis capsule induces nitric oxide production via the platelet activating factor receptor signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hae-Ri; Jeon, Jun Ho; Park, Ok-Kyu; Chun, Jeong-Hoon; Park, Jungchan; Rhie, Gi-Eun

    2015-12-01

    The poly-γ-d-glutamic acid (PGA) capsule, a major virulence factor of Bacillus anthracis, confers protection of the bacillus from phagocytosis and allows its unimpeded growth in the host. PGA capsules released from B. anthracis are associated with lethal toxin in the blood of experimentally infected animals and enhance the cytotoxic effect of lethal toxin on macrophages. In addition, PGA capsule itself activates macrophages and dendritic cells to produce proinflammatory cytokine such as IL-1β, indicating multiple roles of PGA capsule in anthrax pathogenesis. Here we report that PGA capsule of Bacillus licheniformis, a surrogate of B. anthracis capsule, induces production of nitric oxide (NO) in RAW264.7 cells and bone marrow-derived macrophages. NO production was induced by PGA in a dose-dependent manner and was markedly reduced by inhibitors of inducible NO synthase (iNOS), suggesting iNOS-dependent production of NO. Induction of NO production by PGA was not observed in macrophages from TLR2-deficient mice and was also substantially inhibited in RAW264.7 cells by pretreatment of TLR2 blocking antibody. Subsequently, the downstream signaling events such as ERK, JNK and p38 of MAPK pathways as well as NF-κB activation were required for PGA-induced NO production. In addition, the induced NO production was significantly suppressed by treatment with antagonists of platelet activating factor receptor (PAFR) or PAFR siRNA, and mediated through PAFR/Jak2/STAT-1 signaling pathway. These findings suggest that PGA capsule induces NO production in macrophages by triggering both TLR2 and PAFR signaling pathways which lead to activation of NF-kB and STAT-1, respectively. PMID:26350415

  20. Preparation and in vitro antitumor effects of cytosine arabinoside-loaded genipin-poly-l-glutamic acid-modified bacterial magnetosomes

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yuan-Gang; Dai, Qing-Lei; Wang, Shi-Bin; Deng, Qiong-Jia; Wu, Wen-Guo; Chen, Ai-Zheng

    2015-01-01

    To solve the problem of synthesized magnetic nanoparticles in cancer therapy, a new drug delivery system synthesized from bacteria was used to load cytosine arabinoside (Ara-C). Genipin (GP) and poly-l-glutamic acid (PLGA) were selected as dual cross-linkers. The preparation and characterization of Ara-C-loaded GP-PLGA-modified bacterial magnetosomes (BMs) (ABMs-P), as well as their in vitro antitumor effects, were all investigated. Transmission electron micrographs (TEM) and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy suggested that Ara-C could be bound to the membrane of BMs modified by GP-PLGA. The diameters of the BMs and ABMs-P were 42.0±8.6 nm and 74.9±8.2 nm, respectively. The zeta potential revealed that the nanoparticles were stable. Moreover, this system exhibited optimal drug-loading properties and long-term release behavior. The optimal encapsulation efficiency and drug-loading were 64.1%±6.6% and 38.9%±2.4%, respectively, and ABMs-P could effectively release 90% Ara-C within 40 days, without the release of an initial burst. In addition, in vitro antitumor experiments elucidated that ABMs-P is cytotoxic to HL-60 cell lines, with an inhibition rate of 95%. The method of coupling drugs on BMs using dual cross-linkers is effective, and our results reveal that this new system has potential applications for drug delivery in the future. PMID:25733831

  1. Repair of an articular cartilage defect using adipose-derived stem cells loaded on a polyelectrolyte complex scaffold based on poly(l-glutamic acid) and chitosan.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Kunxi; Zhang, Yun; Yan, Shifeng; Gong, Lunli; Wang, Jia; Chen, Xuesi; Cui, Lei; Yin, Jingbo

    2013-07-01

    As a synthetic polypeptide water-soluble poly(l-glutamic acid) (PLGA) was designed to fabricate scaffolds for cartilage tissue engineering. Chitosan (CHI) has been employed as a physical cross-linking component in the construction of scaffolds. PLGA/CHI scaffolds act as sponges with a swelling ratio of 760±45% (mass%), showing promising biocompatibility and biodegradation. Autologous adipose-derived stem cells (ASCs) were expanded and seeded on PLGA/CHI scaffolds, ASC/scaffold constructs were then subjected to chondrogenic induction in vitro for 2weeks. The results showed that PLGA/CHI scaffolds could effectively support ASC adherence, proliferation and chondrogenic differentiation. The ASCs/scaffold constructs were then transplanted to repair full thickness articular cartilage defects (4mm in diameter, to the depth of subchondral bone) created in rabbit femur trochlea. Histological observations found that articular defects were covered with newly formed cartilage 6weeks post-implantation. After 12weeks the regenerated cartilage had integrated well with the surrounding native cartilage and subchondral bone. Toluidine blue and immunohistochemical staining confirmed similar accumulation of glycosaminoglycans and type II collagen in engineered cartilage as in native cartilage 12weeks post-implantation. The result was further supported by quantitative analysis of extracellular matrix deposition. The compressive modulus of the engineered cartilage increased significantly from 30% of that of normal cartilage at 6weeks to 83% at 12weeks. Cyto-nanoindentation also showed analogous biomechanical behavior of the engineered cartilage to that of native cartilage. The results of the present study thus demonstrate the potentiality of PLGA/CHI scaffolds in cartilage tissue engineering. PMID:23535234

  2. Neuronal circuit-dependent alterations in expression of two isoforms of glutamic acid decarboxylase in the hippocampus following electroconvulsive shock: A stereology-based study.

    PubMed

    Jinno, Shozo; Kosaka, Toshio

    2009-11-01

    There is an increasing body of evidence suggesting that GABAergic dysfunction is involved in various psychiatric disorders. The goal of our study was to investigate the influences of electroconvulsive therapy (ECT), one of the most effective treatments for depression, on the GABAergic system in the hippocampus. In this stereology-based study, we identified GABAergic neurons by immunostaining for two isoforms of glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD), GAD65, and GAD67 and estimated the expression changes induced by single or repeated electroconvulsive shock (ECS; an animal model of ECT). The numerical density (ND) of entire population of GABAergic neurons (expressing GAD65 and/or GAD67) was seldom altered by the administration of ECS. GAD67-positive (GAD67(+)) neurons were also rarely affected by ECS. On the other hand, the ND of GAD65(+) neurons was changed in a layer-specific manner. In the CA1 region, the ND of GAD65(+) neurons was increased in the strata radiatum/lacunosum-moleculare (SR/SLM) by repeated ECS. In the CA3 region, the ND of GAD65(+) neurons was decreased in the stratum oriens and SR/SLM after single ECS. The expression ratio of GAD65 in GABAergic neurons was increased specifically in layers receiving afferents from the entorhinal cortex (EC), i.e., SR/SLM of the CA1 region and molecular layer of the dentate gyrus (DG), after repeated ECS administration, whereas the expression ratio of GAD67 in GABAergic neurons was decreased in several layers by the same treatment. These results indicate that the ECS-induced changes in ND of GAD65(+) or GAD67(+) neurons were most likely due to alterations in GAD expression rather than actual increases or decreases in cell numbers. Altogether, the neuronal circuit-dependent alterations in GABA-mediated signaling may play a contributory role in the depression treatment process introduced by ECT. PMID:19283776

  3. Harmonization of Glutamic Acid Decarboxylase and Islet Antigen-2 Autoantibody Assays for National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases Consortia

    PubMed Central

    Bonifacio, Ezio; Yu, Liping; Williams, Alastair K.; Eisenbarth, George S.; Bingley, Polly J.; Marcovina, Santica M.; Adler, Kerstin; Ziegler, Anette G.; Mueller, Patricia W.; Schatz, Desmond A.; Krischer, Jeffrey P.; Steffes, Michael W.; Akolkar, Beena

    2010-01-01

    Background/Rationale: Autoantibodies to islet antigen-2 (IA-2A) and glutamic acid decarboxylase (GADA) are markers for diagnosis, screening, and measuring outcomes in National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (NIDDK) consortia studies. A harmonization program was established to increase comparability of results within and among these studies. Methods: Large volumes of six working calibrators were prepared from pooled sera with GADA 4.8–493 World Health Organization (WHO) units/ml and IA-2A 2–235 WHO units/ml. Harmonized assay protocols for IA-2A and GADA using 35S-methionine-labelled in vitro transcribed and translated antigens were developed based on methods in use in three NIDDK laboratories. Antibody thresholds were defined using sera from patients with recent onset type 1 diabetes and healthy controls. To evaluate the impact of the harmonized assay protocol on concordance of IA-2A and GADA results, two laboratories retested stored TEDDY study sera using the harmonized assays. Results: The harmonized assays gave comparable but not identical results in the three laboratories. For IA-2A, using a common threshold of 5 DK units/ml, 549 of 550 control and patient samples were concordantly scored as positive or negative, specificity was greater than 99% with sensitivity 64% in all laboratories. For GADA, using thresholds equivalent to the 97th percentile of 974 control samples in each laboratory, 1051 (97.9%) of 1074 samples were concordant. On the retested TEDDY samples, discordance decreased from 4 to 1.8% for IA-2A (n = 604 samples; P = 0.02) and from 15.4 to 2.7% for GADA (n = 515 samples; P < 0.0001). Conclusion: Harmonization of GADA and IA-2A is feasible using large volume working calibrators and common protocols and is an effective approach to ensure consistency in autoantibody measurements. PMID:20444913

  4. Diverse Cd(II) compounds based on N-benzoyl-L-glutamic acid and N-donor ligands: Structures and photoluminescent properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Ning; Guo, Wei-Ying; Song, Hui-Hua; Yu, Hai-Tao

    2016-01-01

    Five new Cd(II) coordination polymers with N-benzoyl-L-glutamic acid (H2bzgluO) and different N-donor ligands, [Cd(bzgluO)(2,2‧-bipy)(H2O)]n (1), [Cd(bzgluO)(2,4‧-bipy)2(H2O)·3H2O]n (2), [Cd(bzgluO)(phen)·H2O]n (3), [Cd(bzgluO)(4,4‧-bipy)(H2O)]n (4), [Cd(bzgluO)(bpp)(H2O)·2H2O]n (5) were synthesized (2,2‧-bipy=2,2‧-bipyridine, 2,4‧-bipy=2,4‧-bipyridine, phen=1,10-phenanthroline, 4,4‧-bipy=4,4‧-bipyridine, bpp=1,3-di(4-pyridyl)propane). Compounds 1-2 exhibit a 1D single-chain structure. Compound 1 generates a 2D supramolecular structure via π-π stacking and hydrogen bonding, 3D architecture of compound 2 is formed by hydrogen bonding. Compound 3 features a 1D double-chain structure, which are linked by π-π interactions into a 2D supramolecular layer. Compounds 4-5 display a 2D network structure. Neighboring layers of 4 are extended into a 3D supramolecular architecture through hydrogen bonding. The structural diversity of these compounds is attributed to the effect of ancillary N-donor ligands and coordination modes of H2bzgluO. Luminescent properties of 1-5 were studied at room temperature. Circular dichroism of compounds 1, 2 and 5 were investigated.

  5. Synthesis and photoluminescence properties of silver(I) complexes based on N-benzoyl-L-glutamic acid and N-donor ligands with different flexibility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Ming-Jie; Feng, Qi; Song, Hui-Hua

    2016-05-01

    By changing the N-donor ancillary ligand, three novel silver (I) complexes {[Ag(HbzgluO) (4,4‧-bipy)]·H2O}n (1), {[Ag2(HbzgluO)2 (bpe)2]·2H2O}n (2) and {[Ag(HbzgluO)(bpp)]·2H2O}n (3) (H2bzgluO = N-benzoyl-L-glutamic acid, 4,4‧-bipy = 4,4ˊ-bipyridine, bpe = 1,2-di(4-pyridyl)ethane, bpp = 1,3-di(4-pyridyl)propane) were synthesized. Their structures have been determined by single-crystal X-ray diffraction analyses and further characterized by elemental analyses, IR spectra, powder X-ray diffraction (PXRD), and thermogravimetric analyses (TGA). In this study, the N-donor ligands are changed from rigidity (4,4‧-bipy), quasi-flexibility (bpe) to flexibility (bpp), the structures of complexes also change. Complex 1 features a 1D chain structure which is further linked together to construct a 2D supramolecular structure through hydrogen bonds. Complex 2 is a 1D double-chains configuration which eventually forms a 3D supramolecular network via hydrogen bonding interactions. Whereas, complex 3 exhibits a 2D pleated grid structure which is linked by hydrogen bonding interactions into a 3D supramolecular network. The present observations demonstrate that the modulation of coordination polymers with different structures can accomplish by changing the spacer length of N-donor ligands. In addition, the solid-state circular dichroism (CD) spectra indicated that compound 2 exhibited negative cotton effect which originated from the chiral ligands H2bzgluO and the solid-state fluorescence spectra of the three complexes demonstrated the auxiliary ligands have influence on the photoluminescence properties of the complexes.

  6. The novel isoxazoline ectoparasiticide fluralaner: selective inhibition of arthropod γ-aminobutyric acid- and L-glutamate-gated chloride channels and insecticidal/acaricidal activity.

    PubMed

    Gassel, Michael; Wolf, Christian; Noack, Sandra; Williams, Heike; Ilg, Thomas

    2014-02-01

    Isoxazolines are a novel class of parasiticides that are potent inhibitors of γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA)-gated chloride channels (GABACls) and L-glutamate-gated chloride channels (GluCls). In this study, the effects of the isoxazoline drug fluralaner on insect and acarid GABACl (RDL) and GluCl and its parasiticidal potency were investigated. We report the identification and cDNA cloning of Rhipicephalus (R.) microplus RDL and GluCl genes, and their functional expression in Xenopus laevis oocytes. The generation of six clonal HEK293 cell lines expressing Rhipicephalus microplus RDL and GluCl, Ctenocephalides felis RDL-A285 and RDL-S285, as well as Drosophila melanogaster RDLCl-A302 and RDL-S302, combined with the development of a membrane potential fluorescence dye assay allowed the comparison of ion channel inhibition by fluralaner with that of established insecticides addressing RDL and GluCl as targets. In these assays fluralaner was several orders of magnitude more potent than picrotoxinin and dieldrin, and performed 5-236 fold better than fipronil on the arthropod RDLs, while a rat GABACl remained unaffected. Comparative studies showed that R. microplus RDL is 52-fold more sensitive than R. microplus GluCl to fluralaner inhibition, confirming that the GABA-gated chloride channel is the primary target of this new parasiticide. In agreement with the superior RDL on-target activity, fluralaner outperformed dieldrin and fipronil in insecticidal screens on cat fleas (Ctenocephalides felis), yellow fever mosquito larvae (Aedes aegypti) and sheep blowfly larvae (Lucilia cuprina), as well as in acaricidal screens on cattle tick (R. microplus) adult females, brown dog tick (Rhipicephalus sanguineus) adult females and Ornithodoros moubata nymphs. These findings highlight the potential of fluralaner as a novel ectoparasiticide. PMID:24365472

  7. Differential gene expression for glutamic acid decarboxylase and type II calcium-calmodulin-dependent protein kinase in basal ganglia, thalamus, and hypothalamus of the monkey

    SciTech Connect

    Benson, D.L.; Isackson, P.J.; Hendry, S.H.; Jones, E.G. )

    1991-06-01

    In situ hybridization histochemistry, using cRNA probes, revealed a complementarity in the distributions of cells in the basal ganglia, basal nucleus of Meynert, thalamus, hypothalamus, and rostral part of the midbrain that showed gene expression for glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD) or the alpha-subunit of type II calcium-calmodulin-dependent protein kinase (CAM II kinase-alpha). Cells in certain nuclei such as the thalamic reticular nucleus, globus pallidus, and pars reticulata of the substantia nigra show GAD gene expression only; others in nuclei such as the basal nucleus of Meynert, medial mamillary nuclei, and ventromedial hypothalamic nuclei show CAM II kinase-alpha gene expression only. A few nuclei, for example, the pars compacta of the substantia nigra and the greater part of the subthalamic nucleus, display gene expression for neither GAD nor CAM II kinase-alpha. In other nuclei, notably those of the dorsal thalamus, and possibly in the striatum, GAD- and CAM II kinase-expressing cells appear to form two separate populations that, in most thalamic nuclei, together account for the total cell population. In situ hybridization reveals large amounts of CAM II kinase-alpha mRNA in the neuropil of most nuclei containing CAM II kinase-alpha-positive cells, suggesting its association with dendritic polyribosomes. The message may thus be translated at those sites, close to the synapses with which the protein is associated. The in situ hybridization results, coupled with those from immunocytochemical staining for CAM II kinase-alpha protein, indicate that CAM II kinase-alpha is commonly found in certain non-GABAergic afferent fiber systems but is not necessarily present in the postsynaptic cells on which they terminate. It appears to be absent from most GABAergic fiber systems but can be present in the cells on which they terminate.

  8. Cellular delivery of quantum dot-bound hybridization probe for detection of intracellular pre-microRNA using chitosan/poly(γ-glutamic acid) complex as a carrier.

    PubMed

    Geng, Yao; Lin, Dajie; Shao, Lijia; Yan, Feng; Ju, Huangxian

    2013-01-01

    A quantum dot (QD)-bound hybridization probe was designed for detection of intracellular pre-miRNA using chitosan (CS)/poly(γ-glutamic acid) (γ-PGA) complex as a gene vector. The probe was prepared by assembling thiolated RNA to gold nanoparticle (Au NP) via Au-S bond and then binding 3'-end amine of the RNA to the carboxy group capped on quantum dot surface. The QD-RNA-Au NP probe was assembled on the vector by mixing with aqueous γ-PGA solution and then CS solution to construct a gene delivery system for highly effective cellular uptake and delivery. After the probe was released from CS/γ-PGA complex to the cytoplasm by electrostatic repulsion at intracellular pH, it hybridized with pre-miRNA precursor as target. The formed product was then cleaved by RNase III Dicer, leading to the separation of QDs from Au NPs and fluorescence emission of QDs, which could be detected by confocal microscopic imaging to monitor the amount of the intracellular pre-miRNA precursor. The in vitro assays revealed that the QD-RNA-Au NP was a robust, sensitive and selective probe for quantitative detection of target pre-miRNA. Using MDA-MB231 and MCF-7 breast cancer cells as models, the relative amount of pre-miRNA let-7a could be successfully compared. Since the amount of miRNA is related to the progress and prognosis of cancer, this strategy could be expected to hold promising application potential in medical research and clinical diagnostics. PMID:23762388

  9. Cisplatin Loaded Poly(L-glutamic acid)-g-Methoxy Poly(ethylene glycol) Complex Nanoparticles for Potential Cancer Therapy: Preparation, In Vitro and In Vivo Evaluation.

    PubMed

    Yu, Haiyang; Tang, Zhaohui; Li, Mingqiang; Song, Wantong; Zhang, Dawei; Zhang, Ying; Yang, Yan; Sun, Hai; Deng, Mingxiao; Chen, Xuesi

    2016-01-01

    A series of novel polypeptide-based graft copolymer poly(L-glutamic acid)-graft-methoxy poly(ethylene glycol) (PLG-g-mPEG) was synthesized through a Steglich esterification reaction of PLG with mPEG. The structure of the copolymers was confirmed by nuclear magnetic resonance spectra (NMR) and gel permeation chromatography (GPC). MTT assay demonstrated that the PLG-g-mPEGs had good cell compatibility. The unreacted carboxyl groups of the PLG-g-mPEGs were used to complex cisplatin to form polymer-metal complex nanoparticles (CDDP/PLG-g-mPEG) for cancer therapy. The average hydrodynamic radius of the CDDP/PLG-g-mPEG nanoparticles was inr the range of 14-25 nm, which was beneficial for solid tumor targeting delivery. A sustained release without initial burst was achieved for the CDDP/PLG-g-mPEG nanoparticles, indicating that the CDDP-loaded nanoparticles had great potential to suppress the drug release in blood circulation before the nanoparticles had arrived at targeting tumors. The CDDP/PLG-g-mPEG nanoparticles showed a much longer blood retention profile as compared with the free CDDP. This indicated that the CDDP-loaded nanoparticles had much more opportunity to accumulate in tumor tissue by exerting the EPR effect. In vitro tests demonstrated that the CDDP/PLG-g-mPEG nanoparticles could inhibit the proliferation of HeLa, MCF-7 and A549 cancer cells. At equal dose (4 mg kg(-1)), the CDDP/PLG-g-mPEG nanoparticles showed comparable in vivo antitumor efficacy and significantly lower systemic toxicity as compared with free cis-Diaminedichloroplatinum (cisplatin, CDDP) in MCF-7 tumor bearing mice. These suggested that the CDDP/PLG-g-mPEG nanoparticle drug delivery system had a great potential to be used for cancer therapy. PMID:27301173

  10. Role of Side Chains in β-Sheet Self-Assembly into Peptide Fibrils. IR and VCD Spectroscopic Studies of Glutamic Acid-Containing Peptides.

    PubMed

    Tobias, Fernando; Keiderling, Timothy A

    2016-05-10

    Poly(glutamic acid) at low pH self-assembles after incubation at higher temperature into fibrils composed of antiparallel sheets that are stacked in a β2-type structure whose amide carbonyls have bifurcated H-bonds involving the side chains from the next sheet. Oligomers of Glu can also form such structures, and isotope labeling has provided insight into their out-of-register antiparallel structure [ Biomacromolecules 2013 , 14 , 3880 - 3891 ]. In this paper we report IR and VCD spectra and transmission electron micrograph (TEM) images for a series of alternately sequenced oligomers, Lys-(Aaa-Glu)5-Lys-NH2, where Aaa was varied over a variety of polar, aliphatic, or aromatic residues. Their spectral and TEM data show that these oligopeptides self-assemble into different structures, both local and morphological, that are dependent on both the nature of the Aaa side chains and growth conditions employed. Such alternate peptides substituted with small or polar residues, Ala and Thr, do not yield fibrils; but with β-branched aliphatic residues, Val and Ile, that could potentially pack with Glu side chains, these oligopeptides do show evidence of β2-stacking. By contrast, for Leu, with longer side chains, only β1-stacking is seen while with even larger Phe side chains, either β-form can be detected separately, depending on preparation conditions. These structures are dependent on high temperature incubation after reducing the pH and in some cases after sonication of initial fibril forms and reincubation. Some of these fibrillar peptides, but not all, show enhanced VCD, which can offer evidence for formation of long, multistrand, often twisted structures. Substitution of Glu with residues having selected side chains yields a variety of morphologies, leading to both β1- and β2-structures, that overall suggests two different packing modes for the hydrophobic side chains depending on size and type. PMID:27099990

  11. WAY-855 (3-amino-tricyclo[2.2.1.02.6]heptane-1,3-dicarboxylic acid): a novel, EAAT2-preferring, nonsubstrate inhibitor of high-affinity glutamate uptake

    PubMed Central

    Dunlop, John; Eliasof, Scott; Stack, Gary; McIlvain, H Beal; Greenfield, Alexander; Kowal, Dianne; Petroski, Robert; Carrick, Tikva

    2003-01-01

    The pharmacological profile of a novel glutamate transport inhibitor, WAY-855 (3-amino-tricyclo[2.2.1.02.6]heptane-1,3-dicarboxylic acid), on the activity of the human forebrain glutamate transporters EAAT1, EAAT2 and EAAT3 expressed in stable mammalian cell lines and in Xenopus laevis oocytes is presented. WAY-855 inhibited glutamate uptake mediated by all three subtypes in a concentration-dependent manner, with preferential inhibition of the CNS-predominant EAAT2 subtype in both cells and oocytes. IC50 values for EAAT2 and EAAT3 inhibition in cells were 2.2 and 24.5 μM, respectively, while EAAT1 activity was inhibited by 50% at 100 μM (IC50 values determined in oocytes were 1.3 μM (EAAT2), 52.5 μM (EAAT3) and 125.9 μM (EAAT1)). Application of WAY-855 to EAAT-expressing oocytes failed to induce a transporter current, and the compound failed to exchange with accumulated [3H]D-aspartate in synaptosomes consistent with a nonsubstrate inhibitor. WAY-855 inhibited D-aspartate uptake into cortical synaptosomes by a competitive mechanism, and with similar potency to that observed for the cloned EAAT2. WAY-855 failed to agonise or antagonise ionotropic glutamate receptors in cultured hippocampal neurones, or the human metabotropic glutamate receptor subtype 4 expressed in a stable cell line. WAY-855 represents a novel structure in glutamate transporter pharmacology, and exploration of this structure might provide insights into the discrimination between EAAT2 and other EAAT subtypes. PMID:14517179

  12. Influence of Nitrogen Source, Thiamine, and Light on Biosynthesis of Abscisic Acid by Cercospora rosicola Passerini

    PubMed Central

    Norman, Shirley M.; Maier, Vincent P.; Echols, Linda C.

    1981-01-01

    Abscisic acid production by Cercospora rosicola Passerini in liquid shake culture was measured with different amino acids in combination and singly as nitrogen sources and with different amounts of thiamine in the media. Production of abscisic acid was highest with aspartic acid-glutamic acid and aspartic acid-glutamic acid-serine mixtures as nitrogen sources. Single amino acids that supported the highest production of abscisic acid were asparagine and monosodium glutamate. Thiamine was important for abscisic acid production. Leucine inhibited abscisic acid production. C. rosicola produced abscisic acid in the dark, but production more than doubled in the presence of light. PMID:16345761

  13. Acid Deposition

    EPA Science Inventory

    This indicator presents acid deposition trends in the contiguous U.S. from 1989 to 2007. Data are broken down by wet and dry deposition and deposition of nitrogen and sulfur compounds. Acid deposition is particularly damaging to lakes, streams, and forests and the plants and a...

  14. Acid rain

    SciTech Connect

    White, J.C. )

    1988-01-01

    This book presents the proceedings of the third annual conference sponsored by the Acid Rain Information Clearinghouse (ARIC). Topics covered include: Legal aspects of the source-receptor relationship: an energy perspective; Scientific uncertainty, agency inaction, and the courts; and Acid rain: the emerging legal framework.

  15. Acid rain

    SciTech Connect

    Elsworth, S.

    1985-01-01

    This book was written in a concise and readable style for the lay public. It's purpose was to make the public aware of the damage caused by acid rain and to mobilize public opinion to favor the elimination of the causes of acid rain.

  16. The role of RNA polymerase sigma-factor (RpoS) in induction of glutamate-dependent acid-resistance of Escherichia albertii under anaerobic conditions

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Escherichia albertii is a potential enteric foodborne pathogen with poorly defined genetic and biochemical properties. Acid resistance is perceived to be an important property of enteric pathogens, enabling them to survive passage through stomach acidity so that they may colonize the mammalian gast...

  17. Pharmacokinetics, biodistribution and in vivo efficacy of cisplatin loaded poly(L-glutamic acid)-g-methoxy poly(ethylene glycol) complex nanoparticles for tumor therapy.

    PubMed

    Yu, Haiyang; Tang, Zhaohui; Zhang, Dawei; Song, Wantong; Zhang, Ying; Yang, Yan; Ahmad, Zaheer; Chen, Xuesi

    2015-05-10

    Platinum-based polymeric nano-drugs, especially cisplatin-loaded polymeric nanoparticles (CDDP-NPs), have been extensively exploited for the treatment of solid tumors. However, it is still unclear what role the processing procedure and the properties of the polymeric carrier materials may play in influencing the plasma pharmacokinetics, biodistribution and in vivo efficacy of CDDP-NPs. In this study, a series of poly(l-glutamic acid)-g-methoxy poly(ethylene glycol) (PLG-g-mPEG) copolymers were synthesized for the preparation of CDDP-loaded PLG-g-mPEG (CDDP/PLG-g-mPEG) nanoparticles. All of the parameters, including PLG molecular weight, mPEG/PLG weight ratio, mPEG chain length, ultrafiltration purification and cisplatin loading content, were found to have a significant influence on the plasma pharmacokinetics of the CDDP/PLG-g-mPEG nanoparticles. The blood circulation time of the nanoparticles was prolonged with increases in PLG molecular weight, mPEG/PLG weight ratio, mPEG chain length and CDDP loading content. The use of ultrafiltration purification could prolong the blood circulation time of the nanoparticles as well. Experiments to measure the pharmacokinetics and biodistribution demonstrated that the selected CDDP/PLG-g-mPEG nanoparticles, NP10, had a long blood circulation time and could achieve selective and significant accumulation in Lewis lung carcinoma (LLC) tumors. The platinum plasma concentrations in the LLC tumor-bearing mice receiving NP10 remained up to 46-fold higher than that of mice receiving equivalent doses of free CDDP. In addition, the plasma area under the concentration time curve (AUC) of NP10 was 31-fold higher than that of free CDDP in 48h. The platinum concentration ratio of NP10 to free CDDP in tumors reached as high as 9.4. The tumor AUC ratio of NP10 to CDDP was 6. Using a mouse C26 tumor model, here we demonstrate that NP10 improves the safety and tolerance in vivo when compared to CDDP and effectively inhibits the growth of C26

  18. Clinical and Genetic Characteristics of Non-Insulin-Requiring Glutamic Acid Decarboxylase (GAD) Autoantibody-Positive Diabetes: A Nationwide Survey in Japan

    PubMed Central

    Yasui, Junichi; Kawasaki, Eiji; Tanaka, Shoichiro; Awata, Takuya; Ikegami, Hiroshi; Imagawa, Akihisa; Uchigata, Yasuko; Osawa, Haruhiko; Kajio, Hiroshi; Kawabata, Yumiko; Shimada, Akira; Takahashi, Kazuma; Yasuda, Kazuki; Yasuda, Hisafumi; Hanafusa, Toshiaki; Kobayashi, Tetsuro

    2016-01-01

    Aims Glutamic acid decarboxylase autoantibodies (GADAb) differentiate slowly progressive insulin-dependent (type 1) diabetes mellitus (SPIDDM) from phenotypic type 2 diabetes, but many GADAb-positive patients with diabetes do not progress to insulin-requiring diabetes. To characterize GADAb-positive patients with adult-onset diabetes who do not require insulin therapy for >5 years (NIR-SPIDDM), we conducted a nationwide cross-sectional survey in Japan. Methods We collected 82 GADAb-positive patients who did not require insulin therapy for >5 years (NIR-SPIDDM) and compared them with 63 patients with insulin-requiring SPIDDM (IR-SPIDDM). Clinical and biochemical characteristics, HLA-DRB1-DQB1 haplotypes, and predictive markers for progression to insulin therapy were investigated. Results Compared with the IR-SPIDDM group, the NIR-SPIDDM patients showed later diabetes onset, higher body mass index, longer duration before diagnosis, and less frequent hyperglycemic symptoms at onset. In addition, C-peptide, LDL-cholesterol, and TG were significantly higher in the NIR-SPIDDM compared to IR-SPIDDM patients. The NIR-SPIDDM group had lower frequency of susceptible HLA-DRB1*04:05-DQB1*04:01 and a higher frequency of resistant HLA-DRB1*15:01-DQB1*06:02 haplotype compared to IR-SPIDDM. A multivariable analysis showed that age at diabetes onset (OR = 0.82), duration before diagnosis of GADAb-positive diabetes (OR = 0.82), higher GADAb level (≥10.0 U/ml) (OR = 20.41), and fasting C-peptide at diagnosis (OR = 0.07) were independent predictive markers for progression to insulin-requiring diabetes. An ROC curve analysis showed that the optimal cut-off points for discriminating two groups was the GADAb level of 13.6 U/ml, age of diabetes onset of 47 years, duration before diagnosis of 5 years, and fasting C-peptide of 0.65 ng/ml. Conclusions Clinical, biochemical and genetic characteristics of patients with NIR-SPIDDM are different from those of IR-SPIDDM patients. Age of

  19. The Poly-γ-d-Glutamic Acid Capsule Surrogate of the Bacillus anthracis Capsule Is a Novel Toll-Like Receptor 2 Agonist.

    PubMed

    Jeon, Jun Ho; Lee, Hae-Ri; Cho, Min-Hee; Park, Ok-Kyu; Park, Jungchan; Rhie, Gi-eun

    2015-10-01

    Bacillus anthracis is a pathogenic Gram-positive bacterium that causes a highly lethal infectious disease, anthrax. The poly-γ-d-glutamic acid (PGA) capsule is one of the major virulence factors of B. anthracis, along with exotoxins. PGA enables B. anthracis to escape phagocytosis and immune surveillance. Our previous study showed that PGA activates the human macrophage cell line THP-1 and human dendritic cells, resulting in the production of the proinflammatory cytokine interleukin-1β (IL-1β) (M. H. Cho et al., Infect Immun 78:387-392, 2010, http://dx.doi.org/10.1128/IAI.00956-09). Here, we investigated PGA-induced cytokine responses and related signaling pathways in mouse bone marrow-derived macrophages (BMDMs) using Bacillus licheniformis PGA as a surrogate for B. anthracis PGA. Upon exposure to PGA, BMDMs produced proinflammatory mediators, including tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α), IL-6, IL-12p40, and monocyte chemoattractant protein 1 (MCP-1), in a concentration-dependent manner. PGA stimulated Toll-like receptor 2 (TLR2) but not TLR4 in Chinese hamster ovary cells expressing either TLR2 or TLR4. The ability of PGA to induce TNF-α and IL-6 was retained in TLR4(-/-) but not TLR2(-/-) BMDMs. Blocking experiments with specific neutralizing antibodies for TLR1, TLR6, and CD14 showed that TLR6 and CD14 also were necessary for PGA-induced inflammatory responses. Furthermore, PGA enhanced activation of mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinases and nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB), which are responsible for expression of proinflammatory cytokines. Additionally, PGA-induced TNF-α production was abrogated not only in MyD88(-/-) BMDMs but also in BMDMs pretreated with inhibitors of MAP kinases and NF-κB. These results suggest that immune responses induced by PGA occur via TLR2, TLR6, CD14, and MyD88 through activation of MAP kinase and NF-κB pathways. PMID:26195551

  20. Effect of Jian-Pi-Zhi-Dong Decoction on striatal glutamate and γ-aminobutyric acid levels detected using microdialysis in a rat model of Tourette syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Wen; Wei, Li; Yu, Wenjing; Cui, Xia; Liu, Xiaofang; Wang, Qian; Wang, Sumei

    2016-01-01

    Background Jian-Pi-Zhi-Dong Decoction (JPZDD) is a dedicated treatment of Tourette syndrome (TS). The balance of neurotransmitters in the cortico-striato-pallido-thalamo-cortical network is crucial to the occurrence of TS and related to its severity. This study evaluated the effect of JPZDD on glutamate (Glu) and γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) and their receptors in a TS rat model. Materials and methods Rats were divided into four groups (n=12 each). TS was induced in three of the groups by injecting them with 3,3′-iminodipropionitrile for 7 consecutive days. Two model groups were treated with tiapride (Tia) or JPZDD, while the control and the remaining model group were gavaged with saline. Behavior was assessed by stereotypic score and autonomic activity. Striatal Glu and GABA contents were detected using microdialysis. Expressions of N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor 1 and GABAA receptor (GABAAR) were observed using Western blot and real-time polymerase chain reaction. Results Tia and JPZDD groups had decreased stereotypy compared with model rats; however, the JPZDD group showed a larger decrease in stereotypy than the Tia group at a 4-week time point. In a spontaneous activity test, the total distance of the JPZDD and Tia groups was significantly decreased compared with the model group. The Glu levels of the model group were higher than the control group and decreased with Tia or JPZDD treatment. The GABA level was higher in the model group than the control group. Expressions of GABAAR protein in the model group were higher than in the control group. Treatment with Tia or JPZDD reduced the expression of GABAAR protein. In the case of the mRNA expression, only Tia reduced the expression of N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor 1, compared with the model group. Conclusion JPZDD could alleviate impairments in behavior and dysfunctional signaling by downregulating GABAAR in the striatum. We suggest that this acts to maintain the balance of Glu and GABA. PMID:27279743

  1. The Poly-γ-d-Glutamic Acid Capsule Surrogate of the Bacillus anthracis Capsule Is a Novel Toll-Like Receptor 2 Agonist

    PubMed Central

    Jeon, Jun Ho; Lee, Hae-Ri; Cho, Min-Hee; Park, Ok-Kyu; Park, Jungchan

    2015-01-01

    Bacillus anthracis is a pathogenic Gram-positive bacterium that causes a highly lethal infectious disease, anthrax. The poly-γ-d-glutamic acid (PGA) capsule is one of the major virulence factors of B. anthracis, along with exotoxins. PGA enables B. anthracis to escape phagocytosis and immune surveillance. Our previous study showed that PGA activates the human macrophage cell line THP-1 and human dendritic cells, resulting in the production of the proinflammatory cytokine interleukin-1β (IL-1β) (M. H. Cho et al., Infect Immun 78:387–392, 2010, http://dx.doi.org/10.1128/IAI.00956-09). Here, we investigated PGA-induced cytokine responses and related signaling pathways in mouse bone marrow-derived macrophages (BMDMs) using Bacillus licheniformis PGA as a surrogate for B. anthracis PGA. Upon exposure to PGA, BMDMs produced proinflammatory mediators, including tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α), IL-6, IL-12p40, and monocyte chemoattractant protein 1 (MCP-1), in a concentration-dependent manner. PGA stimulated Toll-like receptor 2 (TLR2) but not TLR4 in Chinese hamster ovary cells expressing either TLR2 or TLR4. The ability of PGA to induce TNF-α and IL-6 was retained in TLR4−/− but not TLR2−/− BMDMs. Blocking experiments with specific neutralizing antibodies for TLR1, TLR6, and CD14 showed that TLR6 and CD14 also were necessary for PGA-induced inflammatory responses. Furthermore, PGA enhanced activation of mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinases and nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB), which are responsible for expression of proinflammatory cytokines. Additionally, PGA-induced TNF-α production was abrogated not only in MyD88−/− BMDMs but also in BMDMs pretreated with inhibitors of MAP kinases and NF-κB. These results suggest that immune responses induced by PGA occur via TLR2, TLR6, CD14, and MyD88 through activation of MAP kinase and NF-κB pathways. PMID:26195551

  2. Serum titres of anti-glutamic acid decarboxylase-65 and anti-IA-2 autoantibodies are associated with different immunoregulatory milieu in newly diagnosed type 1 diabetes patients.

    PubMed

    Gabbay, M Andrade Lima; Sato, M N; Duarte, A J S; Dib, S A

    2012-04-01

    Several studies correlated genetic background and pancreatic islet-cell autoantibody status (type and number) in type 1A diabetes mellitus (T1AD), but there are no data evaluating the relationship among these markers with serum cytokines, regulatory T cells and β cell function. This characterization has a potential importance with regard to T1AD patients' stratification and follow-up in therapeutic prevention. In this study we showed that peripheral sera cytokines [interleukin (IL)-12, IL-6, II-1β, tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-α, IL-10] and chemokines (CXCL10, CXCL8, CXCL9, CCL2) measured were significantly higher in newly diagnosed T1AD patients when compared to healthy controls (P < 0·001). Among T1AD, we found a positive correlation between CXCL10 and CCL-2 (r = 0·80; P = 0·000), IL-8 and TNF-α (r = 0·60; P = 0·000); IL-8 and IL-12 (r = 0·57; P = 0·001) and TNF-α and IL-12 (r = 0·93; P = 0·000). Glutamic acid decarboxylase-65 (GAD-65) autoantibodies (GADA) were associated negatively with CXCL10 (r = -0·45; P = 0·011) and CCL2 (r = -0·65; P = 0·000), while IA-2A showed a negative correlation with IL-10 (r = -0·38; P = 0·027). Human leucocyte antigen (HLA) DR3, DR4 or DR3/DR4 and PTPN22 polymorphism did not show any association with pancreatic islet cell antibodies or cytokines studied. In summary, our results revealed that T1AD have a proinflammatory cytokine profile compared to healthy controls and that IA-2A sera titres seem to be associated with a more inflammatory peripheral cytokine/chemokine profile than GADA. A confirmation of these data in the pre-T1AD phase could help to explain the mechanistic of the well-known role of IA-2A as a more specific marker of beta-cell damage than GADA during the natural history of T1AD. PMID:22385239

  3. Acid rain

    SciTech Connect

    Sweet, W.

    1980-06-20

    Acid precipitation includes not only rain but also acidified snow, hail and frost, as well as sulfur and nitrogen dust. The principal source of acid precipitation is pollution emitted by power plants and smelters. Sulfur and nitrogen compounds contained in the emissions combine with moisture to form droplets with a high acid content - sometimes as acidic as vinegar. When sufficiently concentrated, these acids can kill fish and damage material structures. Under certain circumstances they may reduce crop and forest yields and cause or aggravate respiratory diseases in humans. During the summer, especially, pollutants tend to collect over the Great Lakes in high pressure systems. Since winds typically are westerly and rotate clockwise around high pressure systems, the pollutants gradually are dispersed throughout the eastern part of the continent.

  4. Asparagusic acid.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, Stephen C; Waring, Rosemary H

    2014-01-01

    Asparagusic acid (1,2-dithiolane-4-carboxylic acid) is a simple sulphur-containing 5-membered heterocyclic compound that appears unique to asparagus, though other dithiolane derivatives have been identified in non-food species. This molecule, apparently innocuous toxicologically to man, is the most probable culprit responsible for the curious excretion of odorous urine following asparagus ingestion. The presence of the two adjacent sulphur atoms leads to an enhanced chemical reactivity, endowing it with biological properties including the ability to substitute potentially for α-lipoic acid in α-keto-acid oxidation systems. This brief review collects the scattered data available in the literature concerning asparagusic acid and highlights its properties, intermediary metabolism and exploratory applications. PMID:24099657

  5. [Gastric Acid].

    PubMed

    Ruíz Chávez, R

    1996-01-01

    Gastric acid, a product of parietal cells secretion, full fills multiple biological roles which are absolutely necessary to keep corporal homeostasis. The production of the acid depends upon an effector cellular process represented in the first step by histamine, acetilcholine and gastrin, first messengers of the process. These interact with specific receptors than in sequence activate second messengers -cAMP and the calcium-calmodulin system- which afterwards activate a kinase. An specific protein is then phosphorilated by this enzyme, being the crucial factor that starts the production of acid. Finally, a proton bomb, extrudes the acid towards the gastric lumen. The secretion process mentioned above, is progressive lyactivated in three steps, two of which are stimulators -cephalic and gastric phases- and the other one inhibitor or intestinal phase. These stages are started by mental and neurological phenomena -thought, sight, smell or memory-; by food, drugs or other ingested substances; and by products of digestion. Changes in regulation of acid secretion, in the structure of gastro-duodenal mucosal barrier by a wide spectrum of factors and agents including food, drugs and H. pylori, are the basis of acid-peptic disease, entity in which gastric acid plays a fundamental role. From the therapeutic point of view, so at the theoretical as at the practical levels, t is possible to interfere with the secretion of acid by neutralization of some of the steps of the effector cellular process. An adequate knowledge of the basics related to gastric acid, allows to create strategies for the clinical handling of associated pathology, specifically in relation to peptic acid disease in all of the known clinical forms. PMID:12165790

  6. Acid fog

    SciTech Connect

    Hileman, B.

    1983-03-01

    Fog in areas of southern California previously thought to be pollution-free has been shown to have a pH as low as 1.69. It has been found to be most acidic after smoggy days, suggesting that it forms on the aerosol associated with the previously exiting smog. Studies on Whiteface Mountain in the Adirondacks show that fog water is often 10 times as acidic as rainwater. As a result of their studies, California plans to spend $4 million on acid deposition research in the coming year. (JMT)

  7. Folic acid

    MedlinePlus

    ... in the blood vessel to keep it open. Bipolar disorder. Taking folic acid does not appear to improve the antidepressant effects of lithium in people with bipolar disorder. However, taking folate with the medication valproate improves ...

  8. Mefenamic Acid

    MedlinePlus

    ... as mefenamic acid may cause ulcers, bleeding, or holes in the stomach or intestine. These problems may ... like coffee grounds, blood in the stool, or black and tarry stools.Keep all appointments with your ...

  9. ACID RAIN

    EPA Science Inventory

    Acid precipitation has become one of the major environmental problems of this decade. It is a challenge to scientists throughout the world. Researchers from such diverse disciplines as plant pathology, soil science, bacteriology, meteorology and engineering are investigating diff...

  10. Acid Precipitation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Likens, Gene E.

    1976-01-01

    Discusses the fact that the acidity of rain and snow falling on parts of the U.S. and Europe has been rising. The reasons are still not entirely clear and the consequences have yet to be well evaluated. (MLH)

  11. Carnosic acid.

    PubMed

    Birtić, Simona; Dussort, Pierre; Pierre, François-Xavier; Bily, Antoine C; Roller, Marc

    2015-07-01

    Carnosic acid (salvin), which possesses antioxidative and antimicrobial properties, is increasingly exploited within the food, nutritional health and cosmetics industries. Since its first extraction from a Salvia species (∼70 years ago) and its identification (∼50 years ago), numerous articles and patents (∼400) have been published on specific food and medicinal applications of Rosmarinus and Salvia plant extracts abundant in carnosic acid. In contrast, relevant biochemical, physiological or molecular studies in planta have remained rare. In this overview, recent advances in understanding of carnosic acid distribution, biosynthesis, accumulation and role in planta, and its applications are summarised. We also discuss the deficiencies in our understanding of the relevant biochemical processes, and suggest the molecular targets of carnosic acid. Finally, future perspectives and studies related to its potential roles are highlighted. PMID:25639596

  12. Aminocaproic Acid

    MedlinePlus

    Amicar® Oral Solution ... Aminocaproic acid comes as a tablet and a solution (liquid) to take by mouth. It is usually ... it at room temperature and away from excess heat and moisture (not in the bathroom). Throw away ...

  13. Tranexamic Acid

    MedlinePlus

    ... is used to treat heavy bleeding during the menstrual cycle (monthly periods) in women. Tranexamic acid is in ... tablets for more than 5 days in a menstrual cycle or take more than 6 tablets in a ...

  14. Acidic precipitation

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, H.C.

    1987-01-01

    At the International Symposium on Acidic Precipitation, over 400 papers were presented, and nearly 200 of them are included here. They provide an overview of the present state of the art of acid rain research. The Conference focused on atmospheric science (monitoring, source-receptor relationships), aquatic effects (marine eutrophication, lake acidification, impacts on plant and fish populations), and terrestrial effects (forest decline, soil acidification, etc.).

  15. The asymmetric distribution of enzymic activity between the six subunits of bovine liver glutamate dehydrogenase. Use of D- and L-glutamyl alpha-chloromethyl ketones (4-amino-6-chloro-5-oxohexanoic acid.

    PubMed Central

    Rasool, C G; Nicolaidis, S; Akhtar, M

    1976-01-01

    A method for the preparation of D- and L-glutamyl alpha-chloromethyl ketones (4-amino-6-chloro-5-oxohexanoic acid) is described. These chloromethyl ketones irreversibly inactivated bovine glutamate dehydrogenase, whereas several other related compounds had no adverse effect on the activity of the enzyme. The inactivation process was shown to be due to the modification of lysine-126. The time-courses for the inactivation and the incorporation of radioactivity from tritiated L-glutamyl alpha-chloromethyl ketone into the glutamate dehydrogenase were biphasic. The results were interpreted to suggest the involvement of 'negative co-operative' interactions in the reactivity of lysine-126. From the cumulative evidence it is argued that the first subunit of the enzyme, which takes part in catalysis, makes the largest, and the last the smallest, contribution to the overall catalysis. It is emphasized that three of the six subunits of the enzyme may possess as much as 80% of the total activity of bovine glutamate dehydrogenase. PMID:10889

  16. Glutamate Stimulates Local Protein Synthesis in the Axons of Rat Cortical Neurons by Activating α-Amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic Acid (AMPA) Receptors and Metabotropic Glutamate Receptors*

    PubMed Central

    Hsu, Wei-Lun; Chung, Hui-Wen; Wu, Chih-Yueh; Wu, Huei-Ing; Lee, Yu-Tao; Chen, En-Chan; Fang, Weilun; Chang, Yen-Chung

    2015-01-01

    Glutamate is the principal excitatory neurotransmitter in the mammalian CNS. By analyzing the metabolic incorporation of azidohomoalanine, a methionine analogue, in newly synthesized proteins, we find that glutamate treatments up-regulate protein translation not only in intact rat cortical neurons in culture but also in the axons emitting from cortical neurons before making synapses with target cells. The process by which glutamate stimulates local translation in axons begins with the binding of glutamate to the ionotropic AMPA receptors and metabotropic glutamate receptor 1 and members of group 2 metabotropic glutamate receptors on the plasma membrane. Subsequently, the activated mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) signaling pathway and the rise in Ca2+, resulting from Ca2+ influxes through calcium-permeable AMPA receptors, voltage-gated Ca2+ channels, and transient receptor potential canonical channels, in axons stimulate the local translation machinery. For comparison, the enhancement effects of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) on the local protein synthesis in cortical axons were also studied. The results indicate that Ca2+ influxes via transient receptor potential canonical channels and activated the mTOR pathway in axons also mediate BDNF stimulation to local protein synthesis. However, glutamate- and BDNF-induced enhancements of translation in axons exhibit different kinetics. Moreover, Ca2+ and mTOR signaling appear to play roles carrying different weights, respectively, in transducing glutamate- and BDNF-induced enhancements of axonal translation. Thus, our results indicate that exposure to transient increases of glutamate and more lasting increases of BDNF would stimulate local protein synthesis in migrating axons en route to their targets in the developing brain. PMID:26134564

  17. Salicylic acids

    PubMed Central

    Hayat, Shamsul; Irfan, Mohd; Wani, Arif; Nasser, Alyemeni; Ahmad, Aqil

    2012-01-01

    Salicylic acid is well known phytohormone, emerging recently as a new paradigm of an array of manifestations of growth regulators. The area unleashed yet encompassed the applied agriculture sector to find the roles to strengthen the crops against plethora of abiotic and biotic stresses. The skipped part of integrated picture, however, was the evolutionary insight of salicylic acid to either allow or discard the microbial invasion depending upon various internal factors of two interactants under the prevailing external conditions. The metabolic status that allows the host invasion either as pathogenesis or symbiosis with possible intermediary stages in close systems has been tried to underpin here. PMID:22301975

  18. Folic acid

    MedlinePlus

    ... disease called vitiligo, and an inherited disease called Fragile-X syndrome. It is also used for reducing harmful side ... to blood clots (ischemic stroke). Inherited disease called Fragile-X syndrome.Taking folic acid by mouth does not improve ...

  19. Acid rain

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1984-06-01

    An overview is presented of acid rain and the problems it causes to the environment worldwide. The acidification of lakes and streams is having a dramatic effect on aquatic life. Aluminum, present in virtually all forest soils, leaches out readily under acid conditions and interferes with the gills of all fish, some more seriously than others. There is evidence of major damage to forests in European countries. In the US, the most severe forest damage appears to be in New England, New York's Adirondacks, and the central Appalachians. This small region is part of a larger area of the Northeast and Canada that appears to have more acid rainfall than the rest of the country. It is downwind from major coal burning states, which produce about one quarter of US SO/sub 2/ emissions and one sixth of nitrogen oxide emissions. Uncertainties exist over the causes of forest damage and more research is needed before advocating expensive programs to reduce rain acidity. The President's current budget seeks an expansion of research funds from the current $30 million per year to $120 million.

  20. Formic acid

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Formic acid ; CASRN 64 - 18 - 6 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinogenic Effect

  1. Selenious acid

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Selenious acid ; CASRN 7783 - 00 - 8 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinogenic E

  2. Benzoic acid

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Benzoic acid ; CASRN 65 - 85 - 0 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinogenic Effec

  3. Trichloroacetic acid

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Trichloroacetic acid ( TCA ) ; CASRN 76 - 03 - 9 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Nonca

  4. Dichloroacetic acid

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Dichloroacetic acid ; CASRN 79 - 43 - 6 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinogeni

  5. Acrylic acid

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Acrylic acid ( CASRN 79 - 10 - 7 ) Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinogenic Eff

  6. Cacodylic acid

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Cacodylic acid ; CASRN 75 - 60 - 5 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinogenic Eff

  7. Phosphoric acid

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Phosphoric acid ; CASRN 7664 - 38 - 2 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinogenic

  8. Stearic Acid

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Young, Jay A.

    2004-01-01

    A chemical laboratory information profile (CLIP) is presented for the chemical, stearic acid. The profile lists the chemical's physical and harmful characteristics, exposure limits, and symptoms of major exposure, for the benefit of teachers and students, who use the chemical in the laboratory.

  9. Disorders of glutamate metabolism.

    PubMed

    Kelly, A; Stanley, C A

    2001-01-01

    The significant role the amino acid glutamate assumes in a number of fundamental metabolic pathways is becoming better understood. As a central junction for interchange of amino nitrogen, glutamate facilitates both amino acid synthesis and degradation. In the liver, glutamate is the terminus for release of ammonia from amino acids, and the intrahepatic concentration of glutamate modulates the rate of ammonia detoxification into urea. In pancreatic beta-cells, oxidation of glutamate mediates amino acid-stimulated insulin secretion. In the central nervous system, glutamate serves as an excitatory neurotransmittor. Glutamate is also the precursor of the inhibitory neurotransmittor GABA, as well as glutamine, a potential mediator of hyperammonemic neurotoxicity. The recent identification of a novel form of congenital hyperinsulinism associated with asymptomatic hyperammonemia assigns glutamate oxidation by glutamate dehydrogenase a more important role than previously recognized in beta-cell insulin secretion and hepatic and CNS ammonia detoxification. Disruptions of glutamate metabolism have been implicated in other clinical disorders, such as pyridoxine-dependent seizures, confirming the importance of intact glutamate metabolism. This article will review glutamate metabolism and clinical disorders associated with disrupted glutamate metabolism. PMID:11754524

  10. Oligomerization of L-gamma-carboxyglutamic acid

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hill, A. R. Jr; Orgel, L. E.; Bada, J. L. (Principal Investigator)

    1999-01-01

    Unlike glutamic acid, L-gamma-carboxyglutamic acid does not oligomerize efficiently when treated with carbonyldiimidazole in aqueous solution. However, divalent ions such as Mg2+ catalyze the reaction, and lead to the formation of oligomers in good yield. In the presence of hydroxylapatite, L-gamma-carboxyglutamic acid oligomerizes efficiently in a reaction that proceeds in the absence of divalent ions but is further catalyzed when they are present. After 'feeding' 50 times with activated amino acid in the presence of the Mg2+ ion, oligomers longer than the 20-mer could be detected. The effect of hydroxylapatite on peptide elongation is very sensitive to the nature of the activated amino acid and the acceptor peptide. Glutamic acid oligomerizes more efficiently than L-gamma-carboxyglutamic acid on hydroxylapatite and adds more efficiently to decaglutamic acid in solution. One might, therefore, expect that glutamic acid would add more efficiently than L-gamma-carboxyglutamic acid to decaglutamic acid on hydroxylapatite. The contrary is true--the addition of L-gamma-carboxyglutamic acid is substantially more efficient. This suggests that oligomerization on the surface of hydroxylapatite depends on the detailed match between the structure of the surface of the mineral and the structure of the oligomer.

  11. EndoS from Streptococcus pyogenes is hydrolyzed by the cysteine proteinase SpeB and requires glutamic acid 235 and tryptophans for IgG glycan-hydrolyzing activity

    PubMed Central

    Allhorn, Maria; Olsén, Arne; Collin, Mattias

    2008-01-01

    Background The endoglycosidase EndoS and the cysteine proteinase SpeB from the human pathogen Streptococcus pyogenes are functionally related in that they both hydrolyze IgG leading to impairment of opsonizing antibodies and thus enhance bacterial survival in human blood. In this study, we further investigated the relationship between EndoS and SpeB by examining their in vitro temporal production and stability and activity of EndoS. Furthermore, theoretical structure modeling of EndoS combined with site-directed mutagenesis and chemical blocking of amino acids was used to identify amino acids required for the IgG glycan-hydrolyzing activity of EndoS. Results We could show that during growth in vitro S. pyogenes secretes the IgG glycan-hydrolyzing endoglycosidase EndoS prior to the cysteine proteinase SpeB. Upon maturation SpeB hydrolyzes EndoS that then loses its IgG glycan-hydrolyzing activity. Sequence analysis and structural homology modeling of EndoS provided a basis for further analysis of the prerequisites for IgG glycan-hydrolysis. Site-directed mutagenesis and chemical modification of amino acids revealed that glutamic acid 235 is an essential catalytic residue, and that tryptophan residues, but not the abundant lysine or the single cysteine residues, are important for EndoS activity. Conclusion We present novel information about the amino acid requirements for IgG glycan-hydrolyzing activity of the immunomodulating enzyme EndoS. Furthermore, we show that the cysteine proteinase SpeB processes/degrades EndoS and thus emphasize the importance of the SpeB as a degrading/processing enzyme of proteins from the bacterium itself. PMID:18182097

  12. Binding mode of an α-amino acid-linked quinoxaline-2,3-dione analogue at glutamate receptor subtype GluK1.

    PubMed

    Demmer, Charles S; Møller, Charlotte; Brown, Patricia M G E; Han, Liwei; Pickering, Darryl S; Nielsen, Birgitte; Bowie, Derek; Frydenvang, Karla; Kastrup, Jette S; Bunch, Lennart

    2015-06-17

    Two α-amino acid-functionalized quinoxalines, 1a (CNG-10301) and 1b (CNG-10300), of a quinoxaline moiety coupled to an amino acid moiety were designed, synthesized, and characterized pharmacologically. While 1a displayed low affinity at native AMPA, KA, and NMDA receptors, and at homomeric GluK1,3 receptors, the affinity for GluK2 was in the midmicromolar range (Ki = 136 μM), 1b displayed low to midmicromolar range binding affinity at all the iGluRs (Ki = 9-126 μM). In functional experiments (outside-out patches excised from transfected HEK293T cells), 100 μM 1a partially blocked GluK1 (33% peak response), while GluK2 was unaffected (96% peak response). Furthermore, 1a was shown not to be an agonist at GluK1 and GluK2 at 100 μM. On the other hand, 100 μM 1b fully antagonized GluK1 (8% peak response) but only partially blocked GluK2 (33% peak response). An X-ray structure at 2.3 Å resolution of 1b in the GluK1-LBD (ligand-binding domain) disclosed an unexpected binding mode compared to the predictions made during the design phase; the quinoxaline moiety remains to act as an amino acid bioisostere, but the amino acid moiety is oriented into a new area within the GluK1 receptor. The structure of the GluK1-LBD with 1b showed a large variation in domain openings of the three molecules from 25° to 49°, demonstrating that the GluK1-LBD is capable of undergoing major domain movements. PMID:25856736

  13. Hydroxycarboxylic acids and salts

    DOEpatents

    Kiely, Donald E; Hash, Kirk R; Kramer-Presta, Kylie; Smith, Tyler N

    2015-02-24

    Compositions which inhibit corrosion and alter the physical properties of concrete (admixtures) are prepared from salt mixtures of hydroxycarboxylic acids, carboxylic acids, and nitric acid. The salt mixtures are prepared by neutralizing acid product mixtures from the oxidation of polyols using nitric acid and oxygen as the oxidizing agents. Nitric acid is removed from the hydroxycarboxylic acids by evaporation and diffusion dialysis.

  14. Amino acid isotopic analysis in agricultural systems

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A relatively new approach to stable isotopic analysis—referred to as compound-specific isotopic analysis (CSIA)—has emerged, centering on the measurement of 15N:14N ratios in amino acids (glutamic acid and phenylalanine). CSIA has recently been used to generate trophic position estimates among anima...

  15. Methylmalonic acid blood test

    MedlinePlus

    ... acid is a substance produced when proteins, called amino acids, in the body break down. The health care ... Cederbaum S, Berry GT. Inborn errors of carbohydrate, ammonia, amino acid, and organic acid metabolism. In: Gleason CA, Devaskar ...

  16. Folic acid - test

    MedlinePlus

    Folic acid is a type of B vitamin. This article discusses the test to measure the amount of folic acid in the blood. ... that may interfere with test results, including folic acid supplements. Drugs that can decrease folic acid measurements ...

  17. Uric acid urine test

    MedlinePlus

    The uric acid urine test measures the level of uric acid in urine. Uric acid level can also be checked using a blood ... help determine the cause of a high uric acid level in the blood. It may also be ...

  18. Methylmalonic acid blood test

    MedlinePlus

    The methylmalonic acid blood test measures the amount of methylmalonic acid in the blood. ... Methylmalonic acid is a substance produced when proteins, called amino acids, in the body break down. The health care ...

  19. Folic Acid and Pregnancy

    MedlinePlus

    ... 5 Things to Know About Zika & Pregnancy Folic Acid and Pregnancy KidsHealth > For Parents > Folic Acid and ... before conception and during early pregnancy . About Folic Acid Folic acid, sometimes called folate, is a B ...

  20. Improved stability and enhanced efficiency to degrade chlorimuron-ethyl by the entrapment of esterase SulE in cross-linked poly (γ-glutamic acid)/gelatin hydrogel.

    PubMed

    Yang, Liqiang; Li, Xinyu; Li, Xu; Su, Zhencheng; Zhang, Chenggang; Xu, MingKai; Zhang, Huiwen

    2015-04-28

    Free enzymes often undergo some problems such as easy deactivation, low stability, and less recycling in biodegradation processes, especially in soil condition. A novel esterase SulE, which is responsible for primary degradation of a wide range of sulfonylurea herbicides by methyl or ethyl ester de-esterification, was expressed by strain Hansschlegelia sp. CHL1 and entrapped for the first time in an environment-friendly, biocompatible and biodegradable cross-linked poly (γ-glutamic acid)/gelatin hydrogel (CPE). The activity and stability of CPE-SulE were compared with free SulE under varying pH and temperature condition by measuring chlorimuron-ethyl residue. Meanwhile, the three-dimensional network of CPE-SulE was verified by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The results showed that CPE-SulE obviously improved thermostability, pH stability and reusability compared with free SulE. Furthermore, CPE-SulE enhanced degrading efficiency of chlorimuron-ethyl in both soil and water system, especially in acid environment. The characteristics of CPE-SulE suggested the great potential to remediate chlorimuron-ethyl contaminated soils in situ. PMID:25661176

  1. Understanding Acid Rain

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Damonte, Kathleen

    2004-01-01

    The term acid rain describes rain, snow, or fog that is more acidic than normal precipitation. To understand what acid rain is, it is first necessary to know what an acid is. Acids can be defined as substances that produce hydrogen ions (H+), when dissolved in water. Scientists indicate how acidic a substance is by a set of numbers called the pH…

  2. New bioactive fatty acids

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Many oxygenated fatty acids are bioactive compounds. Nocardia cholesterolicum and Flavobacterium DS5 convert oleic acid to 10 hydroxy stearic acid and linoleic acid to 10-hydroxy-12(Z)-octadecanoic acid. Pseudomonas aeruginosa PR3 converts oleic acid to the new compounds, 7,10-dihydroxy-8(E)-octad...

  3. New Bioactive Fatty Acids

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Many oxygenated fatty acids are bioactive compounds. Nocardia cholesterolicum and Flavobacterium DS5 convert oleic acid to 10 hydroxy stearic acid and linoleic acid to 10-hydroxy-12(Z)-octadecanoic acid. Pseudomonas aeruginosa PR3 converts oleic acid to new compounds, 7,10-dihydroxy-8(E)-octadecen...

  4. pH dependent growth of poly( L-lysine)/poly( L-glutamic) acid multilayer films and their cell adhesion properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richert, Ludovic; Arntz, Youri; Schaaf, Pierre; Voegel, Jean-Claude; Picart, Catherine

    2004-10-01

    The short-term interaction of chondrosarcoma cells with (PGA/PLL) polyelectrolyte multilayers was investigated in a serum-containing medium for films built at different pHs and subsequently exposed to the culture medium. The buildup of the films and their stability was first investigated by means of optical waveguide lightmode spectroscopy, quartz crystal microbalance, streaming potential measurements and atomic force microscopy. While film growth is linear at all pHs, after a few layers have been deposited the growth is much larger for the films built at basic pH and even more pronounced for those built at acidic pH. However, these latter films remain stable in the culture medium only if they have been crosslinked prior to the ionic strength and pH jumps. The films built at acidic pH were found to swell in water by about 200% whereas those built at other pHs did not swell in a physiological buffer. For thin films (≈20 nm) built at pH = 7.4, the detachment forces were dependent on the outermost layer, the forces being significantly higher on PLL-ending films than on PGA-ending ones. In contrast, for the thick films built at pH = 4.4 and at pH = 10.4 (thickness of the order of few hundred of nanometers), the detachment forces were independent of the outermost layer of the film. The films built at pH = 10.4, which shrink in contact with salt containing solutions, were highly cell adhesive whereas those built at acidic pH were highly cell resistant. Protein adsorption and film roughness (as measured by AFM) could not explain these striking differences. The high adhesion observed on the film built at pH 10.4 may rather be related to the secondary structure of the film and to its relatively low swellability in water, whereas the cell resistance of the films built at pH 4.4 may be linked to their high swellability. Therefore, for the PGA/PLL films, the cell adhesion properties can be tuned depending on the deposition pH of the polyelectrolyte solutions. This study

  5. Pivotal Enzyme in Glutamate Metabolism of Poly-γ-Glutamate-Producing Microbes

    PubMed Central

    Ashiuchi, Makoto; Yamamoto, Takashi; Kamei, Tohru

    2013-01-01

    The extremely halophilic archaeon Natrialba aegyptiaca secretes the L-homo type of poly-γ-glutamate (PGA) as an extremolyte. We examined the enzymes involved in glutamate metabolism and verified the presence of L-glutamate dehydrogenases, L-aspartate aminotransferase, and L-glutamate synthase. However, neither glutamate racemase nor D-amino acid aminotransferase activity was detected, suggesting the absence of sources of D-glutamate. In contrast, D-glutamate-rich PGA producers mostly possess such intracellular sources of D-glutamate. The results of our present study indicate that the D-glutamate-anabolic enzyme “glutamate racemase” is pivotal in the biosynthesis of PGA. PMID:25371338

  6. Incomplete tricarboxylic acid cycle in a type I methylotroph, Methylococcus capsulatus.

    PubMed Central

    Patel, R; Hoare, L; Hoare, D S; Taylor, B F

    1975-01-01

    Alpha-Ketoglutaratedehydrogenase was undetectable in extracts of Methylococcus capsulatus. Cells incorporated [1-14-C] acetate into only four protein amino acids (glutamate, proline, arginine, and leucine) and the C5, but not C1, of glutamate. PMID:806581

  7. Structural and biochemical analyses reveal how ornithine acetyl transferase binds acidic and basic amino acid substrates.

    PubMed

    Iqbal, Aman; Clifton, Ian J; Chowdhury, Rasheduzzaman; Ivison, David; Domene, Carmen; Schofield, Christopher J

    2011-09-21

    Structural and biochemical analyses reveal how ornithine acetyl-transferases catalyse the reversible transfer of an acetyl-group from a basic (ornithine) to an acidic (glutamate) amino acid by employing a common mechanism involving an acetyl-enzyme intermediate but using different side chain binding modes. PMID:21796301

  8. Biosynthesis of amino acids in Clostridium pasteurianum

    PubMed Central

    Dainty, R. H.; Peel, J. L.

    1970-01-01

    1. Clostridium pasteurianum was grown on a synthetic medium with the following carbon sources: (a) 14C-labelled glucose, alone or with unlabelled aspartate or glutamate, or (b) unlabelled glucose plus 14C-labelled aspartate, glutamate, threonine, serine or glycine. The incorporation of 14C into the amino acids of the cell protein was examined. 2. In both series of experiments carbon from exogenous glutamate was incorporated into proline and arginine; carbon from aspartate was incorporated into glutamate, proline, arginine, lysine, methionine, threonine, isoleucine, glycine and serine. Incorporations from the other exogenous amino acids indicated the metabolic sequence: aspartate → threonine → glycine ⇌ serine. 3. The following activities were demonstrated in cell-free extracts of the organism: (a) the formation of aspartate by carboxylation of phosphoenolpyruvate or pyruvate, followed by transamination; (b) the individual reactions of the tricarboxylic acid route to 2-oxoglutarate from oxaloacetate; glutamate dehydrogenase was not detected; (c) the conversion of aspartate into threonine via homoserine; (d) the conversion of threonine into glycine by a constitutive threonine aldolase; (e) serine transaminase, phosphoserine transaminase, glycerate dehydrogenase and phosphoglycerate dehydrogenase. This last activity was abnormally high. 4. The combined evidence indicates that in C. pasteurianum the biosynthetic role of aspartate and glutamate is generally similar to that in aerobic and facultatively aerobic organisms, but that glycine is synthesized from glucose via aspartate and threonine. PMID:5419750

  9. Bioactive Fatty Acids

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Oxygenated fatty acids are useful as specialty chemicals, plasticizers, and biomedicals. Microbial enzymes convert fatty acids to mono-, di-, and trihydroxy fatty acid products. Among them, Bacillus megaterium ALA2 converted n-6 and n-3 PUFAs to many new oxygenated fatty acids. Linoleic acid was ...

  10. Active targeting co-delivery system based on pH-sensitive methoxy-poly(ethylene glycol)2K-poly(ε-caprolactone)4K-poly(glutamic acid)1K for enhanced cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Li, Nuannuan; Huang, Chunzhi; Luan, Yuxia; Song, Aixin; Song, Yunmei; Garg, Sanjay

    2016-06-15

    In this paper, we successfully synthesized folate-modified pH-sensitive copolymer methoxy-poly(ethylene glycol)2K-poly(ε-caprolactone)4K-poly(glutamic acid)1K (mPEG2K-PCL4K-PGA1K-FA), which could form the polymeric assembly in an aqueous solution, for co-delivering hydrophilic drugs doxorubicin hydrochloride (DOX) and verapamil hydrochloride (VER) (FA-poly(DOX+VER)). Since VER was an effective P-glycoprotein inhibitor, the combination of DOX and VER could reverse the multidrug resistance efficiently and enhance the therapeutic effect. Therefore, the inhibition ratios of MCF-7/ADR resistant cancer cell treated by FA-poly (DOX+VER) were almost more than 30% higher than those of FA-polyDOX after 48h and 72h. Furthermore, the conjugation of FA could lead the co-delivery systems actively targeting into the FA receptor over-expressing cancer cells in addition to the passive accumulation of the assembly in tumor tissues. Importantly, the prepared mPEG2K-PCL4K-PGA1K-FA assembly showed high pH-sensitive property, which made the drugs mostly released in tumor tissue (acid environment) than in physiological environment (neutral environment). In summary, the as-prepared co-delivery system FA-poly(DOX+VER) demonstrated a high efficiency in reversing the multidrug resistance and targeting FA receptor to improve the anticancer effect of DOX in MCF-7/ADR resistant cells. PMID:27016914

  11. Substrate properties of C1 inhibitor Ma (alanine 434----glutamic acid). Genetic and structural evidence suggesting that the P12-region contains critical determinants of serine protease inhibitor/substrate status.

    PubMed

    Skriver, K; Wikoff, W R; Patston, P A; Tausk, F; Schapira, M; Kaplan, A P; Bock, S C

    1991-05-15

    The serine protease inhibitor (serpin) C1 inhibitor inactivates enzymes involved in the regulation of vascular permeability. A patient from the Ma family with the genetic disorder hereditary angioedema inherited a dysfunctional C1 inhibitor allele. Relative to normal plasma, the patients's plasma contained an additional C1 inhibitor immunoreactive band, which comigrated with normal C1 inhibitor cleaved by plasma kallikrein, C1s, or factor XIIa. C1 inhibitor Ma did not react with a monoclonal antibody to a neoepitope that is present in complexed and cleaved normal C1 inhibitor, suggesting conformational differences between cleaved normal C1- inhibitor and cleaved C1 inhibitor Ma. Molecular cloning and sequencing of exon 8 of the C1 inhibitor Ma allele revealed a single C to A mutation, changing alanine 434 to glutamic acid. Ala 434 of C1 inhibitor aligns with the P12 residue of the prototypical serpin alpha 1-antitrypsin. The P12 amino acid of all inhibitory serpins is alanine, and it is present in a highly conserved region on the amino-terminal side of the serpin-reactive center loop. Whereas normal C1 inhibitor expressed by transfected COS-1 cells formed complexes with and was cleaved by kallikrein, fXIIa, and C1s, COS-1-expressed Ala434---Glu C1 inhibitor was cleaved by these enzymes but did not form complexes with them. These results, together with evidence from other studies, suggest that serpin protease inhibitor activity is the result of protein conformational change that occurs when the P12 region of a serpin moves from a surface location, on the reactive site loop of the native molecule, to an internal location within sheet A of the complexed inhibitor. PMID:2026621

  12. The Pseudomonas aeruginosa antimetabolite L -2-amino-4-methoxy-trans-3-butenoic acid (AMB) is made from glutamate and two alanine residues via a thiotemplate-linked tripeptide precursor

    PubMed Central

    Rojas Murcia, Nelson; Lee, Xiaoyun; Waridel, Patrice; Maspoli, Alessandro; Imker, Heidi J.; Chai, Tiancong; Walsh, Christopher T.; Reimmann, Cornelia

    2015-01-01

    The Pseudomonas aeruginosa toxin L-2-amino-4-methoxy-trans-3-butenoic acid (AMB) is a non-proteinogenic amino acid which is toxic for prokaryotes and eukaryotes. Production of AMB requires a five-gene cluster encoding a putative LysE-type transporter (AmbA), two non-ribosomal peptide synthetases (AmbB and AmbE), and two iron(II)/α-ketoglutarate-dependent oxygenases (AmbC and AmbD). Bioinformatics analysis predicts one thiolation (T) domain for AmbB and two T domains (T1 and T2) for AmbE, suggesting that AMB is generated by a processing step from a precursor tripeptide assembled on a thiotemplate. Using a combination of ATP-PPi exchange assays, aminoacylation assays, and mass spectrometry-based analysis of enzyme-bound substrates and pathway intermediates, the AmbB substrate was identified to be L-alanine (L-Ala), while the T1 and T2 domains of AmbE were loaded with L-glutamate (L-Glu) and L-Ala, respectively. Loading of L-Ala at T2 of AmbE occurred only in the presence of AmbB, indicative of a trans loading mechanism. In vitro assays performed with AmbB and AmbE revealed the dipeptide L-Glu-L-Ala at T1 and the tripeptide L-Ala-L-Glu-L-Ala attached at T2. When AmbC and AmbD were included in the assay, these peptides were no longer detected. Instead, an L-Ala-AMB-L-Ala tripeptide was found at T2. These data are in agreement with a biosynthetic model in which L-Glu is converted into AMB by the action of AmbC, AmbD, and tailoring domains of AmbE. The importance of the flanking L-Ala residues in the precursor tripeptide is discussed. PMID:25814981

  13. Effect of the replacement of aspartic acid/glutamic acid residues with asparagine/glutamine residues in RNase He1 from Hericium erinaceus on inhibition of human leukemia cell line proliferation.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Hiroko; Motoyoshi, Naomi; Itagaki, Tadashi; Suzuki, Mamoru; Inokuchi, Norio

    2015-01-01

    RNase He1 from Hericium erinaceus, a member of the RNase T1 family, has high identity with RNase Po1 from Pleurotus ostreatus with complete conservation of the catalytic sequence. However, the optimal pH for RNase He1 activity is lower than that of RNase Po1, and the enzyme shows little inhibition of human tumor cell proliferation. Hence, to investigate the potential antitumor activity of recombinant RNase He1 and to possibly enhance its optimum pH, we generated RNase He1 mutants by replacing 12 Asn/Gln residues with Asp/Glu residues; the amino acid sequence of RNase Po1 was taken as reference. These mutants were then expressed in Escherichia coli. Using site-directed mutagenesis, we successfully modified the optimal pH for enzyme activity and generated a recombinant RNase He1 that inhibited the proliferation of cells in the human leukemia cell line. These properties are extremely important in the production of anticancer biologics that are based on RNase activity. PMID:25338779

  14. Prebiotic Synthesis of Hydrophobic and Protein Amino Acids

    PubMed Central

    Ring, David; Wolman, Yecheskel; Friedmann, Nadav; Miller, Stanley L.

    1972-01-01

    The formation of amino acids by the action of electric discharges on a mixture of methane, nitrogen, and water with traces of ammonia was studied in detail. The presence of glycine, alanine, α-amino-n-butyric acid, α-aminoisobutyric acid, valine, norvaline, isovaline, leucine, isoleucine, alloisoleucine, norleucine, proline, aspartic acid, glutamic acid, serine, threonine, allothreonine, α-hydroxy-γ-aminobutyric acid, and α,γ-diaminobutyric acid was confirmed by ion-exchange chromatography and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. All of the primary α-amino acids found in the Murchison Meteorite have been synthesized by this electric discharge experiment. PMID:4501592

  15. Development of a specific real-time PCR assay targeting the poly-γ-glutamic acid synthesis gene, pgsB, for the quantification of Bacillus amyloliquefaciens in solid-state fermentation.

    PubMed

    Yong, Xiaoyu; Zhang, Ruifu; Zhang, Nan; Chen, Yilu; Huang, Xinqi; Zhao, Jun; Shen, Qirong

    2013-02-01

    A TaqMan real-time PCR procedure was developed for specific detection and quantification of strains belonging to Bacillus amyloliquefaciens group. The primer pair pgsB726-f/pgsB791-r and the pgsB-probe were designed from one of the poly-γ-glutamic acid synthesis gene (pgsB) of B. amyloliquefaciens. The detection limit was approximately between 10(2)-10(3) cells/mL. A linear correlation between the log10 input pMD-pgsB plasmid DNA copies and the threshold cycle values were observed with a magnitude of linearity in the range of 9.415×10(3)-10(7) copies/mL for the standard curve, which exhibited a slope of -3.35 and an R2 value of 99.8%. Results of validation of this method with artificially contaminated and natural solid-state fermentation samples showed that it was suitable for specific and sensitive detection and quantification for the target strains in solid-state fermentation samples. This could be more useful to understand the fermentation starting strain and the final microbiological properties of fermentation products. PMID:23266849

  16. Probing the surface microstructure of layer-by-layer self-assembly chitosan/poly(l-glutamic acid) multilayers: A grazing-incidence small-angle X-ray scattering study.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Nie; Yang, Chunming; Wang, Yuzhu; Zhao, Binyu; Bian, Fenggang; Li, Xiuhong; Wang, Jie

    2016-01-01

    This study characterized the surface structure of layer-by-layer self-assembly chitosan/poly(L-glutamic acid) multilayers through grazing-incidence small-angle X-ray scattering (GISAXS), X-ray reflectivity (XRR), and atomic force microscopy (AFM). A weakly long-period ordered structure along the in-plane direction was firstly observed in the polyelectrolyte multilayer by the GISAXS technique. This structure can be attributed to the specific domains on the film surface. In the domain, nanodroplets that were formed by polyelectrolyte molecules were orderly arranged along the free surface of the films. This ordered structure gradually disappeared with the increasing bilayer number because of the complex merging behavior of nanodroplets into large islands. Furthermore, resonant diffuse scattering became evident in the GISAXS patterns as the number of bilayers in the polyelectrolyte multilayer was increased. Notably, the lateral cutoff length of resonant diffuse scattering for these polyelectrolyte films was comparable with the long-period value of the ordered nanodroplets in the polyelectrolyte multilayer. Therefore, the nanodroplets could be considered as a basic transmission unit for structure propagation from the inner interface to the film surface. It suggests that the surface structure with length scale larger than the size of nanodroplets was partially complicated from the interface structure near the substrate, but surface structure smaller than the cutoff length was mainly depended on the conformation of nanodroplets. PMID:26478320

  17. Synthesis of poly(ɛ-caprolactone) nanospheres in the presence of the protective agent poly(glutamic acid) and their cytotoxicity, genotoxicity and ability to induce oxidative stress in HepG2 cells.

    PubMed

    Filipović, Nenad; Stevanović, Magdalena; Nunić, Jana; Cundrič, Sandra; Filipič, Metka; Uskoković, Dragan

    2014-05-01

    Nanospheres of poly(ɛ-caprolactone) (PCL) with sizes smaller than 200 nm were produced by combining the freeze drying method and the physicochemical solvent/non-solvent approach. The influence of various types of cryoprotectants (poly(glutamic acid) (PGA) or sacharose) and their concentrations on the outcome of freeze-dried poly(ɛ-caprolactone) particles was evaluated. The physiochemical properties, structural and morphological characteristics of thereby obtained PCL particles were determined by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). The cytotoxicity of the samples was examined by the 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide assay (MTT assay). The formation of intracellular reactive oxygen species was measured spectrophotometrically using a fluorescent probe (DCFH-DA assay). In addition, the genotoxic response of PCL particles obtained using PGA as a cryoprotectant was investigated by the Comet assay. This paper focuses on the role of PGA in the synthesis of PCL particles and demonstrates that PGA plays a dual role in the synthesis, i.e. it acts as a stabilizer but also as a cryoprotective agent. The sufficient and optimal concentration of PGA for producing uniform, spherical but also biocompatible PCL nanoparticles is established to be 0.05%. PMID:24681414

  18. Trophic spectra under the lens of amino acid isotopic analysis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Recent advances in compound specific isotopic ratio analysis (CSIRA) have allowed researchers to measure trophic fractionation of 15N in specific amino acids, namely glutamic acid and phenylalanine. These amino acids have proven useful in food web studies because of the wide and consistent disparity...

  19. Uric acid test (image)

    MedlinePlus

    Uric acid urine test is performed to check for the amount of uric acid in urine. Urine is collected over a 24 ... testing. The most common reason for measuring uric acid levels is in the diagnosis or treatment of ...

  20. Amino Acid Metabolism Disorders

    MedlinePlus

    ... defects & other health conditions > Amino acid metabolism disorders Amino acid metabolism disorders E-mail to a friend Please ... baby’s newborn screening may include testing for certain amino acid metabolism disorders. These are rare health conditions that ...

  1. Plasma amino acids

    MedlinePlus

    Amino acids blood test ... types of methods used to determine the individual amino acid levels in the blood. ... test is done to measure the level of amino acids in the blood. An increased level of a ...

  2. Stomach acid test

    MedlinePlus

    Gastric acid secretion test ... of the cells in the stomach to release acid. The stomach contents are then removed and analyzed. ... 3.5). These numbers are converted to actual acid production in units of milliequivalents per hour in ...

  3. Azelaic Acid Topical

    MedlinePlus

    Azelaic acid gel is used to clear the bumps, lesions, and swelling caused by rosacea (a skin disease that ... redness, flushing, and pimples on the face). Azelaic acid cream is used to treat acne. Azelaic acid ...

  4. Facts about Folic Acid

    MedlinePlus

    ... Information For... Media Policy Makers Facts About Folic Acid Language: English Español (Spanish) Recommend on Facebook Tweet ... of the baby's brain and spine. About folic acid Folic acid is a B vitamin. Our bodies ...

  5. Acid Lipase Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... Awards Enhancing Diversity Find People About NINDS NINDS Acid Lipase Disease Information Page Synonym(s): Cholesterol Ester Storage ... Trials Related NINDS Publications and Information What is Acid Lipase Disease ? Acid lipase disease or deficiency occurs ...

  6. Composition of quince (Cydonia oblonga Miller) seeds: phenolics, organic acids and free amino acids.

    PubMed

    Silva, Branca M; Andrade, Paula B; Ferreres, Federico; Seabra, Rosa M; Oliveira, M Beatriz P P; Ferreira, Margarida A

    2005-04-01

    Phenolic compounds, organic acids and free amino acids of quince seeds were determined by HPLC/DAD, HPLC/UV and GC/FID, respectively. Quince seeds presented a phenolic profile composed of 3-O-caffeoylquinic, 4-O-caffeoylquinic, 5-O-caffeoylquinic and 3,5-dicaffeoylquinic acids, lucenin-2, vicenin-2, stellarin-2, isoschaftoside, schaftoside, 6-C-pentosyl-8-C-glucosyl chrysoeriol and 6-C-glucosyl-8-C-pentosyl chrysoeriol. Six identified organic acids constituted the organic acid profile of quince seeds: citric, ascorbic, malic, quinic, shikimic and fumaric acids. The free amino acid profile was composed of 21 identified free amino acids and the three most abundant were glutamic and aspartic acids and asparagine. PMID:15702641

  7. Coordination polymers with the chiral ligand N-p-tolylsulfonyl-L-glutamic acid: Influence of metal ions and different bipyridine ligands on structural chirality

    SciTech Connect

    He Rong; Song Huihua; Wei Zhen; Zhang Jianjun; Gao Yuanzhe

    2010-09-15

    Four new polymers, namely [Ni(-tsgluO)(2,4'-bipy){sub 2}(H{sub 2}O){sub 2}]{sub n}.5nH{sub 2}O (1), [Co(-tsgluO)(2,4'-bipy){sub 2}(H{sub 2}O){sub 2}]{sub n}.5nH{sub 2}O (2), [Ni(-tsgluO)(4,4'-bipy)]{sub n}.0.5nH{sub 2}O (3), and [Co(-tsgluO)(4,4'-bipy)]{sub n}.0.5nH{sub 2}O (4), where tsgluO{sup 2-}=(+)-N-p-tolylsulfonyl-L-glutamate dianion, 2,4'-bipy=2,4'-bipyridine, and 4,4'-bipy=4,4'-bipyridine, have been prepared and structurally characterized. Compounds 1 and 2 are isostructural and mononuclear, and crystallize in the acentric monoclinic space group Cc, forming 1D chain structures. Compound 3 is also mononuclear, but crystallizes in the chiral space group P2{sub 1}, forming a homochiral 2D architecture. In contrast to the other complexes, compound 4 crystallizes in the space group P-1 and is composed of binuclear [Co{sub 2}O{sub 6}N{sub 2}]{sub n}{sup 4-} units, which give rise to a 2D bilayer framework. Moreover, compounds 1, 2, and 4 self-assemble to form 3D supramolecular structures through {pi}-{pi} stacking and hydrogen-bonding interactions, while compound 3 is further hydrogen-bonded to form 3D frameworks. We have demonstrated the influence of the central metal and bipyridine ligands on the framework chirality of the coordination complexes. - Graphical abstract: Four novel polymers based on a chiral ligand were prepared and structurally characterized; it represents the first series of investigations about the effect of central metals and bipyridine ligands on framework chirality.

  8. Folic acid - test

    MedlinePlus

    ... folic acid measurements include: Alcohol Aminosalicylic acid Birth control pills Estrogens Tetracyclines Ampicillin Chloramphenicol Erythromycin Methotrexate Penicillin Aminopterin Phenobarbital Phenytoin Drugs to treat malaria

  9. Oxalic acid poisoning

    MedlinePlus

    Symptoms of oxalic acid poisoning include: Abdominal pain Burns and blisters where the acid contacted the skin Collapse Convulsions Mouth pain Shock Throat pain Tremors (unintentional trembling) Vomiting

  10. Acid distribution in phosphoric acid fuel cells

    SciTech Connect

    Okae, I.; Seya, A.; Umemoto, M.

    1996-12-31

    Electrolyte acid distribution among each component of a cell is determined by capillary force when the cell is not in operation, but the distribution under the current load conditions had not been clear so far. Since the loss of electrolyte acid during operation is inevitable, it is necessary to store enough amount of acid in every cell. But it must be under the level of which the acid disturbs the diffusion of reactive gases. Accordingly to know the actual acid distribution during operation in a cell is very important. In this report, we carried out experiments to clarify the distribution using small single cells.

  11. Amino acid composition and amino acid-metabolic network in supragingival plaque.

    PubMed

    Washio, Jumpei; Ogawa, Tamaki; Suzuki, Keisuke; Tsukiboshi, Yosuke; Watanabe, Motohiro; Takahashi, Nobuhiro

    2016-01-01

    Dental plaque metabolizes both carbohydrates and amino acids. The former can be degraded to acids mainly, while the latter can be degraded to various metabolites, including ammonia, acids and amines, and associated with acid-neutralization, oral malodor and tissue inflammation. However, amino acid metabolism in dental plaque is still unclear. This study aimed to elucidate what kinds of amino acids are available as metabolic substrates and how the amino acids are metabolized in supragingival plaque, by a metabolome analysis. Amino acids and the related metabolites in supragingival plaque were extracted and quantified comprehensively by CE-TOFMS. Plaque samples were also incubated with amino acids, and the amounts of ammonia and amino acid-related metabolites were measured. The concentration of glutamate was the highest in supragingival plaque, while the ammonia-production was the highest from glutamine. The obtained metabolome profile revealed that amino acids are degraded through various metabolic pathways, including deamination, decarboxylation and transamination and that these metabolic systems may link each other, as well as with carbohydrate metabolic pathways in dental plaque ecosystem. Moreover, glutamine and glutamate might be the main source of ammonia production, as well as arginine, and contribute to pH-homeostasis and counteraction to acid-induced demineralization in supragingival plaque. PMID:27545001

  12. Amino Acid Analyses of Acid Hydrolysates in Desert Varnish

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perry, Randall S.; Staley, James T.; Dworkin, Jason P.; Engel, Mike

    2001-01-01

    There has long been a debate as to whether rock varnish deposits are microbially mediated or are deposited by inorganic processes. Varnished rocks are found throughout the world primarily in arid and semi-arid regions. The varnish coats are typically up to 200 microns thick and are composed of clays and alternating layers enriched in manganese and iron oxides. The individual layers range in thickness from 1 micron to greater than 10 microns and may continue laterally for more than a 100 microns. Overlapping botryoidal structures are visible in thin section and scanning electron micrographs. The coatings also include small amounts of organic mater and detrital grains. Amino-acid hydrolysates offer a means of assessing the organic composition of rock varnish collected from the Sonoran Desert, near Phoenix, AZ. Chromatographic analyses of hydrolysates from powdered samples of rock varnish suggest that the interior of rock varnish is relatively enriched in amino acids and specifically in d-alanine and glutamic acid. Peptidoglycan (murein) is the main structural component of gram-positive bacterial cell walls. The d-enantiomer of alanine and glutamic acid are specific to peptidoglycan and are consequently an indicator for the presence of bacteria. D-alanine is also found in teichoic acid which is only found in gram-positive bacteria. Several researchers have cultured bacteria from the surface of rock varnish and most have been gram-positive, suggesting that gram-positive bacteria are intimately associated with varnish coatings and may play a role in the formation of varnish coatings.

  13. Amino acids in the Yamato carbonaceous chrondrite from Antarctica

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shimoyama, A.; Ponnamperuma, C.; Yanai, K.

    1979-01-01

    Evidence for the presence of amino acids of extraterrestrial origin in the Antarctic Yamato carbonaceous chrondrite is presented. Hydrolyzed and nonhydrolyzed water-extracted amino acid samples from exterior, middle and interior portions of the meteorite were analyzed by an amino acid analyzer and by gas chromatography of N-TFA-isopropyl amino acid derivatives. Nine protein and six nonprotein amino acids were detected in the meteorite at abundances between 34 and less than one nmole/g, with equal amounts in interior and exterior portions. Nearly equal abundances of the D and L enantiomers of alanine, aspartic acid and glutamic acid were found, indicating the abiotic, therefore extraterrestrial, origin of the amino acids. The Antarctic environment and the uniformity of protein amino acid abundances are discussed as evidence against the racemization of terrestrially acquired amino acids, and similarities between Yamato amino acid compositions and the amino acid compositions of the Murchison and Murray type II carbonaceous chrondrites are indicated.

  14. Acid tolerance in amphibians

    SciTech Connect

    Pierce, B.A.

    1985-04-01

    Studies of amphibian acid tolerance provide information about the potential effects of acid deposition on amphibian communities. Amphibians as a group appear to be relatively acid tolerant, with many species suffering increased mortality only below pH 4. However, amphibians exhibit much intraspecific variation in acid tolerance, and some species are sensitive to even low levels of acidity. Furthermore, nonlethal effects, including depression of growth rates and increases in developmental abnormalities, can occur at higher pH.

  15. Assessment of CD4+ T Cell Responses to Glutamic Acid Decarboxylase 65 Using DQ8 Tetramers Reveals a Pathogenic Role of GAD65 121–140 and GAD65 250–266 in T1D Development

    PubMed Central

    Chow, I-Ting; Yang, Junbao; Gates, Theresa J.; James, Eddie A.; Mai, Duy T.; Greenbaum, Carla; Kwok, William W.

    2014-01-01

    Susceptibility to type 1 diabetes (T1D) is strongly associated with MHC class II molecules, particularly HLA-DQ8 (DQ8: DQA1*03:01/DQB1*03:02). Monitoring T1D-specific T cell responses to DQ8-restricted epitopes may be key to understanding the immunopathology of the disease. In this study, we examined DQ8-restricted T cell responses to glutamic acid decarboxylase 65 (GAD65) using DQ8 tetramers. We demonstrated that GAD65121–140 and GAD65250–266 elicited responses from DQ8+ subjects. Circulating CD4+ T cells specific for these epitopes were detected significantly more often in T1D patients than in healthy individuals after in vitro expansion. T cell clones specific for GAD65121–140 and GAD65250–266 carried a Th1-dominant phenotype, with some of the GAD65121–140-specific T cell clones producing IL-17. GAD65250–266-specific CD4+ T cells could also be detected by direct ex vivo staining. Analysis of unmanipulated peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) revealed that GAD65250–266-specific T cells could be found in both healthy and diabetic individuals but the frequencies of specific T cells were higher in subjects with type 1 diabetes. Taken together, our results suggest a proinflammatory role for T cells specific for DQ8-restricted GAD65121–140 and GAD65250–266 epitopes and implicate their possible contribution to the progression of T1D. PMID:25405480

  16. A study of the oligomeric state of the alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid-preferring glutamate receptors in the synaptic junctions of porcine brain.

    PubMed

    Wu, T Y; Liu, C I; Chang, Y C

    1996-11-01

    The number of the subunits in an alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid (AMPA)-preferring L-glutamate receptor in the synaptic junctions of porcine brain was investigated in this study. Upon incubation of the synaptic junctions with three cross-linking regents, dimethyl adipimidate (DMA), dimethyl suberimidate (DMS) and N-succinimidyl-(4-azidophenyl)-1,3'-dithiopropionate (SADP), AMPA receptor subunits in higher-molecular-mass aggregates were detected by immunoblotting. These aggregates migrated as proteins of approx. 200, 300 and 400 kDa. The number and identity of the subunits in a solubilized AMPA receptor were also investigated here. Two samples, W1 and W2, enriched in AMPA receptors were prepared from synaptic junctions by a combination of detergent-solubilization, anion-exchange chromatography and wheatgerm agglutinin affinity chromatography. Hydrodynamic behaviour analyses revealed that the majority of the AMPA receptors in either one of these samples were asymmetrical detergent-surrounded particles with a protein mass around 350 kDa. SDS/PAGE analysis revealed that the majority of AMPA receptors in the W1 sample were comprised of dimers of 106 kDa subunits which were covalently linked by disulphide bonds. Cross-linking these receptors with SADP yielded a new band of approx. 400 kDa. The results obtained here, either from the studies of AMPA receptors embedding in synaptic junctions or from those of detergent-solubilized and partially purified receptors, suggest that AMPA receptors contain a basic core structure comprising of four 106 kDa subunits. PMID:8920974

  17. A study of the oligomeric state of the alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid-preferring glutamate receptors in the synaptic junctions of porcine brain.

    PubMed Central

    Wu, T Y; Liu, C I; Chang, Y C

    1996-01-01

    The number of the subunits in an alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid (AMPA)-preferring L-glutamate receptor in the synaptic junctions of porcine brain was investigated in this study. Upon incubation of the synaptic junctions with three cross-linking regents, dimethyl adipimidate (DMA), dimethyl suberimidate (DMS) and N-succinimidyl-(4-azidophenyl)-1,3'-dithiopropionate (SADP), AMPA receptor subunits in higher-molecular-mass aggregates were detected by immunoblotting. These aggregates migrated as proteins of approx. 200, 300 and 400 kDa. The number and identity of the subunits in a solubilized AMPA receptor were also investigated here. Two samples, W1 and W2, enriched in AMPA receptors were prepared from synaptic junctions by a combination of detergent-solubilization, anion-exchange chromatography and wheatgerm agglutinin affinity chromatography. Hydrodynamic behaviour analyses revealed that the majority of the AMPA receptors in either one of these samples were asymmetrical detergent-surrounded particles with a protein mass around 350 kDa. SDS/PAGE analysis revealed that the majority of AMPA receptors in the W1 sample were comprised of dimers of 106 kDa subunits which were covalently linked by disulphide bonds. Cross-linking these receptors with SADP yielded a new band of approx. 400 kDa. The results obtained here, either from the studies of AMPA receptors embedding in synaptic junctions or from those of detergent-solubilized and partially purified receptors, suggest that AMPA receptors contain a basic core structure comprising of four 106 kDa subunits. PMID:8920974

  18. Toxicity of adipic acid.

    PubMed

    Kennedy, Gerald L

    2002-05-01

    Adipic acid has very low acute toxicity in rats with an LD50 > 5000 mg/kg. Adipic acid produced mild to no skin irritation on intact guinea pig skin as a 50% concentration in propylene glycol; it was not a skin sensitizer. Adipic acid caused mild conjunctival irritation in washed rabbit eyes; in unwashed rabbit eyes, there was mild conjunctival irritation, minimal iritis, but no corneal effects. Adipic acid dust may irritate the mucous membranes of the lungs and nose. In a 2-year feeding study, rats fed adipic acid at concentrations up to 5% in the diet exhibited only weight loss. Adipic acid is not genetically active in a wide variety of assay systems. Adipic acid caused no developmental toxicity in mice, rats, rabbits, or hamsters when administered orally. Adipic acid is partially metabolized in humans; the balance is eliminated unchanged in the urine. Adipic acid is slightly to moderately toxic to fish, daphnia, and algae in acute tests. PMID:12024802

  19. Acid Thunder: Acid Rain and Ancient Mesoamerica

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kahl, Jonathan D. W.; Berg, Craig A.

    2006-01-01

    Much of Mesoamerica's rich cultural heritage is slowly eroding because of acid rain. Just as water dissolves an Alka-Seltzer tablet, acid rain erodes the limestone surfaces of Mexican archaeological sites at a rate of about one-half millimeter per century (Bravo et al. 2003). A half-millimeter may not seem like much, but at this pace, a few…

  20. Quantity of acid in acid fog

    SciTech Connect

    Deal, W.J.

    1983-07-01

    This communication notes the actual magnitude of the acidity in acidic fog particles and suggests a possible line of inquiry into the health effects of such fog so that it can be determined whether a typical fog is detrimental or beneficial relative to dry air.

  1. [Amino acids in saliva].

    PubMed

    Klinger, G; Gruhn, K

    1984-01-01

    Total amino acids in saliva and free and peptide-bound amino acids from 21 saliva samples were determined. The contents of amino acids was 25 mmol/1; total nitrogen content was 78-80 mmol/1. Amino acids consist of Prolin in 25%. Some patients were examined before and after application of the depot estrogen ethinyl estradiosulfonat, which stimulates the assimilation of protein. After application, amino acids increased and the authors found a shift between the single amino acids. Estrogen medication induced an increase in proteins with the character of collagens. Clinical effects are discussed. (author's modified) PMID:6240853

  2. Triazolines--XXVII. delta2-1,2,3-triazoline anticonvulsants: novel 'built-in' heterocyclic prodrugs with a unique 'dual-action' mechanism for impairing excitatory amino acid L-glutamate neurotransmission.

    PubMed

    Kadaba, P K; Stevenson, P J; P-Nnane, I; Damani, L A

    1996-02-01

    The delta2-1,2,3-triazoline anticonvulsants (1) may be considered as representing a unique class of 'built-in' heterocyclic prodrugs where the active 'structure element' is an integral part of the ring system and can be identified only by a knowledge of their chemical reactivity and metabolism. Investigations on the metabolism and pharmacology of a lead triazoline, ADD17014 (1a), suggest that the triazolines function as 'prodrugs' and exert their anticonvulsant activity by impairing excitatory amino acid (EAA) L-glutamate (L-Glu) neurotransmission via a unique 'dual-action' mechanism. While an active beta-amino alcohol metabolite, 2a, from the parent prodrug acts as an N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA)/MK-801 receptor antagonist, the parent triazoline impairs the presynaptic release of L-Glu. Various pieces of theoretical reasoning and experimental evidence led to the elucidation of the dual-action mechanism. Based on the unique chemistry of the triazolines, the potential metabolic pathways and biotransformation products of 1a were predicted to be the beta-amino alcohols 2a and 2a', the alpha-amino acid 3a, the triazole 4a, the aziridine 5a, and the ketimine 6a. In vivo and in vitro pharmacological studies of 1a and potential metabolities, along with a full quantitative urinary metabolic profiling of 1a, indicated the beta-amino alcohol 2a as the active species. It was the only compound that inhibited the specific binding of [3H]MK-801 to the MK-801 site, 56% at 10 microM drug concentration, but itself had no anticonvulsant activity, suggesting 1a acted as a prodrug. Three metabolites were identified; 2a was the most predominant, with lesser amounts of 2a', and very minor amounts of aziridine 5a. Since only 5a can yield 2a', its formation indicated that the biotransformation of 1a occurred, at least in part, through 5a. No amino acid metabolite 3a was detected, which implied that no in vivo oxidation of 2a or oxidative biotransformation of 1a or 5a by hydroxylation at

  3. Circling behavior following unilateral kainic acid injections into rat striatum.

    PubMed

    Taylor, R J; Reavill, C; Jenner, P; Marsden, C D

    1981-12-01

    Unilateral injection of kainic acid (2.5-25 nmol) into rat anterior caudate putamen induced dose-related circling behaviour. Kainic acid (10 nmol) consistently caused initial weak ipsiversive circling lasting 1 h followed by prolonged strong contraversive rotation lasting in excess of 10 h. Unilateral intrastriatal administration of L-glutamic acid, or of monosodium L-glutamate, to normal rats, or administration of monosodium L-glutamate to rats with extensive decortication, did not induce circling behaviour. The simultaneous unilateral injection of monosodium L-glutamate (1 mumol) with kainic acid (10 nmol) did not modify circling behaviour induced by kainic acid. However, extensive decortication greatly reduced circling induced by unilateral intrastriatal kainic acid (10 nmol), and effect not reversed by the simultaneous administration of monosodium L-glutamate (1 mumol). Unilateral 6-hydroxydopamine lesions of the left nigrostriatal pathway abolished the initial ipsiversive rotation and potentiated the subsequent contraversive rotation for up to 4 h after intrastriatal injection of kainic acid (10 nmol). Peripheral administration of haloperidol (1 mg/kg i.p.) also abolished initial ipsiversive rotation and decreased the subsequent contraversive rotation. Electro-coagulation of the ipsilateral strio-nigral pathway prolonged the initial ipsiversive rotation produced by kainic acid, but markedly attenuated contraversive rotation. These findings suggest that circling induced by intrastriatal administration of kainic acid depends on intact corticostriate pathways, but it cannot be reproduced or modified by intrastriatal administration of glutamate. Kainic acid circling appears to be mediated via strio-nigral pathways, and to be modulated by dopaminergic function. PMID:7333356

  4. Hydrochloric acid poisoning

    MedlinePlus

    Hydrochloric acid is a clear, poisonous liquid. It is highly corrosive, which means it immediately causes severe damage, ... discusses poisoning due to swallowing or breathing in hydrochloric acid. This article is for information only. Do NOT ...

  5. Omega-3 Fatty Acids

    MedlinePlus

    Omega-3 fatty acids are used together with lifestyle changes (diet, weight-loss, exercise) to reduce the amount ... the blood in people with very high triglycerides. Omega-3 fatty acids are in a class of medications ...

  6. Omega-6 Fatty Acids

    MedlinePlus

    Omega-6 fatty acids are types of fats. Some types are found in vegetable oils, including corn, evening primrose seed, safflower, and soybean oils. Other types of omega-6 fatty acids are found in black currant seed, borage seed, ...

  7. Zoledronic Acid Injection

    MedlinePlus

    Zoledronic acid (Reclast) is used to prevent or treat osteoporosis (condition in which the bones become thin and weak ... of life,' end of regular menstrual periods). Zoledronic acid (Reclast) is also used to treat osteoporosis in ...

  8. Aminolevulinic Acid Topical

    MedlinePlus

    Aminolevulinic acid is used in combination with photodynamic therapy (PDT; special blue light) to treat actinic keratoses (small crusty ... skin cancer) of the face or scalp. Aminolevulinic acid is in a class of medications called photosensitizing ...

  9. Acid-fast stain

    MedlinePlus

    The acid-fast stain is a laboratory test that determines if a sample of tissue, blood, or other body ... dye. The slide is then washed with an acid solution and a different stain is applied. Bacteria ...

  10. Uric acid - blood

    MedlinePlus

    Uric acid is a chemical created when the body breaks down substances called purines. Purines are found in some ... dried beans and peas, and beer. Most uric acid dissolves in blood and travels to the kidneys. ...

  11. Hydrochloric acid poisoning

    MedlinePlus

    Hydrochloric acid is a clear, poisonous liquid. It is highly corrosive, which means it immediately causes severe damage, such ... poisoning due to swallowing or breathing in hydrochloric acid. This article is for information only. Do NOT ...

  12. Omega-6 Fatty Acids

    MedlinePlus

    ... types of fats. Some types are found in vegetable oils, including corn, evening primrose seed, safflower, and soybean ... from studying specific omega-6 fatty acids or plant oils containing omega-6 fatty acids. See the separate ...

  13. Uric Acid Test

    MedlinePlus

    ... limited. Home Visit Global Sites Search Help? Uric Acid Share this page: Was this page helpful? Also known as: Serum Urate; UA Formal name: Uric Acid Related tests: Synovial Fluid Analysis , Kidney Stone Analysis , ...

  14. Acid-fast stain

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003766.htm Acid-fast stain To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. The acid-fast stain is a laboratory test that determines ...

  15. Aminocaproic Acid Injection

    MedlinePlus

    Aminocaproic acid injection is used to control bleeding that occurs when blood clots are broken down too quickly. This ... the baby is ready to be born). Aminocaproic acid injection is also used to control bleeding in ...

  16. Deoxycholic Acid Injection

    MedlinePlus

    Deoxycholic acid injection is used to improve the appearance and profile of moderate to severe submental fat ('double chin'; fatty tissue located under the chin). Deoxycholic acid injection is in a class of medications called ...

  17. Methylmalonic Acid Test

    MedlinePlus

    ... limited. Home Visit Global Sites Search Help? Methylmalonic Acid Share this page: Was this page helpful? Also known as: MMA Formal name: Methylmalonic Acid Related tests: Vitamin B12 and Folate , Homocysteine , Intrinsic ...

  18. Fatty acid analogs

    DOEpatents

    Elmaleh, David R.; Livni, Eli

    1985-01-01

    In one aspect, a radioactively labeled analog of a fatty acid which is capable of being taken up by mammalian tissue and which exhibits an in vivo beta-oxidation rate below that with a corresponding radioactively labeled fatty acid.

  19. Boric acid poisoning

    MedlinePlus

    ... boric acid poisoning usually occurs when someone swallows powdered roach-killing products that contain the chemical. Chronic ... vein (IV) Medicines to treat symptoms Note: Activated charcoal does not effectively treat (absorb) boric acid. For ...

  20. Lactic acid test

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003507.htm Lactic acid test To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Lactic acid is mainly produced in muscle cells and red ...

  1. Accumulated analyses of amino acid precursors in returned lunar samples

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fox, S. W.; Harada, K.; Hare, P. E.

    1973-01-01

    Six amino acids (glycine, alanine, aspartic acid, glutamic acid, serine, and threonine) obtained by hydrolysis of extracts have been quantitatively determined in ten collections of fines from five Apollo missions. Although the amounts found, 7-45 ng/g, are small, the lunar amino acid/carbon ratios are comparable to those of the carbonaceous chondrites, Murchison and Murray, as analyzed by the same procedures. Since both the ratios of amino acid to carbon, and the four or five most common types of proteinous amino acid found, are comparable for the two extraterrestrial sources despite different cosmophysical histories of the moon and meteorites, common cosmochemical processes are suggested.

  2. Analysis of cyclic pyrolysis products formed from amino acid monomer.

    PubMed

    Choi, Sung-Seen; Ko, Ji-Eun

    2011-11-18

    Amino acid was mixed with silica and tetramethylammonium hydroxide (TMAH) to favor pyrolysis of amino acid monomer. The pyrolysis products formed from amino acid monomer were using GC/MS and GC. 20 amino acids of alanine, arginine, asparagine, aspartic acid, cysteine, glutamic acid, glutamine, glycine, histidine, isoleucine, leucine, lysine, methionine, phenylalanine, proline, serine, threonine, tryptophan, tyrosine, and valine were analyzed. The pyrolysis products were divided into cyclic and non-cyclic products. Among the 20 amino acids, arginine, asparagine, glutamic acid, glutamine, histidine, lysine, and phenylalanine generated cyclic pyrolysis products of the monomer. New cyclic pyrolysis products were formed by isolation of amino acid monomers. They commonly had polar side functional groups to 5-, 6-, or 7-membered ring structure. Arginine, asparagine, glutamic acid, glutamine, histidine, and phenylalanine generated only 5- or 6-membered ring products. However, lysine generated both 6- and 7-membered ring compounds. Variations of the relative intensities of the cyclic pyrolysis products with the pyrolysis temperature and amino acid concentration were also investigated. PMID:21993510

  3. PRODUCTION OF TRIFLUOROACETIC ACID

    DOEpatents

    Haworth, W.N.; Stacey, M.

    1949-07-19

    A method is given for the production of improved yields of trifluoroacetic acid. The compound is prepared by oxidizing m-aminobenzotrifluoride with an alkali metal or alkaline earth metal permanganate at a temperature in the range of 80 deg C to 100 deg C while dissolved ln a mixture of water with glacial acetic acid and/or trifluoroacetic acid. Preferably a mixture of water and trifluoroacetic acid ls used as the solvent.

  4. Plant fatty acid hydroxylases

    DOEpatents

    Somerville, Chris; Broun, Pierre; van de Loo, Frank

    2001-01-01

    This invention relates to plant fatty acyl hydroxylases. Methods to use conserved amino acid or nucleotide sequences to obtain plant fatty acyl hydroxylases are described. Also described is the use of cDNA clones encoding a plant hydroxylase to produce a family of hydroxylated fatty acids in transgenic plants. In addition, the use of genes encoding fatty acid hydroxylases or desaturases to alter the level of lipid fatty acid unsaturation in transgenic plants is described.

  5. Evaluation of Fatty Acid and Amino Acid Compositions in Okra (Abelmoschus esculentus) Grown in Different Geographical Locations

    PubMed Central

    Sami, Rokayya; Lianzhou, Jiang; Yang, Li; Ma, Ying; Jing, Jing

    2013-01-01

    Okra has different uses as a food and a remedy in traditional medicine. Since it produces many seeds, distribution of the plant is also quite easy. Although seed oil yield is low (4.7%), since the linoleic acid composition of the seed oil is quiet high (67.5%), it can still be used as a source of (UNSAT) unsaturated fatty acids. In this study, samples of okra grown in four different locations were analyzed to measure fatty acid and amino acid compositions. The content of the lipid extraction ranged from 4.34% to 4.52% on a dry weight basis. Quantitatively, the main okra fatty acids were palmitic acid (29.18–43.26%), linoleic acid (32.22–43.07%), linolenic acid (6.79–12.34%), stearic acid (6.36–7.73%), oleic acid (4.31–6.98%), arachidic acid (ND–3.48%), margaric acid (1.44–2.16%), pentadecylic acid (0.63–0.92%), and myristic acid (0.21–0.49%). Aspartic acid, proline, and glutamic acids were the main amino acids in okra pods, while cysteine and tyrosine were the minor amino acids. Statistical methods revealed how the fatty acid and amino acid contents in okra may be affected by the sampling location. PMID:24171167

  6. Evaluation of fatty acid and amino acid compositions in okra (Abelmoschus esculentus) grown in different geographical locations.

    PubMed

    Sami, Rokayya; Lianzhou, Jiang; Yang, Li; Ma, Ying; Jing, Jing

    2013-01-01

    Okra has different uses as a food and a remedy in traditional medicine. Since it produces many seeds, distribution of the plant is also quite easy. Although seed oil yield is low (4.7%), since the linoleic acid composition of the seed oil is quiet high (67.5%), it can still be used as a source of (UNSAT) unsaturated fatty acids. In this study, samples of okra grown in four different locations were analyzed to measure fatty acid and amino acid compositions. The content of the lipid extraction ranged from 4.34% to 4.52% on a dry weight basis. Quantitatively, the main okra fatty acids were palmitic acid (29.18-43.26%), linoleic acid (32.22-43.07%), linolenic acid (6.79-12.34%), stearic acid (6.36-7.73%), oleic acid (4.31-6.98%), arachidic acid (ND-3.48%), margaric acid (1.44-2.16%), pentadecylic acid (0.63-0.92%), and myristic acid (0.21-0.49%). Aspartic acid, proline, and glutamic acids were the main amino acids in okra pods, while cysteine and tyrosine were the minor amino acids. Statistical methods revealed how the fatty acid and amino acid contents in okra may be affected by the sampling location. PMID:24171167

  7. Quantity of acid in acid fog

    SciTech Connect

    Deal, W.J.

    1983-07-01

    The chemical composition of fog particles has become of considerable interest, because of both the possibility of interpreting atmospheric- chemistry processes in fog particles in terms of the principles of aqueous chemistry and the potential health effects of species present in fog particles. The acidity of fog particles has received wide attention. This communication noted the actual magnitude of the excess acidity in acidic fog particles and suggested a possible line of inquiry into the health effects of such fog so that it can be determined whether a typical fog is detrimental or beneficial relative to dry air. (DP)

  8. The Acid Rain Reader.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stubbs, Harriett S.; And Others

    A topic which is often not sufficiently dealt with in elementary school textbooks is acid rain. This student text is designed to supplement classroom materials on the topic. Discussed are: (1) "Rain"; (2) "Water Cycle"; (3) "Fossil Fuels"; (4) "Air Pollution"; (5) "Superstacks"; (6) "Acid/Neutral/Bases"; (7) "pH Scale"; (8) "Acid Rain"; (9)…

  9. What Is Acid Rain?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Likens, Gene E.

    2004-01-01

    Acid rain is the collective term for any type of acidified precipitation: rain, snow, sleet, and hail, as well as the presence of acidifying gases, particles, cloud water, and fog in the atmosphere. The increased acidity, primarily from sulfuric and nitric acids, is generated as a by-product of the combustion of fossil fuels such as coal and oil.…

  10. Acid Rain Study Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hunger, Carolyn; And Others

    Acid rain is a complex, worldwide environmental problem. This study guide is intended to aid teachers of grades 4-12 to help their students understand what acid rain is, why it is a problem, and what possible solutions exist. The document contains specific sections on: (1) the various terms used in conjunction with acid rain (such as acid…

  11. [alpha]-Oxocarboxylic Acids

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kerber, Robert C.; Fernando, Marian S.

    2010-01-01

    Several [alpha]-oxocarboxylic acids play key roles in metabolism in plants and animals. However, there are inconsistencies between the structures as commonly portrayed and the reported acid ionization constants, which result because the acids are predominantly hydrated in aqueous solution; that is, the predominant form is RC(OH)[subscript 2]COOH…

  12. 2-Methyl-aspartic acid monohydrate.

    PubMed

    Brewer, Greg; Burton, Aaron S; Dworkin, Jason P; Butcher, Ray J

    2013-11-30

    The title compound, C5H9NO4·H2O, is an isomer of the α-amino acid glutamic acid that crystallizes from water in its zwitterionic form as a monohydrate. It is not one of the 20 proteinogenic α-amino acids that are used in living systems and differs from the natural amino acids in that it has an α-methyl group rather than an α-H atom. In the crystal, an O-H⋯O hydrogen bond is present between the acid and water mol-ecules while extensive N-H⋯O and O-H⋯O hydrogen bonds link the components into a three-dimensional array. PMID:24454270

  13. Animal models of human amino acid responses.

    PubMed

    Baker, David H

    2004-06-01

    The principal differences between experimental animals and humans with regard to amino acid responses are 1) growing animals partition most of their amino acid intake to protein accretion, whereas growing children partition most of their intake to maintenance; 2) invasive assessment procedures are common in animals but very limited in humans; and 3) humans can describe how they feel in response to amino acid levels or balances, whereas animals cannot. New (pharmacologic) uses of amino acids have been and are being discovered (e.g., cysteine, arginine, leucine, glutamine), and this makes it imperative that tolerance limits be established. Work with pigs suggests that excessive intake of methionine and tryptophan present the biggest problems, whereas excessive intake of threonine, glutamate, and the branched-chain amino acids seems to be well tolerated. PMID:15173445

  14. A GC-ECD method for estimation of free and bound amino acids, gamma-aminobutyric acid, salicylic acid, and acetyl salicylic acid from Solanum lycopersicum (L.).

    PubMed

    Meher, Hari Charan; Gajbhiye, Vijay T; Singh, Ghanendra

    2011-01-01

    A gas chromatograph with electron capture detection method for estimation of selected metabolites--amino acids (free and bound), gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA), salicylic acid (SA), and acetyl salicylic acid (ASA) from tomato--is reported. The method is based on nitrophenylation of the metabolites by 1-fluoro-2, 4-dinitrobenzene under aqueous alkaline conditions to form dinitophenyl derivatives. The derivatives were stable under the operating conditions of GC. Analysis of bound amino acids comprised perchloric acid precipitation of protein, alkylation (carboxymethylation) with iodoacetic acid, vapor-phase hydrolysis, and derivatization with 1-fluoro-2,4-dinitrobenzene in that order. The metabolites were resolved in 35 min, using a temperature-programmed run. The method is rapid, sensitive, and precise. It easily measured the typical amino acids (aspartate, asparagine, glutamate, glutamine, alanine, leucine, lysine, and phenylalanine) used for identification and quantification of a protein, resolved amino acids of the same mass (leucine and isoleucine), satisfactorily measured sulfur amino acid (methionine, cystine, and cysteine), and quantified GABA, SA, and ASA, as well. The developed method was validated for specificity, linearity, and precision. It has been applied and recommended for estimation of 25 metabolites from Solanum lycopersicum (L.). PMID:21391500

  15. Glutamic Acid Decarboxylase 65 and Islet Cell Antigen 512/IA-2 Autoantibodies in Relation to Human Leukocyte Antigen Class II DR and DQ Alleles and Haplotypes in Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus ▿

    PubMed Central

    Stayoussef, Mouna; Benmansour, Jihen; Al-Jenaidi, Fayza A.; Said, Hichem B.; Rayana, Chiheb B.; Mahjoub, Touhami; Almawi, Wassim Y.

    2011-01-01

    The frequencies of autoantibodies against glutamic acid decarboxylase 65 (GAD65) and islet cell antigen (ICA) 512/IA-2 (512/IA-2) are functions of the specific human leukocyte antigen (HLA) in type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1D). We investigated the association of HLA class II (DR and DQ) alleles and haplotypes with the presence of GAD and IA-2 autoantibodies in T1D. Autoantibodies were tested in 88 Tunisian T1D patients and 112 age- and gender-matched normoglycemic control subjects by enzyme immunoassay. Among T1D patients, mean anti-GAD antibody titers were higher in the DRB1*030101 allele (P < 0.001), together with the DRB1*030101/DQB1*0201 (P < 0.001) and DRB1*040101/DQB1*0302 (P = 0.002) haplotypes, while lower anti-GAD titers were associated with the DRB1*070101 (P = 0.001) and DRB1*110101 (P < 0.001) alleles and DRB1*070101/DQB1*0201 (P = 0.001) and DRB1*110101/DQB1*030101 (P = 0.001) haplotypes. Mean anti-IA-2 antibody titers were higher in the DRB1*040101 allele (P = 0.007) and DRB1*040101/DQB1*0302 (P = 0.001) haplotypes but were lower in the DRB1*110101 allele (P = 0.010) and the DRB1*110101 (P < 0.001) and DRB1*110101/DQB1*030101 (P = 0.025) haplotypes. Multinomial regression analysis confirmed the positive association of DRB1*030101 and the negative association of DRB1*110101 and DQB1*030101, along with the DRB1*070101/DQB1*0201 and DRB1*110101/DQB1*030101 haplotypes, with anti-GAD levels. In contrast, only the DRB1*040101/DQB1*0302 haplotype was positively associated with altered anti-IA-2 titers. Increased GAD65 and IA-2 antibody positivity is differentially associated with select HLA class II alleles and haplotypes, confirming the heterogeneous nature of T1D. PMID:21490167

  16. Glutamic acid decarboxylase 65 and islet cell antigen 512/IA-2 autoantibodies in relation to human leukocyte antigen class II DR and DQ alleles and haplotypes in type 1 diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Stayoussef, Mouna; Benmansour, Jihen; Al-Jenaidi, Fayza A; Said, Hichem B; Rayana, Chiheb B; Mahjoub, Touhami; Almawi, Wassim Y

    2011-06-01

    The frequencies of autoantibodies against glutamic acid decarboxylase 65 (GAD65) and islet cell antigen (ICA) 512/IA-2 (512/IA-2) are functions of the specific human leukocyte antigen (HLA) in type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1D). We investigated the association of HLA class II (DR and DQ) alleles and haplotypes with the presence of GAD and IA-2 autoantibodies in T1D. Autoantibodies were tested in 88 Tunisian T1D patients and 112 age- and gender-matched normoglycemic control subjects by enzyme immunoassay. Among T1D patients, mean anti-GAD antibody titers were higher in the DRB1*030101 allele (P < 0.001), together with the DRB1*030101/DQB1*0201 (P < 0.001) and DRB1*040101/DQB1*0302 (P = 0.002) haplotypes, while lower anti-GAD titers were associated with the DRB1*070101 (P = 0.001) and DRB1*110101 (P < 0.001) alleles and DRB1*070101/DQB1*0201 (P = 0.001) and DRB1*110101/DQB1*030101 (P = 0.001) haplotypes. Mean anti-IA-2 antibody titers were higher in the DRB1*040101 allele (P = 0.007) and DRB1*040101/DQB1*0302 (P = 0.001) haplotypes but were lower in the DRB1*110101 allele (P = 0.010) and the DRB1*110101 (P < 0.001) and DRB1*110101/DQB1*030101 (P = 0.025) haplotypes. Multinomial regression analysis confirmed the positive association of DRB1*030101 and the negative association of DRB1*110101 and DQB1*030101, along with the DRB1*070101/DQB1*0201 and DRB1*110101/DQB1*030101 haplotypes, with anti-GAD levels. In contrast, only the DRB1*040101/DQB1*0302 haplotype was positively associated with altered anti-IA-2 titers. Increased GAD65 and IA-2 antibody positivity is differentially associated with select HLA class II alleles and haplotypes, confirming the heterogeneous nature of T1D. PMID:21490167

  17. Positive allosteric modulation of α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid glutamate receptors differentially modulates the behavioural effects of citalopram in mouse models of antidepressant and anxiolytic action.

    PubMed

    Fitzpatrick, Ciarán M; Larsen, Maria; Madsen, Louise H; Caballero-Puntiverio, Maitane; Pickering, Darryl S; Clausen, Rasmus P; Andreasen, Jesper T

    2016-09-01

    Drugs that increase monoamine neurotransmission are effective in both anxiety and depression. The therapeutic effects of monoamine-based antidepressant drugs may involve indirect effects on neurotransmission through α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid glutamate receptors (AMPAR). Thus, chronic antidepressant treatment increases AMPAR-mediated neurotransmission and AMPAR-positive allosteric modulators have shown antidepressant-like efficacy in rodents. Here, the effect of enhanced AMPAR neurotransmission on the antidepressant-like and anxiolytic-like actions of the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor citalopram (0-10 mg/kg) was investigated in mice using the AMPAR-positive allosteric modulator LY451646 (0-3 mg/kg). Antidepressant-like effects were assessed using the forced-swim test (FST), whereas anxiolytic-like effects were tested using the elevated zero maze (EZM) and the marble burying test. LY451646 (3 mg/kg) increased swim distance in the FST and a subactive dose of LY451646 (1 mg/kg) enhanced the effect of citalopram in the FST. In the EZM, LY451646 (3 mg/kg) did not show anxiogenic effects alone, but blocked the anxiolytic-like action of citalopram in the EZM, as reflected by an increase in the latency to enter the open areas and a decrease in the number of entries and time spent in the open areas in citalopram-treated mice. In the marble burying test, LY451646 (3 mg/kg) showed no effect alone, but significantly attenuated the anxiolytic-like effect of citalopram (1.25-2.5 mg/kg) by increasing the number of marbles buried in citalopram-treated mice. These results suggest that AMPAR neurotransmission plays opposite roles in anxiety and depression as AMPAR potentiation facilitated the antidepressant-like effects of citalopram while attenuating its anxiolytic-like effect. These findings have ramifications in the search for AMPAR-based novel anxiolytic and antidepressant treatments. PMID:27341500

  18. Mechanisms of acid resistance in enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Lin, J; Smith, M P; Chapin, K C; Baik, H S; Bennett, G N; Foster, J W

    1996-01-01

    Enterohemorrhagic strains of Escherichia coli must pass through the acidic gastric barrier to cause gastrointestinal disease. Taking into account the apparent low infectious dose of enterohemorrhagic E. coli, 11 O157:H7 strains and 4 commensal strains of E. coli were tested for their abilities to survive extreme acid exposures (pH 3). Three previously characterized acid resistance systems were tested. These included an acid-induced oxidative system, an acid-induced arginine-dependent system, and a glutamate-dependent system. When challenged at pH 2.0, the arginine-dependent system provided more protection in the EHEC strains than in commensal strains. However, the glutamate-dependent system provided better protection than the arginine system and appeared equally effective in all strains. Because E. coli must also endure acid stress imposed by the presence of weak acids in intestinal contents at a pH less acidic than that of the stomach, the ability of specific acid resistance systems to protect against weak acids was examined. The arginine- and glutamate-dependent systems were both effective in protecting E. coli against the bactericidal effects of a variety of weak acids. The acids tested include benzoic acid (20 mM; pH 4.0) and a volatile fatty acid cocktail composed of acetic, propionic, and butyric acids at levels approximating those present in the intestine. The oxidative system was much less effective. Several genetic aspects of E. coli acid resistance were also characterized. The alternate sigma factor RpoS was shown to be required for oxidative acid resistance but was only partially involved with the arginine- and glutamate-dependent acid resistance systems. The arginine decarboxylase system (including adi and its regulators cysB and adiY) was responsible for arginine-dependent acid resistance. The results suggest that several acid resistance systems potentially contribute to the survival of pathogenic E. coli in the different acid stress environments of

  19. 21 CFR 172.345 - Folic acid (folacin).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... incorporated by reference in accordance with 5 U.S.C. 552(a) and 1 CFR part 51. Copies are available from the... following prescribed conditions: (a) Folic acid is the chemical N- amino]benzoyl]-L-glutamic acid. (b) Folic... corn grits at a level such that each pound of corn grits contains not more than 1.0 milligram of...

  20. 21 CFR 172.345 - Folic acid (folacin).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... incorporated by reference in accordance with 5 U.S.C. 552(a) and 1 CFR part 51. Copies are available from the... following prescribed conditions: (a) Folic acid is the chemical N- amino]benzoyl]-L-glutamic acid. (b) Folic... corn grits at a level such that each pound of corn grits contains not more than 1.0 milligram of...