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Sample records for acids including serine

  1. Adaptational modification of serine and threonine metabolism in the liver to essential amino acid deficiency in rats.

    PubMed

    Nagao, Kenji; Bannai, Makoto; Seki, Shinobu; Mori, Masato; Takahashi, Michio

    2009-03-01

    It is known that plasma serine and threonine concentrations are elevated in rats chronically fed an essential amino acid deficient diet, but the underlying mechanisms including related gene expressions or serine and threonine concentrations in liver remained to be elucidated. We fed rats lysine or valine deficient diet for 4 weeks and examined the mRNA expressions of serine synthesising (3-phosphoglycerate dehydrogenase, PHGDH) and serine/threonine degrading enzymes (serine dehydratase, SDS) in the liver. Dietary deficiency induced marked elevation of hepatic serine and threonine levels associated with enhancement of PHGDH mRNA expression and repression of SDS mRNA expression. Increases in plasma serine and threonine levels due to essential amino acid deficiency in diet were caused by marked increases in hepatic serine and threonine levels. Proteolytic responses to the amino acid deficiency may be lessened by storing amino radicals as serine and inducing anorexia through elevation of threonine. PMID:18584286

  2. D-Serine metabolism in C6 glioma cells: Involvement of alanine-serine-cysteine transporter (ASCT2) and serine racemase (SRR) but not D-amino acid oxidase (DAO)

    PubMed Central

    Sikka, Pilleriin; Walker, Rosie; Cockayne, Rebecca; Wood, Matthew JA; Harrison, Paul J; Burnet, Philip WJ

    2010-01-01

    D-serine is an endogenous N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor coagonist. It is synthesized from L-serine by serine racemase (SRR), but many aspects of its metabolism remain unclear, especially in the forebrain, which lacks active D-amino acid oxidase (DAO), the major D-serine degradative enzyme. Candidate mechanisms include SRR operating in α,β-eliminase mode (converting D-serine to pyruvate) and regulation by serine transport, in which the alanine-serine-cysteine transporter ASCT2 is implicated. Here we report studies in C6 glioma cells, which “simulate” the forebrain, in that the cells express SRR and ASCT2 but lack DAO activity. We measured D-serine, ASCT2, SRR, and DAO expression and DAO activity in two situations: after incubation of cells for 48 hr with serine isomers and after increased or decreased SRR expression by transfection and RNA interference, respectively. Incubation with serine enantiomers decreased [3H]D-serine uptake and ASCT2 mRNA and increased SRR immunoreactivity but did not alter DAO immunoreactivity, and DAO activity remained undetectable. SRR overexpression increased D-serine and pyruvate and decreased [3H]D-serine uptake and ASCT2 mRNA but did not affect DAO. SRR knockdown did not alter any of the parameters. Our data suggest that D-serine transport mediated by ASCT2 contributes prominently to D-serine homeostasis when DAO activity is absent. The factors regulating D-serine are important for understanding normal NMDA receptor function and because D-serine, along with DAO and SRR, is implicated in the pathogenesis and treatment of schizophrenia. © 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc. PMID:20091774

  3. Serine biosynthesis and transport defects.

    PubMed

    El-Hattab, Ayman W

    2016-07-01

    l-serine is a non-essential amino acid that is biosynthesized via the enzymes phosphoglycerate dehydrogenase (PGDH), phosphoserine aminotransferase (PSAT), and phosphoserine phosphatase (PSP). Besides its role in protein synthesis, l-serine is a potent neurotrophic factor and a precursor of a number of essential compounds including phosphatidylserine, sphingomyelin, glycine, and d-serine. Serine biosynthesis defects result from impairments of PGDH, PSAT, or PSP leading to systemic serine deficiency. Serine biosynthesis defects present in a broad phenotypic spectrum that includes, at the severe end, Neu-Laxova syndrome, a lethal multiple congenital anomaly disease, intermediately, infantile serine biosynthesis defects with severe neurological manifestations and growth deficiency, and at the mild end, the childhood disease with intellectual disability. A serine transport defect resulting from deficiency of the ASCT1, the main transporter for serine in the central nervous system, has been recently described in children with neurological manifestations that overlap with those observed in serine biosynthesis defects. l-serine therapy may be beneficial in preventing or ameliorating symptoms in serine biosynthesis and transport defects, if started before neurological damage occurs. Herein, we review serine metabolism and transport, the clinical, biochemical, and molecular aspects of serine biosynthesis and transport defects, the mechanisms of these diseases, and the potential role of serine therapy. PMID:27161889

  4. Combined Skin Moisturization of Liposomal Serine Incorporated in Hydrogels Prepared with Carbopol ETD 2020, Rhesperse RM 100 and Hyaluronic Acid

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hyeongmin; Ro, Jieun; Barua, Sonia; Hwang, Deuk Sun; Na, Seon-Jeong; Lee, Ho Sung; Jeong, Ji Hoon; Woo, Seulki; Kim, Hyewon; Hong, Bomi; Yun, Gyiae; Kim, Joong-Hark; Yoon, Young-Ho; Park, Myung-Gyu; Kim, Jia; Sohn, Uy Dong

    2015-01-01

    We investigated the combined moisturizing effect of liposomal serine and a cosmeceutical base selected in this study. Serine is a major amino acid consisting of natural moisturizing factors and keratin, and the hydroxyl group of serine can actively interact with water molecules. Therefore, we hypothesized that serine efficiently delivered to the stratum corneum (SC) of the skin would enhance the moisturizing capability of the skin. We prepared four different cosmeceutical bases (hydrogel, oil-in-water (O/W) essence, O/W cream, and water-in-oil (W/O) cream); their moisturizing abilities were then assessed using a Corneometer®. The hydrogel was selected as the optimum base for skin moisturization based on the area under the moisture content change-time curves (AUMCC) values used as a parameter for the water hold capacity of the skin. Liposomal serine prepared by a reverse-phase evaporation method was then incorporated in the hydrogel. The liposomal serine-incorporated hydrogel (serine level=1%) showed an approximately 1.62~1.77 times greater moisturizing effect on the skin than those of hydrogel, hydrogel with serine (1%), and hydrogel with blank liposome. However, the AUMCC values were not dependent on the level of serine in liposomal serine-loaded hydrogels. Together, the delivery of serine to the SC of the skin is a promising strategy for moisturizing the skin. This study is expected to be an important step in developing highly effective moisturizing cosmeceutical products. PMID:26557021

  5. Electron attachment to amino acid clusters in helium nanodroplets: Glycine, alanine, and serine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferreira da Silva, F.; Denifl, S.; Märk, T. D.; Ellis, A. M.; Scheier, P.

    2010-06-01

    The first detailed study of electron attachment to amino acid clusters is reported. The amino acids chosen for investigation were glycine, alanine, and serine. Clusters of these amino acids were formed inside helium nanodroplets, which provide a convenient low temperature (0.37 K) environment for growing noncovalent clusters. When subjected to low energy (2 eV) electron impact the chemistry for glycine and alanine clusters was found to be similar. In both cases, parent cluster anions were the major products, which contrasts with the corresponding monomers in the gas phase, where the dehydrogenated products ([AAn-H]-, where AA=amino acid monomer) dominate. Serine clusters are different, with the major product being the parent anion minus an OH group, an outcome presumably conferred by the facile loss of an OH group from the β carbon of serine. In addition to the bare parent anions and various fragment anions, helium atoms are also observed attached to both the parent anion clusters and the dehydrogenated parent anion clusters. Finally, we present the first anion yield spectra of amino acid clusters from doped helium nanodroplets as a function of incident electron energy.

  6. A Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis Predicted Serine Protease Is Associated with Acid Stress and Intraphagosomal Survival

    PubMed Central

    Kugadas, Abirami; Lamont, Elise A.; Bannantine, John P.; Shoyama, Fernanda M.; Brenner, Evan; Janagama, Harish K.; Sreevatsan, Srinand

    2016-01-01

    The ability to maintain intra-cellular pH is crucial for bacteria and other microbes to survive in diverse environments, particularly those that undergo fluctuations in pH. Mechanisms of acid resistance remain poorly understood in mycobacteria. Although, studies investigating acid stress in M. tuberculosis are gaining traction, few center on Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP), the etiological agent of chronic enteritis in ruminants. We identified a MAP acid stress response network involved in macrophage infection. The central node of this network was MAP0403, a predicted serine protease that shared an 86% amino acid identity with MarP in M. tuberculosis. Previous studies confirmed MarP as a serine protease integral to maintaining intra-bacterial pH and survival in acid in vitro and in vivo. We show that MAP0403 is upregulated in infected macrophages and MAC-T cells that coincided with phagosome acidification. Treatment of mammalian cells with bafilomcyin A1, a potent inhibitor of phagosomal vATPases, diminished MAP0403 transcription. MAP0403 expression was also noted in acidic medium. A surrogate host, M. smegmatis mc2 155, was designed to express MAP0403 and when exposed to either macrophages or in vitro acid stress had increased bacterial cell viability, which corresponds to maintenance of intra-bacterial pH in acidic (pH = 5) conditions, compared to the parent strain. These data suggest that MAP0403 may be the equivalent of MarP in MAP. Future studies confirming MAP0403 as a serine protease and exploring its structure and possible substrates are warranted. PMID:27597934

  7. A Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis Predicted Serine Protease Is Associated with Acid Stress and Intraphagosomal Survival

    PubMed Central

    Kugadas, Abirami; Lamont, Elise A.; Bannantine, John P.; Shoyama, Fernanda M.; Brenner, Evan; Janagama, Harish K.; Sreevatsan, Srinand

    2016-01-01

    The ability to maintain intra-cellular pH is crucial for bacteria and other microbes to survive in diverse environments, particularly those that undergo fluctuations in pH. Mechanisms of acid resistance remain poorly understood in mycobacteria. Although, studies investigating acid stress in M. tuberculosis are gaining traction, few center on Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP), the etiological agent of chronic enteritis in ruminants. We identified a MAP acid stress response network involved in macrophage infection. The central node of this network was MAP0403, a predicted serine protease that shared an 86% amino acid identity with MarP in M. tuberculosis. Previous studies confirmed MarP as a serine protease integral to maintaining intra-bacterial pH and survival in acid in vitro and in vivo. We show that MAP0403 is upregulated in infected macrophages and MAC-T cells that coincided with phagosome acidification. Treatment of mammalian cells with bafilomcyin A1, a potent inhibitor of phagosomal vATPases, diminished MAP0403 transcription. MAP0403 expression was also noted in acidic medium. A surrogate host, M. smegmatis mc2 155, was designed to express MAP0403 and when exposed to either macrophages or in vitro acid stress had increased bacterial cell viability, which corresponds to maintenance of intra-bacterial pH in acidic (pH = 5) conditions, compared to the parent strain. These data suggest that MAP0403 may be the equivalent of MarP in MAP. Future studies confirming MAP0403 as a serine protease and exploring its structure and possible substrates are warranted.

  8. A Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis Predicted Serine Protease Is Associated with Acid Stress and Intraphagosomal Survival.

    PubMed

    Kugadas, Abirami; Lamont, Elise A; Bannantine, John P; Shoyama, Fernanda M; Brenner, Evan; Janagama, Harish K; Sreevatsan, Srinand

    2016-01-01

    The ability to maintain intra-cellular pH is crucial for bacteria and other microbes to survive in diverse environments, particularly those that undergo fluctuations in pH. Mechanisms of acid resistance remain poorly understood in mycobacteria. Although, studies investigating acid stress in M. tuberculosis are gaining traction, few center on Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP), the etiological agent of chronic enteritis in ruminants. We identified a MAP acid stress response network involved in macrophage infection. The central node of this network was MAP0403, a predicted serine protease that shared an 86% amino acid identity with MarP in M. tuberculosis. Previous studies confirmed MarP as a serine protease integral to maintaining intra-bacterial pH and survival in acid in vitro and in vivo. We show that MAP0403 is upregulated in infected macrophages and MAC-T cells that coincided with phagosome acidification. Treatment of mammalian cells with bafilomcyin A1, a potent inhibitor of phagosomal vATPases, diminished MAP0403 transcription. MAP0403 expression was also noted in acidic medium. A surrogate host, M. smegmatis mc(2) 155, was designed to express MAP0403 and when exposed to either macrophages or in vitro acid stress had increased bacterial cell viability, which corresponds to maintenance of intra-bacterial pH in acidic (pH = 5) conditions, compared to the parent strain. These data suggest that MAP0403 may be the equivalent of MarP in MAP. Future studies confirming MAP0403 as a serine protease and exploring its structure and possible substrates are warranted. PMID:27597934

  9. Catalysis of the Oligomerization of O-Phospho-Serine, Aspartic Acid, or Glutamic Acid by Cationic Micelles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boehler, Christof; Hill, Aubrey R., Jr.; Orgel, Leslie E.

    1996-01-01

    Treatment of relatively concentrated aqueous solutions of O-phospho-serine (50 mM), aspartic acid (100 mM) or glutamic acid (100 mM) with carbonyldiimidazole leads to the formation of an activated intermediate that oligomerizes efficiently. When the concentration of amino acid is reduced tenfold, few long oligomers can be detected. Positively-charged cetyltrimethyl ammonium bromide micelles concentrate the negatively-charged activated intermediates of the amino acids at their surfaces and catalyze efficient oligomerization even from dilute solutions.

  10. Catalysis of the Oligomerization of O-Phospho-Serine, Aspartic Acid, or Glutamic Acid by Cationic Micelles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bohler, Christof; Hill, Aubrey R., Jr.; Orgel, Leslie E.

    1996-01-01

    Treatment of relatively concentrated aqueous solutions of 0-phospho-serine (50 mM), aspartic acid (100 mM) or glutamic acid (100 mM) with carbonyldiimidazole leads to the formation of an activated intermediate that oligomerizes efficiently. When the concentration of amino acid is reduced tenfold, few long oligomers can be detected. Positively-charged cetyltrimethyl ammonium bromide micelles concentrate the negatively-charged activated intermediates of the amino acids at their surfaces and catalyze efficient oligomerization even from dilute solutions.

  11. The non-protein amino acid BMAA is misincorporated into human proteins in place of L-serine causing protein misfolding and aggregation.

    PubMed

    Dunlop, Rachael Anne; Cox, Paul Alan; Banack, Sandra Anne; Rodgers, Kenneth John

    2013-01-01

    Mechanisms of protein misfolding are of increasing interest in the aetiology of neurodegenerative diseases characterized by protein aggregation and tangles including Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS), Alzheimer's disease (AD), Parkinson's disease (PD), Lewy Body Dementia (LBD), and Progressive Supranuclear Palsy (PSP). Some forms of neurodegenerative illness are associated with mutations in genes which control assembly of disease related proteins. For example, the mouse sticky mutation sti, which results in undetected mischarging of tRNA(Ala) with serine resulting in the substitution of serine for alanine in proteins causes cerebellar Purkinje cell loss and ataxia in laboratory animals. Replacement of serine 422 with glutamic acid in tau increases the propensity of tau aggregation associated with neurodegeneration. However, the possibility that environmental factors can trigger abnormal folding in proteins remains relatively unexplored. We here report that a non-protein amino acid, β-N-methylamino-L-alanine (BMAA), can be misincorporated in place of L-serine into human proteins. We also report that this misincorporation can be inhibited by L-serine. Misincorporation of BMAA into human neuroproteins may shed light on putative associations between human exposure to BMAA produced by cyanobacteria and an increased incidence of ALS. PMID:24086518

  12. Mechanism-based inactivation of serine transhydroxymethylases by D-fluoroalanine and related amino acids.

    PubMed

    Wang, E A; Kallen, R; Walsh, C

    1981-07-10

    Serine transhydroxymethylase, from lamb or rabbit liver, is known to catalyze slow transamination of D-alanine, but not of L-amino acids, in a tetrahydrofolate-independent reaction. Both enzymes will process the D-isomer of beta-fluoroalanine for alpha, beta-elimination of HF to yield an aminoacrylate-pyridoxal-P-enzyme intermediate. This intermediate partitions between harmless hydrolysis to pyruvate, NH4+, and active enzyme-pyridoxal-P (catalytic turnover) and suicidal enzyme alkylation by covalent modification with an average partition ratio of 40-60 turnovers/inactivation event/monomer unit of this tetrameric enzyme. Enzyme inactivation occurs with stoichiometric incorporation of radioactive label from D-[1,2-14C]fluoroalanine. Titration of enzymic cysteinyl --SH groups with 5,5'-dithiobis(2-nitrobenzoate) indicates loss of 1 --SH group on inactivation. Acid hydrolysis of radioactive-inactive enzyme confirms cysteine residue modification. Treatment of inactive enzyme with 6 M urea, then KBH4, followed by acid hydrolysis yields two radioactive compounds, lanthionine and S-carboxyhydroxyethylcysteine, in about equal amounts. The addition of tetrahydrofolate stimulates both pyruvate production and inactivation to equal extents with about a 200-fold rate acceleration at 0.5 mM tetrahydrofolate to turnover numbers of approximately 120 min-1. The Km for D-fluoroalanine is high, 10-60 mM, and this low substrate affinity suggests D-fluoroalanine will not be a useful in vivo agent for selective inactivation of liver cell serine transhydroxymethylases.

  13. The epidermis of scales in gecko lizards contains multiple forms of beta-keratins including basic glycine-proline-serine-rich proteins.

    PubMed

    Toni, M; Dalla Valle, L; Alibardi, L

    2007-05-01

    The epidermis of scales of gecko lizards comprises alpha- and beta-keratins. Using bidimensional electrophoresis and immunoblotting, we have characterized keratins of corneous layers of scales in geckos, especially beta-keratins in digit pad lamellae. In the latter, the formation of thin bristles (setae) allow for the adhesion and climbing vertical or inverted surfaces. alpha-Keratins of 55-66 kDa remain in the acidic and neutral range of pI, while beta-keratins of 13-18 kDa show a broader variation of pI (4-10). Some protein spots for beta-keratins correspond to previously sequenced, basic glycine-proline-serine-rich beta-keratins of 169-191 amino acids. The predicted secondary structure shows that a large part of the molecule has a random-coiled conformation, small alpha helix regions, and a central region with 2-3 strands (beta-folding). The latter, termed core-box, shows homology with feather-scale-claw keratins of birds and is involved in the formation of beta-keratin filaments. Immunolocalization of beta-keratins indicates that these proteins are mainly present in the beta-layer and oberhautchen layer, including setae. The sequenced proteins of setae form bundles of keratins that determine their elongation. This process resembles that of feather-keratin on the elongation of barbule cells in feathers. It is suggested that small proteins rich in glycine, serine, and proline evolved in reptiles and birds to reinforce the mechanical resistance of the cytokeratin cytoskeleton initially present in the epidermis of scales and feathers.

  14. Proteolytic cleavage of human acid-sensing ion channel 1 by the serine protease matriptase.

    PubMed

    Clark, Edlira B; Jovov, Biljana; Rooj, Arun K; Fuller, Catherine M; Benos, Dale J

    2010-08-27

    Acid-sensing ion channel 1 (ASIC1) is a H(+)-gated channel of the amiloride-sensitive epithelial Na(+) channel (ENaC)/degenerin family. ASIC1 is expressed mostly in the central and peripheral nervous system neurons. ENaC and ASIC function is regulated by several serine proteases. The type II transmembrane serine protease matriptase activates the prototypical alphabetagammaENaC channel, but we found that matriptase is expressed in glioma cells and its expression is higher in glioma compared with normal astrocytes. Therefore, the goal of this study was to test the hypothesis that matriptase regulates ASIC1 function. Matriptase decreased the acid-activated ASIC1 current as measured by two-electrode voltage clamp in Xenopus oocytes and cleaved ASIC1 expressed in oocytes or CHO K1 cells. Inactive S805A matriptase had no effect on either the current or the cleavage of ASIC1. The effect of matriptase on ASIC1 was specific, because it did not affect the function of ASIC2 and no matriptase-specific ASIC2 fragments were detected in oocytes or in CHO cells. Three matriptase recognition sites were identified in ASIC1 (Arg-145, Lys-185, and Lys-384). Site-directed mutagenesis of these sites prevented matriptase cleavage of ASIC1. Our results show that matriptase is expressed in glioma cells and that matriptase specifically cleaves ASIC1 in heterologous expression systems. PMID:20601429

  15. Serine and one-carbon metabolism in cancer.

    PubMed

    Yang, Ming; Vousden, Karen H

    2016-10-01

    The non-essential amino acid serine supports several metabolic processes that are crucial for the growth and survival of proliferating cells, including protein, amino acid and glutathione synthesis. As an important one-carbon donor to the folate cycle, serine contributes to nucleotide synthesis, methylation reactions and the generation of NADPH for antioxidant defence. Many cancer cells are highly dependent on serine, a trait that provides several novel therapeutic opportunities, either through the inhibition of de novo serine synthesis or by limiting the availability or uptake of exogenous serine. PMID:27634448

  16. Arginine as a general acid catalyst in serine recombinase-mediated DNA cleavage.

    PubMed

    Keenholtz, Ross A; Mouw, Kent W; Boocock, Martin R; Li, Nan-Sheng; Piccirilli, Joseph A; Rice, Phoebe A

    2013-10-01

    Members of the serine family of site-specific DNA recombinases use an unusual constellation of amino acids to catalyze the formation and resolution of a covalent protein-DNA intermediate. A recent high resolution structure of the catalytic domain of Sin, a particularly well characterized family member, provided a detailed view of the catalytic site. To determine how the enzyme might protonate and stabilize the 3'O leaving group in the strand cleavage reaction, we examined how replacing this oxygen with a sulfur affected the cleavage rate by WT and mutant enzymes. To facilitate direct comparison of the cleavage rates, key experiments used suicide substrates that prevented religation after cleavage. The catalytic defect associated with mutation of one of six highly conserved arginine residues, Arg-69 in Sin, was partially rescued by a 3' phosphorothiolate substrate. We conclude that Arg-69 has an important role in stabilizing the 3'O leaving group and is the prime candidate for the general acid that protonates the 3'O, in good agreement with the position it occupies in the high resolution structure of the active site of Sin.

  17. Maintained activity of glycogen synthase kinase-3{beta} despite of its phosphorylation at serine-9 in okadaic acid-induced neurodegenerative model

    SciTech Connect

    Lim, Yong-Whan; Yoon, Seung-Yong; Choi, Jung-Eun; Kim, Sang-Min; Lee, Hui-Sun; Choe, Han; Lee, Seung-Chul; Kim, Dong-Hou

    2010-04-30

    Glycogen synthase kinase-3{beta} (GSK3{beta}) is recognized as one of major kinases to phosphorylate tau in Alzheimer's disease (AD), thus lots of AD drug discoveries target GSK3{beta}. However, the inactive form of GSK3{beta} which is phosphorylated at serine-9 is increased in AD brains. This is also inconsistent with phosphorylation status of other GSK3{beta} substrates, such as {beta}-catenin and collapsin response mediator protein-2 (CRMP2) since their phosphorylation is all increased in AD brains. Thus, we addressed this paradoxical condition of AD in rat neurons treated with okadaic acid (OA) which inhibits protein phosphatase-2A (PP2A) and induces tau hyperphosphorylation and cell death. Interestingly, OA also induces phosphorylation of GSK3{beta} at serine-9 and other substrates including tau, {beta}-catenin and CRMP2 like in AD brains. In this context, we observed that GSK3{beta} inhibitors such as lithium chloride and 6-bromoindirubin-3'-monoxime (6-BIO) reversed those phosphorylation events and protected neurons. These data suggest that GSK3{beta} may still have its kinase activity despite increase of its phosphorylation at serine-9 in AD brains at least in PP2A-compromised conditions and that GSK3{beta} inhibitors could be a valuable drug candidate in AD.

  18. Active-site mutations of diphtheria toxin: effects of replacing glutamic acid-148 with aspartic acid, glutamine, or serine.

    PubMed

    Wilson, B A; Reich, K A; Weinstein, B R; Collier, R J

    1990-09-18

    Glutamic acid-148, an active-site residue of diphtheria toxin identified by photoaffinity labeling with NAD, was replaced with aspartic acid, glutamine, or serine by directed mutagenesis of the F2 fragment of the toxin gene. Wild-type and mutant F2 proteins were synthesized in Escherichia coli, and the corresponding enzymic fragment A moieties (DTA) were derived, purified, and characterized. The Glu----Asp (E148D), Glu----Gln (E148Q), and Glu----Ser (E148S) mutations caused reductions in NAD:EF-2 ADP-ribosyltransferase activity of ca. 100-, 250-, and 300-fold, respectively, while causing only minimal changes in substrate affinity. The effects of the mutations on NAD-glycohydrolase activity were considerably different; only a 10-fold reduction in activity was observed for E148S, and the E148D and E148Q mutants actually exhibited a small but reproducible increase in NAD-glycohydrolytic activity. Photolabeling by nicotinamide-radiolabeled NAD was diminished ca. 8-fold in the E148D mutant and was undetectable in the other mutants. The results confirm that Glu-148 plays a crucial role in the ADP-ribosylation of EF-2 and imply an important function for the side-chain carboxyl group in catalysis. The carboxyl group is also important for photochemical labeling by NAD but not for NAD-glycohydrolase activity. The pH dependence of the catalytic parameters for the ADP-ribosyltransferase reaction revealed a group in DTA-wt that titrates with an apparent pKa of 6.2-6.3 and is in the protonated state in the rate-determining step.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  19. Targeting class A and C serine β-lactamases with a broad-spectrum boronic acid derivative.

    PubMed

    Tondi, Donatella; Venturelli, Alberto; Bonnet, Richard; Pozzi, Cecilia; Shoichet, Brian K; Costi, Maria Paola

    2014-06-26

    Production of β-lactamases (BLs) is the most widespread resistance mechanism adopted by bacteria to fight β-lactam antibiotics. The substrate spectrum of BLs has become increasingly broad, posing a serious health problem. Thus, there is an urgent need for novel BL inhibitors. Boronic acid transition-state analogues are able to reverse the resistance conferred by class A and C BLs. We describe a boronic acid analogue possessing interesting and potent broad-spectrum activity vs class A and C serine-based BLs. Starting from benzo(b)thiophene-2-boronic acid (BZBTH2B), a nanomolar non-β-lactam inhibitor of AmpC that can potentiate the activity of a third-generation cephalosporin against AmpC-producing resistant bacteria, we designed a novel broad-spectrum nanomolar inhibitor of class A and C BLs. Structure-based drug design (SBDD), synthesis, enzymology data, and X-ray crystallography results are discussed. We clarified the inhibitor binding geometry responsible for broad-spectrum activity vs serine-active BLs using double mutant thermodynamic cycle studies. PMID:24882105

  20. Targeting Class A and C Serine β-Lactamases with a Broad-Spectrum Boronic Acid Derivative

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Production of β-lactamases (BLs) is the most widespread resistance mechanism adopted by bacteria to fight β-lactam antibiotics. The substrate spectrum of BLs has become increasingly broad, posing a serious health problem. Thus, there is an urgent need for novel BL inhibitors. Boronic acid transition-state analogues are able to reverse the resistance conferred by class A and C BLs. We describe a boronic acid analogue possessing interesting and potent broad-spectrum activity vs class A and C serine-based BLs. Starting from benzo(b)thiophene-2-boronic acid (BZBTH2B), a nanomolar non-β-lactam inhibitor of AmpC that can potentiate the activity of a third-generation cephalosporin against AmpC-producing resistant bacteria, we designed a novel broad-spectrum nanomolar inhibitor of class A and C BLs. Structure-based drug design (SBDD), synthesis, enzymology data, and X-ray crystallography results are discussed. We clarified the inhibitor binding geometry responsible for broad-spectrum activity vs serine-active BLs using double mutant thermodynamic cycle studies. PMID:24882105

  1. Kinetics of long-chain (sphingoid) base biosynthesis in intact LM cells: effects of varying the extracellular concentrations of serine and fatty acid precursors of this pathway.

    PubMed

    Merrill, A H; Wang, E; Mullins, R E

    1988-01-12

    Serine palmitoyltransferase (EC 2.3.1.50) catalyzes the condensation of L-serine and palmitoyl-CoA to yield 3-ketosphinganine in the first unique reaction of long-chain (sphingoid) base biosynthesis. The kinetic effects of changing the extracellular concentrations of the precursors for this pathway were studied with LM cells by following the incorporation of L-[3-14C]serine into the long-chain base (i.e., sphinganine and sphingenine) backbones of complex sphingolipids. [14C]Serine was taken up by the cells and rapidly reached steady-state concentrations similar to those of the medium. From the cellular [14C]serine concentrations and specific activities, the apparent Vmax [14 pmol min-1 (10(6) cells)-1] and Km (0.23 mM) values for long-chain base synthesis were determined and found to be essentially identical with those for serine palmitoyltransferase assayed in vitro [i.e., 13 pmol min-1 (10(6) cells)-1 and 0.27 mM, respectively]. The other precursor, palmitic acid, was also taken up rapidly and increased long-chain base biosynthesis in a concentration-dependent manner. This effect was limited to palmitic acid and matched the known specificity of serine palmitoyltransferase for saturated fatty acyl-CoA's of 16 +/- 1 carbon atoms. These studies delineate the influence of extracellular precursors on the formation of the sphingolipid backbone and suggest that the kinetic properties of serine palmitoyltransferase govern this behavior of long-chain base synthesis in intact cells. PMID:3126810

  2. β-Amino acid catalyzed asymmetric Michael additions: design of organocatalysts with catalytic acid/base dyad inspired by serine proteases.

    PubMed

    Yang, Hui; Wong, Ming Wah

    2011-09-16

    A new type of chiral β-amino acid catalyst has been computationally designed, mimicking the enzyme catalysis of serine proteases. Our catalyst approach is based on the bioinspired catalytic acid/base dyad, namely, a carboxyl and imidazole pair. DFT calculations predict that this designed organocatalyst catalyzes Michael additions of aldehydes to nitroalkenes with excellent enantioselectivities and remarkably high anti diastereoselectivities. The unusual stacked geometry of the enamine intermediate, hydrogen bonding network, and the adoption of an exo transition state are the keys to understand the stereoselectivity.

  3. The importance of serine metabolism in cancer.

    PubMed

    Mattaini, Katherine R; Sullivan, Mark R; Vander Heiden, Matthew G

    2016-08-01

    Serine metabolism is frequently dysregulated in cancers; however, the benefit that this confers to tumors remains controversial. In many cases, extracellular serine alone is sufficient to support cancer cell proliferation, whereas some cancer cells increase serine synthesis from glucose and require de novo serine synthesis even in the presence of abundant extracellular serine. Recent studies cast new light on the role of serine metabolism in cancer, suggesting that active serine synthesis might be required to facilitate amino acid transport, nucleotide synthesis, folate metabolism, and redox homeostasis in a manner that impacts cancer. PMID:27458133

  4. Crystal versus solution structure of enzymes: NMR spectroscopy of a peptide boronic acid-serine protease complex in the crystalline state.

    PubMed Central

    Farr-Jones, S; Smith, S O; Kettner, C A; Griffin, R G; Bachovchin, W W

    1989-01-01

    The effectiveness of boronic acids as inhibitors of serine proteases has been widely ascribed to the ability of the boronyl group to form a tetrahedral adduct with the active-site serine that closely mimics the putative tetrahedral intermediate or transition state formed with substrates. However, recent 15N NMR studies of alpha-lytic protease (EC 3.4.21.12) in solution have shown that some boronic acids and peptide boronic acids form adducts with the active-site histidine instead of with the serine. Such histidine-boron adducts have not thus far been reported in x-ray diffraction studies of boronic acid-serine protease complexes. Here, we report an 15N NMR study of the MeOSuc-Ala-Ala-Pro-boroPhe complex of alpha-lytic protease in the crystalline state using magic-angle spinning. Previous 15N NMR studies have shown this complex involves the formation of a histidine-boron bond in solution. The 15N NMR spectra of the crystalline complex are essentially identical to those of the complex in solution, thereby showing that the structure of this complex is the same in solution and in the crystal and that both involve formation of a histidine-boron adduct. PMID:2780549

  5. Contributions of the D-serine pathway to schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Labrie, Viviane; Wong, Albert H C; Roder, John C

    2012-03-01

    The glutamate neurotransmitter system is one of the major candidate pathways for the pathophysiology of schizophrenia, and increased understanding of the pharmacology, molecular biology and biochemistry of this system may lead to novel treatments. Glutamatergic hypofunction, particularly at the NMDA receptor, has been hypothesized to underlie many of the symptoms of schizophrenia, including psychosis, negative symptoms and cognitive impairment. This review will focus on D-serine, a co-agonist at the NMDA receptor that in combination with glutamate, is required for full activation of this ion channel receptor. Evidence implicating D-serine, NMDA receptors and related molecules, such as D-amino acid oxidase (DAO), G72 and serine racemase (SRR), in the etiology or pathophysiology of schizophrenia is discussed, including knowledge gained from mouse models with altered D-serine pathway genes and from preliminary clinical trials with D-serine itself or compounds modulating the D-serine pathway. Abnormalities in D-serine availability may underlie glutamatergic dysfunction in schizophrenia, and the development of new treatments acting through the D-serine pathway may significantly improve outcomes for many schizophrenia patients. PMID:21295046

  6. Effects of dietary soybean stachyose and phytic acid on gene expressions of serine proteases in Japanese flounder ( Paralichthys olivaceus)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mi, Haifeng; Mai, Kangsen; Zhang, Wenbing; Wu, Chenglong; Cai, Yinghua

    2011-09-01

    Soybean stachyose (SBS) and phytic acid (PA) are anti-nutritional factors (ANF) which have deleterious effects on the growth and digestibility in fish. The present research studied the effects of dietary SBS and PA on the expression of three serine protease genes in the liver of Japanese flounder ( Paralichthys olivaceus). These genes are trypsinogen 1 (poTRY), elastase 1 (poEL) and chymotrypsinogen 1 (poCTRY). Eight artificial diets with graded levels of supplemented ANFs were formulated to 4 levels of SBS (0.00, 0.40, 0.80 and 1.50%), 4 levels of PA (0.00, 0.20, 0.40 and 0.80), respectively. Japanese flounder (initial weight 2.45 g ± 0.01 g) were fed with these diets for 10 weeks with three replications per treatment. At the end of 10 weeks, supplementation of 0.40% of dietary SBS or PA significantly increased the gene expression of poTRY and poCTRY ( P<0.05). The same level of dietary SBS significantly decreased the gene expression of poEL. In comparison with the control group (ANF-free), dietary PA (0.2% and 0.8%) significantly decreased the gene expression of poTRY, poCTRY and poEL ( P<0.05). However, excessive supplement of dietary SBS (1.5%) has no significant effects on these gene expressions ( P>0.05). These results suggested that dietary SBS and dietary PA could directly affect the serine protease genes at the transcriptional level in Japanese flounder, and these genes' expression was more sensitive to dietary PA than to SBS under the current experimental conditions.

  7. Mutations in the yeast LCB1 and LCB2 genes, including those corresponding to the hereditary sensory neuropathy type I mutations, dominantly inactivate serine palmitoyltransferase.

    PubMed

    Gable, Ken; Han, Gongshe; Monaghan, Erin; Bacikova, Dagmar; Natarajan, Mukil; Williams, Robert; Dunn, Teresa M

    2002-03-22

    It was recently demonstrated that mutations in the human SPTLC1 gene, encoding the Lcb1p subunit of serine palmitoyltransferase (SPT), cause hereditary sensory neuropathy type I . As a member of the subfamily of pyridoxal 5'-phosphate enzymes known as the alpha-oxoamine synthases, serine palmitoyltransferase catalyzes the committed step of sphingolipid synthesis. The residues that are mutated to cause hereditary sensory neuropathy type I reside in a highly conserved region of Lcb1p that is predicted to be a catalytic domain of Lcb1p on the basis of alignments with other members of the alpha-oxoamine synthase family. We found that the corresponding mutations in the LCB1 gene of Saccharomyces cerevisiae reduce serine palmitoyltransferase activity. These mutations are dominant and decrease serine palmitoyltransferase activity by 50% when the wild-type and mutant LCB1 alleles are coexpressed. We also show that serine palmitoyltransferase is an Lcb1p small middle dotLcb2p heterodimer and that the mutated Lcb1p proteins retain their ability to interact with Lcb2p. Modeling studies suggest that serine palmitoyltransferase is likely to have a single active site that lies at the Lcb1p small middle dotLcb2p interface and that the mutations in Lcb1p reside near the lysine in Lcb2p that is expected to form the Schiff's base with the pyridoxal 5'-phosphate cofactor. Furthermore, mutations in this lysine and in a histidine residue that is also predicted to be important for pyridoxal 5'-phosphate binding to Lcb2p also dominantly inactivate SPT similar to the hereditary sensory neuropathy type 1-like mutations in Lcb1p. PMID:11781309

  8. Amino acid composition, including key derivatives of eccrine sweat: potential biomarkers of certain atopic skin conditions.

    PubMed

    Mark, Harker; Harding, Clive R

    2013-04-01

    The free amino acid (AA) composition of eccrine sweat is different from other biological fluids, for reasons which are not properly understood. We undertook the detailed analysis of the AA composition of freshly isolated pure human eccrine sweat, including some of the key derivatives of AA metabolism, to better understand the key biological mechanisms governing its composition. Eccrine sweat was collected from the axillae of 12 healthy subjects immediately upon formation. Free AA analysis was performed using an automatic AA analyser after ninhydrin derivatization. Pyrrolidine-5-carboxylic acid (PCA) and urocanic acid (UCA) levels were determined using GC/MS. The free AA composition of sweat was dominated by the presence of serine accounting for just over one-fifth of the total free AA composition. Glycine was the next most abundant followed by PCA, alanine, citrulline and threonine, respectively. The data obtained indicate that the AA content of sweat bears a remarkable similarity to the AA composition of the epidermal protein profilaggrin. This protein is the key source of free AAs and their derivatives that form a major part of the natural moisturizing factor (NMF) within the stratum corneum (SC) and plays a major role in maintaining the barrier integrity of human skin. As perturbations in the production of NMF can lead to abnormal barrier function and can arise as a consequence of filaggrin genotype, we propose the quantification of AAs in sweat may serve as a non-invasive diagnostic biomarker for certain atopic skin conditions, that is, atopic dermatitis (AD).

  9. Purification and amino acid sequence of halystase from snake venom of Agkistrodon halys blomhoffii, a serine protease that cleaves specifically fibrinogen and kininogen.

    PubMed

    Matsui, T; Sakurai, Y; Fujimura, Y; Hayashi, I; Oh-Ishi, S; Suzuki, M; Hamako, J; Yamamoto, Y; Yamazaki, J; Kinoshita, M; Titani, K

    1998-03-15

    We have isolated a serine protease, halystase, from Agkistrodon halys blomhoffii venom by chromatography on DEAE-Sepharose, heparin-Sepharose and Q-Sepharose columns, and have determined the complete amino acid sequence by Edman degradation and by mass spectral analysis of peptides generated by enzymatic and chemical cleavage. The 238-residue sequence of halystase, containing N-linked carbohydrates (about 13%) at two sites showed significant similarity to other thrombin-like snake venom serine proteases (66-72%), mammalian tissue kallikrein (42%) and thrombin (26%). Halystase contained the tentative catalytic triad of His43, Asp88 and Ser184 common to all serine proteases and Asp178 in the primary substrate-binding site. Although halystase contained an RGD sequence at residues 181-183, it did not inhibit platelet aggregation induced by ADP or collagen. It hydrolyzed most efficiently a tissue-kallikrein substrate, prolylphenylalanylarginyl-4-methyl-coumaryl-7-amide, and released bradykinin from bovine kininogen. Halystase did not coagulate human plasma, but it cleaved the fibrinogen B beta chain at the carboxyl side of Arg42 and cleaved slowly the fibrogen A alpha chain. Fibrinogen thus treated gradually became insensitive to thrombin. The proteolytic activity was inhibited with diisopropyl fluorophosphate, phenylmethylsulfonyl fluoride or leupeptin. These results indicate that halystase is a serine protease structurally similar to coagulating thrombin-like snake venom proteases, but it specifically cleaves fibrinogen at sites different from thrombin without inducing fibrin clotting, and hydrolyzes kininogen to produce bradykinin, resulting in the reduction of blood pressure.

  10. Serine Biosynthesis and Regulation in Haemophilus influenzae

    PubMed Central

    Pizer, Lewis I.; Ponce-De-Leon, Manuel; Michalka, Jack

    1969-01-01

    Nutritional mutants of Haemophilus influenzae requiring l-serine for growth were shown to be deficient in their capacity to synthesize serine-phosphate from 3-phosphoglycerate. On the basis of the correlation between this block and the requirement for an exogenous supply of the amino acid, it was concluded that the “phosphorylated” pathway is the only pathway used by H. influenzae for serine biosynthesis. Serine inhibits serine-phosphate production, thereby regulating its own synthesis in a manner analagous to the Enterobacteriaceae. A mutant strain that required either serine or tryptophan for growth was normal in serine-phosphate synthesis and regulation. It was concluded that this strain probably has a tryptophan synthetase with an increased Michaelis constant for serine. PMID:5305003

  11. Periodic density functional theory study of the high-pressure behavior of crystalline L-serine-L-ascorbic acid.

    PubMed

    Chen, Limin; Liu, Chunsheng; Fang, Henan; Xie, Qiyun; Kong, Chengkai; Ji, Guanghan; Xiang, Ziyue

    2016-01-01

    A detailed study of the structural, electronic and absorption properties of crystalline L-serine-L-ascorbic acid (SAA) in the pressure range of 0-300 GPa was performed by density-functional theory (DFT) calculations in this work. Our results show that the compressible crystal of SAA is anisotropic. Furthermore, specific analysis of the variation tendencies of bond lengths and bond angles under different pressures show that the main structural transformations occur at pressures of 40, 50, 70, 100, 130 and 150 GPa, accompanied by repeated formations and disconnections of covalent bonds between O2(P1) and C2(P2) as well as C3(P1) and O1(P2), and a newly formed five-atom ring at 100 GPa. In addition, from 40 to 230 GPa, complex hydrogen bond transformations occur in SAA under compression, while from 240 to 300 GPa, the curve of lattice constants, bond lengths and bond angles of SAA barely changes, suggesting structural stability after 230 GPa. Then, by analyzing the band gap and density of states of SAA, it was found that the crystal undergoes a phase transformation from insulator to semiconductor at 150 GPa and it becomes more sensitive under compression. In addition, a relatively high optical activity with the pressure increases of SAA was seen from the absorption spectra, and two obvious changes of absorption coefficients were also observed at 50 GPa and 130 GPa, respectively, indicating that structural transformations occur here. Graphical abstract Structural formation and breaking of the five-atom ring O1(P2)-C2(P2)-O2(P1)-C2(P1)-C3(P1) with increasing pressure.

  12. Peptidyl inverse esters of p-methoxybenzoic acid: a novel class of potent inactivator of the serine proteases.

    PubMed Central

    Lynas, J; Walker, B

    1997-01-01

    A series of novel synthetic peptides, containing a C-terminal beta-amino alcohol linked to p-methoxybenzoic acid via an ester linkage, have been prepared and tested as inhibitors against typical members of the serine protease family. For example, the sequences Ac-Val-Pro-NH-CH-(CH2-C6H5)-CH2O-CO-C6H4-OCH3 (I) and Ac-Val-Pro-NH-CH-[CH-(CH3)2]-CH2O-CO-C6H4-OCH3 (II), which fulfil the known primary and secondary specificity requirements of chymotrypsin and elastase respectively, have been found to behave as exceptionally potent irreversible inactivators of their respective target protease. Thus I was found to inactivate chymotrypsin with an overall second-order rate constant (k2/Ki) of approx. 6.6x10(6) M-1. s-1, whereas II is an even more potent inactivator of human neutrophil elastase, exhibiting a second-order rate constant of inactivation of approx. 1.3x10(7) M-1.s-1. These values represent the largest rate constants ever reported for the inactivation of these proteases with synthetic peptide-based inactivators. On prolonged incubation in substrate-containing buffers, samples of the inactivated proteases were found to regain activity slowly. The first-order rate constants for the regeneration of enzymic activity from chymotrypsin and human neutrophil elastase inactivated by I and II respectively were determined to be approx. 5.8x10(-5) s-1 and approx. 4.3x10(-4) s-1. We believe that the most likely mechanism for the inactivation and regeneration of enzymic activity involves the formation and subsequent slow hydrolysis of long-lived acyl enzyme intermediates. PMID:9271079

  13. L-serine synthesis in the central nervous system: a review on serine deficiency disorders.

    PubMed

    Tabatabaie, L; Klomp, L W; Berger, R; de Koning, T J

    2010-03-01

    The de novo synthesis of the amino acid L-serine plays an essential role in the development and functioning of the central nervous system (CNS). L-serine displays many metabolic functions during different developmental stages; among its functions providing precursors for amino acids, protein synthesis, nucleotide synthesis, neurotransmitter synthesis and L-serine derived lipids. Patients with congenital defects in the L-serine synthesizing enzymes present with severe neurological abnormalities and underscore the importance of this synthetic pathway. In this review, we will discuss the cellular functions of the L-serine pathway, structure and enzymatic properties of the enzymes involved and genetic defects associated with this pathway. PMID:19963421

  14. Modification of histones by sugar β-N-acetylglucosamine (GlcNAc) occurs on multiple residues, including histone H3 serine 10, and is cell cycle-regulated.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Suisheng; Roche, Kevin; Nasheuer, Heinz-Peter; Lowndes, Noel Francis

    2011-10-28

    The monosaccharide, β-N-acetylglucosamine (GlcNAc), can be added to the hydroxyl group of either serines or threonines to generate an O-linked β-N-acetylglucosamine (O-GlcNAc) residue (Love, D. C., and Hanover, J. A. (2005) Sci. STKE 2005 312, 1-14; Hart, G. W., Housley, M. P., and Slawson, C. (2007) Nature 446, 1017-1022). This post-translational protein modification, termed O-GlcNAcylation, is reversible, analogous to phosphorylation, and has been implicated in many cellular processes. Here, we present evidence that in human cells all four core histones of the nucleosome are substrates for this glycosylation in the relative abundance H3, H4/H2B, and H2A. Increasing the intracellular level of UDP-GlcNAc, the nucleotide sugar donor substrate for O-GlcNAcylation enhanced histone O-GlcNAcylation and partially suppressed phosphorylation of histone H3 at serine 10 (H3S10ph). Expression of recombinant H3.3 harboring an S10A mutation abrogated histone H3 O-GlcNAcylation relative to its wild-type version, consistent with H3S10 being a site of histone O-GlcNAcylation (H3S10glc). Moreover, O-GlcNAcylated histones were lost from H3S10ph immunoprecipitates, whereas immunoprecipitation of either H3K4me3 or H3K9me3 (active or inactive histone marks, respectively) resulted in co-immunoprecipitation of O-GlcNAcylated histones. We also examined histone O-GlcNAcylation during cell cycle progression. Histone O-GlcNAcylation is high in G(1) cells, declines throughout the S phase, increases again during late S/early G(2), and persists through late G(2) and mitosis. Thus, O-GlcNAcylation is a novel histone post-translational modification regulating chromatin conformation during transcription and cell cycle progression.

  15. l-Serine Deficiency Elicits Intracellular Accumulation of Cytotoxic Deoxysphingolipids and Lipid Body Formation*

    PubMed Central

    Esaki, Kayoko; Sayano, Tomoko; Sonoda, Chiaki; Akagi, Takumi; Suzuki, Takeshi; Ogawa, Takuya; Okamoto, Masahiro; Yoshikawa, Takeo; Hirabayashi, Yoshio; Furuya, Shigeki

    2015-01-01

    l-Serine is required to synthesize membrane lipids such as phosphatidylserine and sphingolipids. Nevertheless, it remains largely unknown how a diminished capacity to synthesize l-serine affects lipid homeostasis in cells and tissues. Here, we show that deprivation of external l-serine leads to the generation of 1-deoxysphingolipids (doxSLs), including 1-deoxysphinganine, in mouse embryonic fibroblasts (KO-MEFs) lacking d-3-phosphoglycerate dehydrogenase (Phgdh), which catalyzes the first step in the de novo synthesis of l-serine. A novel mass spectrometry-based lipidomic approach demonstrated that 1-deoxydihydroceramide was the most abundant species of doxSLs accumulated in l-serine-deprived KO-MEFs. Among normal sphingolipid species in KO-MEFs, levels of sphinganine, dihydroceramide, ceramide, and hexosylceramide were significantly reduced after deprivation of external l-serine, whereas those of sphingomyelin, sphingosine, and sphingosine 1-phosphate were retained. The synthesis of doxSLs was suppressed by supplementing the culture medium with l-serine but was potentiated by increasing the ratio of l-alanine to l-serine in the medium. Unlike with l-serine, depriving cells of external l-leucine did not promote the occurrence of doxSLs. Consistent with results obtained from KO-MEFs, brain-specific deletion of Phgdh in mice also resulted in accumulation of doxSLs in the brain. Furthermore, l-serine-deprived KO-MEFs exhibited increased formation of cytosolic lipid bodies containing doxSLs and other sphingolipids. These in vitro and in vivo studies indicate that doxSLs are generated in the presence of a high ratio of l-alanine to l-serine in cells and tissues lacking Phgdh, and de novo synthesis of l-serine is necessary to maintain normal sphingolipid homeostasis when the external supply of this amino acid is limited. PMID:25903138

  16. L-Serine Deficiency Elicits Intracellular Accumulation of Cytotoxic Deoxysphingolipids and Lipid Body Formation.

    PubMed

    Esaki, Kayoko; Sayano, Tomoko; Sonoda, Chiaki; Akagi, Takumi; Suzuki, Takeshi; Ogawa, Takuya; Okamoto, Masahiro; Yoshikawa, Takeo; Hirabayashi, Yoshio; Furuya, Shigeki

    2015-06-01

    L-serine is required to synthesize membrane lipids such as phosphatidylserine and sphingolipids. Nevertheless, it remains largely unknown how a diminished capacity to synthesize L-serine affects lipid homeostasis in cells and tissues. Here, we show that deprivation of external L-serine leads to the generation of 1-deoxysphingolipids (doxSLs), including 1-deoxysphinganine, in mouse embryonic fibroblasts (KO-MEFs) lacking D-3-phosphoglycerate dehydrogenase (Phgdh), which catalyzes the first step in the de novo synthesis of L-serine. A novel mass spectrometry-based lipidomic approach demonstrated that 1-deoxydihydroceramide was the most abundant species of doxSLs accumulated in L-serine-deprived KO-MEFs. Among normal sphingolipid species in KO-MEFs, levels of sphinganine, dihydroceramide, ceramide, and hexosylceramide were significantly reduced after deprivation of external L-serine, whereas those of sphingomyelin, sphingosine, and sphingosine 1-phosphate were retained. The synthesis of doxSLs was suppressed by supplementing the culture medium with L-serine but was potentiated by increasing the ratio of L-alanine to L-serine in the medium. Unlike with L-serine, depriving cells of external L-leucine did not promote the occurrence of doxSLs. Consistent with results obtained from KO-MEFs, brain-specific deletion of Phgdh in mice also resulted in accumulation of doxSLs in the brain. Furthermore, L-serine-deprived KO-MEFs exhibited increased formation of cytosolic lipid bodies containing doxSLs and other sphingolipids. These in vitro and in vivo studies indicate that doxSLs are generated in the presence of a high ratio of L-alanine to L-serine in cells and tissues lacking Phgdh, and de novo synthesis of L-serine is necessary to maintain normal sphingolipid homeostasis when the external supply of this amino acid is limited. PMID:25903138

  17. D-Serine Is a Substrate for Neutral Amino Acid Transporters ASCT1/SLC1A4 and ASCT2/SLC1A5, and Is Transported by Both Subtypes in Rat Hippocampal Astrocyte Cultures

    PubMed Central

    Foster, Alan C.; Farnsworth, Jill; Lind, Genevieve E.; Li, Yong-Xin; Yang, Jia-Ying; Dang, Van; Penjwini, Mahmud; Viswanath, Veena; Staubli, Ursula; Kavanaugh, Michael P.

    2016-01-01

    N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptors play critical roles in synaptic transmission and plasticity. Activation of NMDA receptors by synaptically released L-glutamate also requires occupancy of co-agonist binding sites in the tetrameric receptor by either glycine or D-serine. Although D-serine appears to be the predominant co-agonist at synaptic NMDA receptors, the transport mechanisms involved in D-serine homeostasis in brain are poorly understood. In this work we show that the SLC1 amino acid transporter family members SLC1A4 (ASCT1) and SLC1A5 (ASCT2) mediate homo- and hetero-exchange of D-serine with physiologically relevant kinetic parameters. In addition, the selectivity profile of D-serine uptake in cultured rat hippocampal astrocytes is consistent with uptake mediated by both ASCT1 and ASCT2. Together these data suggest that SLC1A4 (ASCT1) may represent an important route of Na-dependent D-serine flux in the brain that has the ability to regulate extracellular D-serine and thereby NMDA receptor activity. PMID:27272177

  18. In vitro evidence that D-serine disturbs the citric acid cycle through inhibition of citrate synthase activity in rat cerebral cortex.

    PubMed

    Zanatta, Angela; Schuck, Patrícia Fernanda; Viegas, Carolina Maso; Knebel, Lisiane Aurélio; Busanello, Estela Natacha Brandt; Moura, Alana Pimentel; Wajner, Moacir

    2009-11-17

    The present work investigated the in vitro effects of D-serine (D-Ser) on important parameters of energy metabolism in cerebral cortex of young rats. The parameters analyzed were CO(2) generation from glucose and acetate, glucose uptake and the activities of the respiratory chain complexes I-IV, of the citric acid cycle enzymes citrate synthase, aconitase, isocitrate dehydrogenase, alpha-ketoglutarate dehydrogenase, succinate dehydrogenase, fumarase and malate dehydrogenase and of creatine kinase and Na(+),K(+)-ATPase. Our results show that D-Ser significantly reduced CO(2) production from acetate, but not from glucose, reflecting an impairment of the citric acid cycle function. Furthermore, D-Ser did not affect glucose uptake. We also observed that the activity of the mitochondrial enzyme citrate synthase from mitochondrial preparations and purified citrate synthase was significantly inhibited by D-Ser, whereas the other activities of the citric acid cycle as well as the activities of complexes I-III, II-III, II and IV of the respiratory chain, creatine kinase and Na(+),K(+)-ATPase were not affected by this D-amino acid. We also found that L-serine did not affect citrate synthase activity from mitochondrial preparations and purified enzyme. The data indicate that D-Ser impairs the citric acid cycle activity via citrate synthase inhibition, therefore compromising energy metabolism production in cerebral cortex of young rats. Therefore, it is presumed that this mechanism may be involved at least in part in the neurological damage found in patients affected by disorders in which D-Ser metabolism is impaired, with altered cerebral concentrations of this D-amino acid.

  19. Serine proteases of parasitic helminths.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yong; Wen, Yun jun; Cai, Ya Nan; Vallée, Isabelle; Boireau, Pascal; Liu, Ming Yuan; Cheng, Shi Peng

    2015-02-01

    Serine proteases form one of the most important families of enzymes and perform significant functions in a broad range of biological processes, such as intra- and extracellular protein metabolism, digestion, blood coagulation, regulation of development, and fertilization. A number of serine proteases have been identified in parasitic helminths that have putative roles in parasite development and nutrition, host tissues and cell invasion, anticoagulation, and immune evasion. In this review, we described the serine proteases that have been identified in parasitic helminths, including nematodes (Trichinella spiralis, T. pseudospiralis, Trichuris muris, Anisakis simplex, Ascaris suum, Onchocerca volvulus, O. lienalis, Brugia malayi, Ancylostoma caninum, and Steinernema carpocapsae), cestodes (Spirometra mansoni, Echinococcus granulosus, and Schistocephalus solidus), and trematodes (Fasciola hepatica, F. gigantica, and Schistosoma mansoni). Moreover, the possible biological functions of these serine proteases in the endogenous biological phenomena of these parasites and in the host-parasite interaction were also discussed. PMID:25748703

  20. Serine Proteases of Parasitic Helminths

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yong; Wen, Yun jun; Cai, Ya Nan; Vallée, Isabelle; Boireau, Pascal; Liu, Ming Yuan; Cheng, Shi Peng

    2015-01-01

    Serine proteases form one of the most important families of enzymes and perform significant functions in a broad range of biological processes, such as intra- and extracellular protein metabolism, digestion, blood coagulation, regulation of development, and fertilization. A number of serine proteases have been identified in parasitic helminths that have putative roles in parasite development and nutrition, host tissues and cell invasion, anticoagulation, and immune evasion. In this review, we described the serine proteases that have been identified in parasitic helminths, including nematodes (Trichinella spiralis, T. pseudospiralis, Trichuris muris, Anisakis simplex, Ascaris suum, Onchocerca volvulus, O. lienalis, Brugia malayi, Ancylostoma caninum, and Steinernema carpocapsae), cestodes (Spirometra mansoni, Echinococcus granulosus, and Schistocephalus solidus), and trematodes (Fasciola hepatica, F. gigantica, and Schistosoma mansoni). Moreover, the possible biological functions of these serine proteases in the endogenous biological phenomena of these parasites and in the host-parasite interaction were also discussed. PMID:25748703

  1. Structural Insight into Serine Protease Rv3671c that Protects M. tuberculosis from Oxidative and Acidic Stress

    SciTech Connect

    Biswas, Tapan; Small, Jennifer; Vandal, Omar; Odaira, Toshiko; Deng, Haiteng; Ehrt, Sabine; Tsodikov, Oleg V.

    2010-11-15

    Rv3671c, a putative serine protease, is crucial for persistence of Mycobacterium tuberculosis in the hostile environment of the phagosome. We show that Rv3671c is required for M. tuberculosis resistance to oxidative stress in addition to its role in protection from acidification. Structural and biochemical analyses demonstrate that the periplasmic domain of Rv3671c is a functional serine protease of the chymotrypsin family and, remarkably, that its activity increases on oxidation. High-resolution crystal structures of this protease in an active strained state and in an inactive relaxed state reveal that a solvent-exposed disulfide bond controls the protease activity by constraining two distant regions of Rv3671c and stabilizing it in the catalytically active conformation. In vitro biochemical studies confirm that activation of the protease in an oxidative environment is dependent on this reversible disulfide bond. These results suggest that the disulfide bond modulates activity of Rv3671c depending on the oxidative environment in vivo.

  2. Simultaneous and selective decarboxylation of L-serine and deamination of L-phenylalanine in an amino acid mixture--a means of separating amino acids for synthesizing biobased chemicals.

    PubMed

    Teng, Yinglai; Scott, Elinor L; Witte-van Dijk, Susan C M; Sanders, Johan P M

    2016-01-25

    Amino acids (AAs) obtained from the hydrolysis of biomass-derived proteins are interesting feedstocks for the chemical industry. They can be prepared from the byproduct of biofuel production and agricultural wastes. They are rich in functionalities needed in petrochemicals, providing the opportunity to save energy, reagents, and process steps. However, their separation is required before they can be applied for further applications. Electrodialysis (ED) is a promising separation method, but its efficiency needs to be improved when separating AAs with similar isoelectric points. Thus, specific conversions are required to form product with different charges. Here we studied the enzymatic conversions which can be used as a means to aid the ED separation of neutral AAs. A model mixture containing L-serine, L-phenylalanine and L-methionine was used. The reactions of L-serine decarboxylase and L-phenylalanine ammonia-lyase were employed to specifically convert serine and phenylalanine into ethanolamine and trans-cinnamic acid. At the isoelectric point of methionine (pH 5.74), the charge of ethanolamine and trans-cinnamic acid are +1 and -1, therefore facilitating potential separation into three different streams by electrodialysis. Here the enzyme kinetics, specificity, inhibition and the operational stabilities were studied, showing that both enzymes can be applied simultaneously to aid the ED separation of neutral AAs. PMID:25976628

  3. Simultaneous and selective decarboxylation of L-serine and deamination of L-phenylalanine in an amino acid mixture--a means of separating amino acids for synthesizing biobased chemicals.

    PubMed

    Teng, Yinglai; Scott, Elinor L; Witte-van Dijk, Susan C M; Sanders, Johan P M

    2016-01-25

    Amino acids (AAs) obtained from the hydrolysis of biomass-derived proteins are interesting feedstocks for the chemical industry. They can be prepared from the byproduct of biofuel production and agricultural wastes. They are rich in functionalities needed in petrochemicals, providing the opportunity to save energy, reagents, and process steps. However, their separation is required before they can be applied for further applications. Electrodialysis (ED) is a promising separation method, but its efficiency needs to be improved when separating AAs with similar isoelectric points. Thus, specific conversions are required to form product with different charges. Here we studied the enzymatic conversions which can be used as a means to aid the ED separation of neutral AAs. A model mixture containing L-serine, L-phenylalanine and L-methionine was used. The reactions of L-serine decarboxylase and L-phenylalanine ammonia-lyase were employed to specifically convert serine and phenylalanine into ethanolamine and trans-cinnamic acid. At the isoelectric point of methionine (pH 5.74), the charge of ethanolamine and trans-cinnamic acid are +1 and -1, therefore facilitating potential separation into three different streams by electrodialysis. Here the enzyme kinetics, specificity, inhibition and the operational stabilities were studied, showing that both enzymes can be applied simultaneously to aid the ED separation of neutral AAs.

  4. An essential role for de novo biosynthesis of L-serine in CNS development.

    PubMed

    Furuya, Shigeki

    2008-01-01

    L-serine plays a versatile role in intermediary metabolism in eukaryotic cells. The physiological significance of its de novo biosynthesis, however, remains largely unexplored. We demonstrated previously that neurons lose the ability to synthesize L-serine after their final differentiation and thus depend on astrocytes to supply this amino acid. This is due to a lack of neuronal expression of 3-phosphoglycerate dehydrogenase (Phgdh), which initiates de novo L-serine synthesis via the phosphorylated pathway from the glycolytic intermediate 3-phosphoglycerate. In rodent brain, Phgdh is expressed exclusively by the neuroepithelium/radial glia/astrocyte lineage. In humans, serine deficiency disorders can result from a deficiency of Phgdh or other enzymes involved in serine biosynthesis in the phosphorylated pathway. Patients with such disorders have lower serine levels in plasma and cerebrospinal fluid; they exhibit severe neurological symptoms including congenital microcephaly, feeding disabilities, and psychomotor retardation. L-serine supplementation can attenuate developmental defects in these patients. To define the physiological importance of de novo L-serine production, we generated Phgdh knockout mice using targeted gene disruption technique. Phgdh deletion drastically reduced serine and glycine levels in the body. Phgdh knockout mice exhibited overall growth retardation with severe brain malformation, culminating in embryonic lethality. These observations highlight the vital role of de novo L-serine synthesis in the formation and function of the mammalian central nervous system. Furthermore, the embryonic lethal phenotype of Phgdh knockouts indicates that L-serine must be synthesized endogenously in mouse (and probably humans) during embryonic development. PMID:18296366

  5. Serine 157, a retinoic acid receptor alpha residue phosphorylated by protein kinase C in vitro, is involved in RXR.RARalpha heterodimerization and transcriptional activity.

    PubMed

    Delmotte, M H; Tahayato, A; Formstecher, P; Lefebvre, P

    1999-12-31

    Retinoic acid (RA) regulation of cellular proliferation and differentiation is mediated, at least in part, through two related nuclear receptors, RAR and RXR. RA-induced modulation of gene expression leads generally to cellular differentiation, whereas stimulation of the protein kinase C (PKC) signaling pathway is associated with cellular proliferation. Pursuant to our discovery that prolonged activation of PKCs induced a strong decrease in RA responsiveness of a retinoid-inducible reporter gene, we have further investigated the connections between these two signaling pathways. We demonstrate that PKC isoforms alpha and gamma are able to phosphorylate human RARalpha (hRARalpha) in vitro on a single serine residue located in the extended DNA binding domain (T box). The introduction of a negative charge at this position (serine 157) strongly decreased hRARalpha transcriptional activity, whereas a similar mutation at other PKC consensus phosphorylation sites had no effect. The effect on transcriptional activation was correlated with a decrease in the capacity of hRARalpha to heterodimerize with hRXRalpha. Thus hRARalpha is a direct target for PKCalpha and gamma, which may control retinoid receptor transcriptional activities during cellular proliferation and differentiation.

  6. Extraterrestrial Amino Acids in Ureilites Including Almahata Sitta

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burton, A. S.; Glavin, D. P.; Callahan, M. P.; Dworkin, J. P.

    2011-01-01

    Ureilites are a class of meteorites that lack chondrules (achondrites) but have relatively high carbon abundances, averaging approx.3 wt %. Using highly sensitive liquid chromatography coupled with UV fluorescence and time-of-flight mass spectrometry (LC-FD/ToF-MS), it was recently determined that there are amino acids in. fragment 94 of the Almahata Sitta ureilite[l]. Based on the presence of amino acids that are rare in the Earth's biosphere, as well as the near-racemic enantiomeric ratios of marry of the more common amino acids, it was concluded that most of the detected amino acids were indigenous to the meteorite. Although the composition of the Almahata Sitta ureilite appears to be unlike other recovered ureilites, the discovery of amino acids in this meteorite raises the question of whether other ureilites rnav also contain amino acids. Herein we present the results of LC-FDlTo.F-MS analyses of: a sand sample from the Almahata Sitta strewn held, Almahata Sitta fragments 425 (an ordinary H5 chondrite) and 427 (ureilite), as well as an Antarctic ureilite (Allan lulls, ALHA 77257).

  7. Cleavage of peptide bonds bearing ionizable amino acids at P{sub 1} by serine proteases with hydrophobic S{sub 1} pocket

    SciTech Connect

    Qasim, Mohammad A.; Song, Jikui; Markley, John L.; Laskowski, Michael

    2010-10-01

    Research highlights: {yields} Large pK shifts in ionizable groups when buried in the protein interior. {yields} Substrate dependent shifts in pH optimum for serine proteases. {yields} Lys side chain is a stronger acid in serine protease S{sub 1} pocket than Asp side chain. -- Abstract: Enzymatic hydrolysis of the synthetic substrate succinyl-Ala-Ala-Pro-Xxx-pNA (where Xxx = Leu, Asp or Lys) catalyzed by bovine chymotrypsin (CHYM) or Streptomyces griseus protease B (SGPB) has been studied at different pH values in the pH range 3-11. The pH optima for substrates having Leu, Asp, and Lys have been found to be 7.5-8.0, 5.5-6.0, and {approx}10, respectively. At the normally reported pH optimum (pH 7-8) of CHYM and SGPB, the substrate with Leu at the reactive site is more than 25,000-fold more reactive than that with Asp. However, when fully protonated, Asp is nearly as good a substrate as Leu. The pK values of the side chains of Asp and Lys in the hydrophobic S{sub 1} pocket of CHYM and SGPB have been calculated from pH-dependent hydrolysis data and have been found to be about 9 for Asp and 7.4 and 9.7 for Lys for CHYM and SGPB, respectively. The results presented in this communication suggest a possible application of CHYM like enzymes in cleaving peptide bonds contributed by acidic amino acids between pH 5 and 6.

  8. Antiradical activity of gallic acid included in lipid interphases.

    PubMed

    Salcedo, C L; Frías, M A; Cutro, A C; Nazareno, M A; Disalvo, E A

    2014-10-01

    Polyphenols are well known as antioxidant agents and by their effects on the hydration layers of lipid interphases. Among them, gallic acid and its derivatives are able to decrease the dipole potential and to act in water as a strong antioxidant. In this work we have studied both effects on lipid interphases in monolayers and bilayers of dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine. The results show that gallic acid (GA) increases the negative surface charges of large unilamellar vesicles (LUVs) and decreases the dipole potential of the lipid interphase. As a result, positively charged radical species such as ABTS(+) are able to penetrate the membrane forming an association with GA. These results allow discussing the antiradical activity (ARA) of GA at the membrane phase which may be taking place in water spaces between the lipids.

  9. D-Serine and Serine Racemase Are Associated with PSD-95 and Glutamatergic Synapse Stability

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Hong; Jacobi, Ariel A.; Anderson, Stewart A.; Lynch, David R.

    2016-01-01

    D-serine is an endogenous coagonist at the glycine site of synaptic NMDA receptors (NMDARs), synthesized by serine racemase (SR) through conversion of L-serine. It is crucial for synaptic plasticity and is implicated in schizophrenia. Our previous studies demonstrated specific loss of SR, D-serine-responsive synaptic NMDARs, and glutamatergic synapses in cortical neurons lacking α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors, which promotes glutamatergic synapse formation and maturation during development. We thus hypothesize that D-serine and SR (D-serine/SR) are associated with glutamatergic synaptic development. Using morphological and molecular studies in cortical neuronal cultures, we demonstrate that D-serine/SR are associated with PSD-95 and NMDARs in postsynaptic neurons and with glutamatergic synapse stability during synaptic development. Endogenous D-serine and SR colocalize with PSD-95, but not presynaptic vesicular glutamate transporter 1 (VGLUT1), in glutamatergic synapses of cultured cortical neurons. Low-density astrocytes in cortical neuronal cultures lack SR expression but contain enriched D-serine in large vesicle-like structures, suggesting possible synthesis of D-serine in postsynaptic neurons and storage in astrocytes. More interestingly, endogenous D-serine and SR colocalize with PSD-95 in the postsynaptic terminals of glutamatergic synapses during early and late synaptic development, implicating involvement of D-serine/SR in glutamatergic synaptic development. Exogenous application of D-serine enhances the interactions of SR with PSD-95 and NR1, and increases the number of VGLUT1- and PSD-95-positive glutamatergic synapses, suggesting that exogenous D-serine enhances postsynaptic SR/PSD-95 signaling and stabilizes glutamatergic synapses during cortical synaptic development. This is blocked by NMDAR antagonist 2-amino-5-phosphonopentanoic acid (AP5) and 7-chlorokynurenic acid (7-CK), a specific antagonist at the glycine site of NMDARs, demonstrating

  10. Novel 2-oxoimidazolidine-4-carboxylic acid derivatives as Hepatitis C virus NS3-4A serine protease inhibitors: synthesis, activity, and X-ray crystal structure of an enzyme inhibitor complex

    SciTech Connect

    Arasappan, Ashok; Njoroge, F. George; Parekh, Tejal N.; Yang, Xiaozheng; Pichardo, John; Butkiewicz, Nancy; Prongay, Andrew; Yao, Nanhua; Girijavallabhan, Viyyoor

    2008-06-30

    Synthesis and HCV NS3 serine protease inhibitory activity of some novel 2-oxoimidazolidine-4-carboxylic acid derivatives are reported. Inhibitors derived from this new P2 core exhibited activity in the low {micro}M range. X-ray structure of an inhibitor, 15c bound to the protease is presented.

  11. Regulating levels of the neuromodulator d-serine in human brain: structural insight into pLG72 and d-amino acid oxidase interaction.

    PubMed

    Birolo, Leila; Sacchi, Silvia; Smaldone, Giovanni; Molla, Gianluca; Leo, Gabriella; Caldinelli, Laura; Pirone, Luciano; Eliometri, Patrick; Di Gaetano, Sonia; Orefice, Ida; Pedone, Emilia; Pucci, Piero; Pollegioni, Loredano

    2016-09-01

    The human flavoenzyme d-amino acid oxidase (hDAAO) degrades the NMDA-receptor modulator d-serine in the brain. Although hDAAO has been extensively characterized, little is known about its main modulator pLG72, a small protein encoded by the primate-specific gene G72 that has been associated with schizophrenia susceptibility. pLG72 interacts with neosynthesized hDAAO, promoting its inactivation and degradation. In this work, we used low-resolution techniques to characterize the surface topology of the hDAAO-pLG72 complex. By using limited proteolysis coupled to mass spectrometry, we could map the exposed regions in the two proteins after complex formation and highlighted an increased sensitivity to proteolysis of hDAAO in complex with pLG72. Cross-linking experiments by using bis(sulfosuccinimidyl)suberate identified the single covalent bond between T182 in hDAAO and K62 in pLG72. In order to validate the designed mode of interaction, three pLG72 variants incrementally truncated at the C terminus, in addition to a form lacking the 71 N-terminal residues, were produced. All variants were dimeric, folded, and interacted with hDAAO. The strongest decrease in affinity for hDAAO (as well as for the hydrophobic drug chlorpromazine) was apparent for the N-terminally deleted pLG72(72-153) form, which lacked K62. On the other hand, eliminating the disordered C-terminal tail yielded a more stable pLG72 protein, improved the binding to hDAAO, although giving lower enzyme inhibition. Elucidation of the mode of hDAAO-pLG72 interaction now makes it possible to design novel molecules that, by targeting the protein complex, can be therapeutically advantageous for diseases related to impairment in d-serine metabolism.

  12. In Vivo d-Serine Hetero-Exchange through Alanine-Serine-Cysteine (ASC) Transporters Detected by Microelectrode Biosensors

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    d-Serine, a co-agonist of N-methyl d-aspartate (NMDA) receptors, has been implicated in neurological and psychiatric disorders such as cerebral ischemia, lateral amyotrophic sclerosis, or schizophrenia. d-Serine signaling represents an important pharmacological target for treating these diseases; however, the biochemical mechanisms controlling extracellular d-serine levels in vivo are still unclear. d-Serine heteroexchange through small neutral amino acid transporters has been shown in cell cultures and brain slices and could provide a biochemical mechanism for the control of d-serine extracellular concentration in vivo. Alternatively, exocytotic d-serine release has also been proposed. In this study, the dynamics of d-serine release and clearance were explored in vivo on a second-by-second time scale using microelectrode biosensors. The rate of d-serine clearance in the rat frontal cortex after a microionophoretic injection revealed a transporter-mediated uptake mechanism. d-Serine uptake was blocked by small neutral l-amino acids, implicating alanine-serine-cysteine (ASC) transporters, in particular high affinity Asc-1 and low affinity ASCT2 transporters. Interestingly, changes in alanine, serine, or threonine levels resulted in d-serine release through ASC transporters. Asc-1, but not ASCT2, appeared to release d-serine in response to changes in amino acid concentrations. Finally, neuronal silencing by tetrodotoxin increased d-serine extracellular concentration by an ASC-transporter-dependent mechanism. Together, these results indicate that d-serine heteroexchange through ASC transporters is present in vivo and may constitute a key component in the regulation of d-serine extracellular concentration. PMID:23581544

  13. Phosphorylation of Simian Cytomegalovirus Assembly Protein Precursor (pAPNG.5) and Proteinase Precursor (pAPNG1): Multiple Attachment Sites Identified, Including Two Adjacent Serines in a Casein Kinase II Consensus Sequence

    PubMed Central

    Plafker, Scott M.; Woods, Amina S.; Gibson, Wade

    1999-01-01

    The assembly protein precursor (pAP) of cytomegalovirus (CMV), and its homologs in other herpesviruses, functions at several key steps during the process of capsid formation. This protein, and the genetically related maturational proteinase, is distinguished from the other capsid proteins by posttranslational modifications, including phosphorylation. The objective of this study was to identify sites at which pAP is phosphorylated so that the functional significance of this modification and the enzyme(s) responsible for it can be determined. In the work reported here, we used peptide mapping, mass spectrometry, and site-directed mutagenesis to identify two sets of pAP phosphorylation sites. One is a casein kinase II (CKII) consensus sequence that contains two adjacent serines, both of which are phosphorylated. The other site(s) is in a different domain of the protein, is phosphorylated less frequently than the CKII site, does not require preceding CKII-site phosphorylation, and causes an electrophoretic mobility shift when phosphorylated. Transfection/expression assays for proteolytic activity showed no gross effect of CKII-site phosphorylation on the enzymatic activity of the proteinase or on the substrate behavior of pAP. Evidence is presented that both the CKII sites and the secondary sites are phosphorylated in virus-infected cells and plasmid-transfected cells, indicating that these modifications can be made by a cellular enzyme(s). Apparent compartmental differences in phosphorylation of the CKII-site (cytoplasmic) and secondary-site (nuclear) serines suggest the involvement of more that one enzyme in these modifications. PMID:10516011

  14. Purification and characterization of a new serine proteinase from Bacillus subtilis with specificity for amino acids at P1 and P2 positions.

    PubMed

    Yamagata, A; Yoshida, N; Noda, K; Ito, A

    1995-12-01

    A proteinase was purified 230-fold to apparent homogeneity from culture filtrates of Bacillus subtilis by a series of column chromatographies on DE52, DEAE-Toyopearl, Cellulofine GC200M, and Mono-Q, using Boc-Ala-Ala-Pro-Ser-pNA as a substrate. The molecular weight of the proteinase was estimated to be 42,000 by SDS-PAGE in the presence of 2-mercaptoethanol. Studies on the substrate specificity with peptide p-nitroanilides and natural peptides revealed that this proteinase preferentially hydrolyzed the peptide bond on the carboxyl-terminal side of either serine or alanine residues at the P1 position and hydrophobic bulky amino acids at P2. It was most active at pH 9.5 for the hydrolysis of Boc-Ala-Ala-Pro-Ser-pNA. The enzyme was inactivated by diisopropyl fluorophosphate (DFP), but not by tosyl-L-phenylalanine chloromethylketone (TPCK) or by EDTA. Based on the reactivity toward substrates and inhibitors, this enzyme differs from elastase- or subtilisin-like proteinase, hence it is a new type of proteinase with specificity for amino acids at P1 and P2 positions. PMID:8519806

  15. Abnormal presence of the matrix extracellular phosphoglycoprotein-derived acidic serine- and aspartate-rich motif peptide in human hypophosphatemic dentin.

    PubMed

    Boukpessi, Tchilalo; Gaucher, Celine; Léger, Thibaut; Salmon, Benjamin; Le Faouder, Julie; Willig, Cyril; Rowe, Peter S; Garabédian, Michèle; Meilhac, Olivier; Chaussain, Catherine

    2010-08-01

    Severe dental troubles are associated with X-linked hypophosphatemic rickets and are mainly related to impaired dentin mineralization. In dentin matrix, matrix extracellular phosphoglycoprotein (MEPE) may be protected from proteolysis by a specific interaction with PHEX (phosphate regulating gene with homologies to endopeptidases on the X chromosome). The objective of our work was to determine whether PHEX impairment induces MEPE cleavage in dentin and the subsequent release of the C-terminal acidic serine- and aspartate-rich motif (ASARM) peptide, which is known to inhibit mineralization. By Western blot analysis, we explored dentin extracts from seven hypophosphatemic patients with mutations of the PHEX gene. A proteomic approach combining immunoprecipitation, surface-enhanced laser desorption/ionization-time of flight-mass spectrometry and matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight analysis of the samples completed this exploration. This study shows a 4.1-kDa peptide containing the MEPE-derived ASARM peptide in hypophosphatemic samples. The presence of ASARM was less marked in patients treated with 1-hydroxylated vitamin D and phosphate during growth. Moreover, recombinant ASARM implanted in a rat pulp injury model disturbed the formation of the reparative dentin bridge. These results suggest that abnormal MEPE cleavage occurs when PHEX activity is deficient in humans, the ASARM peptide may be involved in the mineralization defects and the PHEX-MEPE interaction may be indirect, as ensuring a better phosphate and vitamin D environment to the mineralizing dentin prevents MEPE cleavage.

  16. Crystal growth and preliminary X-ray study of glutamic acid specific serine protease from Bacillus intermedius

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuranova, I. P.; Blagova, E. V.; Levdikov, V. M.; Rudenskaya, G. N.; Balaban, N. P.; Shakirov, E. V.

    1999-01-01

    The glutamic acid specific protease (glutamyl-endopeptidase) from Bacillus intermedius, strain 3-19, was isolated and purified using ion exchange chromatography on CM-cellulose and Mono-S FPLC column. The conditions for crystallization of the enzyme have been discussed. The crystals of enzyme were grown using hanging-drop vapor-diffusion technique. Crystals belong to the space group C2 with unit cell parameters of a=61.62 Å, b=55.84 Å, c=60.40 Å, β=117.6° X-ray diffraction data to 1.68 Å resolution were collected using synchrotron radiation (EMBL, Hamburg) and an imaging plate scanner.

  17. Urinary loss of glucose, phosphate, and protein by diffusion into proximal straight tubules injured by D-serine and maleic acid

    SciTech Connect

    Carone, F.A.; Nakamura, S.; Goldman, B.

    1985-06-01

    In several models of acute renal failure leakage of glomerular filtrate out of the tubule is an important pathogenetic mechanism; however, bidirectional diffusion of solute to account for certain pathophysiologic features of acute renal failure has received meager attention. Using micropuncture and clearance methods, the authors assessed sequentially leakage of solutes and inulin across proximal straight tubules (PST) injured by two nephrotoxins. In d-serine-treated rats with extensive necrosis of PST, the basis for glucosuria and tubular leakage of inulin was studied. Glucose absorption by the proximal convoluted tubule and glucose delivery to the PST were normal, but glucose delivery to the distal tubule was increased nearly 8-fold, indicating diffusion of glucose from interstitial to tubular luminal fluid across the necrotic PST. Total kidney inulin clearance was greatly reduced, but single nephron glomerular filtration rate, based on proximal convoluted tubule samples, was normal, indicating tubular loss of inulin. Urinary recovery of (/sup 14/C)inulin infused into tubular lumina revealed that proximal convoluted tubule and distal tubule were impermeable to inulin and that inulin diffused out of the necrotic PST. The progressive return over 6 days of tubular impermeability for inulin correlated with relining of PST with new cells. In maleic acid-treated rats the site and extent of tubular necrosis and the nature of urinary loss of solutes were studied. Microdissection revealed that maleic acid caused limited necrosis of PST which averaged 7.4% of total proximal tubular length. Increased urinary excretion of protein, phosphate, and glucose and increased tubular permeability to microinfused (/sup 14/C)inulin occurred with the onset of PST necrosis, and return of these abnormalities to normal correlated with the degree of cellular repair of the PST.

  18. Catalysis of the Carbonylation of Alcohols to Carboxylic Acids Including Acetic Acid Synthesis from Methanol.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Forster, Denis; DeKleva, Thomas W.

    1986-01-01

    Monsanto's highly successful synthesis of acetic acid from methanol and carbon monoxide illustrates use of new starting materials to replace pretroleum-derived ethylene. Outlines the fundamental aspects of the acetic acid process and suggests ways of extending the synthesis to higher carboxylic acids. (JN)

  19. D-serine transporter in Staphylococcus saprophyticus identified.

    PubMed

    Marlinghaus, Lennart; Huß, Melanie; Korte-Berwanger, Miriam; Sakinc-Güler, Türkan; Gatermann, Sören G

    2016-07-01

    Among staphylococci Staphylococcus saprophyticus is the only species that is typically uropathogenic and an important cause of urinary tract infections in young women. The amino acid D-serine occurs in relatively high concentrations in human urine and has a bacteriostatic or toxic effect on many bacteria. In uropathogenic Escherichia coli and S. saprophyticus, the amino acid regulates the expression of virulence factors and can be used as a nutrient. The ability of uropathogens to respond to or to metabolize D-serine has been suggested as a factor that enables colonization of the urinary tract. Until now nothing is known about D-serine transport in S. saprophyticus We generated mutants of putative transporter genes in S. saprophyticus 7108 that show homology to the D-serine transporter cycA of E. coli and tested them in a D-serine depletion assay to analyze the D-serine uptake rate of the cells. The mutant of SPP1070 showed a strong decrease in D-serine uptake. Therefore, SSP1070 was identified as a major D-serine transporter in S. saprophyticus 7108 and was named D-serine transporter A (DstA). D-serine caused a prolonged lag phase of S. saprophyticus in a chemically defined medium. This negative effect was dependent on the presence of DstA.

  20. D-serine transporter in Staphylococcus saprophyticus identified.

    PubMed

    Marlinghaus, Lennart; Huß, Melanie; Korte-Berwanger, Miriam; Sakinc-Güler, Türkan; Gatermann, Sören G

    2016-07-01

    Among staphylococci Staphylococcus saprophyticus is the only species that is typically uropathogenic and an important cause of urinary tract infections in young women. The amino acid D-serine occurs in relatively high concentrations in human urine and has a bacteriostatic or toxic effect on many bacteria. In uropathogenic Escherichia coli and S. saprophyticus, the amino acid regulates the expression of virulence factors and can be used as a nutrient. The ability of uropathogens to respond to or to metabolize D-serine has been suggested as a factor that enables colonization of the urinary tract. Until now nothing is known about D-serine transport in S. saprophyticus We generated mutants of putative transporter genes in S. saprophyticus 7108 that show homology to the D-serine transporter cycA of E. coli and tested them in a D-serine depletion assay to analyze the D-serine uptake rate of the cells. The mutant of SPP1070 showed a strong decrease in D-serine uptake. Therefore, SSP1070 was identified as a major D-serine transporter in S. saprophyticus 7108 and was named D-serine transporter A (DstA). D-serine caused a prolonged lag phase of S. saprophyticus in a chemically defined medium. This negative effect was dependent on the presence of DstA. PMID:27252156

  1. Factor D of the alternative pathway of human complement. Purification, alignment and N-terminal amino acid sequences of the major cyanogen bromide fragments, and localization of the serine residue at the active site.

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, D M; Gagnon, J; Reid, K B

    1980-01-01

    The serine esterase factor D of the complement system was purified from outdated human plasma with a yield of 20% of the initial haemolytic activity found in serum. This represented an approx. 60 000-fold purification. The final product was homogeneous as judged by sodium dodecyl sulphate/polyacrylamide-gel electrophoresis (with an apparent mol.wt. of 24 000), its migration as a single component in a variety of fractionation procedures based on size and charge, and its N-terminal amino-acid-sequence analysis. The N-terminal amino acid sequence of the first 36 residues of the intact molecule was found to be homologous with the N-terminal amino acid sequences of the catalytic chains of other serine esterases. Factor D showed an especially strong homology (greater than 60% identity) with rat 'group-specific protease' [Woodbury, Katunuma, Kobayashi, Titani, & Neurath (1978) Biochemistry 17, 811-819] over the first 16 amino acid residues. This similarity is of interest since it is considered that both enzymes may be synthesized in their active, rather than zymogen, forms. The three major CNBr fragments of factor D, which had apparent mol.wts. of 15 800, 6600 and 1700, were purified and then aligned by N-terminal amino acid sequence analysis and amino acid analysis. By using factor D labelled with di-[1,3-14C]isopropylphosphofluoridate it was shown that the CNBr fragment of apparent mol.wt. 6600, which is located in the C-terminal region of factor D, contained the active serine residue. The amino acid sequence around this residue was determined. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 2. PMID:6821372

  2. Arabidopsis 56–Amino Acid Serine Palmitoyltransferase-Interacting Proteins Stimulate Sphingolipid Synthesis, Are Essential, and Affect Mycotoxin Sensitivity[W][OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Kimberlin, Athen N.; Majumder, Saurav; Han, Gongshe; Chen, Ming; Cahoon, Rebecca E.; Stone, Julie M.; Dunn, Teresa M.; Cahoon, Edgar B.

    2013-01-01

    Maintenance of sphingolipid homeostasis is critical for cell growth and programmed cell death (PCD). Serine palmitoyltransferase (SPT), composed of LCB1 and LCB2 subunits, catalyzes the primary regulatory point for sphingolipid synthesis. Small subunits of SPT (ssSPT) that strongly stimulate SPT activity have been identified in mammals, but the role of ssSPT in eukaryotic cells is unclear. Candidate Arabidopsis thaliana ssSPTs, ssSPTa and ssSPTb, were identified and characterized. Expression of these 56–amino acid polypeptides in a Saccharomyces cerevisiae SPT null mutant stimulated SPT activity from the Arabidopsis LCB1/LCB2 heterodimer by >100-fold through physical interaction with LCB1/LCB2. ssSPTa transcripts were more enriched in all organs and >400-fold more abundant in pollen than ssSPTb transcripts. Accordingly, homozygous ssSPTa T-DNA mutants were not recoverable, and 50% nonviable pollen was detected in heterozygous ssspta mutants. Pollen viability was recovered by expression of wild-type ssSPTa or ssSPTb under control of the ssSPTa promoter, indicating ssSPTa and ssSPTb functional redundancy. SPT activity and sensitivity to the PCD-inducing mycotoxin fumonisin B1 (FB1) were increased by ssSPTa overexpression. Conversely, SPT activity and FB1 sensitivity were reduced in ssSPTa RNA interference lines. These results demonstrate that ssSPTs are essential for male gametophytes, are important for FB1 sensitivity, and limit sphingolipid synthesis in planta. PMID:24214397

  3. Serine deprivation enhances antineoplastic activity of biguanides.

    PubMed

    Gravel, Simon-Pierre; Hulea, Laura; Toban, Nader; Birman, Elena; Blouin, Marie-José; Zakikhani, Mahvash; Zhao, Yunhua; Topisirovic, Ivan; St-Pierre, Julie; Pollak, Michael

    2014-12-15

    Metformin, a biguanide widely used in the treatment of type II diabetes, clearly exhibits antineoplastic activity in experimental models and has been reported to reduce cancer incidence in diabetics. There are ongoing clinical trials to evaluate its antitumor properties, which may relate to its fundamental activity as an inhibitor of oxidative phosphorylation. Here, we show that serine withdrawal increases the antineoplastic effects of phenformin (a potent biguanide structurally related to metformin). Serine synthesis was not inhibited by biguanides. Instead, metabolic studies indicated a requirement for serine to allow cells to compensate for biguanide-induced decrease in oxidative phosphorylation by upregulating glycolysis. Furthermore, serine deprivation modified the impact of metformin on the relative abundance of metabolites within the citric acid cycle. In mice, a serine-deficient diet reduced serine levels in tumors and significantly enhanced the tumor growth-inhibitory actions of biguanide treatment. Our results define a dietary manipulation that can enhance the efficacy of biguanides as antineoplastic agents that target cancer cell energy metabolism.

  4. Polymerase chain reaction system using magnetic beads for analyzing a sample that includes nucleic acid

    DOEpatents

    Nasarabadi, Shanavaz

    2011-01-11

    A polymerase chain reaction system for analyzing a sample containing nucleic acid includes providing magnetic beads; providing a flow channel having a polymerase chain reaction chamber, a pre polymerase chain reaction magnet position adjacent the polymerase chain reaction chamber, and a post pre polymerase magnet position adjacent the polymerase chain reaction chamber. The nucleic acid is bound to the magnetic beads. The magnetic beads with the nucleic acid flow to the pre polymerase chain reaction magnet position in the flow channel. The magnetic beads and the nucleic acid are washed with ethanol. The nucleic acid in the polymerase chain reaction chamber is amplified. The magnetic beads and the nucleic acid are separated into a waste stream containing the magnetic beads and a post polymerase chain reaction mix containing the nucleic acid. The reaction mix containing the nucleic acid flows to an analysis unit in the channel for analysis.

  5. Relative utilization of serine and glycine by chicks.

    PubMed

    Featherston, W R

    1975-01-01

    Studies were conducted on the relative utilizaiton of glycine and serine by chicks fed basal crystalline amino acid diets devoid of these amino acids. The crystalline amino acid mixture was fed at one and three times the requirement levels, thereby stimulating uric acid synthesis at differing rates. In addition, 5 per cent L-glutamine replaced L-glutamic acid on an isonitrogenous basis in three diets containing normal levels of amino acids in the second study. Chicks fed diets devoid of glycine and serine grew less rapidly and less efficiently than chicks fed diets containing either serine or glycine plus serine. These decreases were roughly the same whether the diet contained normal or high levels of amino acids. Serine was as efficient as glycine in supporting chick growth and feed efficiency regardless of whether diets containing normal or high levels of amino acids were fed. Chicks fed diets containing high levels of amino acids grew approximately 81 per cent as rapidly, but 24 per cent more efficiently, than chicks fed normal levels of amino acids, and excreted approximately twice the amount of uric acid per gram of nitrogen consumed. In spite of increased uric acid excretion by chicks fed the high amino acid diets, the dietary void in glycine and serine was no more detrimental to chick growth or feed efficiency than that noted when normal levels of amino acids were fed. Feeding 5 per cent L-glutamine rather than L-glutamic acid in the diet containing normal levels of amino acids had little effect on weight gain, feed efficiency or uric acid excretion. The absence of cystine from the amino acid mixture used in the third study did not have a marked influence on the relative utilization of glycine and serine by the chick. PMID:1169769

  6. Serine incorporation into the selenocysteine moiety of glutathione peroxidase

    SciTech Connect

    Sunde, R.A.; Evenson, J.K.

    1987-01-15

    The selenium in mammalian glutathione peroxidase is present as a selenocysteine ((Se)Cys) moiety incorporated into the peptide backbone 41-47 residues from the N-terminal end. To study the origin of the skeleton of the (Se)Cys moiety, we perfused isolated rat liver with /sup 14/C- or /sup 3/H-labeled amino acids for 4 h, purified the GSH peroxidase, derivatized the (Se)Cys in GSH peroxidase to carboxymethylselenocysteine ((Se)Cys(Cm)), and determined the amino acid specific activity. Perfusion with (/sup 14/C)cystine resulted in (/sup 14/C)cystine incorporation into GSH peroxidase without labeling (Se)Cys(Cm), indicating that cysteine is not a direct precursor for (Se)Cys. (/sup 14/C)Serine perfusion labeled serine, glycine (the serine hydroxymethyltransferase product), and (Se)Cys(Cm) in purified GSH peroxidase, whereas (3-3H)serine perfusion only labeled serine and (Se)Cys(Cm), thus demonstrating that the (Se)Cys in GSH peroxidase is derived from serine. The similar specific activities of serine and (Se)Cys(Cm) strongly suggest that the precursor pool of serine used for (Se) Cys synthesis is the same or similar to the serine pool used for acylation of seryl-tRNAs.

  7. Structural basis of metallo-β-lactamase, serine-β-lactamase and penicillin-binding protein inhibition by cyclic boronates.

    PubMed

    Brem, Jürgen; Cain, Ricky; Cahill, Samuel; McDonough, Michael A; Clifton, Ian J; Jiménez-Castellanos, Juan-Carlos; Avison, Matthew B; Spencer, James; Fishwick, Colin W G; Schofield, Christopher J

    2016-01-01

    β-Lactamases enable resistance to almost all β-lactam antibiotics. Pioneering work revealed that acyclic boronic acids can act as 'transition state analogue' inhibitors of nucleophilic serine enzymes, including serine-β-lactamases. Here we report biochemical and biophysical analyses revealing that cyclic boronates potently inhibit both nucleophilic serine and zinc-dependent β-lactamases by a mechanism involving mimicking of the common tetrahedral intermediate. Cyclic boronates also potently inhibit the non-essential penicillin-binding protein PBP 5 by the same mechanism of action. The results open the way for development of dual action inhibitors effective against both serine- and metallo-β-lactamases, and which could also have antimicrobial activity through inhibition of PBPs. PMID:27499424

  8. Structural basis of metallo-β-lactamase, serine-β-lactamase and penicillin-binding protein inhibition by cyclic boronates

    PubMed Central

    Brem, Jürgen; Cain, Ricky; Cahill, Samuel; McDonough, Michael A.; Clifton, Ian J.; Jiménez-Castellanos, Juan-Carlos; Avison, Matthew B.; Spencer, James; Fishwick, Colin W. G.; Schofield, Christopher J.

    2016-01-01

    β-Lactamases enable resistance to almost all β-lactam antibiotics. Pioneering work revealed that acyclic boronic acids can act as ‘transition state analogue' inhibitors of nucleophilic serine enzymes, including serine-β-lactamases. Here we report biochemical and biophysical analyses revealing that cyclic boronates potently inhibit both nucleophilic serine and zinc-dependent β-lactamases by a mechanism involving mimicking of the common tetrahedral intermediate. Cyclic boronates also potently inhibit the non-essential penicillin-binding protein PBP 5 by the same mechanism of action. The results open the way for development of dual action inhibitors effective against both serine- and metallo-β-lactamases, and which could also have antimicrobial activity through inhibition of PBPs. PMID:27499424

  9. Structural basis of metallo-β-lactamase, serine-β-lactamase and penicillin-binding protein inhibition by cyclic boronates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brem, Jürgen; Cain, Ricky; Cahill, Samuel; McDonough, Michael A.; Clifton, Ian J.; Jiménez-Castellanos, Juan-Carlos; Avison, Matthew B.; Spencer, James; Fishwick, Colin W. G.; Schofield, Christopher J.

    2016-08-01

    β-Lactamases enable resistance to almost all β-lactam antibiotics. Pioneering work revealed that acyclic boronic acids can act as `transition state analogue' inhibitors of nucleophilic serine enzymes, including serine-β-lactamases. Here we report biochemical and biophysical analyses revealing that cyclic boronates potently inhibit both nucleophilic serine and zinc-dependent β-lactamases by a mechanism involving mimicking of the common tetrahedral intermediate. Cyclic boronates also potently inhibit the non-essential penicillin-binding protein PBP 5 by the same mechanism of action. The results open the way for development of dual action inhibitors effective against both serine- and metallo-β-lactamases, and which could also have antimicrobial activity through inhibition of PBPs.

  10. Un-catalyzed peptide bond formation between two monomers of glycine, alanine, serine, threonine, and aspartic acid in gas phase: a density functional theory study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhunia, Snehasis; Singh, Ajeet; Ojha, Animesh K.

    2016-05-01

    In the present report, un-catalyzed peptide bond formation between two monomers of glycine (Gly), alanine (Ala), serine (Ser), threonine (Thr), and aspartic acid (Asp) has been investigated in gas phase via two steps reaction mechanism and concerted mechanism at B3LYP/6-31G(d,p) and M062X/6-31G(d,p) level of theories. The peptide bond is formed through a nucleophilic reaction via transition states, TS1 and TS2 in stepwise mechanism. The TS1 reveals formation of a new C-N bond while TS2 illustrate the formation of C=O bond. In case of concerted mechanism, C-N bond is formed by a single four-centre transition state (TS3). The energy barrier is used to explain the involvement of energy at each step of the reaction. The energy barrier (20-48 kcal/mol) is required for the transformation of reactant state R1 to TS1 state and intermediate state I1 to TS2 state. The large value of energy barrier is explained in terms of distortion and interaction energies for stepwise mechanism. The energy barrier of TS3 in concerted mechanism is very close to the energy barrier of the first transition state (TS1) of the stepwise mechanism for the formation of Gly-Gly and Ala-Ala di- peptide. However, in case of Ser-Ser, Thr-Thr and Asp-Asp di-peptide, the energy barrier of TS3 is relatively high than that of the energy barrier of TS1 calculated at B3LYP/6-31G(d,p) and M062X/6-31G(d,p) level of theories. In both the mechanisms, the value of energy barrier calculated at B3LYP/6-31G(d,p) level of theory is greater than that of the value calculated at M062X/6-31G(d,p) level of theory.

  11. Simultaneous analysis of D-alanine, D-aspartic acid, and D-serine using chiral high-performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry and its application to the rat plasma and tissues.

    PubMed

    Karakawa, Sachise; Shimbo, Kazutaka; Yamada, Naoyuki; Mizukoshi, Toshimi; Miyano, Hiroshi; Mita, Masashi; Lindner, Wolfgang; Hamase, Kenji

    2015-11-10

    A highly sensitive and selective chiral LC-MS/MS method for D-alanine, D-aspartic acid and D-serine has been developed using the precolumn derivatization reagents, 6-aminoquinolyl-N-hydroxysuccinimidyl carbamate (AccQ-Tag) or p-N,N,N-trimethylammonioanilyl N'-hydroxysuccinimidyl carbamate iodide (TAHS). The thus N-tagged enantiomers of the derivatized amino acids were nicely separated within 20min using the cinchona alkaloid-based zwittterionic ion-exchange type enantioselective column, Chiralpak ZWIX(+). The selected reaction monitoring was applied for detecting the target d-amino acids in biological matrices. By using the present chiral LC-MS/MS method, the three d-amino acids and their l-forms could be simultaneously determined in the range of 0.1-500nmol/mL. Finally, the technique was successfully applied to rat plasma and tissue samples.

  12. Cloning, expression and activity analysis of a novel fibrinolytic serine protease from Arenicola cristata

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Chunling; Ju, Jiyu

    2015-06-01

    The full-length cDNA of a protease gene from a marine annelid Arenicola cristata was amplified through rapid amplification of cDNA ends technique and sequenced. The size of the cDNA was 936 bp in length, including an open reading frame encoding a polypeptide of 270 amino acid residues. The deduced amino acid sequnce consisted of pro- and mature sequences. The protease belonged to the serine protease family because it contained the highly conserved sequence GDSGGP. This protease was novel as it showed a low amino acid sequence similarity (< 40%) to other serine proteases. The gene encoding the active form of A. cristata serine protease was cloned and expressed in E. coli. Purified recombinant protease in a supernatant could dissolve an artificial fibrin plate with plasminogen-rich fibrin, whereas the plasminogen-free fibrin showed no clear zone caused by hydrolysis. This result suggested that the recombinant protease showed an indirect fibrinolytic activity of dissolving fibrin, and was probably a plasminogen activator. A rat model with venous thrombosis was established to demonstrate that the recombinant protease could also hydrolyze blood clot in vivo. Therefore, this recombinant protease may be used as a thrombolytic agent for thrombosis treatment. To our knowledge, this study is the first of reporting the fibrinolytic serine protease gene in A. cristata.

  13. Revealing the multiple structures of serine

    PubMed Central

    Blanco, Susana; Sanz, M. Eugenia; López, Juan C.; Alonso, José L.

    2007-01-01

    We explored the conformational landscape of the proteinogenic amino acid serine [CH2OHCH(NH2)COOH] in the gas phase. Solid serine was vaporized by laser ablation, expanded in a supersonic jet, and characterized by Fourier transform microwave spectroscopy. In the isolation conditions of the jet there have been discovered up to seven different neutral (non-zwitterionic) structures of serine, which are conclusively identified by the comparison between the experimental values of the rotational and quadrupole coupling constants with those predicted by ab initio calculations. These seven forms can serve as a basis to represent the shape of serine in the gas phase. From the postexpansion abundances we derived the conformational stability trend, which is controlled by the subtle network of intramolecular hydrogen bonds formed between the polar groups in the amino acid backbone and the hydroxy side chain. It is proposed that conformational cooling perturbs the equilibrium conformational distribution; thus, some of the lower-energy forms are “missing” in the supersonic expansion. PMID:18077350

  14. Effect of omega-3 fatty acids on the modification of erythrocyte membrane fatty acid content including oleic acid in peritoneal dialysis patients.

    PubMed

    An, W S; Lee, S M; Son, Y K; Kim, S E; Kim, K H; Han, J Y; Bae, H R; Park, Y

    2012-01-01

    Erythrocyte membrane fatty acids (FA), such as oleic acid, are related to acute coronary syndrome. There is no report about the effect of omega-3 FA on oleic acid in peritoneal dialysis (PD) patients. We hypothesized that omega-3 FA can modify erythrocyte membrane FA, including oleic acid, in PD patients. In a double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled study, 18 patients who were treated with PD for at least 6 months were randomized to treatment for 12 weeks with omega-3 FA or placebo. Erythrocyte membrane FA content was measured by gas chromatography at baseline and after 12 weeks. The erythrocyte membrane content of eicosapentaenoic acid and docosahexaenoic acid was significantly increased and saturated FA and oleic acid were significantly decreased in the omega-3 FA supplementation group after 12 weeks compared to baseline. In conclusion, erythrocyte membrane FA content, including oleic acid, was significantly modified by omega-3 FA supplementation for 12 weeks in PD patients.

  15. Bacillus thuringiensis Cry3Aa protoxin intoxication of Tenebrio molitor induces widespread changes in the expression of serine peptidase transcripts.

    PubMed

    Oppert, Brenda; Martynov, Alexander G; Elpidina, Elena N

    2012-09-01

    The yellow mealworm, Tenebrio molitor, is a pest of stored grain products and is sensitive to the Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) Cry3Aa toxin. As digestive peptidases are a determining factor in Cry toxicity and resistance, we evaluated the expression of peptidase transcripts in the midgut of T. molitor larvae fed either a control or Cry3Aa protoxin diet for 24 h (RNA-Seq), or in larvae exposed to the protoxin for 6, 12, or 24 h (microarrays). Cysteine peptidase transcripts (9) were similar to cathepsins B, L, and K, and their expression did not vary more than 2.5-fold in control and Cry3Aa-treated larvae. Serine peptidase transcripts (48) included trypsin, chymotrypsin and chymotrypsin-like, elastase 1-like, and unclassified serine peptidases, as well as homologs lacking functional amino acids. Highly expressed trypsin and chymotrypsin transcripts were severely repressed, and most serine peptidase transcripts were expressed 2- to 15-fold lower in Cry3Aa-treated larvae. Many serine peptidase and homolog transcripts were found only in control larvae. However, expression of a few serine peptidase transcripts was increased or found only in Cry3Aa-treated larvae. Therefore, Bt intoxication significantly impacted the expression of serine peptidases, potentially important in protoxin processing, while the insect maintained the production of critical digestive cysteine peptidases.

  16. Serine protease inhibitors of parasitic helminths.

    PubMed

    Molehin, Adebayo J; Gobert, Geoffrey N; McManus, Donald P

    2012-05-01

    Serine protease inhibitors (serpins) are a superfamily of structurally conserved proteins that inhibit serine proteases and play key physiological roles in numerous biological systems such as blood coagulation, complement activation and inflammation. A number of serpins have now been identified in parasitic helminths with putative involvement in immune regulation and in parasite survival through interference with the host immune response. This review describes the serpins and smapins (small serine protease inhibitors) that have been identified in Ascaris spp., Brugia malayi, Ancylostoma caninum Onchocerca volvulus, Haemonchus contortus, Trichinella spiralis, Trichostrongylus vitrinus, Anisakis simplex, Trichuris suis, Schistosoma spp., Clonorchis sinensis, Paragonimus westermani and Echinococcus spp. and discusses their possible biological functions, including roles in host-parasite interplay and their evolutionary relationships. PMID:22310379

  17. On the phenotypic spectrum of serine biosynthesis defects.

    PubMed

    El-Hattab, Ayman W; Shaheen, Ranad; Hertecant, Jozef; Galadari, Hassan I; Albaqawi, Badi S; Nabil, Amira; Alkuraya, Fowzan S

    2016-05-01

    L-serine is a non-essential amino acid that is de novo synthesized via the enzymes phosphoglycerate dehydrogenase (PGDH), phosphoserine aminotransferase (PSAT), and phosphoserine phosphatase (PSP). Besides its role in protein synthesis, L-serine is a precursor of a number of important compounds. Serine biosynthesis defects result from deficiencies in PGDH, PSAT, or PSP and have a broad phenotypic spectrum ranging from Neu-Laxova syndrome, a lethal multiple congenital anomaly disease at the severe end to a childhood disease with intellectual disability at the mild end, with infantile growth deficiency, and severe neurological manifestations as an intermediate phenotype. In this report, we present three subjects with serine biosynthesis effects. The first was a stillbirth with Neu-Laxova syndrome and a homozygous mutation in PHGDH. The second was a neonate with growth deficiency, microcephaly, ichthyotic skin lesions, seizures, contractures, hypertonia, distinctive facial features, and a homozygous mutation in PSAT1. The third subject was an infant with growth deficiency, microcephaly, ichthyotic skin lesions, anemia, hypertonia, distinctive facial features, low serine and glycine in plasma and CSF, and a novel homozygous mutation in PHGDH gene. Herein, we also review previous reports of serine biosynthesis defects and mutations in the PHGDH, PSAT1, and PSPH genes, discuss the variability in the phenotypes associated with serine biosynthesis defects, and elaborate on the vital roles of serine and the potential consequences of its deficiency. PMID:26960553

  18. Role of eukaryotic-like serine/threonine kinases in bacterial cell division and morphogenesis.

    PubMed

    Manuse, Sylvie; Fleurie, Aurore; Zucchini, Laure; Lesterlin, Christian; Grangeasse, Christophe

    2016-01-01

    Bacteria possess a repertoire of versatile protein kinases modulating diverse aspects of their physiology by phosphorylating proteins on various amino acids including histidine, cysteine, aspartic acid, arginine, serine, threonine and tyrosine. One class of membrane serine/threonine protein kinases possesses a catalytic domain sharing a common fold with eukaryotic protein kinases and an extracellular mosaic domain found in bacteria only, named PASTA for 'Penicillin binding proteins And Serine/Threonine kinase Associated'. Over the last decade, evidence has been accumulating that these protein kinases are involved in cell division, morphogenesis and developmental processes in Firmicutes and Actinobacteria. However, observations differ from one species to another suggesting that a general mechanism of activation of their kinase activity is unlikely and that species-specific regulation of cell division is at play. In this review, we survey the latest research on the structural aspects and the cellular functions of bacterial serine/threonine kinases with PASTA motifs to illustrate the diversity of the regulatory mechanisms controlling bacterial cell division and morphogenesis. PMID:26429880

  19. Role of eukaryotic-like serine/threonine kinases in bacterial cell division and morphogenesis.

    PubMed

    Manuse, Sylvie; Fleurie, Aurore; Zucchini, Laure; Lesterlin, Christian; Grangeasse, Christophe

    2016-01-01

    Bacteria possess a repertoire of versatile protein kinases modulating diverse aspects of their physiology by phosphorylating proteins on various amino acids including histidine, cysteine, aspartic acid, arginine, serine, threonine and tyrosine. One class of membrane serine/threonine protein kinases possesses a catalytic domain sharing a common fold with eukaryotic protein kinases and an extracellular mosaic domain found in bacteria only, named PASTA for 'Penicillin binding proteins And Serine/Threonine kinase Associated'. Over the last decade, evidence has been accumulating that these protein kinases are involved in cell division, morphogenesis and developmental processes in Firmicutes and Actinobacteria. However, observations differ from one species to another suggesting that a general mechanism of activation of their kinase activity is unlikely and that species-specific regulation of cell division is at play. In this review, we survey the latest research on the structural aspects and the cellular functions of bacterial serine/threonine kinases with PASTA motifs to illustrate the diversity of the regulatory mechanisms controlling bacterial cell division and morphogenesis.

  20. New L-Serine Derivative Ligands as Cocatalysts for Diels-Alder Reaction

    PubMed Central

    Sousa, Carlos A. D.; Rodríguez-Borges, José E.; Freire, Cristina

    2013-01-01

    New L-serine derivative ligands were prepared and tested as cocatalyst in the Diels-Alder reactions between cyclopentadiene (CPD) and methyl acrylate, in the presence of several Lewis acids. The catalytic potential of the in situ formed complexes was evaluated based on the reaction yield. Bidentate serine ligands showed good ability to coordinate medium strength Lewis acids, thus boosting their catalytic activity. The synthesis of the L-serine ligands proved to be highly efficient and straightforward. PMID:24383009

  1. Fatty Acid Composition of Egg Yolk from Chickens Fed a Diet including Marigold (Tagetes erecta L.)

    PubMed Central

    Altuntaş, A.; Aydin, R.

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the effects of diet supplemented with marigold on egg yolk fatty acid composition and egg quality parameters. Sixty hens were assigned into three groups and fed diets supplemented with 0 (control), 10 g kg−1, or 20 g kg−1 marigold for 42 days. Eggs collected at the 6th week of the study were analyzed for fatty acid analysis. Laying performance, egg quality parameters, and feed intake were also evaluated. Yolk color scores in the group fed the 20 g kg−1 marigold-supplemented diet were found greater than control (10.77 versus 9.77). Inclusion of 20 g kg−1 marigold in diet influenced egg weights adversely compared to the control. Diet supplemented with 10 g kg−1 or 20 g kg−1 marigold increased the levels of C16:0 and C18:0 and decreased levels of C16:1 (n-7) and C18:1 (n-9) in the egg yolk. Also, diet including marigold increased total saturated fatty acids (SFA) and decreased monounsaturated fatty acids (MUFA) in the egg yolk. PMID:25587451

  2. Fatty Acid Composition of Egg Yolk from Chickens Fed a Diet including Marigold (Tagetes erecta L.).

    PubMed

    Altuntaş, A; Aydin, R

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the effects of diet supplemented with marigold on egg yolk fatty acid composition and egg quality parameters. Sixty hens were assigned into three groups and fed diets supplemented with 0 (control), 10 g kg(-1), or 20 g kg(-1) marigold for 42 days. Eggs collected at the 6th week of the study were analyzed for fatty acid analysis. Laying performance, egg quality parameters, and feed intake were also evaluated. Yolk color scores in the group fed the 20 g kg(-1) marigold-supplemented diet were found greater than control (10.77 versus 9.77). Inclusion of 20 g kg(-1) marigold in diet influenced egg weights adversely compared to the control. Diet supplemented with 10 g kg(-1) or 20 g kg(-1) marigold increased the levels of C16:0 and C18:0 and decreased levels of C16:1 (n-7) and C18:1 (n-9) in the egg yolk. Also, diet including marigold increased total saturated fatty acids (SFA) and decreased monounsaturated fatty acids (MUFA) in the egg yolk. PMID:25587451

  3. An algorithm for computing nucleic acid base-pairing probabilities including pseudoknots.

    PubMed

    Dirks, Robert M; Pierce, Niles A

    2004-07-30

    Given a nucleic acid sequence, a recent algorithm allows the calculation of the partition function over secondary structure space including a class of physically relevant pseudoknots. Here, we present a method for computing base-pairing probabilities starting from the output of this partition function algorithm. The approach relies on the calculation of recursion probabilities that are computed by backtracking through the partition function algorithm, applying a particular transformation at each step. This transformation is applicable to any partition function algorithm that follows the same basic dynamic programming paradigm. Base-pairing probabilities are useful for analyzing the equilibrium ensemble properties of natural and engineered nucleic acids, as demonstrated for a human telomerase RNA and a synthetic DNA nanostructure. PMID:15139042

  4. CycloPs: generating virtual libraries of cyclized and constrained peptides including nonnatural amino acids.

    PubMed

    Duffy, Fergal J; Verniere, Mélanie; Devocelle, Marc; Bernard, Elise; Shields, Denis C; Chubb, Anthony J

    2011-04-25

    We introduce CycloPs, software for the generation of virtual libraries of constrained peptides including natural and nonnatural commercially available amino acids. The software is written in the cross-platform Python programming language, and features include generating virtual libraries in one-dimensional SMILES and three-dimensional SDF formats, suitable for virtual screening. The stand-alone software is capable of filtering the virtual libraries using empirical measurements, including peptide synthesizability by standard peptide synthesis techniques, stability, and the druglike properties of the peptide. The software and accompanying Web interface is designed to enable the rapid generation of large, structurally diverse, synthesizable virtual libraries of constrained peptides quickly and conveniently, for use in virtual screening experiments. The stand-alone software, and the Web interface for evaluating these empirical properties of a single peptide, are available at http://bioware.ucd.ie .

  5. Involvement of fub4, a putative serine hydrolase, in fusaric acid biosynthesis in the cotton pathogen Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. vasinfectum

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Previous work has determined that fusaric acid is required for virulence in the Australian isolate of Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. vasinfectum (Fov), which produce copious amounts of fusaric acid. Race 4 isolates, identified in the San Joaquin Valley of California, has caused serious losses and is a p...

  6. The effect of D-serine administration on cognition and mood in older adults

    PubMed Central

    Madeira, Caroline; Vargas-Lopes, Charles; Marques, Priscila; Dantas, Camila; Manhães, Alex C.; Leite, Homero; Panizzutti, Rogerio

    2016-01-01

    Background D-serine is an endogenous co-agonist of the N-Methyl D-Aspartate Receptor (NMDAR) that plays a crucial role in cognition including learning processes and memory. Decreased D-serine levels have been associated with age-related decline in mechanisms of learning and memory in animal studies. Here, we asked whether D-serine administration in older adults improves cognition. Results D-serine administration improved performance in the Groton Maze learning test of spatial memory and learning and problem solving (F(3, 38)= 4.74, p = 0.03). Subjects that achieved higher increases in plasma D-serine levels after administration improved more in test performance (r2=−0.19 p = 0.009). D-serine administration was not associated with any significant changes in the other cognitive tests or in the mood of older adults (p > 0.05). Methods Fifty healthy older adults received D-serine and placebo in a randomized, double blind, placebo-controlled, crossover design study. We studied the effect of D-serine administration on the performance of cognitive tests and an analogue mood scale. We also collected blood samples to measure D-serine, L-serine, glutamate and glutamine levels. Conclusions D-serine administration may be a strategy to improve spatial memory, learning and problem solving in healthy older adults. Future studies should evaluate the impact of long-term D-serine administration on cognition in older adults. PMID:26933803

  7. A serine hydroxymethyltransferase from marine bacterium Shewanella algae: Isolation, purification, characterization and l-serine production.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Wei; Xia, Bingzhao; Liu, Ziduo

    2013-10-01

    Currently, l-serine is mainly produced by enzymatic conversion, in which serine hydroxymethyltransferase (SHMT) is the key enzyme, suggesting the importance of searching for a SHMT with high activity. Shewanella algae, a methanol-utilizing marine bacterium showing high SHMT activity, was selected based on screening bacterial strains and comparison of the activities of SHMTs. A glyA was isolated from the S. algae through thermal asymmetric interlaced PCR (TAIL-PCR) and it encoded a 417 amino acid polypeptide. The SaSHMT, encoded by the glyA, showed the optimal activity at 50°C and pH 7.0, and retained over 45% of its maximal activity after incubation at 40°C for 3h. The enzyme showed better stability under alkaline environment (pH 6.5-9.0) than Hyphomicrobium methylovorum GM2's SHMT (pH 6.0-7.5). The SaSHMT can produce 77.76mM of l-serine by enzymatic conversion, with the molecular conversion rate in catalyzing glycine to l-serine being 1.41-fold higher than that of Escherichia coli. Therefore, the SaSHMT has the potential for industrial applications due to its tolerance of alkaline environment and a relatively high enzymatic conversion rate. PMID:23632047

  8. A bumblebee (Bombus ignitus) venom serine protease inhibitor that acts as a microbial serine protease inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Wan, Hu; Kim, Bo Yeon; Lee, Kwang Sik; Yoon, Hyung Joo; Lee, Kyung Yong; Jin, Byung Rae

    2014-01-01

    Serine protease inhibitors from bumblebee venom have been shown to block plasmin activity. In this study, we identified the protein BiVSPI from the venom of Bombus ignitus to be a serine protease inhibitor and an antimicrobial factor. BiVSPI is a 55-amino acid mature peptide with ten conserved cysteine residues and a P1 methionine residue. BiVSPI is expressed in the venom gland and also found in the venom as an 8-kDa peptide. Recombinant BiVSPI that was expressed in baculovirus-infected insect cells exhibited inhibitory activity against chymotrypsin but not trypsin. BiVSPI also inhibited microbial serine proteases, such as subtilisin A (Ki=6.57nM) and proteinase K (Ki=7.11nM). In addition, BiVSPI was shown to bind directly to Bacillus subtilis, Bacillus thuringiensis, and Beauveria bassiana but not to Escherichia coli. Consistent with these results, BiVSPI exhibited antimicrobial activity against Gram-positive bacteria and fungi. These findings provide evidence for a novel serine protease inhibitor in bumblebee venom that has antimicrobial functions.

  9. Ischemic Acute Kidney Injury Perturbs Homeostasis of Serine Enantiomers in the Body Fluid in Mice: Early Detection of Renal Dysfunction Using the Ratio of Serine Enantiomers

    PubMed Central

    Sasabe, Jumpei; Suzuki, Masataka; Miyoshi, Yurika; Tojo, Yosuke; Okamura, Chieko; Ito, Sonomi; Konno, Ryuichi; Mita, Masashi; Hamase, Kenji; Aiso, Sadakazu

    2014-01-01

    The imbalance of blood and urine amino acids in renal failure has been studied mostly without chiral separation. Although a few reports have shown the presence of D-serine, an enantiomer of L-serine, in the serum of patients with severe renal failure, it has remained uncertain how serine enantiomers are deranged in the development of renal failure. In the present study, we have monitored serine enantiomers using a two-dimensional HPLC system in the serum and urine of mice after renal ischemia-reperfusion injury (IRI), known as a mouse model of acute kidney injury. In the serum, the level of D-serine gradually increased after renal IRI in parallel with that of creatinine, whereas the L-serine level decreased sharply in the early phase after IRI. The increase of D-serine was suppressed in part by genetic inactivation of a D-serine-degrading enzyme, D-amino acid oxidase (DAO), but not by disruption of its synthetic enzyme, serine racemase, in mice. Renal DAO activity was detected exclusively in proximal tubules, and IRI reduced the number of DAO-positive tubules. On the other hand, in the urine, D-serine was excreted at a rate nearly triple that of L-serine in mice with sham operations, indicating that little D-serine was reabsorbed while most L-serine was reabsorbed in physiological conditions. IRI significantly reduced the ratio of urinary D−/L-serine from 2.82±0.18 to 1.10±0.26 in the early phase and kept the ratio lower than 0.5 thereafter. The urinary D−/L-serine ratio can detect renal ischemia earlier than kidney injury molecule-1 (KIM-1) or neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin (NGAL) in the urine, and more sensitively than creatinine, cystatin C, or the ratio of D−/L-serine in the serum. Our findings provide a novel understanding of the imbalance of amino acids in renal failure and offer a potential new biomarker for an early detection of acute kidney injury. PMID:24489731

  10. Biochemical characterization of Acacia schweinfurthii serine proteinase inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Odei-Addo, Frank; Frost, Carminita; Smith, Nanette; Ogawa, Tomohisa; Muramoto, Koji; Oliva, Maria Luiza Vilela; Gráf, László; Naude, Ryno

    2014-10-01

    One of the many control mechanisms of serine proteinases is their specific inhibition by protein proteinase inhibitors. An extract of Acacia schweinfurthii was screened for potential serine proteinase inhibition. It was successfully purified to homogeneity by precipitating with 80% (v/v) acetone and sequential chromatographic steps, including ion-exchange, affinity purification and reversed-phase high performance liquid chromatography. Reducing sodium dodecyl sulphate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis conditions revealed an inhibitor (ASTI) consisting of two polypeptide chains A and B of approximate molecular weights of 16 and 10 kDa, respectively, and under non-reducing conditions, 26 kDa was observed. The inhibitor was shown to inhibit bovine trypsin (Ki of 3.45 nM) at an approximate molar ratio of inhibitor:trypsin (1:1). The A- and B-chains revealed complete sequences of 140 and 40 amino acid residues, respectively. Sequence similarity (70%) was reported between ASTI A-chain and ACTI A-chain (Acacia confusa) using ClustalW. The B-chain produced a 76% sequence similarity between ASTI and Leucaena leucocephala trypsin inhibitor. PMID:24090421

  11. Inactivation of the 3-phosphoglycerate dehydrogenase gene in mice: changes in gene expression and associated regulatory networks resulting from serine deficiency.

    PubMed

    Furuya, Shigeki; Yoshida, Kazuyuki; Kawakami, Yuriko; Yang, Jyung Hoon; Sayano, Tomoko; Azuma, Norihiro; Tanaka, Hideyuki; Kuhara, Satoru; Hirabayashi, Yoshio

    2008-08-01

    D-3-Phosphoglycerate dehydrogenase (Phgdh) is a necessary enzyme for de novo L-serine biosynthesis. Mutations in the human PHGDH cause serine deficiency disorders characterized by severe neurological symptoms including congenital microcephaly and psychomotor retardation. We showed previously that targeted disruption of Phgdh in mice causes overall growth retardation with severe brain microcephaly and leads to embryonic lethality. Here, amino acid analysis of Phgdh knockout (KO) mouse embryos demonstrates that free serine and glycine concentrations are decreased markedly in head samples, reflecting the metabolic changes of serine deficiency found in human patients. To understand the pathogenesis of serine deficiency disorders at the molecular level, we have exploited this animal model to identify altered gene expression patterns using a microarray technology. Comparative microarray analysis of the Phgdh KO and wild-type head at gestational day 13.5 revealed an upregulation of genes involved in transfer RNA aminoacylation, amino acid metabolism, amino acid transport, transcriptional regulation, and translation, and a downregulation of genes involved in transcription in neuronal progenitors and muscle and cartilage development. A computational network analysis software was used to construct transcriptional regulatory networks operative in the Phgdh KO embryos in vivo. These observations suggest that Phgdh inactivation alters transcriptional programs in several regulatory networks. PMID:18228065

  12. Sugarcane Serine Peptidase Inhibitors, Serine Peptidases, and Clp Protease System Subunits Associated with Sugarcane Borer (Diatraea saccharalis) Herbivory and Wounding

    PubMed Central

    Medeiros, Ane H.; Mingossi, Fabiana B.; Dias, Renata O.; Franco, Flávia P.; Vicentini, Renato; Mello, Marcia O.; Moura, Daniel S.; Silva-Filho, Marcio C.

    2016-01-01

    Sugarcane’s (Saccharum spp.) response to Diatraea saccharalis (F.) (Lepidoptera: (Crambidae) herbivory was investigated using a macroarray spotted with 248 sugarcane Expressed Sequence Tags (ESTs) encoding serine peptidase inhibitors, serine peptidases. and Clp protease system subunits. Our results showed that after nine hours of herbivory, 13 sugarcane genes were upregulated and nine were downregulated. Among the upregulated genes, nine were similar to serine peptidase inhibitors and four were similar to Bowman-Birk Inhibitors (BBIs). Phylogenetic analysis revealed that these sequences belong to a phylogenetic group of sugarcane BBIs that are potentially involved in plant defense against insect predation. The remaining four upregulated genes included serine peptidases and one homolog to the Arabidopsis AAA+ chaperone subunit ClpD, which is a member of the Clp protease system. Among the downregulated genes, five were homologous to serine peptidases and four were homologous to Arabidopsis Clp subunits (three homologous to Clp AAA+ chaperones and one to a ClpP-related ClpR subunit). Although the roles of serine peptidase inhibitors in plant defenses against herbivory have been extensively investigated, the roles of plant serine peptidases and the Clp protease system represent a new and underexplored field of study. The up- and downregulated D. saccharalis genes presented in this study may be candidate genes for the further investigation of the sugarcane response to herbivory. PMID:27598134

  13. Sugarcane Serine Peptidase Inhibitors, Serine Peptidases, and Clp Protease System Subunits Associated with Sugarcane Borer (Diatraea saccharalis) Herbivory and Wounding.

    PubMed

    Medeiros, Ane H; Mingossi, Fabiana B; Dias, Renata O; Franco, Flávia P; Vicentini, Renato; Mello, Marcia O; Moura, Daniel S; Silva-Filho, Marcio C

    2016-09-01

    Sugarcane's (Saccharum spp.) response to Diatraea saccharalis (F.) (Lepidoptera: (Crambidae) herbivory was investigated using a macroarray spotted with 248 sugarcane Expressed Sequence Tags (ESTs) encoding serine peptidase inhibitors, serine peptidases. and Clp protease system subunits. Our results showed that after nine hours of herbivory, 13 sugarcane genes were upregulated and nine were downregulated. Among the upregulated genes, nine were similar to serine peptidase inhibitors and four were similar to Bowman-Birk Inhibitors (BBIs). Phylogenetic analysis revealed that these sequences belong to a phylogenetic group of sugarcane BBIs that are potentially involved in plant defense against insect predation. The remaining four upregulated genes included serine peptidases and one homolog to the Arabidopsis AAA+ chaperone subunit ClpD, which is a member of the Clp protease system. Among the downregulated genes, five were homologous to serine peptidases and four were homologous to Arabidopsis Clp subunits (three homologous to Clp AAA+ chaperones and one to a ClpP-related ClpR subunit). Although the roles of serine peptidase inhibitors in plant defenses against herbivory have been extensively investigated, the roles of plant serine peptidases and the Clp protease system represent a new and underexplored field of study. The up- and downregulated D. saccharalis genes presented in this study may be candidate genes for the further investigation of the sugarcane response to herbivory.

  14. Sugarcane Serine Peptidase Inhibitors, Serine Peptidases, and Clp Protease System Subunits Associated with Sugarcane Borer (Diatraea saccharalis) Herbivory and Wounding.

    PubMed

    Medeiros, Ane H; Mingossi, Fabiana B; Dias, Renata O; Franco, Flávia P; Vicentini, Renato; Mello, Marcia O; Moura, Daniel S; Silva-Filho, Marcio C

    2016-01-01

    Sugarcane's (Saccharum spp.) response to Diatraea saccharalis (F.) (Lepidoptera: (Crambidae) herbivory was investigated using a macroarray spotted with 248 sugarcane Expressed Sequence Tags (ESTs) encoding serine peptidase inhibitors, serine peptidases. and Clp protease system subunits. Our results showed that after nine hours of herbivory, 13 sugarcane genes were upregulated and nine were downregulated. Among the upregulated genes, nine were similar to serine peptidase inhibitors and four were similar to Bowman-Birk Inhibitors (BBIs). Phylogenetic analysis revealed that these sequences belong to a phylogenetic group of sugarcane BBIs that are potentially involved in plant defense against insect predation. The remaining four upregulated genes included serine peptidases and one homolog to the Arabidopsis AAA+ chaperone subunit ClpD, which is a member of the Clp protease system. Among the downregulated genes, five were homologous to serine peptidases and four were homologous to Arabidopsis Clp subunits (three homologous to Clp AAA+ chaperones and one to a ClpP-related ClpR subunit). Although the roles of serine peptidase inhibitors in plant defenses against herbivory have been extensively investigated, the roles of plant serine peptidases and the Clp protease system represent a new and underexplored field of study. The up- and downregulated D. saccharalis genes presented in this study may be candidate genes for the further investigation of the sugarcane response to herbivory. PMID:27598134

  15. Fatty acid composition including cis-9, trans-11 CLA of cooked ground lamb

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Little information is available on effect of cooking on beneficial fatty acids such as conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) and n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA). The objective of this study was to examine impact of cooking on the FA composition of ground lamb of two different muscles. Samples were p...

  16. Molecular cloning, characterization and expression of a novel serine proteinase inhibitor gene in bay scallops (Argopecten irradians, Lamarck 1819).

    PubMed

    Zhu, Ling; Song, Linsheng; Chang, Yaqing; Xu, Wei; Wu, Longtao

    2006-03-01

    Serine protease inhibitors, critical regulators of endogenous proteases, are found in all multicellular organisms and play crucial roles in host physiological and immunological effector mechanisms. The first mollusk serine proteinase inhibitor (designated AISPI) cDNA was obtained from the bay scallop Argopecten irradians by randomly sequencing a whole tissue cDNA library and rapid amplification of cDNA ends (RACE). The full-length cDNA of the scallop serine protease inhibitor was 1020 bp, consisting of a 5'-terminal untranslated region (UTR) of 39 bp, a 3'-terminal UTR of 147 bp with a canonical polyadenylation signal sequence AATAAA and a poly(A) tail, and an open reading frame of 834 bp. The AISPI cDNA encoded a polypeptide of 278 amino acids with a putative signal peptide of 22 amino acids and a mature protein of 256 amino acids. The deduced amino-acid sequence of AISPI contained six tandem and homologous domains similar to that of Kazal-type serine protease inhibitors, including the conserved sequence C-X(7)-C-X(6)-Y-X(3)-C-X(2,3)-C and six cysteine residues responsible for the formation of disulfide bridges, indicating that the AISPI protein from bay scallop should be a member of the Kazal-type serine protease inhibitor family. The temporal expression of AISPI was measured by semi-quantitative RT-PCR after injury or bacterial challenge. After the adductor muscle was wounded or injected with Vibrio anguillarum, the expression of AISPI mRNA in hemolymph was up-regulated and reached the maximum level at 8 and 16 h, respectively, and then progressively dropped back to the original level. The results indicated that AISPI could play an important role in injury healing and immune response in mollusks as it could be induced by injury and bacterial challenge. PMID:16005644

  17. Oxidative Deselenization of Selenocysteine: Applications for Programmed Ligation at Serine.

    PubMed

    Malins, Lara R; Mitchell, Nicholas J; McGowan, Sheena; Payne, Richard J

    2015-10-19

    Despite the unique chemical properties of selenocysteine (Sec), ligation at Sec is an under-utilized methodology for protein synthesis. We describe herein an unprecedented protocol for the conversion of Sec to serine (Ser) in a single, high-yielding step. When coupled with ligation at Sec, this transformation provides a new approach to programmed ligations at Ser residues. This new reaction is compatible with a wide range of functionality, including the presence of unprotected amino acid side chains and appended glycans. The utility of the methodology is demonstrated in the rapid synthesis of complex glycopeptide fragments of the epithelial glycoproteins MUC5AC and MUC4 and through the total synthesis of the structured, cysteine (Cys)-free protein eglin C. PMID:26384718

  18. Development of Trypsin-Like Serine Protease Inhibitors as Therapeutic Agents: Opportunities, Challenges, and their Unique Structure-Based Rationales.

    PubMed

    Liang, Guyan; Bowen, J Phillip

    2016-01-01

    There has been a revolution in the development of effective, small-molecule anticoagulants and antiplatelet agents. Numerous trypsin-like serine proteases have been under active pursuit as therapeutic targets. Important examples include thrombin, factor VIIa, factor Xa, and β-tryptase with indications ranging from thrombosis and inflammation to asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Trypsin-like serine proteases exhibit a highly similar tertiary folding pattern, especially for the region near the substrate binding pocket that includes the conserved catalytic triad consisting of histidine 57, aspartic acid 102, and serine 195. A rich collection of X-ray structures for many trypsin-like serine proteases is available, which greatly facilitated the optimization of small organic inhibitors as therapeutic agents. The present review surveyed those inhibitors disclosed in peer-reviewed scientific journals and patent publications with a special focus on structural features and protein-inhibitor interactions that implicated the inhibitor optimization process. The role played by the residue 190 of trypsin-like serine proteases is critical. While many inhibitors without a basic group have progressed into the clinic for ones with alanine 190, the task for those with serine 190 remains extremely challenging, if not impossible. In addition to warfarin, heparin, and low molecular weight heparins (LMWHs), treatment options have expanded with the development and approval of the new oral anticoagulants (NOACs). The NOACs are superior to vitamin K antagonists in terms of rapid onset, pharmacokinetics, drug/food interactions, and regular coagulation monitoring; but one serious drawback is the lack of an effective antidote at this time. Apixaban (Eliquis), rivaroxaban (Xarelto), and edoxaban (Savaysa) are the new Xa inhibitors that have been recently approved by the U.S. FDA and are in current clinical practice. These drugs bind to the active site of factor Xa (f

  19. Electrocatalytic boost up of epinephrine and its simultaneous resolution in the presence of serotonin and folic acid at poly(serine)/multi-walled carbon nanotubes composite modified electrode: A voltammetric study.

    PubMed

    Narayana, P V; Madhusudana Reddy, T; Gopal, P; Mohan Reddy, M; Ramakrishna Naidu, G

    2015-11-01

    The present paper describes the new strategy for the development of nanosensor based on dropcasting of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) followed by electropolymerization of serine (ser) onto the glassy carbon electrode (GCE). The developed nanocomposite sensor was abbreviated as poly(ser)/MWCNTs/GCE and was characterized by using electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) technique. The EIS results confirmed the fast electron transfer rate at the surface of poly(ser)/MWCNTs/GCE. The proposed sensor exhibited good catalytic activity towards the sensing of epinephrine (EP) individually and simultaneously in the presence of serotonin (5-HT) and folic acid (FA) in 0.1M phosphate buffer solution (PBS) at pH7.0. The limit of detection (LOD) and limit of quantification (LOQ) of EP was found to be 6×10(-7)M and 2×10(-6)M respectively. The fabricated sensor showed excellent precision and accuracy with a relative standard deviation (RSD) of 4.86%. The proposed composite sensor was effectively applied towards the determination of EP in human blood serum and pharmaceutical injection sample.

  20. Orexin a phosphorylates the γ-Aminobutyric acid type A receptor β2 subunit on a serine residue and changes the surface expression of the receptor in SH-SY5Y cells exposed to propofol.

    PubMed

    Andersson, Henrik; Björnström, Karin; Eintrei, Christina; Sundqvist, Tommy

    2015-11-01

    Propofol activates the γ-aminobutyric acid type A receptor (GABAA R) and causes a reversible neurite retraction, leaving a thin, thread-like structure behind; it also reverses the transport of vesicles in rat cortical neurons. The awakening peptide orexin A (OA) inhibits this retraction via phospholipase D (PLD) and protein kinase Cɛ (PKCɛ). The human SH-SY5Y cells express both GABAA Rs and orexin 1 and 2 receptors. These cells are used to examine the interaction between OA and the GABAA R. The effects of OA are studied with flow cytometry and immunoblotting. This study shows that OA stimulates phosphorylation on the serine residues of the GABAA R β2 subunit and that the phosphorylation is caused by the activation of PLD and PKCɛ. OA administration followed by propofol reduces the cell surface expression of the GABAA R, whereas propofol stimulation before OA increases the surface expression. The GABAA R β2 subunit is important for receptor recirculation, and the effect of OA on propofol-stimulated cells may be due to a disturbed recirculation of the GABAA R.

  1. Influence of Fatty Acid Precursors, Including Food Preservatives, on the Growth and Fatty Acid Composition of Listeria monocytogenes at 37 and 10°C ▿

    PubMed Central

    Julotok, Mudcharee; Singh, Atul K.; Gatto, Craig; Wilkinson, Brian J.

    2010-01-01

    Listeria monocytogenes is a food-borne pathogen that grows at refrigeration temperatures and increases its content of anteiso-C15:0 fatty acid, which is believed to be a homeoviscous adaptation to ensure membrane fluidity, at these temperatures. As a possible novel approach for control of the growth of the organism, the influences of various fatty acid precursors, including branched-chain amino acids and branched- and straight-chain carboxylic acids, some of which are also well-established food preservatives, on the growth and fatty acid composition of the organism at 37°C and 10°C were studied in order to investigate whether the organism could be made to synthesize fatty acids that would result in impaired growth at low temperatures. The results indicate that the fatty acid composition of L. monocytogenes could be modulated by the feeding of branched-chain amino acid, C4, C5, and C6 branched-chain carboxylic acid, and C3 and C4 straight-chain carboxylic acid fatty acid precursors, but the growth-inhibitory effects of several preservatives were independent of effects on fatty acid composition, which were minor in the case of preservatives metabolized via acetyl coenzyme A. The ability of a precursor to modify fatty acid composition was probably a reflection of the substrate specificities of the first enzyme, FabH, in the condensation of primers of fatty acid biosynthesis with malonyl acyl carrier protein. PMID:20048057

  2. Influence of fatty acid precursors, including food preservatives, on the growth and fatty acid composition of Listeria monocytogenes at 37 and 10degreesC.

    PubMed

    Julotok, Mudcharee; Singh, Atul K; Gatto, Craig; Wilkinson, Brian J

    2010-03-01

    Listeria monocytogenes is a food-borne pathogen that grows at refrigeration temperatures and increases its content of anteiso-C(15:0) fatty acid, which is believed to be a homeoviscous adaptation to ensure membrane fluidity, at these temperatures. As a possible novel approach for control of the growth of the organism, the influences of various fatty acid precursors, including branched-chain amino acids and branched- and straight-chain carboxylic acids, some of which are also well-established food preservatives, on the growth and fatty acid composition of the organism at 37 degrees C and 10 degrees C were studied in order to investigate whether the organism could be made to synthesize fatty acids that would result in impaired growth at low temperatures. The results indicate that the fatty acid composition of L. monocytogenes could be modulated by the feeding of branched-chain amino acid, C(4), C(5), and C(6) branched-chain carboxylic acid, and C(3) and C(4) straight-chain carboxylic acid fatty acid precursors, but the growth-inhibitory effects of several preservatives were independent of effects on fatty acid composition, which were minor in the case of preservatives metabolized via acetyl coenzyme A. The ability of a precursor to modify fatty acid composition was probably a reflection of the substrate specificities of the first enzyme, FabH, in the condensation of primers of fatty acid biosynthesis with malonyl acyl carrier protein.

  3. Fatty acid-releasing activities in Sinorhizobium meliloti include unusual diacylglycerol lipase

    PubMed Central

    Sahonero-Canavesi, Diana X.; Sohlenkamp, Christian; Sandoval-Calderón, Mario; Lamsa, Anne; Pogliano, Kit; López-Lara, Isabel M.; Geiger, Otto

    2016-01-01

    Summary Phospholipids are well known for their membrane forming properties and thereby delimit any cell from the exterior world. In addition, membrane phospholipids can act as precursors for signals and other biomolecules during their turnover. Little is known about phospholipid signalling, turnover and remodelling in bacteria. Recently, we showed that a FadD-deficient mutant of Sinorhizobium meliloti, unable to convert free fatty acids to their coenzyme A derivatives, accumulates free fatty acids during the stationary phase of growth. Enzymatic activities responsible for the generation of these free fatty acids were unknown in rhizobia. Searching the genome of S. meliloti, we identified a potential lysophospholipase (SMc04041) and two predicted patatin-like phospholipases A (SMc00930, SMc01003). Although SMc00930 as well as SMc01003 contribute to the release of free fatty acids in S. meliloti, neither one can use phospholipids as substrates. Here we show that SMc01003 converts diacylglycerol to monoacylglycerol and a fatty acid, and that monoacylglycerol can be further degraded by SMc01003 to another fatty acid and glycerol. A SMc01003-deficient mutant of S. meliloti transiently accumulates diacylglycerol, suggesting that SMc01003 also acts as diacylglycerol lipase (DglA) in its native background. Expression of the DglA lipase in Escherichia coli causes lysis of cells in stationary phase of growth. PMID:25711932

  4. Fatty acid-releasing activities in Sinorhizobium meliloti include unusual diacylglycerol lipase.

    PubMed

    Sahonero-Canavesi, Diana X; Sohlenkamp, Christian; Sandoval-Calderón, Mario; Lamsa, Anne; Pogliano, Kit; López-Lara, Isabel M; Geiger, Otto

    2015-09-01

    Phospholipids are well known for their membrane-forming properties and thereby delimit any cell from the exterior world. In addition, membrane phospholipids can act as precursors for signals and other biomolecules during their turnover. Little is known about phospholipid signalling, turnover and remodelling in bacteria. Recently, we showed that a FadD-deficient mutant of Sinorhizobium meliloti, unable to convert free fatty acids to their coenzyme A derivatives, accumulates free fatty acids during the stationary phase of growth. Enzymatic activities responsible for the generation of these free fatty acids were unknown in rhizobia. Searching the genome of S. meliloti, we identified a potential lysophospholipase (SMc04041) and two predicted patatin-like phospholipases A (SMc00930, SMc01003). Although SMc00930 as well as SMc01003 contribute to the release of free fatty acids in S. meliloti, neither one can use phospholipids as substrates. Here we show that SMc01003 converts diacylglycerol to monoacylglycerol and a fatty acid, and that monoacylglycerol can be further degraded by SMc01003 to another fatty acid and glycerol. A SMc01003-deficient mutant of S. meliloti transiently accumulates diacylglycerol, suggesting that SMc01003 also acts as diacylglycerol lipase (DglA) in its native background. Expression of the DglA lipase in Escherichia coli causes lysis of cells in stationary phase of growth.

  5. Regulation of GluA1 α-Amino-3-Hydroxy-5-Methyl-4-Isoxazolepropionic Acid Receptor Function by Protein Kinase C at Serine-818 and Threonine-840

    PubMed Central

    Jenkins, Meagan A.; Wells, Gordon; Bachman, Julia; Snyder, James P.; Jenkins, Andrew; Huganir, Richard L.; Oswald, Robert E.

    2014-01-01

    Three residues within the AMPA (α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid) receptor subunit GluA1 C terminus (Ser818, Ser831, Thr840) can be phosphorylated by Ca2+/phospholipid-dependent protein kinase (PKC). Here, we show that PKC phosphorylation of GluA1 Ser818 or Thr840 enhances the weighted mean channel conductance without altering the response time course or agonist potency. These data support the idea that these residues constitute a hyper-regulatory domain for the AMPA receptor. Introduction of phosphomimetic mutations increases conductance only at these three sites within the proximal C terminus, consistent with a structural model with a flexible linker connecting the distal C-terminal domain to the more proximal domain containing a helix bracketed by Ser831 and Thr840. NMR spectra support this model and raise the possibility that phosphorylation can alter the configuration of this domain. Our findings provide insight into the structure and function of the C-terminal domain of GluA1, which controls AMPA receptor function and trafficking during synaptic plasticity in the central nervous system. PMID:24452473

  6. Altering the fatty acids in milk fat by including canola seed in dairy cattle diets.

    PubMed

    Chichlowski, M W; Schroeder, J W; Park, C S; Keller, W L; Schimek, D E

    2005-09-01

    The objective was to evaluate the effects of feeding ground canola seed on the fatty acid profile, yield, and composition of milk from dairy cows. Twenty-four multiparous Holstein cows (548.3 +/- 11.9 kg body weight and 28 +/- 9 d in lactation) were randomly assigned to 1 of 2 treatments: Control (CON) or ground canola seed treatment (GCS) with 14% [of diet dry matter (DM)] of the total ration as ground canola seed containing 34% lipid. Diets contained 20% crude protein, but varied in net energy as a result of fat content differences of 2.5% and 6.4% (DM) for CON and GCS, respectively. Diets were composed of corn, corn silage, alfalfa (50:50 ground hay and haylage, DM basis), soybean and blood meal, and vitamins and minerals. Mechanically extruded canola meal was used in the CON diet to adjust for the protein from canola seed in the GCS diet. Cows were housed in tie-stalls and fed and milked twice daily for 10 wk. The inclusion of ground canola seed did not alter DM intake, weight gain, or body condition score of cows. Milk fat from GCS cows had greater proportions of long-chain fatty acids (> or = 18 carbons) and a lower ratio of n-6 to n-3 fatty acids. Feeding GCS reduced the proportion of short- and medium-chain fatty acids. Milk fat from cows fed GCS had a greater proportion of vaccenic acid and tended to have a higher proportion of cis-9,trans-11 conjugated linoleic acid. Actual and 3.5% fat-corrected milk yields were similar between treatments. The milk fat and protein percentages were lower for GCS cows, but total yield of these components was similar between treatments. Milk urea nitrogen was lower and serum urea nitrogen tended to be lower in cows fed canola seed. Serum glucose, insulin, and nonesterified fatty acids were not altered, but serum triglycerides were higher in GCS cows. Ammonia and total volatile fatty acids tended to be lower in ruminal fluid from GCS cows; rumen pH was unchanged. Feeding canola seed to lactating dairy cows resulted in milk

  7. d-serine levels in Alzheimer's disease: implications for novel biomarker development

    PubMed Central

    Madeira, C; Lourenco, M V; Vargas-Lopes, C; Suemoto, C K; Brandão, C O; Reis, T; Leite, R E P; Laks, J; Jacob-Filho, W; Pasqualucci, C A; Grinberg, L T; Ferreira, S T; Panizzutti, R

    2015-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a severe neurodegenerative disorder still in search of effective methods of diagnosis. Altered levels of the NMDA receptor co-agonist, d-serine, have been associated with neurological disorders, including schizophrenia and epilepsy. However, whether d-serine levels are deregulated in AD remains elusive. Here, we first measured D-serine levels in post-mortem hippocampal and cortical samples from nondemented subjects (n=8) and AD patients (n=14). We next determined d-serine levels in experimental models of AD, including wild-type rats and mice that received intracerebroventricular injections of amyloid-β oligomers, and APP/PS1 transgenic mice. Finally, we assessed d-serine levels in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) of 21 patients with a diagnosis of probable AD, as compared with patients with normal pressure hydrocephalus (n=9), major depression (n=9) and healthy controls (n=10), and results were contrasted with CSF amyloid-β/tau AD biomarkers. d-serine levels were higher in the hippocampus and parietal cortex of AD patients than in control subjects. Levels of both d-serine and serine racemase, the enzyme responsible for d-serine production, were elevated in experimental models of AD. Significantly, d-serine levels were higher in the CSF of probable AD patients than in non-cognitively impaired subject groups. Combining d-serine levels to the amyloid/tau index remarkably increased the sensitivity and specificity of diagnosis of probable AD in our cohort. Our results show that increased brain and CSF d-serine levels are associated with AD. CSF d-serine levels discriminated between nondemented and AD patients in our cohort and might constitute a novel candidate biomarker for early AD diagnosis. PMID:25942042

  8. Case Studies in Systems Chemistry. Final Report. [Includes Complete Case Study, Carboxylic Acid Equilibria

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fleck, George

    This publication was produced as a teaching tool for college chemistry. The book is a text for a computer-based unit on the chemistry of acid-base titrations, and is designed for use with FORTRAN or BASIC computer systems, and with a programmable electronic calculator, in a variety of educational settings. The text attempts to present computer…

  9. Antibiosis of some lactic acid bacteria including Lactobacillus acidophilus toward Listeria monocytogenes.

    PubMed

    Raccach, M; McGrath, R; Daftarian, H

    1989-08-01

    Eleven strains of lactic acid bacteria were tested by the 'spot' on the 'lawn' method for their antagonistic activity against four strains of Listeria monocytogenes. Four out of the five strains of lactic acid bacteria most antagonistic toward the pathogen were those cultures known to produce bacteriocins. Four other strains of lactic acid bacteria were not antagonistic against Listeria by this method. Seventeen inhibition zones of the pathogen were obtained at 25 degrees C as compared to 10 at 32 degrees C. Lactobacillus acidophilus strains NU-A and 88, growing in the presence of L. monocytogenes in milk prevented the latter from attaining populations it would have in pure culture (P less than 0.01). 10(1.4)-10(3.5) lower numbers were noted. L. acidophilus in most cases exhibited a bacteriostatic effect toward the pathogen except for strain 88 which appeared to have a bactericidal effect (P less than 0.01) against Listeria strain OH. The lactobacilli reduced the pH of the milk to 4.7 over a 24 h period, showing that acid played a role in the observed antibiosis.

  10. Kinetic model of water disinfection using peracetic acid including synergistic effects.

    PubMed

    Flores, Marina J; Brandi, Rodolfo J; Cassano, Alberto E; Labas, Marisol D

    2016-01-01

    The disinfection efficiencies of a commercial mixture of peracetic acid against Escherichia coli were studied in laboratory scale experiments. The joint and separate action of two disinfectant agents, hydrogen peroxide and peracetic acid, were evaluated in order to observe synergistic effects. A kinetic model for each component of the mixture and for the commercial mixture was proposed. Through simple mathematical equations, the model describes different stages of attack by disinfectants during the inactivation process. Based on the experiments and the kinetic parameters obtained, it could be established that the efficiency of hydrogen peroxide was much lower than that of peracetic acid alone. However, the contribution of hydrogen peroxide was very important in the commercial mixture. It should be noted that this improvement occurred only after peracetic acid had initiated the attack on the cell. This synergistic effect was successfully explained by the proposed scheme and was verified by experimental results. Besides providing a clearer mechanistic understanding of water disinfection, such models may improve our ability to design reactors. PMID:26819382

  11. Cross-talk between the two divergent insulin signaling pathways is revealed by the protein kinase B (Akt)-mediated phosphorylation of adapter protein APS on serine 588.

    PubMed

    Katsanakis, Kostas D; Pillay, Tahir S

    2005-11-11

    The APS adapter protein is recruited to the autophosphorylated kinase domain of the insulin receptor and initiates the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K)-independent pathway of insulin-stimulated glucose transport by recruiting CAP and c-Cbl. In this study, we have identified APS as a novel substrate for protein kinase B/Akt using an antibody that exhibits insulin-dependent immunoreactivity with a phosphospecific antibody raised against the protein kinase B substrate consensus sequence RXRXX(pS/pT) and a phosphospecific antibody that recognizes serine 21/9 of glycogen synthase kinase-3alpha/beta. This phosphorylation of APS is observed in both 3T3-L1 adipocytes and transfected cells. The insulin-stimulated serine phosphorylation of APS was inhibited by a PI3-kinase inhibitor, LY290004, a specific protein kinase B (PKB) inhibitor, deguelin, and knockdown of Akt. Serine 588 of APS is contained in a protein kinase B consensus sequence for phosphorylation conserved in APS across multiple species but not found in other members of this family, including SH2-B and Lnk. Mutation of serine 588 to alanine abolished the insulin-stimulated serine phosphorylation of APS and prevented the localization of APS to membrane ruffles. A glutathione S-transferase fusion protein containing amino acids 534-621 of APS was phosphorylated by purified PKB in vitro, and mutation of serine 588 abolished the PKB-mediated phosphorylation of APS in vitro. Taken together, this study identifies APS as a novel physiological substrate for PKB and the first serine phosphorylation site on APS. These data therefore reveal the molecular cross-talk between the insulin-activated PI3-kinase-dependent and -independent pathways previously thought to be distinct and divergent.

  12. Impact of Serine/Threonine Protein Kinases on the Regulation of Sporulation in Bacillus subtilis

    PubMed Central

    Pompeo, Frédérique; Foulquier, Elodie; Galinier, Anne

    2016-01-01

    Bacteria possess many kinases that catalyze phosphorylation of proteins on diverse amino acids including arginine, cysteine, histidine, aspartate, serine, threonine, and tyrosine. These protein kinases regulate different physiological processes in response to environmental modifications. For example, in response to nutritional stresses, the Gram-positive bacterium Bacillus subtilis can differentiate into an endospore; the initiation of sporulation is controlled by the master regulator Spo0A, which is activated by phosphorylation. Spo0A phosphorylation is carried out by a multi-component phosphorelay system. These phosphorylation events on histidine and aspartate residues are labile, highly dynamic and permit a temporal control of the sporulation initiation decision. More recently, another kind of phosphorylation, more stable yet still dynamic, on serine or threonine residues, was proposed to play a role in spore maintenance and spore revival. Kinases that perform these phosphorylation events mainly belong to the Hanks family and could regulate spore dormancy and spore germination. The aim of this mini review is to focus on the regulation of sporulation in B. subtilis by these serine and threonine phosphorylation events and the kinases catalyzing them. PMID:27148245

  13. Serine, glycine and the one-carbon cycle: cancer metabolism in full circle

    PubMed Central

    Locasale, Jason W

    2013-01-01

    One carbon metabolism involving the folate and methionine cycle integrates carbon units from amino acids, including serine and glycine, and generates diverse outputs, such as the biosynthesis of lipids, nucleotides and proteins, the maintenance of redox status, and the substrates for methylation reactions. Long considered a ‘housekeeping’ process, this pathway has been recently shown to have additional complexity. Recent genetic and functional evidence also suggests that hyperactivation of this pathway is a possible driver of oncogenesis and establishes links to cellular epigenetic status. Given the wealth of clinically available agents that target one carbon metabolism, these new findings could present opportunities for translation into precision cancer medicine. PMID:23822983

  14. Astrocytes are involved in trigeminal dynamic mechanical allodynia: potential role of D-serine.

    PubMed

    Dieb, W; Hafidi, A

    2013-09-01

    Trigeminal neuropathic pain affects millions of people worldwide. Despite decades of study on the neuronal processing of pain, mechanisms underlying enhanced pain states after injury remain unclear. N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor-dependent changes play a critical role in triggering central sensitization in neuropathic pain. These receptors are regulated at the glycine site through a mandatory endogenous co-agonist D-serine, which is synthesized by astrocytes. Therefore, the present study was carried out to determine whether astrocytes are involved, through D-serine secretion, in dynamic mechanical allodynia (DMA) obtained after chronic constriction of the infraorbital nerve (CCI-IoN) in rats. Two weeks after CCI-IoN, an important reaction of astrocytes was present in the medullary dorsal horn (MDH), as revealed by an up-regulation of glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) in allodynic rats. In parallel, an increase in D-serine synthesis, which co-localized with its synthesis enzyme serine racemase, was strictly observed in astrocytes. Blocking astrocyte metabolism by intracisternal delivery of fluorocitrate alleviated DMA. Furthermore, the administration of D-amino-acid oxidase (DAAO), a D-serine-degrading enzyme, or that of L-serine O-sulfate (LSOS), a serine racemase inhibitor, significantly decreased pain behavior in allodynic rats. These results demonstrate that astrocytes are involved in the modulation of orofacial post-traumatic neuropathic pain via the release of the gliotransmitter D-serine.

  15. Human mast cell tryptase: Multiple cDNAs and genes reveal a multigene serine protease family

    SciTech Connect

    Vanderslice, P.; Ballinger, S.M., Tam, E.K.; Goldstein, S.M.; Craik, C.S.; Caughey, G.H. )

    1990-05-01

    Three different cDNAs and a gene encoding human skin mast cell tryptase have been cloned and sequenced in their entirety. The deduced amino acid sequences reveal a 30-amino acid prepropeptide followed by a 245-amino acid catalytic domain. The C-terminal undecapeptide of the human preprosequence is identical in dog tryptase and appears to be part of a prosequence unique among serine proteases. The differences among the three human tryptase catalytic domains include the loss of a consensus N-glycosylation site in one cDNA, which may explain some of the heterogeneity in size and susceptibility to deglycosylation seen in tryptase preparations. All three tryptase cDNAs are distinct from a recently reported cDNA obtained from a human lung mast cell library. A skin tryptase cDNA was used to isolate a human tryptase gene, the exons of which match one of the skin-derived cDNAs. The organization of the {approx}1.8-kilobase-pair tryptase gene is unique and is not closely related to that of any other mast cell or leukocyte serine protease. The 5{prime} regulatory regions of the gene share features with those of other serine proteases, including mast cell chymase, but are unusual in being separated from the protein-coding sequence by an intron. High-stringency hybridization of a human genomic DNA blot with a fragment of the tryptase gene confirms the presence of multiple tryptase genes. These findings provide genetic evidence that human mast cell tryptases are the products of a multigene family.

  16. Improvement in Regional CBF by L-Serine Contributes to Its Neuroprotective Effect in Rats after Focal Cerebral Ischemia

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Zheng-Lin; Wang, Guo-Hua; Sun, Li; Jiang, Rui; Zhao, Guang-Wei; Han, Le-Yang

    2013-01-01

    To investigate the mechanisms underlying the neuroprotective effect of L-serine, permanent focal cerebral ischemia was induced by occlusion of the middle cerebral artery while monitoring cerebral blood flow (CBF). Rats were divided into control and L-serine-treated groups after middle cerebral artery occlusion. The neurological deficit score and brain infarct volume were assessed. Nissl staining was used to quantify the cortical injury. L-serine and D-serine levels in the ischemic cortex were analyzed with high performance liquid chromatography. We found that L-serine treatment: 1) reduced the neurological deficit score, infarct volume and cortical neuron loss in a dose-dependent manner; 2) improved CBF in the cortex, and this effect was inhibited in the presence of apamin plus charybdotoxin while the alleviation of both neurological deficit score and infarct volume was blocked; and 3) increased the amount of L-serine and D-serine in the cortex, and inhibition of the conversion of L-serine into D-serine by aminooxyacetic acid did not affect the reduction of neurological deficit score and infarct volume by L-serine. In conclusion, improvement in regional CBF by L-serine may contribute to its neuroprotective effect on the ischemic brain, potentially through vasodilation which is mediated by the small- and intermediate-conductance Ca2+-activated K+ channels on the cerebral blood vessel endothelium. PMID:23825613

  17. Copper(II)-mediated O-arylation of protected serines and threonines.

    PubMed

    El Khatib, Mirna; Molander, Gary A

    2014-09-19

    An effective protocol toward the O-arylation of β-hydroxy-α-amino acid substrates serine and threonine has been developed via Chan-Lam cross-coupling. This Cu(II)-catalyzed transformation involves benign open-flask conditions that are well-tolerated with a variety of protected (Boc-, Cbz-, Tr-, and Fmoc-) serine and threonine derivatives and various potassium organotrifluoroborates and boronic acids. PMID:25208062

  18. Protein serine/threonine kinases in signal transduction for secondary metabolism and morphogenesis in Streptomyces.

    PubMed

    Umeyama, T; Lee, P-C; Horinouchi, S

    2002-08-01

    A number of proteins in the Gram-positive bacterial genus Streptomyces are phosphorylated on their serine/threonine and tyrosine residues in response to developmental phases. AfsR is one of these proteins and acts as a transcriptional factor in both the regulation of secondary metabolism in Streptomyces coelicolor A3(2) and morphological differentiation in Streptomyces griseus. In S. coelicolor A3(2), AfsR is phosphorylated on its serine and threonine residues by more than three protein kinases whose kinase activity is enhanced by means of autophosphorylation on their serine and threonine residues. The degree of autophosphorylation of AfsK is regulated by KbpA which, by binding directly to the kinase domain of AfsK, inhibits its autophosphorylation. Phosphorylation of AfsR enhances its DNA-binding activity and causes it to bind the promoter elements, including -35, of afsS, thus resulting in activation of afsS transcription. ATPase activity of AfsR is essential for this transcriptional activation, probably because the energy available from ATP hydrolysis is required for the isomerization of the closed complex between AfsR and RNA polymerase to a transcriptionally competent open complex. afsS, encoding a 63-amino-acid protein, then activates transcription of actII-ORF4, a pathway-specific transcriptional activator in the actinorhodin biosynthetic gene cluster, in an as yet unknown way. Distribution of the afsK- afsR systems in a wide variety of Streptomyces species and the presence of many phosphorylated proteins in a given Streptomyces strain suggest that the signal transduction via not only two-component regulatory systems but also serine/threonine kinases generally regulates secondary metabolism and morphogenesis in this genus.

  19. Serine in plants: biosynthesis, metabolism, and functions.

    PubMed

    Ros, Roc; Muñoz-Bertomeu, Jesús; Krueger, Stephan

    2014-09-01

    Serine (Ser) has a fundamental role in metabolism and signaling in living organisms. In plants, the existence of different pathways of Ser biosynthesis has complicated our understanding of this amino acid homeostasis. The photorespiratory glycolate pathway has been considered to be of major importance, whereas the nonphotorespiratory phosphorylated pathway has been relatively neglected. Recent advances indicate that the phosphorylated pathway has an important function in plant metabolism and development. Plants deficient in this pathway display developmental defects in embryos, male gametophytes, and roots. We propose that the phosphorylated pathway is more important than was initially thought because it is the only Ser source for specific cell types involved in developmental events. Here, we discuss its importance as a link between metabolism and development in plants.

  20. Analysis of binding properties and specificity through identification of the interface forming residues (IFR) for serine proteases in silico docked to different inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Enzymes belonging to the same super family of proteins in general operate on variety of substrates and are inhibited by wide selection of inhibitors. In this work our main objective was to expand the scope of studies that consider only the catalytic and binding pocket amino acids while analyzing enzyme specificity and instead, include a wider category which we have named the Interface Forming Residues (IFR). We were motivated to identify those amino acids with decreased accessibility to solvent after docking of different types of inhibitors to sub classes of serine proteases and then create a table (matrix) of all amino acid positions at the interface as well as their respective occupancies. Our goal is to establish a platform for analysis of the relationship between IFR characteristics and binding properties/specificity for bi-molecular complexes. Results We propose a novel method for describing binding properties and delineating serine proteases specificity by compiling an exhaustive table of interface forming residues (IFR) for serine proteases and their inhibitors. Currently, the Protein Data Bank (PDB) does not contain all the data that our analysis would require. Therefore, an in silico approach was designed for building corresponding complexes The IFRs are obtained by "rigid body docking" among 70 structurally aligned, sequence wise non-redundant, serine protease structures with 3 inhibitors: bovine pancreatic trypsin inhibitor (BPTI), ecotine and ovomucoid third domain inhibitor. The table (matrix) of all amino acid positions at the interface and their respective occupancy is created. We also developed a new computational protocol for predicting IFRs for those complexes which were not deciphered experimentally so far, achieving accuracy of at least 0.97. Conclusions The serine proteases interfaces prefer polar (including glycine) residues (with some exceptions). Charged residues were found to be uniquely prevalent at the interfaces between the

  1. Occurrence of phosphatidyl-D-serine in the rat cerebrum.

    PubMed

    Omori, Taketo; Mihara, Hisaaki; Kurihara, Tatsuo; Esaki, Nobuyoshi

    2009-05-01

    Phosphatidylserine (PS), a relatively abundant component of mammalian cell membranes, plays important roles in biological processes including apoptosis and cell signaling. It is believed that phosphatidyl-L-serine is the only naturally occurring PS. Here, we describe for the first time the occurrence of phosphatidyl-D-serine (D-PS) in rat cerebrum. Quantitative HPLC analysis of the derivatives of serine liberated from PS by hydrolysis revealed that the amount of D-PS was approximately 1% of the total PS in the cerebrum. Enzymatic cleavage of cerebrum PS with phospholipase D and phospholipase C resulted in the release of both isomers of serine and phosphoserine, respectively, providing additional evidence for the existence of D-PS. Free D-serine was incorporated into PS in an in vitro system using a cerebrum extract, and this activity was inhibited by EDTA, suggesting the occurrence of a divalent cation-dependent enzyme that synthesizes D-PS by a base-exchange reaction.

  2. Effects of L-serine ingestion on human sleep.

    PubMed

    Ito, Yukihiko; Takahashi, Satomi; Shen, Manzhen; Yamaguchi, Kohji; Satoh, Makoto

    2014-01-01

    To investigate the effects of L-serine intake on human sleep, we conducted two randomized double-blinded crossover studies. In Study 1, healthy subjects who were dissatisfied with their sleep were given L-serine or a placebo 30 min before going to bed. After waking the next morning, subjective sleep quality was rated using the Ogri-Shirakawa-Azumi subjective sleep rating scale. In Study 2, subjective sleep quality was rated using the St. Mary's Hospital sleep questionnaire, and objective parameters, including sleep initiation time, number of nighttime awakenings, and hours of sleep, were evaluated using actigraphy. In Study 1, factors related to "sleep initiation" and "sleep maintenance" during the L-serine intake period were significantly improved compared to the placebo intake period (p = 0.02 and p = 0.008, respectively). In Study 2, scores for "How well did you sleep last night?" and "How satisfied were you with last night's sleep?" were significantly better during L-serine intake compared to placebo (p = 0.04 and p = 0.03, respectively). Subjective evaluation of sleep quality on waking was thus improved. In addition, objective evaluation using actigraphy showed that the "number of nighttime awakenings" tended to be decreased (p = 0.08). These findings suggest that intake of L-serine before going to bed may improve human sleep. PMID:25197619

  3. Fate of N-nitrosodimethylamine, trihalomethane and haloacetic acid precursors in tertiary treatment including biofiltration.

    PubMed

    Farré, Maria José; Reungoat, Julien; Argaud, Francois Xavier; Rattier, Maxime; Keller, Jürg; Gernjak, Wolfgang

    2011-11-01

    The presence of disinfection by-products (DBPs) such as trihalomethanes (THMs), haloacetic acids (HAAs) and N-nitrosamines in water is of great concern due to their adverse effects on human health. In this work, the removal of N-nitrosodimethylamine (NDMA), total THM and five HAA precursors from secondary effluent by biological activated carbon (BAC) is investigated at full and pilot scale. In the pilot plant two filter media, sand and granular activated carbon, are tested. In addition, we evaluate the influence of ozonation prior to BAC filtration on its performance. Among the bulk of NDMA precursors, the fate of four pharmaceuticals containing a dimethylamino moiety in the chemical structure are individually investigated. Both NDMA formation potential and each of the studied pharmaceuticals are dramatically reduced by the BAC even in the absence of main ozonation prior to the filtration. The low removal of NDMA precursors at the sand filtration in comparison to the removal of NDMA precursors at the BAC suggests that adsorption may play an important role on the removal of NDMA precursors by BAC. Contrary, the precursors for THM and HAA formation are reduced in both sand filtration and BAC indicating that the precursors for the formation of these DBPs are to some extent biodegradable.

  4. Differential regulation of host genes including hepatic fatty acid synthase in HBV-transgenic mice.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hongmin; Li, Hong; Yang, Yixuan; Li, Sanglin; Ren, Hong; Zhang, Dazhi; Hu, Huaidong

    2013-06-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) is the most common of the hepatitis viruses that cause chronic liver infections in humans, and it is considered to be a major global health problem. To gain a better understanding of HBV pathogenesis, and identify novel putative targets for anti-HBV therapy, this study was designed to elucidate the differential expression of host proteins in liver tissue from HBV-transgenic mice. Liver samples from two groups, (1) HBV-transgenic (Tg) mice, (2) corresponding background normal mice, wild-type (WT) mice, were collected and subjected to iTRAQ and mass spectrometry analysis. In total, 1950 unique proteins were identified, and 68 proteins were found to be differentially expressed in HBV-Tg mice as compared with that in WT mice. Several differentially expressed proteins were further validated by real-time quantitative RT-PCR, Western blot and immunohistochemical analysis. Furthermore, the association of HBV replication with fatty acid synthase (FASN), one of the highly expressed proteins in HBV-Tg mice, was verified. Silencing of FASN expression in HepG2.2.15 cells suppressed viral replication through the IFN signaling pathway, and some downstream antiviral effectors. The implicated role of FASN in HBV replication provides an opportunity to test existing compounds against FASN for adjuvant therapy and/or treatment of HBV replication. PMID:23675653

  5. Chemical Genetics Uncovers Novel Inhibitors of Lignification, Including p-Iodobenzoic Acid Targeting CINNAMATE-4-HYDROXYLASE.

    PubMed

    Van de Wouwer, Dorien; Vanholme, Ruben; Decou, Raphaël; Goeminne, Geert; Audenaert, Dominique; Nguyen, Long; Höfer, René; Pesquet, Edouard; Vanholme, Bartel; Boerjan, Wout

    2016-09-01

    Plant secondary-thickened cell walls are characterized by the presence of lignin, a recalcitrant and hydrophobic polymer that provides mechanical strength and ensures long-distance water transport. Exactly the recalcitrance and hydrophobicity of lignin put a burden on the industrial processing efficiency of lignocellulosic biomass. Both forward and reverse genetic strategies have been used intensively to unravel the molecular mechanism of lignin deposition. As an alternative strategy, we introduce here a forward chemical genetic approach to find candidate inhibitors of lignification. A high-throughput assay to assess lignification in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) seedlings was developed and used to screen a 10-k library of structurally diverse, synthetic molecules. Of the 73 compounds that reduced lignin deposition, 39 that had a major impact were retained and classified into five clusters based on the shift they induced in the phenolic profile of Arabidopsis seedlings. One representative compound of each cluster was selected for further lignin-specific assays, leading to the identification of an aromatic compound that is processed in the plant into two fragments, both having inhibitory activity against lignification. One fragment, p-iodobenzoic acid, was further characterized as a new inhibitor of CINNAMATE 4-HYDROXYLASE, a key enzyme of the phenylpropanoid pathway synthesizing the building blocks of the lignin polymer. As such, we provide proof of concept of this chemical biology approach to screen for inhibitors of lignification and present a broad array of putative inhibitors of lignin deposition for further characterization. PMID:27485881

  6. Longitudinal distributions of dicarboxylic acids, ω-oxoacids, pyruvic acid, α-dicarbonyls, and fatty acids in the marine aerosols from the central Pacific including equatorial upwelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoque, Mir Md. Mozammal; Kawamura, Kimitaka

    2016-03-01

    Remote marine aerosol samples (total suspended particles) were collected during a cruise in the central Pacific from Japan to Mexico (1°59'N-35°N and 171°54'E-90°58'W). The aerosol samples were analyzed for dicarboxylic acids (C2-C11), ω-oxoacids, pyruvic acid, α-dicarbonyls, and fatty acids as well as organic and elemental carbon, water-soluble organic carbon, and total nitrogen (WSTN). During the study, diacids were the most abundant compound class followed by fatty acids, ω-oxoacids, and α-dicarbonyls. Molecular compositions of diacids showed a predominance of oxalic (C2) acid followed by malonic (C3) and succinic (C4) acids. Oxalic acid comprises 74% of total diacids. This result suggests that photochemical production of oxalic acid is significant over the central Pacific. Spatial distributions of diacids, ω-oxoacids, pyruvic acid, α-dicarbonyls, and fatty acids together with total carbon and WSTN showed higher abundances in the eastern equatorial Pacific where the upwelling of high-nutrient waters followed by high biological productivity is common, indicating that their in situ production is important in the warmer central Pacific through photochemical oxidation from their gaseous and particulate precursors. This study demonstrates that there is a strong linkage in biogeochemical cycles of carbon in the sea-air interface via ocean upwelling, phytoplankton productivity, sea-to-air emissions of organic matter, and formation of secondary organic aerosols in the eastern equatorial Pacific.

  7. Inferring selection in the Anopheles gambiae species complex: an example from immune-related serine protease inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Obbard, Darren J; Welch, John J; Little, Tom J

    2009-01-01

    Background Mosquitoes of the Anopheles gambiae species complex are the primary vectors of human malaria in sub-Saharan Africa. Many host genes have been shown to affect Plasmodium development in the mosquito, and so are expected to engage in an evolutionary arms race with the pathogen. However, there is little conclusive evidence that any of these mosquito genes evolve rapidly, or show other signatures of adaptive evolution. Methods Three serine protease inhibitors have previously been identified as candidate immune system genes mediating mosquito-Plasmodium interaction, and serine protease inhibitors have been identified as hot-spots of adaptive evolution in other taxa. Population-genetic tests for selection, including a recent multi-gene extension of the McDonald-Kreitman test, were applied to 16 serine protease inhibitors and 16 other genes sampled from the An. gambiae species complex in both East and West Africa. Results Serine protease inhibitors were found to show a marginally significant trend towards higher levels of amino acid diversity than other genes, and display extensive genetic structuring associated with the 2La chromosomal inversion. However, although serpins are candidate targets for strong parasite-mediated selection, no evidence was found for rapid adaptive evolution in these genes. Conclusion It is well known that phylogenetic and population history in the An. gambiae complex can present special problems for the application of standard population-genetic tests for selection, and this may explain the failure of this study to detect selection acting on serine protease inhibitors. The pitfalls of uncritically applying these tests in this species complex are highlighted, and the future prospects for detecting selection acting on the An. gambiae genome are discussed. PMID:19497100

  8. Heterogeneity of the serine synthetic pathway in Entamoeba species.

    PubMed

    Chiba, Yoko; Makiuchi, Takashi; Jeelani, Ghulam; Nozaki, Tomoyoshi

    2016-06-01

    Phosphoserine phosphatase (PSP) catalyzes the third step of the phosphorylated serine biosynthetic pathway, and occurred multiple times in evolution, while enzymes catalyzing the first and second steps in the pathway have single respective origins. In the present study, we examined the existence of PSP among genus Entamoeba including a human enteric parasite, Entamoeba histolytica. E. histolytica as well as majority of Entamoeba species have the first and second enzymes, but lacks PSP. In contrast, a reptilian enteric parasite, Entamoeba invadens possesses canonical PSP. Thus, there are variations in the existence of the serine biosynthetic ability among Entamoeba species. PMID:27268730

  9. Phage-encoded Serine Integrases and Other Large Serine Recombinases.

    PubMed

    Smith, Margaret C M

    2015-08-01

    The large serine recombinases (LSRs) are a family of enzymes, encoded in temperate phage genomes or on mobile elements, that precisely cut and recombine DNA in a highly controllable and predictable way. In phage integration, the LSRs act at specific sites, the attP site in the phage and the attB site in the host chromosome, where cleavage and strand exchange leads to the integrated prophage flanked by the recombinant sites attL and attR. The prophage can excise by recombination between attL and attR but this requires a phage-encoded accessory protein, the recombination directionality factor (RDF). Although the LSRs can bind specifically to all the recombination sites, only specific integrase-bound sites can pair in a synaptic complex prior to strand exchange. Recent structural information has led to a breakthrough in our understanding of the mechanism of the LSRs, notably how the LSRs bind to their substrates and how LSRs display this site-selectivity. We also understand that the RDFs exercise control over the LSRs by protein-protein interactions. Other recent work with the LSRs have contributed to our understanding of how all serine recombinases undergo strand exchange subunit rotation, facilitated by surfaces that resemble a molecular bearing.

  10. Purification and properties of serine hydroxymethyltransferase from Sulfolobus solfataricus.

    PubMed Central

    Delle Fratte, S; White, R H; Maras, B; Bossa, F; Schirch, V

    1997-01-01

    Serine hydroxymethyltransferase (SHMT) catalyzes the reversible cleavage of serine to glycine with the transfer of the one-carbon group to tetrahydrofolate to form 5,10-methylenetetrahydrofolate. No SHMT has been purified from a nonmethanogenic Archaea strain, in part because this group of organisms uses modified folates as the one-carbon acceptor. These modified folates are not readily available for use in assays for SHMT activity. This report describes the purification and characterization of SHMT from the thermophilic organism Sulfolobus solfataricus. The exchange of the alpha-proton of glycine with solvent protons in the absence of the modified folate was used as the activity assay. The purified protein catalyzes the synthesis of serine from glycine and a synthetic derivative of a fragment of the natural modified folate found in S. solfataricus. Replacement of the modified folate with tetrahydrofolate did not support serine synthesis. In addition, this SHMT also catalyzed the cleavage of both allo-threonine and beta-phenylserine in the absence of the modified folate. The cleavage of these two amino acids in the absence of tetrahydrofolate is a property of other characterized SHMTs. The enzyme contains covalently bound pyridoxal phosphate. Sequences of three peptides showed significant similarity with those of peptides of SHMTs from two methanogens. PMID:9393711

  11. Production, purification, and properties of serine carboxypeptidase from Paecilomyces carneus.

    PubMed

    Umetsu, H; Hishinuma, K; Wake, H; Ichishima, E

    1996-07-01

    Seventeen strains of the genus Paecilomyces were examined for their ability to produce serine carboxypeptidase. Paecilomyces carneus IFO 7012 exhibited the highest potency for serine carboxypeptidase production. A maximum yield of serine carboxypeptidase was obtained by koji culture of the strain at 22 degrees C for 7 days. The serine carboxypeptidase was purified to homogeneity from an extract of the koji culture. The molecular weight of the enzyme was estimated to be 47,000 by HPLC. The isoelectric point of the enzyme was determined to be 4.0, and the optimum pH was 4.0 toward benzyloxycarbonyl-L-glutamyl-L-tyrosine (Z-Glu-Tyr) and benzyloxycarbonyl-L-phenylalanyl-L-alanine (Z-Phe-Ala), respectively. The enzyme was strongly inhibited by phenylmethylsulfonyl fluoride and p-chloromercurybenzoate. Relative hydrolysis rates of N-acylpeptides and kinetic studies indicated that the enzyme preferred substrates having bulky amino acids in the penultimate position from their carboxy-termini. PMID:8661688

  12. A serine sensor for multicellularity in a bacterium

    PubMed Central

    Subramaniam, Arvind R; DeLoughery, Aaron; Bradshaw, Niels; Chen, Yun; O’Shea, Erin; Losick, Richard; Chai, Yunrong

    2013-01-01

    We report the discovery of a simple environmental sensing mechanism for biofilm formation in the bacterium Bacillus subtilis that operates without the involvement of a dedicated RNA or protein. Certain serine codons, the four TCN codons, in the gene for the biofilm repressor SinR caused a lowering of SinR levels under biofilm-inducing conditions. Synonymous substitutions of these TCN codons with AGC or AGT impaired biofilm formation and gene expression. Conversely, switching AGC or AGT to TCN codons upregulated biofilm formation. Genome-wide ribosome profiling showed that ribosome density was higher at UCN codons than at AGC or AGU during biofilm formation. Serine starvation recapitulated the effect of biofilm-inducing conditions on ribosome occupancy and SinR production. As serine is one of the first amino acids to be exhausted at the end of exponential phase growth, reduced translation speed at serine codons may be exploited by other microbes in adapting to stationary phase. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.01501.001 PMID:24347549

  13. An update on serine deficiency disorders.

    PubMed

    van der Crabben, S N; Verhoeven-Duif, N M; Brilstra, E H; Van Maldergem, L; Coskun, T; Rubio-Gozalbo, E; Berger, R; de Koning, T J

    2013-07-01

    Serine deficiency disorders are caused by a defect in one of the three synthesising enzymes of the L-serine biosynthesis pathway. Serine deficiency disorders give rise to a neurological phenotype with psychomotor retardation, microcephaly and seizures in newborns and children or progressive polyneuropathy in adult patients. There are three defects that cause serine deficiency of which 3-phosphoglycerate dehydrogenase (3-PGDH) deficiency, the defect affecting the first step in the pathway, has been reported most frequently. The other two disorders in L-serine biosynthesis phosphoserine aminotransferase (PSAT) deficiency and phosphoserine phosphatase (PSP) deficiency have been reported only in a limited number of patients. The biochemical hallmarks of all three disorders are low concentrations of serine in cerebrospinal fluid and plasma. Prompt recognition of affected patients is important, since serine deficiency disorders are treatable causes of neurometabolic disorders. The use of age-related reference values for serine in CSF and plasma can be of great help in establishing a correct diagnosis of serine deficiency, in particular in newborns and young children. PMID:23463425

  14. Characterization of a serine proteinase homologous (SPH) in Chinese mitten crab Eriocheir sinensis.

    PubMed

    Qin, Chuanjie; Chen, Liqiao; Qin, Jian G; Zhao, Daxian; Zhang, Hao; Wu, Ping; Li, Erchao

    2010-01-01

    The serine protease homologous (SPH) is an important cofactor of prophenoloxidase-activating enzyme (PPAE). The gene of SPH of Chinese mitten crab Eriocheir sinensis (EsSPH) in hemocytes was cloned and characterized using reverse transcript polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and rapid amplification of cDNA ends (RACE). The SPH cDNA consisted of 1386 bp with an open reading frame (ORF) encoded a protein of 378 amino acids, 154 bp 5'-untranslated region, and 95 bp 3'-untranslated region. Sequence comparisons against the GenBank database showed that EsSPH deduced amino acids had an overall identity to the gene of serine protease family from 41% to 70% of 15 invertebrate species. The protein had the structural characteristics of SPH, including the conserved six cysteine residues in the N-terminal clip domain and the functional activity (His157, Asp209, Gly311) in the C-terminal serine proteinase-like domain. To analyze the role of EsSPH in an acute infection, the temporal expression of the EsSPH gene after the Aeromonas hydrophila challenge was measured by real-time RT-PCR. The EsSPH transcripts in hemocytes significantly increased at 6 h, 12 h and 48 h over time after the A. hydrophila injection. This expression pattern shows that EsSPH has the potential to defend against invading microorganisms. The mRNA transcripts of EsSPH were detected in all tissues with the highest in the hepatopancreas. Interestingly, the mRNA transcripts of EsSPH and proPO were found in ova and expressed in oosperms, suggesting that the maternal transfer of EsSPH and proPO may exit in crab, but this warrants confirmation in further research.

  15. Selected nutrient contents, fatty acid composition, including conjugated linoleic acid, and retention values in separable lean from lamb rib loins as affected by external fat and cooking method.

    PubMed

    Badiani, Anna; Montellato, Lara; Bochicchio, Davide; Anfossi, Paola; Zanardi, Emanuela; Maranesi, Magda

    2004-08-11

    Proximate composition and fatty acid profile, conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) isomers included, were determined in separable lean of raw and cooked lamb rib loins. The cooking methods compared, which were also investigated for cooking yields and true nutrient retention values, were dry heating of fat-on cuts and moist heating of fat-off cuts; the latter method was tested as a sort of dietetic approach against the more traditional former type. With significantly (P < 0.05) lower cooking losses, dry heating of fat-on rib-loins produced slightly (although only rarely significantly) higher retention values for all of the nutrients considered, including CLA isomers. On the basis of the retention values obtained, both techniques led to a minimum migration of lipids into the separable lean, which was higher (P < 0.05) in dry heating than in moist heating, and was characterized by the prevalence of saturated and monounsaturated fatty acids. On the whole, the response to cooking of the class of CLA isomers (including that of the nutritionally most important isomer cis-9,trans-11) was more similar to that of the monounsaturated than the polyunsaturated fatty acids.

  16. Type II Transmembrane Serine Proteases*

    PubMed Central

    Bugge, Thomas H.; Antalis, Toni M.; Wu, Qingyu

    2009-01-01

    Analysis of genome and expressed sequence tag data bases at the turn of the millennium unveiled a new protease family named the type II transmembrane serine proteases (TTSPs) in a Journal of Biological Chemistry minireview (Hooper, J. D., Clements, J. A., Quigley, J. P., and Antalis, T. M. (2001) J. Biol. Chem. 276, 857–860). Since then, the number of known TTSPs has more than doubled, and more importantly, our understanding of the physiological functions of individual TTSPs and their contribution to human disease has greatly increased. Progress has also been made in identifying molecular substrates and endogenous inhibitors. This minireview summarizes the current knowledge of the rapidly advancing TTSP field. PMID:19487698

  17. A PHGDH inhibitor reveals coordination of serine synthesis and 1-carbon unit fate

    PubMed Central

    Pacold, Michael E.; Brimacombe, Kyle R.; Chan, Sze Ham; Rohde, Jason M.; Lewis, Caroline A.; Swier, Lotteke J.Y.M.; Possemato, Richard; Chen, Walter W.; Sullivan, Lucas B.; Fiske, Brian P.; Cho, Sung Won; Freinkman, Elizaveta; Birsoy, Kıvanç; Abu-Remaileh, Monther; Shaul, Yoav D.; Liu, Chieh Min; Zhou, Minerva; Koh, Min Jung; Chung, Haeyoon; Davidson, Shawn M.; Luengo, Alba; Wang, Amy Q.; Xu, Xin; Yasgar, Adam; Liu, Li; Rai, Ganesha; Westover, Kenneth D.; Vander Heiden, Matthew G.; Shen, Min; Gray, Nathanael S.; Boxer, Matthew B.; Sabatini, David M.

    2016-01-01

    Serine is a both a proteinogenic amino acid and the source of one-carbon units essential for de novo purine and deoxythymidine synthesis. In the canonical glucose-derived serine synthesis pathway, Homo sapiens phosphoglycerate dehydrogenase (PHGDH) catalyzes the first, rate-limiting step. Genetic loss of PHGDH is toxic towards PHGDH-overexpressing breast cancer cell lines even in the presence of exogenous serine. Here, we use a quantitative high-throughput screen to identify small molecule PHGDH inhibitors. These compounds reduce the production of glucose-derived serine in cells and suppress the growth of PHGDH-dependent cancer cells in culture and in orthotopic xenograft tumors. Surprisingly, PHGDH inhibition reduced the incorporation into nucleotides of one-carbon units from glucose-derived and exogenous serine. We conclude that glycolytic serine synthesis coordinates the use of one-carbon units from endogenous and exogenous serine in nucleotide synthesis, and suggest that one-carbon unit wasting may contribute to the efficacy of PHGDH inhibitors in vitro and in vivo. PMID:27110680

  18. Evaluation of the number of ionogenic groups of inulinase by acid-base titration.

    PubMed

    Kovaleva, T A; Holyavka, M G; Rezvan, S G; Kozhedub, S V

    2008-06-01

    Acid base titration showed that Aspergillus awamori inulinase includes 178 asparaginic and glutamic acid residues, 20 histidine, 10 serine, and 34 lysine and tyrosine residues. Denaturation temperature for this enzyme was calculated using analysis of the proportion of stabilizing and destabilizing amino acids in the molecule.

  19. Evolutionary Analysis of Novel Serine Proteases in the Venom Gland Transcriptome of Bitis gabonica rhinoceros

    PubMed Central

    Vaiyapuri, Sakthivel; Wagstaff, Simon C.; Harrison, Robert A.; Gibbins, Jonathan M.; Hutchinson, E. Gail

    2011-01-01

    Background Serine proteases are major components of viper venom and target various stages of the blood coagulation system in victims and prey. A better understanding of the diversity of serine proteases and other enzymes present in snake venom will help to understand how the complexity of snake venom has evolved and will aid the development of novel therapeutics for treating snake bites. Methodology and Principal Findings Four serine protease-encoding genes from the venom gland transcriptome of Bitis gabonica rhinoceros were amplified and sequenced. Mass spectrometry suggests the four enzymes corresponding to these genes are present in the venom of B. g. rhinoceros. Two of the enzymes, rhinocerases 2 and 3 have substitutions to two of the serine protease catalytic triad residues and are thus unlikely to be catalytically active, though they may have evolved other toxic functions. The other two enzymes, rhinocerases 4 and 5, have classical serine protease catalytic triad residues and thus are likely to be catalytically active, however they have glycine rather than the more typical aspartic acid at the base of the primary specificity pocket (position 189). Based on a detailed analysis of these sequences we suggest that alternative splicing together with individual amino acid mutations may have been involved in their evolution. Changes within amino acid segments which were previously proposed to undergo accelerated change in venom serine proteases have also been observed. Conclusions and Significance Our study provides further insight into the diversity of serine protease isoforms present within snake venom and discusses their possible functions and how they may have evolved. These multiple serine protease isoforms with different substrate specificities may enhance the envenomation effects and help the snake to adapt to new habitats and diets. Our findings have potential for helping the future development of improved therapeutics for snake bites. PMID:21731776

  20. Temporal changes (1997-2012) of perfluoroalkyl acids and selected precursors (including isomers) in Swedish human serum.

    PubMed

    Gebbink, Wouter A; Glynn, Anders; Berger, Urs

    2015-04-01

    Concentrations (including isomer patterns) and temporal changes (1997-2012) of perfluoroalkyl acids (PFAAs) and selected perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS) and perfluoroalkyl carboxylic acid (PFCA) precursors were determined in serum samples from Swedish women. Perfluorooctane sulfonamide (FOSA) and perfluorooctane sulfonamidoacetic acid (FOSAA), as well as its N-methyl and N-ethyl derivatives (MeFOSAA and EtFOSAA) were consistently detected. Highest PFOS precursor concentrations were found for EtFOSAA (before year 2000) or MeFOSAA and FOSAA (after 2000). Disappearance half-lives for all PFOS precursors were shorter compared to PFOS. 4:2/6:2 and 6:2/6:2 polyfluoroalkyl phosphate diesters (diPAPs) were detected in <60% of the samples, whereas 6:2/8:2 and 8:2/8:2 diPAPs were detected in >60% of the samples, but showed no significant change in concentrations over time. Linear and sum-branched isomers were quantified separately for three PFAAs and three precursors. Significant changes between 1997 and 2012 in the % linear isomer were observed for PFOA and FOSA (increase) and PFOS (decrease).

  1. The N-methyl D-aspartate receptor glycine site and D-serine metabolism: an evolutionary perspective.

    PubMed Central

    Schell, Michael J

    2004-01-01

    The N-methyl D-aspartate (NMDA) type of glutamate receptor requires two distinct agonists to operate. Glycine is assumed to be the endogenous ligand for the NMDA receptor glycine site, but this notion has been challenged by the discovery of high levels of endogenous d-serine in the mammalian forebrain. I have outlined an evolutionary framework for the appearance of a glycine site in animals and the metabolic events leading to high levels of D-serine in brain. Sequence alignments of the glycine-binding regions, along with the scant experimental data available, suggest that the properties of invertebrate NMDA receptor glycine sites are probably different from those in vertebrates. The synthesis of D-serine in brain is due to a pyridoxal-5'-phosphate (B(6))-requiring serine racemase in glia. Although it remains unknown when serine racemase first evolved, data concerning the evolution of B(6) enzymes, along with the known occurrences of serine racemases in animals, point to D-serine synthesis arising around the divergence time of arthropods. D-Serine catabolism occurs via the ancient peroxisomal enzyme d-amino acid oxidase (DAO), whose ontogenetic expression in the hindbrain of mammals is delayed until the postnatal period and absent from the forebrain. The phylogeny of D-serine metabolism has relevance to our understanding of brain ontogeny, schizophrenia and neurotransmitter dynamics. PMID:15306409

  2. The Saccharomyces cerevisiae poly(A)-binding protein is subject to multiple post-translational modifications, including the methylation of glutamic acid.

    PubMed

    Low, Jason K K; Hart-Smith, Gene; Erce, Melissa A; Wilkins, Marc R

    2014-01-10

    Poly(A)-binding protein in mouse and man was recently found to be highly post-translationally modified. Here we analysed an ortholog of this protein, Pab1 from Saccharomyces cerevisiae, to assess the conservation and thus likely importance of these modifications. Pab1 showed the presence of six sites of methylated glutamate, five sites of lysine acetylation, and one phosphorylation of serine. Many modifications on Pab1 showed either complete conservation with those on human or mouse PABPC1, were present on nearby residues and/or were present in the same domain(s). The conservation of methylated glutamate, an unusual modification, was of particular note and suggests a conserved function. Comparison of methylated glutamate sites in human, mouse and yeast poly(A)-binding protein, along with methylation sites catalysed by CheR L-glutamyl protein methyltransferase from Salmonella typhimurium, revealed that the methylation of glutamate preferentially occurs in EE and DE motifs or other small regions of acidic amino acids. The conservation of methylated glutamate in the same protein between mouse, man and yeast suggests the presence of a eukaryotic l-glutamyl protein methyltransferase and that the modification is of functional significance.

  3. Thermodynamic characteristics of protolytic equilibria of L-serine in aqueous solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kochergina, L. A.; Volkov, A. V.; Khokhlova, E. A.; Krutova, O. N.

    2011-05-01

    The heat effects of the reaction of aqueous solution of L-serine with aqueous solutions of HNO3 and KOH were determined by calorimetry at temperatures of 288.15, 298.15, and 308.15 K, and ionic strength values of 0.2, 0.5, and 1.0 (background electrolyte, KNO3). Standard thermodynamic characteristics (Δr H o, Δr G o, Δr S o, Δ C {/p o}) of the acid-base reactions in aqueous solutions of L-serine were calculated. The effect of the concentration of background electrolyte and temperature on the heats of dissociation of amino acid was considered. The combustion energy of L-serine by bomb calorimetry in the medium of oxygen was determined. The standard combustion and formation enthalpies of crystalline L-serine were calculated. The heats of dissolution of crystalline L-serine in water and solutions of potassium hydroxide at 298.15 K were measured by direct calorimetry. The standard enthalpies of formation of L-serine and products of its dissociation in aqueous solution were calculated.

  4. Neutral serine proteases of neutrophils.

    PubMed

    Kettritz, Ralph

    2016-09-01

    Neutrophil serine proteases (NSPs) exercise tissue-degrading and microbial-killing effects. The spectrum of NSP-mediated functions grows continuously, not least because of methodological progress. Sensitive and specific FRET substrates were developed to study the proteolytic activity of each NSP member. Advanced biochemical methods are beginning to characterize common and specific NSP substrates. The resulting novel information indicates that NSPs contribute not only to genuine inflammatory neutrophil functions but also to autoimmunity, metabolic conditions, and cancer. Tight regulatory mechanisms control the proteolytic potential of NSPs. However, not all NSP functions depend on their enzymatic activity. Proteinase-3 (PR3) is somewhat unique among the NSPs for PR3 functions as an autoantigen. Patients with small-vessel vasculitis develop autoantibodies to PR3 that bind their target antigens on the neutrophil surface and trigger neutrophil activation. These activated cells subsequently contribute to vascular necrosis with life-threatening multiorgan failure. This article discusses various aspects of NSP biology and highlights translational aspects with strong clinical implications. PMID:27558338

  5. The S8 serine, C1A cysteine and A1 aspartic protease families in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Beers, Eric P; Jones, Alan M; Dickerman, Allan W

    2004-01-01

    The Arabidopsis thaliana genome has over 550 protease sequences representing all five catalytic types: serine, cysteine, aspartic acid, metallo and threonine (MEROPS peptidase database, http://merops.sanger.ac.uk/), which probably reflect a wide variety of as yet unidentified functions performed by plant proteases. Recent indications that the 26S proteasome, a T1 family-threonine protease, is a regulator of light and hormone responsive signal transduction highlight the potential of proteases to participate in many aspects of plant growth and development. Recent discoveries that proteases are required for stomatal distribution, embryo development and disease resistance point to wider roles for four additional multigene families that include some of the most frequently studied (yet poorly understood) plant proteases: the subtilisin-like, serine proteases (family S8), the papain-like, cysteine proteases (family C1A), the pepsin-like, aspartic proteases (family A1) and the plant matrixin, metalloproteases (family M10A). In this report, 54 subtilisin-like, 30 papain-like and 59 pepsin-like proteases from Arabidopsis, are compared with S8, C1A and A1 proteases known from other plant species at the functional, phylogenetic and gene structure levels. Examples of structural conservation between S8, C1A and A1 genes from rice, barley, tomato and soybean and those from Arabidopsis are noted, indicating that some common, essential plant protease roles were established before the divergence of monocots and eudicots. Numerous examples of tandem duplications of protease genes and evidence for a variety of restricted expression patterns suggest that a high degree of specialization exists among proteases within each family. We propose that comprehensive analysis of the functions of these genes in Arabidopsis will firmly establish serine, cysteine and aspartic proteases as regulators and effectors of a wide range of plant processes.

  6. Characterization of a novel Kazal-type serine proteinase inhibitor of Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Pariani, Sebastián; Contreras, Marisol; Rossi, Franco R; Sander, Valeria; Corigliano, Mariana G; Simón, Francisco; Busi, María V; Gomez-Casati, Diego F; Pieckenstain, Fernando L; Duschak, Vilma G; Clemente, Marina

    2016-04-01

    Many different types of serine proteinase inhibitors have been involved in several kinds of plant physiological processes, including defense mechanisms against phytopathogens. Kazal-type serine proteinase inhibitors, which are included in the serine proteinase inhibitor family, are present in several organisms. These proteins play a regulatory role in processes that involve serine proteinases like trypsin, chymotrypsin, thrombin, elastase and/or subtilisin. In the present work, we characterized two putative Kazal-type serine proteinase inhibitors from Arabidopsis thaliana, which have a single putative Kazal-type domain. The expression of these inhibitors is transiently induced in response to leaf infection by Botrytis cinerea, suggesting that they play some role in defense against pathogens. We also evaluated the inhibitory specificity of one of the Kazal-type serine proteinase inhibitors, which resulted to be induced during the local response to B. cinerea infection. The recombinant Kazal-type serine proteinase inhibitor displayed high specificity for elastase and subtilisin, but low specificity for trypsin, suggesting differences in its selectivity. In addition, this inhibitor exhibited a strong antifungal activity inhibiting the germination rate of B. cinerea conidia in vitro. Due to the important role of proteinase inhibitors in plant protection against pathogens and pests, the information about Kazal-type proteinase inhibitors described in the present work could contribute to improving current methods for plant protection against pathogens.

  7. Serine-rich protein is a novel positive regulator for silicon accumulation in mangrove.

    PubMed

    Sahebi, Mahbod; Hanafi, Mohamed M; Siti Nor Akmar, A; Rafii, Mohd Y; Azizi, Parisa; Idris, A S

    2015-02-10

    Silicon (Si) plays an important role in reducing plant susceptibility against a variety of different biotic and abiotic stresses; and also has an important regulatory role in soil to avoid heavy metal toxicity and providing suitable growing conditions for plants. A full-length cDNAs of 696bp of serine-rich protein was cloned from mangrove plant (Rhizophora apiculata) by amplification of cDNA ends from an expressed sequence tag homologous to groundnut (Arachis hypogaea), submitted to NCBI (KF211374). This serine-rich protein gene encodes a deduced protein of 223 amino acids. The transcript titre of the serine-rich protein was found to be strongly enriched in roots compared with the leaves of two month old mangrove plants and expression level of this serine-rich protein was found to be strongly induced when the mangrove seedlings were exposed to SiO2. Expression of the serine-rich protein transgenic was detected in transgenic Arabidopsis thaliana, where the amount of serine increased from 1.02 to 37.8mg/g. The same trend was also seen in Si content in the roots (14.3%) and leaves (7.4%) of the transgenic A. thaliana compared to the wild-type plants under Si treatment. The biological results demonstrated that the accumulation of the serine amino acid in the vegetative tissues of the transgenic plants enhanced their ability to absorb and accumulate more Si in the roots and leaves and suggests that the serine-rich protein gene has potential for use in genetic engineering of different stress tolerance characteristics.

  8. Serine-rich protein is a novel positive regulator for silicon accumulation in mangrove.

    PubMed

    Sahebi, Mahbod; Hanafi, Mohamed M; Siti Nor Akmar, A; Rafii, Mohd Y; Azizi, Parisa; Idris, A S

    2015-02-10

    Silicon (Si) plays an important role in reducing plant susceptibility against a variety of different biotic and abiotic stresses; and also has an important regulatory role in soil to avoid heavy metal toxicity and providing suitable growing conditions for plants. A full-length cDNAs of 696bp of serine-rich protein was cloned from mangrove plant (Rhizophora apiculata) by amplification of cDNA ends from an expressed sequence tag homologous to groundnut (Arachis hypogaea), submitted to NCBI (KF211374). This serine-rich protein gene encodes a deduced protein of 223 amino acids. The transcript titre of the serine-rich protein was found to be strongly enriched in roots compared with the leaves of two month old mangrove plants and expression level of this serine-rich protein was found to be strongly induced when the mangrove seedlings were exposed to SiO2. Expression of the serine-rich protein transgenic was detected in transgenic Arabidopsis thaliana, where the amount of serine increased from 1.02 to 37.8mg/g. The same trend was also seen in Si content in the roots (14.3%) and leaves (7.4%) of the transgenic A. thaliana compared to the wild-type plants under Si treatment. The biological results demonstrated that the accumulation of the serine amino acid in the vegetative tissues of the transgenic plants enhanced their ability to absorb and accumulate more Si in the roots and leaves and suggests that the serine-rich protein gene has potential for use in genetic engineering of different stress tolerance characteristics. PMID:25479011

  9. A Spider-Derived Kunitz-Type Serine Protease Inhibitor That Acts as a Plasmin Inhibitor and an Elastase Inhibitor

    PubMed Central

    Wan, Hu; Lee, Kwang Sik; Kim, Bo Yeon; Zou, Feng Ming; Yoon, Hyung Joo; Je, Yeon Ho; Li, Jianhong; Jin, Byung Rae

    2013-01-01

    Kunitz-type serine protease inhibitors are involved in various physiological processes, such as ion channel blocking, blood coagulation, fibrinolysis, and inflammation. While spider-derived Kunitz-type proteins show activity in trypsin or chymotrypsin inhibition and K+ channel blocking, no additional role for these proteins has been elucidated. In this study, we identified the first spider (Araneus ventricosus) Kunitz-type serine protease inhibitor (AvKTI) that acts as a plasmin inhibitor and an elastase inhibitor. AvKTI possesses a Kunitz domain consisting of a 57-amino-acid mature peptide that displays features consistent with Kunitz-type inhibitors, including six conserved cysteine residues and a P1 lysine residue. Recombinant AvKTI, expressed in baculovirus-infected insect cells, showed a dual inhibitory activity against trypsin (Ki 7.34 nM) and chymotrypsin (Ki 37.75 nM), defining a role for AvKTI as a spider-derived Kunitz-type serine protease inhibitor. Additionally, AvKTI showed no detectable inhibitory effects on factor Xa, thrombin, or tissue plasminogen activator; however, AvKTI inhibited plasmin (Ki 4.89 nM) and neutrophil elastase (Ki 169.07 nM), indicating that it acts as an antifibrinolytic factor and an antielastolytic factor. These findings constitute molecular evidence that AvKTI acts as a plasmin inhibitor and an elastase inhibitor and also provide a novel view of the functions of a spider-derived Kunitz-type serine protease inhibitor. PMID:23308198

  10. Influence of cold stress on contents of soluble sugars, vitamin C and free amino acids including gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) in spinach (Spinacia oleracea).

    PubMed

    Yoon, Young-Eun; Kuppusamy, Saranya; Cho, Kye Man; Kim, Pil Joo; Kwack, Yong-Bum; Lee, Yong Bok

    2017-01-15

    The contents of soluble sugars (sucrose, fructose, glucose, maltose and raffinose), vitamin C and free amino acids (34 compounds, essential and non-essential) were quantified in open-field and greenhouse-grown spinaches in response to cold stress using liquid chromatography. In general, greenhouse cultivation produced nutritionally high value spinach in a shorter growing period, where the soluble sugars, vitamin C and total amino acids concentrations, including essential were in larger amounts compared to those grown in open-field scenarios. Further, low temperature exposure of spinach during a shorter growth period resulted in the production of spinach with high sucrose, ascorbate, proline, gamma-aminobutyric acid, valine and leucine content, and these constitute the most important energy/nutrient sources. In conclusion, cultivation of spinach in greenhouse at a low temperature (4-7°C) and exposure for a shorter period (7-21days) before harvest is recommended. This strategy will produce a high quality product that people can eat. PMID:27542466

  11. Influence of cold stress on contents of soluble sugars, vitamin C and free amino acids including gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) in spinach (Spinacia oleracea).

    PubMed

    Yoon, Young-Eun; Kuppusamy, Saranya; Cho, Kye Man; Kim, Pil Joo; Kwack, Yong-Bum; Lee, Yong Bok

    2017-01-15

    The contents of soluble sugars (sucrose, fructose, glucose, maltose and raffinose), vitamin C and free amino acids (34 compounds, essential and non-essential) were quantified in open-field and greenhouse-grown spinaches in response to cold stress using liquid chromatography. In general, greenhouse cultivation produced nutritionally high value spinach in a shorter growing period, where the soluble sugars, vitamin C and total amino acids concentrations, including essential were in larger amounts compared to those grown in open-field scenarios. Further, low temperature exposure of spinach during a shorter growth period resulted in the production of spinach with high sucrose, ascorbate, proline, gamma-aminobutyric acid, valine and leucine content, and these constitute the most important energy/nutrient sources. In conclusion, cultivation of spinach in greenhouse at a low temperature (4-7°C) and exposure for a shorter period (7-21days) before harvest is recommended. This strategy will produce a high quality product that people can eat.

  12. Impact of hedonic evaluation on consumers' preferences for beef attributes including its enrichment with n-3 and CLA fatty acids.

    PubMed

    Baba, Yasmina; Kallas, Zein; Costa-Font, Montserrat; Gil, José María; Realini, Carolina E

    2016-01-01

    The impact of hedonic evaluation on consumers' preferences for beef attributes was evaluated (origin, animal diet, fat content, color, price) including its enrichment with omega-3 (n-3) and conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) fatty acids. One group of consumers (n=325) received information about n-3 and CLA, while the other group (n=322) received no information. Consumers conducted a Discrete Choice Experiment (DCE), using the recently developed Generalized Multinomial Logit model; followed by a blind hedonic evaluation of beef samples, which were identified after tasting, and finally repeated the DCE. Results showed that hedonic evaluation had a significant impact on consumers' preferences, which were similar after tasting for all consumers, with less emphasis on the fat content, color, and origin attributes and greater emphasis on animal diet. Preference for n-3 enriched beef increased, while preference for CLA enriched beef was still not significant after tasting. The information provided had a significant effect on consumers' beef preferences, but no significant impact on beef liking scores.

  13. Impact of hedonic evaluation on consumers' preferences for beef attributes including its enrichment with n-3 and CLA fatty acids.

    PubMed

    Baba, Yasmina; Kallas, Zein; Costa-Font, Montserrat; Gil, José María; Realini, Carolina E

    2016-01-01

    The impact of hedonic evaluation on consumers' preferences for beef attributes was evaluated (origin, animal diet, fat content, color, price) including its enrichment with omega-3 (n-3) and conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) fatty acids. One group of consumers (n=325) received information about n-3 and CLA, while the other group (n=322) received no information. Consumers conducted a Discrete Choice Experiment (DCE), using the recently developed Generalized Multinomial Logit model; followed by a blind hedonic evaluation of beef samples, which were identified after tasting, and finally repeated the DCE. Results showed that hedonic evaluation had a significant impact on consumers' preferences, which were similar after tasting for all consumers, with less emphasis on the fat content, color, and origin attributes and greater emphasis on animal diet. Preference for n-3 enriched beef increased, while preference for CLA enriched beef was still not significant after tasting. The information provided had a significant effect on consumers' beef preferences, but no significant impact on beef liking scores. PMID:26331961

  14. Comprehensive Analysis of a Vibrio parahaemolyticus Strain Extracellular Serine Protease VpSP37

    PubMed Central

    Bennici, Carmelo; Quatrini, Paola; Catania, Valentina; Mazzola, Salvatore; Ghersi, Giulio; Cuttitta, Angela

    2015-01-01

    Proteases play an important role in the field of tissue dissociation combined with regenerative medicine. During the years new sources of proteolytic enzymes have been studied including proteases from different marine organisms both eukaryotic and prokaryotic. Herein we have purified a secreted component of an isolate of Vibrio parahaemolyticus, with electrophoretic mobilities corresponding to 36 kDa, belonging to the serine proteases family. Sequencing of the N-terminus enabled the in silico identification of the whole primary structure consisting of 345 amino acid residues with a calculated molecular mass of 37.4 KDa. The purified enzyme, named VpSP37, contains a Serine protease domain between residues 35 and 276 and a canonical Trypsin/Chimotrypsin 3D structure. Functional assays were performed to evaluate protease activity of purified enzyme. Additionally the performance of VpSP37 was evaluated in tissue dissociations experiments and the use of such enzyme as a component of enzyme blend for tissue dissociation procedures is strongly recommended. PMID:26162075

  15. Mycobacterium tuberculosis Serine/Threonine Protein Kinases

    PubMed Central

    PRISIC, SLADJANA; HUSSON, ROBERT N.

    2014-01-01

    The Mycobacterium tuberculosis genome encodes 11 serine/threonine protein kinases (STPKs). A similar number of two-component systems are also present, indicating that these two signal transduction mechanisms are both important in the adaptation of this bacterial pathogen to its environment. The M. tuberculosis phosphoproteome includes hundreds of Ser- and Thr-phosphorylated proteins that participate in all aspects of M. tuberculosis biology, supporting a critical role for the STPKs in regulating M. tuberculosis physiology. Nine of the STPKs are receptor type kinases, with an extracytoplasmic sensor domain and an intracellular kinase domain, indicating that these kinases transduce external signals. Two other STPKs are cytoplasmic and have regulatory domains that sense changes within the cell. Structural analysis of some of the STPKs has led to advances in our understanding of the mechanisms by which these STPKs are activated and regulated. Functional analysis has provided insights into the effects of phosphorylation on the activity of several proteins, but for most phosphoproteins the role of phosphorylation in regulating function is unknown. Major future challenges include characterizing the functional effects of phosphorylation for this large number of phosphoproteins, identifying the cognate STPKs for these phosphoproteins, and determining the signals that the STPKs sense. Ultimately, combining these STPK-regulated processes into larger, integrated regulatory networks will provide deeper insight into M. tuberculosis adaptive mechanisms that contribute to tuberculosis pathogenesis. Finally, the STPKs offer attractive targets for inhibitor development that may lead to new therapies for drug-susceptible and drug-resistant tuberculosis. PMID:25429354

  16. Serine Metabolism Supports the Methionine Cycle and DNA/RNA Methylation through De Novo ATP Synthesis in Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Maddocks, Oliver D.K.; Labuschagne, Christiaan F.; Adams, Peter D.; Vousden, Karen H.

    2016-01-01

    Summary Crosstalk between cellular metabolism and the epigenome regulates epigenetic and metabolic homeostasis and normal cell behavior. Changes in cancer cell metabolism can directly impact epigenetic regulation and promote transformation. Here we analyzed the contribution of methionine and serine metabolism to methylation of DNA and RNA. Serine can contribute to this pathway by providing one-carbon units to regenerate methionine from homocysteine. While we observed this contribution under methionine-depleted conditions, unexpectedly, we found that serine supported the methionine cycle in the presence and absence of methionine through de novo ATP synthesis. Serine starvation increased the methionine/S-adenosyl methionine ratio, decreasing the transfer of methyl groups to DNA and RNA. While serine starvation dramatically decreased ATP levels, this was accompanied by lower AMP and did not activate AMPK. This work highlights the difference between ATP turnover and new ATP synthesis and defines a vital function of nucleotide synthesis beyond making nucleic acids. PMID:26774282

  17. Serine Metabolism Supports the Methionine Cycle and DNA/RNA Methylation through De Novo ATP Synthesis in Cancer Cells.

    PubMed

    Maddocks, Oliver D K; Labuschagne, Christiaan F; Adams, Peter D; Vousden, Karen H

    2016-01-21

    Crosstalk between cellular metabolism and the epigenome regulates epigenetic and metabolic homeostasis and normal cell behavior. Changes in cancer cell metabolism can directly impact epigenetic regulation and promote transformation. Here we analyzed the contribution of methionine and serine metabolism to methylation of DNA and RNA. Serine can contribute to this pathway by providing one-carbon units to regenerate methionine from homocysteine. While we observed this contribution under methionine-depleted conditions, unexpectedly, we found that serine supported the methionine cycle in the presence and absence of methionine through de novo ATP synthesis. Serine starvation increased the methionine/S-adenosyl methionine ratio, decreasing the transfer of methyl groups to DNA and RNA. While serine starvation dramatically decreased ATP levels, this was accompanied by lower AMP and did not activate AMPK. This work highlights the difference between ATP turnover and new ATP synthesis and defines a vital function of nucleotide synthesis beyond making nucleic acids.

  18. The Cryptic dsdA Gene Encodes a Functional D-Serine Dehydratase in Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1.

    PubMed

    Li, Guoqing; Lu, Chung-Dar

    2016-06-01

    D-Serine, an important neurotransmitter, also contributes to bacterial adaptation and virulence in humans. It was reported that Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 can grow on D-serine as the sole nitrogen source, and growth was severely reduced in the dadA mutant devoid of the D-alanine dehydrogenase with broad substrate specificity. In this study, the dsdA gene (PA3357) encoding a putative D-serine dehydratase was subjected to further characterization. Growth on D-serine as the sole source of nitrogen was retained in the ∆dsdA mutant and was abolished completely in the ∆dadA and ∆dadA-∆dsdA mutants. However, when complemented by dsdA on a plasmid, the double mutant was able to grow on D-serine as the sole source of carbon and nitrogen, supporting the proposed biochemical function of DsdA in the conversion of D-serine into pyruvate and ammonia. Among D- and L-amino acids tested, only D-serine and D-threonine could serve as the substrates of DsdA, and the Km of DsdA with D-serine was calculated to be 330 μM. Comparative genomics revealed that this cryptic dsdA gene was highly conserved in strains of P. aeruginosa, and that most strains of Pseudomonas putida possess putative dsdCAX genes encoding a transcriptional regulator DsdC and a D-serine transporter DsdX as in enteric bacteria. In conclusion, this study supports the presence of a cryptic dsdA gene encoding a functional D-serine dehydratase in P. aeruginosa, and the absence of dsdA expression in response to exogenous D-serine might be due to the loss of regulatory elements for gene activation during evolution. PMID:26957519

  19. The Cryptic dsdA Gene Encodes a Functional D-Serine Dehydratase in Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1.

    PubMed

    Li, Guoqing; Lu, Chung-Dar

    2016-06-01

    D-Serine, an important neurotransmitter, also contributes to bacterial adaptation and virulence in humans. It was reported that Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 can grow on D-serine as the sole nitrogen source, and growth was severely reduced in the dadA mutant devoid of the D-alanine dehydrogenase with broad substrate specificity. In this study, the dsdA gene (PA3357) encoding a putative D-serine dehydratase was subjected to further characterization. Growth on D-serine as the sole source of nitrogen was retained in the ∆dsdA mutant and was abolished completely in the ∆dadA and ∆dadA-∆dsdA mutants. However, when complemented by dsdA on a plasmid, the double mutant was able to grow on D-serine as the sole source of carbon and nitrogen, supporting the proposed biochemical function of DsdA in the conversion of D-serine into pyruvate and ammonia. Among D- and L-amino acids tested, only D-serine and D-threonine could serve as the substrates of DsdA, and the Km of DsdA with D-serine was calculated to be 330 μM. Comparative genomics revealed that this cryptic dsdA gene was highly conserved in strains of P. aeruginosa, and that most strains of Pseudomonas putida possess putative dsdCAX genes encoding a transcriptional regulator DsdC and a D-serine transporter DsdX as in enteric bacteria. In conclusion, this study supports the presence of a cryptic dsdA gene encoding a functional D-serine dehydratase in P. aeruginosa, and the absence of dsdA expression in response to exogenous D-serine might be due to the loss of regulatory elements for gene activation during evolution.

  20. Substitution of aspartic acid for glycine at position 310 in type II collagen produces achondrogenesis II, and substitution of serine at position 805 produces hypochondrogenesis: analysis of genotype-phenotype relationships.

    PubMed Central

    Bonaventure, J; Cohen-Solal, L; Ritvaniemi, P; Van Maldergem, L; Kadhom, N; Delezoide, A L; Maroteaux, P; Prockop, D J; Ala-Kokko, L

    1995-01-01

    Two different mutations were found in two unrelated probands with lethal chondrodysplasias, one with achondrogenesis type II and the other with the less severe phenotype of hypochondrogenesis. The mutations in the COL2A1 gene were identified by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis analysis of genomic DNA followed by dideoxynucleotide sequencing and restriction site analysis. The proband with achondrogenesis type II had a heterozygous single-base mutation that substituted aspartate for glycine at position 310 of the alpha 1(II) chain of type II procollagen. The proband with hypochondrogenesis had a heterozygous single-base mutation that substituted serine for glycine at position 805. Type II collagen extracted from cartilage from the probands demonstrated the presence of type I collagen and a delayed electrophoretic mobility, indicating post-translational overmodifications. Analysis of CNBr peptides showed that, in proband 1, the entire peptides were overmodified. Examination of chondrocytes cultured in agarose or alginate indicated that there was a delayed secretion of type II procollagen. In addition, type II collagen synthesized by cartilage fragments from the probands demonstrated a decreased thermal stability. The melting temperature of the type II collagen containing the aspartate-for-glycine substitution was reduced by 4 degrees C, and that of the collagen containing the serine-for-glycine substitution was reduced by 2 degrees C. Electron microscopy of the extracellular matrix from the chondrocyte cultures showed a decreased density of matrix and the presence of unusually short and thin fibrils. Our results indicate that glycine substitutions in the N-terminal region of the type II collagen molecule can produce more severe phenotypes than mutations in the C-terminal region. The aspartate-for-glycine substitution at position 310, which was associated with defective secretion and a probable increased degradation of collagen, is the most destabilizing

  1. Substitution of aspartic acid for glycine at position 310 in type II collagen produces achondrogenesis II, and substitution of serine at position 805 produces hypochondrogenesis: analysis of genotype-phenotype relationships.

    PubMed

    Bonaventure, J; Cohen-Solal, L; Ritvaniemi, P; Van Maldergem, L; Kadhom, N; Delezoide, A L; Maroteaux, P; Prockop, D J; Ala-Kokko, L

    1995-05-01

    Two different mutations were found in two unrelated probands with lethal chondrodysplasias, one with achondrogenesis type II and the other with the less severe phenotype of hypochondrogenesis. The mutations in the COL2A1 gene were identified by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis analysis of genomic DNA followed by dideoxynucleotide sequencing and restriction site analysis. The proband with achondrogenesis type II had a heterozygous single-base mutation that substituted aspartate for glycine at position 310 of the alpha 1(II) chain of type II procollagen. The proband with hypochondrogenesis had a heterozygous single-base mutation that substituted serine for glycine at position 805. Type II collagen extracted from cartilage from the probands demonstrated the presence of type I collagen and a delayed electrophoretic mobility, indicating post-translational overmodifications. Analysis of CNBr peptides showed that, in proband 1, the entire peptides were overmodified. Examination of chondrocytes cultured in agarose or alginate indicated that there was a delayed secretion of type II procollagen. In addition, type II collagen synthesized by cartilage fragments from the probands demonstrated a decreased thermal stability. The melting temperature of the type II collagen containing the aspartate-for-glycine substitution was reduced by 4 degrees C, and that of the collagen containing the serine-for-glycine substitution was reduced by 2 degrees C. Electron microscopy of the extracellular matrix from the chondrocyte cultures showed a decreased density of matrix and the presence of unusually short and thin fibrils. Our results indicate that glycine substitutions in the N-terminal region of the type II collagen molecule can produce more severe phenotypes than mutations in the C-terminal region. The aspartate-for-glycine substitution at position 310, which was associated with defective secretion and a probable increased degradation of collagen, is the most destabilizing

  2. Discovery libraries targeting the major enzyme classes: the serine hydrolases.

    PubMed

    Otrubova, Katerina; Srinivasan, Venkat; Boger, Dale L

    2014-08-15

    Two libraries of modestly reactive ureas containing either electron-deficient acyl anilines or acyl pyrazoles were prepared and are reported as screening libraries for candidate serine hydrolase inhibitors. Within each library is a small but powerful subset of compounds that serve as a chemotype fragment screening library capable of subsequent structural diversification. Elaboration of the pyrazole-based ureas provided remarkably potent irreversible inhibitors of fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH, apparent Ki=100-200 pM) complementary to those previously disclosed enlisting electron-deficient aniline-based ureas.

  3. Crystal Structure of Serine Racemase that Produces Neurotransmitter d-Serine for Stimulation of the NMDA Receptor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goto, Masaru

    d-Serine is an endogenous coagonist for the N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor and is involved in excitatory neurotransmission in the brain. Mammalian pyridoxal 5’-phosphate-dependent serine racemase, which is localized in the mammalian brain, catalyzes the racemization of l-serine to yield d-serine and vice versa. We have determined the structures of three forms of the mammalian enzyme homolog from Schizosaccharomyces pombe. Lys57 and Ser82 located on the protein and solvent sides, respectively, with respect to the cofactor plane, are acid-base catalysts that shuttle protons to the substrate. The modified enzyme, which has a unique lysino-d-alanyl residue at the active site, also binds the substrate serine in the active site, suggesting that the lysino-d-alanyl residue acts as a catalytic base in the same manner as Lys57 of the wild type enzyme.

  4. Unconventional serine proteases: Variations on the catalytic Ser/His/Asp triad configuration

    PubMed Central

    Ekici, Özlem Doğan; Paetzel, Mark; Dalbey, Ross E.

    2008-01-01

    Serine proteases comprise nearly one-third of all known proteases identified to date and play crucial roles in a wide variety of cellular as well as extracellular functions, including the process of blood clotting, protein digestion, cell signaling, inflammation, and protein processing. Their hallmark is that they contain the so-called “classical” catalytic Ser/His/Asp triad. Although the classical serine proteases are the most widespread in nature, there exist a variety of “nonclassical” serine proteases where variations to the catalytic triad are observed. Such variations include the triads Ser/His/Glu, Ser/His/His, and Ser/Glu/Asp, and include the dyads Ser/Lys and Ser/His. Other variations are seen with certain serine and threonine peptidases of the Ntn hydrolase superfamily that carry out catalysis with a single active site residue. This work discusses the structure and function of these novel serine proteases and threonine proteases and how their catalytic machinery differs from the prototypic serine protease class. PMID:18824507

  5. Evolution of a family of metazoan active-site-serine enzymes from penicillin-binding proteins: a novel facet of the bacterial legacy

    PubMed Central

    2008-01-01

    Background Bacterial penicillin-binding proteins and β-lactamases (PBP-βLs) constitute a large family of serine proteases that perform essential functions in the synthesis and maintenance of peptidoglycan. Intriguingly, genes encoding PBP-βL homologs occur in many metazoan genomes including humans. The emerging role of LACTB, a mammalian mitochondrial PBP-βL homolog, in metabolic signaling prompted us to investigate the evolutionary history of metazoan PBP-βL proteins. Results Metazoan PBP-βL homologs including LACTB share unique structural features with bacterial class B low molecular weight penicillin-binding proteins. The amino acid residues necessary for enzymatic activity in bacterial PBP-βL proteins, including the catalytic serine residue, are conserved in all metazoan homologs. Phylogenetic analysis indicated that metazoan PBP-βL homologs comprise four alloparalogus protein lineages that derive from α-proteobacteria. Conclusion While most components of the peptidoglycan synthesis machinery were dumped by early eukaryotes, a few PBP-βL proteins were conserved and are found in metazoans including humans. Metazoan PBP-βL homologs are active-site-serine enzymes that probably have distinct functions in the metabolic circuitry. We hypothesize that PBP-βL proteins in the early eukaryotic cell enabled the degradation of peptidoglycan from ingested bacteria, thereby maximizing the yield of nutrients and streamlining the cell for effective phagocytotic feeding. PMID:18226203

  6. Identification of the active-site serine in human lecithin: cholesterol acyltransferase

    SciTech Connect

    Farooqui, J.; Wohl, R.C.; Kezdy, F.J.; Scanu, A.M.

    1987-05-01

    Lecithin:cholesterol acyltransferase (LCAT) from human plasma reacts stoichiometrically with diisopropylphosphorofluoridate (DFP) resulting in the complete loss of transacylase activity. Purified LCAT was covalently labeled with (TH) DFP and the labeled protein was reduced and carboxymethylated. Cyanogen bromide cleavage followed by gel permeation chromatography yielded a peptide of 4-5 KDa (LCAT CNBr-III) containing most of the radioactive label. Preliminary studies comparing the amino acid composition of the LCAT-CNBr-III with the sequence of LCAT indicate that this peptide corresponds to fragment 168-220. Automated Edman degradation of the radioactive peptide recovered a radioactive PTC-amino acid at cycle 14. Of all predicted CNBr fragments only peptide 168-220 contained a serine at residue 14 from the amino terminus of the peptide. The authors conclude that serine 181 is the active site serine of LCAT.

  7. D-serine in the midbrain periaqueductal gray contributes to morphine tolerance in rats

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Song; Sun, Mengjie; Li, Youyan

    2016-01-01

    Background The N-methyl-D-aspartate subtype of glutamate receptor plays a critical role in morphine tolerance. D-serine, a co-agonist of N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor, participates in many physiological and pathophysiological processes via regulating N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor activation. The purinergic P2X7 receptor activation can induce the D-serine release in the central nervous system. This study aimed to investigate the role of the ventrolateral midbrain periaqueductal gray D-serine in the mechanism of morphine tolerance in rats. The development of morphine tolerance was induced in normal adult male Sprague–Dawley rats through subcutaneous injection of morphine (10 mg/kg). The analgesic effect of morphine (5 mg/kg, i.p.) was assessed by measuring mechanical withdrawal thresholds in rats with an electronic von Frey anesthesiometer. The D-serine concentration and serine racemase expression levels in the ventrolateral midbrain periaqueductal gray were evaluated through enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and Western blot analysis, respectively. The effects of intra-ventrolateral midbrain periaqueductal gray injections of the D-serine degrading enzyme D-amino acid oxidase and antisense oligodeoxynucleotide targeting the P2X7 receptor on chronic morphine-treated rats were also explored. Results We found that repeated morphine administrations decreased the antinociceptive potency of morphine evidenced by the percent changes in mechanical pain threshold in rats. By contrast, the D-serine contents and the expression levels of the serine racemase protein were upregulated in the ventrolateral midbrain periaqueductal gray in morphine-tolerant rats. The development of morphine tolerance was markedly alleviated by intra-ventrolateral midbrain periaqueductal gray injections of D-amino acid oxidase or antisense oligodeoxynucleotide targeting the P2X7 receptor. Conclusions Our data indicate that the development of antinociceptive tolerance to morphine is partially

  8. Biochemical and Structural Studies of Uncharacterized Protein PA0743 from Pseudomonas aeruginosa Revealed NAD+-dependent l-Serine Dehydrogenase*

    PubMed Central

    Tchigvintsev, Anatoli; Singer, Alexander; Brown, Greg; Flick, Robert; Evdokimova, Elena; Tan, Kemin; Gonzalez, Claudio F.; Savchenko, Alexei; Yakunin, Alexander F.

    2012-01-01

    The β-hydroxyacid dehydrogenases form a large family of ubiquitous enzymes that catalyze oxidation of various β-hydroxy acid substrates to corresponding semialdehydes. Several known enzymes include β-hydroxyisobutyrate dehydrogenase, 6-phosphogluconate dehydrogenase, 2-(hydroxymethyl)glutarate dehydrogenase, and phenylserine dehydrogenase, but the vast majority of β-hydroxyacid dehydrogenases remain uncharacterized. Here, we demonstrate that the predicted β-hydroxyisobutyrate dehydrogenase PA0743 from Pseudomonas aeruginosa catalyzes an NAD+-dependent oxidation of l-serine and methyl-l-serine but exhibits low activity against β-hydroxyisobutyrate. Two crystal structures of PA0743 were solved at 2.2–2.3-Å resolution and revealed an N-terminal Rossmann fold domain connected by a long α-helix to the C-terminal all-α domain. The PA0743 apostructure showed the presence of additional density modeled as HEPES bound in the interdomain cleft close to the predicted catalytic Lys-171, revealing the molecular details of the PA0743 substrate-binding site. The structure of the PA0743-NAD+ complex demonstrated that the opposite side of the enzyme active site accommodates the cofactor, which is also bound near Lys-171. Site-directed mutagenesis of PA0743 emphasized the critical role of four amino acid residues in catalysis including the primary catalytic residue Lys-171. Our results provide further insight into the molecular mechanisms of substrate selectivity and activity of β-hydroxyacid dehydrogenases. PMID:22128181

  9. Serine protease activation of near-silent epithelial Na+ channels.

    PubMed

    Caldwell, Ray A; Boucher, Richard C; Stutts, M Jackson

    2004-01-01

    The regulation of epithelial Na+ channel (ENaC) function is critical for normal salt and water balance. This regulation is achieved through cell surface insertion/retrieval of channels, by changes in channel open probability (Po), or through a combination of these processes. Epithelium-derived serine proteases, including channel activating protease (CAP) and prostasin, regulate epithelial Na+ transport, but the molecular mechanism is unknown. We tested the hypothesis that extracellular serine proteases activate a near-silent ENaC population resident in the plasma membrane. Single-channel events were recorded in outside-out patches from fibroblasts (NIH/3T3) stably expressing rat alpha-, beta-, and gamma-subunits (rENaC), before and during exposure to trypsin, a serine protease homologous to CAP and prostasin. Under baseline conditions, near-silent patches were defined as having rENaC activity (NPo) < 0.03, where N is the number of channels. Within 1-5 min of 3 microg/ml bath trypsin superfusion, NPo increased approximately 66-fold (n = 7). In patches observed to contain a single functional channel, trypsin increased Po from 0.02 +/- 0.01 to 0.57 +/- 0.03 (n = 3, mean +/- SE), resulting from the combination of an increased channel open time and decreased channel closed time. Catalytic activity was required for activation of near-silent ENaC. Channel conductance and the Na+/Li+ current ratio with trypsin were similar to control values. Modulation of ENaC Po by endogenous epithelial serine proteases is a potentially important regulator of epithelial Na+ transport, distinct from the regulation achieved by hormone-induced plasma membrane insertion of channels. PMID:12967915

  10. D-serine in the developing human central nervous system.

    PubMed

    Fuchs, Sabine A; Dorland, Lambertus; de Sain-van der Velden, Monique G; Hendriks, Margriet; Klomp, Leo W J; Berger, Ruud; de Koning, Tom J

    2006-10-01

    To elucidate the role of D-serine in human central nervous system, we analyzed D-serine, L-serine, and glycine concentrations in cerebrospinal fluid of healthy children and children with a defective L-serine biosynthesis (3-phosphoglycerate dehydrogenase deficiency). Healthy children showed high D-serine concentrations immediately after birth, both absolutely and relative to glycine and L-serine, declining to low values at infancy. D-Serine concentrations were almost undetectable in untreated 3-phosphoglycerate dehydrogenase-deficient patients. In one patient treated prenatally, D-serine concentration was nearly normal at birth and the clinical phenotype was normal. These observations suggest a pivotal role for D-serine in normal and aberrant human brain development. PMID:17068790

  11. Boronic acid-based enzyme inhibitors: a review of recent progress.

    PubMed

    Fu, H; Fang, H; Sun, Jie; Wang, H; Liu, A; Sun, J; Wu, Z

    2014-01-01

    Since Bortezomib was approved by US FDA as the first drug to treat multiple myeloma, various boronic acid compounds have been developed as enzyme inhibitors. This paper reviewed the progress of boronic acid-based inhibitors against enzymes including proteasome, serine protease, HDACs and other enzymes in the past decade.

  12. Isolation and identification of microorganisms including lactic acid bacteria and their use in microbial deacidification of wines from domestic vineyards.

    PubMed

    Drozdz, Iwona; Makarewicz, Malgorzata; Tuszyński, Tadeusz

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to identify various bacteria isolated from grapes and their wines. Additionally we investigated the capacity of lactic acid bacteria for microbiological deacidification of wines produced in Poland. We have identified Oenococcus oeni, Lactobacillus acidophilus and Lactobacillus delbrueckii. During the microbial deacidification process, we observed decreases of total acidity and increases of volatile acidity, with statistically significant changes noted for O. oeni in Marechal Foch and Seyval Blanc, and for Lb. acidophilus in Frontenac. On the other hand, a statistically significant increase in pH was observed in Marechal Foch and Seyval Blanc following deacidification by O. oeni.

  13. Cloning and characterization of a shrimp clip domain serine protease homolog (c-SPH) as a cell adhesion molecule.

    PubMed

    Lin, Chun-Yu; Hu, Kuang-Yu; Ho, Shih-Hu; Song, Yen-Ling

    2006-01-01

    Clip domain serine protease homologs (c-SPHs) are involved in various innate immune functions in arthropods such as antimicrobial activity, cell adhesion, pattern recognition, opsonization, and regulation of the prophenoloxidase system. In the present study, we cloned a c-SPH cDNA from tiger shrimp (Penaeus monodon) hemocytes. It is 1337 bp in length with a coding region of 1068 bp consisting a protein of 355 amino acid residues. The deduced protein includes one clip domain and one catalytically inactive serine protease-like (SP-like) domain. Its molecular weight is estimated to be 38 kDa with an isoelectric point of 7.9. The predicted cutting site of the signal peptide is located between Gly(21) and Gln(22). We aligned 15 single clip domain SPH protein sequences from 12 arthropod species; the identity of these clip domains is low and that of SP-like domains is from 34% to 46%. The conserved regions are located near the amino acid residues which served as substrate interaction sites in catalytically active serine protease. Phylogenetically, the tiger shrimp c-SPH is most similar to a low molecular mass masquerade-like protein of crayfish, but less similar to c-SPHs in Chelicerata and Insecta. Nested reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) revealed that c-SPH mRNA is expressed most in tissues with the highest hemocyte abundance. Antimicrobial and opsonization activities of the molecule were not detected. The expression of c-SPH mRNA in hemocytes was up-regulated at the 12-day post beta-glucan immersion. Recombinant c-SPH could significantly enhance hemocyte adhesion. The result suggests that the shrimp c-SPH protein plays a role in innate immunity.

  14. Separation of fatty acids or methyl esters including positional and geometric isomers by alumina argentation thin-layer chromatography.

    PubMed

    Breuer, B; Stuhlfauth, T; Fock, H P

    1987-07-01

    This paper describes novel and rapid thin-layer chromatography procedures for the analysis of fatty acids and methyl esters using silver-impregnated alumina sheets. These techniques are known in most laboratories, and the equipment is readily available. The fatty acid method allows a separation of petroselinic (C18:1 delta 6c), oleic (C18:1 delta 9c), elaidic (C18:1 delta 9t), erucic (C22:1 delta 13c), and brassidic acids (C22:1 delta 13t), and the methyl ester method gives an excellent resolution with respect to the number, configuration, and position of the unsaturated centers. Sufficient separation for the subsequent ozonolysis and chromatographic quantification of isomeric C18 and C22 fatty acid methyl esters is obtained with both methods.

  15. Fatty acid composition, including CLA's isomers and cholesterol content of m. longissimus lumborum and m. semimebranosus of Katahdin, Suffolk, Katahdin x Suffolk, and Suffolk x Katahdin lambs

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Lipids in meat products have important human health implications. Muscle tissues from Katahdin (KK), Suffolk (SS), Katahdin x Suffolk (KS), and Suffolk x Katahdin (SS) lambs were analyzed to determine the effect of breed-type on muscle fatty acid composition, including conjugated linoleic acid (CLA)...

  16. A heat-stable serine proteinase from the extreme thermophilic archaebacterium Sulfolobus solfataricus.

    PubMed

    Burlini, N; Magnani, P; Villa, A; Macchi, F; Tortora, P; Guerritore, A

    1992-08-21

    A proteinase was purified to electrophoretic homogeneity from crude extracts of the thermoacidophilic archaebacterium Sulfolobus solfataricus. Molecular mass values assessed by SDS-PAGE and gel filtration were 54 and 118 kDa, respectively, which points to a dimeric structure of the molecule. An isoelectric point of 5.6 was also determined. The enzyme behaved as a chymotrypsin-like serine proteinase, as shown by the inhibitory effects exerted by phenylmethanesulfonyl fluoride, 3,4-dichloroisocoumarin, tosylphenylalaninechloromethyl ketone and chymostatin. Consistently with the inhibition pattern, the enzyme cleaved chromogenic substrates at the carboxyl side of aromatic or bulky aliphatic amino acids; however, it effectively attacked only a small number of such substrates, thus, displaying a specificity much narrower than and clearly different from that of chymotrypsin. This was confirmed by its inability to digest a set of natural substrate proteins, as well as insulin chains A and B; only after alkylation casein was degraded to some extent. Proteinase activity was significantly stimulated by Mn2+ which acted as a mixed-type nonessential activator. The enzyme also displayed a broad pH optimum in the range 6.5-8.0. Furthermore, it was completely stable up to 90 degrees C; above this temperature it underwent first-order thermal inactivation with half-lives ranging from 342 min (92 degrees C) to 7 min (101 degrees C). At 50 degrees C it could withstand 6 M urea and, to some extent, different organic solvents; however, at 95 degrees C it was extensively inactivated by all of these compounds. None of the chemical physical properties of the enzyme, including amino-acid analysis, provided evidence of a possible relation to other well-known microbial serine proteinases.

  17. Significance of the D-serine-deaminase and D-serine metabolism of Staphylococcus saprophyticus for virulence.

    PubMed

    Korte-Berwanger, Miriam; Sakinc, Türkan; Kline, Kimberly; Nielsen, Hailyn V; Hultgren, Scott; Gatermann, Sören G

    2013-12-01

    Staphylococcus saprophyticus is the only species of Staphylococcus that is typically uropathogenic and possesses a gene coding for a D-serine-deaminase (DsdA). As D-serine is prevalent in urine and toxic or bacteriostatic to many bacteria, it is not surprising that the D-serine-deaminase gene is found in the genome of uropathogens. It has been suggested that D-serine-deaminase or the ability to respond to or to metabolize D-serine is important for virulence. For uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC), a high intracellular D-serine concentration affects expression of virulence factors. S. saprophyticus is able to grow in the presence of high D-serine concentrations; however, its D-serine metabolism has not been described. The activity of the D-serine-deaminase was verified by analyzing the formation of pyruvate from D-serine in different strains with and without D-serine-deaminase. Cocultivation experiments were performed to show that D-serine-deaminase confers a growth advantage to S. saprophyticus in the presence of D-serine. Furthermore, in vivo coinfection experiments showed a disadvantage for the ΔdsdA mutant during urinary tract infection. Expression analysis of known virulence factors by reverse transcription-quantitative PCR (RT-qPCR) showed that the surface-associated lipase Ssp is upregulated in the presence of D-serine. In addition, we show that S. saprophyticus is able to use D-serine as the sole carbon source, but interestingly, D-serine had a negative effect on growth when glucose was also present. Taken together, D-serine metabolism is associated with virulence in S. saprophyticus, as at least one known virulence factor is upregulated in the presence of D-serine and a ΔdsdA mutant was attenuated in virulence murine model of urinary tract infection.

  18. Significance of the d-Serine-Deaminase and d-Serine Metabolism of Staphylococcus saprophyticus for Virulence

    PubMed Central

    Sakinc, Türkan; Kline, Kimberly; Nielsen, Hailyn V.; Hultgren, Scott; Gatermann, Sören G.

    2013-01-01

    Staphylococcus saprophyticus is the only species of Staphylococcus that is typically uropathogenic and possesses a gene coding for a d-serine-deaminase (DsdA). As d-serine is prevalent in urine and toxic or bacteriostatic to many bacteria, it is not surprising that the d-serine-deaminase gene is found in the genome of uropathogens. It has been suggested that d-serine-deaminase or the ability to respond to or to metabolize d-serine is important for virulence. For uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC), a high intracellular d-serine concentration affects expression of virulence factors. S. saprophyticus is able to grow in the presence of high d-serine concentrations; however, its d-serine metabolism has not been described. The activity of the d-serine-deaminase was verified by analyzing the formation of pyruvate from d-serine in different strains with and without d-serine-deaminase. Cocultivation experiments were performed to show that d-serine-deaminase confers a growth advantage to S. saprophyticus in the presence of d-serine. Furthermore, in vivo coinfection experiments showed a disadvantage for the ΔdsdA mutant during urinary tract infection. Expression analysis of known virulence factors by reverse transcription-quantitative PCR (RT-qPCR) showed that the surface-associated lipase Ssp is upregulated in the presence of d-serine. In addition, we show that S. saprophyticus is able to use d-serine as the sole carbon source, but interestingly, d-serine had a negative effect on growth when glucose was also present. Taken together, d-serine metabolism is associated with virulence in S. saprophyticus, as at least one known virulence factor is upregulated in the presence of d-serine and a ΔdsdA mutant was attenuated in virulence murine model of urinary tract infection. PMID:24082071

  19. Purification and characterization of an extracellular serine protease from the nematode-trapping fungus Arthrobotrys oligospora.

    PubMed

    Tunlid, A; Rosén, S; Ek, B; Rask, L

    1994-07-01

    When grown in liquid cultures allowing the formation of nematode traps, the fungus Arthrobotrys oligospora produced two extracellular proteases hydrolysing the chromogenic substrate Azocoll. The protease activity was separated into two fractions (FI and FII) using anion-exchange chromatography. In bioassays, protease(s) present in FII immobilized the free-living nematode Panagrellus redivivus indicating that the enzyme(s) might be involved in the infection of nematodes. A protease designated PII was purified from FII to apparent homogeneity by hydrophobic interaction and size-exclusion chromatography, resulting in an approximately 15-fold increase in specific activity. The purified enzyme was glycosylated, had a molecular mass of approximately 35 kDa (gel filtration) and an isoelectric point of pH 4.6. PII immobilized P. redivivus in bioassays and hydrolysed proteins of the purified cuticle. The enzyme hydrolysed several protein substrates including casein, bovine serum albumin and gelatin, but not native collagen. Examination of substrate specificity with synthetic peptides showed that PII readily hydrolysed tripeptides with aromatic or basic amino acids including N-benzoyl-L-phenylalanyl-L-valyl-L-arginine-4-nitroanilide (Bz-Phe-Val-Arg-NA) and succinyl-glycyl-glycyl-L-phenylalanine-4-nitroanilide (Suc-Gly-Gly-Phe-NA). Mono-peptides were hydrolysed at considerably slower rates. PII had an optimum activity between pH 7 and 9 and was susceptible to autodegradation. PII was inhibited by several serine protease inhibitors including phenylmethylsulfonyl fluoride (PMSF), chymostatin and antipain. The protease was N-terminally blocked, but the sequence of one internal peptide showed a high homology with a region containing the active site histidine residue of the subtilisin family of serine proteases.

  20. 21 CFR 582.5701 - Serine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Serine. 582.5701 Section 582.5701 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients and/or Dietary Supplements...

  1. 21 CFR 582.5701 - Serine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Serine. 582.5701 Section 582.5701 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients and/or Dietary Supplements...

  2. 21 CFR 582.5701 - Serine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Serine. 582.5701 Section 582.5701 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients and/or Dietary Supplements...

  3. Subtilases: the superfamily of subtilisin-like serine proteases.

    PubMed Central

    Siezen, R. J.; Leunissen, J. A.

    1997-01-01

    Subtilases are members of the clan (or superfamily) of subtilisin-like serine proteases. Over 200 subtilases are presently known, more than 170 of which with their complete amino acid sequence. In this update of our previous overview (Siezen RJ, de Vos WM, Leunissen JAM, Dijkstra BW, 1991, Protein Eng 4:719-731), details of more than 100 new subtilases discovered in the past five years are summarized, and amino acid sequences of their catalytic domains are compared in a multiple sequence alignment. Based on sequence homology, a subdivision into six families is proposed. Highly conserved residues of the catalytic domain are identified, as are large or unusual deletions and insertions. Predictions have been updated for Ca(2+)-binding sites, disulfide bonds, and substrate specificity, based on both sequence alignment and three-dimensional homology modeling. PMID:9070434

  4. Rapid identification of triterpenoid sulfates and hydroxy fatty acids including two new constituents from Tydemania expeditionis by LC-MS

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jian-Long; Kubanek, Julia; Hay, Mark E.; Aalbersberg, William; Ye, Wen-Cai; Jiang, Ren-Wang

    2011-01-01

    Tydemania expeditionis Weber-van Bosse (Udoteaceae) is a weakly calcified green alga. In the present paper, liquid chromatography coupled with photodiode array detection and electrospray mass spectrometry was developed to identify the fingerprint components. A total of four triterpenoid sulfates and three hydroxy fatty acids in the ethyl acetate fraction of the crude extract were structurally characterized on the basis of retention time, online UV spectrum and mass fragmentation pattern. Furthermore, detailed LC-MS analysis revealed two new hydroxy fatty acids, which were then prepared and characterized by extensive NMR analyses. The proposed method provides a scientific and technical platform for the rapid identification of triterpenoid sulfates and hydroxy fatty acids in similar marine algae and terrestrial plants. PMID:21915955

  5. Inhibition of homocysteine-induced endoplasmic reticulum stress and endothelial cell damage by l-serine and glycine.

    PubMed

    Sim, Woo-Cheol; Han, Inhoi; Lee, Wonseok; Choi, You-Jin; Lee, Kang-Yo; Kim, Dong Gwang; Jung, Seung-Hwan; Oh, Seon-Hee; Lee, Byung-Hoon

    2016-08-01

    Hyperhomocysteinemia is an independent risk factor for several cardiovascular diseases. The use of vitamins to modulate homocysteine metabolism substantially lowers the risk by reducing plasma homocysteine levels. In this study, we evaluated the effects of l-serine and related amino acids on homocysteine-induced endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress and endothelial cell damage using EA.hy926 human endothelial cells. Homocysteine treatment decreased cell viability and increased apoptosis, which were reversed by cotreatment with l-serine. l-Serine inhibited homocysteine-induced ER stress as verified by decreased glucose-regulated protein 78kDa (GRP78) and C/EBP homologous protein (CHOP) expression as well as X-box binding protein 1 (xbp1) mRNA splicing. The effects of l-serine on homocysteine-induced ER stress are not attributed to intracellular homocysteine metabolism, but instead to decreased homocysteine uptake. Glycine exerted effects on homocysteine-induced ER stress, apoptosis, and cell viability that were comparable to those of l-serine. Although glycine did not affect homocysteine uptake or export, coincubation of homocysteine with glycine for 24h reduced the intracellular concentration of homocysteine. Taken together, l-serine and glycine cause homocysteine-induced endothelial cell damage by reducing the level of intracellular homocysteine. l-Serine acts by competitively inhibiting homocysteine uptake in the cells. However, the mechanism(s) by which glycine lowers homocysteine levels are unclear. PMID:27064126

  6. Inhibition of homocysteine-induced endoplasmic reticulum stress and endothelial cell damage by l-serine and glycine.

    PubMed

    Sim, Woo-Cheol; Han, Inhoi; Lee, Wonseok; Choi, You-Jin; Lee, Kang-Yo; Kim, Dong Gwang; Jung, Seung-Hwan; Oh, Seon-Hee; Lee, Byung-Hoon

    2016-08-01

    Hyperhomocysteinemia is an independent risk factor for several cardiovascular diseases. The use of vitamins to modulate homocysteine metabolism substantially lowers the risk by reducing plasma homocysteine levels. In this study, we evaluated the effects of l-serine and related amino acids on homocysteine-induced endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress and endothelial cell damage using EA.hy926 human endothelial cells. Homocysteine treatment decreased cell viability and increased apoptosis, which were reversed by cotreatment with l-serine. l-Serine inhibited homocysteine-induced ER stress as verified by decreased glucose-regulated protein 78kDa (GRP78) and C/EBP homologous protein (CHOP) expression as well as X-box binding protein 1 (xbp1) mRNA splicing. The effects of l-serine on homocysteine-induced ER stress are not attributed to intracellular homocysteine metabolism, but instead to decreased homocysteine uptake. Glycine exerted effects on homocysteine-induced ER stress, apoptosis, and cell viability that were comparable to those of l-serine. Although glycine did not affect homocysteine uptake or export, coincubation of homocysteine with glycine for 24h reduced the intracellular concentration of homocysteine. Taken together, l-serine and glycine cause homocysteine-induced endothelial cell damage by reducing the level of intracellular homocysteine. l-Serine acts by competitively inhibiting homocysteine uptake in the cells. However, the mechanism(s) by which glycine lowers homocysteine levels are unclear.

  7. Serine hydroxymethyltransferase from Escherichia coli: purification and properties.

    PubMed Central

    Schirch, V; Hopkins, S; Villar, E; Angelaccio, S

    1985-01-01

    Serine hydroxymethyltransferase from Escherichia coli was purified to homogeneity. The enzyme was a homodimer of identical subunits with a molecular weight of 95,000. The amino acid sequence of the amino and carboxy-terminal ends and the amino acid composition of cysteine-containing tryptic peptides were in agreement with the primary structure proposed for this enzyme from the structure of the glyA gene (M. Plamann, L. Stauffer, M. Urbanowski, and G. Stauffer, Nucleic Acids Res. 11:2065-2074, 1983). The enzyme contained no disulfide bonds but had one sulfhydryl group on the surface of the protein. Several sulfhydryl reagents reacted with this exposed group and inactivated the enzyme. Spectra of the enzyme in the presence of substrates and substrate analogs showed that the enzyme formed the same complexes and in similar relative concentrations as previously observed with the cytosolic and mitochondrial rabbit liver isoenzymes. Kinetic studies with substrates showed that the affinity and synergistic binding of the amino acid and folate substrates were similar to those obtained with the rabbit liver isoenzymes. The enzyme catalyzed the cleavage of threonine, allothreonine, and 3-phenylserine to glycine and the corresponding aldehyde in the absence of tetrahydrofolate. The enzyme was also inactivated by D-alanine caused by the transamination of the active site pyridoxal phosphate to pyridoxamine phosphate. This substrate specificity was also observed with the rabbit liver isoenzymes. We conclude that the reaction mechanism and the active site structure of E. coli serine hydroxymethyltransferase are very similar to the mechanism and structure of the rabbit liver isoenzymes. PMID:3891721

  8. Serine biosynthesis by photorespiratory and non-photorespiratory pathways: an interesting interplay with unknown regulatory networks.

    PubMed

    Ros, R; Cascales-Miñana, B; Segura, J; Anoman, A D; Toujani, W; Flores-Tornero, M; Rosa-Tellez, S; Muñoz-Bertomeu, J

    2013-07-01

    Photorespiration is a primary metabolic pathway, which, given its energy costs, has often been viewed as a wasteful process. Despite having reached the consensus that one important function of photorespiration is the removal of toxic metabolite intermediates, other possible functions have emerged, and others could well emerge in the future. As a primary metabolic pathway, photorespiration interacts with other routes; however the nature of these interactions is not well known. One of these interacting pathways could be the biosynthesis of serine, since this amino acid is synthesised through photorespiratory and non-photorespiratory routes. At present, the exact contribution of each route to serine supply in different tissues and organs, their biological significance and how pathways are integrated and/or regulated remain unknown. Here, we review the non-photorespiratory serine biosynthetic pathways, their interactions with the photorespiratory pathway, their putative role in plants and their biotechnological interest.

  9. Identification of a small molecule inhibitor of 3-phosphoglycerate dehydrogenase to target serine biosynthesis in cancers

    PubMed Central

    Mullarky, Edouard; Lucki, Natasha C.; Beheshti Zavareh, Reza; Anglin, Justin L.; Gomes, Ana P.; Nicolay, Brandon N.; Wong, Jenny C. Y.; Christen, Stefan; Takahashi, Hidenori; Singh, Pradeep K.; Blenis, John; Fendt, Sarah-Maria; Asara, John M.; DeNicola, Gina M.; Lyssiotis, Costas A.; Lairson, Luke L.; Cantley, Lewis C.

    2016-01-01

    Cancer cells reprogram their metabolism to promote growth and proliferation. The genetic evidence pointing to the importance of the amino acid serine in tumorigenesis is striking. The gene encoding the enzyme 3-phosphoglycerate dehydrogenase (PHGDH), which catalyzes the first committed step of serine biosynthesis, is overexpressed in tumors and cancer cell lines via focal amplification and nuclear factor erythroid-2-related factor 2 (NRF2)-mediated up-regulation. PHGDH-overexpressing cells are exquisitely sensitive to genetic ablation of the pathway. Here, we report the discovery of a selective small molecule inhibitor of PHGDH, CBR-5884, identified by screening a library of 800,000 drug-like compounds. CBR-5884 inhibited de novo serine synthesis in cancer cells and was selectively toxic to cancer cell lines with high serine biosynthetic activity. Biochemical characterization of the inhibitor revealed that it was a noncompetitive inhibitor that showed a time-dependent onset of inhibition and disrupted the oligomerization state of PHGDH. The identification of a small molecule inhibitor of PHGDH not only enables thorough preclinical evaluation of PHGDH as a target in cancers, but also provides a tool with which to study serine metabolism. PMID:26831078

  10. Effect of Plant Growth Regulators on Calcium-stimulated Serine Transport into Tobacco Cells

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Ivan K.

    1978-01-01

    The transport of serine into tobacco cells (Nicotiana tabacum L.) cultured in liquid medium was examined. Transport was inhibited approximately 50% by 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid, indoleacetic acid, α-naphthalene acetic acid, and kinetin at a concentration of 10 micrograms per milliliter. Transport was not inhibited by 2,6-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid and inhibited less than 25% by p-chlorophenoxyacetic acid at this concentration. Removal of 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid from the transport medium resulted in an alleviation of inhibition. Gibberellic acid at concentrations from 2 to 20 micrograms per milliliter stimulated transport. It was previously shown that inhibition of transport by La3+ was due to removal of Ca2+ from surface sites and inhibition of Ca2+ uptake by cells. None of the growth regulators tested had any significant effect on Ca2+ binding and/or transport. A contributing factor to the low transport rates in the absence of Ca2+ is the increased rate of serine efflux. None of the growth regulators tested had any significant effect on the rate of serine efflux. PMID:16660646

  11. Structural basis of substrate specificity in the serine proteases.

    PubMed Central

    Perona, J. J.; Craik, C. S.

    1995-01-01

    Structure-based mutational analysis of serine protease specificity has produced a large database of information useful in addressing biological function and in establishing a basis for targeted design efforts. Critical issues examined include the function of water molecules in providing strength and specificity of binding, the extent to which binding subsites are interdependent, and the roles of polypeptide chain flexibility and distal structural elements in contributing to specificity profiles. The studies also provide a foundation for exploring why specificity modification can be either straightforward or complex, depending on the particular system. PMID:7795518

  12. Mechanism of Ribonuclease III Catalytic Regulation by Serine Phosphorylation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gone, Swapna; Alfonso-Prieto, Mercedes; Paudyal, Samridhdi; Nicholson, Allen W.

    2016-05-01

    Ribonuclease III (RNase III) is a conserved, gene-regulatory bacterial endonuclease that cleaves double-helical structures in diverse coding and noncoding RNAs. RNase III is subject to multiple levels of control, reflective of its global regulatory functions. Escherichia coli (Ec) RNase III catalytic activity is known to increase during bacteriophage T7 infection, reflecting the expression of the phage-encoded protein kinase, T7PK. However, the mechanism of catalytic enhancement is unknown. This study shows that Ec-RNase III is phosphorylated on serine in vitro by purified T7PK, and identifies the targets as Ser33 and Ser34 in the N-terminal catalytic domain. Kinetic experiments reveal a 5-fold increase in kcat and a 1.4-fold decrease in Km following phosphorylation, providing a 7.4–fold increase in catalytic efficiency. Phosphorylation does not change the rate of substrate cleavage under single-turnover conditions, indicating that phosphorylation enhances product release, which also is the rate-limiting step in the steady-state. Molecular dynamics simulations provide a mechanism for facilitated product release, in which the Ser33 phosphomonoester forms a salt bridge with the Arg95 guanidinium group, thereby weakening RNase III engagement of product. The simulations also show why glutamic acid substitution at either serine does not confer enhancement, thus underscoring the specific requirement for a phosphomonoester.

  13. Mechanism of Ribonuclease III Catalytic Regulation by Serine Phosphorylation

    PubMed Central

    Gone, Swapna; Alfonso-Prieto, Mercedes; Paudyal, Samridhdi; Nicholson, Allen W.

    2016-01-01

    Ribonuclease III (RNase III) is a conserved, gene-regulatory bacterial endonuclease that cleaves double-helical structures in diverse coding and noncoding RNAs. RNase III is subject to multiple levels of control, reflective of its global regulatory functions. Escherichia coli (Ec) RNase III catalytic activity is known to increase during bacteriophage T7 infection, reflecting the expression of the phage-encoded protein kinase, T7PK. However, the mechanism of catalytic enhancement is unknown. This study shows that Ec-RNase III is phosphorylated on serine in vitro by purified T7PK, and identifies the targets as Ser33 and Ser34 in the N-terminal catalytic domain. Kinetic experiments reveal a 5-fold increase in kcat and a 1.4-fold decrease in Km following phosphorylation, providing a 7.4–fold increase in catalytic efficiency. Phosphorylation does not change the rate of substrate cleavage under single-turnover conditions, indicating that phosphorylation enhances product release, which also is the rate-limiting step in the steady-state. Molecular dynamics simulations provide a mechanism for facilitated product release, in which the Ser33 phosphomonoester forms a salt bridge with the Arg95 guanidinium group, thereby weakening RNase III engagement of product. The simulations also show why glutamic acid substitution at either serine does not confer enhancement, thus underscoring the specific requirement for a phosphomonoester. PMID:27150669

  14. Phosphorylation of AfsR by multiple serine/threonine kinases in Streptomyces coelicolor A3(2).

    PubMed

    Sawai, Reiko; Suzuki, Ayano; Takano, Yuji; Lee, Ping-Chin; Horinouchi, Sueharu

    2004-06-01

    AfsK, a protein serine/threonine kinase, autophosphorylates on serine and threonine residues and phosphorylates serine and threonine residues of AfsR, a transcriptional activator for afsS involved in secondary metabolism in Streptomyces coelicolor A3(2). pkaG encoding a 592-amino-acid protein and SCD10.09 (named afsL) encoding a 580-amino-acid protein, both of which encode an AfsK-like protein, were transcribed throughout growth. PkaG with a histidine-tag and the kinase catalytic domain of PkaG, produced in Escherichia coli, autophosphorylated dominantly on threonine and slightly on serine residues. In addition, these proteins phosphorylated AfsR on threonine and serine residues. The catalytic domain of AfsL also autophosphorylated and phosphorylated AfsR, on threonine and serine residues in both cases. AfsR was thus found to be phosphorylated by multiple kinases. Disruption of the chromosomal pkaG gene resulted in slightly reduced production of the pigmented antibiotic actinorhodin. These findings, together with the presence of about 40 AfsK homologues and at least five AfsR homologues in S. coelicolor A3(2), suggest that the regulatory networks via eukaryotic-type protein phosphorylation are more diverse and versatile than we have expected.

  15. Fatty acid composition of ruminal digesta and longissimus muscle from lambs fed silage mixtures including red clover, sainfoin, and timothy.

    PubMed

    Campidonico, L; Toral, P G; Priolo, A; Luciano, G; Valenti, B; Hervás, G; Frutos, P; Copani, G; Ginane, C; Niderkorn, V

    2016-04-01

    This work investigated the effects of feeding silage mixtures of a plant containing polyphenol oxidase (PPO; red clover [; RC]), a plant containing tannins (sainfoin [; SF]), and a grass species not containing these compounds (timothy [; T]) on ruminal and intramuscular (i.m.) fatty acids of lambs. Forty 4-mo-old castrated male Romane lambs, divided into 5 groups, received 1 of the following silages: 1) T (100%), 2) a binary mixture of timothy and tannin-containing sainfoin ( cv. Perly; 50:50 [T-SF]), 3) a binary mixture of timothy and PPO-containing red clover ( cv. Mervius; 50:50 [T-RC]), 4) a ternary mixture of timothy, sainfoin, and red clover containing both tannins and PPO (50:25:25, respectively [T-SF-RC]), and 5) a binary mixture of tannin-containing sainfoin and PPO-containing red clover (50:50 [SF-RC]). In the rumen digesta, the partial or total replacement of T with forage legumes was associated with greater concentrations of PUFA ( < 0.001) and 1esser concentrations of MUFA ( < 0.001). The inclusion of forage legumes in the silage favored the accumulation of 18:3 -3 ( < 0.001), with the greatest concentrations being observed in SF-RC. This latter diet also led to the greatest percentage of 18:2 -6 ( < 0.001). Forage legumes decreased the -11 18:1 to 30% of T in rumen digesta ( < 0.001). Forage legumes decreased the total concentration of branched-chain fatty acids in the rumen digesta (on average, -28%; < 0.001), this effect being less marked (-17%; = 0.014) in T-RC in comparison with T. The dietary treatment tended to affect the proportion of MUFA ( = 0.081) and of PUFA ( = 0.079) in the i.m. fat of the LM, respectively, at the highest and lowest numerical value in the T group. The sum of -3 fatty acids was less in the T and T-SF groups compared with the mixture of legumes without T (SF-RC; < 0.001 and < 0.008, respectively). The latter group had also a lesser -6-to--3 ratio than the T-SF group ( = 0.01). -11 18:1 was greater ( < 0.03) in lambs given T

  16. Fatty acid composition of ruminal digesta and longissimus muscle from lambs fed silage mixtures including red clover, sainfoin, and timothy.

    PubMed

    Campidonico, L; Toral, P G; Priolo, A; Luciano, G; Valenti, B; Hervás, G; Frutos, P; Copani, G; Ginane, C; Niderkorn, V

    2016-04-01

    This work investigated the effects of feeding silage mixtures of a plant containing polyphenol oxidase (PPO; red clover [; RC]), a plant containing tannins (sainfoin [; SF]), and a grass species not containing these compounds (timothy [; T]) on ruminal and intramuscular (i.m.) fatty acids of lambs. Forty 4-mo-old castrated male Romane lambs, divided into 5 groups, received 1 of the following silages: 1) T (100%), 2) a binary mixture of timothy and tannin-containing sainfoin ( cv. Perly; 50:50 [T-SF]), 3) a binary mixture of timothy and PPO-containing red clover ( cv. Mervius; 50:50 [T-RC]), 4) a ternary mixture of timothy, sainfoin, and red clover containing both tannins and PPO (50:25:25, respectively [T-SF-RC]), and 5) a binary mixture of tannin-containing sainfoin and PPO-containing red clover (50:50 [SF-RC]). In the rumen digesta, the partial or total replacement of T with forage legumes was associated with greater concentrations of PUFA ( < 0.001) and 1esser concentrations of MUFA ( < 0.001). The inclusion of forage legumes in the silage favored the accumulation of 18:3 -3 ( < 0.001), with the greatest concentrations being observed in SF-RC. This latter diet also led to the greatest percentage of 18:2 -6 ( < 0.001). Forage legumes decreased the -11 18:1 to 30% of T in rumen digesta ( < 0.001). Forage legumes decreased the total concentration of branched-chain fatty acids in the rumen digesta (on average, -28%; < 0.001), this effect being less marked (-17%; = 0.014) in T-RC in comparison with T. The dietary treatment tended to affect the proportion of MUFA ( = 0.081) and of PUFA ( = 0.079) in the i.m. fat of the LM, respectively, at the highest and lowest numerical value in the T group. The sum of -3 fatty acids was less in the T and T-SF groups compared with the mixture of legumes without T (SF-RC; < 0.001 and < 0.008, respectively). The latter group had also a lesser -6-to--3 ratio than the T-SF group ( = 0.01). -11 18:1 was greater ( < 0.03) in lambs given T

  17. Evaluation of a novel food composition database that includes glutamine and other amino acids derived from gene sequencing data

    PubMed Central

    Lenders, CM; Liu, S; Wilmore, DW; Sampson, L; Dougherty, LW; Spiegelman, D; Willett, WC

    2011-01-01

    Objectives To determine the content of glutamine in major food proteins. Subjects/Methods We used a validated 131-food item food frequency questionnaire (FFQ) to identify the foods that contributed the most to protein intake among 70 356 women in the Nurses’ Health Study (NHS, 1984). The content of glutamine and other amino acids in foods was calculated based on protein fractions generated from gene sequencing methods (Swiss Institute of Bioinformatics) and compared with data from conventional (USDA) and modified biochemical (Khun) methods. Pearson correlation coefficients were used to compare the participants’ dietary intakes of amino acids by sequencing and USDA methods. Results The glutamine content varied from 0.01 to to 9.49 g/100 g of food and contributed from 1 to to 33% of total protein for all FFQ foods with protein. When comparing the sequencing and Kuhn’s methods, the proportion of glutamine in meat was 4.8 vs 4.4%. Among NHS participants, mean glutamine intake was 6.84 (s.d.=2.19) g/day and correlation coefficients for amino acid between intakes assessed by sequencing and USDA methods ranged from 0.94 to 0.99 for absolute intake, −0.08 to 0.90 after adjusting for 100 g of protein, and 0.88 to 0.99 after adjusting for 1000 kcal. The between-person coefficient of variation of energy-adjusted intake of glutamine was 16%. Conclusions These data suggest that (1) glutamine content can be estimated from gene sequencing methods and (2) there is a reasonably wide variation in energy-adjusted glutamine intake, allowing for exploration of glutamine consumption and disease. PMID:19756030

  18. Vanadium inhibition of serine and cysteine proteases.

    PubMed

    Guerrieri, N; Cerletti, P; De Vincentiis, M; Salvati, A; Scippa, S

    1999-03-01

    A study was made on the effect of vanadium, in both the tetravalent state in vanadyl sulphate and in the pentavalent state in sodium meta-vanadate, and ortho-vanadate, on the proteolysis of azocasein by two serine proteases, trypsin and subtilisin and two cysteine proteases bromelain and papain. Also the proteolysis of bovine azoalbumin by serine proteases was considered. An inhibitory effect was present in all cases, except meta-vanadate with subtilisin. The oxidation level of vanadium by itself did not determine the inhibition kinetics, which also depended on the type and composition of the vanadium containing molecule and on the enzyme assayed. The pattern of inhibition was similar for proteases belonging to the same class. The highest inhibition was obtained with meta-vanadate on papain and with vanadyl sulphate on bromelain.

  19. Liquid chromatographic resolution of amino acid esters of acyclovir including racemic valacyclovir on crown ether-based chiral stationary phases.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Seong Ae; Hyun, Myung Ho

    2015-03-01

    Valacyclovir, a potential prodrug for the treatment of patients with herpes simplex and herpes zoster, and its analogs were resolved on two chiral stationary phases (CSPs) based on (3,3'-diphenyl-1,1'-binaphthyl)-20-crown-6 covalently bonded to silica gel. In order to find out an appropriate mobile phase condition, various mobile phases consisting of various organic modifiers in water containing various acidic modifiers were applied to the resolution of valacyclovir and its analogs. When 30% acetonitrile in water containing any of 0.05 M, 0.10 M, or 0.15 M perchloric acid was used as a mobile phase, valacyclovir and its analogs were resolved quite well on the two CSPs with the separation factors (α) in the range of 2.49 ~ 6.35 and resolutions (RS ) in the range of 2.95 ~ 12.21. Between the two CSPs, the CSP containing residual silanol protecting n-octyl groups on the silica surface was found to be better than the CSP containing residual silanol groups.

  20. DMPS-arsenic challenge test. II. Modulation of arsenic species, including monomethylarsonous acid (MMA(III)), excreted in human urine.

    PubMed

    Aposhian, H V; Zheng, B; Aposhian, M M; Le, X C; Cebrian, M E; Cullen, W; Zakharyan, R A; Ma, M; Dart, R C; Cheng, Z; Andrewes, P; Yip, L; O'Malley, G F; Maiorino, R M; Van Voorhies, W; Healy, S M; Titcomb, A

    2000-05-15

    The administration of sodium 2,3-dimercapto-1-propane sulfonate (DMPS) to humans chronically exposed to inorganic arsenic in their drinking water resulted in the increased urinary excretion of arsenic, the appearance and identification of monomethylarsonous acid (MMA(III)) in their urine, and a large decrease in the concentration and percentage of urinary dimethylarsinic acid (DMA). This is the first time that MMA(III) has been detected in the urine. In vitro biochemical experiments were then designed and performed to understand the urinary appearance of MMA(III) and decrease of DMA. The DMPS-MMA(III) complex was not active as a substrate for the MMA(III) methyltransferase. The experimental results support the hypothesis that DMPS competes with endogenous ligands for MMA(III), forming a DMPS-MMA complex that is readily excreted in the urine and points out the need for studying the biochemical toxicology of MMA(III). It should be emphasized that MMA(III) was excreted in the urine only after DMPS administration. The results of these studies raise many questions about the potential central role of MMA(III) in the toxicity of inorganic arsenic and to the potential involvement of MMA(III) in the little-understood etiology of hyperkeratosis, hyperpigmentation, and cancer that can result from chronic inorganic arsenic exposure.

  1. Liquid chromatographic resolution of amino acid esters of acyclovir including racemic valacyclovir on crown ether-based chiral stationary phases.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Seong Ae; Hyun, Myung Ho

    2015-03-01

    Valacyclovir, a potential prodrug for the treatment of patients with herpes simplex and herpes zoster, and its analogs were resolved on two chiral stationary phases (CSPs) based on (3,3'-diphenyl-1,1'-binaphthyl)-20-crown-6 covalently bonded to silica gel. In order to find out an appropriate mobile phase condition, various mobile phases consisting of various organic modifiers in water containing various acidic modifiers were applied to the resolution of valacyclovir and its analogs. When 30% acetonitrile in water containing any of 0.05 M, 0.10 M, or 0.15 M perchloric acid was used as a mobile phase, valacyclovir and its analogs were resolved quite well on the two CSPs with the separation factors (α) in the range of 2.49 ~ 6.35 and resolutions (RS ) in the range of 2.95 ~ 12.21. Between the two CSPs, the CSP containing residual silanol protecting n-octyl groups on the silica surface was found to be better than the CSP containing residual silanol groups. PMID:25626672

  2. Far infrared spectra of solid state L-serine, L-threonine, L-cysteine, and L-methionine in different protonation states.

    PubMed

    Gaillard, Thomas; Trivella, Aurélien; Stote, Roland H; Hellwig, Petra

    2015-01-01

    In this study, experimental far infrared measurements of L-serine, L-threonine, L-cysteine, and L-methionine are presented showing the spectra for the 1.0-13.0 pH range. In parallel, solid state DFT calculations were performed on the amino acid zwitterions in the crystalline form. We focused on the lowest frequency far infrared normal modes, which required the most precision and convergence of the calculations. Analysis of the computational results, which included the potential energy distribution of the vibrational modes, permitted a detailed and almost complete assignment of the experimental spectrum. In addition to characteristic signals of the two main acid-base couples, CO2H/CO2(-) and NH3(+)/NH2, specific side chain contributions for these amino acids, including CCO and CCS vibrational modes were analyzed. This study is in line with the growing application of FIR measurements to biomolecules.

  3. Comparative Mitogenomics of Plant Bugs (Hemiptera: Miridae): Identifying the AGG Codon Reassignments between Serine and Lysine

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Pei; Song, Fan; Cai, Wanzhi

    2014-01-01

    Insect mitochondrial genomes are very important to understand the molecular evolution as well as for phylogenetic and phylogeographic studies of the insects. The Miridae are the largest family of Heteroptera encompassing more than 11,000 described species and of great economic importance. For better understanding the diversity and the evolution of plant bugs, we sequence five new mitochondrial genomes and present the first comparative analysis of nine mitochondrial genomes of mirids available to date. Our result showed that gene content, gene arrangement, base composition and sequences of mitochondrial transcription termination factor were conserved in plant bugs. Intra-genus species shared more conserved genomic characteristics, such as nucleotide and amino acid composition of protein-coding genes, secondary structure and anticodon mutations of tRNAs, and non-coding sequences. Control region possessed several distinct characteristics, including: variable size, abundant tandem repetitions, and intra-genus conservation; and was useful in evolutionary and population genetic studies. The AGG codon reassignments were investigated between serine and lysine in the genera Adelphocoris and other cimicomorphans. Our analysis revealed correlated evolution between reassignments of the AGG codon and specific point mutations at the antidocons of tRNALys and tRNASer(AGN). Phylogenetic analysis indicated that mitochondrial genome sequences were useful in resolving family level relationship of Cimicomorpha. Comparative evolutionary analysis of plant bug mitochondrial genomes allowed the identification of previously neglected coding genes or non-coding regions as potential molecular markers. The finding of the AGG codon reassignments between serine and lysine indicated the parallel evolution of the genetic code in Hemiptera mitochondrial genomes. PMID:24988409

  4. Growth and development of the arborescent cactus Stenocereus queretaroensis in a subtropical semiarid environment, including effects of gibberellic acid.

    PubMed

    Pimienta, Eulogio; Hernandez, Gerardo; Domingues, Alejandro; Nobel, Park S.

    1998-01-01

    In Stenocereus queretaroensis (Weber) Buxbaum, an arborescent cactus cultivated in Jalisco, Mexico, for its fruits but studied here in wild populations, stem extension occurred in the autumn at the beginning of the dry season, flowering and fruiting occurred in the spring at the end of the dry season, and new roots grew in the summer during the wet season. The asynchrony of vegetative and reproductive growth reduces competitive sink effects, which may be advantageous for wild populations growing in infertile rocky soils. Seasonal patterns of sugars in the roots and especially the stems of S. queretaroensis were closely related to the main phenological stages, becoming lower in concentration during periods of major stem extension. Cessation of stem extension occurred in 100-year-old plants for which injection of GA(3) reinitiated such growth. Isolated chlorenchyma cylinders had maximum extension in a bathing solution containing 0.1 &mgr;M gibberellic acid.

  5. Homology probing: identification of cDNA clones encoding members of the protein-serine kinase family

    SciTech Connect

    Hanks, S.K.

    1987-01-01

    Mixed /sup 32/P-labeled oligonucleotide probes were used to screen a HeLa cDNA library for clones encoding amino acid contiguities whose conservation is characteristic of the protein-serine kinase family. Eighty thousand clones were screened, from which 19 were identified as showing strong hybridization to two distinct probes. Four clones were chosen for characterization by partial DNA sequence analysis and 3 of these were found to encode amino acid sequences typical of protein-serine kinases. One deduced amino acid sequence shares 72% identify with rabbit skeletal muscle phosphorylase kinase ..gamma..-subunit, while another is closely related to the yeast protein-serine kinases CDC2 in Schizosaccharomyces pombe and CDC28 in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. This screening approach should have applications in the identification of clones encoding previously unknown or poorly characterized members of other protein families.

  6. Skin aging and photoaging alter fatty acids composition, including 11,14,17-eicosatrienoic acid, in the epidermis of human skin.

    PubMed

    Kim, Eun Ju; Kim, Min-Kyoung; Jin, Xing-Ji; Oh, Jang-Hee; Kim, Ji Eun; Chung, Jin Ho

    2010-06-01

    We investigated the alterations of major fatty acid components in epidermis by natural aging and photoaging processes, and by acute ultraviolet (UV) irradiation in human skin. Interestingly, we found that 11,14,17-eicosatrienoic acid (ETA), which is one of the omega-3 polyunsaturated acids, was significantly increased in photoaged human epidermis in vivo and also in the acutely UV-irradiated human skin in vivo, while it was significantly decreased in intrinsically aged human epidermis. The increased ETA content in the epidermis of photoaged human skin and acute UV-irradiated human skin is associated with enhanced expression of human elongase 1 and calcium-independent phosphodiesterase A(2). We demonstrated that ETA inhibited matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-1 expression after UV-irradiation, and that inhibition of ETA synthesis using EPTC and NA-TCA, which are elongase inhibitors, increased MMP-1 expression. Therefore, our results suggest that the UV increases the ETA levels, which may have a photoprotective effect in the human skin.

  7. Chemical Genetics Uncovers Novel Inhibitors of Lignification, Including p-Iodobenzoic Acid Targeting CINNAMATE-4-HYDROXYLASE1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Van de Wouwer, Dorien; Decou, Raphaël; Audenaert, Dominique; Nguyen, Long

    2016-01-01

    Plant secondary-thickened cell walls are characterized by the presence of lignin, a recalcitrant and hydrophobic polymer that provides mechanical strength and ensures long-distance water transport. Exactly the recalcitrance and hydrophobicity of lignin put a burden on the industrial processing efficiency of lignocellulosic biomass. Both forward and reverse genetic strategies have been used intensively to unravel the molecular mechanism of lignin deposition. As an alternative strategy, we introduce here a forward chemical genetic approach to find candidate inhibitors of lignification. A high-throughput assay to assess lignification in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) seedlings was developed and used to screen a 10-k library of structurally diverse, synthetic molecules. Of the 73 compounds that reduced lignin deposition, 39 that had a major impact were retained and classified into five clusters based on the shift they induced in the phenolic profile of Arabidopsis seedlings. One representative compound of each cluster was selected for further lignin-specific assays, leading to the identification of an aromatic compound that is processed in the plant into two fragments, both having inhibitory activity against lignification. One fragment, p-iodobenzoic acid, was further characterized as a new inhibitor of CINNAMATE 4-HYDROXYLASE, a key enzyme of the phenylpropanoid pathway synthesizing the building blocks of the lignin polymer. As such, we provide proof of concept of this chemical biology approach to screen for inhibitors of lignification and present a broad array of putative inhibitors of lignin deposition for further characterization. PMID:27485881

  8. Homologous inhibitors from potato tubers of serine endopeptidases and metallocarboxypeptidases.

    PubMed Central

    Hass, C M; Venkatakrishnan, R; Ryan, C A

    1976-01-01

    A potent polypeptide inhibitor of chymotrypsin has been purified from Russett Burbank potatoes. The inhibitor has no effect on bovine carboxypeptidases A or B but exhibits homology with a carboxypeptidase inhibitor that is also present in potato tubers. The chymotrypsin inhibitor has a molecular weight of approximately 5400 as estimated by gel filtration, amino acid analysis, and titration with chymotrypsin. The polypeptide chain consists of 49 amino acid residues, of which six are half-cystine, forming three disulfide bonds. Its size is similar to that of the carboxypeptidase inhibitor, which contains 39 amino acid residues and also has three disulfide bridges. In immunological double diffusion assays, the chymotrypsin inhibitor and the carboxypeptidase inhibitor do not crossreact; however, automatic Edman degradation of reduced and alkylated derivatives of the chymotrypsin inhibitor, yielding a partial sequence of 18 amino acid residues at the NH2-terminus, reveals a similarity in sequence to that of the carboxypeptidase inhibitor. Thus, inhibitors directed toward two distinct classes of proteases, the serine endopeptidases and the metallocarboxypeptidases, appear to have evolved from a common ancestor. Images PMID:1064864

  9. The uropathogenic species Staphylococcus saprophyticus tolerates a high concentration of D-serine.

    PubMed

    Sakinç, Türkân; Michalski, Nadine; Kleine, Britta; Gatermann, Sören G

    2009-10-01

    Human urine contains a relatively high concentration of d-serine, which is toxic to several nonuropathogenic bacteria, but can be utilized or detoxified by uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC). The sequenced genome of uropathogenic Staphylococcus saprophyticus contains a gene with homology to the d-serine deaminase gene (dsdA) of UPEC. We found the gene in several clinical isolates of S. saprophyticus; however, the gene was absent in Staphylococcus xylosus and Staphylococcus cohnii, phylogenetically close relatives of S. saprophyticus, and could also not be detected in isolates of Staphylococcus aureus, Staphylococcus epidermidis and 13 other staphylococcal species. In addition, the genomes of other sequenced staphylococci do not harbor homologues of this operon. Interestingly, S. saprophyticus could grow in media supplemented with relatively high concentrations of d-serine, whereas S. aureus, S. epidermidis and other staphylococcal species could not. The association of the dsdA gene with growth in media including d-serine was proved by introducing the gene into S. aureus Newman. Given the fact that UPEC and S. saprophyticus tolerate this compound, d-serine utilization and detoxification may be a general property of uropathogenic bacteria.

  10. Impaired neurogenesis in embryonic spinal cord of Phgdh knockout mice, a serine deficiency disorder model.

    PubMed

    Kawakami, Yuriko; Yoshida, Kazuyuki; Yang, Jung Hoon; Suzuki, Takeshi; Azuma, Norihiro; Sakai, Kazuhisa; Hashikawa, Tsutomu; Watanabe, Masahiko; Yasuda, Kaori; Kuhara, Satoru; Hirabayashi, Yoshio; Furuya, Shigeki

    2009-03-01

    Mutations in the d-3-phosphoglycerate dehydrogenase (PHGDH; EC 1.1.1.95) gene, which encodes an enzyme involved in de novol-serine biosynthesis, are shown to cause human serine deficiency disorder. This disorder has been characterized by severe neurological symptoms including congenital microcephaly and psychomotor retardation. Our previous work demonstrated that targeted disruption of mouse Phgdh leads to a marked decrease in serine and glycine, severe growth retardation of the central nervous system, and lethality after embryonic day 13.5. To clarify how a serine deficiency causes neurodevelopmental defects, we characterized changes in metabolites, gene expression and morphological alterations in the spinal cord of Phgdh knockout mice. BeadChip microarray analysis revealed significant dysregulation of genes involved in the cell cycle. Ingenuity Pathway Analysis also revealed a significant perturbation of regulatory networks that operate in the cell cycle progression. Moreover, morphological examinations of the knockout spinal cord demonstrated a marked deficit in dorsal horn neurons. Radial glia cells, native neural stem/progenitor cells, accumulated in the dorsal ventricular zone, but they did not proceed to a G(0)-like quiescent state. The present integrative study provides in vivo evidence that normal cell cycle progression and subsequent neurogenesis of radial glia cells are severely impaired by serine deficiency. PMID:19114063

  11. Retinoic Acid Induced 1, RAI1: A Dosage Sensitive Gene Related to Neurobehavioral Alterations Including Autistic Behavior

    PubMed Central

    Carmona-Mora, Paulina; Walz, Katherina

    2010-01-01

    Genomic structural changes, such as gene Copy Number Variations (CNVs) are extremely abundant in the human genome. An enormous effort is currently ongoing to recognize and catalogue human CNVs and their associations with abnormal phenotypic outcomes. Recently, several reports related neuropsychiatric diseases (i.e. autism spectrum disorders, schizophrenia, mental retardation, behavioral problems, epilepsy) with specific CNV. Moreover, for some conditions, both the deletion and duplication of the same genomic segment are related to the phenotype. Syndromes associated with CNVs (microdeletion and microduplication) have long been known to display specific neurobehavioral traits. It is important to note that not every gene is susceptible to gene dosage changes and there are only a few dosage sensitive genes. Smith-Magenis (SMS) and Potocki-Lupski (PTLS) syndromes are associated with a reciprocal microdeletion and microduplication within chromosome 17p11.2. in humans. The dosage sensitive gene responsible for most phenotypes in SMS has been identified: the Retinoic Acid Induced 1 (RAI1). Studies on mouse models and humans suggest that RAI1 is likely the dosage sensitive gene responsible for clinical features in PTLS. In addition, the human RAI1 gene has been implicated in several neurobehavioral traits as spinocerebellar ataxia (SCA2), schizophrenia and non syndromic autism. In this review we discuss the evidence of RAI1 as a dosage sensitive gene, its relationship with different neurobehavioral traits, gene structure and mutations, and what is known about its molecular and cellular function, as a first step in the elucidation of the mechanisms that relate dosage sensitive genes with abnormal neurobehavioral outcomes. PMID:21629438

  12. Distribution and evolution of the serine/aspartate racemase family in invertebrates.

    PubMed

    Uda, Kouji; Abe, Keita; Dehara, Yoko; Mizobata, Kiriko; Sogawa, Natsumi; Akagi, Yuki; Saigan, Mai; Radkov, Atanas D; Moe, Luke A

    2016-02-01

    Free D-amino acids have been found in various invertebrate phyla, while amino acid racemase genes have been identified in few species. The purpose of this study is to elucidate the distribution, function, and evolution of amino acid racemases in invertebrate animals. We searched the GenBank databases, and found 11 homologous serine racemase genes from eight species in eight different invertebrate phyla. The cloned genes were identified based on their maximum activity as Acropora millepora (Cnidaria) serine racemase (SerR) and aspartate racemase (AspR), Caenorhabditis elegans (Nematoda) SerR, Capitella teleta (Annelida) SerR, Crassostrea gigas (Mollusca) SerR and AspR, Dugesia japonica (Platyhelminthes) SerR, Milnesium tardigradum (Tardigrada) SerR, Penaeus monodon (Arthropoda) SerR and AspR and Strongylocentrotus purpuratus (Echinodermata) AspR. We found that Acropora, Aplysia, Capitella, Crassostrea and Penaeus had two amino acid racemase paralogous genes and these paralogous genes have evolved independently by gene duplication at their recent ancestral species. The transcriptome analyses using available SRA data and enzyme kinetic data suggested that these paralogous genes are expressed in different tissues and have different functions in vivo. Phylogenetic analyses clearly indicated that animal SerR and AspR are not separated by their particular racemase functions and form a serine/aspartate racemase family cluster. Our results revealed that SerR and AspR are more widely distributed among invertebrates than previously known. Moreover, we propose that the triple serine loop motif at amino acid positions 150-152 may be responsible for the large aspartate racemase activity and the AspR evolution from SerR. PMID:26352274

  13. Implantation serine proteinase 2 is a monomeric enzyme with mixed serine proteolytic activity and can silence signalling via proteinase activated receptors.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Navneet; Fahr, Jochen; Renaux, Bernard; Saifeddine, Mahmoud; Kumar, Rajeev; Nishikawa, Sandra; Mihara, Koichiro; Ramachandran, Rithwik; Hollenberg, Morley D; Rancourt, Derrick E

    2013-12-01

    Implantation serine proteinase 2 (ISP2), a S1 family serine proteinase, is known for its role in the critical processes of embryo hatching and implantation in the mouse uterus. Native implantation serine proteinases (ISPs) are co-expressed and co-exist as heterodimers in uterine and blastocyst tissues. The ISP1-ISP2 enzyme complex shows trypsin-like substrate specificity. In contrast, we found that ISP2, isolated as a 34 kDa monomer from a Pichia pastoris expression system, exhibited a mixed serine proteolytic substrate specificity, as determined by a phage display peptide cleavage approach and verified by the in vitro cleavage of synthetic peptides. Based upon the peptide sequence substrate selectivity, a database search identified many potential ISP2 targets of physiological relevance, including the proteinase activated receptor 2 (PAR2). The in vitro cleavage studies with PAR2-derived peptides confirmed the mixed substrate specificity of ISP2. Treatment of cell lines expressing proteinase-activated receptors (PARs) 1, 2, and 4 with ISP2 prevented receptor activation by either thrombin (PARs 1 and 4) or trypsin (PAR2). The disarming and silencing of PARs by ISP2 may play a role in successful embryo implantation.

  14. Fatal cerebral edema associated with serine deficiency in CSF.

    PubMed

    Keularts, Irene M L W; Leroy, Piet L J M; Rubio-Gozalbo, Estela M; Spaapen, Leo J M; Weber, Biene; Dorland, Bert; de Koning, Tom J; Verhoeven-Duif, Nanda M

    2010-12-01

    Two young girls without a notable medical history except for asthma presented with an acute toxic encephalopathy with very low serine concentrations both in plasma and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) comparable to patients with 3-phosphoglycerate dehydrogenase (3-PGDH) deficiency. Clinical symptoms and enzyme measurement (in one patient) excluded 3-PGDH deficiency. Deficiencies in other serine biosynthesis enzymes were highly unlikely on clinical grounds. On basis of the fasting state, ketone bodies and lactate in plasma, urine and CSF, we speculate that reduced serine levels were due to its use as gluconeogenic substrate, conversion to pyruvate by brain serine racemase or decreased L-serine production because of a lack of glucose. These are the first strikingly similar cases of patients with a clear secondary serine deficiency associated with a toxic encephalopathy.

  15. Fatal cerebral edema associated with serine deficiency in CSF.

    PubMed

    Keularts, Irene M L W; Leroy, Piet L J M; Rubio-Gozalbo, Estela M; Spaapen, Leo J M; Weber, Biene; Dorland, Bert; de Koning, Tom J; Verhoeven-Duif, Nanda M

    2010-12-01

    Two young girls without a notable medical history except for asthma presented with an acute toxic encephalopathy with very low serine concentrations both in plasma and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) comparable to patients with 3-phosphoglycerate dehydrogenase (3-PGDH) deficiency. Clinical symptoms and enzyme measurement (in one patient) excluded 3-PGDH deficiency. Deficiencies in other serine biosynthesis enzymes were highly unlikely on clinical grounds. On basis of the fasting state, ketone bodies and lactate in plasma, urine and CSF, we speculate that reduced serine levels were due to its use as gluconeogenic substrate, conversion to pyruvate by brain serine racemase or decreased L-serine production because of a lack of glucose. These are the first strikingly similar cases of patients with a clear secondary serine deficiency associated with a toxic encephalopathy. PMID:20300853

  16. Optimal hematologic variables for oxygen transport, including P50, hemoglobin cooperativity, hematocrit, acid-base status, and cardiac function.

    PubMed

    Winslow, R M

    1988-01-01

    The two important blood properties that affect O2 delivery are the O2 equilibrium curve (OEC) and blood viscosity with its subsequent effect on flow (cardiac output). To quantitate these properties blood OEC's were analyzed in terms of the Adair 4-step oxygenation model and the resulting parameters were used to construct a computer nomogram to reproduce the OEC at any combination of effectors that regulate P50 (pH, PCO2, and 2,3-DPG). In this way, the P50 could be changed systematically and the effects on overall O2 transport could be studied. Hematocrit-viscosity-cardiac output relationships were taken from the literature and validated using data from human subjects with various pathological states and high-altitude natives. A model was then developed, using the Bohr integration, to predict the O2 transport function of blood under a variety of conditions including exercise and hypoxia. The results indicate that the optimal hematocrit is about 43-45%, even in hypoxia. The optimal P50, however, depends on the availability of O2: a high P50 is not necessarily beneficial in hypoxia and high cardiac output states. This model and general approach should prove useful in the design of blood substitutes.

  17. Leukocyte protease binding to nucleic acids promotes nuclear localization and cleavage of nucleic acid binding proteins.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Marshall P; Whangbo, Jennifer; McCrossan, Geoffrey; Deutsch, Aaron J; Martinod, Kimberly; Walch, Michael; Lieberman, Judy

    2014-06-01

    Killer lymphocyte granzyme (Gzm) serine proteases induce apoptosis of pathogen-infected cells and tumor cells. Many known Gzm substrates are nucleic acid binding proteins, and the Gzms accumulate in the target cell nucleus by an unknown mechanism. In this study, we show that human Gzms bind to DNA and RNA with nanomolar affinity. Gzms cleave their substrates most efficiently when both are bound to nucleic acids. RNase treatment of cell lysates reduces Gzm cleavage of RNA binding protein targets, whereas adding RNA to recombinant RNA binding protein substrates increases in vitro cleavage. Binding to nucleic acids also influences Gzm trafficking within target cells. Preincubation with competitor DNA and DNase treatment both reduce Gzm nuclear localization. The Gzms are closely related to neutrophil proteases, including neutrophil elastase (NE) and cathepsin G. During neutrophil activation, NE translocates to the nucleus to initiate DNA extrusion into neutrophil extracellular traps, which bind NE and cathepsin G. These myeloid cell proteases, but not digestive serine proteases, also bind DNA strongly and localize to nuclei and neutrophil extracellular traps in a DNA-dependent manner. Thus, high-affinity nucleic acid binding is a conserved and functionally important property specific to leukocyte serine proteases. Furthermore, nucleic acid binding provides an elegant and simple mechanism to confer specificity of these proteases for cleavage of nucleic acid binding protein substrates that play essential roles in cellular gene expression and cell proliferation.

  18. Serine Protease Catalysis: A Computational Study of Tetrahedral Intermediates and Inhibitory Adducts.

    PubMed

    Ngo, Phong D; Mansoorabadi, Steven O; Frey, Perry A

    2016-08-01

    Peptide boronic acids and peptidyl trifluoromethyl ketones (TFKs) inhibit serine proteases by forming monoanionic, tetrahedral adducts to serine in the active sites. Investigators regard these adducts as analogs of monoanionic, tetrahedral intermediates. Density functional theory (DFT) calculations and fractional charge analysis show that tetrahedral adducts of model peptidyl TFKs are structurally and electrostatically very similar to corresponding tetrahedral intermediates. In contrast, the DFT calculations show the structures and electrostatic properties of analogous peptide boronate adducts to be significantly different. The peptide boronates display highly electrostatically positive boron, with correspondingly negative ligands in the tetrahedra. In addition, the computed boron-oxygen and boron-carbon bond lengths in peptide boronates (which are identical or very similar to the corresponding bonds in a peptide boronate adduct of α-lytic protease determined by X-ray crystallography at subangstrom resolution) are significantly longer than the corresponding bond lengths in model tetrahedral intermediates. Since protease-peptidyl TFKs incorporate low-barrier hydrogen bonds (LBHBs) between an active site histidine and aspartate, while the protease-peptide boronates do not, these data complement the spectroscopic and chemical evidence for the participation of LBHBs in catalysis by serine proteases. Moreover, while the potency of these classes of inhibitors can be correlated to the structures of the peptide moieties, the present results indicate that the strength of their bonds to serine contribute significantly to their inhibitory properties. PMID:27387593

  19. Reducing the serine availability complements the inhibition of the glutamine metabolism to block leukemia cell growth

    PubMed Central

    Polet, Florence; Corbet, Cyril; Pinto, Adan; Rubio, Laila Illan; Martherus, Ruben; Bol, Vanesa; Drozak, Xavier; Grégoire, Vincent; Riant, Olivier; Feron, Olivier

    2016-01-01

    Leukemia cells are described as a prototype of glucose-consuming cells with a high turnover rate. The role of glutamine in fueling the tricarboxylic acid cycle of leukemia cells was however recently identified confirming its status of major anaplerotic precursor in solid tumors. Here we examined whether glutamine metabolism could represent a therapeutic target in leukemia cells and whether resistance to this strategy could arise. We found that glutamine deprivation inhibited leukemia cell growth but also led to a glucose-independent adaptation maintaining cell survival. A proteomic study revealed that glutamine withdrawal induced the upregulation of phosphoglycerate dehydrogenase (PHGDH) and phosphoserine aminotransferase (PSAT), two enzymes of the serine pathway. We further documented that both exogenous and endogenous serine were critical for leukemia cell growth and contributed to cell regrowth following glutamine deprivation. Increase in oxidative stress upon inhibition of glutamine metabolism was identified as the trigger of the upregulation of PHGDH. Finally, we showed that PHGDH silencing in vitro and the use of serine-free diet in vivo inhibited leukemia cell growth, an effect further increased when glutamine metabolism was blocked. In conclusion, this study identified serine as a key pro-survival actor that needs to be handled to sensitize leukemia cells to glutamine-targeting modalities. PMID:26625201

  20. Omega-3 fatty acid concentrate from Dunaliella salina possesses anti-inflammatory properties including blockade of NF-κB nuclear translocation.

    PubMed

    Chitranjali, T; Anoop Chandran, P; Muraleedhara Kurup, G

    2015-02-01

    The health benefits of omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (ω-3 PUFA), mainly eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA 20:5) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA, 22:6), have been long known. Although various studies have demonstrated the health benefits of ω-3 PUFA, the mechanisms of action of ω-3 PUFAs are still not completely understood. While the major commercial source is marine fish oil, in this study we suggest the marine micro algae, Dunaliella salina as an alternate source of omega-3 fatty acids. Treatment with this algal omega-3 fatty acid concentrate (Ds-ω-3 FA) resulted in significant down-regulation of LPS-induced production of TNF-α and IL-6 by peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs). The concentrate was also found to be a potent blocker of cyclooxygenase (COX-2) and matrix metalloproteinase (MMP-2 and MMP-9) expression. The present study reveals the anti-inflammatory properties of Ds-ω-3 FA concentrate including the inhibition of NF-κB translocation.

  1. Human prostate-specific antigen: structural and functional similarity with serine proteases.

    PubMed

    Watt, K W; Lee, P J; M'Timkulu, T; Chan, W P; Loor, R

    1986-05-01

    The complete amino acid sequence of the prostate-specific antigen (PA) from human seminal plasma has been determined from analyses of the peptides generated by cyanogen bromide, hydroxylamine, endoproteinases Arg-C and Lys-C. The single polypeptide chain of PA contains 240-amino acid residues and has a calculated Mr of 26,496. An N-linked carbohydrate side chain is predicted at asparagine-45, and O-linked carbohydrate side chains are possibly attached to serine-69, threonine-70, and serine-71. The primary structure of PA shows a high degree of sequence homology with other serine proteases of the kallikrein family. The active site residues of histidine, aspartic acid, and serine comprising the charge-relay system of typical serine proteases were found in similar positions in PA (histidine-41, aspartic acid-96, and serine-192). At pH 7.8, PA hydrolyzed insulin A and B chains, recombinant interleukin 2, and--to a lesser extent--gelatin, myoglobin, ovalbumin, and fibrinogen. The cleavage sites of these proteins by PA were chemically analyzed as the alpha-carboxyl side of some hydrophobic residues, tyrosine, leucine, valine, and phenylalanine, and of basic residues histidine, lysine, and arginine. The chymotrypsin-like activity of PA exhibited with the chromogenic substrate N-succinyl-L-alanyl-L-alanyl-L-prolyl-L-phenylalanine p-nitroanilide yielded a specific activity of 9.21 microM per min per mg of PA and Km and kcat values of 15.3 mM and 0.075s-1, respectively. "Trypsin-like" activity of PA was also detected with N alpha-benzoyl-DL-arginine p-nitroanilide and gave a specific activity of 1.98 microM per min per mg of PA. Protease inhibitors such as phenylmethylsulfonyl fluoride, diisopropyl fluorophosphate, L-1-tosylamido-2-phenylethyl chloromethyl ketone, aprotinin, leupeptin, soybean trypsin inhibitor as well as Zn2+ and spermidine were effective inhibitors of PA enzymatic activity.

  2. Serine Racemase Deletion Protects Against Cerebral Ischemia And Excitotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Mustafa, Asif K.; Ahmad, Abdullah S.; Zeynalov, Emil; Gazi, Sadia K.; Sikka, Gautam; Ehmsen, Jeffrey T.; Barrow, Roxanne K.; Coyle, Joseph T.; Snyder, Solomon H.; Doré, Sylvain

    2010-01-01

    D-serine, formed from L-serine by serine racemase (SR), is a physiologic co-agonist at NMDA receptors. Using mice with targeted deletion of SR, we demonstrate a role for D-serine in NMDA receptor mediated neurotoxicity and stroke. Brain cultures of SR deleted mice display markedly diminished nitric oxide (NO) formation and neurotoxicity. In intact SR knockout mice NO formation and nitrosylation of NO targets are substantially reduced. Infarct volume following middle cerebral artery occlusion is dramatically diminished in several regions of the brains of SR mutant mice despite evidence of increased NMDA receptor number and sensitivity. PMID:20107067

  3. Conserved water molecules in bacterial serine hydroxymethyltransferases.

    PubMed

    Milano, Teresa; Di Salvo, Martino Luigi; Angelaccio, Sebastiana; Pascarella, Stefano

    2015-10-01

    Water molecules occurring in the interior of protein structures often are endowed with key structural and functional roles. We report the results of a systematic analysis of conserved water molecules in bacterial serine hydroxymethyltransferases (SHMTs). SHMTs are an important group of pyridoxal-5'-phosphate-dependent enzymes that catalyze the reversible conversion of l-serine and tetrahydropteroylglutamate to glycine and 5,10-methylenetetrahydropteroylglutamate. The approach utilized in this study relies on two programs, ProACT2 and WatCH. The first software is able to categorize water molecules in a protein crystallographic structure as buried, positioned in clefts or at the surface. The other program finds, in a set of superposed homologous proteins, water molecules that occur approximately in equivalent position in each of the considered structures. These groups of molecules are referred to as 'clusters' and represent structurally conserved water molecules. Several conserved clusters of buried or cleft water molecules were found in the set of 11 bacterial SHMTs we took into account for this work. The majority of these clusters were not described previously. Possible structural and functional roles for the conserved water molecules are envisaged. This work provides a map of the conserved water molecules helpful for deciphering SHMT mechanism and for rational design of molecular engineering experiments.

  4. Total synthesis of daptomycin by cyclization via a chemoselective serine ligation.

    PubMed

    Lam, Hiu Yung; Zhang, Yinfeng; Liu, Han; Xu, Jianchao; Wong, Clarence T T; Xu, Ci; Li, Xuechen

    2013-04-24

    A total synthesis of daptomycin, the first natural product antibiotic launched in a generation, was achieved. This convergent synthesis relies on an efficient macrocyclization via a serine ligation to assemble the 31-membered cyclic depsipeptide. The difficult esterification by the nonproteinogenic amino acid kynurenine was accomplished via the esterification of a threonine residue by a suitably protected Trp ester, followed by ozonolysis. This synthesis provides a foundation and framework to prepare varied analogues of daptomycin to establish its structure-activity profile.

  5. An isozyme of earthworm serine proteases acts on hydrolysis of triacylglycerol.

    PubMed

    Nakajima, Nobuyoshi; Sugimoto, Manabu; Tsuboi, Sadao; Tsuji, Hideaki; Ishihara, Kohji

    2005-10-01

    An enzyme catalyzing the hydrolysis of triacylglycerol was purified from an earthworm. The N-terminal amino acid sequence and the catalytic function of the purified enzyme were identical to those of Isozyme C, an isozyme of the earthworm-serine proteases. No other lipase proteins were found in the earthworm cells. The isozyme might act on the hydrolysis of triacylglycerol as well as the protein decomposition.

  6. Modulation of glycine sites enhances social memory in rats using PQQ combined with d-serine.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Xingqin; Liu, Dong; Zhang, Rongjun; Peng, Ying; Qin, Xiaofeng; Mao, Shishi

    2016-07-15

    The aim of study was to investigate the effects of pyrroloquinoline quinone (PQQ) combined with d-serine on the modulation of glycine sites in the brain of rats using social recognition test. Rats were divided into seven groups (n=10) and given repeated intraperitoneal (ip) injections of saline, MK-801 (0.5mg/kg), clozapine (1mg/kg), haloperidol (0.1mg/kg), d-serine (0.8g/kg), PQQ (2.0μg/kg), or d-serine (0.4g/kg) combined with PQQ (1.0μg/kg) for seven days. A social recognition test, including assessment of time-dependent memory impairment, was performed. A non-competitive NMDA receptor antagonist, MK-801, significantly impaired social memory, and this impairment was significantly repaired with an atypical antipsychotic (clozapine) but not with a typical antipsychotic (haloperidol). Likewise, d-serine combined with PQQ significantly improved MK-801-disrupted cognition in naïve rats, whereas haloperidol was ineffective. The present results show that the co-agonist NMDA receptor treated with PQQ and d-serine enhances social memory and may be an effective approach for treating the cognitive dysfunction observed in schizophrenic patients. PQQ stimulates glycine modulatory sites by which it may antagonize indirectly by removing glycine from the synaptic cleft or by binding the unsaturated site with d-serine in the brain, providing the insights into future research of central nervous system and drug discovery.

  7. New force field parameters for metalloproteins I: Divalent copper ion centers including three histidine residues and an oxygen-ligated amino acid residue.

    PubMed

    Wise, Olivia; Coskuner, Orkid

    2014-06-30

    Transition metal ion complexation with proteins is ubiquitous across such diverse fields as neurodegenerative and cardiovascular diseases and cancer. In this study, the structures of divalent copper ion centers including three histidine and one oxygen-ligated amino acid residues and the relative binding affinities of the oxygen-ligated amino acid residues with these metal ion centers, which are debated in the literature, are presented. Furthermore, new force field parameters, which are currently lacking for the full-length metal-ligand moieties, are developed for metalloproteins that have these centers. These new force field parameters enable investigations of metalloproteins possessing these binding sites using molecular simulations. In addition, the impact of using the atom equivalence and inequivalence atomic partial charge calculation procedures on the simulated structures of these metallopeptides, including hydration properties, is described.

  8. A novel Na(+) -Independent alanine-serine-cysteine transporter 1 inhibitor inhibits both influx and efflux of D-Serine.

    PubMed

    Sakimura, Katsuya; Nakao, Kenji; Yoshikawa, Masato; Suzuki, Motohisa; Kimura, Haruhide

    2016-10-01

    NMDA receptor dysfunctions are hypothesized to underlie the pathophysiology of schizophrenia, and treatment with D-serine (D-Ser), an NMDA receptor coagonist, may improve the clinical symptoms of schizophrenia. Thus, upregulating the synaptic D-Ser level is a novel strategy for schizophrenia treatment. Na(+) -independent alanine-serine-cysteine transporter 1 (asc-1) is a transporter responsible for regulating the extracellular D-Ser levels in the brain. In this study, we discovered a novel asc-1 inhibitor, (+)-amino(1-(3,5-dichlorophenyl)-3,5-dimethyl-1H-pyrazol-4-yl)acetic acid (ACPP), and assessed its pharmacological profile. ACPP inhibited the D-[(3) H]Ser uptake in human asc-1-expressing CHO cells and rat primary neurons with IC50 values of 0.72 ± 0.13 and 0.89 ± 0.30 μM, respectively. In accordance with the lower asc-1 expression levels in astrocytes, ACPP did not inhibit D-Ser uptake in rat primary astrocytes. In a microdialysis study, ACPP dose dependently decreased the extracellular D-Ser levels in the rat hippocampus under the same conditions in which the asc-1 inhibitor S-methyl-L-cysteine (SMLC) increased it. To obtain insights into this difference, we conducted a D-[(3) H]Ser efflux assay using asc-1-expressing CHO cells. ACPP inhibited D-[(3) H]Ser efflux, whereas SMLC increased it. These results suggest that ACPP is a novel inhibitor of asc-1. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27302861

  9. Extension of a PBPK model for ethylene glycol and glycolic acid to include the competitive formation and clearance of metabolites associated with kidney toxicity in rats and humans

    SciTech Connect

    Corley, R.A.; Saghir, S.A.; Bartels, M.J.; Hansen, S.C.; Creim, J.; McMartin, K.E.; Snellings, W.M.

    2011-02-01

    A previously developed PBPK model for ethylene glycol and glycolic acid was extended to include glyoxylic acid, oxalic acid, and the precipitation of calcium oxalate that is associated with kidney toxicity in rats and humans. The development and evaluation of the PBPK model was based upon previously published pharmacokinetic studies coupled with measured blood and tissue partition coefficients and rates of in vitro metabolism of glyoxylic acid to oxalic acid, glycine and other metabolites using primary hepatocytes isolated from male Wistar rats and humans. Precipitation of oxalic acid with calcium in the kidneys was assumed to occur only at concentrations exceeding the thermodynamic solubility product for calcium oxalate. This solubility product can be affected by local concentrations of calcium and other ions that are expressed in the model using an ion activity product estimated from toxicity studies such that calcium oxalate precipitation would be minimal at dietary exposures below the NOAEL for kidney toxicity in the sensitive male Wistar rat. The resulting integrated PBPK predicts that bolus oral or dietary exposures to ethylene glycol would result in typically 1.4-1.6-fold higher peak oxalate levels and 1.6-2-fold higher AUC's for calcium oxalate in kidneys of humans as compared with comparably exposed male Wistar rats over a dose range of 1-1000 mg/kg. The converse (male Wistar rats predicted to have greater oxalate levels in the kidneys than humans) was found for inhalation exposures although no accumulation of calcium oxalate is predicted to occur until exposures are well in excess of the theoretical saturated vapor concentration of 200 mg/m{sup 3}. While the current model is capable of such cross-species, dose, and route-of-exposure comparisons, it also highlights several areas of potential research that will improve confidence in such predictions, especially at low doses relevant for most human exposures.

  10. An unorthodox sensory adaptation site in the Escherichia coli serine chemoreceptor.

    PubMed

    Han, Xue-Sheng; Parkinson, John S

    2014-02-01

    The serine chemoreceptor of Escherichia coli contains four canonical methylation sites for sensory adaptation that lie near intersubunit helix interfaces of the Tsr homodimer. An unexplored fifth methylation site, E502, lies at an intrasubunit helix interface closest to the HAMP domain that controls input-output signaling in methyl-accepting chemotaxis proteins. We analyzed, with in vivo Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) kinase assays, the serine thresholds and response cooperativities of Tsr receptors with different mutationally imposed modifications at sites 1 to 4 and/or at site 5. Tsr variants carrying E or Q at residue 502, in combination with unmodifiable D and N replacements at adaptation sites 1 to 4, underwent both methylation and demethylation/deamidation, although detection of the latter modifications required elevated intracellular levels of CheB. These Tsr variants could not mediate a chemotactic response to serine spatial gradients, demonstrating that adaptational modifications at E502 alone are not sufficient for Tsr function. Moreover, E502 is not critical for Tsr function, because only two amino acid replacements at this residue abrogated serine chemotaxis: Tsr-E502P had extreme kinase-off output and Tsr-E502I had extreme kinase-on output. These large threshold shifts are probably due to the unique HAMP-proximal location of methylation site 5. However, a methylation-mimicking glutamine at any Tsr modification site raised the serine response threshold, suggesting that all sites influence signaling by the same general mechanism, presumably through changes in packing stability of the methylation helix bundle. These findings are consistent with control of input-output signaling in Tsr through dynamic interplay of the structural stabilities of the HAMP and methylation bundles. PMID:24272777

  11. Standard enthalpies of formation for crystalline serine and isoserine and products of their dissociation in aqueous solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lytkin, A. I.; Chernikov, V. V.; Krutova, O. N.; Damrina, K. V.; Skvortsov, I. A.

    2016-02-01

    The heats of solution of crystalline serine and isoserine in water and potassium hydroxide solutions are measured via direct calorimetry at 298.15 K. The standard enthalpies of formations of amino acids and products of their dissociation in aqueous solution are calculated.

  12. Phosphorylation of SAF-A/hnRNP-U Serine 59 by Polo-Like Kinase 1 Is Required for Mitosis.

    PubMed

    Douglas, Pauline; Ye, Ruiqiong; Morrice, Nicholas; Britton, Sébastien; Trinkle-Mulcahy, Laura; Lees-Miller, Susan P

    2015-08-01

    Scaffold attachment factor A (SAF-A), also called heterogenous nuclear ribonuclear protein U (hnRNP-U), is phosphorylated on serine 59 by the DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PK) in response to DNA damage. Since SAF-A, DNA-PK catalytic subunit (DNA-PKcs), and protein phosphatase 6 (PP6), which interacts with DNA-PKcs, have all been shown to have roles in mitosis, we asked whether DNA-PKcs phosphorylates SAF-A in mitosis. We show that SAF-A is phosphorylated on serine 59 in mitosis, that phosphorylation requires polo-like kinase 1 (PLK1) rather than DNA-PKcs, that SAF-A interacts with PLK1 in nocodazole-treated cells, and that serine 59 is dephosphorylated by protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) in mitosis. Moreover, cells expressing SAF-A in which serine 59 is mutated to alanine have multiple characteristics of aberrant mitoses, including misaligned chromosomes, lagging chromosomes, polylobed nuclei, and delayed passage through mitosis. Our findings identify serine 59 of SAF-A as a new target of both PLK1 and PP2A in mitosis and reveal that both phosphorylation and dephosphorylation of SAF-A serine 59 by PLK1 and PP2A, respectively, are required for accurate and timely exit from mitosis.

  13. Highly potent fibrinolytic serine protease from Streptomyces.

    PubMed

    Uesugi, Yoshiko; Usuki, Hirokazu; Iwabuchi, Masaki; Hatanaka, Tadashi

    2011-01-01

    We introduce a highly potent fibrinolytic serine protease from Streptomyces omiyaensis (SOT), which belongs to the trypsin family. The fibrinolytic activity of SOT was examined using in vitro assays and was compared with those of known fibrinolytic enzymes such as plasmin, tissue-type plasminogen activator (t-PA), urokinase, and nattokinase. Compared to other enzymes, SOT showed remarkably higher hydrolytic activity toward mimic peptides of fibrin and plasminogen. The fibrinolytic activity of SOT is about 18-fold higher than that of plasmin, and is comparable to that of t-PA by fibrin plate assays. Furthermore, SOT had some plasminogen activator-like activity. Results show that SOT and nattokinase have very different fibrinolytic and fibrinogenolytic modes, engendering significant synergetic effects of SOT and nattokinase on fibrinolysis. These results suggest that SOT presents important possibilities for application in the therapy of thrombosis.

  14. Induction of a heparin-stimulated serine proteinase in sex accessory gland tumors of the Lobund-Wistar rat.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Michael J; Lind, Jeremy; Sinha, Akhouri A

    2015-08-01

    Induction of new proteinase activities that may process growth factors, modify cell surface receptors, cleave extracellular matrix proteins, etc. is considered fundamental in carcinogenesis. The purpose of this study was to characterize a novel proteinase activity induced in sex accessory gland cancers (about 70% in seminal vesicles) of adult male Lobund-Wistar rats by a single injection of N-nitroso-N-methylurea (NMU; 25mg/kg) followed by implanted testosterone propionate (45mg in silastic tubing every 2months) treatment for 10-14months. A 28kDa proteinase activity was detected in tumor extracts using SDS-gelatin gel zymography with incubations done without CaCl2. Its activity was stimulated 15 fold by heparin (optimal activity 1.5-3.0μg/lane) added to the tissue extract-SDS sample buffer prior to electrophoresis. No 28kDa heparin-stimulated proteinase (H-SP) was found in the dorsal, lateral and anterior (coagulating gland) prostate lobes or seminal vesicles of untreated adult rats, but there was a 26-30kDa Ca(2+)-independent proteinase activity in the ventral prostate that showed limited heparin stimulation. The 28kDa H-SP was completely inhibited by 1.0mM 4-(2-aminoethyl)benzenesulfonylfluoride (AESBF) indicating that it was a serine-type proteinase. Other types of proteinase inhibitors were without effect, including serine proteinase inhibitors benzamidine, tranexamic acid and ε-aminocaproic acid. Proteinase activities of about 28kDa were found with casein, fibrinogen or carboxymethylated transferrin as substrate, however, these activities were not stimulated by heparin. Similar levels of activities of the 28kDa H-SP were found in primary tumors and their metastases, but little/no activity was detected in serum, even from rats with large tumor volume and metastases. These data demonstrate overexpression of a heparin-stimulated 28kDa serine proteinase in the primary tumors of sex accessory gland cancers and their metastases. This proteinase either does not

  15. Targeted mutation of Δ12 and Δ15 desaturase genes in hemp produce major alterations in seed fatty acid composition including a high oleic hemp oil.

    PubMed

    Bielecka, Monika; Kaminski, Filip; Adams, Ian; Poulson, Helen; Sloan, Raymond; Li, Yi; Larson, Tony R; Winzer, Thilo; Graham, Ian A

    2014-06-01

    We used expressed sequence tag library and whole genome sequence mining to identify a suite of putative desaturase genes representing the four main activities required for production of polyunsaturated fatty acids in hemp seed oil. Phylogenetic-based classification and developing seed transcriptome analysis informed selection for further analysis of one of seven Δ12 desaturases and one of three Δ15 desaturases that we designate CSFAD2A and CSFAD3A, respectively. Heterologous expression of corresponding cDNAs in Saccharomyces cerevisiae showed CSFAD2A to have Δx+3 activity, while CSFAD3A activity was exclusively at the Δ15 position. TILLING of an ethyl methane sulphonate mutagenized population identified multiple alleles including non-sense mutations in both genes and fatty acid composition of seed oil confirmed these to be the major Δ12 and Δ15 desaturases in developing hemp seed. Following four backcrosses and sibling crosses to achieve homozygosity, csfad2a-1 was grown in the field and found to produce a 70 molar per cent high oleic acid (18:1(Δ9) ) oil at yields similar to wild type. Cold-pressed high oleic oil produced fewer volatiles and had a sevenfold increase in shelf life compared to wild type. Two low abundance octadecadienoic acids, 18:2(Δ6,9) and 18:2(Δ9,15), were identified in the high oleic oil, and their presence suggests remaining endogenous desaturase activities utilize the increased levels of oleic acid as substrate. Consistent with this, CSFAD3A produces 18:2(Δ9,15) from endogenous 18:1(Δ9) when expressed in S. cerevisiae. This work lays the foundation for the development of additional novel oil varieties in this multipurpose low input crop.

  16. Distribution of eukaryotic serine racemases in the bacterial domain and characterization of a representative protein in Roseobacter litoralis Och 149.

    PubMed

    Kubota, Takaaki; Shimamura, Shigeru; Kobayashi, Tohru; Nunoura, Takuro; Deguchi, Shigeru

    2016-01-01

    Two distinct bacterial and eukaryotic serine racemases (SRs) have been identified based on phylogenetic and biochemical characteristics. Although some reports have suggested that marine heterotrophic bacteria have the potential to produce d-serine, the gene encoding bacterial SRs is not found in those bacterial genomes. In this study, using in-depth genomic analysis, we found that eukaryotic SR homologues were distributed widely in various bacterial genomes. Additionally, we selected a eukaryotic SR homologue from a marine heterotrophic bacterium, Roseobacter litoralis Och 149 (RiSR), and constructed an RiSR gene expression system in Escherichia coli for studying the properties of the enzyme. Among the tested amino acids, the recombinant RiSR exhibited both racemization and dehydration activities only towards serine, similar to many eukaryotic SRs. Mg2+ and MgATP enhanced both activities of RiSR, whereas EDTA abolished these enzymatic activities. The enzymatic properties and domain structure of RiSR were similar to those of eukaryotic SRs, particularly mammalian SRs. However, RiSR showed lower catalytic efficiency for L-serine dehydration (kcat/Km=0.094 min(-1) mM(-1)) than those of eukaryotic SRs reported to date (kcat/Km=0.6-21 min(-1) mM(-1)). In contrast, the catalytic efficiency for L-serine racemization of RiSR (kcat/Km=3.14 min(-1) mM(-1)) was 34-fold higher than that of l-serine dehydration. These data suggested that RiSR primarily catalysed serine racemization rather than dehydration.

  17. Production of L-serine by Sarcina albida.

    PubMed

    Ema, M; Kakimoto, T; Chibata, I

    1979-06-01

    Conditions for the production of microbial L-serine hydroxymethyltransferase and for the conversion of glycine to L-serine were studied. A number of microorganisms were screened for their abilities to form and accululate L-serine from glycine, and Sarcina albida was selected as the best organism. Enzyme activity in this organism as high as 0.12 U/ml could be produced in shaken cultures at 30 degrees C in a medium containing glucose, ammonium sulfate, glycine, yeast extract, and inorganic salts. L-Serine was produced most efficiently by shaking cells at 30 degrees C in a reaction mixture containing 20% glycine, 5 X 10(-3) M formaldehyde, and 3 X 10(-4) M pyridoxal phosphate in yields of 22 mg of broth in 5 days. L-Serine was easily isolated in 84% yields by ion-exchange resin.

  18. Participation of D-serine in the development and reproduction of the silkworm Bombyx mori.

    PubMed

    Tanigawa, Minoru; Suzuki, Chihiro; Niwano, Kimio; Kanekatsu, Rensuke; Tanaka, Hiroyuki; Horiike, Kihachiro; Hamase, Kenji; Nagata, Yoko

    2016-04-01

    The silkworm Bombyx mori contains high concentrations of free D-serine, an optical isomer of L-serine. To elucidate its function, we first investigated the localization of D-serine in various organs of silkworm larvae, pupae, and adult moths. Using immunohistochemical analysis with an anti-D-serine antibody, we found D-serine in the microvilli of midgut goblet and cylindrical cells and in peripheral matrix components of testicular and ovarian cells. By spectrophotometric analysis, D-serine was also found in the hemolymph and fat body. D-Alanine was not detected in the various organs by immunohistochemistry. Serine racemase, which catalyzes the inter-conversion of L- and D-serine, was found to co-localize with D-serine, and D-serine production from L-serine by intrinsic serine racemase was suggested. O-Phospho-L-serine is an inhibitor of serine racemase, and it was administered to the larvae to reduce the D-serine level. This reagent decreased the midgut caspase-3 level and caused a delay in spermatogenesis and oogenesis. The reagent also decreased mature sperm and egg numbers, suggesting D-serine participation in these processes. D-Serine administration induced an increase in pyruvate levels in testis, midgut, and fat body, indicating conversion of D-serine to pyruvate. On the basis of these results, together with our previous investigation of ATP biosynthesis in testis, we consider the possible involvement of D-serine in ATP synthesis for metamorphosis and reproduction.

  19. Broad Spectrum Activity of a Lectin-Like Bacterial Serine Protease Family on Human Leukocytes

    PubMed Central

    Ayala-Lujan, Jorge Luis; Vijayakumar, Vidhya; Gong, Mei; Smith, Rachel; Santiago, Araceli E.; Ruiz-Perez, Fernando

    2014-01-01

    The serine protease autotransporter from Enterobacteriaceae (SPATE) family, which number more than 25 proteases with apparent diverse functions, have been phylogenetically divided into two distinct classes, designated 1 and 2. We recently demonstrated that Pic and Tsh, two members of the class-2 SPATE family produced by intestinal and extraintestinal pathogenic E. coli, were able to cleave a number of O-glycosylated proteins on neutrophils and lymphocytes resulting in impaired leukocyte functions. Here we show that most members of the class-2 SPATE family have lectin-like properties and exhibit differential protease activity reliant on glycoprotein type and cell lineage. Protease activity was seen in virtually all tested O-glycosylated proteins including CD34, CD55, CD164, TIM1, TIM3, TIM4 and C1-INH. We also show that although SPATE proteins bound and cleaved glycoproteins more efficiently on granulocytes and monocytes, they also targeted glycoproteins on B, T and natural killer lymphocytes. Finally, we found that the characteristic domain-2 of class-2 SPATEs is not required for glycoprotease activity, but single amino acid mutations in Pic domain-1 to those residues naturally occurring in domain-1 of SepA, were sufficient to hamper Pic glycoprotease activity. This study shows that most class-2 SPATEs have redundant activities and suggest that they may function as immunomodulators at several levels of the immune system. PMID:25251283

  20. Cellular distribution of the neutral amino acid transporter subtype ASCT2 in mouse brain.

    PubMed

    Gliddon, Catherine M; Shao, Zongjun; LeMaistre, Jillian L; Anderson, Christopher M

    2009-01-01

    ASCT2 is an ASC (alanine-, serine-, cysteine-preferring) neutral amino acid exchanger that may regulate CNS function by transporting amino acid substrates including L-serine, L-cysteine, L-glutamine, L-glutamate and D-serine. Despite the potentially important role of ASCT2 in influencing metabolic and signaling functions of these amino acids in brain, there has been little description of its distribution in brain tissue. We employed a commercially available human ASCT2 antibody in immunohistochemistry studies in adult mouse brain and found a wide regional distribution for ASCT2 that was limited to dendrites labeled by anti-microtubule-associated protein-2 in cortex, hippocampus and striatum. No ASCT2 immunoreactivity was observed in areas labeled by antibodies against a neuronal cell body marker (NeuN), or either of the astrocyte markers, glial fibrillary acidic protein or S100beta. In cerebellum both Purkinje cell bodies and dendrites were positive for ASCT2 immunoreactivity. In support of a dendritic localization for ASCT2 in cortex, low affinity (K(T) > 1 mM), Na(+)-dependent D-serine and L-glutamine uptake characteristic of ASCT2-mediated transport was observed in P2 synaptosomal preparations. These results suggest that ASCT2 may be an important neuronal neutral amino acid transporter and highlight a discrepancy between findings of astrocyte ASCT2 function in tissue culture and brain in situ.

  1. Amino acid management in cancer

    PubMed Central

    Tsun, Zhi-Yang; Possemato, Richard

    2016-01-01

    Amino acids have a dual role in cellular metabolism, as they are both the building blocks for protein synthesis and intermediate metabolites which fuel other biosynthetic reactions. Recent work has demonstrated that deregulation of both arms of amino acid management are common alterations seen in cancer. Among the most highly consumed nutrients by cancer cells are the amino acids glutamine and serine, and the biosynthetic pathways that metabolize them are required in various cancer subtypes and the object of current efforts to target cancer metabolism. Also altered in cancer are components of the machinery which sense amino acid sufficiency, nucleated by the mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR), a key regulator of cell growth via modulation of key processes including protein synthesis and autophagy. The precise ways in which altered amino acid management supports cellular transformation remain mostly elusive, and a fuller mechanistic understanding of these processes will be important for efforts to exploit such alterations for cancer therapy. PMID:26277542

  2. l-Ala-γ-d-Glu-meso-diaminopimelic Acid (DAP) Interacts Directly with Leucine-rich Region Domain of Nucleotide-binding Oligomerization Domain 1, Increasing Phosphorylation Activity of Receptor-interacting Serine/Threonine-protein Kinase 2 and Its Interaction with Nucleotide-binding Oligomerization Domain 1*

    PubMed Central

    Laroui, Hamed; Yan, Yutao; Narui, Yoshie; Ingersoll, Sarah A.; Ayyadurai, Saravanan; Charania, Moiz A.; Zhou, Feimeng; Wang, Binghe; Salaita, Khalid; Sitaraman, Shanthi V.; Merlin, Didier

    2011-01-01

    The oligopeptide transporter PepT1 expressed in inflamed colonic epithelial cells transports small bacterial peptides, such as muramyl dipeptide (MDP) and l-Ala-γ-d-Glu-meso-diaminopimelic acid (Tri-DAP) into cells. The innate immune system uses various proteins to sense pathogen-associated molecular patterns. Nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain (NOD)-like receptors of which there are more than 20 related family members are present in the cytosol and recognize intracellular ligands. NOD proteins mediate NF-κB activation via receptor-interacting serine/threonine-protein kinase 2 (RICK or RIPK). The specific ligands for some NOD-like receptors have been identified. NOD type 1 (NOD1) is activated by peptides that contain a diaminophilic acid, such as the PepT1 substrate Tri-DAP. In other words, PepT1 transport activity plays an important role in controlling intracellular loading of ligands for NOD1 in turn determining the activation level of downstream inflammatory pathways. However, no direct interaction between Tri-DAP and NOD1 has been identified. In the present work, surface plasmon resonance and atomic force microscopy experiments showed direct binding between NOD1 and Tri-DAP with a Kd value of 34.5 μm. In contrast, no significant binding was evident between muramyl dipeptide and NOD1. Furthermore, leucine-rich region (LRR)-truncated NOD1 did not interact with Tri-DAP, indicating that Tri-DAP interacts with the LRR domain of NOD1. Next, we examined binding between RICK and NOD1 proteins and found that such binding was significant with a Kd value of 4.13 μm. However, NOD1/RICK binding was of higher affinity (Kd of 3.26 μm) when NOD1 was prebound to Tri-DAP. Furthermore, RICK phosphorylation activity was increased when NOD was prebound to Tri-DAP. In conclusion, we have shown that Tri-DAP interacts directly with the LRR domain of NOD1 and consequently increases RICK/NOD1 association and RICK phosphorylation activity. PMID:21757725

  3. RAF protein-serine/threonine kinases: Structure and regulation

    SciTech Connect

    Roskoski, Robert

    2010-08-27

    Research highlights: {yields} The formation of unique side-to-side RAF dimers is required for full kinase activity. {yields} RAF kinase inhibitors block MEK activation in cells containing oncogenic B-RAF. {yields} RAF kinase inhibitors can lead to the paradoxical increase in RAF kinase activity. -- Abstract: A-RAF, B-RAF, and C-RAF are a family of three protein-serine/threonine kinases that participate in the RAS-RAF-MEK-ERK signal transduction cascade. This cascade participates in the regulation of a large variety of processes including apoptosis, cell cycle progression, differentiation, proliferation, and transformation to the cancerous state. RAS mutations occur in 15-30% of all human cancers, and B-RAF mutations occur in 30-60% of melanomas, 30-50% of thyroid cancers, and 5-20% of colorectal cancers. Activation of the RAF kinases requires their interaction with RAS-GTP along with dephosphorylation and also phosphorylation by SRC family protein-tyrosine kinases and other protein-serine/threonine kinases. The formation of unique side-to-side RAF dimers is required for full kinase activity. RAF kinase inhibitors are effective in blocking MEK1/2 and ERK1/2 activation in cells containing the oncogenic B-RAF Val600Glu activating mutation. RAF kinase inhibitors lead to the paradoxical increase in RAF kinase activity in cells containing wild-type B-RAF and wild-type or activated mutant RAS. C-RAF plays a key role in this paradoxical increase in downstream MEK-ERK activation.

  4. Design of activated serine-containing catalytic triads with atomic level accuracy

    PubMed Central

    Rajagopalan, Sridharan; Wang, Chu; Yu, Kai; Kuzin, Alexandre P.; Richter, Florian; Lew, Scott; Miklos, Aleksandr E.; Matthews, Megan L.; Seetharaman, Jayaraman; Su, Min; Hunt, John. F.; Cravatt, Benjamin F.; Baker, David

    2014-01-01

    A challenge in the computational design of enzymes is that multiple properties must be simultaneously optimized -- substrate-binding, transition state stabilization, and product release -- and this has limited the absolute activity of successful designs. Here, we focus on a single critical property of many enzymes: the nucleophilicity of an active site residue that initiates catalysis. We design proteins with idealized serine-containing catalytic triads, and assess their nucleophilicity directly in native biological systems using activity-based organophosphate probes. Crystal structures of the most successful designs show unprecedented agreement with computational models, including extensive hydrogen bonding networks between the catalytic triad (or quartet) residues, and mutagenesis experiments demonstrate that these networks are critical for serine activation and organophosphate-reactivity. Following optimization by yeast-display, the designs react with organophosphate probes at rates comparable to natural serine hydrolases. Co-crystal structures with diisopropyl fluorophosphate bound to the serine nucleophile suggest the designs could provide the basis for a new class of organophosphate captures agents. PMID:24705591

  5. Molecular insights into mechanisms of lepidopteran serine proteinase resistance to natural plant defenses.

    PubMed

    Tamaki, Fábio K; Terra, Walter R

    2015-11-27

    Plants have a wide range of chemical defenses against predation, including substances that target digestive serine proteinases of herbivorous. Previous works demonstrated that lepidopteran insects have digestive serine proteinases resistant to plant proteinase inhibitors (PPIs) and ketone modifications, while coleopteran ones are sensitive to those plant defenses. This paper focuses on molecular aspects that lead lepidopteran serine proteinases to PPI and ketone modification resistance. Using biochemical experiments and computer 3D modeling we demonstrated that lepidopteran trypsins are more hydrophobic than coleopteran ones, a feature associated to trypsin oligomerization and decreased inhibition by PPI. Moreover, the determination of pKa values of chymotrypsin catalytic residues obtained by TPCK modification indicates that the environment around the active site of ketone-resistant and -sensitive chymotrypsins are different. Structural analysis using resistant and sensitive chymotrypsins data allowed us to point 2 hotspot regions around the active site that could explain the observed differences. Our set of results highlights features of serine proteinases important for understanding the resistance of insects to plant chemical defenses.

  6. Purification and characterization of a serine protease from Cucumis trigonus Roxburghi.

    PubMed

    Asif-Ullah, Mufti; Kim, Key-Sun; Yu, Yeon Gyu

    2006-05-01

    Kachri fruit, Cucumis trigonus Roxburghi, contains high protease activity and has been used as meat tenderizer in the Indian subcontinent. A 67 kDa serine protease from Kachri fruit was purified by DEAE-Sepharose and CM-Sepharose chromatography, whose optimum activity was at pH 11 and 70 degrees C. Its activity was strongly inhibited by PMSF, but not by EDTA, pepstatin, or cysteine protease inhibitors. The substrate specificity of the purified protease towards synthetic peptides was comparable to cucumisin, the first characterized subtilisin class plant protease from the sarcocarp of melon fruit (Cucumis melo). These characteristics, along with the N-terminal amino acid sequence, indicated that the isolated protease from Cucumis trigonus Roxburghi is a cucumisin homologue, which belongs to the serine protease family. PMID:16603211

  7. Total lipids of Sarda sheep meat that include the fatty acid and alkenyl composition and the CLA and trans-18:1 isomers.

    PubMed

    Santercole, Viviana; Mazzette, Rina; De Santis, Enrico P L; Banni, Sebastiano; Goonewardene, Laki; Kramer, John K G

    2007-04-01

    The total lipids of the longissimus dorsi muscle were analyzed from commercial adult Sarda sheep in Sardina taken from local abattoirs, and in the subsequent year from three local farms in the Sassari region that provided some information on the amount and type of supplements fed to the pasture-fed sheep. The complete lipid analysis of sheep meat included the fatty acids from O-acyl and N-acyl lipids, including the trans- and conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) isomers and the alk-1-enyl ethers from the plasmalogenic lipids. This analysis required the use of a combination of acid- and base-catalyzed methylation procedures, the former to quantitate the O-acyl, N-acyl and alkenyl ethers, and the latter to determine the content of CLA isomers and their metabolites. A combination of gas chromatographic and silver-ion separation techniques was necessary to quantitate all of the meat lipid constituents, which included a prior separation of the trans-octadecenoic acids (18:1) and a separation of fatty acid methyl esters and the dimethylacetals (DMAs) from the acyl and alk-1-enyl ethers, respectively. The alk-1-enyl moieties of the DMAs were analyzed as their stable cyclic acetals. In general, about half of the meat lipids were triacylglycerols, even though excess fat was trimmed from the meat. The higher fat content in the meat appears to be related to the older age of these animals. The variation in the trans-18:1 and CLA isomer profiles of the Sarda sheep obtained from the abattoirs was much greater than in the profiles from the sheep from the three selected farms. Higher levels of 10t-18:1, 7t9c-18:2, 9t11c-18:2 and 10t12c-18:2 were observed in the commercial sheep meat, which reflected the poorer quality diets of these sheep compared to those from the three farms, which consistently showed higher levels of 11t-18:1, 9c11t-18:2 and 11t13c-18:2. In the second study, sheep were provided with supplements during the spring and summer grazing season, which contributed to higher

  8. Thermodynamic models of aqueous solutions containing inorganic electrolytes and dicarboxylic acids at 298.15 K. 2. Systems including dissociation equilibria.

    PubMed

    Clegg, Simon L; Seinfeld, John H

    2006-05-01

    Atmospheric aerosols contain a significant fraction of water-soluble organic compounds, including dicarboxylic acids. Pitzer activity coefficient models are developed, using a wide range of data at 298.15 K, for the following systems containing succinic acid (H(2)Succ) and/or succinate salts: [H(+), Li(+), Na(+), K(+), Rb(+), Cs(+)]Cl(-)-H(2)Succ-H(2)O, HNO(3)-H(2)Succ-H(2)O, H(+)-NH(4)(+)-HSucc(-)-Succ(2-)-NH(3)-H(2)Succ-H(2)O, NH(4)Cl-(NH(4))(2)Succ-H(2)O, H(+)-Na(+)-HSucc(-)-Succ(2-)-Cl(-)-H(2)Succ-H(2)O, NH(4)NO(3)-H(2)Succ-H(2)O, and H(2)SO(4)-H(2)Succ-H(2)O. The above compositions are given in terms of ions in the cases where acid dissociation was considered. Pitzer models were also developed for the following systems containing malonic acid (H(2)Malo): H(+)-Na(+)-HMalo(-)-Malo(2-)-Cl(-)-H(2)Malo-H(2)O, and H(2)Malo-H(2)SO(4)-H(2)O. The models are used to evaluate the extended Zdanovskii-Stokes-Robinson (ZSR) model proposed by Clegg and Seinfeld (J. Phys. Chem. A 2004, 108, 1008-1017) for calculating water and solute activities in solutions in which dissociation equilibria occur. The ZSR model yields satisfactory results only for systems that contain moderate to high concentrations of (nondissociating) supporting electrolyte. A practical modeling scheme is proposed for aqueous atmospheric aerosols containing both electrolytes and dissociating (organic) nonelectrolytes.

  9. Sequence conservation, phylogenetic relationships, and expression profiles of nondigestive serine proteases and serine protease homologs in Manduca sexta.

    PubMed

    Cao, Xiaolong; He, Yan; Hu, Yingxia; Zhang, Xiufeng; Wang, Yang; Zou, Zhen; Chen, Yunru; Blissard, Gary W; Kanost, Michael R; Jiang, Haobo

    2015-07-01

    Serine protease (SP) and serine protease homolog (SPH) genes in insects encode a large family of proteins involved in digestion, development, immunity, and other processes. While 68 digestive SPs and their close homologs are reported in a companion paper (Kuwar et al., in preparation), we have identified 125 other SPs/SPHs in Manduca sexta and studied their structure, evolution, and expression. Fifty-two of them contain cystine-stabilized structures for molecular recognition, including clip, LDLa, Sushi, Wonton, TSP, CUB, Frizzle, and SR domains. There are nineteen groups of genes evolved from relatively recent gene duplication and sequence divergence. Thirty-five SPs and seven SPHs contain 1, 2 or 5 clip domains. Multiple sequence alignment and molecular modeling of the 54 clip domains have revealed structural diversity of these regulatory modules. Sequence comparison with their homologs in Drosophila melanogaster, Anopheles gambiae and Tribolium castaneum allows us to classify them into five subfamilies: A are SPHs with 1 or 5 group-3 clip domains, B are SPs with 1 or 2 group-2 clip domains, C, D1 and D2 are SPs with a single clip domain in group-1a, 1b and 1c, respectively. We have classified into six categories the 125 expression profiles of SP-related proteins in fat body, brain, midgut, Malpighian tubule, testis, and ovary at different stages, suggesting that they participate in various physiological processes. Through RNA-Seq-based gene annotation and expression profiling, as well as intragenomic sequence comparisons, we have established a framework of information for future biochemical research of nondigestive SPs and SPHs in this model species. PMID:25530503

  10. Fibrin(ogen)olytic activity of bumblebee venom serine protease

    SciTech Connect

    Qiu Yuling; Choo, Young Moo; Yoon, Hyung Joo; Jia Jingming; Cui Zheng; Wang Dong; Kim, Doh Hoon; Sohn, Hung Dae; Jin, Byung Rae

    2011-09-01

    Bee venom is a rich source of pharmacologically active components; it has been used as an immunotherapy to treat bee venom hypersensitivity, and venom therapy has been applied as an alternative medicine. Here, we present evidence that the serine protease found in bumblebee venom exhibits fibrin(ogen)olytic activity. Compared to honeybee venom, bumblebee venom contains a higher content of serine protease, which is one of its major components. Venom serine proteases from bumblebees did not cross-react with antibodies against the honeybee venom serine protease. We provide functional evidence indicating that bumblebee (Bombus terrestris) venom serine protease (Bt-VSP) acts as a fibrin(ogen)olytic enzyme. Bt-VSP activates prothrombin and directly degrades fibrinogen into fibrin degradation products. However, Bt-VSP is not a plasminogen activator, and its fibrinolytic activity is less than that of plasmin. Taken together, our results define roles for Bt-VSP as a prothrombin activator, a thrombin-like protease, and a plasmin-like protease. These findings offer significant insight into the allergic reaction sequence that is initiated by bee venom serine protease and its potential usefulness as a clinical agent in the field of hemostasis and thrombosis. - Graphical abstract: Display Omitted Highlights: > Bumblebee venom serine protease (Bt-VSP) is a fibrin(ogen)olytic enzyme. > Bt-VSP activates prothrombin. > Bt-VSP directly degrades fibrinogen into fibrin degradation products. > Bt-VSP is a hemostatically active protein that is a potent clinical agent.

  11. A common set of conserved motifs in a vast variety of putative nucleic acid-dependent ATPases including MCM proteins involved in the initiation of eukaryotic DNA replication.

    PubMed

    Koonin, E V

    1993-06-11

    A new superfamily of (putative) DNA-dependent ATPases is described that includes the ATPase domains of prokaryotic NtrC-related transcription regulators, MCM proteins involved in the initiation of eukaryotic DNA replication, and a group of uncharacterized bacterial and chloroplast proteins. MCM proteins are shown to contain a modified form of the ATP-binding motif and are predicted to mediate ATP-dependent opening of double-stranded DNA in the replication origins. In a second line of investigation, it is demonstrated that the products of unidentified open reading frames from Marchantia mitochondria and from yeast, and a domain of a baculovirus protein involved in viral DNA replication are related to the superfamily III of DNA and RNA helicases that previously has been known to include only proteins of small viruses. Comparison of the multiple alignments showed that the proteins of the NtrC superfamily and the helicases of superfamily III share three related sequence motifs tightly packed in the ATPase domain that consists of 100-150 amino acid residues. A similar array of conserved motifs is found in the family of DnaA-related ATPases. It is hypothesized that the three large groups of nucleic acid-dependent ATPases have similar structure of the core ATPase domain and have evolved from a common ancestor.

  12. Cationic inhibitors of serine proteinases from buckwheat seeds.

    PubMed

    Tsybina, T A; Dunaevsky, Y E; Musolyamov, A K; Egorov, T A; Belozersky, M A

    2001-09-01

    Preparations of low molecular weight protein inhibitors of serine proteinases have been obtained from buckwheat (Fagopyrum esculentum) seeds by chromatography of seed extract on trypsin-Sepharose 4B, Mono-Q, and Mono-S ion exchangers (FPLC regime). Their molecular masses, determined by mass spectrometry, were 5203 (BWI-1c), 5347 (BWI-2c), 7760 (BWI-3c), and 6031 daltons (BWI-4c). All of the inhibitors possess high pH- and thermal stability in the pH range 2-12. In addition to trypsin, BWI-3c and BWI-4c inhibited chymotrypsin and subtilisin-like bacterial proteases. The N-terminal sequences of all of the inhibitors were determined: BWI-1c (23 residues), BWI-2c (33 residues), BWI-3c (18 residues), and BWI-4c (20 residues). In their physicochemical properties and N-terminal amino acid sequences, the buckwheat seed trypsin inhibitors BWI-3c and BWI-4c appear to belong to potato proteinase inhibitor I family. PMID:11703172

  13. Synthetic sulfoglycolipids targeting the serine-threonine protein kinase Akt.

    PubMed

    Costa, Barbara; Dangate, Milind; Vetro, Maria; Donvito, Giulia; Gabrielli, Luca; Amigoni, Loredana; Cassinelli, Giuliana; Lanzi, Cinzia; Ceriani, Michela; De Gioia, Luca; Filippi, Giulia; Cipolla, Laura; Zaffaroni, Nadia; Perego, Paola; Colombo, Diego

    2016-08-15

    The serine-threonine protein kinase Akt, also known as protein kinase B, is a key component of the phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K)-Akt-mTOR axis. Deregulated activation of this pathway is frequent in human tumors and Akt-dependent signaling appears to be critical in cell survival. PI3K activation generates 3-phosphorylated phosphatidylinositols that bind Akt pleckstrin homology (PH) domain. The blockage of Akt PH domain/phosphoinositides interaction represents a promising approach to interfere with the oncogenic potential of over-activated Akt. In the present study, phosphatidyl inositol mimics based on a β-glucoside scaffold have been synthesized as Akt inhibitors. The compounds possessed one or two lipophilic moieties of different length at the anomeric position of glucose, and an acidic or basic group at C-6. Docking studies, ELISA Akt inhibition assays, and cellular assays on different cell models highlighted 1-O-octadecanoyl-2-O-β-d-sulfoquinovopyranosyl-sn-glycerol as the best Akt inhibitor among the synthesized compounds, which could be considered as a lead for further optimization in the design of Akt inhibitors.

  14. New serine-derived gemini surfactants as gene delivery systems.

    PubMed

    Cardoso, Ana M; Morais, Catarina M; Cruz, A Rita; Silva, Sandra G; do Vale, M Luísa; Marques, Eduardo F; de Lima, Maria C Pedroso; Jurado, Amália S

    2015-01-01

    Gemini surfactants have been extensively used for in vitro gene delivery. Amino acid-derived gemini surfactants combine the special aggregation properties characteristic of the gemini surfactants with high biocompatibility and biodegradability. In this work, novel serine-derived gemini surfactants, differing in alkyl chain lengths and in the linker group bridging the spacer to the headgroups (amine, amide and ester), were evaluated for their ability to mediate gene delivery either per se or in combination with helper lipids. Gemini surfactant-based DNA complexes were characterized in terms of hydrodynamic diameter, surface charge, stability in aqueous buffer and ability to protect DNA. Efficient formulations, able to transfect up to 50% of the cells without causing toxicity, were found at very low surfactant/DNA charge ratios (1/1-2/1). The most efficient complexes presented sizes suitable for intravenous administration and negative surface charge, a feature known to preclude potentially adverse interactions with serum components. This work brings forward a new family of gemini surfactants with great potential as gene delivery systems.

  15. Multi-Biomarkers for Early Detection of Type 2 Diabetes, Including 10- and 12-(Z,E)-Hydroxyoctadecadienoic Acids, Insulin, Leptin, and Adiponectin

    PubMed Central

    Umeno, Aya; Yoshino, Kohzoh; Hashimoto, Yoshiko; Shichiri, Mototada; Kataoka, Masatoshi; Yoshida, Yasukazu

    2015-01-01

    We have previously found that fasting plasma levels of totally assessed 10- and 12-(Z,E)-hydroxyoctadecadienoic acid (HODE) correlated well with levels of glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) and glucose during oral glucose tolerance tests (OGTT); these levels were determined via liquid chromatography—mass spectrometry after reduction and saponification. However, 10- and 12-(Z,E)-HODE alone cannot perfectly detect early impaired glucose tolerance (IGT) and/or insulin resistance, which ultimately lead to diabetes. In this study, we randomly recruited healthy volunteers (n = 57) who had no known history of any diseases, and who were evaluated using the OGTT, the HODE biomarkers, and several additional proposed biomarkers, including retinol binding protein 4 (RBP4), adiponectin, leptin, insulin, glycoalbumin, and high sensitivity-C-reactive protein. The OGTT revealed that our volunteers included normal individuals (n = 44; Group N), “high-normal” individuals (fasting plasma glucose 100–109 mg/dL) with IGT (n = 11; Group HN+IGT), and diabetic individuals (n = 2; Group D). We then used these groups to evaluate the potential biomarkers for the early detection of type 2 diabetes. Plasma levels of RBP4 and glycoalbumin were higher in Group HN+IGT, compared to those in Group N, and fasting levels of 10- and 12-(Z,E)-HODE/linoleic acids were significantly correlated with levels of RBP4 (p = 0.003, r = 0.380) and glycoalbumin (p = 0.006, r = 0.316). Furthermore, we developed a stepwise multiple linear regression models to predict the individuals’ insulin resistance index (the Matsuda Index 3). Fasting plasma levels of 10- and 12-(Z,E)-HODE/linoleic acids, glucose, insulin, and leptin/adiponectin were selected as the explanatory variables for the models. The risks of type 2 diabetes, early IGT, and insulin resistance were perfectly predicted by comparing fasting glucose levels to the estimated Matsuda Index 3 (fasting levels of 10- and 12-(Z,E)-HODE/linoleic acids, insulin

  16. AfsR as an integrator of signals that are sensed by multiple serine/threonine kinases in Streptomyces coelicolor A3(2).

    PubMed

    Horinouchi, Sueharu

    2003-08-01

    The genome sequence of Streptomyces coelicolor A3(2) has revealed the presence of about 40 protein serine/threonine or tyrosine kinases. AfsK, which is able to phosphorylate AfsR, a transcriptional activator with ATPase activity, represents the first instance in which a bacterial Hanks-type protein kinase phosphorylates a specific protein and exerts biologically important functions. The AfsK-AfsR system in S. coelicolor A3(2) globally controls secondary metabolism. The signal transduction pathway so far demonstrated or suggested is as follows: AfsK loosely attached to the membrane autophosphorylates threonine and serine residues, perhaps on sensing some external stimulus, and enhances its kinase activity. The kinase activity is modulated by KbpA, an AfsK-binding protein, by means of protein-protein interactions. The activated AfsK phosphorylates threonine and serine residues of AfsR in the cytoplasm, by which the DNA-binding activity of AfsR is greatly enhanced. In addition to AfsK, other kinases-including PkaG and AfsL-also phosphorylate AfsR, suggesting that AfsR serves as an integrator of multiple signals sensed by these kinases. The phosphorylated AfsR binds the promoter of afsS, which encodes a protein of 63 amino acids, and forms a closed complex with RNA polymerase. The closed complex is then converted to a transcriptionally active open complex by the energy available from ATP hydrolysis by AfsR. AfsS induced in this way activates transcription of pathway-specific transcriptional activators, such as actII-ORF4 for actinorhodin production and redD for undecylprodigiosin, in an as yet unknown manner.

  17. Enteric Bacterial Metabolites Propionic and Butyric Acid Modulate Gene Expression, Including CREB-Dependent Catecholaminergic Neurotransmission, in PC12 Cells - Possible Relevance to Autism Spectrum Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Nankova, Bistra B.; Agarwal, Raj; MacFabe, Derrick F.; La Gamma, Edmund F.

    2014-01-01

    Alterations in gut microbiome composition have an emerging role in health and disease including brain function and behavior. Short chain fatty acids (SCFA) like propionic (PPA), and butyric acid (BA), which are present in diet and are fermentation products of many gastrointestinal bacteria, are showing increasing importance in host health, but also may be environmental contributors in neurodevelopmental disorders including autism spectrum disorders (ASD). Further to this we have shown SCFA administration to rodents over a variety of routes (intracerebroventricular, subcutaneous, intraperitoneal) or developmental time periods can elicit behavioral, electrophysiological, neuropathological and biochemical effects consistent with findings in ASD patients. SCFA are capable of altering host gene expression, partly due to their histone deacetylase inhibitor activity. We have previously shown BA can regulate tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) mRNA levels in a PC12 cell model. Since monoamine concentration is known to be elevated in the brain and blood of ASD patients and in many ASD animal models, we hypothesized that SCFA may directly influence brain monoaminergic pathways. When PC12 cells were transiently transfected with plasmids having a luciferase reporter gene under the control of the TH promoter, PPA was found to induce reporter gene activity over a wide concentration range. CREB transcription factor(s) was necessary for the transcriptional activation of TH gene by PPA. At lower concentrations PPA also caused accumulation of TH mRNA and protein, indicative of increased cell capacity to produce catecholamines. PPA and BA induced broad alterations in gene expression including neurotransmitter systems, neuronal cell adhesion molecules, inflammation, oxidative stress, lipid metabolism and mitochondrial function, all of which have been implicated in ASD. In conclusion, our data are consistent with a molecular mechanism through which gut related environmental signals such as

  18. Contributions of spinal D-amino acid oxidase to chronic morphine-induced hyperalgesia.

    PubMed

    Ma, Shuai; Li, Xin-Yan; Gong, Nian; Wang, Yong-Xiang

    2015-12-10

    Spinal D-amino acid oxidase (DAAO) is an FAD-dependent peroxisomal flavoenzyme which mediates the conversion of neutral and polar D-amino acids (including D-serine) to the corresponding α-keto acids, and simultaneously produces hydrogen peroxide and ammonia. This study has aimed to explore the potential contributions of spinal DAAO and its mediated hydrogen peroxide/D-serine metabolism to the development of morphine-induced hyperalgesia. Bi-daily subcutaneous injections of morphine to mice over 7 days induced thermal hyperalgesia as measured by both the hot-plate and tail-immersion tests, and spinal astroglial activation with increased spinal gene expression of DAAO, glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) and pro-inflammatory cytokines (interleukin-1β (IL-1β), interleukin-6 (IL-6) and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α)). Subcutaneous injections of the potent DAAO inhibitor CBIO (5-chloro-benzo[D]isoxazol-3-ol) prevented and reversed the chronic morphine-induced hyperalgesia. CBIO also inhibited both astrocyte activation and the expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines. Intrathecal injection of the hydrogen peroxide scavenger PBN (phenyl-N-tert-butylnitrone) and of catalase completely reversed established morphine hyperalgesia, whereas subcutaneous injections of exogenous D-serine failed to alter chronic morphine-induced hyperalgesia. These results provided evidence that spinal DAAO and its subsequent production of hydrogen peroxide rather than the D-serine metabolism contributed to the development of morphine-induced hyperalgesia.

  19. Amino acids 16-275 of minute virus of mice NS1 include a domain that specifically binds (ACCA)2-3-containing DNA.

    PubMed

    Mouw, M; Pintel, D J

    1998-11-10

    GST-NS1 purified from Escherichia coli and insect cells binds double-strand DNA in an (ACCA)2-3-dependent fashion under similar ionic conditions, independent of the presence of anti-NS1 antisera or exogenously supplied ATP and interacts with single-strand DNA and RNA in a sequence-independent manner. An amino-terminal domain (amino acids 1-275) of NS1 [GST-NS1(1-275)], representing 41% of the full-length NS1 molecule, includes a domain that binds double-strand DNA in a sequence-specific manner at levels comparable to full-length GST-NS1, as well as single-strand DNA and RNA in a sequence-independent manner. The deletion of 15 additional amino-terminal amino acids yielded a molecule [GST-NS1(1-275)] that maintained (ACCA)2-3-specific double-strand DNA binding; however, this molecule was more sensitive to increasing ionic conditions than full-length GST-NS1 and GST-NS1(1-275) and could not be demonstrated to bind single-strand nucleic acids. A quantitative filter binding assay showed that E. coli- and baculovirus-expressed GST-NS1 and E. coli GST-NS1(1-275) specifically bound double-strand DNA with similar equilibrium kinetics [as measured by their apparent equilibrium DNA binding constants (KD)], whereas GST-NS1(16-275) bound 4- to 8-fold less well.

  20. Serine one-carbon catabolism with formate overflow

    PubMed Central

    Meiser, Johannes; Tumanov, Sergey; Maddocks, Oliver; Labuschagne, Christiaan Fred; Athineos, Dimitris; Van Den Broek, Niels; Mackay, Gillian M.; Gottlieb, Eyal; Blyth, Karen; Vousden, Karen; Kamphorst, Jurre J.; Vazquez, Alexei

    2016-01-01

    Serine catabolism to glycine and a one-carbon unit has been linked to the anabolic requirements of proliferating mammalian cells. However, genome-scale modeling predicts a catabolic role with one-carbon release as formate. We experimentally prove that in cultured cancer cells and nontransformed fibroblasts, most of the serine-derived one-carbon units are released from cells as formate, and that formate release is dependent on mitochondrial reverse 10-CHO-THF synthetase activity. We also show that in cancer cells, formate release is coupled to mitochondrial complex I activity, whereas in nontransformed fibroblasts, it is partially insensitive to inhibition of complex I activity. We demonstrate that in mice, about 50% of plasma formate is derived from serine and that serine starvation or complex I inhibition reduces formate synthesis in vivo. These observations transform our understanding of one-carbon metabolism and have implications for the treatment of diabetes and cancer with complex I inhibitors.

  1. Modeling and structural analysis of evolutionarily diverse S8 family serine proteases.

    PubMed

    Laskar, Aparna; Rodger, Euan James; Chatterjee, Aniruddha; Mandal, Chhabinath

    2011-01-01

    Serine proteases are an abundant class of enzymes that are involved in a wide range of physiological processes and are classified into clans sharing structural homology. The active site of the subtilisin-like clan contains a catalytic triad in the order Asp, His, Ser (S8 family) or a catalytic tetrad in the order Glu, Asp and Ser (S53 family). The core structure and active site geometry of these proteases is of interest for many applications. The aim of this study was to investigate the structural properties of different S8 family serine proteases from a diverse range of taxa using molecular modeling techniques. In conjunction with 12 experimentally determined three-dimensional structures of S8 family members, our predicted structures from an archaeon, protozoan and a plant were used for analysis of the catalytic core. Amino acid sequences were obtained from the MEROPS database and submitted to the LOOPP server for threading based structure prediction. The predicted structures were refined and validated using PROCHECK, SCRWL and MODELYN. Investigation of secondary structures and electrostatic surface potential was performed using MOLMOL. Encompassing a wide range of taxa, our structural analysis provides an evolutionary perspective on S8 family serine proteases. Focusing on the common core containing the catalytic site of the enzyme, the analysis presented here is beneficial for future molecular modeling strategies and structure-based rational drug design.

  2. The phosphorylation of serine 492 of perilipin a directs lipid droplet fragmentation and dispersion.

    PubMed

    Marcinkiewicz, Amy; Gauthier, Denise; Garcia, Anne; Brasaemle, Dawn L

    2006-04-28

    Perilipin A is a key regulator of triacylglycerol storage and hydrolysis in adipocytes; phosphorylation of perilipin A by protein kinase A facilitates maximal lipolysis. Chronic stimulation of lipolysis in 3T3-L1 adipocytes causes large perinuclear lipid droplets to fragment into myriad dispersed perilipin A-covered microlipid droplets. In cultured fibroblasts stably expressing ectopic perilipin A, clustered lipid droplets disperse throughout the cytoplasm upon incubation of the cells with forskolin and isobutylmethylxanthine (IBMX) to elevate levels of cAMP and activate protein kinase A, mirroring events observed in adipocytes. Furthermore, diethylum-belliferyl phosphate inhibits stimulated lipolysis but not the dispersion of lipid droplets, suggesting that products of lipolysis are not required for this remodeling process. We hypothesized that protein kinase A-mediated phosphorylation of perilipin A triggers the remodeling of lipid droplets. The mutation of serine 492 of perilipin A to alanine prevented the dispersion of clustered lipid droplets in fibroblasts stably expressing the mutated perilipin upon incubation with forskolin and IBMX. In contrast, the substitution of serines 81, 222, 276, or 433 with alanine, either singly or in combinations, did not affect the protein kinase A-mediated remodeling of lipid droplets. Interestingly, substitution of serines 433, 492, and 517 of perilipin A with glutamic acid residues blocked the dispersion of clustered lipid droplets in cells incubated with forskolin and IBMX, indicating that the addition of a negative charge does not mimic a phosphate group. We conclude that protein kinase A-mediated phosphorylation of serine 492 of perilipin A drives the fragmentation and dispersion of lipid droplets. PMID:16488886

  3. Identification and characterisation of the excreted/secreted serine proteases of larvae of the old world screwworm fly, Chrysomya bezziana.

    PubMed

    Muharsini, S; Sukarsih; Riding, G; Partoutomo, S; Hamilton, S; Willadsen, P; Wijffels, G

    2000-05-01

    Serine proteases are the major proteolytic activity excreted or secreted from Chrysomya bezziana larvae as demonstrated by gelatin gel analyses and the use of specific substrates, benzoyl-Arg-p-nitroanilide and succinyl-Ala-Ala-Pro-Phe-p-nitroanilide. Serine proteases were identified through their inhibition by 4-(2-aminoethyl)-benzene sulphonyl fluoride and classified as trypsin- and chymotrypsin-like on the basis of inhibition by tosyl-L-lysine chloromethyl ketone and tosyl-L-phenylalanine chloromethyl ketone, respectively. Like most insect serine proteases, the C. bezziana enzymes were active over broad pH range from mildly acidic to alkaline. The excreted or secreted serine proteases were purified by affinity chromatography using soybean trypsin inhibitor. A different subset of the serine proteases was isolated by salt elution from washed larval peritrophic matrices. Amino-terminal sequencing identified both trypsin and chymotrypsin-like sequences in the excreted or secreted pool with the latter being the dominant protease, whereas trypsin was the dominant species in the peritrophic matrix eluant. These results suggest that trypsin was possibly preferably adsorbed by the peritrophic matrix and may act as a final proteolytic processing stage as partially digested and ingested polypeptides pass through the peritrophic matrix. Immunoblot analysis on dissected gut tissues indicated that the anterior and posterior midguts were the main source of the serine proteases, although a novel species of 32 kDa was predominantly associated with the peritrophic matrix. Proteases are a target for a partially protective immune response and understanding the complexity of the secreted and digestive proteases is a necessary part of understanding the mechanism of the host's immunological defence against the parasite.

  4. Negative Role of RIG-I Serine 8 Phosphorylation in the Regulatin of Interferon-beta Production

    SciTech Connect

    E Nistal-Villan; M Gack; G Martinez-Delgado; N Maharaj; K Inn; H Yang; R Wang; A Aggarwal; J Jung; A Garcia-Sastre

    2011-12-31

    RIG-I (retinoic acid-inducible gene I) and TRIM25 (tripartite motif protein 25) have emerged as key regulatory factors to induce interferon (IFN)-mediated innate immune responses to limit viral replication. Upon recognition of viral RNA, TRIM25 E3 ligase binds the first caspase recruitment domain (CARD) of RIG-I and subsequently induces lysine 172 ubiquitination of the second CARD of RIG-I, which is essential for the interaction with downstream MAVS/IPS-1/CARDIF/VISA and, thereby, IFN-beta mRNA production. Although ubiquitination has emerged as a major factor involved in RIG-I activation, the potential contribution of other post-translational modifications, such as phosphorylation, to the regulation of RIG-I activity has not been addressed. Here, we report the identification of serine 8 phosphorylation at the first CARD of RIG-I as a negative regulatory mechanism of RIG-I-mediated IFN-beta production. Immunoblot analysis with a phosphospecific antibody showed that RIG-I serine 8 phosphorylation steady-state levels were decreased upon stimulation of cells with IFN-beta or virus infection. Substitution of serine 8 in the CARD RIG-I functional domain with phosphomimetic aspartate or glutamate results in decreased TRIM25 binding, RIG-I ubiquitination, MAVS binding, and downstream signaling. Finally, sequence comparison reveals that only primate species carry serine 8, whereas other animal species carry an asparagine, indicating that serine 8 phosphorylation may represent a primate-specific regulation of RIG-I activation. Collectively, these data suggest that the phosphorylation of RIG-I serine 8 operates as a negative switch of RIG-I activation by suppressing TRIM25 interaction, further underscoring the importance of RIG-I and TRIM25 connection in type I IFN signal transduction.

  5. An update on potato crisps contents of moisture, fat, salt and fatty acids (including trans-fatty acids) with special emphasis on new oils/fats used for frying.

    PubMed

    Gonçalves Albuquerque, Tânia; Sanches-Silva, Ana; Santos, Lèlita; Costa, Helena S

    2012-09-01

    Eighteen brands of potato crisps, frequently consumed, were analyzed to establish their nutritional value in relation to salt, fat and fatty acid (FA) composition. The purpose of the present study was to determine moisture, total fat, salt contents and FA profiles (including trans-FAs), and to identify the oil/fat used for frying of the 18 brands of potato crisps. Our results show that salt content ranged from 0.127 to 2.77 g/100 g and total fat content of potato crisps varied between 20.0 and 42.8 g/100 g. With respect to FAs analysis, palmitic acid (C16:0), oleic acid (C18:1) and linoleic acid (C18:2) were the major FAs found in the analyzed potato crisps. It is clear from our work that nowadays most potato crisps are currently produced using oils with high contents in unsaturated FAs, which can be considered as healthier from a nutritional point of view. Nevertheless, some brands of potato crisps still use palm oil or a blend of palm oil and other fats/oils, which are very rich in saturated FAs.

  6. ACTIVATION OF A CRYPTIC D-SERINE DEAMINASE (DSD) GENE FROM PSEUDOMONAS CEPACIA 17616

    EPA Science Inventory

    D-serine inhibits growth of P. cepacia 17616; however, resistant mutants able to express an ordinarily cryptic D-serine deaminase (dsd) gene were isolated readily. The resistant strains formed high levels of a D-serine deaminase active on D-threonine as well as D-serine. IS eleme...

  7. Distribution and enantiomeric composition of amino acids in the Murchison meteorite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Engel, M. H.; Nagy, B.

    1982-01-01

    Studies of the amino acid contents and enantiomeric compositions of a single stone from the Murchison meteorite are reported. Water-extracted and 6M HCl-extracted samples from the meteorite interior of meteorite fragments were analyzed by gas chromatography and combined gas chromatography-chemical ionization mass spectrometry. Examination of the D/L ratios of glutamic acid, aspartic acid, proline, leucine and alanine reveals those amino acids extractable by water to be partially racemized, whereas the acid-extracted amino acids were less racemized. The amino acid composition of the stone is similar to those previously reported, including the absence of serine, threonine, tyrosine phenylalanine and methionine and the presence of unusual amino acids including such as isovaline, alpha-aminoisobutyric acid and pseudoleucine. It is concluded that the most likely mechanism accounting for the occurrence of nonracemic amino acid mixtures in the Murchison meteorite is by extraterrestrial stereoselective synthesis or decomposition reactions.

  8. Nutritional assessment of genetically modified rapeseed synthesizing high amounts of mid-chain fatty acids including production responses of growing-finishing pigs.

    PubMed

    Böhme, Hartwig; Rudloff, Eike; Schöne, Friedrich; Schumann, Wolfgang; Hüther, Liane; Flachowsky, Gerhard

    2007-08-01

    The nutritive value of genetically modified myristic acid-rich rapeseed, in which a acyl-thioesterase gene inserted, was studied. Crude nutrients, amino acid and fatty acid profiles as well as mineral and glucosinolate contents were determined and compared with those of the non-transgenic parental cultivar. The concentration of crude nutrients, minerals and amino acids were found to be within the range of natural variance. The myristic and palmitic acid content increased from 0.1 - 11.4% and from 3.6-20%, respectively, at the expense of oleic acid, which decreased from 68.6-42.6% of total fatty acids. The glucosinolate contents increased from 12.4 micromol/g in the parental plant to 19 micromol/g DM in the GM-plant. Full-fat rapeseed of both cultivars was incorporated in pig diets at a level of 15%, and the digestibility and the production efficiency were tested under ad libitum feeding conditions with ten pigs each over the growing finishing period from 32-105 kg BW. The experimental diets did not show significant differences in digestibility and energetic feeding value. However, feed intake and weight gain decreased presumably due to the increasing glucosinolate intake associated with the feeding of transgenic rapeseed. The dietary fatty acids profile influenced the fatty acid profile of body fat. Myristic acid accumulated in back fat and intramuscular fat while the oleic acid content decreased. The increased glucosinolate intake affected the weight of thyroid glands and their iodine concentration.

  9. Deficiency in L-serine deaminase interferes with one-carbon metabolism and cell wall synthesis in Escherichia coli K-12.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiao; El-Hajj, Ziad W; Newman, Elaine

    2010-10-01

    Escherichia coli K-12 provided with glucose and a mixture of amino acids depletes L-serine more quickly than any other amino acid even in the presence of ammonium sulfate. A mutant without three 4Fe4S L-serine deaminases (SdaA, SdaB, and TdcG) of E. coli K-12 is unable to do this. The high level of L-serine that accumulates when such a mutant is exposed to amino acid mixtures starves the cells for C(1) units and interferes with cell wall synthesis. We suggest that at high concentrations, L-serine decreases synthesis of UDP-N-acetylmuramate-L-alanine by the murC-encoded ligase, weakening the cell wall and producing misshapen cells and lysis. The inhibition by high L-serine is overcome in several ways: by a large concentration of L-alanine, by overproducing MurC together with a low concentration of L-alanine, and by overproducing FtsW, thus promoting septal assembly and also by overexpression of the glycine cleavage operon. S-Adenosylmethionine reduces lysis and allows an extensive increase in biomass without improving cell division. This suggests that E. coli has a metabolic trigger for cell division. Without that reaction, if no other inhibition occurs, other metabolic functions can continue and cells can elongate and replicate their DNA, reaching at least 180 times their usual length, but cannot divide.

  10. Conversion of human 5-lipoxygenase to a 15-lipoxygenase by a point mutation to mimic phosphorylation at Serine-663

    SciTech Connect

    Gilbert, Nathaniel C.; Rui, Zhe; Neau, David B.; Waight, Maria T.; Bartlett, Sue G.; Boeglin, William E.; Brash, Alan R.; Newcomer, Marcia E.

    2012-08-31

    The enzyme 5-lipoxygenase (5-LOX) initiates biosynthesis of the proinflammatory leukotriene lipid mediators and, together with 15-LOX, is also required for synthesis of the anti-inflammatory lipoxins. The catalytic activity of 5-LOX is regulated through multiple mechanisms, including Ca{sup 2+}-targeted membrane binding and phosphorylation at specific serine residues. To investigate the consequences of phosphorylation at S663, we mutated the residue to the phosphorylation mimic Asp, providing a homogenous preparation suitable for catalytic and structural studies. The S663D enzyme exhibits robust 15-LOX activity, as determined by spectrophotometric and HPLC analyses, with only traces of 5-LOX activity remaining; synthesis of the anti-inflammatory lipoxin A4 from arachidonic acid is also detected. The crystal structure of the S663D mutant in the absence and presence of arachidonic acid (in the context of the previously reported Stable-5-LOX) reveals substantial remodeling of helices that define the active site so that the once fully encapsulated catalytic machinery is solvent accessible. Our results suggest that phosphorylation of 5-LOX at S663 could not only down-regulate leukotriene synthesis but also stimulate lipoxin production in inflammatory cells that do not express 15-LOX, thus redirecting lipid mediator biosynthesis to the production of proresolving mediators of inflammation.

  11. Mapping of Stat3 serine phosphorylation to a single residue (727) and evidence that serine phosphorylation has no influence on DNA binding of Stat1 and Stat3.

    PubMed Central

    Wen, Z; Darnell, J E

    1997-01-01

    During their polypeptide ligand-induced activation Stats (signaltransducers andactivators oftranscription) 1 and 3 acquire, in addition to an obligatory tyrosine phosphorylation, phosphorylation on serine which boosts their transactivating potential [Wen, Z., Zhong, Z. and Darnell, J. E. Jr. (1995) Cell 82, 241-250]. By examining phosphopeptide maps of wild-type and mutant protein we show here that the Stat3 serine phosphorylation, like the Stat1 serine phosphorylation, occurs on a single residue, serine 727. Neither the DNA binding of Stat1 nor Stat3 is demonstrably affected by the presence or absence of the serine phosphorylation. Thus the earlier demonstration that transcription is enhanced by the presence of the serine 727 residue likely occurs after DNA binding. These findings do not agree with earlier claims of excess serine to tyrosine phosphorylation in activated Stats 1 and 3 or to claims of more stable DNA binding of serine phosphorylated Stat dimers. PMID:9153303

  12. A masquerade-like serine proteinase homologue is necessary for phenoloxidase activity in the coleopteran insect, Holotrichia diomphalia larvae.

    PubMed

    Kwon, T H; Kim, M S; Choi, H W; Joo, C H; Cho, M Y; Lee, B L

    2000-10-01

    Previously, we reported the molecular cloning of cDNA for the prophenoloxidase activating factor-I (PPAF-I) that encoded a member of the serine proteinase group with a disulfide-knotted motif at the N-terminus and a trypsin-like catalytic domain at the C-terminus [Lee, S.Y., Cho, M.Y., Hyun, J.H., Lee, K.M., Homma, K.I., Natori, S. , Kawabata, S.I., Iwanaga, S. & Lee, B.L. (1998) Eur. J. Biochem. 257, 615-621]. PPAF-I is directly involved in the activation of pro-phenoloxidase (pro-PO) by limited proteolysis and the overall structure is highly similar to that of Drosophila easter serine protease, an essential serine protease zymogen for pattern formation in normal embryonic development. Here, we report purification and molecular cloning of cDNA for another 45-kDa novel PPAF from the hemocyte lysate of Holotrichia diomphalia larvae. The gene encodes a serine proteinase homologue consisting of 415 amino-acid residues with a molecular mass of 45 256 Da. The overall structure of the 45-kDa protein is similar to that of masquerade, a serine proteinase homologue expressed during embryogenesis, larval, and pupal development in Drosophila melanogaster. The 45-kDa protein contained a trypsin-like serine proteinase domain at the C-terminus, except for the substitution of Ser of the active site triad to Gly and had a disulfide-knotted domain at the N-terminus. A highly similar 45-kDa serine proteinase homologue was also cloned from the larval cDNA library of another coleopteran, Tenebrio molitor. By in vitro reconstitution experiments, we found that the purified 45-kDa serine proteinase homologue, the purified active PPAF-I and the purified pro-PO were necessary for expressing phenoloxidase activity in the Holotrichia pro-PO system. However, incubation of pro-PO with either PPAF-I or 45-kDa protein, no phenoloxidase activity was observed. Interestingly, when the 45-kDa protein was incubated with PPAF-I and pro-PO in the absence, but not in the presence of Ca2+, the 45-k

  13. CROP/Luc7A, a novel serine/arginine-rich nuclear protein, isolated from cisplatin-resistant cell line.

    PubMed

    Nishii, Y; Morishima, M; Kakehi, Y; Umehara, K; Kioka, N; Terano, Y; Amachi, T; Ueda, K

    2000-01-14

    A novel putative SR protein, designated cisplatin resistance-associated overexpressed protein (CROP), has been cloned from cisplatin-resistant cell lines by differential display. The N-half of the deduced amino acid sequence of 432 amino acids of CROP contains cysteine/histidine motifs and leucine zipper-like repeats. The C-half consists mostly of charged and polar amino acids: arginine (58 residues or 25%), glutamate (36 residues or 16%), serine (35 residues or 15%), lysine (30 residues, 13%), and aspartate (20 residues or 9%). The C-half is extremely hydrophilic and comprises domains rich in lysine and glutamate residues, rich in alternating arginine and glutamate residues, and rich in arginine and serine residues. The arginine/serine-rich domain is dominated by a series of 8 amino acid imperfect repetitive motif (consensus sequence, Ser-Arg-Ser-Arg-Asp/Glu-Arg-Arg-Arg), which has been found in RNA splicing factors. The RNase protection assay and Western blotting analysis indicate that the expression of CROP is about 2-3-fold higher in mRNA and protein levels in cisplatin-resistant ACHN/CDDP cells than in host ACHN cells. CROP is the human homologue of yeast Luc7p, which is supposed to be involved in 5'-splice site recognition and is essential for vegetative growth. PMID:10631324

  14. A highly acid-resistant novel strain of Lactobacillus johnsonii No. 1088 has antibacterial activity, including that against Helicobacter pylori, and inhibits gastrin-mediated acid production in mice

    PubMed Central

    Aiba, Yuji; Nakano, Yasuhiro; Koga, Yasuhiro; Takahashi, Kenji; Komatsu, Yasuhiko

    2015-01-01

    A novel strain of Lactobacillus johnsonii No. 1088 was isolated from the gastric juice of a healthy Japanese male volunteer, and characterized for its effectiveness in the stomach environment. Lactobacillus johnsonii No. 1088 was found to have the strongest acid resistance among several lactobacilli examined (>10% of cells survived at pH 1.0 after 2 h), and such a high acid resistance property was a specific characteristic of this strain of L. johnsonii. When cultured with various virulent bacteria, L. johnsonii No. 1088 inhibited the growth of Helicobacter pylori,Escherichia coli O-157, Salmonella Typhimurium, and Clostridium difficile, in which case its effectiveness was more potent than that of a type strain of L. johnsonii,JCM2012. In addition to its effect in vitro, L. johnsonii No. 1088 inhibited the growth of H. pylori in human intestinal microbiota-associated mice in both its live and lyophilized forms. Moreover, L. johnsonii No. 1088 suppressed gastric acid secretion in mice via decreasing the number of gastrin-positive cells in the stomach. These results taken together suggest that L. johnsonii No. 1088 is a unique lactobacillus having properties beneficial for supporting H. pylori eradication by triple therapy including the use of a proton pump inhibitor (PPI) and also for prophylaxis of gastroesophageal reflux disease possibly caused after H. pylori eradication as a side effect of PPI. PMID:25771812

  15. A highly acid-resistant novel strain of Lactobacillus johnsonii No. 1088 has antibacterial activity, including that against Helicobacter pylori, and inhibits gastrin-mediated acid production in mice.

    PubMed

    Aiba, Yuji; Nakano, Yasuhiro; Koga, Yasuhiro; Takahashi, Kenji; Komatsu, Yasuhiko

    2015-06-01

    A novel strain of Lactobacillus johnsonii No. 1088 was isolated from the gastric juice of a healthy Japanese male volunteer, and characterized for its effectiveness in the stomach environment. Lactobacillus johnsonii No. 1088 was found to have the strongest acid resistance among several lactobacilli examined (>10% of cells survived at pH 1.0 after 2 h), and such a high acid resistance property was a specific characteristic of this strain of L. johnsonii. When cultured with various virulent bacteria, L. johnsonii No. 1088 inhibited the growth of Helicobacter pylori, Escherichia coli O-157, Salmonella Typhimurium, and Clostridium difficile, in which case its effectiveness was more potent than that of a type strain of L. johnsonii, JCM2012. In addition to its effect in vitro, L. johnsonii No. 1088 inhibited the growth of H. pylori in human intestinal microbiota-associated mice in both its live and lyophilized forms. Moreover, L. johnsonii No. 1088 suppressed gastric acid secretion in mice via decreasing the number of gastrin-positive cells in the stomach. These results taken together suggest that L. johnsonii No. 1088 is a unique lactobacillus having properties beneficial for supporting H. pylori eradication by triple therapy including the use of a proton pump inhibitor (PPI) and also for prophylaxis of gastroesophageal reflux disease possibly caused after H. pylori eradication as a side effect of PPI.

  16. Synaptic vesicles contain small ribonucleic acids (sRNAs) including transfer RNA fragments (trfRNA) and microRNAs (miRNA)

    PubMed Central

    Li, Huinan; Wu, Cheng; Aramayo, Rodolfo; Sachs, Matthew S.; Harlow, Mark L.

    2015-01-01

    Synaptic vesicles (SVs) are neuronal presynaptic organelles that load and release neurotransmitter at chemical synapses. In addition to classic neurotransmitters, we have found that synaptic vesicles isolated from the electric organ of Torpedo californica, a model cholinergic synapse, contain small ribonucleic acids (sRNAs), primarily the 5′ ends of transfer RNAs (tRNAs) termed tRNA fragments (trfRNAs). To test the evolutionary conservation of SV sRNAs we examined isolated SVs from the mouse central nervous system (CNS). We found abundant levels of sRNAs in mouse SVs, including trfRNAs and micro RNAs (miRNAs) known to be involved in transcriptional and translational regulation. This discovery suggests that, in addition to inducing changes in local dendritic excitability through the release of neurotransmitters, SVs may, through the release of specific trfRNAs and miRNAs, directly regulate local protein synthesis. We believe these findings have broad implications for the study of chemical synaptic transmission. PMID:26446566

  17. Synaptic vesicles contain small ribonucleic acids (sRNAs) including transfer RNA fragments (trfRNA) and microRNAs (miRNA).

    PubMed

    Li, Huinan; Wu, Cheng; Aramayo, Rodolfo; Sachs, Matthew S; Harlow, Mark L

    2015-01-01

    Synaptic vesicles (SVs) are neuronal presynaptic organelles that load and release neurotransmitter at chemical synapses. In addition to classic neurotransmitters, we have found that synaptic vesicles isolated from the electric organ of Torpedo californica, a model cholinergic synapse, contain small ribonucleic acids (sRNAs), primarily the 5' ends of transfer RNAs (tRNAs) termed tRNA fragments (trfRNAs). To test the evolutionary conservation of SV sRNAs we examined isolated SVs from the mouse central nervous system (CNS). We found abundant levels of sRNAs in mouse SVs, including trfRNAs and micro RNAs (miRNAs) known to be involved in transcriptional and translational regulation. This discovery suggests that, in addition to inducing changes in local dendritic excitability through the release of neurotransmitters, SVs may, through the release of specific trfRNAs and miRNAs, directly regulate local protein synthesis. We believe these findings have broad implications for the study of chemical synaptic transmission.

  18. Synaptic vesicles contain small ribonucleic acids (sRNAs) including transfer RNA fragments (trfRNA) and microRNAs (miRNA).

    PubMed

    Li, Huinan; Wu, Cheng; Aramayo, Rodolfo; Sachs, Matthew S; Harlow, Mark L

    2015-01-01

    Synaptic vesicles (SVs) are neuronal presynaptic organelles that load and release neurotransmitter at chemical synapses. In addition to classic neurotransmitters, we have found that synaptic vesicles isolated from the electric organ of Torpedo californica, a model cholinergic synapse, contain small ribonucleic acids (sRNAs), primarily the 5' ends of transfer RNAs (tRNAs) termed tRNA fragments (trfRNAs). To test the evolutionary conservation of SV sRNAs we examined isolated SVs from the mouse central nervous system (CNS). We found abundant levels of sRNAs in mouse SVs, including trfRNAs and micro RNAs (miRNAs) known to be involved in transcriptional and translational regulation. This discovery suggests that, in addition to inducing changes in local dendritic excitability through the release of neurotransmitters, SVs may, through the release of specific trfRNAs and miRNAs, directly regulate local protein synthesis. We believe these findings have broad implications for the study of chemical synaptic transmission. PMID:26446566

  19. Serous tubal intraepithelial carcinoma upregulates markers associated with high-grade serous carcinomas including Rsf-1 (HBXAP), cyclin E and fatty acid synthase.

    PubMed

    Sehdev, Ann Smith; Kurman, Robert J; Kuhn, Elisabetta; Shih, Ie-Ming

    2010-06-01

    Serous tubal intraepithelial carcinoma (STIC) has been proposed as a precursor for many pelvic high-grade serous carcinomas. Our previous analysis of the ovarian cancer genome identified several genes with oncogenic potential that are amplified and/or overexpressed in the majority of high-grade serous carcinomas. Determining whether these genes are upregulated in STICs is important in further elucidating the relationship of STICs to high-grade serous carcinomas and is fundamental in understanding the molecular pathogenesis of high-grade serous carcinomas. In this study, 37 morphologically defined STICs were obtained from 23 patients with stage IIIC/IV high-grade serous carcinomas. Both STICs and the high-grade serous carcinomas were analyzed for expression of Rsf-1 (HBXAP), cyclin E, fatty acid synthase (FASN) and mucin-4. In addition, they were examined for expression of established markers including p53, Ki-67 and p16. We found that diffuse nuclear p53 and p16 immunoreactivity was observed in 27 (75%) of 36 and 18 (55%) of 33 STICs, respectively, whereas an elevated Ki-67 labeling index (>or=10%) was detected in 29 (78%) of 37 STICs. Cyclin E nuclear staining was seen in 24 (77%) of 35 STICs, whereas normal tubal epithelial cells were all negative. Increased Rsf-1 and FASN immunoreactivity occurred in 63%, and 62% of STICs, respectively, compared with adjacent normal-appearing tubal epithelium. Interestingly, only one STIC showed increased mucin-4 immunoreactivity. Carcinomas, when compared with STICs, overexpressed p16, Rsf-1, cyclin E and FASN in a higher proportion of cases. In conclusion, STICs express several markers including Rsf-1, cyclin E and FASN in high-grade serous carcinomas. In contrast, mucin-4 immunoreactivity either did not change or was reduced in most STICs. These results suggest that overexpression of Rsf-1, cyclin E and FASN occurs early in tumor progression.

  20. Cloning and expression of the gene encoding an extracellular alkaline serine protease from Vibrio alginolyticus strain HY9901, the causative agent of vibriosis in Lutjanus erythopterus (Bloch).

    PubMed

    Cai, S H; Wu, Z H; Jian, J C; Lu, Y S

    2007-08-01

    A 750-bp internal fragment of the alkaline serine protease gene (asp) from the Vibrio alginolyticus strain HY9901 was amplified by polymerase chain reaction (PCR). The flanking sequences of the 5'- and 3'- ends of the asp gene were characterized by reverse and nested PCR. Sequence analysis showed that the asp gene contained an 1893-bp ORF encoding 630 amino acids. The deduced amino acid sequence of the ASP (alkaline serine protease) precursor showed significant homology with several bacterial alkaline serine proteases. Expression of the asp gene in Escherichia coli and activity tests of the ASP indicated that the N-signal peptide of the ASP precursor was essential to autocatalyse and fold correctly the enzyme to obtain activity. The purified ASP was lethal for Lutjanus erythopterus with an LD(50) of 0.25 microg protein g(-1) body weight.

  1. Subcellular localization and membrane topology of serine palmitoyltransferase, 3-dehydrosphinganine reductase, and sphinganine N-acyltransferase in mouse liver.

    PubMed

    Mandon, E C; Ehses, I; Rother, J; van Echten, G; Sandhoff, K

    1992-06-01

    Serine palmitoyltransferase, 3-dehydrosphinganine reductase and sphinganine N-acyltransferase are responsible for the first steps in sphingolipid biosynthesis forming 3-oxosphinganine, sphinganine, and dihydroceramide, respectively. We confirmed the localization of these enzymes in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) using highly purified mouse liver ER and Golgi preparations. Mild digestion of sealed "right-side out" mouse liver ER derived vesicles with different proteolytic enzymes under conditions where latency of mannose-6-phosphatase was 90% produced approximately 60-80% inactivation of serine palmitoyltransferase, 3-dehydrosphinganine reductase, and sphinganine N-acyltransferase activities. These sphingolipid biosynthetic activities (serine palmitoyltransferase, 3-dehydrosphinganine reductase, and sphinganine N-acyltransferase) are not latent, indicating that they face the cytosolic side of the ER, so that substrates have free access to their active sites. Moreover, the membrane-impermeable compound, 4,4'-diisothiocyanostilbene-2,2'-disulfonic acid, which binds to a large number of ER proteins, inhibits serine palmitoyltransferase and sphinganine N-acyltransferase activities by 30-70%. PMID:1317856

  2. Localization of epidermal sphingolipid synthesis and serine palmitoyl transferase activity: alterations imposed by permeability barrier requirements.

    PubMed

    Holleran, W M; Gao, W N; Feingold, K R; Elias, P M

    1995-01-01

    Sphingolipids, the predominant lipid species in mammalian stratum corneum play, a central role in permeability barrier homeostatis. Prior studies have shown that the epidermis synthesizes abundant sphingolipids, a process regulated by barrier requirements, and that inhibition of sphingolipid synthesis interferes with barrier homeostasis. To investigate further the relationship between epidermal sphingolipid metabolism and barrier function, we localized sphingolipid synthetic activity in murine epidermis under basal conditions, and following acute (acetone treatment) or chronic (essential fatty acid deficiency, EFAD) barrier perturbation, using dithiothreitol and/or the staphylococcal epidermolytic toxin to isolate the lower from the outer epidermis. Under basal conditions, both the activity of serine palmitoyl transferase (SPT), the rate-limiting enzyme of sphingolipid synthesis, and the rates of 3H-H2O incorporation into sphingolipids were nearly equivalent in the lower and the outer epidermis. Following acute barrier perturbation, SPT activity increased significantly in both the lower (35%; P < 0.05) and the outer epidermal layers (60%; P < 0.01). The rates of 3H-H2O incorporation into each major sphingolipid family, including ceramides, glucosylceramides and sphingomyelin, increased significantly in both the lower and the outer epidermis of treated flanks after acute barrier disruption. Finally, SPT activity was modestly elevated (20%; P < 0.01) in the lower but not in the outer epidermis of EFAD animals. These studies demonstrate the ability of both lower and outer epidermal cells to generate sphingolipids, and that permeability barrier homeostatic mechanisms appear to differentially regulate SPT activity and sphingolipid synthesis in the lower and the outer epidermis in response to acute and chronic barrier perturbation.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7598529

  3. Metabolic evidence of vitamin B-12 deficiency, including high homocysteine and methylmalonic acid and low holotranscobalamin, is more pronounced in older adults with elevated plasma folate

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Background: An analysis of data from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey indicated that in older adults exposed to folic acid fortification, the combination of low serum vitamin B-12 and elevated folate is associated with higher concentrations of homocysteine and methylmalonic acid ...

  4. Efficient Reassignment of a Frequent Serine Codon in Wild-Type Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Ho, Joanne M; Reynolds, Noah M; Rivera, Keith; Connolly, Morgan; Guo, Li-Tao; Ling, Jiqiang; Pappin, Darryl J; Church, George M; Söll, Dieter

    2016-02-19

    Expansion of the genetic code through engineering the translation machinery has greatly increased the chemical repertoire of the proteome. This has been accomplished mainly by read-through of UAG or UGA stop codons by the noncanonical aminoacyl-tRNA of choice. While stop codon read-through involves competition with the translation release factors, sense codon reassignment entails competition with a large pool of endogenous tRNAs. We used an engineered pyrrolysyl-tRNA synthetase to incorporate 3-iodo-l-phenylalanine (3-I-Phe) at a number of different serine and leucine codons in wild-type Escherichia coli. Quantitative LC-MS/MS measurements of amino acid incorporation yields carried out in a selected reaction monitoring experiment revealed that the 3-I-Phe abundance at the Ser208AGU codon in superfolder GFP was 65 ± 17%. This method also allowed quantification of other amino acids (serine, 33 ± 17%; phenylalanine, 1 ± 1%; threonine, 1 ± 1%) that compete with 3-I-Phe at both the aminoacylation and decoding steps of translation for incorporation at the same codon position. Reassignments of different serine (AGU, AGC, UCG) and leucine (CUG) codons with the matching tRNA(Pyl) anticodon variants were met with varying success, and our findings provide a guideline for the choice of sense codons to be reassigned. Our results indicate that the 3-iodo-l-phenylalanyl-tRNA synthetase (IFRS)/tRNA(Pyl) pair can efficiently outcompete the cellular machinery to reassign select sense codons in wild-type E. coli.

  5. Isolation and characterization of a serine protease, Ba III-4, from Peruvian Bothrops atrox venom.

    PubMed

    Ponce-Soto, L A; Bonfim, V L; Novello, J C; Navarro Oviedo, R; Yarlequé Chocas, A; Marangoni, S

    2007-09-01

    A serine protease from Bothrops atrox (Peruvian specimen's venom) was isolated in two chromatographic steps in LC molecular exclusion and reverse phase-HPLC. This protein was denominated Ba III-4 (33,080.265 Da determinated by MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry) and showed pI of 5.06, Km 0.2 x 10(-1 ) M and the V (máx) 4.1 x 10(-1 )nmoles p-NA/lt/min on the synthetic substrate BapNA. Ba III-4 also showed ability to coagulate bovine fibrinogen. The serine protease was inhibited by soyben trypsin inhibitor and DA2II, which is an anti-hemorrhagic factor isolated from the opossum specie Didelphis albiventris. The primary structure of Ba III-4 showed the presence of His(44), Asp(94) and Ser(193) residues in the corresponding positions to the catalytic triad established in the serine proteases and Ser(193) are inhibited by phenylmethylsulfonylfluoride (PMSF). Amino acid analysis showed a high content of Asp, Glu, Gly, Ser, Ala and Pro, as well as 12 half-cysteine residues. Ba III-4 contained 293 amino acid residues and the primary structure of VIGGDECDIN EHPFLAFMYY SPRYFCGMTL INQEWVLTAA HCRYFCGMTL IHLGVHRESE KANYDEVRRF PKEKYFIFCD NNFTDDEVDK DIMLIRLDKP VSNSEHIAPL SLPSNPPSVG SVCRIMGWGQ TTTSPIDVLS PDEPHCANIN LFDNTVCHTA HPQVANTRTS TDTLCAGDLQ GGRDTCNGDS GGPLICNEQL HGILSWGGDP CAQPNKPAFY TKVYYFDHPW IKSIIAGNKK TVNFTCPPLR SDAKDDSTTY INQEWDWVLT AEHCDRTHMR NSFYDYSSIN SDS. Titration experiments did not show the presence of free sulfhydryl groups after 4 h incubation, nor were differences found in relation to titration kinetics in the presence of nondenaturating buffer. The isolation of this protein, Ba III-4, is of potential interest for the understanding of the pathomechanism of the snake venom action and for the identification of new blood coagulation enzymes of natural sources. PMID:17522968

  6. p38 MAPK regulates PKAα and CUB-serine protease in Amphibalanus amphitrite cyprids

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Gen; He, Li-Sheng; Him Wong, Yue; Xu, Ying; Zhang, Yu; Qian, Pei-Yuan

    2015-01-01

    The MKK3-p38 MAPK pathway has been reported to mediate larval settlement in Amphibalanus (=Balanus) amphitrite. To clarify the underlying molecular mechanism, we applied label-free proteomics to analyze changes in the proteome of cyprids treated with a p38 MAPK inhibitor. The results showed that the expression levels of 80 proteins were significantly modified (p < 0.05). These differentially expressed proteins were assigned to 15 functional groups according to the KOG database and 9 pathways were significantly enriched. Further analysis revealed that p38 MAPK might regulate the energy supply and metamorphosis. Two potential regulatory proteins, CUB-serine protease and PKAα, were both down-regulated in expression. CUB-serine protease localized to postaxial seta 2 and 3, as well as the 4 subterminal sensilla in the antennule. Importantly, it was co-localized with the neuron transmitter serotonin in the sections, suggesting that the CUB-serine protease was present in the neural system. PKAα was highly expressed during the cyprid and juvenile stages, and it was co-localized with phospho-p38 MAPK (pp38 MAPK) to the cement gland, suggesting that PKAα might have some functions in cement glands. Overall, p38 MAPK might regulate multiple functions in A. amphitrite cyprids, including the energy supply, metamorphosis, neural system and cement glands. PMID:26434953

  7. Structural insights into the polypharmacological activity of quercetin on serine/threonine kinases

    PubMed Central

    Baby, Bincy; Antony, Priya; Al Halabi, Walaa; Al Homedi, Zahrah; Vijayan, Ranjit

    2016-01-01

    Polypharmacology, the discovery or design of drug molecules that can simultaneously interact with multiple targets, is gaining interest in contemporary drug discovery. Serine/threonine kinases are attractive targets for therapeutic intervention in oncology due to their role in cellular phosphorylation and altered expression in cancer. Quercetin, a naturally occurring flavonoid, inhibits multiple cancer cell lines and is used as an anticancer drug in Phase I clinical trial. Quercetin glycosides have also received some attention due to their high bioavailability and activity against various diseases including cancer. However, these have been studied to a lesser extent. In this study, the structural basis of the multitarget inhibitory activity of quercetin and isoquercitrin, a glycoside derivative, on serine/threonine kinases using molecular modeling was explored. Structural analysis showed that both quercetin and isoquercitrin exhibited good binding energies and interacted with aspartate in the highly conserved Asp–Phe–Gly motif. The results indicate that isoquercitrin could be a more potent inhibitor of several members of the serine/threonine kinase family. In summary, the current structural evaluation highlights the multitarget inhibitory property of quercetin and its potential to be a chemical platform for oncological polypharmacology. PMID:27729770

  8. p38 MAPK regulates PKAα and CUB-serine protease in Amphibalanus amphitrite cyprids.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Gen; He, Li-Sheng; Him Wong, Yue; Xu, Ying; Zhang, Yu; Qian, Pei-Yuan

    2015-01-01

    The MKK3-p38 MAPK pathway has been reported to mediate larval settlement in Amphibalanus (=Balanus) amphitrite. To clarify the underlying molecular mechanism, we applied label-free proteomics to analyze changes in the proteome of cyprids treated with a p38 MAPK inhibitor. The results showed that the expression levels of 80 proteins were significantly modified (p < 0.05). These differentially expressed proteins were assigned to 15 functional groups according to the KOG database and 9 pathways were significantly enriched. Further analysis revealed that p38 MAPK might regulate the energy supply and metamorphosis. Two potential regulatory proteins, CUB-serine protease and PKAα, were both down-regulated in expression. CUB-serine protease localized to postaxial seta 2 and 3, as well as the 4 subterminal sensilla in the antennule. Importantly, it was co-localized with the neuron transmitter serotonin in the sections, suggesting that the CUB-serine protease was present in the neural system. PKAα was highly expressed during the cyprid and juvenile stages, and it was co-localized with phospho-p38 MAPK (pp38 MAPK) to the cement gland, suggesting that PKAα might have some functions in cement glands. Overall, p38 MAPK might regulate multiple functions in A. amphitrite cyprids, including the energy supply, metamorphosis, neural system and cement glands. PMID:26434953

  9. Malonate-based inhibitors of mammalian serine racemase: kinetic characterization and structure-based computational study.

    PubMed

    Vorlová, Barbora; Nachtigallová, Dana; Jirásková-Vaníčková, Jana; Ajani, Haresh; Jansa, Petr; Rezáč, Jan; Fanfrlík, Jindřich; Otyepka, Michal; Hobza, Pavel; Konvalinka, Jan; Lepšík, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Overactivation of NMDA receptors has been implicated in various neuropathological conditions, including brain ischaemia, neurodegenerative disorders and epilepsy. Production of d-serine, an NMDA receptor co-agonist, from l-serine is catalyzed in vivo by the pyridoxal-5'-phosphate (PLP)-dependent enzyme serine racemase. Specific inhibition of this enzyme has been proposed as a promising strategy for treatment of neurological conditions caused by NMDA receptor dysfunction. Here we present the synthesis and activity analysis of a series of malonate-based inhibitors of mouse serine racemase (mSR). The compounds possessed IC50 values ranging from 40 ± 11 mM for 2,2-bis(hydroxymethyl)malonate down to 57 ± 1 μM for 2,2-dichloromalonate, the most effective competitive mSR inhibitor known to date. The structure-activity relationship of the whole series in the human orthologue (hSR) was interpreted using Glide docking, WaterMap analysis of hydration and quantum mechanical calculations based on the X-ray structure of the hSR/malonate complex. Docking into the hSR active site with three thermodynamically favourable water molecules was able to discern qualitatively between good and weak inhibitors. Further improvement in ranking was obtained using advanced PM6-D3H4X/COSMO semiempirical quantum mechanics-based scoring which distinguished between the compounds with IC50 better/worse than 2 mM. We have thus not only found a new potent hSR inhibitor but also worked out a computer-assisted protocol to rationalize the binding affinity which will thus aid in search for more effective SR inhibitors. Novel, potent hSR inhibitors may represent interesting research tools as well as drug candidates for treatment of diseases associated with NMDA receptor overactivation. PMID:25462239

  10. Serine Protease Autotransporters of Enterobacteriaceae (SPATEs): Biogenesis and Function

    PubMed Central

    Dautin, Nathalie

    2010-01-01

    Serine Protease Autotransporters of Enterobacteriaceae (SPATEs) constitute a large family of proteases secreted by Escherichia coli and Shigella. SPATEs exhibit two distinct proteolytic activities. First, a C-terminal catalytic site triggers an intra-molecular cleavage that releases the N-terminal portion of these proteins in the extracellular medium. Second, the secreted N-terminal domains of SPATEs are themselves proteases; each contains a canonical serine-protease catalytic site. Some of these secreted proteases are toxins, eliciting various effects on mammalian cells. Here, we discuss the biogenesis of SPATEs and their function as toxins. PMID:22069633

  11. An evaluation of chromogenic substrates for characterization of serine protease produced by pathogenic Vibrio alginolyticus.

    PubMed

    Chen, F R; Liu, P C; Lee, K K

    1999-01-01

    Four chromogenic substrates for characterizing serine protease of Vibrio alginolyticus were evaluated. The protease activity of bacterial extracellular products, or the fractions of 33 kD protease purified by the AKTA purifier system with various columns, was completely inhibited by ethylenediamine tetra-acetic acid, ethylene glycol-bis(beta-amino-ethyl ether) N,N,N',N'-tetraacetic acid (EGTA), antipain and phenylmethylsulphonyl fluoride (PMSF) using water-soluble substrates (azoalbumin and azocasein). It was only completely inhibited by antipain and PMSF using water-insoluble substrates (azocoll and hide powder azure). The protease activity was not, or only partially, inhibited by 1,10-phenanthroline and sodium dodecyl sulphate (SDS) using all four substrates. Since chelating agents and 1,10-phenanthroline are commonly employed as inhibitors to identify metalloprotease, the two water-soluble substrates may not be appropriate for this purpose, except for using 1,10-phenanthroline as an inhibitor. Chelating agents may be still applicable as inhibitors using water-insoluble substrates and 1,10-phenanthroline is highly recommended in the characterization for metalloprotease to avoid confusion. In the present study, the 33 kD protease was further confirmed as an SDS-resistant serine protease and not a metalloprotease. PMID:10413876

  12. African swine fever virus encodes a serine protein kinase which is packaged into virions.

    PubMed Central

    Baylis, S A; Banham, A H; Vydelingum, S; Dixon, L K; Smith, G L

    1993-01-01

    Nucleotide sequencing of the SalI j region of the virulent Malawi (LIL20/1) strain of African swine fever virus (ASFV) identified an open reading frame (ORF), designated j9L, with extensive similarity to the family of protein kinases. This ORF encodes a 35.1-kDa protein of 299 amino acids which shares 24.6% amino acid identity with the human pim-1 proto-oncogene and 21.0% identity with the vaccinia virus B1R-encoded protein kinase. The ASFV ORF contains the motifs characteristic of serine-threonine protein kinases, with the exception of the presumed ATP-binding site, which is poorly conserved. The ORF was expressed to high levels in Escherichia coli, and the recombinant enzyme phosphorylated a calf thymus histone protein on serine residues in vitro. An antibody raised to an amino-terminal peptide of the ASFV protein kinase was reactive with the recombinant protein in Western immunoblot analyses and was used to demonstrate the presence of the protein kinase in ASF virions. Images PMID:8331722

  13. Serine hydroxymethyltransferase: a key player connecting purine, folate and methionine metabolism in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Saint-Marc, Christelle; Hürlimann, Hans C; Daignan-Fornier, Bertrand; Pinson, Benoît

    2015-11-01

    Previous genetic analyses showed phenotypic interactions between 5-amino-4-imidazole carboxamide ribonucleotide 5'-phosphate (AICAR) produced from the purine and histidine pathways and methionine biosynthesis. Here, we revisited the effect of AICAR on methionine requirement due to AICAR accumulation in the presence of the fau1 mutation invalidating folinic acid remobilization. We found that this methionine auxotrophy could be suppressed by overexpression of the methionine synthase Met6 or by deletion of the serine hydroxymethyltransferase gene SHM2. We propose that in a fau1 background, AICAR, by stimulating the transcriptional expression of SHM2, leads to a folinic acid accumulation inhibiting methionine synthesis by Met6. In addition, we uncovered a new methionine auxotrophy for the ade3 bas1 double mutant that can be rescued by overexpressing the SHM2 gene. We propose that methionine auxotrophy in this mutant is the result of a competition for 5,10-methylenetetrahydrofolate between methionine and deoxythymidine monophosphate synthesis. Altogether, our data show intricate genetic interactions between one-carbon units, purine and methionine metabolism through fine-tuning of serine hydroxymethyltransferase by AICAR and the transcription factor Bas1.

  14. Cloning and sequencing of the major intracellular serine protease gene of Bacillus subtilis.

    PubMed Central

    Koide, Y; Nakamura, A; Uozumi, T; Beppu, T

    1986-01-01

    A Bacillus subtilis 2.7-kilobase DNA fragment containing an intracellular protease gene was cloned into Escherichia coli. The transformants produced an intracellular protease of approximately 35,000 Mr whose activity was inhibited by both phenylmethylsulfonyl fluoride and EDTA. Introduction of the fragment on a multicopy vector, pUB110, into B. subtilis caused a marked increase in the level of the intracellular protease. The nucleotide sequence of the cloned fragment showed the presence of an open reading frame for a possible proenzyme of the major intracellular serine protease (ISP-I) of B. subtilis with an NH2-terminal 17- or 20-amino-acid extension. The total amino acid sequence of the protease deduced from the nucleotide sequence showed considerable homology with that of an extracellular serine protease, subtilisin. The transcriptional initiation site of the ISP-I gene was identified by nuclease S1 mapping. No typical conserved sequence for promoters was found upstream of the open reading frame. An ISP-I-negative mutant of B. subtilis was constructed by integration of artificially deleted gene into the chromosome. The mutant sporulated normally in a nutritionally rich medium but showed decreased sporulation in a synthetic medium. The chloramphenicol resistance determinant of a plasmid integrated at the ISP-I locus was mapped by PBS1 transduction and was found to be closely linked to metC (99.5%). Images PMID:3087947

  15. Primary structure of human corticosteroid binding globulin, deduced from hepatic and pulmonary cDNAs, exhibits homology with serine protease inhibitors

    SciTech Connect

    Hammond, G.L.; Smith, C.L.; Goping, I.S.; Underhill, D.A.

    1987-08-01

    The authors have isolated and sequenced cDNAs for corticosteroid binding globulin (CBG) prepared from human liver and lung mRNAs. The results indicate that CBG mRNA is relatively abundant in the liver but is also present in the lung, testis, and kidney. The liver CBG cDNA contains an open reading frame for a 405-amino acid (M/sub r/ 45,149) polypeptide. This includes a predominantly hydrophobic, leader sequence of 22 residues that precedes the known NH/sub 2/-terminal sequence of human CBG. We, therefore, predict that the mature protein is composed of 383 amino acids and is a polypeptide of M/sub r/ 42,646. A second, in-frame, 72-base-pair cistron of unknown significance exists between the TAA termination codon for CBG and a possible polyadenylylation signal (AATAAA) located 16 nucleotides before the polyadenylylation site. The deduced amino acid sequence of mature CBG contains two cysteine residues and consensus sequences for the attachment of six possible N-linked oligosaccharide chains. The sequences of the human lung and liver CBG cDNAs differ by only one nucleotide within the proposed leader sequence,and they attribute this to a point mutation. No sequence homology was found between CBG and other steroid binding proteins, but there is a remarkable similarity between the amino acid sequences of CBG and of ..cap alpha../sub 1/-antitrypsin, and this extends to other members of the serpin (serine protease inhibitor) superfamily

  16. Sequence analysis and enzyme kinetics of the L2 serine beta-lactamase from Stenotrophomonas maltophilia.

    PubMed Central

    Walsh, T R; MacGowan, A P; Bennett, P M

    1997-01-01

    The L2 serine active-site beta-lactamase from Stenotrophomonas maltophilia has been classified as a clavulanic acid-sensitive cephalosporinase. The gene encoding this enzyme from S. maltophilia 1275 IID has been cloned on a 3.3-kb fragment into pK18 under the control of a Ptac promoter to generate recombinant plasmid pUB5840; when expressed in Escherichia coli, this gene confers resistance to cephalosporins and penicillins. Sequence analysis has revealed an open reading frame (ORF) of 909 bp with a GC content of 71.6%, comparable to that of the L1 metallo-beta-lactamase gene (68.4%) from the same bacterium. The ORF encodes an unmodified protein of 303 amino acids with a predicted molecular mass of 31.5 kDa, accommodating a putative leader peptide of 27 amino acids. Comparison of the amino acid sequence with those of other beta-lactamases showed it to be most closely related (54% identity) to the BLA-A beta-lactamase from Yersinia enterocolitica. Sequence identity is most obvious near the STXK active-site motif and the SDN loop motif common to all serine active-site penicillinases. Sequences outside the conserved regions display low homology with comparable regions of other class A penicillinases. Kinetics of the enzyme from the cloned gene demonstrated an increase in activity with cefotaxime but markedly less activity with imipenem than previously reported. Hence, the S. maltophilia L2 beta-lactamase is an inducible Ambler class A beta-lactamase which would account for the sensitivity to clavulanic acid. PMID:9210666

  17. AND-34/BCAR3 Regulates Adhesion-Dependent p130Cas Serine Phosphorylation and Breast Cancer Cell Growth Pattern

    PubMed Central

    Makkinje, Anthony; Near, Richard I.; Infusini, Giuseppe; Borre, Pierre Vanden; Bloom, Alexander; Cai, Dongpo; Costello, Catherine E.; Lerner, Adam

    2009-01-01

    NSP protein family members associate with p130Cas, a focal adhesion adapter protein best known as a Src substrate that integrates adhesion-related signaling. Over-expression of AND-34/BCAR3/NSP2 (BCAR3), but not NSP1 or NSP3, induces anti-estrogen resistance in human breast cancer cell lines. BCAR3 over-expression in epithelial MCF-7 cells augments levels of a phosphorylated p130Cas species that migrates more slowly on SDS PAGE while NSP-1 and NSP3 induce modest or no phosphorylation, respectively. Conversely, reduction in BCAR3 expression in mesenchymal MDA-231 cells by inducible shRNA results in loss of such p130Cas phosphorylation. Replacement of NSP3's serine/proline-rich domain with that of AND-34/BCAR3 instills the ability to induce p130Cas phosphorylation. Phospho-amino acid analysis demonstrates that BCAR3 induces p130Cas serine phosphorylation. Mass spectrometry identified phosphorylation at p130Cas serines 139, 437 and 639. p130Cas serine phosphorylation accumulates for several hours after adhesion of MDA-231 cells to fibronectin and is dependent upon BCAR3 expression. BCAR3 knockdown alters p130Cas localization and converts MDA-231 growth to an epithelioid pattern characterized by striking cohesiveness and lack of cellular projections at colony borders. These studies demonstrate that BCAR3 regulates p130Cas serine phosphorylation that is adhesion-dependent, temporally distinct from previously well-characterized rapid Fak and Src kinase-mediated p130Cas tyrosine phosphorylation and that correlates with invasive phenotype. PMID:19454314

  18. Mlp24 (McpX) of Vibrio cholerae implicated in pathogenicity functions as a chemoreceptor for multiple amino acids.

    PubMed

    Nishiyama, So-ichiro; Suzuki, Daisuke; Itoh, Yasuaki; Suzuki, Kazuho; Tajima, Hirotaka; Hyakutake, Akihiro; Homma, Michio; Butler-Wu, Susan M; Camilli, Andrew; Kawagishi, Ikuro

    2012-09-01

    The chemotaxis of Vibrio cholerae, the causative agent of cholera, has been implicated in pathogenicity. The bacterium has more than 40 genes for methyl-accepting chemotaxis protein (MCP)-like proteins (MLPs). In this study, we found that glycine and at least 18 L-amino acids, including serine, arginine, asparagine, and proline, serve as attractants to the classical biotype strain O395N1. Based on the sequence comparison with Vibrio parahaemolyticus, we speculated that at least 17 MLPs of V. cholerae may mediate chemotactic responses. Among them, Mlp24 (previously named McpX) is required for the production of cholera toxin upon mouse infection. mlp24 deletion strains of both classical and El Tor biotypes showed defects in taxis toward several amino acids, which were complemented by the expression of Mlp24. These amino acids enhanced methylation of Mlp24. Serine, arginine, asparagine, and proline were shown to bind directly to the periplasmic fragment of Mlp24. The structural information of its closest homolog, Mlp37, predicts that Mlp24 has two potential ligand-binding pockets per subunit, the membrane distal of which was suggested, by mutational analyses, to be involved in sensing of amino acids. These results suggest that Mlp24 is a chemoreceptor for multiple amino acids, including serine, arginine, and asparagine, which were previously shown to stimulate the expression of several virulence factors, implying that taxis toward a set of amino acids plays critical roles in pathogenicity of V. cholerae.

  19. Permanent farnesylation of lamin A mutants linked to progeria impairs its phosphorylation at serine 22 during interphase

    PubMed Central

    Moiseeva, Olga; Lopes-Paciencia, Stéphane; Huot, Geneviève; Lessard, Frédéric; Ferbeyre, Gerardo

    2016-01-01

    Mutants of lamin A cause diseases including the Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS) characterized by premature aging. Lamin A undergoes a series of processing reactions, including farnesylation and proteolytic cleavage of the farnesylated C-terminal domain. The role of cleavage is unknown but mutations that affect this reaction lead to progeria. Here we show that interphase serine 22 phosphorylation of endogenous mutant lamin A (progerin) is defective in cells from HGPS patients. This defect can be mimicked by expressing progerin in human cells and prevented by inhibition of farnesylation. Furthermore, serine 22 phosphorylation of non-farnesylated progerin was enhanced by a mutation that disrupts lamin A head to tail interactions. The phosphorylation of lamin A or non-farnesylated progerin was associated to the formation of spherical intranuclear lamin A droplets that accumulate protein kinases of the CDK family capable of phosphorylating lamin A at serine 22. CDK inhibitors compromised the turnover of progerin, accelerated senescence of HGPS cells and reversed the effects of FTI on progerin levels. We discuss a model of progeria where faulty serine 22 phosphorylation compromises phase separation of lamin A polymers, leading to accumulation of functionally impaired lamin A structures. PMID:26922519

  20. Elevational Variation in Soil Amino Acid and Inorganic Nitrogen Concentrations in Taibai Mountain, China.

    PubMed

    Cao, Xiaochuang; Ma, Qingxu; Zhong, Chu; Yang, Xin; Zhu, Lianfeng; Zhang, Junhua; Jin, Qianyu; Wu, Lianghuan

    2016-01-01

    Amino acids are important sources of soil organic nitrogen (N), which is essential for plant nutrition, but detailed information about which amino acids predominant and whether amino acid composition varies with elevation is lacking. In this study, we hypothesized that the concentrations of amino acids in soil would increase and their composition would vary along the elevational gradient of Taibai Mountain, as plant-derived organic matter accumulated and N mineralization and microbial immobilization of amino acids slowed with reduced soil temperature. Results showed that the concentrations of soil extractable total N, extractable organic N and amino acids significantly increased with elevation due to the accumulation of soil organic matter and the greater N content. Soil extractable organic N concentration was significantly greater than that of the extractable inorganic N (NO3--N + NH4+-N). On average, soil adsorbed amino acid concentration was approximately 5-fold greater than that of the free amino acids, which indicates that adsorbed amino acids extracted with the strong salt solution likely represent a potential source for the replenishment of free amino acids. We found no appreciable evidence to suggest that amino acids with simple molecular structure were dominant at low elevations, whereas amino acids with high molecular weight and complex aromatic structure dominated the high elevations. Across the elevational gradient, the amino acid pool was dominated by alanine, aspartic acid, glycine, glutamic acid, histidine, serine and threonine. These seven amino acids accounted for approximately 68.9% of the total hydrolyzable amino acid pool. The proportions of isoleucine, tyrosine and methionine varied with elevation, while soil major amino acid composition (including alanine, arginine, aspartic acid, glycine, histidine, leucine, phenylalanine, serine, threonine and valine) did not vary appreciably with elevation (p>0.10). The compositional similarity of many

  1. Elevational Variation in Soil Amino Acid and Inorganic Nitrogen Concentrations in Taibai Mountain, China

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Xin; Zhu, Lianfeng; Zhang, Junhua; Jin, Qianyu; Wu, Lianghuan

    2016-01-01

    Amino acids are important sources of soil organic nitrogen (N), which is essential for plant nutrition, but detailed information about which amino acids predominant and whether amino acid composition varies with elevation is lacking. In this study, we hypothesized that the concentrations of amino acids in soil would increase and their composition would vary along the elevational gradient of Taibai Mountain, as plant-derived organic matter accumulated and N mineralization and microbial immobilization of amino acids slowed with reduced soil temperature. Results showed that the concentrations of soil extractable total N, extractable organic N and amino acids significantly increased with elevation due to the accumulation of soil organic matter and the greater N content. Soil extractable organic N concentration was significantly greater than that of the extractable inorganic N (NO3−-N + NH4+-N). On average, soil adsorbed amino acid concentration was approximately 5-fold greater than that of the free amino acids, which indicates that adsorbed amino acids extracted with the strong salt solution likely represent a potential source for the replenishment of free amino acids. We found no appreciable evidence to suggest that amino acids with simple molecular structure were dominant at low elevations, whereas amino acids with high molecular weight and complex aromatic structure dominated the high elevations. Across the elevational gradient, the amino acid pool was dominated by alanine, aspartic acid, glycine, glutamic acid, histidine, serine and threonine. These seven amino acids accounted for approximately 68.9% of the total hydrolyzable amino acid pool. The proportions of isoleucine, tyrosine and methionine varied with elevation, while soil major amino acid composition (including alanine, arginine, aspartic acid, glycine, histidine, leucine, phenylalanine, serine, threonine and valine) did not vary appreciably with elevation (p>0.10). The compositional similarity of many

  2. Elevational Variation in Soil Amino Acid and Inorganic Nitrogen Concentrations in Taibai Mountain, China.

    PubMed

    Cao, Xiaochuang; Ma, Qingxu; Zhong, Chu; Yang, Xin; Zhu, Lianfeng; Zhang, Junhua; Jin, Qianyu; Wu, Lianghuan

    2016-01-01

    Amino acids are important sources of soil organic nitrogen (N), which is essential for plant nutrition, but detailed information about which amino acids predominant and whether amino acid composition varies with elevation is lacking. In this study, we hypothesized that the concentrations of amino acids in soil would increase and their composition would vary along the elevational gradient of Taibai Mountain, as plant-derived organic matter accumulated and N mineralization and microbial immobilization of amino acids slowed with reduced soil temperature. Results showed that the concentrations of soil extractable total N, extractable organic N and amino acids significantly increased with elevation due to the accumulation of soil organic matter and the greater N content. Soil extractable organic N concentration was significantly greater than that of the extractable inorganic N (NO3--N + NH4+-N). On average, soil adsorbed amino acid concentration was approximately 5-fold greater than that of the free amino acids, which indicates that adsorbed amino acids extracted with the strong salt solution likely represent a potential source for the replenishment of free amino acids. We found no appreciable evidence to suggest that amino acids with simple molecular structure were dominant at low elevations, whereas amino acids with high molecular weight and complex aromatic structure dominated the high elevations. Across the elevational gradient, the amino acid pool was dominated by alanine, aspartic acid, glycine, glutamic acid, histidine, serine and threonine. These seven amino acids accounted for approximately 68.9% of the total hydrolyzable amino acid pool. The proportions of isoleucine, tyrosine and methionine varied with elevation, while soil major amino acid composition (including alanine, arginine, aspartic acid, glycine, histidine, leucine, phenylalanine, serine, threonine and valine) did not vary appreciably with elevation (p>0.10). The compositional similarity of many

  3. A theoretical study of the active sites of papain and S195C rat trypsin: implications for the low reactivity of mutant serine proteinases.

    PubMed Central

    Beveridge, A. J.

    1996-01-01

    The serine and cysteine proteinases represent two important classes of enzymes that use a catalytic triad to hydrolyze peptides and esters. The active site of the serine proteinases consists of three key residues, Asp...His...Ser. The hydroxyl group of serine functions as a nucleophile and the imidazole ring of histidine functions as a general acid/general base during catalysis. Similarly, the active site of the cysteine proteinases also involves three key residues: Asn, His, and Cys. The active site of the cysteine proteinases is generally believed to exist as a zwitterion (Asn...His+...Cys-) with the thiolate anion of the cysteine functioning as a nucleophile during the initial stages of catalysis. Curiously, the mutant serine proteinases, thiol subtilisin and thiol trypsin, which have the hybrid Asp...His...Cys triad, are almost catalytically inert. In this study, ab initio Hartree-Fock calculations have been performed on the active sites of papain and the mutant serine proteinase S195C rat trypsin. These calculations predict that the active site of papain exists predominately as a zwitterion (Cys-...His+...Asn). However, similar calculations on S195C rat trypsin demonstrate that the thiol mutant is unable to form a reactive thiolate anion prior to catalysis. Furthermore, structural comparisons between native papain and S195C rat trypsin have demonstrated that the spatial juxtapositions of the triad residues have been inverted in the serine and cysteine proteinases and, on this basis, I argue that it is impossible to convert a serine proteinase to a cysteine proteinase by site-directed mutagenesis. PMID:8819168

  4. Expression and characterization of Coprothermobacter proteolyticus alkaline serine protease

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    TECHNICAL ABSTRACT A putative protease gene (aprE) from the thermophilic bacterium Coprothermobacter proteolyticus was cloned and expressed in Bacillus subtilis. The enzyme was determined to be a serine protease based on inhibition by PMSF. Biochemical characterization demonstrated the enzyme had...

  5. Sphingoid bases and the serine catabolic enzyme CHA1 define a novel feedforward/feedback mechanism in the response to serine availability.

    PubMed

    Montefusco, David J; Newcomb, Benjamin; Gandy, Jason L; Brice, Sarah E; Matmati, Nabil; Cowart, L Ashley; Hannun, Yusuf A

    2012-03-16

    Targets of bioactive sphingolipids in Saccharomyces cerevisiae were previously identified using microarray experiments focused on sphingolipid-dependent responses to heat stress. One of these heat-induced genes is the serine deamidase/dehydratase Cha1 known to be regulated by increased serine availability. This study investigated the hypothesis that sphingolipids may mediate the induction of Cha1 in response to serine availability. The results showed that inhibition of de novo synthesis of sphingolipids, pharmacologically or genetically, prevented the induction of Cha1 in response to increased serine availability. Additional studies implicated the sphingoid bases phytosphingosine and dihydrosphingosine as the likely mediators of Cha1 up-regulation. The yeast protein kinases Pkh1 and Pkh2, known sphingoid base effectors, were found to mediate CHA1 up-regulation via the transcription factor Cha4. Because the results disclosed a role for sphingolipids in negative feedback regulation of serine metabolism, we investigated the effects of disrupting this mechanism on sphingolipid levels and on cell growth. Intriguingly, exposure of the cha1Δ strain to high serine resulted in hyperaccumulation of endogenous serine and in turn a significant accumulation of sphingoid bases and ceramides. Under these conditions, the cha1Δ strain displayed a significant growth defect that was sphingolipid-dependent. Together, this work reveals a feedforward/feedback loop whereby the sphingoid bases serve as sensors of serine availability and mediate up-regulation of Cha1 in response to serine availability, which in turn regulates sphingolipid levels by limiting serine accumulation.

  6. Temporal trends of perfluoroalkane sulfonic acids and their sulfonamide-based precursors in herring from the Swedish west coast 1991-2011 including isomer-specific considerations.

    PubMed

    Ullah, Shahid; Huber, Sandra; Bignert, Anders; Berger, Urs

    2014-04-01

    A method was developed for simultaneous analysis of perfluoroalkane sulfonic acids (PFSAs) and their sulfonamide-based precursors (perfluoroalkane sulfonamidoacetic acids (FASAAs), sulfonamides (FASAs), and sulfonamidoethanols (FASEs)) in fish muscle. Extraction was performed with acetonitrile followed by a clean-up and fractionation step and instrumental analysis by UPLC/MS/MS and GC/MS. Time trends of PFSAs and their precursors in herring muscle samples originating from the Kattegat at the west coast of Sweden were investigated covering the years 1991-2011. The following analytes were detected, all with decreasing or unchanged trends between 1991 and 2011: Perfluorobutane sulfonic acid (PFBS, below the method detection limit (acid (PFHxS, 9-38pg/g), perfluorooctane sulfonic acid (PFOS, 240-930pg/g), perfluorodecane sulfonic acid (PFDS, acid (MeFOSAA and EtFOSAA, 2-39 and 2-31pg/g, respectively) and perfluorooctane sulfonamide (FOSA, 78-920pg/g). The highest concentrations were found for PFOS and FOSA around the turn of the century. Shorter disappearance half-lives were observed for precursors compared to PFSAs. Assuming that these trend differences are representative for fish consumed by the general Swedish population, this observation suggests that the relative contribution of precursors to total human exposure to PFOS via fish intake has decreased in Sweden over the study period. PFOS precursors in fish may have constituted a significant indirect exposure pathway for PFOS in the 1990s. Isomer-specific analysis of PFOS and FOSA revealed <10% relative contributions of branched isomers to total PFOS and total FOSA. Furthermore, the percentage branched isomers decreased over time for both compounds. These findings are contrary to patterns and temporal trends of PFOS isomers commonly found in human serum. In combination with literature data on isomer patterns

  7. Arsenic Metabolites, Including N-Acetyl-4-hydroxy-m-arsanilic Acid, in Chicken Litter from a Roxarsone-Feeding Study Involving 1600 Chickens.

    PubMed

    Yang, Zonglin; Peng, Hanyong; Lu, Xiufen; Liu, Qingqing; Huang, Rongfu; Hu, Bin; Kachanoski, Gary; Zuidhof, Martin J; Le, X Chris

    2016-07-01

    The poultry industry has used organoarsenicals, such as 3-nitro-4-hydroxyphenylarsonic acid (Roxarsone, ROX), to prevent disease and to promote growth. Although previous studies have analyzed arsenic species in chicken litter after composting or after application to agricultural lands, it is not clear what arsenic species were excreted by chickens before biotransformation of arsenic species during composting. We describe here the identification and quantitation of arsenic species in chicken litter repeatedly collected on days 14, 24, 28, 30, and 35 of a Roxarsone-feeding study involving 1600 chickens of two strains. High performance liquid chromatography separation with simultaneous detection by both inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry and electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry provided complementary information necessary for the identification and quantitation of arsenic species. A new metabolite, N-acetyl-4-hydroxy-m-arsanilic acid (N-AHAA), was identified, and it accounted for 3-12% of total arsenic. Speciation analyses of litter samples collected from ROX-fed chickens on days 14, 24, 28, 30, and 35 showed the presence of N-AHAA, 3-amino-4-hydroxyphenylarsonic acid (3-AHPAA), inorganic arsenite (As(III)), arsenate (As(V)), monomethylarsonic acid (MMA(V)), dimethylarsinic acid (DMA(V)), and ROX. 3-AHPAA accounted for 3-19% of the total arsenic. Inorganic arsenicals (the sum of As(III) and As(V)) comprised 2-6% (mean 3.5%) of total arsenic. Our results on the detection of inorganic arsenicals, methylarsenicals, 3-AHPAA, and N-AHAA in the chicken litter support recent findings that ROX is actually metabolized by the chicken or its gut microbiome. The presence of the toxic metabolites in chicken litter is environmentally relevant as chicken litter is commonly used as fertilizer.

  8. Cloning and chromosomal assignment of a human cDNA encoding a T cell- and natural killer cell-specific trypsin-like serine protease.

    PubMed Central

    Gershenfeld, H K; Hershberger, R J; Shows, T B; Weissman, I L

    1988-01-01

    A cDNA clone encoding a human T cell- and natural killer cell-specific serine protease was obtained by screening a phage lambda gt10 cDNA library from phytohemagglutinin-stimulated human peripheral blood lymphocytes with the mouse Hanukah factor cDNA clone. In an RNA blot-hybridization analysis, this human Hanukah factor cDNA hybridized with a 1.3-kilobase band in allogeneic-stimulated cytotoxic T cells and the Jurkat cell line, but this transcript was not detectable in normal muscle, liver, tonsil, or thymus. By dot-blot hybridization, this cDNA hybridized with RNA from three cytolytic T-cell clones and three noncytolytic T-cell clones grown in vitro as well as with purified CD16+ natural killer cells and CD3+, CD16- T-cell large granular lymphocytes from peripheral blood lymphocytes (CD = cluster designation). The nucleotide sequence of this cDNA clone encodes a predicted serine protease of 262 amino acids. The predicted protein has a 22-amino acid presegment, a 6-amino acid prosegment, and an active enzyme of 234 amino acids with a calculated unglycosylated molecular weight of 25,820. The active enzyme is 71% and 77% similar to the mouse sequence at the amino acid and DNA level, respectively. The human and mouse sequences conserve the active site residues of serine proteases--the trypsin-specific Asp-189 and all 10 cysteine residues. The gene for the human Hanukah factor serine protease is located on human chromosome 5. We propose that this trypsin-like serine protease may function as a common component necessary for lysis of target cells by cytotoxic T lymphocytes and natural killer cells. Images PMID:3257574

  9. Clues to tRNA Evolution from the Distribution of Class II tRNAs and Serine Codons in the Genetic Code.

    PubMed

    Bernhardt, Harold S

    2016-01-01

    We have previously proposed that tRNA(Gly) was the first tRNA and glycine was the first amino acid incorporated into the genetic code. The next two amino acids incorporated would have been the other two small hydrophilic amino acids serine and aspartic acid, which occurred through the duplication of the tRNA(Gly) sequence, followed by mutation of its anticodon by single C to U transition mutations, possibly through spontaneous deamination. Interestingly, however, tRNA(Ser) has a different structure than most other tRNAs, possessing a long variable arm; because of this tRNA(Ser) is classified as a class II tRNA. Also, serine codons are found not only in the bottom right-hand corner of the genetic code table next to those for glycine and aspartic acid, but also in the top row of the table, next to those for two of the most hydrophobic amino acids, leucine and phenylalanine. In the following, I propose that the class II tRNA structure of tRNA(Ser) and the arrangement of serine codons in the genetic code provide clues to the early evolution of tRNA and the genetic code. In addition, I address Di Giulio's recent criticism of our proposal that tRNA(Gly) was the first tRNA, and discuss how early peptides produced from a restricted amino acid alphabet of glycine, serine and aspartic acid might have possessed proteolytic activity, which is possibly important for the early recycling of amino acid monomers. PMID:26927183

  10. Clues to tRNA Evolution from the Distribution of Class II tRNAs and Serine Codons in the Genetic Code

    PubMed Central

    Bernhardt, Harold S.

    2016-01-01

    We have previously proposed that tRNAGly was the first tRNA and glycine was the first amino acid incorporated into the genetic code. The next two amino acids incorporated would have been the other two small hydrophilic amino acids serine and aspartic acid, which occurred through the duplication of the tRNAGly sequence, followed by mutation of its anticodon by single C to U transition mutations, possibly through spontaneous deamination. Interestingly, however, tRNASer has a different structure than most other tRNAs, possessing a long variable arm; because of this tRNASer is classified as a class II tRNA. Also, serine codons are found not only in the bottom right-hand corner of the genetic code table next to those for glycine and aspartic acid, but also in the top row of the table, next to those for two of the most hydrophobic amino acids, leucine and phenylalanine. In the following, I propose that the class II tRNA structure of tRNASer and the arrangement of serine codons in the genetic code provide clues to the early evolution of tRNA and the genetic code. In addition, I address Di Giulio’s recent criticism of our proposal that tRNAGly was the first tRNA, and discuss how early peptides produced from a restricted amino acid alphabet of glycine, serine and aspartic acid might have possessed proteolytic activity, which is possibly important for the early recycling of amino acid monomers. PMID:26927183

  11. Difference in the dynamic properties of chiral and racemic crystals of serine studied by Raman spectroscopy at 3-295 K.

    PubMed

    Kolesov, B A; Boldyreva, E V

    2007-12-27

    Single-crystal polarized Raman spectra (60-4000 cm(-1) at 3 < or = T < or = 295 K) were measured for chiral L- and racemic DL-serine, alpha-amino-beta-hydroxypropionic acid, (NH3)+CH(CH2OH)(COO)-. The Raman spectra of dl-serine do not show any striking changes with temperature or on storage. In contrast to that, the dynamical properties of L-serine change at about 140 K. These changes can be interpreted as the reorientation of the side chain -CH2OH fragments of the zwitterions with respect to the backbone C-C bonds, resulting in the positional disorder of the O-H...O intermolecular H-bonds. The redistribution in the intensities of the Raman spectra of the crystals of L-serine stored for a long time (about a year) indicates the changes in the orientation of the molecular fragments in the direction normal to the axes of the head-to-tail chains. The difference in the thermodynamic functions of L- and DL-serine reported previously [Drebushchak, V. A.; Kovalevskaya, Yu. A.; Paukov, I. E.; Boldyreva, E. V. J. Therm. Anal. Calorim. 2007, 89 (2), 649-654] is explained by the difference in the spectra of external vibrations of the crystals. PMID:18052147

  12. Radiation-induced destruction of hydroxyl-containing amino acids and dipeptides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sladkova, А. А.; Sosnovskaya, А. А.; Edimecheva, I. P.; Shadyro, О. I.

    2012-12-01

    The yields of molecular products resulting from radiolysis of hydroxyl-containing amino acids and dipeptides under various conditions were determined. The possibility of a new radiation-induced destruction pathway has been shown for serine and threonine, as well as for the dipeptides having residues of these amino acids at the N-terminal part of the respective molecule. This process includes formation of N-centered radicals from the starting molecules followed by their decomposition with elimination of side substituents. On radiolysis, serine and threonine were also shown to undergo free-radical destruction to form acetaldehyde and acetone, respectively. A mechanism has been proposed including consecutive stages of fragmentation of α-hydroxyl-containing carbon-centered radicals with elimination of ammonia and decomposition of the secondary radicals with elimination of CO2. The yields of CO2 obtained on radiolysis of serine and threonine were significantly higher (except for solutions at pH 12) than those for alanine and valine, which have no hydroxyl groups in their structures. The obtained data indicate that the hydroxyl-containing amino acids occupy a special place among other amino acids as regards the variety of radiation-induced reactions which they may undergo due to their structural features.

  13. Hypochlorous acid via peroxynitrite activates protein kinase Cθ and insulin resistance in adipocytes

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Jun; Wang, Qilong; Ding, Ye; Zou, Ming-Hui

    2015-01-01

    We recently reported that genetic deletion of myeloperoxidase (MPO) alleviates obesity-related insulin resistance in mice in vivo. How MPO impairs insulin sensitivity in adipocytes is poorly characterized. As hypochlorous acid (HOCl) is a principal oxidant product generated by MPO, we evaluated the effects of HOCl on insulin signaling in adipocytes differentiated from 3T3-L1 cells. Exposure of 3T3-L1 adipocytes to exogenous HOCl (200 μmol/l) attenuated insulin-stimulated 2-deoxyglucose uptake, GLUT4 translocation, and insulin signals, including tyrosine phosphorylation of insulin receptor substrate 1 (IRS1) and phosphorylation of Akt. Furthermore, treatment with HOCl induced phosphorylation of IRS1 at serine 307, inhibitor κB kinase (IKK), c-Jun NH2-terminal kinase (JNK), and phosphorylation of PKCθ (PKCθ). In addition, genetic and pharmacological inhibition of IKK and JNK abolished serine phosphorylation of IRS1 and impairment of insulin signaling by HOCl. Furthermore, knockdown of PKCθ using siRNA transfection suppressed phosphorylation of IKK and JNK and consequently attenuated the HOCl-impaired insulin signaling pathway. Moreover, activation of PKCθ by peroxynitrite was accompanied by increased phosphorylation of IKK, JNK, and IRS1-serine 307. In contrast, ONOO− inhibitors abolished HOCl-induced phosphorylation of PKCθ, IKK, JNK, and IRS1-serine 307, as well as insulin resistance. Finally, high-fat diet (HFD)-induced insulin resistance was associated with enhanced phosphorylation of PKCθ, IKK, JNK, and IRS1 at serine 307 in white adipose tissues from WT mice, all of which were not found in Mpo knockout mice fed HFDs. We conclude that HOCl impairs insulin signaling pathway by increasing ONOO− mediated phosphorylation of PKCθ, resulting in phosphorylation of IKK/JNK and consequent serine phosphorylation of IRS1 in adipocytes. PMID:25381390

  14. Effect of including carob pulp in the diet of fattening pigs on the fatty acid composition and oxidative stability of pork.

    PubMed

    Inserra, L; Luciano, G; Bella, M; Scerra, M; Cilione, C; Basile, P; Lanza, M; Priolo, A

    2015-02-01

    The effect of feeding pigs with carob pulp on meat quality was investigated. Nine pigs were finished on a conventional concentrate-based diet (control), while two groups received a diet comprising of the same ingredients with the inclusion of 8% or 15% carob pulp (Carob 8% and Carob 15%, respectively). Feeding carob-containing diets reduced the concentration of saturated fatty acids in the muscle, increased the concentration of monounsaturated fatty acids in meat (P < 0.01) and of n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) and reduced the n-6/n-3 PUFA ratio (P < 0.001). The meat underwent slow oxidative deterioration over 9 days of storage. However, the Carob 15% treatment increased meat susceptibility to lipid oxidation across storage (P = 0.03), while the dietary treatment did not affect meat colour stability. In conclusion, feeding pigs with carob pulp could represent a strategy,in the Mediterranean areas, to naturally improve meat nutritional value and to promote the exploitation of this local feed resource.

  15. Effect of including carob pulp in the diet of fattening pigs on the fatty acid composition and oxidative stability of pork.

    PubMed

    Inserra, L; Luciano, G; Bella, M; Scerra, M; Cilione, C; Basile, P; Lanza, M; Priolo, A

    2015-02-01

    The effect of feeding pigs with carob pulp on meat quality was investigated. Nine pigs were finished on a conventional concentrate-based diet (control), while two groups received a diet comprising of the same ingredients with the inclusion of 8% or 15% carob pulp (Carob 8% and Carob 15%, respectively). Feeding carob-containing diets reduced the concentration of saturated fatty acids in the muscle, increased the concentration of monounsaturated fatty acids in meat (P < 0.01) and of n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) and reduced the n-6/n-3 PUFA ratio (P < 0.001). The meat underwent slow oxidative deterioration over 9 days of storage. However, the Carob 15% treatment increased meat susceptibility to lipid oxidation across storage (P = 0.03), while the dietary treatment did not affect meat colour stability. In conclusion, feeding pigs with carob pulp could represent a strategy,in the Mediterranean areas, to naturally improve meat nutritional value and to promote the exploitation of this local feed resource. PMID:25460134

  16. Immunisation against a serine protease inhibitor reduces intensity of Plasmodium berghei infection in mosquitoes.

    PubMed

    Williams, Andrew R; Zakutansky, Sara E; Miura, Kazutoyo; Dicks, Matthew D J; Churcher, Thomas S; Jewell, Kerry E; Vaughan, Aisling M; Turner, Alison V; Kapulu, Melissa C; Michel, Kristin; Long, Carole A; Sinden, Robert E; Hill, Adrian V S; Draper, Simon J; Biswas, Sumi

    2013-10-01

    The mosquito innate immune response is able to clear the majority of Plasmodium parasites. This immune clearance is controlled by a number of regulatory molecules including serine protease inhibitors (serpins). To determine whether such molecules could represent a novel target for a malaria transmission-blocking vaccine, we vaccinated mice with Anopheles gambiae serpin-2. Antibodies against Anopheles gambiae serpin-2 significantly reduced the infection of a heterologous Anopheles species (Anopheles stephensi) by Plasmodium berghei, however this effect was not observed with Plasmodium falciparum. Therefore, this approach of targeting regulatory molecules of the mosquito immune system may represent a novel approach to transmission-blocking malaria vaccines.

  17. A non-radioactive method for the assay of many serine/threonine-specific protein kinases.

    PubMed

    Ross, Heike; Armstrong, Christopher G; Cohen, Philip

    2002-09-15

    The generation of drugs that modulate the activities of particular protein kinases has become a prime focus of the pharmaceutical and biotechnology industry. Consequently, improved methods for the development of high-throughput screening formats for these enzymes is a high priority. In the present study, we have designed three generic peptide substrates that can be used to assay a diverse range of protein kinases. These peptides share a common seven-residue epitope that includes the site of phosphorylation, and against which we have generated a phospho-specific antibody. Thus a large number of serine/threonine-specific protein kinases can be screened using a simple non-radioactive format.

  18. A novel serine protease with human fibrino(geno)lytic activities from Artocarpus heterophyllus latex.

    PubMed

    Siritapetawee, Jaruwan; Thumanu, Kanjana; Sojikul, Punchapat; Thammasirirak, Sompong

    2012-07-01

    A protease was isolated and purified from Artocarpus heterophyllus (jackfruit) latex and designated as a 48-kDa antimicrobial protease (AMP48) in a previous publication. In this work, the enzyme was characterized for more biochemical and medicinal properties. Enzyme activity of AMP48 was strongly inhibited by phenylmethanesulfonyl fluoride and soybean trypsin inhibitor, indicating that the enzyme was a plant serine protease. The N-terminal amino acid sequences (A-Q-E-G-G-K-D-D-D-G-G) of AMP48 had no sequence similarity matches with any sequence databases of BLAST search and other plant serine protease. The secondary structure of this enzyme was composed of high α-helix (51%) and low β-sheet (9%). AMP48 had fibrinogenolytic activity with maximal activity between 55 and 60°C at pH 8. The enzyme efficiently hydrolyzed α followed by partially hydrolyzed β and γ subunits of human fibrinogen. In addition, the fibrinolytic activity was observed through the degradation products by SDS-PAGE and emphasized its activity by monitoring the alteration of secondary structure of fibrin clot after enzyme digestion using ATR-FTIR spectroscopy. This study presented the potential role to use AMP48 as antithrombotic for treatment thromboembolic disorders such as strokes, pulmonary emboli and deep vein thrombosis.

  19. Conserved serines in simian immunodeficiency virus capsid are required for virus budding.

    PubMed

    Rue, Sarah M; Roos, Jason W; Clements, Janice E; Barber, Sheila A

    2005-05-25

    The simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) capsid protein (CA), a constituent of the Pr55Gag polyprotein, is phosphorylated in virions but not in virus-producing cells (Rue, S.M., Roos, J.W., Tarwater, P.M., Clements, J.E., Barber, S.A., 2005. Phosphorylation and proteolytic cleavage of gag proteins in budded simian immunodeficiency virus. J. Virol. 79 (4), 2484-2492.). Using phosphoamino acid analysis of CA, we show that serine is the primary phosphate acceptor. A series of substitution mutants of serines in the CA domain of Pr55Gag were constructed in the infectious viral clone SIVmac239. These virus mutants were examined for defects in virus replication and virion infectivity, release, and morphology, as well as alterations in phosphorylation of CA-containing proteins. Although the virus mutants exhibited a number of replication defects, none of these defects could be directly attributed to aberrant CA phosphorylation. A novel defect was a block in early budding, which was common among several virus mutants with substitutions in the CA N terminus. Together, these results indicate that certain residues in the CA N terminus are crucial for early budding events.

  20. Stat5a serine phosphorylation. Serine 779 is constitutively phosphorylated in the mammary gland, and serine 725 phosphorylation influences prolactin-stimulated in vitro DNA binding activity.

    PubMed

    Beuvink, I; Hess, D; Flotow, H; Hofsteenge, J; Groner, B; Hynes, N E

    2000-04-01

    The activity of transcription factors of the Stat family is controlled by phosphorylation of a conserved, carboxyl-terminal tyrosine residue. Tyrosine phosphorylation is essential for Stat dimerization, nuclear translocation, DNA binding, and transcriptional activation. Phosphorylation of Stats on specific serine residues has also been described. We have previously shown that in HC11 mammary epithelial cells Stat5a is phosphorylated on Tyr(694) in a prolactin-sensitive manner, whereas serine phosphorylation is constitutive (Wartmann, M., Cella, N., Hofer, P., Groner, B., Xiuwen, L., Hennighausen, L., and Hynes, N. E. (1996) J. Biol. Chem. 271, 31863-31868). By using mass spectrometry and site-directed mutagenesis, we have now identified Ser(779), located in a unique Stat5a SP motif, as the site of serine phosphorylation. By using phospho-Ser(779)-specific antiserum, we have determined that Ser(779) is constitutively phosphorylated in mammary glands taken from different developmental stages. Stat5a isolated from spleen, heart, brain, and lung was also found to be phosphorylated on Ser(779). Ser(725) in Stat5a has also been identified as a phosphorylation site (Yamashita, H., Xu, J., Erwin, R. A., Farrar, W. L., Kirken, R. A., and Rui, H. (1998) J. Biol. Chem. 273, 30218-30224). Here we show that mutagenesis of Ser(725), Ser(779), or a combination of Ser(725/779) to an Ala had no effect on prolactin-induced transcriptional activation of a beta-casein reporter construct. However, following prolactin induction the Ser(725) mutant displayed sustained DNA binding activity compared with that of wild type Stat5a. The results suggest that Ser(725) phosphorylation has an impact on signal duration. PMID:10744710

  1. Stat5a serine phosphorylation. Serine 779 is constitutively phosphorylated in the mammary gland, and serine 725 phosphorylation influences prolactin-stimulated in vitro DNA binding activity.

    PubMed

    Beuvink, I; Hess, D; Flotow, H; Hofsteenge, J; Groner, B; Hynes, N E

    2000-04-01

    The activity of transcription factors of the Stat family is controlled by phosphorylation of a conserved, carboxyl-terminal tyrosine residue. Tyrosine phosphorylation is essential for Stat dimerization, nuclear translocation, DNA binding, and transcriptional activation. Phosphorylation of Stats on specific serine residues has also been described. We have previously shown that in HC11 mammary epithelial cells Stat5a is phosphorylated on Tyr(694) in a prolactin-sensitive manner, whereas serine phosphorylation is constitutive (Wartmann, M., Cella, N., Hofer, P., Groner, B., Xiuwen, L., Hennighausen, L., and Hynes, N. E. (1996) J. Biol. Chem. 271, 31863-31868). By using mass spectrometry and site-directed mutagenesis, we have now identified Ser(779), located in a unique Stat5a SP motif, as the site of serine phosphorylation. By using phospho-Ser(779)-specific antiserum, we have determined that Ser(779) is constitutively phosphorylated in mammary glands taken from different developmental stages. Stat5a isolated from spleen, heart, brain, and lung was also found to be phosphorylated on Ser(779). Ser(725) in Stat5a has also been identified as a phosphorylation site (Yamashita, H., Xu, J., Erwin, R. A., Farrar, W. L., Kirken, R. A., and Rui, H. (1998) J. Biol. Chem. 273, 30218-30224). Here we show that mutagenesis of Ser(725), Ser(779), or a combination of Ser(725/779) to an Ala had no effect on prolactin-induced transcriptional activation of a beta-casein reporter construct. However, following prolactin induction the Ser(725) mutant displayed sustained DNA binding activity compared with that of wild type Stat5a. The results suggest that Ser(725) phosphorylation has an impact on signal duration.

  2. Hydrogen bonding constrains free radical reaction dynamics at serine and threonine residues in peptides.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Daniel A; Sohn, Chang Ho; Gao, Jinshan; Beauchamp, J L

    2014-09-18

    Free radical-initiated peptide sequencing (FRIPS) mass spectrometry derives advantage from the introduction of highly selective low-energy dissociation pathways in target peptides. An acetyl radical, formed at the peptide N-terminus via collisional activation and subsequent dissociation of a covalently attached radical precursor, abstracts a hydrogen atom from diverse sites on the peptide, yielding sequence information through backbone cleavage as well as side-chain loss. Unique free-radical-initiated dissociation pathways observed at serine and threonine residues lead to cleavage of the neighboring N-terminal Cα-C or N-Cα bond rather than the typical Cα-C bond cleavage observed with other amino acids. These reactions were investigated by FRIPS of model peptides of the form AARAAAXAA, where X is the amino acid of interest. In combination with density functional theory (DFT) calculations, the experiments indicate the strong influence of hydrogen bonding at serine or threonine on the observed free radical chemistry. Hydrogen bonding of the side-chain hydroxyl group with a backbone carbonyl oxygen aligns the singly occupied π orbital on the β-carbon and the N-Cα bond, leading to low-barrier β-cleavage of the N-Cα bond. Interaction with the N-terminal carbonyl favors a hydrogen-atom transfer process to yield stable c and z(•) ions, whereas C-terminal interaction leads to effective cleavage of the Cα-C bond through rapid loss of isocyanic acid. Dissociation of the Cα-C bond may also occur via water loss followed by β-cleavage from a nitrogen-centered radical. These competitive dissociation pathways from a single residue illustrate the sensitivity of gas-phase free radical chemistry to subtle factors such as hydrogen bonding that affect the potential energy surface for these low-barrier processes.

  3. Suppression of the ELO-2 FA elongation activity results in alterations of the fatty acid composition and multiple physiological defects, including abnormal ultradian rhythms, in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed Central

    Kniazeva, Marina; Sieber, Matt; McCauley, Scott; Zhang, Kang; Watts, Jennifer L; Han, Min

    2003-01-01

    While the general steps of fatty acid (FA) biosynthesis are well understood, the individual enzymes involved in the elongation of long chain saturated and polyunsaturated FA (PUFA) are largely unknown. Recent research indicates that these enzymes might be of considerable physiological importance for human health. We use Caenorhabditis elegans to study FA elongation activities and associated abnormal phenotypes. In this article we report that the predicted C. elegans F11E6.5/ELO-2 is a functional enzyme with the FA elongation activity. It is responsible for the elongation of palmitic acid and is involved in PUFA biosynthesis. RNAi-mediated suppression of ELO-2 causes an accumulation of palmitate and an associated decrease in the PUFA fraction in triacylglycerides and phospholipid classes. This imbalance in the FA composition results in multiple phenotypic defects such as slow growth, small body size, reproductive defects, and changes in rhythmic behavior. ELO-2 cooperates with the previously reported ELO-1 in 20-carbon PUFA production, and at least one of the enzymes must function to provide normal growth and development in C. elegans. The presented data indicate that suppression of a single enzyme of the FA elongation machinery is enough to affect various organs and systems in worms. This effect resembles syndromic disorders in humans. PMID:12586704

  4. Characterization of a cloned subtilisin-like serine proteinase from a psychrotrophic Vibrio species.

    PubMed

    Arnórsdottir, Jóhanna; Smáradóttir, Rúna B; Magnússon, Olafur Th; Thorbjarnardóttir, Sigrídur H; Eggertsson, Gudmundur; Kristjánsson, Magnús M

    2002-11-01

    The gene encoding a subtilisin-like serine proteinase in the psychrotrophic Vibrio sp. PA44 has been successfully cloned, sequenced and expressed in Escherichia coli. The gene is 1593 basepairs and encodes a precursor protein of 530 amino acid residues with a calculated molecular mass of 55.7 kDa. The enzyme is isolated, however, as an active 40.6-kDa proteinase, without a 139 amino acid residue N-terminal prosequence. Under mild conditions the enzyme undergoes a further autocatalytic cleavage to give a 29.7-kDa proteinase that retains full enzymatic activity. The deduced amino acid sequence of the enzyme has high homology to proteinases of the proteinase K family of subtilisin-like proteinases. With respect to the enzyme characteristics compared in this study the properties of the wild-type and recombinant proteinases are the same. Sequence analysis revealed that especially with respect to the thermophilic homologues, aqualysin I from Thermus aquaticus and a proteinase from Thermus strain Rt41A, the cold-adapted Vibrio-proteinase has a higher content of polar/uncharged amino acids, as well as aspartate residues. The thermophilic enzymes had a higher content of arginines, and relatively higher number of hydrophobic amino acids and a higher aliphatic index. These factors may contribute to the adaptation of these proteinases to different temperature conditions.

  5. Membrane-anchored serine proteases in health and disease

    PubMed Central

    Bugge, Thomas; Wu, Qingyu

    2013-01-01

    Serine proteases of the trypsin-like family have long been recognized to be critical effectors of biological processes as diverse as digestion, blood coagulation, fibrinolysis, and immunity. In recent years, a subgroup of these enzymes has been identified that are anchored directly to plasma membranes, either by a carboxy-terminal transmembrane domain (Type I), an amino-terminal transmembrane domain with a cytoplasmic extension (Type II or TTSP), or through a glycosyl-phosphatidylinositol (GPI) linkage. Recent biochemical, cellular, and in vivo analyses have now established that membrane-anchored serine proteases are key pericellular contributors to processes vital for development and the maintenance of homeostasis. This chapter will review our current knowledge of the biological and physiological functions of these proteases, their molecular substrates, and their contributions to disease. PMID:21238933

  6. Dynamics simulation of the interaction between serine and water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yang; Zhang, Peng; Lu, Ying-Bo; Han, Sheng-Hao; Yu, Hui

    2013-05-01

    Using the first principles density functional theory (DFT), we simulated the neutron scattering spectra of the hydration dynamics of serine. Experimental data analyses have shown that dissociative H2O molecules were more likely to form hydrogen bonds (H-bonds) with an -OH group in monohydrated serine and easily shift to a -NH_3 ^ + group at a higher hydration level [P. Zhang, Y. Zhang, S. H. Han, Q. W. Yan, R. C. Ford, and J. C. Li, J. Phys. Chem. A 110, 5000 (2006), 10.1021/jp0569741]. We set the 1:1 ratio hydrated compounds at the two positions and found that the H2O could be optimized to form H-bonds with -OH and -NH3+ separately. When the simulated phonon signals of the -OH…H2O and -NH3+…H2O combinations were summed on a 3:1 scale, the calculating spectra were in good agreement with the experimental results, especially for the peak at 423 cm-1 of the -OH…H2O combination and the peak at 367 cm-1 of the -NH3+…H2O combination, which mutually complemented the real spectrum. We confirm that H2O may break the intermolecular H-bonds of the interlaced binding -OH to form a new structure, and that with the skeleton deformation of serine, H2O forms stronger H-bonds more often with the -NH3+ side indicating the flexible dynamic mechanism of the serine hydration process.

  7. Protein chemical synthesis by serine and threonine ligation

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yinfeng; Lam, Hiu Yung; Lee, Chi Lung; Li, Xuechen

    2013-01-01

    An efficient method has been developed for the salicylaldehyde ester-mediated ligation of unprotected peptides at serine (Ser) or threonine (Thr) residues. The utility of this peptide ligation approach has been demonstrated through the convergent syntheses of two therapeutic peptides––ovine-corticoliberin and Forteo––and the human erythrocyte acylphosphatase protein (∼11 kDa). The requisite peptide salicylaldehyde ester precursor is prepared in an epimerization-free manner via Fmoc–solid-phase peptide synthesis. PMID:23569249

  8. Site-specific DNA Inversion by Serine Recombinases

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Reversible site-specific DNA inversion reactions are widely distributed in bacteria and their viruses. They control a range of biological reactions that most often involve alterations of molecules on the surface of cells or phage. These programmed DNA rearrangements usually occur at a low frequency, thereby preadapting a small subset of the population to a change in environmental conditions, or in the case of phages, an expanded host range. A dedicated recombinase, sometimes with the aid of additional regulatory or DNA architectural proteins, catalyzes the inversion of DNA. RecA or other components of the general recombination-repair machinery are not involved. This chapter discusses site-specific DNA inversion reactions mediated by the serine recombinase family of enzymes and focuses on the extensively studied serine DNA invertases that are stringently controlled by the Fis-bound enhancer regulatory system. The first section summarizes biological features and general properties of inversion reactions by the Fis/enhancer-dependent serine invertases and the recently described serine DNA invertases in Bacteroides. Mechanistic studies of reactions catalyzed by the Hin and Gin invertases are then discussed in more depth, particularly with regards to recent advances in our understanding of the function of the Fis/enhancer regulatory system, the assembly of the active recombination complex (invertasome) containing the Fis/enhancer, and the process of DNA strand exchange by rotation of synapsed subunit pairs within the invertasome. The role of DNA topological forces that function in concert with the Fis/enhancer controlling element in specifying the overwhelming bias for DNA inversion over deletion and intermolecular recombination is emphasized. PMID:25844275

  9. Silicone hydrogels grafted with natural amino acids for ophthalmological application.

    PubMed

    Xu, Chen; He, Ruiyu; Xie, Binbin; Ismail, Muhammad; Yao, Chen; Luan, Jie; Li, Xinsong

    2016-09-01

    In this report, protein repelling silicone hydrogels with improved hydrophilicity were prepared by photo-polymerization of silicone-containing monomer and glycidyl methacrylate followed by grafting zwitterionic amino acids. The grafted silicone hydrogels possessed excellent hydrophilic surfaces due to the enrichment of amino acids, which was confirmed by attenuated total reflectance Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, contact angle, and equilibrium water content measurements. Remarkable resistance to bovine serum albumin and lysozyme fouling was observed for the silicone hydrogels immobilized with neutrally charged amino acids because of the formation of zwitterionic surfaces with pairs of protonated secondary ammonium cations and deprotonated carboxyl anions. Meanwhile, the silicone hydrogels grafted with positively or negatively charged amino acids were able to repulse same charged protein with reduced deposition and attract oppositely charged protein with increased adsorption. Preliminary cytotoxicity test indicated that the zwitterionic silicone hydrogels were non-cytotoxic. Similarly, three types of natural amino acids, including serine, aspartic acid and histidine, modified silicone hydrogel contact lenses exhibited excellent hydrophilicity and non-damage to the rabbit's eyes, but only serine modified zwitterionic contact lens showed superior protein fouling resistance compared with the current commercial hydrogel contact lens, which may have great potential application in ophthalmology.

  10. graal: a Drosophila gene coding for several mosaic serine proteases.

    PubMed

    Munier, Anne Isabelle; Medzhitov, Ruslan; Janeway, Charles A; Doucet, Daniel; Capovilla, Maria; Lagueux, Marie

    2004-10-01

    Serine proteases play vital roles in several biological processes such as development and immunity. We have characterized Graal, a large multi-domain serine protease from Drosophila. Graal is spliced in at least three transcripts that are present throughout development. The domains found in Graal proteins are: chitin-binding domains (CBD), scavenger receptor cysteine-rich (SRCR) domains, low density lipoprotein receptor cysteine-rich (LDLR-CR) domains, histidine and proline-rich domains, a NGGYQPP-repeat domain and a serine protease domain. The last 2370 nucleotides of these RNAs are identical and encode a His-rich domain, two SRCR domains, two LDLR-CR domains and a protease domain. The transcription of graal is upregulated after fungal or bacterial infection. Analysis of the Iso1 (y;cn,sp,bw) strain shows that graal transcription is impaired in this fly line due to the insertion of a retrotransposon in the sixth exon. However, no phenotype could be observed consecutive to the absence of graal full length transcripts, particularly in the context of an immune challenge.

  11. Structural Basis for Catalytic Activation of a Serine Recombinase

    SciTech Connect

    Keenholtz, Ross A.; Rowland, Sally-J.; Boocock, Martin R.; Stark, W. Marshall; Rice, Phoebe A.

    2014-10-02

    Sin resolvase is a site-specific serine recombinase that is normally controlled by a complex regulatory mechanism. A single mutation, Q115R, allows the enzyme to bypass the entire regulatory apparatus, such that no accessory proteins or DNA sites are required. Here, we present a 1.86 {angstrom} crystal structure of the Sin Q115R catalytic domain, in a tetrameric arrangement stabilized by an interaction between Arg115 residues on neighboring subunits. The subunits have undergone significant conformational changes from the inactive dimeric state previously reported. The structure provides a new high-resolution view of a serine recombinase active site that is apparently fully assembled, suggesting roles for the conserved active site residues. The structure also suggests how the dimer-tetramer transition is coupled to assembly of the active site. The tetramer is captured in a different rotational substate than that seen in previous hyperactive serine recombinase structures, and unbroken crossover site DNA can be readily modeled into its active sites.

  12. Characterization of Peptides from Capsicum annuum Hybrid Seeds with Inhibitory Activity Against α-Amylase, Serine Proteinases and Fungi.

    PubMed

    Vieira Bard, Gabriela C; Nascimento, Viviane V; Ribeiro, Suzanna F F; Rodrigues, Rosana; Perales, Jonas; Teixeira-Ferreira, André; Carvalho, André O; Fernandes, Katia Valevski S; Gomes, Valdirene M

    2015-04-01

    Over the last several years, the activity of antimicrobial peptides (AMPs), isolated from plant species, against different microorganisms has been demonstrated. More recently, some of these AMPs have been described as potent inhibitors of α-amylases and serine proteinases from insects and mammals. The aim of this work was to obtain AMPs from protein extracts of a hybrid Capsicum (Ikeda × UENF 1381) seeds and to evaluate their microbial and enzyme inhibitory activities. Initially, proteins were extracted from the Capsicum hybrid seeds in buffer (sodium phosphate pH 5.4,) and precipitated with ammonium sulfate (90% saturated). Extract of hybrid seeds was subjected to size exclusion chromatography, and three fractions were obtained: S1, S2 and S3. The amino acid sequence, obtained by mass spectrometry, of the 6 kDa peptide from the S3 fraction, named HyPep, showed 100% identity with PSI-1.2, a serine protease inhibitor isolated from C. annuum seeds, however the bifunctionality of this inhibitor against two enzymes is being shown for the first time in this work. The S3 fraction showed the highest antifungal activity, inhibiting all the yeast strains tested, and it also exhibited inhibitory activity against human salivary and Callosobruchus maculatus α-amylases as well as serine proteinases.

  13. Isolation, expression and characterization of a novel dual serine protease inhibitor, OH-TCI, from king cobra venom.

    PubMed

    He, Ying-Ying; Liu, Shu-Bai; Lee, Wen-Hui; Qian, Jin-Qiao; Zhang, Yun

    2008-10-01

    Snake venom Kunitz/BPTI members are good tools for understanding of structure-functional relationship between serine proteases and their inhibitors. A novel dual Kunitz/BPTI serine proteinase inhibitor named OH-TCI (trypsin- and chymotrypsin-dual inhibitor from Ophiophagus hannah) was isolated from king cobra venom by three chromatographic steps of gel filtration, trypsin affinity and reverse phase HPLC. OH-TCI is composed of 58 amino acid residues with a molecular mass of 6339Da. Successful expression of OH-TCI was performed as the maltose-binding fusion protein in E. coli DH5alpha. Much different from Oh11-1, the purified native and recombinant OH-TCI both had strong inhibitory activities against trypsin and chymotrypsin although the sequence identity (74.1%) between them is very high. The inhibitor constants (K(i)) of recombinant OH-TCI were 3.91 x 10(-7) and 8.46 x10(-8)M for trypsin and chymotrypsin, respectively. To our knowledge, it was the first report of Kunitz/BPTI serine proteinase inhibitor from snake venom that had equivalent trypsin and chymotrypsin inhibitory activities. PMID:18582511

  14. Isolation, expression and characterization of a novel dual serine protease inhibitor, OH-TCI, from king cobra venom.

    PubMed

    He, Ying-Ying; Liu, Shu-Bai; Lee, Wen-Hui; Qian, Jin-Qiao; Zhang, Yun

    2008-10-01

    Snake venom Kunitz/BPTI members are good tools for understanding of structure-functional relationship between serine proteases and their inhibitors. A novel dual Kunitz/BPTI serine proteinase inhibitor named OH-TCI (trypsin- and chymotrypsin-dual inhibitor from Ophiophagus hannah) was isolated from king cobra venom by three chromatographic steps of gel filtration, trypsin affinity and reverse phase HPLC. OH-TCI is composed of 58 amino acid residues with a molecular mass of 6339Da. Successful expression of OH-TCI was performed as the maltose-binding fusion protein in E. coli DH5alpha. Much different from Oh11-1, the purified native and recombinant OH-TCI both had strong inhibitory activities against trypsin and chymotrypsin although the sequence identity (74.1%) between them is very high. The inhibitor constants (K(i)) of recombinant OH-TCI were 3.91 x 10(-7) and 8.46 x10(-8)M for trypsin and chymotrypsin, respectively. To our knowledge, it was the first report of Kunitz/BPTI serine proteinase inhibitor from snake venom that had equivalent trypsin and chymotrypsin inhibitory activities.

  15. Serine O-acetyltransferase is important, but not essential for cysteine-methionine synthesis in Fusarium graminearum.

    PubMed

    Fu, Jing; Zhang, Xiaoping; Chen, Xiang; Yin, Yanni; Ma, Zhonghua

    2014-04-01

    O-acetyltransferase (SAT) is a key enzyme converting serine into O-acetylserine in the synthesis of sulphur-containing amino acids. To characterize the function of FgSAT in Fusarium graminearum, three deletion mutants of FgSAT (ΔFgSAT-1, -2 and -18) were obtained using a gene replacement strategy. The three mutants did not show recognizable phenotypic changes on potato dextrose agar medium, but exhibited a very weak growth on fructose gelatin agar (FGA) medium containing SO₄²⁻ as sole sulfur source. Supplementation of O-acetylserine, cysteine, or methionine, but not serine, rescued the defect of mycelial growth in FgSAT deletion mutants, indicating that FgSAT is involved in conversion of serine into O-acetylserine. The three mutants had a decrease in conidiation in mung bean liquid, but not in carboxymethyl cellulose. Virulence, deoxynivalenol production and fungicide sensitivity assays found that the three mutants showed no significant difference from wild-type progenitor PH-1. Real-time PCR assays detected an increase in expression levels of FgOAHS, FgCBS and FgCGL genes involved in the alternative pathway in FgSAT deletion mutants, suggesting that the alternative pathway in F. graminearum is present and can operate. Addition of homoserine, the upstream substrate of the alternative pathway, also restored the normal mycelial growth of FgSAT deletion mutants on FGA, indicating that the alternative pathway in F. graminearum might be positively regulated by homoserine.

  16. [Quality of data on folic acid content in vegetables included in several Spanish Food Composition Tables and new data on their folate content].

    PubMed

    Olivares, A B; Bernal, M J; Ros, G; Martínez, C; Periago, M J

    2006-01-01

    The relationship between adequate folate intake, adequate serum levels, and lowering the risk of suffering from cardiovascular diseases, neural tube defects, neural illness and some kind of cancers have been widely studied. Because of the expected health benefits, the consumption of foods with high folate content or enriched foods is increasing. Therefore, an adequate folate intake is important in order to reach acceptable serum levels. Reliable food composition data are necessary in order to evaluate and estimate the populations folate intake, elaborate diets and formulate recommended dietary intakes. For this reason, we revised folic acid data in Spanish Food Composition Tables (FCT). The quality of the data was evaluated and compared with other well-known international Food Composition Tables as well as with a high-resolution liquid chromatographic method (HPLC) validated in our laboratory. We evaluated all data about folate content, as well as all the information given like data origin, analytical method, sampling or original database. For the HPLC method, the food samples were incubated with hog kidney conjugase. After that, the samples were purified and concentrated by strong anion exchange (SAX), then the folate content was quantified by HPLC with a combination of two ultraviolet and fluorescence detectors. The evaluation and comparison of data was established according to some parameters, which define the quality of data, giving punctuation depending on the compliance with these parameters. The study of different sources showed that nutrients were different in definition, analysis method, units and expression of data, and that this fact could have a potential influence on TCA data values. In addition, it has been possible to show a wide variation in food number, name of these foods as well as the analysis of raw or cooked products with different composition. When the quality conditions were tested, the Spanish FCT had the lowest punctuation in folate

  17. Exclusion of serine palmitoyltransferase long chain base subunit 2 (SPTLC2) as a common cause for hereditary sensory neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Dawkins, Jennifer L; Brahmbhatt, Sonal; Auer-Grumbach, Michaela; Wagner, Klaus; Hartung, Hans-Peter; Verhoeven, Kristien; Timmerman, Vincent; De Jonghe, Peter; Kennerson, Marina; LeGuern, Eric; Nicholson, Garth A

    2002-10-01

    Recently point mutations in the SPTLC1 subunit of serine palmitoyltransferase have been shown to cause the common form of dominant hereditary sensory neuropathy (HSN1). Serine palmitoyltransferase (SPT) is a heterodimeric molecule made up of two subunits, SPTLC1 and SPTLC2. Twelve index patients from families with presumed genetic sensory neuropathies were screened for SPTLC2 mutations. These families comprised six multigenerational families, including two previously reported families not linked to the SPTLC1 locus on chromosome 9 and one multigenerational family with a complicated hereditary sensory neuropathy syndrome with associated palmar plantar keratosis, ataxia and spastic paraplegia. The remaining families included one consanguineous family with presumed recessive HSN with two affected siblings, one case of congenital sensory neuropathy and four sporadic cases with adult onset sensory neuropathy. No mutations in the SPTLC2 gene were found in any family. These results suggest that SPTLC2 mutations are not a common cause for genetic sensory neuropathies. PMID:12207934

  18. Molecular dynamic and docking interaction study of Heterodera glycines serine proteinase with Vigna mungo proteinase inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Prasad, C V S Siva; Gupta, Saurabh; Gaponenko, Alex; Tiwari, Murlidhar

    2013-08-01

    Many plants do produce various defense proteins like proteinase inhibitors (PIs) to protect them against various pests. PIs function as pseudosubstrates of digestive proteinase, which inhibits proteolysis in pests and leads to amino acid deficiency-based mortality. This work reports the structural interaction studies of serine proteinase of Heterodera glycines (SPHG) with Vigna mungo proteinase inhibitor (VMPI). 3D protein structure modeling, validation of SPHG and VMPI, and their putative protein-protein binding sites were predicted. Protein-protein docking followed by molecular dynamic simulation was performed to find the reliable confirmation of SPHG-VMPI complex. Trajectory analysis of each successive conformation concludes better interaction of first loop in comparison with second loop. Lysine residues of first loop were actively participating in complex formation. Overall, this study discloses the structural aspects and interaction mechanisms of VMPI with SPHG, and it would be helpful in the development of pest-resistant genetically modified crops.

  19. Zn(2+) and Cd(2+) cationized serine complexes: infrared multiple photon dissociation spectroscopy and density functional theory investigations.

    PubMed

    Coates, Rebecca A; Boles, Georgia C; McNary, Christopher P; Berden, Giel; Oomens, Jos; Armentrout, P B

    2016-08-10

    The gas-phase structures of zinc and cadmium dications bound to serine (Ser) are investigated by infrared multiple photon dissociation (IRMPD) action spectroscopy using the free electron laser FELIX, in combination with ab initio calculations. To identify the structures of the experimentally observed species, [Zn(Ser-H)CH3CN](+) and CdCl(+)(Ser), the measured action spectra are compared to linear absorption spectra calculated at the B3LYP/6-311+G(d,p) level for Zn(2+) containing complexes and B3LYP/def2-TZVP levels for Cd(2+) containing complexes. Good agreement between the observed IRMPD spectra and the predicted spectra allows identification of the isomers present. The intact amino acid interacting with cadmium chloride adopts a tridentate chelation involving the amino acid backbone amine and carbonyl groups as well as the hydroxyl group of the side-chain, [N,CO,OH]. The presence of two low-energy conformers is observed for the deprotonated serine-zinc complex, with the same tridentate coordination as for the cadmium complex but proton loss occurs at both the hydroxyl side-chain, [N,CO,O(-)], and the carboxylic acid of the amino acid backbone, [N,CO(-),OH]. These results are profitably compared with the analogous results previously obtained for comparable complexes with cysteine. PMID:27465924

  20. Amino acid profile during exercise and training in Standardbreds.

    PubMed

    Westermann, C M; Dorland, L; Wijnberg, I D; de Sain-van der Velden, M G M; van Breda, E; Barneveld, A; de Graaf-Roelfsema, E; Keizer, H A; van der Kolk, J H

    2011-08-01

    The objective of this study is to assess the influence of acute exercise, training and intensified training on the plasma amino acid profile. In a 32-week longitudinal study using 10 Standardbred horses, training was divided into four phases, including a phase of intensified training for five horses. At the end of each phase, a standardized exercise test, SET, was performed. Plasma amino acid concentrations before and after each SET were measured. Training significantly reduced mean plasma aspartic acid concentration, whereas exercise significantly increased the plasma concentrations of alanine, taurine, methionine, leucine, tyrosine and phenylalanine and reduced the plasma concentrations of glycine, ornithine, glutamine, citrulline and serine. Normally and intensified trained horses differed not significantly. It is concluded that amino acids should not be regarded as limiting training performance in Standardbreds except for aspartic acid which is the most likely candidate for supplementation. PMID:20863542

  1. Molecular mechanism for H2 release from BH3NH3, including the catalytic role of the Lewis acid BH3.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Minh Tho; Nguyen, Vinh Son; Matus, Myrna H; Gopakumar, G; Dixon, David A

    2007-02-01

    Electronic structure calculations using various methods, up to the coupled-cluster CCSD(T) level, in conjunction with the aug-cc-pVnZ basis sets with n = D, T, and Q, extrapolated to the complete basis set limit, show that the borane molecule (BH3) can act as an efficient bifunctional acid-base catalyst in the H2 elimination reactions of XHnYHn systems (X, Y = C, B, N). Such a catalyst is needed as the generation of H2 from isoelectronic ethane and borane amine compounds proceeds with an energy barrier much higher than that of the X-Y bond energy. The asymptotic energy barrier for H2 release is reduced from 36.4 kcal/mol in BH3NH3 to 6.0 kcal/mol with the presence of BH3 relative to the molecular asymptote. The NH3 molecule can also participate in a similar catalytic process but induces a smaller reduction of the energy barrier. The kinetics of these processes was analyzed by both transition-state and RRKM theory. The catalytic effect of BH3 has also been probed by an analysis of the electronic densities of the transition structures using the atom-in-molecule (AIM) and electron localization function (ELF) approaches.

  2. Is endogenous D-serine in the rostral anterior cingulate cortex necessary for pain-related negative affect?

    PubMed

    Ren, Wen-Hua; Guo, Ji-Dong; Cao, Hong; Wang, Hua; Wang, Pei-Fen; Sha, Hong; Ji, Ru-Rong; Zhao, Zhi-Qi; Zhang, Yu-Qiu

    2006-03-01

    Functional activation of NMDA receptors requires co-activation of glutamate- and glycine-binding sites. D-serine is considered to be an endogenous ligand for the glycine site of NMDA receptors. Using a combination of a rat formalin-induced conditioned place avoidance (F-CPA) behavioral model and whole-cell patch-clamp recording in rostral anterior cingulate cortex (rACC) slices, we examined the effects of d-amino acid oxidase (DAAO), an endogenous D-serine-degrading enzyme, and 7-chlorokynurenate (7Cl-KYNA), an antagonist of the glycine site of NMDA receptors, on pain-related aversion. Degradation of endogenous D-serine with DAAO, or selective blockade of the glycine site of NMDA receptors by 7Cl-KYNA, effectively inhibited NMDA-evoked currents in rACC slices. Intra-rACC injection of DAAO (0.1 U) and 7Cl-KYNA (2 and 0.2 mM, 0.6 microL per side) 20 min before F-CPA conditioning greatly attenuated F-CPA scores, but did not affect formalin-induced acute nociceptive behaviors and electric foot shock-induced conditioned place avoidance. This study reveals for the first time that endogenous D-serine plays a critical role in pain-related aversion by activating the glycine site of NMDA receptors in the rACC. Furthermore, these results extend our hypothesis that activation of NMDA receptors in the rACC is necessary for the acquisition of specific pain-related negative emotion. Thus a new and promising strategy for the prevention of chronic pain-induced emotional disturbance might be raised.

  3. Antidepressant-like effect of bright light is potentiated by L-serine administration in a mouse model of seasonal affective disorder.

    PubMed

    Kawai, Misato; Goda, Ryosei; Otsuka, Tsuyoshi; Iwamoto, Ayaka; Uotsu, Nobuo; Furuse, Mitsuhiro; Yasuo, Shinobu

    2015-09-01

    Bright light therapy is used as the primary treatment for seasonal affective disorder; however, the mechanisms underlying its antidepressant effect are not fully understood. Previously, we found that C57BL/6J mice exhibit increased depression-like behavior during a short-day condition (SD) and have lowered brain serotonin (5-HT) content. This study analyzed the effect of bright light on depression-like behaviors and the brain serotonergic system using the C57BL/6J mice. In the mice maintained under SD, bright light treatment (1000 lx, daily 1 h exposure) for 1 week reduced immobility time in the forced swimming test and increased intake of saccharin solution in a saccharin intake test. However, the light treatment did not modify 5-HT content and selective 5-HT uptake in the amygdala, or temporal patterns of core body temperature and wheel-running activity throughout a day. In the next experiment, we attempted to enhance the effect of bright light by using L-serine, a precursor of D-serine that acts as an N-methyl-D-aspartic acid receptor coagonist. Daily subcutaneous injection of L-serine for 2 weeks prior to the bright light strongly reduced the immobility time in the forced swimming test, suggesting a synergistic effect of light and L-serine. Furthermore, bright light increased the total number of 5-HT-immunoreactive cells and cells that had colocalized 5-HT and c-Fos immunosignals in several subregions of the raphe nuclei. These effects were potentiated by prior injection of L-serine. These data suggest that the bright light may elicit an antidepressant-like effect via enhanced 5-HT signals in the brain and L-serine can enhance these effects.

  4. Inhibition of serine palmitoyltransferase in vitro and long-chain base biosynthesis in intact Chinese hamster ovary cells by. beta. -chloroalanine

    SciTech Connect

    Medlock, K.A.; Merrill, A.H. Jr.

    1988-09-06

    The effects of ..beta..-chloroalanine (..beta..-Cl-alanine) on the serine palmitoyltransferase activity and the de novo biosynthesis of sphinganine and sphingenine were investigated in vitro with rat liver microsomes and in vivo with intact Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells. The inhibition in vitro was rapid, irreversible, and concentration and time dependent and apparently involved the active site because inactivation only occurred with ..beta..-Cl-L-alanine and was blocked by L-serine. These are characteristics of mechanism-based (suicide) inhibition. Serine palmitoyltransferase (SPT) was also inhibited when intact CHO cells were incubated with ..beta..-Cl-alanine and this treatment inhibited (/sup 14/C)serine incorporation into long-chain bases by intact cells. The concentration dependence of the loss of SPT activity and of long-chain base synthesis was identical. The effects of ..beta..-Cl-alanine appeared to occur with little perturbation of other cell functions: the cells exhibited no loss in cell viability, (/sup 14/C)serine uptake was not blocked, total lipid biosynthesis from (/sup 14/C)acetic acid was not decreased (nor was the appearance of radiolabel in cholesterol and phosphatidylcholine), and (/sup 3/H)thymidine incorporation into DNA was not affected. There appeared to be little effect on protein synthesis based on the incorporation of (/sup 3/H)leucine, which was only decreased by 14%. Although ..beta..-Cl-L-alanine is known to inhibit other pyridoxal 5'-phosphate dependent enzymes, alanine and aspartate transaminases were not inhibited under these conditions. These results establish the close association between the activity of serine palmitoyltransferase and the cellular rate of long-chain base formation and indicate that ..beta..-Cl-alanine and other mechanism-based inhibitors might be useful to study alterations in cellular long-chain base synthesis.

  5. A Trigger Residue for Transmembrane Signaling in the Escherichia coli Serine Chemoreceptor

    PubMed Central

    Kitanovic, Smiljka; Ames, Peter

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT The transmembrane Tsr protein of Escherichia coli mediates chemotactic responses to environmental serine gradients. Serine binds to the periplasmic domain of the homodimeric Tsr molecule, promoting a small inward displacement of one transmembrane helix (TM2). TM2 piston displacements, in turn, modulate the structural stability of the Tsr-HAMP domain on the cytoplasmic side of the membrane to control the autophosphorylation activity of the signaling CheA kinase bound to the membrane-distal cytoplasmic tip of Tsr. A five-residue control cable segment connects TM2 to the AS1 helix of HAMP and transmits stimulus and sensory adaptation signals between them. To explore the possible role of control cable helicity in transmembrane signaling by Tsr, we characterized the signaling properties of mutant receptors with various control cable alterations. An all-alanine control cable shifted Tsr output toward the kinase-on state, whereas an all-glycine control cable prevented Tsr from reaching either a fully on or fully off output state. Restoration of the native isoleucine (I214) in these synthetic control cables largely alleviated their signaling defects. Single amino acid replacements at Tsr-I214 shifted output toward the kinase-off (L, N, H, and R) or kinase-on (A and G) states, whereas other control cable residues tolerated most amino acid replacements with little change in signaling behavior. These findings indicate that changes in control cable helicity might mediate transitions between the kinase-on and kinase-off states during transmembrane signaling by chemoreceptors. Moreover, the Tsr-I214 side chain plays a key role, possibly through interaction with the membrane interfacial environment, in triggering signaling changes in response to TM2 piston displacements. IMPORTANCE The Tsr protein of E. coli mediates chemotactic responses to environmental serine gradients. Stimulus signals from the Tsr periplasmic sensing domain reach its cytoplasmic kinase control

  6. Probing protein stability with unnatural amino acids

    SciTech Connect

    Mendel, D.; Ellman, J.A.; Zhiyuh Chang; Veenstra, D.L.; Kollman, P.A.; Schultz, P.G. )

    1992-06-26

    Unnatural amino acid mutagenesis, in combination with molecular modeling and simulation techniques, was used to probe the effect of side chain structure on protein stability. Specific replacements at position 133 in T4 lysozyme included (1) leucine (wt), norvaline, ethylglycine, and alanine to measure the cost of stepwise removal of methyl groups from the hydrophobic core, (2) norvaline and O-methyl serine to evaluate the effects of side chain solvation, and (3) leucine, S,S-2-amino-4-methylhexanoic acid, and S-2-amino-3-cyclopentylpropanoic acid to measure the influence of packing density and side chain conformational entropy on protein stability. All of these factors (hydrophobicity, packing, conformational entropy, and cavity formation) significantly influence protein stability and must be considered when analyzing any structural change to proteins.

  7. Realizing serine/threonine ligation: scope and limitations and mechanistic implication thereof

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Clarence T. T.; Li, Tianlu; Lam, Hiu Yung; Zhang, Yinfeng; Li, Xuechen

    2014-01-01

    Serine/Threonine ligation (STL) has emerged as an alternative tool for protein chemical synthesis, bioconjugations as well as macrocyclization of peptides of various sizes. Owning to the high abundance of Ser/Thr residues in natural peptides and proteins, STL is expected to find a wide range of applications in chemical biology research. Herein, we have fully investigated the compatibility of the STL strategy for X-Ser/Thr ligation sites, where X is any of the 20 naturally occurring amino acids. Our studies have shown that 17 amino acids are suitable for ligation, while Asp, Glu, and Lys are not compatible. Among the working 17 C-terminal amino acids, the retarded reaction resulted from the bulky β-branched amino acid (Thr, Val, and Ile) is not seen under the current ligation condition. We have also investigated the chemoselectivity involving the amino group of the internal lysine which may compete with the N-terminal Ser/Thr for reaction with the C-terminal salicylaldehyde (SAL) ester aldehyde group. The result suggested that the free internal amino group does not adversely slow down the ligation rate. PMID:24904921

  8. Ligand Discovery for the Alanine-Serine-Cysteine Transporter (ASCT2, SLC1A5) from Homology Modeling and Virtual Screening

    PubMed Central

    Gameiro, Armanda; Albers, Thomas; Singh, Kurnvir; Shere, Helen; Bonomi, Massimiliano; Holst, Jeff; Schlessinger, Avner

    2015-01-01

    The Alanine-Serine-Cysteine transporter ASCT2 (SLC1A5) is a membrane protein that transports neutral amino acids into cells in exchange for outward movement of intracellular amino acids. ASCT2 is highly expressed in peripheral tissues such as the lung and intestines where it contributes to the homeostasis of intracellular concentrations of neutral amino acids. ASCT2 also plays an important role in the development of a variety of cancers such as melanoma by transporting amino acid nutrients such as glutamine into the proliferating tumors. Therefore, ASCT2 is a key drug target with potentially great pharmacological importance. Here, we identify seven ASCT2 ligands by computational modeling and experimental testing. In particular, we construct homology models based on crystallographic structures of the aspartate transporter GltPh in two different conformations. Optimization of the models’ binding sites for protein-ligand complementarity reveals new putative pockets that can be targeted via structure-based drug design. Virtual screening of drugs, metabolites, fragments-like, and lead-like molecules from the ZINC database, followed by experimental testing of 14 top hits with functional measurements using electrophysiological methods reveals seven ligands, including five activators and two inhibitors. For example, aminooxetane-3-carboxylate is a more efficient activator than any other known ASCT2 natural or unnatural substrate. Furthermore, two of the hits inhibited ASCT2 mediated glutamine uptake and proliferation of a melanoma cancer cell line. Our results improve our understanding of how substrate specificity is determined in amino acid transporters, as well as provide novel scaffolds for developing chemical tools targeting ASCT2, an emerging therapeutic target for cancer and neurological disorders. PMID:26444490

  9. Ligand Discovery for the Alanine-Serine-Cysteine Transporter (ASCT2, SLC1A5) from Homology Modeling and Virtual Screening.

    PubMed

    Colas, Claire; Grewer, Christof; Otte, Nicholas James; Gameiro, Armanda; Albers, Thomas; Singh, Kurnvir; Shere, Helen; Bonomi, Massimiliano; Holst, Jeff; Schlessinger, Avner

    2015-10-01

    The Alanine-Serine-Cysteine transporter ASCT2 (SLC1A5) is a membrane protein that transports neutral amino acids into cells in exchange for outward movement of intracellular amino acids. ASCT2 is highly expressed in peripheral tissues such as the lung and intestines where it contributes to the homeostasis of intracellular concentrations of neutral amino acids. ASCT2 also plays an important role in the development of a variety of cancers such as melanoma by transporting amino acid nutrients such as glutamine into the proliferating tumors. Therefore, ASCT2 is a key drug target with potentially great pharmacological importance. Here, we identify seven ASCT2 ligands by computational modeling and experimental testing. In particular, we construct homology models based on crystallographic structures of the aspartate transporter GltPh in two different conformations. Optimization of the models' binding sites for protein-ligand complementarity reveals new putative pockets that can be targeted via structure-based drug design. Virtual screening of drugs, metabolites, fragments-like, and lead-like molecules from the ZINC database, followed by experimental testing of 14 top hits with functional measurements using electrophysiological methods reveals seven ligands, including five activators and two inhibitors. For example, aminooxetane-3-carboxylate is a more efficient activator than any other known ASCT2 natural or unnatural substrate. Furthermore, two of the hits inhibited ASCT2 mediated glutamine uptake and proliferation of a melanoma cancer cell line. Our results improve our understanding of how substrate specificity is determined in amino acid transporters, as well as provide novel scaffolds for developing chemical tools targeting ASCT2, an emerging therapeutic target for cancer and neurological disorders.

  10. [Evaluation of ten fish species to be included as part of renal diet, due to their protein, phosphorus and fatty acids content].

    PubMed

    Castro-González, Maria Isabel; Maafs-Rodríguez, Ana Gabriela; Pérez-Gil Romo, Fernando

    2012-06-01

    Because renal disease is highly complex, its nutritional treatment is complicated and many foods are restricted, including fish because its phosphorus content. The aim of the present study was to analyze ten fillet fish species, commonly consumed in Mexico (Cyprinus carpio carpio, Ophichthus rex, Symphurus elongatus, Eucinostomus entomelas, Chirostoma patzcuaro, Bairdiella chrysoura, Salmo salar Oreochromis urolepis hornorum, Sphyraena guachancho, Istiophorus albicans), to determine their phosphorus (P), protein (Pr), cholesterol, sodium, potassium, vitamins D3 and E, and n-3 PUFA (EPA+DHA) according to the AOAC techniques, in order to identify which species could be included in renal diet; particularly because of their risk:benefit relations (calculated with those results). Protein values ranged from 16.5 to 33.5g/100 g of fillet; the specie with the highest phosphorus contest was Salmo salar, and with the lowest, Symphurus elongatus. EPA+DHA quantity ranged from 79.64 mg/100 g to 1,381.53 mg/100 g. Considering de P/Pr relation recommended to renal patients, all analyzed species (except Salmo salar, Ophichthus rex and Istiophorus albicans) could be included in their diet. As for the P/EPA+DHA relation, the species most recommended to renal patients are Symphurus elongatus, Bairdiella chrysoura and Sphyraena guachancho. PMID:23610899

  11. Inframolecular acid base studies of the tris and tetrakis myo-inositol phosphates including the 1,2,3-trisphosphate motif

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dozol, Hélène; Blum-Held, Corinne; Guédat, Philippe; Maechling, Clarisse; Lanners, Steve; Schlewer, Gilbert; Spiess, Bernard

    2002-12-01

    The intrinsic acid-base properties of the phosphate groups of three myo-inositol derivatives which display the 1,2,3-trisphosphate motif, i.e. (±)- myo-inositol 1,2,3-trisphosphate (Ins(1,2,3)P 3), (±)- myo-inositol 1,2,3,6-tetrakisphosphate (Ins(1,2,3,6)P 4), and (±)- myo-inositol 1,2,3,5-tetrakisphosphate (Ins(1,2,3,5)P 4) are reported. The studies were performed in 0.2 M KCl solution at 37 °C, near physiological ionic strength and temperature. In addition, in order to shed light on the transition metal complexation properties of Ins(1,2,3)P 3, the influence of the Zn 2+ cations on its 31P NMR titration curves was investigated. From the titration curves as well as from the determined protonation microconstants, it appears that for Ins(1,2,3)P 3, the two lateral P1 and P3 phosphates strongly contribute to stabilise a proton on the central P2 phosphate. However, in the fully deprotonated form of Ins(1,2,3)P 3, P1 and P3 repulse each other so that they establish hydrogen bonds with, respectively, their neighbouring OH6 and OH4 hydroxyls. The 1,2,3-trisphosphate motif of Ins(1,2,3,5)P 4 behaves very similarly to that of Ins(1,2,3)P 3 indicating a poor interaction with the distant P5 phosphate. By contrast, moving a phosphate group from position 5 to position 6 on the myo-inositol ring as in Ins(1,2,3,6)P 4, leads to major changes in the basicity and cooperativity of the phosphate groups. Finally, the presence of Zn 2+ cations has a marked influence on the 31P NMR titration curves of Ins(1,2,3)P 3, leading to the conclusion that two equatorial phosphates, assisted by a middle axial one, afford an optimal chelating moiety that is able to occupy all sites of the metal coordination polyhedron which could be the reason for its antioxidant properties.

  12. Structural Basis for the Catalytic Activity of Human Serine/Threonine Protein Phosphatase type 5 (PP5)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swingle, Mark R.; Ciszak, Ewa M.; Honkanen, Richard E.

    2004-01-01

    Serine/threonine protein phosphatase-5 (PP5) is a member of the PPP-gene family of protein phosphatases that is widely expressed in mammalian tissues and is highly conserved among eukaryotes. PP5 associates with several proteins that affect signal transduction networks, including the glucocorticoid receptor (GR)-heat shock protein-90 (Hsp90)-heterocomplex, the CDC16 and CDC27 subunits of the anaphase-promoting complex, elF2alpha kinase, the A subunit of PP2A, the G12-alpha / G13-alpha subunits of heterotrimeric G proteins and DNA-PK. The catalytic domain of PP5 (PP5c) shares 35-45% sequence identity with the catalytic domains of other PPP-phosphatases, including protein phosphatase-1 (PP1), -2A (PP2A), -2B / calcineurin (PP2B), -4 (PP4), -6 (PP6), and -7 (PP7). Like PP1, PP2A and PP4, PP5 is also sensitive to inhibition by okadaic acid, microcystin, cantharidin, tautomycin, and calyculin A. Here we report the crystal structure of the PP5 catalytic domain (PP5c) at a resolution of 1.6 angstroms. From this structure we propose a mechanism for PP5-mediated hydrolysis of phosphoprotein substrates, which requires the precise positioning of two metal ions within a conserved Asp(sup 271)-M(sub 1):M(sub 2)-W(sup 1)-His(sup 304)-Asp(sup 274) catalytic motif. The structure of PP5c provides a possible structural basis for explaining the exceptional catalytic proficiency of protein phosphatases, which are among the most powerful known catalysts. Resolution of the entire C-terminus revealed a novel subdomain, and the structure of the PP5c should also aid development of type-specific inhibitors.

  13. SEP-1 - a subtilisin-like serine endopeptidase from germinated seeds of Hordeum vulgare L. cv. Morex.

    PubMed

    Fontanini, Debora; Jones, Berne L

    2002-10-01

    Proteolysis is crucial for all living cells. It regulates protein processing, intracellular protein levels and removes abnormal or damaged proteins from the cell, working as a cellular housekeeper. By means of proteolysis, cells can control the short-lived regulatory proteins that affect processes such as signal transduction and reception, transcription, division and cellular growth. Proteolysis also furnishes amino acids for the de novo synthesis of proteins. In germinating seeds, its main role is to degrade storage proteins into small peptides and amino acids that can be used by the embryo during autotrophic growth. We have isolated and purified a serine endopeptidase, one of the many proteolytic enzymes that occur in germinated barley seeds (green malt), using chromatofocusing and DEAE-, CM-, and size-exclusion chromatographies. The enzyme, named SEP-1, has a molecular weight of 70 kDa, as estimated by both sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and size-exclusion chromatography. SEP-1 was detected and measured by its ability to digest gelatin in gels and to hydrolyze the synthetic substrate N-succinyl Ala-Ala-Pro-Leu p-nitroanilide. The hydrolysis of the synthetic substrate was optimal at pH 6.5 and 50 degrees C with a K(m) of 2.6 mM. The enzyme was inhibited by phenylmethylsulfonyl fluoride and p-amidinophenyl methanesulfonyl fluoride but not by any other class-specific inhibitor, suggesting it was a serine endopeptidase. Its amino acid sequence was similar to those of other plant subtilisin-like serine peptidases (EC 3.4.21), especially to the cucumisin-like group. SEP-1 was present in resting seeds, and its activity increased during germination in all of the malted barley tissues except for the endosperm, where it never occurred, suggesting that the enzyme is not likely involved in storage-protein degradation.

  14. Genome-wide survey of prokaryotic serine proteases: Analysis of distribution and domain architectures of five serine protease families in prokaryotes

    PubMed Central

    Tripathi, Lokesh P; Sowdhamini, R

    2008-01-01

    Background Serine proteases are one of the most abundant groups of proteolytic enzymes found in all the kingdoms of life. While studies have established significant roles for many prokaryotic serine proteases in several physiological processes, such as those associated with metabolism, cell signalling, defense response and development, functional associations for a large number of prokaryotic serine proteases are relatively unknown. Current analysis is aimed at understanding the distribution and probable biological functions of the select serine proteases encoded in representative prokaryotic organisms. Results A total of 966 putative serine proteases, belonging to five families, were identified in the 91 prokaryotic genomes using various sensitive sequence search techniques. Phylogenetic analysis reveals several species-specific clusters of serine proteases suggesting their possible involvement in organism-specific functions. Atypical phylogenetic associations suggest an important role for lateral gene transfer events in facilitating the widespread distribution of the serine proteases in the prokaryotes. Domain organisations of the gene products were analysed, employing sensitive sequence search methods, to infer their probable biological functions. Trypsin, subtilisin and Lon protease families account for a significant proportion of the multi-domain representatives, while the D-Ala-D-Ala carboxypeptidase and the Clp protease families are mostly single-domain polypeptides in prokaryotes. Regulatory domains for protein interaction, signalling, pathogenesis, cell adhesion etc. were found tethered to the serine protease domains. Some domain combinations (such as S1-PDZ; LON-AAA-S16 etc.) were found to be widespread in the prokaryotic lineages suggesting a critical role in prokaryotes. Conclusion Domain architectures of many serine proteases and their homologues identified in prokaryotes are very different from those observed in eukaryotes, suggesting distinct roles

  15. Prediction of individual milk proteins including free amino acids in bovine milk using mid-infrared spectroscopy and their correlations with milk processing characteristics.

    PubMed

    McDermott, A; Visentin, G; De Marchi, M; Berry, D P; Fenelon, M A; O'Connor, P M; Kenny, O A; McParland, S

    2016-04-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of mid-infrared spectroscopy in predicting milk protein and free amino acid (FAA) composition in bovine milk. Milk samples were collected from 7 Irish research herds and represented cows from a range of breeds, parities, and stages of lactation. Mid-infrared spectral data in the range of 900 to 5,000 cm(-1) were available for 730 milk samples; gold standard methods were used to quantify individual protein fractions and FAA of these samples with a view to predicting these gold standard protein fractions and FAA levels with available mid-infrared spectroscopy data. Separate prediction equations were developed for each trait using partial least squares regression; accuracy of prediction was assessed using both cross validation on a calibration data set (n=400 to 591 samples) and external validation on an independent data set (n=143 to 294 samples). The accuracy of prediction in external validation was the same irrespective of whether undertaken on the entire external validation data set or just within the Holstein-Friesian breed. The strongest coefficient of correlation obtained for protein fractions in external validation was 0.74, 0.69, and 0.67 for total casein, total β-lactoglobulin, and β-casein, respectively. Total proteins (i.e., total casein, total whey, and total lactoglobulin) were predicted with greater accuracy then their respective component traits; prediction accuracy using the infrared spectrum was superior to prediction using just milk protein concentration. Weak to moderate prediction accuracies were observed for FAA. The greatest coefficient of correlation in both cross validation and external validation was for Gly (0.75), indicating a moderate accuracy of prediction. Overall, the FAA prediction models overpredicted the gold standard values. Near-unity correlations existed between total casein and β-casein irrespective of whether the traits were based on the gold standard (0.92) or mid

  16. Amino acid runs in eukaryotic proteomes and disease associations

    PubMed Central

    Karlin, Samuel; Brocchieri, Luciano; Bergman, Aviv; Mrázek, Jan; Gentles, Andrew J.

    2002-01-01

    We present a comparative proteome analysis of the five complete eukaryotic genomes (human, Drosophila melanogaster, Caenorhabditis elegans, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Arabidopsis thaliana), focusing on individual and multiple amino acid runs, charge and hydrophobic runs. We found that human proteins with multiple long runs are often associated with diseases; these include long glutamine runs that induce neurological disorders, various cancers, categories of leukemias (mostly involving chromosomal translocations), and an abundance of Ca2 + and K+ channel proteins. Many human proteins with multiple runs function in development and/or transcription regulation and are Drosophila homeotic homologs. A large number of these proteins are expressed in the nervous system. More than 80% of Drosophila proteins with multiple runs seem to function in transcription regulation. The most frequent amino acid runs in Drosophila sequences occur for glutamine, alanine, and serine, whereas human sequences highlight glutamate, proline, and leucine. The most frequent runs in yeast are of serine, glutamine, and acidic residues. Compared with the other eukaryotic proteomes, amino acid runs are significantly more abundant in the fly. This finding might be interpreted in terms of innate differences in DNA-replication processes, repair mechanisms, DNA-modification systems, and mutational biases. There are striking differences in amino acid runs for glutamine, asparagine, and leucine among the five proteomes. PMID:11782551

  17. Purification and characterization of a novel serine protease from the mushroom Pholiota nameko.

    PubMed

    Guan, Gui-Ping; Zhang, Guo-Qing; Wu, Ying-Ying; Wang, He-Xiang; Ng, Tzi-Bun

    2011-06-01

    A novel serine protease, with a molecular mass of 19 kDa and the N-terminal sequence of ARTPEAPAEV, was isolated from dried fruiting bodies of the mushroom Pholiota nameko. The purification protocol comprised ion exchange chromatography on DEAE-cellulose, Q-Sepharose and SP-Sepharose, and gel filtration on Superdex 75. It was unadsorbed on DEAE-cellulose and Q-Sepharose but adsorbed on SP-Sepharose. It exhibited an optimum temperature at 50°C, an optimum pH at pH 8.8, a Km of 5.64 mg/mL and a Vmax of 0.98 μmol/min/mL against substrate casein. A number of metal ions inhibited the enzyme including Pb(2+), Mn(2+), Ca(2+), Hg(2+), Zn(2+), Cu(2+), Co(2+), Fe(3+) and Al(3+), with the inhibition of the last two cations being the most potent. K(+) and Mg(2+) slightly enhanced, while Li(+) moderately potentiated the activity of the protease. The protease was strongly inhibited by phenylmethylsulfonyl fluoride (PMSF), suggesting that it is a serine protease.

  18. A chemical proteomic atlas of brain serine hydrolases identifies cell type-specific pathways regulating neuroinflammation

    PubMed Central

    Viader, Andreu; Ogasawara, Daisuke; Joslyn, Christopher M; Sanchez-Alavez, Manuel; Mori, Simone; Nguyen, William; Conti, Bruno; Cravatt, Benjamin F

    2016-01-01

    Metabolic specialization among major brain cell types is central to nervous system function and determined in large part by the cellular distribution of enzymes. Serine hydrolases are a diverse enzyme class that plays fundamental roles in CNS metabolism and signaling. Here, we perform an activity-based proteomic analysis of primary mouse neurons, astrocytes, and microglia to furnish a global portrait of the cellular anatomy of serine hydrolases in the brain. We uncover compelling evidence for the cellular compartmentalization of key chemical transmission pathways, including the functional segregation of endocannabinoid (eCB) biosynthetic enzymes diacylglycerol lipase-alpha (DAGLα) and –beta (DAGLβ) to neurons and microglia, respectively. Disruption of DAGLβ perturbed eCB-eicosanoid crosstalk specifically in microglia and suppressed neuroinflammatory events in vivo independently of broader effects on eCB content. Mapping the cellular distribution of metabolic enzymes thus identifies pathways for regulating specialized inflammatory responses in the brain while avoiding global alterations in CNS function. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.12345.001 PMID:26779719

  19. Conservative Mechanisms of Extracellular Trap Formation by Annelida Eisenia andrei: Serine Protease Activity Requirement

    PubMed Central

    Ortmann, Weronika; Kolaczkowska, Elzbieta

    2016-01-01

    Formation of extracellular traps (ETs) capturing and immobilizing pathogens is now a well-established defense mechanism added to the repertoire of vertebrate phagocytes. These ETs are composed of extracellular DNA (extDNA), histones and antimicrobial proteins. Formation of mouse and human ETs depends on enzymes (i) facilitating decondensation of chromatin by citrullination of histones, and (ii) serine proteases degrading histones. In invertebrates, initial reports revealed existence of ETs composed of extDNA and histones, and here we document for the first time that also coelomocytes, immunocompetent cells of an earthworm Eisenia andrei, cast ETs which successfully trap bacteria in a reactive oxygen species (ROS)-dependent and -independent manner. Importantly, the formation of ETs was observed not only when coelomocytes were studied ex vivo, but also in vivo, directly in the earthworm coelom. These ETs were composed of extDNA, heat shock proteins (HSP27) and H3 histones. Furthermore, the formation of E. andrei ETs depended on activity of serine proteases, including elastase-like activity. Moreover, ETs interconnected and hold together aggregating coelomocytes, a processes proceeding encapsulation. In conclusion, the study confirms ET formation by earthworms, and unravels mechanisms leading to ET formation and encapsulation in invertebrates. PMID:27416067

  20. A single ancient origin for prototypical serine/arginine-rich splicing factors.

    PubMed

    Califice, Sophie; Baurain, Denis; Hanikenne, Marc; Motte, Patrick

    2012-02-01

    Eukaryotic precursor mRNA splicing is a process involving a very complex RNA-protein edifice. Serine/arginine-rich (SR) proteins play essential roles in precursor mRNA constitutive and alternative splicing and have been suggested to be crucial in plant-specific forms of developmental regulation and environmental adaptation. Despite their functional importance, little is known about their origin and evolutionary history. SR splicing factors have a modular organization featuring at least one RNA recognition motif (RRM) domain and a carboxyl-terminal region enriched in serine/arginine dipeptides. To investigate the evolution of SR proteins, we infer phylogenies for more than 12,000 RRM domains representing more than 200 broadly sampled organisms. Our analyses reveal that the RRM domain is not restricted to eukaryotes and that all prototypical SR proteins share a single ancient origin, including the plant-specific SR45 protein. Based on these findings, we propose a scenario for their diversification into four natural families, each corresponding to a main SR architecture, and a dozen subfamilies, of which we profile both sequence conservation and composition. Finally, using operational criteria for computational discovery and classification, we catalog SR proteins in 20 model organisms, with a focus on green algae and land plants. Altogether, our study confirms the homogeneity and antiquity of SR splicing factors while establishing robust phylogenetic relationships between animal and plant proteins, which should enable functional analyses of lesser characterized SR family members, especially in green plants. PMID:22158759

  1. A Single Ancient Origin for Prototypical Serine/Arginine-Rich Splicing Factors1[W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Califice, Sophie; Baurain, Denis; Hanikenne, Marc; Motte, Patrick

    2012-01-01

    Eukaryotic precursor mRNA splicing is a process involving a very complex RNA-protein edifice. Serine/arginine-rich (SR) proteins play essential roles in precursor mRNA constitutive and alternative splicing and have been suggested to be crucial in plant-specific forms of developmental regulation and environmental adaptation. Despite their functional importance, little is known about their origin and evolutionary history. SR splicing factors have a modular organization featuring at least one RNA recognition motif (RRM) domain and a carboxyl-terminal region enriched in serine/arginine dipeptides. To investigate the evolution of SR proteins, we infer phylogenies for more than 12,000 RRM domains representing more than 200 broadly sampled organisms. Our analyses reveal that the RRM domain is not restricted to eukaryotes and that all prototypical SR proteins share a single ancient origin, including the plant-specific SR45 protein. Based on these findings, we propose a scenario for their diversification into four natural families, each corresponding to a main SR architecture, and a dozen subfamilies, of which we profile both sequence conservation and composition. Finally, using operational criteria for computational discovery and classification, we catalog SR proteins in 20 model organisms, with a focus on green algae and land plants. Altogether, our study confirms the homogeneity and antiquity of SR splicing factors while establishing robust phylogenetic relationships between animal and plant proteins, which should enable functional analyses of lesser characterized SR family members, especially in green plants. PMID:22158759

  2. PIM serine/threonine kinases in the pathogenesis and therapy of hematologic malignancies and solid cancers

    PubMed Central

    Brault, Laurent; Gasser, Christelle; Bracher, Franz; Huber, Kilian; Knapp, Stefan; Schwaller, Jürg

    2010-01-01

    The identification as cooperating targets of Proviral Integrations of Moloney virus in murine lymphomas suggested early on that PIM serine/threonine kinases play an important role in cancer biology. Whereas elevated levels of PIM1 and PIM2 were mostly found in hematologic malignancies and prostate cancer, increased PIM3 expression was observed in different solid tumors. PIM kinases are constitutively active and their activity supports in vitro and in vivo tumor cell growth and survival through modification of an increasing number of common as well as isoform-specific substrates including several cell cycle regulators and apoptosis mediators. PIM1 but not PIM2 seems also to mediate homing and migration of normal and malignant hematopoietic cells by regulating chemokine receptor surface expression. Knockdown experiments by RNA interference or dominant-negative acting mutants suggested that PIM kinases are important for maintenance of a transformed phenotype and therefore potential therapeutic targets. Determination of the protein structure facilitated identification of an increasing number of potent small molecule PIM kinase inhibitors with in vitro and in vivo anticancer activity. Ongoing efforts aim to identify isoform-specific PIM inhibitors that would not only help to dissect the kinase function but hopefully also provide targeted therapeutics. Here, we summarize the current knowledge about the role of PIM serine/threonine kinases for the pathogenesis and therapy of hematologic malignancies and solid cancers, and we highlight structural principles and recent progress on small molecule PIM kinase inhibitors that are on their way into first clinical trials. PMID:20145274

  3. Conservative Mechanisms of Extracellular Trap Formation by Annelida Eisenia andrei: Serine Protease Activity Requirement.

    PubMed

    Homa, Joanna; Ortmann, Weronika; Kolaczkowska, Elzbieta

    2016-01-01

    Formation of extracellular traps (ETs) capturing and immobilizing pathogens is now a well-established defense mechanism added to the repertoire of vertebrate phagocytes. These ETs are composed of extracellular DNA (extDNA), histones and antimicrobial proteins. Formation of mouse and human ETs depends on enzymes (i) facilitating decondensation of chromatin by citrullination of histones, and (ii) serine proteases degrading histones. In invertebrates, initial reports revealed existence of ETs composed of extDNA and histones, and here we document for the first time that also coelomocytes, immunocompetent cells of an earthworm Eisenia andrei, cast ETs which successfully trap bacteria in a reactive oxygen species (ROS)-dependent and -independent manner. Importantly, the formation of ETs was observed not only when coelomocytes were studied ex vivo, but also in vivo, directly in the earthworm coelom. These ETs were composed of extDNA, heat shock proteins (HSP27) and H3 histones. Furthermore, the formation of E. andrei ETs depended on activity of serine proteases, including elastase-like activity. Moreover, ETs interconnected and hold together aggregating coelomocytes, a processes proceeding encapsulation. In conclusion, the study confirms ET formation by earthworms, and unravels mechanisms leading to ET formation and encapsulation in invertebrates. PMID:27416067

  4. Protein kinase A phosphorylation at serine-2808 of the cardiac Ca2+-release channel (ryanodine receptor) does not dissociate 12.6-kDa FK506-binding protein (FKBP12.6).

    PubMed

    Xiao, Bailong; Sutherland, Cindy; Walsh, Michael P; Chen, S R Wayne

    2004-03-01

    Dissociation of FKBP12.6 from the cardiac Ca2+-release channel (RyR2) as a consequence of protein kinase A (PKA) hyperphosphorylation of RyR2 at a single amino acid residue, serine-2808, has been proposed as an important mechanism underlying cardiac dysfunction in heart failure. However, the issue of whether PKA phosphorylation of RyR2 can dissociate FKBP12.6 from RyR2 is controversial. To additionally address this issue, we investigated the effect of PKA phosphorylation and mutations at serine-2808 of RyR2 on recombinant or native FKBP12.6-RyR2 interaction. Site-specific antibodies, which recognize the serine-2808 phosphorylated or nonphosphorylated form of RyR2, were used to unambiguously correlate the phosphorylation state of RyR2 at serine-2808 with its ability to bind FKBP12.6. We found that FKBP12.6 can bind to both the serine-2808 phosphorylated and nonphosphorylated forms of RyR2. The S2808D mutant thought to mimic constitutive phosphorylation also retained the ability to bind FKBP12.6. Complete phosphorylation at serine-2808 by exogenous PKA disrupted neither the recombinant nor native FKBP12.6-RyR2 complex. Furthermore, binding of site-specific antibodies to the serine-2808 phosphorylation site did not dissociate FKBP12.6 from or prevent FKBP12.6 from binding to RyR2. Taken together, our results do not support the notion that PKA phosphorylation at serine-2808 dissociates FKBP12.6 from RyR2. PMID:14715536

  5. The Serine-rich Domain from Crk-associated Substrate (p130Cas) is a Four-helix Bundle

    SciTech Connect

    Briknarova, Klara; Nasertorabi, Fariborz; Havert, Marnie L.; Eggleston, Ericka; Hoyt, David W.; Li, C; Olson, A J.; Vuori, Kristiina; Ely, Kathryn R.

    2005-06-10

    p130Cas (Crk-associated substrate) is a docking protein that is involved in assembly of focal adhesions and concomitant cellular signaling. It plays a role in physiological regulation of cell adhesion, migration, survival and proliferation, as well as in oncogenic transformation. The molecule consists of multiple protein-protein interaction motifs including a serine-rich region that is positioned between Crk and Src-binding sites. This study reports the first structure of a functional domain of Cas. The solution structure of the serine-rich region has been determined by nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (NMR) demonstrating that this is a stable domain that folds as a four-helix bundle, a protein-interaction motif.

  6. The effects of ursodeoxycholic acid treatment for intrahepatic cholestasis of pregnancy on maternal and fetal outcomes: a meta-analysis including non-randomized studies.

    PubMed

    Grand'Maison, Sophie; Durand, Madeleine; Mahone, Michèle

    2014-07-01

    Objectif : Les avantages de l’utilisation d’acide ursodésoxycholique (AUDC) pour la prise en charge de la cholestase intrahépatique de la grossesse (CIG) demeurent incertains. Une analyse Cochrane de 2010 ayant porté sur des essais comparatifs randomisés n’a pas été en mesure de se prononcer pour ou contre l’utilisation d’AUDC pour la prise en charge de la CIG. Nous avons mené une méta-analyse de la littérature, en englobant tant les études non randomisées (ENR) que les ECR. Nous avions pour objectif de déterminer si les patientes ayant participé aux ENR étaient comparables à celles qui avaient participé aux ECR; nous avions également pour objectif de déterminer si l’inclusion des ENR pouvait renforcer les données probantes disponibles et orienter la pratique clinique quant à l’utilisation d’AUDC chez les femmes qui présentent une CIG. Sources de données : Nous avons mené des recherches dans Medline (Ovid), Embase (Ovid), EMB Reviews, Cinahl (Ebsco) et Web of Knowledge (Thomson Reuters) en vue d’en tirer les articles publiés entre 1966 et juin 2012. Sélection des études : Nous avons inclus tous les ECR admissibles ayant comparé l’AUDC à un placebo ou à d’autres traitements et toutes les ENR ayant comparé l’AUDC à tout autre traitement chez des femmes présentant une CIG. Synthèse des données : Nous avons inclus 11 ECR (n = 625 grossesses) et six ENR (n = 211 grossesses). Bien que les femmes ayant participé aux ECR et aux ENR aient été comparables, la qualité des études était plus faible dans le cas des ENR. De façon générale, les femmes traitées à l’AUDC ont connu une atténuation du prurit dans 73 % des ECR et dans 100 % des ENR disposant de données disponibles. Les épreuves de fonction hépatique ont présenté une amélioration dans 82 % des ECR et dans 100 % des ENR disposant de données disponibles. Bien que l’utilisation d’AUDC n’ait pas affecté le taux de c

  7. Characterization of a chemostable serine alkaline protease from Periplaneta americana

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Proteases are important enzymes involved in numerous essential physiological processes and hold a strong potential for industrial applications. The proteolytic activity of insects’ gut is endowed by many isoforms with diverse properties and specificities. Thus, insect proteases can act as a tool in industrial processes. Results In the present study, purification and properties of a serine alkaline protease from Periplaneta americana and its potential application as an additive in various bio-formulations are reported. The enzyme was purified near to homogeneity by using acetone precipitation and Sephadex G-100 gel filtration chromatography. Enzyme activity was increased up to 4.2 fold after gel filtration chromatography. The purified enzyme appeared as single protein-band with a molecular mass of ~ 27.8 kDa in SDS-PAGE. The optimum pH and temperature for the proteolytic activity for purified protein were found around pH 8.0 and 60°C respectively. Complete inhibition of the purified enzyme by phenylmethylsulfonyl fluoride confirmed that the protease was of serine-type. The purified enzyme revealed high stability and compatibility towards detergents, oxidizing, reducing, and bleaching agents. In addition, enzyme also showed stability towards organic solvents and commercial detergents. Conclusion Several important properties of a serine protease from P. Americana were revealed. Moreover, insects can serve as excellent and alternative source of industrially important proteases with unique properties, which can be utilized as additives in detergents, stain removers and other bio-formulations. Properties of the P. americana protease accounted in the present investigation can be exploited further in various industrial processes. As an industrial prospective, identification of enzymes with varying essential properties from different insect species might be good approach and bioresource. PMID:24229392

  8. Insulin resistance and muscle insulin receptor substrate‐1 serine hyperphosphorylation

    PubMed Central

    Stuart, Charles A.; Howell, Mary E. A.; Cartwright, Brian M.; McCurry, Melanie P.; Lee, Michelle L.; Ramsey, Michael W.; Stone, Michael H.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Insulin resistance in metabolic syndrome subjects is profound in spite of muscle insulin receptor and insulin‐responsive glucose transporter (GLUT4) expression being nearly normal. Insulin receptor tyrosine kinase phosphorylation of insulin receptor substrate‐1 (IRS‐1) at Tyr896 is a necessary step in insulin stimulation of translocation of GLUT4 to the cell surface. Serine phosphorylation of IRS‐1 by some kinases diminishes insulin action in mice. We evaluated the phosphorylation status of muscle IRS‐1 in 33 subjects with the metabolic syndrome and seventeen lean controls. Each underwent euglycemic insulin clamps and a thigh muscle biopsy before and after 8 weeks of either strength or endurance training. Muscle IRS‐1 phosphorylation at six sites was quantified by immunoblots. Metabolic syndrome muscle IRS‐1 had excess phosphorylation at Ser337 and Ser636 but not at Ser307, Ser789, or Ser1101. Ser337 is a target for phosphorylation by glycogen synthase kinase 3 (GSK3) and Ser636 is phosphorylated by c‐Jun N‐terminal kinase 1 (JNK1). Exercise training without weight loss did not change the IRS‐1 serine phosphorylation. These data suggest that baseline hyperphosphorylation of at least two key serines within muscle IRS‐1 diminishes the transmission of the insulin signal and thereby decreases the insulin‐stimulated translocation of GLUT4. Excess fasting phosphorylation of muscle IRS‐1 at Ser636 may be a major cause of the insulin resistance seen in obesity and might prevent improvement in insulin responsiveness when exercise training is not accompanied by weight loss. PMID:25472611

  9. Molecular cloning, characterization and expression analysis of trypsin-like serine protease from triangle-shell pearl mussel (Hyriopsis cumingii).

    PubMed

    Wang, Hongquan; Liang, Jian; Zhao, Yurong; Liu, Qiaolin; Li, Yaoguo; Yi, Zili; Chen, Kaijian; Xiao, Tiaoyi

    2014-10-01

    Trypsin-like serine protease (TLS) is ubiquitous in animals and plays a number of diverse roles, including dietary protein digestion, hemolymph coagulation, antimicrobial activity and immune responses, among others. This study reports the isolation of a 1048 bp full-length cDNA sequence of TLS from triangle-shell pearl mussel (Hyriopsis cumingii), including a 12 bp 5' UTR (untranslated region), a 172 bp 3' UTR, and an open reading frame (ORF) of 864 bp by rapid amplification of cDNA ends (RACE). Bioinformatic analysis shows that the gene belongs to the trypsin-like serine protease superfamily, and contains a 15 residues N-terminal signal peptide and a conserved C-terminal domain. In comparison to other serine proteases, the catalytic triad were identified as His-98, Asp-149, and Ser-240. Quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR) showed a broad expression of the TLS gene in ten tested tissues. Time-course expression analysis demonstrated that the expression level of the TLS mRNA was significantly up-regulated in eight tested tissues (liver, intestine, gill, heart, axe foot, adductor muscle, kidney and gonad), but down-regulated in mantle and stomach after Aeromonas hydrophila injection. This is one of the results indicate that TLS may be involved in innate defense reactions against A. hydrophila in triangle-shell pearl mussel. PMID:25149589

  10. Oral l-serine supplementation reduces production of neurotoxic deoxysphingolipids in mice and humans with hereditary sensory autonomic neuropathy type 1

    PubMed Central

    Garofalo, Kevin; Penno, Anke; Schmidt, Brian P.; Lee, Ho-Joon; Frosch, Matthew P.; von Eckardstein, Arnold; Brown, Robert H.; Hornemann, Thorsten; Eichler, Florian S.

    2011-01-01

    Hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathy type 1 (HSAN1) causes sensory loss that predominantly affects the lower limbs, often preceded by hyperpathia and spontaneous shooting or lancinating pain. It is caused by several missense mutations in the genes encoding 2 of the 3 subunits of the enzyme serine palmitoyltransferase (SPT). The mutant forms of the enzyme show a shift from their canonical substrate l-serine to the alternative substrate l-alanine. This shift leads to increased formation of neurotoxic deoxysphingolipids (dSLs). Our initial analysis showed that in HEK cells transfected with SPTLC1 mutants, dSL generation was modulated in vitro in the presence of various amino acids. We therefore examined whether in vivo specific amino acid substrate supplementation influenced dSL levels and disease severity in HSAN1. In mice bearing a transgene expressing the C133W SPTLC1 mutant linked to HSAN1, a 10% l-serine–enriched diet reduced dSL levels. l-serine supplementation also improved measures of motor and sensory performance as well as measures of male fertility. In contrast, a 10% l-alanine–enriched diet increased dSL levels and led to severe peripheral neuropathy. In a pilot study with 14 HSAN1 patients, l-serine supplementation similarly reduced dSL levels. These observations support the hypothesis that an altered substrate selectivity of the mutant SPT is key to the pathophysiology of HSAN1 and raise the prospect of l-serine supplementation as a first treatment option for this disorder. PMID:22045570

  11. Oral L-serine supplementation reduces production of neurotoxic deoxysphingolipids in mice and humans with hereditary sensory autonomic neuropathy type 1.

    PubMed

    Garofalo, Kevin; Penno, Anke; Schmidt, Brian P; Lee, Ho-Joon; Frosch, Matthew P; von Eckardstein, Arnold; Brown, Robert H; Hornemann, Thorsten; Eichler, Florian S

    2011-12-01

    Hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathy type 1 (HSAN1) causes sensory loss that predominantly affects the lower limbs, often preceded by hyperpathia and spontaneous shooting or lancinating pain. It is caused by several missense mutations in the genes encoding 2 of the 3 subunits of the enzyme serine palmitoyltransferase (SPT). The mutant forms of the enzyme show a shift from their canonical substrate L-serine to the alternative substrate L-alanine. This shift leads to increased formation of neurotoxic deoxysphingolipids (dSLs). Our initial analysis showed that in HEK cells transfected with SPTLC1 mutants, dSL generation was modulated in vitro in the presence of various amino acids. We therefore examined whether in vivo specific amino acid substrate supplementation influenced dSL levels and disease severity in HSAN1. In mice bearing a transgene expressing the C133W SPTLC1 mutant linked to HSAN1, a 10% L-serine–enriched diet reduced dSL levels. L-serine supplementation also improved measures of motor and sensory performance as well as measures of male fertility. In contrast, a 10% L-alanine–enriched diet increased dSL levels and led to severe peripheral neuropathy. In a pilot study with 14 HSAN1 patients, L-serine supplementation similarly reduced dSL levels. These observations support the hypothesis that an altered substrate selectivity of the mutant SPT is key to the pathophysiology of HSAN1 and raise the prospect of l-serine supplementation as a first treatment option for this disorder.

  12. Oral L-serine supplementation reduces production of neurotoxic deoxysphingolipids in mice and humans with hereditary sensory autonomic neuropathy type 1.

    PubMed

    Garofalo, Kevin; Penno, Anke; Schmidt, Brian P; Lee, Ho-Joon; Frosch, Matthew P; von Eckardstein, Arnold; Brown, Robert H; Hornemann, Thorsten; Eichler, Florian S

    2011-12-01

    Hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathy type 1 (HSAN1) causes sensory loss that predominantly affects the lower limbs, often preceded by hyperpathia and spontaneous shooting or lancinating pain. It is caused by several missense mutations in the genes encoding 2 of the 3 subunits of the enzyme serine palmitoyltransferase (SPT). The mutant forms of the enzyme show a shift from their canonical substrate L-serine to the alternative substrate L-alanine. This shift leads to increased formation of neurotoxic deoxysphingolipids (dSLs). Our initial analysis showed that in HEK cells transfected with SPTLC1 mutants, dSL generation was modulated in vitro in the presence of various amino acids. We therefore examined whether in vivo specific amino acid substrate supplementation influenced dSL levels and disease severity in HSAN1. In mice bearing a transgene expressing the C133W SPTLC1 mutant linked to HSAN1, a 10% L-serine–enriched diet reduced dSL levels. L-serine supplementation also improved measures of motor and sensory performance as well as measures of male fertility. In contrast, a 10% L-alanine–enriched diet increased dSL levels and led to severe peripheral neuropathy. In a pilot study with 14 HSAN1 patients, L-serine supplementation similarly reduced dSL levels. These observations support the hypothesis that an altered substrate selectivity of the mutant SPT is key to the pathophysiology of HSAN1 and raise the prospect of l-serine supplementation as a first treatment option for this disorder. PMID:22045570

  13. P2X7 R-mediated Ca(2+) -independent d-serine release via pannexin-1 of the P2X7 R-pannexin-1 complex in astrocytes.

    PubMed

    Pan, Han-Chi; Chou, Yun-Chia; Sun, Synthia H

    2015-05-01

    D-serine is a coagonist of N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) subtype of glutamate receptor and plays a role in regulating activity-dependent synaptic plasticity. In this study, we examined the mechanism by which extracellular ATP triggers the release of d-serine from astrocytes and discovered a novel Ca(2+) -independent release mechanism mediated by P2X7 receptors (P2X7 R). Using [(3) H] d-serine, which was loaded into astrocytes via the neutral amino acid transporter 2 (ASCT2), we observed that ATP and a potent P2X7 R agonist, 2'(3')-O-(4-benzoylbenzoyl)adenosine-5'-triphosphate (BzATP), stimulated [(3) H]D-serine release and that were abolished by P2X7 R selective antagonists and by shRNAs, whereas enhanced by removal of intracellular or extracellular Ca(2+) . The P2X7 R-mediated d-serine release was inhibited by pannexin-1 antagonists, such as carbenoxolone (CBX), probenecid (PBN), and (10) Panx-1 peptide, and shRNAs, and stimulation of P2X7 R induced P2X7 R-pannexin-1 complex formation. Simply incubating astrocytes in Ca(2+) /Mg(2+) -free buffer also induced the complex formation, and that enhanced basal d-serine release through pannexin-1. The P2X7 R-mediated d-serine release assayed in Ca(2+) /Mg(2+) -free buffer was enhanced as well, and that was inhibited by CBX. Treating astrocytes with general protein kinase C (PKC) inhibitors, such as chelerythrine, GF109203X, and staurosporine, but not Ca(2+) -dependent PKC inhibitor, Gö6976, inhibited the P2X7 R-mediated d-serine release. Thus, we conclude that in astrocytes, P2X7 R-pannexin-1 complex formation is crucial for P2X7 R-mediated d-serine release through pannexin-1 hemichannel. The release is Ca(2+) -independent and regulates by a Ca(2+) -independent PKC. The activated P2X7 R per se is also functioned as a permeation channel to release d-serine in part. This P2X7 R-mediated d-serine release represents an important mechanism for activity-dependent neuron-glia interaction.

  14. Development and validation of a robust and sensitive assay for the discovery of selective inhibitors for serine/threonine protein phosphatases PP1α (PPP1C) and PP5 (PPP5C).

    PubMed

    Swingle, Mark R; Honkanen, Richard E

    2014-10-01

    Protein phosphatase types 1 α (PP1α/PPP1C) and 5 (PP5/PPP5C) are members of the PPP family of serine/threonine protein phosphatases. PP1 and PP5 share a common catalytic mechanism, and several natural compounds, including okadaic acid, microcystin, and cantharidin, act as strong inhibitors of both enzymes. However, to date there have been no reports of compounds that can selectively inhibit PP1 or PP5, and specific or highly selective inhibitors for either PP1 or PP5 are greatly desired by both the research and pharmaceutical communities. Here we describe the development and optimization of a sensitive and robust (representative PP5C assay data: Z'=0.93; representative PP1Cα assay data: Z'=0.90) fluorescent phosphatase assay that can be used to simultaneously screen chemical libraries and natural product extracts for the presence of catalytic inhibitors of PP1 and PP5. PMID:25383722

  15. Development and validation of a robust and sensitive assay for the discovery of selective inhibitors for serine/threonine protein phosphatases PP1α (PPP1C) and PP5 (PPP5C).

    PubMed

    Swingle, Mark R; Honkanen, Richard E

    2014-10-01

    Protein phosphatase types 1 α (PP1α/PPP1C) and 5 (PP5/PPP5C) are members of the PPP family of serine/threonine protein phosphatases. PP1 and PP5 share a common catalytic mechanism, and several natural compounds, including okadaic acid, microcystin, and cantharidin, act as strong inhibitors of both enzymes. However, to date there have been no reports of compounds that can selectively inhibit PP1 or PP5, and specific or highly selective inhibitors for either PP1 or PP5 are greatly desired by both the research and pharmaceutical communities. Here we describe the development and optimization of a sensitive and robust (representative PP5C assay data: Z'=0.93; representative PP1Cα assay data: Z'=0.90) fluorescent phosphatase assay that can be used to simultaneously screen chemical libraries and natural product extracts for the presence of catalytic inhibitors of PP1 and PP5.

  16. Serine proteases of the human immune system in health and disease.

    PubMed

    Heutinck, Kirstin M; ten Berge, Ineke J M; Hack, C Erik; Hamann, Jörg; Rowshani, Ajda T

    2010-07-01

    Serine proteases form a large family of protein-cleaving enzymes that play an essential role in processes like blood coagulation, apoptosis and inflammation. Immune cells express a wide variety of serine proteases such as granzymes in cytotoxic lymphocytes, neutrophil elastase, cathepsin G and proteinase 3 in neutrophils and chymase and tryptase in mast cells. Regulation of proteolysis induced by these serine proteases is essential to prevent self-induced damage. Hence, there are specialized serine protease inhibitors, serpins, which are broadly distributed. Here, we discuss the function of human serine proteases in inflammation, apoptosis and tissue remodeling. Furthermore, we address their impact on development and progression of immune mediated-diseases. Understanding the mode of action of serine proteases will help to unravel molecular processes involved in immunological disorders and will facilitate the identification of new therapeutic targets.

  17. The high content of natural suppressor serine tRNA in dystrophic mouse muscle.

    PubMed Central

    Hitaka, T; Mizutani, T; Watanabe, K; Totsuka, T

    1990-01-01

    In order to gain an insight into the pathogenesis of mouse muscular dystrophy, we investigated the natural suppressor serine tRNA. The natural suppressor seryl-tRNA was distinguished from the other seryl-tRNAs on the basis of its specific property of being converted into phosphoseryl-tRNA by a tRNA kinase. On a wet-weight basis, the content of total tRNA in dystrophic muscles was 47% of that in normal muscles. Although the serine-accepting activities of tRNA were similar in muscles of 3-month-old dystrophic and normal mice, the ratio of [32P]phosphoseryl-tRNA (suppressor tRNA) to the total serine tRNA was significantly enhanced in dystrophic muscles compared with that in normal muscles. This high content of suppressor tRNA in dystrophic muscles was further confirmed by dot-blot hybridization experiments with the DNA probes CGTAGTCGGCAGGAT and CGCCCGAAAGGTGGAA for major tRNA(IGASer) and suppressor tRNA respectively. At the early postnatal age of 3 weeks, when only a week had elapsed since the first manifestation of the dystrophic symptom (hindleg dragging), the ratio of suppressor tRNA to major tRNAs in dystrophic hindleg muscles was abnormally increased. Thereafter it decreased with age in normal mice but remained almost unchanged in dystrophic mice. Consequently, at 3 months old, it was 1.7 times higher in dystrophic than in normal mice. The suppressor tRNA is now accepted to play a role in the synthesis of glutathione peroxidase. The present study showed that the content of this enzyme was abnormally elevated in dystrophic mice. Previously we had demonstrated that the docosahexaenoic (C22:6) acid content in phospholipids was decreased, possibly resulting from the enhanced oxidative milieu caused by the dystrophic condition. Thus far, the findings suggest that an increase in the contents of suppressor tRNA and glutathione peroxidase in dystrophic muscle may have been secondarily induced by such a highly oxidative state in the dystrophic condition. However, it is

  18. The Structure and Phase Diagram of Chiral Alkyl-Serine Monolayers on Mercury

    SciTech Connect

    L Tamam; D Medina; T Menahem; Y Mastai; E Sloutskin; S Yefet; M Deutsch

    2011-12-31

    The structure of liquid-mercury-supported Langmuir films (LFs) of chiral serine-modified fatty acid molecules was studied as a function of length, n = 8-22 carbons, temperature, T = 5-25 C, and surface coverage, A {approx} 40-200 {angstrom}{sup 2} per molecule, for both homochiral and heterochiral compounds. Using surface pressure {pi}-area A isotherms and surface-specific synchrotron X-ray diffraction methods the phase diagram was determined in detail. No lateral order was found for phases comprising surface-parallel molecules, in contrast with unmodified fatty acid LFs on mercury. For phases comprising standing-up molecules, long range lateral order was found for n {>=} 12, but no order for n = 8. The molecules in the ordered phases are extended, and tilt rigidly by {approx}40{sup o} from the surface normal. The homochiral LFs pack in an oblique, single-molecule, unit cell. The heterochiral LFs pack in a body-centered rectangular unit cell, containing two molecules. Unlike unmodified fatty acid LFs, the structure of the standing-up phase does not vary with n, T or A. The interactions underlying these characteristics, and the role of chirality, are discussed.

  19. Phosphomimetic mutation of the mitotically phosphorylated serine 1880 compromises the interaction of the transmembrane nucleoporin gp210 with the nuclear pore complex

    SciTech Connect

    Onischenko, Evgeny A.; Crafoord, Ellinor; Hallberg, Einar . E-mail: einar.hallberg@sh.se

    2007-07-15

    The nuclear pore complexes (NPCs) reversibly disassemble and reassemble during mitosis. Disassembly of the NPC is accompanied by phosphorylation of many nucleoporins although the function of this is not clear. It was previously shown that in the transmembrane nucleoporin gp210 a single serine residue at position 1880 is specifically phosphorylated during mitosis. Using amino acid substitution combined with live cell imaging, time-lapse microscopy and FRAP, we investigated the role of serine 1880 in binding of gp210 to the NPC in vivo. An alanine substitution mutant (S1880A) was significantly more dynamic at the NPC compared to the wild-type protein, suggesting that serine 1880 is important for binding of gp210 to the NPC. Moreover a glutamate substitution (S1880E) closely mimicking phosphorylated serine specifically interfered with incorporation of gp210 into the NPC and compromised its post-mitotic recruitment to the nuclear envelope of daughter nuclei. Our findings are consistent with the idea that mitotic phosphorylation acts to dissociate gp210 from the structural elements of the NPC.

  20. Serine protease identification (in vitro) and molecular structure predictions (in silico) from a phytopathogenic fungus, Alternaria solani.

    PubMed

    Chandrasekaran, Murugesan; Chandrasekar, Raman; Sa, Tongmin; Sathiyabama, Muthukrishnan

    2014-07-01

    Serine proteases are involved in an enormous number of biological processes. The present study aims at characterizing three-dimensional (3D) molecular architecture of serine proteases from early blight pathogen, Alternaria solani that are hypothesized to be markers of phytopathogenicity. A serine protease was purified to homogeneity and MALDI-TOF-MS/MS analysis revealed that protease produced by A. solani belongs to alkaline serine proteases (AsP). AsP is made up of 403 amino acid residues with molecular weight of 42.1 kDa (Isoelectric point - 6.51) and its molecular formula was C1859 H2930 N516 O595 S4 . AsP structure model was built based on its comparative homology with serine protease using the program, MODELER. AsP had 16 β-sheets and 10 α-helices, with Ser(350) (G347-G357), Asp(158) (D158-H169), and His(193) (H193-G203) in separate turn/coil structures. Biological metal binding region situated near 6th-helix and His(193) residue is responsible for metal binding site. Also, calcium ion (Ca(2+)) is coordinated by the carboxyl groups of Lys(84), Ile(85), Lys(86), Asp(87), Phe(88), Ala(89), Ala(90) (K84-A90) for first Ca(2+) binding site and carbonyl oxygen atom of Lys(244), Gly(245), Arg(246), Thr(247), Lys(248), Lys(249), and Ala(250) (K244-A250), for second Ca(2+) binding site. Moreover, Ramachandran plot analysis of protein residues falling into most favored secondary structures were determined (83.3%). The predicted molecular 3D structural model was further verified using PROCHECK, ERRAT, and VADAR servers to confirm the geometry and stereo-chemical parameters of the molecular structural design. The functional analysis of AsP 3D molecular structure predictions familiar in the current study may provide a new perspective in the understanding and identification of antifungal protease inhibitor designing. PMID:24122785

  1. Serine protease identification (in vitro) and molecular structure predictions (in silico) from a phytopathogenic fungus, Alternaria solani.

    PubMed

    Chandrasekaran, Murugesan; Chandrasekar, Raman; Sa, Tongmin; Sathiyabama, Muthukrishnan

    2014-07-01

    Serine proteases are involved in an enormous number of biological processes. The present study aims at characterizing three-dimensional (3D) molecular architecture of serine proteases from early blight pathogen, Alternaria solani that are hypothesized to be markers of phytopathogenicity. A serine protease was purified to homogeneity and MALDI-TOF-MS/MS analysis revealed that protease produced by A. solani belongs to alkaline serine proteases (AsP). AsP is made up of 403 amino acid residues with molecular weight of 42.1 kDa (Isoelectric point - 6.51) and its molecular formula was C1859 H2930 N516 O595 S4 . AsP structure model was built based on its comparative homology with serine protease using the program, MODELER. AsP had 16 β-sheets and 10 α-helices, with Ser(350) (G347-G357), Asp(158) (D158-H169), and His(193) (H193-G203) in separate turn/coil structures. Biological metal binding region situated near 6th-helix and His(193) residue is responsible for metal binding site. Also, calcium ion (Ca(2+)) is coordinated by the carboxyl groups of Lys(84), Ile(85), Lys(86), Asp(87), Phe(88), Ala(89), Ala(90) (K84-A90) for first Ca(2+) binding site and carbonyl oxygen atom of Lys(244), Gly(245), Arg(246), Thr(247), Lys(248), Lys(249), and Ala(250) (K244-A250), for second Ca(2+) binding site. Moreover, Ramachandran plot analysis of protein residues falling into most favored secondary structures were determined (83.3%). The predicted molecular 3D structural model was further verified using PROCHECK, ERRAT, and VADAR servers to confirm the geometry and stereo-chemical parameters of the molecular structural design. The functional analysis of AsP 3D molecular structure predictions familiar in the current study may provide a new perspective in the understanding and identification of antifungal protease inhibitor designing.

  2. Involvement of a Serpin serine protease inhibitor (OoSerpin) from mollusc Octopus ocellatus in antibacterial response.

    PubMed

    Wei, Xiumei; Xu, Jie; Yang, Jianmin; Liu, Xiangquan; Zhang, Ranran; Wang, Weijun; Yang, Jialong

    2015-01-01

    Serpin is an important member of serine protease inhibitors (SPIs), which is capable of regulating proteolytic events and involving in a variety of physiological processes. In present study, a Serpin homolog was identified from Octopus ocellatus (designated as OoSerpin). Full-length cDNA of OoSerpin was of 1735 bp, containing a 5' untranslated region of 214 bp, a 3' UTR of 282 bp, and an open reading frame of 1239 bp. The open reading frame encoded a polypeptide of 412 amino acids which has a predicted molecular weight of 46.5 kDa and an isoelectric point of 8.52. The OoSerpin protein shares 37% sequence identity with other Serpins from Mus musculus (NP_941373) and Ixodes scapularis (XP_002407493). The existence of a conserved SERPIN domain strongly suggested that OoSerpin was a member of the Serpin subfamily. Expression patterns of OoSerpin, both in tissues and towards bacterial stimulation, were then characterized. The mRNA of OoSerpin was constitutively expressed at different levels in all tested tissues of untreated O. ocellatus, including mantle (lowest), muscle, renal sac, gill, hemocyte, gonad, systemic heart, and hepatopancreas (highest). The transcriptional level of OoSerpin was significantly up-regulated (P<0.01) in O. ocellatus upon bacterial challenges with Vibrio anguillarum and Micrococcus luteus, indicating its involvement in the antibacterial immune response. Furthermore, rOoSerpin, the recombinant protein of OoSerpin, exhibited strong abilities to inhibit proteinase activities of trypsin and chymotrypsin as well as the growth of Escherichia coli. Our results demonstrate that OoSerpin is a potential antibacterial factor involved in the immune response of O. ocellatus against bacterial infection.

  3. Involvement of a Serpin serine protease inhibitor (OoSerpin) from mollusc Octopus ocellatus in antibacterial response.

    PubMed

    Wei, Xiumei; Xu, Jie; Yang, Jianmin; Liu, Xiangquan; Zhang, Ranran; Wang, Weijun; Yang, Jialong

    2015-01-01

    Serpin is an important member of serine protease inhibitors (SPIs), which is capable of regulating proteolytic events and involving in a variety of physiological processes. In present study, a Serpin homolog was identified from Octopus ocellatus (designated as OoSerpin). Full-length cDNA of OoSerpin was of 1735 bp, containing a 5' untranslated region of 214 bp, a 3' UTR of 282 bp, and an open reading frame of 1239 bp. The open reading frame encoded a polypeptide of 412 amino acids which has a predicted molecular weight of 46.5 kDa and an isoelectric point of 8.52. The OoSerpin protein shares 37% sequence identity with other Serpins from Mus musculus (NP_941373) and Ixodes scapularis (XP_002407493). The existence of a conserved SERPIN domain strongly suggested that OoSerpin was a member of the Serpin subfamily. Expression patterns of OoSerpin, both in tissues and towards bacterial stimulation, were then characterized. The mRNA of OoSerpin was constitutively expressed at different levels in all tested tissues of untreated O. ocellatus, including mantle (lowest), muscle, renal sac, gill, hemocyte, gonad, systemic heart, and hepatopancreas (highest). The transcriptional level of OoSerpin was significantly up-regulated (P<0.01) in O. ocellatus upon bacterial challenges with Vibrio anguillarum and Micrococcus luteus, indicating its involvement in the antibacterial immune response. Furthermore, rOoSerpin, the recombinant protein of OoSerpin, exhibited strong abilities to inhibit proteinase activities of trypsin and chymotrypsin as well as the growth of Escherichia coli. Our results demonstrate that OoSerpin is a potential antibacterial factor involved in the immune response of O. ocellatus against bacterial infection. PMID:25449372

  4. Structural and functional adaptation of vancomycin resistance VanT serine racemases

    DOE PAGES

    Meziane-Cherif, Djalal; Stogios, Peter J.; Evdokimova, Elena; Egorova, Olga; Savchenko, Alexei; Courvalin, Patrice

    2015-08-11

    Vancomycin resistance in Gram-positive bacteria results from the replacement of the D-alanyl–D-alanine target of peptidoglycan precursors with D-alanyl–D-lactate or D-alanyl–D-serine (D-Ala-D-Ser), to which vancomycin has low binding affinity. VanT is one of the proteins required for the production of D-Ala-D-Ser-terminating precursors by converting L-Ser to D-Ser. VanT is composed of two domains, an N-terminal membrane-bound domain, likely involved in L-Ser uptake, and a C-terminal cytoplasmic catalytic domain which is related to bacterial alanine racemases. To gain insight into the molecular function of VanT, the crystal structure of the catalytic domain of VanTG from VanG-type resistant Enterococcus faecalis BM4518 wasmore » determined. The structure showed significant similarity to type III pyridoxal 5'-phosphate (PLP)-dependent alanine racemases, which are essential for peptidoglycan synthesis. Comparative structural analysis between VanTG and alanine racemases as well as site-directed mutagenesis identified three specific active site positions centered around Asn696 which are responsible for theL-amino acid specificity. This analysis also suggested that VanT racemases evolved from regular alanine racemases by acquiring additional selectivity toward serine while preserving that for alanine. The 4-fold-lower relative catalytic efficiency of VanTG against L-Ser versus L-Ala implied that this enzyme relies on its membrane-bound domain for L-Ser transport to increase the overall rate of D-Ser production. These findings illustrate how vancomycin pressure selected for molecular adaptation of a housekeeping enzyme to a bifunctional enzyme to allow for peptidoglycan remodeling, a strategy increasingly observed in antibiotic-resistant bacteria.« less

  5. Structural and functional adaptation of vancomycin resistance VanT serine racemases

    SciTech Connect

    Meziane-Cherif, Djalal; Stogios, Peter J.; Evdokimova, Elena; Egorova, Olga; Savchenko, Alexei; Courvalin, Patrice

    2015-08-11

    Vancomycin resistance in Gram-positive bacteria results from the replacement of the D-alanyl–D-alanine target of peptidoglycan precursors with D-alanyl–D-lactate or D-alanyl–D-serine (D-Ala-D-Ser), to which vancomycin has low binding affinity. VanT is one of the proteins required for the production of D-Ala-D-Ser-terminating precursors by converting L-Ser to D-Ser. VanT is composed of two domains, an N-terminal membrane-bound domain, likely involved in L-Ser uptake, and a C-terminal cytoplasmic catalytic domain which is related to bacterial alanine racemases. To gain insight into the molecular function of VanT, the crystal structure of the catalytic domain of VanTG from VanG-type resistant Enterococcus faecalis BM4518 was determined. The structure showed significant similarity to type III pyridoxal 5'-phosphate (PLP)-dependent alanine racemases, which are essential for peptidoglycan synthesis. Comparative structural analysis between VanTG and alanine racemases as well as site-directed mutagenesis identified three specific active site positions centered around Asn696 which are responsible for theL-amino acid specificity. This analysis also suggested that VanT racemases evolved from regular alanine racemases by acquiring additional selectivity toward serine while preserving that for alanine. The 4-fold-lower relative catalytic efficiency of VanTG against L-Ser versus L-Ala implied that this enzyme relies on its membrane-bound domain for L-Ser transport to increase the overall rate of D-Ser production. These findings illustrate how vancomycin pressure selected for molecular adaptation of a housekeeping enzyme to a bifunctional enzyme to allow for peptidoglycan remodeling, a strategy increasingly observed in antibiotic-resistant bacteria.

  6. Synthesis of serine-based glycolipids as potential TLR4 activators.

    PubMed

    Huang, Li-De; Lin, Hong-Jyune; Huang, Po-Hsiung; Hsiao, Wei-Chen; Reddy, L Vijaya Raghava; Fu, Shu-Ling; Lin, Chun-Cheng

    2011-04-01

    A new series of monosaccharide-based glycolipids devoid of phosphate groups and with two lipid chains were rationally designed by varying the lipid chain lengths and saccharide structure of a α-GalCer-derived lead compound (CCL-34) that is a potent TLR4 agonist. The NF-κB activity of a 60-membered galactosyl serine-based synthetic library containing compounds with various lipid chain lengths was measured in a HEK293 cell line that stably expressed human TLR4, MD2, and CD14 (293-hTLR4/MD2-CD14). The results showed that the optimal carbon chain lengths for the lipid amine and fatty acid to activate TLR4 were 10-11 and 12, respectively. Evaluation of a 20-membered synthetic glycosyl serine-based lipid library containing compounds with various saccharide moieties and fixed lipid chain lengths revealed that the galactose moiety in CCL-34 could be replaced by glucose without loss of activity (CCL-34-S3 and CCL-34-S16). Changing the orientation of the anomeric glycosidic bond of CCL-34 resulted in a complete loss of activity (β-CCL34). Surprisingly, a change in configuration of the anomeric glycosidic bond in a glucosyl glycolipid is tolerable (CCL-34-S14). Another noteworthy observation is that the activity of a l-fucosyl derived glycolipid (CCL-34-S13) was comparable to that of CCL-34. In sum, this study determines the structural features that are crucial for an optimal TLR4-stimulating activity. It also provides several molecules with immunostimulating potential.

  7. Structural and Functional Adaptation of Vancomycin Resistance VanT Serine Racemases

    PubMed Central

    Meziane-Cherif, Djalal; Stogios, Peter J.; Evdokimova, Elena; Egorova, Olga

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Vancomycin resistance in Gram-positive bacteria results from the replacement of the d-alanyl–d-alanine target of peptidoglycan precursors with d-alanyl–d-lactate or d-alanyl–d-serine (d-Ala-d-Ser), to which vancomycin has low binding affinity. VanT is one of the proteins required for the production of d-Ala-d-Ser-terminating precursors by converting l-Ser to d-Ser. VanT is composed of two domains, an N-terminal membrane-bound domain, likely involved in l-Ser uptake, and a C-terminal cytoplasmic catalytic domain which is related to bacterial alanine racemases. To gain insight into the molecular function of VanT, the crystal structure of the catalytic domain of VanTG from VanG-type resistant Enterococcus faecalis BM4518 was determined. The structure showed significant similarity to type III pyridoxal 5′-phosphate (PLP)-dependent alanine racemases, which are essential for peptidoglycan synthesis. Comparative structural analysis between VanTG and alanine racemases as well as site-directed mutagenesis identified three specific active site positions centered around Asn696 which are responsible for the l-amino acid specificity. This analysis also suggested that VanT racemases evolved from regular alanine racemases by acquiring additional selectivity toward serine while preserving that for alanine. The 4-fold-lower relative catalytic efficiency of VanTG against l-Ser versus l-Ala implied that this enzyme relies on its membrane-bound domain for l-Ser transport to increase the overall rate of d-Ser production. These findings illustrate how vancomycin pressure selected for molecular adaptation of a housekeeping enzyme to a bifunctional enzyme to allow for peptidoglycan remodeling, a strategy increasingly observed in antibiotic-resistant bacteria. PMID:26265719

  8. Bacteriorhodopsin mutants containing single substitutions of serine or threonine residues are all active in proton translocation

    SciTech Connect

    Marti, T.; Otto, H.; Mogi, T.; Roesselet, S.J.H.; Heyn, M.P.; Khorana, H.G. )

    1991-04-15

    To study their role in proton translocation by bacteriorhodopsin, 22 serine and threonine residues presumed to be located within and near the border of the transmembrane segments have been individually replaced by alanine or valine, respectively. Thr-89 was substituted by alanine, valine, and aspartic acid, and Ser-141 by alanine and cysteine. Most of the mutants showed essentially wild-type phenotype with regard to chromophore regeneration and absorption spectrum. However, replacement of Thr-89 by Val and of Ser-141 by Cys caused striking blue shifts of the chromophore by 100 and 80 nm, respectively. All substitutions of Thr-89 regenerated the chromophore at least 10-fold faster with 13-cis retinal than with all-trans retinal. The substitutions at positions 89, 90, and 141 also showed abnormal dark-light adaptation, suggesting interactions between these residues and the retinylidene chromophore. Proton pumping measurements revealed 60-75% activity for mutants of Thr-46, -89, -90, -205, and Ser-226, and about 20% for Ser-141----Cys, whereas the remaining mutants showed normal pumping. Kinetic studies of the photocycle and of proton release and uptake for mutants in which proton pumping was reduced revealed generally little alterations. The reduced activity in several of these mutants is most likely due to a lower percentage of all-trans retinal in the light-adapted state. In the mutants Thr-46----Val and Ser-226----Ala the decay of the photointer-mediate M was significantly accelerated, indicating an interaction between these residues and Asp-96 which reprotonates the Schiff base. Our results show that no single serine or threonine residue is obligatory for proton pumping.

  9. Sequence and immunological characterization of a serine-rich antigen from Mycobacterium leprae.

    PubMed Central

    Vega-López, F; Brooks, L A; Dockrell, H M; De Smet, K A; Thompson, J K; Hussain, R; Stoker, N G

    1993-01-01

    Sera from lepromatous leprosy patients were used to screen a Mycobacterium leprae lambda gt11 library. Three positive plaques were picked, and lysogens were constructed. Immunoblot analysis showed that all of the lysogens expressed an apparently identical beta-galactosidase fusion protein which reacted strongly with the sera. The 1.7-kbp insert from one clone was subcloned into the lacZ gene in pUR290; sequence analysis of the end fused to lacZ revealed an open reading frame with no significant homology to previously published sequences. The insert was used to screen an M. leprae cosmid library, and five clones were isolated. The insert was also found to hybridize to clones expressing the M. leprae antigen which had previously been designated class III and 25L. A 1.8-kbp HindIII fragment was subcloned from one of the cosmids and sequenced. The sequence revealed a 1,227-bp open reading frame, encoding a 408-amino-acid protein with a predicted molecular mass of 42,466 Da. The protein contains amino- and carboxy-terminal hydrophobic domains and a hydrophilic central domain; the amino-terminal domain shows some homology to a 51-kDa hypothetical antigen of Mycobacterium tuberculosis, while the hydrophilic region contains a high proportion of serine residues, and we have therefore designated the protein serine-rich antigen (Sra). Some repeated motifs are present in the protein, but their significance is unknown. Seventy-eight percent of serum samples from multibacillary leprosy patients and 68% of serum samples from paucibacillary leprosy patients recognized the fusion protein, showing that this is a major M. leprae antigen. In contrast, all serum samples from endemic controls were negative, while 26% of serum samples from tuberculosis patients were weakly positive. Images PMID:8478104

  10. The Origin of Amino Acids in Lunar Regolith Samples

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cook, Jamie E.; Callahan, Michael P.; Dworkin, Jason P.; Glavin, Daniel P.; McLain, Hannah L.; Noble, Sarah K.; Gibson, Everett K., Jr.

    2016-01-01

    We analyzed the amino acid content of seven lunar regolith samples returned by the Apollo 16 and Apollo 17 missions and stored under NASA curation since collection using ultrahigh-performance liquid chromatography with fluorescence detection and time-of-flight mass spectrometry. Consistent with results from initial analyses shortly after collection in the 1970s, we observed amino acids at low concentrations in all of the curated samples, ranging from 0.2 parts-per-billion (ppb) to 42.7 ppb in hot-water extracts and 14.5 ppb to 651.1 ppb in 6M HCl acid-vapor-hydrolyzed, hot-water extracts. Amino acids identified in the Apollo soil extracts include glycine, D- and L-alanine, D- and L-aspartic acid, D- and L-glutamic acid, D- and L-serine, L-threonine, and L-valine, all of which had previously been detected in lunar samples, as well as several compounds not previously identified in lunar regoliths: -aminoisobutyric acid (AIB), D-and L-amino-n-butyric acid (-ABA), DL-amino-n-butyric acid, -amino-n-butyric acid, -alanine, and -amino-n-caproic acid. We observed an excess of the L enantiomer in most of the detected proteinogenic amino acids, but racemic alanine and racemic -ABA were present in some samples.

  11. Dynamic properties of extremophilic subtilisin-like serine-proteases.

    PubMed

    Tiberti, Matteo; Papaleo, Elena

    2011-04-01

    The investigation of the structural determinants of enzymatic temperature adaptation is a crucial pre-requisite both in terms of fundamental research and industrial applications to develop new biocatalysts active at different temperature ranges. In several cases, the differences related to cold- or warm-adaptation are related to subtle structural and aminoacidic differences at the molecular level, often hard to detect. In this context, we present a comparative study of psychrophilic, mesophilic and thermophilic subtilisin-like serine proteases by all-atom molecular dynamics (MD) simulations in explicit solvent using a multiple-replica approach. Our results strongly enforce the current view on localized flexibility in crucial functional regions for cold-adapted serine proteases and point out a different optimization and usage of salt-bridge interactions and networks in cold- and warm-adapted enzymes. The analyses allow to identify a subset of structural and dynamic features strictly associated to cold adaptation and which change from cold- to heat-active subtilisins. In particular, the thermophilic subtilisin presents a high affinity calcium binding site which is not structurally conserved in the mesophilic and psychrophilic counterparts, which, as it turns out from the MD analyses, at the same position show a stable salt bridge network and no stabilizing intra-molecular interactions, respectively. These aspects, along with differential flexibility in regions close to the active site or substrate binding pocket, can be an indication of evolution at this protein site toward a lower stability moving from high to low temperature conditions.

  12. Antibacterial activity of silver nanoparticles synthesized from serine.

    PubMed

    Jayaprakash, N; Judith Vijaya, J; John Kennedy, L; Priadharsini, K; Palani, P

    2015-04-01

    Silver nanoparticles (Ag NPs) were synthesized by a simple microwave irradiation method using polyvinyl pyrrolidone (PVP) as a capping agent and serine as a reducing agent. UV-Visible spectra were used to confirm the formation of Ag NPs by observing the surface plasmon resonance (SPR) band at 443nm. The emission spectrum of Ag NPs showed an emission band at 484nm. In the presence of microwave radiation, serine acts as a reducing agent, which was confirmed by Fourier transformed infrared (FT-IR) spectrum. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HR-TEM) and high-resolution scanning electron microscopy (HR-SEM) were used to investigate the morphology of the synthesized sample. These images showed the sphere-like morphology. The elemental composition of the sample was determined by the energy dispersive X-ray analysis (EDX). Selected area electron diffraction (SAED) was used to find the crystalline nature of the Ag NPs. The electrochemical behavior of the synthesized Ag NPs was analyzed by the cyclic voltammetry (CV). Antibacterial experiments showed that the prepared Ag NPs showed relatively similar antibacterial activities, when compared with AgNO3 against Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria.

  13. 21 CFR 172.320 - Amino acids.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ...-Leucine L-Lysine DL-Methionine (not for infant foods) L-Methionine L-Phenylalanine L-Proline L-Serine L... Aminoacetic acid (glycine) L-Leucine DL-Methionine L-Methionine L-Tryptophan L-Phenylalanine L-Proline L... DL-Methionine 3.1 L-Phenylalanine 5.8 L-Proline 4.2 L-Serine 8.4 L-Threonine 5.0 L-Tryptophan 1.6...

  14. 21 CFR 172.320 - Amino acids.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ...-Leucine L-Lysine DL-Methionine (not for infant foods) L-Methionine L-Phenylalanine L-Proline L-Serine L... Aminoacetic acid (glycine) L-Leucine DL-Methionine L-Methionine L-Tryptophan L-Phenylalanine L-Proline L... DL-Methionine 3.1 L-Phenylalanine 5.8 L-Proline 4.2 L-Serine 8.4 L-Threonine 5.0 L-Tryptophan 1.6...

  15. 21 CFR 172.320 - Amino acids.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ...-Leucine L-Lysine DL-Methionine (not for infant foods) L-Methionine L-Phenylalanine L-Proline L-Serine L... Aminoacetic acid (glycine) L-Leucine DL-Methionine L-Methionine L-Tryptophan L-Phenylalanine L-Proline L... DL-Methionine 3.1 L-Phenylalanine 5.8 L-Proline 4.2 L-Serine 8.4 L-Threonine 5.0 L-Tryptophan 1.6...

  16. Structural Insights into the Protease-like Antigen Plasmodium falciparum SERA5 and Its Noncanonical Active-Site Serine

    SciTech Connect

    Hodder, Anthony N.; Malby, Robyn L.; Clarke, Oliver B.; Fairlie, W. Douglas; Colman, Peter M.; Crabb, Brendan S.; Smith, Brian J.

    2009-08-28

    The sera genes of the malaria-causing parasite Plasmodium encode a family of unique proteins that are maximally expressed at the time of egress of parasites from infected red blood cells. These multi-domain proteins are unique, containing a central papain-like cysteine-protease fragment enclosed between the disulfide-linked N- and C-terminal domains. However, the central fragment of several members of this family, including serine repeat antigen 5 (SERA5), contains a serine (S596) in place of the active-site cysteine. Here we report the crystal structure of the central protease-like domain of Plasmodium falciparum SERA5, revealing a number of anomalies in addition to the putative nucleophilic serine: (1) the structure of the putative active site is not conducive to binding substrate in the canonical cysteine-protease manner; (2) the side chain of D594 restricts access of substrate to the putative active site; and (3) the S{sub 2} specificity pocket is occupied by the side chain of Y735, reducing this site to a small depression on the protein surface. Attempts to determine the structure in complex with known inhibitors were not successful. Thus, despite having revealed its structure, the function of the catalytic domain of SERA5 remains an enigma.

  17. Proteolytic Activation of the Protease-activated Receptor (PAR)-2 by the Glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored Serine Protease Testisin*

    PubMed Central

    Driesbaugh, Kathryn H.; Buzza, Marguerite S.; Martin, Erik W.; Conway, Gregory D.; Kao, Joseph P. Y.; Antalis, Toni M.

    2015-01-01

    Protease-activated receptors (PARs) are a family of seven-transmembrane, G-protein-coupled receptors that are activated by multiple serine proteases through specific N-terminal proteolytic cleavage and the unmasking of a tethered ligand. The majority of PAR-activating proteases described to date are soluble proteases that are active during injury, coagulation, and inflammation. Less investigation, however, has focused on the potential for membrane-anchored serine proteases to regulate PAR activation. Testisin is a unique trypsin-like serine protease that is tethered to the extracellular membrane of cells through a glycophosphatidylinositol (GPI) anchor. Here, we show that the N-terminal domain of PAR-2 is a substrate for testisin and that proteolytic cleavage of PAR-2 by recombinant testisin activates downstream signaling pathways, including intracellular Ca2+ mobilization and ERK1/2 phosphorylation. When testisin and PAR-2 are co-expressed in HeLa cells, GPI-anchored testisin specifically releases the PAR-2 tethered ligand. Conversely, knockdown of endogenous testisin in NCI/ADR-Res ovarian tumor cells reduces PAR-2 N-terminal proteolytic cleavage. The cleavage of PAR-2 by testisin induces activation of the intracellular serum-response element and NFκB signaling pathways and the induction of IL-8 and IL-6 cytokine gene expression. Furthermore, the activation of PAR-2 by testisin results in the loss and internalization of PAR-2 from the cell surface. This study reveals a new biological substrate for testisin and is the first demonstration of the activation of a PAR by a serine protease GPI-linked to the cell surface. PMID:25519908

  18. Enantioselective inhibition of D-serine transport by (S)-ketamine

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Nagendra S; Bernier, Michel; Camandola, Simonetta; Khadeer, Mohammed A; Moaddel, Ruin; Mattson, Mark P; Wainer, Irving W

    2015-01-01

    Background and Purpose Patients with major depressive disorder receiving racemic ketamine, (R,S)-ketamine, experience transient increases in Clinician-Administered Dissociative States Scale scores and a coincident drop in plasma d-serine levels. The results suggest that (R,S)-ketamine produces an immediate, concentration-dependent pharmacological effect on d-serine plasma concentrations. One potential source of this effect is (R,S)-ketamine-induced inhibition of the transporter ASCT2, which regulates intracellular d-serine concentrations. In this study, we tested this hypothesis by examining the effect of (S)- and (R)-ketamine on ASCT2-mediated transport of d-serine in PC-12 and 1321N1 cells and primary neuronal cells in culture. Experimental Approach Intracellular and extracellular d-serine levels were determined using capillary electrophoresis–laser-induced fluorescence and liquid chromatography–mass spectrometry respectively. Expression of ASCT2, Asc-1 and serine racemase was determined utilizing Western blotting. Key Results (S)-Ketamine produced a concentration-dependent increase in intracellular d-serine and reduced extracellular d-serine accumulation. In contrast, (R)-ketamine decreased both intracellular and extracellular d-serine levels. The ASCT2 inhibitor, benzyl-d-serine (BDS), and ASCT2 gene knockdown mimicked the action of (S)-ketamine on d-serine in PC-12 cells, while the Asc-1 agonist d-isoleucine reduced intracellular d-serine and increased extracellular d-serine accumulation. This response to d-isoleucine was not affected by BDS or (S)-ketamine. Primary cultures of rat neuronal cells expressed ASCT2 and were responsive to (S)-ketamine and BDS. (S)- and (R)-ketamine increased the expression of monomeric serine racemase in all the cells studied, with (S)-ketamine having the greatest effect. Conclusions and Implications (S)-Ketamine decreased cellular export of d-serine via selective inhibition of ASCT2, and this could represent a possible source

  19. Overexpression and characterization of thermostable serine protease in Escherichia coli encoded by the ORF TTE0824 from Thermoanaerobacter tengcongensis.

    PubMed

    Koma, D; Yamanaka, H; Moriyoshi, K; Ohmoto, T; Sakai, K

    2007-11-01

    A novel extracellular serine protease derived from Thermoanaerobacter tengcongensis, designated tengconlysin, was successfully overexpressed in Escherichia coli as a soluble protein by recombination of an N-terminal Pel B leader sequence instead of the original presequence and C-terminal 6x histidine tags. The purified protein was activated by 0.1% sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) treatment but not by thermal treatment. The molecular weight of tengconlysin estimated by SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis analysis and gel filtration chromatography was 37.9 and 36.2 kDa, respectively, suggesting that the enzyme is monomeric. The N-terminal sequence of mature tengconlysin was LDTAT, suggesting that it is a preproprotein containing a 29 amino acid presequence (predicted from the SigP program) and a 117 amino acid prosequence in the N-terminus. The C-terminal putative propeptide (position 469-540 in the preproprotein) did not inhibit the protease activity. The optimum temperature for tengconlysin activity was 90 degrees C in the presence of 1 mM calcium ions and the optimum pH ranged from 6.5 to 7.0. Activity inhibition studies suggest that the protease is a serine protease. The protease was stable in 0.1% SDS and 1-4 M urea at 70 degrees C in the presence of calcium ions and was activated by the denaturing agents.

  20. Cloning of a serine proteinase inhibitor from bovine brain: expression in the brain and characterization of its target proteinases.

    PubMed

    Nakaya, N; Nishibori, M; Kawabata, M; Saeki, K

    1996-12-01

    A cDNA encoding of the serine proteinase inhibitor (serpin), B-43, was cloned from the cDNA library of the bovine brain. It encoded 378 amino acids, and the MW of the protein was estimated to be 42.6 kDa, which is consistent with that of the native B-43 purified from the bovine brain. The homology search revealed that B-43 belongs to the ovalbumin branch of the serpin superfamily. Among them, B-43 was most homologous to human placental thrombin inhibitor (PI-6) and its murine counterpart, with the amino acid identity of 76% and 71%, respectively. Northern blot analysis showed that the size of the transcript was 1.4 kb, and that the expression of B-43 in the bovine brain varied depending on the brain regions, i.e. a lower level of expression was observed in the cerebral cortex and the hippocampus compared to the level of expression that was observed in the medulla oblongata. [35S]-labeled B-43 protein was synthesized in vitro by using a rabbit reticulocyte lysate system, which formed complexes with proteinases such as thrombin, trypsin, alpha-chymotrypsin, and 7S nerve growth factor (NGF), but not with urokinase or plasmin. These results, together with the immunohistochemical localization of B-43 in astrocytes and in some neurons which was observed in the previous study suggest that B-43 may be involved in the regulation of serine proteinases present in the brain or extravasated from the blood.

  1. Brain-specific Phgdh deletion reveals a pivotal role for L-serine biosynthesis in controlling the level of D-serine, an N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor co-agonist, in adult brain.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jung Hoon; Wada, Akira; Yoshida, Kazuyuki; Miyoshi, Yurika; Sayano, Tomoko; Esaki, Kayoko; Kinoshita, Masami O; Tomonaga, Shozo; Azuma, Norihiro; Watanabe, Masahiko; Hamase, Kenji; Zaitsu, Kiyoshi; Machida, Takeo; Messing, Albee; Itohara, Shigeyoshi; Hirabayashi, Yoshio; Furuya, Shigeki

    2010-12-31

    In mammalian brain, D-serine is synthesized from L-serine by serine racemase, and it functions as an obligatory co-agonist at the glycine modulatory site of N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA)-selective glutamate receptors. Although diminution in D-serine level has been implicated in NMDA receptor hypofunction, which is thought to occur in schizophrenia, the source of the precursor L-serine and its role in D-serine metabolism in adult brain have yet to be determined. We investigated whether L-serine synthesized in brain via the phosphorylated pathway is essential for D-serine synthesis by generating mice with a conditional deletion of D-3-phosphoglycerate dehydrogenase (Phgdh; EC 1.1.1.95). This enzyme catalyzes the first step in L-serine synthesis via the phosphorylated pathway. HPLC analysis of serine enantiomers demonstrated that both L- and D-serine levels were markedly decreased in the cerebral cortex and hippocampus of conditional knock-out mice, whereas the serine deficiency did not alter protein expression levels of serine racemase and NMDA receptor subunits in these regions. The present study provides definitive proof that L-serine-synthesized endogenously via the phosphorylated pathway is a key rate-limiting factor for maintaining steady-state levels of D-serine in adult brain. Furthermore, NMDA-evoked transcription of Arc, an immediate early gene, was diminished in the hippocampus of conditional knock-out mice. Thus, this study demonstrates that in mature neuronal circuits L-serine availability determines the rate of D-serine synthesis in the forebrain and controls NMDA receptor function at least in the hippocampus. PMID:20966073

  2. Biochemical and functional characterization of phosphoserine aminotransferase from Entamoeba histolytica, which possesses both phosphorylated and non-phosphorylated serine metabolic pathways.

    PubMed

    Ali, Vahab; Nozaki, Tomoyoshi

    2006-01-01

    The enteric protozoan parasite Entamoeba histolytica is a unicellular eukaryote that possesses both phosphorylated and non-phosphorylated serine metabolic pathways. In the present study, we described enzymological and functional characterization of phosphoserine aminotransferase (PSAT) from E. histolytica. E. histolytica PSAT (EhPSAT) showed maximum activity for the forward reaction at basic pH, dissimilar to mammalian PSAT, which showed sharp neutral optimum pH. EhPSAT activity was significantly inhibited by substrate analogs, O-phospho-d-serine, O-phospho-l-threonine, and O-acetylserine, suggesting possible regulation of the amoebic PSAT by these metabolic intermediates. Fractionation of the whole parasite lysate and rEhPSAT by anion exchange chromatography verified that EhPSAT represents a dominant PSAT activity. EhPSAT showed a close kinship to PSAT from bacteroides based on amino acid alignment and phylogenetic analyses, suggesting that E. histolytica gained this gene from bacteroides by lateral gene transfer. Comparisons of kinetic properties of recombinant PSAT from E. histolytica and Arabidopsis thaliana showed that EhPSAT possesses significantly higher affinity toward glutamate than the A. thaliana counterpart, which may be explained by significant differences in the isoelectric point and the substitution of arginine, which is involved the binding to the gamma-carboxylate moiety of glutamate, in Escherichia coli PSAT, to serine or threonine in E. histolytica or A. thaliana PSAT, respectively. Heterologous expression of EhPSAT successfully rescued growth defect of a serine-auxotrophic E. coli strain KL282, where serC was deleted, confirming its in vivo role in serine biosynthesis. Together with our previous demonstration of phosphoglycerate dehydrogenase, the present study reinforces physiological significance of the phosphorylated pathway in amoeba.

  3. The PIM family of serine/threonine kinases in cancer.

    PubMed

    Narlik-Grassow, Maja; Blanco-Aparicio, Carmen; Carnero, Amancio

    2014-01-01

    The proviral insertion site in Moloney murine leukemia virus, or PIM proteins, are a family of serine/threonine kinases composed of three different isoforms (PIM1, PIM2, and PIM3) that are highly evolutionarily conserved. These proteins are regulated primarily by transcription and stability through pathways that are controlled by Janus kinase/Signal transducer and activator of transcription, JAK/STAT, transcription factors. The PIM family proteins have been found to be overexpressed in hematological malignancies and solid tumors, and their roles in these tumors were confirmed in mouse tumor models. Furthermore, the PIM family proteins have been implicated in the regulation of apoptosis, metabolism, cell cycle, and homing and migration, which has led to the postulation of these proteins as interesting targets for anticancer drug discovery. In the present work, we review the importance of PIM kinases in tumor growth and as drug targets. PMID:23576269

  4. L-serine capped ZnS:Mn nanocrystals for plant cell biological studies and as a growth enhancing agent for micropropagation of Bacopa monnieri Linn. (Brahmi:Scrophulariaceae)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Augustine, M. Sajimol; Mathew, Lizzy; Alex, Roselin; Deepa, G. D.; Jayalekshmi, S.

    2014-01-01

    In the present work, the prospects of ZnS:Mn nanocrystals capped with L- serine, a bio-compatible amino acid, synthesized by wet chemical route, as efficient fluorescent probes for plant cell biological studies have been investigated. The present synthesis route using bio-compatible material is a low cost and easy to control method. The colloidal stability of the capped nano crystals is very good as they remain stable without settling down for long time. It is observed that L- serine significantly modifies the structural and optical characteristics of the ZnS:Mn nanocrystals and hence is suitable as a bio-compatible capping agent. The structural properties of L- serine capped nanocrystals were investigated by XRD technique. The size of the L- serine capped ZnS:Mn nanocrystals is found to be around 2 nm . The optical characterization of the nanocrystals was carried out on the basis of photoluminescence (PL) spectroscopic studies. The intense photoluminescence emission observed around 597nm for L-serine capped ZnS:Mn offers high prospects of applications in bio-imaging fields. The unique optical properties of nanoparticles make them appealing as in vivo and in vitro fluorophores in a variety of biological investigations. In the present study, L-serine capped ZnS:Mn nanocrystals were used as a staining dye in fluorescent microscope for observing cell division, cell structure etc. These nanocrystals were also incorporated into the culture media along with the normal auxin- cytokinin hormone combinations in Murashige and Skoog (MS) medium for micropropagation of Bacopa monnieri Linn. (Brahmi:Scrophulariaceae), an Ayurvedic medicine. The results suggest that L-serine capped ZnS:Mn nanocrystals can act as efficient enhancers towards quick callusing and shoot proliferation.

  5. L-serine capped ZnS:Mn nanocrystals for plant cell biological studies and as a growth enhancing agent for micropropagation of Bacopa monnieri Linn. (Brahmi:Scrophulariaceae)

    SciTech Connect

    Augustine, M. Sajimol; Mathew, Lizzy; Alex, Roselin; Deepa, G. D.; Jayalekshmi, S.

    2014-01-28

    In the present work, the prospects of ZnS:Mn nanocrystals capped with L- serine, a bio-compatible amino acid, synthesized by wet chemical route, as efficient fluorescent probes for plant cell biological studies have been investigated. The present synthesis route using bio-compatible material is a low cost and easy to control method. The colloidal stability of the capped nano crystals is very good as they remain stable without settling down for long time. It is observed that L- serine significantly modifies the structural and optical characteristics of the ZnS:Mn nanocrystals and hence is suitable as a bio-compatible capping agent. The structural properties of L- serine capped nanocrystals were investigated by XRD technique. The size of the L- serine capped ZnS:Mn nanocrystals is found to be around 2 nm . The optical characterization of the nanocrystals was carried out on the basis of photoluminescence (PL) spectroscopic studies. The intense photoluminescence emission observed around 597nm for L-serine capped ZnS:Mn offers high prospects of applications in bio-imaging fields. The unique optical properties of nanoparticles make them appealing as in vivo and in vitro fluorophores in a variety of biological investigations. In the present study, L-serine capped ZnS:Mn nanocrystals were used as a staining dye in fluorescent microscope for observing cell division, cell structure etc. These nanocrystals were also incorporated into the culture media along with the normal auxin- cytokinin hormone combinations in Murashige and Skoog (MS) medium for micropropagation of Bacopa monnieri Linn. (Brahmi:Scrophulariaceae), an Ayurvedic medicine. The results suggest that L-serine capped ZnS:Mn nanocrystals can act as efficient enhancers towards quick callusing and shoot proliferation.

  6. Enantiomer-specific selection of amino acids.

    PubMed

    Ren, Xueying; Tellez, Luis A; de Araujo, Ivan E

    2013-12-01

    Dietary intake of L-amino acids impacts on several physiological functions, including the control of gastrointestinal motility, pancreatic secretion, and appetite. However, the biological mechanisms regulating behavioral predilections for certain amino acid types remain poorly understood. We tested the hypothesis that, in mice, the potency with which a given glucogenic amino acid increases glucose utilization reflects its rewarding properties. We have found that: (1) during long-, but not short-, term preference tests, L-alanine and L-serine were preferred over their D-enantiomer counterparts, while no such effect was observed for L-threonine vs. D-threonine; (2) these behavioral patterns were closely associated with the ability of L-amino acids to promote increases in respiratory exchange ratios such that those, and only those, L-amino acids able to promote increases in respiratory exchange ratios were preferred over their D-isomers; (3) these behavioral preferences were independent of gustatory influences, since taste-deficient Trpm5 knockout mice displayed ingestive responses very similar to those of their wild-type counterparts. We conclude that the ability to promote increases in respiratory exchange ratios enhances the reward value of nutritionally relevant amino acids and suggest a mechanistic link between substrate utilization and amino acid preferences.

  7. Role of Corynebacterium glutamicum sprA Encoding a Serine Protease in glxR-Mediated Global Gene Regulation

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Eun-Ji; Park, Joon-Song; Kim, Younhee; Lee, Heung-Shick

    2014-01-01

    The global regulator glxR of Corynebacterium glutamicum is involved in many cellular activities. Considering its role, the GlxR protein likely interacts with other proteins to obtain, maintain, and control its activity. To isolate proteins interacting with GlxR, we used a two-hybrid system with GlxR as the bait. Subsequently, the partner, a subtilisin-like serine protease, was isolated from a C. glutamicum genomic library. Unlike glxR, which showed constitutive expression, the expression of sprA, encoding a serine protease, was maximal in the log phase. Purified His6-SprA protein underwent self-proteolysis and proteolyzed purified GlxR. The proteolytic action of SprA on GlxR was not observed in the presence of cyclic adenosine monophosphate, which modulates GlxR activity. The C. glutamicum sprA deletion mutant (ΔsprA) and sprA-overexpressing (P180-sprA) strains showed reduced growth. The activity of isocitrate dehydrogenase (a tricarboxylic acid cycle enzyme) in these strains decreased to 30–50% of that in the wild-type strain. In the P180-sprA strain, proteins involved in diverse cellular functions such as energy and carbon metabolism (NCgl2809), nitrogen metabolism (NCgl0049), methylation reactions (NCgl0719), and peptidoglycan biosynthesis (NCgl1267), as well as stress, starvation, and survival (NCgl0938) were affected and showed decreased transcription. Taken together, these data suggest that SprA, as a serine protease, performs a novel regulatory role not only in glxR-mediated gene expression but also in other areas of cell physiology. In addition, the tight control of SprA and GlxR availability may indicate their importance in global gene regulation. PMID:24691519

  8. VaSP1, catalytically active serine proteinase from Vipera ammodytes ammodytes venom with unconventional active site triad.

    PubMed

    Kurtović, Tihana; Brgles, Marija; Leonardi, Adrijana; Lang Balija, Maja; Sajevic, Tamara; Križaj, Igor; Allmaier, Günter; Marchetti-Deschmann, Martina; Halassy, Beata

    2014-01-01

    VaSP1, a serine proteinase from Vipera ammodytes ammodytes venom, is a glycosylated monomer of 31.5 kDa, as determined by MALDI mass spectrometry, showing multiple isoelectric points between pH 6.5 and pH 8.5. Partial amino acid sequencing of VaSP1 by Edman degradation and MS/MS analysis identified sequences which allowed its classification among the so-called snake venom serine proteinase homologues, members of the peptidase S1 family, however being devoid of the canonical catalytic triad. Only few representatives of this group have been identified so far with just two of them characterised in detail at the protein level. Despite substitution of His57 with Arg, VaSP1 possesses proteolytic activity which can be inhibited by Pefabloc, benzamidine, Zn²⁺ ions, DTT and trypsin inhibitor II, a Kunitz/BPTI group member. It hydrolyses N(α)-benzoyl-Phe-Val-Arg-p-NA, exhibiting Michaelis-Menten behaviour with K(m) = 48.2 μM and V(m) = 0.019 nM s⁻¹. The pH for optimal activity on tested substrate is around 9.0. VaSP1 also cleaves insulin B-chain, digesting it at positions His¹⁰-Leu¹¹, Ala¹⁴-Leu¹⁵ and Tyr¹⁶-Leu¹⁷. Furthermore, the novel serine proteinase is active towards wide array of proteins involved in haemostasis where its degradation of fibrinogen, fibrin, prothrombin, factor X and plasminogen in vivo probably results in depletion of coagulation factors in blood circulation. The possibility that VaSP1 possesses anticoagulant properties has been further indicated by its ability to prolong prothrombin time and activated partial thromboplastin time.

  9. Autotransported Serine Protease A of Neisseria meningitidis: an Immunogenic, Surface-Exposed Outer Membrane, and Secreted Protein

    PubMed Central

    Turner, David P. J.; Wooldridge, Karl G.; Ala'Aldeen, Dlawer A. A.

    2002-01-01

    Several autotransporter proteins have previously been identified in Neisseria meningitidis. Using molecular features common to most members of the autotransporter family of proteins, we have identified an additional novel ca. 112-kDa autotransporter protein in the meningococcal genomic sequence data. This protein, designated autotransported serine protease A (AspA), has significant N-terminal homology to the secreted serine proteases (subtilases) from several organisms and contains a serine protease catalytic triad. The amino acid sequence of AspA is well-conserved in serogroup A, B, and C meningococci. In Neisseria gonorrhoeae, the AspA homologue appears to be a pseudogene. The gene encoding AspA was cloned and expressed from meningococcal strain MC58 (B15:P1.16b). Anti-AspA antibodies were detected in patients' convalescent-phase sera, suggesting that AspA is expressed in vivo during infection and is immunogenic and cross-reactive. Rabbit polyclonal monospecific anti-AspA serum was used to probe whole-cell proteins from a panel of wild-type meningococcal strains and two AspA mutant strains. Expression of the ca. 112-kDa precursor polypeptide was detected in 12 of 20 wild-type meningococcal strains examined, suggesting that AspA expression is phase variable. Immunogold electron microscopy and cellular fractionation studies showed that the AspA precursor is transported to the outer membrane and remains surface exposed. Western blot experiments confirmed that smaller, ca. 68- or 70-kDa components of AspA (AspA68 and AspA70, respectively) are then secreted into the meningococcal culture supernatant. Site-directed mutagenesis of S426 abolished secretion of both rAspA68 and rAspA70 in Escherichia coli, confirming that AspA is an autocleaved autotransporter protein. In conclusion, we characterized a novel, surface-exposed and secreted, immunogenic, meningococcal autotransporter protein. PMID:12117956

  10. Molecular Cloning and Characterization of a Subtilisin-Like Serine Protease Gene (Pr1) from the Medicinal Chinese Caterpillar Mushroom, Ophiocordyceps sinensis (Ascomycetes).

    PubMed

    Shi, Ping; Lu, Zenghui; He, Yuanchuan; Chen, Shijiang; Yan, Jun; Li, Junhong; Zhang, Xiaobing

    2015-01-01

    In the Chinese caterpillar mushroom Ophiocordyceps sinensis, a subtislin-like serine protease (Pr1) is one of the most important enzymes for its infection activity against insect cuticles. The Pr1 gene was isolated from the valuable Chinese medicinal fungus O. sinensis using rapid amplification of 5' and 3' complementary DNA ends. The 2079-bp full-length complementary DNA sequence containing the 1605-bp predicted open reading frame of the Pr1 gene was obtained (GenBank accession no. KF836756). The open reading frame encodes a protein comprising 534 amino acids. Protein sequence multiple alignment analysis revealed high homology with 16 other subtilisin serine proteases and exhibited the highly conserved catalytic domain (D195, H227, and S393). We also constructed a phylogenetic tree in this study. Further molecular studies are needed to elucidate the mechanisms of fungal infection. PMID:26853964

  11. Isolation, gene cloning and expression profile of a pathogen recognition protein: a serine proteinase homolog (Sp-SPH) involved in the antibacterial response in the crab Scylla paramamosain.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hai-peng; Chen, Rong-yuan; Zhang, Min; Wang, Ke-jian

    2010-07-01

    To identify the frontline defense molecules against microbial infection in the crab Scylla paramamosain, a live crab pathogenic microbe, Vibrio parahaemolyticus, was recruited as an affinity matrix to isolate innate immune factors from crab hemocytes lysate. Interestingly, a serine proteinase homolog (Sp-SPH) was obtained together with an antimicrobial peptide-antilipopolysaccharide factor (Sp-ALF). We then determined the full-length cDNA sequence of Sp-SPH, which contained 1298bp with an open reading frame of 1107bp encoding 369 amino acid residues. Multiple alignment analysis showed that the deduced amino acid sequences of Sp-SPH shared overall identity (83.8%) with those of SPH-containing proteins from other crab species. Tissue distribution analysis indicated that the Sp-SPH transcripts were present in various tissues including eye stalk, subcuticular epidermis, gill, hemocyte, stomach, thorax ganglion, brain and muscle of S. paramamosain. The Sp-SPH was highly expressed in selected different development stages including embryo (I, II, III and V), zoea (I), megalopa, and juvenile. Importantly, the prophenoloxidase was also present in the embryos, zoea, juvenile and adult crabs, but relatively lower in megalopa compared to those of other stages. Furthermore, the Sp-SPH mRNA expression showed a statistically significant increase (P<0.05) in both hemocyte and subcuticular epidermis at 24h, and in gill at 96h after challenge of V. parahaemolyticus determined by quantitative real-time PCR. Taken together, the live-bacterial-binding activity and the acute-phase response against bacterial infection of Sp-SPH suggested that it might function as an innate immune recognition molecule and play a key role in host defense against microbe invasion in the crab S. paramamosain.

  12. Isolation, gene cloning and expression profile of a pathogen recognition protein: a serine proteinase homolog (Sp-SPH) involved in the antibacterial response in the crab Scylla paramamosain.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hai-peng; Chen, Rong-yuan; Zhang, Min; Wang, Ke-jian

    2010-07-01

    To identify the frontline defense molecules against microbial infection in the crab Scylla paramamosain, a live crab pathogenic microbe, Vibrio parahaemolyticus, was recruited as an affinity matrix to isolate innate immune factors from crab hemocytes lysate. Interestingly, a serine proteinase homolog (Sp-SPH) was obtained together with an antimicrobial peptide-antilipopolysaccharide factor (Sp-ALF). We then determined the full-length cDNA sequence of Sp-SPH, which contained 1298bp with an open reading frame of 1107bp encoding 369 amino acid residues. Multiple alignment analysis showed that the deduced amino acid sequences of Sp-SPH shared overall identity (83.8%) with those of SPH-containing proteins from other crab species. Tissue distribution analysis indicated that the Sp-SPH transcripts were present in various tissues including eye stalk, subcuticular epidermis, gill, hemocyte, stomach, thorax ganglion, brain and muscle of S. paramamosain. The Sp-SPH was highly expressed in selected different development stages including embryo (I, II, III and V), zoea (I), megalopa, and juvenile. Importantly, the prophenoloxidase was also present in the embryos, zoea, juvenile and adult crabs, but relatively lower in megalopa compared to those of other stages. Furthermore, the Sp-SPH mRNA expression showed a statistically significant increase (P<0.05) in both hemocyte and subcuticular epidermis at 24h, and in gill at 96h after challenge of V. parahaemolyticus determined by quantitative real-time PCR. Taken together, the live-bacterial-binding activity and the acute-phase response against bacterial infection of Sp-SPH suggested that it might function as an innate immune recognition molecule and play a key role in host defense against microbe invasion in the crab S. paramamosain. PMID:20153768

  13. A rapid method for the determination of perfluoroalkyl substances including structural isomers of perfluorooctane sulfonic acid in human serum using 96-well plates and column-switching ultra-high performance liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Salihovic, Samira; Kärrman, Anna; Lindström, Gunilla; Lind, P Monica; Lind, Lars; van Bavel, Bert

    2013-08-30

    To facilitate high-throughput analysis suitable for large epidemiological studies we developed an automated column-switching ultra-performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (HPLC-MS/MS) method for determination of perfluorocarboxylic acids (PFCAs; C5, C6, C7, C8, C9, C10, C11, C12, and C13), perfluoroalkyl sulfonic acids (PFSAs; C4, C6, C8, and C10), perfluorooctane sulfonamide (PFOSA), and five groups of structural perfluorooctane sulfonic acid (PFOS) isomers in human serum or plasma. The analytical procedure involves rapid protein precipitation using 96-well plates followed by an automated sample clean-up using an on-line trap column removing many potentially interfering sample components while through the mobile phase gradient the target analytes are eluted onto the analytical column for further separation and subsequent mass detection. The method was linear (R(2)<0.995) at concentrations ranging from 0.01 to 60ngmL(-1) with method detection limits ranging between 0.01 and 0.17ngmL(-1) depending on the analyte. The developed method was precise, with repeatability (n=7) and reproducibility (n=103) coefficients of variation between 2% and 20% for most compounds including PFOS (2% and 8%) and its structural isomers (2-6% and 4-8%). The method was in conformity with a standard reference material. The column-switching HPLC-MS/MS method has been successfully applied for the determination of perfluoroalkyl substances including structural PFOS isomers in human plasma from an epidemiological study.

  14. Effects of lead exposure on D-serine metabolism in the hippocampus of mice at the early developmental stages.

    PubMed

    Yu, Haiyang; Li, Tingting; Cui, Yan; Liao, Yingjun; Wang, Gaoyang; Gao, Lanyue; Zhao, Fenghong; Jin, Yaping

    2014-11-01

    The aim of this study was to explore the mechanisms of lead neurotoxicity by focusing on the alteration of D-serine metabolism in the hippocampus of mice at the early life. Mother mice and their offspring were exposed to 0, 0.5, 1.0 and 2.0 g/L lead in lead acetate via drinking water from the first day of gestation until the postnatal day (PND) 40. Morris water maze was used to measure the spatial learning and memory ability of PND 40 mice. Expressions of serine racemase (SR), D-amino acid oxidase (DAAO), alanine-serine- cysteine transporter-1 (asc-1) and subunits of N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR) in the hippocampus of PND 10, 20 and 40 mice were examined by western blot and real time RT-PCR. Findings from this study disclosed that the spatial learning ability of mice tested by place trial could be significantly impaired by 0.5 g/L lead exposure, and the spatial memory ability tested by probe trail could be impaired by 1.0 g/L lead exposure. Exposure to 2.0 g/L lead in the water could significantly inhibit the protein and mRNA expression of SR; conversely enhance the expression of DAAO protein and mRNA in the hippocampus during the early developmental stages. However, the protein expressions of DAAO and asc-1 in the hippocampus were significantly enhanced by 0.5 g/L lead exposure at different developmental stages. On the other hand, the protein and mRNA expressions of both NR1 and NR2A were inhibited significantly by 1.0 g/L lead exposure since PND 10, and by 0.5 g/L lead exposure since PND 20. Noteworthy, the protein expression of NR2B was inhibited significantly by 0.5 g/L lead exposure in PND 10 mice, and by 1.0 g/L lead exposure in PND 20 mice, but there was no significant group difference in PND 40 mice. Meanwhile, expressions of asc-1 and NR2B mRNA were not affected obviously by lead exposure. In conclusion, chronic lead exposure during brain development might affect D-serine metabolism by enhancing its degradation, which might be related to the

  15. Effects of lead exposure on D-serine metabolism in the hippocampus of mice at the early developmental stages.

    PubMed

    Yu, Haiyang; Li, Tingting; Cui, Yan; Liao, Yingjun; Wang, Gaoyang; Gao, Lanyue; Zhao, Fenghong; Jin, Yaping

    2014-11-01

    The aim of this study was to explore the mechanisms of lead neurotoxicity by focusing on the alteration of D-serine metabolism in the hippocampus of mice at the early life. Mother mice and their offspring were exposed to 0, 0.5, 1.0 and 2.0 g/L lead in lead acetate via drinking water from the first day of gestation until the postnatal day (PND) 40. Morris water maze was used to measure the spatial learning and memory ability of PND 40 mice. Expressions of serine racemase (SR), D-amino acid oxidase (DAAO), alanine-serine- cysteine transporter-1 (asc-1) and subunits of N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR) in the hippocampus of PND 10, 20 and 40 mice were examined by western blot and real time RT-PCR. Findings from this study disclosed that the spatial learning ability of mice tested by place trial could be significantly impaired by 0.5 g/L lead exposure, and the spatial memory ability tested by probe trail could be impaired by 1.0 g/L lead exposure. Exposure to 2.0 g/L lead in the water could significantly inhibit the protein and mRNA expression of SR; conversely enhance the expression of DAAO protein and mRNA in the hippocampus during the early developmental stages. However, the protein expressions of DAAO and asc-1 in the hippocampus were significantly enhanced by 0.5 g/L lead exposure at different developmental stages. On the other hand, the protein and mRNA expressions of both NR1 and NR2A were inhibited significantly by 1.0 g/L lead exposure since PND 10, and by 0.5 g/L lead exposure since PND 20. Noteworthy, the protein expression of NR2B was inhibited significantly by 0.5 g/L lead exposure in PND 10 mice, and by 1.0 g/L lead exposure in PND 20 mice, but there was no significant group difference in PND 40 mice. Meanwhile, expressions of asc-1 and NR2B mRNA were not affected obviously by lead exposure. In conclusion, chronic lead exposure during brain development might affect D-serine metabolism by enhancing its degradation, which might be related to the

  16. Reaction pathway of tryptophanase-catalyzed L-tryptophan synthesis from D-serine.

    PubMed

    Shimada, Akihiko; Ozaki, Haruka; Saito, Takeshi; Fujii, Noriko

    2011-11-01

    Tryptophanase, L-tryptophan indole-lyase with extremely absolute stereospecificity, can change the stereospecificity in concentrated diammonium hydrogenphosphate solution. While tryptophanase is not inert to D-serine in the absence of diammonium hydrogenphosphate, it can undergo L-tryptophan synthesis from D-serine along with indole in the presence of it. It has been well known that tryptophanase synthesizes L-tryptophan from L-serine through a β-substitution mechanism of the ping-pong type. However, a metabolic pathway of L-tryptophan synthesis from D-serine has remained unclear. The present study aims to elucidate it. Diammonium hydrogenphosphate plays a role in the emergence of catalytic activity on D-serine. The salt gives tryptophanase a small conformational change, which makes it possible to catalyze D-serine. Tryptophanase-bound D-serine produces L-tryptophan synthesis by β-replacement reaction via the enzyme-bound aminoacrylate intermediate. Our result will be valuable in studying the origin of homochirality.

  17. Endocytosis by the asialoglycoprotein receptor is independent of cytoplasmic serine residues.

    PubMed Central

    Geffen, I; Fuhrer, C; Spiess, M

    1991-01-01

    The human asialoglycoprotein (ASGP) receptor, like most other plasma membrane receptors, has previously been shown to be phosphorylated at serine residues within the cytoplasmic domain. Phorbol esters, which activate protein kinase C, cause hyperphosphorylation and down-regulation of the ASGP receptor in HepG2 cells. To test the importance of serine residues for receptor traffic and function, we have mutated all the cytoplasmic serines of the two receptor subunits H1 (at positions 16 and 37) and H2 (at positions 12, 13, and 55) to alanines or glycines. Stable transfected fibroblast cell lines expressing either mutant H1 alone or both mutant subunits together were created and compared to cell lines expressing the respective wild-type proteins. Mutant and wild-type subunits were found to have very similar distributions between the cell surface and intracellular compartments. Constitutive internalization of H1 alone and ligand uptake and degradation by cells expressing both receptor subunits were not affected by the mutations. Cytoplasmic serines and serine phosphorylation are thus not essential for receptor function and intracellular traffic. Analysis of individual serine mutations identified serine-12 of subunit H2 as the major site of phosphorylation in the ASGP receptor. Images PMID:1924301

  18. Enzymatic Synthesis of Galactosylated Serine/Threonine Derivatives by β-Galactosidase from Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Seo, Sooyoun; Rebehmed, Joseph; de Brevern, Alexandre G; Karboune, Salwa

    2015-01-01

    The transgalactosylations of serine/threonine derivatives were investigated using β-galactosidase from Escherichia coli as biocatalyst. Using ortho-nitrophenyl-β-D-galactoside as donor, the highest bioconversion yield of transgalactosylated N-carboxy benzyl L-serine benzyl ester (23.2%) was achieved in heptane:buffer medium (70:30), whereas with the lactose, the highest bioconversion yield (3.94%) was obtained in the buffer reaction system. The structures of most abundant galactosylated serine products were characterized by MS/MS. The molecular docking simulation revealed that the binding of serine/threonine derivatives to the enzyme's active site was stronger (-4.6~-7.9 kcal/mol) than that of the natural acceptor, glucose, and mainly occurred through interactions with aromatic residues. For N-tert-butoxycarbonyl serine methyl ester (6.8%) and N-carboxybenzyl serine benzyl ester (3.4%), their binding affinities and the distances between their hydroxyl side chain and the 1'-OH group of galactose moiety were in good accordance with the quantified bioconversion yields. Despite its lower predicted bioconversion yield, the high experimental bioconversion yield obtained with N-carboxybenzyl serine methyl ester (23.2%) demonstrated the importance of the thermodynamically-driven nature of the transgalactosylation reaction.

  19. Gelatinases and serine proteinase inhibitors of seminal plasma and the reproductive tract of turkey (Meleagris gallopavo).

    PubMed

    Kotłowska, M; Kowalski, R; Glogowski, J; Jankowski, J; Ciereszko, A

    2005-04-01

    This study examined proteolytic enzymes and serine proteinase inhibitors in turkey seminal plasma with relation to their distribution within the reproductive tract and to yellow semen syndrome (YSS). Proteases of blood plasma, extracts from the reproductive tract, and seminal plasma were analyzed by gelatin zymography. We found a clear regional distribution of proteolytic enzymes in the turkey reproductive tract. Each part was characterized by a unique profile of serine proteolytic enzymes of molecular weights ranging from 29 to 88 kDa. The ductus deferens was found to be a site of very intense proteolytic activity. Two metalloproteases of 58 and 66 kDa were detected in all parts of the reproductive tract and seminal plasma. Using electrophoretic methods for detection of anti-trypsin activity, we found three serine proteinase inhibitors in turkey seminal plasma. Two inhibitors were found in the testis and epididymis and a third in the ductus deferens and seminal plasma. Blood plasma was characterized by the presence of two metalloproteinases and one serine proteinase inhibitor (of low migration rate) that were also detected in the reproductive tract. Amidase and anti-trypsin activities (expressed per gram of protein) differed for yellow and white seminal plasma. We concluded that turkey seminal plasma contains metalloproteases, serine proteinases, and serine proteinase inhibitors. The metalloproteases and one proteinase inhibitor are related to blood proteinases but the other two inhibitors and serine proteinases seem to be unique for the reproductive tract.

  20. Serine- and threonine/valine-dependent activation of PDK and Tor orthologs converge on Sch9 to promote aging.

    PubMed

    Mirisola, Mario G; Taormina, Giusi; Fabrizio, Paola; Wei, Min; Hu, Jia; Longo, Valter D

    2014-02-01

    Dietary restriction extends longevity in organisms ranging from bacteria to mice and protects primates from a variety of diseases, but the contribution of each dietary component to aging is poorly understood. Here we demonstrate that glucose and specific amino acids promote stress sensitization and aging through the differential activation of the Ras/cAMP/PKA, PKH1/2 and Tor/S6K pathways. Whereas glucose sensitized cells through a Ras-dependent mechanism, threonine and valine promoted cellular sensitization and aging primarily by activating the Tor/S6K pathway and serine promoted sensitization via PDK1 orthologs Pkh1/2. Serine, threonine and valine activated a signaling network in which Sch9 integrates TORC1 and Pkh signaling via phosphorylation of threonines 570 and 737 and promoted intracellular relocalization and transcriptional inhibition of the stress resistance protein kinase Rim15. Because of the conserved pro-aging role of nutrient and growth signaling pathways in higher eukaryotes, these results raise the possibility that similar mechanisms contribute to aging in mammals.

  1. Viral cysteine proteases are homologous to the trypsin-like family of serine proteases: structural and functional implications.

    PubMed Central

    Bazan, J F; Fletterick, R J

    1988-01-01

    Proteases that are encoded by animal picornaviruses and plant como- and potyviruses form a related group of cysteine-active-center enzymes that are essential for virus maturation. We show that these proteins are homologous to the family of trypsin-like serine proteases. In our model, the active-site nucleophile of the trypsin catalytic triad, Ser-195, is changed to a Cys residue in these viral proteases. The other two residues of the triad, His-57 and Asp-102, are otherwise absolutely conserved in all the viral protease sequences. Secondary structure analysis of aligned sequences suggests the location of the component strands of the twin beta-barrel trypsin fold in the viral proteases. Unexpectedly, the 2a and 3c subclasses of viral cysteine proteases are, respectively, homologous to the small and large structural subclasses of trypsin-like serine proteases. This classification allows the molecular mapping of residues from viral sequences onto related tertiary structures; we precisely identify amino acids that are strong determinants of specificity for both small and large viral cysteine proteases. Images PMID:3186696

  2. Serine hydroxymethyltransferase from the cold adapted microorganism Psychromonas ingrahamii: a low temperature active enzyme with broad substrate specificity.

    PubMed

    Angelaccio, Sebastiana; Florio, Rita; Consalvi, Valerio; Festa, Guido; Pascarella, Stefano

    2012-01-01

    Serine hydroxymethyltransferase from the psychrophilic microorganism Psychromonas ingrahamii was expressed in Escherichia coli and purified as a His-tag fusion protein. The enzyme was characterized with respect to its spectroscopic, catalytic, and thermodynamic properties. The properties of the psychrophilic enzyme have been contrasted with the characteristics of the homologous counterpart from E. coli, which has been structurally and functionally characterized in depth and with which it shares 75% sequence identity. Spectroscopic measures confirmed that the psychrophilic enzyme displays structural properties almost identical to those of the mesophilic counterpart. At variance, the P. ingrahamii enzyme showed decreased thermostability and high specific activity at low temperature, both of which are typical features of cold adapted enzymes. Furthermore, it was a more efficient biocatalyst compared to E. coli serine hydroxymethyltransferase (SHMT) particularly for side reactions. Many β-hydroxy-α-amino acids are SHMT substrates and represent important compounds in the synthesis of pharmaceuticals, agrochemicals and food additives. Thanks to these attractive properties, this enzyme could have a significant potential for biotechnological applications.

  3. Thermostability and reactivity in organic solvent of O-phospho-L-serine sulfhydrylase from hyperthermophilic archaeon Aeropyrum pernix K1.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Takashi; Asai, Shinji; Nakata, Kaori; Kunimoto, Kohei; Oguri, Masateru; Ishikawa, Kazuhiko

    2015-01-01

    O-phospho-l-serine sulfhydrylase (OPSS) from archaeon Aeropyrum pernix K1 is able to synthesize l-cysteine even at 80 °C. In this article, we compared thermal stability and reactivity in organic solvent of OPSS with those of O-acetyl-l-serine sulfhydrylase B (OASS-B) from Escherichia coli. As a result, the thermostability of OPSS was much higher than that of OASS-B. Moreover, the activity of OPSS increased in the reaction mixture containing the organic solvent, such as N, N'-dimethyl formamide and 1,4-dioxane, whereas that of OASS-B gradually decreased as the content of organic solvent increased. From the crystal structural analysis, the intramolecular electrostatic interactions of N-terminal domain in OPSS seemed to be correlated with the tolerance of OPSS to high temperature and organic solvent. These results indicate that OPSS is more superior to OASS-B for the industrial production of l-cysteine and unnatural amino acids that are useful pharmaceuticals in the presence of organic solvent.

  4. Identification, purification and characterization of a novel collagenolytic serine protease from fig (Ficus carica var. Brown Turkey) latex.

    PubMed

    Raskovic, Brankica; Bozovic, Olga; Prodanovic, Radivoje; Niketic, Vesna; Polovic, Natalija

    2014-12-01

    A novel collagenolytic serine protease was identified and then purified (along with ficin) to apparent homogeneity from the latex of fig (Ficus carica, var. Brown Turkey) by two step chromatographic procedure using gel and covalent chromatography. The enzyme is a monomeric protein of molecular mass of 41 ± 9 kDa as estimated by analytical gel filtration chromatography. It is an acidic protein with a pI value of approximately 5 and optimal activity at pH 8.0-8.5 and temperature 60°C. The enzymatic activity was strongly inhibited by PMSF and Pefabloc SC, indicating that the enzyme is a serine protease. The enzyme showed specificity towards gelatin and collagen (215 GDU/mg and 24.8 CDU/mg, respectively) and non-specific protease activity (0.18 U/mg against casein). The enzyme was stable and retained full activity over a broad range of pH and temperature. The fig latex collagenolytic protease is potentially useful as a non-microbial enzyme with collagenolytic activity for various applications in the fields of biochemistry, biotechnology and medicine. PMID:24982021

  5. O-xylosylation in a recombinant protein is directed at a common motif on glycine-serine linkers.

    PubMed

    Spencer, David; Novarra, Shabazz; Zhu, Liang; Mugabe, Sheila; Thisted, Thomas; Baca, Manuel; Depaz, Roberto; Barton, Christopher

    2013-11-01

    Glycine-serine (GS) linkers are commonly used in recombinant proteins to connect domains. Here, we report the posttranslational O-glycosylation of a GS linker in a novel fusion protein. The structure of the O-glycan moiety is a xylose-based core substituted with hexose and sulfated hexauronic acid residues. The total level of O-xylosylation was approximately 30% in the material expressed in HEK-293 cell lines. There was an approximate 10-fold reduction in O-xylosylation levels when the material was expressed in Chinese hamster ovary cell lines. Similar O-glycan structures have been reported for human urinary thrombomodulin and represent the initial building block for proteoglycans such as chondroitin sulfate and heparin. The sites of attachment, determined by electron transfer dissociation mass spectrometry, were localized to serine in the linker regions of the recombinant fusion protein. This attachment could be attributed, in part, to the inherent xylosyltransferase motif present in GS linkers. Elimination of the O-glycan moiety was achieved with modified linkers containing only glycine residues. The aggregation and fragmentation behavior of the GGG construct were comparable to the GSG-linked material during thermal stress. The O-xylosylation reported has implications for the manufacturing consistency of recombinant proteins containing GS linkers. PMID:24105735

  6. Identification, purification and characterization of a novel collagenolytic serine protease from fig (Ficus carica var. Brown Turkey) latex.

    PubMed

    Raskovic, Brankica; Bozovic, Olga; Prodanovic, Radivoje; Niketic, Vesna; Polovic, Natalija

    2014-12-01

    A novel collagenolytic serine protease was identified and then purified (along with ficin) to apparent homogeneity from the latex of fig (Ficus carica, var. Brown Turkey) by two step chromatographic procedure using gel and covalent chromatography. The enzyme is a monomeric protein of molecular mass of 41 ± 9 kDa as estimated by analytical gel filtration chromatography. It is an acidic protein with a pI value of approximately 5 and optimal activity at pH 8.0-8.5 and temperature 60°C. The enzymatic activity was strongly inhibited by PMSF and Pefabloc SC, indicating that the enzyme is a serine protease. The enzyme showed specificity towards gelatin and collagen (215 GDU/mg and 24.8 CDU/mg, respectively) and non-specific protease activity (0.18 U/mg against casein). The enzyme was stable and retained full activity over a broad range of pH and temperature. The fig latex collagenolytic protease is potentially useful as a non-microbial enzyme with collagenolytic activity for various applications in the fields of biochemistry, biotechnology and medicine.

  7. Serine- and threonine/valine-dependent activation of PDK and Tor orthologs converge on Sch9 to promote aging.

    PubMed

    Mirisola, Mario G; Taormina, Giusi; Fabrizio, Paola; Wei, Min; Hu, Jia; Longo, Valter D

    2014-02-01

    Dietary restriction extends longevity in organisms ranging from bacteria to mice and protects primates from a variety of diseases, but the contribution of each dietary component to aging is poorly understood. Here we demonstrate that glucose and specific amino acids promote stress sensitization and aging through the differential activation of the Ras/cAMP/PKA, PKH1/2 and Tor/S6K pathways. Whereas glucose sensitized cells through a Ras-dependent mechanism, threonine and valine promoted cellular sensitization and aging primarily by activating the Tor/S6K pathway and serine promoted sensitization via PDK1 orthologs Pkh1/2. Serine, threonine and valine activated a signaling network in which Sch9 integrates TORC1 and Pkh signaling via phosphorylation of threonines 570 and 737 and promoted intracellular relocalization and transcriptional inhibition of the stress resistance protein kinase Rim15. Because of the conserved pro-aging role of nutrient and growth signaling pathways in higher eukaryotes, these results raise the possibility that similar mechanisms contribute to aging in mammals. PMID:24516402

  8. Serine- and Threonine/Valine-Dependent Activation of PDK and Tor Orthologs Converge on Sch9 to Promote Aging

    PubMed Central

    Fabrizio, Paola; Wei, Min; Hu, Jia; Longo, Valter D.

    2014-01-01

    Dietary restriction extends longevity in organisms ranging from bacteria to mice and protects primates from a variety of diseases, but the contribution of each dietary component to aging is poorly understood. Here we demonstrate that glucose and specific amino acids promote stress sensitization and aging through the differential activation of the Ras/cAMP/PKA, PKH1/2 and Tor/S6K pathways. Whereas glucose sensitized cells through a Ras-dependent mechanism, threonine and valine promoted cellular sensitization and aging primarily by activating the Tor/S6K pathway and serine promoted sensitization via PDK1 orthologs Pkh1/2. Serine, threonine and valine activated a signaling network in which Sch9 integrates TORC1 and Pkh signaling via phosphorylation of threonines 570 and 737 and promoted intracellular relocalization and transcriptional inhibition of the stress resistance protein kinase Rim15. Because of the conserved pro-aging role of nutrient and growth signaling pathways in higher eukaryotes, these results raise the possibility that similar mechanisms contribute to aging in mammals. PMID:24516402

  9. Involvement of serine proteases in the excystation and metacystic development of Entamoeba invadens.

    PubMed

    Makioka, Asao; Kumagai, Masahiro; Kobayashi, Seiki; Takeuchi, Tsutomu

    2009-10-01

    Although the functions of cysteine proteases involved in the pathogenicity and differentiation of Entamoeba histolytica have been demonstrated, little is known about the functions of serine proteases. We examined the involvement of serine proteases in amoebic excystation and metacystic development using inhibitors specific for serine proteases. Entamoeba invadens IP-1 strain was used as the model of excystation and metacystic development of E. histolytica. Four serine protease inhibitors, phenylmethanesulfonyl fluoride (PMSF), 4-(2-aminoethyl) bezensulfonylfluoride hydrochloride, 3, 4-dichloroisocoumarin, and N-tosyl-phe-chloromethylketone, decreased the number of metacystic amoebae in a dose-dependent manner, without showing cytotoxicity to cysts. PMSF inhibited not only the increase but also the development of metacystic amoebae as determined by the change of nucleus number from four- to one-nucleate amoebae. The protease activity in cyst lysates was also inhibited by PMSF and the band of protease on gelatin sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis was weaker than controls when treated with PMSF. Three serine protease families, S28 (three types), S9 (two), and S26 (one) were retrieved from the database of E. invadens. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that amebic enzymes from the serine protease families formed different clades from those from other organisms. The expression levels of these serine proteases in cysts 5 h after the induction of excystation as assessed by real-time reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) were higher than those observed prior to induction assayed by real-time RT-PCR; the increase in one type of S9 (named S9-3) expression was the highest. The expression of S9 enzymes also increased from cysts to trophozoites higher than the other family serine proteases. Thus, the results show that Entamoeba uses their serine proteases in the excystation and metacystic development, which leads to successful infection.

  10. Muscle mitohormesis promotes cellular survival via serine/glycine pathway flux.

    PubMed

    Ost, Mario; Keipert, Susanne; van Schothorst, Evert M; Donner, Verena; van der Stelt, Inge; Kipp, Anna P; Petzke, Klaus-Jürgen; Jove, Mariona; Pamplona, Reinald; Portero-Otin, Manuel; Keijer, Jaap; Klaus, Susanne

    2015-04-01

    Recent studies on mouse and human skeletal muscle (SM) demonstrated the important link between mitochondrial function and the cellular metabolic adaptation. To identify key compensatory molecular mechanisms in response to chronic mitochondrial distress, we analyzed mice with ectopic SM respiratory uncoupling in uncoupling protein 1 transgenic (UCP1-TG) mice as model of muscle-specific compromised mitochondrial function. Here we describe a detailed metabolic reprogramming profile associated with mitochondrial perturbations in SM, triggering an increased protein turnover and amino acid metabolism with induced biosynthetic serine/1-carbon/glycine pathway and the longevity-promoting polyamine spermidine as well as the trans-sulfuration pathway. This is related to an induction of NADPH-generating pathways and glutathione metabolism as an adaptive mitohormetic response and defense against increased oxidative stress. Strikingly, consistent muscle retrograde signaling profiles were observed in acute stress states such as muscle cell starvation and lipid overload, muscle regeneration, and heart muscle inflammation, but not in response to exercise. We provide conclusive evidence for a key compensatory stress-signaling network that preserves cellular function, oxidative stress tolerance, and survival during conditions of increased SM mitochondrial distress, a metabolic reprogramming profile so far only demonstrated for cancer cells and heart muscle.

  11. Chk1 protects against chromatin bridges by constitutively phosphorylating BLM serine 502 to inhibit BLM degradation.

    PubMed

    Petsalaki, Eleni; Dandoulaki, Maria; Morrice, Nick; Zachos, George

    2014-09-15

    Chromatin bridges represent incompletely segregated chromosomal DNA connecting the anaphase poles and can result in chromosome breakage. The Bloom's syndrome protein helicase (BLM, also known as BLMH) suppresses formation of chromatin bridges. Here, we show that cells deficient in checkpoint kinase 1 (Chk1, also known as CHEK1) exhibit higher frequency of chromatin bridges and reduced BLM protein levels compared to controls. Chk1 inhibition leads to BLM ubiquitylation and proteasomal degradation during interphase. Furthermore, Chk1 constitutively phosphorylates human BLM at serine 502 (S502) and phosphorylated BLM localises to chromatin bridges. Mutation of S502 to a non-phosphorylatable alanine residue (BLM-S502A) reduces the stability of BLM, whereas expression of a phospho-mimicking BLM-S502D, in which S502 is mutated to aspartic acid, stabilises BLM and prevents chromatin bridges in Chk1-deficient cells. In addition, wild-type but not BLM-S502D associates with cullin 3, and cullin 3 depletion rescues BLM accumulation and localisation to chromatin bridges after Chk1 inhibition. We propose that Chk1 phosphorylates BLM-S502 to inhibit cullin-3-mediated BLM degradation during interphase. These results suggest that Chk1 prevents deleterious anaphase bridges by stabilising BLM.

  12. Study on A.C. electrical properties of pure and L-serine doped ADP crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joshi, J. H.; Dixit, K. P.; Joshi, M. J.; Parikh, K. D.

    2016-05-01

    Ammonium Dihydrogen Phosphate (ADP) crystals have a wide range of applications in integrated and nonlinear optics. Amino acids having significant properties like molecular chirality, zwitter ionic nature, etc. attracted many researchers to dope them in various NLO crystals. In the present study, pure and different weight percentage L-serine doped ADP crystals were grown by slow solvent evaporation technique at room temperature. The A.C. electrical study was carried out for palletized samples at room temperature. The Nyquist plot showed two semi circles for pure ADP indicated the effect of grain and grain boundary, whereas the doped ADP samples exhibited the single semi circle suggesting the effect of grain. The values resistance and capacitance for grain and grain boundary were calculated. The effect of doping was clearly seen in the grain capacitance and resistance values. The dielectric constant and dielectric loss decreased with increase in frequency for all samples. The Jonscher power law was applied for A.C. conductivity for pure and doped ADP samples. The imaginary part of modulus and impedance versus frequency were drawn and the value of stretch exponent (β) was calculated for all the samples.

  13. Size, charge, and stability of fully serine-based catanionic vesicles: towards versatile biocompatible nanocarriers.

    PubMed

    Silva, Sandra G; do Vale, M Luísa C; Marques, Eduardo F

    2015-03-01

    Vesicles based on mixed cationic and anionic surfactants (catanionic vesicles) offer a number of advantageous colloidal features over conventional lipid-based vesicles, namely spontaneity in formation, long-term stability, and easy modulation of size and charge. If biocompatibility is added through rational design of the chemical components, the potential for biorelated applications further emerges. Here, we report for the first time on two catanionic vesicle systems in which both ionic amphiphiles are derivatized from the same amino acid--serine--with the goal of enhancing aggregate biocompatibility. Phase behavior maps for a mixture with chain length symmetry, 12Ser/12-12Ser, and another with asymmetry, 16Ser/8-8Ser, are presented, for which regions of vesicles, micelles, and coexisting aggregates are identified. For the asymmetric mixture, detailed phase behavior and microstructure characterization have been carried out based on surface tension, light microscopy, cryo-SEM, cryo-TEM, and dynamic light scattering analysis. Vesicles are found with tunable mean size, pH, and zeta potential. Changes in aggregate shape with varying composition and the effect of preparation methods and aging on vesicle features and stability have been investigated in detail. The results are discussed in the light of self-assembly models and related catanionic systems reported before. A versatile system of robust vesicles is thus presented for potential applications.

  14. Identification and characterization of alkaline serine protease from goat skin surface metagenome.

    PubMed

    Pushpam, Paul Lavanya; Rajesh, Thangamani; Gunasekaran, Paramasamy

    2011-01-01

    Metagenomic DNA isolated from goat skin surface was used to construct plasmid DNA library in Escherichia coli DH10B. Recombinant clones were screened for functional protease activity on skim milk agar plates. Upon screening 70,000 clones, a clone carrying recombinant plasmid pSP1 exhibited protease activity. In vitro transposon mutagenesis and sequencing of the insert DNA in this clone revealed an ORF of 1890 bp encoding a protein with 630 amino acids which showed significant sequence homology to the peptidase S8 and S53 subtilisin kexin sedolisin of Shewanella sp. This ORF was cloned in pET30b and expressed in E. coli BL21 (DE3). Although the cloned Alkaline Serine protease (AS-protease) was overexpressed, it was inactive as a result of forming inclusion bodies. After solubilisation, the protease was purified using Ni-NTA chromatography and then refolded properly to retain protease activity. The purified AS-protease with a molecular mass of ~63 kDa required a divalent cation (Co2+ or Mn2+) for its improved activity. The pH and temperature optima for this protease were 10.5 and 42°C respectively. PMID:21906326

  15. The circadian Clock gene regulates acrosin activity of sperm through serine protease inhibitor A3K

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Shuting; Liang, Xin; Wang, Yuhui; Jiang, Zhou; Liu, Yanyou; Hou, Wang; Li, Shiping; Zhang, Jing

    2015-01-01

    Our previous study found that CLOCK knockdown in the testes of male mice led to a reduced fertility, which might be associated with the lower acrosin activity. In this present study, we examined the differential expression in proteins of CLOCK knockdown sperm. Clock gene expression was knocked down in cells to confirm those differentially expressions and serine protease inhibitor SERPINA3K was identified as a potential target. The up-regulated SERPINA3K revealed an inverse relationship with Clock knockdown. Direct treatment of normal sperm with recombinant SERPINA3K protein inhibited the acrosin activity and reduced in vitro fertilization rate. The luciferase reporter gene assay showed that the down-regulated of Clock gene could activate the Serpina3k promoter, but this activation was not affected by the mutation of E-box core sequence. Co-IP demonstrated a natural interaction between SERPIAN3K and RORs (α and β). Taken together, these results demonstrated that SERPINA3K is involved in the Clock gene-mediated male fertility by regulating acrosin activity and provide the first evidence that SERPINA3K could be regulated by Clock gene via retinoic acid-related orphan receptor response elements. PMID:26264441

  16. Aerobic training in rats increases skeletal muscle sphingomyelinase and serine palmitoyltransferase activity, while decreasing ceramidase activity.

    PubMed

    Błachnio-Zabielska, Agnieszka; Zabielski, Piotr; Baranowski, Marcin; Gorski, Jan

    2011-03-01

    Sphingolipids are important components of cell membranes that may also serve as cell signaling molecules; ceramide plays a central role in sphingolipid metabolism. The aim of this study was to examine the effect of 5 weeks of aerobic training on key enzymes and intermediates of ceramide metabolism in skeletal muscles. The experiments were carried out on rats divided into two groups: (1) sedentary and (2) trained for 5 weeks (on a treadmill). The activity of serine palmitoyltransferase (SPT), neutral and acid sphingomyelinase (nSMase and aSMase), neutral and alkaline ceramidases (nCDase and alCDase) and the content of sphingolipids was determined in three types of skeletal muscle. We also measured the fasting plasma insulin and glucose concentration for calculating HOMA-IR (homeostasis model assessment) for estimating insulin resistance. We found that the activities of aSMase and SPT increase in muscle in the trained group. These changes were followed by elevation in the content of sphinganine. The activities of both isoforms of ceramidase were reduced in muscle in the trained group. Although the activities of SPT and SMases increased and the activity of CDases decreased, the ceramide content did not change in any of the studied muscle. Although ceramide level did not change, we noticed increased insulin sensitivity in trained animals. It is concluded that training affects the activity of key enzymes of ceramide metabolism but also activates other metabolic pathways which affect ceramide metabolism in skeletal muscles.

  17. Identification of a Serine Hydrolase Which Cleaves the Alicyclic Ring of Tetralin

    PubMed Central

    Hernáez, M. J.; Andújar, E.; Ríos, J. L.; Kaschabek, S. R.; Reineke, W.; Santero, E.

    2000-01-01

    A gene designated thnD, which is required for biodegradation of the organic solvent tetralin by Sphingomonas macrogoltabidus strain TFA, has been identified. Sequence comparison analysis indicated that thnD codes for a carbon-carbon bond serine hydrolase showing highest similarity to hydrolases involved in biodegradation of biphenyl. An insertion mutant defective in ThnD accumulates the ring fission product which results from the extradiol cleavage of the aromatic ring of dihydroxytetralin. The gene product has been purified and characterized. ThnD is an octameric thermostable enzyme with an optimum reaction temperature at 65°C. ThnD efficiently hydrolyzes the ring fission intermediate of the tetralin pathway and also 2-hydroxy-6-oxo-6-phenylhexa-2,4-dienoic acid, the ring fission product of the biphenyl meta-cleavage pathway. However, it is not active towards the equivalent intermediates of meta-cleavage pathways of monoaromatic compounds which have small substituents in C-6. When ThnD hydrolyzes the intermediate in the tetralin pathway, it cleaves a C-C bond comprised within the alicyclic ring of tetralin instead of cleaving a linear C-C bond, as all other known hydrolases of meta-cleavage pathways do. The significance of this activity of ThnD for the requirement of other activities to mineralize tetralin is discussed. PMID:10986248

  18. Identification of folding intermediates of streblin, the most stable serine protease: biophysical analysis.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Reetesh; Tripathi, Pinki; de Moraes, Fabio Rogerio; Caruso, Icaro P; Jagannadham, Medicherla V

    2014-01-01

    Streblin, a serine proteinase from plant Streblus asper, has been used to investigate the conformational changes induced by pH, temperature, and chaotropes. The near/far UV circular dichroism activities under fluorescence emission spectroscopy and 8-aniline-1-naphthalene sulfonate (ANS) binding have been carried out to understand the unfolding of the protein in the presence of denaturants. Spectroscopic studies reveal that streblin belongs to the α+β class of proteins and exhibits stability towards chemical denaturants, guanidine hydrochloride (GuHCl). The pH-induced transition of this protein is noncooperative for transition phases between pH 0.5 and 2.5 (midpoint, 1.5) and pH 2.5 and 10.0 (midpoint, 6.5). At pH 1.0 or lower, the protein unfolds to form acid-unfolded state, and for pH 7.5 and above, protein turns into an alkaline denatured state characterized by the absence of ANS binding. At pH 2.0 (1 M GuHCl), streblin exists in a partially unfolded state with characteristics of a molten globule state. The protein is found to exhibit strong and predominant ANS binding. In total, six different intermediate states has been identified to show protein folding pathways. PMID:24108566

  19. Characterization of the original Christmas disease mutation (cysteine 206----serine): from clinical recognition to molecular pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Taylor, S A; Duffin, J; Cameron, C; Teitel, J; Garvey, B; Lillicrap, D P

    1992-01-23

    Christmas disease was first reported as a distinct clinical entity in two manuscripts published in 1952. The eponym associated with this disorder, is the surname of the first patient examined in detail and reported by Biggs and colleagues in a paper describing the clinical and laboratory features of seven affected individuals. This patient has severe factor IX coagulant deficiency (less than 0.01 units/ml) and no detectable circulating factor IX antigen (less than 0.01 units/ml). Coding sequence and splice junctions of the factor IX gene from this patient have been amplified in vitro through the polymerase chain reaction (PCR). One nucleotide substitution was identified at nucleotide 30,070 where a guanine was replaced by a cytosine. This mutation alters the amino acid encoded at position 206 in the factor IX protein from cysteine to serine. The non conservative nature of this substitution, the absence of this change in more than 200 previously sequenced factor IX genes and the fact that the remainder of the coding region of this gene was normal, all provide strong circumstantial evidence in favour of this change being the causative mutation in this patient. The molecular characterization of this novel mutation in the index case of Christmas disease, contributes to the rapidly expanding body of knowledge pertaining to Christmas disease pathogenesis.

  20. Solubility, thermal, photoconductivity and laser damage threshold studies on L-serine acetate (LSA) single crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajesh, K.; Thayanithi, V.; Mani, A.; Amudha, M.; Kumar, P. Praveen

    2015-06-01

    L-serine acetate crystal was grown by slow evaporation technique. Solubility of L-Serine Acetate was determined at different temperatures. L-Serine Acetate was characterized by SEM is to identify the morphology of the crystal. TG and DTA study reveals the thermal stability of the grown crystal. Dielectric measurement was carried out for different temperature ranges. Photo conductivity study revealed the nature of conductivity of the crystal under halogen light. Laser damage threshold of the crystal was measured using Nd:YAG laser source. NLO property of the crystal is confirmed by Kurtz-Perry powder technique.

  1. Exploring a new serine protease from Cucumis sativus L.

    PubMed

    Nafeesa, Zohara; Shivalingu, B R; Vivek, H K; Priya, B S; Swamy, S Nanjunda

    2015-03-01

    Coagulation is an important physiological process in hemostasis which is activated by sequential action of proteases. This study aims to understand the involvement of aqueous fruit extract of Cucumis sativus L. (AqFEC) European burp less variety in blood coagulation cascade. AqFEC hydrolyzed casein in a dose-dependent manner. The presence of protease activity was further confirmed by casein zymography which revealed the possible presence of two high molecular weight protease(s). The proteolytic activity was inhibited only by phenyl methyl sulphonyl fluoride suggesting the presence of serine protease(s). In a dose-dependent manner, AqFEC also hydrolysed Aα and Bβ subunits of fibrinogen, whereas it failed to degrade the γ subunit of fibrinogen even at a concentration as high as 100 μg and incubation time up to 4 h. AqFEC reduced the clotting time of citrated plasma by 87.65%. The protease and fibrinogenolytic activity of AqFEC suggests its possible role in stopping the bleeding and ensuing wound healing process.

  2. Serine palmitoyltransferase (SPT) deficient mice absorb less cholesterol.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhiqiang; Park, Tae-Sik; Li, Yan; Pan, Xiaoyue; Iqbal, Jahangir; Lu, David; Tang, Weiqing; Yu, Liqing; Goldberg, Ira J; Hussain, M Mahmood; Jiang, Xian-Cheng

    2009-04-01

    Serine palmitoyltransferase (SPT) is the key enzyme for the biosynthesis of sphingolipids. It has been reported that oral administration of myriocin (an SPT inhibitor) decreases plasma sphingomyelin (SM) and cholesterol levels, and reduces atherosclerosis in apoE knockout (KO) mice. We studied cholesterol absorption in myriocin-treated WT or apoE KO animals and found that, after myriocin treatment, the mice absorbed significantly less cholesterol than controls, with no observable pathological changes in the small intestine. More importantly, we found that heterozygous Sptlc1 (a subunit of SPT) KO mice also absorbed significantly less cholesterol than controls. To understand the mechanism, we measured protein levels of Niemann-Pick C1-like 1 (NPC1L1), ABCG5, and ABCA1, three key factors involved in intestinal cholesterol absorption. We found that NPC1L1 and ABCA1 were decreased, whereas ABCG5 was increased in the SPT deficient small intestine. SM levels on the apical membrane were also measured and they were significantly decreased in SPT deficient mice, compared with controls. In conclusion, SPT deficiency might reduce intestinal cholesterol absorption by altering NPC1L1 and ABCG5 protein levels in the apical membranes of enterocytes through lowering apical membrane SM levels. This may be also true for ABCA1 which locates on basal membrane of enterocytes. Manipulation of SPT activity could thus provide a novel alternative treatment for dyslipidemia. PMID:19416652

  3. Regulation of Adrenal Aldosterone Production by Serine Protease Prostasin

    PubMed Central

    Ko, Takehiro; Kakizoe, Yutaka; Wakida, Naoki; Hayata, Manabu; Uchimura, Kohei; Shiraishi, Naoki; Miyoshi, Taku; Adachi, Masataka; Aritomi, Shizuka; Konda, Tomoyuki; Tomita, Kimio; Kitamura, Kenichiro

    2010-01-01

    A serine protease prostasin has been demonstrated to have a pivotal role in the activation of the epithelial sodium channel. Systemic administration of adenovirus carrying human prostasin gene in rats resulted in an increase in plasma prostasin and aldosterone levels. However, the mechanism by which the elevation of prostasin levels in the systemic circulation stimulated the plasma aldosterone levels remains unknown. Therefore, we examined if prostasin increases the aldosterone synthesis in a human adrenocortical cell line (H295R cells). Luciferase assay using CYP11B2 promoter revealed that prostasin significantly increased the transcriptional activity of CYP11B2. Prostasin significantly increased both CYP11B2 mRNA expression and aldosterone production in a dose-dependent manner. Surprisingly, treatment with camostat mesilate, a potent prostasin inhibitor, had no effect on the aldosterone synthesis by prostasin and also a protease-dead mutant of prostasin significantly stimulated the aldosterone production. A T-type/L-type calcium channel blocker and a protein kinase C (PKC) inhibitor significantly reduced the aldosterone synthesis by prostasin. Our findings suggest a stimulatory effect of prostasin on the aldosterone synthesis by adrenal gland through the nonproteolytic action and indicate a new role of prostasin in the systemic circulation. PMID:20204133

  4. Serine palmitoyltransferase (SPT) deficient mice absorb less cholesterol.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhiqiang; Park, Tae-Sik; Li, Yan; Pan, Xiaoyue; Iqbal, Jahangir; Lu, David; Tang, Weiqing; Yu, Liqing; Goldberg, Ira J; Hussain, M Mahmood; Jiang, Xian-Cheng

    2009-04-01

    Serine palmitoyltransferase (SPT) is the key enzyme for the biosynthesis of sphingolipids. It has been reported that oral administration of myriocin (an SPT inhibitor) decreases plasma sphingomyelin (SM) and cholesterol levels, and reduces atherosclerosis in apoE knockout (KO) mice. We studied cholesterol absorption in myriocin-treated WT or apoE KO animals and found that, after myriocin treatment, the mice absorbed significantly less cholesterol than controls, with no observable pathological changes in the small intestine. More importantly, we found that heterozygous Sptlc1 (a subunit of SPT) KO mice also absorbed significantly less cholesterol than controls. To understand the mechanism, we measured protein levels of Niemann-Pick C1-like 1 (NPC1L1), ABCG5, and ABCA1, three key factors involved in intestinal cholesterol absorption. We found that NPC1L1 and ABCA1 were decreased, whereas ABCG5 was increased in the SPT deficient small intestine. SM levels on the apical membrane were also measured and they were significantly decreased in SPT deficient mice, compared with controls. In conclusion, SPT deficiency might reduce intestinal cholesterol absorption by altering NPC1L1 and ABCG5 protein levels in the apical membranes of enterocytes through lowering apical membrane SM levels. This may be also true for ABCA1 which locates on basal membrane of enterocytes. Manipulation of SPT activity could thus provide a novel alternative treatment for dyslipidemia.

  5. Cloning, expression, and immunological evaluation of two putative secreted serine protease antigens of Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Skeiky, Y A; Lodes, M J; Guderian, J A; Mohamath, R; Bement, T; Alderson, M R; Reed, S G

    1999-08-01

    Culture filtrate proteins (CFP) of Mycobacterium tuberculosis have been shown to contain immunogenic components that elicit at least partial protective immunity against Mycobacterium infection. To clone genes encoding some of the immunogenic proteins, we made a high-titer rabbit anti-CFP serum and used it to screen an M. tuberculosis genomic expression library in Escherichia coli. In this paper, we describe the molecular cloning of two new protein components of CFP and identified them as members of the serine protease gene family. Their open reading frames contain N-terminal hydrophobic secretory signals consistent with their detection in CFP. The predicted molecular masses of the mature, fully processed forms of both antigens are approximately 32 kDa, in agreement with their observed sizes on immunoblots of CFP probed with polyclonal rabbit antisera made to the recombinant proteins. Thus, these proteins have been designated MTB32A and MTB32B. Interestingly, and despite 66% amino acid sequence homology between the two proteins, polyclonal rabbit antisera made to each of the recombinant proteins were found to be specific for the respective immunizing antigens. The recombinant proteins were also evaluated in in vitro assays with donor peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) from healthy purified protein derivative (PPD)-positive individuals of diverse ethnic backgrounds. MTB32A but not MTB32B stimulated PBMC from healthy PPD-positive donors but not from PPD-negative donors to proliferate and secrete gamma interferon. MTB32A is encoded by a single-copy gene which is present in both virulent and avirulent strains of the M. tuberculosis complex and the BCG strain of Mycobacterium bovis but absent in the environmental mycobacterial species tested. In addition, nucleotide sequence comparison of mtb32a of the avirulent H37Ra strain and the virulent Erdman strain, as well as with the corresponding sequences (identified in the databases) of strain H37Rv and the clinical

  6. Concordance between isolated cleft palate in mice and alterations within a region including the gene encoding the [beta][sub 3] subunit of the type A [gamma]-aminobutyric acid receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Culiat, C.T.; Stubbs, L.; Nicholls, R.D.; Montgomery, C.S.; Russell, L.B.; Johnson, D.K. ); Rinchik, E.M. Univ. of Florida, Gainesville )

    1993-06-01

    Genetic and molecular analyses of a number of radiation-induced deletion mutations of the pink-eyed dilution (p) locus in mouse chromosome 7 have identified a specific interval on the genetic map associated with a neonatally lethal mutation that results in cleft palate. This interval, closely linked and distal to p, and bracketed by the genes encoding the [alpha][sub 5] and [beta][sub 3] subunits of the type A [gamma]-aminobutyric acid receptor (Gabra5 and Gabrb3, respectively), contains a gene(s) (cp1; cleft palate 1) necessary for normal palate development. The cp1 interval extends from the distal breakpoint of the prenatally lethal p[sup 83FBFo] deletion to the Gabrb3 locus. Among 20 p deletions tested, there was complete concordance between alterations at the Gabrb3 transcription unit and inability to complement the cleft-palate defect. These mapping data, along with previously described in vivo and in vitro teratological effects of [gamma]-aminobutyric acid or its agonists on palate development, suggest the possibility that a particular type A [gamma]-aminobutyric acid receptor that includes the [beta][sub 3] subunit may be necessary for normal palate development. The placement of the cp1 gene within a defined segment of the larger D15S12h (p)-D15S9h-1 interval in the mouse suggests that the highly homologous region of the human genome, 15q11-q13, be evaluated for a role(s) in human fetal facial development. 29 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  7. 34 CFR 303.15 - Include; including.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 34 Education 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Include; including. 303.15 Section 303.15 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department of Education (Continued) OFFICE OF SPECIAL EDUCATION AND REHABILITATIVE SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION EARLY INTERVENTION PROGRAM FOR INFANTS AND TODDLERS...

  8. Exogenous γ-aminobutyric acid treatment affects citrate and amino acid accumulation to improve fruit quality and storage performance of postharvest citrus fruit.

    PubMed

    Sheng, Ling; Shen, Dandan; Luo, Yi; Sun, Xiaohua; Wang, Jinqiu; Luo, Tao; Zeng, Yunliu; Xu, Juan; Deng, Xiuxin; Cheng, Yunjiang

    2017-02-01

    The loss of organic acids during postharvest storage is one of the major factors that reduces the fruit quality and economic value of citrus. Citrate is the most important organic acid in citrus fruits. Molecular evidence has proved that γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) shunt plays a key role in citrate metabolism. Here, we investigated the effects of exogenous GABA treatment on citrate metabolism and storage quality of postharvest citrus fruit. The content of citrate was significantly increased, which was primarily attributed to the inhibition of the expression of glutamate decarboxylase (GAD). Amino acids, including glutamate, alanine, serine, aspartate and proline, were also increased. Moreover, GABA treatment decreased the fruit rot rate. The activities of antioxidant enzymes and the content of energy source ATP were affected by the treatment. Our results indicate that GABA treatment is a very effective approach for postharvest quality maintenance and improvement of storage performance in citrus production. PMID:27596402

  9. Nuclear Speckle-related Protein 70 Binds to Serine/Arginine-rich Splicing Factors 1 and 2 via an Arginine/Serine-like Region and Counteracts Their Alternative Splicing Activity.

    PubMed

    Kim, Chang-Hyun; Kim, Young-Dae; Choi, Eun-Kyung; Kim, Hye-Ran; Na, Bo-Ra; Im, Sin-Hyeog; Jun, Chang-Duk

    2016-03-18

    Nuclear speckles are subnuclear storage sites containing pre-mRNA splicing machinery. Proteins assembled in nuclear speckles are known to modulate transcription and pre-mRNA processing. We have previously identified nuclear speckle-related protein 70 (NSrp70) as a novel serine/arginine (SR)-related protein that co-localizes with classical SR proteins such as serine/arginine-rich splicing factor 1 (SRSF1 or ASF/SF2) and SRSF2 (SC35). NSrp70 mediates alternative splice site selection, targeting several pre-mRNAs, including CD44 exon v5. Here we demonstrated that NSrp70 interacts physically with two SR proteins, SRSF1 and SRSF2, and reverses their splicing activity in terms of CD44 exon v5 as exon exclusion. The NSrp70 RS-like region was subdivided into three areas. Deletion of the first arginine/serine-rich-like region (RS1) completely abrogated binding to the SR proteins and to target mRNA and also failed to induce splicing of CD44 exon v5, suggesting that RS1 is critical for NSrp70 functioning. Interestingly, RS1 deletion also resulted in the loss of NSrp70 and SR protein speckle positioning, implying a potential scaffolding role for NSrp70 in nuclear speckles. NSrp70 contains an N-terminal coiled-coil domain that is critical not only for self-oligomerization but also for splicing activity. Consistently, deletion of the coiled-coil domain resulted in indefinite formation of nuclear speckles. Collectively, these results demonstrate that NSrp70 acts as a new molecular counterpart for alternative splicing of target RNA, counteracting SRSF1 and SRSF2 splicing activity.

  10. Study of Marine Natural Products Including Resorcyclic Acid Lactones from Humicola fuscoatra That Reactivate Latent HIV-1 Expression in an in Vitro Model of Central Memory CD4+ T Cells

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    An extract of Humicola fuscoatra (UCSC strain no. 108111A) was shown to reactivate latent HIV-1 expression in an in vitro model of central memory CD4+ T cells. We report the bioassay-guided isolation and structure determination of several resorcyclic acid lactones, including four known compounds, radicicol (1, aka. monorden) and pochonins B (2), C (3), and N (4), and three new analogues, radicicols B–D (5–7). Compounds 1–3 and 5 showed moderate activities in the memory T cell model of HIV-1 latency. Radicicol (1) displayed lower potency in reactivating latent HIV-1 (EC50 = 9.1 μM) relative to the HDAC inhibitors apicidin (EC50 = 0.3 μM), romidepsin (EC50 = 0.003 μM), and SAHA (EC50 = 0.6 μM); however, it achieved equivalent maximum efficacy relative to the positive control compounds (98% of SAHA and romidepsin). PMID:24495105

  11. Change in haloacetic acid formation potential during UV and UV/H2O2 treatment of model organic compounds.

    PubMed

    Sakai, Hiroshi; Autin, Olivier; Parsons, Simon

    2013-07-01

    Haloacetic acids (HAAs) are disinfection by-products produced by the chlorination of organic matter, including amino acids. Advanced oxidation processes are expected to be effective for the destruction of HAA precursors; however, recent studies have reported the possible failure of these processes to reduce HAA formation potential. This study examined HAA formation potential during the course of UV or UV/H2O2 treatment of three organic compounds: leucine, serine, and resorcinol. HAA formation potential decreased in the treatment of resorcinol, while the potential increased slightly in the treatment of serine and greatly increased for leucine. The chemical structure required for HAA formation was assumed to be produced during the course of UV/H2O2 treatment of leucine and serine. Also, H abstraction from the δ carbon was assumed to result from the initial degradation of leucine by the hydroxyl radical during the UV/H2O2 treatment. The hydroxyl radical may have further reacted with leucine moiety to shorten its carbon chain. This would have produced a chemical structure capable of forming HAA, thus increasing HAA formation potential.

  12. Change in haloacetic acid formation potential during UV and UV/H2O2 treatment of model organic compounds.

    PubMed

    Sakai, Hiroshi; Autin, Olivier; Parsons, Simon

    2013-07-01

    Haloacetic acids (HAAs) are disinfection by-products produced by the chlorination of organic matter, including amino acids. Advanced oxidation processes are expected to be effective for the destruction of HAA precursors; however, recent studies have reported the possible failure of these processes to reduce HAA formation potential. This study examined HAA formation potential during the course of UV or UV/H2O2 treatment of three organic compounds: leucine, serine, and resorcinol. HAA formation potential decreased in the treatment of resorcinol, while the potential increased slightly in the treatment of serine and greatly increased for leucine. The chemical structure required for HAA formation was assumed to be produced during the course of UV/H2O2 treatment of leucine and serine. Also, H abstraction from the δ carbon was assumed to result from the initial degradation of leucine by the hydroxyl radical during the UV/H2O2 treatment. The hydroxyl radical may have further reacted with leucine moiety to shorten its carbon chain. This would have produced a chemical structure capable of forming HAA, thus increasing HAA formation potential. PMID:23415308

  13. Bacterial serine proteases secreted by the autotransporter pathway: classification, specificity and role in virulence

    PubMed Central

    Ruiz-Perez, Fernando; Nataro, James P.

    2013-01-01

    Serine proteases exist in eukaryotic and prokaryotic organisms and have emerged during evolution as the most abundant and functionally diverse group. In gram-negative bacteria, there is a growing family of high molecular weight serine proteases secreted to the external milieu by a fascinating and widely employed bacterial secretion mechanism, known as the autotransporter pathway. They were initially found in Neisseria, Shigella, and pathogenic Escherichia coli, but have now been also identified in Citrobacter rodentium, Salmonella, and Edwarsiella species. Here, we focus on proteins belonging to the Serine Protease Autotransporter of Enterobacteriaceae (SPATEs) family. Recent findings regarding the predilection of serine proteases to host intracellular or extracellular protein-substrates involved in numerous biological functions, such as those implicated in cytoskeleton stability, autophagy or innate and adaptive immunity, have helped provide a better understanding of SPATEs’ contributions in pathogenesis. Here, we discuss their classification, substrate specificity, and potential roles in pathogenesis. PMID:23689588

  14. A Novel Effect of MARCKS Phosphorylation by Activated PKC: The Dephosphorylation of Its Serine 25 in Chick Neuroblasts

    PubMed Central

    Toledo, Andrea; Zolessi, Flavio R.; Arruti, Cristina

    2013-01-01

    MARCKS (Myristoylated Alanine-Rich C Kinase Substrate) is a peripheral membrane protein, especially abundant in the nervous system, and functionally related to actin organization and Ca-calmodulin regulation depending on its phosphorylation by PKC. However, MARCKS is susceptible to be phosphorylated by several different kinases and the possible interactions between these phosphorylations have not been fully studied in intact cells. In differentiating neuroblasts, as well as some neurons, there is at least one cell-type specific phosphorylation site: serine 25 (S25) in the chick. We demonstrate here that S25 is included in a highly conserved protein sequence which is a Cdk phosphorylatable region, located far away from the PKC phosphorylation domain. S25 phosphorylation was inhibited by olomoucine and roscovitine in neuroblasts undergoing various states of cell differentiation in vitro. These results, considered in the known context of Cdks activity in neuroblasts, suggest that Cdk5 is the enzyme responsible for this phosphorylation. We find that the phosphorylation by PKC at the effector domain does not occur in the same molecules that are phosphorylated at serine 25. The in situ analysis of the subcellular distribution of these two phosphorylated MARCKS variants revealed that they are also segregated in different protein clusters. In addition, we find that a sustained stimulation of PKC by phorbol-12-myristate-13-acetate (PMA) provokes the progressive disappearance of phosphorylation at serine 25. Cells treated with PMA, but in the presence of several Ser/Thr phosphatase (PP1, PP2A and PP2B) inhibitors indicated that this dephosphorylation is achieved via a phosphatase 2A (PP2A) form. These results provide new evidence regarding the existence of a novel consequence of PKC stimulation upon the phosphorylated state of MARCKS in neural cells, and propose a link between PKC and PP2A activity on MARCKS. PMID:23634231

  15. A novel effect of MARCKS phosphorylation by activated PKC: the dephosphorylation of its serine 25 in chick neuroblasts.

    PubMed

    Toledo, Andrea; Zolessi, Flavio R; Arruti, Cristina

    2013-01-01

    MARCKS (Myristoylated Alanine-Rich C Kinase Substrate) is a peripheral membrane protein, especially abundant in the nervous system, and functionally related to actin organization and Ca-calmodulin regulation depending on its phosphorylation by PKC. However, MARCKS is susceptible to be phosphorylated by several different kinases and the possible interactions between these phosphorylations have not been fully studied in intact cells. In differentiating neuroblasts, as well as some neurons, there is at least one cell-type specific phosphorylation site: serine 25 (S25) in the chick. We demonstrate here that S25 is included in a highly conserved protein sequence which is a Cdk phosphorylatable region, located far away from the PKC phosphorylation domain. S25 phosphorylation was inhibited by olomoucine and roscovitine in neuroblasts undergoing various states of cell differentiation in vitro. These results, considered in the known context of Cdks activity in neuroblasts, suggest that Cdk5 is the enzyme responsible for this phosphorylation. We find that the phosphorylation by PKC at the effector domain does not occur in the same molecules that are phosphorylated at serine 25. The in situ analysis of the subcellular distribution of these two phosphorylated MARCKS variants revealed that they are also segregated in different protein clusters. In addition, we find that a sustained stimulation of PKC by phorbol-12-myristate-13-acetate (PMA) provokes the progressive disappearance of phosphorylation at serine 25. Cells treated with PMA, but in the presence of several Ser/Thr phosphatase (PP1, PP2A and PP2B) inhibitors indicated that this dephosphorylation is achieved via a phosphatase 2A (PP2A) form. These results provide new evidence regarding the existence of a novel consequence of PKC stimulation upon the phosphorylated state of MARCKS in neural cells, and propose a link between PKC and PP2A activity on MARCKS.

  16. A novel effect of MARCKS phosphorylation by activated PKC: the dephosphorylation of its serine 25 in chick neuroblasts.

    PubMed

    Toledo, Andrea; Zolessi, Flavio R; Arruti, Cristina

    2013-01-01

    MARCKS (Myristoylated Alanine-Rich C Kinase Substrate) is a peripheral membrane protein, especially abundant in the nervous system, and functionally related to actin organization and Ca-calmodulin regulation depending on its phosphorylation by PKC. However, MARCKS is susceptible to be phosphorylated by several different kinases and the possible interactions between these phosphorylations have not been fully studied in intact cells. In differentiating neuroblasts, as well as some neurons, there is at least one cell-type specific phosphorylation site: serine 25 (S25) in the chick. We demonstrate here that S25 is included in a highly conserved protein sequence which is a Cdk phosphorylatable region, located far away from the PKC phosphorylation domain. S25 phosphorylation was inhibited by olomoucine and roscovitine in neuroblasts undergoing various states of cell differentiation in vitro. These results, considered in the known context of Cdks activity in neuroblasts, suggest that Cdk5 is the enzyme responsible for this phosphorylation. We find that the phosphorylation by PKC at the effector domain does not occur in the same molecules that are phosphorylated at serine 25. The in situ analysis of the subcellular distribution of these two phosphorylated MARCKS variants revealed that they are also segregated in different protein clusters. In addition, we find that a sustained stimulation of PKC by phorbol-12-myristate-13-acetate (PMA) provokes the progressive disappearance of phosphorylation at serine 25. Cells treated with PMA, but in the presence of several Ser/Thr phosphatase (PP1, PP2A and PP2B) inhibitors indicated that this dephosphorylation is achieved via a phosphatase 2A (PP2A) form. These results provide new evidence regarding the existence of a novel consequence of PKC stimulation upon the phosphorylated state of MARCKS in neural cells, and propose a link between PKC and PP2A activity on MARCKS. PMID:23634231

  17. Expression of serine proteinase P186 of Arthrobotrys oligospora and analysis of its nematode-degrading activity.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Hailong; Qiao, Jun; Meng, Qingling; Gong, Shasha; Chen, Cheng; Liu, Tianli; Tian, Lulu; Cai, Xuepeng; Luo, Jianxun; Chen, Chuangfu

    2015-12-01

    The nematode-trapping fungi possess a unique capability of predating and invading nematodes. As a representative nematode-trapping fungus, Arthrobotrys oligospora has been widely used to study the interactions between nematode-trapping fungi and their hosts. Serine proteinase is one of the important virulence factors during process of invasion of the nematode-trapping fungi into nematodes. In this study, using reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction, we amplified the gene sequence of serine proteinase 186 from A. oligospora, cloned it into pPIC9K vector and expressed it in the yeast Pichia pastoris. The expressed recombinant serine proteinase186 (reP186) was purified via Ni-affinity chromatography. The in vitro nematode-degrading activity of reP186 was analyzed. Sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and Western blot analysis revealed that reP186 with molecular weight of 33 kDa was successfully obtained. ReP186 was capable of degrading a series of protein substrates including casein, gelatin, bovine serum albumin, denatured collagen and nematode cortical layer. The reP186 exhibited the maximal activity at pH 8.0 and 55 °C and was highly sensitive to the inhibitor, phenylmethanesulfonylfluoride. Treatment of Caenorhabditis elegans and Haemonchus contortus with reP186 for 12, 24 and 36 h, respectively, resulted in 62, 88 and 100 % of killing rates for C. elegans, and 52, 65 and 84 % of killing rates for H. contortus, respectively, indicating a relatively strong nematode-degrading bioactivity of reP186. PMID:26419902

  18. Genome-wide survey of putative Serine/Threonine protein kinases in cyanobacteria

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xiaowen; Zhao, Fangqing; Guan, Xiangyu; Yang, Yu; Liang, Chengwei; Qin, Song

    2007-01-01

    Background Serine/threonine kinases (STKs) have been found in an increasing number of prokaryotes, showing important roles in signal transduction that supplement the well known role of two-component system. Cyanobacteria are photoautotrophic prokaryotes able to grow in a wide range of ecological environments, and their signal transduction systems are important in adaptation to the environment. Sequence information from several cyanobacterial genomes offers a unique opportunity to conduct a comprehensive comparative analysis of this kinase family. In this study, we extracted information regarding Ser/Thr kinases from 21 species of sequenced cyanobacteria and investigated their diversity, conservation, domain structure, and evolution. Results 286 putative STK homologues were identified. STKs are absent in four Prochlorococcus strains and one marine Synechococcus strain and abundant in filamentous nitrogen-fixing cyanobacteria. Motifs and invariant amino acids typical in eukaryotic STKs were conserved well in these proteins, and six more cyanobacteria- or bacteria-specific conserved residues were found. These STK proteins were classified into three major families according to their domain structures. Fourteen types and a total of 131 additional domains were identified, some of which are reported to participate in the recognition of signals or substrates. Cyanobacterial STKs show rather complicated phylogenetic relationships that correspond poorly with phylogenies based on 16S rRNA and those based on additional domains. Conclusion The number of STK genes in different cyanobacteria is the result of the genome size, ecophysiology, and physiological properties of the organism. Similar conserved motifs and amino acids indicate that cyanobacterial STKs make use of a similar catalytic mechanism as eukaryotic STKs. Gene gain-and-loss is significant during STK evolution, along with domain shuffling and insertion. This study has established an overall framework of sequence

  19. Confluence induced threonine41/serine45 phospho-β-catenin dephosphorylation via ceramide-mediated activation of PP1cγ

    PubMed Central

    Marchesini, Norma; Jones, Jeffrey A.; Hannun, Yusuf A.

    2008-01-01

    It was previously observed that cell confluence induced up-regulation of neutral sphingomyelinase 2 (nSMase2) and increased ceramide levels (Marchesini N, Osta W, Bielawski J, Luberto C, Obeid LM and Hannun YA. (2004) J Biol Chem, 279, 25101−11). In this study, we show that, in MCF7 cells, confluence induces the dephosphorylation of phosphorylated-β-catenin at threonine41/serine45. The effect of confluence on β-catenin dephosphorylation was prevented by down regulation of nSMase2 using siRNA; reciprocally, exogenous addition of short or very long chain ceramides induced dephosphorylation of β-catenin. The serine/threonine protein phosphatase inhibitors calyculin A and okadaic acid prevented β-catenin dephosphorylation during confluence. The specific phosphatase involved was determined by studies using siRNA against the major serine/threonine phosphatases, and the results showed that a specific siRNA against PP1cγ prevented dephosphorylation of β-catenin. Moreover, exogenous ceramides and confluence were found to induce the translocation of PP1cγ to the plasma membrane. All together these results establish: A) a specific intracellular pathway involving the activation of PP1 to mediate the effects of confluence-induced β-catenin dephosphorylation and B) PP1 as a lipid-regulated protein phosphatase downstream of nSMase2/ceramide. Finally, evidence is provided for a role for this pathway in regulating cell motility during confluence. PMID:17996206

  20. Enhanced serine production by bone metastatic breast cancer cells stimulates osteoclastogenesis.

    PubMed

    Pollari, Sirkku; Käkönen, Sanna-Maria; Edgren, Henrik; Wolf, Maija; Kohonen, Pekka; Sara, Henri; Guise, Theresa; Nees, Matthias; Kallioniemi, Olli

    2011-01-01

    Since bone metastatic breast cancer is an incurable disease, causing significant morbidity and mortality, an understanding of the underlying molecular mechanisms would be highly valuable. Here, we describe in vitro and in vivo evidences for the importance of serine biosynthesis in the metastasis of breast cancer to bone. We first characterized the bone metastatic propensity of the MDA-MB-231(SA) cell line variant as compared to the parental MDA-MB-231 cells by radiographic and histological observations in the inoculated mice. Genome-wide gene expression profiling of this isogenic cell line pair revealed that all the three genes involved in the L: -serine biosynthesis pathway, phosphoglycerate dehydrogenase (PHGDH), phosphoserine aminotransferase 1 (PSAT1), and phosphoserine phosphatase (PSPH) were upregulated in the highly metastatic variant. This pathway is the primary endogenous source for L: -serine in mammalian tissues. Consistently, we observed that the proliferation of MDA-MB-231(SA) cells in serine-free conditions was dependent on PSAT1 expression. In addition, we observed that L: -serine is essential for the formation of bone resorbing human osteoclasts and may thus contribute to the vicious cycle of osteolytic bone metastasis. High expression of PHGDH and PSAT1 in primary breast cancer was significantly associated with decreased relapse-free and overall survival of patients and malignant phenotypic features of breast cancer. In conclusion, high expression of serine biosynthesis genes in metastatic breast cancer cells and the stimulating effect of L: -serine on osteoclastogenesis and cancer cell proliferation indicate a functionally critical role for serine biosynthesis in bone metastatic breast cancer and thereby an opportunity for targeted therapeutic interventions.

  1. Multiple mutagenesis of non-universal serine codons of the Candida rugosa LIP2 gene and biochemical characterization of purified recombinant LIP2 lipase overexpressed in Pichia pastoris.

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Guan-Chiun; Lee, Li-Chiun; Sava, Vasyl; Shaw, Jei-Fu

    2002-01-01

    The 17 non-universal serine codons (CTG) in the Candida rugosa LIP2 gene have been converted into universal serine codons (TCT) by overlap extension PCR-based multiple site-directed mutagenesis. An active recombinant LIP2 lipase was overexpressed in Pichia pastoris and secreted into the culture medium. The recombinant LIP2 showed distinguishing catalytic activities when compared with recombinant LIP4 and commercial C. rugosa lipase. The purified enzyme showed optimum activity at pH 7 and a broad temperature optimum in the range 30-50 degrees C. The enzyme retained 80% of residual activity after being heated at 70 degrees C for 10 min. Recombinant LIP2 demonstrated high esterase activity towards long-chain (C12-C16) p-nitrophenyl esters. Tributyrin was the preferred substrate among all triacylglycerols tested for lipolysis. Among cholesteryl esters, LIP2 showed highest lipolytic activity towards cholesteryl laurate. The esterification of myristic acid with alcohols of various chain lengths showed that the long-chain n-octadecanol (C18) was the preferred substrate. In contrast, the esterification of n-propanol with fatty acids of various chain lengths showed that the short-chain butyric acid was the best substrate. From comparative modelling analysis, it appears that several amino acid substitutions resulting in greater hydrophobicity in the substrate-binding site might play an important role in the substrate specificity of LIP2. PMID:12020350

  2. Expression of a new serine protease from Crotalus durissus collilineatus venom in Pichia pastoris and functional comparison with the native enzyme.

    PubMed

    Boldrini-França, Johara; Santos Rodrigues, Renata; Santos-Silva, Ludier Kesser; de Souza, Dayane Lorena Naves; Gomes, Mário Sérgio Rocha; Cologna, Camila Takeno; de Pauw, Edwin; Quinton, Loïc; Henrique-Silva, Flávio; de Melo Rodrigues, Veridiana; Arantes, Eliane Candiani

    2015-12-01

    Snake venom serine proteases (SVSPs) act primarily on plasma proteins related to blood clotting and are considered promising for the treatment of several hemostatic disorders. We report the heterologous expression of a serine protease from Crotalus durissus collilineatus, named collinein-1, in Pichia pastoris, as well as the enzymatic comparative characterization of the toxin in native and recombinant forms. The complementary DNA (cDNA) encoding collinein-1 was amplified from cDNA library of C. d. collilineatus venom gland and cloned into the pPICZαA vector. The recombinant plasmid was used to transform cells of KM71H P. pastoris. Heterologous expression was induced by methanol and yielded 56 mg of recombinant collinein-1 (rCollinein-1) per liter of culture. The native collinein-1 was purified from C. d. collilineatus venom, and its identity was confirmed by amino acid sequencing. The native and recombinant enzymes showed similar effects upon bovine fibrinogen by releasing preferentially fibrinopeptide A. Although both enzymes have induced plasma coagulation, native Colinein-1 has shown higher coagulant activity. The serine proteases were able to hydrolyze the chromogenic substrates S-2222, S-2238, and S2302. Both enzymes showed high stability on different pH and temperature, and their esterase activities were inhibited in the presence of Zn2+ and Cu2+. The serine proteases showed similar k cat/K m values in enzyme kinetics assays, suggesting no significant differences in efficiency of these proteins to hydrolyze the substrate. These results demonstrated that rCollinein-1 was expressed with functional integrity on the evaluated parameters. The success in producing a functionally active recombinant SVSP may generate perspectives to their future therapeutic applications.

  3. Expression of a new serine protease from Crotalus durissus collilineatus venom in Pichia pastoris and functional comparison with the native enzyme.

    PubMed

    Boldrini-França, Johara; Santos Rodrigues, Renata; Santos-Silva, Ludier Kesser; de Souza, Dayane Lorena Naves; Gomes, Mário Sérgio Rocha; Cologna, Camila Takeno; de Pauw, Edwin; Quinton, Loïc; Henrique-Silva, Flávio; de Melo Rodrigues, Veridiana; Arantes, Eliane Candiani

    2015-12-01

    Snake venom serine proteases (SVSPs) act primarily on plasma proteins related to blood clotting and are considered promising for the treatment of several hemostatic disorders. We report the heterologous expression of a serine protease from Crotalus durissus collilineatus, named collinein-1, in Pichia pastoris, as well as the enzymatic comparative characterization of the toxin in native and recombinant forms. The complementary DNA (cDNA) encoding collinein-1 was amplified from cDNA library of C. d. collilineatus venom gland and cloned into the pPICZαA vector. The recombinant plasmid was used to transform cells of KM71H P. pastoris. Heterologous expression was induced by methanol and yielded 56 mg of recombinant collinein-1 (rCollinein-1) per liter of culture. The native collinein-1 was purified from C. d. collilineatus venom, and its identity was confirmed by amino acid sequencing. The native and recombinant enzymes showed similar effects upon bovine fibrinogen by releasing preferentially fibrinopeptide A. Although both enzymes have induced plasma coagulation, native Colinein-1 has shown higher coagulant activity. The serine proteases were able to hydrolyze the chromogenic substrates S-2222, S-2238, and S2302. Both enzymes showed high stability on different pH and temperature, and their esterase activities were inhibited in the presence of Zn2+ and Cu2+. The serine proteases showed similar k cat/K m values in enzyme kinetics assays, suggesting no significant differences in efficiency of these proteins to hydrolyze the substrate. These results demonstrated that rCollinein-1 was expressed with functional integrity on the evaluated parameters. The success in producing a functionally active recombinant SVSP may generate perspectives to their future therapeutic applications. PMID:26227411

  4. Outer membrane-associated serine protease involved in adhesion of Shewanella oneidensis to Fe(III) oxides.

    PubMed

    Burns, Justin L; Ginn, Brian R; Bates, David J; Dublin, Steven N; Taylor, Jeanette V; Apkarian, Robert P; Amaro-Garcia, Samary; Neal, Andrew L; Dichristina, Thomas J

    2010-01-01

    The facultative anaerobe Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 respires a variety of anaerobic electron acceptors, including insoluble Fe(III) oxides. S. oneidensis employs a number of novel strategies for respiration of insoluble Fe(III) oxides, including localization of respiratory proteins to the cell outer membrane (OM). The molecular mechanism by which S. oneidensis adheres to and respires Fe(III) oxides, however, remains poorly understood. In the present study, whole cell fractionation and MALDI-TOF-MS/MS techniques were combined to identify a serine protease (SO3800) associated with the S. oneidensis OM. SO3800 contained predicted structural motifs similar to cell surface-associated serine proteases that function as bacterial adhesins in other gram-negative bacteria. The gene encoding SO3800 was deleted from the S. oneidensis genome, and the resulting mutant strain (DeltaSO3800) was tested for its ability to adhere to and respire Fe(III) oxides. DeltaSO3800 was severely impaired in its ability to adhere to Fe(III) oxides, yet retained wild-type Fe(III) respiratory capability. Laser Doppler velocimetry and cryoetch high-resolution SEM experiments indicated that DeltaSO3800 displayed a lower cell surface charge and higher amount of surface-associated exopolysaccharides. Results of this study indicate that S. oneidensis may respire insoluble Fe(III) oxides at a distance, negating the requirement for attachment prior to electron transfer.

  5. Ketamine Metabolites Enantioselectively Decrease Intracellular D-Serine Concentrations in PC-12 Cells

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Nagendra S.; Rutkowska, Ewelina; Plazinska, Anita; Khadeer, Mohammed; Moaddel, Ruin; Jozwiak, Krzysztof; Bernier, Michel; Wainer, Irving W.

    2016-01-01

    D-Serine is an endogenous NMDA receptor co-agonist that activates synaptic NMDA receptors modulating neuronal networks in the cerebral cortex and plays a key role in long-term potentiation of synaptic transmission. D-serine is associated with NMDA receptor neurotoxicity and neurodegeneration and elevated D-serine concentrations have been associated with Alzheimer’s and Parkinsons’ diseases and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. Previous studies have demonstrated that the ketamine metabolites (rac)-dehydronorketamine and (2S,6S)-hydroxynorketamine decrease intracellular D-serine concentrations in a concentration dependent manner in PC-12 cells. In the current study, PC-12 cells were incubated with a series of ketamine metabolites and the IC50 values associated with attenuated intracellular D-serine concentrations were determined. The results demonstrate that structural and stereochemical features of the studied compounds contribute to the magnitude of the inhibitory effect with (2S,6S)-hydroxynorketamine and (2R,6R)-hydroxynorketamine displaying the most potent inhibition with IC50 values of 0.18 ± 0.04 nM and 0.68 ± 0.09 nM. The data was utilized to construct a preliminary 3D-QSAR/pharmacophore model for use in the design of new and more efficient modulators of D-serine. PMID:27096720

  6. Influence of parasite encoded inhibitors of serine peptidases in early infection of macrophages with Leishmania major

    PubMed Central

    Eschenlauer, Sylvain C P; Faria, Marilia S; Morrison, Lesley S; Bland, Nicolas; Ribeiro-Gomes, Flavia L; DosReis, George A; Coombs, Graham H; Lima, Ana Paula C A; Mottram, Jeremy C

    2009-01-01

    Ecotin is a potent inhibitor of family S1A serine peptidases, enzymes lacking in the protozoan parasite Leishmania major. Nevertheless, L. major has three ecotin-like genes, termed inhibitor of serine peptidase (ISP). ISP1 is expressed in vector-borne procyclic and metacyclic promastigotes, whereas ISP2 is also expressed in the mammalian amastigote stage. Recombinant ISP2 inhibited neutrophil elastase, trypsin and chymotrypsin with Kis between 7.7 and 83 nM. L. major ISP2–ISP3 double null mutants (Δisp2/3) were created. These grew normally as promastigotes, but were internalized by macrophages more efficiently than wild-type parasites due to the upregulation of phagocytosis by a mechanism dependent on serine peptidase activity. Δisp2/3 promastigotes transformed to amastigotes, but failed to divide for 48 h. Intracellular multiplication of Δisp2/3 was similar to wild-type parasites when serine peptidase inhibitors were present, suggesting that defective intracellular growth results from the lack of serine peptidase inhibition during promastigote uptake. Δisp2/3 mutants were more infective than wild-type parasites to BALB/c mice at the early stages of infection, but became equivalent as the infection progressed. These data support the hypothesis that ISPs of L. major target host serine peptidases and influence the early stages of infection of the mammalian host. PMID:19016791

  7. Stat5a serine 725 and 779 phosphorylation is a prerequisite for hematopoietic transformation

    PubMed Central

    Friedbichler, Katrin; Kerenyi, Marc A.; Kovacic, Boris; Li, Geqiang; Hoelbl, Andrea; Yahiaoui, Saliha; Sexl, Veronika; Müllner, Ernst W.; Fajmann, Sabine; Cerny-Reiterer, Sabine; Valent, Peter; Beug, Hartmut; Gouilleux, Fabrice; Bunting, Kevin D.

    2010-01-01

    Stat5 transcription factors are essential gene regulators promoting proliferation, survival, and differentiation of all hematopoietic cell types. Mutations or fusions of oncogenic tyrosine kinases often result in constitutive Stat5 activation. We have modeled persistent Stat5 activity by using an oncogenic Stat5a variant (cS5). To analyze the hitherto unrecognized role of Stat5 serine phosphorylation in this context, we have generated cS5 constructs with mutated C-terminal serines 725 and 779, either alone or in combination. Genetic complementation assays in primary Stat5null/null mast cells and Stat5ΔN T cells demonstrated reconstitution of proliferation with these mutants. Similarly, an in vivo reconstitution experiment of transduced Stat5null/null fetal liver cells transplanted into irradiated wild-type recipients revealed that these mutants exhibit biologic activity in lineage differentiation. By contrast, the leukemogenic potential of cS5 in bone marrow transplants decreased dramatically in cS5 single-serine mutants or was completely absent upon loss of both serine phosphorylation sites. Our data suggest that Stat5a serine phosphorylation is a prerequisite for cS5-mediated leukemogenesis. Hence, interference with Stat5a serine phosphorylation might provide a new therapeutic option for leukemia and myeloid dysplasias without affecting major functions of Stat5 in normal hematopoiesis. PMID:20508164

  8. Structural Mechanisms of Inactivation in Scabies Mite Serine Protease Paralogues

    SciTech Connect

    Fischer, Katja; Langendorf, Christopher G.; Irving, James A.; Reynolds, Simone; Willis, Charlene; Beckham, Simone; Law, Ruby H.P.; Yang, Sundy; Bashtannyk-Puhalovich, Tanya A.; McGowan, Sheena; Whisstock, James C.; Pike, Robert N.; Kemp, David J.; Buckle, Ashley M.

    2009-08-07

    The scabies mite (Sarcoptes scabiei) is a parasite responsible for major morbidity in disadvantaged communities and immuno-compromised patients worldwide. In addition to the physical discomfort caused by the disease, scabies infestations facilitate infection by Streptococcal species via skin lesions, resulting in a high prevalence of rheumatic fever/heart disease in affected communities. The scabies mite produces 33 proteins that are closely related to those in the dust mite group 3 allergen and belong to the S1-like protease family (chymotrypsin-like). However, all but one of these molecules contain mutations in the conserved active-site catalytic triad that are predicted to render them catalytically inactive. These molecules are thus termed scabies mite inactivated protease paralogues (SMIPPs). The precise function of SMIPPs is unclear; however, it has been suggested that these proteins might function by binding and protecting target substrates from cleavage by host immune proteases, thus preventing the host from mounting an effective immune challenge. In order to begin to understand the structural basis for SMIPP function, we solved the crystal structures of SMIPP-S-I1 and SMIPP-S-D1 at 1.85 {angstrom} and 2.0 {angstrom} resolution, respectively. Both structures adopt the characteristic serine protease fold, albeit with large structural variations over much of the molecule. In both structures, mutations in the catalytic triad together with occlusion of the S1 subsite by a conserved Tyr200 residue is predicted to block substrate ingress. Accordingly, we show that both proteases lack catalytic function. Attempts to restore function (via site-directed mutagenesis of catalytic residues as well as Tyr200) were unsuccessful. Taken together, these data suggest that SMIPPs have lost the ability to bind substrates in a classical 'canonical' fashion, and instead have evolved alternative functions in the lifecycle of the scabies mite.

  9. Serine-71 phosphorylation of Rac1 modulates downstream signaling.

    PubMed

    Schwarz, Janett; Proff, Julia; Hävemeier, Anika; Ladwein, Markus; Rottner, Klemens; Barlag, Britta; Pich, Andreas; Tatge, Helma; Just, Ingo; Gerhard, Ralf

    2012-01-01

    The Rho GTPases Rac1 and Cdc42 regulate a variety of cellular functions by signaling to different signal pathways. It is believed that the presence of a specific effector at the location of GTPase activation determines the route of downstream signaling. We previously reported about EGF-induced Ser-71 phosphorylation of Rac1/Cdc42. By using the phosphomimetic S71E-mutants of Rac1 and Cdc42 we investigated the impact of Ser-71 phosphorylation on binding to selected effector proteins. Binding of the constitutively active (Q61L) variants of Rac1 and Cdc42 to their specific interaction partners Sra-1 and N-WASP, respectively, as well as to their common effector protein PAK was abrogated when Ser-71 was exchanged to glutamate as phosphomimetic substitution. Interaction with their common effector proteins IQGAP1/2/3 or MRCK alpha was, however, hardly affected. This ambivalent behaviour was obvious in functional assays. In contrast to Rac1 Q61L, phosphomimetic Rac1 Q61L/S71E was not a