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Sample records for acids lysine arginine

  1. Arginine and lysine decarboxylases and the acid tolerance response of Salmonella Typhimurium.

    PubMed

    Alvarez-Ordóñez, Avelino; Fernández, Ana; Bernardo, Ana; López, Mercedes

    2010-01-01

    Salmonella Typhimurium CECT 443 inactivation at pH 2.5 in Mineral Medium (MM) and MM supplemented with 0.01% (w/v) arginine, lysine or glutamic acid was studied using stationary-phase cells grown in buffered BHI pH 7.0 (non-acid adapted cells) and acidified BHI up to pH 4.5 with acetic, citric, lactic and hydrochloric acids (acid adapted cells). In all cases, acid adapted cells, with D-values ranging from 23.34 to 86.90 min, showed a significantly higher acid resistance than non-acid adapted cells, with D-values between 8.90 and 10.29 min. Whereas the conditions used for acid adaptation did not exert a significant effect on the acid resistance of the S. Typhimurium CECT 443 resulting cells, the inclusion of lysine and arginine in the challenge medium protected them against acid inactivation, reaching D-values of about 2 and 3 times higher, respectively, than those found in MM or MM supplemented with glutamic acid. None of these three amino acids significantly modified the acid resistance of non-acid adapted cells. The relative expression level of adiA (encoding the arginine decarboxylase), adiY (encoding the transcriptional activator of adiA), cadA (encoding the lysine decarboxylase) and cadB (encoding the lysine/cadaverine transport protein) was examined by quantitative PCR. Acid adapted cells showed higher relative expression levels for both systems, arginine decarboxylase and lysine decarboxylase, which demonstrates that the induction of specialized pH-homeostatic systems plays an important role in S. Typhimurium CECT 443 protection against acid stress. However, the increased acid resistance showed by acid adapted cells challenged in MM arginine or lysine free suggests the existence of other microbial survival strategies.

  2. Characterization and detection of lysine-arginine cross-links derived from dehydroascorbic acid.

    PubMed

    Reihl, Oliver; Lederer, Markus O; Schwack, Wolfgang

    2004-02-25

    Covalently cross-linked proteins are among the major modifications caused by the advanced Maillard reaction. So far, the chemical nature of these aggregates is largely unknown. L-dehydroascorbic acid (DHA, 5), the oxidation product of L-ascorbic acid (vitamin C), is known as a potent glycation agent. Identification is reported for the lysine-arginine cross-links N6-[2-[(4-amino-4-carboxybutyl)amino]-5-(2-hydroxyethyl)-3,5-dihydro-4H-imidazol-4-ylidene]-L-lysine (9), N6-[2-[(4-amino-4-carboxybutyl)amino]-5-(1,2-dihydroxyethyl)-3,5-dihydro-4H-imidazol-4-ylidene]-L-lysine (11), and N6-[2-[(4-amino-4-carboxybutyl)amino]-5-[(1S,2S)-1,2,3-trihydroxypropyl]-3,5-dihydro-4H-imidazol-4-ylidene]-L-lysine (13). The formation pathways could be established starting from dehydroascorbic acid (5), the degradation products 1,3,4-trihydroxybutan-2-one (7, L-erythrulose), 3,4-dihydroxy-2-oxobutanal (10, L-threosone), and L-threo-pentos-2-ulose (12, L-xylosone) were proven as precursors of the lysine-arginine cross-links 9, 11, and 13. Products 9 and 11 were synthesized starting from DHA 5, compound N6-[2-[(4-amino-4-carboxybutyl)amino]-5-[(1S,2R)-1,2,3-trihydroxypropyl]-3,5-dihydro-4H-imidazol-4-ylidene]-L-lysine (16) via the precursor D-erythro-pentos-2-ulose (15). The present study revealed that the modification of lysine and arginine side chains by DHA 5 is a complex process and could involve a number of reactive carbonyl species.

  3. Effect of amino acids lysine and arginine on fracture healing in rabbits: A radiological and histomorphological analysis

    PubMed Central

    Sinha, Shivam; Goel, Satish Chandra

    2009-01-01

    Background: Amino acids like arginine and lysine have been suggested to hasten the process of fracture healing by improving the local blood supply, supplementing growth factors, and improving collagen synthesis. We studied the role of lysine and arginine in the fracture repair process with regard to the rate of healing, probable mechanisms involved in the process, and mutual synergism between these agents. Materials and Methods: In an experimental study, 40 rabbits were subjected to ulnar osteotomy. They were distributed in control (14) and test groups (26). Twenty-six animals in the test group were fed with a diet rich in lysine and arginine. Both the groups were followed radiologically and histologically till union. Results: There was better healing of osteotomy in terms of better vascularization, callus formation, and mineralization in the test group. The time of healing in the test group was reduced by a period of 2 weeks. Conclusion: We conclude that amino acids like arginine and lysine may hasten fracture healing. PMID:19838381

  4. Arginine and Lysine Transporters Are Essential for Trypanosoma brucei

    PubMed Central

    Hürlimann, Daniel; Wirdnam, Corina; Haindrich, Alexander C.; Suter Grotemeyer, Marianne; González-Salgado, Amaia; Schmidt, Remo S.; Inbar, Ehud; Mäser, Pascal; Bütikofer, Peter; Zilberstein, Dan; Rentsch, Doris

    2017-01-01

    For Trypanosoma brucei arginine and lysine are essential amino acids and therefore have to be imported from the host. Heterologous expression in Saccharomyces cerevisiae mutants identified cationic amino acid transporters among members of the T. brucei AAAP (amino acid/auxin permease) family. TbAAT5-3 showed high affinity arginine uptake (Km 3.6 ± 0.4 μM) and high selectivity for L-arginine. L-arginine transport was reduced by a 10-times excess of L-arginine, homo-arginine, canavanine or arginine-β-naphthylamide, while lysine was inhibitory only at 100-times excess, and histidine or ornithine did not reduce arginine uptake rates significantly. TbAAT16-1 is a high affinity (Km 4.3 ± 0.5 μM) and highly selective L-lysine transporter and of the compounds tested, only L-lysine and thialysine were competing for L-lysine uptake. TbAAT5-3 and TbAAT16-1 are expressed in both procyclic and bloodstream form T. brucei and cMyc-tagged proteins indicate localization at the plasma membrane. RNAi-mediated down-regulation of TbAAT5 and TbAAT16 in bloodstream form trypanosomes resulted in growth arrest, demonstrating that TbAAT5-mediated arginine and TbAAT16-mediated lysine transport are essential for T. brucei. Growth of induced RNAi lines could partially be rescued by supplementing a surplus of arginine or lysine, respectively, while addition of both amino acids was less efficient. Single and double RNAi lines indicate that additional low affinity uptake systems for arginine and lysine are present in T. brucei. PMID:28045943

  5. THE BASIS OF STABILITY IN LYSINE AND ARGININE SALTS OF UNSATURATED FATTY ACIDS.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    LINOLEIC ACID , STABILIZATION), (* FATTY ACIDS , STABILITY), (*AMINO ACIDS , SALTS), (*ANTIOXIDANTS, AMINO ACIDS ), DEHYDRATED FOODS, ADDITIVES...PRESERVATION, COMPLEX COMPOUNDS, ELECTRICAL CONDUCTIVITY, INFRARED SPECTRA, NUCLEAR MAGNETIC RESONANCE, CHROMATOGRAPHIC ANALYSIS, X RAY DIFFRACTION, CRYSTAL LATTICES, MOLECULAR ISOMERISM, FATTY ACID ESTERS

  6. Production of the amino acids l-glutamate, l-lysine, l-ornithine and l-arginine from arabinose by recombinant Corynebacterium glutamicum.

    PubMed

    Schneider, Jens; Niermann, Karin; Wendisch, Volker F

    2011-07-10

    Amino acid production processes with Corynebacterium glutamicum are based on media containing glucose from starch hydrolysis or fructose and sucrose as present in molasses. Simultaneous utilization of various carbon sources, including glucose, fructose and sucrose, in blends is a typical characteristic of this bacterium. The renewable non-food carbon source arabinose, which is present in hemicellulosic hydrolysates, cannot be utilized by most C. glutamicum strains. Heterologous expression of the araBAD operon from Escherichia coli in the wild-type and in an l-lysine producing strain of C. glutamicum was shown to enable production of l-glutamate and l-lysine, respectively, from arabinose as sole carbon source. l-Ornithine and l-arginine producing strains were constructed and shown to produce l-ornithine and l-arginine from arabinose when araBAD from E. coli was expressed. Moreover, the recombinant strains produced l-glutamate, l-lysine, l-ornithine and l-arginine respectively, from arabinose also when glucose-arabinose blends were used as carbon sources.

  7. Quantum Computational Calculations of the Ionization Energies of Acidic and Basic Amino Acids: Aspartate, Glutamate, Arginine, Lysine, and Histidine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Guzman, C. P.; Andrianarijaona, M.; Lee, Y. S.; Andrianarijaona, V.

    An extensive knowledge of the ionization energies of amino acids can provide vital information on protein sequencing, structure, and function. Acidic and basic amino acids are unique because they have three ionizable groups: the C-terminus, the N-terminus, and the side chain. The effects of multiple ionizable groups can be seen in how Aspartate's ionizable side chain heavily influences its preferred conformation (J Phys Chem A. 2011 April 7; 115(13): 2900-2912). Theoretical and experimental data on the ionization energies of many of these molecules is sparse. Considering each atom of the amino acid as a potential departing site for the electron gives insight on how the three ionizable groups affect the ionization process of the molecule and the dynamic coupling between the vibrational modes. In the following study, we optimized the structure of each acidic and basic amino acid then exported the three dimensional coordinates of the amino acids. We used ORCA to calculate single point energies for a region near the optimized coordinates and systematically went through the x, y, and z coordinates of each atom in the neutral and ionized forms of the amino acid. With the calculations, we were able to graph energy potential curves to better understand the quantum dynamic properties of the amino acids. The authors thank Pacific Union College Student Association for providing funds.

  8. A Study on the Effect of Surface Lysine to Arginine Mutagenesis on Protein Stability and Structure Using Green Fluorescent Protein

    PubMed Central

    Sokalingam, Sriram; Raghunathan, Govindan; Soundrarajan, Nagasundarapandian; Lee, Sun-Gu

    2012-01-01

    Two positively charged basic amino acids, arginine and lysine, are mostly exposed to protein surface, and play important roles in protein stability by forming electrostatic interactions. In particular, the guanidinium group of arginine allows interactions in three possible directions, which enables arginine to form a larger number of electrostatic interactions compared to lysine. The higher pKa of the basic residue in arginine may also generate more stable ionic interactions than lysine. This paper reports an investigation whether the advantageous properties of arginine over lysine can be utilized to enhance protein stability. A variant of green fluorescent protein (GFP) was created by mutating the maximum possible number of lysine residues on the surface to arginines while retaining the activity. When the stability of the variant was examined under a range of denaturing conditions, the variant was relatively more stable compared to control GFP in the presence of chemical denaturants such as urea, alkaline pH and ionic detergents, but the thermal stability of the protein was not changed. The modeled structure of the variant indicated putative new salt bridges and hydrogen bond interactions that help improve the rigidity of the protein against different chemical denaturants. Structural analyses of the electrostatic interactions also confirmed that the geometric properties of the guanidinium group in arginine had such effects. On the other hand, the altered electrostatic interactions induced by the mutagenesis of surface lysines to arginines adversely affected protein folding, which decreased the productivity of the functional form of the variant. These results suggest that the surface lysine mutagenesis to arginines can be considered one of the parameters in protein stability engineering. PMID:22792305

  9. A study on the effect of surface lysine to arginine mutagenesis on protein stability and structure using green fluorescent protein.

    PubMed

    Sokalingam, Sriram; Raghunathan, Govindan; Soundrarajan, Nagasundarapandian; Lee, Sun-Gu

    2012-01-01

    Two positively charged basic amino acids, arginine and lysine, are mostly exposed to protein surface, and play important roles in protein stability by forming electrostatic interactions. In particular, the guanidinium group of arginine allows interactions in three possible directions, which enables arginine to form a larger number of electrostatic interactions compared to lysine. The higher pKa of the basic residue in arginine may also generate more stable ionic interactions than lysine. This paper reports an investigation whether the advantageous properties of arginine over lysine can be utilized to enhance protein stability. A variant of green fluorescent protein (GFP) was created by mutating the maximum possible number of lysine residues on the surface to arginines while retaining the activity. When the stability of the variant was examined under a range of denaturing conditions, the variant was relatively more stable compared to control GFP in the presence of chemical denaturants such as urea, alkaline pH and ionic detergents, but the thermal stability of the protein was not changed. The modeled structure of the variant indicated putative new salt bridges and hydrogen bond interactions that help improve the rigidity of the protein against different chemical denaturants. Structural analyses of the electrostatic interactions also confirmed that the geometric properties of the guanidinium group in arginine had such effects. On the other hand, the altered electrostatic interactions induced by the mutagenesis of surface lysines to arginines adversely affected protein folding, which decreased the productivity of the functional form of the variant. These results suggest that the surface lysine mutagenesis to arginines can be considered one of the parameters in protein stability engineering.

  10. Effect of dietary lysine restriction and arginine supplementation in two patients with pyridoxine-dependent epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Yuzyuk, Tatiana; Thomas, Amanda; Viau, Krista; Liu, Aiping; De Biase, Irene; Botto, Lorenzo D; Pasquali, Marzia; Longo, Nicola

    2016-07-01

    Pyridoxine-Dependent Epilepsy (PDE) is a recessive disorder caused by deficiency of α-aminoadipic semialdehyde dehydrogenase in the catabolic pathway of lysine. It is characterized by intractable seizures controlled by the administration of pharmacological doses of vitamin B6. Despite seizure control with pyridoxine, intellectual disability and developmental delays are still observed in some patients with PDE, likely due to the accumulation of toxic intermediates in the lysine catabolic pathway: alpha-aminoadipic semialdehyde (AASA), delta-1-piperideine-6-carboxylate (P6C), and pipecolic acid. Here we evaluate biochemical and clinical parameters in two PDE patients treated with a lysine-restricted diet and arginine supplementation (100-150mg/kg), aimed at reducing the levels of PDE biomarkers. Lysine restriction resulted in decreased accumulation of PDE biomarkers and improved development. Plasma lysine but not plasma arginine, directly correlated with plasma levels of AASA-P6C (p<0.001, r(2)=0.640) and pipecolic acid (p<0.01, r(2)=0.484). In addition, plasma threonine strongly correlated with the levels of AASA-P6C (p<0.0001, r(2)=0.732) and pipecolic acid (p<0.005, r(2)=0.527), suggesting extreme sensitivity of threonine catabolism to pyridoxine availability. Our results further support the use of dietary therapies in combination with pyridoxine for the treatment of PDE.

  11. Polydiacetylenyl β-cyclodextrin based smart vesicles for colorimetric assay of arginine and lysine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Eunae; Kim, Hwanhee; Choi, Youngjin; Paik, Seung R.; Jung, Seunho

    2016-08-01

    Selective visualization of arginine and lysine has been explored among 20 amino acids using the hybrid conjugate of β-cyclodextrin (β-CD) and polydiacetylene (PDA). The mono pentacosa-10,12-diynyl aminomethyl group was successfully coupled to either the primary or the secondary face of β-CD, where mono-6-amino-6-deoxy-β-CD or mono-3-amino-3-deoxy-β-CD reacted with the N-hydroxysuccinimide ester of 10,12-pentacosadiynoic acid. In this combinatorial system, the cylindrical β-cyclodextrin functions as a channel for the introduction of the cationic amino acids to the artificial membrane. The membrane perturbation and aggregation by the target amino acids could be exclusively visualized as a blue to red color change based on the responsive polydiacetylene domain. These interesting findings demonstrated that the developed β-CD conjugated PDA system may offer a new method of cell-penetrating mechanism, a promising vector system, as well as impact the production industry of arginine or lysine.

  12. Polydiacetylenyl β-cyclodextrin based smart vesicles for colorimetric assay of arginine and lysine

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Eunae; Kim, Hwanhee; Choi, Youngjin; Paik, Seung R.; Jung, Seunho

    2016-01-01

    Selective visualization of arginine and lysine has been explored among 20 amino acids using the hybrid conjugate of β-cyclodextrin (β-CD) and polydiacetylene (PDA). The mono pentacosa-10,12-diynyl aminomethyl group was successfully coupled to either the primary or the secondary face of β-CD, where mono-6-amino-6-deoxy-β-CD or mono-3-amino-3-deoxy-β-CD reacted with the N-hydroxysuccinimide ester of 10,12-pentacosadiynoic acid. In this combinatorial system, the cylindrical β-cyclodextrin functions as a channel for the introduction of the cationic amino acids to the artificial membrane. The membrane perturbation and aggregation by the target amino acids could be exclusively visualized as a blue to red color change based on the responsive polydiacetylene domain. These interesting findings demonstrated that the developed β-CD conjugated PDA system may offer a new method of cell-penetrating mechanism, a promising vector system, as well as impact the production industry of arginine or lysine. PMID:27502314

  13. Lysine and arginine biosyntheses mediated by a common carrier protein in Sulfolobus.

    PubMed

    Ouchi, Takuya; Tomita, Takeo; Horie, Akira; Yoshida, Ayako; Takahashi, Kento; Nishida, Hiromi; Lassak, Kerstin; Taka, Hikari; Mineki, Reiko; Fujimura, Tsutomu; Kosono, Saori; Nishiyama, Chiharu; Masui, Ryoji; Kuramitsu, Seiki; Albers, Sonja-Verena; Kuzuyama, Tomohisa; Nishiyama, Makoto

    2013-04-01

    LysW has been identified as a carrier protein in the lysine biosynthetic pathway that is active through the conversion of α-aminoadipate (AAA) to lysine. In this study, we found that the hyperthermophilic archaeon, Sulfolobus acidocaldarius, not only biosynthesizes lysine through LysW-mediated protection of AAA but also uses LysW to protect the amino group of glutamate in arginine biosynthesis. In this archaeon, after LysW modification, AAA and glutamate are converted to lysine and ornithine, respectively, by a single set of enzymes with dual functions. The crystal structure of ArgX, the enzyme responsible for modification and protection of the amino moiety of glutamate with LysW, was determined in complex with LysW. Structural comparison and enzymatic characterization using Sulfolobus LysX, Sulfolobus ArgX and Thermus LysX identify the amino acid motif responsible for substrate discrimination between AAA and glutamate. Phylogenetic analysis reveals that gene duplication events at different stages of evolution led to ArgX and LysX.

  14. Role of Arginine and Lysine in the Antimicrobial Mechanism of Histone-derived Antimicrobial Peptides

    PubMed Central

    Cutrona, Kara J.; Kaufman, Bethany A.; Figueroa, Dania M.; Elmore, Donald E.

    2015-01-01

    Translocation of cell-penetrating peptides is often promoted by increased content of arginine or other guanidinum groups. However, relatively little research has considered the role of these functional groups on antimicrobial peptide activity. This study compared the activity of three histone-derived antimicrobial peptides—buforin II, DesHDAP1, and parasin— with variants that contain only lysine or arginine cationic residues. These peptides operate via different mechanisms as parasin causes membrane permeabilization while buforin II and DesHDAP1 translocate into bacteria. For all peptides, antibacterial activity increased with increased arginine content. Higher arginine content increased permeabilization for parasin while it improved translocation for buforin II and DesHDAP1. These observations provide insight into the relative importance of arginine and lysine in these antimicrobial peptides. PMID:26555191

  15. Complexation des acides aminés basiques arginine, histidine et lysine avec l'ADN plasmidique en solution aqueuse : participation à la capture de radicaux sous irradiation X à 1,5 keV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tariq Khalil, Talat; Taillefumier, Baptiste; Boulanouar, Omar; Mavon, Christophe; Fromm, Michel

    2016-09-01

    L'environnement chimique de l'ADN en situation biologique est complexe notam-ment en raison de la présence d'histones, protéines nucléaires, associées en quantité approximativement égales à l'ADN pour former la chromatine. Les histones possèdent de nombreux radicaux basiques arginine et lysine chargés positivement et dont la majorité se trouve sur les chaînes émergentes, l'ADN présente quant à lui des charges négatives sur ses groupements phosphates localisés tout au long de la double hélice. Dans cette étude, la complexité de la structure de la chromatine nucléaire est dans un premier temps mimée en solution aqueuse par la formation de complexes entre un ADN plasmidique sonde et les trois acides aminés basiques, Arg, His, Lys, qui, mis à part His, sont protonés au pH physiologique. Ces acides aminés libres en solution sont réputés être des capteurs efficaces de radicaux libres, notamment pour le radical hydroxyle, conférant ainsi un pouvoir protecteur vis-à-vis des effets indirects sur l'ADN en situation d'exposition aux rayonnements ionisants. A concentration fixée, les capacités de capture des acides aminés libres, σ, pour le radical hydroxyle sont typiquement les suivantes σHis ≈σArg > σLys (σLys ≈ 0,1 × σArg). Nous avons mesuré les taux de cassures simple brin par plasmide et par Gray (χ) lors d'expositions de solutions aqueuses de complexes [acide aminé - ADN plasmidique] aux rayons X ultra-mous (1,5 keV). A concentrations égales, les trois acides aminés complexés et présents en large excès ne manifestent pas une capacité de protection de l'ADN proportionnelle à leur capacité de capture libre et en solution ; on trouve en effet des taux de cassures dans l'ordre suivant χHis > χArg > χLys (χLys ≈ 0,01 χArg). Après avoir détaillé le mode opératoire de ces mesures, nous analyserons sur des bases bibliographiques, les modes spécifiques d'interaction des acides aminés basiques avec l'ADN. La sp

  16. Analysis of arginine and lysine methylation utilizing peptide separations at neutral pH and electron transfer dissociation mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Snijders, Ambrosius P L; Hung, Ming-Lung; Wilson, Stuart A; Dickman, Mark J

    2010-01-01

    Arginine and lysine methylation are widespread protein post-translational modifications. Peptides containing these modifications are difficult to retain using traditional reversed-phase liquid chromatography because they are intrinsically basic/hydrophilic and often fragment poorly during collision induced fragmentation (CID). Therefore, they are difficult to analyze using standard proteomic workflows. To overcome these caveats, we performed peptide separations at neutral pH, resulting in increased retention of the hydrophilic/basic methylated peptides before identification using MS/MS. Alternatively trifluoroacetic acid (TFA) was used for increased trapping of methylated peptides. Electron-transfer dissociation (ETD) mass spectrometry was then used to identify and characterize methylated residues. In contrast to previous reports utilizing ETD for arginine methylation, we observed significant amount of side-chain fragmentation. Using heavy methyl stable isotope labeling with amino acids in cell culture it was shown that, similar to CID, a loss of monomethylamine or dimethylamine from the arginine methylated side-chain during ETD can be used as a diagnostic to determine the type of arginine methylation. CID of lysine methylated peptides does not lead to significant neutral losses, but ETD is still beneficial because of the high charge states of such peptides. The developed LC MS/MS methods were successfully applied to tryptic digests of a number of methylated proteins, including splicing factor proline-glutamine-rich protein (SFPQ), RNA and export factor-binding protein 2 (REF2-I) and Sul7D, demonstrating significant advantages over traditional LC MS/MS approaches.

  17. Arginine and lysine reduce the high viscosity of serum albumin solutions for pharmaceutical injection.

    PubMed

    Inoue, Naoto; Takai, Eisuke; Arakawa, Tsutomu; Shiraki, Kentaro

    2014-05-01

    Therapeutic protein solutions for subcutaneous injection must be very highly concentrated, which increases their viscosity through protein-protein interactions. However, maintaining a solution viscosity below 50 cP is important for the preparation and injection of therapeutic protein solutions. In this study, we examined the effect of various amino acids on the solution viscosity of very highly concentrated bovine serum albumin (BSA) and human serum albumin (HSA) at a physiological pH. Among the amino acids tested, l-arginine hydrochloride (ArgHCl) and l-lysine hydrochloride (LysHCl) (50-200 mM) successfully reduced the viscosity of both BSA and HSA solutions; guanidine hydrochloride (GdnHCl), NaCl, and other sodium salts were equally as effective, indicating the electrostatic shielding effect of these additives. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy showed that BSA is in its native state even in the presence of ArgHCl, LysHCl, and NaCl at high protein concentrations. These results indicate that weakened protein-protein interactions play a key role in reducing solution viscosity. ArgHCl and LysHCl, which are also non-toxic compounds, will be used as additives to reduce the solution viscosity of concentrated therapeutic proteins.

  18. Computational prediction of methylation types of covalently modified lysine and arginine residues in proteins.

    PubMed

    Deng, Wankun; Wang, Yongbo; Ma, Lili; Zhang, Ying; Ullah, Shahid; Xue, Yu

    2016-05-30

    Protein methylation is an essential posttranslational modification (PTM) mostly occurs at lysine and arginine residues, and regulates a variety of cellular processes. Owing to the rapid progresses in the large-scale identification of methylation sites, the available data set was dramatically expanded, and more attention has been paid on the identification of specific methylation types of modification residues. Here, we briefly summarized the current progresses in computational prediction of methylation sites, which provided an accurate, rapid and efficient approach in contrast with labor-intensive experiments. We collected 5421 methyllysines and methylarginines in 2592 proteins from the literature, and classified most of the sites into different types. Data analyses demonstrated that different types of methylated proteins were preferentially involved in different biological processes and pathways, whereas a unique sequence preference was observed for each type of methylation sites. Thus, we developed a predictor of GPS-MSP, which can predict mono-, di- and tri-methylation types for specific lysines, and mono-, symmetric di- and asymmetrical di-methylation types for specific arginines. We critically evaluated the performance of GPS-MSP, and compared it with other existing tools. The satisfying results exhibited that the classification of methylation sites into different types for training can considerably improve the prediction accuracy. Taken together, we anticipate that our study provides a new lead for future computational analysis of protein methylation, and the prediction of methylation types of covalently modified lysine and arginine residues can generate more useful information for further experimental manipulation.

  19. Arginine demethylation is catalysed by a subset of JmjC histone lysine demethylases

    PubMed Central

    Walport, Louise J.; Hopkinson, Richard J.; Chowdhury, Rasheduzzaman; Schiller, Rachel; Ge, Wei; Kawamura, Akane; Schofield, Christopher J.

    2016-01-01

    While the oxygen-dependent reversal of lysine Nɛ-methylation is well established, the existence of bona fide Nω-methylarginine demethylases (RDMs) is controversial. Lysine demethylation, as catalysed by two families of lysine demethylases (the flavin-dependent KDM1 enzymes and the 2-oxoglutarate- and oxygen-dependent JmjC KDMs, respectively), proceeds via oxidation of the N-methyl group, resulting in the release of formaldehyde. Here we report detailed biochemical studies clearly demonstrating that, in purified form, a subset of JmjC KDMs can also act as RDMs, both on histone and non-histone fragments, resulting in formaldehyde release. RDM catalysis is studied using peptides of wild-type sequences known to be arginine-methylated and sequences in which the KDM's methylated target lysine is substituted for a methylated arginine. Notably, the preferred sequence requirements for KDM and RDM activity vary even with the same JmjC enzymes. The demonstration of RDM activity by isolated JmjC enzymes will stimulate efforts to detect biologically relevant RDM activity. PMID:27337104

  20. Chemical modification of lysine and arginine residues of bovine heart 2-oxoglutarate dehydrogenase: effect on the enzyme activity and regulation.

    PubMed

    Ostrovtsova, S A

    1998-01-01

    Chemical modification of arginine and lysine residues of bovine heart 2-oxoglutarate dehydrogenase with phenylglyoxal and pyridoxal 5'-phosphate inactivated the enzyme, indicating the importance of these residues for the catalysis. Inactivation caused by pyridoxal 5'-phosphate was prevented in the presence of thiamine pyrophosphate and Mg2+ allowing the assumption that lysine residues participate in binding of the cofactor.

  1. Neither arginine nor histidine can carry out the function of lysine-295 in the ATP-binding site of p60src.

    PubMed Central

    Kamps, M P; Sefton, B M

    1986-01-01

    All 15 protein kinases whose amino acid sequence is known contain a lysine residue at a position homologous to that of lysine-295 in p60src, the transforming protein of Rous sarcoma virus. The ATP analog p-fluorosulfonyl 5'-benzoyl adenosine inactivates both p60src and the catalytic subunit of the cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase by modification of this lysine. We used oligonucleotide-directed mutagenesis to examine the possible functions of this residue. Lysine-295 in p60src was replaced with a glutamic acid, an arginine, or a histidine residue, and mutant p60src proteins were characterized in chicken cells infected by mutant viruses. None of these three mutant p60src proteins had tyrosine protein kinase activity in vitro, and none induced morphological transformation of infected cells. Since neither a histidine nor an arginine residue can replace the function of lysine-295, we suggest that it carries out the specialized function of proton transfer in the phosphotransferase reaction. All three mutant viruses underwent reversion to wild type during passage in tissue culture. Because the rate with which this occurred differed significantly among the mutants, reversion appears to have resulted from errors in transcription, rather than from recombination with the cellular src gene. Images PMID:2430174

  2. Adipic acid increases plasma lysine but does not improve the efficiency of lysine utilization in swine.

    PubMed

    van Kempen, T A; van Heugten, E; Trottier, N L

    2001-09-01

    Adipic acid, upon catabolism, results in intermediates that bear a structural similarity to lysine degradation products. The objectives of this research were to determine whether adipic acid affects lysine concentrations in plasma and to evaluate whether adipic acid improves the efficiency of lysine utilization in pigs. In Exp. 1, nursery pigs (n = 14) were fed (for a period of 7 d) either a standard nursery diet or the same diet supplemented with 1% adipic acid to assess effects on plasma amino acid concentrations (plasma collected on d 7). In Exp. 2, nursery pigs (n = 56) were fed (for a period of 15 d) either a control diet or the same diet but deficient in either lysine, threonine, or tryptophan with or without supplemental adipic acid to assess the effects of adipic acid on the efficiency of amino acid utilization. The results from Exp. 1 showed that adipic acid increased plasma lysine (by 18%) but not alpha-amino adipic acid, an intermediate in lysine degradation. Experiment 2 demonstrated that adipic acid did not increase the efficiency of utilization of lysine, threonine, or tryptophan. The lack of effects on alpha-amino adipic acid in Exp. 1 and the lack of a positive effect on the efficiency of utilization of lysine, threonine, and tryptophan suggest that adipic acid does not inhibit the mitochondrial uptake of lysine and(or) its degradation in the mitochondrion. It is concluded that feeding adipic acid increases plasma lysine but does not improve the efficiency of lysine utilization.

  3. Why do arginine and lysine organize lipids differently? Insights from coarse-grained and atomistic simulations.

    PubMed

    Wu, Zhe; Cui, Qiang; Yethiraj, Arun

    2013-10-10

    An important puzzle in membrane biophysics is the difference in the behaviors of lysine (Lys) and arginine (Arg) based peptides at the membrane. For example, the translocation of poly-Arg is orders of magnitude faster than that of poly-Lys. Recent experimental work suggests that much of the difference can be inferred from the phase behavior of peptide/lipid mixtures. At similar concentrations, mixtures of phosphatidylethanolamine (PE) and phosphatidylserine (PS) lipids display different phases in the presence of these polypeptides, with a bicontinuous phase observed with poly-Arg peptides and an inverted hexagonal phase observed with poly-Lys peptides. Here we show that simulations with the coarse-grained (CG) BMW-MARTINI model reproduce the experimental results. An analysis using atomistic and CG models reveals that electrostatic and glycerol-peptide interactions play a crucial role in determining the phase behavior of peptide-lipid mixtures, with the difference between Arg and Lys arising from the stronger interactions of the former with lipid glycerols. In other words, the multivalent nature of the guanidinium group allows Arg to simultaneously interact with both phosphate and glycerol groups, while Lys engages solely with phosphate; this feature of amino acid/lipid interactions has not been emphasized in previous studies. The Arg peptides colocalize with PS in regions of high negative Gaussian curvature and stabilize the bicontinuous phase. Decreasing the strength of either the electrostatic interactions or the peptide-glycerol interactions causes the inverted hexagonal phase to become more stable. The results highlight the utility of CG models for the investigation of phase behavior but also emphasize the subtlety of the phenomena, with small changes in specific interactions leading to qualitatively different phases.

  4. Quantitative microspectral evaluation of the ratio of arginine-rich to lysine-rich histones in neurons and neuroglial cells.

    PubMed

    Pevzner, L Z; Raygorodskaya, T G; Agroskin, L S

    1978-09-01

    Staining of nervous tissue sections with ammoniacal silver according to Black et al. has been confirmed to be a reliable histochemical colour reaction for quantitative evaluation of arginine-rich and lysine-rich histones in cell structures on the basis of determinations of the position of spectral curve maximum. Neurons of several brain nuclei which differed in predominating neurotransmitter did not differ in the ratio of arginine-rich to lysine-rich histones while some differences in this ratio were found out in the glial satelite cells adjacent to the corresponding neurons of these nuclei. Moderate circadian fluctuations were observed in the arginine-rich to lysine-rich histone ratio, these fluctuations being rather similar in the neurons studied and in the cells of perineuronal neuroglia.

  5. Altering dietary lysine: arginine ratio has little effect on cardiovascular risk factors and vascular reactivity in moderately hypercholesterolemic adults

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Background: The effect of dietary protein type on cardiovascular risk factors and vascular reactivity, with specific focus on the lysine to arginine (Lys:Arg) ratio, has been studied sporadically. Objective: Determine effect of dietary Lys:Arg ratio on cardiovascular risk factors and vascular reacti...

  6. Purification and characterization of two human erythrocyte arylamidases preferentially hydrolysing N-terminal arginine or lysine residues.

    PubMed Central

    Mäkinen, K K; Mäkinen, P L

    1978-01-01

    Two arylamidases (I and II) were purified from human erythrocytes by a procedure that comprised removal of haemoglobin from disrupted cells with CM-Sephadex D-50, followed by treatment of the haemoglobin-free preparation subsequently with DEAE-cellulose, gel-permeation chromatography on Sephadex G-200, gradient solubilization on Celite, isoelectric focusing in a pH gradient from 4 to 6, gel-permeation chromatography on Sephadex G-100 (superfine), and finally affinity chromatography on Sepharose 4B covalently coupled to L-arginine. In preparative-scale purifications, enzymes I and II were separated at the second gel-permeation chromatography. Enzyme II was obtained as a homogeneous protein, as shown by several criteria. Enzyme I hydrolysed, with decreasing rates, the L-amino acid 2-naphtylamides of lysine, arginine, alanine, methionine, phenylalanine and leucine, and the reactions were slightly inhibited by 0.2 M-NaCl. Enzyme II hydrolysed most rapidly the corresponding derivatives of arginine, leucine, valine, methionine, proline and alanine, in that order, and the hydrolyses were strongly dependent on Cl-. The hydrolysis of these substrates proceeded rapidly at physiological Cl- concentration (0.15 M). The molecular weights (by gel filtration) of enzymes I and II were 85 000 and 52 500 respectively. The pH optimum was approx. 7.2 for both enzymes. The isoelectric point of enzyme II was approx. 4.8. Enzyme I was activated by Co2+, which did not affect enzyme II to any noticeable extent. The kinetics of reactions catalysed by enzyme I were characterized by strong substrate inhibition, but enzyme II was not inhibited by high substrate concentrations. The Cl- activated enzyme II also showed endopeptidase activity in hydrolysing bradykinin. PMID:743227

  7. Transport of Arginine and Aspartic Acid into Isolated Barley Mesophyll Vacuoles 1

    PubMed Central

    Martinoia, Enrico; Thume, Monika; Vogt, Esther; Rentsch, Doris; Dietz, Karl-Josef

    1991-01-01

    The transport of arginine into isolated barley (Hordeum vulgare L.) mesophyll vacuoles was investigated. In the absence of ATP, arginine uptake was saturable with a Km of 0.3 to 0.4 millimolar. Positively charged amino acids inhibited arginine uptake, lysine being most potent with a Ki of 1.2 millimolar. In the presence of free ATP, but not of its Mg-complex, uptake of arginine was drastically enhanced and a linear function of its concentration up to 16 millimolar. The nonhydrolyzable adenylyl imidodiphosphate, but no other nucleotide tested, could substitute for ATP. Therefore, it is suggested that this process does not require energy and does not involve the tonoplast ATPase. The ATP-dependent arginine uptake was strongly inhibited by p-chloromercuriphenylsulfonic acid. Furthermore, hydrophobic amino acids were inhibitory (I50 phenylalanine 1 millimolar). Similar characteristics were observed for the uptake of aspartic acid. However, rates of ATP-stimulated aspartic acid transport were 10-fold lower as compared to arginine transport. Uptake of aspartate in the absence of ATP was negligible. PMID:16668447

  8. Occurrence of Arginine Deiminase Pathway Enzymes in Arginine Catabolism by Wine Lactic Acid Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Liu, S.; Pritchard, G. G.; Hardman, M. J.; Pilone, G. J.

    1995-01-01

    l-Arginine, an amino acid found in significant quantities in grape juice and wine, is known to be catabolized by some wine lactic acid bacteria. The correlation between the occurrence of arginine deiminase pathway enzymes and the ability to catabolize arginine was examined in this study. The activities of the three arginine deiminase pathway enzymes, arginine deiminase, ornithine transcarbamylase, and carbamate kinase, were measured in cell extracts of 35 strains of wine lactic acid bacteria. These enzymes were present in all heterofermentative lactobacilli and most leuconostocs but were absent in all the homofermentative lactobacilli and pediococci examined. There was a good correlation among arginine degradation, formation of ammonia and citrulline, and the occurrence of arginine deiminase pathway enzymes. Urea was not detected during arginine degradation, suggesting that the catabolism of arginine did not proceed via the arginase-catalyzed reaction, as has been suggested in some earlier studies. Detection of ammonia with Nessler's reagent was shown to be a simple, rapid test to assess the ability of wine lactic acid bacteria to degrade arginine, although in media containing relatively high concentrations (>0.5%) of fructose, ammonia formation is inhibited. PMID:16534912

  9. Immunoglobulin-G glycation by Fructose leads to structural perturbations and drop off in free Lysine and Arginine residues.

    PubMed

    Faisal, Mohammad; Alatar, Abdulrahman; Ahmad, Saheem

    2017-01-17

    Non-enzymatic glycation is the addition of free carbonyl group of reducing sugar to the free amino groups of proteins and leads to the formation of early glycation products and further into advanced glycation end products (AGEs). Fructose reacts rapidly with the free amino groups of proteins to form AGEs. AGEs are believed to be involved in the pathogenesis of several diseases, particularly in diabetic complications. In this study, IgG was glycated with fructose monosaccharide at 10 mM concentration for varying time interval. The reaction mixture was kept at 370C. The early glycation of IgG was done by nitroblue tetrazolium assay (NBT), and the generation of AGEs was done by the extent of side chain modifications (lysine and arginine), Nε-carboxymethyl lysine, pentosidine and carbonyl content. The decrease in free lysine and arginine residues suggests that protein 'IgG' has undergone modification specifically on epsilon amino groups of lysine and arginine. Additionally, their fluorescence and absorbance characteristics were also systematically studied. The results suggest that the maximum Amadori product (ketoamine content) was formed on sixth day of the incubation. The conformational structural perturbation was observed within the glycated IgG protein as studied by using various physicochemical techniques. This study reports structural perturbation, formation of various intermediates and AGEs.

  10. Triple therapy with pyridoxine, arginine supplementation and dietary lysine restriction in pyridoxine-dependent epilepsy: Neurodevelopmental outcome.

    PubMed

    Coughlin, Curtis R; van Karnebeek, Clara D M; Al-Hertani, Walla; Shuen, Andrew Y; Jaggumantri, Sravan; Jack, Rhona M; Gaughan, Sommer; Burns, Casey; Mirsky, David M; Gallagher, Renata C; Van Hove, Johan L K

    2015-01-01

    Pyridoxine-dependent epilepsy (PDE) is an epileptic encephalopathy characterized by response to pharmacologic doses of pyridoxine. PDE is caused by deficiency of α-aminoadipic semialdehyde dehydrogenase resulting in impaired lysine degradation and subsequent accumulation of α-aminoadipic semialdehyde. Despite adequate seizure control with pyridoxine monotherapy, 75% of individuals with PDE have significant developmental delay and intellectual disability. We describe a new combined therapeutic approach to reduce putative toxic metabolites from impaired lysine metabolism. This approach utilizes pyridoxine, a lysine-restricted diet to limit the substrate that leads to neurotoxic metabolite accumulation and L-arginine to compete for brain lysine influx and liver mitochondrial import. We report the developmental and biochemical outcome of six subjects who were treated with this triple therapy. Triple therapy reduced CSF, plasma, and urine biomarkers associated with neurotoxicity in PDE. The addition of arginine supplementation to children already treated with dietary lysine restriction and pyridoxine further reduced toxic metabolites, and in some subjects appeared to improve neurodevelopmental outcome. Dietary lysine restriction was associated with improved seizure control in one subject, and the addition of arginine supplementation increased the objective motor outcome scale in two twin siblings, illustrating the contribution of each component of this treatment combination. Optimal results were noted in the individual treated with triple therapy early in the course of the disease. Residual disease symptoms could be related to early injury suggested by initial MR imaging prior to initiation of treatment or from severe epilepsy prior to diagnosis. This observational study reports the use of triple therapy, which combines three effective components in this rare condition, and suggests that early diagnosis and treatment with this new triple therapy may ameliorate the

  11. Substitution of lysine for arginine at position 42 of human transforming growth factor-alpha eliminates biological activity without changing internal disulfide bonds.

    PubMed Central

    Defeo-Jones, D; Tai, J Y; Vuocolo, G A; Wegrzyn, R J; Schofield, T L; Riemen, M W; Oliff, A

    1989-01-01

    Transforming growth factor-alpha (TGF-alpha) is a growth-promoting protein that binds to the epidermal growth factor (EGF) receptor. To identify critical residues that govern TGF-alpha-EGF receptor binding, we prepared site-specific substitution mutants of TGF-alpha. Mutant proteins were tested in receptor-binding and mitogenesis assays. Semiconservative substitutions at positions 4, 12, 18, and 45 decreased biological activity 2.1- to 14-fold. The conservative substitution of lysine for arginine at position 42 completely eliminated biological activity. Amino acid composition analysis of proteolytic fragments from TGF-alpha and the Lys-42 mutant indicated that these proteins contained the same disulfide bonds. These studies suggest that arginine 42 may be a contact point for TGF-alpha-EGF receptor interaction. PMID:2506441

  12. Beneficial effects of cod protein on inflammatory cell accumulation in rat skeletal muscle after injury are driven by its high levels of arginine, glycine, taurine and lysine.

    PubMed

    Dort, Junio; Leblanc, Nadine; Maltais-Giguère, Julie; Liaset, Bjørn; Côté, Claude H; Jacques, Hélène

    2013-01-01

    We have shown that feeding cod protein, which is rich in anti-inflammatory arginine, glycine, and taurine, may beneficially modulate the inflammatory response during recovery following skeletal muscle injury; however it is unknown if these amino acids are responsible for this effect. This study was designed to assess whether supplementing casein with an amino acid mixture composed of arginine, glycine, taurine and lysine, matching their respective levels in cod protein, may account for the anti-inflammatory effect of cod protein. Male Wistar rats were fed isoenergetic diets containing either casein, cod protein, or casein supplemented with L-arginine (0.45%), glycine (0.43%), L-taurine (0.17%) and L-lysine (0.44%) (casein+). After 21 days of ad libitum feeding, one tibialis anterior muscle was injured with 200 µl bupivacaine while the saline-injected contra-lateral tibialis anterior was served as sham. Cod protein and casein+ similarly modulated the inflammation as they decreased COX-2 level at day 2 post-injury (cod protein, p=0.014; casein+, p=0.029) and ED1(+) macrophage density at days 2 (cod protein, p=0.012; casein+, p<0.0001), 5 (cod protein, p=0.001; casein+, p<0.0001) and 14 (cod protein, p<0.0001; casein+, p<0.0001) post-injury, and increased ED2(+) macrophage density at days 5 (cod protein, p<0.0001; casein+, p=0.006), 14 (cod protein, p=0.001; casein+, p<0.002) and 28 (cod protein, p<0.009; casein+, p<0.005) post-injury compared with casein. Furthermore, cod protein up-regulated (p=0.037) whereas casein+ tended to up-regulate (p=0.062) myogenin expression at day 5 post-injury compared with casein. In the cod protein-fed group, these changes resulted in greater muscle mass at days 14 (p=0.002), and 28 (p=0.001) post-injury and larger myofiber cross-sectional area at day 28 post-injury compared with casein (p=0.012). No such effects were observed with casein+. These data indicate that anti-inflammatory actions of cod protein, contrary to its effect on

  13. Parkinsonism-associated Protein DJ-1/Park7 Is a Major Protein Deglycase That Repairs Methylglyoxal- and Glyoxal-glycated Cysteine, Arginine, and Lysine Residues

    PubMed Central

    Richarme, Gilbert; Mihoub, Mouadh; Dairou, Julien; Bui, Linh Chi; Leger, Thibaut; Lamouri, Aazdine

    2015-01-01

    Glycation is an inevitable nonenzymatic covalent reaction between proteins and endogenous reducing sugars or dicarbonyls (methylglyoxal, glyoxal) that results in protein inactivation. DJ-1 was reported to be a multifunctional oxidative stress response protein with poorly defined function. Here, we show that human DJ-1 is a protein deglycase that repairs methylglyoxal- and glyoxal-glycated amino acids and proteins by acting on early glycation intermediates and releases repaired proteins and lactate or glycolate, respectively. DJ-1 deglycates cysteines, arginines, and lysines (the three major glycated amino acids) of serum albumin, glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase, aldolase, and aspartate aminotransferase and thus reactivates these proteins. DJ-1 prevented protein glycation in an Escherichia coli mutant deficient in the DJ-1 homolog YajL and restored cell viability in glucose-containing media. These results suggest that DJ-1-associated Parkinsonism results from excessive protein glycation and establishes DJ-1 as a major anti-glycation and anti-aging protein. PMID:25416785

  14. Stabilizing and destabilizing effects of arginine on deoxyribonucleic acid.

    PubMed

    Arakawa, Tsutomu; Hirano, Atsushi; Shiraki, Kentaro; Kita, Yoshiko; Koyama, A Hajime

    2010-03-01

    Aqueous arginine solution now finds a wide range of applications in biotechnology fields, including protein refolding, chromatography and virus inactivation. While progress has been made for mechanistic understanding of the effects of arginine on proteins, we have little understanding on how arginine inactivates viruses. One of the viral components is nucleic acid. We have examined the effects of arginine on the structure and thermal stability of calf thymus deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) using circular dichroism (CD). Both NaCl and arginine reduced CD intensity. At low concentrations, arginine showed a stronger effect on CD intensity than NaCl. Both NaCl and arginine sharply increased the melting temperature at low concentrations (below 0.25 M). However, they had an opposite effect at higher concentrations. Above this concentration, NaCl gradually increased the melting temperature, leading to the onset melting temperature above 90 degrees C. On the other hand, the thermal stability in the presence of arginine reached a maximum at 0.2-0.5 M, after which further addition of arginine caused decreased melting temperature. It is most likely that the increased melting temperature at low concentration is due to electrostatic stabilization of DNA structure by both NaCl and arginine and that the opposite effects at higher salt concentration are due to salt-specific effects, i.e., stabilizing (salting-out) effects of NaCl and destabilizing (salting-in) effects of arginine. Solubility measurements of nucleic acid bases showed that arginine, but not NaCl, increases the solubilities of the bases, supporting their effects on DNA stability at higher concentration.

  15. Differential mode of antimicrobial actions of arginine-rich and lysine-rich histones against Gram-positive Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Morita, Shuu; Tagai, Chihiro; Shiraishi, Takayuki; Miyaji, Kazuyuki; Iwamuro, Shawichi

    2013-10-01

    We previously reported the activities and modes of action of arginine (Arg)-rich histones H3 and H4 against Gram-negative bacteria. In the present study, we investigated the properties of the Arg-rich histones against Gram-positive bacteria in comparison with those of lysine (Lys)-rich histone H2B. In a standard microdilution assay, calf thymus histones H2B, H3, and H4 showed growth inhibitory activity against Staphylococcus aureus with minimum effective concentration values of 4.0, 4.0, and 5.6 μM, respectively. Laser confocal microscopic analyses revealed that both the Arg-rich and Lys-rich histones associated with the surface of S. aureus. However, while the morphology of S. aureus treated with histone H2B appeared intact, those treated with the histones H3 and H4 closely resembled each other, and the cells were blurred. Electrophoretic mobility shift assay results revealed these histones have binding affinity to lipoteichoic acid (LTA), one of major cell surface components of Gram-positive bacteria. Scanning electron microscopic analyses demonstrated that while histone H2B elicited no obvious changes in cell morphology, histones H3 and H4 disrupted the cell membrane structure with bleb formation in a manner similar to general antimicrobial peptides. Consequently, our results suggest that bacterial cell surface LTA initially attracts both the Arg- and Lys-rich histones, but the modes of antimicrobial action of these histones are different; the former involves cell membrane disruption and the latter involves the cell integrity disruption.

  16. Regulatory role for L-arginine in the utilization of amino acids by pig small-intestinal bacteria.

    PubMed

    Dai, Zhao-Lai; Li, Xi-Long; Xi, Peng-Bin; Zhang, Jing; Wu, Guoyao; Zhu, Wei-Yun

    2012-07-01

    We recently reported that bacteria from the pig small intestine rapidly utilize and metabolize amino acids (AA). This study investigated the effect of L-arginine on the utilization of AA by pure bacterial strains (Streptococcus sp., Escherichia coli and Klebsiella sp.) and mixed bacterial cultures derived from the pig small intestine. Bacteria were incubated at 37°C for 3 h in anaerobic AA media containing 0-5 mmol/L of arginine to determine the effect of arginine on the bacterial utilization of AA. Amino acids in the medium plus cell extracts were analyzed by high-performance liquid chromatography. Results indicated concentration-dependent increases in the bacterial utilization of arginine and altered fluxes of arginine into ornithine and citrulline in the bacteria. Net glutamine utilization increased in pure bacterial strains with increased concentrations of arginine. With the addition of arginine, net utilization of threonine, glycine, phenylalanine and branched-chain AA increased (P<0.05) in Streptococcus sp. and Klebsiella sp., but decreased in E. coli. Net utilization of lysine, threonine, isoleucine, leucine, glycine and alanine by jejunal or ileal mixed bacteria decreased (P<0.05) with the addition of arginine. Complete utilization of asparagine, aspartate and serine were observed in pig small-intestinal bacteria after 3 h of incubation. Overall, the addition of arginine affected the metabolism of the arginine-family of AA and the serine- and aspartate-family of AA in small-intestinal bacteria and reduced the utilization of most AA in ileal mixed bacteria. These novel findings indicate that arginine exerts its beneficial effects on swine nutrition partially by regulating AA utilization and metabolism in the small-intestinal microbiota.

  17. Acquired Amino Acid Deficiencies: A Focus on Arginine and Glutamine.

    PubMed

    Morris, Claudia R; Hamilton-Reeves, Jill; Martindale, Robert G; Sarav, Menaka; Ochoa Gautier, Juan B

    2017-04-01

    Nonessential amino acids are synthesized de novo and therefore not diet dependent. In contrast, essential amino acids must be obtained through nutrition since they cannot be synthesized internally. Several nonessential amino acids may become essential under conditions of stress and catabolic states when the capacity of endogenous amino acid synthesis is exceeded. Arginine and glutamine are 2 such conditionally essential amino acids and are the focus of this review. Low arginine bioavailability plays a pivotal role in the pathogenesis of a growing number of varied diseases, including sickle cell disease, thalassemia, malaria, acute asthma, cystic fibrosis, pulmonary hypertension, cardiovascular disease, certain cancers, and trauma, among others. Catabolism of arginine by arginase enzymes is the most common cause of an acquired arginine deficiency syndrome, frequently contributing to endothelial dysfunction and/or T-cell dysfunction, depending on the clinical scenario and disease state. Glutamine, an arginine precursor, is one of the most abundant amino acids in the body and, like arginine, becomes deficient in several conditions of stress, including critical illness, trauma, infection, cancer, and gastrointestinal disorders. At-risk populations are discussed together with therapeutic options that target these specific acquired amino acid deficiencies.

  18. Effect of substituting arginine and lysine with alanine on antimicrobial activity and the mechanism of action of a cationic dodecapeptide (CL(14-25)), a partial sequence of cyanate lyase from rice.

    PubMed

    Taniguchi, Masayuki; Takahashi, Nobuteru; Takayanagi, Tomohiro; Ikeda, Atsuo; Ishiyama, Yohei; Saitoh, Eiichi; Kato, Tetsuo; Ochiai, Akihito; Tanaka, Takaaki

    2014-01-01

    The antimicrobial activity of analogs obtained by substituting arginine and lysine in CL(14-25), a cationic α-helical dodecapeptide, with alanine against Porphyromonas gingivalis, a periodontal pathogen, varied significantly depending on the number and position of cationic amino acids. The alanine-substituted analogs had no hemolytic activity, even at a concentration of 1 mM. The antimicrobial activities of CL(K20A) and CL(K20A, K25A) were 3.8-fold and 9.1-fold higher, respectively, than that of CL(14-25). The antimicrobial activity of CL(R15A) was slightly lower than that of CL(14-25), suggesting that arginine at position 15 is not essential but is important for the antimicrobial activity. The experiments in which the alanine-substituted analogs bearing the replacement of arginine at position 24 and/or lysine at position 25 were used showed that arginine at position 24 was crucial for the antimicrobial activity whenever lysine at position 25 was substituted with alanine. Helical wheel projections of the alanine-substituted analogs indicate that the hydrophobicity in the vicinity of leucine at position 16 and alanines at positions 18 and/or 21 increased by substituting lysine at positions 20 and 25 with alanine, respectively. The degrees of diSC3 -5 release from P. gingivalis cells and disruption of GUVs induced by the alanine-substituted analogs with different positive charges were not closely related to their antimicrobial activities. The enhanced antimicrobial activities of the alanine-substituted analogs appear to be mainly attributable to the changes in properties such as hydrophobicity and amphipathic propensity due to alanine substitution and not to their extents of positive charge (cationicity).

  19. Mutation of aspartic acid-351, lysine-352, and lysine-515 alters the Ca2+ transport activity of the Ca2+-ATPase expressed in COS-1 cells.

    PubMed Central

    Maruyama, K; MacLennan, D H

    1988-01-01

    Full-length cDNAs encoding neonatal and adult isoforms of the Ca2+-ATPase of rabbit fast-twitch skeletal muscle sarcoplasmic reticulum were expressed transiently in COS-1 cells. The microsomal fraction isolated from transfected COS-1 cells contained immunoreactive Ca2+-ATPase and catalyzed Ca2+ transport at rates at least 15-fold above controls. No differences were observed in either the rates or Ca2+ dependency of Ca2+ transport catalyzed by the two isoforms. Aspartic acid-351, the site of formation of the catalytic acyl phosphate in the enzyme, was mutated to asparagine, glutamic acid, serine, threonine, histidine, or alanine. In every case, Ca2+ transport activity and Ca2+-dependent phosphorylation were eliminated. Ca2+ transport was also eliminated by mutation of lysine-352 to arginine, glutamine, or glutamic acid or by mutation of Asp351-Lys352 to Lys351-Asp352. Mutation of lysine-515, the site of fluorescein isothiocyanate modification in the enzyme, resulted in diminished Ca2+ transport activity as follows: arginine, 60%; glutamine, 25%; glutamic acid, 5%. These results demonstrate the absolute requirement of acylphosphate formation for the Ca2+ transport function and define a residue important for ATP binding. They also demonstrate the feasibility of a thorough analysis of active sites in the Ca2+-ATPase by expression and site-specific mutagenesis. Images PMID:2966962

  20. Identification of Structural and Catalytic Classes of Highly Conserved Amino Acid Residues in Lysine 2,3-Aminomutase †

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Dawei; Frey, Perry A.; Lepore, Bryan W.; Ringe, Dagmar; Ruzicka, Frank J.

    2008-01-01

    Lysine 2,3-aminomutase (LAM) from Clostridium subterminale SB4 catalyzes the interconversion of (S)-lysine and (S)-β-lysine by a radical mechanism involving coenzymatic actions of S-adenosylmethionine (SAM), a [4Fe-4S] cluster, and pyridoxal-5′-phosphate (PLP). The enzyme contains a number of conserved acidic residues and a cysteine and arginine-rich motif, that binds iron and sulfide in the [4Fe–4S] cluster. The results of activity and iron, sulfide, and PLP analysis of variants resulting from site-specific mutations of the conserved acidic residues and the arginine residues in the iron-sulfide binding motif indicate two classes of conserved residues of each type. Mutation of the conserved residues Arg134, Asp293, and Asp330 abolish all enzymatic activity. Based on the x-ray crystal structure, these residues bind the ε-aminium and α-carboxylate groups of (S)-lysine. However, among these residues only Asp293 appears to be important for stabilizing the [4Fe–4S] cluster. Members of a second group of conserved residues appear to stabilize the structure of LAM. Mutations of arginine residues 130, 135, and 136 and acidic residues Glu86, Asp165, Glu236, and Asp172 dramatically decrease iron and sulfide contents in the purified variants. Mutation of Asp96 significantly decreases iron and sulfide content. Variants in Arg130 or Asp172 display no detectable activity, whereas variants in the other positions display low to very low activities. Structural roles are assigned to this latter class of conserved amino acids. In particular, a network of hydrogen bonded interactions of Arg130, Glu86, Arg135 and the main chain carbonyl groups of Cys132 and Leu55 appears to stabilize the [4Fe–4S] cluster. PMID:17042481

  1. Amino acid nutrition beyond methionine and lysine for milk protein

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Amino acids are involved in many important physiological processes affecting the production, health, and reproduction of high-producing dairy cows. Most research and recommendations for lactating dairy cows has focused on methionine and lysine for increasing milk protein yield. This is because these...

  2. Myeloperoxidase-mediated protein lysine oxidation generates 2-aminoadipic acid and lysine nitrile in vivo.

    PubMed

    Lin, Hongqiao; Levison, Bruce S; Buffa, Jennifer A; Huang, Ying; Fu, Xiaoming; Wang, Zeneng; Gogonea, Valentin; DiDonato, Joseph A; Hazen, Stanley L

    2017-03-01

    Recent studies reveal 2-aminoadipic acid (2-AAA) is both elevated in subjects at risk for diabetes and mechanistically linked to glucose homeostasis. Prior studies also suggest enrichment of protein-bound 2-AAA as an oxidative post-translational modification of lysyl residues in tissues associated with degenerative diseases of aging. While in vitro studies suggest redox active transition metals or myeloperoxidase (MPO) generated hypochlorous acid (HOCl) may produce protein-bound 2-AAA, the mechanism(s) responsible for generation of 2-AAA during inflammatory diseases are unknown. In initial studies we observed that traditional acid- or base-catalyzed protein hydrolysis methods previously employed to measure tissue 2-AAA can artificially generate protein-bound 2-AAA from an alternative potential lysine oxidative product, lysine nitrile (LysCN). Using a validated protease-based digestion method coupled with stable isotope dilution LC/MS/MS, we now report protein bound 2-AAA and LysCN are both formed by hypochlorous acid (HOCl) and the MPO/H2O2/Cl(-) system of leukocytes. At low molar ratio of oxidant to target protein N(ε)-lysine moiety, 2-AAA is formed via an initial N(ε)-monochloramine intermediate, which ultimately produces the more stable 2-AAA end-product via sequential generation of transient imine and semialdehyde intermediates. At higher oxidant to target protein N(ε)-lysine amine ratios, protein-bound LysCN is formed via initial generation of a lysine N(ε)-dichloramine intermediate. In studies employing MPO knockout mice and an acute inflammation model, we show that both free and protein-bound 2-AAA, and in lower yield, protein-bound LysCN, are formed by MPO in vivo during inflammation. Finally, both 2-AAA and to lesser extent LysCN are shown to be enriched in human aortic atherosclerotic plaque, a tissue known to harbor multiple MPO-catalyzed protein oxidation products. Collectively, these results show that MPO-mediated oxidation of protein lysyl

  3. Gyrate atrophy of the choroid and retina: amino acid metabolism and correction of hyperornithinemia with an arginine-deficient diet.

    PubMed Central

    Valle, D; Walser, M; Brusilow, S W; Kaiser-Kupfer, M

    1980-01-01

    Four patients with gyrate atrophy of the choroid and retina were studied, all of whom exhibited the hyperornithinemia characteristic of this disorder. Elevated plasma histidine and diminished plasma lysine and branched-chain amino acids were also noted. The renal clearances of these four amino acids were not sufficiently elevated to explain their low plasma levels. In one subject, an arginine-deficient diet led to progressive reduction in plasma ornithine from 13 times normal to the upper limits of normal, along with the disappearance of ornithinuria and lysinuria. Orally administered alpha-aminoisobutyric acid facilitated the fall in plasma ornithine by increasing renal losses of ornithine. It also increased the clearances of most other amino acids. When plasma ornithine approached normal (less than 200 microM), plasma lysine became normal, plasma arginine became subnormal, and renal clearances of basic amino acids decreased. Long-term (1.5 yr) maintenance with a diet containing 10-20 g of protein plus essential amino acids served to keep plasma ornithine at between 55-355 microM; chorioretinal degeneration did not progress and vision apparently improved. PMID:7356686

  4. A lysine-to-arginine mutation on NEDD8 markedly reduces the activity of cullin RING E3 ligase through the impairment of neddylation cascades

    SciTech Connect

    Sui, Yiyan; Liu, Yaobin; Xu, Guoqiang

    2015-06-12

    Neural-precursor-cell-expressed developmentally down-regulated 8 (NEDD8) is a ubiquitin-like modifier, which forms covalent conjugates on lysines of its substrates. This post-translational modification, neddylation, plays important roles in tumor cell proliferation and viability. Ubiquitin can form diverse polyubiquitin chains, on its seven lysines, which play important functions in various biological processes. However, the roles of lysines in NEDD8 have not been explored. Here, we generated nine NEDD8 point mutants, each with one lysine replaced by an arginine, to study the putative function of lysines in NEDD8. Our experiments discover that Lys27 in NEDD8 is a critical residue for protein neddylation. Replacement of this residue with arginine almost completely eliminates the conjugation of NEDD8 to its substrates. Furthermore, we find that the K27R mutant impairs NEDD8 conjugation to the E2 enzyme, which normally forms thioester bonds for further transferring NEDD8 to its ligases and substrates. Therefore, this mutation completely inhibits global protein neddylation, including neddylation of cullin family proteins, resulting in decreased activity of cullin-RING E3 ligases. This work sheds new light on the roles of NEDD8 lysines on neddylation cascades and provides a dominant negative mutant for the study of neddylation and its biological functions. - Highlights: • Lys27 in NEDD8 is critical for protein neddylation. • NEDD8 K27R mutant impairs the NEDD8 conjugation. • NEDD8 K27R mutant significantly reduces the activity of cullin-RING E3 ligases.

  5. Histidine-lysine peptides as carriers of nucleic acids.

    PubMed

    Leng, Qixin; Goldgeier, Lisa; Zhu, Jingsong; Cambell, Patricia; Ambulos, Nicholas; Mixson, A James

    2007-03-01

    With their biodegradability and diversity of permutations, peptides have significant potential as carriers of nucleic acids. This review will focus on the sequence and branching patterns of peptide carriers composed primarily of histidines and lysines. While lysines within peptides are important for binding to the negatively charged phosphates, histidines are critical for endosomal lysis enabling nucleic acids to reach the cytosol. Histidine-lysine (HK) polymers by either covalent or ionic bonds with liposomes augment transfection compared to liposome carriers alone. More recently, we have examined peptides as sole carriers of nucleic acids because of their intrinsic advantages compared to the bipartite HK/liposome carriers. With a protocol change and addition of a histidine-rich tail, HK peptides as sole carriers were more effective than liposomes alone in several cell lines. While four-branched polymers with a primary repeating sequence pattern of -HHK- were more effective as carriers of plasmids, eight-branched polymers with a sequence pattern of -HHHK- were more effective as carriers of siRNA. Compared to polyethylenimine, HK carriers of siRNA and plasmids had reduced toxicity. When injected intravenously, HK polymers in complex with plasmids encoding antiangiogenic proteins significantly decreased tumor growth. Furthermore, modification of HK polymers with polyethylene glycol and vascular-specific ligands increased specificity of the polyplex to the tumor by more than 40-fold. Together with further development and insight on the structure of HK polyplexes, HK peptides may prove to be useful as carriers of different forms of nucleic acids both in vitro and in vivo.

  6. Optimal content and ratio of lysine to arginine in the diet of Pacific white shrimp, Litopenaeus vannamei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Zhengfu; Dong, Chaohua; Wang, Linlin; Hu, Yanjiang; Zhu, Wei

    2013-07-01

    The optimal quantity of dietary lysine (Lys) and arginine (Arg), and the optimal ratio of dietary Lys to Arg for Pacific white shrimp Litopenaeus vannamei were investigated. Coated Lys and Arg were added to a basal diet (37.99% crude protein and 7.28% crude lipid) to provide graded levels of Lys and Arg. The experimental diets contained three Lys levels (2.51%, 2.11%, and 1.70% of total diet), and three Arg levels (1.41%, 1.80%, and 2.21% of total diet) and all combinations of these levels were tested. Pacific white shrimp, with a mean weight of 3.62±0.1 g, were randomly distributed in 36 fiberglass tanks with 30 shrimp per tank and reared on the experimental diets for 50 days. After the feeding trial, the growth performance, survival, feed conversion rate (FCR), body composition and protease and lipase activities in the hepatopancreases of the experimental shrimps were determined. The results show that weight gain (WG), specific growth rate (SGR), FCR, body protein, body Lys and Arg content were significantly affected by dietary Lys and Arg ( P <0.05) and improved when dietary Lys and Arg levels were 2.11% ˜ 2.51% and 1.80%˜2.21%, respectively. Protease and lipase activities in the hepatopancreases of the shrimps appeared higher when dietary Lys and Arg quantities were 2.11% ˜2.51% and 1.80%˜2.21%, although the difference was not statistically significant ( P >0.05). Therefore, according to our results, the optimal Lys and Arg quantities in the diet of Pacific white shrimp, L. vannamei, were considered to be 2.11%-2.51% and 1.80%-2.21%, respectively, and the optimal ratio to be 1:0.88-1:1.05.

  7. Protonated arginine and protonated lysine: hydration and its effect on the stability of salt-bridge structures.

    PubMed

    Gao, Bing; Wyttenbach, Thomas; Bowers, Michael T

    2009-07-23

    Using a mass spectrometer equipped with a drift cell, water binding energies of protonated arginine (ArgH+) and protonated lysine (LysH+) were determined in equilibrium experiments and supplementary calculations at the B3LYP/6-311++G** level of theory. The binding energy of the first water molecule was measured to be 10.3 and 10.9 kcal/mol for ArgH+ and LysH+, respectively. Water binding energies decrease with increasing degree of hydration reaching values of 6-7 kcal/mol for the fourth and fifth water molecule. Theory reproduces this trend of decreasing binding energies correctly and theoretical water binding energies agree with experiment quantitatively within 2 kcal/mol. Lowest-energy theoretical structures of ArgH+ and LysH+ are characterized by protonated side chains and neutral alpha-amino and carboxyl groups which form intramolecular hydrogen bonds to the ionic group (charge solvation or CS structures). The salt bridge (SB) structures with two cationic groups (side chain and alpha-amine) and one anionic group (carboxyl) are 13.1 and 9.3 kcal/mol higher in energy for ArgH+ and LysH+, respectively. Theory indicated that the first water molecule binds to the ionic group of the CS structures of ArgH+ and LysH+. With increasing degree of hydration intramolecular interactions are replaced one by one with water bridges with water inserted into the intramolecular hydrogen bonds. Whereas the global minima of ArgH+.(H2O)n and LysH+.(H2O)n, n<7, were calculated to represent CS structures, 7-fold hydrated CS and SB structures, ArgH+.(H2O)7 and LysH+.(H2O)7, are nearly isoenergetic (within <1 kcal/mol).

  8. Altering dietary lysine:arginine ratio has little effect on cardiovascular risk factors and vascular reactivity in moderately hypercholesterolemic adults

    PubMed Central

    Vega-López, Sonia; Matthan, Nirupa R.; Ausman, Lynne M.; Harding, Scott V.; Rideout, Todd C.; Ai, Masumi; Otokozawa, Seiko; Freed, Alicia; Kuvin, Jeffrey T; Jones, Peter J; Schaefer, Ernst J; Lichtenstein, Alice H.

    2010-01-01

    Background Information is scarce regarding the effect of dietary protein type, with specific focus on the lysine to arginine (Lys:Arg) ratio, on cardiovascular risk factors and vascular reactivity in humans. Objective Determine effect of dietary Lys:Arg ratio on cardiovascular risk factors and vascular reactivity in moderately hypercholesterolemic adults. Design Randomized cross-over design of two 35-day diet phases; thirty adults (21 females and 9 males, ≥50 y, LDL cholesterol ≥120 mg/dL). Diets had 20% energy (E) protein, 30%E fat, 50%E carbohydrate and were designed to have low (0.7) or high (1.4) Lys:Arg ratio. Measures included fasting and postprandial lipid, lipoprotein, apolipoprotein concentrations; fasting high sensitivity C-reactive protein (hsCRP), small dense LDL (sdLDL)-cholesterol, remnant lipoprotein cholesterol (RemLC), glycated albumin, adiponectin and immunoreactive insulin concentrations, endogenous cholesteryl ester transfer protein (CETP) and lecithin:cholesterol acyl transferase (LCAT) activities; cholesterol fractional synthesis rate (FSR); and flow mediated dilation (FMD) and peripheral artery tonometry (PAT). Results No differences were observed in fasting and/or postprandial total, LDL, HDL and sdLDL cholesterol, RemLC, Lp(a) or apo B concentrations, LCAT and CETP activities, FSR, glycated albumin, immunoreactive insulin, FMD or PAT. The low, relative to the high, Lys:Arg ratio diet resulted in lower postprandial VLDL cholesterol (−24%, P=0.001) and triglycerides (−23%, P=0.001), and small but significant differences in fasting (−3%, P=0.003) and postprandial (−3%, P=0.018) apo AI, and fasting adiponectin concentrations (+7%, P=0.035). Fasting and postprandial hsCRP concentrations were 23% lower after the low Lys:Arg ratio diet (P=0.020 for both). Conclusions Diets differing in Lys:Arg ratios had no or small effects on cardiovascular risk factors and vascular reactivity. PMID:20042191

  9. Mass Spectrometric Identification of the Arginine and Lysine deficient Proline Rich Glutamine Rich Wheat Storage Proteins

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) of enzymatic digest has made possible identification of a wide variety of proteins and complex samples prepared by such techniques as RP-HPLC or 2-D gel electrophoresis. Success requires peptide fragmentation to be indicative of the peptide amino acid sequence. The f...

  10. Lysine, methionine, phenylalanine, arginine, valine, isoleucine, leucine, and threonine maintenance requirements of broiler breeders.

    PubMed

    Sakomura, N K; Ekmay, R D; Mei, S J; Coon, C N

    2015-11-01

    Five hundred and sixty Cobb-Vantress broiler breeders were used to determine the maintenance requirement of dietary Arg, His, Ile, Leu, Lys, Met, Phe, Thr, and Val in 10 21-d assays using the comparative slaughter technique. Fifty sexually immature broiler breeder pullets per assay were given crystalline amino acid diets containing graded levels of Arg, His, Ile, Leu, Lys, Met, Phe, Thr, or Val, respectively, representing 0, 10, 20, 30, 40% of their suggested requirement level (NRC, 1994) with all other amino acids maintained at 40% of their suggested requirement level. Sixty hens were slaughtered prior to the beginning of the study to assess initial body composition at 3 weight groups. Linear regression lines (protein accretion vs. amino acid intake) were determined and the maintenance requirements were calculated based on zero protein accretion. The maintenance requirements expressed on a metabolic weight basis were determined to be 174, 94, 52, 81, 60, 126, 133, and 155 mg/kg(0.75)/d for Arg, Ile, Leu, Lys, Met, Phe, Thr, and Val, respectively. Additionally, the maintenance requirements, expressed on metabolic protein weight basis, were determined to be 651, 329, 172, 295, 223, 523, 478, and 546 mg/kgCP/d for Arg, Ile, Leu, Lys, Met, Phe, Thr, and Val, respectively. The requirement for His could not be established as the results obtained were outside of assay range.

  11. Poly-l-lysines and poly-l-arginines induce leakage of negatively charged phospholipid vesicles and translocate through the lipid bilayer upon electrostatic binding to the membrane.

    PubMed

    Reuter, Marcel; Schwieger, Christian; Meister, Annette; Karlsson, Göran; Blume, Alfred

    2009-09-01

    Poly-l-lysines (PLL) and poly-l-arginines (PLA) of different polymer chain lengths interact strongly with negatively charged phospholipid vesicles mainly due to their different electrical charges. 1-Palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphoglycerol (POPG), 1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphoglycerol (DPPG) and their mixtures (1/1 mol/mol) with the respective phosphatidylcholines of equivalent chain length were chosen as model membrane systems that form at room temperature either the fluid L(alpha) or the gel phase L(beta) lipid bilayer membranes, respectively. Leakage experiments revealed that the fluid POPG membranes are more perturbed compared to the gel phase DPPG membranes upon peptide binding. Furthermore, it was found that pure PG membranes are more prone to release the vesicle contents as a result of pore formation than the lipid mixtures POPG/POPC and DPPG/DPPC. For the longer polymers (>or=44 amino acids) maximal dye-release was observed when the molar ratio of the concentrations of amino acid residues to charged lipid molecules reached a value of R(P)=0.5, i.e. when the outer membrane layer was theoretically entirely covered by the polymer. At ratios lower or higher than 0.5 leakage dropped significantly. Furthermore, PLL and PLA insertions and/or translocations through lipid membranes were analyzed by using FITC-labeled polymers by monitoring their fluorescence intensity upon membrane binding. Short PLL molecules and PLA molecules of all lengths seemed to translocate through both fluid and gel phase lipid bilayers. Comparison of the PLL and PLA fluorescence assay results showed that PLA interacts stronger with phospholipid membranes compared to PLL. Isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) measurements were performed to give further insight into these mechanisms and to support the findings obtained by fluorescence assays. Cryo-transmission electron microscopy (cryo-TEM) was used to visualize changes in the vesicles' morphology after addition of the

  12. Listeria monocytogenes 10403S Arginine Repressor ArgR Finely Tunes Arginine Metabolism Regulation under Acidic Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Changyong; Dong, Zhimei; Han, Xiao; Sun, Jing; Wang, Hang; Jiang, Li; Yang, Yongchun; Ma, Tiantian; Chen, Zhongwei; Yu, Jing; Fang, Weihuan; Song, Houhui

    2017-01-01

    Listeria monocytogenes is able to colonize human and animal intestinal tracts and to subsequently cross the intestinal barrier, causing systemic infection. For successful establishment of infection, L. monocytogenes must survive the low pH environment of the stomach. L. monocytogenes encodes a functional ArgR, a transcriptional regulator belonging to the ArgR/AhrC arginine repressor family. We aimed at clarifying the specific functions of ArgR in arginine metabolism regulation, and more importantly, in acid tolerance of L. monocytogenes. We showed that ArgR in the presence of 10 mM arginine represses transcription and expression of the argGH and argCJBDF operons, indicating that L. monocytogenes ArgR plays the classical role of ArgR/AhrC family proteins in feedback inhibition of the arginine biosynthetic pathway. Notably, transcription and expression of arcA (encoding arginine deiminase) and sigB (encoding an alternative sigma factor B) were also markedly repressed by ArgR when bacteria were exposed to pH 5.5 in the absence of arginine. However, addition of arginine enabled ArgR to derepress the transcription and expression of these two genes. Electrophoretic mobility shift assays showed that ArgR binds to the putative ARG boxes in the promoter regions of argC, argG, arcA, and sigB. Reporter gene analysis with gfp under control of the argG promoter demonstrated that ArgR was able to activate the argG promoter. Unexpectedly, deletion of argR significantly increased bacterial survival in BHI medium adjusted to pH 3.5 with lactic acid. We conclude that this phenomenon is due to activation of arcA and sigB. Collectively, our results show that L. monocytogenes ArgR finely tunes arginine metabolism through negative transcriptional regulation of the arginine biosynthetic operons and of the catabolic arcA gene in an arginine-independent manner during lactic acid-induced acid stress. ArgR also appears to activate catabolism as well as sigB transcription by anti

  13. Role of arginine 180 and glutamic acid 177 of ricin toxin A chain in enzymatic inactivation of ribosomes.

    PubMed Central

    Frankel, A; Welsh, P; Richardson, J; Robertus, J D

    1990-01-01

    The gene for ricin toxin A chain was modified by site-specific mutagenesis to change arginine 180 to alanine, glutamine, methionine, lysine, or histidine. Separately, glutamic acid 177 was changed to alanine and glutamic acid 208 was changed to aspartic acid. Both the wild-type and mutant proteins were expressed in Escherichia coli and, when soluble, purified and tested quantitatively for enzyme activity. A positive charge at position 180 was found necessary for solubility of the protein and for enzyme activity. Similarly, a negative charge with a proper geometry in the vicinity of position 177 was critical for ricin toxin A chain catalysis. When glutamic acid 177 was converted to alanine, nearby glutamic acid 208 could largely substitute for it. This observation provided valuable structural information concerning the nature of second-site mutations. Images PMID:1978925

  14. Effect of lysine to arginine mutagenesis in the V3 loop of HIV-1 gp120 on viral entry efficiency and neutralization.

    PubMed

    Schwalbe, Birco; Schreiber, Michael

    2015-01-01

    HIV-1 infection is characterized by an ongoing replication leading to T-lymphocyte decline which is paralleled by the switch from CCR5 to CXCR4 coreceptor usage. To predict coreceptor usage, several computer algorithms using gp120 V3 loop sequence data have been developed. In these algorithms an occupation of the V3 positions 11 and 25, by one of the amino acids lysine (K) or arginine (R), is an indicator for CXCR4 usage. Amino acids R and K dominate at these two positions, but can also be identified at positions 9 and 10. Generally, CXCR4-viruses possess V3 sequences, with an overall positive charge higher than the V3 sequences of R5-viruses. The net charge is calculated by subtracting the number of negatively charged amino acids (D, aspartic acid and E, glutamic acid) from the number of positively charged ones (K and R). In contrast to D and E, which are very similar in their polar and acidic properties, the characteristics of the R guanidinium group differ significantly from the K ammonium group. However, in coreceptor predictive computer algorithms R and K are both equally rated. The study was conducted to analyze differences in infectivity and coreceptor usage because of R-to-K mutations at the V3 positions 9, 10 and 11. V3 loop mutants with all possible RRR-to-KKK triplets were constructed and analyzed for coreceptor usage, infectivity and neutralization by SDF-1α and RANTES. Virus mutants R9R10R11 showed the highest infectivity rates, and were inhibited more efficiently in contrast to the K9K10K11 viruses. They also showed higher efficiency in a virus-gp120 paired infection assay. Especially V3 loop position 9 was relevant for a switch to higher infectivity when occupied by R. Thus, K-to-R exchanges play a role for enhanced viral entry efficiency and should therefore be considered when the viral phenotype is predicted based on V3 sequence data.

  15. Arginine-deficient diets alter plasma and tissue amino acids in young and aged rats.

    PubMed

    Gross, K L; Hartman, W J; Ronnenberg, A; Prior, R L

    1991-10-01

    Blood and urine metabolites were measured in two experiments for young (2-mo-old) and aged (20-mo-old) male Sprague-Dawley rats fed arginine-devoid diets made isonitrogenous to a control 1.12% arginine diet by adding alanine or glycine. Diet, fed for 7 or 13 d, had little effect on urinary or plasma ammonia and urea. Urinary orotate excretion was more than 40-fold higher in rats fed the arginine-deficient diets (P less than 0.01) in both experiments. Source of nonessential N (alanine or glycine) in the arginine-deficient diets did not alter orotic acid excretion or plasma or urine ammonia or urea. Changes in plasma arginine, alanine and glycine concentrations reflected the levels of these amino acids in the diet. Tissue ornithine levels reflected dietary arginine level, but tissue citrulline was unaffected by dietary arginine. Glutamate and glutamine were greater in the plasma and liver of rats fed arginine-deficient diets. Plasma concentrations of glutamate and glutamine were positively correlated with urinary orotic acid excretion (P less than 0.05) and ornithine and arginine were negatively correlated with orotic acid excretion (P less than 0.01). Increased tissue glutamine may be related to the greater orotate excretion in rats fed arginine-devoid diets. The metabolic responses to dietary arginine deficiency were similar in young and aged rats. In general, concentrations of amino acids in plasma, liver and spleen were higher in aged rats.

  16. Polymerization on the rocks: beta-amino acids and arginine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, R.; Orgel, L. E.; Bada, J. L. (Principal Investigator)

    1998-01-01

    We have studied the accumulation of long oligomers of beta-amino acids on the surface of minerals using the 'polymerization on the rocks' protocol. We find that long oligopeptides of beta-glutamic acid which cannot be formed in homogeneous aqueous solution are accumulated efficiently on the surface of hydroxylapatite using 1-ethyl-3-(3-dimethylaminopropyl) carbodiimide (EDAC) as condensing agent. The EDAC-induced oligomerization of aspartic acid on hydroxylapatite proceeds even more efficiently. Hydroxylapatite can also facilitate the ligation of the tripeptide (glu)3. The 'polymerization on the rocks' scenario is not restricted to negatively-charged amino acids. Oligoarginines are accumulated on the surface of illite using carbonyldiimidizole (CDI) as condensing agent. We find that FeS2 catalyzes the CDI-induced oligomerization of arginine, although it does not adsorb oligoarginines. These results are relevant to the formation of polypeptides on the primitive earth.

  17. Polymerization on the rocks: beta-amino acids and arginine.

    PubMed

    Liu, R; Orgel, L E

    1998-06-01

    We have studied the accumulation of long oligomers of beta-amino acids on the surface of minerals using the 'polymerization on the rocks' protocol. We find that long oligopeptides of beta-glutamic acid which cannot be formed in homogeneous aqueous solution are accumulated efficiently on the surface of hydroxylapatite using 1-ethyl-3-(3-dimethylaminopropyl) carbodiimide (EDAC) as condensing agent. The EDAC-induced oligomerization of aspartic acid on hydroxylapatite proceeds even more efficiently. Hydroxylapatite can also facilitate the ligation of the tripeptide (glu)3. The 'polymerization on the rocks' scenario is not restricted to negatively-charged amino acids. Oligoarginines are accumulated on the surface of illite using carbonyldiimidizole (CDI) as condensing agent. We find that FeS2 catalyzes the CDI-induced oligomerization of arginine, although it does not adsorb oligoarginines. These results are relevant to the formation of polypeptides on the primitive earth.

  18. Evaluating Force Fields for the Computational Prediction of Ionized Arginine and Lysine Side-Chains Partitioning into Lipid Bilayers and Octanol.

    PubMed

    Sun, Delin; Forsman, Jan; Woodward, Clifford E

    2015-04-14

    Abundant peptides and proteins containing arginine (Arg) and lysine (Lys) amino acids can apparently permeate cell membranes with ease. However, the mechanisms by which these peptides and proteins succeed in traversing the free energy barrier imposed by cell membranes remain largely unestablished. Precise thermodynamic studies (both theoretical and experimental) on the interactions of Arg and Lys residues with model lipid bilayers can provide valuable clues to the efficacy of these cationic peptides and proteins. We have carried out molecular dynamics simulations to calculate the interactions of ionized Arg and Lys side-chains with the zwitterionic 1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DPPC) lipid bilayer for 10 widely used lipid/protein force fields: CHARMM36/CHARMM36, SLIPID/AMBER99SB-ILDN, OPLS-AA/OPLS-AA, Berger/OPLS-AA, Berger/GROMOS87, Berger/GROMOS53A6, GROMOS53A6/GROMOS53A6, nonpolarizable MARTINI, polarizable MARTINI, and BMW MARTINI. We performed umbrella sampling simulations to obtain the potential of mean force for Arg and Lys side-chains partitioning from water to the bilayer interior. We found significant differences between the force fields, both for the interactions between side-chains and bilayer surface, as well as the free energy cost for placing the side-chain at the center of the bilayer. These simulation results were compared with the Wimley-White interfacial scale. We also calculated the free energy cost for transferring ionized Arg and Lys side-chains from water to both dry and wet octanol. Our simulations reveal rapid diffusion of water molecules into octanol whereby the equilibrium mole fraction of water in the wet octanol phase was ∼25%. Surprisingly, our free energy calculations found that the high water content in wet octanol lowered the water-to-octanol partitioning free energies for cationic residues by only 0.6 to 0.7 kcal/mol.

  19. Interference of the CadC regulator in the arginine-dependent acid resistance system of Shigella and enteroinvasive E. coli.

    PubMed

    Casalino, Mariassunta; Prosseda, Gianni; Barbagallo, Marialuisa; Iacobino, Angelo; Ceccarini, Paolo; Latella, Maria Carmela; Nicoletti, Mauro; Colonna, Bianca

    2010-06-01

    A typical pathoadaptive mutation of Shigella and enteroinvasive Escherichia coli (EIEC) is the inactivation of the cad locus which comprises the genes necessary for lysine decarboxylation, an enzyme involved in pH homoeostasis. In E. coli, the cadBA operon, encoding lysine decarboxylase (CadA) and a lysine cadaverine antiporter (CadB), is submitted to the control of CadC, a positive activator whose gene maps upstream the operon, and is transcribed independently from the same strand. CadC is an integral inner membrane protein which acts both, as signal sensor and as transcriptional regulator responding to the low pH and lysine signals. Analysis of the molecular rearrangements responsible for the loss of lysine decarboxylase activity in Shigella and EIEC has revealed that the inactivation of the cadC gene is a common feature. The 3 major adaptive acid resistance (AR) systems - AR1, AR2, and AR3 - are known to be activated at low pH by Shigella and E. coli, allowing them to withstand extremely acid conditions. In this study, evaluating the survival of S. flexneri, S. sonnei, and EIEC strains complemented with a functional cadC gene and challenged at low pH, we present evidence that CadC negatively regulates the expression of the arginine-dependent adaptive acid-resistance system (AR3), encoded by the adi locus while it has no effect on the expression of AR1 and AR2 systems. Moreover, since our results indicate that in enteroinvasive strains the presence of CadC reduces the expression of the arginine decarboxylase encoding gene adiA, it is possible to hypothesize that the loss of functionality of lysine decarboxylase is counterbalanced by a higher expression of the adi system, and that CadC, besides specifically affecting the regulation of the cadBA operon, is also relevant to other systems responding to low pH.

  20. An Efficient Method for the Synthesis of Peptoids with Mixed Lysine-type/Arginine-type Monomers and Evaluation of Their Anti-leishmanial Activity

    PubMed Central

    Bolt, Hannah L.; Denny, Paul W.; Cobb, Steven L.

    2016-01-01

    This protocol describes the manual solid-phase synthesis of linear peptoids that contain two differently functionalized cationic monomers. In this procedure amino functionalized 'lysine' and guanido functionalized 'arginine' peptoid monomers can be included within the same peptoid sequence. This procedure uses on-resin (N-(1-(4,4-dimethyl-2,6-dioxocyclohexylidene)ethyl) or Dde protection, orthogonal conditions to the Boc protection of lysine monomers. Subsequent deprotection allows an efficient on-resin guanidinylation reaction to form the arginine residues. The procedure is compatible with the commonly used submonomer method of peptoid synthesis, allowing simple peptoids to be made using common laboratory equipment and commercially available reagents. The representative synthesis, purification and characterization of two mixed peptoids is described. The evaluation of these compounds as potential anti-infectives in screening assays against Leishmania mexicana is also described. The protozoan parasite L. mexicana is a causative agent of cutaneous leishmaniasis, a neglected tropical disease that affects up to 12 million people worldwide. PMID:27842365

  1. Effect of betaine and arginine in lysine-deficient diets on growth, carcass traits, and pork quality.

    PubMed

    Madeira, M S; Alfaia, C M; Costa, P; Lopes, P A; Martins, S V; Lemos, J P C; Moreira, O; Santos-Silva, J; Bessa, R J B; Prates, J A M

    2015-10-01

    Forty entire male pigs from a commercial crossbreed (Duroc × Large White × Landrace) were used to investigate the individual or combined effects of betaine and Arg supplementation in Lys-deficient diets on growth performance, carcass traits, and pork quality. Pigs with 59.9 ± 1.65 kg BW were randomly assigned to 1 of 5 dietary treatments ( = 8). The 5 dietary treatments were normal Lys and CP diet (0.51% Lys and 16% CP; control), reduced Lys and CP diet (0.35% Lys and 13% CP), reduced Lys and CP diet with betaine supplementation (0.33%), reduced Lys and CP diet with Arg supplementation (1.5%), and reduced Lys and CP diet with betaine and Arg supplementation (0.33% betaine and 1.5% Arg). Pigs were slaughtered at 92.7 ± 2.54 kg BW. The Lys-deficient diets (-35% Lys) increased intramuscular fat (IMF) content by 25% ( = 0.041) and meat juiciness by 12% ( = 0.041) but had a negative effect on growth performance ( < 0.05) of pigs. In addition, Lys-deficient diets increased L* ( = 0.005) and b* ( = 0.010) muscle color parameters and perirenal fat deposition ( < 0.001) and decreased both HCW ( = 0.015) and loin weight ( = 0.023). Betaine and Arg supplementation of Lys-deficient diets had no effect on IMF content but increased ( < 0.05) overall pork acceptability. Arginine supplementation also increased ( = 0.003) meat tenderness. Differences in fatty acid composition of pork were not detected among dietary treatment groups. However, oleic acid was positively correlated ( < 0.05) with IMF content, juiciness, flavor, and overall acceptability of meat. Data confirm that dietary CP reduction enhances pork eating quality but negatively affects pigs' growth performance. Moreover, it is suggested that betaine and Arg supplementation of Lys-deficient diets does not further increase IMF content but improves some pork sensory traits, including overall acceptability.

  2. Delivery of Antisense Peptide Nucleic Acids to Cells by Conjugation with Small Arginine-Rich Cell-Penetrating Peptide (R/W)9

    PubMed Central

    Cordier, Céline; Boutimah, Fatima; Bourdeloux, Mathilde; Dupuy, Florian; Met, Elisabeth; Alberti, Patrizia; Loll, François; Chassaing, Gérard; Burlina, Fabienne; Saison-Behmoaras, Tula Ester

    2014-01-01

    Peptide nucleic acids (PNAs) are very attractive antisense and antigene agents, but these molecules are not passively taken into cells. Here, using a functional cell assay and fluorescent-based methods, we investigated cell uptake and antisense activity of a tridecamer PNA that targets the HIV-1 polypurine tract sequence delivered using the arginine-rich (R/W)9 peptide (RRWWRRWRR). At micromolar concentrations, without use of any transfection agents, almost 80% inhibition of the target gene expression was obtained with the conjugate in the presence of the endosomolytic agent chloroquine. We show that chloroquine not only induced escape from endosomes but also enhanced the cellular uptake of the conjugate. Mechanistic studies revealed that (R/W)9-PNA conjugates were internalized via pinocytosis. Replacement of arginines with lysines reduced the uptake of the conjugate by six-fold, resulting in the abolition of intracellular target inhibition. Our results show that the arginines play a crucial role in the conjugate uptake and antisense activity. To determine whether specificity of the interactions of arginines with cell surface proteoglycans result in the internalization, we used flow cytometry to examine uptake of arginine- and lysine-rich conjugates in wild-type CHO-K1 and proteoglycan-deficient A745 cells. The uptake of both conjugates was decreased by four fold in CHO-745 cells; therefore proteoglycans promote internalization of cationic peptides, irrespective of the chemical nature of their positive charges. Our results show that arginine-rich cell-penetrating peptides, especially (R/W)9, are a promising tool for PNA internalization. PMID:25127364

  3. The role of water and K + ion in the charge transfer between PO4- groups of DNA and the lysine + and arginine + side chains of histone proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bende, A.; Bogár, F.; Ladik, J.

    2008-09-01

    We have calculated the charge transfer (CT) between the PO4- group of DNA and the lysine (Lys) and arginine (Arg) positive side chains of histones in presence of water and K + ions. The calculations were performed at the HF + MP2 level, using the TZVP basis set. The calculations were corrected for basis set superposition error and besides Mulliken's population analysis we have introduced the - for charged systems more reliable - natural population analysis. The results show that the bare PO4--Lys and the PO4--Arg interactions become weaker, mainly, due to the presence of the K + ion. We have found 0.067 e CT for Lys and 0.050 e for Arg.

  4. Pathways of Amino Acid Degradation in Nilaparvata lugens (Stål) with Special Reference to Lysine-Ketoglutarate Reductase/Saccharopine Dehydrogenase (LKR/SDH)

    PubMed Central

    Wan, Pin-Jun; Yuan, San-Yue; Tang, Yao-Hua; Li, Kai-Long; Yang, Lu; Fu, Qiang; Li, Guo-Qing

    2015-01-01

    Nilaparvata lugens harbors yeast-like symbionts (YLSs). In present paper, a genome-wide analysis found 115 genes from Ni. lugens and 90 genes from YLSs that were involved in the metabolic degradation of 20 proteinogenic amino acids. These 205 genes encoded for 77 enzymes. Accordingly, the degradation pathways for the 20 amino acids were manually constructed. It is postulated that Ni. lugens can independently degrade fourteen amino acids (threonine, alanine, glycine, serine, aspartate, asparagine, phenylalanine, tyrosine, glutamate, glutamine, proline, histidine, leucine and lysine). Ni. lugens and YLSs enzymes may work collaboratively to break down tryptophan, cysteine, arginine, isoleucine, methionine and valine. We cloned a lysine-ketoglutarate reductase/saccharopine dehydrogenase gene (Nllkr/sdh) that encoded a bifunctional enzyme catalyzing the first two steps of lysine catabolism. Nllkr/sdh is widely expressed in the first through fifth instar nymphs and adults, and is highly expressed in the fat body, ovary and gut in adults. Ingestion of dsNllkr/sdh by nymphs successfully knocked down the target gene, and caused nymphal/adult mortality, shortened nymphal development stage and reduced adult fresh weight. Moreover, Nllkr/sdh knockdown resulted in three defects: wings were shortened and thickened; cuticles were stretched and thinned; and old nymphal cuticles remained on the tips of legs and abdomen and were not completely shed. These data indicate that impaired lysine degradation negatively affects the survival and development of Ni. lugens. PMID:26000452

  5. The Arginine/Lysine-Rich Element within the DNA-Binding Domain Is Essential for Nuclear Localization and Function of the Intracellular Pathogen Resistance 1

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Kezhen; Wu, Yongyan; Chen, Qi; Zhang, Zihan; Chen, Xin; Zhang, Yong

    2016-01-01

    The mouse intracellular pathogen resistance 1 (Ipr1) gene plays important roles in mediating host immunity and previous work showed that it enhances macrophage apoptosis upon mycobacterium infection. However, to date, little is known about the regulation pattern of Ipr1 action. Recent studies have investigated the protein-coding genes and microRNAs regulated by Ipr1 in mouse macrophages, but the structure and the functional motif of the Ipr1 protein have yet to be explored. In this study, we analyzed the domains and functional motif of the Ipr1 protein. The resulting data reveal that Ipr1 protein forms a homodimer and that the Sp100-like domain mediates the targeting of Ipr1 protein to nuclear dots (NDs). Moreover, we found that an Ipr1 mutant lacking the classic nuclear localization signal (cNLS) also translocated into the nuclei, suggesting that the cNLS is not the only factor that directs Ipr1 nuclear localization. Additionally, mechanistic studies revealed that an arginine/lysine-rich element within the DNA-binding domain (SAND domain) is critical for Ipr1 binding to the importin protein receptor NPI-1, demonstrating that this element plays an essential role in mediating the nuclear localization of Ipr1 protein. Furthermore, our results show that this arginine/lysine-rich element contributes to the transcriptional regulation and apoptotic activity of Ipr1. These findings highlight the structural foundations of Ipr1 action and provide new insights into the mechanism of Ipr1-mediated resistance to mycobacterium. PMID:27622275

  6. Available lysine and digestible amino acid contents of proteinaceous foods of India.

    PubMed

    Rutherfurd, Shane M; Bains, Kiran; Moughan, Paul J

    2012-08-01

    Cereals and legumes are staple foods in India and are limiting in lysine and sulphur amino acids, respectively. Available lysine loss, due to Maillard-type reactions that may occur during food preparation, exacerbates the problem of lysine deficiency particularly in cereals. Consequently, determining the contents of digestible essential amino acids, particularly lysine, is important. True ileal digestibilities of most amino acids (including total and reactive lysine) were determined for ten food ingredients and eleven foods commonly consumed in India. Semi-synthetic diets each containing either an ingredient or the prepared food as the sole protein source were formulated to contain 100 g kg(-1) protein (75 g kg(-1) for rice-based diets) and fed to growing rats. Titanium dioxide was included as an indigestible marker. Digesta were collected and the amino acid content (including reactive lysine) of diets and ileal digesta determined. Available (digestible reactive) lysine content ranged from 1·9-15·4 g kg(-1) and 1·8-12·7 g kg(-1) across the ingredients and prepared foods respectively. True ileal amino acid digestibility varied widely both across ingredients and prepared foods for each amino acid (on average 60-92 %) and across amino acids within each ingredient and prepared food (overall digestibility 31-96 %). Amino acid digestibility was low for many of the ingredients and prepared foods and consequently digestibility must be considered when assessing the protein quality of poorer quality foods. Given commonly encountered daily energy intakes for members of the Indian population, it is estimated that lysine is limiting for adults in many Indian diets.

  7. An arginine to lysine substitution in the bZIP domain of an opaque-2 mutant in maize abolishes specific DNA binding.

    PubMed

    Aukerman, M J; Schmidt, R J; Burr, B; Burr, F A

    1991-02-01

    The opaque-2 (o2) locus in maize encodes a transcription factor involved in the regulation of zein storage proteins. We have shown previously that the O2 protein contains a leucine zipper domain that binds to promoters of 22-kD zein genes. In this paper we characterize an EMS-induced o2 allele, o2-676, that causes a 50% reduction in zein. We have found that the o2-676 mutant protein does not show specific recognition of zein promoter fragments because of the substitution of a lysine residue for an arginine residue within the bZIP domain of o2-676. This particular arginine is conserved within the bZIP domains of all mammalian, fungal, and plant DNA binding proteins of this class. The correlation between this mutation in o2 and the altered pattern of zein expression strongly suggests that O2 regulates transcription of certain members of the zein multigene family through direct interaction with the zein promoters and not through the transcriptional activation of some other regulator of zein gene expression.

  8. A Single P-loop Glutamate Point Mutation to either Lysine or Arginine Switches the Cation–Anion Selectivity of the CNGA2 Channel

    PubMed Central

    Qu, Wei; Moorhouse, Andrew J.; Chandra, Meenak; Pierce, Kerrie D.; Lewis, Trevor M.; Barry, Peter H.

    2006-01-01

    Cyclic nucleotide-gated (CNG) channels play a critical role in olfactory and visual transduction. Site-directed mutagenesis and inside-out patch-clamp recordings were used to investigate ion permeation and selectivity in two mutant homomeric rat olfactory CNGA2 channels expressed in HEK293 cells. A single point mutation of the negatively charged pore loop (P-loop) glutamate (E342) to either a positively charged lysine or arginine resulted in functional channels, which consistently responded to cGMP, although the currents were generally extremely small. The concentration–response curve of the lysine mutant channel was very similar to that of wild-type (WT) channels, suggesting no major structural alteration to the mutant channels. Reversal potential measurements, during cytoplasmic NaCl dilutions, showed that the lysine and the arginine mutations switched the selectivity of the channel from cations (PCl/PNa = 0.07 [WT]) to anions (PCl/PNa = 14 [Lys] or 10 [Arg]). Relative anion permeability sequences for the two mutant channels, measured with bi-ionic substitutions, were NO3− > I− > Br− > Cl− > F− > acetate−, the same as those obtained for anion-selective GABA and glycine channels. The mutant channels also seem to have an extremely small single-channel conductance, measured using noise analysis of about 1–2 pS, compared to a WT value of about 29 pS. The results showed that it is predominantly the charge of the E342 residue in the P-loop, rather than the pore helix dipoles, which controls the cation–anion selectivity of this channel. However, the outward rectification displayed by both mutant channels in symmetrical NaCl solutions suggests that the negative ends of the pore helix dipoles may play a role in reducing the outward movement of Cl− ions through these anion-selective channels. These results have potential implications for the determinants of anion–cation selectivity in the large family of P-loop–containing channels. PMID:16533895

  9. [Protein utilization in lysine-supplemented barley protein and effectiveness of the limiting amino acid lysine in growing pigs].

    PubMed

    Wecke, C; Gebhardt, G

    1982-04-01

    In 57 N-balance experiments with castrated male pigs (20 ... 65 kg live weight) the influence of graded lysine supplements to crushed barley enriched with energy, minerals and vitamins on nitrogen metabolism and lysine effectiveness was tested. Close correlative relations between lysine concentration and the b-value, the NPU-value, N-balance and N-excretion in urine could be detected. In agreement with the law of minimum a constant lysine effectiveness could be observed within the limiting range. The supplemented synthetic lysine distinguished itself by the same effectiveness as the protein-bound barley lysine. When barley supplemented with lysine is used, an amount of lysine supplement should be chosen from the point of view of nutrition physiology which raises the total lysine content to a maximum level of 6.3 g/16 g N because lysine supplementation exceeding this value without the simultaneous supplementation of limiting threonine remains ineffective.

  10. Role of lysine and acidic amino acid residues on the insecticidal activity of Jackbean urease.

    PubMed

    Real-Guerra, Rafael; Carlini, Célia Regina; Stanisçuaski, Fernanda

    2013-09-01

    Canavalia ensiformis has three isoforms of urease: Jackbean urease (JBU), Jackbean urease II and canatoxin. These isoforms present several biological activities, independent from the enzymatic property, such as entomotoxicity and antifungal properties. The entomotoxic activity is a property of the whole protein, as well as of a 10 kDa peptide released by insect digestive enzymes. Here we have used chemical modification to observe the influence of lysines and acidic residues on JBU enzymatic and insecticidal activities. Chemical modification of lysine residues was performed with dimethylamine-borane complex and formaldehyde, and acidic residues were modified by 1-ethyl-3-(3-dimethylaminopropyl) carbodiimide and ethylenediamine. Derivatized ureases, called JBU-Lys (lysine-modified) and JBU-Ac (acidic residues-modified), were assayed for their biochemical and insecticidal properties. Neither modification altered significantly the kinetic parameters analyzed, indicating that no residue critical for the enzyme activity was affected and that the modifications did not incur in any significant structural alteration. On the other hand, both modifications reduced the toxic activity of the native protein fed to Dysdercus peruvianus. The changes observed in the entomotoxic property of the derivatized proteins reflect alterations in different steps of JBU's toxicity towards insects. JBU-Ac is not susceptible to hydrolysis by insect digestive enzymes, hence impairing the release of toxic peptide(s), while JBU-Lys is processed as the native protein. On the other hand, the antidiuretic effect of JBU on Rhodnius prolixus is altered in JBU-Lys, but not in JBU-Ac. Altogether, these data emphasize the role of lysine and acidic residues on the insecticidal properties of ureases.

  11. Biofortification of rice with the essential amino acid lysine: molecular characterization, nutritional evaluation, and field performance

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Qing-qing; Zhang, Chang-quan; Chan, Man-ling; Zhao, Dong-sheng; Chen, Jin-zhu; Wang, Qing; Li, Qian-feng; Yu, Heng-xiu; Gu, Ming-hong; Sun, Samuel Sai-ming; Liu, Qiao-quan

    2016-01-01

    Rice (Oryza sativa L.), a major staple crop worldwide, has limited levels of the essential amino acid lysine. We previously produced engineered rice with increased lysine content by expressing bacterial aspartate kinase and dihydrodipicolinate synthase and inhibiting rice lysine ketoglutarate reductase/saccharopine dehydrogenase activity. However, the grain quality, field performance, and integration patterns of the transgenes in these lysine-enriched lines remain unclear. In the present study, we selected several elite transgenic lines with endosperm-specific or constitutive regulation of the above key enzymes but lacking the selectable marker gene. All target transgenes were integrated into the intragenic region in the rice genome. Two pyramid transgenic lines (High Free Lysine; HFL1 and HFL2) with free lysine levels in seeds up to 25-fold that of wild type were obtained via a combination of the above two transgenic events. We observed a dramatic increase in total free amino acids and a slight increase in total protein content in both pyramid lines. Moreover, the general physicochemical properties were improved in pyramid transgenic rice, but the starch composition was not affected. Field trials indicated that the growth of HFL transgenic rice was normal, except for a slight difference in plant height and grain colour. Taken together, these findings will be useful for the potential commercialization of high-lysine transgenic rice. PMID:27252467

  12. Biofortification of rice with the essential amino acid lysine: molecular characterization, nutritional evaluation, and field performance.

    PubMed

    Yang, Qing-Qing; Zhang, Chang-Quan; Chan, Man-Ling; Zhao, Dong-Sheng; Chen, Jin-Zhu; Wang, Qing; Li, Qian-Feng; Yu, Heng-Xiu; Gu, Ming-Hong; Sun, Samuel Sai-Ming; Liu, Qiao-Quan

    2016-07-01

    Rice (Oryza sativa L.), a major staple crop worldwide, has limited levels of the essential amino acid lysine. We previously produced engineered rice with increased lysine content by expressing bacterial aspartate kinase and dihydrodipicolinate synthase and inhibiting rice lysine ketoglutarate reductase/saccharopine dehydrogenase activity. However, the grain quality, field performance, and integration patterns of the transgenes in these lysine-enriched lines remain unclear. In the present study, we selected several elite transgenic lines with endosperm-specific or constitutive regulation of the above key enzymes but lacking the selectable marker gene. All target transgenes were integrated into the intragenic region in the rice genome. Two pyramid transgenic lines (High Free Lysine; HFL1 and HFL2) with free lysine levels in seeds up to 25-fold that of wild type were obtained via a combination of the above two transgenic events. We observed a dramatic increase in total free amino acids and a slight increase in total protein content in both pyramid lines. Moreover, the general physicochemical properties were improved in pyramid transgenic rice, but the starch composition was not affected. Field trials indicated that the growth of HFL transgenic rice was normal, except for a slight difference in plant height and grain colour. Taken together, these findings will be useful for the potential commercialization of high-lysine transgenic rice.

  13. Influence of wine-like conditions on arginine utilization by lactic acid bacteria.

    PubMed

    Araque, Isabel; Reguant, Cristina; Rozès, Nicolas; Bordons, Albert

    2011-12-01

    Wine can contain trace amounts of ethyl carbamate (EC), a carcinogen formed when ethanol reacts with carbamyl compounds such as citrulline. EC is produced from arginine by lactic acid bacteria (LAB), e.g., Lactobacillus and Pediococcus. Although the amounts of EC in wine are usually negligible, over the last few years there has been a slight but steady increase, as climate change has increased temperatures and alcohol levels have become proportionately higher, both of which favor EC formation. In this study, resting cells of LAB were used to evaluate the effects of ethanol, glucose, malic acid, and low pH on the ability of non-oenococcal strains of these bacteria to degrade arginine and excrete citrulline. Malic acid was found to clearly inhibit arginine consumption in all strains. The relation between citrulline produced and arginine consumed was clearly higher in the presence of ethanol (10-12%) and at low pH (3.0), which is consistent with both the decreased amount of ornithine produced from arginine and the reduction in arginine degradation. In L. brevis and L. buchneri strains isolated from wine and beer, respectively, the synthesis of citrulline from arginine was highest.

  14. Effect of selectively introducing arginine and D-amino acids on the antimicrobial activity and salt sensitivity in analogs of human beta-defensins.

    PubMed

    Olli, Sudar; Rangaraj, Nandini; Nagaraj, Ramakrishnan

    2013-01-01

    We have examined the antimicrobial activity of C-terminal analogs of human β-defensins HBD-1 and-3 wherein lysines have been selectively replaced by L- and D-arginines and L-isoleucine substituted with its D-enantiomer. The analogs exhibited antibacterial and antifungal activities. Physiological concentration of NaCl did not attenuate the activity of the peptides against Gram-negative bacteria considerably, while some attenuation of activity was observed against S. aureus. Variable attenuation of activity was observed in the presence of Ca²⁺ and Mg²⁺. Introduction of D-amino acids abrogated the need for a disulfide bridge for exhibiting activity. Confocal images of carboxyfluorescein (CF) labeled peptides indicated initial localization on the membrane and subsequent translocation into the cell. Analogs corresponding to cationic rich segments of human defensins substituted with L- and D-arginine, could be attractive candidates for development as future therapeutic drugs.

  15. Camphorquinone-10-sulfonic acid and derivatives: convenient reagents for reversible modification of arginine residues

    SciTech Connect

    Pande, C.S.; Pelzig, M.; Glass, J.D.

    1980-02-01

    Camphorquinone-10-sulfonic acid hydrate was prepared by the action of selenous acid on camphor-10-sulfonic acid. Camphorquinone-10-sulfonylnorleucine was prepared either from the sulfonic acid via the sulfonyl chloride or by selenous acid oxidation of camphor-10-sulfonylnorleucine. These reagents are useful for specific, reversible modification of the guanidino groups of arginine residues. Camphorquinonsulfonic acid is a crystalline water-soluble reagent that is especially suitable for use with small arginine-containing molecules, because the sulfonic acid group of the reagent is a convenient handle for analytical and preparative separation of products. Camphorquinonesulfonylnorleucine is more useful for work with large polypeptides and proteins, because hydrolysates of modified proteins may be analyzed for norleucine to determine the extent of arginine modification. The adducts of the camphorquinone derivatives with the guanidino group are stable to 0.5 M hydroxylamine solutions at pH 7, the recommended conditions for cleavage of the corresponding cyclohexanedione adducts. At pH 8-9 the adducts of the camphorquinone derivatives with the guanidino group are cleaved by o-phenylenediamine. The modification and regeneration of arginine, of the dipeptide arginylaspartic acid, of ribonuclease S-peptide, and of soybean trypsin inhibitor are presented as demonstrations of the use of the reagents.The use of camphorquinonesulfonyl chloride to prepare polymers containing arginine-specific ligands is discussed.

  16. Role of Amino Acid Insertions on Intermolecular Forces between Arginine Peptide Condensed DNA Helices

    PubMed Central

    DeRouchey, Jason E.; Rau, Donald C.

    2011-01-01

    In spermatogenesis, chromatin histones are replaced by arginine-rich protamines to densely compact DNA in sperm heads. Tight packaging is considered necessary to protect the DNA from damage. To better understand the nature of the forces condensing protamine-DNA assemblies and their dependence on amino acid content, the effect of neutral and negatively charged amino acids on DNA-DNA intermolecular forces was studied using model peptides containing six arginines. We have previously observed that the neutral amino acids in salmon protamine decrease the net attraction between protamine-DNA helices compared with the equivalent homo-arginine peptide. Using osmotic stress coupled with x-ray scattering, we have investigated the component attractive and repulsive forces that determine the net attraction and equilibrium interhelical distance as a function of the chemistry, position, and number of the amino acid inserted. Neutral amino acids inserted into hexa-arginine increase the short range repulsion while only slightly affecting longer range attraction. The amino acid content alone of salmon protamine is enough to rationalize the forces that package DNA in sperm heads. Inserting a negatively charged amino acid into hexa-arginine dramatically weakens the net attraction. Both of these observations have biological implications for protamine-DNA packaging in sperm heads. PMID:21994948

  17. Quantitative comparison between poly(L-arginine) and poly(L-lysine) at each step of polyplex-based gene transfection using a microinjection technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hashimoto, Tomoko; Kawazu, Takeshi; Nagasaki, Takeshi; Murakami, Akira; Yamaoka, Tetsuji

    2012-02-01

    Among the well-studied polypeptide-type gene carriers, transfection efficiency is empirically known to be higher for poly(L-arginine) (PR) than poly(L-lysine) (PK). The big difference between PR and PK should be determined at one of the intracellular trafficking steps based on the different charge densities, structures or PKa values. However, the endosomal escape and the intranuclear transcription efficiency in living cells have not been clarified yet. In this study, a novel method for quantifying the intranuclear transcription efficiency and the nuclear transport of the polyplex is established based on the nuclear and the cytosolic microinjection technique, and the results for PK and PR with different molecular weights (MWs) are compared in living cells. The intranuclear transcription efficiency is the same in PR and PK and it decreases rapidly with increasing MW, in spite of the commonly measured transfection efficiency. The transcription efficiency is strongly suppressed at high MW and strongly correlates with the polyplex forming ability expressed as a critical ratio of the number of polypeptide cationic groups to the number of pDNA anionic groups. When considered with the results of the cellular uptake and in vitro transfection with or without chloroquine, the rate-limiting step for their gene transfer is the buffering effect-independent endosomal escape.

  18. Injectable supramolecular hydrogel formed from α-cyclodextrin and PEGylated arginine-functionalized poly(l-lysine) dendron for sustained MMP-9 shRNA plasmid delivery.

    PubMed

    Lin, Qianming; Yang, Yumeng; Hu, Qian; Guo, Zhong; Liu, Tao; Xu, Jiake; Wu, Jianping; Kirk, Thomas Brett; Ma, Dong; Xue, Wei

    2017-02-01

    Hydrogels have attracted much attention in cancer therapy and tissue engineering due to their sustained gene delivery ability. To obtain an injectable and high-efficiency gene delivery hydrogel, methoxypolyethylene glycol (MPEG) was used to conjugate with the arginine-functionalized poly(l-lysine) dendron (PLLD-Arg) by click reaction, and then the synthesized MPEG-PLLD-Arg interacted with α-cyclodextrin (α-CD) to form the supramolecular hydrogel by the host-guest interaction. The gelation dynamics, hydrogel strength and shear viscosity could be modulated by α-CD content in the hydrogel. MPEG-PLLD-Arg was confirmed to bind and deliver gene effectively, and its gene transfection efficiency was significantly higher than PEI-25k under its optimized condition. After gelation, MMP-9 shRNA plasmid (pMMP-9) could be encapsulated into the hydrogel matrix in situ and be released from the hydrogels sustainedly, as the release rate was dependent on α-CD content. The released MPEG-PLLD-Arg/pMMP-9 complex still showed better transfection efficiency than PEI-25k and induced sustained tumor cell apoptosis. Also, in vivo assays indicated that this pMMP-9-loaded supramolecular hydrogel could result in the sustained tumor growth inhibition meanwhile showed good biocompatibility. As an injectable, sustained and high-efficiency gene delivery system, this supramolecular hydrogel is a promising candidate for long-term gene therapy.

  19. Modulation of benzodiazepine by lysine and pipecolic acid on pentylenetetrazol-induced seizures

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, Y.F.; Hargest, V.; Chen, J.S.

    1988-01-01

    L-lysine and its metabolite pipecolic acid (PA) have been studied for their effects on pentylenetetrazol (PTZ)-induced seizures in mice. L-Lysine of L-Pa i.p. significantly increased clonic and tonic latencies in a dose-dependent manner against 90 mg/kg PTZ-induced seizures. L-Lysine but not L-Pa enhanced the anticonvulsant effect of diazepam (DZ). L-Pa i.c.v. showed a slight decrease in clonic latency; it did not enhance the antiseizure activity of DZ; it caused seizures at 0.6 mmol/kg. D-PA i.c.v. displayed an opposite effect compared to its L-isomer. The anticonvulsant effect of L-lysine in terms of increase in seizure latency and survival was even more amplified when tested with a submaximal PTZ concentration. L-Lysine showed an enhancement of specific /sup 3/H-flunitrazepam(FZ) binding to mouse brain membranes both in vitro an din vivo. The possibility of L-lysine acting as a modulator for the GABA/benzodiazepine receptors was demonstrated. Since L-PA showed enhancement of /sup 3/H-FZ binding only in vitro but not in vivo, the anticonvulsant effect of L-PA may not be linked to the GABA/benzodiazepine receptor.

  20. Mechanisms for Improved Hygroscopicity of L-Arginine Valproate Revealed by X-Ray Single Crystal Structure Analysis.

    PubMed

    Ito, Masataka; Nambu, Kaori; Sakon, Aya; Uekusa, Hidehiro; Yonemochi, Etsuo; Noguchi, Shuji; Terada, Katsuhide

    2017-03-01

    Valproic acid is widely used as an antiepileptic agent. Valproic acid is in liquid phase while sodium valproate is in solid phase at room temperature. Sodium valproate is hard to manufacture because of its hygroscopic and deliquescent properties. To improve these, cocrystal and salt screening for valproic acid was employed in this study. Two solid salt forms, l-arginine valproate and l-lysine valproate, were obtained and characterized. By using dynamic vapor sorption method, the critical relative humidity of sodium valproate, l-arginine valproate, and l-lysine valproate were measured. Critical relative humidity of sodium valproate was 40%, of l-lysine valproate was 60%, and of l-arginine valproate was 70%. Single-crystal X-ray structure determination of l-arginine valproate was employed. l-Lysine valproate was of low diffraction quality, and l-arginine valproate formed a 1:1 salt. Crystal l-arginine valproate has a disorder in the methylene carbon chain that creates 2 conformations. The carboxylate group of valproic acid is connected to the amino group of l-arginine. Crystalline morphologies were calculated from its crystal structure. Adsorption of water molecules to crystal facets was simulated by Material Studio. When comparing adsorption energy per site of these salts, sodium valproate is more capable of adsorption of water molecule than l-arginine valproate.

  1. Implications of the role of reactive cystein in arginine kinase: reactivation kinetics of 5,5'-dithiobis-(2-nitrobenzoic acid)-modified arginine kinase reactivated by dithiothreitol.

    PubMed

    Pan, Ji-Cheng; Cheng, Yuan; Hui, En-Fu; Zhou, Hai-Meng

    2004-04-30

    The reduction of 5,5'-dithiobis-(2-nitrobenzoic acid)-modified arginine kinase by dithiothreitol has been investigated using the kinetic theory of the substrate reaction during modification of enzyme activity. The results show that the modified arginine kinase can be fully reactivated by an excess concentration of dithiothreitol in a monophasic kinetic course. The presence of ATP or the transition-state analog markedly slows the apparent reactivation rate constant, while arginine shows no effect. The results of ultraviolet (UV) difference and intrinsic fluorescence spectra indicate that the substrate arginine-ADP-Mg2+ can induce conformational changes of the modified enzyme but adding NO3- cannot induce further changes that occur with the native enzyme. The reactive cysteines' location and role in the catalysis of arginine kinase are discussed. It is suggested that the cysteine may be located in the hinge region of the two domains of arginine kinase. The reactive cysteine of arginine kinase may play an important role not in the binding to the transition-state analog but in the conformational changes caused by the transition-state analog.

  2. SucStruct: Prediction of succinylated lysine residues by using structural properties of amino acids.

    PubMed

    López, Yosvany; Dehzangi, Abdollah; Lal, Sunil Pranit; Taherzadeh, Ghazaleh; Michaelson, Jacob; Sattar, Abdul; Tsunoda, Tatsuhiko; Sharma, Alok

    2017-03-28

    Post-Translational Modification (PTM) is a biological reaction which contributes to diversify the proteome. Despite many modifications with important roles in the cellular activity, lysine succinylation has recently emerged as an important PTM mark. It alters the chemical structure of lysines, leading to remarkable changes in the structure and function of proteins. Given the huge amount of proteins being sequenced in the post-genome era, the experimental detection of succinylated residues remains expensive, inefficient and time-consuming. Therefore, the development of computational tools for accurately predicting succinylated lysines is an urgent necessity. To date, several approaches have been proposed but their sensitivity has been reportedly poor. In this paper, we propose an approach that utilizes structural features of amino acids to improve lysine succinylation prediction. Succinylated and non-succinylated lysines were first retrieved from 670 proteins and characteristics such as accessible surface area, backbone torsion angles, and local structure conformations were incorporated. We used the k-nearest neighbors cleaning for dealing with class imbalance and designed a pruned decision tree for classification. Our predictor, referred as SucStruct (Succinylation using Structural features), proved to significantly improve performance when compared to previous predictors, with sensitivity, accuracy and Mathew's correlation coefficient equal to 0.7334-0.7946, 0.7444-0.7608 and 0.4884-0.5240, respectively.

  3. Mechanisms for stimulation of rat anterior pituitary cells by arginine and other amino acids.

    PubMed Central

    Villalobos, C; Núñez, L; García-Sancho, J

    1997-01-01

    1. Arginine and other amino acids are secretagogues for growth hormone and prolactin in the intact animal, but the mechanism of action is unclear. We have studied the effects of amino acids on cytosolic free calcium concentration ([Ca2+]i) in single rat anterior pituitary (AP) cells. Arginine elicited a large increase of [Ca2+]i) in about 40% of all the AP cells, suggesting that amino acids may modulate hormone secretion by acting directly on the pituitary. 2. Cell typing by immunofluorescence of the hormone the cells store showed that the arginine-sensitive cells are distributed uniformly within all the five AP cell types. The arginine-sensitive cells overlapped closely with the subpopulation of cells sensitive to thyrotrophin-releasing hormone. 3. Other cationic as well as several neutral (dipolar) amino acids had the same effect as arginine. The increase of [Ca2+]i was dependent on extracellular Ca2+ and blocked by dihydropyridine, suggesting that it is due to Ca2+ influx through L-type voltage-gated Ca2+ channels. The [Ca2+]i increase was also blocked by removal of extracellular Na+ but not by tetrodotoxin. The substrate specificity for stimulation of AP cells resembled closely that of the amino acid transport system B0+. We propose that electrogenic amino acid influx through this pathway depolarizes the plasma membrane with the subsequent activation of voltage-gated Ca2+ channels and Ca2+ entry. 4. Amino acids also stimulated prolactin secretion in vitro with a similar substrate specificity to that found for the [Ca2+]i increase. Existing data on the stimulation of secretion of other hormones by amino acids suggest that a similar mechanism could apply to other endocrine glands. PMID:9263921

  4. The secondary structure of apolipoproteins in human HDL3 particles after chemical modification of their tyrosine, lysine, cysteine or arginine residues. A Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy study.

    PubMed

    Herzyk, E; Owen, J S; Chapman, D

    1988-09-02

    Fourier transform infrared spectra of apolipoprotein E-depleted human HDL3 have been obtained in H2O and 2H2O buffers. The absorption bands in the protein amide I and amide II regions (1700-1500 cm-1) were assigned to alpha-helical, disordered and beta-strand/beta-turn structures of apolipoproteins A-I and A-II (apoA-I and apoA-II), the apolipoprotein constituents of HDL3. Modification of HDL3 by tetranitromethane (TNM) treatment, acetylation, reduction plus alkylation and 1,2-cyclohexanedione treatment derivatised tyrosine, lysine, cysteine and arginine residues, respectively, and caused alteration of the secondary structure of the HDL3 apolipoproteins to different extents. Each of the chemical modifications caused changes in the frequency of bands associated with beta-strands/beta-turns, but only TNM treatment of HDL3, as judged by the second- and fourth-derivative spectra, resulted in a shift of the band assigned to the alpha-helical structure of the proteins. In agreement with other workers, only TNM treatment of HDL3 particles was found to inhibit their binding by high-affinity cell membrane receptors. It is proposed, therefore, that receptor recognition of HDL3 particles is dependent on conservation of the alpha-helix structures within apoA-I and apoA-II, and that beta-strand/beta-turn structures are not involved. This conclusion is consistent with the predominance of amphipathic alpha-helical structures in both apolipoproteins and with the relaxed specificity of the receptors which are thought to recognise both apoA-I and apoA-II.

  5. X-ray studies on crystalline complexes involving amino acids and peptides. XLII. Adipic acid complexes of L- and DL-arginine and supramolecular association in arginine-dicarboxylic acid complexes.

    PubMed

    Roy, Siddhartha; Singh, Desh Deepak; Vijayan, M

    2005-02-01

    The adipic acid complexes of DL-arginine and L-arginine are made up of zwitterionic, singularly positively charged arginium ions and doubly negatively charged adipate ions, with a 2:1 stoichiometry. One of the two crystallographically independent arginium ions in the L-arginine complex has a conformation hitherto unobserved in crystal structures containing the amino acid. In the present study the structural data on arginine complexes of saturated dicarboxylic acids with 0-5 C atoms separating the two carboxyl functions are given. In terms of molecular aggregation, formic and acetic acid complexes behave in a similar way to those involving fairly long carboxylic acids such as adipic acid. By and large, the supramolecular assembly in complexes involving dicarboxylic acids with 3 or more C atoms separating the carboxyl groups (glutaric, adipic and pimelic acids), and those involving formic and acetic acids, have common features. The aggregation patterns in complexes involving oxalic, malonic and maleic acids do not share striking features among themselves (except for the mode of hydrogen-bonded dimerization of arginium ions) or with those involving larger dicarboxylic acids. Complexes of succinic acid, the shortest linear dicarboxylic acid, share features with those involving shorter as well as longer dicarboxylic acids. The difference in the behaviour of long and short dicarboxylic acids and the ambiguous behaviour of succinic acid can be broadly related to their lengths.

  6. Understanding the synergistic effect of arginine and glutamic acid mixtures on protein solubility.

    PubMed

    Shukla, Diwakar; Trout, Bernhardt L

    2011-10-20

    Understanding protein solubility is a key part of physical chemistry. In particular, solution conditions can have a major effect, and the effect of multiple cosolutes is little understood. It has been shown that the simultaneous addition of L-arginine hydrochloride and L-glutamic acid enhances the maximum achievable solubility of several poorly soluble proteins up to 4-8 times (Golovanov et. al, J. Am. Chem. Soc., 2004, 126, 8933-8939) and reduces the intermolecular interactions between proteins. The observed solubility enhancement is negligible for arginine and glutamic acid solutions as compared to the equimolar mixtures. In this study, we have established the molecular mechanism behind this observed synergistic effect of arginine and glutamic acid mixtures using preferential interaction theory and molecular dynamics simulations of Drosophilia Su(dx) protein (ww34). It was found that the protein solubility enhancement is related to the relative increase in the number of arginine and glutamic acid molecules around the protein in the equimolar mixtures due to additional hydrogen bonding interactions between the excipients on the surface of the protein when both excipients are present. The presence of these additional molecules around the protein leads to enhanced crowding, which suppresses the protein association. These results highlight the role of additive-additive interaction in tuning the protein-protein interactions. Furthermore, this study reports a unique behavior of additive solutions, where the presence of one additive in solution affects the concentration of another on the protein surface.

  7. Arginine to lysine 108 substitution in recombinant CYP1A2 abolishes methoxyresorufin metabolism in lymphoblastoid cells

    PubMed Central

    Hadjokas, Nicholas E; Dai, Renke; Friedman, Fred K; Spence, Michael J; Cusack, Barry J; Vestal, Robert E; Ma, Yongsheng

    2002-01-01

    Cytochrome P4501A2 (CYP1A2) activates a large number of procarcinogens to carcinogens. Phytochemicals such as flavones can inhibit CYP1A2 activity competitively, and hydroxylated derivatives of flavone (galangin) may be potent, selective inhibitors of CYP1A2 activity relative to CYP1A1 activity. Molecular modelling of the CYP1A2 interaction with hydroxylated derivatives of flavone suggests that a number of hydrophobic residues of the substrate-binding domain engage in hydrogen bonding with such inhibitors.We have tested this model using site-directed mutagenesis of these residues in expression plasmids transfected into the human B-lymphoblastoid cell line, AHH-1 TK+/−.Consistent with the molecular model's predicted placement in the active site, amino acid substitutions at the predicted residues abolished CYP1A2 enzymatic activity.Transfected cell lines contained equal amounts of immunoreactive CYP1A2.Our results support the molecular model's prediction of the critical amino acid residues present in the hydrophobic active site, residues that can hydrogen bond with CYP1A2 inhibitors and modify substrate binding and/or turnover. PMID:12023936

  8. Pyridoxal 5'-phosphate inactivates DNA topoisomerase IB by modifying the lysine general acid.

    PubMed

    Vermeersch, Jacqueline J; Christmann-Franck, Serge; Karabashyan, Leon V; Fermandjian, Serge; Mirambeau, Gilles; Der Garabedian, P Arsène

    2004-01-01

    The present results demonstrate that pyridoxal, pyridoxal 5'-phosphate (PLP) and pyridoxal 5'-diphospho-5'-adenosine (PLP-AMP) inhibit Candida guilliermondii and human DNA topoisomerases I in forming an aldimine with the epsilon-amino group of an active site lysine. PLP acts as a competitive inhibitor of C.guilliermondii topoisomerase I (K(i) = 40 microM) that blocks the cleavable complex formation. Chemical reduction of PLP-treated enzyme reveals incorporation of 1 mol of PLP per mol of protein. The limited trypsic proteolysis releases a 17 residue peptide bearing a lysine-bound PLP (KPPNTVIFDFLGK*DSIR). Targeted lysine (K*) in C.guilliermondii topoisomerase I corresponds to that found in topoisomerase I of Homo sapiens (K532), Candida albicans (K468), Saccharomyces cerevisiae (K458) and Schizosaccharomyces pombe (K505). In the human enzyme, K532, belonging to the active site acts as a general acid catalyst and is therefore essential for activity. The spatial orientation of K532-PLP within the active site was approached by molecular modeling using available crystallographic data. The PLP moiety was found at close proximity of several active residues. PLP could be involved in the cellular control of topoisomerases IB. It constitutes an efficient tool to explore topoisomerase IB dynamics during catalysis and is also a lead for new drugs that trap the lysine general acid.

  9. [FATTY ACID COMPOSITION OF PHOSPHOLIPIDS AND ESTERIFIED CHOLESTEROL OF THE BLOOD PLASMA OF RABBIT UNDER ARGININE ACUTE PANCREATITIS].

    PubMed

    Hopanenko, O O; Rivis, J F

    2015-01-01

    The content and fatty acid composition of phospholipids and esterified cholesterol were studied in the blood plasma of rabbits under acute arginine pancreatitis and its correction using linseed oil. It is established that the transport and anti-inflammatory functions of blood plasma deteriorates under acute arginine pancreatitis due to a decrease of the content of polyunsaturated fatty acids in phospholipids. The amount of cholesterol esterified with saturated and monounsaturated fatty acids increases in the blood plasma of rabbits. The concentration of phospholipids and esterified cholesterol is normalized and their fatty acid composition is improved in the lipid composition of the blood plasma of rabbits with acute arginine pancreatitis fed with linseed oil.

  10. Biomimetic niche for neural stem cell differentiation using poly-L-lysine/hyaluronic acid multilayer films.

    PubMed

    Lee, I-Chi; Wu, Yu-Chieh; Cheng, En-Ming; Yang, Wen-Ting

    2015-05-01

    Polyelectrolyte multilayer films have been suggested as tunable substrates with flexible surface properties that can modulate cell behavior. However, these films' biological effects on neural stem/progenitor cells have rarely been studied. Herein, biomimetic multilayer films composed of hyaluronic acid and poly-L-lysine were chosen to mimic the native extracellular matrix niche of brain tissue and were evaluated for their inductive effects, without the addition of chemical factors. Because neural stem/progenitor cells are sensitive to substrate properties, it is important that this system provides control over the surface charge, and slight stiffness variations are also possible. Both of these factors affect neural stem/progenitor cell differentiation. The results showed that neural stem/progenitor cells were induced to differentiate on the poly-L-lysine/hyaluronic acid multilayer films with 0.5-4 alternating layers. In addition, the neurite outgrowth length was regulated by the surface charge of the terminal layer but did not increase with the layer number. In contrast, the quantity of differentiated neurons was enhanced slightly as the number of layers increased but was not affected by the surface charge of the terminal layer. In sum, material pairs in the form of native poly-L-lysine/hyaluronic acid films achieved important targets for neural regenerative medicine, including enhancement of the neurite outgrowth length, regulation of neuron differentiation, and the formation of a network. These extracellular matrix-mimetic poly-L-lysine/hyaluronic acid multilayer films may provide a versatile platform that could be useful for surface modification for applications in neural engineering.

  11. The stabilization effect of dielectric constant and acidic amino acids on arginine-arginine (Arg-Arg) pairings: database survey and computational studies.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhengyan; Xu, Zhijian; Yang, Zhuo; Liu, Yingtao; Wang, Jin'an; Shao, Qiang; Li, Shujin; Lu, Yunxiang; Zhu, Weiliang

    2013-05-02

    Database survey in this study revealed that about one-third of the protein structures deposited in the Protein Data Bank (PDB) contain arginine-arginine (Arg-Arg) pairing with a carbon···carbon (CZ···CZ) interaction distance less than 5 Å. All the Arg-Arg pairings were found to bury in a polar environment composed of acidic residues, water molecules, and strong polarizable or negatively charged moieties from binding site or bound ligand. Most of the Arg-Arg pairings are solvent exposed and 68.3% Arg-Arg pairings are stabilized by acidic residues, forming Arg-Arg-Asp/Glu clusters. Density functional theory (DFT) was then employed to study the effect of environment on the pairing structures. It was revealed that Arg-Arg pairings become thermodynamically stable (about -1 kcal/mol) as the dielectric constant increases to 46.8 (DMSO), in good agreement with the results of the PDB survey. DFT calculations also demonstrated that perpendicular Arg-Arg pairing structures are favorable in low dielectric constant environment, while in high dielectric constant environment parallel structures are favorable. Additionally, the acidic residues can stabilize the Arg-Arg pairing structures to a large degree. Energy decomposition analysis of Arg-Arg pairings and Arg-Arg-Asp/Glu clusters showed that both solvation and electrostatic energies contribute significantly to their stability. The results reported herein should be very helpful for understanding Arg-Arg pairing and its application in drug design.

  12. Arginine-dependent acid-resistance pathway in Shigella boydii

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Ability to survive the low pH of the human stomach is considered be an important virulent determinant. Acid tolerance of Shigella boydii 18 CDPH, the strain implicated in an outbreak may have played an important role in surviving the acidic food (bean salad). The strain was capable of inducing arg...

  13. Reversible lysine modification on proteins by using functionalized boronic acids.

    PubMed

    Cal, Pedro M S D; Frade, Raquel F M; Cordeiro, Carlos; Gois, Pedro M P

    2015-05-26

    Iminoboronates have been utilized to successfully install azide and alkyne bioorthogonal functions on proteins, which may then be further reacted with their bioorthogonal counterparts. These constructs were also used to add polyethylene glycol (PEG) to insulin, a modification which has been shown to be reversible in the presence of fructose. Finally, iminoboronates were used to assemble a folic acid/paclitaxel small-molecule/drug conjugate in situ with an IC50  value of 20.7 nM against NCI-H460 cancer cells and negligible cytotoxicity against the CRL-1502 noncancer cells.

  14. Estradiol augments while progesterone inhibits arginine transport in human endothelial cells through modulation of cationic amino acid transporter-1.

    PubMed

    Bentur, Ohad S; Schwartz, Doron; Chernichovski, Tamara; Ingbir, Merav; Weinstein, Talia; Chernin, Gil; Schwartz, Idit F

    2015-08-15

    Decreased generation of nitric oxide (NO) by endothelial NO synthase (eNOS) characterizes endothelial dysfunction (ECD). Delivery of arginine to eNOS by cationic amino acid transporter-1 (CAT-1) was shown to modulate eNOS activity. We found in female rats, but not in males, that CAT-1 activity is preserved with age and in chronic renal failure, two experimental models of ECD. In contrast, during pregnancy CAT-1 is inhibited. We hypothesize that female sex hormones regulate arginine transport. Arginine uptake in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) was determined following incubation with either 17β-estradiol (E2) or progesterone. Exposure to E2 (50 and 100 nM) for 30 min resulted in a significant increase in arginine transport and reduction in phosphorylated CAT-1 (the inactive form) protein content. This was coupled with a decrease in phosphorylated MAPK/extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) 1/2. Progesterone (1 and 100 pM for 30 min) attenuated arginine uptake and increased phosphorylated CAT-1, phosphorylated protein kinase Cα (PKCα), and phosphorylated ERK1/2 protein content. GO-6976 (PKCα inhibitor) prevented the progesterone-induced decrease in arginine transport. Coincubation with both progesterone and estrogen for 30 min resulted in attenuated arginine transport. While estradiol increases arginine transport and CAT-1 activity through modulation of constitutive signaling transduction pathways involving ERK, progesterone inhibits arginine transport and CAT-1 via both PKCα and ERK1/2 phosphorylation, an effect that predominates over estradiol.

  15. 6th Amino Acid Assessment Workshop

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The focus of the 6th workshop is on lysine, arginine, and related amino acids. Functions, metabolic pathways, clinical uses, and upper tolerance intakes are emphasized in the articles that follow. Lysine is arguably the most deficient amino acid in the food supply of countries where poverty exists, ...

  16. Influence of phenolic compounds on the growth and arginine deiminase system in a wine lactic acid bacterium

    PubMed Central

    Alberto, María R.; de Nadra, María C. Manca; Arena, Mario E.

    2012-01-01

    The influence of seven phenolic compounds, normally present in wine, on the growth and arginine deiminase system (ADI) of Lactobacillus hilgardii X1B, a wine lactic acid bacterium, was established. This system provides energy for bacterial growth and produces citrulline that reacts with ethanol forming the carcinogen ethyl carbamate (EC), found in some wines. The influence of phenolic compounds on bacterial growth was compound dependent. Growth and final pH values increased in presence of arginine. Arginine consumption decreased in presence of protocatechuic and gallic acids (31 and 17%, respectively) and increased in presence of quercetin, rutin, catechin and the caffeic and vanillic phenolic acids (between 10 and 13%, respectively). ADI enzyme activities varied in presence of phenolic compounds. Rutin, quercetin and caffeic and vanillic acids stimulated the enzyme arginine deiminase about 37–40%. Amounts of 200 mg/L gallic and protocatechuic acids inhibited the arginine deiminase enzyme between 53 and 100%, respectively. Ornithine transcarbamylase activity was not modified at all concentrations of phenolic compounds. As gallic and protocatechuic acids inhibited the arginine deiminase enzyme that produces citrulline, precursor of EC, these results are important considering the formation of toxic compounds. PMID:24031815

  17. Influence of phenolic compounds on the growth and arginine deiminase system in a wine lactic acid bacterium.

    PubMed

    Alberto, María R; de Nadra, María C Manca; Arena, Mario E

    2012-01-01

    The influence of seven phenolic compounds, normally present in wine, on the growth and arginine deiminase system (ADI) of Lactobacillus hilgardii X1B, a wine lactic acid bacterium, was established. This system provides energy for bacterial growth and produces citrulline that reacts with ethanol forming the carcinogen ethyl carbamate (EC), found in some wines. The influence of phenolic compounds on bacterial growth was compound dependent. Growth and final pH values increased in presence of arginine. Arginine consumption decreased in presence of protocatechuic and gallic acids (31 and 17%, respectively) and increased in presence of quercetin, rutin, catechin and the caffeic and vanillic phenolic acids (between 10 and 13%, respectively). ADI enzyme activities varied in presence of phenolic compounds. Rutin, quercetin and caffeic and vanillic acids stimulated the enzyme arginine deiminase about 37-40%. Amounts of 200 mg/L gallic and protocatechuic acids inhibited the arginine deiminase enzyme between 53 and 100%, respectively. Ornithine transcarbamylase activity was not modified at all concentrations of phenolic compounds. As gallic and protocatechuic acids inhibited the arginine deiminase enzyme that produces citrulline, precursor of EC, these results are important considering the formation of toxic compounds.

  18. Contribution of gut microbial lysine to liver and milk amino acids in lactating does.

    PubMed

    Abecia, Leticia; Balcells, Joaquím; Fondevila, Manuel; Belenguer, Alvaro; Holtrop, Grietje; Lobley, Gerald E

    2008-11-01

    The contribution of microbial amino acids through caecotrophy to tissue protein metabolism was investigated in lactating does. Attempts were made to vary microbial supply through a dietary antibiotic, Zn bacitracin, and to vary tissue demand through manipulation of litter size. Three groups of eight New Zealand does were fed different experimental diets from day 28 of pregnancy to day 26 of lactation. The control group received the basal diet formulated to meet requirements with grass hay, wheat, soybean meal and barley grain. The second (no antibiotic) group and the third (bacitracin; BAC) group ingested the basal diet supplemented with ammonium sulfate (5 g/kg), initially unlabelled (day 1 to day 8) then labelled with 15N (day 9 to day 30), while the BAC diet was also supplemented throughout with antibiotic (Zn bacitracin; 100 mg/kg). From just after birth each group of does was subdivided into two groups, each of four females, with the litter size either five (LS5) or nine (LS9) pups. The 15N enrichment in liver, milk and caecal bacteria amino acids was determined by GC-combustion-isotope ratio MS. All amino acids in bacterial protein were enriched with the (15 NH 4)2SO4 treatment, with lysine 15N enrichment significantly greater in caecal bacteria (0.23 (SE 0.0063) atom % excess (ape)) than in liver (0.04 (SE 0.0004) ape) or milk protein (0.05 (SE 0.0018) ape), confirming the double origin (bacterial and dietary) of tissue lysine. The contribution of microbes to tissue lysine was 0.23 (SE 0.006) when milk protein was used as reference.

  19. Isolation and characterization of a new advanced glycation endproduct of dehydroascorbic acid and lysine.

    PubMed

    Argirov, Ognyan K; Lin, Bin; Olesen, Paul; Ortwerth, Beryl J

    2003-03-17

    Proteins are subject of posttranslational modification by sugars and their degradation products in vivo. The process is often referred as glycation. L-Dehydroascorbic acid (DHA), an oxidation product of L-ascorbic acid (vitamin C), is known as a potent glycation agent. A new product of modification of lysine epsilon -amino group by DHA was discovered as a result of the interaction between Boc-Lys and dehydroascorbic acid. The chromatographic and spectral analyses revealed that the structure of the product was 1-(5-ammonio-5-carboxypentyl)-3-oxido-4-(hydroxymethyl)pyridinium. The same compound was isolated from DHA modified calf lens protein after hydrolysis and chromatographic separation. The study confirmed that L-erythrulose is an important intermediate of modification of proteins by DHA. The structure of the reported product and in vitro experiments suggested that L-erythrulose could further transform to L-threose, L-erythrose and glycolaldehyde under conditions similar to physiological. The present study revealed that the modification of epsilon -amino groups of lysine residues by DHA is a complex process and could involve a number of reactive carbonyl species.

  20. Lysine requirements of pre-lay broiler breeder pullets: determination by indicator amino acid oxidation.

    PubMed

    Coleman, Russell A; Bertolo, Robert F; Moehn, Soenke; Leslie, Michael A; Ball, Ronald O; Korver, Doug R

    2003-09-01

    The indicator amino acid oxidation (IAAO) method allows the determination of amino acid requirements under conditions of low growth rate as found in pre-laying broiler breeder pullets. Cobb 500 breeder pullets (20 wk old; 2290 +/- 280 g, n = 4) were adapted (6 d) to a pelleted, purified control diet containing all nutrients at >or=110% of NRC recommendations. After recovery from surgery for implantation of a jugular catheter, each bird was fed, in random order, test diets containing one of nine levels of lysine (0.48, 0.96, 1.92, 2.88, 3.84, 4.80, 7.68, 9.60 and 14.40 g/kg of diet). Indicator oxidation was determined during 4-h primed (74 kBq/kg body), constant infusions (44 kBq x h(-1). kg body(-1)) of L-[1-(14)C]phenylalanine. Using the breakpoint of a one-slope broken-line model, the lysine requirement was determined to be 4.88 +/- 0.96 g/kg of diet or 366 +/- 72 mg x hen(-1) x d(-1) with an upper 95% CI of 6.40 g/kg of diet or 480 mg x hen(-1) x d(-1). IAAO allows determination of individual bird amino acid requirements for specific ages and types of birds over short periods of time and enables more accurate broiler breeder pullet diet formulation.

  1. Influence of carbohydrate starvation and arginine on culturability and amino acid utilization of lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis.

    PubMed

    Stuart, M R; Chou, L S; Weimer, B C

    1999-02-01

    Two strains of Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis were used to determine the influence of lactose and arginine on viability and amino acid use during carbohydrate starvation. Lactose provided energy for logarithmic-phase growth, and amino acids such as arginine provided energy after carbohydrate exhaustion. Survival time, cell numbers, and ATP concentrations increased with the addition of arginine to the basal medium. By the onset of lactose exhaustion, the concentrations of glycine-valine and glutamate had decreased by as much as 67% in L. lactis ML3, whereas the serine concentration increased by 97% during the same period. When no lactose was added, the concentrations of these amino acids remained constant. Similar trends were observed for L. lactis 11454. Without lactose or arginine, L. lactis ML3 was nonculturable on agar but was viable after 2 days, as measured by fluorescent viability stains and intracellular ATP levels. However, L. lactis 11454 without lactose or arginine remained culturable for at least 14 days. These data suggest that lactococci become viable but nonculturable in response to carbohydrate depletion. Additionally, these data indicate that amino acids other than arginine facilitate the survival of L. lactis during carbohydrate starvation.

  2. Effect of dietary lysine on hepatic lysine catabolism in broilers

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Lysine is frequently a first- or second-limiting amino acid in poultry diets. Improving the efficiency of lysine use for protein synthesis would effectively lower the lysine requirement and decrease feed costs. Understanding how lysine is degraded and how the degradation is regulated would identif...

  3. Auto-assembly of nanometer thick, water soluble layers of plasmid DNA complexed with diamines and basic amino acids on graphite: Greatest DNA protection is obtained with arginine.

    PubMed

    Khalil, T T; Boulanouar, O; Heintz, O; Fromm, M

    2017-02-01

    We have investigated the ability of diamines as well as basic amino acids to condense DNA onto highly ordered pyrolytic graphite with minimum damage after re-dissolution in water. Based on a bibliographic survey we briefly summarize DNA binding properties with diamines as compared to basic amino acids. Thus, solutions of DNA complexed with these linkers were drop-cast in order to deposit ultra-thin layers on the surface of HOPG in the absence or presence of Tris buffer. Atomic Force Microscopy analyses showed that, at a fixed ligand-DNA mixing ratio of 16, the mean thickness of the layers can be statistically predicted to lie in the range 0-50nm with a maximum standard deviation ±6nm, using a simple linear law depending on the DNA concentration. The morphology of the layers appears to be ligand-dependent. While the layers containing diamines present holes, those formed in the presence of basic amino acids, except for lysine, are much more compact and dense. X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy measurements provide compositional information indicating that, compared to the maximum number of DNA sites to which the ligands may bind, the basic amino acids Arg and His are present in large excess. Conservation of the supercoiled topology of the DNA plasmids was studied after recovery of the complex layers in water. Remarkably, arginine has the best protection capabilities whether Tris was present or not in the initial solution.

  4. Synthesis of peptides from amino acids and ATP with lysine-rich proteinoid

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nakashima, T.; Fox, S. W.

    1980-01-01

    The paper examines the synthesis of peptides from aminoacids and ATP with a lysine-rich protenoid. The latter in aqueous solution catalyzes the formation of peptides from free amino acids and ATP; this catalytic activity is not found in acidic protenoids, even though the latter contain a basic aminoacid. The pH optimum for the synthesis is about 11, but it is appreciable below 8 and above 13. Temperature data indicate an optimum at 20 C or above, with little increase in rate up to 60 C. Pyrophosphate can be used instead of ATP, but the yields are lower. The ATP-aided syntheses of peptides in aqueous solution occur with several types of proteinous aminoacids.

  5. L-lysine-L-tartaric acid: New molecular complex with nonlinear optical properties. Structure, vibrational spectra and phase transitions

    SciTech Connect

    Debrus, S.; Marchewka, M.K. . E-mail: mkm@int.pan.wroc.pl; Baran, J.; Drozd, M.; Czopnik, R.; Pietraszko, A.; Ratajczak, H.

    2005-09-15

    The first X-ray diffraction and vibrational spectroscopic analysis of a novel complex between L-lysine and L-tartaric acid is reported. The structure was solved in two temperatures (320 and 260 K) showing incommensurate phase between them. Room-temperature powder infrared and Raman measurements for the L-lysine-L-tartaric acid molecular complex (1:1) were carried out. DSC measurements on powder samples indicate two phase transitions points at about 295, 300 and 293, 300 K, for heating and cooling, respectively, with noticeable temperature interval between them. Second harmonic generation efficiency d {sub eff}=0.35 d {sub eff} (KDP)

  6. Coordinate expression of the Porphyromonas gingivalis lysine-specific gingipain proteinase, Kgp, arginine-specific gingipain proteinase, RgpA, and the heme/hemoglobin receptor, HmuR.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xinyan; Sroka, Aneta; Potempa, Jan; Genco, Caroline Attardo

    2004-11-01

    Heme utilization in Porphyromonas gingivalis requires the participation of an outer membrane hemin/hemoglobin receptor, HmuR, the lysine-specific gingipain proteinase (Kgp) and arginine-specific gingipain proteinase (Rgp). In this study, the expression of hmuR , kgp and rgpA genes in response to growth with different heme sources was examined by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction and enzyme-linked immunoassay. Coordinate regulation of hmuR , kgp and rgpA gene expression was evaluated through utilization of P. gingivalis hmuR and kgp mutants or by selective inactivation of proteinases with Kgp- and Rgp-specific inhibitors. We observed that expression of the kgp and rgpA genes was not tightly regulated by heme, but rather by the growth phase. In contrast, expression of the hmuR gene was negatively regulated by heme, while growth of P. gingivalis with human serum resulted in increased hmuR expression. A P. gingivalis kgp isogenic mutant demonstrated significantly increased hmuR gene expression, and inactivation of Kgp and Rgp activity by specific inhibitors up-regulated hmuR gene transcription. Moreover, inactivation of Kgp up-regulated rgpA transcription. Finally, a P. gingivalis hmuR mutant exhibited repressed kgp gene expression and lysine-specific proteinase activity. Collectively, these results indicate that kgp , rgpA and hmuR gene transcription is coordinately regulated and may facilitate greater efficiency of heme utilization in P. gingivalis .

  7. The effect of glutamic acid side chain on acidity constant of lysine in beta-sheet: A density functional theory study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sargolzaei, M.; Afshar, M.; Sadeghi, M. S.; Kavee, M.

    2014-07-01

    In this work, the possibility of proton transfer between side chain of lysine and glutamic acid in peptide of Glu--Ala-Lys+ was demonstrated using density functional theory (DFT). We have shown that the proton transfer takes place between side chain of glutamic and lysine residues through the hydrogen bond formation. The structures of transition state for proton transfer reaction were detected in gas and solution phases. Our kinetic studies show that the proton transfer reaction rate in gas phase is higher than solution phase. The ionization constant (p K a) value of lysine residue in peptide was estimated 1.039 which is lower than intrinsic p K a of lysine amino acid.

  8. Effects of L-arginine on solubilization and purification of plant membrane proteins.

    PubMed

    Arakawa, Junji; Uegaki, Masamichi; Ishimizu, Takeshi

    2011-11-01

    Biochemical analysis of membrane proteins is problematic at the level of solubilization and/or purification because of their hydrophobic nature. Here, we developed methods for efficient solubilization and purification of membrane proteins using L-arginine. The addition of 100 mM of basic amino acids (L-arginine, L-lysine, and L-ornithine) to a detergent-containing solubilization buffer enhanced solubilization (by 2.6-4.3 fold) of a model membrane protein-polygalacturonic acid synthase. Of all the amino acids, arginine was the most effective additive for solubilization of this membrane protein. Arginine addition also resulted in the best solubilization of other plant membrane proteins. Next, we examined the effects of arginine on purification of a model membrane protein. In anion-exchange chromatography, the addition of arginine to the loading and elution buffers resulted in a greater recovery of a membrane protein. In ultrafiltration, the addition of arginine to a protein solution significantly improved the recovery of a membrane protein. These results were thought to be due to the properties of arginine that prevent aggregation of hydrophobic proteins. Taken together, the results of our study showed that arginine is useful for solubilization and purification of aggregate-prone membrane proteins.

  9. Role of Arginine and Omega-3 Fatty Acids in Wound Healing and Infection

    PubMed Central

    Alexander, J. Wesley; Supp, Dorothy M.

    2014-01-01

    Significance: Only a few decades ago, the primary focus of nutritional supplementation was to prevent deficiencies of essential nutrients. It is now recognized that, at higher than essential levels, selected nutrients can have a pharmacologic effect to prevent or treat disease. Recent Advances: Two of the most important pharmaconutrients, arginine, and the omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids in fish oil, have been shown to have profound effects on wound healing and infections. Critical Issues: Both arginine and fish oils have independent benefits, but the combination appears to be much more effective. This combination has been shown to affect outcomes involving wound healing and infections, as reviewed here, and can also affect incidence and outcomes in cardiovascular disease, diabetes, organ transplant rejection, and other inflammatory conditions. These possibilities have not yet progressed to widespread clinical application. Future Directions: The optimal combinations of immunonutrients, timing of administration, and the doses needed for best results need to be determined in preclinical and clinical studies. Also, the mechanisms involved in the administration of pharmaconutrients need to be established. PMID:25371851

  10. X-ray studies of crystalline complexes involving amino acids and peptides. XLIII. Adipic acid complexes of L- and DL-lysine.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Alok; Thamotharan, S; Roy, Siddhartha; Vijayan, M

    2006-03-01

    The asymmetric unit of the DL-lysine complex of adipic acid [bis(DL-lysinium) adipate], 2C6H15N2O2+.C6H8O(4)2-, contains a zwitterionic singly charged lysinium cation and half a doubly charged adipate anion (the complete anion has inversion symmetry). That of the L-lysine complex (lysinium hydrogen adipate), C6H15N2O2+.C6H9O4-, consists of a lysinium cation and a singly charged hydrogen adipate anion. In both structures, the lysinium cations organize into layers interconnected by adipate or hydrogen adipate anions. However, the arrangement of the molecular ions in the layer is profoundly different in the DL- and L-lysine complexes. The hydrogen adipate anions in the L-lysine complex form linear arrays in which adjacent ions are interconnected by a symmetric O...H...O hydrogen bond.

  11. Nucleotide sequence of a lysine transfer ribonucleic Acid from bakers' yeast.

    PubMed

    Madison, J T; Boguslawski, S J; Teetor, G H

    1972-05-12

    The nucleotide sequence of one of the two major lysine transfer RNA's from bakers' yeast has been determined. Its structure is compared to that of a lysine tRNA from a haploid yeast. A total of 21 nucleotides differ in the two molecules. Only the T-psi-C-G (thymidine-pseudouridine-cytidine-guanosine) loop and its supporting stem are identical.

  12. PHD finger of the SUMO ligase Siz/PIAS family in rice reveals specific binding for methylated histone H3 at lysine 4 and arginine 2.

    PubMed

    Shindo, Heisaburo; Suzuki, Rintaro; Tsuchiya, Wataru; Taichi, Misako; Nishiuchi, Yuji; Yamazaki, Toshimasa

    2012-06-21

    We determined the three-dimensional structure of the PHD finger of the rice Siz/PIAS-type SUMO ligase, OsSiz1, by NMR spectroscopy and investigated binding ability for a variety of methylated histone H3 tails, showing that OsSiz1-PHD primarily recognizes dimethylated Arg2 of the histone H3 and that methylations at Arg2 and Lys4 reveal synergy effect on binding to OsSiz1-PHD. The K4 cage of OsSiz1-PHD for trimethylated Lys4 of H3K4me3 was similar to that of the BPTF-PHD finger, while the R2 pocket for Arg2 was different. It is intriguing that the PHD module of Siz/PIAS plays an important role, with collaboration with the DNA binding domain SAP, in gene regulation through SUMOylation of a variety of effectors associated with the methylated arginine-riched chromatin domains.

  13. Characterisation of neuroprotective efficacy of modified poly-arginine-9 (R9) peptides using a neuronal glutamic acid excitotoxicity model.

    PubMed

    Edwards, Adam B; Anderton, Ryan S; Knuckey, Neville W; Meloni, Bruno P

    2017-02-01

    In a recent study, we highlighted the importance of cationic charge and arginine residues for the neuroprotective properties of poly-arginine and arginine-rich peptides. In this study, using cortical neuronal cultures and an in vitro glutamic acid excitotoxicity model, we examined the neuroprotective efficacy of different modifications to the poly-arginine-9 peptide (R9). We compared an unmodified R9 peptide with R9 peptides containing the following modifications: (i) C-terminal amidation (R9-NH2); (ii) N-terminal acetylation (Ac-R9); (iii) C-terminal amidation with N-terminal acetylation (Ac-R9-NH2); and (iv) C-terminal amidation with D-amino acids (R9D-NH2). The three C-terminal amidated peptides (R9-NH2, Ac-R9-NH2, and R9D-NH2) displayed neuroprotective effects greater than the unmodified R9 peptide, while the N-terminal acetylated peptide (Ac-R9) had reduced efficacy. Using the R9-NH2 peptide, neuroprotection could be induced with a 10 min peptide pre-treatment, 1-6 h before glutamic acid insult, or when added to neuronal cultures up to 45 min post-insult. In addition, all peptides were capable of reducing glutamic acid-mediated neuronal intracellular calcium influx, in a manner that reflected their neuroprotective efficacy. This study further highlights the neuroprotective properties of poly-arginine peptides and provides insight into peptide modifications that affect efficacy.

  14. Metabolism of lysine in alpha-aminoadipic semialdehyde dehydrogenase-deficient fibroblasts: evidence for an alternative pathway of pipecolic acid formation.

    PubMed

    Struys, Eduard A; Jakobs, Cornelis

    2010-01-04

    The mammalian degradation of lysine is believed to proceed via two distinct routes, the saccharopine and the pipecolic acid routes, that ultimately converge at the level of alpha-aminoadipic semialdehyde (alpha-AASA). alpha-AASA dehydrogenase-deficient fibroblasts were grown in cell culture medium supplemented with either L-[alpha-(15)N]lysine or L-[epsilon-(15)N]lysine to explore the exact route of lysine degradation. L-[alpha-(15)N]lysine was catabolised into [(15)N]saccharopine, [(15)N]alpha-AASA, [(15)N]Delta(1)-piperideine-6-carboxylate, and surprisingly in [(15)N]pipecolic acid, whereas L-[epsilon-(15)N]lysine resulted only in the formation of [(15)N]saccharopine. These results imply that lysine is exclusively degraded in fibroblasts via the saccharopine branch, and pipecolic acid originates from an alternative precursor. We hypothesize that pipecolic acid derives from Delta(1)-piperideine-6-carboxylate by the action of Delta(1)-pyrroline-5-carboxylic acid reductase, an enzyme involved in proline metabolism.

  15. Roles of export genes cgmA and lysE for the production of L-arginine and L-citrulline by Corynebacterium glutamicum.

    PubMed

    Lubitz, Dorit; Jorge, João M P; Pérez-García, Fernando; Taniguchi, Hironori; Wendisch, Volker F

    2016-10-01

    L-arginine is a semi-essential amino acid with application in cosmetic, pharmaceutical, and food industries. Metabolic engineering strategies have been applied for overproduction of L-arginine by Corynebacterium glutamicum. LysE was the only known L-arginine exporter of this bacterium. However, an L-arginine-producing strain carrying a deletion of lysE still accumulated about 10 mM L-arginine in the growth medium. Overexpression of the putative putrescine and cadaverine export permease gene cgmA was shown to compensate for the lack of lysE with regard to L-arginine export. Moreover, plasmid-borne overexpression of cgmA rescued the toxic effect caused by feeding of the dipeptide Arg-Ala to lysE-deficient C. glutamicum and argO-deficient Escherichia coli strains. Deletion of the repressor gene cgmR improved L-arginine titers by 5 %. Production of L-lysine and L-citrulline was not affected by cgmA overexpression. Taken together, CgmA may function as an export system not only for the diamine putrescine and cadaverine but also for L-arginine. The major export system for L-lysine and L-arginine LysE may also play a role in L-citrulline export since production of L-citrulline was reduced when lysE was deleted and improved by 45 % when lysE was overproduced.

  16. The lysP gene encodes the lysine-specific permease.

    PubMed Central

    Steffes, C; Ellis, J; Wu, J; Rosen, B P

    1992-01-01

    Escherichia coli transports lysine by two distinct systems, one of which is specific for lysine (LysP) and the other of which is inhibited by arginine ornithine. The activity of the lysine-specific system increases with growth in acidic medium, anaerobiosis, and high concentrations of lysine. It is inhibited by the lysine analog S-(beta-aminoethyl)-L-cysteine (thiosine). Thiosine-resistant (Tsr) mutants were isolated by using transpositional mutagenesis with TnphoA. A Tsr mutant expressing alkaline phosphatase activity in intact cells was found to lack lysine-specific transport. This lysP mutation was mapped to about 46.5 min on the E. coli chromosome. The lysP-phoA fusion was cloned and used as a probe to clone the wild-type lysP gene. The nucleotide sequence of the 2.7-kb BamHI fragment was determined. An open reading frame from nucleotides 522 to 1989 was observed. The translation product of this open reading frame is predicted to be a hydrophobic protein of 489 residues. The lysP gene product exhibits sequence similarity to a family of amino acid transport proteins found in both prokaryotes and eukaryotes, including the aromatic amino acid permease of E. coli (aroP) and the arginine permease of Saccharomyces cerevisiae (CAN1). Cells carrying a plasmid with the lysP gene exhibited a 10- to 20-fold increase in the rate of lysine uptake above wild-type levels. These results demonstrate that the lysP gene encodes the lysine-specific permease. Images PMID:1315732

  17. Dietary L-lysine prevents arterial calcification in adenine-induced uremic rats.

    PubMed

    Shimomura, Akihiro; Matsui, Isao; Hamano, Takayuki; Ishimoto, Takuya; Katou, Yumiko; Takehana, Kenji; Inoue, Kazunori; Kusunoki, Yasuo; Mori, Daisuke; Nakano, Chikako; Obi, Yoshitsugu; Fujii, Naohiko; Takabatake, Yoshitsugu; Nakano, Takayoshi; Tsubakihara, Yoshiharu; Isaka, Yoshitaka; Rakugi, Hiromi

    2014-09-01

    Vascular calcification (VC) is a life-threatening complication of CKD. Severe protein restriction causes a shortage of essential amino acids, and exacerbates VC in rats. Therefore, we investigated the effects of dietary l-lysine, the first-limiting amino acid of cereal grains, on VC. Male Sprague-Dawley rats at age 13 weeks were divided randomly into four groups: low-protein (LP) diet (group LP), LP diet+adenine (group Ade), LP diet+adenine+glycine (group Gly) as a control amino acid group, and LP diet+adenine+l-lysine·HCl (group Lys). At age 18 weeks, group LP had no VC, whereas groups Ade and Gly had comparable levels of severe VC. l-Lysine supplementation almost completely ameliorated VC. Physical parameters and serum creatinine, urea nitrogen, and phosphate did not differ among groups Ade, Gly, and Lys. Notably, serum calcium in group Lys was slightly but significantly higher than in groups Ade and Gly. Dietary l-lysine strongly suppressed plasma intact parathyroid hormone in adenine rats and supported a proper bone-vascular axis. The conserved orientation of the femoral apatite in group Lys also evidenced the bone-protective effects of l-lysine. Dietary l-lysine elevated plasma alanine, proline, arginine, and homoarginine but not lysine. Analyses in vitro demonstrated that alanine and proline inhibit apoptosis of cultured vascular smooth muscle cells, and that arginine and homoarginine attenuate mineral precipitations in a supersaturated calcium/phosphate solution. In conclusion, dietary supplementation of l-lysine ameliorated VC by modifying key pathways that exacerbate VC.

  18. Dietary l-Lysine Prevents Arterial Calcification in Adenine-Induced Uremic Rats

    PubMed Central

    Shimomura, Akihiro; Matsui, Isao; Hamano, Takayuki; Ishimoto, Takuya; Katou, Yumiko; Takehana, Kenji; Inoue, Kazunori; Kusunoki, Yasuo; Mori, Daisuke; Nakano, Chikako; Obi, Yoshitsugu; Fujii, Naohiko; Takabatake, Yoshitsugu; Nakano, Takayoshi; Tsubakihara, Yoshiharu; Rakugi, Hiromi

    2014-01-01

    Vascular calcification (VC) is a life-threatening complication of CKD. Severe protein restriction causes a shortage of essential amino acids, and exacerbates VC in rats. Therefore, we investigated the effects of dietary l-lysine, the first-limiting amino acid of cereal grains, on VC. Male Sprague-Dawley rats at age 13 weeks were divided randomly into four groups: low-protein (LP) diet (group LP), LP diet+adenine (group Ade), LP diet+adenine+glycine (group Gly) as a control amino acid group, and LP diet+adenine+l-lysine·HCl (group Lys). At age 18 weeks, group LP had no VC, whereas groups Ade and Gly had comparable levels of severe VC. l-Lysine supplementation almost completely ameliorated VC. Physical parameters and serum creatinine, urea nitrogen, and phosphate did not differ among groups Ade, Gly, and Lys. Notably, serum calcium in group Lys was slightly but significantly higher than in groups Ade and Gly. Dietary l-lysine strongly suppressed plasma intact parathyroid hormone in adenine rats and supported a proper bone-vascular axis. The conserved orientation of the femoral apatite in group Lys also evidenced the bone-protective effects of l-lysine. Dietary l-lysine elevated plasma alanine, proline, arginine, and homoarginine but not lysine. Analyses in vitro demonstrated that alanine and proline inhibit apoptosis of cultured vascular smooth muscle cells, and that arginine and homoarginine attenuate mineral precipitations in a supersaturated calcium/phosphate solution. In conclusion, dietary supplementation of l-lysine ameliorated VC by modifying key pathways that exacerbate VC. PMID:24652795

  19. Amino Acid Mixture Enriched With Arginine, Alanine, and Phenylalanine Stimulates Fat Metabolism During Exercise.

    PubMed

    Ueda, Keisuke; Nakamura, Yutaka; Yamaguchi, Makoto; Mori, Takeshi; Uchida, Masayuki; Fujita, Satoshi

    2016-02-01

    Although there have been many investigations of the beneficial effects of both exercise and amino acids (AAs), little is known about their combined effects on the single-dose ingestion of AAs for lipid metabolism during exercise. We hypothesize that taking a specific combination of AAs implicated in glucagon secretion during exercise may increase fat metabolism. We recently developed a new mixture, d-AA mixture (D-mix), that contains arginine, alanine, and phenylalanine to investigate fat oxidation. In a double-blind, placebo-controlled crossover study, 10 healthy male volunteers were randomized to ingest either D-mix (3 g/dose) or placebo. Subjects in each condition subsequently performed a physical task that included workload trials on a cycle ergometer at 50% of maximal oxygen consumption for 1 hr. After oral intake of D-mix, maximum serum concentrations of glycerol (9.32 ± 6.29 mg/L and 5.22 ± 2.22 mg/L, respectively; p = .028), free fatty acid level (0.77 ± 0.26 mEq/L and 0.63 ± 0.28 mEq/L, respectively; p = .022), and acetoacetic acid levels (37.9 ± 17.7 μmol/L and 30.3 ± 13.9 μmol/L, respectively; p = .040) were significantly higher than in the placebo groups. The area under the curve for glucagon during recovery was numerically higher than placebo (6.61 ± 1.33 μg/L · min and 6.06 ± 1.23 μg/L · min, respectively; p = .099). These results suggest that preexercise ingestion of D-mix may stimulate fat metabolism. Combined with exercise, the administration of AA mixtures could prove to be a useful nutritional strategy to maximize fat metabolism.

  20. Synthesis of stereoarray isotope labeled (SAIL) lysine via the "head-to-tail" conversion of SAIL glutamic acid.

    PubMed

    Terauchi, Tsutomu; Kamikawai, Tomoe; Vinogradov, Maxim G; Starodubtseva, Eugenia V; Takeda, Mitsuhiro; Kainosho, Masatsune

    2011-01-07

    A stereoarray isotope labeled (SAIL) lysine, (2S,3R,4R,5S,6R)-[3,4,5,6-(2)H(4);1,2,3,4,5,6-(13)C(6);2,6-(15)N(2)]lysine, was synthesized by the "head-to-tail" conversion of SAIL-Glu, (2S,3S,4R)-[3,4-(2)H(2);1,2,3,4,5-(13)C(5);2-(15)N]glutamic acid, with high stereospecificities for all five chiral centers. With the SAIL-Lys in hand, the unambiguous simultaneous stereospecific assignments were able to be established for each of the prochiral protons within the four methylene groups of the Lys side chains in proteins.

  1. Isolation and properties of an arginine-binding protein from Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Opekarová, M; Kotyk, A; Horák, J; Kholodenko, V P

    1975-11-15

    Transfer of exponentially growing cells of Saccharomyces cerevisiae epsilon 1278 b to a fresh medium (or simply to distilled water) resulted in the loss of ability to transport arginine (and lysine), accompanied by the release of several proteins from the membrane surface or periplasmic space. Fractionation by ultrafiltration, Sephadex G-50 chromatography and freeze-drying yielded a homogeneous protein (55 mg per 100 g dry weight of cells) with specific binding ability for L-arginine (Kd = 3.8 X 10(-1) M) and L-lysine (Ki = 4.2 X 10(-4) M). The protein contains over 40 amino acid residues and has a molecular weight of about 5,000. In solution, it appears to aggregate as its concentration is raised, thereby decreasing the overall binding capacity for arginine. Addition of the protein to a depleted culture does not restore the transport of arginine. It is apparently the recognition protein for the specific arginine-transporting system of Saccharomyces cerevisiae but it occurs in almost identical amounts in the MG 168 mutant with impaired arginine transport.

  2. Use of the guanidination reaction for determining reactive lysine, bioavailable lysine and gut endogenous lysine.

    PubMed

    Rutherfurd, Shane M

    2015-09-01

    Determining the bioavailability of lysine in foods and feedstuffs is important since lysine is often the first limiting indispensable amino acid in diets for intensively farmed livestock (pigs and poultry) and also in many cereal-based diets consumed by humans. When foods or feedstuffs are heat processed, lysine can undergo Maillard reactions to produce nutritionally unavailable products. The guanidination reaction, the reaction of O-methylisourea with the side chain amino group of lysine that produces homoarginine, has been used to determine the unmodified lysine (reactive lysine) in processed foods and feedstuffs and also true ileal digestible reactive lysine (bioavailable lysine). The advantages of the guanidination method in comparison with other reactive lysine methods such as the fluorodinitrobenzene, trinitrobenzenesulphonic acid and dye-binding methods are that it is very specific for reactive lysine and also that the method is relatively straightforward to conduct. The specificity of the guanidination reaction for the lysine side chain amino group is particularly important, since ileal digesta will contain N-terminal groups in the form of free amino acids and peptides. The main disadvantage is that complete conversion of lysine to homoarginine is required, yet it is not straightforward to test for complete guanidination in processed foods and feedstuffs. Another disadvantage is that the guanidination reaction conditions may vary for different food types and sometimes within the same food type. Consequently, food-specific guanidination reaction conditions may be required and more work is needed to optimise the reaction conditions across different foods and feedstuffs.

  3. Important roles for the arginine family of amino acids in swine nutrition and production

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Arginine, glutamine, glutamate, proline, aspartate, asparagine, ornithine, and citrulline are interconvertible via complex interorgan metabolism in most mammals (including the pig). The major sites for their metabolism are the small intestine, kidneys, and liver, with cortisol being a key regulatory...

  4. Citrulline Protects Streptococcus pyogenes from Acid Stress Using the Arginine Deiminase Pathway and the F1Fo-ATPase

    PubMed Central

    Cusumano, Zachary T.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT A common stress encountered by both pathogenic and environmental bacteria is exposure to a low-pH environment, which can inhibit cell growth and lead to cell death. One major defense mechanism against this stress is the arginine deiminase (ADI) pathway, which catabolizes arginine to generate two ammonia molecules and one molecule of ATP. While this pathway typically relies on the utilization of arginine, citrulline has also been shown to enter into the pathway and contribute to protection against acid stress. In the pathogenic bacterium Streptococcus pyogenes, the utilization of citrulline has been demonstrated to contribute to pathogenesis in a murine model of soft tissue infection, although the mechanism underlying its role in infection is unknown. To gain insight into this question, we analyzed a panel of mutants defective in different steps in the ADI pathway to dissect how arginine and citrulline protect S. pyogenes in a low-pH environment. While protection provided by arginine utilization occurred through the buffering of the extracellular environment, citrulline catabolism protection was pH independent, requiring the generation of ATP via the ADI pathway and a functional F1Fo-ATP synthase. This work demonstrates that arginine and citrulline catabolism protect against acid stress through distinct mechanisms and have unique contributions to virulence during an infection. IMPORTANCE An important aspect of bacterial pathogenesis is the utilization of host-derived nutrients during an infection for growth and virulence. Previously published work from our lab identified a unique role for citrulline catabolism in Streptococcus pyogenes during a soft tissue infection. The present article probes the role of citrulline utilization during this infection and its contribution to protection against acid stress. This work reveals a unique and concerted action between the catabolism of citrulline and the F1Fo-ATPase that function together to provide protection for

  5. The Supplementation of Branched-Chain Amino Acids, Arginine, and Citrulline Improves Endurance Exercise Performance in Two Consecutive Days

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, I-Shiung; Wang, Yi-Wen; Chen, I-Fan; Hsu, Gi-Sheng; Hsueh, Chun-Fang; Chang, Chen-Kang

    2016-01-01

    The central nervous system plays a crucial role in fatigue during endurance exercise. Branched-chain amino acids (BCAA) could reduce cerebral serotonin synthesis by competing with its precursor tryptophan for crossing the blood brain barrier. Arginine and citrulline could prevent excess hyperammonemia accompanied by BCAA supplementation. This study investigated the combination of BCAA, arginine, and citrulline on endurance performance in two consecutive days. Seven male and three female endurance runners ingested 0.17 g·kg-1 BCAA, 0.05 g·kg-1 arginine and 0.05 g·kg-1 citrulline (AA trial) or placebo (PL trial) in a randomized cross-over design. Each trial contained a 5000 m time trial on the first day, and a 10000 m time trial on the second day. The AA trial had significantly better performance in 5000 m (AA: 1065.7 ± 33.9 s; PL: 1100.5 ± 40.4 s) and 10000 m (AA: 2292.0 ± 211.3 s; PL: 2375.6 ± 244.2 s). The two trials reported similar ratings of perceived exertion. After exercise, the AA trial had significantly lower tryptophan/BCAA ratio, similar NH3, and significantly higher urea concentrations. In conclusion, the supplementation could enhance time-trial performance in two consecutive days in endurance runners, possibly through the inhibition of cerebral serotonin synthesis by BCAA and the prevention of excess hyperammonemia by increased urea genesis. Key points The combined supplementation of BCAA, arginine, and citrulline could enhance performance in 5000 m and 10000 m in 2 consecutive days in competitive runners. The supplementation may be helpful in multi-day competitions. The supplemented BCAA may alleviate central fatigue, allowing the subjects to run faster at the same degree of perceived exertion. The hyperammonemia that is usually accompanied with BCAA supplementation may be prevented by arginine and citrulline through increased urea genesis. PMID:27803630

  6. Strategies for the Gas Phase Modification of Cationized Arginine via Ion/ion Reactions.

    PubMed

    Prentice, Boone M; McGee, William M; Stutzman, John R; McLuckey, Scott A

    2013-11-15

    The gas phase acetylation of cationized arginine residues is demonstrated here using ion/ion reactions with sulfosuccinimidyl acetate (sulfo-NHS acetate) anions. Previous reports have demonstrated the gas phase modification of uncharged primary amine (the N-terminus and ε-amino side chain of lysine) and uncharged guanidine (the arginine side chain) functionalities via sulfo-NHS ester chemistry. Herein, charge-saturated arginine-containing peptides that contain sodium ions as the charge carriers, such as [ac-ARAAARA+2Na](2+), are shown to exhibit strong reactivity towards sulfo-NHS acetate whereas the protonated peptide analogues exhibit no such reactivity. This difference in reactivity is attributed to the lower sodium ion (as compared to proton) affinity of the arginine, which results in increased nucleophilicity of the cationized arginine guanidinium functionality. This increased nucleophilicity improves the arginine residue's reactivity towards sulfo-NHS esters and enhances the gas phase covalent modification pathway. No such dramatic increase in reactivity towards sulfo-NHS acetate has been observed upon sodium cationization of lysine amino acid residues, indicating that this behavior appears to be unique to arginine. The sodium cationization process is demonstrated in the condensed phase by simply spiking sodium chloride into the peptide sample solution and in the gas phase by a peptide-sodium cation exchange process with a sulfo-NHS acetate sodium-bound dimer cluster reagent. This methodology demonstrates several ways by which arginine can be covalently modified in the gas phase even when it is charged. Collisional activation of an acetylated arginine product can result in deguanidination of the residue, generating an ornithine. This gas phase ornithination exhibits similar site-specific fragmentation behavior to that observed with peptides ornithinated in solution and may represent a useful approach for inducing selective peptide cleavages.

  7. Mapping of Post-translational Modifications of Transition Proteins, TP1 and TP2, and Identification of Protein Arginine Methyltransferase 4 and Lysine Methyltransferase 7 as Methyltransferase for TP2*

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Nikhil; Madapura, M. Pradeepa; Bhat, U. Anayat; Rao, M. R. Satyanarayana

    2015-01-01

    In a unique global chromatin remodeling process during mammalian spermiogenesis, 90% of the nucleosomal histones are replaced by testis-specific transition proteins, TP1, TP2, and TP4. These proteins are further substituted by sperm-specific protamines, P1 and P2, to form a highly condensed sperm chromatin. In spermatozoa, a small proportion of chromatin, which ranges from 1 to 10% in mammals, retains the nucleosomal architecture and is implicated to play a role in transgenerational inheritance. However, there is still no mechanistic understanding of the interaction of chromatin machinery with histones and transition proteins, which facilitate this selective histone replacement from chromatin. Here, we report the identification of 16 and 19 novel post-translational modifications on rat endogenous transition proteins, TP1 and TP2, respectively, by mass spectrometry. By in vitro assays and mutational analysis, we demonstrate that protein arginine methyltransferase PRMT4 (CARM1) methylates TP2 at Arg71, Arg75, and Arg92 residues, and lysine methyltransferase KMT7 (Set9) methylates TP2 at Lys88 and Lys91 residues. Further studies with modification-specific antibodies that recognize TP2K88me1 and TP2R92me1 modifications showed that they appear in elongating to condensing spermatids and predominantly associated with the chromatin-bound TP2. This work establishes the repertoire of post-translational modifications that occur on TP1 and TP2, which may play a significant role in various chromatin-templated events during spermiogenesis and in the establishment of the sperm epigenome. PMID:25818198

  8. Comparative analysis of some essential amino acids and available lysine in Acacia colei and A. tumida seeds using chemical methods and an amino acid analyzer.

    PubMed

    Falade, Olumuyiwa S; Adewusi, Steve R A

    2013-01-01

    Methionine, cysteine, tryptophan, and available lysine were determined in Acacia colei and A. tumida seeds and some cereals using chemical methods, and the results were compared to those obtained using an amino acid analyzer. Ba(OH)2 hydrolysis gave the best result of the three methods of hydrolysis (acid, base, and enzyme) tried. Oxidized methionine, cysteine, and tryptophan were not detected, but S-carboxyethylcysteine was estimated as cysteine by the chemical methods, thus overestimating cysteine's content in Acacia seeds. Tryptophan and methionine were higher in cereals than in Acacia seeds, while the level of cysteine and available lysine was higher in Acacia seeds than in cereals. These results agreed with values obtained using the amino acid analyzer and could therefore be used in low budget laboratories.

  9. Guanidination of Soluble Lysine-Rich Cyanophycin Yields a Homoarginine-Containing Polyamide

    PubMed Central

    Frommeyer, Maja; Bergander, Klaus

    2014-01-01

    Soluble cyanobacterial granule polypeptide (CGP), especially that isolated from recombinant Escherichia coli strains, consists of aspartic acid, arginine, and a greater amount of lysine than that in insoluble CGP isolated from cyanobacteria or various other recombinant bacteria. In vitro guanidination of lysine side chains of soluble CGP with o-methylisourea (OMIU) yielded the nonproteinogenic amino acid homoarginine. The modified soluble CGP consisted of 51 mol% aspartate, 14 mol% arginine, and 35 mol% homoarginine. The complete conversion of lysine residues to homoarginine was confirmed by (i) nuclear magnetic resonance spectrometry, (ii) coupled liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry, and (iii) high-performance liquid chromatography. Unlike soluble CGP, this new homoarginine-containing polyamide was soluble only under acidic or alkaline conditions and was insoluble in water or at a neutral pH. Thus, it showed solubility behavior similar to that of the natural insoluble polymer isolated from cyanobacteria, consisting of aspartic acid and arginine only. Polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis revealed similar degrees of polymerization of the native (12- to 40-kDa) and modified (10- to 35-kDa) polymers. This study showed that the chemical structure and properties of a biopolymer could be changed by in vitro introduction of a new functional group after biosynthesis of the native polymer. In addition, the modified CGP could be digested in vitro using the cyanophycinase from Pseudomonas alcaligenes strain DIP1, yielding a new dipeptide consisting of aspartate and homoarginine. PMID:24509932

  10. Guanidination of soluble lysine-rich cyanophycin yields a homoarginine-containing polyamide.

    PubMed

    Frommeyer, Maja; Bergander, Klaus; Steinbüchel, Alexander

    2014-04-01

    Soluble cyanobacterial granule polypeptide (CGP), especially that isolated from recombinant Escherichia coli strains, consists of aspartic acid, arginine, and a greater amount of lysine than that in insoluble CGP isolated from cyanobacteria or various other recombinant bacteria. In vitro guanidination of lysine side chains of soluble CGP with o-methylisourea (OMIU) yielded the nonproteinogenic amino acid homoarginine. The modified soluble CGP consisted of 51 mol% aspartate, 14 mol% arginine, and 35 mol% homoarginine. The complete conversion of lysine residues to homoarginine was confirmed by (i) nuclear magnetic resonance spectrometry, (ii) coupled liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry, and (iii) high-performance liquid chromatography. Unlike soluble CGP, this new homoarginine-containing polyamide was soluble only under acidic or alkaline conditions and was insoluble in water or at a neutral pH. Thus, it showed solubility behavior similar to that of the natural insoluble polymer isolated from cyanobacteria, consisting of aspartic acid and arginine only. Polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis revealed similar degrees of polymerization of the native (12- to 40-kDa) and modified (10- to 35-kDa) polymers. This study showed that the chemical structure and properties of a biopolymer could be changed by in vitro introduction of a new functional group after biosynthesis of the native polymer. In addition, the modified CGP could be digested in vitro using the cyanophycinase from Pseudomonas alcaligenes strain DIP1, yielding a new dipeptide consisting of aspartate and homoarginine.

  11. Crystallization of dicalcium phosphate dihydrate with presence of glutamic acid and arginine at 37 °C.

    PubMed

    Li, Chengfeng; Ge, Xiaolu; Li, Guochang; Bai, Jiahai; Ding, Rui

    2014-08-01

    The formations of non-metabolic stones, bones and teeth were seriously related to the morphology, size and surface reactivity of dicalcium phosphate dihydrate (DCPD). Herein, a facile biomimetic mineralization method with presence of glutamic acid and arginine was employed to fabricate DCPD with well-defined morphology and adjustable crystallite size. In reaction solution containing more arginine, crystallization of DCPD occurred with faster rate of nucleation and higher density of stacked layers due to the generation of more OH(-) ions after hydrolysis of arginine at 37 °C. With addition of fluorescein or acetone, the consumption of OH(-) ions or desolvation reaction of Ca(2+) ions was modulated, which resulted in the fabrication of DCPD with adjustable crystallite sizes and densities of stacked layers. In comparison with fluorescein-loading DCPD, dicalcium phosphate anhydrate was prepared with enhanced photoluminescence properties due to the reduction of self-quenching effect and regular arrangement of encapsulated fluorescein molecules. With addition of more acetone, DCPD was prepared with smaller crystallite size via antisolvent crystallization. The simulated process with addition of amino acids under 37 °C would shed light on the dynamic process of biomineralization for calcium phosphate compounds.

  12. Creatine, arginine alpha-ketoglutarate, amino acids, and medium-chain triglycerides and endurance and performance.

    PubMed

    Little, Jonathan P; Forbes, Scott C; Candow, Darren G; Cornish, Stephen M; Chilibeck, Philip D

    2008-10-01

    Creatine (Cr) supplementation increases muscle mass, strength, and power. Arginine a-ketoglutarate (A-AKG) is a precursor for nitric oxide production and has the potential to improve blood flow and nutrient delivery (i.e., Cr) to muscles. This study compared a commercial dietary supplement of Cr, A-AKG, glutamine, taurine, branched-chain amino acids, and medium-chain triglycerides with Cr alone or placebo on exercise performance and body composition. Thirty-five men (approximately 23 yr) were randomized to Cr + A-AKG (0.1 g . kg(-1) . d(-1) Cr + 0.075 g . kg(-1) . d(-1)A-AKG, n = 12), Cr (0.1 g . kg(-1) . d(-1), n = 11), or placebo (1 g . kg(-1) . d(-1) sucrose, n = 12) for 10 d. Body composition, muscle endurance (bench press), and peak and average power (Wingate tests) were measured before and after supplementation. Bench-press repetitions over 3 sets increased with Cr + A-AKG (30.9 +/- 6.6 +/- 34.9 +/- 8.7 reps; p < .01) and Cr (27.6 +/- 5.9 +/- 31.0 +/- 7.6 reps; p < .01), with no change for placebo (26.8 +/- 5.0 +/- 27.1 +/- 6.3 reps). Peak power significantly increased in Cr + A-AKG (741 +/- 112 +/- 794 +/- 92 W; p < .01), with no changes in Cr (722 +/- 138 +/- 730 +/- 144 W) and placebo (696 +/- 63 +/- 705 +/- 77 W). There were no differences in average power between groups over time. Only the Cr-only group increased total body mass (79.9 +/- 13.0 +/- 81.1 +/- 13.8 kg; p < .01), with no significant changes in lean-tissue or fat mass. These results suggest that Cr alone and in combination with A-AKG improves upper body muscle endurance, and Cr + A-AKG supplementation improves peak power output on repeated Wingate tests.

  13. Lysine-functionalized nanodiamonds: synthesis, physiochemical characterization, and nucleic acid binding studies

    PubMed Central

    Kaur, Randeep; Chitanda, Jackson M; Michel, Deborah; Maley, Jason; Borondics, Ferenc; Yang, Peng; Verrall, Ronald E; Badea, Ildiko

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Detonation nanodiamonds (NDs) are carbon-based nanomaterials that, because of their size (4–5 nm), stable inert core, alterable surface chemistry, fluorescence, and biocompatibility, are emerging as bioimaging agents and promising tools for the delivery of biochemical molecules into cellular systems. However, diamond particles possess a strong propensity to aggregate in liquid formulation media, restricting their applicability in biomedical sciences. Here, the authors describe the covalent functionalization of NDs with lysine in an attempt to develop nanoparticles able to act as suitable nonviral vectors for transferring genetic materials across cellular membranes. Methods: NDs were oxidized and functionalized by binding lysine moieties attached to a three-carbon-length linker (1,3-diaminopropane) to their surfaces through amide bonds. Raman and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, zeta potential measurement, dynamic light scattering, atomic force microscopic imaging, and thermogravimetric analysis were used to characterize the lysine-functionalized NDs. Finally, the ability of the functionalized diamonds to bind plasmid DNA and small interfering RNA was investigated by gel electrophoresis assay and through size and zeta potential measurements. Results: NDs were successfully functionalized with the lysine linker, producing surface loading of 1.7 mmol g−1 of ND. These modified NDs formed highly stable aqueous dispersions with a zeta potential of 49 mV and particle size of approximately 20 nm. The functionalized NDs were found to be able to bind plasmid DNA and small interfering RNA by forming nanosized “diamoplexes”. Conclusion: The lysine-substituted ND particles generated in this study exhibit stable aqueous formulations and show potential for use as carriers for genetic materials. PMID:22904623

  14. Novel sirtuin inhibitory warheads derived from the N(ε)-acetyl-lysine analog L-2-amino-7-carboxamidoheptanoic acid.

    PubMed

    He, Yanhua; Yan, Lingling; Zang, Wenwen; Zheng, Weiping

    2015-11-14

    Built upon the catalytic mechanism-based pan-SIRT1/2/3 inhibitory warhead L-2-amino-7-carboxamidoheptanoic acid (L-ACAH, a close structural analog of N(ε)-acetyl-lysine) that our laboratory discovered recently, in the current study, its carboxamide NH2-ethylated analog was found to be a ∼2.4-6.6-fold stronger SIRT1/2/3 inhibitory warhead than L-ACAH. Carboxamide NH2-dodecylated and carboxymethylated analogs of L-ACAH were also identified as potent SIRT6 and SIRT5 inhibitory warheads, respectively.

  15. KDP crystal doped with L-arginine amino acid: growth, structure perfection, optical and strength characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pritula, I. M.; Kostenyukova, E. I.; Bezkrovnaya, O. N.; Kolybaeva, M. I.; Sofronov, D. S.; Dolzhenkova, E. F.; Kanaev, A.; Tsurikov, V.

    2016-07-01

    Potassium Dihydrogen Phosphate (KDP) crystal doped with L-arginine (L-arg) amino acid with 1.4 wt% concentration in the solution was grown onto a point seed by the method of temperature reduction. For the first time an attempt was made to grow large-size (7 × 6 × 8 cm3) optically transparent crystals, which allowed to analyze the effect of L-arg additive on the physical properties of the different growth sectors ({100} and {101}) of KDP. The incorporation of L-arg into both growth sectors of the crystal was confirmed by the methods of optical and IR spectroscopy and found to be caused by the ability of the amino acid to form hydrogen bonds with the face {100} and electrostatically interact with the positively charged face {101} of KDP crystal. A slight variation in the unit cell parameters was reported, the elementary cell volume of KDP:L-arg crystal increased in comparison with the one of pure KDP by 2·10-2 and 2.07·10-2 Å3 in the sectors {100} and {101}, respectively. It was found that the doping of L-arg enhanced the SHG efficiency of KDP and depended on the crystal growth sectors. The SHG efficiency of KDP:L-arg was by a factor 2.53 and 3.95 higher in comparison with those of pure KDP for {101} and {100} growth sector, respectively. The doping was found to lead to softening of both faces by ∼3-10% and ∼14-17% in the sectors {101} and {100}, respectively. Investigation of the influence of L-arg molecules on the bulk laser damage threshold of the crystals showed that the bulk laser damage threshold of the samples of KDP:L-arg crystal was higher than the one of the pure crystal in the sector {101} and lower in the sector {100}. The correlation between microhardness and laser damage threshold were discussed. The study is helpful for further searching, designing and simulation of hybrid NLO materials.

  16. Dietary arginine affects energy metabolism through polyamine turnover in juvenile Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar).

    PubMed

    Andersen, Synne M; Holen, Elisabeth; Aksnes, Anders; Rønnestad, Ivar; Zerrahn, Jens-Erik; Espe, Marit

    2013-12-14

    In the present study, quadruplicate groups of juvenile Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar) were fed plant protein-based diets with increasing arginine inclusions (range 28·8-37·4 g/kg DM) to investigate whether arginine supplementation affects growth and lipid accumulation through an elevated polyamine turnover. Dietary lysine was held at a constant concentration, just below the requirement. All other amino acids were balanced and equal in the diets. Arginine supplementation increased protein and fat accretion, without affecting the hepatosomatic or visceralsomatic indices. Dietary arginine correlated with putrescine in the liver (R 0·78, P= 0·01) and with ornithine in the muscle, liver and plasma (P= 0·0002, 0·003 and 0·0002, respectively). The mRNA of ornithine decarboxylase, the enzyme producing putrescine, was up-regulated in the white adipose tissue of fish fed the high-arginine inclusion compared with those fed the low-arginine diet. Concomitantly, spermidine/spermine-(N1)-acetyltransferase, the rate-limiting enzyme for polyamine turnover that consumes acetyl-CoA, showed an increased activity in the liver of fish fed the arginine-supplemented diets. In addition, lower acetyl-CoA concentrations were observed in the liver of fish fed the high-arginine diet, while ATP, which is used in the process of synthesising spermidine and spermine, did not show a similar trend. Gene expression of the rate-limiting enzyme for β-oxidation of long-chain fatty acids, carnitine palmitoyl transferase-1, was up-regulated in the liver of fish fed the high-arginine diet. Taken together, the data support that increased dietary arginine activates polyamine turnover and β-oxidation in the liver of juvenile Atlantic salmon and may act to improve the metabolic status of the fish.

  17. Role of amino acid insertions on intermolecular forces between arginine peptide condensed DNA helices: implications for protamine-DNA packaging in sperm.

    PubMed

    DeRouchey, Jason E; Rau, Donald C

    2011-12-09

    In spermatogenesis, chromatin histones are replaced by arginine-rich protamines to densely compact DNA in sperm heads. Tight packaging is considered necessary to protect the DNA from damage. To better understand the nature of the forces condensing protamine-DNA assemblies and their dependence on amino acid content, the effect of neutral and negatively charged amino acids on DNA-DNA intermolecular forces was studied using model peptides containing six arginines. We have previously observed that the neutral amino acids in salmon protamine decrease the net attraction between protamine-DNA helices compared with the equivalent homo-arginine peptide. Using osmotic stress coupled with x-ray scattering, we have investigated the component attractive and repulsive forces that determine the net attraction and equilibrium interhelical distance as a function of the chemistry, position, and number of the amino acid inserted. Neutral amino acids inserted into hexa-arginine increase the short range repulsion while only slightly affecting longer range attraction. The amino acid content alone of salmon protamine is enough to rationalize the forces that package DNA in sperm heads. Inserting a negatively charged amino acid into hexa-arginine dramatically weakens the net attraction. Both of these observations have biological implications for protamine-DNA packaging in sperm heads.

  18. Hydroxyapatite formation on graphene oxide modified with amino acids: arginine versus glutamic acid.

    PubMed

    Tavafoghi, M; Brodusch, N; Gauvin, R; Cerruti, M

    2016-01-01

    Hydroxyapatite (HA, Ca5(PO4)3OH) is the main inorganic component of hard tissues, such as bone and dentine. HA nucleation involves a set of negatively charged phosphorylated proteins known as non-collagenous proteins (NCPs). These proteins attract Ca(2+) and PO4(3-) ions and increase the local supersaturation to a level required for HA precipitation. Polar and charged amino acids (AAs) are highly expressed in NCPs, and seem to be responsible for the mineralizing effect of NCPs; however, the individual effect of these AAs on HA mineralization is still unclear. In this work, we investigate the effect of a negatively charged (Glu) and positively charged (Arg) AA bound to carboxylated graphene oxide (CGO) on HA mineralization in simulated body fluids (SBF). Our results show that Arg induces HA precipitation faster and in larger amounts than Glu. We attribute this to the higher stability of the complexes formed between Arg and Ca(2+) and PO4(3-) ions, and also to the fact that Arg exposes both carboxyl and amino groups on the surface. These can electrostatically attract both Ca(2+) and PO4(3-) ions, thus increasing local supersaturation more than Glu, which exposes carboxyl groups only.

  19. Hydroxyapatite formation on graphene oxide modified with amino acids: arginine versus glutamic acid

    PubMed Central

    Tavafoghi, M.; Brodusch, N.; Gauvin, R.; Cerruti, M.

    2016-01-01

    Hydroxyapatite (HA, Ca5(PO4)3OH) is the main inorganic component of hard tissues, such as bone and dentine. HA nucleation involves a set of negatively charged phosphorylated proteins known as non-collagenous proteins (NCPs). These proteins attract Ca2+ and PO43− ions and increase the local supersaturation to a level required for HA precipitation. Polar and charged amino acids (AAs) are highly expressed in NCPs, and seem to be responsible for the mineralizing effect of NCPs; however, the individual effect of these AAs on HA mineralization is still unclear. In this work, we investigate the effect of a negatively charged (Glu) and positively charged (Arg) AA bound to carboxylated graphene oxide (CGO) on HA mineralization in simulated body fluids (SBF). Our results show that Arg induces HA precipitation faster and in larger amounts than Glu. We attribute this to the higher stability of the complexes formed between Arg and Ca2+ and PO43− ions, and also to the fact that Arg exposes both carboxyl and amino groups on the surface. These can electrostatically attract both Ca2+ and PO43− ions, thus increasing local supersaturation more than Glu, which exposes carboxyl groups only. PMID:26791001

  20. Crystal growth, structural and thermal studies of amino acids admixtured L-arginine phosphate monohydrate single crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anandan, P.; Saravanan, T.; Parthipan, G.; Kumar, R. Mohan; Bhagavannarayana, G.; Ravi, G.; Jayavel, R.

    2011-05-01

    To study the improved characteristics of L-arginine phosphate monohydrate (LAP) crystals, amino acids mixed LAP crystals have been grown by slow cooling method. Amino acids like glycine, L-alanine, and L-valine have been selected for doping. Optical quality bulk crystals have been harvested after a typical growth period of about twenty days. The effect of amino acids in the crystal lattice and molecular vibrational frequencies of various functional groups in the crystals have been studied using X-ray powder diffraction and Fourier Transform infrared (FTIR) analyses respectively. Thermal behavior of the amino acids mixed LAP crystals have been studied from the TG and DTG analyses. High-resolution X-ray diffraction studies have been carried out to find the crystalline nature. Optical transmission studies have been carried out by UV-vis spectrophotometer. The cut off wavelength is below 240 nm for the grown crystals.

  1. Evolution of phosphagen kinase V. cDNA-derived amino acid sequences of two molluscan arginine kinases from the chiton Liolophura japonica and the turbanshell Battilus cornutus.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, T; Ban, T; Furukohri, T

    1997-06-20

    The cDNAs of arginine kinases from the chiton Liolophura japonica (Polyplacophora) and the turbanshell Battilus cornutus (Gastropoda) were amplified by polymerase chain reaction (PCR), and the complete nucleotide sequences of 1669 and 1624 bp, respectively, were determined. The open reading frame for Liolophura arginine kinase is 1050 nucleotides in length and encodes a protein with 349 amino acid residues, and that for Battilus is 1077 nucleotides and 358 residues. The validity of the cDNA-derived amino acid sequence was supported by chemical sequencing of internal tryptic peptides. The molecular masses were calculated to be 39,057 and 39,795 Da, respectively. The amino acid sequence of Liolophura arginine kinase showed 65-68% identity with those of Battilus and Nordotis (abalone) arginine kinases, and the homology between Battilus and Nordotis was 79%. Molluscan arginine kinases also show lower, but significant homology (38-43%) with rabbit creatine kinase. The sequences of arginine kinases could be used as a molecular clock to elucidate the phylogeny of Mollusca, one of the most diverse animal phyla.

  2. Investigation of nonfouling polypeptides of poly(glutamic acid) with lysine side chains synthesized by EDC·HCl/HOBt chemistry.

    PubMed

    Yang, Qinghua; Li, Wenchen; Wang, Longgang; Wang, Guangzhi; Wang, Zhen; Liu, Lingyun; Chen, Shengfu

    2014-01-01

    Nonfouling polypeptides with homogenous alternating charges draw peoples' attentions for their potential capability in biodegradation. Homogenous glutamic acid (E) and lysine (K) polypeptides were proposed and synthesized before. In this work, a new polypeptide formed by poly(glutamic acid) with lysine side chains (poly(E)-K) was synthesized by facile EDC·HCl/HOBt chemistry and investigated. Results show that these polypeptides also have good nonspecific protein resistance determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. The lowest nonspecific adsorption of the model proteins, anti-IgG and fibrinogen (Fg), on the self-assembling monolayers (SAMs) surface of poly(E)-K was only 3.3 ± 1.8 and 4.4 ± 1.6%, respectively, when protein adsorption on tissue culture polystyrene surface was set as 100%. And, the relative nonspecific protein adsorption increases when the polypeptide molecular weight increases due to the repression of low density polymer brushes. Moreover, almost no obvious cytotoxicity and hemolytic activity in vitro were detected. This work suggests that polypeptides with various formats of homogenous balanced charges could achieve excellent nonspecific protein resistance, which might be the intrinsic reason for the coexistence of high concentration serum proteins in blood.

  3. Jejunal water and electrolyte secretion induced by L-arginine in man.

    PubMed Central

    Hegarty, J E; Fairclough, P D; Clark, M L; Dawson, A M

    1981-01-01

    In this study a perfusion technique has been used to investigate jejunal secretion in response to the dibasic amino acid L-arginine. L-arginine at 5, 15, and 40 mmol/l in isotonic saline solutions induced net intestinal secretion of water and Na+. The structurally similar dibasic amino acid L-lysine caused net absorption at 5 and 15 mmol/l, and only modest net secretion of water and Na+ at 40 mmol/l, although absorption rates of the two amino acids were similar. D-arginine (15 mmol/l) was without effect on net water and Na+ absorption. L-arginine 15 mmol/l inhibited glucose-stimulated water and Na+ absorption when perfused in the same intestinal segment, but was without effect when perfused in separate jejunal or ileal segments. Parenteral chlorpromazine inhibited L-arginine induced jejunal water and Na+ secretion. Jejunal secretion induced by L-arginine thus appears not to be due to passive osmotic water flow, nor to release of circulating secretagogues. Stimulation of a mucosal secretory process is most likely to be the mechanism. PMID:6783480

  4. Repeated sprint ability is not enhanced by caffeine, arginine, and branched-chain amino acids in moderately trained soccer players

    PubMed Central

    Ermolao, Andrea; Zanotto, Tobia; Carraro, Nicolò; Fornasier, Tommaso; Zaccaria, Marco; Neunhaeuserer, Daniel; Bergamin, Marco

    2017-01-01

    The aim was to investigate the effect of a dietary supplementation on the repeated sprint ability (RSA) performance in recreationally trained team sports athletes. Twelve young men underwent a RSA exercise protocol in five trials, in which participants ingested carbohydrates (CHO) plus caffeine (Caf), CHO plus arginine (Arg), CHO plus branched-chain amino acids (BCAA), CHO plus Caf, Arg, and BCAA (ALL), and CHO only. Heart rate, oxygen saturation, hematic lactate, ratings of perceived exertion, average sprint time, total time, best sprint time, peak power, and average power were taken. Data revealed no significant effects neither on physiological nor performance parameters with any of the supplements. PMID:28349034

  5. Identification and characterization of lysine-methylated sites on histones and non-histone proteins.

    PubMed

    Lee, Tzong-Yi; Chang, Cheng-Wei; Lu, Cheng-Tzung; Cheng, Tzu-Hsiu; Chang, Tzu-Hao

    2014-06-01

    Protein methylation is a kind of post-translational modification (PTM), and typically takes place on lysine and arginine amino acid residues. Protein methylation is involved in many important biological processes, and most recent studies focused on lysine methylation of histones due to its critical roles in regulating transcriptional repression and activation. Histones possess highly conserved sequences and are homologous in most species. However, there is much less sequence conservation among non-histone proteins. Therefore, mechanisms for identifying lysine-methylated sites may greatly differ between histones and non-histone proteins. Nevertheless, this point of view was not considered in previous studies. Here we constructed two support vector machine (SVM) models by using lysine-methylated data from histones and non-histone proteins for predictions of lysine-methylated sites. Numerous features, such as the amino acid composition (AAC) and accessible surface area (ASA), were used in the SVM models, and the predictive performance was evaluated using five-fold cross-validations. For histones, the predictive sensitivity was 85.62% and specificity was 80.32%. For non-histone proteins, the predictive sensitivity was 69.1% and specificity was 88.72%. Results showed that our model significantly improved the predictive accuracy of histones compared to previous approaches. In addition, features of the flanking region of lysine-methylated sites on histones and non-histone proteins were also characterized and are discussed. A gene ontology functional analysis of lysine-methylated proteins and correlations of lysine-methylated sites with other PTMs in histones were also analyzed in detail. Finally, a web server, MethyK, was constructed to identify lysine-methylated sites. MethK now is available at http://csb.cse.yzu.edu.tw/MethK/.

  6. Effects of carbohydrate, branched-chain amino acids, and arginine in recovery period on the subsequent performance in wrestlers

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Many athletes need to participate in multiple events in a single day. The efficient post-exercise glycogen recovery may be critical for the performance in subsequent exercise. This study examined whether post-exercise carbohydrate supplementation could restore the performance in the subsequent simulated wrestling match. The effect of branched-chain amino acids and arginine on glucose disposal and performance was also investigated. Nine well-trained male wrestlers participated in 3 trials in a random order. Each trial contained 3 matches with a 1-hr rest between match 1 and 2, and a 2-hr rest between match 2 and 3. Each match contained 3 exercise periods interspersed with 1-min rests. The subjects alternated 10-s all-out sprints and 20-s rests in each exercise period. At the end of match 2, 3 different supplementations were consumed: 1.2 g/kg glucose (CHO trial), 1 g/kg glucose + 0.1 g/kg Arg + 0.1 g/kg BCAA (CHO+AA trial), or water (placebo trial). The peak and average power in the 3 matches was similar in the 3 trials. After the supplementation, CHO and CHO+AA trial showed significantly higher glucose and insulin, and lower glycerol and non-esterified fatty acid concentrations than the placebo trial. There was no significant difference in these biochemical parameters between the CHO and CHO+AA trials. Supplementation of carbohydrate with or without BCAA and arginine during the post-match period had no effect on the performance in the following simulated match in wrestlers. In addition, BCAA and arginine did not provide additional insulinemic effect. PMID:22107883

  7. Infrared and Raman spectroscopy and DFT calculations of DL amino acids: Valine and lysine hydrochloride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paiva, F. M.; Batista, J. C.; Rêgo, F. S. C.; Lima, J. A.; Freire, P. T. C.; Melo, F. E. A.; Mendes Filho, J.; de Menezes, A. S.; Nogueira, C. E. S.

    2017-01-01

    Single crystals of DL-valine and DL-lysine hydrochloride were grown by slow evaporation method and the crystallographic structure were confirmed by X-ray diffraction experiment and Rietveld method. These two crystals have been studied by Raman spectroscopy in the 25-3600 cm-1 spectral range and by infrared spectroscopy through the interval 375-4000 cm-1 at room temperature. Experimental and theoretical vibrational spectra were compared and a complete analysis of the modes was done in terms of the Potential Energy Distribution (PED).

  8. Influence of chemical modification of N alpha-cocoyl-L-arginine ethyl ester on its hepatitis B surface antigen-inactivating effect.

    PubMed Central

    Sugimoto, Y; Toyoshima, S

    1980-01-01

    We have reported previously that N alpha-cocoyl-L-arginine ethyl ester (CAE) strongly inactivates hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg; Sugimoto and Toyoshima, Antimicrob. Agents Chemother. 16:329--332, 1979). Replacement of the L-arginine moiety of CAE by L-lysine did not decrease the HBsAg-inactivating effect of CAE, whereas replacement by some neutral amino acids and L-ornithine decreased it. Esterification of the carboxyl group of N alpha-acyl-L-arginine enhanced its inactivating effect. When the ethyl ester of CAE was converted to an amide group, the effect was appreciably decreased. Modification of the carboxyl group was essential for the inactivation. The effectiveness of N alpha-acyl-L-arginine ethyl ester depends upon the length of the acyl group, with the optimum length for the inactivation of HBsAg being C12 to C14. In addition to CAE, N alpha-lauroyl-L-lysine ethyl ester and N alpha-cocoyl-L-arginine amide were found to be strong inactivators of HBsAg. Significant inactivating effects on HBsAg were not observed in many anionic detergents containing an amino acid. These results suggest that for strongly inactivating HBsAg, a compound should contain a special amino acid, such as L-arginine, and a long acyl group and exhibit a cationic property. PMID:7447415

  9. Preparation, characterization, and biocompatibility evaluation of poly(Nɛ-acryloyl-L-lysine)/hyaluronic acid interpenetrating network hydrogels.

    PubMed

    Cui, Ning; Qian, Junmin; Xu, Weijun; Xu, Minghui; Zhao, Na; Liu, Ting; Wang, Hongjie

    2016-01-20

    In the present study, poly(Nɛ-acryloyl-L-lysine)/hyaluronic acid (pLysAAm/HA) interpenetrating network (IPN) hydrogels were successfully fabricated through the combination of hydrazone bond crosslinking and photo-crosslinking reactions. The HA hydrogel network was first synthesized from 3,3'-dithiodipropionate hydrazide-modified HA and polyethylene glycol dilevulinate by hydrazone bond crosslinking. The pLysAAm hydrogel network was prepared from Nɛ-acryloyl-L-lysine and N,N'-bis(acryloyl)-(L)-cystine by photo-crosslinking. The resultant pLysAAm/HA hydrogels had a good shape recovery property after loading and unloading for 1.5 cycles (up to 90%) and displayed a highly porous microstructure. Their compressive moduli were at least 5 times higher than that of HA hydrogels. The pLysAAm/HA hydrogels had an equilibrium swelling ratio of up to 37.9 and displayed a glutathione-responsive degradation behavior. The results from in vitro biocompatibility evaluation with pre-osteoblasts MC3T3-E1 cells revealed that the pLysAAm/HA hydrogels could support cell viability and proliferation. Hematoxylin and eosin staining indicated that the pLysAAm/HA hydrogels allowed cell and tissue infiltration, confirming their good in vivo biocompatibility. Therefore, the novel pLysAAm/HA IPN hydrogels have great potential for bone tissue engineering applications.

  10. A novel transdermal fomulation of 18β-glycyrrhetic acid with lysine for improving bioavailability and efficacy.

    PubMed

    Li, S; Qiu, Y Q; Zhang, S H; Gao, Y H

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to develop a novel topical liposomal system entrapping 18β-glycyrrhetic acid (GA) for the treatment of chronic allergic dermatitis. A novel liposomal system with molar ratios of GA to lysine from 1:1 to 1:3 was prepared by high-pressure homogenization. The liposomes at the optimized molar ratio of GA to lysine of 1:2 significantly improved GA loading (1.2%) and penetration in vitro. Liposomal gels containing GA 0.3, 0.6 and 0.9% were prepared to investigate the dosage effect on transdermal delivery and anti-inflammatory activity. In vivo pharmacokinetic studies were carried out by nonocclusive application of GA liposomal gels to ICR mouse ears. GA concentrations in skin and plasma increased proportionally with dose over the dose range of 0.3-0.9%. A 2,4-dinitrofluorobenzene-induced contact dermatitis mouse model was made up to evaluate the pharmacodynamics of GA liposomal gels. The liposomal gel with GA 0.9% showed a stronger anti-inflammatory activity than triamcinolone acetonide and econazole nitrate cream, while few side effects were observed in the present model. The topical administration of gel containing novel elastic liposomes of GA was safe and effective in the treatment of chronic allergic dermatitis.

  11. An amino acid sequence motif sufficient for subnuclear localization of an arginine/serine-rich splicing factor.

    PubMed

    Hedley, M L; Amrein, H; Maniatis, T

    1995-12-05

    We have identified an amino acid sequence in the Drosophila Transformer (Tra) protein that is capable of directing a heterologous protein to nuclear speckles, regions of the nucleus previously shown to contain high concentrations of spliceosomal small nuclear RNAs and splicing factors. This sequence contains a nucleoplasmin-like bipartite nuclear localization signal (NLS) and a repeating arginine/serine (RS) dipeptide sequence adjacent to a short stretch of basic amino acids. Sequence comparisons from a number of other splicing factors that colocalize to nuclear speckles reveal the presence of one or more copies of this motif. We propose a two-step subnuclear localization mechanism for splicing factors. The first step is transport across the nuclear envelope via the nucleoplasmin-like NLS, while the second step is association with components in the speckled domain via the RS dipeptide sequence.

  12. Examination of the role of arginine-143 in the human copper and zinc superoxide dismutase by site-specific mutagenesis.

    PubMed

    Beyer, W F; Fridovich, I; Mullenbach, G T; Hallewell, R

    1987-08-15

    The active site arginine-143 of human Cu,Zn superoxide dismutase has been replaced by lysine or by isoleucine. The mutant proteins were expressed at high levels in yeast, purified, and the amino acid substitution explored through the use of group specific reagents. The specific activities of these enzymes, measured by the xanthine oxidase/cytochrome c method and by using dry weight determination to establish protein concentration, were: native enzyme, 6570 units/mg; Lys-substituted enzyme, 2840 units/mg, Ile-substituted enzyme, 708 units/mg. The active site arginine thus plays an important, but not an essential, role in the catalytic process.

  13. Structural insight into the arginine-binding specificity of CASTOR1 in amino acid-dependent mTORC1 signaling

    PubMed Central

    Xia, Jing; Wang, Rong; Zhang, Tianlong; Ding, Jianping

    2016-01-01

    The mechanistic Target Of Rapamycin Complex 1 (mTORC1) is central to the cellular response to changes in nutrient signals such as amino acids. CASTOR1 is shown to be an arginine sensor, which plays an important role in the activation of the mTORC1 pathway. In the deficiency of arginine, CASTOR1 interacts with GATOR2, which together with GATOR1 and Rag GTPases controls the relocalization of mTORC1 to lysosomes. The binding of arginine to CASTOR1 disrupts its association with GATOR2 and hence activates the mTORC1 signaling. Here, we report the crystal structure of CASTOR1 in complex with arginine at 2.5 Å resolution. CASTOR1 comprises of four tandem ACT domains with an architecture resembling the C-terminal allosteric domains of aspartate kinases. ACT1 and ACT3 adopt the typical βαββαβ topology and function in dimerization via the conserved residues from helices α1 of ACT1 and α5 of ACT3; whereas ACT 2 and ACT4, both comprising of two non-sequential regions, assume the unusual ββαββα topology and contribute an arginine-binding pocket at the interface. The bound arginine makes a number of hydrogen-bonding interactions and extensive hydrophobic contacts with the surrounding residues of the binding pocket. The functional roles of the key residues are validated by mutagenesis and biochemical assays. Our structural and functional data together reveal the molecular basis for the arginine-binding specificity of CASTOR1 in the arginine-dependent activation of the mTORC1 signaling. PMID:27648300

  14. Inhibition of corneal neovascularization with a nutrient mixture containing lysine, proline, ascorbic acid, and green tea extract.

    PubMed

    Shakiba, Yadollah; Mostafaie, Ali

    2007-10-01

    Corneal neovascularization is a significant, sight-threatening complication of many ocular surface disorders. Various growth factors and proteinases are involved in corneal neovascularization. The data supporting a causal role for vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) are extensive. Inhibition of VEGF and MMPs is a main strategy for treating corneal neovascularization. Several findings have shown that corneal neovascularization can be reduced by using anti-VEGF and anti-MMPs agents. Efficacy of a nutrient mixture (NM) containing lysine, proline, ascorbic acid, and green tea extract has been demonstrated for reducing VEGF and MMPs secretion by various cells. Moreover, NM can inhibit endothelial cell migration and capillary tube formation. We herein note that topical application of NM is potentially useful for inhibiting corneal neovascularization and restoration of corneal clarity. Further investigations in animal models are needed to place NM alongside corneal neovascularization therapeutics.

  15. Mechanism of arginine sensing by CASTOR1 upstream of mTORC1

    PubMed Central

    Saxton, Robert A.; Chantranupong, Lynne; Knockenhauer, Kevin E.; Schwartz, Thomas U.; Sabatini, David M.

    2016-01-01

    Summary The mechanistic Target of Rapamycin Complex 1 (mTORC1) is a major regulator of eukaryotic growth that coordinates anabolic and catabolic cellular processes with inputs such as growth factors and nutrients, including amino acids1–3. In mammals, arginine is particularly important and promotes diverse physiological effects including immune cell activation, insulin secretion, and muscle growth, largely through activation of mTORC14–7. Arginine activates mTORC1 upstream of the Rag GTPases8, through either the lysosomal amino acid transporter SLC38A9 or the GATOR2-interacting CASTOR1 (Cellular Arginine Sensor for mTORC1)9–12. However, the mechanism by which the mTORC1 pathway detects and transmits the arginine signal has been elusive. Here, we present the 1.8 Å crystal structure of arginine-bound CASTOR1. Homodimeric CASTOR1 binds arginine at the interface of two ACT domains, enabling allosteric control of the adjacent GATOR2-binding site to trigger dissociation from GATOR2 and the downstream activation of mTORC1. Our data reveal that CASTOR1 shares substantial structural homology with the lysine-binding regulatory domain of prokaryotic aspartate kinases, suggesting that the mTORC1 pathway exploited an ancient amino-acid-dependent allosteric mechanism to acquire arginine sensitivity. Together, these results establish a structural basis for arginine sensing by the mTORC1 pathway and provide insights into the evolution of a mammalian nutrient sensor. PMID:27487210

  16. Gastropod arginine kinases from Cellana grata and Aplysia kurodai. Isolation and cDNA-derived amino acid sequences.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, T; Inoue, N; Higashi, T; Mizobuchi, R; Sugimura, N; Yokouchi, K; Furukohri, T

    2000-12-01

    Arginine kinase (AK) was isolated from the radular muscle of the gastropod molluscs Cellana grata (subclass Prosobranchia) and Aplysia kurodai (subclass Opisthobranchia), respectively, by ammonium sulfate fractionation, Sephadex G-75 gel filtration and DEAE-ion exchange chromatography. The denatured relative molecular mass values were estimated to be 40 kDa by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. The isolated enzyme from Aplysia gave a Km value of 0.6 mM for arginine and a Vmax value of 13 micromole Pi min(-1) mg protein(-1) for the forward reaction. These values are comparable to other molluscan AKs. The cDNAs encoding Cellana and Aplysia AKs were amplified by polymerase chain reaction, and the nucleotide sequences of 1,608 and 1,239 bp, respectively, were determined. The open reading frame for Cellana AK is 1044 nucleotides in length and encodes a protein with 347 amino acid residues, and that for A. kurodai is 1077 nucleotides and 354 residues. The cDNA-derived amino acid sequences were validated by chemical sequencing of internal lysyl endopeptidase peptides. The amino acid sequences of Cellana and Aplysia AKs showed the highest percent identity (66-73%) with those of the abalone Nordotis and turbanshell Battilus belonging to the same class Gastropoda. These AK sequences still have a strong homology (63-71%) with that of the chiton Liolophura (class Polyplacophora), which is believed to be one of the most primitive molluscs. On the other hand, these AK sequences are less homologous (55-57%) with that of the clam Pseudocardium (class Bivalvia), suggesting that the biological position of the class Polyplacophora should be reconsidered.

  17. Production of l-Arginine by Arginine Hydroxamate-Resistant Mutants of Bacillus subtilis

    PubMed Central

    Kisumi, Masahiko; Kato, Jyoji; Sugiura, Masaki; Chibata, Ichiro

    1971-01-01

    l-Arginine hydroxamate inhibited the growth of various bacteria, and the inhibition was readily reversed by arginine. l-Arginine hydroxamate (10−3m) completely inhibited the growth of Bacillus subtilis. This inhibitory effect was prevented by 2.5 × 10−4ml-arginine, which was the most effective of all the natural amino acids in reversing the inhibition. l-Arginine hydroxamate-resistant mutants of Bacillus subtilis were isolated and found to excrete l-arginine in relatively high yields. One of the mutants, strain AHr-5, produced 4.5 mg of l-arginine per ml in shaken culture in 3 days. PMID:5002904

  18. Amino Acid Utilization in Seeds of Loblolly Pine during Germination and Early Seedling Growth (I. Arginine and Arginase Activity).

    PubMed Central

    King, J. E.; Gifford, D. J.

    1997-01-01

    The mobilization and utilization of the major storage proteins in loblolly pine (Pinus taeda L.) seeds following imbibition were investigated. Most of the seed protein reserves were contained within the megagametophyte. Breakdown of these proteins occurred primarily following radicle emergence and correlated with a substantial increase in the free amino acid pool in the seedling; the majority of this increase appeared to be the result of export from the megagametophyte. The megagametophyte was able to break down storage proteins and export free amino acids in the absence of the seedling. Arginine (Arg) was the most abundant amino acid among the principal storage proteins of the megagametophyte and was a major component of the free amino acid pools in both the seedling and the megagametophyte. The increase in free Arg coincided with a marked increase in arginase activity, mainly localized within the cotyledons and epicotyl of the seedling. Arginase activity was negligible in isolated seedlings. Experiments with phenylphosphorodiamidate, a urease inhibitor, supported the hypothesis that arginase participates in Arg metabolism in the seedling. The results of this study indicate that Arg could play an important role in the nutrition of loblolly pine during early seedling growth. PMID:12223664

  19. Stimulus-secretion coupling of arginine-induced insulin release. Uptake of metabolized and nonmetabolized cationic amino acids by pancreatic islets

    SciTech Connect

    Blachier, F.; Mourtada, A.; Sener, A.; Malaisse, W.J.

    1989-01-01

    In order to assess the possible role of L-arginine accumulation in islet cells as a determinant of its insulinotropic action, the uptake of L-arginine and other cationic amino acids (L-ornithine, L-homoarginine, D,L-alpha-methylornithine, D,L-alpha-difluoromethylornithine) by rat pancreatic islets was compared to the ionic and secretory responses of the islets to the same amino acids. A tight correlation was found between the net uptake of these amino acids and their capacity to stimulate 86Rb efflux, 45Ca uptake and efflux, and insulin release. In the latter respect, there was little difference between metabolized and nonmetabolized amino acids. Thus, although L-homoarginine and 4-amino-1-guanylpiperidine-4-carboxylic acid failed to act as a substrate for either arginase or amino acid aminotransferase in islet homogenates, they both stimulated 86Rb efflux, 45Ca uptake and efflux, and insulin secretion in intact islets. These findings are compatible with the view that the accumulation of these positively charged amino acids in islet cells represents an essential determinant of their secretory action. Hence, the release of insulin evoked by these amino acids could be due to depolarization of the plasma membrane with subsequent gating of voltage-sensitive Ca2+ channels and/or to some other biophysical effect, as suggested by the persistence of a sizeable secretory response to L-arginine or L-ornithine in islets perifused at a high concentrations of extracellular K+ (50 mM).

  20. 47 CRYOPRESERVATION OF BOVINE GERM CELL USING ANTIFREEZE POLYAMINO-ACID (CARBOXYLATED POLY-L-LYSINE).

    PubMed

    Fujikawa, T; Kubota, C; Ando, T; Imamura, S; Tokumaru, M; Yamakuchi, H; Gen, Y; Hyon, S-H

    2016-01-01

    Carboxylated poly-l-lysine (CPLL) is an ampholytic polymer compound, and it is obtained by converting 65% amino groups to carboxyl groups after synthesising ε-poly-l-lysine aqueous solution and succinic anhydride. CPLL has cryoprotective property similar to antifreeze protein, and addition of CPLL into cryopreservation medium improves the post-thaw survival rate of cells and embryos. In this research, we examined the effectiveness of CPLL as a bovine germ cell cryoprotective material. In experiment 1 (in sperm), the conventional cryopreservation medium used for control group was consisted of 6.5% (vol/vol) glycerin, and the cryopreservation medium used for CPLL group was consisted of 3.25% (vol/vol) glycerin and 0.5% CPLL (wt/vol). The post-thaw survival and motility were assessed by using Sperm Motility Analysis System (DITECT Corp., Tokyo, Japan). There was no significant difference for post-thaw survival rate and motility (control v. CPLL; 98.8% v. 96.6% and 69.7% v. 62.2%, respectively). Artificial insemination was carried out in 65 cows (control v. CPLL; 34v. 31), and the conception rate of the CPLL group was higher than that of the control group (80.6% v. 67.6%; P=0.23). In experiment 2 (embryos), the conventional cryopreservation medium used for control group was consisted of 5% (vol/vol) ethylene glycol and 6% (vol/vol) propylene glycol in PBS. In the CPLL group, 7% (wt/vol) CPLL was added to the conventional medium. In vitro fertilization embryos were cryopreserved at Day 7 and Day 8. There was no significant difference in survival rate at 0, 24, and 48h and hatched rate until 72h after thawing (control v. CPLL: 93.6% v. 93.2%, 69.0% v. 64.7%, 56.1% v. 56.3%, 12.9% v. 10.2%, respectively). Embryos obtained by superovulation treatment and in vivo fertilization at Day 7 were cryopreserved using above 2 media, and transferred non-surgically into synchronized recipient cows (1 embryo per animal). Embryo transfer (ET) was carried out in 81 cows (control v

  1. Heterologous Production of Cyanobacterial Mycosporine-Like Amino Acids Mycosporine-Ornithine and Mycosporine-Lysine in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Katoch, Meenu; Mazmouz, Rabia; Chau, Rocky; Pearson, Leanne A.; Pickford, Russell

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Mycosporine-like amino acids (MAAs) are an important class of secondary metabolites known for their protection against UV radiation and other stress factors. Cyanobacteria produce a variety of MAAs, including shinorine, the active ingredient in many sunscreen creams. Bioinformatic analysis of the genome of the soil-dwelling cyanobacterium Cylindrospermum stagnale PCC 7417 revealed a new gene cluster with homology to MAA synthase from Nostoc punctiforme. This newly identified gene cluster is unusual because it has five biosynthesis genes (mylA to mylE), compared to the four found in other MAA gene clusters. Heterologous expression of mylA to mylE in Escherichia coli resulted in the production of mycosporine-lysine and the novel compound mycosporine-ornithine. To our knowledge, this is the first time these compounds have been heterologously produced in E. coli and structurally characterized via direct spectral guidance. This study offers insight into the diversity, biosynthesis, and structure of cyanobacterial MAAs and highlights their amenability to heterologous production methods. IMPORTANCE Mycosporine-like amino acids (MAAs) are significant from an environmental microbiological perspective as they offer microbes protection against a variety of stress factors, including UV radiation. The heterologous expression of MAAs in E. coli is also significant from a biotechnological perspective as MAAs are the active ingredient in next-generation sunscreens. PMID:27520810

  2. Simultaneous Detection of Dopamine and Uric Acid Using a Poly(l-lysine)/Graphene Oxide Modified Electrode

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yuehua; Lei, Wu; Xu, Yujuan; Xia, Xifeng; Hao, Qingli

    2016-01-01

    A novel, simple and selective electrochemical method was investigated for the simultaneous detection of dopamine (DA) and uric acid (UA) on a poly(l-lysine)/graphene oxide (GO) modified glassy carbon electrode (PLL/GO/GCE) by differential pulse voltammetry (DPV). The electrochemically prepared PLL/GO sensory platform toward the oxidation of UA and DA exhibited several advantages, including high effective surface area, more active sites and enhanced electrochemical activity. Compared to the PLL-modified GCE (PLL/GCE), GO-modified GCE and bare GCE, the PLL/GO/GCE exhibited an increase in the anodic potential difference and a remarkable enhancement in the current responses for both UA and DA. For the simultaneous detection of DA and UA, the detection limits of 0.021 and 0.074 μM were obtained, while 0.031 and 0.018 μM were obtained as the detection limits for the selective detection of UA and DA, using DPV in the linear concentration ranges of 0.5 to 20.0 and 0.5 to 35 μM, respectively. In addition, the PLL/GO/GCE demonstrated good reproducibility, long-term stability, excellent selectivity and negligible interference of ascorbic acid (AA). The proposed modified electrode was successfully implemented in the simultaneous detection of DA and UA in human blood serum, urine and dopamine hydrochloride injection with satisfactory results.

  3. Contribution of the net charge to the regulatory effects of amino acids and epsilon-poly(L-lysine) on the gelatinization behavior of potato starch granules.

    PubMed

    Ito, Azusa; Hattori, Makoto; Yoshida, Tadashi; Takahashi, Koji

    2006-01-01

    The effects of lysine (Lys), monosodium glutamate (GluNa), glycine, alanine and epsilon-poly(L-lysine) (PL) with different degrees of polymerization on the gelatinization behavior of potato starch granules were investigated by DSC, viscosity and swelling measurements, microscopic observation, and measurement of the retained amino acid amount to clarify the contribution of the net charge to their regulatory effects on the gelatinization behavior. The amino acids and PL each contributed to an increase in the gelatinization temperature, and a decrease in the peak viscosity and swelling. These effects strongly depended on the absolute value of their net charge. The disappearance of a negative or positive net charge by adjusting the pH value weakened the contribution. The swelling index and size of the potato starch granules changed according to replacement of the swelling medium. The amino acids and PL were easily retained by the swollen potato starch granules according to replacement of the outer solution of the starch granules.

  4. Protein arginine methylation/demethylation and cancer

    PubMed Central

    Poulard, Coralie; Corbo, Laura; Le Romancer, Muriel

    2016-01-01

    Protein arginine methylation is a common post-translational modification involved in numerous cellular processes including transcription, DNA repair, mRNA splicing and signal transduction. Currently, there are nine known members of the protein arginine methyltransferase (PRMT) family, but only one arginine demethylase has been identified, namely the Jumonji domain-containing 6 (JMJD6). Although its demethylase activity was initially challenged, its dual activity as an arginine demethylase and a lysine hydroxylase is now recognized. Interestingly, a growing number of substrates for arginine methylation and demethylation play key roles in tumorigenesis. Though alterations in the sequence of these enzymes have not been identified in cancer, their overexpression is associated with various cancers, suggesting that they could constitute targets for therapeutic strategies. In this review, we present the recent knowledge of the involvement of PRMTs and JMJD6 in tumorigenesis. PMID:27556302

  5. Synthesis and cytotoxicity of azo nano-materials as new biosensors for L-Arginine determination.

    PubMed

    Shang, Xuefang; Luo, Leiming; Ren, Kui; Wei, Xiaofang; Feng, Yaqian; Li, Xin; Xu, Xiufang

    2015-06-01

    Inspired from biological counterparts, chemical modification of azo derivatives with function groups may provide a highly efficient method to detect amino acid. Herein, we have designed and prepared a series of azo nano-materials involving -NO2, -COOH, -SO3H and naphthyl group, which showed high response for Arginine (Arg) among normal twenty kinds of (Alanine, Valine, Leucine, Isoleucine, Methionine, Aspartic acid, Glutamic acid, Arginine, Glycine, Serine, Threonine, Asparagine, Phenylalanine, Histidine, Tryptophan, Proline, Lysine, Glutamine, Tyrosine and Cysteine). Furthermore, theoretical investigation further illustrated the possible binding mode in the host-guest interaction and the roles of molecular frontier orbitals in molecular interplay. In addition, nano-material 3 exhibited high binding ability for Arg and low cytotoxicity to KYSE450 cells over a concentration range of 5-50μmol·L(-1) which may be used a biosensor for the Arg detection in vivo.

  6. Single amino acid (arginine) deprivation: rapid and selective death of cultured transformed and malignant cells

    PubMed Central

    Scott, L; Lamb, J; Smith, S; Wheatley, D N

    2000-01-01

    The effects of arginine deprivation (–Arg) has been examined in 26 cell lines. Less than 10% of those with transformed or malignant phenotype survived for > 5 days, and many died more rapidly, notably leukaemic cells. Bivariate flow cytometry confirmed that vulnerable cell lines failed to move out of cell cycle into a quiescent state (G0), but reinitiated DNA synthesis. Many cells remained in S-phase, and/or had difficulty progressing through to G2 and M. Two tumour lines proved relatively ‘resistant’, A549 and MCF7. Although considerable cell loss occurred initially, both lines showed a ‘cell cycle freeze’, in which cells survived for > 10 days. These cells recovered their proliferative activity in +Arg medium, but behaved in the same manner to a second –Arg episode as they did to the first episode. In contrast, normal cells entered G0 and survived in –Arg medium for several weeks, with the majority of cells recovering with predictable kinetics in +Arg medium. In general, cells from a wide range of tumours and established lines die quickly in vitro following –Arg treatment, because of defective cell cycle checkpoint stringency, the efficacy of the treatment being most clearly demonstrated in co-cultures in which only the normal cells survived. The findings demonstrate a potentially simple, effective and non-genotoxic strategy for the treatment of a wide range of cancers. © 2000 Cancer Research Campaign PMID:10952786

  7. Heterologous Production of Cyanobacterial Mycosporine-Like Amino Acids Mycosporine-Ornithine and Mycosporine-Lysine in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Katoch, Meenu; Mazmouz, Rabia; Chau, Rocky; Pearson, Leanne A; Pickford, Russell; Neilan, Brett A

    2016-10-15

    Mycosporine-like amino acids (MAAs) are an important class of secondary metabolites known for their protection against UV radiation and other stress factors. Cyanobacteria produce a variety of MAAs, including shinorine, the active ingredient in many sunscreen creams. Bioinformatic analysis of the genome of the soil-dwelling cyanobacterium Cylindrospermum stagnale PCC 7417 revealed a new gene cluster with homology to MAA synthase from Nostoc punctiforme This newly identified gene cluster is unusual because it has five biosynthesis genes (mylA to mylE), compared to the four found in other MAA gene clusters. Heterologous expression of mylA to mylE in Escherichia coli resulted in the production of mycosporine-lysine and the novel compound mycosporine-ornithine. To our knowledge, this is the first time these compounds have been heterologously produced in E. coli and structurally characterized via direct spectral guidance. This study offers insight into the diversity, biosynthesis, and structure of cyanobacterial MAAs and highlights their amenability to heterologous production methods.

  8. Acetylation dictates the morphology of nanophase biosilica precipitated by a 14-amino acid leucine-lysine peptide.

    PubMed

    Lutz, Helmut; Jaeger, Vance; Bonn, Mischa; Pfaendtner, Jim; Weidner, Tobias

    2017-02-01

    N-terminal acetylation is a commonly used modification technique for synthetic peptides, mostly applied for reasons of enhanced stability, and in many cases regarded as inconsequential. In engineered biosilification - the controlled deposition of silica for nanotechnology applications by designed peptides - charged groups often play a deciding role. Here we report that changing the charge by acetylation of a 14-amino acid leucine-lysine (LK) peptide dramatically changes the morphology of precipitated biosilica; acetylated LK peptides produce nano-spheres, whereas nano-wires are precipitated by the same peptide in a non-acetylated form. By using interface-specific vibrational spectroscopy and coarse-grained molecular simulations, we show that this change in morphology is not the result of modified peptide-silica interactions, but rather caused by the stabilization of the hydrophobic core of peptide aggregates created by the removal of a peptide charge upon acetylation. These results should raise awareness of the potential impact of N-terminal modifications in peptide applications. Copyright © 2016 European Peptide Society and John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  9. Cyclen Grafted with poly[(Aspartic acid)-co-Lysine]: Preparation, Assembly with Plasmid DNA, and in Vitro Transfection Studies.

    PubMed

    Ma, Chunying; Zhang, Jin; Guo, Liwen; Du, Changguo; Song, Ping; Zhao, Baojing; Li, Ling; Li, Chao; Qiao, Renzhong

    2016-01-04

    Development of safe and effective gene carriers is the key to the success of gene therapy. Nowadays, it is still required to develop new methods to improve nonviral gene delivery efficiency. Herein, copolymers of poly[(aspartic acid)-co-lysine] grafted with cyclen (cyclen-pAL) were designed and evaluated for efficient gene delivery. Two copolymers with different Asp/Lys block ratios were prepared and characterized by NMR and gel permeation chromatography analysis. Agarose gel retardation, circular dichroism, and fluorescent quenching assays showed the strong DNA-binding and protection ability for the title compounds. Atomic force microscopy studies clearly delineated uniform DNA globules with a diameter around 100 nm, induced by cyclen-pAL. By grafting cyclen on Asp, relatively high gene delivery efficiency and low cytotoxicity of the modified copolymers were achieved compared with their parent compounds. The present work might help to develop strategies for design and modification of polypeptide copolymers, which may also be applied to favorable gene expression and delivery.

  10. Isoxazole‐Derived Amino Acids are Bromodomain‐Binding Acetyl‐Lysine Mimics: Incorporation into Histone H4 Peptides and Histone H3

    PubMed Central

    Sekirnik (née Measures), Angelina R.; Hewings, David S.; Theodoulou, Natalie H.; Jursins, Lukass; Lewendon, Katie R.; Jennings, Laura E.; Rooney, Timothy P. C.; Heightman, Tom D.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract A range of isoxazole‐containing amino acids was synthesized that displaced acetyl‐lysine‐containing peptides from the BAZ2A, BRD4(1), and BRD9 bromodomains. Three of these amino acids were incorporated into a histone H4‐mimicking peptide and their affinity for BRD4(1) was assessed. Affinities of the isoxazole‐containing peptides are comparable to those of a hyperacetylated histone H4‐mimicking cognate peptide, and demonstrated a dependence on the position at which the unnatural residue was incorporated. An isoxazole‐based alkylating agent was developed to selectively alkylate cysteine residues in situ. Selective monoalkylation of a histone H4‐mimicking peptide, containing a lysine to cysteine residue substitution (K12C), resulted in acetyl‐lysine mimic incorporation, with high affinity for the BRD4 bromodomain. The same technology was used to alkylate a K18C mutant of histone H3. PMID:27264992

  11. Amino acids improve acid tolerance and internal pH maintenance in Bacillus cereus ATCC14579 strain.

    PubMed

    Senouci-Rezkallah, Khadidja; Schmitt, Philippe; Jobin, Michel P

    2011-05-01

    This study investigated the involvement of glutamate-, arginine- and lysine-dependent systems in the Acid Tolerance Response (ATR) of Bacillus cereus ATCC14579 strain. Cells were grown in a chemostat at external pH (pH(e)) 7.0 and 5.5. Population reduction after acid shock at pH 4.0 was strongly limited in cells grown at pH 5.5 (acid-adapted) compared with cells grown at pH 7.0 (unadapted), indicating that B. cereus cells grown at low pH(e) were able to induce a marked ATR. Glutamate, arginine and lysine enhanced the resistance of unadapted cells to pH 4.0 acid shock of 1-log or 2-log populations, respectively. Amino acids had no detectable effect on acid resistance in acid-adapted cells. An acid shock at pH 4.0 resulted in a marked drop in internal pH (pH(i)) in unadapted cells compared with acid-adapted cells. When acid shock was achieved in the presence of glutamate, arginine or lysine, pH(i) was maintained at higher values (6.31, 6.69 or 6.99, respectively) compared with pH(i) in the absence of amino acids (4.88). Acid-adapted cells maintained their pH(i) at around 6.4 whatever the condition. Agmatine (a competitive inhibitor of arginine decarboxylase) had a negative effect on the ability of B. cereus cells to survive and maintain their pH(i) during acid shock. Our data demonstrate that B. cereus is able to induce an ATR during growth at low pH. This adaptation depends on pH(i) homeostasis and is enhanced in the presence of glutamate, arginine and lysine. Hence evaluations of the pathogenicity of B. cereus must take into account its ability to adapt to acid stress.

  12. Killing of Mycobacterium avium by Lactoferricin Peptides: Improved Activity of Arginine- and d-Amino-Acid-Containing Molecules

    PubMed Central

    Silva, Tânia; Magalhães, Bárbara; Maia, Sílvia; Gomes, Paula; Nazmi, Kamran; Bolscher, Jan G. M.; Rodrigues, Pedro N.; Bastos, Margarida

    2014-01-01

    Mycobacterium avium causes respiratory disease in susceptible individuals, as well as disseminated infections in immunocompromised hosts, being an important cause of morbidity and mortality among these populations. Current therapies consist of a combination of antibiotics taken for at least 6 months, with no more than 60% overall clinical success. Furthermore, mycobacterial antibiotic resistance is increasing worldwide, urging the need to develop novel classes of antimicrobial drugs. One potential and interesting alternative strategy is the use of antimicrobial peptides (AMP). These are present in almost all living organisms as part of their immune system, acting as a first barrier against invading pathogens. In this context, we investigated the effect of several lactoferrin-derived AMP against M. avium. Short peptide sequences from both human and bovine lactoferricins, namely, hLFcin1-11 and LFcin17-30, as well as variants obtained by specific amino acid substitutions, were evaluated. All tested peptides significantly inhibited the axenic growth of M. avium, the bovine peptides being more active than the human. Arginine residues were found to be crucial for the display of antimycobacterial activity, whereas the all-d-amino-acid analogue of the bovine sequence displayed the highest mycobactericidal activity. These findings reveal the promising potential of lactoferricins against mycobacteria, thus opening the way for further research on their development and use as a new weapon against mycobacterial infections. PMID:24709266

  13. A study of the protein and amino acid requirements of the growing New Zealand White rabbit with emphasis on lysine and the sulphur-containing amino acids.

    PubMed

    Spreadbury, D

    1978-05-01

    1. New Zealand White (NZW) rabbits were given, between 4 and 8 weeks of age, a range of diets, based on oats and fish meal, containing from 104 to 255 g crude protein (nitrogen x 6.25; CP)/kg to establish the level of CP below which growth was retarded. 2. In three experiments each diet was fed to four animals and food intake, growth and N balance were measured over 4 weeks. Body analysis was also carried out after two of the experiments. 3. The rates of food intake and growth of animals increased with dietary CP concentration until a CP concentration of approximately 150 g/kg diet had been reached. Beyond this there was little further improvement. N balance studies showed that once this dietary concentration of CP had been reached, there was a reduced rate of N retention. 4. Good agreement was found between N retention measured by balance methods and by body analysis: body composition showed a tendency towards an increase 5. Microbial protein produced in the caecum and eaten during coprophagy, was found to supplement the dietary protein by approximately 2 g CP/d, or by only 0.1 of a normal dietary intake of CP. 6. In the second part of the study NZW rabbits were offered, between 5 and 8 weeks of age, diets based on oats containing 150 g CP/kg. The protein supplied by oats was supplemented with maize gluten, gelatin, groundnut meal, casein, soya-bean meal or fish meal. 7. Rabbits offered diets containing casein, soya-bean meal and fish meal gained 40-50 g/d similar, to animals given a well-balanced control diet, while those given diets containing maize gluten, gelatin or groundnut meal gained approximately 30 g/d. This indicated that amino acid balance in dietary protein was important to the growing rabbit. 8. In later experiments, diets based on cereals and groundnut meal supplemented with varying amounts of lysine and methionine were offered during a 3-week-post-weaning period in order to assess requirements for those limiting amino acids. 9. The addition of both

  14. Effect of l-lysine-assisted surface grafting for nano-hydroxyapatite on mechanical properties and in vitro bioactivity of poly(lactic acid-co-glycolic acid).

    PubMed

    Liuyun, Jiang; Lixin, Jiang; Chengdong, Xiong; Lijuan, Xu; Ye, Li

    2016-01-01

    It is promising and challenging to study surface modification for nano-hydroxyapatite to improve the dispersion and enhance the mechanical properties and bioactivity of poly(lactic acid-co-glycolic acid). In this paper, we designed an effective new surface grafting with the assist of l-lysine for nano-hydroxyapatite, and the nano-hydroxyapatite surface grafted with the assist of l-lysine (g-nano-hydroxyapatite) was incorporated into poly(lactic acid-co-glycolic acid) to develop a series of g-nano-hydroxyapatite/poly(lactic acid-co-glycolic acid) nano-composites. The surface modification reaction for nano-hydroxyapatite, the mechanical properties, and in vitro human osteoblast-like cell (MG-63) response were characterized and investigated by Fourier transformation infrared, thermal gravimetric analysis, dispersion test, electromechanical universal tester, differential scanning calorimeter measurements, and in vitro cells culture experiment. The results showed that the grafting amount on the surface of nano-hydroxyapatite was enhanced with the increase of l-lysine, and the dispersion of nano-hydroxyapatite was improved more, so that it brought about better promotion crystallization and more excellent mechanical enhancement effect for poly(lactic acid-co-glycolic acid), comparing with the unmodified nano-hydroxyapatite. Moreover, the cells' attachment and proliferation results confirmed that the incorporation of the g-nano-hydroxyapatite into poly(lactic acid-co-glycolic acid) exhibited better biocompatibility than poly(lactic acid-co-glycolic acid). The above results indicated that the new surface grafting with the assist of l-lysine for nano-hydroxyapatite was an ideal novel surface modification method, which brought about better mechanical enhancement effect and in vitro bioactivity for poly(lactic acid-co-glycolic acid) with adding higher g-nano-hydroxyapatite content, suggesting it had a great potential to be used as bone fracture internal fixation materials

  15. Serum Amino Acids Profile and the Beneficial Effects of L-Arginine or L-Glutamine Supplementation in Dextran Sulfate Sodium Colitis

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Miaomiao; Liu, Gang; Yang, Guan; Xion, Yan; Su, Dingding; Wu, Li; Li, Tiejun; Chen, Shuai; Duan, Jielin; Yin, Yulong; Wu, Guoyao

    2014-01-01

    This study was conducted to investigate serum amino acids profile in dextran sulfate sodium (DSS)-induced colitis, and impacts of graded dose of arginine or glutamine supplementation on the colitis. Using DSS-induced colitis model, which is similar to human ulcerative colitis, we determined serum profile of amino acids at day 3, 7, 10 and 12 (5 days post DSS treatment). Meanwhile, effects of graded dose of arginine (0.4%, 0.8%, and 1.5%) or glutamine (0.5%, 1.0% and 2.0%) supplementation on clinical parameters, serum amino acids, colonic tight junction proteins, colonic anti-oxidative indicators [catalase, total superoxide dismutase (T-SOD), glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px)], colonic pro-inflammatory cytokines [interleukin-1 beta (IL-1β), IL-6, IL-17 and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α)] in DSS-induced colitis were fully analyzed at day 7 and 12. Additionally, the activation of signal transduction pathways, including nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB), mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPK), phosphoinositide-3-kinases (PI3K)/PI3K-protein kinase B (Akt), and myosin light chain kinase (MLCK)- myosin light chain (MLC20), were analyzed using immunoblotting. Serum amino acids analysis showed that DSS treatment changed the serum contents of amino acids, such as Trp, Glu, and Gln (P<0.05). Dietary arginine or glutamine supplementation had significant (P<0.05) influence on the clinical and biochemical parameters (T-SOD, IL-17 and TNF-α) in colitis model. These results were associated with colonic NF-κB, PI3K-Akt and MLCK signaling pathways. In conclusion, arginine or glutamine could be a potential therapy for intestinal inflammatory diseases. PMID:24505477

  16. Increased Lysine Content Is the Main Characteristic of the Soluble Form of the Polyamide Cyanophycin Synthesized by Recombinant Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Frommeyer, Maja

    2013-01-01

    Cyanophycin, a polyamide of cyanobacterial or noncyanobacterial origin consisting of aspartate, arginine, and lysine, was synthesized in different recombinant strains of Escherichia coli expressing cphA from Synechocystis sp. strain PCC 6308 or PCC 6803, Anabaena sp. strain PCC 7120, or Acinetobacter calcoaceticus ADP1. The molar aspartate/arginine/lysine ratio of the water-soluble form isolated from a recombinant strain expressing CphA6308 was 1:0.5:0.5, with a lysine content higher than any ever described before. The water-insoluble form consisted instead of mainly aspartate and arginine residues and had a lower proportion of lysine, amounting to a maximum of only 5 mol%. It could be confirmed that the synthesis of soluble cyanobacterial granule polypeptide (CGP) is independent of the origin of cphA. Soluble CGP isolated from all recombinant strains contained a least 17 mol% lysine. The total CGP portion of cell dry matter synthesized by CphA6308 from recombinant E. coli was about 30% (wt/wt), including 23% (wt/wt) soluble CGP, by using terrific broth complex medium for cultivation at 30°C for 72 h. Enhanced production of soluble CGP instead of its insoluble form is interesting for further application and makes recombinant E. coli more attractive as a suitable source for the production of polyaspartic acid or dipeptides. In addition, a new low-cost, time-saving, effective, and common isolation procedure for mainly soluble CGP, suitable for large-scale application, was established in this study. PMID:23686266

  17. Anti-obesity effects of a mixture of thiamin, arginine, caffeine, and citric acid in non-insulin dependent diabetic KK mice.

    PubMed

    Muroyama, Koutarou; Murosaki, Shinji; Yamamoto, Yoshihiro; Odaka, Hiroyuki; Chung, Hee Chung; Miyoshi, Masamitsu

    2003-02-01

    Anti-obesity effects of a mixture of thiamin, arginine, caffeine, and citric acid (TACC) were investigated in non-insulin dependent diabetic KK mice. Feeding of either arginine or caffeine significantly suppressed an increase in hepatic lipid contents in fasted-refed KK mice. In addition, each component admixed with a low-calorie diet effectively reduced adipose tissue weight in KK mice previously fed a high-calorie diet. The decrease in adipose tissue weight was greater with a mixture of arginine and caffeine, and much greater with TACC than with arginine or caffeine alone. Moreover, plasma insulin concentration was significantly lower in mice fed TACC than in control mice. The anti-obesity effects of TACC were also shown when it was supplemented with a tea beverage. Adipose tissue weight, hepatic triglyceride contents, and plasma insulin concentration were significantly lower in mice given TACC-supplemented tea than in control mice. These results suggest that TACC is effective in reducing adipose tissue mass as well as improving disorders in lipid metabolism.

  18. Titanium dioxide nanoparticles modified by salicylic acid and arginine: Structure, surface properties and photocatalytic decomposition of p-nitrophenol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Lei; Feng, Yujie; Liu, Youzhi; Wei, Bing; Guo, Jiaxin; Jiao, Weizhou; Zhang, Zhaohan; Zhang, Qiaoling

    2016-02-01

    In this study, titanium dioxide (TiO2) nanoparticles were surface-modified with salicylic acid (SA) and arginine (Arg) using an environmentally friendly and convenient method, and the bonding structure, surface properties and degradation efficiency of p-nitrophenol (PNP) were investigated. X-ray diffractometry (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), water contact angle (WCA) measurements, ζ-potentiometric analysis, UV/visible diffuse reflectance spectroscopy (UV-vis DRS), and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) were performed to evaluate the modification effect. The degradation rates were determined by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). The results show that bidentate or bridging bonds are most likely formed between SA/Arg and TiO2 surface. Surface modification with SA, Arg, or both can improve the lipophilic properties and decrease the zeta potential, and also result in a red shift of the absorption wavelength. TiO2 nanoparticles modified by Arg or both SA and Arg show a large specific surface area and pore volume. Further, degradation experiments under visible light show that Arg modification is most efficient. This simple and versatile synthetic method to produce TiO2 nanoparticles surface-modified with various organic capping agents can be used for novel multifunctional photocatalysts as required for various applications in energy saving and environmental protection.

  19. Arginine depletion by arginine deiminase does not affect whole protein metabolism or muscle fractional protein synthesis rate in mice

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Due to the absolute need for arginine that certain cancer cells have, arginine depletion is a therapy in clinical trials to treat several types of cancers. Arginine is an amino acids utilized not only as a precursor for other important molecules, but also for protein synthesis. Because arginine depl...

  20. Oral delivery of zoledronic acid by non-covalent conjugation with lysine-deoxycholic acid: In vitro characterization and in vivo anti-osteoporotic efficacy in ovariectomized rats.

    PubMed

    Jeon, Ok-Cheol; Seo, Dong-Hyun; Kim, Han-Sung; Byun, Youngro; Park, Jin Woo

    2016-01-20

    We assessed the possibility of changing the route of administration of zoledronic acid to an oral dosage form and its therapeutic efficacy in an estrogen-deficient osteoporosis rat model. To enhance oral bioavailability, we formed an ionic complex by electrostatic conjugation of zoledronic acid with lysine-linked deoxycholic acid (Lys-DOCA, an oral absorption enhancer). After forming the complex, the characteristic crystalline features of pure zoledronic acid disappeared completely in the powder X-ray diffractogram and differential scanning calorimetry thermogram, indicating that zoledronic acid existed in an amorphous form in the complex. In vitro permeabilities of zoledronic acid/Lys-DOCA (1:1) (ZD1) and zoledronic acid/Lys-DOCA (1:2) (ZD2) complex across Caco-2 cell monolayers were 2.47- and 4.74-fold higher than that of zoledronic acid, respectively. Upon intra-jejunal administration to rats, the intestinal absorption of zoledronic acid was increased significantly and the resulting oral bioavailability of the ZD2 complex was determined to be 6.76±2.59% (0.548±0.161% for zoledronic acid). Ovariectomized (OVX) rats showed 122% increased bone mineral density versus the OVX control at 12weeks after treatment with once weekly oral administration of ZD2 complex (16μg/kg of zoledronic acid). Furthermore, rats treated with ZD2 complex orally showed significant improvement in the parameters of trabecular microarchitecture and bone strength: 149% higher bone volume fraction (BV/TV), 115% higher trabecular number (Tb.N), and 56% higher mean maximum load (Fmax) than in the OVX group. The trabecular microstructure and bone mechanical properties in the oral zoledronic acid group were not significantly changed compared with the OVX control. Thus, the oral ZD2 complex inhibited osteoporosis progression effectively by promoting osteogenesis and trabecular connectivity. The oral ZD2 complex would be expected to improve patient compliance by replacing the conventional

  1. The regulatory effect of citric acid on the co-production of poly(ε-lysine) and poly(L-diaminopropionic acid) in Streptomyces albulus PD-1.

    PubMed

    Xia, Jun; Xu, Zhaoxian; Xu, Hong; Feng, Xiaohai; Bo, Fangfang

    2014-10-01

    Streptomyces albulus PD-1 can co-produce antimicrobial homo-polymers poly(ε-lysine) (ε-PL) and poly(L-diaminopropionic acid) (PDAP). In this study, a novel feeding strategy of citric acid coupled with glucose-(NH4)2SO4 feeding was employed to S. albulus PD-1. When the pH of the culture broth dropped to 4.0, the feeding solution was added continuously to maintain the concentrations of glucose and citric acid at 10 and 4 g L(-1), respectively. As a result, the final concentration of ε-PL increased from 21.7 to 29.7 g L(-1) and the final concentration of PDAP decreased from 4.8 to 3.2 g L(-1). Assays on intracellular nucleotide levels and key enzyme activities were performed to elucidate the underlying regulation mechanism. The addition of citric acid increased NADH/NAD(+) ratio and decreased intracellular ATP level; meanwhile, the activities of pyruvate kinase, citrate synthase and isocitrate dehydrogenase decreased while aspartate aminotransferase activity increased. Therefore, we deduced that citric acid feeding resulted in metabolic flux redistribution at the node of phosphoenolpyruvate; the metabolic pathway from phosphoenolpyruvate directed into tricarboxylic acid cycle was weakened and thus PDAP production was inhibited. On the other hand, the metabolic pathway from phosphoenolpyruvate directed into oxaloacetate and L-aspartate was enhanced, thereby improving ε-PL production. This fermentation strategy may be potentially useful in ε-PL production because it can effectively inhibit the formation of by-products, such as PDAP.

  2. Efficacy of a Complex of 5-Aminolevulinic Acid and Glycyl-Histidyl-Lysine Peptide on Hair Growth

    PubMed Central

    Sim, Hyun Bo; Jang, Yong Hyun; Lee, Seok-Jong; Kim, Do Won; Yim, Soon-Ho

    2016-01-01

    Background Pattern hair loss is a very common problem. Although effective therapeutics for the treatment of pattern hair loss have been used, novel therapeutic modalities are still required to enhance hair growth. Objective We investigated the efficacy and safety of a complex (ALAVAX) of 5-aminolevulinic acid (5-ALA) and glycyl-histidyl-lysine (GHK) peptide for the treatment of pattern hair loss. Methods Forty-five patients with male pattern hair loss were treated with ALAVAX 100 mg/ml (group A), ALAVAX 50 mg/ml (group B) or placebo (group C) once a day for 6 months. Total hair count, hair length, hair thickness, patient's assessment and adverse events were evaluated at month 1, 3, and 6. Results An increase in hair count for 6 months was 52.6 (p<0.05) in group A, 71.5 (p<0.05) in group B, and 9.6 in group C. The ratio of changes in hair count between group B (2.38) and group C (1.21) at 6 months showed a statistically significant difference (p<0.05). The proportion above good satisfaction was higher in group A (26.7%) than in the other groups (group B: 14.3%, group C: 7.1%). There was no statistically significant difference in hair length and hair thickness among 3 groups at 6 months. There was no adverse event in 3 groups. Conclusion Our study showed that a complex of 5-ALA and GHK peptide may be considered as one of the complementary agents for the treatment of male pattern hair loss. PMID:27489425

  3. Small molecule regulators of protein arginine methyltransferases.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Donghang; Yadav, Neelu; King, Randall W; Swanson, Maurice S; Weinstein, Edward J; Bedford, Mark T

    2004-06-04

    Here we report the identification of small molecules that specifically inhibit protein arginine N-methyltransferase (PRMT) activity. PRMTs are a family of proteins that either monomethylate or dimethylate the guanidino nitrogen atoms of arginine side chains. This common post-translational modification is implicated in protein trafficking, signal transduction, and transcriptional regulation. Most methyltransferases use the methyl donor, S-adenosyl-L-methionine (AdoMet), as a cofactor. Current methyltransferase inhibitors display limited specificity, indiscriminately targeting all enzymes that use AdoMet. In this screen we have identified a primary compound, AMI-1, that specifically inhibits arginine, but not lysine, methyltransferase activity in vitro and does not compete for the AdoMet binding site. Furthermore, AMI-1 prevents in vivo arginine methylation of cellular proteins and can modulate nuclear receptor-regulated transcription from estrogen and androgen response elements, thus operating as a brake on certain hormone actions.

  4. Effect of mutation of lysine-128 of the large subunit of ribulose bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase from Anacystis nidulans.

    PubMed

    Bainbridge, G; Anralojc, P J; Madgwick, P J; Pitts, J E; Parry, M A

    1998-12-01

    The contribution of lysine-128 within the active site of Anacystis nidulans d-ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (Rubisco; EC 4.1.1.39) was investigated by the characterization of mutants in which lysine-128 was replaced with arginine, glycine, glutamine, histidine or aspartic acid. Mutated genes encoding the Rubisco large subunit were expressed in Escherichia coli and the resultant polypeptides assembled into active complexes. All of the mutant enzymes had a lower affinity for ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate (RuBP) and lower rates of carboxylation. Substitution of lysine-128 with glutamine, histidine or aspartic acid decreased the specificity factor and led to the production of an additional monophosphate reaction product. We show that this product results from the loss of the phosphate from C-1 of RuBP, most probably by beta-elimination from the 2,3-enediolate derivative of RuBP. The results confirm that lysine-128 is important in determining the position of the essential epsilon-amino group of lysine-334 within the active site and in loop dynamics. This further demonstrates that residues remote from the active site can be manipulated to modify catalytic function.

  5. Drug Discovery Toward Antagonists of Methyl-Lysine Binding Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Herold, J. Martin; Ingerman, Lindsey A; Gao, Cen; Frye, Stephen V

    2011-01-01

    The recognition of methyl-lysine and -arginine residues on both histone and other proteins by specific “reader” elements is important for chromatin regulation, gene expression, and control of cell-cycle progression. Recently the crucial role of these reader proteins in cancer development and dedifferentiation has emerged, owing to the increased interest among the scientific community. The methyl-lysine and -arginine readers are a large and very diverse set of effector proteins and targeting them with small molecule probes in drug discovery will inevitably require a detailed understanding of their structural biology and mechanism of binding. In the following review, the critical elements of methyl-lysine and -arginine recognition will be summarized with respect to each protein family and initial results in assay development, probe design, and drug discovery will be highlighted. PMID:22145013

  6. Proteomic and Biochemical Studies of Lysine Malonylation Suggest Its Malonic Aciduria-associated Regulatory Role in Mitochondrial Function and Fatty Acid Oxidation*

    PubMed Central

    Colak, Gozde; Pougovkina, Olga; Dai, Lunzhi; Tan, Minjia; te Brinke, Heleen; Huang, He; Cheng, Zhongyi; Park, Jeongsoon; Wan, Xuelian; Liu, Xiaojing; Yue, Wyatt W.; Wanders, Ronald J. A.; Locasale, Jason W.; Lombard, David B.; de Boer, Vincent C. J.; Zhao, Yingming

    2015-01-01

    The protein substrates of sirtuin 5-regulated lysine malonylation (Kmal) remain unknown, hindering its functional analysis. In this study, we carried out proteomic screening, which identified 4042 Kmal sites on 1426 proteins in mouse liver and 4943 Kmal sites on 1822 proteins in human fibroblasts. Increased malonyl-CoA levels in malonyl-CoA decarboxylase (MCD)-deficient cells induces Kmal levels in substrate proteins. We identified 461 Kmal sites showing more than a 2-fold increase in response to MCD deficiency as well as 1452 Kmal sites detected only in MCD−/− fibroblast but not MCD+/+ cells, suggesting a pathogenic role of Kmal in MCD deficiency. Cells with increased lysine malonylation displayed impaired mitochondrial function and fatty acid oxidation, suggesting that lysine malonylation plays a role in pathophysiology of malonic aciduria. Our study establishes an association between Kmal and a genetic disease and offers a rich resource for elucidating the contribution of the Kmal pathway and malonyl-CoA to cellular physiology and human diseases. PMID:26320211

  7. Linkages in thermal copolymers of lysine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fox, S. W.; Suzuki, F.

    1976-01-01

    The thermal copolymerization of lysine with other alpha-amino acids has been studied further. The identity of the second amino acid influences various properties of the polymer obtained, including the proportion of alpha and epsilon linkages of lysine. A review of linkages in proteinoids indicates alpha and beta linkages for aspartic acid, alpha and gamma linkages for glutamic acid, alpha and epsilon linkages for lysine, and alpha linkages for other amino acids. Thermal proteinoids are thus more complex in types of linkage than are proteins

  8. Linkages in thermal copolymers of lysine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fox, S. W.; Suzuki, F.

    1975-01-01

    The thermal copolymerization of lysine with other alpha-amino acids was studied. The identity of the second amino acid influences various properties of the polymer obtained, including the proportion of alpha and epsilon linkages of lysine. A review of linkages in proteinoids indicates alpha and beta linkages for aspartic acid, alpha and gamma linkages for glutamic acid, alpha and epsilon linkages for lysine, and alpha linkages for other amino acids. Thermal proteinoids are thus more complex in types of linkage than are proteins.

  9. Electrodeposited reduced graphene oxide incorporating polymerization of l-lysine on electrode surface and its application in simultaneous electrochemical determination of ascorbic acid, dopamine and uric acid.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Dongdong; Li, Lingzhi; Ma, Weina; Chen, Xia; Zhang, Yanmin

    2017-01-01

    This paper demonstrates a novel strategy for the construction of a graphene hybrid composites film, which was fabricated by electrodeposited reduced graphene oxide (ERGO) incorporating polymerization of l-lysine (PLL) onto glassy carbon electrode (GCE). Here we show that graphene films can be prepared on electrodes directly from GO dispersions by one-step electrodeposition technique based on electropolymerized PLL as a positively charged polymer interface to adsorb negatively charged GO nanosheets through electrostatic attraction. The thickness of graphene film can be easily controlled by using the electrodeposition technique, a distinct advantage over previously developed methods. The electrochemically reduced process of GO and electropolymerization of l-lysine were investigated by cyclic voltammetry with a wide potential range. The surface morphology of the modified electrode was characterized by scanning electron microscopy. The ERGO/PLL/GCE shows conducive to electron transfer kinetics for Fe(CN)6(3-)/Fe(CN)6(4-) redox probes, compared with bare GCE, PLL/GCE and ERGO/GCE. The electrochemical behaviors of ascorbic acid (AA), dopamine (DA) and uric acid (UA) at ERGO/PLL/GCE were investigated by cyclic voltammetry, and the results suggest that the modified electrode exhibits enhanced electrocatalytic activity toward these important molecules. Under physiological condition and in the co-existence system of AA, DA and UA, the ERGO/PLL/GCE showed linear voltammetric responses in the concentration of 100μM-1200μM for AA, 2.0μM-60μM for DA and 20μM-200μM for UA, and with the detection limits (S/N=3) of 2.0μM, 0.10μM and 0.15μM for AA, DA and UA, respectively. The developed method has been applied to simultaneous determination of AA, DA and UA in human urine with satisfactory recoveries of 104.2%, 95.4% and 99.9%, respectively. This work demonstrates that the attractive features of ERGO/PLL provide promising applications in simultaneous determination of AA, DA

  10. The same substitution, glutamic acid----lysine at position 501, occurs in three alloalbumins of Asiatic origin: albumins Vancouver, Birmingham, and Adana.

    PubMed Central

    Huss, K; Madison, J; Ishioka, N; Takahashi, N; Arai, K; Putnam, F W

    1988-01-01

    A strategy is described for identifying structural changes in genetic variants of human serum albumin (alloalbumins). By use of this strategy we have determined an amino acid substitution in three alloalbumins of Asiatic origin. The same amino acid exchange, glutamic acid----lysine at position 501, occurs in albumins Vancouver and Birmingham, both from families that migrated from northern India, and also in albumin Adana from Turkey. This exchange corresponds to a single base mutation in the codon GAG to AAG and accords with the slow mobility of the three albumins at pH 8.6. Each of the three alloalbumins had been reported to be a new variant, yet they have the same substitution. These results emphasize the need for structural study of genetic variants that have been differentiated only by nonspecific physical criteria such as dye binding and electrophoretic mobility. We know of no other description of the substitution involved in an alloalbumin originating from the Indian subcontinent. However, the same change of glutamic acid----lysine at position 501 may be present in several other named variants reported for populations in north India and the surrounding regions. Images PMID:2901102

  11. Dietary guanidino acetic acid is an efficacious replacement for arginine for young chicks.

    PubMed

    Dilger, R N; Bryant-Angeloni, K; Payne, R L; Lemme, A; Parsons, C M

    2013-01-01

    Guanidino acetic acid (GAA) is synthesized in the liver and kidney from Arg and Gly and subsequently methylated by S-adenosylmethionine to form creatine. Four bioassays were carried out to determine the capacity of GAA to serve as a dietary replacement for Arg for growing chicks. Broiler chicks were fed Arg-deficient dextrose-casein (0.88% Arg) or corn-corn coproduct-soybean meal (1.0% Arg) basal diets during 9-d battery feeding trials involving 5 pens of 4 chicks per treatment. The dextrose-casein diet was shown to be markedly deficient in Arg as both weight gain and G:F increased (P < 0.01) due to addition of Arg, GAA, or creatine. The optimal level of added GAA was 0.12% of the diet, but this level of GAA or 1.0% creatine-H(2)O did not improve growth performance when added to an Arg-adequate diet. A second assay confirmed this level of optimal Arg in a 2 × 2 factorial arrangement of l-Arg and GAA supplementation. Using a practical-type diet based on corn, corn gluten meal, distillers dried grains with solubles, and soybean meal, similar improvements (P < 0.05) in G:F resulted from addition of 0.25% Arg, 0.12% GAA, or 0.15% creatine·H(2)O. These results demonstrate that 0.12% supplemental GAA, like creatine, produces consistent growth responses in young chicks fed Arg-deficient diets. To provide further evidence of the capacity for GAA to serve as a dietary Arg replacement, the dextrose-casein diet was supplemented with 7 graded doses of Arg in the absence or presence of 0.12% GAA (14 total diets). Quadratic (P < 0.01) responses in weight gain and G:F responses to supplemental Arg were observed. Similar supplemental Arg requirements were estimated in the absence and presence of 0.12% GAA, but GAA elicited a greater improvement (P < 0.05) in G:F when added to Arg-deficient, compared with Arg-adequate, diets. Collectively, these data indicate that GAA can be used as an efficacious replacement for dietary Arg for young chicks.

  12. Enthalpy-driven interactions with sulfated glycosaminoglycans promote cell membrane penetration of arginine peptides.

    PubMed

    Takechi-Haraya, Yuki; Nadai, Ryo; Kimura, Hitoshi; Nishitsuji, Kazuchika; Uchimura, Kenji; Sakai-Kato, Kumiko; Kawakami, Kohsaku; Shigenaga, Akira; Kawakami, Toru; Otaka, Akira; Hojo, Hironobu; Sakashita, Naomi; Saito, Hiroyuki

    2016-06-01

    The first step of cell membrane penetration of arginine peptides is thought to occur via electrostatic interactions between positive charges of arginine residues and negative charges of sulfated glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) on the cell surface. However, the molecular interaction of arginine peptides with GAG still remains unclear. Here, we compared the interactions of several arginine peptides of Tat, R8, and Rev and their analogues with heparin in relation to the cell membrane penetration efficiency. The high-affinity binding of arginine peptides to heparin was shown to be driven by large favorable enthalpy contributions, possibly reflecting multidentate hydrogen bondings of arginine residues with sulfate groups of heparin. Interestingly, the lysine peptides in which all arginine residues are substituted with lysine residues exhibited negligible binding enthalpy despite of their considerable binding to heparin. In CHO-K1 cells, arginine peptides exhibited a great cell-penetrating ability whereas their corresponding lysine peptides did not penetrate into cells. The degree of cell penetration of arginine peptides markedly decreased by the chlorate treatment of cells which prevents the sulfation of GAG chains. Significantly, the cell penetration efficiency of arginine peptides was found to be correlated with the favorable enthalpy of binding to heparin. These results suggest that the enthalpy-driven strong interaction with sulfated GAGs such as heparan sulfate plays a critical role in the efficient cell membrane penetration of arginine peptides.

  13. Preventive effect of a high fluoride toothpaste and arginine-carbonate toothpaste on dentinal tubules exposure followed by acid challenge: a dentine permeability evaluation

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Considering the current high use of high fluoride toothpastes, the aim of the study was to quantify alterations in the root dentine permeability submitted to treatment with a high fluoride toothpaste and 8% arginine, calcium carbonate, sodium monofluorophosphate toothpaste as a preventive treatment for dentinal tubules exposure followed by acid challenge. Methods Thirty-third molars were sectioned below the cementoenamel. The root segments were connected to a hydraulic pressure apparatus to measure dentine permeability after the following sequential steps (n = 10 per group): I) Baseline; II) treatment with phosphoric acid for 30 s (maximum permeability); III) Toothbrushing (1 min) according to the experimental groups (G1- control; G2- 5000 ppm fluoride toothpaste; G3- 8% arginine-calcium carbonate toothpaste); IV) acid challenge for 5 min (orange juice). The data were converted into percentage, considering stage II as 100%. Results The results have shown a statistically significant decreasing on dentine permeability after treatment with toothpaste (Friedman test and Dunn’s post hoc test). Comparison among groups demonstrated a high increasing on dentine permeability when acid challenge was performed after toothbrushing with distilled water (control group) (Kruskal-Wallis and Dunn’s post hoc test). Conclusion The toothpaste treatment may provide sufficient resistance on dentine surface, preventing dentinal tubules exposure after acid challenge. PMID:24958423

  14. Cationic amino acid transporters and beta-defensins in dry eye syndrome.

    PubMed

    Jäger, Kristin; Garreis, Fabian; Dunse, Matthias; Paulsen, Friedrich P

    2010-01-01

    Several diseases concomitant with L-arginine deficiency (diabetes, chronic kidney failure, psoriasis) are significantly associated with dry eye syndrome. One important factor that has so far been neglected is the y(+) transporter. In humans, y(+) accounts for nearly 80% of arginine transport, exclusively carrying the cationic amino acids L-arginine, L-lysine and L-ornithine. y(+) is represented by CAT(cationic amino acid transporter) proteins. L-arginine is a precursor of the moisturizer urea, which has been used in the treatment of dry skin diseases. Although urea has also been shown to be part of the tear film, little attention has been paid to it in this role. Moreover, L-arginine and L-lysine are major components contributing to synthesis of the antimicrobially active beta-defensins induced under dry eye conditions. The first results have demonstrated that transport of L-arginine and L-lysine into epithelial cells is limited by the y(+) transporter at the ocular surface.

  15. Regulation of macrophage functions by L-arginine

    PubMed Central

    1989-01-01

    Sites of inflammation with prominent macrophage infiltration, such as wounds and certain tumors, are uniquely deficient in free arginine. The effects of arginine availability on macrophage physiology were investigated. When cultured in media containing less than 0.1 mM L- arginine, rat resident peritoneal macrophages exhibited enhanced spreading, tumor cytotoxicity, superoxide production, phagocytosis, and protein synthesis. Thus, arginine concentrations similar to those found in sites of inflammation can augment macrophage functions, while those found in plasma (approximately 0.1 mM) and in commonly used culture media (0.4 to 1.2 mM) are inhibitory. Culture in homoarginine, but not D-arginine, ornithine, citrulline, urea, histidine, or lysine also inhibited macrophage tumor cytotoxicity, indicating the specificity of the effect. In contrast to resident macrophages, the tumor cytotoxicity of peritoneal macrophages obtained after C. parvum injection was suppressed by culture in arginine-deficient media. However, L-arginine- deficient media enhanced all other activation-associated functions in C. parvum-elicited macrophages as in resident cells. Arginine-free wound fluid promoted resident macrophage tumoricidal activity when compared with rat serum, and again, the addition of L-arginine was inhibitory. The marked effects of L-arginine availability on macrophage functions, together with the knowledge that these cells modify the extracellular arginine concentration in sites of inflammation through arginase, provide evidence for an autoregulatory mechanism of macrophage activation. PMID:2538541

  16. Determination of useful barley selections in an improvement program for increased lysine content by larvae of Tenebrio molitor L.

    PubMed

    Davis, G R; Sosulski, F W

    1977-12-01

    Larvae of the yellow mealworm, Tenebrio molitor L., Gembloux strain, race F, were reared for 4 weeks at 27 +/- 0.25 degrees C and 65 +/- 5% relative humidity. They were fed on each of 22 cultivars of barley, at the protein level occurring in harvested seed and at a protein level of 10% of dietary protein. Growth and body composition of the larvae were correlated positively and significantly with the concentrations of basic amino acids in the barleys and negatively and significantly with the concentrations of leucine. The percentage of crude protein in larval tissues can be used as a measure of available lysine in barley cultivars, and gains in fresh weight of larvae as indices of arginine concentrations. Differences were evident between the biological and chemical estimations of these amino acids. Several of the Saskatoon barley selections, derived from crosses with Hiproly, were equal to Hiproly or Risø varieties in the amounts of lysine available to the larvae.

  17. Arginine-based cationic liposomes for efficient in vitro plasmid DNA delivery with low cytotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Sarker, Satya Ranjan; Aoshima, Yumiko; Hokama, Ryosuke; Inoue, Takafumi; Sou, Keitaro; Takeoka, Shinji

    2013-01-01

    Background Currently available gene delivery vehicles have many limitations such as low gene delivery efficiency and high cytotoxicity. To overcome these drawbacks, we designed and synthesized two cationic lipids comprised of n-tetradecyl alcohol as the hydrophobic moiety, 3-hydrocarbon chain as the spacer, and different counterions (eg, hydrogen chloride [HCl] salt or trifluoroacetic acid [TFA] salt) in the arginine head group. Methods Cationic lipids were hydrated in 4-(2-hydroxyethyl)-1-piperazineethanesulfonic acid (HEPES) buffer to prepare cationic liposomes and characterized in terms of their size, zeta potential, phase transition temperature, and morphology. Lipoplexes were then prepared and characterized in terms of their size and zeta potential in the absence or presence of serum. The morphology of the lipoplexes was determined using transmission electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy. The gene delivery efficiency was evaluated in neuronal cells and HeLa cells and compared with that of lysine-based cationic assemblies and Lipofectamine™ 2000. The cytotoxicity level of the cationic lipids was investigated and compared with that of Lipofectamine™ 2000. Results We synthesized arginine-based cationic lipids having different counterions (ie, HCl-salt or TFA-salt) that formed cationic liposomes of around 100 nm in size. In the absence of serum, lipoplexes prepared from the arginine-based cationic liposomes and plasmid (p) DNA formed large aggregates and attained a positive zeta potential. However, in the presence of serum, the lipoplexes were smaller in size and negative in zeta potential. The morphology of the lipoplexes was vesicular. Arginine-based cationic liposomes with HCl-salt showed the highest transfection efficiency in PC-12 cells. However, arginine-based cationic liposomes with TFA salt showed the highest transfection efficiency in HeLa cells, regardless of the presence of serum, with very low associated cytotoxicity. Conclusion The gene

  18. Metabolic and immune effects of dietary arginine, glutamine and omega-3 fatty acids supplementation in immunocompromised patients.

    PubMed

    Chuntrasakul, C; Siltharm, S; Sarasombath, S; Sittapairochana, C; Leowattana, W; Chockvivatanavanit, S; Bunnak, A

    1998-05-01

    To evaluate the nutritional, metabolic and immune effects of dietary arginine, glutamine and omega-3 fatty acids (fish oil) supplementation in immunocompromised patients, we performed a prospective study on the effect of immune formula administered to 11 severe trauma patients (average ISS = 24), 10 burn patients (average % TBSA = 48) and 5 cancer patients. Daily calorie and protein administration were based on the patient's severity (Stress factor with the range of 35-50 kcal/kg/day and 1.5-2.5 g/kg/day, respectively) Starting with half concentration liquid immune formula through nasogastric tube by continuous drip at 30 ml/h and increasing to maximum level within 4 days. The additional energy and protein requirement will be given either by parenteral or oral nutritional support. Various nutritional, metabolic, immunologic and clinical parameters were observed on day 0 (baseline), day 3, 7, and 14. Analysis was performed by paired student-t test. Initial mean serum albumin and transferrin showed mild (trauma) to moderate (burn and cancer) degree of malnutrition. Significant improvement of nutritional parameters was seen at day 7 and 14 in trauma and burn patients. Significant increase of total lymphocyte count (day 7, P < 0.01), CD4 + count (day 7, p < 0.01), CD8 + count (day 7, p < 0.0005 & day 14, p < 0.05), complement C3 (day 7, p < 0.005 day 14, p < 0.01), IgG (day 7, and 14, p < 0.0005), IgA (day 7, p < 0.0005 & day 14, p < 0.05), in all patients. C-reactive protein decreased significantly on day 7 (p < 0.0005) and day 14 (p < 0.005). 3 cases of burn wound infection, one case of UTI and one case of sepsis were observed. Two cases of hyperglycemia in burn, 3 cases of hyperbilirubinemia in trauma, 10 cases of elevated LFT (5 trauma/5 burn), and one case of hyponatremia in cancer patients were observed. Two cases of nausea, 4 cases of vomiting, 5 cases of diarrhea (< 3 times/day), 2 cases of abdominal cramp, 1 case of distension were observed. The feeding of

  19. Development and cytotoxicity of Schiff base derivative as a fluorescence probe for the detection of L-Arginine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shang, Xuefang; Li, Jie; Guo, Kerong; Ti, Tongyu; Wang, Tianyun; Zhang, Jinlian

    2017-04-01

    Inspired from biological counter parts, chemical modification of Schiff base derivatives with function groups may provide a highly efficient method to detect amino acids. Therefore, a fluorescent probe involving Schiff base and hydroxyl group has been designed and prepared, which showed high response and specificity for Arginine (Arg) among normal eighteen standard kinds of amino acids (Alanine, Valine, Leucine, Isoleucine, Methionine, Asparticacid, Glutamicacid, Arginine, Glycine, Serine, Threonine, Asparagine, Phenylalanine, Histidine, Tryptophan, Proline, Lysine, Glutamine, Tyrosine and Cysteine). Furthermore, theoretical investigation further illustrated the possible binding mode in the host-guest interaction and the roles of molecular frontier orbitals in molecular interplay. In addition, the synthesized fluorescent probe exhibited high binding ability for Arg and low cytotoxicity to MCF-7 cells over a concentration range of 0-200 μg mL-1 which can be also used as a biosensor for the Arg detection in vivo.

  20. Post-translational enzyme modification by the phosphopantetheinyl transferase is required for lysine and penicillin biosynthesis but not for roquefortine or fatty acid formation in Penicillium chrysogenum.

    PubMed

    García-Estrada, Carlos; Ullán, Ricardo V; Velasco-Conde, Tania; Godio, Ramiro P; Teijeira, Fernando; Vaca, Inmaculada; Feltrer, Raúl; Kosalková, Katarina; Mauriz, Elba; Martín, Juan F

    2008-10-15

    NRPSs (non-ribosomal peptide synthetases) and PKSs (polyketide synthases) require post-translational phosphopantetheinylation to become active. This reaction is catalysed by a PPTase (4'-phosphopantetheinyl transferase). The ppt gene of Penicillium chrysogenum, encoding a protein that shares 50% similarity with the stand-alone large PPTases, has been cloned. This gene is present as a single copy in the genome of the wild-type and high-penicillin-producing strains (containing multiple copies of the penicillin gene cluster). Amplification of the ppt gene produced increases in isopenicillin N and benzylpenicillin biosynthesis. A PPTase-defective mutant (Wis54-PPT(-)) was obtained. It required lysine and lacked pigment and penicillin production, but it still synthesized normal levels of roquefortine. The biosynthesis of roquefortine does not appear to involve PPTase-mediated modification of the synthesizing enzymes. The PPT(-) mutant did not require fatty acids, which indicates that activation of the fatty acid synthase is performed by a different PPTase. Complementation of Wis54-PPT(-) with the ppt gene restored lysine biosynthesis, pigmentation and penicillin production, which demonstrates the wide range of processes controlled by this gene.

  1. Synthesis and Anchoring of Antineoplastic Ferrocene and Phthalocyanine Derivatives on Water-Soluble Polymeric Drug Carriers Derived from Lysine and Aspartic Acid

    PubMed Central

    Maree, M. David; Neuse, Eberhard W.; Erasmus, Elizabeth; Swarts, Jannie C.

    2008-01-01

    The general synthetic strategy towards water-soluble biodegradable drug carriers and the properties that they must have are discussed. The syntheses of water-soluble biodegradable copolymers of lysine and aspartic acid as potential drug-delivering devices, having amine-functionalised side chains are then described. Covalent anchoring of carboxylic acid derivatives of the antineoplastic ferrocene and photodynamically active phthalocyanine moieties to the amine-containing drug carrier copolymers under mild coupling conditions has been achieved utilising the coupling reagent O-benzotriazolyl-N,N,N′,N′-tetramethyluronium hexafluorophosphate to promote formation of the biodegradable amide bond. Even though the parent antineoplastic ferrocene and phthalocyanine derivatives are themselves insoluble in water at pH < 7, the new carrier-drug conjugates that were obtained are well water-soluble. PMID:18288243

  2. Arginine Metabolism in Developing Soybean Cotyledons 1

    PubMed Central

    Micallef, Barry J.; Shelp, Barry J.

    1989-01-01

    The free and protein amino acid composition of Glycine max (L.) Merrill cotyledons was determined for the entire developmental period using high performance liquid chromatography. Arginine constituted 18% of the total protein nitrogen throughout development, and there was a linear arginine nitrogen accumulation rate of 1212 nanomoles per cotyledon per day between 16 and 58 days after anthesis. Arginine and asparagine were major constituents of the free amino acid pool, constituting 14 to 62% and 2 to 41% of the total free amino acid nitrogen, respectively. The urea cycle intermediates, citrulline, ornithine, and argininosuccinate were also detected in the free pool. A comparison of the amino acid composition of cotyledonary protein and of seedcoat exudate suggested that 72% of the cotyledon's arginine requirement is satisfied by in situ biosynthesis, and that 20% of the transformed nitrogen is incorporated into arginine. Also, [1-14C]glutamate and [U-14C]glutamine were fed to excised cotyledons. After 4 hours, 14C was incorporated into protein and released as 14CO2, but none was incorporated into the C-1 and C-6 positions of free and protein arginine, determined using arginine-specific enzyme-linked assays. It is not currently known whether arginine biosynthesis in the cotyledon involves glutamate delivered from the mother plant or glutamate derived in situ. PMID:16666818

  3. Physiological implications of arginine metabolism in plants

    PubMed Central

    Winter, Gudrun; Todd, Christopher D.; Trovato, Maurizio; Forlani, Giuseppe; Funck, Dietmar

    2015-01-01

    Nitrogen is a limiting resource for plant growth in most terrestrial habitats since large amounts of nitrogen are needed to synthesize nucleic acids and proteins. Among the 21 proteinogenic amino acids, arginine has the highest nitrogen to carbon ratio, which makes it especially suitable as a storage form of organic nitrogen. Synthesis in chloroplasts via ornithine is apparently the only operational pathway to provide arginine in plants, and the rate of arginine synthesis is tightly regulated by various feedback mechanisms in accordance with the overall nutritional status. While several steps of arginine biosynthesis still remain poorly characterized in plants, much wider attention has been paid to inter- and intracellular arginine transport as well as arginine-derived metabolites. A role of arginine as alternative source besides glutamate for proline biosynthesis is still discussed controversially and may be prevented by differential subcellular localization of enzymes. Apparently, arginine is a precursor for nitric oxide (NO), although the molecular mechanism of NO production from arginine remains unclear in higher plants. In contrast, conversion of arginine to polyamines is well documented, and in several plant species also ornithine can serve as a precursor for polyamines. Both NO and polyamines play crucial roles in regulating developmental processes as well as responses to biotic and abiotic stress. It is thus conceivable that arginine catabolism serves on the one hand to mobilize nitrogen storages, while on the other hand it may be used to fine-tune development and defense mechanisms against stress. This review summarizes the recent advances in our knowledge about arginine metabolism, with a special focus on the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana, and pinpoints still unresolved critical questions. PMID:26284079

  4. Arginine Deiminase Enzyme Evolving As A Potential Antitumor Agent.

    PubMed

    Somani, Rakesh; Chaskar, Pratip K

    2016-08-17

    Some melanomas and hepatocellular carcinomas have been shown to be auxotrophic for arginine. Arginine deiminase (ADI), an arginine degrading enzyme isolated from Mycoplasma, can inhibit the growth of these tumors. It is a catabolizing enzyme which catabolizes arginine to citrulline. Tumor cells do not express an enzyme called arginosuccinate synthetase (ASS) and hence, these cells becomes auxotrophic for arginine. It is found that ADI is specific for arginine and did not degrade other amino acid. This review covers various aspects of ADIs like origin, properties and chemical modifications for better antitumor activity.

  5. Poly(ornithine-co-arginine-co-glycine-co-aspartic Acid): Preparation via NCA Polymerization and its Potential as a Polymeric Tumor-Penetrating Agent.

    PubMed

    Yu, Haiyang; Tang, Zhaohui; Zhang, Dawei; Song, Wantong; Duan, Taicheng; Gu, Jingkai; Chen, Xuesi

    2015-06-01

    A novel random copolypeptide of ornithine, arginine, glycine, and aspartic acid [Poly(ornithine-co-arginine-co-glycine-co-aspartic acid), Poly(O,R,G,D)] has been prepared through ring-opening polymerization of N-δ-carbobenzoxy-l-ornithine N-carboxyanhydride [Orn(Cbz)-NCA)], l-glycine N-carboxyanhydride (Gly-NCA) and β-benzyl l-aspartate N-carboxyanhydride [Asp(Bn)-NCA], following by subsequent deprotection and guanidization. The structure of Poly(O,R,G,D) was confirmed by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy and gel permeation chromatography (GPC). Low cytotoxicity of Poly(O,R,G,D) was confirmed from MTT assay. The Poly(O,R,G,D) contain some internal sequences of RXXR (X = O, R, G, or D) that could be proteolytically cleaved to expose the cryptic CendR element and bind to Neuropilin-1. This would lead to vascular and tissue permeabilization. Therefore trypsin-cleaved Poly(O,R,G,D) increase the vascular leakage of Evans blue from dermal microvessels at the injection site in vivo skin permeability assay. The intratumoral injection of the Poly(O,R,G,D) significantly enhanced the concentration of cisplatin-loaded nanoparticles in MCF-7 solid tumors. These results show that Poly(O,R,G,D) could increase the vascular leakage and tissue penetration of nanoparticles in a solid tumor and can be used as a potential polymeric tumor-penetrating agent.

  6. A combination of both arginine- and lysine-specific gingipain activity of Porphyromonas gingivalis is necessary for the generation of the micro-oxo bishaem-containing pigment from haemoglobin.

    PubMed Central

    Smalley, John W; Thomas, Michael F; Birss, Andrew J; Withnall, Robert; Silver, Jack

    2004-01-01

    The black pigment of Porphyromonas gingivalis is composed of the mu-oxo bishaem complex of Fe(III) protoporphyrin IX (mu-oxo oligomer, dimeric haem), namely [Fe(III)PPIX]2O. P. gingivalis W50 and Rgp (Arg-gingipain)- and Kgp (Lys-gingipain)-deficient mutants K1A, D7, E8 and W501 [Aduse-Opoku, Davies, Gallagher, Hashim, Evans, Rangarajan, Slaney and Curtis (2000) Microbiology 146, 1933-1940] were grown on horse blood/agar for 14 days and examined for the production of mu-oxo bishaem. Mu-oxo Bishaem was detected by UV-visible, Mössbauer and Raman spectroscopies in wild-type W50 and in the black-pigmented RgpA- and RgpB-deficient mutants (W501 and D7 respectively), whereas no haem species were detected in the straw-coloured colonies of Kgp-deficient strain K1A. The dark brown pigment of the double RgpA/RgpB knockout mutant (E8) was not composed of mu-oxo bishaem, but of a high-spin monomeric Fe(III) protoporphyrin IX species (possibly a haem-albumin complex). In vitro incubation of oxyhaemoglobin with cells of the W50 strain and the RgpA- and RgpB-deficient mutants (W501 and D7) resulted in the formation of mu-oxo bishaem via methaemoglobin as an intermediate. Although the Kgp-deficient strain K1A converted oxyhaemoglobin into methaemoglobin, this was not further degraded into mu-oxo bishaem. The double RgpA/RgpB knockout was also not capable of producing mu-oxo bishaem from oxyhaemoglobin, but instead generated a haemoglobin haemichrome. Inhibition of Arg-X protease activity of W50, W501, D7 and K1A with leupeptin, under conditions where Lys-X protease activity was unaffected, prevented the production of mu-oxo bishaem from oxyhaemoglobin, but resulted in the formation of a haemoglobin haemichrome. These results show that one or both of RgpA and RgpB gingipains, in addition to the lysine-specific gingipain, is necessary for the production of mu-oxo bishaem from haemoglobin by whole cells of P. gingivalis. PMID:14741050

  7. Lysine Fermentation: History and Genome Breeding.

    PubMed

    Ikeda, Masato

    2016-11-11

    Lysine fermentation by Corynebacterium glutamicum was developed in 1958 by Kyowa Hakko Kogyo Co. Ltd. (current Kyowa Hakko Bio Co. Ltd.) and is the second oldest amino acid fermentation process after glutamate fermentation. The fundamental mechanism of lysine production, discovered in the early stages of the process's history, gave birth to the concept known as "metabolic regulatory fermentation," which is now widely applied to metabolite production. After the development of rational metabolic engineering, research on lysine production first highlighted the need for engineering of the central metabolism from the viewpoints of precursor supply and NADPH regeneration. Furthermore, the existence of active export systems for amino acids was first demonstrated for lysine in C. glutamicum, and this discovery has resulted in the current recognition of such exporters as an important consideration in metabolite production. Lysine fermentation is also notable as the first process to which genomics was successfully applied to improve amino acid production. The first global "genome breeding" strategy was developed using a lysine producer as a model; this has since led to new lysine producers that are more efficient than classical industrial producers. These advances in strain development technology, combined with recent systems-level approaches, have almost achieved the optimization of entire cellular systems as cell factories for lysine production. In parallel, the continuous improvement of the process has resulted not only in fermentation processes with reduced load on downstream processing but also in commercialization of various product forms according to their intended uses. Nowadays lysine fermentation underpins a giant lysine demand of more than 2 million metric tons per year.

  8. Lysine catabolism in Rhizoctonia leguminicola and related fungi.

    PubMed Central

    Guengerich, F P; Broquist, H P

    1976-01-01

    The catabolism of lysine was studied in several yeasts and fungi. Results with cell-free extracts of Rhizoctonia leguminicola support a proposed pathway involving (D- and L-) EPSILON-N-acetyllysine, alpha-keto-epsilon-acetamidohexanoic acid, delta-acetamidovaleric acid, and delta-aminovaleric acid in the conversion of L-lysine to shortchain organic acids. Label from radioactive L-lysine was found to accumulate in D- and L-epsilon-N-acetyllysine, delta-acetamidovaleric acid, delta-aminovaleric acid, and glutaric acid in cultures of R. leguminicola, Neurospora crassa, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, and Hansenula saturnus, suggesting that the proposed omega-acetyl pathway of lysine catabolism is generalized among yeasts and fungi. In N. crassa, as is the case in R. leguminicola, the major precursor of L-pipecolic acid was the L-isomer of lysine; 15N experiments were consistent with delta1-piperideine-2-carboxylic acid as an intermediate in the transformation. PMID:131119

  9. Lysine catabolism in Rhizoctonia leguminicola and related fungi.

    PubMed

    Guengerich, F P; Broquist, H P

    1976-04-01

    The catabolism of lysine was studied in several yeasts and fungi. Results with cell-free extracts of Rhizoctonia leguminicola support a proposed pathway involving (D- and L-) EPSILON-N-acetyllysine, alpha-keto-epsilon-acetamidohexanoic acid, delta-acetamidovaleric acid, and delta-aminovaleric acid in the conversion of L-lysine to shortchain organic acids. Label from radioactive L-lysine was found to accumulate in D- and L-epsilon-N-acetyllysine, delta-acetamidovaleric acid, delta-aminovaleric acid, and glutaric acid in cultures of R. leguminicola, Neurospora crassa, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, and Hansenula saturnus, suggesting that the proposed omega-acetyl pathway of lysine catabolism is generalized among yeasts and fungi. In N. crassa, as is the case in R. leguminicola, the major precursor of L-pipecolic acid was the L-isomer of lysine; 15N experiments were consistent with delta1-piperideine-2-carboxylic acid as an intermediate in the transformation.

  10. Amino acids (L-arginine and L-alanine) passivated CdS nanoparticles: Synthesis of spherical hierarchical structure and nonlinear optical properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Talwatkar, S. S.; Tamgadge, Y. S.; Sunatkari, A. L.; Gambhire, A. B.; Muley, G. G.

    2014-12-01

    CdS nanoparticles (NPs) passivated with amino acids (L-alanine and L-arginine) having spherical hierarchical morphology were synthesized by room temperature wet chemical method. Synthesized NPs were characterized by ultraviolet-visible (UV-vis) spectroscopy to study the variation of band gaps with concentration of surface modifying agents. Increase in band gap has been observed with the increase in concentration of surface modifying agents and was found more prominent for CdS NPs passivated with L-alanine. Powder X-ray diffraction (XRD) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) analysis were carried out for the study of crystal structure and morphology of CdS NPs. The average particle size of CdS NPs calculated from Debye-Scherer formula was found to less than 5 nm and agrees well with those determined from UV-vis spectra and TEM data. Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy was performed to know the functional groups of the grown NPs. Peaks in FT-IR spectra indicate the formation of CdS NPs and capping with L-alanine and L-arginine. Photoluminescence spectra of these NPs were also studied. Finally, colloidal solution of CdS-PVAc was subjected to Z-scan experiment under low power cw laser illumination to characterize them for third order nonlinear optical properties. CdS-PVAc colloidal solution shows enhanced nonlinear absorption due to RSA and weak FCA on account of two photon absorption processes triggered by thermal effect.

  11. Efficiency of lysine or threonine retention in growing rats fed diets limiting in either lysine or threonine.

    PubMed

    Gahl, M J; Finke, M D; Crenshaw, T D; Benevenga, N J

    1996-12-01

    Over a 21-d experiment, the efficiency of lysine and threonine retention was determined in 80 male Sprague-Dawley rats (65.9 +/- 0.3 g, means +/- SE) fed purified diets containing an amino acid mix limiting in either lysine or threonine. With additional increments of the first limiting amino acid, lysine concentration in total body protein (g/16 g N) increased (P < 0.01) in rats fed lysine-limiting diets but, when fed threonine-limiting diets, lysine concentration in body protein first increased and then decreased (P < 0.01). As increments of the first limiting amino acid were added, the threonine concentration in total body protein increased then decreased when both lysine- (P < 0.01) and threonine- (P < 0.06) limiting diets were fed. Lysine and threonine retention were calculated based on comparative slaughter. Sixteen rats were killed on d 0 to estimate the grams of amino acid in the body. Retention responses were analyzed using a logistic equation in which lysine or threonine intake was used to predict retention. The maximum marginal efficiency (dr/dI, retention/intake) was observed at <40% of maximum retention. For lysine retention, it was 81% when lysine was limiting and 70% when threonine was limiting. For threonine retention, it was 58% when threonine was limiting and 49% when lysine was limiting. The maximum cumulative efficiency (retention adjusted for maintenance relative to cumulative intake) for lysine retention was 62% when lysine was limiting or 58% when threonine was limiting. For threonine retention, it was 51% when threonine was limiting and 35% when lysine was limiting. Thus, amino acid concentration in body protein is not constant, and amino acids are used with higher efficiency when first limiting.

  12. Adaptation of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 to cells expressing a binding-deficient CD4 mutant (lysine 46 to aspartic acid).

    PubMed Central

    Choe, H R; Sodroski, J

    1995-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-1) was adapted to replicate efficiently in cells expressing an altered form of the CD4 viral receptor. The mutant CD4 (46 K/D) contained a single amino acid change (lysine 46 to aspartic acid) in the CDR2 loop of domain 1, which results in a 15-fold reduction in affinity for the viral gp120 glycoprotein. The ability of the adapted virus to replicate in CD4 46 K/D-expressing cells was independently enhanced by single amino acid changes in the V2 variable loop, the V3 variable loop, and the fourth conserved (C4) region of the gp120 glycoprotein. Combinations of these amino acids in the same envelope glycoprotein resulted in additive enhancement of virus replication in cells expressing the CD4 46 K/D molecule. In cells expressing the wild-type CD4 glycoproteins, the same V2 and V3 residue changes also increased the efficiency of replication of a virus exhibiting decreased receptor-binding ability due to an amino acid change (aspartic acid 368 to glutamic acid) in the gp120 glycoprotein. In neither instance did the adaptive changes restore the binding ability of the monomeric gp120 glycoprotein or the oligomeric envelope glycoprotein complex for the mutant or wild-type CD4 glycoproteins, respectively. Thus, particular conformations of the gp120 V2 and V3 variable loops and of the C4 region allow postreceptor binding events in the membrane fusion process to occur in the context of less than optimal receptor binding. These results suggest that the fusion-related functions of the V2, V3, and C4 regions of gp120 are modulated by CD4 binding. PMID:7707502

  13. Amino Acid Transport into Cultured Tobacco Cells

    PubMed Central

    Harrington, H. Michael; Henke, Randolph R.

    1981-01-01

    Lysine transport into suspension-cultured Wisconsin-38 tobacco cells was observed. Uptake was linear (up to 90 minutes) with respect to time and amount of tissue only after 4 to 6 hours preincubation in calcium-containing medium. The observed cellular accumulation of lysine was against a concentration gradient and not due to exchange diffusion. Transport was stimulated by low pH and characterized by a biphasic uptake isotherm with two Km values for lysine. System I (Km ≃ 5 × 10−6 molar; Vmax ≃ 180 nanomoles per gram fresh weight per hour) and system II (Km ≃ 10−4 molar; Vmax ≃ 1900 nanomoles per gram fresh weight per hour) were inhibited by N-ethylmaleimide and a variety of respiratory inhibitors. This inhibition was not due to increased efflux. In antagonism experiments, system I was inhibited most effectively by basic amino acids, followed by the sulfur amino acids. System I was only slightly inhibited by the neutral and aromatic amino acids and was not inhibited by the acidic amino acids aspartic and glutamic acids. Transport by system II was inhibited by all of the tested amino acids (including aspartic and glutamic acids) and analogs; however, this system was not inhibited by d-arginine. Neither system was strongly inhibited by d-lysine or the lysine analog S-2-aminoethyl-l-cysteine. Arginine was shown to be a competitive inhibitor of both systems with values for Ki similar to the respective Km values. These studies suggest the presence of at least two amino acid permeases in W-38 tobacco cells. PMID:16661678

  14. Effects of intake of a mixture of thiamin, arginine, caffeine, and citric acid on adiposity in healthy subjects with high percent body fat.

    PubMed

    Muroyama, Koutarou; Murosaki, Shinji; Yamamoto, Yoshihiro; Ishijima, Akitoshi; Toh, Yasuo

    2003-11-01

    We assessed the effects of intake of thiamin, arginine, caffeine, and citric acid (TACC) on lipid metabolism in healthy subjects. Thirty-one subjects with high percent body fat (> or = 25.0%) were randomly assigned to a 12-wk intervention with daily intake of TACC-supplemented tea (1.1, 1240, 52, and 540 mg, respectively; n=16) or control tea (n=15). The percent body fat decreased significantly during the intervention in both groups, especially in the TACC group. A percentage decrease in triceps skinfold was significantly greater in the TACC group than in the control group. The decrease in abdominal visceral fat in obese subjects was significantly greater in the TACC group than in the control group. Serum triglyceride was significantly lower during intervention than that during the non-intervention period in the TACC group. These results suggest that TACC may be effective in reducing body fat in obese subjects.

  15. Arginine-glycine-aspartic acid-polyethylene glycol-polyamidoamine dendrimer conjugate improves liver-cell aggregation and function in 3-D spheroid culture.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhanfei; Lian, Fen; Wang, Xiaoqian; Chen, Yanling; Tang, Nanhong

    The polyamidoamine (PAMAM) dendrimer, a type of macromolecule material, has been used in spheroidal cell culture and drug delivery in recent years. However, PAMAM is not involved in the study of hepatic cell-spheroid culture or its biological activity, particularly in detoxification function. Here, we constructed a PAMAM-dendrimer conjugate decorated by an integrin ligand: arginine-glycine-aspartic acid (RGD) peptide. Our studies demonstrate that RGD-polyethylene glycol (PEG)-PAMAM conjugates can promote singly floating hepatic cells to aggregate together in a sphere-like growth with a weak reactive oxygen species. Moreover, RGD-PEG-PAMAM conjugates can activate the AKT-MAPK pathway in hepatic cells to promote cell proliferation and improve basic function and ammonia metabolism. Together, our data support the hepatocyte sphere treated by RGD-PEG-PAMAM conjugates as a potential source of hepatic cells for a biological artificial liver system.

  16. Economic process to co-produce poly(ε-l-lysine) and poly(l-diaminopropionic acid) by a pH and dissolved oxygen control strategy.

    PubMed

    Xu, Zhaoxian; Feng, Xiaohai; Sun, Zhuzhen; Cao, Changhong; Li, Sha; Xu, Zheng; Xu, Zongqi; Bo, Fangfang; Xu, Hong

    2015-01-01

    This study tended to apply biorefinery of indigenous microbes to the fermentation of target-product generation through a novel control strategy. A novel strategy for co-producing two valuable homopoly(amino acid)s, poly(ε-l-lysine) (ε-PL) and poly(l-diaminopropionic acid) (PDAP), was developed by controlling pH and dissolved oxygen concentrations in Streptomyces albulus PD-1 fermentation. The production of ε-PL and PDAP got 29.4 and 9.6gL(-1), respectively, via fed-batch cultivation in a 5L bioreactor. What is more, the highest production yield (21.8%) of similar production systems was achieved by using this novel strategy. To consider the economic-feasibility, large-scale production in a 1t fermentor was also implemented, which would increase the gross profit of 54,243.5USD from one fed-batch bioprocess. This type of fermentation, which produces multiple commercial products from a unified process is attractive, because it will improve the utilization rate of raw materials, enhance production value and enrich product variety.

  17. A pH-responsive drug nanovehicle constructed by reversible attachment of cholesterol to PEGylated poly(l-lysine) via catechol-boronic acid ester formation.

    PubMed

    Yang, Bin; Lv, Yin; Zhu, Jing-Yi; Han, Yun-Tao; Jia, Hui-Zhen; Chen, Wei-Hai; Feng, Jun; Zhang, Xian-Zheng; Zhuo, Ren-Xi

    2014-08-01

    The present work reports the construction of a drug delivery nanovehicle via a pH-sensitive assembly strategy for improved cellular internalization and intracellular drug liberation. Through spontaneous formation of boronate linkage in physiological conditions, phenylboronic acid-modified cholesterol was able to attach onto catechol-pending methoxypoly(ethylene glycol)-block-poly(l-lysine). This comb-type polymer can self-organize into a micellar nanoconstruction that is able to effectively encapsulate poorly water-soluble agents. The blank micelles exhibited negligible in vitro cytotoxicity, yet doxorubicin (DOX)-loaded micelles could effectively induce cell death at a level comparable to free DOX. Owing to the acid-labile feature of the boronate linkage, a reduction in environmental pH from pH 7.4 to 5.0 could trigger the dissociation of the nanoconstruction, which in turn could accelerate the liberation of entrapped drugs. Importantly, the blockage of endosomal acidification in HeLa cells by NH4Cl treatment significantly decreased the nuclear uptake efficiency and cell-killing effect mediated by the DOX-loaded nanoassembly, suggesting that acid-triggered destruction of the nanoconstruction is of significant importance in enhanced drug efficacy. Moreover, confocal fluorescence microscopy and flow cytometry assay revealed the effective internalization of the nanoassemblies, and their cellular uptake exhibited a cholesterol dose-dependent profile, indicating the contribution of introduced cholesterol functionality to the transmembrane process of the nanoassembly.

  18. An unusual effect of application of the amino acid L-arginine on cat visual cortical cells.

    PubMed

    Rivadulla, C; Grieve, K L; Rodriguez, R; Martinez-Conde, S; Acuña, C; Cuderio, J

    1997-03-03

    Iontophoretic application of L-arginine (L-Arg) resulted in a profound decrease in visually elicited and spontaneous activity in 22 of 77 (29%) cells in area 17 of the anaesthetized/paralysed cat. Duration was long, and cells did not recover pre-application activity levels, indicating permanent decline. This effect was obtained without change in the extracellularly recorded wave-form, demonstrating that this did not result from depolarization block. In the remaining 55 cells, application of L-Arg alone, at levels capable of eliciting inhibition as described above, was without effect. In 29 cells, L-Arg application was able to reverse the effect of inhibition of nitric oxide (NO) production. Populations of cells showing the depressive effect described above and those affected by NO modulation levels were mutually exclusive.

  19. Arginine metabolism in developing soybean cotyledons

    SciTech Connect

    Micallef, B.J.; Shelp, B.J. )

    1989-09-01

    Tracerkinetic experiments were performed using L-(guanidino-{sup 14}C)arginine, L-(U-{sup 14}C)arginine, L-(ureido-{sup 14}C)citrulline, and L-(1-{sup 14}C)ornithine to investigate arginine utilization in developing cotyledons of Gycine max (L.) Merrill. Excised cotyledons were injected with carrier-free {sup 14}C compounds and incubated in sealed vials containing a CO{sub 2} trap. The free and protein amino acids were analyzed using higher performance liquid chromatography and arginine-specific enzyme-linked assays. After 4 hours, 75% and 90% of the {sup 14}C metabolized from (guanidino-{sup 14}C)arginine and (U-{sup 14}C)arginine, respectively, was in protein arginine. The net protein arginine accumulation rate, calculated from the depletion of nitrogenous solutes in the cotyledon during incubation, was 17 nanomoles per cotyledon per hour. The data indicated that arginine was also catabolized by the arginase-urease reactions at a rate of 5.5 nanomoles per cotyledon per hour. Between 2 and 4 hours {sup 14}CO{sub 2} was also evolved from carbons other than C-6 of arginine at a rate of 11.0 nanomoles per cotyledon per hour. It is suggested that this extra {sup 14}CO{sub 2} was evolved during the catabolism of ornithine-derived glutamate; {sup 14}C-ornithine was a product of the arginase reaction. A model for the estimated fluxes associated with arginine utilization in developing soybean cotyledons is presented.

  20. Effects of acetic acid and arginine on pH elevation and growth of Bacillus licheniformis in an acidified cucumber juice medium.

    PubMed

    Yang, Zhenquan; Meng, Xia; Breidt, Frederick; Dean, Lisa L; Arritt, Fletcher M

    2015-04-01

    Bacillus licheniformis has been shown to cause pH elevation in tomato products having an initial pH below 4.6 and metabiotic effects that can lead to the growth of pathogenic bacteria. Because of this, the organism poses a potential risk to acidified vegetable products; however, little is known about the growth and metabolism of this organism in these products. To clarify the mechanisms of pH change and growth of B. licheniformis in vegetable broth under acidic conditions, a cucumber juice medium representative of a noninhibitory vegetable broth was used to monitor changes in pH, cell growth, and catabolism of sugars and amino acids. For initial pH values between pH 4.1 to 6.0, pH changes resulted from both fermentation of sugar (lowering pH) and ammonia production (raising pH). An initial pH elevation occurred, with starting pH values of pH 4.1 to 4.9 under both aerobic and anaerobic conditions, and was apparently mediated by the arginine deiminase reaction of B. licheniformis. This initial pH elevation was prevented if 5 mM or greater acetic acid was present in the brine at the same pH. In laboratory media, under favorable conditions for growth, data indicated that growth of the organism was inhibited at pH 4.6 with protonated acetic acid concentrations of 10 to 20 mM, corresponding to 25 to 50 mM total acetic acid; however, growth inhibition required greater than 300 mM citric acid (10-fold excess of the amount in processed tomato products) products under similar conditions. The data indicate that growth and pH increase by B. licheniformis may be inhibited by the acetic acid present in most commercial acidified vegetable products but not by the citric acid in many tomato products.

  1. l-Arginine currents in rat cardiac ventricular myocytes

    PubMed Central

    Peluffo, R Daniel

    2007-01-01

    l-Arginine (l-Arg) is a basic amino acid that plays a central role in the biosynthesis of nitric oxide, creatine, agmantine, polyamines, proline and glutamate. Most tissues, including myocardium, must import l-Arg from the circulation to ensure adequate intracellular levels of this amino acid. This study reports novel l-Arg-activated inward currents in whole-cell voltage-clamped rat ventricular cardiomyocytes. Ion-substitution experiments identified extracellular l-Arg as the charge-carrying cationic species responsible for these currents, which, thus, represent l-Arg import into cardiac myocytes. This result was independently confirmed by an increase in myocyte nitric oxide production upon extracellular application of l-Arg. The inward movement of Arg molecules was found to be passive and independent of Na2+, K2+, Ca2+ and Mg2+. The process displayed saturation and membrane potential (Vm)-dependent kinetics, with a K0.5 for l-Arg that increased from 5 mm at hyperpolarizing Vm to 20 mm at +40 mV. l-Lysine and l-ornithine but not d-Arg produced currents with characteristics similar to that activated by l-Arg indicating that the transport process is stereospecific for cationic l-amino acids. l-Arg current was fully blocked after brief incubation with 0.2 mmN-ethylmaleimide. These features suggest that the activity of the low-affinity, high-capacity CAT-2A member of the y2+ family of transporters is responsible for l-Arg currents in acutely isolated cardiomyocytes. Regardless of the mechanism, we hypothesize that a low-affinity arginine transport process in heart, by ensuring substrate availability for sustained NO production, might play a cardio-protective role during catabolic states known to increase Arg plasma levels severalfold. PMID:17303641

  2. Detection of non-protein amino acids in the presence of protein amino acids. II.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shapshak, P.; Okaji, M.

    1972-01-01

    Studies conducted with the JEOL 5AH amino acid analyzer are described. This instrument makes possible the programming of the chromatographic process. Data are presented showing the separations of seventeen non-protein amino acids in the presence of eighteen protein amino acids. It is pointed out that distinct separations could be obtained in the case of a number of chemically similar compounds, such as ornithine and lysine, N-amidino alanine and arginine, and iminodiacetic acid and S-carboxymethyl cysteine and aspartic acid.

  3. Lmo0036, an ornithine and putrescine carbamoyltransferase in Listeria monocytogenes, participates in arginine deiminase and agmatine deiminase pathways and mediates acid tolerance.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jianshun; Cheng, Changyong; Xia, Ye; Zhao, Hanxin; Fang, Chun; Shan, Ying; Wu, Beibei; Fang, Weihuan

    2011-11-01

    Listeria monocytogenes is a foodborne pathogen causing listeriosis. Acid is one of the stresses that foodborne pathogens encounter most frequently. The ability to survive and proliferate in acidic environments is a prerequisite for infection. However, there is limited knowledge about the molecular basis of adaptation of L. monocytogenes to acid. Arginine deiminase (ADI) and agmatine deiminase (AgDI) systems are implicated in bacterial tolerance to acidic environments. Homologues of ADI and AgDI systems have been found in L. monocytogenes lineages I and II strains. Sequence analysis indicated that lmo0036 encodes a putative carbamoyltransferase containing conserved motifs and residues important for substrate binding. Lmo0036 acted as an ornithine carbamoyltransferase and putrescine carbamoyltransferase, representing the first example, to our knowledge, that catalyses reversible ornithine and putrescine carbamoyltransfer reactions. Catabolic ornithine and putrescine carbamoyltransfer reactions constitute the second step of ADI and AgDI pathways. However, the equilibrium of in vitro carbamoyltransfer reactions was overwhelmingly towards the anabolic direction, suggesting that catabolic carbamoyltransferase was probably the limiting step of the pathways. lmo0036 was induced at the transcriptional level when L. monocytogenes was subjected to low-pH stress. Its expression product in Escherichia coli exhibited higher catabolic carbamoyltransfer activities under acidic conditions. Consistently, absence of this enzyme impaired the growth of Listeria under mild acidic conditions (pH 4.8) and reduced its survival in synthetic human gastric fluid (pH 2.5), and corresponded to a loss in ammonia production, indicating that Lmo0036 was responsible for acid tolerance at both sublethal and lethal pH levels. Furthermore, Lmo0036 played a possible role in Listeria virulence.

  4. Enzymatic Modification of Soluble Cyanophycin Using the Type II Peptidyl Arginine Deiminase from Oryctolagus cuniculus.

    PubMed

    Wiefel, Lars; Steinbüchel, Alexander

    2016-07-01

    An increased structural variety expands the number of putative applications for cyanophycin (multi-l-arginyl-poly-[l-aspartic acid], CGP). Therefore, structural modifications of CGP are of major interest; these are commonly obtained by modification and optimization of the bacterial producing strain or by chemical modification. In this study, an enzymatic modification of arginine side chains from lysine-rich CGP is demonstrated using the peptidyl arginine deiminase from Oryctolagus cuniculus, purified from Escherichia coli after heterologous expression. About 10% of the arginine side chains are converted to citrulline which corresponds to 4% of the polymer's total side chains. An inhibition of the reaction in the presence of small amounts of l-citrulline is observed, thereby explaining the low conversion rate. CGP dipeptides can be modified with about 7.5 mol% of the Asp-Arg dipeptides being converted to Asp-Cit. These results show that the enzymatic modification of CGP is feasible, opening up a whole new area of possible CGP modifications for further research.

  5. Economical production of poly(ε-l-lysine) and poly(l-diaminopropionic acid) using cane molasses and hydrolysate of streptomyces cells by Streptomyces albulus PD-1.

    PubMed

    Xia, Jun; Xu, Zhaoxian; Xu, Hong; Liang, Jinfeng; Li, Sha; Feng, Xiaohai

    2014-07-01

    Poly(ε-L-lysine) (ε-PL) and poly(L-diaminopropionic acid) (PDAP) co-production by Streptomyces albulus PD-1 from cane molasses and hydrolysate of strepyomyces cells (HSC) was investigated for the first time in this study. The optimal initial total sugar concentration of the cane molasses pretreated with sulfuric acid was determined to be 20 g L(-1), and HSC could substitute for yeast extract for ε-PL and PDAP co-production. When fed-batch fermentation was performed in 1t fermentor with pretreated cane molasses and HSC, 20.6 ± 0.5 g L(-1) of ε-PL and 5.2 ± 0.6 g L(-1) of PDAP were obtained. The amount of strepyomyces cells obtained in one fed-batch fermentation is sufficient to prepare the HSC to satisfy the demand of subsequent fermentations, thus the self-cycling of organic nitrogen source becomes available. These results suggest that the low-cost cane molasses and HSC can be used for the economical production of ε-PL and PDAP by S. albulus PD-1.

  6. Amino Acid Changes at Arginine 204 of Troponin I Result in Increased Calcium Sensitivity of Force Development

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Susan; Siu, Rylie; Dewey, Shannamar; Cui, Ziyou; Gomes, Aldrin V.

    2016-01-01

    Mutations in human cardiac troponin I (cTnI) have been associated with restrictive, dilated, and hypertrophic cardiomyopathies. The most commonly occurring residue on cTnI associated with familial hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (FHC) is arginine (R), which is also the most common residue at which multiple mutations occur. Two FHC mutations are known to occur at cTnI arginine 204, R204C and R204H, and both are associated with poor clinical prognosis. The R204H mutation has also been associated with restrictive cardiomyopathy (RCM). To characterize the effects of different mutations at the same residue (R204) on the physiological function of cTnI, six mutations at R204 (C, G, H, P, Q, W) were investigated in skinned fiber studies. Skinned fiber studies showed that all tested mutations at R204 caused significant increases in Ca2+ sensitivity of force development (ΔpCa50 = 0.22–0.35) when compared to wild-type (WT) cTnI. Investigation of the interactions between the cTnI mutants and WT cardiac troponin C (cTnC) or WT cardiac troponin T (cTnT) showed that all the mutations investigated, except R204G, affected either or both cTnI:cTnT and cTnI:cTnC interactions. The R204H mutation affected both cTnI:cTnT and cTnI:cTnC interactions while the R204C mutation affected only the cTnI:cTnC interaction. These results suggest that different mutations at the same site on cTnI could have varying effects on thin filament interactions. A mutation in fast skeletal TnI (R174Q, homologous to cTnI R204Q) also significantly increased Ca2+ sensitivity of force development (ΔpCa50 = 0.16). Our studies indicate that known cTnI mutations associated with poor prognosis (R204C and R204H) exhibit large increases in Ca2+ sensitivity of force development. Therefore, other R204 mutations that cause similar increases in Ca2+ sensitivity are also likely to have poor prognoses. PMID:27895589

  7. Arginine metabolism: nitric oxide and beyond.

    PubMed Central

    Wu, G; Morris, S M

    1998-01-01

    Arginine is one of the most versatile amino acids in animal cells, serving as a precursor for the synthesis not only of proteins but also of nitric oxide, urea, polyamines, proline, glutamate, creatine and agmatine. Of the enzymes that catalyse rate-controlling steps in arginine synthesis and catabolism, argininosuccinate synthase, the two arginase isoenzymes, the three nitric oxide synthase isoenzymes and arginine decarboxylase have been recognized in recent years as key factors in regulating newly identified aspects of arginine metabolism. In particular, changes in the activities of argininosuccinate synthase, the arginases, the inducible isoenzyme of nitric oxide synthase and also cationic amino acid transporters play major roles in determining the metabolic fates of arginine in health and disease, and recent studies have identified complex patterns of interaction among these enzymes. There is growing interest in the potential roles of the arginase isoenzymes as regulators of the synthesis of nitric oxide, polyamines, proline and glutamate. Physiological roles and relationships between the pathways of arginine synthesis and catabolism in vivo are complex and difficult to analyse, owing to compartmentalized expression of various enzymes at both organ (e.g. liver, small intestine and kidney) and subcellular (cytosol and mitochondria) levels, as well as to changes in expression during development and in response to diet, hormones and cytokines. The ongoing development of new cell lines and animal models using cDNA clones and genes for key arginine metabolic enzymes will provide new approaches more clearly elucidating the physiological roles of these enzymes. PMID:9806879

  8. Acid resistance contributes to the high-pressure carbon dioxide resistance of Escherichia coli K-12.

    PubMed

    Furukawa, Soichi; Shimazaki, Junji; Kawaharada, Kazumichi; Matsuda, Tsukasa; Aoyagi, Hiroki; Wakabayashi, Hidekazu; Ogihara, Hirokazu; Yamasaki, Makari; Morinaga, Yasushi

    2015-01-01

    Effect of deletion of acid resistant genes of E. coli on the high-pressure carbon dioxide (HPC) resistance was investigated. Genes coding amino acid decarboxylases, such as lysine, arginine, and glutamate decarboxylase, were found to contribute to HPC resistance. Protonophore-treated cells showed hypersensitivity to HPC, confirming that HPC induced cytoplasm acidification and exerted severe damage on cells by intrusion of gaseous carbon dioxide into cytoplasm.

  9. Staphylococcal nuclease active-site amino acids: pH dependence of tyrosines and arginines by sup 13 C NMR and correlation with kinetic studies

    SciTech Connect

    Grissom, C.G.; Markley, J.L. )

    1989-03-07

    The pH and temperature dependence of the kinetic parameters of staphylococcal nuclease have been examined with three p-nitrophenyl phosphate containing DNA analogues that vary as to 3'-substituent. With wild-type (Foggi variant) nuclease (nuclease wt) and the substrates thymidine 3'-phosphate 5'-(p-nitrophenyl phosphate) (PNPdTp), thymidine 3'-methylphosphonate 5'-(p-nitrophenyl phosphate) (PNPdTp Me), and thymidine 5'-(p-nitrophenyl phosphate) (PNPdT), k{sub cat} remains nearly constant at 13 min{sup {minus}1}. However, k{sub cat}/k{sub m} with nuclease wt varies considerably. The data suggests that the inflection k{sub cat}/K{sub m} with pK{sub a} at 9.67 arises from ionization of tyrosine-85, which hydrogen bonds to the divalent 3'-phosphomonester of substrates with this substituent. The enthalpy of ionization of both deprotonation steps in the k{sub cat}/K{sub m} versus pH profile is 5 kcal/mol. {sup 13}C NMR has been used to determine the pK{sub a} values of the arginine and tyrosine residues. The results do not rule out arginine as a candidate for the acidic catalyst that protonates the 5'-ribose alkoxide prior to product release. The phenolic hydroxyl carbon of tyrosine-85 has been assigned by comparing the {sup 13}C NMR spectrum of nuclease wt and nuclease Y85F. This correlation between pK{sub a} values along with the absence of other candidates indicates that the ionization of tyrosine-85 is the pK{sub a} seen in the k{sub cat}/K{sub m} vs pH profile for substrates with a divalent 3'-phosphomonester. This conclusion is consistent with the proposed role of tyrosine-85 as a hydrogen-bond donor to the 3'-phosphomonoester of substrates poised for exonucleolytic hydrolysis.

  10. Synthesis and Splice-Redirecting Activity of Branched, Arginine-Rich Peptide Dendrimer Conjugates of Peptide Nucleic Acid Oligonucleotides

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Arginine-rich cell-penetrating peptides have found excellent utility in cell and in vivo models for enhancement of delivery of attached charge-neutral PNA or PMO oligonucleotides. We report the synthesis of dendrimeric peptides containing 2- or 4-branched arms each having one or more R-Ahx-R motifs and their disulfide conjugation to a PNA705 splice-redirecting oligonucleotide. Conjugates were assayed in a HeLa pLuc705 cell assay for luciferase up-regulation and splicing redirection. Whereas 8-Arg branched peptide−PNA conjugates showed poor activity compared to a linear (R-Ahx-R)4−PNA conjugate, 2-branched and some 4-branched 12 and 16 Arg peptide−PNA conjugates showed activity similar to that of the corresponding linear peptide−PNA conjugates. Many of the 12- and 16-Arg conjugates retained significant activity in the presence of serum. Evidence showed that biological activity in HeLa pLuc705 cells of the PNA conjugates of branched and linear (R-Ahx-R) peptides is associated with an energy-dependent uptake pathway, predominantly clathrin-dependent, but also with some caveolae dependence. PMID:20879728

  11. [Nutrient composition of some newly bred high-protein and/or high-lysine cereal strains and digestibility by growing pigs. 2. Protein quality and digestibility of the amino acids].

    PubMed

    Bock, H D; Wünsche, J; Meinl, M; Hennig, U; Völker, T

    1982-05-01

    After a first report on the nutrient composition and the digestibility of some newly bred varieties of cereals, information on the apparent digestibility of the amino acids in growing female pigs ascertained with the same test material is given. These data serve the evaluation of the quality of such cultivation products and the completion of the data in of feedstuffs tables and tables of the amino acid content. The newly bred barleystrains meet the requirement of digestible protein of pigs, wheat exceeds it whereas the maize samples fall short of it. The content of digestible lysine in the newly bred barleystrain approximate the requirement of growing pigs. There is ample digestible methionine + cystine in all samples. This again proves that newly cultivated barley and wheat rich in protein and lysine if accordingly supplemented with the limiting amino acid lysine can be used as sole feed for fattening pigs. Moreover, it becomes again obvious that the apparent digestibility of the amino acids can, for practical purposes, be sufficiently exactly evaluated with the help of the apparent digestibility of the crude protein of the respective feedstuff.

  12. Factors affecting lysine degradation by ruminal fusobacteria.

    PubMed

    Russell, James B

    2006-04-01

    Fusobacterium necrophorum can readily be enriched from the rumen with lysine, and its deamination rate is very rapid. The addition of F. necrophorum JB2 to mixed ruminal bacteria significantly increased lysine degradation, but only if the ratio of ruminal fluid to basal medium was less than 25%. If more ruminal fluid (pH 6.1) was added, ammonia production decreased by as much as 80%. Clarified, autoclaved ruminal fluid was also inhibitory. When F. necrophorum JB2 was grown in a lysine-limited continuous culture (0.1 h(-1) dilution rate) and pH was decreased using HCl, optical density decreased linearly, and the culture washed out at pH 5.6. Batch cultures of F. necrophorum JB2 deaminated as much lysine at pH 6.1 as at pH 6.6, but only if fermentation acids were not present. Sodium acetate (100 mM) had little effect at pH 6.6, but the same concentration inhibited ammonia production by 80% at pH 6.1. The idea that fermentation acids could prevent the enrichment of fusobacteria in vivo was supported by the observation that dietary lysine supplementation did not enhance the lysine deamination rate of the mixed ruminal bacteria.

  13. Influence of betaine and arginine supplementation of reduced protein diets on fatty acid composition and gene expression in the muscle and subcutaneous adipose tissue of cross-bred pigs.

    PubMed

    Madeira, Marta S; Rolo, Eva S; Alfaia, Cristina M; Pires, Virgínia R; Luxton, Richard; Doran, Olena; Bessa, Rui J B; Prates, José A M

    2016-03-28

    The isolated or combined effects of betaine and arginine supplementation of reduced protein diets (RPD) on fat content, fatty acid composition and mRNA levels of genes controlling lipid metabolism in pig m. longissimus lumborum and subcutaneous adipose tissue (SAT) were assessed. The experiment was performed on forty intact male pigs (Duroc×Large White×Landrace cross-breed) with initial and final live weights of 60 and 93 kg, respectively. Pigs were randomly assigned to one of the following five diets (n 8): 16·0 % of crude protein (control), 13·0 % of crude protein (RPD), RPD supplemented with 0·33 % of betaine, RPD supplemented with 1·5 % of arginine and RPD supplemented with 0·33 % of betaine and 1·5 % of arginine. Data confirmed that RPD increase intramuscular fat (IMF) content and total fat content in SAT. The increased total fat content in SAT was accompanied by higher GLUT type 4, lipoprotein lipase and stearoyl-CoA desaturase mRNA expression levels. In addition, the supplementation of RPD with betaine and/or arginine did not affect either IMF or total fat in SAT. However, dietary betaine supplementation slightly affected fatty acid composition in both muscle and SAT. This effect was associated with an increase of carnitine O-acetyltransferase mRNA levels in SAT but not in muscle, which suggests that betaine might be involved in the differential regulation of some key genes of lipid metabolism in pig muscle and SAT. Although the arginine-supplemented diet decreased the mRNA expression level of PPARG in muscle and SAT, it did not influence fat content or fatty acid composition in any of these pig tissues.

  14. Cardiolipin binds selectively but transiently to conserved lysine residues in the rotor of metazoan ATP synthases

    PubMed Central

    Duncan, Anna L.

    2016-01-01

    The anionic lipid cardiolipin is an essential component of active ATP synthases. In metazoans, their rotors contain a ring of eight c-subunits consisting of inner and outer circles of N- and C-terminal α-helices, respectively. The beginning of the C-terminal α-helix contains a strictly conserved and fully trimethylated lysine residue in the lipid head-group region of the membrane. Larger rings of known structure, from c9-c15 in eubacteria and chloroplasts, conserve either a lysine or an arginine residue in the equivalent position. In computer simulations of hydrated membranes containing trimethylated or unmethylated bovine c8-rings and bacterial c10- or c11-rings, the head-groups of cardiolipin molecules became associated selectively with these modified and unmodified lysine residues and with adjacent polar amino acids and with a second conserved lysine on the opposite side of the membrane, whereas phosphatidyl lipids were attracted little to these sites. However, the residence times of cardiolipin molecules with the ring were brief and sufficient for the rotor to turn only a fraction of a degree in the active enzyme. With the demethylated c8-ring and with c10- and c11-rings, the density of bound cardiolipin molecules at this site increased, but residence times were not changed greatly. These highly specific but brief interactions with the rotating c-ring are consistent with functional roles for cardiolipin in stabilizing and lubricating the rotor, and, by interacting with the enzyme at the inlet and exit of the transmembrane proton channel, in participation in proton translocation through the membrane domain of the enzyme. PMID:27382158

  15. Acid-base interactions and secondary structures of poly-L-lysine probed by 15N and 13C solid state NMR and Ab initio model calculations.

    PubMed

    Dos, Alexandra; Schimming, Volkmar; Tosoni, Sergio; Limbach, Hans-Heinrich

    2008-12-11

    The interactions of the 15N-labeled amino groups of dry solid poly-L-lysine (PLL) with various halogen and oxygen acids HX and the relation to the secondary structure have been studied using solid-state 15N and 13C CPMAS NMR spectroscopy (CP = cross polarization and MAS = magic angle spinning). For comparison, 15N NMR spectra of an aqueous solution of PLL were measured as a function of pH. In order to understand the effects of protonation and hydration on the 15N chemical shifts of the amino groups, DFT and chemical shielding calculations were performed on isolated methylamine-acid complexes and on periodic halide clusters of the type (CH3NH3(+)X(-))n. The combined experimental and computational results reveal low-field shifts of the amino nitrogens upon interaction with the oxygen acids HX = HF, H2SO4, CH3COOH, (CH3)2POOH, H3PO4, HNO3, and internal carbamic acid formed by reaction of the amino groups with gaseous CO2. Evidence is obtained that only hydrogen-bonded species of the type (Lys-NH2***H-X)n are formed in the absence of water. 15N chemical shifts are maximum when H is located in the hydrogen bond center and then decrease again upon full protonation, as found for aqueous solution at low pH. By contrast, halogen acids interact in a different way. They form internal salts of the type (Lys-NH3(+)X(-))n via the interaction of many acid-base pairs. This salt formation is possible only in the beta-sheet conformation. By contrast, the formation of hydrogen-bonded complexes can occur both in beta-sheet domains as well as in alpha-helical domains. The 15N chemical shifts of the protonated ammonium groups increase when the size of the interacting halogen anions is increased from chloride to iodide and when the number of the interacting anions is increased. Thus, the observed high-field 15N shift of ammonium groups upon hydration is the consequence of replacing interacting halogen atoms by oxygen atoms.

  16. Histone Arginine Methylation

    PubMed Central

    Lorenzo, Alessandra Di; Bedford, Mark T.

    2012-01-01

    Arginine methylation is a common posttranslational modification (PTM). This type of PTM occurs on both nuclear and cytoplasmic proteins, and is particularly abundant on shuttling proteins. In this review, we will focus on one aspect of this PTM: the diverse roles that arginine methylation of the core histone tails play in regulating chromatin function. A family of nine protein arginine methyltransferases (PRMTs) catalyze methylation reactions, and a subset target histones. Importantly, arginine methylation of histone tails can promote or prevent the docking of key transcriptional effector molecules, thus playing a central role in the orchestration of the histone code. PMID:21074527

  17. Accumulation, selection and covariation of amino acids in sieve tube sap of tansy (Tanacetum vulgare) and castor bean (Ricinus communis): evidence for the function of a basic amino acid transporter and the absence of a γ-amino butyric acid transporter.

    PubMed

    Bauer, Susanne N; Nowak, Heike; Keller, Frank; Kallarackal, Jose; Hajirezaei, Mohamad-Reza; Komor, Ewald

    2014-09-01

    Sieve tube sap was obtained from Tanacetum by aphid stylectomy and from Ricinus after apical bud decapitation. The amino acids in sieve tube sap were analyzed and compared with those from leaves. Arginine and lysine accumulated in the sieve tube sap of Tanacetum more than 10-fold compared to the leaf extracts and they were, together with asparagine and serine, preferably selected into the sieve tube sap, whereas glycine, methionine/tryptophan and γ-amino butyric acid were partially or completely excluded. The two basic amino acids also showed a close covariation in sieve tube sap. The acidic amino acids also grouped together, but antagonistic to the other amino acids. The accumulation ratios between sieve tube sap and leaf extracts were smaller in Ricinus than in Tanacetum. Arginine, histidine, lysine and glutamine were enriched and preferentially loaded into the phloem, together with isoleucine and valine. In contrast, glycine and methionine/tryptophan were partially and γ-amino butyric acid almost completely excluded from sieve tube sap. The covariation analysis grouped arginine together with several neutral amino acids. The acidic amino acids were loaded under competition with neutral amino acids. It is concluded from comparison with the substrate specificities of already characterized plant amino acid transporters, that an AtCAT1-like transporter functions in phloem loading of basic amino acids, whereas a transporter like AtGAT1 is absent in phloem. Although Tanacetum and Ricinus have different minor vein architecture, their phloem loading specificities for amino acids are relatively similar.

  18. Biochemical Constraints in a Protobiotic Earth Devoid of Basic Amino Acids: The "BAA(-) World"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McDonald, Gene D.; Storrie-Lombardi, Michael C.

    2010-12-01

    It has been hypothesized in this journal and elsewhere, based on surveys of published data from prebiotic synthesis experiments and carbonaceous meteorite analyses, that basic amino acids such as lysine and arginine were not abundant on prebiotic Earth. If the basic amino acids were incorporated only rarely into the first peptides formed in that environment, it is important to understand what protobiotic chemistry is possible in their absence. As an initial test of the hypothesis that basic amino acid negative [BAA(-)] proteins could have performed at least a subset of protobiotic chemistry, the current work reports on a survey of 13 archaeal and 13 bacterial genomes that has identified 61 modern gene sequences coding for known or putative proteins not containing arginine or lysine. Eleven of the sequences found code for proteins whose functions are well known and important in the biochemistry of modern microbial life: lysine biosynthesis protein LysW, arginine cluster proteins, copper ion binding proteins, bacterial flagellar proteins, and PE or PPE family proteins. These data indicate that the lack of basic amino acids does not prevent peptides or proteins from serving useful structural and biochemical functions. However, as would be predicted from fundamental physicochemical principles, we see no fossil evidence of prebiotic BAA(-) peptide sequences capable of interacting directly with nucleic acids.

  19. Biochemical constraints in a protobiotic earth devoid of basic amino acids: the "BAA(-) world".

    PubMed

    McDonald, Gene D; Storrie-Lombardi, Michael C

    2010-12-01

    It has been hypothesized in this journal and elsewhere, based on surveys of published data from prebiotic synthesis experiments and carbonaceous meteorite analyses, that basic amino acids such as lysine and arginine were not abundant on prebiotic Earth. If the basic amino acids were incorporated only rarely into the first peptides formed in that environment, it is important to understand what protobiotic chemistry is possible in their absence. As an initial test of the hypothesis that basic amino acid negative [BAA(-)] proteins could have performed at least a subset of protobiotic chemistry, the current work reports on a survey of 13 archaeal and 13 bacterial genomes that has identified 61 modern gene sequences coding for known or putative proteins not containing arginine or lysine. Eleven of the sequences found code for proteins whose functions are well known and important in the biochemistry of modern microbial life: lysine biosynthesis protein LysW, arginine cluster proteins, copper ion binding proteins, bacterial flagellar proteins, and PE or PPE family proteins. These data indicate that the lack of basic amino acids does not prevent peptides or proteins from serving useful structural and biochemical functions. However, as would be predicted from fundamental physicochemical principles, we see no fossil evidence of prebiotic BAA(-) peptide sequences capable of interacting directly with nucleic acids.

  20. Substitution of a single amino acid residue in the aromatic/arginine selectivity filter alters the transport profiles of tonoplast aquaporin homologs.

    PubMed

    Azad, Abul Kalam; Yoshikawa, Naoki; Ishikawa, Takahiro; Sawa, Yoshihiro; Shibata, Hitoshi

    2012-01-01

    Aquaporins are integral membrane proteins that facilitate the transport of water and some small solutes across cellular membranes. X-ray crystallography of aquaporins indicates that four amino acids constitute an aromatic/arginine (ar/R) pore constriction known as the selectivity filter. On the basis of these four amino acids, tonoplast aquaporins called tonoplast intrinsic proteins (TIPs) are divided into three groups in Arabidopsis. Herein, we describe the characterization of two group I TIP1s (TgTIP1;1 and TgTIP1;2) from tulip (Tulipa gesneriana). TgTIP1;1 and TgTIP1;2 have a novel isoleucine in loop E (LE2 position) of the ar/R filter; the residue at LE2 is a valine in all group I TIPs from model plants. The homologs showed mercury-sensitive water channel activity in a fast kinetics swelling assay upon heterologous expression in Pichia pastoris. Heterologous expression of both homologs promoted the growth of P. pastoris on ammonium or urea as sole sources of nitrogen and decreased growth and survival in the presence of H(2)O(2). TgTIP1;1- and TgTIP1;2-mediated H(2)O(2) conductance was demonstrated further by a fluorescence assay. Substitutions in the ar/R selectivity filter of TgTIP1;1 showed that mutants that mimicked the ar/R constriction of group I TIPs could conduct the same substrates that were transported by wild-type TgTIP1;1. In contrast, mutants that mimicked group II TIPs showed no evidence of urea or H(2)O(2) conductance. These results suggest that the amino acid residue at LE2 position is critical for the transport selectivity of the TIP homologs and group I TIPs might have a broader spectrum of substrate selectivity than group II TIPs.

  1. L-arginine and aminoguanidine reduce colonic damage of acetic acid-induced colitis in rats: potential modulation of nuclear factor-κB/p65.

    PubMed

    Farghaly, Hanan S M; Thabit, Romany H

    2014-10-01

    The transcription factor, nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) is a key inducer of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) gene expression. The aim of the present study was to investigate the potential protective effect of l-arginine (Arg; nitric oxide precursor) and aminoguanidine (inducible nitric oxide synthase inhibitor) against acetic acid (AA)-induced colitis in rats, and the potential role of NF-κB. Colitis was induced by intrarectal inoculation of rats with 4% acetic acid for three consecutive days. The effect of Arg and aminoguanidine on nitric oxide levels was assessed by Greiss assay and protein expression of NF-κB/p65, and inducible nitric oxide synthase was also investigated by immunohistochemistry. Slides were examined using ImageJ, and results reported as the percent area positive for each marker. Intrarectal AA caused a significant increase in bodyweight loss and colon weights. Arg at 100 mg/day for 7 days before induction of colitis diminished the changes in both bodyweight loss and colon weights. Furthermore, Arg attenuated the colonic tissues macroscopic and microscopic damage induced by acetic acid. In addition, i.p. AG 100 mg/kg given during and after induction of colitis recovered the colonic ulcerative lesion induced by AA. Arg can protect against colonic inflammation; an effect that probably be attributed to its nitric oxide-donating property, resulting in modulatory effects on the expression of NF-κB/p65 in the colon tissues. The results suggested that Arg might reduce the inflammation associated with colitis as confirmed by histopathological investigations. Arg might inhibit AA-induced colitis through the NF-κB/nitric oxide pathway.

  2. Arginine deprivation using pegylated arginine deiminase has activity against primary acute myeloid leukemia cells in vivo.

    PubMed

    Miraki-Moud, Farideh; Ghazaly, Essam; Ariza-McNaughton, Linda; Hodby, Katharine A; Clear, Andrew; Anjos-Afonso, Fernando; Liapis, Konstantinos; Grantham, Marianne; Sohrabi, Fareeda; Cavenagh, Jamie; Bomalaski, John S; Gribben, John G; Szlosarek, Peter W; Bonnet, Dominique; Taussig, David C

    2015-06-25

    The strategy of enzymatic degradation of amino acids to deprive malignant cells of important nutrients is an established component of induction therapy of acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Here we show that acute myeloid leukemia (AML) cells from most patients with AML are deficient in a critical enzyme required for arginine synthesis, argininosuccinate synthetase-1 (ASS1). Thus, these ASS1-deficient AML cells are dependent on importing extracellular arginine. We therefore investigated the effect of plasma arginine deprivation using pegylated arginine deiminase (ADI-PEG 20) against primary AMLs in a xenograft model and in vitro. ADI-PEG 20 alone induced responses in 19 of 38 AMLs in vitro and 3 of 6 AMLs in vivo, leading to caspase activation in sensitive AMLs. ADI-PEG 20-resistant AMLs showed higher relative expression of ASS1 than sensitive AMLs. This suggests that the resistant AMLs survive by producing arginine through this metabolic pathway and ASS1 expression could be used as a biomarker for response. Sensitive AMLs showed more avid uptake of arginine from the extracellular environment consistent with their auxotrophy for arginine. The combination of ADI-PEG 20 and cytarabine chemotherapy was more effective than either treatment alone resulting in responses in 6 of 6 AMLs tested in vivo. Our data show that arginine deprivation is a reasonable strategy in AML that paves the way for clinical trials.

  3. Evidence in support of lysine 77 and histidine 96 as acid-base catalytic residues in saccharopine dehydrogenase from Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Vidya Prasanna; Thomas, Leonard M; Bobyk, Kostyantyn D; Andi, Babak; Cook, Paul F; West, Ann H

    2012-01-31

    Saccharopine dehydrogenase (SDH) catalyzes the final reaction in the α-aminoadipate pathway, the conversion of l-saccharopine to l-lysine (Lys) and α-ketoglutarate (α-kg) using NAD⁺ as an oxidant. The enzyme utilizes a general acid-base mechanism to conduct its reaction with a base proposed to accept a proton from the secondary amine of saccharopine in the oxidation step and a group proposed to activate water to hydrolyze the resulting imine. Crystal structures of an open apo form and a closed form of the enzyme with saccharopine and NADH bound have been determined at 2.0 and 2.2 Å resolution, respectively. In the ternary complex, a significant movement of domain I relative to domain II that closes the active site cleft between the two domains and brings H96 and K77 into the proximity of the substrate binding site is observed. The hydride transfer distance is 3.6 Å, and the side chains of H96 and K77 are properly positioned to act as acid-base catalysts. Preparation of the K77M and H96Q single-mutant and K77M/H96Q double-mutant enzymes provides data consistent with their role as the general acid-base catalysts in the SDH reaction. The side chain of K77 initially accepts a proton from the ε-amine of the substrate Lys and eventually donates it to the imino nitrogen as it is reduced to a secondary amine in the hydride transfer step, and H96 protonates the carbonyl oxygen as the carbinolamine is formed. The K77M, H976Q, and K77M/H96Q mutant enzymes give 145-, 28-, and 700-fold decreases in V/E(t) and >10³-fold increases in V₂/K(Lys)E(t) and V₂/K(α-kg)E(t) (the double mutation gives >10⁵-fold decreases in the second-order rate constants). In addition, the K77M mutant enzyme exhibits a primary deuterium kinetic isotope effect of 2.0 and an inverse solvent deuterium isotope effect of 0.77 on V₂/K(Lys). A value of 2.0 was also observed for (D)(V₂/K(Lys))(D₂O) when the primary deuterium kinetic isotope effect was repeated in D₂O, consistent with a

  4. Arginine-assisted solubilization system for drug substances: solubility experiment and simulation.

    PubMed

    Hirano, Atsushi; Kameda, Tomoshi; Arakawa, Tsutomu; Shiraki, Kentaro

    2010-10-28

    The poor aqueous solubility of drug substances hampers their broader applications. This paper describes a de novo strategy to increase the aqueous solubility of drug substances using an arginine-assisted solubilization system (AASS) with alkyl gallates as model drug substances. Solubility experiments of alkyl gallates showed that arginine greatly increases the aqueous solubility of different alkyl gallates, whose aqueous solubilities differ widely. In contrast, lysine showed marginal effects on alkyl gallates solubility. Molecular dynamic simulation indicated a greater interaction of arginine with alkyl gallates than that of lysine, which reflects favorable interaction between the guanidinium group of arginine and the aromatic ring of alkyl gallates. Such interaction apparently disrupts association of alkyl gallate molecules, leading to solubilization. These results indicate AASS as a promising approach to solubilize poorly soluble drug substances containing aromatic ring structures.

  5. Effects of zinc and sodium monensin on ruminal degradation of lysine-HCl and liquid 2-hydroxy-4-methylthiobutanoic acid.

    PubMed

    Bateman, H G; Williams, C C; Gantt, D T; Chung, Y H; Beem, A E; Stanley, C C; Goodier, G E; Hoyt, P G; Ward, J D; Bunting, L D

    2004-08-01

    Four nonlactating, mature, Holstein cows were fitted with ruminal cannula and used in a 4 x 4 Latin square-designed experiment to evaluate the impact of supplemental Zn and monensin on ruminal degradation of Lys and liquid 2-hydroxy-4-methylthiobutanoic acid (HMB). Cows were fed 4.54 kg (as fed) of alfalfa hay top-dressed with 4.54 kg (as fed) concentrate once daily. Concentrates were formulated to provide 0 or 500 mg/kg of Zn as ZnSO4 and 0 or 40 mg/kg of monensin in the total diet. Zinc supplementation provided approximately 22-fold greater dietary Zn than estimated by NRC requirements. On d 14 of each period, cows were dosed via the rumen cannula with 50 g of HMB and 100 g of Lys-HCl, and the concentrations of Lys and HMB were monitored every 0.5 h for 8 h. Supplemental Zn tended to decrease the proportion of acetate in ruminal fluid postfeeding and increased the proportion of propionate in ruminal fluid postfeeding. Supplemental Zn increased mean fluid passage rate from the rumen. Monensin decreased the proportion of acetate and increased the mean proportion of propionate in ruminal fluid, resulting in a decrease in the ratio of acetate to propionate. Monensin also increased the mean fluid passage rate from the rumen. Neither Zn nor monensin affected the apparent rate of ruminal disappearance of HMB or Lys. However, Zn and monensin interacted to alter the ruminal degradability of free Lys but not HMB. These data indicate that Zn and monensin may interact to alter ruminal degradability of free amino acids.

  6. Detection and characterization of carrier-mediated cationic amino acid transport in lysosomes of normal and cystinotic human fibroblasts. Role in therapeutic cystine removal

    SciTech Connect

    Pisoni, R.L.; Thoene, J.G.; Christensen, H.N.

    1985-04-25

    The discovery of a trans-stimulation property associated with lysine exodus from lysosomes of human fibroblasts has enabled us to characterize a system mediating the transport of cationic amino acids across the lysosomal membrane of human fibroblasts. The cationic amino acids arginine, lysine, ornithine, diaminobutyrate, histidine, 2-aminoethylcysteine, and the mixed disulfide of cysteine and cysteamine all caused trans-stimulation of the exodus of radiolabeled lysine from the lysosomal fraction of human fibroblasts at pH 6.5. In contrast, neutral and acidic amino acids did not affect the rate of lysine exodus. Trans-stimulation of lysine exodus was observed over the pH range from 5.5 to 7.6, was specific for the L-isomer of the cationic amino acid, and was intolerant to methylation of the alpha-amino group of the amino acid. The lysosomotropic amine, chloroquine, greatly retarded lysine exodus, whereas the presence of sodium ion was without effect. The specificity and lack of Na+ dependence of this lysosomal transport system is similar to that of System y+ present on the plasma membrane of human fibroblasts. An important mechanism by which cysteamine treatment of cystinosis allows cystine escape from lysosomes may be the ability of the mixed disulfide of cysteine and cysteamine formed by sulfhydryl-disulfide exchange to migrate by this newly discovered system mediating cationic amino acid transport.

  7. Effect of acidity on the equilibria of formation of mixed Co2+ complexes with heparin and arginine in aqueous solutions at 37°C

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feofanova, M. A.; Frantseva, Yu. V.; Semenov, A. N.; Baranova, N. V.; Zhuravlev, E. V.

    2014-02-01

    Results from studying interactions in the heparin-Co2+ ion-arginine system are presented. The constants of formation of mixed Co2+ complexes with heparin and arginine in aqueous solutions in a broad pH range at 37°C are determined potentiometrically. The chemical equilibria in the system are simulated and the stoichiometry of formation of the complex forms is determined.

  8. Effect of L-lysine on expression of selected genes, serum concentration of amino acids, muscle growth and performance of growing pigs.

    PubMed

    Morales, A; García, H; Arce, N; Cota, M; Zijlstra, R T; Araiza, B A; Cervantes, M

    2015-08-01

    Lysine (Lys) is the first limiting amino acid (AA) in most feed formulations for pigs and most abundant, along with leucine, in muscle proteins. An experiment was conducted with 17 pigs (17.7 ± 0.05 kg initial BW) to identify a role of dietary Lys in the control of protein synthesis in pigs. Fourteen pigs were randomly assigned to one of the two wheat-based dietary treatments: Lys-deficient, 3.0 g/kg (DEF) and Lys-adequate, 10.8 g/kg (ADE). Samples from jejunum mucosa, liver, Longissumus and Semitendinosus muscles, and blood were collected. The other three pigs were sacrificed at the beginning of the trial to measure basal carcass composition. Weight gain, gain:feed ratio, Lys intake and loin eye area were greater in ADE than in DEF pigs (p < 0.01). Muscle-related carcass characteristics were better, and myosin heavy chain IIb expression (MyHC IIb) in Semitendinosus was higher in ADE than in DEF pigs. Expression of AA transporters CAT-1 was lower (p < 0.05), serum Lys was higher and serum Val was lower in pigs fed the ADE diet. The higher muscularity, MyHC IIb expression in Semitendinosus muscle and Lys serum of pigs fed the ADE diet suggest that Lys increases growth rate not only by functioning as protein construction unit but also as potential control of the protein synthesis process.

  9. Plasma concentrations of arginine and related amino acids following traumatic brain injury: Proline as a promising biomarker of brain damage severity.

    PubMed

    Louin, G; Neveux, N; Cynober, L; Plotkine, M; Marchand-Leroux, C; Jafarian-Tehrani, M

    2007-09-01

    The aim of this study was to find a plasma biomarker, in relation with nitric oxide (NO), as a sign of brain damage severity following traumatic brain injury (TBI). We first investigated the post-traumatic evolution of the plasma concentrations of NO via the level of NO end-products metabolites (nitrite plus nitrate, NO(x)), that of l-arginine (Arg) and amino acids involved in its metabolism as well as the time course of neurological score in a rat model of lateral fluid percussion brain injury. First, the level of NO(x) was increased in plasma at 24 and 48 h post-TBI with a marked increase at 72 h. In contrast, this elevation was neither accompanied by a modification of plasma concentrations of Arg, nor of amino acids involved in NO and Arg metabolism, l-ornithine (Orn), l-glutamate (Glu), and l-glutamine (Gln). Second, TBI induced a fall of plasma l-proline (Pro) concentrations. The time course of post-TBI neurological deficit showed also a decrease of neurological score at 24, 48, and 72 h. Furthermore, there is a weak negative correlation between the neurological score and the plasma level of NO(x) (r=-0.305; P<0.05), while a marked positive correlation has been found between the neurological score and the plasma level of Pro (r=0.563; P<0.001). In conclusion, the plasma concentrations of Pro could be a promising marker of post-traumatic neurological deficit.

  10. Probing the role of lysine 16 in ras p[sup 21] protein with unnatural amino acids

    SciTech Connect

    Chung, H.H.; Benson, D.R.; Schultz, P.G. )

    1993-07-14

    Mamalian proteins encoded by the ras gene are thought to function as regulators of various signal transduction processes involved in cell growth and differentiation. The chemical basis for the regulation is cycling of the protein between the inactive guanosine diphosphate (GDP)-bound state and the active guanosine triphophate (GTP)-bound state. Loop 1 of ras contains the GXXXXGK(S/T) motif (residues 10-17), which is found in all ras-related proteins, G proteins, and other nucleotide-binding proteins. Structural and biochemical studies have suggested that Lys 16 of loop 1 is critical for substrate binding and catalysis. The [epsilon]-amino group is involved in ion pair interactions with the [Beta]-and [gamma]-phosphates of GTP and forms hydrogen bonds with the main-chain oxygens of Gly 10 and Ala 11. In order to better understand the role of the key residue in ras function, we have replaced Lys 16 with a number of unnatural amino acid analogues, including (aminoethyl)cysteine, (hydroxyethyl)cysteine, (aminoethyl)homocysteine, and ornithine. We were surprised to find that the [open quotes]unnatural[close quotes] mutant ras proteins retained high levels of GAP-stimulated GTPase activity and GTP dissociation rates comparable to that of wild-type ras. These results may indicate that, in the GAP-activated form, Lys 16 is not involved in transition-state stabilization or GTP binding. However, replacement of Lys 16 with the isosteric uncharged Lys analogue, (hydroxyethyl)cysteine, led to a complete loss of GAP-stimulated GTPase activity, demonstrating the importance of the charged ammonium side chain. 22 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  11. Amino acid and energy interrelationships in growing beef steers: II. Effects of energy intake and metabolizable lysine supply on growth.

    PubMed

    Ludden, P A; Kerley, M S

    1998-12-01

    We conducted three experiments to determine the optimal metabolizable Lys:net energy ratio for growth of beef calves. The single basal diet fed contained corn (56.1%), soybean hulls (18%), cottonseed hulls (15%), animal fat (4.25%), and corn gluten meal (5.6%). In Exp. 1, 54 steers were individually fed the basal diet at 1.5, 2.25, and 3.0 times NEm requirement; rations were top-dressed with 3.4 g of rumen-stable (RS) Met and either 0, 2, 4, 6, 8, or 12 g of RS-Lys daily. An additional 18 steers were fed the same three levels of energy and supplemented with 125 g of blood meal per steer. In Exp. 2, 68 crossbred steers were subjected to the same experimental protocol, with the exception that only the two highest levels of energy were used. Of these steers, 48 were fed individually and received the RS-Lys treatments; the remaining 20 steers received 125 g of blood meal per steer. No interaction (P > .10) was detected between level of supplemental Lys and energy intake in Exp. 1 or 2. Supplementation with RS-Lys improved (P < .01) ADG in Exp. 1, but it had no effect (P > .10) on growth in Exp. 2. The Lys requirement estimates were 44.3 and 51.3 g/d, corresponding to maximal growth rates of 1.21 and 1.64 kg/d for the 2.25 and 3.0 times maintenance treatments, respectively. Comparing the growth rates of steers fed supplemental Lys with those of steers fed blood meal in Exp. 1 and 2 revealed an ADG advantage (P < .03) with blood meal supplementation. To confirm the blood meal response, Exp. 3 used 75 crossbred steers fed the basal diet at 3.0 times NEm requirement plus either 3.4 g RS-Met, 3.4 g RS-Met and 12 g RS-Lys, or 125 g of blood meal per steer. Blood meal supplementation improved (P < .01) growth of steers over those fed supplemental Met or Met plus Lys. Although a distinct relationship between amino acid requirements and energy supply may exist, Lys and Met were not first-limiting in these experiments, or selective supplementation with undegradable protein may

  12. Protective Effects of Arginine on Saccharomyces cerevisiae Against Ethanol Stress

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Yanfei; Du, Zhaoli; Zhu, Hui; Guo, Xuena; He, Xiuping

    2016-01-01

    Yeast cells are challenged by various environmental stresses in the process of industrial fermentation. As the currently main organism for bio-ethanol production, Saccharomyces cerevisiae suffers from ethanol stress. Some amino acids have been reported to be related to yeast tolerance to stresses. Here the relationship between arginine and yeast response to ethanol stress was investigated. Marked inhibitions of ethanol on cell growth, expression of genes involved in arginine biosynthesis and intracellular accumulation of arginine were observed. Furthermore, extracellular addition of arginine can abate the ethanol damage largely. To further confirm the protective effects of arginine on yeast cells, yeast strains with different levels of arginine content were constructed by overexpression of ARG4 involved in arginine biosynthesis or CAR1 encoding arginase. Intracellular arginine was increased by 18.9% or 13.1% respectively by overexpression of ARG4 or disruption of CAR1, which enhanced yeast tolerance to ethanol stress. Moreover, a 41.1% decrease of intracellular arginine was observed in CAR1 overexpressing strain, which made yeast cells keenly sensitive to ethanol. Further investigations indicated that arginine protected yeast cells from ethanol damage by maintaining the integrity of cell wall and cytoplasma membrane, stabilizing the morphology and function of organellae due to low ROS generation. PMID:27507154

  13. Synthesis of Lysine Methyltransferase Inhibitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, Tao; Hui, Chunngai

    2015-07-01

    Lysine methyltransferase which catalyze methylation of histone and nonhistone proteins, play a crucial role in diverse biological processes and has emerged as a promising target for the development of various human diseases, including cancer, inflammation, and psychiatric disorders. However, inhibiting Lysine methyltransferases selectively has presented many challenges to medicinal chemists. During the past decade, lysine methyltransferase inhibitors covering many different structural classes have been designed and developed. In this review, we describe the development of selective, small-molecule inhibitors of lysine methyltransferases with an emphasis on their discovery and chemical synthesis. We highlight the current state of lysine methyltransferase inhibitors and discuss future directions and opportunities for lysine methyltransferase inhibitor discovery.

  14. Parenteral arginine infusion in humans: nutrient substrate or pharmacologic agent?

    PubMed

    Sigal, R K; Shou, J; Daly, J M

    1992-01-01

    When given as a dietary supplement, arginine enhances lymphocyte mitogenesis and improves nitrogen balance. The purpose of this study was to evaluate arginine's ability to mediate these same effects when given as the sole nitrogen source with minimum additional calories. Thirty patients were randomized to receive 20 g/day arginine hydrochloride or a mixed amino acid solution (Travasol) by intravenous infusion for 7 days after abdominal operations. Mean patient age, body weight, gender ratios, and preoperative degree of weight loss were similar between groups. Mean plasma arginine and ornithine levels rose to 228 +/- 50 mumol/L and 191 +/- 76 mumol/L in the arginine group during infusion. Mean nitrogen balance was -8.8 g/day and -9.2 g/day in the arginine and Travasol groups, respectively. Mean lymphocyte stimulation indices to concanavalin A and phytohemagglutinin fell on postoperative day 1 in both groups. No significant differences in patterns of lymphocyte mitogenesis changes were noted between groups. The mean total number of circulating T cells increased in the arginine group at postoperative day 7. Thus, parenteral arginine infusion in postoperative patients provided comparable nitrogen balance to a balanced amino acid solution but did not increase peripheral blood lymphocyte mitogenesis. When arginine is given parenterally as the sole nitrogen source with minimal additional calories to postoperative patients, no enhancement of mitogen-stimulated lymphocyte proliferation could be demonstrated.

  15. Branched-chain amino acids and arginine supplementation attenuates skeletal muscle proteolysis induced by moderate exercise in young individuals.

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, K; Mizuno, M; Mizuno, T; Dilling-Hansen, B; Lahoz, A; Bertelsen, V; Münster, H; Jordening, H; Hamada, K; Doi, T

    2007-06-01

    This study aimed at evaluating the effect of a single oral intake of branched-chain amino acids (BCAA) with Arg on skeletal muscle protein metabolism during moderate exercise in young individuals. Eight healthy volunteers (4 males and 4 females, means +/- SEM, 26 +/- 1 yrs, 177.8 +/- 3.7 cm, 72.6 +/- 3.9 kg) were studied in a randomized double-blind placebo-controlled cross-over trial. The subjects performed 3 bouts of 20-min cycling exercise (5-min break between each bout) at 126 +/- 13 W corresponding to 50 % of the maximal work intensity. A single oral supplement of either a BCAA drink containing 2 g of BCAA and 0.5 g of Arg or an isocaloric placebo drink was given at 10 min of the 1st exercise bout. Both arterial and venous blood samples were simultaneously taken from the radial artery and the femoral vein, respectively. Blood flow in the femoral artery was determined using the ultrasound Doppler technique. The blood sampling and blood flow measurements were performed at rest, every 10 min during each exercise bout. Net balance of BCAA and Phe across the leg muscles were measured by the arteriovenous difference method. The BCAA ingestion resulted in increases in both the plasma BCAA concentration and BCAA uptake into the working leg. The Phe release from the leg during exercise significantly increased as compared to the basal level in the placebo trial (0.97 +/- 0.28 vs. 0.23 +/- 0.22 micromol/min, p < 0.05). In the BCAA trial, the cumulative Phe release from the leg during the 3rd exercise bout was significantly lower than that in the placebo trial (5.0 +/- 7.4 vs. 35.9 +/- 13.2 micromol/25 min, p < 0.05). These results suggest that endurance exercise at moderate intensity enhances proteolysis in working muscles, and a single oral intake of 2 g of BCAA with Arg at onset of exercise effectively suppresses exercise-induced skeletal muscle proteolysis.

  16. Growth and antioxidant status of broilers fed supplemental lysine and pyridoxine under high ambient temperature

    PubMed Central

    Khakpour Irani, Farzaneh; Daneshyar, Mohsen; Najafi, Ramin

    2015-01-01

    Three levels of lysine (90, 100 and 110% of Ross requirement) and of pyridoxine (3, 6 and 9 mg kg-1) were used in a 3 × 3 factorial experiment to investigate the growth and blood antioxidant ability of broilers under high ambient temperature. None of the dietary supplements affected the weight gain during the starter and grower periods. Although no significant differences were detected between the treatments during the entire period, high lysine level fed birds had a lower weight gain. At any levels of pyridoxine, high lysine fed birds were lighter than others. Neither the lysine nor pyridoxine changed the feed intake or feed conversion ratio during the starter, grower and entire period. However there was no significant difference between the treatments for blood malondialdehyde (MDA) concentration, medium lysine fed birds had lower blood MDA than other ones. No significant effects on blood triglyceride, total protein and blood superoxide dismutase activity were indicated with addition of any lysine or pyridoxine level. Medium lysine fed birds had decreased blood glutathione peroxidase activity compared to the birds of other treatments. It was concluded that providing the proposed dietary lysine requirement of Ross strain during heat stress ensuring the best body weight gain and body antioxidant ability. Higher lysine level causes the retarded weight gain due to higher excretion of arginine from the body and consequently higher lipid peroxidation. PMID:26261713

  17. The role of arginine and arginine-metabolizing enzymes during Giardia – host cell interactions in vitro

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Arginine is a conditionally essential amino acid important in growing individuals and under non-homeostatic conditions/disease. Many pathogens interfere with arginine-utilization in host cells, especially nitric oxide (NO) production, by changing the expression of host enzymes involved in arginine metabolism. Here we used human intestinal epithelial cells (IEC) and three different isolates of the protozoan parasite Giardia intestinalis to investigate the role of arginine and arginine-metabolizing enzymes during intestinal protozoan infections. Results RNA expression analyses of major arginine-metabolizing enzymes revealed the arginine-utilizing pathways in human IECs (differentiated Caco-2 cells) grown in vitro. Most genes were constant or down-regulated (e.g. arginase 1 and 2) upon interaction with Giardia, whereas inducible NO synthase (iNOS) and ornithine decarboxylase (ODC) were up-regulated within 6 h of infection. Giardia was shown to suppress cytokine-induced iNOS expression, thus the parasite has both iNOS inducing and suppressive activities. Giardial arginine consumption suppresses NO production and the NO-degrading parasite protein flavohemoglobin is up-regulated in response to host NO. In addition, the secreted, arginine-consuming giardial enzyme arginine deiminase (GiADI) actively reduces T-cell proliferation in vitro. Interestingly, the effects on NO production and T cell proliferation could be reversed by addition of external arginine or citrulline. Conclusions Giardia affects the host’s arginine metabolism on many different levels. Many of the effects can be reversed by addition of arginine or citrulline, which could be a beneficial supplement in oral rehydration therapy. PMID:24228819

  18. Arginine, scurvy and Cartier's "tree of life"

    PubMed Central

    Durzan, Don J

    2009-01-01

    Several conifers have been considered as candidates for "Annedda", which was the source for a miraculous cure for scurvy in Jacques Cartier's critically ill crew in 1536. Vitamin C was responsible for the cure of scurvy and was obtained as an Iroquois decoction from the bark and leaves from this "tree of life", now commonly referred to as arborvitae. Based on seasonal and diurnal amino acid analyses of candidate "trees of life", high levels of arginine, proline, and guanidino compounds were also probably present in decoctions prepared in the severe winter. The semi-essential arginine, proline and all the essential amino acids, would have provided additional nutritional benefits for the rapid recovery from scurvy by vitamin C when food supply was limited. The value of arginine, especially in the recovery of the critically ill sailors, is postulated as a source of nitric oxide, and the arginine-derived guanidino compounds as controlling factors for the activities of different nitric oxide synthases. This review provides further insights into the use of the candidate "trees of life" by indigenous peoples in eastern Canada. It raises hypotheses on the nutritional and synergistic roles of arginine, its metabolites, and other biofactors complementing the role of vitamin C especially in treating Cartier's critically ill sailors. PMID:19187550

  19. Arginine, scurvy and Cartier's "tree of life".

    PubMed

    Durzan, Don J

    2009-02-02

    Several conifers have been considered as candidates for "Annedda", which was the source for a miraculous cure for scurvy in Jacques Cartier's critically ill crew in 1536. Vitamin C was responsible for the cure of scurvy and was obtained as an Iroquois decoction from the bark and leaves from this "tree of life", now commonly referred to as arborvitae. Based on seasonal and diurnal amino acid analyses of candidate "trees of life", high levels of arginine, proline, and guanidino compounds were also probably present in decoctions prepared in the severe winter. The semi-essential arginine, proline and all the essential amino acids, would have provided additional nutritional benefits for the rapid recovery from scurvy by vitamin C when food supply was limited. The value of arginine, especially in the recovery of the critically ill sailors, is postulated as a source of nitric oxide, and the arginine-derived guanidino compounds as controlling factors for the activities of different nitric oxide synthases. This review provides further insights into the use of the candidate "trees of life" by indigenous peoples in eastern Canada. It raises hypotheses on the nutritional and synergistic roles of arginine, its metabolites, and other biofactors complementing the role of vitamin C especially in treating Cartier's critically ill sailors.

  20. Prolonged incubation time in sheep with prion protein containing lysine at position 171

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Sheep scrapie susceptibility or resistance is a function of genotype with polymorphisms at codon 171 in the sheep prion gene playing a major role. Glutamine (Q) at 171 contributes to scrapie susceptibility while arginine (R) is associated with resistance. In some breeds, lysine (K) occurs at codon 1...

  1. Simple method for the simultaneous analysis of pipecolic acid and lysine by high-performance liquid chromatography and its application to rumen liquor and plasma of ruminants.

    PubMed

    Hussain-Yusuf, H; Onodera, R; Nasser, M E; Sato, H

    1999-11-26

    A high-performance liquid chromatography method for the simultaneous determination of pipecolic acid (Pip) and lysine (Lys), a precursor of Pip, in the rumen liquor and plasma of ruminant animals was established. Samples of rumen liquor and plasma were deproteinized with 50% acetonitrile and derivatized with a fluorescent agent 9-fluorenylmethyloxy carbonyl chloride (Fmoc-Cl). Chromatographic separation was achieved on a TSK gel ODS-80TM column using a reversed-phase gradient elution system. For the gradient elution, two mobile phases, A and B, were needed, both commonly consisted of: 5 mM L-proline, 2.5 mM cupric sulfate and 6.5 mM ammonium acetate. Mobile phase B additionally contains 50% (v/v) acetonitrile. The pH of both mobile phases was adjusted to 7.0. Derivatized Pip and Lys were detected on a fluorescent detector at excitation and emission wavelengths of 260 and 313 nm, respectively. The calibration curves were linear within the range 0 to 1 mM (r>0.999). The average recoveries for Pip and Lys were 95.9+/-1.8 and 93.2+/-2.5% in rumen liquor and 98.3+/-1.4 and 97.5+/-1.3% in plasma, respectively. The limits of detection for Pip and Lys were 0.6 and 0.7 microM in rumen liquor and 0.01 and 0.05 microM in plasma. The assay has acceptable precision, relative standard deviation (RSD) for reproducibility (within-day and day-to-day variation) were less than 5.2% for aqueous (5.0 microM Pip and Lys), MB9 (5.0 microM Pip and Lys), plasma (7.1 microM Pip and 85.6 microM Lys) and rumen liquor (28.4 microM Pip and 10.2 microM Lys) samples. The levels of Pip and Lys in faunated goats, determined from three animals over a period of two days sampling, were found to be 36.8+/-18.1 and 14.6+/-2.8 microM in rumen liquor, and 7.3+/-2.5 and 137.3+/-38.0 microM in plasma at 1 h after feeding. This is the first report on the normal levels of Pip in the rumen liquor and plasma of faunated goat.

  2. Pancreatic cancer cell lines deficient in argininosuccinate synthetase are sensitive to arginine deprivation by arginine deiminase

    PubMed Central

    Bowles, Tawnya L.; Kim, Randie; Galante, Joseph; Parsons, Colin M.; Virudachalam, Subbulakshmi; Kung, Hsing-Jien; Bold, Richard J.

    2009-01-01

    Eukaryotic cells can synthesize the non-essential amino acid arginine from aspartate and citrulline using the enzyme argininosuccinate synthetase (ASS). It has been observed that ASS is under-expressed in various types of cancers ASS, for which arginine become auxotrophic. Arginine deiminase (ADI) is a prokaryotic enzyme that metabolizes arginine to citrulline and has been found to inhibit melanoma and hepatoma cancer cells deficient of ASS. We tested the hypothesis that pancreatic cancers have low ASS expression and therefore arginine deprivation by ADI will inhibit cell growth. ASS expression was examined in 47 malignant and 20 non-neoplastic pancreatic tissues as well as a panel of human pancreatic cancer cell lines. Arginine deprivation was achieved by treatment with a recombinant form of ADI formulated with polyethylene glycol (PEG-ADI). Effects on caspase activation, cell growth and cell death were examined. Furthermore, the effect of PEG-ADI on the in vivo growth of pancreatic xenografts was examined. Eighty-seven percent of the tumors lacked ASS expression; 5 of 7 cell lines similarly lacked ASS expression. PEG-ADI specifically inhibited growth of those cell lines lacking ASS. PEG-ADI treatment induced caspase activation and induction of apoptosis. PEG-ADI was well tolerated in mice despite complete elimination of plasma arginine; tumor growth was inhibited by ∼50%. Reduced expression of ASS occurs in pancreatic cancer and predicts sensitivity to arginine deprivation achieved by PEG-ADI treatment. Therefore, these findings suggest that arginine deprivation by ADI could provide a beneficial strategy for the treatment of pancreatic cancer, a malignancy in which new therapy is desperately needed. PMID:18661517

  3. Pancreatic cancer cell lines deficient in argininosuccinate synthetase are sensitive to arginine deprivation by arginine deiminase.

    PubMed

    Bowles, Tawnya L; Kim, Randie; Galante, Joseph; Parsons, Colin M; Virudachalam, Subbulakshmi; Kung, Hsing-Jien; Bold, Richard J

    2008-10-15

    Eukaryotic cells can synthesize the non-essential amino acid arginine from aspartate and citrulline using the enzyme argininosuccinate synthetase (ASS). It has been observed that ASS is underexpressed in various types of cancers ASS, for which arginine become auxotrophic. Arginine deiminase (ADI) is a prokaryotic enzyme that metabolizes arginine to citrulline and has been found to inhibit melanoma and hepatoma cancer cells deficient of ASS. We tested the hypothesis that pancreatic cancers have low ASS expression and therefore arginine deprivation by ADI will inhibit cell growth. ASS expression was examined in 47 malignant and 20 non-neoplastic pancreatic tissues as well as a panel of human pancreatic cancer cell lines. Arginine deprivation was achieved by treatment with a recombinant form of ADI formulated with polyethylene glycol (PEG-ADI). Effects on caspase activation, cell growth and cell death were examined. Furthermore, the effect of PEG-ADI on the in vivo growth of pancreatic xenografts was examined. Eighty-seven percent of the tumors lacked ASS expression; 5 of 7 cell lines similarly lacked ASS expression. PEG-ADI specifically inhibited growth of those cell lines lacking ASS. PEG-ADI treatment induced caspase activation and induction of apoptosis. PEG-ADI was well tolerated in mice despite complete elimination of plasma arginine; tumor growth was inhibited by approximately 50%. Reduced expression of ASS occurs in pancreatic cancer and predicts sensitivity to arginine deprivation achieved by PEG-ADI treatment. Therefore, these findings suggest that arginine deprivation by ADI could provide a beneficial strategy for the treatment of pancreatic cancer, a malignancy in which new therapy is desperately needed.

  4. Preparation of arginine-glycine-aspartic acid-modified biopolymeric nanoparticles containing epigalloccatechin-3-gallate for targeting vascular endothelial cells to inhibit corneal neovascularization.

    PubMed

    Chang, Che-Yi; Wang, Ming-Chen; Miyagawa, Takuya; Chen, Zhi-Yu; Lin, Feng-Huei; Chen, Ko-Hua; Liu, Guei-Sheung; Tseng, Ching-Li

    2017-01-01

    Neovascularization (NV) of the cornea can disrupt visual function, causing ocular diseases, including blindness. Therefore, treatment of corneal NV has a high public health impact. Epigalloccatechin-3-gallate (EGCG), presenting antiangiogenesis effects, was chosen as an inhibitor to treat human vascular endothelial cells for corneal NV treatment. An arginine-glycine-aspartic acid (RGD) peptide-hyaluronic acid (HA)-conjugated complex coating on the gelatin/EGCG self-assembly nanoparticles (GEH-RGD NPs) was synthesized for targeting the αvβ3 integrin on human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) in this study, and a corneal NV mouse model was used to evaluate the therapeutic effect of this nanomedicine used as eyedrops. HA-RGD conjugation via COOH and amine groups was confirmed by (1)H-nuclear magnetic resonance and Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy. The average diameter of GEH-RGD NPs was 168.87±22.5 nm with positive charge (19.7±2 mV), with an EGCG-loading efficiency up to 95%. Images of GEH-RGD NPs acquired from transmission electron microscopy showed a spherical shape and shell structure of about 200 nm. A slow-release pattern was observed in the nanoformulation at about 30% after 30 hours. Surface plasmon resonance confirmed that GEH-RGD NPs specifically bound to the integrin αvβ3. In vitro cell-viability assay showed that GEH-RGD efficiently inhibited HUVEC proliferation at low EGCG concentrations (20 μg/mL) when compared with EGCG or non-RGD-modified NPs. Furthermore, GEH-RGD NPs significantly inhibited HUVEC migration down to 58%, lasting for 24 hours. In the corneal NV mouse model, fewer and thinner vessels were observed in the alkali-burned cornea after treatment with GEH-RGD NP eyedrops. Overall, this study indicates that GEH-RGD NPs were successfully developed and synthesized as an inhibitor of vascular endothelial cells with specific targeting capacity. Moreover, they can be used in eyedrops to inhibit angiogenesis in corneal NV mice.

  5. Escherichia coli O157:H7 Glutamate- and Arginine-dependent Acid Resistance Systems Protect Against Oxidative Stress During Extreme Acid Challenge

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    To investigate the protection that several known Escherichia coli O157:H7 acid resistance systems provide against oxidative stress, the addition of diamide or hydrogen peroxide were used concomitant with acid challenge at pH 2.5 to determine bacterial survival. Diamide and hydrogen peroxide both de...

  6. Escherichia coli O157:H7 Glutamate- and Arginine-dependent Acid Resistance Systems Protect Against Oxidative Stress During Extreme Acid Challenge

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Microorganisms may simultaneously encounter multiple stresses in their environment. To investigate the protection that several known Escherichia coli O157:H7 acid resistance systems might provide against both oxidative and acid stress, the addition of diamide, a membrane-permeable thiol-specific ox...

  7. In vitro degradation of lysine by ruminal fluid-based fermentations and by Fusobacterium necrophorum.

    PubMed

    Elwakeel, E A; Amachawadi, R G; Nour, A M; Nasser, M E A; Nagaraja, T G; Titgemeyer, E C

    2013-01-01

    The objective of these studies was to characterize some factors affecting lysine degradation by mixed ruminal bacteria and by ruminal Fusobacterium necrophorum. Mixed ruminal bacteria degraded lysine, and addition of pure cultures of F. necrophorum did not increase lysine degradation. Addition of acetic or propionic acid strikingly reduced NH(3) production from lysine by mixed ruminal bacteria at pH 6, but not at pH 7. Although typical ruminal environments with acidic pH and normal concentrations of volatile fatty acids might inhibit lysine degradation by F. necrophorum, ruminal fluid contained enough bacteria with a lysine-degrading capacity to ferment 50 mM lysine in vitro. Of 7 strains of ruminal F. necrophorum tested, all grew on both lactate and lysine as the primary energy source. Both subspecies of ruminal F. necrophorum (necrophorum and funduliforme) used lysine as a primary C and energy source. Lysine and glutamic acid were effectively fermented by F. necrophorum, but alanine and tryptophan were not, and histidine and methionine were fermented only to a minor extent. The end products of lactate fermentation by F. necrophorum were propionate and acetate, and those of lysine degradation were butyrate and acetate. Fermentation of glutamic acid by F. necrophorum yielded acetate and butyrate in a ratio near to 2:1. The minimum inhibitory concentration of tylosin for F. necrophorum was not dependent on whether bacteria were grown with lactate or lysine, but F. necrophorum was more susceptible to monensin when grown on lysine than on lactate. Although F. necrophorum is generally resistant to monensin, the ionophore may reduce lysine degradation by F. necrophorum in the rumen. The essential oil components limonene, at 20 or 100 μg/mL, and thymol, at 100 μg/mL, inhibited F. necrophorum growth, whereas eugenol, guaiacol, and vanillin had no effect. Our findings may lead to ways to minimize ruminal lysine degradation and thus increase its availability to the animal.

  8. Intestinal trophic effect of enteral arginine is independent of blood flow in neonatal piglets

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Arginine is an indispensable amino acid in neonates. Arginine is synthesized by gut epithelial cells and may have a protective role in preventing necrotizing enterocolitis. We hypothesized our method included that enteral arginine is a stimulus for intestinal blood flow and subsequent mucosal growth...

  9. Purification of free arginine from chickpea (Cicer arietinum) seeds.

    PubMed

    Cortés-Giraldo, Isabel; Megías, Cristina; Alaiz, Manuel; Girón-Calle, Julio; Vioque, Javier

    2016-02-01

    Chickpea is a grain legume widely consumed in the Mediterranean region and other parts of the world. Chickpea seeds are rich in proteins but they also contain a substantial amount of free amino acids, especially arginine. Hence chickpea may represent a useful source of free amino acids for nutritional or pharmaceutical purposes. Arginine is receiving great attention in recent years because it is the substrate for the synthesis of nitric oxide, an important signaling molecule involved in numerous physiological and pathological processes in mammals. In this work we describe a simple procedure for the purification of arginine from chickpea seeds, using nanofiltration technology and an ion-exchange resin, Amberlite IR-120. Arginine was finally purified by precipitation or crystallization, yielding preparations with purities of 91% and 100%, respectively. Chickpea may represent an affordable green source of arginine, and a useful alternative to production by fermentation or protein hydrolysis.

  10. Effects of arginine on hair damage via oxidative coloring process.

    PubMed

    Oshimura, Eiko; Ino, Masahiro

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to measure the protective effects of arginine in oxidative coloring or bleaching process. Contact angle measurement, tensile measurement and amino acid analysis were employed. As the first step, it was shown that oxidative coloring or bleaching process decreases hair surface hydrophobicity and tensile strength in wet condition. Next the study has been conducted with coloring agents in which part of the ammonia was replaced with arginine, to find that arginine reduced the oxidative change in contact angle and tensile strength. These results suggest that arginine prevents the undesirable attack by hydrogen peroxide on hair proteins and hair surface lipids. Furthermore, it is also suggested from amino acid analysis that a considerable amount of arginine is deposited on, or in hair fibers from coloring agents.

  11. Metabolic engineering of Corynebacterium glutamicum for L-arginine production.

    PubMed

    Park, Seok Hyun; Kim, Hyun Uk; Kim, Tae Yong; Park, Jun Seok; Kim, Suok-Su; Lee, Sang Yup

    2014-08-05

    L-arginine is an important amino acid for diverse industrial and health product applications. Here we report the development of metabolically engineered Corynebacterium glutamicum ATCC 21831 for the production of L-arginine. Random mutagenesis is first performed to increase the tolerance of C. glutamicum to L-arginine analogues, followed by systems metabolic engineering for further strain improvement, involving removal of regulatory repressors of arginine operon, optimization of NADPH level, disruption of L-glutamate exporter to increase L-arginine precursor and flux optimization of rate-limiting L-arginine biosynthetic reactions. Fed-batch fermentation of the final strain in 5 l and large-scale 1,500 l bioreactors allows production of 92.5 and 81.2 g l(-1) of L-arginine with the yields of 0.40 and 0.35 g L-arginine per gram carbon source (glucose plus sucrose), respectively. The systems metabolic engineering strategy described here will be useful for engineering Corynebacteria strains for the industrial production of L-arginine and related products.

  12. Ileal digestibility of nutrients and amino acids in low quality soybean meal sources treated with β-mannanase for growing pigs.

    PubMed

    Upadhaya, S D; Park, J W; Lee, J H; Kim, I H

    2016-07-01

    Apparent ileal digestibility (AID) of energy, dry matter (DM), nitrogen (N) and amino acids and standardized ileal digestibility (SID) of amino acids in low quality soybean meals with different CP concentration (SBM 44% CP and SBM 48% CP) with or without 400 U β-mannanase/kg supplementation were evaluated in 20 cannulated barrows ((Landrace×Yorkshire)×Duroc) with an average BW of 25.08±3.42 kg. A N-free diet was used to determine basal endogenous losses of amino acids. The supplementation of β-mannanase improved (P0.05) AID of N and energy. The type of SBM (SBM 44% CP v. SBM 48% CP) had no effect on AID of DM, N and energy. β-mannanase improved (P<0.05) AID of sum of essential amino acids, arginine, histidine, lysine, valine and glycine. The SID of lysine was higher (P<0.05) in enzyme supplemented than in non-supplemented diets. Larger AID and SID of threonine and proline (P<0.05) were observed in SBM 48% CP than in SBM 44% CP. In conclusion, the supplementation of enzyme improved AID of arginine, histidine, lysine, valine and glycine, but it did not cause marked difference in SID of these amino acids except for lysine. The low nutrient digestibility of the SBM sources used in the present experiment might have favoured the positive effect of β-mannanase supplementation.

  13. Lysine requirement of broiler chicks as affected by protein source and method of statistical evaluation.

    PubMed

    Barbour, G; Latshaw, J D; Bishop, B

    1993-09-01

    1. An experiment was designed to test if the lysine requirement, expressed as g lysine/kg CP, was the same for several protein sources. 2. Groundnut meal, groundnut meal adjusted with indispensable amino acids or sesame meal supplied the dietary CP at 180 g/kg diet. Increments of lysine (1.5 g/kg diet) were added to each of these diets. 3. The gain, food intake and food efficiency responses of broiler chicks were analysed using a quadratic equation and a two-slope method. An estimate of lysine requirements was also obtained from a survey of college students. 4. The different methods produced widely different estimates of lysine requirement. 5. The average lysine requirement was estimated at 50.1 g lysine/kg CP for groundnut meal, 61.7 for adjusted groundnut meal and 54.9 for sesame meal. 6. Reasons for the effect of statistical analysis and protein source on lysine requirement are discussed.

  14. A gene encoding lysine 6-aminotransferase, which forms the beta-lactam precursor alpha-aminoadipic acid, is located in the cluster of cephamycin biosynthetic genes in Nocardia lactamdurans.

    PubMed Central

    Coque, J J; Liras, P; Laiz, L; Martín, J F

    1991-01-01

    A gene (lat) encoding lysine 6-aminotransferase was found upstream of the pcbAB (encoding alpha-aminoadipylcysteinyl-valine synthetase) and pcbC (encoding isopenicillin N synthase) genes in the cluster of early cephamycin biosynthetic genes in Nocardia lactamdurans. The lat gene was separated by a small intergenic region of 64 bp from the 5' end of the pcbAB gene. The lat gene contained an open reading frame of 1,353 nucleotides (71.4% G + C) encoding a protein of 450 amino acids with a deduced molecular mass of 48,811 Da. Expression of DNA fragments carrying the lat gene in Streptomyces lividans led to a high lysine 6-aminotransferase activity which was absent from untransformed S. lividans. The enzyme was partially purified from S. lividans(pULBS8) and showed a molecular mass of 52,800 Da as calculated by Sephadex gel filtration and polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. DNA sequences which hybridized strongly with the lat gene of N. lactamdurans were found in four cephamycin-producing Streptomyces species but not in four other actinomycetes which are not known to produce beta-lactams, suggesting that the gene is specific for beta-lactam biosynthesis and is not involved in general lysine catabolism. The protein encoded by the lat gene showed similarity to ornithine-5-aminotransferases and N-acetylornithine-5-aminotransferases and contained a pyridoxal phosphate-binding consensus amino acid sequence around Lys-300 of the protein. The evolutionary implications of the lat gene as a true beta-lactam biosynthetic gene are discussed. Images PMID:1917857

  15. Use of amino acids as counterions improves the solubility of the BCS II model drug, indomethacin.

    PubMed

    ElShaer, Amr; Khan, Sheraz; Perumal, Dhaya; Hanson, Peter; Mohammed, Afzal R

    2011-07-01

    The number of new chemical entities (NCE) is increasing every day after the introduction of combinatorial chemistry and high throughput screening to the drug discovery cycle. One third of these new compounds have aqueous solubility less than 20µg/mL [1]. Therefore, a great deal of interest has been forwarded to the salt formation technique to overcome solubility limitations. This study aims to improve the drug solubility of a Biopharmaceutical Classification System class II (BCS II) model drug (Indomethacin; IND) using basic amino acids (L-arginine, L-lysine and L-histidine) as counterions. Three new salts were prepared using freeze drying method and characterised by FT-IR spectroscopy, proton nuclear magnetic resonance ((1)HNMR), Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC) and Thermogravimetric analysis (TGA). The effect of pH on IND solubility was also investigated using pH-solubility profile. Both arginine and lysine formed novel salts with IND, while histidine failed to dissociate the free acid and in turn no salt was formed. Arginine and lysine increased IND solubility by 10,000 and 2296 fold, respectively. An increase in dissolution rate was also observed for the novel salts. Since these new salts have improved IND solubility to that similar to BCS class I drugs, IND salts could be considered for possible waivers of bioequivalence.

  16. Reengineering of a Corynebacterium glutamicum l-Arginine and l-Citrulline Producer▿

    PubMed Central

    Ikeda, Masato; Mitsuhashi, Satoshi; Tanaka, Kenji; Hayashi, Mikiro

    2009-01-01

    Toward the creation of a robust and efficient producer of l-arginine and l-citrulline (arginine/citrulline), we have performed reengineering of a Corynebacterium glutamicum strain by using genetic information of three classical producers. Sequence analysis of their arg operons identified three point mutations (argR123, argG92up, and argG45) in one producer and one point mutation (argB26 or argB31) in each of the other two producers. Reconstitution of the former three mutations or of each argB mutation on a wild-type genome led to no production. Combined introduction of argB26 or argB31 with argR123 into a wild type gave rise to arginine/citrulline production. When argR123 was replaced by an argR-deleted mutation (ΔargR), the production was further increased. The best mutation set, ΔargR and argB26, was used to screen for the highest productivity in the backgrounds of different wild-type strains of C. glutamicum. This yielded a robust producer, RB, but the production was still one-third of that of the best classical producer. Transcriptome analysis revealed that the arg operon of the classical producer was much more highly upregulated than that of strain RB. Introduction of leuC456, a mutation derived from a classical l-lysine producer and provoking global induction of the amino acid biosynthesis genes, including the arg operon, into strain RB led to increased production but incurred retarded fermentation. On the other hand, replacement of the chromosomal argB by heterologous Escherichia coli argB, natively insensitive to arginine, caused a threefold-increased production without retardation, revealing that the limitation in strain RB was the activity of the argB product. To overcome this, in addition to argB26, the argB31 mutation was introduced into strain RB, which caused higher deregulation of the enzyme and resulted in dramatically increased production, like the strain with E. coli argB. This reconstructed strain displayed an enhanced performance, thus

  17. Supplementing essential amino acids with the nitric oxide precursor, l-arginine, enhances skeletal muscle perfusion without impacting anabolism in older men.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, W Kyle; Phillips, Bethan E; Wilkinson, Daniel J; Williams, John P; Rankin, Debbie; Lund, Jonathan N; Smith, Kenneth; Atherton, Philip J

    2016-10-06

    Postprandial limb blood flow and skeletal muscle microvascular perfusion reduce with aging. Here we tested the impact of providing bolus essential amino acids (EAA) in the presence and absence of the nitric oxide precursor, l-Arginine (ARG), upon skeletal muscle blood flow and anabolism in older men. Healthy young (YOUNG: 19.7 ± 0.5 y, N = 8) and older men (OLD, 70 ± 0.8 y, N = 8) received 15 g EAA or (older only) 15 g EAA +3 g ARG (OLD-ARG, 69.2 ± 1.2 y, N = 8). We quantified responses in muscle protein synthesis (MPS; incorporation of (13)C phenylalanine into myofibrillar proteins), leg and muscle microvascular blood flow (Doppler/contrast enhanced ultrasound (CEUS)) and insulin/EAA in response to EEA ± ARG. Plasma EAA increased similarly across groups but argininemia was evident solely in OLD-ARG (∼320 mmol, 65 min post feed); increases in plasma insulin (to ∼13 IU ml(-1)) were similar across groups. Increases in femoral flow were evident in YOUNG >2 h after feeding; these effects were blunted in OLD and OLD-ARG. Increases in microvascular blood volume (MBV) occurred only in YOUNG and these effects were isolated to the early postprandial phase (+45% at ∼45 min after feeding) coinciding with detectable arterio-venous differences in EAA reflecting net uptake by muscle. Increases in microvascular flow velocity (MFV) and tissue perfusion (MBV × MFV) occurred (∼2 h) in YOUNG and OLD-ARG, but not OLD. Postprandial protein accretion was greater in YOUNG than OLD or OLD-ARG; the latter two groups being indistinguishable. Therefore, ARG rescues aspects of muscle perfusion in OLD without impacting anabolic blunting, perhaps due to the "rescue" being beyond the period of active EAA-uptake.

  18. Arginine: Its pKa value revisited

    PubMed Central

    Fitch, Carolyn A; Platzer, Gerald; Okon, Mark; Garcia-Moreno E, Bertrand; McIntosh, Lawrence P

    2015-01-01

    Using complementary approaches of potentiometry and NMR spectroscopy, we have determined that the equilibrium acid dissociation constant (pKa value) of the arginine guanidinium group is 13.8 ± 0.1. This is substantially higher than that of ∼12 often used in structure-based electrostatics calculations and cited in biochemistry textbooks. The revised intrinsic pKa value helps explains why arginine side chains in proteins are always predominantly charged, even at pH values as great as 10. The high pKa value also reinforces the observation that arginine side chains are invariably protonated under physiological conditions of near neutral pH. This occurs even when the guanidinium moiety is buried in a hydrophobic micro-environment, such as that inside a protein or a lipid membrane, thought to be incompatible with the presence of a charged group. PMID:25808204

  19. Arginine: Its pKa value revisited.

    PubMed

    Fitch, Carolyn A; Platzer, Gerald; Okon, Mark; Garcia-Moreno, Bertrand E; McIntosh, Lawrence P

    2015-05-01

    Using complementary approaches of potentiometry and NMR spectroscopy, we have determined that the equilibrium acid dissociation constant (pKa value) of the arginine guanidinium group is 13.8 ± 0.1. This is substantially higher than that of ∼ 12 often used in structure-based electrostatics calculations and cited in biochemistry textbooks. The revised intrinsic pKa value helps explains why arginine side chains in proteins are always predominantly charged, even at pH values as great as 10. The high pKa value also reinforces the observation that arginine side chains are invariably protonated under physiological conditions of near neutral pH. This occurs even when the guanidinium moiety is buried in a hydrophobic micro-environment, such as that inside a protein or a lipid membrane, thought to be incompatible with the presence of a charged group.

  20. Removal of acidic or basic α-amino acids in water by poorly water soluble scandium complexes.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Nobuyuki; Jin, Shigeki; Ujihara, Tomomi

    2012-11-02

    To recognize α-amino acids with highly polar side chains in water, poorly water soluble scandium complexes with both Lewis acidic and basic portions were synthesized as artificial receptors. A suspension of some of these receptor molecules in an α-amino acid solution could remove acidic and basic α-amino acids from the solution. The compound most efficient at preferentially removing basic α-amino acids (arginine, histidine, and lysine) was the receptor with 7,7'-[1,3-phenylenebis(carbonylimino)]bis(2-naphthalenesulfonate) as the ligand. The neutral α-amino acids were barely removed by these receptors. Removal experiments using a mixed amino acid solution generally gave results similar to those obtained using solutions containing a single amino acid. The results demonstrated that the scandium complex receptors were useful for binding acidic and basic α-amino acids.

  1. Arginine Deprivation as a Targeted Therapy for Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Feun, L.; You, M.; Wu, C.J.; Kuo, M.T.; Wangpaichitr, M.; Spector, S.; Savaraj, N.

    2011-01-01

    Certain cancers may be auxotrophic for a particular amino acid and amino acid deprivation is one method to treat these tumors. Arginine deprivation is a novel approach to target tumors which lack argininosuccinate synthetase (ASS) expression. ASS is a key enzyme which converts citrulline to arginine. Tumors which usually do not express ASS include melanoma, hepatocellular carcinoma, some mesotheliomas and some renal cell cancers. Arginine can be degraded by several enzymes including arginine deiminase (ADI). Although ADI is a microbial enzyme from mycoplasma, it has high affinity to arginine and catalyzes arginine to citrulline and ammonia. Citrulline can be recycled back to arginine in normal cells which express ASS, whereas ASS(−) tumor cells cannot. A pegylated form of ADI (ADI-PEG20) has been formulated and has shown in vitro and in vivo activity against melanoma and hepatocellular carcinoma. ADI-PEG20 induces apoptosis in melanoma cell lines. However, arginine deprivation can also induce ASS expression in certain melanoma cell lines which can lead to in-vitro drug resistance. Phase I and II clinical trials with ADI-PEG20 have been conducted in patients with melanoma and hepatocellular carcinoma and antitumor activity has been demonstrated in both cancers. This article reviews our laboratory and clinical experience as well as others with ADI-PEG20 as an antineoplastic agent. Future direction in utilizing this agent is also discussed. PMID:18473854

  2. Arginine metabolism in wounds

    SciTech Connect

    Albina, J.E.; Mills, C.D.; Barbul, A.; Thirkill, C.E.; Henry, W.L. Jr.; Mastrofrancesco, B.; Caldwell, M.D.

    1988-04-01

    Arginine metabolism in wounds was investigated in the rat in 1) lambda-carrageenan-wounded skeletal muscle, 2) Schilling chambers, and 3) subcutaneous polyvinyl alcohol sponges. All showed decreased arginine and elevated ornithine contents and high arginase activity. Arginase could be brought to the wound by macrophages, which were found to contain arginase activity. However, arginase was expressed by macrophages only after cell lysis and no arginase was released by viable macrophages in vitro. Thus the extracellular arginase of wounds may derive from dead macrophages within the injured tissue. Wound and peritoneal macrophages exhibited arginase deiminase activity as demonstrated by the conversion of (guanido-/sup 14/C)arginine to radiolabeled citrulline during culture, the inhibition of this reaction by formamidinium acetate, and the lack of prokaryotic contamination of the cultures. These findings and the known metabolic fates of the products of arginase and arginine deiminase in the cellular populations of the wound suggest the possibility of cooperativity among cells for the production of substrates for collagen synthesis.

  3. Argininosuccinate synthase: at the center of arginine metabolism.

    PubMed

    Haines, Ricci J; Pendleton, Laura C; Eichler, Duane C

    2011-01-01

    The levels of L-arginine, a cationic, semi-essential amino acid, are often controlled within a cell at the level of local availability through biosynthesis. The importance of this temporal and spatial control of cellular L-arginine is highlighted by the tissue specific roles of argininosuccinate synthase (argininosuccinate synthetase) (EC 6.3.4.5), as the rate-limiting step in the conversion of L-citrulline to L-arginine. Since its discovery, the function of argininosuccinate synthase has been linked almost exclusively to hepatic urea production despite the fact that alternative pathways involving argininosuccinate synthase were defined, such as its role in providing arginine for creatine and for polyamine biosynthesis. However, it was the discovery of nitric oxide that meaningfully extended our understanding of the metabolic importance of non-hepatic argininosuccinate synthase. Indeed, our knowledge of the number of tissues that manage distinct pools of arginine under the control of argininosuccinate synthase has expanded significantly.

  4. Pegylated arginine deiminase: a novel anticancer enzyme agent

    PubMed Central

    Feun, Lynn; Savaraj, Niramol

    2011-01-01

    Pegylated arginine deiminase (ADI-PEG20) is a novel anticancer enzyme that produces depletion of arginine, which is a nonessential amino acid in humans. Certain tumours, such as malignant melanoma and hepatocellular carcinoma, are auxotrophic for arginine. These tumours that are sensitive to arginine depletion do not express argininosuccinate synthetase, a key enzyme in the synthesis of arginine from citrulline. ADI-PEG20 inhibits human melanomas and hepatocellular carcinomas in vitro and in vivo. Phase I – II trials in patients with melanoma and hepatocellular carcinomas have shown the drug to have antitumour activity and tolerable side effects. Large Phase II trials and randomised, controlled Phase III trials are needed to determine its overall efficacy in the treatment of these malignancies and others. PMID:16787144

  5. Conformation of Lysine Vasopressin: A Comparison with Oxytocin

    PubMed Central

    Walter, Roderich; Glickson, J. D.; Schwartz, I. L.; Havran, R. T.; Meienhofer, Johannes; Urry, D. W.

    1972-01-01

    Starting with assignments of proton nuclear magnetic resonance previously made for oxytocin in deuterated dimethylsulfoxide at 220 MHz, we have assigned resonances for the mammalian antidiuretic hormone, lysine vasopressin. The results demonstrate that spectral assignments of neurohypophyseal hormones and their congeners can, within certain limits, be derived from each other. Comparison of the spectra of lysine vasopressin and oxytocin suggests that the gross backbone conformations of their 20-membered ring components are for the most part similar in deuterated dimethylsulfoxide, whereas the C-terminal acyclic amino-acid sequence of lysine vasopressin is more flexible than that of oxytocin. PMID:4505670

  6. Mutants of Saccharomycopsis lipolytica defective in lysine catabolism.

    PubMed Central

    Gaillardin, C; Fournier, P; Sylvestre, G; Heslot, H

    1976-01-01

    Wild-type strains of Saccharomycopsis lipolytica are able to use lysine as a carbon or a nitrogen source, but not as a unique source for both. Mutants were selected that could not use lysine either as a nitrogen or as a carbon source. Some of them, however, utilized N-6-acetyllysine or 5-aminovaleric acid. Many of the mutants appeared to be blocked in both utilizations, suggesting a unique pathway for lysine degradation (either as a carbon or as a nitrogen source). Genetic characterization of these mutants was achieved by complementation and recombination tests. PMID:1245461

  7. Altered brain arginine metabolism in schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Liu, P; Jing, Y; Collie, N D; Dean, B; Bilkey, D K; Zhang, H

    2016-01-01

    Previous research implicates altered metabolism of l-arginine, a versatile amino acid with a number of bioactive metabolites, in the pathogenesis of schizophrenia. The present study, for we believe the first time, systematically compared the metabolic profile of l-arginine in the frontal cortex (Brodmann's area 8) obtained post-mortem from schizophrenic individuals and age- and gender-matched non-psychiatric controls (n=20 per group). The enzyme assays revealed no change in total nitric oxide synthase (NOS) activity, but significantly increased arginase activity in the schizophrenia group. Western blot showed reduced endothelial NOS protein expression and increased arginase II protein level in the disease group. High-performance liquid chromatography and liquid chromatography/mass spectrometric assays confirmed significantly reduced levels of γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA), but increased agmatine concentration and glutamate/GABA ratio in the schizophrenia cases. Regression analysis indicated positive correlations between arginase activity and the age of disease onset and between l-ornithine level and the duration of illness. Moreover, cluster analyses revealed that l-arginine and its main metabolites l-citrulline, l-ornithine and agmatine formed distinct groups, which were altered in the schizophrenia group. The present study provides further evidence of altered brain arginine metabolism in schizophrenia, which enhances our understanding of the pathogenesis of schizophrenia and may lead to the future development of novel preventions and/or therapeutics for the disease. PMID:27529679

  8. Changes in amino acids and lipids during embryogenesis of European lobster, Homarus gammarus (Crustacea: Decapoda).

    PubMed

    Rosa, R; Calado, R; Andrade, A M; Narciso, L; Nunes, M L

    2005-02-01

    We studied the amino acid and lipid dynamics during embryogenesis of Homarus gammarus. Major essential amino acids (EAA) in the last stage of embryonic development were arginine, lysine and leucine; major nonessential amino acids (NEAA) were glutamic acid, aspartic acid, valine and glycine. The highest percent of utilization occurred in respect to EAA (27.8%), mainly due to a significant decrease (p<0.05) of methionine (38.3%) and threonine (36.0%). NEAA also decreased significantly (p<0.05, 11.4%), namely serine (38.1%), tyrosine (26.4%) and glutamic acid (25.7%). In contrast, the free amino acid content increased significantly (p<0.05) during embryonic development, especially the free nonessential amino acids (FNEAA). In the last stage, the most abundant FNEAA were glycine, proline, alanine and taurine, and the major free essential amino acids (FEAA) were arginine, lysine and leucine. Lipid content decreased significantly (p<0.05) during embryonic development. A substantial decrease in all neutral lipid classes was observed (>80% of utilization). Major fatty acids were 16:0, 18:0, 18:1n-9, 18:2n-6, 18:3n-3, 20:5n-3 and 22:6n-3. Unsaturated (UFA) and saturated fatty acids (SFA) were used up at similar rates (76.5% and 76.3%, respectively). Within UFA, monounsaturates (MUFA) were consumed more than polyunsaturates (PUFA) (82.9% and 67.5%, respectively).

  9. Arginine depletion by arginine deiminase does not affect whole protein metabolism or muscle fractional protein synthesis rate in mice.

    PubMed

    Marini, Juan C; Didelija, Inka Cajo

    2015-01-01

    Due to the absolute need for arginine that certain cancer cells have, arginine depletion is a therapy in clinical trials to treat several types of cancers. Arginine is an amino acids utilized not only as a precursor for other important molecules, but also for protein synthesis. Because arginine depletion can potentially exacerbate the progressive loss of body weight, and especially lean body mass, in cancer patients we determined the effect of arginine depletion by pegylated arginine deiminase (ADI-PEG 20) on whole body protein synthesis and fractional protein synthesis rate in multiple tissues of mice. ADI-PEG 20 successfully depleted circulating arginine (<1 μmol/L), and increased citrulline concentration more than tenfold. Body weight and body composition, however, were not affected by ADI-PEG 20. Despite the depletion of arginine, whole body protein synthesis and breakdown were maintained in the ADI-PEG 20 treated mice. The fractional protein synthesis rate of muscle was also not affected by arginine depletion. Most tissues (liver, kidney, spleen, heart, lungs, stomach, small and large intestine, pancreas) were able to maintain their fractional protein synthesis rate; however, the fractional protein synthesis rate of brain, thymus and testicles was reduced due to the ADI-PEG 20 treatment. Furthermore, these results were confirmed by the incorporation of ureido [14C]citrulline, which indicate the local conversion into arginine, into protein. In conclusion, the intracellular recycling pathway of citrulline is able to provide enough arginine to maintain protein synthesis rate and prevent the loss of lean body mass and body weight.

  10. Changes in the metabolome of rats after exposure to arginine and N-carbamylglutamate in combination with diquat, a compound that causes oxidative stress, assessed by 1H NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Liu, Guangmang; Xiao, Liang; Cao, Wei; Fang, Tingting; Jia, Gang; Chen, Xiaoling; Zhao, Hua; Wu, Caimei; Wang, Jing

    2016-02-01

    Numerous factors can induce oxidative stress in animal production and lead to growth retardation, disease, and even death. Arginine and N-carbamylglutamate can alleviate the effects of oxidative stress. However, the systematic changes in metabolic biochemistry linked to oxidative stress and arginine and N-carbamylglutamate treatment remain largely unknown. This study aims to examine the effects of arginine and N-carbamylglutamate on rat metabolism under oxidative stress. Thirty rats were randomly divided into three dietary groups (n = 10 each). The rats were fed a basal diet supplemented with 0 (control), 1% arginine, or 0.1% N-carbamylglutamate for 30 days. On day 28, the rats in each treatment were intraperitoneally injected with diquat at 12 mg per kg body weight or sterile solution. Urine and plasma samples were analyzed by metabolomics. Compared with the diquat group, the arginine + diquat group had significantly lower levels of acetamide, alanine, lysine, pyruvate, tyrosine, α-glucose, and β-glucose in plasma; N-carbamylglutamate + diquat had higher levels of 3-hydroxybutyrate, 3-methylhistidine, acetone, allantoin, asparagine, citrate, phenylalanine, trimethylamine-N-oxide, and tyrosine, and lower levels of low density lipoprotein, lipid, lysine, threonine, unsaturated lipid, urea, and very low density lipoprotein (P < 0.05) in plasma. Compared with the diquat group, the arginine + diquat group had significantly higher levels of citrate, creatinine, homogentisate, and α-ketoglutarate while lower levels of acetamide, citrulline, ethanol, glycine, isobutyrate, lactate, malonate, methymalonate, N-acetylglutamate, N-methylnicotinamide, propionate, and β-glucose (P < 0.05) in urine. Compared with the diquat group, the N-carbamylglutamate + diquat group had significantly higher levels of allantoin, citrate, homogentisate, phenylacetylglycine, α-ketoglutarate, and β-glucose while lower levels of acetamide, acetate, acetone, benzoate, citrulline, ethanol

  11. Rapid hydrophilic interaction chromatography determination of lysine in pharmaceutical preparations with fluorescence detection after postcolumn derivatization with o-phtaldialdehyde.

    PubMed

    Douša, Michal; Břicháč, Jiří; Gibala, Petr; Lehnert, Petr

    2011-04-05

    A rapid procedure for the determination of lysine based on hydrophilic interaction chromatography (HILIC) separation of arginine and lysine with fluorescence detection has been developed. The separation conditions and parameters of lysine postcolumn derivatization with o-phtaldialdehyde (OPA)/2-mercaptoethanol were studied. The various HILIC columns were employed using isocratic elution. Fluorescence detection was performed at excitation and emission wavelength of 345 nm and 450 nm, respectively. An advantage of the reported method is a simple sample pre-treatment and a quick and very sensitive HPLC method. The developed method was successfully applied for analysis of commercial samples of Ibalgin Fast tablets (Zentiva, Czech Republic).

  12. [The microflora of sourdough. XVIII. The protein degrading capabilities of lactic acid bacteria in sourdough].

    PubMed

    Spicher, G; Nierle, W

    1984-05-01

    Acidification of the dough by the use of sourdough or acidifiers is necessary not only for good baking quality of rye flour but it is also very important for development of the typical sensory characteristics of rye bread. We confirmed that the lactic acid bacteria of sour dough are proteolytic. Proteolytic effects are observed in the increase of the amino acid content during fermentation. A marked increase was found in the content of leucine, alanine, valine, isoleucine, glutamic acid, glutamine, arginine, lysine, methionine, phenylalanine, tyrosine and serine. Lactobacillus plantarum showed a higher proteolytic activity than L. brevis ssp. lindneri or L. fructivorans.

  13. Macula densa arginine delivery and uptake in the rat regulates glomerular capillary pressure. Effects of salt intake.

    PubMed Central

    Welch, W J; Wilcox, C S

    1997-01-01

    These studies tested the hypothesis that delivery and/or cellular uptake of L-arginine limits macula densa nitric oxide generation and actions on tubuloglomerular feedback (TGF) during salt restriction. Maximal TGF responses were assessed from reductions in proximal stop flow pressure during loop of Henle (LH) perfusion at 40 nl/min with artificial tubular fluid containing vehicles or drugs. Orthograde LH perfusion of L-arginine (10[-3] M) reduced maximal TGF significantly in rats adapted to low salt (LS: 7.9+/-0.4-6.3+/-0.4 mmHg; P < 0.05), but not high salt (HS: 5.8+/-0.3-5.9+/-0.3; NS). The effects were stereospecific and prevented by coperfusion with NG-methyl-L-arginine. Microperfusion of L-arginine (10[-3] M) into the peritubular capillaries reduced the maximum TGF response more in nephrons of LS than HS rats (deltaTGF: LS, 32+/-6 vs. HS, 13+/-4%; P < 0.05) and restored a TGF response to luminal perfusion of NG-methyl-L-arginine in LS rats. Coperfusion of nephrons with excess L-lysine or L-homoarginine, which compete with L-arginine for system y+ transport, blocked the fall in proximal stopflow pressure produced by orthograde LH perfusion of L-arginine in LS rats. Reabsorption of [3H]arginine by the perfused loop segment was similar in LS (93+/-2%) and HS (94+/-1%) rats. Coperfusion with excess L-arginine, L-lysine, or L-homoarginine, however, reduced [3H]arginine reabsorption significantly (P < 0.05) more in HS rats than in LS rats. In conclusion, blunting of maximal TGF responses in salt-restricted rats by nephron-derived NO is limited by L-arginine availability and cellular uptake via system y+. PMID:9410901

  14. Solubility Behavior of Cyanophycin Depending on Lysine Content

    PubMed Central

    Wiefel, Lars

    2014-01-01

    Study of the synthesis of cyanophycin (CGP) in recombinant organisms focused for a long time mostly on the insoluble form of CGP, due to its easy purification and its putative use as a precursor for biodegradable chemicals. Recently, another form of CGP, which, in contrast to the insoluble form, was soluble at neutral pH, became interesting due to its high lysine content, which was also assumed to be the reason for the solubility of the polymer. In this study, we demonstrate that lysine incorporated into insoluble CGP affected the solubility of the polymer in relation to its lysine content. Insoluble CGP can be separated along a temperature gradient of 90°C to 30°C, where CGP showed an increasing lysine content corresponding to a decreasing temperature needed for solubilization. CGP with less than 3 to 4 mol% lysine did not become soluble even at 90°C, while CGP with 31 mol% lysine was soluble at 30°C. In lysine fractions at higher than 31 mol%, CGP was soluble. The temperature separation will be suitable for improving the downstream processing of CGP synthesized in large-scale fermentations, including faster and more efficient purification of CGP, as well as enrichment and separation of dipeptides and CGP with specific amino acid compositions. PMID:24271185

  15. Amino Acid Uptake in Arbuscular Mycorrhizal Plants

    PubMed Central

    Whiteside, Matthew D.; Garcia, Maria O.; Treseder, Kathleen K.

    2012-01-01

    We examined the extent to which arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi root improved the acquisition of simple organic nitrogen (ON) compounds by their host plants. In a greenhouse-based study, we used quantum dots (fluorescent nanoparticles) to assess uptake of each of the 20 proteinaceous amino acids by AM-colonized versus uncolonized plants. We found that AM colonization increased uptake of phenylalanine, lysine, asparagine, arginine, histidine, methionine, tryptophan, and cysteine; and reduced uptake of aspartic acid. Arbuscular mycorrhizal colonization had the greatest effect on uptake of amino acids that are relatively rare in proteins. In addition, AM fungi facilitated uptake of neutral and positively-charged amino acids more than negatively-charged amino acids. Overall, the AM fungi used in this study appeared to improve access by plants to a number of amino acids, but not necessarily those that are common or negatively-charged. PMID:23094070

  16. The Amino Acid Arginine 210 of the Response Regulator HrpG of Xanthomonas citri subsp. citri Is Required for HrpG Function in Virulence.

    PubMed

    Ficarra, Florencia A; Garofalo, Cecilia G; Gottig, Natalia; Ottado, Jorgelina

    2015-01-01

    Xanthomonas citri subsp. citri colonizes its hosts through the trafficking of effector proteins to the plant cell by the type III protein secretion system. In X. citri subsp. citri, as in other plant pathogens, the hrp cluster encodes the type III protein secretion system and is regulated by the transcription factors HrpG and HrpX. HrpG belongs to the OmpR family's response regulator of EnvZ/OmpR two-component signal transduction system. Here, we show that the arginine 210 residue is crucial for the transcriptional activity of HrpG revealed by the absence of disease in host plants and hypersensitive response in non-host plants when a strain carrying this point mutation is used in plant infiltration assays. Also, this strain showed decreased expression levels of hrp genes in bacteria grown in culture or when they were recovered from citrus leaves. Moreover, we show for the first time that HrpG binds to both hrpX and its own promoter, and the change of the arginine 210 by a cysteine does not prevent the binding to both promoters. Nevertheless, in vitro hrpX transcription was observed only with HrpG whereas no transcription was detected with the R210C mutant. HrpG was able to interact with itself as well as with the mutant R210C suggesting that it functions as a dimer. The mutant protein R210C showed altered protease sensitivity, suggesting that Arg210 is essential for protein active conformation and thus for transcriptional activity. Our results indicate that arginine 210 in HrpG, as it may occur with this conserved residue in other members of this family of response regulators, is not required for DNA binding whereas is essential for hrp genes transcription and therefore for pathogenicity and HR induction.

  17. A novel potentiometric biosensor for determination of L-lysine in commercial pharmaceutical L-lysine tablet and capsule.

    PubMed

    Yarar, Saniye; Karakuş, Emine

    2016-01-01

    The construction of an L-lysine biosensor on ammonium-selective poly(vinylchloride) (PVC) membrane electrode is described in this study. The construction procedure occurs in two stages: (I) the preparation of ammonium-selective poly(vinylchloride) (PVC) membrane electrode and (II) the chemical immobilization of lysine oxidase on this ammonium-selective electrode by using glutaraldehyde. The ammonium ions produced after enzymatic reaction were determined potentiometrically. The sensitivity of the lysine biosensor against ammonium ions and lysine were studied. The response time, linear working range, reproducibility and life time of the biosensor were also determined. The interfering effect of other amino acids on the biosensor performance was also studied and potentiometric selectivity coefficients were calculated. Although the biosensor responded mainly against tyrosine, a lot of amino acids and ascorbic acid that can be present in some real samples did not show any important interference. Additionally, lysine assay in commercial pharmaceutical lysine tablets and capsules was also successfully carried out. The results were in good agreement with previously reported values.

  18. Regulation of immune responses by L-arginine metabolism.

    PubMed

    Bronte, Vincenzo; Zanovello, Paola

    2005-08-01

    L-Arginine is an essential amino acid for birds and young mammals, and it is a conditionally essential amino acid for adult mammals, as it is important in situations in which requirements exceed production, such as pregnancy. Recent findings indicate that increased metabolism of L-arginine by myeloid cells can result in the impairment of lymphocyte responses to antigen during immune responses and tumour growth. Two enzymes that compete for L-arginine as a substrate - arginase and nitric-oxide synthase - are crucial components of this lymphocyte-suppression pathway, and the metabolic products of these enzymes are important moderators of T-cell function. This Review article focuses on the relevance of L-arginine metabolism by myeloid cells for immunity under physiological and pathological conditions.

  19. Effects of charge-carrying amino acids on the gelatinization and retrogradation properties of potato starch.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wenting; Zhou, Hongxian; Yang, Hong; Cui, Min

    2015-01-15

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the effects of charge-carrying amino acids (lysine (Lys), arginine (Arg), aspartic acid (Asp) and glutamic acid (Glu)) on the gelatinization and retrogradation properties of potato starch. Acidic amino acids (Asp and Glu) showed a decreasing trend in swelling power and granule size of potato starch, but increased amylose leaching and gelatinization temperature. Alkaline amino acid (Arg) showed an increasing trend in swelling power and granule size of potato starch, but decreasing amylose leaching and gelatinization temperature. Lys had no effect on the swelling power of potato starch, except at a high content (0.2 mol/kg). Like other two acidic amino acids, Lys also increased gelatinization temperature. Moreover, the addition of alkaline amino acids (Arg) decreased syneresis value of potato starch but acidic amino acids (Asp and Glu) increased it. Compared to Arg, the syneresis of potato starch with Lys was similar to that of its native starch.

  20. Topological dispositions of lysine. alpha. 380 and lysine. gamma. 486 in the acetylcholine receptor from Torpedo californica

    SciTech Connect

    Dwyer, B.P. )

    1991-04-23

    The locations have been determined, with respect to the plasma membrane, of lysine {alpha}380 and lysine {gamma}486 in the {alpha} subunit and the {gamma} subunit, respectively, of the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor from Torpedo californica. Immunoadsorbents were constructed that recognize the carboxy terminus of the peptide GVKYIAE released by proteolytic digestion from positions 378-384 in the amino acid sequence of the {alpha} subunit of the acetylcholine receptor and the carboxy terminus of the peptide KYVP released by proteolytic digestion from positions 486-489 in the amino acid sequence of the {gamma} subunit. They were used to isolate these peptides from proteolytic digests of polypeptides from the acetylcholine receptor. Sealed vesicles containing the native acetylcholine receptor were labeled with pyridoxal phosphate and sodium ({sup 3}H)-borohydride. The effect of saponin on the incorporation of pyridoxamine phosphate into lysine {alpha}380 and lysine {gamma}486 from the acetylcholine receptor in these vesicles was assessed with the immunoadsorbents. The conclusions that follow from these results are that lysine {alpha}380 is on the inside surface of a vesicle and lysine {gamma}486 is on the outside surface. Because a majority (85%) of the total binding sites for {alpha}-bungarotoxin bind the toxin in the absence of saponin, the majority of the vesicles are right side out with the inside of the vesicle corresponding to the cytoplasmic surface and the outside of the vesicle corresponding to the extracytoplasmic, synaptic surface. Because lysine {alpha}380 and lysine {gamma}486 lie on opposite sides of the membrane, a membrane-spanning segment must be located between the two positions occupied by these two amino acids in the common sequence of a polypeptide of the acetylcholine receptor.

  1. Gas-phase conjugation to arginine residues in polypeptide ions via N-hydroxysuccinimide ester-based reagent ions.

    PubMed

    McGee, William M; Mentinova, Marija; McLuckey, Scott A

    2012-07-18

    Gas-phase conjugation to unprotonated arginine side-chains via N-hydroxysuccinimide (NHS) esters is demonstrated through both charge reduction and charge inversion ion/ion reactions. The unprotonated guanidino group of arginine can serve as a strong nucleophile, resulting in the facile displacement of NHS from NHS esters with concomitant covalent modification of the arginine residue. This reactivity is analogous to that observed with unprotonated primary amines such as the N-terminus or ε-amino group of lysine. In solution, however, the arginine residues tend to be protonated at pH values low enough to prevent hydrolysis of NHS esters, which would render them relatively unreactive with NHS esters. This work demonstrates novel means for gas-phase conjugation to arginine side chains in polypeptide ions.

  2. Comparative study of guanidine-based and lysine-based brush copolymers for plasmid delivery

    PubMed Central

    Carlson, Peter M.; Schellinger, Joan G.; Pahang, Joshuel A.; Johnson, Russell N.; Pun, Suzie H.

    2013-01-01

    Polyethylenimine (PEI), one of the most frequently used polycations for non-viral nucleic acid delivery, exhibits good transfection efficiency to cultured cells but generally has to be used in restricted concentration ranges due to high cytotoxicity. We recently reported a family of HPMA-co-oligolysine brush copolymers that show nucleic acid delivery efficiencies approaching that of PEI. Guanidine-containing polymers have been reported in some systems to be more effective at cellular delivery of cargo than their primary-amine analogs. The goal of this work is to investigate the effect of guanidinylation on gene transfer ability of HPMA-co-oligolysine copolymers. Several parameters were evaluated: arginine versus homoarginine monomers, oligopeptide length, and charge density within the peptide. Using reversible addition-fragmentation chain transfer (RAFT) polymerization, a series of six copolymers were synthesized containing the cationic peptides K10, R10, K5, and (GK)5. Lysine-containing copolymers were functionalized with guanidine by reaction with O-methylisourea to generate an additional five homoarginine-based copolymers. All eleven copolymers readily condensed DNA into small, < 150 nm polyplexes and remained stable in physiological salt conditions. The best performing copolymers provided more efficient gene transfection with less associated cytotoxicity than PEI. Reducing the number of charge centers (from 10 to 5) further reduced toxicity while retaining comparable transfection efficiency to PEI. PMID:23750319

  3. Biofortification of rice with lysine using endogenous histones.

    PubMed

    Wong, H W; Liu, Q; Sun, S S M

    2015-02-01

    Rice is the most consumed cereal grain in the world, but deficient in the essential amino acid lysine. Therefore, people in developing countries with limited food diversity who rely on rice as their major food source may suffer from malnutrition. Biofortification of stable crops by genetic engineering provides a fast and sustainable method to solve this problem. In this study, two endogenous rice lysine-rich histone proteins, RLRH1 and RLRH2, were over-expressed in rice seeds to achieve lysine biofortification. Their protein sequences passed an allergic sequence-based homology test. Their accumulations in rice seeds were raised to a moderate level by the use of a modified rice glutelin 1 promoter with lowered expression strength to avoid the occurrence of physiological abnormalities like unfolded protein response. The expressed proteins were further targeted to protein storage vacuoles for stable storage using a glutelin 1 signal peptide. The lysine content in the transgenic rice seeds was enhanced by up to 35 %, while other essential amino acids remained balanced, meeting the nutritional standards of the World Health Organization. No obvious unfolded protein response was detected. Different degrees of chalkiness, however, were detected in the transgenic seeds, and were positively correlated with both the levels of accumulated protein and lysine enhancement. This study offered a solution to the lysine deficiency in rice, while at the same time addressing concerns about food safety and physiological abnormalities in biofortified crops.

  4. Role of the tissue free amino acids in adaptation of medicinal leeches Hirudo medicinalis L., 1758 to extreme climatic conditions.

    PubMed

    Chernaya, L V; Kovalchuk, L A; Nokhrina, E S

    2016-01-01

    The first comparison of the spectra of free amino acids in tissues of the medicinal leeches H. medicinalis from different climatic and geographical Eurasian areas has been performed. Adaptation of H. medicinalis to extreme climatic conditions occurs via intensification of the amino acid metabolism resulting from a significant increase in the content of essential amino acids. Accumulation of arginine, histidine, and lysine (3.6-, 3.9-, and 2.0-fold increases, respectively) has proved to play a special protective role in adaptation of H. medicinalis to the low positive temperatures.

  5. Systems pathway engineering of Corynebacterium crenatum for improved L-arginine production

    PubMed Central

    Man, Zaiwei; Xu, Meijuan; Rao, Zhiming; Guo, Jing; Yang, Taowei; Zhang, Xian; Xu, Zhenghong

    2016-01-01

    L-arginine is an important amino acid in food and pharmaceutical industries. Until now, the main production method of L-arginine in China is the highly polluting keratin acid hydrolysis. The industrial level L-arginine production by microbial fermentation has become an important task. In previous work, we obtained a new L-arginine producing Corynebacterium crenatum (subspecies of Corynebacterium glutamicum) through screening and mutation breeding. In this work, we performed systems pathway engineering of C. crenatum for improved L-arginine production, involving amplification of L-arginine biosynthetic pathway flux by removal of feedback inhibition and overexpression of arginine operon; optimization of NADPH supply by modulation of metabolic flux distribution between glycolysis and pentose phosphate pathway; increasing glucose consumption by strengthening the preexisting glucose transporter and exploitation of new glucose uptake system; channeling excess carbon flux from glycolysis into tricarboxylic acid cycle to alleviate the glucose overflow metabolism; redistribution of carbon flux at α-ketoglutarate metabolic node to channel more flux into L-arginine biosynthetic pathway; minimization of carbon and cofactor loss by attenuation of byproducts formation. The final strain could produce 87.3 g L−1 L-arginine with yield up to 0.431 g L-arginine g−1 glucose in fed-batch fermentation. PMID:27338253

  6. Arginine deiminase inhibits Porphyromonas gingivalis surface attachment.

    PubMed

    Cugini, Carla; Stephens, Danielle N; Nguyen, Daniel; Kantarci, Alpdogan; Davey, Mary E

    2013-02-01

    The oral cavity is host to a complex microbial community whose maintenance depends on an array of cell-to-cell interactions and communication networks, with little known regarding the nature of the signals or mechanisms by which they are sensed and transmitted. Determining the signals that control attachment, biofilm development and outgrowth of oral pathogens is fundamental to understanding pathogenic biofilm development. We have previously identified a secreted arginine deiminase (ADI) produced by Streptococcus intermedius that inhibited biofilm development of the commensal pathogen Porphyromonas gingivalis through downregulation of genes encoding the major (fimA) and minor (mfa1) fimbriae, both of which are required for proper biofilm development. Here we report that this inhibitory effect is dependent on enzymic activity. We have successfully cloned, expressed and defined the conditions to ensure that ADI from S. intermedius is enzymically active. Along with the cloning of the wild-type allele, we have created a catalytic mutant (ADIC399S), in which the resulting protein is not able to catalyse the hydrolysis of l-arginine to l-citrulline. P. gingivalis is insensitive to the ADIC399S catalytic mutant, demonstrating that enzymic activity is required for the effects of ADI on biofilm formation. Biofilm formation is absent under l-arginine-deplete conditions, and can be recovered by the addition of the amino acid. Taken together, the results indicate that arginine is an important signal that directs biofilm formation by this anaerobe. Based on our findings, we postulate that ADI functions to reduce arginine levels and, by a yet to be identified mechanism, signals P. gingivalis to alter biofilm development. ADI release from the streptococcal cell and its cross-genera effects are important findings in understanding the nature of inter-bacterial signalling and biofilm-mediated diseases of the oral cavity.

  7. Completion of the amino acid sequence of the alpha 1 chain from type I calf skin collagen. Amino acid sequence of alpha 1(I)B8.

    PubMed Central

    Glanville, R W; Breitkreutz, D; Meitinger, M; Fietzek, P P

    1983-01-01

    The complete amino acid sequence of the 279-residue CNBr peptide CB8 from the alpha 1 chain of type I calf skin collagen is presented. It was determined by sequencing overlapping fragments of CB8 produced by Staphylococcus aureus V8 proteinase, trypsin, Endoproteinase Arg-C and hydroxylamine. Tryptic cleavages were also made specific for lysine by blocking arginine residues with cyclohexane-1,2-dione. This completes the amino acid sequence analysis of the 1054-residues-long alpha (I) chain of calf skin collagen. PMID:6354180

  8. Recent advances in the investigation of pancreatic inflammation induced by large doses of basic amino acids in rodents.

    PubMed

    Kui, Balázs; Balla, Zsolt; Végh, Eszter T; Pallagi, Petra; Venglovecz, Viktória; Iványi, Béla; Takács, Tamás; Hegyi, Péter; Rakonczay, Zoltán

    2014-02-01

    It has been known for approximately 30 years that large doses of the semi-essential basic amino acid L-arginine induce severe pancreatic inflammation in rats. Recently, it has been demonstrated that L-arginine can also induce pancreatitis in mice. Moreover, other basic amino acids like L-ornithine and L-lysine can cause exocrine pancreatic damage without affecting the endocrine parenchyma and the ducts in rats. The utilization of these noninvasive severe basic amino acid-induced pancreatitis models is becoming increasingly popular and appreciated as these models nicely reproduce most laboratory and morphological features of human pancreatitis. Consequently, the investigation of basic amino acid-induced pancreatitis may offer us a better understanding of the pathogenesis and possible treatment options of the human disease.

  9. Autoantibodies against mono- and tri-methylated lysine display similar but also distinctive characteristics

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Fan; Chen, Linjie; Gao, Ruitong; Zhang, Wei

    2017-01-01

    Autoantibodies can be either harmful or beneficial to the body. The beneficial autoantibodies play important roles in immunosurveillance, clearance of body waste and maintenance of immune homeostasis. Despite their importance, however, people’s knowledge on the protective autoantibodies is still very limited. In the current study, we examined two autoantibodies that recognized epitopes with only one amino acid. One was against mono-methylated lysine (Kme) and the other was against tri-methylated lysine (Kme3). We found that the antibodies were highly specific and not polyreactive. They did not cross-react each other. Although anti-Kme antibodies were IgM only, a large proportion of the anti-Kme3 antibodies were switched to the IgG isotype. Mass spectrometric analysis showed that both of the antibodies were mainly derived from IGHV 3–7 and/or IGHV3-74 germ line genes with conserved CDR2. De novo sequencing showed that there was a mutation at either of the SS positions on the CDR1 region, which changed one of the serine residues to a basic amino acid, i.e., arginine or lysine. We also found that neither of the antibodies was expressed at birth, and their earliest appearance was approximately 5 months after birth. All healthy human beings expressed the antibodies when they reached age two and maintained the expression thereafter throughout their life. Patients with systemic lupus erythematosus had lower levels of the IgM isotype antibodies. Serum levels of the two IgM antibodies were closely correlated, implying that they were produced by cells from the same B cell subset. We also found that both anti-Kme and anti-Kme3 antibodies could bind and might take part in the clearance of neutrophil extracellular traps released from activated cells. In conclusion, although anti-Kme and anti-Kme3 antibodies share many similarities in their origins, they are different antibodies and have different characteristics. PMID:28222195

  10. Molecular Basis for Lysine Specificity in the Yeast Ubiquitin-Conjugating Enzyme Cdc34 ▿

    PubMed Central

    Sadowski, Martin; Suryadinata, Randy; Lai, Xianning; Heierhorst, Jörg; Sarcevic, Boris

    2010-01-01

    Ubiquitin (Ub)-conjugating enzymes (E2s) and ubiquitin ligases (E3s) catalyze the attachment of Ub to lysine residues in substrates and Ub during monoubiquitination and polyubiquitination. Lysine selection is important for the generation of diverse substrate-Ub structures, which provides versatility to this pathway in the targeting of proteins to different fates. The mechanisms of lysine selection remain poorly understood, with previous studies suggesting that the ubiquitination site(s) is selected by the E2/E3-mediated positioning of a lysine(s) toward the E2/E3 active site. By studying the polyubiquitination of Sic1 by the E2 protein Cdc34 and the RING E3 Skp1/Cul1/F-box (SCF) protein, we now demonstrate that in addition to E2/E3-mediated positioning, proximal amino acids surrounding the lysine residues in Sic1 and Ub are critical for ubiquitination. This mechanism is linked to key residues composing the catalytic core of Cdc34 and independent of SCF. Changes to these core residues altered the lysine preference of Cdc34 and specified whether this enzyme monoubiquitinated or polyubiquitinated Sic1. These new findings indicate that compatibility between amino acids surrounding acceptor lysine residues and key amino acids in the catalytic core of ubiquitin-conjugating enzymes is an important mechanism for lysine selection during ubiquitination. PMID:20194622

  11. Structure-function validation of high lysine analogs of alpha-hordothionin designed by protein modeling.

    PubMed

    Rao, A G; Hassan, M; Hempel, J C

    1994-12-01

    Cereal grains and legume seeds, which are key protein sources for the vegetarian diet, are generally deficient in essential amino acids. Maize, in particular, is deficient in lysine. The inherent lack of lysine-rich proteins in maize has necessitated the search for heterologous proteins enriched in this amino acid, the isolation of the corresponding gene and its ultimate introduction into maize through plant transformation techniques. However, a rate-limiting step to this strategy has been the availability of plant-derived lysine-rich proteins. An appealing solution to the problem is to artificially increase the lysine content of a given protein by mutating appropriate residues to lysine. Here, we expound this strategy, starting with the protein alpha-hordothionin that is derived from barley seeds and consists of five lysine residues in a total of 45 amino acids (11% lysine). To facilitate rational substitutions, the 3-D structure of the protein has been determined by homology modeling with crambin. Based on this model, we have identified surface residues amenable to substitution with lysine. Furthermore, the acceptability of the mutations has been validated through the synthesis and characterization of the derivatives. To this end, our approach has permitted the creation of a modified alpha-hordothionin protein that has a lysine content of approximately 27% and retains the antifungal activity of the wild-type protein.

  12. Arginine production in the neonate

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Endogenous arginine synthesis in adults is a complex multiorgan process, in which citrulline is synthesized in the gut, enters the general circulation, and is converted into arginine in the kidney, by what is known as the intestinal-renal axis. In neonates, the enzymes required to convert citrulline...

  13. Effect of a new injectable male contraceptive on the seminal plasma amino acids studied by proton NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Chaudhury, Koel; Sharma, Uma; Jagannathan, N R; Guha, Sujoy K

    2002-09-01

    Effect of RISUG, a newly developed male contraceptive, on various amino acids of seminal plasma ejaculates was studied by proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy at 400 MHz. Levels of amino acids were compared with the seminal plasma of obstructive azoospermia and controls. Glutamic acid, glutamine, and arginine were found to be high in concentration in human seminal plasma. The concentration of aromatic amino acids such as tyrosine, histidine, and phenylalanine in RISUG-injected subjects showed no significant difference compared to controls (p > 0.1); however, there was a statistically significant decrease in the concentration of these amino acids in obstructive azoospermia. The concentration of some prominent amino acids that showed overlapping resonances, such as isoleucine+leucine+valine (p < 0.01), alanine+isoleucine+lysine (p < 0.01), arginine+lysine+leucine (p < 0.01), and glutamic acid+glutamine (p < 0.01), showed a statistically significant decrease in RISUG-injected subjects compared to controls. Overlap of these amino acid resonances were noticed even at 600 MHz. In general, the total amino acids concentration in RISUG-injected subjects was found to be higher than in azoospermic subjects, confirming the occurrence of 'partial' obstructive azoospermia in subjects injected with this contraceptive.

  14. Characterization of a second lysine decarboxylase isolated from Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Kikuchi, Y; Kojima, H; Tanaka, T; Takatsuka, Y; Kamio, Y

    1997-01-01

    We report here on the existence of a new gene for lysine decarboxylase in Escherichia coli K-12. The hybridization experiments with a cadA probe at low stringency showed that the homologous region of cadA was located in lambda Kohara phage clone 6F5 at 4.7 min on the E. coli chromosome. We cloned the 5.0-kb HindIII fragment of this phage clone and sequenced the homologous region of cadA. This region contained a 2,139-nucleotide open reading frame encoding a 713-amino-acid protein with a calculated molecular weight of 80,589. Overexpression of the protein and determination of its N-terminal amino acid sequence defined the translational start site of this gene. The deduced amino acid sequence showed 69.4% identity to that of lysine decarboxylase encoded by cadA at 93.7 min on the E. coli chromosome. In addition, the level of lysine decarboxylase activity increased in strains carrying multiple copies of the gene. Therefore, the gene encoding this lysine decarboxylase was designated Idc. Analysis of the lysine decarboxylase activity of strains containing cadA, ldc, or cadA ldc mutations indicated that ldc was weakly expressed under various conditions but is a functional gene in E. coli. PMID:9226257

  15. Basis for the equilibrium constant in the interconversion of l-lysine and l-beta-lysine by lysine 2,3-aminomutase.

    PubMed

    Chen, Dawei; Tanem, Justinn; Frey, Perry A

    2007-02-01

    l-beta-lysine and beta-glutamate are produced by the actions of lysine 2,3-aminomutase and glutamate 2,3-aminomutase, respectively. The pK(a) values have been titrimetrically measured and are for l-beta-lysine: pK(1)=3.25 (carboxyl), pK(2)=9.30 (beta-aminium), and pK(3)=10.5 (epsilon-aminium). For beta-glutamate the values are pK(1)=3.13 (carboxyl), pK(2)=3.73 (carboxyl), and pK(3)=10.1 (beta-aminium). The equilibrium constants for reactions of 2,3-aminomutases favor the beta-isomers. The pH and temperature dependencies of K(eq) have been measured for the reaction of lysine 2,3-aminomutase to determine the basis for preferential formation of beta-lysine. The value of K(eq) (8.5 at 37 degrees C) is independent of pH between pH 6 and pH 11; ruling out differences in pK-values as the basis for the equilibrium constant. The K(eq)-value is temperature-dependent and ranges from 10.9 at 4 degrees C to 6.8 at 65 degrees C. The linear van't Hoff plot shows the reaction to be enthalpy-driven, with DeltaH degrees =-1.4 kcal mol(-1) and DeltaS degrees =-0.25 cal deg(-1) mol(-1). Exothermicity is attributed to the greater strength of the bond C(beta)-N(beta) in l-beta-lysine than C(alpha)-N(alpha) in l-lysine, and this should hold for other amino acids.

  16. Acetylation of lysine 40 in alpha-tubulin is not essential in Tetrahymena thermophila

    PubMed Central

    1995-01-01

    In Tetrahymena, at least 17 distinct microtubule structures are assembled from a single primary sequence type of alpha- and beta- tubulin heterodimer, precluding distinctions among microtubular systems based on tubulin primary sequence isotypes. Tetrahymena tubulins also are modified by several types of posttranslational reactions including acetylation of alpha-tubulin at lysine 40, a modification found in most eukaryotes. In Tetrahymena, axonemal alpha-tubulin and numerous other microtubules are acetylated. We completely replaced the single type of alpha-tubulin gene in the macronucleus with a version encoding arginine instead of lysine 40 and therefore cannot be acetylated at this position. No acetylated tubulin was detectable in these transformants using a monoclonal antibody specific for acetylated lysine 40. Surprisingly, mutants lacking detectable acetylated tubulin are indistinguishable from wild-type cells. Thus, acetylation of alpha- tubulin at lysine 40 is non-essential in Tetrahymena. In addition, isoelectric focusing gel analysis of axonemal tubulin from cells unable to acetylate alpha-tubulin leads us to conclude that: (a) most or all ciliary alpha-tubulin is acetylated, (b) other lysines cannot be acetylated to compensate for loss of acetylation at lysine 40, and (c) acetylated alpha-tubulin molecules in wild-type cells contain one or more additional charge-altering modifications. PMID:7775576

  17. The contents of the neuro-excitatory amino acid β-ODAP (β-N-oxalyl-l-α,β-diaminopropionic acid), and other free and protein amino acids in the seeds of different genotypes of grass pea (Lathyrus sativus L.).

    PubMed

    Fikre, Asnake; Korbu, Lijalem; Kuo, Yu-Haey; Lambein, Fernand

    2008-09-15

    The free and protein amino acids of nine different genotypes of grass pea (Lathyrus sativus L.) seeds were analysed by HPLC with pre-column PITC (phenyl isothiocyanate) derivatisation. Among the free amino acids, homoarginine was quantitatively the most important (up to 0.8% seed weight) and stable while the neuro-excitatory amino acid β-ODAP (β-N-oxalyl-l-α,β-diaminopropionic acid) showed highest variation (0.02-0.54%) in the nine genotypes examined. Among protein amino acids, glutamic acid was quantitatively most significant, followed by aspartic acid, arginine, leucine, lysine and proline. The sulphur amino acid, methionine, showed the lowest concentration in all the L. sativus genotypes, and also in lentil (Lens culinaris) and in soybean (Glycine max) seeds analysed at the same time.

  18. Arginine consumption by the intestinal parasite Giardia intestinalis reduces proliferation of intestinal epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Stadelmann, Britta; Merino, María C; Persson, Lo; Svärd, Staffan G

    2012-01-01

    In the field of infectious diseases the multifaceted amino acid arginine has reached special attention as substrate for the hosts production of the antimicrobial agent nitric oxide (NO). A variety of infectious organisms interfere with this part of the host immune response by reducing the availability of arginine. This prompted us to further investigate additional roles of arginine during pathogen infections. As a model we used the intestinal parasite Giardia intestinalis that actively consumes arginine as main energy source and secretes an arginine-consuming enzyme, arginine deiminase (ADI). Reduced intestinal epithelial cell (IEC) proliferation is a common theme during bacterial and viral intestinal infections, but it has never been connected to arginine-consumption. Our specific question was thereby, whether the arginine-consumption by Giardia leads to reduced IEC proliferation, in addition to NO reduction. In vitro cultivation of human IEC lines in arginine-free or arginine/citrulline-complemented medium, as well as in interaction with different G. intestinalis isolates, were used to study effects on host cell replication by MTT assay. IEC proliferation was further analyzed by DNA content analysis, polyamine measurements and expressional analysis of cell cycle regulatory genes. IEC proliferation was reduced upon arginine-withdrawal and also in an arginine-dependent manner upon interaction with G. intestinalis or addition of Giardia ADI. We show that arginine-withdrawal by intestinal pathogens leads to a halt in the cell cycle in IECs through reduced polyamine levels and upregulated cell cycle inhibitory genes. This is of importance with regards to intestinal tissue homeostasis that is affected through reduced cell proliferation. Thus, the slower epithelial cell turnover helps the pathogen to maintain a more stable niche for colonization. This study also shows why supplementation therapy of diarrhea patients with arginine/citrulline is helpful and that

  19. l-lysine production by Bacillus methanolicus: Genome-based mutational analysis and l-lysine secretion engineering.

    PubMed

    Nærdal, Ingemar; Netzer, Roman; Irla, Marta; Krog, Anne; Heggeset, Tonje Marita Bjerkan; Wendisch, Volker F; Brautaset, Trygve

    2017-02-20

    Bacillus methanolicus is a methylotrophic bacterium with an increasing interest in academic research and for biotechnological applications. This bacterium was previously applied for methanol-based production of l-glutamate, l-lysine and the five-carbon diamine cadaverine by wild type, classical mutant and recombinant strains. The genomes of two different l-lysine secreting B. methanolicus classical mutant strains, NOA2#13A52-8A66 and M168-20, were sequenced. We focused on mutational mapping in genes present in l-lysine and other relevant amino acid biosynthetic pathways, as well as in the primary cell metabolism important for precursor supply. In addition to mutations in the aspartate pathway genes dapG, lysA and hom-1, new mutational target genes like alr, proA, proB1, leuC, odhA and pdhD were identified. Surprisingly, no mutations were found in the putative l-lysine transporter gene lysE(MGA3). Inspection of the wild type B. methanolicus strain PB1 genome sequence identified two homologous putative l-lysine transporter genes, lysE(PB1) and lysE2(PB1). The biological role of these putative l-lysine transporter genes, together with the heterologous l-lysine exporter gene lysE(Cg) from Corynebacterium glutamicum, were therefore investigated. Our results demonstrated that the titer of secreted l-lysine in B. methanolicus was significantly increased by overexpression of lysE(Cg) while overexpression of lysE(MGA3), lysE(PB1) and lysE2(PB1) had no measurable effect.

  20. Sirt5 Is an NAD-Dependent Protein Lysine Demalonylase and Desuccinylase*

    PubMed Central

    Du, Jintang; Zhou, Yeyun; Su, Xiaoyang; Yu, Jiu Jiu; Khan, Saba; Jiang, Hong; Kim, Jungwoo; Woo, Jimin; Kim, Jun Huyn; Choi, Brian Hyun; He, Bin; Chen, Wei; Zhang, Sheng; Cerione, Richard A.; Auwerx, Johan; Hao, Quan; Lin, Hening

    2011-01-01

    Sirtuins are NAD-dependent deacetylases that regulate important biological processes. Mammals have seven sirtuins, Sirt1-7. Four of them (Sirt4-7) have no detectable or very weak deacetylase activity. Here we found that Sirt5 is an efficient protein lysine desuccinylase and demalonylase in vitro. The preference for succinyl and malonyl groups was explained by the presence of an arginine residue (Arg105) and tyrosine residue (Tyr102) in the acyl pocket of Sirt5. Several mammalian proteins were identified to have succinyl or malonyl lysine modifications by mass spectrometry. Deletion of Sirt5 in mice appeared to increases the level of succinylation on carbamoyl phosphate synthase 1, a known target of Sirt5. Thus protein lysine succinylation may represent a posttranslational modification that can be reversed by Sirt5 in vivo. PMID:22076378

  1. Extended amino acid sequences around the active-site lysine residue of class-I fructose 1,6-bisphosphate aldolases from rabbit muscle, sturgeon muscle, trout muscle and ox liver.

    PubMed Central

    Benfield, P A; Forcina, B G; Gibbons, I; Perham, R N

    1979-01-01

    1. Amino acid sequences covering the region between residues 173 and 248 [adopting the numbering system proposed by Lai, Nakai & Chang (1974) Science 183, 1204-1206] were derived for trout (Salmo trutta) muscle aldolase and for ox liver aldolase. A comparable sequence was derived for residues 180-248 of sturgeon (Acipenser transmontanus) muscle aldolase. The close homology with the rabbit muscle enzyme was used to align the peptides of the other aldolases from which the sequences were derived. The results also allowed a partial sequence for the N-terminal 39 residues for the ox liver enzyme to be deduced. 2. In the light of the strong homology evinced for these enzymes, a re-investigation of the amino acid sequence of rabbit muscle aldolase between residues 181 and 185 was undertaken. This indicated the presence of a hitherto unsuspected -Ile-Val-sequence between residues 181 and 182 and the need to invert the sequence -Glu-Val- to -Val-Glx- at positions 184 and 185. 3. Comparison of the available amino acid sequences of these enzymes suggested an early evolutionary divergence of the genes for muscle and liver aldolases. It was also consistent with other evidence that the central region of the primary structure of these enzymes (which includes the active-site lysine-227) forms part of a conserved folding domain in the protein subunit. 4. Detailed evidence for the amino acid sequences proposed has been deposited as Suy Lending Division, Boston Spa, Wetherby, West Yorkshire LS23 7BQ, U.K., from whom copies can be obtained on the terms indicated in Biochem. J. (1978) 169, 5. PMID:534504

  2. Role of arginine in the stabilization of proteins against aggregation.

    PubMed

    Baynes, Brian M; Wang, Daniel I C; Trout, Bernhardt L

    2005-03-29

    The amino acid arginine is frequently used as a solution additive to stabilize proteins against aggregation, especially in the process of protein refolding. Despite arginine's prevalence, the mechanism by which it stabilizes proteins is not presently understood. We propose that arginine deters aggregation by slowing protein-protein association reactions, with only a small concomitant effect on protein folding. The associated rate effect was observed experimentally in association of globular proteins (insulin and a monoclonal anti-insulin) and in refolding of carbonic anhydrase. We suggest that this effect arises because arginine is preferentially excluded from protein-protein encounter complexes but not from dissociated protein molecules. Such an effect is predicted by our gap effect theory [Baynes and Trout (2004) Biophys. J. 87, 1631] for "neutral crowder" additives such as arginine which are significantly larger than water but have only a small effect on the free energies of isolated protein molecules. The effect of arginine on refolding of carbonic anhydrase was also shown to be consistent with this hypothesis.

  3. Development and optimization of a novel conductometric bi-enzyme biosensor for L-arginine determination.

    PubMed

    Saiapina, O Y; Dzyadevych, S V; Jaffrezic-Renault, N; Soldatkin, O P

    2012-04-15

    A highly sensitive conductometric biosensor for l-arginine determination was developed by exploiting the unique biorecognition capacities of two enzymes of urea cycle - arginase (E.C. 3.5.3.1) and urease (E.C. 3.5.1.5). The enzymes were co-immobilized in a single bioselective membrane on the working sensor, while a lysine rich bovine serum albumin (BSA) membrane was immobilized on the reference sensor, allowing differential measurements. The optimum percentage ratio of arginase and urease within the bioselective membrane was determined when the biosensor sensitivity to l-arginine and urea was optimum. Analytical characteristics of the conductometric biosensor for l-arginine determination were compared for two types of enzyme immobilization (cross-linking with glutaraldehyde (GA) and entrapment in the polymeric membrane). The optimum features in terms of the sensitivity, the linear range, and the detection limit (4.2 μS/mM, 0.01-4mM, and 5.0 × 10(-7)M, respectively) were found for l-arginine biosensor based on enzyme cross-linking with GA. A quantitative determination of l-arginine in the real sample (a drinkable solution "Arginine Veyron") gave a satisfactory result compared to the data provided by the producer (a relative error was 4.6%). The developed biosensor showed high operational and storage stability.

  4. Free amino acid profiling in the giant puffball mushroom (Calvatia gigantea) using UPLC-MS/MS.

    PubMed

    Kıvrak, İbrahim; Kıvrak, Şeyda; Harmandar, Mansur

    2014-09-01

    Wild edible and medicinal mushroom, Calvatia gigantea, was quantitatively analyzed for the determination of its free amino acids using ultra performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (UPLC-MS/MS). The concentrations of total free amino acids, essential and non-essential amino acids were 199.65 mg/100 g, 113.69 mg/100 g, and 85.96 mg/100 g in C. gigantea, respectively. This study showed that C. gigantea, so called a giant puffball mushroom, has free amino acids content. The essential amino acids: tryptophan, isoleucine, valine, phenylalanine, leucine, threonine, lysine, histidine, methionine, and the non-essential amino acids: tyrosine, 4-hyrdroxy proline, arginine, proline, glycine, serine, alanine, glutamine, glutamic acid, aspargine, aspartic acid were detected.

  5. Two arginine residues suppress the flexibility of nucleosomal DNA in the canonical nucleosome core.

    PubMed

    Kono, Hidetoshi; Shirayama, Kazuyoshi; Arimura, Yasuhiro; Tachiwana, Hiroaki; Kurumizaka, Hitoshi

    2015-01-01

    The dynamics of nucleosomes containing either canonical H3 or its centromere-specific variant CENP-A were investigated using molecular dynamics simulations. The simulations showed that the histone cores were structurally stable during simulation periods of 100 ns and 50 ns, while DNA was highly flexible at the entry and exit regions and partially dissociated from the histone core. In particular, approximately 20-25 bp of DNA at the entry and exit regions of the CENP-A nucleosome exhibited larger fluctuations than DNA at the entry and exit regions of the H3 nucleosome. Our detailed analysis clarified that this difference in dynamics was attributable to a difference in two basic amino acids in the αN helix; two arginine (Arg) residues in H3 were substituted by lysine (Lys) residues at the corresponding sites in CENP-A. The difference in the ability to form hydrogen bonds with DNA of these two residues regulated the flexibility of nucleosomal DNA at the entry and exit regions. Our exonuclease III assay consistently revealed that replacement of these two Arg residues in the H3 nucleosome by Lys enhanced endonuclease susceptibility, suggesting that the DNA ends of the CENP-A nucleosome are more flexible than those of the H3 nucleosome. This difference in the dynamics between the two types of nucleosomes may be important for forming higher order structures in different phases.

  6. Virtual screening and biological characterization of novel histone arginine methyltransferase PRMT1 inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Heinke, Ralf; Spannhoff, Astrid; Meier, Rene; Trojer, Patrick; Bauer, Ingo; Jung, Manfred; Sippl, Wolfgang

    2009-01-01

    Lysine and arginine methyltransferases participate in the posttranslational modification of histones and regulate key cellular functions. Protein arginine methyltransferase 1 (PRMT1) has been identified as an essential component of mixed lineage leukemia (MLL) oncogenic complexes, revealing its potential as a novel therapeutic target in human cancer. The first potent arginine methyltransferase inhibitors were recently discovered by random- and target-based screening approaches. Herein we report virtual and biological screening for novel inhibitors of PRMT1. Structure-based virtual screening (VS) of the Chembridge database composed of 328 000 molecules was performed with a combination of ligand- and target-based in silico approaches. Nine inhibitors were identified from the top-scored docking solutions; these were experimentally tested using human PRMT1 and an antibody-based assay with a time-resolved fluorescence readout. Among several aromatic amines, an aliphatic amine and an amide were also found to be active in the micromolar range.

  7. Effects of arginine on heat-induced aggregation of concentrated protein solutions.

    PubMed

    Shah, Dhawal; Shaikh, Abdul Rajjak; Peng, Xinxia; Rajagopalan, Raj

    2011-01-01

    Arginine is one of the commonly used additives to enhance refolding yield of proteins, to suppress aggregation of proteins, and to increase solubility of proteins, and yet the molecular interactions that contribute to the role of arginine are unclear. Here, we present experiments, using bovine serum albumin (BSA), lysozyme (LYZ), and β-lactoglobulin (BLG) as model proteins, to show that arginine can enhance heat-induced aggregation of concentrated protein solutions, contrary to the conventional belief that arginine is a universal suppressor of aggregation. Results show that the enhancement in aggregation is caused only for BSA and BLG, but not for LYZ, indicating that arginine's preferential interactions with certain residues over others could determine the effect of the additive on aggregation. We use this previously unrecognized behavior of arginine, in combination with density functional theory calculations, to identify the molecular-level interactions of arginine with various residues that determine arginine's role as an enhancer or suppressor of aggregation of proteins. The experimental and computational results suggest that the guanidinium group of arginine promotes aggregation through the hydrogen-bond-based bridging interactions with the acidic residues of a protein, whereas the binding of the guanidinium group to aromatic residues (aggregation-prone) contributes to the stability and solubilization of the proteins. The approach, we describe here, can be used to select suitable additives to stabilize a protein solution at high concentrations based on an analysis of the amino acid content of the protein.

  8. Depletion of arginine by recombinant arginine deiminase induces nNOS-activated neurotoxicity in neuroblastoma cells.

    PubMed

    Lin, Shan-Erh; Wu, Fe-Lin Lin; Wei, Ming-Feng; Shen, Li-Jiuan

    2014-01-01

    The abnormal regulation of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS) is associated with neurodegenerative disorders. Recombinant arginine deiminase (rADI) is a selective NO modulator of iNOS and eNOS in endothelial cells, and it also exhibits neuroprotective activity in an iNOS-induced neuron-microglia coculture system. However, the effect of rADI on nNOS remains unknown. Addressing this issue is important for evaluating the potential application of rADI in neurodegenerative diseases. SH-SY5Y cells were treated with N-methyl-D-aspartic acid (NMDA) to activate nNOS. NMDA increased NO production by 39.7 ± 3.9% via nNOS under arginine-containing conditions, but there was no significant increase in both arginine-free and rADI pretreated arginine-containing (citrulline) buffer. Subsequently, neither NMDA nor rADI alone caused cytotoxicity, whereas cotreatment with NMDA and rADI resulted in dissipation of the cell mitochondrial membrane potential and decreased cell viability. The mechanism of rADI cytotoxicity in the presence of NMDA is caused by the inhibition of NO production via nNOS mediated by the NMDA receptor, which was abolished when extracellular arginine was absent, even in the presence of citrulline. rADI not only reduced NO production but also caused cellular toxicity in nNOS-activated SH-SY5Y cells, suggesting a dual role for rADI in NOS-mediated neurotoxicity.

  9. Lysine metabolism in antisense C-hordein barley grains.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Daiana; Rizzi, Vanessa; Gaziola, Salete A; Medici, Leonardo O; Vincze, Eva; Kozak, Marcin; Lea, Peter J; Azevedo, Ricardo A

    2015-02-01

    The grain proteins of barley are deficient in lysine and threonine due to their low concentrations in the major storage protein class, the hordeins, especially in the C-hordein subgroup. Previously produced antisense C-hordein transgenic barley lines have an improved amino acid composition, with increased lysine, methionine and threonine contents. The objective of the study was to investigate the possible changes in the regulation of key enzymes of the aspartate metabolic pathway and the contents of aspartate-derived amino acids in the nontransgenic line (Hordeum vulgare L. cv. Golden Promise) and five antisense C-hordein transgenic barley lines. Considering the amounts of soluble and protein-bound aspartate-derived amino acids together with the analysis of key enzymes of aspartate metabolic pathway, we suggest that the C-hordein suppression did not only alter the metabolism of at least one aspartate-derived amino acid (threonine), but major changes were also detected in the metabolism of lysine and methionine. Modifications in the activities and regulation of aspartate kinase, dihydrodipicolinate synthase and homoserine dehydrogenase were observed in most transgenic lines. Furthermore the activities of lysine α-ketoglutarate reductase and saccharopine dehydrogenase were also altered, although the extent varied among the transgenic lines.

  10. Exploration of the binding modes of buffalo PGRP1 receptor complexed with meso-diaminopimelic acid and lysine-type peptidoglycans by molecular dynamics simulation and free energy calculation.

    PubMed

    Sahoo, Bikash Ranjan; Dubey, Praveen Kumar; Goyal, Shubham; Bhoi, Gopal Krushna; Lenka, Santosh Kumar; Maharana, Jitendra; Pradhan, Sukanta Kumar; Kataria, Ranjit Singh

    2014-09-05

    The peptidoglycan recognition proteins (PGRPs) are the key components of innate-immunity, and are highly specific for the recognition of bacterial peptidoglycans (PGN). Among different mammalian PGRPs, the PGRP1 binds to murein PGN of Gram-positive bacteria (lysine-type) and also have bactericidal activity towards Gram-negative bacteria (diaminopimelic acid or Dap-type). Buffaloes are the major sources of milk and meat in Asian sub-continents and are highly exposed to bacterial infections. The PGRP activates the innate-immune signaling, but their studies has been confined to limited species due to lack of structural and functional information. So, to understand the structural constituents, 3D model of buffalo PGRP1 (bfPGRP1) was constructed and conformational and dynamics properties of bfPGRP1 was studied. The bfPGRP1 model highly resembled human and camel PGRP structure, and shared a highly flexible N-terminus and centrally placed L-shaped cleft. Docking simulation of muramyl-tripeptide, tetrapeptide, pentapeptide-Dap-(MTP-Dap, MTrP-Dap and MPP-Dap) and lysine-type (MTP-Lys, MTrP-Lys and MPP-Lys) in AutoDock 4.2 and ArgusLab 4.0.1 anticipated β1, α2, α4, β4, and loops connecting β1-α2, α2-β2, β3-β4 and α4-α5 as the key interacting domains. The bfPGRP1-ligand complex molecular dynamics simulation followed by free binding energy (BE) computation conceded BE values of -18.30, -35.53, -41.80, -25.03, -24.62 and -22.30 kJ mol(-1) for MTP-Dap, MTrP-Dap, MPP-Dap, MTP-Lys, MTrP-Lys and MPP-Lys, respectively. The groove-surface and key binding residues involved in PGN-Dap and Lys-type interaction intended by the molecular docking, and were also accompanied by significant BE values directed their importance in pharmacogenomics, and warrants further in vivo studies for drug targeting and immune signaling pathways exploration.

  11. The role of the arginine metabolome in pain: implications for sickle cell disease

    PubMed Central

    Bakshi, Nitya; Morris, Claudia R

    2016-01-01

    Sickle cell disease (SCD) is the most common hemoglobinopathy in the US, affecting approximately 100,000 individuals in the US and millions worldwide. Pain is the hallmark of SCD, and a subset of patients experience pain virtually all of the time. Of interest, the arginine metabolome is associated with several pain mechanisms highlighted in this review. Since SCD is an arginine deficiency syndrome, the contribution of the arginine metabolome to acute and chronic pain in SCD is a topic in need of further attention. Normal arginine metabolism is impaired in SCD through various mechanisms that contribute to endothelial dysfunction, vaso-occlusion, pulmonary complications, risk of leg ulcers, and early mortality. Arginine is a semiessential amino acid that serves as a substrate for protein synthesis and is the precursor to nitric oxide (NO), polyamines, proline, glutamate, creatine, and agmatine. Since arginine is involved in multiple metabolic processes, a deficiency of this amino acid has the potential to disrupt many cellular and organ functions. NO is a potent vasodilator that is depleted in SCD and may contribute to vaso-occlusive pain. As the obligate substrate for NO production, arginine also plays a mechanistic role in SCD-related pain, although its contribution to pain pathways likely extends beyond NO. Low global arginine bioavailability is associated with pain severity in both adults and children with SCD as well as other non-SCD pain syndromes. Preliminary clinical studies of arginine therapy in SCD demonstrate efficacy in treating acute vaso-occlusive pain, as well as leg ulcers and pulmonary hypertension. Restoration of arginine bioavailability through exogenous supplementation of arginine is, therefore, a promising therapeutic target. Phase II clinical trials of arginine therapy for sickle-related pain are underway and a Phase III randomized controlled trial is anticipated in the near future. PMID:27099528

  12. Sugar Substrates for l-Lysine Fermentation by Ustilago maydis

    PubMed Central

    Sánchez-Marroquín, A.; Ledezma, M.; Carreño, R.

    1970-01-01

    The extracellular production of l-lysine in media with cane sugar, blackstrap molasses, or clarified sugar-cane juice by a previously obtained mutant of Ustilago maydis was studied. Enzymatically inverted clarified juice (medium J-3) gave 2.9 g of lysine per liter under the following conditions: inoculum, 5%; pH 5.8; temperature, 30 C; KLa in the fermentors, 0.41 mmoles of O2 per liter per min; fermentation time, 72 hr. The concentrate, obtained by direct evaporation and drying of the fermentation broth, could be used as a possible feed supplement because of its amino-acid and vitamin content. PMID:5485081

  13. Effects of lysine-induced acute renal failure in dogs.

    PubMed

    Asanuma, Kentaro; Adachi, Kenji; Sugimoto, Tetsuro; Chiba, Shuichi

    2006-05-01

    This study investigates the effects of lysine-induced acute renal failure. Female dogs received a lysine hydrochloride (lysine) of 4500 mg/kg/day (3.75 ml/kg/hr) for 3 consecutive days. The dogs were observed for clinical signs. Body weights were recorded, food consumption and water consumption calculated, and urinalysis and blood biochemistry were performed daily. Plasma samples for amino acid determinations were obtained from all dogs, which were necropsied on Day 3. Histopathological examinations were done on all test animals. Compound-related findings include the following. Blood biochemistry results showed increases in ammonia, blood urea nitrogen, blood urea nitrogen/creatinine ratio, and creatinine. Urinary changes consisted of increases in urine volume, total protein, albumin, gamma-glutamyl transpeptidase, and N-acetyl-beta-D-glucosaminidase. In addition, macroscopic findings consisted of pale, congested capsule; microscopic findings consisted of hypertrophy of proximal convoluted tubule (mainly S1 segment), and degeneration/desquamation of urinary tubule (mainly S3 segment with hyaline casts) in the kidney. From these findings, it can be concluded that lysine is nephrotoxic in dogs. Nephrotoxicity of lysine may relate to direct tubular toxicity and to tubular obstruction.

  14. Effects of amino acids on the physiochemical properties of potato starch.

    PubMed

    Cui, Min; Fang, Ling; Zhou, Hongxian; Yang, Hong

    2014-05-15

    The objective of this study was to evaluate effects of different amino acid additives (phenylalanine (Phe), methionine (Met), lysine (Lys), arginine (Arg), aspartic acid (Asp) and glutamic acid (Glu)) on the physicochemical properties of potato starch gels. Charge-carrying amino acids (Lys, Arg, Asp and Glu) significantly decreased the swelling power, solubility, light transmittance, L(∗) value and gel strength of potato starch, but increased syneresis during freeze-thaw treatment, while neutral amino acids (Phe and Met) did not cause modifications in starch gels. During heating, potato starch with fortified charge-carrying amino acids showed a lower peak G' (storage modulus), when compared with Phe and Met. Results showed that charge-carrying amino acids could modify physicochemical properties and improve the nutritional values of starch-based products.

  15. Arginine mimetic structures in biologically active antagonists and inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Masic, Lucija Peterlin

    2006-01-01

    Peptidomimetics have found wide application as bioavailable, biostable, and potent mimetics of naturally occurring biologically active peptides. L-Arginine is a guanidino group-containing basic amino acid, which is positively charged at neutral pH and is involved in many important physiological and pathophysiological processes. Many enzymes display a preference for the arginine residue that is found in many natural substrates and in synthetic inhibitors of many trypsin-like serine proteases, e.g. thrombin, factor Xa, factor VIIa, trypsin, and in integrin receptor antagonists, used to treat many blood-coagulation disorders. Nitric oxide (NO), which is produced by oxidation of L-arginine in an NADPH- and O(2)-dependent process catalyzed by isoforms of nitric oxide synthase (NOS), exhibits diverse roles in both normal and pathological physiologies and has been postulated to be a contributor to the etiology of various diseases. Development of NOS inhibitors as well as analogs and mimetics of the natural substrate L-arginine, is desirable for potential therapeutic use and for a better understanding of their conformation when bound in the arginine binding site. The guanidino residue of arginine in many substrates, inhibitors, and antagonists forms strong ionic interactions with the carboxylate of an aspartic acid moiety, which provides specificity for the basic amino acid residue in the active side. However, a highly basic guanidino moiety incorporated in enzyme inhibitors or receptor antagonists is often associated with low selectivity and poor bioavailability after peroral application. Thus, significant effort is focused on the design and preparation of arginine mimetics that can confer selective inhibition for specific trypsin-like serine proteases and NOS inhibitors as well as integrin receptor antagonists and possess reduced basicity for enhanced oral bioavailability. This review will describe the survey of arginine mimetics designed to mimic the function of the

  16. Site-saturation engineering of lysine 47 in cyclodextrin glycosyltransferase from Paenibacillus macerans to enhance substrate specificity towards maltodextrin for enzymatic synthesis of 2-O-D-glucopyranosyl-L-ascorbic acid (AA-2G).

    PubMed

    Han, Ruizhi; Liu, Long; Shin, Hyun-dong; Chen, Rachel R; Du, Guocheng; Chen, Jian

    2013-07-01

    In this work, the site-saturation engineering of lysine 47 in cyclodextrin glycosyltransferase (CGTase) from Paenibacillus macerans was conducted to improve the specificity of CGTase towards maltodextrin, which can be used as a cheap and easily soluble glycosyl donor for the enzymatic synthesis of 2-O-D-glucopyranosyl-L-ascorbic acid (AA-2G) by CGTase. When using maltodextrin as glycosyl donor, four mutants K47F (lysine→ phenylalanine), K47L (lysine→ leucine), K47V (lysine→ valine) and K47W (lysine→ tryptophan) showed higher AA-2G yield as compared with that produced by the wild-type CGTase. The transformation conditions (temperature, pH and the mass ratio of L-ascorbic acid to maltodextrin) were optimized and the highest titer of AA-2G produced by the mutant K47L could reach 1.97 g/l, which was 64.2% higher than that (1.20 g/l) produced by the wild-type CGTase. The reaction kinetics analysis confirmed the enhanced maltodextrin specificity, and it was also found that compared with the wild-type CGTase, the four mutants had relatively lower cyclization activities and higher disproportionation activities, which was favorable for AA-2G synthesis. The mechanism responsible for the enhanced substrate specificity was further explored by structure modeling and it was indicated that the enhancement of maltodextrin specificity may be due to the short residue chain and the removal of hydrogen bonding interactions between the side chain of residue 47 and the sugar at -3 subsite. Here the obtained mutant CGTases, especially the K47L, has a great potential in the production of AA-2G with maltodextrin as a cheap and easily soluble substrate.

  17. Screening nucleotide binding to amino acid-coated supports by surface plasmon resonance and nuclear magnetic resonance.

    PubMed

    Cruz, Carla; Cabrita, Eurico J; Queiroz, João A

    2011-08-01

    Here, we describe a rapid and efficient screening method using surface plasmon resonance (SPR) and saturation transfer difference-nuclear magnetic resonance (STD-NMR) spectroscopy to yield information regarding the residues involved in nucleotide binding to amino acid-coated supports. The aim of this work was to explore the use of these spectroscopic techniques to study amino acid-nucleotide interactions in order to improve the binding specificity of the amino acid ligands used to purify plasmid DNA. For SPR, we present a strategy that immobilizes arginine and lysine on a surface as model supports, and we analyze binding responses when synthetic homo-deoxyoligonucleotides are injected over the amino acid surface. The binding responses are detectable and reproducible despite the small size of the immobilized amino acids. Using STD-NMR, we performed epitope mapping of homo-deoxyoligonucleotides bound to L-arginine-bisoxyran-Sepharose and L-lysine-Sepharose supports. Polynucleotide binding preferences differed; for example, polyC interacted preferentially through its backbone with the two supports, whereas polyT bound the supports through its thymine moiety. STD-NMR combined with SPR measurements was successfully used to screen amino acid-nucleotide interactions and determine the binding affinities of the complexes.

  18. Biodegradable Nanocomplex from Hyaluronic acid and Arginine based Poly(ester amide)s as the Delivery Vehicles for Improved Photodynamic Therapy of Multidrug Resistant Tumor Cells: An In Vitro Study of the Performance of Chlorin e6 Photosensitizer.

    PubMed

    Ji, Ying; Zhao, Jihui; Chu, Chih-Chang

    2016-12-20

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT), which enables the localized therapeutic effect by light irradiation, provides an alternative and complementary modality for the treatment of tumor. However, the aggregation of photosensitizers in acidic microenvironment of tumor and the non-targeted distribution of photosensitizers in normal tissues significantly affect the PDT efficiency. In this study, we developed a biodegradable nanocomplex HA-Arg-PEA from hyaluronic acid (HA) and arginine based poly(ester amide)s (Arg-PEA) as the nano-carrier for chlorin e6 (Ce6). HA enhanced the tumor-specific endocytosis mediated by the overexpression of CD44 receptor. Arg-PEA not only provide electrostatic interaction with HA to form self-assembled nanostructure, but also improve the monomerization of Ce6 at physiological pH as well as mildly acidic pH. The biodegradable characteristic of HA-Arg-PEA nanocomplex enabled the intracellular delivery of Ce6, in which its release and generation of singlet oxygen can be accelerated by enzymatic degradation of the carrier. The in vitro PDT efficiency of Ce6-loaded HA-Arg-PEA nanocomplex was examined in CD44 positive MDA-MB-435/MDR multidrug resistant melanoma cells. CD44-mediated uptake of Ce6-loaded HA-Arg-PEA nanocomplex significantly improved Ce6 level in MDA-MB-435/MDR cells within short incubation time, and the PDT efficiency in inhibiting multidrug resistant tumor cells was also enhanced at higher Ce6 concentrations. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  19. Formation and inhibition of Nε-(carboxymethyl)lysine in saccharide-lysine model systems during microwave heating.

    PubMed

    Li, Lin; Han, Lipeng; Fu, Quanyi; Li, Yuting; Liang, Zhili; Su, Jianyu; Li, Bing

    2012-10-31

    N(ε)-(carboxymethyl) lysine (CML) is the most abundant advanced glycation end product (AGE), and frequently selected as an AGEs marker in laboratory studies. In this paper, the formation and inhibition of N(ε)-(carboxymethyl)lysine in saccharide-lysine model systems during microwave heating have been studied. The microwave heating treatment significantly promoted the formation of CML during Maillard reactions, which was related to the reaction temperature, time and type of saccharide. The order of CML formation for different saccharides was lactose > glucose > sucrose. Then, the inhibition effect on CML by five inhibitors was further examined. According to the results, ascorbic acid and tocopherol did not affect inhibition of CML, in contrast, thiamin, rutin and quercetin inhibited CML formation, and the inhibitory effects were concentration dependent.

  20. Effects on general acid catalysis from mutations of the invariant tryptophan and arginine residues in the protein tyrosine phosphatase from Yersinia.

    PubMed

    Hoff, R H; Hengge, A C; Wu, L; Keng, Y F; Zhang, Z Y

    2000-01-11

    General acid catalysis in protein tyrosine phosphatases (PTPases) is accomplished by a conserved Asp residue, which is brought into position for catalysis by movement of a flexible loop that occurs upon binding of substrate. With the PTPase from Yersinia, we have examined the effect on general acid catalysis caused by mutations to two conserved residues that are integral to this conformation change. Residue Trp354 is at a hinge of the loop, and Arg409 forms hydrogen bonding and ionic interactions with the phosphoryl group of substrates. Trp354 was mutated to Phe and to Ala, and residue Arg409 was mutated to Lys and to Ala. The four mutant enzymes were studied using steady state kinetics and heavy-atom isotope effects with the substrate p-nitrophenyl phosphate. The data indicate that mutation of the hinge residue Trp354 to Ala completely disables general acid catalysis. In the Phe mutant, general acid catalysis is partially effective, but the proton is only partially transferred in the transition state, in contrast to the native enzyme where proton transfer to the leaving group is virtually complete. Mutation of Arg409 to Lys has a minimal effect on the K(m), while this parameter is increased 30-fold in the Ala mutant. The k(cat) values for R409K and for R409A are about 4 orders of magnitude lower than that for the native enzyme. General acid catalysis is rendered inoperative by the Lys mutation, but partial proton transfer during catalysis still occurs in the Ala mutant. Structural explanations for the differential effects of these mutations on movement of the flexible loop that enables general acid catalysis are presented.

  1. Combining pharmacophore search, automated docking, and molecular dynamics simulations as a novel strategy for flexible docking. Proof of concept: docking of arginine-glycine-aspartic acid-like compounds into the alphavbeta3 binding site.

    PubMed

    Moitessier, Nicolas; Henry, Christophe; Maigret, Bernard; Chapleur, Yves

    2004-08-12

    A novel and highly efficient flexible docking approach is presented where the conformations (internal degrees of freedom) and orientations (external degrees of freedom) of the ligands are successively considered. This hybrid method takes advantage of the synergistic effects of structure-based and ligand-based drug design techniques. Preliminary antagonist-derived pharmacophore determination provides the postulated bioactive conformation. Subsequent docking of this pharmacophore to the receptor crystal structure results in a postulated pharmacophore/receptor binding mode. Pharmacophore-oriented docking of antagonists is subsequently achieved by matching ligand interacting groups with pharmacophore points. Molecular dynamics in water refines the proposed complexes. To validate the method, arginine-glycine-aspartic acid (RGD) containing peptides, pseudopeptides, and RGD-like antagonists were docked to the crystal structure of alphavbeta3 holoprotein and apoprotein. The proposed directed docking was found to be more accurate, faster, and less biased with respect to the protein structure (holo and apoprotein) than DOCK, Autodock, and FlexX docking methods. The successful docking of an antagonist recently cocrystallized with the receptor to both apo and holoprotein is particularly appealing. The results summarized in this report illustrated the efficiency of our light CoMFA/rigid body docking hybrid method.

  2. Integrin αvβ3 as a Promising Target to Image Neoangiogenesis Using In-House Generator-Produced Positron Emitter (68)Ga-Labeled DOTA-Arginine-Glycine-Aspartic Acid (RGD) Ligand.

    PubMed

    Vatsa, Rakhee; Bhusari, Priya; Kumar, Sunil; Chakraborty, Sudipta; Dash, Ashutosh; Singh, Gurpreet; Dhawan, Devinder Kumar; Shukla, Jaya; Mittal, Bhagwant Rai

    2015-06-01

    For the growth and spread of a tumor beyond 2 mm, angiogenesis plays a crucial role, and association of various integrins with angiogenesis is evidential. The aim of the study was radiolabeling of DOTA-chelated RGD (arginine-glycine-aspartic acid) peptide with (68)Ga for PET imaging in locally advanced breast carcinoma. DOTA-RGD was incubated with (68)GaCl3, eluted in 0.05 m HCl. Elution volume, peptide amount, and reaction pH were studied. Radio-ITLC, gas chromatography, endotoxin, and sterility testing were performed. Serial (n=3) and whole-body (n=2) PET/CT imaging was done on patients post i.v. injection of 111-185 MBq of (68)Ga-DOTA-RGD. Maximum radiolabeling yield was achieved with 3 mL elution volume of 15-20 μg peptide at pH 3.5-4.0 with 10 minutes of incubation at 95°C. Product samples were sterile having 99.5% radiochemical purity with residual ethanol content and endotoxins in injectable limits. Intense radiotracer uptake was noticed in the tumor with SUVmax 15.3 at 45 minutes in serial images. Physiological radiotracer uptake was seen in the liver, spleen, ventricles, and thyroid with excretion through the kidneys. The authors concluded that (68)Ga-DOTA-RGD has the potential for imaging α,vβ3 integrin-expressing tumors.

  3. Stable Isotope Peptide Mass Spectrometry To Decipher Amino Acid Metabolism in Dehalococcoides Strain CBDB1

    PubMed Central

    Marco-Urrea, Ernest; Seifert, Jana; von Bergen, Martin

    2012-01-01

    Dehalococcoides species are key players in the anaerobic transformation of halogenated solvents at contaminated sites. Here, we analyze isotopologue distributions in amino acid pools from peptides of Dehalococcoides strain CBDB1 after incubation with 13C-labeled acetate or bicarbonate as a carbon source. The resulting data were interpreted with regard to genome annotations to identify amino acid biosynthesis pathways. In addition to using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) for analyzing derivatized amino acids after protein hydrolysis, we introduce a second, much milder method, in which we directly analyze peptide masses after tryptic digest and peptide fragments by nano-liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization-tandem mass spectrometry (nano-LC-ESI-MS/MS). With this method, we identify isotope incorporation patterns for 17 proteinaceous amino acids, including proline, cysteine, lysine, and arginine, which escaped previous analyses in Dehalococcoides. Our results confirmed lysine biosynthesis via the α-aminoadipate pathway, precluding lysine formation from aspartate. Similarly, the isotopologue pattern obtained for arginine provided biochemical evidence of its synthesis from glutamate. Direct peptide MS/MS analysis of the labeling patterns of glutamine and asparagine, which were converted to glutamate and aspartate during protein hydrolysis, gave biochemical evidence of their precursors and confirmed glutamate biosynthesis via a Re-specific citrate synthase. By addition of unlabeled free amino acids to labeled cells, we show that in strain CBDB1 none of the 17 tested amino acids was incorporated into cell mass, indicating that they are all synthesized de novo. Our approach is widely applicable and provides a means to analyze amino acid metabolism by studying specific proteins even in mixed consortia. PMID:22661690

  4. Inhibition of lytic infection of pseudorabies virus by arginine depletion

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, H.-C.; Kao, Y.-C.; Chang, T-J.; Wong, M.-L. . E-mail: mlwong@dragon.nchu.edu.tw

    2005-08-26

    Pseudorabies virus (PRV) is a member of Alphahepesviruses; it is an enveloped virus with a double-stranded DNA genome. Polyamines (such as spermine and spermidine) are ubiquitous in animal cells and participate in cellular proliferation and differentiation. Previous results of our laboratory showed that the PRV can accomplish lytic infection either in the presence of exogenous spermine (or spermidine) or depletion of cellular polyamines. The amino acid arginine is a precursor of polyamine biosynthesis. In this work, we investigated the role of arginine in PRV infection. It was found that the plaque formation of PRV was inhibited by arginase (enzyme catalyzing the conversion of arginine into ornithine and urea) treatment whereas this inhibition can be reversed by exogenous arginine, suggesting that arginine is essential for PRV proliferation. Western blotting was conducted to study the effect of arginine depletion on the levels of structural proteins of PRV in virus-infected cells. Four PRV structural proteins (gB, gE, UL47, and UL48) were chosen for examination, and results revealed that the levels of viral proteins were obviously reduced in long time arginase treatment. However, the overall protein synthesis machinery was apparently not influenced by arginase treatment either in mock or PRV-infected cells. Analyzing with native gel, we found that arginase treatment affected the mobility of PRV structural proteins, suggesting the conformational change of viral proteins by arginine depletion. Heat shock proteins, acting as molecular chaperons, participate in protein folding and translocation. Our results demonstrated that long time arginase treatment could reduce the expression of cellular heat shock proteins 70 (hsc70 and hsp70), and transcriptional suppression of heat shock protein 70 gene promoter was one of the mechanisms involved in this reduced expression.

  5. Domain Mapping of Heat Shock Protein 70 Reveals That Glutamic Acid 446 and Arginine 447 Are Critical for Regulating Superoxide Dismutase 2 Function.

    PubMed

    Afolayan, Adeleye J; Alexander, Maxwell; Holme, Rebecca L; Michalkiewicz, Teresa; Rana, Ujala; Teng, Ru-Jeng; Zemanovic, Sara; Sahoo, Daisy; Pritchard, Kirkwood A; Konduri, Girija G

    2017-02-10

    Stress-inducible heat shock protein 70 (hsp70) interacts with superoxide dismutase 2 (SOD2) in the cytosol after synthesis to transfer the enzyme to the mitochondria for subsequent activation. However, the structural basis for this interaction remains to be defined. To map the SOD2-binding site in hsp70, mutants of hsp70 were made and tested for their ability to bind SOD2. These studies showed that SOD2 binds in the amino acid 393-537 region of the chaperone. To map the hsp70-binding site in SOD2, we used a series of pulldown assays and showed that hsp70 binds to the amino-terminal domain of SOD2. To better define the binding site, we used a series of decoy peptides derived from the primary amino acid sequence in the SOD2-binding site in hsp70. This study shows that SOD2 specifically binds to hsp70 at (445)GERAMT(450) Small peptides containing GERAMT inhibited the transfer of SOD2 to the mitochondria and decreased SOD2 activity in vitro and in vivo To determine the amino acid residues in hsp70 that are critical for SOD2 interactions, we substituted each amino acid residue for alanine or more conservative residues, glutamine or asparagine, in the GERAMT-binding site. Substitutions of E446A/Q and R447A/Q inhibited the ability of the GERAMT peptide to bind SOD2 and preserved SOD2 function more than other substitutions. Together, these findings indicate that the GERAMT sequence is critical for hsp70-mediated regulation of SOD2 and that Glu(446) and Arg(447) cooperate with other amino acid residues in the GERAMT-binding site for proper chaperone-dependent regulation of SOD2 antioxidant function.

  6. Vasodilator effects of L-arginine are stereospecific and augmented by insulin in humans.

    PubMed

    Dallinger, Susanne; Sieder, Anna; Strametz, Jeanette; Bayerle-Eder, Michaela; Wolzt, Michael; Schmetterer, Leopold

    2003-06-01

    The amino acid l-arginine, the precursor of nitric oxide (NO) synthesis, induces vasodilation in vivo, but the mechanism behind this effect is unclear. There is, however, some evidence to assume that the l-arginine membrane transport capacity is dependent on insulin plasma levels. We hypothesized that vasodilator effects of l-arginine may be dependent on insulin plasma levels. Accordingly, we performed two randomized, double-blind crossover studies in healthy male subjects. In protocol 1 (n = 15), subjects received an infusion of insulin (6 mU x kg(-1) x min(-1) for 120 min) or placebo and, during the last 30 min, l-arginine or d-arginine (1 g/min for 30 min) x In protocol 2 (n = 8), subjects received l-arginine in stepwise increasing doses in the presence (1.5 mU x kg(-1) x min(-1)) or absence of insulin. Renal plasma flow and glomerular filtration rate were assessed by the para-aminohippurate and inulin plasma clearance methods, respectively. Pulsatile choroidal blood flow was assessed with laser interferometric measurement of fundus pulsation, and mean flow velocity in the ophthalmic artery was measured with Doppler sonography. l-arginine, but not d-arginine, significantly increased renal and ocular hemodynamic parameters. Coinfusion of l-arginine with insulin caused a dose-dependent leftward shift of the vasodilator effect of l-arginine. This stereospecific renal and ocular vasodilator potency of l-arginine is enhanced by insulin, which may result from facilitated l-arginine membrane transport, enhanced intracellular NO formation, or increased NO bioavailability.

  7. The microbiome, intestinal function, and arginine metabolism of healthy Indian women are different from those of American and Jamaican women

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Indian women have slower arginine flux during pregnancy compared with American and Jamaican women. Arginine is a semi-essential amino acid that becomes essential during periods of rapid lean tissue deposition. It is synthesized only from citrulline, a nondietary amino acid produced mainly in the gut...

  8. Reassignment of a rare sense codon to a non-canonical amino acid in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Mukai, Takahito; Yamaguchi, Atsushi; Ohtake, Kazumasa; Takahashi, Mihoko; Hayashi, Akiko; Iraha, Fumie; Kira, Satoshi; Yanagisawa, Tatsuo; Yokoyama, Shigeyuki; Hoshi, Hiroko; Kobayashi, Takatsugu; Sakamoto, Kensaku

    2015-01-01

    The immutability of the genetic code has been challenged with the successful reassignment of the UAG stop codon to non-natural amino acids in Escherichia coli. In the present study, we demonstrated the in vivo reassignment of the AGG sense codon from arginine to l-homoarginine. As the first step, we engineered a novel variant of the archaeal pyrrolysyl-tRNA synthetase (PylRS) able to recognize l-homoarginine and l-N6-(1-iminoethyl)lysine (l-NIL). When this PylRS variant or HarRS was expressed in E. coli, together with the AGG-reading tRNAPylCCU molecule, these arginine analogs were efficiently incorporated into proteins in response to AGG. Next, some or all of the AGG codons in the essential genes were eliminated by their synonymous replacements with other arginine codons, whereas the majority of the AGG codons remained in the genome. The bacterial host's ability to translate AGG into arginine was then restricted in a temperature-dependent manner. The temperature sensitivity caused by this restriction was rescued by the translation of AGG to l-homoarginine or l-NIL. The assignment of AGG to l-homoarginine in the cells was confirmed by mass spectrometric analyses. The results showed the feasibility of breaking the degeneracy of sense codons to enhance the amino-acid diversity in the genetic code. PMID:26240376

  9. Effects of rumen-undegradable protein sources and supplemental 2-hydroxy-4-(methylthio)-butanoic acid and lysine-HCl on lactation performance in dairy cows.

    PubMed

    Johnson-VanWieringen, L M; Harrison, J H; Davidson, D; Swift, M L; von Keyserlingk, M A G; Vazquez-Anon, M; Wright, D; Chalupa, W

    2007-11-01

    One hundred primiparous and multiparous Holstein cows were used in an experiment to evaluate the effect of supplementing diets with either a plant- or an animal-based source of rumen-undegradable protein (RUP), with or without AA supplementation, during the transition period and early lactation on milk production response. The experimental design was a randomized block design with approximately one-third of the cows being primiparous. Cows were assigned to 1 of 4 prepartum diets introduced 3 wk before the expected calving date and switched to the corresponding postpartum diet at calving. Diets 1 (AMI) and 2 (AMI+) included a vegetable RUP source (heat- and lignosulfonate-treated canola meal), with diet 2 containing supplemental Lys x HCl and Met hydroxy analog sources [D,L-2 hydroxy-4-(methylthio)-butanoic acid; Alimet feed supplement]. Diets 3 (PRO) and 4 (PRO+) consisted of a blend of animal RUP sources (blood meal, fish meal, feather meal, and porcine meat and bone meal), with diet 4 containing supplemental Lys x HCl and Met hydroxy analog sources [D,L-2 hydroxy-4-(methylthio)-butanoic acid; Alimet]. During the first 4 wk of lactation, dry matter intake was less when synthetic Lys x HCl and Alimet were supplemented, but this effect was no longer evident in wk 5 to 9 of the experiment. Interestingly, despite the initial decrease in dry matter intake in the cows fed AA-supplemented diets, there was no effect of treatment on milk production or the ratio of fat-corrected milk to dry matter intake throughout the 17 wk of the study. Undegradable protein source (vegetable vs. animal) did not affect dry matter intake, milk production, or 3.5% fat-corrected milk production for the first 17 wk of lactation. The results of this study indicate that heat- and lignosulfonate-treated canola meal can be used as a source of undegradable protein in place of high-quality rumen-undegradable animal protein sources without negative effects on milk production when diets are equivalent

  10. Control of arginine utilization in Neurospora.

    PubMed Central

    Weiss, R L; Davis, R H

    1977-01-01

    The response of Neurospora to changes in the availibility of exogenous arginine was investigated. Upon addition of arginine to the growth medium, catabolism is initiated within minutes. This occurs prior to expansion of the arginine pool or augmentation of catabolic enzyme levels. (Basal levels are approximately 25% of those found during growth in arginine-supplemented medium.) Catabolism of arginine is independent of protein synthesis, indicating that the catabolic enzymes are active but that arginine is not available for catabolism unless present in the medium. Upon exhaustion of the supply of exogenous arginine, catabolism ceases abruptly, despite an expanded arginine pool and induced levels of the catabolic enzymes. The arginine pool supports protein synthesis until the cells regain their normal capacity for endogenous arginine synthesis. These observations, combined with the known small level of induction of arginine catabolic enzymes, non-repressibility of most biosynthetic enzymes, and vesicular localization of the bulk of the arginine pool, suggest that compartmentation plays a significant role in controlling arginine metabolism in Neurospora. PMID:838690

  11. Arginine Metabolism in Bacterial Pathogenesis and Cancer Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Xiong, Lifeng; Teng, Jade L. L.; Botelho, Michael G.; Lo, Regina C.; Lau, Susanna K. P.; Woo, Patrick C. Y.

    2016-01-01

    Antibacterial resistance to infectious diseases is a significant global concern for health care organizations; along with aging populations and increasing cancer rates, it represents a great burden for government healthcare systems. Therefore, the development of therapies against bacterial infection and cancer is an important strategy for healthcare research. Pathogenic bacteria and cancer have developed a broad range of sophisticated strategies to survive or propagate inside a host and cause infection or spread disease. Bacteria can employ their own metabolism pathways to obtain nutrients from the host cells in order to survive. Similarly, cancer cells can dysregulate normal human cell metabolic pathways so that they can grow and spread. One common feature of the adaption and disruption of metabolic pathways observed in bacterial and cancer cell growth is amino acid pathways; these have recently been targeted as a novel approach to manage bacterial infections and cancer therapy. In particular, arginine metabolism has been illustrated to be important not only for bacterial pathogenesis but also for cancer therapy. Therefore, greater insights into arginine metabolism of pathogenic bacteria and cancer cells would provide possible targets for controlling of bacterial infection and cancer treatment. This review will summarize the recent progress on the relationship of arginine metabolism with bacterial pathogenesis and cancer therapy, with a particular focus on arginase and arginine deiminase pathways of arginine catabolism. PMID:26978353

  12. Production of amino acids by free-living heterotrophic nitrogen-fixing bacteria.

    PubMed

    González-López, J; Martínez-Toledo, M V; Rodelas, B; Pozo, C; Salmerón, V

    1995-03-01

    Interest of microbial production of amino acids has been increased greatly since development of biotechnological methods. These methods represent a perspective way applied in a future large-scale manufacture of inexpensive amino acids. In this context, the isolation of producing organisms that may be exploited in the desing of alternative methods for the production of amino acids could be of primary importance.In this review we will describe the liberation of amino acids (methionine, lysine, arginine, tryptophane and glutamic acid) byAzotobacter andAzospirillum during growth in culture media with different carbon sources under diazotrophic and adiazotrophic conditions. These organisms may be useful in developing new methods for the industrial production of amino acids.

  13. [Amino acid composition and biologic value of the proteins of several sorts of buckwheat].

    PubMed

    Sarkisova, N E; Kirilenko, S K

    1976-01-01

    The amino acids composition of summary proteins in unground buckwheat of four common and promising varieties grown in the Ukraine was investigated by using ion-exchange chromatography with an automatic analyzor Hd-1200 E. Between individual varieties of buckweheat no essential differences in the amino acids content were in evidence. The total proteins of the buckwheat grit contain high quantities of lysine, treonine, leucine, glutamic acid and arginine. The amino acids score was instrumental in determining the biological value and in eliciting amino acids limiting this value in different grits. These data may be made use of in the practice of public catering for estimating formulae of meals prepared with grits differently combined with other products securing an improved amino acids composition of ready-to-eat meals.

  14. Evaluation of Drosophila metabolic labeling strategies for in vivo quantitative proteomic analyses with applications to early pupa formation and amino acid starvation.

    PubMed

    Chang, Ying-Che; Tang, Hong-Wen; Liang, Suh-Yuen; Pu, Tsung-Hsien; Meng, Tzu-Ching; Khoo, Kay-Hooi; Chen, Guang-Chao

    2013-05-03

    Although stable isotope labeling by amino acids in cell culture (SILAC)-based quantitative proteomics was first developed as a cell culture-based technique, stable isotope-labeled amino acids have since been successfully introduced in vivo into select multicellular model organisms by manipulating the feeding diets. An earlier study by others has demonstrated that heavy lysine labeled Drosophila melanogaster can be derived by feeding with an exclusive heavy lysine labeled yeast diet. In this work, we have further evaluated the use of heavy lysine and/or arginine for metabolic labeling of fruit flies, with an aim to determine its respective quantification accuracy and versatility. In vivo conversion of heavy lysine and/or heavy arginine to several nonessential amino acids was observed in labeled flies, leading to distorted isotope pattern and underestimated heavy to light ratio. These quantification defects can nonetheless be rectified at protein level using the normalization function. The only caveat is that such a normalization strategy may not be suitable for every biological application, particularly when modified peptides need to be individually quantified at peptide level. In such cases, we showed that peptide ratios calculated from the summed intensities of all isotope peaks are less affected by the heavy amino acid conversion and therefore less sequence-dependent and more reliable. Applying either the single Lys8 or double Lys6/Arg10 metabolic labeling strategy to flies, we quantitatively mapped the proteomic changes during the onset of metamorphosis and upon amino acid deprivation. The expression of a number of steroid hormone 20-hydroxyecdysone regulated proteins was found to be changed significantly during larval-pupa transition, while several subunits of the V-ATPase complex and components regulating actomyosin were up-regulated under starvation-induced autophagy conditions.

  15. Rumen-protected methionine and lysine: effects on milk production and plasma amino acids of dairy cows with reference to metabolisable protein status.

    PubMed

    Awawdeh, Mofleh S

    2016-05-01

    Two experiments were conducted to study the effects of rumen-protected Met (RPM) alone or with rumen-protected Lys (RPL) on milk yield and plasma amino acids of dairy cows. In experiment 1, 24 multiparous Holstein cows (154 DIM) were assigned to one of 3 groups where each cow received 0 g/d of RPM and RPL (C), 30 g/d of RPM (M), or 30 g/d of RPM plus 25 g of RPL (ML). The study lasted for 8 weeks where milk yield and composition were determined weekly. Daily milk yield averaged 28·0, 27·8, and 29·7 kg/cow for the C, M, and ML groups, respectively. Dietary treatments had no effects (P ≥ 0·54) on milk contents of fat, lactose, solid non-fat or total solids. Milk protein content in the ML group was greater (P < 0·05) than the C and M groups. Plasma levels of all AA were not significantly (P ≥ 0·09) affected by supplemental RPL and/or RPM. In experiment 2, 30 multiparous Holstein cows (100 DIM) were assigned to one of 3 groups where each cow received 0 g/d of RPM and RPL (C), 50 g/d of RPM (M), or 50 g/d of RPM plus 25 g/d of RPL (ML). The study lasted for 5 weeks. Cows in the M (30·5 kg) and ML (31·4 kg) groups produced (P < 0·05) more milk than those of the C group (29·1 kg). Under conditions of this study, RPM plus RPL improved milk yield and protein contents of dairy cows and was better than supplying RPM alone. Response in milk yield to RPM and RPL was affected by the MP status of cows which deserves further investigation.

  16. Effects of arginine on intestinal epithelial cell integrity and nutrient uptake.

    PubMed

    Xia, Mi; Ye, Lulu; Hou, Qihang; Yu, Qinghua

    2016-11-14

    Arginine is a multifaceted amino acid that is critical to the normal physiology of the gastrointestinal tract. Oral arginine administration has been shown to improve mucosal recovery following intestinal injury. The present study investigated the influence of extracellular arginine concentrations on epithelial cell barrier regulation and nutrition uptake by porcine small intestinal epithelial cell line (IPEC-J2). The results show that reducing arginine concentration from 0·7 to 0·2 mm did not affect the transepithelial electrical resistance value, tight-junction proteins (claudin-1, occludin, E-cadherin), phosphorylated extracellular signal-regulated protein kinases (p-ERK) and mucin-1 expression. Furthermore, reducing arginine concentration stimulated greater expression of cationic amino acid transporter (CAT1), excitatory amino acid transporter (EAAT3) and alanine/serine/cysteine transporter (ASCT1) mRNA by IPEC-J2 cells, which was verified by elevated efficiency of amino acid uptake. Glucose consumption by IPEC-J2 cells treated with 0·2 mm-arginine remained at the same physiological level to guarantee energy supply and to maintain the cell barrier. This experiment implied that reducing arginine concentration is feasible in IPEC-J2 cells guaranteed by nutrient uptake and cell barrier function.

  17. A chimera carrying the functional domain of the orphan protein SLC7A14 in the backbone of SLC7A2 mediates trans-stimulated arginine transport.

    PubMed

    Jaenecke, Isabel; Boissel, Jean-Paul; Lemke, Matthias; Rupp, Johanna; Gasnier, Bruno; Closs, Ellen I

    2012-08-31

    In human skin fibroblasts, a lysosomal transport system specific for cationic amino acids has been described and named system c. We asked if SLC7A14 (solute carrier family 7 member A14), an orphan protein assigned to the SLC7 subfamily of cationic amino acid transporters (CATs) due to sequence homology, may represent system c. Fusion proteins between SLC7A14 and enhanced GFP localized to intracellular vesicles, co-staining with the lysosomal marker LysoTracker(®). To perform transport studies, we first tried to redirect SLC7A14 to the plasma membrane (by mutating putative lysosomal targeting motifs) but without success. We then created a chimera carrying the backbone of human (h) CAT-2 and the protein domain of SLC7A14 corresponding to the so-called "functional domain" of the hCAT proteins, a protein stretch of 81 amino acids that determines the apparent substrate affinity, sensitivity to trans-stimulation, and (as revealed in this study) pH dependence. The chimera mediated arginine transport and exhibited characteristics similar but not identical to hCAT-2A (the low affinity hCAT-2 isoform). Western blot and microscopic analyses confirmed localization of the chimera in the plasma membrane of Xenopus laevis oocytes. Noticeably, arginine transport by the hCAT-2/SLC7A14 chimera was pH-dependent, trans-stimulated, and inhibited by α-trimethyl-L-lysine, properties assigned to lysosomal transport system c in human skin fibroblasts. Expression analysis showed strong expression of SLC7A14 mRNA in these cells. Taken together, these data strongly suggest that SLC7A14 is a lysosomal transporter for cationic amino acids.

  18. Amperometric biosensor based on diamond paste for the enantioanalysis of L-lysine.

    PubMed

    Stefan-van Staden, Raluca-Ioana; Nejem, R'afat Mahmoud; van Staden, Jacobus Frederick; Aboul-Enein, Hassan Y

    2012-05-15

    An amperometric biosensor was proposed for the enantioanalysis of L-lysine. The biosensor is based on the impregnation of L-lysine oxidase in diamond paste. The potential used for the determination of l-lysine was 650 mV. The biosensor exhibited a linear concentration range between 1 and 100 nmol/L with a limit of detection of 4 pmol/L. The selectivity of the biosensor is high over other amino acids, such as L-serine, L-leucine, L-aspartic acid, L-glutamic acid, histamine, glycine. The proposed biosensor can be applied for the determination of L-lysine in serum samples and pharmaceutical compounds.

  19. Effects of free amino acids on cytokine secretion and proliferative activity of feline T cells in an in vitro study using the cell line MYA-1.

    PubMed

    Paßlack, Nadine; Doherr, Marcus G; Zentek, Jürgen

    2016-10-01

    In vitro studies might be an interesting screening method for targeted in vivo studies in the field of immunonutrition and help to reduce and refine animal studies. As the role of amino acids for immune function of cats has not been evaluated in detail so far, the present study aimed at investigating the effects of eight different amino acids (arginine, leucine, isoleucine, valine, glutamine, lysine, threonine and tryptophan) in six concentrations each (0, 0.25, 0.5, 1, 2 and 8x the cat blood level) on cytokine secretion and proliferative activity of feline T cells (MYA-1) in vitro. The results demonstrated that high doses of arginine increased IL-4, IL-10 and TNF-α secretion of T cells, while increasing concentrations of lysine increased IL-10 secretion and proliferative activity of the T cells. High doses of leucine enhanced GM-CSF and IL-10 secretion, while concentrations of threonine in the cell culture media greater than blood concentration also increased GM-CSF and additionally TNF-α secretion of the cells. The effects of glutamine and isoleucine on T cell function were only small. In conclusion, the present in vitro study could evaluate the immunomodulating potential of specific amino acids for feline T cell function. High doses of arginine, lysine, leucine and threonine had a significant impact on cytokine secretion and proliferative activity of the T cells. Targeted in vivo studies should investigate the clinical relevance of dietary supplementation of those amino acids in healthy and diseased cats as a next step.

  20. Lysine malonylation is elevated in type 2 diabetic mouse models and enriched in metabolic associated proteins.

    PubMed

    Du, Yipeng; Cai, Tanxi; Li, Tingting; Xue, Peng; Zhou, Bo; He, Xiaolong; Wei, Peng; Liu, Pingsheng; Yang, Fuquan; Wei, Taotao

    2015-01-01

    Protein lysine malonylation, a newly identified protein post-translational modification (PTM), has been proved to be evolutionarily conserved and is present in both eukaryotic and prokaryotic cells. However, its potential roles associated with human diseases remain largely unknown. In the present study, we observed an elevated lysine malonylation in a screening of seven lysine acylations in liver tissues of db/db mice, which is a typical model of type 2 diabetes. We also detected an elevated lysine malonylation in ob/ob mice, which is another model of type 2 diabetes. We then performed affinity enrichment coupled with proteomic analysis on liver tissues of both wild-type (wt) and db/db mice and identified a total of 573 malonylated lysine sites from 268 proteins. There were more malonylated lysine sites and proteins in db/db than in wt mice. Five proteins with elevated malonylation were verified by immunoprecipitation coupled with Western blot analysis. Bioinformatic analysis of the proteomic results revealed the enrichment of malonylated proteins in metabolic pathways, especially those involved in glucose and fatty acid metabolism. In addition, the biological role of lysine malonylation was validated in an enzyme of the glycolysis pathway. Together, our findings support a potential role of protein lysine malonylation in type 2 diabetes with possible implications for its therapy in the future.

  1. Lysine Malonylation Is Elevated in Type 2 Diabetic Mouse Models and Enriched in Metabolic Associated Proteins*

    PubMed Central

    Du, Yipeng; Cai, Tanxi; Li, Tingting; Xue, Peng; Zhou, Bo; He, Xiaolong; Wei, Peng; Liu, Pingsheng; Yang, Fuquan; Wei, Taotao

    2015-01-01

    Protein lysine malonylation, a newly identified protein post-translational modification (PTM), has been proved to be evolutionarily conserved and is present in both eukaryotic and prokaryotic cells. However, its potential roles associated with human diseases remain largely unknown. In the present study, we observed an elevated lysine malonylation in a screening of seven lysine acylations in liver tissues of db/db mice, which is a typical model of type 2 diabetes. We also detected an elevated lysine malonylation in ob/ob mice, which is another model of type 2 diabetes. We then performed affinity enrichment coupled with proteomic analysis on liver tissues of both wild-type (wt) and db/db mice and identified a total of 573 malonylated lysine sites from 268 proteins. There were more malonylated lysine sites and proteins in db/db than in wt mice. Five proteins with elevated malonylation were verified by immunoprecipitation coupled with Western blot analysis. Bioinformatic analysis of the proteomic results revealed the enrichment of malonylated proteins in metabolic pathways, especially those involved in glucose and fatty acid metabolism. In addition, the biological role of lysine malonylation was validated in an enzyme of the glycolysis pathway. Together, our findings support a potential role of protein lysine malonylation in type 2 diabetes with possible implications for its therapy in the future. PMID:25418362

  2. Lysine-overproducing mutants of Saccharomyces cerevisiae baker's yeast isolated in continuous culture.

    PubMed Central

    Gasent-Ramírez, J M; Benítez, T

    1997-01-01

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae baker's yeast mutants which produce 3 to 17 times as much lysine as the wild type, depending on the nitrogen source, have been selected. The baker's yeast strain was growth in a pH-regulated chemostat in minimal medium with proline as the nitrogen source, supplemented with increasing concentrations of the toxic analog of the lysine S-2-aminoethyl-L-cysteine (AEC). The lysine-overproducing mutants, which were isolated as AEC-resistant mutants, were also resistant to high external concentrations of lysine and to alpha-aminoadipate and seemed to be affected in the lysine biosynthetic pathway but not in the biosynthetic pathways of other amino acids. Lysine overproduction by one of the mutants seemed to be due to, at least, the loss of repression of the homocitrate synthase encoded by the LYS20 gene. The mutant grew slower than the wild type, and its dough-raising capacity was reduced in in vitro assays, probably due to the toxic effects of lysine accumulation or of an intermediate produced in the pathway. This mutant can be added as a food supplement to enrich the nutritive qualities of bakery products, and its resistance to alpha-aminoadipate, AEC, and lysine can be used as a dominant marker. PMID:9406398

  3. Aminocella lysinolytica gen. nov., sp. nov., a L-lysine-degrading, strictly anaerobic bacterium in the class Clostridia isolated from a methanogenic reactor of cattle farms.

    PubMed

    Ueki, Atsuko; Shibuya, Toru; Kaku, Nobuo; Ueki, Katsuji

    2015-01-01

    A strictly anaerobic bacterial strain (WN037(T)) was isolated from a methanogenic reactor. Cells were Gram-positive rods. Strain WN037(T) was asaccharolytic. The strain fermented L-lysine in the presence of B-vitamin mixture or vitamin B12 and produced acetate and butyrate. L-arginine and casamino acids poorly supported the growth. Strain WN037(T) used neither other amino acids nor organic acids examined. The strain had C18:1 ω7c, C16:0 and C18:1 ω7c DMA as the predominant cellular fatty acids. The genomic DNA G + C content was 44.2 mol %. Phylogenetic analysis based on the 16S rRNA gene sequence placed strain WN037(T) in the family Eubacteriaceae in the class Clostridia. The closest relative was Eubacterium pyruvativorans (sequence similarity, 92.8 %). Based on the comprehensive analyses, the novel genus and species, Aminocella lysinolytica gen. nov., sp. nov. was proposed to accommodate the strain. The type strain is WN037(T) (= JCM 19863(T) = DSM 28287(T)).

  4. Differential distribution of amino acids in plants.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Vinod; Sharma, Anket; Kaur, Ravdeep; Thukral, Ashwani Kumar; Bhardwaj, Renu; Ahmad, Parvaiz

    2017-05-01

    Plants are a rich source of amino acids and their individual abundance in plants is of great significance especially in terms of food. Therefore, it is of utmost necessity to create a database of the relative amino acid contents in plants as reported in literature. Since in most of the cases complete analysis of profiles of amino acids in plants was not reported, the units used and the methods applied and the plant parts used were different, amino acid contents were converted into relative units with respect to lysine for statistical analysis. The most abundant amino acids in plants are glutamic acid and aspartic acid. Pearson's correlation analysis among different amino acids showed that there were no negative correlations between the amino acids. Cluster analysis (CA) applied to relative amino acid contents of different families. Alismataceae, Cyperaceae, Capparaceae and Cactaceae families had close proximity with each other on the basis of their relative amino acid contents. First three components of principal component analysis (PCA) explained 79.5% of the total variance. Factor analysis (FA) explained four main underlying factors for amino acid analysis. Factor-1 accounted for 29.4% of the total variance and had maximum loadings on glycine, isoleucine, leucine, threonine and valine. Factor-2 explained 25.8% of the total variance and had maximum loadings on alanine, aspartic acid, serine and tyrosine. 14.2% of the total variance was explained by factor-3 and had maximum loadings on arginine and histidine. Factor-4 accounted 8.3% of the total variance and had maximum loading on the proline amino acid. The relative content of different amino acids presented in this paper is alanine (1.4), arginine (1.8), asparagine (0.7), aspartic acid (2.4), cysteine (0.5), glutamic acid (2.8), glutamine (0.6), glycine (1.0), histidine (0.5), isoleucine (0.9), leucine (1.7), lysine (1.0), methionine (0.4), phenylalanine (0.9), proline (1.1), serine (1.0), threonine (1

  5. Continuous Exposure to L-Arginine Induces Oxidative Stress and Physiological Tolerance in Cultured Human Endothelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Mohan, Srinidi; Wu, Chia-Ching; Shin, Soyoung; Fung, Ho-Leung

    2011-01-01

    The therapeutic benefits of L-arginine (ARG) supplementation in humans, often clearly observed in short-term studies, are not evident after long-term use. The mechanisms for the development of ARG tolerance are not known and cannot be readily examined in humans. We have developed a sensitive in vitro model using a low glucose/low arginine culture medium to study the mechanisms of ARG action and tolerance using two different human endothelial cells, i.e., Ea.hy926 and human umbilical venous endothelial cells (HUVEC). Cultured cells were incubated with different concentrations of ARG and other agents to monitor their effects on eNOS expression and function, as well as glucose and superoxide (O2•−) accumulation. Short-term (2 h) exposure to at least 50 μM ARG moderately increased eNOS activity and intracellular glucose (p<0.05), with no change in eNOS mRNA or protein expression. In contrast, 7-day continuous ARG exposure suppressed eNOS expression and activity. This was accompanied by increase in glucose and O2•− accumulation. Co-incubation with 100 μM ascorbic acid, 300 U/ml PEG-superoxide dismutase (PEG-SOD), 100 μM L-lysine or 30 μM 5-chloro-2-(N-2,5-dichlorobenenesulfonamido))-benzoxazole (a fructose-1,6-bisphosphatase inhibitor) prevented the occurrence of cellular ARG tolerance. Short-term co-incubation of ARG with PEG-SOD improved cellular nitrite accumulation without altering cellular ARG uptake. These studies suggest that ARG-induced oxidative stress may be a primary causative factor for the development of cellular ARG tolerance. PMID:22130739

  6. A Potent, Selective and Cell-active Inhibitor of Human Type I Protein Arginine Methyltransferases

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Hong; Senisterra, Guillermo; Li, Fengling; Butler, Kyle V.; Kaniskan, H. Ümit; Speed, Brandon A.; dela Seña, Carlo; Dong, Aiping; Zeng, Hong; Schapira, Matthieu; Brown, Peter J.; Arrowsmith, Cheryl H.; Barsyte-Lovejoy, Dalia; Liu, Jing; Vedadi, Masoud; Jin, Jian

    2015-01-01

    Protein arginine methyltransferases (PRMTs) play a crucial role in a variety of biological processes. Overexpression of PRMTs has been implicated in various human diseases including cancer. Consequently, selective small-molecule inhibitors of PRMTs have been pursued by both academia and pharmaceutical industry as chemical tools for testing biological and therapeutic hypotheses. PRMTs are divided into three categories: type I PRMTs which catalyze mono- and asymmetric dimethylation of arginine residues, type II PRMTs which catalyze mono- and symmetric dimethylation of arginine residues, and type III PRMT which catalyzes only monomethylation of arginine residues. Here, we report the discovery of a potent, selective and cell-active inhibitor of human type I PRMTs, MS023, and characterization of this inhibitor in a battery of biochemical, biophysical and cellular assays. MS023 displayed high potency for type I PRMTs including PRMT1, 3, 4, 6 and 8, but was completely inactive against type II and type III PRMTs, protein lysine methyltransferases and DNA methyltransferases. A crystal structure of PRMT6 in complex with MS023 revealed that MS023 binds the substrate binding site. MS023 potently decreased cellular levels of histone arginine asymmetric dimethylation. It also reduced global levels of arginine asymmetric dimethylation and concurrently increased levels of arginine monomethylation and symmetric dimethylation in cells. We also developed MS094, a close analog of MS023, which was inactive in biochemical and cellular assays, as a negative control for chemical biology studies. MS023 and MS094 are useful chemical tools for investigating the role of type I PRMTs in health and disease. PMID:26598975

  7. Measurements of radiological data of some amino acids in the energy range 0.122-1.330MeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lokhande, Rajkumar M.; More, Chaitali V.; Surung, Bharat S.; Raut, Siddheshwar D.; Pawar, Pravina P.

    2016-05-01

    Radiological parameters such as μm, σt, σe, Zeff and Neff of amino acids, namely Lysine (C6H15N2O2), Histidine (C6H9N3O2) and Arginine (C6H15N4O2), were measured using NaI (Tl)-based gamma spectrometry. Radioactive sources used in the study are 57Co, 133Ba, 137Cs, 54Mn, 60Co and 22Na. Gamma ray transmission method in a narrow beam good geometry set up was used in the study. The measured data were compared against XCOM-based data. The agreement is within 2%.

  8. [A sensitive and specific radioimmunoassay for arginine vasopressin and its validation].

    PubMed

    Oki, Y; Ohgo, S; Yoshimi, T

    1984-03-20

    A sensitive and specific radioimmunoassay (RIA) for arginine vasopressin (AVP) has been developed and validated. Synthetic AVP was coupled to bovine serum albumin (BSA) with glutaraldehyde. Antisera against AVP were raised in three rabbits immunized with AVP-BSA complex. After 6 months, at the 16th injection, one of the antisera had a titer high enough to be utilizable for RIA at a final dilution of 1:400,000. The labeling of AVP with 125I Na was performed with the modified chloramine T method, and the purification of iodinated AVP was done with gel filtration chromatography on a Sephadex G-25 fine column (1 X 20 cm) with an elution buffer of 0.01 M acetic acid containing 0.1% BSA. Radioactivities from the Sephadex G-25 were eluted in three peaks. 125I-AVP, which was reactive to the antiserum, was contained in the third peak, and 125I-AVP in the fractions on the down slope of the peak was used for the radioligand in the amount of 1000 cpm. The specific activity of purified 125I-AVP was about 400 muCi/microgram. Diluted antiserum and samples, unlabeled AVP or related peptides were preincubated at 4 degrees C for 24 hr, and then 125I-AVP was added to the mixture and incubated for a further 72 hr. Separation of B and F was done with polyethyleneglycol. The minimal detection limit of AVP, which was 95% of the confidence limit of the mean value of B0, was 0.4 pg/tube. The cross-reactivities with lysine vasopressin, arginine vasotocin, DDAVP and oxytocin were 0.1%, 30%, 1% and 0%, respectively. AVP in plasma was extracted with cold acetone and petroleum ether. The recoveries of synthetic AVP from plasma which was added (2-16 pg) were more than 94%. The intra and inter-assay coefficients of variation determined by plasma of AVP concentration of about 4.8 pg/ml were 8.7% and 11.3%, respectively. The RIA detected AVP of concentration as low as 1 pg/ml following the extraction procedure. AVP immunoreactivity was detected without extraction in urine, and the lyophilized

  9. Nitrogen fertilizer factory effects on the amino acid and nitrogen content in the needles of Scots pine.

    PubMed

    Kupsinskiene, E

    2001-12-04

    The aim of the research was to evaluate the content of amino acids in the needles of Pinus sylvestris growing in the area affected by a nitrogen fertilizer factory and to compare them with other parameters of needles, trees, and sites. Three young-age stands of Scots pine were selected at a distance of 0.5 km, 5 km, and 17 km from the factory. Examination of the current-year needles in winter of the year 2000 revealed significant (p < 0.05) differences between the site at a 0.5-km distance from the factory and the site at a 17-km distance from the factory--with the site closest to the factory showing the highest concentrations of protein (119%), total arginine (166%), total other amino acids (depending on amino acid, the effect ranged between 119 and 149%), free arginine (771%), other free amino acids (glutamic acid, threonine, serine, lysine--depending on amino acid, the effect ranged between 162 and 234%), also the longest needles, widest diameter, largest surface area, and heaviest dry weight (respectively, 133, 110, 136, and 169%). The gradient of nitrogen concentration in the needles was assessed on the selected plots over the period of 1995-2000, with the highest concentration (depending on year, 119 to 153%) documented in the site located 0.5 km from the factory. Significant correlations were determined between the total amino acid contents (r = 0.448 -0.939, p < 0.05), some free amino acid (arginine, aspartic acid, glutamic acid, lysine, threonine, and serine) contents (r = 0.418 - 0.975, p < 0.05), and air pollutant concentration at the sites, the distance between the sites and the factory, and characteristics of the needles. No correlation was found between free or total arginine content and defoliation or retention of the needles. In conclusion, it was revealed that elevated mean monthly concentration of ammonia (26 microg m(-3)) near the nitrogen fertilizer factory caused changes in nitrogen metabolism, especially increasing (nearly eight times

  10. Optimization of a gas chromatography-mass spectrometry method with methyl chloroformate derivatization for quantification of amino acids in plant tissue.

    PubMed

    Vancompernolle, Bram; Croes, Kim; Angenon, Geert

    2016-04-01

    Rapid, easy and reliable quantification of amino acids is crucial in research on plant amino acid metabolism and nutritional improvement of crops via enrichment of essential amino acids. A recently reported analysis method, based on solid phase extraction (SPE), derivatization with methyl chloroformate and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry was optimized and tested on three-week-old Arabidopsis thaliana leaf tissues. Optimization of the SPE cleanup yielded recovery rates of minimum 95% for all amino acids (except arginine). Variations in accuracy and precision did not exceed 12.5%, except for cysteine, histidine and tryptophane, which were excluded from analysis. Quantification of overlapping peaks for isoleucine/threonine and proline/asparagine was possible by selection of two specific fragment ions for each amino acid. Of the 16 selected amino acids, 14 were quantified successfully in at least 75% of the samples, while methionine and tyrosine were only quantifiable in 6% and 42%, respectively. A case study on the aspartate super pathway confirmed the applicability of the optimized method on wild type and genetically modified plants: external supplementation of methionine or lysine yielded a 146-fold or 27-fold increase in the respective absolute amino acid levels compared with the control treatment. Induced expression of dhdps-r1 (a mutated lysine biosynthesis gene encoding a feedback insensitive enzyme) caused an 83-fold increase in absolute lysine levels.

  11. Purification and characterization of arginine kinase from the American cockroach (Periplaneta americana).

    PubMed

    Brown, Ashli E; France, Richard M; Grossman, Steven H

    2004-06-01

    The isolation and characterization of homogeneous arginine kinase from the cockroach is reported. The purification protocol produces 6.6 mg of pure enzyme from 6.8 g of whole cockroach. The purified enzyme cross-reacts with a heterologous antibody and monoclonal antibody against arginine kinase from the shrimp. Both antibody preparations also cross-react with extracts from several species known to contain monomeric arginine kinase, but fail to react with extracts from organisms containing dimeric arginine kinase. Cockroach arginine kinase has a molecular mass of approximately 43,000 determined from measurements by gel filtration and gel electrophoresis. Compared with other arginine kinases, the enzyme from the cockroach is relatively thermostable (50% activity retained at 50 degrees C for 10 min) and has a pH optima of 8.5 and 6.5-7.5, for the forward and reverse reactions, respectively. Treatment with 5,5'dithiobis[2-nitrobenzoic acid] indicates that arginine kinase has a single reactive sulfhydryl group and, interestingly, the reaction is biphasic. The Michaelis constants for the phosphagen substrates, arginine: 0.49 mM, phosphoarginine: 0.94 mM, and nucleotide substrates MgATP: 0.14 mM, MgADP: 0.09 mM, are in the range reported for other arginine kinases. A 1% solution of pure enzyme has an absorbance of 7.0 at 280 nm. Calculations based on circular dichroic spectra indicate that arginine kinase from the cockroach has 12% alpha-helical structure. The intrinsic protein fluorescence emission maximum at 340 nm suggests that tryptophan residues are below the surface of the protein and not exposed to solvent. Arginine kinase from the cockroach and shrimp are known to be deleterious immunogens towards humans. The availability of pure protein, its characterization and potential regulation of activity, will be useful in developing agents to control the cockroach population and its destructive role in agriculture and human health.

  12. A region rich in aspartic acid, arginine, tyrosine, and glycine (DRYG) mediates eukaryotic initiation factor 4B (eIF4B) self-association and interaction with eIF3.

    PubMed Central

    Méthot, N; Song, M S; Sonenberg, N

    1996-01-01

    The binding of mRNA to the ribosome is mediated by eukaryotic initiation factors eukaryotic initiation factor 4F (eIF4F), eIF4B, eIF4A, and eIF3, eIF4F binds to the mRNA cap structure and, in combination with eIF4B, is believed to unwind the secondary structure in the 5' untranslated region to facilitate ribosome binding. eIF3 associates with the 40S ribosomal subunit prior to mRNA binding. eIF4B copurifies with eIF3 and eIF4F through several purification steps, suggesting the involvement of a multisubunit complex during translation initiation. To understand the mechanism by which eIF4B promotes 40S ribosome binding to the mRNA, we studied its interactions with partner proteins by using a filter overlay (protein-protein [far Western]) assay and the two-hybrid system. In this report, we show that eIF4B self-associates and also interacts directly with the p170 subunit of eIF3. A region rich in aspartic acid, arginine, tyrosine, and glycine, termed the DRYG domain, is sufficient for self-association of eIF4B, both in vitro and in vivo, and for interaction with the p170 subunit of eIF3. These experiments suggest that eIF4B participates in mRNA-ribosome binding by acting as an intermediary between the mRNA and eIF3, via a direct interaction with the p170 subunit of eIF3. PMID:8816444

  13. Lysine fortification reduces anxiety and lessens stress in family members in economically weak communities in Northwest Syria.

    PubMed

    Smriga, Miro; Ghosh, Shibani; Mouneimne, Youssef; Pellett, Peter L; Scrimshaw, Nevin S

    2004-06-01

    Lysine is a limiting amino acid in diets based on wheat as the staple. In experimental animals, prolonged dietary lysine inadequacy increases stress-induced anxiety. If observed in humans, such a result would have a strong implication for the relationship between nutrition and communal quality of life and mental health. As part of a 3-month randomized double-blind study, we tested whether lysine fortification of wheat reduces anxiety and stress response in family members in poor Syrian communities consuming wheat as a staple food. In the lysine-fortified group, the plasma cortisol response to the blood drawing as a cause of stress was reduced in females, as was sympathetic arousal in males as measured by skin conductance. Lysine fortification also significantly reduced chronic anxiety as measured by the trait anxiety inventory in males. These results suggest that some stress responses in economically weak populations consuming cereal-based diets can be improved with lysine fortification.

  14. Structure-function relationships in the Na,K-ATPase. cap alpha. subunit: site-directed mutagenesis of glutamine-111 to arginine and asparagine-122 to aspartic acid generates a ouabain-resistant enzyme

    SciTech Connect

    Price, E.M.; Lingrel, J.B.

    1988-11-01

    Na,K-ATPases from various species differ greatly in their sensitivity to cardiac glycosides such as ouabain. The sheep and human enzymes are a thousand times more sensitive than the corresponding ones from rat and mouse. To define the region of the ..cap alpha..1 subunit responsible for this differential sensitivity, chimeric cDNAs of sheep and rat were constructed and expressed in ouabain-sensitive HeLa cells. The construct containing the amino-terminal half of the rat ..cap alpha..1 subunit coding region and carboxyl-terminal half of the sheep conferred the ouabain-resistant phenotype to HeLa cells while the reverse construct did not. This indicates that the determinants involved in ouabain sensitivity are located in the amino-terminal half of the Na,K-ATPase ..cap alpha.. subunit. By use of site-directed mutagenesis, the amino acid sequence of the first extracellular domain (H1-H2) of the sheep ..cap alpha..1 subunit was changed to that of the rat. When expressed in HeLa cells, this mutated sheep ..cap alpha..1 construct, like the rat/sheep chimera, was able to confer ouabain resistance to these cells. Furthermore, similar results were observed when HeLa cells were transfected with a sheep ..cap alpha..1 cDNA containing only two amino acid substitutions. The resistant cells, whether transfected with the rat ..cap alpha..1 cDNA, the rat/sheep chimera, or the mutant sheep ..cap alpha..1 cDNAs, exhibited identical biochemical characteristics including ouabain-inhibitable cell growth, /sup 86/Rb/sup +/ uptake, and Na,K-ATPase activity. These results demonstrate that the presence of arginine and aspartic acid on the amino end and carboxyl end, respectively, of the H1-H2 extracellular domain of the Na,K-ATPase ..cap alpha.. subunit together is responsible for the ouabain-resistant character of the rat enzyme and the corresponding residues in the sheep ..cap alpha..1 subunit (glutamine and asparagine) are somehow involved in ouabain binding.

  15. Dietary arginine requirement of juvenile red drum (Sciaenops ocellatus) based on weight gain and feed efficiency.

    PubMed

    Barziza, D E; Buentello, J A; Gatlin, D M

    2000-07-01

    Increasing aquacultural production of red drum (Sciaenops ocellatus) has prompted the determination of many of this species' nutritional requirements. However, limited information is available concerning its amino acid requirements, especially for arginine. Therefore, a feeding trial was conducted with juvenile red drum to determine their quantitative dietary requirement for arginine. Experimental diets contained 35 g crude protein/100 g from red drum muscle and crystalline amino acids. Incremental levels of arginine were added to the diets in place of a mixture of glycine and aspartic acid to maintain all diets isonitrogenous. All diets were fed in triplicate to juvenile red drum for 7 wk. Graded levels of arginine significantly (P < 0.05) affected weight gain, feed efficiency, protein efficiency ratio (PER) and plasma arginine levels of the fish. Based on least-squares regression of feed efficiency and PER data, the minimum requirement (+/- SEM) of red drum for arginine was estimated at 1.44 (+/- 0.15) and 1.48 (+/- 0.12) g/100 g diet (4.11 and 4.23 g/100 g dietary protein), respectively. The arginine requirements estimated from weight gain data were 1.75 (+/- 0.18) g/100 g diet or 5.0 g/100 g dietary protein. These values are similar to those reported for other carnivorous fish species.

  16. Sensitive arginine sensing based on inner filter effect of Au nanoparticles on the fluorescence of CdTe quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Haijian; Li, Ming; Jiang, Linye; Shen, Feng; Hu, Yufeng; Ren, Xueqin

    2017-02-01

    Arginine plays an important role in many biological functions, whose detection is very significant. Herein, a sensitive, simple and cost-effective fluorescent method for the detection of arginine has been developed based on the inner filter effect (IFE) of citrate-stabilized gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) on the fluorescence of thioglycolic acid-capped CdTe quantum dots (QDs). When citrate-stabilized AuNPs were mixed with thioglycolic acid-capped CdTe QDs, the fluorescence of CdTe QDs was significantly quenched by AuNPs via the IFE. With the presence of arginine, arginine could induce the aggregation and corresponding absorption spectra change of AuNPs, which then IFE-decreased fluorescence could gradually recover with increasing amounts of arginine, achieving fluorescence "turn on" sensing for arginine. The detection mechanism is clearly illustrated and various experimental conditions were also optimized. Under the optimum conditions, a decent linear relationship was obtained in the range from 16 to 121 μg L- 1 and the limit of detection was 5.6 μg L- 1. And satisfactory results were achieved in arginine analysis using arginine injection, compound amino acid injection, even blood plasma as samples. Therefore, the present assay showed various merits, such as simplicity, low cost, high sensitivity and selectivity, making it promising for sensing arginine in biological samples.

  17. Identification, expression and antibacterial activities of an antimicrobial peptide NK-lysin from a marine fish Larimichthys crocea.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Qi-Jia; Wang, Jun; Liu, Min; Qiao, Ying; Hong, Wan-Shu; Su, Yong-Quan; Han, Kun-Huang; Ke, Qiao-Zhen; Zheng, Wei-Qiang

    2016-08-01

    As fundamental immunologic mechanism, the innate immunity system is more important than the specific immunity system in teleost fishes during pathogens infection. Antimicrobial peptides are integral parts of the innate immune system, and play significant roles against pathogens infection. NK-lysin, the compounds of the natural killer cells and cytotoxic T cells, are potent and effective antimicrobial peptides widely distributed in animals. In this study, we reported the sequence characteristics, expression profiles and antibacterial activities of a NK-lysin gene (Lc-NK-lysin) from a commercially important marine fish, the large yellow croaker (Larimichthys crocea). The open reading frame of Lc-NK-lysin cDNA sequence was 447 bp in length, coding 148 amino acids. The genomic DNA of Lc-NK-lysin has the common features of NK-lysin family, consisting of five exons and four introns, and in its deduced mature peptide, there are six well-conserved cysteine residues and a Saposin B domain. Lc-NK-lysin was expressed in all tested tissues (skin, muscle, gill, brain, head kidney, heart, liver, spleen, stomach and intestine) with different expression patterns. In pathogens infection the expression profiles of Lc-NK-lysin varied significantly in gill, head kidney, spleen and liver, indicating its role in immune response. Two peptides (Lc-NK-lysin-1 and Lc-NK-lysin-2) divided from the core region of the Lc-NK-lysin mature polypeptide were chemically synthesized and their antibacterial activities were examined; the potential function on the inhibition of bacteria propagation was revealed. Our results suggested that Lc-NK-lysin is a typical member of the NK-lysin family and as an immune-related gene it involves in the immune response when pathogens invasion.

  18. NOVEL ANTI-MICROBIAL PEPTIDE, NK-LYSIN, IS PRODUCED LOCALLY IN THE GUT OF EIMERIA-INFECTED HOST

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    NK-lysin is an anti-microbial and anti-tumor protein produced by NK cells and T lymphocytes in mammals and is considered to be an important component of the local innate immune response to pathogens. Chicken NK-lysin consists of an 868 bp DNA sequence with an ORF of 140 amino acids with a predicted ...

  19. Coacervate-like microspheres from lysine-rich proteinoid

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rohlfing, D. L.

    1975-01-01

    Microspheres form isothermally from lysine-rich proteinoid when the ionic strength of the solution is increased with NaCl or other salts. Studies with different monovalent anions and with polymers of different amino acid composition indicate that charge neutralization and hydrophobic bonding contribute to microsphere formation. The particles also form in sea water, especially if heated or made slightly alkaline. The microspheres differ from those made from acidic proteinoid but resemble coacervate droplets in some ways (isothermal formation, limited stability, stabilization by quinone, uptake of dyes). Because the constituent lysine-rich proteinoid is of simulated prebiotic origin, the study is interpreted to add emphasis to and suggest an evolutionary continuity for coacervation phenomena.

  20. Global Proteomics Analysis of Protein Lysine Methylation

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Xing-Jun; Garcia, Benjamin A.

    2017-01-01

    Lysine methylation is a common protein post-translational modification dynamically mediated by protein lysine methyltransferases (PKMTs) and demethylases (PKDMs). Beyond histone proteins, lysine methylation on non-histone proteins play substantial roles in a variety of functions in cells, and is closely associated with diseases such as cancer. A large body of evidence indicates that the dysregulation of some PKMTs lead to tumorigenesis via their non-histone substrates. However, more studies on other PKMTs have made slow progress owing to the lack of the approaches for extensive screening of lysine methylation sites. Recently a series of publications to perform large-scale analysis of protein lysine methylation have emerged. In this unit, we introduce a protocol for the global analysis of protein lysine methylation in cells by means of immunoaffinity enrichment and mass spectrometry. PMID:27801517

  1. Formation and reduction of 5-hydroxymethylfurfural at frying temperature in model system as a function of amino acid and sugar composition.

    PubMed

    Kavousi, Parviz; Mirhosseini, Hamed; Ghazali, Hasanah; Ariffin, Abdul Azis

    2015-09-01

    5-Hydroxymethylfurfural (HMF) is formed during heat treatment of carbohydrate-containing foods, especially in a deep-fat frying process. This study aimed to investigate the effect of amino acids on the formation and reduction of HMF from glucose, fructose and sucrose at frying temperature in model systems containing binary mixtures of an amino acid and a sugar in equal concentrations (0.3M). The results revealed that the formation of HMF from sugars accelerated in the presence of acidic amino acids (i.e. glutamic and aspartic acids). Conversely, the presence of basic amino acids (i.e. lysine, arginine and histidine) led to reduced concentrations of HMF to non-detectable levels in model systems. The results showed that both pH and heating time significantly affected the formation of HMF from fructose in the presence of glutamic acid. In this regard, a higher amount of HMF was formed at lower pH.

  2. Neutralization of a single arginine residue gates open a two-pore domain, alkali-activated K+ channel.

    PubMed

    Niemeyer, María Isabel; González-Nilo, Fernando D; Zúñiga, Leandro; González, Wendy; Cid, L Pablo; Sepúlveda, Francisco V

    2007-01-09

    Potassium channels share a common selectivity filter that determines the conduction characteristics of the pore. Diversity in K+ channels is given by how they are gated open. TASK-2, TALK-1, and TALK-2 are two-pore region (2P) KCNK K+ channels gated open by extracellular alkalinization. We have explored the mechanism for this alkalinization-dependent gating using molecular simulation and site-directed mutagenesis followed by functional assay. We show that the side chain of a single arginine residue (R224) near the pore senses pH in TASK-2 with an unusual pKa of 8.0, a shift likely due to its hydrophobic environment. R224 would block the channel through an electrostatic effect on the pore, a situation relieved by its deprotonation by alkalinization. A lysine residue in TALK-2 fulfills the same role but with a largely unchanged pKa, which correlates with an environment that stabilizes its positive charge. In addition to suggesting unified alkaline pH-gating mechanisms within the TALK subfamily of channels, our results illustrate in a physiological context the principle that hydrophobic environment can drastically modulate the pKa of charged amino acids within a protein.

  3. Neutralization of a single arginine residue gates open a two-pore domain, alkali-activated K+ channel

    PubMed Central

    Niemeyer, María Isabel; González-Nilo, Fernando D.; Zúñiga, Leandro; González, Wendy; Cid, L. Pablo; Sepúlveda, Francisco V.

    2007-01-01

    Potassium channels share a common selectivity filter that determines the conduction characteristics of the pore. Diversity in K+ channels is given by how they are gated open. TASK-2, TALK-1, and TALK-2 are two-pore region (2P) KCNK K+ channels gated open by extracellular alkalinization. We have explored the mechanism for this alkalinization-dependent gating using molecular simulation and site-directed mutagenesis followed by functional assay. We show that the side chain of a single arginine residue (R224) near the pore senses pH in TASK-2 with an unusual pKa of 8.0, a shift likely due to its hydrophobic environment. R224 would block the channel through an electrostatic effect on the pore, a situation relieved by its deprotonation by alkalinization. A lysine residue in TALK-2 fulfills the same role but with a largely unchanged pKa, which correlates with an environment that stabilizes its positive charge. In addition to suggesting unified alkaline pH-gating mechanisms within the TALK subfamily of channels, our results illustrate in a physiological context the principle that hydrophobic environment can drastically modulate the pKa of charged amino acids within a protein. PMID:17197424

  4. A Toolbox of Genetically Encoded FRET-Based Biosensors for Rapid l-Lysine Analysis.

    PubMed

    Steffen, Victoria; Otten, Julia; Engelmann, Susann; Radek, Andreas; Limberg, Michael; Koenig, Bernd W; Noack, Stephan; Wiechert, Wolfgang; Pohl, Martina

    2016-09-28

    Background: The fast development of microbial production strains for basic and fine chemicals is increasingly carried out in small scale cultivation systems to allow for higher throughput. Such parallelized systems create a need for new rapid online detection systems to quantify the respective target compound. In this regard, biosensors, especially genetically encoded Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET)-based biosensors, offer tremendous opportunities. As a proof-of-concept, we have created a toolbox of FRET-based biosensors for the ratiometric determination of l-lysine in fermentation broth. Methods: The sensor toolbox was constructed based on a sensor that consists of an optimized central lysine-/arginine-/ornithine-binding protein (LAO-BP) flanked by two fluorescent proteins (enhanced cyan fluorescent protein (ECFP), Citrine). Further sensor variants with altered affinity and sensitivity were obtained by circular permutation of the binding protein as well as the introduction of flexible and rigid linkers between the fluorescent proteins and the LAO-BP, respectively. Results: The sensor prototype was applied to monitor the extracellular l-lysine concentration of the l-lysine producing Corynebacterium glutamicum (C. glutamicum) strain DM1933 in a BioLector(®) microscale cultivation device. The results matched well with data obtained by HPLC analysis and the Ninhydrin assay, demonstrating the high potential of FRET-based biosensors for high-throughput microbial bioprocess optimization.

  5. A Toolbox of Genetically Encoded FRET-Based Biosensors for Rapid l-Lysine Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Steffen, Victoria; Otten, Julia; Engelmann, Susann; Radek, Andreas; Limberg, Michael; Koenig, Bernd W.; Noack, Stephan; Wiechert, Wolfgang; Pohl, Martina

    2016-01-01

    Background: The fast development of microbial production strains for basic and fine chemicals is increasingly carried out in small scale cultivation systems to allow for higher throughput. Such parallelized systems create a need for new rapid online detection systems to quantify the respective target compound. In this regard, biosensors, especially genetically encoded Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET)-based biosensors, offer tremendous opportunities. As a proof-of-concept, we have created a toolbox of FRET-based biosensors for the ratiometric determination of l-lysine in fermentation broth. Methods: The sensor toolbox was constructed based on a sensor that consists of an optimized central lysine-/arginine-/ornithine-binding protein (LAO-BP) flanked by two fluorescent proteins (enhanced cyan fluorescent protein (ECFP), Citrine). Further sensor variants with altered affinity and sensitivity were obtained by circular permutation of the binding protein as well as the introduction of flexible and rigid linkers between the fluorescent proteins and the LAO-BP, respectively. Results: The sensor prototype was applied to monitor the extracellular l-lysine concentration of the l-lysine producing Corynebacterium glutamicum (C. glutamicum) strain DM1933 in a BioLector® microscale cultivation device. The results matched well with data obtained by HPLC analysis and the Ninhydrin assay, demonstrating the high potential of FRET-based biosensors for high-throughput microbial bioprocess optimization. PMID:27690044

  6. Arginine-Ornithine Antiporter ArcD Controls Arginine Metabolism and Interspecies Biofilm Development of Streptococcus gordonii*♦

    PubMed Central

    Sakanaka, Akito; Kuboniwa, Masae; Takeuchi, Hiroki; Hashino, Ei; Amano, Atsuo

    2015-01-01

    Arginine is utilized by the oral inhabitant Streptococcus gordonii as a substrate of the arginine deiminase system (ADS), eventually producing ATP and NH3, the latter of which is responsible for microbial resistance to pH stress. S. gordonii expresses a putative arginine-ornithine antiporter (ArcD) whose function has not been investigated despite relevance to the ADS and potential influence on inter-bacterial communication with periodontal pathogens that utilize amino acids as a main energy source. Here, we generated an S. gordonii ΔarcD mutant to explore the role of ArcD in physiological homeostasis and bacterial cross-feeding. First, we confirmed that S. gordonii ArcD plays crucial roles for mediating arginine uptake and promoting bacterial growth, particularly under arginine-limited conditions. Next, metabolomic profiling and transcriptional analysis of the ΔarcD mutant revealed that deletion of this gene caused intracellular accumulation of ornithine leading to malfunction of the ADS and suppression of de novo arginine biosynthesis. The mutant strain also showed increased susceptibility to low pH stress due to reduced production of ammonia. Finally, accumulation of Fusobacterium nucleatum was found to be significantly decreased in biofilm formed by the ΔarcD mutant as compared with the wild-type strain, although ornithine supplementation restored fusobacterium biovolume in dual-species biofilms with the ΔarcD mutant and also enhanced single species biofilm development by F. nucleatum. Our results are the first direct evidence showing that S. gordonii ArcD modulates not only alkali and energy production but also interspecies interaction with F. nucleatum, thus initiating a middle stage of periodontopathic biofilm formation, by metabolic cross-feeding. PMID:26085091

  7. Histone lysine methyltransferases as anti-cancer targets for drug discovery

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Qing; Wang, Ming-wei

    2016-01-01

    Post-translational epigenetic modification of histones is controlled by a number of histone-modifying enzymes. Such modification regulates the accessibility of DNA and the subsequent expression or silencing of a gene. Human histone methyltransferases (HMTs)constitute a large family that includes histone lysine methyltransferases (HKMTs) and histone/protein arginine methyltransferases (PRMTs). There is increasing evidence showing a correlation between HKMTs and cancer pathogenesis. Here, we present an overview of representative HKMTs, including their biological and biochemical properties as well as the profiles of small molecule inhibitors for a comprehensive understanding of HKMTs in drug discovery. PMID:27397541

  8. Effect of inhibitor compounds on Nε-(carboxymethyl)lysine (CML) and Nε-(carboxyethyl)lysine (CEL) formation in model foods.

    PubMed

    Srey, Chou; Hull, George L J; Connolly, Lisa; Elliott, Christopher T; del Castillo, M Dolores; Ames, Jennifer M

    2010-11-24

    The possible adverse effects on health of diet-derived advanced glycation endproducts (AGEs) and advanced lipoxidation endproducts (ALEs) is of current interest. This study had the objective of determining the effects of the addition of AGE/ALE inhibitors and different types of sugar and cooking oil on Nε-(carboxymethyl)lysine (CML) and Nε-(carboxyethyl)lysine (CEL) formation in model foods (sponge cakes). The cake baked using glucose produced the highest level of CML (2.07±0.24 mmol/mol lysine), whereas the cake baked using fructose produced the highest concentration of CEL (25.1±0.15 mmol/mol lysine). There were no significant differences between CML concentrations formed in the cakes prepared using different types of cooking oil, but significant differences (P<0.001) were observed between the cakes prepared using different proportions of cooking oil. The cakes containing oil generated greater concentrations of CML than sucrose. α-Tocopherol and rutin did not inhibit CML and CEL formation. In contrast, ferulic acid and thiamin, thiamin monophosphate, and thiamin pyrophosphate reduced CML and CEL formation.

  9. Adding a Lysine Mimic in the Design of Potent Inhibitors of Histone Lysine Methyltransferases

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, Yanqi; Ganesh, Thota; Horton, John R.; Spannhoff, Astrid; Liu, Jin; Sun, Aiming; Zhang, Xing; Bedford, Mark T.; Shinkai, Yoichi; Snyder, James P.; Cheng, Xiaodong

    2010-07-19

    Dynamic histone lysine methylation involves the activities of modifying enzymes (writers), enzymes removing modifications (erasers), and readers of the histone code. One common feature of these activities is the recognition of lysines in methylated and unmethylated states, whether they are substrates, reaction products, or binding partners. We applied the concept of adding a lysine mimic to an established inhibitor (BIX-01294) of histone H3 lysine 9 methyltransferases G9a and G9a-like protein by including a 5-aminopentyloxy moiety, which is inserted into the target lysine-binding channel and becomes methylated by G9a-like protein, albeit slowly. The compound enhances its potency in vitro and reduces cell toxicity in vivo. We suggest that adding a lysine or methyl-lysine mimic should be considered in the design of small-molecule inhibitors for other methyl-lysine writers, erasers, and readers.

  10. The regulation of ER export and Golgi retention of ST3Gal5 (GM3/GM4 synthase) and B4GalNAcT1 (GM2/GD2/GA2 synthase) by arginine/lysine-based motif adjacent to the transmembrane domain.

    PubMed

    Uemura, Satoshi; Shishido, Fumi; Kashimura, Madoka; Inokuchi, Jin-ichi

    2015-12-01

    In the Golgi maturation model, the Golgi cisternae dynamically mature along a secretory pathway. In this dynamic process, glycosyltransferases are transported from the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) to the Golgi apparatus where they remain and function. The precise mechanism behind this maturation process remains unclear. We investigated two glycosyltransferases, ST3Gal5 (ST3G5) and B4GalNAcT1 (B4GN1), involved in ganglioside synthesis and examined their signal sequences for ER export and Golgi retention. Reports have suggested that the [R/K](X)[R/K] motif functions as an ER exporting signal; however, this signal sequence is insufficient in stably expressed, full-length ST3G5. Through further analysis, we have clarified that the (2)R(3)R(X)(5) (9)K(X)(3) (13)K sequence in ST3G5 is essential for ER export. We have named the sequence the R/K-based motif. On the other hand, for ER export of B4GN1, the homodimer formation in addition to the R/K-based motif is required for ER export suggesting the importance of unidentified lumenal side interaction. We found that ST3G5 R2A/R3A and K9A/K13A mutants localized not only in Golgi apparatus but also in endosomes. Furthermore, the amounts of mature type asparagine-linked (N)-glycans in ST3G5 R2A/R3A and K9A/K13A mutants were decreased compared with those in wild-type proteins, and the stability of the mutants was lower. These results suggest that the R/K-based motif is necessary for the Golgi retention of ST3G5 and that the retention is involved in the maturation of N-glycans and in stability. Thus, several basic amino acids located on the cytoplasmic tail of ST3G5 play important roles in both ER export and Golgi retention.

  11. HU participates in expression of a specific set of genes required for growth and survival at acidic pH in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Bi, Hongkai; Sun, Lianle; Fukamachi, Toshihiko; Saito, Hiromi; Kobayashi, Hiroshi

    2009-05-01

    The major histone-like Escherichia coli protein, HU, is composed of alpha and beta subunits respectively encoded by hupA and hupB in Escherichia coli. A mutant deficient in both hupA and hupB grew at a slightly slower rate than the wild type at pH 7.5. Growth of the mutant diminished with a decrease in pH, and no growth was observed at pH 4.6. Mutants of either hupA or hupB grew at all pH levels tested. The arginine-dependent survival at pH 2.5 was diminished approximately 60-fold by the deletion of both hupA and hupB, whereas the survival was slightly affected by the deletion of either hupA or hupB. The mRNA levels of adiA and adiC, which respectively encode arginine decarboxylase and arginine/agmatine antiporter, were low in the mutant deficient in both hupA and hupB. The deletion of both hupA and hupB had little effect on survival at pH 2.5 in the presence of glutamate or lysine, and expression of the genes for glutamate and lysine decarboxylases was not impaired by the deletion of the HU genes. These results suggest that HU regulates expression of the specific set of genes required for growth and survival in acidic environments.

  12. Druggability of methyl-lysine binding sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santiago, C.; Nguyen, K.; Schapira, M.

    2011-12-01

    Structural modules that specifically recognize—or read—methylated or acetylated lysine residues on histone peptides are important components of chromatin-mediated signaling and epigenetic regulation of gene expression. Deregulation of epigenetic mechanisms is associated with disease conditions, and antagonists of acetyl-lysine binding bromodomains are efficacious in animal models of cancer and inflammation, but little is known regarding the druggability of methyl-lysine binding modules. We conducted a systematic structural analysis of readers of methyl marks and derived a predictive druggability landscape of methyl-lysine binding modules. We show that these target classes are generally less druggable than bromodomains, but that some proteins stand as notable exceptions.

  13. CPLM: a database of protein lysine modifications

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Zexian; Wang, Yongbo; Gao, Tianshun; Pan, Zhicheng; Cheng, Han; Yang, Qing; Cheng, Zhongyi; Guo, Anyuan; Ren, Jian; Xue, Yu

    2014-01-01

    We reported an integrated database of Compendium of Protein Lysine Modifications (CPLM; http://cplm.biocuckoo.org) for protein lysine modifications (PLMs), which occur at active ε-amino groups of specific lysine residues in proteins and are critical for orchestrating various biological processes. The CPLM database was updated from our previously developed database of Compendium of Protein Lysine Acetylation (CPLA), which contained 7151 lysine acetylation sites in 3311 proteins. Here, we manually collected experimentally identified substrates and sites for 12 types of PLMs, including acetylation, ubiquitination, sumoylation, methylation, butyrylation, crotonylation, glycation, malonylation, phosphoglycerylation, propionylation, succinylation and pupylation. In total, the CPLM database contained 203 972 modification events on 189 919 modified lysines in 45 748 proteins for 122 species. With the dataset, we totally identified 76 types of co-occurrences of various PLMs on the same lysine residues, and the most abundant PLM crosstalk is between acetylation and ubiquitination. Up to 53.5% of acetylation and 33.1% of ubiquitination events co-occur at 10 746 lysine sites. Thus, the various PLM crosstalks suggested that a considerable proportion of lysines were competitively and dynamically regulated in a complicated manner. Taken together, the CPLM database can serve as a useful resource for further research of PLMs. PMID:24214993

  14. Global Analysis of Lysine Acetylation Suggests the Involvement of Protein Acetylation in Diverse Biological Processes in Rice (Oryza sativa)

    PubMed Central

    Zhong, Xiaoxian; Tan, Feng; Mujahid, Hana; Zhang, Jian; Nanduri, Bindu; Peng, Zhaohua

    2014-01-01

    Lysine acetylation is a reversible, dynamic protein modification regulated by lysine acetyltransferases and deacetylases. Recent advances in high-throughput proteomics have greatly contributed to the success of global analysis of lysine acetylation. A large number of proteins of diverse biological functions have been shown to be acetylated in several reports in human cells, E.coli, and dicot plants. However, the extent of lysine acetylation in non-histone proteins remains largely unknown in monocots, particularly in the cereal crops. Here we report the mass spectrometric examination of lysine acetylation in rice (Oryza sativa). We identified 60 lysine acetylated sites on 44 proteins of diverse biological functions. Immunoblot studies further validated the presence of a large number of acetylated non-histone proteins. Examination of the amino acid composition revealed substantial amino acid bias around the acetylation sites and the amino acid preference is conserved among different organisms. Gene ontology analysis demonstrates that lysine acetylation occurs in diverse cytoplasmic, chloroplast and mitochondrial proteins in addition to the histone modifications. Our results suggest that lysine acetylation might constitute a regulatory mechanism for many proteins, including both histones and non-histone proteins of diverse biological functions. PMID:24586658

  15. Enhanced plasmin inhibition by a reactive center lysine mutant of the Kunitz-type protease inhibitor domain of the amyloid beta-protein precursor.

    PubMed

    Van Nostrand, W E; Schmaier, A H; Siegel, R S; Wagner, S L; Raschke, W C

    1995-09-29

    The Alzheimer's disease related protein, amyloid beta-protein precursor (A beta PP), contains a domain homologous to Kunitz-type serine protease inhibitors (KPI). The recombinant KPI domain of A beta PP is a potent inhibitor of coagulation factors XIa and IXa and functions as an anticoagulant in vitro. Here we report the expression, purification, and characterization of a reactive center lysine mutant of the KPI domain of A beta PP (KPI-Lys17). An expression plasmid for the KPI-Lys17 domain of A beta PP encoded amino acids 285-345 of the A beta PP cDNA containing a lysine substitution at arginine 17 in the KPI domain. The secreted 61-amino acid product was purified to homogeneity and functionally characterized. The protease inhibitory properties of the KPI-Lys17 domain were compared to those of the native KPI domain of A beta PP. Both KPI domains equally inhibited trypsin, chymotrypsin, and coagulation factors IXa and Xa. However, the KPI-Lys17 domain was an approximately 25-fold less effective inhibitor of coagulation factor XIa resulting in markedly less prolongation of the activated partial thromboplastin time compared to the native KPI domain of A beta PP. On the other hand, the KPI-Lys17 domain was an approximately 10- and 5-fold better inhibitor of plasmin in a chromogenic substrate assay and in a fibrinolytic assay, respectively, than the native KPI domain of A beta PP. Together, these studies suggest that the KPI-Lys17 domain has enhanced anti-fibrinolytic and diminished factor XIa inhibitory properties compared to the native KPI domain of A beta PP.

  16. L-arginine enhances cell proliferation and reduces apoptosis in human endometrial RL95-2 cells

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    L-arginine is considered to be one of the most versatile amino acids due to the fact that it serves as a precursor for many important molecules in cellular physiology. When supplemented in the diet, L-arginine can increase the number of implantation sites in mice and rats, suggesting an effect at th...

  17. Dietary L-arginine supplementation during mouse gestation enhances reproductive performance and Vegfr2 transcription activity in the fetoplacental unit

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Regarded as one of the most versatile amino acids, arginine serves as a precursor for many molecules and has been reported to improve the reproductive performance of rats and pigs. To this end, we sought to determine if dietary L-arginine alters fetoplacental vascular endothelial growth factor recep...

  18. Enteral arginine does not increase superior mesenteric arterial blood flow and but induces mucosal growth in neonatal pigs

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Arginine is an essential amino acid in neonates synthesized by gut epithelial cells and a precursor for nitric oxide (NO) that regulates vasodilatation and blood flow. Arginine supplementation has been shown to improve intestinal integrity in ischemia-reperfusion models and low plasma levels are ass...

  19. Hemoglobin Labeled by Radioactive Lysine

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Bale, W. F.; Yuile, C. L.; DeLaVergne, L.; Miller, L. L.; Whipple, G. H.

    1949-12-08

    This paper reports on the utilization of tagged epsilon carbon of DL-lysine by a dog both anemic and hypoproteinemic due to repeated bleeding plus a diet low in protein. The experiment extended over period of 234 days, a time sufficient to indicate an erythrocyte life span of at least 115 days based upon the rate of replacement of labeled red cell proteins. The proteins of broken down red cells seem not to be used with any great preference for the synthesis of new hemoglobin.

  20. The Human Gene SLC25A29, of Solute Carrier Family 25, Encodes a Mitochondrial Transporter of Basic Amino Acids*

    PubMed Central

    Porcelli, Vito; Fiermonte, Giuseppe; Longo, Antonella; Palmieri, Ferdinando

    2014-01-01

    The human genome encodes 53 members of the solute carrier family 25 (SLC25), also called the mitochondrial carrier family, many of which have been shown to transport carboxylates, amino acids, nucleotides, and cofactors across the inner mitochondrial membrane, thereby connecting cytosolic and matrix functions. In this work, a member of this family, SLC25A29, previously reported to be a mitochondrial carnitine/acylcarnitine- or ornithine-like carrier, has been thoroughly characterized biochemically. The SLC25A29 gene was overexpressed in Escherichia coli, and the gene product was purified and reconstituted in phospholipid vesicles. Its transport properties and kinetic parameters demonstrate that SLC25A29 transports arginine, lysine, homoarginine, methylarginine and, to a much lesser extent, ornithine and histidine. Carnitine and acylcarnitines were not transported by SLC25A29. This carrier catalyzed substantial uniport besides a counter-exchange transport, exhibited a high transport affinity for arginine and lysine, and was saturable and inhibited by mercurial compounds and other inhibitors of mitochondrial carriers to various degrees. The main physiological role of SLC25A29 is to import basic amino acids into mitochondria for mitochondrial protein synthesis and amino acid degradation. PMID:24652292

  1. The human gene SLC25A29, of solute carrier family 25, encodes a mitochondrial transporter of basic amino acids.

    PubMed

    Porcelli, Vito; Fiermonte, Giuseppe; Longo, Antonella; Palmieri, Ferdinando

    2014-05-09

    The human genome encodes 53 members of the solute carrier family 25 (SLC25), also called the mitochondrial carrier family, many of which have been shown to transport carboxylates, amino acids, nucleotides, and cofactors across the inner mitochondrial membrane, thereby connecting cytosolic and matrix functions. In this work, a member of this family, SLC25A29, previously reported to be a mitochondrial carnitine/acylcarnitine- or ornithine-like carrier, has been thoroughly characterized biochemically. The SLC25A29 gene was overexpressed in Escherichia coli, and the gene product was purified and reconstituted in phospholipid vesicles. Its transport properties and kinetic parameters demonstrate that SLC25A29 transports arginine, lysine, homoarginine, methylarginine and, to a much lesser extent, ornithine and histidine. Carnitine and acylcarnitines were not transported by SLC25A29. This carrier catalyzed substantial uniport besides a counter-exchange transport, exhibited a high transport affinity for arginine and lysine, and was saturable and inhibited by mercurial compounds and other inhibitors of mitochondrial carriers to various degrees. The main physiological role of SLC25A29 is to import basic amino acids into mitochondria for mitochondrial protein synthesis and amino acid degradation.

  2. Specificity of a cytochemical bioassay for arginine-vasopressin and its validation for plasma measurement.

    PubMed

    Smith, A; McIntosh, N

    1984-02-01

    The total Na+/K+ ATP-ase activity of the thick ascending limb of the loop of Henle may be stimulated by arginine-vasopressin (AVP). Lysine-vasopressin (LVP), oxytocin (OT), and arginine-vasotocin (AVT) produce less than 5% of the enzyme activity induced by the same concentration of AVP. Physiological concentrations of a mixture of other hormones with known activity on the kidney (T3, T4, aldosterone, angiotensin II, and OT) did not significantly increase total Na+/K+ ATP-ase activity. Specific AVP antiserum consistently removed greater than 90% of the stimulatory effect of plasma. The concentration of AVP in plasmas from dehydrated subjects was greater than 10 times that of the same subjects hydrated. Intra-assay coefficient of variation was 35% and 52% from 200 microliters and 20 microliters of plasma respectively. The interassay coefficient of variation was 53% and 55% from plasma pools with high and low AVP content.

  3. Genome-Wide Analysis of the Lysine Biosynthesis Pathway Network during Maize Seed Development

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yuwei; Xie, Shaojun; Yu, Jingjuan

    2016-01-01

    Lysine is one of the most limiting essential amino acids for humans and livestock. The nutritional value of maize (Zea mays L.) is reduced by its poor lysine content. To better understand the lysine biosynthesis pathway in maize seed, we conducted a genome-wide analysis of the genes involved in lysine biosynthesis. We identified lysine biosynthesis pathway genes (LBPGs) and investigated whether a diaminopimelate pathway variant exists in maize. We analyzed two genes encoding the key enzyme dihydrodipicolinate synthase, and determined that they contribute differently to lysine synthesis during maize seed development. A coexpression network of LBPGs was constructed using RNA-sequencing data from 21 developmental stages of B73 maize seed. We found a large set of genes encoding ribosomal proteins, elongation factors and zein proteins that were coexpressed with LBPGs. The coexpressed genes were enriched in cellular metabolism terms and protein related terms. A phylogenetic analysis of the LBPGs from different plant species revealed different relationships. Additionally, six transcription factor (TF) families containing 13 TFs were identified as the Hub TFs of the LBPGs modules. Several expression quantitative trait loci of LBPGs were also identified. Our results should help to elucidate the lysine biosynthesis pathway network in maize seed. PMID:26829553

  4. Synthesis and Characterization of L-Lysine Conjugated Silver Nanoparticles Smaller Than 10 nM

    PubMed Central

    Bonor, Jeremy; Reddy, Vandhana; Akkiraju, Hemanth; Dhurjati, Prasad; Nohe, Anja

    2015-01-01

    A rapid and convenient batch method for synthesizing lysine-conjugated silver nanoparticles of approximately 5 nm of size was developed. Nanoparticles of size less than 100 nm exhibit significant medical potential. L-Lysine demonstrates potential for therapeutic applications and silver nanoparticles are an optimal choice for drug delivery because of its intrinsic anti-platelet, anti-bacterial and anti-inflammatory capabilities. Current synthesis protocols for Lysine-capped particles under 10 nm are time consuming and tedious and allow only for the sythesis of small quantities of particles. The synthesis of Lysin-capped silver nanoparticles was based on the reaction in which AgNO3 was reduced by excess NaBH4. L-Lysine, a known essential amino acid, served as the capping agent to minimize initial aggregation. The particles were then separated by size chromatography. Capping occurred through the amide bond on L-Lysine as determined by FT-IR. The conjugation of the particle to the amide bond is important, since this leaves the amino group of Lysine open to further modifications. The particles were further characterized in regards to their shape, size and stability. Finally we demonstrated that the synthesized particles exhibit limited to no toxicity in cells, using HEK 293 cell line as a model system. Our sythesis protocol can be successfully used for scale-up and synthesis of high quantities of nanoparticles. PMID:26478827

  5. Structural Basis for l-Lysine Feedback Inhibition of Homocitrate Synthase

    SciTech Connect

    Bulfer, Stacie L.; Scott, Erin M.; Pillus, Lorraine; Trievel, Raymond C.

    2010-09-02

    The {alpha}-aminoadipate pathway of lysine biosynthesis is modulated at the transcriptional and biochemical levels by feedback inhibition. The first enzyme in the {alpha}-aminoadipate pathway, homocitrate synthase (HCS), is the target of the feedback regulation and is strongly inhibited by L-lysine. Here we report the structure of Schizosaccharomyces pombe HCS (SpHCS) in complex with L-lysine. The structure illustrates that the amino acid directly competes with the substrate 2-oxoglutarate for binding within the active site of HCS. Differential recognition of the substrate and inhibitor is achieved via a switch position within the ({alpha}/{beta}){sub 8} TIM barrel of the enzyme that can distinguish between the C5-carboxylate group of 2-oxoglutarate and the {epsilon}-ammonium group of L-lysine. In vitro and in vivo assays demonstrate that mutations of the switch residues, which interact with the L-lysine {epsilon}-ammonium group, abrogate feedback inhibition, as do substitutions of residues within the C-terminal domain that were identified in a previous study of L-lysine-insensitive HCS mutants in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Together, these results yield new insights into the mechanism of feedback regulation of an enzyme central to lysine biosynthesis.

  6. Transcriptional upregulation of four genes of the lysine biosynthetic pathway by homocitrate accumulation in Penicillium chrysogenum: homocitrate as a sensor of lysine-pathway distress.

    PubMed

    Teves, Franco; Lamas-Maceiras, Mónica; García-Estrada, Carlos; Casqueiro, Javier; Naranjo, Leopoldo; Ullán, Ricardo V; Scervino, José-Martín; Wu, Xiaobin; Velasco-Conde, Tania; Martín, Juan F

    2009-12-01

    The lysine biosynthetic pathway has to supply large amounts of alpha-aminoadipic acid for penicillin biosynthesis in Penicillium chrysogenum. In this study, we have characterized the P. chrysogenum L2 mutant, a lysine auxotroph that shows highly increased expression of several lysine biosynthesis genes (lys1, lys2, lys3, lys7). The L2 mutant was found to be deficient in homoaconitase activity since it was complemented by the Aspergillus nidulans lysF gene. We have cloned a gene (named lys3) that complements the L2 mutation by transformation with a P. chrysogenum genomic library, constructed in an autonomous replicating plasmid. The lys3-encoded protein showed high identity to homoaconitases. In addition, we cloned the mutant lys3 allele from the L2 strain that showed a G(1534) to A(1534) point mutation resulting in a Gly(495) to Asp(495) substitution. This mutation is located in a highly conserved region adjacent to two of the three cysteine residues that act as ligands to bind the iron-sulfur cluster required for homoaconitase activity. The L2 mutant accumulates homocitrate. Deletion of the lys1 gene (homocitrate synthase) in the L2 strain prevented homocitrate accumulation and reverted expression levels of the four lysine biosynthesis genes tested to those of the parental prototrophic strain. Homocitrate accumulation seems to act as a sensor of lysine-pathway distress, triggering overexpression of four of the lysine biosynthesis genes.

  7. Light-activated amino acid transport in Halobacterium halobium envelope vesicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Macdonald, R. E.; Lanyi, J. K.

    1977-01-01

    Vesicles prepared from Halobacterium halobium cell envelopes accumulate amino acids in response to light-induced electrical and chemical gradients. Nineteen of 20 commonly occurring amino acids have been shown to be actively accumulated by these vesicles in response to illumination or in response to an artificially created Na+ gradient. On the basis of shared common carriers the transport systems can be divided into eight classes, each responsible for the transport of one or several amino acids: arginine, lysine, histidine; asparagine, glutamine; alanine, glycine, threonine, serine; leucine, valine, isoleucine, methionine; phenylalanine, tyrosine, tryptophan; aspartate; glutamate; proline. Available evidence suggests that these carriers are symmetrical in that amino acids can be transported equally well in both directions across the vesicle membranes. A tentative working model to account for these observations is presented.

  8. Evaluation of microwave-accelerated residue-specific acid cleavage for proteomic applications.

    PubMed

    Swatkoski, Stephen; Gutierrez, Peter; Wynne, Colin; Petrov, Alexey; Dinman, Jonathan D; Edwards, Nathan; Fenselau, Catherine

    2008-02-01

    Microwave-accelerated proteolysis using acetic acid has been shown to occur specifically on either or both sides of aspartic acid residues. This chemical cleavage has been applied to ovalbumin and several model peptides to test the effect on some of the more common post-translational modifications. No oxidation of methionine or cysteine was observed; however, hydrolysis of phosphate groups proceeds at a detectable rate. Acid cleavage was also extended to the yeast ribosome model proteome, where it provided information on 74% of that proteome. Aspartic acid occurs across the proteome with approximately half the frequency of the combined occurrence of the trypsin residues lysine and arginine, and implications of this are considered.

  9. Targeted disruption of murine ornithine aminotransferase gene: Surprising neonatal lethality rescued by arginine therapy and possible mouse model for gyrate atrophy

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, T.; Steel, G.; Valle, D.

    1994-09-01

    Deficiency of ornithine-{delta}-aminotransferase (OAT) in humans results in gyrate atrophy (GA), an autosomal recessive blinding disorder characterized by progressive chorioretinal degeneration and hyperornithinemia. GA patients are otherwise asymptomatic. The explanation for the unique susceptibility of retina to this inborn error is not known. Poor understanding of the pathophysiology hampers development of effective therapy. To address these problems, we undertook targeted disruption of the murine OAT gene. We isolated a 13 kb genomic DNA fragment containing the first five exons of OAT from an AB1 mini-genomic library and made a replacement type targeting vector with the NEOR gene inserted into OAT exon 3 at codon 40. Following electroporation and selection, 4.4% of G418 resistant ES clones had undergone homologous recombination. Chimeric animals produced by blastocyst injection transmitted the disrupted OAT allele. Mice homozygous for OAT disruption (-/-) have no detectable OAT activity in their tissues. Although normal at birth, they die within 10 to 48 hrs. We hypothesize this lethality results from a block in gut arginine biosynthesis, a pathway that requires {open_quotes}reverse{close_quotes} OAT flux and is apparently critical for rapidly growing neonatal mice. Amino acid measurements reveal extreme reduction in urea cycle intermediates in dying mice. With i.p. arginine administration for the first 14 days of life, we have successfully obtained adult (-/-) mice. Plasma amino acids on these mice show a 10-15 fold increase in ornithine and a 2 fold decrease in lysine, biochemical hallmarks of GA. ERG and retinal histopathologic studies are in progress to examine the ocular phenotypes. These mice will provide an invaluable model to test strategies to reduce ornithine accumulation and should also prove useful in understanding the pathophysiology of retina degeneration.

  10. Compartmentalization of amino acids in surfactant aggregates - Partitioning between water and aqueous micellar sodium dodecanoate and between hexane and dodecylammonium propionate trapped water in hexane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fendler, J. H.; Nome, F.; Nagyvary, J.

    1975-01-01

    The partitioning of amino acids (glycine, alanine, leucine, phenylalanine, histidine, aspartic acid, glutamic acid, lysine, isoleucine, threonine, serine, valine, proline, arginine) in aqueous and nonaqueous micellar systems was studied experimentally. Partitioning from neat hexane into dodecylammonium propionate trapped water in hexane was found to be dependent on both electrostatic and hydrophobic interactions, which implies that the interior of dodecylammonium propionate aggregates is negatively charged and is capable of hydrogen bonding in addition to providing a hydrophobic environment. Unitary free energies of transfer of amino acid side chains from hexane to water were determined and solubilities of amino acids in neat hexane substantiated the amino acid hydrophobicity scale. The relevance of the experiments to prebiotic chemistry was examined.

  11. L-arginine independent macrophage tumor cytotoxicity

    SciTech Connect

    Klostergaard, J.; Leroux, M.E. )

    1989-12-29

    We have investigated the role of L-arginine in macrophage tumor cytotoxicity in coculture. L929, EMT-6, MCA-26, and P815 targets were all susceptible to cytolysis by activated macrophages when cocultured in medium containing L-arginine. When cocultured in arginine-free medium, these targets displayed comparable or even higher levels of lysis. L1210 targets were lytically resistant under either condition. However, 59Fe release from this target did reflect strong dependence on the presence of arginine. The structural analogue, NG-monomethyl-L-arginine, was an effective inhibitor of iron-release from L1210 targets cocultured with activated macrophages, whereas it had minimal inhibitory effects on release of 51Cr from cocultured L929 cells. These results suggest that the L-arginine requiring cytotoxic pathway of activated macrophage is independent of major effector mechanisms involved in tumor cell lysis.

  12. Lysine Transport across Isolated Rabbit Ileum

    PubMed Central

    Munck, B. G.; Schultz, Stanley G.

    1969-01-01

    Lysine transport by in vitro distal rabbit ileum has been investigated by determining (a) transmural fluxes across short-circuited segments of the tissue; (b) accumulation by mucosal strips; and (c) influx from the mucosal solution across the brush border into the epithelium. Net transmural flux of lysine is considerably smaller than that of alanine. However, lysine influx across the brush border and lysine accumulation by mucosal strips are quantitatively comparable to alanine influx and accumulation. Evidence is presented that the "low transport capacity" of rabbit ileum for lysine is due to: (a) a carrier-mediated process responsible for efflux of lysine out of the cell across the serosal and/or lateral membranes that is characterized by a low maximal velocity; and (b) a high "backflux" of lysine out of the cell across the mucosal membrane. A possible explanation for the latter observation is discussed with reference to the relatively low Na dependence of lysine transport across the intestinal brush border. PMID:5764744

  13. The Construction and Expression of Lysine-Rich Gene in the Mammary Gland of Transgenic Mice

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Xin; Zhang, Peng; Song, Guangqi; Chen, Yue; Wang, Zhongwei; Yin, Yupeng; Kong, Delong; Zhang, Sheng; Zhao, Zhihui; Ouyang, Hongsheng

    2012-01-01

    Lysine is the limiting amino acid in cereal grains, which represent a major source of human food and animal feed worldwide, and is considered the most important of the essential amino acids. In this study, β-casein, αS2-casein, and lactotransferrin cDNA clone fragments encoding lysine-rich peptides were fused together to generate a lysine-rich (LR) gene and the mammary gland-specific expression vector pBC1-LR-NEOr was constructed. Transgenic mice were generated by pronuclear microinjection of the linearized expression vectors harboring the LR transgene. The transgenic mice and their offspring were examined using multiplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR), Southern blotting, reverse transcriptase–PCR, in situ hybridization, and Western blotting techniques. Our results showed that the LR gene was successfully integrated into the mouse genome and was transmitted stably. The specific LR gene expression was restricted to the mammary gland, active alveoli of the transgenic female mice during lactation. The lysine level of the two transgenic lines was significantly higher than that of nontransgenic controls (p<0.05). In addition, the growth performance of transgenic pups was enhanced by directly feeding them the LR protein-enriched transgenic milk. Our results demonstrated that lysine-rich gene was successfully constructed and expressed in mammary gland of transgenic mice. This study will provide a better understanding of how mammary gland expression systems that increase the lysine content of milk can be applied to other mammals, such as cows. PMID:22577831

  14. Na/sup +/-dependent transport of /sup 14/C-L-lysine across bullfrog alveolar epithelium

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, K.J.; Crandall, E.D.

    1986-03-01

    Transepithelial transport of the basic amino acid L-lysine has been studied utilizing the isolated intact bullfrog lung mounted in the Ussing chamber. Lungs were excised from doubly pithed bullfrogs and sandwiched between two hemichambers. /sup 14/C-(U)-L-lysine was added to the upstream reservoir of amphibian Ringer solution, while the tissue was short-circuited. Two lungs from the same animal were used simultaneously to determine the two opposite unidirectional fluxes. Downstream and upstream radioactivities were assayed and used to estimate the apparent permeability (P) of the labeled lysine. Results indicate that the apparent P of /sup 14/C-L-lysine measured in the alveolar (M) to the pleural (S) direction is 19.06 (+- 2.84) x 10/sup -7/ cm/s and P in the S to M direction is 3.29 (+- 0.02) x 10/sup -7/ cm/s. When the 100 mM NaCl in the bath was replaced by 110 mM choline chloride, the flux of /sup 14/C-L-lysine from the alveolar to the pleural side decreased to the same value as that in the opposite direction. The flux from the pleural to the alveolar direction in the absence of Na/sup +/ did not change. These results suggest that the alveolar epithelium exhibits Na/sup +/-dependent amino acid (L-lysine) transport in the M->S, but not in the S->M, direction.

  15. The construction and expression of lysine-rich gene in the mammary gland of transgenic mice.

    PubMed

    Ma, Xin; Zhang, Peng; Song, Guangqi; Chen, Yue; Wang, Zhongwei; Yin, Yupeng; Kong, Delong; Zhang, Sheng; Zhao, Zhihui; Ouyang, Hongsheng; Tang, Bo; Li, Ziyi

    2012-08-01

    Lysine is the limiting amino acid in cereal grains, which represent a major source of human food and animal feed worldwide, and is considered the most important of the essential amino acids. In this study, β-casein, αS2-casein, and lactotransferrin cDNA clone fragments encoding lysine-rich peptides were fused together to generate a lysine-rich (LR) gene and the mammary gland-specific expression vector pBC1-LR-NEO(r) was constructed. Transgenic mice were generated by pronuclear microinjection of the linearized expression vectors harboring the LR transgene. The transgenic mice and their offspring were examined using multiplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR), Southern blotting, reverse transcriptase-PCR, in situ hybridization, and Western blotting techniques. Our results showed that the LR gene was successfully integrated into the mouse genome and was transmitted stably. The specific LR gene expression was restricted to the mammary gland, active alveoli of the transgenic female mice during lactation. The lysine level of the two transgenic lines was significantly higher than that of nontransgenic controls (p<0.05). In addition, the growth performance of transgenic pups was enhanced by directly feeding them the LR protein-enriched transgenic milk. Our results demonstrated that lysine-rich gene was successfully constructed and expressed in mammary gland of transgenic mice. This study will provide a better understanding of how mammary gland expression systems that increase the lysine content of milk can be applied to other mammals, such as cows.

  16. Influence of Amino Acids in Dairy Products on Glucose Homeostasis: The Clinical Evidence.

    PubMed

    Chartrand, Dominic; Da Silva, Marine S; Julien, Pierre; Rudkowska, Iwona

    2017-02-20

    Dairy products have been hypothesized to protect against type 2 diabetes because of their high content of whey proteins, rich in branched-chain amino acids (BCAAs) - leucine, isoleucine and valine - and lysine, which may decrease postprandial glucose responses and stimulate insulin secretion. Paradoxically, epidemiologic studies also show that higher levels of plasma BCAAs have been linked to insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes. Therefore, the objective was to review the recent clinical evidence concerning the intake of amino acids found in dairy proteins so as to determine their impact on glucose homeostasis in healthy persons and in those with prediabetes and type 2 diabetes. Clinical studies have reported that the major dairy amino acids, namely, leucine, isoleucine, glutamine, phenylalanine, proline and lysine, have beneficial effects on glucose homeostasis. Yet the reported doses of amino acids investigated are too elevated to be reached through adequate dairy product intake. The minor dairy amino acids, arginine and glycine, may improve glucose homeostasis by improving other risk factors for type 2 diabetes. Further, the combination of amino acids may also improve glucose-related outcomes, suggesting additive or synergistic effects. Nevertheless, additional long-term studies in individuals with prediabetes and type 2 diabetes are needed to ascertain the benefits for glucose homeostasis of amino acids found in dairy foods.

  17. Depletion of arginine in yeast cells decreases the resistance to hydrostatic pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nomura, Kazuki; Iwahashi, Hitoshi; Iguchi, Akinori; Shigematsu, Toru

    2015-07-01

    High hydrostatic pressure (HP) inhibits growth and inactivates microorganisms by destabilizing non-covalent molecular interactions. Arginine contributes to stress resistance because it has a guanidine side chain, which assists in the refolding of aggregated proteins. We attempted to analyze the contribution of arginine to high HP stress using a pressure-sensitive mutant strain of Saccharomyces cerevisiae and a metabolomics approach. Our results showed that the content of 136 out of 250 detected metabolites differed in the mutant and parent strains. Decreased metabolites were involved in the tricarboxylic acid cycle and arginine biosynthesis. The expression of genes contributing to arginine biosynthesis was significantly lower in the mutant strain than in the parent strain. When arginine was supplemented to the medium, the mutant strain showed more tolerance to pressure. These results suggest that yeast cells survived due to the contribution of arginine to high pressure resistance. This indicates that depletion of arginine caused by decreased activity of the biosynthesis pathway confers sensitivity to HP.

  18. Structure of arginine overlayers at the aqueous gold interface: implications for nanoparticle assembly.

    PubMed

    Wright, Louise B; Merrill, Nicholas A; Knecht, Marc R; Walsh, Tiffany R

    2014-07-09

    Adsorption of small biomolecules onto the surface of nanoparticles offers a novel route to generation of nanoparticle assemblies with predictable architectures. Previously, ligand-exchange experiments on citrate-capped gold nanoparticles with the amino acid arginine were reported to support linear nanoparticle assemblies. Here, we use a combination of atomistic modeling with experimental characterization to explore aspects of the assembly hypothesis for these systems. Using molecular simulation, we probe the structural and energetic characteristics of arginine overlayers on the Au(111) surface under aqueous conditions at both low- and high-coverage regimes. In the low-density regime, the arginines lie flat on the surface. At constant composition, these overlayers are found to be lower in energy than the densely packed films, although the latter case appears kinetically stable when arginine is adsorbed via the zwitterion group, exposing the charged guanidinium group to the solvent. Our findings suggest that zwitterion-zwitterion hydrogen bonding at the gold surface and minimization of the electrostatic repulsion between adjacent guanidinium groups play key roles in determining arginine overlayer stability at the aqueous gold interface. Ligand-exchange experiments of citrate-capped gold nanoparticles with arginine derivatives agmatine and N-methyl-l-arginine reveal that modification at the guanidinium group significantly diminishes the propensity for linear assembly of the nanoparticles.

  19. Citrulline a More Suitable Substrate than Arginine to Restore NO Production and the Microcirculation during Endotoxemia

    PubMed Central

    Wijnands, Karolina A. P.; Vink, Hans; Briedé, Jacob J.; van Faassen, Ernst E.; Lamers, Wouter H.; Buurman, Wim A.; Poeze, Martijn

    2012-01-01

    Background Impaired microcirculation during endotoxemia correlates with a disturbed arginine-nitric oxide (NO) metabolism and is associated with deteriorating organ function. Improving the organ perfusion in endotoxemia, as often seen in patients with severe infection or systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS) is, therefore, an important therapeutic target. We hypothesized that supplementation of the arginine precursor citrulline rather than arginine would specifically increase eNOS-induced intracellular NO production and thereby improve the microcirculation during endotoxemia. Methodology/Principal Findings To study the effects of L-Citrulline and L-Arginine supplementation on jejunal microcirculation, intracellular arginine availability and NO production in a non-lethal prolonged endotoxemia model in mice. C57/Bl6 mice received an 18 hrs intravenous infusion of endotoxin (LPS, 0.4 µg•g bodyweight−1•h−1), combined with either L-Citrulline (6.25 mg•h-1), L-Arginine (6.25 mg•h−1), or L-Alanine (isonitrogenous control; 12.5 mg•h−1) during the last 6 hrs. The control group received an 18 hrs sterile saline infusion combined with L-Alanine or L-Citrulline during the last 6 hrs. The microcirculation was evaluated at the end of the infusion period using sidestream dark-field imaging of jejunal villi. Plasma and jejunal tissue amino-acid concentrations were measured by HPLC, NO tissue concentrations by electron-spin resonance spectroscopy and NOS protein concentrations using Western blot. Conclusion/Significance L-Citrulline supplementation during endotoxemia positively influenced the intestinal microvascular perfusion compared to L-Arginine-supplemented and control endotoxemic mice. L-Citrulline supplementation increased plasma and tissue concentrations of arginine and citrulline, and restored intracellular NO production in the intestine. L-Arginine supplementation did not increase the intracellular arginine availability. Jejunal tissues in the

  20. Supplementation with apple enriched with L-arginine may improve metabolic control and survival rate in alloxan-induced diabetic rats.

    PubMed

    Escudero, Andrea; Petzold, Guillermo; Moreno, Jorge; Gonzalez, Marcelo; Junod, Julio; Aguayo, Claudio; Acurio, Jesenia; Escudero, Carlos

    2013-01-01

    Supplementation with L-arginine or fresh food with high content of this amino acid is associated with favorable effects in the metabolic control of diabetes. We aimed to determine whether supplementation with apples enriched with L-arginine offer additional benefits compared to L-arginine by itself in a preclinical study of diabetes. This study combines food-engineer technologies with in vivo and in vitro analysis. In vitro experiments show that cells derived from non-diabetic animals and exposed to high glucose (25 mM, 12 H) and cells isolated from alloxan-induced diabetic animals exhibited a reduction (∼50%) in the L-arginine uptake. This effect was reverted by L-arginine pretreatment (12 H) in both the normal and diabetes-derived cells. In preclinical studies, normoglycemic (n = 25) and diabetic groups (n = 50) were divided into subgroups that received either L-arginine (375 mg/kg per 10 days) or apple enriched with L-arginine or vehicle (control). In a preliminary analysis, supplementation with L-arginine by itself (50%) or apple enriched with L-arginine (100%) improve survival rate in the diabetic group compared to control (0%) at the end of the follow up (17 days). This phenomenon was associated with a partial but sustained high plasma level of L-arginine, as well as plasma concentration of nitrites and insulin in the L-arginine or apple + L-arginine groups after supplementation. Apple + L-arginine supplementation in diabetic animals induced the highest and longest effects in the level of these three markers among the studied groups. Therefore, apple enriched by L-arginine offers more benefits than L-arginine by itself in this preclinical study.

  1. Control of TSC2-Rheb signaling axis by arginine regulates mTORC1 activity

    PubMed Central

    Carroll, Bernadette; Maetzel, Dorothea; Maddocks, Oliver DK; Otten, Gisela; Ratcliff, Matthew; Smith, Graham R; Dunlop, Elaine A; Passos, João F; Davies, Owen R; Jaenisch, Rudolf; Tee, Andrew R; Sarkar, Sovan; Korolchuk, Viktor I

    2016-01-01

    The mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) is the key signaling hub that regulates cellular protein homeostasis, growth, and proliferation in health and disease. As a prerequisite for activation of mTORC1 by hormones and mitogens, there first has to be an available pool of intracellular amino acids. Arginine, an amino acid essential during mammalian embryogenesis and early development is one of the key activators of mTORC1. Herein, we demonstrate that arginine acts independently of its metabolism to allow maximal activation of mTORC1 by growth factors via a mechanism that does not involve regulation of mTORC1 localization to lysosomes. Instead, arginine specifically suppresses lysosomal localization of the TSC complex and interaction with its target small GTPase protein, Rheb. By interfering with TSC-Rheb complex, arginine relieves allosteric inhibition of Rheb by TSC. Arginine cooperates with growth factor signaling which further promotes dissociation of TSC2 from lysosomes and activation of mTORC1. Arginine is the main amino acid sensed by the mTORC1 pathway in several cell types including human embryonic stem cells (hESCs). Dependence on arginine is maintained once hESCs are differentiated to fibroblasts, neurons, and hepatocytes, highlighting the fundamental importance of arginine-sensing to mTORC1 signaling. Together, our data provide evidence that different growth promoting cues cooperate to a greater extent than previously recognized to achieve tight spatial and temporal regulation of mTORC1 signaling. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.11058.001 PMID:26742086

  2. Role of a helix B lysine residue in the photoactive site in channelrhodopsins.

    PubMed

    Li, Hai; Govorunova, Elena G; Sineshchekov, Oleg A; Spudich, John L

    2014-04-15

    In most studied microbial rhodopsins two conserved carboxylic acid residues (the homologs of Asp-85 and Asp-212 in bacteriorhodopsin) and an arginine residue (the homolog of Arg-82) form a complex counterion to the protonated retinylidene Schiff base, and neutralization of the negatively charged carboxylates causes red shifts of the absorption maximum. In contrast, the corresponding neutralizing mutations in some relatively low-efficiency channelrhodopsins (ChRs) result in blue shifts. These ChRs do not contain a lysine residue in the second helix, conserved in higher efficiency ChRs (Lys-132 in the crystallized ChR chimera). By action spectroscopy of photoinduced channel currents in HEK293 cells and absorption spectroscopy of detergent-purified pigments, we found that in tested ChRs the Lys-132 homolog controls the direction of spectral shifts in the mutants of the photoactive site carboxylic acid residues. Analysis of double mutants shows that red spectral shifts occur when this Lys is present, whether naturally or by mutagenesis, and blue shifts occur when it is replaced with a neutral residue. A neutralizing mutation of the Lys-132 homolog alone caused a red spectral shift in high-efficiency ChRs, whereas its introduction into low-efficiency ChR1 from Chlamydomonas augustae (CaChR1) caused a blue shift. Taking into account that the effective charge of the carboxylic acid residues is a key factor in microbial rhodopsin spectral tuning, these findings suggest that the Lys-132 homolog modulates their pKa values. On the other hand, mutation of the Arg-82 homolog that fulfills this role in bacteriorhodopsin caused minimal spectral changes in the tested ChRs. Titration revealed that the pKa of the Asp-85 homolog in CaChR1 lies in the alkaline region unlike in most studied microbial rhodopsins, but is substantially decreased by introduction of a Lys-132 homolog or neutralizing mutation of the Asp-212 homolog. In the three ChRs tested the Lys-132 homolog also alters

  3. Lysine acetylation and cancer: A proteomics perspective.

    PubMed

    Gil, Jeovanis; Ramírez-Torres, Alberto; Encarnación-Guevara, Sergio

    2017-01-06

    Lysine acetylation is a reversible modification controlled by two groups of enzymes: lysine acetyltransferases (KATs) and lysine deacetylases (KDACs). Acetylated lysine residues are recognized by bromodomains, a family of evolutionarily conserved domains. The use of high-resolution mass spectrometry-based proteomics, in combination with the enrichment of acetylated peptides through immunoprecipitation with anti-acetyl-lysine antibodies, has expanded the number of acetylated proteins from histones and a few nuclear proteins to more than 2000 human proteins. Because acetylation targets almost all cellular processes, this modification has been associated with cancer. Several KATs, KDACs and bromodomain-containing proteins have been linked to cancer development. Many small molecules targeting some of these proteins have been or are being tested as potential cancer therapies. The stoichiometry of lysine acetylation has not been explored in cancer, representing a promising field in which to increase our knowledge of how this modification is affected in cancer. In this review, we will focus on the strategies that can be used to go deeper in the characterization of the protein lysine acetylation emphasizing in cancer research.

  4. European Sea Bass (Dicentrarchus labrax) Immune Status and Disease Resistance Are Impaired by Arginine Dietary Supplementation

    PubMed Central

    Azeredo, Rita; Pérez-Sánchez, Jaume; Sitjà-Bobadilla, Ariadna; Fouz, Belén; Tort, Lluis; Aragão, Cláudia; Oliva-Teles, Aires; Costas, Benjamín

    2015-01-01

    Infectious diseases and fish feeds management are probably the major expenses in the aquaculture business. Hence, it is a priority to define sustainable strategies which simultaneously avoid therapeutic procedures and reinforce fish immunity. Currently, one preferred approach is the use of immunostimulants which can be supplemented to the fish diets. Arginine is a versatile amino acid with important mechanisms closely related to the immune response. Aiming at finding out how arginine affects the innate immune status or improve disease resistance of European seabass (Dicentrarchus labrax) against vibriosis, fish were fed two arginine-supplemented diets (1% and 2% arginine supplementation). A third diet meeting arginine requirement level for seabass served as control diet. Following 15 or 29 days of feeding, fish were sampled for blood, spleen and gut to assess cell-mediated immune parameters and immune-related gene expression. At the same time, fish from each dietary group were challenged against Vibrio anguillarum and survival was monitored. Cell-mediated immune parameters such as the extracellular superoxide and nitric oxide decreased in fish fed arginine-supplemented diets. Interleukins and immune-cell marker transcripts were down-regulated by the highest supplementation level. Disease resistance data were in accordance with a generally depressed immune status, with increased susceptibility to vibriosis in fish fed arginine supplemented diets. Altogether, these results suggest a general inhibitory effect of arginine on the immune defences and disease resistance of European seabass. Still, further research will certainly clarify arginine immunomodulation pathways thereby allowing the validation of its potential as a prophylactic strategy. PMID:26447480

  5. Direct methylation of FXR by Set7/9, a lysine methyltransferase, regulates the expression of FXR target genes

    PubMed Central

    Balasubramaniyan, Natarajan; Ananthanarayanan, Meena

    2012-01-01

    The farnesoid X receptor (FXR) is a ligand (bile acid)-dependent nuclear receptor that regulates target genes involved in every aspect of bile acid homeostasis. Upon binding of ligand, FXR recruits an array of coactivators and associated proteins, some of which have intrinsic enzymatic activity that modify histones or even components of the transcriptional complex. In this study, we show chromatin occupancy by the Set7/9 methyltransferase at the FXR response element (FXRE) and direct methylation of FXR in vivo and in vitro at lysine 206. siRNA depletion of Set7/9 in the Huh-7 liver cell line decreased endogenous mRNAs of the FXR target genes, the short heterodimer partner (SHP) and bile salt export pump (BSEP). Mutation of the methylation site at K206 of FXR to an arginine prevented methylation by Set7/9. A pan-methyllysine antibody recognized the wild-type FXR but not the K206R mutant form. An electromobility shift assay showed that methylation by Set7/9 enhanced binding of FXR/retinoic X receptor-α to the FXRE. Interaction between hinge domain of FXR (containing K206) and Set7/9 was confirmed by coimmunoprecipitation, GST pull down, and mammalian two-hybrid experiments. Set7/9 overexpression in Huh-7 cells significantly enhanced transactivation of the SHP and BSEP promoters in a ligand-dependent fashion by wild-type FXR but not the K206R mutant FXR. A Set7/9 mutant deficient in methyltransferase activity was also not effective in increasing transactivation of the BSEP promoter. These studies demonstrate that posttranslational methylation of FXR by Set7/9 contributes to the transcriptional activation of FXR-target genes. PMID:22345554

  6. Colorimetric sensor array based on gold nanoparticles and amino acids for identification of toxic metal ions in water.

    PubMed

    Sener, Gulsu; Uzun, Lokman; Denizli, Adil

    2014-01-01

    A facile colorimetric sensor array for detection of multiple toxic heavy metal ions (Hg(2+), Cd(2+), Fe(3+), Pb(2+), Al(3+), Cu(2+), and Cr(3+)) in water is demonstrated using 11-mercaptoundecanoic acid (MUA)-capped gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) and five amino acids (lysine, cysteine, histidine, tyrosine, and arginine). The presence of amino acids (which have functional groups that can form complexes with metal ions and MUA) regulates the aggregation of MUA-capped particles; it can either enhance or diminish the particle aggregation. The combinatorial colorimetric response of all channels of the sensor array (i.e., color change in each of AuNP and amino acid couples) enables naked-eye discrimination of all of the metal ions tested in this study with excellent selectivity.

  7. The development and amino acid binding ability of nano-materials based on azo derivatives: theory and experiment.

    PubMed

    Shang, Xuefang; Du, Jinge; Yang, Wancai; Liu, Yun; Fu, Zhiyuan; Wei, Xiaofang; Yan, Ruifang; Yao, Ningcong; Guo, Yaping; Zhang, Jinlian; Xu, Xiufang

    2014-05-01

    Two nano-material-containing azo groups have been designed and developed, and the binding ability of nano-materials with various amino acids has been characterized by UV-vis and fluorescence titrations. Results indicated that two nano-materials showed the strongest binding ability for homocysteine among twenty normal kinds of amino acids (alanine, valine, leucine, isoleucine, methionine, aspartic acid, glutamic acid, arginine, glycine, serine, threonine, asparagine, phenylalanine, histidine, tryptophan, proline, lysine, glutamine, tyrosine and homocysteine). The reason for the high sensitivity for homocysteine was that two nano-materials containing an aldehyde group reacted with SH in homocysteine and afforded very stable thiazolidine derivatives. Theoretical investigation further illustrated the possible binding mode in host-guest interaction and the roles of molecular frontier orbitals in molecular interplay. Thus, the two nano-materials can be used as optical sensors for the detection of homocysteine.

  8. Characterization of a pyridoxal-5'-phosphate-dependent l-lysine decarboxylase/oxidase from Burkholderia sp. AIU 395.

    PubMed

    Sugawara, Asami; Matsui, Daisuke; Takahashi, Narumi; Yamada, Miwa; Asano, Yasuhisa; Isobe, Kimiyasu

    2014-11-01

    A novel enzyme, which catalyzed decarboxylation of l-lysine into cadaverine with release of carbon dioxide and oxidative deamination of l-lysine into l-2-aminoadipic 5-semialdehyde with release of ammonia and hydrogen peroxide, was found from a newly isolated Burkholderia sp. AIU 395. The enzyme was specific to l-lysine and did not exhibit enzyme activities for other l-amino acids, l-lysine derivatives, d-amino acids, and amines. The apparent Km values for l-lysine in the oxidation and decarboxylation reactions were estimated to be 0.44 mM and 0.84 mM, respectively. The molecular mass was estimated to be 150 kDa, which was composed of two identical subunits with molecular mass of 76.5 kDa. The enzyme contained one mol of pyridoxal 5'-phosphate per subunit as a prosthetic group. The enzyme exhibiting decarboxylase and oxidase activities for l-lysine was first reported here, while the deduced amino acid sequence was homologous to that of putative lysine decarboxylases from the genus Burkholderia.

  9. Lysine biosynthesis and nitrogen metabolism in quinoa (Chenopodium quinoa): study of enzymes and nitrogen-containing compounds.

    PubMed

    Varisi, Vanderlei A; Camargos, Liliane S; Aguiar, Leandro F; Christofoleti, Renata M; Medici, Leonardo O; Azevedo, Ricardo A

    2008-01-01

    Aspartate kinase (AK, EC 2.7.2.4), homoserine dehydrogenase (HSDH, EC 1.1.1.3) and dihydrodipicolinate synthase (DHDPS, EC 4.2.1.52) were isolated and partially purified from immature Chenopodium quinoa Willd seeds. Enzyme activities were studied in the presence of the aspartate-derived amino acids lysine, threonine and methionine and also the lysine analogue S-2-aminoethyl-l-cysteine (AEC), at 1 mM and 5 mM. The results confirmed the existence of, at least, two AK isoenzymes, one inhibited by lysine and the other inhibited by threonine, the latter being predominant in quinoa seeds. HSDH activity was also shown to be partially inhibited by threonine, whereas some of the activity was resistant to the inhibitory effect, indicating the presence of two isoenzymes, one resistant and another sensitive to threonine inhibition. Only one DHDPS isoenzyme highly sensitive to lysine inhibition was detected. The results suggest that the high concentration of lysine observed in quinoa seeds is possibly due to a combined effect of increased lysine synthesis and accumulation in the soluble form and/or as protein lysine. Nitrogen assimilation was also investigated and based on nitrate content, nitrate reductase activity, amino acid distribution and ureide content, the leaves were identified as the predominant site of nitrate reduction in this plant species. The amino acid profile analysis in leaves and roots also indicated an important role of soluble glutamine as a nitrogen transporting compound.

  10. PSEUDOMONAS PYOCYANEA AND THE ARGININE DIHYDROLASE SYSTEM.

    PubMed

    TAYLOR, J J; WHITBY, J L

    1964-03-01

    Non-pigmented strains of Pseudomonas pyocyanea occur frequently and this organism has only limited activity in conventional biochemical tests; 50 strains were tested for the presence of arginine dihydrolase and found positive whereas only Salmonella sp. and Enterobacter sp. among other Gram-negative species were positive. The test for arginine dihydrolase is rapid and simple and suitable for routine use.

  11. Single-chain structure of human ceruloplasmin: the complete amino acid sequence of the whole molecule.

    PubMed Central

    Takahashi, N; Ortel, T L; Putnam, F W

    1984-01-01

    We have determined the amino acid sequence of the amino-terminal 67,000-dalton (67-kDa) fragment of human ceruloplasmin and have established overlapping sequences between the 67-kDa and 50-kDa fragments and between the 50-kDa and 19-kDa fragments. The 67-kDa fragment contains 480 amino acid residues and three glucosamine oligosaccharides. These results together with our previous sequence data for the 50-kDa and 19-kDa fragments complete the amino acid sequence of human ceruloplasmin. The polypeptide chain has a total of 1,046 amino acid residues (Mr 120,085) and has attachment sites for four glucosamine oligosaccharides; together these account for the total molecular mass of human ceruloplasmin (132 kDa). The sequence analysis of the peptides overlapping the fragments showed that one additional amino acid, arginine, is present between the 67-kDa and 50-kDa fragments, and another, lysine, is between the 50-kDa and 19-kDa fragments. Only two apparent sites of amino acid interchange have been identified in the polypeptide chain. Both involve a single-point interchange of glycine and lysine that would result in a difference in charge. The results of the complete sequence analysis verified that human ceruloplasmin is composed of a single polypeptide chain and that the subunit-like fragments are produced by proteolytic cleavage during purification (and possibly also in vivo). PMID:6582496

  12. Essential Amino Acids of the Hantaan Virus N Protein in Its Interaction with RNA

    PubMed Central

    Severson, William; Xu, Xiaolin; Kuhn, Michaela; Senutovitch, Nina; Thokala, Mercy; Ferron, François; Longhi, Sonia; Canard, Bruno; Jonsson, Colleen B.

    2005-01-01

    The nucleocapsid (N) protein of hantavirus encapsidates viral genomic and antigenomic RNAs. Previously, deletion mapping identified a central, conserved region (amino acids 175 to 217) within the Hantaan virus (HTNV) N protein that interacts with a high affinity with these viral RNAs (vRNAs). To further define the boundaries of the RNA binding domain (RBD), several peptides were synthesized and examined for the ability to bind full-length S-segment vRNA. Peptide 195-217 retained 94% of the vRNA bound by the HTNV N protein, while peptides 175-186 and 205-217 bound only 1% of the vRNA. To further explore which residues were essential for binding vRNA, we performed a comprehensive mutational analysis of the amino acids in the RBD. Single and double Ala substitutions were constructed for 18 amino acids from amino acids 175 to 217 in the full-length N protein. In addition, Ala substitutions were made for the three R residues in peptide 185-217. An analysis of protein-RNA interactions by electrophoretic mobility shift assays implicated E192, Y206, and S217 as important for binding. Chemical modification experiments showed that lysine residues, but not arginine or cysteine residues, contribute to RNA binding, which agreed with bioinformatic predictions. Overall, these data implicate lysine residues dispersed from amino acids 175 to 429 of the protein and three amino acids located in the RBD as essential for RNA binding. PMID:16014963

  13. Critical Role for Arginine Methylation in Adenovirus-Infected Cells▿

    PubMed Central

    Iacovides, Demetris C.; O'Shea, Clodagh C.; Oses-Prieto, Juan; Burlingame, Alma; McCormick, Frank

    2007-01-01

    During the late stages of adenovirus infection, the 100K protein (100K) inhibits the translation of cellular messages in the cytoplasm and regulates hexon trimerization and assembly in the nucleus. However, it is not known how it switches between these two functions. Here we show that 100K is methylated on arginine residues at its C terminus during infection and that this region is necessary for binding PRMT1 methylase. Methylated 100K is exclusively nuclear. Mutation of the third RGG motif (amino acids 741 to 743) prevents localization to the nucleus during infection, suggesting that methylation of that sequence is important for 100K shuttling. Treatment of infected cells with methylation inhibitors inhibits expression of late structural proteins. These data suggest that arginine methylation of 100K is necessary for its localization to the nucleus and is a critical cellular function necessary for productive adenovirus infection. PMID:17686851

  14. Lysine fortification of wheat flour improves selected indices of the nutritional status of predominantly cereal-eating families in Pakistan.

    PubMed

    Hussain, Tajammal; Abbas, Shaid; Khan, Mushtaq A; Scrimshaw, Nevin S

    2004-06-01

    Wheat provides more than 50% of the protein and calorie intake of the population of Pakistan. Legumes and animal protein that could complement the amino acid pattern of wheat, in which lysine is the first limiting amino acid for utilization of protein, are not affordable by members of lower socioeconomic groups in developing countries. The purpose of the study was to determine whether lysine fortification of wheat flour would have a positive impact on populations consuming a predominantly wheat-based diet. A double-blind study was carried out for three months on the outskirts of Peshawar, Pakistan. Forty families received wheat flour fortified with lysine, and 40 families received wheat flour without lysine. Wheat provided 59% of the protein for men, 65% for women, and 58% for children. The weight and height of the children in both groups increased during the study, but the increase was significantly greater in the lysine group. Hemoglobin increased significantly in the women receiving lysine-fortified flour. Transferrin levels increased significantly in men, women, and children in the lysine group as compared with those in the control group. Prealbumin increased significantly in adults receiving additional lysine but decreased in children. Men, women, and children in the lysine-supplemented families had significant increases in CD4, CD8, and complement C3 as compared with controls. These results indicate that lysine fortification of wheat flour can significantly improve sensitive indicators of nutritional status in a population consuming a diet in which 58% to 65% of the protein, depending on age and sex, is supplied by wheat.

  15. The Rieske protein from Paracoccus denitrificans is inserted into the cytoplasmic membrane by the twin-arginine translocase.

    PubMed

    Bachmann, Julie; Bauer, Brigitte; Zwicker, Klaus; Ludwig, Bernd; Anderka, Oliver

    2006-11-01

    The Rieske [2Fe-2S] protein (ISP) is an essential subunit of cytochrome bc(1) complexes in mitochondrial and bacterial respiratory chains. Based on the presence of two consecutive arginines, it was argued that the ISP of Paracoccus denitrificans, a Gram-negative soil bacterium, is inserted into the cytoplasmic membrane via the twin-arginine translocation (Tat) pathway. Here, we provide experimental evidence that membrane integration of the bacterial ISP indeed relies on the Tat translocon. We show that targeting of the ISP depends on the twin-arginine motif. A strict requirement is established particularly for the second arginine residue (R16); conservative replacement of the first arginine (R15K) still permits substantial ISP transport. Comparative sequence analysis reveals characteristics common to Tat signal peptides in several bacterial ISPs; however, there are distinctive features relating to the fact that the presumed ISP Tat signal simultaneously serves as a membrane anchor. These differences include an elevated hydrophobicity of the h-region compared with generic Tat signals and the absence of an otherwise well-conserved '+5'-consensus motif lysine residue. Substitution of the +5 lysine (Y20K) compromises ISP export and/or cytochrome bc(1) stability to some extent and points to a specific role for this deviation from the canonical Tat motif. EPR spectroscopy confirms cytosolic insertion of the [2Fe-2S] cofactor. Mutation of an essential cofactor binding residue (C152S) decreases the ISP membrane levels, possibly indicating that cofactor insertion is a prerequisite for efficient translocation along the Tat pathway.

  16. The Glycoprotein B Cytoplasmic Domain Lysine Cluster Is Critical for Varicella-Zoster Virus Cell-Cell Fusion Regulation and Infection.

    PubMed

    Yang, Edward; Arvin, Ann M; Oliver, Stefan L

    2017-01-01

    The conserved glycoproteins gB and gH-gL are essential for herpesvirus entry and cell-cell fusion induced syncytium formation, a characteristic of varicella-zoster virus (VZV) pathology in skin and sensory ganglia. VZV syncytium formation, which has been implicated in the painful condition of postherpetic neuralgia, is regulated by the cytoplasmic domains of gB (gBcyt) via an immunoreceptor tyrosine-based inhibition motif (ITIM) and gH (gHcyt). A lysine cluster (K894, K897, K898, and K900) in the VZV gBcyt was identified by sequence alignment to be conserved among alphaherpesviruses, suggesting a functional role. Alanine and arginine substitutions were used to determine if the positive charge and susceptibility to posttranslational modifications of these lysines contributed to gB/gH-gL cell-cell fusion. Critically, the positive charge of the lysine residues was necessary for fusion regulation, as alanine substitutions induced a 440% increase in fusion compared to that of the wild-type gBcyt while arginine substitutions had wild-type-like fusion levels in an in vitro gB/gH-gL cell fusion assay. Consistent with these results, the alanine substitutions in the viral genome caused exaggerated syncytium formation, reduced VZV titers (-1.5 log10), and smaller plaques than with the parental Oka (pOka) strain. In contrast, arginine substitutions resulted in syncytia with only 2-fold more nuclei, a -0.5-log10 reduction in titers, and pOka-like plaques. VZV mutants with both an ITIM mutation and either alanine or arginine substitutions had reduced titers and small plaques but differed in syncytium morphology. Thus, effective VZV propagation is dependent on cell-cell fusion regulation by the conserved gBcyt lysine cluster, in addition to the gBcyt ITIM and the gHcyt.

  17. Proteome-wide enrichment of proteins modified by lysine methylation

    PubMed Central

    Carlson, Scott M; Moore, Kaitlyn E; Green, Erin M; Martín, Glòria Mas; Gozani, Or

    2015-01-01

    We present a protocol for using the triple malignant brain tumor domains of L3MBTL1 (3×MBT), which bind to mono- and di-methylated lysine with minimal sequence specificity, in order to enrich for such methylated lysine from cell lysates. Cells in culture are grown with amino acids containing light or heavy stable isotopic labels. Methylated proteins are enriched by incubating cell lysates with 3×MBT, or with the binding-null D355N mutant as a negative control. Quantitative liquid chromatography and tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) are then used to identify proteins that are specifically enriched by 3×MBT pull-down. The addition of a third isotopic label allows the comparison of protein lysine methylation between different biological conditions. Unlike most approaches, our strategy does not require a prior hypothesis of candidate methylated proteins, and it recognizes a wider range of methylated proteins than any available method using antibodies. Cells are prepared by growing in isotopic labeling medium for about 7 d; the process of enriching methylated proteins takes 3 d and analysis by LC-MS/MS takes another 1–2 d. PMID:24309976

  18. Cloning, characterization and expression of escapin, a broadly antimicrobial FAD-containing L-amino acid oxidase from ink of the sea hare Aplysia californica.

    PubMed

    Yang, Hsiuchin; Johnson, Paul Micah; Ko, Ko-Chun; Kamio, Michiya; Germann, Markus W; Derby, Charles D; Tai, Phang C

    2005-09-01

    A 60 kDa monomeric protein isolated from the defensive purple ink secretion of the sea hare Aplysia californica was cloned and sequenced, and is the first sea hare antimicrobial protein to be functionally expressed in E. coli. Sequence analysis suggested that this protein is a flavin-containing l-amino acid oxidase (LAAO), with one predicted potential glycosylation site, although the glycosylation could not be experimentally confirmed. This protein, which we call ;escapin', has high sequence similarity to several other gastropod proteins. Escapin was verified by NMR, mass spectroscopy and HPLC to have FAD as its flavin cofactor. Escapin's antimicrobial effects, bacteriostasis and bactericidal, were determined using a combination of two assays: (1) incubation of bacteria on solid media followed by assessment of inhibition by direct observation of zones of inhibition or by turbidity measurements; and (2) incubation of bacteria in liquid media followed by counting viable colonies after growing on agar plates. Native escapin inhibited the growth of Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria, including marine bacteria (Vibrio harveyii and Staphylococcus aureus) and pathogenic bacteria (Staphylococcus aureus, Streptococcus pyogenes and Pseudomonas aeruginosa). Escapin also inhibited the growth of yeast and fungi, with different efficacies. Escapin's antimicrobial activity was concentration dependent and did not decrease when stored for more than 5 months at room temperature. Escapin was bacteriostatic and not bactericidal in minimal media (e.g. salt media) with glucose, yeast extract, and a mixture of 20 amino acids each at 50 micromol l(-1), but was bactericidal in media enriched with Tryptone Peptone. Escapin was also strongly bactericidal in media with l-lysine at concentrations as low as 3 mmol l(-1) and slightly bactericidal in 50 mmol l(-1) l-arginine, but not in most other amino acids even at 50 mmol l(-1). Escapin had high oxidase activity (producing hydrogen

  19. Arginoplexes: an arginine-anchored nanoliposomal carrier for gene delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patel, Ketan; Tyagi, Monica; Monpara, Jasmin; Vora, Lalit; Gupta, Sanjay; Vavia, Pradeep

    2014-04-01

    There is a need of an efficient and safe non-viral gene delivery carrier due to promising future of nucleic acid-based therapeutics in the treatment of intractable diseases. Cytotoxicity and cost are the major concerns with current quaternary ammonium-based cationic liposomes. The major aim of current research work was development and in vitro evaluation of arginine-anchored nanoliposomes for gene delivery. l-Arginine-fatty acid conjugate was synthesized and characterized using IR, NMR, and mass spectroscopy. Synthesized conjugate—lauroyl arginine ethyl ester (LAE) was successfully incorporated into liposomes. Effect of nanocarrier composition on DNA binding was evaluated by preparing solid lipid nanoparticle (SLN) and self nanoemulsifying system (SNES) using same LAE concentration. Effect of cationic head on DNA binding was also evaluated. Arginine-anchored nanoliposomes—arginoplexes (APX) showed superior DNA-binding affinity. Surface PEG was expected to cause hindrance in DNA binding in SLNs and SNES. Guanidino group was found to be a better cationic head for DNA binding compared to primary amine or quaternary amine. Gel retardation assay was performed to optimize the ratio of DNA to LAE in nanocarrier. Serum stability, haemolysis, cytotoxicity, and transfection studies were carried out to evaluate APX. Binding of DNA to APX was found to be stable in the presence of serum, and no degradation of DNA was observed. APX containing 2 mg/ml LAE which exhibited particle size of 72 nm with zeta potential of +57.5 mV, showed lower cytotoxicity and better transfection. APX can be a promising carrier for gene delivery.

  20. Characterization of the arginine deiminase of Streptococcus equi subsp. zooepidemicus.

    PubMed

    Hong, Kyongsu

    2006-09-01

    Streptococcus equi subsp. zooepidemicus is an important cause of infectious diseases in horses and rarely humans. Little is known about the virulence factors or protective antigens of S. equi subsp. zooepidemicus. In the present study, I designed original primers based on an alignment of the gene sagp(arcA) from Streptococcus pyogenes encoding streptococcal acid glycoprotein-arginine deiminase (SAGP/AD) to amplify the S. equi subsp. zooepidemicus counterpart sequence by polymerase chain reaction, and I analyzed the sagp(arcA) gene of the organism. Using chromosomal walking steps, I identified a contiguous eight-gene locus involved in SAGP/AD production. Their open reading frames were found to share significant homologies and to correspond closely in molecular mass to previously sequenced arc genes of S. pyogenes, thus they were designated ahrC.2 (arginine repressor), arcR (CRP/FNR transcription regulator), sagp(arcA) (streptococcal acid glycoprotein-arginine deiminase), putative acetyltransferase gene, arcB (ornithine carbamyl transferase), arcD (arginine-ornithine antiporter), arcT (Xaa-His peptidase), and arcC (carbamate kinase). The SAGP homologue of S. equi subsp. zooepidemicus (SzSAGP), encoded by arcA gene of the bacteria (arcA(SZ)), was successfully expressed in Escherichia coli and purified to homogeneity. When in vitro growth inhibitory activity of the recombinant SzSAGP was tested against MOLT-3 cells, it inhibited the growth of the cells during the 3 days of culture in a dose-dependent manner, accompanied by the induction of apoptotic cell death. The recombinant protein also possessed AD activity. By immunoblot analysis using both anti-SzSAGP-SfbI(H8) and anti-SfbI(H8) sera, I was able to demonstrate that the SzSAGP protein is expressed on the streptococcal surface.

  1. Proteome-wide analysis of lysine acetylation in the plant pathogen Botrytis cinerea

    PubMed Central

    Lv, Binna; Yang, Qianqian; Li, Delong; Liang, Wenxing; Song, Limin

    2016-01-01

    Lysine acetylation is a dynamic and reversible post-translational modification that plays an important role in diverse cellular processes. Botrytis cinerea is the most thoroughly studied necrotrophic species due to its broad host range and huge economic impact. However, to date, little is known about the functions of lysine acetylation in this plant pathogen. In this study, we determined the lysine acetylome of B. cinerea through the combination of affinity enrichment and high-resolution LC-MS/MS analysis. Overall, 1582 lysine acetylation sites in 954 proteins were identified. Bioinformatics analysis shows that the acetylated proteins are involved in diverse biological functions and show multiple cellular localizations. Several particular amino acids preferred near acetylation sites, including KacY, KacH, Kac***R, KacF, FKac and Kac***K, were identified in this organism. Protein interaction network analysis demonstrates that a variety of interactions are modulated by protein acetylation. Interestingly, 6 proteins involved in virulence of B. cinerea, including 3 key components of the high-osmolarity glycerol pathway, were found to be acetylated, suggesting that lysine acetylation plays regulatory roles in pathogenesis. These data provides the first comprehensive view of the acetylome of B. cinerea and serves as a rich resource for functional analysis of lysine acetylation in this plant pathogen. PMID:27381557

  2. Accessibility and mobility of lysine residues in. beta. -lactoglobulin

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, E.M.; Pfeffer, P.E.; Kumosinski, T.F.; Greenberg, R.

    1988-07-26

    N/sup epsilon/-(/sup 2/H/sub 6/)Isopropyllysyl-..beta..-lactoglobulin was prepared by reductive alkylation of ..beta..-lactoglobulin with (/sup 2/H/sub 6/)acetone and NaBH/sub 4/ to provide a /sup 2/H (NMR) probe for the study of lysine involvement in lipid-protein interactions. Amino acid analysis showed 80% of the protein's 15 lysine residues to be labeled. Unmodified lysine residues were located through peptide maps produced from CNBr, tryptic, and chymotryptic digests of the labeled protein. Average correlation times calculated from /sup 2/H NMR spectra were 20 and 320 ps for 8.7 and 3.3 residues, respectively, in 6 M guanidine hydrochloride; in nondenaturing solution, values of 70 and 320 ps were obtained for 6.5 and 3.2 residues, respectively, with the remaining 2.3 modified residues not observed, suggesting that side chains of lysine residues in unordered or flexible regions were more mobile than those in stable periodic structures. /sup 2/H NMR spectra of the protein complexed with dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine confirmed the extrinsic membrane protein type behavior of ..beta..-lactoglobulin previously reported from /sup 31/P NMR studies of the phospholipids complexed with ..beta..-lactoglobulin. Although no physiological function has yet been identified, comparison of these results with the X-ray structure supports the hypothesis that residues not accessible for modification may help to stabilize the cone-shaped ..beta..-barrel thought to contain binding sites for small lipid-soluble molecules.

  3. Effect of supplementation of crystalline lysine on the performance of WL layers in tropics during summer.

    PubMed

    Kumari, K Naga Raja; Reddy, V Ravinder; Preetham, V Chinni; Kumar, D Srinivas; Sen, Arup Ratan; Rao, S Venkata Rama

    2016-04-01

    A trial was conducted to evaluate the effect of lysine concentration in the diet of WL layers with constant ratio of other essential amino acids to lysine. Pullets (528) aged 25 to 36 weeks were fed with test diet containing two protein levels (13.36 and 15.78%) each with 5% concentration of lysine (0.50, 0.55, 0.60, 0.65, and 0.70) and a control with 17% CP and 0.70%, lysine. Each test diet was fed ad libitum to six replicates of eight birds for a period of 12 weeks. Egg production (EP), egg weight (EW), egg mass (EM), feed efficiency (g/g) (FE), body weight gain (BWG), Haugh unit (HU) and yolk colour (YC) were measured. Increased (P ≤ 0.05) EP, EW, EM, FE and BWG were obtained with increasing lysine concentration in diets. Whereas, feed intake/h/day, feed intake/egg, egg shell defects (ESD), mortality and shell thickness were not affected (P ≥ 0.05) by the concentration of lysine in diet. However, higher (P ≤ 0.05) HU score and YC were noticed at low lysine (0.50 %) concentrations. Based on this, it was concluded that WL layers (25-36 weeks) reared in open-sided houses in the tropics require approximately 0.70 % lysine (597.90 vs. 584.39 mg/h/day) in low (13.36% CP) and high (15.78% CP) protein groups in diets containing approximately 2700 kcal of ME/kg in summer.

  4. Role of Environmental Conditions on the Interaction of L-Arginine with Oxide Mineral Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klochko, K.; Jonsson, C. M.; Jonsson, C. L.; Lee, N.; Cleaves, H. J., II; Sverjensky, D. A.; Hazen, R. M.

    2010-04-01

    The current study is focused on surface interactions between L-arginine, the most basic protein amino acid, and rutile in NaCl media over a wide range of solution pH conditions, amino acid concentrations, and solution ionic strengths.

  5. Determination of N epsilon-(carboxymethyl)lysine in foods and related systems.

    PubMed

    Ames, Jennifer M

    2008-04-01

    The sensitive and specific determination of advanced glycation end products (AGEs) is of considerable interest because these compounds have been associated with pro-oxidative and proinflammatory effects in vivo. AGEs form when carbonyl compounds, such as glucose and its oxidation products, glyoxal and methylglyoxal, react with the epsilon-amino group of lysine and the guanidino group of arginine to give structures including N epsilon-(carboxymethyl)lysine (CML), N epsilon-(carboxyethyl)lysine, and hydroimidazolones. CML is frequently used as a marker for AGEs in general. It exists in both the free or peptide-bound forms. Analysis of CML involves its extraction from the food (including protein hydrolysis to release any peptide-bound adduct) and determination by immunochemical or instrumental means. Various factors must be considered at each step of the analysis. Extraction, hydrolysis, and sample clean-up are all less straight forward for food samples, compared to plasma and tissue. The immunochemical and instrumental methods all have their advantages and disadvantages, and no perfect method exists. Currently, different procedures are being used in different laboratories, and there is an urgent need to compare, improve, and validate methods.

  6. Studies on the biochemical composition, energetics and essential amino acids of three mudskippers in Xiamen Harbour

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jun, Wang; Yong-Quan, Su

    1995-12-01

    Measurements were made on the contents of protein, lipid, glycogen (PLG) and water, and on caloric values and amino acids, in muscle of three mudskippers Periophthalmus cantonensis, Scarteiaos viridis and Boleophthalmus pectinirostris collected from Haicang, Xiamen. The essential amino acids (EAA) for these fishes were also studied with radioisotopic trace method. The results showed: (1) The content of each component in tested fish muscles differed slightly, and protein was the most important component making up from 6.685% to 9.891% of the wet weight (about 44.21%-50.45% of dry weight); (2) Energy calculated from the sum of protein, lipid and glycogen in wet muscle was low (<4.3kJ/g) in these fishes, especially in B. pectinirostris (<3.1 kJ/g); the ratios of energy to protein content ( E/P) also were low (<39.873-45.535kJ/g); (3) Seventeen amino acids were determined in these three fishes. The content of the same amino acid (among the seventeen) tested in different species and sexes varied slightly. The amounts of methionine, phenylalanine lysine, arginine, histidine, threonine isoleucine and leucine which are indispensable for the needs of human beings and animals were relatively high, accounting for 47.35%-48.06% of the total amino acid content. (4) Leucine, isoleucine, arginine, lysine, phenylalanine, tryptophan, methionine, histidine, threonine, and valine, are essential in the diet of the three mudskippers as the radioisotopic trace method using D-[U-14C]-glucose showed little or no radioactivity was incorporated into these ten amino acids.

  7. Studies on the biochemical composition, energetics and essential amino acids of three mudskippers in Xiamen Harbour

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jun; Su, Yong-Quan

    1995-12-01

    Measurements were made on the contents of protein, lipid, glycogen (PLG) and water, and on caloric values and amino acids, in muscle of three mudskippers Periophthalmus cantonensis, Scarteiaos viridis and Boleophthalmus pectinirostris collected from Haicang, Xiamen. The essential amino acids (EAA) for these fishes were also studied with radioisotopic trace method. The results showed: (1) The content of each component in tested fish muscles differed slightly, and protein was the most important component making up from 6.685% to 9.891% of the wet weight (about 44.21% 50.45% of dry weight); (2) Energy calculated from the sum of protein, lipid and glycogen in wet muscle was low (<4.3kJ/g) in these fishes, especially in B. pectinirostris (<3.1 kJ/g); the ratios of energy to protein content ( E/P) also were low (<39.873 45.535kJ/g); (3) Seventeen amino acids were determined in these three fishes. The content of the same amino acid (among the seventeen) tested in different species and sexes varied slightly. The amounts of methionine, phenylalanine lysine, arginine, histidine, threonine isoleucine and leucine which are indispensable for the needs of human beings and animals were relatively high, accounting for 47.35% 48.06% of the total amino acid content. (4) Leucine, isoleucine, arginine, lysine, phenylalanine, tryptophan, methionine, histidine, threonine, and valine, are essential in the diet of the three mudskippers as the radioisotopic trace method using D-[U-14C]-glucose showed little or no radioactivity was incorporated into these ten amino acids.

  8. Histone lysine methylation and chromatin replication.

    PubMed

    Rivera, Carlos; Gurard-Levin, Zachary A; Almouzni, Geneviève; Loyola, Alejandra

    2014-12-01

    In eukaryotic organisms, the replication of the DNA sequence and its organization into chromatin are critical to maintain genome integrity. Chromatin components, such as histone variants and histone post-translational modifications, along with the higher-order chromatin structure, impact several DNA metabolic processes, including replication, transcription, and repair. In this review we focus on lysine methylation and the relationships between this histone mark and chromatin replication. We first describe studies implicating lysine methylation in regulating early steps in the replication process. We then discuss chromatin reassembly following replication fork passage, where the incorporation of a combination of newly synthesized histones and parental histones can impact the inheritance of lysine methylation marks on the daughter strands. Finally, we elaborate on how the inheritance of lysine methylation can impact maintenance of the chromatin landscape, using heterochromatin as a model chromatin domain, and we discuss the potential mechanisms involved in this process.

  9. SPOTing Acetyl-Lysine Dependent Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Picaud, Sarah; Filippakopoulos, Panagis

    2015-01-01

    Post translational modifications have been recognized as chemical signals that create docking sites for evolutionary conserved effector modules, allowing for signal integration within large networks of interactions. Lysine acetylation in particular has attracted attention as a regulatory modification, affecting chromatin structure and linking to transcriptional activation. Advances in peptide array technologies have facilitated the study of acetyl-lysine-containing linear motifs interacting with the evolutionary conserved bromodomain module, which specifically recognizes and binds to acetylated sequences in histones and other proteins. Here we summarize recent work employing SPOT peptide technology to identify acetyl-lysine dependent interactions and document the protocols adapted in our lab, as well as our efforts to characterize such bromodomain-histone interactions. Our results highlight the versatility of SPOT methods and establish an affordable tool for rapid access to potential protein/modified-peptide interactions involving lysine acetylation. PMID:27600229

  10. Vacuolar transporter Avt4 is involved in excretion of basic amino acids from the vacuoles of Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Sekito, Takayuki; Chardwiriyapreecha, Soracom; Sugimoto, Naoko; Ishimoto, Masaya; Kawano-Kawada, Miyuki; Kakinuma, Yoshimi

    2014-01-01

    Basic amino acids (lysine, histidine and arginine) accumulated in Saccharomyces cerevisiae vacuoles should be mobilized to cytosolic nitrogen metabolism under starvation. We found that the decrease of vacuolar basic amino acids in response to nitrogen starvation was impaired by the deletion of AVT4 gene encoding a vacuolar transporter. In addition, overexpression of AVT4 reduced the accumulation of basic amino acids in vacuoles under nutrient-rich condition. In contrast to AVT4, the deletion and overexpression of AVT3, which encodes the closest homologue of Avt4p, did not affect the contents of vacuolar basic amino acids. Consistent with these, arginine uptake into vacuolar membrane vesicles was decreased by Avt4p-, but not by Avt3p-overproduction, whereas various neutral amino acids were excreted from vacuolar membrane vesicles in a manner dependent on either Avt4p or Avt3p. These results suggest that Avt4p is a vacuolar amino acid exporter involving in the recycling of basic amino acids.

  11. Bovine brain low Mr acid phosphatase: purification and properties.

    PubMed

    Saeed, A; Tremori, E; Manao, G; Camici, G; Cappugi, G; Ramponi, G

    1990-01-01

    Low molecular weight acid phosphatase from bovine brain was purified to homogeneity using affinity chromatography on p-aminobenzylphosphonic acid-agarose to obtain the enzyme with both high specific activity (110 mumol min-1 mg-1 measured at pH 5.5 and 37 degrees C with p-nitrophenyl phosphate as substrate) and good yields. The enzyme was characterized with respect to molecular weight, amino acid composition, pH op