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Sample records for acids peptides proteins

  1. Heat capacities of amino acids, peptides and proteins.

    PubMed

    Makhatadze, G I

    1998-04-20

    The heat capacity is one of the fundamental parameters describing thermodynamic properties of a system. It has wide applications in a number of areas such as polymer chemistry, protein folding and DNA stability. To aid the scientific community in the analysis of such data, I have compiled a database on the experimentally measured heat capacities of amino acids, polyamino acids, peptides, and proteins in solid state and in aqueous solutions. PMID:9648205

  2. Occurrence and function of D-amino acid-containing peptides and proteins: antimicrobial peptides.

    PubMed

    Mignogna, G; Simmaco, M; Barra, D

    1998-01-01

    Antimicrobial peptides are widely distributed in living organisms, where they represent a constitutive defence system acting as a first line of response against infections. The number of such peptides discovered has increased rapidly in the last few years, and more than 100 have been described from different sources. So far, antimicrobial peptides containing a D-amino acid have only been found in the skin secretions of frogs belonging to the genus Bombina. In the second position of the sequence of the mature peptides either D-alloisoleucine or D-leucine were detected. The D-amino acids are derived from the corresponding L forms by an as yet unknown posttranslational reaction. PMID:9949866

  3. Proteins, Peptides and Amino Acids: Role in Infant Nutrition.

    PubMed

    Nutten, Sophie

    2016-01-01

    Proteins are polymers composed of 30 or more amino acids; some of them are essential dietary components, since they are not synthetized by human metabolic processes. They are crucial for healthy growth and development and influence major functions of the body. The infant's first year is a critical time of rapid growth and development, which must be supported by a high rate of protein synthesis. Breast milk, as a single specific food source in the first months of life, is providing the total protein and essential amino acids required. Infant formulas have been designed for infants who cannot be breastfed. They should be similar to breast milk in their composition and their functional outcomes, insuring appropriate growth, optimal development, maturation of the immune system, easy digestion and healthy metabolic programming. By modifying their protein components, specific infant formulas have also been developed for specific needs. For example, partially hydrolyzed (prevention of atopic dermatitis) and extensively hydrolyzed or amino-acid-based infant formulas (reduction in allergy symptoms) have been designed for the management of cow's milk protein allergy. In conclusion, proteins provided via breast milk or infant formula are essential components of the infant's diet; therefore, the specific quality, quantity and conformation of proteins are of utmost importance for healthy growth and development. PMID:27336588

  4. Incorporation of Noncanonical Amino Acids into Rosetta and Use in Computational Protein-Peptide Interface Design

    PubMed Central

    Renfrew, P. Douglas; Choi, Eun Jung; Bonneau, Richard; Kuhlman, Brian

    2012-01-01

    Noncanonical amino acids (NCAAs) can be used in a variety of protein design contexts. For example, they can be used in place of the canonical amino acids (CAAs) to improve the biophysical properties of peptides that target protein interfaces. We describe the incorporation of 114 NCAAs into the protein-modeling suite Rosetta. We describe our methods for building backbone dependent rotamer libraries and the parameterization and construction of a scoring function that can be used to score NCAA containing peptides and proteins. We validate these additions to Rosetta and our NCAA-rotamer libraries by showing that we can improve the binding of a calpastatin derived peptides to calpain-1 by substituting NCAAs for native amino acids using Rosetta. Rosetta (executables and source), auxiliary scripts and code, and documentation can be found at (http://www.rosettacommons.org/). PMID:22431978

  5. Amino acid and peptide absorption from partial digests of proteins in isolated rat small intestine.

    PubMed Central

    Gardner, M L

    1978-01-01

    1. Absorption of each of sixteen amino acids, free and peptide-bound, has been measured in isolated rat small intestine perfused with five partial digests of proteins. 2. At low concentrations net absorption of each amino acid was proportional to its luminal concentration and independent of the nature of the amino acid. 3. A series of first-order multiple regressions was found to describe well the characteristics of absorption. 4. Rate constants for disappearance of free and peptide-bound amino acids from the lumen were closely similar. However, substantial back-flux occurred of amino acids derived from peptide hydrolysis. Hence 60-70% of the amino-N entering the serosal tissue fluid probably had left the lumen as free amino acids. 5. Intact peptides crossed the mucosa during absorption from a soy bean hydrolysate and in substantial quantities during absorption from one casein digest but not from another. With other hydrolysates there was no evidence for passage of peptides to the serosa. 6. In several cases there was a serious discrepancy between the amount of amino-N absorbed from the lumen and the amount accounted for as peptide or free amino acid in the serosal secretion. 7. The characteristics of absorption were similar (apart from the exceptions in 5 above) for all the digests studied except for soy bean hydrolysate. PMID:731590

  6. Hypochlorite-induced oxidation of amino acids, peptides and proteins.

    PubMed

    Hawkins, C L; Pattison, D I; Davies, M J

    2003-12-01

    Activated phagocytes generate the potent oxidant hypochlorite (HOCl) via the release of the enzyme myeloperoxidase and hydrogen peroxide. HOCl is known to react with a number of biological targets including proteins, DNA, lipids and cholesterol. Proteins are likely to be major targets for reaction with HOCl within a cell due to their abundance and high reactivity with HOCl. This review summarizes information on the rate of reaction of HOCl with proteins, the nature of the intermediates formed, the mechanisms involved in protein oxidation and the products of these reactions. The predicted targets for reaction with HOCl from kinetic modeling studies and the consequences of HOCl-induced protein oxidation are also discussed. PMID:14661089

  7. Lactobacillus gasseri requires peptides, not proteins or free amino acids, for growth in milk.

    PubMed

    Arakawa, K; Matsunaga, K; Takihiro, S; Moritoki, A; Ryuto, S; Kawai, Y; Masuda, T; Miyamoto, T

    2015-03-01

    Lactobacillus gasseri is a widespread commensal lactic acid bacterium inhabiting human mucosal niches and has many beneficial effects as a probiotic. However, L. gasseri is difficult to grow in milk, which hurts usability for the food industry. It had been previously reported that supplementation with yeast extract or proteose peptone, including peptides, enables L. gasseri to grow well in milk. In this study, our objective was to confirm peptide requirement of L. gasseri and evaluate efficacy of peptide release by enzymatic proteolysis on growth of L. gassei in milk. Three strains of L. gasseri did not grow well in modified DeMan, Rogosa, Sharpe broth without any nitrogen sources (MRS-N), but addition of a casein-derived peptide mixture, tryptone, promoted growth. In contrast, little effect was observed after adding casein or a casein-derived amino acid mixture, casamino acids. These results indicate that L. gasseri requires peptides, not proteins or free amino acids, among milk-derived nitrogen sources for growth. Lactobacillus gasseri JCM 1131T hardly had growth capacity in 6 kinds of milk-based media: bovine milk, human milk, skim milk, cheese whey, modified MRS-N (MRSL-N) supplemented with acid whey, and MRSL-N supplemented with casein. Moreover, treatment with digestive proteases, particularly pepsin, to release peptides made it grow well in each milk-based medium. The pepsin treatment was the most effective for growth of strain JCM 1131T in skim milk among the tested food-grade proteases such as trypsin, α-chymotrypsin, calf rennet, ficin, bromelain, and papain. As well as strain JCM 1131T, pepsinolysis of milk improved growth of other L. gasseri strains and some strains of enteric lactobacilli such as Lactobacillus crispatus, Lactobacillus gallinarum, Lactobacillus johnsonii, and Lactobacillus reuteri. These results suggest that some relatives of L. gasseri also use peptides as desirable nitrogen sources, and that milk may be a good supplier of nutritious

  8. Role of the transmembrane domain in SNARE protein mediated membrane fusion: peptide nucleic acid/peptide model systems.

    PubMed

    Wehland, Jan-Dirk; Lygina, Antonina S; Kumar, Pawan; Guha, Samit; Hubrich, Barbara E; Jahn, Reinhard; Diederichsen, Ulf

    2016-08-16

    Fusion of synaptic vesicles with the presynaptic plasma membrane is mediated by Soluble NSF (N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor) Attachment Protein Receptor proteins also known as SNAREs. The backbone of this essential process is the assembly of SNAREs from opposite membranes into tight four helix bundles forcing membranes in close proximity. With model systems resembling SNAREs with reduced complexity we aim to understand how these proteins work at the molecular level. Here, peptide nucleic acids (PNAs) are used as excellent candidates for mimicking the SNARE recognition motif by forming well-characterized duplex structures. Hybridization between complementary PNA strands anchored in liposomes through native transmembrane domains (TMDs) induces the merger of the outer leaflets of the participating vesicles but not of the inner leaflets. A series of PNA/peptide hybrids differing in the length of TMDs and charges at the C-terminal end is presented. Interestingly, mixing of both outer and inner leaflets is seen for TMDs containing an amide in place of the natural carboxylic acid at the C-terminal end. Charged side chains at the C-terminal end of the TMDs are shown to have a negative impact on the mixing of liposomes. The length of the TMDs is vital for fusion as with the use of shortened TMDs, fusion was completely prevented. PMID:27345759

  9. Acidity-Mediated, Electrostatic Tuning of Asymmetrically Charged Peptides Interactions with Protein Nanopores.

    PubMed

    Asandei, Alina; Chinappi, Mauro; Kang, Hee-Kyoung; Seo, Chang Ho; Mereuta, Loredana; Park, Yoonkyung; Luchian, Tudor

    2015-08-01

    Despite success in probing chemical reactions and dynamics of macromolecules on submillisecond time and nanometer length scales, a major impasse faced by nanopore technology is the need to cheaply and controllably modulate macromolecule capture and trafficking across the nanopore. We demonstrate herein that tunable charge separation engineered at the both ends of a macromolecule very efficiently modulates the dynamics of macromolecules capture and traffic through a nanometer-size pore. In the proof-of-principle approach, we employed a 36 amino acids long peptide containing at the N- and C-termini uniform patches of glutamic acids and arginines, flanking a central segment of asparagines, and we studied its capture by the α-hemolysin (α-HL) and the mean residence time inside the pore in the presence of a pH gradient across the protein. We propose a solution to effectively control the dynamics of peptide interaction with the nanopore, with both association and dissociation reaction rates of peptide-α-HL interactions spanning orders of magnitude depending upon solution acidity on the peptide addition side and the transmembrane electric potential, while preserving the amplitude of the blockade current signature. PMID:26144534

  10. Complete amino acid analysis of peptides and proteins after hydrolysis by a mixture of Sepharose-bound peptidases

    PubMed Central

    Bennett, H. P. J.; Elliott, D. F.; Evans, B. E.; Lowry, P. J.; McMartin, C.

    1972-01-01

    Incubation with a mixture of Sepharose-bound peptidases was shown to result in the quantitative release of amino acids from certain peptides and S-aminoethylated proteins. Subtraction of the low background values of amino acids generated by the enzymes enables amino acid ratios of corticotrophin-(1–24)-tetracosapeptide to be determined with a standard deviation on repeat digestions of 3–5%. Good values were obtained for amino acids that are completely or partially destroyed on acid hydrolysis, i.e. tryptophan, tyrosine, serine, asparagine and glutamine. Experiments with peptides containing d-amino acids showed that the enzyme mixture is stereospecific and could therefore be used to detect the presence of d-residues in peptides. The enzyme mixture completely hydrolyses peptide fragments obtained after Edman degradation and should therefore be useful for determining sequences of peptides containing acid-labile amino acid residues. The activities of the bound enzymes were unaltered over a period of 7 months and they provide a simple, reproducible procedure for the quantitative determination of amino acids in peptides and proteins containing l-amino acids. PMID:4349115

  11. Radiation chemistry of amino acids, peptides and proteins in relation to the radiation sterilization of high-protein foods

    SciTech Connect

    Garrison, W. M.

    1981-12-01

    An important source of information on the question of whether or not toxic or other deleterious substances are formed in the radiation sterilization of foods is the chemical study of reaction products and reaction mechanisms in the radiolysis of individual food components. The present evaluation of the radiation chemistry of amino acids, peptides, and proteins outlines the various radiation-induced processes which lead to amino acid degradation and to the synthesis of amino acid derivatives of higher molecular weight. Among the latter are the ..cap alpha..,..cap alpha..'-diamino dicarboxylic acids which are formed as major products in the radiolysis of peptides both in aqueous solution and in the solid state. The ..cap alpha..,..cap alpha..'-diamino acids are of particular interest as irradiation products because they represent a class of compounds not normally encountered in plant and animal protein sources. Such compounds have, however, been isolated from certain types of bacteria and bacterial products. All of the available data strongly suggest that the ..cap alpha..,..cap alpha..'-diamino acids are produced in significant yield in the radiation sterilization of high protein foods. The importance of initiating extensive chemical and biological studies of these and of other high molecular weight products in irradiated food is emphasized.

  12. Radiolytic Modification of Sulfur Containing Acidic Amino Residues in Model Peptides: Fundamental Studies for Protein Footprinting

    SciTech Connect

    Xu,G.; Chance, M.

    2005-01-01

    Protein footprinting based on hydroxyl radical-mediated modification and quantitative mass spectroscopic analysis is a proven technique for examining protein structure, protein-ligand interactions, and structural allostery upon protein complex formation. The reactive and solvent-accessible amino acid side chains function as structural probes; however, correct structural analysis depends on the identification and quantification of all the relevant oxidative modifications within the protein sequence. Sulfur-containing amino acids are oxidized readily and the mechanisms of oxidation are particularly complex, although they have been extensively investigated by EPR and other spectroscopic methods. Here we have undertaken a detailed mass spectrometry study (using electrospray ionization mass spectrometry and tandem mass spectrometry) of model peptides containing cysteine (Cys-SH), cystine (disulfide bonded Cys), and methionine after oxidation using {gamma}-rays or synchrotron X-rays and have compared these results to those expected from oxidation mechanisms proposed in the literature. Radiolysis of cysteine leads to cysteine sulfonic acid (+48 Da mass shift) and cystine as the major products; other minor products including cysteine sulfinic acid (+32 Da mass shift) and serine (-16 Da mass shift) are observed. Radiolysis of cystine results in the oxidative opening of the disulfide bond and generation of cysteine sulfonic acid and sulfinic acid; however, the rate of oxidation is significantly less than that for cysteine. Radiolysis of methionine gives rise primarily to methionine sulfoxide (+16 Da mass shift); this can be further oxidized to methionine sulfone (+32 Da mass shift) or another product with a -32 Da mass shift likely due to aldehyde formation at the {gamma}-carbon. Due to the high reactivity of sulfur-containing amino acids, the extent of oxidation is easily influenced by secondary oxidation events or the presence of redox reagents used in standard proteolytic

  13. Peptide Synthesis through Cell-Free Expression of Fusion Proteins Incorporating Modified Amino Acids as Latent Cleavage Sites for Peptide Release.

    PubMed

    Liutkus, Mantas; Fraser, Samuel A; Caron, Karine; Stigers, Dannon J; Easton, Christopher J

    2016-05-17

    Chlorinated analogues of Leu and Ile are incorporated during cell-free expression of peptides fused to protein, by exploiting the promiscuity of the natural biosynthetic machinery. They then act as sites for clean and efficient release of the peptides simply by brief heat treatment. Dehydro analogues of Leu and Ile are similarly incorporated as latent sites for peptide release through treatment with iodine under cold conditions. These protocols complement enzyme-catalyzed methods and have been used to prepare calcitonin, gastrin-releasing peptide, cholecystokinin-7, and prolactin-releasing peptide prohormones, as well as analogues substituted with unusual amino acids, thus illustrating their practical utility as alternatives to more traditional chemical peptide synthesis. PMID:26918308

  14. Separation of proteins and peptides by capillary electrophoresis in acid buffers containing high concentrations of surfactants.

    PubMed

    Miksík, I; Deyl, Z

    1999-08-01

    Separations of proteins at acid pH in the presence of a high concentration of surfactant [sodium laurylsulfate (SDS), 50 mmol/l] was investigated. The purpose of using high concentrations of SDS as background electrolyte modifier was threefold: First, the surfactant exerts a washing effect upon the capillary wall thus preventing binding of analytes and possible clogging of the capillary. Second, it was revealed that even under very acid conditions (below pH 3) the surfactant is capable of forming associates with protein analytes which still bear considerable negative charge and can be separated on this basis. Third, the system can be applied not only for protein mixtures sufficiently soluble in neutral to alkaline media (leukocyte lysates, standard proteins), but it can be used also with proteins, that are under such conditions virtually insoluble and their solubilization is possible in acid buffers only (eggshell proteins or collagen CNBr fragments). The result was that adsorption to the capillary wall was minimized and the analytes were separated as negatively charged associates with high efficiency. With collagen fragments partition was possible on the affinity differences of the peptides to the surfactant micelles and inner wall of the capillary. Theoretical plate counts approaching 100,000 were easily achieved even with proteins which under the more conventional operation conditions exhibit considerable sticking to the capillary wall. The other feature of this system is that the associates move very rapidly to the anode. Owing to the low pH, endoosmotic flow is negligible, and therefore the system has to be operated at reversed polarity. PMID:10480258

  15. Disrupting Protein Expression with Peptide Nucleic Acids Reduces Infection by Obligate Intracellular Rickettsia

    PubMed Central

    Pelc, Rebecca S.; McClure, Jennifer C.; Kaur, Simran J.; Sears, Khandra T.; Rahman, M. Sayeedur; Ceraul, Shane M.

    2015-01-01

    Peptide Nucleic Acids (PNAs) are single-stranded synthetic nucleic acids with a pseudopeptide backbone in lieu of the phosphodiester linked sugar and phosphate found in traditional oligos. PNA designed complementary to the bacterial Shine-Dalgarno or start codon regions of mRNA disrupts translation resulting in the transient reduction in protein expression. This study examines the use of PNA technology to interrupt protein expression in obligate intracellular Rickettsia sp. Their historically intractable genetic system limits characterization of protein function. We designed PNA targeting mRNA for rOmpB from Rickettsia typhi and rickA from Rickettsia montanensis, ubiquitous factors important for infection. Using an in vitro translation system and competitive binding assays, we determined that our PNAs bind target regions. Electroporation of R. typhi and R. montanensis with PNA specific to rOmpB and rickA, respectively, reduced the bacteria’s ability to infect host cells. These studies open the possibility of using PNA to suppress protein synthesis in obligate intracellular bacteria. PMID:25781160

  16. Synthetic Peptides as Protein Mimics

    PubMed Central

    Groß, Andrea; Hashimoto, Chie; Sticht, Heinrich; Eichler, Jutta

    2016-01-01

    The design and generation of molecules capable of mimicking the binding and/or functional sites of proteins represents a promising strategy for the exploration and modulation of protein function through controlled interference with the underlying molecular interactions. Synthetic peptides have proven an excellent type of molecule for the mimicry of protein sites because such peptides can be generated as exact copies of protein fragments, as well as in diverse chemical modifications, which includes the incorporation of a large range of non-proteinogenic amino acids as well as the modification of the peptide backbone. Apart from extending the chemical and structural diversity presented by peptides, such modifications also increase the proteolytic stability of the molecules, enhancing their utility for biological applications. This article reviews recent advances by this and other laboratories in the use of synthetic protein mimics to modulate protein function, as well as to provide building blocks for synthetic biology. PMID:26835447

  17. Progress in nanoparticulate systems for peptide, proteins and nucleic acid drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Slomkowski, Stanislaw; Gosecki, Mateusz

    2011-11-01

    Progress in many therapies, in particular in the therapies based on peptides, proteins and nucleic acids used as bioactive compounds, strongly depends on development of appropriate carriers which would be suitable for controlled delivery of the intact abovementioned compounds to required tissues, cells and intracellular compartments. This review presents last ten years' achievements and problems in development and application of synthetic polymer nanoparticulate carriers for oral, pulmonary and nasal delivery routes of oligopeptides and proteins. Whereas some traditional synthetic polymer carriers are only briefly recalled the main attention is concentrated on nanoparticles produced from functional copolymers mostly with hydroxyl, carboxyl and amino groups, suitable for immobilization of targeting moieties and for assuring prolonged circulation of nanoparticles in blood. Formulations of various nanoparticulate systems are described, including solid particles, polymer micelles, nanovesicles and nanogels, especially systems allowing drug release induced by external stimuli. Discussed are properties of these species, in particular stability in buffers and models of body fluids, loading with drugs and with drug models, drug release processes and results of biological studies. There are also discussed systems for gene delivery with special attention devoted to polymers suitable for compacting nucleic acids into nanoparticles as well as the relations between chemical structure of polymer carriers and ability of the latter for crossing cell membranes and for endosomal escape. PMID:21902630

  18. Chemiluminescence detection of amino acids, peptides, and proteins using tris-2,2 prime -bipyridine ruthenium(III)

    SciTech Connect

    Li He; Cox, K.A.; Danielson, N.D. )

    1990-01-01

    The feasibility of using the tris-2-2{prime}-bipyridine ruthenium(III) chemiluminescent (CL) reaction for the detection of amino acids, peptides, and proteins has been studied. Detection limits of the amino acids as determined by flow injection analysis (FIA) ranged from 20 pmol of proline to 50 nmol of asparagine. In general, amino acids containing secondary amine groups yielded the strongest responses. A reaction mechanism for Ru(bpy){sub 3}{sup 3+} chemiluminescence of aliphatic amines has been proposed. Studies of peptide molecules and poly-prolines showed that the peptide bond barely contributes to the detection signals. The separation of hydroxyproline and proline in synthetic collagen by HPLC with Ru(bpy){sub 3}{sup 3+} chemiluminescence detection has been shown to be possible.

  19. Isoelectric focusing of proteins and peptides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Egen, N.

    1979-01-01

    Egg-white solution was chosen as the reference solution in order to assess the effects of operational parameters (voltage, flow rate, ampholine pH range and concentration, and protein concentration) of the RIEF apparatus on protein resolution. Topics of discussion include: (1) comparison of RIEF apparatus to conventional IEF techniques (column and PAG) with respect to resolution and throughput; (2) peptide and protein separation (AHF, Thymosin - Fraction 5, vasoactive peptide, L-asparaginase and ACP); and (3) detection of peptides - dansyl derivatives of amino acids and peptides, post-focusing fluorescent labeling of amino acids, peptides and proteins, and ampholine extraction from focused gels.

  20. Peptides and proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Bachovchin, W.W.; Unkefer, C.J.

    1994-12-01

    Advances in magnetic resonance and vibrational spectroscopy make it possible to derive detailed structural information about biomolecular structures in solution. These techniques are critically dependent on the availability of labeled compounds. For example, NMR techniques used today to derive peptide and protein structures require uniformity {sup 13}C-and {sup 15}N-labeled samples that are derived biosynthetically from (U-6-{sup 13}C) glucose. These experiments are possible now because, during the 1970s, the National Stable Isotope Resource developed algal methods for producing (U-6-{sup 13}C) glucose. If NMR techniques are to be used to study larger proteins, we will need sophisticated labelling patterns in amino acids that employ a combination of {sup 2}H, {sup 13}C, and {sup 15}N labeling. The availability of these specifically labeled amino acids requires a renewed investment in new methods for chemical synthesis of labeled amino acids. The development of new magnetic resonance or vibrational techniques to elucidate biomolecular structure will be seriously impeded if we do not see rapid progress in labeling technology. Investment in labeling chemistry is as important as investment in the development of advanced spectroscopic tools.

  1. Self-assembled multicompartment liquid crystalline lipid carriers for protein, peptide, and nucleic acid drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Angelova, Angelina; Angelov, Borislav; Mutafchieva, Rada; Lesieur, Sylviane; Couvreur, Patrick

    2011-02-15

    Lipids and lipopolymers self-assembled into biocompatible nano- and mesostructured functional materials offer many potential applications in medicine and diagnostics. In this Account, we demonstrate how high-resolution structural investigations of bicontinuous cubic templates made from lyotropic thermosensitive liquid-crystalline (LC) materials have initiated the development of innovative lipidopolymeric self-assembled nanocarriers. Such structures have tunable nanochannel sizes, morphologies, and hierarchical inner organizations and provide potential vehicles for the predictable loading and release of therapeutic proteins, peptides, or nucleic acids. This Account shows that structural studies of swelling of bicontinuous cubic lipid/water phases are essential for overcoming the nanoscale constraints for encapsulation of large therapeutic molecules in multicompartment lipid carriers. For the systems described here, we have employed time-resolved small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) and high-resolution freeze-fracture electronic microscopy (FF-EM) to study the morphology and the dynamic topological transitions of these nanostructured multicomponent amphiphilic assemblies. Quasi-elastic light scattering and circular dichroism spectroscopy can provide additional information at the nanoscale about the behavior of lipid/protein self-assemblies under conditions that approximate physiological hydration. We wanted to generalize these findings to control the stability and the hydration of the water nanochannels in liquid-crystalline lipid nanovehicles and confine therapeutic biomolecules within these structures. Therefore we analyzed the influence of amphiphilic and soluble additives (e.g. poly(ethylene glycol)monooleate (MO-PEG), octyl glucoside (OG), proteins) on the nanochannels' size in a diamond (D)-type bicontinuous cubic phase of the lipid glycerol monooleate (MO). At body temperature, we can stabilize long-living swollen states, corresponding to a diamond cubic phase

  2. A bottom-up approach to build the hyperpolarizability of peptides and proteins from their amino acids.

    PubMed

    Duboisset, Julien; Deniset-Besseau, Ariane; Benichou, Emmanuel; Russier-Antoine, Isabelle; Lascoux, Noelle; Jonin, Christian; Hache, François; Schanne-Klein, Marie-Claire; Brevet, Pierre-François

    2013-08-29

    We experimentally demonstrate that some peptides and proteins lend themselves to an elementary analysis where their first hyperpolarizability can be decomposed into the coherent superposition of the first hyperpolarizability of their elementary units. We then show that those elementary units can be associated with the amino acids themselves in the case of nonaromatic amino acids and nonresonant second harmonic generation. As a case study, this work investigates the experimentally determined first hyperpolarizability of rat tail Type I collagen and compares it to that of the shorter peptide [(PPG)10]3, where P and G are the one-letter code for Proline and Glycine, respectively, and that of the triamino acid peptides PPG and GGG. An absolute value of (0.16 ± 0.01) × 10(-30) esu for the first hyperpolarizability of nonaromatic amino acids is then obtained by using the newly defined 0.087 × 10(-30) esu reference value for water. By using a collagen like model, the microscopic hyperpolarizability along the peptide bond can be evaluated at (0.7 ± 0.1) × 10(-30) esu. PMID:23879840

  3. Tri-peptide reference structures for the calculation of relative solvent accessible surface area in protein amino acid residues.

    PubMed

    Topham, Christopher M; Smith, Jeremy C

    2015-02-01

    Relative amino acid residue solvent accessibility values allow the quantitative comparison of atomic solvent-accessible surface areas in different residue types and physical environments in proteins and in protein structural alignments. Geometry-optimised tri-peptide structures in extended solvent-exposed reference conformations have been obtained for 43 amino acid residue types at a high level of quantum chemical theory. Significant increases in side-chain solvent accessibility, offset by reductions in main-chain atom solvent exposure, were observed for standard residue types in partially geometry-optimised structures when compared to non-minimised models built from identical sets of proper dihedral angles abstracted from the literature. Optimisation of proper dihedral angles led most notably to marked increases of up to 54% in proline main-chain atom solvent accessibility compared to literature values. Similar effects were observed for fully-optimised tri-peptides in implicit solvent. The relief of internal strain energy was associated with systematic variation in N, C(α) and C(β) atom solvent accessibility across all standard residue types. The results underline the importance of optimisation of 'hard' degrees of freedom (bond lengths and valence bond angles) and improper dihedral angle values from force field or other context-independent reference values, and impact on the use of standardised fixed internal co-ordinate geometry in sampling approaches to the determination of absolute values of protein amino acid residue solvent accessibility. Quantum chemical methods provide a useful and accurate alternative to molecular mechanics methods to perform energy minimisation of peptides containing non-standard (chemically modified) amino acid residues frequently present in experimental protein structure data sets, for which force field parameters may not be available. Reference tri-peptide atomic co-ordinate sets including hydrogen atoms are made freely available

  4. Altering behavioral responses and dopamine transporter protein with antisense peptide nucleic acids.

    PubMed

    Tyler-McMahon, B M; Stewart, J A; Jackson, J; Bitner, M D; Fauq, A; McCormick, D J; Richelson, E

    2001-10-01

    The dopamine transporter (DAT) plays a role in locomotion and is an obligatory target for amphetamines. We designed and synthesized an antisense peptide nucleic acid (PNA) to rat DAT to examine the effect of this antisense molecule on locomotion and on responsiveness to amphetamines. Rats were injected intraperitoneally daily for 9 days with either saline, an antisense DAT PNA, a scrambled DAT PNA, or a mismatch DAT PNA. On days 7 and 9 after initial motility measurements were taken, the animals were challenged with 10 mg/kg of amphetamine and scored for motility. On day 7, there was no significant difference between the baseline levels of activity of any of the groups or their responses to amphetamine. On day 9, the antisense PNA-treated rats showed a statistically significant increase in their resting motility (P < 0.01). When these rats were challenged with amphetamine, motility of the saline-, scrambled PNA-, and mismatch PNA-treated animals showed increases of 31-, 36-, and 20-fold, respectively, while the antisense PNA-treated animals showed increases of only 3.4-fold (P < 0.01). ELISA results revealed a 32% decrease in striatal DAT in antisense PNA-treated rats compared with the saline, scrambled PNA, and mismatch PNA controls (P < 0.001). These results extend our previous findings that brain proteins can be knocked down in a specific manner by antisense molecules administered extracranially. Additionally, these results suggest some novel approaches for the treatment of diseases dependent upon the function of the dopamine transporter. PMID:11543728

  5. Protein-templated peptide ligation.

    PubMed

    Brauckhoff, Nicolas; Hahne, Gernot; Yeh, Johannes T-H; Grossmann, Tom N

    2014-04-22

    Molecular templates bind particular reactants, thereby increasing their effective concentrations and accelerating the corresponding reaction. This concept has been successfully applied to a number of chemical problems with a strong focus on nucleic acid templated reactions. We present the first protein-templated reaction that allows N-terminal linkage of two peptides. In the presence of a protein template, ligation reactions were accelerated by more than three orders of magnitude. The templated reaction is highly selective and proved its robustness in a protein-labeling reaction that was performed in crude cell lysate. PMID:24644125

  6. Amino acid sequences of peptides from a tryptic digest of a urea-soluble protein fraction (U.S.3) from oxidized wool

    PubMed Central

    Corfield, M. C.; Fletcher, J. C.; Robson, A.

    1967-01-01

    1. A tryptic digest of the protein fraction U.S.3 from oxidized wool has been separated into 32 peptide fractions by cation-exchange resin chromatography. 2. Most of these fractions have been resolved into their component peptides by a combination of the techniques of cation-exchange resin chromatography, paper chromatography and paper electrophoresis. 3. The amino acid compositions of 58 of the peptides in the digest present in the largest amounts have been determined. 4. The amino acid sequences of 38 of these have been completely elucidated and those of six others partially derived. 5. These findings indicate that the parent protein in wool from which the protein fraction U.S.3 is derived has a minimum molecular weight of 74000. 6. The structures of wool proteins are discussed in the light of the peptide sequences determined, and, in particular, of those sequences in fraction U.S.3 that could not be elucidated. PMID:16742497

  7. Analysis of peptide-protein binding using amino acid descriptors: prediction and experimental verification for human histocompatibility complex HLA-A0201.

    PubMed

    Guan, Pingping; Doytchinova, Irini A; Walshe, Valerie A; Borrow, Persephone; Flower, Darren R

    2005-11-17

    Amino acid descriptors are often used in quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) analysis of proteins and peptides. In the present study, descriptors were used to characterize peptides binding to the human MHC allele HLA-A0201. Two sets of amino acid descriptors were chosen: 93 descriptors taken from the amino acid descriptor database AAindex and the z descriptors defined by Wold and Sandberg. Variable selection techniques (SIMCA, genetic algorithm, and GOLPE) were applied to remove redundant descriptors. Our results indicate that QSAR models generated using five z descriptors had the highest predictivity and explained variance (q2 between 0.6 and 0.7 and r2 between 0.6 and 0.9). Further to the QSAR analysis, 15 peptides were synthesized and tested using a T2 stabilization assay. All peptides bound to HLA-A0201 well, and four peptides were identified as high-affinity binders. PMID:16279801

  8. Overcoming the Refractory Expression of Secreted Recombinant Proteins in Mammalian Cells through Modification of the Signal Peptide and Adjacent Amino Acids

    PubMed Central

    Güler-Gane, Gülin; Kidd, Sara; Sridharan, Sudharsan; Vaughan, Tristan J.; Wilkinson, Trevor C. I.

    2016-01-01

    The expression and subsequent purification of mammalian recombinant proteins is of critical importance to many areas of biological science. To maintain the appropriate tertiary structure and post-translational modifications of such proteins, transient mammalian expression systems are often adopted. The successful utilisation of these systems is, however, not always forthcoming and some recombinant proteins prove refractory to expression in mammalian hosts. In this study we focussed on the role of different N-terminal signal peptides and residues immediately downstream, in influencing the level of secreted recombinant protein obtained from suspension HEK293 cells. Using secreted alkaline phosphatase (SEAP) as a model protein, we identified that the +1/+2 downstream residues flanking a heterologous signal peptide significantly affect secreted levels. By incorporating these findings we conducted a comparison of different signal peptide sequences and identified the most productive as secrecon, a computationally-designed sequence. Importantly, in the context of the secrecon signal peptide and SEAP, we also demonstrated a clear preference for specific amino acid residues at the +1 position (e.g. alanine), and a detrimental effect of others (cysteine, proline, tyrosine and glutamine). When proteins that naturally contain these “undesirable” residues at the +1 position were expressed with their native signal peptide, the heterologous secrecon signal peptide, or secrecon with an additional alanine at the +1 or +1 and +2 position, the level of expression differed significantly and in an unpredictable manner. For each protein, however, at least one of the panel of signal peptide/adjacent amino acid combinations enabled successful recombinant expression. In this study, we highlight the important interplay between a signal peptide and its adjacent amino acids in enabling protein expression, and we describe a strategy that could enable recombinant proteins that have so far

  9. Overcoming the Refractory Expression of Secreted Recombinant Proteins in Mammalian Cells through Modification of the Signal Peptide and Adjacent Amino Acids.

    PubMed

    Güler-Gane, Gülin; Kidd, Sara; Sridharan, Sudharsan; Vaughan, Tristan J; Wilkinson, Trevor C I; Tigue, Natalie J

    2016-01-01

    The expression and subsequent purification of mammalian recombinant proteins is of critical importance to many areas of biological science. To maintain the appropriate tertiary structure and post-translational modifications of such proteins, transient mammalian expression systems are often adopted. The successful utilisation of these systems is, however, not always forthcoming and some recombinant proteins prove refractory to expression in mammalian hosts. In this study we focussed on the role of different N-terminal signal peptides and residues immediately downstream, in influencing the level of secreted recombinant protein obtained from suspension HEK293 cells. Using secreted alkaline phosphatase (SEAP) as a model protein, we identified that the +1/+2 downstream residues flanking a heterologous signal peptide significantly affect secreted levels. By incorporating these findings we conducted a comparison of different signal peptide sequences and identified the most productive as secrecon, a computationally-designed sequence. Importantly, in the context of the secrecon signal peptide and SEAP, we also demonstrated a clear preference for specific amino acid residues at the +1 position (e.g. alanine), and a detrimental effect of others (cysteine, proline, tyrosine and glutamine). When proteins that naturally contain these "undesirable" residues at the +1 position were expressed with their native signal peptide, the heterologous secrecon signal peptide, or secrecon with an additional alanine at the +1 or +1 and +2 position, the level of expression differed significantly and in an unpredictable manner. For each protein, however, at least one of the panel of signal peptide/adjacent amino acid combinations enabled successful recombinant expression. In this study, we highlight the important interplay between a signal peptide and its adjacent amino acids in enabling protein expression, and we describe a strategy that could enable recombinant proteins that have so far

  10. Sum Frequency Generation Vibrational Spectroscopy of Adsorbed Amino Acids, Peptides and Proteins of Hydrophilic and Hydrophobic Solid-Water Interfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Holinga IV, George Joseph

    2010-09-01

    Sum frequency generation (SFG) vibrational spectroscopy was used to investigate the interfacial properties of several amino acids, peptides, and proteins adsorbed at the hydrophilic polystyrene solid-liquid and the hydrophobic silica solid-liquid interfaces. The influence of experimental geometry on the sensitivity and resolution of the SFG vibrational spectroscopy technique was investigated both theoretically and experimentally. SFG was implemented to investigate the adsorption and organization of eight individual amino acids at model hydrophilic and hydrophobic surfaces under physiological conditions. Biointerface studies were conducted using a combination of SFG and quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) comparing the interfacial structure and concentration of two amino acids and their corresponding homopeptides at two model liquid-solid interfaces as a function of their concentration in aqueous solutions. The influence of temperature, concentration, equilibration time, and electrical bias on the extent of adsorption and interfacial structure of biomolecules were explored at the liquid-solid interface via QCM and SFG. QCM was utilized to quantify the biological activity of heparin functionalized surfaces. A novel optical parametric amplifier was developed and utilized in SFG experiments to investigate the secondary structure of an adsorbed model peptide at the solid-liquid interface.

  11. Stoichiometric inhibition of amyloid beta-protein aggregation with peptides containing alternating alpha,alpha-disubstituted amino acids.

    PubMed

    Etienne, Marcus A; Aucoin, Jed P; Fu, Yanwen; McCarley, Robin L; Hammer, Robert P

    2006-03-22

    We have prepared two peptides based on the hydrophobic core (Lys-Leu-Val-Phe-Phe) of amyloid beta-protein (Abeta) that contain alpha,alpha-disubstituted amino acids at alternating positions, but differ in the positioning of the oligolysine chain (AMY-1, C-terminus; AMY-2, N-terminus). We have studied the effects of AMY-1 and AMY-2 on the aggregation of Abeta and find that, at stoichiometric concentrations, both peptides completely stop Abeta fibril growth. Equimolar mixtures of AMY-1 and Abeta form only globular aggregates as imaged by scanning force microscopy and transmission electron microscopy. These samples show no signs of protofibrillar or fibrillar material even after prolonged periods of time (4.5 months). Also, 10 mol % of AMY-1 prevents Abeta self-assembly for long periods of time; aged samples (4.5 months) show only a few protofibrillar or fibrillar aggregates. Circular dichroism spectroscopy of equimolar mixtures of AMY-1 and Abeta show that the secondary structure of the mixture changes over time and progresses to a predominantly beta-sheet structure, which is consistent with the design of these inhibitors preferring a sheet-like conformation. Changing the position of the charged tail on the peptide, AMY-2 interacts with Abeta differently in that equimolar mixtures form large ( approximately 1 mum) globular aggregates which do not progress to fibrils, but precipitate out of solution. The differences in the aggregation mediated by the two peptides is discussed in terms of a model where the inhibitors act as cosurfactants that interfere with the native ability of Abeta to self-assemble by disrupting hydrophobic interactions either at the C-terminus or N-terminus of Abeta. PMID:16536517

  12. Scorpion Venom Heat-Resistant Peptide Attenuates Glial Fibrillary Acidic Protein Expression via c-Jun/AP-1.

    PubMed

    Cao, Zhen; Wu, Xue-Fei; Peng, Yan; Zhang, Rui; Li, Na; Yang, Jin-Yi; Zhang, Shu-Qin; Zhang, Wan-Qin; Zhao, Jie; Li, Shao

    2015-11-01

    Scorpion venom has been used in the Orient to treat central nervous system diseases for many years, and the protein/peptide toxins in Buthus martensii Karsch (BmK) venom are believed to be the effective components. Scorpion venom heat-resistant peptide (SVHRP) is an active component of the scorpion venom extracted from BmK. In a previous study, we found that SVHRP could inhibit the formation of a glial scar, which is characterized by enhanced glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) expression, in the epileptic hippocampus. However, the cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying this process remain to be clarified. The results of the present study indicate that endogenous GFAP expression in primary rat astrocytes was attenuated by SVHRP. We further demonstrate that the suppression of GFAP was primarily mediated by inhibiting both c-Jun expression and its binding with AP-1 DNA binding site and other factors at the GFAP promoter. These results support that SVHRP contributes to reducing GFAP at least in part by decreasing the activity of the transcription factor AP-1. In conclusion, the effects of SVHRP on astrocytes with respect to the c-Jun/AP-1 signaling pathway in vitro provide a practical basis for studying astrocyte activation and inhibition and a scientific basis for further studies of traditional medicine. PMID:26134308

  13. Gas-phase ion/ion reactions of peptides and proteins: acid/base, redox, and covalent chemistries

    PubMed Central

    Prentice, Boone M.

    2013-01-01

    Gas-phase ion/ion reactions are emerging as useful and flexible means for the manipulation and characterization of peptide and protein biopolymers. Acid/base-like chemical reactions (i.e., proton transfer reactions) and reduction/oxidation (redox) reactions (i.e., electron transfer reactions) represent relatively mature classes of gas-phase chemical reactions. Even so, especially in regards to redox chemistry, the widespread utility of these two types of chemistries is undergoing rapid growth and development. Additionally, a relatively new class of gas-phase ion/ion transformations is emerging which involves the selective formation of functional-group-specific covalent bonds. This feature details our current work and perspective on the developments and current capabilities of these three areas of ion/ion chemistry with an eye towards possible future directions of the field. PMID:23257901

  14. Human Antimicrobial Peptides and Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Guangshun

    2014-01-01

    As the key components of innate immunity, human host defense antimicrobial peptides and proteins (AMPs) play a critical role in warding off invading microbial pathogens. In addition, AMPs can possess other biological functions such as apoptosis, wound healing, and immune modulation. This article provides an overview on the identification, activity, 3D structure, and mechanism of action of human AMPs selected from the antimicrobial peptide database. Over 100 such peptides have been identified from a variety of tissues and epithelial surfaces, including skin, eyes, ears, mouths, gut, immune, nervous and urinary systems. These peptides vary from 10 to 150 amino acids with a net charge between −3 and +20 and a hydrophobic content below 60%. The sequence diversity enables human AMPs to adopt various 3D structures and to attack pathogens by different mechanisms. While α-defensin HD-6 can self-assemble on the bacterial surface into nanonets to entangle bacteria, both HNP-1 and β-defensin hBD-3 are able to block cell wall biosynthesis by binding to lipid II. Lysozyme is well-characterized to cleave bacterial cell wall polysaccharides but can also kill bacteria by a non-catalytic mechanism. The two hydrophobic domains in the long amphipathic α-helix of human cathelicidin LL-37 lays the basis for binding and disrupting the curved anionic bacterial membrane surfaces by forming pores or via the carpet model. Furthermore, dermcidin may serve as ion channel by forming a long helix-bundle structure. In addition, the C-type lectin RegIIIα can initially recognize bacterial peptidoglycans followed by pore formation in the membrane. Finally, histatin 5 and GAPDH(2-32) can enter microbial cells to exert their effects. It appears that granulysin enters cells and kills intracellular pathogens with the aid of pore-forming perforin. This arsenal of human defense proteins not only keeps us healthy but also inspires the development of a new generation of personalized medicine to

  15. High efficacy of a 20 amino acid peptide of the acidic ribosomal protein P0 against the cattle tick, Rhipicephalus microplus.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Mallon, Alina; Encinosa, Pedro E; Méndez-Pérez, Lídice; Bello, Yamil; Rodríguez Fernández, Rafmary; Garay, Hilda; Cabrales, Ania; Méndez, Luis; Borroto, Carlos; Estrada, Mario Pablo

    2015-06-01

    Current strategies to control cattle ticks use integrated control programs (ICP) that include vaccination. Reduction in the use of chemicals and in the cost of tick control, the delay or elimination of acaricide resistance and the decreasing of environmental pollution are the advantages of using these programs. This integrated program is potentially applicable to all genotypes of chemical resistant ticks. However, the problem here is to improve the efficacy of anti-tick vaccines. The P0 protein is a structural component of the ribosome of all organisms. We have identified an immunogenic region of ribosomal protein P0 from Rhipicephalus spp. ticks that is not very conserved compared to the orthologous protein in their hosts. A synthetic 20 amino acid peptide from this sequence was effective as a vaccine against Rhipicephalus sanguineus infestations in an immunization and challenge experiment using rabbits. In this paper, the same peptide used as vaccine against the cattle tick Rhipicephalus Boophilus microplus shows a significant diminution in the number of engorged females recovered, in the weight of females and the weight of egg masses. The number of eggs hatched was also significantly reduced for the vaccinated group, with an overall effectivity for the antigen pP0 of 96%. These results, together with the conserved sequence of the P0 peptide among ticks, suggest that this antigen could be a good broad spectrum vaccine candidate. It would be expected to be active against many species of ticks and thus has promise in an ICP for effective control of ticks and thereby to improve the efficiency and productivity of the livestock industry. PMID:25958782

  16. Nitrilotriacetic acid-coated magnetic nanoparticles as affinity probes for enrichment of histidine-tagged proteins and phosphorylated peptides.

    PubMed

    Li, Yi-Cheng; Lin, Ya-Shiuan; Tsai, Pei-Jane; Chen, Cheng-Tai; Chen, Wei-Yu; Chen, Yu-Chie

    2007-10-01

    We herein demonstrate superparamagnetic Fe3O4 nanoparticles coated with nitrilotriacetic acid derivative (NTA) that can bind with different immobilized metal ions are capable of probing diverse target species. Immobilized Ni(II) on the surfaces of the NTA-magnetic nanoparticles have the capability of selectively trapping histidine (His)-tagged proteins such as a mutated streptopain tagged with 6x His, i.e., C192S (MW approximately 42 kDa), from cell lysates. Enrichment was achieved by vigorously mixing the sample solution and the nanoparticles by pipetting in and out of a sample vial for only 30 s. After enrichment, the probe-target species could be readily isolated by magnetic separation. We also characterized the proteins enriched on the affinity probes using on-probe tryptic digestion under microwave irradiation for only 2 min, followed by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry analysis. Using this enrichment and tryptic digestion, the target species can be rapidly enriched and characterized, reducing the time required for carrying out the complete analysis to less than 10 min. Furthermore, when either Zr(IV) or Ga (III) ions are immobilized on the surfaces of the NTA-magnetic nanoparticles, the nanoparticles have the capability of selectively enriching phosphorylated peptides from tryptic digests of alpha-, beta-caseins, and diluted milk. The detection limit for the tryptic digests of alpha- and beta-caseins is approximately 50 fmol. PMID:17784733

  17. Predicting membrane protein types by incorporating protein topology, domains, signal peptides, and physicochemical properties into the general form of Chou's pseudo amino acid composition.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yen-Kuang; Li, Kuo-Bin

    2013-02-01

    The type information of un-annotated membrane proteins provides an important hint for their biological functions. The experimental determination of membrane protein types, despite being more accurate and reliable, is not always feasible due to the costly laboratory procedures, thereby creating a need for the development of bioinformatics methods. This article describes a novel computational classifier for the prediction of membrane protein types using proteins' sequences. The classifier, comprising a collection of one-versus-one support vector machines, makes use of the following sequence attributes: (1) the cationic patch sizes, the orientation, and the topology of transmembrane segments; (2) the amino acid physicochemical properties; (3) the presence of signal peptides or anchors; and (4) the specific protein motifs. A new voting scheme was implemented to cope with the multi-class prediction. Both the training and the testing sequences were collected from SwissProt. Homologous proteins were removed such that there is no pair of sequences left in the datasets with a sequence identity higher than 40%. The performance of the classifier was evaluated by a Jackknife cross-validation and an independent testing experiments. Results show that the proposed classifier outperforms earlier predictors in prediction accuracy in seven of the eight membrane protein types. The overall accuracy was increased from 78.3% to 88.2%. Unlike earlier approaches which largely depend on position-specific substitution matrices and amino acid compositions, most of the sequence attributes implemented in the proposed classifier have supported literature evidences. The classifier has been deployed as a web server and can be accessed at http://bsaltools.ym.edu.tw/predmpt. PMID:23137835

  18. Influence of Amino Acid Compositions and Peptide Profiles on Antioxidant Capacities of Two Protein Hydrolysates from Skipjack Tuna (Katsuwonus pelamis) Dark Muscle.

    PubMed

    Chi, Chang-Feng; Hu, Fa-Yuan; Wang, Bin; Li, Zhong-Rui; Luo, Hong-Yu

    2015-05-01

    Influence of amino acid compositions and peptide profiles on antioxidant capacities of two protein hydrolysates from skipjack tuna (Katsuwonus pelamis) dark muscle was investigated. Dark muscles from skipjack tuna were hydrolyzed using five separate proteases, including pepsin, trypsin, Neutrase, papain and Alcalase. Two hydrolysates, ATH and NTH, prepared using Alcalase and Neutrase, respectively, showed the strongest antioxidant capacities and were further fractionated using ultrafiltration and gel filtration chromatography. Two fractions, Fr.A3 and Fr.B2, isolated from ATH and NTH, respectively, showed strong radical scavenging activities toward 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl radicals (EC50 1.08% ± 0.08% and 0.98% ± 0.07%), hydroxyl radicals (EC50 0.22% ± 0.03% and 0.48% ± 0.05%), and superoxide anion radicals (EC50 1.31% ± 0.11% and 1.56% ± 1.03%) and effectively inhibited lipid peroxidation. Eighteen peptides from Fr.A3 and 13 peptides from Fr.B2 were isolated by reversed-phase high performance liquid chromatography, and their amino acid sequences were determined. The elevated antioxidant activity of Fr.A3 might be due to its high content of hydrophobic and aromatic amino acid residues (181.1 and 469.9 residues/1000 residues, respectively), small molecular sizes (3-6 peptides), low molecular weights (524.78 kDa), and amino acid sequences (antioxidant score 6.11). This study confirmed that a smaller molecular size, the presence of hydrophobic and aromatic amino acid residues, and the amino acid sequences were the key factors that determined the antioxidant activities of the proteins, hydrolysates and peptides. The results also demonstrated that the derived hydrolysates and fractions from skipjack tuna (K. pelamis) dark muscles could prevent oxidative reactions and might be useful for food preservation and medicinal purposes. PMID:25923316

  19. Influence of Amino Acid Compositions and Peptide Profiles on Antioxidant Capacities of Two Protein Hydrolysates from Skipjack Tuna (Katsuwonus pelamis) Dark Muscle

    PubMed Central

    Chi, Chang-Feng; Hu, Fa-Yuan; Wang, Bin; Li, Zhong-Rui; Luo, Hong-Yu

    2015-01-01

    Influence of amino acid compositions and peptide profiles on antioxidant capacities of two protein hydrolysates from skipjack tuna (Katsuwonus pelamis) dark muscle was investigated. Dark muscles from skipjack tuna were hydrolyzed using five separate proteases, including pepsin, trypsin, Neutrase, papain and Alcalase. Two hydrolysates, ATH and NTH, prepared using Alcalase and Neutrase, respectively, showed the strongest antioxidant capacities and were further fractionated using ultrafiltration and gel filtration chromatography. Two fractions, Fr.A3 and Fr.B2, isolated from ATH and NTH, respectively, showed strong radical scavenging activities toward 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl radicals (EC50 1.08% ± 0.08% and 0.98% ± 0.07%), hydroxyl radicals (EC50 0.22% ± 0.03% and 0.48% ± 0.05%), and superoxide anion radicals (EC50 1.31% ± 0.11% and 1.56% ± 1.03%) and effectively inhibited lipid peroxidation. Eighteen peptides from Fr.A3 and 13 peptides from Fr.B2 were isolated by reversed-phase high performance liquid chromatography, and their amino acid sequences were determined. The elevated antioxidant activity of Fr.A3 might be due to its high content of hydrophobic and aromatic amino acid residues (181.1 and 469.9 residues/1000 residues, respectively), small molecular sizes (3–6 peptides), low molecular weights (524.78 kDa), and amino acid sequences (antioxidant score 6.11). This study confirmed that a smaller molecular size, the presence of hydrophobic and aromatic amino acid residues, and the amino acid sequences were the key factors that determined the antioxidant activities of the proteins, hydrolysates and peptides. The results also demonstrated that the derived hydrolysates and fractions from skipjack tuna (K. pelamis) dark muscles could prevent oxidative reactions and might be useful for food preservation and medicinal purposes. PMID:25923316

  20. MALDI TOF/TOF-Based Approach for the Identification of d- Amino Acids in Biologically Active Peptides and Proteins.

    PubMed

    Koehbach, Johannes; Gruber, Christian W; Becker, Christian; Kreil, David P; Jilek, Alexander

    2016-05-01

    Several biologically active peptides contain a d- amino acid in a well-defined position, which is position 2 in all peptide epimers isolated to date from vertebrates and also some from invertebrates. The detection of such D- residues by standard analytical techniques is challenging. In tandem mass spectrometric (MS) analysis, although fragment masses are the same for all stereoisomers, peak intensities are known to depend on chirality. Here, we observe that the effect of a d- amino acid in the second N-terminal position on the fragmentation pattern in matrix assisted laser desorption time-of-flight spectrometry (MALDI-TOF/TOF MS) strongly depends on the peptide sequence. Stereosensitive fragmentation (SF) is correlated to a neighborhood effect, but the d- residue also exerts an overall effect influencing distant bonds. In a fingerprint analysis, multiple peaks can thus serve to identify the chirality of a sample in short time and potentially high throughput. Problematic variations between individual spots could be successfully suppressed by cospotting deuterated analogues of the epimers. By identifying the [d-Leu2] isomer of the predicted peptide GH-2 (gene derived bombininH) in skin secretions of the toad Bombina orientalis, we demonstrated the analytical power of SF-MALDI-TOF/TOF measurements. In conclusion, SF-MALDI-TOF/TOF MS combines high sensitivity, versatility, and the ability to complement other methods. PMID:26985971

  1. MALDI TOF/TOF-Based Approach for the Identification of d- Amino Acids in Biologically Active Peptides and Proteins

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Several biologically active peptides contain a d- amino acid in a well-defined position, which is position 2 in all peptide epimers isolated to date from vertebrates and also some from invertebrates. The detection of such D- residues by standard analytical techniques is challenging. In tandem mass spectrometric (MS) analysis, although fragment masses are the same for all stereoisomers, peak intensities are known to depend on chirality. Here, we observe that the effect of a d- amino acid in the second N-terminal position on the fragmentation pattern in matrix assisted laser desorption time-of-flight spectrometry (MALDI-TOF/TOF MS) strongly depends on the peptide sequence. Stereosensitive fragmentation (SF) is correlated to a neighborhood effect, but the d- residue also exerts an overall effect influencing distant bonds. In a fingerprint analysis, multiple peaks can thus serve to identify the chirality of a sample in short time and potentially high throughput. Problematic variations between individual spots could be successfully suppressed by cospotting deuterated analogues of the epimers. By identifying the [d-Leu2] isomer of the predicted peptide GH-2 (gene derived bombininH) in skin secretions of the toad Bombina orientalis, we demonstrated the analytical power of SF-MALDI-TOF/TOF measurements. In conclusion, SF-MALDI-TOF/TOF MS combines high sensitivity, versatility, and the ability to complement other methods. PMID:26985971

  2. Surface aggregation of urinary proteins and aspartic acid-rich peptides on the faces of calcium oxalate monohydrate investigated by in situ force microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Weaver, M L; Qiu, S R; Hoyer, J R; Casey, W H; Nancollas, G H; De Yoreo, J J

    2008-05-28

    The growth of calcium oxalate monohydrate in the presence of Tamm-Horsfall protein (THP), osteopontin (OPN), and the 27-residue synthetic peptides (DDDS){sub 6}DDD and (DDDG){sub 6}DDD [where D = aspartic acid and X = S (serine) or G (glycine)] was investigated via in situ atomic force microscopy (AFM). The results show that these three growth modulators create extensive deposits on the crystal faces. Depending on the modulator and crystal face, these deposits can occur as discrete aggregates, filamentary structures, or uniform coatings. These proteinaceous films can lead to either the inhibition or increase of the step speeds (with respect to the impurity-free system) depending on a range of factors that include peptide or protein concentration, supersaturation and ionic strength. While THP and the linear peptides act, respectively, to exclusively increase and inhibit growth on the (-101) face, both exhibit dual functionality on the (010) face, inhibiting growth at low supersaturation or high modulator concentration and accelerating growth at high supersaturation or low modulator concentration. Based on analyses of growth morphologies and dependencies of step speeds on supersaturation and protein or peptide concentration, we argue for a picture of growth modulation that accounts for the observations in terms of the strength of binding to the surfaces and steps and the interplay of electrostatic and solvent-induced forces at crystal surface.

  3. DPPH radical scavenging activity of a mixture of fatty acids and peptide-containing compounds in a protein hydrolysate of Jatropha curcas seed cake.

    PubMed

    Phengnuam, Thanyarat; Goroncy, Alexander K; Rutherfurd, Shane M; Moughan, Paul J; Suntornsuk, Worapot

    2013-12-01

    Jatropha curcas, a tropical plant, has great potential commercial relevance as its seeds have high oil content. The seeds can be processed into high-quality biofuel producing seed cake as a byproduct. The seed cake, however, has not gotten much attention toward its potential usefulness. This work was aimed to determine the antioxidant activity of different fractions of a protein hydrolysate from J. curcas seed cake and to elucidate the molecular structures of the antioxidants. Seed cake was first processed into crude protein isolate and the protein was hydrolyzed by Neutrase. The hydrolysate obtained from 1 h of Neutrase hydrolysis showed the strongest antioxidant activity against DPPH radical (2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl). After a purification series of protein hydrolysate by liquid chromatography, chemicals acting as DPPH radical inhibitors were found to be a mixture of fatty acids, fatty acid derivatives, and a small amount of peptides characterized by mass spectrometry and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. PMID:24191657

  4. /sup 113/Cd NMR studies of a 1:1 Cd adduct with an 18-residue finger peptide from HIV-1 nucleic acid binding protein, p7

    SciTech Connect

    South, T.L.; Kim, B.; Summers, M.F.

    1989-01-04

    The Zn/sup 2+/ and Cd/sup 2+/ adducts with the 18-residue peptide comprising the amino acid sequence of the first finger (residues 13 through 30) of retroviral nucleic acid binding proteins p7 from HIV-1 (the causative agent of AIDS) have been prepared. /sup 1/H NMR data indicate that the metal adducts are 1:1 compounds that are stable in aqueous solutions for at least a month. The /sup 113/Cd NMR spectral results for the adduct are presented and analyzed. 26 references, 3 figures.

  5. Peptide and protein delivery using new drug delivery systems.

    PubMed

    Jain, Ashish; Jain, Aviral; Gulbake, Arvind; Shilpi, Satish; Hurkat, Pooja; Jain, Sanjay K

    2013-01-01

    Pharmaceutical and biotechnological research sorts protein drug delivery systems by importance based on their various therapeutic applications. The effective and potent action of the proteins/peptides makes them the drugs of choice for the treatment of numerous diseases. Major research issues in protein delivery include the stabilization of proteins in delivery devices and the design of appropriate target-specific protein carriers. Many efforts have been made for effective delivery of proteins/peptidal drugs through various routes of administrations for successful therapeutic effects. Nanoparticles made of biodegradable polymers such as poly lactic acid, polycaprolactone, poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid), the poly(fumaric-co-sebacic) anhydride chitosan, and modified chitosan, as well as solid lipids, have shown great potential in the delivery of proteins/peptidal drugs. Moreover, scientists also have used liposomes, PEGylated liposomes, niosomes, and aquasomes, among others, for peptidal drug delivery. They also have developed hydrogels and transdermal drug delivery systems for peptidal drug delivery. A receptor-mediated delivery system is another attractive strategy to overcome the limitation in drug absorption that enables the transcytosis of the protein across the epithelial barrier. Modification such as PEGnology is applied to various proteins and peptides of the desired protein and peptides also increases the circulating life, solubility and stability, pharmacokinetic properties, and antigenicity of protein. This review focuses on various approaches for effective protein/peptidal drug delivery, with special emphasis on insulin delivery. PMID:23662604

  6. Transport of free and peptide-bound glycated amino acids: synthesis, transepithelial flux at Caco-2 cell monolayers, and interaction with apical membrane transport proteins.

    PubMed

    Hellwig, Michael; Geissler, Stefanie; Matthes, René; Peto, Anett; Silow, Christoph; Brandsch, Matthias; Henle, Thomas

    2011-05-16

    In glycation reactions, the side chains of protein-bound nucleophilic amino acids such as lysine and arginine are post-translationally modified to a variety of derivatives also known as Maillard reaction products (MRPs). Considerable amounts of MRPs are taken up in food. Here we have studied the interactions of free and dipeptide-bound MRPs with intestinal transport systems. Free and dipeptide-bound derivatives of N(6)-(1-fructosyl)lysine (FL), N(6)-(carboxymethyl)lysine (CML), N(6)-(1-carboxyethyl)lysine (CEL), formyline, argpyrimidine, and methylglyoxal-derived hydroimidazolone 1 (MG-H1) were synthesized. The inhibition of L-[(3)H]lysine and [(14) C]glycylsarcosine uptakes was measured in Caco-2 cells which express the H(+)/peptide transporter PEPT1 and lysine transport system(s). Glycated amino acids always displayed lower affinities than their unmodified analogues towards the L-[(3)H]lysine transporter(s). In contrast, all glycated dipeptides except Ala-FL were medium- to high-affinity inhibitors of [(14)C]Gly-Sar uptake. The transepithelial flux of the derivatives across Caco-2 cell monolayers was determined. Free amino acids and intact peptides derived from CML and CEL were translocated to very small extents. Application of peptide-bound MRPs, however, led to elevation (up to 80-fold) of the net flux and intracellular accumulation of glycated amino acids, which were hydrolyzed from the dipeptides inside the cells. We conclude 1) that free MRPs are not substrates for the intestinal lysine transporter(s), and 2) that dietary MRPs are absorbed into intestinal cells in the form of dipeptides, most likely by the peptide transporter PEPT1. After hydrolysis, hydrophobic glycated amino acids such as pyrraline, formyline, maltosine, and argpyrimidine undergo basolateral efflux, most likely by simple diffusion down their concentration gradients. PMID:21538757

  7. Enzymatic recycling of ascorbic acid from dehydroascorbic acid by glutathione-like peptides in the extracellular loops of aminergic G-protein coupled receptors.

    PubMed

    Root-Bernstein, Robert; Fewins, Jenna; Rhinesmith, Tyler; Koch, Ariana; Dillon, Patrick F

    2016-07-01

    The intracellular recycling of ascorbic acid from dehydroascorbic acid by the glutathione-glutathione reductase system has been well-characterized. We propose that extracellular recycling of ascorbic acid is performed in a similar manner by cysteine-rich, glutathione-like regions of the first and second extracellular loops of some aminergic receptors including adrenergic, histaminergic, and dopaminergic receptors. Previous research in our laboratory demonstrated that ascorbic acid binds to these receptors at a site on their first or second extracellular loops, significantly enhancing ligand activity, and apparently recycling hundreds of times their own concentration of ascorbate in an enzymatic fashion. In this study, we have synthesized 25 peptides from the first and second extracellular loops of aminergic and insulin receptors and compared them directly to glutathione for their ability to prevent the oxidation of ascorbate and to regenerate ascorbate from dehydroascorbic acid. Peptide sequences that mimic glutathione in containing a cysteine and a glutamic acid-like amino acid also mimic glutathione activity in effects and in kinetics. Some (but not all) peptide sequences that contain one or more methionines instead of cysteine can significantly retard the oxidation of ascorbic acid but do not recycle it from dehydroascorbate into ascorbate. Peptides lacking both cysteines and methionines uniformly failed to alter significantly ascorbate or dehydroascorbate oxidation or reduction. We believe that this is the first proof that receptors may carry out both ligand binding and enzymatic activity extracellularly. Our results suggest the existence of a previously unknown extracellular system for recycling ascorbate. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:26749062

  8. Low molecular weight flaxseed protein-derived arginine-containing peptides reduced blood pressure of spontaneously hypertensive rats faster than amino acid form of arginine and native flaxseed protein.

    PubMed

    Udenigwe, Chibuike C; Adebiyi, Abayomi P; Doyen, Alain; Li, Huan; Bazinet, Laurent; Aluko, Rotimi E

    2012-05-01

    Flaxseed protein isolate (FPI) contains high amount of arginine, which plays important physiological roles especially as nitric oxide precursor in the vascular endothelium. Arginine-rich peptides can be generated from FPI and used as a source of nitric oxide, which can produce in vivo vasodilatory effects during hypertension. Enzymatic hydrolysis of FPI with trypsin and pronase resulted in a hydrolysate that was fractionated using electrodialysis-ultrafiltration (EDUF). EDUF experiment resulted in migration of peptides to the anionic and cationic recovery compartments. Compared to FPI with 11% arginine, about one-third of the cationic fraction was composed of arginine. Thirteen potential peptide sequences were identified to be present in the cationic compartment of which 12 contained at least one arginine residue. None of the peptides identified from the anionic compartment contained arginine. Oral administration of the cationic peptides (200mg/kgbodywt.) to spontaneously hypertensive rats resulted in a more rapid decrease in systolic blood pressure when compared to similar amounts of FPI or the amino acid form of arginine. It was concluded that the rapid effect of the arginine-rich peptide product suggests faster rate of peptide absorption than amino acids and this may be exploited to provide fast relief from hypertension. PMID:26434317

  9. Noninvasive tagging of proteins with an inorganic chromophore. Selectivity of chloro(terpyridine)platinum(II) toward amino acids, peptides, and cytochromes c

    SciTech Connect

    Brothers, H.M. II; Kostic, N.M.

    1988-05-18

    The complex (Pt(trpy)Cl)/sup +/ exhibits unexpected selectivity toward amino acid side chains in cytochromes c from Candida krusei and bakers' yeast. Although kinetic studies with amino acids and peptides as entering ligands prove this complex to be completely selective toward thiol over imidazole, His-33 and His-39 residues (in both proteins) are labeled with greater yields than the Cys-102 residue (in the bakers' yeast protein). The binding sites are determined by peptide mapping and other methods. The Pt(trpy)/sup 2+/ tags are stable, and the protein derivatives are separated by cation-exchange chromatography. The (Pt(trpy)His)/sup 2+/ and (Pt(trpy)Cys)/sup +/ chromophores are easily detected and quantitated owing to their characteristic and strong UV-vis bands. Spectroscopic and electrochemical measurements show that labeling with the new reagent does not alter the structural and redox properties of the cytochromes c. The unexpected outcome of the protein labeling indicates that, contrary to the common assumption, Cys-102 is not exposed at the protein surface. Modification of this residue with various organic reagents and dimerization of the protein must be accompanied by a perturbation of the conformation, which makes Cys-102 accessible to the reagent or to another molecule of the protein. These predictions from the labeling study are confirmed subsequently by the crystallographic study of the iso-1 cytochrome c from bakers' yeast. The inorganic complex (Pt(trpy)Cl)/sup +/ differs from the other reagents for protein modification by its noninvasiveness, a property that may well render it useful as a probe of the protein surface. 59 refs., 2 figs., 4 tabs.

  10. Synthesis and characterization of antigenic influenza A M2e protein peptide-poly(acrylic) acid bioconjugate and determination of toxicity in vitro.

    PubMed

    Kilinc, Yasemin Budama; Akdeste, Zeynep Mustafaeva; Koc, Rabia Cakir; Bagirova, Melahat; Allahverdiyev, Adil

    2014-01-01

    The influenza A virus is a critical public health problem that causes epidemics and pandemics, and occurs widely all over the world. Various vaccines against the virus have not provided a solution to the problem. Different approaches, particularly M2e peptide-based vaccines, are available for developing universal vaccines against influenza A. However, it is important to select a suitable carrier to obtain an effective vaccine. Accordingly, studies on the usage of various carriers are ongoing. Particularly, polymer-based carriers have gained importance due to both drug delivery and adjuvant effects. Therefore, bioconjugate of the M2e protein peptide from the influenza A virus covalent bonded with poly(acrylic) acid was synthesized in our study for the first time. The characterization was performed using size-exclusion chromatography and fluorescence spectroscopy; subsequently, it was found that the bioconjugate of the examined lower doses (0.05 and 0.5 mg/ml) have no toxic effects on human cell lines. These results suggest that, in the future, the poly(acrylic) acid bioconjugate of the M2e peptide should be studied in vivo for universal vaccine development against the influenza A virus. PMID:25482080

  11. Role of fatty acid transport protein 4 in oleic acid-induced glucagon-like peptide-1 secretion from murine intestinal L cells

    PubMed Central

    Poreba, M. A.; Dong, C. X.; Li, S. K.; Stahl, A.; Miner, J. H.

    2012-01-01

    The antidiabetic intestinal L cell hormone glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) enhances glucose-dependent insulin secretion and inhibits gastric emptying. GLP-1 secretion is stimulated by luminal oleic acid (OA), which crosses the cell membrane by an unknown mechanism. We hypothesized that L cell fatty acid transport proteins (FATPs) are essential for OA-induced GLP-1 release. Therefore, the murine GLUTag L cell model was used for immunoblotting, [3H]OA uptake assay, and GLP-1 secretion assay as determined by radioimmunoassay following treatment with OA ± phloretin, sulfo-N-succinimidyl oleate, or siRNA against FATP4. FATP4−/− and cluster-of-differentiation 36 (CD36)−/− mice received intraileal OA, and plasma GLP-1 was measured by sandwich immunoassay. GLUTag cells were found to express CD36, FATP1, FATP3, and FATP4. The cells demonstrated specific 3H[OA] uptake that was dose-dependently inhibited by 500 and 1,000 μM unlabeled OA (P < 0.001). Cell viability was not altered by treatment with OA. Phloretin and sulfo-N-succinimidyl oleate, inhibitors of protein-mediated transport and CD36, respectively, also decreased [3H]OA uptake, as did knockdown of FATP4 by siRNA transfection (P < 0.05–0.001). OA dose-dependently increased GLP-1 secretion at 500 and 1,000 μM (P < 0.001), whereas phloretin, sulfo-N-succinimidyl oleate, and FATP4 knockdown decreased this response (P < 0.05–0.01). FATP4−/− mice displayed lower plasma GLP-1 at 60 min in response to intraileal OA (P < 0.05), whereas, unexpectedly, CD36−/− mice displayed higher basal GLP-1 levels (P < 0.01) but a normal response to intraileal OA. Together, these findings demonstrate a key role for FATP4 in OA-induced GLP-1 secretion from the murine L cell in vitro and in vivo, whereas the precise role of CD36 remains unclear. PMID:22871340

  12. Repair of rat cranial bone defect by using bone morphogenetic protein-2-related peptide combined with microspheres composed of polylactic acid/polyglycolic acid copolymer and chitosan.

    PubMed

    Li, Jingfeng; Jin, Lin; Wang, Mingbo; Zhu, Shaobo; Xu, Shuyun

    2015-08-01

    The effects of the transplanted bone morphogenetic protein-2 (BMP2) -related peptide P24 and rhBMP2 combined with poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA)/chitosan (CS) microspheres were investigated in promoting the repair of rat cranial bone defect. Forty white rats were selected and equally divided into four groups (group A: 1 μg of rhBMP2/PLGA/CS composite; group B: 3 mg of P24/PLGA/CS composite; group C: 0.5 μg of rhBMP2 + 1.5 mg of P24/PLGA/CS composite; group D: blank PLGA/CS material), and rat cranial bone defect models with a diameter of 5 mm were established. The materials were transplanted to the cranial bone defects. The animals were sacrificed on weeks 6 and 12 post-operation. Radiographic examinations (x-ray imaging and 3D CT scanning) and histological evaluations were performed. The repaired areas of cranial bone defects were measured, and the osteogenetic abilities of various materials were compared. Cranial histology, imaging, and repaired area measurements showed that the osteogenetic effects at two time points (weeks 6 and 12) in group C were better than those in groups A and B. The effects in groups A and B were similar. Group D achieved the worst repair effect of cranial bone defects, where a large number of fibrous connective tissues were observed. The PLGA/CS composite microspheres loaded with rhBMP2 and P24 had optimal concrescence and could mutually increase their osteogenesis capability. rhBMP2 + P24/PLGA/CS composite is a novel material for bone defect repair with stable activity to induce bone formation. PMID:26154695

  13. Constrained Peptides as Miniature Protein Structures

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Hang

    2012-01-01

    This paper discusses the recent developments of protein engineering using both covalent and noncovalent bonds to constrain peptides, forcing them into designed protein secondary structures. These constrained peptides subsequently can be used as peptidomimetics for biological functions such as regulations of protein-protein interactions. PMID:25969758

  14. Designing amino acids to determine the local conformations of peptides.

    PubMed Central

    Burgess, A W

    1994-01-01

    The local conformations of proteins and peptides are determined by the amino acid sequence. However, the 20 amino acids encoded by the genome allow the peptide backbone to fold into many conformations, so that even for a small peptide it becomes very difficult to predict the three-dimensional structure. By using empirical conformational energy calculations, a set of amino acids has been designed that would be expected to constrain the conformation of a peptide or a protein to one or two local minima. Most of these amino acids are based on asymmetric substitutions at the C alpha atom of each residue. The H alpha atom of alanine was replaced by various groups: -OCH3, -NCH3, -SCH3, -CONH2, -CONHCH3, -CON(CH3)2, -NH.CO.CH3, -phenyl, or -o-(OCH3)phenyl. Several of these new amino acids are predicted to fold into unique peptide conformations such as right-handed alpha-helical, left-handed alpha-helical, or extended. In an attempt to produce an amino acid that favored the C(eq)7 conformation (torsion angles: phi = -70 degrees and psi = +70 degrees), an extra amide group was added to the C beta atom of the asparagine side chain. Conformationally restricted amino acids of this type could prove useful for developing new peptide pharmaceuticals, catalysts, or polymers. Images PMID:8146170

  15. Predicting protein-peptide interactions from scratch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Chengfei; Xu, Xianjin; Zou, Xiaoqin; Zou lab Team

    Protein-peptide interactions play an important role in many cellular processes. The ability to predict protein-peptide complex structures is valuable for mechanistic investigation and therapeutic development. Due to the high flexibility of peptides and lack of templates for homologous modeling, predicting protein-peptide complex structures is extremely challenging. Recently, we have developed a novel docking framework for protein-peptide structure prediction. Specifically, given the sequence of a peptide and a 3D structure of the protein, initial conformations of the peptide are built through protein threading. Then, the peptide is globally and flexibly docked onto the protein using a novel iterative approach. Finally, the sampled modes are scored and ranked by a statistical potential-based energy scoring function that was derived for protein-peptide interactions from statistical mechanics principles. Our docking methodology has been tested on the Peptidb database and compared with other protein-peptide docking methods. Systematic analysis shows significantly improved results compared to the performances of the existing methods. Our method is computationally efficient and suitable for large-scale applications. Nsf CAREER Award 0953839 (XZ) NIH R01GM109980 (XZ).

  16. Synthesis and characterization of antigenic influenza A M2e protein peptide-poly(acrylic) acid bioconjugate and determination of toxicity in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Kilinc, Yasemin Budama; Akdeste, Zeynep Mustafaeva; Koc, Rabia Cakir; Bagirova, Melahat; Allahverdiyev, Adil

    2014-01-01

    The influenza A virus is a critical public health problem that causes epidemics and pandemics, and occurs widely all over the world. Various vaccines against the virus have not provided a solution to the problem. Different approaches, particularly M2e peptide–based vaccines, are available for developing universal vaccines against influenza A. However, it is important to select a suitable carrier to obtain an effective vaccine. Accordingly, studies on the usage of various carriers are ongoing. Particularly, polymer-based carriers have gained importance due to both drug delivery and adjuvant effects. Therefore, bioconjugate of the M2e protein peptide from the influenza A virus covalent bonded with poly(acrylic) acid was synthesized in our study for the first time. The characterization was performed using size-exclusion chromatography and fluorescence spectroscopy; subsequently, it was found that the bioconjugate of the examined lower doses (0.05 and 0.5 mg/ml) have no toxic effects on human cell lines. These results suggest that, in the future, the poly(acrylic) acid bioconjugate of the M2e peptide should be studied in vivo for universal vaccine development against the influenza A virus. PMID:25482080

  17. An acidic peptide sequence of nucleolin-related protein can mediate the attachment of calcium oxalate to renal tubule cells.

    PubMed

    Sorokina, Elena A; Wesson, Jeffrey A; Kleinman, Jack G

    2004-08-01

    Crystals that form in tubular fluid must be retained in the kidney to become stones. Nucleolin-related protein (NRP) is found on the surface of inner medullary collecting duct (IMCD) cells in culture (cIMCD) and selectively adsorbs to calcium oxalate (CaOx). We proposed that NRP mediates attachment to the renal tubular epithelium of Ca stone crystals through an electrostatic interaction with a highly acidic region (acidic fragment [AF]) similar to those of other proteins that have been reported to affect urinary crystal formation. The current studies demonstrate that nucleolin is expressed on both apical and basolateral cell surfaces of cIMCD, reaching a peak in the late stages of mitosis and gradually declining to undetectable levels with maturation of the polarized epithelium. Scraping areas of mature monolayers stimulated the cells surrounding the defects to migrate and proliferate so as to repair them, and these areas demonstrate surface NRP expression and enhanced attachment of CaOx monohydrate crystals. Surface expression of the NRP AF was produced by cloning the NRP AF into a display vector. Transfected cIMCD demonstrating copious surface expression of AF enhanced CaOx attachment 6.7-fold compared with control cIMCD, whereas cells transfected with a vector without the AF did not differ from control. AF was also cloned into a replication-deficient adenovirus and expressed in 293 cells, resulting in AF secretion into the nutrient medium. This medium inhibited CaOx attachment to cIMCD, compared with conditioned medium from cells infected with wild-type virus. These results demonstrate that surface-bound AF can mediate CaOx attachment and that secreted AF can inhibit attachment. These results support the notion that surface-associated NRP could mediate attachment of CaOx to the renal tubule epithelium, thereby causing retention of crystals that might eventually become kidney stones. PMID:15284292

  18. Construction of Lasso Peptide Fusion Proteins.

    PubMed

    Zong, Chuhan; Maksimov, Mikhail O; Link, A James

    2016-01-15

    Lasso peptides are a family of ribosomally synthesized and post-translationally modified peptides (RiPPs) typified by an isopeptide-bonded macrocycle between the peptide N-terminus and an aspartate or glutamate side chain. The C-terminal portion of the peptide threads through the N-terminal macrocycle to give the characteristic lasso fold. Because of the inherent stability, both proteolytic and often thermal, of lasso peptides, we became interested in whether proteins could be fused to the free C-terminus of lasso peptides. Here, we demonstrate fusion of two model proteins, the artificial leucine zipper A1 and the superfolder variant of GFP, to the C-terminus of the lasso peptide astexin-1. Successful lasso cyclization of the N-terminus of these fusion proteins requires a flexible linker in between the C-terminus of the lasso peptide and the N-terminus of the protein of interest. The ability to fuse lasso peptides to a protein of interest is an important step toward phage and bacterial display systems for the high-throughput screening of lasso peptide libraries for new functions. PMID:26492187

  19. Bioinformatic analysis of peptide precursor proteins.

    PubMed

    Baggerman, G; Liu, F; Wets, G; Schoofs, L

    2005-04-01

    Neuropeptides are among the most important signal molecules in animals. Traditional identification of peptide hormones through peptide purification is a tedious and time-consuming process. With the advent of the genome sequencing projects, putative peptide precursor can be mined from the genome. However, because bioactive peptides are usually quite short in length and because the active core of a peptide is often limited to only a few amino acids, using the BLAST search engine to identify neuropeptide precursors in the genome is difficult and sometimes impossible. To overcome these shortcomings, we subject the entire set of all known Drosophila melanogaster peptide precursor sequences to motif-finding algorithms in search of a motif that is common for all prepropeptides and that could be used in the search for new peptide precursors. PMID:15891006

  20. Peptide Mass Fingerprinting of Egg White Proteins

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alty, Lisa T.; LaRiviere, Frederick J.

    2016-01-01

    Use of advanced mass spectrometry techniques in the undergraduate setting has burgeoned in the past decade. However, relatively few undergraduate experiments examine the proteomics tools of protein digestion, peptide accurate mass determination, and database searching, also known as peptide mass fingerprinting. In this experiment, biochemistry…

  1. A potent and highly selective peptide substrate for protein kinase C assay.

    PubMed Central

    Toomik, R; Ek, P

    1997-01-01

    Protein kinases exhibit substrate specificities that are often primarily determined by the amino acids around the phosphorylation sites. Peptides corresponding to protein kinase C phosphorylation sites in several different proteins were synthesized on SPOTs membrane which has recently been found to be applicable for studies of protein kinase specificity. After phosphorylation with protein kinase C, we chose the best phosphorylated peptides for the investigation of the importance of amino acids immediately adjacent to the phosphorylation site. The selectivity of the best protein kinase C substrates from this study was analysed with protein kinases A, CK1 and CK2. According to these tests, the most favourable characteristics of SPOTs-membrane-associated peptides were demonstrated by peptide KRAKRKTAKKR. Kinetic analysis of peptide phosphorylation with protein kinase C revealed an apparent Km of 0.49 +/- 0.13 microM and Vmax of 10.0 +/- 0.5 nmol/min per mg with soluble peptide KRAKRKTAKKR. In addition, we assayed several other soluble peptides commonly used as protein kinase C substrates. Peptide KRAKRKTAKKR showed the lowest Km and the highest Vmax/Km value in comparison with peptides FKKSFKL, pEKRPSQRSKYL and KRAKRKTTKKR. Furthermore, of the peptides tested, KRAKRKTAKKR was the most selective substrate for protein kinase C. The favourable kinetic parameters combined with the selectivity should make the KRAKRKTAKKR peptide useful as a substrate for protein kinase C in the assays of both purified enzyme and in crude cell extracts. PMID:9065763

  2. Peptides from milk proteins and their properties.

    PubMed

    Kilara, Arun; Panyam, Dinakar

    2003-01-01

    This review has attempted to study the literature pertaining to peptides derived from milk proteins. Hydrolysis of milk proteins to generate peptides has been practiced for a long time and it was recognized early on in this process that the taste of hydrolyzates might hinder use of these products in food formulations. Modification of protein is necessary to form a more acceptable or utilizable product, to form a product that is less susceptible to deteriorative reactions and to form a product that is of higher nutritionall quality. Modifications may be achieved by a number of chemical and enzymatic means. This review has considered only enzymatic modification of dairy proteins. Modified proteins contain peptides and some of these peptides have been purified and their functionalities have been compared with unmodified proteins. This paper has examined the literature pertaining to improvement in functionality of enzyme-modified proteins. Improvements in solubility, emulsification, foaming and gelation were examined. There is limited information available on the sequence of the peptides necessary to improve the functional characteristics of proteins. Knowing the sequences of desirable functional peptides can lead to genetic alteration of proteins to improve functionality. Addition of synthetic peptides to intact proteins may be another way in which the functionality of proteins can be augmented. Some of the peptides in milk proteins are capable of affecting biological functions of an organism. These effects can be antimicrobial and probiotic, i.e., prevent the growth and proliferation of undesirable and pathogenic organisms, or they may promote the growth of desirable bacteria in the digestive tract of humans and animals. Peptides derived from milk protein have been shown to exert digestive and metabolic effects as well. They may also influence the immune system. These biological effects may play an important role in the development of medical foods that treat or

  3. CancerPPD: a database of anticancer peptides and proteins

    PubMed Central

    Tyagi, Atul; Tuknait, Abhishek; Anand, Priya; Gupta, Sudheer; Sharma, Minakshi; Mathur, Deepika; Joshi, Anshika; Singh, Sandeep; Gautam, Ankur; Raghava, Gajendra P.S.

    2015-01-01

    CancerPPD (http://crdd.osdd.net/raghava/cancerppd/) is a repository of experimentally verified anticancer peptides (ACPs) and anticancer proteins. Data were manually collected from published research articles, patents and from other databases. The current release of CancerPPD consists of 3491 ACP and 121 anticancer protein entries. Each entry provides comprehensive information related to a peptide like its source of origin, nature of the peptide, anticancer activity, N- and C-terminal modifications, conformation, etc. Additionally, CancerPPD provides the information of around 249 types of cancer cell lines and 16 different assays used for testing the ACPs. In addition to natural peptides, CancerPPD contains peptides having non-natural, chemically modified residues and D-amino acids. Besides this primary information, CancerPPD stores predicted tertiary structures as well as peptide sequences in SMILES format. Tertiary structures of peptides were predicted using the state-of-art method, PEPstr and secondary structural states were assigned using DSSP. In order to assist users, a number of web-based tools have been integrated, these include keyword search, data browsing, sequence and structural similarity search. We believe that CancerPPD will be very useful in designing peptide-based anticancer therapeutics. PMID:25270878

  4. Arginine-glycine-aspartic acid- and fibrinogen gamma-chain carboxyterminal peptides inhibit platelet adherence to arterial subendothelium at high wall shear rates. An effect dissociable from interference with adhesive protein binding.

    PubMed Central

    Lawrence, J B; Kramer, W S; McKeown, L P; Williams, S B; Gralnick, H R

    1990-01-01

    Arg-Gly-Asp (RGD)- and fibrinogen gamma-chain carboxyterminal (GQQHHLGGAKQAGDV) peptides inhibit fibrinogen, fibronectin (Fn), vitronectin, and von Willebrand factor (vWF) binding to the platelet glycoprotein IIb-IIIa complex (GP IIb-IIIa). GP IIb-IIIa, vWF, and Fn are essential for normal platelet adherence to subendothelium. We added peptides to normal citrated whole blood before perfusion over human umbilical artery subendothelium and evaluated platelet adherence morphometrically at high (2,600 s-1) and low (800 s-1) wall shear rates. We also examined the effects of the peptides on platelet adhesion to collagen in a static system. At the high wall shear rate, RGDS and GQQHHLGGAKQAGDV caused dose-dependent reduction in the surface coverage with spread and adherent platelets. Amino acid transposition and conservative substitutions of RGD peptides and the AGDV peptide significantly inhibited platelet adherence at 2,600 s-1. By contrast, the modified RGD peptides and AGDV do not affect adhesive protein binding to platelets. None of the native or modified RGD- or fibrinogen gamma-chain peptides significantly inhibited either platelet adherence to subendothelium at 800 s-1 or platelet adhesion to collagen. Our findings demonstrate that peptides that interfere with adhesive protein binding to GP IIb-IIIa inhibit platelet adherence to vascular subendothelium with flowing blood only at high wall shear rates. Platelet adherence to subendothelium at high wall shear rates appears to be mediated by different recognition specificities from those required for fluid-phase adhesive protein binding or static platelet adhesion. PMID:2243140

  5. Protein biosynthesis with conformationally restricted amino acids

    SciTech Connect

    Mendel, D. Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA ); Ellman, J.; Schultz, P.G. )

    1993-05-19

    The incorporation of conformationally constrained amino acids into peptides is a powerful approach for generating structurally defined peptides as conformational probes and bioactive agents. The ability to site-specifically introduce constrained amino acids into large polypeptide chains would provide a similar opportunity to probe the flexibility, conformation, folding and stability of proteins. To this end, we have examined the competence of the Escherichia coli protein biosynthetic machinery to incorporate a number of these unnatural amino acids into the 164 residue protein T4 lysozyme (T4L). Results clearly demonstrate that the protein biosynthetic machinery can accommodate a wide variety of conformationally constrained amino acids. The expansion of structural motifs that can be biosynthetically incorporated into proteins to include a large number of conformationally constrained amino acids significantly increases the power of mutagenesis methods as probes of protein structure and function and provides additional insights into the steric requirements of the translational machinery. 13 refs., 2 figs.

  6. Small cationic antimicrobial peptides delocalize peripheral membrane proteins

    PubMed Central

    Wenzel, Michaela; Chiriac, Alina Iulia; Otto, Andreas; Zweytick, Dagmar; May, Caroline; Schumacher, Catherine; Gust, Ronald; Albada, H. Bauke; Penkova, Maya; Krämer, Ute; Erdmann, Ralf; Metzler-Nolte, Nils; Straus, Suzana K.; Bremer, Erhard; Becher, Dörte; Brötz-Oesterhelt, Heike; Sahl, Hans-Georg; Bandow, Julia Elisabeth

    2014-01-01

    Short antimicrobial peptides rich in arginine (R) and tryptophan (W) interact with membranes. To learn how this interaction leads to bacterial death, we characterized the effects of the minimal pharmacophore RWRWRW-NH2. A ruthenium-substituted derivative of this peptide localized to the membrane in vivo, and the peptide also integrated readily into mixed phospholipid bilayers that resemble Gram-positive membranes. Proteome and Western blot analyses showed that integration of the peptide caused delocalization of peripheral membrane proteins essential for respiration and cell-wall biosynthesis, limiting cellular energy and undermining cell-wall integrity. This delocalization phenomenon also was observed with the cyclic peptide gramicidin S, indicating the generality of the mechanism. Exogenous glutamate increases tolerance to the peptide, indicating that osmotic destabilization also contributes to antibacterial efficacy. Bacillus subtilis responds to peptide stress by releasing osmoprotective amino acids, in part via mechanosensitive channels. This response is triggered by membrane-targeting bacteriolytic peptides of different structural classes as well as by hypoosmotic conditions. PMID:24706874

  7. Accelerated chemical synthesis of peptides and small proteins

    PubMed Central

    Miranda, Les P.; Alewood, Paul F.

    1999-01-01

    The chemical synthesis of peptides and small proteins is a powerful complementary strategy to recombinant protein overexpression and is widely used in structural biology, immunology, protein engineering, and biomedical research. Despite considerable improvements in the fidelity of peptide chain assembly, side-chain protection, and postsynthesis analysis, a limiting factor in accessing polypeptides containing greater than 50 residues remains the time taken for chain assembly. The ultimate goal of this work is to establish highly efficient chemical procedures that achieve chain-assembly rates of approximately 10–15 residues per hour, thus underpinning the rapid chemical synthesis of long polypeptides and proteins, including cytokines, growth factors, protein domains, and small enzymes. Here we report Boc chemistry that employs O-(7-azabenzotriazol-1-yl)-N,N,N′,N′-tetramethyluronium hexafluorophosphate (HATU)/dimethyl sulfoxide in situ neutralization as the coupling agent and incorporates a protected amino acid residue every 5 min to produce peptides of good quality. This rapid coupling chemistry was successfully demonstrated by synthesizing several small to medium peptides, including the “difficult” C-terminal sequence of HIV-1 proteinase (residues 81–99); fragment 65–74 of the acyl carrier protein; conotoxin PnIA(A10L), a potent neuronal nicotinic receptor antagonist; and the pro-inflammatory chemotactic protein CP10, an 88-residue protein, by means of native chemical ligation. The benefits of this approach include enhanced ability to identify and characterize “difficult couplings,” rapid access to peptides for biological and structure–activity studies, and accelerated synthesis of tailored large peptide segments (<50 residues) for use in chemoselective ligation methods. PMID:9989998

  8. Protein-peptide interactions in mixtures of whey peptides and whey proteins.

    PubMed

    Creusot, Nathalie; Gruppen, Harry

    2007-03-21

    The effects of several conditions on the amounts and compositions of aggregates formed in mixtures of whey protein hydrolysate, made with Bacillus licheniformis protease, and whey protein isolate were investigated using response surface methodology. Next, the peptides present in the aggregates were separated from the intact protein and identified with liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry. Increasing both temperature and ionic strength increased the amounts of both intact protein and peptides in the aggregates. There was an optimal amount of added intact WPI that could aggregate with peptides, yielding a maximal amount of aggregated material in which the peptide/protein molar ratio was around 6. Under all conditions applied, the same peptides were observed in the protein-peptide aggregates formed. The dominant peptides were beta-lg AB [f1-45], beta-lg AB [f90-108], and alpha-la [f50-113]. It was hypothesized that peptides could form a kind of glue network that can include beta-lactoglobulin via hydrophobic interactions at the hydrophobic binding sites at the surface of the protein. PMID:17295504

  9. Use of Galerina marginata genes and proteins for peptide production

    DOEpatents

    Hallen-Adams, Heather E.; Scott-Craig, John S.; Walton, Jonathan D.; Luo, Hong

    2016-03-01

    The present invention relates to compositions and methods comprising genes and peptides associated with cyclic peptides and cyclic peptide production in mushrooms. In particular, the present invention relates to using genes and proteins from Galerina species encoding peptides specifically relating to amatoxins in addition to proteins involved with processing cyclic peptide toxins. In a preferred embodiment, the present invention also relates to methods for making small peptides and small cyclic peptides including peptides similar to amanitin. Further, the present inventions relate to providing kits for making small peptides.

  10. How Amino Acids and Peptides Shaped the RNA World

    PubMed Central

    van der Gulik, Peter T.S.; Speijer, Dave

    2015-01-01

    The “RNA world” hypothesis is seen as one of the main contenders for a viable theory on the origin of life. Relatively small RNAs have catalytic power, RNA is everywhere in present-day life, the ribosome is seen as a ribozyme, and rRNA and tRNA are crucial for modern protein synthesis. However, this view is incomplete at best. The modern protein-RNA ribosome most probably is not a distorted form of a “pure RNA ribosome” evolution started out with. Though the oldest center of the ribosome seems “RNA only”, we cannot conclude from this that it ever functioned in an environment without amino acids and/or peptides. Very small RNAs (versatile and stable due to basepairing) and amino acids, as well as dipeptides, coevolved. Remember, it is the amino group of aminoacylated tRNA that attacks peptidyl-tRNA, destroying the bond between peptide and tRNA. This activity of the amino acid part of aminoacyl-tRNA illustrates the centrality of amino acids in life. With the rise of the “RNA world” view of early life, the pendulum seems to have swung too much towards the ribozymatic part of early biochemistry. The necessary presence and activity of amino acids and peptides is in need of highlighting. In this article, we try to bring the role of the peptide component of early life back into focus. We argue that an RNA world completely independent of amino acids never existed. PMID:25607813

  11. PQuad: Visualization of Predicted Peptides and Proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Havre, Susan L.; Singhal, Mudita; Payne, Deborah A.; Webb-Robertson, Bobbie-Jo M.

    2004-10-10

    New high-throughput proteomic techniques generate data faster than biologist and bioinformaticists can analyze it. Yet, hidden within this massive and complex data are answers to basic questions about how cells function to support life or respond to disease. Now biologists can take a global or systems approach studying not one or two proteins at a time but whole proteomes comprising all the proteins in a cell. However, the tremendous size and complexity of the high-throughput experiment data make it difficult to process and interpret. Visualization provides powerful analysis capabilities for such enormous and complex data. In this paper, we introduce a novel interactive visualization, PQuad (Peptide Permutation and Protein Prediction), designed for the visual analysis of peptides (protein fragments) identified from high-throughput data. PQuad depicts the experiment peptides in the context of their parent protein and DNA, thereby integrating proteomic and genomic information. A wrapped line metaphor is applied across key resolutions of the data, from a compressed view of an entire chromosome to the actual nucleotide sequence. PQuad provides a difference visualization for comparing peptides from different experimental conditions. We describe the requirements for such a visual analysis tool, the design decisions, and the novel aspects of PQuad.

  12. Innovation Centre Peptide and Protein Technologies HES-SO Sion: Pioneer in an Emerging Market.

    PubMed

    Heinzelmann, Elsbeth

    2016-01-01

    Peptides are small proteins typically containing a chain of up to 100 amino acids. In our bodies, they are produced every day in vast quantities and perform highly specific biological activities. As there is an increased interest in peptides for pharmaceutical applications, the HES-SO Valais-Wallis created a research group to focus on Peptide and Protein Technologies (P(2)T). PMID:27052764

  13. Urea, but not guanidinium, destabilizes proteins by forming hydrogen bonds to the peptide group.

    PubMed

    Lim, Woon Ki; Rösgen, Jörg; Englander, S Walter

    2009-02-24

    The mechanism by which urea and guanidinium destabilize protein structure is controversial. We tested the possibility that these denaturants form hydrogen bonds with peptide groups by measuring their ability to block acid- and base-catalyzed peptide hydrogen exchange. The peptide hydrogen bonding found appears sufficient to explain the thermodynamic denaturing effect of urea. Results for guanidinium, however, are contrary to the expectation that it might H-bond. Evidently, urea and guanidinium, although structurally similar, denature proteins by different mechanisms. PMID:19196963

  14. Proteins and Amino Acids

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Proteins are the most abundant substances in living organisms and cells. All proteins are constructed from the same twenty amino acids that are linked together by covalent bonds. Shorter chains of two or more amino acids can be linked by covalent bonds to form polypeptides. There are twenty amino...

  15. Graphite Supported Preparation (GSP) of α-Cyano-4-Hydroxycinnamic Acid (CHCA) for Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption/Ionization Mass Spectrometry (MALDI-MS) for Peptides and Proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorka, Jan; Bahr, Ute; Karas, Michael

    2012-11-01

    Graphite as MALDI matrix or in combination with other substances has been reported in recent years. Here, we demonstrate that graphite can be used as target coating supporting the crystallization of the α-cyano-4-hydroxycinnamic acid matrix. A conventional dried-droplet preparation of matrix and analyte solution on a graphite-coated metal target leads to a thin, uniform layer of cubic crystals with about 1 μm edge length. Commercially available graphite powder of 1-2 μm particle size is gently wiped over the target using a cotton Q-tip, leading to an ultra-thin, not-visible film. This surface modification considerably improves analysis of peptides and proteins for MALDI MS using conventional dried-droplet preparation. Compared with untreated targets, the signal intensities of standard peptides are up to eight times higher when using the graphite supported crystallization. The relative standard deviation in peak area of angiotensin II for sample amounts between 1 and 50 fmol is reduced to about 15 % compared with 45 % for untreated sample holders. For a quantification of 1 fmol of the peptide using an internal standard the coefficient of variation is reduced to 3.5 % from 8 %. The new graphite supported preparation (GSP) protocol is very simple and does not require any technical nor manual skills. All standard solvents for peptides and proteins can be used.

  16. Dinosaur Peptides Suggest Mechanisms of Protein Survival

    PubMed Central

    San Antonio, James D.; Schweitzer, Mary H.; Jensen, Shane T.; Kalluri, Raghu; Buckley, Michael; Orgel, Joseph P. R. O.

    2011-01-01

    Eleven collagen peptide sequences recovered from chemical extracts of dinosaur bones were mapped onto molecular models of the vertebrate collagen fibril derived from extant taxa. The dinosaur peptides localized to fibril regions protected by the close packing of collagen molecules, and contained few acidic amino acids. Four peptides mapped to collagen regions crucial for cell-collagen interactions and tissue development. Dinosaur peptides were not represented in more exposed parts of the collagen fibril or regions mediating intermolecular cross-linking. Thus functionally significant regions of collagen fibrils that are physically shielded within the fibril may be preferentially preserved in fossils. These results show empirically that structure-function relationships at the molecular level could contribute to selective preservation in fossilized vertebrate remains across geological time, suggest a ‘preservation motif’, and bolster current concepts linking collagen structure to biological function. This non-random distribution supports the hypothesis that the peptides are produced by the extinct organisms and suggests a chemical mechanism for survival. PMID:21687667

  17. Dinosaur Peptides Suggest Mechanisms of Protein Survival

    SciTech Connect

    San Antonio, James D.; Schweitzer, Mary H.; Jensen, Shane T.; Kalluri, Raghu; Buckley, Michael; Orgel, Joseph P.R.O.

    2011-09-16

    Eleven collagen peptide sequences recovered from chemical extracts of dinosaur bones were mapped onto molecular models of the vertebrate collagen fibril derived from extant taxa. The dinosaur peptides localized to fibril regions protected by the close packing of collagen molecules, and contained few acidic amino acids. Four peptides mapped to collagen regions crucial for cell-collagen interactions and tissue development. Dinosaur peptides were not represented in more exposed parts of the collagen fibril or regions mediating intermolecular cross-linking. Thus functionally significant regions of collagen fibrils that are physically shielded within the fibril may be preferentially preserved in fossils. These results show empirically that structure-function relationships at the molecular level could contribute to selective preservation in fossilized vertebrate remains across geological time, suggest a 'preservation motif', and bolster current concepts linking collagen structure to biological function. This non-random distribution supports the hypothesis that the peptides are produced by the extinct organisms and suggests a chemical mechanism for survival.

  18. Protein identification and Peptide expression resolver: harmonizing protein identification with protein expression data.

    PubMed

    Kearney, Paul; Butler, Heather; Eng, Kevin; Hugo, Patrice

    2008-01-01

    Proteomic discovery platforms generate both peptide expression information and protein identification information. Peptide expression data are used to determine which peptides are differentially expressed between study cohorts, and then these peptides are targeted for protein identification. In this paper, we demonstrate that peptide expression information is also a powerful tool for enhancing confidence in protein identification results. Specifically, we evaluate the following hypothesis: tryptic peptides originating from the same protein have similar expression profiles across samples in the discovery study. Evidence supporting this hypothesis is provided. This hypothesis is integrated into a protein identification tool, PIPER (Protein Identification and Peptide Expression Resolver), that reduces erroneous protein identifications below 5%. PIPER's utility is illustrated by application to a 72-sample biomarker discovery study where it is demonstrated that false positive protein identifications can be reduced below 5%. Consequently, it is recommended that PIPER methodology be incorporated into proteomic studies where both protein expression and identification data are collected. PMID:18062667

  19. Design, Synthesis and Affinity Properties of Biologically Active Peptide and Protein Conjugates of Cotton Cellulose

    SciTech Connect

    Edwards, J. V.; Goheen, Steven C.

    2002-11-30

    The formation of peptide and protein conjugates of cellulose on cotton fabrics provides promising leads for the development of wound healing, antibacterial, and decontaminating textiles. An approach to the design, synthesis, and analysis of bioconjugates containing cellulose peptide and protein conjugates includes: 1) computer graphic modeling for a rationally designed structure; 2) attachment of the peptide or protein to cotton cellulose through a linker amino acid, and 3) characterization of the resulting bioconjugate. Computer graphic simulation of protein and peptide cellulose conjugates gives a rationally designed biopolymer to target synthetic modifications to the cotton cellulose. Techniques for preparing these types of conjugates involve both sequential assembly of the peptide on the fabric and direct crosslinking of the peptide or protein as cellulose bound esters or carboxymethylcellulose amides.

  20. Identification of an amyloidogenic peptide from the Bap protein of Staphylococcus epidermidis.

    PubMed

    Lembré, Pierre; Vendrely, Charlotte; Martino, Patrick Di

    2014-01-01

    Biofilm associated proteins (Bap) are involved in the biofilm formation process of several bacterial species. The sequence STVTVT is present in Bap proteins expressed by many Staphylococcus species, Acinetobacter baumanii and Salmonella enterica. The peptide STVTVTF derived from the C-repeat of the Bap protein from Staphylococcus epidermidis was selected through the AGGRESCAN, PASTA, and TANGO software prediction of protein aggregation and formation of amyloid fibers. We characterized the self-assembly properties of the peptide STVTVTF by different methods: in the presence of the peptide, we observed an increase in the fluorescence intensity of Thioflavin T; many intermolecular β-sheets and fibers were spontaneously formed in peptide preparations as observed by infrared spectroscopy and atomic force microscopy analyses. In conclusion, a 7 amino acids peptide derived from the C-repeat of the Bap protein was sufficient for the spontaneous formation of amyloid fibers. The possible involvement of this amyloidogenic sequence in protein-protein interactions is discussed. PMID:24354773

  1. The H-Index of `An Approach to Correlate Tandem Mass Spectral Data of Peptides with Amino Acid Sequences in a Protein Database'

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Washburn, Michael P.

    2015-11-01

    Over 20 years ago a remarkable paper was published in the Journal of American Society for Mass Spectrometry. This paper from Jimmy Eng, Ashley McCormack, and John Yates described the use of protein databases to drive the interpretation of tandem mass spectra of peptides. This paper now has over 3660 citations and continues to average more than 260 per year over the last decade. This is an amazing scientific achievement. The reason for this is the paper was a cutting edge development at the moment in time when genomes of organisms were being sequenced, protein and peptide mass spectrometry was growing into the field of proteomics, and the power of computing was growing quickly in accordance with Moore's law. This work by the Yates lab grew in importance as genomics, proteomics, and computation all advanced and eventually resulted in the widely used SEQUEST algorithm and platform for the analysis of tandem mass spectrometry data. This commentary provides an analysis of the impact of this paper by analyzing the citations it has generated and the impact of these citing papers.

  2. Endogenous flow of amino acids in the avian ileum as influenced by increasing dietary peptide concentrations.

    PubMed

    Ravindran, Velmurugu; Morel, Patrick C H; Rutherfurd, Shane M; Thomas, Donald V

    2009-03-01

    The aim of the present study was to establish whether feeding broiler chickens with diets containing increasing dietary peptide concentrations would cause increases in ileal endogenous amino acid flow. The flow of N and most amino acids increased quadratically (P < 0.05 to 0.001) with increasing dietary concentrations of peptides. The exceptions were the flow of threonine, serine, glycine, tyrosine and cystine, which increased linearly (P < 0.001) with dietary peptide levels. Another notable exception to the general trend was the flow of proline, which was significantly higher (P < 0.01) in birds fed the protein-free diet. The amino acid profile of endogenous protein, expressed as proportion of crude protein, indicated that the ratios of threonine, glutamic acid, proline, glycine, leucine, histidine, arginine and cystine were influenced (P < 0.05) with increasing dietary peptide concentrations. In general, compared with the protein-free diet, the ratios of threonine and arginine in endogenous protein were lower (P < 0.05) and those of glutamic acid, glycine and histidine were greater (P < 0.05) in diets with high concentrations of peptides. The ratio of proline was found to decrease (P < 0.05) with increasing dietary peptide concentrations. These changes in the amino acid profile of endogenous protein are probably reflective of changes in the output of one or more of the components of endogenous protein. Overall, the present results demonstrated that increasing dietary peptide concentrations increased the flow of endogenous amino acid flow at the terminal ileum of broiler chickens in a dose-dependent manner and also caused changes in the composition of endogenous protein. The observed changes in endogenous amino flow will influence the maintenance requirements for amino acids and also have implications for the calculation of true digestibility coefficient of feedstuffs. PMID:18662428

  3. OMASAL FLOW OF SOLUBLE PROTEINS, PEPTIDES, AND FREE AMINO ACIDS IN DAIRY COWS FED DIETS SUPPLEMENTED WITH PROTEINS OF VARYING RUMINAL DEGRADABILITIES

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Three ruminally and duodenally cannulated cows were assigned to an incomplete 4 x 4 Latin square with four 14-day periods and fed diets supplemented with urea, solvent soybean meal (SSBM), xylose-treated soybean meal (XSBM), or corn gluten meal (CGM) to study the effects of crude protein source on o...

  4. Nanoparticles in relation to peptide and protein aggregation

    PubMed Central

    Zaman, Masihuz; Ahmad, Ejaz; Qadeer, Atiyatul; Rabbani, Gulam; Khan, Rizwan Hasan

    2014-01-01

    Over the past two decades, there has been considerable research interest in the use of nanoparticles in the study of protein and peptide aggregation, and of amyloid-related diseases. The influence of nanoparticles on amyloid formation yields great interest due to its small size and high surface area-to-volume ratio. Targeting nucleation kinetics by nanoparticles is one of the most searched for ways to control or induce this phenomenon. The observed effect of nanoparticles on the nucleation phase is determined by particle composition, as well as the amount and nature of the particle’s surface. Various thermodynamic parameters influence the interaction of proteins and nanoparticles in the solution, and regulate the protein assembly into fibrils, as well as the disaggregation of preformed fibrils. Metals, organic particles, inorganic particles, amino acids, peptides, proteins, and so on are more suitable candidates for nanoparticle formulation. In the present review, we attempt to explore the effects of nanoparticles on protein and peptide fibrillation processes from both perspectives (ie, as inducers and inhibitors on nucleation kinetics and in the disaggregation of preformed fibrils). Their formulation and characterization by different techniques have been also addressed, along with their toxicological effects, both in vivo and in vitro. PMID:24611007

  5. Isolation of Camelid Single-Domain Antibodies Against Native Proteins Using Recombinant Multivalent Peptide Ligands.

    PubMed

    Alturki, Norah A; Henry, Kevin A; MacKenzie, C Roger; Arbabi-Ghahroudi, Mehdi

    2015-01-01

    Generation of antibodies against desired epitopes on folded proteins may be hampered by various characteristics of the target protein, including antigenic and immunogenic dominance of irrelevant epitopes and/or steric occlusion of the desired epitope. In such cases, peptides encompassing linear epitopes of the native protein represent attractive alternative reagents for immunization and screening. Peptide antigens are typically prepared by fusing or conjugating the peptide of interest to a carrier protein. The utility of such antigens depends on many factors including the peptide's amino acid sequence, display valency, display format (synthetic conjugate vs. recombinant fusion) and characteristics of the carrier. Here we provide detailed protocols for: (1) preparation of DNA constructs encoding peptides fused to verotoxin (VT) multimerization domain; (2) expression, purification, and characterization of the multivalent peptide-VT ligands; (3) concurrent panning of a non-immune phage-displayed camelid VHH library against the peptide-VT ligands and native protein; and (4) identification of VHHs enriched via panning using next-generation sequencing techniques. These methods are simple, rapid and can be easily adapted to yield custom peptide-VT ligands that appear to maintain the antigenic structures of the peptide. However, we caution that peptide sequences should be chosen with great care, taking into account structural, immunological, and biophysical information on the protein of interest. PMID:26424272

  6. Proteins and peptides as renewable flocculants.

    PubMed

    Piazza, G J; Garcia, R A

    2010-08-01

    Partially hydrolyzed extracts from blood meal, feather meal, and meat and bone meal, as well as a variety of common surplus agricultural proteins were tested for their ability to promote the flocculation of clay. Partial alkaline or enzymatic hydrolyses of blood meal, feather meal, and meat and bone meal were performed to liberate proteins and peptides from their water-insoluble forms. Some of these extracts promoted flocculation. However, if hydrolysis was extensive, low molecular weight peptides were mainly produced, and these extracts did not promote flocculation. Beef skin gelatins and hydrolyzed fish collagen were found to promote flocculation when pH 5.5 buffer was added. Commercial preparations of peptone enzymatic digest and a mixture of keratin and hydrolyzed keratin did not promote flocculation. PMID:20236820

  7. Fluorinated amino acids: compatibility with native protein structures and effects on protein-protein interactions.

    PubMed

    Salwiczek, Mario; Nyakatura, Elisabeth K; Gerling, Ulla I M; Ye, Shijie; Koksch, Beate

    2012-03-21

    Fluorinated analogues of the canonical α-L-amino acids have gained widespread attention as building blocks that may endow peptides and proteins with advantageous biophysical, chemical and biological properties. This critical review covers the literature dealing with investigations of peptides and proteins containing fluorinated analogues of the canonical amino acids published over the course of the past decade including the late nineties. It focuses on side-chain fluorinated amino acids, the carbon backbone of which is identical to their natural analogues. Each class of amino acids--aliphatic, aromatic, charged and polar as well as proline--is presented in a separate section. General effects of fluorine on essential properties such as hydrophobicity, acidity/basicity and conformation of the specific side chains and the impact of these altered properties on stability, folding kinetics and activity of peptides and proteins are discussed (245 references). PMID:22130572

  8. Facilitating protein solubility by use of peptide extensions

    SciTech Connect

    Freimuth, Paul I; Zhang, Yian-Biao; Howitt, Jason

    2013-09-17

    Expression vectors for expression of a protein or polypeptide of interest as a fusion product composed of the protein or polypeptide of interest fused at one terminus to a solubility enhancing peptide extension are provided. Sequences encoding the peptide extensions are provided. The invention further comprises antibodies which bind specifically to one or more of the solubility enhancing peptide extensions.

  9. An Arabidopsis peptide transporter is a member of a new class of membrane transport proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Steiner, H Y; Song, W; Zhang, L; Naider, F; Becker, J M; Stacey, G

    1994-01-01

    An Arabidopsis peptide transport gene was cloned from an Arabidopsis cDNA library by functionally complementing a yeast peptide transport mutant. The Arabidopsis plant peptide transporter (AtPTR2) allowed growth of yeast cells on dipeptides and tripeptides but not peptides four residues and higher. The plant peptide transporter also conferred sensitivity to a number of ethionine-containing, toxic peptides of chain length three or less and restored the ability to take up radiolabeled dileucine at levels similar to that of the wild type. Dileucine uptake was reduced by the addition of a variety of growth-promoting peptides. The sequence of a cDNA insert of 2.8 kb indicated an open reading frame encoding a 610-amino acid polypeptide (67.5 kD). Hydropathy analysis predicted a highly hydrophobic protein with a number of potential transmembrane segments. At the amino acid level, the Arabidopsis plant peptide transporter shows 24.6, 28.5, and 45.2% identity to the Arabidopsis nitrate-inducible nitrate transporter (CHL1), the rabbit small intestine oligopeptide transporter (PepT1), and the yeast peptide transporter (Ptr2p), respectively, but little identity to other proteins known to be involved in peptide transport. Root growth of Arabidopsis seedlings exposed to ethionine-containing toxic peptides was inhibited, and growth was restored by the addition of certain peptides shown to compete with dileucine uptake in yeast expressing the Arabidopsis transport gene. Consistent with the observed inhibition of root growth by toxic peptides, the peptide transporter is expressed in the roots of Arabidopsis seedlings. This study represents the characterization of a plant peptide transporter that is a member of a new class of related membrane transport proteins. PMID:7919993

  10. Screening Bicyclic Peptide Libraries for Protein-Protein Interaction Inhibitors: Discovery of a Tumor Necrosis Factor-alpha Antagonist

    PubMed Central

    Rhodes, Curran A.; Liu, Yusen; Pei, Dehua

    2013-01-01

    Protein-protein interactions represent a new class of exciting but challenging drug targets, because their large, flat binding sites lack well defined pockets for small molecules to bind. We report here a methodology for chemical synthesis and screening of large combinatorial libraries of bicyclic peptides displayed on rigid small-molecule scaffolds. With planar trimesic acid as the scaffold, the resulting bicyclic peptides are effective for binding to protein surfaces such as the interfaces of protein-protein interactions. Screening of a bicyclic peptide library against tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNFα) identified a potent antagonist that inhibits the TNFα-TNFα receptor interaction and protects cells from TNFα-induced cell death. Bicyclic peptides of this type may provide a general solution for inhibition of protein-protein interactions. PMID:23865589

  11. Co-dependence of genotype and dietary protein intake to affect expression on amino acid/peptide transporters in porcine skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Liu, Y; Kong, X; Li, F; Tan, B; Li, Y; Duan, Y; Yin, Y; He, J; Hu, C; Blachier, F; Wu, Guoyao

    2016-01-01

    A total of 96 barrows (48 pure-bred Bama mini-pigs representing fatty genotype, and 48 Landrace pigs representing lean genotype) were randomly assigned to either a low- or adequate-protein treatment diet. The experimental period commenced at 5 weeks of age and extended to the finishing period. After euthanasia, blood and skeletal muscle samples were collected from pigs at the nursery, growing, and finishing phases. Our results indicate that the concentrations of free AAs in the plasma and muscle decreased as the age of the pigs increased. In addition, a strain × growth phase interaction (P < 0.05) was observed for the free AA pool in the plasma and muscle. The low-protein diet upregulated (P < 0.05) the mRNA levels for T1R1/T1R3 involved in glutamate binding, but downregulated (P < 0.05) the mRNA levels for PAT1, PAT2, and ASCT2, which transport neutral AAs into muscles. Bama mini-pigs had higher (P < 0.05) mRNA levels for LAT1, SNAT2, and EAAC1, but a lower (P < 0.05) mRNA level for PepT1, compared with Landrace pigs. Collectively, our findings indicate that adequate provision of dietary protein plays an important role in regulating profiles of free AA pools and expression of key AA/peptide transporters/transceptors in a genotype- and tissue-specific manner. PMID:26255284

  12. Peptiderive server: derive peptide inhibitors from protein-protein interactions.

    PubMed

    Sedan, Yuval; Marcu, Orly; Lyskov, Sergey; Schueler-Furman, Ora

    2016-07-01

    The Rosetta Peptiderive protocol identifies, in a given structure of a protein-protein interaction, the linear polypeptide segment suggested to contribute most to binding energy. Interactions that feature a 'hot segment', a linear peptide with significant binding energy compared to that of the complex, may be amenable for inhibition and the peptide sequence and structure derived from the interaction provide a starting point for rational drug design. Here we present a web server for Peptiderive, which is incorporated within the ROSIE web interface for Rosetta protocols. A new feature of the protocol also evaluates whether derived peptides are good candidates for cyclization. Fast computation times and clear visualization allow users to quickly assess the interaction of interest. The Peptiderive server is available for free use at http://rosie.rosettacommons.org/peptiderive. PMID:27141963

  13. Rational Design of a Carrier Protein for the Production of Recombinant Toxic Peptides in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Pane, Katia; Durante, Lorenzo; Pizzo, Elio; Varcamonti, Mario; Zanfardino, Anna; Sgambati, Valeria; Di Maro, Antimo; Carpentieri, Andrea; Izzo, Viviana; Di Donato, Alberto; Cafaro, Valeria; Notomista, Eugenio

    2016-01-01

    Commercial uses of bioactive peptides require low cost, effective methods for their production. We developed a new carrier protein for high yield production of recombinant peptides in Escherichia coli very well suited for the production of toxic peptides like antimicrobial peptides. GKY20, a short antimicrobial peptide derived from the C-terminus of human thrombin, was fused to the C-terminus of Onconase, a small ribonuclease (104 amino acids), which efficiently drove the peptide into inclusion bodies with very high expression levels (about 200-250 mg/L). After purification of the fusion protein by immobilized metal ion affinity chromatography, peptide was obtained by chemical cleavage in diluted acetic acid of an acid labile Asp-Pro sequence with more than 95% efficiency. To improve peptide purification, Onconase was mutated to eliminate all acid labile sequences thus reducing the release of unwanted peptides during the acid cleavage. Mutations were chosen to preserve the differential solubility of Onconase as function of pH, which allows its selective precipitation at neutral pH after the cleavage. The improved carrier allowed the production of 15-18 mg of recombinant peptide per liter of culture with 96-98% purity without the need of further chromatographic steps after the acid cleavage. The antimicrobial activity of the recombinant peptide, with an additional proline at the N-terminus, was tested on Gram-negative and Gram-positive strains and was found to be identical to that measured for synthetic GKY20. This finding suggests that N-terminal proline residue does not change the antimicrobial properties of recombinant (P)GKY20. The improved carrier, which does not contain cysteine and methionine residues, Asp-Pro and Asn-Gly sequences, is well suited for the production of peptides using any of the most popular chemical cleavage methods. PMID:26808536

  14. Rational Design of a Carrier Protein for the Production of Recombinant Toxic Peptides in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Pizzo, Elio; Varcamonti, Mario; Zanfardino, Anna; Sgambati, Valeria; Di Maro, Antimo; Carpentieri, Andrea; Izzo, Viviana; Di Donato, Alberto; Cafaro, Valeria; Notomista, Eugenio

    2016-01-01

    Commercial uses of bioactive peptides require low cost, effective methods for their production. We developed a new carrier protein for high yield production of recombinant peptides in Escherichia coli very well suited for the production of toxic peptides like antimicrobial peptides. GKY20, a short antimicrobial peptide derived from the C-terminus of human thrombin, was fused to the C-terminus of Onconase, a small ribonuclease (104 amino acids), which efficiently drove the peptide into inclusion bodies with very high expression levels (about 200–250 mg/L). After purification of the fusion protein by immobilized metal ion affinity chromatography, peptide was obtained by chemical cleavage in diluted acetic acid of an acid labile Asp-Pro sequence with more than 95% efficiency. To improve peptide purification, Onconase was mutated to eliminate all acid labile sequences thus reducing the release of unwanted peptides during the acid cleavage. Mutations were chosen to preserve the differential solubility of Onconase as function of pH, which allows its selective precipitation at neutral pH after the cleavage. The improved carrier allowed the production of 15–18 mg of recombinant peptide per liter of culture with 96–98% purity without the need of further chromatographic steps after the acid cleavage. The antimicrobial activity of the recombinant peptide, with an additional proline at the N-terminus, was tested on Gram-negative and Gram-positive strains and was found to be identical to that measured for synthetic GKY20. This finding suggests that N-terminal proline residue does not change the antimicrobial properties of recombinant (P)GKY20. The improved carrier, which does not contain cysteine and methionine residues, Asp-Pro and Asn-Gly sequences, is well suited for the production of peptides using any of the most popular chemical cleavage methods. PMID:26808536

  15. Predicting protein-ligand and protein-peptide interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bertolazzi, Paola; Guerra, Concettina; Liuzzi, Giampaolo

    2014-06-01

    The paper deals with the identification of binding sites and concentrates on interactions involving small interfaces. In particular we focus our attention on two major interface types, namely protein-ligand and protein-peptide interfaces. As concerns protein-ligand binding site prediction, we classify the most interesting methods and approaches into four main categories: (a) shape-based methods, (b) alignment-based methods, (c) graph-theoretic approaches and (d) machine learning methods. Class (a) encompasses those methods which employ, in some way, geometric information about the protein surface. Methods falling into class (b) address the prediction problem as an alignment problem, i.e. finding protein-ligand atom pairs that occupy spatially equivalent positions. Graph theoretic approaches, class (c), are mainly based on the definition of a particular graph, known as the protein contact graph, and then apply some sophisticated methods from graph theory to discover subgraphs or score similarities for uncovering functional sites. The last class (d) contains those methods that are based on the learn-from-examples paradigm and that are able to take advantage of the large amount of data available on known protein-ligand pairs. As for protein-peptide interfaces, due to the often disordered nature of the regions involved in binding, shape similarity is no longer a determining factor. Then, in geometry-based methods, geometry is accounted for by providing the relative position of the atoms surrounding the peptide residues in known structures. Finally, also for protein-peptide interfaces, we present a classification of some successful machine learning methods. Indeed, they can be categorized in the way adopted to construct the learning examples. In particular, we envisage three main methods: distance functions, structure and potentials and structure alignment.

  16. Pharmacokinetics of Peptide-Fc fusion proteins.

    PubMed

    Wu, Benjamin; Sun, Yu-Nien

    2014-01-01

    Peptide-Fc fusion proteins (or peptibodies) are chimeric proteins generated by fusing a biologically active peptide with the Fc-domain of immunoglobulin G. In this review, we describe recent studies that have evaluated the absorption, distribution, metabolism, and excretion characteristics of peptibodies. Key features of the pharmacokinetics of peptibodies include their extended half-life due to recycling by the neonatal Fc receptor (FcRn), a substantial contribution by renal excretion to total clearance and, for certain peptibodies, target-mediated drug disposition. The prolonged half-life of peptibodies permits less-frequent dose administration compared with small therapeutic peptides, thereby supporting patient convenience and compliance. Hence, a considerable number of peptibodies are currently in preclinical and clinical development. Investigation of the metabolism (biotransformation) of biologics is an evolving area of research: ligand-binding mass spectrometry techniques have been employed for the characterization of the peptibody romiplostim, providing a new approach to evaluation of the degradation products of biologics. Pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic modeling and simulation techniques have been used to predict the pharmacokinetics of peptibodies which can inform clinical decision-making, particularly selection of dosing regimens. This integrated review highlights the distinct pharmacokinetic characteristics of peptibodies and their influence on the drug development process for this emerging family of therapeutics. PMID:24285510

  17. Anticancer and antioxidant activities of the peptide fraction from algae protein waste.

    PubMed

    Sheih, I-Chuan; Fang, Tony J; Wu, Tung-Kung; Lin, Peng-Hsiang

    2010-01-27

    Algae protein waste is a byproduct during production of algae essence from Chlorella vulgaris. There is no known report on the anticancer peptides derived from the microalgae protein waste. In this paper, the peptide fraction isolated from pepsin hydrolysate of algae protein waste had strong dose-dependent antiproliferation and induced a post-G1 cell cycle arrest in AGS cells; however, no cytotoxicity was observed in WI-38 lung fibroblasts cells in vitro. The peptide fraction also revealed much better antioxidant activity toward peroxyl radicals and LDL than those of Trolox. Among these peptides, a potent antiproliferative, antioxidant, and NO-production-inhibiting hendecapeptide was isolated, and its amino acid sequence was VECYGPNRPQF. These results demonstrate that inexpensive algae protein waste could be a new alternative to produce anticancer peptides. PMID:19916544

  18. Peptides containing β-amino acid patterns: challenges and successes in medicinal chemistry.

    PubMed

    Cabrele, Chiara; Martinek, Tamás A; Reiser, Oliver; Berlicki, Łukasz

    2014-12-11

    The construction of bioactive peptides using β-amino acid-containing sequence patterns is a very promising strategy to obtain analogues that exhibit properties of high interest for medicinal chemistry applications. β-Amino acids have been shown to modulate the conformation, dynamics, and proteolytic susceptibility of native peptides. They can be either combined with α-amino acids by following specific patterns, which results in backbone architectures with well-defined orientations of the side chain functional groups, or assembled in de novo-designed bioactive β- or α,β-peptidic sequences. Such peptides display various biological functions, including antimicrobial activity, inhibition of protein-protein interactions, agonism/antagonism of GPCR ligands, and anti-angiogenic activity. PMID:25207470

  19. Prediction of Peptide and Protein Propensity for Amyloid Formation

    PubMed Central

    Família, Carlos; Dennison, Sarah R.; Quintas, Alexandre; Phoenix, David A.

    2015-01-01

    Understanding which peptides and proteins have the potential to undergo amyloid formation and what driving forces are responsible for amyloid-like fiber formation and stabilization remains limited. This is mainly because proteins that can undergo structural changes, which lead to amyloid formation, are quite diverse and share no obvious sequence or structural homology, despite the structural similarity found in the fibrils. To address these issues, a novel approach based on recursive feature selection and feed-forward neural networks was undertaken to identify key features highly correlated with the self-assembly problem. This approach allowed the identification of seven physicochemical and biochemical properties of the amino acids highly associated with the self-assembly of peptides and proteins into amyloid-like fibrils (normalized frequency of β-sheet, normalized frequency of β-sheet from LG, weights for β-sheet at the window position of 1, isoelectric point, atom-based hydrophobic moment, helix termination parameter at position j+1 and ΔG° values for peptides extrapolated in 0 M urea). Moreover, these features enabled the development of a new predictor (available at http://cran.r-project.org/web/packages/appnn/index.html) capable of accurately and reliably predicting the amyloidogenic propensity from the polypeptide sequence alone with a prediction accuracy of 84.9 % against an external validation dataset of sequences with experimental in vitro, evidence of amyloid formation. PMID:26241652

  20. Bioconjugation - using selective chemistry to enhance the properties of proteins and peptides as therapeutics and carriers.

    PubMed

    Gunnoo, Smita B; Madder, Annemieke

    2016-09-14

    The pharmaceutical market has largely been dominated by small molecule drugs; however, larger biomolecules have recently become important contenders. Of these biomolecules, protein and peptide therapeutics are proving useful due to their often improved pharmacokinetic properties. In many circumstances, functionalisation of the protein or peptide therapeutics results in performance enhancement, and various methodologies are applied. In addition, introducing unnatural amino acids for structural reinforcement via chemical modification is also common. These strategies are discussed in this review. PMID:27461374

  1. α-Helix peptides designed from EBV-gH protein display higher antigenicity and induction of monocyte apoptosis than the native peptide

    PubMed Central

    Melo-Cardenas, Johanna; Guevara, Tatiana; Echeverria, Ignacia; Rodriguez, Isabel C.; Vanegas, Magnolia; Amzel, Mario; Patarroyo, Manuel E.

    2010-01-01

    We tested the hypothesis that stabilizing α-helix of Epstein–Barr virus gH-derived peptide 11438 used for binding human cells will increase its biological activity. Non-stable α-helix of peptide 11438 was unfolded in an entropy-driven process, despite the opposing effect of the enthalpy factor. Adding and/or changing amino acids in peptide 11438 allowed the designing of peptides 33207, 33208 and 33210; peptides 33208 and 33210 displayed higher helical content due to a decreased unfolding entropy change as was determined by AGADIR, molecular dynamics and circular dichroism analysis. Peptides 33207, 33208 and 33210 inhibited EBV invasion of peripheral blood mononuclear cells and displayed epitopes more similar to native protein than peptide 11438; these peptides could be useful for detecting antibodies induced by native gH protein since they displayed high reactivity with anti-EBV antibodies. Anti-peptide 33207 antibodies showed higher reactivity with EBV than anti-peptide 11438 antibodies being useful for inducing antibodies against EBV. Anti-peptide 33210 antibodies inhibit EBV invasion of epithelial cells better than anti-peptide 11438 antibodies. Peptide 33210 bound to normal T lymphocytes and Raji cells stronger than peptide 11438 and also induced apoptosis of monocytes and Raji cells but not of normal T cells in a similar way to EBV-gH. Peptide 33210 inhibited the monocytes’ development toward dendritic cells better than EBV and peptide 11438. In conclusion, stabilizing the α-helix in peptides 33208 and 33210 designed from peptide 11438 increased the antigenicity and the ability of the antibodies induced by peptides of inhibiting EBV invasion of host cells. PMID:20473772

  2. Identification of peptides that inhibit regulator of G protein signaling 4 function.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yuren; Lee, Yan; Zhang, Jie; Young, Kathleen H

    2008-01-01

    Regulators of G protein signaling (RGS) are a family of GTPase-activating proteins (GAP) that interact with heterotrimeric G proteins in the negative regulation of G-protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) signaling. RGS4, the first identified mammalian member of the RGS family, has been implicated in many GPCR signaling pathways involved in disease states. We report herein the identification of a 16-amino-acid peptide (P17) as an inhibitor of RGS4. The peptide was found by screening a random peptide library using RGS4 as 'bait' in a yeast two-hybrid system. This peptide inhibited RGS4 GAP activity on Galpha(i1)in a GTPase assay, and blocked the interaction between RGS4 and Galpha(i1)in a pull-down assay. The peptide displayed dose-dependent inhibition of RGS4 and Galpha-interacting protein (GAIP) GAP activities, yet showed no substantial effect on RGS7. Electrophysiological studies in Xenopus oocytes demonstrated that P17 attenuates RGS4 modulation of M(2) muscarinic receptor stimulation of GIRK (G-protein-mediated inwardly rectifying potassium) channels. Deletion of an arginine at the N terminus of P17 abolished its ability to inhibit RGS4 GAP activity, as did deletions of C-terminal residues. The P17 peptide showed no similarity to any known peptide sequence. Further investigation and optimization of the peptide may provide unique information for the development of RGS4 inhibitors for future therapeutic application. PMID:18547979

  3. Protein and Peptide Drug Delivery: Oral Approaches

    PubMed Central

    Shaji, Jessy; Patole, V.

    2008-01-01

    Till recent, injections remained the most common means for administering therapeutic proteins and peptides because of their poor oral bioavailability. However, oral route would be preferred to any other route because of its high levels of patient acceptance and long term compliance, which increases the therapeutic value of the drug. Designing and formulating a polypeptide drug delivery through the gastro intestinal tract has been a persistent challenge because of their unfavorable physicochemical properties, which includes enzymatic degradation, poor membrane permeability and large molecular size. The main challenge is to improve the oral bioavailability from less than 1% to at least 30-50%. Consequently, efforts have intensified over the past few decades, where every oral dosage form used for the conventional small molecule drugs has been used to explore oral protein and peptide delivery. Various strategies currently under investigation include chemical modification, formulation vehicles and use of enzyme inhibitors, absorption enhancers and mucoadhesive polymers. This review summarizes different pharmaceutical approaches which overcome various physiological barriers that help to improve oral bioavailability that ultimately achieve formulation goals for oral delivery. PMID:20046732

  4. The effects of orbital spaceflight on bone histomorphometry and messenger ribonucleic acid levels for bone matrix proteins and skeletal signaling peptides in ovariectomized growing rats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cavolina, J. M.; Evans, G. L.; Harris, S. A.; Zhang, M.; Westerlind, K. C.; Turner, R. T.

    1997-01-01

    A 14-day orbital spaceflight was performed using ovariectomized Fisher 344 rats to determine the combined effects of estrogen deficiency and near weightlessness on tibia radial bone growth and cancellous bone turnover. Twelve ovariectomized rats with established cancellous osteopenia were flown aboard the space shuttle Columbia (STS-62). Thirty ovariectomized rats were housed on earth as ground controls: 12 in animal enclosure modules, 12 in vivarium cages, and 6 killed the day of launch for baseline measurements. An additional 18 ovary-intact rats were housed in vivarium cages as ground controls: 8 rats were killed as baseline controls and the remaining 10 rats were killed 14 days later. Ovariectomy increased periosteal bone formation at the tibia-fibula synostosis; cancellous bone resorption and formation in the secondary spongiosa of the proximal tibial metaphysis; and messenger RNA (mRNA) levels for the prepro-alpha2(1) subunit of type 1 collagen, osteocalcin, transforming growth factor-beta, and insulin-like growth factor I in the contralateral proximal tibial metaphysis and for the collagen subunit in periosteum pooled from tibiae and femora and decreased cancellous bone area. Compared to ovariectomized weight-bearing rats, the flight group experienced decreases in periosteal bone formation, collagen subunit mRNA levels, and cancellous bone area. The flight rats had a small decrease in the cancellous mineral apposition rate, but no change in the calculated bone formation rate. Also, spaceflight had no effect on cancellous osteoblast and osteoclast perimeters or on mRNA levels for bone matrix proteins and signaling peptides. On the other hand, spaceflight resulted in an increase in bone resorption, as ascertained from the diminished retention of a preflight fluorochrome label. This latter finding suggests that osteoclast activity was increased. In a follow-up ground-based experiment, unilateral sciatic neurotomy of ovariectomized rats resulted in cancellous

  5. Nucleic acids encoding human trithorax protein

    DOEpatents

    Evans, Glen A.; Djabali, Malek; Selleri, Licia; Parry, Pauline

    2001-01-01

    In accordance with the present invention, there is provided an isolated peptide having the characteristics of human trithorax protein (as well as DNA encoding same, antisense DNA derived therefrom and antagonists therefor). The invention peptide is characterized by having a DNA binding domain comprising multiple zinc fingers and at least 40% amino acid identity with respect to the DNA binding domain of Drosophila trithorax protein and at least 70% conserved sequence with respect to the DNA binding domain of Drosophila trithorax protein, and wherein said peptide is encoded by a gene located at chromosome 11 of the human genome at q23. Also provided are methods for the treatment of subject(s) suffering from immunodeficiency, developmental abnormality, inherited disease, or cancer by administering to said subject a therapeutically effective amount of one of the above-described agents (i.e., peptide, antagonist therefor, DNA encoding said peptide or antisense DNA derived therefrom). Also provided is a method for the diagnosis, in a subject, of immunodeficiency, developmental abnormality, inherited disease, or cancer associated with disruption of chromosome 11 at q23.

  6. Iron-chelating activity of chickpea protein hydrolysate peptides.

    PubMed

    Torres-Fuentes, Cristina; Alaiz, Manuel; Vioque, Javier

    2012-10-01

    Chickpea-chelating peptides were purified and analysed for their iron-chelating activity. These peptides were purified after affinity and gel filtration chromatography from a chickpea protein hydrolysate produced with pepsin and pancreatin. Iron-chelating activity was higher in purified peptide fractions than in the original hydrolysate. Histidine contents were positively correlated with the iron-chelating activity. Hence fractions with histidine contents above 20% showed the highest chelating activity. These results show that iron-chelating peptides are generated after chickpea protein hydrolysis with pepsin plus pancreatin. These peptides, through metal chelation, may increase iron solubility and bioavailability and improve iron absorption. PMID:25005984

  7. Predicting Three-Dimensional Conformations of Peptides Constructed of Only Glycine, Alanine, Aspartic Acid, and Valine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oda, Akifumi; Fukuyoshi, Shuichi

    2015-06-01

    The GADV hypothesis is a form of the protein world hypothesis, which suggests that life originated from proteins (Lacey et al. 1999; Ikehara 2002; Andras 2006). In the GADV hypothesis, life is thought to have originated from primitive proteins constructed of only glycine, alanine, aspartic acid, and valine ([GADV]-proteins). In this study, the three-dimensional (3D) conformations of randomly generated short [GADV]-peptides were computationally investigated using replica-exchange molecular dynamics (REMD) simulations (Sugita and Okamoto 1999). Because the peptides used in this study consisted of only 20 residues each, they could not form certain 3D structures. However, the conformational tendencies of the peptides were elucidated by analyzing the conformational ensembles generated by REMD simulations. The results indicate that secondary structures can be formed in several randomly generated [GADV]-peptides. A long helical structure was found in one of the hydrophobic peptides, supporting the conjecture of the GADV hypothesis that many peptides aggregated to form peptide multimers with enzymatic activity in the primordial soup. In addition, these results indicate that REMD simulations can be used for the structural investigation of short peptides.

  8. Solid Phase Synthesis of C-Terminal Boronic Acid Peptides.

    PubMed

    Behnam, Mira A M; Sundermann, Tom R; Klein, Christian D

    2016-05-01

    Peptides and peptidomimetics with a C-terminal boronic acid group have prolific applications in numerous fields of research, but their synthetic accessibility remains problematic. A convenient, high yield synthesis of peptide-boronic acids on a solid support is described here, using commercially available 1-glycerol polystyrene resin. The method is compatible with Fmoc chemistry and offers a versatile approach to aryl and alkyl aminoboronic acids without additional purification steps. PMID:27104613

  9. Bioactive proteins and peptides from food sources. Applications of bioprocesses used in isolation and recovery.

    PubMed

    Kitts, David D; Weiler, Katie

    2003-01-01

    There are many examples of biologically active food proteins, with physiological significance beyond the pure nutritional requirements that concern available nitrogen for normal growth and maintenance. Moreover, there are many physiologically active peptides, derived by protease activity from various food protein sources; however, relationships between structural properties and functional activities have not been completely elucidated. Many bioactive peptides have in common structural properties that include a relatively short peptide residue length (e.g. 2-9 amino acids), possessing hydrophobic amino acid residues in addition to proline, lysine or arginine groups. Bioactive peptides are also resistant to the action of digestion peptidases. Antihypertensive peptides, known as Angiotensin I converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors have been derived from milk, corn and fish protein sources. Peptides with opioid activities are derived from wheat gluten or casein, following digestion with pepsin. Exorphins, or opioid peptides derived from food proteins such as wheat and milk (e.g. exogenous sources) have similar structure to endogenous opioid peptides, with a tyrosine residue located at the amino terminal or bioactive site. Immunomodulatory peptides derived from tryptic hydrolysates of rice and soybean proteins act to stimulate superoxide anions (reactive oxygen species-ROS), which triggers non-specific immune defense systems. Antioxidant properties that prevent peroxidation of essential fatty acids have also been shown for peptides derived from milk proteins. The addition of a Leu or Pro residue to the N-terminus of a His-His, dipeptide will enhance antioxidant activity and facilitate further synergy with non-peptide antioxidants (e.g. BHT). We also show herein, that the tryptic digests of casein yielding caseinophosphopeptides exhibits both hydrophilic and lipophilic antioxidant activity due to both metal ion sequestering and quenching of ROS. The separation and

  10. An extensive library of surrogate peptides for all human proteins.

    PubMed

    Mohammed, Yassene; Borchers, Christoph H

    2015-11-01

    Selecting the most appropriate surrogate peptides to represent a target protein is a major component of experimental design in Multiple Reaction Monitoring (MRM). Our software PeptidePicker with its v-score remains distinctive in its approach of integrating information about the proteins, their tryptic peptides, and the suitability of these peptides for MRM that is available online in UniProtKB, NCBI's dbSNP, ExPASy, PeptideAtlas, PRIDE, and GPMDB. The scoring algorithm reflects our "best knowledge" for selecting candidate peptides for MRM, based on the uniqueness of the peptide in the targeted proteome, its physiochemical properties, and whether it has previously been observed. Here we present an updated approach where we have already compiled a list of all possible surrogate peptides of the human proteome. Using our stringent selection criteria, the list includes 165k suitable MRM peptides covering 17k proteins of the human reviewed proteins in UniProtKB. Compared to average of 2-4min per protein for retrieving and integrating the information, the precompiled list includes all peptides available instantly. This allows a more cohesive and faster design of a multiplexed MRM experiment and provides insights into evidence for a protein's existence. We will keep this list up-to-date as proteomics data repositories continue to grow. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Computational Proteomics. PMID:26232110

  11. Ribosomal Synthesis of Peptides with Multiple β-Amino Acids.

    PubMed

    Fujino, Tomoshige; Goto, Yuki; Suga, Hiroaki; Murakami, Hiroshi

    2016-02-17

    The compatibility of β-amino acids with ribosomal translation was studied for decades, but it has been still unclear whether the ribosome can accept various β-amino acids, and whether the ribosome can introduce multiple β-amino acids in a peptide. In the present study, by using the Escherichia coli reconstituted cell-free translation system with a reprogramed genetic code, we screened β-amino acids that give high single incorporation efficiency and used them to synthesize peptides containing multiple β-amino acids. The experiments of single β-amino acid incorporation into a peptide revealed that 13 β-amino acids are compatible with ribosomal translation. Six of the tested β-amino acids (βhGly, l-βhAla, l-βhGln, l-βhPhg, l-βhMet, and d-βhPhg) showed high incorporation efficiencies, and seven (l-βhLeu, l-βhIle, l-βhAsn, l-βhPhe, l-βhLys, d-βhAla, and d-βhLeu) showed moderate incorporation efficiencies; whereas no full-length peptide was produced using other β-amino acids (l-βhPro, l-βhTrp, and l-βhGlu). Subsequent double-incorporation experiments using β-amino acids with high single incorporation efficiency revealed that elongation of peptides with successive β-amino acids is prohibited. Efficiency of the double-incorporation of the β-amino acids was restored by the insertion of Tyr or Ile between the two β-amino acids. On the basis of these experiments, we also designed mRNA sequences of peptides, and demonstrated the ribosomal synthesis of peptides containing different types of β-amino acids at multiple positions. PMID:26807980

  12. New Milk Protein-Derived Peptides with Potential Antimicrobial Activity: An Approach Based on Bioinformatic Studies

    PubMed Central

    Dziuba, Bartłomiej; Dziuba, Marta

    2014-01-01

    New peptides with potential antimicrobial activity, encrypted in milk protein sequences, were searched for with the use of bioinformatic tools. The major milk proteins were hydrolyzed in silico by 28 enzymes. The obtained peptides were characterized by the following parameters: molecular weight, isoelectric point, composition and number of amino acid residues, net charge at pH 7.0, aliphatic index, instability index, Boman index, and GRAVY index, and compared with those calculated for known 416 antimicrobial peptides including 59 antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) from milk proteins listed in the BIOPEP database. A simple analysis of physico-chemical properties and the values of biological activity indicators were insufficient to select potentially antimicrobial peptides released in silico from milk proteins by proteolytic enzymes. The final selection was made based on the results of multidimensional statistical analysis such as support vector machines (SVM), random forest (RF), artificial neural networks (ANN) and discriminant analysis (DA) available in the Collection of Anti-Microbial Peptides (CAMP database). Eleven new peptides with potential antimicrobial activity were selected from all peptides released during in silico proteolysis of milk proteins. PMID:25141106

  13. The G Protein-coupled Receptor Family C Group 6 Subtype A (GPRC6A) Receptor Is Involved in Amino Acid-induced Glucagon-like Peptide-1 Secretion from GLUTag Cells*

    PubMed Central

    Oya, Manami; Kitaguchi, Tetsuya; Pais, Ramona; Reimann, Frank; Gribble, Fiona; Tsuboi, Takashi

    2013-01-01

    Although amino acids are dietary nutrients that evoke the secretion of glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1) from intestinal L cells, the precise molecular mechanism(s) by which amino acids regulate GLP-1 secretion from intestinal L cells remains unknown. Here, we show that the G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR), family C group 6 subtype A (GPRC6A), is involved in amino acid-induced GLP-1 secretion from the intestinal L cell line GLUTag. Application of l-ornithine caused an increase in intracellular Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]i) in GLUTag cells. Application of a GPRC6A receptor antagonist, a phospholipase C inhibitor, or an IP3 receptor antagonist significantly suppressed the l-ornithine-induced [Ca2+]i increase. We found that the increase in [Ca2+]i stimulated by l-ornithine correlated with GLP-1 secretion and that l-ornithine stimulation increased exocytosis in a dose-dependent manner. Furthermore, depletion of endogenous GPRC6A by a specific small interfering RNA (siRNA) inhibited the l-ornithine-induced [Ca2+]i increase and GLP-1 secretion. Taken together, these findings suggest that the GPRC6A receptor functions as an amino acid sensor in GLUTag cells that promotes GLP-1 secretion. PMID:23269670

  14. Oral Administration of a Fusion Protein between the Cholera Toxin B Subunit and the 42-Amino Acid Isoform of Amyloid-β Peptide Produced in Silkworm Pupae Protects against Alzheimer's Disease in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Li, Si; Wei, Zhen; Chen, Jian; Chen, Yanhong; Lv, Zhengbing; Yu, Wei; Meng, Qiaohong; Jin, Yongfeng

    2014-01-01

    A key molecule in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a 42-amino acid isoform of the amyloid-β peptide (Aβ42), which is the most toxic element of senile plaques. In this study, to develop an edible, safe, low-cost vaccine for AD, a cholera toxin B subunit (CTB)-Aβ42 fusion protein was successfully expressed in silkworm pupae. We tested the silkworm pupae-derived oral vaccination containing CTB-Aβ42 in a transgenic mouse model of AD. Anti-Aβ42 antibodies were induced in these mice, leading to a decreased Aβ deposition in the brain. We also found that the oral administration of the silk worm pupae vaccine improved the memory and cognition of mice, as assessed using a water maze test. These results suggest that the new edible CTB-Aβ42 silkworm pupae-derived vaccine has potential clinical application in the prevention of AD. PMID:25469702

  15. Oral administration of a fusion protein between the cholera toxin B subunit and the 42-amino acid isoform of amyloid-β peptide produced in silkworm pupae protects against Alzheimer's disease in mice.

    PubMed

    Li, Si; Wei, Zhen; Chen, Jian; Chen, Yanhong; Lv, Zhengbing; Yu, Wei; Meng, Qiaohong; Jin, Yongfeng

    2014-01-01

    A key molecule in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a 42-amino acid isoform of the amyloid-β peptide (Aβ42), which is the most toxic element of senile plaques. In this study, to develop an edible, safe, low-cost vaccine for AD, a cholera toxin B subunit (CTB)-Aβ42 fusion protein was successfully expressed in silkworm pupae. We tested the silkworm pupae-derived oral vaccination containing CTB-Aβ42 in a transgenic mouse model of AD. Anti-Aβ42 antibodies were induced in these mice, leading to a decreased Aβ deposition in the brain. We also found that the oral administration of the silk worm pupae vaccine improved the memory and cognition of mice, as assessed using a water maze test. These results suggest that the new edible CTB-Aβ42 silkworm pupae-derived vaccine has potential clinical application in the prevention of AD. PMID:25469702

  16. Molecular mechanics and dynamics studies on the interaction of gallic acid with collagen-like peptides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madhan, B.; Thanikaivelan, P.; Subramanian, V.; Raghava Rao, J.; Unni Nair, Balachandran; Ramasami, T.

    2001-10-01

    Molecular modelling approaches have been used to understand the interaction of collagen-like peptides with gallic acid, which mimic vegetable tanning processes involved in protein stabilization. Several interaction sites have been identified and the binding energies of the complexes have been calculated. The calculated binding energies for various geometries are in the range 6-13 kcal/mol. It is found that some complexes exhibit hydrogen bonding, and electrostatic interaction plays a dominant role in the stabilization of the peptide by gallic acid. The π-OH type of interaction is also observed in the peptide stabilization. Molecular dynamics (MD) simulation for 600 ps revealed the possibility of hydrogen bonding between the collagen-like peptide and gallic acid.

  17. Recognition properties of peptides hydropathically complementary to residues 356-375 of the c-raf protein.

    PubMed

    Fassina, G; Roller, P P; Olson, A D; Thorgeirsson, S S; Omichinski, J G

    1989-07-01

    Two peptides with hydropathic complementarity to residues 356-375 of the c-raf protein were synthesized to determine if they recognize the raf-(356-375) peptide as well as the entire protein. One peptide was deduced from the complementary mRNA for the raf protein corresponding to residues 356-375, whereas the other was deduced solely from the amino acid sequence of the 20-mer segment using a computer program able to generate peptide sequences with hydropathic complementarity to a given sequence. Specific binding of both peptides to the raf 20-mer segment was demonstrated when either the raf 20-mer peptide or the complementary peptides were immobilized on a column. Binding affinities were in the millimolar-micromolar range. Identical binding properties were observed with peptides synthesized with either all D- or all L-amino acids, suggesting a lack of conformational dependence. Binding was also unaffected by the presence of 8 M urea or detergents, was dependent on solvent characteristics of pH and ionic strength, and was abolished by the presence of competing peptides in the eluting buffer. Recognition between raf complementary peptides was accompanied by spectral changes in the far and near UV region, as monitored by circular dichroism. Proteolytic degradation was retarded by the binding of these peptides. Once immobilized on a column, these peptides proved useful for the isolation by affinity chromatography of a recombinant c-raf protein from an Escherichia coli crude cell extract. PMID:2472393

  18. Role of signal peptides in targeting of proteins in cyanobacteria.

    PubMed Central

    Mackle, M M; Zilinskas, B A

    1994-01-01

    Proteins of cyanobacteria may be transported across one of two membrane systems: the typical eubacterial cell envelope (consisting of an inner membrane, periplasmic space, and an outer membrane) and the photosynthetic thylakoids. To investigate the role of signal peptides in targeting in cyanobacteria, Synechococcus sp. strain PCC 7942 was transformed with vectors carrying the chloramphenicol acetyltransferase reporter gene fused to coding sequences for one of four different signal peptides. These included signal peptides of two proteins of periplasmic space origin (one from Escherichia coli and the other from Synechococcus sp. strain PCC 7942) and two other signal peptides of proteins located in the thylakoid lumen (one from a cyanobacterium and the other from a higher plant). The location of the gene fusion products expressed in Synechococcus sp. strain PCC 7942 was determined by a chloramphenicol acetyltransferase enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay of subcellular fractions. The distribution pattern for gene fusions with periplasmic signal peptides was different from that of gene fusions with thylakoid lumen signal peptides. Primary sequence analysis revealed conserved features in the thylakoid lumen signal peptides that were absent from the periplasmic signal peptides. These results suggest the importance of the signal peptide in protein targeting in cyanobacteria and point to the presence of signal peptide features conserved between chloroplasts and cyanobacteria for targeting of proteins to the thylakoid lumen. Images PMID:8144451

  19. Byonic: Advanced Peptide and Protein Identification Software

    PubMed Central

    Bern, Marshall; Kil, Yong J.; Becker, Christopher

    2013-01-01

    Byonic™ is the name of a software package for peptide and protein identification by tandem mass spectrometry. This software, which has only recently become commercially available, facilitates a much wider range of search possibilities than previous search software such as SEQUEST and Mascot. Byonic allows the user to define an essentially unlimited number of variable modification types. Byonic also allows the user to set a separate limit on the number of occurrences of each modification type, so that a search may consider only one or two chance modifications such as oxidations and deamidations per peptide, yet allow three or four biological modifications such as phosphorylations, which tend to cluster together. Hence Byonic can search for 10s or even 100s of modification types simultaneously without a prohibitively large combinatorial explosion. Byonic’s Wildcard Search™ allows the user to search for unanticipated or even unknown modifications alongside known modifications. Finally, Byonic’s Glycopeptide Search allows the user to identify glycopeptides without prior knowledge of glycan masses or glycosylation sites. PMID:23255153

  20. Small peptides as potent mimetics of the protein hormone erythropoietin.

    PubMed

    Wrighton, N C; Farrell, F X; Chang, R; Kashyap, A K; Barbone, F P; Mulcahy, L S; Johnson, D L; Barrett, R W; Jolliffe, L K; Dower, W J

    1996-07-26

    Random phage display peptide libraries and affinity selective methods were used to isolate small peptides that bind to and activate the receptor for the cytokine erythropoietin (EPO). In a panel of in vitro biological assays, the peptides act as full agonists and they can also stimulate erythropoiesis in mice. These agonists are represented by a 14- amino acid disulfide-bonded, cyclic peptide with the minimum consensus sequence YXCXXGPXTWXCXP, where X represents positions allowing occupation by several amino acids. The amino acid sequences of these peptides are not found in the primary sequence of EPO. The signaling pathways activated by these peptides appear to be identical to those induced by the natural ligand. This discovery may form the basis for the design of small molecule mimetics of EPO. PMID:8662529

  1. Effect of amino acid substitution in the hydrophobic face of amphiphilic peptides on membrane curvature and perturbation: N-terminal helix derived from adenovirus internal protein VI as a model.

    PubMed

    Murayama, Tomo; Pujals, Sílvia; Hirose, Hisaaki; Nakase, Ikuhiko; Futaki, Shiroh

    2016-11-01

    The N-terminal amphipathic helical segment of adenovirus internal protein VI (AdVpVI) plays a critical role in viral infection. Here, we report that the peptide segment corresponding to AdVpVI (positions 33-55) can induce positive membrane curvature together with membrane perturbation. The enhanced perturbation ability of the peptide was observed for membranes containing negatively charged phospholipids. Based on the liposome leakage assay, substitution of leucine at position 40 to other aliphatic (isoleucine) and aromatic (phenylalanine and tryptophan) residues yielded a similar degree of membrane perturbation by the peptides, which was considerably diminished by the substitution to glutamine. Further studies using the wild-type AdVpVI (33-55) (WT) and phenylalanine-substituted peptides (L40F) demonstrated that both peptides have positive membrane-curvature-inducing ability. These peptides showed higher binding affinity to 50-nm large unilamellar vesicles (LUVs) than to 200-nm LUVs. However, no enhanced perturbation by these peptides was observed for 50-nm LUVs compared to 200-nm LUVs, suggesting that both the original membrane curvature and the additional strain due to peptide insertion affect the membrane perturbation ability of these peptides. In the case of L40F, this peptide rather had a lower membrane perturbation ability for 50-nm LUVs than for 200-nm LUVs, which can be attributed to possible shallower binding of L40F on membranes. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Biopolymers (Pept Sci) 106: 430-439, 2016. PMID:27271816

  2. Probing protein sequences as sources for encrypted antimicrobial peptides.

    PubMed

    Brand, Guilherme D; Magalhães, Mariana T Q; Tinoco, Maria L P; Aragão, Francisco J L; Nicoli, Jacques; Kelly, Sharon M; Cooper, Alan; Bloch, Carlos

    2012-01-01

    Starting from the premise that a wealth of potentially biologically active peptides may lurk within proteins, we describe here a methodology to identify putative antimicrobial peptides encrypted in protein sequences. Candidate peptides were identified using a new screening procedure based on physicochemical criteria to reveal matching peptides within protein databases. Fifteen such peptides, along with a range of natural antimicrobial peptides, were examined using DSC and CD to characterize their interaction with phospholipid membranes. Principal component analysis of DSC data shows that the investigated peptides group according to their effects on the main phase transition of phospholipid vesicles, and that these effects correlate both to antimicrobial activity and to the changes in peptide secondary structure. Consequently, we have been able to identify novel antimicrobial peptides from larger proteins not hitherto associated with such activity, mimicking endogenous and/or exogenous microorganism enzymatic processing of parent proteins to smaller bioactive molecules. A biotechnological application for this methodology is explored. Soybean (Glycine max) plants, transformed to include a putative antimicrobial protein fragment encoded in its own genome were tested for tolerance against Phakopsora pachyrhizi, the causative agent of the Asian soybean rust. This procedure may represent an inventive alternative to the transgenic technology, since the genetic material to be used belongs to the host organism and not to exogenous sources. PMID:23029273

  3. Bacterial proteins and peptides in cancer therapy

    PubMed Central

    Chakrabarty, Ananda M; Bernardes, Nuno; Fialho, Arsenio M

    2014-01-01

    Cancer is one of the most deadly diseases worldwide. In the last three decades many efforts have been made focused on understanding how cancer grows and responds to drugs. The dominant drug-development paradigm has been the “one drug, one target.” Based on that, the two main targeted therapies developed to combat cancer include the use of tyrosine kinase inhibitors and monoclonal antibodies. Development of drug resistance and side effects represent the major limiting factors for their use in cancer treatment. Nowadays, a new paradigm for cancer drug discovery is emerging wherein multi-targeted approaches gain ground in cancer therapy. Therefore, to overcome resistance to therapy, it is clear that a new generation of drugs is urgently needed. Here, regarding the concept of multi-targeted therapy, we discuss the challenges of using bacterial proteins and peptides as a new generation of effective anti-cancer drugs. PMID:24875003

  4. Identification of short peptide sequences in complex milk protein hydrolysates.

    PubMed

    O'Keeffe, Martina B; FitzGerald, Richard J

    2015-10-01

    Numerous low molecular mass bioactive peptides (BAPs) can be generated during the hydrolysis of bovine milk proteins. Low molecular mass BAP sequences are less likely to be broken down by digestive enzymes and are thus more likely to be active in vivo. However, the identification of short peptides remains a challenge during mass spectrometry (MS) analysis due to issues with the transfer and over-fragmentation of low molecular mass ions. A method is described herein using time-of-flight ESI-MS/MS to effectively fragment and identify short peptides. This includes (a) short synthetic peptides, (b) short peptides within a defined hydrolysate sample, i.e. a prolyl endoproteinase hydrolysate of β-casein and (c) short peptides within a complex hydrolysate, i.e. a Corolase PP digest of sodium caseinate. The methodology may find widespread utilisation in the efficient identification of low molecular mass peptide sequences in food protein hydrolysates. PMID:25872436

  5. Group 3 LEA protein model peptides protect enzymes against desiccation stress.

    PubMed

    Furuki, Takao; Sakurai, Minoru

    2016-09-01

    We tested whether model peptides for group 3 late embryogenesis abundant (G3LEA) proteins, which we developed previously, are capable of maintaining the catalytic activities of enzymes dried in their presence. Three different peptides were compared: 1) PvLEA-22, which consists of two tandem repeats of the 11-mer motif found in G3LEA proteins from an African sleeping chironomid; 2) PvLEA-44, which is made of four tandem repeats of the same 11-mer motif; and 3) a peptide whose amino acid composition is the same as that of PvLEA-22, but whose sequence is scrambled. We selected two enzymes, lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) and β-d-galactosidase (BDG), as targets because they have different isoelectric point (pI) values, in the alkaline and acidic range, respectively. While these enzymes were almost inactivated when dried alone, their catalytic activity was preserved at ≥70% of native levels in the presence of any of the above three peptides. This degree of protection is comparable to that conferred by several full-length G3LEA proteins, as reported previously for LDH. Interestingly, the protective activity of the peptides was enhanced slightly when they were mixed with trehalose, especially when the molar content of the peptides was low. On the basis of these results, the G3LEA model peptides show promise as protectants for the dry preservation of enzymes/proteins with a wide range of pI values. PMID:27131872

  6. Purification and identification of novel antioxidant peptides from egg white protein and their antioxidant activities.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jingbo; Jin, Yan; Lin, Songyi; Jones, Gregory S; Chen, Feng

    2015-05-15

    The aim of this study was to isolate antioxidant peptides from egg white protein hydrolysates (EWPH) and identify novel antioxidant peptides by LC tandem mass spectrometric and mid-infrared spectroscopy (MIR). The amino acid composition of peptides was also analyzed by amino acid analyzer on the basis of ninhydrin reaction. Three novel peptides with molecular weights of 628.64 Da, 630.71 Da, and 684.1 Da were identified as Asp-His-Thr-Lys-Glu (DHTKE), Phe-Phe-Glu-Phe-His (FFGFN) and Met-Pro-Asp-Ala-His-Leu (MPDAHL), respectively. DHTKE exhibited the best oxygen radical absorbance capacity (P<0.05). The concentration of FFGFN and MPDAHL to scavenge 50% of DPPH radicals was 80 mM and 60mM, respectively. Thus, the three peptides may have potential applications as a functional food, which could also be used as nutraceutical compounds. PMID:25577078

  7. Information-driven modeling of protein-peptide complexes.

    PubMed

    Trellet, Mikael; Melquiond, Adrien S J; Bonvin, Alexandre M J J

    2015-01-01

    Despite their biological importance in many regulatory processes, protein-peptide recognition mechanisms are difficult to study experimentally at the structural level because of the inherent flexibility of peptides and the often transient interactions on which they rely. Complementary methods like biomolecular docking are therefore required. The prediction of the three-dimensional structure of protein-peptide complexes raises unique challenges for computational algorithms, as exemplified by the recent introduction of protein-peptide targets in the blind international experiment CAPRI (Critical Assessment of PRedicted Interactions). Conventional protein-protein docking approaches are often struggling with the high flexibility of peptides whose short sizes impede protocols and scoring functions developed for larger interfaces. On the other side, protein-small ligand docking methods are unable to cope with the larger number of degrees of freedom in peptides compared to small molecules and the typically reduced available information to define the binding site. In this chapter, we describe a protocol to model protein-peptide complexes using the HADDOCK web server, working through a test case to illustrate every steps. The flexibility challenge that peptides represent is dealt with by combining elements of conformational selection and induced fit molecular recognition theories. PMID:25555727

  8. Solid-state NMR studies of biomineralization peptides and proteins.

    PubMed

    Roehrich, Adrienne; Drobny, Gary

    2013-09-17

    unanswered. This is largely due to a lack of methods capable of providing high-resolution structural information for proteins adsorbed to material surfaces under physiologically relevant conditions. In this Account, we highlight recent work that is providing insight into the structure and crystal recognition mechanisms of a salivary protein model system, as well as the structure and interactions of a peptide that catalyzes the formation of biosilica composites. To develop a better understanding of the structure and interactions of proteins in biomaterials, we have used solid-state NMR techniques to determine the molecular structure and dynamics of proteins and peptides adsorbed onto inorganic crystal surfaces and embedded within biomineral composites. This work adds to the understanding of the structure and crystal recognition mechanisms of an acidic human salivary phosphoprotein, statherin. PMID:23932180

  9. Nanopore analysis of the effect of metal ions on the folding of peptides and proteins.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jeremy S

    2014-03-01

    In this minireview, the nanopore analysis of peptides and proteins in the presence of divalent metal ions will be surveyed. In all cases the binding of the metal ions causes the peptide or protein to adopt a more compact conformation which can no longer enter the α-hemolysin pore. In the absence of Zn(II) the 30-amino acid Zn-finger peptide can readily translocate the pore; but upon addition of Zn(II) the peptide folds and only bumping events are observed. Similarly, the octapeptide repeat from the N-terminus of the prion protein binds Cu(II), which prevents it from translocating. The full-length prion protein also undergoes conformational changes upon binding Cu(II), which results in an increase in the proportion of bumping events. Myelin basic protein of 170 residues is intrinsically disordered and, perhaps surprisingly, for a basic protein of this size, can translocate against the electric field based on the observation that the event time increases with increasing voltage. It, too, folds into a more compact conformation upon binding Cu(II) and Zn(II), which prevents translocation. Finally even proteins such as maltose binding protein which does not contain a formal binding site for metal ions undergoes conformational changes in the presence of the metal chelator, EDTA. Thus, contamination of proteins with trace metal ions should be considered when studying proteins and peptides by nanopore analysis. PMID:24370255

  10. Mutations in fd phage major coat protein modulate affinity of the displayed peptide

    PubMed Central

    Kuzmicheva, G.A.; Jayanna, P.K.; Eroshkin, A.M.; Grishina, M.A.; Pereyaslavskaya, E.S.; Potemkin, V.A.; Petrenko, V.A.

    2009-01-01

    Multibillion-clone libraries of phages displaying guest peptides fused to the major coat protein pVIII (landscape libraries) are a rich source of probes for proteinaceous and non-proteinaceous targets. As opposed to the pIII-type fusion phages, which display peptides as independent structural domains, the guest peptides in the pVIII-fusion phages can be structurally and functionally influenced by contiguous subunits. To decipher the impact of the locale of a guest peptide on its affinity characteristics, we constructed a library of phages carrying β-galactosidase-binding peptide ADTFAKSMQ at the N-terminus of the pVIII protein surrounded by random amino acids. It was found that mutagenesis of amino acids 12–19 (domain C) has polar effects on target binding affinity of the displayed peptide. The phages with highest affinity are characterized by: (i) a net electrostatic charge around −1 of domain C of the mutated phages at pH 7.0; (ii) a lower radius of cylinder coaxial to α-helix formed by domain C; (iii) a lower higher occupied molecular orbital (HOMO) of domain C leading to a decreased formation of hydrogen bonds and (iv) positively charged surface and torsion energy of domain C, which may require a conformational transition of N-terminal peptide ADTFAKSMQ for its binding with β-galactosidase. Influence of the guest peptide on the diversity of mutations in the neighboring landscape area was also observed. PMID:19633313

  11. Peptides Interfering 3A Protein Dimerization Decrease FMDV Multiplication

    PubMed Central

    de la Torre, Beatriz G.; Valle, Javier; Andreu, David; Sobrino, Francisco

    2015-01-01

    Nonstructural protein 3A is involved in relevant functions in foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) replication. FMDV 3A can form homodimers and preservation of the two hydrophobic α-helices (α1 and α2) that stabilize the dimer interface is essential for virus replication. In this work, small peptides mimicking residues involved in the dimer interface were used to interfere with dimerization and thus gain insight on its biological function. The dimer interface peptides α1, α2 and that spanning the two hydrophobic α-helices, α12, impaired in vitro dimer formation of a peptide containing the two α-helices, this effect being higher with peptide α12. To assess the effect of dimer inhibition in cultured cells, the interfering peptides were N-terminally fused to a heptaarginine (R7) sequence to favor their intracellular translocation. Thus, when fused to R7, interference peptides (100 μM) were able to inhibit dimerization of transiently expressed 3A, the higher inhibitions being found with peptides α1 and α12. The 3A dimerization impairment exerted by the peptides correlated with significant, specific reductions in the viral yield recovered from peptide-treated FMDV infected cells. In this case, α2 was the only peptide producing significant reductions at concentrations lower than 100 μM. Thus, dimer interface peptides constitute a tool to understand the structure-function relationship of this viral protein and point to 3A dimerization as a potential antiviral target. PMID:26505190

  12. Recent developments in protein and peptide parenteral delivery approaches

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Ashaben; Cholkar, Kishore; Mitra, Ashim K

    2014-01-01

    Discovery of insulin in the early 1900s initiated the research and development to improve the means of therapeutic protein delivery in patients. In the past decade, great emphasis has been placed on bringing protein and peptide therapeutics to market. Despite tremendous efforts, parenteral delivery still remains the major mode of administration for protein and peptide therapeutics. Other routes such as oral, nasal, pulmonary and buccal are considered more opportunistic rather than routine application. Improving biological half-life, stability and therapeutic efficacy is central to protein and peptide delivery. Several approaches have been tried in the past to improve protein and peptide in vitro/in vivo stability and performance. Approaches may be broadly categorized as chemical modification and colloidal delivery systems. In this review we have discussed various chemical approaches such as PEGylation, hyperglycosylation, mannosylation, and colloidal carriers including microparticles, nanoparticles, liposomes, carbon nanotubes and micelles for improving protein and peptide delivery. Recent developments on in situ thermosensitive gel-based protein and peptide delivery have also been described. This review summarizes recent developments on some currently existing approaches to improve stability, bioavailability and bioactivity of peptide and protein therapeutics following parenteral administration. PMID:24592957

  13. Genotoxicity assessment of peptide/protein-related biotherapeutics: points to consider before testing.

    PubMed

    Thybaud, Veronique; Kasper, Peter; Sobol, Zhanna; Elhajouji, Azeddine; Fellows, Mick; Guerard, Melanie; Lynch, Anthony M; Sutter, Andreas; Tanir, Jennifer Y

    2016-07-01

    The ICH S6(R1) recommendations on safety evaluation of biotherapeutics have led to uncertainty in determining what would constitute a cause for concern that would require genotoxicity testing. A Health and Environmental Sciences Institute's Genetic Toxicology Technical Committee Workgroup was formed to review the current practice of genotoxicity assessment of peptide/protein-related biotherapeutics. There are a number of properties of peptide/protein-related biotherapeutics that distinguish such products from traditional 'small molecule' drugs and need to be taken into consideration when assessing whether genotoxicity testing may be warranted and if so, how to do it appropriately. Case examples were provided by participating companies and decision trees were elaborated to determine whether and when genotoxicity evaluation is needed for peptides containing natural amino acids, non-natural amino acids and other chemical entities and for unconjugated and conjugated proteins. From a scientific point of view, there is no reason for testing peptides containing exclusively natural amino acids irrespective of the manufacturing process. If non-natural amino acids, organic linkers and other non-linker chemical components have already been tested for genotoxicity, there is no need to re-evaluate them when used in different peptide/protein-related biotherapeutics. Unless the peptides have been modified to be able to enter the cells, it is generally more appropriate to evaluate the peptides containing the non-natural amino acids and other non-linker chemical moieties in vivo where the cleavage products can be formed. For linkers, it is important to determine if exposure to reactive forms are likely to occur and from which origin. When the linkers are anticipated to be potential mutagenic impurities they should be evaluated according to ICH M7. If linkers are expected to be catabolic products, it is recommended to test the entire conjugate in vivo, as this would ensure that the

  14. Analysis of Endogenous D-Amino Acid-Containing Peptides in Metazoa

    PubMed Central

    Bai, Lu; Sheeley, Sarah; Sweedler, Jonathan V.

    2010-01-01

    Peptides are chiral molecules with their structure determined by the composition and configuration of their amino acid building blocks. The naturally occurring amino acids, except glycine, possess two chiral forms. This allows the formation of multiple peptide diastereomers that have the same sequence. Although living organisms use L-amino acids to make proteins, a group of D-amino acid-containing peptides (DAACPs) has been discovered in animals that have at least one of their residues isomerized to the D-form via an enzyme-catalyzed process. In many cases, the biological functions of these peptides are enhanced due to this structural conversion. These DAACPs are different from those known to occur in bacterial cell wall and antibiotic peptides, the latter of which are synthesized in a ribosome-independent manner. DAACPs have now also been identified in a number of distinct groups throughout the Metazoa. Their serendipitous discovery has often resulted from discrepancies observed in bioassays or in chromatographic behavior between natural peptide fractions and peptides synthesized according to a presumed all-L sequence. Because this L-to-D post-translational modification is subtle and not detectable by most sequence determination approaches, it is reasonable to suspect that many studies have overlooked this change; accordingly, DAACPs may be more prevalent than currently thought. Although diastereomer separation techniques developed with synthetic peptides in recent years have greatly aided in the discovery of natural DAACPs, there is a need for new, more robust methods for naturally complex samples. In this review, a brief history of DAACPs in animals is presented, followed by discussion of a variety of analytical methods that have been used for diastereomeric separation and detection of peptides. PMID:20490347

  15. Peptide folding in the presence of interacting protein crowders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bille, Anna; Mohanty, Sandipan; Irbäck, Anders

    2016-05-01

    Using Monte Carlo methods, we explore and compare the effects of two protein crowders, BPTI and GB1, on the folding thermodynamics of two peptides, the compact helical trp-cage and the β-hairpin-forming GB1m3. The thermally highly stable crowder proteins are modeled using a fixed backbone and rotatable side-chains, whereas the peptides are free to fold and unfold. In the simulations, the crowder proteins tend to distort the trp-cage fold, while having a stabilizing effect on GB1m3. The extent of the effects on a given peptide depends on the crowder type. Due to a sticky patch on its surface, BPTI causes larger changes than GB1 in the melting properties of the peptides. The observed effects on the peptides stem largely from attractive and specific interactions with the crowder surfaces, and differ from those seen in reference simulations with purely steric crowder particles.

  16. Peptide folding in the presence of interacting protein crowders.

    PubMed

    Bille, Anna; Mohanty, Sandipan; Irbäck, Anders

    2016-05-01

    Using Monte Carlo methods, we explore and compare the effects of two protein crowders, BPTI and GB1, on the folding thermodynamics of two peptides, the compact helical trp-cage and the β-hairpin-forming GB1m3. The thermally highly stable crowder proteins are modeled using a fixed backbone and rotatable side-chains, whereas the peptides are free to fold and unfold. In the simulations, the crowder proteins tend to distort the trp-cage fold, while having a stabilizing effect on GB1m3. The extent of the effects on a given peptide depends on the crowder type. Due to a sticky patch on its surface, BPTI causes larger changes than GB1 in the melting properties of the peptides. The observed effects on the peptides stem largely from attractive and specific interactions with the crowder surfaces, and differ from those seen in reference simulations with purely steric crowder particles. PMID:27155657

  17. Accurate mass spectrometry based protein quantification via shared peptides.

    PubMed

    Dost, Banu; Bandeira, Nuno; Li, Xiangqian; Shen, Zhouxin; Briggs, Steven P; Bafna, Vineet

    2012-04-01

    In mass spectrometry-based protein quantification, peptides that are shared across different protein sequences are often discarded as being uninformative with respect to each of the parent proteins. We investigate the use of shared peptides which are ubiquitous (~50% of peptides) in mass spectrometric data-sets for accurate protein identification and quantification. Different from existing approaches, we show how shared peptides can help compute the relative amounts of the proteins that contain them. Also, proteins with no unique peptide in the sample can still be analyzed for relative abundance. Our article uses shared peptides in protein quantification and makes use of combinatorial optimization to reduce the error in relative abundance measurements. We describe the topological and numerical properties required for robust estimates, and use them to improve our estimates for ill-conditioned systems. Extensive simulations validate our approach even in the presence of experimental error. We apply our method to a model of Arabidopsis thaliana root knot nematode infection, and investigate the differential role of several protein family members in mediating host response to the pathogen. PMID:22414154

  18. A peptide & peptide nucleic acid synthesis technology for transporter molecules and theranostics--the SPPS.

    PubMed

    Pipkorn, Ruediger; Braun, Klaus; Wiessler, Manfred; Waldeck, Waldemar; Schrenk, Hans-Hermann; Koch, Mario; Semmler, Wolfhard; Komljenovic, Dorde

    2014-01-01

    Advances in imaging diagnostics using magnetic resonance tomography (MRT), positron emission tomography (PET) and fluorescence imaging including near infrared (NIR) imaging methods are facilitated by constant improvement of the concepts of peptide synthesis. Feasible patient-specific theranostic platforms in the personalized medicine are particularly dependent on efficient and clinically applicable peptide constructs. The role of peptides in the interrelations between the structure and function of proteins is widely investigated, especially by using computer-assisted methods. Nowadays the solid phase synthesis (SPPS) chemistry emerges as a key technology and is considered as a promising methodology to design peptides for the investigation of molecular pharmacological processes at the transcriptional level. SPPS syntheses could be carried out in core facilities producing peptides for large-scale scientific implementations as presented here. PMID:24843319

  19. A Peptide & Peptide Nucleic Acid Synthesis Technology for Transporter Molecules and Theranostics - The SPPS

    PubMed Central

    Pipkorn, Ruediger; Braun, Klaus; Wiessler, Manfred; Waldeck, Waldemar; Schrenk, Hans-Hermann; Koch, Mario; Semmler, Wolfhard; Komljenovic, Dorde

    2014-01-01

    Advances in imaging diagnostics using magnetic resonance tomography (MRT), positron emission tomography (PET) and fluorescence imaging including near infrared (NIR) imaging methods are facilitated by constant improvement of the concepts of peptide synthesis. Feasible patient-specific theranostic platforms in the personalized medicine are particularly dependent on efficient and clinically applicable peptide constructs. The role of peptides in the interrelations between the structure and function of proteins is widely investigated, especially by using computer-assisted methods. Nowadays the solid phase synthesis (SPPS) chemistry emerges as a key technology and is considered as a promising methodology to design peptides for the investigation of molecular pharmacological processes at the transcriptional level. SPPS syntheses could be carried out in core facilities producing peptides for large-scale scientific implementations as presented here. PMID:24843319

  20. Structure and Energetic Contributions of a Designed Modular Peptide-Binding Protein with Picomolar Affinity.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Simon; Tremmel, Dirk; Madhurantakam, Chaithanya; Reichen, Christian; Mittl, Peer R E; Plückthun, Andreas

    2016-03-16

    Natural armadillo repeat proteins (nArmRP) like importin-α or β-catenin bind their target peptides such that each repeat interacts with a dipeptide unit within the stretched target peptide. However, this modularity is imperfect and also restricted to short peptide stretches of usually four to six consecutive amino acids. Here we report the development and characterization of a regularized and truly modular peptide-specific binding protein, based on designed armadillo repeat proteins (dArmRP), binding to peptides of alternating lysine and arginine residues (KR)n. dArmRP were obtained from nArmRP through cycles of extensive protein engineering, which rendered them more uniform. This regularity is reflected in the consistent binding of dArmRP to (KR)-peptides, where affinities depend on the lengths of target peptides and the number of internal repeats in a very systematic manner, thus confirming the modularity of the interaction. This exponential dependency between affinity and recognition length suggests that each module adds a constant increment of binding energy to sequence-specific recognition. This relationship was confirmed by comprehensive mutagenesis studies that also reveal the importance of individual peptide side chains. The 1.83 Å resolution crystal structure of a dArmRP with five identical internal repeats in complex with the cognate (KR)5 peptide proves a modular binding mode, where each dipeptide is recognized by one internal repeat. The confirmation of this true modularity over longer peptide stretches lays the ground for the design of binders with different specificities and tailored affinities by the assembly of dipeptide-specific modules based on armadillo repeats. PMID:26878586

  1. Synthetic RGD peptides derived from the adhesive domains of snake-venom proteins: evaluation as inhibitors of platelet aggregation.

    PubMed Central

    Lu, X; Deadman, J J; Williams, J A; Kakkar, V V; Rahman, S

    1993-01-01

    Synthetic peptides based on the RGD domains of the potent platelet aggregation inhibitors kistrin and dendroaspin were generated. The 13-amino-acid peptides were synthesized as dicysteinyl linear and disulphide cyclic forms. In platelet-aggregation studies, the cyclic peptides showed 3-fold better inhibition than their linear equivalents and approx. 100-fold greater potency than synthetic linear RGDS peptides derived from fibronectin. An amino acid substitution, Asp10-->Ala, in the kistrin-based peptide gave a 4-fold decrease in potency in the linear peptide, but produced a 2-fold elevation in the inhibitory activity of the cyclic form, generating a peptide of potency comparable with that of the parent protein. PMID:8250845

  2. Effects of APP 5-mer peptide analogue P165 on the synaptic proteins and insulin signal transduction proteins

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Bo; Hu, Peng; Lu, Shu-Jun; Wang, Rong; Du, Yi-Feng

    2014-01-01

    Diabetic encephalopathy (DE) is one of risk factors for Alzheimer’s disease (AD). Our previous findings indicated that DE animals had impairment of learning and memory and degeneration of hippocampal neurons, which could be improved by neurotrophic peptide. APP 17-mer peptide is a synthesized peptide sequenced from soluble amyloid precursor protein. APP 17-mer peptide has neural protective effect, but is susceptible to enzyme degradation. Soluble APP 5-mer peptide is the active form of APP 17-mer peptide, and composed of arginine, glutamic acid, arginine, methionine and serine. P165, an APP 5-mer peptide analog reconstructed by our lab, is resistant to enzyme degradation, and can be orally used to protect neurons. In the present study, high glucose and Aβ25-35 were used to cause injury to human neuroblastoma cell line SH-SY5Y in vitro, and streptozotocin was used to induce diabetes in mice in vivo. The changes in synaptic proteins and proteins of insulin signal transduction which closely correlate with learning and memory were detected in these cells and the brain of mice. Results showed that P165 could up-regulate the expression of α-synuclein and insulin receptor (IR), down-regulate the expression of insulin receptor substrate-1 (IRS-1), PSD-95, Shank1 and MAPK expression. All these findings suggest that nicorandil might be a potential drug used for the treatment of AD. PMID:24753747

  3. Signal peptides are allosteric activators of the protein translocase.

    PubMed

    Gouridis, Giorgos; Karamanou, Spyridoula; Gelis, Ioannis; Kalodimos, Charalampos G; Economou, Anastassios

    2009-11-19

    Extra-cytoplasmic polypeptides are usually synthesized as 'preproteins' carrying amino-terminal, cleavable signal peptides and secreted across membranes by translocases. The main bacterial translocase comprises the SecYEG protein-conducting channel and the peripheral ATPase motor SecA. Most proteins destined for the periplasm and beyond are exported post-translationally by SecA. Preprotein targeting to SecA is thought to involve signal peptides and chaperones like SecB. Here we show that signal peptides have a new role beyond targeting: they are essential allosteric activators of the translocase. On docking on their binding groove on SecA, signal peptides act in trans to drive three successive states: first, 'triggering' that drives the translocase to a lower activation energy state; second, 'trapping' that engages non-native preprotein mature domains docked with high affinity on the secretion apparatus; and third, 'secretion' during which trapped mature domains undergo several turnovers of translocation in segments. A significant contribution by mature domains renders signal peptides less critical in bacterial secretory protein targeting than currently assumed. Rather, it is their function as allosteric activators of the translocase that renders signal peptides essential for protein secretion. A role for signal peptides and targeting sequences as allosteric activators may be universal in protein translocases. PMID:19924216

  4. From amino acid sequence to bioactivity: The biomedical potential of antitumor peptides.

    PubMed

    Blanco-Míguez, Aitor; Gutiérrez-Jácome, Alberto; Pérez-Pérez, Martín; Pérez-Rodríguez, Gael; Catalán-García, Sandra; Fdez-Riverola, Florentino; Lourenço, Anália; Sánchez, Borja

    2016-06-01

    Chemoprevention is the use of natural and/or synthetic substances to block, reverse, or retard the process of carcinogenesis. In this field, the use of antitumor peptides is of interest as, (i) these molecules are small in size, (ii) they show good cell diffusion and permeability, (iii) they affect one or more specific molecular pathways involved in carcinogenesis, and (iv) they are not usually genotoxic. We have checked the Web of Science Database (23/11/2015) in order to collect papers reporting on bioactive peptide (1691 registers), which was further filtered searching terms such as "antiproliferative," "antitumoral," or "apoptosis" among others. Works reporting the amino acid sequence of an antiproliferative peptide were kept (60 registers), and this was complemented with the peptides included in CancerPPD, an extensive resource for antiproliferative peptides and proteins. Peptides were grouped according to one of the following mechanism of action: inhibition of cell migration, inhibition of tumor angiogenesis, antioxidative mechanisms, inhibition of gene transcription/cell proliferation, induction of apoptosis, disorganization of tubulin structure, cytotoxicity, or unknown mechanisms. The main mechanisms of action of those antiproliferative peptides with known amino acid sequences are presented and finally, their potential clinical usefulness and future challenges on their application is discussed. PMID:27010507

  5. Peptide biosensors for the electrochemical measurement of protein kinase activity.

    PubMed

    Kerman, Kagan; Song, Haifeng; Duncan, James S; Litchfield, David W; Kraatz, Heinz-Bernhard

    2008-12-15

    The kinase activities are elucidated using the novel redox-active cosubstrate adenosine 5'-[gamma-ferrocene] triphosphate (Fc-ATP), which enables the kinase-catalyzed transfer of a redox active gamma-phosphate-Fc to a hydroxyamino acid. In this report, a versatile electrochemical biosensor is developed for monitoring the activity and inhibition of a serine/threonine kinase, casein kinase 2 (CK2), and protein tyrosine kinases, Abl1-T315I and HER2, in buffered solutions and in cell lysates. The method is based on the labeling of a specific phosphorylation event with Fc, followed by electrochemical detection. The electrochemical response obtained from the "ferrocenylated" peptides enables monitoring the activity of the kinase and its substrate, as well as the inhibition of small molecule inhibitors on protein phosphorylation. Kinetic information was extracted from the electrochemical measurements for the determination of K(m) and V(m) values, which were in agreement with those previously reported. Kinase reactions were also performed in the presence of well-defined inhibitors of CK2, 4,5,6,7-tetrabromo-2-azabenzimidazole, 2-dimethylamino-4,5,6,7-tetrabromo-1H-benzimidazole, and E-3-(2,3,4,5-tetrabromophenyl)acrylic acid as well as the nonspecific kinase inhibitors, staurosporine and N-benzoylstaurosporine. On the basis of the dependency of the Fc signal on inhibitor concentration, K(i) of the inhibitors was estimated, which were also in agreement with the literature values. The performance of the biosensor was optimized including the kinase reaction, incubation with Fc-ATP, and the small molecule inhibitors. Peptide modified electrochemical biosensors are promising candidates for cost-effective in vitro kinase activity and inhibitor screening assays. PMID:18989981

  6. Current trends in mass spectrometry of peptides and proteins: Application to veterinary and sports-doping control.

    PubMed

    van den Broek, Irene; Blokland, Marco; Nessen, Merel A; Sterk, Saskia

    2015-01-01

    Detection of misuse of peptides and proteins as growth promoters is a major issue for sport and food regulatory agencies. The limitations of current analytical detection strategies for this class of compounds, in combination with their efficacy in growth-promoting effects, make peptide and protein drugs highly susceptible to abuse by either athletes or farmers who seek for products to illicitly enhance muscle growth. Mass spectrometry (MS) for qualitative analysis of peptides and proteins is well-established, particularly due to tremendous efforts in the proteomics community. Similarly, due to advancements in targeted proteomic strategies and the rapid growth of protein-based biopharmaceuticals, MS for quantitative analysis of peptides and proteins is becoming more widely accepted. These continuous advances in MS instrumentation and MS-based methodologies offer enormous opportunities for detection and confirmation of peptides and proteins. Therefore, MS seems to be the method of choice to improve the qualitative and quantitative analysis of peptide and proteins with growth-promoting properties. This review aims to address the opportunities of MS for peptide and protein analysis in veterinary control and sports-doping control with a particular focus on detection of illicit growth promotion. An overview of potential peptide and protein targets, including their amino acid sequence characteristics and current MS-based detection strategies is, therefore, provided. Furthermore, improvements of current and new detection strategies with state-of-the-art MS instrumentation are discussed for qualitative and quantitative approaches. PMID:24375671

  7. MINLP models for the synthesis of optimal peptide tags and downstream protein processing.

    PubMed

    Simeonidis, Evangelos; Pinto, Jose M; Lienqueo, M Elena; Tsoka, Sophia; Papageorgiou, Lazaros G

    2005-01-01

    The development of systematic methods for the synthesis of downstream protein processing operations has seen growing interest in recent years, as purification is often the most complex and costly stage in biochemical production plants. The objective of the work presented here is to develop mathematical models based on mixed integer optimization techniques, which integrate the selection of optimal peptide purification tags into an established framework for the synthesis of protein purification processes. Peptide tags are comparatively short sequences of amino acids fused onto the protein product, capable of reducing the required purification steps. The methodology is illustrated through its application on two example protein mixtures involving up to 13 contaminants and a set of 11 candidate chromatographic steps. The results are indicative of the benefits resulting by the appropriate use of peptide tags in purification processes and provide a guideline for both optimal tag design and downstream process synthesis. PMID:15932268

  8. Short peptide tag for covalent protein labeling based on coiled coils.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jianpeng; Yu, Yongsheng; Xia, Jiang

    2014-01-15

    To label proteins covalently, one faces a trade-off between labeling a protein specifically and using a small tag. Often one must compromise one parameter for the other or use additional components, such as an enzyme, to satisfy both requirements. Here, we report a new reaction that covalently labels proteins by using engineered coiled-coil peptides. Harnessing the concept of "proximity-induced reactivity", the 21-amino-acid three-heptad peptides CCE/CCK were modified with a nucleophilic cysteine and an α-chloroacetyl group at selected positions. When pairs of coiled coils associated, an irreversible covalent bond spontaneously formed between the peptides. The specificity of the cross-linking reaction was characterized, the probes were improved by making them bivalent, and the system was used to label a protein in vitro and receptors on the surface of mammalian cells. PMID:24341800

  9. Disulphide bonds in wheat gluten: cystine peptides derived from gluten proteins following peptic and thermolytic digestion.

    PubMed

    Keck, B; Köhler, P; Wieser, H

    1995-06-01

    Gluten from the wheat variety Rektor was extracted with 70% aqueous ethanol. The insoluble portion (whole glutenin) was partially hydrolysed with trypsin at pH 6.5 and separated on a Sephadex G25 column. The high molecular weight fraction 1 was further hydrolysed with pepsin at pH 2.0. To remove low molecular weight proteins, a portion of whole glutenin was extracted with dilute acetic acid. The residue (enriched glutenin), which contained mostly LMW and HMW subunits of glutenin, was hydrolysed with thermolysin at pH 6.5. The peptic and tryptic hydrolysates were separated on a Sephadex G25 column and the peptide fractions with the highest cystine content were separated further by reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography (RP-HPLC). Cystine peptides were detected by differential chromatography (RP-HPLC prior to and after reduction of disulphide bonds) and then isolated by preparative RP-HPLC. After reduction, cysteine peptides were alkylated and analysed for their amino acid sequence. Altogether, 19 cystine peptides were characterized and assigned to known sequences of gluten proteins; 16 peptides confirmed the positions of disulphide bonds present in LMW subunits and gamma-gliadins, as described previously. For the first time, a cystine peptide has been isolated, representing an intermolecular disulphide bond between the y-type of HMW and LMW subunits. Furthermore, a cystine peptide was assigned to gamma-gliadins; thus, all cysteine residues of gamma-gliadins are documented by at least one cystine peptide. One peptide analysed came from the alpha-amylase inhibitor CM 16. Altogether the results indicate that the intramolecular linkages of gluten proteins are not formed at random, but are strongly directed.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7668061

  10. Intracellular protein delivery activity of peptides derived from insulin-like growth factor binding proteins 3 and 5

    SciTech Connect

    Goda, Natsuko; Tenno, Takeshi; Inomata, Kosuke; Shirakawa, Masahiro; Tanaka, Toshiki; Hiroaki, Hidekazu

    2008-08-01

    Insulin-like growth factor binding proteins (IGFBPs) have various IGF-independent cellular activities, including receptor-independent cellular uptake followed by transcriptional regulation, although mechanisms of cellular entry remain unclear. Herein, we focused on their receptor-independent cellular entry mechanism in terms of protein transduction domain (PTD) activity, which is an emerging technique useful for clinical applications. The peptides of 18 amino acid residues derived from IGFBP-3 and IGFBP-5, which involve heparin-binding regions, mediated cellular delivery of an exogenous protein into NIH3T3 and HeLa cells. Relative protein delivery activities of IGFBP-3/5-derived peptides were approximately 20-150% compared to that of the HIV-Tat peptide, a potent PTD. Heparin inhibited the uptake of the fusion proteins with IGFBP-3 and IGFBP-5, indicating that the delivery pathway is heparin-dependent endocytosis, similar to that of HIV-Tat. The delivery of GST fused to HIV-Tat was competed by either IGFBP-3 or IGFBP-5-derived synthetic peptides. Therefore, the entry pathways of the three PTDs are shared. Our data has shown a new approach for designing protein delivery systems using IGFBP-3/5 derived peptides based on the molecular mechanisms of IGF-independent activities of IGFBPs.

  11. Noninvasive Routes of Proteins and Peptides Drug Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Jitendra; Sharma, P. K.; Bansal, Sumedha; Banik, Arunabha

    2011-01-01

    Recent advances in the field of pharmaceutical biotechnology have led to the formulation of many protein and peptide-based drugs for therapeutic and clinical application. The route of administration has a significant impact on the therapeutic outcome of a drug. The needle and syringe is a well established choice of protein and peptide delivery which has some drawback related to patient and to formulation such as pain, cost, sterility etc. Thus, the noninvasive routes which were of minor importance as parts of drug delivery in the past have assumed added importance in protein and peptide drug delivery and these include nasal, ophthalmic, buccal, vaginal, transdermal and pulmonary routes. The pharmaceutical scientists have some approaches to develop the formulations for protein and peptide delivery by noninvasive routes. But, due to the physiochemical instability and enzymatic barrier of proteins and peptides there are several hurdle to develop suitable formulation. So there is need of penetration enhancers, enzyme inhibitors and suitable vehicles for noninvasive delivery to increase the bioavailability. In this review, the aim is to focus on the approaches to formulation of protein and peptide based drug administration by noninvasive route. PMID:22707818

  12. Positive Charge of “Sticky” Peptides and Proteins Impedes Release From Negatively Charged PLGA Matrices

    PubMed Central

    Balmert, Stephen C.; Zmolek, Andrew C.; Glowacki, Andrew J.; Knab, Timothy D.; Rothstein, Sam N.; Wokpetah, Joseph M.; Fedorchak, Morgan V.; Little, Steven R.

    2015-01-01

    The influence of electrostatic interactions and/or acylation on release of charged (“sticky”) agents from biodegradable polymer matrices was systematically characterized. We hypothesized that release of peptides with positive charge would be hindered from negatively charged poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) microparticles. Thus, we investigated release of peptides with different degrees of positive charge from several PLGA microparticle formulations, with different molecular weights and/or end groups (acid- or ester-terminated). Indeed, release studies revealed distinct inverse correlations between the amount of positive charge on peptides and their release rates from each PLGA microparticle formulation. Furthermore, we examined the case of peptides with net charge that changes from negative to positive within the pH range observed in degrading microparticles. These charge changing peptides displayed counterintuitive release kinetics, initially releasing faster from slower degrading (less acidic) microparticles, and releasing slower from the faster degrading (more acidic) microparticles. Importantly, trends between agent charge and release rates for model peptides also translated to larger, therapeutically relevant proteins and oligonucleotides. The results of these studies may improve future design of controlled release systems for numerous therapeutic biomolecules exhibiting positive charge, ultimately reducing time-consuming and costly trial and error iterations of such formulations. PMID:26085928

  13. Immunization with synthetic peptides containing epitopes of the class 1 outer-membrane protein of Neisseria meningitidis: production of bactericidal antibodies on immunization with a cyclic peptide.

    PubMed

    Christodoulides, M; McGuinness, B T; Heckels, J E

    1993-08-01

    The class 1 outer-membrane protein of Neisseria meningitidis is the target for subtype-specific, bactericidal monoclonal antibodies (mAbs). The epitopes recognized by these antibodies have been mapped previously to linear peptides corresponding to the sequences thought to be exposed at the apices of surface-exposed loops of the protein. In this work several synthetic peptides containing the subtype Pl.16b epitope have been synthetized with the aim of inducing a polyclonal immune response resembling the reactivity of the mAbs. Initially, peptides of 9 and 15 amino acid residues were synthesized and used for immunization after coupling to a carrier protein. The reactivity of the resulting antisera, with synthetic linear decapeptides, resembled that seen in previous epitope mapping experiments with the protective mAbs. However, despite the induction of antibodies having the desired specificity, the antisera reacted poorly with the native protein in outer membranes, and were non-bactericidal. A 36mer peptide, consisting of the entire surface-exposed loop 4 of the class 1 protein was then synthesized and used for immunization as (i) free peptide, (ii) peptide coupled to carrier and (iii) peptide subjected to cyclization, in an attempt to restrict it to conformations that might more closely resemble the native loop structure. In contrast to antisera raised against linear peptides, antibodies raised by immunization with the 36mer cyclic peptide, did not react with linear peptides recognized by the mAbs, but instead appeared to recognize conformational determinants. This antiserum promoted complement-mediated bactericidal killing of the homologous meningococcal strain, demonstrating the potential of synthetic peptide immunogens for inducing a protective immune response against group B meningococci. PMID:7691983

  14. Peptides and proteins in matter wave interferometry: Challenges and prospects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sezer, Ugur; Geyer, Philipp; Mairhofer, Lukas; Brand, Christian; Doerre, Nadine; Rodewald, Jonas; Schaetti, Jonas; Koehler, Valentin; Mayor, Marcel; Arndt, Markus

    2016-05-01

    Recent developments in matter wave physics suggest that quantum interferometry with biologically relevant nanomaterials is becoming feasible for amino acids, peptides, proteins and RNA/DNA strands. Quantum interference of biomolecules is interesting as it can mimic Schrödinger's cat states with molecules of high mass, elevated temperature and biological functionality. Additionally, the high internal complexity can give rise to a rich variety of couplings to the environment and new handles for quantitative tests of quantum decoherence. Finally, matter wave interferometers are highly sensitive force sensors and pave the way for quantum-assisted measurements of biomolecular properties in interaction with tailored or biomimetic environments. Recent interferometer concepts such as the Kapitza-Dirac-Talbot-Lau interferometer (KDTLI) or the Optical Time-domain Matter Wave interferometer (OTIMA) have already proven their potential for quantum optics in the mass range beyond 10000 amu and for metrology. Here we show our advances in quantum interferometry with vitamins and peptides and discuss methods of realizing cold, intense and sufficiently slow beams of synthetically tailored or hydrated polypeptides with promising properties for a new generation of quantum optics.

  15. Isolation, Purification and Molecular Mechanism of a Peanut Protein-Derived ACE-Inhibitory Peptide

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Aimin; Liu, Hongzhi; Liu, Li; Hu, Hui; Wang, Qiang; Adhikari, Benu

    2014-01-01

    Although a number of bioactive peptides are capable of angiotensin I-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitory effects, little is known regarding the mechanism of peanut peptides using molecular simulation. The aim of this study was to obtain ACE inhibiting peptide from peanut protein and provide insight on the molecular mechanism of its ACE inhibiting action. Peanut peptides having ACE inhibitory activity were isolated through enzymatic hydrolysis and ultrafiltration. Further chromatographic fractionation was conducted to isolate a more potent peanut peptide and its antihypertensive activity was analyzed through in vitro ACE inhibitory tests and in vivo animal experiments. MALDI-TOF/TOF-MS was used to identify its amino acid sequence. Mechanism of ACE inhibition of P8 was analyzed using molecular docking and molecular dynamics simulation. A peanut peptide (P8) having Lys-Leu-Tyr-Met-Arg-Pro amino acid sequence was obtained which had the highest ACE inhibiting activity of 85.77% (half maximal inhibitory concentration (IC50): 0.0052 mg/ml). This peanut peptide is a competitive inhibitor and show significant short term (12 h) and long term (28 days) antihypertensive activity. Dynamic tests illustrated that P8 can be successfully docked into the active pocket of ACE and can be combined with several amino acid residues. Hydrogen bond, electrostatic bond and Pi-bond were found to be the three main interaction contributing to the structural stability of ACE-peptide complex. In addition, zinc atom could form metal-carboxylic coordination bond with Tyr, Met residues of P8, resulting into its high ACE inhibiting activity. Our finding indicated that the peanut peptide (P8) having a Lys-Leu-Tyr-Met-Arg-Pro amino acid sequence can be a promising candidate for functional foods and prescription drug aimed at control of hypertension. PMID:25347076

  16. Intracellular Delivery of Proteins via Fusion Peptides in Intact Plants

    PubMed Central

    Ng, Kiaw Kiaw; Motoda, Yoko; Watanabe, Satoru; Sofiman Othman, Ahmad; Kigawa, Takanori; Kodama, Yutaka; Numata, Keiji

    2016-01-01

    In current plant biotechnology, the introduction of exogenous DNA encoding desired traits is the most common approach used to modify plants. However, general plant transformation methods can cause random integration of exogenous DNA into the plant genome. To avoid these events, alternative methods, such as a direct protein delivery system, are needed to modify the plant. Although there have been reports of the delivery of proteins into cultured plant cells, there are currently no methods for the direct delivery of proteins into intact plants, owing to their hierarchical structures. Here, we demonstrate the efficient fusion-peptide-based delivery of proteins into intact Arabidopsis thaliana. Bovine serum albumin (BSA, 66 kDa) was selected as a model protein to optimize conditions for delivery into the cytosol. The general applicability of our method to large protein cargo was also demonstrated by the delivery of alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH, 150 kDa) into the cytosol. The compatibility of the fusion peptide system with the delivery of proteins to specific cellular organelles was also demonstrated using the fluorescent protein Citrine (27 kDa) conjugated to either a nuclear localization signal (NLS) or a peroxisomal targeting signal (PTS). In conclusion, our designed fusion peptide system can deliver proteins with a wide range of molecular weights (27 to 150 kDa) into the cells of intact A. thaliana without interfering with the organelle-targeting peptide conjugated to the protein. We expect that this efficient protein delivery system will be a powerful tool in plant biotechnology. PMID:27100681

  17. Nucleic acids, proteins, and chirality

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Usher, D. A.; Profy, A. T.; Walstrum, S. A.; Needels, M. C.; Bulack, S. C.; Lo, K. M.

    1984-01-01

    The present investigation is concerned with experimental results related, in one case, to the chirality of nucleotides, and, in another case, to the possibility of a link between the chirality of nucleic acids, and that of peptides. It has been found that aminoacylation of the 'internal' hydroxyl group of a dinucleoside monophosphate can occur stereoselectively. However, this reaction has not yet been made a part of a working peptide synthesis scheme. The formation and cleavage of oligonucleotides is considered. In the event of the formation of a helical complex between the oligonucleotide and the polymer, 1-prime,5-prime-bonds in the oligomer are found to become more resistant towards cleavage. The conditions required for peptide bond formation are examined, taking into account the known structures of RNA and possible mechanisms for prebiotic peptide bond formation. The possibility is considered that the 2-prime,5-prime-internucleotide linkage could have played an important part in the early days of biological peptide synthesis.

  18. Quantitative prediction of peptide binding to HLA-DP1 protein.

    PubMed

    Ivanov, Stefan; Dimitrov, Ivan; Doytchinova, Irini

    2013-01-01

    The exogenous proteins are processed by the host antigen-processing cells. Peptidic fragments of them are presented on the cell surface bound to the major hystocompatibility complex (MHC) molecules class II and recognized by the CD4+ T lymphocytes. The MHC binding is considered as the crucial prerequisite for T-cell recognition. Only peptides able to form stable complexes with the MHC proteins are recognized by the T-cells. These peptides are known as T-cell epitopes. All T-cell epitopes are MHC binders, but not all MHC binders are T-cell epitopes. The T-cell epitope prediction is one of the main priorities of immunoinformatics. In the present study, three chemometric techniques are combined to derive a model for in silico prediction of peptide binding to the human MHC class II protein HLA-DP1. The structures of a set of known peptide binders are described by amino acid z-descriptors. Data are processed by an iterative self-consisted algorithm using the method of partial least squares, and a quantitative matrix (QM) for peptide binding prediction to HLA-DP1 is derived. The QM is validated by two sets of proteins and showed an average accuracy of 86 percent. PMID:24091413

  19. Interaction of linear cationic peptides with phospholipid membranes and polymers of sialic acid.

    PubMed

    Kuznetsov, A S; Dubovskii, P V; Vorontsova, O V; Feofanov, A V; Efremov, R G

    2014-05-01

    Polysialic acid (PSA) is a natural anionic polymer typically occurring on the outer surface of cell membranes. PSA is involved in cell signaling and intermolecular interactions with proteins and peptides. The antimicrobial potential of peptides is usually evaluated in model membranes consisting of lipid bilayers but devoid of either PSA or its analogs. The goal of this work was to investigate the possible effect of PSA on the structure of melittin (Mlt) and latarcins Ltc1K, Ltc2a, and the activity of these peptides with respect to model membranes. These peptides are linear cationic ones derived from the venom of bee (Mlt) and spider (both latarcins). The length of each of the peptides is 26 amino acid residues, and they all have antimicrobial activity. However, they differ with respect to conformational mobility, hydrophobic characteristics, and overall charge. In this work, using circular dichroism spectroscopy, we show that the peptides adopt an α-helical conformation upon interaction with either PSA or phospholipid liposomes formed of either zwitterionic or anionic phospholipids or their mixtures. The extent of helicity depends on the amino acid sequence and properties of the medium. Based on small angle X-ray scattering data and the analysis of the fluorescence spectrum of the Trp residue in Mlt, we conclude that the peptide forms an oligomeric complex consisting of α-helical Mlt and several PSA molecules. Both latarcins, unlike Mlt, the most hydrophobic of the peptides, interact weakly with zwitterionic liposomes. However, they bind anionic liposomes or those composed of anionic/zwitterionic lipid mixtures. Latarcin Ltc1K forms associates on liposomes composed of zwitterionic/anionic lipid mixture. The structure of the peptide associates is either disordered or of β-sheet conformation. In all other cases the studied peptides adopt predominately α-helical conformation. In addition, we demonstrate that PSA inhibits membranolytic activity of Mlt and latarcin

  20. The protein and peptide mediated syntheses of non-biologically-produced oxide materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dickerson, Matthew B.

    Numerous examples exist in nature of organisms which have evolved the ability to produce sophisticated structures composed of inorganic minerals. Studies of such biomineralizing organisms have suggested that specialized biomolecules are, in part, responsible for the controlled formation of these structures. The research detailed in this dissertation is focused on the use of biomolecules (i.e., peptides and proteins) to form non-biologically produced materials under mild reaction conditions (i.e., neutral pH, aqueous solutions, and room temperature). The peptides utilized in the studies detailed in this dissertation were identified through the screening of single crystal rutile TiO2 substrates or Ge powder with a phagedisplayed peptide library. Twenty-one peptides were identified which possessed an affinity for Ge. Three of these twenty one peptides were tested for germania precipitation activity. Those peptides possessing a basic isoelectric point as well as hydroxyl- and imidazole-containing amino acid residues were found to be the most effective in precipitating amorphous germania from an alkoxide precursor. The phage-displayed peptide library screening of TiO2 substrates yielded twenty peptides. Four of these peptides, which were heavily enriched in histidine and/or basic amino acid residues, were found to possess signficant titania precipitation activity. The activity of these peptides was found to correlate with the number of positive charges they carried. The sequence of the most active of the library-identified peptides was modified to yield two additional peptides. The titania precipitation activity of these designed peptides was higher than the parent peptide, with reduced pH dependence. The titania materials generated by the library-identified and designed peptides were found to be composed of amorphous titania as well as <10 nm anatase and/or monoclinic TiO2 crystallites. The production of titania and zirconia resulting from the interaction of the

  1. Synthesis of all nineteen appropriately protected chiral alpha-hydroxy acid equivalents of the alpha-amino acids for Boc solid-phase depsi-peptide synthesis.

    PubMed

    Deechongkit, Songpon; You, Shu-Li; Kelly, Jeffery W

    2004-02-19

    [reaction: see text] The preparation of depsi-peptides, amide-to-ester-substituted peptides used to probe the role of hydrogen bonding in protein folding energetics, is accomplished by replacing specific l-alpha-amino acid residues by their alpha-hydroxy acid counterparts in a solid-phase synthesis employing a t-Boc strategy. Herein we describe the efficient stereoselective synthesis of all 19 appropriately protected alpha-hydroxy acid equivalents of the l-alpha-amino acids, employing commercially available materials, expanding the number of available alpha-hydroxy acids from 9 to 19. PMID:14961607

  2. Redesign of a Protein-peptide Interaction: Characterization and Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Jackrel, M.; Valverde, R; Regan, L

    2009-01-01

    The design of protein-peptide interactions has a wide array of practical applications and also reveals insight into the basis for molecular recognition. Here, we present the redesign of a tetratricopeptide repeat (TPR) protein scaffold, along with its corresponding peptide ligand. We show that the binding properties of these protein-peptide pairs can be understood, quantitatively, using straightforward chemical considerations. The recognition pairs we have developed are also practically useful for the specific identification of tagged proteins. We demonstrate the facile replacement of these proteins, which we have termed T-Mods (TPR-based recognition module), for antibodies in both detection and purification applications. The new protein-peptide pair has a dissociation constant that is weaker than typical antibody-antigen interactions, yet the recognition pair is highly specific and we have shown that this affinity is sufficient for both Western blotting and affinity purification. Moreover, we demonstrate that this more moderate affinity is actually advantageous for purification applications, because extremely harsh conditions are not required to dissociate the T-Mod-peptide interaction. The results we present are important, not only because they represent a successful application of protein design but also because they help define the properties that should be sought in other scaffolds that are being developed as antibody replacements.

  3. Anti-HIV screening for cell-penetrating peptides using chloroquine and identification of anti-HIV peptides derived from matrix proteins.

    PubMed

    Mizuguchi, Takaaki; Ohashi, Nami; Nomura, Wataru; Komoriya, Mao; Hashimoto, Chie; Yamamoto, Naoki; Murakami, Tsutomu; Tamamura, Hirokazu

    2015-08-01

    Previously, compounds which inhibit the HIV-1 replication cycle were found in overlapping peptide libraries covering the whole sequence of an HIV-1 matrix (MA) protein constructed with the addition of an octa-arginyl group. The two top lead compounds are sequential fragments MA-8L and MA-9L. In the present study, the addition of chloroquine in cell-based anti-HIV assays was proven to be an efficient method with which to find anti-HIV compounds among several peptides conjugated by cell-penetrating signals such as an octa-arginyl group: the conjugation of an octa-arginyl group to individual peptides contained in whole proteins in combination with the addition of chloroquine in cells is a useful assay method to search active peptides. To find more potent fragment peptides, individual peptides between MA-8L and MA-9L, having the same peptide chain length but with sequences shifted by one amino acid residue, were synthesized in this paper and their anti-HIV activity was evaluated with an anti-HIV assay using chloroquine. As a result, the peptides in the C-terminal side of the series, which are relatively close to MA-9L, showed more potent inhibitory activity against both X4-HIV-1 and R5-HIV-1 than the peptides in the N-terminal side. PMID:26094944

  4. One-pot nanoparticulation of potentially bioactive peptides and gallic acid encapsulation.

    PubMed

    Nourbakhsh, Himan; Madadlou, Ashkan; Emam-Djomeh, Zahra; Wang, Yi-Cheng; Gunasekaran, Sundaram

    2016-11-01

    Whey protein isolate was hydrolyzed to an in vitro antioxidative hydrolysate, followed by transglutaminase-induced cross-linking and microemulsification in an oil phase. The obtained microemulsion was then dispersed in a gallic acid-rich model wastewater which caused gallic acid transportation into internal nanodroplets. Whey peptides were consequently gelled, yielding nanoparticles. Electrophoresis showed that β-lactoglobulin and low molecular weight peptides were cross-linked by transglutaminase. Protein hydrolysis and subsequent enzymatic cross-linking increased the ζ-potential value. Microscopic investigation indicated that most particles were non-spherical. Non-cross-linked and cross-linked peptides underwent a form of heat-triggered self-assembly in the dry state, while nanoparticles did not show such behavior. Peptide crystallites size was increased by cross-linking and acid-induced particle formation. The latter also caused a reduction in intensity of C-H stretching and C-N bending peaks in infra-red spectrum. Gallic acid release from particles to simulated gastrointestinal fluids was through diffusion from swollen particles, and reached almost 70% release. PMID:27211653

  5. Design and characterization of an acid-activated antimicrobial peptide.

    PubMed

    Li, Lina; He, Jian; Eckert, Randal; Yarbrough, Daniel; Lux, Renate; Anderson, Maxwell; Shi, Wenyuan

    2010-01-01

    Dental caries is a microbial biofilm infection in which the metabolic activities of plaque bacteria result in a dramatic pH decrease and shift the demineralization/remineralization equilibrium on the tooth surface towards demineralization. In addition to causing a net loss in tooth minerals, creation of an acidic environment favors growth of acid-enduring and acid-generating species, which causes further reduction in the plaque pH. In this study, we developed a prototype antimicrobial peptide capable of achieving high activity exclusively at low environmental pH to target bacterial species like Streptococcus mutans that produce acid and thrive under the low pH conditions detrimental for tooth integrity. The features of clavanin A, a naturally occurring peptide rich in histidine and phenylalanine residues with pH-dependent antimicrobial activity, served as a design basis for these prototype 'acid-activated peptides' (AAPs). Employing the major cariogenic species S. mutans as a model system, the two AAPs characterized in this study exhibited a striking pH-dependent antimicrobial activity, which correlated well with the calculated charge distribution. This type of peptide represents a potential new way to combat dental caries. PMID:19878192

  6. UNIT 11.10 N-Terminal Sequence Analysis of Proteins and Peptides

    PubMed Central

    Speicher, Kaye D.; Gorman, Nicole; Speicher, David W.

    2009-01-01

    Automated N-terminal sequence analysis involves a series of chemical reactions that derivatize and remove one amino acid at a time from the N-terminal of purified peptides or intact proteins. At least several pmoles of a purified protein or 10 to 20 pmoles of a purified peptide with an unmodified N-terminal is required in order to obtain useful sequence information. In recent years the demand for N-terminal sequencing has decreased substantially as some applications for protein identification and characterization can now be more effectively performed using mass spectrometry. However, N-terminal sequencing remains the method of choice for verifying the N-terminal boundary of recombinant proteins, determining the N-terminal of protease-resistant domains, identifying proteins isolated from species where most of the genome has not yet been sequenced, and mapping modified or crosslinked sites in proteins that prove to be refractory to analysis by mass spectrometry. PMID:18429102

  7. Acne Inversa: Evaluating Antimicrobial Peptides and Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Sand, Michael; Skrygan, Marina; Kreuter, Alexander; Altmeyer, Peter; Gambichler, Thilo

    2012-01-01

    Background Acne inversa is a chronic, suppurative relapsing inflammatory skin disease that primarily affects the axillae, perineum and inframammary regions. Evidence suggests that the innate immune system is involved in the pathogenesis of acne inversa. Objective To investigate the role of the innate immune system in acne inversa. Methods Skin biopsies were obtained from inflammatory skin lesions (n=17) and from non-lesional skin (intraindividual control, n=17) of patients with acne inversa. Additional skin lesions were taken from patients with chronic venous leg ulcers (interindividual control, n=5). Quantitative real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction was used to determine the mRNA levels of antimicrobial peptides and proteins (AMPs), including human β-defensin (hBD)-1, hBD-2 and hBD-3, LL-37 (cathelicidin) and Ribonuclease 7 (RNase 7). mRNA levels were also determined for inflammatory and anti-inflammatory cytokines, including tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α), matrix metalloproteinase-1 (MMP1), interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-6, IL-8 and IL-10. Results The mRNA levels of hBD-2, LL-37, IL-1β, IL-6, IL-8, IL-10 and MMP1 were significantly higher in acne inversa lesions compared to non-lesional skin (p<0.05). A significant positive correlation expression was observed between hBD-2 mRNA expression and LL-37 (ρ=0.53, p=0.03), and between hBD-2 and RNAse 7 (ρ=0.68, p=0.006). When compared to the chronic venous leg ulcer lesions, acne inversa lesions showed a significantly higher expression of RNase 7 mRNA, while IL-1 β, IL-6, IL-8, TNF-α and MMP1 mRNA expression was significantly higher in the chronic venous leg ulcer lesions (p<0.05). Conclusion The AMP, cytokine milieu and tissue proteases in acne inversa lesions differ significantly from non-lesional skin and chronic venous leg ulcers. The positively correlating up-regulation of AMPs in acne inversa indicates an important role of the innate immune system in the pathogenesis of this disorder

  8. Synthesis of peptides from amino acids and ATP with lysine-rich proteinoid

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nakashima, T.; Fox, S. W.

    1980-01-01

    The paper examines the synthesis of peptides from aminoacids and ATP with a lysine-rich protenoid. The latter in aqueous solution catalyzes the formation of peptides from free amino acids and ATP; this catalytic activity is not found in acidic protenoids, even though the latter contain a basic aminoacid. The pH optimum for the synthesis is about 11, but it is appreciable below 8 and above 13. Temperature data indicate an optimum at 20 C or above, with little increase in rate up to 60 C. Pyrophosphate can be used instead of ATP, but the yields are lower. The ATP-aided syntheses of peptides in aqueous solution occur with several types of proteinous aminoacids.

  9. Peptide phosphorylation by calcium-dependent protein kinase from maize seedlings.

    PubMed

    Loog, M; Toomik, R; Sak, K; Muszynska, G; Järv, J; Ek, P

    2000-01-01

    Ca2+-dependent protein kinase (CDPK-1) was purified from maize seedlings, and its substrate specificity studied using a set of synthetic peptides derived from the phosphorylatable sequence RVLSRLHS15VRER of maize sucrose synthase 2. The decapeptide LARLHSVRER was found to be efficiently phosphorylated as a minimal substrate. The same set of peptides were found to be phosphorylated by mammalian protein kinase Cbeta (PKC), but showed low reactivity with protein kinase A (PKA). Proceeding from the sequence LARLHSVRER, a series of cellulose-membrane-attached peptides of systematically modified structure was synthesised. These peptides had hydrophobic (Ala, Leu) and ionic (Arg, Glu) amino acids substituted in each position. The phosphorylation of these substrates by CDPK-1 was measured and the substrate specificity of the maize protein kinase characterised by the consensus sequence motif A/L-5X-4R-3X-2X-1SX+1R+2Z+3R+4, where X denotes a position with no strict amino acid requirements and Z a position strictly not tolerating arginine compared with the other three varied amino acids. This motif had a characteristic sequence element RZR at positions +2 to +4 and closely resembled the primary structure of the sucrose synthase phosphorylation site. The sequence surrounding the phosphorylatable serine in this consensus motif was similar to the analogous sequence K/RXXS/TXK/R proposed for mammalian PKC, but different from the consensus motif RRXS/TX for PKA. PMID:10632703

  10. Enzymatic generation of peptides flanked by basic amino acids to obtain MS/MS spectra with 2× sequence coverage

    PubMed Central

    Ebhardt, H Alexander; Nan, Jie; Chaulk, Steven G; Fahlman, Richard P; Aebersold, Ruedi

    2014-01-01

    RATIONALE Tandem mass (MS/MS) spectra generated by collision-induced dissociation (CID) typically lack redundant peptide sequence information in the form of e.g. b- and y-ion series due to frequent use of sequence-specific endopeptidases cleaving C- or N-terminal to Arg or Lys residues. METHODS Here we introduce arginyl-tRNA protein transferase (ATE, EC 2.3.2.8) for proteomics. ATE recognizes acidic amino acids or oxidized Cys at the N-terminus of a substrate peptide and conjugates an arginine from an aminoacylated tRNAArg onto the N-terminus of the substrate peptide. This enzymatic reaction is carried out under physiological conditions and, in combination with Lys-C/Asp-N double digest, results in arginylated peptides with basic amino acids on both termini. RESULTS We demonstrate that in vitro arginylation of peptides using yeast arginyl tRNA protein transferase 1 (yATE1) is a robust enzymatic reaction, specific to only modifying N-terminal acidic amino acids. Precursors originating from arginylated peptides generally have an increased protonation state compared with their non-arginylated forms. Furthermore, the product ion spectra of arginylated peptides show near complete 2× fragment ladders within the same MS/MS spectrum using commonly available electrospray ionization peptide fragmentation modes. Unexpectedly, arginylated peptides generate complete y- and c-ion series using electron transfer dissociation (ETD) despite having an internal proline residue. CONCLUSIONS We introduce a rapid enzymatic method to generate peptides flanked on either terminus by basic amino acids, resulting in a rich, redundant MS/MS fragment pattern. © 2014 The Authors. Rapid Communications in Mass Spectrometry published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd. PMID:25380496

  11. Association of intestinal peptide transport with a protein related to the cadherin superfamily.

    PubMed

    Dantzig, A H; Hoskins, J A; Tabas, L B; Bright, S; Shepard, R L; Jenkins, I L; Duckworth, D C; Sportsman, J R; Mackensen, D; Rosteck, P R

    1994-04-15

    The first step in oral absorption of many medically important peptide-based drugs is mediated by an intestinal proton-dependent peptide transporter. This transporter facilitates the oral absorption of beta-lactam antibiotics and angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors from the intestine into enterocytes lining the luminal wall. A monoclonal antibody that blocked uptake of cephalexin was used to identify and clone a gene that encodes an approximately 92-kilodalton membrane protein that was associated with the acquisition of peptide transport activity by transport-deficient cells. The amino acid sequence deduced from the complementary DNA sequence of the cloned gene indicated that this transport-associated protein shares several conserved structural elements with the cadherin superfamily of calcium-dependent, cell-cell adhesion proteins. PMID:8153632

  12. Stable Isotope Peptide Mass Spectrometry To Decipher Amino Acid Metabolism in Dehalococcoides Strain CBDB1

    PubMed Central

    Marco-Urrea, Ernest; Seifert, Jana; von Bergen, Martin

    2012-01-01

    Dehalococcoides species are key players in the anaerobic transformation of halogenated solvents at contaminated sites. Here, we analyze isotopologue distributions in amino acid pools from peptides of Dehalococcoides strain CBDB1 after incubation with 13C-labeled acetate or bicarbonate as a carbon source. The resulting data were interpreted with regard to genome annotations to identify amino acid biosynthesis pathways. In addition to using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) for analyzing derivatized amino acids after protein hydrolysis, we introduce a second, much milder method, in which we directly analyze peptide masses after tryptic digest and peptide fragments by nano-liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization-tandem mass spectrometry (nano-LC-ESI-MS/MS). With this method, we identify isotope incorporation patterns for 17 proteinaceous amino acids, including proline, cysteine, lysine, and arginine, which escaped previous analyses in Dehalococcoides. Our results confirmed lysine biosynthesis via the α-aminoadipate pathway, precluding lysine formation from aspartate. Similarly, the isotopologue pattern obtained for arginine provided biochemical evidence of its synthesis from glutamate. Direct peptide MS/MS analysis of the labeling patterns of glutamine and asparagine, which were converted to glutamate and aspartate during protein hydrolysis, gave biochemical evidence of their precursors and confirmed glutamate biosynthesis via a Re-specific citrate synthase. By addition of unlabeled free amino acids to labeled cells, we show that in strain CBDB1 none of the 17 tested amino acids was incorporated into cell mass, indicating that they are all synthesized de novo. Our approach is widely applicable and provides a means to analyze amino acid metabolism by studying specific proteins even in mixed consortia. PMID:22661690

  13. Identification and characterization of antioxidant peptides from chickpea protein hydrolysates.

    PubMed

    Torres-Fuentes, Cristina; Contreras, María del Mar; Recio, Isidra; Alaiz, Manuel; Vioque, Javier

    2015-08-01

    Oxidative stress due to the excess of radical oxygen species (ROS) contribute to the development of different diseases. The use of antioxidants may prevent the development of these diseases by counteracting ROS levels. There is an increasing interest in natural antioxidants as they are safer for consumers than synthetic antioxidants. In this work, reducing power, free radical scavenging and cellular antioxidant activities of chickpea peptides fractions have been investigated. Peptide sequences included in fractions with antioxidant activity were identified. Main sequences, ALEPDHR, TETWNPNHPEL, FVPH and SAEHGSLH, corresponded to legumin, the main seed protein. Most peptides contained histidine, which has shown antioxidant activity. Two peptides also included tryptophan and phenylalanine, in which the phenolic group could also serve as hydrogen donor. These results show that legumin is a source of antioxidant peptides of high interest for food and pharmaceutical industries to develop new nutraceuticals and functional foods. PMID:25766818

  14. Basics and recent advances in peptide and protein drug delivery

    PubMed Central

    Bruno, Benjamin J; Miller, Geoffrey D; Lim, Carol S

    2014-01-01

    While the peptide and protein therapeutic market has developed significantly in the past decades, delivery has limited their use. Although oral delivery is preferred, most are currently delivered intravenously or subcutaneously due to degradation and limited absorption in the gastrointestinal tract. Therefore, absorption enhancers, enzyme inhibitors, carrier systems and stability enhancers are being studied to facilitate oral peptide delivery. Additionally, transdermal peptide delivery avoids the issues of the gastrointestinal tract, but also faces absorption limitations. Due to proteases, opsonization and agglutination, free peptides are not systemically stable without modifications. This review discusses oral and transdermal peptide drug delivery, focusing on barriers and solutions to absorption and stability issues. Methods to increase systemic stability and site-specific delivery are also discussed. PMID:24228993

  15. Arginine selective reagents for ligation to peptides and proteins.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Darren A; Ng, Raymond; Dawson, Philip E

    2016-05-01

    A new class of arginine-specific bioconjugation reagents for protein labeling has been developed. This method utilizes a triazolyl-phenylglyoxal group on the probe molecule that reacts selectively with the guandinyl group of Arg residues in a protein or peptide. The reaction proceeds in neutral to basic bicarbonate buffers and is selective for arginine residues in peptides and folded proteins. Importantly, the triazolyl-phenylglyoxal group can be introduced into complex molecules containing alkyne groups using CuAAC chemistry, providing a robust approach for the generation of phenylglyoxal reactive groups into molecules to be covalently attached onto the surface of proteins. Copyright © 2016 European Peptide Society and John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:27005702

  16. Enrichment of phosphorylated peptides and proteins by selective precipitation methods.

    PubMed

    Rainer, Matthias; Bonn, Günther K

    2015-01-01

    Protein phosphorylation is one of the most prominent post-translational modifications involved in the regulation of cellular processes. Fundamental understanding of biological processes requires appropriate bioanalytical methods for selectively enriching phosphorylated peptides and proteins. Most of the commonly applied enrichment approaches include chromatographic materials including Fe(3+)-immobilized metal-ion affinity chromatography or metal oxides. In the last years, the introduction of several non-chromatographic isolation technologies has increasingly attracted the interest of many scientists. Such approaches are based on the selective precipitation of phosphorylated peptides and proteins by applying various metal cations. The excellent performance of precipitation-based enrichment methods can be explained by the absence of any stationary phase, resin or sorbent, which usually leads to unspecific binding. This review provides an overview of recently published methods for the selective precipitation of phosphorylated peptides and proteins. PMID:25587840

  17. Mapping protein-protein interactions with phage-displayed combinatorial peptide libraries and alanine scanning.

    PubMed

    Kokoszka, Malgorzata E; Kay, Brian K

    2015-01-01

    One avenue for inferring the function of a protein is to learn what proteins it may bind to in the cell. Among the various methodologies, one way for doing so is to affinity select peptide ligands from a phage-displayed combinatorial peptide library and then to examine if the proteins that carry such peptide sequences interact with the target protein in the cell. With the protocols described in this chapter, a laboratory with skills in microbiology, molecular biology, and protein biochemistry can readily identify peptides in the library that bind selectively, and with micromolar affinity, to a given target protein on the time scale of 2 months. To illustrate this approach, we use a library of bacteriophage M13 particles, which display 12-mer combinatorial peptides, to affinity select different peptide ligands for two different targets, the SH3 domain of the human Lyn protein tyrosine kinase and a segment of the yeast serine/threonine protein kinase Cbk1. The binding properties of the selected peptide ligands are then dissected by sequence alignment, Kunkel mutagenesis, and alanine scanning. Finally, the peptide ligands can be used to predict cellular interacting proteins and serve as the starting point for drug discovery. PMID:25616333

  18. Peptides and proteins with antimicrobial activity

    PubMed Central

    Coutinho, Henrique Douglas Melo; Lôbo, Katiuscia Menezes; Bezerra, Denise Aline Casimiro; Lôbo, Inalzuir

    2008-01-01

    The increase of microbial resistance to antibiotics has led to a continuing search for newer and more effective drugs. Antimicrobial peptides are generally found in animals, plants, and microorganisms and are of great interest to medicine, pharmacology, and the food industry. These peptides are capable of inhibiting pathogenic microorganisms. They can attack parasites, while causing little or no harm to the host cells. The defensins are peptides found in granules in the polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMNs) and are responsible for the defense of the organism. Several animal defensins, like dermaseptin, antileukoprotease, protegrin, and others, have had their activities and efficacy tested and been shown to be effective against bacteria, fungi, and protists; there are also specific defensins from invertebrates, e.g., drosomycin and heliomicin; from plants, e.g., the types A and B; and the bacteriocins, e.g., acrocin, marcescin, etc. The aim of the present work was to compile a comprehensive bibliographic review of the diverse potentially antimicrobial peptides in an effort to systematize the current knowledge on these substances as a contribution for further researches. The currently available bibliography does not give a holistic approach on this subject. The present work intends to show that the mechanism of defense represented by defensins is promising from the perspective of its application in the treatment of infectious diseases in human, animals and plants. PMID:21264153

  19. Fast and Selective Modification of Thiol Proteins/Peptides by N-(Phenylseleno)phthalimide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhengfang; Zhang, Yun; Zhang, Hao; Harrington, Peter B.; Chen, Hao

    2012-03-01

    We previously reported that selenamide reagents such as ebselen and N-(phenylseleno)phthalimide (NPSP) can be used to selectively derivatize thiols for mass spectrometric analysis, and the introduced selenium tags are useful as they could survive or removed with collision-induced dissociation (CID). Described herein is the further study of the reactivity of various protein/peptide thiols toward NPSP and its application to derivatize thiol peptides in protein digests. With a modified protocol (i.e., dissolving NPSP in acetonitrile instead of aqueous solvent), we found that quantitative conversion of thiols can be obtained in seconds, using NPSP in a slight excess amount (NPSP:thiol of 1.1-2:1). Further investigation shows that the thiol reactivity toward NPSP reflects its chemical environment and accessibility in proteins/peptides. For instance, adjacent basic amino acid residues increase the thiol reactivity, probably because they could stabilize the thiolate form to facilitate the nucleophilic attack of thiol on NPSP. In the case of creatine phosphokinase, the native protein predominately has one thiol reacted with NPSP while all of four thiol groups of the denatured protein can be derivatized, in accordance with the corresponding protein conformation. In addition, thiol peptides in protein/peptide enzymatic digests can be quickly and effectively tagged by NPSP following tri- n-butylphosphine (TBP) reduction. Notably, all three thiols of the peptide QCCASVCSL in the insulin peptic digest can be modified simultaneously by NPSP. These results suggest a novel and selective method for protecting thiols in the bottom-up approach for protein structure analysis.

  20. Ligand-Based Peptide Design and Combinatorial Peptide Libraries to Target G Protein-Coupled Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Gruber, Christian W.; Muttenthaler, Markus; Freissmuth, Michael

    2016-01-01

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are considered to represent the most promising drug targets; it has been repeatedly said that a large fraction of the currently marketed drugs elicit their actions by binding to GPCRs (with cited numbers varying from 30–50%). Closer scrutiny, however, shows that only a modest fraction of (~60) GPCRs are, in fact, exploited as drug targets, only ~20 of which are peptide-binding receptors. The vast majority of receptors in the humane genome have not yet been explored as sites of action for drugs. Given the drugability of this receptor class, it appears that opportunities for drug discovery abound. In addition, GPCRs provide for binding sites other than the ligand binding sites (referred to as the “orthosteric site”). These additional sites include (i) binding sites for ligands (referred to as “allosteric ligands”) that modulate the affinity and efficacy of orthosteric ligands, (ii) the interaction surface that recruits G proteins and arrestins, (iii) the interaction sites of additional proteins (GIPs, GPCR interacting proteins that regulate G protein signaling or give rise to G protein-independent signals). These sites can also be targeted by peptides. Combinatorial and natural peptide libraries are therefore likely to play a major role in identifying new GPCR ligands at each of these sites. In particular the diverse natural peptide libraries such as the venom peptides from marine cone-snails and plant cyclotides have been established as a rich source of drug leads. High-throughput screening and combinatorial chemistry approaches allow for progressing from these starting points to potential drug candidates. This will be illustrated by focusing on the ligand-based drug design of oxytocin (OT) and vasopressin (AVP) receptor ligands using natural peptide leads as starting points. PMID:20687879

  1. Discovery and application of peptides that bind to proteins and solid state inorganic materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stearns, Linda A.

    A series of three projects was undertaken on the theme of peptide-based molecular recognition. In the first project, a messenger RNA (mRNA) display selection was carried out against the II-VI semiconductors zinc sulfide (ZnS), zinc selenide (ZnSe), and cadmium sulfide (CdS). Sequence analysis of 18-mer semiconductor-binding peptides (SBPs) following four rounds of selection indicated that the amino acid sequences were enriched in polar residues compared to the naive library, suggesting that hydrogen-bonding interactions are a dominant mode of interaction between the SBPs and their cognate inorganic surfaces. Select peptides were expressed as fusions of the green fluorescent protein (GFP) to visualize their recognition of semiconductor crystals. Interpretation of the results was complicated by a high fluorescence background that was observed with certain control GFP fusions. Additional experiments, including cross-specificity binding assays, are needed to characterize the peptides that were isolated in this selection. A second project described the practical application of a known inorganic-binding and nucleating peptide. Peptide A3, which was previously isolated by phage display, was chemically conjugated to a short DNA strand using the heterobifunctional linker succinimidyl 4-[N-maleimidomethyl]cyclohexane-1-carboxylate (SMCC). The resulting peptide-DNA conjugate was hybridized to ten complementary single-stranded capture probes extending outward from the surface of an origami DNA nanotube. A gold precursor solution was added to initiate nucleation and growth of gold nanoparticles at the site of the peptide. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) was used to visualize the gold nanoparticle-decorated nanostructures. This approach holds immense promise for organizing compositionally-diverse materials at the nanoscale. In a third project, a novel non-iterative approach to mRNA display called covalent capture was demonstrated. Using human transferrin as a target

  2. Protein Hydrolysates/Peptides in Animal Nutrition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCalla, Jeff; Waugh, Terry; Lohry, Eric

    The use of protein hydrolysates as an important nutrient for growth and maintenance has been increasing in animal nutrition. Although animal proteins and protein hydrolysates are widely used however, recently vegetable protein hydrolysates are gaining importance. This chapter reviews the use of protein hydrolysates developed by enzyme hydrolysis and by solid state fermentation process in animal nutrition especially for piglets and compares it with the standard products such as plasma and fishmeal.

  3. Effects of anions on the positive ion electrospray ionization mass spectra of peptides and proteins.

    PubMed

    Mirza, U A; Chait, B T

    1994-09-15

    Positive ion electrospray ionization mass spectra of polypeptides are usually obtained from solutions that are acidified and therefore contain relatively high concentrations of anions. The present study describes an investigation of the effects of these ubiquitous anions on the positive ion electrospray ionization mass spectra of peptides and proteins. Certain anionic species in the spray solutions were observed to cause a marked decrease in the net average charge of peptide and protein ions in the mass spectra compared to the average charge measured in the absence of these anions. This charge neutralization effect was found to depend solely on the nature of the anionic species and was independent of the source of the anion (acid or salt), with the propensity for neutralization following the order: CCl3COO- > CF3COO- > CH3COO- approximately Cl-. A mechanism for the observed charge reduction effect is proposed that involves two steps. The first step occurs in solution, where an anion pairs with a positively charged basic group on the peptide. The second step occurs during the process of desolvation or in the gas phase, where the ion pair dissociates to yield the neutral acid and the peptide with reduced charge state. The different propensities for charge neutralization of the different anionic species is presumed to reflect the avidity of the anion-peptide interaction. These findings demonstrate that any attempt to correlate the distribution of charge states observed on proteins in the gas phase (by positive ion electrospray ionization mass spectrometry) with the net charge residing on the protein in solution will require that the described anion effect be taken into account. In addition, it appears that some control over the distribution of charge states on peptides and protein ions can be exercised by an appropriate choice of anion in the electrospray solution. PMID:7978296

  4. Peptides inhibitors of acid-sensing ion channels.

    PubMed

    Diochot, S; Salinas, M; Baron, A; Escoubas, P; Lazdunski, M

    2007-02-01

    Acid-sensing ion channels (ASICs) channels are proton-gated cationic channels mainly expressed in central and peripheric nervous system and related to the epithelial amiloride-sensitive Na(+) channels and to the degenerin family of ion channels. ASICs comprise four proteins forming functional channel subunits (ASIC1a, ASIC1b, ASIC2a, and ASIC3) and two proteins (ASIC2b and ASIC4) without yet known activators. Functional channels are activated by external pH variations ranging from pH(0.5) 6.8 to 4.0 and currents are characterized by either rapid kinetics of inactivation (ASIC1a, ASIC1b, ASIC3) or slow kinetics of inactivation (ASIC2a) and sometimes the presence of a plateau phase (ASIC3). ASIC1a and ASIC3, which are expressed in nociceptive neurons, have been implicated in inflammation and knockout mice studies support the role of ASIC3 in various pain processes. ASIC1a seems more related to synaptic plasticity, memory, learning and fear conditioning in the CNS. ASIC2a contributes to hearing in the cochlea, sour taste sensation, and visual transduction in the retina. The pharmacology of ASICs is limited to rather nonselective drugs such as amiloride, nonsteroid anti-inflammatory drugs, and neuropeptides. Recently, two peptides, PcTx1 and APETx2, isolated from a spider and a sea anemone, have been characterized as selective and high-affinity inhibitors for ASIC1a and ASIC3 channels, respectively. PcTx1 inhibits ASIC1a homomers with an affinity of 0.7 nM (IC(50)) without any effect on ASIC1a containing heteromers and thus helped to characterize ASIC1a homomeric channels in peripheric and central neurons. PcTx1 acts as a gating modifier since it shifts the channel from the resting to an inactivated state by increasing its affinity for H(+). APETx2 is less selective since it inhibits several ASIC3-containing channels (IC(50) from 63 nM to 2 microM) and to date its mode of action is unknown. Nevertheless, APETx2 structure is related to other sea anemone peptides, which

  5. Nutritional value of D-amino acids, D-peptides, and amino acid derivatives in mice

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This paper describes a method for determining the nutritional value of D-amino acids, D-peptides, and amino acid derivatives using a growth assay in mice fed a synthetic all-amino acid diet. A large number of experiments were carried out in which a molar equivalent of the test compound replaced a n...

  6. Role of sequence and structure of the Hendra fusion protein fusion peptide in membrane fusion.

    PubMed

    Smith, Everett Clinton; Gregory, Sonia M; Tamm, Lukas K; Creamer, Trevor P; Dutch, Rebecca Ellis

    2012-08-24

    Viral fusion proteins are intriguing molecular machines that undergo drastic conformational changes to facilitate virus-cell membrane fusion. During fusion a hydrophobic region of the protein, termed the fusion peptide (FP), is inserted into the target host cell membrane, with subsequent conformational changes culminating in membrane merger. Class I fusion proteins contain FPs between 20 and 30 amino acids in length that are highly conserved within viral families but not between. To examine the sequence dependence of the Hendra virus (HeV) fusion (F) protein FP, the first eight amino acids were mutated first as double, then single, alanine mutants. Mutation of highly conserved glycine residues resulted in inefficient F protein expression and processing, whereas substitution of valine residues resulted in hypofusogenic F proteins despite wild-type surface expression levels. Synthetic peptides corresponding to a portion of the HeV F FP were shown to adopt an α-helical secondary structure in dodecylphosphocholine micelles and small unilamellar vesicles using circular dichroism spectroscopy. Interestingly, peptides containing point mutations that promote lower levels of cell-cell fusion within the context of the whole F protein were less α-helical and induced less membrane disorder in model membranes. These data represent the first extensive structure-function relationship of any paramyxovirus FP and demonstrate that the HeV F FP and potentially other paramyxovirus FPs likely require an α-helical structure for efficient membrane disordering and fusion. PMID:22761418

  7. Behavior of amino acids and peptides exposed in Earth orbit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barbier, Bernard; Boillot, François; Chabin, Annie; Venet, Michel; Bure, Corinne; Jacquet, Romain; Bertrand-Urbaniak, Marylène; Brack, André

    2001-08-01

    In order to understand the chemical comportment of organic molecules of prebiotic interest when exposed to space conditions, amino acids, derivatives and peptides where exposed in Earth orbit during the CNES "Perseus-Exobiologie" mission. Dry films of samples were exposed free or associated with mineral powders to vacuum and to solar light down to 120 nm during three months outside the MIR station. After the mission, the remaining products were analyzed with respect of chemical degradation, racemization and polymerization. The analyses revealed a higher sensitivity of amino acids comparatively to peptides. The identification of by-products has allowed determining some photolysis pathways where decarboxylation and decarbonylation were found to be the major chemical reactions for amino acids and peptides, respectively. The study of associated minerals have shown that meteoritic powder was the most efficient to protect samples against UV light. The exposure of different peptides associated to meteorite powder of various thickness have allowed to determine that 5μm films were at least necessary to protect associated organics. Implications for the exogenous origin of organics are discussed.

  8. Protein Translocation through Tom40: Kinetics of Peptide Release

    PubMed Central

    Mahendran, Kozhinjampara R.; Romero-Ruiz, Mercedes; Schlösinger, Andrea; Winterhalter, Mathias; Nussberger, Stephan

    2012-01-01

    Mitochondrial proteins are almost exclusively imported into mitochondria from the cytosol in an unfolded or partially folded conformation. Regardless of whether they are destined for the outer or inner membrane, the intermembrane space, or the matrix, proteins begin the importation process by crossing the mitochondrial outer membrane via a specialized protein import machinery whose main component is the Tom40 channel. High-resolution ion conductance measurements through the Tom40 channel in the presence of the mitochondrial presequence peptide pF1β revealed the kinetics of peptide binding. Here we show that the rates for association kon and dissociation koff strongly depend on the applied transmembrane voltage. Both kinetic constants increase with an increase in the applied voltage. The increase of koff with voltage provides strong evidence of peptide translocation. This allows us to distinguish quantitatively between substrate blocking and permeation. PMID:22225796

  9. The specificity of protection against cationic antimicrobial peptides by lactoferrin binding protein B.

    PubMed

    Morgenthau, Ari; Partha, Sarathy K; Adamiak, Paul; Schryvers, Anthony B

    2014-10-01

    A variety of Gram-negative pathogens possess host-specific lactoferrin (Lf) receptors that mediate the acquisition of iron from host Lf. The integral membrane protein component of the receptor, lactoferrin binding protein A specifically binds host Lf and is required for acquisition of iron from Lf. In contrast, the role of the bi-lobed surface lipoprotein, lactoferrin binding protein B (LbpB), in Lf binding and iron acquisition is uncertain. A common feature of LbpBs from most species is the presence of clusters of negatively charged amino acids in the protein's C-terminal lobe. Recently it has been shown that the negatively charged regions from the Neisseria meningitidis LbpB are responsible for protecting against an 11 amino acid cationic antimicrobial peptide (CAP), lactoferricin (Lfcin), derived from human Lf. In this study we investigated whether the LbpB confers resistance to other CAPs since N. meningitidis is likely to encounter other CAPs from the host. LbpB provided protection against the cathelicidin derived peptide, cathelicidin related antimicrobial peptide (mCRAMP), but did not confer protection against Tritrp 1 or LL37 under our experimental conditions. When tested against a range of rationally designed synthetic peptides, LbpB was shown to protect against IDR-1002 and IDR-0018 but not against HH-2 or HHC10. PMID:25038734

  10. Expression pattern of peptide and amino acid genes in digestive tract of transporter juvenile turbot ( Scophthalmus maximus L.)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Dandan; He, Gen; Mai, Kangsen; Zhou, Huihui; Xu, Wei; Song, Fei

    2016-04-01

    Turbot ( Scophthalmus maximus L.), a carnivorous fish species with high dietary protein requirement, was chosen to examine the expression pattern of peptide and amino acid transporter genes along its digestive tract which was divided into six segments including stomach, pyloric caeca, rectum, and three equal parts of the remainder of the intestine. The results showed that the expression of two peptide and eleven amino acid transporters genes exhibited distinct patterns. Peptide transporter 1 (PepT1) was rich in proximal intestine while peptide transporter 2 (PepT2) was abundant in distal intestine. A number of neutral and cationic amino acid transporters expressed richly in whole intestine including B0-type amino acid transporter 1 (B0AT1), L-type amino acid transporter 2 (LAT2), T-type amino acid transporter 1 (TAT1), proton-coupled amino acid transporter 1 (PAT1), y+L-type amino acid transporter 1 (y+LAT1), and cationic amino acid transporter 2 (CAT2) while ASC amino acid transporter 2 (ASCT2), sodium-coupled neutral amino acid transporter 2 (SNAT2), and y+L-type amino acid transporter 2 (y+LAT2) abundantly expressed in stomach. In addition, system b0,+ transporters (rBAT and b0,+AT) existed richly in distal intestine. These findings comprehensively characterized the distribution of solute carrier family proteins, which revealed the relative importance of peptide and amino acid absorption through luminal membrane. Our findings are helpful to understand the mechanism of the utilization of dietary protein in fish with a short digestive tract.

  11. SIR: Deterministic protein inference from peptides assigned to MS data.

    PubMed

    Matthiesen, Rune; Prieto, Gorka; Amorim, Antonio; Aloria, Kerman; Fullaondo, Asier; Carvalho, Ana S; Arizmendi, Jesus M

    2012-07-16

    Currently the bottom up approach is the most popular for characterizing protein samples by mass spectrometry. This is mainly attributed to the fact that the bottom up approach has been successfully optimized for high throughput studies. However, the bottom up approach is associated with a number of challenges such as loss of linkage information between peptides. Previous publications have addressed some of these problems which are commonly referred to as protein inference. Nevertheless, all previous publications on the subject are oversimplified and do not represent the full complexity of the proteins identified. To this end we present here SIR (spectra based isoform resolver) that uses a novel transparent and systematic approach for organizing and presenting identified proteins based on peptide spectra assignments. The algorithm groups peptides and proteins into five evidence groups and calculates sixteen parameters for each identified protein that are useful for cases where deterministic protein inference is the goal. The novel approach has been incorporated into SIR which is a user-friendly tool only concerned with protein inference based on imports of Mascot search results. SIR has in addition two visualization tools that facilitate further exploration of the protein inference problem. PMID:22626983

  12. Predictive chromatography of peptides and proteins as a complementary tool for proteomics.

    PubMed

    Tarasova, Irina A; Masselon, Christophe D; Gorshkov, Alexander V; Gorshkov, Mikhail V

    2016-08-01

    In the last couple of decades, considerable effort has been focused on developing methods for quantitative and qualitative proteome characterization. The method of choice in this characterization is mass spectrometry used in combination with sample separation. One of the most widely used separation techniques at the front end of a mass spectrometer is high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). A unique feature of HPLC is its specificity to the amino acid sequence of separated peptides and proteins. This specificity may provide additional information about the peptides or proteins under study which is complementary to the mass spectrometry data. The value of this information for proteomics has been recognized in the past few decades, which has stimulated significant effort in the development and implementation of computational and theoretical models for the prediction of peptide retention time for a given sequence. Here we review the advances in this area and the utility of predicted retention times for proteomic applications. PMID:27419248

  13. Molecular Dynamics Simulations of a Pulmonary Surfactant Protein B Peptide in a Lipid Monolayer

    PubMed Central

    Freites, J. Alfredo; Choi, Yunsoo; Tobias, Douglas J.

    2003-01-01

    Pulmonary surfactant is a complex mixture of lipids and proteins that lines the air/liquid interface of the alveolar hypophase and confers mechanical stability to the alveoli during the breathing process. The desire to formulate synthetic mixtures for low-cost prophylactic and therapeutic applications has motivated the study of the specific roles and interactions of the different components. All-atom molecular dynamics simulations were carried out on a model system composed of a monolayer of palmitic acid (PA) and a surfactant protein B peptide, SP-B1–25. A detailed structural characterization as a function of the lipid monolayer specific area revealed that the peptide remains inserted in the monolayer up to values of specific area corresponding to an untilted condensed phase of the the pure palmitic acid monolayer. The system remains stable by altering the conformational order of both the anionic lipid monolayer and the peptide secondary structure. Two elements appear to be key for the constitution of this phase: an electrostatic interaction between the cationic peptide residues with the anionic headgroups, and an exclusion of the aromatic residues on the hydrophobic end of the peptide from the hydrophilic and aqueous regions. PMID:12668426

  14. Reaction mechanisms in the radiolysis of peptides, polypeptides and proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Garrison, W.M.

    1985-01-01

    The purpose of this review is to bring together and to correlate the wide variety of experimental studies that provide information on the reaction products and reaction mechanisms involved in the radiolysis of peptides, polypeptides and proteins (including chromosomal proteins) in both aqueous and solid-state systems. The comparative radiation chemistry of these systems is developed in terms of specific reactions of the peptide main-chain and the aliphatic, aromatic-unsaturated and sulfur-containing side-chains. Information obtained with the various experimental techniques of product analysis, competition kinetics, spin-trapping, pulse radiolysis and ESR spectroscopy is included. 147 refs.

  15. AFM Studies of Conformational Changes in Proteins and Peptides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ploscariu, Nicoleta; Sukthankar, Pinakin; Tomich, John; Szoszkiewicz, Robert

    2015-03-01

    Here, we present estimates of molecular stiffness and mechanical energy dissipation factors for some examples of proteins and peptides. The results are obtained from AFM force spectroscopy measurements. To determine molecular stiffness and mechanical energy dissipation factors we developed a model based on measuring several resonance frequencies of an AFM cantilever in contact with either single protein molecule or peptides adsorbed on arbitrary surface. We used compliant AFM cantilevers with a small aspect ratio - a ratio of length to width - in air and in liquid, including biologically relevant phosphate buffered saline medium. Department of Physics.

  16. Binding of small basic peptides to membranes containing acidic lipids: theoretical models and experimental results.

    PubMed Central

    Ben-Tal, N; Honig, B; Peitzsch, R M; Denisov, G; McLaughlin, S

    1996-01-01

    We measured directly the binding of Lys3, Lys5, and Lys7 to vesicles containing acidic phospholipids. When the vesicles contain 33% acidic lipids and the aqueous solution contains 100 mM monovalent salt, the standard Gibbs free energy for the binding of these peptides is 3, 5, and 7 kcal/mol, respectively. The binding energies decrease as the mol% of acidic lipids in the membrane decreases and/or as the salt concentration increases. Several lines of evidence suggest that these hydrophilic peptides do not penetrate the polar headgroup region of the membrane and that the binding is mainly due to electrostatic interactions. To calculate the binding energies from classical electrostatics, we applied the nonlinear Poisson-Boltzmann equation to atomic models of the phospholipid bilayers and the basic peptides in aqueous solution. The electrostatic free energy of interaction, which arises from both a long-range coulombic attraction between the positively charged peptide and the negatively charged lipid bilayer, and a short-range Born or image charge repulsion, is a minimum when approximately 2.5 A (i.e., one layer of water) exists between the van der Waals surfaces of the peptide and the lipid bilayer. The calculated molar association constants, K, agree well with the measured values: K is typically about 10-fold smaller than the experimental value (i.e., a difference of about 1.5 kcal/mol in the free energy of binding). The predicted dependence of K (or the binding free energies) on the ionic strength of the solution, the mol% of acidic lipids in the membrane, and the number of basic residues in the peptide agree very well with the experimental measurements. These calculations are relevant to the membrane binding of a number of important proteins that contain clusters of basic residues. Images FIGURE 2 FIGURE 3 PMID:8842196

  17. Effect of acid predissolution on fibril size and fibril flexibility of synthetic beta-amyloid peptide.

    PubMed Central

    Shen, C L; Fitzgerald, M C; Murphy, R M

    1994-01-01

    beta-amyloid peptide (A beta) is the major protein component of senile plaques and cerebrovascular amyloid deposits in Alzheimer's patients. Several researchers have demonstrated that A beta is neurotoxic in in vitro and in vivo systems. Peptide aggregation state and/or conformation might play a significant role in determining the toxicity of the peptide. The size and flexibility of fibrils formed from the synthetic peptide beta (1-39), corresponding to the first 39 residues of A beta, were determined. Samples were prepared either directly from lyophilized peptide or diluted from a 10 mg/ml stock solution in 0.1% trifluoroacetic acid (TFA). All samples had a final peptide concentration of 0.5 mg/ml, a final pH of 7.4, and a final NaCl concentration of 0.14 M. The molecular weight and linear density of the fibrils increased with increasing pre-incubation time in TFA, based on static light scattering measurements. Analysis of the angular dependence of the intensity of scattered light indicated that the fibrils were semi-flexible chains and that the fibril flexibility decreased with increasing pre-incubation time in TFA. There was a concomitant change in phase behavior from precipitation to gelation with the decrease in fibril flexibility. Images FIGURE 3 PMID:7811938

  18. Selective labeling of a membrane peptide with 15N-amino acids using cells grown in rich medium.

    PubMed

    Englander, Jacqueline; Cohen, Leah; Arshava, Boris; Estephan, Racha; Becker, Jeffrey M; Naider, Fred

    2006-01-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance spectra of membrane proteins containing multiple transmembrane helices have proven difficult to resolve due to the redundancy of aliphatic and Ser/Thr residues in transmembrane domains and the low chemical shift dispersity exhibited by residues in alpha-helical structures. Although (13)C- and (15)N-labeling are useful tools in the biophysical analysis of proteins, selective labeling of individual amino acids has been used to help elucidate more complete structures and to probe ligand-protein interactions. In general, selective labeling has been performed in Escherichia coli expression systems using minimal media supplemented with a single labeled amino acid and nineteen other unlabeled amino acids and/or by using auxotrophs for specific amino acids. Growth in minimal media often results in low yields of cells or expression products. We demonstrate a method in which one labeled amino acid is added to a rich medium. These conditions resulted in high expression (> or =100 mg/L) of a test fusion protein and milligram quantities of the selectively labeled membrane peptide after cyanogen bromide cleavage to release the peptide from the fusion protein. High levels of (15)N incorporation and acceptable levels of cross-labeling into other amino acid residues of the peptide were achieved. Growth in rich media is a simple and convenient alternative to growth in supplemented minimal media and is readily applicable to the expression of proteins selectively labeled with specific amino acids. PMID:16741986

  19. Antioxidant activity of cod (Gadus morhua) protein hydrolysates: Fractionation and characterisation of peptide fractions.

    PubMed

    Sabeena Farvin, K H; Andersen, Lisa Lystbæk; Otte, Jeanette; Nielsen, Henrik Hauch; Jessen, Flemming; Jacobsen, Charlotte

    2016-08-01

    This study aimed to characterise peptide fractions (>5kDa, 3-5kDa and <3kDa) with antioxidative activity obtained from a cod protein hydrolysate. The free amino acids in all fractions were dominated by Ala, Gly, Glu and Ser. The total amino acid composition had high proportions of Lys, Ala and Glu. The 3-5kDa and <3kDa fractions were further fractionated by size exclusion chromatography. All sub-fractions showed high Fe(2+) chelating activity. The DPPH radical-scavenging activity of the 3-5kDa fraction was exerted mainly by one sub-fraction dominated by peptides with masses below 600Da. The DPPH radical-scavenging activity of the <3kDa fraction was exerted by sub-fractions with low molecular weight. The highest reducing power was found in a sub-fraction containing peptides rich in Arg, Tyr and Phe. Both free amino acids and low molecular weight peptides thus seemed to contribute to the antioxidative activity of the peptide fractions, and Tyr seemed to play a major role in the antioxidant activity. PMID:26988519

  20. Recent Developments in Peptide-Based Nucleic Acid Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Veldhoen, Sandra; Laufer, Sandra D.; Restle, Tobias

    2008-01-01

    Despite the fact that non-viral nucleic acid delivery systems are generally considered to be less efficient than viral vectors, they have gained much interest in recent years due to their superior safety profile compared to their viral counterpart. Among these synthetic vectors are cationic polymers, branched dendrimers, cationic liposomes and cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs). The latter represent an assortment of fairly unrelated sequences essentially characterised by a high content of basic amino acids and a length of 10–30 residues. CPPs are capable of mediating the cellular uptake of hydrophilic macromolecules like peptides and nucleic acids (e.g. siRNAs, aptamers and antisense-oligonucleotides), which are internalised by cells at a very low rate when applied alone. Up to now, numerous sequences have been reported to show cell-penetrating properties and many of them have been used to successfully transport a variety of different cargos into mammalian cells. In recent years, it has become apparent that endocytosis is a major route of internalisation even though the mechanisms underlying the cellular translocation of CPPs are poorly understood and still subject to controversial discussions. In this review, we will summarise the latest developments in peptide-based cellular delivery of nucleic acid cargos. We will discuss different mechanisms of entry, the intracellular fate of the cargo, correlation studies of uptake versus biological activity of the cargo as well as technical problems and pitfalls. PMID:19325804

  1. Recent developments in peptide-based nucleic acid delivery.

    PubMed

    Veldhoen, Sandra; Laufer, Sandra D; Restle, Tobias

    2008-06-01

    Despite the fact that non-viral nucleic acid delivery systems are generally considered to be less efficient than viral vectors, they have gained much interest in recent years due to their superior safety profile compared to their viral counterpart. Among these synthetic vectors are cationic polymers, branched dendrimers, cationic liposomes and cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs). The latter represent an assortment of fairly unrelated sequences essentially characterised by a high content of basic amino acids and a length of 10-30 residues. CPPs are capable of mediating the cellular uptake of hydrophilic macromolecules like peptides and nucleic acids (e.g. siRNAs, aptamers and antisense-oligonucleotides), which are internalised by cells at a very low rate when applied alone. Up to now, numerous sequences have been reported to show cell-penetrating properties and many of them have been used to successfully transport a variety of different cargos into mammalian cells. In recent years, it has become apparent that endocytosis is a major route of internalisation even though the mechanisms underlying the cellular translocation of CPPs are poorly understood and still subject to controversial discussions. In this review, we will summarise the latest developments in peptide-based cellular delivery of nucleic acid cargos. We will discuss different mechanisms of entry, the intracellular fate of the cargo, correlation studies of uptake versus biological activity of the cargo as well as technical problems and pitfalls. PMID:19325804

  2. Negative electron-transfer dissociation nLC-MS/MS facilitates the analysis of thousands of acidic peptides

    PubMed Central

    McAlister, Graeme C.; Russell, Jason D.; Rumachik, Neil G.; Hebert, Alexander S.; Syka, John E. P.; Geer, Lewis Y.; Westphall, Michael S.; Pagliarini, David J.; Coon, Joshua J.

    2012-01-01

    We describe the first implementation of negative electron-transfer dissociation (NETD) on a hybrid ion trap-orbitrap mass spectrometer and its application to high-throughput sequencing of peptide anions. NETD – coupled with high pH separations, negative electrospray ionization (ESI), and an NETD compatible version of OMSSA – is part of a complete workflow that includes the formation, interrogation and sequencing of peptide anions. Together these interlocking pieces facilitated the identification of more than 2,000 unique peptides from Saccharomyces cerevisiae representing the most comprehensive analysis of peptide anions by tandem mass spectrometry to date. The same S. cerevisiae samples were interrogated using traditional, positive modes of peptide LC-MS/MS analysis (e.g., acidic LC separations, positive ESI, and collision activated dissociation), and the resulting peptide identifications of the different workflows were compared. Due to a decreased flux of peptide anions, and a tendency to produced lowly charged precursors, the NETD-based LC-MS/MS workflow was not as sensitive as the positive mode methods. However, the use of NETD readily permits access to underrepresented acidic portions of the proteome by identifying peptides that tended to have lower pI values. As such NETD improves sequence coverage, filling out the acidic portions of proteins that are often overlooked by the other methods. PMID:22335612

  3. A Novel Peptide from Soybean Protein Isolate Significantly Enhances Resistance of the Organism under Oxidative Stress.

    PubMed

    Ma, Heran; Liu, Rui; Zhao, Ziyuan; Zhang, Zhixian; Cao, Yue; Ma, Yudan; Guo, Yi; Xu, Li

    2016-01-01

    Recent studies have indicated that protein hydrolysates have broad biological effects. In the current study we describe a novel antioxidative peptide, FDPAL, from soybean protein isolate (SPI). The aim of this study was to purify and characterize an antioxidative peptide from SPI and determine its antioxidative mechanism. LC-MS/MS was used to isolate and identify the peptide from SPI. The sequence of the peptide was determined to be Phe-Asp-Pro-Ala-Leu (FDPAL, 561 Da). FDPAL can cause significant enhancement of resistance to oxidative stress both in cells as well as simple organisms. In Caenorhabditis elegans (C. elegans), FDPAL can up-regulate the expression of certain genes associated with resistance. The antioxidant activity of this peptide can be attributed to the presence of a specific amino acid sequence. Results from our work suggest that FDPAL can facilitate potential applications of proteins carrying this sequence in the nutraceutical, bioactive material and clinical medicine areas, as well as in cosmetics and health care products. PMID:27455060

  4. A Novel Peptide from Soybean Protein Isolate Significantly Enhances Resistance of the Organism under Oxidative Stress

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Heran; Liu, Rui; Zhao, Ziyuan; Zhang, Zhixian; Cao, Yue; Ma, Yudan; Guo, Yi; Xu, Li

    2016-01-01

    Recent studies have indicated that protein hydrolysates have broad biological effects. In the current study we describe a novel antioxidative peptide, FDPAL, from soybean protein isolate (SPI). The aim of this study was to purify and characterize an antioxidative peptide from SPI and determine its antioxidative mechanism. LC–MS/MS was used to isolate and identify the peptide from SPI. The sequence of the peptide was determined to be Phe-Asp-Pro-Ala-Leu (FDPAL, 561 Da). FDPAL can cause significant enhancement of resistance to oxidative stress both in cells as well as simple organisms. In Caenorhabditis elegans (C. elegans), FDPAL can up-regulate the expression of certain genes associated with resistance. The antioxidant activity of this peptide can be attributed to the presence of a specific amino acid sequence. Results from our work suggest that FDPAL can facilitate potential applications of proteins carrying this sequence in the nutraceutical, bioactive material and clinical medicine areas, as well as in cosmetics and health care products. PMID:27455060

  5. Chemical Synthesis of Hydrocarbon-Stapled Peptides for Protein Interaction Research and Therapeutic Targeting

    PubMed Central

    Bird, Gregory H.; Crannell, W. Christian; Walensky, Loren D.

    2016-01-01

    The peptide alpha-helix represents one of Nature’s most featured protein shapes and is employed in a diversity of protein architectures, spanning the very cytoskeletal infrastructure of the cell to the most intimate contact points between crucial signaling proteins. By installing an all-hydrocarbon crosslink into native sequences, we recapitulate the shape and biological activity of natural peptide alpha-helices, yielding a chemical toolbox to both interrogate the protein interactome and modulate interaction networks for potential therapeutic benefit. Here, we describe our latest approach to synthesizing Stabilized Alpha-Helices (SAH) corresponding to key protein interaction domains. We emphasize a stepwise approach to the production of crosslinking non-natural amino acids, their incorporation into peptide templates, and the application of ruthenium-catalyzed ring closing metathesis to generate hydrocarbon-stapled peptides. Through facile derivatization and functionalization steps, SAHs can be tailored for a broad range of applications in biochemical, structural, proteomic, cellular and in vivo studies. PMID:23801563

  6. Molecular design of specific metal-binding peptide sequences from protein fragments: theory and experiment.

    PubMed

    Kozísek, Milan; Svatos, Ales; Budesínský, Milos; Muck, Alexander; Bauer, Mikael C; Kotrba, Pavel; Ruml, Tomás; Havlas, Zdenek; Linse, Sara; Rulísek, Lubomír

    2008-01-01

    A novel strategy is presented for designing peptides with specific metal-ion chelation sites, based on linking computationally predicted ion-specific combinations of amino acid side chains coordinated at the vertices of the desired coordination polyhedron into a single polypeptide chain. With this aim, a series of computer programs have been written that 1) creates a structural combinatorial library containing Zi-(X)n-Zj sequences (n=0-14; Z: amino acid that binds the metal through the side chain; X: any amino acid) from the existing protein structures in the non-redundant Protein Data Bank; 2) merges these fragments into a single Z1-(X)n1 -Z2-(X)n2 -Z3-(X)n3 -...-Zj polypeptide chain; and 3) automatically performs two simple molecular mechanics calculations that make it possible to estimate the internal strain in the newly designed peptide. The application of this procedure for the most M2+-specific combinations of amino acid side chains (M: metal; see L. Rulísek, Z. Havlas J. Phys. Chem. B 2003, 107, 2376-2385) yielded several peptide sequences (with lengths of 6-20 amino acids) with the potential for specific binding with six metal ions (Co2+, Ni2+, Cu2+, Zn2+, Cd2+ and Hg2+). The gas-phase association constants of the studied metal ions with these de novo designed peptides were experimentally determined by MALDI mass spectrometry by using 3,4,5-trihydroxyacetophenone as a matrix, whereas the thermodynamic parameters of the metal-ion coordination in the condensed phase were measured by isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC), chelatometry and NMR spectroscopy methods. The data indicate that some of the computationally predicted peptides are potential M2+-specific metal-ion chelators. PMID:18633954

  7. Amino acid absorption and homeostasis in mice lacking the intestinal peptide transporter PEPT1.

    PubMed

    Nässl, Anna-Maria; Rubio-Aliaga, Isabel; Fenselau, Henning; Marth, Mena Katharina; Kottra, Gabor; Daniel, Hannelore

    2011-07-01

    The intestinal peptide transporter PEPT1 mediates the uptake of di- and tripeptides derived from dietary protein breakdown into epithelial cells. Whereas the transporter appears to be essential to compensate for the reduced amino acid delivery in patients with mutations in amino acid transporter genes, such as in cystinuria or Hartnup disease, its physiological role in overall amino acid absorption is still not known. To assess the quantitative importance of PEPT1 in overall amino acid absorption and metabolism, PEPT1-deficient mice were studied by using brush border membrane vesicles, everted gut sacs, and Ussing chambers, as well as by transcriptome and proteome analysis of intestinal tissue samples. Neither gene expression nor proteome profiling nor functional analysis revealed evidence for any compensatory changes in the levels and/or function of transporters for free amino acids in the intestine. However, most plasma amino acid levels were increased in Pept1(-/-) compared with Pept1(+/+) animals, suggesting that amino acid handling is altered. Plasma appearance rates of (15)N-labeled amino acids determined after intragastric administration of a low dose of protein remained unchanged, whereas administration of a large protein load via gavage revealed marked differences in plasma appearance of selected amino acids. PEPT1 seems, therefore, important for overall amino acid absorption only after high dietary protein intake when amino acid transport processes are saturated and PEPT1 can provide additional absorption capacity. Since renal amino acid excretion remained unchanged, elevated basal concentrations of plasma amino acids in PEPT1-deficient animals seem to arise mainly from alterations in hepatic amino acid metabolism. PMID:21350187

  8. Analysis of Protein-RNA and Protein-Peptide Interactions in Equine Infectious Anemia

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Jae-Hyung

    2007-01-01

    Macromolecular interactions are essential for virtually all cellular functions including signal transduction processes, metabolic processes, regulation of gene expression and immune responses. This dissertation focuses on the characterization of two important macromolecular interactions involved in the relationship between Equine Infectious Anemia Virus (EIAV) and its host cell in horse: (1) the interaction between the EIAV Rev protein and its binding site, the Rev-responsive element (RRE) and (2) interactions between equine MHC class I molecules and epitope peptides derived from EIAV proteins. EIAV, one of the most divergent members of the lentivirus family, has a single-stranded RNA genome and carries several regulatory and structural proteins within its viral particle. Rev is an essential EIAV regulatory encoded protein that interacts with the viral RRE, a specific binding site in the viral mRNA. Using a combination of experimental and computational methods, the interactions between EIAV Rev and RRE were characterized in detail. EIAV Rev was shown to have a bipartite RNA binding domain contain two arginine rich motifs (ARMs). The RRE secondary structure was determined and specific structural motifs that act as cis-regulatory elements for EIAV Rev-RRE interaction were identified. Interestingly, a structural motif located in the high affinity Rev binding site is well conserved in several diverse lentiviral genoes, including HIV-1. Macromolecular interactions involved in the immune response of the horse to EIAV infection were investigated by analyzing complexes between MHC class I proteins and epitope peptides derived from EIAV Rev, Env and Gag proteins. Computational modeling results provided a mechanistic explanation for the experimental finding that a single amino acid change in the peptide binding domain of the quine MHC class I molecule differentially affectes the recognitino of specific epitopes by EIAV-specific CTL. Together, the findings in this

  9. Assay of Protein and Peptide Adducts of Cholesterol Ozonolysis Products by Hydrophobic and Click Enrichment Methods

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Cholesterol undergoes ozonolysis to afford a variety of oxysterol products, including cholesterol-5,6-epoxide (CholEp) and the isomeric aldehydes secosterol A (seco A) and secosterol B (seco B). These oxysterols display numerous important biological activities, including protein adduction; however, much remains to be learned about the identity of the reactive species and the range of proteins modified by these oxysterols. Here, we synthesized alkynyl derivatives of cholesterol-derived oxysterols and employed a straightforward detection method to establish secosterols A and B as the most protein-reactive of the oxysterols tested. Model adduction studies with an amino acid, peptides, and proteins provide evidence for the potential role of secosterol dehydration products in protein adduction. Hydrophobic separation methods—Folch extraction and solid phase extraction (SPE)—were successfully applied to enrich oxysterol-adducted peptide species, and LC-MS/MS analysis of a model peptide–seco adduct revealed a unique fragmentation pattern (neutral loss of 390 Da) for that species. Coupling a hydrophobic enrichment method with proteomic analysis utilizing characteristic fragmentation patterns facilitates the identification of secosterol-modified peptides and proteins in an adducted protein. More broadly, these improved enrichment methods may give insight into the role of oxysterols and ozone exposure in the pathogenesis of a variety of diseases, including atherosclerosis, Alzheimer’s disease, Parkinson’s disease, and asthma. PMID:25185119

  10. Rapid Online Non-Enzymatic Protein Digestion Combining Microwave Heating Acid Hydrolysis and Electrochemical Oxidation

    PubMed Central

    Basile, Franco; Hauser, Nicolas

    2010-01-01

    We report an online non-enzymatic method for site-specific digestion of proteins to yield peptides that are well suited for collision induced dissociation (CID) tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS). The method combines online microwave heating acid hydrolysis at aspartic acid and online electrochemical oxidation at tryptophan and tyrosine. The combined microwave/electrochemical (microwave/echem) digestion is reproducible and produces peptides with an average sequence length of 10 amino acids. This peptide length is similar to the average peptide length of 9 amino acids obtained by digestion of proteins with the enzyme trypsin. As a result, the peptides produced by this novel non-enzymatic digestion method, when analyzed by ESI-MS, produce protonated molecules with mostly +1 and +2 charge states. The combination of these two non-enzymatic methods overcomes shortcomings with each individual method in that: i) peptides generated by the microwave-hydrolysis method have an average amino acid length of 16 amino acids, and ii) the inability of the electrochemical-cleavage method to reproducibly digest proteins with molecular masses above 4 kDa. Preliminary results are presented on the application and utility of this rapid online digestion (total of 6 min digestion time) on a series of standard peptides and proteins as well as an E. coli protein extract. PMID:21138252

  11. Automated carboxy-terminal sequence analysis of peptides and proteins using diphenyl phosphoroisothiocyanatidate.

    PubMed Central

    Bailey, J. M.; Nikfarjam, F.; Shenoy, N. R.; Shively, J. E.

    1992-01-01

    Proteins and peptides can be sequenced from the carboxy-terminus with isothiocyanate reagents to produce amino acid thiohydantoin derivatives. Previous studies in our laboratory have focused on the automation of the thiocyanate chemistry using acetic anhydride and trimethylsilylisothiocyanate (TMS-ITC) to derivatize the C-terminal amino acid to a thiohydantoin and sodium trimethylsilanolate for specific hydrolysis of the derivatized C-terminal amino acid (Bailey, J.M., Shenoy, N.R., Ronk, M., & Shively, J.E., 1992, Protein Sci. 1, 68-80). A major limitation of this approach was the need to activate the C-terminus with acetic anhydride. We now describe the use of a new reagent, diphenyl phosphoroisothiocyanatidate (DPP-ITC) and pyridine, which combines the activation and derivatization steps to produce peptidylthiohydantoins. Previous work by Kenner et al. (Kenner, G.W., Khorana, H.G., & Stedman, R.J., 1953, Chem. Soc. J., 673-678) with this reagent demonstrated slow kinetics. Several days were required for complete reaction. We show here that the inclusion of pyridine was found to promote the formation of C-terminal thiohydantoins by DPP-ITC resulting in complete conversion of the C-terminal amino acid to a thiohydantoin in less than 1 h. Reagents such as imidazole, triazine, and tetrazole were also found to promote the reaction with DPP-ITC as effectively as pyridine. General base catalysts, such as triethylamine, do not promote the reaction, but are required to convert the C-terminal carboxylic acid to a salt prior to the reaction with DPP-ITC and pyridine. By introducing the DPP-ITC reagent and pyridine in separate steps in an automated sequencer, we observed improved sequencing yields for amino acids normally found difficult to derivatize with acetic anhydride/TMS-ITC. This was particularly true for aspartic acid, which now can be sequenced in yields comparable to most of the other amino acids. Automated programs are described for the C-terminal sequencing of

  12. Regulation of peptide YY homeostasis by gastric acid and gastrin.

    PubMed

    Gomez, G; Padilla, L; Udupi, V; Tarasova, N; Sundler, F; Townsend, C M; Thompson, J C; Greeley, G H

    1996-04-01

    Peptide YY (PYY) is a gut hormone localized primarily in the distal bowel. Because circulating PYY inhibits gastric acid secretion, we investigated the effects of gastric acid secretion and gastrin on gene expression and secretion of PYY. In conscious dogs, PYY release in response to oral food was inhibited (P < 0.05) by pharmacologic inhibition of gastric acid secretion (omeprazole, famotidine). In rats, omeprazole treatment resulted in a significant elevation in serum gastrin concentrations and a simultaneous decrease in PYY messenger RNA (mRNA) and peptide levels in the colon; administration of a gastrin receptor antagonist (L365, 260) prevented the inhibitory actions of omeprazole on colonic PYY mRNA levels. In athymic-nude mice, implantation of a human gastrinoma resulted in an elevation of serum gastrin concentrations and a concomitant depression of colonic PYY mRNA levels. We conclude that endogenous gastric acid secretion up-regulates PYY release and PYY mRNA expression. Circulating gastrin acts to down-regulate PYY release and PYY mRNA expression. This study provides evidence that foregut functions (i.e., gastric acid secretion and gastrin release) exert control over an antiacid signal (e.g. PYY release) emanating from the hindgut. PMID:8625912

  13. The design of peptide-based substrates for the cdc2 protein kinase.

    PubMed Central

    Srinivasan, J; Koszelak, M; Mendelow, M; Kwon, Y G; Lawrence, D S

    1995-01-01

    The substrate sequence specificity of the cdc2 protein kinase from Pisaster ochraceus has been evaluated. The peptide, Ac-Ser-Pro-Gly-Arg-Arg-Arg-Arg-Lys-amide, serves as an efficient cdc2 kinase substrate with a Km of 1.50 +/- 0.04 microM and a Vmax. of 12.00 +/- 0.18 mumol/min per mg. The amino acid sequence of this peptide is not based on any sequence in a known protein substrate of the cyclin-dependent kinase, but rather was designed from structural attributes that appear to be important in the majority of cdc2 substrates. The cyclin-dependent enzyme is remarkably indiscriminate in its ability to recognize and phosphorylate peptides that contain an assortment of structurally diverse residues at the P-2, P-1 and P+2 positions. However, peptides that contain a free N-terminal serine or lack an arginine at the P+4 position are relatively poor substrates. These aspects of the substrate specificity of the cdc2 protein kinase are compared and contrasted with the previously reported substrate specificity of a cdc2-like protein kinase from bovine brain [Beaudette, Lew and Wang (1993) J. Biol. Chem. 268, 20825-20830]. PMID:7639712

  14. Investigating the inclusion properties of aromatic amino acids complexing beta-cyclodextrins in model peptides.

    PubMed

    Caso, Jolanda Valentina; Russo, Luigi; Palmieri, Maddalena; Malgieri, Gaetano; Galdiero, Stefania; Falanga, Annarita; Isernia, Carla; Iacovino, Rosa

    2015-10-01

    Cyclodextrins are commonly used as complexing agents in biological, pharmaceutical, and industrial applications since they have an effect on protein thermal and proteolytic stability, refolding yields, solubility, and taste masking. β-cyclodextrins (β-CD), because of their cavity size are a perfectly suited complexing agent for many common guest moieties. In the case of peptide-cyclodextrin and protein-cyclodextrin host-guest complexes the aromatic amino acids are reported to be the principal responsible of the interaction. For these reasons, we have investigated the inclusion properties of nine designed tripeptides, obtained permuting the position of two L-alanines (Ala, A) with that of one L-tryptophan (Trp, W), L-phenylalanine (Phe, F), or L-tyrosine (Tyr, Y), respectively. Interestingly, the position of the aromatic side-chain in the sequence appears to modulate the β-CD:peptide binding constants, determined via UV-Vis and NMR spectroscopy, which in turn assumes values higher than those reported for the single amino acid. The tripeptides containing a tyrosine showed the highest binding constants, with the central position in the Ac-AYA-NH2 peptide becoming the most favorite for the interaction. A combined NMR and Molecular Docking approach permitted to build detailed complex models, highlighting the stabilizing interactions of the neighboring amino acids backbone atoms with the upper rim of the β-CD. PMID:25985927

  15. High level expression of peptides and proteins using cytochrome b5 as a fusion host.

    PubMed

    Mitra, Ashima; Chakrabarti, Kalyan Sundar; Shahul Hameed, M S; Srinivas, Kalyan V; Senthil Kumar, Ganesan; Sarma, Siddhartha P

    2005-05-01

    A novel fusion protein system based on the highly soluble heme-binding domain of cytochrome b5 has been designed. The ability of cytochrome b5 to increase the levels of expression and solubility of target proteins has been tested by expressing several proteins and peptides, viz., alpha hemoglobin stabilizing protein, the regulatory subunits of acetohydroxy acid synthase I (ilvM) and II (ilvN), the carboxy terminal domains of mouse neuronal kinesin and pantothenate synthatase, two peptide toxins from cone snails, and the inactivation gate from the brain voltage gated sodium channel, NaV1.2. The fusion protein system has been designed to incorporate protease cleavage sites for commonly used proteases, viz., enterokinase, Factor Xa, and Tobacco etch virus protease. Accumulation of expressed protein as a function of time may be visually ascertained by the fact that the cells take on a bright red color during the course of induction. In all the cases tested so far, the fusion protein accumulates in the soluble fraction to high levels. A novel purification protocol has been designed to purify the fusion proteins using metal affinity chromatography, without the need of a hexahistidine-tag. Mass spectral analysis has shown that the fusion proteins are of full length. CD studies have shown that the solubilized fusion proteins are structured. The proteins of interest may be cleaved from the parent protein by either chemical or enzymatic means. The results presented here demonstrate the versatility of the cytochrome b5 based fusion system for the production of peptides and small proteins (<15 kDa). PMID:15802225

  16. Photosensitizing effect of cations on amino acids and peptides.

    PubMed

    Bogdanova, N P; Khenokh, M A

    1969-01-01

    In connection with a study of the chemical evolution of abiogenically synthesized organic compounds on primitive Earth and the physical conditions of other planets, this paper reports the experimental results obtained by the photolysis of solutions of aliphatic amino acids (glycine, alanine, valine, leucine, n. leucine) and peptides in the atmosphere of the air, N2, Ar and CO2 in the presence of the most simple photocatalyzers-cations of sulphates. The evidence shows that the photochemical conversion of NH2 acids depends on the content of the atmosphere. The decay of NH2-group is most active in air. N2 and Ar exert no significant influence on deamination, whereas in the atmosphere of CO2 the formation of ammonia in valine, for example, was only 29 per cent of its total amount during photolysis in the air. Cu2+ and Fe2+ catalyzed while Al3+ inhibited the ammonia excretion. The formation of acetaldehyde during alanine photolysis was actually independent from the atmosphere of N2 and was inhibited in Ar and CO2. Oxydative processes inducing the formation of glyoxalic acid and formaldehyde were sharply inhibited in Ar, N2 and CO2. Under the influence of ultraviolet light of the decay of NH2-acids is also accompanied by the formation of new NH2-acids. The photosensitizing effect of cations induces a rupture of -CO-NH-bonds in peptides and, provided heavy radiation doses, prevents the formation of new NH2-acids. The longer the dipeptide chain, the more significant the quantum yield of its decomposition. The photolysis of dipeptides, leading to their decay, does not necessarily induce a hydrolytic rupture of -CO-NH-bonds resulting in the formation of three amino acids. The results obtained permit approaching problems concerning the effect of the gas content of the atmosphere and various cations (photocatalyzers) on photolytic conversion of abiogenically synthesized and biogenically significant substances, amino acids for example, at the action of ultraviolet light. PMID

  17. Solvent and conformation dependence of amide I vibrations in peptides and proteins containing proline

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roy, Santanu; Lessing, Joshua; Meisl, Georg; Ganim, Ziad; Tokmakoff, Andrei; Knoester, Jasper; Jansen, Thomas L. C.

    2011-12-01

    We present a mixed quantum-classical model for studying the amide I vibrational dynamics (predominantly CO stretching) in peptides and proteins containing proline. There are existing models developed for determining frequencies of and couplings between the secondary amide units. However, these are not applicable to proline because this amino acid has a tertiary amide unit. Therefore, a new parametrization is required for infrared-spectroscopic studies of proteins that contain proline, such as collagen, the most abundant protein in humans and animals. Here, we construct the electrostatic and dihedral maps accounting for solvent and conformation effects on frequency and coupling for the proline unit. We examine the quality and the applicability of these maps by carrying out spectral simulations of a number of peptides with proline in D2O and compare with experimental observations.

  18. Enzymatic generation of peptides from potato proteins by selected proteases and characterization of their structural properties.

    PubMed

    Waglay, Amanda; Karboune, Salwa

    2016-03-01

    The use of low grade starting material for the generation of peptides with bioactivity properties is of interest. The proteins from the potato starch industry byproduct is a promising source, as several health benefits may be associated with their hydrolysates. The efficiency of selected proteases (Novo Pro-D, Alcalase, Flavourzyme, and Papain), exhibiting different substrate specificities and cleavage action modes, to hydrolyze potato protein isolate (patatin and protease inhibitors) was investigated. Novo Pro-D resulted in the lowest degree of hydrolysis, whereas Alcalase, Flavourzyme, and Papain exhibited a high catalytic efficiency for the hydrolysis of potato proteins. The degree of hydrolysis behaved in a concentration dependent manner. However, the end-product profile (peptides and free amino acids) was dependent not only on the protease specificity, its cleavage action mode (endo/exo) and the availability of the intermediate substrates but also on the contribution of the protease inhibitors to the reaction kinetics through their inhibitory effects. Indeed, the dependence of the exo-activity on the catalytic efficiency of the endo-action of protease was shown to be significant. Papain generated more unique peptide sequences with homology assessment matching several potato proteins when compared with Flavourzyme. This can be attributed to the high exo-peptidase activity of Flavourzyme resulting in the generation of shorter peptides which were difficult to match. Flavourzyme produced more peptides originated from patatin fraction, whereas Papain resulted in the release of more peptides corresponding to the protease inhibitor fractions. © 2016 American Institute of Chemical Engineers Biotechnol. Prog., 32:420-429, 2016. PMID:26871415

  19. Bioinspired silicification of silica-binding peptide-silk protein chimeras: comparison of chemically and genetically produced proteins.

    PubMed

    Canabady-Rochelle, Laetitia L S; Belton, David J; Deschaume, Olivier; Currie, Heather A; Kaplan, David L; Perry, Carole C

    2012-03-12

    Novel protein chimeras constituted of "silk" and a silica-binding peptide (KSLSRHDHIHHH) were synthesized by genetic or chemical approaches and their influence on silica-silk based chimera composite formation evaluated. Genetic chimeras were constructed from 6 or 15 repeats of the 32 amino acid consensus sequence of Nephila clavipes spider silk ([SGRGGLGGQG AGAAAAAGGA GQGGYGGLGSQG](n)) to which one silica binding peptide was fused at the N terminus. For the chemical chimera, 28 equiv of the silica binding peptide were chemically coupled to natural Bombyx mori silk after modification of tyrosine groups by diazonium coupling and EDC/NHS activation of all acid groups. After silica formation under mild, biomaterial-compatible conditions, the effect of peptide addition on the properties of the silk and chimeric silk-silica composite materials was explored. The composite biomaterial properties could be related to the extent of silica condensation and to the higher number of silica binding sites in the chemical chimera as compared with the genetically derived variants. In all cases, the structure of the protein/chimera in solution dictated the type of composite structure that formed with the silica deposition process having little effect on the secondary structural composition of the silk-based materials. Similarly to our study of genetic silk based chimeras containing the R5 peptide (SSKKSGSYSGSKGSKRRIL), the role of the chimeras (genetic and chemical) used in the present study resided more in aggregation and scaffolding than in the catalysis of condensation. The variables of peptide identity, silk construct (number of consensus repeats or silk source), and approach to synthesis (genetic or chemical) can be used to "tune" the properties of the composite materials formed and is a general approach that can be used to prepare a range of materials for biomedical and sensor-based applications. PMID:22229696

  20. Targeting diverse protein–protein interaction interfaces with α/β-peptides derived from the Z-domain scaffold

    SciTech Connect

    Checco, James W.; Kreitler, Dale F.; Thomas, Nicole C.; Belair, David G.; Rettko, Nicholas J.; Murphy, William L.; Forest, Katrina T.; Gellman, Samuel H.

    2015-04-14

    Peptide-based agents derived from well-defined scaffolds offer an alternative to antibodies for selective and high-affinity recognition of large and topologically complex protein surfaces. Here, we describe a strategy for designing oligomers containing both α- and β-amino acid residues ("α/β-peptides") that mimic several peptides derived from the three-helix bundle "Z-domain" scaffold. We show that α/β-peptides derived from a Z-domain peptide targeting vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) can structurally and functionally mimic the binding surface of the parent peptide while exhibiting significantly decreased susceptibility to proteolysis. The tightest VEGF-binding α/β-peptide inhibits the VEGF₁₆₅-induced proliferation of human umbilical vein endothelial cells. We demonstrate the versatility of this strategy by showing how principles underlying VEGF signaling inhibitors can be rapidly extended to produce Z-domain–mimetic α/β-peptides that bind to two other protein partners, IgG and tumor necrosis factor-α. Because well-established selection techniques can identify high-affinity Z-domain derivatives from large DNA-encoded libraries, our findings should enable the design of biostable α/β-peptides that bind tightly and specifically to diverse targets of biomedical interest. Such reagents would be useful for diagnostic and therapeutic applications.

  1. Protective immunogenicity of two synthetic peptides selected from the amino acid sequence of Bordetella pertussis toxin subunit S1.

    PubMed Central

    Askelöf, P; Rodmalm, K; Wrangsell, G; Larsson, U; Svenson, S B; Cowell, J L; Undén, A; Bartfai, T

    1990-01-01

    Two peptides, corresponding to amino acids 1-17 and 169-186 of the amino acid sequence of pertussis toxin (PT) subunit S1, were synthesized and coupled to the diphtheria toxin cross-reactive mutant protein CRM 197 and evaluated for immunogenicity and protective capacity against PT challenge in vivo. The peptide-CRM conjugates induced high antibody titers against native toxin in mice (BALB/c, C57/Black, and outbred NMRI) as measured by ELISA. Upon PT challenge (0.5 microgram of toxin) of the NMRI mice, the CRM conjugates of peptides 1-17 and 169-186 fully protected the mice from PT-induced leukocytosis. Immunization with the corresponding bovine serum albumin conjugates of these two peptides also fully protected mice. Rabbit antiserum to the peptide 1-17-CRM conjugate was highly efficient in inhibiting the ADP-ribosylating activity of PT but did not neutralize the clustering effect of PT on Chinese hamster ovary cells. In contrast, the rabbit antiserum raised against the peptide 169-186-CRM conjugate neutralized the clustering effect of PT on Chinese hamster ovary cells but did not inhibit the enzymatic activity of PT. Peptide 169-186-CRM conjugates mimic the immunoglobulin binding properties of PT and also cause clustering of Chinese hamster ovary cells. The CRM conjugates of these two peptides constitute a synthetic pertussis vaccine candidate with the ability to provide a chemically well-defined, safe, and efficient pertussis vaccine. Images PMID:2304902

  2. Cooperative Self-Assembly of Peptide Gelators and Proteins

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Molecular self-assembly provides a versatile route for the production of nanoscale materials for medical and technological applications. Herein, we demonstrate that the cooperative self-assembly of amphiphilic small molecules and proteins can have drastic effects on supramolecular nanostructuring of resulting materials. We report that mesoscale, fractal-like clusters of proteins form at concentrations that are orders of magnitude lower compared to those usually associated with molecular crowding at room temperature. These protein clusters have pronounced effects on the molecular self-assembly of aromatic peptide amphiphiles (fluorenylmethoxycarbonyl- dipeptides), resulting in a reversal of chiral organization and enhanced order through templating and binding. Moreover, the morphological and mechanical properties of the resultant nanostructured gels can be controlled by the cooperative self-assembly of peptides and protein fractal clusters, having implications for biomedical applications where proteins and peptides are both present. In addition, fundamental insights into cooperative interplay of molecular interactions and confinement by clusters of chiral macromolecules is relevant to gaining understanding of the molecular mechanisms of relevance to the origin of life and development of synthetic mimics of living systems. PMID:24256076

  3. Signal Peptide and Propeptide Optimization for Heterologous Protein Secretion in Lactococcus lactis

    PubMed Central

    Le Loir, Y.; Nouaille, S.; Commissaire, J.; Brétigny, L.; Gruss, A.; Langella, P.

    2001-01-01

    Lactic acid bacteria are food-grade microorganisms that are potentially good candidates for production of heterologous proteins of therapeutical or technological interest. We developed a model for heterologous protein secretion in Lactococcus lactis using the staphylococcal nuclease (Nuc). The effects on protein secretion of alterations in either (i) signal peptide or (ii) propeptide sequences were examined. (i) Replacement of the native Nuc signal peptide (SPNuc) by that of L. lactis protein Usp45 (SPUsp) resulted in greatly improved secretion efficiency (SE). Pulse-chase experiments showed that Nuc secretion kinetics was better when directed by SPUsp than when directed by SPNuc. This SPUsp effect on Nuc secretion is not due to a better antifolding activity, since SPUsp:Nuc precursor proteins display enzymatic activity in vitro, while SPNuc:Nuc precursor proteins do not. (ii) Deletion of the native Nuc propeptide dramatically reduces Nuc SE, regardless of which SP is used. We previously reported that a synthetic propeptide, LEISSTCDA, could efficiently replace the native Nuc propeptide to promote heterologous protein secretion in L. lactis (Y. Le Loir, A. Gruss, S. D. Ehrlich, and P. Langella, J. Bacteriol. 180:1895–1903, 1998). To determine whether the LEISSTCDA effect is due to its acidic residues, specific substitutions were introduced, resulting in neutral or basic propeptides. Effects of these two new propeptides and of a different acidic synthetic propeptide were tested. Acidic and neutral propeptides were equally effective in enhancing Nuc SE and also increased Nuc yields. In contrast, the basic propeptide strongly reduced both SE and the quantity of secreted Nuc. We have shown that the combination of the native SPUsp and a neutral or acidic synthetic propeptide leads to a significant improvement in SE and in the quantity of synthesized Nuc. These observations will be valuable in the production of heterologous proteins in L. lactis. PMID:11526014

  4. The use of N-methylated peptides and depsipeptides to probe the binding of heptapeptide substrates to cAMP-dependent protein kinase.

    PubMed

    Bramson, H N; Thomas, N E; Kaiser, E T

    1985-12-15

    Peptide 1, Leu-Arg-Arg-Ala-Ser-Leu-Gly, is an excellent substrate for cAMP-dependent protein kinase. While the importance of both arginines for effective enzyme-substrate interactions has been shown, it has not been known whether the kinase will catalyze phosphorylation of substrates which contain other than peptide bonds. We report that analogs of peptide 1 which contain depsi linkages replacing selected amide bonds are good protein kinase substrates. Therefore, with the possible exception of the serine amide proton, no peptide 1 amide hydrogens are involved in peptide-peptide or peptide-enzyme hydrogen bonding crucial to defining the high substrate activity of this peptide. It is thus unlikely that peptide 1 is bound by the protein kinase while in an alpha-helical or a beta-turn structure. Three peptides were found to be very poor substrates for protein kinase, those containing N-methyl amino acids in place of Ser5 or Leu6 and a peptide containing Pro in place of Leu6. These peptides are poor substrates for the enzyme possibly because they are unable to adopt a conformation necessary for catalysis of phosphoryl group transfer to occur or due to steric effects in the enzymatic active site. PMID:4066678

  5. Chicken Egg Shell Membrane Associated Proteins and Peptides.

    PubMed

    Makkar, Sarbjeet; Liyanage, Rohana; Kannan, Lakshmi; Packialakshmi, Balamurugan; Lay, Jack O; Rath, Narayan C

    2015-11-11

    Egg shells are poultry industry byproducts with potential for use in various biological and agricultural applications. We have been interested in the membranes underlying the calcareous shell as a feed supplement, which showed potential to improve immunity and performance of post hatch poultry. Therefore, to determine their protein and peptide profiles, we extracted the egg shell membranes (ESM) from fresh unfertilized eggs with methanol and guanidine hydrochloride (GdHCl) to obtain soluble proteins for analysis by mass spectrometry. The methanol extract was subjected to matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization (MALDI), electrospray ionization (ESI), high-performance reverse phase liquid chromatographic separation (HPLC), and tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) to determine its peptide and protein profiles. The GdHCl extract was subjected to ESI-HPLC-MS/MS following trypsin digestion of reduced/alkylated proteins. Nine proteins from the methanol extract and >275 proteins from the GdHCl extract were tentatively identified. The results suggested the presence of several abundant proteins from egg whites, such as ovoalbumin, ovotransferrin, and lysozyme as well as many others associated with antimicrobial, biomechanical, cytoskeletal organizational, cell signaling, and enzyme activities. Collagens, keratin, agrin, and laminin were some of the structural proteins present in the ESM. The methanol-soluble fraction contained several clusterin peptides and defensins, particularly, two isoforms of gallin. The ratios of the two isoforms of gallin differed between the membranes obtained from brown and white eggs. The high abundance of several antimicrobial, immunomodulatory, and other bioactive proteins in the ESM along with its potential to entrap various microbes and antigens may make it a suitable vehicle for oral immunization of post hatch poultry and improve their disease resistance. PMID:26485361

  6. Short communication: Measuring the angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitory activity of an 8-amino acid (8mer) fragment of the C12 antihypertensive peptide

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    An eight amino acid fragment (PFPEVFGK) of a known milk protein-derived antihypertensive peptide was synthesized by microwave-assisted solid phase peptide synthesis and purified by reverse phase HPLC. Its ability to inhibit the angiotensin-converting enzyme was assessed and compared to that of the ...

  7. Heparin-binding peptide as a novel affinity tag for purification of recombinant proteins.

    PubMed

    Morris, Jacqueline; Jayanthi, Srinivas; Langston, Rebekah; Daily, Anna; Kight, Alicia; McNabb, David S; Henry, Ralph; Kumar, Thallapuranam Krishnaswamy Suresh

    2016-10-01

    Purification of recombinant proteins constitutes a significant part of the downstream processing in biopharmaceutical industries. Major costs involved in the production of bio-therapeutics mainly depend on the number of purification steps used during the downstream process. Affinity chromatography is a widely used method for the purification of recombinant proteins expressed in different expression host platforms. Recombinant protein purification is achieved by fusing appropriate affinity tags to either N- or C- terminus of the target recombinant proteins. Currently available protein/peptide affinity tags have proved quite useful in the purification of recombinant proteins. However, these affinity tags suffer from specific limitations in their use under different conditions of purification. In this study, we have designed a novel 34-amino acid heparin-binding affinity tag (HB-tag) for the purification of recombinant proteins expressed in Escherichia coli (E. coli) cells. HB-tag fused recombinant proteins were overexpressed in E. coli in high yields. A one-step heparin-Sepharose-based affinity chromatography protocol was developed to purify HB-fused recombinant proteins to homogeneity using a simple sodium chloride step gradient elution. The HB-tag has also been shown to facilitate the purification of target recombinant proteins from their 8 M urea denatured state(s). The HB-tag has been demonstrated to be successfully released from the fusion protein by an appropriate protease treatment to obtain the recombinant target protein(s) in high yields. Results of the two-dimensional NMR spectroscopy experiments indicate that the purified recombinant target protein(s) exist in the native conformation. Polyclonal antibodies raised against the HB-peptide sequence, exhibited high binding specificity and sensitivity to the HB-fused recombinant proteins (∼10 ng) in different crude cell extracts obtained from diverse expression hosts. In our opinion, the HB-tag provides a

  8. Discordance between in silico & in vitro analyses of ACE inhibitory & antioxidative peptides from mixed milk tryptic whey protein hydrolysate.

    PubMed

    Chatterjee, Alok; Kanawjia, S K; Khetra, Yogesh; Saini, Prerna

    2015-09-01

    ACE inhibitory and antioxidative peptides identified by LCMS/MS, from mixed milk (Bubalus bubalis and Bos taurus) tryptic whey protein hydrolysate, were compared with the in silico predictions. α la and ß lg sequences, both from Bubalus bubalis and Bos taurus, were used for in silico study. SWISS-PROT and BIOPEP protein libraries were accessed for prediction of peptide generation. Study observed gaps in the prediction versus actual results, which remain unaddressed in the literature. Many peptides obtained in vitro, were not reflected in in silico predictions. Differences in identified peptides in separate libraries were observed too. In in silico prediction, peptides with known biological activities were also not reflected. Predictions, towards generation of bioactive peptides, based upon in silico release of proteins and amino acid sequences from different sources and thereupon validation in relation to actual results has often been reported in research literature. Given that computer aided simulation for prediction purposes is an effective research direction, regular updating of protein libraries and an effectual integration, for more precise results, is critical. The gaps addressed between these two techniques of research, have not found any address in literature. Inclusion of more flexibility with the variables, within the tools being used for prediction, and a hierarchy based database with search options for various peptides, will further enhance the scope and strength of research. PMID:26344975

  9. Electrospinning of peptide and protein fibres: approaching the molecular scale.

    PubMed

    Nuansing, Wiwat; Frauchiger, Daniela; Huth, Florian; Rebollo, Amaia; Hillenbrand, Rainer; Bittner, Alexander M

    2013-01-01

    For the example of peptides and proteins, we contrast "natural" self-assembly, i.e. aggregation in solutions, with "forced" assembly by electrospinning, i.e. by application of strong electrical fields to concentrated solutions. We were able to spin fibres that contain short stretches of diameters down to 5 nm; the ultimate aim is a fibre of the size of a single molecule. Besides their wide biochemical relevance, small peptides can assemble to defined supramolecular structures such as fibres and tubes. While the main driving mechanism in electrospinning is certainly based on electrostatics, aromatic groups in peptides might play a directing role. We used fluorenyl and phenyl, whose i-stacking is not manifested in vibrational spectra, but is clearly visible in their crystal structures. The main differences between solid phases and single molecules are found for O-H and N-H stretching and bending vibrations, due to extensive hydrogen bonding in solids. However, we found that only proteins, but not peptides, can be spun into ultrathin fibres. Therefore, nanoscale analysis by SEM and AFM, and by infrared near-field microscopy are especially useful. The comparison of the amide bands from the infrared and Raman spectra, combined with circular dichroism spectroscopy, allowed us to assign secondary structures. Our results are not only useful for interpreting and refining current theories of self-assembly and electrospinning, but also for creating new scaffolds for the growth of sensitive cells. PMID:24611278

  10. Characterization and amino acid sequence of a fatty acid-binding protein from human heart.

    PubMed

    Offner, G D; Brecher, P; Sawlivich, W B; Costello, C E; Troxler, R F

    1988-05-15

    The complete amino acid sequence of a fatty acid-binding protein from human heart was determined by automated Edman degradation of CNBr, BNPS-skatole [3'-bromo-3-methyl-2-(2-nitrobenzenesulphenyl)indolenine], hydroxylamine, Staphylococcus aureus V8 proteinase, tryptic and chymotryptic peptides, and by digestion of the protein with carboxypeptidase A. The sequence of the blocked N-terminal tryptic peptide from citraconylated protein was determined by collisionally induced decomposition mass spectrometry. The protein contains 132 amino acid residues, is enriched with respect to threonine and lysine, lacks cysteine, has an acetylated valine residue at the N-terminus, and has an Mr of 14768 and an isoelectric point of 5.25. This protein contains two short internal repeated sequences from residues 48-54 and from residues 114-119 located within regions of predicted beta-structure and decreasing hydrophobicity. These short repeats are contained within two longer repeated regions from residues 48-60 and residues 114-125, which display 62% sequence similarity. These regions could accommodate the charged and uncharged moieties of long-chain fatty acids and may represent fatty acid-binding domains consistent with the finding that human heart fatty acid-binding protein binds 2 mol of oleate or palmitate/mol of protein. Detailed evidence for the amino acid sequences of the peptides has been deposited as Supplementary Publication SUP 50143 (23 pages) at the British Library Lending Division, Boston Spa, Yorkshire LS23 7BQ, U.K., from whom copies may be obtained as indicated in Biochem. J. (1988) 249, 5. PMID:3421901

  11. Cyclic and Macrocyclic Peptides as Chemical Tools To Recognise Protein Surfaces and Probe Protein-Protein Interactions.

    PubMed

    Cardote, Teresa A F; Ciulli, Alessio

    2016-04-19

    Targeting protein surfaces and protein-protein interactions (PPIs) with small molecules is a frontier goal of chemical biology and provides attractive therapeutic opportunities in drug discovery. The molecular properties of protein surfaces, including their shallow features and lack of deep binding pockets, pose significant challenges, and as a result have proved difficult to target. Peptides are ideal candidates for this mission due to their ability to closely mimic many structural features of protein interfaces. However, their inherently low intracellular stability and permeability and high in vivo clearance have thus far limited their biological applications. One way to improve these properties is to constrain the secondary structure of linear peptides by cyclisation. Herein we review various classes of cyclic and macrocyclic peptides as chemical probes of protein surfaces and modulators of PPIs. The growing interest in this area and recent advances provide evidence of the potential of developing peptide-like molecules that specifically target these interactions. PMID:26563831

  12. Increased yield of high purity recombinant human brain natriuretic peptide by acid hydrolysis of short fusion partner in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Kanumuri, Radha Madhavi; Bajji, Chitra; Tummuru, Rajesh R; Tatireddigari, Venkat R R Arva; Mangamoori, Lakshmi Narasu; Panati, Kalpana; Narala, Venkata Ramireddy

    2015-07-01

    Recombinant human B-type natriuretic peptide (rhBNP) is a 32-amino acid peptide used to treat congestive heart failure. In this paper, we report a method for the increased production of rhBNP in Escherichia coli with high purity. hBNP was cloned with a short growth hormone fusion partner coupled with a unique acid-labile dipeptide linker to cleave the fusion protein to release the rhBNP. The recombinant fusion protein was expressed as an inclusion body (IB) and the fermentation process was optimized to produce on large scale. The IBs were recovered by cell lysis, and the pure IBs were directly treated with diluted acid to get the target peptide from the fusion protein and the resultant peptide was purified by reversed phase chromatography. The final purity of the rhBNP was more than 99% with yield of 50mg per liter of culture, which is ten times higher than the previous reports. The purified rhBNP exhibited specific biological activity similar to the standard peptide in producing cyclic-guanosine monophosphate. PMID:25823948

  13. Isolation, purification and characterization of antioxidant peptidic fractions from a bovine liver sarcoplasmic protein thermolysin hydrolyzate.

    PubMed

    Di Bernardini, Roberta; Rai, Dilip K; Bolton, Declan; Kerry, Joseph; O'Neill, Eileen; Mullen, Anne Maria; Harnedy, Pádraigín; Hayes, Maria

    2011-02-01

    Sarcoplasmic proteins isolated from bovine livers were hydrolyzed using the enzyme thermolysin at 37°C for 2h. The hydrolyzates were filtered through molecular weight cut off membranes (MWCO) and filtrates were obtained. The water activity (a(w)) of unhydrolysed sarcoplasmic protein, full hydrolyzates, 10-kDa and 3-kDa filtrates were below the limit necessary for microbial growth. The antioxidant activities of both filtrates and fractions were assessed using the 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) radical scavenging activity assay, the ferric ion reducing antioxidant power (FRAP) assay and the Fe(2+) chelating ability assay. RP-HPLC was used for purification of the full hydrolyzates, the 10-kDa and the 3-kDa filtrates. The peptidic content of the full hydrolyzates, the 10-kDa and the 3-kDa filtrates were assessed using the Dumas method and peptide contents of each fraction were characterized using electrospray quadrupole time-of-flight (ESI-Q-TOF) mass spectrometry with the resultant spectrum analysed using the software programmes Protein Lynx Global Server 2.4. and TurboSEQUEST. Similarities between the amino acid composition of characterized peptides from each fraction and previously reported antioxidant peptides were found. This study demonstrates that meat by-product such as liver can be utilised as raw material for the generation of bioactive peptides with demonstrated antioxidant activities in vitro using the enzyme thermolysin. It is significant as it presents a potential opportunity for meat processors to use their waste streams for the generation of bioactive peptides for potential functional food use. PMID:21129427

  14. [Construction, fermentation and purification of high polymer spider dragline silk protein containing RGD peptide].

    PubMed

    Ruan, Chao-Ran; Huang, Jing-Xing; Wei, Mei-Hong; Li, Min

    2007-09-01

    Spider silk is a natural protein fibroin with excellent character as it is light and tenacious. It has a wild potential applications in the biomedical field due to its good biocompatibility and degradation. Arginine-glycine-aspartic acid (RGD) is a highly conserved amino acid sequence of many adhesion protein. Biological materials binding with RGD peptide in the surface can promote cells adhesion, migration and proliferation. Our lab had constructed the 16 muhimers with the introduced RGD peptide codons which involve cell adhesion for the first time. It was found that the mechanical capability of the 16 mulimer protein was very limited because of the big gap in molecular weight with nature spider proteins when it was used to made biomaterial scaffold.In this paper,based on the 16 multimers of the highly, repetitive sequence of spider dragline silk and with RGD peptide condons which has been constructed by our lab forestall, it was used to construct the 32 and 64 multimers sequence of spider dragline silk by the strategy of "head to tail". The 32 and 64 multimers were ligated into prokaryotic expression vector pET-30a, and then the B121 (DE3) pLysS. The fragments were in agreement with the desired through digestion, agarose gel electrophoresis respectively. By registration into the GenBank data-base, the serial numbers of DQ469929 and DQ837297 were gained respectively. The expression of recombinant protein was introduced by the addition of IPTG. SDS-PAGE analysis shows that the molecular weight of products expressed here are 102 kD and 196.6kD in agreement with the desired respectively. It was the first time for the high polymer spider dragline silk protein expressed in prokaryotic biology. Furthermore, a larger quantity of synthetical proteins with high density fermentation were searched after, and a suit of high efficient purification methods for 32 multimers protein were established. PMID:18051865

  15. Learning a peptide-protein binding affinity predictor with kernel ridge regression

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The cellular function of a vast majority of proteins is performed through physical interactions with other biomolecules, which, most of the time, are other proteins. Peptides represent templates of choice for mimicking a secondary structure in order to modulate protein-protein interaction. They are thus an interesting class of therapeutics since they also display strong activity, high selectivity, low toxicity and few drug-drug interactions. Furthermore, predicting peptides that would bind to a specific MHC alleles would be of tremendous benefit to improve vaccine based therapy and possibly generate antibodies with greater affinity. Modern computational methods have the potential to accelerate and lower the cost of drug and vaccine discovery by selecting potential compounds for testing in silico prior to biological validation. Results We propose a specialized string kernel for small bio-molecules, peptides and pseudo-sequences of binding interfaces. The kernel incorporates physico-chemical properties of amino acids and elegantly generalizes eight kernels, comprised of the Oligo, the Weighted Degree, the Blended Spectrum, and the Radial Basis Function. We provide a low complexity dynamic programming algorithm for the exact computation of the kernel and a linear time algorithm for it’s approximation. Combined with kernel ridge regression and SupCK, a novel binding pocket kernel, the proposed kernel yields biologically relevant and good prediction accuracy on the PepX database. For the first time, a machine learning predictor is capable of predicting the binding affinity of any peptide to any protein with reasonable accuracy. The method was also applied to both single-target and pan-specific Major Histocompatibility Complex class II benchmark datasets and three Quantitative Structure Affinity Model benchmark datasets. Conclusion On all benchmarks, our method significantly (p-value ≤ 0.057) outperforms the current state-of-the-art methods at predicting

  16. Mapping protein-protein interactions with phage-displayed combinatorial peptide libraries.

    SciTech Connect

    Kay, B. K.; Castagnoli, L.; Biosciences Division; Univ. of Rome

    2003-01-01

    This unit describes the process and analysis of affinity selecting bacteriophage M13 from libraries displaying combinatorial peptides fused to either a minor or major capsid protein. Direct affinity selection uses target protein bound to a microtiter plate followed by purification of selected phage by ELISA. Alternatively, there is a bead-based affinity selection method. These methods allow one to readily isolate peptide ligands that bind to a protein target of interest and use the consensus sequence to search proteomic databases for putative interacting proteins.

  17. Many overlapping peptides for protein hydrogen exchange experiments by the fragment separation-mass spectrometry method.

    PubMed

    Mayne, Leland; Kan, Zhong-Yuan; Chetty, Palaniappan Sevugan; Ricciuti, Alec; Walters, Benjamin T; Englander, S Walter

    2011-11-01

    Measurement of the naturally occurring hydrogen exchange (HX) behavior of proteins can in principle provide highly resolved thermodynamic and kinetic information on protein structure, dynamics, and interactions. The HX fragment separation-mass spectrometry method (HX-MS) is able to measure hydrogen exchange in biologically important protein systems that are not accessible to NMR methods. In order to achieve high structural resolution in HX-MS experiments, it will be necessary to obtain many sequentially overlapping peptide fragments and be able to identify and analyze them efficiently and accurately by mass spectrometry. This paper describes operations which, when applied to four different proteins ranging in size from 140 to 908 residues, routinely provides hundreds of useful unique peptides, covering the entire protein length many times over. Coverage in terms of the average number of peptide fragments that span each amino acid exceeds 10. The ability to achieve these results required the integrated application of experimental methods that are described here and a computer analysis program, called ExMS, described in a following paper. PMID:21952777

  18. Receptor Binding by Cholera Toxin B-Subunit and Amino Acid Modification Improves Minimal Peptide Immunogenicity

    PubMed Central

    Boberg, Andreas; Stålnacke, Alexandra; Bråve, Andreas; Hinkula, Jorma; Wahren, Britta; Carlin, Nils

    2012-01-01

    We increase our understanding of augmenting a cellular immune response, by using an HIV-1 protease-derived epitope (PR75–84), and variants thereof, coupled to the C-terminal, of the B subunit of cholera toxin (CTB). Fusion proteins were used for immunizations of HLA-A0201 transgenic C57BL/6 mice. We observed different capacities to elicit a cellular immune response by peptides with additions of five to ten amino acids to the PR epitope. There was a positive correlation between the magnitude of the elicited cellular immune response and the capacity of the fusion protein to bind GM-1. This binding capacity is affected by its ability to form natural pentamers of CTB. Our results suggest that functional CTB pentamers containing a foreign amino acid-modified epitope is a novel way to overcome the limited cellular immunogenicity of minimal peptide antigens. This way of using a functional assay as readout for improved cellular immunogenicity might become highly valuable for difficult immunogens such as short peptides (epitopes).

  19. Oxidative decarboxylation of free and peptide-linked amino acids in phagocytizing guinea pig granulocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Adeniyi-Jones, S K; Karnovsky, M L

    1981-01-01

    The oxidative decarboxylation of amino acids by a system consisting of myeloperoxidase-hydrogen peroxide-chloride has been demonstrated previously by others and the process has been considered to be part of the microbicidal armamentarium of some phagocytic leukocytes. We were able to translate these earlier observations, made on model systems, to intact guinea pig granulocytes. We could demonstrate differences in the cellular handling of peptide-linked amino acids as particles, compared with free amino acids. Specific inhibitors were used to explore two routes of oxidative decarboxylation: (a) the myeloperoxidase-catalyzed direct decarboxylation-deamination reaction, and (b) oxidation of alpha-keto acids after transamination of amino acids. These inhibitors were cyanide, azide, and tapazole for the former pathway, and amino-oxyacetate for the latter. Amino-oxyacetate profoundly inhibited the decarboxylation of free 14C-amino acids (alanine and aspartate) in both resting and stimulated cells, but had only a minimal effect on 14CO2 production from ingested insoluble 14C-protein. On the other hand, the peroxidase inhibitors cyanide, azide, and tapazole dramatically inhibited the production of 14CO2 from ingested particulate 14C-protein, but had only small effects on the decarboxylation of free amino acid. Soluble, uniformly labeled 14C-protein was not significantly converted to 14CO2 even in the presence of phagocytizable polystyrene beads. These observation suggest that the amino acids taken up by phagocytosis (e.g., as denatured protein particles) are oxidatively decarboxylated and deaminated in the phagosomes by the myeloperoxidase-hydrogen peroxide-chloride system; soluble free amino acids that enter the cytoplasm by diffusion or transport are oxidatively decarboxylated after transamination by the normal cellular amino acid oxidative pathway. PMID:6267101

  20. Measuring protein-protein and protein-nucleic Acid interactions by biolayer interferometry.

    PubMed

    Sultana, Azmiri; Lee, Jeffrey E

    2015-01-01

    Biolayer interferometry (BLI) is a simple, optical dip-and-read system useful for measuring interactions between proteins, peptides, nucleic acids, small molecules, and/or lipids in real time. In BLI, a biomolecular bait is immobilized on a matrix at the tip of a fiber-optic sensor. The binding between the immobilized ligand and another molecule in an analyte solution produces a change in optical thickness at the tip and results in a wavelength shift proportional to binding. BLI provides direct binding affinities and rates of association and dissociation. This unit describes an efficient approach using streptavidin-based BLI to analyze DNA-protein and protein-protein interactions. A quantitative set of equilibrium binding affinities (K(d)) and rates of association and dissociation (k(a)/k(d)) can be measured in minutes using nanomole quantities of sample. PMID:25640894

  1. Constrained Cyclic Peptides as Immunomodulatory Inhibitors of the CD2:CD58 Protein-Protein Interaction.

    PubMed

    Sable, Rushikesh; Durek, Thomas; Taneja, Veena; Craik, David J; Pallerla, Sandeep; Gauthier, Ted; Jois, Seetharama

    2016-08-19

    The interaction between the cell-cell adhesion proteins CD2 and CD58 plays a crucial role in lymphocyte recruitment to inflammatory sites, and inhibitors of this interaction have potential as immunomodulatory drugs in autoimmune diseases. Peptides from the CD2 adhesion domain were designed to inhibit CD2:CD58 interactions. To improve the stability of the peptides, β-sheet epitopes from the CD2 region implicated in CD58 recognition were grafted into the cyclic peptide frameworks of sunflower trypsin inhibitor and rhesus theta defensin. The designed multicyclic peptides were evaluated for their ability to modulate cell-cell interactions in three different cell adhesion assays, with one candidate, SFTI-a, showing potent activity in the nanomolar range (IC50: 51 nM). This peptide also suppresses the immune responses in T cells obtained from mice that exhibit the autoimmune disease rheumatoid arthritis. SFTI-a was resistant to thermal denaturation, as judged by circular dichroism spectroscopy and mass spectrometry, and had a half-life of ∼24 h in human serum. Binding of this peptide to CD58 was predicted by molecular docking studies and experimentally confirmed by surface plasmon resonance experiments. Our results suggest that cyclic peptides from natural sources are promising scaffolds for modulating protein-protein interactions that are typically difficult to target with small-molecule compounds. PMID:27337048

  2. Interactions of myelin basic protein with mixed dodecylphosphocholine/palmitoyllysophosphatidic acid micelles

    SciTech Connect

    Mendz, G.L. ); Brown, L.R. ); Martenson, R.E. )

    1990-03-06

    The interactions of myelin basic protein and peptides derived from it with detergent micelles of lysophosphatidylglycerol, lysophosphatidylserine, palmitoyllysophosphatidic acid, and sodium lauryl sulfate, and with mixed micelles of the neutral detergent dodecylphosphocholine and the negatively charged detergent palmitoyllysophosphatidic acid, were investigated by {sup 1}H NMR spectroscopy and circular dichroic spectropolarimetry. The results with single detergents suggested that there are discrete interaction sites in the protein molecule for neutral and anionic detergent micelles and that at least some of these sites are different for each type of detergent. The data on the binding of the protein and peptides to mixed detergent micelles suggested that intramolecular interactions in the intact protein and in one of the longer peptides limited the formation of helices and also that a balance between hydrophobic and ionic forces is achieved in the interactions of the peptides with the detergents. At high detergent/protein molar ratios, hydrophobic interactions appeared to be favored.

  3. Role of Nanotechnology in Delivery of Protein and Peptide Drugs.

    PubMed

    Patil, Sushilkumar; Vhora, Imran; Amrutiya, Jitendra; Lalani, Rohan; Misra, Ambikanandan

    2015-01-01

    The advent of recombinant DNA technology and computational designing has fueled the emergence of proteins and peptides as a new class of modern therapeutics such as vaccines, antigens, antibodies and hormones. Demand for such therapeutics has increased recently due to their distinct pharmacodynamic characteristics of specificity of action and high potency. However, their potential clinical applications are often hindered by involvement of factors which impact their therapeutic potential negatively. Large size, low permeability, conformational fragility, immunogenicity, metabolic degradation and short half-life results in poor bioavailability and inferior efficacy. These challenges have encouraged researchers to devise strategies for effective delivery of proteins and peptides. Recent advances made in nanotechnology are being sought to overcome aforesaid problems and to offer advantages such as higher drug loading, improved stability, sustained release, amenability for non-parenteral administration and targeting through surface modifications. This review focuses on elaborating the role of nanotechnology based formulations and associated challenges in protein and peptide delivery, their clinical outlook and future perspective. PMID:26323432

  4. [Recent progress of dry powder inhalation of proteins and peptides].

    PubMed

    Zhou, Jie-yu; Zhang, Lan; Mao, Shi-rui

    2015-07-01

    To provide theoretical and practical basis for the successful formulation design of physically-mixed inhalation dry powder of proteins and peptides, related references were collected, analyzed and summarized. In this review drug micronization technology and commonly used carriers for inhalation dry powder preparation were introduced. For proteins and peptides, supercritical fluid technology and spray-drying are more suitable because of their capabilities of keeping drug activity. Being approved by U. S. Food and Drug Administration, lactose has been extensively used as carriers in many inhalation products. Formulation and process factors influencing drug deposition in the lung, including carrier properties, drug-carrier ratio, blending order, mixing methods, mixing time and the interaction between drug and carrier, were elucidated. The size, shape and surface properties of carries all influence the interaction between drug and carrier. Besides, influence of micromeritic properties of the dry powder, such as particle size, shape, density, flowability, charge, dispersibility and hygroscopicity, on drug deposition in the lung was elaborated. Among these particle size plays the most crucial role in particle deposition in the lung. Moreover, based on the mechanisms of powder dispersity, some strategies to improve drug lung deposition were put forward, such as adding carrier fines, adding adhesive-controlling materials and reprocessing micronized drug. In order to design physically-mixed inhalation dry powder for proteins and peptides with high lung deposition, it is essential to study drug-carriers interactions systematically and illustrate the potential influence of formulation, process parameters and micromeritic properties of the powder. PMID:26552141

  5. A new strategy for site-specific protein modification: analysis of a Tat peptide-TAR RNA interaction.

    PubMed

    Tamilarasu, N; Zhang, J; Hwang, S; Rana, T M

    2001-01-01

    Site-specific modification of proteins and peptides with reporter molecules provides a powerful research tool in chemistry and biology. We report the synthesis and application of a tyrosine analogue, N-alpha-Fmoc-3-acetyl-L-tyrosine, for selective modification of proteins. As a model system, we synthesized the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) Tat peptide (amino acids 47-56) containing the arginine rich RNA-binding region and replaced the Tyr-47 with 3-acetyl-tyrosine. The acetyl-Tyr-Tat peptide was subsequently labeled with a fluorescein derivative to study RNA-protein interactions by fluorescence energy transfer experiments. Our results showed that the Tat peptide binds to the rhodamine labeled TAR RNA with a dissociation constant (KD) of 1.0 +/- 0.5 nM. This strategy of selective protein modification offers a versatile new procedure for labeling peptides of biological interest at a desired site when several nucleophilic side chains of lysine and cysteine are present. These methods would provide tools for postsynthetic peptide modification and introducing biophysical probes for structural and functional analysis of proteins. PMID:11312672

  6. Phosphorylation of synthetic peptides by a tyrosine protein kinase from the particulate fraction of a lymphoma cell line.

    PubMed Central

    Casnellie, J E; Harrison, M L; Pike, L J; Hellström, K E; Krebs, E G

    1982-01-01

    The particulate fraction from a lymphoma cell line, LSTRA, was found to contain an apparent high level of tyrosine protein kinase activity. When this fraction was incubated with [gamma-32P]ATP in the presence of 10 mM MnCl2, hydrolyzed, and assayed, 70--80% of the radioactivity recovered in phosphoamino acids was in phosphotyrosine. Gel electrophoresis of the proteins showed that a large portion of the 32P was in a single protein with a molecular weight of approximately 58,000. The phosphorylated residue in this protein was identified as phosphotyrosine. Detergent extracts of the particulate fraction from LSTRA cells contained both the Mr 58,000 protein and the enzyme responsible for its phosphorylation. These extracts were found to catalyze the phosphorylation of the tyrosine residue in the synthetic peptide, Ile-Glu-Asp-Asn-Glu-Tyr-Thr-Ala-Arg-Gln-Gly, corresponding to the sequence around the tyrosine that is phosphorylated in pp60src; the Km for the peptide in this reaction was 5 mM. High-performance liquid chromatography was used to assay for this phosphorylation. A second peptide was synthesized that contained two additional arginine residues whose presence permitted the phosphorylation of the peptide to be measured by a simple assay using phosphocellulose paper. The Km for this peptide was 3--4 mM, indicating that the presence of the additional arginine residues did not alter the apparent affinity of the kinase for the peptide. Images PMID:6804939

  7. The nature of peptide interactions with acid end-group PLGAs and facile aqueous-based microencapsulation of therapeutic peptides

    PubMed Central

    Sophocleous, Andreas M.; Desai, Kashappa-Goud H.; Mazzara, J. Maxwell; Tong, Ling; Cheng, Ji-Xin; Olsen, Karl F.; Schwendeman, Steven P.

    2013-01-01

    An important poorly understood phenomenon in controlled-release depots involves the strong interaction between common cationic peptides and low Mw free acid end-group poly(lactic-co-glycolic acids) (PLGAs) used to achieve continuous peptide release kinetics. The kinetics of peptide sorption to PLGA was examined by incubating peptide solutions of 0.2-4 mM octreotide or leuprolide acetate salts in 0.1 M HEPES buffer, pH 7.4, with polymer particles or films at 4-37 °C for 24 h. The extent of absorption/loading of peptides in PLGA particles/films was assayed by two-phase extraction and amino acid analysis. Confocal Raman microspectroscopy and stimulated Raman scattering (SRS) and laser scanning confocal imaging techniques were used to examine peptide penetration in the polymer phase. The release of sorbed peptide from leuprolide-PLGA particles was evaluated both in vitro (PBST + 0.02% sodium azide, 37 °C) and in vivo (male Sprague-Dawley rats). We found that when the PLGA-COOH chains are sufficiently mobilized, therapeutic peptides not only bind at the surface, a common belief to date, but can also internalized and distributed throughout the polymer phase at physiological temperature forming a salt with low-molecular weight PLGA-COOH. Importantly, absorption of leuprolide into low MW PLGA-COOH particles yielded ~17 wt% leuprolide loading in the polymer (i.e., ~70% of PLGA-COOH acids occupied), and the absorbed peptide was released from the polymer for > 2 weeks in a controlled fashion in vitro and as indicated by sustained testosterone suppression in male Sprague-Dawley rats. This new approach, which bypasses the traditional encapsulation method and associated production cost, opens up the potential for facile production of low-cost controlled-release injectable depots for leuprolide and related peptides. PMID:24021356

  8. Antioxidant and ACE Inhibitory Bioactive Peptides Purified from Egg Yolk Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Yousr, Marwa; Howell, Nazlin

    2015-01-01

    Protein by-products from the extraction of lecithin from egg yolk can be converted into value-added products, such as bioactive hydrolysates and peptides that have potential health enhancing antioxidant, and antihypertensive properties. In this study, the antioxidant and angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitory activities of peptides isolated and purified from egg yolk protein were investigated. Defatted egg yolk was hydrolyzed using pepsin and pancreatin and sequentially fractionated by ultrafiltration, followed by gel filtration to produce egg yolk gel filtration fractions (EYGF). Of these, two fractions, EYGF-23 and EYGF-33, effectively inhibited the peroxides and thiobarbituric acid reactive substance (TBARS) in an oxidizing linoleic acid model system. The antioxidant mechanism involved superoxide anion and hydroxyl radicals scavenging and ferrous chelation. The presence of hydrophobic amino acids such as tyrosine (Y) and tryptophan (W), in sequences identified by LC-MS as WYGPD (EYGF-23) and KLSDW (EYGF-33), contributed to the antioxidant activity and were not significantly different from the synthetic BHA antioxidant. A third fraction (EYGF-56) was also purified from egg yolk protein by gel filtration and exhibited high ACE inhibitory activity (69%) and IC50 value (3.35 mg/mL). The SDNRNQGY peptide (10 mg/mL) had ACE inhibitory activity, which was not significantly different from that of the positive control captopril (0.5 mg/mL). In addition, YPSPV in (EYGF-33) (10 mg/mL) had higher ACE inhibitory activity compared with captopril. These findings indicated a substantial potential for producing valuable peptides with antioxidant and ACE inhibitory activity from egg yolk. PMID:26690134

  9. Profiling the substrate specificity of protein kinases by on-bead screening of peptide libraries.

    PubMed

    Trinh, Thi B; Xiao, Qing; Pei, Dehua

    2013-08-20

    A robust, high-throughput method has been developed to screen one-bead-one-compound peptide libraries to systematically profile the sequence specificity of protein kinases. Its ability to provide individual sequences of the preferred substrates permits the identification of sequence contextual effects and nonpermissive residues. Application of the library method to kinases Pim1, MKK6, and Csk revealed that Pim1 and Csk are highly active toward peptide substrates and recognize specific sequence motifs, whereas MKK6 has little activity or sequence selectivity against peptide substrates. Pim1 recognizes peptide substrates of the consensus RXR(H/R)X(S/T); it accepts essentially any amino acid at the S/T-2 and S/T+1 positions, but strongly disfavors acidic residues (Asp or Glu) at the S/T-2 position and a proline residue at the S/T+1 position. The selected Csk substrates show strong sequence covariance and fall into two classes with the consensus sequences of (D/E)EPIYϕXϕ and (D/E)(E/D)S(E/D/I)YϕXϕ (where X is any amino acid and ϕ is a hydrophobic amino acid). Database searches and in vitro kinase assays identified phosphatase PTP-PEST as a Pim1 substrate and phosphatase SHP-1 as a potential Csk substrate. Our results demonstrate that the sequence specificity of protein kinases is defined not only by favorable interactions between permissive residue(s) on the substrate and their cognate binding site(s) on the kinase but also by repulsive interactions between the kinase and nonpermissive residue(s). PMID:23848432

  10. Purification and identification of lipolysis-stimulating peptides derived from enzymatic hydrolysis of soy protein.

    PubMed

    Tsou, May-June; Kao, Fuh-Juin; Lu, Hsi-Chi; Kao, Hao-Chun; Chiang, Wen-Dee

    2013-06-01

    The aim of this study was to purify and identify lipolysis-stimulating peptides derived from Flavourzyme®-soy protein isolate (SPI) hydrolysate (F-SPIH). Glycerol release was employed as a marker for lipolysis in 3T3-L1 adipocytes. A higher glycerol release represents a better lipolysis-stimulating activity. The peptide fraction with highest glycerol release obtained from F-SPIH fractionated by sequential ultrafiltration membranes was further purified using gel filtration chromatography and two steps of reverse-phase high-performance liquid chromatography. The peptides were identified using liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC/MS/MS). Three lipolysis-stimulating peptides were obtained, and the amino acid sequences were ILL, LLL and VHVV, respectively. The in vitro effect of gastrointestinal proteases on lipolysis-stimulating activity of synthetic ILL, LLL and VHVV, respectively, was also investigated. The result suggested that the gastrointestinal protease did not affect lipolysis-stimulating activity of the three novel peptides, which reveals their potential to act as anti-obesity ingredients. PMID:23411267

  11. Cell-free synthesis of isotopically labelled peptide ligands for the functional characterization of G protein-coupled receptors.

    PubMed

    Joedicke, Lisa; Trenker, Raphael; Langer, Julian D; Michel, Hartmut; Preu, Julia

    2016-01-01

    Cell-free systems exploit the transcription and translation machinery of cells from different origins to produce proteins in a defined chemical environment. Due to its open nature, cell-free protein production is a versatile tool to introduce specific labels such as heavy isotopes, non-natural amino acids and tags into the protein while avoiding cell toxicity. In particular, radiolabelled peptides and proteins are valuable tools for the functional characterization of protein-protein interactions and for studying binding kinetics. In this study we evaluated cell-free protein production for the generation of radiolabelled ligands for G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs). These receptors are seven-transmembrane-domain receptors activated by a plethora of extracellular stimuli including peptide ligands. Many GPCR peptide ligands contain disulphide bonds and are thus inherently difficult to produce in bacterial expression hosts or in Escherichia coli-based cell-free systems. Here, we established an adapted E. coli-based cell-free translation system for the production of disulphide bond-containing GPCR peptide ligands and specifically introduce tritium labels for detection. The bacterial oxidoreductase DsbA is used as a chaperone to favour the formation of disulphide bonds and to enhance the yield of correctly folded proteins and peptides. We demonstrate the correct folding and formation of disulphide bonds and show high-affinity ligand binding of the produced radio peptide ligands to the respective receptors. Thus, our system allows the fast, cost-effective and reliable synthesis of custom GPCR peptide ligands for functional and structural studies. PMID:27047736

  12. Effect of electrostatics on aggregation of prion protein Sup35 peptide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Portillo, Alexander M.; Krasnoslobodtsev, Alexey V.; Lyubchenko, Yuri L.

    2012-04-01

    Self-assembly of misfolded proteins into ordered fibrillar structures is a fundamental property of a wide range of proteins and peptides. This property is also linked with the development of various neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s. Environmental conditions modulate the misfolding and aggregation processes. We used a peptide, CGNNQQNY, from yeast prion protein Sup35, as a model system to address effects of environmental conditions on aggregate formation. The GNNQQNY peptide self-assembles in fibrils with structural features that are similar to amyloidogenic proteins. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) and thioflavin T (ThT) fluorescence assay were employed to follow the aggregation process at various pHs and ionic strengths. We also used single molecule AFM force spectroscopy to probe interactions between the peptides under various conditions. The ThT fluorescence data showed that the peptide aggregates fast at pH values approaching the peptide isoelectric point (pI = 5.3) and the kinetics is 10 times slower at acidic pH (pH 2.0), suggesting that electrostatic interactions contribute to the peptide self-assembly into aggregates. This hypothesis was tested by experiments performed at low (11 mM) and high (150 mM) ionic strengths. Indeed, the aggregation lag time measured at pH 2 at low ionic strength (11 mM) is 195 h, whereas the lag time decreases ˜5 times when the ionic strength is increased to 150 mM. At conditions close to the pI value, pH 5.6, the aggregation lag time is 12 ± 6 h under low ionic strength, and there is minimal change to the lag time at 150 mM NaCl. The ionic strength also influences the morphology of aggregates visualized with AFM. In pH 2.0 and at high ionic strength, the aggregates are twofold taller than those formed at low ionic strength. In parallel, AFM force spectroscopy studies revealed minimal contribution of electrostatics to dissociation of transient peptide dimers.

  13. Design and Evaluation of Antimalarial Peptides Derived from Prediction of Short Linear Motifs in Proteins Related to Erythrocyte Invasion

    PubMed Central

    Bianchin, Alessandra; Bell, Angus; Chubb, Anthony J.; Doolan, Nathalie; Leneghan, Darren; Stavropoulos, Ilias; Shields, Denis C.; Mooney, Catherine

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the blood stage of the malaria causing parasite, Plasmodium falciparum, to predict potential protein interactions between the parasite merozoite and the host erythrocyte and design peptides that could interrupt these predicted interactions. We screened the P. falciparum and human proteomes for computationally predicted short linear motifs (SLiMs) in cytoplasmic portions of transmembrane proteins that could play roles in the invasion of the erythrocyte by the merozoite, an essential step in malarial pathogenesis. We tested thirteen peptides predicted to contain SLiMs, twelve of them palmitoylated to enhance membrane targeting, and found three that blocked parasite growth in culture by inhibiting the initiation of new infections in erythrocytes. Scrambled peptides for two of the most promising peptides suggested that their activity may be reflective of amino acid properties, in particular, positive charge. However, one peptide showed effects which were stronger than those of scrambled peptides. This was derived from human red blood cell glycophorin-B. We concluded that proteome-wide computational screening of the intracellular regions of both host and pathogen adhesion proteins provides potential lead peptides for the development of anti-malarial compounds. PMID:26039561

  14. Evaluating Molecular Mechanical Potentials for Helical Peptides and Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, Erik J.; DePaul, Allison J.; Patel, Sarav S.; Sorin, Eric J.

    2010-01-01

    Multiple variants of the AMBER all-atom force field were quantitatively evaluated with respect to their ability to accurately characterize helix-coil equilibria in explicit solvent simulations. Using a global distributed computing network, absolute conformational convergence was achieved for large ensembles of the capped A21 and Fs helical peptides. Further assessment of these AMBER variants was conducted via simulations of a flexible 164-residue five-helix-bundle protein, apolipophorin-III, on the 100 ns timescale. Of the contemporary potentials that had not been assessed previously, the AMBER-99SB force field showed significant helix-destabilizing tendencies, with beta bridge formation occurring in helical peptides, and unfolding of apolipophorin-III occurring on the tens of nanoseconds timescale. The AMBER-03 force field, while showing adequate helical propensities for both peptides and stabilizing apolipophorin-III, (i) predicts an unexpected decrease in helicity with ALA→ARG+ substitution, (ii) lacks experimentally observed 310 helical content, and (iii) deviates strongly from average apolipophorin-III NMR structural properties. As is observed for AMBER-99SB, AMBER-03 significantly overweighs the contribution of extended and polyproline backbone configurations to the conformational equilibrium. In contrast, the AMBER-99φ force field, which was previously shown to best reproduce experimental measurements of the helix-coil transition in model helical peptides, adequately stabilizes apolipophorin-III and yields both an average gyration radius and polar solvent exposed surface area that are in excellent agreement with the NMR ensemble. PMID:20418937

  15. Amine modification of digested peptide at C-terminal end during protein digestion by protease.

    PubMed

    Ito, Toshiyuki; Sugita, Yoshiaki; Takao, Koichi; Ikeguchi, Yoshihiko; Shirahata, Akira

    2007-10-01

    We recently reported that C-terminal polyamine modification occurs when proteins are digested with trypsin in the presence of polyamine [Biochem. Biophys. Res. Commun., 356, 159-162 (2007)]. In the present study, the characteristics of this C-terminal modification in the presence of protease and amine were investigated. When hemoglobin (HB) was digested with trypsin in the presence of N-(2-pyridyl)-1,4-diaminobutane (Py4), formation of the modified peptide was dependent on time and on HB or Py4 concentration. When synthetic peptide was treated with trypsin in the presence of Py4, ca. 0.1% of the peptide was modified with Py4. When HB or cytochrome C was treated with a range of serine proteases in the presence of various amines (Py4, N-(2-pyridyl)-1,3-diaminopropane, tranexamic acid, isonicotinic acid hydrazide and ampicillin), the modified peptide was detected in all cases tested, thus suggesting that amine modification widely accompanies digestion by proteases. PMID:17917247

  16. Forcefield_NCAA: Ab Initio Charge Parameters to Aid in the Discovery and Design of Therapeutic Proteins and Peptides with Unnatural Amino Acids and Their Application to Complement Inhibitors of the Compstatin Family

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    We describe the development and testing of ab initio derived, AMBER ff03 compatible charge parameters for a large library of 147 noncanonical amino acids including β- and N-methylated amino acids for use in applications such as protein structure prediction and de novo protein design. The charge parameter derivation was performed using the RESP fitting approach. Studies were performed assessing the suitability of the derived charge parameters in discriminating the activity/inactivity between 63 analogs of the complement inhibitor Compstatin on the basis of previously published experimental IC50 data and a screening procedure involving short simulations and binding free energy calculations. We found that both the approximate binding affinity (K*) and the binding free energy calculated through MM-GBSA are capable of discriminating between active and inactive Compstatin analogs, with MM-GBSA performing significantly better. Key interactions between the most potent Compstatin analog that contains a noncanonical amino acid are presented and compared to the most potent analog containing only natural amino acids and native Compstatin. We make the derived parameters and an associated web interface that is capable of performing modifications on proteins using Forcefield_NCAA and outputting AMBER-ready topology and parameter files freely available for academic use at http://selene.princeton.edu/FFNCAA. The forcefield allows one to incorporate these customized amino acids into design applications with control over size, van der Waals, and electrostatic interactions. PMID:24932669

  17. Forcefield_NCAA: ab initio charge parameters to aid in the discovery and design of therapeutic proteins and peptides with unnatural amino acids and their application to complement inhibitors of the compstatin family.

    PubMed

    Khoury, George A; Smadbeck, James; Tamamis, Phanourios; Vandris, Andrew C; Kieslich, Chris A; Floudas, Christodoulos A

    2014-12-19

    We describe the development and testing of ab initio derived, AMBER ff03 compatible charge parameters for a large library of 147 noncanonical amino acids including β- and N-methylated amino acids for use in applications such as protein structure prediction and de novo protein design. The charge parameter derivation was performed using the RESP fitting approach. Studies were performed assessing the suitability of the derived charge parameters in discriminating the activity/inactivity between 63 analogs of the complement inhibitor Compstatin on the basis of previously published experimental IC50 data and a screening procedure involving short simulations and binding free energy calculations. We found that both the approximate binding affinity (K*) and the binding free energy calculated through MM-GBSA are capable of discriminating between active and inactive Compstatin analogs, with MM-GBSA performing significantly better. Key interactions between the most potent Compstatin analog that contains a noncanonical amino acid are presented and compared to the most potent analog containing only natural amino acids and native Compstatin. We make the derived parameters and an associated web interface that is capable of performing modifications on proteins using Forcefield_NCAA and outputting AMBER-ready topology and parameter files freely available for academic use at http://selene.princeton.edu/FFNCAA . The forcefield allows one to incorporate these customized amino acids into design applications with control over size, van der Waals, and electrostatic interactions. PMID:24932669

  18. Comparison of amino acid v peptide based enteral diets in active Crohn's disease: clinical and nutritional outcome.

    PubMed Central

    Royall, D; Jeejeebhoy, K N; Baker, J P; Allard, J P; Habal, F M; Cunnane, S C; Greenberg, G R

    1994-01-01

    Elemental diets are considered an effective primary treatment for active Crohn's disease. This study examined the hypothesis that improvement occurs because of the presence of amino acids or the low fat content, or both. A randomised, controlled trial was undertaken in 40 patients with active Crohn's disease to evaluate clinical and nutritional outcomes after an amino acid based diet containing 3% fat was given by a feeding tube compared with a peptide based diet containing 33% fat. After three weeks' treatment, clinical remission occurred in 84% of patients who were given the amino acid diet and 75% of patients who received the peptide diet (p = 0.38). Plasma linoleic acid concentration was reduced after the amino acid but not the peptide diet. An increase in total body nitrogen was associated with the magnitude of nutritional depletion before treatment and at six months' follow up, only patients who showed gains in total body nitrogen after enteral nutrition had a sustained clinical remission. This study shows that peptide based high fat diets are as effective as amino acid low fat diets for achieving clinical remission in active Crohn's disease. Improved total body protein stores but not essential fatty acid depletion may be an important indicator of a sustained remission. PMID:8020806

  19. Approaches for Enhancing Oral Bioavailability of Peptides and Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Renukuntla, Jwala; Vadlapudi, Aswani Dutt; Patel, Ashaben; Boddu, Sai HS.; Mitra, Ashim K

    2013-01-01

    Oral delivery of peptide and protein drugs faces immense challenge partially due to the gastrointestinal (GI) environment. In spite of considerable efforts by industrial and academic laboratories, no major breakthrough in the effective oral delivery of polypeptides and proteins has been accomplished. Upon oral administration, gastrointestinal epithelium acts as a physical and biochemical barrier for absorption of proteins resulting in low bioavailability (typically less than 1–2%). An ideal oral drug delivery system should be capable of a) maintaining the integrity of protein molecules until it reaches the site of absorption, b) releasing the drug at the target absorption site, where the delivery system appends to that site by virtue of specific interaction, and c) retaining inside the gastrointestinal tract irrespective of its transitory constraints. Various technologies have been explored to overcome the problems associated with the oral delivery of macromolecules such as insulin, gonadotropin-releasing hormones, calcitonin, human growth factor, vaccines, enkephalins, and interferons, all of which met with limited success. This review article intends to summarize the physiological barriers to oral delivery of peptides and proteins and novel pharmaceutical approaches to circumvent these barriers and enhance oral bioavailability of these macromolecules. PMID:23428883

  20. Transduction of peptides and proteins into live cells by cell penetrating peptides.

    PubMed

    Mussbach, Franziska; Franke, Martin; Zoch, Ansgar; Schaefer, Buerk; Reissmann, Siegmund

    2011-12-01

    Internalization of peptides and proteins into live cells is an essential prerequisite for studies on intracellular signal pathways, for treatment of certain microbial diseases and for signal transduction therapy, especially for cancer treatment. Cell penetrating peptides (CPPs) facilitate the transport of cargo-proteins through the cell membrane into live cells. CPPs which allow formation of non-covalent complexes with the cargo are used primarily in this study due to the relatively easy handling procedure. Efficiency of the protein uptake is estimated qualitatively by fluorescence microscopy and quantitatively by SDS-PAGE. Using the CPP cocktail JBS-Proteoducin, the intracellular concentrations of a secondary antibody and bovine serum albumin can reach the micromolar range. Internalization of antibodies allows mediation of intracellular pathways including knock down of signal transduction. The high specificity and affinity of antibodies makes them potentially more powerful than siRNA. Thus, CPPs represent a significant new possibility to study signal transduction processes in competition or in comparison to the commonly used other techniques. To estimate the highest attainable intracellular concentrations of cargo proteins, the CPPs are tested for cytotoxicity. Cell viability and membrane integrity relative to concentration of CPPs are investigated. Viability as estimated by the reductive activity of mitochondria (MTT-test) is more sensitive to higher concentrations of CPPs versus membrane integrity, as measured by the release of dead cell protease. Distinct differences in uptake efficiency and cytotoxic effects are found using six different CPPs and six different adhesion and suspension cell lines. PMID:21826709

  1. Gramicidin S: a peptide model for protein glycation and reversal of glycation using nucleophilic amines.

    PubMed

    Shakkottai, V G; Sudha, R; Balaram, P

    2002-08-01

    Nonenzymatic glycation of proteins has been implicated in various diabetic complications and age-related disorders. Proteins undergo glycation at the N-terminus or at the epsilon-amino group of lysine residues. Glycation of proteins proceeds through the stages of Schiff base formation, conversion to ketoamine product and advanced glycation end products. Gramicidin S, which has two ornithine residues, was used as a model system to study the various stages of glycation of proteins using electrospray ionization mass spectrometry. The proximity of two ornithine residues in the peptide favors the glycation reaction. Formation of advanced glycation end products and diglycation on ornithine residues in gramicidin S were observed. The formation of Schiff base adduct is reversible, whereas the Amadori rearrangement to the ketoamine product is irreversible. Nucleophilic amines and hydrazines can deglycate the Schiff base adduct of glucose with peptides and proteins. Hydroxylamine, isonicotinic acid hydrazide and aminoguanidine effectively removed glucose from the Schiff base adduct of gramicidin S. Hydroxylamine is more effective in deglycating the adduct compared with isonicotinic acid hydrazide and aminoguanidine. The observation that the hydrazines are effective in deglycating the Schiff base adduct even in the presence of high concentrations of glucose, may have a possible therapeutic application in preventing complications of diabetes mellitus. Hydrazines may be used to distinguish between the Schiff base and the ketoamine products formed at the initial stages of glycation. PMID:12102724

  2. Selective separation and concentration of antihypertensive peptides from rapeseed protein hydrolysate by electrodialysis with ultrafiltration membranes.

    PubMed

    He, Rong; Girgih, Abraham T; Rozoy, Elodie; Bazinet, Laurent; Ju, Xing-Rong; Aluko, Rotimi E

    2016-04-15

    Rapeseed protein isolate was subjected to alcalase digestion to obtain a protein hydrolysate that was separated into peptide fractions using electrodialysis with ultrafiltration membrane (EDUF) technology. The EDUF process (6h duration) led to isolation of three peptide fractions: anionic (recovered in KCl-1 compartment), cationic (recovered in KCl-2 compartment), and those that remained in the feed compartment, which was labeled final rapeseed protein hydrolysate (FRPH). As expected the KCl-1 peptides were enriched in negatively-charged (43.57%) while KCl-2 contained high contents of positively-charged (28.35%) amino acids. All the samples inhibited angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) and renin activities in dose-dependent manner with original rapeseed protein hydrolysate having the least ACE-inhibitory IC50 value of 0.0932±0.0037 mg/mL while FRPH and KCl-2 had least renin-inhibitory IC50 values of 0.47±0.05 and 0.55±0.06 mg/mL, respectively. Six hours after oral administration (100 mg/kg body weight) to spontaneously hypertensive rats, the FRPH produced the maximum systolic blood pressure reduction of -51 mmHg. PMID:26617047

  3. Differential Properties of Venom Peptides and Proteins in Solitary vs. Social Hunting Wasps.

    PubMed

    Lee, Si Hyeock; Baek, Ji Hyeong; Yoon, Kyungjae Andrew

    2016-02-01

    The primary functions of venoms from solitary and social wasps are different. Whereas most solitary wasps sting their prey to paralyze and preserve it, without killing, as the provisions for their progeny, social wasps usually sting to defend their colonies from vertebrate predators. Such distinctive venom properties of solitary and social wasps suggest that the main venom components are likely to be different depending on the wasps' sociality. The present paper reviews venom components and properties of the Aculeata hunting wasps, with a particular emphasis on the comparative aspects of venom compositions and properties between solitary and social wasps. Common components in both solitary and social wasp venoms include hyaluronidase, phospholipase A2, metalloendopeptidase, etc. Although it has been expected that more diverse bioactive components with the functions of prey inactivation and physiology manipulation are present in solitary wasps, available studies on venom compositions of solitary wasps are simply too scarce to generalize this notion. Nevertheless, some neurotoxic peptides (e.g., pompilidotoxin and dendrotoxin-like peptide) and proteins (e.g., insulin-like peptide binding protein) appear to be specific to solitary wasp venom. In contrast, several proteins, such as venom allergen 5 protein, venom acid phosphatase, and various phospholipases, appear to be relatively more specific to social wasp venom. Finally, putative functions of main venom components and their application are also discussed. PMID:26805885

  4. Differential Properties of Venom Peptides and Proteins in Solitary vs. Social Hunting Wasps

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Si Hyeock; Baek, Ji Hyeong; Yoon, Kyungjae Andrew

    2016-01-01

    The primary functions of venoms from solitary and social wasps are different. Whereas most solitary wasps sting their prey to paralyze and preserve it, without killing, as the provisions for their progeny, social wasps usually sting to defend their colonies from vertebrate predators. Such distinctive venom properties of solitary and social wasps suggest that the main venom components are likely to be different depending on the wasps’ sociality. The present paper reviews venom components and properties of the Aculeata hunting wasps, with a particular emphasis on the comparative aspects of venom compositions and properties between solitary and social wasps. Common components in both solitary and social wasp venoms include hyaluronidase, phospholipase A2, metalloendopeptidase, etc. Although it has been expected that more diverse bioactive components with the functions of prey inactivation and physiology manipulation are present in solitary wasps, available studies on venom compositions of solitary wasps are simply too scarce to generalize this notion. Nevertheless, some neurotoxic peptides (e.g., pompilidotoxin and dendrotoxin-like peptide) and proteins (e.g., insulin-like peptide binding protein) appear to be specific to solitary wasp venom. In contrast, several proteins, such as venom allergen 5 protein, venom acid phosphatase, and various phospholipases, appear to be relatively more specific to social wasp venom. Finally, putative functions of main venom components and their application are also discussed. PMID:26805885

  5. Cyclolization of D-lysergic acid alkaloid peptides.

    PubMed

    Havemann, Judith; Vogel, Dominik; Loll, Bernhard; Keller, Ullrich

    2014-01-16

    The tripeptide chains of the ergopeptines, a class of pharmacologically important D-lysergic acid alkaloid peptides, are arranged in a unique bicyclic cyclol based on an amino-terminal α-hydroxyamino acid and a terminal orthostructure. D-lysergyl-tripeptides are assembled by the nonribosomal peptide synthetases LPS1 and LPS2 of the ergot fungus Claviceps purpurea and released as N-(D-lysergyl-aminoacyl)-lactams. We show total enzymatic synthesis of ergopeptines catalyzed by a Fe²⁺/2-ketoglutarate-dependent dioxygenase (EasH) in conjunction with LPS1/LPS2. Analysis of the reaction indicated that EasH introduces a hydroxyl group into N-(D-lysergyl-aminoacyl)-lactam at α-C of the aminoacyl residue followed by spontaneous condensation with the terminal lactam carbonyl group. Sequence analysis revealed that EasH belongs to the wide and diverse family of the phytanoyl coenzyme A hydroxylases. We provide a high-resolution crystal structure of EasH that is most similar to that of phytanoyl coenzyme A hydroxylase, PhyH, from human. PMID:24361048

  6. An equation to estimate the difference between theoretically predicted and SDS PAGE-displayed molecular weights for an acidic peptide.

    PubMed

    Guan, Yihong; Zhu, Qinfang; Huang, Delai; Zhao, Shuyi; Jan Lo, Li; Peng, Jinrong

    2015-01-01

    The molecular weight (MW) of a protein can be predicted based on its amino acids (AA) composition. However, in many cases a non-chemically modified protein shows an SDS PAGE-displayed MW larger than its predicted size. Some reports linked this fact to high content of acidic AA in the protein. However, the exact relationship between the acidic AA composition and the SDS PAGE-displayed MW is not established. Zebrafish nucleolar protein Def is composed of 753 AA and shows an SDS PAGE-displayed MW approximately 13 kDa larger than its predicted MW. The first 188 AA in Def is defined by a glutamate-rich region containing ~35.6% of acidic AA. In this report, we analyzed the relationship between the SDS PAGE-displayed MW of thirteen peptides derived from Def and the AA composition in each peptide. We found that the difference between the predicted and SDS PAGE-displayed MW showed a linear correlation with the percentage of acidic AA that fits the equation y = 276.5x - 31.33 (x represents the percentage of acidic AA, 11.4% ≤ x ≤ 51.1%; y represents the average ΔMW per AA). We demonstrated that this equation could be applied to predict the SDS PAGE-displayed MW for thirteen different natural acidic proteins. PMID:26311515

  7. Structural characterization of a mutant peptide derived from ubiquitin: implications for protein folding.

    PubMed Central

    Zerella, R.; Chen, P. Y.; Evans, P. A.; Raine, A.; Williams, D. H.

    2000-01-01

    The formation of the N-terminal beta-hairpin of ubiquitin is thought to be an early event in the folding of this small protein. Previously, we have shown that a peptide corresponding to residues 1-17 of ubiquitin folds autonomously and is likely to have a native-like hairpin register. To investigate the causes of the stability of this fold, we have made mutations in the amino acids at the apex of the turn. We find that in a peptide where Thr9 is replaced by Asp, U(1-17)T9D, the native conformation is stabilized with respect to the wild-type sequence, so much so that we are able to characterize the structure of the mutant peptide fully by NMR spectroscopy. The data indicate that U(1-17)T9D peptide does indeed form a hairpin with a native-like register and a type I turn with a G1 beta-bulge, as in the full-length protein. The reason for the greater stability of the U(1-17)T9D mutant remains uncertain, but there are nuclear Overhauser effects between the side chains of Asp9 and Lys 11, which may indicate that a charge-charge interaction between these residues is responsible. PMID:11152124

  8. Identification and characterization of antioxidant peptides obtained by gastrointestinal digestion of amaranth proteins.

    PubMed

    Orsini Delgado, María C; Nardo, Agustina; Pavlovic, Marija; Rogniaux, Hélène; Añón, María C; Tironi, Valeria A

    2016-04-15

    The objective of the present work was to separate and identify antioxidant peptides from a simulated gastrointestinal digest (Id) from Amaranthus mantegazzianus proteins (I), which has previously been demonstrated to have this activity. I and Id were separated by preparative RP-HPLC. Fractions were evaluated by the ORAC method and the more active ones were analyzed by LC-MS/MS. Each fraction presented diverse peptides from different proteins, most of them from the 11S globulin. After grouping the peptides from 11S globulin according to their overlapping sequences, and based on previous information about structure-activity relationships, ten sequences were synthesized, in order to evaluate their antioxidant activity. Four peptides presented interesting activity: AWEEREQGSR>YLAGKPQQEH∼IYIEQGNGITGM∼TEVWDSNEQ. They exhibited some of the structural characteristics already known to demonstrate this activity, all of them containing at least one bulky aromatic residue. All belonged to little structured, internal or exposed regions of the acid subunit of the 11S globulin. PMID:26675853

  9. Safety of protein hydrolysates, fractions thereof and bioactive peptides in human nutrition.

    PubMed

    Schaafsma, G

    2009-10-01

    This paper evaluates the safety for humans with regard to consumption of protein hydrolysates and fractions thereof, including bioactive peptides. The available literature on the safety of protein, protein hydrolysates, fractions thereof and free amino acids on relevant food legislation is reviewed and evaluated. A new concept for the safety assessment of protein hydrolysates and fractions thereof is developed. Benchmarks for the evaluation are safety of total protein intake, safety of free amino acid intake, documented history of safe use, outcome of questionnaires in efficacy studies and safety studies. Similar to the intake of intact proteins with a history of safe use, the intake of hydrolysates made from them, does not raise concern about safety, provided the applied proteolytic enzymes are food grade and thus of suitable quality. The safety of hydrolysates and of fractions thereof, including the so-called bioactive peptides, should always be assessed by the company before market introduction (company safety assessment). Only when a novel protein source is used or a novel production process is applied, which results in significant changes in nutritional value, metabolic effect or increased level of undesirable substances, that products might fall under novel food regulations. This means that company safety assessment should be reviewed and approved by external independent experts (external safety evaluation) and the novel protein hydrolysate (fraction) is authorized by competent authorities before market introduction. It is argued that good judgement on the safety of hydrolysates and the fractions thereof can be obtained by comparing the anticipated intake of amino acids by these products with those levels to be reasonably expected to be ingested under normal conditions of consumption of a balanced and varied diet. The paper shows a decision tree that can be used for safety assessment. PMID:19623200

  10. Enhancing In Silico Protein-Based Vaccine Discovery for Eukaryotic Pathogens Using Predicted Peptide-MHC Binding and Peptide Conservation Scores

    PubMed Central

    Goodswen, Stephen J.; Kennedy, Paul J.; Ellis, John T.

    2014-01-01

    Given thousands of proteins constituting a eukaryotic pathogen, the principal objective for a high-throughput in silico vaccine discovery pipeline is to select those proteins worthy of laboratory validation. Accurate prediction of T-cell epitopes on protein antigens is one crucial piece of evidence that would aid in this selection. Prediction of peptides recognised by T-cell receptors have to date proved to be of insufficient accuracy. The in silico approach is consequently reliant on an indirect method, which involves the prediction of peptides binding to major histocompatibility complex (MHC) molecules. There is no guarantee nevertheless that predicted peptide-MHC complexes will be presented by antigen-presenting cells and/or recognised by cognate T-cell receptors. The aim of this study was to determine if predicted peptide-MHC binding scores could provide contributing evidence to establish a protein’s potential as a vaccine. Using T-Cell MHC class I binding prediction tools provided by the Immune Epitope Database and Analysis Resource, peptide binding affinity to 76 common MHC I alleles were predicted for 160 Toxoplasma gondii proteins: 75 taken from published studies represented proteins known or expected to induce T-cell immune responses and 85 considered less likely vaccine candidates. The results show there is no universal set of rules that can be applied directly to binding scores to distinguish a vaccine from a non-vaccine candidate. We present, however, two proposed strategies exploiting binding scores that provide supporting evidence that a protein is likely to induce a T-cell immune response–one using random forest (a machine learning algorithm) with a 72% sensitivity and 82.4% specificity and the other, using amino acid conservation scores with a 74.6% sensitivity and 70.5% specificity when applied to the 160 benchmark proteins. More importantly, the binding score strategies are valuable evidence contributors to the overall in silico vaccine

  11. Protein Quantification by Derivatization-Free High-Performance Liquid Chromatography of Aromatic Amino Acids

    PubMed Central

    Hesse, Almut

    2016-01-01

    Amino acid analysis is considered to be the gold standard for quantitative peptide and protein analysis. Here, we would like to propose a simple HPLC/UV method based on a reversed-phase separation of the aromatic amino acids tyrosine (Tyr), phenylalanine (Phe), and optionally tryptophan (Trp) without any derivatization. The hydrolysis of the proteins and peptides was performed by an accelerated microwave technique, which needs only 30 minutes. Two internal standard compounds, homotyrosine (HTyr) and 4-fluorophenylalanine (FPhe) were used for calibration. The limit of detection (LOD) was estimated to be 0.05 µM (~10 µg/L) for tyrosine and phenylalanine at 215 nm. The LOD for a protein determination was calculated to be below 16 mg/L (~300 ng BSA absolute). Aromatic amino acid analysis (AAAA) offers excellent accuracy and a precision of about 5% relative standard deviation, including the hydrolysis step. The method was validated with certified reference materials (CRM) of amino acids and of a pure protein (bovine serum albumin, BSA). AAAA can be used for the quantification of aromatic amino acids, isolated peptides or proteins, complex peptide or protein samples, such as serum or milk powder, and peptides or proteins immobilized on solid supports. PMID:27559481

  12. Protein Quantification by Derivatization-Free High-Performance Liquid Chromatography of Aromatic Amino Acids.

    PubMed

    Hesse, Almut; Weller, Michael G

    2016-01-01

    Amino acid analysis is considered to be the gold standard for quantitative peptide and protein analysis. Here, we would like to propose a simple HPLC/UV method based on a reversed-phase separation of the aromatic amino acids tyrosine (Tyr), phenylalanine (Phe), and optionally tryptophan (Trp) without any derivatization. The hydrolysis of the proteins and peptides was performed by an accelerated microwave technique, which needs only 30 minutes. Two internal standard compounds, homotyrosine (HTyr) and 4-fluorophenylalanine (FPhe) were used for calibration. The limit of detection (LOD) was estimated to be 0.05 µM (~10 µg/L) for tyrosine and phenylalanine at 215 nm. The LOD for a protein determination was calculated to be below 16 mg/L (~300 ng BSA absolute). Aromatic amino acid analysis (AAAA) offers excellent accuracy and a precision of about 5% relative standard deviation, including the hydrolysis step. The method was validated with certified reference materials (CRM) of amino acids and of a pure protein (bovine serum albumin, BSA). AAAA can be used for the quantification of aromatic amino acids, isolated peptides or proteins, complex peptide or protein samples, such as serum or milk powder, and peptides or proteins immobilized on solid supports. PMID:27559481

  13. Fish protein hydrolysates: proximate composition, amino acid composition, antioxidant activities and applications: a review.

    PubMed

    Chalamaiah, M; Dinesh Kumar, B; Hemalatha, R; Jyothirmayi, T

    2012-12-15

    The fish processing industry produces more than 60% by-products as waste, which includes skin, head, viscera, trimmings, liver, frames, bones, and roes. These by-product wastes contain good amount of protein rich material that are normally processed into low market-value products, such as animal feed, fish meal and fertilizer. In view of utilizing these fish industry wastes, and for increasing the value to several underutilised fish species, protein hydrolysates from fish proteins are being prepared by several researchers all over the world. Fish protein hydrolysates are breakdown products of enzymatic conversion of fish proteins into smaller peptides, which normally contain 2-20 amino acids. In recent years, fish protein hydrolysates have attracted much attention of food biotechnologists due to the availability of large quantities of raw material for the process, and presence of high protein content with good amino acid balance and bioactive peptides (antioxidant, antihypertensive, immunomodulatory and antimicrobial peptides). PMID:22980905

  14. Organic crystal-binding peptides: morphology control and one-pot formation of protein-displaying organic crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niide, Teppei; Ozawa, Kyohei; Nakazawa, Hikaru; Oliveira, Daniel; Kasai, Hitoshi; Onodera, Mari; Asano, Ryutaro; Kumagai, Izumi; Umetsu, Mitsuo

    2015-11-01

    Crystalline assemblies of fluorescent molecules have different functional properties than the constituent monomers, as well as unique optical characteristics that depend on the structure, size, and morphological homogeneity of the crystal particles. In this study, we selected peptides with affinity for the surface of perylene crystal particles by exposing a peptide-displaying phage library in aqueous solution to perylene crystals, eluting the surface-bound phages by means of acidic desorption or liquid-liquid extraction, and amplifying the obtained phages in Escherichia coli. One of the perylene-binding peptides, PeryBPb1: VQHNTKYSVVIR, selected by this biopanning procedure induced perylene molecules to form homogenous planar crystal nanoparticles by means of a poor solvent method, and fusion of the peptide to a fluorescent protein enabled one-pot formation of protein-immobilized crystalline nanoparticles. The nanoparticles were well-dispersed in aqueous solution, and Förster resonance energy transfer from the perylene crystals to the fluorescent protein was observed. Our results show that the crystal-binding peptide could be used for simultaneous control of perylene crystal morphology and dispersion and protein immobilization on the crystals.Crystalline assemblies of fluorescent molecules have different functional properties than the constituent monomers, as well as unique optical characteristics that depend on the structure, size, and morphological homogeneity of the crystal particles. In this study, we selected peptides with affinity for the surface of perylene crystal particles by exposing a peptide-displaying phage library in aqueous solution to perylene crystals, eluting the surface-bound phages by means of acidic desorption or liquid-liquid extraction, and amplifying the obtained phages in Escherichia coli. One of the perylene-binding peptides, PeryBPb1: VQHNTKYSVVIR, selected by this biopanning procedure induced perylene molecules to form homogenous planar

  15. Evaluation of New Diagnostic Biomarkers in Pediatric Sepsis: Matrix Metalloproteinase-9, Tissue Inhibitor of Metalloproteinase-1, Mid-Regional Pro-Atrial Natriuretic Peptide, and Adipocyte Fatty-Acid Binding Protein

    PubMed Central

    Alqahtani, Mashael F.; Smith, Craig M.; Weiss, Scott L.; Dawson, Susan; Ralay Ranaivo, Hantamalala; Wainwright, Mark S.

    2016-01-01

    Elevated plasma concentrations of matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9), tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase-1 (TIMP-1), mid-regional pro-atrial natriuretic peptide (mrProANP), and adipocyte fatty-acid-binding proteins (A-FaBPs) have been investigated as biomarkers for sepsis or detection of acute neurological injuries in adults, but not children. We carried out a single-center, prospective observational study to determine if these measures could serve as biomarkers to identify children with sepsis. A secondary aim was to determine if these biomarkers could identify children with neurologic complications of sepsis. A total of 90 patients ≤ 18 years-old were included in this study. 30 with severe sepsis or septic shock were compared to 30 age-matched febrile and 30 age-matched healthy controls. Serial measurements of each biomarker were obtained, beginning on day 1 of ICU admission. In septic patients, MMP9-/TIMP-1 ratios (Median, IQR, n) were reduced on day 1 (0.024, 0.004–0.174, 13), day 2 (0.020, 0.002–0.109, 10), and day 3 (0.018, 0.003–0.058, 23) compared with febrile (0.705, 0.187–1.778, 22) and healthy (0.7, 0.4–1.2, 29) (p< 0.05) controls. A-FaBP and mrProANP (Median, IQR ng/mL, n) were elevated in septic patients compared to control groups on first 2 days after admission to the PICU (p <0.05). The area under the curve (AUC) for MMP-9/TIMP-1 ratio, mrProANP, and A-FaBP to distinguish septic patients from healthy controls were 0.96, 0.99, and 0.76, respectively. MMP-9/TIMP-1 ratio was inversely and mrProANP was directly related to PIM-2, PELOD, and ICU and hospital LOS (p<0.05). A-FaBP level was associated with PELOD, hospital and ICU length of stay (p<0.05). MMP-9/TIMP-1 ratio associated with poor Glasgow Outcome Score (p<0.05). A-FaBP levels in septic patients with neurological dysfunction (29.3, 17.2–54.6, 7) were significantly increased compared to septic patients without neurological dysfunction (14.6, 13.3–20.6, 11). MMP-9/TIMP-1 ratios

  16. Characterization of the antimicrobial peptide derived from sapecin B, an antibacterial protein of Sarcophaga peregrina (flesh fly).

    PubMed Central

    Yamada, K; Natori, S

    1994-01-01

    Sapecin B, an antibacterial protein of Sarcophaga peregrina, was divided into four peptides. A hendecapeptide derived from its helix region was found to have comparable antibacterial activity with that of the complete protein. This peptide had a much wider spectrum of antimicrobial activity than that of sapecin B, exhibiting activity on not only Staphylococcus aureus (Gram-positive) and Escherichia coli (Gram-negative), but also some yeasts, including Candida albicans. The peptide was shown to bind to liposomes containing acidic phospholipids and cause release of entrapped glucose, suggesting that its primary site of action is the bacterial membrane. Its antimicrobial activity could be increased by substituting various amino acid residues for hydrophobic and/or basic ones. PMID:8141776

  17. Inhaled protein/peptide-based therapies for respiratory disease.

    PubMed

    Fellner, Robert C; Terryah, Shawn T; Tarran, Robert

    2016-12-01

    Asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), and cystic fibrosis (CF) are all chronic pulmonary diseases, albeit with different etiologies, that are characterized by airflow limitation, chronic inflammation, and abnormal mucus production/rheology. Small synthetic molecule-based therapies are commonly prescribed for all three diseases. However, there has been increased interest in "biologicals" to treat these diseases. Biologicals typically constitute protein- or peptide-based therapies and are often more potent than small molecule-based drugs. In this review, we shall describe the pros and cons of several different biological-based therapies for respiratory disease, including dornase alfa, a recombinant DNAase that reduces mucus viscosity and short palate lung and nasal epithelial clone 1 (SPLUNC1)-derived peptides that treat Na(+) hyperabsorption and rebalance CF airway surface liquid homeostasis. PMID:27098663

  18. Usefulness of ELISA Methods for Assessing LPS Interactions with Proteins and Peptides

    PubMed Central

    Martínez-Sernández, Victoria; Orbegozo-Medina, Ricardo A.; Romarís, Fernanda; Paniagua, Esperanza; Ubeira, Florencio M.

    2016-01-01

    Lipopolysaccharide (LPS), the major constituent of the outer membrane of Gram-negative bacteria, can trigger severe inflammatory responses during bacterial infections, possibly leading to septic shock. One approach to combatting endotoxic shock is to neutralize the most conserved part and major mediator of LPS activity (lipid A) with LPS-binding proteins or peptides. Although several available assays evaluate the biological activity of these molecules on LPS (e.g. inhibition of LPS-induced TNF-α production in macrophages), the development of simple and cost-effective methods that would enable preliminary screening of large numbers of potential candidate molecules is of great interest. Moreover, it would be also desirable that such methods could provide information about the possible biological relevance of the interactions between proteins and LPS, which may enhance or neutralize LPS-induced inflammatory responses. In this study, we designed and evaluated different types of ELISA that could be used to study possible interactions between LPS and any protein or peptide. We also analysed the usefulness and limitations of the different ELISAs. Specifically, we tested the capacity of several proteins and peptides to bind FITC-labeled LPSs from Escherichia coli serotypes O111:B4 and O55:B5 in an indirect ELISA and in two competitive ELISAs including casein hydrolysate (hCAS) and biotinylated polymyxin B (captured by deglycosylated avidin; PMX) as LPS-binding agents in the solid phase. We also examined the influence of pH, detergents and different blocking agents on LPS binding. Our results showed that the competitive hCAS-ELISA performed under mildly acidic conditions can be used as a general method for studying LPS interactions, while the more restrictive PMX-ELISA may help to identify proteins/peptides that are likely to have neutralizing properties in vitro or in vivo. PMID:27249227

  19. Novel non-invasive protein and peptide drug delivery approaches.

    PubMed

    Wallis, L; Kleynhans, E; Toit, T Du; Gouws, C; Steyn, D; Steenekamp, J; Viljoen, J; Hamman, J

    2014-01-01

    Protein and peptide based therapeutics are typically administered by injection due to their poor uptake when administered via enteral routes of drug administration. Unfortunately, chronic administration of these drugs through multiple injections presents certain patient related problems and it is difficult to mimic the normal physiological release patterns via this mode of drug administration. A need therefore exists to non-invasively deliver these drugs by means of alternative ways such as via the oral, pulmonary, nasal, transdermal and buccal administration routes. Although some attempts of needle free peptide and protein drug delivery have progressed to the clinical stage, relatively limited success has been achieved in terms of commercially available products. Despite the low frequency of clinical breakthroughs with noninvasive protein drug delivery this far, it remains an active research area with renewed interest not only due to its improved therapeutic potential, but also due to the attractive commercial outcomes it offers. It is the aim of this review article to reflect on the main strategies investigated to overcome the barriers against effective systemic protein drug delivery in different routes of drug administration. Approaches based on chemical modifications and pharmaceutical technologies are discussed with reference to examples of drugs and devices that have shown potential, while attempts that have failed are also briefly outlined. PMID:25106909

  20. Applications and Challenges for Use of Cell-Penetrating Peptides as Delivery Vectors for Peptide and Protein Cargos

    PubMed Central

    Kristensen, Mie; Birch, Ditlev; Mørck Nielsen, Hanne

    2016-01-01

    The hydrophilic nature of peptides and proteins renders them impermeable to cell membranes. Thus, in order to successfully deliver peptide and protein-based therapeutics across the plasma membrane or epithelial and endothelial barriers, a permeation enhancing strategy must be employed. Cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs) constitute a promising tool and have shown applications for peptide and protein delivery into cells as well as across various epithelia and the blood-brain barrier (BBB). CPP-mediated delivery of peptides and proteins may be pursued via covalent conjugation of the CPP to the cargo peptide or protein or via physical complexation obtained by simple bulk-mixing of the CPP with its cargo. Both approaches have their pros and cons, and which is the better choice likely relates to the physicochemical properties of the CPP and its cargo as well as the route of administration, the specific barrier and the target cell. Besides the physical barrier, a metabolic barrier must be taken into consideration when applying peptide-based delivery vectors, such as the CPPs, and stability-enhancing strategies are commonly employed to prolong the CPP half-life. The mechanisms by which CPPs translocate cell membranes are believed to involve both endocytosis and direct translocation, but are still widely investigated and discussed. The fact that multiple factors influence the mechanisms responsible for cellular CPP internalization and the lack of sensitive methods for detection of the CPP, and in some cases the cargo, further complicates the design and conduction of conclusive mechanistic studies. PMID:26840305

  1. Applications and Challenges for Use of Cell-Penetrating Peptides as Delivery Vectors for Peptide and Protein Cargos.

    PubMed

    Kristensen, Mie; Birch, Ditlev; Mørck Nielsen, Hanne

    2016-01-01

    The hydrophilic nature of peptides and proteins renders them impermeable to cell membranes. Thus, in order to successfully deliver peptide and protein-based therapeutics across the plasma membrane or epithelial and endothelial barriers, a permeation enhancing strategy must be employed. Cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs) constitute a promising tool and have shown applications for peptide and protein delivery into cells as well as across various epithelia and the blood-brain barrier (BBB). CPP-mediated delivery of peptides and proteins may be pursued via covalent conjugation of the CPP to the cargo peptide or protein or via physical complexation obtained by simple bulk-mixing of the CPP with its cargo. Both approaches have their pros and cons, and which is the better choice likely relates to the physicochemical properties of the CPP and its cargo as well as the route of administration, the specific barrier and the target cell. Besides the physical barrier, a metabolic barrier must be taken into consideration when applying peptide-based delivery vectors, such as the CPPs, and stability-enhancing strategies are commonly employed to prolong the CPP half-life. The mechanisms by which CPPs translocate cell membranes are believed to involve both endocytosis and direct translocation, but are still widely investigated and discussed. The fact that multiple factors influence the mechanisms responsible for cellular CPP internalization and the lack of sensitive methods for detection of the CPP, and in some cases the cargo, further complicates the design and conduction of conclusive mechanistic studies. PMID:26840305

  2. Nisin-induced expression of a recombinant antihypertensive peptide in dairy lactic acid bacteria

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Peptides with antihypertensive activity have been identified from the enzymatic hydrolysis of bovine milk proteins. A 12-residue peptide (FFVAPFPEVFGK) shown to inhibit the angiotensin I-converting enzyme is released from the enzymatic breakdown of aS1-casein. A synthetic gene encoding this peptid...

  3. Targeting DNA G-Quadruplex Structures with Peptide Nucleic Acids

    PubMed Central

    Panyutin, Igor G.; Onyshchenko, Mykola I.; Englund, Ethan A.; Appella, Daniel H.; Neumann, Ronald D.

    2012-01-01

    Regulation of genetic functions based on targeting DNA or RNA sequences with complementary oligonucleotides is especially attractive in the post-genome era. Oligonucleotides can be rationally designed to bind their targets based on simple nucleic acid base pairing rules. However, the use of natural DNA and RNA oligonucleotides as targeting probes can cause numerous off-target effects. In addition, natural nucleic acids are prone to degradation in vivo by various nucleases. To address these problems, nucleic acid mimics such as peptide nucleic acids (PNA) have been developed. They are more stable, show less off-target effects, and, in general, have better binding affinity to their targets. However, their high affinity to DNA can reduce their sequence-specificity. The formation of alternative DNA secondary structures, such as the G-quadruplex, provides an extra level of specificity as targets for PNA oligomers. PNA probes can target the loops of G-quadruplex, invade the core by forming PNA-DNA guanine-tetrads, or bind to the open bases on the complementary cytosine-rich strand. Not only could the development of such G-quadruplex-specific probes allow regulation of gene expression, but it will also provide a means to clarify the biological roles G-quadruplex structures may possess. PMID:22376112

  4. Slow peptide bond formation by proline and other N-alkylamino acids in translation.

    PubMed

    Pavlov, Michael Y; Watts, Richard E; Tan, Zhongping; Cornish, Virginia W; Ehrenberg, Måns; Forster, Anthony C

    2009-01-01

    Proteins are made from 19 aa and, curiously, one N-alkylamino acid ("imino acid"), proline (Pro). Pro is thought to be incorporated by the translation apparatus at the same rate as the 19 aa, even though the alkyl group in Pro resides directly on the nitrogen nucleophile involved in peptide bond formation. Here, by combining quench-flow kinetics and charging of tRNAs with cognate and noncognate amino acids, we find that Pro incorporates in translation significantly more slowly than Phe or Ala and that other N-alkylamino acids incorporate much more slowly. Our results show that the slowest step in incorporation of N-alkylamino acids is accommodation/peptidyl transfer after GTP hydrolysis on EF-Tu. The relative incorporation rates correlate with expectations from organic chemistry, suggesting that amino acid sterics and basicities affect translation rates at the peptidyl transfer step. Cognate isoacceptor tRNAs speed Pro incorporation to rates compatible with in vivo, although still 3-6 times slower than Phe incorporation from Phe-tRNA(Phe) depending on the Pro codon. Results suggest that Pro is the only N-alkylamino acid in the genetic code because it has a privileged cyclic structure that is more reactive than other N-alkylamino acids. Our data on the variation of the rate of incorporation of Pro from native Pro-tRNA(Pro) isoacceptors at 4 different Pro codons help explain codon bias not accounted for by the "tRNA abundance" hypothesis. PMID:19104062

  5. Bioorganic Chemistry: Peptides and Proteins (edited by Sidney M. Hecht)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anthony-Cahill, Spencer

    1999-07-01

    Sidney M. Hecht, Ed. Oxford University Press: New York, 1998. 532 pp. ISBN 0-19-508468-3. $75.00. The second volume in the Bioorganic Chemistry series edited by Sidney Hecht is an outstanding addition to the collections of all scientists who teach and/or do research in the field of protein chemistry. The coverage of current research is up to date and thus the book is of great relevance to all chemists with interest in proteins, not just to academicians. As an instructor I found numerous references to current research, which I have included in my lecture notes for the undergraduate Biochemistry course and a senior-level Protein Engineering course taught at WWU. In addition to the chapters covering a broad spectrum of protein chemistry, there are two chapters (protein structural analysis, site-directed mutagenesis) which are excellent introductions to laboratory procedures in protein chemistry and molecular biology. The first chapter is an overview of basic protein biochemistry and serves as an introduction to the rest of the book. This chapter is dispensable for readers familiar with introductory biochemistry. The chapter on chemical synthesis of peptides is an exhaustive review of solution and solid-phase methods, with numerous references. I was struck by the abundance of figures showing structures of reactants but the general lack of organic chemical mechanisms. This is true for the rest of the book as well. Presumably the chemistry is known to the intended reader (grad students, advanced undergrads); however, as a devoted pusher of electrons, I was expecting to see more mechanisms in this and subsequent chapters. Instructors will have to present this aspect of the chemistry in lecture. The relevance of peptide chemistry is underscored by accompanying chapters on peptide hormones and peptidomimetics. Taken together these three chapters provide an excellent introduction to pharmaceutical peptide chemistry. The chapter on total synthesis of proteins is one of my

  6. Counting sulfhydryls and disulfide bonds in peptides and proteins using mercurial ions as an MS-tag.

    PubMed

    Guo, Yifei; Chen, Liqin; Yang, Limin; Wang, Qiuquan

    2008-08-01

    Organic mercurial compounds are the most specific and sensitive reagents for reaction with the sulfhydryl groups (SHs) in peptides and proteins because of the strong mercury-sulfur affinity. Using the monofunctional organic mercury ion RHg(+) as a mass spectrometry (MS)-tag has the advantages of reacting with one sulfhydryl group, offering definite mass shift, and especially stable and characteristic nonradioactive isotopic distribution. Mass spectrometric analysis of derivatized sulfhydryls in peptides/proteins is thus an alternative for precisely counting the number of sulfhydryl groups and disulfide bonds (SS). Here the tags used include monomethylmercury chloride, monoethylmercury chloride, and 4-(hydroxymercuri) benzoic acid. The feasibility of this strategy is demonstrated using HPLC/ESI-MS to count SHs and SS in model peptides/proteins, i.e., glutathione, phytochelatins, lysozyme and beta-lactoglobulin, which contain increasing SHs and various SS linkages. PMID:18524619

  7. Identification of novel peptide substrates for protein farnesyltransferase reveals two substrate classes with distinct sequence selectivities

    PubMed Central

    Hougland, James L.; Hicks, Katherine A.; Hartman, Heather L.; Kelly, Rebekah A.; Watt, Terry J.; Fierke, Carol A.

    2010-01-01

    Prenylation is a post-translational modification essential for the proper localization and function of many proteins. Farnesylation, the attachment of a 15-carbon farnesyl group near the C-terminus of protein substrates, is catalyzed by protein farnesyltransferase (FTase). Farnesylation has received significant interest as a target for pharmaceutical development and farnesyltransferase inhibitors (FTIs) are in clinical trials as cancer therapeutics. However, as the total complement of prenylated proteins is unknown, the FTase substrates responsible for FTI efficacy are not yet understood. Identifying novel prenylated proteins within the human proteome constitutes an important step towards understanding prenylation-dependent cellular processes. Based on sequence preferences for FTase derived from analysis of known farnesylated proteins, we selected and screened a library of small peptides representing the C-termini of 213 human proteins for activity with FTase. We identified 77 novel FTase substrates that exhibit multiple-turnover reactivity within this library; our library also contained 85 peptides that can be farnesylated by FTase only under single-turnover conditions. Based on these results, a second library was designed that yielded an additional 29 novel multiple-turnover FTase substrates and 45 single-turnover substrates. The two classes of substrates exhibit different specificity requirements. Efficient multiple-turnover reactivity correlates with the presence of a nonpolar amino acid at the a2 position and a Phe, Met, or Gln at the terminal X residue, consistent with the proposed Ca1a2X sequence model. In contrast, the sequences of the single-turnover substrates vary significantly more at both the a2 and X residues and are not well-described by current farnesylation algorithms. These results improve the definition of prenyltransferase substrate specificity, test the efficacy of substrate algorithms, and provide valuable information about therapeutic targets

  8. Di-heterometalation of thiol-functionalized peptide nucleic acids

    PubMed Central

    Joshi, Tanmaya; Patra, Malay; Spiccia, Leone; Gasser, Gilles

    2013-01-01

    As a proof-of-principle, two hetero-bimetallic PNA oligomers containing a ruthenium(II) polypyridyl and a cyclopentadienyl manganese tricarbonyl complex have been prepared by serial combination of solid-phase peptide coupling and in-solution thiol chemistry. Solid-phase N-terminus attachment of Ru(II)-polypyridyl carboxylic acid derivative, C1, onto the thiol-functionalized PNA backbone (H-a-a-g-t-c-t-g-c-linker-cys-NH2) has been performed by standard peptide coupling method. As two parallel approaches, the strong affinity of thiols for maleimide and haloacetyl group has been exploited for subsequent post-SPPS addition of cymantrene-based organometallic cores, C2 and C3. Michael-like addition and thioether ligation of thiol functionalized PNA1 (H-gly-a-a-g-t-c-t-g-c-linker-cys-NH2) and PNA2 (C1-a-a-g-t-c-t-g-c-linker-cys-NH2) to cymantrene maleimide and chloroacetyl derivatives, C2 and C3, respectively, has been performed. The synthesized ruthenium(II)-cymantrenyl PNA oligomers have been characterized by mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) and IR spectroscopy. The distinct Mn-CO vibrational IR stretches, between 1,924–2,074 cm−1, have been used as markers to confirm the presence of cymantrenyl units in the PNA sequences and the purity of the HPLC-purified PNA thioethers assessed using LC-MS. PMID:23422249

  9. PepBind: a comprehensive database and computational tool for analysis of protein-peptide interactions.

    PubMed

    Das, Arindam Atanu; Sharma, Om Prakash; Kumar, Muthuvel Suresh; Krishna, Ramadas; Mathur, Premendu P

    2013-08-01

    Protein-peptide interactions, where one partner is a globular protein (domain) and the other is a flexible linear peptide, are key components of cellular processes predominantly in signaling and regulatory networks, hence are prime targets for drug design. To derive the details of the protein-peptide interaction mechanism is often a cumbersome task, though it can be made easier with the availability of specific databases and tools. The Peptide Binding Protein Database (PepBind) is a curated and searchable repository of the structures, sequences and experimental observations of 3100 protein-peptide complexes. The web interface contains a computational tool, protein inter-chain interaction (PICI), for computing several types of weak or strong interactions at the protein-peptide interaction interface and visualizing the identified interactions between residues in Jmol viewer. This initial database release focuses on providing protein-peptide interface information along with structure and sequence information for protein-peptide complexes deposited in the Protein Data Bank (PDB). Structures in PepBind are classified based on their cellular activity. More than 40% of the structures in the database are found to be involved in different regulatory pathways and nearly 20% in the immune system. These data indicate the importance of protein-peptide complexes in the regulation of cellular processes. PMID:23896518

  10. Towards generation of bioactive peptides from meat industry waste proteins: Generation of peptides using commercial microbial proteases.

    PubMed

    Ryder, Kate; Bekhit, Alaa El-Din; McConnell, Michelle; Carne, Alan

    2016-10-01

    Five commercially available food-grade microbial protease preparations were evaluated for their ability to hydrolyse meat myofibrillar and connective tissue protein extracts to produce bioactive peptides. A bacterial-derived protease (HT) extensively hydrolysed both meat protein extracts, producing peptide hydrolysates with significant in vitro antioxidant and ACE inhibitor activities. The hydrolysates retained bioactivity after simulated gastrointestinal hydrolysis challenge. Gel permeation chromatography sub-fractionation of the crude protein hydrolysates showed that the smaller peptide fractions exhibited the highest antioxidant and ACE inhibitor activities. OFFGEL electrophoresis of the small peptides of both hydrolysates showed that low isoelectric point peptides had antioxidant activity; however, no consistent relationship was observed between isoelectric point and ACE inhibition. Cell-based assays indicated that the hydrolysates present no significant cytotoxicity towards Vero cells. The results indicate that HT protease hydrolysis of meat myofibrillar and connective tissue protein extracts produces bioactive peptides that are non-cytotoxic, should be stable in the gastrointestinal tract and may contain novel bioactive peptide sequences. PMID:27132822

  11. Single Molecule Spectroscopy of Amino Acids and Peptides by Recognition Tunneling

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Yanan; Ashcroft, Brian; Zhang, Peiming; Liu, Hao; Sen, Suman; Song, Weisi; Im, JongOne; Gyarfas, Brett; Manna, Saikat; Biswas, Sovan; Borges, Chad; Lindsay, Stuart

    2014-01-01

    The human proteome has millions of protein variants due to alternative RNA splicing and post-translational modifications, and variants that are related to diseases are frequently present in minute concentrations. For DNA and RNA, low concentrations can be amplified using the polymerase chain reaction, but there is no such reaction for proteins. Therefore, the development of single molecule protein sequencing is a critical step in the search for protein biomarkers. Here we show that single amino acids can be identified by trapping the molecules between two electrodes that are coated with a layer of recognition molecules and measuring the electron tunneling current across the junction. A given molecule can bind in more than one way in the junction, and we therefore use a machine-learning algorithm to distinguish between the sets of electronic ‘fingerprints’ associated with each binding motif. With this recognition tunneling technique, we are able to identify D, L enantiomers, a methylated amino acid, isobaric isomers, and short peptides. The results suggest that direct electronic sequencing of single proteins could be possible by sequentially measuring the products of processive exopeptidase digestion, or by using a molecular motor to pull proteins through a tunnel junction integrated with a nanopore. PMID:24705512

  12. Single-molecule spectroscopy of amino acids and peptides by recognition tunnelling.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yanan; Ashcroft, Brian; Zhang, Peiming; Liu, Hao; Sen, Suman; Song, Weisi; Im, JongOne; Gyarfas, Brett; Manna, Saikat; Biswas, Sovan; Borges, Chad; Lindsay, Stuart

    2014-06-01

    The human proteome has millions of protein variants due to alternative RNA splicing and post-translational modifications, and variants that are related to diseases are frequently present in minute concentrations. For DNA and RNA, low concentrations can be amplified using the polymerase chain reaction, but there is no such reaction for proteins. Therefore, the development of single-molecule protein sequencing is a critical step in the search for protein biomarkers. Here, we show that single amino acids can be identified by trapping the molecules between two electrodes that are coated with a layer of recognition molecules, then measuring the electron tunnelling current across the junction. A given molecule can bind in more than one way in the junction, and we therefore use a machine-learning algorithm to distinguish between the sets of electronic 'fingerprints' associated with each binding motif. With this recognition tunnelling technique, we are able to identify D and L enantiomers, a methylated amino acid, isobaric isomers and short peptides. The results suggest that direct electronic sequencing of single proteins could be possible by sequentially measuring the products of processive exopeptidase digestion, or by using a molecular motor to pull proteins through a tunnel junction integrated with a nanopore. PMID:24705512

  13. Single-molecule spectroscopy of amino acids and peptides by recognition tunnelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Yanan; Ashcroft, Brian; Zhang, Peiming; Liu, Hao; Sen, Suman; Song, Weisi; Im, Jongone; Gyarfas, Brett; Manna, Saikat; Biswas, Sovan; Borges, Chad; Lindsay, Stuart

    2014-06-01

    The human proteome has millions of protein variants due to alternative RNA splicing and post-translational modifications, and variants that are related to diseases are frequently present in minute concentrations. For DNA and RNA, low concentrations can be amplified using the polymerase chain reaction, but there is no such reaction for proteins. Therefore, the development of single-molecule protein sequencing is a critical step in the search for protein biomarkers. Here, we show that single amino acids can be identified by trapping the molecules between two electrodes that are coated with a layer of recognition molecules, then measuring the electron tunnelling current across the junction. A given molecule can bind in more than one way in the junction, and we therefore use a machine-learning algorithm to distinguish between the sets of electronic `fingerprints' associated with each binding motif. With this recognition tunnelling technique, we are able to identify D and L enantiomers, a methylated amino acid, isobaric isomers and short peptides. The results suggest that direct electronic sequencing of single proteins could be possible by sequentially measuring the products of processive exopeptidase digestion, or by using a molecular motor to pull proteins through a tunnel junction integrated with a nanopore.

  14. Human Protein and Amino Acid Requirements.

    PubMed

    Hoffer, L John

    2016-05-01

    Human protein and amino acid nutrition encompasses a wide, complex, frequently misunderstood, and often contentious area of clinical research and practice. This tutorial explains the basic biochemical and physiologic principles that underlie our current understanding of protein and amino acid nutrition. The following topics are discussed: (1) the identity, measurement, and essentiality of nutritional proteins; (2) the definition and determination of minimum requirements; (3) nutrition adaptation; (4) obligatory nitrogen excretion and the minimum protein requirement; (5) minimum versus optimum protein intakes; (6) metabolic responses to surfeit and deficient protein intakes; (7) body composition and protein requirements; (8) labile protein; (9) N balance; (10) the principles of protein and amino acid turnover, including an analysis of the controversial indicator amino acid oxidation technique; (11) general guidelines for evaluating protein turnover articles; (12) amino acid turnover versus clearance; (13) the protein content of hydrated amino acid solutions; (14) protein requirements in special situations, including protein-catabolic critical illness; (15) amino acid supplements and additives, including monosodium glutamate and glutamine; and (16) a perspective on the future of protein and amino acid nutrition research. In addition to providing practical information, this tutorial aims to demonstrate the importance of rigorous physiologic reasoning, stimulate intellectual curiosity, and encourage fresh ideas in this dynamic area of human nutrition. In general, references are provided only for topics that are not well covered in modern textbooks. PMID:26796095

  15. The Signal Peptide of a Vacuolar Protein Is Necessary and Sufficient for the Efficient Secretion of a Cytosolic Protein 1

    PubMed Central

    Hunt, Dale C.; Chrispeels, Maarten J.

    1991-01-01

    A cytosolic pea (Pisum sativum) seed albumin (ALB) and a chimeric protein (PHALB) consisting of the signal peptide and first three amino acids of phytohemagglutinin (PHA) and the amino acid sequence of ALB were expressed in parallel suspension cultures of tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) cells and their intracellular fates examined. PHALB was efficiently secreted by the cells whereas ALB remained intracellular. These experiments show that the information contained in the signal peptide of a vacuolar protein is both necessary and sufficient for efficient secretion, and define secretion as a default or bulk-flow pathway. Entry into the secretory pathway was accompanied by glycosylation and the efficient conversion of the high mannose glycans into complex glycans indicating that transported glycoproteins do not need specific recognition domains for the modifying enzymes in the Golgi. Tunicamycin depressed the accumulation of the unglycosylated polypeptide in the culture medium much less than the accumulation of other glycoproteins. We interpret this as evidence that glycans on proteins that are not normally glycosylated do not have the same function of stabilizing and protecting the polypeptide as on natural glycoproteins. ImagesFigure 2Figure 3Figure 5Figure 6Figure 7Figure 8 PMID:16668149

  16. Coupling protein complex analysis to peptide based proteomics.

    PubMed

    Gao, Qiang; Madian, Ashraf G; Liu, Xiuping; Adamec, Jiri; Regnier, Fred E

    2010-12-01

    Proteolysis is a central component of most proteomics methods. Unfortunately much of the information relating to the structural diversity of proteins is lost during digestion. This paper describes a method in which the native proteome of yeast was subjected to preliminary fractionation by size exclusion chromatography (SEC) prior to trypsin digestion of SEC fractions and reversed phase chromatography-mass spectral analysis to identify tryptic peptides thus generated. Through this approach proteins associated with other proteins in high molecular mass complexes were recognized and identified. A focus of this work was on the identification of Hub proteins that associate with multiple interaction partners. A critical component of this strategy is to choose methods and conditions that maximize retention of native structure during the various stages of analysis prior to proteolysis, especially during cell lysis. Maximum survival of protein complexes during lysis was obtained with the French press and bead-beater methods of cell disruption at approximately pH 8 with 200 mM NaCl in the lysis buffer. Structure retention was favored by higher ionic strength, suggesting that hydrophobic effects are important in maintaining the structure of protein complexes. Recovery of protein complexes declined substantially with storage at any temperature, but storage at -20°C was best when low temperature storage was necessary. Slightly lower recovery was obtained with storage at -80°C while lowest recovery was achieved at 4°C. It was concluded that initial fractionation of native proteins in cell lysates by SEC prior to RPC-MS/MS of tryptic digests can be used to recognize and identify proteins in complexes along with their interaction partners in known protein complexes. PMID:21036361

  17. Viroporin potential of the lentivirus lytic peptide (LLP) domains of the HIV-1 gp41 protein

    PubMed Central

    Costin, Joshua M; Rausch, Joshua M; Garry, Robert F; Wimley, William C

    2007-01-01

    Background Mechanisms by which HIV-1 mediates reductions in CD4+ cell levels in infected persons are being intensely investigated, and have broad implications for AIDS drug and vaccine development. Virally induced changes in membrane ionic permeability induced by lytic viruses of many families contribute to cytopathogenesis. HIV-1 induces disturbances in plasma membrane ion transport. The carboxyl terminus of TM (gp41) contains potential amphipathic α-helical motifs identified through their structural similarities to naturally occurring cytolytic peptides. These sequences have been dubbed lentiviral lytic peptides (LLP) -1, -2, and -3. Results Peptides corresponding to the LLP domains (from a clade B virus) partition into lipid membranes, fold into α-helices and disrupt model membrane permeability. A peptide corresponding to the LLP-1 domain of a clade D HIV-1 virus, LLP-1D displayed similar activity to the LLP-1 domain of the clade B virus in all assays, despite a lack of amino acid sequence identity. Conclusion These results suggest that the C-terminal domains of HIV-1 Env proteins may form an ion channel, or viroporin. Increased understanding of the function of LLP domains and their role in the viral replication cycle could allow for the development of novel HIV drugs. PMID:18028545

  18. Regulation of Airway Inflammation by G-protein Regulatory Motif Peptides of AGS3 protein

    PubMed Central

    Choi, IL-Whan; Ahn, Do Whan; Choi, Jang-Kyu; Cha, Hee-Jae; Ock, Mee Sun; You, EunAe; Rhee, SangMyung; Kim, Kwang Chul; Choi, Yung Hyun; Song, Kyoung Seob

    2016-01-01

    Respiratory diseases such as asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), and lung infections have critical consequences on mortality and morbidity in humans. The aims of the present study were to examine the mechanisms by which CXCL12 affects MUC1 transcription and airway inflammation, which depend on activator of G-protein signaling (AGS) 3 and to identify specific molecules that suppress CXCL12-induced airway inflammation by acting on G-protein-coupled receptors. Herein, AGS3 suppresses CXCL12-mediated upregulation of MUC1 and TNFα by regulating Gαi. We found that the G-protein regulatory (GPR) motif peptide in AGS3 binds to Gαi and downregulates MUC1 expression; in contrast, this motif upregulates TNFα expression. Mutated GPR Q34A peptide increased the expression of MUC1 and TGFβ but decreased the expression of TNFα and IL-6. Moreover, CXCR4-induced dendritic extensions in 2D and 3D matrix cultures were inhibited by the GPR Q34A peptide compared with a wild-type GPR peptide. The GPR Q34A peptide also inhibited CXCL12-induced morphological changes and inflammatory cell infiltration in the mouse lung, and production of inflammatory cytokines in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid and the lungs. Our data indicate that the GPR motif of AGS3 is critical for regulating MUC1/Muc1 expression and cytokine production in the inflammatory microenvironment. PMID:27270970

  19. The world of beta- and gamma-peptides comprised of homologated proteinogenic amino acids and other components.

    PubMed

    Seebach, Dieter; Beck, Albert K; Bierbaum, Daniel J

    2004-08-01

    The origins of our nearly ten-year research program of chemical and biological investigations into peptides based on homologated proteinogenic amino acids are described. The road from the biopolymer poly[ethyl (R)-3-hydroxybutanoate] to the beta-peptides was primarily a step from organic synthesis methodology (the preparation of enantiomerically pure compounds (EPCs)) to supramolecular chemistry (higher-order structures maintained through non-covalent interactions). The performing of biochemical and biological tests on the beta- and gamma-peptides, which differ from natural peptides/proteins by a single or two additional CH(2) groups per amino acid, then led into bioorganic chemistry and medicinal chemistry. The individual chapters of this review article begin with descriptions of work on beta-amino acids, beta-peptides, and polymers (Nylon-3) that dates back to the 1960s, even to the times of Emil Fischer, but did not yield insights into structures or biological properties. The numerous, often highly physiologically active, or even toxic, natural products containing beta- and gamma-amino acid moieties are then presented. Chapters on the preparation of homologated amino acids with proteinogenic side chains, their coupling to provide the corresponding peptides, both in solution (including thioligation) and on the solid phase, their isolation by preparative HPLC, and their characterization by mass spectrometry (HR-MS and MS sequencing) follow. After that, their structures, predominantly determined by NMR spectroscopy in methanolic solution, are described: helices, pleated sheets, and turns, together with stack-, crankshaft-, paddlewheel-, and staircase-like patterns. The presence of the additional C--C bonds in the backbones of the new peptides did not give rise to a chaotic increase in their secondary structures as many protein specialists might have expected: while there are indeed more structure types than are observed in the alpha-peptide realm - three different

  20. The role of metals in protein conformational disorders - The case of prion protein and Aβ -peptide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Santis, E.; Minicozzi, V.; Morante, S.; Rossi, G. C.; Stellato, F.

    2016-02-01

    Protein conformational disorders are members of a vast class of pathologies in which endogenous proteins or peptides undergo a misfolding process by switching from the physiological soluble configuration to a pathological fibrillar insoluble state. An important, but not yet fully elucidated, role in the process appears to be played by transition metal ions, mainly copper and zinc. X-ray absorption spectroscopy is one of the most suitable techniques for the structural characterization of biological molecules in complex with metal. Owing to its chemical selectivity and sensitivity to the local atomic geometry around the absorber, it can be successfully used to study the environment of metal ions in complex with proteins and peptides in physiological conditions. In this paper we present X-ray absorption spectroscopy studies of the metal ions coordination modes in systems where metals are complexed with specific amyloidogenic proteins and peptides. In particular, we show results concerning the Amyloid β peptide, that is involved in Alzheimer's disease, and the Prion protein, that is responsible for the Transmissible Spongiform Encephalopathy. Our findings suggest that the copper and zinc ions may play a crucial role in the aggregation and fibril formation process of these two biomolecules. Elucidating this kind of interaction could be a key preliminary step before any viable therapy can be conceived or designed.

  1. Solution structures, dynamics, and ice growth inhibitory activity of peptide fragments derived from an antarctic yeast protein.

    PubMed

    Shah, Syed Hussinien H; Kar, Rajiv K; Asmawi, Azren A; Rahman, Mohd Basyaruddin A; Murad, Abdul Munir A; Mahadi, Nor M; Basri, Mahiran; Rahman, Raja Noor Zaliha A; Salleh, Abu B; Chatterjee, Subhrangsu; Tejo, Bimo A; Bhunia, Anirban

    2012-01-01

    Exotic functions of antifreeze proteins (AFP) and antifreeze glycopeptides (AFGP) have recently been attracted with much interest to develop them as commercial products. AFPs and AFGPs inhibit ice crystal growth by lowering the water freezing point without changing the water melting point. Our group isolated the Antarctic yeast Glaciozyma antarctica that expresses antifreeze protein to assist it in its survival mechanism at sub-zero temperatures. The protein is unique and novel, indicated by its low sequence homology compared to those of other AFPs. We explore the structure-function relationship of G. antarctica AFP using various approaches ranging from protein structure prediction, peptide design and antifreeze activity assays, nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) studies and molecular dynamics simulation. The predicted secondary structure of G. antarctica AFP shows several α-helices, assumed to be responsible for its antifreeze activity. We designed several peptide fragments derived from the amino acid sequences of α-helical regions of the parent AFP and they also showed substantial antifreeze activities, below that of the original AFP. The relationship between peptide structure and activity was explored by NMR spectroscopy and molecular dynamics simulation. NMR results show that the antifreeze activity of the peptides correlates with their helicity and geometrical straightforwardness. Furthermore, molecular dynamics simulation also suggests that the activity of the designed peptides can be explained in terms of the structural rigidity/flexibility, i.e., the most active peptide demonstrates higher structural stability, lower flexibility than that of the other peptides with lower activities, and of lower rigidity. This report represents the first detailed report of downsizing a yeast AFP into its peptide fragments with measurable antifreeze activities. PMID:23209600

  2. Amino acid composition and antioxidant properties of pea seed ( Pisum sativum L.) enzymatic protein hydrolysate fractions.

    PubMed

    Pownall, Trisha L; Udenigwe, Chibuike C; Aluko, Rotimi E

    2010-04-28

    The amino acid composition and antioxidant activities of peptide fractions obtained from HPLC separation of a pea protein hydrolysate (PPH) were studied. Thermolysin hydrolysis of pea protein isolate and ultrafiltration (3 kDa molecular weight cutoff membrane) yielded a PPH that was separated into five fractions (F1-F5) on a C(18) reverse phase HPLC column. The fractions that eluted later from the column (F3-F5) contained higher contents hydrophobic and aromatic amino acids when compared to fractions that eluted early or the original PPH. Fractions F3-F5 also exhibited the strongest radical scavenging and metal chelating activities; however, hydrophobic character did not seem to contribute to reducing power of the peptides. In comparison to glutathione, the peptide fractions had significantly higher (p < 0.05) ability to inhibit linoleic acid oxidation and chelate metals. In contrast, glutathione had significantly higher (p < 0.05) free radical scavenging properties than the peptide fractions. PMID:20359226

  3. Effect of Hofmeister ions on protein thermal stability: roles of ion hydration and peptide groups?

    PubMed

    Sedlák, Erik; Stagg, Loren; Wittung-Stafshede, Pernilla

    2008-11-01

    We have systematically explored the Hofmeister effects of cations and anions (0.3-1.75 M range) for acidic Desulfovibrio desulfuricans apoflavodoxin (net charge -19, pH 7) and basic horse heart cytochrome c (net charge +17, pH 4.5). The Hofmeister effect of the ions on protein thermal stability was assessed by the parameter dT trs/d[ion] (T trs; thermal midpoint). We show that dT trs/d[ion] correlates with ion partition coefficients between surface and bulk water and ion surface tension effects: this suggests direct interactions between ions and proteins. Surprisingly, the stability effects of the different ions on the two model proteins are similar, implying a major role of the peptide backbone, instead of charged groups, in mediation of the interactions. Upon assessing chemical/physical properties of the ions responsible for the Hofmeister effects on protein stability, ion charge density was identified as most important. Taken together, our study suggests key roles for ion hydration and the peptide group in facilitating interactions between Hofmeister ions and proteins. PMID:18782555

  4. Transmissible gastroenteritis virus; identification of M protein-binding peptide ligands with antiviral and diagnostic potential

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The membrane (M) protein is one of the major structural proteins of coronavirus particles. In this study, the M protein of transmissible gastroenteritis virus (TGEV) was used to biopan a 12-mer phage display random peptide library. Three phages expressing TGEV-M-binding peptides were identified and ...

  5. Incorporation of Acid-Labile Masking Groups for the Traceless Synthesis of C-Terminal Peptide α-Ketoacids.

    PubMed

    Thuaud, Frédéric; Rohrbacher, Florian; Zwicky, André; Bode, Jeffrey W

    2016-08-01

    An optimized protocol for the masking of α-ketoacids with acid-labile cyclic acetal protecting groups is reported. Unlike prior approaches, these new conditions allow the synthesis of protected α-ketoacids bearing aromatic, hindered alkyl, and protected polar side chains. Attachment to a Wang-type linker and solid support provides a resin that delivers fully unprotected C-terminal peptide α-ketoacids upon resin cleavage. These peptides are the key starting materials for chemical protein synthesis using the α-ketoacid-hydroxylamine ligation. PMID:27439001

  6. Amino acid and peptide absorption in patients with coeliac disease and dermatitis herpetiformis

    PubMed Central

    Silk, D. B. A.; Kumar, Parveen J.; Perrett, D.; Clark, M. L.; Dawson, A. M.

    1974-01-01

    A double-lumen perfusion technique has been used to study amino acid and peptide absorption in eight normal control subjects, 13 patients with untreated adult coeliac disease, and 16 patients with dermatitis herpetiformis who had varying morphological abnormalities of the small bowel. All subjects were perfused with isotonic solutions containing 10 mM glycyl-L-alanine and 10 mM glycine + 10 mM L-alanine. Patients with adult coeliac disease had impaired absorption of glycine (p < 0·01) and L-alanine (p < 0·05) from the amino acid solution compared with the control subjects. Amino acid uptake from the dipeptide solution was not significantly impaired, although four individual patients had impaired uptake of both amino acids. In contrast to these findings, very few patients with dermatitis herpetiformis had impaired amino acid absorption from either solution. Sodium absorption was impaired from both solutions when the groups of patients with adult coeliac disease and dermatitis herpetiformis with subtotal villous atrophy and partial villous atrophy were studied, and there were patients in each group who secreted sodium and water. The results suggest that malabsorption of dietary protein is unlikely to occur in dermatitis herpetiformis but may occur and contribute to protein deficiency seen in some severe cases of adult coeliac disease. The impairment of sodium and water absorption provides evidence that there may be functional impairment of the jejunal mucosa in dermatitis herpetiformis as well as in adult coeliac disease. PMID:4820629

  7. A Perl procedure for protein identification by Peptide Mass Fingerprinting

    PubMed Central

    Tiengo, Alessandra; Barbarini, Nicola; Troiani, Sonia; Rusconi, Luisa; Magni, Paolo

    2009-01-01

    Background One of the topics of major interest in proteomics is protein identification. Protein identification can be achieved by analyzing the mass spectrum of a protein sample through different approaches. One of them, called Peptide Mass Fingerprinting (PMF), combines mass spectrometry (MS) data with searching strategies in a suitable database of known protein to provide a list of candidate proteins ranked by a score. To this aim, several algorithms and software tools have been proposed. However, the scoring methods and mainly the statistical evaluation of the results can be significantly improved. Results In this work, a Perl procedure for protein identification by PMF, called MsPI (Mass spectrometry Protein Identification), is presented. The implemented scoring methods were derived from the literature. MsPI implements a strategy to remove the contaminant masses present in the acquired spectra. Moreover, MsPI includes a statistical method to assign to each candidate protein, in addition to the scoring value, a p-value. Results obtained by MsPI on a dataset of 10 protein samples were compared with those achieved using two other software tools, i.e. Piums and Mascot. Piums implements one of the scoring methods available in MsPI, while Mascot is one of the most frequently used software tools in the protein identification field. MsPI scripts are available for downloading on the web site . Conclusion The performances of MsPI seem to be better than those of Piums and Mascot. In fact, on the considered dataset, MsPI includes in its candidate proteins list, the "true" proteins nine times over ten, whereas Piums includes in its list the "true" proteins only four time over ten. Even if Mascot also correctly includes in the candidates list the "true" proteins nine times over ten, it provides longer candidate lists, therefore increasing the number of false positives when the molecular weight of the proteins in the sample is approximatively known (e.g. by the 1-D/2-D

  8. Affinity-based thermoresponsive precipitation of proteins modified with polymer-binding peptides.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Seigo; Sawada, Toshiki; Ishizone, Takashi; Serizawa, Takeshi

    2016-04-14

    A 12-mer peptide with an affinity for the meso diad sequence of poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) (PNIPAM) was identified through affinity-based peptide screening. A model protein (i.e., human serum albumin (HSA)) chemically modified with the peptide was successfully precipitated with PNIPAM above the lower critical solution temperature (LCST) of PNIPAM. PMID:26996430

  9. Hydrolysis of whey protein isolate with Bacillus licheniformis protease: aggregating capacities of peptide fractions.

    PubMed

    Creusot, Nathalie; Gruppen, Harry

    2008-11-12

    In a previous study, peptides aggregating at pH 7.0 derived from a whey protein hydrolysate made with Bacillus licheniformis protease were fractionated and identified. The objective of the present work was to investigate the solubility of the fractionated aggregating peptides, as a function of concentration, and their aggregating capacities toward added intact proteins. The amount of aggregated material and the composition of the aggregates obtained were measured by nitrogen concentration and size exclusion chromatography, respectively. The results showed that of the four fractions obtained from the aggregating peptides, two were insoluble, while the other two consisted of 1:1 mixture of low and high solubility peptides. Therefore, insoluble peptides coaggregated, assumedly via hydrophobic interactions, other relatively more soluble peptides. It was also shown that aggregating peptides could aggregate intact protein nonspecifically since the same peptides were involved in the aggregation of whey proteins, beta-casein, and bovine serum albumin. Both insoluble and partly insoluble peptides were required for the aggregation of intact protein. These results are of interest for the applications of protein hydrolysates, as mixtures of intact protein and peptides are often present in these applications. PMID:18922012

  10. Constrained peptides with target-adapted cross-links as inhibitors of a pathogenic protein-protein interaction.

    PubMed

    Glas, Adrian; Bier, David; Hahne, Gernot; Rademacher, Christoph; Ottmann, Christian; Grossmann, Tom N

    2014-02-24

    Bioactive conformations of peptides can be stabilized by macrocyclization, resulting in increased target affinity and activity. Such macrocyclic peptides proved useful as modulators of biological functions, in particular as inhibitors of protein-protein interactions (PPI). However, most peptide-derived PPI inhibitors involve stabilized α-helices, leaving a large number of secondary structures unaddressed. Herein, we present a rational approach towards stabilization of an irregular peptide structure, using hydrophobic cross-links that replace residues crucially involved in target binding. The molecular basis of this interaction was elucidated by X-ray crystallography and isothermal titration calorimetry. The resulting cross-linked peptides inhibit the interaction between human adaptor protein 14-3-3 and virulence factor exoenzyme S. Taking into consideration that irregular peptide structures participate widely in PPIs, this approach provides access to novel peptide-derived inhibitors. PMID:24504455

  11. Peptide Length Determines Equilibrium Secondary Structure in Protein-Analogous Micelles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tirrell, Matthew; Marullo, Rachel; Kastantin, Mark

    2013-03-01

    This work seeks improved bottom-up design of bioinspired materials built from peptide-amphiphiles, which are a class of bioconjugates whereby a biofunctional peptide is covalently attached to a hydrophobic moiety that drives self-assembly in aqueous solution. Specifically, this work highlights the importance of peptide length (i.e. molecular weight) in determining the equilibrium secondary structure of the peptide as well as the self-assembled (i.e. micelle) geometry. Peptides used here repeat a seven-amino acid sequence between one and four times to vary peptide length while maintaining similar peptide-peptide interactions. Without a hydrophobic tail, these peptides all exhibit a combination of random coil and α-helical structure. Upon self-assembly, however, short peptides are prone to β-sheet structure and cylindrical geometry while longer peptides remain helical in spheroidal micelles. The transition to β-sheets in short peptides is kinetic, whereby amphiphiles first self-assemble with helical peptide structure, then overcome an activation barrier as they transition to their equilibrium β-sheet structure at a rate that depends on both temperature and ionic strength. These results identify peptide length as an important control over equilibrium peptide secondary structure and micelle geometry. Furthermore, the kinetic nature of the helix-to-sheet transition opens the door for shape-changing bioinspired materials with tunable conversion rates.

  12. Biological implications of SNPs in signal peptide domains of human proteins.

    PubMed

    Jarjanazi, Hamdi; Savas, Sevtap; Pabalan, Noel; Dennis, James W; Ozcelik, Hilmi

    2008-02-01

    Proteins destined for secretion or membrane compartments possess signal peptides for insertion into the membrane. The signal peptide is therefore critical for localization and function of cell surface receptors and ligands that mediate cell-cell communication. About 4% of all human proteins listed in UniProt database have signal peptide domains in their N terminals. A comprehensive literature survey was performed to retrieve functional and disease associated genetic variants in the signal peptide domains of human proteins. In 21 human proteins we have identified 26 disease associated mutations within their signal peptide domains, 14 mutations of which have been experimentally shown to impair the signal peptide function and thus influence protein transportation. We took advantage of SignalP 3.0 predictions to characterize the signal peptide prediction score differences between the mutant and the wild-type alleles of each mutation, as well as 189 previously uncharacterized single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) found to be located in the signal peptide domains of 165 human proteins. Comparisons of signal peptide prediction outcomes of mutations and SNPs, have implicated SNPs potentially impacting the signal peptide function, and thus the cellular localization of the human proteins. The majority of the top candidate proteins represented membrane and secreted proteins that are associated with molecular transport, cell signaling and cell to cell interaction processes of the cell. This is the first study that systematically characterizes genetic variation occurring in the signal peptides of all human proteins. This study represents a useful strategy for prioritization of SNPs occurring within the signal peptide domains of human proteins. Functional evaluation of candidates identified herein may reveal effects on major cellular processes including immune cell function, cell recognition and adhesion, and signal transduction. PMID:17680692

  13. Protein identification: the origins of peptide mass fingerprinting.

    PubMed

    Henzel, William J; Watanabe, Colin; Stults, John T

    2003-09-01

    Peptide mass fingerprinting (PMF) grew from a need for a faster, more efficient method to identify frequently observed proteins in electrophoresis gels. We describe the genesis of the idea in 1989, and show the first demonstration with fast atom bombardment mass spectrometry. Despite its promise, the method was seldom used until 1992, with the coming of significantly more sensitive commercial instrumentation based on MALDI-TOF-MS. We recount the evolution of the method and its dependence on a number of technical breakthroughs, both in mass spectrometry and in other areas. We show how it laid the foundation for high-throughput, high-sensitivity methods of protein analysis, now known as proteomics. We conclude with recommendations for further improvements, and speculation of the role of PMF in the future. PMID:12954162

  14. Selective enrichment and identification of cross-linked peptides to study 3-D structures of protein complexes by mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Buncherd, Hansuk; Nessen, Merel A; Nouse, Niels; Stelder, Sacha K; Roseboom, Winfried; Dekker, Henk L; Arents, Jos C; Smeenk, Linde E; Wanner, Martin J; van Maarseveen, Jan H; Yang, Xiao; Lewis, Peter J; de Koning, Leo J; de Koster, Chris G; de Jong, Luitzen

    2012-04-01

    Chemical cross-linking of protein complexes combined with mass spectrometry is a powerful approach to obtain 3-D structural information by revealing amino residues that are in close spatial proximity. To increase the efficiency of mass spectrometric analysis, we have demonstrated the selective enrichment of cross-linked peptides from the 350 kDa protein complex RNA polymerase (RNAP) from Bacillus subtilis. Bis(succinimidyl)-3-azidomethyl glutarate was used as a cross-linker along with an azide-reactive cyclooctyne-conjugated resin to capture target peptides. Subsequently released peptides were fractionated by strong cation exchange chromatography and subjected to LC-MS/MS. We mapped 10 different intersubunit and 24 intrasubunit cross-links by xComb database searching supplied with stringent criteria for confirmation of the proposed structure of candidate cross-linked peptides. The cross-links fit into a homology model of RNAP. Cross-links between β lobe 1 and the β' downstream jaw, and cross-links involving the N-terminal and C-terminal parts of the α subunits suggest conformational flexibility. The analytical strategy presented here can be applied to map protein-protein interactions at the amino acid level in biological assemblies of similar complexity. Our approach enables the exploration of alternative peptide fragmentation techniques that may further facilitate cross-link analysis. PMID:22326961

  15. Directed Evolution of a Cyclized Peptoid-Peptide Chimera against a Cell-Free Expressed Protein and Proteomic Profiling of the Interacting Proteins to Create a Protein-Protein Interaction Inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Kawakami, Takashi; Ogawa, Koji; Hatta, Tomohisa; Goshima, Naoki; Natsume, Tohru

    2016-06-17

    N-alkyl amino acids are useful building blocks for the in vitro display evolution of ribosomally synthesized peptides because they can increase the proteolytic stability and cell permeability of these peptides. However, the translation initiation substrate specificity of nonproteinogenic N-alkyl amino acids has not been investigated. In this study, we screened various N-alkyl amino acids and nonamino carboxylic acids for translation initiation with an Escherichia coli reconstituted cell-free translation system (PURE system) and identified those that efficiently initiated translation. Using seven of these efficiently initiating acids, we next performed in vitro display evolution of cyclized peptidomimetics against an arbitrarily chosen model human protein (β-catenin) cell-free expressed from its cloned cDNA (HUPEX) and identified a novel β-catenin-binding cyclized peptoid-peptide chimera. Furthermore, by a proteomic approach using direct nanoflow liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (DNLC-MS/MS), we successfully identified which protein-β-catenin interaction is inhibited by the chimera. The combination of in vitro display evolution of cyclized N-alkyl peptidomimetics and in vitro expression of human proteins would be a powerful approach for the high-speed discovery of diverse human protein-targeted cyclized N-alkyl peptidomimetics. PMID:27010125

  16. Mass Spectrometry Analysis of the Extracellular Peptidome of Lactococcus lactis: Lines of Evidence for the Coexistence of Extracellular Protein Hydrolysis and Intracellular Peptide Excretion.

    PubMed

    Guillot, Alain; Boulay, Mylène; Chambellon, Émilie; Gitton, Christophe; Monnet, Véronique; Juillard, Vincent

    2016-09-01

    We report here the use of a peptidomic approach to revisit the extracellular proteolysis of Lactococcus lactis. More than 1800 distinct peptides accumulate externally during growth of the plasmid-free protease-negative strain L. lactis IL1403 in a protein- and peptide-free medium. These peptides mainly originate from cell-surface- and cytoplasmic-located proteins, despite the fact that no cell lysis could be evidenced. Positioning each identified peptide on its parental protein sequence demonstrated the involvement of exo- and endopeptidase activities. The endopeptidases responsible for the release of surface and cytoplasmic peptides had distinct specificities. The membrane-anchored protease HtrA was responsible for the release of only a part of the surface peptides, and its preference for branched-chain amino acids in the N-terminal side of the cleaved bond was established in situ. Other yet uncharacterized surface proteases were also involved. Several lines of evidence suggest that surface and cytoplasmic peptides were produced by different routes, at least part of the latter being most likely excreted as peptides from the cells. The mechanism by which these cytoplasmic peptides are excreted remains an open question, as it is still the case for excreted cytoplasmic proteins. PMID:27439475

  17. Purification and sequencing of the active site tryptic peptide from penicillin-binding protein 1b of Escherichia coli

    SciTech Connect

    Nicholas, R.A.; Suzuki, H.; Hirota, Y.; Strominger, J.L.

    1985-07-02

    This paper reports the sequence of the active site peptide of penicillin-binding protein 1b from Escherichia coli. Purified penicillin-binding protein 1b was labeled with (/sup 14/C)penicillin G, digested with trypsin, and partially purified by gel filtration. Upon further purification by high-pressure liquid chromatography, two radioactive peaks were observed, and the major peak, representing over 75% of the applied radioactivity, was submitted to amino acid analysis and sequencing. The sequence Ser-Ile-Gly-Ser-Leu-Ala-Lys was obtained. The active site nucleophile was identified by digesting the purified peptide with aminopeptidase M and separating the radioactive products on high-pressure liquid chromatography. Amino acid analysis confirmed that the serine residue in the middle of the sequence was covalently bonded to the (/sup 14/C)penicilloyl moiety. A comparison of this sequence to active site sequences of other penicillin-binding proteins and beta-lactamases is presented.

  18. Signal peptide optimization tool for the secretion of recombinant protein from Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Mori, Akihiro; Hara, Shoichi; Sugahara, Tomohiro; Kojima, Takaaki; Iwasaki, Yugo; Kawarasaki, Yasuaki; Sahara, Takehiko; Ohgiya, Satoru; Nakano, Hideo

    2015-11-01

    The secretion efficiency of foreign proteins in recombinant microbes is strongly dependent on the combination of the signal peptides (SPs) used and the target proteins; therefore, identifying the optimal SP sequence for each target protein is a crucial step in maximizing the efficiency of protein secretion in both prokaryotes and eukaryotes. In this study, we developed a novel method, named the SP optimization tool (SPOT), for the generation and rapid screening of a library of SP-target gene fusion constructs to identify the optimal SP for maximizing target protein secretion. In contrast to libraries generated in previous studies, SPOT fusion constructs are generated without adding the intervening sequences associated with restriction enzyme digestion sites. Therefore, no extra amino acids are inserted at the N-terminus of the target protein that might affect its function or conformational stability. As a model system, β-galactosidase (LacA) from Aspergillus oryzae was used as a target protein for secretion from Saccharomyces cerevisiae. In total, 60 SPs were selected from S. cerevisiae secretory proteins and utilized to generate the SP library. While many of the SP-LacA fusions were not secreted, several of the SPs, AGA2, CRH1, PLB1, and MF(alpha)1, were found to enhance LacA secretion compared to the WT sequence. Our results indicate that SPOT is a valuable method for optimizing the bioproduction of any target protein, and could be adapted to many host strains. PMID:25912446

  19. [Ectopic osteogenesis in vivo using bone morphogenetic protein-2 derived peptide loaded biodegradable hydrogel].

    PubMed

    Zhao, Jingjing; Fang, Zhenhua; Huang, Ruokun; Xiao, Kai; Li, Jing; Xie, Ming; Kan, Wusheng

    2014-08-01

    We investigated the development of an injectable, biodegradable hydrogel composite of poly(trimethylene carbonate)-F127-poly(trimethylene carbonate)(PTMC11-F127-PTMC11 )loaded with bone morphogenetic protein-2 (BMP-2) derived peptide P24 for ectopic bone formation in vivo and evaluated its release kinetics in vitro. Then we evaluated P24 peptide release kinetics from different concentration of PTMC11-F127-PTMC11 hydrogel in vitro using bicinchoninic acid (BCA)assay. P24/ PTMC11-F127-PTMC11 hydrogel was implanted into each rat's erector muscle of spine and ectopic bone formation of the implanted gel in vivo was detected by hematoxylin and eosin stain (HE). PTMC11-F127-PTMC11 hydrogel with concentration more than 20 percent showed sustained slow release for one month after the initial burst release. Bone trabeculae surround the P24/ PTMC11-F127-PTMC11 hydrogel was shown at the end of six weeks by hematoxylin and eosin stain. These results indicated that encapsulated bone morphogenetic protein (BMP-2) derived peptide P24 remained viable in vivo, thus suggesting the potential of PTMC11-F127-PT- MC11 composite hydrogels as part of a novel strategy for localized delivery of bioactive molecules. PMID:25508424

  20. [Ectopic osteogenesis in vivo using bone morphogenetic protein-2 derived peptide loaded biodegradable hydrogel].

    PubMed

    Zhao, Jingjing; Fang, Zhenhua; Huang, Ruokun; Xiao, Kai; Li, Jing; Xie, Ming; Kan, Wusheng

    2014-08-01

    We investigated the development of an injectable, biodegradable hydrogel composite of poly(trimethylene carbonate)-F127-poly(trimethylene carbonate)(PTMC11-F127-PTMC11 )loaded with bone morphogenetic protein-2 (BMP-2) derived peptide P24 for ectopic bone formation in vivo and evaluated its release kinetics in vitro. Then we evaluated P24 peptide release kinetics from different concentration of PTMC11-F127-PTMC11 hydrogel in vitro using bicinchoninic acid (BCA)assay. P24/ PTMC11-F127-PTMC11 hydrogel was implanted into each rat's erector muscle of spine and ectopic bone formation of the implanted gel in vivo was detected by hematoxylin and eosin stain (HE). PTMC11-F127-PTMC11 hydrogel with concentration more than 20 percent showed sustained slow release for one month after the initial burst release. Bone trabeculae surround the P24/ PTMC11-F127-PTMC11 hydrogel was shown at the end of six weeks by hematoxylin and eosin stain. These results indicated that encapsulated bone morphogenetic protein (BMP-2) derived peptide P24 remained viable in vivo, thus suggesting the potential of PTMC11-F127-PT- MC11 composite hydrogels as part of a novel strategy for localized delivery of bioactive molecules. PMID:25464793

  1. Influence of peptides-phenolics interaction on the antioxidant profile of protein hydrolysates from Brassica napus.

    PubMed

    Hernández-Jabalera, Anaid; Cortés-Giraldo, Isabel; Dávila-Ortíz, Gloria; Vioque, Javier; Alaiz, Manuel; Girón-Calle, Julio; Megías, Cristina; Jiménez-Martínez, Cristian

    2015-07-01

    The role of the peptides-phenolic compounds (PC) interaction on the antioxidant capacity profile (ACP) of protein hydrolysates from rapeseed (Brassica napus) was studied in 36 hydrolysates obtained from a PC-rich and PC-reduced protein substrate. The latent profile analysis (LPA), with data of seven in vitro methods and one assay for cellular antioxidant activity (CAA), allowed identifying five distinctive groups of hydrolysates, each one with distinctive ACP. The interaction of peptides with naturally present PC diminished in vitro antioxidant activity in comparison with their PC-reduced counterparts. However, CAA increased when peptides-PC interaction occurred. The profile with the highest average CAA (62.41 ± 1.48%), shown by hydrolysates obtained by using alcalase, shared typical values of Cu(2+)-catalysed β-carotene oxidation (62.41 ± 0.43%), β-carotene bleaching inhibition (91.75 ± 0.22%) and Cu(2+)-chelating activity (74.53 ± 0.58%). The possibilities for a sample to exhibit ACP with higher CAA increased with each unit of positively charged amino acids, according to multinomial logistic regression analysis. PMID:25704722

  2. Cationic amphipathic peptides accumulate sialylated proteins and lipids in the plasma membrane of eukaryotic host cells

    PubMed Central

    Weghuber, Julian; Aichinger, Michael C.; Brameshuber, Mario; Wieser, Stefan; Ruprecht, Verena; Plochberger, Birgit; Madl, Josef; Horner, Andreas; Reipert, Siegfried; Lohner, Karl; Henics, Tamás; Schütz, Gerhard J.

    2011-01-01

    Cationic antimicrobial peptides (CAMPs) selectively target bacterial membranes by electrostatic interactions with negatively charged lipids. It turned out that for inhibition of microbial growth a high CAMP membrane concentration is required, which can be realized by the incorporation of hydrophobic groups within the peptide. Increasing hydrophobicity, however, reduces the CAMP selectivity for bacterial over eukaryotic host membranes, thereby causing the risk of detrimental side-effects. In this study we addressed how cationic amphipathic peptides—in particular a CAMP with Lysine–Leucine–Lysine repeats (termed KLK)—affect the localization and dynamics of molecules in eukaryotic membranes. We found KLK to selectively inhibit the endocytosis of a subgroup of membrane proteins and lipids by electrostatically interacting with negatively charged sialic acid moieties. Ultrastructural characterization revealed the formation of membrane invaginations representing fission or fusion intermediates, in which the sialylated proteins and lipids were immobilized. Experiments on structurally different cationic amphipathic peptides (KLK, 6-MO-LF11-322 and NK14-2) indicated a cooperation of electrostatic and hydrophobic forces that selectively arrest sialylated membrane constituents. PMID:21718688

  3. Isolation and identification of antioxidant peptides from enzymatically hydrolyzed rice bran protein.

    PubMed

    Wattanasiritham, Ladda; Theerakulkait, Chockchai; Wickramasekara, Samanthi; Maier, Claudia S; Stevens, Jan F

    2016-02-01

    Khao Dawk Mali 105 rice bran protein (RBP) was fractionated into albumin (12.5%), globulin (13.9%), glutelin (70.8%) and prolamine (2.9%). The native and denatured RBP fractions were hydrolyzed with papain and trypsin for 3h at optimum conditions. The RBP fractions and their hydrolysates were evaluated for their antioxidant activity by the Oxygen Radical Absorbance Capacity (ORAC) assay. The trypsin-hydrolyzed denatured albumin exhibited the highest antioxidant activity with an ORAC value of 4.07 μmol of Trolox equivalent (TE)/mg protein. This hydrolysate was separated by using RP-HPLC and three fractions with high antioxidant activity were examined by LTQ-FTICR ESI mass spectrometry. The MW of the peptides from these fractions were 800-2100 Da. and consisted of 6-21 amino acid residues. Most of the peptides from the fractions demonstrated typical characteristics of well-known antioxidant peptides. The results suggest that trypsin-hydrolyzed denatured rice bran albumin might be useful as a natural food antioxidant. PMID:26304333

  4. Reaction mechanisms in the radiolysis of peptides, polypeptides, and proteins. I. Reactions of the peptide main-chain in model systems

    SciTech Connect

    Garrison, W.M.

    1982-08-01

    The object of this review is to bring together and to correlate our present knowledge of products and mechanisms in the radiolysis of peptides, polypeptides and proteins in both aqueous and solid-state systems. Results obtained with various experimental techniques such as product analysis, competition kinetics, ESR spectroscopy and pulse radiolysis are included. Here in part I the emphasis is on the various radiation-induced reactions of the peptide main-chain in model systems. In part II the emphasis is on the radiation chemistry of side-chain loci of the aliphatic, sulfur-containing, aromatic and other unsaturated amino acid residues in similar systems. And, in part III this information on model systems is used in interpreting the mechanisms of chemical change in the radiolysis of proteins in aqueous solution and in the solid state. 60 references.

  5. Solvation thermodynamics of amino acid side chains on a short peptide backbone

    SciTech Connect

    Hajari, Timir; Vegt, Nico F. A. van der

    2015-04-14

    The hydration process of side chain analogue molecules differs from that of the actual amino acid side chains in peptides and proteins owing to the effects of the peptide backbone on the aqueous solvent environment. A recent molecular simulation study has provided evidence that all nonpolar side chains, attached to a short peptide backbone, are considerably less hydrophobic than the free side chain analogue molecules. In contrast to this, the hydrophilicity of the polar side chains is hardly affected by the backbone. To analyze the origin of these observations, we here present a molecular simulation study on temperature dependent solvation free energies of nonpolar and polar side chains attached to a short peptide backbone. The estimated solvation entropies and enthalpies of the various amino acid side chains are compared with existing side chain analogue data. The solvation entropies and enthalpies of the polar side chains are negative, but in absolute magnitude smaller compared with the corresponding analogue data. The observed differences are large; however, owing to a nearly perfect enthalpy-entropy compensation, the solvation free energies of polar side chains remain largely unaffected by the peptide backbone. We find that a similar compensation does not apply to the nonpolar side chains; while the backbone greatly reduces the unfavorable solvation entropies, the solvation enthalpies are either more favorable or only marginally affected. This results in a very small unfavorable free energy cost, or even free energy gain, of solvating the nonpolar side chains in strong contrast to solvation of small hydrophobic or nonpolar molecules in bulk water. The solvation free energies of nonpolar side chains have been furthermore decomposed into a repulsive cavity formation contribution and an attractive dispersion free energy contribution. We find that cavity formation next to the peptide backbone is entropically favored over formation of similar sized nonpolar side

  6. Bioactive Molecules Released in Food by Lactic Acid Bacteria: Encrypted Peptides and Biogenic Amines

    PubMed Central

    Pessione, Enrica; Cirrincione, Simona

    2016-01-01

    Lactic acid bacteria (LAB) can produce a huge amount of bioactive compounds. Since their elective habitat is food, especially dairy but also vegetal food, it is frequent to find bioactive molecules in fermented products. Sometimes these compounds can have adverse effects on human health such as biogenic amines (tyramine and histamine), causing allergies, hypertensive crises, and headache. However, some LAB products also display benefits for the consumers. In the present review article, the main nitrogen compounds produced by LAB are considered. Besides biogenic amines derived from the amino acids tyrosine, histidine, phenylalanine, lysine, ornithine, and glutamate by decarboxylation, interesting peptides can be decrypted by the proteolytic activity of LAB. LAB proteolytic system is very efficient in releasing encrypted molecules from several proteins present in different food matrices. Alpha and beta-caseins, albumin and globulin from milk and dairy products, rubisco from spinach, beta-conglycinin from soy and gluten from cereals constitute a good source of important bioactive compounds. These encrypted peptides are able to control nutrition (mineral absorption and oxidative stress protection), metabolism (blood glucose and cholesterol lowering) cardiovascular function (antithrombotic and hypotensive action), infection (microbial inhibition and immunomodulation) and gut-brain axis (opioids and anti-opioids controlling mood and food intake). Very recent results underline the role of food-encrypted peptides in protein folding (chaperone-like molecules) as well as in cell cycle and apoptosis control, suggesting new and positive aspects of fermented food, still unexplored. In this context, the detailed (transcriptomic, proteomic, and metabolomic) characterization of LAB of food interest (as starters, biocontrol agents, nutraceuticals, and probiotics) can supply a solid evidence-based science to support beneficial effects and it is a promising approach as well to obtain

  7. Bioactive Molecules Released in Food by Lactic Acid Bacteria: Encrypted Peptides and Biogenic Amines.

    PubMed

    Pessione, Enrica; Cirrincione, Simona

    2016-01-01

    Lactic acid bacteria (LAB) can produce a huge amount of bioactive compounds. Since their elective habitat is food, especially dairy but also vegetal food, it is frequent to find bioactive molecules in fermented products. Sometimes these compounds can have adverse effects on human health such as biogenic amines (tyramine and histamine), causing allergies, hypertensive crises, and headache. However, some LAB products also display benefits for the consumers. In the present review article, the main nitrogen compounds produced by LAB are considered. Besides biogenic amines derived from the amino acids tyrosine, histidine, phenylalanine, lysine, ornithine, and glutamate by decarboxylation, interesting peptides can be decrypted by the proteolytic activity of LAB. LAB proteolytic system is very efficient in releasing encrypted molecules from several proteins present in different food matrices. Alpha and beta-caseins, albumin and globulin from milk and dairy products, rubisco from spinach, beta-conglycinin from soy and gluten from cereals constitute a good source of important bioactive compounds. These encrypted peptides are able to control nutrition (mineral absorption and oxidative stress protection), metabolism (blood glucose and cholesterol lowering) cardiovascular function (antithrombotic and hypotensive action), infection (microbial inhibition and immunomodulation) and gut-brain axis (opioids and anti-opioids controlling mood and food intake). Very recent results underline the role of food-encrypted peptides in protein folding (chaperone-like molecules) as well as in cell cycle and apoptosis control, suggesting new and positive aspects of fermented food, still unexplored. In this context, the detailed (transcriptomic, proteomic, and metabolomic) characterization of LAB of food interest (as starters, biocontrol agents, nutraceuticals, and probiotics) can supply a solid evidence-based science to support beneficial effects and it is a promising approach as well to obtain

  8. EHD3 Protein Is Required for Tubular Recycling Endosome Stabilization, and an Asparagine-Glutamic Acid Residue Pair within Its Eps15 Homology (EH) Domain Dictates Its Selective Binding to NPF Peptides.

    PubMed

    Bahl, Kriti; Xie, Shuwei; Spagnol, Gaelle; Sorgen, Paul; Naslavsky, Naava; Caplan, Steve

    2016-06-24

    An elaborate network of dynamic lipid membranes, termed tubular recycling endosomes (TRE), coordinates the process of endocytic recycling in mammalian cells. The C-terminal Eps15 homology domain (EHD)-containing proteins have been implicated in the bending and fission of TRE, thus regulating endocytic recycling. EHD proteins have an EH domain that interacts with proteins containing an NPF motif. We found that NPF-containing EHD1 interaction partners such as molecules interacting with CasL-like1 (MICAL-L1) and Syndapin2 are essential for TRE biogenesis. Also crucial for TRE biogenesis is the generation of phosphatidic acid, an essential lipid component of TRE that serves as a docking point for MICAL-L1 and Syndapin2. EHD1 and EHD3 have 86% amino acid identity; they homo- and heterodimerize and partially co-localize to TRE. Despite their remarkable identity, they have distinct mechanistic functions. EHD1 induces membrane vesiculation, whereas EHD3 supports TRE biogenesis and/or stabilization by an unknown mechanism. While using phospholipase D inhibitors (which block the conversion of glycerophospholipids to phosphatidic acid) to deplete cellular TRE, we observed that, upon inhibitor washout, there was a rapid and dramatic regeneration of MICAL-L1-marked TRE. Using this "synchronized" TRE biogenesis system, we determined that EHD3 is involved in the stabilization of TRE rather than in their biogenesis. Moreover, we identify the residues Ala-519/Asp-520 of EHD1 and Asn-519/Glu-520 of EHD3 as defining the selectivity of these two paralogs for NPF-containing binding partners, and we present a model to explain the atomic mechanism and provide new insight for their differential roles in vesiculation and tubulation, respectively. PMID:27189942

  9. Topical Delivery of Protein and Peptide Using Novel Cell Penetrating Peptide IMT-P8

    PubMed Central

    Gautam, Ankur; Nanda, Jagpreet Singh; Samuel, Jesse S.; Kumari, Manisha; Priyanka, Priyanka; Bedi, Gursimran; Nath, Samir K.; Mittal, Garima; Khatri, Neeraj; Raghava, Gajendra Pal Singh

    2016-01-01

    Skin, being the largest organ of the body, is an important site for drug administration. However, most of the drugs have poor permeability and thus drug delivery through the skin is very challenging. In this study, we examined the transdermal delivery capability of IMT-P8, a novel cell-penetrating peptide. We generated IMT-P8-GFP and IMT-P8-KLA fusion constructs and evaluated their internalization into mouse skin after topical application. Our results demonstrate that IMT-P8 is capable of transporting green fluorescent protein (GFP) and proapoptotic peptide, KLA into the skin and also in different cell lines. Interestingly, uptake of IMT-P8-GFP was considerably higher than TAT-GFP in HeLa cells. After internalization, IMT-P8-KLA got localized to the mitochondria and caused significant cell death in HeLa cells signifying an intact biological activity. Further in vivo skin penetration experiments revealed that after topical application, IMT-P8 penetrated the stratum corneum, entered into the viable epidermis and accumulated inside the hair follicles. In addition, both IMT-P8-KLA and IMT-P8-GFP internalized into the hair follicles and dermal tissue of the skin following topical application. These results suggested that IMT-P8 could be a potential candidate to be used as a topical delivery vehicle for various cosmetic and skin disease applications. PMID:27189051

  10. Topical Delivery of Protein and Peptide Using Novel Cell Penetrating Peptide IMT-P8.

    PubMed

    Gautam, Ankur; Nanda, Jagpreet Singh; Samuel, Jesse S; Kumari, Manisha; Priyanka, Priyanka; Bedi, Gursimran; Nath, Samir K; Mittal, Garima; Khatri, Neeraj; Raghava, Gajendra Pal Singh

    2016-01-01

    Skin, being the largest organ of the body, is an important site for drug administration. However, most of the drugs have poor permeability and thus drug delivery through the skin is very challenging. In this study, we examined the transdermal delivery capability of IMT-P8, a novel cell-penetrating peptide. We generated IMT-P8-GFP and IMT-P8-KLA fusion constructs and evaluated their internalization into mouse skin after topical application. Our results demonstrate that IMT-P8 is capable of transporting green fluorescent protein (GFP) and proapoptotic peptide, KLA into the skin and also in different cell lines. Interestingly, uptake of IMT-P8-GFP was considerably higher than TAT-GFP in HeLa cells. After internalization, IMT-P8-KLA got localized to the mitochondria and caused significant cell death in HeLa cells signifying an intact biological activity. Further in vivo skin penetration experiments revealed that after topical application, IMT-P8 penetrated the stratum corneum, entered into the viable epidermis and accumulated inside the hair follicles. In addition, both IMT-P8-KLA and IMT-P8-GFP internalized into the hair follicles and dermal tissue of the skin following topical application. These results suggested that IMT-P8 could be a potential candidate to be used as a topical delivery vehicle for various cosmetic and skin disease applications. PMID:27189051

  11. Folic Acid Inhibits Amyloid β-Peptide Production through Modulating DNA Methyltransferase Activity in N2a-APP Cells

    PubMed Central

    Li, Wen; Jiang, Mingyue; Zhao, Shijing; Liu, Huan; Zhang, Xumei; Wilson, John X.; Huang, Guowei

    2015-01-01

    Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is a common neurodegenerative disease resulting in progressive dementia, and is a principal cause of dementia among older adults. Folate acts through one-carbon metabolism to support the methylation of multiple substrates. We hypothesized that folic acid supplementation modulates DNA methyltransferase (DNMT) activity and may alter amyloid β-peptide (Aβ) production in AD. Mouse Neuro-2a cells expressing human APP695 were incubated with folic acid (2.8–40 μmol/L), and with or without zebularine (the DNMT inhibitor). DNMT activity, cell viability, Aβ and DNMTs expression were then examined. The results showed that folic acid stimulated DNMT gene and protein expression, and DNMT activity. Furthermore, folic acid decreased Aβ protein production, whereas inhibition of DNMT activity by zebularine increased Aβ production. The results indicate that folic acid induces methylation potential-dependent DNMT enzymes, thereby attenuating Aβ production. PMID:26492244

  12. Folic Acid Inhibits Amyloid β-Peptide Production through Modulating DNA Methyltransferase Activity in N2a-APP Cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Wen; Jiang, Mingyue; Zhao, Shijing; Liu, Huan; Zhang, Xumei; Wilson, John X; Huang, Guowei

    2015-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a common neurodegenerative disease resulting in progressive dementia, and is a principal cause of dementia among older adults. Folate acts through one-carbon metabolism to support the methylation of multiple substrates. We hypothesized that folic acid supplementation modulates DNA methyltransferase (DNMT) activity and may alter amyloid β-peptide (Aβ) production in AD. Mouse Neuro-2a cells expressing human APP695 were incubated with folic acid (2.8-40 μmol/L), and with or without zebularine (the DNMT inhibitor). DNMT activity, cell viability, Aβ and DNMTs expression were then examined. The results showed that folic acid stimulated DNMT gene and protein expression, and DNMT activity. Furthermore, folic acid decreased Aβ protein production, whereas inhibition of DNMT activity by zebularine increased Aβ production. The results indicate that folic acid induces methylation potential-dependent DNMT enzymes, thereby attenuating Aβ production. PMID:26492244

  13. Studies of the chemical basis of the origin of protein synthesis Initiation and direction of peptide growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mullins, D. W., Jr.; Lacey, J. C., Jr.

    1980-01-01

    The data presented in this paper show that the ease of nonenzymatic activation of carboxylic acids by ATP at pH 5 varies directly with the pKa of the carboxyl group, and is consistent with the idea that it is the protonated form of the carboxyl group which participates in the activation reaction. Consequently, since most N-blocked amino acids have higher pKas than do their unblocked forms, they are activated more readily, and it has been demonstrated that this principle applies to peptides as well, which are activated more rapidly than single amino acids. It is proposed that this fact may be partly responsible for the origin of two important features still observed in contemporary protein synthesis: (1) initiation in prokaryotes is accomplished with an N-blocked amino acid, and (2) elongation in all living systems occurs at the carboxyl end of the growing peptide.

  14. Crystal structure of a human rhinovirus neutralizing antibody complexed with a peptide derived from viral capsid protein VP2.

    PubMed Central

    Tormo, J; Blaas, D; Parry, N R; Rowlands, D; Stuart, D; Fita, I

    1994-01-01

    The three-dimensional structure of the complex between the Fab fragment of an anti-human rhinovirus neutralizing antibody (8F5) and a cross-reactive synthetic peptide from the viral capsid protein VP2 has been determined at 2.5 A resolution by crystallographic methods. The refinement is presently at an R factor of 0.18 and the antigen-binding site and viral peptide are well defined. The peptide antigen adopts a compact fold by two tight turns and interacts through hydrogen bonds, some with ionic character, and van der Waals contacts with antibody residues from the six hypervariable loops as well as several framework amino acids. The conformation adopted by the peptide is closely related to the corresponding region of the viral protein VP2 on the surface of human rhinovirus 1A whose three-dimensional structure is known. Implications for the cross-reactivity between peptides and the viral capsid are discussed. The peptide-antibody interactions, together with the analysis of mutant viruses that escape neutralization by 8F5 suggest two different mechanisms for viral escape. The comparison between the complexed and uncomplexed antibody structures shows important conformational rearrangements, especially in the hypervariable loops of the heavy chain. Thus, it constitutes a clear example of the 'induced fit' molecular recognition mechanism. Images PMID:8194515

  15. β-Propeller Blades as Ancestral Peptides in Protein Evolution

    PubMed Central

    Kopec, Klaus O.; Lupas, Andrei N.

    2013-01-01

    Proteins of the β-propeller fold are ubiquitous in nature and widely used as structural scaffolds for ligand binding and enzymatic activity. This fold comprises between four and twelve four-stranded β-meanders, the so called blades that are arranged circularly around a central funnel-shaped pore. Despite the large size range of β-propellers, their blades frequently show sequence similarity indicative of a common ancestry and it has been proposed that the majority of β-propellers arose divergently by amplification and diversification of an ancestral blade. Given the structural versatility of β-propellers and the hypothesis that the first folded proteins evolved from a simpler set of peptides, we investigated whether this blade may have given rise to other folds as well. Using sequence comparisons, we identified proteins of four other folds as potential homologs of β-propellers: the luminal domain of inositol-requiring enzyme 1 (IRE1-LD), type II β-prisms, β-pinwheels, and WW domains. Because, with increasing evolutionary distance and decreasing sequence length, the statistical significance of sequence comparisons becomes progressively harder to distinguish from the background of convergent similarities, we complemented our analyses with a new method that evaluates possible homology based on the correlation between sequence and structure similarity. Our results indicate a homologous relationship of IRE1-LD and type II β-prisms with β-propellers, and an analogous one for β-pinwheels and WW domains. Whereas IRE1-LD most likely originated by fold-changing mutations from a fully formed PQQ motif β-propeller, type II β-prisms originated by amplification and differentiation of a single blade, possibly also of the PQQ type. We conclude that both β-propellers and type II β-prisms arose by independent amplification of a blade-sized fragment, which represents a remnant of an ancient peptide world. PMID:24143202

  16. Composition of free and peptide-bound amino acids in beef chuck, loin, and round cuts.

    PubMed

    Wu, G; Cross, H R; Gehring, K B; Savell, J W; Arnold, A N; McNeill, S H

    2016-06-01

    Meat is a food for humans. However, beef consumption in the United States has steadily declined by >14% over the past decade due to a variety of factors, including insufficient knowledge of animal protein. This study quantified all proteinogenic AA as well as nutritionally and physiologically significant nonproteinogenic AA and small peptides in beef cuts from 3 subprimals (chuck, round, and loin). Beef carcasses ( = 10) were selected at 3 commercial packing plants in the United States. Retail-cut samples were analyzed for the nitrogenous substances after acid, alkaline, or enzymatic hydrolysis and after deproteinization. In these chuck, round, and loin cuts, total amounts of glutamate (free plus peptide bound) were the highest (69-75 mg/g dry weight) followed by lysine, leucine, arginine, and glutamine in descending order. This is the first study to determine aspartate, asparagine, glutamate, and glutamine in meat proteins of any animal species. In all the beef samples evaluated, glutamine was the most abundant free AA (4.0-5.7 mg/g dry weight) followed by taurine, alanine, glutamate, and β-alanine. Additionally, samples from all beef cuts had high concentrations of anserine, carnosine, and glutathione, which were 2.8 to 3.7, 15.2 to 24.2, and 0.68 to 0.79 mg/g dry weight, respectively. Beef top loin steaks appear to provide higher protein nutrition values than top round steaks and under blade roasts, but all are excellent sources of proteinogenic AA as well as antioxidant AA and peptides to improve human growth, development, and health. Our findings may help guide future decisions regarding human and animal nutrition. PMID:27285936

  17. Collagen peptide-based biomaterials for protein delivery and peptide-promoted self-assembly of gold nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ernenwein, Dawn M.

    2011-12-01

    Bottom-up self-assembly of peptides has driven the research progress for the following two projects: protein delivery vehicles of collagen microflorettes and the assembly of gold nanoparticles with coiled-coil peptides. Collagen is the most abundant protein in the mammals yet due to immunogenic responses, batch-to-batch variability and lack of sequence modifications, synthetic collagen has been designed to self-assemble into native collagen-like structures. In particular with this research, metal binding ligands were incorporated on the termini of collagen-like peptides to generate micron-sized particles, microflorettes. The over-arching goal of the first research project is to engineer MRI-active microflorettes, loaded with His-tagged growth factors with differential release rates while bound to stem cells that can be implemented toward regenerative cell-based therapies. His-tagged proteins, such as green fluorescent protein, have successfully been incorporated on the surface and throughout the microflorettes. Protein release was monitored under physiological conditions and was related to particle degradation. In human plasma full release was obtained within six days. Stability of the microflorettes under physiological conditions was also examined for the development of a therapeutically relevant delivery agent. Additionally, MRI active microflorettes have been generated through the incorporation of a gadolinium binding ligand, DOTA within the collagen-based peptide sequence. To probe peptide-promoted self-assemblies of gold nanoparticles (GNPs) by non-covalent, charge complementary interactions, a highly anionic coiled-coil peptide was designed and synthesized. Upon formation of peptide-GNP interactions, the hydrophobic domain of the coiled-coil were shown to promote the self-assembly of peptide-GNPs clustering. Hydrophobic forces were found to play an important role in the assembly process, as a peptide with an equally overall negative charge, but lacking an

  18. Global analysis of myocardial peptides containing cysteines with irreversible sulfinic and sulfonic acid post-translational modifications.

    PubMed

    Paulech, Jana; Liddy, Kiersten A; Engholm-Keller, Kasper; White, Melanie Y; Cordwell, Stuart J

    2015-03-01

    Cysteine (Cys) oxidation is a crucial post-translational modification (PTM) associated with redox signaling and oxidative stress. As Cys is highly reactive to oxidants it forms a range of post-translational modifications, some that are biologically reversible (e.g. disulfides, Cys sulfenic acid) and others (Cys sulfinic [Cys-SO2H] and sulfonic [Cys-SO3H] acids) that are considered "irreversible." We developed an enrichment method to isolate Cys-SO2H/SO3H-containing peptides from complex tissue lysates that is compatible with tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS). The acidity of these post-translational modification (pKa Cys-SO3H < 0) creates a unique charge distribution when localized on tryptic peptides at acidic pH that can be utilized for their purification. The method is based on electrostatic repulsion of Cys-SO2H/SO3H-containing peptides from cationic resins (i.e. "negative" selection) followed by "positive" selection using hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography. Modification of strong cation exchange protocols decreased the complexity of initial flowthrough fractions by allowing for hydrophobic retention of neutral peptides. Coupling of strong cation exchange and hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography allowed for increased enrichment of Cys-SO2H/SO3H (up to 80%) from other modified peptides. We identified 181 Cys-SO2H/SO3H sites from rat myocardial tissue subjected to physiologically relevant concentrations of H2O2 (<100 μm) or to ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) injury via Langendorff perfusion. I/R significantly increased Cys-SO2H/SO3H-modified peptides from proteins involved in energy utilization and contractility, as well as those involved in oxidative damage and repair. PMID:25561502

  19. Development of the affinity materials for phosphorylated proteins/peptides enrichment in phosphoproteomics analysis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhi-Gang; Lv, Nan; Bi, Wen-Zhi; Zhang, Ji-Lin; Ni, Jia-Zuan

    2015-04-29

    Reversible protein phosphorylation is a key event in numerous biological processes. Mass spectrometry (MS) is the most powerful analysis tool in modern phosphoproteomics. However, the direct MS analysis of phosphorylated proteins/peptides is still a big challenge because of the low abundance and insufficient ionization of phosphorylated proteins/peptides as well as the suppression effects of nontargets. Enrichment of phosphorylated proteins/peptides by affinity materials from complex biosamples is the most widely used strategy to enhance the MS detection. The demand of efficiently enriching phosphorylated proteins/peptides has spawned diverse affinity materials based on different enrichment principles (e.g., electronic attraction, chelating). In this review, we summarize the recent development of various affinity materials for phosphorylated proteins/peptides enrichment. We will highlight the design and fabrication of these affinity materials, discuss the enrichment mechanisms involved in different affinity materials, and suggest the future challenges and research directions in this field. PMID:25845677

  20. Phosphorylation of Alzheimer disease amyloid precursor peptide by protein kinase C and Ca sup 2+ /calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II

    SciTech Connect

    Gandy, S.; Czernik, A.J.; Greengard, P. )

    1988-08-01

    The amino acid sequence of the Alzheimer disease amyloid precursor (ADAP) has been deduced from the corresponding cDNA, and hydropathy analysis of the sequence suggest a receptor-like structure with a single transmembrane domain. The putative cytoplasmic domain of ADAP contains potential sites for serine and threonine phosphorylation. In the present study, synthetic peptides derived from this domain were used as model substrates for various purified protein kinases. Protein kinase C rapidly catalyzed the phosphorylation of a peptide corresponding to amino acid residues 645-661 of ADAP. Ca{sup 2+}/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II phosphorylated ADAP peptide (645-661) on Thr-654 and Ser-655. Using rat cerebral cortex synaptosomes prelabeled with {sup 32}P{sub i}, a {sup 32}P-labeled phosphoprotein of {approx}135 kDa was immunoprecipitated by using antisera prepared against ADAP peptide(597-624), consistent with the possibility that the holoform of ADAP in rat brain is a phosphoprotein. Based on analogy with the effect of phosphorylation by protein kinase C of juxtamembrane residues in the cytoplasmic domain of the epidermal growth factor receptor and the interleukin 2 receptor, phosphorylation of ADAP may target it for internalization.

  1. Determination of conformation and orientation of immobilized peptides and proteins at buried interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Lei; Ulrich, Nathan W.; Mello, Charlene M.; Chen, Zhan

    2015-01-01

    Surface immobilized peptides/proteins have important applications such as antimicrobial coating and biosensing. We report a study of such peptides/proteins using sum frequency generation vibrational spectroscopy and ATR-FTIR. Immobilization on surfaces via physical adsorption and chemical coupling revealed that structures of chemically immobilized peptides are determined by immobilization sites, chemical environments, and substrate surfaces. In addition, controlling enzyme orientation by engineering the surface immobilization site demonstrated that structures can be well-correlated to measured chemical activity. This research facilitates the development of immobilized peptides/proteins with improved activities by optimizing their surface orientation and structure.

  2. Peptide o-aminoanilides as crypto-thioesters for protein chemical synthesis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jia-Xing; Fang, Ge-Min; He, Yao; Qu, Da-Liang; Yu, Min; Hong, Zhang-Yong; Liu, Lei

    2015-02-01

    Fully unprotected peptide o-aminoanilides can be efficiently activated by NaNO2 in aqueous solution to furnish peptide thioesters for use in native chemical ligation. This finding enables the convergent synthesis of proteins from readily synthesizable peptide o-aminoanilides as a new type of crypto-thioesters. The practicality of this approach is shown by the synthesis of histone H2B from five peptide segments. Purification or solubilization tags, which are sometimes needed to improve the efficiency of protein chemical synthesis, can be incorporated into the o-aminoanilide moiety, as demonstrated in the preparation of the cyclic protein lactocyclicin Q. PMID:25475965

  3. Neurotrophic effects of amyloid precursor protein peptide 165 in vitro.

    PubMed

    Yao, Jie; Ma, Lina; Wang, Rong; Sheng, Shuli; Ji, Zhijuan; Zhang, Jingyan

    2016-01-01

    Diabetic encephalopathy is one of the risk factors for Alzheimer's disease. Our previous findings indicated that animals with diabetic encephalopathy exhibit learning and memory impairment in addition to hippocampal neurodegeneration, both of which are ameliorated with amyloid precursor protein (APP) 17-mer (APP17) peptide treatment. Although APP17 is neuroprotective, it is susceptible to enzymatic degradation. Derived from the active sequence structure of APP17, we have previously structurally transformed and modified several APP5-mer peptides (APP328-332 [RERMS], APP 5). We have developed seven different derivatives of APP5, including several analogs. Results from the 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide assay on human neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cells in the present study showed that P165 was the most neuroprotective APP5 derivative. Furthermore, we tested the effects of APP5 and P165 on the number of cells and the release of lactate dehydrogenase. Western immunoblot analyses were also performed. The digestion rates of P165 and APP5 were determined by the pepsin digestion test. P165 resisted pepsin digestion significantly more than APP5. Therefore, P165 may be optimal for oral administration. Overall, these findings suggest that P165 may be a potential drug for the treatment of diabetic encephalopathy. PMID:26551064

  4. Recent Advances in Computational Models for the Study of Protein-Peptide Interactions.

    PubMed

    Kilburg, D; Gallicchio, E

    2016-01-01

    We review computational models and software tools in current use for the study of protein-peptide interactions. Peptides and peptide derivatives are growing in interest as therapeutic agents to target protein-protein interactions. Protein-protein interactions are pervasive in biological systems and are responsible for the regulation of critical functions within the cell. Mutations or dysregulation of expression can alter the network of interactions among proteins and cause diseases such as cancer. Protein-protein binding interfaces, which are often large, shallow, and relatively feature-less, are difficult to target with small-molecule inhibitors. Peptide derivatives based on the binding motifs present in the target protein complex are increasingly drawing interest as superior alternatives to conventional small-molecule inhibitors. However, the design of peptide-based inhibitors also presents novel challenges. Peptides are more complex and more flexible than standard medicinal compounds. They also tend to form more extended and more complex interactions with their protein targets. Computational modeling is increasingly being employed to supplement synthetic and biochemical work to offer guidance and energetic and structural insights. In this review, we discuss recent in silico structure-based and physics-based approaches currently employed to model protein-peptide interactions with a few examples of their applications. PMID:27567483

  5. Synthetic Protein Scaffolds Based on Peptide Motifs and Cognate Adaptor Domains for Improving Metabolic Productivity.

    PubMed

    Horn, Anselm H C; Sticht, Heinrich

    2015-01-01

    The efficiency of many cellular processes relies on the defined interaction among different proteins within the same metabolic or signaling pathway. Consequently, a spatial colocalization of functionally interacting proteins has frequently emerged during evolution. This concept has been adapted within the synthetic biology community for the purpose of creating artificial scaffolds. A recent advancement of this concept is the use of peptide motifs and their cognate adaptor domains. SH2, SH3, GBD, and PDZ domains have been used most often in research studies to date. The approach has been successfully applied to the synthesis of a variety of target molecules including catechin, D-glucaric acid, H2, hydrochinone, resveratrol, butyrate, gamma-aminobutyric acid, and mevalonate. Increased production levels of up to 77-fold have been observed compared to non-scaffolded systems. A recent extension of this concept is the creation of a covalent linkage between peptide motifs and adaptor domains, which leads to a more stable association of the scaffolded systems and thus bears the potential to further enhance metabolic productivity. PMID:26636078

  6. Synthetic Protein Scaffolds Based on Peptide Motifs and Cognate Adaptor Domains for Improving Metabolic Productivity

    PubMed Central

    Horn, Anselm H. C.; Sticht, Heinrich

    2015-01-01

    The efficiency of many cellular processes relies on the defined interaction among different proteins within the same metabolic or signaling pathway. Consequently, a spatial colocalization of functionally interacting proteins has frequently emerged during evolution. This concept has been adapted within the synthetic biology community for the purpose of creating artificial scaffolds. A recent advancement of this concept is the use of peptide motifs and their cognate adaptor domains. SH2, SH3, GBD, and PDZ domains have been used most often in research studies to date. The approach has been successfully applied to the synthesis of a variety of target molecules including catechin, D-glucaric acid, H2, hydrochinone, resveratrol, butyrate, gamma-aminobutyric acid, and mevalonate. Increased production levels of up to 77-fold have been observed compared to non-scaffolded systems. A recent extension of this concept is the creation of a covalent linkage between peptide motifs and adaptor domains, which leads to a more stable association of the scaffolded systems and thus bears the potential to further enhance metabolic productivity. PMID:26636078

  7. Anaplasma marginale major surface protein 1a directs cell surface display of tick BM95 immunogenic peptides on Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Canales, Mario; Almazán, Consuelo; Pérez de la Lastra, José M; de la Fuente, José

    2008-07-31

    The surface display of heterologous proteins on live Escherichia coli using anchoring motifs from outer membranes proteins has impacted on many areas of biochemistry, molecular biology and biotechnology. The Anaplasma marginale major surface protein 1a (MSP1a) contains N-terminal surface-exposed repeated peptides (28-289 amino acids) that are involved in pathogen interaction with host cell receptors and is surface-displayed when the recombinant protein is expressed in E. coli. Therefore, it was predicted that MSP1a would surface display on E. coli peptides inserted in the N-terminal repeats region of the protein. The Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) microplus BM86 and BM95 glycoproteins are homologous proteins that protect cattle against tick infestations. In this study, we demonstrated that a recombinant protein comprising tick BM95 immunogenic peptides fused to the A. marginale MSP1a N-terminal region is displayed on the E. coli surface and is recognized by anti-BM86 and anti-MSP1a antibodies. This system provides a novel approach to the surface display of heterologous antigenic proteins on live E. coli and suggests the possibility to use the recombinant bacteria for immunization studies against cattle tick infestations. PMID:18582976

  8. Amino acid sequence of a vitamin K-dependent Ca2+-binding peptide from bovine prothrombin.

    PubMed

    Howard, J B; Fausch, M D

    1975-08-10

    The amino acid sequence of a 31-residue peptide from bovine prothrombin has been determined. This peptide has been shown to contain the vitamin K-dependent modification required for Ca2+ binding (Nelsestuen, G. L., and Suttie, J. W. (1973) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U. S. A. 70, 3366-3370) and the modified amino acid, gamma-carboxyglutamic acid (Nelsestuen, G. L., Zytkovicz, T., and Howard, J. B. (1974) J. Biol. Chem. 249, 6347-6350). The peptide was shown to correspond to residues 12 to 42 of prothrombin. PMID:807581

  9. Self-Templated Nucleation in Peptide and Protein Aggregation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Auer, Stefan; Dobson, Christopher M.; Vendruscolo, Michele; Maritan, Amos

    2008-12-01

    Peptides and proteins exhibit a common tendency to assemble into highly ordered fibrillar aggregates, whose formation proceeds in a nucleation-dependent manner that is often preceded by the formation of oligomeric assemblies. This process has received much attention because disordered oligomeric aggregates have been associated with neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s disease. Here we describe a self-templated nucleation mechanism that determines the transition between the initial condensation of polypeptide chains into disordered assemblies and their reordering into fibrillar structures. The results that we present show that at the molecular level this transition is due to the ability of polypeptide chains to reorder within oligomers into fibrillar assemblies whose surfaces act as templates that stabilize the disordered assemblies.

  10. Distinguishing Proteins From Arbitrary Amino Acid Sequences

    PubMed Central

    Yau, Stephen S.-T.; Mao, Wei-Guang; Benson, Max; He, Rong Lucy

    2015-01-01

    What kinds of amino acid sequences could possibly be protein sequences? From all existing databases that we can find, known proteins are only a small fraction of all possible combinations of amino acids. Beginning with Sanger's first detailed determination of a protein sequence in 1952, previous studies have focused on describing the structure of existing protein sequences in order to construct the protein universe. No one, however, has developed a criteria for determining whether an arbitrary amino acid sequence can be a protein. Here we show that when the collection of arbitrary amino acid sequences is viewed in an appropriate geometric context, the protein sequences cluster together. This leads to a new computational test, described here, that has proved to be remarkably accurate at determining whether an arbitrary amino acid sequence can be a protein. Even more, if the results of this test indicate that the sequence can be a protein, and it is indeed a protein sequence, then its identity as a protein sequence is uniquely defined. We anticipate our computational test will be useful for those who are attempting to complete the job of discovering all proteins, or constructing the protein universe. PMID:25609314

  11. Adsorption and protonation of peptides and proteins in pH responsive gels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Longo, Gabriel S.; Szleifer, Igal

    2016-08-01

    To describe the non-trivial features of the equilibrium protonation and physical adsorption of peptides/proteins in pH-responsive hydrogels, we summarize our recent theoretical work on the subject. In these systems, molecular confinement in nanometer-sized environments modifies the balance between chemical state, physical interactions and molecular organization, which results in a behavior that is qualitatively different from what is expected from assuming the bulk solution protonation. To enhance adsorption, the pH-dependent deprotonation curves of all amino acids of adsorbed proteins are adequately shifted and deformed, which depends, in a complex fashion, on the specific amino acid. This possibility of modifying different acid–base equilibriums gives the adsorbed protein degrees of freedom to regulate charge and enhance electrostatic attractions under a wide range of experimental conditions. Protein adsorption modifies the microenvironment inside the hydrogel, particularly the gel pH. As a result, the state of protonation of the network is different before and after adsorption. The physicochemical considerations described in this review can be useful in the design of functional materials involving protein adsorption.

  12. Structural and Thermodynamical Insights into the Recognition of Native Proteins by Anti-Peptide Antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Armstrong, A. A.; Hildreth, James E. K.; Amzel, L. M.

    2013-01-01

    The mechanism by which antibodies elicited against protein-derived peptides achieve cross-reactivity with their cognate proteins remains unknown. To address this question we have carried out the complete thermodynamic characterization of the association of a monoclonal antibody (260.33.12) raised against a peptide (SNpep) derived from staphylococcal nuclease (SNase) with both eliciting peptide and cognate protein. Although both ligands bind with similar affinity (Kd = 0.42 µM and 0.30 µM for protein and peptide, respectively), protein and peptide binding have highly different thermodynamic signatures: peptide binding is characterized by a large enthalpic contribution (ΔH = −7.7 kcal/mol) whereas protein binding is dominated by a large entropic contribution (-TΔS = −7.2 kcal/mol). The structure of the SNpep:Fab complex, determined by x-ray diffraction, reveals that the bound conformation of the peptide differs from the conformation of the corresponding loop region in crystal structures of free SNase. The energy difference, estimated by molecular dynamics simulations between native SNase and a model in which the Ω-loop is built in the conformation of the Fab-bound peptide, shows that the energetic cost of adopting this conformation is compatible with the enthalpic cost of binding the protein vis-à-vis the peptide. These results are compatible with a mechanism by which the anti-peptide antibody recognizes the cognate protein: high affinity is maintained upon binding a nonnative conformation by offsetting enthalpic penalties with reduced entropic losses. These findings provide potentially useful guidelines for the identification of linear epitopes within protein sequences that are well suited for the development of synthetic peptide vaccines. PMID:23473830

  13. D-Amino acid residue in the C-type natriuretic peptide from the venom of the mammal, Ornithorhynchus anatinus, the Australian platypus.

    PubMed

    Torres, Allan M; Menz, Ian; Alewood, Paul F; Bansal, Paramjit; Lahnstein, Jelle; Gallagher, Clifford H; Kuchel, Philip W

    2002-07-31

    The C-type natriuretic peptide from the platypus venom (OvCNP) exists in two forms, OvCNPa and OvCNPb, whose amino acid sequences are identical. Through the use of nuclear magnetic resonance, mass spectrometry, and peptidase digestion studies, we discovered that OvCNPb incorporates a D-amino acid at position 2 in the primary structure. Peptides containing a D-amino acid have been found in lower forms of organism, but this report is the first for a D-amino acid in a biologically active peptide from a mammal. The result implies the existence of a specific isomerase in the platypus that converts an L-amino acid residue in the protein to the D-configuration. PMID:12135762

  14. Peptide/protein vaccine delivery system based on PLGA particles.

    PubMed

    Allahyari, Mojgan; Mohit, Elham

    2016-03-01

    Due to the excellent safety profile of poly (D,L-lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA) particles in human, and their biodegradability, many studies have focused on the application of PLGA particles as a controlled-release vaccine delivery system. Antigenic proteins/peptides can be encapsulated into or adsorbed to the surface of PLGA particles. The gradual release of loaded antigens from PLGA particles is necessary for the induction of efficient immunity. Various factors can influence protein release rates from PLGA particles, which can be defined intrinsic features of the polymer, particle characteristics as well as protein and environmental related factors. The use of PLGA particles encapsulating antigens of different diseases such as hepatitis B, tuberculosis, chlamydia, malaria, leishmania, toxoplasma and allergy antigens will be described herein. The co-delivery of antigens and immunostimulants (IS) with PLGA particles can prevent the systemic adverse effects of immunopotentiators and activate both dendritic cells (DCs) and natural killer (NKs) cells, consequently enhancing the therapeutic efficacy of antigen-loaded PLGA particles. We will review co-delivery of different TLR ligands with antigens in various models, highlighting the specific strengths and weaknesses of the system. Strategies to enhance the immunotherapeutic effect of DC-based vaccine using PLGA particles can be designed to target DCs by functionalized PLGA particle encapsulating siRNAs of suppressive gene, and disease specific antigens. Finally, specific examples of cellular targeting where decorating the surface of PLGA particles target orally administrated vaccine to M-cells will be highlighted. PMID:26513024

  15. Probing Protein Structure by Amino Acid-Specific Covalent Labeling and Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Mendoza, Vanessa Leah; Vachet, Richard W.

    2009-01-01

    For many years, amino acid-specific covalent labeling has been a valuable tool to study protein structure and protein interactions, especially for systems that are difficult to study by other means. These covalent labeling methods typically map protein structure and interactions by measuring the differential reactivity of amino acid side chains. The reactivity of amino acids in proteins generally depends on the accessibility of the side chain to the reagent, the inherent reactivity of the label and the reactivity of the amino acid side chain. Peptide mass mapping with ESI- or MALDI-MS and peptide sequencing with tandem MS are typically employed to identify modification sites to provide site-specific structural information. In this review, we describe the reagents that are most commonly used in these residue-specific modification reactions, details about the proper use of these covalent labeling reagents, and information about the specific biochemical problems that have been addressed with covalent labeling strategies. PMID:19016300

  16. L-amino acid ligase from Pseudomonas syringae producing tabtoxin can be used for enzymatic synthesis of various functional peptides.

    PubMed

    Arai, Toshinobu; Arimura, Yasuhiro; Ishikura, Shun; Kino, Kuniki

    2013-08-01

    Functional peptides are expected to be beneficial compounds that improve our quality of life. To address the growing need for functional peptides, we have examined peptide synthesis by using microbial enzymes. l-Amino acid ligase (Lal) catalyzes the condensation of unprotected amino acids in an ATP-dependent manner and is applicable to fermentative production. Hence, Lal is a promising enzyme to achieve cost-effective synthesis. To obtain a Lal with novel substrate specificity, we focused on the putative Lal involved in the biosynthesis of the dipeptidic phytotoxin designated tabtoxin. The tabS gene was cloned from Pseudomonas syringae NBRC14081 and overexpressed in Escherichia coli cells. The recombinant TabS protein produced showed the broadest substrate specificity of any known Lal; it detected 136 of 231 combinations of amino acid substrates when dipeptide synthesis was examined. In addition, some new substrate specificities were identified and unusual amino acids, e.g., l-pipecolic acid, hydroxy-l-proline, and β-alanine, were found to be acceptable substrates. Furthermore, kinetic analysis and monitoring of the reactions over a short time revealed that TabS showed distinct substrate selectivity at the N and C termini, which made it possible to specifically synthesize a peptide without by-products such as homopeptides and heteropeptides with the reverse sequence. TabS specifically synthesized the following functional peptides, including their precursors: l-arginyl-l-phenylalanine (antihypertensive effect; yield, 62%), l-leucyl-l-isoleucine (antidepressive effect; yield, 77%), l-glutaminyl-l-tryptophan (precursor of l-glutamyl-l-tryptophan, which has antiangiogenic activity; yield, 54%), l-leucyl-l-serine (enhances saltiness; yield, 83%), and l-glutaminyl-l-threonine (precursor of l-glutamyl-l-threonine, which enhances saltiness; yield, 96%). Furthermore, our results also provide new insights into tabtoxin biosynthesis. PMID:23770908

  17. Supramolecular control of self-assembling terthiophene-peptide conjugates through the amino acid side chain

    SciTech Connect

    Lehrman, Jessica A.; Cui, Honggang; Tsai, Wei-Wen; Moyer, Tyson J.; Stupp, Samuel I.

    2013-07-30

    The self-assembly of oligothiophene–peptide conjugates can be directed through the systematic variation of the peptide sequence into different nanostructures, including flat spicules, nanotubes, spiral sheets, and giant, flat sheets. Furthermore, the assembly of these molecules is not controlled by steric interactions between the amino acid side chains.

  18. Porcine myofibrillar proteins as potential precursors of bioactive peptides - an in silico study.

    PubMed

    Kęska, Paulina; Stadnik, Joanna

    2016-06-15

    Selected porcine myofibrillar proteins have been assessed as potential precursors of bioactive peptides based on in silico analysis. The potential of protein sequences for releasing peptides was evaluated by determining the profile of their potential biological activity and the frequency of occurrence of fragments with a given activity using the BIOPEP database. Digestive enzymes: pepsin, trypsin and chymotrypsin have been used for the in silico proteolysis with the use of the "Enzyme(s) action" tool in BIOPEP. After simulated gastrointestinal digestion the tested sequences of pig myofibrillar proteins are a potential source of a total of 399 peptides with activities such as enzyme inhibition, antioxidative, hypotensive, stimulating or regulating various body functions and antiamnestic activities. Within the intact proteins and after simulated gastrointestinal digestion, dipeptidyl peptidase IV inhibitory peptide sequences were the most frequently observed. The results indicate that pork myofibrillar proteins are a promising source of peptides with biological activity. PMID:27247979

  19. Identification and binding mechanism of phage displayed peptides with specific affinity to acid-alkali treated titanium.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yuhua; Tan, Jing; Wu, Baohua; Wang, Jianxin; Qu, Shuxin; Weng, Jie; Feng, Bo

    2016-10-01

    Acid-alkali treatment is one of means widely used for preparing bioactive titanium surfaces. Peptides with specific affinity to titanium surface modified by acid-alkali two-steps treatment were obtained via phage display technology. Out of the eight new unique peptides, titanium-binding peptide 54 displayed by monoclonal M13 phage at its pIII coat protein (TBP54-M13 phage) was proved to have higher binding affinity to the substrate. The binding interaction occurred at the domain from phenylalanine at position 1 to arginine at position 6 in the sequences of TBP54 (FAETHRGFHFSF) mainly via the reaction of these residues with the Ti surface. Together the coordination and electrostatic interactions controlled the specific binding of the phage to the substrate. The binding affinity was dependent on the surface basic hydroxyl group content. In addition, the phage showed a different interaction way with the Ti surface without acid-alkali treatment along with an impaired affinity. This study could provide more understanding of the interaction mechanism between the selected peptide and its specific substrate, and develop a promising method for the biofunctionalization of titanium. PMID:27371890

  20. Antioxidant capacity of hydrolyzed animal by-products and relation to amino acid composition and peptide size distribution.

    PubMed

    Damgaard, Trine; Lametsch, René; Otte, Jeanette

    2015-10-01

    The antioxidative capacity of six different tissue hydrolysates (porcine colon, heart and neck and bovine lung, kidney and pancreas) were tested by three different assays monitoring iron chelation, ABTS radical scavenging and inhibition of lipid oxidation in emulsions, respectively. The hydrolysates were also investigated with respect to amino acid composition and peptide size distribution. The hydrolysates contained peptides ranging from 20 kDa to below 100 Da with a predominance of peptides with low molecular weight (53.8 to 89.0 % below 3 kDa). All hydrolysates exhibited antioxidant activity as assessed with all three methods; inhibition of lipid oxidation ranging from 72 to 88 % (at a final protein concentration of 7 mg/mL), iron chelation capacity from 23 to 63 % (at 1.1 mg/mL), and ABTS radical scavenging from 38 to 50 % (at 10 μg /mL). The antioxidant activity did not correlate with the proportion of low molecular weight peptides in the hydrolysed tissues, but with the content of specific amino acid residues. The ABTS radical scavenging capacity of the tissues was found to correlate with the content of Trp, Tyr, Met and Arg, whereas the ability to inhibit the oxidation of lineoleic acid correlated with the content of Glu and His. The chosen animal by-products thus represent a natural source of antioxidants with potential for food application. PMID:26396396

  1. Evaluation of parameters in peptide mass fingerprinting for protein identification by MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kyunghee; Bae, Dongwon; Lim, Dongbin

    2002-04-30

    Protein identification by peptide mass fingerprinting, using the matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS), plays a major role in large proteome projects. In order to develop a simple and reliable method for protein identification by MALDI-TOF MS, we compared and evaluated the major steps in peptide mass fingerprinting. We found that the removal of excess enzyme from the in-gel digestion usually gave a few more peptide peaks, which were important for the identification of some proteins. Internal calibration always gave better results. However, for a large number of samples, two step calibrations (i.e. database search with peptide mass from external calibration, then the use of peptide masses from the search result as internal calibrants) were useful and convenient. From the evaluation and combination of steps that were already developed by others, we established a single overall procedure for peptide identification from a polyacrylamide gel. PMID:12018838

  2. Ribosome-mediated incorporation of a non-standard amino acid into a peptide through expansion of the genetic code.

    PubMed

    Bain, J D; Switzer, C; Chamberlin, A R; Benner, S A

    1992-04-01

    One serious limitation facing protein engineers is the availability of only 20 'proteinogenic' amino acids encoded by natural messenger RNA. The lack of structural diversity among these amino acids restricts the mechanistic and structural issues that can be addressed by site-directed mutagenesis. Here we describe a new technology for incorporating non-standard amino acids into polypeptides by ribosome-based translation. In this technology, the genetic code is expanded through the creation of a 65th codon-anticodon pair from unnatural nucleoside bases having non-standard hydrogen-bonding patterns. This new codon-anticodon pair efficiently supports translation in vitro to yield peptides containing a non-standard amino acid. The versatility of the ribosome as a synthetic tool offers new possibilities for protein engineering, and compares favourably with another recently described approach in which the genetic code is simply rearranged to recruit stop codons to play a coding role. PMID:1560827

  3. A simple contact mapping algorithm for identifying potential peptide mimetics in protein–protein interaction partners

    PubMed Central

    Krall, Alex; Brunn, Jonathan; Kankanala, Spandana; Peters, Michael H

    2014-01-01

    A simple, static contact mapping algorithm has been developed as a first step at identifying potential peptide biomimetics from protein interaction partner structure files. This rapid and simple mapping algorithm, “OpenContact” provides screened or parsed protein interaction files based on specified criteria for interatomic separation distances and interatomic potential interactions. The algorithm, which uses all-atom Amber03 force field models, was blindly tested on several unrelated cases from the literature where potential peptide mimetics have been experimentally developed to varying degrees of success. In all cases, the screening algorithm efficiently predicted proposed or potential peptide biomimetics, or close variations thereof, and provided complete atom-atom interaction data necessary for further detailed analysis and drug development. In addition, we used the static parsing/mapping method to develop a peptide mimetic to the cancer protein target, epidermal growth factor receptor. In this case, secondary, loop structure for the peptide was indicated from the intra-protein mapping, and the peptide was subsequently synthesized and shown to exhibit successful binding to the target protein. The case studies, which all involved experimental peptide drug advancement, illustrate many of the challenges associated with the development of peptide biomimetics, in general. Proteins 2014; 82:2253–2262. © 2014 The Authors. Proteins: Structure, Function, and Bioinformatics Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:24756879

  4. A vocabulary of ancient peptides at the origin of folded proteins

    PubMed Central

    Alva, Vikram; Söding, Johannes; Lupas, Andrei N

    2015-01-01

    The seemingly limitless diversity of proteins in nature arose from only a few thousand domain prototypes, but the origin of these themselves has remained unclear. We are pursuing the hypothesis that they arose by fusion and accretion from an ancestral set of peptides active as co-factors in RNA-dependent replication and catalysis. Should this be true, contemporary domains may still contain vestiges of such peptides, which could be reconstructed by a comparative approach in the same way in which ancient vocabularies have been reconstructed by the comparative study of modern languages. To test this, we compared domains representative of known folds and identified 40 fragments whose similarity is indicative of common descent, yet which occur in domains currently not thought to be homologous. These fragments are widespread in the most ancient folds and enriched for iron-sulfur- and nucleic acid-binding. We propose that they represent the observable remnants of a primordial RNA-peptide world. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.09410.001 PMID:26653858

  5. Bioactive Peptides from Angelica sinensis Protein Hydrolyzate Delay Senescence in Caenorhabditis elegans through Antioxidant Activities

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Qiangqiang; Huang, Yunxuan; Qin, Chuixin; Liang, Ming; Mao, Xinliang; Li, Shuiming; Zou, Yongdong; Jia, Weizhang; Li, Haifeng; Ma, Chung Wah; Huang, Zebo

    2016-01-01

    Since excessive reactive oxygen species (ROS) is known to be associated with aging and age-related diseases, strategies modulating ROS level and antioxidant defense systems may contribute to the delay of senescence. Here we show that the protein hydrolyzate from Angelica sinensis was capable of increasing oxidative survival of the model animal Caenorhabditis elegans intoxicated by paraquat. The hydrolyzate was then fractionated by ultrafiltration, and the antioxidant fraction (<3 kDa) was purified by gel filtration to obtain the antioxidant A. sinensis peptides (AsiPeps), which were mostly composed of peptides with <20 amino acid residues. Further studies demonstrate that AsiPeps were able to reduce the endogenous ROS level, increase the activities of the antioxidant enzymes superoxide dismutase and catalase, and decrease the content of the lipid peroxidation product malondialdehyde in nematodes treated with paraquat or undergoing senescence. AsiPeps were also shown to reduce age pigments accumulation and extend lifespan but did not affect the food-intake behavior of the nematodes. Taken together, our results demonstrate that A. sinensis peptides (AsiPeps) are able to delay aging process in C. elegans through antioxidant activities independent of dietary restriction. PMID:26941890

  6. Design of Catalytic Peptides and Proteins Through Rational and Combinatorial Approaches.

    PubMed

    Maeda, Yoshiaki; Makhlynets, Olga V; Matsui, Hiroshi; Korendovych, Ivan V

    2016-07-11

    This review focuses on recent progress in noncomputational methods to introduce catalytic function into proteins, peptides, and peptide assemblies. We discuss various approaches to creating catalytic activity and classification of noncomputational methods into rational and combinatorial classes. The section on rational design covers recent progress in the development of short peptides and oligomeric peptide assemblies for various natural and unnatural reactions. The section on combinatorial design describes recent advances in the discovery of catalytic peptides. We present the future prospects of these and other new approaches in a broader context, including implications for functional material design. PMID:27022702

  7. Penetration depth of surfactant peptide KL4 into membranes is determined by fatty acid saturation.

    PubMed

    Antharam, Vijay C; Elliott, Douglas W; Mills, Frank D; Farver, R Suzanne; Sternin, Edward; Long, Joanna R

    2009-05-20

    KL(4) is a 21-residue functional peptide mimic of lung surfactant protein B, an essential protein for lowering surface tension in the alveoli. Its ability to modify lipid properties and restore lung compliance was investigated with circular dichroism, differential scanning calorimetry, and solid-state NMR spectroscopy. KL(4) binds fluid lamellar phase PC/PG lipid membranes and forms an amphipathic helix that alters lipid organization and acyl chain dynamics. The binding and helicity of KL(4) is dependent on the level of monounsaturation in the fatty acid chains. At physiologic temperatures, KL(4) is more peripheral and dynamic in fluid phase POPC/POPG MLVs but is deeply inserted into fluid phase DPPC/POPG vesicles, resulting in immobilization of the peptide. Substantial increases in the acyl chain order are observed in DPPC/POPG lipid vesicles with increasing levels of KL(4), and POPC/POPG lipid vesicles show small decreases in the acyl chain order parameters on addition of KL(4). Additionally, a clear effect of KL(4) on the orientation of the fluid phase PG headgroups is observed, with similar changes in both lipid environments. Near the phase transition temperature of the DPPC/POPG lipid mixtures, which is just below the physiologic temperature of lung surfactant, KL(4) causes phase separation with the DPPC remaining in a gel phase and the POPG partitioned between gel and fluid phases. The ability of KL(4) to differentially partition into lipid lamellae containing varying levels of monounsaturation and subsequent changes in curvature strain suggest a mechanism for peptide-mediated lipid organization and trafficking within the dynamic lung environment. PMID:19450480

  8. Penetration Depth of Surfactant Peptide KL4 into Membranes Is Determined by Fatty Acid Saturation

    PubMed Central

    Antharam, Vijay C.; Elliott, Douglas W.; Mills, Frank D.; Farver, R. Suzanne; Sternin, Edward; Long, Joanna R.

    2009-01-01

    KL4 is a 21-residue functional peptide mimic of lung surfactant protein B, an essential protein for lowering surface tension in the alveoli. Its ability to modify lipid properties and restore lung compliance was investigated with circular dichroism, differential scanning calorimetry, and solid-state NMR spectroscopy. KL4 binds fluid lamellar phase PC/PG lipid membranes and forms an amphipathic helix that alters lipid organization and acyl chain dynamics. The binding and helicity of KL4 is dependent on the level of monounsaturation in the fatty acid chains. At physiologic temperatures, KL4 is more peripheral and dynamic in fluid phase POPC/POPG MLVs but is deeply inserted into fluid phase DPPC/POPG vesicles, resulting in immobilization of the peptide. Substantial increases in the acyl chain order are observed in DPPC/POPG lipid vesicles with increasing levels of KL4, and POPC/POPG lipid vesicles show small decreases in the acyl chain order parameters on addition of KL4. Additionally, a clear effect of KL4 on the orientation of the fluid phase PG headgroups is observed, with similar changes in both lipid environments. Near the phase transition temperature of the DPPC/POPG lipid mixtures, which is just below the physiologic temperature of lung surfactant, KL4 causes phase separation with the DPPC remaining in a gel phase and the POPG partitioned between gel and fluid phases. The ability of KL4 to differentially partition into lipid lamellae containing varying levels of monounsaturation and subsequent changes in curvature strain suggest a mechanism for peptide-mediated lipid organization and trafficking within the dynamic lung environment. PMID:19450480

  9. Signal peptide peptidase (SPP) assembles with substrates and misfolded membrane proteins into distinct oligomeric complexes

    PubMed Central

    Schrul, Bianca; Kapp, Katja; Sinning, Irmgard; Dobberstein, Bernhard

    2010-01-01

    SPP (signal peptide peptidase) is an aspartyl intramembrane cleaving protease, which processes a subset of signal peptides, and is linked to the quality control of ER (endoplasmic reticulum) membrane proteins. We analysed SPP interactions with signal peptides and other membrane proteins by co-immunoprecipitation assays. We found that SPP interacts specifically and tightly with a large range of newly synthesized membrane proteins, including signal peptides, preproteins and misfolded membrane proteins, but not with all co-expressed type II membrane proteins. Signal peptides are trapped by the catalytically inactive SPP mutant SPPD/A. Preproteins and misfolded membrane proteins interact with both SPP and the SPPD/A mutant, and are not substrates for SPP-mediated intramembrane proteolysis. Proteins interacting with SPP are found in distinct complexes of different sizes. A signal peptide is mainly trapped in a 200 kDa SPP complex, whereas a preprotein is predominantly found in a 600 kDa SPP complex. A misfolded membrane protein is detected in 200, 400 and 600 kDa SPP complexes. We conclude that SPP not only processes signal peptides, but also collects preproteins and misfolded membrane proteins that are destined for disposal. PMID:20196774

  10. Aqueous Synthesis of Peptide Thioesters from Amino Acids and a Thiol Using 1,1‧-Carbonyldiimidazole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weber, Arthur L.

    2005-10-01

    A new method was developed for the synthesis of peptide thioesters from free amino acids and thiols in water. This one-pot simple method involves two steps: (1) activation in water of an amino acid presumably as its N-carboxyanhydride (NCA) using 1,1‧-carbonyldiimidazole (CDI), and (2) subsequent condensation of the activated amino acid-NCA in the presence of a thiol. With this method citrulline peptide thioesters containing up to 10 amino acid residues were prepared in a single reaction. This aqueous synthetic method provides a simple way to prepare peptide thioesters for studies of peptide replication involving ligation of peptide thioesters on peptide templates. The relevance of peptide replication to the origin-of-life process is supported by previous studies showing that amino acid thioesters (peptide thioester precursors) can be synthesized under prebiotic conditions by reaction of small sugars with ammonia and a thiol.

  11. Cyclic Sulfamidate Enabled Syntheses of Amino Acids, Peptides, Carbohydrates, and Natural Products

    EPA Science Inventory

    This article reviews the emergence of cyclic sulfamidates as versatile intermediatesfor the synthesis of unnatural amino acids, chalcogen peptides, modified sugars, drugs and drug candidates, and important natural products.

  12. Tetrazine-Containing Amino Acid for Peptide Modification and Live Cell Labeling

    PubMed Central

    Ni, Zhongqiu; Zhou, Lanxia; Li, Xu; Zhang, Jing; Dong, Shouliang

    2015-01-01

    A novel amino acid derivative 3-(4-(1, 2, 4, 5-tetrazine-3-yl) phenyl)-2-aminopropanoic acid was synthesized in this study. The compound possessed better water-solubility and was synthesized more easily compared with the well-known and commercially available 3-(p-benzylamino)-1, 2, 4, 5-tetrazine. Tetrazine-containing amino acid showed excellent stability in biological media and might be used for cancer cell labeling. Moreover, the compound remained relatively stable in 50% TFA/DCM with little decomposition after prolonged exposure at room temperature. The compound could be utilized as phenylalanine or tyrosine analogue in peptide modification, and the tetrazine-containing peptide demonstrated more significant biological activity than that of the parent peptide. The combination of tetrazine group and amino acid offered broad development prospects of the bioorthogonal labeling and peptide synthesis. PMID:26536589

  13. Computational exploration of a protein receptor binding space with student proposed peptide ligands.

    PubMed

    King, Matthew D; Phillips, Paul; Turner, Matthew W; Katz, Michael; Lew, Sarah; Bradburn, Sarah; Andersen, Tim; McDougal, Owen M

    2016-01-01

    Computational molecular docking is a fast and effective in silico method for the analysis of binding between a protein receptor model and a ligand. The visualization and manipulation of protein to ligand binding in three-dimensional space represents a powerful tool in the biochemistry curriculum to enhance student learning. The DockoMatic tutorial described herein provides a framework by which instructors can guide students through a drug screening exercise. Using receptor models derived from readily available protein crystal structures, docking programs have the ability to predict ligand binding properties, such as preferential binding orientations and binding affinities. The use of computational studies can significantly enhance complimentary wet chemical experimentation by providing insight into the important molecular interactions within the system of interest, as well as guide the design of new candidate ligands based on observed binding motifs and energetics. In this laboratory tutorial, the graphical user interface, DockoMatic, facilitates docking job submissions to the docking engine, AutoDock 4.2. The purpose of this exercise is to successfully dock a 17-amino acid peptide, α-conotoxin TxIA, to the acetylcholine binding protein from Aplysia californica-AChBP to determine the most stable binding configuration. Each student will then propose two specific amino acid substitutions of α-conotoxin TxIA to enhance peptide binding affinity, create the mutant in DockoMatic, and perform docking calculations to compare their results with the class. Students will also compare intermolecular forces, binding energy, and geometric orientation of their prepared analog to their initial α-conotoxin TxIA docking results. PMID:26537635

  14. Stimulation of Lysine Decarboxylase Production in Escherichia coli by Amino Acids and Peptides1

    PubMed Central

    Cascieri, T.; Mallette, M. F.

    1973-01-01

    A commercial hydrolysate of casein stimulated production of lysine decarboxylase (EC 4.1.1.18) by Escherichia coli B. Cellulose and gel chromatography of this hydrolysate yielded peptides which were variably effective in this stimulation. Replacement of individual, stimulatory peptides by equivalent amino acids duplicated the enzyme levels attained with those peptides. There was no indication of specific stimulation by any peptide. The peptides were probably taken up by the oligopeptide transport system of E. coli and hydrolyzed intracellularly by peptidases to their constituent amino acids for use in enzyme synthesis. Single omission of amino acids from mixtures was used to screen them for their relative lysine decarboxylase stimulating abilities. Over 100 different mixtures were evaluated in establishing the total amino acid requirements for maximal synthesis of lysine decarboxylase by E. coli B. A mixture containing all of the common amino acids except glutamic acid, aspartic acid, and alanine increased lysine decarboxylase threefold over an equivalent weight of casein hydrolysate. The nine most stimulatory amino acids were methionine, arginine, cystine, leucine, isoleucine, glutamine, threonine, tyrosine, and asparagine. Methionine and arginine quantitatively were the most important. A mixture of these nine was 87% as effective as the complete mixture. Several amino acids were inhibitory at moderate concentrations, and alanine (2.53 mM) was the most effective. Added pyridoxine increased lysine decarboxylase activity 30%, whereas other B vitamins and cyclic adenosine 5′-monophosphate had no effect. PMID:4588201

  15. Efficacy of peptide nucleic acid and selected conjugates against specific cellular pathologies of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Browne, Elisse C; Parakh, Sonam; Duncan, Luke F; Langford, Steven J; Atkin, Julie D; Abbott, Belinda M

    2016-04-01

    Cellular studies have been undertaken on a nonamer peptide nucleic acid (PNA) sequence, which binds to mRNA encoding superoxide dismutase 1, and a series of peptide nucleic acids conjugated to synthetic lipophilic vitamin analogs including a recently prepared menadione (vitamin K) analog. Reduction of both mutant superoxide dismutase 1 inclusion formation and endoplasmic reticulum stress, two of the key cellular pathological hallmarks in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, by two of the prepared PNA oligomers is reported for the first time. PMID:26935939

  16. Ribosome reinitiation at leader peptides increases translation of bacterial proteins.

    PubMed

    Korolev, Semen A; Zverkov, Oleg A; Seliverstov, Alexandr V; Lyubetsky, Vassily A

    2016-01-01

    Short leader genes usually do not encode stable proteins, although their importance in expression control of bacterial genomes is widely accepted. Such genes are often involved in the control of attenuation regulation. However, the abundance of leader genes suggests that their role in bacteria is not limited to regulation. Specifically, we hypothesize that leader genes increase the expression of protein-coding (structural) genes via ribosome reinitiation at the leader peptide in the case of a short distance between the stop codon of the leader gene and the start codon of the structural gene. For instance, in Actinobacteria, the frequency of leader genes at a distance of 10-11 bp is about 70 % higher than the mean frequency within the 1 to 65 bp range; and it gradually decreases as the range grows longer. A pronounced peak of this frequency-distance relationship is also observed in Proteobacteria, Bacteroidetes, Spirochaetales, Acidobacteria, the Deinococcus-Thermus group, and Planctomycetes. In contrast, this peak falls to the distance of 15-16 bp and is not very pronounced in Firmicutes; and no such peak is observed in cyanobacteria and tenericutes. Generally, this peak is typical for many bacteria. Some leader genes located close to a structural gene probably play a regulatory role as well. PMID:27084079

  17. Cleavage by signal peptide peptidase is required for the degradation of selected tail-anchored proteins

    PubMed Central

    Boname, Jessica M.; Bloor, Stuart; Wandel, Michal P.; Nathan, James A.; Antrobus, Robin; Dingwell, Kevin S.; Thurston, Teresa L.; Smith, Duncan L.; Smith, James C.; Randow, Felix

    2014-01-01

    The regulated turnover of endoplasmic reticulum (ER)–resident membrane proteins requires their extraction from the membrane lipid bilayer and subsequent proteasome-mediated degradation. Cleavage within the transmembrane domain provides an attractive mechanism to facilitate protein dislocation but has never been shown for endogenous substrates. To determine whether intramembrane proteolysis, specifically cleavage by the intramembrane-cleaving aspartyl protease signal peptide peptidase (SPP), is involved in this pathway, we generated an SPP-specific somatic cell knockout. In a stable isotope labeling by amino acids in cell culture–based proteomics screen, we identified HO-1 (heme oxygenase-1), the rate-limiting enzyme in the degradation of heme to biliverdin, as a novel SPP substrate. Intramembrane cleavage by catalytically active SPP provided the primary proteolytic step required for the extraction and subsequent proteasome-dependent degradation of HO-1, an ER-resident tail-anchored protein. SPP-mediated proteolysis was not limited to HO-1 but was required for the dislocation and degradation of additional tail-anchored ER-resident proteins. Our study identifies tail-anchored proteins as novel SPP substrates and a specific requirement for SPP-mediated intramembrane cleavage in protein turnover. PMID:24958774

  18. Rational Evolution of Antimicrobial Peptides Containing Unnatural Amino Acids to Combat Burn Wound Infections.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Meng; Chen, Ming; Zhang, Jue

    2016-09-01

    Antimicrobial peptides have long been raised as a promising strategy to combat bacterial infection in burn wounds. Here, we attempted to rationally design small antimicrobial peptides containing unnatural amino acids by integrating in silico analysis and in vitro assay. Predictive quantitative sequence-activity models were established and validated rigorously based on a large panel of nonamer antimicrobial peptides with known antibacterial activity. The best quantitative sequence-activity model predictor was employed to guide genetic evolution of a peptide population. In the evolution procedure, a number of unnatural amino acids with desired physicochemical properties were introduced, resulting in a genetic evolution-improved population, from which seven peptide candidates with top scores, containing 1-3 unnatural amino acids, and having diverse structures were successfully identified, and their antibacterial potencies against two antibiotic-resistant bacterial strains isolated from infected burn wounds were measured using in vitro susceptibility test. Consequently, four (WL-Orn-LARKIV-NH2 , ARKRWF-Dab-FL-NH2 , KFI-Hag-IWR-Orn-R-NH2 and YW-Hag-R-Cit-RF-Orn-N-NH2 ) of the seven tested peptides were found to be more potent than reference Bac2A, the smallest naturally occurring broad spectrum antimicrobial peptide. Molecular dynamics simulations revealed that the designed peptides can fold into amphipathic helical structure that allows them to interact directly with microbial membranes. PMID:27062533

  19. A spliced antigenic peptide comprising a single spliced amino acid is produced in the proteasome by reverse splicing of a longer peptide fragment followed by trimming.

    PubMed

    Michaux, Alexandre; Larrieu, Pierre; Stroobant, Vincent; Fonteneau, Jean-François; Jotereau, Francine; Van den Eynde, Benoît J; Moreau-Aubry, Agnès; Vigneron, Nathalie

    2014-02-15

    Peptide splicing is a novel mechanism of production of peptides relying on the proteasome and involving the linkage of fragments originally distant in the parental protein. Peptides produced by splicing can be presented on class I molecules of the MHC and recognized by CTLs. In this study, we describe a new antigenic peptide, which is presented by HLA-A3 and comprises two noncontiguous fragments of the melanoma differentiation Ag gp100(PMEL17) spliced together in the reverse order to that in which they appear in the parental protein. Contrary to the previously described spliced peptides, which are produced by the association of fragments of 3-6 aa, the peptide described in this work results from the ultimate association of an 8-aa fragment with a single arginine residue. As described before, peptide splicing takes place in the proteasome by transpeptidation involving an acyl-enzyme intermediate linking one of the peptide fragment to a catalytic subunit of the proteasome. Interestingly, we observe that the peptide causing the nucleophilic attack on the acyl-enzyme intermediate must be at least 3 aa long to give rise to a spliced peptide. The spliced peptide produced from this reaction therefore bears an extended C terminus that needs to be further trimmed to produce the final antigenic peptide. We show that the proteasome is able to perform the final trimming step required to produce the antigenic peptide described in this work. PMID:24453253

  20. Evaluation of the in vitro antioxidant properties of a cod (Gadus morhua) protein hydrolysate and peptide fractions.

    PubMed

    Girgih, Abraham T; He, Rong; Hasan, Fida M; Udenigwe, Chibuike C; Gill, Tom A; Aluko, Rotimi E

    2015-04-15

    Mechanically-deboned cod muscle proteins were sequentially hydrolysed using pepsin and a trypsin+chymotrypsin combination, which was followed by passing the digest through a 1 kDa equipped tangential flow filtration system; the permeate (<1 kDa peptides) was collected as the cod protein hydrolysate (CPH). Reversed-phase high performance liquid chromatography (RP-HPLC) was used to separate the CPH into four peptide fractions (CF1-CF4) and their in vitro antioxidant properties investigated. Results showed that most of the peptide fractions (CF2-CF4) displayed significantly higher (p<0.05) oxygen radical absorbance capacity values (698-942 μM Trolox equivalents, TE/g) and 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl scavenging activities (17-32%) than those of CPH (613 μM TE/g and 19%, respectively). However, the unfractionated CPH displayed improved capability to scavenge superoxide and hydroxyl radicals as well as significantly higher (p<0.05) ferric iron reduction and chelation of iron than the RP-HPLC peptides. The CPH and peptide fractions displayed a dose-dependent inhibition of linoleic acid oxidation. PMID:25466072

  1. Synthesis and Kinetic Analysis of Two Conformationally Restricted Peptide Substrates of Escherichia coli Penicillin-Binding Protein 5.

    PubMed

    Nemmara, Venkatesh V; Nicholas, Robert A; Pratt, R F

    2016-07-26

    Escherichia coli PBP5 (penicillin-binding protein 5) is a dd-carboxypeptidase involved in bacterial cell wall maturation. Beyond the C-terminal d-alanyl-d-alanine moiety, PBP5, like the essential high-molecular mass PBPs, has little specificity for other elements of peptidoglycan structure, at least as elicited in vitro by small peptidoglycan fragments. On the basis of the crystal structure of a stem pentapeptide derivative noncovalently bound to E. coli PBP6 (Protein Data Bank entry 3ITB ), closely similar in structure to PBP5, we have modeled a pentapeptide structure at the active site of PBP5. Because the two termini of the pentapeptide are directed into solution in the PBP6 crystal structure, we then modeled a 19-membered cyclic peptide analogue by cross-linking the terminal amines by succinylation. An analogous smaller, 17-membered cyclic peptide, in which the l-lysine of the original was replaced by l-diaminobutyric acid, could also be modeled into the active site. We anticipated that, just as the reactivity of stem peptide fragments of peptidoglycan with PBPs in vivo may be entropically enhanced by immobilization in the polymer, so too would that of our cyclic peptides with respect to their acyclic analogues in vitro. This paper describes the synthesis of the peptides described above that were required to examine this hypothesis and presents an analysis of their structures and reaction kinetics with PBP5. PMID:27420403

  2. Antimicrobial peptides and proteins of the horse - insights into a well-armed organism

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Antimicrobial peptides play a pivotal role as key effectors of the innate immune system in plants and animals and act as endogenous antibiotics. The molecules exhibit an antimicrobial activity against bacteria, viruses, and eukaryotic pathogens with different specificities and potencies depending on the structure and amino-acid composition of the peptides. Several antimicrobial peptides were comprehensively investigated in the last three decades and some molecules with remarkable antimicrobial properties have reached the third phase of clinical studies. Next to the peptides themselves, numerous organisms were examined and analyzed regarding their repertoire of antimicrobial peptides revealing a huge number of candidates with potencies and properties for future medical applications. One of these organisms is the horse, which possesses numerous peptides that are interesting candidates for therapeutical applications in veterinary medicine. Here we summarize investigations and knowledge on equine antimicrobial peptides, point to interesting candidates, and discuss prospects for therapeutical applications. PMID:21888650

  3. Plasmid DNA delivery by arginine-rich cell-penetrating peptides containing unnatural amino acids.

    PubMed

    Kato, Takuma; Yamashita, Hiroko; Misawa, Takashi; Nishida, Koyo; Kurihara, Masaaki; Tanaka, Masakazu; Demizu, Yosuke; Oba, Makoto

    2016-06-15

    Cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs) have been developed as drug, protein, and gene delivery tools. In the present study, arginine (Arg)-rich CPPs containing unnatural amino acids were designed to deliver plasmid DNA (pDNA). The transfection ability of one of the Arg-rich CPPs examined here was more effective than that of the Arg nonapeptide, which is the most frequently used CPP. The transfection efficiencies of Arg-rich CPPs increased with longer post-incubation times and were significantly higher at 48-h and 72-h post-incubation than that of the commercially available transfection reagent TurboFect. These Arg-rich CPPs were complexed with pDNA for a long time in cells and effectively escaped from the late endosomes/lysosomes into the cytoplasm. These results will be helpful for designing novel CPPs for pDNA delivery. PMID:27132868

  4. Installing amino acids and peptides on N-heterocycles under visible-light assistance

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Yunhe; Jiang, Min; Wang, Hui; Fu, Hua

    2016-01-01

    Readily available natural α-amino acids are one of nature’s most attractive and versatile building blocks in synthesis of natural products and biomolecules. Peptides and N-heterocycles exhibit various biological and pharmaceutical functions. Conjugation of amino acids or peptides with N-heterocycles provides boundless potentiality for screening and discovery of diverse biologically active molecules. However, it is a great challenge to install amino acids or peptides on N-heterocycles through formation of carbon-carbon bonds under mild conditions. In this article, eighteen N-protected α-amino acids and three peptides were well assembled on phenanthridine derivatives via couplings of N-protected α-amino acid and peptide active esters with substituted 2-isocyanobiphenyls at room temperature under visible-light assistance. Furthermore, N-Boc-proline residue was successfully conjugated with oxindole derivatives using similar procedures. The simple protocol, mild reaction conditions, fast reaction, and high efficiency of this method make it an important strategy for synthesis of diverse molecules containing amino acid and peptide fragments. PMID:26830014

  5. Installing amino acids and peptides on N-heterocycles under visible-light assistance.

    PubMed

    Jin, Yunhe; Jiang, Min; Wang, Hui; Fu, Hua

    2016-01-01

    Readily available natural α-amino acids are one of nature's most attractive and versatile building blocks in synthesis of natural products and biomolecules. Peptides and N-heterocycles exhibit various biological and pharmaceutical functions. Conjugation of amino acids or peptides with N-heterocycles provides boundless potentiality for screening and discovery of diverse biologically active molecules. However, it is a great challenge to install amino acids or peptides on N-heterocycles through formation of carbon-carbon bonds under mild conditions. In this article, eighteen N-protected α-amino acids and three peptides were well assembled on phenanthridine derivatives via couplings of N-protected α-amino acid and peptide active esters with substituted 2-isocyanobiphenyls at room temperature under visible-light assistance. Furthermore, N-Boc-proline residue was successfully conjugated with oxindole derivatives using similar procedures. The simple protocol, mild reaction conditions, fast reaction, and high efficiency of this method make it an important strategy for synthesis of diverse molecules containing amino acid and peptide fragments. PMID:26830014

  6. Rapid complexing of oxoacylglycerols with amino acids, peptides and aminophospholipids.

    PubMed

    Kurvinen, J P; Kuksis, A; Ravandi, A; Sjövall, O; Kallio, H

    1999-03-01

    We prepared model Schiff bases from 2-[9-oxo]nonanoyl glycerol (2-MAG-ALD) and various amino compounds. 2-MAG-ALD was obtained by pancreatic lipase hydrolysis of trioleoyl glycerol and reductive ozonolysis of the resulting 2-monooleoyl glycerol. The reaction products were purified by thin-layer chromatography. Schiff bases were synthesized in greater than 50% yield by reacting 2-MAG-ALD with twofold molar excess of valine, Nalpha-acetyl-L-lysine methyl ester and the tripeptides glycyl-glycyl-glycine, glycyl-glycyl-histidine, and glycyl-histidyl-lysine in aqueous methanol and with 1-palmitoyl-2-stearoyl glycerophosphoethanolamine (PE) in chloroform/methanol for 16 h at room temperature. Prior to analysis the bases were reduced with sodium cyanoborohydride in methanol for 30 min at 4 degrees C. Reaction products were analyzed by high-performance liquid chromatography/electrospray ionization/mass spectrometry (HPLC/ESI/MS). Reduced Schiff bases of 2-MAG-ALD with PE and amino acids were analyzed by normal-phase HPLC/ESI/MS and those with peptides by reversed-phase HPLC/ESI/MS. Single adducts were obtained in all cases and both the alpha-amino group of valine and the epsilon-amino group of Nalpha-acetyl-L-lysine methyl ester were reactive. Molecular ions of reaction products were the only detected ions in the negative ionization mode, whereas in the positive ion mode sodiated molecular ions were also detected. The present study suggests that 2-MAG-ALD may form Schiff base adducts with amino compounds in other aqueous media, such as the intestinal lumen and in the hydrophobic environment of cell membranes. PMID:10230725

  7. A model for protocellular coordination of nucleic acid and protein syntheses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fox, S. W.

    1981-01-01

    The proteinoid model for the coordination of protein synthesis with nucleic acid coding within the evolving protocell is discussed. Evidence for the self-ordering of amino acid chains, which would enhance the catalytic activity of a lysine-rich proteinoid, is presented, along with that for the preferential formation of microparticles, particularly proteinoid microparticles, in various solutions. Demonstrations of the catalytic activity of lysine-rich proteinoids in the synthesis of peptide and internucleotide bonds are pointed out. The view of evolution as a two stage sequence in which the geological synthesis of peptides evolved to the protocellular synthesis of peptides and oligonucleotides is discussed, and contrasted with the alternative view, in accord with the central dogma, that nucleic acids arose first then governed the production of proteins and protocells.

  8. Comparisons of Protein and Peptide Complexity in Poneroid and Formicoid Ant Venoms.

    PubMed

    Aili, Samira R; Touchard, Axel; Koh, Jennifer M S; Dejean, Alain; Orivel, Jérôme; Padula, Matthew P; Escoubas, Pierre; Nicholson, Graham M

    2016-09-01

    Animal venom peptides are currently being developed as novel drugs and bioinsecticides. Because ants use venoms for defense and predation, venomous ants represent an untapped source of potential bioactive toxins. This study compared the protein and peptide components of the poneroid ants Neoponera commutata, Neoponera apicalis, and Odontomachus hastatus and the formicoid ants Ectatomma tuberculatum, Ectatomma brunneum, and Myrmecia gulosa. 1D and 2D PAGE revealed venom proteins in the mass range <10 to >250 kDa. NanoLC-ESI-QTOF MS/MS analysis of tryptic peptides revealed the presence of common venom proteins and also many undescribed proteins. RP-HPLC separation followed by MALDI-TOF MS of the venom peptides also revealed considerable heterogeneity. It was found that the venoms contained between 144 and 1032 peptides with 5-95% of peptides in the ranges 1-4 and 1-8 kDa for poneroid and formicoid ants, respectively. By employing the reducing MALDI matrix 1,5-diaminonapthalene, up to 28 disulfide-bonded peptides were also identified in each of the venoms. In particular, the mass range of peptides from poneroid ants is lower than peptides from other venoms, indicating possible novel structures and pharmacologies. These results indicate that ant venoms represent an enormous, untapped source of novel therapeutic and bioinsecticide leads. PMID:27436154

  9. Slow peptide bond formation by proline and other N-alkylamino acids in translation

    PubMed Central

    Pavlov, Michael Y.; Watts, Richard E.; Tan, Zhongping; Cornish, Virginia W.; Ehrenberg, Måns; Forster, Anthony C.

    2009-01-01

    Proteins are made from 19 aa and, curiously, one N-alkylamino acid (“imino acid”), proline (Pro). Pro is thought to be incorporated by the translation apparatus at the same rate as the 19 aa, even though the alkyl group in Pro resides directly on the nitrogen nucleophile involved in peptide bond formation. Here, by combining quench-flow kinetics and charging of tRNAs with cognate and noncognate amino acids, we find that Pro incorporates in translation significantly more slowly than Phe or Ala and that other N-alkylamino acids incorporate much more slowly. Our results show that the slowest step in incorporation of N-alkylamino acids is accommodation/peptidyl transfer after GTP hydrolysis on EF-Tu. The relative incorporation rates correlate with expectations from organic chemistry, suggesting that amino acid sterics and basicities affect translation rates at the peptidyl transfer step. Cognate isoacceptor tRNAs speed Pro incorporation to rates compatible with in vivo, although still 3–6 times slower than Phe incorporation from Phe-tRNAPhe depending on the Pro codon. Results suggest that Pro is the only N-alkylamino acid in the genetic code because it has a privileged cyclic structure that is more reactive than other N-alkylamino acids. Our data on the variation of the rate of incorporation of Pro from native Pro-tRNAPro isoacceptors at 4 different Pro codons help explain codon bias not accounted for by the “tRNA abundance” hypothesis. PMID:19104062

  10. The impact of α-hydrazino acids embedded in short fluorescent peptides on peptide interactions with DNA and RNA.

    PubMed

    Suć, Josipa; Tumir, Lidija-Marija; Glavaš-Obrovac, Ljubica; Jukić, Marijana; Piantanida, Ivo; Jerić, Ivanka

    2016-06-01

    A series of novel hydrazino-based peptidomimetics and analogues comprising N-terminal lysine and C-terminal phenanthridinyl-l-alanine were prepared. The presented results demonstrate the up to now unknown possibility to finely modulate peptide interactions with DNA/RNA by α-hydrazino group insertion and how the different positioning of two α-hydrazino groups in peptides controls binding to various double stranded and single stranded DNA and RNA. All peptidomimetics bind with 1-10 micromolar affinity to ds-DNA/RNA, whereby the binding mode is a combination of electrostatic interactions and hydrophobic interactions within DNA/RNA grooves. Insertion of the α-hydrazino group into the peptide systematically decreased its fluorimetric response to DNA/RNA binding in the order: mono-hydrazino < alternating-hydrazino < sequential-hydrazino group. Binding studies of ss-polynucleotides suggest intercalation of phenanthridine between polynucleotide bases, whereby affinity and fluorimetric response decrease with the number of α-hydrazino groups in the peptide sequence. Particularly interesting was the interaction of two sequential α-hydrazino acids-peptidomimetic with poly rG, characterised by a specific strong increase of CD bands, while all other peptide/ssRNA combinations gave only a CD-band decrease. All mentioned interactions could also be reversibly controlled by adjusting the pH, due to the protonation of the fluorophore. PMID:27161341

  11. Computational Framework for Prediction of Peptide Sequences That May Mediate Multiple Protein Interactions in Cancer-Associated Hub Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Sarkar, Debasree; Patra, Piya; Ghosh, Abhirupa; Saha, Sudipto

    2016-01-01

    A considerable proportion of protein-protein interactions (PPIs) in the cell are estimated to be mediated by very short peptide segments that approximately conform to specific sequence patterns known as linear motifs (LMs), often present in the disordered regions in the eukaryotic proteins. These peptides have been found to interact with low affinity and are able bind to multiple interactors, thus playing an important role in the PPI networks involving date hubs. In this work, PPI data and de novo motif identification based method (MEME) were used to identify such peptides in three cancer-associated hub proteins—MYC, APC and MDM2. The peptides corresponding to the significant LMs identified for each hub protein were aligned, the overlapping regions across these peptides being termed as overlapping linear peptides (OLPs). These OLPs were thus predicted to be responsible for multiple PPIs of the corresponding hub proteins and a scoring system was developed to rank them. We predicted six OLPs in MYC and five OLPs in MDM2 that scored higher than OLP predictions from randomly generated protein sets. Two OLP sequences from the C-terminal of MYC were predicted to bind with FBXW7, component of an E3 ubiquitin-protein ligase complex involved in proteasomal degradation of MYC. Similarly, we identified peptides in the C-terminal of MDM2 interacting with FKBP3, which has a specific role in auto-ubiquitinylation of MDM2. The peptide sequences predicted in MYC and MDM2 look promising for designing orthosteric inhibitors against possible disease-associated PPIs. Since these OLPs can interact with other proteins as well, these inhibitors should be specific to the targeted interactor to prevent undesired side-effects. This computational framework has been designed to predict and rank the peptide regions that may mediate multiple PPIs and can be applied to other disease-associated date hub proteins for prediction of novel therapeutic targets of small molecule PPI modulators. PMID

  12. Identification of protein N-termini in Cyanophora paradoxa cyanelles: transit peptide composition and sequence determinants for precursor maturation

    PubMed Central

    Köhler, Daniel; Dobritzsch, Dirk; Hoehenwarter, Wolfgang; Helm, Stefan; Steiner, Jürgen M.; Baginsky, Sacha

    2015-01-01

    Glaucophyta, rhodophyta, and chloroplastida represent the three main evolutionary lineages that diverged from a common ancestor after primary endosymbiosis. Comparative analyses between members of these three lineages are a rich source of information on ancestral plastid features. We analyzed the composition and the cleavage site of cyanelle transit peptides from the glaucophyte Cyanophora paradoxa by terminal amine labeling of substrates (TAILS), and compared their characteristics to those of representatives of the chloroplastida. Our data show that transit peptide architecture is similar between members of these two lineages. This entails a comparable modular structure, an overrepresentation of serine or alanine and similarities in the amino acid composition around the processing peptidase cleavage site. The most distinctive difference is the overrepresentation of phenylalanine in the N-terminal 1–10 amino acids of cyanelle transit peptides. A quantitative proteome analysis with periplasm-free cyanelles identified 42 out of 262 proteins without the N-terminal phenylalanine, suggesting that the requirement for phenylalanine in the N-terminal region is not absolute. Proteins in this set are on average of low abundance, suggesting that either alternative import pathways are operating specifically for low abundance proteins or that the gene model annotation is incorrect for proteins with fewer EST sequences. We discuss these two possibilities and provide examples for both interpretations. PMID:26257763

  13. Effect of Peptide Size on Antioxidant Properties of African Yam Bean Seed (Sphenostylis stenocarpa) Protein Hydrolysate Fractions

    PubMed Central

    Ajibola, Comfort F.; Fashakin, Joseph B.; Fagbemi, Tayo N.; Aluko, Rotimi E.

    2011-01-01

    Enzymatic hydrolysate of African yam bean seed protein isolate was prepared by treatment with alcalase. The hydrolysate was further fractionated into peptide sizes of <1, 1–3, 3–5 and 5–10 kDa using membrane ultrafiltration. The protein hydrolysate (APH) and its membrane ultrafiltration fractions were assayed for in vitro antioxidant activities. The <1 kDa peptides exhibited significantly better (p < 0.05) ferric reducing power, diphenyl-1-picryhydradzyl (DPPH) and hydroxyl radical scavenging activities when compared to peptide fractions of higher molecular weights. The high activity of <1 kDa peptides in these antioxidant assay systems may be related to the high levels of total hydrophobic and aromatic amino acids. In comparison to glutathione (GSH), the APH and its membrane fractions had significantly higher (p < 0.05) ability to chelate metal ions. In contrast, GSH had significantly greater (p < 0.05) ferric reducing power and free radical scavenging activities than APH and its membrane fractions. The APH and its membrane fractions effectively inhibited lipid peroxidation, results that were concentration dependent. The activity of APH and its membrane fractions against linoleic acid oxidation was higher when compared to that of GSH but lower than that of butylated hydroxyl toluene (BHT). The results show potential use of APH and its membrane fractions as antioxidants in the management of oxidative stress-related metabolic disorders and in the prevention of lipid oxidation in food products. PMID:22072912

  14. Role of SbmA in the uptake of peptide nucleic acid (PNA)-peptide conjugates in E. coli.

    PubMed

    Ghosal, Anubrata; Vitali, Ally; Stach, James E M; Nielsen, Peter E

    2013-02-15

    Antisense PNA oligomers targeting essential genes (acpP or ftsZ) and conjugated to the delivery peptide L((KFF)(3)K) show complete growth inhibition of wild type E. coli strain (MG1655) with submicromolar MIC. In this study we show that resistant mutants generated against such PNA-peptide conjugates had disruptions in the region of sbmA, a gene encoding an inner membrane peptide transporter. The wild type sensitivity to the PNA conjugates was re-established in the resistance mutants by complementation with sbmA. Furthermore, deletion of sbmA in E. coli AS19, a strain that is sensitive to unmodified PNA, resulted in resistance to PNA. Finally, PNA conjugated with the corresponding non-biological H-D((KFF)(3)K) peptide retained antibacterial activity in sbmA deletion strains, whereas the same conjugate with a protease-sensitive linker did not. These results clearly identify SbmA as a carrier of naked PNA over the inner bacterial membrane and thereby infer that the peptide is transporting the PNA conjugates over the outer membrane. Strains lacking SbmA were used to screen novel peptide-PNA carriers that were SbmA-independent. Four such PNA-peptide conjugates, H-D((KFF)(3)K), H-(RFR)(4)-Ahx-βAla, H-(R-Ahx-R)(4)-Ahx-βAla, and H-(R-Ahx)(6)-βAla, were identified that utilize an alternative uptake mechanism but retain their antimicrobial potency. In addition SbmA is the first protein identified to recognize PNA. PMID:23138594

  15. A novel method to identify nucleic acid binding sites in proteins by scanning mutagenesis: application to iron regulatory protein.

    PubMed Central

    Neupert, B; Menotti, E; Kühn, L C

    1995-01-01

    We describe a new procedure to identify RNA or DNA binding sites in proteins, based on a combination of UV cross-linking and single-hit chemical peptide cleavage. Site-directed mutagenesis is used to create a series of mutants with single Asn-Gly sequences in the protein to be analysed. Recombinant mutant proteins are incubated with their radiolabelled target sequence and UV irradiated. Covalently linked RNA- or DNA-protein complexes are digested with hydroxylamine and labelled peptides identified by SDS-PAGE and autoradiography. The analysis requires only small amounts of protein and is achieved within a relatively short time. Using this method we mapped the site at which human iron regulatory protein (IRP) is UV cross-linked to iron responsive element RNA to amino acid residues 116-151. Images PMID:7544459

  16. Detection of trans–cis flips and peptide-plane flips in protein structures

    SciTech Connect

    Touw, Wouter G.; Joosten, Robbie P.; Vriend, Gert

    2015-07-28

    A method is presented to detect peptide bonds that need either a trans–cis flip or a peptide-plane flip. A coordinate-based method is presented to detect peptide bonds that need correction either by a peptide-plane flip or by a trans–cis inversion of the peptide bond. When applied to the whole Protein Data Bank, the method predicts 4617 trans–cis flips and many thousands of hitherto unknown peptide-plane flips. A few examples are highlighted for which a correction of the peptide-plane geometry leads to a correction of the understanding of the structure–function relation. All data, including 1088 manually validated cases, are freely available and the method is available from a web server, a web-service interface and through WHAT-CHECK.

  17. Formation of Amino Acid Thioesters for Prebiotic Peptide Synthesis: Catalysis By Amino Acid Products

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weber, Arthur L.; DeVincenzi, Donald L. (Technical Monitor)

    1999-01-01

    The origin of life can be described as a series of events in which a prebiotic chemical process came increasingly under the control of its catalytic products. In our search for this prebiotic process that yielded catalytic takeover products (such as polypeptides), we have been investigating a reaction system that generates peptide-forming amino acid thioesters from formaldehyde, glycolaldehyde, and ammonia in the presence of thiols. As shown below, this model process begins by aldol condensation of formaldehyde and glycolaldehyde to give trioses and releases. These sugars then undergo beta-dehydration yielding their respective alpha-ketoaldehydes. Addition of ammonia to the alpha-ketoaldehydes yields imines which can either: (a) rearrange in the presence of thesis to give amino acid thioesters or (be react with another molecule of aldehyde to give imidazoles. This 'one-pot' reaction system operates under mild aqueous conditions, and like modem amino acid biosynthesis, uses sugar intermediates which are converted to products by energy-yielding redox reactions. Recently, we discovered that amino acids, such as the alanine reaction product, catalyze the first and second steps of the process. In the presence of ammonia the process also generates other synthetically useful products, like the important biochemical -- pyruvic acid.

  18. Prediction and verification of novel peptide targets of protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B.

    PubMed

    Li, Xun; Köhn, Maja

    2016-08-01

    Phosphotyrosine peptides are useful starting points for inhibitor design and for the search for protein tyrosine phosphatase (PTP) phosphoprotein substrates. To identify novel phosphopeptide substrates of PTP1B, we developed a computational prediction protocol based on a virtual library of protein sequences with known phosphotyrosine sites. To these we applied sequence-based methods, biologically meaningful filters and molecular docking. Five peptides were selected for biochemical testing of their potential as PTP1B substrates. All five peptides were equally good substrates for PTP1B compared to a known peptide substrate whereas appropriate control peptides were not recognized, showing that our protocol can be used to identify novel peptide substrates of PTP1B. PMID:27025565

  19. Identification, characterization, and synthesis of peptide epitopes and a recombinant six-epitope protein for Trichomonas vaginalis serodiagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Alderete, JF; Neace, Calvin J

    2013-01-01

    There is a need for a rapid, accurate serodiagnostic test useful for both women and men infected by Trichomonas vaginalis, which causes the number one sexually transmitted infection (STI). Women and men exposed to T. vaginalis make serum antibody to fructose-1,6-bisphosphate aldolase (ALD), α-enolase (ENO), and glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAP). We identified, by epitope mapping, the common and distinct epitopes of each protein detected by the sera of women patients with trichomonosis and by the sera of men highly seropositive to the immunogenic protein α-actinin (positive control sera). We analyzed the amino acid sequences to determine the extent of identity of the epitopes of each protein with other proteins in the databanks. This approach identified epitopes unique to T. vaginalis, indicating these peptide-epitopes as possible targets for a serodiagnostic test. Individual or combinations of 15-mer peptide epitopes with low to no identity with other proteins were reactive with positive control sera from both women and men but were unreactive with negative control sera. These analyses permitted the synthesis of a recombinant His6 fusion protein of 111 amino acids with an Mr of ~13.4 kDa, which consisted of 15-mer peptides of two distinct epitopes each for ALD, ENO, and GAP. This recombinant protein was purified by affinity chromatography. This composite protein was detected by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), dot blots, and immunoblots, using positive control sera from women and men. These data indicate that it is possible to identify epitopes and that either singly, in combination, or as a composite protein represent targets for a point-of-care serodiagnostic test for T. vaginalis.

  20. Studies on the high-sulphur proteins of reduced Merino wool. Amino acid sequence of protein SCMKB-IIIB4

    PubMed Central

    Swart, L. S.; Haylett, T.

    1971-01-01

    The complete amino acid sequence of protein SCMKB-IIIB4 is presented. It is closely related to the sequence of protein SCMKB-IIIB3 (Haylett, Swart & Parris, 1971) differing in only four positions. The peptic and thermolysin peptides of protein SCMKB-IIIB4 were analysed by the dansyl–Edman method (Gray, 1967) and by tritium-labelling of C-terminal residues (Matsuo, Fujimoto & Tatsuno, 1966). This protein is the third member of a group of high-sulphur wool proteins with molecular weight of about 11400. It consists of 98 residues and has acetylalanine and carboxymethylcysteine as N- and C-terminal residues respectively. PMID:4942536

  1. [Effect of proteolysis inhibitors on the incorporation of labelled amino acids into proteins].

    PubMed

    Konikova, A S; Korotkina, R N

    1975-01-01

    Role of peptide bond breaks in the incorporation of amino acids into proteins in a "protein--amino acid" system is investigated. For this purpose the incorporation of labelled amino acids into trypsin under the inhibition of its autolysis by a specific inhibitor from soybean and epsilon-amino-caproic acid is studied. The trypsin inhibitor from soybean is found to suppress considerably the incorporation of 14C-glycine, 14C-lysine and 14C-methionine into crystal trypsin and not to affect the incorporation of labelled amino acids into chomotrypsin, papain and carboxypeptidase. Epsilon-Aminocaproic acid inhibited 14C-glycine incorporation into crystal trypsin by 40% and did not change its incorporation level into serum albumin. The dependency of amino acid incorporation level into trypsin on the activity of autolysis in the "protein--amino acid" system is demonstrated. PMID:1212456

  2. Putative signal peptides of two BURP proteins can direct proteins to their destinations in tobacco cell system.

    PubMed

    Tang, Yulin; Ou, Zhonghua; Qiu, Jianbin; Mi, Zilan

    2014-11-01

    Plant-specific BURP family proteins have a diverse subcellular localization with different functions. However, only limited studies have investigated the functions of their different domains. In the present study, the role of the N-terminal putative signal peptide in protein subcellular localization was investigated using a tobacco cell system. The results showed that SALI3-2 was present in vacuoles, whereas AtRD22 was directed to the apoplast. The N-terminal putative signal peptides of both proteins were confirmed to be the essential and critical domains for targeting the proteins to their destinations. We also demonstrate that the expression and accumulation of mGFP in tobacco cells was increased when mGFP was fused to the putative signal peptide of SALI3-2. The findings offer the potential application of this short peptide in protein production in plants. PMID:25048229

  3. Major peptides from amaranth (Amaranthus cruentus) protein inhibit HMG-CoA reductase activity.

    PubMed

    Soares, Rosana Aparecida Manólio; Mendonça, Simone; de Castro, Luíla Ívini Andrade; Menezes, Amanda Caroline Cardoso Corrêa Carlos; Arêas, José Alfredo Gomes

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study was to identify the major peptides generated by the in vitro hydrolysis of Amaranthus cruentus protein and to verify the effect of these peptides on the activity of 3-hydroxy-3-methyl-glutaryl-CoA reductase (HMG-CoA reductase), a key enzyme in cholesterol biosynthesis. A protein isolate was prepared, and an enzymatic hydrolysis that simulated the in vivo digestion of the protein was performed. After hydrolysis, the peptide mixture was filtered through a 3 kDa membrane. The peptide profile of this mixture was determined by reversed phase high performance chromatography (RP-HPLC), and the peptide identification was performed by LC-ESI MS/MS. Three major peptides under 3 kDa were detected, corresponding to more than 90% of the peptides of similar size produced by enzymatic hydrolysis. The sequences identified were GGV, IVG or LVG and VGVI or VGVL. These peptides had not yet been described for amaranth protein nor are they present in known sequences of amaranth grain protein, except LVG, which can be found in amaranth α‑amylase. Their ability to inhibit the activity of HMG-CoA reductase was determined, and we found that the sequences GGV, IVG, and VGVL, significantly inhibited this enzyme, suggesting a possible hypocholesterolemic effect. PMID:25690031

  4. Major Peptides from Amaranth (Amaranthus cruentus) Protein Inhibit HMG-CoA Reductase Activity

    PubMed Central

    Soares, Rosana Aparecida Manólio; Mendonça, Simone; de Castro, Luíla Ívini Andrade; Menezes, Amanda Caroline Cardoso Corrêa Carlos; Arêas, José Alfredo Gomes

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study was to identify the major peptides generated by the in vitro hydrolysis of Amaranthus cruentus protein and to verify the effect of these peptides on the activity of 3-hydroxy-3-methyl-glutaryl-CoA reductase (HMG-CoA reductase), a key enzyme in cholesterol biosynthesis. A protein isolate was prepared, and an enzymatic hydrolysis that simulated the in vivo digestion of the protein was performed. After hydrolysis, the peptide mixture was filtered through a 3 kDa membrane. The peptide profile of this mixture was determined by reversed phase high performance chromatography (RP-HPLC), and the peptide identification was performed by LC-ESI MS/MS. Three major peptides under 3 kDa were detected, corresponding to more than 90% of the peptides of similar size produced by enzymatic hydrolysis. The sequences identified were GGV, IVG or LVG and VGVI or VGVL. These peptides had not yet been described for amaranth protein nor are they present in known sequences of amaranth grain protein, except LVG, which can be found in amaranth α‑amylase. Their ability to inhibit the activity of HMG-CoA reductase was determined, and we found that the sequences GGV, IVG, and VGVL, significantly inhibited this enzyme, suggesting a possible hypocholesterolemic effect. PMID:25690031

  5. Tragacanth as an oral peptide and protein delivery carrier: Characterization and mucoadhesion.

    PubMed

    Nur, M; Ramchandran, L; Vasiljevic, T

    2016-06-01

    Biopolymers such as tragacanth, an anionic polysaccharide gum, can be alternative polymeric carrier for physiologically important peptides and proteins. Characterization of tragacanth is thus essential for providing a foundation for possible applications. Rheological studies colloidal solution of tragacanth at pH 3, 5 or 7 were carried out by means of steady shear and small amplitude oscillatory measurements. Tragacanth mucoadhesivity was also analyzed using an applicable rheological method and compared to chitosan, alginate and PVP. The particle size and zeta potential were measured by a zetasizer. Thermal properties of solutions were obtained using a differential scanning calorimetry. The solution exhibited shear-thinning characteristics. The value of the storage modulus (G') and the loss modulus (G″) increased with an increase in angular frequency (Ω). In all cases, loss modulus values were higher than storage values (G″>G') and viscous character was, therefore, dominant. Tragacanth and alginate showed a good mucoadhesion. Tragacanth upon dispersion created particles of a submicron size with a negative zeta potential (-7.98 to -11.92mV). These properties were pH dependant resulting in acid gel formation at pH 3.5. Tragacanth has thus a potential to be used as an excipient for peptide/protein delivery. PMID:27083363

  6. Novel peptide with a specific calcium-binding capacity from whey protein hydrolysate and the possible chelating mode.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Lina; Huang, Qimin; Huang, Shunli; Lin, Jiaping; Wang, Shaoyun; Huang, Yifan; Hong, Jing; Rao, Pingfan

    2014-10-22

    A novel peptide with a specific calcium-binding capacity was isolated from whey protein hydrolysates. The isolation procedures included diethylaminoethyl (DEAE) anion-exchange chromatography, Sephadex G-25 gel filtration, and reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). A peptide with a molecular mass of 237.99 Da was identified by liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization/mass spectrometry (LC-ESI/MS), and its amino acid sequence was confirmed to be Gly-Tyr. The calcium-binding capacity of Gly-Tyr reached 75.38 μg/mg, increasing by 122% when compared to the hydrolysate complex. The chelating interaction mode between the Gly-Tyr and calcium ion was investigated, indicating that the major binding sites included the oxygen atom of the carbonyl group and nitrogen of the amino or imino group. The folding and structural modification of the peptide arose along with the addition of the calcium ion. The profile of (1)H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy demonstrated that the electron cloud density around the hydrogen nucleus in the peptide changed was caused by the calcium ion. The results of ζ potential showed that the Gly-Tyr-Ca chelate was a neutral molecule in which the calcium ion was surrounded by the specific binding sites of the peptide. Moreover, thermogravimetry-differential scanning calorimetry (TG-DSC) and calcium-releasing assay revealed that the Gly-Tyr-Ca chelate exerted excellent thermal stability and solubility in both acidic and basic conditions, which were beneficial to calcium absorption in the gastrointestinal tract of the human body and, therefore, improved its bioavailability. These findings further the progress in the research of whey protein, suggesting the potential in making peptide-calcium chelate as a dietary supplement. PMID:25265391

  7. Tuning the Protein Corona of Hydrogel Nanoparticles: The Synthesis of Abiotic Protein and Peptide Affinity Reagents.

    PubMed

    O'Brien, Jeffrey; Shea, Kenneth J

    2016-06-21

    Nanomaterials, when introduced into a complex, protein-rich environment, rapidly acquire a protein corona. The type and amount of proteins that constitute the corona depend significantly on the synthetic identity of the nanomaterial. For example, hydrogel nanoparticles (NPs) such as poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) (NIPAm) have little affinity for plasma proteins; in contrast, carboxylated poly(styrene) NPs acquire a dense protein corona. This range of protein adsorption suggests that the protein corona might be "tuned" by controlling the chemical composition of the NP. In this Account, we demonstrate that small libraries of synthetic polymer NPs incorporating a diverse pool of functional monomers can be screened for candidates with high affinity and selectivity to targeted biomacromolecules. Through directed synthetic evolution of NP compositions, one can tailor the protein corona to create synthetic organic hydrogel polymer NPs with high affinity and specificity to peptide toxins, enzymes, and other functional proteins, as well as to specific domains of large proteins. In addition, many NIPAm NPs undergo a change in morphology as a function of temperature. This transformation often correlates with a significant change in NP-biomacromolecule affinity, resulting in a temperature-dependent protein corona. This temperature dependence has been used to develop NP hydrogels with autonomous affinity switching for the protection of proteins from thermal stress and as a method of biomacromolecule purification through a selective thermally induced catch and release. In addition to temperature, changes in pH or buffer can also alter a NP protein corona composition, a property that has been exploited for protein purification. Finally, synthetic polymer nanoparticles with low nanomolar affinity for a peptide toxin were shown to capture and neutralize the toxin in the bloodstream of living mice. While the development of synthetic polymer alternatives to protein affinity reagents is

  8. A salt-regulated peptide derived from the CAP superfamily protein negatively regulates salt-stress tolerance in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Chien, Pei-Shan; Nam, Hong Gil; Chen, Yet-Ran

    2015-01-01

    High salinity has negative impacts on plant growth through altered water uptake and ion-specific toxicities. Plants have therefore evolved an intricate regulatory network in which plant hormones play significant roles in modulating physiological responses to salinity. However, current understanding of the plant peptides involved in this regulatory network remains limited. Here, we identified a salt-regulated peptide in Arabidopsis. The peptide was 11 aa and was derived from the C terminus of a cysteine-rich secretory proteins, antigen 5, and pathogenesis-related 1 proteins (CAP) superfamily. This peptide was found by searching homologues in Arabidopsis using the precursor of a tomato CAP-derived peptide (CAPE) that was initially identified as an immune signal. In searching for a CAPE involved in salt responses, we screened CAPE precursor genes that showed salt-responsive expression and found that the PROAtCAPE1 (AT4G33730) gene was regulated by salinity. We confirmed the endogenous Arabidopsis CAP-derived peptide 1 (AtCAPE1) by mass spectrometry and found that a key amino acid residue in PROAtCAPE1 is critical for AtCAPE1 production. Moreover, although PROAtCAPE1 was expressed mainly in the roots, AtCAPE1 was discovered to be upregulated systemically upon salt treatment. The salt-induced AtCAPE1 negatively regulated salt tolerance by suppressing several salt-tolerance genes functioning in the production of osmolytes, detoxification, stomatal closure control, and cell membrane protection. This discovery demonstrates that AtCAPE1, a homologue of tomato immune regulator CAPE1, plays an important role in the regulation of salt stress responses. Our discovery thus suggests that the peptide may function in a trade-off between pathogen defence and salt tolerance. PMID:26093145

  9. Structure-based rational design of peptide hydroxamic acid inhibitors to target tumor necrosis factor-α converting enzyme as potential therapeutics for hepatitis.

    PubMed

    Wu, Dan; Gu, Qiuhong; Zhao, Ning; Xia, Fei; Li, Zhiwei

    2015-12-01

    The human tumor necrosis factor-α converting enzyme (TACE) has recently been raised as a new and promising therapeutic target of hepatitis and other inflammatory diseases. Here, we reported a successful application of the solved crystal structure of TACE complex with a peptide-like ligand INN for rational design of novel peptide hydroxamic acid inhibitors with high potency and selectivity to target and inhibit TACE. First, the intermolecular interactions between TACE catalytic domain and INN were characterized through an integrated bioinformatics approach, with which the key substructures of INN that dominate ligand binding were identified. Subsequently, the INN molecular structure was simplified to a chemical sketch of peptide hydroxamic acid compound, which can be regarded as a linear tripeptide capped by a N-terminal carboxybenzyl group (chemically protective group) and a C-terminal hydroxamate moiety (coordinated to the Zn(2+) at TACE active site). Based on the sketch, a virtual combinatorial library containing 180 peptide hydroxamic acids was generated, from which seven samples were identified as promising candidates by using a knowledge-based protein-peptide affinity predictor and were then tested in vitro with a standard TACE activity assay protocol. Consequently, three designed peptide hydroxamic acids, i.e. Cbz-Pro-Ile-Gln-hydroxamic acid, Cbz-Leu-Ile-Val-hydroxamic acid and Cbz-Phe-Val-Met-hydroxamic acid, exhibited moderate or high inhibitory activity against TACE, with inhibition constants Ki of 36 ± 5, 510 ± 46 and 320 ± 26 nM, respectively. We also examined the structural basis and non-bonded profile of TACE interaction with a designed peptide hydroxamic acid inhibitor, and found that the inhibitor ligand is tightly buried in the active pocket of TACE, forming a number of hydrogen bonds, hydrophobic forces and van der Waals contacts at the interaction interface, conferring both stability and specificity for TACE-inhibitor complex

  10. Relationship between cadmium, zinc, Cd-peptide, and organic acid in tobacco suspension cells

    SciTech Connect

    Krotz, R.M.; Evangelou, B.P.; Wagner, G.J. )

    1989-10-01

    Responses of tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) suspension cells to Cd and Zn were studied in the presence and absence of ligand of Cd-peptide in order to understand the role of this peptide versus other mechanisms in Cd and Zn accumulation and accommodation in plants. With 45 micromolar Cd and 300 micromolar Zn (non-growth-inhibiting levels), metals appeared rapidly within cells, and intracellular Cd and Zn reached medium concentrations after 6 to 10 hours. Cd-peptide was observed in response to Cd after 2 hours, but this form only accounted for {approximately}30% of soluble Cd after 24 hours. Peptide was not observed in cells exposed to 300 micromolar Zn for up to 7 days. Organic acid-to-metal stoichiometry indicated that endogenous organic acid content of cells was more than sufficient to complex absorbed metals and no evidence was found for stimulation of organic acid biosynthesis by Cd or Zn. Metal-complexing potential of organic acids for Cd and Zn versus endogenous cations is discussed as is vacuolar-extravacuolar distribution of metals. The absence of Cd-peptide does not limit Cd-accumulation in the system studied. Results suggest that tobacco suspension cells accommodte the presence of non-growth-inhibiting and growth-inhibiting levels of Cd and Zn by sequestration in the vacuole as complexes with endogenous organic acids and that this may be a principal means for accommodation of Cd as well as Zn in the presence and absence of Cd-peptide.

  11. Identification of CRISP2 from human sperm as PSP94-binding protein and generation of CRISP2-specific anti-peptide antibodies.

    PubMed

    Anklesaria, Jenifer H; Kulkarni, Bhalchandra J; Pathak, Bhakti R; Mahale, Smita D

    2016-06-01

    Cysteine-rich secretory proteins (CRISPs) are mainly found in the mammalian male reproductive tract and reported to be involved at different stages of fertilization. CRISPs have been shown to interact with prostate secretory protein of 94 amino acids (PSP94) from diverse sources, and the binding of these evolutionarily conserved proteins across species is proposed to be of functional significance. Of the three mammalian CRISPs, PSP94-CRISP3 interaction is well characterized, and specific binding sites have been identified; whereas, CRISP2 has been shown to interact with PSP94 in vitro. Interestingly, human CRISP3 and CRISP2 proteins are closely related showing 71.4% identity. In this study, we identified CRISP2 as a potential binding protein of PSP94 from human sperm. Further, we generated antisera capable of specifically detecting CRISP2 and not CRISP3. In this direction, specific peptides corresponding to the least conserved ion channel regulatory region were synthesized, and polyclonal antibodies were generated against the peptide in rabbits. The binding characteristics of the anti-CRISP2 peptide antibody were evaluated using competitive ELISA. Immunoblotting experiments also confirmed that the peptide was able to generate antibodies capable of detecting the mature CRISP2 protein present in human sperm lysate. Furthermore, this anti-CRISP2 peptide antibody also detected the presence of native CRISP2 on sperm.Copyright © 2016 European Peptide Society and John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:27161017

  12. Synthesis and biological properties of amino acids and peptides containing a tetrazolyl moiety

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popova, E. A.; Trifonov, R. E.

    2015-09-01

    Literature data published mainly in the last 15 years on the synthesis and biological properties of amino acid analogues and derivatives containing tetrazolyl moieties are analyzed. Tetrazolyl analogues and derivatives of amino acids and peptides are shown to be promising for medicinal chemistry. Being polynitrogen heterocyclic systems comprising four endocyclic nitrogen atoms, tetrazoles can behave as acids and bases and form strong hydrogen bonds with proton donors (more rarely, with acceptors). They have high metabolic stability and are able to penetrate biological membranes. The review also considers the synthesis and properties of linear and cyclic peptides based on modified amino acids incorporating a tetrazolyl moiety. A special issue is the discussion of the biological properties of tetrazole-containing amino acids and peptides, which exhibit high biological activity and can be used to design new drugs. The bibliography includes 200 references.

  13. Immobilized palladium(II) ion affinity chromatography for recovery of recombinant proteins with peptide tags containing histidine and cysteine.

    PubMed

    Kikot, Pamela; Polat, Aise; Achilli, Estefania; Fernandez Lahore, Marcelo; Grasselli, Mariano

    2014-11-01

    Fusion of peptide-based tags to recombinant proteins is currently one of the most used tools for protein production. Also, immobilized metal ion affinity chromatography (IMAC) has a huge application in protein purification, especially in research labs. The combination of expression systems of recombinant tagged proteins with this robust chromatographic system has become an efficient and rapid tool to produce milligram-range amounts of proteins. IMAC-Ni(II) columns have become the natural partners of 6xHis-tagged proteins. The Ni(II) ion is considered as the best compromise of selectivity and affinity for purification of a recombinant His-tagged protein. The palladium(II) ion is also able to bind to side chains of amino acids and form ternary complexes with iminodiacetic acid and free amino acids and other sulfur-containing molecules. In this work, we evaluated two different cysteine- and histidine-containing six amino acid tags linked to the N-terminal group of green fluorescent protein (GFP) and studied the adsorption and elution conditions using novel eluents. Both cysteine-containing tagged GFPs were able to bind to IMAC-Pd(II) matrices and eluted successfully using a low concentration of thiourea solution. The IMAC-Ni(II) system reaches less than 20% recovery of the cysteine-containing tagged GFP from a crude homogenate of recombinant Escherichia coli, meanwhile the IMAC-Pd(II) yields a recovery of 45% with a purification factor of 13. PMID:25277090

  14. Peptides Composed of Alternating L- and D-Amino Acids Inhibit Amyloidogenesis in Three Distinct Amyloid Systems Independent of Sequence.

    PubMed

    Kellock, Jackson; Hopping, Gene; Caughey, Byron; Daggett, Valerie

    2016-06-01

    There is now substantial evidence that soluble oligomers are primary toxic agents in amyloid diseases. The development of an antibody recognizing the toxic soluble oligomeric forms of different and unrelated amyloid species suggests a common conformational intermediate during amyloidogenesis. We previously observed a common occurrence of a novel secondary structure element, which we call α-sheet, in molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of various amyloidogenic proteins, and we hypothesized that the toxic conformer is composed of α-sheet structure. As such, α-sheet may represent a conformational signature of the misfolded intermediates of amyloidogenesis and a potential unique binding target for peptide inhibitors. Recently, we reported the design and characterization of a novel hairpin peptide (α1 or AP90) that adopts stable α-sheet structure and inhibits the aggregation of the β-Amyloid Peptide Aβ42 and transthyretin. AP90 is a 23-residue hairpin peptide featuring alternating D- and L-amino acids with favorable conformational propensities for α-sheet formation, and a designed turn. For this study, we reverse engineered AP90 to identify which of its design features is most responsible for conferring α-sheet stability and inhibitory activity. We present experimental characterization (CD and FTIR) of seven peptides designed to accomplish this. In addition, we measured their ability to inhibit aggregation in three unrelated amyloid species: Aβ42, transthyretin, and human islet amylin polypeptide. We found that a hairpin peptide featuring alternating L- and D-amino acids, independent of sequence, is sufficient for conferring α-sheet structure and inhibition of aggregation. Additionally, we show a correlation between α-sheet structural stability and inhibitory activity. PMID:27012425

  15. Empirical methods for identifying specific peptide-protein interactions for smart reagent development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kogot, Joshua M.; Sarkes, Deborah A.; Stratis-Cullum, Dimitra N.; Pellegrino, Paul M.

    2012-06-01

    The current state of the art in the development of antibody alternatives is fraught with difficulties including mass production, robustness, and overall cost of production. The isolation of synthetic alternatives using peptide libraries offers great potential for recognition elements that are more stable and have improved binding affinity and target specificity. Although recent advances in rapid and automated discovery and synthetic library engineering continue to show promise for this emerging science, there remains a critical need for an improved fundamental understanding of the mechanisms of recognition. To better understand the fundamental mechanisms of binding, it is critical to be able to accurately assess binding between peptide reagents and protein targets. The development of empirical methods to analyze peptide-protein interactions is often overlooked, since it is often assumed that peptides can easily substitute for antibodies in antibody-derived immunoassays. The physico-chemical difference between peptides and antibodies represents a major challenge for developing peptides in standard immunoassays as capture or detection reagents. Analysis of peptide presents a unique challenge since the peptide has to be soluble, must be capable of target recognition, and capable of ELISA plate or SPR chip binding. Incorporating a plate-binding, hydrophilic peptide fusion (PS-tag) improves both the solubility and plate binding capability in a direct peptide ELISA format. Secondly, a solution based methods, affinity capillary electrophoresis (ACE) method is presented as a solution-based, affinity determination method that can be used for determining both the association constants and binding kinetics.

  16. Functional interactions between polypyrimidine tract binding protein and PRI peptide ligand containing proteins.

    PubMed

    Coelho, Miguel B; Ascher, David B; Gooding, Clare; Lang, Emma; Maude, Hannah; Turner, David; Llorian, Miriam; Pires, Douglas E V; Attig, Jan; Smith, Christopher W J

    2016-08-15

    Polypyrimidine tract binding protein (PTBP1) is a heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein (hnRNP) that plays roles in most stages of the life-cycle of pre-mRNA and mRNAs in the nucleus and cytoplasm. PTBP1 has four RNA binding domains of the RNA recognition motif (RRM) family, each of which can bind to pyrimidine motifs. In addition, RRM2 can interact via its dorsal surface with proteins containing short peptide ligands known as PTB RRM2 interacting (PRI) motifs, originally found in the protein Raver1. Here we review our recent progress in understanding the interactions of PTB with RNA and with various proteins containing PRI ligands. PMID:27528752

  17. Peptide vaccine against canine parvovirus: identification of two neutralization subsites in the N terminus of VP2 and optimization of the amino acid sequence.

    PubMed

    Casal, J I; Langeveld, J P; Cortés, E; Schaaper, W W; van Dijk, E; Vela, C; Kamstrup, S; Meloen, R H

    1995-11-01

    The N-terminal domain of the major capsid protein VP2 of canine parvovirus was shown to be an excellent target for development of a synthetic peptide vaccine, but detailed information about number of epitopes, optimal length, sequence choice, and site of coupling to the carrier protein was lacking. Therefore, several overlapping peptides based on this N terminus were synthesized to establish conditions for optimal and reproducible induction of neutralizing antibodies in rabbits. The specificity and neutralizing ability of the antibody response for these peptides were determined. Within the N-terminal 23 residues of VP2, two subsites able to induce neutralizing antibodies and which overlapped by only two glycine residues at positions 10 and 11 could be discriminated. The shortest sequence sufficient for neutralization induction was nine residues. Peptides longer than 13 residues consistently induced neutralization, provided that their N termini were located between positions 1 and 11 of VP2. The orientation of the peptides at the carrier protein was also of importance, being more effective when coupled through the N terminus than through the C terminus to keyhole limpet hemocyanin. The results suggest that the presence of amino acid residues 2 to 21 (and probably 3 to 17) of VP2 in a single peptide is preferable for a synthetic peptide vaccine. PMID:7474152

  18. Detection of antimicrobial (poly)peptides with acid urea polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis followed by Western immunoblot.

    PubMed

    Porter, Edith; Valore, Erika V; Anouseyan, Rabin; Salzman, Nita H

    2015-01-01

    Antimicrobial (poly)peptides (AMPs) are ancient key effector molecules of innate host defense and have been identified in mammals, insects, plants, and even fungi (Nakatsuji and Gallo, J Invest Dermatol, 132: 887-895, 2012). They exhibit a cationic net charge at physiological pH and are rich in hydrophobic amino acids (Dufourc et al., Curr Protein Pept Sci, 13: 620-631, 2012). Their mode of action has been best investigated in bacteria. When assuming secondary structure the cationic and hydrophobic amino acids are sequestered creating a bipartitioned molecule in which the cationic amino acids mediate initial electrostatic interaction with the negatively charged bacterial surface and the hydrophobic amino acids mediate embedding into the bacterial membranes followed by a multitude of effects interfering with bacterial viability (Nicolas, FEBS J, 276: 6483-6496, 2009; Padovan et al., Curr Protein Pept Sci, 11: 210-219, 2010). However, immunomodulatory, antitumor, and other effects have been added to the ever increasing list of AMP functions (Pushpanathan et al., Int J Pept, 2013: 675391, 2013). Several classes of AMPs have been distinguished based on structure, namely anti-parallel beta-sheet, alpha-helical, circular, as well as disulfide bridge connectivity (Bond and Khalid, Protein Pept Lett, 17: 1313-1327, 2010). Many of the AMPs undergo posttranslational modification including further proteolysis. Biochemical analysis at the protein level is of great interest for a wide range of scientists and important when studying host-pathogen interaction, for example Salmonella invasion of the small intestine. Acid-urea polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (AU-PAGE) followed by Western immunoblotting is an important tool for the identification and quantification of cationic AMPs. The protocol for these procedures outlined here describes, in detail, the necessary steps; including pouring the AU-gels, preparing the test samples, performing the electrophoretic separation and

  19. Combining Ultracentrifugation and Peptide Termini Group-specific Immunoprecipitation for Multiplex Plasma Protein Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Volk, Sonja; Schreiber, Thomas D.; Eisen, David; Wiese, Calvin; Planatscher, Hannes; Pynn, Christopher J.; Stoll, Dieter; Templin, Markus F.; Joos, Thomas O.; Pötz, Oliver

    2012-01-01

    Blood plasma is a valuable source of potential biomarkers. However, its complexity and the huge dynamic concentration range of its constituents complicate its analysis. To tackle this problem, an immunoprecipitation strategy was employed using antibodies directed against short terminal epitope tags (triple X proteomics antibodies), which allow the enrichment of groups of signature peptides derived from trypsin-digested plasma. Isolated signature peptides are subsequently detected using MALDI-TOF/TOF mass spectrometry. Sensitivity of the immunoaffinity approach was, however, compromised by the presence of contaminant peaks derived from the peptides of nontargeted high abundant proteins. A closer analysis of the enrichment strategy revealed nonspecific peptide binding to the solid phase affinity matrix as the major source of the contaminating peptides. We therefore implemented a sucrose density gradient ultracentrifugation separation step into the procedure. This yielded a 99% depletion of contaminating peptides from a sucrose fraction containing 70% of the peptide-antibody complexes and enabled the detection of the previously undetected low abundance protein filamin-A. Assessment of this novel approach using 15 different triple X proteomics antibodies demonstrated a more consistent detection of a greater number of targeted peptides and a significant reduction in the intensity of nonspecific peptides. Ultracentrifugation coupled with immunoaffinity MS approaches presents a powerful tool for multiplexed plasma protein analysis without the requirement for demanding liquid chromatography separation techniques. PMID:22527512

  20. Comparison between the behavior of different hydrophobic peptides allowing membrane anchoring of proteins

    PubMed Central

    Lhor, Mustapha; Bernier, Sarah; Horchani, Habib; Bussières, Sylvain; Cantin, Line; Desbat, Bernard; Salesse, Christian

    2014-01-01

    Membrane binding of proteins such as short chain dehydrogenases reductases or tail-anchored proteins relies on their N- and/or C-terminal hydrophobic transmembrane segment. In this review, we propose guidelines to characterize such hydrophobic peptide segments using spectroscopic and biophysical measurements. The secondary structure content of the C-terminal peptides of retinol dehydrogenase 8, RGS9-1 anchor protein, lecithin retinol acyl transferase, and of the N-terminal peptide of retinol dehydrogenase 11 has been deduced by prediction tools from their primary sequence as well as by using infrared or circular dichroism analyses. Depending on the solvent and the solubilization method, significant structural differences were observed, often involving α-helices. The helical structure of these peptides was found to be consistent with their presumed membrane binding. Langmuir monolayers have been used as membrane models to study lipid-peptide interactions. The values of maximum insertion pressure obtained for all peptides using a monolayer of 1,2-dioleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phospho-ethanolamine (DOPE) are larger than the estimated lateral pressure of membranes, thus suggesting that they bind membranes. Polarization modulation infrared reflection absorption spectroscopy has been used to determine the structure and orientation of these peptides in the absence and in the presence of a DOPE monolayer. This lipid induced an increase or a decrease in the organization of the peptide secondary structure. Further measurements are necessary using other lipids to better understand the membrane interactions of these peptides. PMID:24560216

  1. Comparison between the behavior of different hydrophobic peptides allowing membrane anchoring of proteins.

    PubMed

    Lhor, Mustapha; Bernier, Sarah C; Horchani, Habib; Bussières, Sylvain; Cantin, Line; Desbat, Bernard; Salesse, Christian

    2014-05-01

    Membrane binding of proteins such as short chain dehydrogenase reductases or tail-anchored proteins relies on their N- and/or C-terminal hydrophobic transmembrane segment. In this review, we propose guidelines to characterize such hydrophobic peptide segments using spectroscopic and biophysical measurements. The secondary structure content of the C-terminal peptides of retinol dehydrogenase 8, RGS9-1 anchor protein, lecithin retinol acyl transferase, and of the N-terminal peptide of retinol dehydrogenase 11 has been deduced by prediction tools from their primary sequence as well as by using infrared or circular dichroism analyses. Depending on the solvent and the solubilization method, significant structural differences were observed, often involving α-helices. The helical structure of these peptides was found to be consistent with their presumed membrane binding. Langmuir monolayers have been used as membrane models to study lipid-peptide interactions. The values of maximum insertion pressure obtained for all peptides using a monolayer of 1,2-dioleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phospho-ethanolamine (DOPE) are larger than the estimated lateral pressure of membranes, thus suggesting that they bind membranes. Polarization modulation infrared reflection absorption spectroscopy has been used to determine the structure and orientation of these peptides in the absence and in the presence of a DOPE monolayer. This lipid induced an increase or a decrease in the organization of the peptide secondary structure. Further measurements are necessary using other lipids to better understand the membrane interactions of these peptides. PMID:24560216

  2. PepComposer: computational design of peptides binding to a given protein surface.

    PubMed

    Obarska-Kosinska, Agnieszka; Iacoangeli, Alfredo; Lepore, Rosalba; Tramontano, Anna

    2016-07-01

    There is a wide interest in designing peptides able to bind to a specific region of a protein with the aim of interfering with a known interaction or as starting point for the design of inhibitors. Here we describe PepComposer, a new pipeline for the computational design of peptides binding to a given protein surface. PepComposer only requires the target protein structure and an approximate definition of the binding site as input. We first retrieve a set of peptide backbone scaffolds from monomeric proteins that harbor the same backbone arrangement as the binding site of the protein of interest. Next, we design optimal sequences for the identified peptide scaffolds. The method is fully automatic and available as a web server at http://biocomputing.it/pepcomposer/webserver. PMID:27131789

  3. Recent Advances in Protein and Peptide Drug Delivery: A Special Emphasis on Polymeric Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Ashaben; Patel, Mitesh; Yang, Xiaoyan; Mitra, Ashim K.

    2015-01-01

    Proteins and peptides are widely indicated in many diseased states. Parenteral route is the most commonly employed method of administration for therapeutic proteins and peptides. However, requirement of frequent injections due to short in vivo half-life results in poor patient compliance. Non-invasive drug delivery routes such as nasal, transdermal, pulmonary, and oral offer several advantages over parenteral administration. Intrinsic physicochemical properties and low permeability across biological membrane limit protein delivery via non-invasive routes. One of the strategies to improve protein and peptide absorption is by delivering through nanostructured delivery carriers. Among nanocarriers, polymeric nanoparticles (NPs) have demonstrated significant advantages over other delivery systems. This article summarizes the application of polymeric NPs for protein and peptide drug delivery following oral, nasal, pulmonary, parenteral, transdermal, and ocular administrations. PMID:25106908

  4. Nucleic Acid-Peptide Complex Phase Controlled by DNA Hybridization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vieregg, Jeffrey; Lueckheide, Michael; Leon, Lorraine; Marciel, Amanda; Tirrell, Matthew

    When polyanions and polycations are mixed, counterion release drives formation of polymer-rich complexes that can either be solid (precipitates) or liquid (coacervates) depending on the properties of the polyelectrolytes. These complexes are important in many fields, from encapsulation of industrial polymers to membrane-free segregation of biomolecules such as nucleic acids and proteins. Condensation of long double-stranded DNA has been studied for several decades, but comparatively little attention has been paid to the polyelectrolyte behavior of oligonucleotides. We report here studies of DNA oligonucleotides (10 - 88 nt) complexed with polylysine (10 - 100 aa). Unexpectedly, we find that the phase of the resulting complexes is controlled by the hybridization state of the nucleic acid, with double-stranded DNA forming precipitates and single-stranded DNA forming coacervates. Stability increases with polyelectrolyte length and decreases with solution salt concentration, with complexes of the longer double-stranded polymers undergoing precipitate/coacervate/soluble transitions as ionic strength is increased. Mixing coacervates formed by complementary single-stranded oligonucleotides results in precipitate formation, raising the possibility of stimulus-responsive material design.

  5. Methodology for Labeling Proteins and Peptides with Lead-212 (212Pb)

    PubMed Central

    Baidoo, Kwamena E.; Milenic, Diane E.; Brechbiel, Martin W.

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Alpha particles possess an exquisite degree of cytotoxicity when employed for targeted α–particle therapy (TAT) or radioimmunotherapy (RIT). 212Pb, which acts as an in vivo generator of the α-emitting nuclide 212Bi has shown great promise in pre-clinical studies when used to label the HER2 binding antibody, trastuzumab. Currently, the first RIT clinical trial employing 212Pb radiolabeled trastuzumab is in progress. This report provides detailed current protocol operations and steps that were generated for use in the clinical trial as well as the relevant pre-clinical experimentation, and describes in detail the labeling of proteins or peptides with 212Pb as provided via a 224Ra based generator system. Methods 212Pb was eluted from the 224Ra/212Pb generator using hydrochloric acid (2 M). The generator eluate was evaporated and digested with nitric acid (8M) followed by extraction of the 212Pb with dilute nitric acid (0.1 M). The dilute nitric acid solution of 212Pb was used to label the immunoconjugate Trastuzumab-TCMC (2-(4-isothiocyanatobenzyl-1,4,7,10-tetraaza-1,4,7,10,tetra-(2-carbamonylmethyl)-cyclododecane) at pH 5.5. Results Elution of 212Pb from the generator was efficient yielding > 90% of available 212Pb. Trastuzumab-TCMC was efficiently labeled with a radiochemical yield of 94 +/− 4% (n = 7) by ITLC and an isolated yield of 73 +/− 3 % (n = 7). Conclusions The results show the feasibility of generating radioimmunoconjugates and peptide conjugates for use as in vivo α generator systems in the clinic. The technology holds promise in applications involving the treatment of minimal disease such as micrometastases and residual tumor after surgical debulking, hematological cancers, infections, and compartmental cancers, such as ovarian cancer. PMID:23602604

  6. HomoSAR: bridging comparative protein modeling with quantitative structural activity relationship to design new peptides.

    PubMed

    Borkar, Mahesh R; Pissurlenkar, Raghuvir R S; Coutinho, Evans C

    2013-11-15

    Peptides play significant roles in the biological world. To optimize activity for a specific therapeutic target, peptide library synthesis is inevitable; which is a time consuming and expensive. Computational approaches provide a promising way to simply elucidate the structural basis in the design of new peptides. Earlier, we proposed a novel methodology termed HomoSAR to gain insight into the structure activity relationships underlying peptides. Based on an integrated approach, HomoSAR uses the principles of homology modeling in conjunction with the quantitative structural activity relationship formalism to predict and design new peptide sequences with the optimum activity. In the present study, we establish that the HomoSAR methodology can be universally applied to all classes of peptides irrespective of sequence length by studying HomoSAR on three peptide datasets viz., angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitory peptides, CAMEL-s antibiotic peptides, and hAmphiphysin-1 SH3 domain binding peptides, using a set of descriptors related to the hydrophobic, steric, and electronic properties of the 20 natural amino acids. Models generated for all three datasets have statistically significant correlation coefficients (r(2)) and predictive r2 (r(pred)2) and cross validated coefficient ( q(LOO)2). The daintiness of this technique lies in its simplicity and ability to extract all the information contained in the peptides to elucidate the underlying structure activity relationships. The difficulties of correlating both sequence diversity and variation in length of the peptides with their biological activity can be addressed. The study has been able to identify the preferred or detrimental nature of amino acids at specific positions in the peptide sequences. PMID:24105965

  7. Bioavailability of milk protein-derived bioactive peptides: a glycaemic management perspective.

    PubMed

    Horner, Katy; Drummond, Elaine; Brennan, Lorraine

    2016-06-01

    Milk protein-derived peptides have been reported to have potential benefits for reducing the risk of type 2 diabetes. However, what the active components are and whether intact peptides exert this bioactivity has received little investigation in human subjects. Furthermore, potentially useful bioactive peptides can be limited by low bioavailability. Various peptides have been identified in the gastrointestinal tract and bloodstream after milk-protein ingestion, providing valuable insights into their potential bioavailability. However, these studies are currently limited and the structure and sequence of milk peptides exerting bioactivity for glycaemic management has received little investigation in human subjects. The present article reviews the bioavailability of milk protein-derived peptides in human studies to date, and examines the evidence on milk proteins and glycaemic management, including potential mechanisms of action. Areas in need of advancement are identified. Only by establishing the bioavailability of milk protein-derived peptides, the active components and the mechanistic pathways involved can the benefits of milk proteins for the prevention or management of type 2 diabetes be fully realised in future. PMID:27109024

  8. Stable accumulation of seed storage proteins containing vaccine peptides in transgenic soybean seeds.

    PubMed

    Maruyama, Nobuyuki; Fujiwara, Keigo; Yokoyama, Kazunori; Cabanos, Cerrone; Hasegawa, Hisakazu; Takagi, Kyoko; Nishizawa, Keito; Uki, Yuriko; Kawarabayashi, Takeshi; Shouji, Mikio; Ishimoto, Masao; Terakawa, Teruhiko

    2014-10-01

    There has been a significant increase in the use of transgenic plants for the large-scale production of pharmaceuticals and industrial proteins. Here, we report the stable accumulation of seed storage proteins containing disease vaccine peptides in transgenic soybean seeds. To synthesize vaccine peptides in soybean seeds, we used seed storage proteins as a carrier and a soybean breeding line lacking major seed storage proteins as a host. Vaccine peptides were inserted into the flexible disordered regions in the A1aB1b subunit three-dimensional structure. The A1aB1b subunit containing vaccine peptides in the disordered regions were sorted to the protein storage vacuoles where vaccine peptides are partially cleaved by proteases. In contrast, the endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-retention type of the A1aB1b subunit containing vaccine peptides accumulated in compartments that originated from the ER as an intact pro-form. These results indicate that the ER may be an organelle suitable for the stable accumulation of bioactive peptides using seed storage proteins as carriers. PMID:24794626

  9. A toy model of prebiotic peptide evolution: the possible role of relative amino acid abundances.

    PubMed

    Polanco, Carlos; Buhse, Thomas; Samaniego, José Lino; Castañón González, Jorge Alberto

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents a mathematical-computational toy model based on the assumed dynamic principles of prebiotic peptide evolution. Starting from a pool of amino acid monomers, the model describes in a generalized manner the generation of peptides and their sequential information. The model integrates the intrinsic and dynamic key elements of the initiation of biopolymerization, such as the relative amino acid abundances and polarities, as well as the oligomer reversibility, i.e. fragmentation and recombination, and peptide self-replication. Our modeling results suggest that the relative amino acid abundances, as indicated by Miller-Urey type electric discharge experiments, played a principal role in the early sequential information of peptide profiles. Moreover, the computed profiles display an astonishing similarity to peptide profiles observed in so-called biological common ancestors found in the following three microorganisms; E. coli, M. jannaschii, and S. cereviasiae. The prebiotic peptide fingerprint was obtained by the so-called polarity index method that was earlier reported as a tool for the identification of cationic amphipathic antibacterial short peptides. PMID:23741717

  10. Antimicrobial Peptides in 2014

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Guangshun; Mishra, Biswajit; Lau, Kyle; Lushnikova, Tamara; Golla, Radha; Wang, Xiuqing

    2015-01-01

    This article highlights new members, novel mechanisms of action, new functions, and interesting applications of antimicrobial peptides reported in 2014. As of December 2014, over 100 new peptides were registered into the Antimicrobial Peptide Database, increasing the total number of entries to 2493. Unique antimicrobial peptides have been identified from marine bacteria, fungi, and plants. Environmental conditions clearly influence peptide activity or function. Human α-defensin HD-6 is only antimicrobial under reduced conditions. The pH-dependent oligomerization of human cathelicidin LL-37 is linked to double-stranded RNA delivery to endosomes, where the acidic pH triggers the dissociation of the peptide aggregate to release its cargo. Proline-rich peptides, previously known to bind to heat shock proteins, are shown to inhibit protein synthesis. A model antimicrobial peptide is demonstrated to have multiple hits on bacteria, including surface protein delocalization. While cell surface modification to decrease cationic peptide binding is a recognized resistance mechanism for pathogenic bacteria, it is also used as a survival strategy for commensal bacteria. The year 2014 also witnessed continued efforts in exploiting potential applications of antimicrobial peptides. We highlight 3D structure-based design of peptide antimicrobials and vaccines, surface coating, delivery systems, and microbial detection devices involving antimicrobial peptides. The 2014 results also support that combination therapy is preferred over monotherapy in treating biofilms. PMID:25806720

  11. Antimicrobial peptides in 2014.

    PubMed

    Wang, Guangshun; Mishra, Biswajit; Lau, Kyle; Lushnikova, Tamara; Golla, Radha; Wang, Xiuqing

    2015-01-01

    This article highlights new members, novel mechanisms of action, new functions, and interesting applications of antimicrobial peptides reported in 2014. As of December 2014, over 100 new peptides were registered into the Antimicrobial Peptide Database, increasing the total number of entries to 2493. Unique antimicrobial peptides have been identified from marine bacteria, fungi, and plants. Environmental conditions clearly influence peptide activity or function. Human α-defensin HD-6 is only antimicrobial under reduced conditions. The pH-dependent oligomerization of human cathelicidin LL-37 is linked to double-stranded RNA delivery to endosomes, where the acidic pH triggers the dissociation of the peptide aggregate to release its cargo. Proline-rich peptides, previously known to bind to heat shock proteins, are shown to inhibit protein synthesis. A model antimicrobial peptide is demonstrated to have multiple hits on bacteria, including surface protein delocalization. While cell surface modification to decrease cationic peptide binding is a recognized resistance mechanism for pathogenic bacteria, it is also used as a survival strategy for commensal bacteria. The year 2014 also witnessed continued efforts in exploiting potential applications of antimicrobial peptides. We highlight 3D structure-based design of peptide antimicrobials and vaccines, surface coating, delivery systems, and microbial detection devices involving antimicrobial peptides. The 2014 results also support that combination therapy is preferred over monotherapy in treating biofilms. PMID:25806720

  12. Formulation of a Peptide Nucleic Acid Based Nucleic Acid Delivery Construct

    PubMed Central

    Millili, Peter G.; Yin, Daniel H.; Fan, Haihong; Naik, Ulhas P.; Sullivan, Millicent O.

    2010-01-01

    Gene delivery biomaterials need to be designed to efficiently achieve nuclear delivery of plasmid DNA. Polycations have been used to package DNA and other nucleic acids within sub-micron sized particles, offering protection from shear-induced or enzymatic degradation. However, cytotoxicity issues coupled with limited in vivo transfection efficiencies minimize the effectiveness of this approach. In an effort to improve upon existing technologies aimed at delivering nucleic acids, an alternative approach to DNA packaging was explored. Peptide nucleic acids (PNAs) were used to directly functionalize DNA with poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) chains that provide a steric layer and inhibit multimolecular aggregation during complexation. DNA prePEGylation by this strategy was predicted to enable the formation of more homogeneous and efficiently packaged polyplexes. In this work, DNA-PNA-peptide-PEG (DP3) conjugates were synthesized and self-assembled with 25 kDa poly(ethylenimine) (PEI). Complexes with small standard deviations and average diameters ranging from 30 – 50 nm were created, with minimal dependence of complex size on N:P ratio (PEI amines to DNA phosphates). Furthermore, PEI-DNA interactions were altered by the derivitization strategy, resulting in tighter compaction of the PEI-DP3 complexes in comparison with PEI-DNA complexes. Transfection experiments in Chinese Hamster Ovary (CHO) cells revealed comparable transfection efficiencies but reduced cytotoxicities of the PEI-DP3 complexes relative to PEI-DNA complexes. The enhanced cellular activities of the PEI-DP3 complexes were maintained following the removal of free PEI from the PEI-DP3 formulations, whereas the cellular activity of the conventional PEI-DNA formulations was reduced by free PEI removal. These findings suggest that DNA prePEGylation by the PNA-based strategy might provide a way to circumvent cytotoxicity and formulation issues related to the use of PEI for in vivo gene delivery. PMID:20131756

  13. Peptides identified in soybean protein increase plasma cholesterol in mice on hypercholesterolemic diets

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The in vitro micellar cholesterol displacement assay has been used to identify peptides that may potentially reduce cholesterol in vivo. We tested two of these peptides, LPYPR and WGAPSI, derived from soybean protein (SP) that have been reported to displace cholesterol from micelles by feeding them...

  14. Activities of Venom Proteins and Peptides with Possible Therapeutic Applications from Bees and WASPS.

    PubMed

    Ye, Xiujuan; Guan, Suzhen; Liu, Jiwen; Ng, Charlene C W; Chan, Gabriel H H; Sze, Stephen C W; Zhang, Kalin Y; Naude, Ryno; Rolka, Krzysztof; Wong, Jack Ho; Ng, Tzi Bun

    2016-01-01

    The variety of proteins and peptides isolated from honey bee venom and wasp venom includes melittin, adiapin, apamine, bradykinin, cardiopep, mast cell degranulating peptide, mastoparan, phospholipase A2 and secapin. Some of the activities they demonstrate may find therapeutic applications. PMID:27323949

  15. Biological significance and applications of heme c proteins and peptides.

    PubMed

    Kleingardner, Jesse G; Bren, Kara L

    2015-07-21

    between the iron and the protein surface as revealed by nuclear resonance vibrational spectroscopy studies. Finally, heme covalent attachment is proposed to be an important feature supporting multiple roles of cyt c in programmed cell death (apoptosis). Heme covalent attachment is not only vital for the biological functions of cyt c but also provides a useful handle in a number of applications. For one, the engineering of heme c onto an exposed portion of a protein of interest has been shown to provide a visible affinity purification tag. In addition, peptides with covalently attached heme, known as microperoxidases, have been studied as model compounds and oxidation catalysts and, more recently, in applications for energy conversion and storage. The wealth of insight gained about heme c through fundamental studies of cyts c forms a basis for future efforts toward engineering natural and artificial cytochromes for a variety of applications. PMID:26083801

  16. The Prebiotic Synthesis of Ethylenediamine Monoacetic Acid, The Repeating Unit of Peptide Nucleic Acids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nelson, Kevin E.; Miller, Stanley L.

    1992-01-01

    The polymerization of ribonucleic acids or their precursors constitutes an important event in prebiotic chemistry. The various problems using ribonucleotides to make RNA suggest that there may have been a precursor. An attractive possibility are the peptide nucleic acids (PNA). PNAs are nucleotide analogs that make use of a polymer of ethylenediamine monoacetic acid (EDMA or 2-amninoethyl glycine) with the bases attached by an acetic acid. EDMA is an especially attractive alternative to the ribose phosphate or deoxyribose phosphate backbone because it contains no chiral centers and is potentially prebiotic, but there is no reported prebiotic synthesis. We have synthesized both EDMA and ethylenediamine diacetic acid (EDDA) from the prebiotic compounds ethylenediamine, formaldehyde, and hydrogen cyanide. The yields of EDMA range from 11 to 79% along with some sEDDA and uEDDA. These reactions work with concentrations of 10(exp -1)M and as low as 10(exp -4)M, and the reaction is likely to be effective at even lower concentrations. Ethylenediamine is a likely prebiotic compound, but it has not yet been demonstrated, although compounds such as ethanolamine and cysteamine have been proven to be prebiotic. Under neutral pH and heating at l00 C, EDMA is converted to the lactam, monoketopiperazine (MKP). The cyclization occurs and has an approximate ratio of MKP/EDMA = 3 at equilibrium. We have measured the solubilities of EDMA center dot H20 as 6.4 m, EDMA center dot HCl center dot H20 as 13.7 m, and EDMA center dot 2HCl center dot H20 as 3.4 m. These syntheses together with the high solubility of EDMA suggest that EDMA would concentrate in drying lagoons and might efficiently form polymers. Given the instability of ribose and the poor polymerizability of nucleotides, the prebiotic presence of EDMA and the possibility of its polymerization raises the possibility that PNAs are the progenitors of present day nucleic acids. A pre-RNA world may have existed in which PNAs or

  17. Metallochelate Coupling of Phosphorescent Pt-Porphyrins to Peptides, Proteins, and Self-Assembling Protein Nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Dmitriev, Ruslan I; O'Donnell, Neil; Papkovsky, Dmitri B

    2016-02-17

    Specific and reversible metallochelate coupling via nitrilotriacetate (NTA) moiety is widely used for immobilization, purification, and labeling of oligo(histidine)-tagged proteins. Here, we evaluated this strategy to label various peptides and proteins with phosphorescent Pt-porphyrin derivatives bearing NTA group(s). Zn(2+) complexes were shown to have minimal effect on the photophysics of the porphyrin moiety, allowing quenched-phosphorescence sensing of O2. We complexed the PtTFPP-NTA conjugate with His-containing peptide that can facilitate intracellular loading, and observed efficient accumulation and phosphorescent staining of MEF cells. The more hydrophilic PtCP-NTA conjugate was also seen to form stable complexes with larger polypeptide constructs based on fluorescent proteins, and with subunits of protein nanoparticles, which retained their ability to self-assemble. Testing in phosphorescence lifetime based O2 sensing assays on a fluorescence reader and PLIM microscope revealed that phosphorescent metallochelate complexes perform similarly to the existing O2 probes. Thus, metallochelate coupling allows simple preparation of different types of biomaterials labeled with phosphorescent Pt-porphyrins. PMID:26704593

  18. Identification of a Highly Conserved Epitope on Avian Influenza Virus Non-Structural Protein 1 Using a Peptide Microarray

    PubMed Central

    Wen, Xuexia; Bao, Hongmei; Shi, Lin; Tao, Qimeng; Jiang, Yongping; Zeng, Xianying; Xu, Xiaolong; Tian, Guobin; Zheng, Shimin; Chen, Hualan

    2016-01-01

    Avian influenza virus (AIV) non-structural protein 1 (NS1) is a multifunctional protein. It is present at high levels in infected cells and can be used for AIV detection and diagnosis. In this study, we generated monoclonal antibody (MAb) D7 against AIV NS1 protein by immunization of BALB/c mice with purified recombinant NS1 protein expressed in Escherichia coli. Isotype determination revealed that the MAb was IgG1/κ-type subclass. To identify the epitope of the MAb D7, the NS1 protein was truncated into a total of 225 15-mer peptides with 14 amino acid overlaps, which were spotted for a peptide microarray. The results revealed that the MAb D7 recognized the consensus DAPF motif. Furthermore, the AIV NS1 protein with the DAPF motif deletion was transiently expressed in 293T cells and failed to react with MAb D7. Subsequently, the DAPF motif was synthesized with an elongated GSGS linker at both the C- and N-termini. The MAb D7 reacted with the synthesized peptide both in enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and dot-blot assays. From these results, we concluded that DAPF motif is the epitope of MAb D7. To our knowledge, this is the first report of a 4-mer epitope on the NS1 protein of AIV that can be recognized by MAb using a peptide microarray, which is able to simplify epitope identification, and that could serve as the basis for immune responses against avian influenza. PMID:26938453

  19. Use of a peptide rather than free amino acid nitrogen source in chemically defined "elemental" diets.

    PubMed

    Silk, D B; Fairclough, P D; Clark, M L; Hegarty, J E; Marrs, T C; Addison, J M; Burston, D; Clegg, K M; Matthews, D M

    1980-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that amino acid (AA) residues are absorbed more rapidly from di- tripeptides than from free AA. In the present study, an intestinal perfusion technique has been used in normal human subjects to compare absorption of AA residues and total alpha-amino nitrogen (N) from 4 partial enzymic hydrolysates of protein (50--80% of the N contents present as small peptides) and their respective equimolar free AA mixtures. alpha-Amino N absorption was greater from 2 casein hydrolytes and a lactalbumin hydrolysate than from the respective free AA mixtures but similar to that from a fish protein hydrolysate and its AA mixture. The considerable variation in absorption of individual AA residues from the AA mixtures was much reduced when the protein hydrolysates were perfused, as a number of AA which were poorly absorbed from the AA mixtures were absorbed to a greater extent from the protein hydrolysates. The casein and lactalbumin hydrolysates had a stimulatory effect on jejunal absorption of water and electrolytes. In contrast, the fish protein hydrolysate appeared to cause a mean net secretion of fluid and electrolytes. The findings indicate that when absorption is limited by diminished luminal hydrolysis or absorptive capacity, serious consideration might be given to using partial enzymic hydrolysates of whole protein rather than free AA mixtures as the N source in "elemental" diets. Care should be taken, however, in ensuring that the preparation of choice does not promote a net secretion of fluid and electrolytes for such a property could have a deleterious effect in the clinical setting. PMID:6780707

  20. Identification and Evaluation of Cryoprotective Peptides from Chicken Collagen: Ice-Growth Inhibition Activity Compared to That of Type I Antifreeze Proteins in Sucrose Model Systems.

    PubMed

    Du, Lihui; Betti, Mirko

    2016-06-29

    The ability of chicken collagen peptides to inhibit the growth of ice crystals was evaluated and compared to that of fish antifreeze proteins (AFPs). This ice inhibition activity was assessed using a polarized microscope by measuring ice crystal dimensions in a sucrose model system with and without collagen peptides after seven thermal cycles. The system was stabilized at -25 °C and cycled between -16 and -12 °C. Five candidate peptides with ice inhibition activity were identified using liquid chromatography and tandem mass spectrometry and were then synthesized. Their ice inhibition capacity was compared to that of type I AFPs in a 23% sucrose model system. Specific collagen peptides with certain amino acid sequences reduced the extent of ice growth by approximately 70% at a relatively low concentration (1 mg/mL). These results suggest that specific collagen peptides may act in a noncolligative manner, inhibiting ice crystal growth like type I AFPs, but less efficiently. PMID:27293017

  1. The effects of shared peptides on protein quantitation in label-free proteomics by LC/MS/MS

    SciTech Connect

    Jin, Shuangshuang; Daly, Don S.; Springer, David L.; Miller, John H.

    2008-01-02

    Assessment of differential protein abundance from the observed properties of detected peptides is an essential part of protein profiling based on shotgun proteomics. However, the abundance observed for degenerate peptides may be due to contributions from multiple proteins that are affected differently by a given treatment. Excluding degenerate peptides eliminates this ambiguity but may significantly decrease the number of proteins for which abundance estimates can be obtained. Peptide degeneracy within a family of biologically related proteins does not cause ambiguity if family members have a common response to treatment. Based on this concept, we have developed an approach for including degenerate peptides in the analysis of differential protein abundance in protein profiling. Data from a recent proteomics study of lung tissue from mice exposed to lipopolysaccharide, cigarette smoke, and a combination of these agents is used to illustrate our method. Starting from data where about half of the protein identifications involved degenerate peptides, 82% of the affected proteins were grouped into families, based on FASTA annotation, with closure on peptide degeneracy. In many cases, a common abundance relative to control was sufficient to explain ion-current peak areas for peptides, both unique and degenerate, that identified biologically-related proteins in a peptide-degeneracy closure group. Based on these results, we propose that peptide-degeneracy closure groups provide a way to include abundance data for degenerate-peptides in quantitative protein profiling by high throughput mass spectrometry.

  2. Purification of growth-promoting peptides and proteins, and of histones, by high pressure silica gel chromatography.

    PubMed

    Pickart, L R; Thaler, M M

    1975-01-01

    A rapid method for the purification of histones and a variety of growth-promoting proteins and peptides by chromatography on silica gel has been developed. The isolation of the growth-promoting components of serum has been hampered by excessive losses associated with the use of water-based purification mens in acidic methanol-H2O solutions (eg. insulin, albumin, the somatomedins) provides a basis for purification on high-pressure silica gel columns, while peptides and histones can be purified in similar solvents. After column chromatography, the solvent is removed by flash-evaporation, or the protein may be precipitated directly from the solvent by neutralization of the pH and the addition of ethanol. The retention of biological activity (eg. somatomedin-C binding to insulin receptors and cell-growth stimulation) and recovery are excellent. PMID:1215337

  3. An extra dimension in protein tagging by quantifying universal proteotypic peptides using targeted proteomics

    PubMed Central

    Vandemoortele, Giel; Staes, An; Gonnelli, Giulia; Samyn, Noortje; De Sutter, Delphine; Vandermarliere, Elien; Timmerman, Evy; Gevaert, Kris; Martens, Lennart; Eyckerman, Sven

    2016-01-01

    The use of protein tagging to facilitate detailed characterization of target proteins has not only revolutionized cell biology, but also enabled biochemical analysis through efficient recovery of the protein complexes wherein the tagged proteins reside. The endogenous use of these tags for detailed protein characterization is widespread in lower organisms that allow for efficient homologous recombination. With the recent advances in genome engineering, tagging of endogenous proteins is now within reach for most experimental systems, including mammalian cell lines cultures. In this work, we describe the selection of peptides with ideal mass spectrometry characteristics for use in quantification of tagged proteins using targeted proteomics. We mined the proteome of the hyperthermophile Pyrococcus furiosus to obtain two peptides that are unique in the proteomes of all known model organisms (proteotypic) and allow sensitive quantification of target proteins in a complex background. By combining these ’Proteotypic peptides for Quantification by SRM’ (PQS peptides) with epitope tags, we demonstrate their use in co-immunoprecipitation experiments upon transfection of protein pairs, or after introduction of these tags in the endogenous proteins through genome engineering. Endogenous protein tagging for absolute quantification provides a powerful extra dimension to protein analysis, allowing the detailed characterization of endogenous proteins. PMID:27264994

  4. A method for the 32P labeling of peptides or peptide nucleic acid oligomers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kozlov, I. A.; Nielsen, P. E.; Orgel, L. E.; Bada, J. L. (Principal Investigator)

    1998-01-01

    A novel approach to the radioactive labeling of peptides and PNA oligomers is described. It is based on the conjugation of a deoxynucleoside 3'-phosphate with the terminal amine of the substrate, followed by phosphorylation of the 5'-hydroxyl group of the nucleotide using T4 polynucleotide kinase and [gamma-32P]ATP.

  5. Design of an epitope-based peptide vaccine against spike protein of human coronavirus: an in silico approach

    PubMed Central

    Oany, Arafat Rahman; Emran, Abdullah-Al; Jyoti, Tahmina Pervin

    2014-01-01

    Human coronavirus (HCoV), a member of Coronaviridae family, is the causative agent of upper respiratory tract infections and “atypical pneumonia”. Despite severe epidemic outbreaks on several occasions and lack of antiviral drug, not much progress has been made with regard to an epitope-based vaccine designed for HCoV. In this study, a computational approach was adopted to identify a multiepitope vaccine candidate against this virus that could be suitable to trigger a significant immune response. Sequences of the spike proteins were collected from a protein database and analyzed with an in silico tool, to identify the most immunogenic protein. Both T cell immunity and B cell immunity were checked for the peptides to ensure that they had the capacity to induce both humoral and cell-mediated immunity. The peptide sequence from 88–94 amino acids and the sequence KSSTGFVYF were found as the most potential B cell and T cell epitopes, respectively. Furthermore, conservancy analysis was also done using in silico tools and showed a conservancy of 64.29% for all epitopes. The peptide sequence could interact with as many as 16 human leukocyte antigens (HLAs) and showed high cumulative population coverage, ranging from 75.68% to 90.73%. The epitope was further tested for binding against the HLA molecules, using in silico docking techniques, to verify the binding cleft epitope interaction. The allergenicity of the epitopes was also evaluated. This computational study of design of an epitope-based peptide vaccine against HCoVs allows us to determine novel peptide antigen targets in spike proteins on intuitive grounds, albeit the preliminary results thereof require validation by in vitro and in vivo experiments. PMID:25187696

  6. Biological activities of a synthetic peptide composed of two unlinked domains from a retroviral transmembrane protein sequence.

    PubMed Central

    Wegemer, D E; Kabat, K G; Kloetzer, W S

    1990-01-01

    We report several biological activities of a synthetic peptide whose sequence contains the highly conserved region of feline leukemia virus transmembrane protein (TM) synthetically linked to another short TM-derived sequence particularly rich in polar positive residues. This 29-amino-acid peptide blocked [3H]thymidine uptake 30 to 50% by concanavalin A-stimulated CD4(+)--but not CD8(+)-enriched murine splenocytes. Maximal suppression was detected at 12.5 micrograms (3 microM) to 75 micrograms (19 microM) per ml of growth medium; stimulation of [3H]thymidine uptake was observed at higher peptide concentrations. The synthetic peptide inhibited but did not stimulate [3H]thymidine uptake by mitogen-activated thymocytes and antibody production by splenocytes as determined in a liquid hemolytic plaque assay. Similarities are reported between a consensus sequence of diverse retroviral TMs and a region of alpha interferons shown by others to be important for antiviral and cytostatic properties. The TM sequence-derived synthetic peptide blocked in a nontoxic and sequence-specific manner the release of murine leukemia virus from two chronically infected cell lines. We suggest that some of the biological effects of retroviral TM are mediated through a common pathway shared with alpha interferons. Images PMID:1969500

  7. Electrostatic binding and hydrophobic collapse of peptide-nucleic acid aggregates quantified using force spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Camunas-Soler, Joan; Frutos, Silvia; Bizarro, Cristiano V; de Lorenzo, Sara; Fuentes-Perez, Maria Eugenia; Ramsch, Roland; Vilchez, Susana; Solans, Conxita; Moreno-Herrero, Fernando; Albericio, Fernando; Eritja, Ramón; Giralt, Ernest; Dev, Sukhendu B; Ritort, Felix

    2013-06-25

    Knowledge of the mechanisms of interaction between self-aggregating peptides and nucleic acids or other polyanions is key to the understanding of many aggregation processes underlying several human diseases (e.g., Alzheimer's and Parkinson's diseases). Determining the affinity and kinetic steps of such interactions is challenging due to the competition between hydrophobic self-aggregating forces and electrostatic binding forces. Kahalalide F (KF) is an anticancer hydrophobic peptide that contains a single positive charge that confers strong aggregative properties with polyanions. This makes KF an ideal model to elucidate the mechanisms by which self-aggregation competes with binding to a strongly charged polyelectrolyte such as DNA. We use optical tweezers to apply mechanical forces to single DNA molecules and show that KF and DNA interact in a two-step kinetic process promoted by the electrostatic binding of DNA to the aggregate surface followed by the stabilization of the complex due to hydrophobic interactions. From the measured pulling curves we determine the spectrum of binding affinities, kinetic barriers, and lengths of DNA segments sequestered within the KF-DNA complex. We find there is a capture distance beyond which the complex collapses into compact aggregates stabilized by strong hydrophobic forces and discuss how the bending rigidity of the nucleic acid affects this process. We hypothesize that within an in vivo context, the enhanced electrostatic interaction of KF due to its aggregation might mediate the binding to other polyanions. The proposed methodology should be useful to quantitatively characterize other compounds or proteins in which the formation of aggregates is relevant. PMID:23706043

  8. Site-Specific Characterization of d-Amino Acid Containing Peptide Epimers by Ion Mobility Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Traditionally, the d-amino acid containing peptide (DAACP) candidate can be discovered by observing the differences of biological activity and chromatographic retention time between the synthetic peptides and naturally occurring peptides. However, it is difficult to determine the exact position of d-amino acid in the DAACP candidates. Herein, we developed a novel site-specific strategy to rapidly and precisely localize d-amino acids in peptides by ion mobility spectrometry (IMS) analysis of mass spectrometry (MS)-generated epimeric fragment ions. Briefly, the d/l-peptide epimers were separated by online reversed-phase liquid chromatography and fragmented by collision-induced dissociation (CID), followed by IMS analysis. The epimeric fragment ions resulting from d/l-peptide epimers exhibit conformational differences, thus showing different mobilities in IMS. The arrival time shift between the epimeric fragment ions was used as criteria to localize the d-amino acid substitution. The utility of this strategy was demonstrated by analysis of peptide epimers with different molecular sizes, [d-Trp]-melanocyte-stimulating hormone, [d-Ala]-deltorphin, [d-Phe]-achatin-I, and their counterparts that contain all-l amino acids. Furthermore, the crustacean hyperglycemia hormones (CHHs, 8.5 kDa) were isolated from the American lobster Homarus americanus and identified by integration of MS-based bottom-up and top-down sequencing approaches. The IMS data acquired using our novel site-specific strategy localized the site of isomerization of l- to d-Phe at the third residue of the CHHs from the N-terminus. Collectively, this study demonstrates a new method for discovery of DAACPs using IMS technique with the ability to localize d-amino acid residues. PMID:24328107

  9. Partial Molecular Characterization of Arctium minus Aspartylendopeptidase and Preparation of Bioactive Peptides by Whey Protein Hydrolysis.

    PubMed

    Cimino, Cecilia V; Colombo, María Laura; Liggieri, Constanza; Bruno, Mariela; Vairo-Cavalli, Sandra

    2015-08-01

    In this article, we report the cloning of an aspartic protease (AP) from flowers of Arctium minus (Hill) Bernh. (Asteraceae) along with the use of depigmented aqueous flower extracts, as a source of APs, for