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Sample records for acids peptides proteins

  1. BIOACTIVE PROTEINS, PEPTIDES, AND AMINO ACIDS FROM MACROALGAE(1).

    PubMed

    Harnedy, Pádraigín A; FitzGerald, Richard J

    2011-04-01

    Macroalgae are a diverse group of marine organisms that have developed complex and unique metabolic pathways to ensure survival in highly competitive marine environments. As a result, these organisms have been targeted for mining of natural biologically active components. The exploration of marine organisms has revealed numerous bioactive compounds that are proteinaceous in nature. These include proteins, linear peptides, cyclic peptides and depsipeptides, peptide derivatives, amino acids, and amino acid-like components. Furthermore, some species of macroalgae have been shown to contain significant levels of protein. While some protein-derived bioactive peptides have been characterized from macroalgae, macroalgal proteins currently still represent good candidate raw materials for biofunctional peptide mining. This review will provide an overview of the important bioactive amino-acid-containing compounds that have been identified in macroalgae. Moreover, the potential of macroalgal proteins as substrates for the generation of biofunctional peptides for utilization as functional foods to provide specific health benefits will be discussed.

  2. Peptide nucleic acid probe for protein affinity purification based on biotin-streptavidin interaction and peptide nucleic acid strand hybridization.

    PubMed

    Tse, Jenny; Wang, Yuanyuan; Zengeya, Thomas; Rozners, Eriks; Tan-Wilson, Anna

    2015-02-01

    We describe a new method for protein affinity purification that capitalizes on the high affinity of streptavidin for biotin but does not require dissociation of the biotin-streptavidin complex for protein retrieval. Conventional reagents place both the selectively reacting group (the "warhead") and the biotin on the same molecule. We place the warhead and the biotin on separate molecules, each linked to a short strand of peptide nucleic acid (PNA), synthetic polymers that use the same bases as DNA but attached to a backbone that is resistant to attack by proteases and nucleases. As in DNA, PNA strands with complementary base sequences hybridize. In conditions that favor PNA duplex formation, the warhead strand (carrying the tagged protein) and the biotin strand form a complex that is held onto immobilized streptavidin. As in DNA, the PNA duplex dissociates at moderately elevated temperature; therefore, retrieval of the tagged protein is accomplished by a brief exposure to heat. Using iodoacetate as the warhead, 8-base PNA strands, biotin, and streptavidin-coated magnetic beads, we demonstrate retrieval of the cysteine protease papain. We were also able to use our iodoacetyl-PNA:PNA-biotin probe for retrieval and identification of a thiol reductase and a glutathione transferase from soybean seedling cotyledons.

  3. Assessing the Chemical Accuracy of Protein Structures via Peptide Acidity

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Janet S.; Hernández, Griselda; LeMaster, David M.

    2012-01-01

    Although the protein native state is a Boltzmann conformational ensemble, practical applications often require a representative model from the most populated region of that distribution. The acidity of the backbone amides, as reflected in hydrogen exchange rates, is exquisitely sensitive to the surrounding charge and dielectric volume distribution. For each of four proteins, three independently determined X-ray structures of differing crystallographic resolution were used to predict exchange for the static solvent-exposed amide hydrogens. The average correlation coefficients range from 0.74 for ubiquitin to 0.93 for Pyrococcus furiosus rubredoxin, reflecting the larger range of experimental exchange rates exhibited by the latter protein. The exchange prediction errors modestly correlate with the crystallographic resolution. MODELLER 9v6-derived homology models at ~60% sequence identity (36% identity for chymotrypsin inhibitor CI2) yielded correlation coefficients that are ~0.1 smaller than for the cognate X-ray structures. The most recently deposited NOE-based ubiquitin structure and the original NMR structure of CI2 fail to provide statistically significant predictions of hydrogen exchange. However, the more recent RECOORD refinement study of CI2 yielded predictions comparable to the X-ray and homology model-based analyses. PMID:23182463

  4. Release of free amino acids upon oxidation of peptides and proteins by hydroxyl radicals.

    PubMed

    Liu, Fobang; Lai, Senchao; Tong, Haijie; Lakey, Pascale S J; Shiraiwa, Manabu; Weller, Michael G; Pöschl, Ulrich; Kampf, Christopher J

    2017-03-01

    Hydroxyl radical-induced oxidation of proteins and peptides can lead to the cleavage of the peptide, leading to a release of fragments. Here, we used high-performance liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (HPLC-MS/MS) and pre-column online ortho-phthalaldehyde (OPA) derivatization-based amino acid analysis by HPLC with diode array detection and fluorescence detection to identify and quantify free amino acids released upon oxidation of proteins and peptides by hydroxyl radicals. Bovine serum albumin (BSA), ovalbumin (OVA) as model proteins, and synthetic tripeptides (comprised of varying compositions of the amino acids Gly, Ala, Ser, and Met) were used for reactions with hydroxyl radicals, which were generated by the Fenton reaction of iron ions and hydrogen peroxide. The molar yields of free glycine, aspartic acid, asparagine, and alanine per peptide or protein varied between 4 and 55%. For protein oxidation reactions, the molar yields of Gly (∼32-55% for BSA, ∼10-21% for OVA) were substantially higher than those for the other identified amino acids (∼5-12% for BSA, ∼4-6% for OVA). Upon oxidation of tripeptides with Gly in C-terminal, mid-chain, or N-terminal positions, Gly was preferentially released when it was located at the C-terminal site. Overall, we observe evidence for a site-selective formation of free amino acids in the OH radical-induced oxidation of peptides and proteins, which may be due to a reaction pathway involving nitrogen-centered radicals.

  5. Applications of hydrophilic interaction chromatography to amino acids, peptides, and proteins.

    PubMed

    Periat, Aurélie; Krull, Ira S; Guillarme, Davy

    2015-02-01

    This review summarizes the recent advances in the analysis of amino acids, peptides, and proteins using hydrophilic interaction chromatography. Various reports demonstrate the successful analysis of amino acids under such conditions. However, a baseline resolution of the 20 natural amino acids has not yet been published and for this reason, there is often a need to use mass spectrometry for detection to further improve selectivity. Hydrophilic interaction chromatography is also recognized as a powerful technique for peptide analysis, and there are a lot of papers showing its applicability for proteomic applications (peptide mapping). It is expected that its use for peptide mapping will continue to grow in the future, particularly because this analytical strategy can be combined with reversed-phase liquid chromatography, in a two-dimensional setup, to reach very high resolving power. Finally, the interest in hydrophilic interaction chromatography for intact proteins analysis is less evident due to possible solubility issues and a lack of suitable hydrophilic interaction chromatography stationary phases. To date, it has been successfully employed only for the characterization of membrane proteins, histones, and the separation of glycosylated isoforms of an intact glycoprotein. From our point of view, the number of hydrophilic interaction chromatography columns compatible with intact proteins (higher upper temperature limit, large pore size, etc.) is still too limited.

  6. Site-Specific Pyrolysis Induced Cleavage at Aspartic Acid Residue in Peptides and Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Shaofeng; Basile, Franco

    2011-01-01

    A simple and site-specific non-enzymatic method based on pyrolysis has been developed to cleave peptides and proteins. Pyrolytic cleavage was found to be specific and rapid as it induced a cleavage at the C-terminal side of aspartic acid in the temperature range of 220–250 °C in 10 seconds. Electrospray Ionization (ESI) mass spectrometry (MS) and tandem-MS (MS/MS) were used to characterize and identify pyrolysis cleavage products, confirming that sequence information is conserved after the pyrolysis process in both peptides and protein tested. This suggests that pyrolysis-induced cleavage at aspartyl residues can be used as a rapid protein digestion procedure for the generation of sequence specific protein biomarkers. PMID:17388620

  7. Entropy reduction in unfolded peptides (and proteins) due to conformational preferences of amino acid residues.

    PubMed

    Schweitzer-Stenner, Reinhard; Toal, Siobhan E

    2014-11-07

    As established by several groups over the last 20 years, amino acid residues in unfolded peptides and proteins do not exhibit the unspecific random distribution as assumed by the classical random coil model. Individual amino acid residues in small peptides were found to exhibit different conformational preferences. Here, we utilize recently obtained conformational distributions of guest amino acid residues in GxG peptides to estimate their conformational entropy, which we find to be significantly lower than the entropy of an assumed random coil like distribution. Only at high temperature do backbone entropies approach random coil like values. We utilized the obtained backbone entropies of the investigated amino acid residues to estimate the loss of conformational entropy caused by a coil → helix transition and identified two subsets of amino acid residues for which the thus calculated entropy losses correlate well with the respective Gibbs energy of helix formation obtained for alanine based host-guest systems. Calculated and experimentally derived entropic losses were found to be in good agreement. For most of the amino acid residues investigated entropic losses derived from our GxG distributions correlate very well with corresponding values recently obtained from MD simulations biased by conformational propensities derived from truncated coil libraries. Both, conformational entropy and the entropy of solvation exhibit a strong, residue specific temperature dependence, which can be expected to substantially affect the stability of unfolded states. Altogether, our results provide strong evidence for the notion that conformational preferences of amino acid residues matter with regard to the thermodynamics of peptide and protein folding.

  8. Lactobacillus gasseri requires peptides, not proteins or free amino acids, for growth in milk.

    PubMed

    Arakawa, K; Matsunaga, K; Takihiro, S; Moritoki, A; Ryuto, S; Kawai, Y; Masuda, T; Miyamoto, T

    2015-03-01

    Lactobacillus gasseri is a widespread commensal lactic acid bacterium inhabiting human mucosal niches and has many beneficial effects as a probiotic. However, L. gasseri is difficult to grow in milk, which hurts usability for the food industry. It had been previously reported that supplementation with yeast extract or proteose peptone, including peptides, enables L. gasseri to grow well in milk. In this study, our objective was to confirm peptide requirement of L. gasseri and evaluate efficacy of peptide release by enzymatic proteolysis on growth of L. gassei in milk. Three strains of L. gasseri did not grow well in modified DeMan, Rogosa, Sharpe broth without any nitrogen sources (MRS-N), but addition of a casein-derived peptide mixture, tryptone, promoted growth. In contrast, little effect was observed after adding casein or a casein-derived amino acid mixture, casamino acids. These results indicate that L. gasseri requires peptides, not proteins or free amino acids, among milk-derived nitrogen sources for growth. Lactobacillus gasseri JCM 1131T hardly had growth capacity in 6 kinds of milk-based media: bovine milk, human milk, skim milk, cheese whey, modified MRS-N (MRSL-N) supplemented with acid whey, and MRSL-N supplemented with casein. Moreover, treatment with digestive proteases, particularly pepsin, to release peptides made it grow well in each milk-based medium. The pepsin treatment was the most effective for growth of strain JCM 1131T in skim milk among the tested food-grade proteases such as trypsin, α-chymotrypsin, calf rennet, ficin, bromelain, and papain. As well as strain JCM 1131T, pepsinolysis of milk improved growth of other L. gasseri strains and some strains of enteric lactobacilli such as Lactobacillus crispatus, Lactobacillus gallinarum, Lactobacillus johnsonii, and Lactobacillus reuteri. These results suggest that some relatives of L. gasseri also use peptides as desirable nitrogen sources, and that milk may be a good supplier of nutritious

  9. Radiation chemistry of amino acids, peptides and proteins in relation to the radiation sterilization of high-protein foods

    SciTech Connect

    Garrison, W. M.

    1981-12-01

    An important source of information on the question of whether or not toxic or other deleterious substances are formed in the radiation sterilization of foods is the chemical study of reaction products and reaction mechanisms in the radiolysis of individual food components. The present evaluation of the radiation chemistry of amino acids, peptides, and proteins outlines the various radiation-induced processes which lead to amino acid degradation and to the synthesis of amino acid derivatives of higher molecular weight. Among the latter are the ..cap alpha..,..cap alpha..'-diamino dicarboxylic acids which are formed as major products in the radiolysis of peptides both in aqueous solution and in the solid state. The ..cap alpha..,..cap alpha..'-diamino acids are of particular interest as irradiation products because they represent a class of compounds not normally encountered in plant and animal protein sources. Such compounds have, however, been isolated from certain types of bacteria and bacterial products. All of the available data strongly suggest that the ..cap alpha..,..cap alpha..'-diamino acids are produced in significant yield in the radiation sterilization of high protein foods. The importance of initiating extensive chemical and biological studies of these and of other high molecular weight products in irradiated food is emphasized.

  10. Radiolytic Modification of Sulfur Containing Acidic Amino Residues in Model Peptides: Fundamental Studies for Protein Footprinting

    SciTech Connect

    Xu,G.; Chance, M.

    2005-01-01

    Protein footprinting based on hydroxyl radical-mediated modification and quantitative mass spectroscopic analysis is a proven technique for examining protein structure, protein-ligand interactions, and structural allostery upon protein complex formation. The reactive and solvent-accessible amino acid side chains function as structural probes; however, correct structural analysis depends on the identification and quantification of all the relevant oxidative modifications within the protein sequence. Sulfur-containing amino acids are oxidized readily and the mechanisms of oxidation are particularly complex, although they have been extensively investigated by EPR and other spectroscopic methods. Here we have undertaken a detailed mass spectrometry study (using electrospray ionization mass spectrometry and tandem mass spectrometry) of model peptides containing cysteine (Cys-SH), cystine (disulfide bonded Cys), and methionine after oxidation using {gamma}-rays or synchrotron X-rays and have compared these results to those expected from oxidation mechanisms proposed in the literature. Radiolysis of cysteine leads to cysteine sulfonic acid (+48 Da mass shift) and cystine as the major products; other minor products including cysteine sulfinic acid (+32 Da mass shift) and serine (-16 Da mass shift) are observed. Radiolysis of cystine results in the oxidative opening of the disulfide bond and generation of cysteine sulfonic acid and sulfinic acid; however, the rate of oxidation is significantly less than that for cysteine. Radiolysis of methionine gives rise primarily to methionine sulfoxide (+16 Da mass shift); this can be further oxidized to methionine sulfone (+32 Da mass shift) or another product with a -32 Da mass shift likely due to aldehyde formation at the {gamma}-carbon. Due to the high reactivity of sulfur-containing amino acids, the extent of oxidation is easily influenced by secondary oxidation events or the presence of redox reagents used in standard proteolytic

  11. Influence of the yeast strain on the changes of the amino acids, peptides and proteins during sparkling wine production by the traditional method.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Rodríguez, A J; Carrascosa, A V; Martín-Alvarez, P J; Moreno-Arribas, V; Polo, M C

    2002-12-01

    The influence of five yeast strains on the nitrogen fractions, amino acids, peptides and proteins, during 12 months of aging of sparkling wines produced by the traditional or Champenoise method, was studied. High-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) techniques were used for analysis of the amino acid and peptide fractions. Proteins plus polypeptides were determined by the colorimetric Bradford method. Four main stages were detected in the aging of wines with yeast. In the first stage, a second fermentation took place; amino acids and proteins plus polypeptides diminished, and peptides were liberated. In the second stage, there was a release of amino acids and proteins, and peptides were degraded. In the third stage, the release of proteins and peptides predominated. In the fourth stage, the amino acid concentration diminished. The yeast strain used influenced the content of free amino acids and peptides and the aging time in all the nitrogen fractions.

  12. Disrupting Protein Expression with Peptide Nucleic Acids Reduces Infection by Obligate Intracellular Rickettsia

    PubMed Central

    Pelc, Rebecca S.; McClure, Jennifer C.; Kaur, Simran J.; Sears, Khandra T.; Rahman, M. Sayeedur; Ceraul, Shane M.

    2015-01-01

    Peptide Nucleic Acids (PNAs) are single-stranded synthetic nucleic acids with a pseudopeptide backbone in lieu of the phosphodiester linked sugar and phosphate found in traditional oligos. PNA designed complementary to the bacterial Shine-Dalgarno or start codon regions of mRNA disrupts translation resulting in the transient reduction in protein expression. This study examines the use of PNA technology to interrupt protein expression in obligate intracellular Rickettsia sp. Their historically intractable genetic system limits characterization of protein function. We designed PNA targeting mRNA for rOmpB from Rickettsia typhi and rickA from Rickettsia montanensis, ubiquitous factors important for infection. Using an in vitro translation system and competitive binding assays, we determined that our PNAs bind target regions. Electroporation of R. typhi and R. montanensis with PNA specific to rOmpB and rickA, respectively, reduced the bacteria’s ability to infect host cells. These studies open the possibility of using PNA to suppress protein synthesis in obligate intracellular bacteria. PMID:25781160

  13. Synthetic Peptides as Protein Mimics

    PubMed Central

    Groß, Andrea; Hashimoto, Chie; Sticht, Heinrich; Eichler, Jutta

    2016-01-01

    The design and generation of molecules capable of mimicking the binding and/or functional sites of proteins represents a promising strategy for the exploration and modulation of protein function through controlled interference with the underlying molecular interactions. Synthetic peptides have proven an excellent type of molecule for the mimicry of protein sites because such peptides can be generated as exact copies of protein fragments, as well as in diverse chemical modifications, which includes the incorporation of a large range of non-proteinogenic amino acids as well as the modification of the peptide backbone. Apart from extending the chemical and structural diversity presented by peptides, such modifications also increase the proteolytic stability of the molecules, enhancing their utility for biological applications. This article reviews recent advances by this and other laboratories in the use of synthetic protein mimics to modulate protein function, as well as to provide building blocks for synthetic biology. PMID:26835447

  14. Progress in nanoparticulate systems for peptide, proteins and nucleic acid drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Slomkowski, Stanislaw; Gosecki, Mateusz

    2011-11-01

    Progress in many therapies, in particular in the therapies based on peptides, proteins and nucleic acids used as bioactive compounds, strongly depends on development of appropriate carriers which would be suitable for controlled delivery of the intact abovementioned compounds to required tissues, cells and intracellular compartments. This review presents last ten years' achievements and problems in development and application of synthetic polymer nanoparticulate carriers for oral, pulmonary and nasal delivery routes of oligopeptides and proteins. Whereas some traditional synthetic polymer carriers are only briefly recalled the main attention is concentrated on nanoparticles produced from functional copolymers mostly with hydroxyl, carboxyl and amino groups, suitable for immobilization of targeting moieties and for assuring prolonged circulation of nanoparticles in blood. Formulations of various nanoparticulate systems are described, including solid particles, polymer micelles, nanovesicles and nanogels, especially systems allowing drug release induced by external stimuli. Discussed are properties of these species, in particular stability in buffers and models of body fluids, loading with drugs and with drug models, drug release processes and results of biological studies. There are also discussed systems for gene delivery with special attention devoted to polymers suitable for compacting nucleic acids into nanoparticles as well as the relations between chemical structure of polymer carriers and ability of the latter for crossing cell membranes and for endosomal escape.

  15. An active twenty-amino-acid-residue peptide derived from the inhibitor protein of the cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase.

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, H C; van Patten, S M; Smith, A J; Walsh, D A

    1985-01-01

    Digestion with Staphylococcus aureus V8 proteinase of the inhibitor protein of the cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase results in the sequential formation of three active inhibitory peptides. The smallest active peptide has the sequence Thr-Thr-Tyr-Ala-Asp-Phe-Ile-Ala-Ser-Gly-Arg-Thr-Gly-Arg-Arg-Asn-Ala-Ile- His-Asp . This 20-amino-acid-residue peptide has 20-40% of the activity of the native molecule and a Ki of 0.2 nM. Inhibition, as a minimum, appears to be based upon the inhibitor protein containing the recognition sequences that dictate protein-substrate-specificity. This inhibitory peptide also has sequence homology with the phosphorylation site for a protein kinase other than the cyclic AMP-dependent enzyme. PMID:3000357

  16. Isoelectric focusing of proteins and peptides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Egen, N.

    1979-01-01

    Egg-white solution was chosen as the reference solution in order to assess the effects of operational parameters (voltage, flow rate, ampholine pH range and concentration, and protein concentration) of the RIEF apparatus on protein resolution. Topics of discussion include: (1) comparison of RIEF apparatus to conventional IEF techniques (column and PAG) with respect to resolution and throughput; (2) peptide and protein separation (AHF, Thymosin - Fraction 5, vasoactive peptide, L-asparaginase and ACP); and (3) detection of peptides - dansyl derivatives of amino acids and peptides, post-focusing fluorescent labeling of amino acids, peptides and proteins, and ampholine extraction from focused gels.

  17. Peptide Conformer Acidity Analysis of Protein Flexibility Monitored by Hydrogen Exchange†

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    The amide hydrogens that are exposed to solvent in the high-resolution X-ray structures of ubiquitin, FK506-binding protein, chymotrypsin inhibitor 2, and rubredoxin span a billion-fold range in hydroxide-catalyzed exchange rates which are predictable by continuum dielectric methods. To facilitate analysis of transiently accessible amides, the hydroxide-catalyzed rate constants for every backbone amide of ubiquitin were determined under near physiological conditions. With the previously reported NMR-restrained molecular dynamics ensembles of ubiquitin (PDB codes 2NR2 and 2K39) used as representations of the Boltzmann-weighted conformational distribution, nearly all of the exchange rates for the highly exposed amides were more accurately predicted than by use of the high-resolution X-ray structure. More strikingly, predictions for the amide hydrogens of the NMR relaxation-restrained ensemble that become exposed to solvent in more than one but less than half of the 144 protein conformations in this ensemble were almost as accurate. In marked contrast, the exchange rates for many of the analogous amides in the residual dipolar coupling-restrained ubiquitin ensemble are substantially overestimated, as was particularly evident for the Ile 44 to Lys 48 segment which constitutes the primary interaction site for the proteasome targeting enzymes involved in polyubiquitylation. For both ensembles, “excited state” conformers in this active site region having markedly elevated peptide acidities are represented at a population level that is 102 to 103 above what can exist in the Boltzmann distribution of protein conformations. These results indicate how a chemically consistent interpretation of amide hydrogen exchange can provide insight into both the population and the detailed structure of transient protein conformations. PMID:19722680

  18. Design of protease-resistant myelin basic protein-derived peptides by cleavage site directed amino acid substitutions.

    PubMed

    Burster, Timo; Marin-Esteban, Viviana; Boehm, Bernhard O; Dunn, Shannon; Rotzschke, Olaf; Falk, Kirsten; Weber, Ekkehard; Verhelst, Steven H L; Kalbacher, Hubert; Driessen, Christoph

    2007-11-15

    Multiple Sclerosis (MS) is considered to be a T cell-mediated autoimmune disease. An attractive strategy to prevent activation of autoaggressive T cells in MS, is the use of altered peptide ligands (APL), which bind to major histocompatibility complex class II (MHC II) molecules. To be of clinical use, APL must be capable of resisting hostile environments including the proteolytic machinery of antigen presenting cells (APC). The current design of APL relies on cost- and labour-intensive strategies. To overcome these major drawbacks, we used a deductive approach which involved modifying proteolytic cleavage sites in APL. Cleavage site-directed amino acid substitution of the autoantigen myelin basic protein (MBP) resulted in lysosomal protease-resistant, high-affinity binding peptides. In addition, these peptides mitigated T cell activation in a similar fashion as conventional APL. The strategy outlined allows the development of protease-resistant APL and provides a universal design strategy to improve peptide-based immunotherapeutics.

  19. Peptides and proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Bachovchin, W.W.; Unkefer, C.J.

    1994-12-01

    Advances in magnetic resonance and vibrational spectroscopy make it possible to derive detailed structural information about biomolecular structures in solution. These techniques are critically dependent on the availability of labeled compounds. For example, NMR techniques used today to derive peptide and protein structures require uniformity {sup 13}C-and {sup 15}N-labeled samples that are derived biosynthetically from (U-6-{sup 13}C) glucose. These experiments are possible now because, during the 1970s, the National Stable Isotope Resource developed algal methods for producing (U-6-{sup 13}C) glucose. If NMR techniques are to be used to study larger proteins, we will need sophisticated labelling patterns in amino acids that employ a combination of {sup 2}H, {sup 13}C, and {sup 15}N labeling. The availability of these specifically labeled amino acids requires a renewed investment in new methods for chemical synthesis of labeled amino acids. The development of new magnetic resonance or vibrational techniques to elucidate biomolecular structure will be seriously impeded if we do not see rapid progress in labeling technology. Investment in labeling chemistry is as important as investment in the development of advanced spectroscopic tools.

  20. Self-assembled multicompartment liquid crystalline lipid carriers for protein, peptide, and nucleic acid drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Angelova, Angelina; Angelov, Borislav; Mutafchieva, Rada; Lesieur, Sylviane; Couvreur, Patrick

    2011-02-15

    Lipids and lipopolymers self-assembled into biocompatible nano- and mesostructured functional materials offer many potential applications in medicine and diagnostics. In this Account, we demonstrate how high-resolution structural investigations of bicontinuous cubic templates made from lyotropic thermosensitive liquid-crystalline (LC) materials have initiated the development of innovative lipidopolymeric self-assembled nanocarriers. Such structures have tunable nanochannel sizes, morphologies, and hierarchical inner organizations and provide potential vehicles for the predictable loading and release of therapeutic proteins, peptides, or nucleic acids. This Account shows that structural studies of swelling of bicontinuous cubic lipid/water phases are essential for overcoming the nanoscale constraints for encapsulation of large therapeutic molecules in multicompartment lipid carriers. For the systems described here, we have employed time-resolved small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) and high-resolution freeze-fracture electronic microscopy (FF-EM) to study the morphology and the dynamic topological transitions of these nanostructured multicomponent amphiphilic assemblies. Quasi-elastic light scattering and circular dichroism spectroscopy can provide additional information at the nanoscale about the behavior of lipid/protein self-assemblies under conditions that approximate physiological hydration. We wanted to generalize these findings to control the stability and the hydration of the water nanochannels in liquid-crystalline lipid nanovehicles and confine therapeutic biomolecules within these structures. Therefore we analyzed the influence of amphiphilic and soluble additives (e.g. poly(ethylene glycol)monooleate (MO-PEG), octyl glucoside (OG), proteins) on the nanochannels' size in a diamond (D)-type bicontinuous cubic phase of the lipid glycerol monooleate (MO). At body temperature, we can stabilize long-living swollen states, corresponding to a diamond cubic phase

  1. A bottom-up approach to build the hyperpolarizability of peptides and proteins from their amino acids.

    PubMed

    Duboisset, Julien; Deniset-Besseau, Ariane; Benichou, Emmanuel; Russier-Antoine, Isabelle; Lascoux, Noelle; Jonin, Christian; Hache, François; Schanne-Klein, Marie-Claire; Brevet, Pierre-François

    2013-08-29

    We experimentally demonstrate that some peptides and proteins lend themselves to an elementary analysis where their first hyperpolarizability can be decomposed into the coherent superposition of the first hyperpolarizability of their elementary units. We then show that those elementary units can be associated with the amino acids themselves in the case of nonaromatic amino acids and nonresonant second harmonic generation. As a case study, this work investigates the experimentally determined first hyperpolarizability of rat tail Type I collagen and compares it to that of the shorter peptide [(PPG)10]3, where P and G are the one-letter code for Proline and Glycine, respectively, and that of the triamino acid peptides PPG and GGG. An absolute value of (0.16 ± 0.01) × 10(-30) esu for the first hyperpolarizability of nonaromatic amino acids is then obtained by using the newly defined 0.087 × 10(-30) esu reference value for water. By using a collagen like model, the microscopic hyperpolarizability along the peptide bond can be evaluated at (0.7 ± 0.1) × 10(-30) esu.

  2. A Double-Chambered Protein Nanocage Loaded with Thrombin Receptor Agonist Peptide (TRAP) and γ-Carboxyglutamic Acid of Protein C (PC-Gla) for Sepsis Treatment.

    PubMed

    Lee, Wonhwa; Seo, Junyoung; Kwak, Soyoung; Park, Eun Ji; Na, Dong Hee; Kim, Soyoun; Lee, You Mie; Kim, In-San; Bae, Jong-Sup

    2015-11-01

    New protein nanocages are designed bearing two functional proteins, γ-carboxyglutamic acid of protein C (PC-Gla) and thrombin receptor agonist peptide (TRAP), and have an anti-septic response. These nanoparticles reduce sepsis-induced organ injury and septic mortality in vivo. Noting that there are currently no medications for severe sepsis, these results show that novel nanoparticles can be used to treat sepsis.

  3. Tri-peptide reference structures for the calculation of relative solvent accessible surface area in protein amino acid residues.

    PubMed

    Topham, Christopher M; Smith, Jeremy C

    2015-02-01

    Relative amino acid residue solvent accessibility values allow the quantitative comparison of atomic solvent-accessible surface areas in different residue types and physical environments in proteins and in protein structural alignments. Geometry-optimised tri-peptide structures in extended solvent-exposed reference conformations have been obtained for 43 amino acid residue types at a high level of quantum chemical theory. Significant increases in side-chain solvent accessibility, offset by reductions in main-chain atom solvent exposure, were observed for standard residue types in partially geometry-optimised structures when compared to non-minimised models built from identical sets of proper dihedral angles abstracted from the literature. Optimisation of proper dihedral angles led most notably to marked increases of up to 54% in proline main-chain atom solvent accessibility compared to literature values. Similar effects were observed for fully-optimised tri-peptides in implicit solvent. The relief of internal strain energy was associated with systematic variation in N, C(α) and C(β) atom solvent accessibility across all standard residue types. The results underline the importance of optimisation of 'hard' degrees of freedom (bond lengths and valence bond angles) and improper dihedral angle values from force field or other context-independent reference values, and impact on the use of standardised fixed internal co-ordinate geometry in sampling approaches to the determination of absolute values of protein amino acid residue solvent accessibility. Quantum chemical methods provide a useful and accurate alternative to molecular mechanics methods to perform energy minimisation of peptides containing non-standard (chemically modified) amino acid residues frequently present in experimental protein structure data sets, for which force field parameters may not be available. Reference tri-peptide atomic co-ordinate sets including hydrogen atoms are made freely available.

  4. Carbohydrates in peptide and protein design.

    PubMed

    Jensen, Knud J; Brask, Jesper

    2005-01-01

    Monosaccharides and amino acids are fundamental building blocks in the assembly of nature's polymers. They have different structural aspects and, to a significant extent, different functional groups. Oligomerization gives rise to oligosaccharides and peptides, respectively. While carbohydrates and peptides can be found conjoined in nature, e.g., in glycopeptides, the aim of this review is the radical redesign of peptide structures using carbohydrates, particularly monosaccharides and cyclic oligosaccharides, to produce novel peptides, peptidomimetics, and abiotic proteins. These hybrid molecules, chimeras, have properties arising largely from the combination of structural characteristics of carbohydrates with the functional group diversity of peptides. This field includes de novo designed synthetic glycopeptides, sugar (carbohydrate) amino acids, carbohydrate scaffolds for nonpeptidal peptidomimetics of cyclic peptides, cyclodextrin functionalized peptides, and carboproteins, i.e., carbohydrate-based proteinmimetics. These successful applications demonstrate the general utility of carbohydrates in peptide and protein architecture.

  5. Purification and characterisation of a glutamic acid-containing peptide with calcium-binding capacity from whey protein hydrolysate.

    PubMed

    Huang, Shun-Li; Zhao, Li-Na; Cai, Xixi; Wang, Shao-Yun; Huang, Yi-Fan; Hong, Jing; Rao, Ping-Fan

    2015-02-01

    The bioavailability of dietary ionised calcium is affected by intestinal basic environment. Calcium-binding peptides can form complexes with calcium to improve its absorption and bioavailability. The aim of this study was focused on isolation and characterisation of a calcium-binding peptide from whey protein hydrolysates. Whey protein was hydrolysed using Flavourzyme and Protamex with substrate to enzyme ratio of 25:1 (w/w) at 49 °C for 7 h. The calcium-binding peptide was isolated by DEAE anion-exchange chromatography, Sephadex G-25 gel filtration and reversed phase high-performance liquid chromatography (RP-HPLC). A purified peptide of molecular mass 204 Da with strong calcium binding ability was identified on chromatography/electrospray ionisation (LC/ESI) tandem mass spectrum to be Glu-Gly (EG) after analysis and alignment in database. The calcium binding capacity of EG reached 67·81 μg/mg, and the amount increased by 95% compared with whey protein hydrolysate complex. The UV and infrared spectrometer analysis demonstrated that the principal sites of calcium-binding corresponded to the carboxyl groups and carbonyl groups of glutamic acid. In addition, the amino group and peptide amino are also the related groups in the interaction between EG and calcium ion. Meanwhile, the sequestered calcium percentage experiment has proved that EG-Ca is significantly more stable than CaCl2 in human gastrointestinal tract in vitro. The findings suggest that the purified dipeptide has the potential to be used as ion-binding ingredient in dietary supplements.

  6. Need for accurate and standardized determination of amino acids and bioactive peptides for evaluating protein quality and potential health effects of foods and dietary supplements.

    PubMed

    Gilani, G Sarwar; Xiao, Chaowu; Lee, Nora

    2008-01-01

    Accurate standardized methods for the determination of amino acid in foods are required to assess the nutritional safety and compositional adequacy of sole source foods such as infant formulas and enteral nutritionals, and protein and amino acid supplements and their hydrolysates, and to assess protein claims of foods. Protein digestibility-corrected amino acid score (PDCAAS), which requires information on amino acid composition, is the official method for assessing protein claims of foods and supplements sold in the United States. PDCAAS has also been adopted internationally as the most suitable method for routine evaluation of protein quality of foods by the Food and Agriculture Organization/World Health Organization. Standardized methods for analysis of amino acids by ion-exchange chromatography have been developed. However, there is a need to develop validated methods of amino acid analysis in foods using liquid chromatographic techniques, which have replaced ion-exchange methods for quantifying amino acids in most laboratories. Bioactive peptides from animal and plant proteins have been found to potentially impact human health. A wide range of physiological effects, including blood pressure-lowering effects, cholesterol-lowering ability, antithrombotic effects, enhancement of mineral absorption, and immunomodulatory effects have been described for bioactive peptides. There is considerable commercial interest in developing functional foods containing bioactive peptides. There is also a need to develop accurate standardized methods for the characterization (amino acid sequencing) and quantification of bioactive peptides and to carry out dose-response studies in animal models and clinical trials to assess safety, potential allergenicity, potential intolerance, and efficacy of bioactive peptides. Information from these studies is needed for determining the upper safe levels of bioactive peptides and as the basis for developing potential health claims for bioactive

  7. Amino acid sequences of peptides from a tryptic digest of a urea-soluble protein fraction (U.S.3) from oxidized wool

    PubMed Central

    Corfield, M. C.; Fletcher, J. C.; Robson, A.

    1967-01-01

    1. A tryptic digest of the protein fraction U.S.3 from oxidized wool has been separated into 32 peptide fractions by cation-exchange resin chromatography. 2. Most of these fractions have been resolved into their component peptides by a combination of the techniques of cation-exchange resin chromatography, paper chromatography and paper electrophoresis. 3. The amino acid compositions of 58 of the peptides in the digest present in the largest amounts have been determined. 4. The amino acid sequences of 38 of these have been completely elucidated and those of six others partially derived. 5. These findings indicate that the parent protein in wool from which the protein fraction U.S.3 is derived has a minimum molecular weight of 74000. 6. The structures of wool proteins are discussed in the light of the peptide sequences determined, and, in particular, of those sequences in fraction U.S.3 that could not be elucidated. PMID:16742497

  8. Analysis of peptide-protein binding using amino acid descriptors: prediction and experimental verification for human histocompatibility complex HLA-A0201.

    PubMed

    Guan, Pingping; Doytchinova, Irini A; Walshe, Valerie A; Borrow, Persephone; Flower, Darren R

    2005-11-17

    Amino acid descriptors are often used in quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) analysis of proteins and peptides. In the present study, descriptors were used to characterize peptides binding to the human MHC allele HLA-A0201. Two sets of amino acid descriptors were chosen: 93 descriptors taken from the amino acid descriptor database AAindex and the z descriptors defined by Wold and Sandberg. Variable selection techniques (SIMCA, genetic algorithm, and GOLPE) were applied to remove redundant descriptors. Our results indicate that QSAR models generated using five z descriptors had the highest predictivity and explained variance (q2 between 0.6 and 0.7 and r2 between 0.6 and 0.9). Further to the QSAR analysis, 15 peptides were synthesized and tested using a T2 stabilization assay. All peptides bound to HLA-A0201 well, and four peptides were identified as high-affinity binders.

  9. Overcoming the Refractory Expression of Secreted Recombinant Proteins in Mammalian Cells through Modification of the Signal Peptide and Adjacent Amino Acids

    PubMed Central

    Güler-Gane, Gülin; Kidd, Sara; Sridharan, Sudharsan; Vaughan, Tristan J.; Wilkinson, Trevor C. I.

    2016-01-01

    The expression and subsequent purification of mammalian recombinant proteins is of critical importance to many areas of biological science. To maintain the appropriate tertiary structure and post-translational modifications of such proteins, transient mammalian expression systems are often adopted. The successful utilisation of these systems is, however, not always forthcoming and some recombinant proteins prove refractory to expression in mammalian hosts. In this study we focussed on the role of different N-terminal signal peptides and residues immediately downstream, in influencing the level of secreted recombinant protein obtained from suspension HEK293 cells. Using secreted alkaline phosphatase (SEAP) as a model protein, we identified that the +1/+2 downstream residues flanking a heterologous signal peptide significantly affect secreted levels. By incorporating these findings we conducted a comparison of different signal peptide sequences and identified the most productive as secrecon, a computationally-designed sequence. Importantly, in the context of the secrecon signal peptide and SEAP, we also demonstrated a clear preference for specific amino acid residues at the +1 position (e.g. alanine), and a detrimental effect of others (cysteine, proline, tyrosine and glutamine). When proteins that naturally contain these “undesirable” residues at the +1 position were expressed with their native signal peptide, the heterologous secrecon signal peptide, or secrecon with an additional alanine at the +1 or +1 and +2 position, the level of expression differed significantly and in an unpredictable manner. For each protein, however, at least one of the panel of signal peptide/adjacent amino acid combinations enabled successful recombinant expression. In this study, we highlight the important interplay between a signal peptide and its adjacent amino acids in enabling protein expression, and we describe a strategy that could enable recombinant proteins that have so far

  10. Sum Frequency Generation Vibrational Spectroscopy of Adsorbed Amino Acids, Peptides and Proteins of Hydrophilic and Hydrophobic Solid-Water Interfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Holinga IV, George Joseph

    2010-09-01

    Sum frequency generation (SFG) vibrational spectroscopy was used to investigate the interfacial properties of several amino acids, peptides, and proteins adsorbed at the hydrophilic polystyrene solid-liquid and the hydrophobic silica solid-liquid interfaces. The influence of experimental geometry on the sensitivity and resolution of the SFG vibrational spectroscopy technique was investigated both theoretically and experimentally. SFG was implemented to investigate the adsorption and organization of eight individual amino acids at model hydrophilic and hydrophobic surfaces under physiological conditions. Biointerface studies were conducted using a combination of SFG and quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) comparing the interfacial structure and concentration of two amino acids and their corresponding homopeptides at two model liquid-solid interfaces as a function of their concentration in aqueous solutions. The influence of temperature, concentration, equilibration time, and electrical bias on the extent of adsorption and interfacial structure of biomolecules were explored at the liquid-solid interface via QCM and SFG. QCM was utilized to quantify the biological activity of heparin functionalized surfaces. A novel optical parametric amplifier was developed and utilized in SFG experiments to investigate the secondary structure of an adsorbed model peptide at the solid-liquid interface.

  11. Antihypertensive Peptides from Milk Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Jäkälä, Pauliina; Vapaatalo, Heikki

    2010-01-01

    Dietary proteins possess a wide range of nutritional and functional properties. They are used as a source of energy and amino acids, which are needed for growth and development. Many dietary proteins, especially milk proteins, contain physiologically active peptides encrypted in the protein sequence. These peptides may be released during gastrointestinal digestion or food processing and once liberated, cause different physiological functions. Milk-derived bioactive peptides are shown to have antihypertensive, antimicrobial, immunomodulatory, antioxidative and mineral-binding properties. During the fermentation of milk with certain lactobacilli, two interesting tripeptides Ile-Pro-Pro and Val-Pro-Pro are released from casein to the final product. These lactotripeptides have attenuated the development of hypertension in several animal models and lowered blood pressure in clinical studies. They inhibit ACE in vitro at micromolar concentrations, protect endothelial function in vitro and reduce arterial stiffness in humans. Thus, milk as a traditional food product can after certain processing serve as a functional food and carry specific health-promoting effects, providing an option to control blood pressure. PMID:27713251

  12. Biophysical and morphological studies on the dual interaction of non-octarepeat prion protein peptides with copper and nucleic acids.

    PubMed

    Chaves, Juliana A P; Sanchez-López, Carolina; Gomes, Mariana P B; Sisnande, Tháyna; Macedo, Bruno; de Oliveira, Vanessa End; Braga, Carolina A C; Rangel, Luciana P; Silva, Jerson L; Quintanar, Liliana; Cordeiro, Yraima

    2014-08-01

    Conversion of prion protein (PrP) to an altered conformer, the scrapie PrP (PrP(Sc)), is a critical step in the development of transmissible spongiform encephalopathies. Both Cu(II) and nucleic acid molecules have been implicated in this conversion. Full-length PrP can bind up to six copper ions; four Cu(II) binding sites are located in the octarepeat domain (residues 60-91), and His-96 and His-111 coordinate two additional copper ions. Experimental evidence shows that PrP binds different molecules, resulting in diverse cellular signaling events. However, there is little information about the interaction of macromolecular ligands with Cu(II)-bound PrP. Both RNA and DNA sequences can bind PrP, and this interaction results in reciprocal conformational changes. Here, we investigated the interaction of Cu(II) and nucleic acids with amyloidogenic non-octarepeat PrP peptide models (comprising human PrP residues 106-126 and hamster PrP residues 109-149) that retain His-111 as the copper-anchoring residue. The effect of Cu(II) and DNA or RNA sequences in the aggregation, conformation, and toxicity of PrP domains was investigated at low and neutral pH. Circular dichroism and EPR spectroscopy data indicate that interaction of the PrP peptides with Cu(II) and DNA occurs at pH 7. This dual interaction induces conformational changes in the peptides, modulating their aggregation, and affecting the morphology of the aggregated species, resulting in different cytotoxic effects. These results provide new insights into the role of Cu(II) and nucleic acid sequences in the structural conversion and aggregation of PrP, which are both critical events related to prion pathogenesis.

  13. Characterizing hydrophobicity of amino acid side chains in a protein environment via measuring contact angle of a water nanodroplet on planar peptide network.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Chongqin; Gao, Yurui; Li, Hui; Meng, Sheng; Li, Lei; Francisco, Joseph S; Zeng, Xiao Cheng

    2016-11-15

    Hydrophobicity of macroscopic planar surface is conventionally characterized by the contact angle of water droplets. However, this engineering measurement cannot be directly extended to surfaces of proteins, due to the nanometer scale of amino acids and inherent nonplanar structures. To measure the hydrophobicity of side chains of proteins quantitatively, numerous parameters were developed to characterize behavior of hydrophobic solvation. However, consistency among these parameters is not always apparent. Herein, we demonstrate an alternative way of characterizing hydrophobicity of amino acid side chains in a protein environment by constructing a monolayer of amino acids (i.e., artificial planar peptide network) according to the primary and the β-sheet secondary structures of protein so that the conventional engineering measurement of the contact angle of a water droplet can be brought to bear. Using molecular dynamics simulations, contact angles θ of a water nanodroplet on the planar peptide network, together with excess chemical potentials of purely repulsive methane-sized Weeks-Chandler-Andersen solute, are computed. All of the 20 types of amino acids and the corresponding planar peptide networks are studied. Expectedly, all of the planar peptide networks with nonpolar amino acids are hydrophobic due to θ [Formula: see text] 90°, whereas all of the planar peptide networks of the polar and charged amino acids are hydrophilic due to θ [Formula: see text] 90°. Planar peptide networks of the charged amino acids exhibit complete-wetting behavior due to θ [Formula: see text] 0°. This computational approach for characterization of hydrophobicity can be extended to artificial planar networks of other soft matter.

  14. Differential Binding of Monomethylarsonous Acid Compared to Arsenite and Arsenic Trioxide with Zinc Finger Peptides and Proteins

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Arsenic is an environmental toxin that enhances the carcinogenic effect of DNA-damaging agents, such as ultraviolet radiation and benzo[a]pyrene. Interaction with zinc finger proteins has been shown to be an important molecular mechanism for arsenic toxicity and cocarcinogenesis. Arsenicals such as arsenite, arsenic trioxide (ATO), and monomethylarsonous acid (MMA(III)) have been reported to interact with cysteine residues of zinc finger domains, but little is known about potential differences in their selectivity of interaction. Herein we analyzed the interaction of arsenite, MMA(III), and ATO with C2H2, C3H1, and C4 configurations of zinc fingers using UV–vis, cobalt, fluorescence, and mass spectrometry. We observed that arsenite and ATO both selectively bound to C3H1 and C4 zinc fingers, while MMA(III) interacted with all three configurations of zinc finger peptides. Structurally and functionally, arsenite and ATO caused conformational changes and zinc loss on C3H1 and C4 zinc finger peptide and protein, respectively, whereas MMA(III) changed conformation and displaced zinc on all three types of zinc fingers. The differential selectivity was also demonstrated in zinc finger proteins isolated from cells treated with these arsenicals. Our results show that trivalent inorganic arsenic compounds, arsenite and ATO, have the same selectivity and behavior when interacting with zinc finger proteins, while methylation removes the selectivity. These findings provide insights on the molecular mechanisms underlying the differential effects of inorganic versus methylated arsenicals, as well as the role of in vivo arsenic methylation in arsenic toxicity and carcinogenesis. PMID:24611629

  15. Differential binding of monomethylarsonous acid compared to arsenite and arsenic trioxide with zinc finger peptides and proteins.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Xixi; Sun, Xi; Mobarak, Charlotte; Gandolfi, A Jay; Burchiel, Scott W; Hudson, Laurie G; Liu, Ke Jian

    2014-04-21

    Arsenic is an environmental toxin that enhances the carcinogenic effect of DNA-damaging agents, such as ultraviolet radiation and benzo[a]pyrene. Interaction with zinc finger proteins has been shown to be an important molecular mechanism for arsenic toxicity and cocarcinogenesis. Arsenicals such as arsenite, arsenic trioxide (ATO), and monomethylarsonous acid (MMA(III)) have been reported to interact with cysteine residues of zinc finger domains, but little is known about potential differences in their selectivity of interaction. Herein we analyzed the interaction of arsenite, MMA(III), and ATO with C2H2, C3H1, and C4 configurations of zinc fingers using UV-vis, cobalt, fluorescence, and mass spectrometry. We observed that arsenite and ATO both selectively bound to C3H1 and C4 zinc fingers, while MMA(III) interacted with all three configurations of zinc finger peptides. Structurally and functionally, arsenite and ATO caused conformational changes and zinc loss on C3H1 and C4 zinc finger peptide and protein, respectively, whereas MMA(III) changed conformation and displaced zinc on all three types of zinc fingers. The differential selectivity was also demonstrated in zinc finger proteins isolated from cells treated with these arsenicals. Our results show that trivalent inorganic arsenic compounds, arsenite and ATO, have the same selectivity and behavior when interacting with zinc finger proteins, while methylation removes the selectivity. These findings provide insights on the molecular mechanisms underlying the differential effects of inorganic versus methylated arsenicals, as well as the role of in vivo arsenic methylation in arsenic toxicity and carcinogenesis.

  16. Regulation of protein kinase Cmu by basic peptides and heparin. Putative role of an acidic domain in the activation of the kinase.

    PubMed

    Gschwendt, M; Johannes, F J; Kittstein, W; Marks, F

    1997-08-15

    Protein kinase Cmu is a novel member of the protein kinase C (PKC) family that differs from the other isoenzymes in structural and enzymatic properties. No substrate proteins of PKCmu have been identified as yet. Moreover, the regulation of PKCmu activity remains obscure, since a structural region corresponding to the pseudosubstrate domains of other PKC isoenzymes has not been found for PKCmu. Here we show that aldolase is phosphorylated by PKCmu in vitro. Phosphorylation of aldolase and of two substrate peptides by PKCmu is inhibited by various proteins and peptides, including typical PKC substrates such as histone H1, myelin basic protein, and p53. This inhibitory activity seems to depend on clusters of basic amino acids in the protein/peptide structures. Moreover, in contrast to other PKC isoenzymes PKCmu is activated by heparin and dextran sulfate. Maximal activation by heparin is about twice and that by dextran sulfate four times as effective as maximal activation by phosphatidylserine plus 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate, the conventional activators of c- and nPKC isoforms. We postulate that PKCmu contains an acidic domain, which is involved in the formation and stabilization of an active state and which, in the inactive enzyme, is blocked by an intramolecular interaction with a basic domain. This intramolecular block is thought to be released by heparin and possibly also by 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate/phosphatidylserine, whereas basic peptides and proteins inhibit PKCmu activity by binding to the acidic domain of the active enzyme.

  17. Gas-phase ion/ion reactions of peptides and proteins: acid/base, redox, and covalent chemistries.

    PubMed

    Prentice, Boone M; McLuckey, Scott A

    2013-02-01

    Gas-phase ion/ion reactions are emerging as useful and flexible means for the manipulation and characterization of peptide and protein biopolymers. Acid/base-like chemical reactions (i.e., proton transfer reactions) and reduction/oxidation (redox) reactions (i.e., electron transfer reactions) represent relatively mature classes of gas-phase chemical reactions. Even so, especially in regards to redox chemistry, the widespread utility of these two types of chemistries is undergoing rapid growth and development. Additionally, a relatively new class of gas-phase ion/ion transformations is emerging which involves the selective formation of functional-group-specific covalent bonds. This feature details our current work and perspective on the developments and current capabilities of these three areas of ion/ion chemistry with an eye towards possible future directions of the field.

  18. Gas-phase ion/ion reactions of peptides and proteins: acid/base, redox, and covalent chemistries

    PubMed Central

    Prentice, Boone M.

    2013-01-01

    Gas-phase ion/ion reactions are emerging as useful and flexible means for the manipulation and characterization of peptide and protein biopolymers. Acid/base-like chemical reactions (i.e., proton transfer reactions) and reduction/oxidation (redox) reactions (i.e., electron transfer reactions) represent relatively mature classes of gas-phase chemical reactions. Even so, especially in regards to redox chemistry, the widespread utility of these two types of chemistries is undergoing rapid growth and development. Additionally, a relatively new class of gas-phase ion/ion transformations is emerging which involves the selective formation of functional-group-specific covalent bonds. This feature details our current work and perspective on the developments and current capabilities of these three areas of ion/ion chemistry with an eye towards possible future directions of the field. PMID:23257901

  19. Borinic acid catalysed peptide synthesis.

    PubMed

    El Dine, Tharwat Mohy; Rouden, Jacques; Blanchet, Jérôme

    2015-11-18

    The catalytic synthesis of peptides is a major challenge in the modern organic chemistry hindered by the well-established use of stoichiometric coupling reagents. Herein, we describe for the first time that borinic acid is able to catalyse this reaction under mild conditions with an improved activity compared to our recently developed thiophene-based boronic acid. This catalyst is particularly efficient for peptide bond synthesis affording dipeptides in good yields without detectable racemization.

  20. Supplementation with branched-chain amino acids to a low-protein diet regulates intestinal expression of amino acid and peptide transporters in weanling pigs.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shihai; Qiao, Shiyan; Ren, Man; Zeng, Xiangfang; Ma, Xi; Wu, Zhenlong; Thacker, Philip; Wu, Guoyao

    2013-11-01

    This study determined the effects of dietary branched-chain amino acids (AA) (BCAA) on growth performance, expression of jejunal AA and peptide transporters, and the colonic microflora of weanling piglets fed a low-protein (LP) diet. One hundred and eight Large White × Landrace × Duroc piglets (weaned at 28 days of age) were fed a normal protein diet (NP, 20.9 % crude protein), an LP diet (LP, 17.1 % crude protein), or an LP diet supplemented with BCAA (LP + BCAA, 17.9 % crude protein) for 14 days. Dietary protein restriction reduced piglet growth performance and small-intestinal villous height, which were restored by BCAA supplementation to the LP diet to values for the NP diet. Serum concentrations of BCAA were reduced in piglets fed the LP diet while those in piglets fed the LP + BCAA diet were similar to values for the NP group. mRNA levels for Na(+)-neutral AA exchanger-2, cationic AA transporter-1, b(0,+) AA transporter, and 4F2 heavy chain were more abundant in piglets fed the LP + BCAA diet than the LP diet. However, mRNA and protein levels for peptide transporter-1 were lower in piglets fed the LP + BCAA diet as compared to the LP diet. The colonic microflora did not differ among the three groups of pigs. In conclusion, growth performance, intestinal development, and intestinal expression of AA transporters in weanling piglets are enhanced by BCAA supplementation to LP diets. Our findings provide a new molecular basis for further understanding of BCAA as functional AA in animal nutrition.

  1. Human Antimicrobial Peptides and Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Guangshun

    2014-01-01

    As the key components of innate immunity, human host defense antimicrobial peptides and proteins (AMPs) play a critical role in warding off invading microbial pathogens. In addition, AMPs can possess other biological functions such as apoptosis, wound healing, and immune modulation. This article provides an overview on the identification, activity, 3D structure, and mechanism of action of human AMPs selected from the antimicrobial peptide database. Over 100 such peptides have been identified from a variety of tissues and epithelial surfaces, including skin, eyes, ears, mouths, gut, immune, nervous and urinary systems. These peptides vary from 10 to 150 amino acids with a net charge between −3 and +20 and a hydrophobic content below 60%. The sequence diversity enables human AMPs to adopt various 3D structures and to attack pathogens by different mechanisms. While α-defensin HD-6 can self-assemble on the bacterial surface into nanonets to entangle bacteria, both HNP-1 and β-defensin hBD-3 are able to block cell wall biosynthesis by binding to lipid II. Lysozyme is well-characterized to cleave bacterial cell wall polysaccharides but can also kill bacteria by a non-catalytic mechanism. The two hydrophobic domains in the long amphipathic α-helix of human cathelicidin LL-37 lays the basis for binding and disrupting the curved anionic bacterial membrane surfaces by forming pores or via the carpet model. Furthermore, dermcidin may serve as ion channel by forming a long helix-bundle structure. In addition, the C-type lectin RegIIIα can initially recognize bacterial peptidoglycans followed by pore formation in the membrane. Finally, histatin 5 and GAPDH(2-32) can enter microbial cells to exert their effects. It appears that granulysin enters cells and kills intracellular pathogens with the aid of pore-forming perforin. This arsenal of human defense proteins not only keeps us healthy but also inspires the development of a new generation of personalized medicine to

  2. The amino acid sequences of eleven tryptic peptides of papaya mosaic virus protein by electron ionization mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Parente, A; Short, M N; Self, R; Parsley, K R

    1982-04-01

    Eleven of the fourteen tryptic peptides of papaya mosaic virus protein have been sequenced by electron ionization mass spectrometry using chemical and enzymic hydrolyses and mixture analysis as required. Mid-chain cleavages of N-C bonds produced secondary ion series which allowed up to 16 residues to be sequenced without further hydrolysis. Mixture analysis on hydrolysis products enabled a 24 residue tryptic peptide to be sequenced from the data recorded in a single mass spectrum.

  3. Influence of Amino Acid Compositions and Peptide Profiles on Antioxidant Capacities of Two Protein Hydrolysates from Skipjack Tuna (Katsuwonus pelamis) Dark Muscle

    PubMed Central

    Chi, Chang-Feng; Hu, Fa-Yuan; Wang, Bin; Li, Zhong-Rui; Luo, Hong-Yu

    2015-01-01

    Influence of amino acid compositions and peptide profiles on antioxidant capacities of two protein hydrolysates from skipjack tuna (Katsuwonus pelamis) dark muscle was investigated. Dark muscles from skipjack tuna were hydrolyzed using five separate proteases, including pepsin, trypsin, Neutrase, papain and Alcalase. Two hydrolysates, ATH and NTH, prepared using Alcalase and Neutrase, respectively, showed the strongest antioxidant capacities and were further fractionated using ultrafiltration and gel filtration chromatography. Two fractions, Fr.A3 and Fr.B2, isolated from ATH and NTH, respectively, showed strong radical scavenging activities toward 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl radicals (EC50 1.08% ± 0.08% and 0.98% ± 0.07%), hydroxyl radicals (EC50 0.22% ± 0.03% and 0.48% ± 0.05%), and superoxide anion radicals (EC50 1.31% ± 0.11% and 1.56% ± 1.03%) and effectively inhibited lipid peroxidation. Eighteen peptides from Fr.A3 and 13 peptides from Fr.B2 were isolated by reversed-phase high performance liquid chromatography, and their amino acid sequences were determined. The elevated antioxidant activity of Fr.A3 might be due to its high content of hydrophobic and aromatic amino acid residues (181.1 and 469.9 residues/1000 residues, respectively), small molecular sizes (3–6 peptides), low molecular weights (524.78 kDa), and amino acid sequences (antioxidant score 6.11). This study confirmed that a smaller molecular size, the presence of hydrophobic and aromatic amino acid residues, and the amino acid sequences were the key factors that determined the antioxidant activities of the proteins, hydrolysates and peptides. The results also demonstrated that the derived hydrolysates and fractions from skipjack tuna (K. pelamis) dark muscles could prevent oxidative reactions and might be useful for food preservation and medicinal purposes. PMID:25923316

  4. MALDI TOF/TOF-Based Approach for the Identification of d- Amino Acids in Biologically Active Peptides and Proteins.

    PubMed

    Koehbach, Johannes; Gruber, Christian W; Becker, Christian; Kreil, David P; Jilek, Alexander

    2016-05-06

    Several biologically active peptides contain a d- amino acid in a well-defined position, which is position 2 in all peptide epimers isolated to date from vertebrates and also some from invertebrates. The detection of such D- residues by standard analytical techniques is challenging. In tandem mass spectrometric (MS) analysis, although fragment masses are the same for all stereoisomers, peak intensities are known to depend on chirality. Here, we observe that the effect of a d- amino acid in the second N-terminal position on the fragmentation pattern in matrix assisted laser desorption time-of-flight spectrometry (MALDI-TOF/TOF MS) strongly depends on the peptide sequence. Stereosensitive fragmentation (SF) is correlated to a neighborhood effect, but the d- residue also exerts an overall effect influencing distant bonds. In a fingerprint analysis, multiple peaks can thus serve to identify the chirality of a sample in short time and potentially high throughput. Problematic variations between individual spots could be successfully suppressed by cospotting deuterated analogues of the epimers. By identifying the [d-Leu2] isomer of the predicted peptide GH-2 (gene derived bombininH) in skin secretions of the toad Bombina orientalis, we demonstrated the analytical power of SF-MALDI-TOF/TOF measurements. In conclusion, SF-MALDI-TOF/TOF MS combines high sensitivity, versatility, and the ability to complement other methods.

  5. MALDI TOF/TOF-Based Approach for the Identification of d- Amino Acids in Biologically Active Peptides and Proteins

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Several biologically active peptides contain a d- amino acid in a well-defined position, which is position 2 in all peptide epimers isolated to date from vertebrates and also some from invertebrates. The detection of such D- residues by standard analytical techniques is challenging. In tandem mass spectrometric (MS) analysis, although fragment masses are the same for all stereoisomers, peak intensities are known to depend on chirality. Here, we observe that the effect of a d- amino acid in the second N-terminal position on the fragmentation pattern in matrix assisted laser desorption time-of-flight spectrometry (MALDI-TOF/TOF MS) strongly depends on the peptide sequence. Stereosensitive fragmentation (SF) is correlated to a neighborhood effect, but the d- residue also exerts an overall effect influencing distant bonds. In a fingerprint analysis, multiple peaks can thus serve to identify the chirality of a sample in short time and potentially high throughput. Problematic variations between individual spots could be successfully suppressed by cospotting deuterated analogues of the epimers. By identifying the [d-Leu2] isomer of the predicted peptide GH-2 (gene derived bombininH) in skin secretions of the toad Bombina orientalis, we demonstrated the analytical power of SF-MALDI-TOF/TOF measurements. In conclusion, SF-MALDI-TOF/TOF MS combines high sensitivity, versatility, and the ability to complement other methods. PMID:26985971

  6. Surface aggregation of urinary proteins and aspartic acid-rich peptides on the faces of calcium oxalate monohydrate investigated by in situ force microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Weaver, M L; Qiu, S R; Hoyer, J R; Casey, W H; Nancollas, G H; De Yoreo, J J

    2008-05-28

    The growth of calcium oxalate monohydrate in the presence of Tamm-Horsfall protein (THP), osteopontin (OPN), and the 27-residue synthetic peptides (DDDS){sub 6}DDD and (DDDG){sub 6}DDD [where D = aspartic acid and X = S (serine) or G (glycine)] was investigated via in situ atomic force microscopy (AFM). The results show that these three growth modulators create extensive deposits on the crystal faces. Depending on the modulator and crystal face, these deposits can occur as discrete aggregates, filamentary structures, or uniform coatings. These proteinaceous films can lead to either the inhibition or increase of the step speeds (with respect to the impurity-free system) depending on a range of factors that include peptide or protein concentration, supersaturation and ionic strength. While THP and the linear peptides act, respectively, to exclusively increase and inhibit growth on the (-101) face, both exhibit dual functionality on the (010) face, inhibiting growth at low supersaturation or high modulator concentration and accelerating growth at high supersaturation or low modulator concentration. Based on analyses of growth morphologies and dependencies of step speeds on supersaturation and protein or peptide concentration, we argue for a picture of growth modulation that accounts for the observations in terms of the strength of binding to the surfaces and steps and the interplay of electrostatic and solvent-induced forces at crystal surface.

  7. The role of citric acid in oral peptide and protein formulations: relationship between calcium chelation and proteolysis inhibition.

    PubMed

    Welling, Søren H; Hubálek, František; Jacobsen, Jette; Brayden, David J; Rahbek, Ulrik L; Buckley, Stephen T

    2014-04-01

    The excipient citric acid (CA) has been reported to improve oral absorption of peptides by different mechanisms. The balance between its related properties of calcium chelation and permeation enhancement compared to a proteolysis inhibition was examined. A predictive model of CA's calcium chelation activity was developed and verified experimentally using an ion-selective electrode. The effects of CA, its salt (citrate, Cit) and the established permeation enhancer, lauroyl carnitine chloride (LCC) were compared by measuring transepithelial electrical resistance (TEER) and permeability of insulin and FD4 across Caco-2 monolayers and rat small intestinal mucosae mounted in Ussing chambers. Proteolytic degradation of insulin was determined in rat luminal extracts across a range of pH values in the presence of CA. CA's capacity to chelate calcium decreased ~10-fold for each pH unit moving from pH 6 to pH 3. CA was an inferior weak permeation enhancer compared to LCC in both in vitro models using physiological buffers. At pH 4.5 however, degradation of insulin in rat luminal extracts was significantly inhibited in the presence of 10mM CA. The capacity of CA to chelate luminal calcium does not occur significantly at the acidic pH values where it effectively inhibits proteolysis, which is its dominant action in oral peptide formulations. On account of insulin's low basal permeability, inclusion of alternative permeation enhancers is likely to be necessary to achieve sufficient oral bioavailability since this is a weak property of CA.

  8. Determination of the sequences of protein-derived peptides and peptide mixtures by mass spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Morris, Howard R.; Williams, Dudley H.; Ambler, Richard P.

    1971-01-01

    Micro-quantities of protein-derived peptides have been converted into N-acetylated permethyl derivatives, and their sequences determined by low-resolution mass spectrometry without prior knowledge of their amino acid compositions or lengths. A new strategy is suggested for the mass spectrometric sequencing of oligopeptides or proteins, involving gel filtration of protein hydrolysates and subsequent sequence analysis of peptide mixtures. Finally, results are given that demonstrate for the first time the use of mass spectrometry for the analysis of a protein-derived peptide mixture, again without prior knowledge of the protein or components within the mixture. PMID:5158904

  9. α/β-Peptide Foldamers Targeting Intracellular Protein-Protein Interactions with Activity in Living Cells.

    PubMed

    Checco, James W; Lee, Erinna F; Evangelista, Marco; Sleebs, Nerida J; Rogers, Kelly; Pettikiriarachchi, Anne; Kershaw, Nadia J; Eddinger, Geoffrey A; Belair, David G; Wilson, Julia L; Eller, Chelcie H; Raines, Ronald T; Murphy, William L; Smith, Brian J; Gellman, Samuel H; Fairlie, W Douglas

    2015-09-09

    Peptides can be developed as effective antagonists of protein-protein interactions, but conventional peptides (i.e., oligomers of l-α-amino acids) suffer from significant limitations in vivo. Short half-lives due to rapid proteolytic degradation and an inability to cross cell membranes often preclude biological applications of peptides. Oligomers that contain both α- and β-amino acid residues ("α/β-peptides") manifest decreased susceptibility to proteolytic degradation, and when properly designed these unnatural oligomers can mimic the protein-recognition properties of analogous "α-peptides". This report documents an extension of the α/β-peptide approach to target intracellular protein-protein interactions. Specifically, we have generated α/β-peptides based on a "stapled" Bim BH3 α-peptide, which contains a hydrocarbon cross-link to enhance α-helix stability. We show that a stapled α/β-peptide can structurally and functionally mimic the parent stapled α-peptide in its ability to enter certain types of cells and block protein-protein interactions associated with apoptotic signaling. However, the α/β-peptide is nearly 100-fold more resistant to proteolysis than is the parent stapled α-peptide. These results show that backbone modification, a strategy that has received relatively little attention in terms of peptide engineering for biomedical applications, can be combined with more commonly deployed peripheral modifications such as side chain cross-linking to produce synergistic benefits.

  10. Affinity purification of copper chelating peptides from chickpea protein hydrolysates.

    PubMed

    Megías, Cristina; Pedroche, Justo; Yust, Maria M; Girón-Calle, Julio; Alaiz, Manuel; Millan, Francisco; Vioque, Javier

    2007-05-16

    Chickpea protein hydrolysates obtained with alcalase and flavourzyme were used for purification of copper chelating peptides by affinity chromatography using copper immobilized on solid supports. The chelating activity of purified peptides was indirectly measured by the inhibition of beta-carotene oxidation in the presence of copper. Two protein hydrolysates, obtained after 10 and 100 min of hydrolysis, were the most inhibitory of beta-carotene oxidation. Purified copper chelating peptides from these protein hydrolysates contained 19.7 and 35.1% histidine, respectively, in comparison to 2.7 and 2.6% in the protein hydrolysates. Chelating peptides from hydrolysate obtained after 10 min of hydrolysis were the most antioxidative being 8.3 times more antioxidative than the hydrolysate, while chelating peptides purified from protein hydrolysate obtained after 100 min were 3.1 times more antioxidative than its hydrolysate. However, the histidine content was higher in peptides derived from the 100 min hydrolysate (19.7 against 35.1% in 10 min hydrolysate), indicating that this amino acid is not the only factor involved in the antioxidative activity, and other factors such as peptide size or amino acid sequence are also determinant. This manuscript shows that affinity chromatography is a useful procedure for purification of copper chelating peptides. This method can be extended to other metals of interest in nutrition, such as calcium, iron, or zinc. Purified chelating peptides, in addition to their antioxidative properties, may also be useful in food mineral fortification for increasing the bioavailability of these metals.

  11. Constrained Peptides as Miniature Protein Structures

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Hang

    2012-01-01

    This paper discusses the recent developments of protein engineering using both covalent and noncovalent bonds to constrain peptides, forcing them into designed protein secondary structures. These constrained peptides subsequently can be used as peptidomimetics for biological functions such as regulations of protein-protein interactions. PMID:25969758

  12. Photolysis Accompanying Peptide Absorption in Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, W. David; Foster, Joseph F.

    1972-01-01

    Exposure of proteins and polypeptides to ultraviolet radiation below 240 nm produces peptide cleavage which may or may not be accompanied by observable changes in conformation and optical rotary dispersion (ORD) properties, depending on the stability of the secondary and tertiary structure of the macromolecule under the experimental conditions. Helical and coiled forms of poly-L-glutamic acid undergo degradation at similar rates but only the helical form shows a significant change in rotatory properties. The helical form of poly-L-lysine, but neither the coiled nor β forms, shows a change in [α]233 on irradiation at 233 nm. β-Lactoglobulin shows essentially no change in [α]233 on irradiation in either dilute salt solution or 4 M urea at room temperature; however, in 4 M urea at 56°C a large change occurs. A model is developed which shows that studies of the effect of radiation on ORD properties may be useful in providing information on possible intermediate steps in protein denaturation. The method is illustrated with results on bovine plasma albumin. A quantum yield, 4.3 × 10-3 moles/einstein, was obtained for peptide cleavage in this protein at 225 nm. These studies, based on gel electrophoresis, also showed that the fragments produced are essentially random, suggesting that transfer of energy from aromatic residues is not an important contributor to the peptide photolysis. Possible errors which could arise in ORD and other studies involving intense ultraviolet radiation are considered. PMID:5063838

  13. Predicting protein-peptide interactions from scratch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Chengfei; Xu, Xianjin; Zou, Xiaoqin; Zou lab Team

    Protein-peptide interactions play an important role in many cellular processes. The ability to predict protein-peptide complex structures is valuable for mechanistic investigation and therapeutic development. Due to the high flexibility of peptides and lack of templates for homologous modeling, predicting protein-peptide complex structures is extremely challenging. Recently, we have developed a novel docking framework for protein-peptide structure prediction. Specifically, given the sequence of a peptide and a 3D structure of the protein, initial conformations of the peptide are built through protein threading. Then, the peptide is globally and flexibly docked onto the protein using a novel iterative approach. Finally, the sampled modes are scored and ranked by a statistical potential-based energy scoring function that was derived for protein-peptide interactions from statistical mechanics principles. Our docking methodology has been tested on the Peptidb database and compared with other protein-peptide docking methods. Systematic analysis shows significantly improved results compared to the performances of the existing methods. Our method is computationally efficient and suitable for large-scale applications. Nsf CAREER Award 0953839 (XZ) NIH R01GM109980 (XZ).

  14. Can natural proteins designed with 'inverted' peptide sequences adopt native-like protein folds?

    PubMed

    Sridhar, Settu; Guruprasad, Kunchur

    2014-01-01

    We have carried out a systematic computational analysis on a representative dataset of proteins of known three-dimensional structure, in order to evaluate whether it would possible to 'swap' certain short peptide sequences in naturally occurring proteins with their corresponding 'inverted' peptides and generate 'artificial' proteins that are predicted to retain native-like protein fold. The analysis of 3,967 representative proteins from the Protein Data Bank revealed 102,677 unique identical inverted peptide sequence pairs that vary in sequence length between 5-12 and 18 amino acid residues. Our analysis illustrates with examples that such 'artificial' proteins may be generated by identifying peptides with 'similar structural environment' and by using comparative protein modeling and validation studies. Our analysis suggests that natural proteins may be tolerant to accommodating such peptides.

  15. Electron transfer dissociation of modified peptides and proteins.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yuping; Dong, Jia; Vachet, Richard W

    2011-10-01

    Mass spectrometry is the method of choice for sequencing peptides and proteins and is the preferred choice for characterizing post-translational modifications (PTMs). The most commonly used dissociation method to characterize peptides (i.e. collision-induced dissociation (CID)), however, has some limitations when it comes to analyzing many PTMs. Because CID chemistry is influenced by amino acid side-chains, some modifications can alter or inhibit dissociation along the peptide backbone, thereby limiting sequence information and hindering identification of the modification site. Electron transfer dissociation (ETD) has emerged as an alternate dissociation technique that, in most cases, overcomes these limitations of CID because it is less affected by side chain chemistry. Here, we review recent applications of ETD for characterizing peptide and protein PTMs with a particular emphasis on the advantages of ETD over CID, the ways in which ETD and CID have been used in a complementary manner, and how peptide modifications can still influence ETD dissociation pathways.

  16. Bioactive proteins and peptides in foods.

    PubMed

    Walther, Barbara; Sieber, Robert

    2011-03-01

    Increasing amounts of data demonstrate a bioactive role of proteins and peptides above and beyond their nutritional impact. The focus of the investigations has mainly been on vitamin- and mineral-binding proteins, on antimicrobial, immunosuppressing/-modulatory proteins, and on proteins with enzyme inhibitory activity as well as on hormones and growth factors from different food proteins; most research has been performed on milk proteins. Because of their molecular size, intact absorption of proteins in the human gastrointestinal tract is limited. Therefore, most of the proteins with biological functions show physiological activity in the gastrointestinal tract by enhancing nutrient absorption, inhibiting enzymes, and modulating the immune system to defend against pathogens. Peptides are released during fermentation or digestion from food proteins by proteolytic enzymes; such peptides have been found mainly in milk. Some of these released peptides exert biological activities such as opiate-like, antihypertensive, mineral-binding, antioxidative, antimicrobial, immuno-, and cytomodulating activity. Intact absorption of these smaller peptides is more likely than that of the larger proteins. Consequently, other organs than the gastrointestinal tract are possible targets for their biological functions. Bioactive proteins as well as bioactive peptides are part of a balanced diet. It is possible to accumulate bioactive peptides in food, for example by using specific microorganisms in fermented dairy products. Although bioactive peptides have been the subject of several studies in vitro and in vivo, their health potential is still under investigation. Up to now, the Commission of European Communities has not (yet) authorized any health claims for bioactive proteins and peptides from food.

  17. Controlled delivery of peptides and proteins.

    PubMed

    Degim, I Tuncer; Celebi, Nevin

    2007-01-01

    The final aim/target of Pharmaceutical Sciences is to design successful dosage forms for effective therapy, considering individual patient needs and compliance. Development of new drug entities, particularly using peptides and proteins, is growing in importance and attracting increased interest, as they are specifically effective at a comparably low dose. These very potent and specific peptides and proteins can now be produced in large quantities due to increased knowledge and advancements in biotechnological and pharmaceutical applications. A number of peptide and protein products are now available on the market, and numerous studies investigating them have been published in the literature. Although many peptide/protein like products are generally designed for parenteral administration, some other noninvasive routes have also been used. For example, desmopressin is delivered nasally and deoxyribonuclease by inhalation. Although peptides and proteins are generally orally inactive, cyclosporine is an exception. In order to design and develop long-acting, more effective peptide/protein drugs, the controlled release mechanisms and effective parameters need to be understood and clarified. Therefore, we review herein various peptide/protein delivery systems, including biodegradable and nondegradable microspheres, microcapsules, nanocapsules, injectable implants, diffusion-controlled hydrogels and other hydrophilic systems, microemulsions and multiple emulsions, and the use of iontophoresis or electroporation, and discuss the results of recent researches.

  18. Establishment and characterization of monoclonal and polyclonal antibodies against human intestinal fatty acid-binding protein (I-FABP) using synthetic regional peptides and recombinant I-FABP.

    PubMed

    Kajiura, Satoshi; Yashiki, Tetsuya; Funaoka, Hiroyuki; Ohkaru, Yasuhiko; Nishikura, Ken; Kanda, Tatsuo; Ajioka, Yoichi; Igarashi, Michihiro; Hatakeyama, Katsuyoshi; Fujii, Hiroshi

    2008-01-01

    We have succeeded in raising highly specific anti-human intestinal fatty acid-binding protein (I-FABP) monoclonal antibodies by immunizing animals with three synthetic regional peptides, i.e., the amino terminal (RP-1: N-acetylated 1-19-cysteine), middle portion (RP-2: cysteinyl-91-107) and carboxylic terminal (RP-3: cysteinyl-121-131) regions of human I-FABP, and the whole I-FABP molecule as antigens. We also raised a polyclonal antibody by immunizing with a recombinant (r) I-FABP. To ascertain the specificity of these antibodies for human I-FABP, the immunological reactivity of each was examined by a binding assay using rI-FABP, partially purified native I-FABP and related proteins such as liver-type (L)-FABP, heart-type (H)-FABP, as well as the regional peptides as reactants, and by Western blot analysis. In addition, the expression and distribution of I-FABP in the human gastrointestinal tract were investigated by an immunohistochemical technique using a carboxylic terminal region-specific monoclonal antibody, 8F9, and a polyclonal antibody, DN-R2. Our results indicated that both the monoclonal and polyclonal antibodies established in this study were highly specific for I-FABP, but not for L-FABP and H-FABP. Especially, the monoclonal antibodies raised against the regional peptides, showed regional specificity for the I-FABP molecule. Immunoreactivity of I-FABP was demonstrated in the mucosal epithelium of the jejunum and ileum by immunohistochemical staining, and the immunoreactivity was based on the presence of the whole I-FABP molecule but not the presence of any precursors or degradation products containing a carboxylic terminal fragment. It is concluded that some of these monoclonal and polyclonal antibodies, such as 8F9, 4205, and DN-R2, will be suitable for use in research on the immunochemistry and clinical chemistry of I-FABP because those antibodies can recognize both types of native and denatured I-FABP. In order to detect I-FABP in blood samples, it

  19. Noncovalent chirality sensing ensembles for the detection and reaction monitoring of amino acids, peptides, proteins, and aromatic drugs.

    PubMed

    Biedermann, Frank; Nau, Werner M

    2014-05-26

    Ternary complexes between the macrocyclic host cucurbit[8]uril, dicationic dyes, and chiral aromatic analytes afford strong induced circular dichroism (ICD) signals in the near-UV and visible regions. This allows for chirality sensing and peptide-sequence recognition in water at low micromolar analyte concentrations. The reversible and noncovalent mode of binding ensures an immediate response to concentration changes, which allows the real-time monitoring of chemical reactions. The introduced supramolecular method is likely to find applications in bioanalytical chemistry, especially enzyme assays, for drug-related analytical applications, and for continuous monitoring of enantioselective reactions, particularly asymmetric catalysis.

  20. Peptide Mass Fingerprinting of Egg White Proteins

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alty, Lisa T.; LaRiviere, Frederick J.

    2016-01-01

    Use of advanced mass spectrometry techniques in the undergraduate setting has burgeoned in the past decade. However, relatively few undergraduate experiments examine the proteomics tools of protein digestion, peptide accurate mass determination, and database searching, also known as peptide mass fingerprinting. In this experiment, biochemistry…

  1. CancerPPD: a database of anticancer peptides and proteins.

    PubMed

    Tyagi, Atul; Tuknait, Abhishek; Anand, Priya; Gupta, Sudheer; Sharma, Minakshi; Mathur, Deepika; Joshi, Anshika; Singh, Sandeep; Gautam, Ankur; Raghava, Gajendra P S

    2015-01-01

    CancerPPD (http://crdd.osdd.net/raghava/cancerppd/) is a repository of experimentally verified anticancer peptides (ACPs) and anticancer proteins. Data were manually collected from published research articles, patents and from other databases. The current release of CancerPPD consists of 3491 ACP and 121 anticancer protein entries. Each entry provides comprehensive information related to a peptide like its source of origin, nature of the peptide, anticancer activity, N- and C-terminal modifications, conformation, etc. Additionally, CancerPPD provides the information of around 249 types of cancer cell lines and 16 different assays used for testing the ACPs. In addition to natural peptides, CancerPPD contains peptides having non-natural, chemically modified residues and D-amino acids. Besides this primary information, CancerPPD stores predicted tertiary structures as well as peptide sequences in SMILES format. Tertiary structures of peptides were predicted using the state-of-art method, PEPstr and secondary structural states were assigned using DSSP. In order to assist users, a number of web-based tools have been integrated, these include keyword search, data browsing, sequence and structural similarity search. We believe that CancerPPD will be very useful in designing peptide-based anticancer therapeutics.

  2. Bioactive Proteins and Peptides from Soybeans.

    PubMed

    Agyei, Dominic

    2015-01-01

    Dietary proteins from soybeans have been shown to offer health benefits in vivo and/or in vitro either as intact proteins or in partially digested forms also called bioactive peptides. Upon oral administration and absorption, soy-derived bioactive peptides may induce several physiological responses such as antioxidative, antimicrobial, antihypertensive, anticancer and immunomodulatory effects. There has therefore been a mounting research interest in the therapeutic potential of soy protein hydrolysates and their subsequent incorporation in functional foods and 'Food for Specified Health Uses' (FOSHU) related products where their biological activities may assist in the promotion of good health or in the control and prevention of diseases. This mini review discusses relevant patents and gives an overview on bioactive proteins and peptides obtainable from soybeans. Processes for the production and formulation of these peptides are given, together with specific examples of their therapeutic potential and possible areas of application.

  3. Peptide-protein interactions within human hair keratins.

    PubMed

    Cruz, Célia F; Matamá, Teresa; Cavaco-Paulo, Artur

    2017-03-15

    We selected 1235 decapeptides from human hair proteins encoded by human genes of keratins and keratin associated proteins. The peptides were linked to glass arrays and screened for their affinity towards a solution of human hair extracted keratin fraction. Based on the physicochemical properties of the peptides, ten variables were studied: content of different types of amino acid side chains (cysteine, hydrophobic, polar, basic, acidic, aromatic rings, amide, alcohol side chains), isoelectric point, and net charge. We found differences statistically significant on the binding affinity of peptides based on their content of cysteine, hydrophobic and polar amino acids, mainly containing alcohols. These results point to the formation of hydrophobic interactions and disulfide bonds between small peptides and human hair keratins as the main driving forces for the interaction of possible cosmetic peptides, namely designed to strength human hair. As so, our results enlighten the nature of the interaction of keratin based materials with human hair, which are claimed to enhance hair fiber strength, and enable a more directed and sustained hair care peptide design.

  4. Peptide-Based Molecular Hydrogels as Supramolecular Protein Mimics.

    PubMed

    Singh, Nishant; Kumar, Mohit; Miravet, Juan F; Ulijn, Rein V; Escuder, Beatriu

    2017-01-23

    This Minireview concerns recent advances in the design, synthesis, and application of low molecular-weight peptidic hydrogelators. The sequence-specific combinations of amino acid side chain functionalities combined with hydrogen bonding of amide backbones and hydrophobic (aromatic) capping groups give these peptidic molecules the intrinsic tendency to self-assemble. The most prevalent designs include N-capped amino acid residues, bolamphiphilic peptides, and amphipathic peptides. Factors such as hydrophobic effects, the Hofmeister effect, and tunable ionization influence their aggregation properties. The self-assembly of simple bio-inspired building blocks into higher organized structures allows comparisons to be drawn with proteins and their complex functionalities, providing preliminary insights into complex biological functions and also enabling their application in a wide range of fields including catalysis, biomedical applications, and mimicry of natural dissipative systems. The Minireview is concluded by a short summary and outlook, highlighting the advances and steps required to bridge the gaps in the understanding of such systems.

  5. Arginine-glycine-aspartic acid- and fibrinogen gamma-chain carboxyterminal peptides inhibit platelet adherence to arterial subendothelium at high wall shear rates. An effect dissociable from interference with adhesive protein binding.

    PubMed Central

    Lawrence, J B; Kramer, W S; McKeown, L P; Williams, S B; Gralnick, H R

    1990-01-01

    Arg-Gly-Asp (RGD)- and fibrinogen gamma-chain carboxyterminal (GQQHHLGGAKQAGDV) peptides inhibit fibrinogen, fibronectin (Fn), vitronectin, and von Willebrand factor (vWF) binding to the platelet glycoprotein IIb-IIIa complex (GP IIb-IIIa). GP IIb-IIIa, vWF, and Fn are essential for normal platelet adherence to subendothelium. We added peptides to normal citrated whole blood before perfusion over human umbilical artery subendothelium and evaluated platelet adherence morphometrically at high (2,600 s-1) and low (800 s-1) wall shear rates. We also examined the effects of the peptides on platelet adhesion to collagen in a static system. At the high wall shear rate, RGDS and GQQHHLGGAKQAGDV caused dose-dependent reduction in the surface coverage with spread and adherent platelets. Amino acid transposition and conservative substitutions of RGD peptides and the AGDV peptide significantly inhibited platelet adherence at 2,600 s-1. By contrast, the modified RGD peptides and AGDV do not affect adhesive protein binding to platelets. None of the native or modified RGD- or fibrinogen gamma-chain peptides significantly inhibited either platelet adherence to subendothelium at 800 s-1 or platelet adhesion to collagen. Our findings demonstrate that peptides that interfere with adhesive protein binding to GP IIb-IIIa inhibit platelet adherence to vascular subendothelium with flowing blood only at high wall shear rates. Platelet adherence to subendothelium at high wall shear rates appears to be mediated by different recognition specificities from those required for fluid-phase adhesive protein binding or static platelet adhesion. PMID:2243140

  6. Protein quantification using a cleavable reporter peptide.

    PubMed

    Duriez, Elodie; Trevisiol, Stephane; Domon, Bruno

    2015-02-06

    Peptide and protein quantification based on isotope dilution and mass spectrometry analysis are widely employed for the measurement of biomarkers and in system biology applications. The accuracy and reliability of such quantitative assays depend on the quality of the stable-isotope labeled standards. Although the quantification using stable-isotope labeled peptides is precise, the accuracy of the results can be severely biased by the purity of the internal standards, their stability and formulation, and the determination of their concentration. Here we describe a rapid and cost-efficient method to recalibrate stable isotope labeled peptides in a single LC-MS analysis. The method is based on the equimolar release of a protein reference peptide (used as surrogate for the protein of interest) and a universal reporter peptide during the trypsinization of a concatenated polypeptide standard. The quality and accuracy of data generated with such concatenated polypeptide standards are highlighted by the quantification of two clinically important proteins in urine samples and compared with results obtained with conventional stable isotope labeled reference peptides. Furthermore, the application of the UCRP standards in complex samples is described.

  7. Small cationic antimicrobial peptides delocalize peripheral membrane proteins

    PubMed Central

    Wenzel, Michaela; Chiriac, Alina Iulia; Otto, Andreas; Zweytick, Dagmar; May, Caroline; Schumacher, Catherine; Gust, Ronald; Albada, H. Bauke; Penkova, Maya; Krämer, Ute; Erdmann, Ralf; Metzler-Nolte, Nils; Straus, Suzana K.; Bremer, Erhard; Becher, Dörte; Brötz-Oesterhelt, Heike; Sahl, Hans-Georg; Bandow, Julia Elisabeth

    2014-01-01

    Short antimicrobial peptides rich in arginine (R) and tryptophan (W) interact with membranes. To learn how this interaction leads to bacterial death, we characterized the effects of the minimal pharmacophore RWRWRW-NH2. A ruthenium-substituted derivative of this peptide localized to the membrane in vivo, and the peptide also integrated readily into mixed phospholipid bilayers that resemble Gram-positive membranes. Proteome and Western blot analyses showed that integration of the peptide caused delocalization of peripheral membrane proteins essential for respiration and cell-wall biosynthesis, limiting cellular energy and undermining cell-wall integrity. This delocalization phenomenon also was observed with the cyclic peptide gramicidin S, indicating the generality of the mechanism. Exogenous glutamate increases tolerance to the peptide, indicating that osmotic destabilization also contributes to antibacterial efficacy. Bacillus subtilis responds to peptide stress by releasing osmoprotective amino acids, in part via mechanosensitive channels. This response is triggered by membrane-targeting bacteriolytic peptides of different structural classes as well as by hypoosmotic conditions. PMID:24706874

  8. Plasma Free Amino Acid Responses to Intraduodenal Whey Protein, and Relationships with Insulin, Glucagon-Like Peptide-1 and Energy Intake in Lean Healthy Men

    PubMed Central

    Luscombe-Marsh, Natalie D.; Hutchison, Amy T.; Soenen, Stijn; Steinert, Robert E.; Clifton, Peter M.; Horowitz, Michael; Feinle-Bisset, Christine

    2016-01-01

    This study determined the effects of increasing loads of intraduodenal (ID) dairy protein on plasma amino acid (AA) concentrations, and their relationships with serum insulin, plasma glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) and energy intake. Sixteen healthy men had concentrations of AAs, GLP-1 and insulin measured in response to 60-min ID infusions of hydrolysed whey protein administered, in double-blinded and randomised order, at 2.1 (P2.1), 6.3 (P6.3) or 12.5 (P12.5) kJ/min (encompassing the range of nutrient emptying from the stomach), or saline control (C). Energy intake was quantified immediately afterwards. Compared with C, the concentrations of 19/20 AAs, the exception being cysteine, were increased, and this was dependent on the protein load. The relationship between AA concentrations in the infusions and the area under the curve from 0 to 60 min (AUC0–60 min) of each AA profile was strong for essential AAs (R2 range, 0.61–0.67), but more variable for non-essential (0.02–0.54) and conditional (0.006–0.64) AAs. The AUC0–60 min for each AA was correlated directly with the AUC0–60 min of insulin (R2 range 0.3–0.6), GLP-1 (0.2–0.6) and energy intake (0.09–0.3) (p < 0.05, for all), with the strongest correlations being for branched-chain AAs, lysine, methionine and tyrosine. These findings indicate that ID whey protein infused at loads encompassing the normal range of gastric emptying increases plasma concentrations of 19/20 AAs in a load-dependent manner, and provide novel information on the close relationships between the essential AAs, leucine, valine, isoleucine, lysine, methionine, and the conditionally-essential AA, tyrosine, with energy intake, insulin and GLP-1. PMID:26742062

  9. Inhibition of NADPH oxidase activation by synthetic peptides mapping within the carboxyl-terminal domain of small GTP-binding proteins. Lack of amino acid sequence specificity and importance of polybasic motif.

    PubMed

    Joseph, G; Gorzalczany, Y; Koshkin, V; Pick, E

    1994-11-18

    The small GTP-binding protein (G protein) Rac1 is an obligatory participant in the assembly of the superoxide (O2-.)-generating NADPH oxidase complex of macrophages. We investigated the effect of synthetic peptides, mapping within the near carboxyl-terminal domains of Rac1 and of related G proteins, on the activity of NADPH oxidase in a cell-free system consisting of solubilized guinea pig macrophage membrane, a cytosolic fraction enriched in p47phox and p67phox (or total cytosol), highly purified Rac1-GDP dissociation inhibitor for Rho (Rho GDI) complex, and the activating amphiphile, lithium dodecyl sulfate. Peptides Rac1-(178-188) and Rac1-(178-191), but not Rac2-(178-188), inhibited NADPH oxidase activity in a Rac1-dependent system when added prior to or simultaneously with the initiation of activation. However, undecapeptides corresponding to the near carboxyl-terminal domains of RhoA and RhoC and, most notably, a peptide containing the same amino acids as Rac1-(178-188), but in reversed orientation, were also inhibitory. Surprisingly, O2-. production in a Rac2-dependent cell-free system was inhibited by Rac1-(178-188) but not by Rac2-(178-188). Finally, basic polyamino acids containing lysine, histidine, or arginine, also inhibited NADPH oxidase activation. We conclude that inhibition of NADPH oxidase activation by synthetic peptides mapping within the carboxyl-terminal domain of certain small G proteins is not amino acid sequence-specific but related to the presence of a polybasic motif. It has been proposed that such a motif serves as a plasma membrane targeting signal for a number of small G proteins (Hancock, J.F., Paterson, H., and Marshall, C.J. (1990) Cell 63, 133-139).

  10. Prediction of binding modes between protein L-isoaspartyl (D-aspartyl) O-methyltransferase and peptide substrates including isomerized aspartic acid residues using in silico analytic methods for the substrate screening.

    PubMed

    Oda, Akifumi; Noji, Ikuhiko; Fukuyoshi, Shuichi; Takahashi, Ohgi

    2015-12-10

    Because the aspartic acid (Asp) residues in proteins are occasionally isomerized in the human body, not only l-α-Asp but also l-β-Asp, D-α-Asp and D-β-Asp are found in human proteins. In these isomerized aspartic acids, the proportion of D-β-Asp is the largest and the proportions of l-β-Asp and D-α-Asp found in human proteins are comparatively small. To explain the proportions of aspartic acid isomers, the possibility of an enzyme able to repair l-β-Asp and D-α-Asp is frequently considered. The protein L-isoaspartyl (D-aspartyl) O-methyltransferase (PIMT) is considered one of the possible repair enzymes for l-β-Asp and D-α-Asp. Human PIMT is an enzyme that recognizes both l-β-Asp and D-α-Asp, and catalyzes the methylation of their side chains. In this study, the binding modes between PIMT and peptide substrates containing l-β-Asp or D-α-Asp residues were investigated using computational protein-ligand docking and molecular dynamics simulations. The results indicate that carboxyl groups of both l-β-Asp and D-α-Asp were recognized in similar modes by PIMT and that the C-terminal regions of substrate peptides were located in similar positions on PIMT for both the l-β-Asp and D-α-Asp peptides. In contrast, for peptides containing l-α-Asp or D-β-Asp residues, which are not substrates of PIMT, the computationally constructed binding modes between PIMT and peptides greatly differed from those between PIMT and substrates. In the nonsubstrate peptides, not inter- but intra-molecular hydrogen bonds were observed, and the conformations of peptides were more rigid than those of substrates. Thus, the in silico analytical methods were able to distinguish substrates from nonsubstrates and the computational methods are expected to complement experimental analytical methods.

  11. REACTION OF AMINO-ACIDS AND PEPTIDE BONDS WITH FORMALDEHYDE AS MEASURED BY CHANGES IN THE ULTRA-VIOLET SPECTRA,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    AMINO ACIDS , CHEMICAL REACTIONS), (*PEPTIDES, CHEMICAL REACTIONS), (*FORMALDEHYDE, CHEMICAL REACTIONS), (*ULTRAVIOLET SPECTROSCOPY, PROTEINS), ABSORPTION SPECTRA, CHEMICAL BONDS, AMIDES, CHEMICAL EQUILIBRIUM, REACTION KINETICS

  12. Use of Galerina marginata genes and proteins for peptide production

    DOEpatents

    Hallen-Adams, Heather E.; Scott-Craig, John S.; Walton, Jonathan D.; Luo, Hong

    2017-03-21

    The present invention relates to compositions and methods comprising genes and peptides associated with cyclic peptides and cyclic peptide production in mushrooms. In particular, the present invention relates to using genes and proteins from Galerina species encoding peptides specifically relating to amatoxins in addition to proteins involved with processing cyclic peptide toxins. In a preferred embodiment, the present invention also relates to methods for making small peptides and small cyclic peptides including peptides similar to amanitin. Further, the present inventions relate to providing kits for making small peptides.

  13. Use of Galerina marginata genes and proteins for peptide production

    DOEpatents

    Hallen-Adams, Heather E.; Scott-Craig, John S.; Walton, Jonathan D.; Luo, Hong

    2016-03-01

    The present invention relates to compositions and methods comprising genes and peptides associated with cyclic peptides and cyclic peptide production in mushrooms. In particular, the present invention relates to using genes and proteins from Galerina species encoding peptides specifically relating to amatoxins in addition to proteins involved with processing cyclic peptide toxins. In a preferred embodiment, the present invention also relates to methods for making small peptides and small cyclic peptides including peptides similar to amanitin. Further, the present inventions relate to providing kits for making small peptides.

  14. Evidence of peptide oxidation from major myofibrillar proteins in dry-cured ham.

    PubMed

    Gallego, Marta; Mora, Leticia; Aristoy, M-Concepción; Toldrá, Fidel

    2015-11-15

    In this study, a peptidomic approach has been used in the identification of naturally generated peptides during a dry-curing process, showing methionine (Met) oxidation in their sequence. A total of 656 peptides derived from major myofibrillar proteins in Protected Designation of Origin (PDO) Teruel dry-cured ham have been identified by nanoliquid chromatography coupled to tandem mass spectrometry (nLC-MS/MS), including 120 peptides showing methionine oxidation. The percentage of oxidised peptides in the studied proteins ranged from 6% to 35%, being peptides derived from nebulin, titin, myosin heavy chains, and troponin I proteins, those showing the highest number of oxidised methionine. The identification of the peptide sequence incorporating the oxidised amino acid provides valuable information of neighbouring amino acids, degree of hydrolysis of the sample, and characteristics of the peptide, which might be very useful for a future better understanding of the oxidation mechanisms occurring in dry-curing processing.

  15. Histidine-lysine peptides as carriers of nucleic acids.

    PubMed

    Leng, Qixin; Goldgeier, Lisa; Zhu, Jingsong; Cambell, Patricia; Ambulos, Nicholas; Mixson, A James

    2007-03-01

    With their biodegradability and diversity of permutations, peptides have significant potential as carriers of nucleic acids. This review will focus on the sequence and branching patterns of peptide carriers composed primarily of histidines and lysines. While lysines within peptides are important for binding to the negatively charged phosphates, histidines are critical for endosomal lysis enabling nucleic acids to reach the cytosol. Histidine-lysine (HK) polymers by either covalent or ionic bonds with liposomes augment transfection compared to liposome carriers alone. More recently, we have examined peptides as sole carriers of nucleic acids because of their intrinsic advantages compared to the bipartite HK/liposome carriers. With a protocol change and addition of a histidine-rich tail, HK peptides as sole carriers were more effective than liposomes alone in several cell lines. While four-branched polymers with a primary repeating sequence pattern of -HHK- were more effective as carriers of plasmids, eight-branched polymers with a sequence pattern of -HHHK- were more effective as carriers of siRNA. Compared to polyethylenimine, HK carriers of siRNA and plasmids had reduced toxicity. When injected intravenously, HK polymers in complex with plasmids encoding antiangiogenic proteins significantly decreased tumor growth. Furthermore, modification of HK polymers with polyethylene glycol and vascular-specific ligands increased specificity of the polyplex to the tumor by more than 40-fold. Together with further development and insight on the structure of HK polyplexes, HK peptides may prove to be useful as carriers of different forms of nucleic acids both in vitro and in vivo.

  16. How Amino Acids and Peptides Shaped the RNA World

    PubMed Central

    van der Gulik, Peter T.S.; Speijer, Dave

    2015-01-01

    The “RNA world” hypothesis is seen as one of the main contenders for a viable theory on the origin of life. Relatively small RNAs have catalytic power, RNA is everywhere in present-day life, the ribosome is seen as a ribozyme, and rRNA and tRNA are crucial for modern protein synthesis. However, this view is incomplete at best. The modern protein-RNA ribosome most probably is not a distorted form of a “pure RNA ribosome” evolution started out with. Though the oldest center of the ribosome seems “RNA only”, we cannot conclude from this that it ever functioned in an environment without amino acids and/or peptides. Very small RNAs (versatile and stable due to basepairing) and amino acids, as well as dipeptides, coevolved. Remember, it is the amino group of aminoacylated tRNA that attacks peptidyl-tRNA, destroying the bond between peptide and tRNA. This activity of the amino acid part of aminoacyl-tRNA illustrates the centrality of amino acids in life. With the rise of the “RNA world” view of early life, the pendulum seems to have swung too much towards the ribozymatic part of early biochemistry. The necessary presence and activity of amino acids and peptides is in need of highlighting. In this article, we try to bring the role of the peptide component of early life back into focus. We argue that an RNA world completely independent of amino acids never existed. PMID:25607813

  17. The bioactive acidic serine- and aspartate-rich motif peptide.

    PubMed

    Minamizaki, Tomoko; Yoshiko, Yuji

    2015-01-01

    The organic component of the bone matrix comprises 40% dry weight of bone. The organic component is mostly composed of type I collagen and small amounts of non-collagenous proteins (NCPs) (10-15% of the total bone protein content). The small integrin-binding ligand N-linked glycoprotein (SIBLING) family, a NCP, is considered to play a key role in bone mineralization. SIBLING family of proteins share common structural features and includes the arginine-glycine-aspartic acid (RGD) motif and acidic serine- and aspartic acid-rich motif (ASARM). Clinical manifestations of gene mutations and/or genetically modified mice indicate that SIBLINGs play diverse roles in bone and extraskeletal tissues. ASARM peptides might not be primary responsible for the functional diversity of SIBLINGs, but this motif is suggested to be a key domain of SIBLINGs. However, the exact function of ASARM peptides is poorly understood. In this article, we discuss the considerable progress made in understanding the role of ASARM as a bioactive peptide.

  18. PQuad: Visualization of Predicted Peptides and Proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Havre, Susan L.; Singhal, Mudita; Payne, Deborah A.; Webb-Robertson, Bobbie-Jo M.

    2004-10-10

    New high-throughput proteomic techniques generate data faster than biologist and bioinformaticists can analyze it. Yet, hidden within this massive and complex data are answers to basic questions about how cells function to support life or respond to disease. Now biologists can take a global or systems approach studying not one or two proteins at a time but whole proteomes comprising all the proteins in a cell. However, the tremendous size and complexity of the high-throughput experiment data make it difficult to process and interpret. Visualization provides powerful analysis capabilities for such enormous and complex data. In this paper, we introduce a novel interactive visualization, PQuad (Peptide Permutation and Protein Prediction), designed for the visual analysis of peptides (protein fragments) identified from high-throughput data. PQuad depicts the experiment peptides in the context of their parent protein and DNA, thereby integrating proteomic and genomic information. A wrapped line metaphor is applied across key resolutions of the data, from a compressed view of an entire chromosome to the actual nucleotide sequence. PQuad provides a difference visualization for comparing peptides from different experimental conditions. We describe the requirements for such a visual analysis tool, the design decisions, and the novel aspects of PQuad.

  19. Nanotechnology for delivery of peptide nucleic acids (PNAs).

    PubMed

    Gupta, Anisha; Bahal, Raman; Gupta, Meera; Glazer, Peter M; Saltzman, W Mark

    2016-10-28

    Over the past three decades, peptide nucleic acids have been employed in numerous chemical and biological applications. Peptide nucleic acids possess enormous potential because of their superior biophysical properties, compared to other oligonucleotide chemistries. However, for therapeutic applications, intracellular delivery of peptide nucleic acids remains a challenge. In this review, we summarize the progress that has been made in delivering peptide nucleic acids to intracellular targets. In addition, we emphasize recent nanoparticle-based strategies for efficient delivery of conventional and chemically-modified peptides nucleic acids.

  20. Dinosaur Peptides Suggest Mechanisms of Protein Survival

    SciTech Connect

    San Antonio, James D.; Schweitzer, Mary H.; Jensen, Shane T.; Kalluri, Raghu; Buckley, Michael; Orgel, Joseph P.R.O.

    2011-09-16

    Eleven collagen peptide sequences recovered from chemical extracts of dinosaur bones were mapped onto molecular models of the vertebrate collagen fibril derived from extant taxa. The dinosaur peptides localized to fibril regions protected by the close packing of collagen molecules, and contained few acidic amino acids. Four peptides mapped to collagen regions crucial for cell-collagen interactions and tissue development. Dinosaur peptides were not represented in more exposed parts of the collagen fibril or regions mediating intermolecular cross-linking. Thus functionally significant regions of collagen fibrils that are physically shielded within the fibril may be preferentially preserved in fossils. These results show empirically that structure-function relationships at the molecular level could contribute to selective preservation in fossilized vertebrate remains across geological time, suggest a 'preservation motif', and bolster current concepts linking collagen structure to biological function. This non-random distribution supports the hypothesis that the peptides are produced by the extinct organisms and suggests a chemical mechanism for survival.

  1. Graphite supported preparation (GSP) of α-cyano-4-hydroxycinnamic acid (CHCA) for matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry (MALDI-MS) for peptides and proteins.

    PubMed

    Gorka, Jan; Bahr, Ute; Karas, Michael

    2012-11-01

    Graphite as MALDI matrix or in combination with other substances has been reported in recent years. Here, we demonstrate that graphite can be used as target coating supporting the crystallization of the α-cyano-4-hydroxycinnamic acid matrix. A conventional dried-droplet preparation of matrix and analyte solution on a graphite-coated metal target leads to a thin, uniform layer of cubic crystals with about 1 μm edge length. Commercially available graphite powder of 1-2 μm particle size is gently wiped over the target using a cotton Q-tip, leading to an ultra-thin, not-visible film. This surface modification considerably improves analysis of peptides and proteins for MALDI MS using conventional dried-droplet preparation. Compared with untreated targets, the signal intensities of standard peptides are up to eight times higher when using the graphite supported crystallization. The relative standard deviation in peak area of angiotensin II for sample amounts between 1 and 50 fmol is reduced to about 15 % compared with 45 % for untreated sample holders. For a quantification of 1 fmol of the peptide using an internal standard the coefficient of variation is reduced to 3.5 % from 8 %. The new graphite supported preparation (GSP) protocol is very simple and does not require any technical nor manual skills. All standard solvents for peptides and proteins can be used.

  2. Graphite Supported Preparation (GSP) of α-Cyano-4-Hydroxycinnamic Acid (CHCA) for Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption/Ionization Mass Spectrometry (MALDI-MS) for Peptides and Proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorka, Jan; Bahr, Ute; Karas, Michael

    2012-11-01

    Graphite as MALDI matrix or in combination with other substances has been reported in recent years. Here, we demonstrate that graphite can be used as target coating supporting the crystallization of the α-cyano-4-hydroxycinnamic acid matrix. A conventional dried-droplet preparation of matrix and analyte solution on a graphite-coated metal target leads to a thin, uniform layer of cubic crystals with about 1 μm edge length. Commercially available graphite powder of 1-2 μm particle size is gently wiped over the target using a cotton Q-tip, leading to an ultra-thin, not-visible film. This surface modification considerably improves analysis of peptides and proteins for MALDI MS using conventional dried-droplet preparation. Compared with untreated targets, the signal intensities of standard peptides are up to eight times higher when using the graphite supported crystallization. The relative standard deviation in peak area of angiotensin II for sample amounts between 1 and 50 fmol is reduced to about 15 % compared with 45 % for untreated sample holders. For a quantification of 1 fmol of the peptide using an internal standard the coefficient of variation is reduced to 3.5 % from 8 %. The new graphite supported preparation (GSP) protocol is very simple and does not require any technical nor manual skills. All standard solvents for peptides and proteins can be used.

  3. Comparison of the endogenous ileal and faecal amino acid excretion in the dog (Canis familiaris) and the rat (Rattus rattus) determined under protein-free feeding and peptide alimentation.

    PubMed

    Hendriks, W H; Sritharan, K; Hodgkinson, S M

    2002-10-01

    The aim of the study was to determine and compare the endogenous ileal excretions of nitrogen and amino acids under protein-free and peptide alimentation by the dog and rat. Two diets were prepared, one that was devoid of protein and the other containing 23% enzyme hydrolysed casein. Chromic oxide was included in the diets as an indigestible marker. A total of 10 mixed breed dogs were fed hourly either a protein-free or enzymatically hydrolysed casein diet for a total of 10 days. A faecal sample was obtained from each dog on day 9 while digesta was obtained from the terminal 20 cm of the ileum directly after euthanasia on day 10. A total of 12 8-week-old Sprague-Dawley rats received the same diets as the dogs. A faecal sample from each rat was obtained on day 7 while ileal digesta samples were obtained on day 8. The endogenous ileal excretions of most amino acids were greater in the dogs and rats that received the enzymatically hydrolysed casein diet compared with those receiving the protein free diet. Whereas the pattern of endogenous amino acid excretion was similar in the rats and dogs, the dogs excreted a significantly greater amount of nitrogen (1.91 vs. 2.27 and 1.63 vs. 4.12 g/kg dry matter intake for the protein-free and peptide alimentation method, respectively) and all amino acids except for glycine, isoleucine and leucine. Endogenous ileal amino acid excretions are higher in dogs compared to omnivorous animals such as rats and pigs but similar to the carnivorous cat.

  4. Lasso Peptide Biosynthetic Protein LarB1 Binds Both Leader and Core Peptide Regions of the Precursor Protein LarA

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Lasso peptides are a member of the superclass of ribosomally synthesized and posttranslationally modified peptides (RiPPs). Like all RiPPs, lasso peptides are derived from a gene-encoded precursor protein. The biosynthesis of lasso peptides requires two enzymatic activities: proteolytic cleavage between the leader peptide and the core peptide in the precursor protein, accomplished by the B enzymes, and ATP-dependent isopeptide bond formation, accomplished by the C enzymes. In a subset of lasso peptide biosynthetic gene clusters from Gram-positive organisms, the B enzyme is split between two proteins. One such gene cluster is found in the organism Rhodococcus jostii, which produces the antimicrobial lasso peptide lariatin. The B enzyme in R. jostii is split between two open reading frames, larB1 and larB2, both of which are required for lariatin biosynthesis. While the cysteine catalytic triad is found within the LarB2 protein, LarB1 is a PqqD homologue expected to bind to the lariatin precursor LarA based on its structural homology to other RiPP leader peptide binding domains. We show that LarB1 binds to the leader peptide of the lariatin precursor protein LarA with a sub-micromolar affinity. We used photocrosslinking with the noncanonical amino acid p-azidophenylalanine and mass spectrometry to map the interaction of LarA and LarB1. This analysis shows that the LarA leader peptide interacts with a conserved motif within LarB1 and, unexpectedly, the core peptide of LarA also binds to LarB1 in several positions. A Rosetta model built from distance restraints from the photocrosslinking experiments shows that the scissile bond between the leader peptide and core peptide in LarA is in a solvent-exposed loop. PMID:27800552

  5. Lasso Peptide Biosynthetic Protein LarB1 Binds Both Leader and Core Peptide Regions of the Precursor Protein LarA.

    PubMed

    Cheung, Wai Ling; Chen, Maria Y; Maksimov, Mikhail O; Link, A James

    2016-10-26

    Lasso peptides are a member of the superclass of ribosomally synthesized and posttranslationally modified peptides (RiPPs). Like all RiPPs, lasso peptides are derived from a gene-encoded precursor protein. The biosynthesis of lasso peptides requires two enzymatic activities: proteolytic cleavage between the leader peptide and the core peptide in the precursor protein, accomplished by the B enzymes, and ATP-dependent isopeptide bond formation, accomplished by the C enzymes. In a subset of lasso peptide biosynthetic gene clusters from Gram-positive organisms, the B enzyme is split between two proteins. One such gene cluster is found in the organism Rhodococcus jostii, which produces the antimicrobial lasso peptide lariatin. The B enzyme in R. jostii is split between two open reading frames, larB1 and larB2, both of which are required for lariatin biosynthesis. While the cysteine catalytic triad is found within the LarB2 protein, LarB1 is a PqqD homologue expected to bind to the lariatin precursor LarA based on its structural homology to other RiPP leader peptide binding domains. We show that LarB1 binds to the leader peptide of the lariatin precursor protein LarA with a sub-micromolar affinity. We used photocrosslinking with the noncanonical amino acid p-azidophenylalanine and mass spectrometry to map the interaction of LarA and LarB1. This analysis shows that the LarA leader peptide interacts with a conserved motif within LarB1 and, unexpectedly, the core peptide of LarA also binds to LarB1 in several positions. A Rosetta model built from distance restraints from the photocrosslinking experiments shows that the scissile bond between the leader peptide and core peptide in LarA is in a solvent-exposed loop.

  6. A nutrigenomics view of protein intake: macronutrient, bioactive peptides, and protein turnover.

    PubMed

    Chou, Chieh Jason; Affolter, Michael; Kussmann, Martin

    2012-01-01

    Proteins are needed for the development and sustainability of life. They are the molecular machines and building blocks in the human body that drive or exert most biological functions and confer structure and function to cell and tissue architecture. Dietary proteins provide essential amino acids and complement lipid and carbohydrate as a major source of energy. Therefore, humans must consume a sufficient amount and quality of proteins to stay healthy and avoid deficiencies. Even with a reasonable amount of intake, variability in protein consumption can result in measurable health consequences in specific conditions. This said, dietary protein delivers more than energy and building blocks to the human body: the pools of body, tissue, and cell proteins, peptides, and amino acids are under complex metabolic control, resulting in a highly dynamic protein turnover, that is, the interplay between synthesis and degradation. Proteins also contain peptide sequences that can be interpreted as bioactive precursors which can be liberated upon digestion to exert biological functions locally (e.g., in the gut) or systemically (i.e., via the bloodstream). In this chapter, we will first review holistic readouts of protein intake assessed by omics technologies such as gene expression, proteomics, and metabolite profiling. Second, we will look at protein benefits beyond macronutrient supply and describe how to generate, analyze, and leverage bioactive peptides. In the third part, we will discuss protein turnover as tackled by proteomics tools that allow single-protein resolution at proteome-wide scale.

  7. The role of the VQIVYK peptide in tau protein phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Perez, Mar; Santa-María, Ismael; Tortosa, Elena; Cuadros, Raquel; Del Valle, Mercedes; Hernández, Felix; Moreno, Francisco J; Avila, Jesús

    2007-11-01

    Although it remains unclear whether they are related to one another, tau aggregation and phosphorylation are the main pathological hallmarks of the neuronal disorders known as tauopathies. The capacity to aggregate is impaired in a variant of the tau 3R isoform that lacks residues 306-311 (nomenclature for the largest CNS tau isoform) and hence, we have taken advantage of this feature to study how phosphorylation and aggregation may be related as well as the role of this six amino acid peptide (VQIVYK). Through these analyses, we found that the phosphorylation of the tau variant was higher than that of the complete tau protein and that not only the deletion of these residues, but also the interaction of these residues, in tau 3R, with thioflavin-S augmented tau phosphorylation by glycogen synthase kinase 3. In addition, the binding of the peptide containing the residues 306-311 to the whole tau protein provoked an increase in tau phosphorylation. This observation could be physiologically relevant as may suggest that tau-tau interactions, through those residues, facilitate tau phosphorylation. In summary, our data indicate that deletion of residues VQIVYK, in tau protein produces an increase in tau phosphorylation, without tau aggregation, because the VQIVYK peptide, that favors aggregation, is missing. On the other hand, when the whole tau protein interacts with thioflavin-S or the peptide VQIVYK, an increase in both aggregation and phosphorylation occurs.

  8. Design, Synthesis and Affinity Properties of Biologically Active Peptide and Protein Conjugates of Cotton Cellulose

    SciTech Connect

    Edwards, J. V.; Goheen, Steven C.

    2002-11-30

    The formation of peptide and protein conjugates of cellulose on cotton fabrics provides promising leads for the development of wound healing, antibacterial, and decontaminating textiles. An approach to the design, synthesis, and analysis of bioconjugates containing cellulose peptide and protein conjugates includes: 1) computer graphic modeling for a rationally designed structure; 2) attachment of the peptide or protein to cotton cellulose through a linker amino acid, and 3) characterization of the resulting bioconjugate. Computer graphic simulation of protein and peptide cellulose conjugates gives a rationally designed biopolymer to target synthetic modifications to the cotton cellulose. Techniques for preparing these types of conjugates involve both sequential assembly of the peptide on the fabric and direct crosslinking of the peptide or protein as cellulose bound esters or carboxymethylcellulose amides.

  9. Identification of bitter peptides in whey protein hydrolysate.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiaowei; Jiang, Deshou; Peterson, Devin G

    2014-06-25

    Bitterness of whey protein hydrolysates (WPH) can negatively affect product quality and limit utilization in food and pharmaceutical applications. Four main bitter peptides were identified in a commercial WPH by means of sensory-guided fractionation techniques that included ultrafiltration and offline two-dimensional reverse phase chromatography. LC-TOF-MS/MS analysis revealed the amino acid sequences of the bitter peptides were YGLF, IPAVF, LLF, and YPFPGPIPN that originated from α-lactalbumin, β-lactoglobulin, serum albumin, and β-casein, respectively. Quantitative LC-MS/MS analysis reported the concentrations of YGLF, IPAVF, LLF, and YPFPGPIPN to be 0.66, 0.58, 1.33, and 2.64 g/kg powder, respectively. Taste recombination analysis of an aqueous model consisting of all four peptides was reported to explain 88% of the bitterness intensity of the 10% WPH solution.

  10. Effects of protein and peptide addition on lipid oxidation in powder model system.

    PubMed

    Park, Eun Young; Murakami, Hiroshi; Mori, Tomohiko; Matsumura, Yasuki

    2005-01-12

    The effect of protein and peptide addition on the oxidation of eicosapentaenoic acid ethyl ester (EPE) encapsulated by maltodextrin (MD) was investigated. The encapsulated lipid (powder lipid) was prepared in two steps, i.e., mixing of EPE with MD solutions (+/- protein and peptides) to produce emulsions and freeze-drying of the resultant emulsions. EPE oxidation in MD powder progressed more rapidly in the humid state [relative humidity (RH) = 70%] than in the dry state (RH = 10%). The addition of soy protein, soy peptide, and gelatin peptides improved the oxidation stability of EPE encapsulated by MD, and the inhibition of lipid oxidation by the protein and the peptides was more dramatic in the humid state. Especially, the oxidation of EPE was almost perfectly suppressed when the lipid was encapsulated with MD + soy peptide during storage in the humid state for 7 days. Several physical properties such as the lipid particle size of the emulsions, the fraction of nonencapsulated lipids, scanning electron microscopy images of powder lipids, and the mobility of the MD matrix were investigated to find the modification of encapsulation behavior by the addition of the protein and peptides, but no significant change was observed. On the other hand, the protein and peptides exhibited a strong radical scavenging activity in the powder systems as well as in the solution systems. These results suggest that a chemical mechanism such as radical scavenging ability plays an important role in the suppression of EPE oxidation in MD powder by soy proteins, soy peptides, and gelatin peptides.

  11. The H-Index of `An Approach to Correlate Tandem Mass Spectral Data of Peptides with Amino Acid Sequences in a Protein Database'

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Washburn, Michael P.

    2015-11-01

    Over 20 years ago a remarkable paper was published in the Journal of American Society for Mass Spectrometry. This paper from Jimmy Eng, Ashley McCormack, and John Yates described the use of protein databases to drive the interpretation of tandem mass spectra of peptides. This paper now has over 3660 citations and continues to average more than 260 per year over the last decade. This is an amazing scientific achievement. The reason for this is the paper was a cutting edge development at the moment in time when genomes of organisms were being sequenced, protein and peptide mass spectrometry was growing into the field of proteomics, and the power of computing was growing quickly in accordance with Moore's law. This work by the Yates lab grew in importance as genomics, proteomics, and computation all advanced and eventually resulted in the widely used SEQUEST algorithm and platform for the analysis of tandem mass spectrometry data. This commentary provides an analysis of the impact of this paper by analyzing the citations it has generated and the impact of these citing papers.

  12. A Minimalist Substrate for Enzymatic Peptide and Protein Conjugation

    PubMed Central

    Wollack, James W.; Silverman, Julie M.; Petzold, Christopher J.; Mougous, Joseph D.; Distefano, Mark D.

    2010-01-01

    Recently a number of non-natural prenyl groups containing alkynes and azides have been developed as handles to perform click chemistry on proteins and peptides ending in the sequence “CAAX”, where C is a cysteine that becomes alkylated, A is an aliphatic amino acid and X is any amino acid. When such molecules are modified, a tag containing a prenyl analog and the “CAAX box” sequence remains. Here we report the synthesis of an alkyne-containing substrate comprised of only nine non-hydrogen atoms. This substrate was synthesized in six steps from 3-methyl-2-buten-1-ol and has been enzymatically incorporated into both proteins and peptides using protein farnesyltransferase. After prenylation the final three amino acids required for enzymatic recognition can be removed using carboxypeptidase Y, leaving a single residue (the cysteine from the “CAAX box”) and the prenyl analog as the only modifications. We also demonstrate that this small tag minimizes the impact of the modification on the solubility of the targeted protein. Hence, this new approach should be useful for applications in which the presence of a large tag hinders the modified protein's solubility, reactivity or utility. PMID:19856367

  13. Terahertz Spectroscopic Analysis of Peptides and Proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Falconer, Robert J.; Markelz, Andrea G.

    2012-10-01

    Spectroscopic analysis using the Terahertz frequencies between 0.1-15 THz (3-500 cm-1) has been underutilised by the biochemistry community but is starting to yield some scientifically interesting information. Analysis of structures from simple molecules like N-methylacetamide, to polyamides, peptides and relatively complex proteins provides different types of information dependant on the molecular size. The absorbance spectrum of small molecules is dominated by individual modes and specific hydrogen bonds, peptide spectra have peaks associated with secondary structure, while protein spectra are dominated by ensembles of hydrogen bonds and/or collective modes. Protein dynamics has been studied using Terahertz spectroscopy using proteins like bacteriorhodopsin, illustrating a potential application where this approach can provide complementary global dynamics information to the current nuclear magnetic resonance and fluorescence-based techniques. Analysis of higher-order protein structures like polyomavirus virus-like particles generate quite different spectra compared to their constituent parts. The presence of an extended hydration layer around proteins, first postulated to explain data generated using p-germanium spectroscopy may present a particularly interesting opportunity to better understand protein's complex interaction with water and small solutes in an aqueous environment. The practical aspects of Terahertz spectroscopy including sample handling, the use of molecular dynamics simulation and orthogonal experiment design are also discussed.

  14. Nanoparticles in relation to peptide and protein aggregation

    PubMed Central

    Zaman, Masihuz; Ahmad, Ejaz; Qadeer, Atiyatul; Rabbani, Gulam; Khan, Rizwan Hasan

    2014-01-01

    Over the past two decades, there has been considerable research interest in the use of nanoparticles in the study of protein and peptide aggregation, and of amyloid-related diseases. The influence of nanoparticles on amyloid formation yields great interest due to its small size and high surface area-to-volume ratio. Targeting nucleation kinetics by nanoparticles is one of the most searched for ways to control or induce this phenomenon. The observed effect of nanoparticles on the nucleation phase is determined by particle composition, as well as the amount and nature of the particle’s surface. Various thermodynamic parameters influence the interaction of proteins and nanoparticles in the solution, and regulate the protein assembly into fibrils, as well as the disaggregation of preformed fibrils. Metals, organic particles, inorganic particles, amino acids, peptides, proteins, and so on are more suitable candidates for nanoparticle formulation. In the present review, we attempt to explore the effects of nanoparticles on protein and peptide fibrillation processes from both perspectives (ie, as inducers and inhibitors on nucleation kinetics and in the disaggregation of preformed fibrils). Their formulation and characterization by different techniques have been also addressed, along with their toxicological effects, both in vivo and in vitro. PMID:24611007

  15. Isoelectric Point Separations of Peptides and Proteins.

    PubMed

    Pergande, Melissa R; Cologna, Stephanie M

    2017-01-25

    The separation of ampholytic components according to isoelectric point has played an important role in isolating, reducing complexity and improving peptide and protein detection. This brief review outlines the basics of isoelectric focusing, including a summary of the historical achievements and considerations in experimental design. Derivative methodologies of isoelectric focusing are also discussed including common detection methods used. Applications in a variety of fields using isoelectric point based separations are provided as well as an outlook on the field for future studies.

  16. N-terminal sequence analysis of proteins and peptides.

    PubMed

    Reim, D F; Speicher, D W

    2001-05-01

    Amino-terminal (N-terminal) sequence analysis is used to identify the order of amino acids of proteins or peptides, starting at their N-terminal end. This unit describes the sequence analysis of protein or peptide samples in solution or bound to PVDF membranes using a Perkin-Elmer Procise Sequencer. Sequence analysis of protein or peptide samples in solution or bound to PVDF membranes using a Hewlett-Packard Model G1005A sequencer is also described. Methods are provided for optimizing separation of PTH amino acid derivatives on Perkin-Elmer instruments and for increasing the proportion of sample injected onto the PTH analyzer on older Perkin-Elmer instruments by installing a modified sample loop. The amount of data obtained from a single sequencer run is substantial, and careful interpretation of this data by an experienced scientist familiar with the current operation performance of the instrument used for this analysis is critically important. A discussion of data interpretation is therefore provided. Finally, discussion of optimization of sequencer performance as well as possible solutions to frequently encountered problems is included.

  17. Glutamic Acid Selective Chemical Cleavage of Peptide Bonds.

    PubMed

    Nalbone, Joseph M; Lahankar, Neelam; Buissereth, Lyssa; Raj, Monika

    2016-03-04

    Site-specific hydrolysis of peptide bonds at glutamic acid under neutral aqueous conditions is reported. The method relies on the activation of the backbone amide chain at glutamic acid by the formation of a pyroglutamyl (pGlu) imide moiety. This activation increases the susceptibility of a peptide bond toward hydrolysis. The method is highly specific and demonstrates broad substrate scope including cleavage of various bioactive peptides with unnatural amino acid residues, which are unsuitable substrates for enzymatic hydrolysis.

  18. Facilitating protein solubility by use of peptide extensions

    SciTech Connect

    Freimuth, Paul I; Zhang, Yian-Biao; Howitt, Jason

    2013-09-17

    Expression vectors for expression of a protein or polypeptide of interest as a fusion product composed of the protein or polypeptide of interest fused at one terminus to a solubility enhancing peptide extension are provided. Sequences encoding the peptide extensions are provided. The invention further comprises antibodies which bind specifically to one or more of the solubility enhancing peptide extensions.

  19. Co-dependence of genotype and dietary protein intake to affect expression on amino acid/peptide transporters in porcine skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Liu, Y; Kong, X; Li, F; Tan, B; Li, Y; Duan, Y; Yin, Y; He, J; Hu, C; Blachier, F; Wu, Guoyao

    2016-01-01

    A total of 96 barrows (48 pure-bred Bama mini-pigs representing fatty genotype, and 48 Landrace pigs representing lean genotype) were randomly assigned to either a low- or adequate-protein treatment diet. The experimental period commenced at 5 weeks of age and extended to the finishing period. After euthanasia, blood and skeletal muscle samples were collected from pigs at the nursery, growing, and finishing phases. Our results indicate that the concentrations of free AAs in the plasma and muscle decreased as the age of the pigs increased. In addition, a strain × growth phase interaction (P < 0.05) was observed for the free AA pool in the plasma and muscle. The low-protein diet upregulated (P < 0.05) the mRNA levels for T1R1/T1R3 involved in glutamate binding, but downregulated (P < 0.05) the mRNA levels for PAT1, PAT2, and ASCT2, which transport neutral AAs into muscles. Bama mini-pigs had higher (P < 0.05) mRNA levels for LAT1, SNAT2, and EAAC1, but a lower (P < 0.05) mRNA level for PepT1, compared with Landrace pigs. Collectively, our findings indicate that adequate provision of dietary protein plays an important role in regulating profiles of free AA pools and expression of key AA/peptide transporters/transceptors in a genotype- and tissue-specific manner.

  20. Screening bicyclic peptide libraries for protein-protein interaction inhibitors: discovery of a tumor necrosis factor-α antagonist.

    PubMed

    Lian, Wenlong; Upadhyaya, Punit; Rhodes, Curran A; Liu, Yusen; Pei, Dehua

    2013-08-14

    Protein-protein interactions represent a new class of exciting but challenging drug targets, because their large, flat binding sites lack well-defined pockets for small molecules to bind. We report here a methodology for chemical synthesis and screening of large combinatorial libraries of bicyclic peptides displayed on rigid small-molecule scaffolds. With planar trimesic acid as the scaffold, the resulting bicyclic peptides are effective for binding to protein surfaces such as the interfaces of protein-protein interactions. Screening of a bicyclic peptide library against tumor necrosis factor-α (TNFα) identified a potent antagonist that inhibits the TNFα-TNFα receptor interaction and protects cells from TNFα-induced cell death. Bicyclic peptides of this type may provide a general solution for inhibition of protein-protein interactions.

  1. Heterologous production of peptides in plants: fusion proteins and beyond.

    PubMed

    Viana, Juliane Flávia Cançado; Dias, Simoni Campos; Franco, Octávio Luiz; Lacorte, Cristiano

    2013-11-01

    Recombinant DNA technology has allowed the ectopic production of proteins and peptides of different organisms leading to biopharmaceutical production in large cultures of bacterial, yeasts and mammalian cells. Otherwise, the expression of recombinant proteins and peptides in plants is an attractive alternative presenting several advantages over the commonly used expression systems including reduced production costs, easy scale-up and reduced risks of pathogen contamination. Different types of proteins and peptides have been expressed in plants, including antibodies, antigens, and proteins and peptides of medical, veterinary and industrial applications. However, apart from providing a proof of concept, the use of plants as platforms for heterologous protein and peptide production still depends on key steps towards optimization including the enhancement of expression levels, manipulation of post-transcriptional modifications and improvements in purification methods. In this review, strategies to increase heterologous protein and peptide stability and accumulation are discussed, focusing on the expression of peptides through the use of gene fusions.

  2. Rational Design of a Carrier Protein for the Production of Recombinant Toxic Peptides in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Pizzo, Elio; Varcamonti, Mario; Zanfardino, Anna; Sgambati, Valeria; Di Maro, Antimo; Carpentieri, Andrea; Izzo, Viviana; Di Donato, Alberto; Cafaro, Valeria; Notomista, Eugenio

    2016-01-01

    Commercial uses of bioactive peptides require low cost, effective methods for their production. We developed a new carrier protein for high yield production of recombinant peptides in Escherichia coli very well suited for the production of toxic peptides like antimicrobial peptides. GKY20, a short antimicrobial peptide derived from the C-terminus of human thrombin, was fused to the C-terminus of Onconase, a small ribonuclease (104 amino acids), which efficiently drove the peptide into inclusion bodies with very high expression levels (about 200–250 mg/L). After purification of the fusion protein by immobilized metal ion affinity chromatography, peptide was obtained by chemical cleavage in diluted acetic acid of an acid labile Asp-Pro sequence with more than 95% efficiency. To improve peptide purification, Onconase was mutated to eliminate all acid labile sequences thus reducing the release of unwanted peptides during the acid cleavage. Mutations were chosen to preserve the differential solubility of Onconase as function of pH, which allows its selective precipitation at neutral pH after the cleavage. The improved carrier allowed the production of 15–18 mg of recombinant peptide per liter of culture with 96–98% purity without the need of further chromatographic steps after the acid cleavage. The antimicrobial activity of the recombinant peptide, with an additional proline at the N-terminus, was tested on Gram-negative and Gram-positive strains and was found to be identical to that measured for synthetic GKY20. This finding suggests that N-terminal proline residue does not change the antimicrobial properties of recombinant (P)GKY20. The improved carrier, which does not contain cysteine and methionine residues, Asp-Pro and Asn-Gly sequences, is well suited for the production of peptides using any of the most popular chemical cleavage methods. PMID:26808536

  3. Rational Design of a Carrier Protein for the Production of Recombinant Toxic Peptides in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Pane, Katia; Durante, Lorenzo; Pizzo, Elio; Varcamonti, Mario; Zanfardino, Anna; Sgambati, Valeria; Di Maro, Antimo; Carpentieri, Andrea; Izzo, Viviana; Di Donato, Alberto; Cafaro, Valeria; Notomista, Eugenio

    2016-01-01

    Commercial uses of bioactive peptides require low cost, effective methods for their production. We developed a new carrier protein for high yield production of recombinant peptides in Escherichia coli very well suited for the production of toxic peptides like antimicrobial peptides. GKY20, a short antimicrobial peptide derived from the C-terminus of human thrombin, was fused to the C-terminus of Onconase, a small ribonuclease (104 amino acids), which efficiently drove the peptide into inclusion bodies with very high expression levels (about 200-250 mg/L). After purification of the fusion protein by immobilized metal ion affinity chromatography, peptide was obtained by chemical cleavage in diluted acetic acid of an acid labile Asp-Pro sequence with more than 95% efficiency. To improve peptide purification, Onconase was mutated to eliminate all acid labile sequences thus reducing the release of unwanted peptides during the acid cleavage. Mutations were chosen to preserve the differential solubility of Onconase as function of pH, which allows its selective precipitation at neutral pH after the cleavage. The improved carrier allowed the production of 15-18 mg of recombinant peptide per liter of culture with 96-98% purity without the need of further chromatographic steps after the acid cleavage. The antimicrobial activity of the recombinant peptide, with an additional proline at the N-terminus, was tested on Gram-negative and Gram-positive strains and was found to be identical to that measured for synthetic GKY20. This finding suggests that N-terminal proline residue does not change the antimicrobial properties of recombinant (P)GKY20. The improved carrier, which does not contain cysteine and methionine residues, Asp-Pro and Asn-Gly sequences, is well suited for the production of peptides using any of the most popular chemical cleavage methods.

  4. Fmoc/Trt-amino acids: comparison to Fmoc/tBu-amino acids in peptide synthesis.

    PubMed

    Barlos, K; Gatos, D; Koutsogianni, S

    1998-03-01

    Model peptides containing the nucleophilic amino acids Trp and Met have been synthesized with the application of Fmoc/Trt- and Fmoc/tBu-amino acids, for comparison. The deprotection of the peptides synthesized using Fmoc/Trt-amino acids in all cases leads to crude peptides of higher purity than that of the same peptides synthesized using Fmoc/tBu-amino acids.

  5. Food proteins as a source of bioactive peptides with diverse functions.

    PubMed

    Rutherfurd-Markwick, Kay J

    2012-08-01

    In addition to supplying essential nutrients, some food proteins can confer additional health benefits beyond nutrition. The presence of bioactive proteins and peptides in different foods is a factor not currently taken into consideration when assessing the dietary quality of food proteins. The range of described physiological benefits attributed to bioactive proteins and peptides is diverse. Multiple factors can potentially impact on the ability of a bioactive peptide or protein to elicit an effect. Although some food proteins act directly in their intact form to elicit their effects, generally it is peptides derived from digestion, hydrolysis or fermentation that are of most interest. The levels of bioactive peptides generated must be sufficient to elicit a response, but should not be so high as to be unsafe, thus causing negative effects. In addition, some peptides cause systemic effects and therefore must be absorbed, again in sufficient amounts to elicit their action. Many studies to date have been carried out in vitro; therefore it is important that further trials are conducted in vivo to assess efficacy, dose response and safety of the peptides, particularly if health related claims are to be made. Therefore, methods must be developed and standardised that enable the measurement of health benefits and also the level of bioactive peptides which are absorbed into the bloodstream. Once standardised, such methods may provide a new perspective and an additional mechanism for analysing protein quality which is currently not encompassed by the use of the protein digestibility-corrected amino acid score (PDCAAS).

  6. Therapeutic design of peptide modulators of protein-protein interactions in membranes.

    PubMed

    Stone, Tracy A; Deber, Charles M

    2017-04-01

    Membrane proteins play the central roles in a variety of cellular processes, ranging from nutrient uptake and signalling, to cell-cell communication. Their biological functions are directly related to how they fold and assemble; defects often lead to disease. Protein-protein interactions (PPIs) within the membrane are therefore of great interest as therapeutic targets. Here we review the progress in the application of membrane-insertable peptides for the disruption or stabilization of membrane-based PPIs. We describe the design and preparation of transmembrane peptide mimics; and of several categories of peptidomimetics used for study, including d-enantiomers, non-natural amino acids, peptoids, and β-peptides. Further aspects of the review describe modifications to membrane-insertable peptides, including lipidation and cyclization via hydrocarbon stapling. These approaches provide a pathway toward the development of metabolically stable, non-toxic, and efficacious peptide modulators of membrane-based PPIs. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Lipid order/lipid defects and lipid-control of protein activity edited by Dirk Schneider.

  7. Prediction of Peptide and Protein Propensity for Amyloid Formation

    PubMed Central

    Família, Carlos; Dennison, Sarah R.; Quintas, Alexandre; Phoenix, David A.

    2015-01-01

    Understanding which peptides and proteins have the potential to undergo amyloid formation and what driving forces are responsible for amyloid-like fiber formation and stabilization remains limited. This is mainly because proteins that can undergo structural changes, which lead to amyloid formation, are quite diverse and share no obvious sequence or structural homology, despite the structural similarity found in the fibrils. To address these issues, a novel approach based on recursive feature selection and feed-forward neural networks was undertaken to identify key features highly correlated with the self-assembly problem. This approach allowed the identification of seven physicochemical and biochemical properties of the amino acids highly associated with the self-assembly of peptides and proteins into amyloid-like fibrils (normalized frequency of β-sheet, normalized frequency of β-sheet from LG, weights for β-sheet at the window position of 1, isoelectric point, atom-based hydrophobic moment, helix termination parameter at position j+1 and ΔG° values for peptides extrapolated in 0 M urea). Moreover, these features enabled the development of a new predictor (available at http://cran.r-project.org/web/packages/appnn/index.html) capable of accurately and reliably predicting the amyloidogenic propensity from the polypeptide sequence alone with a prediction accuracy of 84.9 % against an external validation dataset of sequences with experimental in vitro, evidence of amyloid formation. PMID:26241652

  8. Prediction of Peptide and Protein Propensity for Amyloid Formation.

    PubMed

    Família, Carlos; Dennison, Sarah R; Quintas, Alexandre; Phoenix, David A

    2015-01-01

    Understanding which peptides and proteins have the potential to undergo amyloid formation and what driving forces are responsible for amyloid-like fiber formation and stabilization remains limited. This is mainly because proteins that can undergo structural changes, which lead to amyloid formation, are quite diverse and share no obvious sequence or structural homology, despite the structural similarity found in the fibrils. To address these issues, a novel approach based on recursive feature selection and feed-forward neural networks was undertaken to identify key features highly correlated with the self-assembly problem. This approach allowed the identification of seven physicochemical and biochemical properties of the amino acids highly associated with the self-assembly of peptides and proteins into amyloid-like fibrils (normalized frequency of β-sheet, normalized frequency of β-sheet from LG, weights for β-sheet at the window position of 1, isoelectric point, atom-based hydrophobic moment, helix termination parameter at position j+1 and ΔG° values for peptides extrapolated in 0 M urea). Moreover, these features enabled the development of a new predictor (available at http://cran.r-project.org/web/packages/appnn/index.html) capable of accurately and reliably predicting the amyloidogenic propensity from the polypeptide sequence alone with a prediction accuracy of 84.9 % against an external validation dataset of sequences with experimental in vitro, evidence of amyloid formation.

  9. Isoelectric Point Separations of Peptides and Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Pergande, Melissa R.; Cologna, Stephanie M.

    2017-01-01

    The separation of ampholytic components according to isoelectric point has played an important role in isolating, reducing complexity and improving peptide and protein detection. This brief review outlines the basics of isoelectric focusing, including a summary of the historical achievements and considerations in experimental design. Derivative methodologies of isoelectric focusing are also discussed including common detection methods used. Applications in a variety of fields using isoelectric point based separations are provided as well as an outlook on the field for future studies. PMID:28248255

  10. Virtual screening using combinatorial cyclic peptide libraries reveals protein interfaces readily targetable by cyclic peptides.

    PubMed

    Duffy, Fergal J; O'Donovan, Darragh; Devocelle, Marc; Moran, Niamh; O'Connell, David J; Shields, Denis C

    2015-03-23

    Protein-protein and protein-peptide interactions are responsible for the vast majority of biological functions in vivo, but targeting these interactions with small molecules has historically been difficult. What is required are efficient combined computational and experimental screening methods to choose among a number of potential protein interfaces worthy of targeting lead macrocyclic compounds for further investigation. To achieve this, we have generated combinatorial 3D virtual libraries of short disulfide-bonded peptides and compared them to pharmacophore models of important protein-protein and protein-peptide structures, including short linear motifs (SLiMs), protein-binding peptides, and turn structures at protein-protein interfaces, built from 3D models available in the Protein Data Bank. We prepared a total of 372 reference pharmacophores, which were matched against 108,659 multiconformer cyclic peptides. After normalization to exclude nonspecific cyclic peptides, the top hits notably are enriched for mimetics of turn structures, including a turn at the interaction surface of human α thrombin, and also feature several protein-binding peptides. The top cyclic peptide hits also cover the critical "hot spot" interaction sites predicted from the interaction crystal structure. We have validated our method by testing cyclic peptides predicted to inhibit thrombin, a key protein in the blood coagulation pathway of important therapeutic interest, identifying a cyclic peptide inhibitor with lead-like activity. We conclude that protein interfaces most readily targetable by cyclic peptides and related macrocyclic drugs may be identified computationally among a set of candidate interfaces, accelerating the choice of interfaces against which lead compounds may be screened.

  11. Peptide and amino acid separation with nanofiltration membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Tsuru, Toshinori; Shutou, Takatoshi; Nakao, Shin-Ichi; Kimura, Shoji )

    1994-05-01

    Several nanofiltration membranes [UTC-20, 60 (Toray Industries), NF-40 (Film-Tech Corporation), Desal-5, G-20 (Desalination Systems), and NTR-7450 (Nitto Electric Industrial Co.)] were applied to separate amino acids and peptides on the basis of charge interaction with the membranes since most of them contain charged functional groups. Nanofiltration membranes having a molecular weight cutoff (MWCO) below 300 (UTC-20, 60, NF-40 and Desal-5) were not suitable for separation of amino acids. On the other hand, separation of amino acids and peptides with nanofiltration membranes having a MWCO around 2000-3000 (NTR-7450 and G-20) was satisfactory based on a charge effect mechanism; charged amino acids and peptides were rejected while neutral amino acids and peptides permeated through the membranes. Separation of peptides having different isoelectric points with nanofiltration membranes was possible by adjusting the pH. 15 refs., 11 figs., 4 tabs.

  12. Protein Sequence Alignment Taking the Structure of Peptide Bond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hara, Toshihide; Sato, Keiko; Ohya, Masanori

    2013-01-01

    In a previous paper1 we proposed a new method for performing pairwise alignment of protein sequences. The method, called MTRAP, achieves the highest performance compared with other alignment methods such as ClustalW22,3 on two benchmarks for alignment accuracy. In this paper, we introduce a new measure between two amino acids based on the formation of peptide bonds. The measure is implemented into MTRAP software to further improve alignment accuracy. Our alignment software is available at

  13. Bioconjugation - using selective chemistry to enhance the properties of proteins and peptides as therapeutics and carriers.

    PubMed

    Gunnoo, Smita B; Madder, Annemieke

    2016-09-14

    The pharmaceutical market has largely been dominated by small molecule drugs; however, larger biomolecules have recently become important contenders. Of these biomolecules, protein and peptide therapeutics are proving useful due to their often improved pharmacokinetic properties. In many circumstances, functionalisation of the protein or peptide therapeutics results in performance enhancement, and various methodologies are applied. In addition, introducing unnatural amino acids for structural reinforcement via chemical modification is also common. These strategies are discussed in this review.

  14. Protein and Peptide Drug Delivery: Oral Approaches

    PubMed Central

    Shaji, Jessy; Patole, V.

    2008-01-01

    Till recent, injections remained the most common means for administering therapeutic proteins and peptides because of their poor oral bioavailability. However, oral route would be preferred to any other route because of its high levels of patient acceptance and long term compliance, which increases the therapeutic value of the drug. Designing and formulating a polypeptide drug delivery through the gastro intestinal tract has been a persistent challenge because of their unfavorable physicochemical properties, which includes enzymatic degradation, poor membrane permeability and large molecular size. The main challenge is to improve the oral bioavailability from less than 1% to at least 30-50%. Consequently, efforts have intensified over the past few decades, where every oral dosage form used for the conventional small molecule drugs has been used to explore oral protein and peptide delivery. Various strategies currently under investigation include chemical modification, formulation vehicles and use of enzyme inhibitors, absorption enhancers and mucoadhesive polymers. This review summarizes different pharmaceutical approaches which overcome various physiological barriers that help to improve oral bioavailability that ultimately achieve formulation goals for oral delivery. PMID:20046732

  15. The effects of orbital spaceflight on bone histomorphometry and messenger ribonucleic acid levels for bone matrix proteins and skeletal signaling peptides in ovariectomized growing rats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cavolina, J. M.; Evans, G. L.; Harris, S. A.; Zhang, M.; Westerlind, K. C.; Turner, R. T.

    1997-01-01

    A 14-day orbital spaceflight was performed using ovariectomized Fisher 344 rats to determine the combined effects of estrogen deficiency and near weightlessness on tibia radial bone growth and cancellous bone turnover. Twelve ovariectomized rats with established cancellous osteopenia were flown aboard the space shuttle Columbia (STS-62). Thirty ovariectomized rats were housed on earth as ground controls: 12 in animal enclosure modules, 12 in vivarium cages, and 6 killed the day of launch for baseline measurements. An additional 18 ovary-intact rats were housed in vivarium cages as ground controls: 8 rats were killed as baseline controls and the remaining 10 rats were killed 14 days later. Ovariectomy increased periosteal bone formation at the tibia-fibula synostosis; cancellous bone resorption and formation in the secondary spongiosa of the proximal tibial metaphysis; and messenger RNA (mRNA) levels for the prepro-alpha2(1) subunit of type 1 collagen, osteocalcin, transforming growth factor-beta, and insulin-like growth factor I in the contralateral proximal tibial metaphysis and for the collagen subunit in periosteum pooled from tibiae and femora and decreased cancellous bone area. Compared to ovariectomized weight-bearing rats, the flight group experienced decreases in periosteal bone formation, collagen subunit mRNA levels, and cancellous bone area. The flight rats had a small decrease in the cancellous mineral apposition rate, but no change in the calculated bone formation rate. Also, spaceflight had no effect on cancellous osteoblast and osteoclast perimeters or on mRNA levels for bone matrix proteins and signaling peptides. On the other hand, spaceflight resulted in an increase in bone resorption, as ascertained from the diminished retention of a preflight fluorochrome label. This latter finding suggests that osteoclast activity was increased. In a follow-up ground-based experiment, unilateral sciatic neurotomy of ovariectomized rats resulted in cancellous

  16. Fatty acid conjugation enhances the activities of antimicrobial peptides.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhining; Yuan, Penghui; Xing, Meng; He, Zhumei; Dong, Chuanfu; Cao, Yongchang; Liu, Qiuyun

    2013-04-01

    Antimicrobial peptides are small molecules that play a crucial role in innate immunity in multi-cellular organisms, and usually expressed and secreted constantly at basal levels to prevent infection, but local production can be augmented upon an infection. The clock is ticking as rising antibiotic abuse has led to the emergence of many drug resistance bacteria. Due to their broad spectrum antibiotic and antifungal activities as well as anti-viral and anti-tumor activities, efforts are being made to develop antimicrobial peptides into future microbial agents. This article describes some of the recent patents on antimicrobial peptides with fatty acid conjugation. Potency and selectivity of antimicrobial peptide can be modulated with fatty acid tails of variable length. Interaction between membranes and antimicrobial peptides was affected by fatty acid conjugation. At concentrations above the critical miscelle concentration (CMC), propensity of solution selfassembly hampered binding of the peptide to cell membranes. Overall, fatty acid conjugation has enhanced the activities of antimicrobial peptides, and occasionally it rendered inactive antimicrobial peptides to be bioactive. Antimicrobial peptides can not only be used as medicine but also as food additives.

  17. Nucleic acids encoding human trithorax protein

    DOEpatents

    Evans, Glen A.; Djabali, Malek; Selleri, Licia; Parry, Pauline

    2001-01-01

    In accordance with the present invention, there is provided an isolated peptide having the characteristics of human trithorax protein (as well as DNA encoding same, antisense DNA derived therefrom and antagonists therefor). The invention peptide is characterized by having a DNA binding domain comprising multiple zinc fingers and at least 40% amino acid identity with respect to the DNA binding domain of Drosophila trithorax protein and at least 70% conserved sequence with respect to the DNA binding domain of Drosophila trithorax protein, and wherein said peptide is encoded by a gene located at chromosome 11 of the human genome at q23. Also provided are methods for the treatment of subject(s) suffering from immunodeficiency, developmental abnormality, inherited disease, or cancer by administering to said subject a therapeutically effective amount of one of the above-described agents (i.e., peptide, antagonist therefor, DNA encoding said peptide or antisense DNA derived therefrom). Also provided is a method for the diagnosis, in a subject, of immunodeficiency, developmental abnormality, inherited disease, or cancer associated with disruption of chromosome 11 at q23.

  18. Predicting three-dimensional conformations of peptides constructed of only glycine, alanine, aspartic acid, and valine.

    PubMed

    Oda, Akifumi; Fukuyoshi, Shuichi

    2015-06-01

    The GADV hypothesis is a form of the protein world hypothesis, which suggests that life originated from proteins (Lacey et al. 1999; Ikehara 2002; Andras 2006). In the GADV hypothesis, life is thought to have originated from primitive proteins constructed of only glycine, alanine, aspartic acid, and valine ([GADV]-proteins). In this study, the three-dimensional (3D) conformations of randomly generated short [GADV]-peptides were computationally investigated using replica-exchange molecular dynamics (REMD) simulations (Sugita and Okamoto 1999). Because the peptides used in this study consisted of only 20 residues each, they could not form certain 3D structures. However, the conformational tendencies of the peptides were elucidated by analyzing the conformational ensembles generated by REMD simulations. The results indicate that secondary structures can be formed in several randomly generated [GADV]-peptides. A long helical structure was found in one of the hydrophobic peptides, supporting the conjecture of the GADV hypothesis that many peptides aggregated to form peptide multimers with enzymatic activity in the primordial soup. In addition, these results indicate that REMD simulations can be used for the structural investigation of short peptides.

  19. Predicting Three-Dimensional Conformations of Peptides Constructed of Only Glycine, Alanine, Aspartic Acid, and Valine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oda, Akifumi; Fukuyoshi, Shuichi

    2015-06-01

    The GADV hypothesis is a form of the protein world hypothesis, which suggests that life originated from proteins (Lacey et al. 1999; Ikehara 2002; Andras 2006). In the GADV hypothesis, life is thought to have originated from primitive proteins constructed of only glycine, alanine, aspartic acid, and valine ([GADV]-proteins). In this study, the three-dimensional (3D) conformations of randomly generated short [GADV]-peptides were computationally investigated using replica-exchange molecular dynamics (REMD) simulations (Sugita and Okamoto 1999). Because the peptides used in this study consisted of only 20 residues each, they could not form certain 3D structures. However, the conformational tendencies of the peptides were elucidated by analyzing the conformational ensembles generated by REMD simulations. The results indicate that secondary structures can be formed in several randomly generated [GADV]-peptides. A long helical structure was found in one of the hydrophobic peptides, supporting the conjecture of the GADV hypothesis that many peptides aggregated to form peptide multimers with enzymatic activity in the primordial soup. In addition, these results indicate that REMD simulations can be used for the structural investigation of short peptides.

  20. Specificity profiling of protein phosphatases toward phosphoseryl and phosphothreonyl peptides.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Qing; Luechapanichkul, Rinrada; Zhai, Yujing; Pei, Dehua

    2013-07-03

    A combinatorial library method was developed to systematically profile the substrate specificity of protein phosphatases toward phosphoseryl (pS) and phosphothreonyl (pT) peptides. Application of this method and a previously reported phosphotyrosyl (pY) library screening technique to dual-specificity phosphatase (DUSP) VH1 of vaccinia virus revealed that VH1 is highly active toward both pS/pT and pY peptides. VH1 exhibits different and more stringent sequence specificity toward pS/pT than pY substrates. Unlike previously characterized protein tyrosine phosphatases (PTPs), the activity and specificity of VH1 are primarily determined by the amino acid residues C-terminal to the pS, pT, or pY residue. In contrast, the mammalian VH1-related (VHR) DUSP has intrinsically low catalytic activity toward pS and pT substrates, suggesting that its primary physiological function is to dephosphorylate pY residues in substrate proteins. This method is applicable to other DUSPs and protein-serine/threonine phosphatases, and the substrate specificity data will be useful for identifying the physiological substrates of these enzymes.

  1. Mutual Amino Acid Catalysis in Salt-Induced Peptide Formation Supports this Mechanism's Role in Prebiotic Peptide Evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suwannachot, Yuttana; Rode, Bernd M.

    1999-10-01

    The presence of some amino acids and dipeptides under the conditions of the salt-induced peptide formation reaction (aqueous solution at 85 °C, Cu(II) and NaCl) has been found to catalyze the formation of homopeptides of other amino acids, which are otherwise produced only in traces or not at all by this reaction. The condensation of Val, Leu and Lys to form their homodipeptides can occur to a considerable extent due to catalytic effects of other amino acids and related compounds, among which glycine, histidine, diglycine and diketopiperazine exhibit the most remarkable activity. These findings also lead to a modification of the table of amino acid sequences preferentially formed by the salt-induced peptide formation (SIPF) reaction, previously used for a comparison with the sequence preferences in membrane proteins of primitive organisms

  2. Milk proteins as a source of tryptophan-containing bioactive peptides.

    PubMed

    Nongonierma, Alice B; FitzGerald, Richard J

    2015-07-01

    Tryptophan (W) is an essential amino acid which is primarily required for protein synthesis. It also acts as a precursor of key biomolecules for human health (serotonin, melatonin, tryptamine, niacin, nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD), phosphorylated NAD (NADP), quinolinic acid, kynureric acid, etc.). Among dietary proteins, milk proteins are particularly rich in W. W residues within milk proteins may be released by proteolytic/peptidolytic enzymes either as a free amino acid or as part of peptide sequences. Different W-containing peptides originating from milk proteins have been shown in vitro to display a wide range of bioactivities such as angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) inhibition along with antioxidant, antidiabetic and satiating related properties. Free W has been shown in certain instances to have an effect on cognition and the aforementioned bioactive properties. However, a higher bioactive potency has generally been observed with specific W-containing peptides compared to free W. Since W is thermolabile, the impact of processing on the stability of W-containing peptides needs to be considered. Milk protein-derived W-containing peptides may have significant potential as natural health promoting agents in humans.

  3. Byonic: Advanced Peptide and Protein Identification Software

    PubMed Central

    Bern, Marshall; Kil, Yong J.; Becker, Christopher

    2013-01-01

    Byonic™ is the name of a software package for peptide and protein identification by tandem mass spectrometry. This software, which has only recently become commercially available, facilitates a much wider range of search possibilities than previous search software such as SEQUEST and Mascot. Byonic allows the user to define an essentially unlimited number of variable modification types. Byonic also allows the user to set a separate limit on the number of occurrences of each modification type, so that a search may consider only one or two chance modifications such as oxidations and deamidations per peptide, yet allow three or four biological modifications such as phosphorylations, which tend to cluster together. Hence Byonic can search for 10s or even 100s of modification types simultaneously without a prohibitively large combinatorial explosion. Byonic’s Wildcard Search™ allows the user to search for unanticipated or even unknown modifications alongside known modifications. Finally, Byonic’s Glycopeptide Search allows the user to identify glycopeptides without prior knowledge of glycan masses or glycosylation sites. PMID:23255153

  4. Enzyme-mediated ligation technologies for peptides and proteins.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Marcel; Toplak, Ana; Quaedflieg, Peter Jlm; Nuijens, Timo

    2017-02-18

    With the steadily increasing complexity and quantity requirements for peptides in industry and academia, the efficient and site-selective ligation of peptides and proteins represents a highly desirable goal. Within this context, enzyme-mediated ligation technologies for peptides and proteins have attracted great interest in recent years as they represent an extremely powerful extension to the scope of chemical methodologies (e.g. native chemical ligation) in basic and applied research. Compared to chemical ligation methods, enzymatic strategies using ligases such as sortase, butelase, peptiligase or omniligase generally feature excellent chemoselectivity, therefore making them valuable tools for protein and peptide chemists.

  5. Role of signal peptides in targeting of proteins in cyanobacteria.

    PubMed Central

    Mackle, M M; Zilinskas, B A

    1994-01-01

    Proteins of cyanobacteria may be transported across one of two membrane systems: the typical eubacterial cell envelope (consisting of an inner membrane, periplasmic space, and an outer membrane) and the photosynthetic thylakoids. To investigate the role of signal peptides in targeting in cyanobacteria, Synechococcus sp. strain PCC 7942 was transformed with vectors carrying the chloramphenicol acetyltransferase reporter gene fused to coding sequences for one of four different signal peptides. These included signal peptides of two proteins of periplasmic space origin (one from Escherichia coli and the other from Synechococcus sp. strain PCC 7942) and two other signal peptides of proteins located in the thylakoid lumen (one from a cyanobacterium and the other from a higher plant). The location of the gene fusion products expressed in Synechococcus sp. strain PCC 7942 was determined by a chloramphenicol acetyltransferase enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay of subcellular fractions. The distribution pattern for gene fusions with periplasmic signal peptides was different from that of gene fusions with thylakoid lumen signal peptides. Primary sequence analysis revealed conserved features in the thylakoid lumen signal peptides that were absent from the periplasmic signal peptides. These results suggest the importance of the signal peptide in protein targeting in cyanobacteria and point to the presence of signal peptide features conserved between chloroplasts and cyanobacteria for targeting of proteins to the thylakoid lumen. Images PMID:8144451

  6. Identification of a peptide binding protein that plays a role in antigen presentation

    SciTech Connect

    Lakey, E.K.; Margoliash, E.; Pierce, S.K.

    1987-03-01

    The helper T-cell response to globular proteins appears, in general, to require intracellular processing of the antigen, such that a peptide fragment containing the T-cell antigenic determinant is released and transported to and held on the surface of an Ia-expressing, antigen-presenting cell. However, the molecular details underlying these phenomena are largely unknown. The means by which antigenic peptides are anchored on the antigen-presenting cell surface was investigated. A cell surface protein is identified that was isolated by it ability to bind to a 24-amino acid peptide fragment of pigeon cytochrome c, residues 81-104, containing the major antigenic determinant for B10.A mouse T cells. This peptide binding protein, purified from (/sup 35/S)methionine-labeled cells, appears as two discrete bands of approx. =72 and 74 kDa after NaDodSO/sub 4//PAGE. The protein can be eluted from the peptide affinity column with equivalent concentrations of either the antigenic pigeon cytochrome c peptide or the corresponding nonantigenic peptide of mouse cytochrome c. However, it does not bind to the native cytochromes c, either of pigeon or mouse, and thus the protein appears to recognize some structure available only in the free peptides. This protein plays a role in antigen presentation. Its expression is not major histocompatibility complex-restricted in that the blocking activity of the antisera can be absorbed on spleen cells from mice of different haplotypes. This peptide binding protein can be isolated from a variety of cell types, including B cells, T cells, and fibroblasts. The anchoring of processed peptides on the cell surface by such a protein may play a role in antigen presentation.

  7. Oral Administration of a Fusion Protein between the Cholera Toxin B Subunit and the 42-Amino Acid Isoform of Amyloid-β Peptide Produced in Silkworm Pupae Protects against Alzheimer's Disease in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Li, Si; Wei, Zhen; Chen, Jian; Chen, Yanhong; Lv, Zhengbing; Yu, Wei; Meng, Qiaohong; Jin, Yongfeng

    2014-01-01

    A key molecule in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a 42-amino acid isoform of the amyloid-β peptide (Aβ42), which is the most toxic element of senile plaques. In this study, to develop an edible, safe, low-cost vaccine for AD, a cholera toxin B subunit (CTB)-Aβ42 fusion protein was successfully expressed in silkworm pupae. We tested the silkworm pupae-derived oral vaccination containing CTB-Aβ42 in a transgenic mouse model of AD. Anti-Aβ42 antibodies were induced in these mice, leading to a decreased Aβ deposition in the brain. We also found that the oral administration of the silk worm pupae vaccine improved the memory and cognition of mice, as assessed using a water maze test. These results suggest that the new edible CTB-Aβ42 silkworm pupae-derived vaccine has potential clinical application in the prevention of AD. PMID:25469702

  8. Oral administration of a fusion protein between the cholera toxin B subunit and the 42-amino acid isoform of amyloid-β peptide produced in silkworm pupae protects against Alzheimer's disease in mice.

    PubMed

    Li, Si; Wei, Zhen; Chen, Jian; Chen, Yanhong; Lv, Zhengbing; Yu, Wei; Meng, Qiaohong; Jin, Yongfeng

    2014-01-01

    A key molecule in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a 42-amino acid isoform of the amyloid-β peptide (Aβ42), which is the most toxic element of senile plaques. In this study, to develop an edible, safe, low-cost vaccine for AD, a cholera toxin B subunit (CTB)-Aβ42 fusion protein was successfully expressed in silkworm pupae. We tested the silkworm pupae-derived oral vaccination containing CTB-Aβ42 in a transgenic mouse model of AD. Anti-Aβ42 antibodies were induced in these mice, leading to a decreased Aβ deposition in the brain. We also found that the oral administration of the silk worm pupae vaccine improved the memory and cognition of mice, as assessed using a water maze test. These results suggest that the new edible CTB-Aβ42 silkworm pupae-derived vaccine has potential clinical application in the prevention of AD.

  9. Bacterial proteins and peptides in cancer therapy

    PubMed Central

    Chakrabarty, Ananda M; Bernardes, Nuno; Fialho, Arsenio M

    2014-01-01

    Cancer is one of the most deadly diseases worldwide. In the last three decades many efforts have been made focused on understanding how cancer grows and responds to drugs. The dominant drug-development paradigm has been the “one drug, one target.” Based on that, the two main targeted therapies developed to combat cancer include the use of tyrosine kinase inhibitors and monoclonal antibodies. Development of drug resistance and side effects represent the major limiting factors for their use in cancer treatment. Nowadays, a new paradigm for cancer drug discovery is emerging wherein multi-targeted approaches gain ground in cancer therapy. Therefore, to overcome resistance to therapy, it is clear that a new generation of drugs is urgently needed. Here, regarding the concept of multi-targeted therapy, we discuss the challenges of using bacterial proteins and peptides as a new generation of effective anti-cancer drugs. PMID:24875003

  10. Simultaneous separation of acid and basic bioactive peptides by electrodialysis with ultrafiltration membrane.

    PubMed

    Poulin, Jean-François; Amiot, Jean; Bazinet, Laurent

    2006-05-29

    beta-Lactoglobulin (beta-lg), one of the major whey components, can release by enzymatic hydrolysis different bioactive peptidic sequences according to the enzyme used. However, these protein hydrolysates have to be fractionated to obtain peptides in a more purified form. The aim of the present work was to evaluate the feasibility of separating peptides from a beta-lg hydrolysate using an ultrafiltration (UF) membrane stacked in an electrodialysis (ED) cell and to study the effect of pH on the migration of basic/cationic and acid/anionic peptides in the ED configuration. Electrodialysis with ultrafiltration membrane (EDUF) appeared to be a selective method of separation since amongst a total of 40 peptides in the raw hydrolysate, only 13 were recovered in the separated adjacent solutions (KCl 1 and KCl 2). Amongst these 13 migrating peptides, 3 acid/anionic peptides migrated only in one compartment (KCl 1), while 3 basic/cationic peptides migrated only in the second compartment (KCl 2) and that whatever the pH conditions of the hydrolysate solution. Furthermore, the highest migration was obtained for the ACE-inhibitory peptide beta-lg 142-148, with a value of 10.75%. The integrity of the UF membrane was kept and EDUF would minimize the fouling of UF membrane.

  11. Molecular self-assembly using peptide nucleic acids.

    PubMed

    Berger, Or; Gazit, Ehud

    2017-01-01

    Peptide nucleic acids (PNAs) are extensively studied for the control of genetic expression since their design in the 1990s. However, the application of PNAs in nanotechnology is much more recent. PNAs share the specific base-pair recognition characteristic of DNA together with material-like properties of polyamides, both proteins and synthetic polymers, such as Kevlar and Nylon. The first application of PNA was in the form of PNA-amphiphiles, resulting in the formation of either lipid integrated structures, hydrogels or fibrillary assemblies. Heteroduplex DNA-PNA assemblies allow the formation of hybrid structures with higher stability as compared with pure DNA. A systematic screen for minimal PNA building blocks resulted in the identification of guanine-containing di-PNA assemblies and protected guanine-PNA monomer spheres showing unique optical properties. Finally, the co-assembly of PNA with thymine-like three-faced cyanuric acid allowed the assembly of poly-adenine PNA into fibers. In summary, we believe that PNAs represent a new and important family of building blocks which converges the advantages of both DNA- and peptide-nanotechnologies.

  12. Molecular mechanics and dynamics studies on the interaction of gallic acid with collagen-like peptides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madhan, B.; Thanikaivelan, P.; Subramanian, V.; Raghava Rao, J.; Unni Nair, Balachandran; Ramasami, T.

    2001-10-01

    Molecular modelling approaches have been used to understand the interaction of collagen-like peptides with gallic acid, which mimic vegetable tanning processes involved in protein stabilization. Several interaction sites have been identified and the binding energies of the complexes have been calculated. The calculated binding energies for various geometries are in the range 6-13 kcal/mol. It is found that some complexes exhibit hydrogen bonding, and electrostatic interaction plays a dominant role in the stabilization of the peptide by gallic acid. The π-OH type of interaction is also observed in the peptide stabilization. Molecular dynamics (MD) simulation for 600 ps revealed the possibility of hydrogen bonding between the collagen-like peptide and gallic acid.

  13. Amino Acid- vs. Peptide-Odorants: Responses of Individual Olfactory Receptor Neurons in an Aquatic Species

    PubMed Central

    Hassenklöver, Thomas; Pallesen, Lars P.; Schild, Detlev; Manzini, Ivan

    2012-01-01

    Amino acids are widely used waterborne olfactory stimuli proposed to serve as cues in the search for food. In natural waters the main source of amino acids is the decomposition of proteins. But this process also produces a variety of small peptides as intermediate cleavage products. In the present study we tested whether amino acids actually are the natural and adequate stimuli for the olfactory receptors they bind to. Alternatively, these olfactory receptors could be peptide receptors which also bind amino acids though at lower affinity. Employing calcium imaging in acute slices of the main olfactory epithelium of the fully aquatic larvae of Xenopus laevis we show that amino acids, and not peptides, are more effective waterborne odorants. PMID:23300867

  14. Amino Acid and Peptide Immobilization on Oxidized Nanocellulose: Spectroscopic Characterization

    PubMed Central

    Barazzouk, Saïd; Daneault, Claude

    2012-01-01

    In this work, oxidized nanocellulose (ONC) was synthesized and chemically coupled with amino acids and peptides using a two step coupling method at room temperature. First, ONC was activated by N-ethyl-N’-(3-dimethylaminopropyl) carbodiimide hydrochloride, forming a stable active ester in the presence of N-hydroxysuccinimide. Second, the active ester was reacted with the amino group of the amino acid or peptide, forming an amide bond between ONC and the grafted molecule. Using this method, the intermolecular interaction of amino acids and peptides was avoided and uniform coupling of these molecules on ONC was achieved. The coupling reaction was very fast in mild conditions and without alteration of the polysaccharide. The coupling products (ONC-amino acids and ONC-peptides) were characterized by transmission electron microscopy and by the absorption, emission, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) spectroscopic techniques.

  15. Peptide nucleic acid probes with charged photocleavable mass markers

    PubMed Central

    Ball, Rachel J; Green, Philip S; Gale, Nittaya; Langley, G John

    2010-01-01

    Halogen-labelled peptide organic acid (HPOA) monomers have been synthesised and incorporated into sequence-specific peptide nucleic acid (PNA) probes. Three different types of probe have been prepared; the unmodified PNA probe, the PNA probe with a mass marker, and the PNA probe with photocleavable mass marker. All three types of probe have been used in model studies to develop a mass spectrometry-based hybridisation assay for detection of point mutations in DNA. PMID:21687524

  16. [Therapeutic properties of proteins and peptides from colostrum and milk].

    PubMed

    Zimecki, Michał; Artym, Jolanta

    2005-01-01

    Colostrum and milk are rich in proteins and peptides which play a crucial role in innate immunity when transferred to the offspring and may accelerate maturation of the immune system in neonates. The immunotropic properties of these proteins prompted investigators research their potential application in prevention and therapy. Lactoferrin (LF) exhibits antibacterial, antifungal, antiviral, antiparasitice, and antitumoral activities. It is protective with regard to intestinal epithelium, promotes bone growth, and accelerates the recovery of immune system function in immunocompromised animals. LF was tried in the treatment of hepatitis C infection and the intestinal form of graft-versus-host disease (GvHD). A proline-rich polypeptide (PRP) demonstrated a variety of immunotropic functions, including the promotion of T-cell maturation and inhibition of autoimmune disorders. PRP, in the form of chewable tablets (Colostrinin) was recently found to improve or stabilize the health status of Alzheimer's disease patients. Casein and casein-derived peptides showed protective activities in enamel demineralization and as caries-preventing agents. The protein hydrolyzates were also protective in diabetic animals, reduced tumor growth, had antihypertensive activity and diminished colicky symptoms in infants. Glycomacropeptide (GMP), a peptide derived from kappa-casein, exhibited various antibacterial and antithrombotic activities. Alpha-lactalbumin (LA) demonstrated antiviral, antitumoral and anti-stress properties. LA-enriched diets were anxiolytic, lowered blood pressure in rats, prevented diarrhea, and led to a better weight gain in malnourished children. HAMLET, a complex of LA and oleic acid, was effective in patients with cutaneous papillomas. Lysozyme found application in infant formulas, the treatment of periodentitis, and the prevention of tooth decay. Milk enriched in lysozyme was used in feeding premature infants suffering from concomitant diseases. Interesting

  17. Preorganized Peptide Scaffolds as Mimics of Phosphorylated Proteins Binding Sites with a High Affinity for Uranyl.

    PubMed

    Starck, Matthieu; Sisommay, Nathalie; Laporte, Fanny A; Oros, Stéphane; Lebrun, Colette; Delangle, Pascale

    2015-12-07

    Cyclic peptides with two phosphoserines and two glutamic acids were developed to mimic high-affinity binding sites for uranyl found in proteins such as osteopontin, which is believed to be a privileged target of this ion in vivo. These peptides adopt a β-sheet structure that allows the coordination of the latter amino acid side chains in the equatorial plane of the dioxo uranyl cation. Complementary spectroscopic and analytical methods revealed that these cyclic peptides are efficient uranyl chelating peptides with a large contribution from the phosphorylated residues. The conditional affinity constants were measured by following fluorescence tryptophan quenching and are larger than 10(10) at physiological pH. These compounds are therefore promising models for understanding uranyl chelation by proteins, which is relevant to this actinide ion toxicity.

  18. Cellular disulfide bond formation in bioactive peptides and proteins.

    PubMed

    Patil, Nitin A; Tailhades, Julien; Hughes, Richard Anthony; Separovic, Frances; Wade, John D; Hossain, Mohammed Akhter

    2015-01-14

    Bioactive peptides play important roles in metabolic regulation and modulation and many are used as therapeutics. These peptides often possess disulfide bonds, which are important for their structure, function and stability. A systematic network of enzymes--a disulfide bond generating enzyme, a disulfide bond donor enzyme and a redox cofactor--that function inside the cell dictates the formation and maintenance of disulfide bonds. The main pathways that catalyze disulfide bond formation in peptides and proteins in prokaryotes and eukaryotes are remarkably similar and share several mechanistic features. This review summarizes the formation of disulfide bonds in peptides and proteins by cellular and recombinant machinery.

  19. Isolation and structural elucidation of antioxidant peptides from oyster (Saccostrea cucullata) protein hydrolysate.

    PubMed

    Umayaparvathi, S; Meenakshi, S; Vimalraj, V; Arumugam, M; Balasubramanian, T

    2014-01-01

    Protein derived from the oyster (Saccostrea cucullata) was hydrolyzed using protease from Bacillus cereus SU12 for isolation of antioxidant peptides. The oyster hydrolysate exhibited a strong antioxidant potential in DPPH (85.7±0.37%) followed by Hydrogen peroxide radical scavenging activity (81.6±0.3%), Hydroxyl radical-scavenging activity (79.32±0.6%), Reducing power assay (2.63±0.2 OD at 700nm). Due to the high antioxidant potential, hydrolysate was fractionated in Sephadex G-25 gel filtration chromatography. The active peptide fraction was further purified by UPLC-MS. Totally 7 antioxidant peptides were collected. Among 7 peptides (SCAP 1-7), 3 peptides (SCAP 1, 3 and 7) had highest scavenging ability on DPPH radicals. The amino acid sequence and molecular mass of purified antioxidant peptides (SCAP1, SCAP3 and SCAP7) were determined by Q-TOF ESI mass spectroscopy and structures of the peptides were Leu-Ala-Asn-Ala-Lys (MW=515.29Da), Pro-Ser-Leu-Val-Gly-Arg-Pro-Pro-Val-Gly-Lys-Leu-Thr-Leu (MW=1432.89Da) and Val-Lys-Val-Leu-Leu-Glu-His-Pro-Val-Leu (MW=1145.75Da), respectively. The unique amino acid composition and sequence in the peptides might play an important role in expression of their antioxidant activity. The results of this study suggest that oyster protein hydrolysate is good source of natural antioxidants.

  20. Plasmodium falciparum AMA-1 erythrocyte binding peptides implicate AMA-1 as erythrocyte binding protein.

    PubMed

    Urquiza, M; Suarez, J E; Cardenas, C; Lopez, R; Puentes, A; Chavez, F; Calvo, J C; Patarroyo, M E

    2000-10-15

    The role of AMA-1 during merozoite invasion has not yet been determined. However, reported experimental evidence suggests that this protein can be used, in particular as erythrocyte-binding protein, since, Fab fragments against this protein are able to block merozoite invasion. Using a previously described methodology, eight peptides with high binding activity to human erythrocyte, scattered along the different domains and having around 130 nM affinity constants, were identified in the Plasmodium falciparum AMA-1 protein. Their binding activity was sialic acid independent. Some of these peptides showed homology with the erythrocyte binding domains of one of the apical organelle protein family, MAEBL, identified in rodent malarial parasites. One of these peptides shares amino acid sequence with a previously reported B-cell epitope which induces antibodies to block parasite growth. The critical residues were identified for erythrocyte binding conserved peptides 4313 (DAEVAGTQYRLPSGKCPVFG), 4321 (VVDNWEKVCPRKNLQNAKFG), 4325 (MIKSAFLPTGAFKADRYKSH) and 4337 (WGEEKRASHTTPVLMEKPYY). All conserved peptides were able to block merozoite invasion of new RBC and development, suggesting that these peptides are involved in P. falciparum invasion.

  1. Recent developments in protein and peptide parenteral delivery approaches

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Ashaben; Cholkar, Kishore; Mitra, Ashim K

    2014-01-01

    Discovery of insulin in the early 1900s initiated the research and development to improve the means of therapeutic protein delivery in patients. In the past decade, great emphasis has been placed on bringing protein and peptide therapeutics to market. Despite tremendous efforts, parenteral delivery still remains the major mode of administration for protein and peptide therapeutics. Other routes such as oral, nasal, pulmonary and buccal are considered more opportunistic rather than routine application. Improving biological half-life, stability and therapeutic efficacy is central to protein and peptide delivery. Several approaches have been tried in the past to improve protein and peptide in vitro/in vivo stability and performance. Approaches may be broadly categorized as chemical modification and colloidal delivery systems. In this review we have discussed various chemical approaches such as PEGylation, hyperglycosylation, mannosylation, and colloidal carriers including microparticles, nanoparticles, liposomes, carbon nanotubes and micelles for improving protein and peptide delivery. Recent developments on in situ thermosensitive gel-based protein and peptide delivery have also been described. This review summarizes recent developments on some currently existing approaches to improve stability, bioavailability and bioactivity of peptide and protein therapeutics following parenteral administration. PMID:24592957

  2. Fragmentation reactions of deprotonated peptides containing aspartic acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harrison, Alex G.; Young, Alex B.

    2006-09-01

    The fragmentation reactions of deprotonated peptides containing aspartic acid have been elucidated using MS2 and MS3 experiments and accurate mass measurements where necessary. The disposition of labile (N and O bonded) hydrogens in the fragmentation products has been studied by exchanging the labile hydrogens for deuterium whereby the [MD]- ion is formed on electrospray ionization. [alpha]-Aspartyl and [beta]-aspartyl dipeptides give very similar fragment ion spectra on collisional activation, involving for both species primarily formation of the y1 ion and loss of H2O from [MH]- followed by further fragmentation, thus precluding the distinction of the isomeric species by negative ion tandem mass spectrometry. Dipeptides of sequence HXxxAspOH give characteristic spectra different from the [alpha]- and [beta]-isomers. For larger peptides containing aspartic acid a common fragmentation reaction involves nominal cleavage of the NC bond N-terminal to the aspartic acid residue to form a c ion (deprotonated amino acid amide (c1) or peptide amide (cn)) and the complimentary product involving elimination of a neutral amino acid amide or peptide amide. When aspartic acid is in the C-terminal position this fragmentation reaction occurs from the [MH]- ion while when the aspartic acid is not in the C-terminal position the fragmentation reaction occurs mainly from the [MHH2O]- ion. The products of this NC bond cleavage reaction serve to identify the position of the aspartic acid residue in the peptide.

  3. Predicting anticancer peptides with Chou's pseudo amino acid composition and investigating their mutagenicity via Ames test.

    PubMed

    Hajisharifi, Zohre; Piryaiee, Moien; Mohammad Beigi, Majid; Behbahani, Mandana; Mohabatkar, Hassan

    2014-01-21

    Cancer is an important reason of death worldwide. Traditional cytotoxic therapies, such as radiation and chemotherapy, are expensive and cause severe side effects. Currently, design of anticancer peptides is a more effective way for cancer treatment. So there is a need to develop a computational method for predicting the anticancer peptides. In the present study, two methods have been developed to predict these peptides using support vector machine (SVM) as a powerful machine learning algorithm. Classifiers have been applied based on the concept of Chou's pseudo-amino acid composition (PseAAC) and local alignment kernel. Since a number of HIV-1 proteins have cytotoxic effect, therefore we predicted the anticancer effect of HIV-1 p24 protein with these methods. After the prediction, mutagenicity of 2 anticancer peptides and 2 non-anticancer peptides was investigated by Ames test. Our results show that, the accuracy and the specificity of local alignment kernel based method are 89.7% and 92.68%, respectively. The accuracy and specificity of PseAAC-based method are 83.82% and 85.36%, respectively. By computational analysis, out of 22 peptides of p24 protein, 4 peptides are anticancer and 18 are non-anticancer. In the Ames test results, it is clear that anticancer peptides (ARP788.8 and ARP788.21) are not mutagenic. Therefore the results demonstrate that the described computation methods are useful to identify potential anticancer peptides, which are worthy of further experimental validation and 2 peptides (ARP788.8 and ARP788.21) of HIV-1 p24 protein can be used as new anticancer candidates without mutagenicity.

  4. Peptide drugs to target G protein-coupled receptors.

    PubMed

    Bellmann-Sickert, Kathrin; Beck-Sickinger, Annette G

    2010-09-01

    Major indications for use of peptide-based therapeutics include endocrine functions (especially diabetes mellitus and obesity), infectious diseases, and cancer. Whereas some peptide pharmaceuticals are drugs, acting as agonists or antagonists to directly treat cancer, others (including peptide diagnostics and tumour-targeting pharmaceuticals) use peptides to 'shuttle' a chemotherapeutic agent or a tracer to the tumour and allow sensitive imaging or targeted therapy. Significant progress has been made in the last few years to overcome disadvantages in peptide design such as short half-life, fast proteolytic cleavage, and low oral bioavailability. These advances include peptide PEGylation, lipidisation or multimerisation; the introduction of peptidomimetic elements into the sequences; and innovative uptake strategies such as liposomal, capsule or subcutaneous formulations. This review focuses on peptides targeting G protein-coupled receptors that are promising drug candidates or that have recently entered the pharmaceutical market.

  5. Structural basis for precursor protein-directed ribosomal peptide macrocyclization

    PubMed Central

    Li, Kunhua; Condurso, Heather L.; Li, Gengnan; Ding, Yousong; Bruner, Steven D.

    2016-01-01

    Macrocyclization is a common feature of natural product biosynthetic pathways including the diverse family of ribosomal peptides. Microviridins are architecturally complex cyanobacterial ribosomal peptides whose members target proteases with potent reversible inhibition. The product structure is constructed by three macrocyclizations catalyzed sequentially by two members of the ATP-grasp family, a unique strategy for ribosomal peptide macrocyclization. Here, we describe the detailed structural basis for the enzyme-catalyzed macrocyclizations in the microviridin J pathway of Microcystis aeruginosa. The macrocyclases, MdnC and MdnB, interact with a conserved α-helix of the precursor peptide using a novel precursor peptide recognition mechanism. The results provide insight into the unique protein/protein interactions key to the chemistry, suggest an origin of the natural combinatorial synthesis of microviridin peptides and provide a framework for future engineering efforts to generate designed compounds. PMID:27669417

  6. Structural basis for precursor protein-directed ribosomal peptide macrocyclization.

    PubMed

    Li, Kunhua; Condurso, Heather L; Li, Gengnan; Ding, Yousong; Bruner, Steven D

    2016-11-01

    Macrocyclization is a common feature of natural product biosynthetic pathways including the diverse family of ribosomal peptides. Microviridins are architecturally complex cyanobacterial ribosomal peptides that target proteases with potent reversible inhibition. The product structure is constructed via three macrocyclizations catalyzed sequentially by two members of the ATP-grasp family, a unique strategy for ribosomal peptide macrocyclization. Here we describe in detail the structural basis for the enzyme-catalyzed macrocyclizations in the microviridin J pathway of Microcystis aeruginosa. The macrocyclases MdnC and MdnB interact with a conserved α-helix of the precursor peptide using a novel precursor-peptide recognition mechanism. The results provide insight into the unique protein-protein interactions that are key to the chemistry, suggest an origin for the natural combinatorial synthesis of microviridin peptides, and provide a framework for future engineering efforts to generate designed compounds.

  7. Reverse-phase HPLC separation of hemp seed (Cannabis sativa L.) protein hydrolysate produced peptide fractions with enhanced antioxidant capacity.

    PubMed

    Girgih, Abraham T; Udenigwe, Chibuike C; Aluko, Rotimi E

    2013-03-01

    Hemp seed protein hydrolysate (HPH) was produced through simulated gastrointestinal tract (GIT) digestion of hemp seed protein isolate followed by partial purification and separation into eight peptide fractions by reverse-phase (RP)-HPLC. The peptide fractions exhibited higher oxygen radical absorbance capacity as well as scavenging of 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl, superoxide and hydroxyl radicals when compared to HPH. Radical scavenging activities of the fractionated peptides increased as content of hydrophobic amino acids or elution time was increased, with the exception of hydroxyl radical scavenging that showed decreased trend. Glutathione (GSH), HPH and the RP-HPLC peptide fractions possessed low ferric ion reducing ability but all had strong (>60 %) metal chelating activities. Inhibition of linoleic acid oxidation by some of the HPH peptide fractions was higher at 1 mg/ml when compared to that observed at 0.1 mg/ml peptide concentration. Peptide separation resulted in higher concentration of some hydrophobic amino acids (especially proline, leucine and isoleucine) in the fractions (mainly F5 and F8) when compared to HPH. The elution time-dependent increased concentrations of the hydrophobic amino acids coupled with decreased levels of positively charged amino acids may have been responsible for the significantly higher (p < 0.05) antioxidant properties observed for some of the peptide fractions when compared to the unfractionated HPH. In conclusion, the antioxidant activity of HPH after simulated GIT digestion is mainly influenced by the amino acid composition of some of its peptides.

  8. Genotoxicity assessment of peptide/protein-related biotherapeutics: points to consider before testing.

    PubMed

    Thybaud, Veronique; Kasper, Peter; Sobol, Zhanna; Elhajouji, Azeddine; Fellows, Mick; Guerard, Melanie; Lynch, Anthony M; Sutter, Andreas; Tanir, Jennifer Y

    2016-07-01

    The ICH S6(R1) recommendations on safety evaluation of biotherapeutics have led to uncertainty in determining what would constitute a cause for concern that would require genotoxicity testing. A Health and Environmental Sciences Institute's Genetic Toxicology Technical Committee Workgroup was formed to review the current practice of genotoxicity assessment of peptide/protein-related biotherapeutics. There are a number of properties of peptide/protein-related biotherapeutics that distinguish such products from traditional 'small molecule' drugs and need to be taken into consideration when assessing whether genotoxicity testing may be warranted and if so, how to do it appropriately. Case examples were provided by participating companies and decision trees were elaborated to determine whether and when genotoxicity evaluation is needed for peptides containing natural amino acids, non-natural amino acids and other chemical entities and for unconjugated and conjugated proteins. From a scientific point of view, there is no reason for testing peptides containing exclusively natural amino acids irrespective of the manufacturing process. If non-natural amino acids, organic linkers and other non-linker chemical components have already been tested for genotoxicity, there is no need to re-evaluate them when used in different peptide/protein-related biotherapeutics. Unless the peptides have been modified to be able to enter the cells, it is generally more appropriate to evaluate the peptides containing the non-natural amino acids and other non-linker chemical moieties in vivo where the cleavage products can be formed. For linkers, it is important to determine if exposure to reactive forms are likely to occur and from which origin. When the linkers are anticipated to be potential mutagenic impurities they should be evaluated according to ICH M7. If linkers are expected to be catabolic products, it is recommended to test the entire conjugate in vivo, as this would ensure that the

  9. SNIPER peptide-mediated degradation of endogenous proteins.

    PubMed

    Fan, Xuelai; Wang, Yu Tian

    2015-03-02

    Rapid and reversible methods for altering the function of endogenous proteins are not only indispensable tools for probing complex biological systems, but may potentially drive the development of new therapeutics for the treatment of human diseases. Genetic approaches have provided insights into protein function, but are limited in speed, reversibility and spatiotemporal control. To overcome these limitations, we have developed a peptide-based method (SNIPER: Selective Native Protein Eradication) to degrade any given endogenous protein at the post-translational level by harnessing chaperone-mediated autophagy, a major intracellular protein degradation pathway. This unit presents a typical strategy in the design and validation of a protein-knockdown peptide.

  10. Analysis of proteins and peptides by electromigration methods in microchips.

    PubMed

    Štěpánová, Sille; Kašička, Václav

    2017-01-01

    This review presents the developments and applications of microchip electromigration methods in the separation and analysis of peptides and proteins in the period 2011-mid-2016. The developments in sample preparation and preconcentration, microchannel material, and surface treatment are described. Separations by various microchip electromigration methods (zone electrophoresis in free and sieving media, affinity electrophoresis, isotachophoresis, isoelectric focusing, electrokinetic chromatography, and electrochromatography) are demonstrated. Advances in detection methods are reported and novel applications in the areas of proteomics and peptidomics, quality control of peptide and protein pharmaceuticals, analysis of proteins and peptides in biomatrices, and determination of physicochemical parameters are shown.

  11. Fibroin-modulator-binding protein-1 (FMBP-1) contains a novel DNA-binding domain, repeats of the score and three amino acid peptide (STP), conserved from Caenorhabditis elegans to humans.

    PubMed

    Takiya, Shigeharu; Ishikawa, Tetsurou; Ohtsuka, Katsuya; Nishita, Yoshinori; Suzuki, Yoshiaki

    2005-01-01

    The predicted transcriptional regulatory factor for the fibroin gene of the silkworm Bombyx mori, fibroin-modulator-binding protein-1 (FMBP-1), was purified by sequential DNA affinity column chromatography, and cDNA clones corresponding to FMBP-1 were isolated from a library. The N-terminal half of FMBP-1 has a weak similarity to the DNA-binding domain of several transcriptional regulatory factors in higher plants. The C-terminal half contains four tandem repeats of a novel 23 amino acid motif, which we named the score and three amino acid peptide (STP). Other genes containing STP repeats were found in Drosophila, Caenorhabditis elegans, mouse and human. Mutational analysis of FMBP-1 showed that the STP repeats form a novel DNA-binding domain. Sequences flanking STP repeats modulated DNA-binding activity. The FMBP-1 gene was expressed during the fourth to fifth instar. FMBP-1 activity appeared to be regulated at the transcriptional level and by the post-transcriptional modification.

  12. Analysis of Endogenous D-Amino Acid-Containing Peptides in Metazoa

    PubMed Central

    Bai, Lu; Sheeley, Sarah; Sweedler, Jonathan V.

    2010-01-01

    Peptides are chiral molecules with their structure determined by the composition and configuration of their amino acid building blocks. The naturally occurring amino acids, except glycine, possess two chiral forms. This allows the formation of multiple peptide diastereomers that have the same sequence. Although living organisms use L-amino acids to make proteins, a group of D-amino acid-containing peptides (DAACPs) has been discovered in animals that have at least one of their residues isomerized to the D-form via an enzyme-catalyzed process. In many cases, the biological functions of these peptides are enhanced due to this structural conversion. These DAACPs are different from those known to occur in bacterial cell wall and antibiotic peptides, the latter of which are synthesized in a ribosome-independent manner. DAACPs have now also been identified in a number of distinct groups throughout the Metazoa. Their serendipitous discovery has often resulted from discrepancies observed in bioassays or in chromatographic behavior between natural peptide fractions and peptides synthesized according to a presumed all-L sequence. Because this L-to-D post-translational modification is subtle and not detectable by most sequence determination approaches, it is reasonable to suspect that many studies have overlooked this change; accordingly, DAACPs may be more prevalent than currently thought. Although diastereomer separation techniques developed with synthetic peptides in recent years have greatly aided in the discovery of natural DAACPs, there is a need for new, more robust methods for naturally complex samples. In this review, a brief history of DAACPs in animals is presented, followed by discussion of a variety of analytical methods that have been used for diastereomeric separation and detection of peptides. PMID:20490347

  13. Inhibition of infectious human immunodeficiency virus type 1 particle formation by Gag protein-derived peptides.

    PubMed

    Niedrig, M; Gelderblom, H R; Pauli, G; März, J; Bickhard, H; Wolf, H; Modrow, S

    1994-06-01

    Sequential overlapping Gag protein-derived oligopeptides of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) 22 to 24 amino acids long, were synthesized and tested in vitro for antiviral activity. Two synthetic peptides, one derived from the matrix protein p17 (NPGLLETSEGCRQ, amino acids 47 to 59) and one located in the capsid protein p24 (PAATLEEMMTA, amino acids 339 to 349) inhibited the production of infectious virus when added to HIV-1-infected cultures when used in the range of 20 to 200 micrograms/ml. As shown by thin section electron microscopy, peptide treatment resulted in the release of immature, deformed virus particles suggesting that the two peptides interfered with assembly and maturation. Other Gag protein-derived oligopeptides had little or no influence on virus production. To characterize further the functionally active regions we synthesized peptide derivatives with three consecutive amino acids substituted by alanine; they did not cause inhibition. Therefore the regions responsible for inhibition were located between amino acids 50 to 61 in p17, and 342 to 350 in p24. These observations might lead to the development of a new antiviral strategy affecting the late stage of virus replication.

  14. Enzymatic digestion of the milk protein beta-casein releases potent chemotactic peptide(s) for monocytes and macrophages.

    PubMed

    Kitazawa, Haruki; Yonezawa, Kumiko; Tohno, Masanori; Shimosato, Takeshi; Kawai, Yasushi; Saito, Tadao; Wang, Ji Ming

    2007-09-01

    Proteins in the milk release biologically active peptides upon enzymatic digestion. In the present study, we report the identification of novel monocyte/macrophage chemotactic peptides derived from enzymatically digested bovine beta-casein, a casein family member that is a major constituent of milk. Beta-casein fragments generated by actinase E showed potent chemotactic activity for human and mouse monocytes/macrophages, but not neutrophils, T lymphocytes or dendritic cells. The fragment-induced migration of human monocytes was inhibited by pertussis toxin and was not desensitized by a variety of known chemoattractants, suggesting that the digests activate a unique G protein-coupled receptor(s). The digests were further fractionated and purified to yield 3 small peptides. One peptide Q1 designated as "beta-casochemotide-1" with the amino acid sequence of YPVEP (f114-118 of beta-casein) induced high levels of macrophage chemotaxis. It also promoted calcium mobilization in macrophages, another indication of cell activation. Our study suggests that biologically active peptides released by actinase-digested milk beta-casein may promote innate host immune responses by inducing macrophage migration and activation.

  15. Aromatic amino acids providing characteristic motifs in the Raman and SERS spectroscopy of peptides.

    PubMed

    Wei, Fang; Zhang, Dongmao; Halas, Naomi J; Hartgerink, Jeffrey D

    2008-07-31

    Raman and surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopies (SERS) are potentially important tools in the characterization of biomolecules such as proteins and DNA. In this work, SERS spectra of three cysteine-containing aromatic peptides: tryptophan-cysteine, tyrosine-cysteine, and phenylalanine-cysteine, bound to Au nanoshell substrates, were obtained, and compared to their respective normal Raman spectra. While the linewidths of the SERS peaks are significantly broadened (up to 70%), no significant spectral shifts (<6 cm (-1)) of the major Stokes modes were observed between the two modalities. We show that the Raman and SERS spectra of penetratin, a cell-penetrating peptide oligomer, can be comprised quite reliably from the spectra of its constituent aromatic amino acids except in the backbone regions where the spectral intensities are critically dependent on the length and conformations of the probed molecules. From this study we conclude that, together with protein backbone groups, aromatic amino acid residues provide the overwhelmingly dominant features in the Raman and SERS spectra of peptides and proteins when present. It follows that the Raman modes of these three small constructed peptides may likely apply to the assignment of Raman and SERS features in the spectra of other peptides and proteins.

  16. Signal peptides are allosteric activators of the protein translocase

    PubMed Central

    Gouridis, Giorgos; Karamanou, Spyridoula; Gelis, Ioannis; Kalodimos, Charalampos G.; Economou, Anastassios

    2010-01-01

    Extra-cytoplasmic polypeptides are usually synthesized as “preproteins” carrying aminoterminal, cleavable signal peptides1 and secreted across membranes by translocases. The main bacterial translocase comprises the SecYEG protein-conducting channel and the peripheral ATPase motor SecA2,3. Most proteins destined for the periplasm and beyond are exported post-translationally by SecA2,3. Preprotein targeting to SecA is thought to involve signal peptides4 and chaperones like SecB5,6. Here we reveal that signal peptides have a novel role beyond targeting: they are essential allosteric activators of the translocase. Upon docking on their binding groove on SecA, signal peptides act in trans to drive three successive states: first, “triggering” that drives the translocase to a lower activation energy state; then “trapping” that engages non-native preprotein mature domains docked with high affinity on the secretion apparatus and, finally, “secretion” during which trapped mature domains undergo multiple turnovers of translocation in segments7. A significant contribution by mature domains renders signal peptides less critical in bacterial secretory protein targeting than currently assumed. Rather, it is their function as allosteric activators of the translocase that renders signal peptides essential for protein secretion. A role for signal peptides and targeting sequences as allosteric activators may be universal in protein translocases. PMID:19924216

  17. Structural basis for precursor protein-directed ribosomal peptide macrocyclization

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Kunhua; Condurso, Heather L.; Li, Gengnan; Ding, Yousong; Bruner, Steven D.

    2016-11-11

    Macrocyclization is a common feature of natural product biosynthetic pathways including the diverse family of ribosomal peptides. Microviridins are architecturally complex cyanobacterial ribosomal peptides that target proteases with potent reversible inhibition. The product structure is constructed via three macrocyclizations catalyzed sequentially by two members of the ATP-grasp family, a unique strategy for ribosomal peptide macrocyclization. Here we describe in detail the structural basis for the enzyme-catalyzed macrocyclizations in the microviridin J pathway of Microcystis aeruginosa. The macrocyclases MdnC and MdnB interact with a conserved α-helix of the precursor peptide using a novel precursor-peptide recognition mechanism. The results provide insight into the unique protein–protein interactions that are key to the chemistry, suggest an origin for the natural combinatorial synthesis of microviridin peptides, and provide a framework for future engineering efforts to generate designed compounds.

  18. Protein hydrolysates in animal nutrition: Industrial production, bioactive peptides, and functional significance.

    PubMed

    Hou, Yongqing; Wu, Zhenlong; Dai, Zhaolai; Wang, Genhu; Wu, Guoyao

    2017-01-01

    Recent years have witnessed growing interest in the role of peptides in animal nutrition. Chemical, enzymatic, or microbial hydrolysis of proteins in animal by-products or plant-source feedstuffs before feeding is an attractive means of generating high-quality small or large peptides that have both nutritional and physiological or regulatory functions in livestock, poultry and fish. These peptides may also be formed from ingested proteins in the gastrointestinal tract, but the types of resultant peptides can vary greatly with the physiological conditions of the animals and the composition of the diets. In the small intestine, large peptides are hydrolyzed to small peptides, which are absorbed into enterocytes faster than free amino acids (AAs) to provide a more balanced pattern of AAs in the blood circulation. Some peptides of plant or animal sources also have antimicrobial, antioxidant, antihypertensive, and immunomodulatory activities. Those peptides which confer biological functions beyond their nutritional value are called bioactive peptides. They are usually 2-20 AA residues in length but may consist of >20 AA residues. Inclusion of some (e.g. 2-8%) animal-protein hydrolysates (e.g., porcine intestine, porcine mucosa, salmon viscera, or poultry tissue hydrolysates) or soybean protein hydrolysates in practical corn- and soybean meal-based diets can ensure desirable rates of growth performance and feed efficiency in weanling pigs, young calves, post-hatching poultry, and fish. Thus, protein hydrolysates hold promise in optimizing the nutrition of domestic and companion animals, as well as their health (particularly gut health) and well-being.

  19. Milk proteins-derived bioactive peptides in dairy products: molecular, biological and methodological aspects.

    PubMed

    Dziuba, Bartłomiej; Dziuba, Marta

    2014-01-01

    Proteins are one of the primary components of the food, both in terms of nutrition and function. They are main source of amino acids, essential for synthesis of proteins, and also source of energy. Additionally, many proteins exhibit specific biological activities, which may have effect on functional or pro-health properties of food products. These proteins and their hydrolysis products, peptides, may influence the properties of food and human organism. The number of commercially available food products containing bioactive peptides is very low, apart from that milk proteins are their rich source. It could be supposed that number of available products with declared activity will rise in near future because of observed strong uptrend on interest in such products. Molecular and biological properties of milk proteins, as precursors of bioactive peptides was characterised in the work. Therefore, the strategy of research and obtaining of such peptides both in laboratory and industrial scale, as well as the range of their commercial application, was presented. Several examples of research efforts presenting high potential to develop new products containing bioactive peptides from milk proteins and predetermined as nutraceuticals was described.

  20. A luminescent affinity tag for proteins based on the terbium(III)-binding peptide.

    PubMed

    Sueda, Shinji; Tanaka, Shogo; Inoue, Sayomi; Komatsu, Hideyuki

    2012-03-01

    Genetically encoded tags attached to proteins of interest are widely exploited for proteome analysis. Here, we present Tb(3+)-binding peptides (TBPs) which can be used for both luminescent measurements and affinity purification of proteins. TBPs consist of acidic amino acid residues and tryptophan residues which serve as Tb(3+)-binding sites and sensitizers for Tb(3+) luminescence, respectively. The Tb(3+) complexes of TBPs fused to a target protein exhibited luminescence characteristic of Tb(3+) by excitation of the tryptophan residue, and fusion proteins fused to one of the TPBs were successfully isolated from Escherichia coli cell lysate by affinity chromatography with a Tb(3+)-immobilized solid support.

  1. Origination of the Protein Fold Repertoire from Oily Pluripotent Peptides

    PubMed Central

    Mannige, Ranjan V.

    2014-01-01

    While the repertoire of protein folds that exists today underlies most of life’s capabilities, our mechanistic picture of protein fold origination is incomplete. This paper discusses a hypothetical mechanism for the emergence of the protein fold repertoire from highly dynamic and collapsed peptides, exemplified by peptides with high oil content or hydrophobicity. These peptides are called pluripotent to emphasize their capacity to evolve into numerous folds transiently available to them. As evidence, the paper will discuss previous simulation work on the superior fold evolvability of oily peptides, trace (“fossil”) evidence within proteomes seen today, and a general relationship between protein dynamism and evolvability. Aside from implications on the origination of protein folds, the hypothesis implies that the vanishing utility of a random peptide in protein origination may be relatively exaggerated, as some random peptides with a certain composition (e.g., oily) may fare better than others. In later sections, the hypothesis is discussed in the context of existing discussions regarding the spontaneous origination of biomolecules. PMID:28250375

  2. Peptides and proteins in matter wave interferometry: Challenges and prospects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sezer, Ugur; Geyer, Philipp; Mairhofer, Lukas; Brand, Christian; Doerre, Nadine; Rodewald, Jonas; Schaetti, Jonas; Koehler, Valentin; Mayor, Marcel; Arndt, Markus

    2016-05-01

    Recent developments in matter wave physics suggest that quantum interferometry with biologically relevant nanomaterials is becoming feasible for amino acids, peptides, proteins and RNA/DNA strands. Quantum interference of biomolecules is interesting as it can mimic Schrödinger's cat states with molecules of high mass, elevated temperature and biological functionality. Additionally, the high internal complexity can give rise to a rich variety of couplings to the environment and new handles for quantitative tests of quantum decoherence. Finally, matter wave interferometers are highly sensitive force sensors and pave the way for quantum-assisted measurements of biomolecular properties in interaction with tailored or biomimetic environments. Recent interferometer concepts such as the Kapitza-Dirac-Talbot-Lau interferometer (KDTLI) or the Optical Time-domain Matter Wave interferometer (OTIMA) have already proven their potential for quantum optics in the mass range beyond 10000 amu and for metrology. Here we show our advances in quantum interferometry with vitamins and peptides and discuss methods of realizing cold, intense and sufficiently slow beams of synthetically tailored or hydrated polypeptides with promising properties for a new generation of quantum optics.

  3. Current trends in mass spectrometry of peptides and proteins: Application to veterinary and sports-doping control.

    PubMed

    van den Broek, Irene; Blokland, Marco; Nessen, Merel A; Sterk, Saskia

    2015-01-01

    Detection of misuse of peptides and proteins as growth promoters is a major issue for sport and food regulatory agencies. The limitations of current analytical detection strategies for this class of compounds, in combination with their efficacy in growth-promoting effects, make peptide and protein drugs highly susceptible to abuse by either athletes or farmers who seek for products to illicitly enhance muscle growth. Mass spectrometry (MS) for qualitative analysis of peptides and proteins is well-established, particularly due to tremendous efforts in the proteomics community. Similarly, due to advancements in targeted proteomic strategies and the rapid growth of protein-based biopharmaceuticals, MS for quantitative analysis of peptides and proteins is becoming more widely accepted. These continuous advances in MS instrumentation and MS-based methodologies offer enormous opportunities for detection and confirmation of peptides and proteins. Therefore, MS seems to be the method of choice to improve the qualitative and quantitative analysis of peptide and proteins with growth-promoting properties. This review aims to address the opportunities of MS for peptide and protein analysis in veterinary control and sports-doping control with a particular focus on detection of illicit growth promotion. An overview of potential peptide and protein targets, including their amino acid sequence characteristics and current MS-based detection strategies is, therefore, provided. Furthermore, improvements of current and new detection strategies with state-of-the-art MS instrumentation are discussed for qualitative and quantitative approaches.

  4. Isolation, Purification and Molecular Mechanism of a Peanut Protein-Derived ACE-Inhibitory Peptide

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Aimin; Liu, Hongzhi; Liu, Li; Hu, Hui; Wang, Qiang; Adhikari, Benu

    2014-01-01

    Although a number of bioactive peptides are capable of angiotensin I-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitory effects, little is known regarding the mechanism of peanut peptides using molecular simulation. The aim of this study was to obtain ACE inhibiting peptide from peanut protein and provide insight on the molecular mechanism of its ACE inhibiting action. Peanut peptides having ACE inhibitory activity were isolated through enzymatic hydrolysis and ultrafiltration. Further chromatographic fractionation was conducted to isolate a more potent peanut peptide and its antihypertensive activity was analyzed through in vitro ACE inhibitory tests and in vivo animal experiments. MALDI-TOF/TOF-MS was used to identify its amino acid sequence. Mechanism of ACE inhibition of P8 was analyzed using molecular docking and molecular dynamics simulation. A peanut peptide (P8) having Lys-Leu-Tyr-Met-Arg-Pro amino acid sequence was obtained which had the highest ACE inhibiting activity of 85.77% (half maximal inhibitory concentration (IC50): 0.0052 mg/ml). This peanut peptide is a competitive inhibitor and show significant short term (12 h) and long term (28 days) antihypertensive activity. Dynamic tests illustrated that P8 can be successfully docked into the active pocket of ACE and can be combined with several amino acid residues. Hydrogen bond, electrostatic bond and Pi-bond were found to be the three main interaction contributing to the structural stability of ACE-peptide complex. In addition, zinc atom could form metal-carboxylic coordination bond with Tyr, Met residues of P8, resulting into its high ACE inhibiting activity. Our finding indicated that the peanut peptide (P8) having a Lys-Leu-Tyr-Met-Arg-Pro amino acid sequence can be a promising candidate for functional foods and prescription drug aimed at control of hypertension. PMID:25347076

  5. Intracellular protein delivery activity of peptides derived from insulin-like growth factor binding proteins 3 and 5

    SciTech Connect

    Goda, Natsuko; Tenno, Takeshi; Inomata, Kosuke; Shirakawa, Masahiro; Tanaka, Toshiki; Hiroaki, Hidekazu

    2008-08-01

    Insulin-like growth factor binding proteins (IGFBPs) have various IGF-independent cellular activities, including receptor-independent cellular uptake followed by transcriptional regulation, although mechanisms of cellular entry remain unclear. Herein, we focused on their receptor-independent cellular entry mechanism in terms of protein transduction domain (PTD) activity, which is an emerging technique useful for clinical applications. The peptides of 18 amino acid residues derived from IGFBP-3 and IGFBP-5, which involve heparin-binding regions, mediated cellular delivery of an exogenous protein into NIH3T3 and HeLa cells. Relative protein delivery activities of IGFBP-3/5-derived peptides were approximately 20-150% compared to that of the HIV-Tat peptide, a potent PTD. Heparin inhibited the uptake of the fusion proteins with IGFBP-3 and IGFBP-5, indicating that the delivery pathway is heparin-dependent endocytosis, similar to that of HIV-Tat. The delivery of GST fused to HIV-Tat was competed by either IGFBP-3 or IGFBP-5-derived synthetic peptides. Therefore, the entry pathways of the three PTDs are shared. Our data has shown a new approach for designing protein delivery systems using IGFBP-3/5 derived peptides based on the molecular mechanisms of IGF-independent activities of IGFBPs.

  6. Functional Proteins from Short Peptides: Dayhoff's Hypothesis Turns 50.

    PubMed

    Romero Romero, M Luisa; Rabin, Avigayel; Tawfik, Dan S

    2016-12-23

    First and foremost: Margaret Dayhoff's 1966 hypothesis on the origin of proteins is now an accepted model for the emergence of large, globular, functional proteins from short, simple peptides. However, the fundamental question of how the first protein(s) emerged still stands. The tools and hypotheses pioneered by Dayhoff, and the over 65 million protein sequences and 12 000 structures known today, enable those who follow in her footsteps to address this question.

  7. Noninvasive molecular imaging of MYC mRNA expression in human breast cancer xenografts with a [99mTc]peptide-peptide nucleic acid-peptide chimera.

    PubMed

    Tian, Xiaobing; Aruva, Mohan R; Qin, Wenyi; Zhu, Weizhu; Sauter, Edward R; Thakur, Mathew L; Wickstrom, Eric

    2005-01-01

    Human estrogen receptor-positive breast cancer cells typically display elevated levels of Myc protein due to overexpression of MYC mRNA, and elevated insulin-like growth factor 1 receptor (IGF1R) due to overexpression of IGF1R mRNA. We hypothesized that scintigraphic detection of MYC peptide nucleic acid (PNA) probes with an IGF1 peptide loop on the C-terminus, and a [99mTc]chelator peptide on the N-terminus, could measure levels of MYC mRNA noninvasively in human IGF1R-overexpressing MCF7 breast cancer xenografts in nude mice. We prepared the chelator-MYC PNA-IGF1 peptide, as well as a 4-nt mismatch PNA control, by solid-phase synthesis. We imaged MCF7 xenografts scintigraphically and measured the distribution of [99mTc]probes by scintillation counting of dissected tissues. MCF7 xenografts in nude mice were visualized at 4 and 24 h after tail vein administration of the [99mTc]PNA probe specific for MYC mRNA, but not with the mismatch control. The [99mTc]probes distributed normally to the kidneys, livers, tumors, and other tissues. Molecular imaging of oncogene mRNAs in solid tumors with radiolabel-PNA-peptide chimeras might provide additional genetic characterization of preinvasive and invasive breast cancers.

  8. Investigating gas phase dissociation pathways of crosslinked peptides : application to protein complex determination.

    SciTech Connect

    Young, Malin M.; Gaucher, Sara P.; Hadi, Masood Z.

    2005-02-01

    Chemical crosslinking is an important tool for probing protein structure and protein-protein interactions. The approach usually involves crosslinking of specific amino acids within a folded protein or protein complex, enzymatic digestion of the crosslinked protein(s), and identification of the resulting crosslinked peptides by liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry (LC/MS). In this manner, distance constraints are obtained for residues that must be in close proximity to one another in the native structure or complex. As the complexity of the system under study increases, for example, a large multi-protein complex, simply measuring the mass of a crosslinked species will not always be sufficient to determine the identity of the crosslinked peptides. In such a case, tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) could provide the required information if the data can be properly interpreted. In MS/MS, a species of interest is isolated in the gas phase and allowed to undergo collision induced dissociation (CID). Because the gas-phase dissociation pathways of peptides have been well studied, methods are established for determining peptide sequence by MS/MS. However, although crosslinked peptides dissociate through some of the same pathways as isolated peptides, the additional dissociation pathways available to the former have not been studied in detail. Software such as MS2Assign has been written to assist in the interpretation of MS/MS from crosslinked peptide species, but it would be greatly enhanced by a more thorough understanding of how these species dissociate. We are thus systematically investigating the dissociation pathways open to crosslinked peptide species. A series of polyalanine and polyglycine model peptides have been synthesized containing one or two lysine residues to generate defined inter- and intra-molecular crosslinked species, respectively. Each peptide contains 11 total residues, and one arginine residue is present at the carboxy terminus to mimic species

  9. Synthesis of peptide sequences derived from fibril-forming proteins.

    PubMed

    Scanlon, Denis B; Karas, John A

    2011-01-01

    The pathogenesis of a large number of diseases, including Alzheimer's Disease, Parkinson's Disease, and Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease (CJD), is associated with protein aggregation and the formation of amyloid, fibrillar deposits. Peptide fragments of amyloid-forming proteins have been found to form fibrils in their own right and have become important tools for unlocking the mechanism of amyloid fibril formation and the pathogenesis of amyloid diseases. The synthesis and purification of peptide sequences derived from amyloid fibril-forming proteins can be extremely challenging. The synthesis may not proceed well, generating a very low quality crude product which can be difficult to purify. Even clean crude peptides can be difficult to purify, as they are often insoluble or form fibrils rapidly in solution. This chapter presents methods to recognise and to overcome the difficulties associated with the synthesis, and purification of fibril-forming peptides, illustrating the points with three synthetic examples.

  10. Protein- and Peptide-Modified Synthetic Polymeric Biomaterials

    PubMed Central

    Krishna, Ohm D.; Kiick, Kristi L.

    2015-01-01

    This review presents an overview on biohybrid approaches of integrating the structural and functional features of proteins and peptides with synthetic polymers and the resulting unique properties in such hybrids, with a focus on bioresponsive/bioactive systems with biomaterials applications. The review is divided in two broad sections. First, we describe several examples of biohybrids produced by combining versatile synthetic polymers with proteins/enzymes and drugs that have resulted in (1) hybrid materials based on responsive polymers, (2) responsive hydrogels based on enzyme-catalyzed reactions, protein–protein interactions and protein–drug sensing, and (3) dynamic hydrogels based on conformational changes of a protein. Next, we present hybrids produced by combining synthetic polymers with peptides, classified based on the properties of the peptide domain: (1) peptides with different conformations, such as α-helical, coiled-coil, and β-sheet; (2) peptides derived from structural protein domains such as silk, elastin, titin, and collagen; and (3) peptides with other biofunctional properties such as cell-binding domains and enzyme-recognized degradation domains. PMID:20091878

  11. Nucleic acids, proteins, and chirality

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Usher, D. A.; Profy, A. T.; Walstrum, S. A.; Needels, M. C.; Bulack, S. C.; Lo, K. M.

    1984-01-01

    The present investigation is concerned with experimental results related, in one case, to the chirality of nucleotides, and, in another case, to the possibility of a link between the chirality of nucleic acids, and that of peptides. It has been found that aminoacylation of the 'internal' hydroxyl group of a dinucleoside monophosphate can occur stereoselectively. However, this reaction has not yet been made a part of a working peptide synthesis scheme. The formation and cleavage of oligonucleotides is considered. In the event of the formation of a helical complex between the oligonucleotide and the polymer, 1-prime,5-prime-bonds in the oligomer are found to become more resistant towards cleavage. The conditions required for peptide bond formation are examined, taking into account the known structures of RNA and possible mechanisms for prebiotic peptide bond formation. The possibility is considered that the 2-prime,5-prime-internucleotide linkage could have played an important part in the early days of biological peptide synthesis.

  12. Peptide ligand recognition by G protein-coupled receptors

    PubMed Central

    Krumm, Brian E.

    2015-01-01

    The past few years have seen spectacular progress in the structure determination of G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs). We now have structural representatives from classes A, B, C, and F. Within the rhodopsin-like class A, most structures belong to the α group, whereas fewer GPCR structures are available from the β, γ, and δ groups, which include peptide GPCRs such as the receptors for neurotensin (β group), opioids, chemokines (γ group), and protease-activated receptors (δ group). Structural information on peptide GPCRs is restricted to complexes with non-peptidic drug-like antagonists with the exception of the chemokine receptor CXCR4 that has been crystallized in the presence of a cyclic peptide antagonist. Notably, the neurotensin receptor 1 is to date the only peptide GPCR whose structure has been solved in the presence of a peptide agonist. Although limited in number, the current peptide GPCR structures reveal great diversity in shape and electrostatic properties of the ligand binding pockets, features that play key roles in the discrimination of ligands. Here, we review these aspects of peptide GPCRs in view of possible models for peptide agonist binding. PMID:25852552

  13. The protein and peptide mediated syntheses of non-biologically-produced oxide materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dickerson, Matthew B.

    Numerous examples exist in nature of organisms which have evolved the ability to produce sophisticated structures composed of inorganic minerals. Studies of such biomineralizing organisms have suggested that specialized biomolecules are, in part, responsible for the controlled formation of these structures. The research detailed in this dissertation is focused on the use of biomolecules (i.e., peptides and proteins) to form non-biologically produced materials under mild reaction conditions (i.e., neutral pH, aqueous solutions, and room temperature). The peptides utilized in the studies detailed in this dissertation were identified through the screening of single crystal rutile TiO2 substrates or Ge powder with a phagedisplayed peptide library. Twenty-one peptides were identified which possessed an affinity for Ge. Three of these twenty one peptides were tested for germania precipitation activity. Those peptides possessing a basic isoelectric point as well as hydroxyl- and imidazole-containing amino acid residues were found to be the most effective in precipitating amorphous germania from an alkoxide precursor. The phage-displayed peptide library screening of TiO2 substrates yielded twenty peptides. Four of these peptides, which were heavily enriched in histidine and/or basic amino acid residues, were found to possess signficant titania precipitation activity. The activity of these peptides was found to correlate with the number of positive charges they carried. The sequence of the most active of the library-identified peptides was modified to yield two additional peptides. The titania precipitation activity of these designed peptides was higher than the parent peptide, with reduced pH dependence. The titania materials generated by the library-identified and designed peptides were found to be composed of amorphous titania as well as <10 nm anatase and/or monoclinic TiO2 crystallites. The production of titania and zirconia resulting from the interaction of the

  14. Surface Functionalization of Piezoelectric Aluminum Nitride with Selected Amino Acid and Peptides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan, Edmund Ho Man

    In the present contribution, we elaborate on the covalent attachment of the amino acid cysteine and selected cysteine-bearing peptides, in aqueous buffered media, onto AlN surfaces modified with adlayers of one of our homemade bifunctional alkyltrichlorosilane cross-linking molecules bearing the benzenethiosulfonate head group. Surface characterizations confirmed the successful covalent immobilization of cysteine in buffered media, whereas the attachment of the peptides proved to be difficult as the undesired partial destruction of the adlayer on AlN by hydrolysis in aqueous/buffered solvent systems, which was confirmed in a separate study, appeared to have interfered with the covalent attachment and resulted in one of the peptides failing to immobilize. Future directions from this will focus on optimizing the solvent conditions for the cysteine/peptide immobilizations and the implementation of the surface chemistry to the covalent functionalization of AlN with biologically significant protein fragments, among them the antigen-binding fragment of antibodies.

  15. Protein and amino acid nutrition

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Dairy cow protein and amino acid nutrition have a significant role in sustainable dairying. Protein, amino acids, and nitrogen are inextricably linked through effects in the rumen, metabolism of the cow, and environmental nutrient management. Feeding systems have been making progress toward emphasiz...

  16. A direct comparison of helix propensity in proteins and peptides

    PubMed Central

    Myers, Jeffrey K.; Pace, C. Nick; Scholtz, J. Martin

    1997-01-01

    α-Helical secondary structure occurs widely in globular proteins and its formation is a key step in their folding. As a consequence, understanding the energetics of helix formation is crucial to understanding protein folding and stability. We have measured the helix propensities of the nonpolar amino acids for an α-helix in an intact protein, ribonuclease T1, and for a 17-residue peptide with a sequence identical to that of the α-helix in the protein. The helix propensities are in excellent agreement. This shows that when compared in the same sequence context, the helix propensities of the nonpolar amino acids are identical in helical peptides and intact proteins, and that conclusions based on studies of the helix-to-coil transitions of peptides may, in favorable cases, be directly applicable to proteins. Our helix propensities based on ribonuclease T1 are in good agreement with those from similar studies of barnase and T4 lysozyme. In contrast, our helix propensities differ substantially from those derived from studies of alanine-stabilized or salt bridge-stabilized model α-helical peptides. PMID:9096306

  17. Basics and recent advances in peptide and protein drug delivery

    PubMed Central

    Bruno, Benjamin J; Miller, Geoffrey D; Lim, Carol S

    2014-01-01

    While the peptide and protein therapeutic market has developed significantly in the past decades, delivery has limited their use. Although oral delivery is preferred, most are currently delivered intravenously or subcutaneously due to degradation and limited absorption in the gastrointestinal tract. Therefore, absorption enhancers, enzyme inhibitors, carrier systems and stability enhancers are being studied to facilitate oral peptide delivery. Additionally, transdermal peptide delivery avoids the issues of the gastrointestinal tract, but also faces absorption limitations. Due to proteases, opsonization and agglutination, free peptides are not systemically stable without modifications. This review discusses oral and transdermal peptide drug delivery, focusing on barriers and solutions to absorption and stability issues. Methods to increase systemic stability and site-specific delivery are also discussed. PMID:24228993

  18. Improved bone morphogenetic protein-2 retention in an injectable collagen matrix using bifunctional peptides.

    PubMed

    Hamilton, Paul T; Jansen, Michelle S; Ganesan, Sathya; Benson, R Edward; Hyde-Deruyscher, Robin; Beyer, Wayne F; Gile, Joseph C; Nair, Shrikumar A; Hodges, Jonathan A; Grøn, Hanne

    2013-01-01

    To promote healing of many orthopedic injuries, tissue engineering approaches are being developed that combine growth factors such as Bone Morphogenetic Proteins (BMP) with biomaterial carriers. Although these technologies have shown great promise, they still face limitations. We describe a generalized approach to create target-specific modular peptides that bind growth factors to implantable biomaterials. These bifunctional peptide coatings provide a novel way to modulate biology on the surface of an implant. Using phage display techniques, we have identified peptides that bind with high affinity to BMP-2. The peptides that bind to BMP-2 fall into two different sequence clusters. The first cluster of peptide sequences contains the motif W-X-X-F-X-X-L (where X can be any amino acid) and the second cluster contains the motif F-P-L-K-G. We have synthesized bifunctional peptide linkers that contain BMP-2 and collagen-binding domains. Using a rat ectopic bone formation model, we have injected rhBMP-2 into a collagen matrix with or without a bifunctional BMP-2: collagen peptide (BC-1). The presence of BC-1 significantly increased osteogenic cellular activity, the area of bone formed, and bone maturity at the site of injection. Our results suggest that bifunctional peptides that can simultaneously bind to a growth factor and an implantable biomaterial can be used to control the delivery and release of growth factors at the site of implantation.

  19. Selected Lactic Acid Bacteria Synthesize Antioxidant Peptides during Sourdough Fermentation of Cereal Flours

    PubMed Central

    Coda, Rossana; Pinto, Daniela; Gobbetti, Marco

    2012-01-01

    A pool of selected lactic acid bacteria was used for the sourdough fermentation of various cereal flours with the aim of synthesizing antioxidant peptides. The radical-scavenging activity of water/salt-soluble extracts (WSE) from sourdoughs was significantly (P < 0.05) higher than that of chemically acidified doughs. The highest activity was found for whole wheat, spelt, rye, and kamut sourdoughs. Almost the same results were found for the inhibition of linoleic acid autoxidation. WSE were subjected to reverse-phase fast protein liquid chromatography. Thirty-seven fractions were collected and assayed in vitro. The most active fractions were resistant to further hydrolysis by digestive enzymes. Twenty-five peptides of 8 to 57 amino acid residues were identified by nano-liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization-tandem mass spectrometry. Almost all of the sequences shared compositional features which are typical of antioxidant peptides. All of the purified fractions showed ex vivo antioxidant activity on mouse fibroblasts artificially subjected to oxidative stress. This study demonstrates the capacity of sourdough lactic acid bacteria to release peptides with antioxidant activity through the proteolysis of native cereal proteins. PMID:22156436

  20. Synthesis of peptides from amino acids and ATP with lysine-rich proteinoid

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nakashima, T.; Fox, S. W.

    1980-01-01

    The paper examines the synthesis of peptides from aminoacids and ATP with a lysine-rich protenoid. The latter in aqueous solution catalyzes the formation of peptides from free amino acids and ATP; this catalytic activity is not found in acidic protenoids, even though the latter contain a basic aminoacid. The pH optimum for the synthesis is about 11, but it is appreciable below 8 and above 13. Temperature data indicate an optimum at 20 C or above, with little increase in rate up to 60 C. Pyrophosphate can be used instead of ATP, but the yields are lower. The ATP-aided syntheses of peptides in aqueous solution occur with several types of proteinous aminoacids.

  1. Polyvalent display and packing of peptides and proteins on semiconductor quantum dots: predicted versus experimental results.

    PubMed

    Prasuhn, Duane E; Deschamps, Jeffrey R; Susumu, Kimihiro; Stewart, Michael H; Boeneman, Kelly; Blanco-Canosa, Juan B; Dawson, Philip E; Medintz, Igor L

    2010-02-22

    Quantum dots (QDs) are loaded with a series of peptides and proteins of increasing size, including a <20 residue peptide, myoglobin, mCherry, and maltose binding protein, which together cover a range of masses from <2.2 to approximately 44 kDa. Conjugation to the surface of dihydrolipoic acid-functionalized QDs is facilitated by polyhistidine metal affinity coordination. Increasing ratios of dye-labeled peptides and proteins are self-assembled to the QDs and then the bioconjugates are separated and analyzed using agarose gel electrophoresis. Fluorescent visualization of both conjugated and unbound species allows determination of an experimentally derived maximum loading number. Molecular modeling utilizing crystallographic coordinates or space-filling structures of the peptides and proteins also allow the predicted maximum loadings to the QDs to be estimated. Comparison of the two sets of results provides insight into the nature of the QD surface and reflects the important role played by the nanoparticle's hydrophilic solubilizing surface ligands. It is found that for the larger protein molecules steric hindrance is the major packing constraint. In contrast, for the smaller peptides, the number of available QD binding sites is the principal determinant. These results can contribute towards an overall understanding of how to engineer designer bioconjugates for both QDs and other nanoparticle materials.

  2. Phage display screen for peptides that bind Bcl-2 protein.

    PubMed

    Park, Hye-Yeon; Kim, Joungmok; Cho, June-Haeng; Moon, Ji Young; Lee, Su-Jae; Yoon, Moon-Young

    2011-01-01

    Bcl-2 family proteins are key regulators of apoptosis associated with human disease, including cancer. Bcl-2 protein has been found to be overexpressed in many cancer cells. Therefore, Bcl-2 protein is a potential diagnostic target for cancer detection. In the present study, the authors have identified several Bcl-2 binding peptides with high affinity (picomolar range) from a 5-round M13 phage display library screening. These peptides can be used to develop novel diagnostic probes or potent inhibitors with diverse polyvalencies.

  3. Enrichment of phosphorylated peptides and proteins by selective precipitation methods.

    PubMed

    Rainer, Matthias; Bonn, Günther K

    2015-01-01

    Protein phosphorylation is one of the most prominent post-translational modifications involved in the regulation of cellular processes. Fundamental understanding of biological processes requires appropriate bioanalytical methods for selectively enriching phosphorylated peptides and proteins. Most of the commonly applied enrichment approaches include chromatographic materials including Fe(3+)-immobilized metal-ion affinity chromatography or metal oxides. In the last years, the introduction of several non-chromatographic isolation technologies has increasingly attracted the interest of many scientists. Such approaches are based on the selective precipitation of phosphorylated peptides and proteins by applying various metal cations. The excellent performance of precipitation-based enrichment methods can be explained by the absence of any stationary phase, resin or sorbent, which usually leads to unspecific binding. This review provides an overview of recently published methods for the selective precipitation of phosphorylated peptides and proteins.

  4. Stable Isotope Peptide Mass Spectrometry To Decipher Amino Acid Metabolism in Dehalococcoides Strain CBDB1

    PubMed Central

    Marco-Urrea, Ernest; Seifert, Jana; von Bergen, Martin

    2012-01-01

    Dehalococcoides species are key players in the anaerobic transformation of halogenated solvents at contaminated sites. Here, we analyze isotopologue distributions in amino acid pools from peptides of Dehalococcoides strain CBDB1 after incubation with 13C-labeled acetate or bicarbonate as a carbon source. The resulting data were interpreted with regard to genome annotations to identify amino acid biosynthesis pathways. In addition to using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) for analyzing derivatized amino acids after protein hydrolysis, we introduce a second, much milder method, in which we directly analyze peptide masses after tryptic digest and peptide fragments by nano-liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization-tandem mass spectrometry (nano-LC-ESI-MS/MS). With this method, we identify isotope incorporation patterns for 17 proteinaceous amino acids, including proline, cysteine, lysine, and arginine, which escaped previous analyses in Dehalococcoides. Our results confirmed lysine biosynthesis via the α-aminoadipate pathway, precluding lysine formation from aspartate. Similarly, the isotopologue pattern obtained for arginine provided biochemical evidence of its synthesis from glutamate. Direct peptide MS/MS analysis of the labeling patterns of glutamine and asparagine, which were converted to glutamate and aspartate during protein hydrolysis, gave biochemical evidence of their precursors and confirmed glutamate biosynthesis via a Re-specific citrate synthase. By addition of unlabeled free amino acids to labeled cells, we show that in strain CBDB1 none of the 17 tested amino acids was incorporated into cell mass, indicating that they are all synthesized de novo. Our approach is widely applicable and provides a means to analyze amino acid metabolism by studying specific proteins even in mixed consortia. PMID:22661690

  5. Chiral separation of amino acids and peptides by capillary electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Wan, H; Blomberg, L G

    2000-04-14

    Chiral separation of amino acids and peptides by capillary electrophoresis (CE) is reviewed regarding the separation principles of different approaches, advantages and limitations, chiral recognition mechanisms and applications. The direct approach details various chiral selectors with an emphasis on cyclodextrins and their derivatives, antibiotics and chiral surfactants as the chiral selectors. The indirect approach deals with various chiral reagents applied for diastereomer formation and types of separation media such as micelles and polymeric pseudo-stationary phases. Many derivatization reagents used for high sensitivity detection of amino acids and peptides are also discussed and their characteristics are summarized in tables. A large number of relevant examples is presented illustrating the current status of enantiomeric and diastereomeric separation of amino acids and peptides. Strategies to enhance the selectivity and optimize separation parameters by the application of experimental designs are described. The reversal of enantiomeric elution order and the effects of organic modifiers on the selectivity are illustrated in both direct and indirect methods. Some applications of chiral amino acid and peptide analysis, in particular, regarding the determination of trace enantiomeric impurities, are given. This review selects more than 200 articles published between 1988 and 1999.

  6. Peptide Suboptimal Conformation Sampling for the Prediction of Protein-Peptide Interactions.

    PubMed

    Lamiable, Alexis; Thévenet, Pierre; Eustache, Stephanie; Saladin, Adrien; Moroy, Gautier; Tuffery, Pierre

    2017-01-01

    The blind identification of candidate patches of interaction on the protein surface is a difficult task that can hardly be accomplished without a heuristic or the use of simplified representations to speed up the search. The PEP-SiteFinder protocol performs a systematic blind search on the protein surface using a rigid docking procedure applied to a limited set of peptide suboptimal conformations expected to approximate satisfactorily the conformation of the peptide in interaction. All steps rely on a coarse-grained representation of the protein and the peptide. While simple, such a protocol can help to infer useful information, assuming a critical analysis of the results. Moreover, such a protocol can be extended to a semi-flexible protocol where the suboptimal conformations are directly folded in the vicinity of the receptor.

  7. Serine-selective aerobic cleavage of peptides and a protein using a water-soluble copper-organoradical conjugate.

    PubMed

    Seki, Yohei; Tanabe, Kana; Sasaki, Daisuke; Sohma, Youhei; Oisaki, Kounosuke; Kanai, Motomu

    2014-06-16

    The site-specific cleavage of peptide bonds is an important chemical modification of biologically relevant macromolecules. The reaction is not only used for routine structural determination of peptides, but is also a potential artificial modulator of protein function. Realizing the substrate scope beyond the conventional chemical or enzymatic cleavage of peptide bonds is, however, a formidable challenge. Here we report a serine-selective peptide-cleavage protocol that proceeds at room temperature and near neutral pH value, through mild aerobic oxidation promoted by a water-soluble copper-organoradical conjugate. The method is applicable to the site-selective cleavage of polypeptides that possess various functional groups. Peptides comprising D-amino acids or sensitive disulfide pairs are competent substrates. The system is extendable to the site-selective cleavage of a native protein, ubiquitin, which comprises more than 70 amino acid residues.

  8. Fast and selective modification of thiol proteins/peptides by N-(phenylseleno)phthalimide.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhengfang; Zhang, Yun; Zhang, Hao; Harrington, Peter B; Chen, Hao

    2012-03-01

    We previously reported that selenamide reagents such as ebselen and N-(phenylseleno)phthalimide (NPSP) can be used to selectively derivatize thiols for mass spectrometric analysis, and the introduced selenium tags are useful as they could survive or removed with collision-induced dissociation (CID). Described herein is the further study of the reactivity of various protein/peptide thiols toward NPSP and its application to derivatize thiol peptides in protein digests. With a modified protocol (i.e., dissolving NPSP in acetonitrile instead of aqueous solvent), we found that quantitative conversion of thiols can be obtained in seconds, using NPSP in a slight excess amount (NPSP:thiol of 1.1-2:1). Further investigation shows that the thiol reactivity toward NPSP reflects its chemical environment and accessibility in proteins/peptides. For instance, adjacent basic amino acid residues increase the thiol reactivity, probably because they could stabilize the thiolate form to facilitate the nucleophilic attack of thiol on NPSP. In the case of creatine phosphokinase, the native protein predominately has one thiol reacted with NPSP while all of four thiol groups of the denatured protein can be derivatized, in accordance with the corresponding protein conformation. In addition, thiol peptides in protein/peptide enzymatic digests can be quickly and effectively tagged by NPSP following tri-n-butylphosphine (TBP) reduction. Notably, all three thiols of the peptide QCCASVCSL in the insulin peptic digest can be modified simultaneously by NPSP. These results suggest a novel and selective method for protecting thiols in the bottom-up approach for protein structure analysis.

  9. Fast and Selective Modification of Thiol Proteins/Peptides by N-(Phenylseleno)phthalimide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhengfang; Zhang, Yun; Zhang, Hao; Harrington, Peter B.; Chen, Hao

    2012-03-01

    We previously reported that selenamide reagents such as ebselen and N-(phenylseleno)phthalimide (NPSP) can be used to selectively derivatize thiols for mass spectrometric analysis, and the introduced selenium tags are useful as they could survive or removed with collision-induced dissociation (CID). Described herein is the further study of the reactivity of various protein/peptide thiols toward NPSP and its application to derivatize thiol peptides in protein digests. With a modified protocol (i.e., dissolving NPSP in acetonitrile instead of aqueous solvent), we found that quantitative conversion of thiols can be obtained in seconds, using NPSP in a slight excess amount (NPSP:thiol of 1.1-2:1). Further investigation shows that the thiol reactivity toward NPSP reflects its chemical environment and accessibility in proteins/peptides. For instance, adjacent basic amino acid residues increase the thiol reactivity, probably because they could stabilize the thiolate form to facilitate the nucleophilic attack of thiol on NPSP. In the case of creatine phosphokinase, the native protein predominately has one thiol reacted with NPSP while all of four thiol groups of the denatured protein can be derivatized, in accordance with the corresponding protein conformation. In addition, thiol peptides in protein/peptide enzymatic digests can be quickly and effectively tagged by NPSP following tri- n-butylphosphine (TBP) reduction. Notably, all three thiols of the peptide QCCASVCSL in the insulin peptic digest can be modified simultaneously by NPSP. These results suggest a novel and selective method for protecting thiols in the bottom-up approach for protein structure analysis.

  10. Ligand-Based Peptide Design and Combinatorial Peptide Libraries to Target G Protein-Coupled Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Gruber, Christian W.; Muttenthaler, Markus; Freissmuth, Michael

    2016-01-01

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are considered to represent the most promising drug targets; it has been repeatedly said that a large fraction of the currently marketed drugs elicit their actions by binding to GPCRs (with cited numbers varying from 30–50%). Closer scrutiny, however, shows that only a modest fraction of (~60) GPCRs are, in fact, exploited as drug targets, only ~20 of which are peptide-binding receptors. The vast majority of receptors in the humane genome have not yet been explored as sites of action for drugs. Given the drugability of this receptor class, it appears that opportunities for drug discovery abound. In addition, GPCRs provide for binding sites other than the ligand binding sites (referred to as the “orthosteric site”). These additional sites include (i) binding sites for ligands (referred to as “allosteric ligands”) that modulate the affinity and efficacy of orthosteric ligands, (ii) the interaction surface that recruits G proteins and arrestins, (iii) the interaction sites of additional proteins (GIPs, GPCR interacting proteins that regulate G protein signaling or give rise to G protein-independent signals). These sites can also be targeted by peptides. Combinatorial and natural peptide libraries are therefore likely to play a major role in identifying new GPCR ligands at each of these sites. In particular the diverse natural peptide libraries such as the venom peptides from marine cone-snails and plant cyclotides have been established as a rich source of drug leads. High-throughput screening and combinatorial chemistry approaches allow for progressing from these starting points to potential drug candidates. This will be illustrated by focusing on the ligand-based drug design of oxytocin (OT) and vasopressin (AVP) receptor ligands using natural peptide leads as starting points. PMID:20687879

  11. Protein Hydrolysates/Peptides in Animal Nutrition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCalla, Jeff; Waugh, Terry; Lohry, Eric

    The use of protein hydrolysates as an important nutrient for growth and maintenance has been increasing in animal nutrition. Although animal proteins and protein hydrolysates are widely used however, recently vegetable protein hydrolysates are gaining importance. This chapter reviews the use of protein hydrolysates developed by enzyme hydrolysis and by solid state fermentation process in animal nutrition especially for piglets and compares it with the standard products such as plasma and fishmeal.

  12. Extreme diversity of scorpion venom peptides and proteins revealed by transcriptomic analysis: implication for proteome evolution of scorpion venom arsenal.

    PubMed

    Ma, Yibao; He, Yawen; Zhao, Ruiming; Wu, Yingliang; Li, Wenxin; Cao, Zhijian

    2012-02-16

    Venom is an important genetic development crucial to the survival of scorpions for over 400 million years. We studied the evolution of the scorpion venom arsenal by means of comparative transcriptome analysis of venom glands and phylogenetic analysis of shared types of venom peptides and proteins between buthids and euscorpiids. Fifteen types of venom peptides and proteins were sequenced during the venom gland transcriptome analyses of two Buthidae species (Lychas mucronatus and Isometrus maculatus) and one Euscorpiidae species (Scorpiops margerisonae). Great diversity has been observed in translated amino acid sequences of these transcripts for venom peptides and proteins. Seven types of venom peptides and proteins were shared between buthids and euscorpiids. Molecular phylogenetic analysis revealed that at least five of the seven common types of venom peptides and proteins were likely recruited into the scorpion venom proteome before the lineage split between Buthidae and Euscorpiidae with their corresponding genes undergoing individual or multiple gene duplication events. These are α-KTxs, βKSPNs (β-KTxs and scorpines), anionic peptides, La1-like peptides, and SPSVs (serine proteases from scorpion venom). Multiple types of venom peptides and proteins were demonstrated to be continuously recruited into the venom proteome during the evolution process of individual scorpion lineages. Our results provide an insight into the recruitment pattern of the scorpion venom arsenal for the first time.

  13. The identification of novel cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase anchoring proteins using bioinformatic filters and peptide arrays

    PubMed Central

    McLaughlin, William A.; Hou, Tingjun; Taylor, Susan S.; Wang, Wei

    2011-01-01

    A-kinase anchoring proteins (AKAPs) localize cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA) to specific regions in the cell and place PKA in proximity to its phosphorylation targets. A computational model was created to identify AKAPs that bind to the docking/dimerization domain of the RII alpha isoform of the regulatory subunit of PKA. The model was used to search the entire human proteome, and the top candidates were tested for an interaction using peptide array experiments. Verified interactions include sphingosine kinase interacting protein and retinoic acid-induced protein 16. These interactions highlight new signaling pathways mediated by PKA. PMID:21115539

  14. Collision-induced dissociation (CID) of peptides and proteins.

    PubMed

    Wells, J Mitchell; McLuckey, Scott A

    2005-01-01

    The most commonly used activation method in the tandem mass spectrometry (MS) of peptides and proteins is energetic collisions with a neutral target gas. The overall process of collisional activation followed by fragmentation of the ion is commonly referred to as collision-induced dissociation (CID). The structural information that results from CID of a peptide or protein ion is highly dependent on the conditions used to effect CID. These include, for example, the relative translational energy of the ion and target, the nature of the target, the number of collisions that is likely to take place, and the observation window of the apparatus. This chapter summarizes the key experimental parameters in the CID of peptide and protein ions, as well as the conditions that tend to prevail in the most commonly employed tandem mass spectrometers.

  15. [Origin and evolution of peptide-protein bioregulators].

    PubMed

    Chipens, G I; Freĭdlin, I S; Skliarova, S N

    1987-01-01

    Possible evolutionary pathways of cellular regulatory systems are discussed. Analysis of animal evolution suggests that peptide and protein bioregulators emerged at an early stage during formation of biochemical systems in prokaryotic cells involving protein synthesis on ribosomes, the processes of exo- and endocytosis and limited proteolysis reactions. Primary autocrine bioregulators are compared with growth factors. Models for cellular bioregulation are discussed in which both cell receptors and peptide/protein ligands, primarily immunoglobins, act as prehormones. Their internalization and limited proteolysis can lead to formation of low-molecular peptides (tetines) acting as autocrine or paracrine bioregulators. Basing on the concept of biochemical universality, it is suggested that the effects of many growth factors, hormones, immunoglobulins, mono- and lymphokins are mediated by identical or similar (carrying the same signatures) fragments which are produced in cells due to limited proteolysis reactions and which are directly involved in activation of biochemical systems in these cells.

  16. Structural and biological mimicry of protein surface recognition by [alpha/beta]-peptide foldamers

    SciTech Connect

    Horne, W. Seth; Johnson, Lisa M.; Ketas, Thomas J.; Klasse, Per Johan; Lu, Min; Moore, John P.; Gellman, Samuel H.

    2009-10-05

    Unnatural oligomers that can mimic protein surfaces offer a potentially useful strategy for blocking biomedically important protein-protein interactions. Here we evaluate an approach based on combining {alpha}- and {beta}-amino acid residues in the context of a polypeptide sequence from the HIV protein gp41, which represents an excellent testbed because of the wealth of available structural and biological information. We show that {alpha}/{beta}-peptides can mimic structural and functional properties of a critical gp41 subunit. Physical studies in solution, crystallographic data, and results from cell-fusion and virus-infectivity assays collectively indicate that the gp41-mimetic {alpha}/{beta}-peptides effectively block HIV-cell fusion via a mechanism comparable to that of gp41-derived {alpha}-peptides. An optimized {alpha}/{beta}-peptide is far less susceptible to proteolytic degradation than is an analogous {alpha}-peptide. Our findings show how a two-stage design approach, in which sequence-based {alpha} {yields} {beta} replacements are followed by site-specific backbone rigidification, can lead to physical and biological mimicry of a natural biorecognition process.

  17. Sequence-specific fragmentation of matrix-assisted laser-desorbed protein/peptide ions.

    PubMed

    Brown, R S; Lennon, J J

    1995-11-01

    By utilizing delayed pulsed ion extraction of ions generated via the matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) technique, fast (< 320 ns) metastable ion fragmentation is observed for both peptide and protein analytes in the ion source of a linear time-of-flight mass spectrometer. Small peptides such as the oxidized B chain of bovine insulin exhibit fragmentation at the amide linking bond between peptide residues. Overlapping sequence information is provided by fragmentation from both the C- and N-terminal ends of the peptide (cn-, yn-, and z*n-type fragment ions). Larger proteins can also exhibit a wealth of sequence specific fragment ions in favorable cases. One example is cytochrome c, which undergoes substantial (approximately 80%) fast fragmentation at the amide bonds along the amino acid backbone of the protein. Only amide bond cleavages initiating from the C-terminal end (cn fragments) are observed. The observed fragmentation pattern provides a significant amount of potential sequence information for these molecules. External mass calibration of the intact protonated molecular ions is demonstrated with mass accuracies typically around 100 ppm. Mass accuracies for the observed fragment ions ranged from +/- 0.20 Da for the smaller peptides studied (i.e., oxidized B chain of bovine insulin) to +/- 0.38 Da for the largest protein studied (cytochrome c), based upon the known sequences.

  18. Specificity analysis of protein lysine methyltransferases using SPOT peptide arrays.

    PubMed

    Kudithipudi, Srikanth; Kusevic, Denis; Weirich, Sara; Jeltsch, Albert

    2014-11-29

    Lysine methylation is an emerging post-translation modification and it has been identified on several histone and non-histone proteins, where it plays crucial roles in cell development and many diseases. Approximately 5,000 lysine methylation sites were identified on different proteins, which are set by few dozens of protein lysine methyltransferases. This suggests that each PKMT methylates multiple proteins, however till now only one or two substrates have been identified for several of these enzymes. To approach this problem, we have introduced peptide array based substrate specificity analyses of PKMTs. Peptide arrays are powerful tools to characterize the specificity of PKMTs because methylation of several substrates with different sequences can be tested on one array. We synthesized peptide arrays on cellulose membrane using an Intavis SPOT synthesizer and analyzed the specificity of various PKMTs. Based on the results, for several of these enzymes, novel substrates could be identified. For example, for NSD1 by employing peptide arrays, we showed that it methylates K44 of H4 instead of the reported H4K20 and in addition H1.5K168 is the highly preferred substrate over the previously known H3K36. Hence, peptide arrays are powerful tools to biochemically characterize the PKMTs.

  19. Specificity Analysis of Protein Lysine Methyltransferases Using SPOT Peptide Arrays

    PubMed Central

    Kudithipudi, Srikanth; Kusevic, Denis; Weirich, Sara; Jeltsch, Albert

    2014-01-01

    Lysine methylation is an emerging post-translation modification and it has been identified on several histone and non-histone proteins, where it plays crucial roles in cell development and many diseases. Approximately 5,000 lysine methylation sites were identified on different proteins, which are set by few dozens of protein lysine methyltransferases. This suggests that each PKMT methylates multiple proteins, however till now only one or two substrates have been identified for several of these enzymes. To approach this problem, we have introduced peptide array based substrate specificity analyses of PKMTs. Peptide arrays are powerful tools to characterize the specificity of PKMTs because methylation of several substrates with different sequences can be tested on one array. We synthesized peptide arrays on cellulose membrane using an Intavis SPOT synthesizer and analyzed the specificity of various PKMTs. Based on the results, for several of these enzymes, novel substrates could be identified. For example, for NSD1 by employing peptide arrays, we showed that it methylates K44 of H4 instead of the reported H4K20 and in addition H1.5K168 is the highly preferred substrate over the previously known H3K36. Hence, peptide arrays are powerful tools to biochemically characterize the PKMTs. PMID:25489813

  20. Delivery of therapeutic peptides and proteins to the CNS.

    PubMed

    Salameh, Therese S; Banks, William A

    2014-01-01

    Peptides and proteins have potent effects on the brain after their peripheral administration, suggesting that they may be good substrates for the development of CNS therapeutics. Major hurdles to such development include their relation to the blood-brain barrier (BBB) and poor pharmacokinetics. Some peptides cross the BBB by transendothelial diffusion and others cross in the blood-to-brain direction by saturable transporters. Some regulatory proteins are also transported across the BBB and antibodies can enter the CNS via the extracellular pathways. Glycoproteins and some antibody fragments can be taken up and cross the BBB by mechanisms related to adsorptive endocytosis/transcytosis. Many peptides and proteins are transported out of the CNS by saturable efflux systems and enzymatic activity in the blood, CNS, or BBB are substantial barriers to others. Both influx and efflux transporters are altered by various substances and in disease states. Strategies that manipulate these interactions between the BBB and peptides and proteins provide many opportunities for the development of therapeutics. Such strategies include increasing transendothelial diffusion of small peptides, upregulation of saturable influx transporters with allosteric regulators and other posttranslational means, use of vectors and other Trojan horse strategies, inhibition of efflux transporters including with antisense molecules, and improvement in pharmacokinetic parameters to overcome short half-lives, tissue sequestration, and enzymatic degradation.

  1. Organization of model helical peptides in lipid bilayers: insight into the behavior of single-span protein transmembrane domains.

    PubMed Central

    Sharpe, Simon; Barber, Kathryn R; Grant, Chris W M; Goodyear, David; Morrow, Michael R

    2002-01-01

    Selectively deuterated transmembrane peptides comprising alternating leucine-alanine subunits were examined in fluid bilayer membranes by solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy in an effort to gain insight into the behavior of membrane proteins. Two groups of peptides were studied: 21-mers having a 17-amino-acid hydrophobic domain calculated to be close in length to the hydrophobic thickness of 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl phosphatidylcholine and 26-mers having a 22-amino-acid hydrophobic domain calculated to exceed the membrane hydrophobic thickness. (2)H NMR spectral features similar to ones observed for transmembrane peptides from single-span receptors of higher animal cells were identified which apparently correspond to effectively monomeric peptide. Spectral observations suggested significant distortion of the transmembrane alpha-helix, and/or potential for restriction of rotation about the tilted helix long axis for even simple peptides. Quadrupole splittings arising from the 26-mer were consistent with greater peptide "tilt" than were those of the analogous 21-mer. Quadrupole splittings associated with monomeric peptide were relatively insensitive to concentration and temperature over the range studied, indicating stable average conformations, and a well-ordered rotation axis. At high peptide concentration (6 mol% relative to phospholipid) it appeared that the peptide predicted to be longer than the membrane thickness had a particular tendency toward reversible peptide-peptide interactions occurring on a timescale comparable with or faster than approximately 10(-5) s. This interaction may be direct or lipid-mediated and was manifest as line broadening. Peptide rotational diffusion rates within the membrane, calculated from quadrupolar relaxation times, T(2e), were consistent with such interactions. In the case of the peptide predicted to be equal to the membrane thickness, at low peptide concentration spectral lineshape indicated the additional

  2. Calcium-binding capacity of wheat germ protein hydrolysate and characterization of Peptide-calcium complex.

    PubMed

    Liu, Feng-Ru; Wang, Li; Wang, Ren; Chen, Zheng-Xing

    2013-08-07

    This study investigates the ability of various wheat germ protein hydrolysates (WGPHs) to bind calcium and characterizes the peptide-calcium complexes. We demonstrate that the amount of Ca bound depended greatly on the type of enzyme, degree of hydrolysis (DH), amino acid composition, and molecular mass distribution of different hydrolysates. The maximum level of Ca bound (67.5 mg·g(-1)) occurred when Alcalase was used to hydrolyze wheat germ protein at a DH of 21.5%. Peptide fragments exhibiting high calcium-binding capacity had molecular mass <2000 Da. The calcium-binding peptides mainly consisted of Glu, Arg, Asp, and Gly, and the level of Ca bound was related to the hydrophobic amino acid content in WGPHs. UV-visible and Fourier transform infrared spectra demonstrate that amino nitrogen atoms and oxygen atoms on the carboxyl group were involved in complexation. Therefore, wheat germ protein is a promising protein source for the production of calcium-binding peptides and could be utilized as a bioactive ingredient for nutraceutical food production.

  3. The specificity of protection against cationic antimicrobial peptides by lactoferrin binding protein B.

    PubMed

    Morgenthau, Ari; Partha, Sarathy K; Adamiak, Paul; Schryvers, Anthony B

    2014-10-01

    A variety of Gram-negative pathogens possess host-specific lactoferrin (Lf) receptors that mediate the acquisition of iron from host Lf. The integral membrane protein component of the receptor, lactoferrin binding protein A specifically binds host Lf and is required for acquisition of iron from Lf. In contrast, the role of the bi-lobed surface lipoprotein, lactoferrin binding protein B (LbpB), in Lf binding and iron acquisition is uncertain. A common feature of LbpBs from most species is the presence of clusters of negatively charged amino acids in the protein's C-terminal lobe. Recently it has been shown that the negatively charged regions from the Neisseria meningitidis LbpB are responsible for protecting against an 11 amino acid cationic antimicrobial peptide (CAP), lactoferricin (Lfcin), derived from human Lf. In this study we investigated whether the LbpB confers resistance to other CAPs since N. meningitidis is likely to encounter other CAPs from the host. LbpB provided protection against the cathelicidin derived peptide, cathelicidin related antimicrobial peptide (mCRAMP), but did not confer protection against Tritrp 1 or LL37 under our experimental conditions. When tested against a range of rationally designed synthetic peptides, LbpB was shown to protect against IDR-1002 and IDR-0018 but not against HH-2 or HHC10.

  4. Mass spectrometry of peptides and proteins from human blood.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Peihong; Bowden, Peter; Zhang, Du; Marshall, John G

    2011-01-01

    It is difficult to convey the accelerating rate and growing importance of mass spectrometry applications to human blood proteins and peptides. Mass spectrometry can rapidly detect and identify the ionizable peptides from the proteins in a simple mixture and reveal many of their post-translational modifications. However, blood is a complex mixture that may contain many proteins first expressed in cells and tissues. The complete analysis of blood proteins is a daunting task that will rely on a wide range of disciplines from physics, chemistry, biochemistry, genetics, electromagnetic instrumentation, mathematics and computation. Therefore the comprehensive discovery and analysis of blood proteins will rank among the great technical challenges and require the cumulative sum of many of mankind's scientific achievements together. A variety of methods have been used to fractionate, analyze and identify proteins from blood, each yielding a small piece of the whole and throwing the great size of the task into sharp relief. The approaches attempted to date clearly indicate that enumerating the proteins and peptides of blood can be accomplished. There is no doubt that the mass spectrometry of blood will be crucial to the discovery and analysis of proteins, enzyme activities, and post-translational processes that underlay the mechanisms of disease. At present both discovery and quantification of proteins from blood are commonly reaching sensitivities of ∼1 ng/mL.

  5. Reaction mechanisms in the radiolysis of peptides, polypeptides and proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Garrison, W.M.

    1985-01-01

    The purpose of this review is to bring together and to correlate the wide variety of experimental studies that provide information on the reaction products and reaction mechanisms involved in the radiolysis of peptides, polypeptides and proteins (including chromosomal proteins) in both aqueous and solid-state systems. The comparative radiation chemistry of these systems is developed in terms of specific reactions of the peptide main-chain and the aliphatic, aromatic-unsaturated and sulfur-containing side-chains. Information obtained with the various experimental techniques of product analysis, competition kinetics, spin-trapping, pulse radiolysis and ESR spectroscopy is included. 147 refs.

  6. Rice Bran Protein as a Potent Source of Antimelanogenic Peptides with Tyrosinase Inhibitory Activity.

    PubMed

    Ochiai, Akihito; Tanaka, Seiya; Tanaka, Takaaki; Taniguchi, Masayuki

    2016-10-28

    Rice (Oryza sativa) is consumed as a staple food globally, and rice bran, the byproduct, is an unused biomass that is ultimately discarded as waste. Thus, in the present study, a technique for producing tyrosinase inhibitory peptides from rice bran protein (RBP) was developed. Simultaneous treatment of RBP with chymotrypsin and trypsin produced numerous peptides. Subsequently, six tyrosinase inhibitory peptides were isolated from the hydrolysate fractions in a multistep purification protocol, and their amino acid sequences were determined. Three of these peptides had a C-terminal tyrosine residue and exhibited significant inhibitory effects against tyrosinase-mediated monophenolase reactions. Furthermore, peptide CT-2 (Leu-Gln-Pro-Ser-His-Tyr) potently inhibited melanogenesis in mouse B16 melanoma cells without causing cytotoxicity, suggesting the potential of CT-2 as an agent for melanin-related skin disorder treatment. The present data indicate that RBP is a potent source of tyrosinase inhibitory peptides and that simultaneous treatment of RBP with chymotrypsin and trypsin efficiently produces these peptides.

  7. Ribosomal Synthesis of Macrocyclic Peptides in Vitro and in Vivo Mediated by Genetically Encoded Amino-Thiol Unnatural Amino Acids

    PubMed Central

    Frost, John R.; Jacob, Nicholas T.; Papa, Louis J.; Owens, Andrew E.

    2015-01-01

    A versatile method for orchestrating the formation of side-chain-to-tail cyclic peptides from ribosomally derived polypeptide precursors is reported. Upon ribosomal incorporation into intein-containing precursor proteins, designer unnatural amino acids bearing side-chain 1,3- or 1,2-aminothiol functionalities are able to promote the cyclization of a downstream target peptide sequence via a C-terminal ligation/ring contraction mechanism. Using this approach, peptide macrocycles of variable size and composition could be generated in a pH-triggered manner in vitro, or directly in living bacterial cells. This methodology furnishes a new platform for the creation and screening of genetically encoded libraries of conformationally constrained peptides. This strategy was applied to identify and isolate a low micromolar streptavidin binder (KD = 1.1 µM) from a library of cyclic peptides produced in E. coli, thereby illustrating its potential toward aiding the discovery of functional peptide macrocycles. PMID:25933125

  8. Automated sequencing of insoluble peptides using detergent. Bacteriophage fl coat protein.

    PubMed

    Bailey, G S; Gillett, D; Hill, D F; Petersen, G B

    1977-04-10

    Peptides which are highly nonpolar and insoluble under moderate conditions of pH and ionic strength cannot be subjected to automated sequence analysis. We report a method for solubilization of one such peptide, bacteriophage fl coat protein, by chemical modification in the presence of sodium dodecyl sulfate. Following this treatment the 50-residue peptide was degraded stepwise in an automated sequenator using a single cleavage Quadrol program with high repetitive yield through residue 47. We also report a modified program using detergent incorporated into dimethylallylamine buffer which permitted sequencing with high repetitive yields for at least the first 18 residues of the unmodified and otherwise highly insoluble coat protein. The presence of detergent caused no observable difficulties in detection of residues by gas chromatography, thin layer chromatography, or amino acid analysis.

  9. Expression pattern of peptide and amino acid genes in digestive tract of transporter juvenile turbot ( Scophthalmus maximus L.)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Dandan; He, Gen; Mai, Kangsen; Zhou, Huihui; Xu, Wei; Song, Fei

    2016-04-01

    Turbot ( Scophthalmus maximus L.), a carnivorous fish species with high dietary protein requirement, was chosen to examine the expression pattern of peptide and amino acid transporter genes along its digestive tract which was divided into six segments including stomach, pyloric caeca, rectum, and three equal parts of the remainder of the intestine. The results showed that the expression of two peptide and eleven amino acid transporters genes exhibited distinct patterns. Peptide transporter 1 (PepT1) was rich in proximal intestine while peptide transporter 2 (PepT2) was abundant in distal intestine. A number of neutral and cationic amino acid transporters expressed richly in whole intestine including B0-type amino acid transporter 1 (B0AT1), L-type amino acid transporter 2 (LAT2), T-type amino acid transporter 1 (TAT1), proton-coupled amino acid transporter 1 (PAT1), y+L-type amino acid transporter 1 (y+LAT1), and cationic amino acid transporter 2 (CAT2) while ASC amino acid transporter 2 (ASCT2), sodium-coupled neutral amino acid transporter 2 (SNAT2), and y+L-type amino acid transporter 2 (y+LAT2) abundantly expressed in stomach. In addition, system b0,+ transporters (rBAT and b0,+AT) existed richly in distal intestine. These findings comprehensively characterized the distribution of solute carrier family proteins, which revealed the relative importance of peptide and amino acid absorption through luminal membrane. Our findings are helpful to understand the mechanism of the utilization of dietary protein in fish with a short digestive tract.

  10. Antioxidant activity of cod (Gadus morhua) protein hydrolysates: Fractionation and characterisation of peptide fractions.

    PubMed

    Sabeena Farvin, K H; Andersen, Lisa Lystbæk; Otte, Jeanette; Nielsen, Henrik Hauch; Jessen, Flemming; Jacobsen, Charlotte

    2016-08-01

    This study aimed to characterise peptide fractions (>5kDa, 3-5kDa and <3kDa) with antioxidative activity obtained from a cod protein hydrolysate. The free amino acids in all fractions were dominated by Ala, Gly, Glu and Ser. The total amino acid composition had high proportions of Lys, Ala and Glu. The 3-5kDa and <3kDa fractions were further fractionated by size exclusion chromatography. All sub-fractions showed high Fe(2+) chelating activity. The DPPH radical-scavenging activity of the 3-5kDa fraction was exerted mainly by one sub-fraction dominated by peptides with masses below 600Da. The DPPH radical-scavenging activity of the <3kDa fraction was exerted by sub-fractions with low molecular weight. The highest reducing power was found in a sub-fraction containing peptides rich in Arg, Tyr and Phe. Both free amino acids and low molecular weight peptides thus seemed to contribute to the antioxidative activity of the peptide fractions, and Tyr seemed to play a major role in the antioxidant activity.

  11. xComb: a cross-linked peptide database approach to protein-protein interaction analysis.

    PubMed

    Panchaud, Alexandre; Singh, Pragya; Shaffer, Scott A; Goodlett, David R

    2010-05-07

    We developed an informatic method to identify tandem mass spectra composed of chemically cross-linked peptides from those of linear peptides and to assign sequence to each of the two unique peptide sequences. For a given set of proteins the key software tool, xComb, combs through all theoretically feasible cross-linked peptides to create a database consisting of a subset of all combinations represented as peptide FASTA files. The xComb library of select theoretical cross-linked peptides may then be used as a database that is examined by a standard proteomic search engine to match tandem mass spectral data sets to identify cross-linked peptides. The database search may be conducted against as many as 50 proteins with a number of common proteomic search engines, e.g. Phenyx, Sequest, OMSSA, Mascot and X!Tandem. By searching against a peptide library of linearized, cross-linked peptides, rather than a linearized protein library, search times are decreased and the process is decoupled from any specific search engine. A further benefit of decoupling from the search engine is that protein cross-linking studies may be conducted with readily available informatics tools for which scoring routines already exist within the proteomic community.

  12. Single amino acid fingerprinting of the human antibody repertoire with high density peptide arrays.

    PubMed

    Weber, Laura K; Palermo, Andrea; Kügler, Jonas; Armant, Olivier; Isse, Awale; Rentschler, Simone; Jaenisch, Thomas; Hubbuch, Jürgen; Dübel, Stefan; Nesterov-Mueller, Alexander; Breitling, Frank; Loeffler, Felix F

    2017-04-01

    The antibody species that patrol in a patient's blood are an invaluable part of the immune system. While most of them shield us from life-threatening infections, some of them do harm in autoimmune diseases. If we knew exactly all the antigens that elicited all the antibody species within a group of patients, we could learn which ones correlate with immune protection, are irrelevant, or do harm. Here, we demonstrate an approach to this question: First, we use a plethora of phage-displayed peptides to identify many different serum antibody binding peptides. Next, we synthesize identified peptides in the array format and rescreen the serum used for phage panning to validate antibody binding peptides. Finally, we systematically vary the sequence of validated antibody binding peptides to identify those amino acids within the peptides that are crucial for binding "their" antibody species. The resulting immune fingerprints can then be used to trace them back to potential antigens. We investigated the serum of an individual in this pipeline, which led to the identification of 73 antibody fingerprints. Some fingerprints could be traced back to their most likely antigen, for example the immunodominant capsid protein VP1 of enteroviruses, most likely elicited by the ubiquitous poliovirus vaccination. Thus, with our approach, it is possible, to pinpoint those antibody species that correlate with a certain antigen, without any pre-information. This can help to unravel hitherto enigmatic diseases.

  13. Antimicrobial Peptides Targeting Gram-negative Pathogens, Produced and Delivered by Lactic Acid Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Volzing, Katherine; Borrero, Juan; Sadowsky, Michael J.; Kaznessis, Yiannis N.

    2014-01-01

    We present results of tests with recombinant Lactococcus lactis that produce and secrete heterologous antimicrobial peptides with activity against Gram-negative pathogenic Escherichia coli and Salmonella. In an initial screening, the activities of numerous candidate antimicrobial peptides, made by solid state synthesis, were assessed against several indicator pathogenic E. coli and Salmonella strains. Peptides A3APO and Alyteserin were selected as top performers based on high antimicrobial activity against the pathogens tested and on significantly lower antimicrobial activity against L. lactis. Expression cassettes containing the signal peptide of the protein Usp45 fused to the codon optimized sequence of mature A3APO and Alyteserin were cloned under the control of a nisin-inducible promoter nisA and transformed into L. lactis IL1403. The resulting recombinant strains were induced to express and secrete both peptides. A3APO- and Alyteserin-containing supernatants from these recombinant L. lactis inhibited the growth of pathogenic E. coli and Salmonella by up to 20-fold, while maintaining the host’s viability. This system may serve as a model for the production and delivery of antimicrobial peptides by lactic acid bacteria to target Gram-negative pathogenic bacteria populations. PMID:23808914

  14. Food Proteins as Source of Opioid Peptides-A Review.

    PubMed

    Garg, Swati; Nurgali, Kulmira; Mishra, Vijay Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Traditional opioids, mainly alkaloids, have been used in the clinical management of pain for a number of years but are often associated with numerous side-effects including sedation, dizziness, physical dependence, tolerance, addiction, nausea, vomiting, constipation and respiratory depression which prevent their effective use. Opioid peptides derived from food provide significant advantages as safe and natural alternative due to the possibility of their production using animal and plant proteins as well as comparatively less side-effects. This review aims to discuss the current literature on food-derived opioid peptides focusing on their production, methods of detection, isolation and purification. The need for screening more dietary proteins as a source of novel opioid peptides is emphasized in order to fully understand their potential in pain management either as a drug or as part of diet complementing therapeutic prescription.

  15. A Novel Peptide from Soybean Protein Isolate Significantly Enhances Resistance of the Organism under Oxidative Stress

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Heran; Liu, Rui; Zhao, Ziyuan; Zhang, Zhixian; Cao, Yue; Ma, Yudan; Guo, Yi; Xu, Li

    2016-01-01

    Recent studies have indicated that protein hydrolysates have broad biological effects. In the current study we describe a novel antioxidative peptide, FDPAL, from soybean protein isolate (SPI). The aim of this study was to purify and characterize an antioxidative peptide from SPI and determine its antioxidative mechanism. LC–MS/MS was used to isolate and identify the peptide from SPI. The sequence of the peptide was determined to be Phe-Asp-Pro-Ala-Leu (FDPAL, 561 Da). FDPAL can cause significant enhancement of resistance to oxidative stress both in cells as well as simple organisms. In Caenorhabditis elegans (C. elegans), FDPAL can up-regulate the expression of certain genes associated with resistance. The antioxidant activity of this peptide can be attributed to the presence of a specific amino acid sequence. Results from our work suggest that FDPAL can facilitate potential applications of proteins carrying this sequence in the nutraceutical, bioactive material and clinical medicine areas, as well as in cosmetics and health care products. PMID:27455060

  16. Selecting protein N-terminal peptides by combined fractional diagonal chromatography.

    PubMed

    Staes, An; Impens, Francis; Van Damme, Petra; Ruttens, Bart; Goethals, Marc; Demol, Hans; Timmerman, Evy; Vandekerckhove, Joël; Gevaert, Kris

    2011-07-14

    In recent years, procedures for selecting the N-terminal peptides of proteins with analysis by mass spectrometry have been established to characterize protease-mediated cleavage and protein α-N-acetylation on a proteomic level. As a pioneering technology, N-terminal combined fractional diagonal chromatography (COFRADIC) has been used in numerous studies in which these protein modifications were investigated. Derivatization of primary amines--which can include stable isotope labeling--occurs before trypsin digestion so that cleavage occurs after arginine residues. Strong cation exchange (SCX) chromatography results in the removal of most of the internal peptides. Diagonal, reversed-phase peptide chromatography, in which the two runs are separated by reaction with 2,4,6-trinitrobenzenesulfonic acid, results in the removal of the C-terminal peptides and remaining internal peptides and the fractionation of the sample. We describe here the fully matured N-terminal COFRADIC protocol as it is currently routinely used, including the most substantial improvements (including treatment with glutamine cyclotransferase and pyroglutamyl aminopeptidase to remove pyroglutamate before SCX, and a sample pooling scheme to reduce the overall number of liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry analyses) that were made since its original publication. Completion of the N-terminal COFRADIC procedure takes ~5 d.

  17. Design of Stable α-Helical Peptides and Thermostable Proteins in Biotechnology and Biomedicine.

    PubMed

    Yakimov, A P; Afanaseva, A S; Khodorkovskiy, M A; Petukhov, M G

    2016-01-01

    α-Helices are the most frequently occurring elements of the secondary structure in water-soluble globular proteins. Their increased conformational stability is among the main reasons for the high thermal stability of proteins in thermophilic bacteria. In addition, α-helices are often involved in protein interactions with other proteins, nucleic acids, and the lipids of cell membranes. That is why the highly stable α-helical peptides used as highly active and specific inhibitors of protein-protein and other interactions have recently found more applications in medicine. Several different approaches have been developed in recent years to improve the conformational stability of α-helical peptides and thermostable proteins, which will be discussed in this review. We also discuss the methods for improving the permeability of peptides and proteins across cellular membranes and their resistance to intracellular protease activity. Special attention is given to the SEQOPT method (http://mml.spbstu.ru/services/seqopt/), which is used to design conformationally stable short α-helices.

  18. Chemical Synthesis of Hydrocarbon-Stapled Peptides for Protein Interaction Research and Therapeutic Targeting

    PubMed Central

    Bird, Gregory H.; Crannell, W. Christian; Walensky, Loren D.

    2016-01-01

    The peptide alpha-helix represents one of Nature’s most featured protein shapes and is employed in a diversity of protein architectures, spanning the very cytoskeletal infrastructure of the cell to the most intimate contact points between crucial signaling proteins. By installing an all-hydrocarbon crosslink into native sequences, we recapitulate the shape and biological activity of natural peptide alpha-helices, yielding a chemical toolbox to both interrogate the protein interactome and modulate interaction networks for potential therapeutic benefit. Here, we describe our latest approach to synthesizing Stabilized Alpha-Helices (SAH) corresponding to key protein interaction domains. We emphasize a stepwise approach to the production of crosslinking non-natural amino acids, their incorporation into peptide templates, and the application of ruthenium-catalyzed ring closing metathesis to generate hydrocarbon-stapled peptides. Through facile derivatization and functionalization steps, SAHs can be tailored for a broad range of applications in biochemical, structural, proteomic, cellular and in vivo studies. PMID:23801563

  19. Chemical synthesis of hydrocarbon-stapled peptides for protein interaction research and therapeutic targeting.

    PubMed

    Bird, Gregory H; Crannell, W Christian; Walensky, Loren D

    2011-09-01

    The peptide α-helix represents one of nature's most featured protein shapes and is employed in a diversity of protein architectures, from the cytoskeletal infrastructure to the most intimate contact points between crucial signaling proteins. By installing an all-hydrocarbon crosslink into native sequences, the shape and biological activity of natural peptide α-helices can be recapitulated, yielding a chemical toolbox that can be used both to interrogate the protein interactome and to modulate interaction networks for potential therapeutic benefit. Here, current methodology for synthesizing stabilized α-helices (SAH) corresponding to key protein interaction domains is described. A stepwise approach is taken for the production of crosslinking non-natural amino acids, incorporation of the residues into peptide templates, and application of ruthenium-catalyzed ring-closing metathesis to generate hydrocarbon-stapled peptides. Through facile derivatization and functionalization steps, SAHs can be tailored for a broad range of applications in biochemical, structural, proteomic, cellular, and in vivo studies. Curr. Protoc. Chem. Biol. 3:99-117 © 2011 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  20. Lactic Acid Bacteria as Cell Factories for the Generation of Bioactive Peptides.

    PubMed

    Brown, Lucia; Pingitore, Esteban Vera; Mozzi, Fernanda; Saavedra, Lucila; Villegas, Josefina M; Hebert, Elvira M

    2017-01-01

    There is a growing interest in the incorporation of functional foods in the daily diet to achieve health promotion and disease risk reduction. Numerous studies have focused on the production of biologically active peptides as nutraceuticals and functional food ingredients due to their health benefits. These short peptides, displaying antihypertensive, antioxidant, mineral binding, immunomodulatory and antimicrobial activities are hidden in a latent state within the primary sequences of food proteins requiring enzymatic proteolysis for their release. While microbial fermentation is one of the major and economically most convenient processes used to generate bioactive peptides, lactic acid bacteria (LAB) are widely used as starter cultures for the production of diverse fermented foods. This article reviews the current knowledge on LAB as cell factories for the production of bioactive peptides from a variety of food protein sources. These microorganisms depend on a complex proteolytic system to ensure successful fermentation processes. In the dairy industry, LAB containing cell envelope-associated proteinases (CEPs) are employed as biocatalysts for the first step of casein breakdown releasing bioactive peptides during milk fermentation. A better understanding of the functionality and regulation of the proteolytic system of LAB opens up future opportunities for the production of novel food-derived compounds with potential health-promoting properties.

  1. Butelase-mediated cyclization and ligation of peptides and proteins.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Giang K T; Qiu, Yibo; Cao, Yuan; Hemu, Xinya; Liu, Chuan-Fa; Tam, James P

    2016-10-01

    Enzymes that catalyze efficient macrocyclization or site-specific ligation of peptides and proteins can enable tools for drug design and protein engineering. Here we describe a protocol to use butelase 1, a recently discovered peptide ligase, for high-efficiency cyclization and ligation of peptides and proteins ranging in size from 10 to >200 residues. Butelase 1 is the fastest known ligase and is found in pods of the common medicinal plant Clitoria ternatea (also known as butterfly pea). It has a very simple C-terminal-specific recognition motif that requires Asn/Asp (Asx) at the P1 position and a dipeptide His-Val at the P1' and P2' positions. Substrates for butelase-mediated ligation can be prepared by standard Fmoc (9-fluorenylmethyloxycarbonyl) chemistry or recombinant expression with the minimal addition of this tripeptide Asn-His-Val motif at the C terminus. Butelase 1 achieves cyclizations that are 20,000 times faster than those of sortase A, a commonly used enzyme for backbone cyclization. Unlike sortase A, butelase is traceless, and it can be used for the total synthesis of naturally occurring peptides and proteins. Furthermore, butelase 1 is also useful for intermolecular ligations and synthesis of peptide or protein thioesters, which are versatile activated intermediates necessary for and compatible with many chemical ligation methods. The protocol describes steps for isolation and purification of butelase 1 from plant extract using a four-step chromatography procedure, which takes ∼3 d. We then describe steps for intramolecular cyclization, intermolecular ligation and butelase-mediated synthesis of protein thioesters. Butelase reactions are generally completed within minutes and often achieve excellent yields.

  2. Tritium labeling of amino acids and peptides with liquid and solid tritium

    SciTech Connect

    Peng, C.T.; Hua, R.L.; Souers, P.C.; Coronado, P.R.

    1988-01-01

    Amino acids and peptides were labeled with liquid and solid tritium at 21 K and 9 K. At these low temperatures radiation degradation is minimal, and tritium incorporation increases with tritium concentration and exposure time. Ring saturation in L-phenyl-alanine does not occur. Peptide linkage in oligopeptides is stable toward tritium. Deiodination in 3-iodotyrosine and 3,5-diiodotyrosine occurs readily and proceeds in steps by losing one iodine atom at a time. Nickel and noble metal supported catalysts when used as supports for dispersion of the substrate promote tritium labeling at 21 K. Our study shows that both liquid and solid tritium are potentially useful agents for labeling peptides and proteins. 11 refs., 1 fig., 3 tabs.

  3. Tritium labeling of amino acids and peptides with liquid and solid tritium

    SciTech Connect

    Souers, P.C.; Coronado, P.R.; Peng, C.T.; Hua, R.L.

    1988-01-01

    Amino acids and peptides were labeled with liquid and solid tritium at 21/degree/K and 9/degree/K. At these low temperatures radiation degradation is minimal, and tritium incorporation increases with tritium concentration and exposure time. Ring saturation in L-phenylalanine does not occur. Peptide linkage in oligopeptides is stable toward tritium. Deiodination in 3-iodotyrosine and 3,5-diiodotyrosine occurs readily and proceeds in steps by losing one iodine atom at a time. Nickel and noble metal supported catalysts when used as supports for dispersion of the substrate promote tritium labeling at 21 K. Our study shows that both liquid and solid tritiums are potentially useful agents for labeling peptides and proteins.

  4. Disruption of the glucocorticoid receptor assembly with heat shock protein 90 by a peptidic antiglucocorticoid.

    PubMed

    Dao-Phan, H P; Formstecher, P; Lefebvre, P

    1997-06-01

    Association of glucocorticoid (GR) and progesterone (PR) receptors with a set of molecular chaperones, including the 90-kDa heat shock protein (hsp90), is a dynamic process required for proper folding and maintaining these nuclear receptors under a transcriptionally inactive, ligand-responsive state. Mutational studies of the chicken hsp90 complementary DNA suggested that three regions of this protein (A, B, and Z) interact with the hormone-binding domain of GR, whereas region A is dispensable for hsp90 binding to PR. We found that this 69-amino acid region can be narrowed down to a 35-mer alpha-helical, acidic peptide, which is by itself able to inhibit hsp90 association to GR translated in vitro. The hsp90-free GR did not bind ligand, but was devoid of any specific DNA-binding activity, and higher peptide concentrations specifically inhibited the binding of activated GR to DNA. When overexpressed in cultured cells, this peptide acted as an antiglucocorticoid and inhibited the antiactivating protein-1 activity and the ligand-dependent nuclear transfer of GR. None of these effects, either in vivo and in vitro, was observed for PR. The region from residue 232 to residue 265 of hsp90 is, therefore, a domain critical for its association to GR, an association that is a prerequisite for receptor transcriptional activity. More importantly, these results demonstrate that targeting specific protein/protein interaction interfaces is a powerful means to specifically modulate nuclear receptor signaling pathways in a ligand-independent manner.

  5. Bioactive vegetable proteins and peptides in lipid-lowering; nutraceutical potential.

    PubMed

    Ruiz Ruiz, Jorge Carlos; Betancur Ancona, David Abram; Segura Campos, Maira Rubi

    2014-04-01

    As the last century saw a decline in the burden of nutritional deficiency and infectious disease, the global burden of chronic disease, cardiovascular disease (CVD) in particular, is increasing. CVD is the leading cause of death in the developed countries. Significant research efforts on the prevention and treatment of this disease have identified elevated plasma cholesterol as a primary risk factor for CVD. Although CVD progresses with hypercholesterolemia, it seems possibility to delay and prevent its development through improvement of diet. Recent findings demonstrate that protein concentrates, protein hydrolysates, and peptides derived from vegetables may promote a significant decrease in blood cholesterol concentration. This reduction in cholesterol and lipid levels by protein, protein hydrolysates, and peptides can be the result of dietary changes, reduced cholesterol biosynthesis, changes in bile acid synthesis, and reduced absorption of lipid cholesterol and bile acid. Combination drug/diet therapies may reduce the number of drug prescriptions, the progressive rise in "optimal" drug dosage and costs associated with pharmaceutical management of disease. These bioactive vegetable proteins, hydrolysates and peptides may be used in formulation of functional foods, nutraceuticals, and natural drugs because of their health benefit effects suggesting their use as an alternative in treatment of various dyslipidemias, and a potential agent for reducing cardiovascular diseases risk factors.

  6. Analysis of Protein-RNA and Protein-Peptide Interactions in Equine Infectious Anemia

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Jae-Hyung

    2007-01-01

    Macromolecular interactions are essential for virtually all cellular functions including signal transduction processes, metabolic processes, regulation of gene expression and immune responses. This dissertation focuses on the characterization of two important macromolecular interactions involved in the relationship between Equine Infectious Anemia Virus (EIAV) and its host cell in horse: (1) the interaction between the EIAV Rev protein and its binding site, the Rev-responsive element (RRE) and (2) interactions between equine MHC class I molecules and epitope peptides derived from EIAV proteins. EIAV, one of the most divergent members of the lentivirus family, has a single-stranded RNA genome and carries several regulatory and structural proteins within its viral particle. Rev is an essential EIAV regulatory encoded protein that interacts with the viral RRE, a specific binding site in the viral mRNA. Using a combination of experimental and computational methods, the interactions between EIAV Rev and RRE were characterized in detail. EIAV Rev was shown to have a bipartite RNA binding domain contain two arginine rich motifs (ARMs). The RRE secondary structure was determined and specific structural motifs that act as cis-regulatory elements for EIAV Rev-RRE interaction were identified. Interestingly, a structural motif located in the high affinity Rev binding site is well conserved in several diverse lentiviral genoes, including HIV-1. Macromolecular interactions involved in the immune response of the horse to EIAV infection were investigated by analyzing complexes between MHC class I proteins and epitope peptides derived from EIAV Rev, Env and Gag proteins. Computational modeling results provided a mechanistic explanation for the experimental finding that a single amino acid change in the peptide binding domain of the quine MHC class I molecule differentially affectes the recognitino of specific epitopes by EIAV-specific CTL. Together, the findings in this

  7. Amino acid sequence of homologous rat atrial peptides: natriuretic activity of native and synthetic forms.

    PubMed Central

    Seidah, N G; Lazure, C; Chrétien, M; Thibault, G; Garcia, R; Cantin, M; Genest, J; Nutt, R F; Brady, S F; Lyle, T A

    1984-01-01

    A substance called atrial natriuretic factor (ANF), localized in secretory granules of atrial cardiocytes, was isolated as four homologous natriuretic peptides from homogenates of rat atria. The complete sequence of the longest form showed that it is composed of 33 amino acids. The three other shorter forms (2-33, 3-33, and 8-33) represent amino-terminally truncated versions of the 33 amino acid parent molecule as shown by analysis of sequence, amino acid composition, or both. The proposed primary structure agrees entirely with the amino acid composition and reveals no significant sequence homology with any known protein or segment of protein. The short form ANF-(8-33) was synthesized by a multi-fragment condensation approach and the synthetic product was shown to exhibit specific activity comparable to that of the natural ANF-(3-33). PMID:6232612

  8. Carrier Mediated Systemic Delivery of Protein and Peptide Therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Zaman, Rahela; Othman, Iekhan; Chowdhury, Ezharul Hoque

    2016-01-01

    Over the last few decades proteins and peptide therapeutics have occupied an enormous fraction of pharmaceutical industry. Despite their high potential as therapeutics, the big challenge often encountered is the effective administration and bioavailability of protein therapeutics in vivo system. Peptide molecules are well known for their in vivo short half-lives. In addition, due to high molecular weight and susceptibility to enzymatic degradation, often it is not easy to administer peptides and proteins orally or through any other noninvasive routes. Conventional drug management system often demands for frequent and regular interval intravenous/subcutaneous administration, which decreases overall patient compliance and increases chances of side-effects related to dose-fluctuation in systemic circulation. A controlled mode of delivery system could address all these short-comings at a time. Therefore, long-acting sustained release formulations for both invasive and noninvasive routes are under rigorous study currently. Long-acting formulations through invasive routes can address patient compliance and dose-fluctuation issues by less frequent administration. Also, any new route of administration other than invasive routes will address cost-effectiveness of the therapeutic by lessening the need to deal with health professional and health care facility. Although a vast number of studies are dealing with novel drug delivery systems, till now only a handful of controlled release formulations for proteins and peptides have been approved by FDA. This study therefore focuses on current and perspective controlled release formulations of existing and novel protein/peptide therapeutics via conventional invasive routes as well as potential novel non-invasive routes of administration, e.g., oral, buccal, sublingual, nasal, ocular, rectal, vaginal and pulmonary.

  9. Bioactive peptides and proteins from foods: indication for health effects.

    PubMed

    Möller, Niels Peter; Scholz-Ahrens, Katharina Elisabeth; Roos, Nils; Schrezenmeir, Jürgen

    2008-06-01

    Some dietary proteins cause specific effects going beyond nutrient supply. A number of proteins seem to act directly in the intestine, such as IGFs, lactoferrin and immunoglobulins. Many substances, however, are peptides encrypted in intact molecules and are released from their encrypted position by enzymes during gastrointestinal transit or by fermentation or ripening during food processing. Among food-derived bioactive proteins and peptides from plants and animals, those obtained from milk are known in particular. Numerous effects have been described after in vitro and animal trials for bioactive proteins and peptides, such as immunomodulating, antihypertensive, osteoprotective, antilipemic, opiate, antioxidative and antimicrobial. This article reviews the current knowledge of the existence of bioactive proteins and of in vitro bioactivity and the present evidence of health effects exerted by such substances or products containing bioactive compounds. For example, there is evidence for the antihypertensive effects of milk products fermented with Lactobacillus helveticus containing the tripeptides IPP and VPP, which inhibit angiotensin converting enzyme, and for osteoprotective effects by milk basic protein. There is less profound evidence on the immunomodulating effects of lactoferrin and postprandial triglyceride reduction by a hydrolysate of bovine hemoglobin.

  10. Prediction of Functional Class of Proteins and Peptides Irrespective of Sequence Homology by Support Vector Machines

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Zhi Qun; Lin, Hong Huang; Zhang, Hai Lei; Han, Lian Yi; Chen, Xin; Chen, Yu Zong

    2007-01-01

    Various computational methods have been used for the prediction of protein and peptide function based on their sequences. A particular challenge is to derive functional properties from sequences that show low or no homology to proteins of known function. Recently, a machine learning method, support vector machines (SVM), have been explored for predicting functional class of proteins and peptides from amino acid sequence derived properties independent of sequence similarity, which have shown promising potential for a wide spectrum of protein and peptide classes including some of the low- and non-homologous proteins. This method can thus be explored as a potential tool to complement alignment-based, clustering-based, and structure-based methods for predicting protein function. This article reviews the strategies, current progresses, and underlying difficulties in using SVM for predicting the functional class of proteins. The relevant software and web-servers are described. The reported prediction performances in the application of these methods are also presented. PMID:20066123

  11. Design of Stable α-Helical Peptides and Thermostable Proteins in Biotechnology and Biomedicine

    PubMed Central

    Yakimov, A.P.; Afanaseva, A.S.; Khodorkovskiy, M.A.; Petukhov, M.G.

    2016-01-01

    α-Helices are the most frequently occurring elements of the secondary structure in water-soluble globular proteins. Their increased conformational stability is among the main reasons for the high thermal stability of proteins in thermophilic bacteria. In addition, α-helices are often involved in protein interactions with other proteins, nucleic acids, and the lipids of cell membranes. That is why the highly stable α-helical peptides used as highly active and specific inhibitors of protein–protein and other interactions have recently found more applications in medicine. Several different approaches have been developed in recent years to improve the conformational stability of α-helical peptides and thermostable proteins, which will be discussed in this review. We also discuss the methods for improving the permeability of peptides and proteins across cellular membranes and their resistance to intracellular protease activity. Special attention is given to the SEQOPT method (http://mml.spbstu.ru/services/seqopt/), which is used to design conformationally stable short α-helices. PMID:28050268

  12. Automated carboxy-terminal sequence analysis of peptides and proteins using diphenyl phosphoroisothiocyanatidate.

    PubMed Central

    Bailey, J. M.; Nikfarjam, F.; Shenoy, N. R.; Shively, J. E.

    1992-01-01

    Proteins and peptides can be sequenced from the carboxy-terminus with isothiocyanate reagents to produce amino acid thiohydantoin derivatives. Previous studies in our laboratory have focused on the automation of the thiocyanate chemistry using acetic anhydride and trimethylsilylisothiocyanate (TMS-ITC) to derivatize the C-terminal amino acid to a thiohydantoin and sodium trimethylsilanolate for specific hydrolysis of the derivatized C-terminal amino acid (Bailey, J.M., Shenoy, N.R., Ronk, M., & Shively, J.E., 1992, Protein Sci. 1, 68-80). A major limitation of this approach was the need to activate the C-terminus with acetic anhydride. We now describe the use of a new reagent, diphenyl phosphoroisothiocyanatidate (DPP-ITC) and pyridine, which combines the activation and derivatization steps to produce peptidylthiohydantoins. Previous work by Kenner et al. (Kenner, G.W., Khorana, H.G., & Stedman, R.J., 1953, Chem. Soc. J., 673-678) with this reagent demonstrated slow kinetics. Several days were required for complete reaction. We show here that the inclusion of pyridine was found to promote the formation of C-terminal thiohydantoins by DPP-ITC resulting in complete conversion of the C-terminal amino acid to a thiohydantoin in less than 1 h. Reagents such as imidazole, triazine, and tetrazole were also found to promote the reaction with DPP-ITC as effectively as pyridine. General base catalysts, such as triethylamine, do not promote the reaction, but are required to convert the C-terminal carboxylic acid to a salt prior to the reaction with DPP-ITC and pyridine. By introducing the DPP-ITC reagent and pyridine in separate steps in an automated sequencer, we observed improved sequencing yields for amino acids normally found difficult to derivatize with acetic anhydride/TMS-ITC. This was particularly true for aspartic acid, which now can be sequenced in yields comparable to most of the other amino acids. Automated programs are described for the C-terminal sequencing of

  13. Rapid online nonenzymatic protein digestion combining microwave heating acid hydrolysis and electrochemical oxidation.

    PubMed

    Basile, Franco; Hauser, Nicolas

    2011-01-01

    We report an online nonenzymatic method for site-specific digestion of proteins to yield peptides that are well suited for collision-induced dissociation tandem mass spectrometry. The method combines online microwave heating acid hydrolysis at aspartic acid and online electrochemical oxidation at tryptophan and tyrosine. The combined microwave/electrochemical digestion is reproducible and produces peptides with an average sequence length of 10 amino acids. This peptide length is similar to the average peptide length of 9 amino acids obtained by digestion of proteins with the enzyme trypsin. As a result, the peptides produced by this novel nonenzymatic digestion method, when analyzed by electrospray ionization mass spectrometry, produce protonated molecules with mostly +1 and +2 charge states. The combination of these two nonenzymatic methods overcomes shortcomings with each individual method in that (i) peptides generated by the microwave-hydrolysis method have an average amino acid length of 16 amino acids and (ii) the electrochemical-cleavage method is unable to reproducibly digest proteins with molecular masses above 4 kDa. Preliminary results are presented on the application and utility of this rapid online digestion (total of 6 min of digestion time) on a series of standard peptides and proteins as well as an Escherichia coli protein extract.

  14. Conservation of peptide structure of outer membrane protein-macromolecular complex from Neisseria gonorrhoeae.

    PubMed Central

    Hansen, M V; Wilde, C E

    1984-01-01

    The structural conservation of an outer membrane protein of Neisseria gonorrhoeae called OMP-MC (outer membrane protein-macromolecular complex) was investigated by determining the isoelectric point and amino-terminal amino acid sequence of the protein and by using high-performance liquid chromatography for comparative tryptic peptide mapping. The 76,000-dalton subunits generated by reduction and alkylation of the native 800,000-dalton complex from six test strains focused in ultrathin gels as bands of restricted heterogeneity at an approximate pI of 7.6. Dansyl chloride labeling indicated that all strains shared glycine as the amino-terminal amino acid. Sequence analysis of OMP-MC from two strains revealed no amino acid differences within the first 11 residues. Dual-label peptide maps revealed an extremely high degree of conservation of peptide structure. The results indicate that (i) OMP-MCs isolated from various strains of N. gonorrhoeae share structural homology and (ii) the 800,000-dalton complex is a homopolymer composed of 10 to 12 apparently identical 76,000-dalton subunits. Images PMID:6421738

  15. Synthesis and characterization of a 'fluorous' (fluorinated alkyl) affinity reagent that labels primary amine groups in proteins/peptides.

    PubMed

    Qian, Jiang; Cole, Richard B; Cai, Yang

    2011-01-01

    Strong non-covalent interactions such as biotin-avidin affinity play critical roles in protein/peptide purification. A new type of 'fluorous' (fluorinated alkyl) affinity approach has gained popularity due especially to its low level of non-specific binding to proteins/peptides. We have developed a novel water-soluble fluorous labeling reagent that is reactive (via an active sulfo-N-hydroxylsuccinimidyl ester group) to primary amine groups in proteins/peptides. After fluorous affinity purification, the bulky fluorous tag moiety and the long oligoethylene glycol (OEG) spacer of this labeling reagent can be trimmed via the cleavage of an acid labile linker. Upon collision-induced dissociation, the labeled peptide ion yields a characteristic fragment that can be retrieved from the residual portion of the fluorous affinity tag, and this fragment ion can serve as a marker to indicate that the relevant peptide has been successfully labeled. As a proof of principle, the newly synthesized fluorous labeling reagent was evaluated for peptide/protein labeling ability in phosphate-buffered saline (PBS). Results show that both the aqueous environment protein/peptide labeling and the affinity enrichment/separation process were highly efficient.

  16. Affinity purification of copper-chelating peptides from sunflower protein hydrolysates.

    PubMed

    Megías, Cristina; Pedroche, Justo; Yust, Maria M; Girón-Calle, Julio; Alaiz, Manuel; Millan, Francisco; Vioque, Javier

    2007-08-08

    Copper-chelating peptides were purified from sunflower protein hydrolysates by affinity chromatography using immobilized copper. A variety of protein hydrolysates were obtained by incubation with the proteases Alcalase and Flavourzyme for different periods of time. Chelating activity was indirectly determined by measuring the inhibitory effect of hydrolysates on the oxidation of beta-carotene by copper. Copper-binding peptides purified from the two hydrolysates that inhibited oxidation by copper the most contained 25.4 and 42.0% histidine and inhibited beta-carotene oxidation 8 and 3 times more than the original hydrolysates, which had 2.4 and 2.6% histidine, respectively. Thus, histidine content is not the only factor involved in antioxidant activity, and probably other factors such as peptide size and amino acid sequence are also important. This work shows that affinity chromatography can be used for the purification of copper-chelating peptides and probably other metals of nutritional interest such as calcium, iron, and zinc. In addition to their antioxidant potential, chelating peptides are of nutritional interest because they increase bioavailability of minerals.

  17. Investigating the inclusion properties of aromatic amino acids complexing beta-cyclodextrins in model peptides.

    PubMed

    Caso, Jolanda Valentina; Russo, Luigi; Palmieri, Maddalena; Malgieri, Gaetano; Galdiero, Stefania; Falanga, Annarita; Isernia, Carla; Iacovino, Rosa

    2015-10-01

    Cyclodextrins are commonly used as complexing agents in biological, pharmaceutical, and industrial applications since they have an effect on protein thermal and proteolytic stability, refolding yields, solubility, and taste masking. β-cyclodextrins (β-CD), because of their cavity size are a perfectly suited complexing agent for many common guest moieties. In the case of peptide-cyclodextrin and protein-cyclodextrin host-guest complexes the aromatic amino acids are reported to be the principal responsible of the interaction. For these reasons, we have investigated the inclusion properties of nine designed tripeptides, obtained permuting the position of two L-alanines (Ala, A) with that of one L-tryptophan (Trp, W), L-phenylalanine (Phe, F), or L-tyrosine (Tyr, Y), respectively. Interestingly, the position of the aromatic side-chain in the sequence appears to modulate the β-CD:peptide binding constants, determined via UV-Vis and NMR spectroscopy, which in turn assumes values higher than those reported for the single amino acid. The tripeptides containing a tyrosine showed the highest binding constants, with the central position in the Ac-AYA-NH2 peptide becoming the most favorite for the interaction. A combined NMR and Molecular Docking approach permitted to build detailed complex models, highlighting the stabilizing interactions of the neighboring amino acids backbone atoms with the upper rim of the β-CD.

  18. Bio-inspired Silicification of Silica-binding Peptide-Silk Protein Chimeras: Comparison of Chemically and Genetically Produced Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Canabady-Rochelle, Laetitia L.S.; Belton, David J.; Deschaume, Olivier; Currie, Heather A.; Kaplan, David L.; Perry, Carole C.

    2012-01-01

    Novel protein chimeras constituted of ‘silk’ and a silica-binding peptide (KSLSRHDHIHHH) were synthesized by genetic or chemical approaches and their influence on silica-silk based chimera composite formation evaluated. Genetic chimeras were constructed from 6 or 15 repeats of the 32 amino acid consensus sequence of Nephila clavipes spider silk ([SGRGGLGGQG AGAAAAAGGA GQGGYGGLGSQG]n) to which one silica binding peptide was fused at the N terminus. For the chemical chimera, 25 equivalents of the silica binding peptide were chemically coupled to natural Bombyx mori silk after modification of tyrosine groups by diazonium coupling and EDC/NHS activation of all acid groups. After silica formation under mild, biomaterial compatible conditions the effect of peptide addition on the properties of the silk and chimeric silk-silica composite materials was explored. The composite biomaterial properties could be related to the extent of silica condensation and to the higher number of silica binding sites in the chemical chimera as compared to the genetically derived variants. In all cases, the structure of the protein / chimera in solution dictated the type of composite structure that formed with the silica deposition process having little effect on the secondary structural composition of the silk based materials. Similarly to our study of genetic silk based chimeras containing the R5 peptide (SSKKSGSYSGSKGSKRRIL), the role of the chimeras (genetic and chemical) used in the present study resided more in aggregation and scaffolding than in the catalysis of condensation. The variables of peptide identity, silk construct (number of consensus repeats or silk source) and approach to synthesis (genetic or chemical) can be used to ‘tune’ the properties of the composite materials formed and is a general approach which can be used to prepare a range of materials for biomedical and sensor based applications. PMID:22229696

  19. Assay of phosphotyrosyl protein phosphatase using synthetic peptide 1142-1153 of the insulin receptor.

    PubMed

    King, M J; Sale, G J

    1988-09-12

    Synthetic peptide 1142-1153 of the insulin receptor was phosphorylated on tyrosine by the insulin receptor and found to be a potent substrate for dephosphorylation by rat liver particulate and soluble phosphotyrosyl protein phosphatases. Apparent Km values were approximately 5 microM. Vm values (nmol phosphate removed/min per mg protein) were 0.62 (particulate) and 0.2 (soluble). This corresponds to 80% of total activity being membrane-associated, indicating that membrane-bound phosphatases are important receptor phosphatases. The phosphatase activities were distinct from acid and alkaline phosphatase. In conclusion peptide 1142-1153 provides a useful tool for the further study and characterization of phosphotyrosyl protein phosphatases.

  20. Solvent and conformation dependence of amide I vibrations in peptides and proteins containing proline.

    PubMed

    Roy, Santanu; Lessing, Joshua; Meisl, Georg; Ganim, Ziad; Tokmakoff, Andrei; Knoester, Jasper; Jansen, Thomas L C

    2011-12-21

    We present a mixed quantum-classical model for studying the amide I vibrational dynamics (predominantly CO stretching) in peptides and proteins containing proline. There are existing models developed for determining frequencies of and couplings between the secondary amide units. However, these are not applicable to proline because this amino acid has a tertiary amide unit. Therefore, a new parametrization is required for infrared-spectroscopic studies of proteins that contain proline, such as collagen, the most abundant protein in humans and animals. Here, we construct the electrostatic and dihedral maps accounting for solvent and conformation effects on frequency and coupling for the proline unit. We examine the quality and the applicability of these maps by carrying out spectral simulations of a number of peptides with proline in D(2)O and compare with experimental observations.

  1. Peptiderive server: derive peptide inhibitors from protein–protein interactions

    PubMed Central

    Sedan, Yuval; Marcu, Orly; Lyskov, Sergey; Schueler-Furman, Ora

    2016-01-01

    The Rosetta Peptiderive protocol identifies, in a given structure of a protein–protein interaction, the linear polypeptide segment suggested to contribute most to binding energy. Interactions that feature a ‘hot segment’, a linear peptide with significant binding energy compared to that of the complex, may be amenable for inhibition and the peptide sequence and structure derived from the interaction provide a starting point for rational drug design. Here we present a web server for Peptiderive, which is incorporated within the ROSIE web interface for Rosetta protocols. A new feature of the protocol also evaluates whether derived peptides are good candidates for cyclization. Fast computation times and clear visualization allow users to quickly assess the interaction of interest. The Peptiderive server is available for free use at http://rosie.rosettacommons.org/peptiderive. PMID:27141963

  2. Protein-based peptide-bond formation by aminoacyl-tRNA protein transferase.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Kazunori; Toh, Yukimatsu; Suto, Kyoko; Shimizu, Yoshihiro; Oka, Natsuhisa; Wada, Takeshi; Tomita, Kozo

    2007-10-18

    Eubacterial leucyl/phenylalanyl-tRNA protein transferase (LF-transferase) catalyses peptide-bond formation by using Leu-tRNA(Leu) (or Phe-tRNA(Phe)) and an amino-terminal Arg (or Lys) of a protein, as donor and acceptor substrates, respectively. However, the catalytic mechanism of peptide-bond formation by LF-transferase remained obscure. Here we determine the structures of complexes of LF-transferase and phenylalanyl adenosine, with and without a short peptide bearing an N-terminal Arg. Combining the two separate structures into one structure as well as mutation studies reveal the mechanism for peptide-bond formation by LF-transferase. The electron relay from Asp 186 to Gln 188 helps Gln 188 to attract a proton from the alpha-amino group of the N-terminal Arg of the acceptor peptide. This generates the attacking nucleophile for the carbonyl carbon of the aminoacyl bond of the aminoacyl-tRNA, thus facilitating peptide-bond formation. The protein-based mechanism for peptide-bond formation by LF-transferase is similar to the reverse reaction of the acylation step observed in the peptide hydrolysis reaction by serine proteases.

  3. Chicken Egg Shell Membrane Associated Proteins and Peptides.

    PubMed

    Makkar, Sarbjeet; Liyanage, Rohana; Kannan, Lakshmi; Packialakshmi, Balamurugan; Lay, Jack O; Rath, Narayan C

    2015-11-11

    Egg shells are poultry industry byproducts with potential for use in various biological and agricultural applications. We have been interested in the membranes underlying the calcareous shell as a feed supplement, which showed potential to improve immunity and performance of post hatch poultry. Therefore, to determine their protein and peptide profiles, we extracted the egg shell membranes (ESM) from fresh unfertilized eggs with methanol and guanidine hydrochloride (GdHCl) to obtain soluble proteins for analysis by mass spectrometry. The methanol extract was subjected to matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization (MALDI), electrospray ionization (ESI), high-performance reverse phase liquid chromatographic separation (HPLC), and tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) to determine its peptide and protein profiles. The GdHCl extract was subjected to ESI-HPLC-MS/MS following trypsin digestion of reduced/alkylated proteins. Nine proteins from the methanol extract and >275 proteins from the GdHCl extract were tentatively identified. The results suggested the presence of several abundant proteins from egg whites, such as ovoalbumin, ovotransferrin, and lysozyme as well as many others associated with antimicrobial, biomechanical, cytoskeletal organizational, cell signaling, and enzyme activities. Collagens, keratin, agrin, and laminin were some of the structural proteins present in the ESM. The methanol-soluble fraction contained several clusterin peptides and defensins, particularly, two isoforms of gallin. The ratios of the two isoforms of gallin differed between the membranes obtained from brown and white eggs. The high abundance of several antimicrobial, immunomodulatory, and other bioactive proteins in the ESM along with its potential to entrap various microbes and antigens may make it a suitable vehicle for oral immunization of post hatch poultry and improve their disease resistance.

  4. Heparin-binding peptide as a novel affinity tag for purification of recombinant proteins.

    PubMed

    Morris, Jacqueline; Jayanthi, Srinivas; Langston, Rebekah; Daily, Anna; Kight, Alicia; McNabb, David S; Henry, Ralph; Kumar, Thallapuranam Krishnaswamy Suresh

    2016-10-01

    Purification of recombinant proteins constitutes a significant part of the downstream processing in biopharmaceutical industries. Major costs involved in the production of bio-therapeutics mainly depend on the number of purification steps used during the downstream process. Affinity chromatography is a widely used method for the purification of recombinant proteins expressed in different expression host platforms. Recombinant protein purification is achieved by fusing appropriate affinity tags to either N- or C- terminus of the target recombinant proteins. Currently available protein/peptide affinity tags have proved quite useful in the purification of recombinant proteins. However, these affinity tags suffer from specific limitations in their use under different conditions of purification. In this study, we have designed a novel 34-amino acid heparin-binding affinity tag (HB-tag) for the purification of recombinant proteins expressed in Escherichia coli (E. coli) cells. HB-tag fused recombinant proteins were overexpressed in E. coli in high yields. A one-step heparin-Sepharose-based affinity chromatography protocol was developed to purify HB-fused recombinant proteins to homogeneity using a simple sodium chloride step gradient elution. The HB-tag has also been shown to facilitate the purification of target recombinant proteins from their 8 M urea denatured state(s). The HB-tag has been demonstrated to be successfully released from the fusion protein by an appropriate protease treatment to obtain the recombinant target protein(s) in high yields. Results of the two-dimensional NMR spectroscopy experiments indicate that the purified recombinant target protein(s) exist in the native conformation. Polyclonal antibodies raised against the HB-peptide sequence, exhibited high binding specificity and sensitivity to the HB-fused recombinant proteins (∼10 ng) in different crude cell extracts obtained from diverse expression hosts. In our opinion, the HB-tag provides a

  5. Kojic Acid Peptide: A New Compound with Anti-Tyrosinase Potential

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Birendra Kumar; Park, Seok Hoon; Lee, Hyang-Bok; Goo, Young-Aae; Kim, Hyoung Shik; Cho, Seung Hee; Lee, Jeong Hun; Ahn, Ghe Whan; Kim, Jin Pyo; Kang, Su Myoung

    2016-01-01

    Background Kojic acid was used for decades in the cosmetic industry as an antimelanogenic agent. However, there are two major drawbacks of Kojic acid, one is cytotoxicity and second are instability on storage. These limitations led the scientist to synthesize the active Kojic acid peptides. Objective In the present study, we synthesize and investigate the effect of five Kojic acid peptides to overcome the limitation of Kojic acid. Methods The peptide was analyzed and purified by high-performance liquid chromatography and matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time of flight mass spectroscopy. Further, the tyrosinase activities of the Kojic acid and Kojic acid peptides were compared. The toxicity was measured and the melanin content is recorded in B16F10 mouse melanoma cells. Results Maximum tyrosinase activity was measured by Kojic acid peptides. Therefore, Kojic acid peptides were subjected to melanin assay and cytotoxicity assay and finally the stability of the Kojic acid peptide was measured. Conclusion It was observed that this newly synthesized Kojic acid peptide is stable and potent to inhibit the tyrosinase activity and melanin content of B16F10 mouse melanoma cells without exhibiting cell toxicity. Together, these preliminary results suggest that a further exploration is being needed to establish Kojic acid peptide as antimelanogenic agent. PMID:27746633

  6. Short communication: Measuring the angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitory activity of an 8-amino acid (8mer) fragment of the C12 antihypertensive peptide

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    An eight amino acid fragment (PFPEVFGK) of a known milk protein-derived antihypertensive peptide was synthesized by microwave-assisted solid phase peptide synthesis and purified by reverse phase HPLC. Its ability to inhibit the angiotensin-converting enzyme was assessed and compared to that of the ...

  7. Kinetic study of sulphuric acid hydrolysis of protein feathers.

    PubMed

    Ben Hamad Bouhamed, Sana; Kechaou, Nabil

    2017-02-28

    Poultry feather keratin is the most important by-product from the poultry industry due to its abundance. Different methods have been still applied to process this by-product such as enzymatic hydrolysis which is expensive and inapplicable at the industrial level. This paper presents a study of acid hydrolysis of poultry feathers using different types of acids, sulphuric acid concentration, different temperatures and solid to liquid ratio to obtain a liquid product rich in peptides. The feathers analysis revealed a crude protein content of 88.83%. A maximum peptides production of 676 mg/g was reached using sulphuric acid, 1 molar acid concentration and 50 g/l solid to liquid ratio at a temperature of 90 °C after 300 min. A reaction scheme for protein aggregation and decomposition to polypeptides and amino acids was proposed and a kinetic model for peptides production was developed. The proposed kinetic model proved to be well adapted to the experimental data with R (2) = 0.99.

  8. Multimodal Recognition of Diverse Peptides by the C-Terminal SH2 Domain of Phospholipase C-γ1 Protein.

    PubMed

    McKercher, Marissa A; Guan, Xiaoyang; Tan, Zhongping; Wuttke, Deborah S

    2017-04-11

    SH2 domains recognize phosphotyrosine (pY)-containing peptide ligands and play key roles in the regulation of receptor tyrosine kinase pathways. Each SH2 domain has individualized specificity, encoded in the amino acids neighboring the pY, for defined targets that convey their distinct functions. The C-terminal SH2 domain (PLCC) of the phospholipase C-γ1 full-length protein (PLCγ1) typically binds peptides containing small and hydrophobic amino acids adjacent to the pY, including a peptide derived from platelet-derived growth factor receptor B (PDGFRB) and an intraprotein recognition site (Y783 of PLCγ1) involved in the regulation of the protein's lipase activity. Remarkably, PLCC also recognizes unexpected peptides containing amino acids with polar or bulky side chains that deviate from this pattern. This versatility in recognition specificity may allow PLCγ1 to participate in diverse, previously unrecognized, signaling pathways in response to binding chemically dissimilar partners. We have used structural approaches, including nuclear magnetic resonance and X-ray crystallography, to elucidate the mechanisms of noncognate peptide binding to PLCC by ligands derived from receptor tyrosine kinase ErbB2 and from the insulin receptor. The high-resolution peptide-bound structures reveal that PLCC has a relatively static backbone but contains a chemically rich protein surface comprised of a combination of hydrophobic pockets and amino acids with charged side chains. We demonstrate that this expansive and chemically diverse PLCC interface, in addition to peptide conformational plasticity, permits PLCC to recognize specific noncognate peptide ligands with multimodal specificity.

  9. Binding properties of a peptide derived from beta-lactamase inhibitory protein.

    PubMed

    Rudgers, G W; Huang, W; Palzkill, T

    2001-12-01

    To overcome the antibiotic resistance mechanism mediated by beta-lactamases, small-molecule beta-lactamase inhibitors, such as clavulanic acid, have been used. This approach, however, has applied selective pressure for mutations that result in beta-lactamases no longer sensitive to beta-lactamase inhibitors. On the basis of the structure of beta-lactamase inhibitor protein (BLIP), novel peptide inhibitors of beta-lactamase have been constructed. BLIP is a 165-amino-acid protein that is a potent inhibitor of TEM-1 beta-lactamase (K(i) = 0.3 nM). The cocrystal structure of TEM-1 beta-lactamase and BLIP indicates that residues 46 to 51 of BLIP make critical interactions with the active site of TEM-1 beta-lactamase. A peptide containing this six-residue region of BLIP was found to retain sufficient binding energy to interact with TEM-1 beta-lactamase. Inhibition assays with the BLIP peptide reveal that, in addition to inhibiting TEM-1 beta-lactamase, the peptide also inhibits a class A beta-lactamase and a class C beta-lactamase that are not inhibited by BLIP. The crystal structures of class A and C beta-lactamases and two penicillin-binding proteins (PBPs) reveal that the enzymes have similar three-dimensional structures in the vicinity of the active site. This similarity suggests that the BLIP peptide inhibitor may have a broad range of activity that can be used to develop novel small-molecule inhibitors of various classes of beta-lactamases and PBPs.

  10. Binding Properties of a Peptide Derived from β-Lactamase Inhibitory Protein

    PubMed Central

    Rudgers, Gary W.; Huang, Wanzhi; Palzkill, Timothy

    2001-01-01

    To overcome the antibiotic resistance mechanism mediated by β-lactamases, small-molecule β-lactamase inhibitors, such as clavulanic acid, have been used. This approach, however, has applied selective pressure for mutations that result in β-lactamases no longer sensitive to β-lactamase inhibitors. On the basis of the structure of β-lactamase inhibitor protein (BLIP), novel peptide inhibitors of β-lactamase have been constructed. BLIP is a 165-amino-acid protein that is a potent inhibitor of TEM-1 β-lactamase (Ki = 0.3 nM). The cocrystal structure of TEM-1 β-lactamase and BLIP indicates that residues 46 to 51 of BLIP make critical interactions with the active site of TEM-1 β-lactamase. A peptide containing this six-residue region of BLIP was found to retain sufficient binding energy to interact with TEM-1 β-lactamase. Inhibition assays with the BLIP peptide reveal that, in addition to inhibiting TEM-1 β-lactamase, the peptide also inhibits a class A β-lactamase and a class C β-lactamase that are not inhibited by BLIP. The crystal structures of class A and C β-lactamases and two penicillin-binding proteins (PBPs) reveal that the enzymes have similar three-dimensional structures in the vicinity of the active site. This similarity suggests that the BLIP peptide inhibitor may have a broad range of activity that can be used to develop novel small-molecule inhibitors of various classes of β-lactamases and PBPs. PMID:11709298

  11. Learning a peptide-protein binding affinity predictor with kernel ridge regression

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The cellular function of a vast majority of proteins is performed through physical interactions with other biomolecules, which, most of the time, are other proteins. Peptides represent templates of choice for mimicking a secondary structure in order to modulate protein-protein interaction. They are thus an interesting class of therapeutics since they also display strong activity, high selectivity, low toxicity and few drug-drug interactions. Furthermore, predicting peptides that would bind to a specific MHC alleles would be of tremendous benefit to improve vaccine based therapy and possibly generate antibodies with greater affinity. Modern computational methods have the potential to accelerate and lower the cost of drug and vaccine discovery by selecting potential compounds for testing in silico prior to biological validation. Results We propose a specialized string kernel for small bio-molecules, peptides and pseudo-sequences of binding interfaces. The kernel incorporates physico-chemical properties of amino acids and elegantly generalizes eight kernels, comprised of the Oligo, the Weighted Degree, the Blended Spectrum, and the Radial Basis Function. We provide a low complexity dynamic programming algorithm for the exact computation of the kernel and a linear time algorithm for it’s approximation. Combined with kernel ridge regression and SupCK, a novel binding pocket kernel, the proposed kernel yields biologically relevant and good prediction accuracy on the PepX database. For the first time, a machine learning predictor is capable of predicting the binding affinity of any peptide to any protein with reasonable accuracy. The method was also applied to both single-target and pan-specific Major Histocompatibility Complex class II benchmark datasets and three Quantitative Structure Affinity Model benchmark datasets. Conclusion On all benchmarks, our method significantly (p-value ≤ 0.057) outperforms the current state-of-the-art methods at predicting

  12. A retroviral-derived peptide phosphorylates protein kinase D/protein kinase Cmu involving phospholipase C and protein kinase C.

    PubMed

    Luangwedchakarn, Voravich; Day, Noorbibi K; Hitchcock, Remi; Brown, Pam G; Lerner, Danica L; Rucker, Rajivi P; Cianciolo, George J; Good, Robert A; Haraguchi, Soichi

    2003-05-01

    CKS-17, a synthetic peptide representing a unique amino acid motif which is highly conserved in retroviral transmembrane proteins and other immunoregulatory proteins, induces selective immunomodulatory functions, both in vitro and in vivo, and activates intracellular signaling molecules such as cAMP and extracellular signal-regulated kinases. In the present study, using Jurkat T-cells, we report that CKS-17 phosphorylates protein kinase D (PKD)/protein kinase C (PKC) mu. Total cell extracts from CKS-17-stimulated Jurkat cells were immunoblotted with an anti-phospho-PKCmu antibody. The results show that CKS-17 significantly phosphorylates PKD/PKCmu in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Treatment of cells with the PKC inhibitors GF 109203X and Ro 31-8220, which do not act directly on PKD/PKCmu, attenuates CKS-17-induced phosphorylation of PKD/PKCmu. In contrast, the selective protein kinase A inhibitor H-89 does not reverse the action of CKS-17. Furthermore, a phospholipase C (PLC) selective inhibitor, U-73122, completely blocks the phosphorylation of PKD/PKCmu by CKS-17 while a negative control U-73343 does not. In addition, substitution of lysine for arginine residues in the CKS-17 sequence completely abrogates the ability of CKS-17 to phosphorylate PKD/PKCmu. These results clearly indicate that CKS-17 phosphorylates PKD/PKCmu through a PLC- and PKC-dependent mechanism and that arginine residues play an essential role in this activity of CKS-17, presenting a novel modality of the retroviral peptide CKS-17 and molecular interaction of this compound with target cells.

  13. The use of colloidal microgels for the controlled delivery of proteins and peptides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cornelius, Victoria J.; Snowden, Martin J.; Mitchell, John C.

    2007-01-01

    Colloidal microgels may be used for the absorption and controlled release of confirmationally sensitive molecules such as proteins and peptides. These monodisperse microgels are easily prepared in a single pot reaction from e.g. Nisopropylacrylamide, butyl acrylate and methacrylic acid in the presence of a cross-linking agent and a suitable free radical initiator. The resultant materials display dramatic conformational changes in aqueous dispersion in response to changes in e.g. environmental pH. Colloidal microgels are capable of absorbing a range of different proteins and peptides at one pH, affording them protection by changing the conformation of the microgel following a pH change. A further change in environmental pH will allow the microgel to adopt a more extended confirmation and therefore allow the release of the encapsulated material. In the case of e.g. insulin this would offer the possibility of an oral delivery route. At the pH of stomach the microgel adopts a compact conformation, "protecting" the protein from denaturation. As the pH increases passing into the GI tract, the microgel changes its conformation to a more expanded form and thereby allows the protein to be released. Colloidal microgels offer an opportunity for the controlled release of conformationally sensitive protein and peptide molecules via an oral route.

  14. Fermentation of peptides and amino acids by a monensin-sensitive ruminal Peptostreptococcus.

    PubMed Central

    Chen, G J; Russell, J B

    1988-01-01

    A monensin-sensitive ruminal peptostreptococcus was able to grow rapidly (growth rate of 0.5/h) on an enzymatic hydrolysate of casein, but less than 23% of the amino acid nitrogen was ever utilized. When an acid hydrolysate was substituted for the enzymatic digest, more than 31% of the nitrogen was converted to ammonia and cell protein. Coculture experiments and synergisms with peptide-degrading strains of Bacteroides ruminicola and Streptococcus bovis indicated that the peptostreptococcus was unable to transport certain peptides or hydrolyze them extracellularly. Leucine, serine, phenylalanine, threonine, and glutamine were deaminated at rates of 349, 258, 102, 95, and 91 nmol/mg of protein per min, respectively. Deamination rates for some other amino acids were increased when the amino acids were provided as pairs of oxidized and reduced amino acids (Stickland reactions), but these rates were still less than 80 nmol/mg of protein per min. In continuous culture (dilution rate of 0.1/h), bacterial dry matter and ammonia production decreased dramatically at a pH of less than 6.0. When dilution rates were increased from 0.08 to 0.32/h (pH 7.0), ammonia production increased while production of bacterial dry matter and protein decreased. These rather peculiar kinetics resulted in a slightly negative estimate of maintenance energy and could not be explained by a change in fermentation products. Approximately 80% of the cell dry matter was protein. When corrections were made for cell composition, the yield of ATP was higher than the theoretical maximum value. It is possible that mechanisms other than substrate-level phosphorylation contributed to the energetics of growth. PMID:2975156

  15. G protein antagonists. A novel hydrophobic peptide competes with receptor for G protein binding.

    PubMed

    Mukai, H; Munekata, E; Higashijima, T

    1992-08-15

    A substance P (SP) analog, [D-Pro4,D-Trp7,9,10] SP4-11, is known to inhibit the actions of various structurally unrelated messenger molecules as well as SP. Our studies on the effects of this peptide on the regulation of purified G proteins by receptor showed that at least some of the biological effects of the peptide can be explained by the ability of the peptide to block the activation of G proteins by receptors. Here we report that a novel truncated SP-related peptide, pGlu-Gln-D-Trp-Phe-D-Trp-D-Trp-Met-NH2, inhibited the activation of G(i) or G(o) by M2 muscarinic cholinergic receptor (M2 mAChR) or of Gs by beta-adrenergic receptor in the reconstituted phospholipid vesicles, assayed by receptor-promoted GTP hydrolysis. The inhibition by the peptide was apparently reversible and competitive with respect to receptor binding to G proteins; the inhibition could be overcome by increasing the concentration of receptor in the vesicles and was not altered by changes in the concentration of G protein. The competing effects of the peptide were used to analyze the effect of agonist on receptor-G protein interaction. The concentration change of muscarinic agonist did not alter the inhibitory effects of the peptide on M2 mAChR-promoted GTPase by G(o), which is consistent with the idea that agonist increases the regulatory efficiency of the receptor but does not alter its affinity for G proteins. This new group of compounds (G protein antagonists) is a promising tool to study receptor-G protein interaction quantitatively.

  16. Constrained Cyclic Peptides as Immunomodulatory Inhibitors of the CD2:CD58 Protein-Protein Interaction.

    PubMed

    Sable, Rushikesh; Durek, Thomas; Taneja, Veena; Craik, David J; Pallerla, Sandeep; Gauthier, Ted; Jois, Seetharama

    2016-08-19

    The interaction between the cell-cell adhesion proteins CD2 and CD58 plays a crucial role in lymphocyte recruitment to inflammatory sites, and inhibitors of this interaction have potential as immunomodulatory drugs in autoimmune diseases. Peptides from the CD2 adhesion domain were designed to inhibit CD2:CD58 interactions. To improve the stability of the peptides, β-sheet epitopes from the CD2 region implicated in CD58 recognition were grafted into the cyclic peptide frameworks of sunflower trypsin inhibitor and rhesus theta defensin. The designed multicyclic peptides were evaluated for their ability to modulate cell-cell interactions in three different cell adhesion assays, with one candidate, SFTI-a, showing potent activity in the nanomolar range (IC50: 51 nM). This peptide also suppresses the immune responses in T cells obtained from mice that exhibit the autoimmune disease rheumatoid arthritis. SFTI-a was resistant to thermal denaturation, as judged by circular dichroism spectroscopy and mass spectrometry, and had a half-life of ∼24 h in human serum. Binding of this peptide to CD58 was predicted by molecular docking studies and experimentally confirmed by surface plasmon resonance experiments. Our results suggest that cyclic peptides from natural sources are promising scaffolds for modulating protein-protein interactions that are typically difficult to target with small-molecule compounds.

  17. Enhancing the buccal mucosal delivery of peptide and protein therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Caon, Thiago; Jin, Liang; Simões, Cláudia M O; Norton, Raymond S; Nicolazzo, Joseph A

    2015-01-01

    With continuing advances in biotechnology and genetic engineering, there has been a dramatic increase in the availability of new biomacromolecules, such as peptides and proteins that have the potential to ameliorate the symptoms of many poorly-treated diseases. Although most of these macromolecular therapeutics exhibit high potency, their large molecular mass, susceptibility to enzymatic degradation, immunogenicity and tendency to undergo aggregation, adsorption, and denaturation have limited their ability to be administered via the traditional oral route. As a result, alternative noninvasive routes have been investigated for the systemic delivery of these macromolecules, one of which is the buccal mucosa. The buccal mucosa offers a number of advantages over the oral route, making it attractive for the delivery of peptides and proteins. However, the buccal mucosa still exhibits some permeability-limiting properties, and therefore various methods have been explored to enhance the delivery of macromolecules via this route, including the use of chemical penetration enhancers, physical methods, particulate systems and mucoadhesive formulations. The incorporation of anti-aggregating agents in buccal formulations also appears to show promise in other mucosal delivery systems, but has not yet been considered for buccal mucosal drug delivery. This review provides an update on recent approaches that have shown promise in enhancing the buccal mucosal transport of macromolecules, with a major focus on proteins and peptides.

  18. Smart polymer based delivery systems for peptides and proteins.

    PubMed

    Al-Tahami, Khaled; Singh, Jagdish

    2007-01-01

    Biodegradable polymeric systems represent promising means for delivering many bioactive agents, including peptide and protein drugs. The importance of these systems grew with the advancement in the understanding of peptide and protein pharmacology as well as the ability to mass-produce these compounds. Some polymers undergo sol-gel transition once administered. In situ gel formation happens in response to one or a combination of two or more stimuli. These stimuli include UV-irradiation, pH change, temperature change, and solvent exchange. These smart polymeric systems have several advantages over conventional methods, such as ease of manufacturing, ease of administration, biodegradability, and the ability to alter release profiles of the incorporated agents. In the past few years, an increasing number of in situ gel-forming systems have been investigated and many patents for their use in various biomedical applications, including drug delivery, have been reported. In this article, we introduce the different strategies that have been developed and patented for the use of smart polymers in delivering peptide and protein drugs. The advantage, disadvantages, possibilities, and limitations of each of the smart polymer systems have been discussed.

  19. Novel peptides from the RAS-p21 and p53 proteins for the treatment of cancer.

    PubMed

    Bowne, Wilbur B; Michl, Josef; Bluth, Martin H; Zenilman, Michael E; Pincus, Matthew R

    2007-01-01

    We have employed a novel computer-based molecular modeling method to design peptides from the ras-p21 and p53 proteins that block proliferation of cancer cells. The rationale of our approach is to identify peptide domains from each protein that alter conformation in response to oncogenic amino acid substitutions in their polypeptide chain. We accomplish this by first generating and comparing low energy average structures for oncogenic and wild-type proteins using conformational energy calculations. Peptides are then synthesized corresponding to these domains. These domains are then linked to a trans-membrane-penetrating sequence (called penetratin) and tested against cancer and untransformed cell lines. Remarkably, we have found that two ras-p21 peptides, 35-47 and 96-110, called PNC-7 and PNC-2, respectively, can induce phenotypic reversion of ras-transformed TUC-3 pancreatic cancer cells and ras-transformed HT1080 human fibrosarcoma cells to their untransformed phenotypes. Moreover, both peptides were found to be cytotoxic to ras-transformed human MIA-PaCa-2 pancreatic carcinoma cells and human U-251 astrocytoma cells. Importantly, these peptides have no effect on the growth of their normal cellular counterparts. We have also synthesized peptides from the p53 protein corresponding to its hdm-2-binding domain sequences (residues 12-26), also linked to the penetratin sequence. Surprisingly, we have found that these peptides induce 100 percent tumor cell necrosis, not apoptosis, in 13 different human cancer cell lines but have no effect on normal pancreatic acinar cells, breast epithelial cells, and human stem cells. Moreover, these peptides are cytotoxic to TUC-3 pancreatic tumor cells in nude mice plus eradicate these tumor cells when administered at sites near these tumors. These novel peptides appear to hold much promise as new, non-toxic anti-cancer agents.

  20. Quantifying protein by bicinchoninic Acid.

    PubMed

    Simpson, Richard J

    2008-08-01

    INTRODUCTIONThis protocol describes a method of quantifying protein that is a variation of the Lowry assay. It uses bicinchoninic acid (BCA) to enhance the detection of Cu(+) generated under alkaline conditions at sites of complexes between Cu(2+) and protein. The resulting chromophore absorbs at 562 nm. This technique is divided into three parts: Standard Procedure, Microprocedure, and 96-Well Microtiter Plate Procedure. For each procedure, test samples are assayed in parallel with protein standards that are used to generate a calibration curve, and the exact concentration of protein in the test samples is interpolated. The standard BCA assay uses large volumes of both reagents and samples and cannot easily be automated. If these issues are important, the Microprocedure is recommended. This in turn can be adapted for use with a microplate reader in the 96-Well Microtiter Plate Procedure. If the microplate reader is interfaced with a computer, more than 1000 samples can be read per hour.

  1. Antioxidant and ACE Inhibitory Bioactive Peptides Purified from Egg Yolk Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Yousr, Marwa; Howell, Nazlin

    2015-01-01

    Protein by-products from the extraction of lecithin from egg yolk can be converted into value-added products, such as bioactive hydrolysates and peptides that have potential health enhancing antioxidant, and antihypertensive properties. In this study, the antioxidant and angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitory activities of peptides isolated and purified from egg yolk protein were investigated. Defatted egg yolk was hydrolyzed using pepsin and pancreatin and sequentially fractionated by ultrafiltration, followed by gel filtration to produce egg yolk gel filtration fractions (EYGF). Of these, two fractions, EYGF-23 and EYGF-33, effectively inhibited the peroxides and thiobarbituric acid reactive substance (TBARS) in an oxidizing linoleic acid model system. The antioxidant mechanism involved superoxide anion and hydroxyl radicals scavenging and ferrous chelation. The presence of hydrophobic amino acids such as tyrosine (Y) and tryptophan (W), in sequences identified by LC-MS as WYGPD (EYGF-23) and KLSDW (EYGF-33), contributed to the antioxidant activity and were not significantly different from the synthetic BHA antioxidant. A third fraction (EYGF-56) was also purified from egg yolk protein by gel filtration and exhibited high ACE inhibitory activity (69%) and IC50 value (3.35 mg/mL). The SDNRNQGY peptide (10 mg/mL) had ACE inhibitory activity, which was not significantly different from that of the positive control captopril (0.5 mg/mL). In addition, YPSPV in (EYGF-33) (10 mg/mL) had higher ACE inhibitory activity compared with captopril. These findings indicated a substantial potential for producing valuable peptides with antioxidant and ACE inhibitory activity from egg yolk. PMID:26690134

  2. Antioxidant and ACE Inhibitory Bioactive Peptides Purified from Egg Yolk Proteins.

    PubMed

    Yousr, Marwa; Howell, Nazlin

    2015-12-07

    Protein by-products from the extraction of lecithin from egg yolk can be converted into value-added products, such as bioactive hydrolysates and peptides that have potential health enhancing antioxidant, and antihypertensive properties. In this study, the antioxidant and angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitory activities of peptides isolated and purified from egg yolk protein were investigated. Defatted egg yolk was hydrolyzed using pepsin and pancreatin and sequentially fractionated by ultrafiltration, followed by gel filtration to produce egg yolk gel filtration fractions (EYGF). Of these, two fractions, EYGF-23 and EYGF-33, effectively inhibited the peroxides and thiobarbituric acid reactive substance (TBARS) in an oxidizing linoleic acid model system. The antioxidant mechanism involved superoxide anion and hydroxyl radicals scavenging and ferrous chelation. The presence of hydrophobic amino acids such as tyrosine (Y) and tryptophan (W), in sequences identified by LC-MS as WYGPD (EYGF-23) and KLSDW (EYGF-33), contributed to the antioxidant activity and were not significantly different from the synthetic BHA antioxidant. A third fraction (EYGF-56) was also purified from egg yolk protein by gel filtration and exhibited high ACE inhibitory activity (69%) and IC50 value (3.35 mg/mL). The SDNRNQGY peptide (10 mg/mL) had ACE inhibitory activity, which was not significantly different from that of the positive control captopril (0.5 mg/mL). In addition, YPSPV in (EYGF-33) (10 mg/mL) had higher ACE inhibitory activity compared with captopril. These findings indicated a substantial potential for producing valuable peptides with antioxidant and ACE inhibitory activity from egg yolk.

  3. Metabolism of Peptides by Rumen Microorganisms

    PubMed Central

    Wright, D. E.

    1967-01-01

    Rumen microorganisms utilize tryptic peptides from Chlorella protein, forming carbon dioxide, volatile fatty acids, and bacterial protein. Peptide carbon is more efficiently converted into bacterial protein than is amino acid carbon. A progressive degradation of the peptides was demonstrated by use of columns of Sephadex G-25. PMID:6035045

  4. The nature of peptide interactions with acid end-group PLGAs and facile aqueous-based microencapsulation of therapeutic peptides

    PubMed Central

    Sophocleous, Andreas M.; Desai, Kashappa-Goud H.; Mazzara, J. Maxwell; Tong, Ling; Cheng, Ji-Xin; Olsen, Karl F.; Schwendeman, Steven P.

    2013-01-01

    An important poorly understood phenomenon in controlled-release depots involves the strong interaction between common cationic peptides and low Mw free acid end-group poly(lactic-co-glycolic acids) (PLGAs) used to achieve continuous peptide release kinetics. The kinetics of peptide sorption to PLGA was examined by incubating peptide solutions of 0.2-4 mM octreotide or leuprolide acetate salts in 0.1 M HEPES buffer, pH 7.4, with polymer particles or films at 4-37 °C for 24 h. The extent of absorption/loading of peptides in PLGA particles/films was assayed by two-phase extraction and amino acid analysis. Confocal Raman microspectroscopy and stimulated Raman scattering (SRS) and laser scanning confocal imaging techniques were used to examine peptide penetration in the polymer phase. The release of sorbed peptide from leuprolide-PLGA particles was evaluated both in vitro (PBST + 0.02% sodium azide, 37 °C) and in vivo (male Sprague-Dawley rats). We found that when the PLGA-COOH chains are sufficiently mobilized, therapeutic peptides not only bind at the surface, a common belief to date, but can also internalized and distributed throughout the polymer phase at physiological temperature forming a salt with low-molecular weight PLGA-COOH. Importantly, absorption of leuprolide into low MW PLGA-COOH particles yielded ~17 wt% leuprolide loading in the polymer (i.e., ~70% of PLGA-COOH acids occupied), and the absorbed peptide was released from the polymer for > 2 weeks in a controlled fashion in vitro and as indicated by sustained testosterone suppression in male Sprague-Dawley rats. This new approach, which bypasses the traditional encapsulation method and associated production cost, opens up the potential for facile production of low-cost controlled-release injectable depots for leuprolide and related peptides. PMID:24021356

  5. Prion protein self-peptides modulate prion interactions and conversion

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Molecular mechanisms underlying prion agent replication, converting host-encoded cellular prion protein (PrPC) into the scrapie associated isoform (PrPSc), are poorly understood. Selective self-interaction between PrP molecules forms a basis underlying the observed differences of the PrPC into PrPSc conversion process (agent replication). The importance of previously peptide-scanning mapped ovine PrP self-interaction domains on this conversion was investigated by studying the ability of six of these ovine PrP based peptides to modulate two processes; PrP self-interaction and conversion. Results Three peptides (octarepeat, binding domain 2 -and C-terminal) were capable of inhibiting self-interaction of PrP in a solid-phase PrP peptide array. Three peptides (N-terminal, binding domain 2, and amyloidogenic motif) modulated prion conversion when added before or after initiation of the prion protein misfolding cyclic amplification (PMCA) reaction using brain homogenates. The C-terminal peptides (core region and C-terminal) only affected conversion (increased PrPres formation) when added before mixing PrPC and PrPSc, whereas the octarepeat peptide only affected conversion when added after this mixing. Conclusion This study identified the putative PrP core binding domain that facilitates the PrPC-PrPSc interaction (not conversion), corroborating evidence that the region of PrP containing this domain is important in the species-barrier and/or scrapie susceptibility. The octarepeats can be involved in PrPC-PrPSc stabilization, whereas the N-terminal glycosaminoglycan binding motif and the amyloidogenic motif indirectly affected conversion. Binding domain 2 and the C-terminal domain are directly implicated in PrPC self-interaction during the conversion process and may prove to be prime targets in new therapeutic strategy development, potentially retaining PrPC function. These results emphasize the importance of probable PrPC-PrPC and required Pr

  6. Enhancing in silico protein-based vaccine discovery for eukaryotic pathogens using predicted peptide-MHC binding and peptide conservation scores.

    PubMed

    Goodswen, Stephen J; Kennedy, Paul J; Ellis, John T

    2014-01-01

    Given thousands of proteins constituting a eukaryotic pathogen, the principal objective for a high-throughput in silico vaccine discovery pipeline is to select those proteins worthy of laboratory validation. Accurate prediction of T-cell epitopes on protein antigens is one crucial piece of evidence that would aid in this selection. Prediction of peptides recognised by T-cell receptors have to date proved to be of insufficient accuracy. The in silico approach is consequently reliant on an indirect method, which involves the prediction of peptides binding to major histocompatibility complex (MHC) molecules. There is no guarantee nevertheless that predicted peptide-MHC complexes will be presented by antigen-presenting cells and/or recognised by cognate T-cell receptors. The aim of this study was to determine if predicted peptide-MHC binding scores could provide contributing evidence to establish a protein's potential as a vaccine. Using T-Cell MHC class I binding prediction tools provided by the Immune Epitope Database and Analysis Resource, peptide binding affinity to 76 common MHC I alleles were predicted for 160 Toxoplasma gondii proteins: 75 taken from published studies represented proteins known or expected to induce T-cell immune responses and 85 considered less likely vaccine candidates. The results show there is no universal set of rules that can be applied directly to binding scores to distinguish a vaccine from a non-vaccine candidate. We present, however, two proposed strategies exploiting binding scores that provide supporting evidence that a protein is likely to induce a T-cell immune response-one using random forest (a machine learning algorithm) with a 72% sensitivity and 82.4% specificity and the other, using amino acid conservation scores with a 74.6% sensitivity and 70.5% specificity when applied to the 160 benchmark proteins. More importantly, the binding score strategies are valuable evidence contributors to the overall in silico vaccine discovery

  7. Evaluating molecular mechanical potentials for helical peptides and proteins.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Erik J; DePaul, Allison J; Patel, Sarav S; Sorin, Eric J

    2010-04-07

    Multiple variants of the AMBER all-atom force field were quantitatively evaluated with respect to their ability to accurately characterize helix-coil equilibria in explicit solvent simulations. Using a global distributed computing network, absolute conformational convergence was achieved for large ensembles of the capped A(21) and F(s) helical peptides. Further assessment of these AMBER variants was conducted via simulations of a flexible 164-residue five-helix-bundle protein, apolipophorin-III, on the 100 ns timescale. Of the contemporary potentials that had not been assessed previously, the AMBER-99SB force field showed significant helix-destabilizing tendencies, with beta bridge formation occurring in helical peptides, and unfolding of apolipophorin-III occurring on the tens of nanoseconds timescale. The AMBER-03 force field, while showing adequate helical propensities for both peptides and stabilizing apolipophorin-III, (i) predicts an unexpected decrease in helicity with ALA-->ARG(+) substitution, (ii) lacks experimentally observed 3(10) helical content, and (iii) deviates strongly from average apolipophorin-III NMR structural properties. As is observed for AMBER-99SB, AMBER-03 significantly overweighs the contribution of extended and polyproline backbone configurations to the conformational equilibrium. In contrast, the AMBER-99phi force field, which was previously shown to best reproduce experimental measurements of the helix-coil transition in model helical peptides, adequately stabilizes apolipophorin-III and yields both an average gyration radius and polar solvent exposed surface area that are in excellent agreement with the NMR ensemble.

  8. Microwave-assisted acid and base hydrolysis of intact proteins containing disulfide bonds for protein sequence analysis by mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Reiz, Bela; Li, Liang

    2010-09-01

    Controlled hydrolysis of proteins to generate peptide ladders combined with mass spectrometric analysis of the resultant peptides can be used for protein sequencing. In this paper, two methods of improving the microwave-assisted protein hydrolysis process are described to enable rapid sequencing of proteins containing disulfide bonds and increase sequence coverage, respectively. It was demonstrated that proteins containing disulfide bonds could be sequenced by MS analysis by first performing hydrolysis for less than 2 min, followed by 1 h of reduction to release the peptides originally linked by disulfide bonds. It was shown that a strong base could be used as a catalyst for microwave-assisted protein hydrolysis, producing complementary sequence information to that generated by microwave-assisted acid hydrolysis. However, using either acid or base hydrolysis, amide bond breakages in small regions of the polypeptide chains of the model proteins (e.g., cytochrome c and lysozyme) were not detected. Dynamic light scattering measurement of the proteins solubilized in an acid or base indicated that protein-protein interaction or aggregation was not the cause of the failure to hydrolyze certain amide bonds. It was speculated that there were some unknown local structures that might play a role in preventing an acid or base from reacting with the peptide bonds therein.

  9. Effect of electrostatics on aggregation of prion protein Sup35 peptide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Portillo, Alexander M.; Krasnoslobodtsev, Alexey V.; Lyubchenko, Yuri L.

    2012-04-01

    Self-assembly of misfolded proteins into ordered fibrillar structures is a fundamental property of a wide range of proteins and peptides. This property is also linked with the development of various neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s. Environmental conditions modulate the misfolding and aggregation processes. We used a peptide, CGNNQQNY, from yeast prion protein Sup35, as a model system to address effects of environmental conditions on aggregate formation. The GNNQQNY peptide self-assembles in fibrils with structural features that are similar to amyloidogenic proteins. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) and thioflavin T (ThT) fluorescence assay were employed to follow the aggregation process at various pHs and ionic strengths. We also used single molecule AFM force spectroscopy to probe interactions between the peptides under various conditions. The ThT fluorescence data showed that the peptide aggregates fast at pH values approaching the peptide isoelectric point (pI = 5.3) and the kinetics is 10 times slower at acidic pH (pH 2.0), suggesting that electrostatic interactions contribute to the peptide self-assembly into aggregates. This hypothesis was tested by experiments performed at low (11 mM) and high (150 mM) ionic strengths. Indeed, the aggregation lag time measured at pH 2 at low ionic strength (11 mM) is 195 h, whereas the lag time decreases ˜5 times when the ionic strength is increased to 150 mM. At conditions close to the pI value, pH 5.6, the aggregation lag time is 12 ± 6 h under low ionic strength, and there is minimal change to the lag time at 150 mM NaCl. The ionic strength also influences the morphology of aggregates visualized with AFM. In pH 2.0 and at high ionic strength, the aggregates are twofold taller than those formed at low ionic strength. In parallel, AFM force spectroscopy studies revealed minimal contribution of electrostatics to dissociation of transient peptide dimers.

  10. Counting peptide-water hydrogen bonds in unfolded proteins.

    PubMed

    Gong, Haipeng; Porter, Lauren L; Rose, George D

    2011-02-01

    It is often assumed that the peptide backbone forms a substantial number of additional hydrogen bonds when a protein unfolds. We challenge that assumption in this article. Early surveys of hydrogen bonding in proteins of known structure typically found that most, but not all, backbone polar groups are satisfied, either by intramolecular partners or by water. When the protein is folded, these groups form approximately two hydrogen bonds per peptide unit, one donor or acceptor for each carbonyl oxygen or amide hydrogen, respectively. But when unfolded, the backbone chain is often believed to form three hydrogen bonds per peptide unit, one partner for each oxygen lone pair or amide hydrogen. This assumption is based on the properties of small model compounds, like N-methylacetamide, or simply accepted as self-evident fact. If valid, a chain of N residues would have approximately 2N backbone hydrogen bonds when folded but 3N backbone hydrogen bonds when unfolded, a sufficient difference to overshadow any uncertainties involved in calculating these per-residue averages. Here, we use exhaustive conformational sampling to monitor the number of H-bonds in a statistically adequate population of blocked polyalanyl-six-mers as the solvent quality ranges from good to poor. Solvent quality is represented by a scalar parameter used to Boltzmann-weight the population energy. Recent experimental studies show that a repeating (Gly-Ser) polypeptide undergoes a denaturant-induced expansion accompanied by breaking intramolecular peptide H-bonds. Results from our simulations augment this experimental finding by showing that the number of H-bonds is approximately conserved during such expansion⇋compaction transitions.

  11. Approaches for enhancing oral bioavailability of peptides and proteins.

    PubMed

    Renukuntla, Jwala; Vadlapudi, Aswani Dutt; Patel, Ashaben; Boddu, Sai H S; Mitra, Ashim K

    2013-04-15

    Oral delivery of peptide and protein drugs faces immense challenge partially due to the gastrointestinal (GI) environment. In spite of considerable efforts by industrial and academic laboratories, no major breakthrough in the effective oral delivery of polypeptides and proteins has been accomplished. Upon oral administration, gastrointestinal epithelium acts as a physical and biochemical barrier for absorption of proteins resulting in low bioavailability (typically less than 1-2%). An ideal oral drug delivery system should be capable of (a) maintaining the integrity of protein molecules until it reaches the site of absorption, (b) releasing the drug at the target absorption site, where the delivery system appends to that site by virtue of specific interaction, and (c) retaining inside the gastrointestinal tract irrespective of its transitory constraints. Various technologies have been explored to overcome the problems associated with the oral delivery of macromolecules such as insulin, gonadotropin-releasing hormones, calcitonin, human growth factor, vaccines, enkephalins, and interferons, all of which met with limited success. This review article intends to summarize the physiological barriers to oral delivery of peptides and proteins and novel pharmaceutical approaches to circumvent these barriers and enhance oral bioavailability of these macromolecules.

  12. Approaches for Enhancing Oral Bioavailability of Peptides and Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Renukuntla, Jwala; Vadlapudi, Aswani Dutt; Patel, Ashaben; Boddu, Sai HS.; Mitra, Ashim K

    2013-01-01

    Oral delivery of peptide and protein drugs faces immense challenge partially due to the gastrointestinal (GI) environment. In spite of considerable efforts by industrial and academic laboratories, no major breakthrough in the effective oral delivery of polypeptides and proteins has been accomplished. Upon oral administration, gastrointestinal epithelium acts as a physical and biochemical barrier for absorption of proteins resulting in low bioavailability (typically less than 1–2%). An ideal oral drug delivery system should be capable of a) maintaining the integrity of protein molecules until it reaches the site of absorption, b) releasing the drug at the target absorption site, where the delivery system appends to that site by virtue of specific interaction, and c) retaining inside the gastrointestinal tract irrespective of its transitory constraints. Various technologies have been explored to overcome the problems associated with the oral delivery of macromolecules such as insulin, gonadotropin-releasing hormones, calcitonin, human growth factor, vaccines, enkephalins, and interferons, all of which met with limited success. This review article intends to summarize the physiological barriers to oral delivery of peptides and proteins and novel pharmaceutical approaches to circumvent these barriers and enhance oral bioavailability of these macromolecules. PMID:23428883

  13. Interactions of myelin basic protein with mixed dodecylphosphocholine/palmitoyllysophosphatidic acid micelles

    SciTech Connect

    Mendz, G.L. ); Brown, L.R. ); Martenson, R.E. )

    1990-03-06

    The interactions of myelin basic protein and peptides derived from it with detergent micelles of lysophosphatidylglycerol, lysophosphatidylserine, palmitoyllysophosphatidic acid, and sodium lauryl sulfate, and with mixed micelles of the neutral detergent dodecylphosphocholine and the negatively charged detergent palmitoyllysophosphatidic acid, were investigated by {sup 1}H NMR spectroscopy and circular dichroic spectropolarimetry. The results with single detergents suggested that there are discrete interaction sites in the protein molecule for neutral and anionic detergent micelles and that at least some of these sites are different for each type of detergent. The data on the binding of the protein and peptides to mixed detergent micelles suggested that intramolecular interactions in the intact protein and in one of the longer peptides limited the formation of helices and also that a balance between hydrophobic and ionic forces is achieved in the interactions of the peptides with the detergents. At high detergent/protein molar ratios, hydrophobic interactions appeared to be favored.

  14. Differentiating amino acid residues and side chain orientations in peptides using scanning tunneling microscopy.

    PubMed

    Claridge, Shelley A; Thomas, John C; Silverman, Miles A; Schwartz, Jeffrey J; Yang, Yanlian; Wang, Chen; Weiss, Paul S

    2013-12-11

    Single-molecule measurements of complex biological structures such as proteins are an attractive route for determining structures of the large number of important biomolecules that have proved refractory to analysis through standard techniques such as X-ray crystallography and nuclear magnetic resonance. We use a custom-built low-current scanning tunneling microscope to image peptide structures at the single-molecule scale in a model peptide that forms β sheets, a structural motif common in protein misfolding diseases. We successfully differentiate between histidine and alanine amino acid residues, and further differentiate side chain orientations in individual histidine residues, by correlating features in scanning tunneling microscope images with those in energy-optimized models. Beta sheets containing histidine residues are used as a model system due to the role histidine plays in transition metal binding associated with amyloid oligomerization in Alzheimer's and other diseases. Such measurements are a first step toward analyzing peptide and protein structures at the single-molecule level.

  15. Forcefield_NCAA: Ab Initio Charge Parameters to Aid in the Discovery and Design of Therapeutic Proteins and Peptides with Unnatural Amino Acids and Their Application to Complement Inhibitors of the Compstatin Family

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    We describe the development and testing of ab initio derived, AMBER ff03 compatible charge parameters for a large library of 147 noncanonical amino acids including β- and N-methylated amino acids for use in applications such as protein structure prediction and de novo protein design. The charge parameter derivation was performed using the RESP fitting approach. Studies were performed assessing the suitability of the derived charge parameters in discriminating the activity/inactivity between 63 analogs of the complement inhibitor Compstatin on the basis of previously published experimental IC50 data and a screening procedure involving short simulations and binding free energy calculations. We found that both the approximate binding affinity (K*) and the binding free energy calculated through MM-GBSA are capable of discriminating between active and inactive Compstatin analogs, with MM-GBSA performing significantly better. Key interactions between the most potent Compstatin analog that contains a noncanonical amino acid are presented and compared to the most potent analog containing only natural amino acids and native Compstatin. We make the derived parameters and an associated web interface that is capable of performing modifications on proteins using Forcefield_NCAA and outputting AMBER-ready topology and parameter files freely available for academic use at http://selene.princeton.edu/FFNCAA. The forcefield allows one to incorporate these customized amino acids into design applications with control over size, van der Waals, and electrostatic interactions. PMID:24932669

  16. Protein-protein interface-binding peptides inhibit the cancer therapy target human thymidylate synthase.

    PubMed

    Cardinale, Daniela; Guaitoli, Giambattista; Tondi, Donatella; Luciani, Rosaria; Henrich, Stefan; Salo-Ahen, Outi M H; Ferrari, Stefania; Marverti, Gaetano; Guerrieri, Davide; Ligabue, Alessio; Frassineti, Chiara; Pozzi, Cecilia; Mangani, Stefano; Fessas, Dimitrios; Guerrini, Remo; Ponterini, Glauco; Wade, Rebecca C; Costi, M Paola

    2011-08-23

    Human thymidylate synthase is a homodimeric enzyme that plays a key role in DNA synthesis and is a target for several clinically important anticancer drugs that bind to its active site. We have designed peptides to specifically target its dimer interface. Here we show through X-ray diffraction, spectroscopic, kinetic, and calorimetric evidence that the peptides do indeed bind at the interface of the dimeric protein and stabilize its di-inactive form. The "LR" peptide binds at a previously unknown binding site and shows a previously undescribed mechanism for the allosteric inhibition of a homodimeric enzyme. It inhibits the intracellular enzyme in ovarian cancer cells and reduces cellular growth at low micromolar concentrations in both cisplatin-sensitive and -resistant cells without causing protein overexpression. This peptide demonstrates the potential of allosteric inhibition of hTS for overcoming platinum drug resistance in ovarian cancer.

  17. A genetic algorithm that seeks native states of peptides and proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Sun, S

    1995-01-01

    We describe a computer algorithm to predict native structures of proteins and peptides from their primary sequences, their known native radii of gyration, and their known disulfide bonding patterns, starting from random conformations. Proteins are represented as simplified real-space main chains with single-bead side chains. Nonlocal interactions are taken from structural database-derived statistical potentials, as in an earlier treatment. Local interactions are taken from simulations of (phi, psi) energy surfaces for each amino acid generated using the Biosym Discover program. Conformational searching is done by a genetic algorithm-based method. Reasonable structures are obtained for melittin (a 26-mer), avian pancreatic polypeptide inhibitor (a 36-mer), crambin (a 46-mer), apamin (an 18-mer), tachyplesin (a 17-mer), C-peptide of ribonuclease A (a 13-mer), and four different designed helical peptides. A hydrogen bond interaction was tested and found to be generally unnecessary for helical peptides, but it helps fold some sheet regions in these structures. For the few longer chains we tested, the method appears not to converge. In those cases, it appears to recover native-like secondary structures, but gets incorrect tertiary folds. PMID:8527647

  18. Differential Properties of Venom Peptides and Proteins in Solitary vs. Social Hunting Wasps

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Si Hyeock; Baek, Ji Hyeong; Yoon, Kyungjae Andrew

    2016-01-01

    The primary functions of venoms from solitary and social wasps are different. Whereas most solitary wasps sting their prey to paralyze and preserve it, without killing, as the provisions for their progeny, social wasps usually sting to defend their colonies from vertebrate predators. Such distinctive venom properties of solitary and social wasps suggest that the main venom components are likely to be different depending on the wasps’ sociality. The present paper reviews venom components and properties of the Aculeata hunting wasps, with a particular emphasis on the comparative aspects of venom compositions and properties between solitary and social wasps. Common components in both solitary and social wasp venoms include hyaluronidase, phospholipase A2, metalloendopeptidase, etc. Although it has been expected that more diverse bioactive components with the functions of prey inactivation and physiology manipulation are present in solitary wasps, available studies on venom compositions of solitary wasps are simply too scarce to generalize this notion. Nevertheless, some neurotoxic peptides (e.g., pompilidotoxin and dendrotoxin-like peptide) and proteins (e.g., insulin-like peptide binding protein) appear to be specific to solitary wasp venom. In contrast, several proteins, such as venom allergen 5 protein, venom acid phosphatase, and various phospholipases, appear to be relatively more specific to social wasp venom. Finally, putative functions of main venom components and their application are also discussed. PMID:26805885

  19. Differential Properties of Venom Peptides and Proteins in Solitary vs. Social Hunting Wasps.

    PubMed

    Lee, Si Hyeock; Baek, Ji Hyeong; Yoon, Kyungjae Andrew

    2016-01-22

    The primary functions of venoms from solitary and social wasps are different. Whereas most solitary wasps sting their prey to paralyze and preserve it, without killing, as the provisions for their progeny, social wasps usually sting to defend their colonies from vertebrate predators. Such distinctive venom properties of solitary and social wasps suggest that the main venom components are likely to be different depending on the wasps' sociality. The present paper reviews venom components and properties of the Aculeata hunting wasps, with a particular emphasis on the comparative aspects of venom compositions and properties between solitary and social wasps. Common components in both solitary and social wasp venoms include hyaluronidase, phospholipase A2, metalloendopeptidase, etc. Although it has been expected that more diverse bioactive components with the functions of prey inactivation and physiology manipulation are present in solitary wasps, available studies on venom compositions of solitary wasps are simply too scarce to generalize this notion. Nevertheless, some neurotoxic peptides (e.g., pompilidotoxin and dendrotoxin-like peptide) and proteins (e.g., insulin-like peptide binding protein) appear to be specific to solitary wasp venom. In contrast, several proteins, such as venom allergen 5 protein, venom acid phosphatase, and various phospholipases, appear to be relatively more specific to social wasp venom. Finally, putative functions of main venom components and their application are also discussed.

  20. Selective separation and concentration of antihypertensive peptides from rapeseed protein hydrolysate by electrodialysis with ultrafiltration membranes.

    PubMed

    He, Rong; Girgih, Abraham T; Rozoy, Elodie; Bazinet, Laurent; Ju, Xing-Rong; Aluko, Rotimi E

    2016-04-15

    Rapeseed protein isolate was subjected to alcalase digestion to obtain a protein hydrolysate that was separated into peptide fractions using electrodialysis with ultrafiltration membrane (EDUF) technology. The EDUF process (6h duration) led to isolation of three peptide fractions: anionic (recovered in KCl-1 compartment), cationic (recovered in KCl-2 compartment), and those that remained in the feed compartment, which was labeled final rapeseed protein hydrolysate (FRPH). As expected the KCl-1 peptides were enriched in negatively-charged (43.57%) while KCl-2 contained high contents of positively-charged (28.35%) amino acids. All the samples inhibited angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) and renin activities in dose-dependent manner with original rapeseed protein hydrolysate having the least ACE-inhibitory IC50 value of 0.0932±0.0037 mg/mL while FRPH and KCl-2 had least renin-inhibitory IC50 values of 0.47±0.05 and 0.55±0.06 mg/mL, respectively. Six hours after oral administration (100 mg/kg body weight) to spontaneously hypertensive rats, the FRPH produced the maximum systolic blood pressure reduction of -51 mmHg.

  1. Compensating Stereochemical Changes Allow Murein Tripeptide to Be Accommodated in a Conventional Peptide-binding Protein*

    PubMed Central

    Maqbool, Abbas; Levdikov, Vladimir M.; Blagova, Elena V.; Hervé, Mireille; Horler, Richard S. P.; Wilkinson, Anthony J.; Thomas, Gavin H.

    2011-01-01

    The oligopeptide permease (Opp) of Escherichia coli is an ATP-binding cassette transporter that uses the substrate-binding protein (SBP) OppA to bind peptides and deliver them to the membrane components (OppBCDF) for transport. OppA binds conventional peptides 2–5 residues in length regardless of their sequence, but does not facilitate transport of the cell wall component murein tripeptide (Mtp, l-Ala-γ-d-Glu-meso-Dap), which contains a d-amino acid and a γ-peptide linkage. Instead, MppA, a homologous substrate-binding protein, forms a functional transporter with OppBCDF for uptake of this unusual tripeptide. Here we have purified MppA and demonstrated biochemically that it binds Mtp with high affinity (KD ∼ 250 nm). The crystal structure of MppA in complex with Mtp has revealed that Mtp is bound in a relatively extended conformation with its three carboxylates projecting from one side of the molecule and its two amino groups projecting from the opposite face. Specificity for Mtp is conferred by charge-charge and dipole-charge interactions with ionic and polar residues of MppA. Comparison of the structure of MppA-Mtp with structures of conventional tripeptides bound to OppA, reveals that the peptide ligands superimpose remarkably closely given the profound differences in their structures. Strikingly, the effect of the d-stereochemistry, which projects the side chain of the d-Glu residue at position 2 in the direction of the main chain in a conventional tripeptide, is compensated by the formation of a γ-linkage to the amino group of diaminopimelic acid, mimicking the peptide bond between residues 2 and 3 of a conventional tripeptide. PMID:21705338

  2. A versatile 2A peptide-based bicistronic protein expressing platform for the industrial cellulase producing fungus, Trichoderma reesei

    DOE PAGES

    Subramanian, Venkataramanan; Schuster, Logan A.; Moore, Kyle T.; ...

    2017-02-06

    Here, the industrial workhorse fungus, Trichoderma reesei, is typically exploited for its ability to produce cellulase enzymes, whereas use of this fungus for over-expression of other proteins (homologous and heterologous) is still very limited. Identifying transformants expressing target protein is a tedious task due to low transformation efficiency, combined with highly variable expression levels between transformants. Routine methods for identification include PCR-based analysis, western blotting, or crude activity screening, all of which are time-consuming techniques. To simplify this screening, we have adapted the 2A peptide system from the foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) to T. reesei to express a readily screenablemore » marker protein that is co-translated with a target protein. The 2A peptide sequence allows multiple independent genes to be transcribed as a single mRNA. Upon translation, the 2A peptide sequence causes a 'ribosomal skip' generating two (or more) independent gene products. When the 2A peptide is translated, the 'skip' occurs between its two C-terminal amino acids (glycine and proline), resulting in the addition of extra amino acids on the C terminus of the upstream protein and a single proline addition to the N terminus of the downstream protein. To test this approach, we have cloned two heterologous proteins on either side of a modified 2A peptide, a secreted cellobiohydrolase enzyme (Cel7A from Penicillium funiculosum) as our target protein, and an intracellular enhanced green fluorescent protein (eGFP) as our marker protein. Using straightforward monitoring of eGFP expression, we have shown that we can efficiently monitor the expression of the target Cel7A protein.« less

  3. An endurance-enhancing effect of peanut meal protein hydrolysate in mice: possible involvement of a specific peanut peptide.

    PubMed

    Liu, J; Chen, L W; Ji, K M; Yu, L; Zhang, Z J

    2014-10-01

    To improve the functional properties of peanut meal protein for wide utilization, hydrolysis was conducted by alcalase. Compared with saline and peanut meal protein, intragastric administration of low molecular weight (<1 kD) peanut meal peptide (PPH I) could significantly prolong swimming time, increase levels of blood sugar, non-esterified fatty acids (NEFA) and liver glycogen and decrease blood lactate content in mice. Levels of Pro, Leu, Val and His in low molecular weight peanut meal peptides were higher significantly than those in other peanut meal protein hydrolysates. Hydrophobic amino acids, such as Pro, Tyr and His, could perhaps capture free radical and increase antioxidant capacity of peanut peptide and retard fatigue induced by free radical. After separation by HPLC, a primary peptide P1, Pro-Glu-Ile-Glu-Val, was sequenced. Its N-terminal was Val, and it was rich in antioxidant amino acid, Pro and Ile. Levels of plasma glucose, NEFA and liver glycogen in PPH I group were higher than those in mice intragastric administration with peptide P1, and the swimming time is longer in PPH I group than in P1 group. So, the high content of P1 was one of the reason why PPH I had high endurance-enhancing capacity.

  4. Sequence-specific determination of protein and peptide concentrations by absorbance at 205 nm.

    PubMed

    Anthis, Nicholas J; Clore, G Marius

    2013-06-01

    Quantitative studies in molecular and structural biology generally require accurate and precise determination of protein concentrations, preferably via a method that is both quick and straightforward to perform. The measurement of ultraviolet absorbance at 280 nm has proven especially useful, since the molar absorptivity (extinction coefficient) at 280 nm can be predicted directly from a protein sequence. This method, however, is only applicable to proteins that contain tryptophan or tyrosine residues. Absorbance at 205 nm, among other wavelengths, has been used as an alternative, although generally using absorptivity values that have to be uniquely calibrated for each protein, or otherwise only roughly estimated. Here, we propose and validate a method for predicting the molar absorptivity of a protein or peptide at 205 nm directly from its amino acid sequence, allowing one to accurately determine the concentrations of proteins that do not contain tyrosine or tryptophan residues. This method is simple to implement, requires no calibration, and should be suitable for a wide range of proteins and peptides.

  5. Enhancing In Silico Protein-Based Vaccine Discovery for Eukaryotic Pathogens Using Predicted Peptide-MHC Binding and Peptide Conservation Scores

    PubMed Central

    Goodswen, Stephen J.; Kennedy, Paul J.; Ellis, John T.

    2014-01-01

    Given thousands of proteins constituting a eukaryotic pathogen, the principal objective for a high-throughput in silico vaccine discovery pipeline is to select those proteins worthy of laboratory validation. Accurate prediction of T-cell epitopes on protein antigens is one crucial piece of evidence that would aid in this selection. Prediction of peptides recognised by T-cell receptors have to date proved to be of insufficient accuracy. The in silico approach is consequently reliant on an indirect method, which involves the prediction of peptides binding to major histocompatibility complex (MHC) molecules. There is no guarantee nevertheless that predicted peptide-MHC complexes will be presented by antigen-presenting cells and/or recognised by cognate T-cell receptors. The aim of this study was to determine if predicted peptide-MHC binding scores could provide contributing evidence to establish a protein’s potential as a vaccine. Using T-Cell MHC class I binding prediction tools provided by the Immune Epitope Database and Analysis Resource, peptide binding affinity to 76 common MHC I alleles were predicted for 160 Toxoplasma gondii proteins: 75 taken from published studies represented proteins known or expected to induce T-cell immune responses and 85 considered less likely vaccine candidates. The results show there is no universal set of rules that can be applied directly to binding scores to distinguish a vaccine from a non-vaccine candidate. We present, however, two proposed strategies exploiting binding scores that provide supporting evidence that a protein is likely to induce a T-cell immune response–one using random forest (a machine learning algorithm) with a 72% sensitivity and 82.4% specificity and the other, using amino acid conservation scores with a 74.6% sensitivity and 70.5% specificity when applied to the 160 benchmark proteins. More importantly, the binding score strategies are valuable evidence contributors to the overall in silico vaccine

  6. Metal solubility enhancing peptides derived from barley protein.

    PubMed

    Eckert, Ewelina; Bamdad, Fatemeh; Chen, Lingyun

    2014-09-15

    Mineral supplements are required to be soluble as their bioavailability is highly correlated to their solubility in body fluids. In this study, metal binding capacity of barley protein hydrolysates and their purified fractions was investigated and expressed as increase in solubility of metal ions. Metal ions in the presence of hydrolysates exhibited a remarkable increase in solubility: 118, 32, 10, 29 and 35-fold for Fe(2+), Fe(3+), Ca(2+), Cu(2+) and Zn(2+), respectively. A mixture of low molecular weight peptides possesses a synergistic combination of both charged and hydrophobic residues and achieves the best binding metal ions. Electrostatic interactions via charged side chains and coordination binding with His and Cys, initially attract the metal ions and, afterward, hydrophobic interactions and aromatic ring stacking stabilize the positioning of metal ions in the structure of the peptide. Barley hordein hydrolysates show potential as dietary supplements that enhance both mineral solubility and bioavailability.

  7. Evaluation of New Diagnostic Biomarkers in Pediatric Sepsis: Matrix Metalloproteinase-9, Tissue Inhibitor of Metalloproteinase-1, Mid-Regional Pro-Atrial Natriuretic Peptide, and Adipocyte Fatty-Acid Binding Protein.

    PubMed

    Alqahtani, Mashael F; Smith, Craig M; Weiss, Scott L; Dawson, Susan; Ralay Ranaivo, Hantamalala; Wainwright, Mark S

    2016-01-01

    Elevated plasma concentrations of matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9), tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase-1 (TIMP-1), mid-regional pro-atrial natriuretic peptide (mrProANP), and adipocyte fatty-acid-binding proteins (A-FaBPs) have been investigated as biomarkers for sepsis or detection of acute neurological injuries in adults, but not children. We carried out a single-center, prospective observational study to determine if these measures could serve as biomarkers to identify children with sepsis. A secondary aim was to determine if these biomarkers could identify children with neurologic complications of sepsis. A total of 90 patients ≤ 18 years-old were included in this study. 30 with severe sepsis or septic shock were compared to 30 age-matched febrile and 30 age-matched healthy controls. Serial measurements of each biomarker were obtained, beginning on day 1 of ICU admission. In septic patients, MMP9-/TIMP-1 ratios (Median, IQR, n) were reduced on day 1 (0.024, 0.004-0.174, 13), day 2 (0.020, 0.002-0.109, 10), and day 3 (0.018, 0.003-0.058, 23) compared with febrile (0.705, 0.187-1.778, 22) and healthy (0.7, 0.4-1.2, 29) (p< 0.05) controls. A-FaBP and mrProANP (Median, IQR ng/mL, n) were elevated in septic patients compared to control groups on first 2 days after admission to the PICU (p <0.05). The area under the curve (AUC) for MMP-9/TIMP-1 ratio, mrProANP, and A-FaBP to distinguish septic patients from healthy controls were 0.96, 0.99, and 0.76, respectively. MMP-9/TIMP-1 ratio was inversely and mrProANP was directly related to PIM-2, PELOD, and ICU and hospital LOS (p<0.05). A-FaBP level was associated with PELOD, hospital and ICU length of stay (p<0.05). MMP-9/TIMP-1 ratio associated with poor Glasgow Outcome Score (p<0.05). A-FaBP levels in septic patients with neurological dysfunction (29.3, 17.2-54.6, 7) were significantly increased compared to septic patients without neurological dysfunction (14.6, 13.3-20.6, 11). MMP-9/TIMP-1 ratios were

  8. Evaluation of New Diagnostic Biomarkers in Pediatric Sepsis: Matrix Metalloproteinase-9, Tissue Inhibitor of Metalloproteinase-1, Mid-Regional Pro-Atrial Natriuretic Peptide, and Adipocyte Fatty-Acid Binding Protein

    PubMed Central

    Alqahtani, Mashael F.; Smith, Craig M.; Weiss, Scott L.; Dawson, Susan; Ralay Ranaivo, Hantamalala; Wainwright, Mark S.

    2016-01-01

    Elevated plasma concentrations of matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9), tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase-1 (TIMP-1), mid-regional pro-atrial natriuretic peptide (mrProANP), and adipocyte fatty-acid-binding proteins (A-FaBPs) have been investigated as biomarkers for sepsis or detection of acute neurological injuries in adults, but not children. We carried out a single-center, prospective observational study to determine if these measures could serve as biomarkers to identify children with sepsis. A secondary aim was to determine if these biomarkers could identify children with neurologic complications of sepsis. A total of 90 patients ≤ 18 years-old were included in this study. 30 with severe sepsis or septic shock were compared to 30 age-matched febrile and 30 age-matched healthy controls. Serial measurements of each biomarker were obtained, beginning on day 1 of ICU admission. In septic patients, MMP9-/TIMP-1 ratios (Median, IQR, n) were reduced on day 1 (0.024, 0.004–0.174, 13), day 2 (0.020, 0.002–0.109, 10), and day 3 (0.018, 0.003–0.058, 23) compared with febrile (0.705, 0.187–1.778, 22) and healthy (0.7, 0.4–1.2, 29) (p< 0.05) controls. A-FaBP and mrProANP (Median, IQR ng/mL, n) were elevated in septic patients compared to control groups on first 2 days after admission to the PICU (p <0.05). The area under the curve (AUC) for MMP-9/TIMP-1 ratio, mrProANP, and A-FaBP to distinguish septic patients from healthy controls were 0.96, 0.99, and 0.76, respectively. MMP-9/TIMP-1 ratio was inversely and mrProANP was directly related to PIM-2, PELOD, and ICU and hospital LOS (p<0.05). A-FaBP level was associated with PELOD, hospital and ICU length of stay (p<0.05). MMP-9/TIMP-1 ratio associated with poor Glasgow Outcome Score (p<0.05). A-FaBP levels in septic patients with neurological dysfunction (29.3, 17.2–54.6, 7) were significantly increased compared to septic patients without neurological dysfunction (14.6, 13.3–20.6, 11). MMP-9/TIMP-1 ratios

  9. Peptide inhibitors of the Keap1-Nrf2 protein-protein interaction.

    PubMed

    Hancock, Rowena; Bertrand, Hélène C; Tsujita, Tadayuki; Naz, Shama; El-Bakry, Ayman; Laoruchupong, Jitnueng; Hayes, John D; Wells, Geoff

    2012-01-15

    Disruption of the interaction between the ubiquitination facilitator protein Keap1 and the cap'n'collar basic-region leucine-zipper transcription factor Nrf2 is a potential strategy to enhance expression of antioxidant and free radical detoxification gene products regulated by Nrf2. Agents that disrupt this protein-protein interaction may be useful pharmacological probes and future cancer-chemopreventive agents. We describe the structure-activity relationships for a series of peptides based upon regions of the Nrf2 Neh2 domain, of varying length and sequence, that interact with the Keap1 Kelch domain and disrupt the interaction with Nrf2. We have also investigated sequestosome-1 (p62) and prothymosin-α sequences that have been reported to interact with Keap1. To achieve this we have developed a high-throughput fluorescence polarization (FP) assay to screen inhibitors. In addition to screening synthetic peptides, we have used a phage display library approach to identify putative peptide ligands with non-native sequence motifs. Candidate peptides from the phage display library screening protocol were evaluated in the FP assay to quantify their binding activity. Hybrid peptides based upon the Nrf2 "ETGE" motif and the sequestosome-1 "Keap1-interaction region" have superior binding activity compared to either native peptide alone.

  10. Design, synthesis and biological evaluation of novel non-peptide boronic acid derivatives as proteasome inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Ge, Ying; Li, Aibo; Wu, Jianwei; Feng, Haiwei; Wang, Letian; Liu, Hongwu; Xu, Yungen; Xu, Qingxiang; Zhao, Li; Li, Yuyan

    2017-03-10

    A novel series of non-peptide proteasome inhibitors bearing the 1, 4-naphthoquinone scaffold and boronic acid warhead was developed. In the biological evaluation on the chymotrypsin-like activity of human 20S proteasome, five compounds showed IC50 values in the nanomolar range. Docking experiments into the yeast 20S proteasome rationalized their biological activities and allowed further optimization of this interesting class of inhibitors. Within the cellular proliferation inhibition assay and western blot analysis, compound 3e demonstrated excellent anti-proliferative activity against solid tumor cells and clear accumulation of ubiquitinated cellular proteins. Furthermore, in the microsomal stability assay compound 3e demonstrated much improved metabolic stability compared to bortezomib, emerging as a promising lead compound for further design of non-peptide proteasome inhibitors.

  11. Quinacrine reactivity with prion proteins and prion-derived peptides.

    PubMed

    Zawada, Zbigniew; Šafařík, Martin; Dvořáková, Eva; Janoušková, Olga; Březinová, Anna; Stibor, Ivan; Holada, Karel; Bouř, Petr; Hlaváček, Jan; Sebestík, Jaroslav

    2013-05-01

    Quinacrine is a drug that is known to heal neuronal cell culture infected with prions, which are the causative agents of neurodegenerative diseases called transmissible spongiform encephalopathies. However, the drug fails when it is applied in vivo. In this work, we analyzed the reason for this failure. The drug was suggested to "covalently" modify the prion protein via an acridinyl exchange reaction. To investigate this hypothesis more closely, the acridine moiety of quinacrine was covalently attached to the thiol groups of cysteines belonging to prion-derived peptides and to the full-length prion protein. The labeled compounds were conveniently monitored by fluorescence and absorption spectroscopy in the ultraviolet and visible spectral regions. The acridine moiety demonstrated characteristic UV-vis spectrum, depending on the substituent at the C-9 position of the acridine ring. These results confirm that quinacrine almost exclusively reacts with the thiol groups present in proteins and peptides. The chemical reaction alters the prion properties and increases the concentration of the acridine moiety in the prion protein.

  12. Consistency in structural energetics of protein folding and peptide recognition.

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, C.; Cornette, J. L.; Delisi, C.

    1997-01-01

    We report a new free energy decomposition that includes structure-derived atomic contact energies for the desolvation component, and show that it applies equally well to the analysis of single-domain protein folding and to the binding of flexible peptides to proteins. Specifically, we selected the 17 single-domain proteins for which the three-dimensional structures and thermodynamic unfolding free energies are available. By calculating all terms except the backbone conformational entropy change and comparing the result to the experimentally measured free energy, we estimated that the mean entropy gain by the backbone chain upon unfolding (delta Sbb) is 5.3 cal/K per mole of residue, and that the average backbone entropy for glycine is 6.7 cal/K. Both numbers are in close agreement with recent estimates made by entirely different methods, suggesting a promising degree of consistency between data obtained from disparate sources. In addition, a quantitative analysis of the folding free energy indicates that the unfavorable backbone entropy for each of the proteins is balanced predominantly by favorable backbone interactions. Finally, because the binding of flexible peptides to receptors is physically similar to folding, the free energy function should, in principle, be equally applicable to flexible docking. By combining atomic contact energies, electrostatics, and sequence-dependent backbone entropy, we calculated a priori the free energy changes associated with the binding of four different peptides to HLA-A2, 1 MHC molecule and found agreement with experiment to within 10% without parameter adjustment. PMID:9144777

  13. Purification and Identification of Antioxidant Peptides from Protein Hydrolysate of Scalloped Hammerhead (Sphyrna lewini) Cartilage

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xue-Rong; Chi, Chang-Feng; Li, Li; Wang, Bin

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study was to purify and identify peptides with antioxidant properties from protein hydrolysate of scalloped hammerhead (Sphyrna lewini) cartilage. Cartilaginous proteins of the scalloped hammerhead were extracted by guanidine hydrochloride, and three antioxidant peptides, named enzymolysis peptide of scalloped hammerhead cartilage A (SCPE-A), SCPE-B and SCPE-C, were subsequently isolated from the hydrolysate of the cartilaginous proteins using ultrafiltration and chromatography. The amino acid sequences of SCPE-A, SCPE-B and SCPE-C were identified as Gly-Pro-Glu (GPE), Gly-Ala-Arg-Gly-Pro-Gln (GARGPQ), and Gly-Phe-Thr-Gly-Pro-Pro-Gly-Phe-Asn-Gly (GFTGPPGFNG), with molecular weights of 301.30 Da, 584.64 Da and 950.03 Da, respectively. As per in vitro activity testing, SCPE-A, SCPE-B and SCPE-C exhibited strong scavenging activities on 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl radicals (DPPH•) (half elimination ratio (EC50) 2.43, 2.66 and 1.99 mg/mL), hydroxyl radicals (HO•) (EC50 0.28, 0.21 and 0.15 mg/mL), 2,2′-azino-bis-3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulfonic acid radicals (ABTS+•) (EC50 0.24, 0.18 and 0.29 mg/mL), and superoxide anion radicals (O2−•) (EC50 0.10, 0.14 and 0.11 mg/mL). In addition, SCPE-A showed inhibition activity similar to butylated hydroxytoluene (BHT) in lipid peroxidation in a linoleic acid model system. The amino acid residues of Gly, Pro and Phe could positively influence the antioxidant activities of GPE, GARGPQ and GFTGPPGFNG. These results suggested that GPE, GARGPQ and GFTGPPGFNG might serve as potential antioxidants and be used as food additives and functional foods. PMID:28257057

  14. Usefulness of ELISA Methods for Assessing LPS Interactions with Proteins and Peptides

    PubMed Central

    Martínez-Sernández, Victoria; Orbegozo-Medina, Ricardo A.; Romarís, Fernanda; Paniagua, Esperanza; Ubeira, Florencio M.

    2016-01-01

    Lipopolysaccharide (LPS), the major constituent of the outer membrane of Gram-negative bacteria, can trigger severe inflammatory responses during bacterial infections, possibly leading to septic shock. One approach to combatting endotoxic shock is to neutralize the most conserved part and major mediator of LPS activity (lipid A) with LPS-binding proteins or peptides. Although several available assays evaluate the biological activity of these molecules on LPS (e.g. inhibition of LPS-induced TNF-α production in macrophages), the development of simple and cost-effective methods that would enable preliminary screening of large numbers of potential candidate molecules is of great interest. Moreover, it would be also desirable that such methods could provide information about the possible biological relevance of the interactions between proteins and LPS, which may enhance or neutralize LPS-induced inflammatory responses. In this study, we designed and evaluated different types of ELISA that could be used to study possible interactions between LPS and any protein or peptide. We also analysed the usefulness and limitations of the different ELISAs. Specifically, we tested the capacity of several proteins and peptides to bind FITC-labeled LPSs from Escherichia coli serotypes O111:B4 and O55:B5 in an indirect ELISA and in two competitive ELISAs including casein hydrolysate (hCAS) and biotinylated polymyxin B (captured by deglycosylated avidin; PMX) as LPS-binding agents in the solid phase. We also examined the influence of pH, detergents and different blocking agents on LPS binding. Our results showed that the competitive hCAS-ELISA performed under mildly acidic conditions can be used as a general method for studying LPS interactions, while the more restrictive PMX-ELISA may help to identify proteins/peptides that are likely to have neutralizing properties in vitro or in vivo. PMID:27249227

  15. The impact of photo-induced molecular changes of dairy proteins on their ACE-inhibitory peptides and activity.

    PubMed

    Kerkaert, Barbara; Mestdagh, Frédéric; Cucu, Tatiana; Shrestha, Kshitij; Van Camp, John; De Meulenaer, Bruno

    2012-08-01

    Among all dietary proteins, dairy proteins are the most important source of bio-active peptides which can, however, be affected by modifications upon processing and storage. Since it is still unknown to which extent the biological activity of dairy proteins is altered by chemical reactions, this study focuses on the effect of photo-induced molecular changes on the angiotensin I converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitory activity. Milk proteins were dissolved in phosphate buffer containing riboflavin and stored under light at 4 °C for one month during which the molecular changes and the ACE-inhibitory activity were analysed. An increase in the total protein carbonyls and the N-formylkynurenine content was observed, besides a decrease in the free thiol, tryptophan, tyrosine and histidine content. These changes were more severe in caseins compared with whey proteins and resulted moreover in the aggregation of caseins. Due to these photo-induced molecular changes, a significant loss of the ACE-inhibitory activity was observed for casein peptides. A peptide analysis moreover illustrated that the decreased activity was not attributed to a reduced digestibility but to losses of specific ACE-inhibitory peptides. The observed molecular changes, more specifically the degradation of specific amino acids and the casein aggregation, could be assigned as the cause of the altered peptide pattern and as such of the loss in ACE-inhibitory activity.

  16. Peptides released from acid goat whey by a yeast-lactobacillus association isolated from cheese microflora.

    PubMed

    Didelot, Sandrine; Bordenave-Juchereau, Stephanie; Rosenfeld, Eric; Piot, Jean-Marie; Sannier, Frederic

    2006-05-01

    Seven lactobacilli and a variety of microflora extracted from twenty five commercial cheeses were grown on unsupplemented acid goat whey and screened for their capacity to hydrolyse whey proteins [alpha-lactalbumin (alpha-la) and beta-lactoglobulin (beta-lg)] and to generate peptides. Fermentations were performed aerobically or anaerobically at 37 degrees C using crude or pre-heated whey (10 min at 65, 75 or 85 degrees C). Under aerobic conditions, growth of lactobacilli was poor and protein hydrolysis did not occur. Anaerobic conditions slightly increased lactobacilli growth but neither beta-lg hydrolysis nor peptide generation were observed. More than 50% of alpha-la was digested into a truncated form of alpha-la (+/- 12 kDa) in crude whey and whey pre-heated at 65 degrees C. Twenty-five microflora extracted from raw milk cheeses were screened for their proteolytic activities on acid goat whey under the conditions previously described. Eight of them were able to hydrolyse up to 50% of alpha-la mainly during aerobic growth on crude or pre-heated whey. The corresponding hydrolysates were enriched in peptides. The hydrolysate involving microflora extracted from Comté cheese after or at 18 months ripening was the only one to exhibit hydrolysis of both alpha-la and beta-lg. Microbiological analysis showed that microorganisms originating from Comté cheese and capable of growth on unsupplemented whey consisted of Candida parapsilosis and Lactobacillus paracasei. Fermentation kinetic profiles suggested that peptides were released from alpha-la hydrolysis. The co-culture of both microorganisms was required for alpha-la hydrolysis that occurred concomitantly with the pH decrease. During whey fermentation, Cand. parapsilosis excrete at least one protease responsible for alpha-la hydrolysis, and Lb. paracasei is responsible for medium acidification that is required for protease activation.

  17. Protein Quantification by Derivatization-Free High-Performance Liquid Chromatography of Aromatic Amino Acids

    PubMed Central

    Hesse, Almut

    2016-01-01

    Amino acid analysis is considered to be the gold standard for quantitative peptide and protein analysis. Here, we would like to propose a simple HPLC/UV method based on a reversed-phase separation of the aromatic amino acids tyrosine (Tyr), phenylalanine (Phe), and optionally tryptophan (Trp) without any derivatization. The hydrolysis of the proteins and peptides was performed by an accelerated microwave technique, which needs only 30 minutes. Two internal standard compounds, homotyrosine (HTyr) and 4-fluorophenylalanine (FPhe) were used for calibration. The limit of detection (LOD) was estimated to be 0.05 µM (~10 µg/L) for tyrosine and phenylalanine at 215 nm. The LOD for a protein determination was calculated to be below 16 mg/L (~300 ng BSA absolute). Aromatic amino acid analysis (AAAA) offers excellent accuracy and a precision of about 5% relative standard deviation, including the hydrolysis step. The method was validated with certified reference materials (CRM) of amino acids and of a pure protein (bovine serum albumin, BSA). AAAA can be used for the quantification of aromatic amino acids, isolated peptides or proteins, complex peptide or protein samples, such as serum or milk powder, and peptides or proteins immobilized on solid supports. PMID:27559481

  18. Amino acid sequence of atrial natriuretic peptides in human coronary sinus plasma.

    PubMed

    Yandle, T; Crozier, I; Nicholls, G; Espiner, E; Carne, A; Brennan, S

    1987-07-31

    Two atrial natriuretic peptides were purified from pooled human coronary sinus plasma by Sep-Pak extraction, immunoaffinity chromatography and reverse phase HPLC. The amino acid sequences of the two peptides were homologous with 99-126 human atrial natriuretic peptide (hANP) and 106-126 hANP, the latter being most probably linked to 99-105 ANP by the disulphide bond. The molar ratio of the peptides in plasma, as assessed by radioimmunoassay was 10:3.

  19. Derivatized nanoparticle coated capillaries for purification and micro-extraction of proteins and peptides.

    PubMed

    Bakry, R; Gjerde, D; Bonn, G K

    2006-06-01

    Various methods are used to enrich or purify a protein of interest from other proteins and components in a crude cell lysate or other sample. One of the most powerful methods is affinity purification, also called affinity chromatography, whereby the proteins of interest are purified by virtue of their specific binding properties to an immobilized ligand. Affinity purification is becoming more widely used for exploring post-translation modifications and protein-protein interactions, especially with a view toward developing new general tag systems and strategies of chemical derivatization on peptides for affinity selection. Our work was aimed to immobilize proteins or ligands for affinity purification of antibodies, fusion-tagged proteins and other proteins and peptides. Selected proteins or peptides are efficiently extracted and enriched using chemically derivatized walls of a fused silica capillary column. In this paper, we present an open tubular capillary, where the inner wall of a fused silica capillary was derivatized by covalent binding of modified polystyrene latex particles. The capillaries were derivatized with iminodiacetic acid and loaded with Fe3+ or Ni2+ for the purification and enrichment of phosphopeptides or His-tagged proteins, respectively. The latex coated capillaries have been successfully applied to enrich phosphopeptides from beta-casein tryptic digest and ovalbumin tryptic digest at a micro volume scale with recoveries ranging from 92 to 95%. The capillaries have been eluted under conditions compatible with MALDI-MS without any prior desalting step. In another approach, concanavalin A (Con A) or Protein G were immobilized on the epoxy modified latex on the inner wall of the fused silica capillary for the purification of glycoproteins and immunoglobulin, respectively. The design of the capillary and the protocols used for purification permits the direct detection of eluted proteins and peptides with gel electrophoresis or with mass spectrometry

  20. Nisin-induced expression of a recombinant antihypertensive peptide in dairy lactic acid bacteria

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Peptides with antihypertensive activity have been identified from the enzymatic hydrolysis of bovine milk proteins. A 12-residue peptide (FFVAPFPEVFGK) shown to inhibit the angiotensin I-converting enzyme is released from the enzymatic breakdown of aS1-casein. A synthetic gene encoding this peptid...

  1. Bioorganic Chemistry: Peptides and Proteins (edited by Sidney M. Hecht)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anthony-Cahill, Spencer

    1999-07-01

    Sidney M. Hecht, Ed. Oxford University Press: New York, 1998. 532 pp. ISBN 0-19-508468-3. $75.00. The second volume in the Bioorganic Chemistry series edited by Sidney Hecht is an outstanding addition to the collections of all scientists who teach and/or do research in the field of protein chemistry. The coverage of current research is up to date and thus the book is of great relevance to all chemists with interest in proteins, not just to academicians. As an instructor I found numerous references to current research, which I have included in my lecture notes for the undergraduate Biochemistry course and a senior-level Protein Engineering course taught at WWU. In addition to the chapters covering a broad spectrum of protein chemistry, there are two chapters (protein structural analysis, site-directed mutagenesis) which are excellent introductions to laboratory procedures in protein chemistry and molecular biology. The first chapter is an overview of basic protein biochemistry and serves as an introduction to the rest of the book. This chapter is dispensable for readers familiar with introductory biochemistry. The chapter on chemical synthesis of peptides is an exhaustive review of solution and solid-phase methods, with numerous references. I was struck by the abundance of figures showing structures of reactants but the general lack of organic chemical mechanisms. This is true for the rest of the book as well. Presumably the chemistry is known to the intended reader (grad students, advanced undergrads); however, as a devoted pusher of electrons, I was expecting to see more mechanisms in this and subsequent chapters. Instructors will have to present this aspect of the chemistry in lecture. The relevance of peptide chemistry is underscored by accompanying chapters on peptide hormones and peptidomimetics. Taken together these three chapters provide an excellent introduction to pharmaceutical peptide chemistry. The chapter on total synthesis of proteins is one of my

  2. Opioid peptides derived from food proteins suppress aggregation and promote reactivation of partly unfolded stressed proteins.

    PubMed

    Artemova, N V; Bumagina, Z M; Kasakov, A S; Shubin, V V; Gurvits, B Ya

    2010-02-01

    A new view of the opioid peptides is presented. The potential of small peptides derived from precursor food proteins, to bind to partly unfolded stressed proteins to prevent their irreversible aggregation and inactivation has been demonstrated in various in vitro test systems: dithiothreitol-induced aggregation of alpha-lactalbumin (LA), heat-induced aggregation of alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH), and aggregation and inactivation of bovine erythrocyte carbonic anhydrase (CA) in the process of its refolding after removal of stress conditions. Using dynamic light scattering (DLS), turbidimetry, fluorescence, and circular dichroism measurements protective effects of the synthetic opioid peptides: exorphin C from wheat gluten (Tyr-Pro-Ile-Ser-Leu), rubiscolin-5 from spinach ribulose-bisphosphate-carboxylase/oxygenase (Rubisco) (Tyr-Pro-Leu-Asp-Leu), and hemorphin-6 from bovine hemoglobin (Tyr-Pro-Trp-Thr-Gln-Arg) have been revealed. We have demonstrated the concentration-dependent suppression of light scattering intensity of aggregates of LA and ADH in the presence of the peptides, the population of nanoparticles with higher hydrodynamic radii being shifted to the lower ones, accompanied by an increase in the lag period of aggregation. The presence of the peptides in the refolding solution was shown to assist reactivation of CA and enhance the yield of the CA soluble protein. The results suggest that bioactive food protein fragments may be regarded as exogenous supplements to the endogenous defense mechanisms of the human organism under stress conditions.

  3. Protein transduction: cell penetrating peptides and their therapeutic applications.

    PubMed

    Wagstaff, Kylie M; Jans, David A

    2006-01-01

    Cell penetrating proteins or peptides (CPPs) have the ability to cross the plasma membranes of mammalian cells in an apparently energy- and receptor-independent fashion. Although there is much debate over the mechanism by which this "protein transduction" occurs, the ability of CPPs to translocate rapidly into cells is being exploited to deliver a broad range of therapeutics including proteins, DNA, antibodies, oligonucleotides, imaging agents and liposomes in a variety of situations and biological systems. The current review looks at the delivery of many such molecules by various CPPs, and their potential therapeutic application in a wide range of areas. CPP ability to deliver different cargoes in a relatively efficient and non-invasive manner has implications as far reaching as drug delivery, gene transfer, DNA vaccination and beyond. Although many questions remain to be answered and limitations on the use of CPPs exist, it is clear that this emerging technology has much to offer in a clinical setting.

  4. Development of a Small Peptide Tag for Covalent Labeling of Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Tanaka, Fujie; Fuller, Roberta; Asawapornmongkol, Lily; Warsinke, Axel; Gobuty, Sarah; Barbas, Carlos F.

    2008-01-01

    A 21-mer peptide that can be used to covalently introduce synthetic molecules into proteins has been developed. Phage displayed peptide libraries were subjected to reaction-based selection with 1,3-diketones. The peptide was further evolved by addition of a randomized region and reselection for improved binding. The resulting 21-mer peptide had a reactive amino group that formed an enaminone with 1,3-diketone and was used as a tag for labeling of maltose binding protein. Using this peptide tag and 1,3-diketone derivatives, a variety of molecules such as reporter probes and functionalities may be covalently introduced into proteins of interest. PMID:17602682

  5. Structure of synthetic peptide analogues of an eggshell protein of Schistosoma mansoni.

    PubMed Central

    Middaugh, C. R.; Thomson, J. A.; Burke, C. J.; Mach, H.; Naylor, A. M.; Bogusky, M. J.; Ryan, J. A.; Pitzenberger, S. M.; Ji, H.; Cordingley, J. S.

    1993-01-01

    The peptide (Gly-L-Tyr-L-Asp-L-Lys-L-Tyr)6, referred to as F4-6, was synthesized as a model for a schistosome eggshell protein in which the Gly-Tyr-Asp-Lys-Tyr consensus sequence is repeated over 40 times. Analysis by CD, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, potentiometric and spectrophotomertric titrations, NMR, and molecular modeling suggests that F4-6 forms some type of left-handed structure. A likely possibility appears to be a left-handed alpha-helix stabilized by Lysi-Aspi +4 salt bridges and possibly Aspi-Tyri +4 hydrogen bonding and Tyr-Tyr interactions. Spectroscopic studies of a number of F4-6 analogues support this conclusion. For example, substitution of D-Ala for Gly produces a peptide with enhanced left-handed helical spectral characteristics, whereas an L-Ala substitution results in a peptide with minimal structure. These studies suggest that the F4 protein from Schistosoma mansoni may be the first example of a naturally occurring protein devoid of proline and carbohydrate that forms a left-handed helix composed of L-amino acids, although alternative forms of other left-handed structures have yet to be rigorously excluded. PMID:8318895

  6. Structure and function of matrix proteins and peptides in the biomineral formation in crustaceans.

    PubMed

    Nagasawa, Hiromichi

    2011-01-01

    Crustaceans have hard cuticle with layered structure, which is composed mainly of chitin, proteins, and calcium carbonate. Crustaceans grow by shedding the old cuticle and replacing it with a new one. Decalcification in the cuticle during the pre-molt stage and concomitant calcification in the stomach to form gastroliths observed in some crustacean species are triggered by the molting hormone. Various proteins and peptides have been identified from calcified cuticle and gastroliths, and their functions have been examined in terms of calcification and interaction with chitin. Acidic nature of matrix proteins is important for recruitment of calcium ions and interaction with calcium carbonate. Examination of the relationship between amino acid sequence containing acidic amino acid residues and calcification inhibitory activity revealed that the potency did not depend on the sequence but on the number of acidic amino acid residues. Calcium carbonate in the calcified tissues of crustaceans is amorphous in many cases. Crustaceans take a strategy to induce and maintain amorphous calcium carbonate by using low-molecular-weight phosphorus compounds.

  7. Pharmacokinetics of biotech drugs: peptides, proteins and monoclonal antibodies.

    PubMed

    Lin, Jiunn H

    2009-09-01

    With the advances in recombinant DNA biotechnology, molecular biology and immunology, the number of biotech drugs, including peptides, proteins and monoclonal antibodies, available for clinical use has dramatically increased in recent years. Although pharmacokinetic principles are equally applicable to the large molecule drugs and conventional small molecule drugs, the underlying mechanisms for the processes of absorption, distribution, metabolism and excretion (ADME) of large molecule drugs are often very different from that of small molecule drugs. Therefore, a good understanding of the ADME processes of large molecule drugs is essential in support of the development of therapeutic biologics. The purpose of this article is to review the current knowledge of the ADME processes that govern the pharmacokinetics of biotech drugs. The challenges encountered by orally administered peptide and protein drugs, and the nature of lymphatic absorption after subcutaneous administration will be discussed. In addition, molecular mechanisms of biodistribution, metabolism and renal excretion of biotech drugs will also be discussed. Finally, approaches used for prediction of human pharmacokinetics of protein drugs will be briefly discussed.

  8. Towards generation of bioactive peptides from meat industry waste proteins: Generation of peptides using commercial microbial proteases.

    PubMed

    Ryder, Kate; Bekhit, Alaa El-Din; McConnell, Michelle; Carne, Alan

    2016-10-01

    Five commercially available food-grade microbial protease preparations were evaluated for their ability to hydrolyse meat myofibrillar and connective tissue protein extracts to produce bioactive peptides. A bacterial-derived protease (HT) extensively hydrolysed both meat protein extracts, producing peptide hydrolysates with significant in vitro antioxidant and ACE inhibitor activities. The hydrolysates retained bioactivity after simulated gastrointestinal hydrolysis challenge. Gel permeation chromatography sub-fractionation of the crude protein hydrolysates showed that the smaller peptide fractions exhibited the highest antioxidant and ACE inhibitor activities. OFFGEL electrophoresis of the small peptides of both hydrolysates showed that low isoelectric point peptides had antioxidant activity; however, no consistent relationship was observed between isoelectric point and ACE inhibition. Cell-based assays indicated that the hydrolysates present no significant cytotoxicity towards Vero cells. The results indicate that HT protease hydrolysis of meat myofibrillar and connective tissue protein extracts produces bioactive peptides that are non-cytotoxic, should be stable in the gastrointestinal tract and may contain novel bioactive peptide sequences.

  9. Di-heterometalation of thiol-functionalized peptide nucleic acids

    PubMed Central

    Joshi, Tanmaya; Patra, Malay; Spiccia, Leone; Gasser, Gilles

    2013-01-01

    As a proof-of-principle, two hetero-bimetallic PNA oligomers containing a ruthenium(II) polypyridyl and a cyclopentadienyl manganese tricarbonyl complex have been prepared by serial combination of solid-phase peptide coupling and in-solution thiol chemistry. Solid-phase N-terminus attachment of Ru(II)-polypyridyl carboxylic acid derivative, C1, onto the thiol-functionalized PNA backbone (H-a-a-g-t-c-t-g-c-linker-cys-NH2) has been performed by standard peptide coupling method. As two parallel approaches, the strong affinity of thiols for maleimide and haloacetyl group has been exploited for subsequent post-SPPS addition of cymantrene-based organometallic cores, C2 and C3. Michael-like addition and thioether ligation of thiol functionalized PNA1 (H-gly-a-a-g-t-c-t-g-c-linker-cys-NH2) and PNA2 (C1-a-a-g-t-c-t-g-c-linker-cys-NH2) to cymantrene maleimide and chloroacetyl derivatives, C2 and C3, respectively, has been performed. The synthesized ruthenium(II)-cymantrenyl PNA oligomers have been characterized by mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) and IR spectroscopy. The distinct Mn-CO vibrational IR stretches, between 1,924–2,074 cm−1, have been used as markers to confirm the presence of cymantrenyl units in the PNA sequences and the purity of the HPLC-purified PNA thioethers assessed using LC-MS. PMID:23422249

  10. Synthesis of hybrid hydrazino peptides: protected vs unprotected chiral α-hydrazino acids.

    PubMed

    Suć, Josipa; Jerić, Ivanka

    2015-01-01

    Peptidomimetics based on hydrazino derivatives of α-amino acids represent an important class of peptidic foldamers with promising biological activities, like protease inhibition and antimicrobial activity. However, the lack of straightforward method for the synthesis of optically pure hydrazino acids and efficient incorporation of hydrazino building blocks into peptide sequence hamper wider exploitation of hydrazino peptidomimetics. Here we described the utility of N (α)-benzyl protected and unprotected hydrazino derivatives of natural α-amino acids in synthesis of peptidomimetics. While incorporation of N (α)-benzyl-hydrazino acids into peptide chain and deprotection of benzyl moiety proceeded with difficulties, unprotected hydrazino acids allowed fast and simple construction of hybrid peptidomimetics.

  11. Detection of antibodies to hepatitis C virus (HCV) structural proteins in anti-HCV-positive sera by an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay using synthetic peptides as antigens.

    PubMed Central

    Ishida, C; Matsumoto, K; Fukada, K; Matsushita, K; Shiraki, H; Maeda, Y

    1993-01-01

    We have defined 10 linear immunogenic regions encoded by the putative hepatitis C virus (HCV) structural proteins (core and envelope) by employing an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and by using 17 sequential synthetic peptides covering the N-terminal 330 amino acids of the structural polyproteins as antigens. These peptides correspond to amino acids 1 to 24, 21 to 44, 42 to 68, 64 to 91, and 100 to 120 of the putative core protein and amino acids 192 to 212, 223 to 238, 236 to 258, 250 to 266, and 307 to 330 of the putative envelope protein. In particular, the peptide covering amino acids 21 to 44 of the core protein was reactive with all but one (40 of 41) of the serum samples giving a positive signal in the passive hemagglutination assay (PHA) using the core and nonstructural proteins (NS 3/4) of the virus as antigens. We detected the HCV genome in 25 (61%) of 41 PHA-positive serum samples by the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) test. Of 25 PCR-positive serum samples, 17 serum samples had reactivity to the peptides derived from the envelope protein. On the other hand, only 1 of the 16 PCR-negative serum samples had reactivity to the peptides derived from the envelope protein. Interestingly, we often observed high serum alanine aminotransferase levels in PCR-positive individuals bearing antibodies to the envelope protein. PMID:7681849

  12. Detection of peptides, proteins, and drugs that selectively interact with protein targets.

    PubMed

    Serebriiskii, Ilya G; Mitina, Olga; Pugacheva, Elena N; Benevolenskaya, Elizaveta; Kotova, Elena; Toby, Garabet G; Khazak, Vladimir; Kaelin, William G; Chernoff, Jonathan; Golemis, Erica A

    2002-11-01

    Genome sequencing has been completed for multiple organisms, and pilot proteomic analyses reported for yeast and higher eukaryotes. This work has emphasized the facts that proteins are frequently engaged in multiple interactions, and that governance of protein interaction specificity is a primary means of regulating biological systems. In particular, the ability to deconvolute complex protein interaction networks to identify which interactions govern specific signaling pathways requires the generation of biological tools that allow the distinction of critical from noncritical interactions. We report the application of an enhanced Dual Bait two-hybrid system to allow detection and manipulation of highly specific protein-protein interactions. We summarize the use of this system to detect proteins and peptides that target well-defined specific motifs in larger protein structures, to facilitate rapid identification of specific interactors from a pool of putative interacting proteins obtained in a library screen, and to score specific drug-mediated disruption of protein-protein interaction.

  13. Pyrrolidinyl peptide nucleic acid homologues: effect of ring size on hybridization properties.

    PubMed

    Mansawat, Woraluk; Vilaivan, Chotima; Balázs, Árpád; Aitken, David J; Vilaivan, Tirayut

    2012-03-16

    The effect of ring size of four- to six-membered cyclic β-amino acid on the hybridization properties of pyrrolidinyl peptide nucleic acid with an alternating α/β peptide backbone is reported. The cyclobutane derivatives (acbcPNA) show the highest T(m) and excellent specificity with cDNA and RNA.

  14. New Structural Data Reveal the Motion of Carrier Proteins in Nonribosomal Peptide Synthesis

    PubMed Central

    Kittilä, Tiia; Mollo, Aurelio

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The nonribosomal peptide synthetases (NRPSs) are one of the most promising resources for the production of new bioactive molecules. The mechanism of NRPS catalysis is based around sequential catalytic domains: these are organized into modules, where each module selects, modifies, and incorporates an amino acid into the growing peptide. The intermediates formed during NRPS catalysis are delivered between enzyme centers by peptidyl carrier protein (PCP) domains, which makes PCP interactions and movements crucial to NRPS mechanism. PCP movement has been linked to the domain alternation cycle of adenylation (A) domains, and recent complete NRPS module structures provide support for this hypothesis. However, it appears as though the A domain alternation alone is insufficient to account for the complete NRPS catalytic cycle and that the loaded state of the PCP must also play a role in choreographing catalysis in these complex and fascinating molecular machines. PMID:27435901

  15. Regulation of Airway Inflammation by G-protein Regulatory Motif Peptides of AGS3 protein

    PubMed Central

    Choi, IL-Whan; Ahn, Do Whan; Choi, Jang-Kyu; Cha, Hee-Jae; Ock, Mee Sun; You, EunAe; Rhee, SangMyung; Kim, Kwang Chul; Choi, Yung Hyun; Song, Kyoung Seob

    2016-01-01

    Respiratory diseases such as asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), and lung infections have critical consequences on mortality and morbidity in humans. The aims of the present study were to examine the mechanisms by which CXCL12 affects MUC1 transcription and airway inflammation, which depend on activator of G-protein signaling (AGS) 3 and to identify specific molecules that suppress CXCL12-induced airway inflammation by acting on G-protein-coupled receptors. Herein, AGS3 suppresses CXCL12-mediated upregulation of MUC1 and TNFα by regulating Gαi. We found that the G-protein regulatory (GPR) motif peptide in AGS3 binds to Gαi and downregulates MUC1 expression; in contrast, this motif upregulates TNFα expression. Mutated GPR Q34A peptide increased the expression of MUC1 and TGFβ but decreased the expression of TNFα and IL-6. Moreover, CXCR4-induced dendritic extensions in 2D and 3D matrix cultures were inhibited by the GPR Q34A peptide compared with a wild-type GPR peptide. The GPR Q34A peptide also inhibited CXCL12-induced morphological changes and inflammatory cell infiltration in the mouse lung, and production of inflammatory cytokines in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid and the lungs. Our data indicate that the GPR motif of AGS3 is critical for regulating MUC1/Muc1 expression and cytokine production in the inflammatory microenvironment. PMID:27270970

  16. Single-molecule spectroscopy of amino acids and peptides by recognition tunnelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Yanan; Ashcroft, Brian; Zhang, Peiming; Liu, Hao; Sen, Suman; Song, Weisi; Im, Jongone; Gyarfas, Brett; Manna, Saikat; Biswas, Sovan; Borges, Chad; Lindsay, Stuart

    2014-06-01

    The human proteome has millions of protein variants due to alternative RNA splicing and post-translational modifications, and variants that are related to diseases are frequently present in minute concentrations. For DNA and RNA, low concentrations can be amplified using the polymerase chain reaction, but there is no such reaction for proteins. Therefore, the development of single-molecule protein sequencing is a critical step in the search for protein biomarkers. Here, we show that single amino acids can be identified by trapping the molecules between two electrodes that are coated with a layer of recognition molecules, then measuring the electron tunnelling current across the junction. A given molecule can bind in more than one way in the junction, and we therefore use a machine-learning algorithm to distinguish between the sets of electronic `fingerprints' associated with each binding motif. With this recognition tunnelling technique, we are able to identify D and L enantiomers, a methylated amino acid, isobaric isomers and short peptides. The results suggest that direct electronic sequencing of single proteins could be possible by sequentially measuring the products of processive exopeptidase digestion, or by using a molecular motor to pull proteins through a tunnel junction integrated with a nanopore.

  17. Characterization of prion proteins with monospecific antisera to synthetic peptides.

    PubMed

    Barry, R A; Vincent, M T; Kent, S B; Hood, L E; Prusiner, S B

    1988-02-15

    The prion protein (PrP) 27-30 is the major macromolecular component in highly purified preparations of prions derived from scrapie-infected hamster brain. Immunoblotting studies demonstrated that this protein is generated by partial protease digestion of a larger precursor (PrPSc) with an apparent Mr of 33 to 35 kDa, and that a protease-sensitive cellular PrP isoform, designated PrPC, is present in normal hamster brain. To characterize the relationships among these proteins, ELISA and immunoblotting studies were undertaken with rabbit antisera raised against three synthetic PrP peptides. All three antisera were found to specifically react with the prion proteins, and failed to identify other lower or higher m.w. PrP proteins. Our results provide evidence that the primary structures of PrP 27-30, PrPSc, and PrPC are related; this conclusion supports molecular cloning studies indicating that these proteins are encoded by the same chromosomal gene.

  18. The role of metals in protein conformational disorders - The case of prion protein and Aβ -peptide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Santis, E.; Minicozzi, V.; Morante, S.; Rossi, G. C.; Stellato, F.

    2016-02-01

    Protein conformational disorders are members of a vast class of pathologies in which endogenous proteins or peptides undergo a misfolding process by switching from the physiological soluble configuration to a pathological fibrillar insoluble state. An important, but not yet fully elucidated, role in the process appears to be played by transition metal ions, mainly copper and zinc. X-ray absorption spectroscopy is one of the most suitable techniques for the structural characterization of biological molecules in complex with metal. Owing to its chemical selectivity and sensitivity to the local atomic geometry around the absorber, it can be successfully used to study the environment of metal ions in complex with proteins and peptides in physiological conditions. In this paper we present X-ray absorption spectroscopy studies of the metal ions coordination modes in systems where metals are complexed with specific amyloidogenic proteins and peptides. In particular, we show results concerning the Amyloid β peptide, that is involved in Alzheimer's disease, and the Prion protein, that is responsible for the Transmissible Spongiform Encephalopathy. Our findings suggest that the copper and zinc ions may play a crucial role in the aggregation and fibril formation process of these two biomolecules. Elucidating this kind of interaction could be a key preliminary step before any viable therapy can be conceived or designed.

  19. Peptide Surface Display and Secretion Using Two LPXTG-Containing Surface Proteins from Lactobacillus fermentum BR11

    PubMed Central

    Turner, Mark S.; Hafner, Louise M.; Walsh, Terry; Giffard, Philip M.

    2003-01-01

    A locus encoding two repetitive proteins that have LPXTG cell wall anchoring signals from Lactobacillus fermentum BR11 has been identified by using an antiserum raised against whole L. fermentum BR11 cells. The first protein, Rlp, is similar to the Rib surface protein from Streptococcus agalactiae, while the other protein, Mlp, is similar to the mucus binding protein Mub from Lactobacillus reuteri. It was shown that multiple copies of mlp exist in the genome of L. fermentum BR11. Regions of Rlp, Mlp, and the previously characterized surface protein BspA were used to surface display or secrete heterologous peptides in L. fermentum. The peptides tested were 10 amino acids of the human cystic fibrosis transmembrane regulator protein and a six-histidine epitope (His6). The BspA promoter and secretion signal were used in combination with the Rlp cell wall sorting signal to express, export, and covalently anchor the heterologous peptides to the cell wall. Detection of the cell surface protein fusions revealed that Rlp was a significantly better surface display vector than BspA despite having lower cellular levels (0.7 mg per liter for the Rlp fusion compared with 4 mg per liter for the BspA fusion). The mlp promoter and encoded secretion signal were used to express and export large (328-kDa at 10 mg per liter) and small (27-kDa at 0.06 mg per liter) amino-terminal fragments of the Mlp protein fused to the His6 and CFTR peptides or His6 peptide, respectively. Therefore, these newly described proteins from L. fermentum BR11 have potential as protein production and targeting vectors. PMID:14532035

  20. New mechanisms that regulate Saccharomyces cerevisiae short peptide transporter achieve balanced intracellular amino acid concentrations.

    PubMed

    Melnykov, Artem V

    2016-01-01

    The budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is able to take up large quantities of amino acids in the form of di- and tripeptides via a short peptide transporter, Ptr2p. It is known that PTR2 can be induced by certain peptides and amino acids, and the mechanisms governing this upregulation are understood at the molecular level. We describe two new opposing mechanisms of regulation that emphasize potential toxicity of amino acids: the first is upregulation of PTR2 in a population of cells, caused by amino acid secretion that accompanies peptide uptake; the second is loss of Ptr2p activity, due to transporter internalization following peptide uptake. Our findings emphasize the importance of proper amino acid balance in the cell and extend understanding of peptide import regulation in yeast.

  1. Solution Structures, Dynamics, and Ice Growth Inhibitory Activity of Peptide Fragments Derived from an Antarctic Yeast Protein

    PubMed Central

    Asmawi, Azren A.; Rahman, Mohd Basyaruddin A.; Murad, Abdul Munir A.; Mahadi, Nor M.; Basri, Mahiran; Rahman, Raja Noor Zaliha A.; Salleh, Abu B.; Chatterjee, Subhrangsu; Tejo, Bimo A.; Bhunia, Anirban

    2012-01-01

    Exotic functions of antifreeze proteins (AFP) and antifreeze glycopeptides (AFGP) have recently been attracted with much interest to develop them as commercial products. AFPs and AFGPs inhibit ice crystal growth by lowering the water freezing point without changing the water melting point. Our group isolated the Antarctic yeast Glaciozyma antarctica that expresses antifreeze protein to assist it in its survival mechanism at sub-zero temperatures. The protein is unique and novel, indicated by its low sequence homology compared to those of other AFPs. We explore the structure-function relationship of G. antarctica AFP using various approaches ranging from protein structure prediction, peptide design and antifreeze activity assays, nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) studies and molecular dynamics simulation. The predicted secondary structure of G. antarctica AFP shows several α-helices, assumed to be responsible for its antifreeze activity. We designed several peptide fragments derived from the amino acid sequences of α-helical regions of the parent AFP and they also showed substantial antifreeze activities, below that of the original AFP. The relationship between peptide structure and activity was explored by NMR spectroscopy and molecular dynamics simulation. NMR results show that the antifreeze activity of the peptides correlates with their helicity and geometrical straightforwardness. Furthermore, molecular dynamics simulation also suggests that the activity of the designed peptides can be explained in terms of the structural rigidity/flexibility, i.e., the most active peptide demonstrates higher structural stability, lower flexibility than that of the other peptides with lower activities, and of lower rigidity. This report represents the first detailed report of downsizing a yeast AFP into its peptide fragments with measurable antifreeze activities. PMID:23209600

  2. Desalted duck egg white peptides promote calcium uptake by counteracting the adverse effects of phytic acid.

    PubMed

    Hou, Tao; Liu, Weiwei; Shi, Wen; Ma, Zhili; He, Hui

    2017-03-15

    The structure of the desalted duck egg white peptides-calcium chelate was characterized by fluorescence spectroscopy, fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, and dynamic light scattering. Characterization results showed structural folding and aggregation of amino acids or oligopeptides during the chelation process. Desalted duck egg white peptides enhanced the calcium uptake in the presence of oxalate, phosphate and zinc ions in Caco-2 monolayers. Animal model indicated that desalted duck egg white peptides effectively enhanced the mineral absorption and counteracted the deleterious effects of phytic acid. These findings suggested that desalted duck egg white peptides might promote calcium uptake in three pathways: 1) desalted duck egg white peptides bind with calcium to form soluble chelate and avoid precipitate; 2) the chelate is absorbed as small peptides by enterocyte; and 3) desalted duck egg white peptides regulate the proliferation and differentiation of enterocytes through the interaction with transient receptor potential vanilloid 6 calcium channel.

  3. Transmissible gastroenteritis virus; identification of M protein-binding peptide ligands with antiviral and diagnostic potential

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The membrane (M) protein is one of the major structural proteins of coronavirus particles. In this study, the M protein of transmissible gastroenteritis virus (TGEV) was used to biopan a 12-mer phage display random peptide library. Three phages expressing TGEV-M-binding peptides were identified and ...

  4. Chemical methods for producing disulfide bonds in peptides and proteins to study folding regulation.

    PubMed

    Okumura, Masaki; Shimamoto, Shigeru; Hidaka, Yuji

    2014-04-01

    Disulfide bonds play a critical role in the folding of secretory and membrane proteins. Oxidative folding reactions of disulfide bond-containing proteins typically require several hours or days, and numerous misbridged disulfide isomers are often observed as intermediates. The rate-determining step in refolding is thought to be the disulfide-exchange reaction from nonnative to native disulfide bonds in folding intermediates, which often precipitate during the refolding process because of their hydrophobic properties. To overcome this, chemical additives or a disulfide catalyst, protein disulfide isomerase (PDI), are generally used in refolding experiments to regulate disulfide-coupled peptide and protein folding. This unit describes such methods in the context of the thermodynamic and kinetic control of peptide and protein folding, including (1) regulation of disulfide-coupled peptides and protein folding assisted by chemical additives, (2) reductive unfolding of disulfide-containing peptides and proteins, and (3) regulation of disulfide-coupled peptide and protein folding using PDI.

  5. Effect of Hofmeister ions on protein thermal stability: roles of ion hydration and peptide groups?

    PubMed

    Sedlák, Erik; Stagg, Loren; Wittung-Stafshede, Pernilla

    2008-11-01

    We have systematically explored the Hofmeister effects of cations and anions (0.3-1.75 M range) for acidic Desulfovibrio desulfuricans apoflavodoxin (net charge -19, pH 7) and basic horse heart cytochrome c (net charge +17, pH 4.5). The Hofmeister effect of the ions on protein thermal stability was assessed by the parameter dT trs/d[ion] (T trs; thermal midpoint). We show that dT trs/d[ion] correlates with ion partition coefficients between surface and bulk water and ion surface tension effects: this suggests direct interactions between ions and proteins. Surprisingly, the stability effects of the different ions on the two model proteins are similar, implying a major role of the peptide backbone, instead of charged groups, in mediation of the interactions. Upon assessing chemical/physical properties of the ions responsible for the Hofmeister effects on protein stability, ion charge density was identified as most important. Taken together, our study suggests key roles for ion hydration and the peptide group in facilitating interactions between Hofmeister ions and proteins.

  6. An optimized transit peptide for effective targeting of diverse foreign proteins into chloroplasts in rice

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Bo-Ran; Zhu, Cheng-Hua; Yao, Zhen; Cui, Li-Li; Zhang, Jian-Jun; Yang, Cheng-Wei; He, Zheng-Hui; Peng, Xin-Xiang

    2017-01-01

    Various chloroplast transit peptides (CTP) have been used to successfully target some foreign proteins into chloroplasts, but for other proteins these same CTPs have reduced localization efficiencies or fail completely. The underlying cause of the failures remains an open question, and more effective CTPs are needed. In this study, we initially observed that two E.coli enzymes, EcTSR and EcGCL, failed to be targeted into rice chloroplasts by the commonly-used rice rbcS transit peptide (rCTP) and were subsequently degraded. Further analyses revealed that the N-terminal unfolded region of cargo proteins is critical for their localization capability, and that a length of about 20 amino acids is required to attain the maximum localization efficiency. We considered that the unfolded region may alleviate the steric hindrance produced by the cargo protein, by functioning as a spacer to which cytosolic translocators can bind. Based on this inference, an optimized CTP, named RC2, was constructed. Analyses showed that RC2 can more effectively target diverse proteins, including EcTSR and EcGCL, into rice chloroplasts. Collectively, our results provide further insight into the mechanism of CTP-mediated chloroplastic localization, and more importantly, RC2 can be widely applied in future chloroplastic metabolic engineering, particularly for crop plants.

  7. Technological options for the production of health-promoting proteins and peptides derived from milk and colostrum.

    PubMed

    Korhonen, H; Pihlanto, A

    2007-01-01

    Milk proteins are known to exert a wide range of nutritional, functional and biological activities. Apart from being a balanced source of valuable amino acids, milk proteins contribute to the consistency and sensory properties of various dairy products. Furthermore, many milk proteins possess specific biological properties which make them potential ingredients of health-promoting foods. These properties are attributed to both native protein molecules and to physiologically active peptides encrypted in the protein molecules. Considerable progress has been made over the last twenty years in technologies aimed at separation, fractionation and isolation in a purified form of many interesting proteins occurring in bovine colostrum and milk. Industrial-scale methods have been developed for native whey proteins such as immunoglobulins, lactoferrin, lactoperoxidase, alpha-lactalbumin and beta-lactoglobulin. Their large-scale manufacture and commercial exploitation is still limited although validated research data about their physiological health benefits is rapidly accumulating. Promising product concepts and novel fields of use have emerged recently, and some of these molecules have already found commercial applications. The same applies to bioactive peptides derived from different milk proteins. Active peptides can be liberated during gastrointestinal digestion or milk fermentation with proteolytic enzymes. Such peptides may exert a number of physiological effects in vivo on the gastrointestinal, cardiovascular, endocrine, immune, nervous and other body systems. However, at present the industrial-scale production of such peptides is limited by a lack of suitable technologies. On the other hand, a number of bioactive peptides have been identified in fermented dairy products, and there are already a few commercial dairy products enriched with blood pressure-reducing milk protein peptides. There is a need to develop methods to optimise the activity of bioactive peptides in

  8. Protein identification: the origins of peptide mass fingerprinting.

    PubMed

    Henzel, William J; Watanabe, Colin; Stults, John T

    2003-09-01

    Peptide mass fingerprinting (PMF) grew from a need for a faster, more efficient method to identify frequently observed proteins in electrophoresis gels. We describe the genesis of the idea in 1989, and show the first demonstration with fast atom bombardment mass spectrometry. Despite its promise, the method was seldom used until 1992, with the coming of significantly more sensitive commercial instrumentation based on MALDI-TOF-MS. We recount the evolution of the method and its dependence on a number of technical breakthroughs, both in mass spectrometry and in other areas. We show how it laid the foundation for high-throughput, high-sensitivity methods of protein analysis, now known as proteomics. We conclude with recommendations for further improvements, and speculation of the role of PMF in the future.

  9. Free tyrosine and tyrosine-rich peptide-dependent superoxide generation catalyzed by a copper-binding, threonine-rich neurotoxic peptide derived from prion protein.

    PubMed

    Yokawa, Ken; Kagenishi, Tomoko; Goto, Kaishi; Kawano, Tomonori

    2009-01-01

    Previously, generation of superoxide anion (O(2)(*-)) catalyzed by Cu-binding peptides derived from human prion protein (model sequence for helical Cu-binding motif VNITKQHTVTTTT was most active) in the presence of catecholamines and related aromatic monoamines such as phenylethylamine and tyramine, has been reported [Kawano, T., Int J Biol Sci 2007; 3: 57-63]. The peptide sequence (corresponding to helix 2) tested here is known as threonine-rich neurotoxic peptide. In the present article, the redox behaviors of aromatic monoamines, 20 amino acids and prion-derived tyrosine-rich peptide sequences were compared as putative targets of the oxidative reactions mediated with the threonine-rich prion-peptide. For detection of O(2)(*-), an O(2)(*-)-specific chemiluminescence probe, Cypridina luciferin analog was used. We found that an aromatic amino acid, tyrosine (structurally similar to tyramine) behaves as one of the best substrates for the O(2)(*-) generating reaction (conversion from hydrogen peroxide) catalyzed by Cu-bound prion helical peptide. Data suggested that phenolic moiety is required to be an active substrate while the presence of neither carboxyl group nor amino group was necessarily required. In addition to the action of free tyrosine, effect of two tyrosine-rich peptide sequences YYR and DYEDRYYRENMHR found in human prion corresponding to the tyrosine-rich region was tested as putative substrates for the threonine-rich neurotoxic peptide. YYR motif (found twice in the Y-rich region) showed 2- to 3-fold higher activity compared to free tyrosine. Comparison of Y-rich sequence consisted of 13 amino acids and its Y-to-F substitution mutant sequence revealed that the tyrosine-residues on Y-rich peptide derived from prion may contribute to the higher production of O(2)(*-). These data suggest that the tyrosine residues on prion molecules could be additional targets of the prion-mediated reactions through intra- or inter-molecular interactions. Lastly, possible

  10. Hydrolysis of whey protein isolate with Bacillus licheniformis protease: aggregating capacities of peptide fractions.

    PubMed

    Creusot, Nathalie; Gruppen, Harry

    2008-11-12

    In a previous study, peptides aggregating at pH 7.0 derived from a whey protein hydrolysate made with Bacillus licheniformis protease were fractionated and identified. The objective of the present work was to investigate the solubility of the fractionated aggregating peptides, as a function of concentration, and their aggregating capacities toward added intact proteins. The amount of aggregated material and the composition of the aggregates obtained were measured by nitrogen concentration and size exclusion chromatography, respectively. The results showed that of the four fractions obtained from the aggregating peptides, two were insoluble, while the other two consisted of 1:1 mixture of low and high solubility peptides. Therefore, insoluble peptides coaggregated, assumedly via hydrophobic interactions, other relatively more soluble peptides. It was also shown that aggregating peptides could aggregate intact protein nonspecifically since the same peptides were involved in the aggregation of whey proteins, beta-casein, and bovine serum albumin. Both insoluble and partly insoluble peptides were required for the aggregation of intact protein. These results are of interest for the applications of protein hydrolysates, as mixtures of intact protein and peptides are often present in these applications.

  11. Mutations in amyloid precursor protein and presenilin-1 genes increase the basal oxidative stress in murine neuronal cells and lead to increased sensitivity to oxidative stress mediated by amyloid beta-peptide (1-42), HO and kainic acid: implications for Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Mohmmad Abdul, Hafiz; Sultana, Rukhsana; Keller, Jeffrey N; St Clair, Daret K; Markesbery, William R; Butterfield, D Allan

    2006-03-01

    Oxidative stress is observed in Alzheimer's disease (AD) brain, including protein oxidation and lipid peroxidation. One of the major pathological hallmarks of AD is the brain deposition of amyloid beta-peptide (Abeta). This 42-mer peptide is derived from the beta-amyloid precursor protein (APP) and is associated with oxidative stress in vitro and in vivo. Mutations in the PS-1 and APP genes, which increase production of the highly amyloidogenic amyloid beta-peptide (Abeta42), are the major causes of early onset familial AD. Several lines of evidence suggest that enhanced oxidative stress, inflammation, and apoptosis play important roles in the pathogenesis of AD. In the present study, primary neuronal cultures from knock-in mice expressing mutant human PS-1 and APP were compared with those from wild-type mice, in the presence or absence of various oxidizing agents, viz, Abeta(1-42), H2O2 and kainic acid (KA). APP/PS-1 double mutant neurons displayed a significant basal increase in oxidative stress as measured by protein oxidation, lipid peroxidation, and 3-nitrotyrosine when compared with the wild-type neurons (p < 0.0005). Elevated levels of human APP, PS-1 and Abeta(1-42) were found in APP/PS-1 cultures compared with wild-type neurons. APP/PS-1 double mutant neuron cultures exhibited increased vulnerability to oxidative stress, mitochondrial dysfunction and apoptosis induced by Abeta(1-42), H2O2 and KA compared with wild-type neuronal cultures. The results are consonant with the hypothesis that Abeta(1-42)-associated oxidative stress and increased vulnerability to oxidative stress may contribute significantly to neuronal apoptosis and death in familial early onset AD.

  12. Comparative studies of adhesion peptides based on l- or d-amino acids.

    PubMed

    Nikitin, Sergey; Palmer, Daniel; Meldal, Morten; Diness, Frederik

    2016-10-01

    Detailed studies comparing solid-supported l- or d-amino acid adhesion peptides based on the sequence KLHRIRA were performed. Stability towards proteases and levels of cellular adhesion to the otherwise inert surface of PEGA resin were compared by using fluorescently labelled peptides. A clear difference in the peptide stability towards cleavage by subtilisin, trypsin, or papain was observed. However, all of the on-bead peptides provided an optimal surface for cell adhesion and proliferation. In long-term experiments, these properties were still found to be similar on the resins modified either with l- or with d-amino acids and unaffected by the nature of their fluorescence labelling at either terminus. These results support that the more accessible l-amino acids can be utilized for cell adhesion experiments and confirm the nonspecific interaction mechanism of cell binding to these peptides on the bead surface. Copyright © 2016 European Peptide Society and John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  13. Steric effects in peptide and protein exchange with activated disulfides.

    PubMed

    Kerr, Jason; Schlosser, Jessica L; Griffin, Donald R; Wong, Darice Y; Kasko, Andrea M

    2013-08-12

    Disulfide exchange is an important bioconjugation tool, enabling chemical modification of peptides and proteins containing free cysteines. We previously reported the synthesis of a macromer bearing an activated disulfide and its incorporation into hydrogels. Despite their ability to diffuse freely into hydrogels, larger proteins were unable to undergo in-gel disulfide exchange. In order to understand this phenomenon, we synthesized four different activated disulfide-bearing model compounds (Mn = 300 Da to 10 kDa) and quantified their rate of disulfide exchange with a small peptide (glutathione), a moderate-sized protein (β-lactoglobulin), and a large protein (bovine serum albumin) in four different pH solutions (6.0, 7.0, 7.4, and 8.0) to mimic biological systems. Rate constants of exchange depend significantly on the size and accessibility of the thiolate. pH also significantly affects the rate of reaction, with the faster reactions occurring at higher pH. Surprisingly, little difference in exchange rates is seen between macromolecular disulfides of varying size (Mn = 2 kDa - 10 kDa), although all undergo exchange more slowly than their small molecule analogue (MW = 300 g/mol). The maximum exchange efficiencies (% disulfides exchanged after 24 h) are not siginificantly affected by thiol size or pH, but somewhat affected by disulfide size. Therefore, while all three factors investigated (pH, disulfide size, and thiolate size) can influence the exchange kinetics and extent of reaction, the size of the thiolate and its accessibility plays the most significant role.

  14. Rational Design of a Polymer with Robust Efficacy for Intracellular Protein and Peptide Delivery.

    PubMed

    Chang, Hong; Lv, Jia; Gao, Xin; Wang, Xing; Wang, Hui; Chen, Hui; He, Xu; Li, Lei; Cheng, Yiyun

    2017-03-08

    The efficient delivery of biopharmaceutical drugs such as proteins and peptides into the cytosol of target cells poses substantial challenges owing to their large size and susceptibility to degradation. Current protein delivery vehicles have limitations such as the need for protein modification, insufficient delivery of large-size proteins or small peptides, and loss of protein function after the delivery. Here, we adopted a rational approach to design a polymer with robust efficacy for intracellular protein and peptide delivery. The polymer is composed of a dendrimer scaffold, a hydrophobic membrane-disruptive region, and a multivalent protein binding surface. It allows efficient protein/peptide binding, endocytosis, and endosomal disruption and is capable of efficiently delivering various biomacromolecules including bovine serum albumin, R-phycoerythrin, p53, saporin, β-galactosidase, and peptides into the cytosol of living cells. Transduction of apoptotic proteins and peptides successfully induces apoptosis in cancer cells, suggesting that the activities of proteins and peptides are maintained during the delivery. This technology represents an efficient and useful tool for intracellular protein and peptide delivery and has broad applicability for basic research and clinical applications.

  15. Bioactive peptides derived from milk proteins and their health beneficial potentials: an update.

    PubMed

    Nagpal, Ravinder; Behare, Pradip; Rana, Rajiv; Kumar, Ashwani; Kumar, Manoj; Arora, Sanu; Morotta, Fransesco; Jain, Shalini; Yadav, Hariom

    2011-01-01

    It has been well recognized that dietary proteins provide a rich source of biologically active peptides. Today, milk proteins are considered the most important source of bioactive peptides and an increasing number of bioactive peptides have been identified in milk protein hydrolysates and fermented dairy products. Bioactive peptides derived from milk proteins offer a promising approach for the promotion of health by means of a tailored diet and provide interesting opportunities to the dairy industry for expansion of its field of operation. The potential health benefits of milk protein-derived peptides have been a subject of growing commercial interest in the context of health-promoting functional foods. Hence, these peptides are being incorporated in the form of ingredients in functional and novel foods, dietary supplements and even pharmaceuticals with the purpose of delivering specific health benefits.

  16. Adsorption and protonation of peptides and proteins in pH responsive gels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Longo, Gabriel S.; Szleifer, Igal

    2016-08-01

    To describe the non-trivial features of the equilibrium protonation and physical adsorption of peptides/proteins in pH-responsive hydrogels, we summarize our recent theoretical work on the subject. In these systems, molecular confinement in nanometer-sized environments modifies the balance between chemical state, physical interactions and molecular organization, which results in a behavior that is qualitatively different from what is expected from assuming the bulk solution protonation. To enhance adsorption, the pH-dependent deprotonation curves of all amino acids of adsorbed proteins are adequately shifted and deformed, which depends, in a complex fashion, on the specific amino acid. This possibility of modifying different acid-base equilibriums gives the adsorbed protein degrees of freedom to regulate charge and enhance electrostatic attractions under a wide range of experimental conditions. Protein adsorption modifies the microenvironment inside the hydrogel, particularly the gel pH. As a result, the state of protonation of the network is different before and after adsorption. The physicochemical considerations described in this review can be useful in the design of functional materials involving protein adsorption.

  17. Human immunodeficiency virus trans-activator of transcription peptide detection via ribonucleic acid aptamer on aminated diamond biosensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahim Ruslinda, A.; Wang, Xianfen; Ishii, Yoko; Ishiyama, Yuichiro; Tanabe, Kyosuke; Kawarada, Hiroshi

    2011-09-01

    The potential of ribonucleic acid (RNA) as both informational and ligand binding molecule have opened a scenario in the development of biosensors. An aminated diamond-based RNA aptasensor is presented for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) trans-activator of transcription (Tat) peptide protein detection that not only gives a labeled or label-free detection method but also provides a reusable platform for a simple, sensitive, and selective detection of proteins. The immobilized procedure was based on the binding interaction between positively charged amine terminated diamond and the RNA aptamer probe molecules with the negatively charged surface carboxylic compound linker molecule such as terephthalic acid.

  18. Topical Delivery of Protein and Peptide Using Novel Cell Penetrating Peptide IMT-P8

    PubMed Central

    Gautam, Ankur; Nanda, Jagpreet Singh; Samuel, Jesse S.; Kumari, Manisha; Priyanka, Priyanka; Bedi, Gursimran; Nath, Samir K.; Mittal, Garima; Khatri, Neeraj; Raghava, Gajendra Pal Singh

    2016-01-01

    Skin, being the largest organ of the body, is an important site for drug administration. However, most of the drugs have poor permeability and thus drug delivery through the skin is very challenging. In this study, we examined the transdermal delivery capability of IMT-P8, a novel cell-penetrating peptide. We generated IMT-P8-GFP and IMT-P8-KLA fusion constructs and evaluated their internalization into mouse skin after topical application. Our results demonstrate that IMT-P8 is capable of transporting green fluorescent protein (GFP) and proapoptotic peptide, KLA into the skin and also in different cell lines. Interestingly, uptake of IMT-P8-GFP was considerably higher than TAT-GFP in HeLa cells. After internalization, IMT-P8-KLA got localized to the mitochondria and caused significant cell death in HeLa cells signifying an intact biological activity. Further in vivo skin penetration experiments revealed that after topical application, IMT-P8 penetrated the stratum corneum, entered into the viable epidermis and accumulated inside the hair follicles. In addition, both IMT-P8-KLA and IMT-P8-GFP internalized into the hair follicles and dermal tissue of the skin following topical application. These results suggested that IMT-P8 could be a potential candidate to be used as a topical delivery vehicle for various cosmetic and skin disease applications. PMID:27189051

  19. Reaction mechanisms in the radiolysis of peptides, polypeptides, and proteins. I. Reactions of the peptide main-chain in model systems

    SciTech Connect

    Garrison, W.M.

    1982-08-01

    The object of this review is to bring together and to correlate our present knowledge of products and mechanisms in the radiolysis of peptides, polypeptides and proteins in both aqueous and solid-state systems. Results obtained with various experimental techniques such as product analysis, competition kinetics, ESR spectroscopy and pulse radiolysis are included. Here in part I the emphasis is on the various radiation-induced reactions of the peptide main-chain in model systems. In part II the emphasis is on the radiation chemistry of side-chain loci of the aliphatic, sulfur-containing, aromatic and other unsaturated amino acid residues in similar systems. And, in part III this information on model systems is used in interpreting the mechanisms of chemical change in the radiolysis of proteins in aqueous solution and in the solid state. 60 references.

  20. Purification and sequencing of the active site tryptic peptide from penicillin-binding protein 1b of Escherichia coli

    SciTech Connect

    Nicholas, R.A.; Suzuki, H.; Hirota, Y.; Strominger, J.L.

    1985-07-02

    This paper reports the sequence of the active site peptide of penicillin-binding protein 1b from Escherichia coli. Purified penicillin-binding protein 1b was labeled with (/sup 14/C)penicillin G, digested with trypsin, and partially purified by gel filtration. Upon further purification by high-pressure liquid chromatography, two radioactive peaks were observed, and the major peak, representing over 75% of the applied radioactivity, was submitted to amino acid analysis and sequencing. The sequence Ser-Ile-Gly-Ser-Leu-Ala-Lys was obtained. The active site nucleophile was identified by digesting the purified peptide with aminopeptidase M and separating the radioactive products on high-pressure liquid chromatography. Amino acid analysis confirmed that the serine residue in the middle of the sequence was covalently bonded to the (/sup 14/C)penicilloyl moiety. A comparison of this sequence to active site sequences of other penicillin-binding proteins and beta-lactamases is presented.

  1. Noncovalent Protein and Peptide Functionalization of Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes for Biodelivery and Optical Sensing Applications.

    PubMed

    Antonucci, Alessandra; Kupis-Rozmysłowicz, Justyna; Boghossian, Ardemis A

    2017-04-05

    The exquisite structural and optical characteristics of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs), combined with the tunable specificities of proteins and peptides, can be exploited to strongly benefit technologies with applications in fields ranging from biomedicine to industrial biocatalysis. The key to exploiting the synergism of these materials is designing protein/peptide-SWCNT conjugation schemes that preserve biomolecule activity while keeping the near-infrared optical and electronic properties of SWCNTs intact. Since sp(2) bond-breaking disrupts the optoelectronic properties of SWCNTs, noncovalent conjugation strategies are needed to interface biomolecules to the nanotube surface for optical biosensing and delivery applications. An underlying understanding of the forces contributing to protein and peptide interaction with the nanotube is thus necessary to identify the appropriate conjugation design rules for specific applications. This article explores the molecular interactions that govern the adsorption of peptides and proteins on SWCNT surfaces, elucidating contributions from individual amino acids as well as secondary and tertiary protein structure and conformation. Various noncovalent conjugation strategies for immobilizing peptides, homopolypeptides, and soluble and membrane proteins on SWCNT surfaces are presented, highlighting studies focused on developing near-infrared optical sensors and molecular scaffolds for self-assembly and biochemical analysis. The analysis presented herein suggests that though direct adsorption of proteins and peptides onto SWCNTs can be principally applied to drug and gene delivery, in vivo imaging and targeting, or cancer therapy, nondirect conjugation strategies using artificial or natural membranes, polymers, or linker molecules are often better suited for biosensing applications that require conservation of biomolecular functionality or precise control of the biomolecule's orientation. These design rules are intended to

  2. Functional interactions between polypyrimidine tract binding protein and PRI peptide ligand containing proteins.

    PubMed

    Coelho, Miguel B; Ascher, David B; Gooding, Clare; Lang, Emma; Maude, Hannah; Turner, David; Llorian, Miriam; Pires, Douglas E V; Attig, Jan; Smith, Christopher W J

    2016-08-15

    Polypyrimidine tract binding protein (PTBP1) is a heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein (hnRNP) that plays roles in most stages of the life-cycle of pre-mRNA and mRNAs in the nucleus and cytoplasm. PTBP1 has four RNA binding domains of the RNA recognition motif (RRM) family, each of which can bind to pyrimidine motifs. In addition, RRM2 can interact via its dorsal surface with proteins containing short peptide ligands known as PTB RRM2 interacting (PRI) motifs, originally found in the protein Raver1. Here we review our recent progress in understanding the interactions of PTB with RNA and with various proteins containing PRI ligands.

  3. Crosslinking studies of protein-protein interactions in nonribosomal peptide biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Hur, Gene H; Meier, Jordan L; Baskin, Jeremy; Codelli, Julian A; Bertozzi, Carolyn R; Marahiel, Mohamed A; Burkart, Michael D

    2009-04-24

    Selective protein-protein interactions between nonribosomal peptide synthetase (NRPS) proteins, governed by communication-mediating (COM) domains, are responsible for proper translocation of biosynthetic intermediates to produce the natural product. In this study, we developed a crosslinking assay, utilizing bioorthogonal probes compatible with carrier protein modification, for probing the protein interactions between COM domains of NRPS enzymes. Employing the Huisgen 1,3-dipolar cycloaddition of azides and alkynes, we examined crosslinking of cognate NRPS modules within the tyrocidine pathway and demonstrated the sensitivity of our panel of crosslinking probes toward the selective protein interactions of compatible COM domains. These studies indicate that copper-free crosslinking substrates uniquely offer a diagnostic probe for protein-protein interactions. Likewise, these crosslinking probes serve as ideal chemical tools for structural studies between NRPS modules where functional assays are lacking.

  4. Solvation thermodynamics of amino acid side chains on a short peptide backbone

    SciTech Connect

    Hajari, Timir; Vegt, Nico F. A. van der

    2015-04-14

    The hydration process of side chain analogue molecules differs from that of the actual amino acid side chains in peptides and proteins owing to the effects of the peptide backbone on the aqueous solvent environment. A recent molecular simulation study has provided evidence that all nonpolar side chains, attached to a short peptide backbone, are considerably less hydrophobic than the free side chain analogue molecules. In contrast to this, the hydrophilicity of the polar side chains is hardly affected by the backbone. To analyze the origin of these observations, we here present a molecular simulation study on temperature dependent solvation free energies of nonpolar and polar side chains attached to a short peptide backbone. The estimated solvation entropies and enthalpies of the various amino acid side chains are compared with existing side chain analogue data. The solvation entropies and enthalpies of the polar side chains are negative, but in absolute magnitude smaller compared with the corresponding analogue data. The observed differences are large; however, owing to a nearly perfect enthalpy-entropy compensation, the solvation free energies of polar side chains remain largely unaffected by the peptide backbone. We find that a similar compensation does not apply to the nonpolar side chains; while the backbone greatly reduces the unfavorable solvation entropies, the solvation enthalpies are either more favorable or only marginally affected. This results in a very small unfavorable free energy cost, or even free energy gain, of solvating the nonpolar side chains in strong contrast to solvation of small hydrophobic or nonpolar molecules in bulk water. The solvation free energies of nonpolar side chains have been furthermore decomposed into a repulsive cavity formation contribution and an attractive dispersion free energy contribution. We find that cavity formation next to the peptide backbone is entropically favored over formation of similar sized nonpolar side

  5. Essential Amino Acids of the Hantaan Virus N Protein in Its Interaction with RNA

    PubMed Central

    Severson, William; Xu, Xiaolin; Kuhn, Michaela; Senutovitch, Nina; Thokala, Mercy; Ferron, François; Longhi, Sonia; Canard, Bruno; Jonsson, Colleen B.

    2005-01-01

    The nucleocapsid (N) protein of hantavirus encapsidates viral genomic and antigenomic RNAs. Previously, deletion mapping identified a central, conserved region (amino acids 175 to 217) within the Hantaan virus (HTNV) N protein that interacts with a high affinity with these viral RNAs (vRNAs). To further define the boundaries of the RNA binding domain (RBD), several peptides were synthesized and examined for the ability to bind full-length S-segment vRNA. Peptide 195-217 retained 94% of the vRNA bound by the HTNV N protein, while peptides 175-186 and 205-217 bound only 1% of the vRNA. To further explore which residues were essential for binding vRNA, we performed a comprehensive mutational analysis of the amino acids in the RBD. Single and double Ala substitutions were constructed for 18 amino acids from amino acids 175 to 217 in the full-length N protein. In addition, Ala substitutions were made for the three R residues in peptide 185-217. An analysis of protein-RNA interactions by electrophoretic mobility shift assays implicated E192, Y206, and S217 as important for binding. Chemical modification experiments showed that lysine residues, but not arginine or cysteine residues, contribute to RNA binding, which agreed with bioinformatic predictions. Overall, these data implicate lysine residues dispersed from amino acids 175 to 429 of the protein and three amino acids located in the RBD as essential for RNA binding. PMID:16014963

  6. Changing ABRA protein peptide to fit into the HLA-DRbeta1*0301 molecule renders it protection-inducing.

    PubMed

    Salazar, Luz M; Alba, Martha P; Curtidor, Hernando; Bermúdez, Adriana; Luis E Vargas; Rivera, Zuly J; Patarroyo, Manuel E

    2004-09-10

    The Plasmodium falciparum acidic-basic repeat antigen represents a potential malarial vaccine candidate. One of this protein's high activity binding peptides, named 2150 ((161)KMNMLKENVDYIQKNQNLFK(180)), is conserved, non-immunogenic, and non-protection-inducing. Analogue peptides whose critical binding residues (in bold) were replaced by amino-acids having similar mass but different charge were synthesized and tested to try to modify such immunological properties. These analogues' HLA-DRbeta1* molecule binding ability were also studied in an attempt to explain their biological mechanisms and correlate binding capacity and immunological function with their three-dimensional structure determined by (1)H NMR. A 3(10) distorted helical structure was identified in protective and immunogenic peptide 24922 whilst alpha-helical structure was found for non-immunogenic, non-protective peptides having differences in alpha-helical position. The changes performed on immunogenic, protection-inducing peptide 24922 allowed it to bind specifically to the HLA-DRbeta1*0301 molecule, suggesting that these changes may lead to better interaction with the MHC Class II-peptide-TCR complex rendering it immunogenic and protective, thus suggesting a new way of developing multi-component, sub-unit-based anti-malarial vaccines.

  7. Analysis of bacteriophage N protein and peptide binding to boxB RNA using polyacrylamide gel coelectrophoresis (PACE).

    PubMed Central

    Cilley, C D; Williamson, J R

    1997-01-01

    The antitermination protein N from bacteriophage lambda (Nlambda) interacts with the nut site in its own mRNA, as well as host factors, to facilitate formation of a termination-resistant transcription complex. The conserved, amino-terminal arginine-rich domain of Nlambda protein is known to interact with a small RNA hairpin (boxB) derived from the nut site RNA. We have examined the binding of Nlambda protein, peptides derived from the amino terminus of Nlambda, and the related phage P22 N protein to lambda boxB RNAs. To facilitate the study of complexes that are not amenable to gel retardation assays, a new polyacrylamide affinity coelectrophoresis technique (PACE) was developed. Using the PACE assay, we have demonstrated that a 19-amino acid peptide from the amino terminus of Nlambda protein binds lambda boxB RNA with a Kd,app of 5.2 nM. PACE was also used to study the binding affinity of a number of Nlambda peptide and lambda boxB RNA mutants. The PACE technique is complementary to the traditional gel retardation assay for direct measurement of binding interactions, and will be useful for any procedure that requires a pool of RNAs to be resolved based on their relative affinities for proteins or peptides. PMID:8990399

  8. Copper binding to octarepeat peptides of the prion protein monitored by mass spectrometry.

    PubMed Central

    Whittal, R. M.; Ball, H. L.; Cohen, F. E.; Burlingame, A. L.; Prusiner, S. B.; Baldwin, M. A.

    2000-01-01

    Electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) was used to measure the binding of Cu2+ ions to synthetic peptides corresponding to sections of the sequence of the mature prion protein (PrP). ESI-MS demonstrates that Cu2+ is unique among divalent metal ions in binding to PrP and defines the location of the major Cu2+ binding site as the octarepeat region in the N-terminal domain, containing multiple copies of the repeat ProHisGlyGlyGlyTrpGlyGln. The stoichiometries of the complexes measured directly by ESI-MS are pH dependent: a peptide containing four octarepeats chelates two Cu2+ ions at pH 6 but four at pH 7.4. At the higher pH, the binding of multiple Cu2+ ions occurs with a high degree of cooperativity for peptides C-terminally extended to incorporate a fifth histidine. Dissociation constants for each Cu2+ ion binding to the octarepeat peptides, reported here for the first time, are mostly in the low micromolar range; for the addition of the third and fourth Cu2+ ions to the extended peptides at pH 7.4, K(D)'s are <100 nM. N-terminal acetylation of the peptides caused some reduction in the stoichiometry of binding at both pH's. Cu2+ also binds to a peptide corresponding to the extreme N-terminus of PrP that precedes the octarepeats, arguing that this region of the sequence may also make a contribution to the Cu2+ complexation. Although the structure of the four-octarepeat peptide is not affected by pH changes in the absence of Cu2+, as judged by circular dichroism, Cu2+ binding induces a modest change at pH 6 and a major structural perturbation at pH 7.4. It is possible that PrP functions as a Cu2+ transporter by binding Cu2+ ions from the extracellular medium under physiologic conditions and then releasing some or all of this metal upon exposure to acidic pH in endosomes or secondary lysosomes. PMID:10716185

  9. Bioactive Molecules Released in Food by Lactic Acid Bacteria: Encrypted Peptides and Biogenic Amines

    PubMed Central

    Pessione, Enrica; Cirrincione, Simona

    2016-01-01

    Lactic acid bacteria (LAB) can produce a huge amount of bioactive compounds. Since their elective habitat is food, especially dairy but also vegetal food, it is frequent to find bioactive molecules in fermented products. Sometimes these compounds can have adverse effects on human health such as biogenic amines (tyramine and histamine), causing allergies, hypertensive crises, and headache. However, some LAB products also display benefits for the consumers. In the present review article, the main nitrogen compounds produced by LAB are considered. Besides biogenic amines derived from the amino acids tyrosine, histidine, phenylalanine, lysine, ornithine, and glutamate by decarboxylation, interesting peptides can be decrypted by the proteolytic activity of LAB. LAB proteolytic system is very efficient in releasing encrypted molecules from several proteins present in different food matrices. Alpha and beta-caseins, albumin and globulin from milk and dairy products, rubisco from spinach, beta-conglycinin from soy and gluten from cereals constitute a good source of important bioactive compounds. These encrypted peptides are able to control nutrition (mineral absorption and oxidative stress protection), metabolism (blood glucose and cholesterol lowering) cardiovascular function (antithrombotic and hypotensive action), infection (microbial inhibition and immunomodulation) and gut-brain axis (opioids and anti-opioids controlling mood and food intake). Very recent results underline the role of food-encrypted peptides in protein folding (chaperone-like molecules) as well as in cell cycle and apoptosis control, suggesting new and positive aspects of fermented food, still unexplored. In this context, the detailed (transcriptomic, proteomic, and metabolomic) characterization of LAB of food interest (as starters, biocontrol agents, nutraceuticals, and probiotics) can supply a solid evidence-based science to support beneficial effects and it is a promising approach as well to obtain

  10. Bioactive Molecules Released in Food by Lactic Acid Bacteria: Encrypted Peptides and Biogenic Amines.

    PubMed

    Pessione, Enrica; Cirrincione, Simona

    2016-01-01

    Lactic acid bacteria (LAB) can produce a huge amount of bioactive compounds. Since their elective habitat is food, especially dairy but also vegetal food, it is frequent to find bioactive molecules in fermented products. Sometimes these compounds can have adverse effects on human health such as biogenic amines (tyramine and histamine), causing allergies, hypertensive crises, and headache. However, some LAB products also display benefits for the consumers. In the present review article, the main nitrogen compounds produced by LAB are considered. Besides biogenic amines derived from the amino acids tyrosine, histidine, phenylalanine, lysine, ornithine, and glutamate by decarboxylation, interesting peptides can be decrypted by the proteolytic activity of LAB. LAB proteolytic system is very efficient in releasing encrypted molecules from several proteins present in different food matrices. Alpha and beta-caseins, albumin and globulin from milk and dairy products, rubisco from spinach, beta-conglycinin from soy and gluten from cereals constitute a good source of important bioactive compounds. These encrypted peptides are able to control nutrition (mineral absorption and oxidative stress protection), metabolism (blood glucose and cholesterol lowering) cardiovascular function (antithrombotic and hypotensive action), infection (microbial inhibition and immunomodulation) and gut-brain axis (opioids and anti-opioids controlling mood and food intake). Very recent results underline the role of food-encrypted peptides in protein folding (chaperone-like molecules) as well as in cell cycle and apoptosis control, suggesting new and positive aspects of fermented food, still unexplored. In this context, the detailed (transcriptomic, proteomic, and metabolomic) characterization of LAB of food interest (as starters, biocontrol agents, nutraceuticals, and probiotics) can supply a solid evidence-based science to support beneficial effects and it is a promising approach as well to obtain

  11. Bactericidal activity of synthetic peptides based on the structure of the 55-kilodalton bactericidal protein from human neutrophils.

    PubMed Central

    Gray, B H; Haseman, J R

    1994-01-01

    Short (10- to 11-mer) hydrophilic peptides based on the structure of the 55-kDa bactericidal protein (BP55, B/PI, and CAP57) from human neutrophil granules were identified from the hydropathy plot of the 456-amino-acid sequence predicted from the nucleotide sequences of cDNA clones for BP55 and B/PI. Peptides corresponding to amino acid residues 90 to 99 (peptide #90-99), 86 to 99, or 90 to 102 of BP55 were bactericidal toward 5 x 10(6) Pseudomonas aeruginosa cells at 0.6 x 10(-5) to 1.5 x 10(-5) M and killed an Escherichia coli rough strain at 3 x 10(-5) M. The #90-99 peptide with a cysteine added at the amino terminus (C#90-99) was approximately 10 times more active than #90-99, killing P. aeruginosa at 1.5 x 10(-6) M. Peptides representing amino acid residues 27 to 37, 118 to 127, and 160 to 170 and the first 10 amino acids of the signal sequence for BP55 were not bactericidal. When coupled to either keyhole limpet hemocyanin or ovalbumin protein carriers through the thiol group, the C#90-99 peptide was not diminished on a molar basis in its capacity for killing of P. aeruginosa. Two other relatively hydrophilic peptides with an added amino-terminal cysteine, peptides C#227-236 and C#418-427, were not bactericidal at 1.2 x 10(-4) M or at 100 times the effective bactericidal concentration of C#90-99. The C#90-99 peptide killed E. coli at 1.5 x 10(-5) M, or at 10 times the concentration required to kill an equal number of P. aeruginosa cells. Although Pseudomonas cepacia and Staphylococcus aureus were resistent to killing by the parent BP55 molecule, they were susceptible to the C#90-99 and #90-99 peptides in the same concentration range as was E. coli. When all peptides were compared for the ability to neutralize E. coli O55:B5 endotoxin in a Limulus amoebocyte lysate assay, the C#227-236, C#418-427, and #160-170 peptides completely inhibited gelation at a 10(-4) M concentration. All other synthetic peptides, including bactericidal peptide #90-99 and its

  12. Experimental conformational energy maps of proteins and peptides.

    PubMed

    Balaji, Govardhan A; Nagendra, H G; Balaji, Vitukudi N; Rao, Shashidhar N

    2017-02-07

    We have presented an extensive analysis of the peptide backbone dihedral angles in the PDB structures and computed experimental Ramachandran plots for their distributions seen under a various constraints on X-ray resolution, representativeness at different sequence identity percentages, and hydrogen bonding distances. These experimental distributions have been converted into isoenergy contour plots using the approach employed previously by F. M. Pohl. This has led to the identification of energetically favored minima in the Ramachandran (ϕ, ψ) plots in which global minima are predominantly observed either in the right-handed α-helical or the polyproline II regions. Further, we have identified low energy pathways for transitions between various minima in the (ϕ,ψ) plots. We have compared and presented the experimental plots with published theoretical plots obtained from both molecular mechanics and quantum mechanical approaches. In addition, we have developed and employed a root mean square deviation (RMSD) metric for isoenergy contours in various ranges, as a measure (in kcal.mol(-1) ) to compare any two plots and determine the extent of correlation and similarity between their isoenergy contours. In general, we observe a greater degree of compatibility with experimental plots for energy maps obtained from molecular mechanics methods compared to most quantum mechanical methods. The experimental energy plots we have investigated could be helpful in refining protein structures obtained from X-ray, NMR, and electron microscopy and in refining force field parameters to enable simulations of peptide and protein structures that have higher degree of consistency with experiments. Proteins 2017. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Structure activity relationship modelling of milk protein-derived peptides with dipeptidyl peptidase IV (DPP-IV) inhibitory activity.

    PubMed

    Nongonierma, Alice B; FitzGerald, Richard J

    2016-05-01

    Quantitative structure activity type models were developed in an attempt to predict the key features of peptide sequences having dipeptidyl peptidase IV (DPP-IV) inhibitory activity. The models were then employed to help predict the potential of peptides, which are currently reported in the literature to be present in the intestinal tract of humans following milk/dairy product ingestion, to act as inhibitors of DPP-IV. Two models (z- and v-scale) for short (2-5 amino acid residues) bovine milk peptides, behaving as competitive inhibitors of DPP-IV, were developed. The z- and the v-scale models (p<0.05, R(2) of 0.829 and 0.815, respectively) were then applied to 56 milk protein-derived peptides previously reported in the literature to be found in the intestinal tract of humans which possessed a structural feature of DPP-IV inhibitory peptides (P at the N2 position). Ten of these peptides were synthetized and tested for their in vitro DPP-IV inhibitory properties. There was no agreement between the predicted and experimentally determined DPP-IV half maximal inhibitory concentrations (IC50) for the competitive peptide inhibitors. However, the ranking for DPP-IV inhibitory potency of the competitive peptide inhibitors was conserved. Furthermore, potent in vitro DPP-IV inhibitory activity was observed with two peptides, LPVPQ (IC50=43.8±8.8μM) and IPM (IC50=69.5±8.7μM). Peptides present within the gastrointestinal tract of human may have promise for the development of natural DPP-IV inhibitors for the management of serum glucose.

  14. Sequencing of Proteins from Two-Dimensional Gels by Using in situ Digestion and Transfer of Peptides to Polyvinylidene Difluoride Membranes: Application to Proteins Associated with Sensitization in Aplysia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kennedy, T. E.; Gawinowicz, M. A.; Barzilai, A.; Kandel, E. R.; Sweatt, J. D.

    1988-09-01

    We have developed a method for obtaining partial internal amino acid sequence data from proteins isolated directly from preparative two-dimensional polyacrylamide gels. Proteins from a crude cell homogenate are separated using preparative two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Then, the gel is stained with Coomassie blue and the protein spots of interest are cut out. The in situ protein is digested with Staphylococcus aureus V8 protease in a second polyacrylamide gel and the peptides are separated by one-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. The peptides are then electroblotted onto a polyvinylidene difluoride membrane, visualized using Coomassie blue, cut out, and sequenced using an automated gas phase sequencer. Using this method, we have obtained amino acid sequence data for two proteins that are altered after long-term sensitization: actin and Aplysia protein 407. In addition, we have obtained amino acid sequence data for rat protein 425, a protein that appears to be homologous to Aplysia protein 407.

  15. Peptide-derived Method to Transport Genes and Proteins Across Cellular and Organellar Barriers in Plants

    PubMed Central

    Chuah, Jo-Ann; Horii, Yoko; Numata, Keiji

    2016-01-01

    The capacity to introduce exogenous proteins and express (or down-regulate) specific genes in plants provides a powerful tool for fundamental research as well as new applications in the field of plant biotechnology. Viable methods that currently exist for protein or gene transfer into plant cells, namely Agrobacterium and microprojectile bombardment, have disadvantages of low transformation frequency, limited host range, or a high cost of equipment and microcarriers. The following protocol outlines a simple and versatile method, which employs rationally-designed peptides as delivery agents for a variety of nucleic acid- and protein-based cargoes into plants. Peptides are selected as tools for development of the system due to their biodegradability, reduced size, diverse and tunable properties as well as the ability to gain intracellular/organellar access. The preparation, characterization and application of optimized formulations for each type of the wide range of delivered cargoes (plasmid DNA, double-stranded DNA or RNA, and protein) are described. Critical steps within the protocol, possible modifications and existing limitations of the method are also discussed. PMID:28060264

  16. Models to predict intestinal absorption of therapeutic peptides and proteins.

    PubMed

    Antunes, Filipa; Andrade, Fernanda; Ferreira, Domingos; Nielsen, Hanne Morck; Sarmento, Bruno

    2013-01-01

    Prediction of human intestinal absorption is a major goal in the design, optimization, and selection of drugs intended for oral delivery, in particular proteins, which possess intrinsic poor transport across intestinal epithelium. There are various techniques currently employed to evaluate the extension of protein absorption in the different phases of drug discovery and development. Screening protocols to evaluate protein absorption include a range of preclinical methodologies like in silico, in vitro, in situ, ex vivo and in vivo. It is the careful and critical use of these techniques that can help to identify drug candidates, which most probably will be well absorbed from the human intestinal tract. It is well recognized that the human intestinal permeability cannot be accurately predicted based on a single preclinical method. However, the present social and scientific concerns about the animal well care as well as the pharmaceutical industries need for rapid, cheap and reliable models predicting bioavailability give reasons for using methods providing an appropriate correlation between results of in vivo and in vitro drug absorption. The aim of this review is to describe and compare in silico, in vitro, in situ, ex vivo and in vivo methods used to predict human intestinal absorption, giving a special attention to the intestinal absorption of therapeutic peptides and proteins.

  17. Peptide-chaperone-directed transdermal protein delivery requires energy.

    PubMed

    Ruan, Renquan; Jin, Peipei; Zhang, Li; Wang, Changli; Chen, Chuanjun; Ding, Weiping; Wen, Longping

    2014-11-03

    The biologically inspired transdermal enhanced peptide TD1 has been discovered to specifically facilitate transdermal delivery of biological macromolecules. However, the biological behavior of TD1 has not been fully defined. In this study, we find that energy is required for the TD1-mediated transdermal protein delivery through rat and human skins. Our results show that the permeation activity of TD1-hEGF, a fusion protein composed of human epidermal growth factor (hEGF) and the TD1 sequence connected with a glycine-serine linker (GGGGS), can be inhibited by the energy inhibitor, rotenone or oligomycin. In addition, adenosine triphosphate (ATP), the essential energetic molecule in organic systems, can effectively facilitate the TD1 directed permeation of the protein-based drug into the skin in a dose-dependent fashion. Our results here demonstrate a novel energy-dependent permeation process during the TD1-mediated transdermal protein delivery that could be valuable for the future development of promising new transdermal drugs.

  18. Modifying RESA protein peptide 6671 to fit into HLA-DRbeta1* pockets induces protection against malaria.

    PubMed

    Alba, Martha Patricia; Salazar, Luz Mary; Vargas, Luis Eduardo; Trujillo, Mary; Lopez, Yolanda; Patarroyo, Manuel Elkin

    2004-03-19

    6671 is a non-immunogenic, conserved high activity red blood cell binding peptide located between residues 141 and 160 of the Plasmodium falciparum RESA protein. This peptide's critical red blood cell (RBC) binding residues have been replaced by amino acids having similar mass but different charge to change their immunologic properties. Three analogues (two of them immunogenic and protective and one immunogenic) were studied by purified HLA-DRbeta1* binding and NMR to correlate their structure with their immunological properties. Native peptide 6671 had a very flexible beta-sheet structure, whilst its immunogenic, protective, and non-protective peptide analogues presented an alpha-helical structure having different locations and lengths. These changes in peptide structure facilitated their fitting into HLA-DRbeta1* molecules. This paper shows for the first time how modifications performed on RESA protein non-immunogenic, non-protectogenic peptides impose a configuration allowing them to fit perfectly into the MHC II-TCR complex, in turn leading to appropriate activation of the immune system.

  19. Studies of the chemical basis of the origin of protein synthesis Initiation and direction of peptide growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mullins, D. W., Jr.; Lacey, J. C., Jr.

    1980-01-01

    The data presented in this paper show that the ease of nonenzymatic activation of carboxylic acids by ATP at pH 5 varies directly with the pKa of the carboxyl group, and is consistent with the idea that it is the protonated form of the carboxyl group which participates in the activation reaction. Consequently, since most N-blocked amino acids have higher pKas than do their unblocked forms, they are activated more readily, and it has been demonstrated that this principle applies to peptides as well, which are activated more rapidly than single amino acids. It is proposed that this fact may be partly responsible for the origin of two important features still observed in contemporary protein synthesis: (1) initiation in prokaryotes is accomplished with an N-blocked amino acid, and (2) elongation in all living systems occurs at the carboxyl end of the growing peptide.

  20. Collagen peptide-based biomaterials for protein delivery and peptide-promoted self-assembly of gold nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ernenwein, Dawn M.

    2011-12-01

    Bottom-up self-assembly of peptides has driven the research progress for the following two projects: protein delivery vehicles of collagen microflorettes and the assembly of gold nanoparticles with coiled-coil peptides. Collagen is the most abundant protein in the mammals yet due to immunogenic responses, batch-to-batch variability and lack of sequence modifications, synthetic collagen has been designed to self-assemble into native collagen-like structures. In particular with this research, metal binding ligands were incorporated on the termini of collagen-like peptides to generate micron-sized particles, microflorettes. The over-arching goal of the first research project is to engineer MRI-active microflorettes, loaded with His-tagged growth factors with differential release rates while bound to stem cells that can be implemented toward regenerative cell-based therapies. His-tagged proteins, such as green fluorescent protein, have successfully been incorporated on the surface and throughout the microflorettes. Protein release was monitored under physiological conditions and was related to particle degradation. In human plasma full release was obtained within six days. Stability of the microflorettes under physiological conditions was also examined for the development of a therapeutically relevant delivery agent. Additionally, MRI active microflorettes have been generated through the incorporation of a gadolinium binding ligand, DOTA within the collagen-based peptide sequence. To probe peptide-promoted self-assemblies of gold nanoparticles (GNPs) by non-covalent, charge complementary interactions, a highly anionic coiled-coil peptide was designed and synthesized. Upon formation of peptide-GNP interactions, the hydrophobic domain of the coiled-coil were shown to promote the self-assembly of peptide-GNPs clustering. Hydrophobic forces were found to play an important role in the assembly process, as a peptide with an equally overall negative charge, but lacking an

  1. Folic Acid Inhibits Amyloid β-Peptide Production through Modulating DNA Methyltransferase Activity in N2a-APP Cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Wen; Jiang, Mingyue; Zhao, Shijing; Liu, Huan; Zhang, Xumei; Wilson, John X; Huang, Guowei

    2015-10-20

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a common neurodegenerative disease resulting in progressive dementia, and is a principal cause of dementia among older adults. Folate acts through one-carbon metabolism to support the methylation of multiple substrates. We hypothesized that folic acid supplementation modulates DNA methyltransferase (DNMT) activity and may alter amyloid β-peptide (Aβ) production in AD. Mouse Neuro-2a cells expressing human APP695 were incubated with folic acid (2.8-40 μmol/L), and with or without zebularine (the DNMT inhibitor). DNMT activity, cell viability, Aβ and DNMTs expression were then examined. The results showed that folic acid stimulated DNMT gene and protein expression, and DNMT activity. Furthermore, folic acid decreased Aβ protein production, whereas inhibition of DNMT activity by zebularine increased Aβ production. The results indicate that folic acid induces methylation potential-dependent DNMT enzymes, thereby attenuating Aβ production.

  2. Peptides as Model Systems for the Unfolded State of Proteins Explored By Vibrational Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schweitzer-Stenner, Reinhard; Measey, Thomas; Hagarman, Andrew

    2008-11-01

    Unfolded proteins are generally thought to be structurally random with a minimum of non-local interactions. This concept implies that with the exception of glycine and proline the conformational propensities of amino acid residues in polypeptides should be comparable in that they all sample the statistically allowed region of the Ramachandran plot. However, over the last ten years experimental and computational evidence has emerged for the notion that the conformational space of residues might be more restricted than predicted by random or statistical coil models. We have developed several algorithms which can be used to simulate the amide I band profile of the IR, isotropic Raman, anisotropic Raman and Vibrational Circular Dichroism (VCD) spectra of polypeptides based on assumed ensembles of side chain conformations. The simulations are generally restricted by 3JcαHNH coupling constants obtained from NMR spectroscopy. A comparison with experimental results reveals that e.g. alanine has a clear preference for the so called polyproline II (PPII) conformation in short peptides. The situation becomes more complex if longer polyalanines are doped with negatively charged residues. For the so-called XAO-peptide (X2A7O2, X: diaminobutyric acid, O;ornithine) we found a more compact structure owing to multiple turn conformations sampled by the X2A7 interfaces. For Salmon Calcitonin, a 32-residue hormone, we identified a mixture of PPII, β-strand and helical conformations. Currently, we are in the process of investigating short GxG (x; different natural amino acid residues) peptides in terms of conformational distributions obtained from coil libraries. This will enable us obtain the conformational preferences of amino acid residues in the absence of nearest neighbor interactions.

  3. Determination of conformation and orientation of immobilized peptides and proteins at buried interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Lei; Ulrich, Nathan W.; Mello, Charlene M.; Chen, Zhan

    2015-01-01

    Surface immobilized peptides/proteins have important applications such as antimicrobial coating and biosensing. We report a study of such peptides/proteins using sum frequency generation vibrational spectroscopy and ATR-FTIR. Immobilization on surfaces via physical adsorption and chemical coupling revealed that structures of chemically immobilized peptides are determined by immobilization sites, chemical environments, and substrate surfaces. In addition, controlling enzyme orientation by engineering the surface immobilization site demonstrated that structures can be well-correlated to measured chemical activity. This research facilitates the development of immobilized peptides/proteins with improved activities by optimizing their surface orientation and structure.

  4. [An improved method of preparing protein and peptide probes in mass spectrometry with ionization of division fragments by californium-252 (TOF-PDMS)].

    PubMed

    Chivanov, V D; Zubarev, R A; Aksenov, S A; Bordunova, O G; Eremenko, V I; Kabanets, V M; Tatarinova, V I; Mishnev, A K; Kuraev, V V; Knysh, A N; Eremenko, I A

    1996-08-01

    The addition of organic acids (picric, oxalic, citric, or tartaric) to peptide and protein samples was found to significantly increase the yield of their quasi-molecular ions (QMI) in time-of-flight 252Cf plasma desorption mass spectrometry. The yield of the ions depended on the pKa of the acid added.

  5. Phosphorylation of Alzheimer disease amyloid precursor peptide by protein kinase C and Ca sup 2+ /calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II

    SciTech Connect

    Gandy, S.; Czernik, A.J.; Greengard, P. )

    1988-08-01

    The amino acid sequence of the Alzheimer disease amyloid precursor (ADAP) has been deduced from the corresponding cDNA, and hydropathy analysis of the sequence suggest a receptor-like structure with a single transmembrane domain. The putative cytoplasmic domain of ADAP contains potential sites for serine and threonine phosphorylation. In the present study, synthetic peptides derived from this domain were used as model substrates for various purified protein kinases. Protein kinase C rapidly catalyzed the phosphorylation of a peptide corresponding to amino acid residues 645-661 of ADAP. Ca{sup 2+}/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II phosphorylated ADAP peptide (645-661) on Thr-654 and Ser-655. Using rat cerebral cortex synaptosomes prelabeled with {sup 32}P{sub i}, a {sup 32}P-labeled phosphoprotein of {approx}135 kDa was immunoprecipitated by using antisera prepared against ADAP peptide(597-624), consistent with the possibility that the holoform of ADAP in rat brain is a phosphoprotein. Based on analogy with the effect of phosphorylation by protein kinase C of juxtamembrane residues in the cytoplasmic domain of the epidermal growth factor receptor and the interleukin 2 receptor, phosphorylation of ADAP may target it for internalization.

  6. Observation of the side chain O-methylation of glutamic acid or aspartic acid containing model peptides by electrospray ionization-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Atik, A Emin; Guray, Melda Z; Yalcin, Talat

    2017-03-15

    O-methylation of the side chains of glutamic acid (E) and aspartic acid (D) residues is generally observed modification when an acidified methanol/water (MeOH/dH2O) mixture is used as a solvent system during sample preparation for proteomic research. This chemical modification may result misidentification with endogenous protein methylation; therefore, a special care should be taken during sample handling prior to mass spectrometric analysis. In the current study, we systematically examined the extent of E/D methylation and C-terminus carboxyl group of synthetic model peptides in terms of different incubation temperatures, storage times, and added acid types as well as its percentages. To monitor these effects, C-terminus amidated and free acid forms of synthetic model peptides comprised of E or D residue(s) have been analyzed by electrospray ionization-mass spectrometry (ESI-MS). Additionally, LC-MS/MS experiments were performed to confirm the formation of methylated peptide product. The results showed that the rate of methylation was increased as the temperature increases along with prolong incubation times. Moreover, the extent of methylation was remarkably high when formic acid (FA) used as a protonation agent instead of acetic acid (AA). In addition, it was found that the degree of methylation was significantly decreased by lowering acid percentages in ESI solution. More than one acidic residue containing model peptides have been also used to explore the extent of multiple methylation reaction. Lastly, the ethanol (EtOH) and isopropanol (iPrOH) have been substituted separately with MeOH in sample preparation step to investigate the extent of esterification reaction under the same experimental conditions. However, in the positive perspective of view, this method can be used as a simple, rapid and cheap method for methylation of acidic residues under normal laboratory conditions.

  7. [Biologically active peptide fragments of functional proteins produced by proteolysis in vitro].

    PubMed

    Filippova, M M; Karelin, A A; Ivanov, V T

    1997-05-01

    Over 100 various peptides were identified as a result of numerous studies of in vitro proteolytic digestion of some proteins and tissue preparations. Many of them exhibit wide spectra of biological effects, which are similar to those described for some groups of endogenous peptide bioregulators. The possibility of in vitro modeling of endogenous processes of proteolytic digestion of proteins that provides biologically active peptides is discussed.

  8. Synthetic Protein Scaffolds Based on Peptide Motifs and Cognate Adaptor Domains for Improving Metabolic Productivity

    PubMed Central

    Horn, Anselm H. C.; Sticht, Heinrich

    2015-01-01

    The efficiency of many cellular processes relies on the defined interaction among different proteins within the same metabolic or signaling pathway. Consequently, a spatial colocalization of functionally interacting proteins has frequently emerged during evolution. This concept has been adapted within the synthetic biology community for the purpose of creating artificial scaffolds. A recent advancement of this concept is the use of peptide motifs and their cognate adaptor domains. SH2, SH3, GBD, and PDZ domains have been used most often in research studies to date. The approach has been successfully applied to the synthesis of a variety of target molecules including catechin, D-glucaric acid, H2, hydrochinone, resveratrol, butyrate, gamma-aminobutyric acid, and mevalonate. Increased production levels of up to 77-fold have been observed compared to non-scaffolded systems. A recent extension of this concept is the creation of a covalent linkage between peptide motifs and adaptor domains, which leads to a more stable association of the scaffolded systems and thus bears the potential to further enhance metabolic productivity. PMID:26636078

  9. Global analysis of myocardial peptides containing cysteines with irreversible sulfinic and sulfonic acid post-translational modifications.

    PubMed

    Paulech, Jana; Liddy, Kiersten A; Engholm-Keller, Kasper; White, Melanie Y; Cordwell, Stuart J

    2015-03-01

    Cysteine (Cys) oxidation is a crucial post-translational modification (PTM) associated with redox signaling and oxidative stress. As Cys is highly reactive to oxidants it forms a range of post-translational modifications, some that are biologically reversible (e.g. disulfides, Cys sulfenic acid) and others (Cys sulfinic [Cys-SO2H] and sulfonic [Cys-SO3H] acids) that are considered "irreversible." We developed an enrichment method to isolate Cys-SO2H/SO3H-containing peptides from complex tissue lysates that is compatible with tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS). The acidity of these post-translational modification (pKa Cys-SO3H < 0) creates a unique charge distribution when localized on tryptic peptides at acidic pH that can be utilized for their purification. The method is based on electrostatic repulsion of Cys-SO2H/SO3H-containing peptides from cationic resins (i.e. "negative" selection) followed by "positive" selection using hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography. Modification of strong cation exchange protocols decreased the complexity of initial flowthrough fractions by allowing for hydrophobic retention of neutral peptides. Coupling of strong cation exchange and hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography allowed for increased enrichment of Cys-SO2H/SO3H (up to 80%) from other modified peptides. We identified 181 Cys-SO2H/SO3H sites from rat myocardial tissue subjected to physiologically relevant concentrations of H2O2 (<100 μm) or to ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) injury via Langendorff perfusion. I/R significantly increased Cys-SO2H/SO3H-modified peptides from proteins involved in energy utilization and contractility, as well as those involved in oxidative damage and repair.

  10. Self-Templated Nucleation in Peptide and Protein Aggregation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Auer, Stefan; Dobson, Christopher M.; Vendruscolo, Michele; Maritan, Amos

    2008-12-01

    Peptides and proteins exhibit a common tendency to assemble into highly ordered fibrillar aggregates, whose formation proceeds in a nucleation-dependent manner that is often preceded by the formation of oligomeric assemblies. This process has received much attention because disordered oligomeric aggregates have been associated with neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s disease. Here we describe a self-templated nucleation mechanism that determines the transition between the initial condensation of polypeptide chains into disordered assemblies and their reordering into fibrillar structures. The results that we present show that at the molecular level this transition is due to the ability of polypeptide chains to reorder within oligomers into fibrillar assemblies whose surfaces act as templates that stabilize the disordered assemblies.

  11. Solid-phase N-terminal peptide enrichment study by optimizing trypsin proteolysis on homoarginine modified proteins by mass spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Chowdhury, Saiful M.; Munske, Gerhard R.; Yang, Jonathon; Zhukova, Daria; Nguen, Hamilton; Bruce, James E.

    2014-01-01

    Rationale Proteolytic cleavages generate active precursor proteins by creating new N-termini in the proteins. A number of strategies recently published regarding the enrichment of original or newly formed N-terminal peptides using guanidination of lysine residues and amine reactive reagents. For effective enrichment of N-terminal peptides, the efficiency of trypsin proteolysis on homoarginine (guanidinated) modified proteins must be understood and simple and versatile solid-phase N-terminal capture strategies should be developed. Methods We present here a mass spectrometry-based study to evaluate and optimize the trypsin proteolysis on a guanidinated modified protein. Trypsin proteolysis was studied using different amount of trypsin to modified protein ratios. To capture the original N-termini, after guanidination of proteins, original N-termini were acetylated and the proteins were digested with trypsin. The newly formed N-terminal tryptic peptides were captured with a new amine reactive acid-cleavable solid-phase reagent. The original N-terminal peptides were then collected from the supernatant of the solution. Results We demonstrated a detailed study of the efficiency of enzyme trypsin on homoarginine modified proteins. We observed that the rate of hydrolysis of homoarginine residues compared to their lysine/arginine counter parts were slower but generally cleaved after an overnight digestion period depending on the protein to protease concentration ratios. Selectivity of the solid-phase N-terminal reagent was studied by enrichment of original N-terminal peptides from two standard proteins, ubiquitin and RNaseS. Conclusion We found enzyme trypsin is active in guanidinated form of protein depending on enzyme to protein concentrations, time and the proximity of arginine residues in the sequence. The novel solid-phase capture reagent also successfully enriched N-terminal peptides from the standard protein mixtures. We believe this trypsin proteolysis study on

  12. [Development of a novel transdermal delivery system of peptide and protein drugs using microneedle arrays].

    PubMed

    Katsumi, Hidemasa; Quan, Ying-Shu; Kamiyama, Fumio; Kusamori, Kosuke; Sakane, Toshiyasu; Yamamoto, Akira

    2014-01-01

    Transdermal delivery of peptide and protein drugs may be limited by the stratum corneum, which is a protective barrier against the entry of microorganisms and water. Many approaches have been utilized to promote peptide and protein drugs delivery across the stratum corneum, including chemical enhancer modification and physical disruption of barrier function. However, it has been difficult to achieve therapeutic levels of peptide and protein drugs via this route without any skin irritation. Recently, attention has been paid to the possibility of using microneedle arrays in delivering peptide and protein drugs into the skin. As a novel and minimally invasive approach, microneedle arrays are capable of creating superficial pathways across the skin for peptide and protein drugs to achieve enhanced transdermal drug delivery. This method combines the efficacy of conventional injection needles with the convenience of transdermal patches, while minimizing the disadvantages of these administration methods. Therefore, microneedle arrays are a very useful alternative method for delivering peptide and protein drugs from the skin into the systemic circulation without any serious damage to skin. In this review, recent challenges in the developments of microneedle arrays for the delivery of peptide and protein drugs are summarized. Then, future developments of microneedle arrays for the delivery of peptide and protein drugs are also discussed in order to improve their therapeutic efficacy and safety.

  13. Fully Blind Docking at the Atomic Level for Protein-Peptide Complex Structure Prediction.

    PubMed

    Yan, Chengfei; Xu, Xianjin; Zou, Xiaoqin

    2016-10-04

    Protein-peptide interactions play an important role in many cellular processes. In silico prediction of protein-peptide complex structure is highly desirable for mechanistic investigation of these processes and for therapeutic design. However, predicting all-atom structures of protein-peptide complexes without any knowledge about the peptide binding site and the bound peptide conformation remains a big challenge. Here, we present a docking-based method for predicting protein-peptide complex structures, referred to as MDockPeP, which starts with the peptide sequence and globally docks the all-atom, flexible peptide onto the protein structure. MDockPeP was tested on the peptiDB benchmarking database using both bound and unbound protein structures. The results show that MDockPeP successfully generated near-native peptide binding modes in 95.0% of the bound docking cases and in 92.2% of the unbound docking cases. The performance is significantly better than other existing docking methods. MDockPeP is computationally efficient and suitable for large-scale applications.

  14. Peptide/protein vaccine delivery system based on PLGA particles

    PubMed Central

    Allahyari, Mojgan; Mohit, Elham

    2016-01-01

    abstract Due to the excellent safety profile of poly (D,L-lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA) particles in human, and their biodegradability, many studies have focused on the application of PLGA particles as a controlled-release vaccine delivery system. Antigenic proteins/peptides can be encapsulated into or adsorbed to the surface of PLGA particles. The gradual release of loaded antigens from PLGA particles is necessary for the induction of efficient immunity. Various factors can influence protein release rates from PLGA particles, which can be defined intrinsic features of the polymer, particle characteristics as well as protein and environmental related factors. The use of PLGA particles encapsulating antigens of different diseases such as hepatitis B, tuberculosis, chlamydia, malaria, leishmania, toxoplasma and allergy antigens will be described herein. The co-delivery of antigens and immunostimulants (IS) with PLGA particles can prevent the systemic adverse effects of immunopotentiators and activate both dendritic cells (DCs) and natural killer (NKs) cells, consequently enhancing the therapeutic efficacy of antigen-loaded PLGA particles. We will review co-delivery of different TLR ligands with antigens in various models, highlighting the specific strengths and weaknesses of the system. Strategies to enhance the immunotherapeutic effect of DC-based vaccine using PLGA particles can be designed to target DCs by functionalized PLGA particle encapsulating siRNAs of suppressive gene, and disease specific antigens. Finally, specific examples of cellular targeting where decorating the surface of PLGA particles target orally administrated vaccine to M-cells will be highlighted. PMID:26513024

  15. Isolation and nature of intracellular alpha-aminoadipic acid-containing peptides from Paecilomyces persicinus P-10.

    PubMed Central

    Eriquez, L A; Pisano, M A

    1979-01-01

    Small intracellular peptides containing alpha-aminoadipic acid, cysteine, and a valine moiety were obtained from mycelia of Paecilomyces persicinus P-10 by ethanol or trichloroacetic acid extraction. After performic acid oxidation and ion-exchange chromatography, analysis of the peptide fractions by two-dimensional thin-layer electrophoresis and chromatography revealed the presence of three related peptides, as sulfonic acid derivatives, each containing alpha-aminoadipic acid. Each peptide was isolated in chromatographically pure form by semipreparative thin-layer electrophoresis and chromatography. The purified peptides were subjected to differential hydrolysis, dansylation, and combined dansylation-phenylisothiocyanate sequence analysis. Based on these studies, the structures of the isolated peptides were determined to be (i) glycl-delta-(alpha-aminoadipyl)-cysteinyl-beta-hydroxyvaline, (ii) glycyl-delta-(alpha-aminoadipyl)-cysteinylvaline, and (iii) delta-(alpha-aminoadipyl)-cysteinylvaline. The peptides isolated from Paecilomyces are similar to the alpha-aminoadipic acid-cysteine-valine moiety complex peptides isolated from Cephalosporium. PMID:574371

  16. Transamidase subunit GAA1/GPAA1 is a M28 family metallo-peptide-synthetase that catalyzes the peptide bond formation between the substrate protein's omega-site and the GPI lipid anchor's phosphoethanolamine.

    PubMed

    Eisenhaber, Birgit; Eisenhaber, Stephan; Kwang, Toh Yew; Grüber, Gerhard; Eisenhaber, Frank

    2014-01-01

    The transamidase subunit GAA1/GPAA1 is predicted to be the enzyme that catalyzes the attachment of the glycosylphosphatidyl (GPI) lipid anchor to the carbonyl intermediate of the substrate protein at the ω-site. Its ~300-amino acid residue lumenal domain is a M28 family metallo-peptide-synthetase with an α/β hydrolase fold, including a central 8-strand β-sheet and a single metal (most likely zinc) ion coordinated by 3 conserved polar residues. Phosphoethanolamine is used as an adaptor to make the non-peptide GPI lipid anchor look chemically similar to the N terminus of a peptide.

  17. Phospholipid conjugate for intracellular delivery of peptide nucleic acids

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Gang; Fang, Huafeng; Song, Yinyin; Bielska, Agata A.; Wang, Zhenghui; Taylor, John-Stephen A.

    2009-01-01

    Peptide nucleic acids (PNAs) have a number of attractive features that have made them an ideal choice for antisense and antigene-based tools, probes and drugs, but their poor membrane permeability has limited their application as therapeutic or diagnostic agents. Herein we report a general method for the synthesis of phospholipid-PNAs (LP-PNAs), and compare the effect of non-cleavable lipids and bioreductively cleavable lipids (L and LSS) and phospholipid (LP) on the splice-correcting bioactivity of a PNA bearing the cell penetrating Arg9 group (PNA-R9). While the three constructs show similar and increasing bioactivity at 1–3 μM, the activity of LP-PNA-R9 continues to increase from 4–6 μM while the activity of L-PNA-R9 remains constant and LSS-PNA-R9 decreases rapidly in parallel with their relative cytotoxicity. The activity of both LP-PNA-R9 and L-PNA-R9 were found to dramatically increase with chloroquine, as expected for an endocytotic entry mechanism. Both constructs were also found to have CMC values of 1.0 and 4.5 μM in 150 mM NaCl, pH 7 water, suggesting that micelle formation may play a hitherto unrecognized role in modulating toxicity and/or facilitating endocytosis. PMID:19678628

  18. Intracellular delivery of cell-penetrating peptide-transcriptional factor fusion protein and its role in selective osteogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Suh, Jin Sook; Lee, Jue Yeon; Choi, Yoon Jung; You, Hyung Keun; Hong, Seong-Doo; Chung, Chong Pyoung; Park, Yoon Jeong

    2014-01-01

    Protein-transduction technology has been attempted to deliver macromolecular materials, including protein, nucleic acids, and polymeric drugs, for either diagnosis or therapeutic purposes. Herein, fusion protein composed of an arginine-rich cell-penetrating peptide, termed low-molecular-weight protamine (LMWP), and a transcriptional coactivator with a PDZ-binding motif (TAZ) protein was prepared and applied in combination with biomaterials to increase bone-forming capacity. TAZ has been recently identified as a specific osteogenic stimulating transcriptional coactivator in human mesenchymal stem cell (hMSC) differentiation, while simultaneously blocking adipogenic differentiation. However, TAZ by itself cannot penetrate the cells, and thus needs a transfection tool for translocalization. The LMWP-TAZ fusion proteins were efficiently translocalized into the cytosol of hMSCs. The hMSCs treated with cell-penetrating LMWP-TAZ exhibited increased expression of osteoblastic genes and protein, producing significantly higher quantities of mineralized matrix compared to free TAZ. In contrast, adipogenic differentiation of the hMSCs was blocked by treatment of LMWP-TAZ fusion protein, as reflected by reduced marker-protein expression, adipocyte fatty acid-binding protein 2, and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ messenger ribonucleic acid levels. LMWP-TAZ was applied in alginate gel for the purpose of localization and controlled release. The LMWP-TAZ fusion protein-loaded alginate gel matrix significantly increased bone formation in rabbit calvarial defects compared with alginate gel matrix mixed with free TAZ protein. The protein transduction of TAZ fused with cell-penetrating LMWP peptide was able selectively to stimulate osteogenesis in vitro and in vivo. Taken together, this fusion protein-transduction technology for osteogenic protein can thus be applied in combination with biomaterials for tissue regeneration and controlled release for tissue

  19. Removal of detergents from proteins and peptides in a spin-column format.

    PubMed

    Antharavally, Babu S

    2012-08-01

    To enable downstream analysis, it is critical to remove unbound detergents from protein and peptide samples. This unit describes the use of a high-performance resin that offers exceptional detergent removal for proteins and peptides. The easy-to-use spin format significantly improves results over the standard drip column and batch methodologies, with >95% removal of 1% to 5% detergents, including SDS, sodium deoxycholate, CHAPS, Triton X-100, Triton X-114, NP-40, Brij-35, octyl glucoside, octyl thioglucoside, and lauryl maltoside, with high recovery of proteins and peptides. Detergent removal efficiency is evaluated using colorimetric methods and mass spectrometry (MS). BSA tryptic peptides have been successfully analyzed by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) and matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI)-MS for identification of protein, following detergent removal using the resin. Advantages of this method include speed (less than 15 min), efficient detergent removal, and high recovery of proteins and peptides.

  20. Peptide Sharing Between Influenza A H1N1 Hemagglutinin and Human Axon Guidance Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Kanduc, Darja

    2014-01-01

    Epidemiologic data suggest that maternal microbial infections may cause fetal neurodevelopmental disorders, potentially increasing susceptibility to heavy psychopathologies such as schizophrenia, schizophreniform disorder, autism, pervasive developmental disorders, bipolar disorders, psychosis, epilepsy, language and speech disorders, and cognitive impairment in adult offspring. However, the molecular pathomechanisms underlying such a relationship are not clear. Here we analyze the potential role of the maternal immune response to viral infection in determining fetal brain injuries that increase the risk of neurological disorders in the adult. We use influenza infection as a disease model and human axon guidance pathway, a key process in the formation of neural network during midgestation, as a potential fetal target of immune insults. Specifically, we examined influenza A H1N1 hemagglutinin (HA), an antigenic viral protein, for amino acid sequence similarity to a random library of 188 axon guidance proteins. We obtain the results that (1) contrary to any theoretical expectations, 45 viral pentapeptide matches are distributed throughout a subset of 36 guidance molecules; (2) in 24 guidance proteins, the peptide sharing with HA antigen involves already experimentally validated influenza HA epitopes; and (3) most of the axon guidance vs HA peptide overlap is conserved among influenza A viral strains and subsets. Taken together, our data indicate that immune cross-reactivity between influenza HA and axon guidance molecules is possible and may well represent a pathologic mechanism capable of determining neurodevelopmental disruption in the fetus. PMID:23378012

  1. Reagent Cluster Anions for Multiple Gas-phase Covalent Modifications of Peptide and Protein Cations

    PubMed Central

    Prentice, Boone M.; Stutzman, John R.; McLuckey, Scott A.

    2013-01-01

    Multiple gas phase ion/ion covalent modifications of peptide and protein ions are demonstrated here using cluster-type reagent anions of N-hydroxysulfosuccinimide acetate (sulfo-NHS acetate) and 2-formyl-benzenesulfonic acid (FBMSA). These reagents are used here to selectively modify unprotonated primary amine functionalities of peptides and proteins. Multiple reactive reagent molecules can be present in a single cluster ion, which allows for multiple covalent modifications to be achieved in a single ion/ion encounter and at the ‘cost’ of only a single analyte charge. Multiple derivatizations are demonstrated when the number of available reactive sites on the analyte cation exceeds the number of reagent molecules in the anionic cluster (e.g., data shown here for reactions between the polypeptide [K10+3H]3+ and the reagent cluster [5R5Na-Na]−). This type of gas phase ion chemistry is also applicable to whole protein ions. Here, ubiquitin was successfully modified using an FBMSA cluster anions which, upon collisional activation, produced fragment ions with various numbers of modifications. Data for the pentamer cluster are included here as illustrative of the results obtained for the clusters comprised of 2–6 reagent molecules. PMID:23702708

  2. The Structure-Activity Relationship of the Antioxidant Peptides from Natural Proteins.

    PubMed

    Zou, Tang-Bin; He, Tai-Ping; Li, Hua-Bin; Tang, Huan-Wen; Xia, En-Qin

    2016-01-12

    Peptides derived from dietary proteins, have been reported to display significant antioxidant activity, which may exert notably beneficial effects in promoting human health and in food processing. Recently, much research has focused on the generation, separation, purification and identification of novel peptides from various protein sources. Some researchers have tried to discover the structural characteristics of antioxidant peptides in order to lessen or avoid the tedious and aimless work involving the ongoing generated peptide preparation schemes. This review aims to summarize the current knowledge on the relationship between the structural features of peptides and their antioxidant activities. The relationship between the structure of the precursor proteins and their abilities to release antioxidant fragments will also be summarized and inferred. The preparation methods and antioxidant capacity evaluation assays of peptides and a prediction scheme of quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) will also be pointed out and discussed.

  3. Western blot analysis of Src kinase assays using peptide substrates ligated to a carrier protein.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jie; Sun, Luo; Ghosh, Inca; Xu, Ming-Qun

    2004-06-01

    We have applied intein-mediated peptide ligation (IPL) to the use of peptide substrates for kinase assays and subsequent Western blot analysis. IPL allows for the efficient ligation of a synthetic peptide with an N-terminal cysteine residue to an intein-generated carrier protein containing a cysteine reactive C-terminal thioester through a native peptide bond. A distinct advantage of this procedure is that each carrier protein molecule ligates only one peptide, ensuring that the ligation product forms a sharp band on sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE). We demonstrate the effectiveness of this approach by mutational analysis of peptide substrates derived from human cyclin-dependent kinase, Cdc2, which contains a phosphorylation site of human c-Src protein tyrosine kinase.

  4. Distinguishing Proteins From Arbitrary Amino Acid Sequences

    PubMed Central

    Yau, Stephen S.-T.; Mao, Wei-Guang; Benson, Max; He, Rong Lucy

    2015-01-01

    What kinds of amino acid sequences could possibly be protein sequences? From all existing databases that we can find, known proteins are only a small fraction of all possible combinations of amino acids. Beginning with Sanger's first detailed determination of a protein sequence in 1952, previous studies have focused on describing the structure of existing protein sequences in order to construct the protein universe. No one, however, has developed a criteria for determining whether an arbitrary amino acid sequence can be a protein. Here we show that when the collection of arbitrary amino acid sequences is viewed in an appropriate geometric context, the protein sequences cluster together. This leads to a new computational test, described here, that has proved to be remarkably accurate at determining whether an arbitrary amino acid sequence can be a protein. Even more, if the results of this test indicate that the sequence can be a protein, and it is indeed a protein sequence, then its identity as a protein sequence is uniquely defined. We anticipate our computational test will be useful for those who are attempting to complete the job of discovering all proteins, or constructing the protein universe. PMID:25609314

  5. Supramolecular control of self-assembling terthiophene-peptide conjugates through the amino acid side chain

    SciTech Connect

    Lehrman, Jessica A.; Cui, Honggang; Tsai, Wei-Wen; Moyer, Tyson J.; Stupp, Samuel I.

    2013-07-30

    The self-assembly of oligothiophene–peptide conjugates can be directed through the systematic variation of the peptide sequence into different nanostructures, including flat spicules, nanotubes, spiral sheets, and giant, flat sheets. Furthermore, the assembly of these molecules is not controlled by steric interactions between the amino acid side chains.

  6. A vocabulary of ancient peptides at the origin of folded proteins

    PubMed Central

    Alva, Vikram; Söding, Johannes; Lupas, Andrei N

    2015-01-01

    The seemingly limitless diversity of proteins in nature arose from only a few thousand domain prototypes, but the origin of these themselves has remained unclear. We are pursuing the hypothesis that they arose by fusion and accretion from an ancestral set of peptides active as co-factors in RNA-dependent replication and catalysis. Should this be true, contemporary domains may still contain vestiges of such peptides, which could be reconstructed by a comparative approach in the same way in which ancient vocabularies have been reconstructed by the comparative study of modern languages. To test this, we compared domains representative of known folds and identified 40 fragments whose similarity is indicative of common descent, yet which occur in domains currently not thought to be homologous. These fragments are widespread in the most ancient folds and enriched for iron-sulfur- and nucleic acid-binding. We propose that they represent the observable remnants of a primordial RNA-peptide world. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.09410.001 PMID:26653858

  7. Bioactive Peptides from Angelica sinensis Protein Hydrolyzate Delay Senescence in Caenorhabditis elegans through Antioxidant Activities

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Qiangqiang; Huang, Yunxuan; Qin, Chuixin; Liang, Ming; Mao, Xinliang; Li, Shuiming; Zou, Yongdong; Jia, Weizhang; Li, Haifeng; Ma, Chung Wah; Huang, Zebo

    2016-01-01

    Since excessive reactive oxygen species (ROS) is known to be associated with aging and age-related diseases, strategies modulating ROS level and antioxidant defense systems may contribute to the delay of senescence. Here we show that the protein hydrolyzate from Angelica sinensis was capable of increasing oxidative survival of the model animal Caenorhabditis elegans intoxicated by paraquat. The hydrolyzate was then fractionated by ultrafiltration, and the antioxidant fraction (<3 kDa) was purified by gel filtration to obtain the antioxidant A. sinensis peptides (AsiPeps), which were mostly composed of peptides with <20 amino acid residues. Further studies demonstrate that AsiPeps were able to reduce the endogenous ROS level, increase the activities of the antioxidant enzymes superoxide dismutase and catalase, and decrease the content of the lipid peroxidation product malondialdehyde in nematodes treated with paraquat or undergoing senescence. AsiPeps were also shown to reduce age pigments accumulation and extend lifespan but did not affect the food-intake behavior of the nematodes. Taken together, our results demonstrate that A. sinensis peptides (AsiPeps) are able to delay aging process in C. elegans through antioxidant activities independent of dietary restriction. PMID:26941890

  8. Fast Photochemical Oxidation of Proteins (FPOP) for Comparing Structures of Protein/Ligand Complexes: The Calmodulin-peptide Model System

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Hao; Gau, Brian C.; Jones, Lisa M.; Vidavsky, Ilan; Gross, Michael L.

    2010-01-01

    Fast Photochemical Oxidation of Proteins (FPOP) is a mass-spectrometry-based protein footprinting method that modifies proteins on the microsecond time scale. Highly reactive •OH, produced by laser photolysis of hydrogen peroxide, oxidatively modifies the side chains of approximately one half the common amino acids on this time scale. Owing to the short labeling exposure, only solvent-accessible residues are sampled. Quantification of the modification extent for the apo and holo states of a protein-ligand complex should provide structurally sensitive information at the amino-acid level to compare the structures of unknown protein complexes with known ones. We report here the use of FPOP to monitor the structural changes of calmodulin in its established binding to M13 of the skeletal muscle myosin light chain kinase. We use the outcome to establish the unknown structures resulting from binding with melittin and mastoparan. The structural comparison follows from a comprehensive examination of the extent of FPOP modifications as measured by proteolysis and LC-MS/MS for each protein-ligand equilibrium. The results not only show that the three calmodulin-peptide complexes have similar structures but also reveal those regions of the protein that became more or less solvent-accessible upon binding. This approach has the potential for relatively high throughput, information-dense characterization of a series of protein-ligand complexes in biochemistry and drug discovery when the structure of one reference complex is known, as is the case for calmodulin and M13 of the skeletal muscle myosin light chain kinase, and the structures of related complexes are not,. PMID:21142124

  9. Identification and binding mechanism of phage displayed peptides with specific affinity to acid-alkali treated titanium.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yuhua; Tan, Jing; Wu, Baohua; Wang, Jianxin; Qu, Shuxin; Weng, Jie; Feng, Bo

    2016-10-01

    Acid-alkali treatment is one of means widely used for preparing bioactive titanium surfaces. Peptides with specific affinity to titanium surface modified by acid-alkali two-steps treatment were obtained via phage display technology. Out of the eight new unique peptides, titanium-binding peptide 54 displayed by monoclonal M13 phage at its pIII coat protein (TBP54-M13 phage) was proved to have higher binding affinity to the substrate. The binding interaction occurred at the domain from phenylalanine at position 1 to arginine at position 6 in the sequences of TBP54 (FAETHRGFHFSF) mainly via the reaction of these residues with the Ti surface. Together the coordination and electrostatic interactions controlled the specific binding of the phage to the substrate. The binding affinity was dependent on the surface basic hydroxyl group content. In addition, the phage showed a different interaction way with the Ti surface without acid-alkali treatment along with an impaired affinity. This study could provide more understanding of the interaction mechanism between the selected peptide and its specific substrate, and develop a promising method for the biofunctionalization of titanium.

  10. Probing Protein Structure by Amino Acid-Specific Covalent Labeling and Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Mendoza, Vanessa Leah; Vachet, Richard W.

    2009-01-01

    For many years, amino acid-specific covalent labeling has been a valuable tool to study protein structure and protein interactions, especially for systems that are difficult to study by other means. These covalent labeling methods typically map protein structure and interactions by measuring the differential reactivity of amino acid side chains. The reactivity of amino acids in proteins generally depends on the accessibility of the side chain to the reagent, the inherent reactivity of the label and the reactivity of the amino acid side chain. Peptide mass mapping with ESI- or MALDI-MS and peptide sequencing with tandem MS are typically employed to identify modification sites to provide site-specific structural information. In this review, we describe the reagents that are most commonly used in these residue-specific modification reactions, details about the proper use of these covalent labeling reagents, and information about the specific biochemical problems that have been addressed with covalent labeling strategies. PMID:19016300

  11. ArrayPitope: Automated Analysis of Amino Acid Substitutions for Peptide Microarray-Based Antibody Epitope Mapping

    PubMed Central

    Hansen, Christian Skjødt; Østerbye, Thomas; Marcatili, Paolo; Lund, Ole; Buus, Søren

    2017-01-01

    Identification of epitopes targeted by antibodies (B cell epitopes) is of critical importance for the development of many diagnostic and therapeutic tools. For clinical usage, such epitopes must be extensively characterized in order to validate specificity and to document potential cross-reactivity. B cell epitopes are typically classified as either linear epitopes, i.e. short consecutive segments from the protein sequence or conformational epitopes adapted through native protein folding. Recent advances in high-density peptide microarrays enable high-throughput, high-resolution identification and characterization of linear B cell epitopes. Using exhaustive amino acid substitution analysis of peptides originating from target antigens, these microarrays can be used to address the specificity of polyclonal antibodies raised against such antigens containing hundreds of epitopes. However, the interpretation of the data provided in such large-scale screenings is far from trivial and in most cases it requires advanced computational and statistical skills. Here, we present an online application for automated identification of linear B cell epitopes, allowing the non-expert user to analyse peptide microarray data. The application takes as input quantitative peptide data of fully or partially substituted overlapping peptides from a given antigen sequence and identifies epitope residues (residues that are significantly affected by substitutions) and visualize the selectivity towards each residue by sequence logo plots. Demonstrating utility, the application was used to identify and address the antibody specificity of 18 linear epitope regions in Human Serum Albumin (HSA), using peptide microarray data consisting of fully substituted peptides spanning the entire sequence of HSA and incubated with polyclonal rabbit anti-HSA (and mouse anti-rabbit-Cy3). The application is made available at: www.cbs.dtu.dk/services/ArrayPitope. PMID:28095436

  12. Computational Exploration of a Protein Receptor Binding Space with Student Proposed Peptide Ligands

    PubMed Central

    King, Matthew D.; Phillips, Paul; Turner, Matthew W.; Katz, Michael; Lew, Sarah; Bradburn, Sarah; Andersen, Tim; Mcdougal, Owen M.

    2017-01-01

    Computational molecular docking is a fast and effective in silico method for the analysis of binding between a protein receptor model and a ligand. The visualization and manipulation of protein to ligand binding in three-dimensional space represents a powerful tool in the biochemistry curriculum to enhance student learning. The DockoMatic tutorial described herein provides a framework by which instructors can guide students through a drug screening exercise. Using receptor models derived from readily available protein crystal structures, docking programs have the ability to predict ligand binding properties, such as preferential binding orientations and binding affinities. The use of computational studies can significantly enhance complimentary wet chemical experimentation by providing insight into the important molecular interactions within the system of interest, as well as guide the design of new candidate ligands based on observed binding motifs and energetics. In this laboratory tutorial, the graphical user interface, DockoMatic, facilitates docking job submissions to the docking engine, AutoDock 4.2. The purpose of this exercise is to successfully dock a 17-amino acid peptide, α-conotoxin TxIA, to the acetylcholine binding protein from Aplysia californica-AChBP to determine the most stable binding configuration. Each student will then propose two specific amino acid substitutions of α-conotoxin TxIA to enhance peptide binding affinity, create the mutant in DockoMatic, and perform docking calculations to compare their results with the class. Students will also compare intermolecular forces, binding energy, and geometric orientation of their prepared analog to their initial α-conotoxin TxIA docking results. PMID:26537635

  13. Computational exploration of a protein receptor binding space with student proposed peptide ligands.

    PubMed

    King, Matthew D; Phillips, Paul; Turner, Matthew W; Katz, Michael; Lew, Sarah; Bradburn, Sarah; Andersen, Tim; McDougal, Owen M

    2016-01-01

    Computational molecular docking is a fast and effective in silico method for the analysis of binding between a protein receptor model and a ligand. The visualization and manipulation of protein to ligand binding in three-dimensional space represents a powerful tool in the biochemistry curriculum to enhance student learning. The DockoMatic tutorial described herein provides a framework by which instructors can guide students through a drug screening exercise. Using receptor models derived from readily available protein crystal structures, docking programs have the ability to predict ligand binding properties, such as preferential binding orientations and binding affinities. The use of computational studies can significantly enhance complimentary wet chemical experimentation by providing insight into the important molecular interactions within the system of interest, as well as guide the design of new candidate ligands based on observed binding motifs and energetics. In this laboratory tutorial, the graphical user interface, DockoMatic, facilitates docking job submissions to the docking engine, AutoDock 4.2. The purpose of this exercise is to successfully dock a 17-amino acid peptide, α-conotoxin TxIA, to the acetylcholine binding protein from Aplysia californica-AChBP to determine the most stable binding configuration. Each student will then propose two specific amino acid substitutions of α-conotoxin TxIA to enhance peptide binding affinity, create the mutant in DockoMatic, and perform docking calculations to compare their results with the class. Students will also compare intermolecular forces, binding energy, and geometric orientation of their prepared analog to their initial α-conotoxin TxIA docking results.

  14. Surface Modification of Poly(dimethylsiloxane) Using Ionic Complementary Peptides to Minimize Nonspecific Protein Adsorption.

    PubMed

    Yu, Xiaoling; Xiao, Junzhu; Dang, Fuquan

    2015-06-02

    Poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) has become a widely used material for microfluidic and biological applications. However, PDMS has unacceptably high levels of nonspecific protein adsorption, which significantly lowers the performance of PDMS-based microfluidic chips. Most existing methods to reduce protein fouling of PDMS are to make the surface more hydrophilic by surface oxidization, polymer grafting, and physisorbed coatings. These methods suffer from the relatively short-term stability, the multistep complex treatment procedure, or the insufficient adsorption reduction. Herein, we developed a novel and facile modification method based on self-assembled peptides with well-tailored amino acid composition and sequence, which can also interact strongly with the PDMS surface in the same way as proteins, for suppressing the nonspecific protein fouling and improving the biocompatibility of PDMS-based microfluidic chips. We first demonstrated that an ionic complementary peptide, EAR16-II with a sequence of [(Ala-Glu-Ala-Glu-Ala-Arg-Ala-Arg)2], can readily self-assemble into an amphipathic film predominantly composed of tightly packed β-sheets on the native hydrophobic and plasma-oxidized hydrophilic PDMS surfaces upon low concentrations of carbohydrates. The self-assembled EAR16-II amphipathic film exposed its hydrophobic side to the solution and thus rendered the PDMS surface hydrophobic with water contact angles (WCAs) of around 110.0°. However, the self-assembled EAR16-II amphipathic film exhibited excellent protein-repelling and blood compatibility properties comparable to or better than those obtained with previously reported methods. A schematic model has been proposed to explain the interactions of EAR16-II with the PDMS surface and the antifouling capability of EAR16-II coatings at a molecular level. The current work will pave the way to the development of novel coating materials to address the nonspecific protein adsorption on PDMS, thereby broadening the

  15. Partial d-amino acid substitution: Improved enzymatic stability and preserved Ab recognition of a MUC2 epitope peptide

    PubMed Central

    Tugyi, Regina; Uray, Katalin; Iván, Dóra; Fellinger, Erzsébet; Perkins, Alan; Hudecz, Ferenc

    2005-01-01

    The stability of an immunogen against enzymatic degradation is considered an important factor for the design of synthetic vaccines. For our studies, we have selected an epitope from the tandem-repeat unit of the high-molecular-weight MUC2 mucin glycoprotein, which can be underglycosylated in case of colon cancer. In this study, we prepared a MUC2 peptide containing the PTGTQ epitope of a MUC2 protein backbone-specific mAb 996 and its derivatives. In these peptides, the N- and C-terminal flanking regions were systematically substituted by up to three d-amino acids. Peptides prepared by solid-phase synthesis were tested for their mAb 996 binding in competitive ELISA experiments, and their stability was studied in serum and lysosomal preparation. Our data show that the epitope function of peptide 15TPTPTGTQTPT25 is retained even in the presence of two d-amino acid residues at its N-terminal flanking region and up to three at its C-terminal flanking region (tpTPTGTQtpt). Also, this partly d peptide shows high resistance against proteolytic degradation in diluted human serum and in lysosomal preparation. These findings suggest that, by appropriate combination of structural modifications (namely, d-amino acid substitution) in the flanks of an Ab epitope, it is feasible to construct a synthetic antigen with preserved recognition properties and high stability against enzymatic degradation. Peptides tPTPTGTQTpt and tpTPTGTQTpt derived from this study can be used for immunization experiments and as potential components of synthetic vaccines for tumor therapy. PMID:15630090

  16. Ribosome reinitiation at leader peptides increases translation of bacterial proteins.

    PubMed

    Korolev, Semen A; Zverkov, Oleg A; Seliverstov, Alexandr V; Lyubetsky, Vassily A

    2016-04-16

    Short leader genes usually do not encode stable proteins, although their importance in expression control of bacterial genomes is widely accepted. Such genes are often involved in the control of attenuation regulation. However, the abundance of leader genes suggests that their role in bacteria is not limited to regulation. Specifically, we hypothesize that leader genes increase the expression of protein-coding (structural) genes via ribosome reinitiation at the leader peptide in the case of a short distance between the stop codon of the leader gene and the start codon of the structural gene. For instance, in Actinobacteria, the frequency of leader genes at a distance of 10-11 bp is about 70 % higher than the mean frequency within the 1 to 65 bp range; and it gradually decreases as the range grows longer. A pronounced peak of this frequency-distance relationship is also observed in Proteobacteria, Bacteroidetes, Spirochaetales, Acidobacteria, the Deinococcus-Thermus group, and Planctomycetes. In contrast, this peak falls to the distance of 15-16 bp and is not very pronounced in Firmicutes; and no such peak is observed in cyanobacteria and tenericutes. Generally, this peak is typical for many bacteria. Some leader genes located close to a structural gene probably play a regulatory role as well.

  17. Cyclic Sulfamidate Enabled Syntheses of Amino Acids, Peptides, Carbohydrates, and Natural Products

    EPA Science Inventory

    This article reviews the emergence of cyclic sulfamidates as versatile intermediatesfor the synthesis of unnatural amino acids, chalcogen peptides, modified sugars, drugs and drug candidates, and important natural products.

  18. Development of bioactive peptides from fish proteins and their health promoting ability.

    PubMed

    Senevirathne, Mahinda; Kim, Se-Kwon

    2012-01-01

    Great amount of marine fish species have been identified with potential nutraceutical and medicinal values. Consequently, a number of bioactive compounds have been identified including fish muscle proteins, peptides, collagen and gelatin, fish oil, fish bone. Bioactive peptides derived from various fish muscle proteins have shown various biological activities including antihypertensive, antibacterial, anticoagulant, anti-inflammatory, and antioxidant activities, and hence they may be a potential material for biomedical and food industries. Further, they are commonly used in medical and pharmaceutical industries as carrier molecules for drugs, proteins, and genes. Hence, fish muscle protein-derived peptides are valuable natural resources that can be potential material for biomedical, nutraceutical, and food industries.

  19. Overview of the regulation of disulfide bond formation in Peptide and protein folding.

    PubMed

    Hidaka, Yuji

    2014-04-01

    Disulfide bonds play a critical role in the maintenance of the native conformation of proteins under thermodynamic control. In general, disulfide bond formation is associated with protein folding, and this restricts the formation of folding intermediates such as misbridged disulfide isomers or kinetically trapped conformations, which provide important information related to how proteins fold into their native conformation. Therefore, numerous studies have focused on the structural analysis of folding intermediates in vitro. However, isolating or trapping folding intermediates, as well as the entire proteins, including mutant proteins, is not an easy task. Several chemical methods have recently been developed for examining peptide and protein folding and for producing, e.g., intact, post-translationally modified, or kinetically trapped proteins, or proteins with misbridged disulfide bonds. This overview introduces chemical methods for regulating the formation of disulfide bonds of peptides and proteins in the context of the thermodynamic and kinetic control of peptide and protein folding.

  20. Systematic studies of the mass spectrometric properties of alkaline earth metal cationized amino acids and peptides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Küjckelmann, Ulrich; Müller, Dietrich; Weber, Carsten

    1997-07-01

    The results of a systematic study of the gas phase interactions of α-amino acids and peptides (4-15 amino acids) with alkaline earth metals, observed with mass spectrometric techniques, are presented. Furthermore, a model for the cationization with calcium at the C-terminal amino acid arginine in rotaviral polypeptides is presented.

  1. Antimicrobial peptides and proteins of the horse - insights into a well-armed organism

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Antimicrobial peptides play a pivotal role as key effectors of the innate immune system in plants and animals and act as endogenous antibiotics. The molecules exhibit an antimicrobial activity against bacteria, viruses, and eukaryotic pathogens with different specificities and potencies depending on the structure and amino-acid composition of the peptides. Several antimicrobial peptides were comprehensively investigated in the last three decades and some molecules with remarkable antimicrobial properties have reached the third phase of clinical studies. Next to the peptides themselves, numerous organisms were examined and analyzed regarding their repertoire of antimicrobial peptides revealing a huge number of candidates with potencies and properties for future medical applications. One of these organisms is the horse, which possesses numerous peptides that are interesting candidates for therapeutical applications in veterinary medicine. Here we summarize investigations and knowledge on equine antimicrobial peptides, point to interesting candidates, and discuss prospects for therapeutical applications. PMID:21888650

  2. Plasticity in protein-peptide recognition: crystal structures of two different peptides bound to concanavalin A.

    PubMed Central

    Jain, D; Kaur, K J; Salunke, D M

    2001-01-01

    The structures of concanavalin A (ConA) in complex with two carbohydrate-mimicking peptides, 10-mer (MYWYPYASGS) and 15-mer (RVWYPYGSYLTASGS) have been determined at 2.75 A resolution. In both crystal structures four independent peptide molecules bind to each of the crystallographically independent subunits of ConA tetramer. The peptides exhibit small but significant variability in conformations and interactions while binding to ConA. The crystal structure of another similar peptide, 12-mer (DVFYPYPYASGS), in complex with ConA has been determined (Jain, D., K. J. Kaur, B. Sundaravadivel, and D. M. Salunke. 2000. Structural and functional consequences of peptide-carbohydrate mimicry. J. Biol. Chem. 275:16098-16102). Comparison of the three complexes shows that the peptides bind to ConA at a common binding site, using different contacting residues and interactions depending on their sequence and the local environment at the binding site. The binding is also optimized by corresponding plasticity of the peptide binding site on ConA. The diversity in conformation and interactions observed here are in agreement with the structural leeway concerning plasticity of specific molecular recognition in biological processes. The adaptability of peptide-ConA interactions may also be correlated with the carbohydrate-mimicking property of these peptides. PMID:11371463

  3. Efficacy of peptide nucleic acid and selected conjugates against specific cellular pathologies of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Browne, Elisse C; Parakh, Sonam; Duncan, Luke F; Langford, Steven J; Atkin, Julie D; Abbott, Belinda M

    2016-04-01

    Cellular studies have been undertaken on a nonamer peptide nucleic acid (PNA) sequence, which binds to mRNA encoding superoxide dismutase 1, and a series of peptide nucleic acids conjugated to synthetic lipophilic vitamin analogs including a recently prepared menadione (vitamin K) analog. Reduction of both mutant superoxide dismutase 1 inclusion formation and endoplasmic reticulum stress, two of the key cellular pathological hallmarks in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, by two of the prepared PNA oligomers is reported for the first time.

  4. Antimicrobial Peptides Containing Unnatural Amino Acid Exhibit Potent Bactericidal Activity against ESKAPE Pathogens

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-01-01

    Antimicrobial peptides containing unnatural amino acid exhibit potent bactericidal activity against ESKAPE pathogens R. P. Hicks a, J. J. Abercrombie...tic classes, membrane-disruptors and non -membrane-disrup- tors.30,31 Five different mechanisms have been proposed at one time or another to explain...DATES COVERED - 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Antimicrobial Peptides Containing Unnatural Amino Acid Exhibit Potent Bactericidal Activity Against

  5. Production of a recombinant hybrid molecule of cholera toxin-B-subunit and proteolipid-protein-peptide for the treatment of experimental encephalomyelitis.

    PubMed

    Yuki, Y; Byun, Y; Fujita, M; Izutani, W; Suzuki, T; Udaka, S; Fujihashi, K; McGhee, J R; Kiyono, H

    2001-07-05

    Mucosal administration of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE)-specific autoantigens can reduce the onset of disease. To examine whether cholera toxin-B-subunit (CTB)-conjugated EAE-specific T-cell epitope can reduce development of the autoimmune disease in mice, we produced a recombinant hybrid molecule of CTB fusion protein linked with proteolipid-protein (PLP)-peptide139-151(C140S) at levels up to 0.1 gram per liter culture media in Bacillus brevis as a secretion-expression system. Amino acid sequencing and GM1-receptor binding assay showed that this expression system produced a uniformed recombinant hybrid protein. EAE was induced in SJL/J mice by systemic administration with the PLP-peptide. When nasally immunized 5 times with 70 microg rCTB PLP-peptide hybrid protein, mice showed a significantly suppressed development of ongoing EAE and an inhibition of both the PLP-peptide-specific delayed-type hypersensitivity (DTH) responses and leukocyte infiltration into the spinal cord. In contrast, all mice given the PLP-peptide alone or the PLP-peptide with the free form of CTB did not suppress the development of EAE and DTH responses. These results suggest that nasal treatment with the recombinant B. brevis-derived hybrid protein of CTB and autoantigen peptide could prove useful in the control of multiple sclerosis.

  6. Producing peptide arrays for epitope mapping by intein-mediated protein ligation.

    PubMed

    Sun, Luo; Rush, John; Ghosh, Inca; Maunus, Jeremy R; Xu, Ming-Qun

    2004-09-01

    Peptide arrays are increasingly used to define antibody epitopes and substrate specificities of protein kinases. Their use is hampered, however, by ineffective and variable binding efficiency of peptides, which often results in low sensitivity and inconsistent results. To overcome these limitations, we have developed a novel method for making arrays of synthetic peptides on various membranes after ligating the peptide substrates to an intein-generated carrier protein. We have conducted screening for optimal carrier proteins by immunoreactivity and direct assessment of binding using a peptide derivatized at a lysine sidechain with fluorescein, CDPEK(fluorescein)DS. Ligation of a synthetic peptide antigen to a carrier protein, HhaI methylase, resulted in an improved retention of peptides and an increased sensitivity of up to 10(4)-fold in immunoassay- and epitope-scanning experiments. Denaturing the ligation products with 2% sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) or an organic solvent (20% methanol) prior to arraying did not significantly affect the immunoreactivity of the HhaI methylase-peptide product. Because the carrier protein dominates the binding of ligation products and contains one peptide reactive site, the amount of peptide arrayed onto the membranes can be effectively normalized. This technique was utilized in the alanine scanning of hemagglutinin (HA) antigen using two monoclonal antibodies, resulting in distinguishing the different antigen epitope profiles. Furthermore, we show that this method can be used to characterize the antibodies that recognize phosphorylated peptides. This novel approach allows for synthetic peptides to be uniformly arrayed onto membranes, compatible with a variety of applications.

  7. Development of synthetic peptide ELISA based on nonstructural protein 2C of foot and mouth disease virus.

    PubMed

    Oem, Jae Ku; Kye, Soo Jeong; Lee, Kwang Nyeong; Park, Jong Hyeon; Kim, Yong Joo; Song, Hee Jong; Yeh, Max

    2005-12-01

    It was reported that the sera of convalescent animals contain antibodies to foot and mouth disease (FMD) virus (FMDV) 2C, highly conserved nonstructural protein (NSP), whereas the sera of vaccinated animals do not. But ELISA methods using this protein were not reported and developed until recently. In this study, NSP 2C peptides were synthesized within the amino acid sequence of the conserved 2C nonstructural region of FMDV according to the sequences from Genbank database and used for identifying antigenic determinants. One of the synthesized thirteen peptides gave strong positive reactivity with most of the sera from 13 FMD infected farms, but not with sera from vaccinated and non-infected animals. Moreover, with the sera collected through serial bleedings from four cattle and five goats infected with FMDV O/SKR/2000 experimentally, positive results were obtained in two species after 10 days post infection (DPI). Therefore, we tried to develop and evaluate this ELISA based on 2C peptides. In comparison with the commercial NSP ELISA, the 2C peptide based ELISA method showed good specificity and sensitivity. These results demonstrate that the synthetic 2C peptide ELISA can be a complementary marker to differentiate FMDV-infected from vaccinated on a herd basis.

  8. Evaluation of the in vitro antioxidant properties of a cod (Gadus morhua) protein hydrolysate and peptide fractions.

    PubMed

    Girgih, Abraham T; He, Rong; Hasan, Fida M; Udenigwe, Chibuike C; Gill, Tom A; Aluko, Rotimi E

    2015-04-15

    Mechanically-deboned cod muscle proteins were sequentially hydrolysed using pepsin and a trypsin+chymotrypsin combination, which was followed by passing the digest through a 1 kDa equipped tangential flow filtration system; the permeate (<1 kDa peptides) was collected as the cod protein hydrolysate (CPH). Reversed-phase high performance liquid chromatography (RP-HPLC) was used to separate the CPH into four peptide fractions (CF1-CF4) and their in vitro antioxidant properties investigated. Results showed that most of the peptide fractions (CF2-CF4) displayed significantly higher (p<0.05) oxygen radical absorbance capacity values (698-942 μM Trolox equivalents, TE/g) and 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl scavenging activities (17-32%) than those of CPH (613 μM TE/g and 19%, respectively). However, the unfractionated CPH displayed improved capability to scavenge superoxide and hydroxyl radicals as well as significantly higher (p<0.05) ferric iron reduction and chelation of iron than the RP-HPLC peptides. The CPH and peptide fractions displayed a dose-dependent inhibition of linoleic acid oxidation.

  9. Comparisons of Protein and Peptide Complexity in Poneroid and Formicoid Ant Venoms.

    PubMed

    Aili, Samira R; Touchard, Axel; Koh, Jennifer M S; Dejean, Alain; Orivel, Jérôme; Padula, Matthew P; Escoubas, Pierre; Nicholson, Graham M

    2016-09-02

    Animal venom peptides are currently being developed as novel drugs and bioinsecticides. Because ants use venoms for defense and predation, venomous ants represent an untapped source of potential bioactive toxins. This study compared the protein and peptide components of the poneroid ants Neoponera commutata, Neoponera apicalis, and Odontomachus hastatus and the formicoid ants Ectatomma tuberculatum, Ectatomma brunneum, and Myrmecia gulosa. 1D and 2D PAGE revealed venom proteins in the mass range <10 to >250 kDa. NanoLC-ESI-QTOF MS/MS analysis of tryptic peptides revealed the presence of common venom proteins and also many undescribed proteins. RP-HPLC separation followed by MALDI-TOF MS of the venom peptides also revealed considerable heterogeneity. It was found that the venoms contained between 144 and 1032 peptides with 5-95% of peptides in the ranges 1-4 and 1-8 kDa for poneroid and formicoid ants, respectively. By employing the reducing MALDI matrix 1,5-diaminonapthalene, up to 28 disulfide-bonded peptides were also identified in each of the venoms. In particular, the mass range of peptides from poneroid ants is lower than peptides from other venoms, indicating possible novel structures and pharmacologies. These results indicate that ant venoms represent an enormous, untapped source of novel therapeutic and bioinsecticide leads.

  10. CycloPs: generating virtual libraries of cyclized and constrained peptides including nonnatural amino acids.

    PubMed

    Duffy, Fergal J; Verniere, Mélanie; Devocelle, Marc; Bernard, Elise; Shields, Denis C; Chubb, Anthony J

    2011-04-25

    We introduce CycloPs, software for the generation of virtual libraries of constrained peptides including natural and nonnatural commercially available amino acids. The software is written in the cross-platform Python programming language, and features include generating virtual libraries in one-dimensional SMILES and three-dimensional SDF formats, suitable for virtual screening. The stand-alone software is capable of filtering the virtual libraries using empirical measurements, including peptide synthesizability by standard peptide synthesis techniques, stability, and the druglike properties of the peptide. The software and accompanying Web interface is designed to enable the rapid generation of large, structurally diverse, synthesizable virtual libraries of constrained peptides quickly and conveniently, for use in virtual screening experiments. The stand-alone software, and the Web interface for evaluating these empirical properties of a single peptide, are available at http://bioware.ucd.ie .

  11. Installing amino acids and peptides on N-heterocycles under visible-light assistance.

    PubMed

    Jin, Yunhe; Jiang, Min; Wang, Hui; Fu, Hua

    2016-02-02

    Readily available natural α-amino acids are one of nature's most attractive and versatile building blocks in synthesis of natural products and biomolecules. Peptides and N-heterocycles exhibit various biological and pharmaceutical functions. Conjugation of amino acids or peptides with N-heterocycles provides boundless potentiality for screening and discovery of diverse biologically active molecules. However, it is a great challenge to install amino acids or peptides on N-heterocycles through formation of carbon-carbon bonds under mild conditions. In this article, eighteen N-protected α-amino acids and three peptides were well assembled on phenanthridine derivatives via couplings of N-protected α-amino acid and peptide active esters with substituted 2-isocyanobiphenyls at room temperature under visible-light assistance. Furthermore, N-Boc-proline residue was successfully conjugated with oxindole derivatives using similar procedures. The simple protocol, mild reaction conditions, fast reaction, and high efficiency of this method make it an important strategy for synthesis of diverse molecules containing amino acid and peptide fragments.

  12. Installing amino acids and peptides on N-heterocycles under visible-light assistance

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Yunhe; Jiang, Min; Wang, Hui; Fu, Hua

    2016-01-01

    Readily available natural α-amino acids are one of nature’s most attractive and versatile building blocks in synthesis of natural products and biomolecules. Peptides and N-heterocycles exhibit various biological and pharmaceutical functions. Conjugation of amino acids or peptides with N-heterocycles provides boundless potentiality for screening and discovery of diverse biologically active molecules. However, it is a great challenge to install amino acids or peptides on N-heterocycles through formation of carbon-carbon bonds under mild conditions. In this article, eighteen N-protected α-amino acids and three peptides were well assembled on phenanthridine derivatives via couplings of N-protected α-amino acid and peptide active esters with substituted 2-isocyanobiphenyls at room temperature under visible-light assistance. Furthermore, N-Boc-proline residue was successfully conjugated with oxindole derivatives using similar procedures. The simple protocol, mild reaction conditions, fast reaction, and high efficiency of this method make it an important strategy for synthesis of diverse molecules containing amino acid and peptide fragments. PMID:26830014

  13. Detection of trans–cis flips and peptide-plane flips in protein structures

    SciTech Connect

    Touw, Wouter G.; Joosten, Robbie P.; Vriend, Gert

    2015-07-28

    A method is presented to detect peptide bonds that need either a trans–cis flip or a peptide-plane flip. A coordinate-based method is presented to detect peptide bonds that need correction either by a peptide-plane flip or by a trans–cis inversion of the peptide bond. When applied to the whole Protein Data Bank, the method predicts 4617 trans–cis flips and many thousands of hitherto unknown peptide-plane flips. A few examples are highlighted for which a correction of the peptide-plane geometry leads to a correction of the understanding of the structure–function relation. All data, including 1088 manually validated cases, are freely available and the method is available from a web server, a web-service interface and through WHAT-CHECK.

  14. Effect of Peptide Size on Antioxidant Properties of African Yam Bean Seed (Sphenostylis stenocarpa) Protein Hydrolysate Fractions

    PubMed Central

    Ajibola, Comfort F.; Fashakin, Joseph B.; Fagbemi, Tayo N.; Aluko, Rotimi E.

    2011-01-01

    Enzymatic hydrolysate of African yam bean seed protein isolate was prepared by treatment with alcalase. The hydrolysate was further fractionated into peptide sizes of <1, 1–3, 3–5 and 5–10 kDa using membrane ultrafiltration. The protein hydrolysate (APH) and its membrane ultrafiltration fractions were assayed for in vitro antioxidant activities. The <1 kDa peptides exhibited significantly better (p < 0.05) ferric reducing power, diphenyl-1-picryhydradzyl (DPPH) and hydroxyl radical scavenging activities when compared to peptide fractions of higher molecular weights. The high activity of <1 kDa peptides in these antioxidant assay systems may be related to the high levels of total hydrophobic and aromatic amino acids. In comparison to glutathione (GSH), the APH and its membrane fractions had significantly higher (p < 0.05) ability to chelate metal ions. In contrast, GSH had significantly greater (p < 0.05) ferric reducing power and free radical scavenging activities than APH and its membrane fractions. The APH and its membrane fractions effectively inhibited lipid peroxidation, results that were concentration dependent. The activity of APH and its membrane fractions against linoleic acid oxidation was higher when compared to that of GSH but lower than that of butylated hydroxyl toluene (BHT). The results show potential use of APH and its membrane fractions as antioxidants in the management of oxidative stress-related metabolic disorders and in the prevention of lipid oxidation in food products. PMID:22072912

  15. Identification of protein N-termini in Cyanophora paradoxa cyanelles: transit peptide composition and sequence determinants for precursor maturation

    PubMed Central

    Köhler, Daniel; Dobritzsch, Dirk; Hoehenwarter, Wolfgang; Helm, Stefan; Steiner, Jürgen M.; Baginsky, Sacha

    2015-01-01

    Glaucophyta, rhodophyta, and chloroplastida represent the three main evolutionary lineages that diverged from a common ancestor after primary endosymbiosis. Comparative analyses between members of these three lineages are a rich source of information on ancestral plastid features. We analyzed the composition and the cleavage site of cyanelle transit peptides from the glaucophyte Cyanophora paradoxa by terminal amine labeling of substrates (TAILS), and compared their characteristics to those of representatives of the chloroplastida. Our data show that transit peptide architecture is similar between members of these two lineages. This entails a comparable modular structure, an overrepresentation of serine or alanine and similarities in the amino acid composition around the processing peptidase cleavage site. The most distinctive difference is the overrepresentation of phenylalanine in the N-terminal 1–10 amino acids of cyanelle transit peptides. A quantitative proteome analysis with periplasm-free cyanelles identified 42 out of 262 proteins without the N-terminal phenylalanine, suggesting that the requirement for phenylalanine in the N-terminal region is not absolute. Proteins in this set are on average of low abundance, suggesting that either alternative import pathways are operating specifically for low abundance proteins or that the gene model annotation is incorrect for proteins with fewer EST sequences. We discuss these two possibilities and provide examples for both interpretations. PMID:26257763

  16. Food protein-derived bioactive peptides: production, processing, and potential health benefits.

    PubMed

    Udenigwe, Chibuike C; Aluko, Rotimi E

    2012-01-01

    Bioactive peptides (BAPs), derived through enzymatic hydrolysis of food proteins, have demonstrated potential for application as health-promoting agents against numerous human health and disease conditions, including cardiovascular disease, inflammation, and cancer. The feasibility of pharmacological application of these peptides depends on absorption and bioavailability in intact forms in target tissues, which in turn depends on structure of the peptides. Therefore, production and processing of peptides based on important structure-function parameters can lead to the production of potent peptides. This article reviews the literature on BAPs with emphasis on strategic production and processing methods as well as antihypertensive, anticancer, anticalmodulin, hypocholesterolemic, and multifunctional properties of the food protein-derived peptides. It is recommended that future research efforts on BAP should be directed toward elucidation of their in vivo molecular mechanisms of action, safety at various doses, and pharmacological activity in maintaining homeostasis during aberrant health conditions in human subjects.

  17. Prediction and verification of novel peptide targets of protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B.

    PubMed

    Li, Xun; Köhn, Maja

    2016-08-01

    Phosphotyrosine peptides are useful starting points for inhibitor design and for the search for protein tyrosine phosphatase (PTP) phosphoprotein substrates. To identify novel phosphopeptide substrates of PTP1B, we developed a computational prediction protocol based on a virtual library of protein sequences with known phosphotyrosine sites. To these we applied sequence-based methods, biologically meaningful filters and molecular docking. Five peptides were selected for biochemical testing of their potential as PTP1B substrates. All five peptides were equally good substrates for PTP1B compared to a known peptide substrate whereas appropriate control peptides were not recognized, showing that our protocol can be used to identify novel peptide substrates of PTP1B.

  18. The B1 Protein Guides the Biosynthesis of a Lasso Peptide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Shaozhou; Fage, Christopher D.; Hegemann, Julian D.; Mielcarek, Andreas; Yan, Dushan; Linne, Uwe; Marahiel, Mohamed A.

    2016-10-01

    Lasso peptides are a class of ribosomally synthesized and post-translationally modified peptides (RiPPs) with a unique lariat knot-like fold that endows them with extraordinary stability and biologically relevant activity. However, the biosynthetic mechanism of these fascinating molecules remains largely speculative. Generally, two enzymes (B for processing and C for cyclization) are required to assemble the unusual knot-like structure. Several subsets of lasso peptide gene clusters feature a “split” B protein on separate open reading frames (B1 and B2), suggesting distinct functions for the B protein in lasso peptide biosynthesis. Herein, we provide new insights into the role of the RiPP recognition element (RRE) PadeB1, characterizing its capacity to bind the paeninodin leader peptide and deliver its peptide substrate to PadeB2 for processing.

  19. Slow peptide bond formation by proline and other N-alkylamino acids in translation

    PubMed Central

    Pavlov, Michael Y.; Watts, Richard E.; Tan, Zhongping; Cornish, Virginia W.; Ehrenberg, Måns; Forster, Anthony C.

    2009-01-01

    Proteins are made from 19 aa and, curiously, one N-alkylamino acid (“imino acid”), proline (Pro). Pro is thought to be incorporated by the translation apparatus at the same rate as the 19 aa, even though the alkyl group in Pro resides directly on the nitrogen nucleophile involved in peptide bond formation. Here, by combining quench-flow kinetics and charging of tRNAs with cognate and noncognate amino acids, we find that Pro incorporates in translation significantly more slowly than Phe or Ala and that other N-alkylamino acids incorporate much more slowly. Our results show that the slowest step in incorporation of N-alkylamino acids is accommodation/peptidyl transfer after GTP hydrolysis on EF-Tu. The relative incorporation rates correlate with expectations from organic chemistry, suggesting that amino acid sterics and basicities affect translation rates at the peptidyl transfer step. Cognate isoacceptor tRNAs speed Pro incorporation to rates compatible with in vivo, although still 3–6 times slower than Phe incorporation from Phe-tRNAPhe depending on the Pro codon. Results suggest that Pro is the only N-alkylamino acid in the genetic code because it has a privileged cyclic structure that is more reactive than other N-alkylamino acids. Our data on the variation of the rate of incorporation of Pro from native Pro-tRNAPro isoacceptors at 4 different Pro codons help explain codon bias not accounted for by the “tRNA abundance” hypothesis. PMID:19104062

  20. Role of SbmA in the uptake of peptide nucleic acid (PNA)-peptide conjugates in E. coli.

    PubMed

    Ghosal, Anubrata; Vitali, Ally; Stach, James E M; Nielsen, Peter E

    2013-02-15

    Antisense PNA oligomers targeting essential genes (acpP or ftsZ) and conjugated to the delivery peptide L((KFF)(3)K) show complete growth inhibition of wild type E. coli strain (MG1655) with submicromolar MIC. In this study we show that resistant mutants generated against such PNA-peptide conjugates had disruptions in the region of sbmA, a gene encoding an inner membrane peptide transporter. The wild type sensitivity to the PNA conjugates was re-established in the resistance mutants by complementation with sbmA. Furthermore, deletion of sbmA in E. coli AS19, a strain that is sensitive to unmodified PNA, resulted in resistance to PNA. Finally, PNA conjugated with the corresponding non-biological H-D((KFF)(3)K) peptide retained antibacterial activity in sbmA deletion strains, whereas the same conjugate with a protease-sensitive linker did not. These results clearly identify SbmA as a carrier of naked PNA over the inner bacterial membrane and thereby infer that the peptide is transporting the PNA conjugates over the outer membrane. Strains lacking SbmA were used to screen novel peptide-PNA carriers that were SbmA-independent. Four such PNA-peptide conjugates, H-D((KFF)(3)K), H-(RFR)(4)-Ahx-βAla, H-(R-Ahx-R)(4)-Ahx-βAla, and H-(R-Ahx)(6)-βAla, were identified that utilize an alternative uptake mechanism but retain their antimicrobial potency. In addition SbmA is the first protein identified to recognize PNA.

  1. The b' domain provides the principal peptide-binding site of protein disulfide isomerase but all domains contribute to binding of misfolded proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Klappa, P; Ruddock, L W; Darby, N J; Freedman, R B

    1998-01-01

    Protein disulfide isomerase (PDI) is a very efficient catalyst of folding of many disulfide-bonded proteins. A great deal is known about the catalytic functions of PDI, while little is known about its substrate binding. We recently demonstrated by cross-linking that PDI binds peptides and misfolded proteins, with high affinity but broad specificity. To characterize the substrate-binding site of PDI, we investigated the interactions of various recombinant fragments of human PDI, expressed in Escherichia coli, with different radiolabelled model peptides. We observed that the b' domain of human PDI is essential and sufficient for the binding of small peptides. In the case of larger peptides, specifically a 28 amino acid fragment derived from bovine pancreatic trypsin inhibitor, or misfolded proteins, the b' domain is essential but not sufficient for efficient binding, indicating that contributions from additional domains are required. Hence we propose that the different domains of PDI all contribute to the binding site, with the b' domain forming the essential core. PMID:9463371

  2. Competitive Binding to Cuprous Ions of Protein and BCA in the Bicinchoninic Acid Protein Assay

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Tao; Long, Mian; Huo, Bo

    2010-01-01

    Although Bicinchoninic acid (BCA) has been widely used to determine protein concentration, the mechanism of interaction between protein, copper ion and BCA in this assay is still not well known. Using the Micro BCA protein assay kit (Pierce Company), we measured the absorbance at 562 nm of BSA solutions with different concentrations of protein, and also varied the BCA concentration. When the concentration of protein was increased, the absorbance exhibited the known linear and nonlinear increase, and then reached an unexpected plateau followed by a gradual decrease. We introduced a model in which peptide chains competed with BCA for binding to cuprous ions. Formation of the well-known chromogenic complex of BCA-Cu1+-BCA was competed with the binding of two peptide bonds (NTPB) to cuprous ion, and there is the possibility of the existence of two new complexes. A simple equilibrium equation was established to describe the correlations between the substances in solution at equilibrium, and an empirical exponential function was introduced to describe the reduction reaction. Theoretical predictions of absorbance from the model were in good agreement with the measurements, which not only validated the competitive binding model, but also predicted a new complex of BCA-Cu1+-NTPB that might exist in the final solution. This work provides a new insight into understanding the chemical bases of the BCA protein assay and might extend the assay to higher protein concentration. PMID:21625379

  3. Competitive Binding to Cuprous Ions of Protein and BCA in the Bicinchoninic Acid Protein Assay.

    PubMed

    Huang, Tao; Long, Mian; Huo, Bo

    2010-01-01

    Although Bicinchoninic acid (BCA) has been widely used to determine protein concentration, the mechanism of interaction between protein, copper ion and BCA in this assay is still not well known. Using the Micro BCA protein assay kit (Pierce Company), we measured the absorbance at 562 nm of BSA solutions with different concentrations of protein, and also varied the BCA concentration. When the concentration of protein was increased, the absorbance exhibited the known linear and nonlinear increase, and then reached an unexpected plateau followed by a gradual decrease. We introduced a model in which peptide chains competed with BCA for binding to cuprous ions. Formation of the well-known chromogenic complex of BCA-Cu(1+)-BCA was competed with the binding of two peptide bonds (NTPB) to cuprous ion, and there is the possibility of the existence of two new complexes. A simple equilibrium equation was established to describe the correlations between the substances in solution at equilibrium, and an empirical exponential function was introduced to describe the reduction reaction. Theoretical predictions of absorbance from the model were in good agreement with the measurements, which not only validated the competitive binding model, but also predicted a new complex of BCA-Cu(1+)-NTPB that might exist in the final solution. This work provides a new insight into understanding the chemical bases of the BCA protein assay and might extend the assay to higher protein concentration.

  4. Major Peptides from Amaranth (Amaranthus cruentus) Protein Inhibit HMG-CoA Reductase Activity

    PubMed Central

    Soares, Rosana Aparecida Manólio; Mendonça, Simone; de Castro, Luíla Ívini Andrade; Menezes, Amanda Caroline Cardoso Corrêa Carlos; Arêas, José Alfredo Gomes

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study was to identify the major peptides generated by the in vitro hydrolysis of Amaranthus cruentus protein and to verify the effect of these peptides on the activity of 3-hydroxy-3-methyl-glutaryl-CoA reductase (HMG-CoA reductase), a key enzyme in cholesterol biosynthesis. A protein isolate was prepared, and an enzymatic hydrolysis that simulated the in vivo digestion of the protein was performed. After hydrolysis, the peptide mixture was filtered through a 3 kDa membrane. The peptide profile of this mixture was determined by reversed phase high performance chromatography (RP-HPLC), and the peptide identification was performed by LC-ESI MS/MS. Three major peptides under 3 kDa were detected, corresponding to more than 90% of the peptides of similar size produced by enzymatic hydrolysis. The sequences identified were GGV, IVG or LVG and VGVI or VGVL. These peptides had not yet been described for amaranth protein nor are they present in known sequences of amaranth grain protein, except LVG, which can be found in amaranth α‑amylase. Their ability to inhibit the activity of HMG-CoA reductase was determined, and we found that the sequences GGV, IVG, and VGVL, significantly inhibited this enzyme, suggesting a possible hypocholesterolemic effect. PMID:25690031

  5. A model for protocellular coordination of nucleic acid and protein syntheses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fox, S. W.

    1981-01-01

    The proteinoid model for the coordination of protein synthesis with nucleic acid coding within the evolving protocell is discussed. Evidence for the self-ordering of amino acid chains, which would enhance the catalytic activity of a lysine-rich proteinoid, is presented, along with that for the preferential formation of microparticles, particularly proteinoid microparticles, in various solutions. Demonstrations of the catalytic activity of lysine-rich proteinoids in the synthesis of peptide and internucleotide bonds are pointed out. The view of evolution as a two stage sequence in which the geological synthesis of peptides evolved to the protocellular synthesis of peptides and oligonucleotides is discussed, and contrasted with the alternative view, in accord with the central dogma, that nucleic acids arose first then governed the production of proteins and protocells.

  6. Tuning the Protein Corona of Hydrogel Nanoparticles: The Synthesis of Abiotic Protein and Peptide Affinity Reagents.

    PubMed

    O'Brien, Jeffrey; Shea, Kenneth J

    2016-06-21

    Nanomaterials, when introduced into a complex, protein-rich environment, rapidly acquire a protein corona. The type and amount of proteins that constitute the corona depend significantly on the synthetic identity of the nanomaterial. For example, hydrogel nanoparticles (NPs) such as poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) (NIPAm) have little affinity for plasma proteins; in contrast, carboxylated poly(styrene) NPs acquire a dense protein corona. This range of protein adsorption suggests that the protein corona might be "tuned" by controlling the chemical composition of the NP. In this Account, we demonstrate that small libraries of synthetic polymer NPs incorporating a diverse pool of functional monomers can be screened for candidates with high affinity and selectivity to targeted biomacromolecules. Through directed synthetic evolution of NP compositions, one can tailor the protein corona to create synthetic organic hydrogel polymer NPs with high affinity and specificity to peptide toxins, enzymes, and other functional proteins, as well as to specific domains of large proteins. In addition, many NIPAm NPs undergo a change in morphology as a function of temperature. This transformation often correlates with a significant change in NP-biomacromolecule affinity, resulting in a temperature-dependent protein corona. This temperature dependence has been used to develop NP hydrogels with autonomous affinity switching for the protection of proteins from thermal stress and as a method of biomacromolecule purification through a selective thermally induced catch and release. In addition to temperature, changes in pH or buffer can also alter a NP protein corona composition, a property that has been exploited for protein purification. Finally, synthetic polymer nanoparticles with low nanomolar affinity for a peptide toxin were shown to capture and neutralize the toxin in the bloodstream of living mice. While the development of synthetic polymer alternatives to protein affinity reagents is

  7. Preparation and antioxidative properties of a rapeseed ( Brassica napus ) protein hydrolysate and three peptide fractions.

    PubMed

    Xue, Zhaohui; Yu, Wancong; Liu, Zhiwei; Wu, Moucheng; Kou, Xiaohong; Wang, Jiehua

    2009-06-24

    This study investigated the possibility of converting the insoluble rapeseed meal protein into functionally active ingredients for food applications. The rapeseed ( Brassica napus ) meal protein isolates were first digested by Alcalase and Flavourzyme, and the resultant rapeseed crude hydrolysate (RSCH) exhibited a dose-dependent reducing antioxidant power and hydroxyl radical scavenging ability. RSCH could also inhibit the malonyldialdehyde (MDA) generation by 50% in blood serum at 150 mg/mL. RSCH was further separated into three fractions (RSP1, RSP2, and RSP3) by Sephadex gel filtration according to their different molecular weights. The amino acid compositions and antioxidant potentials were assessed for RSP1-3 fractions. All three fractions showed inhibiting effects on superoxide anion generation to various extents. They could also inhibit the autohemolysis of rat red blood cells and MDA formation in rat liver tissue homogenate. The results suggested that rapeseed peptide hydrolysate may be useful as a human food addition as a source of bioactive peptides with antioxidant properties.

  8. New fungal defensin-like peptides provide evidence for fold change of proteins in evolution

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Yucheng; Gao, Bin

    2016-01-01

    Defensins containing a consensus cystine framework, Cys[1]…Cys[2]X3Cys[3]…Cys[4]… Cys[5]X1Cys[6] (X, any amino acid except Cys; …, variable residue numbers), are extensively distributed in a variety of multicellular organisms (plants, fungi and invertebrates) and essentially involved in immunity as microbicidal agents. This framework is a prerequisite for forming the cysteine-stabilized α-helix and β-sheet (CSαβ) fold, in which the two invariant motifs, Cys[2]X3Cys[3]/Cys[5]X1Cys[6], are key determinants of fold formation. By using a computational genomics approach, we identified a large superfamily of fungal defensin-like peptides (fDLPs) in the phytopathogenic fungal genus – Zymoseptoria, which includes 132 structurally typical and 63 atypical members. These atypical fDLPs exhibit an altered cystine framework and accompanying fold change associated with their secondary structure elements and disulfide bridge patterns, as identified by protein structure modelling. Despite this, they definitely are homologous with the typical fDLPs in view of their precise gene structure conservation and identical precursor organization. Sequence and structural analyses combined with functional data suggest that most of Zymoseptoria fDLPs might have lost their antimicrobial activity. The present study provides a clear example of fold change in the evolution of proteins and is valuable in establishing remote homology among peptide superfamily members with different folds. PMID:27913751

  9. Tragacanth as an oral peptide and protein delivery carrier: Characterization and mucoadhesion.

    PubMed

    Nur, M; Ramchandran, L; Vasiljevic, T

    2016-06-05

    Biopolymers such as tragacanth, an anionic polysaccharide gum, can be alternative polymeric carrier for physiologically important peptides and proteins. Characterization of tragacanth is thus essential for providing a foundation for possible applications. Rheological studies colloidal solution of tragacanth at pH 3, 5 or 7 were carried out by means of steady shear and small amplitude oscillatory measurements. Tragacanth mucoadhesivity was also analyzed using an applicable rheological method and compared to chitosan, alginate and PVP. The particle size and zeta potential were measured by a zetasizer. Thermal properties of solutions were obtained using a differential scanning calorimetry. The solution exhibited shear-thinning characteristics. The value of the storage modulus (G') and the loss modulus (G″) increased with an increase in angular frequency (Ω). In all cases, loss modulus values were higher than storage values (G″>G') and viscous character was, therefore, dominant. Tragacanth and alginate showed a good mucoadhesion. Tragacanth upon dispersion created particles of a submicron size with a negative zeta potential (-7.98 to -11.92 mV). These properties were pH dependant resulting in acid gel formation at pH 3.5. Tragacanth has thus a potential to be used as an excipient for peptide/protein delivery.

  10. Formation of Amino Acid Thioesters for Prebiotic Peptide Synthesis: Catalysis By Amino Acid Products

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weber, Arthur L.; DeVincenzi, Donald L. (Technical Monitor)

    1999-01-01

    The origin of life can be described as a series of events in which a prebiotic chemical process came increasingly under the control of its catalytic products. In our search for this prebiotic process that yielded catalytic takeover products (such as polypeptides), we have been investigating a reaction system that generates peptide-forming amino acid thioesters from formaldehyde, glycolaldehyde, and ammonia in the presence of thiols. As shown below, this model process begins by aldol condensation of formaldehyde and glycolaldehyde to give trioses and releases. These sugars then undergo beta-dehydration yielding their respective alpha-ketoaldehydes. Addition of ammonia to the alpha-ketoaldehydes yields imines which can either: (a) rearrange in the presence of thesis to give amino acid thioesters or (be react with another molecule of aldehyde to give imidazoles. This 'one-pot' reaction system operates under mild aqueous conditions, and like modem amino acid biosynthesis, uses sugar intermediates which are converted to products by energy-yielding redox reactions. Recently, we discovered that amino acids, such as the alanine reaction product, catalyze the first and second steps of the process. In the presence of ammonia the process also generates other synthetically useful products, like the important biochemical -- pyruvic acid.

  11. The Intestinal Peptide Transporter PEPT1 Is Involved in Food Intake Regulation in Mice Fed a High-Protein Diet

    PubMed Central

    Sailer, Manuela; Daniel, Hannelore

    2011-01-01

    High-protein diets are effective in achieving weight loss which is mainly explained by increased satiety and thermogenic effects. Recent studies suggest that the effects of protein-rich diets on satiety could be mediated by amino acids like leucine or arginine. Although high-protein diets require increased intestinal amino acid absorption, amino acid and peptide absorption has not yet been considered to contribute to satiety effects. We here demonstrate a novel finding that links intestinal peptide transport processes to food intake, but only when a protein-rich diet is provided. When mice lacking the intestinal peptide transporter PEPT1 were fed diets containing 8 or 21 energy% of protein, no differences in food intake and weight gain were observed. However, upon feeding a high-protein (45 energy%) diet, Pept1−/− mice reduced food intake much more pronounced than control animals. Although there was a regain in food consumption after a few days, no weight gain was observed which was associated with a reduced intestinal energy assimilation and increased fecal energy losses. Pept1−/− mice on high-protein diet displayed markedly reduced plasma leptin levels during the period of very low food intake, suggesting a failure of leptin signaling to increase energy intake. This together with an almost two-fold elevated plasma arginine level in Pept1−/− but not wildtype mice, suggests that a cross-talk of arginine with leptin signaling in brain, as described previously, could cause these striking effects on food intake. PMID:22031831

  12. Identification and characterization of peptide fragments for the direct and site-specific immobilization of functional proteins onto the surface of silicon nitride.

    PubMed

    Kumada, Yoichi; Ootsuka, Takeru; Asada, Masashi; Yoshizuka, Saori; Chiyama, Masateru; Sakane, Masayasu; Fida, Hasan M D; Sawada, Kazuaki; Okumura, Koichi; Kishimoto, Michimasa

    2014-08-20

    In this study, we successfully identified peptide fragments that have a strong affinity toward the surface of a silicon nitride (SiN) substrate. An E. coli soluble protein, which was preferentially adsorbed onto the surface of a SiN substrate was isolated by 2D electrophoresis, and it was identified as "elongation factor Tu (ELN)" via the peptide MS fingerprinting method. A recombinant ELN that was originally cloned and produced, also maintained its adsorptive ability to a SiN substrate, by comparison with BSA that was used as a control protein. The peptide fragments derived from the recombinant ELN were prepared via 3 types of proteases with different recognition properties (trypsin, chymotrypsin and V8 protease). The peptide mixture was applied to the surface of a SiN substrate, and then, the SiN-binding peptide candidates were isolated and identified. The amino acid sequences of the peptide candidates were genetically fused with the C-terminal region of glutathione S-transferase as a model protein, and the adsorption properties of mutant-type GSTs on the surface of a SiN substrate were directly monitored using a reflectometric interference spectroscopy (RIfS) sensor system. Consequently, among the 8 candidates identified, the genetic fusion of TP14, V821 and CT22 peptides resulted in a significant enhancement of GST adsorption to the surface of the SiN substrate, while the adsorption of a wild-type GST was hardly detectable by RIfS sensor. These peptide fragments were located at the C-terminal region in the aminoacid sequence of recombinant ELN. Interestingly, the sequence with the shortest and strongest SiN-binding peptide, TP14 (GYRPQFYFR), was also found in that of V821 (GGRHTPFFKGYRPQFYFRTTDVTGTIE). The TP14 peptide might be the smallest unit of SiN-binding peptide, and a clarification of the amino acid contribution in TP14 peptide will be the next subject. Three-fold higher enzymatic activities were detected from the SiN substrate immobilized with GST-TP14

  13. Identification and mapping of functional domains on human T-cell lymphotropic virus type 1 envelope proteins by using synthetic peptides.

    PubMed Central

    Sagara, Y; Inoue, Y; Shiraki, H; Jinno, A; Hoshino, H; Maeda, Y

    1996-01-01

    To identify the regions that are important in human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1) envelope function, we synthesized 23 kinds of peptides covering the envelope proteins and examined the inhibitory effect of each peptide on syncytium formation induced by HTLV-1-bearing cells. Of the 23 synthetic peptides, 2, corresponding to amino acids 197 to 216 on gp46 and 400 to 429 on gp21, inhibited syncytium formation induced by HTLV-1-bearing cells but did not affect syncytium formation induced by human immunodeficiency virus type 1-producing cells. The peptide concentrations giving 50% inhibition of syncytium formation for gp46 197 to 216 and gp21 400 to 429 were 14.9 and 6.0 microM, respectively. A syncytium formation assay with overlapping synthetic peptides containing amino acids 175 to 236 and 391 to 448 of the envelope proteins showed that syncytium formation was inhibited by peptides that contained the amino acid sequences 197 to 205 (Asp-His-Ile-Leu-Glu-Pro-Ser-Ile-Pro) and 397 to 406 (Gln-Glu-Gln-Cys-Arg-Phe- Pro-Asn-Ile-Thr). These observations suggest that the two regions corresponding to amino acids 197 to 216 and 400 to 429 are involved] in HTLV-1 envelope function. PMID:8627675

  14. A salt-regulated peptide derived from the CAP superfamily protein negatively regulates salt-stress tolerance in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Chien, Pei-Shan; Nam, Hong Gil; Chen, Yet-Ran

    2015-08-01

    High salinity has negative impacts on plant growth through altered water uptake and ion-specific toxicities. Plants have therefore evolved an intricate regulatory network in which plant hormones play significant roles in modulating physiological responses to salinity. However, current understanding of the plant peptides involved in this regulatory network remains limited. Here, we identified a salt-regulated peptide in Arabidopsis. The peptide was 11 aa and was derived from the C terminus of a cysteine-rich secretory proteins, antigen 5, and pathogenesis-related 1 proteins (CAP) superfamily. This peptide was found by searching homologues in Arabidopsis using the precursor of a tomato CAP-derived peptide (CAPE) that was initially identified as an immune signal. In searching for a CAPE involved in salt responses, we screened CAPE precursor genes that showed salt-responsive expression and found that the PROAtCAPE1 (AT4G33730) gene was regulated by salinity. We confirmed the endogenous Arabidopsis CAP-derived peptide 1 (AtCAPE1) by mass spectrometry and found that a key amino acid residue in PROAtCAPE1 is critical for AtCAPE1 production. Moreover, although PROAtCAPE1 was expressed mainly in the roots, AtCAPE1 was discovered to be upregulated systemically upon salt treatment. The salt-induced AtCAPE1 negatively regulated salt tolerance by suppressing several salt-tolerance genes functioning in the production of osmolytes, detoxification, stomatal closure control, and cell membrane protection. This discovery demonstrates that AtCAPE1, a homologue of tomato immune regulator CAPE1, plays an important role in the regulation of salt stress responses. Our discovery thus suggests that the peptide may function in a trade-off between pathogen defence and salt tolerance.

  15. Linear antigenic regions of the structural proteins of human T-cell lymphotropic virus type I detected by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays using synthetic peptides as antigens.

    PubMed Central

    Washitani, Y; Kuroda, N; Shiraki, H; Itoyama, Y; Sato, H; Ohshima, K; Kiyokawa, H; Maeda, Y

    1992-01-01

    We synthesized 46 sequential peptides 21 to 39 amino acids long over the structural protein of human T-cell leukemia virus type I (HTLV-I; the p19 and p24 gag protein and the gp46 and p20E env proteins) and tested their reactivities against antibodies in sera from HTLV-I healthy carriers and patients diagnosed as having human T-cell leukemia-lymphoma (ATLL) and myelopathy (HAM) by using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Of the 46 synthetic peptides, 18 peptides (2 corresponding to the p19 gag protein, 2 corresponding to the p24 gag protein, 8 corresponding to the gp46 env protein, and 6 corresponding to the p20E env protein) reacted with antibodies in the sera from HTLV-I healthy carriers. In particular, the peptides comprising amino acids 100 to 119 and 119 to 130 of the gag and 175 to 199, 213 to 236, 253 to 282, and 288 to 317 of the env proteins reacted with antibodies in sera from more than 30% of HTLV-I healthy carriers. These peptides also showed high reactivities to the antibodies in the sera from patients with ATLL and HAM. The results indicate that the predominant antigenic regions of the structural protein of HTLV-I were located at the C-terminal end of the p19 gag protein and the C-terminal half of the gp46 env protein, and the corresponding peptides proved to be useful antigens in detecting antibodies in the sera from individuals infected with HTLV-I. PMID:1537894

  16. Activation of carboxyl group with cyanate: peptide bond formation from dicarboxylic acids.

    PubMed

    Danger, Grégoire; Charlot, Solenne; Boiteau, Laurent; Pascal, Robert

    2012-06-01

    The reaction of cyanate with C-terminal carboxyl groups of peptides in aqueous solution was considered as a potential pathway for the abiotic formation of peptide bonds under the condition of the primitive Earth. The catalytic effect of dicarboxylic acids on cyanate hydrolysis was definitely attributed to intramolecular nucleophilic catalysis by the observation of the 1H-NMR signal of succinic anhydride when reacting succinic acid with KOCN in aqueous solution (pH 2.2-5.5). The formation of amide bonds was noticed when adding amino acids or amino acid derivatives into the solution. The reaction of N-acyl aspartic acid derivatives was observed to proceed similarly and the scope of the cyanate-promoted reaction was analyzed from the standpoint of prebiotic peptide formation. The role of cyanate in activating peptide C-terminus constitutes a proof of principle that intramolecular reactions of adducts of peptides C-terminal carboxyl groups with activating agents represent a pathway for peptide activation in aqueous solution, the relevance of which is discussed in connexion with the issue of the emergence of homochirality.

  17. Scaffolded multiple cyclic peptide libraries for protein mimics by native chemical ligation.

    PubMed

    van de Langemheen, H; van Hoeke, M; Quarles van Ufford, H C; Kruijtzer, J A W; Liskamp, R M J

    2014-07-07

    The accessibility to collections, libraries and arrays of cyclic peptides is increasingly important since cyclic peptides may provide better mimics of the loop-like structures ubiquitously present in and - especially - on the surface of proteins. The next important step is the preparation of libraries of ensembles of scaffolded cyclic peptides, which upon screening may lead to promising protein mimics. Here we describe the synthesis of a tri-cysteine containing scaffold as well as the simultaneous native chemical ligation of three cyclic peptides thereby affording a clean library of multiple cyclic peptides on this scaffold, representing potential mimics of gp120. Members of this collection of protein mimics showed a decent inhibition of the gp120-CD4 interaction.

  18. Proteins and peptides: The need to improve them as promising therapeutics for ulcerative colitis.

    PubMed

    Sahu, Kantrol Kumar; Minz, Sunita; Kaurav, Monika; Pandey, Ravi Shankar

    2016-01-01

    The present review briefly describes the nature, type and pathogenesis of ulcerative colitis, and explores the potential use of peptides and proteins in the treatment of inflammatory bowel disease, especially ulcerative colitis. Intestinal absorption and the barrier mechanism of peptide and protein drugs are also discussed, with special emphasis on various strategies which make these drugs better therapeutics having high specificity, potency and molecular targeting ability. However, the limitation of such therapeutics are oral administration, poor pharmacokinetic profile and decreased bioavailability. The recent findings illustrated in this review will be helpful in designing the peptide/protein drugs as a promising treatment of choice for ulcerative colitis.

  19. Synthesis and biological properties of amino acids and peptides containing a tetrazolyl moiety

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popova, E. A.; Trifonov, R. E.

    2015-09-01

    Literature data published mainly in the last 15 years on the synthesis and biological properties of amino acid analogues and derivatives containing tetrazolyl moieties are analyzed. Tetrazolyl analogues and derivatives of amino acids and peptides are shown to be promising for medicinal chemistry. Being polynitrogen heterocyclic systems comprising four endocyclic nitrogen atoms, tetrazoles can behave as acids and bases and form strong hydrogen bonds with proton donors (more rarely, with acceptors). They have high metabolic stability and are able to penetrate biological membranes. The review also considers the synthesis and properties of linear and cyclic peptides based on modified amino acids incorporating a tetrazolyl moiety. A special issue is the discussion of the biological properties of tetrazole-containing amino acids and peptides, which exhibit high biological activity and can be used to design new drugs. The bibliography includes 200 references.

  20. Methodology for Labeling Proteins and Peptides with Lead-212 (212Pb)

    PubMed Central

    Baidoo, Kwamena E.; Milenic, Diane E.; Brechbiel, Martin W.

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Alpha particles possess an exquisite degree of cytotoxicity when employed for targeted α–particle therapy (TAT) or radioimmunotherapy (RIT). 212Pb, which acts as an in vivo generator of the α-emitting nuclide 212Bi has shown great promise in pre-clinical studies when used to label the HER2 binding antibody, trastuzumab. Currently, the first RIT clinical trial employing 212Pb radiolabeled trastuzumab is in progress. This report provides detailed current protocol operations and steps that were generated for use in the clinical trial as well as the relevant pre-clinical experimentation, and describes in detail the labeling of proteins or peptides with 212Pb as provided via a 224Ra based generator system. Methods 212Pb was eluted from the 224Ra/212Pb generator using hydrochloric acid (2 M). The generator eluate was evaporated and digested with nitric acid (8M) followed by extraction of the 212Pb with dilute nitric acid (0.1 M). The dilute nitric acid solution of 212Pb was used to label the immunoconjugate Trastuzumab-TCMC (2-(4-isothiocyanatobenzyl-1,4,7,10-tetraaza-1,4,7,10,tetra-(2-carbamonylmethyl)-cyclododecane) at pH 5.5. Results Elution of 212Pb from the generator was efficient yielding > 90% of available 212Pb. Trastuzumab-TCMC was efficiently labeled with a radiochemical yield of 94 +/− 4% (n = 7) by ITLC and an isolated yield of 73 +/− 3 % (n = 7). Conclusions The results show the feasibility of generating radioimmunoconjugates and peptide conjugates for use as in vivo α generator systems in the clinic. The technology holds promise in applications involving the treatment of minimal disease such as micrometastases and residual tumor after surgical debulking, hematological cancers, infections, and compartmental cancers, such as ovarian cancer. PMID:23602604

  1. Identification of CRISP2 from human sperm as PSP94-binding protein and generation of CRISP2-specific anti-peptide antibodies.

    PubMed

    Anklesaria, Jenifer H; Kulkarni, Bhalchandra J; Pathak, Bhakti R; Mahale, Smita D

    2016-06-01

    Cysteine-rich secretory proteins (CRISPs) are mainly found in the mammalian male reproductive tract and reported to be involved at different stages of fertilization. CRISPs have been shown to interact with prostate secretory protein of 94 amino acids (PSP94) from diverse sources, and the binding of these evolutionarily conserved proteins across species is proposed to be of functional significance. Of the three mammalian CRISPs, PSP94-CRISP3 interaction is well characterized, and specific binding sites have been identified; whereas, CRISP2 has been shown to interact with PSP94 in vitro. Interestingly, human CRISP3 and CRISP2 proteins are closely related showing 71.4% identity. In this study, we identified CRISP2 as a potential binding protein of PSP94 from human sperm. Further, we generated antisera capable of specifically detecting CRISP2 and not CRISP3. In this direction, specific peptides corresponding to the least conserved ion channel regulatory region were synthesized, and polyclonal antibodies were generated against the peptide in rabbits. The binding characteristics of the anti-CRISP2 peptide antibody were evaluated using competitive ELISA. Immunoblotting experiments also confirmed that the peptide was able to generate antibodies capable of detecting the mature CRISP2 protein present in human sperm lysate. Furthermore, this anti-CRISP2 peptide antibody also detected the presence of native CRISP2 on sperm.Copyright © 2016 European Peptide Society and John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  2. Immobilized palladium(II) ion affinity chromatography for recovery of recombinant proteins with peptide tags containing histidine and cysteine.

    PubMed

    Kikot, Pamela; Polat, Aise; Achilli, Estefania; Fernandez Lahore, Marcelo; Grasselli, Mariano

    2014-11-01

    Fusion of peptide-based tags to recombinant proteins is currently one of the most used tools for protein production. Also, immobilized metal ion affinity chromatography (IMAC) has a huge application in protein purification, especially in research labs. The combination of expression systems of recombinant tagged proteins with this robust chromatographic system has become an efficient and rapid tool to produce milligram-range amounts of proteins. IMAC-Ni(II) columns have become the natural partners of 6xHis-tagged proteins. The Ni(II) ion is considered as the best compromise of selectivity and affinity for purification of a recombinant His-tagged protein. The palladium(II) ion is also able to bind to side chains of amino acids and form ternary complexes with iminodiacetic acid and free amino acids and other sulfur-containing molecules. In this work, we evaluated two different cysteine- and histidine-containing six amino acid tags linked to the N-terminal group of green fluorescent protein (GFP) and studied the adsorption and elution conditions using novel eluents. Both cysteine-containing tagged GFPs were able to bind to IMAC-Pd(II) matrices and eluted successfully using a low concentration of thiourea solution. The IMAC-Ni(II) system reaches less than 20% recovery of the cysteine-containing tagged GFP from a crude homogenate of recombinant Escherichia coli, meanwhile the IMAC-Pd(II) yields a recovery of 45% with a purification factor of 13.

  3. A novel method to identify and characterise peptide mimotopes of heat shock protein 70-associated antigens.

    PubMed

    Arnaiz, Blanca; Madrigal-Estebas, Laura; Todryk, Stephen; James, Tharappel C; Doherty, Derek G; Bond, Ursula

    2006-04-08

    The heat shock protein, Hsp70, has been shown to play an important role in tumour immunity. Vaccination with Hsp70-peptide complexes (Hsp70-PCs), isolated from autologous tumour cells, can induce protective immune responses. We have developed a novel method to identify synthetic mimic peptides of Hsp70-PCs and to test their ability to activate T-cells. Peptides (referred to as "recognisers") that bind to Hsp70-PCs from the human breast carcinoma cell line, MDA-MB-231, were identified by bio-panning a random peptide M13 phage display library. Synthetic recogniser peptides were subsequently used as bait in a reverse bio-panning experiment to identify potential Hsp70-PC mimic peptides. The ability of the recogniser and mimic peptides to prime human lymphocyte responses against tumour cell antigens was tested by stimulating lymphocytes with autologous peptide-loaded monocyte-derived dendritic cells (DCs). Priming and subsequent stimulation with either the recogniser or mimic peptide resulted in interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma) secretion by the lymphocytes. Furthermore, DCs loaded with Hsp70, Hsp70-PC or the recogniser or the mimic peptide primed the lymphocytes to respond to soluble extracts from breast cells. These results highlight the potential application of synthetic peptide-mimics of Hsp70-PCs, as modulators of the immune response against tumours.

  4. Oral films as breakthrough tools for oral delivery of proteins/peptides.

    PubMed

    Castro, Pedro M; Fonte, Pedro; Sousa, Flávia; Madureira, Ana Raquel; Sarmento, Bruno; Pintado, Manuela E

    2015-08-10

    Therapeutic proteins and peptides demonstrate unique, peerless, pharmacological characteristics such as high specificity to receptors and superior biological mimicking of physiological mechanisms, resulting in a better therapeutic index compared to conventional chemical-derived drugs. However, proteins also present inherent bioavailability limitations. Thus, this paper proposes several effective tools to improve protein/peptide drugs stability, permeability and pharmacokinetics with special emphasis on oral polymeric films as oral delivery platforms. Indeed, oral films present inherent characteristics that can greatly enhance biological performance of proteins and peptides and patient compliance along with other advantages that are critically discussed in this review. A rational choice of excipients addressed in and manufacture processes are also focused. In addition, possible toxicity issues to be overtaken and critical analysis regarding current market tendencies respecting oral films and protein/peptides along with future prospects are disclosed.

  5. Recent Advances in Protein and Peptide Drug Delivery: A Special Emphasis on Polymeric Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Ashaben; Patel, Mitesh; Yang, Xiaoyan; Mitra, Ashim K.

    2015-01-01

    Proteins and peptides are widely indicated in many diseased states. Parenteral route is the most commonly employed method of administration for therapeutic proteins and peptides. However, requirement of frequent injections due to short in vivo half-life results in poor patient compliance. Non-invasive drug delivery routes such as nasal, transdermal, pulmonary, and oral offer several advantages over parenteral administration. Intrinsic physicochemical properties and low permeability across biological membrane limit protein delivery via non-invasive routes. One of the strategies to improve protein and peptide absorption is by delivering through nanostructured delivery carriers. Among nanocarriers, polymeric nanoparticles (NPs) have demonstrated significant advantages over other delivery systems. This article summarizes the application of polymeric NPs for protein and peptide drug delivery following oral, nasal, pulmonary, parenteral, transdermal, and ocular administrations. PMID:25106908

  6. Self-Assembled Peptide- and Protein-Based Nanomaterials for Antitumor Photodynamic and Photothermal Therapy.

    PubMed

    Abbas, Manzar; Zou, Qianli; Li, Shukun; Yan, Xuehai

    2017-03-01

    Tremendous interest in self-assembly of peptides and