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Sample records for acids proteins carbohydrates

  1. Electrocatalysis in proteins, nucleic acids and carbohydrates.

    PubMed

    Paleček, Emil; Bartošík, Martin; Ostatná, Veronika; Trefulka, Mojmír

    2012-02-01

    The ability of proteins to catalyze hydrogen evolution has been known for more than 80 years, but the poorly developed d.c. polarographic "pre-sodium wave" was of little analytical use. Recently, we have shown that by using constant current chronopotentiometric stripping analysis, proteins produce a well-developed peak H at hanging mercury drop and solid amalgam electrodes. Peak H sensitively reflects changes in protein structures due to protein denaturation, single amino acid exchange, etc. at the picomole level. Unmodified DNA and RNA do not yield such a peak, but they produce electrocatalytic voltammetric signals after modification with osmium tetroxide complexes with nitrogen ligands [Os(VIII)L], binding covalently to pyrimidine bases in nucleic acids. Recently, it has been shown that six-valent [Os(VI)L] complexes bind to 1,2-diols in polysaccharides and oligosaccharides, producing voltammetric responses similar to those of DNA-Os(VIII)L adducts. Electrocatalytic peaks produced by Os-modified nucleic acids, proteins (reaction with tryptophan residues) and carbohydrates are due to the catalytic hydrogen evolution, allowing determination of oligomers at the picomolar level.

  2. Meal composition and plasma amino acid ratios: Effect of various proteins or carbohydrates, and of various protein concentrations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yokogoshi, Hidehiko; Wurtman, Richard J.

    1986-01-01

    The effects of meals containing various proteins and carbohydrates, and of those containing various proportions of protein (0 percent to 20 percent of a meal, by weight) or of carbohydrate (0 percent to 75 percent), on plasma levels of certain large neutral amino acids (LNAA) in rats previously fasted for 19 hours were examined. Also the plasma tryptophan ratios (the ratio of the plasma trytophan concentration to the summed concentrations of the other large neutral amino acids) and other plasma amino acid ratios were calculated. (The plasma tryptophan ratio has been shown to determine brain tryptophan levels and, thereby, to affect the synthesis and release of the neurotransmitter serotonin). A meal containing 70 percent to 75 percent of an insulin-secreting carbohydrate (dextrose or dextrin) increased plasma insulin levels and the tryptophan ratio; those containing 0 percent or 25 percent carbohydrate failed to do so. Addition of as little as 5 percent casein to a 70 percent carbohydrate meal fully blocked the increase in the plasma tryptophan ratio without affecting the secretion of insulin - probably by contributing much larger quantities of the other LNAA than of tryptophan to the blood. Dietary proteins differed in their ability to suppress the carbohydrate-induced rise in the plasma tryptophan ratio. Addition of 10 percent casein, peanut meal, or gelatin fully blocked this increase, but lactalbumin failed to do so, and egg white did so only partially. (Consumption of the 10 percent gelatin meal also produced a major reduction in the plasma tyrosine ratio, and may thereby have affected brain tyrosine levels and catecholamine synthesis.) These observations suggest that serotonin-releasing neurons in brains of fasted rats are capable of distinguishing (by their metabolic effects) between meals poor in protein but rich in carbohydrates that elicit insulin secretion, and all other meals. The changes in brain serotonin caused by carbohydrate-rich, protein

  3. Whey fermentation by thermophilic lactic acid bacteria: evolution of carbohydrates and protein content.

    PubMed

    Pescuma, Micaela; Hébert, Elvira María; Mozzi, Fernanda; Font de Valdez, Graciela

    2008-05-01

    Whey, a by-product of the cheese industry usually disposed as waste, is a source of biological and functional valuable proteins. The aim of this work was to evaluate the potentiality of three lactic acid bacteria strains to design a starter culture for developing functional whey-based drinks. Fermentations were performed at 37 and 42 degrees C for 24h in reconstituted whey powder (RW). Carbohydrates, organic acids and amino acids concentrations during fermentation were evaluated by RP-HPLC. Proteolytic activity was measured by the o-phthaldialdehyde test and hydrolysis of whey proteins was analyzed by Tricine SDS-PAGE. The studied strains grew well (2-3log cfu/ml) independently of the temperature used. Streptococcus thermophilus CRL 804 consumed 12% of the initial lactose concentration and produced the highest amount of lactic acid (45 mmol/l) at 24h. Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus CRL 454 was the most proteolytic (91 microg Leu/ml) strain and released the branched chain amino acids Leu and Val. In contrast, Lactobacillus acidophilus CRL 636 and S. thermophilus CRL 804 consumed most of the amino acids present in whey. The studied strains were able to degrade the major whey proteins, alpha-lactalbumin being degraded in a greater extent (2.2-3.4-fold) than beta-lactoglobulin. Two starter cultures were evaluated for their metabolic and proteolytic activities in RW. Both cultures acidified and reduced the lactose content in whey in a greater extent than the strains alone. The amino acid release was higher (86 microg/ml) for the starter SLb (strains CRL 804+CRL 454) than for SLa (strains CRL 804+CRL 636, 37 microg/ml). Regarding alpha-lactalbumin and beta-lactoglobulin degradation, no differences were observed as compared to the values obtained with the single cultures. The starter culture SLb showed high potential to be used for developing fermented whey-based beverages.

  4. Hepatic fatty acid biosynthesis is more responsive to protein than carbohydrate in rainbow trout during acute stimulations.

    PubMed

    Dai, Weiwei; Panserat, Stéphane; Kaushik, Sadasivam; Terrier, Frédéric; Plagnes-Juan, Elisabeth; Seiliez, Iban; Skiba-Cassy, Sandrine

    2016-01-01

    The link between dietary carbohydrate/protein and de novo lipogenesis (DNL) remains debatable in carnivorous fish. We aimed to evaluate and compare the response of hepatic lipogenic gene expression to dietary carbohydrate intake/glucose and dietary protein intake/amino acids (AAs) during acute stimulations using both in vivo and in vitro approaches. For the in vivo trial, three different diets and a controlled-feeding method were employed to supply fixed amount of dietary protein or carbohydrate in a single meal; for the in vitro trial, primary hepatocytes were stimulated with a low or high level of glucose (3 mM or 20 mM) and a low or high level of AAs (one-fold or four-fold concentrated AAs). In vitro data showed that a high level of AAs upregulated the expression of enzymes involved in DNL [fatty acid synthase (FAS) and ATP citrate lyase (ACLY)], lipid bioconversion [elongation of very long chain fatty acids like-5 (Elovl5), Elovl2, Δ6 fatty acyl desaturase (D6D) and stearoyl-CoA desaturase-1 (SCD1)], NADPH production [glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PDH) and malic enzyme (ME)], and transcriptional factor sterol regulatory element binding protein 1-like, while a high level of glucose only elevated the expression of ME. Data in trout liver also showed that high dietary protein intake induced higher lipogenic gene expression (FAS, ACLY, and Elovl2) regardless of dietary carbohydrate intake, while high carbohydrate intake markedly suppressed the expression of acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACC) and Elovl5. Overall, we conclude that, unlike rodents or humans, hepatic fatty acid biosynthetic gene expression in rainbow trout is more responsive to dietary protein intake/AAs than dietary carbohydrate intake/glucose during acute stimulations. This discrepancy probably represents one important physiological and metabolic difference between carnivores and omnivores.

  5. Carbohydrates in peptide and protein design.

    PubMed

    Jensen, Knud J; Brask, Jesper

    2005-01-01

    Monosaccharides and amino acids are fundamental building blocks in the assembly of nature's polymers. They have different structural aspects and, to a significant extent, different functional groups. Oligomerization gives rise to oligosaccharides and peptides, respectively. While carbohydrates and peptides can be found conjoined in nature, e.g., in glycopeptides, the aim of this review is the radical redesign of peptide structures using carbohydrates, particularly monosaccharides and cyclic oligosaccharides, to produce novel peptides, peptidomimetics, and abiotic proteins. These hybrid molecules, chimeras, have properties arising largely from the combination of structural characteristics of carbohydrates with the functional group diversity of peptides. This field includes de novo designed synthetic glycopeptides, sugar (carbohydrate) amino acids, carbohydrate scaffolds for nonpeptidal peptidomimetics of cyclic peptides, cyclodextrin functionalized peptides, and carboproteins, i.e., carbohydrate-based proteinmimetics. These successful applications demonstrate the general utility of carbohydrates in peptide and protein architecture.

  6. Amino Acid Composition of Protein-Enriched Dried Pasta:
Is It Suitable for a Low-Carbohydrate Diet?

    PubMed Central

    Vidrih, Rajko

    2015-01-01

    Summary Today, obesity is one of the major health problems, a so-called epidemic of the developed world. Obesity arises through an imbalance between energy intake and energy expenditure, so it is important for products to have a balanced nutritional composition. The aim of this study is to prepare high-protein pasta with high nutritional quality, with emphasis on its amino acid composition, as ordinary durum pasta lacks lysine and threonine. Ordinary durum wheat pasta contains, on average, 77% carbohydrate, and can have even less than 10% protein. It is therefore often excluded from normal energy-restricted diets, and especially from low-carbohydrate diets. In this study pasta that can satisfy the nutritional requirements of a low-carbohydrate diet and is suitable for daily use was developed and evaluated. Protein-enhanced pasta was produced by adding high amounts of plant protein extract (40% dry matter) without (plain high-protein pasta) or with 3% dried spinach powder (high-protein spinach pasta) to durum wheat semolina. According to the sensory analysis data, the addition of 40% of plant protein extract satisfied sensory and nutritional requirements, allowing further development and evaluation for possible marketing. This analysis shows that these high-protein neutral and spinach pasta contain 36.4 and 39.6 g of protein per 100 g of dry mass, 12.07 and 14.70 g of total essential amino acids per 100 g of dry mass, and a high content of branched-chain amino acids, i.e. 5.54 and 6.65 g per 100 g of dry mass, respectively. This therefore represents a true alternative to durum wheat pasta for low-carbohydrate diets. PMID:27904361

  7. Relation between the secondary structure of carbohydrate residues of alpha1-acid glycoprotein (orosomucoid) and the fluorescence of the protein.

    PubMed

    Albani, Jihad R

    2003-05-01

    We studied in this work the relation that exists between the secondary structure of the glycans of alpha(1)-acid glycoprotein and the fluorescence of the Trp residues of the protein. We calculated for that the efficiency of quenching and the radiative and non-radiative constants. Our results indicate that the glycans display a spatial structure that is modified upon asialylation. The asialylated conformation is closer to the protein matrix than the sialylated form, inducing by that a decrease in the fluorescence parameters of the Trp residues. In fact, the mean quantum yield of Trp residues in sialylated and asialylated alpha(1)-acid glycoprotein are 0.0645 and 0.0385, respectively. Analysis of the fluorescence emission of alpha(1)-acid glycoprotein as the result of two contributions (surface and hydrophobic domains) indicates that quantum yields of both classes of Trp residues are lower when the protein is in the asialylated form. Also, the mean fluorescence lifetime of Trp residues decreases from 2.285 ns in the sialylated protein to 1.948 ns in the asialylated one. The radiative rate constant k(r) of the Trp residues in the sialylated alpha(1)-acid glycoprotein is higher than that in the asialylated protein. Thus, the carbohydrate residues are closer to the Trp residues in the absence of sialic acid. The modification of the spatial conformation of the glycans upon asialylation is confirmed by the decrease of the fluorescence lifetimes of Calcofluor, a fluorophore that binds to the carbohydrate residues. Finally, thermal intensity quenching of Calcofluor bound to alpha(1)-acid glycoprotein shows that the carbohydrate residues have slower residual motions in the absence of sialic acid residues.

  8. Combined nitrogen limitation and cadmium stress stimulate total carbohydrates, lipids, protein and amino acid accumulation in Chlorella vulgaris (Trebouxiophyceae).

    PubMed

    Chia, Mathias Ahii; Lombardi, Ana Teresa; da Graça Gama Melão, Maria; Parrish, Christopher C

    2015-03-01

    Metals have interactive effects on the uptake and metabolism of nutrients in microalgae. However, the effect of trace metal toxicity on amino acid composition of Chlorella vulgaris as a function of varying nitrogen concentrations is not known. In this research, C. vulgaris was used to investigate the influence of cadmium (10(-7) and 2.0×10(-8)molL(-1) Cd) under varying nitrogen (2.9×10(-6), 1.1×10(-5) and 1.1×10(-3)molL(-1)N) concentrations on its growth rate, biomass and biochemical composition. Total carbohydrates, total proteins, total lipids, as well as individual amino acid proportions were determined. The combination of Cd stress and N limitation significantly inhibited growth rate and cell density of C. vulgaris. However, increasing N limitation and Cd stress stimulated higher dry weight and chlorophyll a production per cell. Furthermore, biomolecules like total proteins, carbohydrates and lipids increased with increasing N limitation and Cd stress. Ketogenic and glucogenic amino acids were accumulated under the stress conditions investigated in the present study. Amino acids involved in metal chelation like proline, histidine and glutamine were significantly increased after exposure to combined Cd stress and N limitation. We conclude that N limitation and Cd stress affects the physiology of C. vulgaris by not only decreasing its growth but also stimulating biomolecule production.

  9. The amino acid sequence of a carbohydrate-containing immunoglobulin-light-chain-type amyloid-fibril protein.

    PubMed Central

    Tveteraas, T; Sletten, K; Westermark, P

    1985-01-01

    The amino acid sequence of an amyloid-fibril protein Es492 of immunoglobulin-lambda-light-chain origin (AL) was elucidated. The amyloid fibrils were obtained from the spleen of a patient who died from systemic amyloidosis. The amino acid sequence was elucidated from structural studies of peptides derived from digestion of the protein with trypsin, thermolysin, chymotrypsin and Staphylococcus aureus V8 proteinase and from cleavage of the protein with CNBr and BNPS-skatole. A heterogeneity in the length of the polypeptide was seen in the C-terminal region. The protein was by sequence homology to other lambda-chains shown to be of the V lambda II subgroup. Although an extensive homology was seen, some amino acid residues in positions 26, 31, 32, 40, 44, 93, 97, 98 and 99 have not previously been reported in these positions of V lambda II proteins. The significance of these residues in the fibril formation is unclear. The protein was found to contain carbohydrate, with glycosylation sites in two of the hypervariable regions. PMID:3936482

  10. Heat capacity changes in carbohydrates and protein-carbohydrate complexes.

    PubMed

    Chavelas, Eneas A; García-Hernández, Enrique

    2009-05-13

    Carbohydrates are crucial for living cells, playing myriads of functional roles that range from being structural or energy-storage devices to molecular labels that, through non-covalent interaction with proteins, impart exquisite selectivity in processes such as molecular trafficking and cellular recognition. The molecular bases that govern the recognition between carbohydrates and proteins have not been fully understood yet. In the present study, we have obtained a surface-area-based model for the formation heat capacity of protein-carbohydrate complexes, which includes separate terms for the contributions of the two molecular types. The carbohydrate model, which was calibrated using carbohydrate dissolution data, indicates that the heat capacity contribution of a given group surface depends on its position in the saccharide molecule, a picture that is consistent with previous experimental and theoretical studies showing that the high abundance of hydroxy groups in carbohydrates yields particular solvation properties. This model was used to estimate the carbohydrate's contribution in the formation of a protein-carbohydrate complex, which in turn was used to obtain the heat capacity change associated with the protein's binding site. The model is able to account for protein-carbohydrate complexes that cannot be explained using a previous model that only considered the overall contribution of polar and apolar groups, while allowing a more detailed dissection of the elementary contributions that give rise to the formation heat capacity effects of these adducts.

  11. Effect of binding of Calcofluor White on the carbohydrate residues of alpha1-acid glycoprotein (orosomucoid) on the structure and dynamics of the protein moiety. A fluorescence study.

    PubMed

    Albani, J R

    2001-08-23

    Calcofluor White is a fluorescent probe that interacts with polysaccharides and is commonly used in clinical studies. Interaction between Calcofluor White and carbohydrate residues of alpha1-acid glycoprotein (orosomucoid) was previously studied at low and high concentrations of Calcofluor compared to that of the protein. alpha1-Acid glycoprotein contains 40% carbohydrate by weight and has up to 16 sialic acid residues. At equimolar concentrations of Calcofluor and alpha1-acid glycoprotein, the fluorophore displays free motions [Albani, J. R.; Sillen, A.; Coddeville, B.; Plancke, Y. D.; Engelborghs, Y. Carbohydr. Res. 1999, 322, 87-94], while at high concentration of Calcofluor, its surrounding microenvironment is rigid, inducing the rigidity of the fluorophore itself [Albani, J. R.; Sillen, A.; Plancke, Y. D.; Coddeville, B.; Engelborghs, Y. Carbohydr. Res. 2000, 327, 333-340]. In the present work, red-edge excitation spectra and steady-state anisotropy studies performed on Trp residues in the presence of Calcofluor, showed that the apparent dynamics of Trp residues are not modified. However, deconvoluting the emission spectra with two different methods into different components, reveals that the structure of the protein matrix has been disrupted in the presence of high Calcofluor concentrations.

  12. Carbohydrate-protein interactions and their biosensing applications.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Xiangqun; Andrade, Cesar A S; Oliveira, Maria D L; Sun, Xue-Long

    2012-04-01

    Carbohydrate recognition is clearly present throughout nature, playing a major role in the initial attachment of one biological entity to another. The important question is whether these prevalent interactions could provide a real suitable alternative to the use of antibodies or nucleic acid for detection and identification. Currently, examples of carbohydrates being employed in biological detection systems are limited. The challenges of using carbohydrate recognition for detection mainly come from the weak affinity of carbohydrate-protein interactions, the lack of versatile carbohydrate scaffolds with well-defined structures, and the less developed high-information-content, real-time, and label-free assay technology. In this review, we focus on discussing the characteristics of carbohydrate-protein interactions in nature and the methods for carbohydrate immobilization based on surface coupling chemistry in terms of their general applicability for developing carbohydrate- and lectin-based label-free sensors. Furthermore, examples of innovative design of multivalent carbohydrate-protein interactions for sensor applications are given. We limit our review to show the feasibility of carbohydrate and lectin as recognition elements for label-free sensor development in several representative cases to formulate a flexible platform for their use as recognition elements for real-world biosensor applications.

  13. Two mathematical models for the correction of carbohydrate and protein interference in the determination of uronic acids by the m-hydroxydiphenyl method.

    PubMed

    Murado, Miguel Anxo; Vázquez, José Antonio; Montemayor, María Ignacia; Cabo, Marta López; del Pilar González, María

    2005-06-01

    The most common method in the routine determination of uronic acids, the m-hydroxydiphenyl reaction, recently adapted to rapid microplate analysis, has as a main inconvenience, in any one of their modalities, interferences due to the frequent presence of proteins and neutral carbohydrates in the samples. Corresponding corrections in the literature are unsatisfactory when applied to complex matrices, and further adaptation to the microplate analysis is not free from additional problems. With particular reference to hyaluronic acid, the interactions between the principal reactants and the interfering materials are studied kinetically under realistic conditions, and simple mathematical models are proposed which satisfactorily describe the experimental results and allow adequate corrections to be made.

  14. Wood adhesives containing proteins and carbohydrates

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In recent years there has been resurgent interest in using biopolymers as sustainable and environmentally friendly ingredients in wood adhesive formulations. Among them, proteins and carbohydrates are the most commonly used. In this chapter, an overview is given of protein-based and carbohydrate-...

  15. Lower vegetable protein intake and higher dietary acid load associated with lower carbohydrate intake are risk factors for metabolic syndrome in patients with type 2 diabetes: Post-hoc analysis of a cross-sectional study

    PubMed Central

    Iwase, Hiroya; Tanaka, Muhei; Kobayashi, Yukiko; Wada, Sayori; Kuwahata, Masashi; Kido, Yasuhiro; Hamaguchi, Masahide; Asano, Mai; Yamazaki, Masahiro; Hasegawa, Goji; Nakamura, Naoto; Fukui, Michiaki

    2015-01-01

    Aims/Introduction A low-carbohydrate diet based on animal sources is associated with higher all-cause mortality, whereas a vegetable-based low-carbohydrate diet is associated with lower cardiovascular disease mortality. It has been suggested that acid/base imbalance might play an important role in some cardiometabolic abnormalities. The aims of the present study were to evaluate whether carbohydrate intake is associated with quality of dietary protein and acid load, and whether these are related to metabolic syndrome in patients with type 2 diabetes. Materials and Methods The present cross-sectional study involved 149 patients with type 2 diabetes. Dietary intake was assessed using a validated self-administered diet history questionnaire. Dietary acid load was assessed by potential renal acid load and net endogenous acid production. Results Mean daily total energy intake, carbohydrate intake, animal protein intake and vegetable protein intake were 1821.5 kcal, 248.8 g, 36.1 g and 31.1 g, respectively. Carbohydrate energy/total energy was negatively correlated with animal protein energy/total energy, potential renal acid load or net endogenous acid production score, and was positively correlated with vegetable protein energy/total energy. Logistic regression analyses showed that the subgroup of patients with a lower vegetable protein energy/total energy or higher potential renal acid load or net endogenous acid production score was significantly associated with the prevalence of metabolic syndrome. Conclusions The present study showed that carbohydrate intake was associated with the quality of dietary protein and dietary acid load. Furthermore, decreased vegetable protein intake and increased dietary acid load were associated with the prevalence of metabolic syndrome. PMID:26221526

  16. Varying Response of the Concentration and Yield of Soybean Seed Mineral Elements, Carbohydrates, Organic Acids, Amino Acids, Protein, and Oil to Phosphorus Starvation and CO2 Enrichment

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Shardendu K.; Barnaby, Jinyoung Y.; Reddy, Vangimalla R.; Sicher, Richard C.

    2016-01-01

    A detailed investigation of the concentration (e.g., mg g-1 seed) and total yield (e.g., g plant-1) of seed mineral elements and metabolic profile under phosphorus (P) starvation at ambient (aCO2) and elevated carbon dioxide (eCO2) in soybean is limited. Soybean plants were grown in a controlled environment at either sufficient (0.50 mM P, control) or deficient (0.10 and 0.01 mM, P-stress) levels of P under aCO2 and eCO2 (400 and 800 μmol mol-1, respectively). Both the concentration and yield of 36 out of 38 seed components responded to P treatment and on average 25 and 11 components increased and decreased, respectively, in response to P starvation. Concentrations of carbohydrates (e.g., glucose, sugar alcohols), organic acids (e.g., succinate, glycerate) and amino acids increased while oil, and several minerals declined under P deficiency. However, the yield of the majority of seed components declined except several amino acids (e.g., phenylalanine, serine) under P deficiency. The concentration-based relationship between seed protein and oil was negative (r2 = 0.96), whereas yield-based relationship was positive (r2 = 0.99) across treatments. The CO2 treatment also altered the concentration of 28 out of 38 seed components, of which 23 showed decreasing (e.g., sucrose, glucose, citrate, aconitate, several minerals, and amino acids) while C, iron, Mn, glycerate, and oil showed increasing trends at eCO2. Despite a decreased concentration, yields of the majority of seed components were increased in response to eCO2, which was attributable to the increased seed production especially near sufficient P nutrition. The P × CO2 interactions for the concentration of amino acids and the yield of several components were due to the lack of their response to eCO2 under control or the severe P starvation, respectively. Thus, P deficiency primarily reduced the concentration of oil and mineral elements but enhanced a majority of other components. However, seed components yield

  17. Varying Response of the Concentration and Yield of Soybean Seed Mineral Elements, Carbohydrates, Organic Acids, Amino Acids, Protein, and Oil to Phosphorus Starvation and CO2 Enrichment.

    PubMed

    Singh, Shardendu K; Barnaby, Jinyoung Y; Reddy, Vangimalla R; Sicher, Richard C

    2016-01-01

    A detailed investigation of the concentration (e.g., mg g(-1) seed) and total yield (e.g., g plant(-1)) of seed mineral elements and metabolic profile under phosphorus (P) starvation at ambient (aCO2) and elevated carbon dioxide (eCO2) in soybean is limited. Soybean plants were grown in a controlled environment at either sufficient (0.50 mM P, control) or deficient (0.10 and 0.01 mM, P-stress) levels of P under aCO2 and eCO2 (400 and 800 μmol mol(-1), respectively). Both the concentration and yield of 36 out of 38 seed components responded to P treatment and on average 25 and 11 components increased and decreased, respectively, in response to P starvation. Concentrations of carbohydrates (e.g., glucose, sugar alcohols), organic acids (e.g., succinate, glycerate) and amino acids increased while oil, and several minerals declined under P deficiency. However, the yield of the majority of seed components declined except several amino acids (e.g., phenylalanine, serine) under P deficiency. The concentration-based relationship between seed protein and oil was negative (r(2) = 0.96), whereas yield-based relationship was positive (r(2) = 0.99) across treatments. The CO2 treatment also altered the concentration of 28 out of 38 seed components, of which 23 showed decreasing (e.g., sucrose, glucose, citrate, aconitate, several minerals, and amino acids) while C, iron, Mn, glycerate, and oil showed increasing trends at eCO2. Despite a decreased concentration, yields of the majority of seed components were increased in response to eCO2, which was attributable to the increased seed production especially near sufficient P nutrition. The P × CO2 interactions for the concentration of amino acids and the yield of several components were due to the lack of their response to eCO2 under control or the severe P starvation, respectively. Thus, P deficiency primarily reduced the concentration of oil and mineral elements but enhanced a majority of other components. However, seed

  18. Carbohydrate Polymers for Nonviral Nucleic Acid Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Sizovs, Antons; McLendon, Patrick M.; Srinivasachari, Sathya

    2014-01-01

    Carbohydrates have been investigated and developed as delivery vehicles for shuttling nucleic acids into cells. In this review, we present the state of the art in carbohydrate-based polymeric vehicles for nucleic acid delivery, with the focus on the recent successes in preclinical models, both in vitro and in vivo. Polymeric scaffolds based on the natural polysaccharides chitosan, hyaluronan, pullulan, dextran, and schizophyllan each have unique properties and potential for modification, and these results are discussed with the focus on facile synthetic routes and favorable performance in biological systems. Many of these carbohydrates have been used to develop alternative types of biomaterials for nucleic acid delivery to typical polyplexes, and these novel materials are discussed. Also presented are polymeric vehicles that incorporate copolymerized carbohydrates into polymer backbones based on polyethylenimine and polylysine and their effect on transfection and biocompatibility. Unique scaffolds, such as clusters and polymers based on cyclodextrin (CD), are also discussed, with the focus on recent successes in vivo and in the clinic. These results are presented with the emphasis on the role of carbohydrate and charge on transfection. Use of carbohydrates as molecular recognition ligands for cell-type specific delivery is also briefly reviewed. We contend that carbohydrates have contributed significantly to progress in the field of non-viral DNA delivery, and these new discoveries are impactful for developing new vehicles and materials for treatment of human disease. PMID:21504102

  19. Selective fermentation of carbohydrate and protein fractions of Scenedesmus, and biohydrogenation of its lipid fraction for enhanced recovery of saturated fatty acids.

    PubMed

    Lai, YenJung Sean; Parameswaran, Prathap; Li, Ang; Aguinaga, Alyssa; Rittmann, Bruce E

    2016-02-01

    Biofuels derived from microalgae have promise as carbon-neutral replacements for petroleum. However, difficulty extracting microalgae-derived lipids and the co-extraction of non-lipid components add major costs that detract from the benefits of microalgae-based biofuel. Selective fermentation could alleviate these problems by managing microbial degradation so that carbohydrates and proteins are hydrolyzed and fermented, but lipids remain intact. We evaluated selective fermentation of Scenedesmus biomass in batch experiments buffered at pH 5.5, 7, or 9. Carbohydrates were fermented up to 45% within the first 6 days, protein fermentation followed after about 20 days, and lipids (measured as fatty acid methyl esters, FAME) were conserved. Fermentation of the non-lipid components generated volatile fatty acids, with acetate, butyrate, and propionate being the dominant products. Selective fermentation of Scenedesmus biomass increased the amount of extractable FAME and the ratio of FAME to crude lipids. It also led to biohydrogenation of unsaturated FAME to more desirable saturated FAME (especially to C16:0 and C18:0), and the degree of saturation was inversely related to the accumulation of hydrogen gas after fermentation. Moreover, the microbial communities after selective fermentation were enriched in bacteria from families known to perform biohydrogenation, i.e., Porphyromonadaceae and Ruminococcaceae. Thus, this study provides proof-of-concept that selective fermentation can improve the quantity and quality of lipids that can be extracted from Scenedesmus.

  20. Protein-bound carbohydrates in breast cancer. Liquid-chromatographic analysis for mannose, galactose, fucose, and sialic acid in serum.

    PubMed

    Mrochek, J E; Dinsmore, S R; Tormey, D C; Waalkes, T P

    1976-09-01

    We describr high-resolution chromatographic analysis for protein-bound sialic acid in serum, with use of a cerate oxidimetric detector. Values for sera from normal women averaged 680.5 mg/liter, with a coefficient of variation of 23%. Including data obtained by previously developed chromatographic procedures for protein-bound mannose, galactose, and fucsoe, we assessed sera from breast-cancer patients whose malignancy had been categorized as either stable, responsive, or progressive (based on clinical observations spaced from two to five months apart). All of 12 responsive patients had decreases of protein-bound fucose averaging 34.5% (SD, 16.1) and all of 10 patients with progressive disease had increases averaging 38.3% (SD 21.5). Changes in fucose averaged less than 6.7% (SD, 4.9) for eight patients with clinically stable breast cancer. Changes in protein-bound mannose, galactose, and sialic acid did not correlate as well as did fucose with the clinical disease status of the patients.

  1. The Mitochondrial Sulfur Dioxygenase ETHYLMALONIC ENCEPHALOPATHY PROTEIN1 Is Required for Amino Acid Catabolism during Carbohydrate Starvation and Embryo Development in Arabidopsis1[C][W

    PubMed Central

    Krüßel, Lena; Junemann, Johannes; Wirtz, Markus; Birke, Hannah; Thornton, Jeremy D.; Browning, Luke W.; Poschet, Gernot; Hell, Rüdiger; Balk, Janneke; Braun, Hans-Peter; Hildebrandt, Tatjana M.

    2014-01-01

    The sulfur dioxygenase ETHYLMALONIC ENCEPHALOPATHY PROTEIN1 (ETHE1) catalyzes the oxidation of persulfides in the mitochondrial matrix and is essential for early embryo development in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). We investigated the biochemical and physiological functions of ETHE1 in plant metabolism using recombinant Arabidopsis ETHE1 and three transfer DNA insertion lines with 50% to 99% decreased sulfur dioxygenase activity. Our results identified a new mitochondrial pathway catalyzing the detoxification of reduced sulfur species derived from cysteine catabolism by oxidation to thiosulfate. Knockdown of the sulfur dioxygenase impaired embryo development and produced phenotypes of starvation-induced chlorosis during short-day growth conditions and extended darkness, indicating that ETHE1 has a key function in situations of high protein turnover, such as seed production and the use of amino acids as alternative respiratory substrates during carbohydrate starvation. The amino acid profile of mutant plants was similar to that caused by defects in the electron-transfer flavoprotein/electron-transfer flavoprotein:ubiquinone oxidoreductase complex and associated dehydrogenases. Thus, in addition to sulfur amino acid catabolism, ETHE1 also affects the oxidation of branched-chain amino acids and lysine. PMID:24692429

  2. Impact of diets with a high content of greaves-meal protein or carbohydrates on faecal characteristics, volatile fatty acids and faecal calprotectin concentrations in healthy dogs

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Research suggests that dietary composition influences gastrointestinal function and bacteria-derived metabolic products in the dog colon. We previously reported that dietary composition impacts upon the faecal microbiota of healthy dogs. This study aims at evaluating the dietary influences on bacteria-derived metabolic products associated with the changes in faecal microbiota that we had previously reported. We fed high-carbohydrate starch based (HCS), [crude protein: 194 g/kg, starch: 438 g/kg], high-protein greaves-meal (HPGM), [crude protein: 609 g/kg, starch: 54 g/kg] and dry commercial (DC), [crude protein: 264 g/kg, starch: 277 g/kg] diets, and studied their effects on the metabolism of the colonic microbiota and faecal calprotectin concentrations in five Beagle dogs, allocated according to the Graeco-Latin square design. Each dietary period lasted for three weeks and was crossed-over with washout periods. Food intake, body weight, and faecal consistency scores, dry matter, pH, ammonia, volatile fatty acids (VFAs), and faecal canine calprotectin concentrations were determined. Results Faecal ammonia concentrations decreased with the HCS diet. All dogs fed the HPGM diet developed diarrhoea, which led to differences in faecal consistency scores between the diets. Faecal pH was higher with the HPGM diet. Moreover, decreases in propionic and acetic acids coupled with increases in branched-chain fatty acids and valeric acid caused changes in faecal total VFAs in dogs on the HPGM diet. Faecal canine calprotectin concentration was higher with the HPGM diet and correlated positively with valeric acid concentration. Conclusions The HPGM diet led to diarrhoea in all dogs, and there were differences in faecal VFA profiles and faecal canine calprotectin concentrations. PMID:24107268

  3. Phenol-Sulfuric Acid Method for Total Carbohydrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nielsen, S. Suzanne

    The phenol-sulfuric acid method is a simple and rapid colorimetric method to determine total carbohydrates in a sample. The method detects virtually all classes of carbohydrates, including mono-, di-, oligo-, and polysaccharides. Although the method detects almost all carbohydrates, the absorptivity of the different carbohydrates varies. Thus, unless a sample is known to contain only one carbohydrate, the results must be expressed arbitrarily in terms of one carbohydrate.

  4. Boronic acids for fluorescence imaging of carbohydrates.

    PubMed

    Sun, Xiaolong; Zhai, Wenlei; Fossey, John S; James, Tony D

    2016-02-28

    "Fluorescence imaging" is a particularly exciting and rapidly developing area of research; the annual number of publications in the area has increased ten-fold over the last decade. The rapid increase of interest in fluorescence imaging will necessitate the development of an increasing number of molecular receptors and binding agents in order to meet the demand in this rapidly expanding area. Carbohydrate biomarkers are particularly important targets for fluorescence imaging given their pivotal role in numerous important biological events, including the development and progression of many diseases. Therefore, the development of new fluorescent receptors and binding agents for carbohydrates is and will be increasing in demand. This review highlights the development of fluorescence imaging agents based on boronic acids a particularly promising class of receptors given their strong and selective binding with carbohydrates in aqueous media.

  5. Leucine-enriched protein feeding does not impair exercise-induced free fatty acid availability and lipid oxidation: beneficial implications for training in carbohydrate-restricted states.

    PubMed

    Impey, Samuel G; Smith, Dominic; Robinson, Amy L; Owens, Daniel J; Bartlett, Jonathan D; Smith, Kenneth; Limb, Marie; Tang, Jonathan; Fraser, William D; Close, Graeme L; Morton, James P

    2015-02-01

    Given that the enhanced oxidative adaptations observed when training in carbohydrate (CHO)-restricted states is potentially regulated through free fatty acid (FFA)-mediated signalling and that leucine-rich protein elevates muscle protein synthesis, the present study aimed to test the hypothesis that leucine-enriched protein feeding enhances circulating leucine concentration but does not impair FFA availability or whole body lipid oxidation during exercise. Nine males cycled for 2 h at 70% VO2peak when fasted (PLACEBO) or having consumed a whey protein solution (WHEY) or a leucine-enriched whey protein gel (GEL), administered as 22 g 1 h pre-exercise, 11 g/h during and 22 g 30 min post-exercise. Total leucine administration was 14.4 g and 6.3 in GEL and WHEY, respectively. Mean plasma leucine concentrations were elevated in GEL (P = 0.001) compared with WHEY and PLACEBO (375 ± 100, 272 ± 51, 146 ± 14 µmol L(-1), respectively). No differences (P = 0.153) in plasma FFA (WHEY 0.53 ± 0.30, GEL 0.45 ± 0.25, PLACEBO 0.65 ± 0.30, mmol L(-1)) or whole body lipid oxidation during exercise (WHEY 0.37 ± 0.26, GEL 0.36 ± 0.24, PLACEBO 0.34 ± 0.24 g/min) were apparent between trials, despite elevated (P = 0.001) insulin in WHEY and GEL compared with PLACEBO (38 ± 16, 35 ± 16, 22 ± 11 pmol L(-1), respectively). We conclude that leucine-enriched protein feeding does not impair FFA availability or whole body lipid oxidation during exercise, thus having practical applications for athletes who deliberately train in CHO-restricted states to promote skeletal muscle adaptations.

  6. Impact of Dietary Carbohydrate and Protein Levels on Carbohydrate Metabolism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lasker, Denise Ann

    2009-01-01

    The goal of this dissertation was to investigate the impact of changing dietary carbohydrate (CARB) intakes within recommended dietary guidelines on metabolic outcomes specifically associated with glycemic regulations and carbohydrate metabolism. This research utilized both human and animal studies to examine changes in metabolism across a wide…

  7. Effects of abscisic acid, ethylene and sugars on the mobilization of storage proteins and carbohydrates in seeds of the tropical tree Sesbania virgata (Leguminosae)

    PubMed Central

    Tonini, Patricia Pinho; Purgatto, Eduardo; Buckeridge, Marcos Silveira

    2010-01-01

    Background and Aims Endospermic legumes are abundant in tropical forests and their establishment is closely related to the mobilization of cell-wall storage polysaccharides. Endosperm cells also store large numbers of protein bodies that play an important role as a nitrogen reserve in this seed. In this work, a systems approach was adopted to evaluate some of the changes in carbohydrates and hormones during the development of seedlings of the rain forest tree Sesbania virgata during the period of establishment. Methods Seeds imbibed abscisic acid (ABA), glucose and sucrose in an atmosphere of ethylene, and the effects of these compounds on the protein contents, α-galactosidase activity and endogenous production of ABA and ethylene by the seeds were observed. Key Results The presence of exogenous ABA retarded the degradation of storage protein in the endosperm and decreased α-galactosidase activity in the same tissue during galactomannan degradation, suggesting that ABA represses enzyme action. On the other hand, exogenous ethylene increased α-galactosidase activity in both the endosperm and testa during galactomannan degradation, suggesting an inducing effect of this hormone on the hydrolytic enzymes. Furthermore, the detection of endogenous ABA and ethylene production during the period of storage mobilization and the changes observed in the production of these endogenous hormones in the presence of glucose and sucrose, suggested a correlation between the signalling pathway of these hormones and the sugars. Conclusions These findings suggest that ABA, ethylene and sugars play a role in the control of the hydrolytic enzyme activities in seeds of S. virgata, controlling the process of storage degradation. This is thought to ensure a balanced flow of the carbon and nitrogen for seedling development. PMID:20705626

  8. Carbohydrates

    MedlinePlus

    Starches; Simple sugars; Sugars; Complex carbohydrates; Diet - carbohydrates; Simple carbohydrates ... forms of carbohydrates to function properly. Sugars and starches are broken down by the body into glucose ( ...

  9. Carbohydrates.

    PubMed

    Cocinero, Emilio J; Çarçabal, Pierre

    2015-01-01

    Although carbohydrates represent one of the most important families of biomolecules, they remain under-studied in comparison to the other biomolecular families (peptides, nucleobases). Beyond their best-known function of energy source in living systems, they act as mediator of molecular recognition processes, carrying molecular information in the so-called "sugar code," just to name one of their countless functions. Owing to their high conformational flexibility, they encode extremely rich information conveyed via the non-covalent hydrogen bonds within the carbohydrate and with other biomolecular assemblies, such as peptide subunits of proteins. Over the last decade there has been tremendous progress in the study of the conformational preferences of neutral oligosaccharides, and of the interactions between carbohydrates and various molecular partners (water, aromatic models, and peptide models), using vibrational spectroscopy as a sensitive probe. In parallel, other spectroscopic techniques have recently become available to the study of carbohydrates in the gas phase (microwave spectroscopy, IRMPD on charged species).

  10. Chemoenzymatic synthesis of surfactants from carbohydrates, amino acids, and fatty acids.

    PubMed

    Bellahouel, S; Rolland, V; Roumestant, M L; Viallefont, P; Martinez, J

    2001-02-01

    The chemoenzymatic synthesis of new surfactants is reported; they were prepared from unprotected carbohydrates, amino acids, and fatty acids. This study pointed out the factors that govern the possibility to enzymatically bind the carbohydrate to the amino acid.

  11. Analysis of Carbohydrate and Fatty Acid Marker Abundance in Ricin Toxin Preparations for Forensic Information

    SciTech Connect

    Colburn, Heather A.; Wunschel, David S.; Kreuzer-Martin, Helen W.; Moran, James J.; Antolick, Kathryn C.; Melville, Angela M.

    2010-07-15

    One challenge in the forensic analysis of ricin samples is determining the method and extent of sample preparation. Ricin purification from the source castor seeds is essentially a protein purification through removal of the non-protein fractions of the seed. Two major, non-protein constituents in the seed are the castor oil and carbohydrates. Ricinoleic acid is a relatively unique fatty acid in nature and is the most abundant component of castor oil, which comprises roughly half the seed weight. The carbohydrate component comprises roughly half of the remaining “mash” left after oil and hull removal. We used derivatization of carbohydrate and fatty acid markers followed by identification and quantification using gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) to assess compositional changes in ricin samples purified by different methods. The loss of ricinoleic acid indicated steps for oil removal had occurred. Changes to the carbohydrate content of the sample were also observed following protein precipitation. The differential loss of arabinose relative to mannose indicated removal of the major carbohydrate fraction of the seed and enrichment of the protein content. Taken together, these changes in fatty acid and carbohydrate abundance are indicative of the preparation method used for each sample.

  12. Pre-Anthesis Reserve Utilization for Protein and Carbohydrate Synthesis in Grains of Wheat1

    PubMed Central

    Gebbing, Thomas; Schnyder, Hans

    1999-01-01

    We assessed the contribution of pre-anthesis reserve C to protein and carbohydrate deposition in grains of wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) using a new approach comprised of steady-state 13C/12C labeling and separation of the protein and carbohydrate fractions of mature grains. Experiments were performed with two spring wheat cultivars (Kadett and Star) grown with differential N fertilizer supply over 2 years. Pre-anthesis reserves contributed between 30% and 47% of the C in protein and 8% to 27% of the C in carbohydrates of grains. Partitioning of pre-anthesis C among the grain fractions was strongly dependent on the C/N (w/w) ratio in mobilized pre-anthesis biomass (r2 = 0.92). There appeared to be no significant exchange of pre-anthesis C between amino acids and carbohydrates during redistribution. The mean apparent efficiency of mobilized carbohydrate-C use in grain filling (MECHO, estimated as the mass of pre-anthesis C deposited in grain carbohydrates per gram of pre-anthesis C mobilized from carbohydrates in vegetative plant parts) was 0.72, whereas that of protein-C (MEP) was 0.56. However, MEP and MECHO varied among treatments. MECHO increased with increasing contributions of water-soluble carbohydrates to total pre-anthesis carbohydrate mobilization. MEP decreased with increasing residence time of protein in vegetative biomass. Possible causes for variability of MEP and MECHO are discussed. PMID:10557235

  13. Molecular simulations of carbohydrates and protein-carbohydrate interactions: motivation, issues and prospects.

    PubMed

    Fadda, Elisa; Woods, Robert J

    2010-08-01

    The characterization of the 3D structure of oligosaccharides, their conjugates and analogs is particularly challenging for traditional experimental methods. Molecular simulation methods provide a basis for interpreting sparse experimental data and for independently predicting conformational and dynamic properties of glycans. Here, we summarize and analyze the issues associated with modeling carbohydrates, with a detailed discussion of four of the most recently developed carbohydrate force fields, reviewed in terms of applicability to natural glycans, carbohydrate-protein complexes and the emerging area of glycomimetic drugs. In addition, we discuss prospectives and new applications of carbohydrate modeling in drug discovery.

  14. Reinforcement effect of soy protein and carbohydrates in polymer composites

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The modulus of soft polymer material can be increased by filler reinforcement. A review of using soy protein and carbohydrates as alternative renewable reinforcement material is presented here. Dry soy protein and carbohydrates are rigid and can form strong filler networks through hydrogen-bonding...

  15. Carbohydrate-reactive, pore-forming outer membrane proteins of Aeromonas hydrophila.

    PubMed Central

    Quinn, D M; Atkinson, H M; Bretag, A H; Tester, M; Trust, T J; Wong, C Y; Flower, R L

    1994-01-01

    Two outer membrane proteins of Aeromonas hydrophila A6, isolated in a one-step affinity chromatography process based on carbohydrate reactivity, were found to be pore-forming molecules in artificial planar bilayer membranes. These carbohydrate-reactive outer membrane proteins (CROMPs; M(r)s, 40,000 and 43,000) were subjected to amino acid analysis. The amino acid profiles for these two outer membrane proteins were almost identical. A partial protein sequence of a 14-amino-acid fragment of the 40,000-Da protein revealed homology with outer membrane porins of Escherichia coli and A. hydrophila. CROMPs were compared with carbohydrate-reactive porins also extracted from outer membranes of A. hydrophila A6. These porins were isolated by using standard porin purification techniques (insolubility in 2% sodium dodecyl sulfate, solubility in 0.4 M NaCl, and Sephacryl S-200 gel filtration), and then Synsorb H type 2 affinity chromatography was done. The physical and functional properties of the carbohydrate-reactive porins and CROMPs were found to be identical. On the basis of pore-forming properties in planar lipid bilayers and channel inhibition with maltotriose solutions, a nonspecific, general diffusion porin and a LamB-like maltoporin were identified in both CROMP and carbohydrate-reactive porin preparations. To our knowledge, the use of carbohydrate reactivity to isolate channel-forming proteins from bacterial outer membranes has not been reported previously. Images PMID:7520425

  16. Carbohydrates

    MedlinePlus

    ... glossary girlshealth.gov home http://www.girlshealth.gov/ Home Nutrition Nutrition basics Carbohydrates Carbohydrates Carbohydrates (say: kar-boh-HEYE-drayts) are the body's main source of energy. They are sometimes called "carbs" for short. If ...

  17. Multicomponent cascade reactions of unprotected carbohydrates and amino acids.

    PubMed

    Voigt, Benjamin; Linke, Michael; Mahrwald, Rainer

    2015-06-05

    Herein an operationally simple multicomponent reaction of unprotected carbohydrates with amino acids and isonitriles is presented. By the extension of this Ugi-type reaction to an unprotected disaccharide a novel glycopeptide structure was accessible.

  18. Validation of lignocellulosic biomass carbohydrates determination via acid hydrolysis.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Shengfei; Runge, Troy M

    2014-11-04

    This work studied the two-step acid hydrolysis for determining carbohydrates in lignocellulosic biomass. Estimation of sugar loss based on acid hydrolyzed sugar standards or analysis of sugar derivatives was investigated. Four model substrates (starch, holocellulose, filter paper and cotton) and three levels of acid/material ratios (7.8, 10.3 and 15.4, v/w) were studied to demonstrate the range of test artifacts. The method for carbohydrates estimation based on acid hydrolyzed sugar standards having the most satisfactory carbohydrate recovery and relative standard deviation. Raw material and the acid/material ratio both had significant effect on carbohydrate hydrolysis, suggesting the acid to have impacts beyond a catalyst in the hydrolysis. Following optimal procedures, we were able to reach a carbohydrate recovery of 96% with a relative standard deviation less than 3%. The carbohydrates recovery lower than 100% was likely due to the incomplete hydrolysis of substrates, which was supported by scanning electron microscope (SEM) images.

  19. Carbohydrates

    MedlinePlus

    Carbohydrates are one of the main types of nutrients. They are the most important source of energy for your body. Your digestive system changes carbohydrates into glucose (blood sugar). Your body uses this ...

  20. Collective choice in ants: the role of protein and carbohydrates ratios.

    PubMed

    Arganda, S; Nicolis, S C; Perochain, A; Péchabadens, C; Latil, G; Dussutour, A

    2014-10-01

    In a foraging context, social insects make collective decisions from individuals responding to local information. When faced with foods varying in quality, ants are known to be able to select the best food source using pheromone trails. Until now, studies investigating collective decisions have focused on single nutrients, mostly carbohydrates. In the environment, the foods available are a complex mixture and are composed of various nutrients, available in different forms. In this paper, we explore the effect of protein to carbohydrate ratio on ants' ability to detect and choose between foods with different protein characteristics (free amino acids or whole proteins). In a two-choice set up, Argentine ants Linepithema humile were presented with two artificial foods containing either whole protein or amino acids in two different dietary conditions: high protein food or high carbohydrate food. At the collective level, when ants were faced with high carbohydrate foods, they did not show a preference between free amino acids or whole proteins, while a preference for free amino acids emerged when choosing between high protein foods. At the individual level, the probability of feeding was higher for high carbohydrates food and for foods containing free amino acids. Two mathematical models were developed to evaluate the importance of feeding probability in collective food selection. A first model in which a forager deposits pheromone only after feeding, and a second model in which a forager always deposits pheromone, but with greater intensity after feeding. Both models were able to predict free amino acid selection, however the second one was better able to reproduce the experimental results suggesting that modulating trail strength according to feeding probability is likely the mechanism explaining amino acid preference at a collective level in Argentine ants.

  1. ANALYSIS OF RICIN TOXIN PREPARATIONS FOR CARBOHYDRATE AND FATTY ACID ABUNDANCE AND ISOTOPE RATIO INFORMATION

    SciTech Connect

    Wunschel, David S.; Kreuzer-Martin, Helen W.; Antolick, Kathryn C.; Colburn, Heather A.; Moran, James J.; Melville, Angela M.

    2009-12-01

    This report describes method development and preliminary evaluation for analyzing castor samples for signatures of purifying ricin. Ricin purification from the source castor seeds is essentially a problem of protein purification using common biochemical methods. Indications of protein purification will likely manifest themselves as removal of the non-protein fractions of the seed. Two major, non-protein, types of biochemical constituents in the seed are the castor oil and various carbohydrates. The oil comprises roughly half the seed weight while the carbohydrate component comprises roughly half of the remaining “mash” left after oil and hull removal. Different castor oil and carbohydrate components can serve as indicators of specific toxin processing steps. Ricinoleic acid is a relatively unique fatty acid in nature and is the most abundant component of castor oil. The loss of ricinoleic acid indicates a step to remove oil from the seeds. The relative amounts of carbohydrates and carbohydrate-like compounds, including arabinose, xylose, myo-inositol fucose, rhamnose, glucosamine and mannose detected in the sample can also indicate specific processing steps. For instance, the differential loss of arabinose relative to mannose and N-acetyl glucosamine indicates enrichment for the protein fraction of the seed using protein precipitation. The methods developed in this project center on fatty acid and carbohydrate extraction from castor samples followed by derivatization to permit analysis by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). Method descriptions herein include: the source and preparation of castor materials used for method evaluation, the equipment and description of procedure required for chemical derivatization, and the instrument parameters used in the analysis. Two types of derivatization methods describe analysis of carbohydrates and one procedure for analysis of fatty acids. Two types of GC-MS analysis is included in the method development, one

  2. Amino Acid Change in the Carbohydrate Response Element Binding Protein is associated with lower triglycerides and myocardial infarction incidence depending on level of adherence to the Mediterranean diet in the PREDIMED trial

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A variant (rs3812316, C771G, and Gln241His) in the MLXIPL (Max-like protein X interacting protein-like) gene encoding the carbohydrate response element binding protein has been associated with lower triglycerides. However, its association with cardiovascular diseases and gene-diet interactions modul...

  3. Interactions of polyphenols with carbohydrates, lipids and proteins.

    PubMed

    Jakobek, Lidija

    2015-05-15

    Polyphenols are secondary metabolites in plants, investigated intensively because of their potential positive effects on human health. Their bioavailability and mechanism of positive effects have been studied, in vitro and in vivo. Lately, a high number of studies takes into account the interactions of polyphenols with compounds present in foods, like carbohydrates, proteins or lipids, because these food constituents can have significant effects on the activity of phenolic compounds. This paper reviews the interactions between phenolic compounds and lipids, carbohydrates and proteins and their impact on polyphenol activity.

  4. Carbohydrate-binding protein identification by coupling structural similarity searching with binding affinity prediction.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Huiying; Yang, Yuedong; von Itzstein, Mark; Zhou, Yaoqi

    2014-11-15

    Carbohydrate-binding proteins (CBPs) are potential biomarkers and drug targets. However, the interactions between carbohydrates and proteins are challenging to study experimentally and computationally because of their low binding affinity, high flexibility, and the lack of a linear sequence in carbohydrates as exists in RNA, DNA, and proteins. Here, we describe a structure-based function-prediction technique called SPOT-Struc that identifies carbohydrate-recognizing proteins and their binding amino acid residues by structural alignment program SPalign and binding affinity scoring according to a knowledge-based statistical potential based on the distance-scaled finite-ideal gas reference state (DFIRE). The leave-one-out cross-validation of the method on 113 carbohydrate-binding domains and 3442 noncarbohydrate binding proteins yields a Matthews correlation coefficient of 0.56 for SPalign alone and 0.63 for SPOT-Struc (SPalign + binding affinity scoring) for CBP prediction. SPOT-Struc is a technique with high positive predictive value (79% correct predictions in all positive CBP predictions) with a reasonable sensitivity (52% positive predictions in all CBPs). The sensitivity of the method was changed slightly when applied to 31 APO (unbound) structures found in the protein databank (14/31 for APO versus 15/31 for HOLO). The result of SPOT-Struc will not change significantly if highly homologous templates were used. SPOT-Struc predicted 19 out of 2076 structural genome targets as CBPs. In particular, one uncharacterized protein in Bacillus subtilis (1oq1A) was matched to galectin-9 from Mus musculus. Thus, SPOT-Struc is useful for uncovering novel carbohydrate-binding proteins. SPOT-Struc is available at http://sparks-lab.org.

  5. The statolith compartment in Chara rhizoids contains carbohydrate and protein

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang-Cahill, F.; Kiss, J. Z.

    1995-01-01

    In contrast to higher plants, the alga Chara has rhizoids with single membrane-bound compartments that function as statoliths in gravity perception. Previous work has demonstrated that these statoliths contain barium sulfate crystals. In this study, we show that statoliths in Chara rhizoids react with a Coomassie Brilliant Blue cytochemical stain for proteins. While statoliths did not react with silver methenamine carbohydrate cytochemistry, the monoclonal antibody CCRC-M2, which is against a carbohydrate (sycamore-maple rhamnogalacturonan I), labeled the statolith compartment. These results demonstrate that in addition to barium sulfate, statoliths in Chara rhizoids have an organic matrix that consists of protein and carbohydrate moieties. Since the statoliths were silver methenamine negative, the carbohydrate in this compartment could be a 3-linked polysaccharide. CCRC-M2 also labeled Golgi cisternae, Golgi-associated vesicles, apical vesicles, and cell walls in the rhizoids. The specificity of CCRC-M2 immunolabeling was verified by several control experiments, including the demonstration that labeling was abolished when the antibody was preabsorbed with its antigen. Since in this and a previous study (John Z. Kiss and L. Andrew Staehelin, American Journal of Botany 80: 273-282, 1993) antibodies against higher plant carbohydrates crossreacted with cell walls of Chara in a specific manner, Characean algae may be a useful model system in biochemical and molecular studies of cell walls.

  6. Effects of carbohydrate, protein and lipid content of organic waste on hydrogen production and fermentation products.

    PubMed

    Alibardi, Luca; Cossu, Raffaello

    2016-01-01

    Organic waste from municipalities, food waste and agro-industrial residues are ideal feedstocks for use in biological conversion processes in biorefinery chains, representing biodegradable materials containing a series of substances belonging to the three main groups of the organic matter: carbohydrates, proteins and lipids. Biological hydrogen production by dark fermentation may assume a central role in the biorefinery concept, representing an up-front treatment for organic waste capable of hydrolysing complex organics and producing biohydrogen. This research study was aimed at evaluating the effects of carbohydrate, protein and lipid content of organic waste on hydrogen yields, volatile fatty acid production and carbon-fate. Biogas and hydrogen productions were linearly correlated to carbohydrate content of substrates while proteins and lipids failed to produce significant contributions. Chemical composition also produced effects on the final products of dark fermentation. Acetic and butyric acids were the main fermentation products, with their ratio proving to correlate with carbohydrate and protein content. The results obtained in this research study enhance the understanding of data variability on hydrogen yields from organic waste. Detailed information on waste composition and chemical characterisation are essential to clearly identify the potential performances of the dark fermentation process.

  7. Efficient production of free fatty acids from soybean meal carbohydrates.

    PubMed

    Wang, Dan; Thakker, Chandresh; Liu, Ping; Bennett, George N; San, Ka-Yiu

    2015-11-01

    Conversion of biomass feedstock to chemicals and fuels has attracted increasing attention recently. Soybean meal, containing significant quantities of carbohydrates, is an inexpensive renewable feedstock. Glucose, galactose, and fructose can be obtained by enzymatic hydrolysis of soluble carbohydrates of soybean meal. Free fatty acids (FFAs) are valuable molecules that can be used as precursors for the production of fuels and other value-added chemicals. In this study, free fatty acids were produced by mutant Escherichia coli strains with plasmid pXZ18Z (carrying acyl-ACP thioesterase (TE) and (3R)-hydroxyacyl-ACP dehydratase) using individual sugars, sugar mixtures, and enzymatic hydrolyzed soybean meal extract. For individual sugar fermentations, strain ML211 (MG1655 fadD(-) fabR(-) )/pXZ18Z showed the best performance, which produced 4.22, 3.79, 3.49 g/L free fatty acids on glucose, fructose, and galactose, respectively. While the strain ML211/pXZ18Z performed the best with individual sugars, however, for sugar mixture fermentation, the triple mutant strain XZK211 (MG1655 fadD(-) fabR(-) ptsG(-) )/pXZ18Z with an additional deletion of ptsG encoding the glucose-specific transporter, functioned the best due to relieved catabolite repression. This strain produced approximately 3.18 g/L of fatty acids with a yield of 0.22 g fatty acids/g total sugar. Maximum free fatty acids production of 2.78 g/L with a high yield of 0.21 g/g was achieved using soybean meal extract hydrolysate. The results suggested that soybean meal carbohydrates after enzymatic treatment could serve as an inexpensive feedstock for the efficient production of free fatty acids.

  8. Stacking Interactions between Carbohydrate and Protein Quantified by Combination of Theoretical and Experimental Methods

    PubMed Central

    Nečasová, Ivona; Mishra, Sushil Kumar; Komárek, Jan; Koča, Jaroslav

    2012-01-01

    Carbohydrate – receptor interactions are an integral part of biological events. They play an important role in many cellular processes, such as cell-cell adhesion, cell differentiation and in-cell signaling. Carbohydrates can interact with a receptor by using several types of intermolecular interactions. One of the most important is the interaction of a carbohydrate's apolar part with aromatic amino acid residues, known as dispersion interaction or CH/π interaction. In the study presented here, we attempted for the first time to quantify how the CH/π interaction contributes to a more general carbohydrate - protein interaction. We used a combined experimental approach, creating single and double point mutants with high level computational methods, and applied both to Ralstonia solanacearum (RSL) lectin complexes with α-l-Me-fucoside. Experimentally measured binding affinities were compared with computed carbohydrate-aromatic amino acid residue interaction energies. Experimental binding affinities for the RSL wild type, phenylalanine and alanine mutants were −8.5, −7.1 and −4.1 kcal.mol−1, respectively. These affinities agree with the computed dispersion interaction energy between carbohydrate and aromatic amino acid residues for RSL wild type and phenylalanine, with values −8.8, −7.9 kcal.mol−1, excluding the alanine mutant where the interaction energy was −0.9 kcal.mol−1. Molecular dynamics simulations show that discrepancy can be caused by creation of a new hydrogen bond between the α-l-Me-fucoside and RSL. Observed results suggest that in this and similar cases the carbohydrate-receptor interaction can be driven mainly by a dispersion interaction. PMID:23056230

  9. Interactive Effects of Indigestible Carbohydrates, Protein Type, and Protein Level on Biomarkers of Large Intestine Health in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Taciak, Marcin; Barszcz, Marcin; Tuśnio, Anna; Pastuszewska, Barbara

    2015-01-01

    The effects of indigestible carbohydrates, protein type, and protein level on large intestine health were examined in rats. For 21 days, 12 groups of six 12-week-old male Wistar rats were fed diets with casein (CAS), or potato protein concentrate (PPC), providing 14% (lower protein level; LP), or 20% (higher protein level; HP) protein, and containing cellulose, resistant potato starch, or pectin. Fermentation end-products, pH, and β-glucuronidase levels in cecal digesta, and ammonia levels in colonic digesta were determined. Cecal digesta, tissue weights, cecal and colon morphology, and colonocyte DNA damage were also analyzed. Digesta pH was lower, whereas relative mass of cecal tissue and digesta were higher in rats fed pectin diets than in those fed cellulose. Cecal parameters were greater in rats fed PPC and HP diets than in those fed CAS and LP diets, respectively. Short-chain fatty acid (SCFA) concentrations were unaffected by protein or carbohydrate type. Total SCFA, acetic acid, and propionic acid concentrations were greater in rats fed LP diets than in those fed HP. Cecal pool of isobutyric and isovaleric acids was greater in rats fed PPC than in those fed CAS diets. PPC diets decreased phenol concentration and increased ammonia concentration in cecal and colonic digesta, respectively. Cecal crypt depth was greater in rats fed PPC and HP diets, and was unaffected by carbohydrates; whereas colonic crypt depth was greater in rats fed cellulose. Myenteron thickness in the cecum was unaffected by nutrition, but was greater in the colon of rats fed cellulose. Colonocyte DNA damage was greater in rats fed LP diets than in those fed HP diets, and was unaffected by carbohydrate or protein type. It was found that nutritional factors decreasing cecal digesta weight contribute to greater phenol production, increased DNA damage, and reduced ammonia concentration in the colon. PMID:26536028

  10. Pyrolysis characteristics and pathways of protein, lipid and carbohydrate isolated from microalgae Nannochloropsis sp.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xin; Sheng, Lili; Yang, Xiaoyi

    2017-04-01

    Microalgal components were isolated gradually to get lipid-rich, protein-rich and carbohydrate-rich components. The aim of this work was to study pyrolysis mechanism of microalgae by real isolated real algae components. Thermogrametric analysis (DTG) curve of microalgae was fitted by single pyrolysis curves of protein, lipid and carbohydrate except special zones, which likely affected by cell disruption and hydrolysis mass loss. Experimental microalgae liquefaction without water index N was 0.6776, 0.3861 and 0.2856 for isolated lipid, protein and carbohydrate. Pyrolysis pathways of lipid are decarboxylation, decarbonylation, fragmentation of glycerin moieties and steroid to form hydrocarbons, carboxylic acids and esters. Pyrolysis pathways of protein are decarboxylation, deamination, hydrocarbon residue fragmentation, dimerization and fragmentation of peptide bonds to form amide/amines/nitriles, esters, hydrocarbons and N-heterocyclic compounds, especially diketopiperazines (DKPs). Pyrolysis pathways of carbohydrate are dehydrated reactions and further fragmentation to form ketones and aldehyde, decomposition of lignin to form phenols, and fragmentation of lipopolysaccharides.

  11. Correlation between carbohydrate-binding specificity and amino acid sequence of carbohydrate-binding regions of Cytisus-type anti-H(O) lectins.

    PubMed

    Konami, Y; Yamamoto, K; Osawa, T; Irimura, T

    1992-06-15

    A carbohydrate-binding peptide of the di-N-acetylchitobiose-binding Cytisus sessilifolius anti-H(O) lectin I (CSA-I) was isolated from the endoproteinase Asp-N digest of CSA-I by affinity chromatography on a column of N-acetyl-D-glucosamine oligomer-Sepharose (GlcNAc oligomer-Sepharose). The amino acid sequence of the carbohydrate-binding peptide of CSA-I was determined to be DTYFGKTYNPW using a gas-phase protein sequencer. This sequence corresponds to the sequence from Asp-129 to Trp-139 based on the primary structure of CSA-I, and shows a high degree of homology to those of the putative carbohydrate-binding peptide of the Laburnum alpinum lectin I (LAA-I) (DTYFGKAYNPW) and of the Ulex europaeus lectin II (UEA-II) (DSYFGKTYNPW). The binding of these three anti-H(O) lectins is known to be inhibited by di-N-acetylchitobiose but not by L-fucose. These results strongly suggest that there is a good correlation between the carbohydrate-binding specificity and the amino acid sequence of the carbohydrate-binding regions of di-N-acetylchitobiose-binding lectins.

  12. Amino acid, fatty acid, and carbohydrate content of Artocarpus altilis (breadfruit).

    PubMed

    Golden, K D; Williams, O J

    2001-06-01

    A study is conducted to determine the amino acid, fatty acid, and carbohydrate content of breadfruit using high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) and gas chromatography (GC). An HPLC method is used for the determination of amino acids and fatty acids in breadfruit. Representative amino acid samples are derivatized with phenylisothiocianate and the resulting phenylthiocarbamyl derivatives are separated on a reversed-phase column by gradient elution with a 0.05M ammonium acetate buffer and 0.01M ammonium acetate in acetonitrile-methanol-water (44:10:46, v/v). Representative fatty acid samples are derivatized with phenacyl bromide and the resulting fatty acid phenacyl esters are separated on a reversed-phase column by gradient elution with acetonitrile and water. Amino acid and fatty acid derivatives are detected by ultraviolet detection at 254 nm. The analysis of the carbohydrates in breadfruit employs a GC method. Carbohydrates are derivatized using trimethylchlorosilane and hexamethyldisilazane to form trimethylsilyl ethers. Compounds in the samples are separated by the temperature programming of a GC using nitrogen as the carrier gas. Percent recoveries of amino acids, fatty acids, and carbohydrates are 72.5%, 68.2%, and 81.4%, respectively. The starch content of the breadfruit is 15.52 g/100 g fresh weight.

  13. Carbopeptides: carbohydrates as potential templates for de novo design of protein models.

    PubMed

    Jensen, K J; Barany, G

    2000-07-01

    De novo design of proteins has evolved into a powerful approach for studying the factors governing protein folding and stability. Among the families of structures frequently studied is the 'four-helix bundle' in which four alpha-helical peptide strands, linked by loops, form a hydrophobic core. Assembly of protein models on a template has been suggested as a way to reduce the entropy of folding. Here we describe the potential use of a carbohydrate as such a template. The monosaccharide D-galactose was per-O-acylated with (Nbeta-Fmoc-betaAla)2O to give a penta-substituted derivative, which was converted to the corresponding glycosyl bromide and used for the glycosylation of 4-hydroxymethylbenzoic acid pentafluorophenyl ester (HMBA-OPfp). The beta-glycosidic carbohydrate template (Nbeta-Fmoc-3Ala)4-beta-D-Galp-(1-O)-MBA-OPfp thus obtained was coupled to a PAL-PEG-PS resin and simultaneously extended at the four arms to yield, after cleavage from the solid support, a carbopeptide with four identical peptide strands. Extension of this concept to, for example, synthesis of novel multiple antigenic peptides (MAPs) and synthesis of carbohydrate clusters can be easily envisioned. The ability to efficiently synthesize such structures sets the stage for further studies to test whether the carbohydrate templates do indeed nucleate folding.

  14. Effects of lipoic acid on growth and biochemical responses of common carp fed with carbohydrate diets.

    PubMed

    Santos, R A; Caldas, S; Primel, E G; Tesser, M B; Monserrat, J M

    2016-12-01

    Lipoic acid (LA) is an antioxidant that also favors glucose uptake in mammals. Until now, there are no studies evaluating the potential effect of this molecule on glycemic control in fish. It was evaluated LA effects on glucose uptake in common carp Cyprinus carpio fed with carbohydrate diets from two carbohydrate sources: glucose (GLU) and starch (STA), and supplemented or not with LA, being the diets: +GLU/-LA (GLU); +GLU/+LA (GLU + LA); +STA/-LA (STA); and +STA/+LA (STA + LA). Carp juveniles (6.5 ± 0.1 g) were fed with each diet ad libitum 4 times a day, during 68 days. Muscle glycogen concentration was higher (p < 0.05) in GLU and GLU + LA than in STA and STA + LA groups. On fish fed with starch, muscle cholesterol and triglyceride concentrations were higher (p < 0.05) in fish fed diets supplemented with LA. Muscle protein levels were higher in fish fed with LA, independent of the diet carbohydrate source. Lipid peroxidation was significantly reduced (p < 0.05) in fish muscle on fish fed the STA + LA diets when compared with the STA diet. Our findings indicate that LA modulates lipid, proteins and carbohydrate metabolism together with the well-known antioxidant effect. Also, LA showed to enhance starch utilization taking into account muscle cholesterol and triglyceride levels.

  15. Improved Feed Protein Fractional Schemes for Formulating Rations With the Cornell Net Carbohydrate and Protein System

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Adequate predictions of rumen-degradable protein (RDP) and rumen-undegradable protein (RUP) supplies are necessary to optimize performance while minimizing losses of excess nitrogen (N). The objectives of this study were to evaluate the original Cornell Net Carbohydrate Protein System (CNCPS) protei...

  16. A single-amino-acid substitution eliminates the stringent carbohydrate requirement for intracellular transport of a viral glycoprotein.

    PubMed

    Pitta, A M; Rose, J K; Machamer, C E

    1989-09-01

    In this report, we have investigated the contribution of primary sequence to the carbohydrate requirement for intracellular transport of two closely related glycoproteins, the G proteins of the San Juan and Orsay strains of vesicular stomatitis virus. We used site-directed mutagenesis of the coding sequence to eliminate the two consensus sites for glycosylation in the Orsay G protein. Whereas the nonglycosylated San Juan G protein required at least one of its two asparagine-linked oligosaccharides for transport to the plasma membrane at 37 degrees C, a fraction of the Orsay G protein was transported without carbohydrate. Of the 10 amino acid differences between these two proteins, residue 172 (tyrosine in San Juan, aspartic acid in Orsay) played the major role in determining the stringency for the carbohydrate requirement. The rates at which the glycosylated and nonglycosylated Orsay G proteins were transported to the cell surface were the same, although a smaller fraction of the nonglycosylated protein was transported. These results suggest that the carbohydrate does not promote intracellular transport directly but influences a polypeptide folding or oligomerization step which is critical for transport.

  17. Protein-Carbohydrate Interactions Studied by NMR: From Molecular Recognition to Drug Design

    PubMed Central

    Fernández-Alonso, María del Carmen; Díaz, Dolores; Berbis, Manuel Álvaro; Marcelo, Filipa; Cañada, Javier; Jiménez-Barbero, Jesús

    2012-01-01

    Diseases that result from infection are, in general, a consequence of specific interactions between a pathogenic organism and the cells. The study of host-pathogen interactions has provided insights for the design of drugs with therapeutic properties. One area that has proved to be promising for such studies is the constituted by carbohydrates which participate in biological processes of paramount importance. On the one hand, carbohydrates have shown to be information carriers with similar, if not higher, importance than traditionally considered carriers as amino acids and nucleic acids. On the other hand, the knowledge on molecular recognition of sugars by lectins and other carbohydrate-binding proteins has been employed for the development of new biomedical strategies. Biophysical techniques such as X-Ray crystallography and NMR spectroscopy lead currently the investigation on this field. In this review, a description of traditional and novel NMR methodologies employed in the study of sugar-protein interactions is briefly presented in combination with a palette of NMR-based studies related to biologically and/or pharmaceutically relevant applications. PMID:23305367

  18. Transient decrements in mood during energy deficit are independent of dietary protein-to-carbohydrate ratio.

    PubMed

    Karl, J Philip; Thompson, Lauren A; Niro, Philip J; Margolis, Lee M; McClung, James P; Cao, Jay J; Whigham, Leah D; Combs, Gerald F; Young, Andrew J; Lieberman, Harris R; Pasiakos, Stefan M

    2015-02-01

    Energy deficit and dietary macronutrient intake are thought to independently modulate cognition, mood and sleep. To what extent manipulating the dietary ratio of protein-to-carbohydrate affects mood, cognition and sleep during short-term energy deficit is undetermined. Using a randomized, block design, 39 non-obese young adults (21±1 years, BMI 25±1 kg/m(2)) consumed diets containing 0.8 g, 1.6 g or 2.4 g protein per kg body weight per day for 31 days. Carbohydrate intake was reduced to accommodate higher protein intakes while dietary fat was maintained at 30% of total energy intake. Cognitive performance, mood, self-reported sleep quality, and plasma amino acid concentrations were periodically assessed during a 10-day energy balance period and a subsequent 21-day, 40% energy deficit period. Anger, tension and total mood disturbance increased during the initial ten days of energy deficit (P<0.05), but by the end of the energy deficit returned to levels not different from those measured during energy balance. No effects of dietary protein-to-carbohydrate ratio on cognitive performance, mood or self-reported sleep quality were observed during energy balance or energy deficit. Thus, high-protein, low-carbohydrate, moderate-fat diets do not appear to benefit or impair cognition, mood or sleep in non-obese adults during energy deficit. These findings suggest that energy deficit may initially be psychologically difficult for non-obese individuals attempting to lose weight, but that these changes are transient. Employing strategies that alleviate decrements in mood during this initial period of adaptation may help sustain weight loss efforts.

  19. Interaction between carbohydrate residues of alpha1-acid glycoprotein (orosomucoid) and saturating concentrations of Calcofluor White. A fluorescence study.

    PubMed

    Albani, J R; Sillen, A; Plancke, Y D; Coddeville, B; Engelborghs, Y

    2000-07-24

    Calcofluor White is a fluorescent probe that interacts with polysaccharides and is commonly used in clinical studies. Interaction between Calcofluor White and carbohydrate residues of alpha1-acid glycoprotein (orosomucoid) was previously followed by fluorescence titration of the Trp residues of the protein. A stoichiometry of one Calcofluor for one protein has been found [J.R. Albani and Y.D. Plancke, Carbohydr. Res., 318 (1999) 193-200]. Alpha1-acid glycoprotein contains 40% carbohydrate by weight and has up to 16 sialic acid residues. Since binding of Calcofluor to alpha1-acid glycoprotein occurs mainly on the carbohydrate residues, we studied in the present work the interaction between Calcofluor and the protein by following the fluorescence change of the fluorophore. In order to establish the role of the sialic acid residues in the interaction, the experiments were performed with the sialylated and asialylated protein. Interaction of Calcofluor with sialylated alpha1-acid glycoprotein induces a red shift of the emission maximum of the fluorophore from 438 to 450 nm at saturation (one Calcofluor for one sialic acid) and an increase in the fluorescence intensity. At saturation the fluorescence intensity increase levels off. Binding of Calcofluor to asialylated acid glycoprotein does not change the position of the emission maximum of the fluorophore and induces a decrease in its fluorescence intensity. Saturation occurs when 10 molecules of Calcofluor are bound to 1 mol of alpha1-acid glycoprotein. Since the protein contains five heteropolysaccharide groups, we have 2 mol of Calcofluor for each group. Addition of free sialic acid to Calcofluor induces a continuous decrease in the fluorescence intensity of the fluorophore but does not change the position of the emission maximum. Our results confirm the presence of a defined spatial conformation of the sialic acid residues, a conformation that disappears when they are free in solution. Dynamics studies on Calcofluor

  20. Selection of dietary protein and carbohydrate by rats: Changes with maturation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yokogoshi, Hidehiko; Theall, Cynthia L.; Wurtman, Richard J.

    1985-01-01

    Weaning (21-day-old; 40-50 g) male rats given simultaneous access to foods, containing 18 percent casein and 15 or 70 percent carbohydrate (dextrin), tended to consume only 29-35 percent as much protein as carbohydrate (i.e., protein/carbohydrate ratios were 0.29-0.35). With maturation, when animals weighed 100 g or more, about half continued this pattern of nutrient choice, but the others abruptly began to consume considerably larger proportions of protein, exhibiting protein/carbohydrate ratios as high as 0.80-1.00. Each adult animal's protein/carbohydrate ratio tended to vary only slightly (s.e. = 3 percent of means). Adult protein/carbohydrate ratios were not correlated with fasting brain 5-HT or 5-HIAA levels. These marked differences among rats in eating behavior would not be observed when--as is usually the case--animals are given access to only one diet.

  1. Effects of alkali stress on growth, free amino acids and carbohydrates metabolism in Kentucky bluegrass (Poa pratensis).

    PubMed

    Zhang, Pingping; Fu, Jinmin; Hu, Longxing

    2012-10-01

    Soil alkalization is one of the most prominent adverse environmental factors limiting plant growth, while alkali stress affects amino acids and carbohydrates metabolism. The objective of this study was conducted to investigate the effects of alkali stress on growth, amino acids and carbohydrates metabolism in Kentucky bluegrass (Poa pratensis). Seventy-day-old plants were subjected to four pH levels: 6.0 (control), 8.0 (low), 9.4 (moderate) and 10.3 (severe) for 7 days. Moderate to severe alkali stress (pH >9.4) caused a significant decline in turf quality and growth rate in Kentucky bluegrass. Soluble protein was unchanged in shoots, but decreased in roots as pH increased. The levels of amino acids was kept at the same level as control level at 4 days after treatment (DAT) in shoots, but greater at 7 DAT, when plants were subjected to severe (pH 10.3) alkali stress. The alkali stressed plants had a greater level of starch, water soluble carbohydrate and sucrose content, but lower level of fructose and glucose. Fructan and total non-structural carbohydrate (TNC) increased at 4 DAT and decreased at 7 DAT for alkali stressed plants. These results suggested that the decrease in fructose and glucose contributed to the growth reduction under alkali stress, while the increase in amino acids, sucrose and storage form of carbohydrate (fructan, starch) could be an adaptative mechanism in Kentucky bluegrass under alkali stress.

  2. Apparent low ability of liver and muscle to adapt to variation of dietary carbohydrate:protein ratio in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss).

    PubMed

    Skiba-Cassy, Sandrine; Panserat, Stéphane; Larquier, Mélanie; Dias, Karine; Surget, Anne; Plagnes-Juan, Elisabeth; Kaushik, Sadasivam; Seiliez, Iban

    2013-04-28

    The rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) exhibits high dietary amino acid requirements and an apparent inefficiency to use dietary carbohydrates. Using this species, we investigated the metabolic consequences of long-term high carbohydrates/low protein feeding. Fish were fed two experimental diets containing either 20% carbohydrates/50% proteins (C20P50), or high levels of carbohydrates at the expense of proteins (35% carbohydrates/35% proteins--C35P35). The expression of genes related to hepatic and muscle glycolysis (glucokinase (GK), pyruvate kinase and hexokinase) illustrates the poor utilisation of carbohydrates irrespective of their dietary levels. The increased postprandial GK activity and the absence of inhibition of the gluconeogenic enzyme glucose-6-phosphatase activity support the hypothesis of the existence of a futile cycle around glucose phosphorylation extending postprandial hyperglycaemia. After 9 weeks of feeding, the C35P35-fed trout displayed lower body weight and feed efficiency and reduced protein and fat gains than those fed C20P50. The reduced activation of eukaryotic translation initiation factor 4-E binding protein 1 (4E-BP1) in the muscle in this C35P35 group suggests a reduction in protein synthesis, possibly contributing to the reduction in N gain. An increase in the dietary carbohydrate:protein ratio decreased the expression of genes involved in amino acid catabolism (serine dehydratase and branched-chain α-keto acid dehydrogenase E1α and E1β), and increased that of carnitine palmitoyltransferase 1, suggesting a higher reliance on lipids as energy source in fish fed high-carbohydrate and low-protein diets. This probably also contributes to the lower fat gain. Together, these results show that different metabolic pathways are affected by a high-carbohydrate/low-protein diet in rainbow trout.

  3. Convergence of carbohydrate-biased intake targets in caged worker honeybees fed different protein sources.

    PubMed

    Altaye, Solomon Z; Pirk, Christian W W; Crewe, Robin M; Nicolson, Susan W

    2010-10-01

    The nutritional needs of bees are supplied by nectar carbohydrates and by protein and other nutrients in pollen but little is known of how bees achieve nutritional balance. Using newly emerged caged worker honeybees (Apis mellifera scutellata), we investigated whether bees maintain their intake target when confined to pairs of imbalanced complementary diets varying in protein to carbohydrate (P:C) ratio. Diets were formulated using three protein sources [casein, royal jelly or Feed-Bee (a natural pollen substitute)] and sucrose. Within each protein type, honeybees switched between complementary diets and converged on the same P:C intake target. However, this target differed between protein types: P:C ratios were 1:12, 1:14 and 1:11 on casein, royal jelly and Feed-Bee diets, respectively. Except for an early peak in protein consumption on royal jelly diets, these strongly convergent ratios remained constant over the 14 day experiment. This is probably due to the absence of brood, reflected in relatively stable values measured for haemolymph protein concentration and hypopharyngeal gland activation in bees on Feed-Bee diets. Performance of caged workers was also assessed in terms of survival and ovarian activation. Survival was highest on casein diets and lowest on Feed-Bee diets but ovarian activation was highest on royal jelly diets and lowest on casein diets. This may be due to additional components in Feed-Bee and royal jelly (e.g. fatty acids), which are needed to activate the ovaries but also reduce survival. Nutrient intake of broodless workers is directly related to their own physiological requirements, and the strong carbohydrate bias may reflect the high metabolic rate of honeybees even under resting conditions.

  4. Identification and Characterization of Sulfated Carbohydrate-Binding Protein from Lactobacillus reuteri

    PubMed Central

    Nishiyama, Keita; Ochiai, Ayaka; Tsubokawa, Daigo; Ishihara, Kazuhiko; Yamamoto, Yuji; Mukai, Takao

    2013-01-01

    We previously purified a putative sulfated-galactosylceramide (sulfatide)-binding protein with a molecular weight of 47 kDa from the cell surface of Lactobacillus reuteri JCM1081. The aim of this study was to identify the 47-kDa protein, examine its binding to sulfated glycolipids and mucins, and evaluate its role in bacterial adhesion to mucosal surfaces. By cloning and sequencing analysis, the 47-kDa protein was identified as elongation factor-Tu (EF-Tu). Adhesion properties were examined using 6×Histidine-fused EF-Tu (His6-EF-Tu). Surface plasmon resonance analysis demonstrated pH-dependent binding of His6-EF-Tu to sulfated glycolipids, but not to neutral or sialylated glycolipids, suggesting that a sulfated galactose residue was responsible for EF-Tu binding. Furthermore, His6-EF-Tu was found to bind to porcine gastric mucin (PGM) by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Binding was markedly reduced by sulfatase treatment of PGM and in the presence of acidic and desialylated oligosaccharide fractions containing sulfated carbohydrate residues prepared from PGM, demonstrating that sulfated carbohydrate moieties mediated binding. Histochemical staining revealed similar localization of His6-EF-Tu and high iron diamine staining in porcine mucosa. These results indicated that EF-Tu bound PGM via sulfated carbohydrate moieties. To characterize the contribution of EF-Tu to the interaction between bacterial cells and PGM, we tested whether anti-EF-Tu antibodies could inhibit the interaction. Binding of L. reuteri JCM1081 to PGM was significantly blocked in a concentration-dependent matter, demonstrating the involvement of EF-Tu in bacterial adhesion. In conclusion, the present results demonstrated, for the first time, that EF-Tu bound sulfated carbohydrate moieties of sulfated glycolipids and sulfomucin, thereby promoting adhesion of L. reuteri to mucosal surfaces. PMID:24391811

  5. Carbohydrate, protein, and fat metabolism during exercise after oral carnitine supplementation in humans.

    PubMed

    Broad, Elizabeth M; Maughan, Ronald J; Galloway, Stuart D

    2008-12-01

    Twenty nonvegetarian active males were pair-matched and randomly assigned to receive 2 g of L-carnitine L-tartrate (LC) or placebo per day for 2 wk. Participants exercised for 90 min at 70% VO2max after 2 days of a prescribed diet (M +/- SD: 13.6 +/- 1.6 MJ, 57% carbohydrate, 15% protein, 26% fat, 2% alcohol) before and after supplementation. Results indicated no change in carbohydrate oxidation, nitrogen excretion, branched-chain amino acid oxidation, or plasma urea during exercise between the beginning and end of supplementation in either group. After 2 wk of LC supplementation the plasma ammonia response to exercise tended to be suppressed (0 vs. 2 wk at 60 min exercise, 97 +/- 26 vs. 80 +/- 9, and 90 min exercise, 116 +/- 47 vs. 87 +/- 25 micromol/L), with no change in the placebo group. The data indicate that 2 wk of LC supplementation does not affect fat, carbohydrate, and protein contribution to metabolism during prolonged moderate-intensity cycling exercise. The tendency toward suppressed ammonia accumulation, however, indicates that oral LC supplementation might have the potential to reduce the metabolic stress of exercise or alter ammonia production or removal, which warrants further investigation.

  6. Effects of protein and carbohydrate meals on mood and performance: interactions with sex and age.

    PubMed

    Spring, B; Maller, O; Wurtman, J; Digman, L; Cozolino, L

    Normal adult subjects (n = 184) consumed a high-protein or high-carbohydrate meal. Two hours later their mood and performance were tested. The effects of meal composition on mood were different for men and women, and for older and younger subjects. Females, but not males, reported greater sleepiness after a carbohydrate as opposed to a protein meal. Male subjects, but not females, reported greater calmness after a carbohydrate as opposed to a protein meal. Older subjects responded differently to meals depending upon the time of day when these were consumed. When meals were eaten for breakfast (but not for lunch) individuals 40 yr of age or older felt more tense and less calm after a protein than after a carbohydrate meal. Although older subjects reported subjective discomfort after a morning protein meal, they displayed objective performance impairments after a carbohydrate lunch. Subjects 40 yr of age or older were impaired on a test of sustained selective attention (dichotic shadowing) after consuming a high-carbohydrate lunch. The shadowing impairment after carbohydrate consumption was as pronounced without distraction as with distraction and resulted mostly from increased omission errors. Our findings suggest negative effects on concentration when older subjects consume a high-carbohydrate, low-protein lunch. These negative effects of carbohydrate consumption appear to arise predominantly from lapses of attention rather than from intrusion of distractors.

  7. Reinforcement effect of soy protein/carbohydrate ratio in styrene-butadiene polymer

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Soy protein and carbohydrate at different ratios were blended with latex to form composites. The variation of protein to carbohydrate ratio has a sifnificant effect on the composite properties and the results from dynamic mechanical method showed a substantial reinforcement effect. The composites ...

  8. Interaction between calcofluor white and carbohydrates of alpha 1-acid glycoprotein.

    PubMed

    Albani, J R; Plancke, Y D

    1999-05-31

    Interactions between the fluorescent probe, calcofluor white, and human serum albumin (HSA) and alpha 1-acid glycoprotein (orosomucoid) are compared. The two proteins have comparable isoelectric points, but alpha 1-acid glycoprotein is highly glycosylated (40% of glycans by weight), while the serum albumin is not. Binding of calcofluor to the proteins induces an increase in both the fluorescence anisotropy and the fluorescence intensity of the fluorophore. Also, we found that the calcofluor exhibits a fluorescence emission with a maximum located at 432, 415 or 445 nm, respectively, in the absence of proteins, in the presence of HSA, and in the presence of alpha 1-acid glycoprotein. The stoichiometries of the calcofluor-serum albumin and calcofluor-alpha 1-acid glycoprotein complexes are 2:1 and 1:1, respectively. The association constants are 0.04 and 0.15 microM-1, respectively. The calcofluor does not interact with Lens culinaris agglutinin (LCA), although the protein has a hydrophobic site. Nevertheless, one cannot exclude that the binding of the fluorophore to the HSA is nonspecific. Our results, when compared with those obtained with calcofluor dissolved in the hydrophobic solvent isobutanol, and with the fluorescent probe, potassium 6-(p-toluidino)-2-naphthalenesulfonate (TNS), bound to alpha 1-acid glycoprotein, indicate that the emission of calcofluor bound to HSA occurs from a hydrophobic state, while that of calcofluor bound to alpha 1-acid glycoprotein occurs from a hydrophilic state. The fluorescence intensity of calcofluor decreases in the presence of carbohydrates isolated from alpha 1-acid glycoprotein, while it increases in the presence of alpha 1-cellulose. Thus, calcofluor interacts mainly with the glycan moiety of alpha 1-acid glycoprotein, and its fluorescence is sensitive to the secondary structure of the glycans.

  9. Intake of Protein Plus Carbohydrate during the First Two Hours after Exhaustive Cycling Improves Performance the following Day.

    PubMed

    Rustad, Per I; Sailer, Manuela; Cumming, Kristoffer T; Jeppesen, Per B; Kolnes, Kristoffer J; Sollie, Ove; Franch, Jesper; Ivy, John L; Daniel, Hannelore; Jensen, Jørgen

    2016-01-01

    Intake of protein immediately after exercise stimulates protein synthesis but improved recovery of performance is not consistently observed. The primary aim of the present study was to compare performance 18 h after exhaustive cycling in a randomized diet-controlled study (175 kJ·kg(-1) during 18 h) when subjects were supplemented with protein plus carbohydrate or carbohydrate only in a 2-h window starting immediately after exhaustive cycling. The second aim was to investigate the effect of no nutrition during the first 2 h and low total energy intake (113 kJ·kg(-1) during 18 h) on performance when protein intake was similar. Eight endurance-trained subjects cycled at 237±6 Watt (~72% VO2max) until exhaustion (TTE) on three occasions, and supplemented with 1.2 g carbohydrate·kg(-1)·h(-1) (CHO), 0.8 g carbohydrate + 0.4 g protein·kg(-1)·h(-1) (CHO+PRO) or placebo without energy (PLA). Intake of CHO+PROT increased plasma glucose, insulin, and branch chained amino acids, whereas CHO only increased glucose and insulin. Eighteen hours later, subjects performed another TTE at 237±6 Watt. TTE was increased after intake of CHO+PROT compared to CHO (63.5±4.4 vs 49.8±5.4 min; p<0.05). PLA reduced TTE to 42.8±5.1 min (p<0.05 vs CHO). Nitrogen balance was positive in CHO+PROT, and negative in CHO and PLA. In conclusion, performance was higher 18 h after exhaustive cycling with intake of CHO+PROT compared to an isocaloric amount of carbohydrate during the first 2 h post exercise. Intake of a similar amount of protein but less carbohydrate during the 18 h recovery period reduced performance.

  10. Intake of Protein Plus Carbohydrate during the First Two Hours after Exhaustive Cycling Improves Performance the following Day

    PubMed Central

    Rustad, Per I.; Kolnes, Kristoffer J.; Sollie, Ove; Franch, Jesper; Ivy, John L.; Daniel, Hannelore; Jensen, Jørgen

    2016-01-01

    Intake of protein immediately after exercise stimulates protein synthesis but improved recovery of performance is not consistently observed. The primary aim of the present study was to compare performance 18 h after exhaustive cycling in a randomized diet-controlled study (175 kJ·kg-1 during 18 h) when subjects were supplemented with protein plus carbohydrate or carbohydrate only in a 2-h window starting immediately after exhaustive cycling. The second aim was to investigate the effect of no nutrition during the first 2 h and low total energy intake (113 kJ·kg-1 during 18 h) on performance when protein intake was similar. Eight endurance-trained subjects cycled at 237±6 Watt (~72% VO2max) until exhaustion (TTE) on three occasions, and supplemented with 1.2 g carbohydrate·kg-1·h-1 (CHO), 0.8 g carbohydrate + 0.4 g protein·kg-1·h-1 (CHO+PRO) or placebo without energy (PLA). Intake of CHO+PROT increased plasma glucose, insulin, and branch chained amino acids, whereas CHO only increased glucose and insulin. Eighteen hours later, subjects performed another TTE at 237±6 Watt. TTE was increased after intake of CHO+PROT compared to CHO (63.5±4.4 vs 49.8±5.4 min; p<0.05). PLA reduced TTE to 42.8±5.1 min (p<0.05 vs CHO). Nitrogen balance was positive in CHO+PROT, and negative in CHO and PLA. In conclusion, performance was higher 18 h after exhaustive cycling with intake of CHO+PROT compared to an isocaloric amount of carbohydrate during the first 2 h post exercise. Intake of a similar amount of protein but less carbohydrate during the 18 h recovery period reduced performance. PMID:27078151

  11. Ligand-mediated dimerization of a carbohydrate-binding molecule reveals a novel mechanism for protein-carbohydrate recognition.

    PubMed

    Flint, James; Nurizzo, Didier; Harding, Stephen E; Longman, Emma; Davies, Gideon J; Gilbert, Harry J; Bolam, David N

    2004-03-19

    The structural and thermodynamic basis for carbohydrate-protein recognition is of considerable importance. NCP-1, which is a component of the Piromyces equi cellulase/hemicellulase complex, presents a provocative model for analyzing how structural and mutational changes can influence the ligand specificity of carbohydrate-binding proteins. NCP-1 contains two "family 29" carbohydrate-binding modules designated CBM29-1 and CBM29-2, respectively, that display unusually broad specificity; the proteins interact weakly with xylan, exhibit moderate affinity for cellulose and mannan, and bind tightly to the beta-1,4-linked glucose-mannose heteropolymer glucomannan. The crystal structure of CBM29-2 in complex with cellohexaose and mannohexaose identified key residues involved in ligand recognition. By exploiting this structural information and the broad specificity of CBM29-2, we have used this protein as a template to explore the evolutionary mechanisms that can lead to significant changes in ligand specificity. Here, we report the properties of the E78R mutant of CBM29-2, which displays ligand specificity that is different from that of wild-type CBM29-2; the protein retains significant affinity for cellulose but does not bind to mannan or glucomannan. Significantly, E78R exhibits a stoichiometry of 0.5 when binding to cellohexaose, and both calorimetry and ultracentrifugation show that the mutant protein displays ligand-mediated dimerization in solution. The three-dimensional structure of E78R in complex with cellohexaose reveals the intriguing molecular basis for this "dimeric" binding mode that involves the lamination of the oligosaccharide between two CBM molecules. The 2-fold screw axis of the ligand is mirrored in the orientation of the two protein domains with adjacent sugar rings stacking against the equivalent aromatic residues in the binding site of each protein molecule of the molecular sandwich. The sandwiching of an oligosaccharide chain between two protein

  12. Protein and carbohydrate supplementation increases aerobic and thermoregulatory capacities

    PubMed Central

    Okazaki, Kazunobu; Goto, Masaki; Nose, Hiroshi

    2009-01-01

    The incidence of heat illness and heat stroke is greater in older than younger people. In this context, exercise training regimens to increase heat tolerance in older people may provide protection against heat illness. Acute increases in plasma volume (PV) improve thermoregulation during exercise in young subjects, but there is some evidence that changes in PV in response to acute exercise are blunted in older humans. We recently demonstrated that protein–carbohydrate (Pro-CHO) supplementation immediately after a bout of exercise increased PV and plasma albumin content (Albcont) after 23 h in both young and older subjects. We also examined whether Pro-CHO supplementation during aerobic training enhanced thermoregulation by increasing PV and Albcont in older subjects. Older men aged ∼68 years exercised at moderate intensity, 60 min day−1, 3 days week−1, for 8 weeks, at ∼19°C, and took either placebo (CNT; 0.5 kcal, 0 g protein kg−1) or Pro-CHO supplement (Pro-CHO; 3.2 kcal, 0.18 g protein kg−1) immediately after exercise. After training, we found during exercise at 30°C that increases in oesophageal temperature (Tes) were attenuated more in Pro-CHO than CNT and associated with enhanced cutaneous vasodilatation and sweating. We also confirmed similar results in young subjects after 5 days of training. These results demonstrate that post-exercise protein and CHO consumption enhance thermoregulatory adaptations especially in older subjects and provide insight into potential strategies to improve cardiovascular and thermoregulatory adaptations to exercise in both older and younger subjects. PMID:19752117

  13. Protein-carbohydrate interactions between Lactobacillus salivarius and pig mucins.

    PubMed

    Iñiguez-Palomares, C; Jiménez-Flores, R; Vázquez-Moreno, L; Ramos-Clamont-Montfort, G; Acedo-Félix, E

    2011-10-01

    Adherence to the gastrointestinal tract is a key element desirable for many of the proposed beneficial health effects of probiotic bacteria. The aims of this study were to determine the amounts of adhesion of 3 Lactobacillus salivarius strains (Lb6, Lb9, and Lb10) to porcine small intestinal mucins and to determine whether adhesion is a function of lectin-like activities. Dot and Western blot assays were performed to investigate bacterial adhesion. Several carbohydrates and glycoproteins were evaluated to determine whether they interfered with adhesion of the Lactobacillus strains to intestinal mucins and to determine whether they had lectin-like activities. The Lb9 and Lb10 strains had greater association with piglet mucins than did those from 22- to 24-wk-old finishing pigs (P = 0.021 and 0.037, respectively), whereas the Lb6 strain adhered to both (P = 0.138). Western blot assays showed that bacterial adhesion detected piglet mucosa from the duodenum, jejunum, and ileum. In finishing pigs, the adhesion was variable throughout the gastrointestinal tract. Galactose and mannose diminished the interaction of the Lb9 and Lb10 strains in intestinal mucosa (P = 0.028 and 0.026, respectively), whereas pig gastric mucin reduced the adhesion of the Lb6 strain (P = 0.013). Adhesion of the Lb9 and Lb10 strains to intestinal mucosa was less after protease treatment (P = 0.023 and 0.018, respectively), which indicates that proteins are needed for the Lb9 and Lb10 strains to recognize mucin. The Lb6 strain also demonstrated diminished adhesion after periodate treatment (P = 0.038). From these results, we suggest that the nature of the bacterial lectin-like substance is a surface protein that loosely binds to the bacterial cell surface. All the tested strains adhered to specific targets in the small intestinal mucosa of piglets, and the bacteria had lectin-like proteins involved in this adhesion.

  14. Acid-Catalyzed Algal Biomass Pretreatment for Integrated Lipid and Carbohydrate-Based Biofuels Production

    SciTech Connect

    Laurens, L. M. L.; Nagle, N.; Davis, R.; Sweeney, N.; Van Wychen, S.; Lowell, A.; Pienkos, P. T.

    2014-11-12

    One of the major challenges associated with algal biofuels production in a biorefinery-type setting is improving biomass utilization in its entirety, increasing the process energetic yields and providing economically viable and scalable co-product concepts. We demonstrate the effectiveness of a novel, integrated technology based on moderate temperatures and low pH to convert the carbohydrates in wet algal biomass to soluble sugars for fermentation, while making lipids more accessible for downstream extraction and leaving a protein-enriched fraction behind. We studied the effect of harvest timing on the conversion yields, using two algal strains; Chlorella and Scenedesmus, generating biomass with distinctive compositional ratios of protein, carbohydrate, and lipids. We found that the late harvest Scenedesmus biomass had the maximum theoretical biofuel potential at 143 gasoline gallon equivalent (GGE) combined fuel yield per dry ton biomass, followed by late harvest Chlorella at 128 GGE per ton. Our experimental data show a clear difference between the two strains, as Scenedesmus was more successfully converted in this process with a demonstrated 97 GGE per ton. Our measurements indicated a release of >90% of the available glucose in the hydrolysate liquors and an extraction and recovery of up to 97% of the fatty acids from wet biomass. Techno-economic analysis for the combined product yields indicates that this process exhibits the potential to improve per-gallon fuel costs by up to 33% compared to a lipids-only process for one strain, Scenedesmus, grown to the mid-point harvest condition.

  15. The covalent linkage of protein to carbohydrate in the extracellular protein-polysaccharide from the red alga Porphyridium cruentum.

    PubMed Central

    Heaney-Kieras, J; Rodén, L; Chapman, D J

    1977-01-01

    The extracellular anionic polysaccharide isolated from cultures of a unicellular red alga, Porphyridium cruentum, contains a small amount of protein after extensive purification. The polysaccharide and protein are recovered in the same fraction after isopycnic CsCl-density-gradient centrifugation in 4M-guanidinium chloride, under conditions designed to separate proteins from polysaccharide. The peptide portion of the protein-polysaccharide is released from the polysaccharide by alkali under conditions for beta-elimination. The released peptide is non-diffusible, but in can be separated from the polysaccharide by precipitation of the polysaccharide as the cetylpyridinium complex. Under conditions for beta-elimination of certain O-glycosidic carbohydrate-protein linkages, selective destruction of serine and threonine occurs. The addition of a reducing agent to the alkali mixture produces a selective increase in alanine and alpha-aminobutyric acid. Addition of a tritiated reducing agent to the alkali mixture produces radioactive alanine and alpha-aminobutyric acid, and xylitol as the only sugar alcohol. Similar results are obtained from glycopeptides isolated from partial acid hydrolysates. A macromolecular structure of the protein-polysaccharide is suggested by a comparison of the intrinsic viscosity of material before and after treatment with alkali and proteolytic enzymes. PMID:889565

  16. Breakfast high in whey protein or carbohydrates improves coping with workload in healthy subjects.

    PubMed

    Sihvola, Nora; Korpela, Riitta; Henelius, Andreas; Holm, Anu; Huotilainen, Minna; Müller, Kiti; Poussa, Tuija; Pettersson, Kati; Turpeinen, Anu; Peuhkuri, Katri

    2013-11-14

    Dietary components may affect brain function and influence behaviour by inducing the synthesis of neurotransmitters. The aim of the present study was to examine the influence of consumption of a whey protein-containing breakfast drink v. a carbohydrate drink v. control on subjective and physiological responses to mental workload in simulated work. In a randomised cross-over design, ten healthy subjects (seven women, median age 26 years, median BMI 23 kg/m(2)) participated in a single-blinded, placebo-controlled study. The subjects performed demanding work-like tasks after having a breakfast drink high in protein (HP) or high in carbohydrate (HC) or a control drink on separate sessions. Subjective states were assessed using the NASA Task Load Index (NASA-TLX), the Karolinska sleepiness scale (KSS) and the modified Profile of Mood States. Heart rate was recorded during task performance. The ratio of plasma tryptophan (Trp) to the sum of the other large neutral amino acids (LNAA) and salivary cortisol were also analysed. The plasma Trp:LNAA ratio was 30 % higher after the test drinks HP (median 0·13 (μmol/l)/(μmol/l)) and HC (median 0·13 (μmol/l)/(μmol/l)) than after the control drink (median 0·10 (μmol/l)/(μmol/l)). The increase in heart rate was smaller after the HP (median 2·7 beats/min) and HC (median 1·9 beats/min) drinks when compared with the control drink (median 7·2 beats/min) during task performance. Subjective sleepiness was reduced more after the HC drink (median KSS - 1·5) than after the control drink (median KSS - 0·5). There were no significant differences between the breakfast types in the NASA-TLX index, cortisol levels or task performance. We conclude that a breakfast drink high in whey protein or carbohydrates may improve coping with mental tasks in healthy subjects.

  17. Weight Loss at a Cost: Implications of High-Protein, Low- Carbohydrate Diets.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gabel, Kathe A.; Lund, Robin J.

    2002-01-01

    Addresses three claims of high-protein, low-carbohydrate diets: weight loss is attributed to the composition of the diet; insulin promotes the storage of fat, thereby, by limiting carbohydrates, dieters will decrease levels of insulin and body fat; and weight loss is the result of fat loss. The paper examines relevant scientific reports and notes…

  18. Microencapsulation of tannic acid for oral administration to inhibit carbohydrate digestion in the gastrointestinal tract.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Wei; Iyer, Vidya; Flores, Floirendo P; Donhowe, Erik; Kong, Fanbin

    2013-06-01

    The prevalence of diabetes mellitus and obesity is rapidly rising worldwide. Recently, there is increasing evidence that phytochemicals such as polyphenols in our diet could directly inhibit the activities of key digestive enzymes, representing a novel method of controlling and preventing diabetes mellitus and obesity. More research is required to determine how to effectively utilize phytochemicals within the gastrointestinal (GI) tract to obtain maximum inhibition of digestive enzymes. This study investigated the inhibition efficiency of tannic acid (TA) on α-amylase as compared with other potential inhibitors using an in vitro method. The inhibition mode and kinetics were studied. The results showed that tannic acid (TA) is more effective in inhibiting α-amylase than a commercial starch blocker (Phase 2 Starch Blocker), and some selected flavonoids and polyphenols including quercetin, rutin, and polyphenon from green tea. It is also found that inhibition of α-amylase by TA in the GI tract is difficult if administered orally due to the non-specific and reversible noncompetitive interaction between tannic acid and α-amylase or other proteins. Accordingly, a pH-sensitive delivery system using calcium-alginate microspheres encapsulating tannic acid was successfully developed for oral administration to inhibit carbohydrate digestion in the GI tract. The encapsulated TA in calcium-alginate microspheres could be protected from the proteins in the stomach, and sustain release and inhibit α-amylase activity in the small intestine.

  19. Steam explosion of Brewer's spent grain improves enzymatic digestibility of carbohydrates and affects solubility and stability of proteins.

    PubMed

    Kemppainen, K; Rommi, K; Holopainen, U; Kruus, K

    2016-09-01

    Steam explosion was studied as a means to improve the enzymatic digestibility of carbohydrates in Brewer's spent grain, a protein and lipid-rich lignocellulosic by-product of the brewing industry. Having temperature, treatment time and the presence of acid catalyst as variables, a treatment at 200 °C for 10 min without an acid catalyst was found to be the most efficient, dissolving 12.1 % of the dry matter. Mainly oligomeric non-cellulosic glucan and arabinoxylan were dissolved, and the remaining insoluble carbohydrates could be efficiently hydrolysed by an enzyme cocktail (75 % hydrolysis yield). The process also caused partial protein degradation and dissolved over a third of the total nitrogen. Meanwhile, the insoluble protein appeared to become more strongly associated with acid-insoluble lignin. Compositional changes observed in the proteins and carbohydrates were supported by the results of epifluorescence microscopy. The process yielded three chemically different fractions which could serve as biorefinery products or intermediates.

  20. Seasonal organic matter dynamics in the Great Barrier Reef lagoon: Contribution of carbohydrates and proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lønborg, Christian; Doyle, Jason; Furnas, Miles; Menendez, Patricia; Benthuysen, Jessica A.; Carreira, Cátia

    2017-04-01

    Organic matter (OM) plays a fundamental role in sustaining the high productivity of coral reef ecosystems. Carbohydrates and proteins constitute two of the major chemical classes identified in the OM pool and are used as indicators of bioavailability due to their fast turn-over. We conducted three cruises across the southern shelf of the Great Barrier Reef (GBR) during the early dry, late dry and wet seasons in 2009-2010 to 1) assess the relative bioavailability of particulate (POM) and dissolved (DOM) organic matter, 2) track the temporal and spatial variability in the carbohydrate and protein contribution to the OM pool, and 3) assess factors influencing protein and carbohydrate fractions of the OM pool. Generally, higher concentrations of particulate carbohydrates were found during the wet season, while similar concentrations of particulate protein were found during the three seasons. Both the dissolved carbohydrates and proteins had highest levels during the early dry season and lowest during the wet season, suggesting seasonal variations in the chemical composition of the DOM pool. Spatially, carbohydrates showed higher concentrations at the inshore stations, while no clear spatial pattern was found for the protein concentrations. On average carbohydrates and proteins accounted for a similar fraction (13±5 and 12±6% respectively) of POM, while carbohydrates accounted for a smaller fraction of the DOM than the proteins (6±3 and 13±10%). This suggests that the POM bioavailability was similar between seasons, while the DOM bioavailability varied seasonally with highest levels during the early dry season. This demonstrates that carbohydrates and proteins in the GBR have temporal and spatial variations. Our statistical analysis showed that 1) both carbohydrates and proteins were related with the POM and DOM C:N:P stoichiometry, demonstrating that both bulk estimates (stoichiometry) and specific compounds (CHO and Prot) provide useful measures of OM

  1. Fractionation of carbohydrate and protein content of some forage feeds of ruminants for nutritive evaluation

    PubMed Central

    Das, Lalatendu Keshary; Kundu, S. S.; Kumar, Dinesh; Datt, Chander

    2015-01-01

    Aim: To evaluate some forage feeds of ruminants in terms of their carbohydrate (CHO) and protein fractions using Cornell Net Carbohydrate and Protein System (CNCPS). Materials and Methods: Eleven ruminant feeds (six green fodders - maize, oat, sorghum, bajra, cowpea, berseem and five range herbages - para grass, guinea grass, hedge lucerne, setaria grass and hybrid napier) were selected for this study. Each feed was chemically analyzed for proximate principles (dry matter, crude protein [CP], ether extract, organic matter and ash), fiber fractions (neutral detergent fiber, acid detergent fiber, acid detergent lignin, cellulose and hemicellulose), primary CHO fractions (CHO, non-structural CHO, structural CHO and starch) and primary protein fractions (neutral detergent insoluble CP, acid detergent insoluble CP, non-protein nitrogen and soluble protein). The results were fitted to the equations of CNCPS to arrive at various CHO (CA - fast degrading, CB1 - intermediate degrading, CB2 - slow degrading and CC - non-degrading or unavailable) and protein (PA - instantaneously degrading, PB1 - fast degrading, PB2 - intermediate degrading, PB3 - slow degrading and PC - non-degrading or unavailable) fractions of test feeds. Results: Among green fodders, cowpea and berseem had higher CA content while except hedge lucerne all range herbages had lower CA values. CB1 content of all feeds was low but similar. All feeds except cowpea, berseem, and hedge lucerne contained higher CB2 values. Oat among green fodders and hybrid napier among range herbages had lower CC fraction. Feeds such as bajra, cowpea, berseem and the setaria grass contained lower PA fraction. All green fodders had higher PB1 content except maize and cowpea while all range herbages had lower PB1 values except hedge lucerne. Para grass and hybrid napier contained exceptionally low PB2 fraction among all feeds. Low PC contents were reported in oat and berseem fodders. Conclusion: Based on our findings, it was

  2. Characterization of carbohydrate structural features recognized by anti-arabinogalactan-protein monoclonal antibodies.

    PubMed

    Yates, E A; Valdor, J F; Haslam, S M; Morris, H R; Dell, A; Mackie, W; Knox, J P

    1996-03-01

    Arabinogalactan-proteins (AGPs) are a diverse class of plant cell surface proteoglycans implicated in a range of fundamental processes associated with plant cell development. Anti-AGP monoclonal antibodies have been used extensively for the investigation of the developmental regulation of AGPs although virtually nothing is known about the structure of the carbohydrate epitopes recognised by these antibodies. In this report, a series of methyl glycosides of monosaccharides and a range of oligosaccharides that are elements of the carbohydrate component of AGPs have been investigated for recognition by previously derived anti-AGP monoclonal antibodies. No clear evidence was obtained for the involvement of terminal arabinofuranosides, nor of the galactan backbone, in the recognition of the glycan structure of AGPs by any of the antibodies used in this study. Interestingly, the most effective inhibitor of the binding of the monoclonal antibodies MAC207, JIM4 and JIM13 to exudate gum antigens was an acidic trisaccharide, isolated from a partial acid hydrolysate of gum karaya which has the structure: GlcA beta(1-->3) GalA alpha(1-->2)Rha, determined by a combination of FAB-MS, GC-MS and NMR spectroscopy.

  3. Structural characterization of the Streptococcus pneumoniae carbohydrate substrate-binding protein SP0092

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Minzhe

    2017-01-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae is an opportunistic respiratory pathogen that remains a major cause of morbidity and mortality globally, with infants and the elderly at the highest risk. S. pneumoniae relies entirely on carbohydrates as a source of carbon and dedicates a third of all uptake systems to carbohydrate import. The structure of the carbohydrate-free substrate-binding protein SP0092 at 1.61 Å resolution reveals it to belong to the newly proposed subclass G of substrate-binding proteins, with a ligand-binding pocket that is large enough to accommodate complex oligosaccharides. SP0092 is a dimer in solution and the crystal structure reveals a domain-swapped dimer with the monomer subunits in a closed conformation but in the absence of carbohydrate ligand. This closed conformation may be induced by dimer formation and could be used as a mechanism to regulate carbohydrate uptake. PMID:28045395

  4. Chemical biology based on target-selective degradation of proteins and carbohydrates using light-activatable organic molecules.

    PubMed

    Toshima, Kazunobu

    2013-05-01

    Proteins and carbohydrates play crucial roles in a wide range of biological processes, including serious diseases. The development of novel and innovative methods for selective control of specific proteins and carbohydrates functions has attracted much attention in the field of chemical biology. In this account article, the development of novel chemical tools, which can degrade target proteins and carbohydrates by irradiation with a specific wavelength of light under mild conditions without any additives, is introduced. This novel class of photochemical agents promise bright prospects for finding not only molecular-targeted bioprobes for understanding of the structure-activity relationships of proteins and carbohydrates but also novel therapeutic drugs targeting proteins and carbohydrates.

  5. Viscosity-Reducing Bulky-Salt Excipients Prevent Gelation of Protein, but Not Carbohydrate, Solutions.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Awanish; Klibanov, Alexander M

    2017-01-23

    The problem of gelation of concentrated protein solutions, which poses challenges for both downstream protein processing and liquid formulations of pharmaceutical proteins, is addressed herein by employing previously discovered viscosity-lowering bulky salts. Procainamide-HCl and the salt of camphor-10-sulfonic acid with L-arginine (CSA-Arg) greatly retard gelation upon heating and subsequent cooling of the model proteins gelatin and casein in water: Whereas in the absence of additives the proteins form aqueous gels within several hours at room temperature, procainamide-HCl for both proteins and also CSA-Arg for casein prevent gel formation for months under the same conditions. The inhibition of gelation by CSA-Arg stems exclusively from the CSA moiety: CSA-Na was as effective as CSA-Arg, while Arg-HCl was marginally or not effective. The tested bulky salts did not inhibit (and indeed accelerated) temperature-induced gel formation in aqueous solutions of all examined carbohydrates-starch, agarose, alginate, gellan gum, and carrageenan.

  6. Towards complete hydrolysis of soy flour carbohydrates by enzyme mixtures for protein enrichment: A modeling approach.

    PubMed

    Loman, Abdullah Al; Ju, Lu-Kwang

    2016-05-01

    Soy protein is a well-known nutritional supplement in proteinaceous food and animal feed. However, soybeans contain complex carbohydrate. Selective carbohydrate removal by enzymes could increase the protein content and remove the indigestibility of soy products for inclusion in animal feed. Complete hydrolysis of soy flour carbohydrates is challenging due to the presence of proteins and different types of non-structural polysaccharides. This study is designed to guide complex enzyme mixture required for hydrolysis of all types of soy flour carbohydrates. Enzyme broths from Aspergillus niger, Aspergillus aculeatus and Trichoderma reesei fermentations were evaluated in this study for soy carbohydrate hydrolysis. The resultant hydrolysate was measured for solubilized carbohydrate by both total carbohydrate and reducing sugar analyses. Conversion data attained after 48h hydrolysis were first fitted with models to determine the maximum fractions of carbohydrate hydrolyzable by each enzyme group, i.e., cellulase, xylanase, pectinase and α-galactosidase. Kinetic models were then developed to describe the increasing conversions over time under different enzyme activities and process conditions. The models showed high fidelity in predicting soy carbohydrate hydrolysis over broad ranges of soy flour loading (5-25%) and enzyme activities: per g soy flour, cellulase, 0.04-30 FPU; xylanase, 3.5-618U; pectinase, 0.03-120U; and α-galactosidase, 0.01-60U. The models are valuable in guiding the development and production of optimal enzyme mixtures toward hydrolysis of all types of carbohydrates present in soy flour and in optimizing the design and operation of hydrolysis reactor and process.

  7. Coronavirus receptor switch explained from the stereochemistry of protein-carbohydrate interactions and a single mutation.

    PubMed

    Bakkers, Mark J G; Zeng, Qinghong; Feitsma, Louris J; Hulswit, Ruben J G; Li, Zeshi; Westerbeke, Aniek; van Kuppeveld, Frank J M; Boons, Geert-Jan; Langereis, Martijn A; Huizinga, Eric G; de Groot, Raoul J

    2016-05-31

    Hemagglutinin-esterases (HEs) are bimodular envelope proteins of orthomyxoviruses, toroviruses, and coronaviruses with a carbohydrate-binding "lectin" domain appended to a receptor-destroying sialate-O-acetylesterase ("esterase"). In concert, these domains facilitate dynamic virion attachment to cell-surface sialoglycans. Most HEs (type I) target 9-O-acetylated sialic acids (9-O-Ac-Sias), but one group of coronaviruses switched to using 4-O-Ac-Sias instead (type II). This specificity shift required quasisynchronous adaptations in the Sia-binding sites of both lectin and esterase domains. Previously, a partially disordered crystal structure of a type II HE revealed how the shift in lectin ligand specificity was achieved. How the switch in esterase substrate specificity was realized remained unresolved, however. Here, we present a complete structure of a type II HE with a receptor analog in the catalytic site and identify the mutations underlying the 9-O- to 4-O-Ac-Sia substrate switch. We show that (i) common principles pertaining to the stereochemistry of protein-carbohydrate interactions were at the core of the transition in lectin ligand and esterase substrate specificity; (ii) in consequence, the switch in O-Ac-Sia specificity could be readily accomplished via convergent intramolecular coevolution with only modest architectural changes in lectin and esterase domains; and (iii) a single, inconspicuous Ala-to-Ser substitution in the catalytic site was key to the emergence of the type II HEs. Our findings provide fundamental insights into how proteins "see" sugars and how this affects protein and virus evolution.

  8. Aliphatic, Cyclic, and Aromatic Organic Acids, Vitamins, and Carbohydrates in Soil: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Vranova, Valerie; Rejsek, Klement; Formanek, Pavel

    2013-01-01

    Organic acids, vitamins, and carbohydrates represent important organic compounds in soil. Aliphatic, cyclic, and aromatic organic acids play important roles in rhizosphere ecology, pedogenesis, food-web interactions, and decontamination of sites polluted by heavy metals and organic pollutants. Carbohydrates in soils can be used to estimate changes of soil organic matter due to management practices, whereas vitamins may play an important role in soil biological and biochemical processes. The aim of this work is to review current knowledge on aliphatic, cyclic, and aromatic organic acids, vitamins, and carbohydrates in soil and to identify directions for future research. Assessments of organic acids (aliphatic, cyclic, and aromatic) and carbohydrates, including their behaviour, have been reported in many works. However, knowledge on the occurrence and behaviour of D-enantiomers of organic acids, which may be abundant in soil, is currently lacking. Also, identification of the impact and mechanisms of environmental factors, such as soil water content, on carbohydrate status within soil organic matter remains to be determined. Finally, the occurrence of vitamins in soil and their role in biological and biochemical soil processes represent an important direction for future research. PMID:24319374

  9. Aliphatic, cyclic, and aromatic organic acids, vitamins, and carbohydrates in soil: a review.

    PubMed

    Vranova, Valerie; Rejsek, Klement; Formanek, Pavel

    2013-11-10

    Organic acids, vitamins, and carbohydrates represent important organic compounds in soil. Aliphatic, cyclic, and aromatic organic acids play important roles in rhizosphere ecology, pedogenesis, food-web interactions, and decontamination of sites polluted by heavy metals and organic pollutants. Carbohydrates in soils can be used to estimate changes of soil organic matter due to management practices, whereas vitamins may play an important role in soil biological and biochemical processes. The aim of this work is to review current knowledge on aliphatic, cyclic, and aromatic organic acids, vitamins, and carbohydrates in soil and to identify directions for future research. Assessments of organic acids (aliphatic, cyclic, and aromatic) and carbohydrates, including their behaviour, have been reported in many works. However, knowledge on the occurrence and behaviour of D-enantiomers of organic acids, which may be abundant in soil, is currently lacking. Also, identification of the impact and mechanisms of environmental factors, such as soil water content, on carbohydrate status within soil organic matter remains to be determined. Finally, the occurrence of vitamins in soil and their role in biological and biochemical soil processes represent an important direction for future research.

  10. Metabolism of organic acids, nitrogen and amino acids in chlorotic leaves of 'Honeycrisp' apple (Malus domestica Borkh) with excessive accumulation of carbohydrates.

    PubMed

    Wang, Huicong; Ma, Fangfang; Cheng, Lailiang

    2010-07-01

    Metabolite profiles and activities of key enzymes in the metabolism of organic acids, nitrogen and amino acids were compared between chlorotic leaves and normal leaves of 'Honeycrisp' apple to understand how accumulation of non-structural carbohydrates affects the metabolism of organic acids, nitrogen and amino acids. Excessive accumulation of non-structural carbohydrates and much lower CO(2) assimilation were found in chlorotic leaves than in normal leaves, confirming feedback inhibition of photosynthesis in chlorotic leaves. Dark respiration and activities of several key enzymes in glycolysis and tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle, ATP-phosphofructokinase, pyruvate kinase, citrate synthase, aconitase and isocitrate dehydrogenase were significantly higher in chlorotic leaves than in normal leaves. However, concentrations of most organic acids including phosphoenolpyruvate (PEP), pyruvate, oxaloacetate, 2-oxoglutarate, malate and fumarate, and activities of key enzymes involved in the anapleurotic pathway including PEP carboxylase, NAD-malate dehydrogenase and NAD-malic enzyme were significantly lower in chlorotic leaves than in normal leaves. Concentrations of soluble proteins and most free amino acids were significantly lower in chlorotic leaves than in normal leaves. Activities of key enzymes in nitrogen assimilation and amino acid synthesis, including nitrate reductase, glutamine synthetase, ferredoxin and NADH-dependent glutamate synthase, and glutamate pyruvate transaminase were significantly lower in chlorotic leaves than in normal leaves. It was concluded that, in response to excessive accumulation of non-structural carbohydrates, glycolysis and TCA cycle were up-regulated to "consume" the excess carbon available, whereas the anapleurotic pathway, nitrogen assimilation and amino acid synthesis were down-regulated to reduce the overall rate of amino acid and protein synthesis.

  11. Farnesoid X Receptor Inhibits the Transcriptional Activity of Carbohydrate Response Element Binding Protein in Human Hepatocytes

    PubMed Central

    Caron, Sandrine; Huaman Samanez, Carolina; Dehondt, Hélène; Ploton, Maheul; Briand, Olivier; Lien, Fleur; Dorchies, Emilie; Dumont, Julie; Postic, Catherine; Cariou, Bertrand; Lefebvre, Philippe

    2013-01-01

    The glucose-activated transcription factor carbohydrate response element binding protein (ChREBP) induces the expression of hepatic glycolytic and lipogenic genes. The farnesoid X receptor (FXR) is a nuclear bile acid receptor controlling bile acid, lipid, and glucose homeostasis. FXR negatively regulates hepatic glycolysis and lipogenesis in mouse liver. The aim of this study was to determine whether FXR regulates the transcriptional activity of ChREBP in human hepatocytes and to unravel the underlying molecular mechanisms. Agonist-activated FXR inhibits glucose-induced transcription of several glycolytic genes, including the liver-type pyruvate kinase gene (L-PK), in the immortalized human hepatocyte (IHH) and HepaRG cell lines. This inhibition requires the L4L3 region of the L-PK promoter, known to bind the transcription factors ChREBP and hepatocyte nuclear factor 4α (HNF4α). FXR interacts directly with ChREBP and HNF4α proteins. Analysis of the protein complex bound to the L4L3 region reveals the presence of ChREBP, HNF4α, FXR, and the transcriptional coactivators p300 and CBP at high glucose concentrations. FXR activation does not affect either FXR or HNF4α binding to the L4L3 region but does result in the concomitant release of ChREBP, p300, and CBP and in the recruitment of the transcriptional corepressor SMRT. Thus, FXR transrepresses the expression of genes involved in glycolysis in human hepatocytes. PMID:23530060

  12. Fiber Type-Specific Satellite Cell Content in Cyclists Following Heavy Training with Carbohydrate and Carbohydrate-Protein Supplementation

    PubMed Central

    McKenzie, Alec I.; D'Lugos, Andrew C.; Saunders, Michael J.; Gworek, Keith D.; Luden, Nicholas D.

    2016-01-01

    The central purpose of this study was to evaluate the fiber type-specific satellite cell and myonuclear responses of endurance-trained cyclists to a block of intensified training, when supplementing with carbohydrate (CHO) vs. carbohydrate-protein (PRO). In a crossover design, endurance-trained cyclists (n = 8) performed two consecutive training periods, once supplementing with CHO (de facto “control” condition) and the other with PRO. Each training period consisted of 10 days of intensified cycle training (ICT–120% increase in average training duration) followed by 10 days of recovery (RVT–reduced volume training; 33% volume reduction vs. normal training). Skeletal muscle biopsies were obtained from the vastus lateralis before and after ICT and again following RVT. Immunofluorescent microscopy was used to quantify SCs (Pax7+), myonuclei (DAPI+), and myosin heavy chain I (MyHC I). Data are expressed as percent change ± 90% confidence limits. The 10-day block of ICTCHO increased MyHC I SC content (35 ± 28%) and myonuclear density (16 ± 6%), which remained elevated following RVTCHO (SC = 69 ± 50% vs. PRE; Nuclei = 17 ± 15% vs. PRE). MyHC II SC and myonuclei were not different following ICTCHO, but were higher following RVTCHO (SC = +33 ± 31% vs. PRE; Nuclei = 15 ± 14% vs. PRE), indicating a delayed response compared to MyHC I fibers. The MyHC I SC pool increased following ICTPRO (37 ± 37%), but without a concomitant increase in myonuclei. There were no changes in MyHC II SC or myonuclei following ICTPRO. Collectively, these trained endurance cyclists possessed a relatively large pool of SCs that facilitated rapid (MyHC I) and delayed (MyHC II) satellite cell proliferation and myonuclear accretion under carbohydrate conditions. The current findings strengthen the growing body of evidence demonstrating alterations in satellite cell number in the absence of hypertrophy. Satellite cell pool expansion is typically viewed as an advantageous response to

  13. Fiber Type-Specific Satellite Cell Content in Cyclists Following Heavy Training with Carbohydrate and Carbohydrate-Protein Supplementation.

    PubMed

    McKenzie, Alec I; D'Lugos, Andrew C; Saunders, Michael J; Gworek, Keith D; Luden, Nicholas D

    2016-01-01

    The central purpose of this study was to evaluate the fiber type-specific satellite cell and myonuclear responses of endurance-trained cyclists to a block of intensified training, when supplementing with carbohydrate (CHO) vs. carbohydrate-protein (PRO). In a crossover design, endurance-trained cyclists (n = 8) performed two consecutive training periods, once supplementing with CHO (de facto "control" condition) and the other with PRO. Each training period consisted of 10 days of intensified cycle training (ICT-120% increase in average training duration) followed by 10 days of recovery (RVT-reduced volume training; 33% volume reduction vs. normal training). Skeletal muscle biopsies were obtained from the vastus lateralis before and after ICT and again following RVT. Immunofluorescent microscopy was used to quantify SCs (Pax7+), myonuclei (DAPI+), and myosin heavy chain I (MyHC I). Data are expressed as percent change ± 90% confidence limits. The 10-day block of ICTCHO increased MyHC I SC content (35 ± 28%) and myonuclear density (16 ± 6%), which remained elevated following RVTCHO (SC = 69 ± 50% vs. PRE; Nuclei = 17 ± 15% vs. PRE). MyHC II SC and myonuclei were not different following ICTCHO, but were higher following RVTCHO (SC = +33 ± 31% vs. PRE; Nuclei = 15 ± 14% vs. PRE), indicating a delayed response compared to MyHC I fibers. The MyHC I SC pool increased following ICTPRO (37 ± 37%), but without a concomitant increase in myonuclei. There were no changes in MyHC II SC or myonuclei following ICTPRO. Collectively, these trained endurance cyclists possessed a relatively large pool of SCs that facilitated rapid (MyHC I) and delayed (MyHC II) satellite cell proliferation and myonuclear accretion under carbohydrate conditions. The current findings strengthen the growing body of evidence demonstrating alterations in satellite cell number in the absence of hypertrophy. Satellite cell pool expansion is typically viewed as an advantageous response to exercise

  14. Characterization of the carbohydrate components of Taenia solium oncosphere proteins and their role in the antigenicity.

    PubMed

    Arana, Yanina; Verastegui, Manuela; Tuero, Iskra; Grandjean, Louis; Garcia, Hector H; Gilman, Robert H

    2013-10-01

    This study examines the carbohydrate composition of Taenia solium whole oncosphere antigens (WOAs), in order to improve the understanding of the antigenicity of the T. solium. Better knowledge of oncosphere antigens is crucial to accurately diagnose previous exposure to T. solium eggs and thus predict the development of neurocysticercosis. A set of seven lectins conjugates with wide carbohydrate specificity were used on parasite fixations and somatic extracts. Lectin fluorescence revealed that D-mannose, D-glucose, D-galactose and N-acetyl-D-galactosamine residues were the most abundant constituents of carbohydrate chains on the surface of T. solium oncosphere. Lectin blotting showed that posttranslational modification with N-glycosylation was abundant while little evidence of O-linked carbohydrates was observed. Chemical oxidation and enzymatic deglycosylation in situ were performed to investigate the immunoreactivity of the carbohydrate moieties. Linearizing or removing the carbohydrate moieties from the protein backbones did not diminish the immunoreactivity of these antigens, suggesting that a substantial part of the host immune response against T. solium oncosphere is directed against the peptide epitopes on the parasite antigens. Finally, using carbohydrate probes, we demonstrated for the first time that the presence of several lectins on the surface of the oncosphere was specific to carbohydrates found in intestinal mucus, suggesting a possible role in initial attachment of the parasite to host cells.

  15. CHARACTERIZATION OF THE CARBOHYDRATE COMPONENTS OF Taenia solium ONCOSPHERE PROTEINS AND THEIR ROLE IN THE ANTIGENICITY

    PubMed Central

    Arana, Yanina; Verastegui, Manuela; Tuero, Iskra; Grandjean, Louis; Garcia, Hector H.; Gilman, Robert H.

    2015-01-01

    This study examines the carbohydrate composition of Taenia solium whole oncosphere antigens (WOAs), in order to improve the understanding of the antigenicity of the T. solium. Better knowledge of oncosphere antigens is crucial to accurately diagnose previous exposure to T. solium eggs and thus predict the development of neurocysticercosis. A set of seven lectins conjugates with wide carbohydrate specificity were used on parasite fixations and somatic extracts. Lectin fluorescence revealed that D-mannose, D-glucose, D-galactose and N-acetyl-D-galactosamine residues were the most abundant constituents of carbohydrate chains on the surface of T. solium oncosphere. Lectin blotting showed that post-translational modification with N-glycosylation was abundant while little evidence of O-linked carbohydrates was observed. Chemical oxidation and enzymatic deglycosylation in situ were performed to investigate the immunoreactivity of the carbohydrate moieties. Linearizing or removing the carbohydrate moieties from the protein backbones did not diminish the immunoreactivity of these antigens, suggesting that a substantial part of the host immune response against T. solium oncosphere is directed against the peptide epitopes on the parasite antigens. Finally, using carbohydrate probes, we demonstrated for the first time that the presence of several lectins on the surface of the oncosphere was specific to carbohydrates found in intestinal mucus, suggesting a possible role in initial attachment of the parasite to host cells. PMID:23982308

  16. Investigation of phospholipid synthesis and the disposition of amino acid and carbohydrate

    SciTech Connect

    Boehme, D.S.

    1986-01-01

    The synthesis of pulmonary phospholipids by offspring of diabetic female rats was assessed by means of high performance liquid chromatography combined with automated phosphate analysis. No changes in the pool sizes of the major phospholipids or their precursors were observed. However, offspring of both insulin-treated and untreated diabetic mothers displayed increased pulmonary lyso-phosphatidylcholine. The concentration of glycerylphosphorylcholine, the metabolic product of lyso-phosphatidylcholine, was also increased in these offspring, providing further evidence of a reduced reacylation pathway in the offspring of diabetic mothers. The concentration of phosphatidylglycerol was reduced in the lungs from offspring of diabetic mothers. Preliminary investigation suggested that the mechanism of insulin action on lungs from offspring of diabetic rats may be the diversion of substrate from lipid synthetic pathways into protein synthesis. The utilization of (14C)-labeled amino acids and carbohydrates by normal fetal rat lung, however, revealed no direct insulin effect on protein synthesis. The ability of the fetal lung to convert amino acids into Krebs Cycle intermediates was demonstrated.

  17. Acid-Catalyzed Algal Biomass Pretreatment for Integrated Lipid and Carbohydrate-Based Biofuels Production

    DOE PAGES

    Laurens, L. M. L.; Nagle, N.; Davis, R.; ...

    2014-11-12

    One of the major challenges associated with algal biofuels production in a biorefinery-type setting is improving biomass utilization in its entirety, increasing the process energetic yields and providing economically viable and scalable co-product concepts. We demonstrate the effectiveness of a novel, integrated technology based on moderate temperatures and low pH to convert the carbohydrates in wet algal biomass to soluble sugars for fermentation, while making lipids more accessible for downstream extraction and leaving a protein-enriched fraction behind. We studied the effect of harvest timing on the conversion yields, using two algal strains; Chlorella and Scenedesmus, generating biomass with distinctive compositionalmore » ratios of protein, carbohydrate, and lipids. We found that the late harvest Scenedesmus biomass had the maximum theoretical biofuel potential at 143 gasoline gallon equivalent (GGE) combined fuel yield per dry ton biomass, followed by late harvest Chlorella at 128 GGE per ton. Our experimental data show a clear difference between the two strains, as Scenedesmus was more successfully converted in this process with a demonstrated 97 GGE per ton. Our measurements indicated a release of >90% of the available glucose in the hydrolysate liquors and an extraction and recovery of up to 97% of the fatty acids from wet biomass. Techno-economic analysis for the combined product yields indicates that this process exhibits the potential to improve per-gallon fuel costs by up to 33% compared to a lipids-only process for one strain, Scenedesmus, grown to the mid-point harvest condition.« less

  18. Nutrient digestibility and evaluation of protein and carbohydrate fractionation of citrus by-products.

    PubMed

    Lashkari, S; Taghizadeh, A

    2013-08-01

    The protein and carbohydrate fractionation and nutrient digestibility of citrus by-products were determined. Ruminal, intestinal and total tract CP disappearance values were measured by a modified three-step (MTSP) method and in vitro CP disappearance method (IVCP). Test feeds were orange pulp (OP), lime pulp (LP), lemon pulp (LEP), grapefruit pulp (GP), sweet lemon pulp (SLP), bitter lemon pulp (BLP), bergamot orange pulp (BP) and tangerine pulp (TP). The rumen undegradable protein (RUP) fractions of the feedstuffs were obtained by ruminal incubation in three cannulated wethers and incubation in protease solution (protease type xiv, Streptomyces griseus). The data were analysed using completely randomized design. There were significant differences between the tested feeds in protein fractions and acid detergent insoluble nitrogen (ADIN; C fraction) was highest in GP (14.56%) (p<0.001). For carbohydrate fraction, the highest C fraction was also observed in GP (2.67%) and in relation to the other citrus pulps (p<0.001). Ruminal CP disappearance was highest in OP (71.89%) (p<0.001). The level of post-ruminal CP disappearance, measured by MTSP, was highest for BP (34.94%) (p<0.001). The highest in vitro dry matter digestibility (IVDMD) was found for TP (80.44%) followed by that estimated for BP (78.38%) (p<0.001). The estimated metabolizable energy (MJ/kg DM) varied from 9.77 for LP to 12.91 for BP. Tangerine pulp had the highest true rumen digestibility (TRD) (p<0.001). According to the results, it could be concluded that citrus by-products have high nutritive value and also, the in vitro techniques can be easily used to determine of the nutritive value of citrus by-products.

  19. Disorders of Carbohydrate Metabolism

    MedlinePlus

    ... Metabolic Disorders Disorders of Carbohydrate Metabolism Disorders of Amino Acid Metabolism Disorders of Lipid Metabolism Carbohydrates are sugars. ... Metabolic Disorders Disorders of Carbohydrate Metabolism Disorders of Amino Acid Metabolism Disorders of Lipid Metabolism NOTE: This is ...

  20. Reversible covalent interactions of β-aminoboronic acids with carbohydrate derivatives.

    PubMed

    Garrett, Graham E; Diaz, Diego B; Yudin, Andrei K; Taylor, Mark S

    2017-02-07

    β-Aminoalkylboronic acids are capable of binding to carbohydrate derivatives through reversible covalent interactions. An anthracene-bearing β-aminoboronic acid has been synthesized, enabling determinations of association constants for binding of sugars by fluorescence spectroscopy. The diol-binding properties of β-aminoboronic acids are also useful in catalysis: one such compound displays remarkably high activity for regioselective O-acylation of a pyranoside derivative.

  1. Molecular cloning and expression of chicken carbohydrate response element binding protein and Max-like protein X gene homologues

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Carbohydrate response element binding protein (ChREBP) and sterol regulatory element binding protein-1c (SREBP-1c) are transcription factors that are known to be key regulators of glucose metabolism and lipid synthesis in mammals. Since ChREBP and its co-activator Max-like protein X (Mlx) have not ...

  2. Substrate Interaction in Intravenous Feeding. Comparative Effects of Carbohydrate and Fat on Amino Acid Utilization in Fasting Man

    PubMed Central

    Wolfe, Bruce M.; Culebras, J. M.; Sim, A. J. W.; Ball, M. R.; Moore, F. D.

    1977-01-01

    emulsion was more effective than the available glycerol alone. The accompanying endocrine and biochemical changes suggest that the milieu for ideal utilization of infused amino acids is variable: ketones at low range (carbohydrate) or moderately elevated (fat emulsion); insulin elevated (carbohydrate) or unchanged (fat emulsion). The utilization of the infused amino acids was markedly improved in both endocrine settings, suggesting that it is the provision of energy as substrate as well as the endocrine setting that determines amino acid utilization. There were other changes in plasma intermediates, particularly fatty acids, glucose and urea, all consistent with the concept that when amino acids are given without other substrates, the amino acids must be maximally utilized for gluconeogenesis. When other substrates are provided (particularly glucose at high dose) then this mandate no longer exists and protein synthesis from the amino acids is favored. Several of the plasma amino acid concentrations responded to glucose when added to amino acid infusion. Amino acids alone produced increases in concentration of all the amino acids found in the infusion with the exception of alanine, arginine, and threonine. Many of these increases were abated by the addition of glucose to the amino acid infusion, suggesting an increased utilization rate. Glycerol and fat emulsion, while modulating increases in the plasma amino acid concentration, did so to a lesser extent than did glucose. This lowering of amino acid concentration was unaccompanied by an increase in urinary excretion. The assumption is therefore made that the provision of the added glucose favors the incorporation of amino acid into protein. There is no evidence from these data to suggest that a rising concentration of ketones in the blood favors amino acid utilization or protein synthesis. PMID:410376

  3. Effect of carbohydrate and protein in the EPS on sludge settling characteristics.

    PubMed

    Shin, H S; Kang, S T; Nam, S Y

    2001-01-01

    EPSs have been believed to play a bonding role in microbial floc formation. However, the precise role is not well known. In this study, sludge settling characteristics and the carbohydrate to protein ratio in the EPS were tested at various airflow rates. Sludge was collected from three modified sequencing batch reacetors (MSBRs), which were operated with airflow rates of 0.8 L/min, 2 L/min and 4 L/min, respectively. During the operation periods, the reactor operated at an airflow rate of 0.8 L/min showed a sludge volume index (SVI) of 80 to 90 mL/g and a constant ratio of carbohydrate to protein in the EPS, while a significant increase of this ratio and the SVI occurred in the other reactors. High airflow rate increased the amount of carbohydrate in the EPS, but the protein level was almost constant for reactors with airflow rates of 2 L/min and 4 L/min. The higher ratio of carbohydrate to protein caused the bulking of the sludge; hence it was not favourable for sludge settling. The ratio of carbohydrate and protein in the EPS is inferred to be essential for solid floc formation.

  4. Characterization of protein and carbohydrate mid-IR spectral features in crop residues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xin, Hangshu; Zhang, Yonggen; Wang, Mingjun; Li, Zhongyu; Wang, Zhibo; Yu, Peiqiang

    2014-08-01

    To the best of our knowledge, a few studies have been conducted on inherent structure spectral traits related to biopolymers of crop residues. The objective of this study was to characterize protein and carbohydrate structure spectral features of three field crop residues (rice straw, wheat straw and millet straw) in comparison with two crop vines (peanut vine and pea vine) by using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) technique with attenuated total reflectance (ATR). Also, multivariate analyses were performed on spectral data sets within the regions mainly related to protein and carbohydrate in this study. The results showed that spectral differences existed in mid-IR peak intensities that are mainly related to protein and carbohydrate among these crop residue samples. With regard to protein spectral profile, peanut vine showed the greatest mid-IR band intensities that are related to protein amide and protein secondary structures, followed by pea vine and the rest three field crop straws. The crop vines had 48-134% higher spectral band intensity than the grain straws in spectral features associated with protein. Similar trends were also found in the bands that are mainly related to structural carbohydrates (such as cellulosic compounds). However, the field crop residues had higher peak intensity in total carbohydrates region than the crop vines. Furthermore, spectral ratios varied among the residue samples, indicating that these five crop residues had different internal structural conformation. However, multivariate spectral analyses showed that structural similarities still exhibited among crop residues in the regions associated with protein biopolymers and carbohydrate. Further study is needed to find out whether there is any relationship between spectroscopic information and nutrition supply in various kinds of crop residue when fed to animals.

  5. The impact of carbohydrate and protein level and sources on swine manure foaming properties

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This study explored the impact of swine diet on the composition, methane production potential, and foaming properties of manure. Samples of swine manure were collected from controlled feeding trials with diets varying in protein and carbohydrate levels and sources. Protein sources consisted of corn ...

  6. Off-line elimination of carbohydrates for amino acid analysis of samples with high carbohydrate content by ion-exchange chromatography.

    PubMed

    Ding, Yongsheng; Yu, Hong; Mou, Shifen

    2003-05-16

    This paper introduces a new off-line sample preparation that eliminates carbohydrates from amino acid samples containing a high carbohydrate content before analysis by anion-exchange chromatography and integrated pulsed amperometric detection. First, the sample is introduced into a cation-exchange column in the hydrogen form. Carbohydrates are removed completely using 0.02% formic acid as a transfer fluid, while only amino acids are retained. Amino acids are then extracted from the cation-exchange resin by 10 ml of 1 M ammonia. The ammonia collected is evaporated to dryness and the residue redissolved in water containing 20 mg/l NaN3 for injection. All amino acids are recovered following the carbohydrate removal step. The average recovery is 97.2%. The relative standard deviation for seven replicates is less than 5.2%. The usefulness of the method is illustrated with chromatograms of ratafia samples obtained before and after the off-line removal of carbohydrates.

  7. Effects of protein and carbohydrate on an insect herbivore: the vista from a fitness landscape.

    PubMed

    Le Gall, Marion; Behmer, Spencer T

    2014-11-01

    Protein and carbohydrates are important nutrients driving the growth of herbivores; however, their content in plants is highly variable. Multiple studies have explored their effect on herbivores, but only one other study (using a caterpillar) has provided a comprehensive overview that includes a simultaneous evaluation of their ratios and concentrations. In the present work, we ran two experiments using nymphs of the generalist grasshopper Melanoplus differentialis. Grasshoppers and caterpillars differ in a number of important ways, which might affect their feeding and physiological responses to foods with variable content of protein and carbohydrates. First, in a choice experiment, we measured performance and related this to the self-selected intake of nutrients. No differences were found for duration of development across treatments, but gain in mass was lower on a diet of low macronutrient concentration. Consumption of protein was always tightly regulated, but intake of carbohydrate was significantly reduced when consuming diluted food. In the second experiment, insects were constrained to one of nine diets and we plotted performance and consumption using a fitness-landscape approach that mimics the natural variation of nutrients in plants. We found significant effects of protein and carbohydrate content on gain in mass and in duration of development. The concentration of macronutrients in the food had more pronounced effects than did the protein-to-carbohydrate ratio. The protein-carbohydrate content also significantly affected the intake of food and energy (calories), production of frass, and digestive efficiency. On foods with low macronutrient concentration consumption was high, but digestive efficiency was low. Our results suggest that insects will favor protein-biased foods when the total macronutrient content of available foods is low, and that in the short-term compensatory feeding responses can overcome nutritional deficits and/or imbalances. However

  8. 3-Aminoquinoline/p-coumaric acid as a MALDI matrix for glycopeptides, carbohydrates, and phosphopeptides.

    PubMed

    Fukuyama, Yuko; Funakoshi, Natsumi; Takeyama, Kohei; Hioki, Yusaku; Nishikaze, Takashi; Kaneshiro, Kaoru; Kawabata, Shin-Ichirou; Iwamoto, Shinichi; Tanaka, Koichi

    2014-02-18

    Glycosylation and phosphorylation are important post-translational modifications in biological processes and biomarker research. The difficulty in analyzing these modifications is mainly their low abundance and dissociation of labile regions such as sialic acids or phosphate groups. One solution in matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) mass spectrometry is to improve matrices for glycopeptides, carbohydrates, and phosphopeptides by increasing the sensitivity and suppressing dissociation of the labile regions. Recently, a liquid matrix 3-aminoquinoline (3-AQ)/α-cyano-4-hydroxycinnamic acid (CHCA) (3-AQ/CHCA), introduced by Kolli et al. in 1996, has been reported to increase sensitivity for carbohydrates or phosphopeptides, but it has not been systematically evaluated for glycopeptides. In addition, 3-AQ/CHCA enhances the dissociation of labile regions. In contrast, a liquid matrix 1,1,3,3-tetramethylguanidium (TMG, G) salt of p-coumaric acid (CA) (G3CA) was reported to suppress dissociation of sulfate groups or sialic acids of carbohydrates. Here we introduce a liquid matrix 3-AQ/CA for glycopeptides, carbohydrates, and phosphopeptides. All of the analytes were detected as [M + H](+) or [M - H](-) with higher or comparable sensitivity using 3-AQ/CA compared with 3-AQ/CHCA or 2,5-dihydroxybenzoic acid (2,5-DHB). The sensitivity was increased 1- to 1000-fold using 3-AQ/CA. The dissociation of labile regions such as sialic acids or phosphate groups and the fragmentation of neutral carbohydrates were suppressed more using 3-AQ/CA than using 3-AQ/CHCA or 2,5-DHB. 3-AQ/CA was thus determined to be an effective MALDI matrix for high sensitivity and the suppression of dissociation of labile regions in glycosylation and phosphorylation analyses.

  9. Glycan arrays containing synthetic Clostridium difficile lipoteichoic acid oligomers as tools toward a carbohydrate vaccine.

    PubMed

    Martin, Christopher E; Broecker, Felix; Eller, Steffen; Oberli, Matthias A; Anish, Chakkumkal; Pereira, Claney L; Seeberger, Peter H

    2013-08-18

    Clostridium difficile is a leading cause of severe nosocomial infections. Cell-surface carbohydrate antigens are promising vaccine candidates. Here we report the first total synthesis of oligomers of the lipoteichoic acid antigen repeating unit. Synthetic glycan microarrays revealed anti-glycan antibodies in the blood of patients that help to define epitopes for vaccine development.

  10. Improved analyses for soil carbohydrates, amino acids, and phenols: Tools for understanding soil processes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A process-level understanding of soil carbon(C) and nitrogen (N) cycling will be facilitated by precise measurement of biochemical compounds in soil organic matter. This review summarizes some recent developments in analyses for soil carbohydrates, amino compounds (amino acids and amino sugars), and...

  11. Antiviral and immunostimulating effects of lignin-carbohydrate-protein complexes from Pimpinella anisum.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jung-Bum; Yamagishi, Chihiro; Hayashi, Kyoko; Hayashi, Toshimitsu

    2011-01-01

    Three antiviral and immunostimulating substances (LC1, LC2 and LC3) were isolated from a hot water extract of seeds of Pimpinella anisum by combination of anion-exchange, gel filtration and hydrophobic interaction column chromatographies. Chemical and spectroscopic analyses revealed them to be lignin-carbohydrate-protein complexes. These lignin-carbohydrate complexes (LCs) showed antiviral activities against herpes simplex virus types 1 and 2 (HSV-1 and -2), human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) and measles virus. LCs were also found to interfere with virus adsorption to the host cell surface and directly inactivate viruses. Furthermore, they enhanced nitric oxide (NO) production by inducing iNOS mRNA and protein expression in RAW 264.7 murine macrophage cells. The induced mRNA expression of cytokines including IL-1β and IL-10 was also apparent. These results suggest that the lignin-carbohydrate-protein complexes from P. anisum possessed potency as functional food ingredients against infectious diseases.

  12. Psychobiological effects of carbohydrates.

    PubMed

    Spring, B; Chiodo, J; Harden, M; Bourgeois, M J; Mason, J D; Lutherer, L

    1989-05-01

    The authors studied whether the fatiguing effects of eating lunch are greater for carbohydrate-rich meals than for other meals, and related the time course of behavioral change to plasma glucose, insulin, and amino acids. On different occasions, in counterbalanced order, normal women (N = 7) fasted overnight, ate a standard breakfast, and at lunch either continued to fast or ate a high-carbohydrate, low-protein meal; a hedonically similar meal containing both carbohydrate and protein; or a high-protein, low-carbohydrate meal. Meals were isocaloric and equated for fat content. Only the carbohydrate meal significantly increased fatigue, which could not be attributed to hypoglycemia because plasma glucose remained elevated. Fatigue began approximately, when the carbohydrate meal elevated the plasma tryptophan ratio but ended even though the ratio remained elevated. Fatigue after a high-carbohydrate lunch could not be explained by reactive hypoglycemia or sweet taste, and could partially be explained by the hypothesis that fatigue parallels an elevation of the tryptophan ratio.

  13. Interaction between dietary protein content and the source of carbohydrates along the gastrointestinal tract of weaned piglets.

    PubMed

    Pieper, Robert; Boudry, Christelle; Bindelle, Jérôme; Vahjen, Wilfried; Zentek, Jürgen

    2014-01-01

    Although fermentable carbohydrates (CHO) can reduce metabolites derived from dietary protein fermentation in the intestine of pigs, the interaction between site of fermentation and substrate availability along the gut is still unclear. The current study aimed at determining the impact of two different sources of carbohydrates in diets with low or very high protein content on microbial metabolite profiles along the gastrointestinal tract of piglets. Thirty-six piglets (n = 6 per group) were fed diets high (26%, HP) or low (18%, LP) in dietary protein and with or without two different sources of carbohydrates (12% sugar beet pulp, SBP, or 8% lignocellulose, LNC) in a 2 × 3 factorial design. After 3 weeks, contents from stomach, jejunum, ileum, caecum, proximal and distal colon were taken and analysed for major bacterial metabolites (D-lactate, L-lactate, short chain fatty acids, ammonia, amines, phenols and indols). Results indicate considerable fermentation of CHO and protein already in the stomach. HP diets increased the formation of ammonia, amines, phenolic and indolic compounds throughout the different parts of the intestine with most pronounced effects in the distal colon. Dietary SBP inclusion in LP diets favoured the formation of cadaverine in the proximal parts of the intestine. SBP mainly increased CHO-derived metabolites such as SCFA and lactate and decreased protein-derived metabolites in the large intestine. Based on metabolite profiles, LNC was partly fermented in the distal large intestine and reduced mainly phenols, indols and cadaverine, but not ammonia. Multivariate analysis confirmed more diet-specific metabolite patterns in the stomach, whereas the CHO addition was the main determinant in the caecum and proximal colon. The protein level mainly influenced the metabolite patterns in the distal colon. The results confirm the importance of CHO source to influence the formation of metabolites derived from protein fermentation along the intestinal

  14. Carbohydrate, Organic Acid, and Amino Acid Composition of Bacteroids and Cytosol from Soybean Nodules 1

    PubMed Central

    Streeter, John G.

    1987-01-01

    Metabolites in Bradyrhizobium japonicum bacteroids and in Glycine max (L.) Merr. cytosol from root nodules were analyzed using an isolation technique which makes it possible to estimate and correct for changes in concentration which may occur during bacteroid isolation. Bacteroid and cytosol extracts were fractionated on ion-exchange columns and were analyzed for carbohydrate composition using gas-liquid chromatography and for organic acid and amino acid composition using high performance liquid chromatography. Analysis of organic acids in plant tissues as the phenacyl derivatives is reported for the first time and this approach revealed the presence of several unknown organic acids in nodules. The time required for separation of bacteroids and cytosol was varied, and significant change in concentration of individual compounds during the separation of the two fractions was estimated by calculating the regression of concentration on time. When a statistically significant slope was found, the true concentration was estimated by extrapolating the regression line to time zero. Of 78 concentration estimates made, there was a statistically significant (5% level) change in concentration during sample preparation for only five metabolites: glucose, sucrose, and succinate in the cytosol and d-pinitol and serine in bacteroids. On a mass basis, the major compounds in bacteroids were (descending order of concentration): myo-inositol, d-chiro-inositol, α,α-trehalose, sucrose, aspartate, glutamate, d-pinitol, arginine, malonate, and glucose. On a proportional basis (concentration in bacteroid as percent of concentration in bacteroid + cytosol fractions), the major compounds were: α-aminoadipate (94), trehalose (66), lysine (58), and arginine (46). The results indicate that metabolite concentrations in bacteroids can be reliably determined. PMID:16665774

  15. A convenient method for synthesis of glyconanoparticles for colorimetric measuring carbohydrate-protein interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Chuang, Yen-Jun; Zhou, Xichun; Pan, Zhengwei; Turchi, Craig

    2009-11-06

    Carbohydrate functionalized nanoparticles, i.e., the glyconanoparticles, have wide application ranging from studies of carbohydrate-protein interactions, in vivo cell imaging, biolabeling, etc. Currently reported methods for preparation of glyconanoparticles require multi-step modifications of carbohydrates moieties to conjugate to nanoparticle surface. However, the required synthetic manipulations are difficult and time consuming. We report herewith a simple and versatile method for preparing glyconanoparticles. This method is based on the utilization of clean and convenient microwave irradiation energy for one-step, site-specific conjugation of unmodified carbohydrates onto hydrazide-functionalized Au nanoparticles. A colorimetric assay that utilizes the ensemble of gold glyconanoparticles and Concanavalin A (ConA) was also presented. This feasible assay system was developed to analyze multivalent interactions and to determine the dissociation constant (K{sub d}) for five kind of Au glyconanoparticles with lectin. Surface plasmon changes of the Au glyconanoparticles as a function of lectin-carbohydrate interactions were measured and the dissociation constants were determined based on non-linear curve fitting. The strength of the interaction of carbohydrates with ConA was found to be as follows: maltose > mannose > glucose > lactose > MAN5.

  16. Prediction of carbohydrate binding sites on protein surfaces with 3-dimensional probability density distributions of interacting atoms.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Keng-Chang; Jian, Jhih-Wei; Yang, Ei-Wen; Hsu, Po-Chiang; Peng, Hung-Pin; Chen, Ching-Tai; Chen, Jun-Bo; Chang, Jeng-Yih; Hsu, Wen-Lian; Yang, An-Suei

    2012-01-01

    Non-covalent protein-carbohydrate interactions mediate molecular targeting in many biological processes. Prediction of non-covalent carbohydrate binding sites on protein surfaces not only provides insights into the functions of the query proteins; information on key carbohydrate-binding residues could suggest site-directed mutagenesis experiments, design therapeutics targeting carbohydrate-binding proteins, and provide guidance in engineering protein-carbohydrate interactions. In this work, we show that non-covalent carbohydrate binding sites on protein surfaces can be predicted with relatively high accuracy when the query protein structures are known. The prediction capabilities were based on a novel encoding scheme of the three-dimensional probability density maps describing the distributions of 36 non-covalent interacting atom types around protein surfaces. One machine learning model was trained for each of the 30 protein atom types. The machine learning algorithms predicted tentative carbohydrate binding sites on query proteins by recognizing the characteristic interacting atom distribution patterns specific for carbohydrate binding sites from known protein structures. The prediction results for all protein atom types were integrated into surface patches as tentative carbohydrate binding sites based on normalized prediction confidence level. The prediction capabilities of the predictors were benchmarked by a 10-fold cross validation on 497 non-redundant proteins with known carbohydrate binding sites. The predictors were further tested on an independent test set with 108 proteins. The residue-based Matthews correlation coefficient (MCC) for the independent test was 0.45, with prediction precision and sensitivity (or recall) of 0.45 and 0.49 respectively. In addition, 111 unbound carbohydrate-binding protein structures for which the structures were determined in the absence of the carbohydrate ligands were predicted with the trained predictors. The overall

  17. Carbohydrate and protein contents of grain dusts in relation to dust morphology.

    PubMed Central

    Dashek, W V; Olenchock, S A; Mayfield, J E; Wirtz, G H; Wolz, D E; Young, C A

    1986-01-01

    Grain dusts contain a variety of materials which are potentially hazardous to the health of workers in the grain industry. Because the characterization of grain dusts is incomplete, we are defining the botanical, chemical, and microbial contents of several grain dusts collected from grain elevators in the Duluth-Superior regions of the U.S. Here, we report certain of the carbohydrate and protein contents of dusts in relation to dust morphology. Examination of the gross morphologies of the dusts revealed that, except for corn, each dust contained either husk or pericarp (seed coat in the case of flax) fragments in addition to respirable particles. When viewed with the light microscope, the fragments appeared as elongated, pointed structures. The possibility that certain of the fragments within corn, settled, and spring wheat were derived from cell walls was suggested by the detection of pentoses following colorimetric assay of neutralized 2 N trifluoroacetic acid hydrolyzates of these dusts. The presence of pentoses together with the occurrence of proteins within water washings of grain dusts suggests that glycoproteins may be present within the dusts. With scanning electron microscopy, each dust was found to consist of a distinct assortment of particles in addition to respirable particles. Small husk fragments and "trichome-like" objects were common to all but corn dust. Images FIGURE 4. FIGURE 5. PMID:3709476

  18. Restricted dynamics of water around a protein-carbohydrate complex: Computer simulation studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jana, Madhurima; Bandyopadhyay, Sanjoy

    2012-08-01

    Water-mediated protein-carbohydrate interaction is a complex phenomenon responsible for different biological processes in cellular environment. One of the unexplored but important issues in this area is the role played by water during the recognition process and also in controlling the microscopic properties of the complex. In this study, we have carried out atomistic molecular dynamics simulations of a protein-carbohydrate complex formed between the hyaluronan binding domain of the murine Cd44 protein and the octasaccharide hyaluronan in explicit water. Efforts have been made to explore the heterogeneous influence of the complex on the dynamic properties of water present in different regions around it. It is revealed from our analyses that the heterogeneous dynamics of water around the complex are coupled with differential time scales of formation and breaking of hydrogen bonds at the interface. Presence of a highly rigid thin layer of motionally restricted water molecules bridging the protein and the carbohydrate in the common region of the complex has been identified. Such water molecules are expected to play a crucial role in controlling properties of the complex. Importantly, it is demonstrated that the formation of the protein-carbohydrate complex affects the transverse and longitudinal degrees of freedom of the interfacial water molecules in a heterogeneous manner.

  19. Pretreatment of Sugar Beet Pulp with Dilute Sulfurous Acid is Effective for Multipurpose Usage of Carbohydrates.

    PubMed

    Kharina, M; Emelyanov, V; Mokshina, N; Ibragimova, N; Gorshkova, T

    2016-05-01

    Sulfurous acid was used for pretreatment of sugar beet pulp (SBP) in order to achieve high efficiency of both extraction of carbohydrates and subsequent enzymatic hydrolysis of the remaining solids. The main advantage of sulfurous acid usage as pretreatment agent is the possibility of its regeneration. Application of sulfurous acid as hydrolyzing agent in relatively low concentrations (0.6-1.0 %) during a short period of time (10-20 min) and low solid to liquid ratio (1:3, 1:6) allowed effective extraction of carbohydrates from SBP and provided positive effect on subsequent enzymatic hydrolysis. The highest obtained concentration of reducing substances (RS) in hydrolysates was 8.5 %; up to 33.6 % of all carbohydrates present in SBP could be extracted. The major obtained monosaccharides were arabinose and glucose (9.4 and 7.3 g/l, respectively). Pretreatment of SBP with sulfurous acid increased 4.6 times the yield of glucose during subsequent enzymatic hydrolysis of remaining solids with cellulase cocktail, as compared to the untreated SBP. Total yield of glucose during SBP pretreatment and subsequent enzymatic hydrolysis amounted to 89.4 % of the theoretical yield. The approach can be applied directly to the wet SBP. Hydrolysis of sugar beet pulp with sulfurous acid is recommended for obtaining of individual monosaccharides, as well as nutritional media.

  20. Recovery from a cycling time trial is enhanced with carbohydrate-protein supplementation vs. isoenergetic carbohydrate supplementation

    PubMed Central

    Berardi, John M; Noreen, Eric E; Lemon, Peter WR

    2008-01-01

    Background In this study we assessed whether a liquid carbohydrate-protein (C+P) supplement (0.8 g/kg C; 0.4 g/kg P) ingested early during recovery from a cycling time trial could enhance a subsequent 60 min effort on the same day vs. an isoenergetic liquid carbohydrate (CHO) supplement (1.2 g/kg). Methods Two hours after a standardized breakfast, 15 trained male cyclists completed a time trial in which they cycled as far as they could in 60 min (AMex) using a Computrainer indoor trainer. Following AMex, subjects ingested either C+P, or CHO at 10, 60 and 120 min, followed by a standardized meal at 4 h post exercise. At 6 h post AMex subjects repeated the time trial (PMex). Results There was a significant reduction in performance for both groups in PMex versus AMex. However, performance and power decreases between PMex and AMex were significantly greater (p ≤ 0.05) with CHO (-1.05 ± 0.44 km and -16.50 ± 6.74 W) vs C+P (-0.30 ± 0.50 km and -3.86 ± 6.47 W). Fat oxidation estimated from RER values was significantly greater (p ≤ 0.05) in the C+P vs CHO during the PMex, despite a higher average workload in the C+P group. Conclusion Under these experimental conditions, liquid C+P ingestion immediately after exercise increases fat oxidation, increases recovery, and improves subsequent same day, 60 min efforts relative to isoenergetic CHO ingestion. PMID:19108717

  1. Enhancing flora balance in the gastrointestinal tract of mice by lactic acid bacteria from Chinese sourdough and enzyme activities indicative of metabolism of protein, fat, and carbohydrate by the flora.

    PubMed

    Yang, Dong; Yu, Xiaomin; Wu, Yaoping; Chen, Xingxing; Wei, Hua; Shah, Nagendra P; Xu, Feng

    2016-10-01

    In this study, we investigated the effect of administration of 5 strains of lactic acid bacteria (LAB) isolated from traditional Chinese sourdough on the flora balance of gastrointestinal tract of mice. We specifically measured Enterococcus, Enterobacter, Bacteroides, and Lactobacillus by plate count and real-time PCR methods, and α-glucosidase, lactate dehydrogenase, esterase, and aminopeptidase activities as indicative of metabolism of sugar, fat, and protein from LAB isolated from feces of mice in vitro. The results showed that administration of Lactobacillus acidophilus LAC0201 and Lactobacillus fermentum LFE0302 lowered the uricacid index of serum. Lactobacillus acidophilus LAC0201, L. fermentum LFE0302, as well as Lactobacillus curvatus LCU0401 administration resulted in a reduction in the opportunistic pathogens (i.e., Enterococcus and Enterobacter), meanwhile, administration of L. fermentum LFE0302 and Lactobacillus sp. ULA0104 resulted in an increase in the counts of Lactobacillus. Lactobacillus fermentum LFE0302 administration increased starch digestion of intestinal flora after 4wk of feeding and also resulted in increased α-glucosidase activity in the intestinal flora after 3wk of feeding. We found a similar trend in esterase activity after administration of L. acidophilus LAC0201 for 3wk. Hence, our study suggested that LAB from Chinese sourdough might be used as potential probiotics to strengthen the flora balance in gastrointestinal tract and positively change the metabolism of nutrients through bacterial enzyme activities.

  2. Rapid Analysis of Listeria monocytogenes Cell Wall Teichoic Acid Carbohydrates by ESI-MS/MS

    PubMed Central

    Eugster, Marcel R.; Loessner, Martin J.

    2011-01-01

    We report the application of electrospray ionization (ESI) mass spectrometry for compositional characterization of wall teichoic acids (WTA), a major component of Gram-positive bacterial cell walls. Tandem mass spectrometry (ESI-MS/MS) of purified and chemically hydrolyzed monomeric WTA components provided sufficient information to identify WTA monomers and their specific carbohydrate constituents. A lithium matrix was used for ionization of uncharged WTA monomers, and successfully applied to analyze the WTA molecules of four Listeria strains differing in carbohydrate substitution on a conserved polyribitol-phosphate backbone structure. Carbohydrate residues such as N-acetylglucosamine or rhamnose linked to the WTA could directly be identified by ESI-MS/MS, circumventing the need for quantitative analysis by gas chromatography. The presence of a terminal N-acetylglucosamine residue tethered to the ribitol was confirmed using fluorescently labeled wheat-germ agglutinin. In conclusion, the mass spectrometry method described here will greatly facilitate compositional analysis and characterization of teichoic acids and similar macromolecules from diverse bacterial species, and represents a significant advance in the identification of serovar-specific carbohydrates and sugar molecules on bacteria. PMID:21738682

  3. Rapid analysis of Listeria monocytogenes cell wall teichoic acid carbohydrates by ESI-MS/MS.

    PubMed

    Eugster, Marcel R; Loessner, Martin J

    2011-01-01

    We report the application of electrospray ionization (ESI) mass spectrometry for compositional characterization of wall teichoic acids (WTA), a major component of gram-positive bacterial cell walls. Tandem mass spectrometry (ESI-MS/MS) of purified and chemically hydrolyzed monomeric WTA components provided sufficient information to identify WTA monomers and their specific carbohydrate constituents. A lithium matrix was used for ionization of uncharged WTA monomers, and successfully applied to analyze the WTA molecules of four Listeria strains differing in carbohydrate substitution on a conserved polyribitol-phosphate backbone structure. Carbohydrate residues such as N-acetylglucosamine or rhamnose linked to the WTA could directly be identified by ESI-MS/MS, circumventing the need for quantitative analysis by gas chromatography. The presence of a terminal N-acetylglucosamine residue tethered to the ribitol was confirmed using fluorescently labeled wheat-germ agglutinin. In conclusion, the mass spectrometry method described here will greatly facilitate compositional analysis and characterization of teichoic acids and similar macromolecules from diverse bacterial species, and represents a significant advance in the identification of serovar-specific carbohydrates and sugar molecules on bacteria.

  4. Reaction of protein and carbohydrates with EDC for making unique biomaterials

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Prior research from this laboratory has demonstrated the feasibility of using chemical and enzymatic treatments on protein and carbohydrate waste products for the purpose of making fillers to enhance the properties of leather. These treatments (microbial transglutaminase, genipin, and polyphenols i...

  5. Transient decrements in mood during energy deficit are independent of dietary protein-to-carbohydrate ratio

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Energy deficit and dietary macronutrient intake are thought to independently modulate cognition, mood and sleep. To what extent manipulating the dietary ratio of protein-to-carbohydrate affects mood, cognition and sleep during short-term energy deficit is undetermined. Using a randomized, block desi...

  6. Update: The Digestion and Absorption of Carbohydrate and Protein: Role of the Small Intestine.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leese, H. J.

    1984-01-01

    Discusses the role of the small intestine in the digestion and absorption of carbohydrates and proteins. Indicates as outdated the view that these materials must be broken down to monomeric units before absorption and that the gut secretes a mixture of digestive juices which brings about absorption. (JN)

  7. Reaction of protein and carbohydrates with EDC for purpose of making products with unique functional properties

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Prior research from this laboratory has demonstrated the feasibility of using chemical and enzymatic treatments on protein and carbohydrate waste products for the purpose of making fillers to enhance the properties of leather. These treatments (microbial transglutaminase, genipin, and polyphenols i...

  8. Protein and Carbohydrate Contents of Plant Seeds: An Introduction to Biochemical Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Deutch, Charles E.; Egan, Todd P.; Meekins, J. Forrest; Siegel, Carol

    2004-01-01

    The first of two projects developed for an introductory biology course of science majors titled Biological Concepts I is described. Students were divided into groups and were asked to determine the total amount of protein and carbohydrate in different types of seeds that were provided to them.

  9. Systemic Glucose Level Changes with a Carbohydrate-Restricted and Higher Protein Diet Combined with Exercise

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bowden, Rodney G.; Lanning, Beth A.; Doyle, Eva I.; Slonaker, Becky; Johnston, Holly M.; Scanes, Georgene

    2007-01-01

    Objective: The authors' purpose in this study was to compare the effects of macronutrient intake on systemic glucose levels in previously sedentary participants who followed 1 of 4 diets that were either higher protein or high carbohydrate, while initiating an exercise program. Participants and Methods: The authors randomly assigned 94 sedentary…

  10. Impact of dietary carbohydrate and protein source and content on swine manure foaming properties

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Diet ingredients are thought to contribute to foaming problems associated with swine deep-pit systems. Two experiments explored the impact of protein and carbohydrate sources in swine diets on the physicochemical properties, methane production potential, and foaming characteristics of swine manure. ...

  11. Patterns of carbohydrate and fatty acid changes under nitrogen starvation in the microalgae Haematococcus pluvialis and Nannochloropsis sp.

    PubMed

    Recht, Lee; Zarka, Aliza; Boussiba, Sammy

    2012-06-01

    The aim of this research was to study the impact of nitrogen starvation on the production of two major secondary metabolites, fatty acids and carbohydrates, in two microalgae: Nannochloropsis sp. and Haematococcus pluvialis. The major response to nitrogen starvation in both algae occurred within the first 2 days, accompanied by a sharp reduction in chlorophyll content. However, the pattern of the response differed between the two microalgae. In H. pluvialis, the first response to nitrogen starvation was intensive production of carbohydrates, accumulating to up to 63% of dry weight by day 1; on day 2, the total carbohydrate content decreased and was partially degraded, possibly to support fatty acid synthesis. Under these conditions, H. pluvialis accumulated up to 35% total fatty acids in the biomass. In Nannochloropsis sp., the immediate and major response, which was maintained throughout the entire period of exposure to stress, was production of fatty acids, accumulating up to 50% of dry weight, while carbohydrate content in the biomass remained stable at 18%. In addition, we tested the effect of the lipid-synthesis inhibitor sesamol, known to inhibit malic enzyme, on the balance between total fatty acid and carbohydrate contents in H. pluvialis and Nannochloropsis sp. In both cultures, sesamol inhibited fatty acid accumulation, but the carbohydrate content was reduced as well, albeit to a lesser extent. These findings demonstrate the complexity of the stress-response and the potential link between fatty acid and carbohydrate synthesis.

  12. The development of new molecular tools containing a chemically synthesized carbohydrate ligand for the elucidation of carbohydrate roles via photoaffinity labeling: carbohydrate-protein interactions are affected by the structures of the glycosidic bonds and the reducing-end sugar.

    PubMed

    Ohtsuka, Isao; Sadakane, Yutaka; Hada, Noriyasu; Higuchi, Mari; Atsumi, Toshiyuki; Kakiuchi, Nobuko

    2014-08-01

    Photoaffinity labeling technology is a highly efficient method for cloning carbohydrate-binding proteins. When the carbohydrate probes are synthesized according to conventional methods, however, the reducing terminus of the sugar is opened to provide an acyclic structure. Our continued efforts to solve this problem led to the development of new molecular tools with an oligosaccharide structure that contains a phenyldiazirine group for the elucidation of carbohydrate-protein interactions. We investigated whether carbohydrate-lectin interactions are affected by differences in the glycosidic formation and synthesized three types of molecular tools containing Galp-GlcpNAc disaccharide ligands and a photoreactive group (1, 2, 3). Photoaffinity labeling validated the recognition of the new ligand by different glycosidic bonds. Photoaffinity labeling also demonstrated that both the reducing end sugar and non-reducing end sugar recognized the Erythrina cristagalli agglutinin.

  13. Protein v. carbohydrate intake differentially affects liking- and wanting-related brain signalling.

    PubMed

    Born, Jurriaan M; Martens, Mieke J I; Lemmens, Sofie G T; Goebel, Rainer; Westerterp-Plantenga, Margriet S

    2013-01-28

    Extreme macronutrient intakes possibly lead to different brain signalling. The aim of the present study was to determine the effects of ingesting high-protein v. high-carbohydrate food on liking and wanting task-related brain signalling (TRS) and subsequent macronutrient intake. A total of thirty female subjects (21.6 (SD 2.2) years, BMI 25.0 (SD 3.7) kg/m²) completed four functional MRI scans: two fasted and two satiated on two different days. During the scans, subjects rated all food items for liking and wanting, thereby choosing the subsequent meal. The results show that high-protein (PROT) v. high-carbohydrate (CARB) conditions were generated using protein or carbohydrate drinks at the first meal. Energy intake and hunger were recorded. PROT (protein: 53.7 (SD 2.1) percentage of energy (En%); carbohydrate: 6.4 (SD 1.3) En%) and CARB conditions (protein: 11.8 (SD 0.6) En%; carbohydrate: 70.0 (SD 2.4) En%) were achieved during the first meal, while the second meals were not different between the conditions. Hunger, energy intake, and behavioural liking and wanting ratings were decreased after the first meal (P< 0.001). Comparing the first with the second meal, the macronutrient content changed: carbohydrate -26.9 En% in the CARB condition, protein -37.8 En% in the PROT condition. After the first meal in the CARB condition, wanting TRS was increased in the hypothalamus. After the first meal in the PROT condition, liking TRS was decreased in the putamen (P< 0.05). The change in energy intake from the first to the second meal was inversely related to the change in liking TRS in the striatum and hypothalamus in the CARB condition and positively related in the PROT condition (P< 0.05). In conclusion, wanting and liking TRS were affected differentially with a change in carbohydrate or protein intake, underscoring subsequent energy intake and shift in macronutrient composition.

  14. Functionalization of OEP-based benzochlorins to develop carbohydrate-conjugated photosensitizers. Attempt to target beta-galactoside-recognized proteins.

    PubMed

    Li, Guolin; Pandey, Suresh K; Graham, Andrew; Dobhal, Mahabeer P; Mehta, Ricky; Chen, Yihui; Gryshuk, Amy; Rittenhouse-Olson, Kate; Oseroff, Allan; Pandey, Ravindra K

    2004-01-09

    meso-(2-Formylvinyl)octaethylporphyrin on reaction with cyanotrimethylsilane in the presence of various catalysts [copper triflate [Cu(OTf)(2)], indium triflate [In(OTf)(3)], or magnesium bromide diethyl etherate (MgBr(2).Et(2)O)] produced a mixture of the intermediate 3-hydroxy-3-cyanopropenoporphyrin, the corresponding trimethylsilyl ether derivative, and the unexpected propenochlorins. The yields of the reaction products were found to depend on the reaction conditions and the catalysts used. The intermediate porphyrins on treatment with concentrated sulfuric acid yielded the free-base cyanobenzochlorins in major quantity along with several other novel benzochlorins as minor products. Reduction of ethyl-3-hydroxy-1-pentenoate-porphyrin with DIBAL-H/NaBH(4) and subsequent acid treatment provided the corresponding free-base 10(3)-(2-hydroxyethyl)benzochlorin, which upon a sequence of reactions gave a free-base benzochlorin bearing a carboxylic acid functionality in good yield. It was then condensed with a variety of carbohydrates (glucosamine, galactosamine, and lactosamine), and the related conjugates were screened using the galectin-binding-ability assay. Among the carbohydrate conjugates investigated, the lactose and galactose analogues displayed the galectin-binding ability with an enhancement of about 300-400-fold compared to lactose. In preliminary studies, all photosensitizers (with or without carbohydrate moieties) were found to be active in vitro [radiation-induced fibrosarcoma (RIF) tumor cells]. However, the cells incubated with lactose (known to bind to beta-galactoside-recognized proteins) prior to the addition of the photosensitizers containing the beta-galactose moiety (e.g., galactose and lactose) produced a 100% decrease in their photosensitizing efficacy. Under similar experimental conditions, benzochlorin without a beta-galactoside moiety or the related glucose conjugate did not show any inhibition in its photosensitizing efficacy. These results

  15. Differential Amino Acid, Carbohydrate and Lipid Metabolism Perpetuations Involved in a Subtype of Rheumatoid Arthritis with Chinese Medicine Cold Pattern

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Hongtao; Niu, Xuyan; Gu, Yan; Lu, Cheng; Xiao, Cheng; Yue, Kevin; Zhang, Ge; Pan, Xiaohua; Jiang, Miao; Tan, Yong; Kong, Hongwei; Liu, Zhenli; Xu, Guowang; Lu, Aiping

    2016-01-01

    Pattern classification is a key approach in Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM), and it is used to classify the patients for intervention selection accordingly. TCM cold and heat patterns, two main patterns of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) had been explored with systems biology approaches. Different regulations of apoptosis were found to be involved in cold and heat classification in our previous works. For this study, the metabolic profiling of plasma was explored in RA patients with typical TCM cold or heat patterns by integrating liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry (LC/MS) and gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) platforms in conjunction with the Ingenuity Pathway Analysis (IPA) software. Three main processes of metabolism, including amino acid, carbohydrate and lipid were focused on for function analysis. The results showed that 29 and 19 differential metabolites were found in cold and heat patterns respectively, compared with healthy controls. The perturbation of amino acid metabolism (increased essential amino acids), carbohydrate metabolism (galactose metabolism) and lipid metabolism, were found to be involved in both cold and heat pattern RA. In particular, more metabolic perturbations in protein and collagen breakdown, decreased glycolytic activity and aerobic oxidation, and increased energy utilization associated with RA cold pattern patients. These findings may be useful for obtaining a better understanding of RA pathogenesis and for achieving a better efficacy in RA clinical practice. PMID:27775663

  16. Effect of carbohydrate-protein supplementation postexercise on rat muscle glycogen synthesis and phosphorylation of proteins controlling glucose storage.

    PubMed

    Hara, Daisuke; Morrison, Paul J; Ding, Zhenping; Ivy, John L

    2011-10-01

    To examine whether addition of protein to a carbohydrate supplement enhances muscle glycogen synthesis, we compared the muscle glycogen concentrations of rats that had been depleted of their muscle glycogen stores with a 3-hour swim and immediately supplemented with a placebo (Con), carbohydrate (CHO), or carbohydrate plus protein supplement (C+P). Rats were given either 0.9 g carbohydrate per kilogram body mass for the CHO group or 0.9 g carbohydrate + 0.3 g protein per kilogram body mass for the C+P groups. Muscle samples of the red and white quadriceps were excised immediately, 30 minutes, or 90 minutes postexercise. Glycogen concentration of the C+P group was greater than that of the CHO group at 90 minutes postexercise in both red (C+P, 28.3 ± 2.6 µmol/g vs CHO, 22.4 ± 2.0 µmol/g; P < .05) and white (C+P, 24.9 ± 2.4 µmol/g vs CHO, 17.64 ± 1.5 µmol/g; P < .01) quadriceps. Protein kinase B phosphorylation was greater in the C+P-30 group (the number following treatment group abbreviation refers to time [in minutes] of euthanasia following exercise) than the sedentary control and exercised control groups in red quadriceps at 30 minutes and in white quadriceps at 90 minutes postexercise. This difference was not observed in the CHO group. Phosphorylation of glycogen synthase was significantly reduced 30 minutes postexercise and returned to baseline levels by 90 minutes postexercise in both CHO- and C+P-supplemented groups, with no difference between supplements. These results demonstrated that the addition of protein to a carbohydrate supplement will enhance the rate of muscle glycogen restoration postexercise and may involve facilitation of the glucose transport process.

  17. Effect of the secondary structure of carbohydrate residues of alpha 1-acid glycoprotein (orosomucoid) on the local dynamics of Trp residues.

    PubMed

    Albani, Jihad René

    2004-01-01

    We studied in this work the relation between the secondary structure of the carbohydrate residues of alpha1-acid glycoprotein and the local motions of Trp residues of the protein. We measured for this purpose the fluorescence emission intensity and anisotropy of the Trp residues between -46 and +30 degrees of the sialylated and asialylated protein. Our results indicate that, in both forms, the global profile of the emission intensity with temperature shows that Trp residues display static and collisional interaction with the neighboring amino acids. However, the profile of the asialylated form is more structured than that observed for the sialylated protein. The Y-plot analysis of the emission-anisotropy results indicated that the frictional resistance to rotation of the surface Trp residue is less important in the sialylated protein than in the asialylated form. This result is in good agreement with the fact that, in the asialylated conformation, the carbohydrate residues are closer to the protein surface than in the sialylated form, thereby increasing the contact of the surface Trp residue with the neighboring amino acids. Also, the interaction between the carbohydrate residues and the surface Trp residue contributes to the modification of the frictional resistance to rotation of the fluorophore.

  18. Efficacy of reducing sugar and phenol-sulfuric acid assays for analysis of soluble carbohydrates in feedstuffs

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Reducing sugar (RSA) and phenol–sulfuric acid (PSA) assays are commonly used to analyze water-soluble carbohydrates. However, questions have arisen as to their accuracy for measurement of feedstuffs with diverse carbohydrate profiles. This study evaluated the efficacy of RSA and PSA as they would co...

  19. Use of glass transitions in carbohydrate excipient design for lyophilized protein formulations

    PubMed Central

    Roughton, Brock C.; Topp, E.M.; Camarda, Kyle V.

    2013-01-01

    This work describes an effort to apply methods from process systems engineering to a pharmaceutical product design problem, with a novel application of statistical approaches to comparing solutions. A computational molecular design framework was employed to design carbohydrate molecules with high glass transition temperatures and low water content in the maximally freeze-concentrated matrix, with the objective of stabilizing lyophilized protein formulations. Quantitative structure–property relationships were developed for glass transition temperature of the anhydrous solute, glass transition temperature of the maximally concentrated solute, melting point of ice and Gordon–Taylor constant for carbohydrates. An optimization problem was formulated to design an excipient with optimal property values. Use of a stochastic optimization algorithm, Tabu search, provided several carbohydrate excipient candidates with statistically similar property values, as indicated by prediction intervals calculated for each property. PMID:24385675

  20. Effects of an amino acid carbohydrate drink on exercise performance after consecutive-day exercise bouts.

    PubMed

    Skillen, Rebecca A; Testa, Massimo; Applegate, Elizabeth A; Heiden, Eric A; Fascetti, Andrea J; Casazza, Gretchen A

    2008-10-01

    This study examined the effect of amino acids in a carbohydrate beverage on cycling performance. Twelve male athletes (28.5 +/- 2.1 yr) cycled at 75% VO2peak for 90 min followed by a ride to exhaustion at 85% VO2peak, before (T1) and on 2 consecutive days (T2 and T3) after 2 weeks of supplementation with 3.6% carbohydrate plus 1% amino acids (AA) or 4.6% carbohydrate-only (CHO) isocaloric beverages. Muscle damage was assessed by plasma creatine kinase (CK), and muscle fatigue by changes in vertical jump pre- to postexercise. Muscle soreness, overall fatigue, and changes in mood state were assessed using questionnaires. Plasma CK was lower for AA in T3 (214.0 +/- 13.5 vs. 485.9 +/- 191.4 U/L immediately post, 213.9 +/- 13.1 vs. 492.0 +/- 199.4 U/L 5 hr post, and 194.9 +/- 17.9 vs. 405.9 +/- 166.6 U/L 24 hr postexercise in AA and CHO, respectively). Time to exhaustion decreased from T2 to T3 only in CHO (10.9 +/- 2.5 to 12.6 +/- 3.2 vs. 13.8 +/- 2.8 to 7.8 +/- 1.5 min in AA and CHO, respectively). Vertical-jump change from pre- to postexercise was greater in T3 for the CHO treatment. Total fatigue score and mood disturbance decreased significantly only with AA in T3. The addition of AA to a carbohydrate beverage after consecutive-day exercise bouts reduced muscle damage as indicated by CK levels, decreased fatigue, and maintained exercise performance compared with consuming carbohydrate alone.

  1. The Role of Carbohydrate Response Element Binding Protein in Intestinal and Hepatic Fructose Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Iizuka, Katsumi

    2017-01-01

    Many articles have discussed the relationship between fructose consumption and the incidence of obesity and related diseases. Fructose is absorbed in the intestine and metabolized in the liver to glucose, lactate, glycogen, and, to a lesser extent, lipids. Unabsorbed fructose causes bacterial fermentation, resulting in irritable bowl syndrome. Therefore, understanding the mechanisms underlying intestinal and hepatic fructose metabolism is important for the treatment of metabolic syndrome and fructose malabsorption. Carbohydrate response element binding protein (ChREBP) is a glucose-activated transcription factor that controls approximately 50% of de novo lipogenesis in the liver. ChREBP target genes are involved in glycolysis (Glut2, liver pyruvate kinase), fructolysis (Glut5, ketohexokinase), and lipogenesis (acetyl CoA carboxylase, fatty acid synthase). ChREBP gene deletion protects against high sucrose diet-induced and leptin-deficient obesity, because Chrebp−/− mice cannot consume fructose or sucrose. Moreover, ChREBP contributes to some of the physiological effects of fructose on sweet taste preference and glucose production through regulation of ChREBP target genes, such as fibroblast growth factor-21 and glucose-6-phosphatase catalytic subunits. Thus, ChREBP might play roles in fructose metabolism. Restriction of excess fructose intake will be beneficial for preventing not only metabolic syndrome but also irritable bowl syndrome. PMID:28241431

  2. Optimizing intramuscular adaptations to aerobic exercise: effects of carbohydrate restriction and protein supplementation on mitochondrial biogenesis.

    PubMed

    Margolis, Lee M; Pasiakos, Stefan M

    2013-11-01

    Mitochondrial biogenesis is a critical metabolic adaptation to aerobic exercise training that results in enhanced mitochondrial size, content, number, and activity. Recent evidence has shown that dietary manipulation can further enhance mitochondrial adaptations to aerobic exercise training, which may delay skeletal muscle fatigue and enhance exercise performance. Specifically, studies have demonstrated that combining carbohydrate restriction (endogenous and exogenous) with a single bout of aerobic exercise potentiates the beneficial effects of exercise on markers of mitochondrial biogenesis. Additionally, studies have demonstrated that high-quality protein supplementation enhances anabolic skeletal muscle intracellular signaling and mitochondrial protein synthesis following a single bout of aerobic exercise. Mitochondrial biogenesis is stimulated by complex intracellular signaling pathways that appear to be primarily regulated by 5'AMP-activated protein kinase and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase mediated through proliferator-activated γ receptor co-activator 1 α activation, resulting in increased mitochondrial DNA expression and enhanced skeletal muscle oxidative capacity. However, the mechanisms by which concomitant carbohydrate restriction and dietary protein supplementation modulates mitochondrial adaptations to aerobic exercise training remains unclear. This review summarizes intracellular regulation of mitochondrial biogenesis and the effects of carbohydrate restriction and protein supplementation on mitochondrial adaptations to aerobic exercise.

  3. Glycosylated Conductive Polymer: A Multimodal Biointerface for Studying Carbohydrate-Protein Interactions.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Xiangqun; Qu, Ke; Rehman, Abdul

    2016-09-20

    Carbohydrate-protein interactions occur through glycoproteins, glycolipids, or polysaccharides displayed on the cell surface with lectins. However, studying these interactions is challenging because of the complexity and heterogeneity of the cell surface, the inherent structural complexity of carbohydrates, and the typically weak affinities of the binding reactions between the lectins and monovalent carbohydrates. The lack of chromophores and fluorophores in carbohydrate structures often drives such investigations toward fluorescence labeling techniques, which usually require tedious and complex synthetic work to conjugate fluorescent tags with additional risk of altering the reaction dynamics. Probing these interactions directly on the cell surface is even more difficult since cells could be too fragile for labeling or labile dynamics could be affected by the labeled molecules that may interfere with the cellular activities, resulting in unwanted cell responses. In contrast, label-free biosensors allow real-time monitoring of carbohydrate-protein interactions in their natural states. A prerequisite, though, for this strategy to work is to mimic the coding information on potential interactions of cell surfaces onto different biosensing platforms, while the complementary binding process can be transduced into a useful signal noninvasively. Through carbohydrate self-assembled monolayers and glycopolymer scaffolds, the multivalency of the naturally existing simple and complex carbohydrates can be mimicked and exploited with label-free readouts (e.g., optical, acoustic, mechanical, electrochemical, and electrical sensors), yet such inquiries reflect only limited aspects of complicated biointeraction processes due to the unimodal transduction. In this Account, we illustrate that functionalized glycosylated conductive polymer scaffolds are the ideal multimodal biointerfaces that not only simplify the immobilization process for surface fabrication via electrochemical

  4. Carbohydrate Loading.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Csernus, Marilyn

    Carbohydrate loading is a frequently used technique to improve performance by altering an athlete's diet. The objective is to increase glycogen stored in muscles for use in prolonged strenuous exercise. For two to three days, the athlete consumes a diet that is low in carbohydrates and high in fat and protein while continuing to exercise and…

  5. Crystal Structure of Trimeric Carbohydrate Recognition and Neck Domains of Surfactant Protein A

    SciTech Connect

    Head,J.; Mealy, T.; McCormack, F.; Seaton, B.

    2003-01-01

    Surfactant protein A (SP-A), one of four proteins associated with pulmonary surfactant, binds with high affinity to alveolar phospholipid membranes, positioning the protein at the first line of defense against inhaled pathogens. SP-A exhibits both calcium-dependent carbohydrate binding, a characteristic of the collectin family, and specific interactions with lipid membrane components. The crystal structure of the trimeric carbohydrate recognition domain and neck domain of SP-A was solved to 2.1-{angstrom} resolution with multiwavelength anomalous dispersion phasing from samarium. Two metalbinding sites were identified, one in the highly conserved lectin site and the other 8.5 {angstrom} away. The interdomain carbohydrate recognition domain-neck angle is significantly less in SP-A than in the homologous collectins, surfactant protein D, and mannose-binding protein. This conformational difference may endow the SP-A trimer with a more extensive hydrophobic surface capable of binding lipophilic membrane components. The appearance of this surface suggests a putative binding region for membrane-derived SP-A ligands such as phosphatidylcholine and lipid A, the endotoxic lipid component of bacterial lipopolysaccharide that mediates the potentially lethal effects of Gram-negative bacterial infection.

  6. Balancing of lipid, protein, and carbohydrate intake in a predatory beetle following hibernation, and consequences for lipid restoration.

    PubMed

    Noreika, Norbertas; Madsen, Natalia E L; Jensen, Kim; Toft, Søren

    2016-05-01

    Carnivorous animals are known to balance their consumption of lipid and protein, and recent studies indicate that some mammalian carnivores also regulate their intake of carbohydrate. We investigated macronutrient balancing and lipid restoration following hibernation in the ground beetle Anchomenus dorsalis, hypothesizing that carbohydrates might be important energy sources upon hibernation when predator lipid stores are exhausted and prey are equally lean. We recorded the consumption of lipid, protein, and carbohydrate over nine days following hibernation, as the beetles foraged to refill their lipid stores. Each beetle was given the opportunity to regulate consumption from two semi-artificial foods differing in the proportion of two of the three macronutrients, while the third macronutrient was kept constant. When analyzing consumption of the three macronutrients on an energetic basis, it became apparent that the beetles regulated lipid and carbohydrate energy interchangeably and balanced the combined energy intake from the two macronutrients against protein intake. Restoration of lipid stores was independent of the availability of any specific macronutrient. However, the energetic consumption required to refill lipid stores was higher when a low proportion of lipids was ingested, suggesting that lipids were readily converted into lipid stores while there were energetic costs associated with converting carbohydrate and protein into stored lipids. Our experiment demonstrates that carbohydrates are consumed and regulated as a non-protein energy source by A. dorsalis despite an expectedly low occurrence of carbohydrates in their natural diet. Perhaps carbohydrates are in fact an overlooked supplementary energy source in the diet of carnivorous arthropods.

  7. Protein-Carbohydrate Interaction between Sperm and the Egg-Coating Envelope and Its Regulation by Dicalcin, a Xenopus laevis Zona Pellucida Protein-Associated Protein.

    PubMed

    Miwa, Naofumi

    2015-05-22

    Protein-carbohydrate interaction regulates multiple important processes during fertilization, an essential biological event where individual gametes undergo intercellular recognition to fuse and generate a zygote. In the mammalian female reproductive tract, sperm temporarily adhere to the oviductal epithelium via the complementary interaction between carbohydrate-binding proteins on the sperm membrane and carbohydrates on the oviductal cells. After detachment from the oviductal epithelium at the appropriate time point following ovulation, sperm migrate and occasionally bind to the extracellular matrix, called the zona pellucida (ZP), which surrounds the egg, thereafter undergoing the exocytotic acrosomal reaction to penetrate the envelope and to reach the egg plasma membrane. This sperm-ZP interaction also involves the direct interaction between sperm carbohydrate-binding proteins and carbohydrates within the ZP, most of which have been conserved across divergent species from mammals to amphibians and echinoderms. This review focuses on the carbohydrate-mediated interaction of sperm with the female reproductive tract, mainly the interaction between sperm and the ZP, and introduces the fertilization-suppressive action of dicalcin, a Xenopus laevis ZP protein-associated protein. The action of dicalcin correlates significantly with a dicalcin-dependent change in the lectin-staining pattern within the ZP, suggesting a unique role of dicalcin as an inherent protein that is capable of regulating the affinity between the lectin and oligosaccharides attached on its target glycoprotein.

  8. Localizing Carbohydrate Binding Sites in Proteins Using Hydrogen/Deuterium Exchange Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jingjing; Kitova, Elena N.; Li, Jun; Eugenio, Luiz; Ng, Kenneth; Klassen, John S.

    2016-01-01

    The application of hydrogen/deuterium exchange mass spectrometry (HDX-MS) to localize ligand binding sites in carbohydrate-binding proteins is described. Proteins from three bacterial toxins, the B subunit homopentamers of Cholera toxin and Shiga toxin type 1 and a fragment of Clostridium difficile toxin A, and their interactions with native carbohydrate receptors, GM1 pentasaccharides (β-Gal-(1→3)-β-GalNAc-(1→4)[α-Neu5Ac-(2→3)]-β-Gal-(1→4)-Glc), Pk trisaccharide (α-Gal-(1→4)-β-Gal-(1→4)-Glc) and CD-grease (α-Gal-(1→3)-β-Gal-(1→4)-β-GlcNAcO(CH2)8CO2CH3), respectively, served as model systems for this study. Comparison of the differences in deuterium uptake for peptic peptides produced in the absence and presence of ligand revealed regions of the proteins that are protected against deuterium exchange upon ligand binding. Notably, protected regions generally coincide with the carbohydrate binding sites identified by X-ray crystallography. However, ligand binding can also result in increased deuterium exchange in other parts of the protein, presumably through allosteric effects. Overall, the results of this study suggest that HDX-MS can serve as a useful tool for localizing the ligand binding sites in carbohydrate-binding proteins. However, a detailed interpretation of the changes in deuterium exchange upon ligand binding can be challenging because of the presence of ligand-induced changes in protein structure and dynamics.

  9. Synthesis and emulsifying properties of carbohydrate fatty acid esters produced from Agave tequilana fructans by enzymatic acylation.

    PubMed

    Casas-Godoy, Leticia; Arrizon, Javier; Arrieta-Baez, Daniel; Plou, Francisco J; Sandoval, Georgina

    2016-08-01

    Carbohydrate fatty acid esters are non-ionic surfactants with a broad spectrum of applications. These molecules are generally synthesized using short carbohydrates or linear fructans; however in this research carbohydrate fatty acid esters were produced for the first time with branched fructans from Agave tequilana. Using immobilized lipases we successfully acylated A. tequilana fructans with vinyl laurate, obtaining products with different degrees of polymerization (DP). Lipozyme 435 was the most efficient lipase to catalyze the transesterification reaction. HPLC and ESI-MS analysis proved the presence of a mixture of acylated products as a result of the chemical complexity of fructans in the A. tequilana. The ESI-MS spectra showed a molecular mass shift between 183 and 366g/mol for fructooligosaccharides with a DP lower than 6, which indicated the presence of Agave fructans that had been mono- and diacylated with lauric acid. The carbohydrate fatty acid esters (CFAE) obtained showed good emulsifying properties in W/O emulsions.

  10. Simultaneous determination of amino acids and carbohydrates in culture media of Clostridium thermocellum by valve-switching ion chromatography.

    PubMed

    Fa, Yun; Yang, Haiyan; Ji, Chengshuai; Cui, He; Zhu, Xinshu; Du, Juan; Gao, Jun

    2013-10-10

    An improved method for the simultaneous determination of 20 amino acids and 7 carbohydrates using one-valve switching after injection, ion chromatography, and integrated pulsed amperometric detection is proposed. The resolution of the amino acids and carbohydrates in the cation trap column was investigated. In addition, parameters including flow liquid type, flow rate, concentration, and valve-switch timing were optimized. The method is time-saving, effective, and accurate for the simultaneous separation of amino acids and carbohydrates, with a mean correlation coefficient of >0.99 and repeatability of 0.5-4.6% for eight replicates. The method was successfully applied in the analysis of amino acids and carbohydrates in aseptic media and in extracellular culture media of three phenotypes of Clostridium thermocellum.

  11. Diet structure, butyric acid, and fermentable carbohydrates influence growth performance, gut morphology, and cecal fermentation characteristics in broilers

    PubMed Central

    Qaisrani, S. N.; van Krimpen, M. M.; Kwakkel, R. P.; Verstegen, M. W. A.; Hendriks, W. H.

    2015-01-01

    An experiment with 288 male (Ross 308) 1-d-old broilers was conducted to test the hypothesis that a coarse diet supplemented with butyric acid (BA) and fermentable carbohydrates (FC) improves performance of broilers with a poorly digestible protein source. The interaction effects of diet structure (fine or coarse), FC supplementation (with or without), and BA supplementation (with or without) in a poorly digestible diet based on rapeseed meal (RSM) were tested in a factorial arrangement of 8 (2 × 2 × 2) dietary treatments. The coarseness of the diet affected feed intake (FI) (P < 0.001), BW gain (P = 0.001), and the feed conversion ratio (FCR) (P = 0.001) positively. Broilers fed the coarse diets had, on average, 14% heavier gizzards and 11, 7, 5, and 6% lower relative empty weights of the crop, duodenum, jejunum, and ileum, respectively, compared with those fed the fine diets. Dietary coarseness resulted in, on average, 6% greater ileal protein digestibility, 20% lower gizzard pH, 19% greater villus height, 18% lower crypt depth, and 23% reduced cecal branched chain fatty acids (BCFA) compared with chickens fed the fine diets. Broilers fed BA-supplemented diets had an improved FCR (P = 0.004) and decreased crypt depth (P < 0.001) compared with those fed diets without BA. Fermentable carbohydrate supplementation did not influence growth performance, gut development, or contents of total BCFA and total biogenic amines in the cecal digesta (P > 0.05). Supplementation with FC, however, decreased the cecal concentration of spermine by approximately 31% compared with broilers fed diets without FC (P = 0.002). In conclusion, feeding a coarse diet supplemented with BA improved performance of broilers fed a diet containing a poorly digestible protein source. The negative effects of a poorly digestible protein source can thus be partly counterbalanced by coarse grinding and BA supplementation in the diet. PMID:26175052

  12. Diet structure, butyric acid, and fermentable carbohydrates influence growth performance, gut morphology, and cecal fermentation characteristics in broilers.

    PubMed

    Qaisrani, S N; van Krimpen, M M; Kwakkel, R P; Verstegen, M W A; Hendriks, W H

    2015-09-01

    An experiment with 288 male (Ross 308) 1-d-old broilers was conducted to test the hypothesis that a coarse diet supplemented with butyric acid (BA) and fermentable carbohydrates (FC) improves performance of broilers with a poorly digestible protein source. The interaction effects of diet structure (fine or coarse), FC supplementation (with or without), and BA supplementation (with or without) in a poorly digestible diet based on rapeseed meal (RSM) were tested in a factorial arrangement of 8 (2×2×2) dietary treatments. The coarseness of the diet affected feed intake (FI) (P<0.001), BW gain (P=0.001), and the feed conversion ratio (FCR) (P=0.001) positively. Broilers fed the coarse diets had, on average, 14% heavier gizzards and 11, 7, 5, and 6% lower relative empty weights of the crop, duodenum, jejunum, and ileum, respectively, compared with those fed the fine diets. Dietary coarseness resulted in, on average, 6% greater ileal protein digestibility, 20% lower gizzard pH, 19% greater villus height, 18% lower crypt depth, and 23% reduced cecal branched chain fatty acids (BCFA) compared with chickens fed the fine diets. Broilers fed BA-supplemented diets had an improved FCR (P=0.004) and decreased crypt depth (P<0.001) compared with those fed diets without BA. Fermentable carbohydrate supplementation did not influence growth performance, gut development, or contents of total BCFA and total biogenic amines in the cecal digesta (P>0.05). Supplementation with FC, however, decreased the cecal concentration of spermine by approximately 31% compared with broilers fed diets without FC (P=0.002). In conclusion, feeding a coarse diet supplemented with BA improved performance of broilers fed a diet containing a poorly digestible protein source. The negative effects of a poorly digestible protein source can thus be partly counterbalanced by coarse grinding and BA supplementation in the diet.

  13. Intra-oral lactic acid production during clearance of different foods containing various carbohydrates.

    PubMed

    Linke, H A; Moss, S J; Arav, L; Chiu, P M

    1997-06-01

    Oral carbohydrate clearance and acid production were monitored over a two hour time period following the ingestion of six foods (chocolate bar, potato chip, oreo cookie, sugar cube, raisin and jelly bean). Each food was evaluated intra-orally in eight volunteers. Oral fluid samples were obtained from each volunteer at 30 min intervals at five different tooth sites using absorbent paper points. The oral fluid samples were analyzed qualitatively and quantitatively for carbohydrates and organic acids using high performance liquid chromatography. Data obtained for each food were averaged and subjected to statistical analysis. The quantity of lactic acid produced 30 min after ingestion was found to be in the following order: (highest) raisin > chocolate bar > sugar cube > jelly bean > oreo cookie > potato chip (least). Two hours after food intake the order had changed significantly: potato chip > jelly bean > sugar cube > chocolate bar > oreo cookie > raisin. A direct linear relationship existed between lactic acid production and the presence of glucose. In foods containing cooked starch prolonged clearance occurs via the intermediate metabolites maltotriose, maltose and glucose. Results indicated that the term 'stickiness', when used to label certain foods such as jelly bean and chocolate bar, should be used cautiously. Foods containing only cooked starch or cooked starch and sugars can be considered as 'sticky', since glucose arising from their intra-oral degradation contributed to acid production over prolonged periods of time.

  14. Patterns of organic acids exuded by pioneering fungi from a glacier forefield are affected by carbohydrate sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brunner, Ivano; Goren, Asena; Schlumpf, Alessandro

    2014-01-01

    Bare soils in the area of retreating glaciers are ideal environments to study the role of microorganisms in the early soil formation and in processes of mineral weathering. The aim of our study was to investigate whether the source of carbohydrate would influence the patterns of organic acids exuded by fungal species. Three pioneering fungus species, isolated from fine granitic sediments in front of the Damma glacier from the central Swiss Alps, have previously been found to have the capability to exude organic acids and dissolve granite powder. In batch experiments, various carbohydrates, including glucose, cellulose, pectin, pollen, and cell remnants of cyanobacteria, fungi, and algae, were applied as carbohydrate sources and the patterns of exuded organic acids recorded. The results showed that two fungi, the zygomycete fungus Mucor hiemalis and the ascomycete fungus Penicillium chrysogenum, released a significantly higher amount of organic acids in dependence on specific carbohydrate sources. Pollen and algae as carbohydrate sources triggered significantly the exudation of malate in M. hiemalis, and pollen and cellulose that of oxalate in P. chrysogenum. We conclude that the occurrence of complex carbohydrate sources in nutrient-deficient deglaciated soils may positively influence the exudation of organic acids of fungi. In particular, pollen and remnants of other microorganisms can trigger the exudation of organic acids of fungi in order to promote the weathering of minerals and to make nutrients available that would otherwise be trapped in that cryospheric environment.

  15. Protein and amino acid nutrition

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Dairy cow protein and amino acid nutrition have a significant role in sustainable dairying. Protein, amino acids, and nitrogen are inextricably linked through effects in the rumen, metabolism of the cow, and environmental nutrient management. Feeding systems have been making progress toward emphasiz...

  16. The effect of structural differences in the reducing terminus of sugars on the binding affinity of carbohydrates and proteins analyzed using photoaffinity labeling.

    PubMed

    Ohtsuka, Isao; Sadakane, Yutaka; Higuchi, Mari; Hada, Noriyasu; Hada, Junko; Kakiuchi, Nobuko; Sakushima, Akiyo

    2011-01-15

    Because carbohydrates and proteins bind with such low affinity, the nature of their interactions is not clear. Photoaffinity labeling with diazirin groups is useful for elucidating the roles of carbohydrates in these binding processes. However, when carbohydrate probes are synthesized according to this conventional method, the reducing terminus of the sugar is opened to provide an acyclic structure. Because greater elucidation of carbohydrate-protein interactions requires a closed-ring carbohydrate in addition to the photoreactive group, we synthesized new molecular tools. The carbohydrate ligands were synthesized in three steps (glycosylation with allyl alcohol, deprotection, and ozonolysis). Specific binding proteins for carbohydrate ligands were obtained by photoaffinity labeling. Closed ring-type carbohydrate ligands, in which the reducing sugar is closed, bound to lectins more strongly than open ring-type sugars. Carbohydrate to protein binding was observed using AFM.

  17. Evaluation of heat shock protein (HSP-60) induction on accumulation of carbohydrate in Isochrysis galbana

    SciTech Connect

    Olsen, H.; Wolfe, M.; Tell, J.; Tjeerdema, R.

    1995-12-31

    Primary levels of the marine food chain may play an important role in the fate of petroleum hydrocarbons in both chemically dispersed and un-dispersed oil spills. HSP-60 proteins, members of the chaperonin family of stress proteins, are induced in response to a wide variety of environmental agents, including UV light, heavy metals, and xenobiotics. Increased production and storage of carbohydrate in I. galbana has been associated with aging and stress. Thus, HSP-60 and carbohydrate storage were selected as sublethal endpoints of exposure to the primary producer, I. galbana, a golden brown, unicellular algae, and a significant component of the marine phytoplankton community. The authors have found that I. galbana cultures exposed to water-accommodated fractions (WAF) of Prudhoe Bay Crude Oil (PBCO), and PBCO/dispersant preparations efficiently induce HSP-60. Studies indicated that WAF produced a dose-related response in I. galbana, which increased as a function of time. Dispersant alone showed the greatest induction, while combined WAF-dispersant showed less induction, suggesting a possible competition between crude oil and algae for dispersant interaction. In addition, they have demonstrated that I. galbana accumulates carbohydrates in response to exposure to WAF and PBCO/dispersant preparations and therefore represents another index of stress in this organism. They were interested in determining if induction of stress proteins and HSP60 in particular represented an adaptive-mechanism, allowing this algae to better cope with exposure to petroleum hydrocarbons released in the marine environment during an oil spill. In an effort to determine if stress protein induction serves as a protective adaptive response to exposure to petroleum hydrocarbons they examined the effect of heat shock induction on the accumulation of carbohydrates by these organisms in response to exposure to WAF and dispersed oil preparations.

  18. Consequences of exchanging carbohydrates for proteins in the cholesterol metabolism of mice fed a high-fat diet.

    PubMed

    Raymond, Frédéric; Wang, Long; Moser, Mireille; Metairon, Sylviane; Mansourian, Robert; Zwahlen, Marie-Camille; Kussmann, Martin; Fuerholz, Andreas; Macé, Katherine; Chou, Chieh Jason

    2012-01-01

    Consumption of low-carbohydrate, high-protein, high-fat diets lead to rapid weight loss but the cardioprotective effects of these diets have been questioned. We examined the impact of high-protein and high-fat diets on cholesterol metabolism by comparing the plasma cholesterol and the expression of cholesterol biosynthesis genes in the liver of mice fed a high-fat (HF) diet that has a high (H) or a low (L) protein-to-carbohydrate (P/C) ratio. H-P/C-HF feeding, compared with L-P/C-HF feeding, decreased plasma total cholesterol and increased HDL cholesterol concentrations at 4-wk. Interestingly, the expression of genes involved in hepatic steroid biosynthesis responded to an increased dietary P/C ratio by first down-regulation (2-d) followed by later up-regulation at 4-wk, and the temporal gene expression patterns were connected to the putative activity of SREBF1 and 2. In contrast, Cyp7a1, the gene responsible for the conversion of cholesterol to bile acids, was consistently up-regulated in the H-P/C-HF liver regardless of feeding duration. Over expression of Cyp7a1 after 2-d and 4-wk H-P/C-HF feeding was connected to two unique sets of transcription regulators. At both time points, up-regulation of the Cyp7a1 gene could be explained by enhanced activations and reduced suppressions of multiple transcription regulators. In conclusion, we demonstrated that the hypocholesterolemic effect of H-P/C-HF feeding coincided with orchestrated changes of gene expressions in lipid metabolic pathways in the liver of mice. Based on these results, we hypothesize that the cholesterol lowering effect of high-protein feeding is associated with enhanced bile acid production but clinical validation is warranted. (246 words).

  19. Decreased rate of protein synthesis, caspase-3 activity, and ubiquitin-proteasome proteolysis in soleus muscles from growing rats fed a low-protein, high-carbohydrate diet.

    PubMed

    Batistela, Emanuele; Pereira, Mayara Peron; Siqueira, Juliany Torres; Paula-Gomes, Silvia; Zanon, Neusa Maria; Oliveira, Eduardo Brandt; Navegantes, Luiz Carlos Carvalho; Kettelhut, Isis C; Andrade, Claudia Marlise Balbinotti; Kawashita, Nair Honda; Baviera, Amanda Martins

    2014-06-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the changes in the rates of both protein synthesis and breakdown, and the activation of intracellular effectors that control these processes in soleus muscles from growing rats fed a low-protein, high-carbohydrate (LPHC) diet for 15 days. The mass and the protein content, as well as the rate of protein synthesis, were decreased in the soleus from LPHC-fed rats. The availability of amino acids was diminished, since the levels of various essential amino acids were decreased in the plasma of LPHC-fed rats. Overall rate of proteolysis was also decreased, explained by reductions in the mRNA levels of atrogin-1 and MuRF-1, ubiquitin conjugates, proteasome activity, and in the activity of caspase-3. Soleus muscles from LPHC-fed rats showed increased insulin sensitivity, with increased levels of insulin receptor and phosphorylation levels of AKT, which probably explains the inhibition of both the caspase-3 activity and the ubiquitin-proteasome system. The fall of muscle proteolysis seems to represent an adaptive response that contributes to spare proteins in a condition of diminished availability of dietary amino acids. Furthermore, the decreased rate of protein synthesis may be the driving factor to the lower muscle mass gain in growing rats fed the LPHC diet.

  20. L: (+)-Lactic acid production from non-food carbohydrates by thermotolerant Bacillus coagulans.

    PubMed

    Ou, Mark S; Ingram, Lonnie O; Shanmugam, K T

    2011-05-01

    Lactic acid is used as an additive in foods, pharmaceuticals, and cosmetics, and is also an industrial chemical. Optically pure lactic acid is increasingly used as a renewable bio-based product to replace petroleum-based plastics. However, current production of lactic acid depends on carbohydrate feedstocks that have alternate uses as foods. The use of non-food feedstocks by current commercial biocatalysts is limited by inefficient pathways for pentose utilization. B. coagulans strain 36D1 is a thermotolerant bacterium that can grow and efficiently ferment pentoses using the pentose-phosphate pathway and all other sugar constituents of lignocellulosic biomass at 50°C and pH 5.0, conditions that also favor simultaneous enzymatic saccharification and fermentation (SSF) of cellulose. Using this bacterial biocatalyst, high levels (150-180 g l(-1)) of lactic acid were produced from xylose and glucose with minimal by-products in mineral salts medium. In a fed-batch SSF of crystalline cellulose with fungal enzymes and B. coagulans, lactic acid titer was 80 g l(-1) and the yield was close to 80%. These results demonstrate that B. coagulans can effectively ferment non-food carbohydrates from lignocellulose to L: (+)-lactic acid at sufficient concentrations for commercial application. The high temperature fermentation of pentoses and hexoses to lactic acid by B. coagulans has these additional advantages: reduction in cellulase loading in SSF of cellulose with a decrease in enzyme cost in the process and a reduction in contamination of large-scale fermentations.

  1. Influence of fermentable carbohydrates or protein on large intestinal and urinary metabolomic profiles in piglets.

    PubMed

    Pieper, R; Neumann, K; Kröger, S; Richter, J F; Wang, J; Martin, L; Bindelle, J; Htoo, J K; Vahjen, V; Van Kessel, A G; Zentek, J

    2012-12-01

    It was recently shown that variations in the ratio of dietary fermentable carbohydrates (fCHO) and fermentable protein (fCP) differentially affect large intestinal microbial ecology and the mucosal response. Here we investigated the use of mass spectrometry to profile changes in metabolite composition in colon and urine associated with variation in dietary fCHO and fCP composition and mucosal physiology. Thirty-two weaned piglets were fed 4 diets in a 2 × 2 factorial design with low fCP and low fCHO, low fCP and high fCHO, high fCP and low fCHO, and high fCP and high fCHO. After 21 to 23 d, all pigs were euthanized and colon digesta and urine metabolite profiles were obtained by mass spectrometry. Analysis of mass spectra by partial least squares approach indicated a clustering of both colonic and urinary profiles for each pig by feeding group. Metabolite identification and annotation using the Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG) metabolic pathways revealed increased abundance of metabolites associated with arachidonic acid metabolism in colon of pigs fed a high concentration of fCP irrespective of dietary fCHO. Urinary metabolites did not show as clear patterns. Mass spectrometry can effectively differentiate metabolite profiles in colon contents and urine associated with changes in dietary composition. Whether metabolite profiling is an effective tool to identify specific metabolites (biomarkers) or metabolite profiles associated with gut function and integrity needs further elucidation.

  2. Verification of protein sparing by feeding carbohydrate to common carp Cyprinus carpio

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Zhenyan; Li, Jinghui; Zhang, Baolong; Fang, Zhenzhen; Sun, Jinhui; Bai, Dongqing; Sun, Jinsheng; Qiao, Xiuting

    2017-03-01

    A 9-week feeding trial in floating freshwater cages (1.0 m×1.0 m×2.0 m) was conducted to study the effects of different dietary levels of protein and starch on growth, body composition, and gene expression of enzymes in common carp, Cyprinus carpio (mean body weight, 36.12±1.18 g) to evaluate the protein-sparing effect of dietary carbohydrate. Four diets were formulated with corn starch as the carbohydrate source to obtain corn starch levels of 6.5%, 13%, 19.5%, or 26% and protein levels of 30.5%, 28.2%, 26.4%, and 24.2%. The results showed no differences in growth performance of fish fed the diets with different protein and corn starch levels, but body composition and glucose metabolic enzyme activity of carp were significantly affected by the different diets ( P< 0.05). Weight gain, specific growth rate, and the feed conversion ratio were not different in fish fed the different dietary treatments. Protein efficiency ratio increased significantly as corn starch level increased ( P< 0.05). Whole-body crude lipid composition increased with increasing dietary corn starch level ( P< 0.05). Glucokinase (GK), hexokinase, and pyruvate kinase (PK) activities increased significantly with increasing dietary corn starch level ( P< 0.05), whereas glucose-6-phosphate (G6Pase) activity decreased with increasing dietary corn starch level ( P< 0.05). GK gene expression was significantly higher in fish fed the high-corn starch diet than those fed the low-corn starch diet ( P< 0.05). G6pase gene expression tended to decrease with increasing starch level ( P> 0.05). In summary, the results indicate a protein-sparing effect by substituting carbohydrate in the diet of common carp.

  3. Verification of protein sparing by feeding carbohydrate to common carp Cyprinus carpio

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Zhenyan; Li, Jinghui; Zhang, Baolong; Fang, Zhenzhen; Sun, Jinhui; Bai, Dongqing; Sun, Jinsheng; Qiao, Xiuting

    2016-06-01

    A 9-week feeding trial in floating freshwater cages (1.0 m×1.0 m×2.0 m) was conducted to study the effects of diff erent dietary levels of protein and starch on growth, body composition, and gene expression of enzymes in common carp, Cyprinus carpio (mean body weight, 36.12±1.18 g) to evaluate the protein-sparing effect of dietary carbohydrate. Four diets were formulated with corn starch as the carbohydrate source to obtain corn starch levels of 6.5%, 13%, 19.5%, or 26% and protein levels of 30.5%, 28.2%, 26.4%, and 24.2%. The results showed no diff erences in growth performance of fish fed the diets with diff erent protein and corn starch levels, but body composition and glucose metabolic enzyme activity of carp were significantly aff ected by the diff erent diets (P<0.05). Weight gain, specific growth rate, and the feed conversion ratio were not diff erent in fish fed the diff erent dietary treatments. Protein efficiency ratio increased significantly as corn starch level increased (P<0.05). Whole-body crude lipid composition increased with increasing dietary corn starch level (P<0.05). Glucokinase (GK), hexokinase, and pyruvate kinase (PK) activities increased significantly with increasing dietary corn starch level (P<0.05), whereas glucose-6-phosphate (G6Pase) activity decreased with increasing dietary corn starch level (P<0.05). GK gene expression was significantly higher in fish fed the high-corn starch diet than those fed the low-corn starch diet (P<0.05). G6pase gene expression tended to decrease with increasing starch level (P>0.05). In summary, the results indicate a protein-sparing effect by substituting carbohydrate in the diet of common carp.

  4. Carbohydrate and amino acid metabolism in fasting and aestivating African lungfish (Protopterus dolloi).

    PubMed

    Frick, Natasha Therese; Bystriansky, Jason Scott; Ip, Yuen Kwong; Chew, Shit Fun; Ballantyne, James Stuart

    2008-09-01

    The potential importance of carbohydrates and amino acids as fuels during periods of fasting and aestivation in the African lungfish, Protopterus dolloi, were examined. No significant decreases in tissue glycogen levels were observed following 60 days of fasting or aestivation, suggesting lungfish may undergo 'glycogen sparing'. Yet glycogenolysis may be important during aestivation based on the differing responses of two flux-generating enzymes of the glycolytic pathway, hexokinase (HK) and pyruvate kinase (PK). PK is required for glycogen breakdown whereas HK is not. HK activity is significantly down-regulated in the heart and gill tissues during aestivation, while PK activity is sustained. The significant negative correlation between the activity of HK and glucose levels in the heart of aestivating lungfish suggests HK may be regulated by glucose concentrations. There was no indication of anaerobic glycolytic flux during aestivation as lactate did not accumulate in any of the tissues examined, and no significant induction of lactate dehydrogenase (LDH)activity was observed. The increase in glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH) and aspartate aminotransferase (Asp-AT) activities in the liver of aestivating P. dolloi suggests some energy may be obtained via increased aminoacid catabolism, leading to the generation of tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle intermediates. These findings indicate the importance of both carbohydrate and amino acid fuel stores during aestivation in aphylogenetically ancient, air-breathing fish.

  5. Glycemic Response of a Carbohydrate-Protein Bar with Ewe-Goat Whey

    PubMed Central

    Manthou, Eirini; Kanaki, Maria; Georgakouli, Kalliopi; Deli, Chariklia K.; Kouretas, Dimitrios; Koutedakis, Yiannis; Jamurtas, Athanasios Z.

    2014-01-01

    In this study we examined the glycaemic index (GI) and glycaemic load (GL) of a functional food product, which contains ewe-goat whey protein and carbohydrates in a 1:1 ratio. Nine healthy volunteers, (age, 23.3 ± 3.9 years; body mass index, 24.2 ± 4.1 kg·m2; body fat %, 18.6 ± 10.0) randomly consumed either a reference food or amount of the test food both with equal carbohydrate content in two visits. In each visit, seven blood samples were collected; the first sample after an overnight fast and the remaining six at 15, 30, 45, 60, 90 and 120 min after the beginning of food consumption. Plasma glucose concentration was measured and the GI was determined by calculation of the incremental area under the curve. The GL was calculated using the equation: test food GI/100 g available carbohydrates per test food serving. The GI of the test food was found to be 5.18 ± 3.27, while the GL of one test food serving was 1.09 ± 0.68. These results indicate that the tested product can be classified as a low GI (<55) and low GL (<10) food. Given the health benefits of low glycaemic response foods and whey protein consumption, the tested food could potentially promote health beyond basic nutrition. PMID:24926525

  6. Tracking the oxidative kinetics of carbohydrates, amino acids and fatty acids in the house sparrow using exhaled 13CO2.

    PubMed

    McCue, M D; Sivan, O; McWilliams, S R; Pinshow, B

    2010-03-01

    Clinicians commonly measure the (13)CO(2) in exhaled breath samples following administration of a metabolic tracer (breath testing) to diagnose certain infections and metabolic disorders. We believe that breath testing can become a powerful tool to investigate novel questions about the influence of ecological and physiological factors on the oxidative fates of exogenous nutrients. Here we examined several predictions regarding the oxidative kinetics of specific carbohydrates, amino acids and fatty acids in a dietary generalist, the house sparrow (Passer domesticus). After administering postprandial birds with 20 mg of one of seven (13)C-labeled tracers, we measured rates of (13)CO(2) production every 15 min over 2 h. We found that sparrows oxidized exogenous amino acids far more rapidly than carbohydrates or fatty acids, and that different tracers belonging to the same class of physiological fuels had unique oxidative kinetics. Glycine had a mean maximum rate of oxidation (2021 nmol min(-1)) that was significantly higher than that of leucine (351 nmol min(-1)), supporting our prediction that nonessential amino acids are oxidized more rapidly than essential amino acids. Exogenous glucose and fructose were oxidized to a similar extent (5.9% of dose), but the time required to reach maximum rates of oxidation was longer for fructose. The maximum rates of oxidation were significantly higher when exogenous glucose was administered as an aqueous solution (122 nmol min(-1)), rather than as an oil suspension (93 nmol min(-1)), supporting our prediction that exogenous lipids negatively influence rates of exogenous glucose oxidation. Dietary fatty acids had the lowest maximum rates of oxidation (2-6 nmol min(-1)), and differed significantly in the extent to which each was oxidized, with 0.73%, 0.63% and 0.21% of palmitic, oleic and stearic acid tracers oxidized, respectively.

  7. Analysis of carbohydrate-protein interactions with synthetic N-linked neoglycoconjugate probes.

    PubMed Central

    Wong, S Y; Manger, I D; Guile, G R; Rademacher, T W; Dwek, R A

    1993-01-01

    Recently we have describe a simple efficient chemical method of generating an asparagine side-chain linker with beta-stereochemistry at the anomeric position of neutral oligosaccharides. We now report the 1-N-glycyl beta-derivatization of sialylated saccharides. Several neoglycoconjugates formed using these N-linked inter-mediates were investigated for their usefulness in probing carbohydrate-protein interactions. First, biotinyl derivatives of two xylose/fucose class plant-type oligosaccharides purified from horseradish peroxidase were effective in demonstrating the carbohydrate specificity of polyclonal anti-(horseradish peroxidase) antibodies. Secondly, a fluorescein-labelled asialo- and digalactosylated biantennary complex sugar was synthesized and shown to bind to a Ricinus communis agglutinin column. This galactose-specific recognition was abolished by treating this fluorescein-labelled oligosaccharide with jack bean beta-galactosidase. Finally, two 1-N-glycyl beta-saccharide derivatives were modified with thiophosgene to form their corresponding isothiocyanate derivatives. Coupling of these isothiocyanate derivatives of sugars to BSA, amino-derivatized polystyrene plates and glass-fibre discs resulted in multiple sugar presentation. The binding of an anti-N-acetylglucosamine monoclonal antibody to N,N'-diacetylchitobiose residues presented on BSA and solid supports was shown by e.l.i.s.a. Similarly the binding of concanavalin A to asialo-, agalactosylated biantennary complex oligosaccharide residues attached to BSA was demonstrated by a competitive e.l.i.s.a. Our results demonstrate that N-linked neoglycoconjugates could be made readily available and they are valuable tools for the detailed analyses of carbohydrates and carbohydrate-binding proteins. Images Figure 2 Figure 6 Figure 9 PMID:7506528

  8. Association of protein structure, protein and carbohydrate subfractions with bioenergy profiles and biodegradation functions in modeled forage.

    PubMed

    Ji, Cuiying; Zhang, Xuewei; Yu, Peiqiang

    2016-03-15

    The objectives of this study were to detect unique aspects and association of forage protein inherent structure, biological compounds, protein and carbohydrate subfractions, bioenergy profiles, and biodegradation features. In this study, common available alfalfa hay from two different sourced-origins (FSO vs. CSO) was used as a modeled forage for inherent structure profile, bioenergy, biodegradation and their association between their structure and bio-functions. The molecular spectral profiles were determined using non-invasive molecular spectroscopy. The parameters included: protein structure amide I group, amide II group and their ratios; protein subfractions (PA1, PA2, PB1, PB2, PC); carbohydrate fractions (CA1, CA2, CA3, CA4, CB1, CB2, CC); biodegradable and undegradable fractions of protein (RDPA2, RDPB1, RDPB2, RDP; RUPA2 RUPB1, RUPB2, RUPC, RUP); biodegradable and undegradable fractions of carbohydrate (RDCA4, RDCB1, RDCB2, RDCB3, RDCHO; RUCA4, RUCB1; RUCB2; RUCB3 RUCC, RUCHO) and bioenergy profiles (tdNDF, tdFA, tdCP, tdNFC, TDN1×, DE3×, ME3×, NEL3×; NEm, NEg). The results show differences in protein and carbohydrate (CHO) subfractions in the moderately degradable true protein fraction (PB1: 502 vs. 420 g/kg CP, P=0.09), slowly degraded true protein fraction (PB2: 45 vs. 96 g/kg CP, P=0.02), moderately degradable CHO fraction (CB2: 283 vs. 223 g/kg CHO, P=0.06) and slowly degraded CHO fraction (CB3: 369 vs. 408 g/kg CHO) between the two sourced origins. As to biodegradable (RD) fractions of protein and CHO in rumen, there were differences in RD of PB1 (417 vs. 349 g/kg CP, P=0.09), RD of PB2 (29 vs. 62 g/kg CP, P=0.02), RD of CB2 (251 vs. 198 g/kg DM, P=0.06), RD of CB3 (236 vs. 261 g/kg CHO, P=0.08). As to bioenergy profile, there were differences in total digestible nutrient (TDN: 551 vs. 537 g/kg DM, P=0.06), and metabolic bioenergy (P=0.095). As to protein molecular structure, there were differences in protein structure 1st and 2nd amide groups (P

  9. Association of protein structure, protein and carbohydrate subfractions with bioenergy profiles and biodegradation functions in modeled forage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ji, Cuiying; Zhang, Xuewei; Yu, Peiqiang

    2016-03-01

    The objectives of this study were to detect unique aspects and association of forage protein inherent structure, biological compounds, protein and carbohydrate subfractions, bioenergy profiles, and biodegradation features. In this study, common available alfalfa hay from two different sourced-origins (FSO vs. CSO) was used as a modeled forage for inherent structure profile, bioenergy, biodegradation and their association between their structure and bio-functions. The molecular spectral profiles were determined using non-invasive molecular spectroscopy. The parameters included: protein structure amide I group, amide II group and their ratios; protein subfractions (PA1, PA2, PB1, PB2, PC); carbohydrate fractions (CA1, CA2, CA3, CA4, CB1, CB2, CC); biodegradable and undegradable fractions of protein (RDPA2, RDPB1, RDPB2, RDP; RUPA2 RUPB1, RUPB2, RUPC, RUP); biodegradable and undegradable fractions of carbohydrate (RDCA4, RDCB1, RDCB2, RDCB3, RDCHO; RUCA4, RUCB1; RUCB2; RUCB3 RUCC, RUCHO) and bioenergy profiles (tdNDF, tdFA, tdCP, tdNFC, TDN1 ×, DE3 ×, ME3 ×, NEL3 ×; NEm, NEg). The results show differences in protein and carbohydrate (CHO) subfractions in the moderately degradable true protein fraction (PB1: 502 vs. 420 g/kg CP, P = 0.09), slowly degraded true protein fraction (PB2: 45 vs. 96 g/kg CP, P = 0.02), moderately degradable CHO fraction (CB2: 283 vs. 223 g/kg CHO, P = 0.06) and slowly degraded CHO fraction (CB3: 369 vs. 408 g/kg CHO) between the two sourced origins. As to biodegradable (RD) fractions of protein and CHO in rumen, there were differences in RD of PB1 (417 vs. 349 g/kg CP, P = 0.09), RD of PB2 (29 vs. 62 g/kg CP, P = 0.02), RD of CB2 (251 vs. 198 g/kg DM, P = 0.06), RD of CB3 (236 vs. 261 g/kg CHO, P = 0.08). As to bioenergy profile, there were differences in total digestible nutrient (TDN: 551 vs. 537 g/kg DM, P = 0.06), and metabolic bioenergy (P = 0.095). As to protein molecular structure, there were differences in protein structure 1st

  10. Carbohydrate and dietary fiber

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Carbohydrate provides 50 to 60% of the calories consumed by the average American. Although relatively little carbohydrate is needed in the diet, carbohydrate spares protein and fat being metabolized for calories. The principal dietary carbohydrates are sugars and starches. Sugars (simple carbohydrat...

  11. The effect of a low carbohydrate beverage with added protein on cycling endurance performance in trained athletes.

    PubMed

    Ferguson-Stegall, Lisa; McCleave, Erin L; Ding, Zhenping; Kammer, Lynne M; Wang, Bei; Doerner, Phillip G; Liu, Yang; Ivy, John L

    2010-10-01

    Ingesting carbohydrate plus protein during prolonged variable intensity exercise has demonstrated improved aerobic endurance performance beyond that of a carbohydrate supplement alone. The purpose of the present study was to determine if a supplement containing a mixture of different carbohydrates (glucose, maltodextrin, and fructose) and a moderate amount of protein given during endurance exercise would increase time to exhaustion (TTE), despite containing 50% less total carbohydrate than a carbohydrate-only supplement. We also sought post priori to determine if there was a difference in effect based on percentage of ventilatory threshold (VT) at which the subjects cycled to exhaustion. Fifteen trained male and female cyclists exercised on 2 separate occasions at intensities alternating between 45 and 70% VO2max for 3 hours, after which the workload increased to ∼74-85% VO2max until exhaustion. Supplements (275 mL) were provided every 20 minutes during exercise, and these consisted of a 3% carbohydrate/1.2% protein supplement (MCP) and a 6% carbohydrate supplement (CHO). For the combined group (n = 15), TTE in MCP did not differ from CHO (31.06 ± 5.76 vs. 26.03 ± 4.27 minutes, respectively, p = 0.064). However, for subjects cycling at or below VT (n = 8), TTE in MCP was significantly greater than for CHO (45.64 ± 7.38 vs. 35.47 ± 5.94 minutes, respectively, p = 0.006). There were no significant differences in TTE for the above VT group (n = 7). Our results suggest that, compared to a traditional 6% CHO supplement, a mixture of carbohydrates plus a moderate amount of protein can improve aerobic endurance at exercise intensities near the VT, despite containing lower total carbohydrate and caloric content.

  12. Chemotactic behavior of deep subsurface bacteria toward carbohydrates, amino acids and a chlorinated alkene

    SciTech Connect

    Lopez de Victoria, G. . Dept. of Biology)

    1989-02-01

    The chemotactic behavior of deep terrestrial subsurface bacteria toward amino acids, carbohydrates and trichloroethylene was assayed using a modification of the capillary method and bacterial enumeration by acridine orange direct counts. Eleven isolates of bacteria isolated from six different geological formations were investigated. A bimodal response rather than an absolute positive or negative response was observed in most assays. Most of the isolates were positively chemotactic to low concentrations of substrates and were repelled by high concentrations of the same substrate. However, this was not the case for trichloroethylene (TCE) which was mostly an attractant and elicited the highest responses in all the isolates when compared with amino acids and carbohydrates. The movement rates of these isolates in aseptic subsurface sediments in the absence and presence of TCE were also determined using a laboratory model. All of the isolates showed distinct response range, peak, and threshold concentrations when exposed to the same substrates suggesting that they are possibly different species as has been inferred from DNA homology studies. 101 refs., 4 figs., 57 tabs.

  13. Nanoparticle-enhanced fluorescence emission for non-separation assays of carbohydrates using a boronic acid-alizarin complex.

    PubMed

    Li, Qianjin; Kamra, Tripta; Ye, Lei

    2016-03-04

    Addition of crosslinked polymer nanoparticles into a solution of a 3-nitrophenylboronic acid-alizarin complex leads to significant enhancement of fluorescence emission. Using the nanoparticle-enhanced boronic acid-alizarin system has improved greatly the sensitivity and extended the dynamic range of separation-free fluorescence assays for carbohydrates.

  14. Modification of soy protein hydrolysates by Maillard reaction: Effects of carbohydrate chain length on structural and interfacial properties.

    PubMed

    Li, Weiwei; Zhao, Haibo; He, Zhiyong; Zeng, Maomao; Qin, Fang; Chen, Jie

    2016-02-01

    This study investigated the effects of carbohydrate chain length on the structural and interfacial properties of the Maillard reaction conjugates of soy protein hydrolysates (Mw>30 kDa). The covalent attachment of sugars to soy peptides was confirmed by amino acid analysis and examination of the Fourier-transform infrared spectra. The results suggested that the emulsion stability of the conjugates increased as the length of the carbohydrate chains increased. The surface activity measurement revealed that the soy peptide-dextran conjugates were closely packed and that each molecule occupied a small area of the interface. It was further confirmed that the soy peptide-dextran conjugates formed a thick adsorbed layer at the oil-water interface, as observed in the confocal laser scanning micrographs. The interfacial layer of soy peptides was rheologically complex with broad linear viscoelastic region and strong elastic modulus, and the soy peptide-dextran conjugates might form multilayer adsorption at the interface. This study suggested that the improved surface properties of the soy peptide-dextran conjugates were a result of the strong membrane formed by the closely packed molecular and multilayer adsorption at the interface, which provided steric hindrance to flocculation.

  15. Complete amino acid sequence and structure characterization of the taste-modifying protein, miraculin.

    PubMed

    Theerasilp, S; Hitotsuya, H; Nakajo, S; Nakaya, K; Nakamura, Y; Kurihara, Y

    1989-04-25

    The taste-modifying protein, miraculin, has the unusual property of modifying sour taste into sweet taste. The complete amino acid sequence of miraculin purified from miracle fruits by a newly developed method (Theerasilp, S., and Kurihara, Y. (1988) J. Biol. Chem. 263, 11536-11539) was determined by an automatic Edman degradation method. Miraculin was a single polypeptide with 191 amino acid residues. The calculated molecular weight based on the amino acid sequence and the carbohydrate content (13.9%) was 24,600. Asn-42 and Asn-186 were linked N-glycosidically to carbohydrate chains. High homology was found between the amino acid sequences of miraculin and soybean trypsin inhibitor.

  16. Effect of carbohydrate- and protein-rich meals on exercise-induced activation of lipolysis in obese subjects.

    PubMed

    Erdmann, J; Tholl, S; Schusdziarra, V

    2010-04-01

    Exercise is an important part of obesity treatment concepts to support fat mobilisation from adipose tissue and also fat oxidation nolich is impaired in obese subjects. In normal weight subjects it is well known that stimulation of plasma insulin levels by a carbohydrate meal can inhibit lipolysis and subsequent fat oxidation. Since obese subjects frequently have elevated basal and postprandial insulin levels the effect of carbohydrate- and protein-rich test meals on exercise-induced activation of lipolysis is of special interest. Twenty obese subjects performed bicycle exercise for 30 min in the fasted state, 30 min after a carbohydrate-or a protein-rich meal, and 120 min after the carbohydrate meal (n=12), respectively, at low intensity. Activation of lipolysis was assessed by plasma glycerol levels. In addition, plasma insulin, glucose, and lactate concentrations were determined. In comparison to the fasted state, the carbohydrate meal suppressed activation of lipolysis. Following the protein meal, exercise led to an attenuated but significant increase of glycerol levels. A similar rise was observed when the carbohydrate meal was ingested 2 h prior to the exercise bout. To improve exercise-induced lipolysis and subsequent fat oxidation during low-intensity exercise obese subjects should not ingest carbohydrates immediately before exercise. Hunger sensations should be satisfied with protein-rich food. When carbohydrates are consumed 2 h prior to exercise its lipolytic effect is comparable to the protein meal. These data are useful in every day dietary counselling and might help to improve weight loss during obesity treatment.

  17. Evaluation of Selected Classical Force Fields for Alchemical Binding Free Energy Calculations of Protein-Carbohydrate Complexes.

    PubMed

    Mishra, Sushil K; Calabró, Gaetano; Loeffler, Hannes H; Michel, Julien; Koča, Jaroslav

    2015-07-14

    Protein-carbohydrate recognition is crucial in many vital biological processes including host-pathogen recognition, cell-signaling, and catalysis. Accordingly, computational prediction of protein-carbohydrate binding free energies is of enormous interest for drug design. However, the accuracy of current force fields (FFs) for predicting binding free energies of protein-carbohydrate complexes is not well understood owing to technical challenges such as the highly polar nature of the complexes, anomerization, and conformational flexibility of carbohydrates. The present study evaluated the performance of alchemical predictions of binding free energies with the GAFF1.7/AM1-BCC and GLYCAM06j force fields for modeling protein-carbohydrate complexes. Mean unsigned errors of 1.1 ± 0.06 (GLYCAM06j) and 2.6 ± 0.08 (GAFF1.7/AM1-BCC) kcal·mol(-1) are achieved for a large data set of monosaccharide ligands for Ralstonia solanacearum lectin (RSL). The level of accuracy provided by GLYCAM06j is sufficient to discriminate potent, moderate, and weak binders, a goal that has been difficult to achieve through other scoring approaches. Accordingly, the protocols presented here could find useful applications in carbohydrate-based drug and vaccine developments.

  18. Amino acid sequence and carbohydrate-binding analysis of the N-acetyl-D-galactosamine-specific C-type lectin, CEL-I, from the Holothuroidea, Cucumaria echinata.

    PubMed

    Hatakeyama, Tomomitsu; Matsuo, Noriaki; Shiba, Kouhei; Nishinohara, Shoichi; Yamasaki, Nobuyuki; Sugawara, Hajime; Aoyagi, Haruhiko

    2002-01-01

    CEL-I is one of the Ca2+-dependent lectins that has been isolated from the sea cucumber, Cucumaria echinata. This protein is composed of two identical subunits held by a single disulfide bond. The complete amino acid sequence of CEL-I was determined by sequencing the peptides produced by proteolytic fragmentation of S-pyridylethylated CEL-I. A subunit of CEL-I is composed of 140 amino acid residues. Two intrachain (Cys3-Cys14 and Cys31-Cys135) and one interchain (Cys36) disulfide bonds were also identified from an analysis of the cystine-containing peptides obtained from the intact protein. The similarity between the sequence of CEL-I and that of other C-type lectins was low, while the C-terminal region, including the putative Ca2+ and carbohydrate-binding sites, was relatively well conserved. When the carbohydrate-binding activity was examined by a solid-phase microplate assay, CEL-I showed much higher affinity for N-acetyl-D-galactosamine than for other galactose-related carbohydrates. The association constant of CEL-I for p-nitrophenyl N-acetyl-beta-D-galactosaminide (NP-GalNAc) was determined to be 2.3 x 10(4) M(-1), and the maximum number of bound NP-GalNAc was estimated to be 1.6 by an equilibrium dialysis experiment.

  19. Addition of glutamine to essential amino acids and carbohydrate does not enhance anabolism in young human males following exercise.

    PubMed

    Wilkinson, Sarah B; Kim, Paul L; Armstrong, David; Phillips, Stuart M

    2006-10-01

    We examined the effect of a post-exercise oral carbohydrate (CHO, 1 g.kg(-1).h(-1)) and essential amino acid (EAA, 9.25 g) solution containing glutamine (0.3 g/kg BW; GLN trial) versus an isoenergetic CHO-EAA solution without glutamine (control, CON trial) on muscle glycogen resynthesis and whole-body protein turnover following 90 min of cycling at 65% VO2 peak. Over the course of 3 h of recovery, muscle biopsies were taken to measure glycogen resynthesis and mixed muscle protein synthesis (MPS), by incorporation of [ring-2H5] phenylalanine. Infusion of [1-13C] leucine was used to measure whole-body protein turnover. Exercise resulted in a significant decrease in muscle glycogen (p < 0.05) with similar declines in each trial. Glycogen resynthesis following 3 h of recovery indicated no difference in total accumulation or rate of repletion. Leucine oxidation increased 2.5 fold (p < 0.05) during exercise, returned to resting levels immediately post-exercise,and was again elevated at 3 h post-exercise (p < 0.05). Leucine flux, an index of whole-body protein breakdown rate, was reduced during exercise, but increased to resting levels immediately post-exercise, and was further increased at 3 h post-exercise (p < 0.05), but only during the CON trial. Exercise resulted in a marked suppression of whole-body protein synthesis (50% of rest; p < 0.05), which was restored post-exercise; however, the addition of glutamine did not affect whole-body protein synthesis post-exercise. The rate of MPS was not different between trials. The addition of glutamine to a CHO + EAA beverage had no effect on post-exercise muscle glycogen resynthesis or muscle protein synthesis, but may suppress a rise in whole-body proteolysis during the later stages of recovery.

  20. Genetically Encoded Fragment-Based Discovery of Glycopeptide Ligands for Carbohydrate-Binding Proteins

    DOE PAGES

    Ng, Simon; Lin, Edith; Kitov, Pavel I.; ...

    2015-04-10

    Here we describe an approach to accelerate the search for competitive inhibitors for carbohydrate-recognition domains (CRDs). Genetically encoded fragment-based-discovery (GE-FBD) uses selection of phagedisplayed glycopeptides to dock a glycan fragment at the CRD and guide selection of Synergistic peptide motifs adjacent to the CRD. Starting from concanavalin A (ConA), a mannose (Man)-binding protein, as a bait, we narrowed a library of 108 glycopeptides to 86 leads that share a consensus motif, Man-WYD. Validation of synthetic leads yielded Man-WYDLF that exhibited 40 50-fold enhancement in affinity over methyl α-D-mannopyranoside (MeMan). Lectin array Suggested specificity: Man-WYD derivative bound only to 3 outmore » of 17 proteins-ConA, LcH, and PSA-that bind to Man. An X-ray structure of ConA.:Man-WYD proved that the trimannoside core and Man-WYD exhibit identical CRD docking; but their extra-CRD binding modes are significantly. different. Still, they have comparable affinity and selectivity for various Man-binding proteins. The intriguing observation provides new insight into functional mimicry :of carbohydrates by peptide ligands. GE-FBD may provide an alternative to rapidly search for competitive inhibitors for lectins.« less

  1. Genetically Encoded Fragment-Based Discovery of Glycopeptide Ligands for Carbohydrate-Binding Proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Ng, Simon; Lin, Edith; Kitov, Pavel I.; Tjhung, Katrina F.; Gerlits, Oksana O.; Deng, Lu; Kasper, Brian; Sood, Amika; Paschal, Beth M.; Zhang, Ping; Ling, Chang-Chun; Klassen, John S.; Noren, Christopher J.; Mahal, Lara K.; Woods, Robert J.; Coates, Leighton; Derda, Ratmir

    2015-04-10

    Here we describe an approach to accelerate the search for competitive inhibitors for carbohydrate-recognition domains (CRDs). Genetically encoded fragment-based-discovery (GE-FBD) uses selection of phagedisplayed glycopeptides to dock a glycan fragment at the CRD and guide selection of Synergistic peptide motifs adjacent to the CRD. Starting from concanavalin A (ConA), a mannose (Man)-binding protein, as a bait, we narrowed a library of 108 glycopeptides to 86 leads that share a consensus motif, Man-WYD. Validation of synthetic leads yielded Man-WYDLF that exhibited 40 50-fold enhancement in affinity over methyl α-D-mannopyranoside (MeMan). Lectin array Suggested specificity: Man-WYD derivative bound only to 3 out of 17 proteins-ConA, LcH, and PSA-that bind to Man. An X-ray structure of ConA.:Man-WYD proved that the trimannoside core and Man-WYD exhibit identical CRD docking; but their extra-CRD binding modes are significantly. different. Still, they have comparable affinity and selectivity for various Man-binding proteins. The intriguing observation provides new insight into functional mimicry :of carbohydrates by peptide ligands. GE-FBD may provide an alternative to rapidly search for competitive inhibitors for lectins.

  2. Dynamics of carbohydrate residues of alpha 1-acid glycoprotein (orosomucoid) followed by red-edge excitation spectra and emission anisotropy studies of Calcofluor White.

    PubMed

    Albani, J R; Sillen, A; Coddeville, B; Plancke, Y D; Engelborghs, Y

    1999-11-23

    Dynamics studies on Calcofluor White bound to the carbohydrate residues of sialylated and asialylated alpha 1-acid glycoprotein (orosomucoid) have been performed. The interaction between the fluorophore and the protein was found to occur preferentially with the glycan residues with a dependence on their spatial conformation. In the presence of sialylated alpha 1-acid glycoprotein, excitation at the red edge of the absorption spectrum of calcofluor does not lead to a shift in the fluorescence emission maximum (440 nm) of the fluorophore. Thus, the emission of calcofluor occurs from a relaxed state. This is confirmed by anisotropy studies as a function of temperature (Perrin plot). In the presence of asialylated alpha 1-acid glycoprotein, red-edge excitation spectra show an important shift (8 nm) of the fluorescence emission maximum of the probe. This reveals that emission of calcofluor occurs before relaxation of the surrounding carbohydrate residues occurs. Emission from a non-relaxed state means that Calcofluor molecules are bound tightly to the carbohydrate residues, a result confirmed by anisotropy studies.

  3. The antimicrobial efficacy and structure activity relationship of novel carbohydrate fatty acid derivatives against Listeria spp. and food spoilage microorganisms.

    PubMed

    Nobmann, Patricia; Smith, Aoife; Dunne, Julie; Henehan, Gary; Bourke, Paula

    2009-01-15

    Novel mono-substituted carbohydrate fatty acid (CFA) esters and ethers were investigated for their antibacterial activity against a range of pathogenic and spoilage bacteria focussing on Listeria monocytogenes. Carbohydrate derivatives with structural differences enable comparative studies on the structure/activity relationship for antimicrobial efficacy and mechanism of action. The antimicrobial efficacy of the synthesized compounds was compared with commercially available compounds such as monolaurin and monocaprylin, as well as the pure free fatty acids, lauric acid and caprylic acid, which have proven antimicrobial activity. Compound efficacy was compared using an absorbance based broth microdilution assay to determine the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC), increase in lag phase and decrease in maximum growth rate. Among the carbohydrate derivatives synthesized, lauric ether of methyl alpha-d-glucopyranoside and lauric ester of methyl alpha-d-mannopyranoside showed the highest growth-inhibitory effect with MIC values of 0.04 mM, comparable to monolaurin. CFA derivatives were generally more active against Gram positive bacteria than Gram negative bacteria. The analysis of both ester and ether fatty acid derivatives of the same carbohydrate, in tandem with alpha and beta configuration of the carbohydrate moiety suggest that the carbohydrate moiety is involved in the antimicrobial activity of the fatty acid derivatives and that the nature of the bond also has a significant effect on efficacy, which requires further investigation. This class of CFA derivatives has great potential for developing antibacterial agents relevant to the food industry, particularly for control of Listeria or other Gram-positive pathogens.

  4. Free cyclitol, soluble carbohydrate and protein contents in Vigna unguiculata and Phaseolus vulgaris bean sprouts.

    PubMed

    Ribeiro, Elane da Silva; Centeno, Danilo da Cruz; Figueiredo-Ribeiro, Rita de Cássia; Fernandes, Kátia Valevski Sales; Xavier-Filho, José; Oliveira, Antônia Elenir Amancio

    2011-04-27

    Seeds sprouts have been used as a good source of basic nutrients and nutraceutical compounds. The high nutritional value of seeds derives from the deposition of compounds during development. However some of these molecules are used in metabolic processes like germination, which leads to a considerable variation in their concentrations once these events are completed. In this work, we investigate the levels of inositols (myo-inositol, D-pinitol and ononitol), soluble carbohydrates and proteins in cotyledons of Phaseolus vulgaris and Vigna unguiculata sprouts. Sprouting increased myo-inositol and glucose content and reduction of raffinose and ononitol was observed. The protein levels increased in P. vulgaris and decreased in V. unguiculata sprouting. The level of sucrose was maintained in both sprouts. D-Pinitol was detected only in quiescent seeds. Our results suggested that bean sprout is an important source of proteins, sucrose, glucose and myo-inositol. Additionally, bean sprouts have low levels of raffinose, an antinutritional compound.

  5. Short-term recovery from prolonged exercise: exploring the potential for protein ingestion to accentuate the benefits of carbohydrate supplements.

    PubMed

    Betts, James A; Williams, Clyde

    2010-11-01

    This review considers aspects of the optimal nutritional strategy for recovery from prolonged moderate to high intensity exercise. Dietary carbohydrate represents a central component of post-exercise nutrition. Therefore, carbohydrate should be ingested as early as possible in the post-exercise period and at frequent (i.e. 15- to 30-minute) intervals throughout recovery to maximize the rate of muscle glycogen resynthesis. Solid and liquid carbohydrate supplements or whole foods can achieve this aim with equal effect but should be of high glycaemic index and ingested following the feeding schedule described above at a rate of at least 1 g/kg/h in order to rapidly and sufficiently increase both blood glucose and insulin concentrations throughout recovery. Adding ≥0.3 g/kg/h of protein to a carbohydrate supplement results in a synergistic increase in insulin secretion that can, in some circumstances, accelerate muscle glycogen resynthesis. Specifically, if carbohydrate has not been ingested in quantities sufficient to maximize the rate of muscle glycogen resynthesis, the inclusion of protein may at least partially compensate for the limited availability of ingested carbohydrate. Some studies have reported improved physical performance with ingestion of carbohydrate-protein mixtures, both during exercise and during recovery prior to a subsequent exercise test. While not all of the evidence supports these ergogenic benefits, there is clearly the potential for improved performance under certain conditions, e.g. if the additional protein increases the energy content of a supplement and/or the carbohydrate fraction is ingested at below the recommended rate. The underlying mechanism for such effects may be partly due to increased muscle glycogen resynthesis during recovery, although there is varied support for other factors such as an increased central drive to exercise, a blunting of exercise-induced muscle damage, altered metabolism during exercise subsequent to

  6. Protein-carbohydrate supplements improve muscle protein balance in muscular dystrophy patients after endurance exercise: a placebo-controlled crossover study.

    PubMed

    Andersen, Grete; Ørngreen, Mette C; Preisler, Nicolai; Jeppesen, Tina D; Krag, Thomas O; Hauerslev, Simon; van Hall, Gerrit; Vissing, John

    2015-01-15

    In healthy individuals, postexercise protein supplementation increases muscle protein anabolism. In patients with muscular dystrophies, aerobic exercise improves muscle function, but the effect of exercise on muscle protein balance is unknown. Therefore, we investigated 1) muscle protein balance before, during, and after exercise and 2) the effect of postexercise protein-carbohydrate supplementation on muscle protein balance in patients with muscular dystrophies. In 17 patients [7 women and 10 men, aged 33 ± 11 yr (18-52), body mass index: 22 ± 3 kg/m(2) (16-26)] and 8 healthy matched controls [3 women and 5 men, age 33 ± 13 years (19-54), body mass index: 23 ± 3 kg/m(2) (19-27)], muscle protein synthesis, breakdown, and fractional synthesis rates (FSR) were measured across the leg using tracer dilution methodology on two occasions, with and without oral postexercise protein-carbohydrate supplementation. In patients, muscle protein breakdown increased in the recovery period (11 ± 1 μmol phenylalanine/min) vs. rest (8 ± 1 μmol phenylalanine/min, P = 0.02), enhancing net muscle protein loss. In contrast, postexercise protein-carbohydrate supplementation reduced protein breakdown, abolished net muscle protein loss, and increased the muscle FSR in patients (0.04 to 0.06%/h; P = 0.03). In conclusion, postexercise protein-carbohydrate supplementation reduces skeletal mixed-muscle protein breakdown, enhances FSR, resulting in a reduced net muscle loss in patients with muscular dystrophies. The findings suggest that postexercise protein-carbohydrate supplementation could be an important add-on to exercise training therapy in muscular dystrophies, and long-term studies of postexercise protein-carbohydrate supplementation are warranted in these conditions.

  7. The geometric framework for nutrition reveals interactions between protein and carbohydrate during larval growth in honey bees.

    PubMed

    Helm, Bryan R; Slater, Garett; Rajamohan, Arun; Yocum, George D; Greenlee, Kendra J; Bowsher, Julia H

    2017-04-10

    In holometabolous insects, larval nutrition affects adult body size, a life history trait with a profound influence on performance and fitness. Individual nutritional components of larval diets are often complex and may interact with one another, necessitating the use of a geometric framework for elucidating nutritional effects. In the honey bee, Apis mellifera, nurse bees provision food to developing larvae, directly moderating growth rates and caste development. However, the eusocial nature of honey bees makes nutritional studies challenging, because diet components cannot be systematically manipulated in the hive. Using in vitro rearing, we investigated the roles and interactions between carbohydrate and protein content on larval survival, growth, and development in A. mellifera We applied a geometric framework to determine how these two nutritional components interact across nine artificial diets. Honey bees successfully completed larval development under a wide range of protein and carbohydrate contents, with the medium protein (∼5%) diet having the highest survival. Protein and carbohydrate both had significant and non-linear effects on growth rate, with the highest growth rates observed on a medium-protein, low-carbohydrate diet. Diet composition did not have a statistically significant effect on development time. These results confirm previous findings that protein and carbohydrate content affect the growth of A. mellifera larvae. However, this study identified an interaction between carbohydrate and protein content that indicates a low-protein, high-carb diet has a negative effect on larval growth and survival. These results imply that worker recruitment in the hive would decline under low protein conditions, even when nectar abundance or honey stores are sufficient.

  8. Production of hydrogen, ethanol and volatile fatty acids from the seaweed carbohydrate mannitol.

    PubMed

    Xia, Ao; Jacob, Amita; Herrmann, Christiane; Tabassum, Muhammad Rizwan; Murphy, Jerry D

    2015-10-01

    Fermentative hydrogen from seaweed is a potential biofuel of the future. Mannitol, which is a typical carbohydrate component of seaweed, was used as a substrate for hydrogen fermentation. The theoretical specific hydrogen yield (SHY) of mannitol was calculated as 5 mol H2/mol mannitol (615.4 mL H2/g mannitol) for acetic acid pathway, 3 mol H2/mol mannitol (369.2 mL H2/g mannitol) for butyric acid pathway and 1 mol H2/mol mannitol (123.1 mL H2/g mannitol) for lactic acid and ethanol pathways. An optimal SHY of 1.82 mol H2/mol mannitol (224.2 mL H2/g mannitol) was obtained by heat pre-treated anaerobic digestion sludge under an initial pH of 8.0, NH4Cl concentration of 25 mM, NaCl concentration of 50mM and mannitol concentration of 10 g/L. The overall energy conversion efficiency achieved was 96.1%. The energy was contained in the end products, hydrogen (17.2%), butyric acid (38.3%) and ethanol (34.2%).

  9. How Phosphotransferase System-Related Protein Phosphorylation Regulates Carbohydrate Metabolism in Bacteria†

    PubMed Central

    Deutscher, Josef; Francke, Christof; Postma, Pieter W.

    2006-01-01

    The phosphoenolpyruvate(PEP):carbohydrate phosphotransferase system (PTS) is found only in bacteria, where it catalyzes the transport and phosphorylation of numerous monosaccharides, disaccharides, amino sugars, polyols, and other sugar derivatives. To carry out its catalytic function in sugar transport and phosphorylation, the PTS uses PEP as an energy source and phosphoryl donor. The phosphoryl group of PEP is usually transferred via four distinct proteins (domains) to the transported sugar bound to the respective membrane component(s) (EIIC and EIID) of the PTS. The organization of the PTS as a four-step phosphoryl transfer system, in which all P derivatives exhibit similar energy (phosphorylation occurs at histidyl or cysteyl residues), is surprising, as a single protein (or domain) coupling energy transfer and sugar phosphorylation would be sufficient for PTS function. A possible explanation for the complexity of the PTS was provided by the discovery that the PTS also carries out numerous regulatory functions. Depending on their phosphorylation state, the four proteins (domains) forming the PTS phosphorylation cascade (EI, HPr, EIIA, and EIIB) can phosphorylate or interact with numerous non-PTS proteins and thereby regulate their activity. In addition, in certain bacteria, one of the PTS components (HPr) is phosphorylated by ATP at a seryl residue, which increases the complexity of PTS-mediated regulation. In this review, we try to summarize the known protein phosphorylation-related regulatory functions of the PTS. As we shall see, the PTS regulation network not only controls carbohydrate uptake and metabolism but also interferes with the utilization of nitrogen and phosphorus and the virulence of certain pathogens. PMID:17158705

  10. Multiparametric investigation of competitive and noncompetitive sorption characteristics of SMP fractions (carbohydrate and protein) on activated carbon.

    PubMed

    Dizge, Nadir; Tansel, Berrin

    2011-01-30

    Sorption characteristics of soluble microbial products (SMPs) as carbohydrate and protein on activated carbon were investigated. Batch experiments were conducted to evaluate the sorption kinetics and the equilibrium conditions. The parameters studied included initial SMP concentration (50-200mg/L), activated carbon dosage (0.25-50 g/L), contact time (0.02-4h), particle size of activated carbon used (5-75 μm, 75-850 μm, and 850-1000 μm), and presence of one or both SMP fractions. The equilibrium sorption of carbohydrate and protein were significantly affected by the presence of the second SMP fraction in the solutions. Adsorption isotherms were expressed by the Langmuir and Freundlich models. The adsorption rates under noncompetitive and competitive conditions were analyzed with kinetics-based Lagergren pseudo-first order and pseudo-second order models; and diffusion-based external diffusion and Weber-Morris intraparticle models. Both SMP fractions were removed effectively, however, sorption of protein was significantly better than that of carbohydrate in all cases. The relatively significant effect of particle size on sorption of protein indicates that protein is most likely adsorbed as a single layer on the carbon surface. For the carbohydrate, the increase in particle size did not decrease the sorption significantly indicating that carbohydrate may be adsorbed in multiple layers or may diffuse into the porous matrix more effectively.

  11. Vascular effects of a low-carbohydrate high-protein diet

    PubMed Central

    Foo, Shi Yin; Heller, Eric R.; Wykrzykowska, Joanna; Sullivan, Christopher J.; Manning-Tobin, Jennifer J.; Moore, Kathryn J.; Gerszten, Robert E.; Rosenzweig, Anthony

    2009-01-01

    The cardiovascular complications of obesity have prompted interest in dietary interventions to reduce weight, including low-carbohydrate diets that are generally high in protein and fat. However, little is known about the long-term effects of these diets on vascular health. We examined the cardiovascular effects of a low-carbohydrate, high-protein diet (LCHP) in the ApoE−/− mouse model of atherosclerosis and in a model of ischemia-induced neovascularization. Mice on a LCHP were compared with mice maintained on either the standard chow diet (SC) or the Western diet (WD) which contains comparable fat and cholesterol to the LCHP. LCHP-fed mice developed more aortic atherosclerosis and had an impaired ability to generate new vessels in response to tissue ischemia. These changes were not explained by alterations in serum cholesterol, inflammatory mediators or infiltrates, or oxidative stress. The LCHP diet substantially reduced the number of bone marrow and peripheral blood endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs), a marker of vascular regenerative capacity. EPCs from mice on a LCHP diet also manifest lower levels of activated (phosphorylated) Akt, a serine-threonine kinase important in EPC mobilization, proliferation, and survival. Taken together, these data demonstrate that in animal models LCHP diets have adverse vascular effects not reflected in serum markers and that nonlipid macronutrients can modulate vascular progenitor cells and pathophysiology. PMID:19706393

  12. Carbohydrate particles as protein carriers and scaffolds: physico-chemical characterization and collagen stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peres, Ivone; Rocha, Sandra; Loureiro, Joana A.; do Carmo Pereira, Maria; Ivanova, Galya; Coelho, Manuel

    2012-09-01

    The preservation of protein properties after entrapping into polymeric matrices and the effects of drying the emulsions still remains uncertain and controversial. Carbohydrate particles were designed and prepared by homogenization of gum arabic and maltodextrin mixture, with collagen hydrolysate (CH) followed by spray-drying. The encapsulation of CH in the carbohydrate matrix was achieved with an efficiency of 85 ± 2 %. The morphology and the size of the particles, before (40-400 nm) and after spray-drying (<20 μm), were characterized by scanning electron microscopy and dynamic light scattering. Measurements of the nuclear relaxation times and application of diffusion ordered spectroscopy, obtained through pulsed field gradient NMR experiments, have been performed to determine the structure of the CH-polysaccharide conjugates and to clarify the mechanism of CH immobilization in the polysaccharide matrix. In vitro release profiles in ultrapure water and in cellular medium reveal that the diffusion rate of CH from the polymeric matrix to the dialysis solution decreases in average 30-50 % over time, compared to free CH molecules. In cellular medium at 37 °C, the complete release of CH from the particles is achieved only after 24 h, demonstrating a significant decrease in the CH mass transfer process when compared with free CH. The findings of this study outline the ability of gum arabic/maltodextrin matrices to entrap and preserve CH original properties after the spray-drying process and support the potential of the polymeric scaffold for protein delivery and tissue engineering.

  13. Effect of milk protein addition to a carbohydrate-electrolyte rehydration solution ingested after exercise in the heat.

    PubMed

    James, Lewis J; Clayton, David; Evans, Gethin H

    2011-02-01

    The present study examined the effects of milk protein on rehydration after exercise in the heat, via the comparison of energy- and electrolyte content-matched carbohydrate and carbohydrate-milk protein solutions. Eight male subjects lost 1·9 (SD 0·2) % of their body mass by intermittent exercise in the heat and rehydrated with 150% of their body mass loss with either a 65 g/l carbohydrate solution (trial C) or a 40 g/l carbohydrate, 25 g/l milk protein solution (trial CP). Urine samples were collected before and after exercise and for 4 h after rehydration. Total cumulative urine output after rehydration was greater for trial C (1212 (SD 310) ml) than for trial CP (931 (SD 254) ml) (P < 0·05), and total fluid retention over the study was greater after ingestion of drink CP (55 (SD 12) %) than that after ingestion of drink C (43 (SD 15) %) (P < 0·05). At the end of the study period, whole body net fluid balance (P < 0·05) was less negative for trial CP (-0·26 (SD 0·27) litres) than for trial C (-0·52 (SD 0·30) litres), and although net negative for both the trials, it was only significantly negative after ingestion of drink C (P < 0·05). The results of the present study suggest that when matched for energy density and fat content, as well as for Na and K concentration, and when ingested after exercise-induced dehydration, a carbohydrate-milk protein solution is better retained than a carbohydrate solution. These results suggest that gram-for-gram, milk protein is more effective at augmenting fluid retention than carbohydrate.

  14. Behavioural responses of the snail Lymnaea acuminata to carbohydrates and amino acids in bait pellets.

    PubMed

    Agrahari, P; Singh, D K

    2010-12-01

    Snail control could play an important role in programmes against fascioliasis, especially if the methods used for molluscicide delivery could be improved, such as by the development of bait formulations containing both an effective attractant and a molluscicide, to ensure good levels of contact between the molluscicide and the target snail populations. In a recent study, the attractiveness to Lymnaea acuminata (an intermediate host of the digenean trematode Fasciola gigantica) of potential components of snail-attractant pellets was investigated. Carbohydrates (glucose, maltose, sucrose or starch, each at 10 mM) and amino acids (citrulline, tryptophan, proline or serine, each at 20 mM), were tested in aquaria, with the snails initially placed 22.5, 30 or 45 cm from an agar pellet containing the component under test. Under these conditions, starch and proline emerged as the strongest attractants for L. acuminata, followed by maltose and serine.

  15. The amino acid sequence of a carbohydrate-containing fragment of hen ovotransferrin.

    PubMed Central

    Kingston, I B; Williams, J

    1975-01-01

    1. Hen ovotransferrin was treated with CNBr and fractionated by gel filtration. 2. After further treatment by reduction and carboxymethylation a carbohydrate-containing fragment of molecular weight 11990 was obtained (fragment BCd). 3. The amino acid sequence of this fragment was determined. It consists of a single chain of 94 residues. 4. The structure of a tryptic glycopeptide derived from whole ovotransferrin permitted a further eight residues to be assigned at the N-terminus of fragment BCd. 5. Heterogeneity was found at two positions. 6. Further evidence has been deposited as Supplementary Publication SUP 50045 (19 pages) at the British Library (Lending Division), Boston Spa, Wetherby, W. Yorkshire LS23 7BQ, U.K., from whom copies may be obtained on the terms indicated in Biochem. J. (1975), 145, 5. PMID:1172663

  16. Parsing the life-shortening effects of dietary protein: effects of individual amino acids.

    PubMed

    Arganda, Sara; Bouchebti, Sofia; Bazazi, Sepideh; Le Hesran, Sophie; Puga, Camille; Latil, Gérard; Simpson, Stephen J; Dussutour, Audrey

    2017-01-11

    High-protein diets shorten lifespan in many organisms. Is it because protein digestion is energetically costly or because the final products (the amino acids) are harmful? To answer this question while circumventing the life-history trade-off between reproduction and longevity, we fed sterile ant workers on diets based on whole proteins or free amino acids. We found that (i) free amino acids shortened lifespan even more than proteins; (ii) the higher the amino acid-to-carbohydrate ratio, the shorter ants lived and the lower their lipid reserves; (iii) for the same amino acid-to-carbohydrate ratio, ants eating free amino acids had more lipid reserves than those eating whole proteins; and (iv) on whole protein diets, ants seem to regulate food intake by prioritizing sugar, while on free amino acid diets, they seem to prioritize amino acids. To test the effect of the amino acid profile, we tested diets containing proportions of each amino acid that matched the ant's exome; surprisingly, longevity was unaffected by this change. We further tested diets with all amino acids under-represented except one, finding that methionine, serine, threonine and phenylalanine are especially harmful. All together, our results show certain amino acids are key elements behind the high-protein diet reduction in lifespan.

  17. EFFECT OF DIETARY PROTEIN AND CARBOHYDRATE LEVELS ON WEIGHT GAIN AND GONAD PRODUCTION IN THE SEA URCHIN LYTECHINUS VARIEGATUS.

    PubMed

    Heflin, Laura E; Gibbs, Victoria K; Powell, Mickie L; Makowsky, Robert; Lawrence, John M; Lawrence, Addison L; Watts, Stephen A

    2012-08-15

    Adult Lytechinus variegatus were fed eight formulated diets with different protein (ranging from 12 to 36%) and carbohydrate (ranging from 21 to 39 %) levels. Each sea urchin (n = 8 per treatment) was fed a daily sub-satiation ration of 1.5% of average body weight for 9 weeks. Akaike information criterion analysis was used to compare six different hypothesized dietary composition models across eight growth measurements. Dietary protein level and protein: energy ratio were the best models for prediction of total weight gain. Diets with the highest (> 68.6 mg P kcal(--1)) protein: energy ratios produced the most wet weight gain after 9 weeks. Dietary carbohydrate level was a poor predictor for most growth parameters examined in this study. However, the model containing a protein × carbohydrate interaction effect was the best model for protein efficiency ratio (PER). PER decreased with increasing dietary protein level, more so at higher carbohydrate levels. Food conversion ratio (FCR) was best modeled by total dietary energy levels: Higher energy diets produced lower FCRs. Dietary protein level was the best model of gonad wet weight gain. These data suggest that variations in dietary nutrients and energy differentially affect organismal growth and growth of body components.

  18. Effects of step-wise increases in dietary carbohydrate on circulating saturated Fatty acids and palmitoleic Acid in adults with metabolic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Volk, Brittanie M; Kunces, Laura J; Freidenreich, Daniel J; Kupchak, Brian R; Saenz, Catherine; Artistizabal, Juan C; Fernandez, Maria Luz; Bruno, Richard S; Maresh, Carl M; Kraemer, William J; Phinney, Stephen D; Volek, Jeff S

    2014-01-01

    Recent meta-analyses have found no association between heart disease and dietary saturated fat; however, higher proportions of plasma saturated fatty acids (SFA) predict greater risk for developing type-2 diabetes and heart disease. These observations suggest a disconnect between dietary saturated fat and plasma SFA, but few controlled feeding studies have specifically examined how varying saturated fat intake across a broad range affects circulating SFA levels. Sixteen adults with metabolic syndrome (age 44.9±9.9 yr, BMI 37.9±6.3 kg/m2) were fed six 3-wk diets that progressively increased carbohydrate (from 47 to 346 g/day) with concomitant decreases in total and saturated fat. Despite a distinct increase in saturated fat intake from baseline to the low-carbohydrate diet (46 to 84 g/day), and then a gradual decrease in saturated fat to 32 g/day at the highest carbohydrate phase, there were no significant changes in the proportion of total SFA in any plasma lipid fractions. Whereas plasma saturated fat remained relatively stable, the proportion of palmitoleic acid in plasma triglyceride and cholesteryl ester was significantly and uniformly reduced as carbohydrate intake decreased, and then gradually increased as dietary carbohydrate was re-introduced. The results show that dietary and plasma saturated fat are not related, and that increasing dietary carbohydrate across a range of intakes promotes incremental increases in plasma palmitoleic acid, a biomarker consistently associated with adverse health outcomes.

  19. Effects of CO₂ on Acer negundo pollen fertility, protein content, allergenic properties, and carbohydrates.

    PubMed

    Silva, M; Ribeiro, H; Abreu, I; Cruz, A; Esteves da Silva, J C G

    2015-05-01

    Atmospheric gaseous pollutants can induce qualitative and quantitative changes in airborne pollen characteristics. In this work, it was investigated the effects of carbon dioxide (CO2) on Acer negundo pollen fertility, protein content, allergenic properties, and carbohydrates. Pollen was collected directly from the anthers and in vitro exposed to three CO2 levels (500, 1000, and 3000 ppm) for 6 and 24 h in an environmental chamber. Pollen fertility was determined using viability and germination assays, total soluble protein was determined with Coomassie Protein Assay Reagent, and the antigenic and allergenic properties were investigated by sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) and immunological techniques using patients' sera. Also, pollen fructose, sucrose, and glucose values were determined. Carbon dioxide exposure affected negatively pollen fertility, total soluble protein content, and fructose content. The patient sera revealed increased IgE reactivity to proteins of A. negundo pollen exposed to increasing levels of the pollutant. No changes were detected in the SDS-PAGE protein profiles and in sucrose and glucose levels. Our results indicate that increase in atmospheric CO2 concentrations can have a negative influence of some features of A. negundo airborne pollen that can influence the reproductive processes as well as respiratory pollen allergies in the future.

  20. Computer simulation of protein—carbohydrate complexes: application to arabinose-binding protein and pea lectin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rao, V. S. R.; Biswas, Margaret; Mukhopadhyay, Chaitali; Balaji, P. V.

    1989-03-01

    The CCEM method (Contact Criteria and Energy Minimisation) has been developed and applied to study protein-carbohydrate interactions. The method uses available X-ray data even on the native protein at low resolution (above 2.4 Å) to generate realistic models of a variety of proteins with various ligands. The two examples discussed in this paper are arabinose-binding protein (ABP) and pea lectin. The X-ray crystal structure data reported on ABP-β- L-arabinose complex at 2.8, 2.4 and 1.7 Å resolution differ drastically in predicting the nature of the interactions between the protein and ligand. It is shown that, using the data at 2.4 Å resolution, the CCEM method generates complexes which are as good as the higher (1.7 Å) resolution data. The CCEM method predicts some of the important hydrogen bonds between the ligand and the protein which are missing in the interpretation of the X-ray data at 2.4 Å resolution. The theoretically predicted hydrogen bonds are in good agreement with those reported at 1.7 Å resolution. Pea lectin has been solved only in the native form at 3 Å resolution. Application of the CCEM method also enables us to generate complexes of pea lectin with methyl-α- D-glucopyranoside and methyl-2,3-dimethyl-α- D-glucopyranoside which explain well the available experimental data in solution.

  1. Effects of dietary amino acids, carbohydrates, and choline on neurotransmitter synthesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wurtman, Richard J.

    1988-01-01

    The ability of a meal to increase or decrease brain neurotransmitter synthesis has been studied. It is concluded that brain serotonin synthesis is directly controlled by the proportions of carbohydrate to protein in meals and snacks that increase or decrease brain tryptophan levels, thereby changing the substrate saturation of tryptophan hydroxylase and the rate of serotonin synthesis. The ability of serotoninergic neurons to have their output coupled to dietary macronutrients enables them to function as sensors of peripheral metabolism, and to subserve an important role in the control of appetite. The robust and selective responses of catecholaminergic and cholinergic neurons to supplemental tyrosine and choline suggest that these compounds may become useful as a new type of drug for treating deseases or conditions in which adequate quantities of the transmitter would otherwise be unavailable.

  2. Carbohydrate-protein interactions that drive processive polysaccharide translocation in enzymes revealed from a computational study of cellobiohydrolase processivity.

    PubMed

    Knott, Brandon C; Crowley, Michael F; Himmel, Michael E; Ståhlberg, Jerry; Beckham, Gregg T

    2014-06-18

    Translocation of carbohydrate polymers through protein tunnels and clefts is a ubiquitous biochemical phenomenon in proteins such as polysaccharide synthases, glycoside hydrolases, and carbohydrate-binding modules. Although static snapshots of carbohydrate polymer binding in proteins have long been studied via crystallography and spectroscopy, the molecular details of polysaccharide chain processivity have not been elucidated. Here, we employ simulation to examine how a cellulose chain translocates by a disaccharide unit during the processive cycle of a glycoside hydrolase family 7 cellobiohydrolase. Our results demonstrate that these biologically and industrially important enzymes employ a two-step mechanism for chain threading to form a Michaelis complex and that the free energy barrier to chain threading is significantly lower than the hydrolysis barrier. Taken with previous studies, our findings suggest that the rate-limiting step in enzymatic cellulose degradation is the glycosylation reaction, not chain processivity. Based on the simulations, we find that strong electrostatic interactions with polar residues that are conserved in GH7 cellobiohydrolases, but not in GH7 endoglucanases, at the leading glucosyl ring provide the thermodynamic driving force for polysaccharide chain translocation. Also, we consider the role of aromatic-carbohydrate interactions, which are widespread in carbohydrate-active enzymes and have long been associated with processivity. Our analysis suggests that the primary role for these aromatic residues is to provide tunnel shape and guide the carbohydrate chain to the active site. More broadly, this work elucidates the role of common protein motifs found in carbohydrate-active enzymes that synthesize or depolymerize polysaccharides by chain translocation mechanisms coupled to catalysis.

  3. Lignin, cutin, amino acid and carbohydrate analyses of marine particulate organic matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hedges, John I.

    Our group at the University of Washington has specifically designed methods for the analysis of lignin compounds [Hedges and Ertel, 1982], cutin acids [Goñi and Hedges, 1990a], amino acids [Cowie and Hedges, in press, 1991a, b] and various carbohydrates, including aldoses [Cowie and Hedges, 1984], cyclitols [Hedges and Weliky, 1989] and uronic acids [Walters and Hedges, 1988; Bergamaschi and Hedges, in preparation], in particulate samples from aquatic environments. All of these procedures are derivatives of previous methods that we have adapted for application to complex natural mixtures and tested on a variety of sample types, such as plankton, woods, soils and sediments, for precision, accuracy and yield efficiencies. All the methods are written up in detail and only will be summarized in the following sections. The remaining discussion, covering the various compound types in the order given above, will focus on unpublished procedural developments for each technique, special problems that are unique to each method and related tricks of the trade. Lignin analysis will be treated in most detail because it is the method with which we have had the longest and most detailed experience.

  4. Verticillium dahliae manipulates plant immunity by glycoside hydrolase 12 proteins in conjuction with carbohydrate-binding module 1.

    PubMed

    Gui, Yue-Jing; Chen, Jie-Yin; Zhang, Dan-Dan; Li, Nan-Yang; Li, Ting-Gang; Zhang, Wen-Qi; Wang, Xin-Yan; Short, Dylan P G; Li, Lei; Guo, Wei; Kong, Zhi-Qiang; Bao, Yu-Ming; Subbarao, Krishna V; Dai, Xiao-Feng

    2017-02-15

    Glycoside hydrolase 12 (GH12) proteins act as virulence factors and pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs) in oomycetes. However, the pathogenic mechanisms of fungal GH12 proteins have not been characterized. In this study, we demonstrated that two of the six GH12 proteins produced by the fungus Verticillium dahliae Vd991, VdEG1 and VdEG3 acted as PAMPs to trigger cell death and PAMP-triggered immunity (PTI) independent of their enzymatic activity in Nicotiana benthamiana. A 63-amino-acid peptide of VdEG3 was sufficient for cell death-inducing activity, but this was not the case for the corresponding peptide of VdEG1. Further study indicated that VdEG1 and VdEG3 trigger PTI in different ways: BAK1 is required for VdEG1- and VdEG3-triggered immunity, while SOBIR1 is specifically required for VdEG1-triggered immunity in N. benthamiana. Unlike oomycetes, which employ RXLR effectors to suppress host immunity, a carbohydrate-binding module family 1 (CBM1) protein domain suppressed GH12 protein-induced cell death. Furthermore, during infection of N. benthamiana and cotton, VdEG1 and VdEG3 acted as PAMPs and virulence factors, respectively indicative of host-dependent molecular functions. These results suggest that VdEG1 and VdEG3 associate differently with BAK1 and SOBIR1 receptor-like kinases to trigger immunity in N. benthamiana, and together with CBM1-containing proteins manipulate plant immunity. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  5. Influence of carbohydrate starvation and arginine on culturability and amino acid utilization of lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis.

    PubMed

    Stuart, M R; Chou, L S; Weimer, B C

    1999-02-01

    Two strains of Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis were used to determine the influence of lactose and arginine on viability and amino acid use during carbohydrate starvation. Lactose provided energy for logarithmic-phase growth, and amino acids such as arginine provided energy after carbohydrate exhaustion. Survival time, cell numbers, and ATP concentrations increased with the addition of arginine to the basal medium. By the onset of lactose exhaustion, the concentrations of glycine-valine and glutamate had decreased by as much as 67% in L. lactis ML3, whereas the serine concentration increased by 97% during the same period. When no lactose was added, the concentrations of these amino acids remained constant. Similar trends were observed for L. lactis 11454. Without lactose or arginine, L. lactis ML3 was nonculturable on agar but was viable after 2 days, as measured by fluorescent viability stains and intracellular ATP levels. However, L. lactis 11454 without lactose or arginine remained culturable for at least 14 days. These data suggest that lactococci become viable but nonculturable in response to carbohydrate depletion. Additionally, these data indicate that amino acids other than arginine facilitate the survival of L. lactis during carbohydrate starvation.

  6. Sulfonic acid functionalized nano γ-Al2O3 catalyzed per-O-acetylated of carbohydrates.

    PubMed

    Wu, Liqiang; Yin, Zhikui

    2013-01-10

    A simple and clean synthesis of per-O-acetylation carbohydrate derivatives has been accomplished by treatment of sugars with a stoichiometric quantity of acetic anhydride under solvent-free conditions in the presence of sulfonic acid functionalized nano γ-Al(2)O(3) as an efficient and environmentally benign catalyst.

  7. PRODUCTION AND ECONOMIC OPTIMIZATION OF DIETARY PROTEIN AND CARBOHYDRATE IN THE CULTURE OF JUVENILE SEA URCHIN Lytechinus variegatus.

    PubMed

    Heflin, Laura E; Makowsky, Robert; Taylor, J Christopher; Williams, Michael B; Lawrence, Addison L; Watts, Stephen A

    2016-10-01

    Juvenile Lytechinus variegatus (ca. 3.95± 0.54 g) were fed one of 10 formulated diets with different protein (ranging from 11- 43%) and carbohydrate (12 or 18%; brackets determined from previous studies) levels. Urchins (n= 16 per treatment) were fed a daily sub-satiation ration equivalent to 2.0% of average body weight for 10 weeks. Our objective was (1) to create predictive models of growth, production and efficiency outcomes and (2) to generate economic analysis models in relation to these dietary outcomes for juvenile L. variegatus held in culture. At dietary protein levels below ca. 30%, models for most growth and production outcomes predicted increased rates of growth and production among urchins fed diets containing 18% dietary carbohydrate levels as compared to urchins fed diets containing 12% dietary carbohydrate. For most outcomes, growth and production was predicted to increase with increasing level of dietary protein up to ca. 30%, after which, no further increase in growth and production were predicted. Likewise, dry matter production efficiency was predicted to increase with increasing protein level up to ca. 30%, with urchins fed diets with 18% carbohydrate exhibiting greater efficiency than those fed diets with 12% carbohydrate. The energetic cost of dry matter production was optimal at protein levels less than those required for maximal weight gain and gonad production, suggesting an increased energetic cost (decreased energy efficiency) is required to increase gonad production relative to somatic growth. Economic analysis models predict when cost of feed ingredients are low, the lowest cost per gram of wet weight gain will occur at 18% dietary carbohydrate and ca. 25- 30% dietary protein. In contrast, lowest cost per gram of wet weight gain will occur at 12% dietary carbohydrate and ca. 35- 40% dietary protein when feed ingredient costs are high or average. For both 18 and 12% levels of dietary carbohydrate, cost per gram of wet weight gain is

  8. Effects of Meals High in Carbohydrate, Protein, and Fat on Ghrelin and Peptide YY Secretion in Prepubertal Children

    PubMed Central

    Lomenick, Jefferson P.; Melguizo, Maria S.; Mitchell, Sabrina L.; Summar, Marshall L.; Anderson, James W.

    2009-01-01

    Context: Ghrelin and peptide YY (PYY) are two hormones produced by the gastrointestinal tract that have effects on appetite. However, little is known about their secretion in response to meals high in individual macronutrients in prepubertal children. Objective: We sought to understand how meals high in carbohydrate, protein, and fat affect serum concentrations of total ghrelin and total PYY, hypothesizing that these macronutrients would exert differential effects on their secretion. Design and Setting: This was a cross-sectional study at one tertiary care center. Subjects: Subjects were 7- to 11-yr-old healthy normal-weight (NW) and obese (OB) volunteers recruited from local advertisements. Interventions: After an overnight fast, the subjects were given a breakfast high in carbohydrate, protein, or fat at 0800 h. Blood samples for total ghrelin and total PYY were taken at baseline, 30 min, and hourly from 0900 to 1200 h. Main Outcome Measure: We assessed postprandial ghrelin suppression and PYY elevation, as well as changes in reported hunger and satiety, after the three test meals. Results: After the high-protein meal, ghrelin declined gradually in both groups over the study period without subsequent increase, whereas ghrelin suppressed more rapidly to a nadir at 60 min after the high-carbohydrate meal in both NW and OB children, followed by rebound in ghrelin levels. Similarly, after the high-protein meal, PYY concentrations increased steadily over the course of the morning in both groups without decline, whereas PYY levels peaked 30 min after the high-carbohydrate meal in both NW and OB subjects with significant decline thereafter. Ghrelin and PYY responses to the high-fat meal were somewhat intermediate between that observed with high carbohydrate and high protein. The OB children reported higher hunger and lower satiety after the high-carbohydrate meal compared to the NW subjects, whereas appetite ratings were similar between the groups after the high-protein

  9. Low humic acids promote in vitro lily bulblet enlargement by enhancing roots growth and carbohydrate metabolism * #

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Yun; Xia, Yi-ping; Zhang, Jia-ping; Du, Fang; Zhang, Lin; Ma, Yi-di; Zhou, Hong

    2016-01-01

    Bulblet development is a problem in global lily bulb production and carbohydrate metabolism is a crucial factor. Micropropagation acts as an efficient substitute for faster propagation and can provide a controllable condition to explore bulb growth. The present study was conducted to investigate the effects of humic acid (HA) on bulblet swelling and the carbohydrate metabolic pathway in Lilium Oriental Hybrids ‘Sorbonne’ under in vitro conditions. HA greatly promoted bulblet growth at 0.2, 2.0, and 20.0 mg/L, and pronounced increases in bulblet sucrose, total soluble sugar, and starch content were observed for higher HA concentrations (≥2.0 mg/L) within 45 d after transplanting (DAT). The activities of three major starch synthetic enzymes (including adenosine 5'-diphosphate glucose pyrophosphorylase, granule-bound starch synthase, and soluble starch synthase) were enhanced dramatically after HA application especially low concentration HA (LHA), indicating a quick response of starch metabolism. However, higher doses of HA also caused excessive aboveground biomass accumulation and inhibited root growth. Accordingly, an earlier carbon starvation emerged by observing evident starch degradation. Relative bulblet weight gradually decreased with increased HA doses and thereby broke the balance between the source and sink. A low HA concentration at 0.2 mg/L performed best in both root and bulblet growth. The number of roots and root length peaked at 14.5 and 5.75 cm, respectively. The fresh bulblet weight and diameter reached 468 mg (2.9 times that under the control treatment) and 11.68 mm, respectively. Further, sucrose/starch utilization and conversion were accelerated and carbon famine was delayed as a result with an average relative bulblet weight of 80.09%. To our knowledge, this is the first HA application and mechanism research into starch metabolism in both in vitro and in vivo condition in bulbous crops. PMID:27819136

  10. Quantifying protein by bicinchoninic Acid.

    PubMed

    Simpson, Richard J

    2008-08-01

    INTRODUCTIONThis protocol describes a method of quantifying protein that is a variation of the Lowry assay. It uses bicinchoninic acid (BCA) to enhance the detection of Cu(+) generated under alkaline conditions at sites of complexes between Cu(2+) and protein. The resulting chromophore absorbs at 562 nm. This technique is divided into three parts: Standard Procedure, Microprocedure, and 96-Well Microtiter Plate Procedure. For each procedure, test samples are assayed in parallel with protein standards that are used to generate a calibration curve, and the exact concentration of protein in the test samples is interpolated. The standard BCA assay uses large volumes of both reagents and samples and cannot easily be automated. If these issues are important, the Microprocedure is recommended. This in turn can be adapted for use with a microplate reader in the 96-Well Microtiter Plate Procedure. If the microplate reader is interfaced with a computer, more than 1000 samples can be read per hour.

  11. Quantitative determination of carboxylic acids, amino acids, carbohydrates, ethanol and hydroxymethylfurfural in honey by (1)H NMR.

    PubMed

    del Campo, Gloria; Zuriarrain, Juan; Zuriarrain, Andoni; Berregi, Iñaki

    2016-04-01

    A method using (1)H NMR spectroscopy has been developed to quantify simultaneously thirteen analytes in honeys without previous separation or pre-concentration steps. The method has been successfully applied to determine carboxylic acids (acetic, formic, lactic, malic and succinic acids), amino acids (alanine, phenylalanine, proline and tyrosine), carbohydrates (α- and β-glucose and fructose), ethanol and hydroxymethylfurfural in eucalyptus, heather, lavender, orange blossom, thyme and rosemary honeys. Quantification was performed by using the area of the signal of each analyte in the honey spectra, together with external standards. The regression analysis of the signal area against concentration plots, used for the calibration of each analyte, indicates a good linearity over the concentration ranges found in honeys, with correlation coefficients higher than 0.985 for the thirteen quantified analytes. The recovery studies give values over the 93.7-105.4% range with relative standard deviations lower than 7.4%. Good precision, with relative standard deviations over the range of 0.78-5.21% is obtained.

  12. Apoptosis induced by a low-carbohydrate and high-protein diet in rat livers

    PubMed Central

    Monteiro, Maria Emília L; Xavier, Analucia R; Oliveira, Felipe L; Filho, Porphirio JS; Azeredo, Vilma B

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To determine whether high-protein, high-fat, and low-carbohydrate diets can cause lesions in rat livers. METHODS: We randomly divided 20 female Wistar rats into a control diet group and an experimental diet group. Animals in the control group received an AIN-93M diet, and animals in the experimental group received an Atkins-based diet (59.46% protein, 31.77% fat, and 8.77% carbohydrate). After 8 wk, the rats were anesthetized and exsanguinated for transaminases analysis, and their livers were removed for flow cytometry, immunohistochemistry, and light microscopy studies. We expressed the data as mean ± standard deviation (SD) assuming unpaired and parametric data; we analyzed differences using the Student’s t-test. Statistical significance was set at P < 0.05. RESULTS: We found that plasma alanine aminotransferase and aspartate aminotransferase levels were significantly higher in the experimental group than in the control group. According to flow cytometry, the percentages of nonviable cells were 11.67% ± 1.12% for early apoptosis, 12.07% ± 1.11% for late apoptosis, and 7.11% ± 0.44% for non-apoptotic death in the experimental diet group and 3.73% ± 0.50% for early apoptosis, 5.67% ± 0.72% for late apoptosis, and 3.82% ± 0.28% for non-apoptotic death in the control diet group. The mean percentage of early apoptosis was higher in the experimental diet group than in the control diet group. Immunohistochemistry for autophagy was negative in both groups. Sinusoidal dilation around the central vein and small hepatocytes was only observed in the experimental diet group, and fibrosis was not identified by hematoxylin-eosin or Trichrome Masson staining in either group. CONCLUSION: Eight weeks of an experimental diet resulted in cellular and histopathological lesions in rat livers. Apoptosis was our principal finding; elevated plasma transaminases demonstrate hepatic lesions. PMID:27298559

  13. An olive pollen protein with allergenic activity, Ole e 10, defines a novel family of carbohydrate-binding modules and is potentially implicated in pollen germination

    PubMed Central

    2005-01-01

    CBMs (carbohydrate-binding modules) are the most common non-catalytic modules associated with enzymes active in plant cell-wall hydrolysis. They have been frequently identified by amino acid sequence alignments, but only a few have been experimentally established to have a carbohydrate-binding activity. A small olive pollen protein, Ole e 10 (10 kDa), has been described as a major inducer of type I allergy in humans. In the present study, the ability of Ole e 10 to bind several polysaccharides has been analysed by affinity gel electrophoresis, which demonstrated that the protein bound 1,3-β-glucans preferentially. Analytical ultracentrifugation studies confirmed binding to laminarin, at a protein/ligand ratio of 1:1. The interaction of Ole e 10 with laminarin induced a conformational change in the protein, as detected by CD and fluorescence analyses, and an increase of 3.6 °C in the thermal denaturation temperature of Ole e 10 in the presence of the glycan. These results, and the absence of alignment of the sequence of Ole e 10 with that of any classified CBM, indicate that this pollen protein defines a novel family of CBMs, which we propose to name CBM43. Immunolocalization of Ole e 10 in mature and germinating pollen by transmission electron microscopy and confocal laser scanning microscopy demonstrated the co-localization of Ole e 10 and callose (1,3-β-glucan) in the growing pollen tube, suggesting a role for this protein in the metabolism of carbohydrates and in pollen tube wall re-formation during germination. PMID:15882149

  14. Synthesis and characterization of copolyanhydrides of carbohydrate-based galactaric acid and adipic acid.

    PubMed

    Mehtiö, Tuomas; Nurmi, Leena; Rämö, Virpi; Mikkonen, Hannu; Harlin, Ali

    2015-01-30

    A series of copolyanhydrides, consisting of 2,3,4,5-tetra-O-acetylgalactaric acid (AGA) and adipic acid (AA) as monomer units, was polymerized. Synthesis of AGA monomer consisted of two steps. First, O-acetylation of galactaric acid secondary hydroxyl groups was performed using acetic anhydride as a reagent. Acetic anhydride was then further used as a reagent in the synthesis of diacetyl mixed anhydride of AGA. Polymerizations were conducted as bulk condensation polymerization at 150 °C. Thermal properties of the copolymers varied depending on monomer composition. Increase in the AGA content had a clear increasing effect on the Tg. A similar increasing effect was observed in Tm. The degree of crystallinity decreased as AGA content increased. There was a slightly lowering tendency in the molecular weights of the obtained polymers when the AGA content in the polymerization mixtures increased. The described synthesis route shows that bio-based aldaric acid monomers are potential candidates for the adjustment of thermal properties of polyanhydrides.

  15. Carbohydrates blended with polydextrose lower gas production and short-chain fatty acid production in an in vitro system.

    PubMed

    Vester Boler, Brittany M; Hernot, David C; Boileau, Thomas W; Bauer, Laura L; Middelbos, Ingmar S; Murphy, Michael R; Swanson, Kelly S; Fahey, George C

    2009-09-01

    Maximizing health benefits of prebiotics, while limiting negative side effects, is of importance to the food industry. This study examined several oligosaccharides and their blends in an in vitro fermentation model. Substrates included medium- and long-chain fructooligosaccharides (FOS), oligofructose-enriched inulin, galactooligosaccharide, polydextrose (POL), and 50:50 substrate blends. Substrates and blends were fermented in vitro using human fecal inoculum, and fermentation characteristics were quantified at 0, 4, 8, and 12 hours. We hypothesized that mixtures of short- and long-chain oligosaccharides would generate less gas than do short-chain oligosaccharides and modulate gut microflora to a greater extent than do long-chain oligosaccharides. Carbohydrates blended with POL had decreased (P < .01) total gas volume and H(2) produced after 4, 8, and 12 hours of fermentation compared with individual carbohydrates. Mixing of 2 oligofructose-enriched inulin products led to less (P < .05) gas produced and a slower (P < .05) rate of production. When mixed with POL, all carbohydrates tested in the present study produced less total short-chain fatty acids (P < .04) and butyrate (P < .0001) after 12 hours of in vitro fermentation, compared with individual carbohydrates. The bifidogenic effect of medium-chain FOS and oligofructose-enriched inulin after 12 hours of in vitro fermentation was lower (P < .05) when mixed with POL. Mixing the pure carbohydrates with galactooligosaccharide increased (P < .05) bifidobacteria counts measured after 12 hours of in vitro fermentation, except when mixed with medium-chain FOS. In general, when mixed with POL, all carbohydrates had lower gas production, gas production rates, butyrate and total short-chain fatty acid production, and bifidobacteria counts than when fermented alone for 12 hours.

  16. The uniform galactose 4-sulfate structure in the carbohydrate-protein linkage region of human urinary trypsin inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Yamada, S; Oyama, M; Yuki, Y; Kato, K; Sugahara, K

    1995-10-15

    The carbohydrate-protein linkage region of a chondroitin 4-sulfate chain attached to urinary trypsin inhibitor (UTI) was isolated from human urine and characterized structurally. The chondroitin 4-sulfate chain was released from UTI by beta-elimination using alkaline NaBH4 then digested with chondroitinase ABC. These treatments resulted in only a single hexasaccharide alditol derived from the carbohydrate-protein linkage region. Chemical and enzymic analyses and 600-MHz 1H-NMR spectroscopy revealed that the hexasaccharide alditol had the following structure: delta HexA alpha 1-3GalNAc(4-sulfate) beta 1-4GlcA beta 1- 3Gal(4-sulfate) beta 1-3Gal beta 1-4Xyl-ol, where delta HexA, GlcA and Xyl-ol represent 4-deoxy-alpha-L-threo-hex-4-enepyranosyluronic acid, D-glucuronic acid and D-xylitol, respectively. This structure contained the novel 4-sulfated Gal residue, which was first demonstrated in one of the three linkage hexasaccharide-serines isolated from chondroitin 4-sulfate of rat chondrosarcoma [Sugahara, K., Yamashina, I., de Waard, P., Van Halbeek, H. & Vliegenhart, J. F. G. (1988) J. Biol. Chem. 263, 10168-10174]. This disulfated structure was recently identified as the sole structural component in the linkage hexasaccharide alditol fraction isolated from inter-alpha-trypsin inhibitor (ITI) in human plasma [Yamada, S., Oyama, M., Kinugasa, H., Nakagawa, T., Kawasaki, T., Nagasawa, S., Khoo, K.-H., Morris, H.R., Dell, A. & Sugahara, K. (1995) Glycobiology 5, 335-341]. The structural uniformity in the linkage hexasaccharide structure of ITI and UTI is in marked contrast to the heterogeneity demonstrated in the linkage hexasaccharides isolated from cartilaginous chondroitin sulfate whose linkage regions are sometimes but not always phosphorylated on the Xyl residue or sulfated on the Gal residue(s). The uniform structure containing the novel 4-sulfated Gal residue in the linkage region of UTI and ITI may imply its significance in the biosynthetic mechanism of

  17. Effect of quarantine treatments on the carbohydrate and organic acid content of mangoes (cv. Tommy Atkins)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cruz, J. N.; Soares, C. A.; Fabbri, A. D. T.; Cordenunsi, B. R.; Sabato, S. F.

    2012-08-01

    Brazil is one of the largest mango producers and the third largest mango exporter worldwide. Irradiation treatment and its commercial feasibility have been studied in our country to make it possible to develop new markets and, consequently, to compete with the major exporters of mangoes, Mexico and India. This work was designed to compare irradiation treatment with the hot water dip treatment in mangoes cv. Tommy Atkins for export and to verify that the main attributes for acceptance, color and texture, as well as carbohydrate and organic acid contents, were maintained. In this study, the fruit was divided into groups: control, hot water dip-treated (46 °C for 90 min), and irradiation-treated at doses of 0.4 kGy and 1.0 kGy. The fruit was stored at low temperature (11 °C±2) for 14 days and then at room temperature (23 °C±2) until the end of the study. The results indicated that the fruit given a dose of 1.0 kGy remained in a less advanced stage of ripening (stage 3) throughout the storage period, but experienced a greater loss of texture in the beginning of the experiment. It was noted that only the control group had higher levels of citric acid and succinic acid on the last day of the experiment. There were no significant differences in the total sugar content between any treatment groups. Gamma radiation can be used as a quarantine treatment and does not interfere negatively with the quality attributes of mangoes.

  18. Spatiotemporal variation of dissolved carbohydrates and amino acids in Jiaozhou Bay, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Di; Yang, Guipeng; Sun, Yan; Wu, Guanwei

    2017-03-01

    Surface seawater samples were collected from Jiaozhou Bay, China, during six cruises (March-May 2010, September-November 2010) to study the distribution of dissolved organic matter including dissolved organic carbon (DOC), total dissolved carbohydrates, namely monosaccharides (MCHO) and polysaccharides (PCHO) and total hydrolysable amino acids. These included dissolved free amino acids (DFAA) and combined amino acids (DCAA). The goal was to investigate possible relationships between these dissolved organic compounds and environmental parameters. During spring, the concentrations of MCHO and PCHO were 9.6 (2.8-22.6) and 11.0 (2.9-42.5) μmol C/L, respectively. In autumn, MCHO and PCHO were 9.1 (2.6-27.0) and 10.8 (2.4-25.6) μmol C/L, respectively. The spring concentrations of DFAA and DCAA were 1.7 (1.1-4.1) and 7.6 (1.1-31.0) μmol C/L, respectively, while in autumn, DFAA and DCAA were 2.3 (1.1-8.0) and 3.3 (0.6-7.2) μmol C/L, respectively. Among these compounds, the concentrations of PCHO were the highest, accounting for nearly a quarter of the DOC, followed by MCHO, DCAA and DFAA. The concentrations of the organic compounds exhibited a decreasing trend from the coastal to the central regions of the bay. A negative correlation between concentrations of DOC and salinity in each cruise suggested that riverine inputs around the bay have an important impact on the distribution of DOC in the surface water. A significant positive correlation was found between DOC and total bacteria count in spring and autumn, suggesting bacteria play an important role in the marine carbon cycle.

  19. Spatiotemporal variation of dissolved carbohydrates and amino acids in Jiaozhou Bay, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Di; Yang, Guipeng; Sun, Yan; Wu, Guanwei

    2016-06-01

    Surface seawater samples were collected from Jiaozhou Bay, China, during six cruises (March-May 2010, September-November 2010) to study the distribution of dissolved organic matter including dissolved organic carbon (DOC), total dissolved carbohydrates, namely monosaccharides (MCHO) and polysaccharides (PCHO) and total hydrolysable amino acids. These included dissolved free amino acids (DFAA) and combined amino acids (DCAA). The goal was to investigate possible relationships between these dissolved organic compounds and environmental parameters. During spring, the concentrations of MCHO and PCHO were 9.6 (2.8-22.6) and 11.0 (2.9-42.5) μmol C/L, respectively. In autumn, MCHO and PCHO were 9.1 (2.6-27.0) and 10.8 (2.4-25.6) μmol C/L, respectively. The spring concentrations of DFAA and DCAA were 1.7 (1.1-4.1) and 7.6 (1.1-31.0) μmol C/L, respectively, while in autumn, DFAA and DCAA were 2.3 (1.1-8.0) and 3.3 (0.6-7.2) μmol C/L, respectively. Among these compounds, the concentrations of PCHO were the highest, accounting for nearly a quarter of the DOC, followed by MCHO, DCAA and DFAA. The concentrations of the organic compounds exhibited a decreasing trend from the coastal to the central regions of the bay. A negative correlation between concentrations of DOC and salinity in each cruise suggested that riverine inputs around the bay have an important impact on the distribution of DOC in the surface water. A significant positive correlation was found between DOC and total bacteria count in spring and autumn, suggesting bacteria play an important role in the marine carbon cycle.

  20. Influences of carbohydrate plus amino acid supplementation on differing exercise intensity adaptations in older persons: skeletal muscle and endocrine responses.

    PubMed

    Onambélé-Pearson, Gladys Leopoldine; Breen, Leigh; Stewart, Claire E

    2010-06-01

    Losses in physiological function in healthy ageing occur partly as a consequence of reduced protein intake and partly as a consequence of less than 30-min/day of moderate to vigorous physical activity. The current study aimed to compare the effects of two different intensities of resistance training in healthy older adults, whose habitual dietary intake was supplemented with carbohydrate and amino acid preparations. We hypothesised that although intensive exercise with appropriate carbohydrate and amino acid supplementation would result in the most profound impact on in vivo markers of healthy physiologic and endocrine functions in previously sedentary older individuals, the effectiveness of the less intense exercise prescription with supplementation would also result in beneficial adaptations over and above findings of previous studies on low intensity exercise alone. Twenty-nine older adults (out of 32) completed the study after being randomly assigned to low (SUP_LowR, i.e., approximately 40% 1RM; n = 16) versus high resistance training (SUP_HighR, i.e., approximately 80% 1RM; n = 13) for 12 weeks. A carbohydrate supplement was ingested immediately before and during every exercise session and an amino acid cocktail was ingested post-exercise. Neither intervention significantly impacted upon body composition assessed using: Body mass index, waist/hip ratio and bioelectric impedance. Muscle strength increased similarly in the two groups with the SUP_HighR protocol showing 46 +/- 8%, 10.8 +/- 4.4% and 26.9 +/- 4.9% (P < 0.01) improvements in 1-RM strength, unilateral and bilateral knee extension torque, respectively, compared with 39 +/- 2%, 9.4 +/- 3.7% and 29.5 +/- 8.2% (P < 0.01) increments in the same measures in the SUP_LowR group. Lean muscle thickness however, showed a greater benefit of the SUP_LowR protocol (8.7 +/- 3.9% increase, P < 0.05) compared with the SUP_HighR protocol, which elicited no significant change. In terms of functional abilities, only

  1. Effect of varying the concentrations of carbohydrate and milk protein in rehydration solutions ingested after exercise in the heat.

    PubMed

    James, Lewis J; Evans, Gethin H; Madin, Joshua; Scott, Darren; Stepney, Michael; Harris, Russell; Stone, Robert; Clayton, David J

    2013-10-01

    The present study investigated the relationship between the milk protein content of a rehydration solution and fluid balance after exercise-induced dehydration. On three occasions, eight healthy males were dehydrated to an identical degree of body mass loss (BML, approximately 1·8%) by intermittent cycling in the heat, rehydrating with 150% of their BML over 1 h with either a 60 g/l carbohydrate solution (C), a 40 g/l carbohydrate, 20 g/l milk protein solution (CP20) or a 20 g/l carbohydrate, 40 g/l milk protein solution (CP40). Urine samples were collected pre-exercise, post-exercise, post-rehydration and for a further 4 h. Subjects produced less urine after ingesting the CP20 or CP40 drink compared with the C drink (P<0·01), and at the end of the study, more of the CP20 (59 (SD 12)%) and CP40 (64 (SD 6)%) drinks had been retained compared with the C drink (46 (SD 9)%) (P<0·01). At the end of the study, whole-body net fluid balance was more negative for trial C (- 470 (SD 154) ml) compared with both trials CP20 (- 181 (SD 280) ml) and CP40 (2107 (SD 126) ml) (P<0·01). At 2 and 3 h after drink ingestion, urine osmolality was greater for trials CP20 and CP40 compared with trial C (P<0·05). The present study further demonstrates that after exercise-induced dehydration, a carbohydrate--milk protein solution is better retained than a carbohydrate solution. The results also suggest that high concentrations of milk protein are not more beneficial in terms of fluid retention than low concentrations of milk protein following exercise-induced dehydration.

  2. Influence of carbohydrate source on ruminal fermentation characteristics, performance, and microbial protein synthesis in dairy cows.

    PubMed

    Gozho, G N; Mutsvangwa, T

    2008-07-01

    Eight multiparous Holstein cows (676 +/- 57 kg of body weight; 121 +/- 17 d-in-milk) were used in a replicated 4 x 4 Latin square design to determine the effects of 4 sources of carbohydrate on milk yield and composition, ruminal fermentation, and microbial N flow to the duodenum. Four cows in one of the Latin squares were fitted with permanent ruminal cannulae. Diets contained (DM basis) 50% forage in combinations of alfalfa hay and barley silage, and 50% concentrate. The concentrate portion of the diets contained barley, corn, wheat, or oats grain as the primary source of carbohydrate. Intake of DM ranged from 24.0 to 26.2 kg/d, and it tended to be lower in cows fed the wheat-based diet compared with those fed the barley-based diet; consequently, milk yield tended to be lower in cows fed the wheat-based diet compared with those fed the barley-based diet. Cows fed the barley- or wheat-based diets had a lower milk fat content compared with those fed the corn-based diet. Ruminal fermentation characteristics were largely unaffected by the source of dietary carbohydrate, with similar ruminal pH and volatile fatty acid and ammonia concentrations for the first 6 h after the morning feeding. Dietary treatment did not affect total tract apparent digestibility of DM, organic matter, and neutral detergent fiber; however, total tract apparent digestibility of starch in cows fed the oats-based diet was higher compared with those fed the corn-and wheat-based diets. Nitrogen that was used for productive purposes (i.e., N secreted in milk + N apparently retained by the cow) tended to be lower in cows fed the wheat-based diet compared with cows fed the barley-, corn-, or oats-based diets. Urinary purine derivative (PD) excretion was similar in cows fed the barley-, corn-, and wheat-based diets; however, purine derivative excretion was higher in cows fed the barley-based diet compared with those fed the oats-based diet. Consequently, estimated microbial N flow to the duodenum was

  3. Fabrication of carbohydrate surfaces by using nonderivatised oligosaccharides, and their application to measuring the assembly of sugar-protein complexes.

    PubMed

    Popplewell, Jonathan F; Swann, Marcus J; Ahmed, Yassir; Turnbull, Jerry E; Fernig, David G

    2009-05-04

    This way up. Dual polarisation interferometry was used to design and characterise a surface on which the orientation and density of immobilised carbohydrates was suitable for studying their interactions with proteins. Lactoferrin was shown to adopt two orientations: "end-on" or "side-on", while for FGF-2 a single monolayer of protein was observed. The new surface can be used to elucidate the binding of proteins to carbohydrates and the geometry of the complexes, a frequently controversial area. Surface-based tools, such as microarrays and optical biosensors, are being increasingly applied to the analysis of carbohydrate-protein interactions. A key to these developments is the presentation of the carbohydrate to the protein target. Dual polarisation interferometry (DPI) is a surface-based technique that permits the real-time measurement of the changes in thickness, refractive index and mass of adsorbates 100 nm thick or less on the surface of a functionalised waveguide. DPI has been used to design and characterise a surface on which the orientation and density of the immobilised carbohydrates is suitable for studying their interactions with proteins and where nonspecific binding is reduced to less than 5 % of total binding. A thiol-functionalised surface was derivatised with a heterobifunctional crosslinker to yield a hydrazide surface. This was treated with oligosaccharides, derived from keratan sulfate (KS) chondroitin sulfate (CS) and heparin, that possess a reducing end. To block the unreacted hydrazide groups, the surface was treated with an aldehyde-functionalised PEG. The heparin DP-10 surfaces were then used to determine the performance of the immobilised DP-10 with respect to binding of two well-characterised proteins, lactoferrin (Lf) and fibroblast growth factor-2. The results show that Lf could adopt two different orientations, at high protein loadings the protein layer thickness corresponded to an "end-on" orientation of Lf, whilst rinsing with buffer

  4. Effect of Host Plant on the Chemical Composition of Tetranychus urticae (Prostigmata: Tetranychidae): Variability in Soluble Protein, Anions, and Carbohydrates.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Chemical analyses of two-spotted spider mite, Tetranychus urticae (Koch), and 3 of their host plants, Phaseolus vulgaris L., Phaseolus lunatus L., and Vigna unguiculata L. show that the content of total soluble protein, carbohydrates, and anions in the mites varies independently from the concentrat...

  5. Rhinacanthus nasutus Improves the Levels of Liver Carbohydrate, Protein, Glycogen, and Liver Markers in Streptozotocin-Induced Diabetic Rats

    PubMed Central

    Visweswara Rao, Pasupuleti; Madhavi, K.; Dhananjaya Naidu, M.; Gan, Siew Hua

    2013-01-01

    The present study was designed to investigate the total carbohydrate, total protein, and glycogen levels in the liver and to measure functional liver markers such as aspartate aminotransferase (AST) and alanine aminotransferase (ALT) in streptozotocin-(STZ-) induced diabetic rats after treatment with methanolic extract of Rhinacanthus nasutus (R. nasutus). The methanolic extract of R. nasutus was orally administered at 200 mg/kg/day while glibenclamide was administered at 50 mg/kg/day. All animals were treated for 30 days before being sacrificed. The amounts of carbohydrate, glycogen, proteins, and liver markers (AST and ALT) were measured in the liver tissue of the experimental animals. The levels of carbohydrate, glycogen, and proteins were significantly reduced in the diabetic rats but were augmented considerably after 30 days of R. nasutus treatment. The elevated AST and ALT levels in diabetic rats showed a significant decline after treatment with R. nasutus for 30 days. These results show that the administration of R. nasutus ameliorates the altered levels of carbohydrate, glycogen, proteins, and AST and ALT observed in diabetic rats and indicate that R. nasutus restores overall metabolism and liver function in experimental diabetic rats. In conclusion, the outcomes of the present study support the traditional belief that R. nasutus could ameliorate the diabetic state. PMID:24204387

  6. Role of fermentable carbohydrate supplements with a low-protein diet in the course of chronic renal failure: experimental bases.

    PubMed

    Younes, H; Alphonse, J C; Behr, S R; Demigné, C; Rémésy, C

    1999-04-01

    During the past few years, considerable attention has been given to the impact of nutrition on kidney disease. The question arises of whether the effect of a moderate dietary protein restriction could be reinforced by enrichment of the diet with fermentable carbohydrates. Feeding fermentable carbohydrates may stimulate the extrarenal route of nitrogen (N) excretion through the fecal route. Such an effect has been reported in several species, including healthy humans and patients with chronic renal failure (CRF). Furthermore, studies of these subjects show that the greater fecal N excretion during the fermentable carbohydrate supplementation period was accompanied by a significant decrease in plasma urea concentration. In animal models of experimental renal failure, the consumption of diets containing fermentable carbohydrates results in a greater rate of urea N transfer from blood to the cecal lumen, where it is hydrolyzed by bacterial urease before subsequent microflora metabolism and proliferation. Therefore, this results in a greater fecal N excretion, coupled with a reduction in urinary N excretion and plasma urea concentration. Because elevated concentrations of serum urea N have been associated with adverse clinical symptoms of CRF, these results suggest a possible usefulness of combining fermentable carbohydrates with a low-protein diet to increase N excretion through the fecal route. Further investigations in this population of patients of whether fermentable carbohydrates in the diet may be beneficial in delaying or treating the symptoms and chronic complications of CRF will certainly emerge in the future. This should be realized without adversely affecting nutritional status and, as far as possible, by optimizing protein intake for the patients without being detrimental to renal function.

  7. [Influence of bean yellow mosaic virus on metabolism of photosynthetic pigments, proteins and carbohydrates in Glycine soja L].

    PubMed

    Kyrychenko, A M

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents data on BYMV effects on some physiological processes of Glycine soja L. cultivated in the right-bank forest-steppe regions. Pigment content (chlorophyll a, b and carotenoids), soluble proteins and water soluble carbohydrates were estimated and, as has been shown, are subjected to significant changes as compared with control plants, namely: a decrease in the content of chlorophyll a, b and carotenoids was 64%, 53% and 36% compared with the control plants. The significant increase in carbohydrates (56% compared to the control) was observed at the end of the test period.

  8. Influence of thermally processed carbohydrate/amino acid mixtures on the fermentation by Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Tauer, Andreas; Elss, Sandra; Frischmann, Matthias; Tellez, Patricia; Pischetsrieder, Monika

    2004-04-07

    The production of alcoholic beverages such as Tequila, Mezcal, whiskey, or beer includes the fermentation of a mash containing Maillard reaction products. Because excessive heating of the mash can lead to complications during the following fermentation step, the impact of Maillard products on the metabolism of Saccharomyces cerevisiae was investigated. For this purpose, fermentation was carried out in a model system in the presence and absence of Maillard reaction products and formation of ethanol served as a marker for the progression of fermentation. We found that increasing amounts of Maillard products reduced the formation of ethanol up to 80%. This effect was dependent on the pH value during the Maillard reaction, reaction time, as well as the carbohydrate and amino acid component used for the generation of Maillard reaction products. Another important factor is the pH value during fermentation: The inhibitory effect of Maillard products was not detectable at a pH of 4 and increased with higher pH-values. These findings might be of relevance for the production of above-mentioned beverages.

  9. Effects of the Dietary Protein and Carbohydrate Ratio on Gut Microbiomes in Dogs of Different Body Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Lauber, Christian L.; Czarnecki-Maulden, Gail; Pan, Yuanlong; Hannah, Steven S.

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Obesity has become a health epidemic in both humans and pets. A dysbiotic gut microbiota has been associated with obesity and other metabolic disorders. High-protein, low-carbohydrate (HPLC) diets have been recommended for body weight loss, but little is known about their effects on the canine gut microbiome. Sixty-three obese and lean Labrador retrievers and Beagles (mean age, 5.72 years) were fed a common baseline diet for 4 weeks in phase 1, followed by 4 weeks of a treatment diet, specifically, the HPLC diet (49.4% protein, 10.9% carbohydrate) or a low-protein, high-carbohydrate (LPHC) diet (25.5% protein, 38.8% carbohydrate) in phase 2. 16S rRNA gene profiling revealed that dietary protein and carbohydrate ratios have significant impacts on gut microbial compositions. This effect appeared to be more evident in obese dogs than in lean dogs but was independent of breed. Consumption of either diet increased the bacterial evenness, but not the richness, of the gut compared to that after consumption of the baseline diet. Macronutrient composition affected taxon abundances, mainly within the predominant phyla, Firmicutes and Bacteroidetes. The LPHC diet appeared to favor the growth of Bacteroides uniformis and Clostridium butyricum, while the HPLC diet increased the abundances of Clostridium hiranonis, Clostridium perfringens, and Ruminococcus gnavus and enriched microbial gene networks associated with weight maintenance. In addition, we observed a decrease in the Bacteroidetes to Firmicutes ratio and an increase in the Bacteroides to Prevotella ratio in the HPLC diet-fed dogs compared to these ratios in dogs fed other diets. Finally, analysis of the effect of diet on the predicted microbial gene network was performed using phylogenetic investigation of communities by reconstruction of unobserved states (PICRUSt). PMID:28119466

  10. Effect of hyperbaric oxygenation on carbohydrate metabolism protein synthesis in the myocardium during sustained hypodynamia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Makarov, G. A.

    1980-01-01

    Glycolysis and the intensity of protein synthesis were studied in 140 white male rats in subcellular fractions of the myocardium during 45 day hypodynamia and hyperbaric oxygenation. Hypodynamia increased: (1) the amount of lactic acids; (2) the amount of pyruvic acid; (3) the lactate/pyruvate coefficient; and (4) the activities of aldolase and lactate dehydrogenase. Hyperbaric oxygenation was found to have a favorable metabolic effect on the animals with hypodynamia.

  11. Altering fatty acid availability does not impair prolonged, continuous running to fatigue: evidence for carbohydrate dependence.

    PubMed

    Leckey, Jill J; Burke, Louise M; Morton, James P; Hawley, John A

    2016-01-15

    We determined the effect of suppressing lipolysis via administration of nicotinic acid (NA) on fuel substrate selection and half-marathon running capacity. In a single-blinded, Latin square design, 12 competitive runners completed four trials involving treadmill running until volitional fatigue at a pace based on 95% of personal best half-marathon time. Trials were completed in a fed or overnight fasted state: 1) carbohydrate (CHO) ingestion before (2 g CHO·kg(-1)·body mass(-1)) and during (44 g/h) [CFED]; 2) CFED plus NA ingestion [CFED-NA]; 3) fasted with placebo ingestion during [FAST]; and 4) FAST plus NA ingestion [FAST-NA]. There was no difference in running distance (CFED, 21.53 ± 1.07; CFED-NA, 21.29 ± 1.69; FAST, 20.60 ± 2.09; FAST-NA, 20.11 ± 1.71 km) or time to fatigue between the four trials. Concentrations of plasma free fatty acids (FFA) and glycerol were suppressed following NA ingestion irrespective of preexercise nutritional intake but were higher throughout exercise in FAST compared with all other trials (P < 0.05). Rates of whole-body CHO oxidation were unaffected by NA ingestion in the CFED and FAST trials, but were lower in the FAST trial compared with the CFED-NA trial (P < 0.05). CHO was the primary substrate for exercise in all conditions, contributing 83-91% to total energy expenditure with only a small contribution from fat-based fuels. Blunting the exercise-induced increase in FFA via NA ingestion did not impair intense running capacity lasting ∼85 min, nor did it alter patterns of substrate oxidation in competitive athletes. Although there was a small but obligatory use of fat-based fuels, the oxidation of CHO-based fuels predominates during half-marathon running.

  12. Ligand identification of carbohydrate-binding proteins employing a biotinylated glycan binding assay and tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Wuhrer, Manfred; van Remoortere, Alexandra; Balog, Crina I A; Deelder, André M; Hokke, Cornelis H

    2010-11-15

    Characterization of protein-carbohydrate interactions at the molecular level is important for understanding many glycan-mediated processes. Here we present a method for the identification of glycan ligands of carbohydrate-binding proteins. The glycans released from natural sources are labeled with biotinamidocaproyl hydrazide (BACH) and subsequently fractionated by high-performance liquid chromatography. Glycan fractions are screened for binding to carbohydrate-binding proteins (CBPs) using a microtitration plate binding assay; CBPs are immobilized, BACH-glycan fractions are added, and bound BACH-glycans are detected using alkaline phosphatase-conjugated streptavidin. The glycan structures in binding fractions are studied by (tandem) mass spectrometry, exoglycosidase treatment, and rechromatography, thereby revealing the glycan motifs recognized by the CBPs. Subsequent surface plasmon resonance experiments using a reverse setup with immobilization of the BACH-glycan ligands on streptavidin-coated surfaces provide more information on glycan-CBP interactions via association and dissociation curves. The presented method is easy and fast, and the required instrumentation is available in many laboratories. The assay is very sensitive given that both the mass spectrometric analysis and the microtitration plate binding assay can be performed on femtomole amounts of BACH-glycans. This approach should be generally applicable to study and structurally identify carbohydrate ligands of anti-glycan antibodies and lectins.

  13. Glucose-6-phosphate mediates activation of the carbohydrate responsive binding protein (ChREBP)

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Ming V.; Chen, Weiqin; Harmancey, Romain N.; Nuotio-Antar, Alli M.; Imamura, Minako; Saha, Pradip; Taegtmeyer, Heinrich; Chan, Lawrence

    2010-05-07

    Carbohydrate response element binding protein (ChREBP) is a Mondo family transcription factor that activates a number of glycolytic and lipogenic genes in response to glucose stimulation. We have previously reported that high glucose can activate the transcriptional activity of ChREBP independent of the protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A)-mediated increase in nuclear entry and DNA binding. Here, we found that formation of glucose-6-phosphate (G-6-P) is essential for glucose activation of ChREBP. The glucose response of GAL4-ChREBP is attenuated by D-mannoheptulose, a potent hexokinase inhibitor, as well as over-expression of glucose-6-phosphatase (G6Pase); kinetics of activation of GAL4-ChREBP can be modified by exogenously expressed GCK. Further metabolism of G-6-P through the two major glucose metabolic pathways, glycolysis and pentose-phosphate pathway, is not required for activation of ChREBP; over-expression of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) diminishes, whereas RNAi knockdown of the enzyme enhances, the glucose response of GAL4-ChREBP, respectively. Moreover, the glucose analogue 2-deoxyglucose (2-DG), which is phosphorylated by hexokinase, but not further metabolized, effectively upregulates the transcription activity of ChREBP. In addition, over-expression of phosphofructokinase (PFK) 1 and 2, synergistically diminishes the glucose response of GAL4-ChREBP. These multiple lines of evidence support the conclusion that G-6-P mediates the activation of ChREBP.

  14. A low carbohydrate, high protein diet slows tumor growth and prevents cancer initiation.

    PubMed

    Ho, Victor W; Leung, Kelvin; Hsu, Anderson; Luk, Beryl; Lai, June; Shen, Sung Yuan; Minchinton, Andrew I; Waterhouse, Dawn; Bally, Marcel B; Lin, Wendy; Nelson, Brad H; Sly, Laura M; Krystal, Gerald

    2011-07-01

    Since cancer cells depend on glucose more than normal cells, we compared the effects of low carbohydrate (CHO) diets to a Western diet on the growth rate of tumors in mice. To avoid caloric restriction-induced effects, we designed the low CHO diets isocaloric with the Western diet by increasing protein rather than fat levels because of the reported tumor-promoting effects of high fat and the immune-stimulating effects of high protein. We found that both murine and human carcinomas grew slower in mice on diets containing low amylose CHO and high protein compared with a Western diet characterized by relatively high CHO and low protein. There was no weight difference between the tumor-bearing mice on the low CHO or Western diets. Additionally, the low CHO-fed mice exhibited lower blood glucose, insulin, and lactate levels. Additive antitumor effects with the low CHO diets were observed with the mTOR inhibitor CCI-779 and especially with the COX-2 inhibitor Celebrex, a potent anti-inflammatory drug. Strikingly, in a genetically engineered mouse model of HER-2/neu-induced mammary cancer, tumor penetrance in mice on a Western diet was nearly 50% by the age of 1 year whereas no tumors were detected in mice on the low CHO diet. This difference was associated with weight gains in mice on the Western diet not observed in mice on the low CHO diet. Moreover, whereas only 1 mouse on the Western diet achieved a normal life span, due to cancer-associated deaths, more than 50% of the mice on the low CHO diet reached or exceeded the normal life span. Taken together, our findings offer a compelling preclinical illustration of the ability of a low CHO diet in not only restricting weight gain but also cancer development and progression.

  15. Structural bases of lectin-carbohydrate affinities: comparison with protein-folding energetics.

    PubMed Central

    García-Hernández, E.; Hernández-Arana, A.

    1999-01-01

    We have made a comparative structure based analysis of the thermodynamics of lectin-carbohydrate (L-C) binding and protein folding. Examination of the total change in accessible surface area in those processes revealed a much larger decrease in free energy per unit of area buried in the case of L-C associations. According to our analysis, this larger stabilization of L-C interactions arises from a more favorable enthalpy of burying a unit of polar surface area, and from higher proportions of polar areas. Hydrogen bonds present at 14 L-C interfaces were identified, and their overall characteristics were compared to those reported before for hydrogen bonds in protein structures. Three major factors might explain why polar-polar interactions are stronger in L-C binding than in protein folding: (1) higher surface density of hydrogen bonds; (2) better hydrogen-bonding geometry; (3) larger proportion of hydrogen bonds involving charged groups. Theoretically, the binding entropy can be partitioned into three main contributions: entropy changes due to surface desolvation, entropy losses arising from freezing rotatable bonds, and entropic effects that result from restricting translation and overall rotation motions. These contributions were estimated from structural information and added up to give calculated binding entropies. Good correlation between experimental and calculated values was observed when solvation effects were treated according to a parametrization developed by other authors from protein folding studies. Finally, our structural parametrization gave calculated free energies that deviate from experimental values by 1.1 kcal/mol on the average; this amounts to an uncertainty of one order of magnitude in the binding constant. PMID:10338018

  16. Optimizing Intramuscular Adaptations to Aerobic Exercise: Effects of Carbohydrate Restriction and Protein Supplementation on Mitochondrial Biogenesis12

    PubMed Central

    Margolis, Lee M.; Pasiakos, Stefan M.

    2013-01-01

    Mitochondrial biogenesis is a critical metabolic adaptation to aerobic exercise training that results in enhanced mitochondrial size, content, number, and activity. Recent evidence has shown that dietary manipulation can further enhance mitochondrial adaptations to aerobic exercise training, which may delay skeletal muscle fatigue and enhance exercise performance. Specifically, studies have demonstrated that combining carbohydrate restriction (endogenous and exogenous) with a single bout of aerobic exercise potentiates the beneficial effects of exercise on markers of mitochondrial biogenesis. Additionally, studies have demonstrated that high-quality protein supplementation enhances anabolic skeletal muscle intracellular signaling and mitochondrial protein synthesis following a single bout of aerobic exercise. Mitochondrial biogenesis is stimulated by complex intracellular signaling pathways that appear to be primarily regulated by 5′AMP-activated protein kinase and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase mediated through proliferator-activated γ receptor co-activator 1 α activation, resulting in increased mitochondrial DNA expression and enhanced skeletal muscle oxidative capacity. However, the mechanisms by which concomitant carbohydrate restriction and dietary protein supplementation modulates mitochondrial adaptations to aerobic exercise training remains unclear. This review summarizes intracellular regulation of mitochondrial biogenesis and the effects of carbohydrate restriction and protein supplementation on mitochondrial adaptations to aerobic exercise. PMID:24228194

  17. Beneficial effects of sustained activity on the use of dietary protein and carbohydrate traced with stable isotopes 15N and 13C in gilthead sea bream (Sparus aurata).

    PubMed

    Felip, O; Blasco, J; Ibarz, A; Martin-Perez, M; Fernández-Borràs, J

    2013-02-01

    To determine the effects of sustained swimming on the use and fate of dietary nutrients in gilthead sea bream, a group of fish were forced to undertake moderate and sustained swimming (1.5 BL s(-1)) for 3 weeks and compared with a control group undertaking voluntary activity. The exercise group showed a significant increase in specific growth rate (C: 1.13 ± 0.05; E: 1.32 ± 0.06 % day(-1), P < 0.05) with no significant change in food intake (C: 3.56 ± 0.20; E: 3.84 ± 0.03 % of body weight). The addition of (13)C-starch and (15)N-protein to a single meal of 1 % ration allowed analysis of the fate of both nutrients in several tissues and in their components, 6 and 24 h after force-feeding. In exercised fish improved redistribution of dietary components increased the use of carbohydrates and lipid as fuels. Gilthead sea bream have a considerable capacity for carbohydrate absorption irrespective of swimming conditions, but in trained fish (13)C rose in all liver fractions with no changes in store contents. This implies higher nutrient turnover with exercise. Higher retention of dietary protein (higher (15)N uptake into white muscle during the entire post-prandial period) was found under sustained exercise, highlighting the protein-sparing effect. The combined effects of a carbohydrate-rich, low-protein diet plus sustained swimming enhanced amino acid retention and also prevented excessive lipid deposition in gilthead sea bream.

  18. Cloning, expression, purification, crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis of the VP8* carbohydrate-binding protein of the human rotavirus strain Wa

    SciTech Connect

    Kraschnefski, Mark J.; Scott, Stacy A.; Holloway, Gavan; Coulson, Barbara S.; Itzstein, Mark von; Blanchard, Helen

    2005-11-01

    The carbohydrate-binding component (VP8*{sub 64–223}) of the human Wa rotavirus spike protein has been overexpressed in E. coli, purified and crystallized in two different crystal forms. X-ray diffraction data have been collected that have enabled determination of the Wa VP8*{sub 64–223} structure by molecular replacement. Rotaviruses exhibit host-specificity and the first crystallographic information on a rotavirus strain that infects humans is reported here. Recognition and attachment to host cells, leading to invasion and infection, is critically linked to the function of the outer capsid spike protein of the rotavirus particle. In some strains the VP8* component of the spike protein is implicated in recognition and binding of sialic-acid-containing cell-surface carbohydrates, thereby enabling infection by the virus. The cloning, expression, purification, crystallization and initial X-ray diffraction analysis of the VP8* core from human Wa rotavirus is reported. Two crystal forms (trigonal P3{sub 2}21 and monoclinic P2{sub 1}) have been obtained and X-ray diffraction data have been collected, enabling determination of the VP8*{sub 64–223} structure by molecular replacement.

  19. One-step metabolomics: carbohydrates, organic and amino acids quantified in a single procedure.

    PubMed

    Shoemaker, James D

    2010-06-25

    Every infant born in the US is now screened for up to 42 rare genetic disorders called "inborn errors of metabolism". The screening method is based on tandem mass spectrometry and quantifies acylcarnitines as a screen for organic acidemias and also measures amino acids. All states also perform enzymatic testing for carbohydrate disorders such as galactosemia. Because the results can be non-specific, follow-up testing of positive results is required using a more definitive method. The present report describes the "urease" method of sample preparation for inborn error screening. Crystalline urease enzyme is used to remove urea from body fluids which permits most other water-soluble metabolites to be dehydrated and derivatized for gas chromatography in a single procedure. Dehydration by evaporation in a nitrogen stream is facilitated by adding acetonitrile and methylene chloride. Then, trimethylsilylation takes place in the presence of a unique catalyst, triethylammonium trifluoroacetate. Automated injection and chromatography is followed by macro-driven custom quantification of 192 metabolites and semi-quantification of every major component using specialized libraries of mass spectra of TMS derivatized biological compounds. The analysis may be performed on the widely-used Chemstation platform using the macros and libraries available from the author. In our laboratory, over 16,000 patient samples have been analyzed using the method with a diagnostic yield of about 17%--that is, 17% of the samples results reveal findings that should be acted upon by the ordering physician. Included in these are over 180 confirmed inborn errors, of which about 38% could not have been diagnosed using previous methods.

  20. Chemical and photophysical mechanism of fluorescence enhancement of 3-quinolineboronic acid upon change of pH and binding with carbohydrates.

    PubMed

    Shen, Qian Jin; Jin, Wei Jun

    2011-01-01

    The free 3-quinolineboronic acid (3-QBA) with the lowest (n-π*) excited singlet is non- or weakly fluorescent while protonated 3-QBA has the lowest (π-π*) excited singlet state and is highly fluorescent. The hybridization of boronic atom or charge transfer from aromatic ring to boronic acid group plays a secondary role in affecting fluorescence intensity. Binding with carbohydrate at a proper acidity, the hybridization of boron atom changes from sp(2) to sp(3) and the nitrogen atom in the quinoline ring is partially protonated, resulting in large enhancement of fluorescence. Meanwhile, the fluorescent lifetime of 3-QBA produces obvious change by binding with carbohydrates. Quinoline boronic acid is an important water-soluble fluorescence sensor for carbohydrate recognition. Both the remarkable changes in intensity and lifetime of 3-QBA can act as working parameters in recognition of carbohydrates at physiological pH.

  1. Liver Fatty Acid Composition and Inflammation in Mice Fed with High-Carbohydrate Diet or High-Fat Diet

    PubMed Central

    da Silva-Santi, Lorena Gimenez; Antunes, Marina Masetto; Caparroz-Assef, Silvana Martins; Carbonera, Fabiana; Masi, Laureane Nunes; Curi, Rui; Visentainer, Jesuí Vergílio; Bazotte, Roberto Barbosa

    2016-01-01

    Both high-carbohydrate diet (HCD) and high-fat diet (HFD) modulate liver fat accumulation and inflammation, however, there is a lack of data on the potential contribution of carbohydrates and lipids separately. For this reason, the changes in liver fatty acid (FA) composition in male Swiss mice fed with HCD or HFD were compared, at the time points 0 (before starting the diets), and after 7, 14, 28 or 56 days. Activities of stearoyl-CoA desaturase-1 (SCD-1), ∆-6 desaturase (D6D), elongases and de novo lipogenesis (DNL) were estimated. Liver mRNA expression of acetyl-CoA carboxylase 1 (ACC1) was evaluated as an additional indicator of the de novo lipogenesis. Myeloperoxidase activity, nitric oxide (NO) production, and mRNA expressions of F4/80, type I collagen, interleukin (IL)-6, IL-1β, IL-10, and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) were measured as indication of the liver inflammatory state. The HCD group had more intense lipid deposition, particularly of saturated fatty acids (SFAs) and monounsaturated fatty acids (MUFAs). This group also showed higher DNL, SCD-1, and D6D activities associated with increased NO concentration, as well as myeloperoxidase activity. Livers from the HFD group showed higher elongase activity, stored more polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) and had a lower omega-6/omega-3 fatty acid (n-6/n-3) ratio. In conclusion, liver lipid accumulation, fatty acids (FA) composition and inflammation were modulated by the dietary composition of lipids and carbohydrates. The HCD group had more potent lipogenic and inflammatory effects in comparison with HFD. PMID:27801862

  2. Liver Fatty Acid Composition and Inflammation in Mice Fed with High-Carbohydrate Diet or High-Fat Diet.

    PubMed

    da Silva-Santi, Lorena Gimenez; Antunes, Marina Masetto; Caparroz-Assef, Silvana Martins; Carbonera, Fabiana; Masi, Laureane Nunes; Curi, Rui; Visentainer, Jesuí Vergílio; Bazotte, Roberto Barbosa

    2016-10-29

    Both high-carbohydrate diet (HCD) and high-fat diet (HFD) modulate liver fat accumulation and inflammation, however, there is a lack of data on the potential contribution of carbohydrates and lipids separately. For this reason, the changes in liver fatty acid (FA) composition in male Swiss mice fed with HCD or HFD were compared, at the time points 0 (before starting the diets), and after 7, 14, 28 or 56 days. Activities of stearoyl-CoA desaturase-1 (SCD-1), ∆-6 desaturase (D6D), elongases and de novo lipogenesis (DNL) were estimated. Liver mRNA expression of acetyl-CoA carboxylase 1 (ACC1) was evaluated as an additional indicator of the de novo lipogenesis. Myeloperoxidase activity, nitric oxide (NO) production, and mRNA expressions of F4/80, type I collagen, interleukin (IL)-6, IL-1β, IL-10, and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) were measured as indication of the liver inflammatory state. The HCD group had more intense lipid deposition, particularly of saturated fatty acids (SFAs) and monounsaturated fatty acids (MUFAs). This group also showed higher DNL, SCD-1, and D6D activities associated with increased NO concentration, as well as myeloperoxidase activity. Livers from the HFD group showed higher elongase activity, stored more polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) and had a lower omega-6/omega-3 fatty acid (n-6/n-3) ratio. In conclusion, liver lipid accumulation, fatty acids (FA) composition and inflammation were modulated by the dietary composition of lipids and carbohydrates. The HCD group had more potent lipogenic and inflammatory effects in comparison with HFD.

  3. Advanced glycation end products increase carbohydrate responsive element binding protein expression and promote cancer cell proliferation.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hanbei; Wu, Lifang; Li, Yakui; Meng, Jian; Lin, Ning; Yang, Dianqiang; Zhu, Yemin; Li, Xiaoyong; Li, Minle; Xu, Ye; Wu, Yuchen; Tong, Xuemei; Su, Qing

    2014-09-01

    Diabetic patients have increased levels of advanced glycation end products (AGEs) and the role of AGEs in regulating cancer cell proliferation is unclear. Here, we found that treating colorectal and liver cancer cells with AGEs promoted cell proliferation. AGEs stimulated both the expression and activation of a key transcription factor called carbohydrate responsive element binding protein (ChREBP) which had been shown to promote glycolytic and anabolic activity as well as proliferation of colorectal and liver cancer cells. Using siRNAs or the antagonistic antibody for the receptor for advanced glycation end-products (RAGE) blocked AGEs-induced ChREBP expression or cell proliferation in cancer cells. Suppressing ChREBP expression severely impaired AGEs-induced cancer cell proliferation. Taken together, these results demonstrate that AGEs-RAGE signaling enhances cancer cell proliferation in which AGEs-mediated ChREBP induction plays an important role. These findings may provide new explanation for increased cancer progression in diabetic patients.

  4. Timing influence of carbohydrate-protein ingestion on muscle soreness and next-day running performance.

    PubMed

    Greer, Beau Kjerulf; Price, Anna; Jones, Brett

    2014-06-01

    The present study investigates timing effects of a carbohydrate-protein (CHO-PROT) beverage on indicators of muscle damage and next day running performance. Nine trained subjects completed three trials of a 30 min downhill run, followed by a 1.5 mile treadmill running time trial 24 hr later in a blinded, crossover design. Either a CHO-PROT or noncaloric placebo beverage was given 30 and 5 min prior to, at the 15 min mark during, immediately after, and 30 min after the downhill running protocol. In the first treatment (T1), a total of 360 kilocalories were given 30 and 5 min prior to downhill running, as well as at the 15 min mark, with placebos used at other time points. In the second treatment (T2), an isocaloric amount was given but only immediately after and 30 min after downhill running, with placebos used at other time points. In the placebo treatment, a placebo was given at all time points. There were no significant differences in the 1.5 mile time trial or soreness between trials (p > .05). Regardless of timing, the ingestion of a CHO-PROT beverage had no effect on next day running performance or muscular soreness versus a placebo.

  5. The Roles of Vitamin A in the Regulation of Carbohydrate, Lipid, and Protein Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Wei; Chen, Guoxun

    2014-01-01

    Currently, two-thirds of American adults are overweight or obese. This high prevalence of overweight/obesity negatively affects the health of the population, as obese individuals tend to develop several chronic diseases, such as type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular diseases. Due to obesity’s impact on health, medical costs, and longevity, the rise in the number of obese people has become a public health concern. Both genetic and environmental/dietary factors play a role in the development of metabolic diseases. Intuitively, it seems to be obvious to link over-nutrition to the development of obesity and other metabolic diseases. However, the underlying mechanisms are still unclear. Dietary nutrients not only provide energy derived from macronutrients, but also factors such as micronutrients with regulatory roles. How micronutrients, such as vitamin A (VA; retinol), regulate macronutrient homeostasis is still an ongoing research topic. As an essential micronutrient, VA plays a key role in the general health of an individual. This review summarizes recent research progress regarding VA’s role in carbohydrate, lipid, and protein metabolism. Due to the large amount of information regarding VA functions, this review focusses on metabolism in metabolic active organs and tissues. Additionally, some perspectives for future studies will be provided. PMID:26237385

  6. Protein and carbohydrate intake influence sperm number and fertility in male cockroaches, but not sperm viability

    PubMed Central

    Bunning, Harriet; Rapkin, James; Belcher, Laurence; Archer, C. Ruth; Jensen, Kim; Hunt, John

    2015-01-01

    It is commonly assumed that because males produce many, tiny sperm, they are cheap to produce. Recent work, however, suggests that sperm production is not cost-free. If sperm are costly to produce, sperm number and/or viability should be influenced by diet, and this has been documented in numerous species. Yet few studies have examined the exact nutrients responsible for mediating these effects. Here, we quantify the effects of protein (P) and carbohydrate (C) intake on sperm number and viability in the cockroach Nauphoeta cinerea, as well as the consequences for male fertility. We found the intake of P and C influenced sperm number, being maximized at a high intake of diets with a P : C ratio of 1 : 2, but not sperm viability. The nutritional landscapes for male fertility and sperm number were closely aligned, suggesting that sperm number is the major determinant of male fertility in N. cinerea. Under dietary choice, males regulate nutrient intake at a P : C ratio of 1 : 4.95, which is midway between the ratios needed to maximize sperm production and pre-copulatory attractiveness in this species. This raises the possibility that males regulate nutrient intake to balance the trade-off between pre- and post-copulatory traits in this species. PMID:25608881

  7. New structures of the O-specific polysaccharides of Proteus. 3. Polysaccharides containing non-carbohydrate organic acids.

    PubMed

    Kondakova, A N; Toukach, F V; Senchenkova, S N; Arbatsky, N P; Shashkov, A S; Knirel, Y A; Bartodziejska, B; Zych, K; Rozalski, A; Sidorczyk, Z

    2003-04-01

    Four new Proteus O-specific polysaccharides were isolated by mild acid degradation from the lipopolysaccharides of P. penneri 28 (1), P. vulgaris O44 (2), P. mirabilis G1 (O3) (3), and P. myxofaciens (4), and their structures were elucidated using NMR spectroscopy and chemical methods. They were found to contain non-carbohydrate organic acids, including ether-linked lactic acid and amide-linked amino acids, and the following structures of the repeating units were established: [Figure: see text], where (S)-Lac and (R)-aLys stand for (S)-1-carboxyethyl (residue of lactic acid) and N(epsilon)-[(R)-1-carboxyethyl]-L-lysine ("alaninolysine"), respectively. The data obtained in this work and earlier serve as the chemical basis for classification of the bacteria Proteus.

  8. Metabolic determinants of body weight after cats were fed a low-carbohydrate high-protein diet or a high-carbohydrate low-protein diet ad libitum for 8 wk.

    PubMed

    Coradini, M; Rand, J S; Morton, J M; Rawlings, J M

    2014-10-01

    Overweight and obese conditions are common in cats and are associated with the development of a number of diseases. Knowledge of metabolic determinants and predictors of weight gain may enable better preventative strategies for obesity in cats. Lean, healthy cats were fed either a low-carbohydrate high-protein diet (n 16) or a high-carbohydrate low-protein (n 16) diet ad libitum for 8 wk. Potential determinants and predictors of final body weight assessed were body fat and lean masses, energy required for maintenance, energy requirements above maintenance for each kilogram of weight gain, insulin sensitivity index, fasting, mean 24-h and peak plasma glucose, insulin, and leptin concentrations, and fasting and mean 24-h serum adiponectin concentrations. In cats fed the low-carbohydrate high-protein diet, after adjusting for initial body weight, those with higher energy requirements for weight gain and higher fasting glucose concentration had higher final body weights (P ≤ 0.01). Predicted final body weights using initial body weight, fasting glucose and mean 24-h insulin concentrations (partial R(2) 37.3%) were imprecise. An equation using just initial body weight and fasting glucose concentration would be of more practical value, but was marginally less precise. In cats fed the high-carbohydrate low-protein diet, those with lower fasting leptin concentration initially had higher final body weights (P = 0.01). Predicted final body weights using initial body weight, energy requirements for maintenance, total body fat percentage and fasting leptin concentration (partial R(2) 39.2%) were reasonably precise. Further studies are warranted to confirm these findings and to improve the precision of predicted final body weights.

  9. Soybean hull induced production of carbohydrases and protease among Aspergillus and their effectiveness in soy flour carbohydrate and protein separation.

    PubMed

    Li, Qian; Loman, Abdullah Al; Coffman, Anthony M; Ju, Lu-Kwang

    2017-03-15

    Soybean hull consists mainly of three major plant carbohydrates, i.e., cellulose, hemicellulose and pectin. It is inexpensive and a good potential substrate for carbohydrase production because it is capable of inducing a complete spectrum of activities to hydrolyze complex biomass. Aspergillus is known for carbohydrase production but no studies have evaluated and compared, among Aspergillus species and strains, the soybean hull induced production of various carbohydrases. In this study, A. aculeatus, A. cinnamomeus, A. foetidus, A. phoenicis and 11 A. niger strains were examined together with T. reesei Rut C30, another known carbohydrase producer. The carbohydrases evaluated included pectinase, polygalacturonase, xylanase, cellulase, α-galactosidase and sucrase. Growth morphology and pH profiles were also followed. Among Aspergillus strains, morphology was found to correlate with both carbohydrase production and pH decrease profile. Filamentous strains gave higher carbohydrase production while causing slower pH decrease. The enzyme broths produced were also tested for separation of soy flour carbohydrate and protein. Defatted soy flour contains about 53% protein and 32% carbohydrate. The enzymatic treatment can increase protein content and remove indigestible oligo-/poly-saccharides, and improve use of soy flour in feed and food. Protease production by different strains was therefore also compared for minimizing protein degradation. A. niger NRRL 322 and A. foetidus NRRL 341 were found to be the most potent strains that produced maximal carbohydrases and minimal protease under soybean hull induction.

  10. Effects of adult-derived carbohydrates, amino acids and micronutrients on female reproduction in a fruit-feeding butterfly.

    PubMed

    Bauerfeind, Stephanie S; Fischer, Klaus

    2005-05-01

    It is generally believed that butterflies (and other holometabolous insects) rely primarily on reserves accumulated during the larval stage for reproduction, whereas the carbohydrate-rich adult diet is thought to mainly cover energy requirements. In at least some species though, realization of the full reproductive potential is extensively affected by post-eclosion nutrition. While the importance of carbohydrates is fairly well understood, the role of adult-derived amino acids and micronutrients is controversial and largely unknown, respectively. We here focus on the effects of different adult diets on female reproduction in the tropical, fruit-feeding butterfly Bicyclus anynana (Nymphalidae). Carbohydrates were the most important adult-derived nutrients affecting reproduction. Adding amino acids, vitamins or minerals to sucrose-based solutions did not yield a reproductive output equivalent to that of fruit-fed females, which showed the highest performance throughout. This suggests that either not yet identified compounds of fruit substantially contribute to reproduction, or that resource congruence (the use of nutrient types in a specified ratio) rather than any specific nutrient component is of key importance. Apart from adult income, realized fecundity depended on egg size and longevity, with the former dominating when dietary quality was low, but the latter when quality was high. Thus, the egg size-number trade-off seems to be affected by female nutrition.

  11. The effect of dietary protein and fermentable carbohydrates levels on growth performance and intestinal characteristics in newly weaned piglets.

    PubMed

    Bikker, P; Dirkzwager, A; Fledderus, J; Trevisi, P; le Huërou-Luron, I; Lallès, J P; Awati, A

    2006-12-01

    Reducing the CP content and increasing the fermentable carbohydrates (FC) content of the diet may counteract the negative effects of protein fermentation in newly weaned piglets fed high-CP diets. To study the synergistic effects of CP and FC on gut health and its consequences for growth performance, 272 newly weaned piglets (26 d of age, 8.7 kg of BW) were allotted to 1 of 4 dietary treatments in a 2 x 2 factorial arrangement, with low and high CP and low and high FC content as the factors. Eight piglets from each dietary treatment were killed on d 7 postweaning. Feces and digesta from ileum and colon were collected to determine nutrient digestibility, fermentation products, and microbial counts. In addition, jejunum tissues samples were collected for intestinal morphology and enzyme activity determination. During the entire 4-wk period, interactions between the dietary CP and FC contents were found for ADFI (P = 0.022), ADG (P = 0.001), and G:F (P = 0.033). The high-FC content reduced ADFI, ADG, and G:F in the low-CP diet, whereas the FC content did not affect growth performance in the high-CP diet. Lowering the CP content of the low-FC diet improved ADFI and ADG, whereas lowering the CP content of the high-FC diet did not influence growth performance. The low-CP diets resulted in a lower concentration of ammonia in the small intestine (P = 0.003), indicating reduced protein fermentation. In the small intestine, the high FC content increased the number of lactobacilli (P = 0.047), tended to decrease the number of coliforms (P = 0.063), tended to increase the lactic acid content (P = 0.080), and reduced the concentration of ammonia (P = 0.049). In the colon, the high-FC diets increased the concentration of total VFA (P = 0.009), acetic acid (P = 0.003), and butyric acid (P = 0.018), and tended to decrease the ammonia concentration (P = 0.076). Intestinal morphology and activity of brush border enzymes were not affected by the diet, although maltase activity tended

  12. The addition of whey protein to a carbohydrate-electrolyte drink does not influence post-exercise rehydration.

    PubMed

    Hobson, Ruth; James, Lewis

    2015-01-01

    The addition of whey protein to a carbohydrate-electrolyte drink has been shown to enhance post-exercise rehydration when a volume below that recommended for full fluid balance restoration is provided. We investigated if this held true when volumes sufficient to restore fluid balance were consumed and if differences might be explained by changes in plasma albumin content. Sixteen participants lost ~1.9% of their pre-exercise body mass by cycling in the heat and rehydrated with 150% of body mass lost with either a 60 g · L(-1) carbohydrate drink (CHO) or a 60 g · L(-1) carbohydrate, 20 g · L(-1) whey protein isolate drink (CHO-P). Urine and blood samples were collected pre-exercise, post-exercise, post-rehydration and every hour for 4 h post-rehydration. There was no difference between trials for total urine production (CHO 1057 ± 319 mL; CHO-P 970 ± 334 mL; P = 0.209), drink retention (CHO 51 ± 12%; CHO-P 55 ± 15%; P = 0.195) or net fluid balance (CHO -393 ± 272 mL; CHO-P -307 ± 331 mL; P = 0.284). Plasma albumin content relative to pre-exercise was increased from 2 to 4 h during CHO-P only. These results demonstrate that the addition of whey protein isolate to a carbohydrate-electrolyte drink neither enhances nor inhibits rehydration. Therefore, where post-exercise protein ingestion might benefit recovery, this can be consumed without effecting rehydration.

  13. Formation of a seed germination promoter from carbohydrates and amino acids.

    PubMed

    Light, Marnie E; Burger, Barend V; van Staden, Johannes

    2005-07-27

    The ability of plant-derived smoke to act as a germination cue in many species has led to widespread interest in this aspect of seed biology. Recently, 3-methyl-2H-furo[2,3-c]pyran-2-one was identified as the main germination cue from smoke. Here, we report on the formation of this compound from reactions of sugars with amino acids. Heating proteins or amino acids with sugars at 180 degrees C for 30 min produces water soluble extracts that promote germination. High-performance liquid chromatography indicated that the active compound(s) derived from these reactions coeluted with the active fraction from a smoke solution. Gas chromatography-mass spectroscopy showed that the active constituent is identical to the germination cue from plant-derived smoke. The results presented in this paper provide evidence for the formation of the major germination cue found in smoke from ubiquitously occurring organic compounds.

  14. A photo-cleavable biotin affinity tag for the facile release of a photo-crosslinked carbohydrate-binding protein.

    PubMed

    Chang, Tsung-Che; Adak, Avijit K; Lin, Ting-Wei; Li, Pei-Jhen; Chen, Yi-Ju; Lai, Chain-Hui; Liang, Chien-Fu; Chen, Yu-Ju; Lin, Chun-Cheng

    2016-03-15

    The use of photo-crosslinking glycoprobes represents a powerful strategy for the covalent capture of labile protein complexes and allows detailed characterization of carbohydrate-mediated interactions. The selective release of target proteins from solid support is a key step in functional proteomics. We envisaged that light activation can be exploited for releasing labeled protein in a dual photo-affinity probe-based strategy. To investigate this possibility, we designed a trifunctional, galactose-based, multivalent glycoprobe for affinity labeling of carbohydrate-binding proteins. The resulting covalent protein-probe adduct is attached to a photo-cleavable biotin affinity tag; the biotin moiety enables specific presentation of the conjugate on streptavidin-coated beads, and the photolabile linker allows the release of the labeled proteins. This dual probe promotes both the labeling and the facile cleavage of the target protein complexes from the solid surfaces and the remainder of the cell lysate in a completely unaltered form, thus eliminating many of the common pitfalls associated with traditional affinity-based purification methods.

  15. Protein, carbohydrate, lipid concentrations and HSP 70-HSP 90 (stress protein) expression over an annual cycle: useful tools to detect feeding constraints in a benthic suspension feeder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rossi, Sergio; Snyder, Mark J.; Gili, Josep-Marìa

    2006-03-01

    In the present paper we suggest an effect of seasonal variations in food availability on two ecophysiological parameters in a warm temperate benthic suspension feeder: the tissue concentrations of proteins, carbohydrates and lipids on the one hand, and the expression of stress proteins (HSP 70 and 90, inducible and/or constitutive) on the other hand. The concentrations of biomacromolecules have already been used to describe bentho-pelagic and reproductive processes, but this is the first time that stress protein expression is suggested to be directly related with food constraints in marine organisms. Paramuricea clavata (Cnidaria: Gorgonacea) express HSP 70 and 90 (constitutive and/or inducible) throughout the seasonal cycle, and HSP 70 levels are twice as high as the levels of HSP 90. In summer and autumn, when seston availability to suspension feeders was low, P. clavata showed low levels of carbohydrates and lipids, but high levels of HSPs expression. The levels of HSP 70 and 90 expression fit with negative exponential functions of carbohydrate and lipid concentrations. We suggest a direct effect of food availability on the studied ecophysiological parameters while the effect of temperature may be rather indirect. HSP expression as well as the tissue concentrations of carbohydrate and lipids may be used as biomarkers of environmental changes and seston availability to benthic suspension feeders.

  16. Combined carbohydrate-protein supplementation improves competitive endurance exercise performance in the heat.

    PubMed

    Cathcart, Andrew J; Murgatroyd, Scott R; McNab, Alison; Whyte, Laura J; Easton, Chris

    2011-09-01

    Laboratory-based studies have demonstrated that adding protein (PRO) to a carbohydrate (CHO) supplement can improve thermoregulatory capacity, exercise performance and recovery. However, no study has investigated these effects in a competitive sporting context. This study assessed the effects of combined CHO-PRO supplementation on physiological responses and exercise performance during 8 days of strenuous competition in a hot environment. Twenty-eight cyclists participating in the TransAlp mountain bike race were randomly assigned to fitness-matched placebo (PLA 76 g L(-1) CHO) or CHO-PRO (18 g L(-1) PRO, 72 g L(-1) CHO) groups. Participants were given enough supplements to allow ad libitum consumption. Physiological and anthropometric variables were recorded pre- and post-exercise. Body mass decreased significantly from race stage 1 to 8 in the PLA group (-0.75 ± 0.22 kg, P = 0.01) but did not change in the CHO-PRO group (0.42 ± 0.42 kg, P = 0.35). Creatine kinase concentration and muscle soreness were substantially elevated during the race, but were not different between groups (P = 0.82, P = 0.44, respectively). Urine osmolality was significantly higher in the CHO-PRO versus the PLA group (P = 0.04) and the rise in tympanic temperature from pre- to post-exercise was significantly less in CHO-PRO versus PLA (P = 0.01). The CHO-PRO group also completed the 8 stages significantly quicker than the PLA group (2,277 ± 127 vs. 2,592 ± 68 min, respectively, P = 0.02). CHO-PRO supplementation therefore appears to prevent body mass loss, enhance thermoregulatory capacity and improve competitive exercise performance despite no effect on muscle damage.

  17. Probing the Functions of Carbohydrate Binding Modules in the CBEL Protein from the Oomycete Phytophthora parasitica

    PubMed Central

    Martinez, Thomas; Texier, Hélène; Nahoum, Virginie; Lafitte, Claude; Cioci, Gianluca; Heux, Laurent; Dumas, Bernard; O’Donohue, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Oomycetes are microorganisms that are distantly related to true fungi and many members of this phylum are major plant pathogens. Oomycetes express proteins that are able to interact with plant cell wall polysaccharides, such as cellulose. This interaction is thought to be mediated by carbohydrate-binding modules that are classified into CBM family 1 in the CAZy database. In this study, the two CBMs (1–1 and 1–2) that form part of the cell wall glycoprotein, CBEL, from Phytophthora parasitica have been submitted to detailed characterization, first to better quantify their interaction with cellulose and second to determine whether these CBMs can be useful for biotechnological applications, such as biomass hydrolysis. A variety of biophysical techniques were used to study the interaction of the CBMs with various substrates and the data obtained indicate that CBEL’s CBM1-1 exhibits much greater cellulose binding ability than CBM1-2. Engineering of the family 11 xylanase from Talaromyces versatilis (TvXynB), an enzyme that naturally bears a fungal family 1 CBM, has produced two variants. The first one lacks its native CBM, whereas the second contains the CBEL CBM1-1. The study of these enzymes has revealed that wild type TvXynB binds to cellulose, via its CBM1, and that the substitution of its CBM by oomycetal CBM1-1 does not affect its activity on wheat straw. However, intriguingly the addition of CBEL during the hydrolysis of wheat straw actually potentiates the action of TvXynB variant lacking a CBM1. This suggests that the potentiating effect of CBM1-1 might not require the formation of a covalent linkage to TvXynB. PMID:26390127

  18. High-protein-low-carbohydrate diet: deleterious metabolic and cardiovascular effects depend on age.

    PubMed

    Bedarida, Tatiana; Baron, Stephanie; Vessieres, Emilie; Vibert, Francoise; Ayer, Audrey; Marchiol-Fournigault, Carmen; Henrion, Daniel; Paul, Jean-Louis; Noble, Florence; Golmard, Jean-Louis; Beaudeux, Jean-Louis; Cottart, Charles-Henry; Nivet-Antoine, Valerie

    2014-09-01

    High-protein-low-carbohydrate (HP-LC) diets have become widespread. Yet their deleterious consequences, especially on glucose metabolism and arteries, have already been underlined. Our previous study (2) has already shown glucose intolerance with major arterial dysfunction in very old mice subjected to an HP-LC diet. The hypothesis of this work was that this diet had an age-dependent deleterious metabolic and cardiovascular outcome. Two groups of mice, young and adult (3 and 6 mo old), were subjected for 12 wk to a standard or to an HP-LC diet. Glucose and lipid metabolism was studied. The cardiovascular system was explored from the functional stage with Doppler-echography to the molecular stage (arterial reactivity, mRNA, immunohistochemistry). Young mice did not exhibit any significant metabolic modification, whereas adult mice presented marked glucose intolerance associated with an increase in resistin and triglyceride levels. These metabolic disturbances were responsible for cardiovascular damages only in adult mice, with decreased aortic distensibility and left ventricle dysfunction. These seemed to be the consequence of arterial dysfunctions. Mesenteric arteries were the worst affected with a major oxidative stress, whereas aorta function seemed to be maintained with an appreciable role of cyclooxygenase-2 to preserve endothelial function. This study highlights for the first time the age-dependent deleterious effects of an HP-LC diet on metabolism, with glucose intolerance and lipid disorders and vascular (especially microvessels) and cardiac functions. This work shows that HP-LC lead to equivalent cardiovascular alterations, as observed in very old age, and underlines the danger of such diet.

  19. Spatio-Temporal, Genotypic, and Environmental Effects on Plant Soluble Protein and Digestible Carbohydrate Content: Implications for Insect Herbivores with Cotton as an Exemplar.

    PubMed

    Deans, Carrie A; Behmer, Spencer T; Fiene, Justin; Sword, Gregory A

    2016-11-01

    Plant soluble protein and digestible carbohydrate content significantly affect insect herbivore fitness, but studies reporting plant protein and carbohydrate content are rare. Instead, the elements nitrogen and carbon often are used as surrogates for plant protein and digestible carbohydrate content, respectively. However, this is problematic for two reasons. First, carbon is found in all organic molecules, which precludes strong correlations with ecologically important dietary macronutrients (e.g., digestible carbohydrates, the primary energy source for most insect herbivores). Second, some elements (e.g., nitrogen) are present in both macronutrients (e.g., protein) and non-nutritive secondary compounds (e.g., alkaloids, protease inhibitors); in these cases N values would greatly overestimate protein available for an insect herbivore. Thus, the objective of this study was to explicitly document plant protein-carbohydrate content and assess its variation in cotton (Gossypium hirsutum and G. barbadense), which is a nutritional resource for a number of insect herbivores. We did this by measuring plant soluble protein (P) and digestible carbohydrate (C) content across seven plant tissues, five varieties, and two growing environments. Significant differences in P and C concentration, total macronutrient content (P + C), and P:C ratio were observed across plant tissues, plant age and environment; smaller differences were seen across plant genotype. Foliar tissues had higher total P + C content compared to reproductive tissues, except for developing seeds and developing flowers, which contained twice the total P + C content; these two tissues also had the highest P content. Our data show that even agricultural monocultures offer a highly heterogeneous protein-carbohydrate landscape for insect herbivores. Characterizing plant resources using nutritional currencies (e.g., protein and carbohydrates) that are ecologically and physiologically-relevant to insect

  20. Impact of Glycosidic Bond Configuration on Short Chain Fatty Acid Production from Model Fermentable Carbohydrates by the Human Gut Microbiota.

    PubMed

    Harris, Hannah C; Edwards, Christine A; Morrison, Douglas J

    2017-01-01

    Short chain fatty acids (SCFA) are the major products of carbohydrate fermentation by gut bacteria. Different carbohydrates are associated with characteristic SCFA profiles although the mechanisms are unclear. The individual SCFA profile may determine any resultant health benefits. Understanding determinants of individual SCFA production would enable substrate choice to be tailored for colonic SCFA manipulation. To test the hypothesis that the orientation and position of the glycosidic bond is a determinant of SCFA production profile, a miniaturized in vitro human colonic batch fermentation model was used to study a range of isomeric glucose disaccharides. Diglucose α(1-1) fermentation led to significantly higher butyrate production (p < 0.01) and a lower proportion of acetate (p < 0.01) compared with other α bonded diglucoses. Diglucose β(1-4) also led to significantly higher butyrate production (p < 0.05) and significantly increased the proportions of propionate and butyrate compared with diglucose α(1-4) (p < 0.05). There was no significant effect of glycosidic bond configuration on absolute propionate production. Despite some differences in the SCFA production of different glucose disaccharides, there was no clear relationship between SCFA production and bond configuration, suggesting that other factors may be responsible for promoting selective SCFA production by the gut microbiota from different carbohydrates.

  1. Impact of Glycosidic Bond Configuration on Short Chain Fatty Acid Production from Model Fermentable Carbohydrates by the Human Gut Microbiota

    PubMed Central

    Harris, Hannah C.; Edwards, Christine A.; Morrison, Douglas J.

    2017-01-01

    Short chain fatty acids (SCFA) are the major products of carbohydrate fermentation by gut bacteria. Different carbohydrates are associated with characteristic SCFA profiles although the mechanisms are unclear. The individual SCFA profile may determine any resultant health benefits. Understanding determinants of individual SCFA production would enable substrate choice to be tailored for colonic SCFA manipulation. To test the hypothesis that the orientation and position of the glycosidic bond is a determinant of SCFA production profile, a miniaturized in vitro human colonic batch fermentation model was used to study a range of isomeric glucose disaccharides. Diglucose α(1-1) fermentation led to significantly higher butyrate production (p < 0.01) and a lower proportion of acetate (p < 0.01) compared with other α bonded diglucoses. Diglucose β(1-4) also led to significantly higher butyrate production (p < 0.05) and significantly increased the proportions of propionate and butyrate compared with diglucose α(1-4) (p < 0.05). There was no significant effect of glycosidic bond configuration on absolute propionate production. Despite some differences in the SCFA production of different glucose disaccharides, there was no clear relationship between SCFA production and bond configuration, suggesting that other factors may be responsible for promoting selective SCFA production by the gut microbiota from different carbohydrates. PMID:28045429

  2. A Low-Protein, High-Carbohydrate Diet Stimulates Thermogenesis in the Brown Adipose Tissue of Rats via ATF-2.

    PubMed

    de França, Suélem A; dos Santos, Maísa P; Przygodda, Franciele; Garófalo, Maria Antonieta R; Kettelhut, Isis C; Magalhães, Diego A; Bezerra, Kalinne S; Colodel, Edson M; Flouris, Andreas D; Andrade, Cláudia M B; Kawashita, Nair H

    2016-03-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate thermogenesis in the interscapular brown adipose tissue (IBAT) of rats submitted to low-protein, high-carbohydrate (LPHC) diet and the involvement of adrenergic stimulation in this process. Male rats (~100 g) were submitted to LPHC (6%-protein; 74%-carbohydrate) or control (C; 17%-protein; 63%-carbohydrate) isocaloric diets for 15 days. The IBAT temperature was evaluated in the rats before and after the administration of noradrenaline (NA) (20 µg 100 g b w(-1) min(-1)). The expression levels of uncoupling protein 1 (UCP1) and other proteins involved in the regulation of UCP1 expression were determined by Western blot (Student's t test, P ≤ 0.05). The LPHC diet promoted a 1.1 °C increase in the basal temperature of IBAT when compared with the basal temperature in the IBAT of the C group. NA administration promoted a 0.3 °C increase in basal temperature in the IBAT of the C rats and a 0.5 °C increase in the IBAT of the LPHC group. The level of UCP1 increased 60% in the IBAT of LPHC-fed rats, and among the proteins involved in its expression, such as β3-AR and α1-AR, there was a 40% increase in the levels of p38-MAPK and a 30% decrease in CREB when compared to the C rats. The higher sympathetic flux to IBAT, which is a consequence of the administration of the LPHC diet to rats, activates thermogenesis and increases the expression of UCP1 in the tissue. Our results suggest that the increase in UCP1 content may occur via p38 MAPK and ATF2.

  3. Distinguishing Proteins From Arbitrary Amino Acid Sequences

    PubMed Central

    Yau, Stephen S.-T.; Mao, Wei-Guang; Benson, Max; He, Rong Lucy

    2015-01-01

    What kinds of amino acid sequences could possibly be protein sequences? From all existing databases that we can find, known proteins are only a small fraction of all possible combinations of amino acids. Beginning with Sanger's first detailed determination of a protein sequence in 1952, previous studies have focused on describing the structure of existing protein sequences in order to construct the protein universe. No one, however, has developed a criteria for determining whether an arbitrary amino acid sequence can be a protein. Here we show that when the collection of arbitrary amino acid sequences is viewed in an appropriate geometric context, the protein sequences cluster together. This leads to a new computational test, described here, that has proved to be remarkably accurate at determining whether an arbitrary amino acid sequence can be a protein. Even more, if the results of this test indicate that the sequence can be a protein, and it is indeed a protein sequence, then its identity as a protein sequence is uniquely defined. We anticipate our computational test will be useful for those who are attempting to complete the job of discovering all proteins, or constructing the protein universe. PMID:25609314

  4. Skeletal Muscle myomiR Are Differentially Expressed by Endurance Exercise Mode and Combined Essential Amino Acid and Carbohydrate Supplementation

    PubMed Central

    Margolis, Lee M.; McClung, Holly L.; Murphy, Nancy E.; Carrigan, Christopher T.; Pasiakos, Stefan M.

    2017-01-01

    Skeletal muscle microRNAs (myomiR) expression is modulated by exercise, however, the influence of endurance exercise mode, combined with essential amino acid and carbohydrate (EAA+CHO) supplementation are not well defined. This study determined the effects of weighted versus non-weighted endurance exercise, with or without EAA+CHO ingestion on myomiR expression and their association with muscle protein synthesis (MPS). Twenty five adults performed 90 min of metabolically-matched (2.2 VO2 L·m−1) load carriage (LC; performed on a treadmill wearing a vest equal to 30% of individual body mass) or cycle ergometry (CE) exercise, during which EAA+CHO (10 g EAA and 46 g CHO) or non-nutritive control (CON) drinks were consumed. Expression of myomiR (RT-qPCR) were determined at rest (PRE), immediately post-exercise (POST), and 3 h into recovery (REC). Muscle protein synthesis (2H5-phenylalanine) was measured during exercise and recovery. Relative to PRE, POST, and REC expression of miR-1-3p, miR-206, miR-208a-5, and miR-499 was lower (P < 0.05) for LC compared to CE, regardless of dietary treatment. Independent of exercise mode, miR-1-3p and miR-208a-5p expression were lower (P < 0.05) after ingesting EAA+CHO compared to CON. Expression of miR-206 was highest for CE-CON than any other treatment (exercise-by-drink, P < 0.05). Common targets of differing myomiR were identified as markers within mTORC1 signaling, and miR-206 and miR-499 were inversely associated with MPS rates immediately post-exercise. These findings suggest the alterations in myomiR expression between exercise mode and EAA+CHO intake may in part be due to differing MPS modulation immediately post-exercise. PMID:28386239

  5. [EFFECTS OF INGESTING CARBOHYDRATE-PROTEIN SUPPLEMENTS DURING EXERCISE ON ENDURANCE PERFORMANCE: A SYSTEMATIC REVIEW].

    PubMed

    Espino-González, Ever; Muñoz-Daw, María de Jesús; Candia-Lujan, Ramon

    2015-11-01

    Introducción: las bebidas deportivas ayudan a mejorar el rendimiento físico de forma significativa debido a su aporte de carbohidratos, electrolitos y agua. Sin embargo, en las últimas décadas se ha encontrado que ingerir una bebida deportiva con proteína durante el ejercicio mejora el rendimiento físico, produce menores pérdidas de peso corporal inducidas por la deshidratación y ayuda a disminuir el daño muscular postejercicio en comparación con una bebida únicamente con carbohidratos y electrolitos. Objetivo: analizar los principales estudios sobre la efectividad de la ingesta de un suplemento con carbohidratos, proteína y electrolitos durante el ejercicio. Método: se realizó una búsqueda automatizada en Google académico, EBSCO, PubMEd y Scopus, utilizando las palabras clave: Carbohydrate-protein and performance y Added protein and sports drink. Se evaluó la calidad metodológica de los ensayos y se tomó en cuenta que la ingesta del suplemento fuera durante el ejercicio. Resultados: de los veinte artículos que se incluyeron, trece obtuvieron resultados en los que la ingesta de una bebida deportiva con proteína generó mejoras significativas en el rendimiento físico en comparación con una bebida únicamente con carbohidratos y electrolitos, o un placebo. Discusión: aumentar el contenido calórico de las bebidas deportivas al agregar proteína es probablemente una estrategia más efectiva en comparación con disminuir el contenido de carbohidratos para igualar la cantidad de energía. Conclusiones: el consumo de proteína durante el ejercicio posiblemente sirva como una ayuda ergogénica, retardando el tiempo hasta llegar al agotamiento. Sin embargo, hace falta más evidencia que así lo demuestre.

  6. A suggested model for potato MIVOISAP involving functions of central carbohydrate and amino acid metabolism, as well as actin cytoskeleton and endocytosis.

    PubMed

    Ezquer, Ignacio; Li, Jun; Ovecka, Miroslav; Baroja-Fernández, Edurne; Muñoz, Francisco José; Montero, Manuel; Díaz de Cerio, Jessica; Hidalgo, Maite; Sesma, María Teresa; Bahaji, Abdellatif; Etxeberria, Ed; Pozueta-Romero, Javier

    2010-12-01

    We have recently found that microbial species ranging from Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria to different fungi emit volatiles that strongly promote starch accumulation in leaves of both mono- and di-cotyledonous plants. Transcriptome and enzyme activity analyses of potato leaves exposed to volatiles emitted by Alternaria alternata revealed that starch over-accumulation was accompanied by enhanced 3-phosphoglycerate to Pi ratio, and changes in functions involved in both central carbohydrate and amino acid metabolism. Exposure to microbial volatiles also promoted changes in the expression of genes that code for enzymes involved in endocytic uptake and traffic of solutes. With the overall data we propose a metabolic model wherein important determinants of accumulation of exceptionally high levels of starch include (a) upregulation of ADPglucose-producing SuSy, starch synthase III and IV, proteins involved in the endocytic uptake and traffic of sucrose, (b) down-regulation of acid invertase, starch breakdown enzymes and proteins involved in internal amino acid provision, and (c) 3-phosphoglycerate-mediated allosteric activation of ADPglucose pyrophosphorylase.

  7. Nutritional physiology of life-history trade-offs: how food protein-carbohydrate content influences life-history traits in the wing-polymorphic cricket Gryllus firmus.

    PubMed

    Clark, Rebecca M; Zera, Anthony J; Behmer, Spencer T

    2015-01-15

    Although life-history trade-offs result from the differential acquisition and allocation of nutritional resources to competing physiological functions, many aspects of this topic remain poorly understood. Wing-polymorphic insects, which possess alternative morphs that trade off allocation to flight capability versus early reproduction, provide a good model system for exploring this topic. In this study, we used the wing-polymorphic cricket Gryllus firmus to test how expression of the flight capability versus reproduction trade-off was modified across a heterogeneous protein-carbohydrate nutritional landscape. Newly molted adult female long- and short-winged crickets were given one of 13 diets with different concentrations and ratios of protein and digestible carbohydrate; for each cricket, we measured consumption patterns, growth and allocation to reproduction (ovary mass) versus flight muscle maintenance (flight muscle mass and somatic lipid stores). Feeding responses in both morphs were influenced more by total macronutrient concentration than by protein-carbohydrate ratio, except at high-macronutrient concentration, where protein-carbohydrate balance was important. Mass gain tended to be greatest on protein-biased diets for both morphs, but was consistently lower across all diets for long-winged females. When long-winged females were fed high-carbohydrate foods, they accumulated greater somatic lipid stores; on high-protein foods, they accumulated greater somatic protein stores. Food protein-carbohydrate content also affected short-winged females (selected for early reproductive onset), which showed dramatic increases in ovary size, including ovarian stores of lipid and protein, on protein-biased foods. This is the first study to show how the concentration and ratio of dietary protein and carbohydrate affects consumption and allocation to key physiological features associated with the reproduction-dispersal life-history trade-off.

  8. Effect of a carbohydrate-protein multi-ingredient supplement on intermittent sprint performance and muscle damage in recreational athletes.

    PubMed

    Naclerio, Fernando; Larumbe-Zabala, Eneko; Cooper, Robert; Jimenez, Alfonso; Goss-Sampson, Mark

    2014-10-01

    Carbohydrate-protein-based multi-ingredient supplements have been proposed as an effective strategy for limiting the deleterious effects of exercise-induced muscle damage. This study compares the effects of a commercially available carbohydrate-protein supplement enriched with l-glutamine and l-carnitine-l-tartrate to carbohydrate alone or placebo on sprint performance, muscle damage markers, and recovery from intermittent exercise. On 3 occasions, 10 recreationally trained males ingested a multi-ingredient, a carbohydrate supplement, or a placebo before, during, and immediately after a 90-min intermittent repeated sprint test. Fifteen-metre sprint times, creatine kinase, myoglobin, and interleukin-6 were assessed before (pre), immediately after (post), 1 h after (1h), and 24 h after (24h) exercise. Total sprint time measured during the intermittent protocol was not different between conditions. Fifteen-metre sprint time was slower (p < 0.05) at post, 1h and 24h compared with pre without differences between conditions (p > 0.05). Creatine kinase at 24h was lower (p < 0.05) in the multi-ingredient (461.8 ± 271.8 U·L) compared with both carbohydrate and placebo (606 ± 314.5 U·L and 636 ± 344.6 U·L, respectively). Myoglobin increased (p < 0.05) in all 3 conditions at post and 1h compared with pre, showing lower values at 1h (p < 0.05) for the carbohydrate and a trend (p = 0.060) for multi-ingredient compared with the placebo condition (211.4 ± 127.2 ng·mL(-1) and 239.4 ± 103.8 ng·mL(-1) vs. 484.6 ± 200.0 ng·mL(-1), respectively). Interleukin-6 increased at both post and 1h compared with pre (p < 0.05) with no differences between conditions. In conclusion, ingesting a multi-ingredient supplement before, during, and immediately after a 90-min intermittent sprint test resulted in no effects on performance and fatigue while the accumulation of some biomarkers of muscle damage could be attenuated.

  9. Community-Based Network Study of Protein-Carbohydrate Interactions in Plant Lectins Using Glycan Array Data

    PubMed Central

    Malik, Adeel; Lee, Juyong; Lee, Jooyoung

    2014-01-01

    Lectins play major roles in biological processes such as immune recognition and regulation, inflammatory responses, cytokine signaling, and cell adhesion. Recently, glycan microarrays have shown to play key roles in understanding glycobiology, allowing us to study the relationship between the specificities of glycan binding proteins and their natural ligands at the omics scale. However, one of the drawbacks in utilizing glycan microarray data is the lack of systematic analysis tools to extract information. In this work, we attempt to group various lectins and their interacting carbohydrates by using community-based analysis of a lectin-carbohydrate network. The network consists of 1119 nodes and 16769 edges and we have identified 3 lectins having large degrees of connectivity playing the roles of hubs. The community based network analysis provides an easy way to obtain a general picture of the lectin-glycan interaction and many statistically significant functional groups. PMID:24755681

  10. Effects of sulfhydryl compounds, carbohydrates, organic acids, and sodium sulfite on the formation of lysinoalanine in preserved egg.

    PubMed

    Luo, Xu-Ying; Tu, Yong-Gang; Zhao, Yan; Li, Jian-Ke; Wang, Jun-Jie

    2014-08-01

    To identify inhibitors for lysinoalanine formation in preserved egg, sulfhydryl compounds (glutathione, L-cysteine), carbohydrates (sucrose, D-glucose, maltose), organic acids (L-ascorbic acid, citric acid, DL-malic acid, lactic acid), and sodium sulfite were individually added at different concentrations to a pickling solution to prepare preserved eggs. Lysinoalanine formation as an index of these 10 substances was determined. Results indicate that glutathione, D-glucose, maltose, L-ascorbic acid, citric acid, lactic acid, and sodium sulfite all effectively diminished lysinoalanine formation in preserved egg albumen and yolk. When 40 and 80 mmol/L of sodium sulfite, citric acid, L-ascorbic acid, and D-glucose were individually added into the pickling solution, the inhibition rates of lysinoalanine in the produced preserved egg albumen and yolk were higher. However, the attempt of minimizing lysinoalanine formation was combined with the premise of ensuring preserved eggs quality. Moreover, the addition of 40 and 80 mmol/L of sodium sulfite, 40 and 80 mmol/L of D-glucose, 40 mmol/L of citric acid, and 40 mmol/L of L-ascorbic acid was optimal to produce preserved eggs. The corresponding inhibition rates of lysinoalanine in the albumen were approximately 76.3% to 76.5%, 67.6% to 67.8%, 74.6%, and 74.6%, and the corresponding inhibition rates of lysinoalanine in the yolk were about 68.7% to 69.7%, 50.6% to 51.8%, 70.4%, and 57.8%. It was concluded that sodium sulfite, D-glucose, L-ascorbic, and citric acid at suitable concentrations can be used to control the formation of lysinoalanine during preserved egg processing.

  11. Differential effects of abscisic acid on desiccation tolerance and carbohydrates in three species of liverworts.

    PubMed

    Pence, Valerie C; Dunford, Susan S; Redella, Steven

    2005-12-01

    Tissues of three species of in vitro grown liverworts, Riccia fluitans, Pallavicinia lyellii, and Marchantia polymorpha, were subjected to rapid drying with and without preculture for 1 week on medium containing 10 microM ABA. ABA preculture initiated total desiccation tolerance in R. fluitans, whereas control tissues were killed after 30 min of drying. Survival was also improved in P. lyellii, whereas ABA did not affect survival of M. polymorpha after rapid drying. ABA treatment did, however, reduce the rate of water loss in M. polymorpha. Total soluble carbohydrates were increased in ABA-treated R. fluitans and P. lyellii, but not in M. polymorpha, although there was no correlation between survival and changes in the percentage of these carbohydrates as reducing sugars. These differences in response to ABA and desiccation likely reflect different adaptations of these three species to conditions in situ.

  12. Effects of Homologous Phosphoenolpyruvate-Carbohydrate Phosphotransferase System Proteins on Carbohydrate Uptake and Poly(3-Hydroxybutyrate) Accumulation in Ralstonia eutropha H16▿†

    PubMed Central

    Kaddor, Chlud; Steinbüchel, Alexander

    2011-01-01

    Seven gene loci encoding putative proteins of the phosphoenolpyruvate-carbohydrate phosphotransferase system (PEP-PTS) were identified in the genome of Ralstonia eutropha H16 by in silico analysis. Except the N-acetylglucosamine-specific PEP-PTS, an additional complete PEP-PTS is lacking in strain H16. Based on these findings, we generated single and multiple deletion mutants defective mainly in the PEP-PTS genes to investigate their influence on carbon source utilization, growth behavior, and poly(3-hydroxybutyrate) (PHB) accumulation. As supposed, the H16 ΔfrcACB and H16 ΔnagFEC mutants exhibited no growth when cultivated on fructose and N-acetylglucosamine, respectively. Furthermore, a transposon mutant with a ptsM-ptsH insertion site did not grow on both carbon sources. The observed phenotype was not complemented, suggesting that it results from an interaction of genes or a polar effect caused by the Tn5::mob insertion. ptsM, ptsH, and ptsI single, double, and triple mutants stored much less PHB than the wild type (about 10 to 39% [wt/wt] of cell dry weight) and caused reduced PHB production in mutants lacking the H16_A2203, H16_A0384, frcACB, or nagFEC genes. In contrast, mutant H16 ΔH16_A0384 accumulated 11.5% (wt/wt) more PHB than the wild type when grown on gluconate and suppressed partially the negative effect of the ptsMHI deletion on PHB synthesis. Based on our experimental data, we discussed whether the PEP-PTS homologous proteins in R. eutropha H16 are exclusively involved in the complex sugar transport system or whether they are also involved in cellular regulatory functions of carbon and PHB metabolism. PMID:21478317

  13. Screening method of carbohydrate-binding proteins in biological sources by capillary affinity electrophoresis and its application to determination of Tulipa gesneriana agglutinin in tulip bulbs.

    PubMed

    Nakajima, Kazuki; Kinoshita, Mitsuhiro; Oda, Yasuo; Masuko, Takashi; Kaku, Hanae; Shibuya, Naoto; Kakehi, Kazuaki

    2004-09-01

    We developed capillary affinity electrophoresis (CAE) to analyze the molecular interaction between carbohydrate chains and proteins in solution state. A mixture of oligosaccharides derived from a glycoprotein was labeled with 8-aminopyrene-1,3,6-trisulfonate (APTS), and used as glycan library without isolation. Interaction of a carbohydrate-binding protein with each oligosaccharide in the mixture could be simultaneously observed, and relative affinities of oligosaccharides toward the protein were accurately determined. In this study, we applied CAE to detect the presence of lectins in some plants (Japanese elderberry bark and tulip bulb). In the crude extract of the elderberry bark, binding activity toward sialo-carbohydrate chains could be easily detected. We also examined the presence of lectins in the crude extract of tulip bulbs and determined the detailed carbohydrate-binding specificity of Tulipa gesneriana agglutinin (TGA), one of the lectins from tulip bulbs. Kinetic studies demonstrated that TGA showed novel carbohydrate-binding specificity and preferentially recognized triantennary oligosaccharides with Gal residues at nonreducing termini and a Fuc residue linked through alpha(1-6) linkage at chitobiose portion of the reducing termini but not tetraantennary carbohydrates. The results described here indicate that CAE will be a valuable method for both screening of lectins in natural sources and determination of their detailed carbohydrate-binding specificities.

  14. Dietary nutrient levels regulate protein and carbohydrate intake, gluconeogenic/glycolytic flux and blood trehalose level in the insect Manduca sexta L.

    PubMed

    Thompson, S N; Borchardt, D B; Wang, L-W

    2003-03-01

    This study examined the effects of dietary casein and sucrose levels on nutrient intake, and distinguished the effects of carbohydrate and protein consumption on growth, fat content, pyruvate metabolism and blood trehalose level of 5th instar Manduca sexta larvae. Growth increased with increasing casein consumption but was unaffected by carbohydrate intake. Fat content also increased with carbohydrate consumption, but on carbohydrate-free diets fat content increased with increased protein consumption. Blood trehalose level and pyruvate metabolism were examined by nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy analysis of blood following administration of (3-(13)C)pyruvate. On diets containing sucrose, blood trehalose increased with increasing carbohydrate intake, and on most diets trehalose was synthesized entirely from dietary sucrose. Pyruvate cycling, indicated by the alanine C2/C3 (13)C enrichment ratio, increased with carbohydrate consumption reflecting increased glycolysis, and pyruvate decarboxylation exceeded carboxylation on all sucrose diets. Larvae that consumed <75 mg/day sucrose were gluconeogenic, based on the [2 (trehalose C6)(Glx C3/C2)]/alanine C2] (13)C enrichment ratio. On carbohydrate-free diets, blood trehalose levels were low and maintained entirely by gluconeogenesis. Blood trehalose level increased with increasing protein intake. Pyruvate cycling was very low, although many insects displayed higher levels of pyruvate decarboxylation than carboxylation. All gluconeogenic larvae displayed alanine (13)C enrichment ratios <0.35 and had blood trehalose levels <50 mM.

  15. Exploring the free-energy landscape of carbohydrate-protein complexes: development and validation of scoring functions considering the binding-site topology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eid, Sameh; Saleh, Noureldin; Zalewski, Adam; Vedani, Angelo

    2014-12-01

    Carbohydrates play a key role in a variety of physiological and pathological processes and, hence, represent a rich source for the development of novel therapeutic agents. Being able to predict binding mode and binding affinity is an essential, yet lacking, aspect of the structure-based design of carbohydrate-based ligands. We assembled a diverse data set comprising 273 carbohydrate-protein crystal structures with known binding affinity and evaluated the prediction accuracy of a large collection of well-established scoring and free-energy functions, as well as combinations thereof. Unfortunately, the tested functions were not capable of reproducing binding affinities in the studied complexes. To simplify the complex free-energy surface of carbohydrate-protein systems, we classified the studied proteins according to the topology and solvent exposure of the carbohydrate-binding site into five distinct categories. A free-energy model based on the proposed classification scheme reproduced binding affinities in the carbohydrate data set with an r 2 of 0.71 and root-mean-squared-error of 1.25 kcal/mol ( N = 236). The improvement in model performance underlines the significance of the differences in the local micro-environments of carbohydrate-binding sites and demonstrates the usefulness of calibrating free-energy functions individually according to binding-site topology and solvent exposure.

  16. Fabrication of hydrophobic polymer foams with double acid sites on surface of macropore for conversion of carbohydrate.

    PubMed

    Pan, Jianming; Mao, Yanli; Gao, Heping; Xiong, Qingang; Qiu, Fengxian; Zhang, Tao; Niu, Xiangheng

    2016-06-05

    Herein we reported a simple and novel synthetic strategy for the fabrication of two kinds of hydrophobic polymer foam catalysts (i.e. Cr(3+)-HPFs-1-H(+) and HPFs-1-H(+)) with hierarchical porous structure, inhomogeneous acidic composition and Lewis-Brønsted double acid sites distributed on the surface, which was used to one-pot conversion of carbohydrate (such as cellulose, glucose and fructose) to a key chemical platform (i.e. 5-hydroxymethylfurfural, HMF). The water-in-oil (W/O) high internal phase emulsions (HIPEs), stabilized by both Span 80 and acidic prepolymers as analogous particles offered the acidic actives, were used as the template for simultaneous polymerization of oil phase in the presence of divinylbenzene (DVB) and styrene (St). After subsequent ion-exchange process, Lewis and Brønsted acid sites derived from exchanged Cr(3+) and H(+) ion were both fixed on the surface of cell of the catalysts. The HPFs-1-H(+) and Cr(3+)-HPFs-1-H(+) had similar hierarchical porous, hydrophobic surface and acid sites (HPFs-1-H(+) with macropores ranging from 0.1 μm to 20 μm, uniform mesopores in 14.4 nm, water contact angle of 122° and 0.614 mmolg(-1) of Brønsted acid sites, as well as Cr(3+)-HPFs-1-H(+) with macropores ranging from 0.1 μm to 20 μm, uniform mesopores in 13.3 nm, water contact angle of 136° and 0.638 mmolg(-1) of Lewis-Brønsted acid sites). It was confirmed that Lewis acid sites of catalyst had a slight influence on the HMF yield of fructose came from the function of Brønsted acid sites, and Lewis acid sites were in favor of improving the HMF yield from cellulose and glucose. This work opens up a simple and novel route to synthesize multifunctional polymeric catalysts for efficient one-pot conversion of carbohydrate to HMF.

  17. The Potential of a High Protein-Low Carbohydrate Diet to Preserve Intrahepatic Triglyceride Content in Healthy Humans

    PubMed Central

    Martens, Eveline A.; Gatta-Cherifi, Blandine; Gonnissen, Hanne K.; Westerterp-Plantenga, Margriet S.

    2014-01-01

    Background Protein supplementation has been shown to reduce the increases in intrahepatic triglyceride (IHTG) content induced by acute hypercaloric high-fat and high-fructose diets in humans. Objective To assess the effect of a 12-wk iso-energetic high protein-low carbohydrate (HPLC) diet compared with an iso-energetic high carbohydrate-low protein (HCLP) diet on IHTG content in healthy non-obese subjects, at a constant body weight. Design Seven men and nine women [mean ± SD age: 24±5 y; BMI: 22.9±2.1 kg/m2] were randomly allocated to a HPLC [30/35/35% of energy (En%) from protein/carbohydrate/fat] or a HCLP (5/60/35 En%) diet by stratification on sex, age and BMI. Dietary guidelines were prescribed based on individual daily energy requirements. IHTG content was measured by 1H-magnetic resonance spectroscopy before and after the dietary intervention. Results IHTG content changed in different directions with the HPLC (CH2H2O: 0.23±0.17 to 0.20±0.10; IHTG%: 0.25±0.20% to 0.22±0.11%) compared with the HCLP diet (CH2H2O: 0.34±0.20 vs. 0.38±0.21; IHTG%: 0.38±0.22% vs. 0.43±0.24%), which resulted in a lower IHTG content in the HPLC compared with the HCLP diet group after 12 weeks, which almost reached statistical significance (P = 0.055). Conclusions A HPLC vs. a HCLP diet has the potential to preserve vs. enlarge IHTG content in healthy non-obese subjects at a constant body weight. Trial Registration Clinicaltrials.gov NCT01551238 PMID:25330327

  18. Penicillium purpurogenum produces a family 1 acetyl xylan esterase containing a carbohydrate-binding module: characterization of the protein and its gene.

    PubMed

    Gordillo, Felipe; Caputo, Valentina; Peirano, Alessandra; Chavez, Renato; Van Beeumen, Jozef; Vandenberghe, Isabel; Claeyssens, Marc; Bull, Paulina; Ravanal, María Cristina; Eyzaguirre, Jaime

    2006-10-01

    At least three acetyl xylan esterases (AXE I, II and III) are secreted by Penicillium purpurogenum. This publication describes more detailed work on AXE I and its gene. AXE I binds cellulose but not xylan; it is glycosylated and inactivated by phenylmethylsulphonyl fluoride, showing that it is a serine esterase. The axe1 gene presents an open reading frame of 1278 bp, including two introns of 68 and 61 bp; it codes for a signal peptide of 31 residues and a mature protein of 351 amino acids (molecular weight 36,693). AXE I has a modular structure: a catalytic module at the amino terminus belonging to family 1 of the carbohydrate esterases, a linker rich in serines and threonines, and a family 1 carboxy terminal carbohydrate binding module (CBM). The CBM is similar to that of AXE from Trichoderma reesei, (with a family 5 catalytic module) indicating that the genes for catalytic modules and CBMs have evolved separately, and that they have been linked by gene fusion. The promoter sequence of axe1 contains several putative sequences for binding of gene expression regulators also found in other family 1 esterase gene promoters. It is proposed that AXE I and II act in succession in xylan degradation; first, xylan is attacked by AXE I and other xylanases possessing CBMs (which facilitate binding to lignocellulose), followed by other enzymes acting mainly on soluble substrates.

  19. The role of the glucose-sensing transcription factor carbohydrate-responsive element-binding protein pathway in termite queen fertility

    PubMed Central

    Sillam-Dussès, David; Hanus, Robert; Poulsen, Michael; Roy, Virginie; Favier, Maryline

    2016-01-01

    Termites are among the few animals that themselves can digest the most abundant organic polymer, cellulose, into glucose. In mice and Drosophila, glucose can activate genes via the transcription factor carbohydrate-responsive element-binding protein (ChREBP) to induce glucose utilization and de novo lipogenesis. Here, we identify a termite orthologue of ChREBP and its downstream lipogenic targets, including acetyl-CoA carboxylase and fatty acid synthase. We show that all of these genes, including ChREBP, are upregulated in mature queens compared with kings, sterile workers and soldiers in eight different termite species. ChREBP is expressed in several tissues, including ovaries and fat bodies, and increases in expression in totipotent workers during their differentiation into neotenic mature queens. We further show that ChREBP is regulated by a carbohydrate diet in termite queens. Suppression of the lipogenic pathway by a pharmacological agent in queens elicits the same behavioural alterations in sterile workers as observed in queenless colonies, supporting that the ChREBP pathway partakes in the biosynthesis of semiochemicals that convey the signal of the presence of a fertile queen. Our results highlight ChREBP as a likely key factor for the regulation and signalling of queen fertility. PMID:27249798

  20. Screening Carbohydrate Libraries for Protein Interactions Using the Direct ESI-MS Assay. Applications to Libraries of Unknown Concentration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kitova, Elena N.; El-Hawiet, Amr; Klassen, John S.

    2014-08-01

    A semiquantitative electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) binding assay suitable for analyzing mixtures of oligosaccharides, at unknown concentrations, for interactions with target proteins is described. The assay relies on the differences in the ratio of the relative abundances of the ligand-bound and free protein ions measured by ESI-MS at two or more initial protein concentrations to distinguish low affinity (≤103 M-1) ligands from moderate and high affinity (>105 M-1) ligands present in the library and to rank their affinities. Control experiments were performed on solutions of a single chain antibody and a mixture of synthetic oligosaccharides, with known affinities, in the absence and presence of a 40-component carbohydrate library to demonstrate the implementation and reliability of the assay. The application of the assay for screening natural libraries of carbohydrates against proteins is also demonstrated using mixtures of human milk oligosaccharides, isolated from breast milk, and fragments of a bacterial toxin and human galectin 3.

  1. The cell surface protein Ag43 facilitates phage infection of Escherichia coli in the presence of bile salts and carbohydrates.

    PubMed

    Gabig, Magdalena; Herman-Antosiewicz, Anna; Kwiatkowska, Marta; Los, Marcin; Thomas, Mark S; Wegrzyn, Grzegorz

    2002-05-01

    It was found that infection of Escherichia coli by bacteriophage lambda is inhibited in the presence of certain bile salts and carbohydrates when cells are in the "OFF" state for production of the phase-variable cell surface protein antigen 43 (Ag43). The inhibition of phage growth was found to be due to a significant impairment in the process of phage adsorption. Expression of the gene encoding Ag43 (agn43) from a plasmid or inactivation of the oxyR gene (encoding an activator of genes important for defence against oxidative stress) suppressed this inhibition. A mutation, rpoA341, in the gene encoding the alpha subunit of RNA polymerase also facilitated phage adsorption in the presence of bile salts and carbohydrates. The rpoA341 mutation promoted efficient production of Ag43 in a genetic background that would otherwise be in the "OFF" phase for expression of the agn43 gene. Analysis of a reporter gene fusion demonstrated that the promoter for the agn43 gene was more active in the rpoA341 mutant than in the otherwise isogenic rpoA(+) strain. The combined inhibitory action of bile salts and carbohydrates on phage adsorption and the abolition of this inhibition by production of Ag43 was not restricted to lambda, as a similar phenomenon was observed for the coliphages P1 and T4.

  2. Proteins and Carbohydrates from Red Seaweeds: Evidence for Beneficial Effects on Gut Function and Microbiota.

    PubMed

    Cian, Raúl E; Drago, Silvina R; de Medina, Fermín Sánchez; Martínez-Augustin, Olga

    2015-08-20

    Based on their composition, marine algae, and namely red seaweeds, are good potential functional foods. Intestinal mucosal barrier function refers to the capacity of the intestine to provide adequate containment of luminal microorganisms and molecules. Here, we will first outline the component of seaweeds and will summarize the effects of these on the regulation of mucosal barrier function. Special attention will be paid to unique components of red seaweeds: proteins and derived peptides (e.g., phycobiliproteins, glycoproteins that contain "cellulose binding domains", phycolectins and the related mycosporine-like amino acids) together with polysaccharides (e.g., floridean starch and sulfated galactans, such as carrageenans, agarans and "dl-hybrid") and minerals. These compounds have been shown to exert prebiotic effects, to regulate intestinal epithelial cell, macrophage and lymphocyte proliferation and differentiation and to modulate the immune response. Molecular mechanisms of action of peptides and polysaccharides are starting to be elucidated, and evidence indicating the involvement of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), insulin-like growth factor receptor (IGFR), Toll-like receptors (TLR) and signal transduction pathways mediated by protein kinase B (PKB or AKT), nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) and mitogen activated protein kinases (MAPK) will also be summarized. The need for further research is clear, but in vivo experiments point to an overall antiinflammatory effect of these algae, indicating that they can reinforce membrane barrier function.

  3. Proteins and Carbohydrates from Red Seaweeds: Evidence for Beneficial Effects on Gut Function and Microbiota

    PubMed Central

    Cian, Raúl E.; Drago, Silvina R.; Sánchez de Medina, Fermín; Martínez-Augustin, Olga

    2015-01-01

    Based on their composition, marine algae, and namely red seaweeds, are good potential functional foods. Intestinal mucosal barrier function refers to the capacity of the intestine to provide adequate containment of luminal microorganisms and molecules. Here, we will first outline the component of seaweeds and will summarize the effects of these on the regulation of mucosal barrier function. Special attention will be paid to unique components of red seaweeds: proteins and derived peptides (e.g., phycobiliproteins, glycoproteins that contain “cellulose binding domains”, phycolectins and the related mycosporine-like amino acids) together with polysaccharides (e.g., floridean starch and sulfated galactans, such as carrageenans, agarans and “dl-hybrid”) and minerals. These compounds have been shown to exert prebiotic effects, to regulate intestinal epithelial cell, macrophage and lymphocyte proliferation and differentiation and to modulate the immune response. Molecular mechanisms of action of peptides and polysaccharides are starting to be elucidated, and evidence indicating the involvement of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), insulin-like growth factor receptor (IGFR), Toll-like receptors (TLR) and signal transduction pathways mediated by protein kinase B (PKB or AKT), nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) and mitogen activated protein kinases (MAPK) will also be summarized. The need for further research is clear, but in vivo experiments point to an overall antiinflammatory effect of these algae, indicating that they can reinforce membrane barrier function. PMID:26308006

  4. Regioselective, borinic acid-catalyzed monoacylation, sulfonylation and alkylation of diols and carbohydrates: expansion of substrate scope and mechanistic studies.

    PubMed

    Lee, Doris; Williamson, Caitlin L; Chan, Lina; Taylor, Mark S

    2012-05-16

    Synthetic and mechanistic aspects of the diarylborinic acid-catalyzed regioselective monofunctionalization of 1,2- and 1,3-diols are presented. Diarylborinic acid catalysis is shown to be an efficient and general method for monotosylation of pyranoside derivatives bearing three secondary hydroxyl groups (7 examples, 88% average yield). In addition, the scope of the selective acylation, sulfonylation, and alkylation is extended to 1,2- and 1,3-diols not derived from carbohydrates (28 examples); the efficiency, generality, and operational simplicity of this method are competitive with those of state-of-the-art protocols including the broadly applied organotin-catalyzed or -mediated reactions. Mechanistic details of the organoboron-catalyzed processes are explored using competition experiments, kinetics, and catalyst structure-activity relationships. These experiments are consistent with a mechanism in which a tetracoordinate borinate complex reacts with the electrophilic species in the turnover-limiting step of the catalytic cycle.

  5. Carbohydrates in Supramolecular Chemistry.

    PubMed

    Delbianco, Martina; Bharate, Priya; Varela-Aramburu, Silvia; Seeberger, Peter H

    2016-02-24

    Carbohydrates are involved in a variety of biological processes. The ability of sugars to form a large number of hydrogen bonds has made them important components for supramolecular chemistry. We discuss recent advances in the use of carbohydrates in supramolecular chemistry and reveal that carbohydrates are useful building blocks for the stabilization of complex architectures. Systems are presented according to the scaffold that supports the glyco-conjugate: organic macrocycles, dendrimers, nanomaterials, and polymers are considered. Glyco-conjugates can form host-guest complexes, and can self-assemble by using carbohydrate-carbohydrate interactions and other weak interactions such as π-π interactions. Finally, complex supramolecular architectures based on carbohydrate-protein interactions are discussed.

  6. Effects of protein level, methionine supplementation and carbohydrate type of the diet on liver lipid and plasma free threonine contents in the lactating rat.

    PubMed

    Leclerc, J; Chanussot, B; Miller, M L; Poisson, J P; Belleville, J

    1989-01-01

    Eight groups of 13-15 female rats were fed purified diets after littering. Four groups received a low protein (8% casein) diet (groups 8) and the others, a normal protein (20% casein) diet (groups 20). Carbohydrates were supplied either as starch (groups S) or as starch plus 40% fructose (groups F). Half the animals received a 0.4% methionine supplementation (groups M). Four or five dams per group were sacrificed on days 2, 7 and 14 after littering. The diet intake was increased by methionine supplementation, substitution of starch for fructose and increased protein content, mainly during the second week of lactation. This influenced weight variation of the dams and litter growth. On all days, the plasma levels of cholesterol esters, triglycerides and phospholipids were positively correlated with the dietary protein level. On days 7 and 14, the liver neutral lipid content was increased in rats fed the low protein diets supplemented with methionine (groups 8SM and 8FM) and the normal protein diets containing 40% fructose (groups 20F and 20FM). The plasma free threonine content was positively correlated with the protein level in the diet. On day 14, rats fed a low protein diet had a threonine deficiency, except those in groups 8S and 8F. The plasma free threonine content of these rats was not reduced, possibly due to an impaired utilization of this amino acid. The liver lipidosis observed during lactation, in contrast to that observed during growth with a low protein diet, was not due to a threonine deficiency.

  7. Effect of low-fat, high-carbohydrate, high-fiber diet on fecal bile acids and neutral sterols.

    PubMed

    Reddy, B S; Engle, A; Simi, B; O'Brien, L T; Barnard, R J; Pritikin, N; Wynder, E L

    1988-07-01

    The effect of a diet low in total fat and high in complex carbohydrates on the excretion of bile acids and neutral sterols and on serum lipids was studied in women, 46-47 years old, who were consuming a mixed Western diet. Participants kept an initial 3-day food record while consuming their normal diet (pre-diet period). During the dietary intervention period (experimental diet) which lasted for 26 days, all volunteers consumed a low-calorie, low-fat (less than 10% of total calories), high-fiber (37 g/day, high-carbohydrate diet. At the 1-year follow-up, the participants completed another 3-day food record, which indicates that these volunteers maintained their caloric and fat intake at levels slightly higher than the experimental diet, but lower than the pre-diet period. Individual 24-hr fecal samples for 2 days and blood samples were collected from the volunteers during each dietary period. Fecal samples were analyzed for neutral sterols and bile acids, and blood samples were analyzed to ascertain cholesterol and triglyceride levels. There were no significant differences in the excretion of neutral sterols between the dietary periods. Fecal secondary bile acids were significantly lower during the experimental and follow-up diet periods compared with the pre-test diet period. Serum cholesterol levels were significantly lower during the experimental and follow-up diet periods than during the pre-test diet period. These results suggest that switching from a high-fat, low-fiber diet to a low-fat, high-fiber diet can reduce the excretion of bile acids which are thought to be involved in the promotion of colon cancer.

  8. Protein:carbohydrate ratios explain life span patterns found in Queensland fruit fly on diets varying in yeast:sugar ratios.

    PubMed

    Fanson, Benjamin G; Taylor, Phillip W

    2012-12-01

    Dietary restriction extends life span across a vast diversity of taxa, but significant challenges remain in elucidating the underlying mechanisms. Distinguishing between caloric and nutrient effects is an essential step. Recent studies with Drosophila and tephritid fruit flies have reported increased life span as dietary yeast-to-sugar ratios decreased and these effects have been attributed to changes in protein-to-carbohydrate (P:C) ratios of the diets rather than calories. However, yeast is a complex mix of macronutrients and micronutrients, and hence changes in yeast content of the diet necessarily alters other nutrients in lockstep. To explicitly test whether studies using yeast are justified in attributing results to diet protein content rather than correlated nutrients, we developed a chemically defined diet allowing manipulation of just the ratio of protein (free amino acids) to carbohydrate (sucrose) levels of diets while holding other nutrients constant. Mated, female Queensland fruit flies (Q-flies) were fed 1 of 18 diets varying in P:C ratios and diet concentration. Diet consumption, egg production, and life span were recorded for each fly. In close concordance with recent studies using yeast diets, flies had increased life span as P:C ratios decreased, and caloric restriction did not extend life span. Similarly, egg production was maximized on high P:C ratios, but lifetime egg production was maximized on intermediate P:C ratios, indicating a life history trade-off between life span and egg production rate. Finally, Q-flies adjusted their diet intake in response to P:C ratios and diet concentration. Our results substantiate recent claims that P:C ratios significantly modulate life span in flies.

  9. A functional glycoprotein competitive recognition and signal amplification strategy for carbohydrate-protein interaction profiling and cell surface carbohydrate expression evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yangzhong; Chen, Zhuhai; Liu, Yang; Li, Jinghong

    2013-07-01

    A simple and sensitive carbohydrate biosensor has been suggested as a potential tool for accurate analysis of cell surface carbohydrate expression as well as carbohydrate-based therapeutics for a variety of diseases and infections. In this work, a sensitive biosensor for carbohydrate-lectin profiling and in situ cell surface carbohydrate expression was designed by taking advantage of a functional glycoprotein of glucose oxidase acting as both a multivalent recognition unit and a signal amplification probe. Combining the gold nanoparticle catalyzed luminol electrogenerated chemiluminescence and nanocarrier for active biomolecules, the number of cell surface carbohydrate groups could be conveniently read out. The apparent dissociation constant between GOx@Au probes and Con A was detected to be 1.64 nM and was approximately 5 orders of magnitude smaller than that of mannose and Con A, which would arise from the multivalent effect between the probe and Con A. Both glycoproteins and gold nanoparticles contribute to the high affinity between carbohydrates and lectin. The as-proposed biosensor exhibits excellent analytical performance towards the cytosensing of K562 cells with a detection limit of 18 cells, and the mannose moieties on a single K562 cell were determined to be 1.8 × 1010. The biosensor can also act as a useful tool for antibacterial drug screening and mechanism investigation. This strategy integrates the excellent biocompatibility and multivalent recognition of glycoproteins as well as the significant enzymatic catalysis and gold nanoparticle signal amplification, and avoids the cell pretreatment and labelling process. This would contribute to the glycomic analysis and the understanding of complex native glycan-related biological processes.A simple and sensitive carbohydrate biosensor has been suggested as a potential tool for accurate analysis of cell surface carbohydrate expression as well as carbohydrate-based therapeutics for a variety of diseases and

  10. Carbohydrate Dehydration Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dolson, David A.; And Others

    1995-01-01

    Discusses the impact of various factors on the "charring reaction" of a carbohydrate with concentrated sulfuric acid including the type of sugar, the degree of fineness of the sugar crystals, and the amount of water added. (JRH)

  11. SLC27 fatty acid transport proteins.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Courtney M; Stahl, Andreas

    2013-01-01

    The uptake and metabolism of long chain fatty acids (LCFA) are critical to many physiological and cellular processes. Aberrant accumulation or depletion of LCFA underlie the pathology of numerous metabolic diseases. Protein-mediated transport of LCFA has been proposed as the major mode of LCFA uptake and activation. Several proteins have been identified to be involved in LCFA uptake. This review focuses on the SLC27 family of fatty acid transport proteins, also known as FATPs, with an emphasis on the gain- and loss-of-function animal models that elucidate the functions of FATPs in vivo and how these transport proteins play a role in physiological and pathological situations.

  12. Production and applications of carbohydrate-derived sugar acids as generic biobased chemicals.

    PubMed

    Mehtiö, Tuomas; Toivari, Mervi; Wiebe, Marilyn G; Harlin, Ali; Penttilä, Merja; Koivula, Anu

    2016-10-01

    This review considers the chemical and biotechnological synthesis of acids that are obtained by direct oxidation of mono- or oligosaccharide, referred to as sugar acids. It focuses on sugar acids which can be readily derived from plant biomass sources and their current and future applications. The three main classes of sugar acids are aldonic, aldaric and uronic acids. Interest in organic acids derived from sugars has recently increased, as part of the interest to develop biorefineries which produce not only biofuels, but also chemicals to replace those currently derived from petroleum. More than half of the most desirable biologically produced platform chemicals are organic acids. Currently, the only sugar acid with high commercial production is d-gluconic acid. However, other sugar acids such as d-glucaric and meso-galactaric acids are being produced at a lower scale. The sugar acids have application as sequestering agents and binders, corrosion inhibitors, biodegradable chelators for pharmaceuticals and pH regulators. There is also considerable interest in the use of these molecules in the production of synthetic polymers, including polyamides, polyesters and hydrogels. Further development of these sugar acids will lead to higher volume production of the appropriate sugar acids and will help support the next generation of biorefineries.

  13. Ferulic Acid Alleviates Changes in a Rat Model of Metabolic Syndrome Induced by High-Carbohydrate, High-Fat Diet.

    PubMed

    Senaphan, Ketmanee; Kukongviriyapan, Upa; Sangartit, Weerapon; Pakdeechote, Poungrat; Pannangpetch, Patchareewan; Prachaney, Parichat; Greenwald, Stephen E; Kukongviriyapan, Veerapol

    2015-08-04

    Metabolic syndrome is a cluster of metabolic abnormalities characterized by obesity, insulin resistance, hypertension and dyslipidemia. Ferulic acid (FA) is the major phenolic compound found in rice oil and various fruits and vegetables. In this study, we examined the beneficial effects of FA in minimizing insulin resistance, vascular dysfunction and remodeling in a rat model of high-carbohydrate, high-fat diet-induced metabolic changes, which is regarded as an analogue of metabolic syndrome (MS) in man. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were fed a high carbohydrate, high fat (HCHF) diet and 15% fructose in drinking water for 16 weeks, where control rats were fed with standard chow diet and tap water. FA (30 or 60 mg/kg) was orally administered to the HCHF and control rats during the last six weeks of the study. We observed that FA significantly improved insulin sensitivity and lipid profiles, and reduced elevated blood pressure, compared to untreated controls (p < 0.05). Moreover, FA also improved vascular function and prevented vascular remodeling of mesenteric arteries. The effects of FA in HCHF-induced MS may be realized through suppression of oxidative stress by down-regulation of p47phox, increased nitric oxide (NO) bioavailability with up-regulation of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) and suppression of tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α). Our results suggest that supplementation of FA may have health benefits by minimizing the cardiovascular complications of MS and alleviating its symptoms.

  14. Proteomics Profiling Reveals Carbohydrate Metabolic Enzymes and 14-3-3 Proteins Play Important Roles for Starch Accumulation during Cassava Root Tuberization.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xuchu; Chang, Lili; Tong, Zheng; Wang, Dongyang; Yin, Qi; Wang, Dan; Jin, Xiang; Yang, Qian; Wang, Liming; Sun, Yong; Huang, Qixing; Guo, Anping; Peng, Ming

    2016-01-21

    Cassava is one of the most important root crops as a reliable source of food and carbohydrates. Carbohydrate metabolism and starch accumulation in cassava storage root is a cascade process that includes large amounts of proteins and cofactors. Here, comparative proteomics were conducted in cassava root at nine developmental stages. A total of 154 identified proteins were found to be differentially expressed during starch accumulation and root tuberization. Many enzymes involved in starch and sucrose metabolism were significantly up-regulated, and functional classification of the differentially expressed proteins demonstrated that the majority were binding-related enzymes. Many proteins were took part in carbohydrate metabolism to produce energy. Among them, three 14-3-3 isoforms were induced to be clearly phosphorylated during storage root enlargement. Overexpression of a cassava 14-3-3 gene in Arabidopsis thaliana confirmed that the older leaves of these transgenic plants contained higher sugar and starch contents than the wild-type leaves. The 14-3-3 proteins and their binding enzymes may play important roles in carbohydrate metabolism and starch accumulation during cassava root tuberization. These results not only deepened our understanding of the tuberous root proteome, but also uncovered new insights into carbohydrate metabolism and starch accumulation during cassava root enlargement.

  15. Proteomics Profiling Reveals Carbohydrate Metabolic Enzymes and 14-3-3 Proteins Play Important Roles for Starch Accumulation during Cassava Root Tuberization

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xuchu; Chang, Lili; Tong, Zheng; Wang, Dongyang; Yin, Qi; Wang, Dan; Jin, Xiang; Yang, Qian; Wang, Liming; Sun, Yong; Huang, Qixing; Guo, Anping; Peng, Ming

    2016-01-01

    Cassava is one of the most important root crops as a reliable source of food and carbohydrates. Carbohydrate metabolism and starch accumulation in cassava storage root is a cascade process that includes large amounts of proteins and cofactors. Here, comparative proteomics were conducted in cassava root at nine developmental stages. A total of 154 identified proteins were found to be differentially expressed during starch accumulation and root tuberization. Many enzymes involved in starch and sucrose metabolism were significantly up-regulated, and functional classification of the differentially expressed proteins demonstrated that the majority were binding-related enzymes. Many proteins were took part in carbohydrate metabolism to produce energy. Among them, three 14-3-3 isoforms were induced to be clearly phosphorylated during storage root enlargement. Overexpression of a cassava 14-3-3 gene in Arabidopsis thaliana confirmed that the older leaves of these transgenic plants contained higher sugar and starch contents than the wild-type leaves. The 14-3-3 proteins and their binding enzymes may play important roles in carbohydrate metabolism and starch accumulation during cassava root tuberization. These results not only deepened our understanding of the tuberous root proteome, but also uncovered new insights into carbohydrate metabolism and starch accumulation during cassava root enlargement. PMID:26791570

  16. Towards a synthesis of frameworks in nutritional ecology: interacting effects of protein, carbohydrate and phosphorus on field cricket fitness.

    PubMed

    Harrison, Sarah J; Raubenheimer, David; Simpson, Stephen J; Godin, Jean-Guy J; Bertram, Susan M

    2014-10-07

    Phosphorus has been identified as an important determinant of nutrition-related biological variation. The macronutrients protein (P) and carbohydrates (C), both alone and interactively, are known to affect animal performance. No study, however, has investigated the importance of phosphorus relative to dietary protein or carbohydrates, or the interactive effects of phosphorus with these macronutrients, on fitness-related traits in animals. We used a nutritional geometry framework to address this question in adult field crickets (Gryllus veletis). Our results showed that lifespan, weight gain, acoustic mate signalling and egg production were maximized on diets with different P : C ratios, that phosphorus did not positively affect any of these fitness traits, and that males and females had different optimal macronutrient intake ratios for reproductive performance. When given a choice, crickets selected diets that maximized both lifespan and reproductive performance by preferentially eating diets with low P : C ratios, and females selected diets with a higher P : C ratio than males. Conversely, phosphorus intake was not regulated. Overall, our findings highlight the importance of disentangling the influences of different nutrients, and of quantifying both their individual and interactive effects, on animal fitness traits, so as to gain a more integrative understanding of their nutritional ecology.

  17. Towards a synthesis of frameworks in nutritional ecology: interacting effects of protein, carbohydrate and phosphorus on field cricket fitness

    PubMed Central

    Harrison, Sarah J.; Raubenheimer, David; Simpson, Stephen J.; Godin, Jean-Guy J.; Bertram, Susan M.

    2014-01-01

    Phosphorus has been identified as an important determinant of nutrition-related biological variation. The macronutrients protein (P) and carbohydrates (C), both alone and interactively, are known to affect animal performance. No study, however, has investigated the importance of phosphorus relative to dietary protein or carbohydrates, or the interactive effects of phosphorus with these macronutrients, on fitness-related traits in animals. We used a nutritional geometry framework to address this question in adult field crickets (Gryllus veletis). Our results showed that lifespan, weight gain, acoustic mate signalling and egg production were maximized on diets with different P : C ratios, that phosphorus did not positively affect any of these fitness traits, and that males and females had different optimal macronutrient intake ratios for reproductive performance. When given a choice, crickets selected diets that maximized both lifespan and reproductive performance by preferentially eating diets with low P : C ratios, and females selected diets with a higher P : C ratio than males. Conversely, phosphorus intake was not regulated. Overall, our findings highlight the importance of disentangling the influences of different nutrients, and of quantifying both their individual and interactive effects, on animal fitness traits, so as to gain a more integrative understanding of their nutritional ecology. PMID:25143029

  18. Lower Protein-to-Carbohydrate Ratio in Maternal Diet is Associated with Higher Childhood Systolic Blood Pressure up to Age Four Years

    PubMed Central

    Blumfield, Michelle L.; Nowson, Caryl; Hure, Alexis J.; Smith, Roger; Simpson, Stephen J.; Raubenheimer, David; MacDonald-Wicks, Lesley; Collins, Clare E.

    2015-01-01

    The prenatal environment can influence development of offspring blood pressure (BP), which tracks into adulthood. This prospective longitudinal study investigated whether maternal pregnancy dietary intake is associated with the development of child BP up to age four years. Data are from 129 mother-child dyads enrolled in the Women and Their Children’s Health study. Maternal diet was assessed using a validated 74-item food frequency questionnaire at 18 to 24 weeks and 36 to 40 weeks, with a reference period of the previous three months. Child systolic and diastolic BP were measured at 3, 6, 9, 12, 24, 36 and 48 months, using an automated BP monitor. Using mixed-model regression analyses adjusted for childhood growth indices, pregnancy intakes of percentage of energy (E%) polyunsaturated fat (β coefficient 0.73; 95% CI 0.003, 1.45; p = 0.045), E% omega-6 fatty acids (β coefficient 0.89; 95% CI 0.09, 1.69; p = 0.03) and protein-to-carbohydrate (P:C) ratio (β coefficient −14.14; 95% CI −27.68, −0.60; p = 0.04) were associated with child systolic BP trajectory up to 4 years. Child systolic BP was greatest at low proportions of dietary protein (<16% of energy) and high carbohydrate (>40% of energy) intakes. There may be an ideal maternal macronutrient ratio associated with optimal infant BP. Maternal diet, which is potentially modifiable, may play an important role in influencing offspring risk of future hypertension. PMID:25919307

  19. Investigation of carbohydrate and protein metabolism in the digestive organs of the rabbit under the combined influence of vibration, acceleration and irradiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yuy, R. I.

    1975-01-01

    During spaceflight, the organism is subjected to the influence of various extremal factors such as acceleration, vibration, irradiation, etc. The study of the influence of these factors on metabolism, especially carbohydrate and protein metabolism, in young rabbits is of great significance in simulation experiments. Dynamic factors and irradiation, depending on dose and duration, lead to reduced RNA and protein metabolism.

  20. Effects of carbohydrate, branched-chain amino acids, and arginine in recovery period on the subsequent performance in wrestlers

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Many athletes need to participate in multiple events in a single day. The efficient post-exercise glycogen recovery may be critical for the performance in subsequent exercise. This study examined whether post-exercise carbohydrate supplementation could restore the performance in the subsequent simulated wrestling match. The effect of branched-chain amino acids and arginine on glucose disposal and performance was also investigated. Nine well-trained male wrestlers participated in 3 trials in a random order. Each trial contained 3 matches with a 1-hr rest between match 1 and 2, and a 2-hr rest between match 2 and 3. Each match contained 3 exercise periods interspersed with 1-min rests. The subjects alternated 10-s all-out sprints and 20-s rests in each exercise period. At the end of match 2, 3 different supplementations were consumed: 1.2 g/kg glucose (CHO trial), 1 g/kg glucose + 0.1 g/kg Arg + 0.1 g/kg BCAA (CHO+AA trial), or water (placebo trial). The peak and average power in the 3 matches was similar in the 3 trials. After the supplementation, CHO and CHO+AA trial showed significantly higher glucose and insulin, and lower glycerol and non-esterified fatty acid concentrations than the placebo trial. There was no significant difference in these biochemical parameters between the CHO and CHO+AA trials. Supplementation of carbohydrate with or without BCAA and arginine during the post-match period had no effect on the performance in the following simulated match in wrestlers. In addition, BCAA and arginine did not provide additional insulinemic effect. PMID:22107883

  1. Increase in the carbohydrate content of the microalgae Spirulina in culture by nutrient starvation and the addition of residues of whey protein concentrate.

    PubMed

    Vieira Salla, Ana Cláudia; Margarites, Ana Cláudia; Seibel, Fábio Ivan; Holz, Luiz Carlos; Brião, Vandré Barbosa; Bertolin, Telma Elita; Colla, Luciane Maria; Costa, Jorge Alberto Vieira

    2016-06-01

    Non-renewable sources that will end with time are the largest part of world energy consumption, which emphasizes the necessity to develop renewable sources of energy. This necessity has created opportunities for the use of microalgae as a biofuel. The use of microalgae as a feedstock source for bioethanol production requires high yields of both biomass and carbohydrates. With mixotrophic cultures, wastewater can be used to culture algae. The aim of the study was to increase the carbohydrate content in the microalgae Spirulina with the additions of residues from the ultra and nanofiltration of whey protein. The nutrient deficit in the Zarrouk medium diluted to 20% and the addition of 2.5% of both residue types led to high carbohydrate productivity (60 mg L(-1) d(-1)). With these culture conditions, the increase in carbohydrate production in Spirulina indicated that the conditions were appropriate for use with microalgae as a feedstock in the production of bioethanol.

  2. Stereoselective synthesis of light-activatable perfluorophenylazide-conjugated carbohydrates for glycoarray fabrication and evaluation of structural effects on protein binding by SPR imaging.

    PubMed

    Deng, Lingquan; Norberg, Oscar; Uppalapati, Suji; Yan, Mingdi; Ramström, Olof

    2011-05-07

    A series of light-activatable perfluorophenylazide (PFPA)-conjugated carbohydrate structures have been synthesized and applied to glycoarray fabrication. The glycoconjugates were structurally varied with respect to anomeric attachment, S-, and O-linked carbohydrates, respectively, as well as linker structure and length. Efficient stereoselective synthetic routes were developed, leading to the formation of the PFPA-conjugated structures in good yields over few steps. The use of glycosyl thiols as donors proved especially efficient and provided the final compounds in up to 70% total yield with high anomeric purities. PFPA-based photochemistry was subsequently used to generate carbohydrate arrays on a polymeric surface, and surface plasmon resonance imaging (SPRi) was applied for evaluation of carbohydrate-protein interactions using the plant lectin Concanavalin A (Con A) as a probe. The results indicate better performance and equal efficiency of S- and O-linked structures with intermediate linker length.

  3. Simultaneous analysis of carbohydrates and organic acids by HPLC-DAD-RI for monitoring goat's milk yogurts fermentation.

    PubMed

    da Costa, Marion Pereira; Frasao, Beatriz da Silva; Lima, Bruno Reis Carneiro da Costa; Rodrigues, Bruna Leal; Conte Junior, Carlos Adam

    2016-05-15

    During yogurt manufacture, the lactose fermentation and organic acid production can be used to monitor the fermentation process by starter cultures and probiotic bacteria. In the present work, a simple, sensitive and reproducible high-performance liquid chromatography with dual detectors, diode array detector and refractive index was validated by simultaneous analysis of carbohydrates and organic acids in goat milk yogurts. In addition, pH and bacterial analysis were performed. Separation of all the compounds was performed on an Aminex HPX-87H column (300×7.8 mm, 9 µm) utilizing a 3 mmol L(-1) sulfuric acid aqueous mobile phase under isocratic conditions. Lactose, glucose, galactose, citric, lactic and formic acids were used to evaluate the following performance parameters: selectivity, linearity, precision, limit of detection (LOD), limit of quantification (LOQ), decision limits (CCα), detection capabilities (CCβ), recovery and robustness. For the method application a six goat milk yogurts were elaborated: natural, probiotic, prebiotic, symbiotic, cupuassu fruit pulp, and probiotic with cupuassu fruit pulp. The validated method presented an excellent selectivity with no significant matrix effect, and a broad linear study range with coefficients of determination higher than 0.995. The relative standard deviation was lower than 10% under repeatability and within-laboratory reproducibility conditions for the studied analytes. The LOD of the method was defined from 0.001 to 0.003 µg g(-1), and the LOQ from 0.003 to 0.013 µg g(-1). The CCα was ranged from 0.032 to 0.943 µg g(-1), and the CCβ from 0.053 to 1.604 µg g(-1). The obtained recovery values were from 78% to 119%. In addition, the method exhibited an appropriate robustness for all parameter evaluated. Base in our data, it was concluded that the performance parameters demonstrated total method adequacy for the detection and quantification of carbohydrates and organic acids in goat milk yogurts. The

  4. Z-sinapinic acid: the change of the stereochemistry of cinnamic acids as rational synthesis of a new matrix for carbohydrate MALDI-MS analysis.

    PubMed

    Salum, María L; Itovich, Lucia M; Erra-Balsells, Rosa

    2013-11-01

    Successful application of matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) MS started with the introduction of efficient matrices such as cinnamic acid derivatives (i.e. 3,5-dimethoxy-4-hydroxycinnamic acid, SA; α-cyano-4-hydroxycinnamic acid). Since the empirical founding of these matrices, other commercial available cinnamic acids with different nature and location of substituents at benzene ring were attempted. Rational design and synthesis of new cinnamic acids have been recently described too. Because the presence of a rigid double bond in its molecule structure, cinnamic acids can exist as two different geometric isomers, the E-form and Z-form. Commercial available cinnamic acids currently used as matrices are the geometric isomers trans or E (E-cinnamic and trans-cinnamic acids). As a new rational design of MALDI matrices, Z-cinnamic acids were synthesized, and their properties as matrices were studied. Their performance was compared with that of the corresponding E-isomer and classical crystalline matrices (3,5-dihydroxybenzoic acid; norharmane) in the analysis of neutral/sulfated carbohydrates. Herein, we demonstrate the outstanding performance for Z-SA. Sulfated oligosaccharides were detected in negative ion mode, and the dissociation of sulfate groups was almost suppressed. Additionally, to better understand the quite different performance of each geometric isomer as matrix, the physical and morphological properties as well as the photochemical stability in solid state were studied. The influence of the E/Z photoisomerization of the matrix during MALDI was evaluated. Finally, molecular modeling (density functional theory study) of the optimized geometry and stereochemistry of E-cinnamic and Z-cinnamic acids revealed some factors governing the analyte-matrix interaction.

  5. An enzymatic bridge between carbohydrate and amino acid metabolism: regulation of glutamate dehydrogenase by reversible phosphorylation in a severe hypoxia-tolerant crayfish.

    PubMed

    Dawson, Neal J; Storey, Kenneth B

    2012-04-01

    Glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH) (EC 1.4.1.3) is a crucial enzyme involved in bridging two metabolic pathways, gating the use of glutamate for either amino acid metabolism, or carbohydrate metabolism. The present study investigated GDH from tail muscle of the freshwater crayfish Orconectes virilis exploring changes to kinetic properties, phosphorylation levels and structural stability between two forms of the enzyme (aerobic control and 20-h severe hypoxic). Evidence indicated that GDH was converted to a high phosphate form under oxygen limitation. ProQ Diamond phosphoprotein staining showed a 42% higher bound phosphate content on GDH from muscle of severely hypoxic crayfish compared with the aerobic form, and treatment of this GDH with commercial phosphatase (alkaline phosphatase), and treatments that stimulated the activities of different endogenous protein phosphatases (stimulating PP1 + PP2A, PP2B, and PP2C) yielded significant increases in the fold activation by ADP of GDH from both control and severe hypoxic conditions. By contrast, stimulation of the activities of endogenous protein kinases (AMPK, PKA or CaMK) significantly reduced the ADP fold activation from control animals. The physiological consequence of severe hypoxia-induced GDH phosphorylation may be to suppress GDH activity under low oxygen, shutting off this critical bridge point between two metabolic pathways.

  6. Mutational Insights into the Roles of Amino Acid Residues in Ligand Binding for Two Closely Related Family 16 Carbohydrate Binding Modules

    SciTech Connect

    Su, Xiaoyun; Agarwal, Vinayak; Dodd, Dylan; Bae, Brian; Mackie, Roderick I.; Nair, Satish K.; Cann, Isaac K.O.

    2010-11-22

    Carbohydrate binding modules (CBMs) are specialized proteins that bind to polysaccharides and oligosaccharides. Caldanaerobius polysaccharolyticus Man5ACBM16-1/CBM16-2 bind to glucose-, mannose-, and glucose/mannose-configured substrates. The crystal structures of the two proteins represent the only examples in CBM family 16, and studies that evaluate the roles of amino acid residues in ligand binding in this family are lacking. In this study, we probed the roles of amino acids (selected based on CBM16-1/ligand co-crystal structures) on substrate binding. Two tryptophan (Trp-20 and Trp-125) and two glutamine (Gln-81 and Gln-93) residues are shown to be critical in ligand binding. Additionally, several polar residues that flank the critical residues also contribute to ligand binding. The CBM16-1 Q121E mutation increased affinity for all substrates tested, whereas the Q21G and N97R mutants exhibited decreased substrate affinity. We solved CBM/substrate co-crystal structures to elucidate the molecular basis of the increased substrate binding by CBM16-1 Q121E. The Gln-121, Gln-21, and Asn-97 residues can be manipulated to fine-tune ligand binding by the Man5A CBMs. Surprisingly, none of the eight residues investigated was absolutely conserved in CBM family 16. Thus, the critical residues in the Man5A CBMs are either not essential for substrate binding in the other members of this family or the two CBMs are evolutionarily distinct from the members available in the current protein database. Man5A is dependent on its CBMs for robust activity, and insights from this study should serve to enhance our understanding of the interdependence of its catalytic and substrate binding modules.

  7. Adaptive changes in amino acid metabolism permit normal longevity in mice consuming a low-carbohydrate ketogenic diet.

    PubMed

    Douris, Nicholas; Melman, Tamar; Pecherer, Jordan M; Pissios, Pavlos; Flier, Jeffrey S; Cantley, Lewis C; Locasale, Jason W; Maratos-Flier, Eleftheria

    2015-10-01

    Ingestion of very low-carbohydrate ketogenic diets (KD) is associated with weight loss, lowering of glucose and insulin levels and improved systemic insulin sensitivity. However, the beneficial effects of long-term feeding have been the subject of debate. We therefore studied the effects of lifelong consumption of this diet in mice. Complete metabolic analyses were performed after 8 and 80weeks on the diet. In addition we performed a serum metabolomic analysis and examined hepatic gene expression. Lifelong consumption of KD had no effect on morbidity or mortality (KD vs. Chow, 676 vs. 630days) despite hepatic steatosis and inflammation in KD mice. The KD fed mice lost weight initially as previously reported (Kennnedy et al., 2007) and remained lighter and had less fat mass; KD consuming mice had higher levels of energy expenditure, improved glucose homeostasis and higher circulating levels of β-hydroxybutyrate and triglycerides than chow-fed controls. Hepatic expression of the critical metabolic regulators including fibroblast growth factor 21 were also higher in KD-fed mice while expression levels of lipogenic enzymes such as stearoyl-CoA desaturase-1 was reduced. Metabolomic analysis revealed compensatory changes in amino acid metabolism, primarily involving down-regulation of catabolic processes, demonstrating that mice eating KD can shift amino acid metabolism to conserve amino acid levels. Long-term KD feeding caused profound and persistent metabolic changes, the majority of which are seen as health promoting, and had no adverse effects on survival in mice.

  8. Adaptive changes in amino acid metabolism permit normal longevity in mice consuming a low-carbohydrate ketogenic diet

    PubMed Central

    Douris, Nicholas; Melman, Tamar; Pecherer, Jordan M.; Pissios, Pavlos; Flier, Jeffrey S.; Cantley, Lewis C.; Locasale, Jason W.; Maratos-Flier, Eleftheria

    2016-01-01

    Ingestion of very low-carbohydrate ketogenic diets (KD) is associated with weight loss, lowering of glucose and insulin levels and improved systemic insulin sensitivity. However, the beneficial effects of long-term feeding have been the subject of debate. We therefore studied the effects of lifelong consumption of this diet in mice. Complete metabolic analyses were performed after 8 and 80 weeks on the diet. In addition we performed a serum metabolomic analysis and examined hepatic gene expression. Lifelong consumption of KD had no effect on morbidity or mortality (KD vs. Chow, 676 vs. 630 days) despite hepatic steatosis and inflammation in KD mice. The KD fed mice lost weight initially as previously reported (Kennnedy et al., 2007) and remained lighter and had less fat mass; KD consuming mice had higher levels of energy expenditure, improved glucose homeostasis and higher circulating levels of β-hydroxybutyrate and triglycerides than chow-fed controls. Hepatic expression of the critical metabolic regulators including fibroblast growth factor 21 were also higher in KD-fed mice while expression levels of lipogenic enzymes such as stearoyl-CoA desaturase-1 was reduced. Metabolomic analysis revealed compensatory changes in amino acid metabolism, primarily involving down-regulation of catabolic processes, demonstrating that mice eating KD can shift amino acid metabolism to conserve amino acid levels. Long-term KD feeding caused profound and persistent metabolic changes, the majority of which are seen as health promoting, and had no adverse effects on survival in mice. PMID:26170063

  9. Capillary electrophoresis-mass spectrometry of carbohydrates

    PubMed Central

    Zaia, Joseph

    2014-01-01

    The development of methods for capillary electrophoresis (CE) with on-line mass spectrometric detection (CE/MS) is driven by the need for accurate, robust and sensitive glycomics analysis for basic biomedicine, biomarker discovery, and analysis of recombinant protein therapeutics. One important capability is to profile glycan mixtures with respect to the patterns of substituents including sialic acids, acetate, sulfate, phosphate, and other groups. There is additional need for an MS-compatible separation system capable of resolving carbohydrate isomers. This review summarizes applications of CS/MS to analysis of carbohydrates, glycoproteins and glycopeptides that have appeared since 2008. Readers are referred to recent comprehensive reviews covering earlier publications. PMID:23386333

  10. Capillary electrophoresis-mass spectrometry of carbohydrates.

    PubMed

    Zaia, Joseph

    2013-01-01

    The development of methods for capillary electrophoresis (CE) with on-line mass spectrometric detection (CE/MS) is driven by the need for accurate, robust, and sensitive glycomics analysis for basic biomedicine, biomarker discovery, and analysis of recombinant protein therapeutics. One important capability is to profile glycan mixtures with respect to the patterns of substituents including sialic acids, acetate, sulfate, phosphate, and other groups. There is additional need for an MS-compatible separation system capable of resolving carbohydrate isomers. This chapter summarizes applications of CS/MS to analysis of carbohydrates, glycoproteins, and glycopeptides that have appeared since 2008. Readers are referred to recent comprehensive reviews covering earlier publications.

  11. The gut microbiome of kittens is affected by dietary protein:carbohydrate ratio and associated with blood metabolite and hormone concentrations.

    PubMed

    Hooda, Seema; Vester Boler, Brittany M; Kerr, Katherine R; Dowd, Scot E; Swanson, Kelly S

    2013-05-01

    High-protein, low-carbohydrate (HPLC) diets are common in cats, but their effect on the gut microbiome has been ignored. The present study was conducted to test the effects of dietary protein:carbohydrate ratio on the gut microbiota of growing kittens. Male domestic shorthair kittens were raised by mothers fed moderate-protein, moderate-carbohydrate (MPMC; n 7) or HPLC (n 7) diets, and then weaned at 8 weeks onto the same diet. Fresh faeces were collected at 8, 12 and 16 weeks; DNA was extracted, followed by amplification of the V4–V6 region of the 16S rRNA gene using 454 pyrosequencing. A total of 384 588 sequences (average of 9374 per sample) were generated. Dual hierarchical clustering indicated distinct clustering based on the protein:carbohydrate ratio regardless of age. The protein:carbohydrate ratio affected faecal bacteria. Faecal Actinobacteria were greater (P< 0·05) and Fusobacteria were lower (P< 0·05) in MPMC-fed kittens. Faecal Clostridium, Faecalibacterium, Ruminococcus, Blautia and Eubacterium were greater (P< 0·05) in HPLC-fed kittens, while Dialister, Acidaminococcus, Bifidobacterium, Megasphaera and Mitsuokella were greater (P< 0·05) in MPMC-fed kittens. Principal component analysis of faecal bacteria and blood metabolites and hormones resulted in distinct clusters. Of particular interest was the clustering of blood TAG with faecal Clostridiaceae, Eubacteriaceae, Ruminococcaceae, Fusobacteriaceae and Lachnospiraceae; blood ghrelin with faecal Coriobacteriaceae, Bifidobacteriaceae and Veillonellaceae; and blood glucose, cholesterol and leptin with faecal Lactobacillaceae. The present results demonstrate that the protein:carbohydrate ratio affects the faecal microbiome, and highlight the associations between faecal microbes and circulating hormones and metabolites that may be important in terms of satiety and host metabolism.

  12. In Situ Expression of Acidic and Thermophilic Carbohydrate Active Enzymes by Filamentous Fungi (JGI Seventh Annual User Meeting 2012: Genomics of Energy and Environment)

    SciTech Connect

    Mosier, Annika

    2012-03-22

    Annika Mosier, graduate student from Stanford University presents a talk titled "In Situ Expression of Acidic and Thermophilic Carbohydrate Active Enzymes by Filamentous Fungi" at the JGI User 7th Annual Genomics of Energy & Environment Meeting on March 22, 2012 in Walnut Creek, Calif

  13. In Situ Expression of Acidic and Thermophilic Carbohydrate Active Enzymes by Filamentous Fungi (JGI Seventh Annual User Meeting 2012: Genomics of Energy and Environment)

    ScienceCinema

    Mosier, Annika [Stanford University

    2016-07-12

    Annika Mosier, graduate student from Stanford University presents a talk titled "In Situ Expression of Acidic and Thermophilic Carbohydrate Active Enzymes by Filamentous Fungi" at the JGI User 7th Annual Genomics of Energy & Environment Meeting on March 22, 2012 in Walnut Creek, Calif

  14. Studies of Biosilicification; The Role of Proteins, Carbohydrates and Model Compounds in Structure Control

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-12-31

    increased to incorporate 125mM sodium acetate in 200mM sodium hydroxide to elute galacturonic acid. D- glucosamine and glucuronic acid were not investigated. A...apparent only as a shoulder on the glucosamine peak but this is clearly an improvement on the first method where the two peaks were indistinguishable. It...rhamnose 5) galactose 6) glucosamine 7) glucose 8) xylose 9) mannose 10) galacturonic acid 11) glucuronic acid. Separation of monosaccharides from the

  15. Trends in dietary energy, fat, carbohydrate and protein intake in Chinese children and adolescents from 1991 to 2009

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Zhaohui; Dibley, Michael J.

    2012-01-01

    Few studies have examined nutrition transition in children in China. Our aim, in the present study, was to examine temporal trends in dietary energy, fat, carbohydrate and protein intake in Chinese children aged 7–17 years. The analysis used individual level, consecutive 3 d dietary recall data from seven rounds of the China Health and Nutrition Surveys in 1991 (n 2714), 1993 (n 2542), 1997 (n 2516), 2000 (n 2142), 2004 (n 1341), 2006 (n 1072) and 2009 (n 996). Mixed-effect models were constructed to obtain adjusted means and to examine trends after adjusting for intra-class correlation within clusters and for covariates including age, sex, urban/rural residence and income. From 1991 to 2009, daily energy intake steadily declined from 9511·0 to 7658·2 kJ (P < 0·0001). There was a steady decline in daily carbohydrate intake from 382·5 to 254·1 g (P < 0·0001), and in the proportion of energy from carbohydrate from 66·7 to 56·8 % (P < 0·0001). In contrast, daily fat intake steadily increased from 54·8 to 66·0 g (P < 0·0001), as did the proportion of energy from fat from 21·5 to 30·0 % (P < 0·0001). The proportion of children who consumed a diet with more than 30 % of energy from fat increased from 20·1 to 49·4 % (P < 0·0001). The proportion of energy from protein increased from 11·8 to 13·1 % (P < 0·0001), although daily protein intake dropped from 66·2 to 58·0 g (P < 0·0001). Our data suggest that Chinese children have been undergoing a rapid nutrition transition to a high-fat diet. PMID:22244308

  16. Glyco-gold nanoparticle shapes enhance carbohydrate-protein interactions in mammalian cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sangabathuni, Sivakoti; Vasudeva Murthy, Raghavendra; Chaudhary, Preeti Madhukar; Surve, Manalee; Banerjee, Anirban; Kikkeri, Raghavendra

    2016-06-01

    Advances in shape-dependent nanoparticle (NP) research have prompted a close scrutiny of the behaviour of nanostructures in vitro and in vivo. Data pertaining to cellular uptake and site specific sequestration of different shapes of NPs will undoubtedly assist researchers to design better nano-probes for therapeutic and imaging purposes. Herein, we investigated the shape dependent uptake of glyco-gold nanoparticles (G-AuNPs) in different cancer cell lines. Specifically, we have compared the behaviour of spherical, rod and star AuNPs with mannose and galactose conjugations. In vitro experiments showed that the rod-AuNPs exhibited the highest uptake over that of the star and spherical counterparts. Further, an investigation of the mechanism of the uptake clearly demonstrated clathrin mediated endocytosis of the specific G-AuNPs. These results reveal the benefits of different G-AuNP shapes in carbohydrate-mediated interactions.Advances in shape-dependent nanoparticle (NP) research have prompted a close scrutiny of the behaviour of nanostructures in vitro and in vivo. Data pertaining to cellular uptake and site specific sequestration of different shapes of NPs will undoubtedly assist researchers to design better nano-probes for therapeutic and imaging purposes. Herein, we investigated the shape dependent uptake of glyco-gold nanoparticles (G-AuNPs) in different cancer cell lines. Specifically, we have compared the behaviour of spherical, rod and star AuNPs with mannose and galactose conjugations. In vitro experiments showed that the rod-AuNPs exhibited the highest uptake over that of the star and spherical counterparts. Further, an investigation of the mechanism of the uptake clearly demonstrated clathrin mediated endocytosis of the specific G-AuNPs. These results reveal the benefits of different G-AuNP shapes in carbohydrate-mediated interactions. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c6nr03008d

  17. Cyclic Sulfamidate Enabled Syntheses of Amino Acids, Peptides, Carbohydrates, and Natural Products

    EPA Science Inventory

    This article reviews the emergence of cyclic sulfamidates as versatile intermediatesfor the synthesis of unnatural amino acids, chalcogen peptides, modified sugars, drugs and drug candidates, and important natural products.

  18. Arabidopsis G-protein interactome reveals connections to cell wall carbohydrates and morphogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Klopffleisch, Karsten; Phan, Nguyen; Augustin, Kelsey; Bayne, Robert S; Booker, Katherine S; Botella, Jose R; Carpita, Nicholas C; Carr, Tyrell; Chen, Jin-Gui; Cooke, Thomas Ryan; Frick-Cheng, Arwen; Friedman, Erin J; Fulk, Brandon; Hahn, Michael G; Jiang, Kun; Jorda, Lucia; Kruppe, Lydia; Liu, Chenggang; Lorek, Justine; McCann, Maureen C; Molina, Antonio; Moriyama, Etsuko N; Mukhtar, M Shahid; Mudgil, Yashwanti; Pattathil, Sivakumar; Schwarz, John; Seta, Steven; Tan, Matthew; Temp, Ulrike; Trusov, Yuri; Urano, Daisuke; Welter, Bastian; Yang, Jing; Panstruga, Ralph; Uhrig, Joachim F; Jones, Alan M

    2011-01-01

    The heterotrimeric G-protein complex is minimally composed of Gα, Gβ, and Gγ subunits. In the classic scenario, the G-protein complex is the nexus in signaling from the plasma membrane, where the heterotrimeric G-protein associates with heptahelical G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs), to cytoplasmic target proteins called effectors. Although a number of effectors are known in metazoans and fungi, none of these are predicted to exist in their canonical forms in plants. To identify ab initio plant G-protein effectors and scaffold proteins, we screened a set of proteins from the G-protein complex using two-hybrid complementation in yeast. After deep and exhaustive interrogation, we detected 544 interactions between 434 proteins, of which 68 highly interconnected proteins form the core G-protein interactome. Within this core, over half of the interactions comprising two-thirds of the nodes were retested and validated as genuine in planta. Co-expression analysis in combination with phenotyping of loss-of-function mutations in a set of core interactome genes revealed a novel role for G-proteins in regulating cell wall modification. PMID:21952135

  19. Effect of low-carbohydrate diets high in either fat or protein on thyroid function, plasma insulin, glucose, and triglycerides in healthy young adults.

    PubMed

    Ullrich, I H; Peters, P J; Albrink, M J

    1985-01-01

    A low-carbohydrate diet, frequently used for treatment of reactive hypoglycemia, hypertriglyceridemia, and obesity may affect thyroid function. We studied the effects of replacing the deleted carbohydrate with either fat or protein in seven healthy young adults. Subjects were randomly assigned to receive seven days of each of two isocaloric liquid-formula, low-carbohydrate diets consecutively. One diet was high in polyunsaturated fat (HF), with 10%, 55%, and 35% of total calories derived from protein, fat, and carbohydrate, respectively. The other was high in protein (HP) with 35%, 30%, and 35% of total calories derived from protein, fat, and carbohydrate. Fasting blood samples were obtained at baseline and on day 8 of each diet. A meal tolerance test representative of each diet was given on day 7. The triiodothyronine (T3) declined more (P less than .05) following the HF diet than the HP diet (baseline 198 micrograms/dl, HP 138, HF 113). Thyroxine (T4) and reverse T3 (rT3) did not change significantly. Thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) declined equally after both diets. The insulin level was significantly higher 30 minutes after the HP meal (148 microU/ml) than after the HF meal (90 microU/ml). The two-hour glucose level for the HP meal was less, 85 mg/dl, than after the HF meal (103 mg/dl). Serum triglycerides decreased more after the HF diet (HF 52 mg/dl, HP 67 mg/dl). Apparent benefits of replacing carbohydrate with polyunsaturated fat rather than protein are less insulin response and less postpeak decrease in blood glucose and lower triglycerides. The significance of the lower T3 level is unknown.

  20. Detection of non-protein amino acids in the presence of protein amino acids. II.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shapshak, P.; Okaji, M.

    1972-01-01

    Studies conducted with the JEOL 5AH amino acid analyzer are described. This instrument makes possible the programming of the chromatographic process. Data are presented showing the separations of seventeen non-protein amino acids in the presence of eighteen protein amino acids. It is pointed out that distinct separations could be obtained in the case of a number of chemically similar compounds, such as ornithine and lysine, N-amidino alanine and arginine, and iminodiacetic acid and S-carboxymethyl cysteine and aspartic acid.

  1. Production of levulinic acid, furfural, and gamma valerolactone from C.sub.5 and C.sub.6 carbohydrates in mono- and biphasic systems using gamma-valerolactone as a solvent

    DOEpatents

    Dumesic, James A.; Alonso, David Martin; Gurbuz, Elif I.; Wettstein, Stephanie G.

    2013-03-19

    A method to make levulinic acid (LA), furfural, or gamma-valerolactone (GVL). React cellulose (and/or other C.sub.6 carbohydrates) or xylose (and/or other C.sub.5 carbohydrates) or combinations thereof in a monophasic reaction medium comprising GVL and an acid; or (ii) a biphasic reaction system comprising an organic layer comprising GVL, and a substantially immiscible aqueous layer. At least a portion of the cellulose (and/or other C.sub.6 carbohydrates), if present, is converted to LA and at least a portion of the xylose (and/or other C.sub.5 carbohydrates), if present, is converted into furfural.

  2. Evaluation of endogenous acidic metabolic products associated with carbohydrate metabolism in tumor cells

    PubMed Central

    Mazzio, Elizabeth A.; Smith, Bruce

    2010-01-01

    Tumor cells have a high tolerance for acidic and hypoxic microenvironments, also producing abundant lactic acid through accelerated glycolysis in the presence or absence of O2. While the accumulation of lactate is thought to be a major contributor to the reduction of pH-circumscribing aggressive tumors, it is not known if other endogenous metabolic products contribute this acidity. Furthermore, anaerobic metabolism in cancer cells bears similarity to homo-fermentative lactic acid bacteria, however very little is known about an alternative pathway that may drive adenosine triphosphate (ATP) production independent of glycolysis. In this study, we quantify over 40 end-products (amines, acids, alcohols, aldehydes, or ketones) produced by malignant neuroblastoma under accelerated glycolysis (+glucose (GLU) supply 1–10 mM) ± mitochondrial toxin; 1-methyl-4-phenyl-pyridinium (MPP+) to abate aerobic respiration to delineate differences between anaerobic vs. aerobic cell required metabolic pathways. The data show that an acceleration of anaerobic glycolysis prompts an expected reduction in extracellular pH (pHex) from neutral to 6.7±0.006. Diverse metabolic acids associated with this drop in acidity were quantified by ionic exchange liquid chromatography (LC), showing concomitant rise in lactate (Ctrls 7.5±0.5 mM; +GLU 12.35±1.3 mM; +GLU + MPP 18.1±1.8 mM), acetate (Ctrl 0.84±0.13 mM: +GLU 1.3±0.15 mM; +GLU + MPP 2.7±0.4 mM), fumarate, and a-ketoglutarate (<10μM) while a range of other metabolic organic acids remained undetected. Amino acids quantified by o-phthalaldehyde precolumn derivatization/electrochemical detection–LC show accumulation of L-alanine (1.6±.052 mM), L-glutamate (285±9.7μM), L-asparagine (202±2.1μM), and L-aspartate (84.2±4.9μM) produced during routine metabolism, while other amino acids remain undetected. In contrast, the data show no evidence for accumulation of acetaldehyde, aldehydes, or ketones (Purpald/2

  3. Substitution of crude cell wall for neutral detergent fibre in the equations of the Cornell Net Carbohydrate and Protein System that predict carbohydrate fractions: application to sunflower ( Helianthus annuus L.).

    PubMed

    Queiroz, M A A; Fukushima, R S; Gomide, C A; Braga, M R

    2008-07-01

    Prediction of carbohydrate fractions using equations from the Cornell Net Carbohydrate and Protein System (CNCPS) is a valuable tool to assess the nutritional value of forages. In this paper, these carbohydrate fractions were predicted using data from three sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.) cultivars, fresh or as silage. The CNCPS equations for fractions B2 and C include measurement of ash and protein-free neutral detergent fibre (NDF) as one of their components. However, NDF lacks pectin and other non-starch polysaccharides that are found in the cell wall (CW) matrix, so this work compared the use of a crude CW preparation instead of NDF in the CNCPS equations. There were no differences in the estimates of fractions B1 and C when CW replaced NDF; however, there were differences in fractions A and B2. Some of the CNCPS equations could be simplified when using CW instead of NDF. Notably, lignin could be expressed as a proportion of DM, rather than on the basis of ash and protein-free NDF, when predicting CNCPS fraction C. The CNCPS fraction B1 (starch + pectin) values were lower than pectin determined through wet chemistry. This finding, along with the results obtained by the substitution of CW for NDF in the CNCPS equations, suggests that pectin was not part of fraction B1 but present in fraction A. We suggest that pectin and other non-starch polysaccharides that are dissolved by the neutral detergent solution be allocated to a specific fraction (B2) and that another fraction (B3) be adopted for the digestible cell wall carbohydrates.

  4. Effect of the Ratio of Non-fibrous Carbohydrates to Neutral Detergent Fiber and Protein Structure on Intake, Digestibility, Rumen Fermentation, and Nitrogen Metabolism in Lambs.

    PubMed

    Ma, T; Tu, Y; Zhang, N F; Deng, K D; Diao, Q Y

    2015-10-01

    This study aimed to investigate the effect of the ratio of non-fibrous carbohydrates to neutral detergent fibre (NFC/NDF) and undegraded dietary protein (UDP) on rumen fermentation and nitrogen metabolism in lambs. Four Dorper×thin-tailed Han crossbred lambs, averaging 62.3±1.9 kg of body weight and 10 mo of age, were randomly assigned to four dietary treatments of combinations of two levels of NFC/NDF (1.0 and 1.7) and two levels of UDP (35% and 50% of crude protein [CP]). Duodenal nutrient flows were measured with dual markers of Yb and Co, and microbial N (MN) synthesis was estimated using (15)N. High UDP decreased organic matter (OM) intake (p = 0.002) and CP intake (p = 0.005). Ruminal pH (p<0.001), ammonia nitrogen (NH3-N; p = 0.008), and total volatile fatty acids (p<0.001) were affected by dietary NFC/NDF. The ruminal concentration of NH3-N was also affected by UDP (p<0.001). The duodenal flow of total MN (p = 0.007) was greater for lambs fed the high NFC/NDF diet. The amount of metabolisable N increased with increasing dietary NFC:NDF (p = 0.02) or UDP (p = 0.04). In conclusion, the diets with high NFC/NDF (1.7) and UDP (50% of CP) improved metabolisable N supply to lambs.

  5. Low-carbohydrate diets.

    PubMed

    Last, Allen R; Wilson, Stephen A

    2006-06-01

    Americans spend dollar 33 billion annually on weight loss products and services, and a large portion of this money is spent on low-carbohydrate diets. Because of their higher protein and fat content and lower fiber and carbohydrate content, concerns have been raised about the potential health consequences of low-carbohydrate diets. Published long-term data are lacking. Short-term studies comparing traditional low-fat diets with low-carbohydrate diets found lower triglyceride levels, higher high-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels, similar low-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels, and lower A1C levels in persons on low-carbohydrate diets. These diets induce greater weight loss at three and six months than traditional low-fat diets; however, by one year there is no significant difference in maintained weight loss. Weight loss is directly related to calorie content and the ability to maintain caloric restriction; the proportions of nutrients in the diet are irrelevant. Low-carbohydrate diets had lower dropout rates than low-fat diets in several studies, possibly because of the high protein content and low glycemic index, which can be appetite suppressing. Data indicate that low-carbohydrate diets are a safe, reasonable alternative to low-fat diets for weight loss. Additional studies are needed to investigate the long-term safety and effectiveness of these and other approaches to weight loss.

  6. A glycoconjugate of Haemophilus influenzae Type b capsular polysaccharide with tetanus toxoid protein: hydrodynamic properties mainly influenced by the carbohydrate

    PubMed Central

    Abdelhameed, Ali Saber; Adams, Gary G.; Morris, Gordon A.; Almutairi, Fahad M.; Duvivier, Pierre; Conrath, Karel; Harding, Stephen E.

    2016-01-01

    Three important physical properties which may affect the performance of glycoconjugate vaccines against serious disease are molar mass (molecular weight), heterogeneity (polydispersity), and conformational flexibility in solution. The dilute solution behaviour of native and activated capsular polyribosylribitol (PRP) polysaccharides extracted from Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib), and the corresponding glycoconjugate made by conjugating this with the tetanus toxoid (TT) protein have been characterized and compared using a combination of sedimentation equilibrium and sedimentation velocity in the analytical ultracentrifuge with viscometry. The weight average molar mass of the activated material was considerably reduced (Mw ~ 0.24 × 106 g.mol−1) compared to the native (Mw ~ 1.2 × 106 g.mol−1). Conjugation with the TT protein yielded large polydisperse structures (of Mw ~ 7.4 × 106 g.mol−1), but which retained the high degree of flexibility of the native and activated polysaccharide, with frictional ratio, intrinsic viscosity, sedimentation conformation zoning behaviour and persistence length all commensurate with highly flexible coil behaviour and unlike the previously characterised tetanus toxoid protein (slightly extended and hydrodynamically compact structure with an aspect ratio of ~3). This non-protein like behaviour clearly indicates that it is the carbohydrate component which mainly influences the physical behaviour of the glycoconjugate in solution. PMID:26915577

  7. A glycoconjugate of Haemophilus influenzae Type b capsular polysaccharide with tetanus toxoid protein: hydrodynamic properties mainly influenced by the carbohydrate.

    PubMed

    Abdelhameed, Ali Saber; Adams, Gary G; Morris, Gordon A; Almutairi, Fahad M; Duvivier, Pierre; Conrath, Karel; Harding, Stephen E

    2016-02-26

    Three important physical properties which may affect the performance of glycoconjugate vaccines against serious disease are molar mass (molecular weight), heterogeneity (polydispersity), and conformational flexibility in solution. The dilute solution behaviour of native and activated capsular polyribosylribitol (PRP) polysaccharides extracted from Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib), and the corresponding glycoconjugate made by conjugating this with the tetanus toxoid (TT) protein have been characterized and compared using a combination of sedimentation equilibrium and sedimentation velocity in the analytical ultracentrifuge with viscometry. The weight average molar mass of the activated material was considerably reduced (Mw ~ 0.24 × 10(6) g.mol(-1)) compared to the native (Mw ~ 1.2 × 10(6) g.mol(-1)). Conjugation with the TT protein yielded large polydisperse structures (of Mw ~ 7.4 × 10(6) g.mol(-1)), but which retained the high degree of flexibility of the native and activated polysaccharide, with frictional ratio, intrinsic viscosity, sedimentation conformation zoning behaviour and persistence length all commensurate with highly flexible coil behaviour and unlike the previously characterised tetanus toxoid protein (slightly extended and hydrodynamically compact structure with an aspect ratio of ~3). This non-protein like behaviour clearly indicates that it is the carbohydrate component which mainly influences the physical behaviour of the glycoconjugate in solution.

  8. Short-term effect of a high-protein/low-carbohydrate diet on aminopeptidase in adult rat jejunoileum. Site of aminopeptidase response.

    PubMed

    Raul, F; Goda, T; Gossé, F; Koldovský, O

    1987-10-15

    The short-term effects of high-protein/low-carbohydrate diet on aminopeptidase N activity were studied in the brush-border membranes of proximal jejunum and proximal ileum of adult rats. The animals were starved overnight and re-fed for 15 h either with a standard diet (20% protein, 55% carbohydrate, in terms of energy content) or with a high-protein/low-carbohydrate diet of equal energy content (70% protein, 5% carbohydrate). All rats consumed similar amounts of diet, and measurements were made 15 h after initiation of re-feeding. In the proximal jejunum a slight increase in aminopeptidase activity was observed after the high-protein intake. In contrast, considerable stimulation (52%) of the enzyme specific activity was obtained in the proximal ileum. This increase in ileal aminopeptidase activity was more prominent in the mature cells of the upper villus. To determine if the increase of aminopeptidase activity was due to an increased amount of enzyme protein, rocket immunoelectrophoresis was performed with detergent-solubilized brush-border protein from ileum on agarose gels containing anti-(rat brush-border) antiserum. When the same amount of enzyme activity was loaded on the gels, the peaks of immunoprecipitate for aminopeptidase were similar for animals fed on a standard or a high-protein diet. When the same amount of protein was loaded, the peak of immunoprecipitate for aminopeptidase was higher (81%) after a high-protein diet. These results showed that the high protein intake evoked an increase in aminopeptidase activity, with a concomitant increase in the amount of immunoreactive protein.

  9. Nucleic acids, proteins, and chirality

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Usher, D. A.; Profy, A. T.; Walstrum, S. A.; Needels, M. C.; Bulack, S. C.; Lo, K. M.

    1984-01-01

    The present investigation is concerned with experimental results related, in one case, to the chirality of nucleotides, and, in another case, to the possibility of a link between the chirality of nucleic acids, and that of peptides. It has been found that aminoacylation of the 'internal' hydroxyl group of a dinucleoside monophosphate can occur stereoselectively. However, this reaction has not yet been made a part of a working peptide synthesis scheme. The formation and cleavage of oligonucleotides is considered. In the event of the formation of a helical complex between the oligonucleotide and the polymer, 1-prime,5-prime-bonds in the oligomer are found to become more resistant towards cleavage. The conditions required for peptide bond formation are examined, taking into account the known structures of RNA and possible mechanisms for prebiotic peptide bond formation. The possibility is considered that the 2-prime,5-prime-internucleotide linkage could have played an important part in the early days of biological peptide synthesis.

  10. Implication of fermentable carbohydrates targeting the gut microbiota on conjugated linoleic acid production in high-fat-fed mice.

    PubMed

    Druart, Céline; Neyrinck, Audrey M; Dewulf, Evelyne M; De Backer, Fabienne C; Possemiers, Sam; Van de Wiele, Tom; Moens, Frédéric; De Vuyst, Luc; Cani, Patrice D; Larondelle, Yvan; Delzenne, Nathalie M

    2013-09-28

    In vitro experiments have shown that isolated human gut bacteria are able to metabolise PUFA into conjugated PUFA like conjugated linoleic acids (CLA). The hypothesis of the present paper was that high-fat (HF) diet feeding and supplementation with fermentable carbohydrates that have prebiotic properties modulate the in vivo production of CLA by the mouse gut microbiota. Mice were treated for 4 weeks as follows: control (CT) groups were fed a standard diet; HF groups were fed a HF diet rich in linoleic acid (18 : 2n-6); the third groups were fed with the HF diet supplemented with either inulin-type fructans (HF-ITF) or arabinoxylans (HF-Ax). HF diet feeding increased rumenic acid (cis-9,trans-11-18 : 2 CLA) content both in the caecal and liver tissues compared with the CT groups. ITF supplementation had no major effect compared with the HF diet whereas Ax supplementation increased further rumenic acid (cis-9,trans-11-18 : 2 CLA) in the caecal tissue. These differences between both prebiotics may be linked to the high fat-binding capacity of Ax that provides more substrates for bacterial metabolism and to differential modulation of the gut microbiota (specific increase in Roseburia spp. in HF-Ax v. HF). In conclusion, these experiments supply the proof of concept that the mouse gut microbiota produces CLA in vivo, with consequences on the level of CLA in the caecal and liver tissues. We postulate that the CLA-producing bacteria could be a mediator to consider in the metabolic effects of both HF diet feeding and prebiotic supplementation.

  11. Carbohydrates: functionality in foods.

    PubMed

    Chinachoti, P

    1995-04-01

    Many functional requirements are met by the use of simple and complex carbohydrates in food. Carbohydrates offer a wide range of rheological and other properties, including solubility, cryoprotection, sweetening effect, hygroscopicity, crystallization inhibition, flavor encapsulation, and coating ability. These properties are based on chemical structure and interactions with other molecules through hydrogen bonding, ionic effect, and the formation of complexes with lipids and proteins. The ability to understand these properties directly affects the development of food products and processes. Thus, the functionality of carbohydrates in foods integrates precise knowledge of chemical structure and behavior with practical applications in the development and preparation of foods.

  12. Interactions of dietary protein and carbohydrate determine blood sugar level and regulate nutrient selection in the insect Manduca sexta L.

    PubMed

    Thompson, S N; Redak, R A

    2000-09-01

    The non-homeostatic regulation of blood sugar concentration in the insect Manduca sexta L. was affected by nutritional status. Larvae maintained on diets lacking sucrose displayed low concentrations of trehalose, the blood sugar of insects, which varied from 5 to 15 mM with increasing dietary casein level between 12.5 and 75 g/l. These insects were glucogenic, as demonstrated by the selective 13C enrichment of trehalose synthesized from [3-13C]alanine, and de novo synthesis was the sole source of blood sugar. The distribution of 13C in glutamine established that following transamination of the 13C substituted substrate, [3-13C]pyruvate carboxylation rather than decarboxylation was the principal pathway of Pyr metabolism. The mean blood trehalose level was higher in insects maintained on diets with sucrose. At the lowest dietary casein level blood trehalose was approximately 50 mM, and declined to 20 mM at the highest casein level. Gluconeogenesis was detected in insects maintained on sucrose-free diets at the higher protein levels examined, but [3-13C]pyruvate decarboxylation and TCA cycle metabolism was the principal fate of [3-13C]alanine following transamination, and dietary carbohydrate was the principal source of glucose for trehalose synthesis. Feeding studies established a relationship between nutritional status, blood sugar level and dietary self-selection. Insects preconditioned by feeding on diets without sucrose had low blood sugar levels regardless of dietary casein level, and when subsequently given a choice between a sucrose diet or a casein diet, selected the former. Larvae preconditioned on a diet containing sucrose and the lowest level of casein had high blood sugar levels and subsequently selected the casein diet. Larvae maintained on the sucrose diet with the highest casein level had low blood sugar and self-selected the sucrose diet. When preconditioned on diets with sucrose and intermediate levels of casein, insects selected more equally

  13. Carbohydrate-Based Nanocarriers Exhibiting Specific Cell Targeting with Minimum Influence from the Protein Corona.

    PubMed

    Kang, Biao; Okwieka, Patricia; Schöttler, Susanne; Winzen, Svenja; Langhanki, Jens; Mohr, Kristin; Opatz, Till; Mailänder, Volker; Landfester, Katharina; Wurm, Frederik R

    2015-06-15

    Whenever nanoparticles encounter biological fluids like blood, proteins adsorb on their surface and form a so-called protein corona. Although its importance is widely accepted, information on the influence of surface functionalization of nanocarriers on the protein corona is still sparse, especially concerning how the functionalization of PEGylated nanocarriers with targeting agents will affect protein corona formation and how the protein corona may in turn influence the targeting effect. Herein, hydroxyethyl starch nanocarriers (HES-NCs) were prepared, PEGylated, and modified on the outer PEG layer with mannose to target dendritic cells (DCs). Their interaction with human plasma was then studied. Low overall protein adsorption with a distinct protein pattern and high specific affinity for DC binding were observed, thus indicating an efficient combination of "stealth" and targeting behavior.

  14. Co-ingestion of carbohydrate and whey protein increases fasted rates of muscle protein synthesis immediately after resistance exercise in rats

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Wanyi; Ding, Zhenping; Solares, Geoffrey J.; Choi, Soon-Mi; Wang, Bo; Yoon, Aram; Farrar, Roger P.; Ivy, John L.

    2017-01-01

    The objective of the study was to investigate whether co-ingestion of carbohydrate and protein as compared with protein alone augments muscle protein synthesis (MPS) during early exercise recovery. Two months old rats performed 10 repetitions of ladder climbing with 75% of body weight attached to their tails. Placebo (PLA), whey protein (WP), or whey protein plus carbohydrate (CP) was then given to rats by gavage. An additional group of sedentary rats (SED) was used as controls. Blood samples were collected immediately and at either 1 or 2 h after exercise. The flexor hallucis longus muscle was excised at 1 or 2 h post exercise for analysis of MPS and related signaling proteins. MPS was significantly increased by CP compared with PLA (p<0.05), and approached significance compared with WP at 1 h post exercise (p = 0.08). CP yielded a greater phosphorylation of mTOR compared with SED and PLA at 1 h post exercise and SED and WP at 2 h post exercise. CP also increased phosphorylation of p70S6K compared with SED at 1 and 2 h post exercise. 4E-BP1 phosphorylation was inhibited by PLA at 1 h but elevated by WP and CP at 2 h post exercise relative to SED. The phosphorylation of AMPK was elevated by exercise at 1 h post exercise, and this elevated level was sustained only in the WP group at 2 h. The phosphorylation of Akt, GSK3, and eIF2Bε were unchanged by treatments. Plasma insulin was transiently increased by CP at 1 h post exercise. In conclusion, post-exercise CP supplementation increases MPS post exercise relative to PLA and possibly WP, which may have been mediated by greater activation of the mTOR signaling pathway. PMID:28296942

  15. Carbohydrate Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bemiller, James N.

    Carbohydrates are important in foods as a major source of energy, to impart crucial textural properties, and as dietary fiber which influences physiological processes. Digestible carbohydrates, which are converted into monosaccharides, which are absorbed, provide metabolic energy. Worldwide, carbohydrates account for more than 70% of the caloric value of the human diet. It is recommended that all persons should limit calories from fat (the other significant source) to not more than 30% and that most of the carbohydrate calories should come from starch. Nondigestible polysaccharides (all those other than starch) comprise the major portion of dietary fiber (Sect. 10.5). Carbohydrates also contribute other attributes, including bulk, body, viscosity, stability to emulsions and foams, water-holding capacity, freeze-thaw stability, browning, flavors, aromas, and a range of desirable textures (from crispness to smooth, soft gels). They also provide satiety. Basic carbohydrate structures, chemistry, and terminology can be found in references (1, 2).

  16. Synthesis of S-linked glycosyl amino acids in aqueous solution with unprotected carbohydrates.

    PubMed

    Cohen, S B; Halcomb, R L

    2001-02-08

    [figure: see text] The cyclic sulfamidate 5 was synthesized in 60% overall yield from L-serine benzyl ester. Compound 5 reacted cleanly with the sodium thiolate salt of a variety of unprotected 1-thio sugars in aqueous buffer to afford the corresponding S-linked amino acid glycoconjugates in good yields after hydrolysis of the N-sulfates.

  17. KM+, a mannose-binding lectin from Artocarpus integrifolia: amino acid sequence, predicted tertiary structure, carbohydrate recognition, and analysis of the beta-prism fold.

    PubMed Central

    Rosa, J. C.; De Oliveira, P. S.; Garratt, R.; Beltramini, L.; Resing, K.; Roque-Barreira, M. C.; Greene, L. J.

    1999-01-01

    The complete amino acid sequence of the lectin KM+ from Artocarpus integrifolia (jackfruit), which contains 149 residues/mol, is reported and compared to those of other members of the Moraceae family, particularly that of jacalin, also from jackfruit, with which it shares 52% sequence identity. KM+ presents an acetyl-blocked N-terminus and is not posttranslationally modified by proteolytic cleavage as is the case for jacalin. Rather, it possesses a short, glycine-rich linker that unites the regions homologous to the alpha- and beta-chains of jacalin. The results of homology modeling implicate the linker sequence in sterically impeding rotation of the side chain of Asp141 within the binding site pocket. As a consequence, the aspartic acid is locked into a conformation adequate only for the recognition of equatorial hydroxyl groups on the C4 epimeric center (alpha-D-mannose, alpha-D-glucose, and their derivatives). In contrast, the internal cleavage of the jacalin chain permits free rotation of the homologous aspartic acid, rendering it capable of accepting hydrogen bonds from both possible hydroxyl configurations on C4. We suggest that, together with direct recognition of epimeric hydroxyls and the steric exclusion of disfavored ligands, conformational restriction of the lectin should be considered to be a new mechanism by which selectivity may be built into carbohydrate binding sites. Jacalin and KM+ adopt the beta-prism fold already observed in two unrelated protein families. Despite presenting little or no sequence similarity, an analysis of the beta-prism reveals a canonical feature repeatedly present in all such structures, which is based on six largely hydrophobic residues within a beta-hairpin containing two classic-type beta-bulges. We suggest the term beta-prism motif to describe this feature. PMID:10210179

  18. A putative carbohydrate-binding domain of the lactose-binding Cytisus sessilifolius anti-H(O) lectin has a similar amino acid sequence to that of the L-fucose-binding Ulex europaeus anti-H(O) lectin.

    PubMed

    Konami, Y; Yamamoto, K; Osawa, T; Irimura, T

    1995-04-01

    The complete amino acid sequence of a lactose-binding Cytisus sessilifolius anti-H(O) lectin II (CSA-II) was determined using a protein sequencer. After digestion of CSA-II with endoproteinase Lys-C or Asp-N, the resulting peptides were purified by reversed-phase high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) and then subjected to sequence analysis. Comparison of the complete amino acid sequence of CSA-II with the sequences of other leguminous seed lectins revealed regions of extensive homology. The amino acid sequence of a putative carbohydrate-binding domain of CSA-II was found to be similar to those of several anti-H(O) leguminous lectins, especially to that of the L-fucose-binding Ulex europaeus lectin I (UEA-I).

  19. Multi-Component synthesis and computational studies of three novel thio-barbituric acid carbohydrate derivatives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, Stuti; Khare, Naveen K.

    2017-01-01

    The thio-barbituric acid is convenient starting compound for the preparation of fused heterocycles and its 5-substituted derivatives which are pharmacologically one of the most important classes of compounds. The fused compounds of thio-barbituric acid, 4-(1R,2S,3S,4S)-1,2,3,4,5-tetrahydroxy pentyl-10-phenyl-1,3,6,8,9,10 hexahydro-2,7-dithiooxopyrido [2,3-d; 6,5'] dipyrimidine-4,5 diones (1), 4-(1S,2S,3S,4S)-1,2,3,4,5-tetrahydroxy pentyl-10-phenyl-1,3,6,8,9,10 hexahydro-2,7-dithiooxopyrido [2,3-d; 6,5'] dipyrimidine-4,5 diones (2), 3-(1R,2S,3S)-1,2,3,4-tetrahydroxy butyl-10-phenyl-1,3,6,8,9,10 hexahydro-2,7-dithiooxopyrido [2,3-d; 6,5'] dipyrimidine-4,5 diones (3) have been synthesized in single step by the condensation of thio-barbituric acid with sugars (L-rhamnose, L-fucose and L-arabinose) & aniline using para-toluene sulfonic acid (p-TSA) as an effective acid catalyst under refluxing conditions. The molecular structure and detailed spectroscopic analysis of all three novel synthesized thiones derivatives have been performed using experimental techniques like 1H, 13C NMR, 2D (COSY, HSQC, DEPT-135 and DEPT-90) as well as theoretical calculations by density functional theory (DFT) using B3LYP and 6-311G + (d, p) basis set. The strength and nature of weak intramolecular interactions have been studied by atom in molecule (AIM) approach. Global reactivity descriptors have been computed to predict reactivity and reactive sites in the molecule.

  20. Varying type of forage, concentration of metabolizable protein, and source of carbohydrate affects nutrient digestibility and production by dairy cows.

    PubMed

    Weiss, W P; St-Pierre, N R; Willett, L B

    2009-11-01

    The effects of forage source, concentration of metabolizable protein (MP), type of carbohydrate, and their interactions on nutrient digestibility and production were evaluated using a central composite treatment design. All diets (dry basis) contained 50% forage that ranged from 25:75 to 75:25 alfalfa silage:corn silage. Rumen-degradable protein comprised 10.7% of the dry matter (DM) in all diets, but undegradable protein ranged from 4.1 to 7.1%, resulting in dietary MP concentrations of 8.8 to 12.0% of the DM. Dietary starch ranged from 22 to 30% of the DM with a concomitant decrease in neutral detergent fiber concentrations. A total of 15 diets were fed to 36 Holstein cows grouped in 6 blocks. Each block consisted of three 21-d periods, and each cow was assigned a unique sequence of 3 diets, resulting in 108 observations. Milk production and composition, feed intake, and digestibility of major nutrients (via total collection of feces and urine) were measured. Few significant interactions between main effects were observed. Starch concentration had only minor effects on digestibility and production. Replacing corn silage with alfalfa decreased digestibility of N but increased digestibility of neutral detergent fiber. Increasing the concentration of MP increased N digestibility. The concentration (Mcal/kg) of dietary digestible energy (DE) increased linearly as starch concentration increased (very small effect) and was affected by a forage by MP interaction. At low MP, high alfalfa reduced DE concentration, but at high MP, increasing alfalfa increased DE concentration. Increasing alfalfa increased DM and DE intakes, which increased yields of energy-corrected milk, protein, and fat. Increasing MP increased yields of energy-corrected milk and protein. The response in milk protein to changes in MP was much less than predicted using the National Research Council (2001) model.

  1. Adipose tissue transcriptional response of lipid metabolism genes in growing Iberian pigs fed oleic acid v. carbohydrate enriched diets.

    PubMed

    Benítez, R; Núñez, Y; Fernández, A; Isabel, B; Rodríguez, C; Daza, A; López-Bote, C; Silió, L; Óvilo, C

    2016-06-01

    Diet influences animal body and tissue composition due to direct deposition and to the nutrients effects on metabolism. The influence of specific nutrients on the molecular regulation of lipogenesis is not well characterized and is known to be influenced by many factors including timing and physiological status. A trial was performed to study the effects of different dietary energy sources on lipogenic genes transcription in ham adipose tissue of Iberian pigs, at different growth periods and on feeding/fasting situations. A total of 27 Iberian male pigs of 28 kg BW were allocated to two separate groups and fed with different isocaloric feeding regimens: standard diet with carbohydrates as energy source (CH) or diet enriched with high oleic sunflower oil (HO). Ham subcutaneous adipose tissue was sampled by biopsy at growing (44 kg mean BW) and finishing (100 kg mean BW) periods. The first sampling was performed on fasted animals, while the last sampling was performed twice, with animals fasted overnight and 3 h after refeeding. Effects of diet, growth period and feeding/fasting status on gene expression were explored quantifying the expression of a panel of key genes implicated in lipogenesis and lipid metabolism processes. Quantitative PCR revealed several differentially expressed genes according to diet, with similar results at both timings: RXRG, LEP and FABP5 genes were upregulated in HO group while ME1, FASN, ACACA and ELOVL6 were upregulated in CH. The diet effect on ME1 gene expression was conditional on feeding/fasting status, with the higher ME1 gene expression in CH than HO groups, observed only in fasting samples. Results are compatible with a higher de novo endogenous synthesis of fatty acids (FA) in the carbohydrate-supplemented group and a higher FA transport in the oleic acid-supplemented group. Growth period significantly affected the expression of most of the studied genes, with all but PPARG showing higher expression in finishing pigs according to

  2. An amino acid-electrolyte beverage may increase cellular rehydration relative to carbohydrate-electrolyte and flavored water beverages

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background In cases of dehydration exceeding a 2% loss of body weight, athletic performance can be significantly compromised. Carbohydrate and/or electrolyte containing beverages have been effective for rehydration and recovery of performance, yet amino acid containing beverages remain unexamined. Therefore, the purpose of this study is to compare the rehydration capabilities of an electrolyte-carbohydrate (EC), electrolyte-branched chain amino acid (EA), and flavored water (FW) beverages. Methods Twenty men (n = 10; 26.7 ± 4.8 years; 174.3 ± 6.4 cm; 74.2 ± 10.9 kg) and women (n = 10; 27.1 ± 4.7 years; 175.3 ± 7.9 cm; 71.0 ± 6.5 kg) participated in this crossover study. For each trial, subjects were dehydrated, provided one of three random beverages, and monitored for the following three hours. Measurements were collected prior to and immediately after dehydration and 4 hours after dehydration (3 hours after rehydration) (AE = −2.5 ± 0.55%; CE = −2.2 ± 0.43%; FW = −2.5 ± 0.62%). Measurements collected at each time point were urine volume, urine specific gravity, drink volume, and fluid retention. Results No significant differences (p > 0.05) existed between beverages for urine volume, drink volume, or fluid retention for any time-point. Treatment x time interactions existed for urine specific gravity (USG) (p < 0.05). Post hoc analysis revealed differences occurred between the FW and EA beverages (p = 0.003) and between the EC and EA beverages (p = 0.007) at 4 hours after rehydration. Wherein, EA USG returned to baseline at 4 hours post-dehydration (mean difference from pre to 4 hours post-dehydration = -0.0002; p > 0.05) while both EC (-0.0067) and FW (-0.0051) continued to produce dilute urine and failed to return to baseline at the same time-point (p < 0.05). Conclusion Because no differences existed for fluid retention, urine or drink volume at any time point, yet USG returned to

  3. Structural characterization of a unique interface between carbohydrate response element-binding protein (ChREBP) and 14-3-3β protein.

    PubMed

    Ge, Qiang; Huang, Nian; Wynn, R Max; Li, Yang; Du, Xinlin; Miller, Bonnie; Zhang, Hong; Uyeda, Kosaku

    2012-12-07

    Carbohydrate response element-binding protein (ChREBP) is an insulin-independent, glucose-responsive transcription factor that is expressed at high levels in liver hepatocytes where it plays a critical role in converting excess carbohydrates to fat for storage. In response to fluctuating glucose levels, hepatic ChREBP activity is regulated in large part by nucleocytoplasmic shuttling of ChREBP protein via interactions with 14-3-3 proteins. The N-terminal ChREBP regulatory region is necessary and sufficient for glucose-responsive ChREBP nuclear import and export. Here, we report the crystal structure of a complex of 14-3-3β bound to the N-terminal regulatory region of ChREBP at 2.4 Å resolution. The crystal structure revealed that the α2 helix of ChREBP (residues 117-137) adopts a well defined α-helical conformation and binds 14-3-3 in a phosphorylation-independent manner that is different from all previously characterized 14-3-3 and target protein-binding modes. ChREBP α2 interacts with 14-3-3 through both electrostatic and van der Waals interactions, and the binding is partially mediated by a free sulfate or phosphate. Structure-based mutagenesis and binding assays indicated that disrupting the observed 14-3-3 and ChREBP α2 interface resulted in a loss of complex formation, thus validating the novel protein interaction mode in the 14-3-3β·ChREBP α2 complex.

  4. Effects of different temperatures on the total carbohydrate, lipid and protein amounts of the bean beetle, Acanthoscelides obtectus Say (Coleoptera: Bruchidae).

    PubMed

    Sönmez, Evrim; Gülel, Adem

    2008-07-15

    This study investigates the effects of different temperatures on the total carbohydrate, lipid and protein amounts of Acanthoscelides obtectus Say, which is a common cereal pest. Studies have been carried out under laboratory conditions at 20 +/- 2 degrees C, 30 +/- 2 degrees C and 60 +/- 5% relative humidity. No specific photoperiodic regimen has been used throughout the study. Total carbohydrate, protein and lipid amounts for females at 20 degrees C were 61.74, 35.77 and 83.79 microg/individual, respectively, whereas the amounts for males were 34.94, 29.53 and 57.98 microg/individual, respectively. At 30 degrees C, total carbohydrate, protein and lipid amounts for females were 92.00, 42.18 and 83.26 microg/individual, respectively. The amounts at the same temperature for males were 43.34, 34.08 and 52.19 microg/individual, respectively. In both sexes, total carbohydrate and protein amounts at 30 degrees C were higher than those at 20 degrees C whereas this was not true for total lipid amounts.

  5. Alimentary proteins, amino acids and cholesterolemia.

    PubMed

    Blachier, François; Lancha, Antonio H; Boutry, Claire; Tomé, Daniel

    2010-01-01

    Numerous data from both epidemiological and experimental origins indicate that some alimentary proteins and amino acids in supplements can modify the blood LDL cholesterol, HDL cholesterol and total cholesterol. After an initial approval of the health claim for soy protein consumption for the prevention of coronary heart disease, more recently it has been concluded from an overall analysis of literature that isolated soy protein with isoflavones only slightly decrease LDL and total cholesterol. Other plant extracts and also some proteins from animal origin have been reported to exert a lowering effect on blood cholesterol when compared with a reference protein (often casein). The underlying mechanisms are still little understood. Individual amino acids and mixture of amino acids have also been tested (mostly in animal studies) for their effects on cholesterol parameters and on cholesterol metabolism. Methionine, lysine, cystine, leucine, aspartate and glutamate have been tested individually and in combination in different models of either normo or hypercholesterolemic animals and found to be able to modify blood cholesterol and/or LDL cholesterol and/or HDL cholesterol. It is however not known if these results are relevant to human nutrition.

  6. EFFECT OF SOY PROTEIN AND CARBOHYDRATE RATIO ON THE VISCOELASTIC PROPERTIES OF STYRENE-BUTADIENE COMPOSITES

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    When soy products including soy protein isolate, defatted soy flour, soy protein concentrate, and soy spent flakes were incorporated into rubber latex to form composites, they showed substantial reinforcement effects as measured by rheological and mechanical methods. It was observed that different ...

  7. Effect of soy protein and carbohydrate ratio on the viscoelastic properties of styrene-butadiene composites

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    When soy products including soy protein isolate (SPI), defatted soy flour, soy protein concentrate, and soy spent flakes (SSF) were incorporated into rubber latex to form composites, they showed substantial reinforcement effects as measured by rheological and mechanical methods. It was observed tha...

  8. Synergy of Lewis and Brønsted acids on catalytic hydrothermal decomposition of carbohydrates and corncob acid hydrolysis residues to 5-hydroxymethylfurfural

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Chao; Zhang, Liming; Zhou, Tian; Chen, Jiachuan; Xu, Feng

    2017-01-01

    5-hydroxymethylfurfural (HMF) is an important platform molecule in the synthesis of various chemicals and materials. Herein, we reported a simple and effective dehydration of glucose-based carbohydrates to HMF in a biphasic system containing cyclopentyl methyl ether as the organic phase and AlCl3 with minute amounts of HCl as co-catalysts. The results showed that the mixed catalysts had a positive synergistic catalytic effect on glucose conversion to HMF compared with single AlCl3 or HCl catalyst. For glucose, the highest HMF yield of 54.5% was achieved at 175 °C for 20 min. More importantly, the optimal catalytic system was so efficient that it achieved one of the highest reported yields of HMF (30.5%) directly from corncob acid hydrolysis residues. Thus, the catalytic system can become a promising route for effective utilization of biomass in future biorefineries. PMID:28084456

  9. Glycosylation and expanded utility of a modified whey protein ingredient via carbohydrate conjugation at low pH.

    PubMed

    Lillard, J S; Clare, D A; Daubert, C R

    2009-01-01

    Whey protein, at one time considered a by-product of the cheese-making process, is now commonly used in foods for its thickening and emulsifying properties. Currently, approximately 30% of these proteinaceous resources remain under-utilized. Previously, an acidified, thermally treated whey protein concentrate (mWPC) was developed to produce a cold-set thickening ingredient. Mass spectroscopy revealed an approximate 2.5-fold decrease in the lactosylation of beta-lactoglobulin in mWPC starting materials compared with commercial whey protein concentrates, manufactured at a higher pH. Potentially, this should increase the number of reactive sites that remain available for carbohydrate attachment. With this study, the formation of glycoprotein complexes was demonstrated between the mWPC ingredient and lactose, naturally occurring in mWPC powders, or between mWPC protein components with dextran (35 to 45 and 100 to 200 kDa) materials at low pH. In fact, additional dry heating of mWPC powders showed a 3-fold increase in the amount of lactosylated beta-lactoglobulin. Evidence of Maillard reactivity was suggested using colorimetry, o-phthaldialdehyde assays, and sodium dodecyl sulfate PAGE followed by glycoprotein staining. Resultant glycoprotein dispersions exhibited altered functionality, in which case steady shear and small amplitude oscillatory rheology parameters were shown to be dependent on the specific reducing sugar present. Furthermore, the emulsion stability of mWPC-dextran fractions was 2 to 3 times greater than either mWPC or commercial WPC dispersions based on creaming index values. The water-holding capacity of all test samples decreased with additional heating steps; however, mWPC-dextran powders still retained nearly 6 times their weight of water. Scanning electron microscopy revealed that mWPC-dextran conjugates formed a porous network that differed significantly from the dense network observed with mWPC samples. This porosity likely affected both the

  10. Cyclin D1 inhibits hepatic lipogenesis via repression of carbohydrate response element binding protein and hepatocyte nuclear factor 4α.

    PubMed

    Hanse, Eric A; Mashek, Douglas G; Becker, Jennifer R; Solmonson, Ashley D; Mullany, Lisa K; Mashek, Mara T; Towle, Howard C; Chau, Anhtung T; Albrecht, Jeffrey H

    2012-07-15

    Following acute hepatic injury, the metabolic capacity of the liver is altered during the process of compensatory hepatocyte proliferation by undefined mechanisms. In this study, we examined the regulation of de novo lipogenesis by cyclin D1, a key mediator of hepatocyte cell cycle progression. In primary hepatocytes, cyclin D1 significantly impaired lipogenesis in response to glucose stimulation. Cyclin D1 inhibited the glucose-mediated induction of key lipogenic genes, and similar effects were seen using a mutant (D1-KE) that does not activate cdk4 or induce cell cycle progression. Cyclin D1 (but not D1-KE) inhibited the activity of the carbohydrate response element-binding protein (ChREBP) by regulating the glucose-sensing motif of this transcription factor. Because changes in ChREBP activity could not fully explain the effect of cyclin D1, we examined hepatocyte nuclear factor 4α (HNF4α), which regulates numerous differentiated functions in the liver including lipid metabolism. We found that both cyclins D1 and D1-KE bound to HNF4α and significantly inhibited its recruitment to the promoter region of lipogenic genes in hepatocytes. Conversely, knockdown of cyclin D1 in the AML12 hepatocyte cell line promoted HNF4α activity and lipogenesis. In mouse liver, HNF4α bound to a central domain of cyclin D1 involved in transcriptional repression. Cyclin D1 inhibited lipogenic gene expression in the liver following carbohydrate feeding. Similar findings were observed in the setting of physiologic cyclin D1 expression in the regenerating liver. In conclusion, these studies demonstrate that cyclin D1 represses ChREBP and HNF4α function in hepatocytes via Cdk4-dependent and -independent mechanisms. These findings provide a direct link between the cell cycle machinery and the transcriptional control of metabolic function of the liver.

  11. Carbohydrate and Amino Acid Metabolism in the Ectomycorrhizal Ascomycete Sphaerosporella brunnea during Glucose Utilization 1

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Francis; Ramstedt, Mauritz; Söderhäll, Kenneth; Canet, Daniel

    1988-01-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy was utilized to study the metabolism of [1-13C]glucose in mycelia of the ectomycorrhizal ascomycete Sphaerosporella brunnea. The main purpose was to assess the biochemical pathways for the assimilation of glucose and to identify the compounds accumulated during glucose assimilation. The majority of the 13C label was incorporated into mannitol, while glycogen, trehalose and free amino acids were labeled to a much lesser extent. The high enrichment of the C1/C6 position of mannitol indicated that the polyol was formed via a direct route from absorbed glucose. Randomization of the 13C label was observed to occur in glucose and trehalose leading to the accumulation of [1,6-13C]trehalose and [1,6-13C]glucose. This suggests that the majority of the glucose carbon used to form trehalose was cycled through the metabolically active mannitol pool. The proportion of label entering the free amino acids represented 38% of the soluble 13C after 6 hours of continuous glucose labeling. Therefore, amino acid biosynthesis is an important sink of assimilated carbon. Carbon-13 was incorporated into [3-13C]alanine and [2-13C]-, [3-13C]-, and [4-13C]glutamate and glutamine. From the analysis of the intramolecular 13C enrichment of these amino acids, it is concluded that [3-13C]pyruvate, arising from [1-13C]glucose catabolism, was used by alanine aminotransferase, pyruvate dehydrogenase, and pyruvate carboxylase (or phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase). Intramolecular 13C labeling patterns of glutamate and glutamine were similar and are consistent with the operation of the Krebs cycle. There is strong evidence for (a) randomization of the label on C2 and C3 positions of oxaloacetate via malate dehydrogenase and fumarase, and (b) the dual biosynthetic and respiratory role of the citrate synthase, aconitase, and isocitrate dehydrogenase reactions. The high flux of carbon through the carboxylation (presumably pyruvate carboxylase) step indicates that CO

  12. Exploring the interactions between bacteriophage-encoded glycan binding proteins and carbohydrates.

    PubMed

    Simpson, David J; Sacher, Jessica C; Szymanski, Christine M

    2015-10-01

    There is an unprecedented interest in glycobiology due to the increasing appreciation of its impact on all aspects of life. Likewise, bacteriophage biology is enjoying a new renaissance as the post-antibiotic era fuels the search for novel ways to control harmful bacteria. Phages have spent the last 3 billion years developing ways of recognizing and manipulating bacterial surface glycans. Therefore, phages comprise a massive reservoir of glycan-binding and -hydrolyzing proteins with the potential to be exploited for glycan analysis, bacterial diagnostics and therapeutics. We discuss phage tail proteins that recognize bacterial surface polysaccharides, endolysins that bind and cleave peptidoglycan, Ig-like proteins that attach to mucin glycans, and phage effector proteins that recognize both bacterial and eukaryotic oligosaccharides.

  13. Understanding carbohydrate structures fermented or resistant to fermentation in broilers fed rapeseed (Brassica napus) meal to evaluate the effect of acid treatment and enzyme addition.

    PubMed

    Pustjens, Annemieke M; de Vries, Sonja; Schols, Henk A; Gruppen, Harry; Gerrits, Walter J J; Kabel, Mirjam A

    2014-04-01

    Unprocessed and acid-extruded rapeseed meal (RSM) was fed to broiler chickens, with and without addition of commercial pectolytic enzymes. Nonstarch polysaccharide (NSP) fermentability and unfermented NSP structures from RSM were studied in the excreta in detail. From unprocessed RSM, 24% of the nonglucose polysaccharides could be fermented. Acid treatment did not have a significant effect, but enzyme addition did improve fermentability to 38%. Most likely, the significant increase in NSP fermentability can be ascribed to the addition of pectolytic enzymes, which decreased branchiness of the water-soluble arabinan. Mainly xyloglucan, (glucurono-)xylan, (branched) arabinan, and cellulose remained in the excreta. The proportion of unextractable carbohydrates increased in excreta from broilers fed acid-extruded RSM. Probably, acid extrusion resulted in a less accessible NSP matrix, also decreasing the accessibility for pectolytic enzymes added in the diet. During alkaline extraction of the excreta, 39 to 52% (wt/wt) of the insoluble carbohydrates was released as glucosyl- and uronyl-rich carbohydrates, probably originally present via ester linkages or hydrogen bonding within the cellulose-lignin network. These linkages are expected to hinder complete NSP fermentation and indicate that digestibility of RSM may benefit substantially from an alkaline treatment or addition of esterases.

  14. Effects of dietary levels of carbohydrate, lipid, phosphorus and zinc on the growth, feed conversion and protein efficiency ratio of Nile tilapia ( Oreochromis niloticus)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zhongjie; Lei, Wu; Yang, Yunxia; Ye, Jun

    1993-09-01

    A 54-day feeding experiment was conducted on juvenile Nile tilapia using isonitrogenous, isocaloric semipurified diets. The carbohydrate content in the diet was 9%, 32% and 50%; the corresponding lipid content was 22.2%, 12%, and 4%. The diets were supplemented with 0.85% or 1.5% phosphorus and 40 mg/kg or 100 mg/kg zinc. The experiment was carried out in flow-through aquaria using dechlorinated tap water at 23 26°C. The experiment showed that the increase of the carbohydrate content in the diets resulted in a 43 249% increase in weight gain, a 27 59% decrease in feed conversion ratio, and a 65 121% increase in protein efficiency ratio. In fish fed diets containing 36 50% carbohydrate, an increase in supplemented phosphorus to 1.5% greatly increased the weight gain. On the contrary, a high content of supplemented zinc (100 mg/kg) inhibited growth and increased feed conversion ratio.

  15. Conformations of amino acids in proteins.

    PubMed

    Hovmöller, Sven; Zhou, Tuping; Ohlson, Tomas

    2002-05-01

    The main-chain conformations of 237 384 amino acids in 1042 protein subunits from the PDB were analyzed with Ramachandran plots. The populated areas of the empirical Ramachandran plot differed markedly from the classical plot in all regions. All amino acids in alpha-helices are found within a very narrow range of phi, psi angles. As many as 40% of all amino acids are found in this most populated region, covering only 2% of the Ramachandran plot. The beta-sheet region is clearly subdivided into two distinct regions. These do not arise from the parallel and antiparallel beta-strands, which have quite similar conformations. One beta region is mainly from amino acids in random coil. The third and smallest populated area of the Ramachandran plot, often denoted left-handed alpha-helix, has a different position than that originally suggested by Ramachandran. Each of the 20 amino acids has its own very characteristic Ramachandran plot. Most of the glycines have conformations that were considered to be less favoured. These results may be useful for checking secondary-structure assignments in the PDB and for predicting protein folding.

  16. Measurement of protein using bicinchoninic acid.

    PubMed

    Smith, P K; Krohn, R I; Hermanson, G T; Mallia, A K; Gartner, F H; Provenzano, M D; Fujimoto, E K; Goeke, N M; Olson, B J; Klenk, D C

    1985-10-01

    Bicinchoninic acid, sodium salt, is a stable, water-soluble compound capable of forming an intense purple complex with cuprous ion (Cu1+) in an alkaline environment. This reagent forms the basis of an analytical method capable of monitoring cuprous ion produced in the reaction of protein with alkaline Cu2+ (biuret reaction). The color produced from this reaction is stable and increases in a proportional fashion over a broad range of increasing protein concentrations. When compared to the method of Lowry et al., the results reported here demonstrate a greater tolerance of the bicinchoninate reagent toward such commonly encountered interferences as nonionic detergents and simple buffer salts. The stability of the reagent and resulting chromophore also allows for a simplified, one-step analysis and an enhanced flexibility in protocol selection. This new method maintains the high sensitivity and low protein-to-protein variation associated with the Lowry technique.

  17. Controlling the potential gastrointestinal fate of β-carotene emulsions using interfacial engineering: Impact of coating lipid droplets with polyphenol-protein-carbohydrate conjugate.

    PubMed

    Liu, Fuguo; Ma, Cuicui; Zhang, Ruojie; Gao, Yanxiang; Julian McClements, David

    2017-04-15

    The impact of interfacial coatings comprised of polyphenol-protein-carbohydrate conjugates on the properties of nutraceutical-fortified lipid droplets during digestion was investigated. Surface-active chlorogenic acid-lactoferrin-polydextrose (CA-LF-PD) conjugate was synthesized as emulsifier to stabilize lipid droplets in β-carotene-enriched oil-in-water emulsions. Changes in droplet size, charge, and microstructure were monitored as β-carotene emulsions were passed through a simulated gastrointestinal tract model (mouth, stomach, small intestine). LF-coated droplets were unstable to flocculation at pH 8.0-9.0, due to the reduction in electrostatic repulsion, but CA-LF-PD conjugate-coated droplets were stable. Emulsions stabilized by ternary conjugate had better stability to droplet aggregation under simulated GIT conditions than other systems, which increased β-carotene bioaccessibility. The importance of including an oral phase in the simulated GIT model was also demonstrated. The ternary conjugate-stabilized emulsions developed in this study have potential applications as protectors and carriers of hydrophobic drugs, supplements and nutraceuticals.

  18. Carbohydrate-protein ingestion improves subsequent running capacity towards the end of a football-specific intermittent exercise.

    PubMed

    Alghannam, Abdullah F

    2011-10-01

    The majority of football players succumb to fatigue towards the end of the game. This study was designed to examine the influence of protein coingestion with carbohydrate (CHO) vs. an isocaloric CHO supplement on subsequent running capacity towards the end of a simulated football match. Six male amateur football players participated in 3 trials applied in a randomized cross-over experimental design. A laboratory-based, football-specific intermittent exercise was allocated for 75 min interspersed with a 15-min recovery, immediately followed by run time to fatigue (RTF) at 80% peak oxygen consumption. In each trial, prior to exercise and during half-time, participants randomly ingested a placebo (PLC), 6.9% CHO, or 4.8% CHO plus 2.1% protein (CHO-P) supplements matched for color and taste. CHO-P resulted in longer RTF (23.02 ± 5.27 min) than did CHO (16.49 ± 3.25 min) and PLC (11.00 ± 2.80 min) (p < 0.05). Blood glucose was higher in CHO-P at the point of fatigue (4.68 ± 0.64) compared with CHO and PLC (3.92 ± 0.29 and 3.66 ± 0.36, respectively; p < 0.05). Ratings of perceived exertion were lower in the CHO-P subjects at the onset of exercise and towards the end of intermittent exercise when compared with the PLC and CHO subjects (p < 0.05). When protein was added to a CHO supplement, subsequent running capacity following limited recovery from intermittent exercise was enhanced. This improvement suggests that protein coingestion may exert an ergogenic benefit upon endurance capacity during intermittent activity.

  19. Effect of low carbohydrate high protein (LCHP) diet on lipid metabolism, liver and kidney function in rats.

    PubMed

    Kostogrys, Renata B; Franczyk-Żarów, Magdalena; Maślak, Edyta; Topolska, Kinga

    2015-03-01

    The objective of this study was to compare effects of Western diet (WD) with low carbohydrate high protein (LCHP) diet on lipid metabolism, liver and kidney function in rats. Eighteen rats were randomly assigned to three experimental groups and fed for the next 2 months. The experimental diets were: Control (7% of soybean oil, 20% protein), WD (21% of butter, 20% protein), and LCHP (21% of butter and 52.4% protein) diet. The LCHP diet significantly decreased the body weight of the rats. Diet consumption was differentiated among groups, however significant changes were observed since third week of the experiment duration. Rats fed LCHP diet ate significantly less (25.2g/animal/day) than those from Control (30.2g/animal/day) and WD (27.8 g/animal/day) groups. Additionally, food efficiency ratio (FER) tended to decrease in LCHP fed rats. Serum homocysteine concentration significantly decreased in rats fed WD and LCHP diets. Liver weights were significantly higher in rats fed WD and LCHP diets. At the end of the experiment (2 months) the triacylglycerol (TAG) was significantly decreased in animals fed LCHP compared to WD. qRT-PCR showed that SCD-1 and FAS were decreased in LCHP fed rats, but WD diet increased expression of lipid metabolism genes. Rats receiving LCHP diet had two fold higher kidney weight and 54.5% higher creatinin level compared to Control and WD diets. In conclusion, LCHP diet decreased animal's body weight and decreased TAG in rat's serum. However, kidney damage in LCHP rats was observed.

  20. Varying forage type, metabolizable protein concentration, and carbohydrate source affects manure excretion, manure ammonia, and nitrogen metabolism of dairy cows.

    PubMed

    Weiss, W P; Willett, L B; St-Pierre, N R; Borger, D C; McKelvey, T R; Wyatt, D J

    2009-11-01

    Effects of forage source, concentration of metabolizable protein (MP), and type of carbohydrate on manure excretion by dairy cows and production of ammonia from that manure were evaluated using a central composite experimental design. All diets (dry basis) contained 50% forage that ranged from 25:75 to 75:25 alfalfa silage:corn silage. Diets contained 10.7% rumen-degradable protein with variable concentrations of undegradable protein so that dietary MP ranged from 8.8 to 12%. Starch concentration ranged from 22 to 30% with a concomitant decrease in neutral detergent fiber. A total of 15 diets were fed to 36 Holstein cows grouped in 6 blocks. Each block was a replicated 3 x 3 Latin square resulting in 108 observations. Manure output (urine and feces) was measured using total collection, and fresh feces and urine were combined into slurries and incubated for 48 h to measure NH3-N production. Feces, urine, and manure output averaged 50.5, 29.5, and 80.1 kg/d, respectively. Manure output increased with increasing dry matter intake (approximately 3.5 kg of manure/kg of dry matter intake), increased concentrations of alfalfa (mostly via changes in urine output), and decreased concentrations of starch (mostly via changes in fecal output). The amount of NH3-N produced per gram of manure decreased with increasing alfalfa because excreted N shifted from urine to feces. Increasing MP increased NH3-N produced per gram of manure mainly because of increased urinary N, but increased fecal N also contributed to the manure NH3. Manure NH3-N production per cow (accounts for effects on manure production and NH3-N produced per unit of manure) was least and milk protein yields were maximal for diets with high alfalfa (75% of the forage), moderate MP (11% of diet dry matter), and high starch (30% of diet dry matter).

  1. Chemical reporter for visualizing metabolic cross-talk between carbohydrate metabolism and protein modification.

    PubMed

    Zaro, Balyn W; Chuh, Kelly N; Pratt, Matthew R

    2014-09-19

    Metabolic chemical reporters have been largely used to study posttranslational modifications. Generally, it was assumed that these reporters entered one biosynthetic pathway, resulting in labeling of one type of modification. However, because they are metabolized by cells before their addition onto proteins, metabolic chemical reporters potentially provide a unique opportunity to read-out on both modifications of interest and cellular metabolism. We report here the development of a metabolic chemical reporter 1-deoxy-N-pentynyl glucosamine (1-deoxy-GlcNAlk). This small-molecule cannot be incorporated into glycans; however, treatment of mammalian cells results in labeling of a variety proteins and enables their visualization and identification. Competition of this labeling with sodium acetate and an acetyltransferase inhibitor suggests that 1-deoxy-GlcNAlk can enter the protein acetylation pathway. These results demonstrate that metabolic chemical reporters have the potential to isolate and potentially discover cross-talk between metabolic pathways in living cells.

  2. Integrated Management Strategies Increase Cottonseed, Oil and Protein Production: The Key Role of Carbohydrate Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Hongkun; Zhang, Xinyue; Chen, Binglin; Meng, Yali; Wang, Youhua; Zhao, Wenqing; Zhou, Zhiguo

    2017-01-01

    Cottonseed, oil, and protein, as the by-products of cotton production, have the potential to provide commodities to meet the increasing demand of renewable bio-fuels and ruminant feed. An increase in crop yield per unit area requires high-yielding cultivar management with an economic nitrogen (N) rate, an optimal N application schedule, high-yielding plant populations and strong seedlings. Whether the integration of these agronomic practices into a coherent management system can increase the productivity of cotton fiber, embryo oil and protein requires experimental elucidation. In this 2-year study, conventional management practices (CM) were used as a control, and two integrated management strategies (IMS1 and IMS2) were considered at two soil fertility levels (high soil fertility and low soil fertility) to analyze the metabolic and biochemical traits of cotton embryos. The results illustrate that the cottonseed, oil, and protein yields for IMS1 and IMS2 were significantly higher than those under CM at both soil fertility levels and the fiber yield increased as well. The IMS regulated the maternal photo thermal environment by delaying the flowering date, resulting in increases in the seed weight. In developing cotton embryos, the IMS increased the embryo weight accumulation rate and biomass partitioning into oil and protein, which were associated with high activities of H+-ATPase, H+-PPase, sucrose synthase (SuSy), and cell wall invertase (C-INV) and low activities of sucrose phosphate synthase (SPS) and vacuole invertase (V-INV). Increased hexoses (D-fructose, D-glucose) content contributed to the oil and protein contents. These results suggest that increased sucrose/H+ symport, sucrose hydrolysis, hexoses synthesis, and cumulative photo-thermal product (PTP), especially in the early stage of embryo growth, play a dominant role in the high productivity of cotton oil and protein. PMID:28194156

  3. Effect of flue gas CO2 on the growth, carbohydrate and fatty acid composition of a green microalga Scenedesmus obliquus for biofuel production.

    PubMed

    Ji, Min-Kyu; Yun, Hyun-Shik; Hwang, Jae-Hoon; Salama, El-Sayed; Jeon, Byong-Hun; Choi, Jaeyoung

    2016-10-31

    Effect of various flue gas CO2 concentrations (5%, 10% and 14.1%) on growth rate and biochemical properties of a green microalga Scenedesmus obliquus was investigated. S. obliquus showed the highest biomass production and growth rate (0.36 g L(-1) and μmax = 1.00 day(-1)), total inorganic carbon removal (35.8 mg L(-1)), lipid productivity (9.9 mg L(-1) day) and carbohydrate productivity (10.3 mg L(-1) day) with 14.1% CO2 after 8 days of cultivation. Fatty acid methyl ester analysis revealed that the palmitic and oleic acid contents were increased up to 5% and 7% with 14.1% CO2, respectively. Application of flue gas CO2 enhanced the growth along with lipid and carbohydrate productivity of S. obliquus, which can be exploited for reducing the CO2 concentration.

  4. Pasting and extrusion properties of mixed carbohydrates and whey protein isolate matrices

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Mixed systems of whey protein isolate (WPI) or texturized WPI (tWPI) and different starches may form weak or strong gel pastes or rigid matrices depending on interactions. The paste viscoelasticity of starches from amioca, barley, corn starch, Hylon VII, plantain, and pea starch, mixed with whey pro...

  5. Responses to oleic, linoleic and α-linolenic acids in high-carbohydrate, high-fat diet-induced metabolic syndrome in rats.

    PubMed

    Poudyal, Hemant; Kumar, Senthil A; Iyer, Aarjit; Waanders, Jennifer; Ward, Leigh C; Brown, Lindsay

    2013-07-01

    We investigated the changes in adiposity, cardiovascular and liver structure and function, and tissue fatty acid compositions in response to oleic acid-rich macadamia oil, linoleic acid-rich safflower oil and α-linolenic acid-rich flaxseed oil (C18 unsaturated fatty acids) in rats fed either a diet high in simple sugars and mainly saturated fats or a diet high in polysaccharides (cornstarch) and low in fat. The fatty acids induced lipid redistribution away from the abdomen, more pronounced with increasing unsaturation; only oleic acid increased whole-body adiposity. Oleic acid decreased plasma total cholesterol without changing triglycerides and nonesterified fatty acids, whereas linoleic and α-linolenic acids decreased plasma triglycerides and nonesterified fatty acids but not cholesterol. α-Linolenic acid improved left ventricular structure and function, diastolic stiffness and systolic blood pressure. Neither oleic nor linoleic acid changed the left ventricular remodeling induced by high-carbohydrate, high-fat diet, but both induced dilation of the left ventricle and functional deterioration in low fat-diet-fed rats. α-Linolenic acid improved glucose tolerance, while oleic and linoleic acids increased basal plasma glucose concentrations. Oleic and α-linolenic acids, but not linoleic acid, normalized systolic blood pressure. Only oleic acid reduced plasma markers of liver damage. The C18 unsaturated fatty acids reduced trans fatty acids in the heart, liver and skeletal muscle with lowered stearoyl-CoA desaturase-1 activity index; linoleic and α-linolenic acids increased accumulation of their C22 elongated products. These results demonstrate different physiological and biochemical responses to primary C18 unsaturated fatty acids in a rat model of human metabolic syndrome.

  6. Carbohydrates on Proteins: Site-Specific Glycosylation Analysis by Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Zhikai; Desaire, Heather

    2015-07-01

    Glycosylation on proteins adds complexity and versatility to these biologically vital macromolecules. To unveil the structure-function relationship of glycoproteins, glycopeptide-centric analysis using mass spectrometry (MS) has become a method of choice because the glycan is preserved on the glycosylation site and site-specific glycosylation profiles of proteins can be readily determined. However, glycopeptide analysis is still challenging given that glycopeptides are usually low in abundance and relatively difficult to detect and the resulting data require expertise to analyze. Viewing the urgent need to address these challenges, emerging methods and techniques are being developed with the goal of analyzing glycopeptides in a sensitive, comprehensive, and high-throughput manner. In this review, we discuss recent advances in glycoprotein and glycopeptide analysis, with topics covering sample preparation, analytical separation, MS and tandem MS techniques, as well as data interpretation and automation.

  7. Carbohydrates on Proteins: Site-Specific Glycosylation Analysis by Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Zhikai; Desaire, Heather

    2015-01-01

    Glycosylation on proteins adds complexity and versatility to these biologically vital macromolecules. To unveil the structure-function relationship of glycoproteins, glycopeptide-centric analysis using mass spectrometry (MS) has become a method of choice because the glycan is preserved on the glycosylation site and site-specific glycosylation profiles of proteins can be readily determined. However, glycopeptide analysis is still challenging given that glycopeptides are usually low in abundance and relatively difficult to detect and the resulting data require expertise to analyze. Viewing the urgent need to address these challenges, emerging methods and techniques are being developed with the goal of analyzing glycopeptides in a sensitive, comprehensive, and high-throughput manner. In this review, we discuss recent advances in glycoprotein and glycopeptide analysis, with topics covering sample preparation, analytical separation, MS and tandem MS techniques, as well as data interpretation and automation.

  8. Introduction of the carbohydrate-activated promoter P(malK) for recombinant protein production.

    PubMed

    Boström, M; Larsson, G

    2002-07-01

    A production protocol for the use of the malK promoter was established. The protocol includes two phases: an initial fed-batch phase on glucose to reach a high cell density and a fed-batch phase on maltose for production of the desired recombinant protein. It is suggested that this cultivation scheme could be used for all promoters that are catabolite repressed by glucose and where growth and production need to be separated. The specific feature of this system is shown by its ability to control the rate of synthesis of the product protein, ss-galactosidase. In the production phase with a constant feed or an exponential feeding of 0.1 h(-1) it took 4 h longer to reach the maximum specific production rate than with the higher dilution rates of 0.25 h(-1) and 0.4 h(-1), respectively. In the above experiments a dilution rate of 0.3 h(-1) in the growth phase was used. The volumetric production of this system could furthermore be extended to 40 h. All protocol procedures so far tested resulted in the same maximum production rate, but reached in different lengths of time. It is argued that this system is particularly well suited for the production of proteins that have a complex structure and/or need to be produced in a soluble form or to be exported to the periplasm.

  9. Surface functionalization of liposomes with proteins and carbohydrates for use in anti-cancer applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Platt, Virginia M.

    Liposomes can be used to exploit the altered biology of cancer thereby increasing delivery of liposome-associated anti-cancer drugs. In this dissertation, I explore methods that utilize the unique cancer expression of the polymeric glycosaminoglycan hyaluronan (HA) and the HA receptor CD44 to target liposomes to tumors, using liposomes functionalized with proteins or oligosaccharides on their surface. To make it easier to prepare protein-functionalized liposomes, a non-covalent protein/liposome association method based upon metal chelation/his 6 interaction was devised and characterized. I evaluated non-covalent attachment of the prodrug converting enzyme yeast cytosine deaminase, the far-red fluorescent protein mKate, two antigens ovalbumin and the membrane proximal region of an HIV GAG and hyaluronidase, a HA-degrading enzyme. In Chapter 2, I describe the synthesis of hyaluronan-oligosaccharide (HA-O) lipid conjugates and their incorporation into liposomes to target CD44-overexpressing cancer cells. HA-O ligands of defined-length, up to 10 monosaccharides, were attached to lipids via various linkers by reductive amination. The HA-lipids were easily incorporated into liposomes but did not mediate binding of liposomes to CD44 overexpressing cells. In Chapter 3, I evaluate the capacity of tris-NTA-Ni-lipids incorporated within a liposome bilayer to associate with his6-tagged proteins. Tris-NTA-lipids of differing structures and avidities were used to associate yeast cytosine deaminase and mKate to the surface of liposomes. Two tris-NTA-lipids and a mono-NTA lipid associated his-tagged proteins to a 1:1 molar ratio in solution. The proteins remained active while associated with the liposome surface. When challenged in vitro with fetal calf serum, tris-NTA-containing liposomes retained his-tagged proteins longer than mono-NTA. However, the tris-NTA/his6 interaction was found to be in a dynamic state; free yeast cytosine deaminase rapidly competed with pre-bound m

  10. Identification of plant and animal glues in museum objects by GC-MS, after catalytic hydrolysis of the proteins by the use of a cation exchanger, with simultaneous separation from the carbohydrates.

    PubMed

    Schneider, U; Kenndler, E

    2001-09-01

    A method is described which enables the group-separation of proteinaceous binding media from vegetable glues (carbohydrates), and simultaneous hydrolysis of the proteins in mixtures of both. The mixtures of the binders are suspended in aqueous-ethanolic solvent with the H+ form of a strong cation exchanger and treated at elevated temperature in sealed vials. The polypeptides are cleaved by H+-catalysed hydrolysis. On abstraction the amino acids are transformed into the ammonium ions by the protons, and the cations are adsorbed by the exchanger resin. The amino acids are removed from solution in this way, thus suppressing interfering reactions with other binders, e.g. humin formation with carbohydrates. Clear and colourless solutions were obtained with all mixtures of vegetable and animal glues. Two fractions can be obtained after separation of the solid resin from the liquid supernatant - the resin fraction with the adsorbed amino acids, and the aqueous-ethanolic solution with the carbohydrates. In each of these fractions the two classes of binder can be identified separately by GC-MS; this avoids the occurrence of unresolved GC peaks and superimposed mass spectra. The method has been used to identify the binder found between fabric layers of a Burgundian liturgical vestment of the Order of the Golden Fleece from the first half of the 15th century, the Cope of the Virgin Mary. With the aid of the GC pattern obtained, and the mass spectra of the main peaks, which were identified as glucopyranose anomers, the binding medium was identified as starch.

  11. Counting carbohydrates

    MedlinePlus

    ... There are 3 major types of carbohydrates: Sugars Starches Fiber Sugars are found naturally in some foods ... syrups, such as those added to canned fruit Starches are found naturally in foods. Your body breaks ...

  12. Inadequacy of prebiotic synthesis as origin of proteinous amino acids.

    PubMed

    Wong, J T; Bronskill, P M

    1979-07-18

    The production of some nonproteinous, and lack of production of other proteinous, amino acids in model prebiotic synthesis, along with the instability of glutamine and asparagine, suggest that not all of the 20 present day proteinous amino acids gained entry into proteins directly from the primordial soup. Instead, a process of active co-evolution of the genetic code and its constituent amino acids would have to precede the final selection of these proteinous amono acids.

  13. Ingestion of nutrition bars high in protein or carbohydrate does not impact 24-h energy intakes in healthy young adults.

    PubMed

    Trier, Catherine M; Johnston, Carol S

    2012-12-01

    Sales of nutrition bars increased almost 10-fold to $1.7billion over the past decade yet few studies have examined the impact of bar ingestion on dietary parameters. In this crossover trial, 24-h energy intakes were assessed in free-living college students ingesting a high-protein (HP, 280kcal) or a high-carbohydrate (HC, 260kcal) nutrition bar upon waking. Fifty-four students entered the trial, and 37 participants completed the three test days. Daily energy intakes ranged from 1752±99kcal for the non-intervention day to 1846±75 and 1891±110kcal for the days the HP and HC bars were consumed respectively (p=0.591). However, for individuals who reported high levels of physically activity (n=11), daily energy intakes increased significantly compared to the control day for the HC bar day (+45%; p=0.030) and HP bar day (+22%; p=0.038). Macro- and micro-nutrient intakes differed significantly across test days in the total sample mirroring the nutrient profile of the specific bars. These data suggest that young adults adjust caloric intakes appropriately following the ingestion of energy-dense nutrition bars over a 24-h period. Moreover, nutrition bars may represent a unique opportunity to favorably influence nutrient status of young adults.

  14. Toxic influence of organophosphate, carbamate, and organochlorine pesticides on cellular metabolism of lipids, proteins, and carbohydrates: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Karami-Mohajeri, Somayyeh; Abdollahi, Mohammad

    2011-09-01

    Pesticides, including organophosphate (OP), organochlorine (OC), and carbamate (CB) compounds, are widely used in agricultural and indoor purposes. OP and CB act as acetyl cholinesterase (AChE) inhibitors that affect lots of organs such as peripheral and central nervous systems, muscles, liver, pancreas, and brain, whereas OC are neurotoxic involved in alteration of ion channels. There are several reports about metabolic disorders, hyperglycemia, and also oxidative stress in acute and chronic exposures to pesticides that are linked with diabetes and other metabolic disorders. In this respect, there are several in vitro and in vivo but few clinical studies about mechanism underlying these effects. Bibliographic databases were searched for the years 1963-2010 and resulted in 1652 articles. After elimination of duplicates or irrelevant papers, 204 papers were included and reviewed. Results indicated that OP and CB impair the enzymatic pathways involved in metabolism of carbohydrates, fats and protein within cytoplasm, mitochondria, and proxisomes. It is believed that OP and CB show this effect through inhibition of AChE or affecting target organs directly. OC mostly affect lipid metabolism in the adipose tissues and change glucose pathway in other cells. As a shared mechanism, all OP, CB and OC induce cellular oxidative stress via affecting mitochondrial function and therefore disrupt neuronal and hormonal status of the body. Establishing proper epidemiological studies to explore exact relationships between exposure levels to these pesticides and rate of resulted metabolic disorders in human will be helpful.

  15. The Effects of Different High-Protein Low-Carbohydrates Proprietary Foods on Blood Sugar in Healthy Subjects.

    PubMed

    Lodi, Alessandra; Karsten, Bettina; Bosco, Gerardo; Gómez-López, Manuel; Brandão, Paula Paraguassú; Bianco, Antonino; Paoli, Antonio

    2016-11-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze the effects on blood sugar concentrations through the calculation of the glycemic score (GS) of 10 different high-protein low-carbohydrates (CHOs) proprietary foods that are commonly used as meals during very low-CHO ketogenic diets or during low-CHO diets. Fourteen healthy females were tested for their glycemic response curve elicited by 1000 kJ of glucose three times within a 3-week period (one test each week) compared with one of 10 test foods once on separate days twice a week. After determining the GS of each food in each individual, the mean GS of each test food was calculated. All test foods, compared with glucose, produced a significantly lower glycemic response. The GS of all test food resulted in being lower than 25 and the difference between the mean glycemia after the intake of glucose (mean 122 ± 15 mg/dL) and after the intake of the sweet test foods (mean 89 ± 7 mg/dL) was 33 mg/dL (P < .001), whereas the difference between the mean glycemia after the intake of glucose and after the intake of savory test foods (mean 91 ± 8 mg/dL) was of 31 mg/dL (P < .001).

  16. Co-digestion of municipal sewage sludge and solid waste: modelling of carbohydrate, lipid and protein content influence.

    PubMed

    Nielfa, A; Cano, R; Pérez, A; Fdez-Polanco, M

    2015-03-01

    Solid wastes from industrial, commercial and community activities are of growing concern as the total volume of waste produced continues to increase. The knowledge of the specific composition and characteristics of the waste is an important tool in the correct development of the anaerobic digestion process. The problems derived from the anaerobic digestion of sole substrates with high lipid, carbohydrate or protein content lead to the co-digestion of these substrates with another disposed waste, such as sewage sludge. The kinetic of the anaerobic digestion is especially difficult to explain adequately, although some mathematical models are able to represent the main aspects of a biological system, thus improving understanding of the parameters involved in the process. The aim of this work is to evaluate the experimental biochemical methane potential on the co-digestion of sewage sludge with different solid wastes (grease; spent grain and cow manure) through the implementation of four kinetic models. The co-digestion of grease waste and mixed sludge obtained the best improvements from the sole substrates, with additional positive synergistic effects. The Gompertz model fits the experimental biochemical methane potential to an accuracy of 99%, showing a correlation between the percentage of lipid in the substrates and co-digestions and the period of lag phase.

  17. Cold induced changes in lipid, protein and carbohydrate levels in the tropical insect Gromphadorhina coquereliana.

    PubMed

    Chowanski, Szymon; Lubawy, Jan; Spochacz, Marta; Ewelina, Paluch; Grzegorz, Smykalla; Rosinski, Grzegorz; Slocinska, Malgorzata

    2015-05-01

    Insects cope with thermal stressors using mechanisms such as rapid cold hardening and acclimation. These mechanisms have been studied in temperate insects, but little is known about their use by tropical insects in response to cold stress. Here, we investigated whether cold stress (1×8 h and 3×8 h at 4°C) triggers a metabolic response in the Madagascar cockroach Gromphadorhina coquereliana. We examined the effects of cold on the levels of selected metabolites in the fat body tissue of G. coquereliana. After cold exposure, we found that the quantity of total protein increased significantly in the insect fat body, whereas glycogen decreased slightly. Using antibodies, we observed upregulation of AQP-like proteins and changes in the HSP70 levels in the fat body of G. coquereliana when exposed to cold. We also examined the content and nature of the free sugars in the G. coquereliana hemolymph and discovered an increase in the levels of polyols and glucose in response to cold stress. These results suggest an important role of the fat body tissue of tropical insects upon cold exposure.

  18. Body composition, dietary carbohydrates and fatty acids determine post-fertilisation development of bovine oocytes in vitro.

    PubMed

    Adamiak, S J; Powell, K; Rooke, J A; Webb, R; Sinclair, K D

    2006-02-01

    This study assessed the interactive effects of carbohydrate type (fibre vs starch) and fatty acid (FA) supplementation (0% vs 6% calcium soaps of palm oil FA) on the post-fertilisation development of oocytes recovered from low and moderate body condition score (BCS) heifers. A secondary objective was to compare the FA composition of plasma to that of granulosa cells (GCs) and cumulus-oocyte complexes (COCs) from these animals, and to relate these findings to the developmental potential of oocytes. Plasma, GCs and COCs were recovered from 32 heifers on day 5 of a synchronised oestrous cycle for FA analyses. Oocytes were also recovered on days 10 and 15 of the same cycle after short-term ovarian stimulation (FSH + GnRH), and matured, fertilised and cultured to the blastocyst stage in vitro. High levels of dietary starch increased (P < 0.01) plasma insulin but, together with dietary FA, reduced (P < 0.05) blastocyst yields in low, but not in moderate, BCS heifers. Diet-induced alterations to the FA content of plasma were less apparent in GCs and COCs. In summary, although dietary lipids increased the FA content of COCs, the selective uptake of saturated FAs at the expense of mainly polyunsaturated FAs within the follicular compartment ensured that the FA composition of COCs was largely unaffected by diet. However, the concentration of saturated FAs within COCs was inherently high, and so further increases in FA content may have impaired post-fertilisation development. The data establish a robust nutritional framework for more detailed studies into the mechanistic effects of dietary composition on the post-fertilisation developmental potential of oocytes.

  19. Microbial degradation of whole-grain complex carbohydrates and impact on short-chain fatty acids and health.

    PubMed

    Bach Knudsen, Knud Erik

    2015-03-01

    Whole-grain cereals have a complex dietary fiber (DF) composition consisting of oligosaccharides (mostly fructans), resistant starch, and nonstarch polysaccharides (NSPs); the most important are arabinoxylans, mixed-linkage β(1,3; 1,4)-d-glucan (β-glucan), and cellulose and the noncarbohydrate polyphenolic ether lignin. The highest concentration of NSPs and lignin is found in the outer cell layers of the grain, and refined flour will consequently be depleted of a large proportion of insoluble DF components. The flow and composition of carbohydrates to the large intestine are directly related to the intake of DF. The type and composition of cereal DF can consequently be used to modulate the microbial composition and activity as well as the production and molar ratios of short-chain fatty acids (SCFAs). Arabinoxylans and β-glucan in whole-grain cereals and cereal ingredients have been shown to augment SCFA production, with the strongest relative effect on butyrate. When arabinoxylans were provided as a concentrate, the effect was only on total SCFA production. Increased SCFA production in the large intestine was shown by the concentration in the portal vein, whereas the impact on the concentration in peripheral blood was less because the majority of propionate and butyrate is cleared in the liver. Active microbial fermentation with increased SCFA production reduced the exposure of potentially toxic compounds to the epithelium, potentially stimulating anorectic hormones and acting as signaling molecules between the gut and the peripheral tissues. The latter can have implications for insulin sensitivity and glucose homeostasis.

  20. Production of high optical purity l-lactic acid from waste activated sludge by supplementing carbohydrate: effect of temperature and pretreatment time.

    PubMed

    Jian, Qiwei; Li, Xiang; Chen, Yinguang; Liu, Yanan; Pan, Yin

    2016-10-01

    It has been widely accepted that the most environmentally beneficial way to treat waste activated sludge (WAS), the byproduct of municipal wastewater treatment plant, is to recover the valuable organic acid. However, the bio-conversion of lactic acid, one of the high added-value chemical, is seldom reported from WAS fermentation. In this paper, l-lactic acid was observed dominant in the WAS fermentation liquid with carbohydrate addition at ambient temperature. Furthermore, the effect of temperature on l-lactic acid and d-lactic acid production was fully discussed: two isomers were rapidly produced and consumed up in one day at mesophilic condition; and almost optically pure l-lactic acid was generated at thermophilic condition, yet time-consuming with yield of l-lactic acid enhancing by 52.9% compared to that at ambient temperature. The study mechanism showed that mesophilic condition was optimal for both production and consumption of l-lactic acid and d-lactic acid, while consumption of l-lactic acid and production of d-lactic acid were severely inhibited at thermophilic condition. Therefore, by maintaining thermophilic for 4 h in advance and subsequently fermenting mesophilic for 34 h, the concentration of l-lactic acid with optical activity of 98.3% was improved to 16.6 ± 0.5 g COD/L at a high specific efficiency of 0.6097/d.

  1. Versatile acetylation of carbohydrate substrates with bench-top sulfonic acids and application to one-pot syntheses of peracetylated thioglycosides.

    PubMed

    Chao, Chin-Sheng; Chen, Min-Chun; Lin, Shih-Che; Mong, Kwok-Kong T

    2008-04-07

    Inexpensive and readily available sulfonic acids, p-toluenesulfonic acid, and sulfuric acid are versatile and efficient catalysts for the peracetylation of a broad spectrum of carbohydrate substrates in good yield and in a practical time frame. Three appealing features in sulfonic acid-catalyzed acetylation of free sugars were explored including (1) suppression of furanosyl acetate formation for D-galactose and L-fucose; (2) high yielding chemoselective acetylation of sialic acid under appropriate conditions; and (3) peracetylation of amino sugars with different amino protecting functions. Simple one-pot two step acetylation-thioglycosidation methods for the expeditious synthesis of p-tolyl per-O-acetyl thioglycosides were also delineated.

  2. Binding specificity of mannose-specific carbohydrate-binding protein from the cell surface of Trypanosoma cruzi.

    PubMed

    Bonay, P; Molina, R; Fresno, M

    2001-09-01

    The sugar binding specificity of the recently described mannose-specific carbohydrate-binding proteins (CBP) isolated to homogeneity from both the epimastigote and trypomastigote stages of the pathogenic protozoa Trypanosoma cruzi has been studied by quantitative hapten inhibition of the biotinylated CBPs to immobilized thyroglobulin using model oligosaccharides. The results clearly show a differential specificity toward high-mannose glycans between the CBPs from the two developmental stages. Thus, the isolated CBP from epimastigotes exhibited stronger affinity for higher mannose oligomers containing the Manalpha1-2Manalpha1-6Manalpha1-6 structure. Its affinity decreased, as did the number of mannose residues on the oligomer or removal of the terminal Manalpha1-2-linked mannose. By contrast the CBP isolated from the trypomastigote stage showed about 400-fold lower avidity than the epimastigote form, and contrary to it, it was slightly more specific toward Man5GlcNAc than Man9GlcNAc. Analysis of the interaction of epimastigote-Man-CBP with its ligands by UV difference spectroscopy indicates the existence of an extended binding site in that protein with a large enthalpic contribution to the binding. The thermodynamic parameters of binding were obtained by isothermal titration calorimetry and been found that the DeltaH values to be in good agreement with the van't Hoff values. The binding reactions are mainly enthalpically driven and exhibit enthalpy-enthropy compensation. In addition, analysis of the high-mannose glycans from different parts of the digestive tract of the reduviid insect vector of T. cruzi suggest a role of the CBP in the retention of the epimastigote stage in the anterior portion of the gut.

  3. Hypothalamic norepinephrine turnover response to a single low protein, high carbohydrate meal in the male Wistar rat

    SciTech Connect

    Raum, W.; Glick, Z.

    1986-03-01

    A single meal stimulates norepinephrine turnover (NET) by approximately 4-fold in the brown adipose tissue (BAT). In this experiment the role of the hypothalamus in regulating this response was examined. NET was measured in the cortex (C), ventro-medial (VMH), and the lateral hypothalamus (LH). A total of 48 male Wistar rats (200 g body weight) were trained to eat during two feeding sessions per day. On the experimental day, one group (N = 24) was meal deprived and the other (N = 24) was given a low protein, high carbohydrate test meal for 2 hours. NET was determined by the synthesis inhibition method using alpha-methyltyrosine (AMT) injected within one hour after the meal. Norepinephrine (NE) content in each brain section was measured by radioimmunoassay at 4 time points (0, 1, 2, 3 hours) after AMT. The turnover rate (TR) was calculated as the slope of the decline in NE content over time (ng/mg protein/hr) following AMT. The fraction of the total pool of NE released/hr (k) was calculated by dividing the slope (TR) by the Y intercept (NE content at zero time). NET (TR) increased significantly (p < .05) in the VMH following a meal (9.36 +/- .67 vs 8.04 +/- .98 ng/hr; fed vs deprived). There was no change in TR in the C or LH, or in k in any brain section. The marked (4-fold) increase in BAT NET and minimal increase in VMH NET suggests that the meal has a direct effect on BAT with the VMH playing a secondary or modulatory role.

  4. Rapid and sensitive anthrone-sulfuric acid assay in microplate format to quantify carbohydrate in biopharmaceutical products: method development and validation.

    PubMed

    Leyva, Alberto; Quintana, Anelis; Sánchez, Meily; Rodríguez, Elias N; Cremata, José; Sánchez, Julio C

    2008-03-01

    The need for an accurate, fast and reliable analysis of carbohydrate test is crucial for numerous biological processes. In that sense, anthrone-sulfuric acid assay is one of the most efficient quantification techniques successfully applied to carbohydrate determination. In this paper, a sensitive and accurate anthrone-sulfuric acid microplate assay was developed and validated for the quantitative estimation of yeast carbohydrates in the production of hepatitis B virus surface antigen, and the main component of the recombinant vaccine HEBERBIOVAC HB. A response surface methodology was applied to design and optimize the assay in order to maximize the differences on the expected effect and to minimize the number of experiments. The proposed method was linear over the concentration range from 10 to 120 microg/mL for glucose, with values for the coefficient of determination >0.99. Intra- and inter-assay variation coefficient ranged between 0.45-4.79% and 2.48-8.94%, respectively. The Student t-test used in the interference study, revealed good parallelism among curves (T(obs)< or =T(0.05)), which indicates the lack of interference in the working range. Yields obtained in accuracy test for two concentration levels varied between 90 and 105%, confirming the assay's reliability. In conclusion, the validated method, which has successfully been used for the process control monitoring of several samples generated from the production of hepatitis B vaccine, allows the quality and purity of the final product.

  5. The roles of carbohydrates, proteins and lipids in the process of aggregation of natural marine organic matter investigated by means of 2D correlation spectroscopy applied to infrared spectra.

    PubMed

    Mecozzi, Mauro; Pietrantonio, Eva; Pietroletti, Marco

    2009-01-01

    In this paper the marine organic matter soluble in an alkaline medium called extractable humic substance (EHS), was extracted from three sediment samples of Tyrrhenian Sea and separated by precipitation at pH 2 in the two fractions of fulvic acids (FAs) and humic acids (HAs). FAs were further fractionated in seven sub-samples of different molecular weight (mw) by means of seven different ultrafiltration membranes operating in the range between mw<1 kDa and mw>100 kDa. Then the qualitative composition of each sample of fractionated FAs and HAs was studied by means of one-dimensional Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy in reflectance mode (FTIR-DRIFT) and by two-dimensional (2D) correlation spectroscopy both in wavelength-wavelength (WW) and in sample-sample (SS) mode. The application of 2D correlation WW spectroscopy allows to elucidate the different roles played by carbohydrates and proteins with respect to some lipid compounds such as fatty acids and ester fatty acids during the process of aggregate formations from mw approximately 1 kDa to higher size aggregates. In addition, 2D correlation WW spectroscopy allows to observe some peculiar interactions between carbohydrates and proteins in the formation of EHS aggregates, interactions which vary from a sample to another sample. The results of 2D correlation SS spectroscopy confirm the general evidences obtained by 2D WW spectroscopy and moreover, they also describe the formation of EHS aggregates as a complex process where evolutionary links and connectivity between aggregates of neighbour molecular size ranges are not evident. Two-dimensional correlation spectroscopy applied to FTIR spectroscopy shows to be a powerful tool for the investigation of the mechanisms involved in EHS aggregation because it supports the acquisition of structural information which sometimes can be hardly obtained by one-dimensional FTIR spectroscopy.

  6. The roles of carbohydrates, proteins and lipids in the process of aggregation of natural marine organic matter investigated by means of 2D correlation spectroscopy applied to infrared spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mecozzi, Mauro; Pietrantonio, Eva; Pietroletti, Marco

    2009-01-01

    In this paper the marine organic matter soluble in an alkaline medium called extractable humic substance (EHS), was extracted from three sediment samples of Tyrrhenian Sea and separated by precipitation at pH 2 in the two fractions of fulvic acids (FAs) and humic acids (HAs). FAs were further fractionated in seven sub-samples of different molecular weight (mw) by means of seven different ultrafiltration membranes operating in the range between mw < 1 kDa and mw > 100 kDa. Then the qualitative composition of each sample of fractionated FAs and HAs was studied by means of one-dimensional Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy in reflectance mode (FTIR-DRIFT) and by two-dimensional (2D) correlation spectroscopy both in wavelength-wavelength (WW) and in sample-sample (SS) mode. The application of 2D correlation WW spectroscopy allows to elucidate the different roles played by carbohydrates and proteins with respect to some lipid compounds such as fatty acids and ester fatty acids during the process of aggregate formations from mw ˜1 kDa to higher size aggregates. In addition, 2D correlation WW spectroscopy allows to observe some peculiar interactions between carbohydrates and proteins in the formation of EHS aggregates, interactions which vary from a sample to another sample. The results of 2D correlation SS spectroscopy confirm the general evidences obtained by 2D WW spectroscopy and moreover, they also describe the formation of EHS aggregates as a complex process where evolutionary links and connectivity between aggregates of neighbour molecular size ranges are not evident. Two-dimensional correlation spectroscopy applied to FTIR spectroscopy shows to be a powerful tool for the investigation of the mechanisms involved in EHS aggregation because it supports the acquisition of structural information which sometimes can be hardly obtained by one-dimensional FTIR spectroscopy.

  7. Protein and Amino Acid Profiles of Different Whey Protein Supplements.

    PubMed

    Almeida, Cristine C; Alvares, Thiago S; Costa, Marion P; Conte-Junior, Carlos A

    2016-01-01

    Whey protein (WP) supplements have received increasing attention by consumers due to the high nutritional value of the proteins and amino acids they provide. However, some WP supplements may not contain the disclosed amounts of the ingredients listed on the label, compromising the nutritional quality and the effectiveness of these supplements. The aim of this study was to evaluate and compare the contents of total protein (TP), α-lactalbumin (α-LA), β-lactoglobulin (β-LG), free essential amino acids (free EAA), and free branched-chain amino acids (free BCAA), amongst different WP supplements produced by U.S. and Brazilian companies. Twenty commercial brands of WP supplements were selected, ten manufactured in U.S. (WP-USA) and ten in Brazil (WP-BRA). The TP was analyzed using the Kjeldahl method, while α-LA, β-LG, free EAA, and free BCAA were analyzed using HPLC system. There were higher (p < 0.05) concentrations of TP, α-LA, β-LG, and free BCAA in WP-USA supplements, as compared to the WP-BRA supplements; however, there was no difference (p > 0.05) in the content of free EAA between WP-USA and WP-BRA. Amongst the 20 brands evaluated, four WP-USA and seven WP-BRA had lower (p < 0.05) values of TP than those specified on the label. In conclusion, the WP-USA supplements exhibited better nutritional quality, evaluated by TP, α-LA, β-LG, and free BCAA when compared to WP-BRA.

  8. Differential responses of the incretin hormones GIP and GLP-1 to increasing doses of dietary carbohydrate but not dietary protein in lean rats

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Qing; Kindel, Tammy L.; Tso, Patrick

    2010-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that oral ingestion of nutrients stimulates secretion of the incretin hormones glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide (GIP) and glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1); however, it is unclear whether there is a dose-dependent response between the amount of nutrient ingested and the secretion of the hormones in vivo. Using our lymph fistula rat model, we previously demonstrated that both GIP and GLP-1 responded dose dependently to increasing amounts of infused dietary lipid and that the GLP-1-secreting cells were more sensitive to changes in intestinal lipid content. In the present study, we investigated the dose-dependent relationships between incretin secretion and the two remaining macronutrients, carbohydrate and protein. To accomplish this objective, the major mesenteric lymphatic duct of male Sprague-Dawley rats was cannulated. Each animal received a single bolus (3 ml) of saline, dextrin, whey protein, or casein hydrolysate (0.275, 0.55, 1.1, 2.2, 4.4 kcal) via a surgically inserted duodenal or ileal feeding tube. Lymph was continuously collected for 3 h and analyzed for GIP and GLP-1 content. Both GIP and GLP-1 outputs responded dose dependently to increasing amounts of dietary carbohydrate but not protein. Additionally, we found that the GIP-secreting cells were more sensitive than the GLP-1-secreting cells to changes in intestinal carbohydrate content. PMID:20522638

  9. Hypochlorous and peracetic acid induced oxidation of dairy proteins.

    PubMed

    Kerkaert, Barbara; Mestdagh, Frédéric; Cucu, Tatiana; Aedo, Philip Roger; Ling, Shen Yan; De Meulenaer, Bruno

    2011-02-09

    Hypochlorous and peracetic acids, both known disinfectants in the food industry, were compared for their oxidative capacity toward dairy proteins. Whey proteins and caseins were oxidized under well controlled conditions at pH 8 as a function of the sanitizing concentration. Different markers for protein oxidation were monitored. The results established that the protein carbonyl content was a rather unspecific marker for protein oxidation, which did not allow one to differentiate the oxidant used especially at the lower concentrations. Cysteine, tryptophan, and methionine were proven to be the most vulnerable amino acids for degradation upon hypochlorous and peracetic acid treatment, while tyrosine was only prone to degradation in the presence of hypochlorous acid. Hypochlorous acid induced oxidation gave rise to protein aggregation, while during peracetic acid induced oxidation, no high molecular weight aggregates were observed. Protein aggregation upon hypochlorous acid oxidation could primarily be linked to tryptophan and tyrosine degradation.

  10. Dose response of whey protein isolate in addition to a typical mixed meal on blood amino acids and hormonal concentrations.

    PubMed

    Forbes, Scott C; McCargar, Linda; Jelen, Paul; Bell, Gordon J

    2014-04-01

    The purpose was to investigate the effects of a controlled typical 1-day diet supplemented with two different doses of whey protein isolate on blood amino acid profiles and hormonal concentrations following the final meal. Nine males (age: 29.6 ± 6.3 yrs) completed four conditions in random order: a control (C) condition of a typical mixed diet containing ~10% protein (0.8 g·kg1), 65% carbohydrate, and 25% fat; a placebo (P) condition calorically matched with carbohydrate to the whey protein conditions; a low-dose condition of 0.8 grams of whey protein isolate per kilogram body mass per day (g·kg1·d1; W1) in addition to the typical mixed diet; or a high-dose condition of 1.6 g·kg1·d1 (W2) of supplemental whey protein in addition to the typical mixed diet. Following the final meal, significant (p < .05) increases in total amino acids, essential amino acids (EAA), branch-chained amino acids (BCAA), and leucine were observed in plasma with whey protein supplementation while no changes were observed in the control and placebo conditions. There was no significant group difference for glucose, insulin, testosterone, cortisol, or growth hormone. In conclusion, supplementing a typical daily food intake consisting of 0.8 g of protein·kg1·d1 with a whey protein isolate (an additional 0.8 or 1.6 g·kg1·d1) significantly elevated total amino acids, EAA, BCAA, and leucine but had no effect on glucose, insulin, testosterone, cortisol, or growth hormone following the final meal. Future acute and chronic supplementation research examining the physiological and health outcomes associated with elevated amino acid profiles is warranted.

  11. Molecular design of glycoprotein mimetics: glycoblotting by engineered proteins with an oxylamino-functionalized amino acid residue.

    PubMed

    Matsubara, Naoki; Oiwa, Kei; Hohsaka, Takahiro; Sadamoto, Reiko; Niikura, Kenichi; Fukuhara, Norio; Takimoto, Akio; Kondo, Hirosato; Nishimura, Shin-Ichiro

    2005-11-18

    The general and efficient method for the site-directed glycosylation of proteins is a key step in order to understand the biological importance of the carbohydrate chains of proteins and to control functional roles of the engineered glycoproteins in terms of the development of improved glycoprotein therapeutics. We have developed a novel method for site-directed glycosylation of proteins based on chemoselective blotting of common reducing sugars by genetically encoded proteins. The oxylamino-functionalized L-homoserine residues, 2-amino-4-O-(N-methylaminooxy) butanoic acid and 2-amino-4-aminooxy butanoic acid, were efficiently incorporated into proteins by using the four-base codon/anticodon pair strategy in Escherichia coli in vitro translation. Direct and chemoselective coupling between unmodified simple sugars and N-methylaminooxy group displayed on the engineered streptavidin allowed for the combinatorial synthesis of novel glycoprotein mimetics.

  12. Selective Detection of Carbohydrates and Their Peptide Conjugates by ESI-MS Using Synthetic Quaternary Ammonium Salt Derivatives of Phenylboronic Acids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kijewska, Monika; Kuc, Adam; Kluczyk, Alicja; Waliczek, Mateusz; Man-Kupisinska, Aleksandra; Lukasiewicz, Jolanta; Stefanowicz, Piotr; Szewczuk, Zbigniew

    2014-06-01

    We present new tags based on the derivatives of phenylboronic acid and apply them for the selective detection of sugars and peptide-sugar conjugates in mass spectrometry. We investigated the binding of phenylboronic acid and its quaternary ammonium salt (QAS) derivatives to carbohydrates and peptide-derived Amadori products by HR-MS and MS/MS experiments. The formation of complexes between sugar or sugar-peptide conjugates and synthetic tags was confirmed on the basis of the unique isotopic distribution resulting from the presence of boron atom. Moreover, incorporation of a quaternary ammonium salt dramatically improved the efficiency of ionization in mass spectrometry. It was found that the formation of a complex with phenylboronic acid stabilizes the sugar moiety in glycated peptides, resulting in simplification of the fragmentation pattern of peptide-derived Amadori products. The obtained results suggest that derivatization of phenylboronic acid as QAS is a promising method for sensitive ESI-MS detection of carbohydrates and their conjugates formed by non-enzymatic glycation or glycosylation.

  13. Selective detection of carbohydrates and their peptide conjugates by ESI-MS using synthetic quaternary ammonium salt derivatives of phenylboronic acids.

    PubMed

    Kijewska, Monika; Kuc, Adam; Kluczyk, Alicja; Waliczek, Mateusz; Man-Kupisinska, Aleksandra; Lukasiewicz, Jolanta; Stefanowicz, Piotr; Szewczuk, Zbigniew

    2014-06-01

    We present new tags based on the derivatives of phenylboronic acid and apply them for the selective detection of sugars and peptide-sugar conjugates in mass spectrometry. We investigated the binding of phenylboronic acid and its quaternary ammonium salt (QAS) derivatives to carbohydrates and peptide-derived Amadori products by HR-MS and MS/MS experiments. The formation of complexes between sugar or sugar-peptide conjugates and synthetic tags was confirmed on the basis of the unique isotopic distribution resulting from the presence of boron atom. Moreover, incorporation of a quaternary ammonium salt dramatically improved the efficiency of ionization in mass spectrometry. It was found that the formation of a complex with phenylboronic acid stabilizes the sugar moiety in glycated peptides, resulting in simplification of the fragmentation pattern of peptide-derived Amadori products. The obtained results suggest that derivatization of phenylboronic acid as QAS is a promising method for sensitive ESI-MS detection of carbohydrates and their conjugates formed by non-enzymatic glycation or glycosylation.

  14. Relationship between population growth of the red flour beetle Tribolium castaneum and protein and carbohydrate content in flour and starch.

    PubMed

    Wong, Nellie; Lee, Chow-Yang

    2011-12-01

    The effects of eight diets (atta flour, wheat flour, self-rising flour, rice flour, custard powder, corn flour, tapioca starch, and potato starch) on the development of the red flour beetle, Tribolium castaneum (Herbst), reared at 29-31 degrees C and 66-70% RH were assessed. Five pairs of male and female T. castaneum were reared on the respective diets for 28 d before the experimental setup was dismantled and adult counts were recorded. In another experiment, the insects were allowed to mate and oviposit in each flour or starch type over a period of 7 d before being removed. The counting of pupae and adult emergence began on the day of emergence and was continued on a daily basis until day 140. Proximate analysis was performed for chemical composition of each diet, and the numbers of new adults that developed were found to be positively correlated (r2 = 0.97; P < 0.05) with the protein content and negatively correlated (r2 = 0.93; P < 0.05) with the carbohydrate content. For T. castaneum, the suitable diets were ranked as follows: atta flour > wheat flour > self-rising flour > rice flour > custard powder > corn flour > tapioca starch > potato starch. T. castaneum larval development to the pupal and adult stages developed significantly faster in atta flour (P < 0.05) than in the other diets, and the greatest number of progeny was produced from beetles reared on atta flour. Fewer adults emerged from wheat flour, self-rising flour, and rice flour, and no new emergences were recorded for the remaining diets. Developmental rate was much slower in beetles reared on diets in which a low number in progeny was produced. These data illustrate that different diets can influence the sustainability of these insects and affect their development and growth.

  15. Analysis of exposed cellulose surfaces in pretreated wood biomass using carbohydrate-binding module (CBM)-cyan fluorescent protein (CFP).

    PubMed

    Kawakubo, Takeshi; Karita, Shuichi; Araki, Yuko; Watanabe, Shota; Oyadomari, Masafumi; Takada, Rie; Tanaka, Fumio; Abe, Kentaro; Watanabe, Takahito; Honda, Yoichi; Watanabe, Takashi

    2010-02-15

    In enzymatic saccharification of lignocellulosics, the access of the enzymes to exposed cellulose surfaces is a key initial step in triggering hydrolysis. However, knowledge of the structure-hydrolyzability relationship of the pretreated biomass is still limited. Here we used fluorescent-labeled recombinant carbohydrate-binding modules (CBMs) from Clostridium josui as specific markers for crystalline cellulose (CjCBM3) and non-crystalline cellulose (CjCBM28) to analyze the complex surfaces of wood tissues pretreated with NaOH, NaOH-Na(2)S (kraft pulping), hydrothermolysis, ball-milling, and organosolvolysis. Japanese cedar wood, one of the most recalcitrant softwood species was selected for the analysis. The binding analysis clarified the linear dependency of the exposure of crystalline and non-crystalline cellulose surfaces for enzymatic saccharification yield by the organosolv and kraft delignification processes. Ball-milling for 5-30 min increased saccharification yield up to 77%, but adsorption by the CjCBM-cyan fluorescent proteins (CFPs) was below 5%. Adsorption of CjCBM-CFPs on the hydrothermolysis pulp were less than half of those for organosolvolysis pulp, in coincidence with low saccharification yields. For all the pretreated wood, crystallinity index was not directly correlated with the overall saccharification yield. Fluorescent microscopy revealed that CjCBM3-CFP and CjCBM28-CFP were site-specifically adsorbed on external fibrous structures and ruptured or distorted fiber surfaces. The assay system with CBM-CFPs is a powerful measure to estimate the initiation sites of hydrolysis and saccharification yields from chemically delignified wood pulps.

  16. Sex-specific effects of protein and carbohydrate intake on reproduction but not lifespan in Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Jensen, Kim; McClure, Colin; Priest, Nicholas K; Hunt, John

    2015-08-01

    Modest dietary restriction extends lifespan (LS) in a diverse range of taxa and typically has a larger effect in females than males. Traditionally, this has been attributed to a stronger trade-off between LS and reproduction in females than in males that is mediated by the intake of calories. Recent studies, however, suggest that it is the intake of specific nutrients that extends LS and mediates this trade-off. Here, we used the geometric framework (GF) to examine the sex-specific effects of protein (P) and carbohydrate (C) intake on LS and reproduction in Drosophila melanogaster. We found that LS was maximized at a high intake of C and a low intake of P in both sexes, whereas nutrient intake had divergent effects on reproduction. Male offspring production rate and LS were maximized at the same intake of nutrients, whereas female egg production rate was maximized at a high intake of diets with a P:C ratio of 1:2. This resulted in larger differences in nutrient-dependent optima for LS and reproduction in females than in males, as well as an optimal intake of nutrients for lifetime reproduction that differed between the sexes. Under dietary choice, the sexes followed similar feeding trajectories regulated around a P:C ratio of 1:4. Consequently, neither sex reached their nutritional optimum for lifetime reproduction, suggesting intralocus sexual conflict over nutrient optimization. Our study shows clear sex differences in the nutritional requirements of reproduction in D. melanogaster and joins the growing list of studies challenging the role of caloric restriction in extending LS.

  17. Sex-specific effects of protein and carbohydrate intake on reproduction but not lifespan in Drosophila melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    Jensen, Kim; McClure, Colin; Priest, Nicholas K; Hunt, John

    2015-01-01

    Modest dietary restriction extends lifespan (LS) in a diverse range of taxa and typically has a larger effect in females than males. Traditionally, this has been attributed to a stronger trade-off between LS and reproduction in females than in males that is mediated by the intake of calories. Recent studies, however, suggest that it is the intake of specific nutrients that extends LS and mediates this trade-off. Here, we used the geometric framework (GF) to examine the sex-specific effects of protein (P) and carbohydrate (C) intake on LS and reproduction in Drosophila melanogaster. We found that LS was maximized at a high intake of C and a low intake of P in both sexes, whereas nutrient intake had divergent effects on reproduction. Male offspring production rate and LS were maximized at the same intake of nutrients, whereas female egg production rate was maximized at a high intake of diets with a P:C ratio of 1:2. This resulted in larger differences in nutrient-dependent optima for LS and reproduction in females than in males, as well as an optimal intake of nutrients for lifetime reproduction that differed between the sexes. Under dietary choice, the sexes followed similar feeding trajectories regulated around a P:C ratio of 1:4. Consequently, neither sex reached their nutritional optimum for lifetime reproduction, suggesting intralocus sexual conflict over nutrient optimization. Our study shows clear sex differences in the nutritional requirements of reproduction in D. melanogaster and joins the growing list of studies challenging the role of caloric restriction in extending LS. PMID:25808180

  18. Co-Ingestion of Whey Protein with a Carbohydrate-Rich Breakfast Does Not Affect Glycemia, Insulinemia or Subjective Appetite Following a Subsequent Meal in Healthy Males

    PubMed Central

    Allerton, Dean M.; Campbell, Matthew D.; Gonzalez, Javier T.; Rumbold, Penny L. S.; West, Daniel J.; Stevenson, Emma J.

    2016-01-01

    We aimed to assess postprandial metabolic and appetite responses to a mixed-macronutrient lunch following prior addition of whey protein to a carbohydrate-rich breakfast. Ten healthy males (age: 24 ± 1 years; body mass index (BMI): 24.5 ± 0.7 kg/m2) completed three trials in a non-isocaloric, crossover design. A carbohydrate-rich breakfast (93 g carbohydrate; 1799 kJ) was consumed with (CHO + WP) or without (CHO) 20 g whey protein isolate (373 kJ), or breakfast was omitted (NB). At 180 min, participants consumed a mixed-macronutrient lunch meal. Venous blood was sampled at 15 min intervals following each meal and every 30 min thereafter, while subjective appetite sensations were collected every 30 min throughout. Post-breakfast insulinemia was greater after CHO + WP (time-averaged area under the curve (AUC0–180 min): 193.1 ± 26.3 pmol/L), compared to CHO (154.7 ± 18.5 pmol/L) and NB (46.1 ± 8.0 pmol/L; p < 0.05), with no difference in post-breakfast (0–180 min) glycemia (CHO + WP, 3.8 ± 0.2 mmol/L; CHO, 4.2 ± 0.2 mmol/L; NB, 4.2 ± 0.1 mmol/L; p = 0.247). There were no post-lunch (0–180 min) effects of condition on glycemia (p = 0.492), insulinemia (p = 0.338) or subjective appetite (p > 0.05). Adding whey protein to a carbohydrate-rich breakfast enhanced the acute postprandial insulin response, without influencing metabolic or appetite responses following a subsequent mixed-macronutrient meal. PMID:26927166

  19. Metabolic engineering for the production of shikimic acid in an evolved Escherichia coli strain lacking the phosphoenolpyruvate: carbohydrate phosphotransferase system

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Shikimic acid (SA) is utilized in the synthesis of oseltamivir-phosphate, an anti-influenza drug. In this work, metabolic engineering approaches were employed to produce SA in Escherichia coli strains derived from an evolved strain (PB12) lacking the phosphoenolpyruvate:carbohydrate phosphotransferase system (PTS-) but with capacity to grow on glucose. Derivatives of PB12 strain were constructed to determine the effects of inactivating aroK, aroL, pykF or pykA and the expression of plasmid-coded genes aroGfbr, tktA, aroB and aroE, on SA synthesis. Results Batch cultures were performed to evaluate the effects of genetic modifications on growth, glucose consumption, and aromatic intermediate production. All derivatives showed a two-phase growth behavior with initial high specific growth rate (μ) and specific glucose consumption rate (qs), but low level production of aromatic intermediates. During the second growth phase the μ decreased, whereas aromatic intermediate production reached its maximum. The double aroK- aroL- mutant expressing plasmid-coded genes (strain PB12.SA22) accumulated SA up to 7 g/L with a yield of SA on glucose of 0.29 mol/mol and a total aromatic compound yield (TACY) of 0.38 mol/mol. Single inactivation of pykF or pykA was performed in PB12.SA22 strain. Inactivation of pykF caused a decrease in μ, qs, SA production, and yield; whereas TACY increased by 33% (0.5 mol/mol). Conclusions The effect of increased availability of carbon metabolites, their channeling into the synthesis of aromatic intermediates, and disruption of the SA pathway on SA production was studied. Inactivation of both aroK and aroL, and transformation with plasmid-coded genes resulted in the accumulation of SA up to 7 g/L with a yield on glucose of 0.29 mol/mol PB12.SA22, which represents the highest reported yield. The pykF and pykA genes were inactivated in strain PB12.SA22 to increase the production of aromatic compounds in the PTS- background. Results

  20. Isolation of carbohydrate-metabolizing, extremely halophilic bacteria.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tomlinson, G. A.; Hochstein, L. I.

    1972-01-01

    Four previously unrecognized strains of extremely halophilic bacteria that utilize carbohydrates have been isolated. Gas production proved an unreliable index of carbohydrate metabolism; therefore, carbohydrate utilization was measured by determining acid formation and sugar disappearance during growth. By these procedures, carbohydrate utilization was readily detected. The results suggest that carbohydrate dissimilation by extremely halophilic bacteria may be more common than previously thought and that the apparent rarity of carbohydrate-metabolizing halophiles may be an artifact of the isolation procedures used.

  1. The sulphated carbohydrate-protein linkage region isolated from chondroitin 4-sulphate chains of inter-alpha-trypsin inhibitor in human plasma.

    PubMed

    Yamada, S; Oyama, M; Kinugasa, H; Nakagawa, T; Kawasaki, T; Nagasawa, S; Khoo, K H; Morris, H R; Dell, A; Sugahara, K

    1995-05-01

    Inter-alpha-trypsin inhibitor (ITI) in human plasma has a unique structural architecture composed of three polypeptide chains (H1, H2 and L chains), which are linked to each other through a chondroitin 4-sulphate chain. The structure of the carbohydrate-protein linkage region of the chondroitin 4-sulphate chain attached to the L chain was investigated. The peptide-chondroitin sulphate fraction was isolated by anion-exchange chromatography after exhaustive digestion with lysyl endopeptidase and then V8 protease. The chondroitin 4-sulphate chain was released from the peptides by beta-elimination using NaB3H4 and then digested with chondroitinase ABC. These treatments resulted in a single 3H-labelled hexasaccharide alditol fraction derived from the linkage region which had been associated with the L chain. Chemical and enzymatic analyses as well as fast-atom bombardment-mass spectrometry (FAB-MS) analysis revealed that the 3H-labelled hexasaccharide alditol had the following structure: delta HexA-alpha 1-3GalNAc(4-sulphate)beta 1-4GlcA beta 1-3Gal(4-sulphate)beta 1-3Gal beta 1-4Xyl-ol (where delta HexA is 4-deoxy-alpha-L-threo-hex-4-enepyranosyluronic acid and Xyl-ol is xylitol). The structure contained the novel 4-sulphated Gal residue, which was previously demonstrated in a linkage hexasaccharide isolated from chondroitin 4-sulphate of rat chondrosarcoma (Sugahara et al., J. Biol. Chem., 263, 10168-10174, 1988) and of whale cartilage (Sugahara et al., Eur. J. Biochem., 202, 805-811, 1991). The above disulphated hexasaccharide alditol was the only component detected in the linkage region fraction of the chondroitin 4-sulphate chain of ITI, which implies some biological significance of this novel structure.

  2. Arabinoxylan‐oligosaccharides (AXOS) affect the protein/carbohydrate fermentation balance and microbial population dynamics of the Simulator of Human Intestinal Microbial Ecosystem

    PubMed Central

    Sanchez, J. I.; Marzorati, M.; Grootaert, C.; Baran, M.; Van Craeyveld, V.; Courtin, C. M.; Broekaert, W. F.; Delcour, J. A.; Verstraete, W.; Van de Wiele, T.

    2009-01-01

    Summary Arabinoxylan‐oligosaccharides (AXOS) are a recently newly discovered class of candidate prebiotics as – depending on their structure – they are fermented in different regions of gastrointestinal tract. This can have an impact on the protein/carbohydrate fermentation balance in the large intestine and, thus, affect the generation of potentially toxic metabolites in the colon originating from proteolytic activity. In this study, we screened different AXOS preparations for their impact on the in vitro intestinal fermentation activity and microbial community structure. Short‐term fermentation experiments with AXOS with an average degree of polymerization (avDP) of 29 allowed part of the oligosaccharides to reach the distal colon, and decreased the concentration of proteolytic markers, whereas AXOS with lower avDP were primarily fermented in the proximal colon. Additionally, prolonged supplementation of AXOS with avDP 29 to the Simulator of Human Intestinal Microbial Ecosystem (SHIME) reactor decreased levels of the toxic proteolytic markers phenol and p‐cresol in the two distal colon compartments and increased concentrations of beneficial short‐chain fatty acids (SCFA) in all colon vessels (25–48%). Denaturant gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) analysis indicated that AXOS supplementation only slightly modified the total microbial community, implying that the observed effects on fermentation markers are mainly caused by changes in fermentation activity. Finally, specific quantitative PCR (qPCR) analysis showed that AXOS supplementation significantly increased the amount of health‐promoting lactobacilli as well as of Bacteroides–Prevotella and Clostridium coccoides–Eubacterium rectale groups. These data allow concluding that AXOS are promising candidates to modulate the microbial metabolism in the distal colon. PMID:21261885

  3. Tracing metabolic routes of dietary carbohydrate and protein in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) using stable isotopes ([¹³C]starch and [¹⁵N]protein): effects of gelatinisation of starches and sustained swimming.

    PubMed

    Felip, Olga; Ibarz, Antoni; Fernández-Borràs, Jaume; Beltrán, Marta; Martín-Pérez, Miguel; Planas, Josep V; Blasco, Josefina

    2012-03-01

    Here we examined the use of stable isotopes, [¹³C]starch and [¹⁵N]protein, as dietary tracers to study carbohydrate assimilation and distribution and protein utilisation, respectively, by rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss). The capacity of glucose uptake and use by tissues was studied, first, by varying the digestibility of carbohydrate-rich diets (30 % carbohydrate), using raw starch and gelatinised starch (GS) and, second, by observing the effects of two regimens of activity (voluntary swimming, control; sustained swimming at 1·3 body lengths/s, exercise) on the GS diet. Isotopic ratio enrichment (¹³C and ¹⁵N) of the various tissue components (protein, lipid and glycogen) was measured in the liver, muscles, viscera and the rest of the fish at 11 and 24 h after a forced meal. A level of 30 % of digestible carbohydrates in the food exceeded the capacity of rainbow trout to use this nutrient, causing long-lasting hyperglycaemia that raises glucose uptake by tissues, and the synthesis of glycogen and lipid in liver. Total 13C recovered 24 h post-feeding in the GS group was lower than at 11 h, indicating a proportional increase in glucose oxidation, although the deposition of lipids in white muscle (WM) increased. Prolonged hyperglycaemia was prevented by exercise, since sustained swimming enhances the use of dietary carbohydrates, mainly through conversion to lipids in liver and oxidation in muscles, especially in red muscle (RM). Higher recoveries of total 15N for exercised fish at 24 h, mainly into the protein fraction of both RM and WM, provide evidence that sustained swimming improves protein deposition, resulting in an enhancement of the protein-sparing effect.

  4. Common Prairie feeds with different soluble and insoluble fractions used for CPM diet formulation in dairy cattle: Impact of carbohydrate-protein matrix structure on protein and other primary nutrient digestion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Quanhui; Wang, Zhisheng; Zhang, Xuewei; Yu, Peiqiang

    2014-03-01

    An experiment was conducted to investigate the relationship of carbohydrates molecular spectral characteristics to rumen degradability of primary nutrients in Prairie feeds in dairy cattle. In total, 12 different types of feeds were selected, each type of feed was from three different source with total 37 samples. Six types of them were energy-sourced feeds and the others were protein-sourced feeds. The carbohydrates molecular spectral intensity of various functional groups were collected using Fourier transform infrared attenuated total reflectance (ATR-FT/IR) spectroscopy. In the in situ study, the results showed that the rumen digestibility and digestible fractions of primary nutrients (DM, OM, NCP, and CP) were significantly different (P < 0.05) among the feeds. The spectral bands features were significantly different (P < 0.05) among the feeds. Spectral intensities of A_Cell, H_1415 and H_1370 were weakly positively correlated with in situ rumen digestibility and digestible fractions of DM, OM and NCP. Spectral intensities of H_1150, H_1015, A_1, and A_3 were weakly negatively associated with in situ rumen degradation of CP. Spectral intensities of A_1240 and H_1240, mainly associated with cellulosic compounds, were correlated with rumen CP degradation. The multiple regression analysis demonstrated that the spectral intensities of A_3 and H_1415 played the most important role and could be used as a potential tool to predict rumen protein degradation of feeds in dairy cattle. In conclusion, this study showed that the carbohydrates as a whole have an effect on protein rumen degradation, rather than cellulose alone, indicating carbohydrate-protein matrix structure impact protein utilization in dairy cattle. The non-invasive molecular spectral technique (ATR-FT/IR) could be used as a rapid potential tool to predict rumen protein degradation of feedstuffs by using molecular spectral bands intensities in carbohydrate fingerprint region.

  5. Common Prairie feeds with different soluble and insoluble fractions used for CPM diet formulation in dairy cattle: impact of carbohydrate-protein matrix structure on protein and other primary nutrient digestion.

    PubMed

    Peng, Quanhui; Wang, Zhisheng; Zhang, Xuewei; Yu, Peiqiang

    2014-01-01

    An experiment was conducted to investigate the relationship of carbohydrates molecular spectral characteristics to rumen degradability of primary nutrients in Prairie feeds in dairy cattle. In total, 12 different types of feeds were selected, each type of feed was from three different source with total 37 samples. Six types of them were energy-sourced feeds and the others were protein-sourced feeds. The carbohydrates molecular spectral intensity of various functional groups were collected using Fourier transform infrared attenuated total reflectance (ATR-FT/IR) spectroscopy. In the in situ study, the results showed that the rumen digestibility and digestible fractions of primary nutrients (DM, OM, NCP, and CP) were significantly different (P<0.05) among the feeds. The spectral bands features were significantly different (P<0.05) among the feeds. Spectral intensities of A_Cell, H_1415 and H_1370 were weakly positively correlated with in situ rumen digestibility and digestible fractions of DM, OM and NCP. Spectral intensities of H_1150, H_1015, A_1, and A_3 were weakly negatively associated with in situ rumen degradation of CP. Spectral intensities of A_1240 and H_1240, mainly associated with cellulosic compounds, were correlated with rumen CP degradation. The multiple regression analysis demonstrated that the spectral intensities of A_3 and H_1415 played the most important role and could be used as a potential tool to predict rumen protein degradation of feeds in dairy cattle. In conclusion, this study showed that the carbohydrates as a whole have an effect on protein rumen degradation, rather than cellulose alone, indicating carbohydrate-protein matrix structure impact protein utilization in dairy cattle. The non-invasive molecular spectral technique (ATR-FT/IR) could be used as a rapid potential tool to predict rumen protein degradation of feedstuffs by using molecular spectral bands intensities in carbohydrate fingerprint region.

  6. Jasmonic acid influences mycorrhizal colonization in tomato plants by modifying the expression of genes involved in carbohydrate partitioning.

    PubMed

    Tejeda-Sartorius, Miriam; Martínez de la Vega, Octavio; Délano-Frier, John Paul

    2008-06-01

    The role of jasmonic acid (JA) on mycorrhizal colonization by Glomus fasciculatum in tomato plants was examined using mutant plants overexpressing prosystemin (PS) or affected in the synthesis of JA (suppressor of prosystemin-mediated responses 2, spr2). The degree of mycorrhizal colonization was determined by measuring frequency (F%) and intensity (M%) of colonization and arbuscule abundance (A%). Gene expression and biochemical analyses were also performed in roots to detect changes in carbon (C) partitioning. Colonization was similar in mycorrhizal PS and wild-type roots, except for a higher A% in the former. Conversely, colonization was severely reduced in roots of spr2 mutants. No association was found between levels of expression of genes coding for systemic wound responsive proteins (or SWRPs) and other defense-related proteins in roots and mycorrhization levels in these plants. On the other hand, the degree of mycorrhizal colonization correlated with changes in the transcriptional regulation of a number of genes involved in sucrose hydrolysis and transport, cell wall invertase activity and mycorrhizal-specific fatty acid content in roots. The results obtained suggest that one of the mechanisms by which JA might operate to modulate the mycorrhization process could be through its influence on the regulation of C partitioning in the plant. The significant colonization increase observed in mycorrhizal spr2 plants supplied with exogenous methyl jasmonate supports its role as a positive regulator of the symbiosis.

  7. Nucleic acids encoding human trithorax protein

    DOEpatents

    Evans, Glen A.; Djabali, Malek; Selleri, Licia; Parry, Pauline

    2001-01-01

    In accordance with the present invention, there is provided an isolated peptide having the characteristics of human trithorax protein (as well as DNA encoding same, antisense DNA derived therefrom and antagonists therefor). The invention peptide is characterized by having a DNA binding domain comprising multiple zinc fingers and at least 40% amino acid identity with respect to the DNA binding domain of Drosophila trithorax protein and at least 70% conserved sequence with respect to the DNA binding domain of Drosophila trithorax protein, and wherein said peptide is encoded by a gene located at chromosome 11 of the human genome at q23. Also provided are methods for the treatment of subject(s) suffering from immunodeficiency, developmental abnormality, inherited disease, or cancer by administering to said subject a therapeutically effective amount of one of the above-described agents (i.e., peptide, antagonist therefor, DNA encoding said peptide or antisense DNA derived therefrom). Also provided is a method for the diagnosis, in a subject, of immunodeficiency, developmental abnormality, inherited disease, or cancer associated with disruption of chromosome 11 at q23.

  8. Proteomic analysis of Arabidopsis thaliana leaves in response to acute boron deficiency and toxicity reveals effects on photosynthesis, carbohydrate metabolism, and protein synthesis.

    PubMed

    Chen, Mei; Mishra, Sasmita; Heckathorn, Scott A; Frantz, Jonathan M; Krause, Charles

    2014-02-15

    Boron (B) stress (deficiency and toxicity) is common in plants, but as the functions of this essential micronutrient are incompletely understood, so too are the effects of B stress. To investigate mechanisms underlying B stress, we examined protein profiles in leaves of Arabidopsis thaliana plants grown under normal B (30 μM), compared to plants transferred for 60 and 84 h (i.e., before and after initial visible symptoms) in deficient (0 μM) or toxic (3 mM) levels of B. B-responsive polypeptides were sequenced by mass spectrometry, following 2D gel electrophoresis, and 1D gels and immunoblotting were used to confirm the B-responsiveness of some of these proteins. Fourteen B-responsive proteins were identified, including: 9 chloroplast proteins, 6 proteins of photosynthetic/carbohydrate metabolism (rubisco activase, OEC23, photosystem I reaction center subunit II-1, ATPase δ-subunit, glycolate oxidase, fructose bisphosphate aldolase), 6 stress proteins, and 3 proteins involved in protein synthesis (note that the 14 proteins may fall into multiple categories). Most (8) of the B-responsive proteins decreased under both B deficiency and toxicity; only 3 increased with B stress. Boron stress decreased, or had no effect on, 3 of 4 oxidative stress proteins examined, and did not affect total protein. Hence, our results indicate relatively early specific effects of B stress on chloroplasts and protein synthesis.

  9. Healthy carbohydrates

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Functional foods include dietary fiber consisting of health-promoting carbohydrates. We have produced novel prebiotics from orange peel and observed that they extend the shelf life of probiotic bacteria in synbiotics. Some pectic-oligosaccharides and xyloglucan-oligosaccharides also have anti-adhesi...

  10. A low carbohydrate, high protein diet suppresses intratumoral androgen synthesis and slows castration-resistant prostate tumor growth in mice.

    PubMed

    Fokidis, H Bobby; Yieng Chin, Mei; Ho, Victor W; Adomat, Hans H; Soma, Kiran K; Fazli, Ladan; Nip, Ka Mun; Cox, Michael; Krystal, Gerald; Zoubeidi, Amina; Tomlinson Guns, Emma S

    2015-06-01

    Dietary factors continue to preside as dominant influences in prostate cancer prevalence and progression-free survival following primary treatment. We investigated the influence of a low carbohydrate diet, compared to a typical Western diet, on prostate cancer (PCa) tumor growth in vivo. LNCaP xenograft tumor growth was studied in both intact and castrated mice, representing a more advanced castration resistant PCa (CRPC). No differences in LNCaP tumor progression (total tumor volume) with diet was observed for intact mice (P = 0.471) however, castrated mice on the Low Carb diet saw a statistically significant reduction in tumor growth rate compared with Western diet fed mice (P = 0.017). No correlation with serum PSA was observed. Steroid profiles, alongside serum cholesterol and cholesteryl ester levels, were significantly altered by both diet and castration. Specifically, DHT concentration with the Low Carb diet was 58% that of the CRPC-bearing mice on the Western diet. Enzymes in the steroidogenesis pathway were directly impacted and tumors isolated from intact mice on the Low Carb diet had higher AKR1C3 protein levels and lower HSD17B2 protein levels than intact mice on the Western diet (ARK1C3: P = 0.074; HSD17B2: P = 0.091, with α = 0.1). In contrast, CRPC tumors from mice on Low Carb diets had higher concentrations of both HSD17B2 (P = 0.016) and SRD5A1 (P = 0.058 with α = 0.1) enzymes. There was no correlation between tumor growth in castrated mice for Low Carb diet versus Western diet and (a) serum insulin (b) GH serum levels (c) insulin receptor (IR) or (d) IGF-1R in tumor tissue. Intact mice fed Western diet had higher serum insulin which was associated with significantly higher blood glucose and tumor tissue IR. We conclude that both diet and castration have a significant impact on the endocrinology of mice bearing LNCaP xenograft tumors. The observed effects of diet on cholesterol and steroid regulation impact tumor tissue DHT specifically and are

  11. Evaluation of the National Research Council (2001) dairy model and derivation of new prediction equations. 1. Digestibility of fiber, fat, protein, and nonfiber carbohydrate.

    PubMed

    White, R R; Roman-Garcia, Y; Firkins, J L; VandeHaar, M J; Armentano, L E; Weiss, W P; McGill, T; Garnett, R; Hanigan, M D

    2017-03-02

    Evaluation of ration balancing systems such as the National Research Council (NRC) Nutrient Requirements series is important for improving predictions of animal nutrient requirements and advancing feeding strategies. This work used a literature data set (n = 550) to evaluate predictions of total-tract digested neutral detergent fiber (NDF), fatty acid (FA), crude protein (CP), and nonfiber carbohydrate (NFC) estimated by the NRC (2001) dairy model. Mean biases suggested that the NRC (2001) lactating cow model overestimated true FA and CP digestibility by 26 and 7%, respectively, and under-predicted NDF digestibility by 16%. All NRC (2001) estimates had notable mean and slope biases and large root mean squared prediction error (RMSPE), and concordance (CCC) ranged from poor to good. Predicting NDF digestibility with independent equations for legumes, corn silage, other forages, and nonforage feeds improved CCC (0.85 vs. 0.76) compared with the re-derived NRC (2001) equation form (NRC equation with parameter estimates re-derived against this data set). Separate FA digestion coefficients were derived for different fat supplements (animal fats, oils, and other fat types) and for the basal diet. This equation returned improved (from 0.76 to 0.94) CCC compared with the re-derived NRC (2001) equation form. Unique CP digestibility equations were derived for forages, animal protein feeds, plant protein feeds, and other feeds, which improved CCC compared with the re-derived NRC (2001) equation form (0.74 to 0.85). New NFC digestibility coefficients were derived for grain-specific starch digestibilities, with residual organic matter assumed to be 98% digestible. A Monte Carlo cross-validation was performed to evaluate repeatability of model fit. In this procedure, data were randomly subsetted 500 times into derivation (60%) and evaluation (40%) data sets, and equations were derived using the derivation data and then evaluated against the independent evaluation data. Models

  12. Site specific incorporation of keto amino acids into proteins

    DOEpatents

    Schultz, Peter G [La Jolla, CA; Wang, Lei [San Diego, CA

    2011-12-06

    Compositions and methods of producing components of protein biosynthetic machinery that include orthogonal tRNAs, orthogonal aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases, and orthogonal pairs of tRNAs/synthetases, which incorporate keto amino acids into proteins are provided. Methods for identifying these orthogonal pairs are also provided along with methods of producing proteins with keto amino acids using these orthogonal pairs.

  13. Site specific incorporation of keto amino acids into proteins

    DOEpatents

    Schultz, Peter G [La Jolla, CA; Wang, Lei [San Diego, CA

    2012-02-14

    Compositions and methods of producing components of protein biosynthetic machinery that include orthogonal tRNAs, orthogonal aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases, and orthogonal pairs of tRNAs/synthetases, which incorporate keto amino acids into proteins are provided. Methods for identifying these orthogonal pairs are also provided along with methods of producing proteins with keto amino acids using these orthogonal pairs.

  14. Site specific incorporation of keto amino acids into proteins

    DOEpatents

    Schultz, Peter G [La Jolla, CA; Wang, Lei [San Diego, CA

    2011-03-22

    Compositions and methods of producing components of protein biosynthetic machinery that include orthogonal tRNAs, orthogonal aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases, and orthogonal pairs of tRNAs/synthetases, which incorporate keto amino acids into proteins are provided. Methods for identifying these orthogonal pairs are also provided along with methods of producing proteins with keto amino acids using these orthogonal pairs.

  15. Site specific incorporation of keto amino acids into proteins

    DOEpatents

    Schultz, Peter G.; Wang, Lei

    2008-10-07

    Compositions and methods of producing components of protein biosynthetic machinery that include orthogonal tRNAs, orthogonal aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases, and orthogonal pairs of tRNAs/synthetases, which incorporate keto amino acids into proteins are provided. Methods for identifying these orthogonal pairs are also provided along with methods of producing proteins with keto amino acids using these orthogonal pairs.

  16. Site specific incorporation of keto amino acids into proteins

    DOEpatents

    Schultz, Peter G.; Wang, Lei

    2009-04-28

    Compositions and methods of producing components of protein biosynthetic machinery that include orthogonal tRNAs, orthogonal aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases, and orthogonal pairs of tRNAs/synthetases, which incorporate keto amino acids into proteins are provided. Methods for identifying these orthogonal pairs are also provided along with methods of producing proteins with keto amino acids using these orthogonal pairs.

  17. Abuse potential of carbohydrates for overweight carbohydrate cravers

    PubMed Central

    Spring, Bonnie; Schneider, Kristin; Smith, Malaina; Kendzor, Darla; Appelhans, Bradley; Hedeker, Donald; Pagoto, Sherry

    2010-01-01

    Rationale The long-rejected construct of food addiction is undergoing re-examination. Objectives . To evaluate whether a novel carbohydrate food shows abuse potential for rigorously defined carbohydrate cravers, as evidenced by selective self-administration and mood enhancement during double-blind discrimination testing. Methods Discrete trials choice testing was performed with 61 overweight (BMI m=27.64, SD=2.59) women (ages 18–45; 19.70% African American) whose diet records showed >4 weekly afternoon/evening emotional eating episodes confined to snacks with carbohydrate:protein ≥ 6:1. After being induced into a sad mood, participants were exposed, double-blind and in counterbalanced order, to taste-matched carbohydrate and protein beverages. They were asked to choose and self-administer the drink that made them feel better. Results Women overwhelmingly chose the carbohydrate beverage, even though blinded. Mixed-effects regression modeling, controlling for beverage order, revealed greater liking and greater reduction in dysphoria following the carbohydrate beverage compared to the protein beverage, but no differential effect on vigor. Conclusion For women who crave them, carbohydrates appear to display abuse potential, plausibly contributing to overconsumption and overweight. PMID:18273603

  18. Enumeration of human colonic bacteria producing phenolic and indolic compounds: effects of pH, carbohydrate availability and retention time on dissimilatory aromatic amino acid metabolism.

    PubMed

    Smith, E A; Macfarlane, G T

    1996-09-01

    Concentrations of phenolic compounds in human gut contents were more than fourfold higher in the distal colon (6.2 mmol kg-1) compared to the proximal bowel (1.4 mmol kg-1). Tryptophan metabolites were never found in more than trace amounts in large intestinal contents and phenol substituted fatty acids were the major products of aromatic amino acid fermentation that accumulated in the proximal colon, whereas phenol and p-cresol were more important in the distal gut, accounting for 70% of all products of dissimilatory aromatic amino acid metabolism. In vitro incubations of colonic material showed that phenol was produced most rapidly (1.0 mumol g-1 h-1), whereas indole was formed comparatively slowly (0.06 mumol g-1 h-1). Most probable number (MPN) estimations demonstrated that large populations of phenol and indole producing bacteria occur in the large intestine (range log10 9.8-11.5 (g dry wt faeces)-1, mean 10.6, N = 7). With respect to phenolic compounds, phenylacetate and phenylpropionate producers predominated, while indoleacetate-forming bacteria were the major tryptophan-utilizing organisms. Quantitation of products of dissimilatory aromatic amino acid metabolism in MPN tubes showed that phenol and phenylpropionate mainly accumulated at low sample dilutions, whereas phenylacetate, p-cresol, indoleacetate and indolepropionate were formed in greatest amounts at high sample dilutions. The significance of pH and carbohydrate availability with respect to aromatic amino acid metabolism was shown in batch culture fermentation studies, where net production of phenolic compounds by mixed populations of intestinal bacteria was reduced by approximately 33% during growth at pH 5.5 compared to pH 6.8, and by 60% in the presence of a fermentable carbohydrate. Experiments with 16 species of intestinal bacteria belonging to six different genera showed that environmental factors such as low pH and high carbohydrate availability markedly reduced dissimilatory aromatic amino

  19. Learning about Carbohydrates

    MedlinePlus

    ... What Happens in the Operating Room? Learning About Carbohydrates KidsHealth > For Kids > Learning About Carbohydrates A A ... of energy for the body. Two Types of Carbohydrates There are two major types of carbohydrates (or ...

  20. Learning about Carbohydrates

    MedlinePlus

    ... dientes Video: Getting an X-ray Learning About Carbohydrates KidsHealth > For Kids > Learning About Carbohydrates Print A ... of energy for the body. Two Types of Carbohydrates There are two major types of carbohydrates (or ...

  1. Cellular Retinoic Acid Binding Protein and Breast Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-05-01

    fatty acid probe anilinonaphtalene-8- sulphonic acid (ANS) was measured. ANS readily associates with various FABPs and its fluorescence is highly...DAMD17-03-1-0249 TITLE: Cellular Retinoic Acid Binding Protein and Breast Cancer PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Leslie J. (Willmert) Donato...DATES COVERED (From - To) 14 Apr 03 – 13 Apr 06 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Cellular Retinoic Acid Binding Protein and Breast Cancer 5b. GRANT NUMBER

  2. Terrestrial carbohydrates support freshwater zooplankton during phytoplankton deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Taipale, Sami J.; Galloway, Aaron W. E.; Aalto, Sanni L.; Kahilainen, Kimmo K.; Strandberg, Ursula; Kankaala, Paula

    2016-01-01

    Freshwater food webs can be partly supported by terrestrial primary production, often deriving from plant litter of surrounding catchment vegetation. Although consisting mainly of poorly bioavailable lignin, with low protein and lipid content, the carbohydrates from fallen tree leaves and shoreline vegetation may be utilized by aquatic consumers. Here we show that during phytoplankton deficiency, zooplankton (Daphnia magna) can benefit from terrestrial particulate organic matter by using terrestrial-origin carbohydrates for energy and sparing essential fatty acids and amino acids for somatic growth and reproduction. Assimilated terrestrial-origin fatty acids from shoreline reed particles exceeded available diet, indicating that Daphnia may convert a part of their dietary carbohydrates to saturated fatty acids. This conversion was not observed with birch leaf diets, which had lower carbohydrate content. Subsequent analysis of 21 boreal and subarctic lakes showed that diet of herbivorous zooplankton is mainly based on high-quality phytoplankton rich in essential polyunsaturated fatty acids. The proportion of low-quality diets (bacteria and terrestrial particulate organic matter) was <28% of the assimilated carbon. Taken collectively, the incorporation of terrestrial carbon into zooplankton was not directly related to the concentration of terrestrial organic matter in experiments or lakes, but rather to the low availability of phytoplankton. PMID:27510848

  3. Daily Overfeeding from Protein and/or Carbohydrate Supplementation for Eight Weeks in Conjunction with Resistance Training Does not Improve Body Composition and Muscle Strength or Increase Markers Indicative of Muscle Protein Synthesis and Myogenesis in Resistance-Trained Males

    PubMed Central

    Spillane, Mike; Willoughby, Darryn S.

    2016-01-01

    This study determined the effects of heavy resistance training and daily overfeeding with carbohydrate and/or protein on blood and skeletal muscle markers of protein synthesis (MPS), myogenesis, body composition, and muscle performance. Twenty one resistance-trained males were randomly assigned to either a protein + carbohydrate [HPC (n = 11)] or a carbohydrate [HC (n = 10)] supplement group in a double-blind fashion. Body composition and muscle performance were assessed, and venous blood samples and muscle biopsies were obtained before and after eight weeks of resistance training and supplementation. Data were analyzed by two-way ANOVA (p ≤ 0.05). Total body mass, body water, and fat mass were significantly increased in both groups in response to resistance training, but not supplementation (p < 0.05); however, lean mass was not significantly increased in either group (p = 0.068). Upper- (p = 0.024) and lower-body (p = 0.001) muscle strength and myosin heavy chain (MHC) 1 (p = 0.039) and MHC 2A (p = 0.027) were also significantly increased with resistance training. Serum IGF-1, GH, and HGF were not significantly affected (p > 0.05). Muscle total DNA, total protein, and c-Met were not significantly affected (p > 0.05). In conjunction with resistance training, the peri-exercise and daily overfeeding of protein and/or carbohydrate did not preferentially improve body composition, muscle performance, and markers indicative of MPS and myogenic activation. Key points In response to 56 days of heavy resistance training and HC or HPC supplementation, similar increases in muscle mass and strength in both groups occurred; however, the increases were not different between supplement groups. The supplementation of HPC had no preferential effect on augmenting serum IGF-1 GH, or HGF. The supplementation of HPC had no preferential effect on augmenting increases in total muscle protein content or the myogenic markers, total DNA and muscle cMet content. In response to 56 days of

  4. Daily Overfeeding from Protein and/or Carbohydrate Supplementation for Eight Weeks in Conjunction with Resistance Training Does not Improve Body Composition and Muscle Strength or Increase Markers Indicative of Muscle Protein Synthesis and Myogenesis in Resistance-Trained Males.

    PubMed

    Spillane, Mike; Willoughby, Darryn S

    2016-03-01

    This study determined the effects of heavy resistance training and daily overfeeding with carbohydrate and/or protein on blood and skeletal muscle markers of protein synthesis (MPS), myogenesis, body composition, and muscle performance. Twenty one resistance-trained males were randomly assigned to either a protein + carbohydrate [HPC (n = 11)] or a carbohydrate [HC (n = 10)] supplement group in a double-blind fashion. Body composition and muscle performance were assessed, and venous blood samples and muscle biopsies were obtained before and after eight weeks of resistance training and supplementation. Data were analyzed by two-way ANOVA (p ≤ 0.05). Total body mass, body water, and fat mass were significantly increased in both groups in response to resistance training, but not supplementation (p < 0.05); however, lean mass was not significantly increased in either group (p = 0.068). Upper- (p = 0.024) and lower-body (p = 0.001) muscle strength and myosin heavy chain (MHC) 1 (p = 0.039) and MHC 2A (p = 0.027) were also significantly increased with resistance training. Serum IGF-1, GH, and HGF were not significantly affected (p > 0.05). Muscle total DNA, total protein, and c-Met were not significantly affected (p > 0.05). In conjunction with resistance training, the peri-exercise and daily overfeeding of protein and/or carbohydrate did not preferentially improve body composition, muscle performance, and markers indicative of MPS and myogenic activation. Key pointsIn response to 56 days of heavy resistance training and HC or HPC supplementation, similar increases in muscle mass and strength in both groups occurred; however, the increases were not different between supplement groups.The supplementation of HPC had no preferential effect on augmenting serum IGF-1 GH, or HGF.The supplementation of HPC had no preferential effect on augmenting increases in total muscle protein content or the myogenic markers, total DNA and muscle cMet content.In response to 56 days of a

  5. Carbohydrate-based nanoparticles for potential applications in medicine.

    PubMed

    Marradi, Marco; García, Isabel; Penadés, Soledad

    2011-01-01

    Although carbohydrates are essential for life, the development of medical tools based on these important biomolecules is significantly slower than those based on proteins or nucleic acids. This chapter deals with the applications of nanoparticles decorated with carbohydrates and discusses the perspectives of their use in the field of medicine. The review is divided into two sections: diagnosis and therapy. Within these topics, the focus will be on two main types of systems: carbohydrate-coated metallic nanoparticles in which the carbohydrate ligands are "covalently" linked to a nanosized metallic cluster and polysaccharide-encapsulated metallic cores. The former glyconanoparticles (GNPs) represent a powerful chemical tool in the field of glycobiology as a specific carbohydrate can be selected to exert a concrete biological function and profile carbohydrate-based interactions. Up to now, these GNPs have been mainly used as potential anti-adhesion agents against pathogens. The opportunity of inserting multifunctionality and changing the nucleus size/material is giving birth to new targeted systems for imaging and therapy. On the other hand, nonmetallic polysaccharide-based nanoparticles have been successfully used as drug delivery carriers in addition to molecular imaging.

  6. The Effects of Breakfast Consumption and Composition on Metabolic Wellness with a Focus on Carbohydrate Metabolism.

    PubMed

    Maki, Kevin C; Phillips-Eakley, Alyssa K; Smith, Kristen N

    2016-05-01

    Findings from epidemiologic studies indicate that there are associations between breakfast consumption and a lower risk of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) and metabolic syndrome, prompting interest in the influence of breakfast on carbohydrate metabolism and indicators of T2DM risk. The objective of this review was to summarize the available evidence from randomized controlled trials assessing the impact of breakfast on variables related to carbohydrate metabolism and metabolic wellness. Consuming compared with skipping breakfast appeared to improve glucose and insulin responses throughout the day. Breakfast composition may also be important. Dietary patterns high in rapidly available carbohydrate were associated with elevated T2DM risk. Therefore, partial replacement of rapidly available carbohydrate with other dietary components, such as whole grains and cereal fibers, proteins, and unsaturated fatty acids (UFAs), at breakfast may be a useful strategy for producing favorable metabolic outcomes. Consumption of fermentable and viscous dietary fibers at breakfast lowers glycemia and insulinemia. Fermentable fibers likely act through enhancing insulin sensitivity later in the day, and viscous fibers have an acute effect to slow the rate of carbohydrate absorption. Partially substituting protein for rapidly available carbohydrate enhances satiety and diet-induced thermogenesis, and also favorably affects lipoprotein lipids and blood pressure. Partially substituting UFA for carbohydrate has been associated with improved insulin sensitivity, lipoprotein lipids, and blood pressure. Overall, the available evidence suggests that consuming breakfast foods high in whole grains and cereal fiber, while limiting rapidly available carbohydrate, is a promising strategy for metabolic health promotion.

  7. Protein turnover, amino acid requirements and recommendations for athletes and active populations

    PubMed Central

    Poortmans, J.R.; Carpentier, A.; Pereira-Lancha, L.O.; Lancha, A.

    2012-01-01

    Skeletal muscle is the major deposit of protein molecules. As for any cell or tissue, total muscle protein reflects a dynamic turnover between net protein synthesis and degradation. Noninvasive and invasive techniques have been applied to determine amino acid catabolism and muscle protein building at rest, during exercise and during the recovery period after a single experiment or training sessions. Stable isotopic tracers (13C-lysine, 15N-glycine, 2H5-phenylalanine) and arteriovenous differences have been used in studies of skeletal muscle and collagen tissues under resting and exercise conditions. There are different fractional synthesis rates in skeletal muscle and tendon tissues, but there is no major difference between collagen and myofibrillar protein synthesis. Strenuous exercise provokes increased proteolysis and decreased protein synthesis, the opposite occurring during the recovery period. Individuals who exercise respond differently when resistance and endurance types of contractions are compared. Endurance exercise induces a greater oxidative capacity (enzymes) compared to resistance exercise, which induces fiber hypertrophy (myofibrils). Nitrogen balance (difference between protein intake and protein degradation) for athletes is usually balanced when the intake of protein reaches 1.2 g·kg−1·day−1 compared to 0.8 g·kg−1·day−1 in resting individuals. Muscular activities promote a cascade of signals leading to the stimulation of eukaryotic initiation of myofibrillar protein synthesis. As suggested in several publications, a bolus of 15-20 g protein (from skimmed milk or whey proteins) and carbohydrate (± 30 g maltodextrine) drinks is needed immediately after stopping exercise to stimulate muscle protein and tendon collagen turnover within 1 h. PMID:22666780

  8. Nonfeed application of rendered animal proteins for microbial production of eicosapentaenoic acid by the fungus Pythium irregulare.

    PubMed

    Liang, Yi; Garcia, Rafael A; Piazza, George J; Wen, Zhiyou

    2011-11-23

    Rendered animal proteins are well suited for animal nutrition applications, but the market is maturing, and there is a need to develop new uses for these products. The objective of this study is to explore the possibility of using animal proteins as a nutrient source for microbial production of omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids by the microalga Schizochytrium limacinum and the fungus Pythium irregulare. To be absorbed by the microorganisms, the proteins needed to be hydrolyzed into small peptides and free amino acids. The utility of the protein hydrolysates for microorganisms depended on the hydrolysis method used and the type of microorganism. The enzymatic hydrolysates supported better cell growth performance than the alkali hydrolysates did. P. irregulare displayed better overall growth performance on the experimental hydrolysates compared to S. limacinum. When P. irregulare was grown in medium containing 10 g/L enzymatic hydrolysate derived from meat and bone meal or feather meal, the performance of cell growth, lipid synthesis, and omega-3 fatty acid production was comparable to the that of culture using commercial yeast extract. The fungal biomass derived from the animal proteins had 26-29% lipid, 32-34% protein, 34-39% carbohydrate, and <2% ash content. The results show that it is possible to develop a nonfeed application for rendered animal protein by hydrolysis of the protein and feeding to industrial microorganisms which can produce omega-3 fatty acids for making omega-3-fortified foods or feeds.

  9. Binding of Sperm to the Zona Pellucida Mediated by Sperm Carbohydrate-Binding Proteins is not Species-Specific in vitro between Pigs and Cattle

    PubMed Central

    Takahashi, Kazuya; Kikuchi, Kazuhiro; Uchida, Yasuomi; Kanai-Kitayama, Saeko; Suzuki, Reiichiro; Sato, Reiko; Toma, Kazunori; Geshi, Masaya; Akagi, Satoshi; Nakano, Minoru; Yonezawa, Naoto

    2013-01-01

    Carbohydrates are candidates for the basis of species-selective interaction of gametes during mammalian fertilization. In this study, we sought to clarify the roles of sugar residues in the species-selective, sperm–oocyte interaction in pigs and cattle. Acrosome-intact porcine and bovine sperm exhibited their strongest binding affinities for β-Gal and α-Man residues, respectively. Porcine-sperm specificity changed from β-Gal to α-Man after the acrosome reaction, while bovine-sperm specificity did not. Binding of acrosome-intact and acrosome-reacted sperm decreased after trypsinization, indicating that the carbohydrate-binding components are proteins. While immature oocytes bound homologous sperm preferentially to heterologous sperm, oocytes matured in vitro bound similar numbers of homologous and heterologous sperm. Lectin staining revealed the aggregation of α-Man residues on the outer surface of the porcine zona during maturation. In both species, zona-free, mature oocytes bound homologous sperm preferentially to heterologous sperm. The lectin-staining patterns of the zona pellucida and zona-free oocytes coincided with the carbohydrate-binding specificities of acrosome-intact and acrosome-reacted sperm, respectively, supporting the involvement of carbohydrates in gamete recognition in pigs and cattle. These results also indicate that sperm-zona pellucida and sperm–oolemma bindings are not strictly species-specific in pigs and cattle, and further suggest that sperm penetration into the zona and/or fusion with oolemma may be species-specific between pigs and cattle. PMID:24970158

  10. Differential acute effects of carbohydrate- and protein-rich drinks compared with water on cardiac output during rest and exercise in healthy young men.

    PubMed

    Rontoyanni, Victoria G; Werner, Kristin; Sanders, Thomas A B; Hall, Wendy L

    2015-08-01

    The acute effects of drinks rich in protein (PRO) versus carbohydrate (CHO) on cardiovascular hemodynamics and reactivity are uncertain. A randomized crossover design was used to compare 400-mL isoenergetic (1.1 MJ) drinks containing whey protein (PRO; 44 g) or carbohydrate (CHO; 57 g) versus 400 mL of water in 14 healthy men. The primary and secondary outcomes were changes in cardiac output, blood pressure, systemic vascular resistance (SVR) and digital volume pulse measured prior to and 30 min following consumption at rest, during 12 min of multi-stage bicycle ergometry, and 15 min postexercise. The mean change (95% confidence interval (CI)) in resting cardiac output at 30 min was greater for CHO than for PRO or water: 0.7 (0.4 to 1.0), 0.1 (-0.2 to 0.40), and 0.0 (-0.3 to 0.3) L/min (P < 0.001), respectively; the higher cardiac output following CHO was accompanied by an increase in stroke volume and a lower SVR. The mean increments (95% CI) in cardiac output during exercise were CHO 4.7 (4.4 to 5.0), PRO 4.9 (4.6 to 5.2), and water 4.6 (4.3 to 4.9) L/min with the difference between PRO versus water being significant (P < 0.025). There were no other statistically significant differences. In summary, a CHO-rich drink increased cardiac output and lowered SVR in the resting state compared with a PRO-rich drink or water but the effect size of changes in these variables did not differ during or after exercise between CHO and PRO. Neither protein nor carbohydrate affected blood pressure reactivity to exercise.

  11. Determination of carboxylic acids, carbohydrates, glycerol, ethanol, and 5-HMF in beer by high-performance liquid chromatography and UV-refractive index double detection.

    PubMed

    Castellari, M; Sartini, E; Spinabelli, U; Riponi, C; Galassi, S

    2001-06-01

    A high-performance liquid chromatographic method is proposed for the simultaneous separation of main carboxylic acids, carbohydrates, ethanol, glycerol, and 5-HMF in beer by direct injection. A column packed with a sulfonated divinyl benzene-styrene copolymer and an isocratic elution with 0.0045N sulfuric acid and acetonitrile (6%, v/v) are employed. UV and refractive index detectors connected in series are also used to reduce the matrix interference of phenolic compounds. In conditions described, nine compounds are quantitated in a single chromatographic run without any pretreatment except for sample dilution and filtration before injection. Precision, accuracy, linearity of response, limit of detection, and limit of quantitation are also evaluated for each compound. Satisfactory results are obtained to justify the application of this method to all phases of beer production for process and quality control.

  12. Post-exercise whey protein hydrolysate supplementation induces a greater increase in muscle protein synthesis than its constituent amino acid content.

    PubMed

    Kanda, Atsushi; Nakayama, Kyosuke; Fukasawa, Tomoyuki; Koga, Jinichiro; Kanegae, Minoru; Kawanaka, Kentaro; Higuchi, Mitsuru

    2013-09-28

    It is well known that ingestion of a protein source is effective in stimulating muscle protein synthesis after exercise. In addition, there are numerous reports on the impact of leucine and leucine-rich whey protein on muscle protein synthesis and mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) signalling. However, there is only limited information on the effects of whey protein hydrolysates (WPH) on muscle protein synthesis and mTOR signalling. The aim of the present study was to compare the effects of WPH and amino acids on muscle protein synthesis and the initiation of translation in skeletal muscle during the post-exercise phase. Male Sprague–Dawley rats swam for 2 h to depress muscle protein synthesis. Immediately after exercise, the animals were administered either carbohydrate (CHO), CHO plus an amino acid mixture (AA) or CHO plus WPH. At 1 h after exercise, the supplements containing whey-based protein (AA and WPH) caused a significant increase in the fractional rate of protein synthesis (FSR) compared with CHO. WPH also caused a significant increase in FSR compared with AA. Post-exercise ingestion of WPH caused a significant increase in the phosphorylation of mTOR levels compared with AA or CHO. In addition, WPH caused greater phosphorylation of ribosomal protein S6 kinase and eukaryotic initiation factor 4E-binding protein 1 than AA and CHO. In contrast, there was no difference in plasma amino acid levels following supplementation with either AA or WPH. These results indicate that WPH may include active components that are superior to amino acids for stimulating muscle protein synthesis and initiating translation.

  13. Role of choline deficiency in the Fatty liver phenotype of mice fed a low protein, very low carbohydrate ketogenic diet.

    PubMed

    Schugar, Rebecca C; Huang, Xiaojing; Moll, Ashley R; Brunt, Elizabeth M; Crawford, Peter A

    2013-01-01

    Though widely employed for clinical intervention in obesity, metabolic syndrome, seizure disorders and other neurodegenerative diseases, the mechanisms through which low carbohydrate ketogenic diets exert their ameliorative effects still remain to be elucidated. Rodent models have been used to identify the metabolic and physiologic alterations provoked by ketogenic diets. A commonly used rodent ketogenic diet (Bio-Serv F3666) that is very high in fat (~94% kcal), very low in carbohydrate (~1% kcal), low in protein (~5% kcal), and choline restricted (~300 mg/kg) provokes robust ketosis and weight loss in mice, but through unknown mechanisms, also causes significant hepatic steatosis, inflammation, and cellular injury. To understand the independent and synergistic roles of protein restriction and choline deficiency on the pleiotropic effects of rodent ketogenic diets, we studied four custom diets that differ only in protein (5% kcal vs. 10% kcal) and choline contents (300 mg/kg vs. 5 g/kg). C57BL/6J mice maintained on the two 5% kcal protein diets induced the most significant ketoses, which was only partially diminished by choline replacement. Choline restriction in the setting of 10% kcal protein also caused moderate ketosis and hepatic fat accumulation, which were again attenuated when choline was replete. Key effects of the 5% kcal protein diet - weight loss, hepatic fat accumulation, and mitochondrial ultrastructural disarray and bioenergetic dysfunction - were mitigated by choline repletion. These studies indicate that synergistic effects of protein restriction and choline deficiency influence integrated metabolism and hepatic pathology in mice when nutritional fat content is very high, and support the consideration of dietary choline content in ketogenic diet studies in rodents to limit hepatic mitochondrial dysfunction and fat accumulation.

  14. Effect of nitrogen-starvation, light intensity and iron on triacylglyceride/carbohydrate production and fatty acid profile of Neochloris oleoabundans HK-129 by a two-stage process.

    PubMed

    Sun, Xian; Cao, Yu; Xu, Hui; Liu, Yan; Sun, Jianrui; Qiao, Dairong; Cao, Yi

    2014-03-01

    Triacylglyceride (TAG) and carbohydrate are potential feedstock for biofuels production. In this study, a two-stage process was applied for enhancing TAG/carbohydrate production in the selected microalgae - Neochloris oleoabundans HK-129. In stage I, effects of nitrogen, light intensity and iron on cell growth were investigated, and the highest biomass productivity of 292.83±5.83mg/L/d was achieved. In stage II, different nitrogen-starvation periods, light intensities and iron concentrations were employed to trigger accumulation of TAG and carbohydrate. The culture under 2-day N-starvation, 200μmol/m(2)/s light intensity and 0.037mM Fe(3+) concentration produced the maximum TAG and carbohydrate productivity of 51.58mg/L/d and 90.70mg/L/d, respectively. Nitrogen starvation period and light intensity had marked effects on TAG/carbohydrate accumulation and fatty acids profile, compared to iron concentration. The microalgal lipid was mainly composed of C16/C18 fatty acids (90.02%), saturated fatty acids (29.82%), and monounsaturated fatty acids (32.67%), which is suitable for biodiesel synthesis.

  15. Multisite clickable modification of proteins using lipoic acid ligase.

    PubMed

    Plaks, Joseph G; Falatach, Rebecca; Kastantin, Mark; Berberich, Jason A; Kaar, Joel L

    2015-06-17

    Approaches that allow bioorthogonal and, in turn, site-specific chemical modification of proteins present considerable opportunities for modulating protein activity and stability. However, the development of such approaches that enable site-selective modification of proteins at multiple positions, including internal sites within a protein, has remained elusive. To overcome this void, we have developed an enzymatic approach for multisite clickable modification based on the incorporation of azide moieties in proteins using lipoic acid ligase (LplA). The ligation of azide moieties to the model protein, green fluorescent protein (GFP), at the N-terminus and two internal sites using lipoic acid ligase was shown to proceed efficiently with near-complete conversion. Modification of the ligated azide groups with poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG), α-d-mannopyranoside, and palmitic acid resulted in highly homogeneous populations of protein-polymer, protein-sugar, and protein-fatty acid conjugates. The homogeneity of the conjugates was confirmed by mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF) and SDS-PAGE electrophoresis. In the case of PEG attachment, which involved the use of strain-promoted azide-alkyne click chemistry, the conjugation reaction resulted in highly homogeneous PEG-GFP conjugates in less than 30 min. As further demonstration of the utility of this approach, ligated GFP was also covalently immobilized on alkyne-terminated self-assembled monolayers. These results underscore the potential of this approach for, among other applications, site-specific multipoint protein PEGylation, glycosylation, fatty acid modification, and protein immobilization.

  16. The source of fermentable carbohydrates influences the in vitro protein synthesis by colonic bacteria isolated from pigs.

    PubMed

    Bindelle, J; Buldgen, A; Wavreille, J; Agneessens, R; Destain, J P; Wathelet, B; Leterme, P

    2007-09-01

    Two in vitro experiments were carried out to quantify the incorporation of nitrogen (N) by pig colonic bacteria during the fermentation of dietary fibre, including non-starch polysaccharides and resistant starch. In the first experiment, five purified carbohydrates were used: starch (S), cellulose (C), inulin (I), pectin (P) and xylan (X). In the second experiment, three pepsin-pancreatin hydrolysed ingredients were investigated: potato, sugar-beet pulp and wheat bran. The substrates were incubated in an inoculum, prepared from fresh faeces of sows and a buffer solution providing 15N-labelled NH4Cl. Gas production was monitored. Bacterial N incorporation (BNI) was estimated by measuring the incorporation of 15N in the solid residue at half-time to asymptotic gas production (T/2). The remaining substrate was analysed for sugar content. Short-chain fatty acids (SCFA) were determined in the liquid phase. In the first experiment, the fermentation kinetics differed between the substrates. P, S and I showed higher rates of degradation (P < 0.001), while X and C showed a longer lag time and T/2. The sugar disappearance reached 0.91, 0.90, 0.81, 0.56 and 0.46, respectively, for P, I, S, C and X. Among them, S and I fixed more N per gram substrate (P < 0.05) than C, X and P (22.9 and 23.2 mg fixed N per gram fermented substrate v. 11.3, 12.3 and 9.8, respectively). Production of SCFA was the highest for the substrates with low N fixation: 562 and 565 mg/g fermented substrate for X and C v. 290 to 451 for P, I and S (P < 0.01). In the second experiment, potato and sugar-beet pulp fermented more rapidly than wheat bran (P < 0.001). Substrate disappearance at T/2 varied from 0.17 to 0.50. BNI were 18.3, 17.0 and 10.2 fixed N per gram fermented substrate, for sugar-beet pulp, potato and wheat bran, respectively, but were not statistically different. SCFA productions were the highest with wheat bran (913 mg/g fermented substrate) followed by sugar-beet pulp (641) and potato (556

  17. N-Glycoprofiling Analysis for Carbohydrate Composition and Site-Occupancy Determination in a Poly-Glycosylated Protein: Human Thyrotropin of Different Origins

    PubMed Central

    Ribela, Maria Teresa C. P.; Damiani, Renata; Silva, Felipe D.; Lima, Eliana R.; Oliveira, João E.; Peroni, Cibele N.; Torjesen, Peter A.; Soares, Carlos R.; Bartolini, Paolo

    2017-01-01

    Human thyrotropin (hTSH) is a glycoprotein with three potential glycosylation sites: two in the α-subunit and one in the β-subunit. These sites are not always occupied and occupancy is frequently neglected in glycoprotein characterization, even though it is related to folding, trafficking, initiation of inflammation and host defense, as well as congenital disorders of glycosylation (CDG). For the first time N-glycoprofiling analysis was applied to the site-occupancy determination of two native pituitary hTSH, in comparison with three recombinant preparations of hTSH, a widely used biopharmaceutical. A single methodology provided the: (i) average N-glycan mass; (ii) mass fraction of each monosaccharide and of sulfate; and (iii) percent carbohydrate. The results indicate that the occupancy (65%–87%) and carbohydrate mass (12%–19%) can be up to 34%–57% higher in recombinant hormones. The average glycan mass is 24% lower in pituitary hTSH and contains ~3-fold fewer moles of galactose (p < 0.005) and sialic acid (p < 0.01). One of the two native preparations, which had the smallest glycan mass together with the lowest occupancy and GalNAc, sulfate, Gal and sialic acid contents, also presented the lowest in vivo bioactivity and circulatory half-life. The methodology described, comparing a recombinant biopharmaceutical to its native equivalent, can be applied to any physiologically or clinical relevant glycoprotein. PMID:28165356

  18. N-Glycoprofiling Analysis for Carbohydrate Composition and Site-Occupancy Determination in a Poly-Glycosylated Protein: Human Thyrotropin of Different Origins.

    PubMed

    Ribela, Maria Teresa C P; Damiani, Renata; Silva, Felipe D; Lima, Eliana R; Oliveira, João E; Peroni, Cibele N; Torjesen, Peter A; Soares, Carlos R; Bartolini, Paolo

    2017-02-03

    Human thyrotropin (hTSH) is a glycoprotein with three potential glycosylation sites: two in the α-subunit and one in the β-subunit. These sites are not always occupied and occupancy is frequently neglected in glycoprotein characterization, even though it is related to folding, trafficking, initiation of inflammation and host defense, as well as congenital disorders of glycosylation (CDG). For the first time N-glycoprofiling analysis was applied to the site-occupancy determination of two native pituitary hTSH, in comparison with three recombinant preparations of hTSH, a widely used biopharmaceutical. A single methodology provided the: (i) average N-glycan mass; (ii) mass fraction of each monosaccharide and of sulfate; and (iii) percent carbohydrate. The results indicate that the occupancy (65%-87%) and carbohydrate mass (12%-19%) can be up to 34%-57% higher in recombinant hormones. The average glycan mass is 24% lower in pituitary hTSH and contains ~3-fold fewer moles of galactose (p < 0.005) and sialic acid (p < 0.01). One of the two native preparations, which had the smallest glycan mass together with the lowest occupancy and GalNAc, sulfate, Gal and sialic acid contents, also presented the lowest in vivo bioactivity and circulatory half-life. The methodology described, comparing a recombinant biopharmaceutical to its native equivalent, can be applied to any physiologically or clinical relevant glycoprotein.

  19. Role of Ingested Amino Acids and Protein in the Promotion of Resistance Exercise–Induced Muscle Protein Anabolism123

    PubMed Central

    Rasmussen, Blake B

    2016-01-01

    The goal of this critical review is to comprehensively assess the evidence for the molecular, physiologic, and phenotypic skeletal muscle responses to resistance exercise (RE) combined with the nutritional intervention of protein and/or amino acid (AA) ingestion in young adults. We gathered the literature regarding the translational response in human skeletal muscle to acute exposure to RE and protein/AA supplements and the literature describing the phenotypic skeletal muscle adaptation to RE and nutritional interventions. Supplementation of protein/AAs with RE exhibited clear protein dose–dependent effects on translational regulation (protein synthesis) through mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) signaling, which was most apparent through increases in p70 ribosomal protein S6 kinase 1 (S6K1) phosphorylation, compared with postexercise recovery in the fasted or carbohydrate-fed state. These acute findings were critically tested via long-term exposure to RE training (RET) and protein/AA supplementation, and it was determined that a diminishing protein/AA supplement effect occurs over a prolonged exposure stimulus after exercise training. Furthermore, we found that protein/AA supplements, combined with RET, produced a positive, albeit minor, effect on the promotion of lean mass growth (when assessed in >20 participants/treatment); a negligible effect on muscle mass; and a negligible to no additional effect on strength. A potential concern we discovered was that the majority of the exercise training studies were underpowered in their ability to discern effects of protein/AA supplementation. Regardless, even when using optimal methodology and large sample sizes, it is clear that the effect size for protein/AA supplementation is low and likely limited to a subset of individuals because the individual variability is high. With regard to nutritional intakes, total protein intake per day, rather than protein timing or quality, appears to be more of a factor

  20. Role of different additives and metallic micro minerals on the enhanced citric acid production by Aspergillus niger MNNG-115 using different carbohydrate materials.

    PubMed

    Ali, Sikander; Haq, Ikram-ul

    2005-01-01

    The present investigation deals with the promotry effect of different additives and metallic micro minerals on citric acid production by Aspergillus niger MNNG-115 using different carbohydrate materials. For this, sugar cane bagasse was fortified with sucrose salt medium. Ethanol and coconut oil at 3.0% (v/w) level increased citric acid productivity. Fluoroacetate at a concentration of 1.0 mg/ml bagasse enhanced the yield of citric acid significantly. However, the addition of ethanol and fluoroacetate after 6 h of growth gave the maximum conversion of available sugar to citric acid. In another study, influence of some metallic micro-minerals viz. copper sulphate, molybdenum sulphate, zinc sulphate and cobalt sulphate on microbial synthesis of citric acid using molasses medium was also carried out. It was found that copper sulphate and molybdenum sulphate remarkably enhanced the production of citric acid while zinc sulphate was not so effective. However, cobalt sulphate was the least effective for microbial biosynthesis of citric acid under the same experimental conditions. In case of CuSO(4), the strain of Aspergillus niger MNNG-115 showed enhanced citric productivity with experimental (9.80%) over the control (7.54%). In addition, the specific productivity of the culture at 30 ppm CuSO(4) (Q(p) = 0.012a g/g cells/h) was several folds higher than other all other concentrations. All kinetic parameters including yield coefficients and volumetric rates revealed the hyper productivity of citric acid by CuSO(4) using blackstrap molasses as the basal carbon source.

  1. Protein and sulfur amino acid requirements of broiler breeder hens.

    PubMed

    Harms, R H; Wilson, H R

    1980-02-01

    Two experiments were conducted with Cobb color-sexed broiler breeder hens to determine their protein and sulfur amino acid requirement. A daily intake between 400 and 478 mg of methionine and between 722 and 839 mg of total sulfur amino acids was necessary for maximum egg production, the latter in a diet of 13.07% protein. Slightly lower levels supported maximum body weights. Hens laying at the highest rate consumed 23.4 g of protein per day.

  2. Los Alamos sequence analysis package for nucleic acids and proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Kanehisa, M I

    1982-01-01

    An interactive system for computer analysis of nucleic acid and protein sequences has been developed for the Los Alamos DNA Sequence Database. It provides a convenient way to search or verify various sequence features, e.g., restriction enzyme sites, protein coding frames, and properties of coded proteins. Further, the comprehensive analysis package on a large-scale database can be used for comparative studies on sequence and structural homologies in order to find unnoted information stored in nucleic acid sequences. PMID:6174934

  3. Effect of berberine on the antioxidant status, ultrastructural modifications and protein bound carbohydrates in azoxymethane-induced colon cancer in rats.

    PubMed

    Thirupurasundari, Chandragiri Janakiraman; Padmini, Ramakrishnan; Devaraj, Sivasithambaram Niranjali

    2009-02-12

    Chemically induced carcinogenesis models in the rat are widely used for studying the biology of cancer and for developing and evaluating cancer prevention strategies. The azoxymethane(AOM)-induced rat colon tumor is a valuable tool for studying the interaction between tumor development and exogenous factors. Malignant conditions are characterized by enhanced levels of lipid peroxidative products, protein bound carbohydrates indicative of membrane damage and an ineffective antioxidant scavenging system. In the present study, AOM-induced rat showed lipid peroxidative damage, alterations in the membrane glycoprotein component and antioxidant defense system, along with ultrastructural changes like disruption in goblet cell and its membrane, swollen mitochondria with cristae dispersed, elongated endoplasmic reticulum and other features of neoplastic invasion. Berberine sign